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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

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into my mind things which I have never uttered, and which I
have never contemplated. He knows that the parallel he has
offered to the House exists. He and his party refused to
consider an agreement with Russia until they had complied
with the British Government's conditions."
THE PRIME MINISTER : " Did that result in an agreement ?
I do not know the particular occasion to which the hon.
Member refers------"
MR. GRENFELL :   " The Debt settlement."
THE PRIME MINISTER : "It may be reasonable to say that
if a country owes money there should be some indication that
it is going to pay that money. The hon. Member is making
this error again? in confusing the entering into conversations
with the making of an agreement. It would not be unreason-
able to demand that certain things should be done before
an agreement is made. We are not prepared to make peace
at any price. We have essentials that must be conceded
to us before we can make an agreement. The hon. Member
asked what sort of a settlement I had in mind when speaking
of a settlement in Spain being an essential part of an agreement.
The ex-Foreign Secretary has stated more than once what
we had in mind when we talked about a settlement in Spain.
Provided there is no foreign interference,, we desire to let
the Spaniards make their own settlement. We do not con-
sider that it is part of our duty or part of our aim to dictate
to the Spaniards what settlement they shall make. The
settlement we want is a settlement of Spanish questions by
Spaniards free from foreign interference. The party opposite
profess to be super-pacifists. They have often in the past
accused the National Government of a policy tending towards
war, but I wonder whether those who are constantly seeking
peace are prepared to do anything to ensue it ? The hon.
Member opposite said that I had spoken of a four-Power
pact. I never used those words."
MR. GRENFELL :   ** An agreement between four Powers.**
THE PRIME MINISTER : " The word * pact" might perhaps
carry implications, that I did not intend. Surely it cannot be
disputed that those four Powers I named are the most powerful
in Europe. After all, Russia is partly European but partly
Asiatic. Surely it cannot be denied that if the most powerful