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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

" TN the speech to which we have just listened the right
J[ hon. Gentleman has used some hard and provocative
words. It is tempting to reply in kind, but for my part
I feel that the international situation to-day is so grave that
I have no heart for interchanges across this Table of re-
proaches and accusations of betrayal. I want, therefore, to
address myself to the right hon. Gentleman's Motion, and in a
spirit of greater gravity than might be perhaps employed on a
less grave occasion. The right hon. Gentleman (Mr. Attlee)
has asked leave to move the Adjournment of the House
£ to call attention to a definite matter of urgent public impor-
tance, namely, the lack of Ministerial policy to counter the
grave menace to British interests arising out of the armed
intervention in Spain by certain foreign Powers.'
I wish to point out that leave was asked and obtained on a
definite matter—the situation in Spain. In the concluding
words of the right hon. Gentleman in which he called for a
declaration of Government policy on matters going far
beyond Spain, it seemed to me that he was attempting to take
this matter rather out of the narrow limits within the terms of
the Motion. What we have to deal with in connection with
this Motion is the grave menace—to use the words of the
Motion—to British interests arising out of the armed inter-
vention in Spain by certain foreign Powers. From what does
this menace arise ? Apparently, the right hon. Gentleman
thinks that it is something which has grown up suddenly,
in the night. [HON. MEMBERS : * No.'] He must think so,
or he would not have moved this Motion. I assume that what
he means is that a victory by General Franco is the menace
in question."
MR. NEIL MACLEAN : " Intervention by foreign Powers."
THE PRIME MINISTER : " Why, then, is the matter urgent ?
I can only assume it is because the right hon. Gentleman
thinks that this victory is imminent.   He went on to make
what seemed to me to be a number of assumptions which were
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