(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1931, High Point College"

HIGH POIN'3 

donaf ■ y 





has 



WWBNN MBMOUALUBftACY 

HIGH POINT QOLLBGB 

HIGH KHKT, H. C 



I 





■ ■' ■ . 

'■ 



high point mmiEca 



THE 



1931 ZENITH 



VOLUME FIVE 

6773 







PUBLISHED BY THE 

SENIOR CLASS 

OF 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Hart Campbell. Editor 



Property of the IAtestf 
High Point College 






- 



DEDICATION 



C TEPHEN C. CLARK, prominent High 
Point realtor and developer, has prob- 
ably done more toward the development 
and conservation of the natural beauty in 
North Carolina than any other individual 
in close contact wi:h High Point College. 
Bits of his futurisric outlook may be seen 
in our own city, exposed through his de 
velopments in the beautiful Emerywood 
section. 

As the trend of Mr. Clark's work sug- 
gested the theme of this book, we, of the 
Senior Class, take great pleasure in dedicat- 
ing the 1931 edition of The Zenith to a 
gentleman, a friend, and a man held high 
in the esteem of his community. 




L3 1 






CONTENTS 



BOOK I 

ADMINISTRATION 

BOOK II 

CLASSES 

BOOK III 

ATHLETICS 

BOOK IV 

ORGANIZATIONS 

BOOK V 

FEATURES 




^ 



THEME 



"beauty is truth, — truth beauty, 
That is all ye know on earth and 
all ye need to know." 

It is with the vision of these memorable lines from the 
colorful Keats before us, that we proceed into the theme 
of the 193 1 edition of The Zenith. From the eastern 
coast to the mountains in the west we have brought you 
"Natural Beauty" spots of North Carolina. This 
scheme has been carried throughout the book, and it is 
our aim to create an undying respect for these great 
masterpieces of God's handiwork. 
Perhaps you have seen most of these pictures in the 
realistic, — then this book will form a firm bond with 
that first meeting. Perhaps you have not seen these 
views before, — then the book will serve as a link with 
future meeting. If we fail in the original intent of the 
annual, at least we have placed in your hands a col- 
lection of priceless beauty that would make any of us 
proud of our homage. 



FH 







( , \ Ikh.wh Hi Mi'iim v-. A.M.. I U >. 

President 







E NJJBKI 






Faculty 





J. II ni! art Allred, A.B., A.M. 
Profeisor ef Modern Languages 



Ben 11. Hill, A.I!., M.S., Ph.D. 

I'rttftssur of Bwfogy 



J l J.IAN F. Beall, A.B. 

J fhlftu Dim tor 
PfoffSSOr uf Et rttio m it s 



E. a Cummings, U.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
f'roffssor of Chemistry 



R. H. Gunk, A.B. 
Bursar 



Miss Bonwe Enoch 

Instructor in Art 





Clifford R. Hixshaw, A.B., A.M. 

Prof titer nj Education 



Miss E. Vera Ldol, A.B., B.S., A.M. 

Professor of English 



Page twelve 






%XmAs$M 








EN 



Faculty 



Howard L. Spessarij, B.S. 

Dean of Men 

Professor of Business sldmini irati&n 



P. S. Kennett. A.B., IS. IX. LL.D. 
Professor of History 



P. E. Lindley, A.B., A.M., Litr.D. 

Dean of (loltetje 

Professor "f Religious Education 



W. F. McCanless. A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 

Miss Naomi Morris, B.S. 
Professor «f Home Economics 

J. Barley Molrane, B.S., M.S. 

Professor of C In mi. try and Physics 

Miss Margaret Sloan, A.B. 
In>irin tar itt Piano, I'uiir, ami Theoretical 

Sltbjri is 



Ernest I). Slim son 

Department of Music 

instructor in Voice, Piano, and Theoretical 

Subjects 










Page thirteen 















Faculty 





Floyd R. Garrett, A.B, 

Li lit' tit tan 



Miss Mildred Ll'CE, A.B. 

Ins/rut tar in Violin 



Miss Doris Keener 
Secretary So lleyisrar 



Mrs. H, A. White, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Grrek 



Miss Mabel Williams, A.B., A.M 

Professor a/ English and Journalist. 



Mrs, C. L. Whitakbr 
Dietitian 





V P. Yvrboruich, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Romance Languages 



Miss Mary E. Young, A.B., A.M. 

Dean of II' a men 
hull ttt Itir in History and Education 




BOBBV ALLREB 

Mascot 



CLASS OF 1931 



Officers 



Chester Smith ■ 

John Easter 

Gladys Morris . . . 
Currie Williams 



Prcsiiitni 

■ . Vice-President 
. . Secretary 

Treasurer 





Philip Ruth 

HIGH point, K, c. 

Hat lift fir nf Sclent e 

Epsilon Ela Phi; Pre-Med Club, i, 2, 3, 4; President of Pre-Med Club, 4. 

" 'Is then- no hope,' the sick man said. 
I he silent doctor shook his hind, 
.1 nd took his leave uith signs of sorrow. 
Despairing of his fee tomorrow.* 1 






\lr 



V 



^VJ 



*A 



Hazel Lanier 

HIGH POINT, X. c. 
Bat ketor of Science 

Pianist Girk' Glee Club, 3, 4; Pianbi High Point College Choir, 3, 4; President Etude 

Music Club. 

"The ivory handi on the ivory keys 
Strayed in it fitful fantasy, 
Like the silver gleam when the poplar trees 

Rust I, their pule It tins listlessly." 






j&S* 













t*TSb 



Mary Elizabeth Crowell 



HIGH POINT, K. C. 

Baihrlor «/ 4rtf 

Nikanthan Literary Snrietv; Sigma Alpha Phi: Dai- Student Council; Choral Huh; Girl*' 

Glee Cluh.' 

"Genteel it} personage, 
Condm t , an (I equipage, 
Generous and free." 



George Taylor 

JAMESTOWN', S. C. 

Baehrlar tif .Iris 
Thalean, 4; Epsilon Eta Phi. 

'His life is gentle, and the elements 
So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up, 

And say fi all the war Id. this is a man," 



1 



^SBTY^'Wr 1 * 



^rs 






N'J-Ji 




W8 



William Barrette Harris 

IHAIOX, U, C, 

Ihulitlnr of .Iris 

Thalean Literary Society, 5, 4: Davidson County Clnb, 3; V. M, C. A., 3, 4. 

"Everything that heard him flay. 
Even the billows of the sea. 
Hung their heads, and then lay l/y ; 

hilling rare and grief of heart 
tall asleep, or, hearing, die." 



Hayse Wood 

nuAHAM, ;;. c. 

fiiii helor of Arts 

E. C. T. C, 1, 1; Eton, 3; Nikanthan Literary Sncietv, 4; Christian Endeavor, 4; Y. W 

C. A., +. 

"And u-hrrrsrie'er th'tu move, good luck 
Shall fling her old shoe after." 



^ 









SEJbfai 

lUiill:' 



H 




Nancy Louise Collett 

TKIMTY. K. c. 

Bachelor of .Irts 

Alpha Thi'ia Psi ; Nikamhan Literary Society, i, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President Nikamhan So- 
ciety, ;; Y. \V. C. A., 2, 3, 4; Choral Cluh, 2; Seribterus Club, 2; Woman's Hay Student 

Government, 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 2, Heat! Proctor, 3, President, 4; Pan- Hid limit: Council, 4. 

"Born for success, she seenu 
With umit to win. with heart to hold, 
With shining gifts- that take till ryes." 




J. T. Bowman 

LIBERTY', K. C, 

Bar/iflor n/ Arts 

Epsilon Eta Phi; Thaleati Literary Society, 2, 3, 4; Chaplain Literary Society, 3; Minis- 
terial Association, 3, 3,4; Secretary Ministerial Association, 3; Treasurer Ministerial Asso- 
ciation. 3; President Ministerial Associaton, 4; Y, M. C. A., 2, 3. 4; Secretary Y. M. C. A., 
4; Christian Endeavor, 1, 3, 4; President Christian Endeavor, 4; Scribierus Club, 4; 

Purple Players, 3. 

"A blade of grass is always a blade of grass, whether in one country or another." 



Wk 6 



fsfJ 




]0 







Henry C, Furches 

MQCKSVU LE, V. C. 

1 1 tn hehr »/ his 

Helta Alpha Epsilon; Akrothinian Literary Society, j; President Akrothinian Literary 
Society, 4; Scrihterus Club, 3; Vice-President Scrihlerus Cluh, 4; Othccr Y. M. C. A., 4; 
Student Council, 4; Christian Endeavor, ;, 4; Football, 5, 4; Basketball, 3. 4; Baseball, 3, 4. 

"C011IJ I lave Ira. I should In htififiirr now," 



Emma Lee Poole 

GRF.ENVII.l.K, 5. C. 

Bachelor ni hts 

Si^ma Alpha I'-i ; Artemesian Literary Society, 1 2, 3, 4; Critic, 4; Christian Endeavor, 
1, 3, 3, 4; Workshop, t ; Dramatic Club, 3; Modern Priscilla, +; Scribltriis Cluh, 4; Choral 
Cluh, 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader, 4; Best Girl Leader, 4; Most Typical Sophomore Girl, 2. 

"Here buds iht pr'nuisr of rr Irs tint north." 



"six 



Y 



4f£- 






v«* , i^ 




n 










h 4; 

Vice- 



Ruby Warlick 

LAWHOAIE, N. C, 
tint helot of Si'irnt f 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Nikantban Literary Society, 1, 2, j, 4; Modern Priscilla, 1, 
Christian Endeavor, I, 1, 3, 4; Class Secretary, >; Treasurer Modern Priscilla. 
President Modern Priscilla, 3; College Marshal, 3. 

"Shi "' pretty to ivulk with, 
And witty to talk ivith. 
And pleasant, loo. to think about." 



