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Full text of "The Loom Of Language"

250                The Loom of Language

Many Spanish words have come to look different from equivalent
ones in other Romance languages because of the interpolation of an
additional consonant

LATIN
	ITALIAN
	SPANISH
	PORTUGUESE
	FRENCH
	ENGLISH

fame
	fame
	hambre
	fome
	faim
	hunger

hoimne
	uomo
	hombre
	homem
	homme
	man

legumine
	legume
	legmnbre
	legume
	legume
	vegetable

sanguine
	sangue
	sangre
	sangue
	sang
	blood

semmare
	sermnare
	sembrar
	semear
	semer
	to sow

The table before the last but one shows that Portuguese does not share
this/-less word-form As previous ones have shown, Portuguese dif ers
from Spanish in two other ways It participated in the b-v shift which
Spanish resisted, and it resisted the replacement of e and o by the
compounds le and ue Portuguese shares with French the tendency to
slough off medial consonants It shares with Spanish elimination of a
medial d, as illustrated by the first five, and, with no other Romance
language the disappearance of 7, as illustrated by the last four examples
in the next table. The reader will find other differences between Portu-
guese and Spanish in Chapter VIII, p 345

LATIN
	ITALIAN
	SPANISH
	PORTUGUESE
	FRENCH
	ENGLISH

cadere
	cadere
	caer
	CAIR
	choir*
	to fall

credere
	credere
	creer
	CRER
	croire
	to believe

fideh
	fedele
	FIEL
		fidele
	faithful

audire
	udire
	01T
	OUVIR
	ouirf
	to hear

laudare
	lodare
	loar
	LOUVAR
	louer
	to praise

caelo
	cielo
		cu
	ciel
	sky

colore
	colore
	color
	COR
	couleur
	colour

salute
	salute
	salud
	SAUDE
	salut
	health

volare
	volare
	volar
	VOAR
	voler
	to fly

THE GREEK CONTRIBUTION
The revolt against papal authority in the sixteenth century went
hand in hand with biblical scholarship and a renewal of interest in
Greek philosophy. Greek words, disguised by Latin spelling, came into
English usage. At the beginning of the nineteenth century a steady
* archaic^ the usual verb equivalent of to j"all is tomber
f archaic^ the usual verb equivalent of to hear is entendre    The imperative
of ouir survives in our law courts as oyez9 oyez (hear> oh hear1).