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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1927, High Point College"

THE 

ZENITH 

1927 

VOLUME ONE 




PUBLISHED BY THE STUPENTS OF 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 





ion 




THE FOUNDERS OF 
HIGH POINT COLLEGE 



Who by their interest and faith in th? 
fundamental goodness of human nature 
and their belief that this could be de- 
veloped best by directed physical, men ■ 
tal. and moral training, and who by 
their patient, self-sacrificing zeal and 
efforts conceived and finally brought 
to realization an institution for those 
purposes, we the grateful students of 
High Point College dedicate this 
first edition of the Zenith. 




initmiuiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiniiiiii 



iniriiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiifiiiiHitiitiiiiiifii 




Book I. 
THE COLLEGE 



Book II. 
THE CLASSES 




<5g 



Y?rou/on 



5INCE our college is new, prece- 
dents must be established. Those 
who are privileged to share in the 
making of such precedents occupy a 
place of great responsibility. Realizing 
this, we have tried to be very careful 
to gather together in an attractive, 
moderately expensive book that mate- 
rial which represents all worthwhile 
college activities and plays an impor- 
tant part in our life. Due to our inex- 
perience, the work has been doubly 
hard, and the results may not satisfy 
our ambitions. We do not expect this 
to be the best annual High Point Col- 
lege will produce. Indeed, we ardent- 
ly desire that our successors may be in- 
finitely more successful. However, we 
sincerely hope that this first volume ot 
the Zenith will keep forever in your 
minds happy memories of college asso- 
ciations and endear you more than ever 
to Alma Mater. 



t/ 



"Uhe Staff 











3s 










^ooli One 
THE COLLEGE 






The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




College Song 

Words and Music by 
Dorothy Hoskins and Margaret Gurley 

In our hearts we'll hold the mem'ry 

Of a place we love the best; 
O'er it waves a purple banner, 

Emblem of its fearlessness. 

CHORUS 
We praise thy name, and thy honor true. 
They stand for loyalty and love; 
May yours be fame, that to you is due, 
For you we'll always fight. 
We want the right 
To uphold thy standard high; 
To give the best we have to thee, 
Mem'ries of you we will cherish, H. P. C. 

When we're on the field of battle, 
When we strive for praise to thee; 

May our teams be undefeated, 
Ours the crown of victory. 



Page nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




History oi High Point College 

IGH POINT COLLEGE had its beginning in the mind of 
Rev. J. F. McCulloch, a native of Guilford County, 
North Carolina, and a graduate of Adrian College, Adrian, 
Michigan. After his graduation, Dr. McCulloch taught 
for a few years and then returned to North Carolina with the conviction 
that the North Carolina Conference should establish within her borders a 
high-grade college. With this purpose in mind he attended the Annual 
Conference at LaGrange in 1893, and so well did he present his desire 
that a Committee on Ways and Means was appointed to investigate 
and if possible to provide means for building the college. But no 
sooner did this committee begin its work than it was found that the 
Church in North Carolina did not feel the need of such an institution. 
Whereupon, Dr. McCulloch set about to establish a Church paper 
in order that his views and all college propoganda might be put into 
the homes of the members of the Methodist Protestant Church. Our 
Church Record, the name of which was afterwards changed to The 
Methodist Protestant Herald, was established. A very desirable lot 
was purchased in Greensboro on South Elm Street, 30x150 feet, for 
$3,300.00, and a building was erected at a cost of about $4,500.00. 
Later additions to the building brought the total investment up to 
$1 1,381.00. So greatly has this property advanced in value that it is now 
regarded as worth between $75,000.00 and ?ioo,000.00. 

But it was not until after many years of agitation, personal solicita- 
tion and many disappointments that the college as an enterprise really 
began to appear. First, Mr. J. C. Roberts, of Kernersville, N. C, a loyal 
member of the Methodist Protestant Church, provided in his will a gift 
of $10,000.00, if the college should be ready to open by 1920; otherwise, 
the gift was to be used as an invested fund, the interest on which was to be 
used for educating worthy young men preparing for the ministry. The gift 
stimulated considerable interest and when the college was finally built the 
Administration building was named in honor of Mr. Roberts. 

It was at the Enfield Annual Conference in 1920 that the next im- 
portant step was taken. Dr. Andrews, then President of the Conference, 
recommended in his annual report that unless our people were willing to 
go forward in the erection of the college we should abandon the cherished 
hope. The conference was moved to appoint a College Committee, com- 
posed of Dr. Andrews, Rev. L. W. Gerringer, and Rev. J. E. Pritchard. 



Page ten 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



who were to visit the churches in the North Carolina district and to put 
on a campaign for funds for the college. Seeing that at last the Church 
was interested, in the college enterprise Mr. J. Norman Wills, a son and 
grandson of ministers of the Methodist Protestant Church, himself a 
loyal and useful layman in the same church, was moved to propose that if 
the Church in North Carolina would raise in good subscriptions as much 
as $300,000.00 by the end of the year he would give $100,000.00 
towards the enterprise. The campaign was put on and pressed most 
vigorously. The time for raising the total amount was extended by 
Mr. Wills but business conditions in the State becoming less prosperous 
than formerly, when the campaign closed, only $241,000.00 was secured. 
However, with this assurance of success, the Board of Education of 
North Carolina decided to go forward. And a challenge was sent to 
several cities in the Piedmont section that if an acceptable site and $100,- 
OOO.OO should be offered the Committee it would consider the location 
of the college in that city. Burlington, Greensboro, and High Point all 
met the condition but the High Point site was chosen. 

A Building Committee consisting of Dr. F. R. Harris, Dr. J. F. 
McCulloch, Dr. R. M. Andrews, Mr. R. F. Williams, Mr. J. Norman 
Wills, Mr. R. H. Brooks, and Mr. J. S. Pickett was appointed. Mr. 
Herbert B. Hunter was engaged as Architect, and he, with Mr. J. 
Norman Wills and Dr. Andrews visited a number of colleges and uni- 
versities and after thorough investigation recommended to the committee 
that the Colonial style of architecture be chosen. 

Plans were drawn and work proceeded on the erection of the build- 
ings without much delay. The cornerstone of Roberts Hall was laid 
June 29th, 1922; the building was completed during the Fall of that 
year. McCulloch Hall, a dormitory for. boys, and Woman's Hall, a 
dormitory for girls, were not completed until about the middle of Sep- 
tember, 1924. College was opened September 15th of this year. Work 
was begun with two college classes. There were fifteen members in the 
Sophomore Class, ninety-nine in the Freshman Class, and twenty in the 
preparatory department. This department was discontinued at the close 
of the second year. The total enrollment for 1925 exceeded 200 and the 
present number enrolled is larger. The total value of the property, 
consisting of buildings, grounds, and equipment is greatly in excess of 
$500,000.00. 




Page eleven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



rnirnr —n^^i.m .v 




Our President, Dr. R. M. Andrews 



Page twelve 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





President Robert M. Andrews 
D.D. 

10NG before the first brick was 
placed on our campus, or ever was 
heard the sound of tool here, Dr. 
Andrews was pioneering for High 
Point College. It was under his direction that 
the forces were organized which led to the 
creation of this institution. And since the very 
day of its inception he has given to our college 
his wisdom, his labors, and his fullest devotion. 
President Andrews is a scholar of intellectual 
vigor, a soul of Christian culture, and a spirit of 
deepest human sympathies. By building, as 
he is, his noble qualities into the life of the 
school and into the youthful hearts of the 
students, his influence becomes a perpetual 
inspiration to all who feel the power of his 
personality. 



Page thirteen 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zemtk 



Officers of Administration 

Dr. R. M. Andrews 

President 

P. E. LlNDLEY 
Dean and Registrar 

Miss Mary E. Young 

Dean of Women 
N. P. Yarborough T. C. Johnson 

Dean of Men Librarian 

Miss Pauleete Rogers Mrs. Alan B. Street 

Bursar Dietitian 

Mrs. C. L. Whitaker 
Supervisor of Dining Room 

Dr. S. S. Coe 

College Physician 

W. C. Hall 
Superintendent of Grounds 



Page fourteen 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven ZenitK 



i mnnamnpia ' -™ 





P. E. LlNDLEY 
Our Dean 



Page fifteen 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zemtn 




/ *r\\i^ 




Faculty 



R. M. Andrews, D.D. 
English Bible 



, Hobart Allrfd, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Romance Languages 



J. I'. Bovi.iv. A.B., LL.B. 

Athletic Director 



J. D. Hardy, A.B., B.D. 
Professor of Biology 



Miss Vera Idol, A.B., B.S. 

Professor of English 



Talmadge C. Johnson, 
A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Philosophy 
Associate Professor of English 



Page sixlft n 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



"**■•"'"' ■"— 




Faculty 



Paul S. Kennett, A.B., B.D. 
Professor of Social Science 



Percy E. Llndley, A.H., A.M. 

Dean of College 

Professor of Education ami School 
Management 



W. F. McCanless, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 



Miss Novella McIntyre 

Teacher of Piano 



J. Harley Mourane, B.S., M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry ami Physics 



Dan- Walter Smith 

Instructor in Voice, History of Music, 
and Musical Appreciation 




Page seventeen 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



~^~ 



rr r rnu H I M 1 "" i irTT 



Faculty 




Mrs. Alan B. Street, R.S. 

Dietitian 
Professor of Home £ counties 

Mrs. Henry A. White, A.B, 

A.M. 

Professor of Greek 

Miss Mabel Williams, A.B. 

Professor of Latin 

X. P. Yarborough, A.B. 

Dean of Men 

Associate Professor of Romanic 
Languages 

Miss Mary Young, A.B. 

Dean of Women 
Instructor in History 

Mrs. C. L. Whjtaker 
Supervisor of Dining Room 

Miss Pauleete Rogers 

Bursar 



Page eighteen 
































THE CLASSES 












The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenitn 





Page puienty-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Senior Class 

Colors: Green and White Flower: White Rose 

Motto: "Climb Though the Rocks Be Rugged" 

Mascot: Master "Billy" Houck 

Officers 

H. E. Coble President 

Emma Lewis Whitaker Vice-President 

Margaret Perry Secretary 

Cleo Harrell Treasurer 



Page twenty-two 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




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Pa^« twenty-three 




MAHFI. INEZ HAI.CH, A.B. 

I.K.AKSVILI.E, N. C. 

,\n stan Literal 1 )' Sooiety; Assistant in French and Spanish 1 2, I)j Treasurer, Artunn-aiatt Soelety 

(S); ''liti* 1 . Avl«'Eii''si:iu Society (4). 

Here's in the youngest member of the Senior Class, though not many realise it. clue to her dignity 
anil discipline. She has, indeed proved herself to lie a number one student. When French and 
Spanish are mentioned, one's mind almost invariably turns to Mahel. She has that remarkable 
quality of being able to impart knowledge, and should make a wonderful success as a teacher. 
At heart, she is kind, willing, and sympathetic, and if once a friend, always. She is the kind who 
had rather be lound out than heard, hut we are told that "still waters run deep." Who knows 
what unseen qualities she po>sesses? Her unusual love of nature and travel makes her an inter- 
esting conversationalist. Ma} - happiness and success accompany her always. 