John Easter 

inrcii point, n. c. 

Bachelor nj Arts 

President Freshman Class; Thalean Literary Society, 5, 4; Epsilon Eta Phi; Vice-President 
Senior Class; Critic of Thaleans, 4; V. M. C A„ 3, 4. 

"To set tin- cause above the renown, 
To love the same above the prize. 






u 






n ^i*r# 



J. Clyde Pugh 

CLIMAX, S. C. 

lint lh-lar of St tent t 

Epsilon I'.ta Phi; Class Vice-Ptesident, z\ Class President) 3; Manager Track, 2, 3; Man- 
ager Football, 4; Zenith St;irF. 1, 2: Business Manager Zenith, 4; Hi-Po Staff, 1, 3; 
Vice-President N. C. C. P. A., 4; Thalean Literary Society, i, 2, 3, 4; Forensic Council, 
2, 4; Prrshtcnt N. C. I'orensic Council Association, 4; Secretary Block "H" Club, 4, 

"Strung principles joint! with common sense, 
To mortals is v. providence." 



Charlene Grimes 

iiich point, n~. c. 

Bat lielur of Arts 

Alpha Theta Psi; Artemesian Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Day Student Council, :, 2, ;, 4; 
Vice-President Day Student Council, 4; Athletic Association, 3; Vice-President Athletic 

Association, 3. 

"Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than smiles of other maidens are." 



w w. 



^>V^ 









" uninniui 



US 




ft 



fji*!*^-^ 1 ^ 




HO 

fil 





Chester Craig Smith, Jr. 

IHRJI POINT, S. C 

is iii lie tor of Science 

Epsiion Eta Phi; Track, i, z, 3; President Senior Gar*; Commercial Chili. 

" To he, eon tents his natural desire. 
He asks no angel's U'ing, no seraph's fire; 
Hut thinks, admitted to that equal sky, 
His faithful friends shall hear hi in company" 



to 



BT 



Evelyn Pauline Seward 
hich point, x. c 
Bachelor of .Iris 



Alpha Theta Psi; Artemestari Literary Society; Vice-President Artemesian Society, ;; 
Chaplain, 4; Girls' Day Student Government, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Girls' Athletic Association, 3. 

"In all thy hummus, whether grove or mellow, 
Thuu'rt such 11 lovely, pleasant friend." 






w&Z~T 







mca poi\t. k. e. 

Bachelor of .his 

Si»;ma Alpha Phi; Nikanthan Literary Society, r, *, 3, 4; Class Treasurer, j; Class Secre- 
tary, j; Secretary Day Student Council, 3; Secretary Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Forensic 
Council, 4; ZENITH Staff, 4; Viee-Presidenl Y. W. C. A., 3; Class Historian, 

"The reason firm, tin temperate will. 
Endurance, foresight, strength and skill." 



Hart Caiwufi i 
rochester, pa. 

Bachelor n/ Arts 

Editor of Zenith; Monogram Club, 1; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Ili-Po Staff, 4; Class Officer, 

1, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 1; President of Studetrt Council, 4; President of Klock "H" Club, 

4; Student Representative to Athletic Council] 4. 

"Li>nt of himself, though not of lauds, 
Ami having nothing, yet hath alt." 






_^>l j u 



I k '■^^^ 






vtS^^ 





Francis J, Walter 

CHICAGO, ILL, 

Hiii fitter nf .Iris 

Delta Alpha Epsilon ; Sports Editor ZfcN'lTH, 4; Spurts Editor Hi-I'", 4; Block "H" Cluh; 

Football, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, *, 3, 4; Captain of Basketball, 4; Tennis, 3, 4; Captain ot 

[Vimis, 3; Akrothiman Literar> Society, 1, 2. 

"J friend received with thumps ttptiti the back." 






Mary Beth Warlick 

LAWMiALK, M. C. 

lliu heter <>f Science 

Sim-na Alpha Phi; Nikanthan Literary Society, 1. 2, 3, 4; Modern Priscitla Cluh, t, 2, 
3, 4; Christian Endeavor, i, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Purple Players, 3; President 
Nikanthan Literary Society, 2; Class Treasurer, 3; Secretary Woman's Student Govern- 
ment Association, 3; Secretary Modern Prisrilla Club, 2; College Marshal, 3. 

"Her air. her manner, all tvhrt saw admired." 






'J A ■* -^ 



(J 






E 




Leslie Dale Johnson 

1111,11 I'DIV], N. C. 

/til. Iii lor nf .Irts 

Alpha Tlicta Km; Mikanthati Literary Snciety, r, z, 4; \'. W, ('. A., 1, 2, 4; Preside:!! 
Y. W. (.'. A., 4; Da* Student Council, t, 2, 4; Treasurer Day Student Council, 2. 

"The languages, especially the dead, 

Tin sc'u rices, and most of all the abtrust , 
The arts, at least all sui li as could be said 
To In /In must remote frnm common use, 

fa alt these slir was much and deeply read." 



Fred Tate Andrews 

IIICM FOlXTj .V. C, 

ttiii lii-lnr a) .his 

Akroihmian Literarj Society, 3, 4; Football, 3, 4; Track, 3, 4; Baseball, 3, 4. 

"/ am not in myself, but 1 become 
Portion of that around aw; and In me 
High mountains air a feeling, but the hum 
Of human cities torture." 



3&A 



iff/ 



^ra 




if 



Riley H. Litman 

UNTONTWN, PA. 

Bachelor of .Iris 

Delta Alpha Epsiltin; Monogram Club, t; Football, t, a, 3, 4; Basketball, i, 2, 3, 4; 
Editor lli-l'tt, 4; Vice-President Block "II" Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; Marshal 3. 

"/ nut caught by her berry brown hair. 
And the rose on her thirl- is my joy." 



Alice Lucille Brown 

JAMESTOWN, \', C. 

Bachelor of .Iris 

Alpha Theta rNi ; Nikanthan Literary Society, 3, 1; Glee Club, 3, 4; Choral Club, 3. 4; 

Dai Student Council, 3, 4; Baseball Leader, 3; Basketball Leader, 5; Nikanthan Reporter, 

4; Assistant Cheer Leader, 4; President Athletic Council, 4; Etude Club. 

"A cheerful temper joined with coquettishness will make beauty attractive, 
knowledge delightful, arid wit ffood-natured" 



**38T*Y 










Mate Edwards 

BELWOOD, H. C. 

Itarhrlor if Science 

Ntltamhan Literary Society; Christian Endeavor, i, z, j, 4 ; Modern Priscilla, 2, a 4; 
Secretarj Modern Priscilla, 3; Head Proctor Student Government, 3; Treasurer Modern 

Priscilla, 4. 

"Every person is responsible for all the good within the scope of his abilities, 

emit fnr no more, and none ecu; tilt whose Sphen is the largest." 



Vernon A. Morton 

WA1 KERTOWH, X. C. 

Bachelor itt .Iris 

liil'.m Literary Society; Ministerial Association, 3,4. 

"Courage j Brother! Dn not stumble, 
Though thy path be dark as night; 
There's a Star t't guide the humble, 
Trust in God find do the right." 



3»W 



:§B^*> 






^ra 



w-y§ 



H[ 







l^b 



Ruth Woodcock 

CHARLOI re, x. c, 

Bm hfffir of .his 

Theta Phi; Artentcsian Literary Society, i, », j, t: President Artemesian Society, 4.; 

Scrihlems Club, 2, 3. 4;, Choral Club, 1, 2, 3; Christian Endeavor, 1, 2, 3. 4; Purpli 

Players, 2, 3; Secretar} Purple Players, 3; Associate Editor Hi-Po, 4; Zenith SiafF, 4; 

Cheer Leader, ;. 4; Most Popular, 3. 

"Today, whatever may annoy. 
The word for mr is Joy. just simple Joy." 



J. Riley Martin 

l'\lovir>w\", I*A, 

Bachelor of Science 

Delta Alpha Epsilon; Zenith Staff, i, 2, ;; Akrothinian Literary Society, 1, 2; Assistant 
Football Manager, t; Football Manager, 2; Most Representative Sophomore; President 
Commercial Club, 3; Chief Marshal, 3; Glee Club, t, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2; Budget 

Director, 4; Block "H" Club, 4. 

"Much can be made 0/ a Scotch/win if lie hi caught ynuntj." 






<r«*sc 







m 



Elizabeth Brown 

lllfiH POINT. S. C, 

Baehefef nf Arts 

Theta Phi; Artemcsbn Literary Society, 2, 3; Purple Players, 3; Junifir Marshal; ZENITH 

Staff, 3. 

" The wealth of rich feelings — the deep — the pure; 
With strength to inert sorrow and faith to endure." 



William Kenneth Lyons 

CAMBRIDGE, MD. 

Bachelor «f ,-lrts 

Tha'eau Literary Society, 4; Vice-Presiiletil College Sunday School Class; Chorister; Chris- 
tian Endeavor, 4; Ministerial Association; Y. M. C. A. 

"The heart is the hidden treasure of man, 
The tongue is the gate to the treasure." 



3a& 



\ 



W4 



ri 






^rs 



MlTTV^i^fTW 




HG 




# 



1 



Lila Essie Haney 

MARSIIVILLE, H. C. 

Bachelor of .his 

Artemesian Literary Society, 3, 3, 4; Treasurer Artemesian Society, 3; Scrihlerus Club, 4.; 
Y. W. C. A., 4; Purple Players, 3. 4: Christian Endeavor, 2, 3, 4. 

' // hene'er you're in doubt, said a toy I once knew, 
"Tifixt two lines of conduct which course to pursue, 
.hk a woman's advice j and it hat ever she advise, 
Da the very reverse, and you're sure to be irise." 



