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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1929, High Point College"

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1929 ZENITH 

Copyright 



A. ANTONAKOS 

Editor 

T. ANTONAKOS 

Business Manager 




THC 192? ZCNITH 

VOLUME THREE OF THE YEAR-BOOK 



PUBLISHED FOR THE 

Students of High Point College 




EDITED BY 
A. ANTONAKOS AND T. OLIN MATHEWS 



SPONSORED BY THE SENIOR CLASS 



HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAY, 1929 



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PREFACE 




F COURSE we realize that no annual can ever 
approach a reflection of college life as it really 
is. Only a cinematograph machine could do that 
and then only if the subjects were caught while 
unaware they were being photographed. At best the material 
contained in a year book can act only as an incentive for the 
recollection of life in the college as it was lived. Very much 
the same sort of glamour hangs about an annual as about a 
framed picture. The picture centers our view on a particular 
spot marked off by the frame but we always wonder what ex- 
tends beyond — could we but see. An annual represents a 
static point in college organization, generally at the peak of 
activity, that is all. You yourself must supply the rest. 

As for the art theme, there is none. It was our original in- 
tentions to make it modern; but in studying the modern motif 
we were led to the classic and finally we were led to adopt 
a middle ground of classic simplicity and modem impressionism. 
We have attempted to make the whole background of the book 
atmospheric. If any symbolic meaning can be attached to any 
of the executions, well and good. If not, consider them decora- 
tive. 

In spite of several handicaps we have attempted to produce the 
annual at a minimum of expense to the student and at the same 
time of superior artistic value. We hope that we have suc- 
ceeded at least in part. The cost to the student has been less 
this year than that of any previous year at the sacrifice of 
neither space nor quality of material. 

We express our thanks to those who have helped collect ma- 
terial for the Nineteen Twenty-nine ZENITH ; particularly to 
the students who were intrusted by the Seniors with the task 
of compiling their Senior write-ups. And to the college ad- 
ministration we wish to extend our sincerest appreciation for 
their co-operation, without which this book could not have been. 

The Staff. 



JTJTJXnjTJXTUTJTJTJTJTJTJXnJ^^ 







THE FACULTY 

THE CLASSES 

ATHLETICS 

THE ORGANIZATIONS 

FEATURES 



TJXTUTJTJXnJTJTJTJTJTTJTJ^^ 




JTJrTTLnJTJnUTJTITJXnJTJTJ^^ 




EDICATED 



TO 



DR. P. E. LINDLEY 



WHOSE DIGNITY AND 
PERSONALITY ARE 
INVESTED IN YOUTH 




FROM Monti. iiu Avenue 




R. M. Andrews, D.n. 
President 






Faculty 



-*- 





J. HOBART Ai.i.reii, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Romance Languages 



Miss Gladys Barkeit, B.S. 

Instructor in Shorthand and 
Typewriting 



J. P. Boylin, A.B., I.I..H. 
Illilrtii Director 



E. O. Cummin'CS, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 



Mrs GBORCE C. Hai.tom 
Itursar 



Miss Ruth Henley, A.B., B.S. 
Professor of Biology 





Clifford R. HlNSHAW, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Kdutation 



Miss E. Vera Idol, A.B., B.S., A.M. 
Professor of English 



12 



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Faculty 



Talmage C. Johnson, A.B., A.M.. 

Dean of Men 
Professor of Philosophy and Journalism 



Paul S. Kk.v.vett, A.B., B.D., LI..D. 

Professor of History 

Percy E. Likdley, A.K., A.M., Liit.D. 

Dean ol College 
Professor of Religious Education 



Walter F. McCanless, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 



Miss Lolise McDeakman, U.S. 
Librarian 



J, Hari.ev MODRANE, U.S., M.S. 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics 






Miss IIortense Spiegell. B.F.A. 

Instructor in Piano 

Ernest B. Stimsox 

Department of Music 
Instructor in loiie. Piano and Theo- 
retical Subjects 





>3 



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Facult'' 



Stanley Pugh, A.B. 
Professor of Business Administration 



Miss Dorothy St. Clair, A.B. 
T rat her of Violin 



Mrs. Madeleine B. Street, B.S. 

Professor of Home Economies 



Mrs. II. A. White. A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Greek 






Miss Mabei. Williams, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Latin 
Assistant Professor of English 



Mrs. C. I.. Wiiitakkr 

Dietitian 



Nathaniel P. Vakboroi-gh, A.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 



Miss Mary F.. Young, A.B., A.M. 
Dean of Women and Instructor in 



History 





Jane Peter Street, Mascot 



SENIOR CLASS 

Culms: While ami Gold Flower; Dais) 

Motto: "Character is Greater than Intellect." 

Officers 

I. Keith Harrison President 

Margaret Gurlev t 'ice-President 

Louise Adams Secretary 

J Anus \V. BRAXTON Treasurer 

1)r, I'. E. I.inui.i v tdvisor 



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Louise Adams, A.B. 

PLEASANT CARDBUS, N. C. 

Nikanlhan Literary Society 

Christian Endeavor Society. 1. -■ 3. 4; Paracelsus 

Scientific Society, 2, 3. -I; Secretary of Christian En- 

dvavor Society, 8; Randolph County r*iuh. t, 2. 3; 

I Ilk Inir nub. 3. I; Dramatic Club. 2, 3; Vice-Prest- 

<i< in >•( Christian Endeavor Society, 4; Secretary of 

'lass. 1; Vice-President of Nikinthan Literary 

Society, 3j TracK Team. 

"I.ayal and steadfast, loving and true," are the key- 
ni.tr Wor4s in Louise's character. Her loyalty extends 
throughout her varied range of activity — school, 
church, home, and friendships. Her loving, straight- 
i"i»;inl M)ii;ii-<ni'ss and sportsmanship are the solid 
foundations on Which she has built her life, and it 
is through these that she has meant so much to her 
college. She is .i leader In literary and Christian 

Bndeavor Societies, a dependable hand in all gins' 

at hi. -ties, and stands high in scholarship — always 
achieving worthwhile thine-"* with little effort. Her 
reserve Is onl) exceeded by the capable manner in 
which her mind grasps and solves a problem. Her 
friendships ore only exceeded by the love which guides 

her in them and will lead Iter life forward to the 
challenge that she keeps steadfastly before her. 




Jab us Walter Braxton. A.B. 

SNOW CAMP, N. C. 



Epsilon Eta I'/ii 



Thai ran Literary Society 



Ministerial Association, 1, 2. 3. 4; Christian Endeavor 
Society, 1, 2, 3. 4; Delegate to International Siudent 
V-. hint... i convention. Ib-trait. Mich.. 3; Y. M. C. A.. 
3. I; Men's Student Government, 3; Delegate to State 
Student Volunteer Convention. 1, 3; Assistant In 
Chemistry Laboratory, 2. 3; Alamance Club, 1, 2, 3; 
t'hornl ClUb. 4; College Band. 1. 2, 3; College Mar- 
shal, "; Chapel Monitor. 3; Class Treasurer. 4; 
T)i:il.an Literary Society, Vice-President. 3. Secretary, 
l' chaplain. 2; Y. M. C. A., Vice-President, 8; Mem- 
ber Cabinet. 4; Men's student Government. Treasurer. 
:t; Alamance County Club. President. 2; Ministerial 
Association. President. 2. 4; Chaplain. 3: College Band 
Treasurer, 2, 3; Football Squad, 3. 

Ministi rial duties have not kept Jahus from engaging 
In all other college activities. He Is an earnest stu- 
denti and interested in all phases of college life; 
christian Endeavor. Literary Societies, athletics, and 
girls elalm his full attention. Always busy. He 
demonstrates the fact that work is one of the most 
Satisfying ways of Spending time. The fact that he 
preaches two or more sermons every Sunday, meets 
from two to live classes daily, with Often and tinex- 
pevted pastoral duty to perform, does not make hint 
less sociable or less energetic. He still believes In 
fun, polities, good literature, and in High Point Col- 
lege. 



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Antonios Antonakos, B.S. 

HIGH POINT, X. C. 

I'ic-Mod 1'lul., 2. 3. i; Bushiest M.iiiai;.-. Ili-I'n. :: ; 

College Marshal, ■■■: Technician Dramatic Work Shop, 

:i; \. B. C. student. 4; Editor-in-Chief "Zenith," I; 

Advertising Manager for Athletics, », 

Tuny has all ihai makes a real student, native brll- 
HnncH. studious habits, loyalty, nil around Interests, 
ami a wonderful capacity for work. He la the artist 
or the class; and his contributions to the literary and 
dramatic work or the institution have been marked, 
Leader la grades, power In the workshop, a success 
on the "Hl-Fo" staff, winner of the Junior prise for 
besi all-round student and now successful odilor of 
the "Zenith." what more could he do! And with all, 
a Jolly real follow. Success has been his and will he 

his. 




J 1/ ANITA AlWICK, A. 15. 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Sigma Alfha Phi 



Xik/int//an Literary Soiirly 



Artemealan Literary society, l: Pan-Hellenic Council, 
4; Choral flub. 4; Secretary Nlkaniliaii I, Horary So- 
ciety, 2; Secretary Class, 3; Secretary-Treasurer Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 4; President Girls - Athletic Associa- 
tion, I; Captain Girls' Track Team. 3, 4. 

Juanlta holds a place in the hearts of her school- 
mates, Her entrance permit? A clean-cul character, 

A heart of gold — ortou purposely hidden by it* owner 
with words that to the casual listener would seem 
pointed. No one can say thai she wus not a good 
student. Her major is Latin — and she loo was among 

iho.se who attempted to master the uvular "r" in the 
advanced courses of French. And in athletics— first, 

captain of the girls' Hack team, and now prealdenl 

of the Kills' athletic association, un the field few 

could excel her. 




>9 




Theodore Antonakos, R.S. 

high POIKT, v. c. 

Pro- Mod Club, i\ 3, I; Akrothlnfan Literary Sm.ii>. 
t; Purneclsus Hi'icnllfti Society. ;:; Vleo-Presldem Pre- 
Mod Club, 2- Bualuos Manager -in I'm," 2\ Preafdeni 
Paracelsus s. i. miu'm SoHety, :t; Business Manner 
"Zenith." I. 

'I'h. ■..ilnr,. with technique inn I skill thill Tt>\\ attain. 

is ii < mis. initiMis wurkor both in the laboratory and 

"ii Hi.- |tu« ii.- is .1 lover <>i truth and hales 

h\|.."ii.-> and Bliam t» every form. v-i. unlike so 
many who have the scl ntinc attitude, ho bos loal 
none of. humanism. He has a keen appreciation ol 
humor, and one could And no friend with more sym- 
pathetb understanding and consideration of others 
than "Foots!*.*' 




Tkiva Jane Bbeson. A.B. 

KERNERSVILLE, W, C. 

.Irtrtrii'siiin l.ttrrary Socitty 

Christian Rn den vol Society, l. 2. 4; Paracelsus Soien- 
ni' Poel iv, 2. I; Modern Prlscllla Club, -. »; Guilford 
Cou tit j rtub, l. 2. I; Vice-President Modern Prlactlto 

i 'I >■ 1. I i i'..,.i..Iulhi Daiinil.iin- U..1... -■!•:.. BnMlstai t • 



■ 'till 



I ; 81 



etary 



i'.it celsns Sclent iii. 
Track Team. 



S i> . i ; 



Treva i> thi leoai In stature <>i the Class »r '-it, but 
her peraonalUs la bo big that you don't notice ber 
Rtature al all. She Is cheerful and playful: yet. she 
line will power and determination to win in what- 
pver gome she plays. Her Interests range from Some 
Economics to Track, chief among them bt-inu: foreign 
language, which she plans i" teach. Though she Is 
n lover of run. she la serious when she lined !»••; an 
excellent scholar) a genuine friend. Here's to you, 
Treva, may yours he Lhe best of. all that la good. 



20 



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Ai.ia Allen, A.B. 

MBBANE, x. c. 



Si,j ma Alpha Phi 



Nikant/ian Literary Satiety 



Modern Prlsellla Club, I; Christian Endeavor Society, 
k S, ■'. I: Choral Club, 2. i, i; Secretary Clan, 2. 
Secretary Student Government, 2: Treasurer Nlknn- 
Ihiin Society, :i. Colleh-e Marshal. :i; I •i.nii-i I'hrlsilnn 

K avor Society, S, I: Pianist Ntknmhan Llloinrj 

Society, t. Track, 2. S. 

A real true pal, 

l* — oyal, generous, and wise 

T " a ii;ii .-. i can; To an If, I shall — 

A — Ita, lis she, towards the heights aspires. 



All knowledge 
And music her 
li there Is an 



is her province, 

kingdom; 

empire ol mind or heart 



it is in blending oi colors for the beauty ol orl 

She eame In niiisli-r ami ehanKcd nOI her mind. 
We cherish ilia record sin- i.-. leaving behind. 




Grover La Marr Angel, A.B. 

MARS HILL, JJ, C. 



Epsilon Eta Phi 



Thai tan Literary Society 



Christian Endeavor, I, 2. ::. t. Student Volunteer, 2, 
:i, I; Y M. C. A., :i. 1; Men's Student Council, 1. 2. 3: 
Uramatii' Workshop, -, 3; Paracelsus Sclentllli So* 
I'letj I. 2, :;. Musi, i-iui.. :i: Choral Club, 3; Western 
Club, I. 2. S, I; Pan-Hellenic Counoll, J; Bcrlblerua 
Club, i; President Christian Endeavor, t; Treasurer, 
:. Couni'll I:, i-i '.-.'iilatixi*. 1; President K\tension i 'lnl.. 
2; President Thalcan Literary Society, (Second Semes- 
ter, 4)1 Seoretary, (Plrsl Semester, *); Vice-President 
Men's Student Couni'll, 2; Editor "Tht.. Volunteer/' ;:. 
-i; Manager News Bureau, :i. 4; Secretary Paracelsus 
Scientific Society, 2; Secretary Dramatic Workshop, ::; 
class Poet. 4; Assistant Biuiotty Laboratory, i. 2; 

Track Team, 3. 

Thai Angel Indeed is all his name implies, any ol his 

mi urns Mends will corroborate, for in- is always 

lan. i. sympathetic ami loving; one t.. whom «•■ In- 
stlnctlvoly turn for ulil on any difficult proposition. 
Unusual scholastic attainments ami participation In 
practically all eactra-curricular activities combine in 
mi.iKi' the youngest senior an all-round student. De- 

, his many aellvili s, Ansel has round lime In 

do Intensive research work, leading to a certain grad- 
uate degree In the department "i social hour. With 
English as his Immediate future and religious educa- 
tion as his ambition, those who know him may easllj 
predict » successful career that we will be proud i" 
, i 1 1 m i as a product of Itlsh Point College, 




21 




Helen Litetia Barker, A. B. 



1 1 14.11 POINT, N. c. 



Alp ha Tlnta Psi 



Sikarithan Literary Society 



Girls' D113 Student Government! 

Helen i- a practical, straightforward girl who works 
easily and comfortablj at any task she undertakes. 
She has a friendly disposition and is thoughtful of 

others. Hit keen hrnwii eyes atlia't I In- attention 

01 everyone< She Is so reserved about her own affairs 

that not many people know her intimately — always 
Interested in her school work and conscientiously In- 
dustrious In her application to hey books, she grasps 
those opportunities for learning, which will help her 
in III.'. In chOOBing her life work, It would he well 

for her tn lake some career in whieh her domestic 
proficiency Id be made useful. 




Margaret Ci.arine Davis. A.B. 
high point, h, c. 

Alpha Tftita /'si Nikanthan Literary Society 

Girls' Daj Student Government. 3. •*: Treasurer Class, 

;•; vn -e-i'resi.h m Girls' Day student Government, 4. 

A dependable* steady kind of person with a greai 
ambition and high Ideals — that's "Maggie." She does 
everything in her power to make everyone happy, sin- 
is noted for refinement and good ehurarter. Hit per- 
sonality radiate* among her associates. She Is pleas- 
ant in her mnnm-r of meeting people, and she gives 
the impression or liking everyone she meets because 
she is ready to serve them in any way possible. Bril- 
liant in her hooks— a person who never begins any- 
thing unless she finishes 11. We know that life holds 
ureal things for her. 



U 



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Raymond D. Dixon, A.B. 

GOLOSBORO, N. C. 

Delta Alfha Epsilon 

Secretary Monogram Club, '1; Mnniicram Club. I. -J, ::. 
I; Dramatic Club, I; Captain Football, 2; Alternate 
Captain Football, 4; Captain Basiball, ::: Football, l. 

2. 3. 1; Baseball. 1. 2, 3, 1. 

"Dick, the sincere," a one hundred per oent Mend. 
One of the heal liked men on the campus. Dick has 
been a star in all of his athletic undertakings, He 
has been a depndable leader, one who works for others' 
Interests, one who gives all. asking nothing for him- 
self. Ele Will he mlSSed as much In the i\tr:i-'Hrri- 

eular activities and social life of the campus as on 
the athletic field. We expect great things of this 
quiet unassuming comrade. 