ETHEL VIRGINIA BLACK WELDER, A.B. 

CONCORD, V. C. 

Nlkantlmn Literary SoeUtyj President, Student Government (2); Chora] Society (2); Aeolian Choir <4); 

Christian Emiravm 12. 1 1. 

Just one look into Ethel's big eyes [ells anyone that she is "a friend in need and a friend indeed." 
In the two years that Ethel has been iviili us she has wmi our hearts. She has a hijj heart, and 
when we need a mother's comfort and a mother's advice we always go to Ethel. Most everyone 
calls her "Mamma," not because of her age, but because o[ her personality. 

She ivamler'st the wide world about, 
Unchecked by pride or scrupulous doubt, 
With friends to greet her, or without, 

Vet plea set 1 anil willing; 
Meek, yielding to the occasion's call, 
And if necessary suffering for all 
Her function apostolical 

In peace fulfilling. 




REBECCA MAY FRAZIER, A.B. 

man point, k. c. 

Artemeslan Literary Society; Secretin*} SopI ore Class; i :: i ; Critic, Artemusian Society (2); President, 

Al'KTIIi-l:ill .<<i. !-■!(. (3l; I'M II ..r-ill-l - ll >■ I , "Zrlltth" III. 

The pen writes with Mich remarkable ease in reciiriling lier character, deeds, and thoughts that 
brakes must be applied to counteract the tendency toward acceleration. Those who have not had 
the pleasure of knowing May have missed a rare privilege. She is a lover of ideals and con- 
stantly strive* to attain them. She docs well any task, for May is the kind of a girl who has a 
conscience that is in good working order. Her knowledge is broad, as she has drunk deep oi the 
Pierian Springs. But with all these traits, "mirahle dictu," she remains a sweet, modest, amiable 
girl whom everybody loves ami esteems. If true worth and honest purpose count for aitght in 
this world, she will ascend to the very eminence of success in anything she undertakes. 







Nihaiitli.ni J.jJi i ary Socfi 



ALMA CLEO HARRELL, A.B. 

I- .IS | III Ml. \. C. 

iv, Class TVeasurpr hi Parncolsus Scientific Be 



ot) i ::. I i. 



In Cleo ivc have the quietest member of the Senior Class, She Is that type of girl whom we can 
not help admiring for her gentle nature and pleasing disposition, Cleo could hardly he termed 
really solitary, for, although a nervous energy prevents her from desiring to participate with the 
crowd, she will not consent tit he alone. No one was ever more lasling in affection than Cleo for 
those whom she comes to love. Selfishness has no part in her life. Thmightfulness for others, 
and a conscientious spirit attract us all to seek her company. 

An industrious mind has led Cleo to seek a way that is considered too hard by many of us. 
tier slogan is "Math" ami Home Economics, Such a person is sure to win the best that life 
offers. 







Art Pin e&ifUi 



JEWEL HERTICE HUGHES, B.M. 

KAMII.KMA\, W, C. 

-iternry B ty. Christian Endeavor is. 4); Treasurer, Dramatic I'Uih (4); 

Reporter ili- President Artcmealan Society hi; Theta I'lu. 



■•ni-Po" 



Jewel is a pearl heyond price. Since ■■he tame to lis last year ive have heen realizing this more 
and more. Demure at a distance, upon closer anpiaintance we find that the nods have hestowed 
on her that priceless possession that they nive to comparatively few — a subtle sense of humor. 
Jewel is endowed with winsome ways and a unique personality. Her disposition is one of the 
sweetest and she is attractive in every sense of the word. To see her is not to know her, but to 
know her is to love her. To mam people she is quiet hot she tail make a piano talk. We take 
great pride in introducing; rair first B.M. student at High Point College. 




CA1 LIE EUNICE ISLEY, A. is. 

Bt ki.im;i'i\. n. c. 



Artemestan Literary Society; Assistant Librarian (2 
Suetety I-. 11; Alamanci Countj Clirtj [3, I); Head Pr< 



h . >■]! 

i ui 121 ; 



iral 

hi n 



*j (2); Christian Endeavor 
ciuip i i j , Aeolian Cltolr i i i. 



Callic's ambition ami determination cannol be measured by her size. She i> dignified, quiet, pre- 
cis*, and studious, hut Hints time to show her friends the agreeable and talkative side oi her 
nature. C.'allie is finishing college in lliree \ears, and in this sh irt rime has completed more 
course* than many students ol lour years college training. Her idul U truly an Idol; often she 
feels that her life work will he the same as that of her adored teacher. One week *hc Is en- 
thusiastic about teaching kindergarten, ami the next week her interest i> lit home economics. 
Whatever she may teach we are sure she vvill succeed. Callie tells us she belongs to the tribe or 
manhaters, but she will have to prove it tn us. Even us an haters love and are loved at times. 







J. 






FLORA POMONA JOHNSON, A.B. 

CtSSOKVlLtE, n;. C 

Ktkanthan Literary Society; AL-iiii;iin «■ County Club, (ft, 3, H; Cttrlati&u Sndeavor (2, 3, t); Secretary 
siiiiii'iii iiKVi'Minirii* (2): Vlee-Preairluiit Ctnas t2); Class Secretary (3); Choral Sn. i-i> (2>j President 
Student Government I i I ■ 

Although quiet nuil a diligent worker, Pomona is one of the foremost of the class. Her unassum- 
ing manner tends tt> fool one into believing that she sees only the serious side of lift; hut in 
reality, she is a rare combination of gentle dignity and genial good humor. She will never tor- 
ment her friends with a recital nf tier triumphs and troubles, hut is always a patient listener 
to those who s<, impose upon Iter, rejoicing with them in their joy, or sorrowing with them in their 
snirmvs. As a result she makes many friends ami loses none. They say that "hoys ami hanks don't 
mix," hut "Pony" has managed tu comhine a successful college career with a tiwre than successful 
love affair. Her friends wish her the realization of her highest ambitions. 




MARGARET EMMA 1T.RRY, A.IS. 

THOMASVTLLB, S. C. 

Nilmnthaii J ^ i r » i ir\ Society; Secretary rJigli Cowl <'-*: Vlce-Prewldeul Class (3); Secretary Class Mi 
Ai..ii;in I'lmii ni, Dramatic Club (4J; Joke editor "SSenith" <n, President Nlknntliatt Society <l>. 

Margaret, our "Red," lias been a valuable asset to her class and to her college, When she came to 
us in '2+, the I" 1 ** to Greensboro college "as our gain, "Red," is popular enough tor various 
reasons, but perhaps we like her best fur her good cheer ami smiles. Her loyalty and tine spirit 
of co-operation have won for her various honors. In spite ot her devotion to "jimmie," she has 
found lime to make a successful society president ami to earn commendable grades. We understand 
thai "Red" expects to teach next year, and doubtless her success as a teacher will help to establish 
for her Alma Mater a good name. We hope that she will not surrender completely to Cupid 
for a while. 




Ktk&Tllli.'ttb Lili'i:ii\ 



EMMA I.I WIS Will lAKKR. A.H. 

TOBACCCn I! I.E. W C. 

Society; Critic, \ 1 1 slan Soi •■ n (S); Brtttor "Torch" 

"lii-I'i." in. Business Manager "Zenith" ill. 



(J>; Socials Editor 



Here's a sir! who says what she thinks and means what she says. She is a natural-born worker, 
and puts her whole soul into what sin- undertakes to do. Since she hat a splendid mind, the studies 
when she wants in ami "dupes" the professors the rest of the time. Leadership is a quality that 
she possesses in abundance. Loyal, dependable, and kill of energy is Emma Lewis. Where she is, 
there pep is also. Not onlj is she game lor anything hut she is good at everything. She Us 
capable "I accomplishing much. Although lew people know her atnhitinn, everybody is sure 
that she Ints one, ami urn class would not be complete Without her. 






















EUGENIA FLAY WILLIAMS, A.I3. 

IJL'KI l\i:illS, N. C. 



Pfl -— i ■ 1 « - 1 1 1 Vt 'l.-l!l>'SUll Sr.i E«?t) i .' i . 

J: Christian Endeavrar (2, 8, ii: S 

mi's Student C'« il i:u , Theta I'll (4) 



Ti . 



tivurcr 
etfti s , 



Choral Society <S>; Vice- 
Treasurer Cheering One 



Artemestan LUerarj s... 
President Alamance Cli 
Munrlri >i ill. fr, Biderti 

Brown curls, dancing brown eves, winsome disposition, lovable smile, charming personality — 
That's not an exaggeration, li is our "Gene." "Gene" is ;i line combination of true nobility, 
true likabiliiv, and true reliability. Even chough we cannol say what her ambition is today, 
nor can we predict it for the future, we know "Gene" is capable of attaining any goal she may 
desire. She may he a foreign missionary or she may turn lu j i attention to less serious pursuits. 
We wonder who will take the place of Nigh Poini College's bundle of sunshine as she goes forth 
to cast her rays in Kurea. 







HERMAN EARLE COBLE, A.B. 

BURLINGTOM, ,\, C. 



TIl-iI.mii l.il.Tary S..1I1 -rj ; l'i-,vt,l.-lll Th« 

Ci&sa \2. -it ; President Christian End< 
"/■-null" I u. 



lean Society 12): President Ala ie« Club (2); President 

iver Ml: Critic, Th&lean Society HJ: Assistant Editor 



"H. E. C." as this young man is best known among campus circles, lias won a host of friends by 
his high intellectual powers, by his genial nature, and by his unconscious portrayal of sterling 
qualities of character. Mis originality and strong personality are characteristic traits of his 
college career. In the classroom he has proved true to his objectives. His love and talents for 
Christian work have beer] shown in his efforts in ihe Christian Endeavor Society. His activities 
in other organizations, the Literary Society most noticeable, prove his punctuality, his debating 
qualities, and lii» general usefulness. With service as hi- motto, ami Hi an Litidley as his ideal, 
we know the world will he much hi'Mifiidt because we will have lived in it. 




OVANDA C'OU'MISI S LOV, A.B, 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 

"Ki,|i"": Mlntfitorlo] &8fiocl&tioi] (2, ::. I); CI®$& Treasurer C3J 

"Lum" is lit the philnsripliic.il l\pr, silent 1ml given in deep meditation. At a moment when others 
are showing signs of excitement in classroom or chapel, this young scholar is resting on his calm, 
fearless foundation of thought. Vet when a matter of Ethics or Metaphysics is to be handled 
young Loy is on the joh ivith his philosophic dissecting set. His analysis of deep subjects is 
clear arid the expositions satisfying. Hut, best of all, "Luui" is fully disposed to use this good 
thinking for the benefit of others. Already his productive intellect is being felt in religious leader- 
ship, and we predict for him an eminent career along the pioneer roads lit the 1 bought World. 