Edgar O. Peeler 

I ,U\ ND.VI.E, S'. C. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Thatean Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chaplain Thalean Society, 3; President Literary So- 

cietv, 4; Ministerial Association, i, 2, 3, 4; Secretary Ministerial Association, 2; Chaplain 

Ministerial Association, 3; President Ministerial Association, 3; President North Carolina 

Ministerial Student Association, 4. 

"An honest man. close-buttoned to the chin. 
Broadcloth without, and a warm heart within" 










E^'NJ^BIfl 



DH 




Currie Williams 

KM, AND, N. C. 
Bachder of Jrts 

Epsiion Eta Phi; Old Ironsides, i, 2; Thalean Literary Society, t, 2. 3, 4; Christian En- 
deavor, t, 2, 5, 4: V. M. C". A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President Thalean Literary Society, 4; 
Class Treasurer, 4; Football, 2, 3; Basketball, t; Baseball, 1,2, 3,4; Soccer, 4. 

"He was not merely " 'hip "I tht old block, but the old block itself," 



Gladys E. Morris 

I.U.I.SION-, N'. C. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Nikanthan Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Athletic A liation, j, 4; Scriblerus Club, 3, 4; Treasurer Woman's Student Council, 2; 

Modern Priscilla, 2; Class Secretary, 4; V. W. C. A„ 5; Director of Girls' Athletics, 4. 

"Great thoughts, like great deeds, need no trumpet," 










:rs>i$ 






^ra 




El 

n 









— 'rwdTTr 




Margaret Thompson 

M.MIISON', ». C. 

Hiii It,' Inr a j .his 

Theta Phi; Catawba College, t, 2: Artemesian Literary Society, 3, 4: Purple Players, 3; 
Christian Endeavor, 3, +; Vice-President Christian Endeavor, 4; President of Student 
, Government, 4; V. W. C, A., 3, +; Athletic Association, 3. 

"For all that is (aire, is by nature good; 
That is a signe to know the gentle Mood." 



J. Bill Snotherly 

.U-firM AHI.F, \". C. 

Bat ftefor »f .iris 

Epsilou Eta Phi; Tbalcan Literary Society, 2.. 3; Treasurer Thalean Literary Society, 1; 
Band, 2; Purple Players, 2; Y, M, C A., 2, 3. 



"In mathematics he was greater 
Than Tycho Brake, or Erra Pater; 
For lw. by geometric scale, 

Could take the size of pots of ale." 









Nil 







Flora Dell Mitchell 

JENNINGS, K, C. 

Bachelor of Science 

Nikanthan Literary Society, t, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer Ntkaothan Society, 3; Christian Endeavor, 
1. J. j, 4; Modern Priscilla C'luh, 2, 3, 4; Presided! Priscilla Club, 4; Vice-President Stu- 
dent Government, 4. 

Charity and personal force are the only investments worth having." 



]H 




Lula Gray Harris 

DENTON, N, C. 

Bachelor 0} Arts 

Nikanthan Literary Society, 1, j, 3, +; Day Student Council, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 1 : 
Davidson County Club, 3; ScriblertiS Club, 4. 

"May X r >" lio* ""< nviiti. and pass many pleasant years unknown to fame; ami 
aha have congenial friends." 



V«? 



»jy 



^-t&r 







EG 



If 







Maloie Kennedy Bogle 

KtODENlTE, a. il. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Artemesian Literary Society, 3, 4; Pianist Artemesiari Society, 4; Y. W, C. A,, 3, 4; 
Choral C'luli, 3; Girls' Glee Chth, 5, 4; (dee Club Librarian, 3, +; Mixed Glee Cluh, 4; 
Mixed Glee Club Librarian, 4; Christian Endeavor, 3, 4; Secretary Christian Endeavor, 3, 

"Shi- knows wh/itevei's to he known. 
Hut tun eh more than she knows would own." 



Pauline Hicks 

IIICII POINT, N. C. 

Bachelor of Scieut e 

Sigma Alpha Phi; Nikanthau Literary Society, I, 2, 3, 4 ; Pianist Niknnthan Society, 2, 3, 4; 
Dramatic Club, 2; Guilford County Club, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, i\ Hay Student Council, 4. 



1 



"Honor nuiintiiin'ulg. 
Meanness disdaining, 
Stilt entertaining, 
Engaging and new. 



74& 



Js 






The College Highway 

_ ^.-SilOH WAYS are happy byways." In September, 1927, such a highway 

led boys and girls from various pans of the United States to High Point 

J if. College, an institution offering a tour of four years to young people who 

\Ba wish ro acquire a cosmopolitan view of life. With this well established 

* company, our group of one hi mil red ami sin students began its tour. 




The first road we were to travel was the Freshman Highway. Riley Martin was 
elected lieutenant, whose duties were to point out the interesting sights and to warn us 
when we were approaching bumps or danger. Not even the hold-up by the Sophomore 
Highwaymen frightened us, an. I in reality, we rather enjoyed their rough treatment. 
Nothing happened to worry us until we saw a sign in the distance that read "Final 
Examinations." Failure to observe this sign would have made it impossible for us to 
obey the second warning — "Narrow Passage — Road through to Sophomore Highway." 

A three months rest was taken before we began the journey on this highway. Th? 
roatl proved to be broader, but still the surface was rough in places and the grade steep. 
Milbourne Amos was lieutenant this year. Once the crest of the hill was reached, the 
gliding on the other side caused us to forget all our difficulties except one — today that 
thought still enters our minds — what if we had glided into the wrong road, as some of 
our members did, and had missed the Junior Highway? 

News bad been received that the Junior road was beautiful and that many in- 
teresting attractions were in store for us. Our lieutenant, Clyde Pugh, a keen observer, 
saw a red light in the distance, which was a warning for us to stop. We were frightened 
for fear something hail gone wrong, hut it proved to be a halt in our frivolous life to 
enable us to make a study of the future. It was during this stop that one of our 
greatest desires was fulfilled — we received our class rings. Our journey was begun 
again, and with the rings sparkling on our fingers, we were ready for more excitement. 
A short distance farther in our travel we came to a little place called "Junior-Senior 
Banquet." We delayed here for a day and entertained the travelers who were leaving 
us at the next stop; and then our Junior Highway became the Senior Highway. 

Under the guidance of Chester Smith, we entered this seemingly last broad stretch 
of the college highway. But as we advanced we found many narrow bridges over 
chasms, deep and wide, in extra curricular activities and in our scholastic work we 
were confronted with mysterious signs and beacons which were interpreted by our 
interested Traffic Directors, the faculty. As a token of appreciation to the authorities 
responsible for the college highway, we curbed the small stretch of highway in front of 
the college. 

The donning of caps and gowns, and the completion of our annual brought a 
realization of the seriousness of the situation. "Commencement Town" loomed into 
view, and on the highway we found the sign— "Caution, Drive Carefully; Highway 
of Fife Just Beyond." And in each face, with a little smile, a little pain that this town 
could not be again. You went your way, 1 chose my byway, and thus life went on. 

Fmisi: J 1 \\i\ns. 



Page thirty-eight 



Xn £D?mariam 



Ifflr arr proud to urluimuLrnar 

Ulim ifltttrhrU as a rlassmatr 

and friraip, JFnr turn urars ate 

mprff hayuu fnurtljrr in rarrg- 

iun, nut this frirnnshiu, attb it 

inanr uh nlah In sir aim furu- 

ituj tn thr tnp. ^unopuli] lie 

Irft us. Mnt tu nn auail. fnr 

h.is mtnauntro spirit \s gtill 

nualiiun nmuarn with tltr 

(glass nf 1931- 

liis rlass. 



Page thirty -nine 



'cA thing of beauty is a joy for- 
ever; its loveliness increases, it will 
never fade into nothingness." 

— Keats. 



Officers 

William Ludwig President 

Harvey Warlick Vice-President 

Sue Morgan Secretary 

Loyd Leonard Treasurer 





■Juoior Class 



Frances Pritcheti 

BURLIXCTON, N, C. 



1 1 \R\R\ WaRLICK 
LAWNDALH, N. C. 



Eleanor Vhuxc 

MKMIKKSON, N. C. 



Anzelette Prrvost 

W0RTJ1VII.LE, K. C. 



Clay M uhson 

J F.N KINDS, N. C. 



Grace Koontz 

IlltUI PTIIST, s. c. 



Clifford Peace 

TRINITY, N. C. 



Page fortjMW 



Junior Class 



I I Aitviv Radcliffb 

MfPRVKV, \. e. 



Hazle Hicks 

HICH POINT, Si. C. 



J i' anita Andrews 

1 KIM IS", V c. 



Fielding Kearns 

HIGH POINT, N. c. 



Fern Daniel 

1 1 k;ii POINT, K. c. 



Rei cha Chadwick 

JAMESTOWN, K. C. 



Zi-.is Denny 

PINNACLE, N. C. 




Page forty- 1 /tree 



»^"— 





■Junior Class 



Martha Hall 

C XA1 IISVII.LK, VA. 



l\'AN Mil. I. 
HIGH L'OIVI', s. c. 



Mary Lee Briles 
rich mint. h. c. 



Verdie Marshbanks 

MAKS HILL, H, C. 



Lawrence Lee 

LAWNBALB, N. C. 



Loyd Leonard 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 



Olive Thomas 
mars hill, k. c. 



Page forty- four 










Junior Class 



Thelma Moss 
high point, w. c. 



Allen Hastings 

SKAItJKn, DEL. 



Truth Islev 

OKA HAM, N. C. 



Sue Morgan 

FARMER, (J. C. 



Lewis Beth ha 

BURLINGTON, ft. C. 



Will ark White 
clayton, del. 



Nathalie Lackey 
fallston, n, l", 




Page forty-five 




ZTE N^H 

fwilfn 



-©■ 




Junior Class 



Sallik Win id 

ikh i.is'ii;k, s'. c. 



VVii.i.1 ui I.i nwm 

.K.l.l.sii.v, pa. 



