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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

THE right hon. Gentleman (Sir Archibald Sinclair) who
'has just addressed the House has moved a reduction of
the Vote, and, of course, his business is to put a different point
of view from that which the House would expect of me; never-
theless, the right hon. Gentleman did not on this occasion
unduly stress disagreement and, in the concluding part of
his speech, he said that everybody would agree with what
he understood to be the main aim of the Government. I
think that must be so. I cannot imagine anyone in any part of
the House who would disagree with what we have so
frequently declared to be the main aim of the Government's
foreign policy, namely, the establishment and the maintenance
of peace and the removal, as far as that may be practicable, of
all causes of possible conflict in the amelioration of grievances
between one country and another.
" It pleases the right hon. Gentleman sometimes to suggest
that our attitude towards certain countries in Europe is one
of continued concession, and although from time to time he
gives instances which go to prove the opposite, they are to be
excepted. Let not the right hon. Gentleman or anyone, either
in this country or elsewhere, imagine for one moment that,
although we seek peace? we are willing to sacrifice, even for
peace, British honour and British vital interests. We are
making rapid progress with our great rearmament programme,
and day by day the armed strength of this country becomes
more formidable. While that tremendous power which we
are accumulating remains there as a guarantee that we can
defend ourselves if we are attacked, we are not unmindful of
the consideration that although it is good to have a giant's
strength, it is tyrannous to use it like a giant. Our aims are
not .the less peaceful because no one can imagine that we have
reason to fear any opponent.
" The right hon. Gentleman moved over a very wide field
and put to me a great number of questions.  I am not sure that
- I remember all his questions, much less the answers, but in
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