WILLIAM McKINLEY LOY, AJB. 

BURUKCTOSJ, >, C. 
"Kopo"; Ministerial \sso«-l n (2 ::. n; Class I 1 ntKlent i:;i. Class KUrtorian ill, 

"Kill" Loy's chief trait is determination. It was this element that brought him up through farm 
ansi factory into the charm ol set J -master] and <•> the summits ut scholastic fame. Loy is one of 
those rare and north] students who has "won his spurs" outside the classroom as well as in. He 
impresses us as an anient disciple ot the Great Out-of-doors, and, like Emerson, he K°es- to the 
"God of the woods to brine His Word to men," \ el "Bill" is a real fellow ! Always a 
friend, jolly and kind, he brings good cheer to our ranks. And out ol a wise heart he lends 
support to all worthy enterprises of the college cause, Perhaps we shall always think of 
him, nut ('hiss Historian, as the epitome ol college lite, as through the years he reflects 
honor on our Alma Mater. 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Class Poem 

Four long years of work and grind 

And our goal it shall be won; 
Our childhood days we've left behind^ 

Our college days begun. 

One year so soon it slipped by. 

With work and joy and glee; 
As sophomores then our work did ply 

Together industriously. 

Other years have quickly sped, 

We reached the senior's state; 
This path we gladly tread 

Until we graduate. 

Now comes the time we'd thought the end, 
The beginning, though, we find; 

Our energies we gladly bend, 
No longer call it grind. 

Emma Lewis Whitaker, Poet. 



Page thirty-seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Class History 




HE Senior Class of 1927, the initial class of High Point College, is a 
synthetic creation, a conglomeration. Each member was rocked in the 
cradle of another institution, and was representative of respective Fresh- 
man Classes in seven different colleges of this state and Virginia. If 
there is any inherent value in variety, this class is intrinsically superior. H. E. Coble 
came from Wake Forest ; Cleo Harrell from Salem ; Eugenia Williams from Shenan- 
doah; Margaret Perry from Greensboro College for Women; Pomona Johnson and 
Mabel Balch from Guilford; May Frazier and Emma Lewis Whitaker from North 
Carolina College for Women; Ethel Blackwelder, Jewel Hughes, Callie Isley, O. C. 
Loy, and W. M. Loy from Elon. Each "had elsewhere its setting and cometh from 
afar." 

When High Point College opened her doors for the first time, in the Fall of 1924, 
thirteen ex-Freshmen were greeted by incompleted dormitories, seventeen days of con- 
tinuous rain, and mud of a depth and nature rarely experienced. The environment was 
very conducive to devolution. Turtles and crawfish would have been the natural con- 
sequence of the process. However, fate was kind and all have survived. Rain still 
occasionally comes, but the evolutionary growth of the college has eliminated the 
other named conditions. Each year of our stay has become more pleasant. A more 
comfortable, wholesome, and congenial atmosphere can hardly be found among the 
institutions of this nature in the South. 

As stated, the Class of '27 started on its academic journey with "unlucky" thirteen 
members, and its ultimate destination is approached by the same. Two members have 
been lost while an equal addition has been made, thus maintaining the inauspicious 
number "thirteen." The principle deduced from the clinging mud of '24 seems to have 
become a coercive, dominating force in the lives of the individual members. Tenacity 
and determination characterize the class as a whole. Almost every member has 
climbed to his present heights in the academic realm through the most adverse condi- 
tions. Some members have had outside duties sufficient to debilitate the man of 
average powers. 

Few classes have ever experienced a more absolute freedom. There have been no 
upper-classmen to dictate nor to advise ; our unquestioned liberty has not been curbed by 
traditions ; but at all times we have been governed by conclusions drawn from our own 
deliberations. Unbiased and unprejudiced we have stood and acted. 

With this air of freedom we have at all times had a consciousness of our responsi- 
bility as the first class. The establishment of precedence has been strenuously avoided 
that classes who follow may be left to the dictates of future light. 

W. M. Loy, Historian. 



Page thirty-eight 



Tne Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenitk 




Senior Prophecy 




SUPERNATURAL revelations have long ago ceased to exist. The sibyls are in their 
caves no longer, and the long-whiskered prophet too has disappeared. There 
remains, however, one means of prophecy that cannot fail of fulfillment, and so, I, 
J the prophet, through the inspiration of three years of association with these eager 
minds predict the outcome of their lives after they have left the memorable halls of 
High Point College. By the manner of their work here, I shall foretell the work of their future. 

For three long years I have been a day dreamer and a night prowler on the campus. By 
associating with the Class of '27, I have been able to learn some of the faults, habits, and exper- 
iences of the individual members. Guided by the information of the past I have been called from 
the daily grind of the present and have been shown bright worlds of the future where crowns 
and honors have been won, all by the class of '27. 

Bill Loy will complete his course at Westminster Theological Seminary and become pastor of 
Grace Church, Greensboro, where he will bitterly denounce class prejudices, knickers for both 
boys and girls, and "bootlegging." When he chooses to come back to his Alma Mater, his time 
will be spent with his brother, O. C. Loy, who will have become professor of Religious Education. 
Bill will insist on discussing the merits and demerits of Chevrolets while O. C, deeply concerned 
with the "inheritance of acquired characteristics," will contend that his children cannot possibly 
inherit the characteristics of marrying while in college. 

May Frazier will receive her M.A. degree at Columbia University, and travel with the Red- 
path Chautauqua, lecturing on the "Art of Self-Culture." Later she will reside in a nearby city 
where she will divide her time between home duties and part-time instructor of English at 1 
well-known college. 

Margaret Perry will teach "gym" in High Point High School, of which her husband will be 

principal. 

Mabel Balch will complete a course in Romance Languages at the University of Paris, and 
return to America to become head of the language department at a North Carolina college. 

Emma Lewis Whitaker will become Society Editor for the Baltimore Sun, but will realize later 
that politics is her calling and run for Congress in the Fifth District. She will be assisted in her 
campaign by Callie Isley who will have great influence because of her position as supervisor of 
education in Alamance County. 

A glimpse of the diamond on Pomona Johnson's hand is sufficient to forecast her future. 

Jewel Hughes will become pianist for the Chicago Concert Company, until she gives up this 
career for an intensive course in Home Economics. 

Ethel Blackwelder will engage in Social Service work for several years, and after acquiring 
enough dignity will succeed Miss Young as Dean of Women at High Point College. 

Herman Coble, our president, with his fine qualities of leadership, will become governor of 
Texas and probably rise to even greater positions. 

Cleo Harrell will teach Home Economics in Spray High School and later become Matron in a 
reformatory for boys. 

Alas, the curtain of my brain is falling. I cannot see any more. My own future remains closed 
behind it. But what does it matter? Destiny will deal with me as it sees fit. 

Eugenia Williams, Prophet. 



Page thirty-nine 




Tne Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Last Will and Testament 

State oh North Carolina, County of Guilford. 

E, the class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-seven, being of a sound mind, mem- 
ory, and understanding, and being cognizant of the irregularity and pitfalls of 
this earthly existence, do make and declare this, our last Will and Testament, hereby 
declaring void any and all Wills heretofore executed by us. As to such estates as 
the fates have allowed us to accumulate, we make the following disposition, viz.: 

Section I 

Article I. We desire that our executor, hereinafter named, see that our funeral services be 
directed in accordance with thee wishes of our friends and relatives, pay all funeral expenses, 
together with our just debts, including society dues, library fines, book store bills, and laboratory 
fees. The aforesaid debts shall be paid out of the first money belonging to our estate which 
may come into his hands. 

Article II. We give and bequeath to the Dean of Women the privilege of giving social hour 
at any time she wishes, provided it is not too often, and hoping that she may break up many 
forlorn love affairs. 

Section II 

Article I. To the class of '28 we give and bequeath all our senior privileges, particularly 
our privilege of honor dates once a week, those taken as well as given, hoping that they may 
ascertain what these privileges are and not abuse them. 

Article II. To the Sophomore class we will our beauty and attractiveness, including curling 
irons, compacts, and other aids to the aforesaid beauty and attractiveness. 

Article III. We give to the Freshman class our excess knowledge, hoping they will make 
better use of it than we have. 

Section III 

Article I. May Frazier wills her dignity to Helen Hayes, Virginia Pickens and Louise 
Holmes, the said characteristic to be used as the common property of the aforesaid parties. 

Article II. Pomona Johnson bequeaths her successful love affair to Lois Coble, who will 
have the same right to become engaged while in college, the fates to the contrary notwithstanding. 

Article III., Red Perry wills and bequeaths to Eme Keck her golden locks to be used to induce 
those who enter the beauty parlor to desire the "eaten crop." 

Article IV. Mable Balch willingly bequeaths her knowledge of French to Vista Dixon. 

Article V. Gene Williams, after due consideration, wills a leather bound volume on "How 
to Be Pretty" to the one who needs it most, hoping this person will study the contents as she has 
done. 

Article VL To Pauline Hicks is given the perseverance of Ethel Blackwelder, hoping the 
same will be cultivated. 

Article VII. Cleo Harrell wills and bequeaths; to Elizabeth Nicholson her stored up knowl- 
edge of Home Economics. 

Article VIII. Herman Coble wills his originality to Pat Paschall. 

Article IX. To Nick) Sides and Dwight Hearne, Bill and O. C. Loy will their privilege of 
getting married during their college career. 

Article X. Emma Lewis Whitaker wills and bequeaths her subscription to the Hi-Po to Louise 
Adams. 

Article XI. To Loraine Ellison, Callie Isley bequeaths her friendly disposition and Unselfish 
ways. 

. Article XII. Jewel Hughes' musical talent and accomplishment are hereby willed to Annie Lee 
Jarrell with the desire that she may use such gifts wisely. 

And we do hereby appoint and constitute Captain Rankin sole executor of this, our last Will 
and Testament. 

In witness whereof, we, the Class of Twenty-seven, the testators, have to this our will set 
our hands and seal this, the 24th day of May, Anno Domini, one thousand nine hundred and 
twenty-seven. 

Class of Twenty-Seven. XSeal~\ 
Testator [Seal] 



Page fort) 



1 he Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





SI MORS \ \H If H lit \l \KC()'] 



Page forty-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



11 Ml 




■are we 



]E, the members of the first grad- 
uating class of High Point College, 
close our career as students with 
sorrowful joy. Our hearts are 
grieved that we must leave these scenes made 
dear by pleasures and cares alike, and yet, 
we rejoice over the prospects of the future made 
bright because of our stay here. The world 
changes and if we progress we must adapt our- 
selves to new conditions. This is the test of 
true living. We feel more humbly capable of 
meeting life than we did when we entered 
these now almost sacred doors, thanks to every 
phase of our association here. In parting we 
wish to say farewell to our professors, farewell 
to our friends, farewell to these buildings, fare- 
well to each other. And again we say, 
Farewell ! 



