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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1932, High Point College"

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ZENITH 




^Published by 

SENIOR CLASS 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 
W. Allen Hastings, Editor 



'Book One 
ADMINISTRATION 

'Book Two 
THE CLASSES 



'Book Three 
ATHLETICS 

'Book Four 
ORGANIZATIONS 






'Book Five 
FEATURES 



"SMus'ic, when sweet voices die, 
''Vibrates in the memory." 



(~C^~£.ROM the grand symphony 
*~* of college life we have striven 
to catch the simple melodies of 
everyday college existence, the 
brilliant rhapsodies of hilarity 
and social life, the lifting strains 
of friendships made and cher- 
ished, the full and solemn chords 
of ambition fulfilled, and weave 
them into a symphonic whole 
whose music will resound in its 
fullness even when memory 
grows dim. 






TO 

<SMrs. Q.F. Tomlinson 

qA great patron and lover of music, 
and one who has probably done 
more than any other person to pro- 
mote its advancement in the city of 
High Point. She is a friend of the 
college, and in loving appreciation 
we, the Class of Nineteen Thirty- 
two, dedicate to her this sixth 
volume of 



Prelude 



Q^jL^ VERY great music master writes, at some time, 
^— ^ one composition which rises above all his other 
works, recognized as a masterpiece because it contains 
the very soul of the master himself, the essence of his 
being. It may begin with the stately measures arising 
from some deep trend of thought followed by the sol- 
emn melody of latent ambition. From time to time 
there may creep in the poignant sobbing notes of some 
divine melancholy, preceding more joyous strains and 
finally ending in the crashing chords of triumph. 

We have realized that we, too, are composers writing 
that greatest masterpiece of all — Life. In it, too, there 
are different elements — the ambitious, the melancholy, 
the joyous, the self-sacrificing, the triumphant. Those 
who have gone before us have left us the lovely melodies 
of their lives to enrich ours, and in those melodies have 
left a challenge to us to weave into the symphony of our 
lives all that is beautiful and gracious and uplifting. 
We take up the challenge and promise — a promise 
stronger because it is silent— that we will make the 
music of our lives so beautiful that it will be worthy to 
ring in the Kingdom that shall know no end. 



AN DEL, Qeorge Frederick (1685- 
1759>, was bom at Halle, it has 
been said that Handel was Ger* 
man born, Italian influenced, and Eng- 
lish stabilized. Handel was an orator 
and a painter. An orator is one who 
orates, one who expresses thoughts in an 
eloquent manner. An orator may use 
words of others and put them in another 
farm. It is necessary for an orator to 
assimilate, and Handel had an uncanny 
way of assimilating what he heard. He 
reacted to every artistic thing he heard, 
Handel's music can be compared to a 
fine landscape painting- His beauty is 
in the large, not detailed, and he painted 
with large brush strokes. His melodies 
ncre largely within the tetracfiord and he 
fined firm melodic line*. He was auto- 
cratic, domineering, and high tempered- 
He loved praise, and he desired to be the 
fittest in his line. He was extremely gen- 
erotts and kind. 




Gideon- Ireland Humphreys, A.M., D.D. 
President 









>7 

































Faculty 



J. Hobart Allred, A B., A.M. 
Professor of Modern Language 



Bex H. Hill. A. B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 



J i i.i an F. Beau., A B. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

Professor of Economics 



E. O. Cummins, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 



R. H. Gvnn, A.B. 

BURSAR 
Professor of Business IJininislration 



Miss Bonnie Enoch 
Instructor in Art 











Clifford R. Htnshaw, A.B., A.M. 
M.A. 

Professor of Education 



N. M, Harrison, A.B., B.D. 
Promotional Secretary 



iS 



Faculty 



Howard L. Spessard, B.S. 

DEAN OF MEN 

Professor of Business Administration 



P. S. Kennett, A B , B.D., LL.D. 

Professor gf History 



?. E. LlNDLEY, A B., A.M., I.ITT.I) 
DEAN OF COU.ECE 

Professor of Religious Education 



W. F. McCamless, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 



Miss Naomi Morris, B.S. 
Professor of I tome Economies 



J. Harley Mourane, B.S., M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics 









Miss Margaret Sloan, A.B. 

Instructor in Piano, loicc, and Theoretical 

Subjects 



Ernest B. Stimson 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

instructor in Voice, Piano, and Theoretical 
Subjects 








19 







Faculty 





Floyh R. Garrett. A H. 

Librarian 



Miss Mildred Luce, A.B. 