Gladys Guthiuiz 

SAJI IPAIIAW, X. C, 



Eloisb Best 

mini POINT, V. C. 



Frank Rohbiks 

tltflir POINT, "N. c. 



Page forty -six 



CLASS OF 1933 

Officers 

Gor-Ev Yow President 

Carl Smith Vice-President 

Ina McAdams Secretary 

Irma Paschaix - Tremurer 



l l age j "arty- seven 






HE 








Sophomore Class 



( U ..\!)vs Ciller 



KENNETH SlVART 



ClCERO CrOTTS 



Mrs. Vernon Morton 



Gladys Davis 



Li la Aaron 



Clarence Morris 



Agnes Ingram 



Go lev Vinv 



Margaret Pickett 



Marvin Hedrick 



f essie Smith 



Ann Jones 



Carl Smith 



Crawford Smith 



' 



Page forty-tig hs 



1, 

5-' 



Sophoinore Class 



Joyce Julian 



JOHN III GHES 



Rali'h Jacks 



Elizabeth Girlev 



Pali. Craven 



Margaret Neese 



Homer Bivens 

Mai dk Ha.mil 



Khivator English 



Hi/oh McCachern 



Dwicht Davidson' 



Irene Seward 



Joe Cravek 



William Howard 



Irma Paschall 




Page foiiy-nine 



froperty of the Library 
High Point College 














Sophooiorc Class 



Ixa McAdams 



Tony SlMlTON 



Rohert Cory 



Ella Mam Workman 



ElVA C ART NCR 



M.arth a G.ONTZ 



DwlfiHT NlFONfi 



l/\RM I I N \U>\\ \RI> 



ohm Morgan 



Katie Stanfield 



Hugh Dutton 



Ui-rtha Connelly 



Elizabeth Ross 



C. L. Gray, Jr. 



Hoy Whitlow 



Pagt- fifty 



H^Jez^ 





CLASS OF 1934 

Officers 

Donald Hi. i. -mick President 

Mary Reid Idol . Vice-President 

Frances Taylor Secretary 

Khhirt Williams Treasurer 



Pay i" fifty-one 




Freshman Class 



DOROTHY KlRKMAN 



Adelaide Crowgll 



Johx Taylor 



Kent Douglas 



Frances Brown 



Mildred Marlette 



A LEAS 1- MYRICK 



Henry Michael 



Frances Taylor 



Ddrtha Causey 



Mary Reid Iiiol 



WoODRDW Morris 
Me eta Heath 

George Crickmore 

Daisy Simpson 

Norm an Dement 

Louise Carter 



Page fifty-two 




will I 



s» 



Freshman Class 



.Mary Bundy 



Thomas Km. is 



Alma Andrews 



Thomas Carpenter 



Fth el Faw 



I ,1 llRfil W \KI1 



Virginia Beam 

Robert Williams 
Alice Haynes 
Laura Braswell 

John Crioim ebauch 

Lili.ie Map Stroud 
Ida Johnson 

Frank Sudia 

Ola Stafford 
Melva Massev 

Virl Andrews 




Page fifty-lhree 




rtU P 





Freshman Class 



Sarah Holmes 



Howard Smith 



Mary Croi ch 



I.i i .Musi k 



Mary K.akkin 



Job Cnisi.E 



Lois Davis 



Harvey Pressley 



Kl BY VaRNI.R 



HELEN BeTTS 

Charlie Grant 

eoith guthrhs 

Jul; STONE 

Jewel Welch 

John Austin 

Jewell Crowsont 

Thomas Hollincisworth 



fcl'^L'^V 


"- "*^ A 


y ^spr 







R. H. Gun-n-, Jr. 
Mascot 



School of Commerce 



Officers 



1 [azle Hicks .... 
Mildred Boswell 



Flower: Sweet Pea 



President 

. Secretary- Treasurer 



TH « 






School of Commerce 



Beulah Lew allen 



John Ward 



Bessie Barn kite 



Saj.lie McCain 



Jessie Royals 



Mad el Hayes 



Vera Smith 



Blanche Gilliam 



[ )i mi it 1 1 v Wi llis 



Kate Sexton 



Page fifty-six 




^""p^N j^n^Bi 



W 



School of Commerce 



Mii.dreii Reowinb 



Donald Stock ard 



Bessie Hedrick 



Mary Limville 



Mary Wicks 



Julia Hayes 



Anna Lanier 



Mildred Boswell 



Loyd York 



Kate Shirley 




Page fifty -seven 



[EDITOR'S NOTE] 

C PEAKING one's mind is not al- 
ways the correct thing, but I 
have reason to believe that Pugh 
has taken it upon himself to get a 
girl. He has shown entirely too 
much interest in beauty of late. I 
sincerely hope that others will get a 
similar inspiration from this book. 



FOOTBALL 

— — =<y?3S'*>=- — - — = 




Julian F, Bcall 

Last year, Captain Beall, of the University of South Caro- 
lina, completed a brilliant career as a player and this year as 
Coach Beall, he came to High Point to guide the destinies of the 
Panthers of 1930-31. 

Coach has definitely inserted his style into the team. This 
was apparent with the marked improvement shown in each suc- 
ceeding game. Spring practice, and few casualties by graduation 
are the reasons why High Point expects its golden era of football 
to begin ivith the team of 1931. 

Both on the campus and in the city, Coach has won a host 
of friends who admire him as a man and as a coach. A heavy 
schedule and no knowledge of the men to play under him con- 
fronted him at the start of the season. Undaunted, he plunged 
into the task with an aggressive spirit so characteristic of him. 




PUCAI 



Mi Kim \ 



Pierce 



Swart 



Bulla 



PuGH 

Chief of the staff of managers and trainers dc luxe. 
Clyde looked after the wants and needs of the player= 
in a very capable manner. He had a mighty hard 
season of it seeing to the money matters, free passes, 
entertainment of visitors, etcetera. 

McKlBBEN 

A real fight is the thing, was Mac's way of think- 
ing. He roved trom center to end and then to guard 



< 






**mi&R 





where he really found himself and played a scrapping 
good game from then on. 

Pierce 

As quarterback or halfback, Jet was always the man 
on whom coach could depend to fill any void in the 
backfield. With the experience gained in this year's 
play this home tow ner is expected to step into the job 
of running the team in 1931. 

Swart 

Casey started the season in great style and got better 
as the season progressed. His seventy-five 
yard return of a kickoff against Appalachian 
was the classic play of the season. Playing a 
slashing game, Ken often gave the opposition 
the impression that he was playing in theit 
backfield and doing them wrong. 

Bulla 



Jumping from the local high school to 
the college and playing against a southern 
conference foe in his first game was part of 
the turbulent career of this freshman. He 
made good from the start in his first year. 




POITS 



Royal 



] i Kiin - 



Cravek 



Cooper 



Potts 

Mac was one of the hardest workers and surest 
blockers on the squad. Most everybody agrees that the 
reason he plays the game so well is because he really 
likes to play. His play characterized an aggressive 
spirit. 

Royal 

Ken started slow but ended the season as a veritable 
hurricane. Weighing only one hundred and fifty 
pounds, he could spot an opponent a few score of 
pounds of avoirdupois and still make the go- 
ing tougher than most opponents like. 

Cooper 

Bill ran his girl down in tough scrimmages 
throughout the week and then turned both 
guns loose over the week-end against Purple 
and White foes. Rough and ready for any- 
thing they could give, he played consistently 
good throughout the year. 

FURCHES 

Playing every minute in varsity games was 
the record Henry made at his first year of 



pivot play. He started off sensationally and finished 
meteorically. Appalachian and Carawba will particu- 
larly remember this curly haired battler. 

Craver 

Joe, playing along side of his buddy, Furches, formed 
a combination that was not bested this year. In this 
his second year of playing football he missed a sum 
total of five minutes of play. Continuing in this way 
he will soon scale the heights to real stardom. 





Leonard 



Campbell 



] [ J M \ \ 



l.nm in 



RAIK'LIFFE 



Leonard 

Taking orders from the chief of the staff and learn- 
ing all about the business of managing a football team 
was Load's lot this year. Next year he graduates to 
the manager's position and should make a splendid 
one. 

Campbell 

Hart was the engineer of the Panthers scoring play. 
Three times the play that Hart made up resulted in 
scores when they were most needed. Vicious tackling 







%*■%.--* 





and hard charging featured the play of this diminutive 
back in his last year of college football. 

LlTMAN 

Telling his opponents what he intended doing and 
then going out and doing it was Riley's forte. His 
spirit and leadership imbued his mates with confidence 
and kept them ever fighting. He was a good ground 
gainer and a pass catcher de luxe. 

LUDWIG 

Bill had a lot of duties and did them all 
well. Plunging the line and backing it up, 
passing and receiving, and blocking and punt- 
ing were some of the tasks taken care of by 
this keystoner. He always had a full after- 
noon of work ahead of him. 



Radcuffe 

Injuries kept Harvey from playing his best 
game. Toward the close of the season, how- 
ever, his aggressive spirit brought out some 
beautiful line work that bodes ill for next 
year's opponents. Year by year this Morven 
man continues to improve. 




RONYECZ 



COKV 



Johnson 



\V il I I l; 



Helmick 



RONYECZ 

Not a flashy type of player but very dependable was 
Zol. In the Lenoir-Rhyne game, High Point had no 
one in the lineup who could kick field goals consistent- 
ly. In the huddle he said he could kick it and there- 
upon stepped back and placed the oval squarely be- 
tween the uprights, 

Cory 

The newspapers described Bob as "the spark plug of 
the Panther offense." Some of the high lights of his 
play were: He was not out punted all year; 
ran eighty yards from scrimmage against 
Lenoir-Rhyne; caught a pass and went sixty 
yards for only Panther score in American U. 
game. 

Helmick 

His first year of college was good enough 
to safely say that one end position will be 
looked after in a very capable manner for the 
next three years. Don had an exceptionally 
good day against Appalachian. 

