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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

/-r^HIS is the thirteenth Debate on foreign affairs
JL we have had in nine weeks. I should think that
such concentrated attention upon one subject must be quite
unprecedented in our Parliamentary history. I think this
Debate can also stand out as memorable in one respect:
I never remember before having listened to the opening
speaker moving a Motion of Censure on the Government
and speaking for sixty minutes without ever mentioning
the Motion, The right hon. Gentleman the Member for
Wakefield (Mr. Greenwood) made lengthy attacks upon the
heads of other States; he sketched out imaginary and alto-
gather inaccurate accounts of the policy of His Majesty's
Government; but he kept studiously clear of the terms of the
Motion, and, above all, the words  General Election * never
passed his lips.
" On the last occasion, less than a fortnight ago, when we
were debating foreign affairs, I made a very lengthy and care-
fully considered statement upon the policy of His Majesty's
Government, and it does not seem to me that I should serve
any useful purpose if I were to repeat that statement this after-
noon, even though I made it in somewhat different words. On
that occasion, being very conscious that we were discussing
issues of unusual gravity and magnitude, I tried to make my
statement as unprovocative as possible, and my example was
followed by my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer (Sir John Simon), who wound up the Debate; but we
got no response from the other side, and to-day they are making
this a party question, and hoping to exploit for party purposes
the difficulties of the international situation. In that, I am
convinced that they are profoundly mistaken, for from all the
sources of information from which I have been able to draw>
the policy of His Majesty's Government, as stated, has won
the general approval of the whole country; and not only this
.country, but I may say practically the whole world, with the
possible exception of Russia. Therefore, I am not disposed
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