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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1928, High Point College"

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WRBNN MBMOKAL I0RA2Y 
HIGH VOINT OOtLBGB 




Property of the Likaty 
ffidb Point foikte 




This, tke second Volume of the 
ZENITH, is an endeavor to por- 
tray life at High Point College 
as it really is. Realizing the re- 
sponsibility -which is ours, v?e 
haVe tried to embody in this Vol- 
ume an idea of the College, its 
faculty, classes and extra curric- 
ula activities. If this book suc- 
ceeds in picturing High Point 
College and its life as you see 
it, and serves to keep thoughts 
of your associations there fresh 
in your memory, it Will haVe 
achieved its purpose. 

The Staff. 



DEDICATION 






Dr. R. M. Andrews 

forked for this college vtfhen it 
v?as only a Visionary institution. 
His interest in it, and his labors 
for it, showed that he had a great 
concern for the Welfare of the 
young people of today. His sincere 
endeavors and his ability led the 
directors of the College to make 
him its first president. In this 
capacity he has, for four years, 
faithfully guided and directed its 
progress. To him, the first Presi- 
dent of High Point College, vJe 
dedicate this Volume of 

THE ZENITH. 



& 



College Song 

words and music by 
Dorothy Hoskins and Margaret Gurley 

In our hearts we'll hold the mem'ry 
Of a place we love the best; 
O'er it waves a purple banner, 
Emblem of its fearlessness. 

CHORUS 
We praise thy name and thy honor true, 
They stand for loyalty and love; 
May yours be fame, that to you is due, 
For you we'll always fight. 
We want the right 
To uphold thy standards high; 
To give the best we have to thee, 
Mem'ries of you we will cherish, H. P. C. 

When we're on the field of battle, 
When we strive for praise to thee; 
May our teams be undefeated, 
Ours the crown of victory. 

CHORUS 




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Book One 



The College 



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IB 31 B S 8 H 3 B S & 18 



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THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Faculty 



R. M. Andrews, D.D. 

President 



J. Hobart Allrei>, A.B., A.M. 

Profrssor of Romance Language) 



J. P. Boylin, A.B., LL.B. 

.7 ssoeiate Professor in Mathematics and 
.1 ltd i- tit Director 



Jj-:rry D. Hardy, A.B., S.T.B. 

Professor of Biology ami Geology 



Clifford Reginald Hinshaw, 
A.H., A.M. 

Professor of /: <tn tat ion 



Miss E. Vera Idol, A.B., B.S., A.M. 
Professor of English 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Faculty 



Talmage C. Johnson, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Philosophy and Journalism 



Paul S. Kennett, A.B., B.D. 
Professor of Social Science 



Percy E. Lindley, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Religious Education 
Dean of the College 



Walter F. McCanless, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 



Mrs. Chas. \V. Moseley 

I iis tr hi tor, Department of Art 



\. Harley Mourane, B.S., M.S. 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics 



Faculty 



Mrs. Alan T. Street, B.S. 

Professor of II nine limn urn its 



Miss Mary Todd, A.A., A.B. 

Professor of Expression /nut Physinii lidu- 



Mrs. Henry A. White, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Greek 



Miss Mabel Williams, A.B. 

Professor of Lalin 



Stanley Pugh, A.B. 

Se/ioo! of Commerce 



Pauleete Rogers 
Bursar 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Faculty 







Nathaniel P. Yar borough, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Romance Language 



Miss Mary E. Young, A.R. 

Dran of Women and Instructor in History 



Miss Novella M<jI\tire 

'/', ,i, In r i,l Piano 



Professor Dan Smith 

Voice anil Theoretical Subjects 



Miss Dorothy St. Claire 

Teacher of Violin 



Mrs. C. L. Whitaker 

Uieiii inn 



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Book Two 



The Classes 



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THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY -EIGHT 




Senior Class 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Yellow Rose 

Motto: "Non serviri sed servire." 

Lucile Garnett Hinshaw, Mascot 

Officers 

J. Elwood Carroll President 

Effie Keck Vice-President 

Dora Pearson Secretary 

C. D. Sides Treasurer 

Miss Mabel Williams, Class Adviser 















Senior Class 



LUCILE Garxftt HlNSHAW, Mascot 

liinii POIK I, H, C. 

The most unanimous vote of the {'lass (if *28 would he that Garnett, little 
daughter of Pnif. and Mrs. (". K. (iinshau, is the finest little mascot a class 
could have. 

Winsome and Charming, her golden curls and big blue eyes have charmed 
each member nf the class and it is certain that none of U5 will ever forget the 
lovelj liitle mascot in her '•senior" cap and gown. 



Gforok William Andrew, A.B. 

MARION, Mi. 

Chaplain Tlmtean Literary Society, "; Chaplain Ministerial Association. S; President Minis- 
terial A^s.j. iarn.n. I; ''nn. h cii:i i'-;< n t.iT.i;n> Society, i. President V -VI C I. I; President 
Tim lean i. in-racy Society, J; Inter-Collefflatc nitu.-i. S. t. 

"Here is a man to ii"1»l against the world, a man to match the moontains ami iIil- sea*'* in 
Uit> magnetic personality <a r:,.,.,^.. ajmIi.',* we Find embodied all the characteristics oj i 
(in. Christian gentleman. These qualities, together ^oli the flne character and exceptional 
abilities a. n , a debater, have v,"n tVn ii in i a imsi .-j iii.-inis. ih* i>"Hra. ii ol i hristian lead 
ershJp has bean shown in [he V. M, i 1 .v., literary merit in his literan society, and altruism 
m pastoral work. In scholarship be has no superior, n. -■ . , n . I .- out in the alumni mater as 
on,. ,,[ our best all-round men, 













Thmlefln Literal 1 } 
terlal Asgoclal Ion 



Ptylla E. Bingham, a.B. 

FALL8TOW, N. C. 
uduty, I 2, '■'. I. Christian Endcavoi Society, 1. 8, I, i. 










2, ::. « ; 8el< linn-- B ty, 



Thalenn 8 ■■ 

-\.^-*i.'i,HI«U!, 



S; Christian Endeavor Exl 



I ; i "hftp!ftlti Thalean Society :, Vic 
Assist am .-■■■■ retarj Thalean Society, 



M -- ii 1 1 1- 

'nsi«in, 






Tk ^UIl'HI M I 1 1 i -: r ^ ■ I" i n I 
I, 



"Do what's right, cottij (vlntl may." Ptylln Is :l true Christian gentleman, what more could 
wc Miy? Q ill:,. in. j, dependable— urr* words iii.n uesl describe hltn, He belongs to the 

■ Mil-', n Ell , StUdlOUa I '■ I- I !i-l i ■■>>■>-■ ^ S ■ 3 Intellectual ability Ulul dOtfil IIihiaH^i. TtlOUghV 

fulness tot *it her* if In- ttrsl objective. 

Ptylls is one i»[ tho&i mt k n who has not attempted i-i ■ gain campus popularity! bul has always 
placed Itts studies mi Hi maj In r>«stor of the Inrgetf trhureh in North Carolina, and he 
may have ■ ■ ■■- hum lit* pariah bul wherever hi hs called to servi wc dare say he'll bo n 

RIICC* BR. 



Liixik Mae Braxton, A.B. 



SNOW l.\MP, EC. C. 

Christian EihIi-jivhi 1 s-i<h-i>. i. :■. ::, k * "in 1*1 urn Rjnh-:iv^r Treasurer, I: Christian Endeavor 
Vice ri i ■.- i.i< in. :■; . Christian Endenvoi Extension Club President, t; Artemealan Literary So- 
ciety, i :.' : Chaplain Arti*meslan Litorarj Society, 1 . Alamance County Club, l. 2, ?., i , Pres- 
in.ni Unmance County Club, I: Paracelsus Sclentlfh Society, 2, B; Secretary Paracelsus 

.< r, 3 ; \ik;nii lion Literarj Kn-elcty, 3. i. Vim President Modern I 'i-Lsi-Jllii Club, I; Dramatic 

u ... h Shop, i. 

"To know hi'i i* to love h*nV* t*UHi Mai possesses oi the most oh arm lug personalities 

;i i i> to lie i "Mini in our ■■■<.!-:■ Quiet, res* ■■■J, appreciative, »nd lady- like qualities: are 
domlnanl in liei cbaraen r. < 'omblned wit u Im r rmbli.- ideals Is the very <h?£tra ble ability 
i ,, saj fuel the right t hlng m i he right i lme, whlrh has won fr<r her a coveted place In 
Hit' hear! oi everyone with whom shi comes In contact, Ncvei tun busy ii» share tae other's 
troubles, always read) to lend a helping hand; n true example oi Christian womanhood— 
that's i.i i hi- Mi- 










bemor Class 

Lillian Norvella Buckner, B.M. 









I.lHf-.rtIV, V. C< 



Thets Pit I j Artemealan Lltarars Society, :i. I. Christian Endeavor Society, St I, Dramatic Club, 
3; Wurk Shop* I; Glee Club, i. Vice- President Artemesian Literary Society, 3; Pianist \u.-- 
mesiftti Literary Society. 4: Secretary-Treasurei i:iiTnir4[«ii Count; Club, 3; Vice-President 

Randolph C iv Club, I. President if. p. C, Mush Club, :: Assist on 1 Managej Aeolian ChoJi 

Si Qultford Colh e*< ■ -'- 















A unique, Indefinable quality marks Lillian ah 'Mii-i.niin.ix4 la tru Class ..s 23 m I 

to attract every om Both bo>a and girls, ghe nol only malte« manj rriends but 

friendsh Ips are always lasting. Considering bei sunny dlsposit Ion sympathy th understan 

and Interesting personality, t'rw large, numhoi "i bet friend* i- ennlb '■r-i- I 

"Jimp*"" in [he only B.M. student oi our ctase and Is pianist In tilmosl » -■ > \\ orgnnixatln 

whbh she belongs. A, t though her ehiai Interest rests In mush and art, she has mum ou 

Interests* 

Lovely In character face, and mfrid as thi mus' oi the arts to which >h- has pledged 

allegiance, ir (a small won del thai wo pledge out allegiance to Lillian, in- Incomparable ft 

■«i friends, 



1 1 1 r v 

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her 

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Minnie Irene Caffev, A.B. 






IIK-FI POlST, S\ C. 

Siijma Alpha Phi; Artemestan Literary Society, 1 J, :t. i: Christian ISndeavor, l; Crttb 
Arteineslan Society, I; Work Shop, I: Hiking Club, i: Ragsers, i. Guilford County Club, 
2 h s, j , Class Poet, I ; lntor--SoeIet> Debater, :: ■ rnter-Colleg;1ati Debater, i President i- • ■< n - 

ih * 'og mil, l. 

"Tn strive, to seek, to llnd. and not to yield/' "Mm-" delve* deeply into life, plans tk - 

thai she win follow, and In ;i capable, L»uslncss-irice manner, brings loos* things to pasa which 

she wishes. She does "what man) dream of all their lives," iTou wouh - soon forgel 

-Hi,,- 1 ghi haa the happj combination oi ;i truly brilliant mind ouplcd with a distinctly 
rM ,ii. i,j'j;ii ittTxttniiltiy "(' suvh it tttrt •■ \h,\t jt makes ffcseh fell In bjij group. When a* wanl 
a person who will understand, we go to"MIc. "' She will sympathize with our moods, i" thej 
gray or serious. When we WiirH mlvlo?, we call nn "Ml' " When we want ir. get pepped up 
and are in search oi a good time, we drop by "Mkv room, ru you wonder that we all lova 
"Mic"? 










Jami-.s Klwooi) Carroll, A.B 






lola Tail K 
3, i. Eland 
3, i; presid 
Thalean L>H 
elation, i. i 
Monitor, L'. 
A ■ Forensic 
[■Ji ■! 



ft£lBSVtt.LB 

Appft; President Class I; Lnter-i 

:'. 3, I; President Eta 

■■lit Thaleari Literary Society, 2j Ti« 



\. C. 



...Iriihir, j i<*bate Team, 2, 3, i ; Football Team, 

,. -I l President Band, I; Secretary Band 3; Thali an Literary Society, l, s, 

■■in Thaleari Literary Society, 2; Treasurer Thalean Literati Society, 3; Reporter 

i i ■■ i \ Sini'-i.v i. Ministerial Association, l. 2, " i; Presldrnl Ministerial Asso- 

■ Secretary Mtnlstertal Association, -i; Paracelsus Sclentffh Socle tj .'. 3. \i Chape] 



. ■ , ■ mi ,i «i ■ vf <•! ■■ jii i ion, ■> 

I; Head MoiHtoi Men's Stud*nl Dover ent 3; S. \\ M. Hi-lt-^nTi- r.. Detroit 

i ' il. :' . Best All-Round Boy Student :;: A. h C, Scholarship, :i. Christian 

mv-.i, l. 2, '■'■. I. Christian Endeuvai Pi'LSident, I, Murium :mi cluli, 'i, ■ 






Carroll's place in il 1\ C. is unique, a debater an athlete, a preacher, he is the mosi vei 
sat It* man on th< campus, H* has been a successful intercollegiate debater for three sue- 
cessivi yearn and la outstanding in his literary soclet) work, He was voted ■ 1 1 e - bc&l alt- 
round student in his Junior yrn ;;ml thi< must v:ii lulI*1-- itiriub>'i- "I ihv senior class. Mi* 
.»i.iiu> la nitto shown by thi raet that h< play* In the college band and is :■ member of prac- 
tlcaily every organisation on the campus, in him we nnd a true Christian friend- Hi* 
sarcasm is sometimes biting but Iilh big heart baa won for him iIh- confidence of everyone. 
Wo ;ii' proud to hav« film sis president "i our class 

Mary Luis Coble, A.B, 

GRAHAM, \, C, 

\rtemcslan Uteran Saelc-t) i . t, '■ I; I "hi ist Ian End en \ or Society, i. _ 3 i . Pai 
Solentifh Society, ■:. 3 H J. Alsniance County Club, 1. ', h , '■•. I; Christf&fl End avor Extension 
Club, 2, S, (; Monitor irtemealan Literary Society, 4 . B tarj ParaccUua Bclentifli S ty, ' 

Here's one who ■* always rhe rful, ^Mmu ami; 

One who looks for i^ml annoni; Hi-- UmL 

She's one who nevei acta cross w >■ •-. 

E > ■ M. i-u test days; 

One whfi races hardships in best stj h — 

With a smile. 

She's one who Is eager to help everyone she can* 

Tn ail th< ways Bho nan. 

She's everybody's friend, and io nil ihc same — 

Lots is her nnmo. 











Thotn Phi; Choral Society 1; rinHti-mi KmH-sivor ^oetety, 1, S t ft, ', Artetneslaii Lltefan 
Society, 1. ~: Secretary ail m>< -inn Literary Eoclety, 3: Christian Endeavor Extension Club, 

':, :>. t. [j»nvn Khh1 I'niLr .■, :;. 1 ,. B cretnrj Down Easl Club, S; Nlkanthan Literary S ■ 

3, -J; l-hnne Economics "; Dramatic Work Shop, i : Crltli bflkantlhan Society, 4; President 1 

Spanish < 'lull, I. 

Our Spender's si «ri brown eyes fusl see the dreams ol delicate sound and Imagery thui 
Spencer, the poet, fashioned loag sttfo. She has caught, withal, a vision of irue womanlim - 
that wnnHli'i'dil mixture of \'*v< . nvi'fUi.-ss and laughter. Entering school the Hrst y<--ir r>l 
Its existence, she has grown up with and Into the college, tier going will tea «/e a ya wnios 
gap that only time rati nil. yi>t we bravely smile. The att»idnu f tLt nt hw hi!^]i ItK-uLs :i it rj umbl- 
« j4i-ins vu IJ niii \y Im-iiiK honor t-» our A Ima Mat' p in the years to come. 



Mary Vista Dixon 



Corresponding Secretary 

!. S; Student Volunteer 

M--.!. in Prisctlla club 






.IRHKTY, N, L\ 

Yfaata Phi: Artemesian Lit era rj Society, \, 2, 5, -k Nurse, ^. S, I; 
Christian Endeavor Society, 1, 2. 2, I; Guilford Count? ('tub 1. 
Group, 1, -: Treasurer Girls Student Council, i; Exlenaton t 2. 3, 

2. 3: Work Shop I 

The girl with red hair, piercing brown eyes, and a Jolly disposition — yea that's vista, she 
is always full of Tun, kind ■ o everybody o n>i willing in bear the burdens ol all J rlenfls and 
assoeJatea, Her bean is so bis thai Berrfee tor others Is hei aim and her joy. The dark aldt- of 
life she never Bees* Those who know her can not fall to appreciate thn excellent quail tie J 
so bountifully bestowed, upon her* In all her works she Is good, but best in Rome Economics, 










Floyd Richard Garrett, A.B. 



II LXAN, M. C, 

Thalcan literary Society L h . S. 4; Thnlean Society Berretary 2 Thali m Society Ritportcr, H, 
President Band, :i. Assistant Business Manager "Hi Pov* 1 3; Seeretarj &ten's Student Govern- 
ment, S; Kilil^r-in-« Jhtel "HI Po," i . I christian ETute&vm I 'horietor, ) ; Bf.TUl Libra r I m |j 

I m. ■'- \ . J. 

in Garrett we have fi i ;« student nnd thinker of unusual Ability. Such Is evld&"ced by 

hla raeord and leadership as >►! the outstanding members ol all his classes Friends 

genial, and a man with high Idea Is and principles, we see In him the making ol ;> real clfcl 
zen. in scholarship he la genuine, persistent, and effective: mi the eampun he Is sun-i-i- ■>>•'■ 
practical ; and 3n extra-ourrirular LCtivities he Is always "then especially in the field of 
journalism, literary society activity, and "aerial hour/* \\v pride oursetvea In ciuimfng hi™ 
as an alumnus uf High Point Coileg*, 




























Tb&leau LM-T.in Society, ::. I; ,\imi<i' ; i . -■ i ftssorintfon* :;. I; Christian Eadeavoi Society, 3. 
1 : Voung Ucti's christian \ ---,■■ i . 1 1 1 . - . < . i. 



"None inii himsell can be hia parallel." SwII*- 
combined In the moat unusual personality thn 
came in tifl two years agw from Westminster 
Miw productive Intel led hai been oil on the 



i^onHdmcit, dignity, ability and sincerity tl 

High Point College i««* i -'. > -t known. Baltocic 
Theological Seminary and from the very Ural 
am pus, 3 1 «s jnH-iii hif wa,j ot meeting I) i e pi - 



stmts a uiUqui contrast with thai ol his serious nature; ho constantly overflows with yon km 

mid 1 1 ■ 1 1 ;.;■ 1 1 1 p ■ i ■ , His ii- ■■[> 'Mi:«Ksiy ol religious problems anil his euj naturi htava won foi 

it h eh a lasting memory in the minds ol th* entire class. 



Fred Thomas Hauser, B.S. 

in in MOUNTAIN, N. C, 

Kappa Phi: Vara.ty Poo-tbaM, 1- 3. 5, i. Varslti Basketball. I. Varsity Baseball, 1; Presld>-n1 

Student Senate, S; Praalcleni iv-.Mii dub 3: Paracelsus Scientific S sty, t 2. 3. I; Prfwl 

,1,111 Parn.ee I sua Society, 2; Akrotnlnian Literary Society, 3, >- Viee-Presld"*nl Akrolhlnian 

Society. 8; Secretnn Akrothlnion Society, l ; Christian Etodeavot toHety 1 t, ". I: Work 

Shop, t. Muim^i'iini i'JiiU, £ " 4. \V» >i in I'Luii. :' , Prestdonl Western Ctub, '■'■, 

Physical strength, mental ability and vlrltltj at lb' hlghes) lype, an th< outstanding chai 
aeteri&tics "i 'Boob" Marsei. Mediclm is- ins goal, but in.-- varied honors show li Ea ver- 
satility, He tfl loyal, dependable and lovlaJ iri n crisis, . « 1 1 ■ n -.> rlear thinker. F01 a man with 

Ideals* and with the ability t<j achieve ;iii of them, w>- km>w **t u*» linn, mi tin- ^.l.jji 1 

, lean Panther; m thi * lasa room, a student; ami lit everj position In n in- h be has i" n 
honon d, a ta otite. 



. lea 

hunon <t. :t f.'iviiril 

He has one Eauti bov 



■ver : hi lovi 



•t — and shi 



1 00, We' 1 . liMiLmi R .■> 1 s 1 mi. 1 : ■ 













K 



Senior Class 



Helen Hilliard Haves, A.S. 



HHMDEKSOX, N. C, 



ThRta Phi; Arlk'nn-Kl:in N<i<Tary Society* I, - S. i\ 
Via -President c k. Seirk-ty, i , tii>w u East Club, L, *>, <-. -. r . 
Secretary Down East Club, t, J; Pnrm-eUus Scientific Society, 1. . 

1. 2; Afcslsukiil Editor 'Hi Po," 3; Assistant Editor "Zenith," 3; Dramatic club, 1, 2 t 3 

Council, a, jl inter-Soeiety Debaters Inter-co 



Christian Endeavor Society, l. 2, 3, 4; 

3. i. President Down K&at Club, |; 

Assistant ■"Torch" Editor, 



.MM I ■ ' L I ■ ■ ■ ■ I til t I ', ' -■■- ■ " ' 

Fiin nslr I'ouiu'il, 3; Sern-Uty Km-l .Mb-nl 

legate Debater; president Work Shop, 4 H 

An outstanding nlom-H-r <u HJhIi I'oini ' !ot!effi and the I !la*s "t '38, llil*'n's capable initia- 
tive and application pi are her firmly on the topmost rungs uf our own private bidder of 
iVimr. H--I leadership in to many phases ol college activities clearly demonstrates her all- 
f - 1 u jj i l abilities. High lit en is and ambitious characterise her. She will lea ve a big va an* 
in the whole college curricula for we reel that do one can Quite impart her Interest and 
enthusiasm in studies, athletics, religious activities* dramatics, social life, and college spirit. 
Those "i us who have known her "starward eyes" En these four years, predict rot Helen 
lit* r.'|i runs hi tb-e world's ladder <ii fame* 



Emily Aileen Hendricks, A.B. 