Clair f. Janet Douglas, A.B. 

men point, h, c. 



.11 tlia Tin la I'si 



Nikanthan Literary Society 



Onoral Club, 1. 2. S, I; Girls' Day student Council, 
3. 1; Forensic Council, 2. I; Pan-Hellenic Council, S; 
Nikanthan Inter-Soclei >• Hcl.ator. 2. I; iiiier-i'ollegiate 
Debater, 3: President Spanish Club, 3; President Olds' 

Day Student Goxernmenl I'ouncil, 1; chairman l-'oreti- 
slc Council, 2. I. 

First say thai she can be depended upon, and then 
make the statement that she has Initiative. This 
will characterize her In reference lo her schoolmates, 
judge her actttons; analyze her expressions concern- 
ing everyday affairs. She Is intelligent. Ami then 

make a study of the Qualities which she appreciates 
— honesty of character — the beauty ot balanced liv- 
ing — you have an index to her character. Tins IS 

Claire Douglas. 




23 




LlLLtE Mae Davis, A.B. 

CI-KMMONS, N. C. 

. / rtemesian Literary Satiety 

Christian Endeavor Society, i. 2. it. I; Choral Club. 
I; Pa rac el sua Scientific Society, I; Western club, 1, 2. 
::. Vb i -I'r.shhnl Clrls' J •;»>- Stud.nl ' biv.-rnni.-ni. \\\ 
Treasurer Christian Endeavor Society, 2; Chaplain 

Ai ■i«-in«->i:in Literary Society, 2; Track Team, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Kind and sweei In disposition j a quiet, invarying na- 

lure; always willing lo do her part — that's Llllle Mar! 
All who know her are Impressed by her strength of 
eharaeier, refinement, sweet temper, ami gentle nature. 
Then- i- something about her loval.li- personality that 
belong* i" ii" ""'' else. She Is one, who never falls 

when duty calls her service. Llllle Mae was always 

Interested In her school work and other phases of 

coll off o life— from social activities in athletics. Her 
scholarship, together with her gentle characteristics, 

will surely brim; l" her those things which count, in 
the -i. ;ii game t-i Ufa Here's to you, Mllie Mac! 




Elda Clark, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

.•lit erne sian Literary Satiety 

Cull ford County flub, 1. 2, 3; Workshop, 3; Day Stu- 
dent Council, -'. ::, \, Si-rfhierus Club, A: Modern Prls- 
cilla Club. 2. 

Bids is a sane, sensible person with a strong will 
power, ami i airies through any project in which sin- 
is interested, sin- is independent and happy. Her 
ideas are definite when It comes to expressing them. 
She is one who works easily and capably, without 
making any fuss over what she has accomplished. 
BtlQ hi very feminine in her love for pretty clothes. 
Olid dresses well. She is planning to bo an "old innld 
School teacher,* 1 but we wonder? \\V think not. 



••'4 



Willie Beatrice Fritz, A.B, 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 

Alpha Thela I'si Nikanthan Literary Society 

Paracelsus Scientific Society, 2. j; Choral Club, I, 2, 
i. Spanish Club, 2; Modern Prlsctlla Club, I: Woman'* 
Student Government, 1: Gtrl*s Day Student Council, t, 
I; Sorlblerua < "iul>. 4; Christian Endeavor, 1: Enter- 
ColloKlatc Debater, 2; (ntor-Soclety Debater, 2. I; Sec- 
retary Paracelsus scientific Society, 2; Treasurer 

Paracelsus Scientific Society. I; Track. 1. 2. 

As Willie round her niche In High Point College no 
will she find it in the world — in the hearts of every- 
one with whom sin- comes in contact judge that by 
her diamond. She Is finishing college in throe years — 
liut thai does not ki't'P her from participation in extra- 
curricular activities. There is her line record in de- 
bating ami athletics, Good grades from her we nat- 
urally expect. A pretty, popular, Lntolligenl and 
vivacious girl who will make a success "i life and who 

will il" II whole-heartedly. 




Louise Holmes, A.B. 

CRESWBIX, X. C. 

Irttma'tan Literary Society 

Dramatic Workshop, I: Paravelsus Sclentlflc Society, 
2. christian Endeavor Society, I, 2. 3. t: Vice-Presi- 
dent Artemeslan Literary Society, "; President Dra- 
matic ''lull. 2; Vice-President "I'mvli fcstst v'luli." 2; 
Varsity Track Team. 3. 

who is more capable than Louise? she can do any- 
thing and do it well. As for lu-r sincerity, once she 
la your friend, she is your true Mend always. Can 

yOU WObder why people go to her for sympathy'.' She 

is .-..rious when ii is time to he serious, hut when 

thai lime is past, she Is the jollies! of 111.' crowd. 

Too, she has enough Independence i" he charming, so 
thai is why we think of Louise oa one m the most 
popular girls on the campus, 




25 



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Margaret Girlky, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, V. C. 



Theta Hi 



Nikanthan Literary Society 



CJU'O riuli. 1. 2, ."!. 1; Girls' Hay Student Coiim-fl, 3. I; 
Guilford County Club, i, 2. 3; Dramatic Club, 2; 
VIi . i-Presldent of Senior Class, 4; Art editor of 
"Zenlih." 2. .!; Business Stall of "Zenith," i; Busi- 
ness Stan ol "Hi-Po." 3; Art Editor of "Ton-h," i; 
Reporter •<> Nikanthan Literary Society, :t; Most Pop- 
ular Girl. 3. 

in speaking of representative people Margaret is one 
..I the Oral thai we must mention. In looking over 

hrr college • -ari.-i we find that "Meg" has l n very 

busy in many phases of eollege activities. An artist. 

peine : "'' editor of the "Zenith" for two years; a 

niiiKli-lnii. helping •■nmpnse the words and music of the 
Alma Mater; a hard worker and one on whom we 
■ an depend: one of the most popular girls on the 
campus possessing, with beauty and brains, a dash 
oi wit. Well, what else Is there to say? Nothing — 

except thai with all this she has found time to have 

a date nlmoai every "nlte" with certain Sopho- 
more! ' ' ' Certainly she has enjoyed her college 
days and has made them what they should be. Hals 
1. 11 to .1 "Oral rate" girl! 




Z. Blanche Ingram, A.B. 

KERNBRSVILLE, N. C. 

htemesian Literary Society 

Christian Endeavor Society, 1. 2, l: Paracelsus Scten- 
nii. Society, l. 2; Dramatic nub. i; Worh Shop, 2; 
Modern Prlscllls Club, I; Circulo-fispanol, 2; Western 
ClUbi 1; Vlce-PreslOenl Woman's Student Govern- 
ment, 4. 

Shall we call her the "Little Puritan Maiden?" Just 
l<i look at her. one is reminded of the pure, modes) 
mil "i the Old New England days. Indeed she Is so 

loving, uind, ami Bacrlflelngi one would <veti dare pay 
her reverence, she is a friend to everybody and her 

Cheerful and witty disposition makes life about lui 
always bright and sunny. Add to this, depth of char- 
acter anil determination and you will see why we have 
such faith In her future, ami why we pledge to her 
-... Unhesitatingly our love and loyalty. 



26 



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Dorothy Vernon Hoskins. R.S. 

men POINT, H, c. 

Thtla Phi Nikanlhan Library Society 

Guilford County Club. l. 2. 3: Dramatic Club, .'; Glee 

1 lUb, 1, 2. 3, 4; Pnil-Hfllcllic Council; fill-Is" |lnv 

Student Council; "Hl-Po" Business stair, 3; "Zenith" 
Business Staff, i: Chorister Nikanthan Society, 2. 
President Nikanthan Society, 4: Assistant Manager ol 
G Club, :i; Manager Glee Club, 4: Presldenl ol Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 4; Best All-Ruund Girl, ::. Uosl Rep- 
resentative Senior Girl, 4; Class Prophet, 4. 

And "Hot" captivates us nil! Talented, popular, 

friendly, capable, attractive, a good sport — a u i 

all-rouiui arlrl-l She is an enthusiastic supportet ol 
ail college activities Her ability, her loyalty, and 
her friendship demonstrate her life as a student here 
The dominant lalenl of her manifold endowments Is 
her voice — n lyric soprano of unusual beauts ; and 
she uses it with marked Intelligence. Us clarity an, I 
purity leave nothing to be destred. And we con never 
forget thai It was she and "Met:" who composed our 
school ?-t>ni;. We know that Dorothy will refleel credit 
on her Alma Mater. 




Keith Harrison, R.S. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Delia Alpha Efsilon Akrothinian Literary Society 

Forensic Council, 8; Pan-Hellenic Council, i; Paracel- 
sus Sclentillc Society, S; Pre-Med Club, 2. S, 4: Student 
Aelivitles Council, 4; Class Treasurer. 2; Pre-Med Club 

Secretary and Treasurer, :< ; Class President, I; Inter- 
collegiate Orator. 2. :i; Representative lo A. A. A. S., 
3; Student Chairman. Student Activities. 4. 

ii conaistencj be truly golden then surely your hear) 
must be found to be wrought of poor pewter, and 
that alloyed. Pour more privileged years. LODff, hut 
fleeting years, eventful, unavailing, progressive, dis- 
astrous, disheartening, gone years. Months of assur- 
ance, depths ol depression—* But hold this Jargon, 
Navarre, 'tis but a trembling oi the body. "Would 
tremble still more aid i Know where i am about la 
take you." 




27 




Vivian Elizabeth Nicholson, A.B. 

MEBANB, N. C. 

Siijmu .Itp/ia Phi Artemeiian Literary Society 

rhrlstinn Endeavor Society, 1. '-'. I, 4; Christian Bn- 
deavoi Extension Club, I, 2. 3. 4. Girls' student Coun- 
i II. 1. 2. :'.. 4; Dramati. >'lul>. 2. S; Modi-Ill Pliw-illli 
Club, :;. -I; Choral Club, I. 2. .1. *: Serlblerus Club, I; 
president Artemesian Literary Society, 4; Secretary 

AiI.-iii4-.smi. I.li.i :.i y Si,.i.ty. 2: Pianist. 1; VI Presi- 

,i •• ii t Class "; V"li ie-l*resfdent Dramatic ''luL. :i; VI 

president Choral Club, 4, inters... I. ty Debater, 4; 
College Marshal, 3; class Historian, 4 

'Tile kind of n girl of whom High Polni College is 
proud." 




Blaine M. Madison, A.B. 
mis-, K. c. 



Epsilon Eta Phi 



Thaiean Literary Society 



i ii. I Ironsides, s. 4; Christian Endeavor, i, -'. 4; v. m. 
C A , i. 2. I: Dramatic Workshop, 2; Choral Club, 2, 
4: Western Club, 1. 2. I; Pun-Hellenic Council, 4: 
Literary Group, i; Spanish »Muh. 2-. College Enter- 
tainers, l: President Thaiean Literary Sooletj (Flrsl 
Semester), i. Presiili in dill Ironsides, 2; Critic Thai- 
ean Literary Society (Last Semester), 4: Chapel 

Monitor. I: Pi-.-siilent Old Ironsides (Flrsl s.-in.-st. i I 
I. Secretary Y. M. C. A., 4; Treasurer Old Ironsides 
(Last Semester), 4: Section Monitor, l, 2. Council Rep- 
resentative, 4. 

"Pus--." an he is known in everyone on the campus, 
is just another nroof thut valuable things come In 
small jiui l.ai:.--. II is favorite (|uotation is "Sweet 
Jessie" and his hobby is English; he is equally fond 
..I each. He lias not eontiiied his work lo the study 
of English entirely, bul has been an outstanding ftg- 
ure in society work, and it will suffer the loss of one 
ot its greatest sons when hi- Is gone The su.-eessl ul 
pilotage of ih.' Thaiean Literary Society during his 
last year In college is an example of his ability as a 
leader. We hate to see you leave, "Puss," for you 
have iitad.' ..in liv.'.s s.cin l.rlghter: hut our loss Is 
III.' World's gall), and this time We lose a gem. 



28 



UTJTJTJTJTXUTJTJ~UTJTJ"1JH^^ 



William II. II i ntbr, Jr.. A.B. 

RREEN'SBORO, N. C. 

Delta Alpha Epsilon dkresMnian Literary Society 

Dramatic Club, 3: Monogram Club. 2, ?.. 4; I'an-ll- |- 
lenh Council, 4; I'hrlsthin Kinlfavur Sm-li-iv. J, ::. I; 
Akro thin Ian Society, 2. :i. i: President Akrothinian 
Society, 4; President Class, :i; Treasurer Akrothlnlan 
Society, 3; Fooll-all. 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, I, 3; Man- 
ager Baseball, -■ 

a man's reaction to the stimulus administered from 
liln follow -man characterises him to the fullest extent. 
Hill's four years n| iiiuhi Poln I College i d no flow- 
ery words al praise, no exaggerations ol oharacter, 
i.ut just a simple recollection ol those fundamental)! 
that nvUcs him a elcan-cui character. Broadmlnded, 
determined, and willingness to accept another's opin- 
ion stamp him as a leader, As Junior Class presi- 
dent, and head of the Akrothinlan Literary Society 
he placed himself In the hearts »»r Mh classmates and 

a t> friends. Tin- football men call him "The 

Plugger." in a simple way his ti animates have rocog- 
nl/.-ti his four years of service to the foolhall squad. 
Regardless of your actions in future years, Bill, you 
hit iis. ever) inch :» man 




1 1 URL an Ei ra Jon es, A.B. 

WEAVBRVILLB, \. C. 

Choral Club 

Jones is a rather queer Individual according to those 
win* do not know him well. u«' addresses everyone as 
"Young sprout" ami refers i» girls as "Chaps." He 
is :■ in ..:uiiiiiiHi.(i son ni | i.i. son who Is ever seeking 
new truths and his questions on class aro ever a 

s ■■,. or piquancy to his Instructors. His ol i> 

»a'i 'nlngi" ami ins silver- toned voice will be missed 

when be leaves Bigb Potm College. Good Lock t«» 
you, Jones, W"e have always looked forward to your 
music numbers In chapel. Wherever you go we ore 
certain thai your voice will win for you a place in the 

hearts of nun. 




29 




Velna Jane Teagi -n, A.B. 

KERKERSVU.LE, K. C. 



dlplia Thda Psi 



Nikanthan Literary Society 



Mara inn College, I. 3; Choral Club, I; Modern Prla- 
• iihi Club, i; Girl's i »;i \ student Council, \. 

Vet no is a pontic soul, with refinement, culture, 

daintiness, and is loved by ;ill Who know her. She 

is attractive, neat, sympathetic, thoughtful, and likes 
Lo Ao kindly deeds for others, Her devotedness to 
her family and relatives show that she is always 
ready to sacrifice herself in their behalf. She Is 
womanly and delight nil in her manner cowards men 
and women, and Is as much a favorite with the mas- 
culine portion "i humanity as with the feminine. 
Here's wish In 8 success and happiness lo her in what- 
ever she undertakes. 




Pauline Whitaker. A.B. 

JULIAN, N, C. 

Tin la Phi .htttnrsiart Literary Society 

Christian Endeavor Society, l. 2. .",. 4; Modern Pris- 
ellla, '-, ?•, 4; Wo man's Student Government Associa- 
tion, i. 2, :s, i; K<ii«nsi*- Council, 4; Presldenl Woman's 
Student Government Association, 4; Head Proctor, ;!: 
Treasurer Artemeslnn Literary Society, 3; Secretary 
Christian Endeavor extension <'iui>, 2. 

Ouf high regard ami deep love Cor "Polly," we "would 

not willingly l»-i die." At first glance one WOUld 

possihly Think her ivsei vd — hut nol so wh*'ii one ffOefi 
beneath this and sees her at her best. When in 

trouble, or In need of friendly counsel we turn to 
Polly. This quality coupled with firmness, determina- 
tion, and ability has made her thoroughly su. ressful 
In the difficult position of Rouse President. Jusl as 
her (deals are high so are her achievements, not only 
in scholarship but In all other campus activities, We 
predict for her future success — why she lins even 

aspired to Greek. Polly says the "Garrett" i* t>< have 

the largest place In her home! 



30 



-TTJTJTJTJTJTJTJXnj^ 



Ethel Inez Reynolds, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

. Irtetncsian Litirary Satisfy 

Girls" Day Student Government Association, ". I; 

''lirislian Kud-avr Su.i.-tv. 1, 2. ?.. I. Culllord <'.niiilv 

Club, ], 2, ::. 1; Chaplain Arlpni'sfan l.ii.rary s... i,i>, 
I; Sti-rutary-Tn-asur* r Guilford County Club. 

H ore's !» Inez, the other twin from *'oul In town/' 

Lovable, cheerful, patient, and demure, a friend el 

whom you are always sure." H»t heart is like ;i 

garden fair wh^ri^ many pleasant Rowers grow, Those 
who know her, love her for her amiable character, 
ami kind disposition, and <*oimi it a privilege i<» be 
numbered among her friends* She was always a 
worthy student, an active figure In tin* social lifi- or 
the college, ■•> sincere, steady religious worker, and 

an id-'al littlf housrke»iH r on (lit- sideline. \W w»pii- 

der if sin- will really leaeh next year or ad-^Vance* 1 

in her I sekeoping. Success will surely he hers la 

Whatever euurse she pursues. 




