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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

Baronet has given us a comprehensive
thoughtful survey of the whole field of foreign
affairs, and I have listened to him with all the more pleasure
because here and there I heard a phrase with which I was
not in disagreement. I do not rise at this moment for the
purpose of replying to him, or indeed of developing most
of the subjects on which he touched. My right hon. Friend
the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (Mr. Eden) will have
an opportunity of speaking later and I have no doubt he will be
able to make reply to the points that have been raised. I rise
only in order to say a few words about one aspect of foreign
policy, and it is one which at present is uppermost in all
minds in Europe, the situation arising out of the civil war in
Spain. I do not think it ought to be necessary for me to
state what is the policy of His Majesty's Government in
regard to that situation, because it has already been so
frequently repeated, but, all the same, I will state it again,
because it seems to me that every now and then there is a
tendency, amid the strong feelings that are aroused in this
connection, to forget what it is that the Government really
are aiming at,
" In this Spanish situation there is one peculiar feature
which gives it a specially dangerous aspect. That is that to
many people looking on from outside, it presents itself as a
struggle between two rival systems each of which commands
an enthusiastic, even a passionate body of support among
its adherents in their respective countries, with the result
that supporters of these two rival systems cannot help
regarding the issue of the struggle in Spain as a defeat or a
victory, as the case may be, for the side to which they are
attached. I am not expressing an opinion as to whether that
view of the struggle is correct or not, but I say that the fact
that it is held constitutes a perpetual danger to the peace of
Europe, because, if some country or Government representing
One of these two ideas attempts to intervene beyond a certain
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