Johnson 

Captain-elect for 1931. Harry was the ver- 
satile back. He could do anything and every- 



thing he was called on to do. A brilliant open field 
runner, sure, hard tackier and a pass receiver extraor- 
dinary were some of the qualities that brought him 
the admiration of all who saw him perform. 

Walter 

The gunner from Chicago who was the firing end 
of the Panther passing attack, Frank was the last 
of the Illinois boys to play for the Purple and White 
and kept his home state well represented. The Catawba 
game closed his eventful football career. 





Johnson, T. 



VlTEK 



Watson 



PUSEV 



Bakkby 



Johnson, T. 

Keeping the aggregation in shape was Talton's job. 
It was not his fault that the team had a poor season 
as he always had the boys taped up well both for 
games and practice sessions. He was one of the 
staunchest devotees of the team. 



V 



ITEK 



Getting down to school after the season had started 
and winning a regular berth at tackle was the achieve- 




ment of this prodigy of Ohio. His famous "every play 
like its at you" became the war-cry of the team. 

Watson 

Roger changed his position this year, moving from 
guard to center. With the experience gained in this 
year's campaign he is expected to take over the center 
job left vacant by the graduation of Furches. 

PUSEY 

Seaford, Delaware, sent this red headed native son 
down to represent High Point in football. 
Although hampered somewhat by painful leg 
injuries, he gave his all in helping hold that 
line. Big things are expected of George next 
season. 



Barkby 

A leg injury kept Buck on the bench at the 
start of the season but did not prevent him 
from playing a great game at the wind up. 
The Elon team particularly felt the full force 
of his tackling and blocking. 




KlSA.V 



Andrews 



Simeon' 



Woklev 



Denny 



KlSAN 

An end, of whom much was expected. However, he 
received an injury thac shelved him for the whole year. 
During practice he was a hard and conscientious 
worker and before his injury seemed destined to do a 
lot of playing. 

Andrews 

"Big Bear Mountain" was the sobtiquet that de- 
scribed the largest candidate for a position on the 
squad. Tate picked up a lot of valuable knowledge 
that should make him an outstanding man on 
the team next year. 



Denny 

"Zeb" was another of the Panthers who 
spent most of the time licking the wounds. 
For the few games that he was ready for, 
"Zeb" did oustanding work. The homecom- 
ing game with American University was his 
particular day for scintillating. 

Simeon 

The big-little man on the practice field did 
not get much chance to strut his stuff in the 



games. Tony was handicapped by a small stature but 
he did not let this interfere with giving the big boys 
the works in the scrimmages. 

WORLEY 

A veteran of four years, the blond viking, was in- 
capacitated about the middle of the season through 
some totn neck muscles. This completed a spectacular 
football career for the turbulent Worley. 




f 



t&toik 






**' ** : itm ^ . ? ' y t^fo 

^^B ^^B B-'H B 

HbBVI 








l f Jk r mr%^y^ 


i^f J St**'"**r' 1 ^Bi 





icsxiinrie 



The Panthers went down to Raleigh and took a 37-0 beating in the opening game of the year in 
North Carolina. It was also the first night game to be played in the state. The distinction of playing 
in the opening game of the season and of ushering in night football were about all the honors won 
in the contest with State. A scant three inches of terra firma was the margin by which Wofford tamed 
the Panthers. Next week it was just a case of too much Jimmy Green down at Clinton, S. C, where 
Presbyterian college holds sway. 

October 18th was homecoming day, and a 6-6 deadlock was fought with American University. The 
Washington lads tied it up with just two minutes to play in the last quarter. In the next game Ap- 
prentice school, of Newport News, was given three quarters of a lesson in how to play the modern 
game of football. Idle fourth quarter — well, we lost, 13-12. 

High Point opened the Little Seven race with a 20 to O win o\er A. C. C, but were on the short 
end of a fierce struggle over at Elon. The best game of the year was played against the strong Ap- 
palachian team. On a muddy field, the team beat the highly touted mountaineers, 13-6, and by so 
doing made amends for two previous bad showings at home. 

High Point went in the lead twice against Lenoir Rhyne but each time the Bears fought back to 
even terms. The game ended in a tie score and it ssemed about the best way for it to end, for if either 
team would have lost it would have seemed unjust. The finale was with the unbeaten Catawba team. 
The general consensus of opinion was that the team outplayed the Indians but were unfortunate in the 
breaks of the game. However, the Panthers had O points and Catawha had 12 when the final whistle 
blew. 

All in all, two were won, six lost, and two tied. Not a very commendable record to look at, but if 
there were only about two inches less on a football field — but why make alibis — it was a very poor 
season and let's let it go at that. 



BASKETBALL 







Louis McKibbk.v 
Ma natjer 



Manager of basketball, the most ungrateful of jobs, was handled in a very capable 
manner by Louis McKibben. Maxwell Potts deserves high praise for his hard work as 
assistant manager. McKibben became manager in the second semester, succeeding 
Worley. 

The basketball team entered the 1930-31 season with a reputation to uphold. For 
three previous years Panther teams had brought home basketball championships through 
wins in the North State conference league. Every game played in the conference was 
fiercely contested, but lady luck deserted the locals. 

Had a few balls rolled in the hoop instead of hitting the rim, rolling around and 
then rolling off, fell the other way this might well be the story of a fourth champion- 
ship team. As is, the Panthers finished far down the list in this year's race. Julian 
Beall, coach, watched his team play brilliantly in some games and poorly in others. 








Frank Walter 

Captain of the team. This season 
dosed four years of basketball for 
Frank. From the day of his entry at 
High Point college in the middle of the 
1 927-2 R season he has played a promi- 
nent role in the success of Panther 
court squads. 



RrLEY LlTMAN 

T.ast year's captain and co-captain 
this year. Riley has played four years 
of scintillating basketball for tttgtl 
Point. In a cosmopolitan choice of 
North State conference coaches, he was 
chosen on the mythical all-star team. 
The graduation of Walter and Litman 
leaves two guard positions open that 
will In- hard to fill. 



Harry Johnson 

In stride, one of the best forwards 
in the Carolina*. A flashy dribbler and 
a dead shot, Harry was at his best in a 
close game and has pulled many a close 
game out of the fire for the purple and 
white. 



William Ludwig 

The irrepressible Bill cut a wide 
swatch in basketball channels this year. 
Always a good floor man he kept life 
in the team with his ever present fight- 
to- the- finish spirit. He also racked 
enough points to place him far up in 
the scoring column. 



Allen Hastings 

Al started the season slowly but 
gradually worked up steam until he 
was one of the most dependable men 
on the su.uad. He has a particular 
passion tor heating Flop by firing the 
last shot that sinks their ship in the 
classic games of the season. 



Page seventy 








Henry Furches 

This year completes Henry's college 
athletic career. For two years he has 
been a dependable member of the bas- 
ketball team. His aggressive spirit did 
much to keep the morale of the team at 
a high pitch. He was a most con- 
scientious worker. 



Stephen Forrest 

The strapping center of seventy-six 
inches. Steve always managed to get 
possession of the ball from the tip-off 
and to bat in enough halls from under 
the basket to make him one of the mosl 
valuable assets of the team. His work 
throughout the year was ven con- 
sistent. 



Robert Cory 

On his hot nights, Bob compares 
favorably with any player High Point 
has ever had. He turned in the most 
brilliant performance of the year in the 
Elon game when he counted eighteen 
points to do a lot more than his share 
(O whip the Christians. 



Chester Smith 

"Chet" was the best shot on the 
squad. He could left-hand them in 
from almost an> position on the floor. 
His shots went I h rough the hoop with 
uncanny accuracy, not even stepping 
long enough to say hello to the rim. 



Kenneth Swart 

"Ken" has shown the most remark- 
ahle advancement this season. Coming 
up from last year's reserve team to a 
place where he is looked upon as one 
of the mainstays for next year's team. 
And he still has two years to go. 




Paije seventy-one 






Results of the 1930=31 Basketball Season 



High 

Iff j:li 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High" 
High 
High 
High 
High 

Hid, 

High 



Point 

Point 

Point 

Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
I'oint 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 



Number of games played . . 
Number of games won . . . 
Number of games lost . . . 
Average points (High Point) 
\veragr Points ! ( >pponents i 



35 
25 
24 
23 
27 
T9 

'7 
41 

2 I 

59 
56 
29 

17 

44 
23 
30 

J4 
24 

24 

562 



H. P. V. M. C. A. . 

Wofford 

Catawba 

Elon 

Wake Forest . . . 

( iuil t'ui'il 

Appalachian .... 

Elon 

Wofford 

Paris Island Marines 
Paris Island Marines 
Atlantic Christian . 

Catawba 

Lenoir Rhyne . . . 
Appalachian .... 
Atlantic Christian . 

Guilford 

Wake Forest . . . 
Lenoir Rhyne . . . 



. 21 

. 22 

• 29 
. 20 

■ 35 

■ 25 
. 21 

■ 39 

■ 3f 
. a 
. 28 

■ 17 

■ 25 
■36 
•38 

• 3r 
. 26 

• 32 

■ 23 

50 r 

19 

9 

10 

29.6 

26.3 



Page seventy-two 



MINOR 
SPORTS 




Page seventy-three 




Soccer 

For the first time in High Point history a soccer team was organ- 
ized. The team went through its season undefeated. High Point 
has taken the initiative in trying to form a soccer league among the 
colleges in the North State conference and in so doing deserves high 
commendation. 

No small credit is due Mr. Hartley of the Y, M. C. A. for his 
work in forming the team. Chester and Carl Smith are due the major 
share of the honors for the good showing of the team. 