Nikanthnn Society. 4 : fJuilfurd 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 

:ount] Club, i. 2. 3, *; ''liTisitan Endeavor Boci 
celsua Sclenltdc 8™ lety, 4. 






*1 






>ty, 4: Paia- 



Wlieii Aileen raim In i- I >•- -'-" ■!'- >-ri>u(ih1 will le-r im-.i • . i > ■- - ■ i ■> = ■ I . > - nan.- m 

character, modesty and Induatrj These two qualities euupted wiili a sunny smite, have 
gained for 1j f i' n successful college career, many enduring friendships, and an assured advance- 
ment in her chosen work. 

Psychology la Alletn's hobby, and she puts her knowledge "f this subject Intu practical use. 
In her presence we often reel that, in her quiet way, she is "sizing" ns up. With Hit knnvvl- 
'■introapection" and "behavior** thos*. art- fortunate whn get bet good opinion, 

Aileen hasn't told us. hut we uelievi nbe Is going, to be a teacher — happy will be the Bel 

room lii.il she keeps Bui she won't leaeh Sohi;; she loves a home too Well, 






I X!»/ , 










/* 








Senior Cla 



55 



Reed Lawton Hill, A.B. 



Ilir.ll POINT, N. C 






Outstanding in hie college work. In his social contacts and En his m nmaniihc iiuiiiiih*. ami 

towering high with hi* record cs an athlete, "ftionk" is one ■■(" the best-known and best-loved 
members of hla i lass 

Hi- has an enviable record as an athleti — has bee i every varaltj team except on* m in- 

fmir college pear*. Hi* is a letter and star man In basketball* football and baseball* yet h. 
carries his honors with. put affectation or dlsplaj W< predicl roj "Monk** thai his tuiooess 

Jik I ■ r r> will !..■ ;i- .tin -:i( lis hi* si.n-i-sy j I|mi^ ijlihit. - . 




Joseph William Holmes, A.B. 



GRAHAM, M. C, 

Iota Tuu Kappa ; Class presides* i ; prestdenl Student Government, 1 ; Secretary Thalean 
Literary Society, 2: Manager Baseball, I, 2; President Akrothinlan Literary Society, S; CMtfi 
Akrothinlan Literary Horivty. t; J'ji^i-I'tu Mmi's Studr-m Gnvernni'"iit fc 4; Christian Emi- ;i v-h 

Society, I. a, 3. 1; Monogram club. ^ N 3, \, College Marshal S; Mamance Club, 1. 2, 3, 4; 
secretary Dramatic Club. 3: Claw Treasurer, 3; Class Historian 4; Business Manager "Zenith" 1. 

Joe Holmes is an outstanding man who keeps m thi background by choice — his own choice. 
Being one of the most capable men that the Class, ol '28 has ever had, Joe has been honored 
with offices of varii'J responsibility, beginning wftii the class presidency in his freshman year. 
To the public, Joe is a ijulet, dignified., capable, ambitious young man ol sound character, with 
a smili? and a friendly word for everybody, Tn his nm-i Ultimate friends he la al] of thai 
and a lot men*, but even they do not know him entirely* for there i* an Invisible barrier of 
reserve behind which Joe seems to take a final refuge — a place wherein he is free t>* meditate 
1*11 [In- I'alhiHi-s of fiunniTitt> iu q w\u*lu. 







Senior Class 



Rj BY KATHRYN [SLEY 

GRAHAM, K. t h . 

Artemesian Literary Sociel * , 1 -.-'•, ( ; ' In jsi Inn Kndi-n\ • r Sm.-ii-i j , I. '.', :'., -t; ,\\-.i mi m ■ 
Counts Club, i, -. 8, t. Paracelsus Scientific Society. 2, 2. 4: Christian Endeavor Extension 
Group 1, '■', t; Dramatic Ouh. 2, 3; Treasure) i trams t l«- Workshop, -J: Secretary Class, ». 
Seci etary Paracelsus gctentiFU' Society 8; Christian iSndeavoi Extension * 'lui«. ;; , Modern Prts- 
rllla Club, i: Reporter Alamanvi County Club i 

Whether &kiea are dark or sunny. Ruby Is nlwajrs r beam of tight, and at the slightest provo- 
cation shfi bursts Into e^nuim- laughter She has the wonderful ability <>i disposing «»i her 
troubles hi such a waj as nevei to burden her friends. She completes in :i commendable 
way, all thai she undertakes whether easy or difficult, Her optimism compensates t<ir her 
lack "i st a tor**- Her ambition and nbitlly In Hnim- Econ&mh n foretell for he r t hi< greatest 

■■ The in r thai maj be said of any on* may bs said nf Ruby. She possesses a trui* 

■ "hrisi Ian character. 



Annie Lee Jarrelu A.B. 



HIGH prilN'l, N. C. 

Alpha Thets Pal: Vice-President "lass, S; Member Artemestan Literary Society, l, 2; Treas- 
urer Arternealan Literary Society, 1; Guilford County Olub, %, %, I; jtfemhei Ntkanthan Lit- 
erary Society, :t. I: Chaplain Ntkanthan Society, 3; Member Modern PrtsclUa <*lub $, a, 
tnter-Society Debater, 8; Preaidenl Day Student Government, t; Workshop, i. 

\v, usual!) look t«« different people for each <*t thi qualities ^i Intel toot, beauty attraetivc- 
ness, and sportsmanship, luil f here is a girl w! >m bines all "i' i bese Into a wonderful per- 
sonality -An Lee Those who know her arc won completely by her winsomen«ss and abil- 
ity In every line. She overcomes all ©UstaH> j s in lit r nwn sweet way and posscssvs such <!■■- 
sirabie traits that she Is the very epitome of girlhood, We know thai Annie Leo's remark- 
able personality Including firm will, broad Intellect, and keen sensibility will enable her to 
give and to receive the best in lit v. We wish thai only, for there i* n^UiinK mora to wish, 











. 3, l. Membai 
Monitor Nikan- 



RlTH jARRIiLL, A.B. 

Illl.fl POINT, N\ C. 

Alpha Theta pal; Vice-President Clasa, i. Member Guilford County Club, 1 f 
Arternesistn Literary Society, 1; Member Nikanthnn Literary Society, 3 i; 
than gnHety, i; Warn Shop, II "Hi -PI" Reporter. I 

The Kmis were g I to ufl whex t^.-> allowed Ruth to iuiu our ran Us ami shnn- i\w< |i*ys and 

trials uf oar straggle toward the cove-ted a.k. @he has g&Entd this goal in only three years 
and Is the youngest ini-mbci Hi tin rhiss Imiioiu- h'i ilin ■■ vi-:li-s wilh us she has demon* 
ai rated a grand combination of unumud ability, loyalty and friendship, Ruth is an Inter- 
esting type, in]] of rare wit which might at first be Interpreted as sarcasm. Charm, Indlvtdu* 
s Usm a adt efficiency are characterise lea of hers, fiiu h, we're betting on you, and! we r.. now 
that sometime, somewhere, "far from the madding crowd/' we shall hoar great things ol you 



Canary Belle Johnson, A.B. 









SF.ARROVE, M* C. 

Artemealan Literary Society, l, ^". S, -i ; Christian Endeavor Society, 1. .. 3. l. Choral Society 
L 2; Randolph County Club, 2. 3, -J; president Handidnji County Club 2 3; Treasurer Arte, 
cneslan Literary Society '■' , Aeolian Choir, 3; Society Editor '*Hl-Po," lj Rassera «"luk *, 

Ever since Doe arrived in oar midst her friendly disposition runl sp*rli at comradeship have 
i- n dominant factors In creating our regard for her. Nevet gloaming about with a Ions 
face, she Imparts her ch'eerfuiness with a lavish hand, and thus endears herself to all. She 

j« intere^hd in b< i yrbooi uork. ami JcSentlouslj Industrious iii her application to her 

u.iokH. y. 1 she always finds time to scout about with her friends, and enthusiastically enjoy 
whatever turns un — be it a hike to tnwn or one of her numerous honor dates. Serious and 
lovable in her dally contacts and thoughts. Canary is a fc'irl on whom one can always depend. 




Kffir Taxi- Kkck, A.B 



SNOW CAMP, N. C. 

gig Alpha Phi; Christian Endeavor Society, 1, J J, 3, J; President Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety 2; a 1 1 emealan Literary Society, t , 2; Monitor A rtemesian I -■ r ■«-■ ary Society, - : Christian 
Endeavor Extension Club. ;t. i: Aiamanee County Club i J, 3, t, Secretary Alamance County 
club, -: Vice President Alamance ( '■iiinty Club, I; Paracelsus Scientific Society, 2, 3, 4; Rp- 
porter Pa racelsus Boi letj . ' , Nl leant ban tdterara Societ * . ;■ I; < rifts' Si udeot j 'ounclt, t t 8, 
3, 4; Vice-President Student Council ^: Vice-President Class, I; Critic fctodsni rrlsHtla 
CJub, i; Dramath Work Shop: Forensic Council, i. 

a lovct oi run, ret wrtaua whe -i b« that's Erne! We all know Erne to !"■ tin- Rnesl 

tyj an all-round girt, Sim- Is r conscientious worker, :i good sport, and has shown remark- 

able ability as ;i lender. Everyone knows.- her rb b friend Though her Interests range from 

Home Ec mirs to Dramatics, she la r.hlett) Interested In religious wnrk. In whbh wc are 

sun shi will nrovi ;t strong assei roi good In life'a gt*ea1 game, Here's tn you, Kile . maj voui 
In. be filled wilh happiness, as pu ronttnuc m "Puiitm ( h< uu-am." 



JACX)B HIM] KRESS, A.B. 

tirosi.-vsvu ii, \, c. 

Business Manager "Torch,*" 2i Assistant Business Manager "Torch," I College Marshal, " : 

Thalean Uterarj Society, ■'•. i: Pre-Med Club, ;: i; Farnn-lsu* SncniinV ,Sn iefy. rt, l: vh>i> 

President Thalean Uti-rnry H.»biy, i v\ ■ sinn ruin. -2. ".. i. s--. i- r ^ m-batfr. J, 

No onflj who i* r&vored bo bis acqunlntauct loubu that "Jake" wti". occupy a roremoel 
placi In future scientific circles. He assimilates knowledge with remarkable aptitude and Is 
recognised by his classmates for his remarkable scholastic abilities. His knowledge la broad, 
he Is otic oi those fortunate*, who "drink deep of the Pierian spring/' 

Be is modest — he who is not, has nothing to be modest over. He has a very practical mind 
a pleasing personality and many other amiable characteristics* To enumerate thtm would 
bll a great volume. There can be hut tfofc most brilliant future before him! 




Lewis Charles Kress, 



-fv sidcnl Vi- M. nt 



i; The 
Ifcty, 3, 



(KOMASVII.I E, v C 

■;» n Litera i v Society* 3. 
; Western Hull ^'. 3. 4. 



Paracelsus ScEenilftc 




With his MijrniJh' frame ^i mind n is evident rhhi "Biu Kress" will eventually achieve 
i-i i>m uMTin- tn the t i i ■ j 1 1 *ii' work in- und.urta.iccs> SU attable disposition and tenacity oi pur* 

pose have been demonstrated throujjhowl his colleee yean and th 'tit&ndlng quality or 

Imk work in sufficient i »» prove these characteristics. Mi spite of ht« red hair. Lew la is good 
nature d an<] friendly as is shown by his man) rrlcnds and the admiration ol all his classmates, 
"Big Ki.ss" la :l valuable member of i hi- class <>r '-£■ 



Alma Leonard Lambeth, A.B. 

TRINITY, N, C 

\ ik.i ni ban Litcnu*) Society, I; Girls' Day Student Council, I 

"In soul sincere, In Action faithful, in honor clear." Your first Impression of Alms is one of 
timidity and modesty. To see her Is not to koe*j*> her, but only by close friendship can you see 
the real fiirl and appreciate her real qualities. In her quiet and modest wny she h*..s been 
eager in mnkins hft HIV- ,-hi inl ► ■■■si mj-. .i-l vi-jh ui .- mi uihI> rsiiuntmp, She has (won when Other* 
would have glveo up In despair. She believes thai "the true processes through which Iiumnn 
beings make the most of themselves are Aral, Insjiirju inn : si-rumi. affirmation ; third, prep- 
aration." The future lias for all characters like Almo whatever thea desire. 










Senior Class 

W. Raymond Lemons, A.B. 



i IDKESDAt-E, K. C. 



Member Student Govi n 
Football Squad, I. - !. 

|-;,ni«-,lsn> Si M 111 i!ii S..I I. 'I ■. 

li'T Miini^iiim Club 



■i.n 1. 



:;. 



stent, I I; Thalean Literary Sw, 
i Baseball Riuad, I. Vlee-Presldenl Thalenn Society, i, :i. , 

.Mill Society, -. :t, -i ; Memoer Guilford County Club; \]»-m- 

i 'Ur I I Ian I ■: 1 1. ,: 1 , - . , T. -n S... i.-t v. 1. 2, ;L, 1 



I, I'M 



l : 









I, Basketball Squad, 1: 
>sident 



In tin- iiii*' course "f events we always observe t Iiiei i the individual musl eltheT find hlmsell :l 
jil;ir'<- .ir make mi-'. "Dink" Lemons has not only Found hlmsell .1 place i ■ l the hearts o) hu 
ela&smates and Instructors, bu( has shown ins worthiness to ho'tl such ;i place, K *Dlak" has 

1 n an outstanding man throuffhoui In- four years al High r«4nt College, hi the classroom, 

In athletics, and «n extt-ji -.-m-,-,. m.i ...i^ni,: ..r .mi umiis, hi.- -ijn.iny i»i purpose and desire 
u» succeed have brought him ;i great deal ol distinction. We predict unlimited success 101 
htm In whatever he undertakes, 

Annie Elizabeth Livengood, A.B. 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Girls' Student Council 1. J, ;■:, i; Christian Endeavoi Society 1. 8, :;, |; 
Christian Endeavoi Extension Club, _. 5; Arit*me«.lan Literary Society, 1, 3; Guilford Count) 

Club -. '■'. '. President Guilford County Club, S; Paracelsus Sclentifh S iy. 2, 3, I; Vice> 

Pi csidenl Paraci tsua s -i > . I; Leadei Stndenl Volunteer Group, E; N'ikam ban Literary 

Society, :;. I . President Student Volunteer Group, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, :\; Modern Pi is- tlte 

1 ■■iii.. |< Chaplain Nlkanthan Society, 1. Critic Dramatic I'luii, 1 , Critic Christian Endeavor, 

\: Critic Christian EmH*avoi Club. i\ Critic Girts' Student Council, I. 

\ ry laugh a winning griillc, that's Annie H*r cheerful disposition and sincerity can 

not help but win her friends, si ntcm Into both the social and religions life ol th« 

school, and what she undertakes to do, she does with her whole heart and soul. Thou 
takes a heavy "off-campus correspondence course/' sh< is never neglectful ol hex class worft 
and Student Volunteer, in :t rem years from now ;i country aomewb'i •■ i<n iiiis earth is 
Koine, to be much Culler ■"! lov< on account at her influence. We know Annie will com-i out 
mi, top without the best wishes of 'SB— hut here they art. In big numbers. 










1 

























Senior Class 







T. Glenn Madison, A.B. 

oi.ix, \'. £ 

Epciton Ctn Phi TbttJi .n Literal*: Sort • ■■ I. 2, 3, I; Prexldeni Ttialttan Literary So*-lpty, 1: 
Treasurei Thalean Literal*) 1 Society, 2; Secretary Tbak-nn Literary Society, l, President 

Tii.i 1:cti Literary SoHetj '■'• . Dvba g i r h. ::; Thntean Chaulatn, I; Christian Endearo* 

President, -: Ministerial Association Treasurer, S» Secretary ::. v lee- President, i. Paracelaiu 

Scientific Society, Vice-President, I; Western Club Preside m. i. Men'« Student Council, -. I, 

Critic Thalean Litem rj Society, I; A-ssistam Treasure' V. M. i\ a., i. Debating. Team, 3, A. 

To Look at Madison, one would thinft he saw only the serious side of utr, hut he has a Benau 

of huniur excelled by few- He la self-rellaiil En nil his pursuits :iml has won the conftden * 

\mt\i students and faculty. Dora and Religious Bducal were his majors while in college, 

and his life will be h ';i ruriher pursuit nf these subjects." Madison entered mn class with 
the rdea that be had been called to the ministry, and his Christian character, hi* ability and 
sirii-hM il > In the ivurk, I L»rii'lL^ I'm 1 hi in tin- highest *if-v< ■ sjq hi 1 1|.> HjI un-, 



Annie Lucille Morrison, a ,B, 

high point, n, c. 

Alpha Thetfl Pal; Membei A lesion Literary Society, 2; Guilford Co ■■ Club, 3 8, I; 

President CJuilfordl Count)" Club, :: ,. Nlkanthan Lllerarj Society, 3; Marshal, 3; President 
Nlkanthan Literary Society, i; Glrla' Day Snnh-ni t'm'i'-nmi'-iJi. i, sii-in^h i 'tub, i ; Inter- 

S i> Debatt r, (. 

j it Lucille we tun] .i pleasing blend of m hotau ship teariershiji and unassuming r Icaty, Mm 

high seholarahlp earned foi her in her lunior year the nni»c ul moat studious girl ;ir iiiuii 
potnl College. While she is an excellent student she by no means shuts he reel l off from 
other furms of school activity, foi Bhi Is also ;m enthusiastic athletics "fan/' That she la 
iui able leader has been demofurtrated by hei capable piloting ol Uw- Xlkanthan Literary fo- 
clety through its second year ol growth. But with uii her ability, leadership-, and her excel* 
lence in seholarabln, sin* still remains sweet, modest, unspoiled: n raenerous friend 
It is esusy to sea why f VMh«" H is >-n ponprnliy i>npulnr t 




Max Parrish, A.B. 

II mil POINT, V. l. 

Delta Alpha TCpsilon; Akrolhtnian Literary j*«rri.i> . r; i ■ Assistant Advertising Manager 
■'Z**nith "' :'i; Assistant Bushu^* M:irKi^.i "Hi r.-." i- v. .M. C A, Member, I; Guilford Countl 

Club, l. -l. 3, I. 

here's i<i a regular fellow — a hard worker, :l sincere friend, an onthpalaatlc supporter lor 
all thnt Is Htfiu and pood, and above all. a gentleman! These admirable dualities combined 
with an attrat-tlve personality have won I'm &lax the respect and admiration of all those with 
wham li>' has come In contact. "A stsir with tile ladles, and i ehelh on tli>- ballroom Boor" 
that's Max. He's really in his element when he bs dam* Ins, »s can hi- proved by his count- 
less number of friends and acquaintances, n<- has brought a never-to»ne»forgotten personality 
into tite class oi '£8 and ii is with :* feeling «*f Irreparabh loss thai we see him leave. 



Percy Marshall Paschall, A.B. 

KIIKJ WAV, \. C. 



I.. la Tail Kii|.|>:i Akrothinion Literary Society, 3, 4: Down East Cltlh, 2, 3, 4; I'm-: Isu* 

Scientific Society, -. 3, <: Football Squad, i, 3, I; Basketball Squad, 1; Dramatic Club, !, :: : 

I'n-suli-ril Aknilhilli.in l.iii'i.uy Kmiily. I. I'l •■:- l - 1 . ■ r 1 1 hinvn l-jiti club .J; S1ihi.ni G Nl 

im nl Council, 3. 4: Munngram flub, 3, I; Athletic Editor "Zenith," 3: Christian Endeavor, 
i, i, S, 1; Reporter Alcrothtntaa Society, 3: Critic Akmthinian Society, 4. 

Tn find one word that describes Pal is Impossible, ih-v a composite of mmiy — preparedness, 
sportsmanship, individuality, humor, intellect and a host of other terms or the superlative 
type may be uscil unrestrainedly, Pal is a iru,- ,1,-fiiiiiicin i>f a koih1 ""all-round" student. 
High Point College optinrii lit* -hinrs wiih Pat watting in enter. Sim-e than he has made him- 
self an integral part of the activities nl the school. 
The challenge is Huiik out for oni- ■,. nttd a Inter ■!. T. K, brother, n superior Akrothlnt&n, 

,111,1 a better stuili-llt. 






































Dora Ellen Pearson, a.B 



FRANKLIN, VA. 

Nlkurui ;lii Lttirnry society \i. t\ "Treasurer Woman's Rtutienl Gov* mt H 

2: ilirfstiun Endeavor Society I. J. ■'<, 4; Paracelsus s,-i, m ,n, Socle! > , Modern Pi I* Ilia 
Club* s, 4 ; Secretary of * rtirfsttan Endeavoi Extension ' 'lub, ^ r 8; i iut-of-State « Hub, :■ i . 

Down Eftel Ctub. '■''. 

An the peel has said, Dora is "just the quU j t kind whose natures nev*i vary.** Like a wc*« 
brown sparrow «he Mis frum pfactf la place quite nolseh ssl) irxi epi for ».-, a glomu em fttpJ 
of di-ilgiit. Ni' one knowa luat whal in- bach oi Imt sober exteriot but some daj the world 
will know Tn-i realisation ol her dreams musl surely come We can desiri nothing more 
than iht' attainment of her high ideals and ambitions, \\\ who know hei are impressed l>j 
hi i strength ol character, sweet tempeTj and Ken tie nature, it Is thought thai one of Cupid's 
dafntj arrows Is lodged In the bre&ai ol oui Uttli brown sparrow. 



Virginia Britt Pickens, A.B. 



HIGH POINT, N\ C* 

Theta Pnlj Artemestan Literary Borit>t) I - 3, J. Gull i Count) Club, > •. 3, l; rhrtatlafi 

Endeavor Society-, i> 2. Prealdeni Dramatli Club, i; v i. ^-President Art* meslan Utti rarj t$*> 
eiety, 2: Cheering One Hundred, ; '- 

Uflrt#r Virginia's mask >-i uni i n >i '-rn ■■■ l -■ L1 r>-.i l r ■ i ■ ■ 1 1 -i h ln.si ■ h.> i tn wins the hearts • •■» thorn 
around in-r. She ittay be called the "Sphinx" *it i»uv claaa, for 1 1 - ■ fascination and tevdefin&bb 
.hi p] Rjystery Itwpa us gueesiDB what sh* win <i<i n*'xt. She does as ah« pleases and "doesn't 
give a rip*" how others take It, Hut tJn j beaut} of it la ahe usually knows what pleases. Indi- 
viduality is t>xiar*?ssed in everything she does. She h attractive, friendly, capable. a tjaod 
apoii and in short, i*j*« a dear, sweet girl Set future— will ii be ;l* o teacher or as .i 
druggist's assistant? Only time wfJJ till. Here'e luck to you, "Ginger," 




Bessie Redwine. a.B 



LEXINGTOK, \. C. 

