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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

266   ____________________________________________
told me that it is his intention to come half-way to meet
me. That is to spare an old man such another long
journey.**
Six days later•, on Thursday, zznd September, Mr. Chamber-
lain again flew to Germany to meet Herr Hitler at Bad Godesberg,
having first obtained the unanimous agreement of his colleagues
in the Cabinet and of the French Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister (who, in their desire to find a solution that would not
compel France to take military action in accordance -with her
obligations^ had already warmly approved the flight to Berchtes-
gaderi) and the consent of the C^ech Government to the principle
of the transfer of the predominantly German areas of C^echo-
Slovakia to the Reich. But the German Chancellor^ asserting
acts of oppression and terrorism against the Sudeten Germans^
was impatient at further delay and insistent on an immediate
transfer of all predominantly German areas. On the following
day Mr. Chamberlain refused to renew the conversations until
the situation had been clarified, and the following letters passed
between the two statesmen :
Mr. Chamberlain to Herr Hitler
" GODESBERG,
" September 23, 1938.
" I think it may clarify the situation and accelerate our
conversation if I send you this note before we meet this
morning*
" I am ready to put to the Czech Government your proposal
as to the areas, so that they may examine the suggested
provisional boundary. So far as I can see, there is no need
to hold a plebiscite for the bulk of the areas, i.e., for those
areas which (according to statistics upon which both sides
seem to agree) are predominantly Sudeten German areas.
I have no doubt, however, that the Czech Government would
be willing to accept your proposal for a plebiscite to determine
how far, if at all, the proposed new frontier need be adjusted.
" The difficulty I see about the proposal you put to me
yesterday afternoon arises from the suggestion that the areas
should in the immediate future be occupied by German