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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

----------------------------------------------------------__-------   159
stantiate the charge by any evidence. I will give the right
hon. Gentleman an opportunity of doing so now.
MR. GREENWOOD : " While thanking the right hon.
Gentleman, I would point out that I have already read to the
House the election pledges of the Government. Their policy
now does not conform to them.53
THE PRIME MINISTER :   " Which election pledges ? "
HON. MEMBERS:   "1935."
MR. GREENWOOD : " If the right hon. Gentleman had
taken the trouble to read the speech I made on a previous
occasion, he would know that I quoted the charges then;
I could have quoted them to-day; and I am prepared to do so
now, if he likes."
THE PRIME MINISTER : " Very well, the right hon. Gentle-
man did not think it worth while, on a Motion of Censure,
to repeat those charges, but he refers me to a speech which he
made on a previous occasion when there was no Motion of
Censure/'
MR. GREENWOOD : " We might as well get the facts right.
It was when I moved the previous Motion of Censure.'5
THE PRIME MINISTER : " That was on the Motion on
which the right hon. Gentleman was not "going to divide.
But we will not waste time on that. We will examine the
charge which the right hon. Gentleman has made. He said
that we had stated in our election manifesto that the League
of Nations would remain as heretofore the keystone of
British foreign policy. I would like to go on and read a few
more words. As a rule, you want to get the whole paragraph
before you can properly weigh up the meaning of a particular
sentence. It went on to say :
" e The prevention of war and the establishment of settled
peace in the world must always be the most vital interest of the
British people, and the League is the instrument which has
been framed and to which we look for the attainment of these
objects. We shall, therefore, continue to do all in our power
to uphold the Covenant and to maintain and increase the
efficiency of the League/
It is still the fact that we look forward to the time when the
League will be so strengthened and so revitalised------**