SiKnia Alpha Phi; Art t^iim l.nr:irv Society, &, 3, I; President \ i "U -m. ■-.: a n Literary Society 

4; Christian Ehtduavor Society* 1, :s. I; Paracelsus Scientific Society 2. :i. t: Reporter Para* 
colsus Society, _, Pre-Med Society, -. W*stcm Club, i. s, %\ Secretary Girls' Student Council, 
2: Dramatic Club, Z\ He Ad Proctor Girts* Studeai Council, 3; Work Shop, I; Track Team 

3. L Hiking Club, i. 

Bessie is - ol ili>- best alt- round plrla m the campus. Wei popularity Is attested u> by the 

urn ecu slit' holds in Hip v;imi>hk m liutiy/Ait "urns iii tin- i-Lini|)ii>\ iiml by tli>" vast innri'luT ol stu- 
dents who are pleased to call themselves her rriend, Bessie i* active In the Iftcrarj society, 
hrlnjt president >■( one ol thi two girls' soclctk'&; is a stai ol in .:ni-' track Learn; la much 
Interested In the social life t*f the school; and it must be admitted that she makes pusslng 
grades uri :iii her classes. Her mottu seemi to i"-. "My friend, whmi I hnve is ours." 



Jacob Robingwitz, B.S. 



HIGH POINT, K. C. 

Business MftOAger "Torch," i : That* on Literary Society, l, S, *j, *; pre-Med i mu, a t 3, l : 
Pofracelsus Scientific Society, :\ 3, i; Guilford County Club, i, i f , i. 

"iakh-" is a familiar rwtme on the campus of Hlffh Point Coiled Everybody likes Mm, SJa 
ready smile and rriendly manner ai«'«nius hu In* hir.ni nui»il»i oj friendfl HoMffevef, Jakll 
is nn»re iM bom* m the science laboratory than be la In m> class room, Delighting In Hclon- 
tlflc experiments, fen spends mucli nt his time aninng test-tubes and chemicals, Jakfe — a pos- 
sessor ol those rare qualities which enable h,ni to do thoroughly what he pets nut to do. 
This ability combined with o sclentlfli thirsl leads us u- prcdtcl a brilliant and striking 
tut lire for Mini In the fiMd oi" science, 
















James Porter Rogers, B.S 



i, Varsity Pootl 

ei ■ - ■ - 1 : i r y A hiniitl- ' * ' ■ 1 1 1 ' 

»ramatic < Hub, 3; ■ '■ Hi - 



Iota 
Ctui 



ni'MI.IS(MTIS f N. C 



alnn l,ifi:ii'. s -1 v. 8, 1; A tarn a 

lII, 1 2, ::, J, Vai'sltj B laketbalt, J ; 
:: , President Monogram Club, 3; B* 
Hand. S; Class Prophet, I; Athleth 



■ '"lull, 
Presld* 

VI 

Editor 



Eilttoi "Torch," t; "Hf-rV Reporter, 3, 



It A I .-t ITt !i 1 1 * ' ■ 

o PresUh ni 
"Hl-Po " •< 



*'iub I; 
Class, ::, 
; AihhH- 



Bi i 1 1 1 r i p k r intellect, road> writ, pleasing personality, ami energy combined- that's J i mm It*, I! is 
h Kiel charai Icrlstlc is dctetmlnatlon. and when a position demanded n inn tn with shrewd 
busiuesH judgment, Jlmmi* was usually ehosea. Always cool, apparent 'y taking his tim«- 
abouf everything hi Is the kind who knows the rtghl thins to tin at thi righl time. Jimmi- 
will in'! b< forgotten by those! fortunate eimupli "if have known him and ft esq tinted with him. 
Hi h;i.- mad' .i success in the class room, on the gridiron, and wherever else he has happened 
to be, and we predict that i hit* same success will characterise him In whatever ha ma -. do 
after graduation. 

Genevieve Gertrude Rule, A.B. 



Sigma Alpha i h| " Artemeaiai 
i 'hr Isl i in Eadeol m , L m-ii-Ty I 
i , i rhei - Ine. E m- I lundred, a ~. 



JAMESTOWN, X. C + 

Ut y Society, 1. S, 3. I: Guilford Counts Club, I. 2. 3 I 

RAZSjtr Club; Commissioner of Internal Revenue. Razse*" Club, 
Track Tr;im, j r Hiking Cluh, i: Class Statistician, 4, Editor- 
ifi-i'hicr -ZiDith,'' i. 

The **Go!den Halo" is r splendid rule to know, especially when it is golden In Gertrude's 
Inimitable way. From the w\>i >*( her hair, ■ ■ » the i'in»- gold of h»i character, thoughts, 
i. I. uls. anil abillUc*, easily mm why the Class of 'SS has never discarded on. Rule any- 
way, Conscientious and capable In her echolastir work, dependable, in all she undertakes, 

she was wisely chosen editor "i our t »nU nn<i * ia*s st-nriKi ^-Jjsti. ii-i <ini< i rimd''?$ry i* n 

shield for hor sensitive nature ; bor thoughts shield her dreams; her personal rtj expresses 
i.i • r character, A ready wit and kt-in sympathy complete the picture of our own Rale who 
affords us nm ■.]'-■ u 4 vistas of realms of pure gold* 




Cornelius D. Sides, A.B 






1 HM-IIKH, \. C, 



i •- ii;i Uphsi Spallon; Presidem Thah an Literal y £ 1 j i . Presid«n1 Pnrai elsua s. tent Ulc 

Society. 3; Panthers Band, 1'. ii ; w.^nim Hub, 3, I; Report*! Paracelsus Scientific Society, 4; 
Plan I -r ThaJeati Literary Society, I: Kappa Phl 3 a; Class Treasurer, 4; Foot) tall Squad, i H i; 
Secretary Thaloan Literary Society, ">. Dramatic Club, S; Reportei Thalean Literary Society, B, 



N"ieJt is a man who never desired responsibility, but lias had \t entrusted <■■ Jmn ho< aus*' .a uss 
■ nii^. iii.d disposition and dependability ni,< toyalty to th< Thalean Literary Society i* ex- 
uelied only by iii^ work on the Benim Memorial Qate, His motto "Does it Pay," can bo 

riMiiir.j hi pvim'V pliasi' nf in* work. Nick Is a lover of musiCj and his greatest ami m la to 

hi nr .i pipe nrganlal Success 1s h Bverel with Sides, We never know where r.. look for him, 

but t j i « ■ world win soon, learn *■< bis eecrci ambitions, Uways busy, never loafing *\ny or night* 



May Snipes, A.B. 

HILLSBORO, K« C, 

Artempflian LHerar,) Society, I. 2; Nikanlhan Llterarj Soviet} ". I, Treasure) Nik ban 

Literary Society Paracelsus Brian 1 1 lie Society, | a 2, 3, I; Christian fgndeavoi g Pi I 

Perhaps whal has impressed «i> moat I j nboul May m tin years thai she has been witb ua can b< 
^timm>>i! up J - U.II-.A-. I>>] nun-t irJiij; r^rirlinesi i.h lend help to those who are in need, her 

r ) uifh devotion to rh* guitar and banjo, a nd her ever-increasing love for reading. When 

the* traits are mi seed with gentle a lenity and genial good nature, we cannot help but find a 
lovable characti t In Mas - 

She is an everlasting friend to those whom she grows to love, Latin is her tlogun. Many 
good wishes go w II i> h« i 




























Ai though Paul just entered our class rr*r our tost yuoi h* la no stranger »i High Point, n 

n quiet, congenial sort of fellow and has ahowu ua f n* :< 1 i is speak loudei than 'a-.h-^Js, foi 

vfi have found him "pramptIy-fln-th**spot" wl«cu there is nnythiog rnj j,, . j h ■ f , .. uv ere ffiad 
hi came to TwfTUv-ktiiht. Ha is .1 i T-i.ti.i on wh'.sii ■■mi Tuiy d . pe "1-1 . Kls athletic lotfuv** 
, ■ -i 1 1 ,. r s in 1 pai ■ u. iiv puts ii la creed Intn bis d**ed, nor apeaKs with double tongue. We pri 
diet success fin Swuii^Ti in ins h'.fia1 oarCBT, 




Senior Class 

Laura Ellen Thompson, a.B. 



GREENSBORO, V t 



Skm;i Alpha T*hl ■ SecretH ry i lass, I , 3; Bocrel «*rj Gultl ord Counts Club, 1; Chrial Ian En* 

deavoi t. - f M *; Head Pror-tor, . ParAcelsus Scientific Society, 3 : -. v*Ici Pn Idenl Nlkan- 

: h.in Society, '.'- ; Nlkanthan I literary Society, l! Assistant in Home Economics D^jiartrm at, 

4; President Modem Prlsellla Club, J. President Woman's Studenl Government, -k. 

iH A perfect woman nobly planned '* whose- simplicity «s ehar.icterlstk of nob leal woman! d 

whose poise lends charm to her natural abilities, She i.i -.\ Wck-r, n srhohir, unci :« h^ii^r. 
We wondrr IT thr siffbl of '*wood' Is m ."iin'.mi til her natural-born home eaconomfes ability. 
Even fin, «-<> have no fear "i Uurn mt&nrnfl the beat In :til ihni is food and admirable Th< 
tlt j a of ber friendships are as fast as th«' waves of her hair, and thi li^iit of her smile i* 
riv.it kit tty t In? tmn< uf Im-i vnif-r Above all, I .aura la n follower m iln gleam* 



Ralph H. Vance, A.B. 

Iih,ll POINT, K, Ci 

Thalt-nn Literary Society, ' ... ". *; Panthers Band %, ,;, I; Guilford Countj Club i. 3, i; 

T. M. C. A,. I; Kopo, :; Class President, 2: Thalcan Literary Society President. £; Thalean 

Literary Society Secretary, 2; Critic Thalcan LU«rarj Society, .. President Guilford County 

Club il Sep r-T'ii -<. i'niir li-i's Rami, -I. 

Features worthy nf the Greek (mTin-irt;ds. t fri«-iniTy hut nevertheless reserved bearing, and 
a somewhat serious outlook i»n Hfv- are the Urndln.y '-burn- ii i i-u. ■?. ..r thl^ son r»i High Potnl 
A leader, a a t u l I * ■ ?i t . .nnl ivlthnl a first i*I:ls=s I'^li'ife mult his record if 1 ■:■ n enviable one. fc c ■ :— 
honors ami ui-hii'vcm^nts stand out and bespeak his rhararrter and ability. One nf the most 
likable man In college h«* makes friends with whomever In- comes In contact, and is uni- 
versally populate. Because we know iiim iiici because, of IiJj* record, we, recommend Ralph to 
the world rts one destined to succeed, and one who ivili bring honor to High Potnl College, 















Senior Class 

Marv Lelia Wagoner, a.b. 

BROWN SUMMIT* X, C 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Artpmestan I rary Society, 3; Nikanthan Literary Society, 3, i; Christian 

Endeavor Society. 3 3, '. Treasurej Christian Bude&voi B«ri«iy, ::, Trunin- hriscJun Ku- 

(I tavor fitrU \y, i ; Spanish < 'lull, i -, Dramatic Worfc sinj|> h i ■ kiuiU nt VhiIhhh^t iSami. a -, 
Christian Endeavor Extension Club, J* 

"LftttA of stature, big In heart, kind and sweet in disposing! : :ii%v,«.vs tvfuiy to do hiT part/* 
Such are Leila's chnractcHstlus, yet tfts> don't fully describe her Leila is iu*L "different," 
There \6 eomethinfi about her lovable personality that belongs to no one Blue in the world. 
sin is n person who poaaesaea initiative and beautiful eharaei «. She never fails when duty 
calls for her service, and Mn- religious organizations, as wr?Jj as others un the rant pus will 
have an empty place that will be hard to iiil an pIu- tjo*'j* mith in st-rvin- oi homf or In foreign 
Raids, 

Mary Eugenia Woollen, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, X. C. 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Artemeslan Literary S ty, I 2, i; Guilford County Club, I* 2 ( 4; Treas- 
urer Class, I; ChnaiJan i-iinhjiv-u Si.,.'n-iy. y. Win-k sii.i|>, il Paracelsus Scientific Society, -t ■■ 
Glee Crab, l; President Kilting Club, -t : Captain Raisers, -i ; Class Testator, 4, 

Serious "r fanciful as the m i -iiii..>- her. Way la ever thi- reserve, sensitive versatile, cap- 
able, and ii. 11 mint: young dreamer — a dreamer who delves deeply into the mysteries of tiff 
and universal qualities, but who Always presents to the public her serious amito and unvary- 
ing cheerfulness* She is a scholar in the deepest s^na*» of the word — an explorer Into the 
realms of philosophy and truth for Iht personal satisfaction, ITet what more whimsical, 
carefree, lovable companion could one desire,? She Is the Ideal fi-n-mi with whom one loves 
to share the mysteries oi a gray day; swims -.U.hl* tin np,-n road: share with her the glow 
of one's campftrt'. Briefly she is u dependable friend, ol "the stuff mm uf whk-h dreams are 
in a dr." 







The Class of '2S, which contains forty-five members, is the first full-fledged Senior 

Class of High Point College. Most of its members entered the 

College at the time of its opening in 1924.. 



44 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN T W E N T Y - E I G H T 




CI 



ass 



'oem 



i 







Come, see the master builder as he stands 

Before the work he fashioned with his hands! 

With care and pride and loving thought, 

Rare bits of stone and glass he's brought. 

Each piece he took and placed it with much care 

Until an urn he'd made of beauty rare. 

Thus wrought he well until at last he saw 

Mosaic urn without a single flaw. 

There stood the urn the while a whole year flew, 

Until a passerby, whom no one knew, 

With careless hasty hands brushed it aside 

And into different bits 'twas scattered wide. 

Now see the master builder patient stand 

And gather all the pieces with his hand; 

Again with loving thought and skillful art, 

He fashions o'er each tiny different part, 

Until at last we see the urn once more, 

A perfect thing from beauty's varied store. 

A pattern of the first, yet different far, 

As stars are like, yet different from each star. 

The caravan of time again moves on 

Until the second year has come and gone. 

The lovely patterns gleaming on the vase 

Attract and center every person's gaze. 

Then fate, with strong and wilful hands once 

more 
Swept it aside and dashed it to the floor. 
The pieces lying there were changed and made 
To other shapes and forms, and there they 

stayed 
To wait the coming of the master man, 
Who grieved to see this breaking of his plan. 
With loving labor truly fine and strong 
He set to work amid the busy throng — 
Excelled his work of both the years before 
And gave the world a knowledge of his lore, 
By showing all who saw, how this new urn 
From broken far-flung bits anew could burn 
With beauty's flame, like as the leaping fire 
From ashes springs and flames up high and 

higher. 
So see this urn, a lesson true to all, 
Of patient love a marvel to recall 



To all who chanced to see it three times new, 
Three times destroyed, thrice gained in beauty's 

hue. 
The winds of time the third year swept away 
And at its end by chance the winds at play 
Picked up the urn and bore it on its wings 
Until, grown tired, the lovely urn it flings 
Aside, like children throw away a toy, 
Which now no longer brings them any joy. 
Far and wide the broken pieces flew, 
Into the corners of the world they blew, 
And when the master builder saw with pain 
His work undone, his task he took again 
And from the corners of the earth he sought 
The scattered fragments on which he had 

wrought 
With care and toil. But some were lost to view 
And in their place he set some pieces new. 
With finished skill and steady artful hand, 
He set with all the skill at his command 
A pattern new. A master-piece of skill, 
He made this urn so lovely hearts stood still. 
Each piece was fitted aright, 
It seemed a lovely symbol of his might. 
The threads of time spun out and fate let slide 
A year of beauty, love, and joy beside, 
Before the threads of time the fates now clipped 
And from its place the perfect urn was slipped. 
This time the urn, just as it hit the earth — 
So much it had absorbed its maker's worth — 
It fell in many patterns rare and lone, 
Yet each a perfect pattern of its own. 
Each piece of others borrowed tiny bits 
And to itself the other's beauty fits. 
Each piece is stamped like to the master's soul 
And each out in the world stars to its goal. 
The master-builder views them from his height 
And pleased he is with what now meets his sight ; 
Each piece he moulded thrice into the urn, 
That each might with the other's beauty burn 
Until, work done, each piece alone could stand 
A perfect unit by the Master planned. 

Minnie Caffey, Class Poet. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHf 




CLASS SONG 

The end of one journey we sing of tonight, 

Of friendships, and knowledge, and partings so near; 

With hopes and high courage our spirits are bright, 

Oh, come now and join us in words fraught with cheer. 

With mem'ries of school days which now thrill each heart, 
We turn to the future and what it may bring; 

We face new adventures as now we must part, 

But long may these mem'ries through all our lives ring. 

"To serve, not to be served," we took as our theme, 
In friendships, and school work, and now do we sing; 

The same shining motto, still follow its gleam, 

Through life's need for service its challenge will ring. 



46 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Senior Class History 



XT was a social hour, to be sure, but it was different from all the ones that had pre- 
ceded it. As was the usual custom he had walked over to Woman's Hall at 4 
o'clock and found her waiting. 
"Suppose we take a stroll out toward the gate," he said, "I want to tell you 
something about our class, and its sojourn at High Point College." 

"I'd be delighted," she said. 

He offered her his arm, and they strolled out to the gate. They seated themselves at the 
foot of the gate and he began: 

"Well, to go back to the very beginning, it was in the fall of 1924 that we arrived here. 
There were seventy-four of us who had that peculiar and pleasant privilege of being the first 
freshman class to register at High Point College. With no precedents and no traditions to 
follow, we set about to establish them. 

At our second class meeting we decided to leave as a memorial a large brick gate here at 
this entrance. The estimated cost in round numbers was $175.00. We set about by selling ice 
cream, having tag day, and various ways to raise the necessary amount. The first year was 
eventful, not so much for the knowledge we gained, but for turnip patch raids, painting of 
numerals, founding of organizations, and the introduction to the fundamentals of what college 
life should be. 

When we came back the next year, as sophomores, we had not only lost a part of our 
freshness, but a number of our classmates) as well. We were only fifty-five strong now, but 
we were sophomores and we were not the only ones who knew it, for we had another freshman 
class at the college that year. 

Our Junior year found us with fifty members, still struggling to raise the necessary amount 
of money to erect the memorial gate. The proceeds from several plays proved helpful, but 
insufficient to make the gate a reality instead of a dream. 

Now we have come to the present year when the forty-five who have stuck through the fore- 
going years are honored by being called Seniors and have before them the prospect of going out 
into life in the very near future. Some of our band will be remembered for their wonderful ath- 
letic feats, others for their powerful oratory and active leadership in the various student activities 
of the college. The entire class looks with pride upon the marvelous growth of its Alma 
Mater. We have seen rough brick and mortar transformed into beautiful buildings. We have 
seen mud puddles evolved into a beautiful campus, but above all, we have seen High Point 
College meet the state requirements of an A-grade college, and as a result of this achievement 
we are able to go out to take up life's work on an equal footing with graduates of other higher 
institutions. 

In athletics the graduating class has been outstanding, and has been represented in every 
branch of sport at High Point College. In the intercollegiate debates our class has also been 
a leader. 

The graduating class looks with pride upon the literary societies that were organized under 
its leadership, and especially this beautiful gate which has been erected and paid for at a 
cost of $900. By building this gate we have set a precedent that the other classes are follow- 
ing and we hope that after all, our labors at High Point College have not been in vain. 

At this moment in his discourse they heard voices coming from the steps of Roberts Hall. 
They listened, and they heard something like this: 

"We praise thy name, and honor truth, they stand for loyalty and love, 

May yours be fame, to you is due, 

For you we'll ahvays fight, we want the right 

To uphold your standards high, to give the best we have to thee. 
Memories of you we will cherish, 

H. P. C. 

They arose and standing with bowed heads remained silent till the echo of the last refrain 
had died away in the distince. 
"I see I have a rival," she said. 
"Yes," he replied. "I shall always be true to my Alma Mater." 

J. W. Holmes, Historian. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Class Prophecy 



HAVING attempted a four-year experiment on the possibility of acquiring a certain 
amount of knowledge, it must be admitted that the task has been too much for me. 
The individual capacity cannot be exceeded, and the ' attempt has proved almost 
fatal. In the course of this process, however, it has been my good fortune to stumble 
upon the formula of a compound which has baffled scientists throughout the world in their 
attempts to discover its composition and properties. Its composition I shall withhold, but its 
properties are such that to fail to disclose them would be almost criminal. 

"Alcophine," as I have named this compound, is a colorless liquid which vaporizes readily 
when exposed to air. Its vapors, when inhaled, have the remarkable power of clothing the 
mind with a far-sightedness that surpasses the wildest flights of human imagination. The method 
of preparation has been destroyed through my own carelessness, but if the contents of this vial 
suffice to carry me through a prediction of the future of my classmates, with enough remaining 
to make it possible for me to perceive again the means of preparing another portion of the 
same compound, I shall be grateful. 

With a few large sniffs, I will proceed, and as best I can, foretell the future of those 
with whom I have so diligently struggled in my quest for learning. (Sniff, sniff, snifl). There. 
I am leaving you. Far, far into the future I am able to see and recognize the realization of 
their fondest hopes, and some, perhaps, not so fond. 

J. Elwood Carroll has become head of the Department of Home Economics at Bryn Mawr 
College. It might have been expected that the fair sex would play a major part in the future 
of Dr. Carroll. However, he is not alone in this affectation, for Floyd Garrett is head of the 
Department of Voice Culture at the same school. These two are good examples of failures, 
according to the doctrines of Rev. Raymond Hallock, who has advanced to the pinnacle of 
fame through his exploitation of the fair sex from h!s pulpit in the largest denominational 
church in New York City. 

