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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

YOU, my Lord Mayor, with that courtesy which is
traditional among the holders of your great office,
have proposed the health of His Majesty's Ministers in terms
which are all the more gratifying to our ears because they form
a marked contrast to the valuation which has been put upon
our services by some less partial observers. It is not for
me to say which is the truer estimate, but I may at least
thank you, my Lord Mayor, for the discrimination with
which you have dwelt upon our achievements and passed
over our shortcomings—if we have any. And I must
express my unqualified gratitude to this company for the
magnificent response which they have given to the toast
I recognised in that demonstration just now a more than usual
warmth and enthusiasm, and I think I know what it meant,
for it expressed a spirit which has been manifested throughout
the many thousands .of letters which I have received during
recent weeks—the spirit of England, thankful to have been
spared the ordeal which came so close, but ready now to answer
any call which their country may make upon them in order
that she may face the future with equanimity.
" It is customary on these occasions for the Prime Minister
to present a general review of foreign affairs, but I hope I
shall not be thought discourteous to any nation, or unmindful
of those with whom we have especially friendly relations, if
to-night I depart from this practice and confine myself to a
strictly limited field; for unless I did that I should be unable
to deal as I should wish with the subject which is uppermost
in the minds of most of us, and perhaps in the minds of those
who are listening to me in different parts of the world—I
mean the significance of the events which culminated at
Munich.
" Now I am speaking to-night to an audience vastly greater
than that I see in front of me.  There may be among them
many who approve of what I have been trying to do; there
may be many who think I ought to have done something
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