Instruitttr in Ciolin 



Miss Naomi Dawson 
Offjre Secretary 



Mrs. ft. A. White, A.B., A.M. 
Prafetsor of Greek and Lai in 



Miss Mahel Williams. A.B., A.M. 

Professor of English and Journalism 



Mrs. C. L. Whitaker 

Dietitian 





N. P. Yarhorolgh, A.B., A.M. 

Professor of Romante Languages 



Miss Mary E. Young, A.B., A.M. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 
Professor of History ait.t Fdnfation 



20 



<5*£ 



*QZ_A RT * Wolf gang &4 madeus* 
(1756*1791), was bom at Salzburg. 
He is called the Ambassador and 
the Etcher. An ambassador is one sent on 
public business from one sovereign to an- 
other. An ambassador must lure a wonder' 
fid knowledge of the world in wh'ch he lives. 
He must hare high ideals and a strong chir- 
>t* ter. He must be well-trave'ed and diplo- 
mat c . M o -art n as of t h is type , wit h th e 
kingdom of music as his sovereign* He was 
the greatest genius of all music history and 
brought about internal changes in music- 
Etchings arc finely wrought and only an 
artistic person can do them* Mozart was 
truly an etcher. His music is like real lace 
which is handed down from generation to 
generation* His style was individual yet cos- 
mopolitan* He took the best from every 
country* melody, grace and suppleness from 
Italy ; rhythm* vigor* and life from France; 
and polyphonic depth and strength from 
Germany. He had depth and simplicity* 
ctarity without shallowness, sweetness with- 
out sickliness. 










Class of 1932 



Officers 

Harvey Waruck President 

Jester Pierce Vice-President 

JlMxiTA Andrews Secretary 

Roger Watson Treasurer 

Dr. P. S. ElSMEn {dvisor 

Nat Mason Harrison, Jr. . Mascot 




*3 










Senior Class 



JUANITA SCARBORO ANDREWS, A.B. 

TRINITY, N, C. 

A O * 



Nikanthan Literary Society, I, 2, 3, 4; Vice-Fresuletit. 3; President, 4; Woman's Day 
Student Government Secretary, 3; Site- President, 4; Y. \V. C. A., 2, 3, 4; Class 

Secretary, 4. 



Wilbur Leroy Barkby, A.B. 

NEW RAGLE. PA. 
A A E 

Kixithall, 1,2,3,4; Baseball, 2 ; Basketball, 2. 






*4 










Senior Class 






Elcuse Elizabeth Best, A.B. 

I UC PI HUM, V. c. 

■\ 1 1 iti H--.1 .li i Literal"} Society, i. 3, 4: Critic, 4: Purple Players, 



'Zenith" Staff, 4. 



Stephen Lewis Bethea, A.B. 



CIRSnXVILl.E, V c. 

a A ]■: 



Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Thalcan Literary Sccicty, 1, 2; Block "H" Club. 3, 4; Soccer, 4; 
Christian Endeavor, I, 2; Tennis, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Business Manager "Zenith," 3; 

Sports Editor "Zenith," 4. 



*5 




Senior Class 
Maloie Kennedy Bogle, A.B., '31; B.S. 

H MM] E KITE, ». C. 

Artemesian Literary Society, 3, 4, s; College Choir, 4, s ; Girls' Glee CItib, 4, 5; 
Etude Music Club, 4, s ; Y. W. C. A.; Christian Endeavor, 3, 4, 5. 



Mary Lee Briles, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N*. C. 



26 













Senior Class 
Sara Reuche Chadwick, A.B. 

JAMESTOWN, N. C. 

a e * 

Nikanthan Literary Society, i, a, J, 4; Chora! Club, 3. 



Elsie Fern Daniel, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, 8. C. 

Artemesian Literary Society, 4. 







Senior Class 
Zeb Denny, A.B. 

P1XNACLE, s. C 
I T K 

Football, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 2. 3, 4; Akrothinian Literary Society, 2, 3, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent, 4; Scriblerus Club, 3, 4; ['resilient, 4; "Hi-Po" Staff, 4; "Zenith" Start, 4. 



Gladys Irene Guthrie, A.B. 

SAXAPAKAW, X. C, 
2: d » 

Nikanthan Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 3; 
President. 4; Modern Priscilla, 3, 4; Treasurer, 4; Choral Club, 2; Y. W. C. A., 2; 

Athletic Association, 2, 3. 