Lillian Buckner cannot deny that her career as a lyceum pianist has not been successful. 
After having accumulated considerable wealth in her profession, she has settled down to a quiet 
life of domestic tranquility in Morgantown, W. Va. Now, she is firm in her belief that Patrick 
Henry, like herself, had a reason when he said, "Give me liberty or give me death." 

The Chief of the Staff of Surgeons of a certain large dog and cat hospital is Fred Hauser, 
better known as "Boob." Having made good in the veterinary field, he is now attracting 
attention as an authority in the world of animal surgery. Without attaching any significance 
to the fact, it might be said that Vista Dixon is head nurse in the same institution. 

(Sniff, sniff). 

Gertrude Rule, who made herself famous as a publications editor by her work on the Zenith, 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




is now editing the magazine section of the Jamestown Blade. Her recent criticism of political 
corruption is expected to aid materially in her coming campaign for the office of mayor in that 
city. 

Joe Holmes has always been known for his ability to handle the fair sex. Following up 
his talent, he is now dividing his time between the practice of law and lecturing for the W. C. 
T. U. on the "Inevitable Result." In another year he will retire and go to Randleman, where 
he will operate a sheep farm. 

To foretell the future of Lois Coble does not require any keen sense of intellect or foresight. 
She has taken it upon herself to fill the shoes of Miss Mary Elizabeth Young as Dean of Women 
at High Point College. There is no doubt but that she is entirely capable. 

G. W. Andrew, after having attained his degree of Doctor of Divinity, has returned to his 
native state and become head of the Theological Seminary of the largest church school in 
Indiana. One of his pet policies is catering to the preparation of missionaries to Kentucky. 

R. L. Hill, better known as "Monk," formerly cherished an ambition to become a coach, but 
for some unknown reason he has entered politics, and is now holding the important office of 
mayor of the city of Graham. "Monk's political aspirations are destined to be successful. 

Consequent to his association with "Monk" Hill, "Nick" Sides has also relinquished a former 
aspiration for political success. As mayor of Mebane, N. C, he is promoting a civic program 
which will insure domestic tranquility for the benefit of his fellow sufferers. 

(Sniff, sniff). 

Bessie Redwine has become one of the foremost woman politicians ever known. She was 
always proud of her name, and hoping to perpetuate it in the minds of the multitudes, she has 
become a professional campaigner for presidential candidates who have a wet plank in their 
platform. 

Jacob Robinowitz once aspired to be a famous surgeon in Johns Hopkins Hospital, but at 
last he has succumbed to the desire to watch the "Brownies" roll over the counter. He has 
succeeded in putting his father out of business by becoming a large factor in the founding of 
the Robinowitz and Lemons Emporium. The Lemons of this firm is Raymond Lemons, of our 
class of '28, another "would be" surgeon, who finds the clothing business more profitable. I 
hope "Dink" will not succeed in putting Jakie out of business. 

Out in the West we find another member of the class of '2%. It's Ralph Vance, and he has 
become a Mormon. Wonder what he wants with more than one wife? 

Coming back to our native state, we find Ptylla Bingham doing his bit to promote the best 
interests of civilization. Ptylla was always a great admirer of Luther Burbank and is following 
closely in his footsteps! He promises the world a new kind of blackberry — one that will not 
be green when it is red. 

Poor Helen Hayes! She always tried so hard to retain her slim, boyish figure, but she has 
failed. She gained 487 pounds the first six months after she and "Bill" Lewis severed friendly 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY - E I 6 H T| 




relations, and she was able to begin taking nourishment again. She is now appearing in an 
exhibition of freaks at Madison Square Garden. 

(Sniff, sniff.) 

Spencer Cutchin did not surprise us when she captured all woman's honors in the last 
Olympic games. Since becoming a professional athlete she has broken world's records in every- 
thing except the javelin throw. She seems unable to grasp the thing. 

Ruby Isley has become a famous novelist, and critics acclaim her as being far superior to 
Elinor Glyn. We are not surprised at Ruby, for she always was appealing for something. 

Alma Lambeth is now heading a nation-wide matrimonial bureau, and her past success was 
sufficient to induce "Pat" Paschall to make application for the first blond that enrolled. His 
application is still on file. 

Through the influence of Glenn Madison, who was disappointed in love, and is now direct- 
ing choruses for Ziegfield's Follies, Minnie Caffey holds the spotlight on the dancing stage of 
othe metropolis. Her success she attributes to the untiring co-operation of Prof. Pugh while at 
High Point College. 

(Sniff, sniff.) 

Jimmie Ellington, lightweight boxing champion of the world, is known to the followers of 
the leather-pushing profession as the man who is always seeing "Red" — therefore, always 
dangerous. His heavyweight aspirations will fail to materialize, however. 

Unless we keep our radios tuned off of WJZ, we are destined to hear the familiar voice of 
Paul Swanson, announcer for that station. Of course, we congratulate him on h.'s choice of pro- 
fessions because radio announcers are universally beloved. 

May Woollen has at last made her talking useful. She has signed a life-time contract with 
the Victor Talking Machine Company, and will spend the remainder of her earthly existence 
speaking into a horn. She is recording a series of "Helpful Household Hints for Homely 
Husbands." 

Among the numerous other celebraties produced by the Class of '28, we are justly proud of 
Erma Suits. Since becoming a professional bathing beauty and artists' model she has walked 
off with more honors than could be loaded in the rumble seat of a Chrysler roadster. 

(Sniff, sniff.) 

All of our classmates, however, have not enjoyed the good fortune of the majority. Lucile 
Morrison, for instance, has failed in every attempt she has made to pass a course in graduate 
work. We sympathize with her, .though, for we know that she tried hard enough, even if she 
couldn't make a passing grade. 

"Lucky at cards — unlucky at love" is a familiar saying, and the truth is borne out by the 
fact that Max Parrish has become a woman-hater and a professional gambler. The next time 
he breaks the banks at Monte Carlo he is going to" donate a nrusjc building to High Point College. 

Shall we say that the intellect and uplift of this class is confined within the borders of our 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




own nation? Certainly not, for five of our most far-sighted co-eds have extended their 
activities to the Fiji Islands and the natives are about to get wise to themselves. Feeling that the 
age-old custom of eating their victims without any show of table-manners was grossly inconsid- 
erate of the natives, Laura Thompson, Lillie Mae Braxton, Annie Livengood, Dora Pearson and 
Effie Keck have initated a movement which will eventually result in the placement of proper 
table settings in every household, and every member 1 of the family a living personification of 
Emily Post's Book of Etiquette. 

(Sniff, sniff.) 

J. H. and L. C. Kress, who recently established themselves in business in the downtown 
district of New York City, are spending their time regretting a certain fire sale which never 
materialized. They are not wholly cut off from their former acquaintances, however, because 
Canary Johnson is doing a 20-year term in the same institution for her imperfect attempt to 
impersonate a "Flapper Bandit." Canary will return to Seagrove for her next attempt, pro- 
vided a bank or a post-office has been established by that time. 

Unable to resist the impulse, Virginia Pickens is now a registered druggist and business 
woman, but she is not the sole proprietor of the firm. 

Ruth and Annie Lee Jarrell, who are now playing Keith's circuit as a dancing team, attribute 
their poor success to the fact that they were unable to obtain a competent instructor while 
attending High Point College, where they majored in dancing. This particular department, 
however, is no longer liable to such criticism, since Aileen Hendricks was elected to succeed 
Prof. Yarborough as head instructor of the art of classic terpsichore. 

(Sniff, sniff.) 

May Snipes, whose greatest care was always for her fellowman, has returned to the moun- 
tains of Hillsboro to do educational and missionary work among the natives. It is her firm 
belief that the presidential possibilities of her native heath have never been fully recognized. 

Matrimony has its charms for most girls, and we believe that Lelia Wagoner is no exception. 
Since she has become such a proficient horsewoman, and has been engaged to instruct the Prince 
of Wales in the proper manner of alighting as well as riding, rumors have been flying thick 
and fast. Oh, well ! I suppose we could tolerate some royalty. 

And now, let me tell you of — sniff, sniff, sniff — curses! What have I done that my sniffing 
potion should be entirely used up and my own future withheld? But it doesn't matter. Was 
it Kipling who said: "A rag, a bone, and a hank of hair"? I must go to work. 

-\ *$^^ Prophet, Class of '28. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Statistics 



m 



'OST words found in any language have a meaning of some kind. This 
does not mean that they must be translated into another language to 
convey what they stand for. Simpler words of the same language can 
easily give their meaning. 

It is hard for us to learn the scientific names of flowers, so we usually use 
a common name. People are given names which are easily pronounced and 
understood. Names which are connected with certain people come to have spe- 
cific meanings. During the four years that the members of the Class of 1928 have 
been here they have created meanings for their names. 

I have been told that the meanings which I have given to the names of the 
various members of this class are absolutely false. However, I will present 
these meanings to you and leave you to decide whether I have been at fault in 
my judgment. 

This is a Dictionary of the Class of 1928 



To me, G. W. Andrews means "deceitful." 

Ptylla Bingham brings romance to my mind. 

Lillie Mae Braxton is a rebellious character. 

Lillian Buckner is our most energetic class- 
mate. 

Our biggest eye-talker is Minnie Caffey. 

J. Elwood Carroll is the most effeminate boy. 

Lois Coble, the biggest vamp. 

Spencer Cutchin, the most athletic girl. 

Vista Dixon means an opera star. 

James Ellington is systematic. 

Floyd Garrett, untidy. 

Raymond Hallock, a heart smasher. 

Fred T. Hauser, our most timid boy. 

Helen Hayes, fleshy. 

Aileen Hendrix, full of curiosity. 

R. L. Hill is a bookworm. 

J. W. Holmes is our woman-hater. 

Ruby Isley, a siren. 

The most punctual of our number is Annie 
Lee Jarrell. 

Ruth Jarrell is most boisterous. 

Canary Johnson means "a regular dater." 

Effie Keck is the most affable member of 
the class. 

J. H. Kress stands for sympathy. 



L. C. Kre:s stands for pessimism. 

Alma Lambeth uses the most cosmetics. 

Raymond Lemons is our most dignified. 

Annie Livengood is very frivolous. 

The name Glenn Madison means an athletic 
boy. 

Lucille Morrison is the friendliest. 

Max Parrish is the most serious minded. 

Percy Paschall means popularity. 

Dora Pearson is a noisy character. 

Virginia Pickens, the cutest. 

The most disagreeable of our number is 
Bessie JRedwine. 

Jacob Robinowitz is a salesman. 

James P. Rogers means easily led. 

C. D. Sides is a handler of money. 

May Snipes, a lover — of Latin. 

Erma Suits is our best swimmer. 

Paul Swanson, the best basketball player. 

Laura Thompson signifies the biggest tom- 
boy. 

Ralph Vance is our biggest talker. 

The name Leila Wagoner means "of great 
height." 

Mary Woollen denotes complete attention. 



Whether I have been false or true, the meanings here given are not the final 
authority, and may be changed if desired. 

Statistician. 



52 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Last Will and Testament 

State of North Carolina, 
County of Guilford. 

We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-eight, being 
uf sound mind, memory, and understanding, and being cognizant of 
the irregularity and pitfalls of this earthly existence, do make and 
declare this, our last will and testament, hereby declaring void 
any and all wills heretofore executed by us. As to such estate as 
the Fates have allowed us to accumulate, we make the following 
disposition, viz : 

Section I. 

Article i. We desire that our executor, hereinafter named, see 
that our funeral services be directed in accordance to the wishes of 
our friends and relatives. We would like to make the special re- 
quest, however, that the faculty of the college have charge of all 
funeral sermons and talks. 

Article 2. With the money left in the treasury after the 
funeral expenses and the cost of the senior gate is met, we desire 
that he buy chocolate milks to be distributed in both dormitories 
nightly. 

Section II. 

Article I. To the present Junior Class we bequeath the right 
to perch on each side of the senior gate in case the lamps burn dimly 
and they feel that a little added brilliance is necessary. 

Article 2. To the Sophomore Class we will those great treas- 
ure store houses, our theses, over which we have labored so long 
and earnestly. We hope that they will be able to appreciate the 
true genius which lies in these our masterpieces. 

Article 3. We give to the Freshmen our part in the green 
fuzz now spreading over the face of the campus. We fondly hope 
that they will love, cherish, and watch each tiny blade as we have 
done. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Section III. 

Article i. Gertrude Rule wills her hay fever to Paul Freeman, 
with the fond hope that since all else fails, tears may move the 
fair ladies. 

Article 2. Helen Hayes and Vista .Dixon rather reluctantly 
bequeath their intense admiration and adoration for Miss Mary 
E. Young to all incoming Freshmen of next year, to be divided 
equally among them. 

Article 3. Raymond Hallock leaves to the college a set of 
rather cumbersome volumes entitled, "The First Duty of Man," or 
"Love and How to Keep Its Spark Aglow After Marriage." 
These are to be placed in the library for the use of all. 

Article 4. G. W. Andrew wills his preaching ability to D. D. 
Broome. 

Article 5. Annie Lee and Ruth Jarrell and J. H. and L. C. 
Kress will their shining examples of family spirit to Elizabeth and 
Edna Nicholson and Tony and Theodore Antonakcs. 

Article 6. Boob Hauser, with a true helpful spirit, has con- 
sented to leave Professor T. C. Johnson his voice, since a few girls 
on the eastern end of the dormitory have complained that they 
have not heard quite all of his lectures. 

Article 7. Lillie May Braxton, Ruby Isley, Annie Livengood, 
Effie Keck, Lelia Wagoner, and Erma Suits gladly give their 
knowledge of the domestic arts to Delia Moore, because they feel 
that she will have more need for a domestic hand than the short 
hand over which she has labored so industriously this winter. 

Article 8. To the poets of the school, Floyd Garrett wills the 
twilight green which he has discovered in Bristol glass. 

Article g. Laura Thompson, with true sympathy, leaves her 
bearing and forbearing to Pauline Whitaker. 

Article 10. Lillian Buckner wills Ernest Blosser to Evelyn 
Gibson and Emma Lee Poole. Sole ownership of said gentleman is 
to be determined by a duel, and may the best man win. 

Article 11. Joe Holmes impatiently gives his speed to H. E. 
Jones. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Article 12. Jimmie Rogers leaves his popularity with the fair 
sex to Ralph Mulligan. 

Article 13. Canary Johnson willingly bequeaths her position 
as a teacher next year to the first promising applicant, since she 
feels that she herself will not need the position. 

Article 14. To the proctors of the College, to aid them in 
keeping the halls quiet, Lois Coble wills her voice, with its similar 
cadences to that of Miss Young. 

Article 15. To Jabus Braxton, Nick Sides wills his knowledge 
of human nature, and the pocketbook with which encounter with 
and mastery of the gate furnished him. 

Article 16. Pat Paschall bequeaths to Graydon Ring his ca- 
pacity for complete and sustained crushes, with the hope that he 
may soon become as proficient in the art as he. 

Article 17. Alma Lambeth wills her dependability to Maggie 
Davis. 

Article 18. The Student Volunteers will and bequeath their 
social hours with Grover Angel to the coming Student Volunteers. 

Article ig. Monk Hill herewith wills his monograms and 
stars which he has earned as an athlete to Paul Brasser, since the 
poor boy can't seem to win any of his own. 

Article 20. To Willie Fritz, Lucille Morrison leaves her brain 
power, with the hope that it will enable her to pass most of her 
work next year. 

Article 21. Max Parrish willingly wills and bequeaths the 
managership of the Panther Pack to Jabus Braxton. 

Article 22. Jacob Robinwitz leaves to Milbourne Amos his 
mantle of oratory. 

Article 23. Spencer Cutchin wills to the Junior girls the mem- 
ory of her diamond, with the fond hope that it may be an inspira- 
tion to them to look at it and do the best they can. 

Article 24. J. Elwood Carroll bequeaths his sarcasm to Miss 
Mary E. Young. 

Article 25. Virginia Pickens wills to Louise Holmes her part 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY- EIGHT 




in a certain drug store, in order that that young lady may have 
all the sandwiches and drinks she desires. 

Article 26. To the institution of High Point College, that it 
may ever be an inspiration to all incoming students, Paul Swan- 
son wills and bequeaths his picture. 

Article 2J. Aileen Hendrix wills her mileage coming to and 
from school in the past four years to Jessie Blair. 

Article 28. Dink Lemons reluctantly parts with his curling 
irons in leaving them to Cecil Wathan, with whom he has been 
using them in partnership during the past year. 

Article 2Q. Bessie Redwine bequeaths her all-round qualities 
to Dot Hoskins. 

Article 30. Dora Pearson and Glenn Madison will and be- 
queath to Mae Williams and Harvey Young their ability to create 
at the dining table a little seventh heaven of their own, wherein 
they live immune to all petty interferences from the outside world. 

Article 31. Prylla Bingham gives to the College his Sopho- 
more Sonnet, to be framed and hung in the upstairs club room as 
an inspiration to all aspiring lovers. 

Article 32. Jimmie Ellington wills his marked senior dignity 
to John Perry Dosier, hoping that he will cultivate the aforesaid 
quality. 

Article 33. Mae Snipes wills and bequeaths all rights and 
privileges to the use of her last name to the present Freshman boys 
to be used in introducing the next year Freshmen to college life. 

Article 34. To Charlie Lyles, Mic Caffey rather reluctantly 
bequeaths her vocabulary of words. She feels obliged, however, to 
withhold all words with more than ten syllables for her own use. 

And we do hereby appoint Dr. S. S. Coe sole executor of this 
our last will and testament. 

In witness whereof, we, the Class of Twenty-eight, the tes- 
tators, have to this will set our hands and seal this the 26th day 
of May, Anno Domini, one thousand nine hundred and twenty- 
eight. 

Class of Twenty-eight. 

Testators. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Junior Class 



Colors: White and Gold 



Flower: Daisy 



Motto: "Character is greater than intellect." 



Officers 

William H. Hunter President 

Elizabeth Nicholson Vice-President 

Juanita Amick Secretary 

Margaret Davis Treasurer 

Dr. P. E. Lindley, Class Adviser 



Class Song 



W e raise high our voices in song, 

The greatest of tribute we bring; 
To the class that ive love so quell, 

We will now joyously sing. 
We love Thee, dear faithful band, 

And we pledge our devotion anew; 
Pressing onward toward our motto, 

We'll forever be loyal and true. 

CHORUS 

Oh, dear class of White and Gold, 
With thy truth our lives entwine; 

And we'll give praise and honor, 
To the Class of 'Twenty-nine. 

We'll cherish the friendships we made, 

In obedience to thy command ; 
To give our power and our talents 

To make one unbroken band. 
We remember, dear Alma Mater, 

How we did struggle in thy care, 
To master the great lessons 

Of our class, and thee, so fair. 
— Grover L. Angel. 



58 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Junior Class 



Louise Adams 

CLIMAX, N. C. 



Alta Allen 

MEBANE, N. C. 



JUAN1TA AMICK 

EURLlNfftON, N. C. 



Grover L. Axgel 

MARS HILt, N. C, 



Theodore Anton akos 

HIGH POINT, W. C. 



ANTONiOS AmTON'AKOS 
Hinu POINT, », C 



Sumter Bowen 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 





THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Junior Class 



Pall Brassf.r 
morgantown, w. va. 



Jab i s Braxton' 
snow CAMP, m. c. 



Dewey D. Broome 

MAlTIIfiWS, M. C. 

Elda Clark 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Lillii; Mab Davis 

CLEMMOXS, \\ C. 



Ci-aire Douglas 
man poivt, \'. c. 



Vista Garrett 

EiUFtUJi'CTON, S. C. 



60 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Junior Class 



Margaret Gurley 
high point, k. c. 



Frances Hattox 

HIGH POINT, \\ C. 



Vera Hedgbcock 
high point, m. c. 



Louise Holmes 

CRESWEtL, N\ C. 



Dorothy Hoskins 

HIGH POINT, N\ C. 



NORINE HoRNEY 
HIGH POINT, M. C. 



William Hunter 
gree vsijoko, n. c. 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Junior Class 



Euzaretii NU'HOLSOV 
MEBANE, N. C. 

Inez Reynolds 

iimiii ith\ i. n. ( . 



Irene Reynolds 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Graydon Ring 

i icon POINT, N. c. 

Lois Smith 

INCH POINT, N. C. 



Rebecca Walser 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Marjorie Welborn 

IIICH POINT, N. C. 



Pauline Whitaker 

JULIAN, n. c. 



62 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT. 




Sophomore Class 

Colors: Blue and White Flower: White Lily 

Motto: "Non sibi, sed omnibus." 

Officers 

Harvey M. Younc President 

Raymond Perdue Vice-President 

Nettie Stuart . . Secretary 

Elizabeth Hanner Treasurer 

J. D. Hardy, Class Adviser 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Soph 



omores 



CLASS OF 1930 



Hilda Amick 
Rosalie Andrews 
Kaleopia Antonakos 
James Asbury 
Grace Barnette 
Winfred Beck 
Treva Beeson 
Bettie Bloom 
Ernest Blosser 
Jessie Blair 
Clarence Clodfelter 
Lena Mae Clodfelter 
Pierce Criddlebaugh 



James Daughtry 
Carl W. Dennis 
John P. Dosier 
Pauline Elkins 
Eva M. Ellis 
Loraine Ellison 
Noel Feezor 
Eula Fogleman 
Wade Fuquay 
Laura S. Freeland 
Willie Beatrice Fritz 
Kenton C. Hackman 
Elizabeth Hanner 
A. Blanco Harrell 
John Heath 
Pauline Hicks 
Pauline Hunter 
Blanche Ingram 



Grace Keck 
Blaine Madison 
T. Olin Mathews 
Luther R. Medlin 
Clifford Mitchell 
Nellie Morris 
Ralph Mulligan 
Ave C. McArthur 
Louis McFadden 
Richard McMannis 
Thelma McPhaul 
Willie Edna Nicholson 
Lucy Nunnery 
Ruth Osborne 
Fred G. Pegg 
Raymond R. Perdue . 
Glenn G. Perry 
George Ridge 



Chas. C. Robbins, Jr. 
James V. Robertson 
Helen Shields 
Fannie Stamey 
Robert Snyder 
Nettie Stuart 
Hobert Thompson 
Inez Trogdon 
Cecil Wathen 
Coy Williard 
Maie Williams 
Leona Wood 
Willie B. Wood 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





SOPHOMORES 



lA 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





SOPHOMORES 



■M 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




^©S 




Freshman Class 

Officers 

Riley Martin President 

Ernest Poletz Vice-President 

Ruth Watson Secretary 

Wanda Penny Treasurer 

C. R. HinshaWj Class Adviser 



*<Sta. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





FRESHMEN 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





FRESHMEN 



the; zenith, nineteen twenty-eight 




School of Commerce 



v — ■ "^F we lack commercial training, we are handicapped, no matter what may be our 
I attainment. Without it, business prominence is impossible. How important, there- 

M * ore > ,nat we acquire not only a cultural but a commercial education as well — an edu- 

^""" ^ cation that will fit us for service in the world and give us an insight into the methods 

of successful business. Such an education is offered by the Commercial Department to every 

student anxious "to get on" in the world. 

