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Full text of "The Note Books Of Samuel Butler"

250              Written Sketches

said in Life and Habit that a bullock can take an eyelash out
of its eye with its hind-foot—which I saw one of my bullocks
in New Zealand do), at the Barley Mow, Englefield Green,
they have a picture of a horse and dog talking to one another,
made entirely of butterflies' wings, and very well and spiritedly
done too.

They have another picture, done in the same way, of a grey-
hound running after a hare, also good but not so good.

At Abbey Wood

I heard a man say to another: " I went to live there just
about the time that beer came down from 5d. to 4d. a pot.
That will give you an idea when it was."

At Ightham Mote

We took Ightham on one of our Sunday walks about a fort-
night ago, and Jones and I wanted to go inside over the house.

My cousin said, " You'd much better not, it will only un-
settle your history."

We felt, however, that we had so little history to unsettle
that we left him outside and went in.

Dr. Mandell Creighton and Mr. W. S. Rockstro

" The Bishop had, been reading Mr. Samuel Butler's en-
chanting look Alps and Sanctuaries and determined to visit
some of the places there described. We divided our time between
the Italian lakes and the lower slopes of the Alps and explored
many mountain sanctuaries. . . . As a result of this journey the
Bishop got to know Mr. S. "Butler. He wrote to tell him the
pleasure his books had given us and asked him to visit us.
After this he came frequently and the Bishop was much attracted
by his original mind and stores of out-of-the-way knowledge."
(The Life and Letters of Dr. Mandell Creighton by his Wife,
Vol. II, p. 83.)

The first time that Dr. Creighton asked me to come down
to Peterborough in 1894 before he became Bishop of London,
I was a little doubtful whether to go or not. As usual, I con-
sulted my good clerk, Alfred, who said :