Estelle Irene Ri-ynolos, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Artemeslan Litirary Sot iffy 

Qullfurd Count a club, 1, 2. 3. I; Christian Endeavor 
Society, 1, -, 3, i. Clitic Artemeafon Literary So- 
ciety, 1. 

Take a pleasant sniil»\ add to llils a quiet and un- 
assuming manner, ml* With a neat appearame. flavor 

wiiii courtesy, and silr in a tew grains of dignity. 
The result win be Irene, f of the capable and de- 
pendable "Twins" o( tlii* Class of '29. 




v 




Pearl Payne, A.H. 

GUILFORD COLLEGE, N, C. 
Girls' l.'ay Student Government Association. 

in Pearl we have ono ••( the more quiet members of 
iii>- class. Such a characteristic bi a grcal asset and 
one to be admired. Wo always find her to bo a 
\.i% sympathetic! listener and Interested In whatever 
ono has to say. Running hand In hand with this 
mri trail «»• find thai site Is vary studious — ami 
therefore a good student. "Still waters run deep" 
and with this in mind we an- sure thai the future 
holds great things for Pearl, and that she will make 

l: i in whatever alia undertakes. Remember that 

that we are proud to have you In the Class of •SB. 
Pearl; and your classmates 1 host wishes go with you. 




Glenn G. Perry, B.S. 

THOMASVILLE, V. C. 

Delta Alpha Epsilon Akrothinian Literary Society 

Scientific Society, 2; 1'iv-M.d Society, 1. 2. 4; Or- 
'Im-ii.i. i. 'i; w.'st Club, l; President Freshman Class; 
President Orchestra, l; Prcsldenl Pro-Mod Society, I; 
Manager Basket bull, I. Football, 4; Manager Basket- 
ball, i. 

Glenn possesses those characteristics that stamp him 
;is .t i it. mi u. all that know him. Unusual work in 
the classroom brings about his graduation In three 
years. As freshman class president he uncovered 

great leadership ability, in literary society he was 
an outstanding figure. I" athletic circles he was a 
member of the football squad and manager ol the 
i- 1 ik et ball team, in continuing bis ••duration at some 
medical school u ■■■ readily prophesy .success. As presi- 
dent of the pri'-nud society here he proved that he 
hail an unusual preliminary knowledge of medicine, 
hi losing you thin year, Glenn, wo feel it is like losing 
ah "Jioiii'St-lo-L-onilin .ss" pal. May ilic finders be 

characters that win value you as we have. 



32 



LJTJXJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJXTLn^^ 



GraVDON Ring, A. 15. 

1IICH POINT, V. c. 

Choral Club 

Gray don is a auieti unassuming sort <•< Individual whoi 
while not having a large circle ol associates, fa .1 

thorough good fellow, Is del dablc, <-«.n^. i> n 1 s. and 

hafl a refreshing sense 01 I111111..1. II.- goefl about his 

business in a thorough manner and with an earnest- 
ness wiiii li ha-* won rm* him an enviable scholastic 

1 'd at High Point College He Is a wlsard In 

mathematics and we cannot tint predict for him a 
brilliant record ir be carries out his plana r©r attend- 
ing post-graduate school. 




Marjorie Welborw A.B, 

HIGH POINT, N. c. 
Nikanthan Literary Society 

Day BtUdeiil t'mincil. ?., 1, S<riM-rus I'luii. i; Mouitm 

Day Student I'ounril. 3: Secretary and Treasurer 
Scrlblerus <*iub, 4. 

"If I , ; ( ii gel tin- iar, you wanta so with ttie?" 
That's Miiijitrit — always thinking of sonic one .-l~». 

When Hi.- game's called, here cornea Marjorie with 
more than her share »f the girls. She's never made 
herself conspicuous. Conscientious and capable In hei 

scholastic work, she has done her work evidently and 

whole-heartedly, if she loves she loves and a truer 

friend you'll neve* ftnd. 




33 




William Bennett Wood, A.B. 

ESSEX, N. C. 



Epsilon Eta Phi 



Thalean Literary Society 



Christian Endeavor, l. J. I; V. M. C. A., 2. 4; Min- 
isterial Association, 1. 2, i; Eastern Cluo, l. 2: Chrls- 
n. hi Endeavor Bxtensfon Group, l, 2. 4; Dramatic: 
till-, i; it. shi» ni Ministerial Association, i, Vio*- 
i -i . i . i- in . i. vi. .■-it. si. ii nt v. M. c A.« 4; Vice- 
President Thalean Literary Society, i ; Vice-President 
Extension Club, 2, 

An Individual of care qualities, who does not try to 
Impress upon the herd thai he t* above "- Wood 
has not confined his scholastic activities to religious 
education alone, t»ut versatility has been one »f the 
.In. i characteristics of hia college life. IneludinR an 
adoration nf "I'lirly hair." Hi' has attained s«mi' of 
ihe highest honors in the religious education depart- 
in.-ni : hut at the sam.' time hfl has searched far 
aihld. RtUdfed with an open, unprejudiced mind, ami 

has t'h -\ eloped o sound) practicable and happy philoso- 
phy <•! life. Those who can count "Bill" among 
their friends are fortunatoi Tor he in always the 
same Jovial and true friend; always willing and eager 
io lend a helping hand. 




Raymond Brtce Yokley, B.S. 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 

./ krothinian Literary Society 

Pro- Med Society, ::. I; Western Club. 2. 3; Christian 
Endeavor Society, 1, -. 3. 4; student Government, 1. 2; 

Treasurer Akrothlnian I.iierary Soeieiy. l; Secretary 
Alcrothhihiii Lit.rar> Society, l; Vice-President West- 
ern Club, 3; Secretary Western Club, 8; Reporter 

AUrothinian r.in -rary Society, 4. 

"Red." as he is known to his schoolmates, is one who 
possesses real ability on class and ran make friends 
anywhere. He has been an active worker In college 
activities and will no doubt find a plait- in life that 
can bd Oiled only L\ capable men. "Bed" may 
no( be of athletic nature, but you ran depend on 
him I" be there with that old Panther spirit anil his 

unassuming smile that the girls cannot resist. Kc 
seems Blow »■> those who do no* know him. hut he 
thinks smiinlly. knows [he right IhlnK to do at the 
right time, ami ran he classed as a very business* I Ike 
young man We predict a bright future for "Red" 
in whatever field he ma> choose. 



34 



Mamie Ethel York, A.B. 

ARCHDALE, V. c. 

flrtemesian Literary Society 

Grils* Day Student Council, 2. I; BcrlhlerUs Club, I; 

■ -iii-i'o" Reporter, i: Associate Editor ->< mi:,/ S; 

Edilor-in-.lii.I "Hl-Po," *. 

When wo say Mamie, we always osso.hu.- her with 

the "Ht-Po." as she is the editor-in -oh let. Tho waj 
tthe has managed llw publication of this paper hIiowh 
her ability in the field ol journal lam. Bui her scholas- 
tic rating i.s high also. Although her duties on the 

paper <i. i permit her to take a great Interest in 

extra-curricular aotivltlosi she is ready to help when 
called upon. We sec Mamie as sell -will. -il. n I'ne) 
which is evident in the manner in which she handles 
her various tasks alone. She lias a way ol adding 

apice to oven dry conversation, She is quick at 
repartee and her spark of w-II adds xesl to the interesi 
created. All admire you, Mamie! You will brine 

honor to your Alma Mater. 




Bf.v Lhver Herman ^ A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N, C. 

Phi Alpha (Johns Hopkins University) 

Although Bt-n has only been a memlur o( .mr Class 
for one year he Is no stranger in High Point. i I • ■ 

■lid bin first two years of college work at Johns 

Hopkins University, hut later received his LL.B. at 
Wiil ( » Forest in 1925. Ben Is a great fallow and 

shows us that actions speak louder than words, "He 

puts his creed Into his deed." His character and 

ability stand out wherever >'•• is. We predial suc- 
cess for him in his legal career. 




35 



LnjTJTJTJxruajxn 



TXlJTJXnJTJTJTJXJT^^ 




J. Vernon Robertson, A. 15. 

HARMONY, -V. C. 

Di-ha llpha Eps'don Akrothinian Literary Socir/y 

Baseball, 1. 2, 3, 4; Scientific Society; Basketball, i. 

s*. in. .ii Robertson, hotter known as "Robby" on the 
rampus, is a e/onticman— nut boistrous, not loo noil- 
s' r\ al i\ .-. Km ns thoSC who koOW li t m would Bay, "■> 

regular follow." He is always ready io bo iur part 
•Hi anything, whether it in- t»f a frivolous aature or 
work ti> be done. His scholastic ability is shown by 

the ia< t thai he Is Batting his degree In Hi years 

One* ■•Robby" Is taken Into your confidence and you 
learn i" know him you cant help bul be proud i<> 

.:il1 him a friend. 




36 



TJTJTJTTJXnJTJTJTJTXUTJTJTJTJ^^ 



Class Poem 

By Groves L. Anobl 

The beadsmith brings u necklace )\ue, 

A beauteous, wondrous thing. 

The masterpiece "/ a master hand. 

The beadsmith shaped and planned 

Each bead thai makes oar priceless string. 

The beads are like drops of dew 

He/ore the dawn of day 

lias licea replaced by burning saa ; 

Each drop alike, ye/ every one 

Shines in its pecalair way. 

Three times the string was broki ,; ,- 

Thrice the beads lucre scattered 'round. 

The beadsmith set to work anew 

'To make a siring that's straight and true. 

But each time fewer beads were found. 

And noli 1 the string must break again. 

Each bead must leave the rest. 

And somewhere in the world be known 

By shining luster, as precious stone 

Of strength and value best. 

To you we'll the a string of beads 

Unbroken , as the beadsmith planned. 

Though we scatter o'er the earth. 

We'll reflect the moulder's north 

In life of beauty to all the land. 



37 



JTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTIJTJTJTJ-U^^ 



' ; ""'''' ."/i^l 



White an* Goli 



JkuiVftStuf) 



^^^j =t =H# j ,r? fti ^ — m 

W* .-., is«r li.ofc oiu— voic** rnfjono. Th* or^*>'*xtof tribute we ti«*9 TV> <Jl« 



W« 'II chcr 



-Ji.^b oi»j— voic** m song, Tlut or«a'*xt ajtn 
»«Jl f_(iv fnrnb ■vhipu*< i*(^ In ofcuWiw* to t')y 



Cow-nani Xc 




gji*» — ©««.»• po<-/wrarai> l«/«ncj ')"., Ui.fift oncunbioli 



SIM . 




— ; — ...i j J — < ?*■ ,. . ^ ^iric — *-^r i — : = — 



low* (.»^t -?•**- faiik- ful "*'r>«M*o <x»£ ^"E'^' 01 "' A# -«*•«- ion, <* 
J«or«lo»y- C**jt|tg a»A6-«ld Witt) T^ jga °"» fiwg 7 en- 



*e-»a * a*>ur. Pic^ittj 



«rc To, 




oaw«ri'«ww*vur ta»»*o Wi'lfft>«»»r be loya I BM true M . 



«ir* wilianoj '7ifbeC/Qss ©> Tumvty-,. 




J« 



JXTTJTJTJT-JTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^ 



And So We Saw 



By Elizabeth Niciioi.asox 




i'LL NEVER FORGET the morning we registered. Yes, it was in 
the- fall of 1925. There were one- hundred and twenty-three of us 
registering this September morning. As all other freshmen, we too 

were at a loss to know what it was all about. 1 recall hearing one of 
the girls say that she didn't believe she would like her work because they didn't 
even teach Arithmetic here. Gee! 1 was terribly shocked! The first two 
weeks passed off nicely with the only outstanding error, that of electing a "prep" 
as President of the Freshman Class. We soon found our mistake and after 
much coaching from the uppcrelassmen realized what a terrible blunder we had 
made. It was the next few months, however, that we remember best. Some 
ignorant freshman misread the worthy motto of the sophomore class, "Non 
serviri sed scrvire," and thus it was translated to us, "Not to serve but to be 
served." For nine long months we remained unenlightened as to the false trans- 
lation. 

Hut as sophomores we soon realized our mistakes anil as sweet vengeance, 




. . .^-^ 






■*§S *'•>'"' . ' //■ EL 

ft - » ^==£^sSSar 



.■ ■■-.- "*&* 









: ".'^^'"'v;;:-^"" ;-■---;-- • . .--■■; 





:y. 






39 



And So We Saw 



(Continued) 

made the incoming Class oi f 20 look up and serve us. It was during this period 
in our career that two <>l our girls, Dorothy Hoskins and Margaret Gurley, 
unite the College Song. Keith Harrison won out in the State Oratorical Con- 
test. Several ol our members took part in the intercollegiate debates. There 
were now only fifty-four of us, but had we not done our part to put II. I*. C. on 
the map? 

In the tall of '27 forty entered the Junior Class. Our members again took 
part in all the College activities. One of the mountain peaks of the Junior 
year was the Junior-Senior banquet given in Robert's Hall. April 19. 1928. 
The decorations and toasts were a credit to the class and with Kill Hunter as 
toastlliastcr the banquet went over in a big fashion! It was in this year too that 
we saw High Point College meet the state requirements of an A-grade college. 

As seniors \vc sec our dreams come true. The beautiful fountain stands as 
a recognition of our love for our Alma Mater. We have watched her first two 
graduating classes go out to meet life. It is not with pain and grief that we 
gti for we feel that there is something bigger in life that is calling us. Thus wc 
leave happy, feeling that now we are better prepared to meet life as it really 
is. Remember, classmates, that High Point College is watching us and reading 
with interest the thirty-six volumes that are being written by the members 
of the Class of '20. 




i" 



TJTJTJXTUTJTJriJTJTjrXJTJTJT^^ 




Raymond Perdue, President 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Colors: Blue and While Floicrr: While I.ily 

Motto: "Non sil»i, t-eil nnmihus." 

( )fficers 

Raymond Perdue President 

Wade F. Fuqiav Vice-President 

T. OtlN MATHEWS Secretory 

LUCY NuNERY Treasurer 

Prok. J. I It iiiak i Ai.i Kin idvisor 




Junior Class 



K.U.OI'IA Antonakos 

HICK POINT, H, C. 

Artemesian, 6 •!• 



James Asblrv 

IIICII POINT, (J. c. 



Ernest Blosser 

MoRGANTOWN', VV. VA. 
I T K 



Rosalie Andrews 

high point, h, c. 
Artemesian, A 8 -V 



Bettie Bloom 
high point, n. c. 

Artemesian 



Hilda A.mick 
burlington, n. c. 
Nikanthan, S A * 



T. P. Cridlebaugh 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Grace Barnett 

MEBAKE, N. C. 

'•-' : ', . 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 



-4- 



42 



ajTJT_njTjnjxrLnjTJTJTJxrx^ 



JTJTTTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJXTLJriJl^ 



Junior Cla 



ss 



->- 



Lorraine Ellison 

innii POINT, x. c. 
Arlemesian 



Wade 1'. Fuquay 
sii.rr cnr, x. c. 
Thalean, E n * 

JOHK P. Dosil-K 

ORFENSBORO, X. C. 

Thalean, B II * 

Eva Ellis 
henderson, x. c. 

Aiteinesiiin 



Kenneth Holt 
burlikgton, x. c, 

I ll.llr.in 

Blanche Hockaday 

thelma, x. c. 

Artcmesian 

Elizabeth Handier 

jui.iax, x. c. 

Arlemcsian, H 'I' 

Pauline Hunter 
iobaccovii.le, n. c. 

Nikanrhan, O + 




43 



JU1 




-S-- 



Junior Class 



Grace Kkck 

SNOW CAMP, S. C. 

Nikanlhan, 2 A * 
f.r.N A 1 . \M I'.l III 

TRINITY, N. C. 
Nikanlhan 

Lki.i.a Motsinoer 

GUILFORD COLLEGE, N. C. 
Artrmc-sian 

Clifford Mitchell 

DRCATUR, ILL. 
I T K 

T, Olin Mathews 

1IICII POINT, N. c. 

A A R 

Richard Mac.Mavnms 

I'ROSTBURC, Ml). 
! T K 

Ralph MULLIGAN 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 

Akrothinian, A A 2 

Ll'THKR MEDLIN 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Thalean 



-4- 



4+ 



UTJTJTJTlJTJ-lJTJnjTJTJTJTJ^^ 



jxnjxnjTJTTJTJxnjTJxnjTJTj^ 



.},_ 



Junior Class 



Graham Madison 

ii wimis, v. c. 

Tlialean, K II * 



Edna Nicholson 
mebane, n". c, 

Artemesian. i) A •!• 



Lucy Nt nery 

WIIITAKIKS, \. C. 
Nikanthan, 2 A >!• 

Ran 'miimi PerOI f. 
koaxoke, va. 