What makes a commercial education especially valuable, is that it is practical throughout. 
It does not concern itself with speculations, theories, or hypothesis, but strives to teach men and 
women to transact business in a businesslike manner, and it does this, not half-heartedly, but 
systematically and efficiently, by instruction in various subjects. 

The Commercial Department gives the student, first of all, a real command of the language. 
It teaches him to increase his vocabulary, use the right word in the right place, and write tactful, 
convincing letters. It makes good business English its watchword and sets before the student 
high standards in expression and composition. 

Commercial law is likewise recognized as a subject of vital importance. No matter what 
position a student will some day hold, whether it be in the fields of accountancy, salesman- 
ship or banking, or whether he fills an executive position of prominence — no matter, where he 
may find himself and what kind of work he will be asked to do, a knowledge of commercial 
law will pave the way for bigger responsibilities and increased income. "Ignorance of the 
law excuses no one," but is often a prolific source of endless trouble. 

Again: Shortland and typewriting receive that attention which is due them in this pro- 
gressive and commercial age. No young man or woman of today can slight either of them, 
for the executives of today work fast. They want the man or woman who is swift, accurate 
and certain. 

Closely allied to the latter is bookkeeping, familiarity with which is more important today 
than ever before. Everything is done systematically, both at home and in the office. Budgets 
are to be followed, accounts are to be kept, books are to be balanced. Today practically every 
business requires a man or woman to keep an accurate record of all financial transactions. 

We thus see. that the Commercial Department is purely practical, aiming to prepare young 
people for the activities of business life and the sound management of their own individual 
affairs. Its course of study embraces practically all those subjects required by all successful 
business men of today, and the whole system of instruction is characterized by that conscientious- 
ness and thoroughness which is indispensable to efficiency and progress. Hence, to enroll in the 
Commercial Department is a long step in the right direction, the beginning of a preparation for 
a successful life. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




One Year Commercial Students 



Hassel Allen . . 
Evelyn Armfield . 
Helen Allred . . 
Katie Lee Barnette 



Bookkeeping Mebane, N. C. 

Secretarial Jamestown, N. C. 

Bookkeeping High Point, N. C. 

Secretarial Mebane, N. C. 



Thaila Copeland Bookkeeping and Secretarial High Point, N. C. 



William Dixon .... 
ashburn elliotte . . . 
Henry Gurley . . . . . 

James Garner 

Geneva Garrett .... 
Reynold Gonzalez . . . 

Bess Hoskins 

Penn Hunter 

Mary Jernigan 

Clarence Jones Bookkeeping 

Mary E. Lassater Secretarial 

William Lewis Bookkeeping 

T. B. McDowell Bookkeeping 

J. B. Moffitt ... Bookkeeping 

Della E. Moore Secretarial 

Maude Overstreet . . . 
Robert Richardson . . . 



Bookkeeping Reidsville, N. C. 

Bookkeeping High Point, N. C. 

Bookkeeping High Point, N. C. 

Bookkeeping High Point, N. C. 

Bookkeeping Thomasville, N. C. 

Bookkeeping Havana, Cuba 

Secretarial High Point, N. C. 

Bookkeeping Greensboro, N. C. 

Secretarial 



Asheville, N. C. 

. . Mebane, N. C. 

. Randleman, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

...:.... Graham, N. C. 

Bookkeeping and Secretarial Beaufort, N. C. 

. . Bookkeeping Atlanta, Ga. 



Gladys Snipes Secretarial 

Robert Snyder Bookkeeping 

Ila Welborn Secretarial 

Grace Wood Bookkeeping 



Hillsboro, N. C. 

Somerset, Ky. 

High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 



'our 



ear 



iommercia 



ial Teach 



eacners 



course 



John Alpers Freshman ......... Champaign, 111. 

Harry Culler Freshman High Point, N. C. 

Riley Martin Freshman Uniontown, Pa. 

Frank Poletz Freshman Uniontown, Pa. 

E. W. Weant Sophomore High Point, N. C. 



Students- taking one or more commercial subjects: Joseph Allen, Raleigh, N. C. ; Theo. 
Antonakos, High Point; Cie Combs, Eldorado, Ark.; Pauline Elkins, Liberty, N. C. ; Evelyn 
Gibson, High Point ; Herbert Gupton, Raleigh, N. C. ; Gwin Hester, Raleigh, N. C. ; Carter 
Humeston, High Point; Elizabeth Johnson, High Point; L. C. Kress, Thomasville, N. C. ; Vir- 
ginia McEwen, High Point; Charles Morris, Decatur, 111.; Eula Parker, Kernersville, N. C. ; 
Ida Preston, Kernersville, N. C. ; J. Robinowitz, High Point; Gertrude Rule, Jamestown, N. C. ; 
Raymond Perdue, Roanoke, Va. ; P. C. Russell, Randleman, N. C. ; Prof. Street, Charlottesville, 
Va.; Elizabeth S. Welborn, High Point; Mike Withrow, Eldorado, Ark.; E. A. Wright, High 
Point; Mrs. C. L. Whitaker, High Point; Ina Farlow, Sophia, N. C. ; Helen Shields, Kerners- 
ville, N C. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





I HMMKRl'l \l. I'M' MM Ml N'T 




fi B ■ H 



'A%W« B .V^Wi^/^^ - 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




COACH JACK BOYLIN 




Coach Hoyliti came to High Point College in 1925. During his 
three years of service he has really put High Point College on the map. 
Coach is a man possessing a wonder till ability, an inborn sense of fair 
play, and a personality which attracts and fascinates the attention. He 
has established in High Point College a standard of athletics which not 
only develops the physical, but also the mental and moral sides of his 
athletes. He is a man of exemplary life and habits and stands for 
manliness, self-reliance and clean sportsmanship. 

His "get in there and fight 'em team" helped High Point College 
realize its first Little Five championship. Other schools of the state, 
particularly the Rig Five, are fast realizing that High Point College 
is rapidly coming to the front in athletics. Coach Poylin, th? High 
Point College students are proud of you. 



77 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN T W E N T Y - E I G H T 

3Sg®twi 





T, C. Johnson 
Director of Athletics 



Mary Todd 
Supervisor of Girls' Athletics 







OSPlRLES ROB BINS WADE FUQUAY LAWTON HILL CHARLES AMieic 



Ciiakt.es KdlSTilVS 

Manager of Football 



Wade Fuquay 
Manager of Basketball 

Ciiaki.es Amick 
Manager of Track 



Lawtox Hill 
Manager nf Basil/all 



So 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





81 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 










Football Squad 



Frewf /fnit', /(■// /» right: Rogers, Mai err, Perdue, Nvgard, Dixon, Driesback, 
Heath, IIauser, MacMannts, Poletz, Campbell, Ganoe, Braxton. 

Second Rain, left to right: Snider, Combs, Ewing, Lemons, Ellington - , Paschall, 
McFadden, Mitchell, Hackman, Thompson, Pierce, Clark. 

Third R&is, left to right: Sinus, Daughtery. Vow, Carroll, Blosser, Hutton, 

LlTMA.N, KOBEIN'S, HUNTER, CULLER, WlTHROW, WaTHEN, 

Fourth Row, left to right: Coach J. P, Boylin, Mascot Yates, Assistant Manager 
Paschall, Hill, 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Miss Dorothy Templix 

Sponsor 

Miss Templin is from Champaign, Illinois, and is very prominent in social 
circles there. There is little wonder that Captain Heath those her as sponsor for 
the 1927 football team. May the team ahvays have a sponsnr as attractive as 
Miss Templin. 

Captain John Heath 

"Johnnie" was one of the hest backfield men ever to wear the Purple and White 
Jersey and his record at High Point College has been one that few moleskin wearers 
have ever challenged. Cnfortunately injuries kept him out of the line-up for a part 
of the time thoujrh he always went in to stem the tide of threatening attacks. 
Johnnie looked his hest against Lenoir-Rhyne and Guilford and makes the Zenith's 
All-Little Five team in a walk. 



Ralph Mullic.w 

Chen Leader 



sx 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Little Five Champs 

High Point College . . . . 48 ; A. C. C 

High Point College .... 13; Lenoir-Rhyne O 

High Point College .... 6; Elon O 

High Point College .... 27 ; Guilford O 

Totals, H. P. C 94; Opponents o 



Other Opponents 



High Point College 

High Point College 

High Point College 

High Point College 

High Point College 

High Point College 

Totals, H. P. C. 



35 ; King College o 

o; Hampden-Sidney H5 

7; Milligan o 

o; Fort Benning 14 

7 ; Wake Forest- ' v$ 

6 ; Marines ..." 6 



55 ; Opponents 39 



Individual Scoring 



1. Poletz 30 

2. Alpers 18 

3. Heath . 23 

4. Brasser 18 

5. Perdue 18 



6 Campbell 12 

7. Method 12 

8. Mitchell 10 

9. McFadden 6 

10. Rogers 1 



11. Thompson 1 

Total points scored, 149. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




MICHAEL U'lTHKOW 

Looked upon as a third string man at the first 
of the season, Mike came forward rapidly and 
before half of the scheduled matins won- nver, 
lie was taking the field with the first tram. 
The Fort Bennin^ team was very emphatic 
in Lta praise of the "sorrel-top" player on the 
Panther eleven. Then' is little (|U4-stinn hut 
that Mike will he a regular next year, 

VKRXEH Mt; \lil> 

Behind the moustache is a real, honest* to- 
good n ess football player; a center of no mean 
repute. Nigard was handicapped with a bad 

;iiiliic all sua^on, but pvr farmed well in sev- 
eral important games, His best work was evi- 
dent in the Guilford clash. 

CKCIK WATIIKN 

Kentucky may he known for her horses hut 
we It now her for Ceese Wat hen, who came to 
High Point last year. Ceese was one Of the 
smallest nun on tin? team hut he hold down 
his position at guard like a giant. He always 
was one of the first down under a punt and 
when he tackled a man, the man stayed tackled. 
We want you back again next year, Curly. 



J, KLMS SMDKIt 

Kentucky again! At tackle Bob played a most 
consistent and aggressive brand of fuotbaH all 
season. Big and powerful, his charging through 
lime after time to break up plays won for 
him respect from his teammates, his oppo- 
nents, and the spectators. He r-.mtd mil he 
kept aft" the all-Little Five team. 



ERNEST BLOSSER 

Ernie Blosaer has greatly strengthened the Pan- 
ther stjuad this year by bis good work at end. 
Blosser was chosen to play end on the Little 
Five mythical, and in our estimation he well 
deserves this honor. Nice going, Ernie. 



I KAN< IH Hl'TTON 

Francis "Tiny" Button, the big man that played 
.1 whale of a game at tackle and thaw won for 
himself a coveted place on the All-Little five. 
The work of Hutton has been a great help in 
annexing the championship this year. 




8S 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




CLIFFORD MITCHELL 

Clifford "Tim" Mitchell, the little man with 
l ho Big Tin 1 , played a bang-up jaitie this year. 
When it conn ;■■ b h ■ getting away punts Tim can 
take his place with the hesl ol the punters in 
the Little Five. Tim wan his firsl tetter this 

year Ity Uts ffitoil ivnrk in the tmnki'h'M. ibenl 

work, Tim. 

LOUIS McFADDEN 

Louis "Louie* 1 M cFadden, the Little Irishman 

I'n mi [)ci';iiiir, Illinois, played a line g.ime nil 
season and was a valuable man to the squad 
willi his passing and ability to side-step his 
would-be tacklera. Because he Is a gx>od play- 
er and a prime of a fellow. Louie is w.-u hk-'.i 
liy (He d'Hiii. 

I.KO mi;ti ion 
Leo. the big, powerful, plunging fullback, played 

a mnni >;j»tiL-- all Si';iM»li. rallies! Jol'tably he 

can be c siden-d anions the besl defensive 

men In the state. I "s playing, along with bis 

Plea nf spintsiiianship, mail.- him a favorite with 
both the team and the spectators. Leo looked 
Hrury m'', M L nt'iiinst lite I'arris Island Murine^ 
and en it ied the ball across the goal line for 
the touchdown that enabled us to tie the. strong 
Malt]i. team. 



KENTON HACKMAN 

This tall you tli came to High Point from De- 
catur High school of Illinois, His record there 
as an athlete was a good one. He was picked 
as a tar-kle on the second all-Little Five team 

;iml u>-ll In- deserves Mieb r eo^liitioU. H 'Hnek" 
ftutln-rl 4-^pei-iLll!y x'ntil ux.'titi&l Kt**ti iitu} \V;ikc 

Foresl . 



JOHN DBIESBACK 

The "side-steppedness fool" in the Little Five 
realms pictures Johnnie in good manner. Once 
ibis lad got past the line of scrimmage, he was 
-.■►in- like :i IjuIN'I ami iVw safely men could 
stop him. Johnny was plated on Coach Craw- 
ford's (Guilford) all-Little Five team, at a half- 
hfiek position. 

<,KOIi( ]r ; 111 Ol. i: 

"Tubby" Ridge, the boy that played at guard 
and gave his opponents a real treat when he hit 
their side of the line. Tubby Is another one of 

tboj-r \> layers who never niVeS up Until Hie last 
whistle blows. Tllliby t.1.- 3 1 1 !.- I.a.-k a^ain next 

year to continue his good work with the Pan- 
thers, 




So 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




kiavooh < AltKOIX 

■: " : i r- 1 - ■ ■ I I is .iliiilll'T L; i : ; i. i 1 1 hS. I i i h |.l;i\,-,| ,| litl-i- ~..iill' 

arid was a valuable asset in winning the oham- 
pfonshtp. Canoil was always in there giving 
and taking though generally giving more than 
he took. He thereby won for himself the title 
of the "Fighting Minister/' This i3 his last 
year in school and coach will greatly miss hi in 
next year, 

KICIfAKD MACMANNTS 

RU hard (Dick) MaeMannte played a nice game 

at end this year, .l ij, I u:i* :i[. Ids best in rlic I. - 

nuir-lihyne ^ame. This is Disk's set I year 

as a Panther and he has made his letter both 
years. Hi3 defensive ability makes him one of 
the most valuable men on the Panther squad. 

JAMKS KOtiKJtS 

Jimmy Rogers isn't the kind of a player that 
iHiJ'orins l-i i 1 1 i : ■ 1 1 1 feats all the time, hut just 
the same, Jimmy is a good consistent player. 
He does what he is supposed to do well, and as 
a nsult lie is a member of the Monogram Club. 
Jimmy put more pep into the scrimmages tban 
any other man on the squad. Everyone will 
miss Jimmy when he graduates this year. 



IIOIIAKT THOMPSON 

"Pat," alternate captain and tackle, Es the 
nghtingest Irishman that ever donned a Pan- 
ther uniform, Pat pfnvii.1 Ins |n-*t against the 
Marines, although it nan in- rr;n.Jil.v nald that 
there is not an opposing lineman that does not 
remember him. Nice going this season, Pat, 

KAY PERDUE 

Although handicapped the last of the season 
wiMi a bail knee, "Cotton" was one of our star 
performers and created quite a disturbance in 
the Guilford ranks on Armisth ■■ hay, when 
:n- h -h 1 1 1 . ^ - e 1 ■ l I \hr <.■<=• tmnhdii'Lvns. liny was prob- 
ably at his best against Hampden Sidney. He 
is a two-letter man. jililuni^h nnly a sphomore. 
Cotton's defensive ability never received the 
ej edil (hat it was due. 

.11 If 1IAKL MATEKU 

Only an 1 1 isli imjiti cne|d have such u name, vel 
this Irishman was a good football play r. Hi- 
was somewhat of a triple-threat man. being able 
to kick fairly well, pass accurately and make 
consistent gains. This is Mike's first year as 
a Panther, 




THE ZENITH 



NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





FRANK rOLKTZ 

Besides being picked as halfback on the all- 
Little Five team. "Wop" was also picked by the 
Durham News as Fullback on the « md mythi- 
cal all-*;tnte team, Th<» writer r>f the News 

Eirtii-h- prai^i-d \ViP]i highly, s.-iyin- I h.;i 1 h t- 

pared with Jankoski of Duke, "Wnii" is only 
a frfshman and Coach Boy 1 hi is eountinK heav- 
ily on him next year. Poletz was at his besl 
In the Wake Forest and Elon games, 

KAY II1XON 

"Every Inch a football player." is what we have 

to Koy of Hny l>i\nm. This popular player was 
fan tain , h r l:isl y.-ar's In-am. Ih slull.-.l .v.'iv 
^inir lliis yr;ir, plEiyiltu l I ■ - "I VlLsiViJy Ml end. ;nul 
offensively at hither #u;ml or hallOack. Mi* 
all-around ability warrants him a position on 
the Zenith's all-Little five team. Dick is a 
three-letter man and will be back again with 
us nuxl year. 

I Kll> IIAISK1I 

"Kniili" ;i.-: Wi ktHiW llilll. n 1 1 1 S i " 1 1 lli- I "lit bull 

career this year. Mis aggressiveness and abil- 
ity as a center have earned the coveted "II " 
for him three years in Miecesjd'ui. l*oi*b \\n.< at 
his best in the Elon game. He was chosen '• 
many Sports writers as renter on the all-Little 
Five Uam, Big Boy, wc will miss you next 
year. 



IWI/L mtASsKK 

"Peanuts" was voted the best all-around ath- 
lete in the school, having made letters last year 
in football, basketball, and baseball- LVntil in 
was forced out this season with a badly in- 
jured shoulder, Brasser was going like a house 
afire and was causing much comment through- 
out the football circles In the state. Brasser 
is only a sophomore and much is expected from 
b i in in the n ex t t wo yea rs. 



CAKOLD GANOE 

,\ whale of ;\ huh- mini characterizes <ianoe, 
who. although a Freshman, made his letter this 
year. His good work at the end position in 
Tin- tiuillold KMili.' fMUS.d riHi.di fiiiiuiHTlt ill the 
itiM ndstainis. In all probability I his la*] should 
be one of Coach Hoylin's outstanding bets pexl 
fall. 



HAKTFOKD CAMPBELL 

"Hart" might be classed as a little big man 
because he carried the ball across the goal line 
twice this year. He get into nearly every game 
and looked his best against King college. Hart 
should filve Konicoin- some stiff competition for 
the quarterback post next fall. 





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THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





^5 



^c^^^x 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN T W E N T Y - E I G H T 





BASKETBALL SQUAD 



"Little Six Champions 

Front Row, left t<> right: Mitchell, Mulligan-, Hill, Perdue. 
Second Ruit.-: Williard, Thompson, Brasser, Snider. 
Last Rvzt:: MANAGER FUQUAY, Vow, LlTMAK. 



90 



THE ZENITH, 




Egg 

fETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

mm 




Mrs. A, A. Hill 

Sponsor 

Mrs. Hill witnessed her first basketball 
game this year when she saw the Purple 
Panthers defeat the fast American Univer- 
sity team of Washington, D. C. Since that 
game she has been a regular spectator, tak- 
ing part in both the cheering and praise of 
her boy and his buddies. The team is glad 
to have you as sponsor of the first Lirr It- 
Six champs. 





Captain "Monk" Hill 

High Point College loses one of its greatest bas- 
ketball players this year, when Captain Monk Hill 
will be lost by graduation. This three-letter star 
has been a constant thorn in the side of all oppo- 
nents since his coming here four years ago. He has 
been captain in both football and baseball, and this 
is his third successive year as captain of the basket- 
ball team. We are proud to possess him as the cap- 
tain of High Point College's first "Little Six" 
championship" basketball quintet; and, oh, how we 
will miss you next year, Monk! Out of all of 
Mank's girl friends he has chosen the one who is 
dearest to him as the team's sponsor — his mother. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





R.w Perdue 

"Cotton," one of our few three-letter men, was one of our outstanding stars this 
year, being noted especially for his fighting and passing qualities. He was a scorer 
in all games but probably looked his best against Catawba College, when In- brought 
the game out of the ice by caging three field goals in rapid succession. Cotton will 
be back again next year and that is something. 

Riley Litman 

Xhis little pug-nosed star hails from Uniontown, Pa., where he played as a high 
school eager. Riley, although a freshman, played in nearly every game and impressed 
Coach Hoy I in very favorably as a guard. It is very probable that In - will till Cap- 
tain Hill's place at guard next year when the latter graduates. He is very aggres- 
sive and a very promising athlete. 

Paul Brasser 

Without "Old Ironsides," High Point could not have a basketball team. This 
little sparingly haired athlete is one of the best liked fellows on the team besides being 
one of its stars. Paul is also a three-letter man and when he laughs is when he is 
most dangerous. High Point is glad she has you for two more years, Brasser, old boy. 

Ralph Mci.licax 

This is Mulligan's second year on the team and he still has two more years at High 
Point. He is sort of a handy man, playing both at guard and forward during the past 

season, lie also hails from I m'nntown, Pa. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





"Pat 1 ' Thompson 

Good old Pat, ain't he marvelful? This big Irishman was shifted to forward this year 
and well did he fill the job. He was a shining light in all of our Rjmts a It In nigh lit- did tint 
have as good a season at hitting the hoop as he did last year. However he more than made 
up for tliis by his clever floor work and passing, and that is that. 