Results of the 1930 Soccer Season 

High Point i; H. P. H. S o 

High Point i ; Jamestown t 

High Point 2; H. P. Rangers 1 

High Point 1 ; Catawba o 

High Point 9; H, P. Rangers 2 

High Point 2; Catawba . 1 



I'age seventy-four 




EktSJiBll 



;?- 




Tenuis 

Tennis at High Point college reached its high mark during the 1931 
season. For the first time the college athletic council voted an appro- 
priation to this sport. Two new courts were built and more general 
interest in the sport was manifested than ever before. 

In this sport several men deserve commendation for the work that 
they have done. Professor Yarborough, through his untiring effort, 
succeeded in getting the appropriation that made it possible to finance 
the work of putting in the courts, done so well by the college Y. M. 
C. A., of which Clay Madison was president. To Frank Walter goes the 
credit of initiating an annual tennis meet in the North State con- 
ference. 

When the "Zenith" went to press the schedule of meets was only 
tentative. Dual meets were expected to be held with Catawba, Guil- 
ford, Appalachian, Lenoir Rhyne, and Elon. The net team also ex- 
pected to play one meet here with Maryville and to participate in the 
conference meeting. 



Page seventy-five 



m 




v# 



Track 

Defending champions of the North State conference is the so- 
briquet that the track team hail in entering the 193] season. Last 
year the team completely overwhelmed all opposition in the con- 
ference. 

Several outstanding men were lost from last years' champions, 
however, and the team faced a strenuous fight to retain its lofty 
position. The schedule for the season was expected to be pretty 
much similar to the schedule of 1930. 

Three prominent performers were lost to the cindermen when 
Mulligan graduated and Zacovic and Boone discontinued tru*ir 
work at this school. However, the Panthers still retained consistent 
first place winners in Simeon, Hughes, and Pusey, And with the 
experience gained in last year's campaign High Points' point getters, 
but not shining satellites, are expected to make a strong bid for star- 
dom this year. 

Track history at High Point runs parallel to the work that 
.Mulligan and Pugh put into it as coach and business manager. 
When they entered school, there was no track team, when they 
graduated, track was one nf the most popular sports on the campus. 
Mulligan, with customary ambition, succeeded in forming the team 
while Pugh, with his genius for getting money, was the financial 
backer of the sport. 

This year the college athletic council took complete charge of 
sponsoring a track team. Heretofore the team was formed mainly 
through student initiative. 




I 



Page ii'i-eiity-si.T 




Mfikr 



v# 




L0U15E JENNINGS LEW15BETHEA RUTH WOODCOCK JOHN EASTER 



Page seventy-nine 



TU 












NL , 

TlliiiiMMllfll? 





JOHN WARD 



IN A MS ADAMS FRANK WALTER, 




Prti/c eighty 






ere PHsciMa Clmb 



OFFICERS 

Flora Dell. Mitchell President 

Axzelette Prevost Fhe-President 

Olive Thomas Secretary 

Maie Edwards Trfctsur,r 

Vekbii: Marsh banks Critie 

Miss Naomi Morris .... ..... Sponsor 

Members 

Bertha Coxsei.lv Veroie Marshranks EuzAbeth Ross 

Martha Clqntz Si;e Morgan Daisy Simpson 

Maie Edwards Flora Deli Mitchell Ln.ua Mae Stroud 

Glabvs Guthrie Akzelette Prevost Olive Thomas 

Meeta Heath Emma Lee Poole Mart Beth Warlick 

Joyce Julian Irma Paschall Ruby Warlick 

Trutif Isley Eleanor Ym ng 



Page tighty-one 









%£P 





si KM'.] I Hi \ ill I; 




AESCULAP1ANS 



Page eighty-two 





Christian Endeavor 

Mniln: Fur Christ nnd Church 
Officers 

j.t.bowman • ■ ■ : ■ :*"***" 

Marcajuit Thommos . - • -rut-fraM* 

GtADYS GUTHRIB ... ■ S W rfa > J' 

W. M. Howard Treasure) 

Elizabeth Ross .... ■ • Corresponding Secretary 

Truth Isi.ev /•»«*< 

Akzelktti Prevost iss'utmt Pianist 

W. K. Lyoki ' . ■ ' c/ ""' ish ' r 

Mrs, J. T. Bowmab Cemeil Representative 

Miss Mary E. Young Faculty Advisor 



Page eighty-three 







BMMi 

■m^: uMflmlTMl 




ETl DE MUSIC CI.l'H 




(lUL'HBSTRA 



Page eighty-four 




lDM&T , "' i 








UIIM.W 5 IIAV STl HINT tdCXlTI. 




BLOCK H ULUB 



/'(ijc eighty- five 














WOMAN S ST I DENT GOVERNMENT 




MENS STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Page cit) lily-six 




Mg maSM 










Y. W. C. A, 








Leslie Johnson 


. . President Verdi k 


M 


irshbanks Vict-Pretideni 












Mem hers 




Lila Aaron 


Martha Clontz 






Mary LlSVHAE 


JUANITA ANDREWS 


Mercedes Deane 






Flora Dell Mitchell 


Bessie Barotttb 


Ethel Faw 






Margaret Pickett 


Maloie Bocle 


Essie Hanky 






Frances Pritciiett 


Louisf. Carter 


Truth Isi.ky 






Ola Stafford 


Dortjia Cause v 


Louise Jennings 






Daisy Simpson 


Louise Collett 


Nathalie Lackey 






Jessie Smith 


!■".! 1 A CaKI NKK 








Margaret Thompsok 



Faculty Advisors 
Miss Margaret Sloan Miss Naomi Morris 



Page riff/ity-scven 










Colors: Lavender and White 

Flotaer: Lavender Iri* 




Mrttln: Victory Cnmtii Patience 



Garnet, Hinsiiaw 
Maicat 



Nikanthaim Literary Society 
Officers 

Mary Beth Warlick President 

Juanita Andrews Fire-President 

Elizabeth GURLEY Secretary 

Verdie Marsh banks Treasurer 

Oijve Thomas Chaplain 

Mrs, II, A. White Idiisor 



Members 



I.ti.A Aaron 
Juanita Andrews 
Vikl Andrews 
Bessie Barnette 
Virginia Beam 
Helen Beits 
Sai.lif M. Bivins 
Laura Braswui 

I I ill II I'.unU V 

Mari Bundy 
Mrs, J, T. Biium \^ 
Louise Carter 

lniCmiM k 

IlnRTHA Causey 



Mari ua I'lontz 
Louise Collett 
Adelaide Crow ell 
Elizabeth Crowell 
Lois Davis 
Maie Edwards 
Elizabeth Guri ei 
Edith Gt ntRn 
Gladys Guthrie 
Lula G, Harris 
Alice Havnes 
Me eta Heath 
Hazle Hicks 
Pauline Hicks 

Ella Mae 



Sarah Holmes 
Acnes Ingram 
Ann Jones 
Louise Jennings 
Leslie Johnson 
Dorothy Kirkmak 
Nathalie Lackey 
I. ai.a Li sulky 
Verdie Marshbanks 
Melva Massey 
Flora D. Mitchell 
Gladys Morris 
Mrs. Verkok Morton 
Thelma Moss 

Workman 



Margaret Pickett 
Frances Pritchett 
Mary D. Raskin- 
Kate Shirley 
Daisy Simpson 
Vera Smith 
Ola Stafford 
Lome M. Stroud 
Olive Thomas 
Mary B. Warlick 
Ruby Warlick 
Jewell Welch 
Hayse Wood 
Sallie Wood 



Miss Naomi Morris 



Honorary Members 
Miss Mabel Williams 



Mrs. P. E, Linhley 



Page eighty-eight 











Page cit/fily-nine 




Thai can Literary Society 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Motto: "Master Firsi Ourselves" 



flower: White Rf»c 



Full S em est v i 
E. 0. Peeler . . 
Ct/RJttE Williams 
W. M. Howard . 
Clarence Morris 
Bill Ssotheru . 
Jons Easter . 

Ct.AV Madison . . 
LOYO Leonard . . 



PlIAREI, HSRUOCKBR 

Harvey Warlick . 

Clyde PuGH , 



Officers 

. President . 
Vice-President , 
, Secretary . 

Issislttnl Sn rrltiry 
. Treasurer . 
. . Critic . . . 



. Clm plain . 
. . . Society Reporter . 
Press Reporter . 
. . . Marshal . 
. . Assistant Marshal . 
Forensic Council Representative 



S prin ff Semester 

. . Jon\ Easter 

. J. T. Bowman 

. Ralph Jacks 

. Carl Smith 

. Bill Smotheru 

. Kenneth Lyons 

Clarence Morris 

. Tyree Linoi.ev 

. Vernon Cannoy 

. Howard Pickett 

. . .Joe Coble , 



J. T. Bowm \ s 
Vernos Cannoy 
Joe Coble 
John Easter 
Barretts Harris 
Marvin HedricK 
I'iiarei. Herlocker 
W. M. Howard 
Ralph Jacks 
Ollie Knight 
Lovd Leonard 
Tyree LtjJDLEY 
Kenneth Lyons 
Clay Madison 

Cl RK 



Roll 

John Morgan 
Clarence Morris 
Woodrow Morris 
Lee Moser 
E. O. Peeler 
Howard Pickeit 
Clyde Pugh 
Brl'ce Russell 
Carl Smith 
Bill Snotheri-Y 
( ,i rmr.i I'm 1 1 in 
Forrest Wagoner 
Harvey VVarlick 
Wii.i arii White 
ie Williams 



Page ninety 








Paijc nin,ly-onc 









Arteanesian Literary Society 



Colors: Green ami Gold 



At uUn: Maidenly Virtue and Purity 
Mascot! M:ir\ Anne Cue 



Flower: Jonquil 



Officers 

Rt hi Win hut ilk President 

Si b Morgan; Vice-President 

In a McAdams . Secretary 

Anzelette Prevost ... Treasurer 

Kiizaisi in Ross Chaplain 

Emma LeB Pom i; Crilit: 

Maloie Bogle Pianist 

Ik ma Paschali Monitor 

Marcakei Neese Chorister 

I 1 1 H - 1 i ; i - 1 . . . . , . . . . Rtpartei 



Alma Andrews 
Eloisk: Best 
M iloie Bogle 
Mildred Bosweli 
Frances Brows 
Bertha Connelli 
i.i voys Culler 
Ethel Faw 
Charlene Gkimi s 
Essie llwn 
Julia Hayes 

Maiih Hayes 
Bessii Hedkick 
Mary Re in Idol 
Truth Isley 



Mem hers 

Joyce Julian 
DORIS Keener 
Ann Lanier 
Mary Linvii.le 
MltOREO Mari i- I u- 
S1.1-. Morgan 
Aleasb Mvrick 
Ina McAdams 
Irma Paschall 
Emma Lee Poole 
Anv.ei.kitk Prevosi 
Mildred Rsdwine 
Elizabeth Ross 
Evelyx Sewarc 
Irene Seward 
Riii whir English 



Km ie L. Stan held 
Frances Tai lor 
Margaret Thompson 
Ernestine Von Cannon 
Dorothy Willis 
Rltii Woodcock 
Eleanor Younc 
Margaret. Neese 
Sai.ue McCain 

< r] IDYi llAVIS 

Cornelia Howard 
[da Johnson 
Rliby Varner 
Jessie Smith 
Martha Hall 



Page ninety- two 




NO 







Page ninety-thru 





_ N 




MUM I . 