Page forty-two 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Page forty-three 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



J- 



lunior Class 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Yellow Rose 

Motto: "Non Serviri Sed Servire" 

Mascot: Yellow Cat 

Officers 

Edwin Hedrick ■ . . President 

Annie Lee Jarrell ; First Vice-President 

James Rogers Second Vice-President 

Ruby Isley Secretary 

Joe Holmes Treasurer 

James Ellington Reporter 

Miss Mabel Williams ...... . Class Adviser 



Page forty-four 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Search for Knowledge 




NCE upon a time a company of jolly Juniors left their Holmes to wander 
over Hills and Brooks in search of the Tree of Knowledge. They went 
along singing Carrolls which goes to show what a jolly crowd they were. 
They stopped a Wagoner to buy some Cates and Lemons. 

"Let's get some Redwine," said Percy Paschall. 

"No !" protested Roy Bethune, "That's against the Rule." 

They stopped by the Sides of the road and ate their lunch. Lillian Buckner sat 
down Andrew a picture. 

"How do you like that, Jimmy Rogers?" 

"Oh, it Suits me all right." 

Just then they came to Madison. 

"Hello! Spencer Cutchin Hauser friends?" cried an old man. 

"Oh, they're all Livengood except Aileen Hendricks; she nearly died. I thought 
she would Parrish from Burns. We started to stop but she cried "Ad Vance." So we 
went on but we had to sleep in Hayes and fields many times." 

"Let's go on," said Ptylla Bingham whose thirst for knowledge was exceedingly 
great, "or the Snipes will get us, and of all the birds I know, they scare me most." 

So on they went, always jolly in all kinds of trouble, until they reached their desti- 
nation. Then and there all forty-six of them tried to climb the Tree of Knowledge 
at the same time. 

"What are you trying to do, Jim Ellington — pull the tree up by the roots?" 

"Forsooth, what are you Kecking about? Do you want all the knowledge?" cried 
Jim, and he went on climbing frantically. 

All of a sudden, Crash! Down went the Tree of Knowledge with' a force that 
shook the earth, and with it went forty-six jolly Juniors still jolly as ever. 

"Hey! What's the trouble?" cried a farmer. 

"Oh ! We were just Picken knowledge off the tree, but we've found that it's better 
to dig for it," cried Bill Ragan, and forthwith he and all the jolly Juniors set to work 
to dig for knowledge. 



Page forty-jive 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 







Juni 




tors 



G. W, ANDREW 
JOCELYN lU'RNS 

ROY BETHUNE 
MINNIE CAFFEY 

PTYLLA BINGHAM 
ELWOOD CARROLL 

LILLIE MAE BRAXTON 
LOIS COIiLE 

CHAR) !-:.S BROODS 
SI J ENCER CUTCHIN 

UL1.IAX BITKNER 
VISTA DIXON 



Page jorty-six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Jun 



lors 



JAMES ELLINGTON 
JOE HOLMES 

HELEN HAVES 
RUBY ISLEV 

FRED HAt'SER 
ANNIE LEE JARRELL 

EDWIN HEDRICK 
ANARY JOHNSON 

AILEEN HENDRICKS 
EFFIE KECK 

R. L. HILL 
L C. KRESS 



*\ 















Page forty-seven 



m) 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Jun 



lors 



J. 11. KRESS 
MAX PARRISII 

ALMA LAMBETH 
PERCY PA SC El ALL 

RAYMOND LEMONS 
DORA PEARSON 

LUCILLE MORRISON 
VIRGINIA PICKENS 

AN'Mi: LIVEN GOOD 
WILLIAM RAG AN 

GLENN MADISON 
BESSIE REDWINE 



Page forty- eight 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Jun 



lors 



JACOB R0B1N0W1TZ 
MARGARET SNIPES 



JAMES ROGERS 
ERMA SUITS 



(.I.RIKCIVi: Kl I !• 
LAURA THOMPSON 



G. D. SIDES 
LEI.IA WAGONER 



MAY SNIPES 



RALPH VANCE 



Page jorsy-ntne 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




History of tke Junior Class 

N September, 1924, seventy-four quaking Freshmen with 
anxious countenances entered the portals of High Point 
College and began their quest for knowledge. Little did 
they heed the mud which was vainly striving to cover a part 
of their greenness on that memorable day. Where they floundered 
around in nrfid ankle-deep, future students will stroll down shady walks 
bordered with flowers. 

On this, the first Freshman class of High Point College, rested the 
responsibility of making traditions for all the future classes. The Class 
of '28 was the first to plan a memorial for the college ; it was a gate which 
was to be erected during the Junior year. This first year we Freshmen 
were represented in all phases of college activity, both in athletic and 
literary achievements. 

The year 1925 witnessed a marked change in the one-time Freshmen. 
Gone were those timid, cringing creatures, and in their places stood 
worldly-wise, self-assured Sophomores. With a haughty manner they 
watched the Freshmen as the latter blundered into forbidden places, 
little realizing the consequences of their folly. The task of the Sopho- 
mores was to raise money for the gate. The class gamely experimented 
with every available means for raising money, anything from selling 
peanuts and sandwiches to giving dramatic entertainments. 

The year 1926 ushered in the Juniors who viewed with a kind of 
condescension the vain attempts of the Sophomores to exert their longed- 
for authority. The Juniors immediately began to cast about for means 
to make money for the gate. The proceeds from several plays proved 
their ability as financiers. We hope that by next Spring the gate will 
adorn the campus of High Point College and stand as a fitting memorial 
to the Class of '28. 



Page, fifty 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenitn 




JPuffe fifty-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Soph 



CL 



omore ^lass 

Motto: "Character is Greater than Intellect." 

Colors: White and Gold 

Flower: Daisy 

Officers 

Clarence Lee President 

Floyd Garrett Vice-President 

Alta Allen Secretary 

Elizabeth Nicholson .... Corresponding Secretary 

Keith Harrison Treasurer 

Nady Cates, Jr Reporter 



Page fifty-tvio 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Class Song 



We raise high our voices in song, 

The greatest of tribute we bring; 
To the Class that we love so well 

We will now joyously sing. 
We love Thee, dear faithful Band, 
Pressing onward toward our motto, 
We'll forever be loyal and true. 

CHORUS 

Oh, dear Class of White and Gold, 
With Thy truth our lives entwine 

And we'll give praise and honor, 
To the Class of 'Twenty-nine. 

We'll cherish the friendships we made, 

In obedience to Thy command; 
To give our power and talents 

To make one unbroken Band. 
We remember, dear Alma Mater, 

How we did struggle in Thy care 
To master the great lessons 

Of our Class, and Thee, so fair. 

Grover L. Angel, '29. 




Page fifty-three 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




v f ^> 




SOPHOMORES 



Page fifty -four 



i 



Tne Nineteen- Twenty-seven Zenith 





SOE'HOMORlsS 



Page fifty-five 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Soph 



omore 



Roll 



Louise Adams 
Alta Allen 
Juanita Amick 
Grover Angel 
Antonio Antonakos 
Theodore Antonakos 
Helen Barker 
Lacy Baynes 
Winfred Beck 



Sumter Bowen 

Paul Brasseur 

Jabus Braxton 

Mabel Butler 

Mary Byrum 

Nady Cates 

Elda Clark 

Lillie Mae Davis 

Maggie Davis 
Vera Hedgecock Clarence Lee 

Pauline Hicks William Lewis 

Wilbert Hines Floyd Little 

Louise Holmes Elizabeth Nicholson 

Norine Horney John Perry 

Dorothy Hoskins Dallas Rathbone 

Adam Hunt Inez Reynolds 

William Hunter Irene Reynolds 

Ruth Jarrell Graydon Ring 

Horace Seward 

Inez Strader 

Swannie Thompson 

Leona Wagner 

Ernest Wall 

Albert Walker 

Marjorie Welborn 

Pauline Whitaker 

William Worley 

Bruce Yokely 



Raymond Dixon 
Claire Douglas 
Floyd Garrett 
Vista Garrett 
Marcaret Gurley 
Mary Hammer 
Keith Harrison 
Beulah Hassell 
Dwight Hearne 



Vaye fifly-six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





FRESHMAN 



Page fifty-seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Freshman Class 

Colors: Blue and White Flower: White Lily 

Motto: "Non Sibi, Sed Omnibus" 

Officers 

Glenn Perry President 

Coy Williard Vice-President 

Lucy Nunery Secretary 

Rosalie Andrews Treasurer 

J. D. Hardy Class Adviser 



Page fifty-eight 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Superlative Types Among Freshmen 

Most Beautiful Girl Kaliopia Antonakos 

Most Handsome Boy Coy Williard 

Most Attractive Girl Pauline Elkins 

Best Dressed Girl Mamie Frances Stamey 

Best Dressed Boy Coy Williard 

Most Popular Boy Ralph Mulligan 

Most Studious Girl Willie Fritz 

Most Studious Boy John Dosier 

Best Ail-Around Student Ralph Mulligan 

Jolliest Girl Hilda Amick 

Most Humorous Boy Jake Martin 

Peppiest Girl Bill Shakleford 

Best Athlete Pat Thompson 

Most Dignified Girl Estelle Moore 

Most Dignified Boy Harvey Young 

Most Original Student . ' James York 



Page fifty+nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




f") ^ f^ {% 






FRLSHMEN 



Fajff ii^/jj 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





FRESHMEN 



Page sixty-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Fresh 



reshmen a 



nd Special 



Kaliopia Antonakos 
Rosalie Andrews 
James Asbury 
Hilda Amick 
Grace Barnette 
Jessie Blair 
Ernest Blosser 
Bettie Bloom 
Frances Byrum 
Bain Carroll 
Clarence Clodfelter 
Lena Clodfelter 
Herbert Combs 
Pierce Cridlebaugh 
James Daughtry 



Louis McFadden 
Richard McMannis 
Ottie McNeill 
Thelma McPhaul 
Luther Medlin 
Frank Mitchell 
Nellie Morris 
Ralph Mulligan 
Edith Myers 
Edna Nicholson 
Lucy Nunery 
Alta Mae Osborn 
Ruth Osborne 
Fred Pegg 
R. R. Perdue 



Carl Dennis 
John Dosier 
Pauline Elkins 
Loraine Ellison 
Eva Ellis 
Noel Feezor 
Eula Fogleman 
Willie Fritz 
Wade Fuquay 
Fred Furr 

William Greenwell 
Kenton Hackman 
Raymond Hallock 
Elizabeth Hanner 
Blanco Harrell 

Glenn Perry 



George Hundley 
Pauline Hunter 
Grace Keck 
Violet Keck 
Maurice Kelly 
Lena Lambeth 
Dorothy Lambe 
Eliza Lomax 
Fred Love 
Blaine Madison 
Graham Madison 
Jacob Martin 
Olin Matthews 
Estelle Moore 
Ava McArthut 



Esther Pritchard 
Lloyd Pierce 
Dewey Proctor 
Vernon Robertson 
Charles Robbins 
Mamie Frances Stamey 
Vera Smith 
Willard Shakleford 
Nettie Stuart 
Ezora Suits 
*Willie Talbert 
Charles Tate 
Hobart Thompson 
Inez Trogden 



Cecil Walthen 
Edwin White 
Coy Williard 
Maie Williams 
John Wood 
Leona Wood 
Willie Wood 
Elizabeth Yokely 
James York 
Mamie York 
Virgil Yow 
Harvey Young 



Page sixty-tieo 






i 










Gluts and Organizations 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




H.G»*S' 



IZATIONS 



Page sixty-four 



Tne Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





MAY FRAZiEE. 