J. Rufus Snider 

I'hi-. little tfllow I id ii a hard j.ili when ii came to mixing with thi big l«n>. bui lie held 

his own wonderfully well and was one of our leading scorers. American University would no 
doubt have defeated us here had it not been for Hob, this popular athlete scoring twenty points. 
Coach Boyl'n also has this ^tar to depend upon in the next two years. 

Ernest Blosser 

Morgantown High School, in West Virginia, had a basketball team two years ago hut it 
came to High Point College last fall in the person of Ernie Plnsser. This is Hloss's second 
year on the team and he has filled every position but standing guard, and what we mean, he 
filled them well. He is a "center" attraction at social hour. 

Clifford Mitchell 

"Mitch" hails from Decatur, Illinois, where they make starch and basketball players, and 
although Mitch has plenty of the former we must place him in the latter class. Mitch was a 
whirl of an asset to our team this year and we won't soon forget his wonderful showing against 
Catawba College, when he scored five field goals in the first few minutes of the game and enra- 
pletelv demoralized the Catawba cagers. Mitch is a typical Northerner though, because he 
must have his snow. 



93 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY- EIGHT 




Basketball Records 



Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 
Purple Panthers 



37 
36 
41 
20 

47 
35 
29 

19 
37 
39 
35 
46 

ft 

19 
34 
26 

4i 
22 



Carolina Nighthawks 35 

Rocky Mt. "Y" 44 

Atlantic Christian College 24 

North Carolina State 46 

Greensboro "Y" 23 

Catawba 20 

Lenoir-Rhyne 26 

Greensboro "Y" 20 

American University 22 

Guilford 24 

Richmond Grays 22 

Randolph-Macon 39 

Richmond Blues . 30 

Statesville 16 

Catawba 24 

Guilford 27 

Lenoir-Rhyne 21 

American University 27 



Purple Panthers 606; Opponents 490 

Total games won, 13; lost g. 

This record does not include home games with Statesville and A. C. C, since the 
annual went to press before they were played. 

Individual Scoring 

Thompson 131 Hill 82 Snider 101 

Mulligan ...... 91 Perdue 65 Brasser 26 

Blosser 5 Mitchell 66 Litman 9 

Thompson led in field goals with 48. Mulligan had the best fflul average with 
19-25. 



94 





THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




^pg^rn. 




95 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Baseball Squad 



Front Rnv.-, left to right: Russell, Moffitt, Hunter. Perdue, Captain Dixok. 

Second Rowi, left to right; Fuquay, Hill, Brasser, Williams, Blossir. 

Third /?««.', left to right: Coach Boylik. McFadden, Vnw, Hedrick, Mitchell. 



•>>• 



i^^^^^^^^^^^^I 




THE ZENITH, 



NINETEEN 



TWENTY 





BKTSKY Dl'RI.AN'l) 

There is no question but that tin.' baseball team made a "big hit" when they 
selected Miss Dm land for sponsor of this popular sport. This attractive young lady 
has a very charming personality and is exceedingly popular with the younger set of 
High Point. At every game, rain or shine, played on the local diamond. Miss Dur- 
land can be found in the grandstand cheering for the Purple Panthers. 

Capt. Raymond Dixon 

Ray does not need any write-up. Everyone that knows him likes him and what 
more could be wished by any man? He is somewhat of a triple threat man in baseball, 
being a clever fielder, a consistent hitter, and a clever base runner. Ths team has 
a very tough schedule this spring and Ray is just the kind of a leader that can inspire 
his men to "put out" their best. Here's to their success on the Southern trip during 
the Easter holidays. 

Baseball Schedule 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 12 — Wake Forest, here. 



3 — Wofford. there. 
4 — Newberry, there. 
5 — Erskine, there. 
6 — Piedmont, there. 
7 — Piedmont, there. 
9 — Elon at Greensboro. 



April [8 — Lenoir- Rhync, here. 
April 20 — Catawba (pending) 
May 3 — Erskine, here. 

(iaines are also pending with ( iuil 
ford, A. C. C, Lenoir-Rhyne and Ca- 
tawba. 



17 



^^CQss. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




TmSm» 




Monogram Club 



Front Hoi* left to right: Carroll, Roc;eks. Hedrick, Lemons, Fuquay, Hausbr. 
Second Row, left to riijltt: Holmes. McFaoden, Hi.osser. Ellington j Wathen. 
Third Row, It'fl to right: Mal'Mawis, NiCARD, HACKMAN, Litman, DlXON. 
Fourth Row, left to right: Snider, Lewis, Thompson, Poletz, Perdue, Hill. 
Fourth Row, left to right: AI.PERS, COACH BOVLIN, MITCHELL, CAMPBELL, PaSCHALL. 



<>S 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Track Team 

Front row, irft io right: LlTMAN, SwanSON, Pr.co, MULLIGAN, MlTCHILL. 

St-aiiid Row, lift to fiij ht: Manager Amick, Martin, Crotts, Braxton, Ancel. 

Third Row, I, -ft to rigid: Allen, Morris, Dauchtery, Holt, Dosier. 



[00 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Cut. Ralph Mulligan 

Mulligan is the captain of High Po'ut's first track team and it was wholely through his 
efforts that this sport was introduced in our institution. Mulligan was High Point's sole con- 
testant in the state collegiate meet held in Greensboro last year and went to the finals in the 
100-yard dash which was won by Currie of Davidson College, who hroke the state record by 
riming the distance in <; and 3-5 seconds. The prospects are very good for the team this venr 
and it is hoped that it will place near the top in all of its meets this spring. 

Written by Ray Perdue. 



Miss Anne Carter Marsh 

It is an honor for High Point College's first track team to have Miss Marsh as a sponsor. 
This charming young woman is very popular among the younger social set of High Point 
and is particularly interested in all Purple and White athletics. It is hoped that our First 
track team will he as successful in its meets as it was in its selection of a sponsor. 



Track Schedule 



March 23 — Interclass meet. 

April z\ — Guilford dual meet. 

April 2S — Catawba dual meet (pending). 

May 2 — Wake Forest dual meet. 

Mav 5 — State meet at (Jreensboro, 

May 1 — State Freshmen (pending). 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Letter Men of 1927-1928 



Perdue 




Rogers 


Poletz 




Michell 


Brasser 




Carroll 


LlTMAN 
FUQUAY 




Hutton 
MacMannis 




Mateer 


Heath 


Blosser 


Ganoe 


Hill 


Alpers 


Method 


Dixon 


Nigard 


Hauser 


Mulligan 


Wathan 


Snider 
McFadden 




WlTHROW 

Campbell 




Thompson 




Ridge 


Hackman 




Yow 


Hedrick 




Driesback 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Ralph Mulligan 

Coach of Girls' Athletics 

Coach Mulligan instituted girls' track here last year fur the first time, having a squad of 
twelve girls. This year nearly thirty girls reported. It is hoped that this form of a thirties 
will be a forerunner of other branches of athletics in which the g'rls might participate. Coach 
Mulligan also was the sponsor of High Point College's first interscholastic track meet for girls, 
which front now on will he an annual affair. 

C APTA I N J UA X ITA AMICK 

Juanita Amick was chosen captain of the girls' track team because of her great showing 
last year on the first girls' track team in the history of the college. In the inter class meet last 
year, Captain Amick was the highest individual scorer, winning the running broad jump, 
75-yard dash, and baseball throw, and placing second in the high jump. The team this year 
promises to be much better than the one of last year, since many of the freshmen girls were 
stars on high school teams. Besides the inter class meet and the intersociety affair, it is hoped 
that the girls will be able to meet Catawba, Salem and other schools in dual meets. The sec- 
ond annual interscholastic girls' track meet for high schools will be held again this year on 
the local athletic field. The High Point High School team carried away the honors last year, 
with Concord placing second. The Max Rones cup must he won two years in succession before 
a school can claim possession to it. 

Girls' Track Schedule 

March 23 — Iim-rriass meet. 
March jo — Artemesians vs. Nikanthans. 
April 6— High Point High School (here). 
April 20 — Greensboro High School (here), 
April 27 — Second annual cholastic meet. 
">3 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Girls Track Team 



front R/inu. ti-jt to riijlii: Ueeson-, Morris, Watson, Rkiwijce, Amick, Ei.kins 

Second Rntt:, left to right: Braxton, Wagner, Adams, Shields, Ltvenqood, Spevcer, 
Haxkek. Supervisor Todd. 

Third /fiat, left to right: ('.. Hakm-itk, Davis, K. Bars'ETTE, WOOLLEN, Wari.ick, 
Allew, Caffev. 

Frit/, Keck, Clodfelter anil Primm are missing from the picture. 



11...I 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




All-Zenitb Football Team 



OF 



Little Five Colleges 



Right End Raymond Dixon H. P. C. 

Right Tackle Captain Snider H. P. C. 

Right Guard Beam Lenoir-Rhyne 

Center Fred Hauser H. P. C. 

Left Guard Cecil Wathan H. P. C. 

Left Tackle Hobart Thompson H. P. C. 

Left End Zeigler Elon 

Quarterback Walker Elon 

Right Halfback Heath H. P. C. 

Left Halfback Perdue H. P. C. 

Fullback Jack Alpers H. P. C. 

Out of a possible 20 votes, Snider received 19 votes and is therefore made captain of the 
all-star team. Perdue followed close on his heels with 17 votes, and Walker of Elon was third 
with 16 votes. 

Those who were well In the running for the first team were Marshall and Hoyle of Guil- 
ford, Branncr and McCauley of Elon, Riggon of A. C. C, Nigard, Poletz, Hackman, and Mac- 
Mannis of High Point. 



All-Zenith Basketball Team 



OF 



Little Six Colleges 



First Team 



Second Team 



Perdue, H. P. C Forward Hayworth, Guilford 

Thompson, Capt., H. P. C Forward Newman, Capt., Elon 

Snider, H. P. C Center Coble, Guilford 

Mulligan, H. P. C Guard Mitchell, H. P. C 

Hamerick, Elon Guard Hill, H. P. C 

Honorable mention: Coltrane, Guilford; Kiser, Lenoir-Rhyne; Peeler, Catawba. Thomp- 
son received the most votes, getting eight for first team. Mulligan was second with seven. 

These teams were picked by the football squad and basketball squad of High Point College. 
It is true that H. P. C. is well represented on both teams but it will be remembered that the 
Panthers won both championships and lost but one game in both sports, that being in basketball 
to Guilford. 



T05 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 







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THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





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LUC i Lie TOSBJ50M 

A&SOCt ate cturcsR, 





T.e,dOHN50N 

AOVlSCft 



dU ANITA AMfeK 

JUNlOft EDITOR. 




CLYDE 'PUGH 

ADVERTISING MfiR. 



d.W.HOLMES 

BUSINESS M&R.- 



<jERTPODE QOte £ALDB MULLIGAN 

CDITOti-tM'CKtC.r ATHLETIC EOlTOS 






MAOSAGCTGUPLEy 

ft«.°T £DITOf£ 



PILEV MAETIN 

FR'ESHHAH EOiTQR AW TVPI&T 



QiCHAPDMftfMAWllS 






THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





CLYDE PUQH 
ftDV. MANAGER, 



BI-PO STAFF 



PAUL BRA5SER 

CIBCULWION J-ieR.. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 






Artemesian Society 

Officers 

Bessie RedWINE . President 

Louise Holmes Vice-President 

Elizabeth Hanner Secretary 

Paiuvk Wiii'I'akek Treasurer 

Makv Anm: Coe Mascot 




--tE2i. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




ARTEMEStAN LITERARY" SnflKTY 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





AKROTHINIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Akrothinian Literary Society 

Organized IQ26 
Motto: "Find a way or make one." 



Honorary Members 
Paul S. Kennett Talmage C. Johnson 

Officers 

First Seftiester Second Semester 

Richard MacMannis President C. Virgil Yow 

Reed L. Hill Vice-President James P. Rocers 

Fred T. Hauser Secretary James Asbury 

William H. Hunter ....... Treasurer William H. Hunter 

James Daughtery Reporter Reed L. Hill 

Joseph W. Holmes Critic Percy M. Paschall 



Active Members 



James Daughtery 
Reed L. Hill 
Percy M. Paschall 
James R. Weedon 
William H. Hunter 
Charles C. Robbins, Jr. 
Richard MacMannis 
Paul Swanso'n 
Clarence Clodfelter 

T. Olin 



Joseph W. Holmes 
Fred T. Hauser 
James P. Rogers 
Theodore Antonakos 
James Asbury 
C. Virgil Yow 
Glenn Perry 
Richard Paschall 
Riley Martin 
Mathews 



"5 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Nikanthan Literary Society 



Motto: " \ictnrv crowns Patience." 



Lucille Morrison 
Louise Adams 
Lucv Nu.vxerv 
Alia Allen . , 
Annie Livencood 



///.i;v7\" I,avc uder Iris 



Caters: La vernier and White 



Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

■ - ■ Treasurer 

Chaplain 
Mrs, II. A. White 



Ava Mc Arthur . 
Pauline Kennett 
Palt.im; \Ikks . . 
ErFIE KtL'K . . 

Marcaret Gurley 
. , . . Adviser 



Monitor 

Mascot 

Pianist 

Critic 

Reporter 



. l6 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





NIKANTHAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



i 17 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 









K/<# 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Thalean Literary Society 



Fall Semester 



Officers 
Office 



Spring Semester 



C. D. Sides President G. W. Andrews 

Jabus Braxton Vice-President J. H. Kress 

Baynes; Fred Pegg Secretary Fred Pegg 

P. E. Bingham Assistant Secretary C. P. Jones 

D. D. Broome Treasurer D. D. Broome 

J. H. Kress Marshal Ralph Cottle 

Ralph Cottle Assistant Marshal C. W. Pope 

G. W. Andrews Critic T. G. Madison 

T. G. Madison Chaplain Monroe Bennett 

J. E. Carroll; Milbourne Amos . . Press Reporter Milbourne Amos 

Harvey Young ......... Society Reporter T. J. Whitehead 

F. R. Garrett Pianist CD. Sides 

Ralph Vance Debating Coach Harvey Young 



Roll 

H. A. Allen 
C. B, Amick, Jr. 
Grover L. Angel 
Carl Dennis 
John P. Dosier 
Aubrey Dunbar 
Noel Feezor 
W. F. Fuquay 
Raymond Hallock 
K. G. Holt 

W. Wood 



Flotuer: White Rose 



L. C. Kress 
E. O. Lane 
Raymond Lemons 
Chas. Liles 
Blaine Madison 
E. O. Peeler 
T. H. Penton 
J. C. Pugh 
Taft White 
C. Williams 



Color: Purple and Gold 



Motto: "Master first ourselves." 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





christian i-:nt)|-;avor society 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY- EIGHT 




Christian Endeavor Society 

Officers 

Lelia Wagoner President 

Fred G. Pegg Vice-President 

Nettie Stuart Secretary 

Enda Nicholson Corresponding Secretary 

Grover L Angel Treasurer 

Alta Allen Pianist 

Vista Garrett Assistant Pianist 

Charles Webster Pope Chorister 

Pauline Whitaker Reporter 



'For Christ and the Church' 



One of the largest and most active organizations on the campus is the Christian 
Endeavor Society. Organized on October 12, 1924, the society has done definite 
work under the able leadership of young people from church societies from many sec- 
tions of the state. It has since become a very necessary part of the life of the students 
who soon learned to work together as one unit "For Christ and the Church." 

Prayer meetings are held every Sunday evening during the college year and through 
these the students have learned to think more about their souls, life work, and individual 
problems, as well as national and international problems. They have learned each other 
better, and have been drawn in close fellowship with the Master more by the Christian 
Endeavor Society than by any other student organization. 

The society has taken active part in the city union activities and foreign and home 
missions, having twice won the city union banner and is at present clothing an orphan 
in our own children's home and educating a boy in a Christian college in Japan. The 
extension club of the society organizes societies throughout the state. Although not 
definitely connected with any church, the society has taken part in many activities of 
the different churches in the city. 

The society is the most representative organization of the college. Practically all 
the boarding students are members, and students from all classes and denominations 
take part. A fine spirit has been developed and much has been accomplished. We are 
glad to have a part in an activity in which we hope to be able to increase the cause 
of the Master, whom we are earnestly trying to serve. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 






— 





L 




\ 



BMnMHi^^ 



Ministerial Association 



G. W. Andrew 
Monroe Bennett 
Ptylla Bingham 
Jabus Braxton 
Dewey Rkoome 
J. Elwooo Carroll 
Ralph Cottle 
r. t. h allocs 



Anvil LlVENCOOD 

I.eli a Wagoner 
Grover Angel 
Eva Spemcer 
Vista Dixon 



Kenneth Holt 
T. G. Madison 
E. (). Peeler 
T. H. Penton 
Taet White 

']'. I. Willi I Ml Ml 

\V. B. Wood 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 






tAURJ.THQMP.SON 




LIUIE MAE DAU!.! 



EDNA NICHOLSON 



WOMANS 

V I':. STUDENT 

'ERNMENT 






PAWLINE WMTAKEE 




KELUEWQEEIS 



EPNA HOLDER 



GIRLS' STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
Laura Thompson, president; Lillle ZtCae Davis, vice-president; Pauline Whitalcer, head proctor: 
Edna Nicholson, secretary; Nellie Morris, treasurer; Edna Mae Holder, Freshman representative. 




JOHNPRfiRYDOSIEE. 

5ECP.E.TARY 



JABU5W.BRAXT0H, 

TREASURE* 



MEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL 

I2J 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





ltt\l 

STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



Annie Lee Jarre U, president; Erma Suits, vice-president; Margaret Davis, secretary; Kalopta 
Antonakos, treasurer; Marjorle We] born, monitor; Wanda Penny. Freshman representative. 



'ORENSIOCOUNC1L 




I>r. P. E. LindUy, Dr. P. S. Keunett, Prof. T T C. Johnson, Rffie Keck, Ralph H, Vance, Minnie Coffey, 

Virgil Yow. 



i ^4 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




AlVnLLLt 




MRS STREET 

PRESIDENT 



H£L£R HAVE S 

SECF?£TA£*V 



Theta Phi 




MISS WILLIAMS BESSIE REW1NE 

Sigma Alpha Phi 



S 





MISS MclNTieE CURIE D0U6LA5 

iLPHA Theta Psi 



Pbof.HINSHAW C.R,MacMANN!5 

IotaTaji 




4k f X J* 

Prof.HAGDV QROVee L.AN6EL 

Epsilon Eta Phi 



12$ 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





THE WORKSHOP 



Hi. 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





r- 

LI 
J 

y 

_ 

v. 

— 



- 
•- 

M 

- 



1 -7 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





AESCULAPIUS MEDICAL CLUB 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





\R1 i I i-s 








**5* 




MODERN PRISCILLA CLUB 

121} 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Intercollegiate Orators 




Milbourke Amos 

Representative in State Contest of the 

N. C. I. F, A. at Davidson, 




Keith Harrison 

Representative in state Peace Contest 
at Elon. April -~. 




Pali, Swanson 

Represent&tfre in state Contest on the 

Constitution at Duke. April 2". 



i y.i 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Or. W.ANDREW T GLENN MADISON MiLBOUKNE AMOS 

Intercollegiate Debaters 

The Sl'Hiiihi.i' 

March 16 Lenoir-Rhyne at High Point 

March 1 6 Guilford at Guilford 

March 23 Wake Forest at Castalia, N. C. 

March 30 Wofford at High Point 

April 2 Catawba at High Point 

April 2 Catawba at Salisbury 

The Qlery 
Resolved; "That the United States Should Cease to Protect by 
Armed Force Capital Invested in Foreign Countries Except -^lifter a 
Formal Declaration of War." 




J.ELWOOD CARROLL T. d . WHITEHEAD 



131 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN IWENIT-EIGHT 





Minnie Caffey Willie Frit/, Claire Dolt-las Helen Haves 



Inter-Society Debate 



Reselvedj That the United States should grant the Philippines their independence immediately. 








k 




Rosalie Andrews Helen Haves Willie Fritz Lucille Morrison 

Intercollegiate Debate 

RrsnlvrJ, That the I'nited States should adopt a uniform marriage and divorce law. 



i i- 



-=se5^§ 




--jifc,. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





■ n 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





S| *or* Mrs, J. C Whitsrl], Mrs. ft. M. Andrews, Mrs G, K, Hlnshaw, Mrs. E. L. Douglas. 

Members i" Pftculfcy — Miss Kovella Mclntyn*. Mis. H. A. Whiii-. Pledges — Louise Collett, Margaret 
Davis, A va Mc A it 1 1 u r, K a th I e< - n Tea g lie* .11 * m ben* — ft osa lie A ndre ws, CI a i re Do u yl as, Willie Fr i t k , 
Norine Horary. Anmi 1 Leo Jaiiell, Rutli Jarrell, Lucille Morrison. 



13+ 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





FACULTY MEMBER, Miss Mabel Williams. MEMBERS: Alta Allen. Hilda Amick, Juanlta 
Amiok Minnie Caftey, Louise Jennings, Effie Keck, Grace. Keck, Annie Livengood, Edna Nicholson, 
Elizabeth Nicholson, Wanda Penny, Bessie Itedwine, Gertrude Rule, Laura Thompson, Leila Wag- 
oner, May "Woollen. 

'35 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





13'. 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





Colors: Red and Black 

"Horse" Carroll 
"Movk" Mill 
"Joe" Holmes 

"Charlie" Brooks 
"Swampy" Hear he 

"Dick" Paschall 



Iota Tau Kappa 

Fratres in Col leg io 
"•Pat" Paschall "Ed" Hedrick 

"Jimmie" Rogers "Ernic" Blosser 

"Virce" Yow "Bid," Lewis 

Fratres ex Collecio 
"Ab" Walker 
"Roy" Bethune 

Pledges 

"Tiny" Hutton 

Fratres Hoxorari 



Flovicr: Red Ruse 

"Hick" MacMannis 
"Tim" Mitchell 
"Tubby" Riuge 



'Frank" Rowan 
"Lube" Rathbone 



'Charlie" Morris 



Dean P, E. Lwdley 
Dr. H. B. Hiatt 



Don' C. McRae 
Prof. P. S. Ken sett 



R. N. Mann 
C R. Hinshaw 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





V. > 



) 


? <i 


( 




J 




r - — > 




i 


k < 


\ 




(Organized 1927) 
Colors: Blue and White Fleiuer: White Carnation 

Charter Members 
Grover L. Angel Jabvs W. Braxton John Perry Doseer Wade F. Fuquay 
T. G. Madison Talion J. Whitehead William U. Wood 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




PRATERS IN PLEDG 



~"% W~~* 





. ... . «► 

5 (?OPE J.CLVDE PUGH TAFT WHtTE CURftlE WILLIAMS 

HONORARY GRADUATE 



WEBSTER POPE 




HEfiMAN E. COBLE. 1 7 




RARY FACULTY 



\ T 







W ^ 



Prof. N.P.YARB0R0U6H Psof.J.H.MOUPANE Prof W.F.McC AN LESS 



> 

Prof J D.HARDY 



/ 



'39 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





IT HE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Tketa Pki 



Colors: Dark Green and Light Green. Symbol: Sword Fern. 