2S 










Senior Class 









W. Allen Hastings, B.S. 

SEAFORt), DEL, 
1 T K 

Class P resilient, 2; Aferothiuiaii Literary Society, 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; President, 3; Critic, 4; 
Secretary, 2; Basketball. 1, 2, 3, 4; Marshal, 3; College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 
2, 4; Soccer, 3, 4; Baseball, I, 2; "Zenith" Editor, 4; Athletic Council, 3. 4* Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 3, 4; President, 3, 4; Treasurer Commercial Cluh, 2; Associate 
Editor "HI-Po," 4; Block "H" Club, 3, 4; Tennis Team, 2, 3. 



Martha Hall, B.S. 

men point, x. c, 
Artemesian Literary Society, i, 2, 3. 4; Modern Priscilla Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 






:<i 




Senior Class 
Ellen Blanche Hockaday, B.S. 

TIIFI..UA, S. C. 

Artemesian Literarv Society, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, 3, 4; Modern Priseilla, 3, 4; 

Y. W. C. A., 4- 



Claris Gordon Isley, A.B. 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 

Ministerial Association, 3, 4. 



X" 




Senior Class 






Truth F. Isley, B.S. 

GRAHAM, W. C, 

Artemesian Literary Society, i, 2, 3, 4; Monitor, 2; Christian Endeavor, 1, 2, }, 4; 
Y. W. C. A., 2, j, 4; Modern PristJUa Club, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club, 3, 4; Vice- 
President, 3; Choral Club, I, 2; Etude Music Club, 3, 4; Treasurer, 3; Vice-Presi- 
dent, 4; Vice-President Woman's Student Government, 4. 









William Marvin Jarrell, A.B. 

HIGH FOIST, N. c. 






$1 







Senior Class 



Harry A, Johnson, A.B. 

USHONTOWS, PA. 
A A E 

Freshman Class Treasurer; Football, 2, 3, 4, Captain. 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Track, 

l, 2, 3, 4. 

T. M. Johnson, Jr., A.B. 

BURLINGTON', X. C. 
A A li 

Football Trainer, 2, 3; Football Manager, 4; Assistant Manager, 3; Akrothim'an 
Literary Society, 1,2; "Hi-Po" Staff, I, 3, 4. 



• 



?-• 




Senior Class 



Gilbert Fielding Kearns, A.B. 

infill pnivr, N. c 
E II ']> 

Junior Marshal, 3; Orchestra, 3; Etude Music Club, 3, 4, 
Manie Grace Koontz, A.B. 

IIICII POINT, N. C. 
A * 

Artemesian Literary Society, 1,4; Glee Club, 1 ; Day Student Council, 4; Choral 
Club, 4; Etude Music Club, 4. 



33 







Senior Class 



Nathalee Larue Lackey, A.B. 

FALLSTON, K. C. 
2 A * 

Nikanthan Literary Society, I, 2, 3, 4; College Choir, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety, 1, 2, 3. 4; Scriblerus Club, 3; Y. W. C. A., 2, 3, 4; Etude Music Cluh, 3, 4; 
Captain Swimming Team, 2; Choral Cluh, t, 2; Girls' dee Club, 3; Representative 

State Plav Day. 



Lawrence W. Lee, A.B. 

LAWN DALE, X. C. 

Rutherford Junior College, 1,2; Akrothinian Literary Society, 3, 4; Assistant Secre- 
tary, 3; Ministerial Association, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A., 3, 4; Secretary, 3; Christian En- 
deavor, 3, 4. 



u 




Semi or Class 



Lala Ione Lindley, A.B. 



GRAHAM, N. C. 



Nikantban Literary Society, i, 2, 3, 4: Christian Endeavor, i, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 2, 3, 4; 

Librarian, 4; Head Proctor, J.j Athletic Association, 2, 3; Etude Music Club, 3. 4; 

Girts' Glee Club, 3 ; V. W. C. A., 2. 






William Seymour Ludwig, A.B. 

ALLISON, PA. 

4 A E 



Football, i, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, I, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2; Track, 3; Akrothinian Lit- 
erary Society, 1, 4; Vice-President. J : Clas< President, 3: "Hi-I'u" Staff, 3; Editor, 4; 
Block "H" Club, 3, 4; Pan-Hellenic Council. 4; Boys' Student Council, 3. 



'5 



- 




Senior Class 



L E. Mabry, A.B. 

HIGH pni.vr, x. c. 

Tbalenn Literary Society. 4; Ministerial Association, 4; Entered from Catawba 

College, 4. 

Verdie Lorena Marshbanks, B.S. 

MARS IMI.L, Hi C. 

