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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

---------------------------------------------------------__    27I
Germans to the Reich by the Czech Government is only given
in the hope thereby to win time so as, by one means or another,
to bring about a change in contradiction to this principle.
For if the proposal that these territories are to belong to
Germany is sincerely accepted, there is no ground to postpone
the practical resolution of this principle. My knowledge of
Czech practice in such matters over a period of long years
compels me to assume the insincerity of Czech assurances
so long as they are not implemented by practical proof. The
German Reich is, however, determined by one means or
another to terminate these attempts, which have lasted for
decades, to deny by diktory methods the legal claims of
oppressed peoples.
" Moreover, the same attitude applies to the other nation-
alities in this State. They also are the victims of long oppres-
sion and violence. In their case, also, every assurance given
hitherto has been broken. In their case, also, attempts have
been made by dilatory dealing with their complaints or wishes
to win time in order to be able to oppress them still more
subsequently. These nations, also, if they are to achieve
their rights, will, sooner or later, have no alternative but to
secure them for themselves. In any event, Germany, if—
as it now appears to be the case—she should find it impossible
to have die clear rights of Germans in Czechoslovakia
accepted by way of negotiation, is determined to exhaust
the other possibilities which then alone remain open to her.
"ADOLF HITLER/'
Mr. Chamberlain to Herr Hitler
" GODESBERG,
" September 23, 1938.
" I have received your Excellency's communication in reply
to my letter of this morning and have taken note of its
contents.
" In my capacity as intermediary, it is evidently now my
duty—since your Excellency maintains entirely the position
you took last night—to put your proposals before the
Czechoslovak Government.
"Accordingly, I request your Excellency to be good