Motto: "To God, Thy Country, and to Thy Friends Be True." ; 

\ 

Fratres Honorari 
Mrs. M. B. Street Miss Dorothy St. Claire 



Fratres in Collegio 



-Helen Hayes 
.Lillian Buckner 
Dorothy Hoskins 
Leona Wood 
Elizabeth Hanner 
Mamie Frances Stamey 
Lillie Jane Long 



•Vista Dixon 
Virginia Pickens 
Pauline Elkins 
Spencer Cutchin 
Pauline WhitAker 
Kalopia Antonakos 
Pauline Hunter 



Fratres ex Collegio 
Jewel Hughes Margaret Perry 

Eugenia Williams Willard Shackleford 

Pledges 



Margaret Gurley 



Eva Ellis 



141 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 







THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Index of Superlative Types 

Most Charming Kaloi>ia Antonakos 

Most Handsome Cecil Wathen 

Best All-round Girl DoROTHV HOSKINS 

Best All-round Boy Fred Hauser 

Cutest Girl Hilda Amick 

Wittiest Boy Frank Poletz 

Most Popular Girl Margaret Glrlev 

Most Popular Boy Joe Holmes 

Best Liked Boy Richard MacMannis 

Most Cultured Keith Harrison 

Best Athlete Paul Brasser 

Best Leader J. P. Rogers 

Sunniest Charles Amick, Jr. 

Most Venturesome PAULINE Hl'NTER 




tBammmmmrnmm 






Xrfnfom&s h 




^J/auser 3 fr> 




mmtmrnmrnmymm 








HHHIHHHHIHH 




tam&wsB&stiBMBBm 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 









THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Miscellaneous Clippings 



He Is It 

Freddie the frosh gave his fraternity pin 
to that young Davis kid who lived out on 
Kay street. One day last week when he 
called on her a new inaid opened the door. 

"Miss Frances is engaged, sir," said the 
maid. 

"I know it," replied Freddie; "I'm what 
she is engaged to," 



She: "Is it true that yon intend to climh the 
library tomorrow?" 

lie: "No, ma'am! I couldn't do it." 

"Why not?" 

'loo manv stories in it!" 



The c'ass composition was on "Kings," and 
this is what one boy wrote: 

"The most powerful king on earth is Wor- 
king; the laziest, Shir-king; one of the wor t 
kings, Smo-king; the wittiest, Jo-king; the 
quietest, Thinking; the thirstiest, Driu-kiug; 
the slyest, Win-king, and the noisest, Tal- 
king." 



A Chinese truckman in San Franriscn sent 
the following hill to a grocer for delivering 
orders: 

to Goes 

jo Comes 

At sec a Went $5,00 



"Jack: "Ma! Freddie's heen hurt at foot- 
ball!" 

Fond Mama: "Oh, dear, dear! What does 
the telegram say?" 

Jack: "'Nose broken. How shall I set it — 
Creek or Roman?' " 



Miss Teacher: "Ralph, 1 am punishing you 
because I love you," 

Mulligan: 'Gee, teacher, I wisht I was nig 
enough to return your love!" 



On Honor 

The Student: "Say, Myrtle, this honor sys- 
tem is sure some stunt. Yesterday the profes- 
sor calls my roommate up to the desk an' says; 
'Look here, Mr. Durairar, what authority was 
you quoting? Almost every sentence in your 
paper is inclosed in quotation marks.' An' Bill 
says hack, 'Between you an' me, Pro., I was 
quotin' the fellow next to me.' " — Yalr Record. 



A high school boy asked a librarian for a 
copy of "Veins and Adenoids." A search 
through books on physiology failed to reveal 
am such title. He was asked if he knew the 
author, and replied: "Why, Shakespeare, I 
guess." It was discovered he wanted "Venus 
and Adonis." This is comparable to the 
woman who wanted "She Sat in the Wood 
Box," which was found to he "The Satin wood 
Box." 

* 9 9 

Mrs, Wonvelth: "When Johnson asked you 
if you liked 'Omar Khayyam,' you shouldn't 
have said you never drank it." 

Mr, Worwelth: "Why not?" 

Mrs. Worwelth: "Why, because it's not a 
drink, it's a cheese." 



His Experience 

Freshman: "Did you ever read Looking 
Backward' ?" 

Sophomore: "Yeah, once in an examination, 
and got expelled." 



The Boy Was Right 

Last winter at college the temperature on 
three successive nights dropped to zero. 

"That's nothing!" snorted Freddie the 
Frosh. "That's nothing!" 

"What's nothing?" indignantly asked Sam 
the Senior. 

"Zero!" remarked Freddie snappily, as he 
bolted the door. 



Budding Entomologist 

Mother: "Why is baby crying?" 
Nurse (in next room) : "He wants — " 
Mother: "Well, give him what he wants." 
The baby howls louder. 

Mother: "Why, didn't you give him what 
he « anted ?" 

Nurse: "I did. It was a bee." 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Miscellaneous Clippings 



Another Subject 

Bobby, running breathlessly into the house 
{mm the school, exclaimed: 'Oh, mother, I 
can write! See!" And he seized a piece nf 
paper and scrawled on it. 

"Hot. Bobby," asked his mother, "what does 
it mean ?" 

"Dimno," was the reply, "I haven't learned 
to read yet." 

* * i 

Juror: "1 can't serve on this panel. Judge. 
Just one look at that man convinces me he 
is guilty," 

Judge: "That's not the prisoner. That's the 
prosecuting attorney." 



Frosh: "1 think I've seen this play ■Asbes- 
tos' before." 

Wise Soph: "Hog, don't show your ignor- 
ance. Asbestos is the Latin word for 'wet- 

eume'. 11 

. - . 

A man in a mental hospital sat dang'ing 
a stick, with a piece of string attached, over a 
Bower bed. A visitor approached, and wish- 
ing to he affable, remarked: "How many have 
urn caught?" 

"You're the ninth," was the reply. 



Poet: "My wife said this last poem of mine 
caused her heart to miss a heat." 

Editor: "Rejected! We don't want any- 
thing that will interfere with our circulation." 



Safety First 

"Mama, may we go down into the garden? 
They say there is a comet to be seen tonight." 

"All right, go down, but don't go too near 
it," 

r I » 

Rastus, out in a boat with his best girl, 
Mandy, had been teasing for a kiss, but she 
refused again and again. Finally he became 
desperate. "Mandy," he threatened, "effen 
you don't lemme kiss vou. I'se gwine to up et 
dis here boat." 

(letting home, Mandy told her mother all 
about il. 

"An' did you let the gemman kiss you?" 
her mother asked. 

"Well, did >ou all see anything in de paper 
dis enawning about two uiggahs drotvnin'?" 



Him: "You look like a sensible girl; let's 
get married." 

, Her: "Nothing doing, I'm just as sensible 
as I look." 



Philip: "I hate those revolving doors," 
Morris: "So do I. You can't slain them 
when vou're mad." 



Sl'ch Moniker 

Clerk: "Your name?" 
Gob: "C. Faring Mann." 
Clerk: "1 asked your name, not your occu- 
pation." 



Not a Lay Success 

A young country minister, noted for his 
jollity, was dining at a farmhouse one Sun- 
day, and when his plate of roast chicken was 
passed to him, he remarked facetiously: "Well, 
here's where that chicken enters the minis- 
try," 

"Hope it does better there than it did in lay 
work," rejoined the bright hoy of the family. 



Inheriting Too Much 

"My dear boy, you have grown to be the 
living image of your father. You have your 
father's eyes, you have his nose, you have his 

mouth — " 

Jimmy (gloomily) : "Yes, and I have his 
trousers, too," 



Ft i.i. of Emptiness 

Dattghtery: "Noises in my head keep me 
awake." 

Hardy: "That's impossible." 

"How's that ?" 

"You can't transmit sound through a vac- 
uum." — Til-Hits. 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Directory of Faculty and Students 

Faculty 

ANDREWS, Dr. R. M . Hig), Poinu x. C. 

AlLRED, J. HOBART , . Uif , h p oillt) N . C- 

BOYLUf, J. P H i gh p„; Ilt| N> c _ 

Hardy, J, D. Hi,,), p„i, t t, N. C. 

Hlnshaw, C. R High p^ nj_ c. 

Miss Vera .... High P „ mt| N . c 



Anderson, S. C. 
Hitch Point. N. C. 



Idol, 

Johnson, Talmace 

Kennett, Paul S. 

LlNDLBY, PERCY E. . , ; High Point, N. C. 

McCanless, Walter F High Point, N. C 

McIntyre, Miss Novella Asheviile, N. C. 

MOSELY, MRS. CHAS Greensboro, N. C. 

MoURANI, J. Harlev Durham. N. C. 

Pugh, Stanley Findlay. Ohio 

Rogers, Pauleete , Burlington. N. r. 

Smith, Dan Walter High Point, N'. C. 

St. Claire, Miss Dorothy Brownwood, rexas 

Street, Mrs. Alan T. . . Charlottesville, Va. 

1 , Mi-- M \«i In til . Mo. 

White, Mrs. Henry A High Point, N. C. 

WILLIAMS, Miss Mabei Greensboro, N, C. 

Whitaker. Mrs. C. L High Point, N. C. 

Yarbrouch, N. P Hendersonville, N. C. 

YOUNG, Miss Marv Henderson, N. C. 



Seniors 



Andrew, G. W. . . 
Bingham, Ptylla . 

BRAXTON. I.II.t.lE Mae 

Buckner, Lillian 



Marion, I 
Lawndale, N 
Snow Camp, 
. . Libertv. 



Cafpey, Minnie High Point, 

Carroll, J, Elwood Reidsvitk, 

Coble, I,ois Graham, 

CUTCHIN, Spencer Whirakers, 

Dixon, Vista Liberty, 

Ellington, James High point, 

Garrett, FLOYD Julian, N. 

HALLOCK, Raymond Long Island, New V 

Hawser, Frei> T. ........ King, N. 

Hayes, Helen Henderson, N. 

Hendricks, Aileen High Point, N. 

Hill, R. L High Point, N. 

Holmes. L W Graham. N. 

IsLEY, Ruby Graham, N. 

Jarrell, Annie Lee High Point. N. 

Jarrell, Ruth H 'fi h p "' ,nt - N - 

Johnson. Canary ■ Seagrnve, N. 

Keck. Eefie Snow Camp, N. 

Kress I. II Thnmasville, N. 

Kress! L. C Thomasville, N. 



Lambeth, Alma 

Lemons, RAYMOND • 

LivENnoon, Annie - 

Madison, Glenn 

Morrison, Llich.e ■ 

Parrish, Max 

Paschall, Percy 

Pearson. Dora 

Pickens Virginia . , . . , High Point, N 

Redwine, Bessie" Lexington, N 

Rodinowitz, Jacob H >K h Pomt - N 



Trinity, N. 
Stokesilale, N. 
Greei);.l>oro, N. 
. . Olin, N. 
High Point, N, 
High Point, N, 
Ridgeway, N. 
Franklin, 



ml. 
C 
C. 

c. 

c. 
{', 

c. 
c. 

c. 
c. 
c. 

ork 
C. 

c. 

c. 

. C. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

c. 
, c. 
. r. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

c. 

('. 

c. 

V.-i. 

c. 
c. 

c. 



*£&-&. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Directory of Faculty and Students 



Seniors (Continued) 



Rogers, James p. 
Rule, Gertrube 
Sides, C. D. . . 
Snipes, Mae . . 
Suits, Erma . . 

SWANSQN, Fill 

Thompson, Lai ra 
Vakce, Ralph 
Wagoner, Li i u 

\\ nr, I I I \, MakV 



Adams, LOUISE . , , 
Allen, Alta ... 
Amick, Jlamta 
Angel, Grover L. . 
Anto v A KOS, A NTONIOS 
Axtonakos, Theodore 
Barker, Helen . . , 
Baynes, Lacs' . . 
Bowes, Sumter . , . 
Braxton* , Jab us . , 
Broome, Dewey D. 
Gates, Nady M., Jr. 
Clark, Elda . . . , 
Davis, Liu.ii Mae 
Davis. Margaret . , 
Dixon, Raymond . , 
Douglas, Claire 
CrURLEv, Margaret 
Harrison, Keith 
Hassell, Beulah 
Hatton, Frances . 
KidCECOCK, Vera 
Heorick, Edwin 
Hikes, Wilbert , . 
Holmes, Lol'ise . . 

HOSKINS. DORfJIHV . 

Hokney, Norine 
Duster, William . 
Jones, II . E. . . . 
McCarn, B. H. . 
Nicholson, Elizabeth 
Reynolds, Ink/ . . 
Reynolds, Irene 
Rinc, Grayson . , 
Smith, Lois . . . 
Teacup, Vrlna 
Walskr, Rebecca . 
Wei.rorx, Marjorie 
Whitaker, Pauline 
Yokley, Bruce . , 



Amick, Hilda . . . 
Andrews, Rosalie . . 
axtonakos, k:\i.eopia 
Asbdry, James . . . 
Harm lie, Grace , . 
Beck, Win i red . . . 



.K 



MORS 



Burlington, N. C. 

Jamestmvn, N, C. 

. Concord, N. C. 

rlHIsboro, N, C. 

High Point, N. C. 

Wilkesboro, N. C 

Greensboro, N. C. 

High F.»int, N. C. 

Brown Summit, N. C, 

, High Point, N. C. 



Sophomores 



Climax, 
, Mebane, 

Burlington, 
Mars Hil 
High Point, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
Wentworth, 
High Point, 
Snow Camp, 
Matthews, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
. Clemrui!-, 
High Point, 
Gold shorn. 
High Point, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
Ai.lii1.il.-. 
High Point. 
High Point, 
High Point, 
High Point, 

. Creswell, 

High Point, 
High Point, 
Greensboro, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
Mehatle, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
High Point, 
K.ernerM'ille, 
High Point, 
High Point, 

Julian, 
Lexington, 



I. N. C. 



N. ( . 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. ( . 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

V ( . 

N. «: . 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 



Burlington, N. 
High Point, N, 
High Point, N. 
High Point, N. 
. Mehane, N. 
High Point, N. 



N. C. 
N. C. 

N, C. 
\ ( . 
N. C. 
N. C. 

N. C. 

\. i . 



C. 

c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 







^SJ^ 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Directory of Faculty and Students 



Reeson, Treva . 
Bloom, He run . 
Blosser, Ernest 
Blair, Jessie . . 
Brasseur, Paul . 
Brown, Elizabeth 
Ci.oiii-ei.tkr, Clarence 
Clodfelter, Lena 
Cottle, Ralph . 
CriodlebaUGH, T. Pierce 
Dauchtry, James , 
Dennis, Carl . . 
Hosier, John p. . . 
Elkins, Pauline 
Ellis, Eva .... 
Ellison, Loraine 
Feezor, Noel . . 
Focleman, Elila 
Freeland, Laura 
Fritz, Willie . . 
Fuquav, Wade . . 
Gibson, Evelyn . . 
Hackman, Kenton 
Hanker, Elizabeth 
Hakrell, Blanco 
Heath, John 
Hunter, Pauline 
ingram, blanche 
Keck, Grace . . 
K i staid, Margaret 
Lambeth, Lena . 
Lasater, Louise 
Lemons, Carl 
Madison, Blaine 
Mathews, T. Olin 
Medlin, Luther 
Method, Leo 
McArthur, Ava 
McPhaul, Thelma 
MacMannjs, Richard 
Mitchell, Clifford 
Morris, Nellie . . 
Mulligan, Ralph . 
Nicholson, Ejina 
Nunnery, Lucy . . 
Osborne, Alt a Mae 
Osborne, Ruth . . 
\'\\ m , f'i \m. 
Pegc, Fred . . ■ 
Perry. Glenn . 
Perdue, Raymond . 
Prim, Ruth . . . 
Quakenbush, Jessie . 
Ridge, George . . . 
Robertson, J. Vernon 
Robbins, Charles C. Jr 
Russell, Cleo . . . 
Russell, Paul . . . 
Shields, Helen . . . 
Stamey, Fanny , . . 
Stuart, Nettie . . . 
Teacue, Kathleen 



SOPHOMOR ES (Con I'm tied) 







Kernersville, X, C, 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. Morgantowu, W. \'n. 






Thomasville, N. C. 






. Morgantowu, W. V;i. 






. , High Point, N. C. 






Thomasville, N, C. 






Thomasrille, N. C. 






. Brooklyn, New York 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . Charlotte. X. C. 






. . Statnviilc, N. C. 






. . Randleman, N. C. 






. . . Liberty, N. C. 






, . Henderson, N. C. 






. . High Point, N, C. 






. Linwood, N. C. 






Guilford College, N. C. 






, . High Point, N. C. 






. . Lexington, N. C, 






. . Siler City, N. C. 






. . High Point, N. C. 






Decatitr, Illinois 






. . . . Julian, N. C. 






. . East Bend, N. C. 






Champaign, Illinois 






. Tobacco vi Me, N. C. 






Kerliersvilte, N. C. 






Snow Camp, N. C. 






, . . Asheville, N. C. 






. . . Trinity, N. C. 






, . . Ervvin, N. C. 






. . Stokesdale, N. C. 






.... Olin. N. C. 






, . High Point, N. C. 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . High Point, N. C, 






.... Staley, N. C. 






. . . Shannon, N. C. 






. Frosthnrg, Maryland 






, . Decatur, Illinois; 






. . . Fallston, N. ('. 






Unioittown, Penna. 






, . . Mebane, N. C. 






. . WlLtakers, N. C. 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . High Point, N. C. 






Guilford College, N. C. 






Guilford College, N. C 






Thomasvillc, N. C. 






. . . . Roanoke, V"a, 






. Thnmasville, N. C. 






. . Burlington, N. C. 






. . . High Point, N. C. 






. , . Jennings, N, C. 






. . . High Point, N. C. 






. . . . Sophia, N. C. 






. . . . Sophia, N. C. 






Kernersville, N, C. 






. . . High Point, N. C. 






. . . . Liberty, X. C. 






. . Kernersville, N. C. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

Directory or Faculty ana Students 

Sophomores (Continued) 
Thompson, Hqbart Decatur, Illinois 

I I.-IH.IUIS, I Ml / . . . . , .Vlil"cru. N. C. 

W'.miii n. CECIL , . Mnrgiinnekt, Kcntnikv 

Welborn, Elizabeth Snow High Paint, N. C 

Whitehead, T. J. Snow Camp, N. (", 

Williams, Maie Lawndale, N. 

Wjluard, Cm High Point, X. 

Wooo, Leon a Mittboro, N. 

Wood, Willie B , Hnl lister, N. 

YORK, MAMU Arrhdaie, N. 

Young, Harvey Stokesdale, N. 

Vow, ViRCll Gibsonvllte, N. 



Freshmen 

Amick, Charles B., Jr. Burlington, N. C. 

Amih, Miiikjikm- High Point, N. C. 

Barker, Allen High Point, N. ('. 

Barnes, W. Newton , Linwood, N. C. 

Benni ii, Monroe Burlington, N. ('. 

Hess, Estei.le Vale, N. C. 

Brooks, Jacksie I High Point, N, C. 

Browne, Lucile Jamestown, N, ('. 

Bryant, Howard High Point, N. C. 

Campbell, Hartford Rochester, Pennsylvania 

Carter, Guy H Drj Fork, Virginia 

Clinard, Margaret . , Thomasville, N. C. 

Clark, Stuart High Point, N. C. 

Collett, Louise Trinity, N. C. 

Connor, Qubntin Charlotte, N, c, 

Crotts, Howard D Ashboro, N. C. 

Ckowbll, Elizabeth Archdale, N, C. 

CULLER, .1. Norman Pinnacle. N. C, 

Driesbach, John Duluth, Minn. 

D linear, Aubrey High Point, N. C, 

Edwards, Ma ik Belwood, N C, 

Ewing, Albert . , Casey, Illinois 

FARLOWE, Ina Sophia, N. V, 

Frank, Andrew High Rrn-k, N. C. 

Freeman, Fannynet Easier, S. C. 

Freemav. Paul Greensboro, N. C. 

Ganoe, Garold Rochester, Pennsylvania 

GENTRY, BradSHeR Roxlwrn, N. C 

Gibson, LaVergxe . , Hij;h Point, N. C. 

Grimes, Ciiarikm- High Point, N. C. 

Hall, Mildred Ophir, N. c. 

Harris, Barrett Denton, N, C. 

Harris, Doris Peari Carthage, N. C. 

Harris, LuLa Denton, N. C 

Heorick, Wm. Marvin nigh Rock, N. C. 

Herman, Minnie High Point, N, C. 

Herndon, John Wm High Point, N. C. 

Holder, Edna Ashboro, N. C. 

Holt, Kenneth Burlington, N. C 

Hooks, At. ma Mai; High Point, N. C 

Humeston, Carter High Point, N. C. 

Hi MTBR, Nl.v.1 Pinnacle, N, C 

Hi i in\, Francis H Morgantown, \V. Va. 

HOKE, TheODORS .....,,,. Pottsville, Pennsylvania 

Ingram, Irvin S High Point, N. C. 

|innint;s, Louise High Point, N. C. 