Akrniliinian, A A K 

Fred Pego 

r.uii.fori) college, n. c. 
Thalean 



c'n \ri.is C. RonniNS, Jr. 

MICH POINT, X. C. 

Akrodiinian, A A E 



Georoe Ridge 

high POINT, X. C. 
I X K 



Virginia Stroupe 

mt. holly, h. c. 

Artemesian, A O * 




♦S 




Junior Class 



-*- 



Kathleen Teague 
kernersvii.le, n. c. 
Nikanthan, A >i> 



Wayne VVi-amt 
men point, v. c. 



Hobart Thompson 

decatur, ill. 

Nettie Stuart 

liberty, (j. c. 

Nikanthan, 6 $ 



Coy Willard 
mnii poixt, n. c. 

A A E 



Mate Williams 

iaumiai.e, v. c. 

Nikanthan 



.\ '// ;;; Panel 



fnssic Ray Blair 

TTTOMASVnXE, K. C. 

I'm i. Brasser 
morgantow.v, w. v \. 

A A !■: 



Vernon S. Nygard 

DULUTH, MINK, 

Harry H. Culler 
mr.ii point, .*. c. 



■V> 



nj-ixuTXTJTxuxTLTuxruxnjriJTJT-rL^^ 




Junior Class 
■4 «- 



Fannie Stamey 
h1cii point, m. c. 

e * 

William Worley 
fairmont, w. va. 

Akrothinuin 

Talton J. Whitehead 

SNOW CAMP, N. C. 

Thalean, E II * 
L.EONA Wood 

MILLBORO, N. C. 

Artemesian, 9 'I 1 

II \rvi:v Young 
Stokesdale, n. c. 
Thalean, -i A E 

Virgil Vow 

CIBSON'VILLE, N. C. 
Akrolhinian, I T K 




Not in Panel 



Laura Stanton Freeland 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



'I'ii 1 1. ma McPhaul 

SHANNON, V. C. 

Artcmcsian 



Albert Burke Furchess 
mocksville. n. c. 

Akrothinian 



George Edwin Hedrigk 

high point, n. c. 
Akrolhinian, I T K 



47 



TJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTIJTJTJTJ^^ 




From YVissi Cullegh Drive 



.,x 




Mnr.iHKM Amos, President 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

( >i tilt: its 

Mii.noiKM: Amos President 

Clyde Pucii Vice-President 

Rlbv Waki.ick Secretary 

LOUISE Jennincs Treasurer 

C. R. llixsn.wv Class Advisor 



JXTTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJXTIJTJIJTJ^^ 



J1TL 



"UT-nJTJTJTJTJXnJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^ 




Soph 



phomore 



CI 



ass 



Charles B. Amick, Jr. 

BURLINGTON, V. C. 

Monroe Bennett 

BURLINGTON, S. C. 

Allen Barker 

Ilir.II POINT, X. c. 

Louise Collette 

1IICU POINT, K, c. 

Aubrey Dunbar 

HIGH POINT, N". C. 

Hi ldah Dixon 
greensboro, n. c. 

Mar Edwards 

bei.wooi), n. c. 

Charline Grimes 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Fanny N'ht Frebm w 
easley, s. c. 

Edna Holder 

asheboro, v. c. 

I.i i. \ Gray Harris 

DENTON, N. C. 

Minnie Herman 

HIGH POINT, X. C. 

Francis Hutton 

morcantovvn, w. va. 

Barrbtt Harris 

hi skin, n. c. 

John Herndon 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Amy L. Mitchell 

jennings, n. c. 

Charlhs I.ii.es 

littleton, n. c. 

I. ii. i. ii Jam; LonC 

WIKSTOK-SALEM, N. c. 



5" 



Soph 



pnomore 



CI 



ass 



Vernon Nygard (Junior) 

DUIUTIf, MINN, 

Gladys Morris 
fallston, x. c. 

DaviI) Plummer 
high point, x. c. 

J. Clyob Pi o.ii 

CLIMAX, N. C. 

Emma Lee Poole 

GREB.VV1I.LE, S. C. 

Wi-bstfr Pope 

kkrxkksvii.i.e, v. c. 

Philip Rith 

men point, x. c. 

Khoar Peeler 

i.uvmvm i:, V. c. 

Sam Raper 

i i \i\rnn\, v. c. 

Chester Smith 
mich point, v c. 

Ev \ Spencer 

libertv, v. c. 

Evelyn Seward 

men pom, n. c. 

( JioRon Taylor 

GREENSBORO, X. C. 

Ct rrif Williams 

EH.AND, K. C. 

Mary Beth Warlick 
lawkdale w. c. 

Taft Whit i? 

lawndale, x. c. 

Ruby Warlick 

OLI.V, N. C. 

Ralph Weedon 








Wist of Roberts Hall 



52 



UTJTJXrLrUTJXJT_rLnJTJTJTJT^^ 




Jon\ Easier, President 



FRESHMEN CLASS 



I >FF1CERS 

John Easter President 

William Ludwic ricr-Prtttdeni 

Eleanor Younc .... . . Secretary 

IIakkv JoHN'SON' Treasurer 

Charles Forsiiihx Marshal 

I)k. Pail S. Kbknett Idtiisor 



JTJTJTXLTIJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^^ 




Fresh 



reshman 



Wilbur Barkby 

n>-« Bable, Pn, 

Juantta Andrews 
Trinity, x. i". 

Louis Betiiea 

Lexington, X. <*. 

M:\KV Briles 

High I' i. K. i 

Clarence Briles 

C'urawayi N. <'. 

W. P. Bivins 

High Point, n. •■ 

Nancy Bivins 
Graham, N C, 

Holt Brown 

Lexington, x. c. 

Reucha Chadwick 

Jnmestow ii. X. i'. 
J. M. Cl-OER 

StatoBVllle, x. c 

HotART Cl.OUGH 
Sf'ai'rii«l. Del. 

William Coltrane 

Greensboro, X. f. 

Tiil'rman Cook 

Thomas-lite, x. C. 

Emma Dix 

iinii I'.. in i. x .-. 

Ferx Daniels 

i i mh Pnint, x ''. 

Conrad Curtis 

i ll.M. Ilirl.l, a, c. 
C. W. FORSIIIER 

Danville, mi. 

Gladys Guthrie 
Saxapahaw, x, o. 

Ai.leve Fuquay 

Slier City, x C. 
BETSV DURLAN'I) 

iiiyh Point, x 

Martha Hall 
fliiuclevlllc, Vn. 

St. Clair IIerndon' 
High r x c. 

Muriel IIouser 
Vale, x. <: 

II. C. Haskiss 
High Point, x. C. 



5+ 






UTJnJTJTJTJTJHUTJTJTJTJTJTJn^ 



'reshman 



Truth Isley 

Graham, N. C. 

IIa/.i.e Hicks 

niuli Point, N. C. 

Vernon Idol 

High Point, n. 0. 

Ivan Hill 

High Pollll, N. C. 

Leslie Johnson 

1 1 lull Poliii, n. C, 

Fielding Kearns 
Hluh Point. N. C. 

Carlis Kennedy 

Tliimiiisi l)]e, N. C. 

Talton Johnson 
Wbltakei* N. c. 

Nathalie Lackev 

Fallaton, N. C. 

Marian Kress 

Tin Bvllle. N. C. 

Dorothy Leonard 

U-xIngtou, N- 0, 
Grace Koontz 

High I'.iinl, N\ C, 

Loyd Leonard 

Thomasvlllti, X. r '. 

Catherine Liles 

High Point. N. C. 

Lala Lindley 

Graham, N. C. 

Dess'.e Lee Little 
Durham, x. C. 

Robert Loftin 
Denton, N. •'■ 

William Lodwic 

Allisnli, Pa. 

\'frihe Marsiibanks 

Mills Hill. N. C. 

Sally McCain 

Asli.'linr.., N. i'. 

Sue Morgan 
Farmer, N. r ". 

A. Moser 

Mecfcanloaburg, T';«. 

Tiielma Moss 

1 1 lull Point. N. I". 

irons' Lulu Moore 
I.ilnriy. N ' 




55 




Fresh 



reshman 



An'CELETTE PREVOST 

VVorthvillv, N. <-. 

Frances Prichett 
Burlington, N. *'. 

Jester Pierce 

II lull Point, N C. 

Stuart Payne 

Thomoevlllo, N, C, 

Harvey Radcliff 

Morv n, N. "•. 

Frank Robbiks 
High Point, n. c 

Elizabeth Rogers 

Burlington, N. i*. 

Anne Robbivs 

I Huh Point. N. C. 

DlLLARD Shell 

High Point. N. C. 

Christine SmATHERS 
High Point, N. <\ 

William Snotiierly 

AH"- 'le, N, C. 

Velton Snyder 
Hlsh Point, n. e. 

Lebls Stone 

sil.-r City, N ''. 

Hi vikice Wadoell 
Conrord. n. C. 

Olive Thomas 
Mars Min, n i -. 

Willie Spencer 
Enfield, n c. 

Hoy Whitlow 

Lexingl N. i\ 

Everet Whitlow 
i,, xinuton, N. <\ 

Harvey Warlick 

Lawndale, N. (J 

Bona Walker 
Aahcuoro, N. C, 

I i i iiki) York 

High Point, N. C. 

Eleanor Young 
Henderson, N. C 

Adei.e Williams 
Graham, N C 

Rum Woodcock 
I'harlolle, N. C. 



S« 



School of Commerce 




pi DAYS gone by, it was necessary to have only a cultural education to 
be calleil "educated." These days have long passed, and today an edu- 
cation is not completed without some knowledge of commercial training. 
Now. we realize that we must have an insight into practical life — an edu- 
cation that will fit us For service. With this in view, the Commercial Department offers 
this opportunity to those students who want to succeed in the business world. 

Why have such a department in a college.' Because our economic life has been 
growing more and more complex and demands better minds to grapple with its prob- 
lems. Because there are hundreds ol young men and women who would take a higher 
education if emphasis were laid upon subjects which had to do with their future 
careers. Because the colleges and universities ought to have a more influential place 
in the business life of the country. 

The Commercial Department has as its goal "High Standards of Business I'nglish." 
To this end, it strives to give tin- student the best training possible in this field. It 
gives a student a real command of the language along with an increased vocabulary. 
Then it stresses the use of forceful anil tacrlul words, both in composition and in 
expression. 

Quite as necessary as the above is Commercial Law. \\ hether a student plans to 
be a doctor or a salesman; a laborer or a promoter, he must have some knowledge of 
law. It is the common need ol today, and commercial law will give the essential steps 
that lead to success. 

Shorthand and typewriting are ol such importance that one must be able to do both 
efficiently. To be successful as a stenographer, one must he able to take and transcribe 
notes readily, and to acquire neatness in the work turned out. An inefficient stenog- 
rapher cannot hold a good position, for the business man demands accuracy, speed. 
and a sense of responsibility. 

Equally important is bookkeeping, which is essential in every business house. Books 
must be balanced, accounts kept, and records filed. The business man demands this, 
and he wants a man or woman who can do it accurately and systematically. 

The aim of the Commercial Department is: ( I ) To train the student for business 
on the basis of a broad outlook on life. (2) To give him thorough knowledge of the 
principles that underlie business action, (j) To acquaint him with efficient business 
practice. 

To enroll in the Commercial Department means that you are one step higher on 
the ladder called "Success.' 

Stanley Pi oh 



57 



School of Commerce 




Mary Adams 



Margaret Franklin 



Ellen Glenn 




William Hastings 



Bess Hoskiks 



Elizabeth Hubbard 




Maitie Kerr 



Joy Livencood 



Milred Massey 



5« 



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TJTJXTTJTJ-lJTJTJTJ-UT-riJT_n^ 



School of Comme 



rce 




Odessa Meyers 



Elizabeth Pickett 



Esther Pkiciiakii 




Paul Ruth 



Helen Shields 



Lois Smith 




Mallove Stanfiei.d Milton Schwartz 



Adeline Wilsov 



59 



JTJTJTJTJTLJTJTJT-riJTJTJTJT-nJTJT^ 



rxn_T!JTJTJTJTJTJ-UTJTJTJTJTJ^^ 




The Campus Gum Treb 



60 



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/ 



ATHL6TICS 



Coach J. P. 
Boylin 



The place to which High Point has climbed in the athletic world in 
the few years of the College's existence is the direct result of the effi- 
ciency of Coach Boylin. Our popular mentor is a graduate of Wake 
Forest, and is finishing his fourth year as director of Panther athletics. 
It is needless to say that Coach has had a hard time here, but his success, 
despite this fact, is nil the more commendable. A comparison between 
the teams of the first year of the College and the teams that have repre- 
sented High Point since that time show what he has meant here. Those 
men who have played under the direction of Coach Jack Boylin have 
nothing for him hut the highest regard, which is probably the finest thing 
that can be said of a coach. High Point College is indebted to Coach 
J. P. Boylin. 



«3 



XnJTXTJTJTJTJTUTJOJTJTJTLJTJT^^ 



nJ-LTTrUT-nJTJ"LnJTJTJTJTJ^^ 



Lettermen of High Point 

(List includes men winning letters in 19.28 baseball who are still in school.; 



FURCHES 




Thompson 


Dixon 




H UTTON 


Bl.OSSI u 




Perdue 


RoitHINS 




LlTMAX 


WORLEY 


Williams 


Nygard 


Watiii \ 


Mitch ell 


Ybw 


Ridge 


Glasgow 


Campbell 


Mac Manx is 


Ml I.LIGAN 


Brooks 




Johnson 


Strickles 




Hastings 


Fl'Ql'AY 




Hedrick 


Brasser 




Robertson 



64 



JTJTJTJT-TLnJTJTJTJTJTJXnJTJTJTJ^ 




Captain 



FOOTBALL 



% 




Manager 



Hobart Thompson 

Spectacular and dependable was ihi> fine leader of the 
Panther band last season. Pat's attributes made him the 

ideal leader through a hard schedule. His fighting heart, 
his knowledge of football, and his disposition, comhine to 
make him an inspiration to his men and to make him elf 
one of the most talked of players in this section. This Illi- 
noian will have one more year of football, and there is 
00 doubt that he VVl'l eclipse his past efforts. 

Riley Martin 

The managerial reins of the football squad were looked 
after bj this Pennsylvania product. Efficiency i-- his motto, 

and he looked alter the business details ol the team like an 
old-time manager. Every day Riley was on the field, and 
has never failed in his duties Whether it was transporta- 
tion or accommodations, he had everything "fixed" at the 

proper time. The only thing he lacks is hair for his head. 



JXnJTJTXJTJTJTJXnjHLJTJXJTJ^^ 



rXJTJTJTJXTLTTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^^ 



Perdue Leading Scorers "f" '7 



Fnuf Touckdowi 
B| Sl.te_Or<,| 

Scot**. 




■ 
... ( . 



■ 
■ 

■ 

I 



FOOTBALL 



RaviMond Perdue 

Tins native Virginian was the greatest s-nr- 
Ing threat "i which the High Point aggregation 
could boast. During the past season Kay came 
Into Ilia own on the ffrldlron and was not satls- 
ri • - • t until he was high scorer of the entire 

si. t!.. Perdue is an exceptionally quick starter 

ami runs with gW a at power. Had It nol been 
for the fact that he had to do much of the 
line plunging there Is no doubt that he would 
have crossed oven more goal lines. 



Richard MagMaknis 
Captain-elect 

"I'l.U- Is from Frostburg, Md. This scantily 

hair I'd youth has been playing with the Purple 

Panthers lor the past three seasons. So well Is 
in- liked, his teammates elected him to lead 
them through the next football year. Dick has 
proved himself well worthy of the name. Pan- 
<li< i. ami is a Valuable man at either end or 

guard. 



Earnest Blosser 

Unlike most athletes, Blosser, the ninuu- 

i.-iin.-.r. has upheld the great reputation with 
which he r&mc her.-. Smart, dependable, and 
with plenty oJ nerve, "Bloss" has been In- 
valuable to the team< Only the injuries ho 

suffered duiini: the season kept this flue end 

from greater heights. 



Raymond Dixon 

This nd-hiadi-d fellow has been one of the 
mosl dependable and one of the most versa- 
tile football players at High Point College for 

the lasl lour years. Playing his last season In a 

purple Jersey, Dixon directed the team from 
the quarterback position and outdid himself In 
a very game played. The Goldsboro youth will 

leave a great vacancy in the Panther lineup 

which is gomg to !»■_ hard to fill. 



-;- 



RESUME 



HIGH POINT — WINGATE 

The Panthers opened the season here against 
Wlngate Junior College, and trampled the 
visitors under a powerful attack. Coach Boy- 
lln used over thirty men in this encounter In 
an effort to get a line on his men agalnSI 
opponents. Wingate showed some real fight 
and should be commended. 



