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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

Debate on foreign affairs is taking place at
the urgent request of the Opposition. We have
not thought it right to refuse to accede to that request,
but I must express my own personal regret that it has been
thought necessary to have another public discussion on
foreign affairs. It is so difficult to say anything that can do
good, and so easy to say much that might do harm. A china
shop is not the best or the safest place for a fencing match, and
if, in my reply to the right hon. Gentleman (Mr. Attlee), I am
not altogether as informative as he would like me to be, it
must be remembered that, even if the Opposition do not
feel any responsibility for the safety of the crockery, certainly
His Majesty's Government do. It is our responsibility.

" The right hon. Gentleman stated at the beginning of
his speech that there was a profound difference of view
between the Opposition and the supporters of the Govern-
ment on foreign affairs, but I think that in listening to his
speech the House must have been surprised, after that
exordium, to find how much he had to say with which the
House itself was in general agreement. In particular, If I
may say so, His Majesty's Government fully realise what the
right hon. Gentleman said about the new methods of propa-
ganda which have sprung up in recent years. They fully
realise that the old stand-upon-your-dignity methods are no
longer applicable to modern conditions, and that, in the
rough-and-tumble of international relations which we see
to-day, it is absolutely necessary that we should take measures
to protect ourselves from constant misrepresentation. The
objectives which the right hon. Gentleman put before us are,
I think, broadly speaking, common to us all It is only
when one comes to the methods of achieving those objectives
that I am bound to say I found the right hon. Gentleman's
speech singularly lacking in constructive ideas. Nor could I
perceive what was the particular course which the right
*hon. Gentleman would have had us take in the past,

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