£DlTOft-lN-Cnitf 



EMMA LEWIS- WHITAKER 

BUSlNtSS MHNH6C.R, ,«« 




i^% ^ 




1 




MARGARET PESKY 
JOKE LOlTOR 



JAME5 E.LLIN6TDN 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



/IMTI1 STAI-1- 



PtRCY PASCHALL 

ATHLE.TIC EtHTOfc 



Page sixty-five 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



iniTi'iir 1 "*"!! mi mi r 1 " 




William P. Raiian 

ATHLETIC F.Oir&fl 



Floyd R, Garrett 

AS5'T BUSINESS MjK 



Hl-PO STAFF 



Page s'txty-tix 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Annie Livengood Vista. Dixon Leli&W&^oner Gene Williams 




G.W.Andrew 



F.M.Furr R.T.tiallock 



W.B.Wood 



STL DENT VOLUNTEERS AND .MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



Page sixty-seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




WOMAN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL 
Pomona Johnson, President Bessie Redwine, Head Proctor 

Effie Keck, I'ice-President 
Ai.ta Allek, Scat hay Swan N IE Thompson, Treasurer 







MENS STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL 
Fred Hauser, President Albert Walker, Vice-President 

Floyd Garrett, Secretary Percy Paschall, Head Monitor 



Page sixty -eight 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



,ir f r- pirTrTiinTin-iT-i.-r- ■ ■ t-ttt: n mrm 





AEOLIAN CHOIR 



Page sixty-nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




> 

r- 
- 

- 



- 

-r. 

- 

u 



mm ■ 



Pa^e seventy 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Christian Endeavor Society 




NE of the most active organizations on the campus is the Christian Endeavor Society. 
The very first Sunday evening after the -college opened, a Christian Endeavor 
prayer meeting was held in the auditorium of Robert's Hall. On October 12, 1924, 
the society was definitely organized for work under the able leadership of young 
people from church societies of many sections of the state. It has since become 
a very necessary part of the life of the students who soon learned to work together as one unit 
"For Christ and the Church." 

Since the organization of the society, regular week'y prayer meetings have been held practically 
every Sunday evening during the college year. The society has been of great benefit to each 
individual student and of real worth to the college as a whole. Through the meetings, students 
have learned to think more about their souls, their life work, and individual problems, as well as 
about national and work problems. They have learned each other better, and have been drawn 
in close fellowship with the Master more by the Christian Endeavor Society than by any other 
student organization. 

From the beginning of the second co'lege year the Christian Endeavor Society has had full 
charge of the Sunday evening religious services. The meetings are well attended, as all are 
assured that they will receive real benefit from the service. Usually a speaker is secured to talk 
after the programs. 

Not only have the Christian Endeavorers been interested in the religious side of life, but also 
in the social side, for Christian Endeavor is not a one-sided affair. Well planned socials have 
been given at intervals. 

Broadmindedness is another characteristic that can be applied to our society as well as to all 
others in the state, we believe. We have taken part in city union activities and foreign and home 
missions. Though not definitely connected with any particular church we have done much for 
churches throughout the state. The members of the society have gone back to their homes and 
organized societies. There is also a regular extension group sent out for this purpose. 

The Christian Endeavor Society is the most representative organization of the college. Prac- 
tically all the boarding students are members. Students from all classes take part in the meetings 
and everybody feels that it is his society. Ideas have been brought together from all parts 
of the state and even from other states. A fine spirit of co-operation has developed and much 
has been accomplished. We are glad to be a part of the world-wide organization of Christian 
Endeavor, and look forward to years of activity in which we hope to be able to increase greatly 
the cause of the Great Master, whom we are earnestly trying to serve. 



Tage seventy-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



. ■ —4 



\ 




v. 
o 



P«(?f seventy -two 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





- 



Page seventy-three 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



-S^si 







ARTEMESIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page tevinty-four 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Artemesian Literary Society 

Emblem: Crescent 
Colors: Green and Gold Flower: Daffodil 

Society Song 

Dear Artemesia, we strive for Thee. 
We have as our goal now, purity, 
Maidenly virtue worthy of praise 
To dear Artemesia, our songs of joy we raise. 

Dear Artemesia, all throughout life 

May we be conquerers in our strife; 

Be always faithful, ever be true 

To dear Artemesia, as we are who sing to you. 



Page seventy-five 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




It* H 




A K ROT J SI AX LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page seventy-six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Akrothinian Literary Society 



HE Akrothinian Literary Society was organized the lat- 
ter part of May, 1926. Previous to the organization of 
this society, there was one other for boys functioning on 
the campus. The charter members of the new organization 



were: 



Percy M. Paschall President 

Fred T. Hauser Vice-President 

John R. Perry Secretary 

' R. Bruce Yokely . . Treasurer 
W. H. Hunter, Jr. . . Marshal 

Adam S. Hunt Dallas C. Rathbone 

Floyd G. Little 

Prof. P. S. Kennett, Faculty Adviser 
Prof. T. C. Johnson, Honorary Member 

We selected the name "Akrothinian," meaning "Highest Point," 
from a group of Greek letters supplied by Mrs. White, the professor 
of Greek. Our motto is: "Find a way or make one," the words of 
the illustrious super-general, Napoleon Bonaparte. 

Although «ur society started with a very small group of young men, 
the influx of new members has nourished the organization until it has 
grown far beyond our initial expectations. We started with only eight 
members, but there are at present enrolled in our society twenty-eight 
students and two faculty members. The reasons for our growth may 
be accounted for by the untiring efforts of all members, a fraternal 
spirit among the boys, an air of congeniality, and the direct results of 
our meetings. We are very optimistic over the present outlook of our 
past gains, and can safely predict a prosperous future for the Akrothinian 
Literary Society of High Point College. 



Page seventy-seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




i 



MKWTll \\ r in it Mn vn'ii n 



Page seventy-eight 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Nikanthan Literary Society 

Colors: Lavender and White Flower: Lavender Iris 

Motto: "Victory Crowns Patience" 

Emblem: Wreath of laurels encircling a palm leaf, mounted on black onyx 

Officers 

Margaret Perry , President 

Laura Thompson Vice-President 

Juanita Amick '. . . Secretary 

May Snipes Treasurer 

Emma Lewis Whitaker Critic 

Vista Garrett Pianist 

Annie Lee Jarrell Chaplain 

Dorothy Hoskins Chorister 

Ruth Jarrell Monitor ■ 

Pauline Kennett Mascot 

Mrs. H. A. White ... Faculty Adviser 
Claire Douglas . Reporter 

In the Spring of 1926, it was decided that the Artemesian Society had grown too large, 
to function satisfactorily. Consequently, by vote of the entire society, the membership was . 
equally divided. Just before the close of school the members of the new society, twenty of them, 
met and organized themselves under the name of Nikanthans. The organization was not worked 
out in detail, but a firm foundation was laid. 

At the opening of college in the Fall of 1926, thirty-one new members joined the society, making 
a total of fifty-one members. Besides these, there are six honorary faculty members. After every 
business session, a short program of some kind is presented, usually being an appreciation program. 
Much talent has been discovered in the society through the programs presented. 

The Nikanthans are a very congenial group of girls and in all cases hpve proved to work 
together very harmoniously. 



Ptcge . seventy-nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





O £y O f- fTi "p 




THALEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Vaye eighty 



Tke ( Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Thalean Literary Society 

Organized October 10, 1924 
Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: White Rose 

Motto: "Master First Ourselves" 

Officers 

First Semester : 

T. Glenn Madison . . ■ President 

J. Albert Walker Vice-President 

Jabus W. Braxton Secretary 

Harvey M. Young Assistant Secretary 

J. Elwood Carroll Treasurer (Elected jor entire year) 

Ralph H. Vance Critic 

Floyd R. Garrett Society Reporter 

Lacy G. Baynes • Pianist 

Grover L. Angel ■ Marshal 

Ralph H. Vance Press Reporter 

Second Semester: 

Ralph H. Vance President 

Raymond L. Lemons Vice-President 

Cornelius D. Sides Secretary 

Lacy G. Baynes Assistant Secretary 

. J. Elwood Carroll Treasurer 

Herman E. Coble ,• ■ Crihc 

Carl Dennis Society Reporter 

DwiGHT M. Hearne Pianist 

Graham R. Madison Marshal 

Grover L. Angel Pre " Re P orter 

George William Andrew Chaplain 



Page eighiy-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





PARACELSLS SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 



Page eighty-three 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



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Page eighty- five 




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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



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Page eighty -six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




ALA MAN' CH COUNTY CLUB 



Page eighty -tig In 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



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The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zemth 





RANDOLPH COL'NTY CLUB 



Page ninety-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



np 



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KAPPA J'HI FRATERNITY 



Page ninety- fcwo 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Kappa Phi 

K * 
Motto: Fratre Care Colors: Red and Clue 

Officers 

Paul Brasseur President 

Hobart Thompson Vice-President 

F. T. Hauser . . Secretary 

Ralph Mulligan Treasurer 

Ray Dixon Sergeant-at-Arms 

Charles Robbins Property Manager 

Fratres in Facultate 
T. C. Johnson N, P. Yarbrough 

J. H. Mouranf. 

Fratres in Urbe 
A. L. Caldwell Dr. W. L. Jackson 

Dr. S. S. Coe Dr. J. C. Groom 

Dick Goolsby 



Fratres in Collegio 



Paul Brasseur 
Hobart Thompson 
F. T. Hauser 
Ralph Mulligan 
Ray Perdue 
Charles Robbins 
Ray Dixon 

Clarence Lee 



John Perry 

Leo Method 

Francis Greenwell 

Adam» Hunt 

C. D. Sides 

Keith Harrison 

J. Vernon Robertson 



Page ninety-three . 