FOOTBALL 



Albert Furches 

This is the follow who did the passing tor 
ii)i* eleven last season. ,\ hard worker, a quluk 
thinker on the Bold, and pons ssine lots «.r skill 
wiiii H football, he has fit led In perfectly In 
ills first year at Hlah Point. Purchos eume Hero 
from Mara Hill. 



William Worlky 

There Im no doubl thai Bill plnyud ihc heal 

fuulhiill of his eareer for High Poinl lasl sea- 

aon. He was in there fighting during the 

whole season, and with tils great power was 

one of the hist llnenmn in these parts. Prob- 
ably, it could be Bald, thai he played his 
beat games against Presbyterian and Newberry, 

though his whiili- M-a>»m was . omuii-mln |,|,-, 



George Ridge 

Tubby had no designs on the ceutcr poal 
lion when the Beason started, but the early in- 
jury 10 Nygard forced him to thai job for 
almost the whole season. Even though the b1& 

fellow would rather have bo n at some other 
line post he soon earned quite B reputation 
ai the pivot position, and proved to be one Ol 

the big factors in the Panther attack. 



Clifford Mitchell 

Tim Is the bes( punter thai ever played for 
the Purple and White, and it is the writer's 

opinion that he will hold that title for a long 
time yet. The Decatur player worked at the 
fullha-'k position for nmsi m ili> *.-a-ii.n and 

did some nice playing ai thai post. MlU'holi 
win have two more seasons at iiiuii Point. 



Ihristians Resort 



RESUME 



HIGH POINT — WOl-TORD 

This same, played In Spartanburg, was one 
..i the thrillers of Hie season The Terrtors 
were powerful, and made the local boys pat 
out everything they bad to hold them i" n 
7-0 scoret No less than five times did the 

Panthers hold their opponents on the goal line 
and punt out of danger. The score came when 
there was only a few minutes to play as a re- 
sult of a pass over the goal line. 



Eleven Wii 
ught Game Fro 
anthers 12 To 




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-e 


HflH 


en 




s 




e 




E- 




-4-> 




V- 


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^\ 


CO 




<A 


4> JB 


'■S 


13 «* 


'1 


"o oj 


*3 


« fi 



rUXIXnj-LTLnjTJOJTJTJTJTJnJ^^ 



PASSES TUR 
DEFEAT INTO 



Boylinites Move Towar 



"Little 
Perdi 



Title A 
Actio 

tl,,h fo^l C 

Up tin T» 
.1 H.n of c 




FOOTBALL 



Virgil Yow 

"Big Yow" didn't know much about loot hall 
When ho came to High Point College three 
years ago. but now he is a finished lineman and 
a star on the team. There Is no doubt that he 
broke up more plays behind the line than any 
other m;tn on the Club last season. His two 
hundred odd pounds has added a lot of strength 
to the Boylinites. 



Cecil Wathen 

Cecil has been one of the most conspicuous 
men in Bnyiln's array of talent for three >enrs 
and has lived up to I he r put at Ion he left on 
the gridiron In former seasons. Playing at the 
tackle and guard positions this load of dyna- 
mite has helped to explode many an opponent's 
idea of victory. 



Francis Hitton 

This two hundred and thirty odd pound line- 
man played his second good season for High 
Point, aiding greatly In the victories that the 
locejl annexed In 192N. When ll was necessary 
to open a hole In the opposing line the work- 
was usually assigned to this giant. It would 
be superfluous to say that the hole was opened. 



Charles Rorbins 

Charlie is probably the young st of the High 

Point warriors, hut he made quite an Impres- 
sion on the field this past season. He eame 
to the College from High Point high school 

with practically no gridiron experience, hut in 

his three Seasons here he has become a valuable 
fullback. 



RESUME 



HIGH POINT — OGLETHORPE 

High Point lost this name by a score of 
13-0, but the Georgians were not that much 
better than us under ordinary conditions as 
later games proved. With little reserve 

strength due to injuries In the Wofford game 
the week before, the Panthers were badly 
crippled. Oglethorpe, however, had one of the 
finest, If not the finest team, met by Coach 
Boylln's boys during the season. 



FOOTBALL 



Vern Nygard 

One of the hesi snnpperbacks in the North 
State is this "Duke" Nygard. lie was Injured 
during the first few practices of the season and 
was unable to Bet into action until the Inst four 
games or the campaign, it was easily seen in 
these that he Is still the power in the center 
• '< the line thai he was two years ago. 



Hart Campbell 

Injuries also followed this little Riustaehed 
gentleman through n large part of the season, 
i. ut when he was in condition he played :i 
mighty good l.ranrl of footlmll. Hart directed 
the team when he was In the game and will 
hove to be reckoned with when the iiuarter- 
backs try out next fall. 



Clayton Glasgow 

Glasgow Is another Mars Hill product and 
is finishing his first year here. Like his part- 
ner, Furehes, he has been a ureal help In 
the Panther line. Having lo learn an entirely 
new system and to go Into the opening varsity 
games. Glasgow has done extremely well. II.. 

will have ..in' more s.'nson of fre.tliall here. 



Charlks Brooks 
Charlie was a member of the first football 

team that High Point ever had. He plays 
an end position on the team and acts as trainer 
for the sijuad in his spare moments, Charlie 
does so many things well that he is a most 
valuable man in the Panther camp. 



RlLEV LlTMAN 

Kil.-y came to us from smoky Unionti.wn. 
Pennsylvania and Though he could not partici- 
pate in football during his freshman year on 
account of injuries, he proved to be a valuable 
man In the Panther backfleld last season. Be- 
cause of his speed nnd versatility he will he an 
outstanding candidate for Dlxon'S job at iiuar- 
ter next season. 



RESUME 



HIGH 1'OIXT — KHSKIXE 

Once more the Panthers were beaten by 
the aerial route when Ersklne slipped two 
passes over for two touchdowns. In every other 

department of the game the South Carolinians 

were outplayed according to newspaper reports 
of the game. The visitors scored first just 
before the hnlf was over, after the locals had 
taken the ball deep into their opponent's terri- 
tory. The second touchdown eaiue very much 
like the first one. High Point srored late In 
the game on a blocked kick. 




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JTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ-UTJTJXTlJXr^ 



RESUME 



IIK.II POINT — IT. ISRAGU 

This uitti' was .-'■1ii'«lii|ii) ns n vari-Hv »»n«.'i 

'■Mi iii. -mii»- luuitlliMl mosi mi it in g i ntyle 

The i;:inii' served Iwn |»iii|mis.s mi ih.ii ii u:t\'- 
Hi. H'SUllirfl a l.-sl niltl III* hi«'«l II I - 

iiinliy id see iii action sonu men who were hoi 
eligible fin- i In' itiiK-i game. 

HIGH POINT — LENOIR IIHY.NK 

Tins Maim was [he ftrst One With a " 1 . > 1 I !•■ 

Six" ..|'|""""l, ami |irn\i-i| (,. In- a kihmI Imlil. 

Tin' Pant tiers wer reputed to be inueh bettor, 
but two I title breaks kepi the score to n very 
close, margin. Shortly after the Boyllnltea 
scored they frimbledj thus gtvfnu the Bears n 
touchdown Lenoir's second scon came us a 
i. suit mi .1 blocked kick. The Bears wen a 
fighting lol that day 

HH.H POINT — KLOX 

Tin. second "Llttli Six" game with Elon was 
an all-Panther affair. The a«ori does not Indi- 
cate the superiority in this game. Boylln's men 
seamed i" take real delight In crushing their 
opponents, ami the local mentor let □ lot ol 
Ms utility players u--i In and enjoy It. The 
Christiana eonoed >i nothing until the final 
whistle though everything woe against Uiem, 

HIGH POINT — ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN 

To prove further their prowess In tin- junto) 
r tin Terence «.i th.- state, ih* Panthers orushed 



the Little Christians under an avalanche ».i 
touclidowiia in the second half of tho encounter, 
Boyllu took mosi ol in- varaltj out ..i the 
game after they bad scored otu touonodwn, and 
did n>>t inseri them again until the beginning 
mi tin- second half. The Witaonltes goi awns 
i"i n touchdown Hhortl} after, the regulars wen 
taken itum the game. 

HIGH POINT— PRESBYTERIAN 

Tins aiiaii proved to be the moat heart- 
breaking game thai the Panthers participated 

In lining III. M-it.srtti. 1'. C, vol tWO tOUCh- 

downs early, but were put on the short end ><t 
Mi. score when the locals started the second 
nan with two touchdowns and a safety* The 
Blue Stockings ~<<i hold ol another score in the 
last three minutes ol play when High Point 
made the mistake uf playing defensive boll in- 
Head ol keeping the oval in their own posses- 
sion. 

HIGH POINT — XEWHKKRY 

lu tiits contest High Point's oggregat on 

play »i the best gan i the season. They held 

the Newberrj tndlans on the six-inch "'"- for 
four downs, and soon after wen I out and got 
themselves a touchdown to win the game fi-o. 
The Panthers refused to make the mistake that 
the) did the week before, and wero driving 
ii..- N.ni.,ir> line ..n their tour-yard Hue ai the 



Schedule of Games Played During 1928 



September 22 
September 2') 
( )ctober 
( )ctober 
< ictober 
October 
November 
November 
November 12 

November iS 



(. 

13 
20 

•27 
.? 
•) 



High 
High 



Point 38 j Wingate 



Point 



Wofford 7 



High Point o; Oglethorpe . . 

High Point 7; Erslcine . . . . 

High Point 42; Ft. Bragg • • • 

High Point 14; Lenoir-Rhyne . 

High Point 13; Elon 

High Point 40; Atlantic-Christian 

High Point is; Presbyterian . . 

High Point (i ; Newberry . . 



(1 


High Point 


7 


Spartanburg 


33 


Asheville 


\2 


High Point 


1 > 


lligh Point 


12 


Hickory 


II 


Elon 


6 


1 1 igh Point 


19 


Charlotte 





Newberry 






r &^$k" -*J9«*y. 



MN II 



70 



TTUTJXnJTJiLITJTJTJXriJTJTJTJ~LJ~l^^ 



riJTJTJTJTJTJxnjnjTJTJTJxn-^^ 




Captain 




BASKETBALL 



Manager 



Ralph Mulligan 
The captain of the basketball team is small in stature, 

lint packed full of energy and life, lie has led ihe team 
capably, and being the leader has nut kept him from play- 
ing his nun stellar game on the cnurt. Mulligan is con- 
ceded to he nne of the fastest men in the state, and this 
asset has added tn the efficiency nf the team throughout the 
campaign. Ralph has nne mnre year at High Point. 

Glenn Perry 

The fiimr team was well taken care nf with this native 
n( Thomasvillt in the manager's role. They say in the 
equipment room that Perry never Inst a blanket. Coach 
Boylin leels that this accnmpli~hment nil the manager's part 
makes him a marked man and worthy nf much prai e. 
Glenn is a pie-medical student, anil will graduate from the 

college this June. 



UTJTJTJTJTJTJTXIJTJTJTJTJTJ-U^^ 



-anmers mee^w ott! 

Jark.^fca^eeting 
choc- r ^fcithle 




lm 

Toni* 
J» Hwo . 

»•»» U,« 

n\gk r< -u 
•r >■*. 

a IiMl 
■b»i r'.m 



^^^■Vi «... .1 

W W'nffon! (Mm !»•• I 

SUM • >«VD n ( „ 
■ ••at**" 

• **•<* »H 



BASKETBALL 



Clifford Mitchell 

This running mate nf Mulligan 
is a guard of the first calibre. 
"Milch" seems to have no trou- 
ble getting into the scoring col- 
umn himself while seeing that 
his opponents are held to a min- 
imum. Mis long shots from the 
deep court have given many a 
thrill during the season just past. 



IIob.art Thompson' 

This fellow is the same depend- 
able, brilliant player in basket- 
ball that he is on the gridiron. 
Playing at a forward position 
"Pat" is again this seasoti one of 
the leading scorers on the Squad. 
He i- also versatile enough that 
he may be used at the pivot posi- 
tion if the necessity arises. 



[ 1>^ /^ 



RlLKV LlTMAN 

Another of William Penn's boys 
is l.itman. lie is a finished bas- 
ketball player and cavorts 
around the guard position. He 
is a good shot, coming in for his 
share of the limelight as a scorer 
from the deep court. Riley is a 
sophomore and has two more 
years with the team. 



7-= 



JTTJTJTJTJTjnJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^^ 



BASKETBALL 



'/ m ■* 



Court Hi 



Allan Hastings 



Hastings served his first year on 
the floor team in an admirable 
fashion. His first streak of bril- 
liancy was in the Winston- 
Salem game when he scored 25 
points in about as many min- 
utes. From that time on he de- 
veloped and became a fine per- 
former. 

Herbert Strickler 

This big fellow is a newcomer 
in the Panther ranks, but he has 
already proved himself to be the 
hest center that the college ever 
boasted. He has added the 
punch to the team that has kept 
it in the winning column. Strick 
will have a few more years at 
High Point and will set the 
basketball fans a dizzy pace be- 
fore he is through. 

Harry Johnson 

The Pennsylvanian you see here 
comes in the same category with 
Walter;; — he's mighty tricky 
with a basketball, too. Like 
some others, this is Harry's first 
year with the team ; but he has 
shown unusual ability and will 
continue to improve and star 
with the cage team. 

Virgil Yow 

Gibsonville's representative has 
as his chief attribute, dependa- 
bility. Virgil filled the position 
at center before the others 
rounded into form for the job. 
However, this fellow has been 
valuable to Coach Boylin as a 
good utility man. Yow has one 
more year at college. 







73 




Little Six Champions 



High Point 

Icrrnce of the 

with a conferei 
ai High Point 



High Poini 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

IliKh Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 

High Point 



won an undisputed claim to the basketball championship of the "Little Six" con- 
state when Elon was beaten on her own court. There remained one more same 
nee team for the Panthers, but no matter what the result may he the title rests secure 



High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 



Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
High Point 

High Point 
High Point 
(Note) Result 



Basketball Results For 1928-1929 



43; Danville Y. M. C. A. 
. 39; Durham V. M. C. A. . 
. 37; Durham Y. M. C. A. . 
. 16; Wofford College . . . 
. 56; Winston Y. M. C. A. . 
. 3$; Erskine College . . . 
. 21 ; Newberry College . 
. 49; Winston Y. M. C. A. . 
. 34; Lenoir-Rhyne College . 
. 47; Charlotte Monograms . 
.23; Richmond V. M. C. A. 
. 30; Richmond Councilors . 
. 48; Virginia Medical College 
25 ; Richmond Blues . . . 
Atlantic Christian . 
Fort Bragg (Army) . 
Atlantic Christian . , 
38; Finn College .... 
. 25; I.cnoir-Rh> ne College . 
. 46; Catawba College . 
. 28; Elon College . . . 
; Charlotte Monograms , 
; Catawba College . . . 
of last two games not known at compilation. 



• 33: 



37; 



4>; 

26; 

19; 
24; 
32; 
32; 
3°; 
19; 
+2: 
47; 

28; 
3°; 



'9; 
33; 
n; 

33; 
30; 



Where Played 

. . . Danville 

. . . Durham 

. .High Point 

. . High Point 

. Winston-Salem 

. . Erskine 

. Newberry 

. . High Point 

. High Point 

. . High Point 

. . Richmond 

. . Richmond 

. . Richmond 

. . Richmond 

. . High Point 

. . Fort Bragg 

. . . Wilson 

. . High Point 

. . Hickory 

. High Point 

. . . . Elon 

. . Charlotte 

. . Salisbury 



74 



ITJTJTJTJXTLJTXUTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^ 





CAP I AIM 



Man' ager 



BASEBALL 



Virgil Yow 

The High Poim College baseball 
■ram this year will be captained by C. 
Virgil Vow, an all-round athlete ai the 
local institution. Vow i> a versatile 
performer in the diamond sport, and 
although best known lor his pitching 
ability, he is frequently used in the out- 
field because of his ability to hit. 

Captain Vow is a member of the 
Junior Class, having entered High 

Point College from Gibson ville High 
School. Gibsonville, North Carolina. 



Clifford Mitchell 
A playing manager is a rare thing to 

a baseball team, but Clifford Mitchell 
has the honor of holding that position. 
Clifford is quite a baseball player, and 
is capable of holding down the difficult 
backstop position or performing in the 
outer gardens. Still, when Coach Bo\- 
lin began looking around for a good 
manager his eyes fell upon the hurl\ 
form of the caretaker of athletic equip- 
ment! Mitchell, besides playing, will 
also have to perform the manager's 
duties, but he will do a good job of 
them both. 



rXJTJTJTJXJOJTJTJXTIJTJTJTJT-rL^ 





m t if M t ,fy 





RESUME 



The baseball learn, representing High Point College last year, was one nl ihe strongest in llic 
history of the school. Starting the season with bright prospects, with the exception of the 
pitching staff, the Panthers began a long hard schedule that would tax the potential powers 
of any aggregation. The team took a trip through South Carolina during the Easter holidays 
and turned in three notable victories against two defeats. The teams met and defeated, were 
Erskine, Wofford, and Piedmont college. The Panthers were defeated by Newberry in a hard- 
fought game and ended the trip with a close defeat from Piedmont in a two game series. 