-u^ 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

Directory of Faculty and Students 



Fr rsh M en (Continued) 



[o»i s, Howard . . . 
Lame, Edcar O. . . . 
Liles, Charlie . . . 
Lt'l'MAN, Riley . . , 
Lono, LlLLIE Jams . . 
Lov, Hai.lie .... 
Mankss, Colon . . . 
Martin, David . . . 
Masse v, Ciies'iek . . 
Massey, l.msi: , . . 
Matthews, Leok . . 
McEwen, Virginia 
Mitchell, Amv Lou . 
Mitcheix, Flora Delle 
MoFFtTT, Ernest . . 
Morris, Ciiarl.es . . 
Morris, Gladys , . . 
MOTSINGER, Leu. A . . 
Murk, Katiiekim-, . 
Nycaso, Verne . . 
parker, f.cla . . 
Paschall, Richard 
Pa'iteksok, I k i s I 
Penny, Wanda . . 
Penton, Thomas Hej 
Peeler, Edcar O. . 
Pi i iv, Norman . . 
Pi CRN el i., Ciias. 
Pierce, Llovd . . 
Pope, Ciias, Webster 
Preston, Ida Lee . 
Presnei.l, Althea 

lull I/. Ernest . , 

Poole, Emma Lee . 
Proctor, Dewey 
Pi ch, Clvde . . . 
Quick, Mary . . 

Rafkk. Sam I 

Reese, Robert L. . . 
Roth, Phillip ... 
Seward, Evelyn . , 
Shoaf, Mary NeAL 
Sicelofi, James . . . 
SMITH, Chester . . . 
Snipes, Mary Lois . . 
SpEKCER, Eva . . . 

I'.u lor, George J. . . 
Taylor, Mary WlNSLOW 

I iroMPSON, J. Adrian- 
Walter, Frank . . 
Walton, Doris . . 
Wari.ick, Mary Beth 
Warlick, Rlhy . . . 
Watson, Ruth . . . 
Wkedon, Ralph . . 
Winn-:, Tait - . . 
Wii.kins, Bruce . . 
Williams, B, Clirrie . 
Wood, John A. . . ■ 
Wokley, William . . 



!®il 







. High Pi.iiit, N'. C. 






. . , Pinnacle, N. V. 






. . . Littleton, N. C. 






"niontown, Pennsylvania 






Winston-Salem, N C. 






. . Burlington, N. C. 






. . . . Biscoe, N, C. 






. . Hi^h Point, N, C. 






. . . Trinity, N. C. 






. , . Trinity, N, C. 






Bessemer City, N. c. 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . . Jennings, N. C. 






. . . Jennirigs. N. C. 






. . . Decatur, Illinois 






Decatur, (Kino's 






. . . Filllstnn, N. C. 






Guilford College, N. ('. 






Cooleemee, N. C. 






. . . Dill nth, Minn. 






Kernersviile, N. C. 






. . Ridgeway, N. C. 






Burlington, N. C. 






. . llii;li Point, N. C, 






. . Hissop, Alabama 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . High Poiin, N. C. 






Champaign, Illinois 






. . High Point, N. C. 






. . Kernersviile, N, C. 






. . . Stdkesdale, N. C. 






. Ashebrcrn, N. C. 






Oil City, Pennsylvania 






. . Greenville*, S. C. 






High Point, N. C. 






Climax, N. C. 






. . . Pageland, S. C. 






. Linwontl, N. C 1 . 






. . tli^h Point, N. C. 






. . High Point, N, C. 






. . . High Point. N. C. 






Limvood, N, C. 






. . Lexington, N, C. 






. , . High Point, N. C. 






High Point, N. C. 






. . . Liberty, \\ ('. 






Greensboro, N. C. 






Elizabeth City, N. C. 






. . . Reidsville, N. C. 






. . . Chicago, Illinois 






, , , High Point, N. C. 






Lawmlale, N. C. 






Lawndale, X. C. 






. . . Greensboro, N C. 






. . . High Point, N, C. 






lllin. N. C. 






. . . Decatur, Illinois 






Efiaml. N. C. 






. . . High Point, N. C. 






. . . Fairmont, \V. Va, 










THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

Directory or Faculty ana Students 



Violin Students 



Einstein, Kathryn 
Fogleman, Eula . 

( rARRETT, VlSTA . 
Mi EWEN, VIRGINIA 

Davis, Roger . . 
Davis, Charles . 



Angel, Grovek . . 
Ai.ii'.s, Alt a . . 
Andrews, Alma 
Andrews, Rosalie 

HrDOKS, JACKS1E . . 

Buckner, Lillian 
Einstein, Kathryn 
Hanker, Elizabeth 
Harris, Doris 
Harris, Lula 
IIiait, Mrs. M. S 
TIit'Ks, PAUI im , 

Holder, Edna 

JENNIM.S, l.lll [M- 



Ballard, E, Lester 
Davis, Cars . . . 
Einstein, Kathryn 
Garrett, Vista . . 
IIamil, Hire . . . 



, . High Point, N. C. 
Guilford College, N. C. 
, . Burlington, N, C. 
. . High Poitu, N. C. 

Keruersville, N. C. 

Keruersville, N. C. 



Allen, Hassell . , 
Allen, JOSEPH , . 
Ai.lreo, Helen . , 
Alpers, John . . 
a nto n a kos, t j i e 00 r e 
Armfielii, Evelyn . 
Bar.vrtte, Katie Lee 
Combs, Cy . . . 
Copeland, Thalia 
Ci LLl R, Harry . . 
Dixon, William 
Elkins, Pauline 
Elliott, Askburn . 
Farlowe, Ina . . 
i rARKEX, James .. . 
Garrett, Geneva . 
(.iinsoN, Evelyn . . 
( SONZALEZ, REINALDO 
< ^1 I'll is, Hekreki' 

CrVRLEY, HENRY . . 

Hester, Gwin . . 
Hoskins, Hess . . 
Humeston, Carter 
Hi mir, Pens . . 
Jeknica.n, Maxi 
Johnson, Elizabeth 
Jones. Clarence 
Kress, L. C. . . . 



Davis, Mrs. Carv 
Mill, Mrs. J. C. . 
Hill, Nancv . . . 
Pegc, Fred . , - 
York, Mamie . . 
Walker, Robt., Jr. 



. . High Point, N. C. 

, , High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

LJuiliord College, N. C. 

. . Arch-dale, N. C. 

. . High Point, N. C. 



PlANO Students 



Mars Hill, N. C. Garrett, Vista . . 

. Mehane, N. C. Marsh, Mrs. Waije 

High Point, N. C. Morris, CHARLES 

High Point. N. C. Neese, Margaret Opal 

High Point, N. C. Nicholson, Edna 

Liberty, N. C. Picknell, Chas. 

High Point, N. C. Poletz, Ernest . . 

. . Julian, N. C. Sides, CD.... 

. Carthage, N. C. SMITH, VERA . . . 

Denton, N. C. Stevens, Elizabeth 

High Point, N. C. Teacue, Kathleen 

High Point, N. C. Terry, Mrs. !.. R. , 

. Ashhoro, N. C. Yo lints, Kathleen 
High point, N. C. 

Special Students 



. Burlington, N, C. 
. High Point, N. C. 
Decatur, Illinois 
. High Point, N. C. 
. , Mehane, N. C. 
Champaign, Illinois 
. . . Oil City, Pa. 
. . Concord, N, C. 
. High Point, N. C. 
. High Point, N, C. 
Kerliersville, N. C. 
. High Point, N. C. 
. High Point, N. C. 



High Point, N. 
High Point, N. 
High Point, N. 

Burlington, N. 
High Point, N. 



Johnson, Elizabeth . 
Mateer, Michael . 
Payujr, Mrs. Alma B. 
TEAfiUE, T. C. . . . 

Wright, E. A High Point, N. C. 



High Point, N. C. 
. . . Moii.it:), Pa. 

High Point, N. C. 
Kernersviltc, N, C. 



Commercial 

. Mehane, N, C. 
. Raleigh, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
Champaign, Illinois 
High Point, N. C. 
Jamestown, N. C. 
'. Mehane, N, C. 
. Eldorado, Ark. 
High Point, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
Reidsville. N. C. 

Liberty, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 

Sophia, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 

I U.,in;i.vill-. \. C, 

High Point, N. C. 
Cienlncgos. Ciiha 
. Raleigh, N. C. 
High Point, N, C. 
. Raleigh, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 
. Guilford, N. C. 
Ashevillc, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 

Mil. , \. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 



Students 

Lassiter, Mary' . . 
Lewis, William D. 
Martin, Riley . . 
McEwen, Virginia 
McDowell, Thomas 
Moffitt, J. S. . . 
Moore, Della . . 
Morris, Chas. . . 
ovekstreet, maude 
Parker, Eula . . 
Pekdlie, Raymond . 
Poletz, Frank . . 
Preston, Ida . . . 
Richardson, Robert 

ROEflNOWITZ, J. , . 

Role, Gertrude 
Russell, Paul . . 
Shields, Helen . . 
Snipes, Gladys . . 
Snyder, Robert . 
Street. Mrs. Ai. 
We ant, Wayne 
Welborn, Elizabeth S 
Wii.born, I la 
Whitaker, Mrs. 
With row, Mike 
Worm, Grace 
Wright, E. A. 



LAN T 



C. L 



Rand I eman, N. C, 

High Point. N, C. 

. I'niontown, Pa. 

High Point, N. C. 

, Raleigh, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

Graham, N. C. 

Decani r, Illinois 

. Beaufort, N. C. 
Kernersville, N. C. 

Roanoke, Virginia 

, Iriiontonn, Pa. 

Stokesdale, N. C. 

Gainesville, Georgia 

High Point, N.'C. 

Jamestown, N. C. 

Randleman, N. C. 

Keruersville, N. C. 

Hitfsboro, N. C. 

Somerset, Kentucky 

Charlottesville, Vs. 

High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 
Eldorado, Arkansas 

High Point, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 







THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY -EIGHT 




fiiD/ 




r — ^p) 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

FIFTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 11, 

1928 



1 1 1 




?m 







i. ^^^^^J^L.j^U^rm^ 



For Catalogue Afifily to 

THE PRESIDENT 

High Point, N. C. 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




An Ideal Place to Get Your 
Needs 

S. ROBINOWITZ 

"The Store of Better Values" 

1 10 East Washington Street 



Drugs With a Reputation 

MANN DRUG 
STORES 

Elwood Herd B!d R . 6 1 8 N. Main St. 



250 Rooms 



250 Baths 



KING COTTON 
HOTEL 

Greensboro. North Carolina 



Kester Furniture 
Company 

Phone 2788 

116 South Main Street 

"A Good Store in a Good 
Town" 



STEPHEN'S ART STUDIO 




"A Story in Picture Leaves Nothing Untolcr' 

High Point, N. C. 104"j N. Main St. 



S^ISef 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 





No Better Business Partner 
Than a Good Bank Aid- 
ing in Your Success 

WACHOVIA BANK 
SJ TRUST CO. 

High Point, N. C. 
Caiptat and Surplus $5,000,000 



SNOW LUMBER 
COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Lumber, Sash, Doors 
Blinds, Etc, 



HIGH POINT. N. C. 



Sporting Goods and Every- 
thing in Hardware 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

HIGH POINT 

HARDWARE 



1 27 S, Main 



Phone 2140 



QUALITY 



SERVICE 



Britt Electric Co. 

Electrical Contractors 

Lighting Fixtures and 
Appliances 



132 S. Wrtirn St. 



Phone 2830 



If Those Vegetables You 

Had Were A-l Quality, 

It's a Pretty Safe Bet 

That They Came 

From 

W, I. Anderson 8 
Company 

Greensroro. North Carolina 



That's Our Specialty 

* 

Mr. Merchant, Take a Hint 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Vanstocy Clothes For 
The College Man! 

The extra value found 
in Vanstory clothes has 
an instant appeal to col- 
lege men of all classes. 
Whether you would buy 
the very highest priced 
or the lowest priced gar- 
ments you'll get a full 
measure of value for 
every dollar you pay. 

Vdndloru 



CLOTMUVG tZOfii1PS*rW- 



ehds ffiV Knight Pres and fityr 
Jefferson Standard Bldg. 



HOWERTON'S 

Apparel for the Discriminating 
Woman 

156 S. Main Street 
High Point, North Carolina 



THE COMMERCIAL 
NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL, $1,000,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 
$1,000,000.00 



Jarrett 
Stationery Company 

Office Supplies 

Carter Fountain Pens, Books, 

Stationery. Victor Records, 

and Victrolas 

Everyday Greeting Cards 



HIGH POINT 
STEAM LAUNDRY 

French Dry Cleaners and Dyers 

Phone J 25 

High Point, North Carolina 



ECKERDS 

Cut Rate Drug Store 
140 South Main St. 

We Sell the Best For 
Less 

Prescriptions Registered Druggist 



The Plant That Service Built" 




Dry Cleaning — Tailoring 
Dyeing 

1009 E, Green St. Phone 2980 

Gloicr £) st?m — Rimsfy Mrrfcod Dry Clouine 





THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




DIAMONDS 



PEARLS 



' ^vA;f;///^ 



WATCHES 





CLOCKS 



Leading Credit Jewelers 
\2o3MMamSt?J 



\:\\ 



%.HIGHP01NT# 



HIGH POINT'S LEADING CREDIT JEWELER 



RUN RIGHT TO 

RING'S 

The Rexalt Store 



K W. Peters Co. 

Boston, Mass. 

OFFICIAL JEWELERS 

Class Rings, Pins, Emblems 
Invitations 

District Manager District Office 

J, H. Miller Durham, N. C. 



BELK-STEVENS 
COMPANY 

'•SELL IT FOR LESS 1 ' 



ORIGINATORS 



THE 

MORRIS 

PLAN 



5% Savings 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




TRY US FOR 

DRUGS DRINKS 

SMOKES RADIOS 

HART DRUG 
COMPANY 

NEXT TO POST OFFICE 
Phones 321-322 



LEONARD CLOTHING 
COMPANY, INC. 



120 So. 
Main St. 




Phone 
41185 



HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



N. E. RUSSELL 

Shoe Repair Shop 

108 South Main Street 

Phone 2616 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 



Moffitt Printing 
Company 

COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 

206 East Washington St. 
Phone 2252 



Utility Service and the Community 

More than any other one factor, the quality of its utility services 
determines the desirability and attractiveness of a community for 
business or as a place in which to live. 

In industry and in the home the application of electricity to in- 
dustrial and household operations is multiplying the effectiveness of 
the labor of the worker and relieving the housekeepers of drudgery 
and fatigue. And while it increases the efficiency of the individual, 
it raises the quality of the work accomplished as well. 

We invite attention to the standard of utility services in the cities 
in which we supply these essentials to modern living and modern 
business. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMPANY 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY- EIGHT 






COMPLIMENTS 






OF 


J. 


W. 


SECHREST 8 
SON 



Q&kXh 



WHERE QUALITY TELLS 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 

'The Carolina*' Greatest Hardware 
and Sporting Goods House" 



GOOD CLOTHES 

N. K SILVER 
COMPANY 



SODAS 



CANDIES 



Cecil's Drug Store 

Notris and Jacob's 
Candies 



CIGARS 



LUNCHES 



BARBER-HALL 
PRINTING CO. 

"Better Printing Pays" 

Telephone 2385 High Point, N. C. 

Everything in Printing 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Let Us Serve You After 
Graduation 



Consult us about your future 
home — the loan you want — 
your insurance. We are equip- 
ped to serve your real estate 
needs. 



Southern Real 
Estate Company 

104 N. Elm Street 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



VISIT US 

Suit Pressing, Shoe Repairing 
Shoe Shining, Hat Cleaning 

HIGH POINT HAT 
SHOP 



Phone 2924 



102 N. Main St. 



You'll Thoroughly Enjoy 
Eating Here 

FRIENDLY 
CAFETERIA 

132 South Main Street 



"AN EATING PLACE OF 
EXCELLENCE" 

George Washington 
Cafe 

104 North Main Street 



HOWELL 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

Fixtures and Supplies 

Phone 2832 114 N. Wrenn St. 



FOOTWEAR "FIT" TO 
WEAR 

Merit Shoe Co. 

Incorporated 
134 S. Main St. HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Large or Small Savings 
Accounts Appreciated 

Globe Industrial 
Bank 

5% INTEREST 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




STAMEY'S 

High Point's Greatest Jewelry Store 

Showing the New and Distinctive in 

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 

and Silverware 

Visit Our New and Unusual Gift and 
Art Shop 

A Cordial Welcome to College Students 

108 North Main Street 




Dr. Nat Walker 

Optometrist 

Over Hart Drug Company 
Next to Post Office 

High Point, North Carolina 



25 Years Service to Our Customer! 

Newest in Men's 
and Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

LONDON'S 

121 North Main Street 



For First-Class Shoe Repairing 
Call 4313 

W. C BROWN 
SHOE SHOP 

Work Called For and Delivered 
Pbone 4313 128 N. Wrenn St. 




vtf HERZ- 




to FIND 

A 
SOUND 
INVEST- 
MENT/ 



-IIIW^^^^^ 

%HE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Gruen Watches 
Seth-Thomas Clocks 




The Croix De Guerre of 
American Achievement 

THE GRUEN PENTAGON 

S. J, MORTON 

Jeweler 
Quality— Honesty — Service 

Fine Watch and Jewelry 

Repairing and 

Engraving 

106 North Main Street 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Gorham Silver 

Finest Quality 
Diamonds 



CLOTHES AS YOU WANT THEM 

JOHN AUSTIN 

COMMERCIAL BANK BARBER SHOP 

High Point, N. C. Phone 5489 

REPRESENTING 

Paul Tailoring Co. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
TAILORED-TO-MEASURE-ONLY 



WHEN YOU GET IT 
AT 

Mat ton's Drug Co. 

It's Good 



Have You Tried Sunshine's 
Genuine Dry Cleaning Yet? 

For AH Things of Silk or Wool 

It- Has No Equal 

Phone 393 

Sunshine Laundry 



The Acorn Store 

ALWAYS 

Dependable Merchandise 

127 N. Main St. 
High Point, North Carolina 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




THE BEST SHOP IN HIGH POINT 

FOR MISSES AND LADIES 
NEW STYLES EVERY DAY 

WAGGER'S LADIES' SHOP 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 



R. K. STEWARTS 
SON 

CONTRACTORS FOR 
HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

High Point, N. C. 



Herbert B. Hunter 

THE ARCHITECT FOR 
HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

High Point, N. C. 



DR. MAX RONES 

Registered Optometrist 




High Point's Only Exclusive Optical Store 
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 

FRAMES, LENSES, FIELD GLASSES 

Phone 2625 
203 N. Main Street High Point, N. C. 

Office Hours 9 A. M. to 6 P. M. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Dad! What About Your Boy's Education? 

OF 1,000 children en- 
tering public school, 
only 23 graduate from 
college, for in the ma- 
jority of cases, no finan- 
cial provision is made to 
permit a complete edu- 
cation. 

You can guarantee that 
boy of yours a fair start 
in life through the Re- 
liance Educational En- 
dowment. 

For a well laid-out plan consult a specialist on the ap- 
plications of insurance. 

Today •mite or 'phone 



N. L. GARNER, General Agent 

Phone 2834 
715 COMMERCIAL BANK BUILDING 




IOOO ENTER PUBLIC SCHOOL 




RELIANCE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF PITTSBURGH 




THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY -EIGHT 




Enrols Department 
Store 

Opposite Post Office 
Phone 2412 High Point, N. C. 

"SELLS FOR LESS' 



THE SHERATON 
HOTEL 

Willis G. Poole, Manager 

High Point, North Carolina 

"A Good Hotel in a Good Town" 



Aesop said two thousand years 
ago: "You can't drive a nail with 
a sponge, no matter how much you 
soak it." 



Carolina Homes 

INCORPORATED 

Realtors 

Bob Tudor, Manager 
Commercial Bank Building 

TELEPHONES 2727-2093 



Jones & Peacock 

INCORPORATED 

INSURANCE 

All Kinds 
301 North Main Street 



The Rhodes Press 

130 West Commerce Street 

High Point, N. C. 

Telephone 4214 



Loans 

Insurance 

Rentals 


IT 


CAN BE DONE 


Homes Sold 

on Monthly 

Payment Plan 




^'/ V r cg T ,c -a 






High Point, N. C. 


~\Jr 



tH E ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




You'll find the ZENITH in protection 
afforded you by the 



Pilot 

Life Insurance 

Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Real Estate Loans 

by 2 % and 6% Interest 

Also 10 Year Monthly Loans with 60 
Pet Cent Appraisal 

GREENSBORO BOND & 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

R. A. Colvin, Manager 

806 Commercial National Bank Building 

Phone 2787 



"A Quarter Century of Service' 



COLLEGE CORNER 


North State Shoe Store 


Featuring 

"Styics of Today, Tvith a Touch of 
Tomorrow" 


PHONE 4037 



Tne Ideal Car for tne Teacner and Student 

THE BIGGER AND BETTER 
for Economical Transportation 




Correct Size 



Correct Price 



SHERATON CHEVROLET COMPANY 

"A MIGHTY GOOD PLACE TO BUY" 

High Point, N. C. 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




DON'T FORCLT TO CALL 2058 FOR 

CLOVER BRAND ICE CREAM 

AND 

PASTEURIZED DAIRY PRODUCTS 
None Better 

HIGH POINT CREAMERY COMPANY 



Real Estate Service 
That Excels 

Auction and Private Sales 

FARLOW INSURANCE AND 
REALTY COMPANY 

High Point. N. C. 



GIVE US A TRIAL ON 
YOUR NEXT JOB 

STRICKLAND AND 
FREEMAN 

Consulting Engineers 

Phone 4271 

Office, Commercial Bank Building 



After You Graduate and Start Working You Should Save at 
Least Ten Per Cent of Your Earnings Each Month 

Building and Loan Shares Are the Best Medium to Accumulate 
a Substantial Sum. 

HIGH POINT PERPETUAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION 

At the Commercial National Bank 



we -wish to take 


this 


opportunity 


to express our 


appreciation to our Ad 


vertisers for 


their co-oftera- 


tfon and suftfiort, 


and t 


3 urge 


the St 


uaents to trade 


with the Firms the 


t adv 


ertise 


with us. 

The Zenith Staff. 




sy 












THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 




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LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 






HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 



V 



ensonT 

PRINTING CO. 
NASHVILLE. 
tTENN 






COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 






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IWfr & " : Z ,E NITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 




Autographs 




I 



THE ZENITH, NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

Autographs 




high MaQeotMbfei 

HJGHPDarr.w.c