(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

I think that from the practical point of view there is much to
be said for a proposition of that kind.
" I would make only two observations upon it. The first
is this : However completely we encase such a proposal as
that in the Covenant of the League, however wholeheartedly
the League may be prepared to give its sanction and approval
to such a subject, as a matter of fact it does not differ from the
old alliances of pre-war days, which we thought we had
abandoned in favour of something better. A second observa-
tion that I would like to make is that the value of such alliances
as that, as a deterrent to possible aggression, must obviously
depend upon their military efficiency, upon the numbers and
equipment of the forces that can be mobilised, on their dis-
tribution in relation to the area in which they might have
to be employed, and on the amount of preparation and
co-ordination of plans which it might be possible to achieve
beforehand.
" But there is one conclusion which, I think, emerges
from that brief review* I stress it because it seems to me to be
a corollary both of the failure of the League for the moment
to provide us with collective security, and also of the con-
ditions which would alone make any form of collective
security effective as a deterrent. The conclusion I draw is
this : That if Great Britain is to make a substantial contribu-
tion towards the establishment of what I have described once
agairi as our greatest interest, she must be strongly armed for
defence and for counter-offence. Sometimes it has seemed to
me that hon. Members opposite were endeavouring to make
some distinction between the purposes for which our arma-
ments can be used. I could understand that if it were con-
templated that in any circumstances these armaments could be
used for purposes of aggression, or, indeed, for any purposes
which were inconsistent with the spirit of the Covenant*
But we all know that there is no question with us of anything
of the kind. If that be so, I cannot myself see any object in
trying to make a difference between armaments required for
self-defence and armaments required for the purpose of
fulfilling international obligations.
" If ever the time comes when the world establishes an
international police force which will inspire us all with full