The locals lost four games by the margin of one run. Two of these were to Atlantic Christian 
College by the close score of 5-4. Wake Forest managed to pull two games out of the fire 
against the Panthers by coming from behind in the closing innings to win both games, 11-8, 
and 3-2. The Boylinites had the habit of losing close games by the margin of one or two runs. 
Edwin Hedrick, local hurler, was the chief hard luck pitcher, losing four games by only one run. 

The Pointers were not so successful in the "Little Six" conference games, losing to Lenoir- 
Rhvne, Atlantic Christian and Elnn. Catawba College was defeated in two games, one of 
them being a shutout game for the locals while the other tilt went twelve innings before the 
locals could score the winning runs. 

Coach J. P. Boylin has high hopes of a successful season for this year's diamond squad. He 
bases his optimism upon the fact that the majority of the letter men from last year and year 
before last are back. Also the team is augmented by som new and high class material that 
would be welcomed by any college team. 

Among the lettermen back are: catchers, Wade Fuquay and Clifford Mitchell; pitchers, 
Edwin Hedrick and Virgil Yow; infieldcrs, Raymond Perdue, Ray Dixon, Paul Brasser and 
Ernest Blosser. Among the candidates for the outer garden will be Graham Madison, Ragsdalc, 
former Oak Ridge performer, William I.udwig, and others. 

The hurling corps will be strengthened by the addition of Grady Stone, former star 
pitcher for Wallburg High School. Stone entered the local college at the beginning of the 
second semester and his friends are looking for him to have a most successful season. 

Ragsdalc is one of the hardest hitters in the state and a great defensive man. This Spring 
he is to get a tryout with Greensboro Piedmont league club. 



76 



LTIJTJTJXJTJTJXJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^ 




TRACK 



Captains 





Captain Ralph Mulligan 

Mulligan was again elected captain of the High Point 
College track team. He was the lone High Point entry in 
the state intercollegiate meet in Greensboro last year, and 
won two third places, in the 100 and 220 yard dashes. He 
scored three first places in a dual meet against Guilford, and 
one first and two seconds in a dual meet with Wake Forest. 

Captain Juanita A.mick 

This makes Juanita Amick's third successive year as cap- 
tain of the girls' track team. She is considered as one of 
the best girl athletes in the state and holds quite a few- 
records at the college. She is especially strong in the run- 
ning broad jump, the hurdles and the baseball throw. She 
has proved a good leader and is deserving of much considera- 
tion in college sport activities. 

Manager Clyde Plgh 

Pugh was selected manager of both the girls' and boys' 
track team, and has arranged very attractive schedules for 
both of the organizations. Pugh, although only a sophomore, 
is considered as one of the most energetic young men on the 
campus, and holds many responsible positions. 



Man Acer 




Boys Track Team 



Front Roue, left to right: Smith, Johnson 1 . Litman, Capt. Mulligan. 
Second Row, left to right: Barkby, Luiiwig, Hunter. Perdue. 
Third Row, left to right: Massev, Ewinc, Forshikr, Puoh. 
Fourth Rev/1 S'irickler, VVori.f.y, Stei.gen, Hastings. 



78 



^JTJTJTJTXlJTJXriXLJ-UTJXJ~U~^^ 



Boys Track T 



earn 




HE High Point College track team was not very .successful last year — 
probably as it was the first track team the college has ever had. Through 
various sources the team this year has been equipped with new suits. Prac- 
tice started early in the spring, and as the book goes to press there is 
every indication that the team is going to be successful. 

Strickler has proved to be a very good field man. He puts the shot around forty 
feet, hurls the discus a distance of 130 feet, and high jumps about five feet, ten inches, 
Johnson has displayed unusual ability in crossing both the high and low hurdles, and is 
expected to win several places. Ludwig, in the pole vault, has been crossing the bar 
at eleven feet. Barkby, Stelgan, Hunter, Smith, Massey, have all made good time 
in the distance events — most of them specializing in the mile and half mile. Worley, 
Perdue, and Forshier centered their attention to the weights, and promise to place in 
the different meets. Litman, Ewing, and Mulligan all showed well in the sprints. 
Ewing and Mulligan take part in the 100, 220, and broad jump, while Litman runs 
the 440 and half mile. 

Last year the team finished filth in the state intercollegiate meet with six points. 
There is little doubt but that the Panthers will be higher in the list this year. 



Track Schedule 

April 13 Intcrclass Meet 

April 20 Guilford Dual Meet (pending) 

April 27 Catawba Dual Meet (pending) 

May 3-4 State Intercollegiate Meet 

May 9 Dual Meet with Davidson 



79 



JTXUTJTJTTJTJTJTJTJT-nJTJTJTJ^^ 







Girls' Track Team 

Girls' track at High Point College is the only form of sport that the girls have a 
chance to participate in. and it is fast becoming popular with the girls as a whole. 
The first year there were only thirteen girls on the squad, last year there were twenty- 
seven, and this year over thirty reported for the first practice. Letters are awarded 
to those girls who win a first place or a total of eight points during the season. 



Tracic Schedule 

Intcrelass Meet April 13 

Xikantlian-Artemesiaii Meet April 20 

Third Annual Interscholastic Meet April 27 

Dual Meet with Lenoir-Rhyne (pending) May 11 



80 









UXTTJTJXITJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^ 




ORGANIZATIONS 



nJXIOJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^ 




83 



UTJTJTJTTlJTJTJTLJTJTXUXnJXn 



II I'" 



THE HI-PO 



■ 

•>. ... // m 











; • I 

W ' lli 

II _ 






stti^ Shop 



JTJTJTJTJTJT-TIJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^ 



TJOJTJTJXTUTJTJTJXnJTJTJTJnLnJTJ^ 




I'Rn-.MMl CIA H 




SCRIHLI-RIS en P. 



85 



LJTJTriJTJTUTJTJXriJTJTJTJTJTJ^^ 






flome economics Uu 


a 






Officers 












Mak\ Beth Warlick . 





. . Secretary 










MRS. Allan T. 


SlKI.I 1 


Members 


. . . . Sponsor 


ih i ham Dixon 




ANGI LETTS PREVOST 


M m W'ii LI VMS 


Mae Edwards 




Beatrice Wadell 


Pauline Wimiamk 


Lillie Jane Long 




I.eona Wood 


I.i EANOR Vfol SC 


Eva Ellis 




Mary Beth Warlick 


Willie Fritz 


Elizabeth Hanker 




Mrs. C. I.. W'ii maker 


Hilda Amick 


Lillie Mae Davis 




Ruby Warlick 


Nettie Stuart 


( iLAovs Morris 




Lella Motsincer 


Vblna Teagi r 


Flora Dell Mi rem 1 1 




Louise Jennings 


Alia Allen- 


Veriiii Marshbanks 




Eva Spencer 


Blanche Ingram 


Hi \\i UK IIOCKADAY 




Virginia Sikoi pi 


Emma Dix 


Olive Thomas 




Elizabeth Nicholson 


Mrs. M. H. Street 



S6 



LnJTJTlJTJTJTJTJTTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJT^ 







College Choral Club 



Mil HOi.KSK B, Amos . 
Elizabeth Nichouon 



Prof. E. B. StiMSOtf, Director 
. . President Elizabeth Rogers . . . 

Vice-President Charles 15. AMICK, Jr. 

Elizabeth Hanker, Librarian 



■ Secretary 
Treasurer 



The Choral Club was indeed a success during the past year. I inter the able direc- 
tion of Prof. Stimson the club prepared and presented several programs of merit. 
Unfortunately the Christmas cantata was abandoned after the influenza epidemic be- 
came so serious at the College. A public recital was given jointly by the club and 
the college orchestra. The same week the club broadcasted from Station WNRC at 
Greensboro. A cantata will be given during commencement week. 



»7 



UXnLTTJXJTJTJT-nJXmTJ^^ 



jaJTJTJTTJT_nXLnJTJTJXrUTJTJ^^ 



Ministerial Association 




J a bus W. Braxton 
F.. O. Peeler 
Willie Wood 
Taft White 
Ilnv Whitlow 
Kenneth Holt 
Monroe Bennett 
Talton Whitehead 



Student Volunteer Group 



ra©DR 




Holt w. Brown 
Eva W. Spencer 
Grover L. Angel 
Olive Thomas 
Muriel IIouser 
Truth Isley 
Dessie Lea Little 
Edgar O. Lane 



rTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJXTUXriJTJTJTJT-nj-l^ 



Forensic 
Council 

Dr. P. S. Kfsni.it 
Pkof. C. R. IIin-siiaw 
Dr. p. e. Lindlby 
Claire Douolas 
J. Clyde Puch 
Ralph Mulligan 
Pauline Whitaker 







Y. M. C. A. 

Council 



T. J. Whitehead 
President 

\V. B. Wood 

Pice-President 

B. M. Madison 

Secretary 

K. G. Holt 

Treasurer 

G rover A so el 

Jabus Braxton 

Dr. P. E. I.inih.ey 
Advisor 




TJTJTJXTlJTJTJXriJTJTJTJTJTXU"^ 




Artemesian Literary Society 



Colors: lirrrn .mil Yellow 



Mrs. Wimtaker 
Miss Young 
Miss Bakki ii 



Flower: Jumiuil 



lo\i)K\K\ Members 

Miss loot. 
Miss St. Claire 

Mks. Street 
Mks. Voi\i; 



Mks. Andrews 
Mks. Haltom 
Mrs. McCani.ess 



Elizabeth Nicholson, President 
Edna Holder, Secretary 
Ike/. Reynolds, Chaplain 
Rosalie Andrews, Pianist 
Anne Rob bins, Chorister 



Officers 

Elizabeth Hanker, Vici-Pres. 

Iliiiv Shields, Treasurer 
Irene Reynolds, C.rit'u 
1'keva Beeson, Monitor 
Lokaine Wilson, Reporter 



Treva Beeson 
Edna Nicholson 
Pauline Whitaker 
Eva Ellis 
Sue Morgan- 
Louise Holmes 
Blanche Ingram 
Catherine Lii.es 
C'ii.arline Grimes 
Bettie Bloom 
i.i izabeth Nicholson 
Elizabeth Hanner 



Members 

Leon a Wood 
Anne Roiibins 
Edna Walker 
Blanche Hockaday 
Grace Koontz 
Evelyn Seward 
Kai.opia Antonakos 
Loraine Ellison- 
Eleanor Young 

Mai love StANFIBLD 
Inez Reynolds 
Helen Shields 



Eloa Clark- 
Edna Holder 
Lela Motsincer 
Fannie Net Freeman- 
Ruth Woodcock 
Irene Reynolds 
Angelette Prevost 
Rosalie Andrews 
Edna Clark 
Sai.lie McCain- 
Truth Islet- 
Emma Lee Poole 



90 



ITJTJTJTJT-rU-TJTJ-LnJTJTJTJ^ 







i@€D&9 




9' 



JTJTJTJTJTJTJXrLTTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^ 



Akrotkinian Literary Society 



Organized 1926 



Motto; "Find :i waj nr muke one." 



Colors; Green anil White 



Flower: Fern 



First Semester 

William Hunter 
Bruce Yokeley . 
Km. I'm Mulligan 
Adam Hunt . . 
Bruce Vokelev . 
Virgil Vow . . 



Officers 

Second Semester 

. President . Ralph Mulligan 

Vice-President Clayton Glasgow 

. Secretary Bruce Yokeley 

. Treasurer Adam Hunt 

. Reporter . ■ ■ Virgil Vow 

. Critic Burke Furches 



Honorary MEMBERS 
Dr. Paul S. Kenneii Talmace C. Johnson 



Active Members 



Wll.lll R Barkby 
Burke Furches 
Ci \i ins Glasgow 
Henry Hankins 
Adam Hunt 
William Hi s 11 k 
Harry Johnson 
William LudWIG 
Edwin Hedrick 
Hobart Clouch 
S 1 1 i'iikn" Forrest 
Allen Hastings 
Ralph Mulligan 



Glenn Perry 
Charles Robbins 
Frank Robbins 
Vernon Robertson 
Hoy Whitlow 
Virgil Vow 
Bruce Yokeley 
Raymond Perdue 
Arthur Moser 

Wll I I AM WORLEY 

Frank Walters 
Riley Martin 
Roger Watson 



92 



jTjn_ruTJTJ-UTJxruT-njTJT^ 



LITJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJ^ 




Akrothinian Literary Society 

The Akrothinian Literary Society is the youngest society on the campus, and a 
brother society tn the Artenresiarts. The first joint society day held this year was a 
very elaborate affair. 

The society appreciates the interest taken by alumni members this year. Fred T. 
Hauser has offered an annual prize of $10 in gold to the society member who is selected 
io give the society day address. Glenn Perry, a senior, made the address this year. 
The Paul Swansnn prize of #10 is given annually to the man who has proven to be 
the best all-around member during the school year. The Holmcs-Hill-Paschall prize 
of $id is given to the debater who makes the intercollegiate debating team. Should 
more than one man make the team, this sum is given to each man. 

The membership of the society has increased very rapidly and promises to be one 
of the largest organizations on the campus by next year. The programs have been 
excellent and all of the members have hail the society at heart. 



93 



njXJTJTJTJTTlJTJXnJTJTJTJTJT^^ 




Gi £ 



Nikanthan Literary Society 



Colors: Lavender mid While 



Vlower: Lavender lri» 



Motto: Victory Crowns Patience 



Demon n Hoskjns . . 
Hilda Amick . . . 
Mary Beth Wari.ick 
Grace Keck . • • 



( )fficers 
President \\ wn\ Amick Crit'u 

l"n r-l'rrsultnt EVA SpEKCER Chaplain 

Secretary Mrs. II. A. White Idvisor 

. Treasurer Garnet Hinshaw . ...... Mascot 



Society Song 



To Thee, Oh fairest Nike 
We bow in worshipping 

ll'e pray thee to aeeept the love 
IT e now sn humbly bring 
ll'e reioi/nize thy wisdom 
Our hearts all turn to thee 
In gain thy richest blessing 
.In own of victory. 



.Ill praise to thee dear Nike 

Our refuge and our friend 

We'll always think of thee with love 

hid serve thee to the end 
Though far away we wander 
When college (lays are through 
We'll cherish dearest mrin'ries 

hid sing our praise of you. 



Chorus 

Thy name we'll always cherish 
Thy motto we'll revere 
For to be known as Nikanthan) 
Is an honor to hold dear. 



94 



TJTJTXUXTTJTJTJTJTJTJXnjriJTJnj^^ 



TJTJTJT-JTTLnJTJTJ-lJTJTJTXUT^^ 




•>s 



JXJTjnUOJTJTJTJTJTJTJT-TUTJTJTJTJT^^ 



Thalean Literary Society 



Colors: Purple anil Gold 




Mollt, "Master First Our-ehes" 



Officers 
Fall Semist r 

Hi. vise M. Madison President .... 

Frkd <;. Pecc Vice-President . 

Grover L. Ancel Secretary .... 

B. CiKKii: Williams . . . Assistant Secretary . 

John Perry Dosikr . . . , .... Treasurer ... 

Talton J. Whitehead Critic 

GeORCE MONROE Hi:\m ii . .... Chaplain . 

WADE I'. Fl'Oi'AY Society Reporter . . . 

MiLBOURNB Amos t'ress Reporter . . . 

Aubrey Dunbar Assistant Press Reporter . 

Charles B. Amick, Jr • . Marshal .... 

Lewis Bethea . . Assistant Marshal . . . 

Charles Webster Pope Debating Coach . . . 

J. CLYDE PUOH Forensic Council Representative 



Flower: While Rose 



Spring Semester 
. . Grover L. Ancel 
. . William B. Wood 
. Graham R. Madison 
. . . J. Clyde Pucii 
. . John Perry Dosier 
. Blaine M. Madison 
... J. Taft White 

Talton j. Whitehead 
. . . Aubrey Dunbar 

Chari.es Webster Pope 

. . . Robert Loftin 

. B. Currie Williams 

. Milbourne Amos 

. . . J. Clyde Puch 



J. T. Bdwm \ n 
Jauls W. Braxton 
Holt W. Brown 
j. Marvin Ci oi k 



Roll 

Charles Fosiiier Lloyd Leonard 

Kesm in G. II"i i Charles Lh.es 

Edgar 0. Lane Li mi « Mi in i\ 

John Easter E. O. Peeler 



David E. Plummer 
Willie Spencer 
Harvey Waklick 
Harvey M. Young 



To honor now a name so dear. 
If e laise our voices strong; 
To pay a tribute anil to praise — 
The Thalean Hand in soar/, so: 



our lives like Thine, 
mould : 
and Knowledge blend — 

Gold, so: 



Society Song 

hid so, dear T hales, 
We'll ever strive to 
And with Thy Art 
The Purple and the 
Chorus 

Here's to the Thalcans, 

Our noble Hand so true, 
With justice, peace, and loyally our aim; 

From the sheer white rose. 
All our purity grows, and 

II V strive for right, not fame. 
So, when Gold and I'urplc waves — 

.///</ we've " Master'd first ourselves" ; 
Then, hail to the Thalcans, 

And to our College dear 
We'll praise and love their namcj always. 