Tke Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Mf't .*£. - , - ■ 



IOTA TAL KAPPA FRATERNITY 



"tntly-fout 









The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Iota Tau Kappa 



Colors: Red and Ulack 



Fratres in Collegio 



Flazver; Red Rose 



Roy Bethune 
Ernest Beosser 
C. A. Brooks, Jr. 
Edwin Hedrick 
R. L. Hill 
J. W. Holmes 



\V. 1). I.KWIS 

Richard McMannis 
P. M. PaschAll 
Dallas Rath bone 
J. P. Rogers 
F. E. Rowan 



Fratres Honorari 



Dean P. E. Linoley 
Dr. H. B. Hiatt 

R. N. Mann 



Don' C, McRae 
Prok, P. S. Kennett 



Page ninety- five 



^iSPc^ 



Tke Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Theta Phi 

Colors: Dark Green and Li^ht Green Flower; Sword Fern 

Motlo: "To God, Thy Country ami to Thy Friend — Be True" 

Member in Faculty 
Mrs. Street 



Helen Hayes 

Vista Dcxon 
Lillian Buckner 



Mem hers in College 

Bl! I. Sll \Kl.l-.KIkl> 

Virginia Pickens 



Gene Williams 
Jewel Hlcfies 
Margaret Perry 



Page ninety-six 




ATHLETICS 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Page ninety-nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Coach Boylin 




HE teams play well. The contests have much support and enthusiasm. 
Games are won and lost. Spirits are brightened and dampened. This 
goes on often without a thought of the force which makes it possible. 
Coach Boylin has worked faithfully with and for High Point College, 
not only in athletics, but in every other undertaking. Coach seems quiet until one 
knows him, but that occurs very soon. Though not coming into direct contact through 
classes and otherwise with most of us, he has a most remarkable capacity of learn- 
ing people's names and faces. Some of us wonder how he finds out who we insig- 
nificant beings are, even sooner than some of our professors. 

Coach Boylin has accomplished his greatest work in athletics. High Point College, 
being new, had no reputation in any line when the doors opened in the fall of 1924. 
Now our Alma Mater is known in many states. This is due to a great extent to the 
tireless energy and patience of Coach, who has caused students from all over the 
United States to come here because of the interest he aroused from his work with 
our teams. We appreciate and honor him, and we want him to know it. 



Our Cheer Lead 



eaaers 



No college without a spirit can successfully exist. College spirit is aroused per- 
haps more by athletics than by other forces. But this spirit, when it is once alive, 
spreads to every phase of school life. Charlie Brooks and his co-workers have helped 
High Point College wonderfully. We have a college spirit here, one of which we 
are proud. Much credit is due to our faithful cheer leaders for this and for our 
success in many lines. Lately the "Cheering One Hundred" was organized, which is 
destined to be an outstanding factor in college life, especially since it is under the guid- 
ance of such enthusiastic students as our cheer leaders. Every person connected with 
High Point College is grateful to them for their work. 



Page one hundred 



Tlie Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



LllLLUIHlinn muni 




Review and Propliecy of High Point College 

Athletics 




PROPHECY has been fulfilled ! Looking back two years into the gloom 
that shrouded High Point College athletics, one sees a path leading out 
paved with blocks of success, hewn by undying High Point enthusiasm, 
earnest effort, and loyal co-operation. Two years ago the prophecy was 
made that the followers of the Purple and White would gaze upon the years of 1925 
and 1926, pointing these as landmarks in athletics at High Point College. That proph- 
ecy has been fulfilled, for another great year has been added. 

Our success during the past year has been marvelous. Our teams have been 
coached by Jack Boylin ; our victories have been High Point College victorie3. Suc- 
cess inspires optimism. One cannot but see a bright future for the Purple and White 
in 1927 and 1928, after recalling the achievements of the past year. . 

In football, the chief sport, High Point carried its flag further abroad, especially 
in the South, chiefly by conquering Guilford at Greensboro in the first gams ever to 
be played in the new World War Memorial Stadium, and earlier in the season stop- 
ping the Little Christians, one of the strongest teams of the Little Five and who had 
not tasted defeat before during the season. 

In basketball High Point College more than held its own, playing and defeating 
teams in both the North and South. 

Adhering strictly to the high standards upon which the present athletic system 
was founded, making athletic standards second only to scholastic standards, and co- 
operating whole-heartedly with other departments of the institution make athletics 
worth while at High Point College and mean more to those who participate. 

In the success of High Point College athletics is well reflected the consistent 
progress being made in all of its departments. Each new achievement forms a mile- 
stone along the road of progress. The achievement of the 1926-27 seasons makes 
landmarks of which High Point College may well be proud. High Point College 
can, must, and will carry on in athletics, as in other things, always the highest and 
best of collegiate undertakings. 



Page one hundred one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



, iH , i , i , i<i<iH , i»i , i , i , i i * 




- 
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Page one hundred two 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




The 1926 Football Season 




INETEEN TWENTY-SIX stands out as the banner year for football 
in the three-year history of High Point College. 

The King College grid warriors were met for the first time, and the 
"touchdown-a-minute" team yielded to a scoreless tie. This game was 
hard-fought throuhgout, and thus the season opened with a fighting spirit. 

For the second game the "Boylinites" met the Lenoir-Rhyne "Mountain Bears." 
Here the experienced and mighty Spurlock proved too much for the Panthers' less 
experienced men. Hence Lenoir-Rhyne took the big end of a 29-0 score. 

It was down in South Carolina at Paris Island that the Panthers next journeyed, 
this time to encounter a team composed of former college gridiron stars from all parts 
of the country. Indeed much credit must be given the Panthers for having held the 
Marines to 26 points. 

A huge crowd of football enthusiasts witnessed the first victory and home game 
of the season, when the Panthers met the Milligan aggregation. 

The splendor of the 13-7 victory was somewhat shaded because of the injuries 
Hill, McMannis and Rowan received. 

The next week the "Little Christians" of A. C. C. came to High Point for their 
first defeat. Previous to this game they had not been defeated, nor had their goal 
line been crossed. On a trick play, Mulligan, substitute quarterback, scored a 7 for 
H. P. C, by making a touchdown. 

The thrill of the season was when Guilford and High Point clashed on November 
1 1 . The two great rivals met in the new World War Memorial Stadium in Greens- 
boro for the first game ever played there. Approximately five thousand people wit- 
nessed this battle, and High Point College won her first victory over Guilford in 
the 7-3 score. . ■ . 

The season hastened to an end after this hard-fought Guilford game. Atlantic 
Christian College had challenged the Panthers to a game to be played in Wilson. 
The Panthers had accepted, and in the hardest-fought gridiron battle ever seen in 
Wilson, the "Little Christians" were prevented gaining their hope for a touchdown — 
0-0 was the story of the battle. 

An efficient coach, a fighting spirit, a winning spirit — ended High Point College's 
greatest football season. 



Page' one hundred three 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



1926 Record in Football 



High 


Point College . 






o; 


High 


Point College . 






o; 


High 


Point College . 






o; 


High 


Point College . 






13; 


High 


Point College . 






7; 


High 


Point College . 






7; 


High 


Point College . 






0; 




Winners 


of 




F. E. Rowan 






R. MacMannis 






C. Wathan 






K. Hackman 






L. McFadden 






Ed Hedrick 






Wm. Worley 






H. P. Thompso 


N 




J. R. Perry 






J. E. Carro 


ll 







King College 

Lenoir-Rhyne 

Paris Island Marines . 
Milligan College . . . 
Atlantic Christian College 
Guilford College . . . 
Atlantic Christian College 



o 
28 
26 

7 
o 

3 

o 



k H" 



in 



1926 



E. Blosser 

F. T. Hauser 
C. A. Brooks 

P. M. B. Brasseur 

R. L. Hill 

V. Yow 

R. Dixon 

J. P. Rogers 

W. C. Lee 

L. J. C. Method 



Football Schedule, 1927 

Sept. 17 Elon at Elon 

Sept. 24 Kings College at High Point 

Oct. 1 Paris Island Marines at High Point 

Oct. 8 Hampden-Sidney at Hampden-Sidney 

Oct. 15 Milligan at Bristol, Tenn. 

Oct. 22 Fort Benning at Fort Benning, S. C. 

Oct. 29 ... Lenoir-Rhyne at High Point 

Nov. 5 Open 

Nov. 11 Guilford at Greensboro 

Nov. 12 Western Maryland at Westminster, Md. 

Thanksgiving Open 



Page one hundred four 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





BASKETBALL SQUAD 



Page one hundrea $t>e 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Basketball Schedule, 1927 

Jan. 22 White Oak "Y" at Greensboro 

Jan. 27 Elon College at Elon 

Jan. 28 Atlantic Christian College at Wilson 

Jan. 29 Wake Forest College at Wake Forest 

Feb. 2 Wake Forest College at High Point 

Feb. 3 Atlantic Christian College at High Point 

Feb. 5 Catawba College at High Point 

Feb. 8 . . Lenoir-Rhyne College at Lenoir-Rhyne 

Feb. 9 Catawba College at Salisbury, N. C. 

Feb. 10 Concord "Y" at High Point 

Feb. 12 . . Elon College at High Point 

Feh. 16 Lenoir-Rhyne at High Point 

Feb. 22 Greensboro "Y" at Greensboro 

Feb. 23 Concord *'Y" at Concord, N. C. 

Feb. 25 Guilford College at Guilford College 

Feb. 26 Greensboro "Y" at High Point 

Baseball Prophecy, 1927 

While the season has not yet begun, with many of our old men back 
and a good supply of new material, High Point College will have one of 
the strongest diamond outfits of the Little Five. We include in our 
schedule this year some of the outstanding teams in the state and also 
some aggressive ones in South Carolina arid Georgia. The student body 
pledges to coach and to the team its support. 



Page one hundred six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





Page one hundred seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




MONOGRAM CLUB 



Page one hundred eight 


























FEATURES 




They stand out superior, 

Have loyal hearts and true; 

And with their many talents, 
They bless and serve us, too. 

Their graces are excelling, 

As were they sent from Heaven; 

And well always hold in memory, 
Our Tyfies of T wenty-seven. 





Elwood Carroll 

BEST ALL-AROUND 





HE. Cobles 

MOST ORIGINAL 



tmmmm 



e Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Jokes 



Ptylla: "John, this theater is burning up." 
John Perry Dosier: "We should worry. 
We've seen almost all the show." 

* * * 

"Does she ever walk home from rides?" 
"No, but sometimes she rides home from 



* * * 

Mr. Johnson: "This is the fourth morning 
you've been late, Rogers." 

Rogers: "Yes, sir, I overslept myself, sir." 

Mr. Johnson : "Do you have a clock ?" 

Rogers : "Yes, sir." . 

Mr. Johnson: "Don't you wind it up?" 

Rogers: "Oh, yes, yes; I wind it up." 

Mr. Johnson: "And do you set the alarm?" 

Rogers: "Every night, sir." 

Mr. Johnson: "But, don't you hear the 
alarm in the morning, Rogers?" 

Rogers: "No, sir; that's the trouble. You 
see the thing goes off while I am asleep." 

* * * 

It's fortunate Dad doesn't remember what 
he paid for his textbooks in college. 

* * * 

"'Who is the fellow Tide I hear about so 
much?" 

"I never heard of him." 

"Why, I've heard everyone saying "Hi 
Tide, and 'Lo Tide!" 



"I feel like the oldest man in the world." 
"Why, there's nothing the matter, is there ?" 
"No, but I've just been listening to a six- 
teen-year-old Freshman tell about things he 
used to do when he was a kid." 

* * * 

Pat: "Do you know that girl?" 
Joe: "Wait till I see if she matches this 
powder on my coat sleeve." 

* * * 

Jewel: "I think he is a poet." 

Louise H.: "How can you tell?" 