. ;, ' i iLr 



rothinian Literary Society 



Colors: Green ami White 



Organized 192^ 
Motto: "Find a way or make one" 



F tower: Fern 



Officers 
W. Allen Hastings President 

?EB Denny Vice-President 

Joe Cum Secretory 

Tony Simeon , . Assistant Secretary 

Golev Yow Treasurer 

John Taylor Marshal 

Henry Furches . Critic 



Roj.i. 



Tate Andrews 
Joe Ckavkk 
Dwjcht Davidson 
Zee Denny. 
Norman Dement 

1 h sky Fl KCHBS 

Allen Hastings 

Don mii Mi i mii h 
ANTHONY KlSAN 
HllRAKT MYKIL'K 



Lawrence Lee 
Harvey Radcmfee 
Donai i) Stockaro 
Tony Simeon 
Lyman Tboxi eb 

.I')lf\ I A \ I.OB 

Roger Watson 

Hoy Whitlow 
Robert Williams 
Golev Vow 



Page ninety-four 







Ail 




Pa gf ni m-ty- five 




















i 







T.IRI.S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 







CHORAL CLl'B 



/'flc/C KHUfy-iUt 












Pae-Hellemic 
Council 



Student 
Representatives 



Louise Jennings 

Sigma Alpha Phi 



Allen Hastings 
Iota Tau Kappa 



Loyu Leonard 

Epsifon Eta Phi 



Eleanor Young 
Theta Phi 



Louise Collett 
/tlpha Thriu Psi 



Riley Litman 
Dflla Alpha Eprilon 




Paae ninety-seven 
















Louise JENNINGS 
Emma Lei Poole 
Paul ike Hicks 



Sigma Alpha Phi 

SORORES IN' COLLEGIO 

Ruby Warlick Ei.izaretm Crowe ll 

Mary Beth Warlick Verme Maksh banks 

( ,i Am- MuKkii Hazle Hicks 



Nathalie Lackey 

AnZELETTE Pre YOST 

Martha Clontz 



SORORES IN pACL'LTATB 



Mabli. Williams 



GRADUATES 



Elizabeth Nicholson 
Ji amta A MICK 

I.Al R I TllliM I'-MS 
Mix VIE C:\l I I 1 



( iERTRUOE Rl'I.E 

Alta Allen 
Annie Livekcood 
Lelia Warner Coble 



Mae Workman 
Bessie Redwi\e 
Hilda Amick 
Adele Williams 



l ,K U 1 H \KM I II 



Vera Idol 



Edna Nicholson 
Lucy Nunnery 
(>race Keck 
Allene Fuquay 



Page ninety-eight 



IliitM^iSMLM 



^ PyM yii 




Cotttrs: Red and White 

Flov;ir: Red Rust 



Motto: Tn seek the Noblest 



LOL'ISH Ctil I I i l 

Leslie Johnson 
Lucille Brown 
Chaklene Grimes 

Lucille Morrison 
Ri hi Jarrell 
Akxie Lee Jarrell 
Willie Fritz 



Alpha Tiheta Psi 

Student Sisters 

\vah ita a morews agnes [ncram 

Gladys Culler Ina McAdams 

Reucha Chadwick Ass Jokes 



Graduate 

Norine Hornet 
Velna Teagl'e 
Elizabeth Yokley 

R I I 1 1 [ 1 1 \ E .1- 1 



Sisters 

Rosalie Andrews 
Helps' Barker 
Margaret Daws 
Claire DOUGLAS 



Tiielma Moss 
[renb Seward 
Evelyn Seward 
Grace Kooxtz 

Kathleen Teacce 
Virginia Strocpe 
Helen Snyder 
Novella Ml- I sty re 



Mrs. H, A. White 
Mrs. J. C.,Whitesell 



Honorary Members 
Mks. R. M. Andrews 



Mrs, E. L, Douglas 
Mrs. F. A. Thomas 



Page ninety -nine 




/';;■'-' mm 




Motto; To God, thy Country, and to 
thy Friend, Be True. 




C.nlors; Dark Green and Light 
Green 

Flower; White Rose 



Miss Margaret Sloan 



Theta Phi 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Miss Mildred Luce 

SORORES IN COLLHGIO 



Miss Naomi Morris 



Lii.a Aaron 
Elizabeth Brown 



|i\vh 1 1 1 i.l 1 1 « 
Lillian Bucknek 
Willard Shackelford 
Vista Dixon 
Helen Haves 
Fanny Stamev 
Ann Rob bins 



Elizabeth Gurley 
Doris Keener 



Sue Morgan 

M u;i.\KI i I llHMl';ris 



SuRORES Ex-COLLEGIO 



Holdah Dixon 
Elizabeth Hanner 
Pauline Whitaker 
Margaret Gurley 
Lillie Jane Long 
1 i i i \ i \ W'n : i \us 
Margaret Perry 



Leon a Wood 

fvALOPIA AnTONAKOS 

Nettie Stewart 
Helen Osborne 
Pauline Elkins 
Virginia Pickens 
Spencer Cltchin 



Ruth Woodcock 
Eleanor Young 



Pauline Hunter 

Dorothy Hoskins 

Eloise Beam 

Eva Ellis 

Mrs. A. S. Street 

Miss Dorothy St. CLAtR 



Page one hundred 







Iota Tain Kappa 






HoNORARl FRATRES 




R. N. Mann 

Dr. P. E. Linbley 


0. A. Kirk man", Jr. 

Fratres in Colleciu 


Dr. 11. B. Hiatt 
Hr. P. S, Kesneti 


Crawford Smith 
Golev Vow 

LOUIS McKlBBEN 

Allen Hastings 


Jester Pierce 
George Push* 
C, L. Gray, Jr. 

Pledges 


Dwight Davidson 
Ivan HrLL 
Zeb Denny 
Foe Craver 


John- Taylor 
John' Ward 
Frank Sudia 


Cl.AY MADISON! 

George Crickmore 
Hob art Myrick 
Howard Smith 


\l l.i K 1 I'livM 

Curtis Humphreys 
T. M. Potts 


Page one hundred one 







TJ-I E 




nffnrriTTrfrfliflnTriTcrjTrr 





EpsiJon lit a 



Cl RRll Williams 
J. Clyde Pi CM 
J. "I". Bowmas 
[mis Easter 

Herman I£. Coble 
I < .1 1 w Madison 
(Irovf.r L, Angel 
J.MtLS W. Braxton 



FrATRES IX COLLEG[0 

Chester Smith William Snotherly 

Georci Taylor Loyd Leonard 

Philip Rltji Harvey Waklick 



Fratres Ex-Co llegio 

Monroe BenkeTT Blaine Madison 

a i brev Dunbar Wade Fuciuav 

WILLIAM B. Wood Edgar O. Lane 

John P. lioziER Graham R. Madison 

Fratres Honorarj 

FeRRI D, Haroy Walter F. McT.uiiw J. Harlby Mourake 



Roger Watson 
Harvey Radcliffe 
Carl Smith 
Howard Pickett 

L other Meolin 
We ester Pope 
Taft White 
Talton Whitehead 



N. P. Yarborouch 



Page an? hundred two 




l-fcfei 




™^ 




Colon: 
Red ami Blue 



Lewis Bethea 
Wilbur Barkby 
Robert Cory 
Edwin Copeland 
Stephen Forrest 



T altos Johnson 




Delta Alpha IKp.si 

FRATRES IX COLLEGIO 
Henry Furciies 
John Hughes 
H.vrry Johnson 
Rilev I.itman 
William Ludwic 

Pledges 
William Cohpi-k 



Swtetheart: 

[ . I. i 1 \ i \ \i a ; 



Riley Martin 
Frank Robbins 
Tones Simeon 
Kenneth Swart 
Frank Walter 



Z()l.|fi\ ROSTVECZ 



Page one hundred three 



if 



p^ra 



■ 







MINISTERIAL ASSOC r ATIO X 




GIRLS GLEE CLCR 



Page one hundred four 



:<Grc 







Overlooking the Eighty Chimney %ock 



Book V Features 




(as chosen by the student body) 

Most Charming Girl . . . . . Ina McAdams 

Most Active Boy Clyde Pugh 

Jolliest Girl Hazie Hicks 

Most Humorous Boy Lewis Bethea 

Best Girl Student Leslie Johnson 

Best Boy Student John Easter 

Most Popular Girl ...... Frances Taylor 

Most Popular Boy Hart Campbell 

Best Girl Leader Emma Lee Poole 

Best Boy Leader Henry Furches 

Most Unassuming Girl Sue Morgan 

Biggest Bluffer Tate Andrews 

Most Popular Faculty Members^ 

[Dr. P. E. Lindley 



W$(m0 




Ina SMcoAdams 















Clyde Vug/I 







Hazlc Hicks 









Lewis 'ftcthea 










yohn Baster 




Henry Ftirches 






I 



/ 










a 






Tate oAndrews 







<s*wo 



"Dr. <P. 6. Lindley 



* 



THE 




K 



I ■ 





PUGH 



FENCY FELLA'S 



VOW 



1 






3MALES+IFEMALE 



BOOKSTORE LOFER5 



BSZNE55 





SAMPLES 



MORE BIZNESS 




TIN FULL 



ED'S 6ANG 




ALBERT 





HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

EIGHTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 10, 1931 




For Catalogue Apply to 

THE PRESIDENT 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 




H 




Au Revoir, But Not Good-bye! 