Grover L. Ancel, '29 



96 




97 



,mjTJT-TUTLJlJTJTJTJXrLnJTJl^^ 




Triangle Debaters 
Query: Resolved that a substitute for the Jury System should be adopted. 



Affirmative 

Fred Pegg 

I >. 1". I'll MMHR 



Negative 

MtLBOURNE Amos 
R \i i'ii Mi i.i.ir. \\ 



Schedule 

March 23 Wake Forest Affirmative at High Point 

March 15 High Point Negative at I.enoir-Rhyne 

Lenior-Rliync Negative at Guilford. 

Guilford Negative at High Point. 

April 10 Furnian Affirmative at High Point 

Results 
High Point College Affirmative . . . .3; Guilford i> 



High Point College Negative . . 1 ; I.cnoir-Rhv ne 2 

High Point College Negative . . . .2; Wake Forest 1 

High Point College Negative . . . .3; Furman 



98 



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Girls Inter-Society Debaters 

Query: Resolved that the President of the 
United States should be elected by Direct 
Vote of the People. 



Nik.wtii.w — Aginnutivi 
Wn.ui: Fritz 

Claire Doi clas 

Artemesian — Negative 

Elizabeth Nicholson 

Hi-:i.i;x Shields 



99 



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Christian Endeavor Society 

Motto: For Christ and Church. 
Colors: Blue and White. 



IOO 




I III ii_i RS 

Grove* L Angel . President 

Louise Adams Vice-President 

Leona Wood Secretory 

Edna Nicholson Corresponding Secretary 

(iiakiis H. AM1CK, Jk Treasurer 

Alia Allen Pianist 

Graham R. Madison . Chorister 

Talton J. Whitehead . President Extension Club 

Jaiii'5 W. Braxton Council Representative 

Miss Mar* E. Younc Faculty Advisor 




Grovex I.. Ancel 

President 



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Women s Student 

Government 

Association 

P.Al LINE WlIITAKGR 

President 

Blanche Ingram 
Vice-President 

I III. DA AMICK 

Secretary 

( '.i.adys Morris 
Treasurer 

Elizabeth Manner 
Head Proctor 

Olive Thomas 
Freshman Representative 




Women s Day 
Student Govern- 
ment Council 

Claire Douglas 
President 

Maggie Davis 
Vice-President 

Rosalie Andrews 

Secretary 

Louise Coi.lett 
Treasurer 

Kalopia Antonakos 
Head Proi tor 

Emma Dix 

Freshman Representative 



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Pan-Hellenic 
Council 



Delta Alpha Epsilon 
Prof. J. Hobart Allrbd 

W'ii MAM IIimi:k 




Alpha '1' hi In I'si 

Mrs. II. A. WHITE 

W'ii. i ii Fritz 



lulu 'Vhii Kappa 
Prof. C. R. IIissiiaw 
Richard MacMansis 



Sigma Alpha Phi 
Miss Mabel Williams 

I i wiia Amick 

Epsilon Eta Phi 

Pkof. J. H. MOURAKI 
Blaine Madison 

Tin hi Phi 

Mrs. Alan T. Street 

Dorothy Hoskins 






103 



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iTSAMIS 4iRA*TSR! RAHIS 
l'. Olin Mathews 

HlBh Pnlnl. N. O. 

Raymond Perdue 
Roanoke, Va. 

William Hunter 

I ;i eonsbOfo, N I •. 
IIaKVIV Voixc 

Stoltcsflali', N. C. 
Prof. J. IIobakt Allrep 

High Point, N. c. 

Faculty Advisor 

Glenn Perrv 

XhomasvtllQ, N. I '•. 

Ravmond Dixon 

Gold boro, n C. 

Keith Harrison 
iiiuii Point, N. C. 

Coy WlLI.IARD 

Mifii Point, .v. C. 

PAUL liRASSER 

Morgantown, \v. Va 

Ralph Mulligan 
Untontown, Pa. 

Charles Rorbiks 
High Point, n. c. 

Riley Litman 

tJnlontown, Pa. 

Rilfv Martin 
Unlontown, Pa. 

Charles B. Amick 
Burlington, N. O. 

Vernon Robertson 
i larmony, N. i ',. 

Pledges 

Frank Rof.biss 
iiiKh Point, N. c. 

IIobakt ClOUCH 
Seafor'l. Dolawarr 

Wilbur Barrbv 

New Bogle, i':i. 
David Pi.ummer 

iiit.-ii Point, N. c. 

William Ludwig 
Allison. Pa. 



104 



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Sigma Alpha 
Phi 



■ '■ -' •' ■ ■'-*& -2>«3 _3=--<» 




Colurs 

Pcimlre Klue and Gold 

Flower 

Yellow Roschnd 
Fratui.S IN CotLEQIO 
Al.TA Al.l.l N 

Hilda Amick 
Juanita Amick 
I- ww N'ii Freeman 
Allene Fuquay 
Minnie Herman 
Louise Jennings 
Grace Keck 
Elizabeth Nicholson 
Edna Nicholson 
Lucy Nunnery 
Elizabeth Rogers 
Adelr Williams 
Ruby Warlick 
Marv Beth Warlick 
Fratres Ex-Coi.i.i c.Ii I 
Gertrude Rile 
Effie Keck 
Bessie Redwine 
May Woolen 
Minnie Capfey 
I.ki.ia Wagoner 
Laura Thompson 
Annie Livengood 
Wanda Penny 

Fratres in Faci ltate 

Mabel Williams 
iiortense spiegell 




_3?.*e j5*t* 



• 



105 



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. 



M • ' «: 






; 



• 








loll 



AlpKa TKeta P 



si 



St i ui:\r Sistlrs 



W'ii.i ii Fritz 
Claire Douglas 
Margaret Davis 

Kathleen Teagi e 



l.oi im: C'ni.LElT 

Rosalie Andrews 
Hi i en Barker 
Vblna Teacue 



( iradc ate Sisters 



Lucille Morrison 
Ri in Jarrell 



Awn Lee Jarri i l 

Norini FIORKEV 



Pledged Sisters 

h \\u\ Andrews Rbucka Cuauwicr 

Leslie Johnson Catherine LiLES 

Virginia S i k 1 1 1 i'i 



Honorary Members 

Mrs. II. A. WHITE Miss Ri hi Henley 

Mrs. (". R. Hinshau Mrs r. m. Andrews 

Mrs. J. C. Wiiiiesell Mrs. I'. I . Hoi ci \- 

Miss Novella McIntirE 



107 




jTjaJTLJTJXnJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJOJlJ^^ 




Epsilon Eta Pin 




Flower: White Carnation 
Grover La Mam Anci i 

GEORGI Monroe liENNKi I 

.1 a ii us w m.i ik i'.u \xion 
John Perky Dosier 
Wade Fi.em Fioiav 



fratres in" collegio 

Edgar Odell Lane 
Blaine Mark Madison 
Graham Rex Madison 
Charles Websti k Popi 



Colors: Queen IJluc and White 



Jacod Clyde Pugh 
James Takt White 
Talton Johnson Whitewi ID 
Benjamin Currie Williams 
William Bennett Wood 



Fratres Ex-Colleoio 
I-Ierman Earl Coble, '37 Tvri Glenn Madison, '28 

Fratres I Ionorari 
[KRRi David Hardy James Harlev Mourane 

Walter Frederick McCasless Nathaniel Patton Varborough 



10S 



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<K fax^r~^x.i& (^>r~v^ti ^>r^u^ s& 




V 



5S 



Ron 
on 




F 



r 
V 

I- 



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109 



Tketa Phi 



Miiiin: To God, M\ Country, and t'> Thy Friend, lie True. 
Colors: Dark Green and Light Green 

Symbol: Swortl Fern 

FrATRES HONORARl 

Mrs. M. 15. Sikii i Mi-- Dorothy St. Clair 



Fratres i\ Collegio 



Dorothy Hoskins 
Leona Wood 
Elizabeth Hanker 
Mamie Frances Stamky 
Lillie Jane LOKG 



Pauline Wimtakf.r 
Kalopia Antonakos 

Pauline Hunter 
Margaret Gurley 
Nettie Stuart 



Fratres Ex-Collegio 



I i u 1 1. Minns 
Eucenia Williams 

M VKGARET I'lRRY 

Williard Shackelford 
Helen Hayes 



Lillian Ruckner 
\ista Dixon 
V'ircin'ia Pickens 
Pauline Ei.kins 
Spencer Cutciiin 



Pledges 



Ann Rorrins 
1mm a Dix 



Eleanor Young 

Si i Morgan 



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Iota Tau Kappa 



c. Virgo. Vmv 
Edwin Hborick 

C. Richard MacMawis 




Active Members 

Charles Brooks, Jr. 
Mil bourne Amos 



George Ridce 
Clifford Mitchell 
Ernest Bi.osskr 



Honorary Members 

Dr. II. li. IIiatt Dr. P. S. Keknett 

Randall Mann Prof. C. R. Hinshaw 

Dr. P. E, Lihdlev 



Pledges (First Semester) 
William Worlev Arthur Moser 



I 




K^^-i 



uperlatatives 




Ckosen b$ 
their classmates 
as their 
representatives 



LnxuTJTXLnjTJTTJxruxrLnj 




Dorothy Hoskins 

Senior 

"There are few people iii this 
world so sweet, so full of charm, 
and so talented as "Dot." 



Tony Antonakos 

Senior 

"Those who an getting Tony an 
getting one of our fete — hut we 
have gained by knowing him." 




116 



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jxruxnjTJTJTJTJTj-ij-Lru-Lr 



Lucy Nun kio 

Junior 

Lucy is able to assimilate the best 
ui/li which she comes in contact. 





Virgil Yow 

Junior 

Virgil is <i truly representative ju- 
nior buy embodying high ideals. 



"7 



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Emma Lee Poole 

Sophomort 

Emma Lit — the possessor of beau- 
tiful brown ryes which reflect liri 
vivacious spirit." 



Riley Martin 

Sop/iornnrr 

"Martini" is our of the best known 
atta lust liked men on tin campus — 
"a good chnp." 




118 



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Betsy Durland 

Freshman 

hi Betsy fiv ail mil ( the imtuiul 
ivay she wears nil '// her graces. 





Robert Loftin 

Freshman 

Robert's personal merits, regard- 
h ft o/ his good tanks, are gaining 
jnr him outstanding success. 



119 



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H. P. C. 

Words anil Musi, by Dorothy 1 1 ostitis and Margaret Gurley 




J/j our JjtartSTuc'H kolS ike Jncm'rjr of a place are 7oVe </;e best •' 

^J/heijtiia'i-coij tlje tielo of itaitle. ~Vflj<ra toc eiii-befo>- pi-mise. to tljra. 




X)'er ii looOes or pur-ple batj- rjei— Em-blent qf 
Jdxyoiirieauisbe un-cle — -j-ea/t — eo. Ours rrje. 



its Jcarlea — 
crorSti o ( t"Cco- 




yf > i 'H | J a JJ-J 1 i J J ifll ±-h^ 

*> "*- irr. .:. iL. i A.. -. _ ... /.. . 






~Wej>ra/ise i)]y Tjvxna ouj<5 tfyu 



()o«-er- £)• 



C1-U.C - — ■ 





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EJiESSfe 



1TP.J fe 



x'r/ey Gtmjofor }ov — •»! - xj emS lo\ic:- 



■ May joui-sie fnas.a — 




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~ t\a.t royoM is 6ue — ■ for you cuell cJ-^zjoys $*&$ w ~6jor< xlje 




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t\yj s^anoaros Jjio,j| To 5J0« f j;e tesi we 



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mil 



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g g J.- J ! J- J- ,J. J ) J- J. | J i, J- J 



Ijave to ~ i\)e.«. 



mpi 



?*? 



m^ 



j. 



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'Mem-Vies oj- you. laa Tuill 



t it t 



irt 



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prtp 



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121 



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Faculty 

I ('iillllllllrtl ' j 



Mils. I.i.'cil i: OwSLBY 

Department <>\ Expression 



Miss Bowie Enoch 
Department «/ Art 



J 



unior 



CI 



ass 



(Continued) 



Edward Clayton Glasgow 

castalia, ». c. 

.Hi o I /i iii iii n 

AflAM SCOTI Hi \i 

i \s\r, v. c. 

a \ i: 
.Hinlliiiiiiiii 



Cecil WATHEN 

MORCANITE1.D, KV. 

ELIZABETH SS'OW WELBORN 

IIIOII POINT, X. c. 

Ii Irniisiiiil 

1 1. mm A. Wright 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Soph 



omore 



CI 



ass 



(Continued) 



JACKS1R I.I CM I I BROOKS 
llAKT 1!. CAMPBRI I . . 
El 1/ Mil: I II CROWELL . . 

Albert Ewinc . . . 
Essie Eh a Hanky . . 
Louise J. Jennings . . 
Edgar Odf.i.i. Lave . . 
Bernice C. Eee .... 
Riley Hill Lit man- . . 



High Point, N'. C. 
. . Rochester, Pa. 
. High Point, N. C 

. . . Casey, III. 
. Mnrshville, N. C. 
. High Point, N. C, 
. . Pinnacle, N. C. 

High Point, N C. 
. . I'ninntown, Pa. 
William EVAS Worley 



J. Riley Martin: .... LTniontown, Pa. 
Chester Massey .... Trinity, N. C. 

Louise MASSEY Trinity, N. C. 

Clifford Ciiari.es Mitchell . Decatur, III. 
Flora Dell Mitchell . . . Jennings, N. C. 
Richard C. Pasciiall . . Ridgeway, N. C. 
Wanda M. Penny . . . Blgh Point. N. C. 
James L. Siceloi F .... Lexington, N. C. 

Francis Walters Chicago. III. 

. Fairmont, W. Va. 



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Fresh 



resnman 



CI 



ass 



[Continued) 



Clement Ai.den- Andrews . . Chicago, 
Jambs Howard Blair . . High Point, N. 
Walter Monroe Crouch . High Point, N, 



James 'Blase Daniel 
John Cicero Easter . . 
William Edwards . 

Thomas CARL EVERETT 

James Foscue . . . . 
A M'.nv David Harris . 
William M. Jarrell . 



. High Point, N 

High Point. N. 

. High Point, N. 

. Slnkesdali-, X. 

. Jamestown, N. 
High Point, N. 
High Point, N. 

W'll I I AM Ivor. I K 



c. 

V. 

C. 

C. 

c. 
c. 
c. 
c. 

W't 



IIakkv Abrahams Johnson- . (Jniontown, Pa. 



I I D I.I S7.CZA S~K\ 

II \koi n JAMI s Mai OS . 

Ruth Winnola I'i kkv . 

W'll 1.1AM RACSDALE . 

1 1 1/ m:i in Reitkbl . . 
William P. Richardson 

TllOM \s Ri id Sill i ins . 
N'l I I II Sheron . . . . 
S. Ellis Tucker . . . 
. . Morven, N, C. 



Perth Amliiiv, N. J. 

. . . Chicago, III. 

. High Point, N. ( . 

Jamestown, N- C, 

High Point, N. C. 

. Stokesdale, N. C. 

, High Point, N. <'. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

High Point, N. C. 



Commercial Students 



Mary Elizabeth Adams . . 
Clarence Bkii.es .... 

IIobart ClOOCH 

Harry Culler 

James Foscue 

Margaret Lynn Franklin- . 

f.i.i. en- Glenn 

Aaron Harris 

William Allen Hastings 
Minnie ZlTA HERMAN . 
Hess Marsh Hoskixs . . . 
Elizabeth Hampton Hubbard 
Walter Hitciiens . . . 

Lot ise Jennings 

Elizabeth Johnson- . . 
Mai he Inez Kerr . . . 

Minnie Kress 

Joy Ross Liven-good . , 
James Rii.ey Martin . 
Mildred Evans Masse y . 
Sai.i.ii: Ellen- McCain . . . 
IIoiin- LULU Moore .... 
Odessa Viola Myers . . 
Margaret Elizabeth Pickett 
Esther Pritciiarii .... 

Clyde J. PUGH 

William RACSDALE .... 
Andrew Paul Ruth . . . 
Milton M. Schwartz . . . 

Helen- Shields 

Hazel Simpman 

Chester Smith 

Ida Mai.loye Stan-tieed . . 
Wayne E. Weant .... 
Elizabeth Adeline Wiison 



. Si I retarial . 

. Freshman . 
. Frcs/unan . 

. Junior . , ■ 
. Freshman . 
. Secretarial . 
. Set retarial . . 
. Freshman . 
. Freshman . 
. . Spei ml . . . 
Bookkeeping . . 
. St < retarial . 
Bookkeeping . . 
Typewriting . 
. Shorthand . 
. Set retarial . . 
. Penmanship . . 
. Set retarial . . 
. Sophomore . 
. Secretarial . . 
. Sn retarial . . 
. Secretarial . 
. Secretarial . 
. Secretarial . 
. . Special . . • 
. Sophomore . 
. Special . 
, Bookkeeping . 

