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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

there must be an increase in some parts of the programme,
especially in that of the Royal Air Force and the anti-aircraft
defences. In order to bring about the progress which we
feel to be necessary, men and materials will be required, and
rearmament work must have first priority in the nation's
effort. The full and rapid equipment of the nation for self-
defence must be its primary aim.
" I gratefully acknowledge the way in which workers and
employers have co-operated in carrying out the programme
hitherto. Such co-operation will be even more necessary for
bringing to practical and early fruition the plans to which
I have referred, and the Government are confident that they
can rely on the continued help and good-will of all con-
cerned. In the view of the Government, it is not for them to
try to dictate to the great industries the detailed action which
will be necessary for overcoming difficulties. It is in accord-
ance with our traditions that these industries themselves,
through their joint machinery, should work out the details
in the manner which is likely to be most effective. Steps are
already being taken to inform organised workers and organised
employers of the nature of the demands which the accelerated
plans will make upon their industries, and thus to pkce them
in a position to devise practical methods for meeting those
demands by mutual arrangements and with a minimum of
Government interference. By such means it is expected that
the volume of production, which in the new circumstances
is not sufficient for our needs, will be substantially increased,
" The building operations necessary for the expansion of
the three Services will be expedited. This will facilitate the
process of recruitment of Naval, Military, and Air Force
personnel. The action already indicated will serve to acceler-
ate the production of Naval equipment. Similar measures
will be taken for completing at the earliest date possible the
erection of new factories. Further capacity with a view to
advancing the output of anti-aircraft and other guns will be
put in hand. This priority will also enable us to expedite the
programme of air-raid precautions. The satisfactory response
to the appeal for recruits in connection with air-raid pre-
cautions is evidence of the widespread interest that is being
taken throughout the country in this urgent question, By