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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

298_______________________________________._
representatives. Sir Horace Wilson arrived in Berlin on
the afternoon of the a6th and he presented his letter to Herr
Hitler, who listened to him, but expressed the view that he
could not depart from the procedure of the memorandum,
as he felt conferences would lead to further intolerable
procrastinations.
" I should tell the House how deeply impressed on my
mind by my conversations with Herr Hitler and by every
speech he has made, is his rooted distrust and disbelief in
the sincerity of the Czech Government. That has been one
of the governing factors in all this difficult story of
negotiation.
" In the meantime after reading Herr Hitler's speech in
Berlin, in which he, as I say, expressed his disbelief in the
intention of the Czech Government to carry out their promises,
I issued a statement in which I offered, on behalf of the
British Government, to guarantee that the promises they had
made to us and the French Government should be carried out.
But yesterday morning Sir Horace Wilson resumed his
conversations with Herr Hitler, and finding his views appar-
ently still unchanged, he by my instructions repeated to him in
precise terms what I said a few minutes ago was the upshot
of our conversations with the French, namely, that if the
Czechs reject the German Memorandum and Germany
attacks Czechoslovakia, we had been informed by the French
Government that they would fulfil their obligations to Czecho-
slovakia, and that should the forces of France in consequence
become actively engaged in hostilities against Germany,
the British Government would feel obliged to support
them.
** The next document in the White Paper refers to a con-
versation which I had with M. Masaryk as to whether the
Czechoslovak Government would take part in such a con-
ference as I had proposed to Herr Hitler, and the Czech
Government replied accepting the proposal under certain
conditions which are set out in their letter. Now the story
which I have told the House brings us up to last night.
About 10.30 I received from Herr Hitler a reply to my letter
sent by Sir Horace Wilson. It is printed in the White Paper.
A careful perusal of this letter indicates certain limitations cm