. Special . 

. Secretarial . 
. Secretarial ■ ■ 
. Sophomore ■ ■ 
. Secretarial . 

. . Junior . . . 

. Secretarial ■ 



. High Point 

Caraway, N'. C. 

. Seaford, Del. 

. High Point 

. . Jamestown 

lli^li Point 

Lancaster, S. ('. 

. High Point 

. Seaford, Del. 
. I linh Point 
. High Point 
. Ili«li Poinl 
. Francisco 

. Iliull Poinl 

. I linn Point 

. Iliyli Point 

. 1 1 i j^li Poinl 

, c rreenshoro 
Uniontown, Pa. 

. High Point 

. Asheboro 

. Lexington 

. Thomasville 

. High Point 

. High Point 

. Climax, N. C. 

. . Jamestown 

. . High Poinl 

. . High Point 

. Kernersville 

. . High Point 

. . High Point 

. . Mich Point 

. . High Point 

. Lenk>ville 



123 



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HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

SIXTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 9, 1929 





aril 



-=m 






For Catalogue Apply to 

THE PRESIDENT 

High Point, North Carolina 



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GEO. W. LOWE, Inc. 
BUICK 

Sales and Service 
Phone 2820 



The Princess Cafe 

An Unusually Good Place to 
Eat 

304 North Main Street 
High Point. N. C. 

A Place You Will Tell Your Friends 
About 



MEREDITH MOTOR 
COMPANY 

General Auto Repairing and Certified 
Service on All Makes of Cars 

Cadillac. Franklin. Nash 

Hudson and Packard 

a Specialty 

"We Gel Em Large or Sma'l" 



For 

\ 


All 


Cold Troubles 

1CKS 

VapoRub 

Just Rub It On 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



J. W. SECHREST » SON 



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n 




You Won't Find the Answer in the 

"BOOK OF ETIQUETTE" 

If you're not quite sure which fork to use. or if 
you are wondering how to greet a visiting queen, 
the "Book of Etiquette'' can give you kindly 
counsel. 

But when it comes to the selection of a gift, you 
must look to your own brains for the inspiration 
and guidance. 

Maybe you're desperate, but take heart. We can be 
of help to you before it is too late. For we are 
always showing the unusual at our store, and here 
you will find the perfect gift, easily and quickly. 
It may be a gorgeous diamond or a stately but 
inexpensive silver vase, but whatever it is. it will 
bear the seal of STAMEY'S ... and that 
means gifts beyond comparison but most mod- 
erately priced. 

STAMEY'S 

High Point's Greatest Jewelry Store 
108 North Main Street 



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'A Story in Picture 

Leaves Nothing Untold' 

STEPHENS 
STUDIO 

Official Photographer to 

THE ZENITH 

A Specialist in Baby 
Photography 

I 1 6 N. Main Street 

High Point, N. C. 



The High Point Candy 
Company 

Jul Four Doors Below the College 
Corner 

Candies. Ice Cream. Soft Drinks 
Cigars. Cigarettes 

120 N. Main Street 
HIGH POINT. N. C. 



WL LEAD IN SPORTING GOODS 



BASKETBALL HOCKEY 



Beeson Hardware Co. 

High Point. N. C. 
3 I 7— Phone— 3 1 8 

GOLF TENNIS 



THE BEST FOR LESS 




No Better Business Partner 
Than a Good Bank Aid- 
ing in Your Success 

WACHOVIA BANK 
&* TRUST CO. 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 



LfT 



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Quality Comes First — We Have It 
Service Comes Next — We Give It 
Satisfaction is What We All Want 

We GUARANTEE It 

BROWN BILT SHOE 
STORE 

128 S. Main St. High Point. N. C. 



JOHNSON 

Florist 
"Say It With Flowers" 

STORE 

1 1 2 W. Washington St. 

Phone 4 366 



The George Washington Cafe 

"An Eating Place of Excellence" 

104 North Main Street 

Just Above the Railroad 




Whether it applies to principles 
of character or the value of prop- 
erty is the first consideration of 
every man. 

S. C. CLARK 

Developer of Emerywood 



Telephone 2414 



Office E. Washington Street 
HIGH POINT. N. C. 



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28 Years 

Continuous Service 

to Our Patrons 

Fruits-Vegetables 

Still Anxious to Serve You 

W. I. Anderson 
8 Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Wholesale Only 



\ 




THE COMMERCIAL 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 



H. W. PETERS CO. 

Boston, Mass. 
Official Jewelers 

Class Rings, Pins, Emblems 
Favors, Invitations 



Dry Cleaning Clothes Correctly is an Art 

It Has Always Been Our Aim to Place at the Disposal of Our 
Patrons THE BEST 

HIGH POINT STEAM LAUNDRY 

PHONE 3 25 

High Point, North Carolina 



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The Rhodes Press 

1 32 West Commerce Street 
HIGH POINT. N. C 

Telephone 4214 




Good Year Tires 
Hiatt Tire Co. 

PHONE 2872 



DON'T FORGET TO CALL 2058 FOR 

CLOVER BRAND ICE CREAM 

AND 

PASTEURIZED DAIRY PRODUCTS 

None Better 

HIGH POINT CREAMERY COMPANY 



Elwood Hotel 

"Famous for Food" 

High Point. N. C. 

R. K. Young. Manager 



Herbert B. Hunter 

THE ARCHITECT FOR 
HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

High Point. N. C. 



The 


Enterprise 


High Point' 

Is vitally 


Only Daily Newspaper 
interested in the de- 


velopmeni 


of High Point Col- 


lege. M.i 


y its material and 


spintuj 


I growth continue 


upon 


the broad plane 


of 


its inception. 




TAILORED CLOTHES 

Nationally Known- Justly Famous 

SCHWARTZ'S 



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M#DEItN 

BEAUTIE/ 



— of these days do not depend altogether upon facials, 
marcels, permancnts and other beauty aids to keep up 
appearances. They send their dainty frocks, beautiful coats 
and other wearing apparel regularly to Sartin to be expert- 
ly dry cleaned and made to look like new. All the clear- 
ness of color — all the freshness of feel — all the softness 
of nap — all the original smartness of style — is restored 
to your clothing by our process of dry cleaning and modern 
pressing methods. 

SARTIN DRY CLEANING CO. 

Cleaners and Dyers 

High Point. N. C. 
Phone 4501 



winston salem. n. c. 
Phone 1800 — 24 64 



english street branch 
Phone 2906 



"For That Well -Dressed Feeling" 



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Ideal Furniture Co. 

incorporated 

manufacturers of 

Living Room Furniture 

Wholesale .mil Reiail Dealers in 

FURNITURE AND DRAPERIES 

Phone 2759 

516 North Main Street 

High Point. N. C. 




Dr. Nat Walker 

Optometrist 

Over Han Drug Companv 
Nexi to Post Office 

High Point. North Carolina 



SNOW LUMBER 
COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

Lumber, Sash. Doors 
Blinds. Etc. 



HIGH POINT. N. C. 



Let Us Serve You After 
Graduation 

Consult us about your future 
home —the loan you want — 
your insurance. We are equipped 
to serve your real estate needs. 



SOUTHERN REAL 
ESTATE CO. 

104 N. Elm Street 
Greensboro. N. C. 



the new 



jaW B LINCOLN 




"Service That Satisfies" 

Wilson Motor Co. 

High Point. N. C. 



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STALEN EZELACHTIG HARD, A.B. 

LOCHVILLE, MARY VAN I A 
\Unilitm l.it.Tiir> Society |.;i a V\ 

Assist. s*i.« . Jenxrlularua Cluu, 1. 
Aul hor i lass pass-word. 

Member i r ,i. K I .-:< mi. 

Memltei Woman's I »:•> Student Council S, :; 
Mimiier Arrlhalaplerna Spanish nub, ".. t;. 7. s. 
Faculty ravorltc pp North Cluh. Een, iwh, arte 
TJoorhvt-twr Olinoskchgnlcialro-* Greek Club, Hepta, 

"I« t"t. • Mill .1. 

Mush turner "Chontmnl Choral Clnh." I'n, deux, 
I rots. 

"in. 1..1 ru. u-rauLr-tlKhiin r. W1111. 111. hv. 

Ever since Stolen came i" deai old Flllouthlank 

[' -' "" pi;"" has nevoi been the same. He 

if inai -i'ii .it :. fellow who would never lei oiij 
ol hla associates lower his standing. He stands 
high hi the estimates of the facility and can often 
lie seen talking with tho dean, He has the ability 
t«. ihinic mi almost any subject about which he 
may hnve Ideas. 

Stolen i- a verj populni young ">"" socially, 
especial!) with tin ivwiket'-iwlnd >l wot He nlway* 
attends nil functions where unythlng to eat is 
served without rosl, Then \tt no more persist en 1 
visit 01 at tit. woman's hall than he- He liasen*i 

nplished much yel but Itci U ex pec tiny to eel 

away with somcthlnfl nlmonl any .lay now II. 
is the sort «»i a young man «>' which are college 
is Justly proud. We know thai regardless ol what 
endeavour h« mnj go Into, a bright ruture run- 
iii.iits him. 



AMOS REALTY 
COMPANY 

Developers of 

MILBOURNE HEIGHTS 

Anything in Real Estate 

High Point. N. C. 



QUALITY SERVICE 

Britt Electric Co. 

Electrical Contractors 

Lighting Fixtures and 
Appliances 

H2 S. Wrcnn Si. PHONE 28 50 



BARBER-HALL 
PRINTING CO. 

"Better Printing Pays" 

Telephone 2?8t High Point. N. C. 

Everything in Printing 



For First-Class Shoe Repairing 
Call 4313 

W. C. BROWN 
SHOE SHOP 

Work Called For and Delivered 
Phone 4313 1-8 N. Wrcnn Sc. 



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Collegians Demand the Best 

MERIT SHOES 

Meet the Standard 

MERIT SHOE CO. 

Incorporated 
1 34 S. Main St. High Point. N. C. 



Wagger's Ladies' Shop 

DISTINCTION 

For the Woman Who Cares 



HIS. Main St. 



Phone 2931 



Large or Small Savings 
Accounts Appreciated 

Globe Industrial 
Bank 

5'; INTEREST 



Stall I iml tin- ZENITH in Protection 
Afforded Vim lij the 

Pilot 

Life Insurance 

Company 

C.REENSBORO. N. C. 




"Over a Quarter Century of Service" 
SI 00.000.000.00 Insurance in Force 



Meet Your Friends at 

HART DRUG CO. 

Next to Post Office 

Phones 321 — 327 

Fountain Pens 
Shaeffer — Parker — Waterman 

Agents for 

Elizabeth Andrews Toilet 
Articles 



COLLEGE GRADUATES 

The Perpetual Building and Loan Association Offers the Logical 
Medium for Systematic Saving 

"Always at Your Service" 

High Point Perpetual Building & Loan Association 

at the Commercial National Bank 



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Jones & Peacock 

INCORPORATED 

INSURANCE 

All Kinds 

301 North Main St. 



RING DRUG CO. 

Next to Wachovia Bank 

"Bobbits Service" 
Telephone 313 




Protects .ind serves the home with up- 
to-d.ite policies. Suited to every need 
of the family. Low premiums, liberal 
dividends. Assure your firuncMl in- 
dependence bv insuring with 

Colonial Life Ins. Co. 

home office 

8th Floor Commercial National 

Bank Building 

Telephone 2 706 



JW l MrMHMJ TVantporli.-W 




The Outstanding Chevrolet in Chevrolet History 



—A SIX IN THE PRICE RANGE OF A FOUR 



LYLES CHEVROLET COMPANY 



North Main Street 



Phone 4210 



"Quality at Low Cost" 



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SODA CANDIES 

Cecil Drug Store 



Phone 1ti9 



The Rexall Store 



Cecil-Simpson-Ring Co. 

Phone 2?7t>, WtSI End 
PRESCRIPTIONS LUNCHES 



OAeLLd 



*H£»E OUAL/TY TELLS 



GREENSBORO. N. C. 

"The Carolina^' Greatest Hardware 
and Sporting Goo./s House" 



Sporting Goods and Every- 
thing in Hardware 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

HIGH POINT 
HARDWARE 



127 S. Main 



Phone 2J40 



N. E. RUSSELL 

Shoe Repair Shop 

108 South Main Street 

Phone 2616 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 




Prof. Stales' E. H uto 
B.S., A.B., M.A. 

Inslruttor in O/i-vu •iltn/j 

Faculty Advisor FIT FRATERNiry 



'The Plant That Service Built' 




Dry Cleaning. Tailor- 
ing, Dyeing 



is 



1011 E. Green St. Phone 2980 

High Point. N. C. 



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R. K. STEWART « 
SON 

CONTRACTORS FOR 
HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

High Point, N. C. 



GOOD CLOTHES 

N. H. SILVER 
COMPANY 



HOOD SYSTEM 
INDUSTRIAL 
BANK 



Weekly and Monthly 
Loans 



5'A PAID ON SAVINGS 

210 N. Main Street 
HIGH POINT. N. C. 



PERMANENCY 

Established in High Point to Serve 
the High Point People 

"With Sunshine Service" 



Phone 393 




Laundry 



HIGH POINT. N. C. 



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Utility Service and the Community 

More than any other one factor, the quality of its utility services 
determines the desirability and attractiveness of a community for 
business or as a place in which to live. 

In industry and in the home the application of electricity to 
industrial and household operations is multiplying the effectiveness 
of the labor of the worker and re.ieving the housekeepers of drudgery 
and fatigue. And while it increases the efficiency of the individual, 
it raises the quality of the work accomplished as well. 

We invite attention to the standard of utility services in the 
cities in which we supply these essentials to modern living and 
modern business. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMPANY 



'Needle-Molded' 
Clothes 

Lines Now in 
SEE 

SCHWAB 

The Tailor 

107 Ea<i Bro.-.d St. 




Phone 406} 



Howell Electric Co. 

Electrical Dealers 
and Contractors 

Phone 2832 1 1 4 N. Wrenn 



Carolina Homes 

INCORPORATED 

Realtors 

BOB TUDOR. Manager 

Commcmjl B.inV. Bnilili tlK 

TELEPHONES J727 209) 



MERITA BREAD 
CAKES AND 
CRACKERS 

American Bakeries 
Company 



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fj1F w LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 



PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 



HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 




it 

ff ^-^ 

) COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 




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Latest Available Photograph of 
Dr Hard 



LOCAL COLLEGE 
PROFESSOR DIES 



Dr. Stalen Hard, of local Oige- 
vahlt College, passed out last night 
from a severe attack of Polynia- 
themia. Dr. Hard is a graduate of 
Filloutblank College and has had 
two summer school courses at Mi- 
crocephalon College. He then spent 
two years in Germany and won his 
Ph.l>. in Education at Dummkopfe- 
sel University of Chicago. Illinoy. 

This is Dr. Hard's first experi- 
ence of this kind. 



\A/'" "'"'' t0 tn:C ""^vantage °f 

' ' this opportunity to thank 

the people with whose co-operation 

this annual lias been made possible. 

The mainstay of any publication 
is its advertisers, and we wish t;> 
extend to them our thanks and best 
wishes. A sound and since sful 
company advertises and is proud of 
its output. Wc would have tlu 
students bear this in mind. 

We wish to heartily thank Mr. 
G rover Angel for his tireless and 
persistent effort at collecting pho- 
tographs for special scctioi s in this 
book. James Asbury for special 
art work. Nor must we forget 
Kalopia Antonakos and Lorain 
Ellison for typing, proof-reading, 
and offering helpful remarks and 
suggestions, which were cheerfully 
disregarded. We must also thank 
Riley Martin and Fred Pegg for 
operating two word-mill:. Special 
gratitude is proffered to .Miss 
Hetty Sloan ot X. C. for inspira- 
tion and help in eliminating from 
our book many features, following 
quaint old American custt ms gen- 
eral enough to apply to any cam- 
pus, which were souperfluerius. 
The Editor and Associate Editor 
wish to express appreciation to 
Thelma Mcl'haul for a square 
meal and two days of much needed 
rest. 



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The Senior Class acknowledges gralilude to Mr. S. P. Montgomery for his 

supervision of the erection of the fountain. Also to these firms in High Point 

for their generous gifts and cooperation in the project: 

SNOW LUMBER COMPANY 

HIGH POINT HARDWARE COMPANY 

BEESON HARDWARE COMPANY 

CRESCENT LUMBER COMPANY 

J. C. HOLMES LUMBER COMPANY 

SMITH SUPPLY COMPANY 
And to the Garden Clubs of the Citv 



& 



C7* 9 HE Moving Finger writes; 

^ and having writ, 

Moves on: nor all your Piety 

nor Wit 

Shall lure it bach to cancel 

half a Line, 

Nor all your Tears wash out a 

Word of it. 

— The Rubaiyat. 



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