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Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

to hear their point of view and to satisfy so far as we can anv
reasonable aspirations that they cherish and which do not
conflict with the general rights of others to liberty and justice.
" In that way alone we shall remove these eternal suspicions
that poison the international atmosphere and get back our
security of mind and that confidence which is the life-blood
of successful enterprise.
" We like to have our grumbles, but sometimes it is a good
rule to ' count your blessings/ Anyone who does so in this
country—whether employer, worker, man or woman—will
find that there is very much to be grateful for in the conditions
here as compared with the conditions in most other countries.
" We should like to see their conditions improved; we
should be ready to talk with their representatives to see how
best to bring about such a result But, of course, it is in times
of peace alone that attention can be directed to improving
the standard of living of the people, war must have the opposite
effect, and I am confident therefore that all thoughtful people
in all countries will join with me in working for the avoidance
of war, so that we and they may equally share in the higher
wages, shorter hours, better food, and better clothes which
the development of science and industry has rendered possible.
" I wish I could stop there and turn at once to other fields
in which you and we could work together for the benefit of
the nations. But there is another side to international relations
on which I must say a few words.
" We cannot forget that though it takes at least two to
make a peace, one can make a war. And until we have come
to clear understandings in which all political tension is swept
away we must put ourselves in a position to defend ourselves
against attack, whether upon our land, our people, or the
principles of freedom with which our existence as a democracy
is bound up and which to us seem to enshrine the highest
attributes of human life and spirit It is for this purpose,, for
the purpose of defence and not of attack, that we are pursuing
the task of rearmament with unrelenting vigour and with the
full approval of the country,
" It has taken us a long time, so low had our defences
fallen in the vain hope that others would follow our example,
to get going the m^&inery that had run down- But progress