Jewel : "Don't you see the lines on his face ?" 

* * * 

They put bridges on violins to get the 
music across. 

* * * 

Just think! If it were not for journalism 
we wouldn't know what a rotten world we're 
living in. 

* * * 

Charles Robbins: "Do you know Wendy?" 
Cotton: "Wendy who?" 
Charles: "Wendy we eat?" 

* * * 

"Say, could you tell me how I can find the 
chemistry building?" 
"Sure. Ask somebody." 



Page me hundred Puienty-one 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Jok 



es 



"A college town is certainly dead during 
Christmas." 

"Yes, it has all the sap taken out of it." 

* •* * 

Ho: "Did you go to college?" 
Bo: "Naw, me mudder wanted to gimme a 
fair start in life." 

* * * 

Mr. Johnson: "Max, what does that first 

part of your name stand for?" 
M. Parrish: "I'll bite, professor." 
Mr. Johnson : "I think it must be Maximum 

Clamor, which when translated is Greatest 

Noise." 



The Hi-Po: "The present Senior Class 
came to this college without reputation." 

* * * 

Effie: "Don't you speak to him any more?" 

Bessie : "No. Whenever I pass him I give 
him the geological survey." 

Effie : "Geological survey ?" 

Bessie : "Yes, that's what's commonly known 
as the stony stare." 

* * * 

Mr. Jones: "Blanco, lift up your feet." 
Blanco: "Hush yo' mouth, fool, I goes to 
college." 



* * * 

TST Maybe You Can Tell Us Why- 

Elizabeth Hanner sings carols all the year through. 

'n Pomona Johnson wears a diamond. 

'n Bessie Redwine always likes Swampy places. 

'n Pauline Whitaker thinks Garrets are essential things 

for a beautiful home, 
'n Percy Paschall is interested in architecture, 
n' Mr. Johnson doesn't purchase a megaphone, 
'n Miss Balch and Halloek like to pull candy, 
'n Eva Ellis is fond of running water — Brooks, etc. 
'n Pauline Elkins always sings "My Wild Irish Rose." 
'n Mabel Butler likes dumb animals — Morik(s). 
'n Dallas Rathbone has a (Jewel). 
'n Ava MacArther always wears a coat. 



Page one hundred tnaenty-tiuo 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 





k*< AX 



Pn^c omc hundred t<wenty-ihret 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenitk 



Directory of Students and Faculty 

Faculty 

Andrews, Dr. R. M. High Point, N. C. 

Allred, J. Hobart High Point, N. C. 

Battle, Miss Bessie Greensboro, N. C. 

Hardy, J. D High Point, N. C. 

Idol, Miss Vera High Point, N. C. 

Johnson, Talmadge C ' Anderson, S. C. 

Kennett, Paul S High Point, N. C. 

Lindley, Percy E High Point, N. C. 

McCanless, Walter F High Point, N. C. 

McIntyre, Miss Novella Asheville, N. C. 

Mqurane, J. Harley Durham, N. C. 

Rogers, Pauleete Burlington, N. C. 

Smith, Dan Walter High Point, N. C. 

Street, Mrs. Alan B Charlottesville, Va. 

White, Mrs. Henry A. . . High Point, N. C. 

Williams, Miss Mabel Greensboro, N. C. 

Whitaker, Mrs. C. L High Point, N. C. 

Yarborough, N. P Hendersonville, N. C. 

Young, Miss Mary Henderson, N. C. 

Seniors 

Balch, Mabel . . Leakesville, N. C. 

Tlackwelder, Ethel Concord, N. C. 

Coble, H. E Burlington, N. C. 

FrAzier, May High Point, N. C. 

Harrell, Cleo East Bend, N. C. 

Hughes, Jewel Randleman, N. C. 

Isley, Callie Burlington, N. C. 

Johnson, Pomona Gibsonville, N. C. 

Loy, O. C Burlington, N. C. 

Loy, W. M Burlington, N. C. 

Perry, Margaret Thomasville, N. C. 

Whitaker, Emma Lewis Tobaccovilk, N. C. 

Williams, Eugenia Burlington, N. C. 

Juniors 

Andrew, G. W Marion, Ind. 

Bethune, Roy Alma, Ga. 

Bingham, Ptylla Fal'.stown, N. C. 

Braxton, Lillie Mae Snow Camp, N. C. 

Brooks, Charles High Point, N. C. 

Buckner, Lillian Liberty, N. C. 

Burns, Jocelyn High Point, N. C. 

Caffey, Minnie High Point, N. C. 

Carroll, J. Elwood Reidville, N. C. 

Coble, Lois '. Graham, N. C. 

Cutchin, Spencer Whitakers, N. C. 

Dixon, Vista Greensboro, N. C 



Page one hundred twenty-four 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



' lliiiurr 



Juniors (Continued) 

Ellington, James High Point, N. C. 

Hayes, Helen Henderson, N. C. 

Hauser, Fred Pilot Mountain, N. C. 

Edwin, Hedrick High Point, N. C. 

Hendricks, Aileen High Point, N. C. 

Hill, R. L High Point, N. C. 

Holmes, J. W. ..... Graham, N. C. 

Isley, Ruby Graham, N. C. 

Jarrell, Annie Lee High Point, N. C. 

Johnson, Canary Seagrove, N. C. 

Keck, Effie Snow Camp, N. C. 

Kress, Lewis Charles Thomasville, N. C. 

Kress, Jacob Himi Thomasville, N. C. 

Lambeth, Alma Trinity, N. C. 

Lemons, Raymond Stokesdale, N. C. 

Livengood, Annie Greensboro, N. C. 

Madison, Glenn Olin, N. C. 

Morrison, Lucille High Point, N. C. 

Parrish, Max High Point, N. C. 

Paschall, Percy Ridgeway, N. C. 

Pearson, Dora Franklin, Va. 

Pickens, Virginia High Point, N. C. 

Ragan, William High Point, N. C. 

Redwine, Bessie Lexington, N. C. 

Robinowitz, Jacob High Point, N. C. 

Rogers, James Burlington, N. C. 

Rule, Gertrude Jamestown, N. C. 

Sides, CD '. Concord, N. C. 

Snipes, Margaret High Point, N. C. 

Snipes, May Hillsboro, N. C. 

Suits, Erma Mebane, N. C. 

Thompson, Laura Greensboro, N. C. 

Vance, Ralph High Point, N\ C. 

Wagoner, Lelia Brown Summit, N. C. 

Sophomores 

Adams, Louise Climax, N. C. 

Allen, Alta Mebane, N. C. 

Amick, Juanita Burlington, N. C. 

Angel, Grover Mars Hill, N. C. 

Antonakos, Toney High Point, N. C. 

Antonakos, Theodore High Point, N. C. 

Barker, Helen High Point, N. C. 

Baynes, Lacy Wentworth, N. C. 

Beck, Winfred High Point, N. C. 

Bowen, Sumter Hi S h Point > N - C ' 

Brasseur, Paul Morgantown, W. Va. 

Butler, Mabel Reidsville, N. C. 

Byrum, Mary High Point, N. C. 

Braxton, Jabus '. • Snow Camp, N. C. 



Page one hundred twenty-five 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Sophomores (Continued) 

Garrett, Vista High Point, N. C 

Cates, Nady High Point, N. C. 

Clark, Elda High Point, N. C. 

Davis, Lillie Mae Clemmons, N. C. 

Davis, Maggie High Point, N. C. 

Dixon, Raymond Goldsboro, N. C. 

Douglas, Claire High Point, N. C. 

Garrett, Floyd Julian, N. C. 

Gurley, Margaret High Point, N. C. 

Hammer, Mary High Point, N. C. 

Harrison, Keith High Point, N. C. 

Hassell, Beulah Archdale, N. C. 

Hearne, Dwight Grayson, La. 

Hedgecock, Vera High Point, N. C. 

Hicks, Pauline High Point, N. C. 

Hines, Wilbert High Point, N. C. 

Holmes, Louise Creswell, N. C. 

Horney, Norine High Point, N. C. 

Hoskins, Dorothy High Point, N. C. 

Hunt, Adam Casar, N. C. 

Hunter, William Greensboro, N. C. 

Jarrell, Ruth High Point, N. C. 

Lee, Clarence Grayson, La. 

Lewis, William High Point, N. C. 

Little, Floyd Stanfield, N. C. 

Nicholson, Elizabeth Mebane, N. C. 

Perry, John Thomasville, N. C. 

Rathbone, Dallas Lake Junaluska, N. C. 

Reynolds, Inez High Point, N. C. 

Reynolds, Irene High Point, N. C. 

Ring, Graydon High Point, N. C. 

Seward, Horace High Point, N. C. 

Strader, Inez High Point, N. C. 

Thompson, Swannie . Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Wagner, Leona High Point, N. C. 

Wall, Ernest Walkertown, N. C. 

Walker, Albert Stokesdale, N. C. 

Welborn, Marjorie High Point, N. C. 

Whitaker, Pauline Julian, N. C. 

Worley, William Fairmont, W.. Va. 

Yokely, Bruce Lexington, N. C. 

Freshmen 

Antonakos, Kaliopia High Point, N. C. 

Andrews, Rosalie High Point, N. C. 

Asbury, James High Point, N. C. 

Amick, Hilda Burlington, N. C. 

Barnette, Grace Mebane, N. C. 

Blair, Jessie Thomasville, N. C. 



Page one hundred twenty-six 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Freshmen (Continued) 

Blosser, Ernest Morgantown, W. Va. 

Bloom, Bettie High Point, N. C. 

Byrum, Frances High Point, N. C. 

ClodfeLter, Clarence Thomasville, N. C. 

Clodfelter, Lena Thomasville, N. C. 

Carroll, Bain Morgantown, W. Va. 

Cridlebaugh, Pierce High Point, N, C. 

Daughtry, James Charlotte, N. C 

Dennis, Carl Statesville, N. C. 

Dosier, John .... * Randleman, N. C. 

Elkins, Pauline Liberty, N. C. 

Ellison, Loraine High Point, N. C. 

Ellis, Eva Henderson, N. C. 

Feezor, Noel Linwood, N. C. 

Fogleman, Eula Guilford College, N. C. 

Fritz, Willie Lexington, N. C. 

Fuquay, Wade Siler City, N. C. 

Furr, Fred Harrisburg, N. C. 

Greenwell, William Morganfield, Ky. 

Hackman, Kenton Decatur, 111. 

Hanner, Elizabeth Julian, N. C. 

Harrell, Blanco East Bend, N. C. 

Hundley, George Thomasville, N. C. 

Hunter, Pauline Tobaccoville, N. C. 

Keck, Grace Snow Camp, N. C. 

Keck, Violet Snow Camp, N. C. 

Kelly, Maurice Minersville, Pa. 

Lambeth, Lena Trinity, N. C. 

Lambe, Dorothy Randleman, N. C. 

Lomax, Eliza High Point, N. C. 

Love, Fred Concord, N. C. 

Madison, Blaine Olin, N. C. 