May We Continue to Serve You 

in the Future 



*& 



SARTIN DRY CLEANING CO. 
DUTCH LAUNDRY, Inc. 

Friendly Cleaners and Launderers 



Yours for 

More Happiness — 



PUBLIX- 

KINCEY 

THEATRES 



THE PARAMOUNT 

THE BROADHURST 

THE RIALTO 



FOR 



Quality Printing 



SEE 



THE CREATIVE 
PRINT SHOP 



106 College Street 
Telephone 2645 



Official Photographers 
TO 

THE ZENITH 




"A Story m Picture 
Leaves Nothing Untold" 

STEPHEN'S 
STUDIO 



& 

520 N. Main Street 

HIGH POINT, N. C, 



For Quality Shoe Repairing 
Call 4313 

W. C. BROWN 

SHOE SHOP 

Work Catted tor and Delivered 
128 N. Wrenn Street 



The Rhodes Press 

Printers — Stationers 
Office Outfitters 

130-152 W. Commerce Street 

Telephone 4595 




THE COMMERCIAL 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 








For the Well-Dressed College Man 
Custom Tailored Clothes, $24.50 and Up 

Complete Line of Men's Furnishings 
215 N, Main Street 



I.KAii IN SPORTING GOODS 



BASKETBALL, — 111 II 'KEY 

nil-: 
Beeson Hardware Co. 

High Point, N. C. 
JI7 — Phone — 318 

< : i >!.!■■ T10MNIH 



THE PKiiT l-'iil; Lit 



LYLES CHEVROLET 
COMPANY 

SHU 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

"It's Wise to Choose a Six" 




Intrinsic Value 

Whether it Applies to Principles of 
Character or the Value of Property is 
the First Consideration of Every Man. 

S. C. CLARK 



Developer of Emerywood 



Telephone 2414 



Office Second Floor Commercial Bank Bldg. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 






JT 



Dry Cleaners and Dyers 
"We Klean Klothcs Ktean" 

HIGH POINT 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

Phone 3225 



College Clothes 

At Prices to 
Fit College 
Pocket books 



"Better Printing Pays" 


Phone 2385 


BARBER-HALL 


PRINTING CO. 


High Point, N. C. 



H 


W. Peters Co., 

Boston, Mass. 

Official Jewelers 


Inc. 


Class 


Rings, Pins, Emhlems, 
Invitations 


Favors, 


j. 


H. MILLER, District Manager 


Box 


877 Durham 


, N. C. 



Sporting Goods, Hardware, Auto Accessories* Tires and Radios 
Sold Over the Counter 

SEARS, ROEBUCK & COMPANY 

Retail Department Store 

J09 N. Main Street Phone 2449 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



CAROLINA CASKET COMPANY 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 




hfflTMfffllh 





WRIGHT-CLINE SHOP 

Suits Ready-Made and Tailor-Made 

R. M. CLINE E. V. WOMBLE J. N. WRIGHT 

313 N. Main Street — Next to Broadhurst Theatre 

Finckley Hats Friendly Fire Shoes 



Dr. Nat Walker 

Optometrist 

Over Hart Drug Company 
Next to Post Office 

High Point, N. C. 



''Heart of High Point" 

ELWOOD HOTEL 
AND CAFE 

"Famous for Food" 



Utility Service and the Community 

More than any other one factor, the quality of its utility serv- 
ices determines the desirability and attractiveness of a community 
for business or as a place in which to live. 

In industry and in the home the application of electricity to 
industrial and household operations is multiplying the effective- 
ness of the labor of the worker and relieving the housekeepers of 
drudgery and fatigue. And while it increases the efficiency of the 
individual, it raises the quality of the work accomplished as well. 

We invite attention to the standard of utility services in the 
cities in which we supply these essentials to modern living and 
modern business. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMPANY 






WILSON MOTOR 
COMPANY 



The New 



& Lincoln 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Correct Fashions 
Without Price Penalties 



At Winston-Salem's Cross-Roads 
Fourth and Liberty Streets 



Leading Furniture Dealers of High Point 

Clarion Radios Wcstinghottse Refrigerators 

KESTER FURNITURE CO. 

H4 S. Main Street Telephone 2788 



Edt at the 

Friendly Cafeterias 

"Every Meal a Pleasant Memory" 
Greensboro Durham 

High Point 
Chape] Hill Winston^Salem 




The High Point, Thomasville & Denton 
Railroad Co. 

Is an outstanding example of accomplishment as the result of co- 
operation and steady hard work. Large or small, any community 
thrives only when there is co-operation and a general 
spirit of service. 








■ 



PERMANENCY 

Established in High Point to Serve the 
High Point People 

With Sunshtne Service 



« 




Laundry 



Phone 393 



High Point, N. C. 



Perfect Protection 

•very Way 
ivery Day 



Pays 



N. L. GARNER 

General Agent 
RELIANCE LIFE 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



C. L. AMOS 



OAKWOOD MEMORIAL PARK 

North Carolina's Finest 
PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY 

Visit This Beautiful Place on the Way to the College 
H. C. SEC H REST, Secretary and Manager 



U [ 




Si 



« 




Princess | 

Care 

& ! 


High Point's Finest 




A#j !**_«■ www ^Ir^'B 

"j4b Unusually Good Place to Eat" 



Life Health 

Harrison & Harmon 

411 Commercial National Bank Bide. 

District Agent) 

CONNECTICUT GENERAL LIFE 

INSURANCE CO. 
Accident Group 



Miss Lizzie Gooch 

Exclusive Ready -to -Wear and 
Millinery 

# « * 

North Main Street 
High Point, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

J. W. SECHREST AND SON 



COLLEGE GRADUATES 

The Perpetual Building and Loan Association Offers the Logical Medium lor 

Systematic Saving 

"Always at Your Service" 

High Point Perpetual Building G? Loan Association 
AT THE COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK 




Mann Drug Stores 

Drugs With a Reputation 

* * t 

Elwood Hotel Bldg. 640 N. Main St. 



GREENSBORO NEWS-RECORD 



(Morning) (Even 

A 24-hitur newspaper service for Qvt 
bciro and cvnirai Piedmont compai 

to th* best* 
0*rvlco having the Interest 61 boih 
acrfber and advert leer at hearl 
Flral a NBWSpaper; then all i\n> 
features, sports* markets* fttc, 
thought -provoking ftditoriftls, 
Address the 
Circulation Department 

NEWS-RECORD Greensboro, N 



itig) 



III s( 
plus 



You May Not 

But If You Do 

DAY OR NIGHT 
CALL 

Meredith Brothers 

General Auto Repairing and Certified 
Service on All Makes of Cars 

"We Get 'Em Large or Smalt" 



tr 



From a Friend' 



MYRTLE DESK COMPANY 




Desks 



Manufacturers of 

Office Furniture 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Customers 
Telephone Stands 



Tables 



! 









ISTJ 




This iip< 


•k ih rus^d trt 


mi 8, K. Smith 


CMll (>T 11 


cover tliuf In 


mumutt 1 tu be 


Hillislui-l 


H?J suiil K rn 1 


Iff] mill SMI III 


(KAMI 


1) hi mi (irmii 


ExAtfon of ©rftfto- 


men s|K^'iu!i/4ii^ in 111* 


cmnktion si iK 1 \*t**- 


iltii'tiittr 


tl U'uikI riHiTix 


\\ Itulei «i >«nir 


©ovt'r rt'i'iiirvrmMil* mrtj hv, thin nr^siii- 




/ill i ;mi MttKr.v ( lu-in. 


Send for information and Prices to 


The 


S. K. Smith Co. 




2H Institute Place 




OtlcagQi 


in. 



For News When It is News 

Read 

The Enterprise 

Its connections with the leading news 
gatherers of the world enable The 
Enterprise Eo furnish its hosts of read- 
ers with the news of the day when it 
is news. 

The High 
Point enterprise 



NEW SERVICE LAUNDRY 


205 Centennial 


Avenue 


Phone 3364 


Laundry ing 




Hifih Point, N. C. 

Cleaning 


Altering 




Pressing 

Dyeing 

Best Work and Quick Service 



THE GREEN LANTERN GRILL AND 
SWEET-SHOP 

(IIKJll POINT < \M>V (UMI'AW. Inc.) 
120 N. Main Street Phone 2689 

BILTMORE ICE CREAM 

PARTY NOVELTIES MOULDED ICE CREAM 

Grill and Fountain Service 



THE ZENITH has been made possible through the courtesy 
of our advertisers and the Student Budget, under the direction of 
Riley Martin. Financially, our book would have been an im- 
porsibility, but for them; and we take this means of showing our 
deepest appreciation for their hearty cooperation and generous 
rupport. 

THE STAFF. 






N 


















COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 




nx£l sip |o A}ttdca,j 












■ _■_=■ 



Autograph 









rui 




cAutographs