(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Struggle For Peace"

--------------------------------------__--------------------- 431

and ourselves would immediately come to her assistance. The
right hon. Gentleman quoted a passage from a speech of mine
which was made very recently, but perhaps I may be per-
mitted to recall to the House that as long ago as last September
I myself gave a warning of the possibility of such a departure
as we are now contemplating. On that Tuesday, 2yth
September, at a moment when it hardly seemed possible
to cherish any longer the hope that peace might be preserved,
it was my duty to broadcast a message. I would like, if I
may, to recall to the House one or two sentences that I spoke
then:

cc t

I am myself a man of peace to the depths of my soul.
Armed conflict between nations is a nightmare to me; but if
I were convinced that any nation had made up its mind to
dominate the world by fear of its force, I should feel that it
must be resisted. Under such a domination life for people
who believe in liberty would not be worth living/
At that time I did not myself feel that the events that were
taking place in connection with Czechoslovakia necessarily
involved such an assumption as that. My opinion at that time
was, as it is now, that war as it is waged in these days is
such a frightful thing that I could not ask the country to
accept new commitments which might involve us in war
unless some really vital principle like that which I have just
described were at stake. A little later, at the end of the year,
hon. Members will recall that the President of the United
States in a New Year's message dwelt on the same thought.
At the end of that month I alluded to that New Year's message,
and said that a challenge of that kind, a demand to dominate
one by one other nations without limits to where that might
go, was the only challenge which could endanger the peace
of the world, but that if it were made, then I felt, like President
Roosevelt, that it must be resisted.
" There were some at that time, indeed, there were some
in September, who believed that the first steps had already
been taken towards making that challenge. At that time it
was possible to quote to those who held that view the assur-
ances that had been given to me, and not to me only but to the
world, that the foreign policy of the German Government was