Madison, Graham Jennings, N. C. 

Martin, Jacob Minersville, Pa. 

Matthews, Olin High Point, N. C. 

McArthur, Ava Staley, N. C. 

McFadden, Louis Decatur, 111. 

McMannis, Richard Frostburg, Md. 

McNeill, Ottie High Point, N. C. 

McPhaul, Thelma Shannon, N. C. 

Medlin, Luther ■ High Point, N. C. 

Mitchell, Frank High Point, N. C. 

Moore, Estelle High Point, N. C. 

Morris, Nellie Fallstown, N. C. 

Mulligan, Ralph Uniontown, Pa. 

Myers, Edith Thomasville, N. C. 

Nicholson, Edna Mebane, N. C. 

Nunery, Lucy Whitakers, N. C. 

Osborne, Ruth Hi g h Point . N - c - 



Page one hundred tiventy-seven 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Freshmen (Continued) 

Osborn, Alta Mae High Point, N. C. 

Pegg, Fred Guilford College, N. C. 

Perry, Glenn Thomasville, N. C. 

Perdue, R. R Roanoke, Va. 

Pritchard, Esther High Point, N. C. 

Pierce, Lloyd High Point, N. C. 

Proctor, Dewey High Point, N. C. 

Robertson, Vernon Jennings N. C. 

Robbins, Charles High Point, N. C. 

Stamey, Mamie Frances High Point, N. C. 

Shackleford, Willard Gosneyville, Ky. 

Stuart, Nettie Liberty, N. C. 

Suits, Ezora Mebane, N. C. 

*Talbert, Willie Advance, N. C. 

Tate, Charles High Point, N. C. 

Thompson, Hobart Decatur, 111. 

Trogden, Inez Stokesdale, N. C. 

Walthen, Cecil Morganfield, Ky. 

White, Edwin Belvidere, N. C. 

Williard, Coy High Pointi N c 

Williams, Maie Lawndale, N. C. 

Wood, John High Point> N c 

Wood, Leona Millboro, N. C. 

Wood, Willie .- Hollister, N. C. 

Yokely, Elizabeth Lexington, N. C. 

York, James . 0Iinj N- c _ 

York, Mamie . Archdale, N. C. 

Yow, Virwl Gibsonville, N. C. 

Young, Harvey Stokesdale, N. C. 

Special Students 

Andrews, Alma High Pointj N _ c 

Andrews, Mrs. R. M High Point, N. C. 

Combs, Herbert H£gh Poiat> N Q 

Ford, Mrs. F.H High Point, N C. 

Hallock, Raymond East-Port L. I. N Y. 

Hudson, Hibernia H ; gh Poir ^ N c 

Hudson, LaVerne HIgh Poi N c; 

McCallum, Mrs. L High Poi N c 

Method, Leo Du!uth 

Ott, H. F „ ' , ^ 

Rowan, H. F *™ ' p* 

s, SK> j. t w - ; p onaco ; T "' 

„ ' J ., A High Pomt, NT. C. 

Siceloff, Mary Alice „. , „ . _ ', „ 

„ ' High Point, N. C. 

Smith, Vera . „. , „ . XT „ 

„ „ High Point, N. C. 

Stevens, Elizabeth „. , n . ' ., „ 

v ' High Point, N. C. 

Younts, Kathleen tr- , „ . „, „ 

. High Point, N. C. 

•Deceased 



Page one hundred twenty-eight 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 








Page one hundred twenty-nine 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



INTERIOR DECORATION 



A New Service in This Section 



FURNITURE— RUGS—DRAPERIES 
ART OBJECTS 

ESTIMATES 



H. C BARTHMAIER CO. 

High Point, N. C. 



"jFke Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




RANDALL'S PHARMACY 

Only the Best — Plus 
SERVICE 

"Never Waste a Good Thirst On a Poor Drink" 

Phone 381 

RANDALL/ S PHARMACY 



QUALITY SERVICE 

Britt Electric Co. 

Electrical Contractors 

Lighting Fixtures and 
Appliances 

124 South Main Street 

Telephone 2830 



"The Plant That Service Built" 




Dry Cleaning — Tailoring 
Dyeing 

1009 E. Green St. Phone 2980 

Glover System — Ramsey Method Dry Cleaning 



SMITH 8 MOORE 

Clean and Up-to-Date 
Tonsorial Parlor 

Five Polite and Attentive 
Barbers 

Hot and Oold Tub and 
Shower Baths 



THE HOOD SYSTEM 

INDUSTRIAL 

BANK 



5#> Paid On Savings 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



BEESON 
HDW. CO. 

Nappon China, Rogers Silver- 
ware and Electric Goods 
Also Sporting Goods 



No Better Business Partner 
Than a Good Bank Aid- 
ing in Your Success 

WACHOVIA BANK 
8 TRUST CO. 

High Point, N. C. 
Capital and Surplus $5,000,000 



Students Kept Spick and Span 

BY 

HIGH POINT STEAM LAUNDRY 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing 
Phone 325 



MINIATURES 



COPYING 



EDWARD'S STUDIO 

"Artistic Potttaitute" 



t 



Over Jacob's Boot Shop 



PHONE 2954 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Run Right to 

RING'S 

The Rexall Store 



Just a Good Place to Eat 



Regular Breakfast, Dinner 
and Supper 

DE LUXE CAFE 

John E. Chalios, Prop. 




THE HUB 

Snappy Men's Wear 

120 N. Main St. 
Phone 9220 



BARBER-HALL 
PRINTING CO. 

High Point, N. C. 

Printers and Designers 

Catalogs — Annuals — Booklets 

Commercial Printing and 
Engraving 

PHONE 2385 "Better Printing Pays" 



Build for yourself a strong box, 

Fashion each part with care. ' 
Fit it with hasp and padlock 

And put all your troubles there; 
Hide therein all your failures 

And each bitter sip you quaff, 
Lock all your heartaches within it, 

Then sit on the lid and laugh. 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Vanstoty Clothes Fot 
The College Man! 

The extra value found 
in Vanstory clothes has 
an instant appeal to col- 
lege men of all classes. 
Whether you would buy 
the very highest priced 
or the lowest priced gar- 
ments you'll get a full 
measure of value for 
every dollar you pay. 




' C,M.McK«ic»i,Pi.ii. IM«» 

Jefferson Standard E!tg. 



SODAS 



CANDIES 



Cecil's Drug Store 

Norris and Block's 
Candies 



CIGARS 



LUNCHES 



Ethel : "Let's go to the library." 
Pomona: "Sorry, I gotta study." 



YOUNG MAN: 

Next to an Education Your Best Investment 
Is High Point's Future 

Put a Few Dollars Away in Real Estate and 
Watch It Grow in Value 

ffl 

STEPHEN C CLARK 

REALTOR 



Tke Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

A GOOD PLACE FOR BOTH 
SON AND DAUGHTER 




For Particulars Apply to 

The President 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

High Point, N. C. 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Moffitt Printing 
Company 

COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 

206 E. Washington St. 
Phone 2252 



N. R RUSSELL 

Shoe Repair Shop 
108 S. Main St. 

Phone 2616 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 



Homer Warm Air Furnaces 

and 

Electrical Appliances 

Clinard Electric 
Company 



When You Get it at 



Matton's Drug Co. 



IT'S GOOD 



"AN EATING PLACE OF 
EXCELLENCE" 

George Washington 
Cafe 

104 North Main St. 



ORIGINATORS 




5% Savings 



Comment on Student's Paper:" "Please write a little more legibly. ' 
Student: "Professor, what is this you wrote on the back of my paper?" 



* * • 



Miss Idol: "Have you seen Oliver Twist?" 

Callie Isley: "Of course not; I never attend modern dances." 



The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 




Imagine: 

Cleo Harrell doing the Charleston. 
Helen Hayes not laughing. 
Lillian Buckner looking wise. 

Vista Dixon staying in her room when supposed to. 
Willie Fritz not studying. 

Professor Yarborough saying a different blessing. 
Professor Mourane giving lifts. 
Red Perry being serious. 
Gene Williams being caught up with. 
Bill Ragan getting to class on time. 
Jewel Hughes without her shadow — Louise Holmes. 
Pomona Johnson without a diamond. 
Pauline Elkins studying. 
Bill Shackelford with black hair. 
Jessie Blair winning the fifty-yard dash. 
Lena Clodfelter without chewing-gum. 
Boob Hauser dancing. 
Charlie Robbins in love. 
Bill Hunter with little feet. 

Dr. Andrews and Professor Yarborough playing leap- 
frog. 
Francis Rowan speaking to everybody. 
Snyder riding a bicycle. 
Angel playing football. 
A square meal. 

We Wonder What Would Happen If : 

Dr. Andrews decided we were working too hard and 

declared a holiday. 
Professor Johnson should have the sore throat. 
The Junior Class failed to meet after chapel. 
Charlie Brooks couldn't yell. 
Seniors didn't have to write theses. 
Everybody got to chapel on time. 
A visitor came to chapel and didn't declare he was 

glad to be there. 
Snyder and Martin should stop collaborating. 




The Nineteen Twenty-seven Zenith 



Blue Label Fruit and 
Vegetable Market 

Fresh Potato Chips Daily 
We Deliver 



North Wrenn 



Phone 2566 



FRAZIER PIANO 
CORPORATION 

Oldest House 

Sells Best Pianos 

High Point and Greensboro, N. C. 



Miss Young: "Where was the Declaration of Independence signed?" 
Claire Douglas: "At the bottom, of course." 

* * * 

Miss Mclntyre: "Why don't you pause there? Can't' you see it's 
marked 'rest'?" 

Elizabeth Nicholson: "Yes'm, but I'm not tired today." 



COMMERCIAL 
NATIONAL BANK 

Capital, $1,000,000.00 

Surplus and Profits, 
$1,000,000.00 



Kester Furniture 
Company 

Phone 2788 
136 S. Main Sr 

"A Good Store in a Good 
Town" 



Sporting Goods and 

Everything in 

Hardware 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

High Point Hardware 

127 S. Main Phone 2340 



CLOTHES THAT 
SATISFY 

R R SILVER CO. 



>>'513 



msk 



7 ^» 



£emnnual$n 
ravers 



b 



OUR 
SUPREMACY 

m THE SOUTHEJRN 
YEAR-BOOK FIELD 
IS THE RESULT OF 
PERSONAL SERVICE 

THE CAPITOL 

ENQRAV1NQ 

COMPANY 

Has had mora than twenty s)ear< of 
successful experience in Year-Book 
Designing and Engraving. The;? 
are recognised as (ha leaders in the 
creation and production of the better 
class of annual?. Their experience,, 
equipment, corps of artists, designers 
and engravers are entirely at 
your disposal 



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Capitol Enqravinq Co. 

[30.JM.!J4.!1S FOURTH AVENUE. NORTH 

NASHVILLE 
TENN, 



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THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 




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\iW* LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 

PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 

HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 



ensonI 

PRINTING CO.; 

NASHVILLE. 
t^jENN. 

COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 







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