2 A •!> 

Nikanthan Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer, 3; Forensic Council, 4; Woman's 
Student Government Board, 2; Y. W. C. A., 2. 3, 4; Vice-President, 3; Dramatic 
Club. 2; Christian Endeavor, 1. 2. 3, 4; Modern Priscilla Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice- 
President, 4; Pan- Hellenic Council, 4, 



36 










Senior Class 



J. Clay Madison, A.B. 

JENNIMCSj N. C, 
I T K 

Thaleao Literary Society, 2, 3, 4; Chaplain, 3; President, 4; Intercollegiate Debater, 
2, 3, 4; Orator, 3; Baseball, 2; Christian Endeavor, 2, 3. 4; Y. M. C. A., 2, 3, 4; 
President, 3; Etmle Music Club, 3, 4; Vice-President, 3; College Choir, 3, 4; Min- 
isterial Association, 2, 3, 4; Chaplain, 3; President Stare Ministerial Association, 4. 

Sue Morgan, A,B. 

FARMER, X. C. 

I. <[. 

Artcmcsian Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President, 3: Chaplain, 4; Christian En- 
deavor, 1, 2, 3, 4; Scriblerus Club, 2, 3, 4; President, 3; Y. W. C. A., 2, 3, 4; Sec- 
retary, a; Treasurer, 3; Modern Priscilla, 2, 3, 4; Secretary Class, 3; Intersociety 
Debater, 3; Dramatic Club, 2, 4; Vice-President, 2; Athletic Association, 2, 3, 









37 










Senior Class 






Thelma Frances Moss, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
A 8 * 

Nikartthan Literary Society, t, 2. 3. 4; Chaplain. 3, 4; Day Student Government 
Council, 3; PiTsiiicnt, 4; Pan-Hellenic Council, 4, 



Clifford Hinshaw Peace, A.B, 

TRIX1TV, K. C. 
I T K 

Weaver College, 1, 2\ Ministerial Association, Jt, 4; Vice-President. 3; President, 4; 
College Choir, 3. 4; President, 4; Etude Music Club, 3, 4. 



a 




Senior Class 
Jester LeRoy Pierce, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, ». C. 

I IX 
Vice-President Senior Class; Foothill!. I, 2, j, 4: Basketball, 1, 2, %\ Baseball, 1, 2. 

Anzelette Prevost, B.S. 

WQRTHVILLE, N, C. 
S A * 

Artemesian Literary Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer, 3; Forensic Council, 4; Christian 

Endeavor, 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Pnscilla, 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President, 3; President, 4; 

Dramatic Club, 2, 4; Secretary Woman's Student Government, 3; College Glee Club, 

1, 2; Girls' Glee Club, 2; College Marshal. 3. 



11 




Senior Class 



Frances Roach Pritchett, A.B. 



BURT, I SCION, 8, C. 

Nikanthan Literary Society, i, 2, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, t, 2, 3, 4; Pianist, 3; 

Assistant Treasurer, 3 ; Y. W. G. A., 2, 3, 4; President, 4; College Choir, 3, 4; Mixed 

Glee Club, 2, 3; Etude Music Club, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor Secretary, 4. 

Harvey Neal Radcliffe, A.B. 

MQRVEX, N. C. 
Iv ]1 <I> 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 4; Akrothinian Literary Society, 2, 3. 4; Y, M. 
C. A., 3, 4; Secretary, 4; Block "H" Club, 3, 4. 



+ o 




Senior Class 



Frank Robbins, A.B. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

A A E 

Manager Track, 3; Football, 4; Aknithininn, 1, 4; Tenuis, 2, 3. 4; "Zenith" Staff, 4. 



Olive Glenn Thomas, B.S. 

MARS mix, N. e. 
2 A <!' 

Christian Endeavor, I, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 2; Y. W. C. A,, 2; Nikanthan Literary So- 
ciety, 1, 2, 3, 4: Chaplain. 3; Modern Priseilla, 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 3; Student Vol- 
unteer Group, 1, 2, 3; President, 2; Freshman Representative Student Council, 1; 

President, 4. 



4' 




Senior Class 



Harvey Samuel Warljck, A.B, 

LMVNIJALE, N. C. 
EH* 



Thalean Literary Society, i, 2. 3, 4; Pan- Hellenic Council, 4; Vice-President Class, 3 ; 

President Class, 4; Block "H" Club, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 4; Track, 3; Soccer, 3, 4; 

V. M. C, A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, i, 2, 3, 4. 



Roger William Watson, A.B, 

M OR VEX, B. C 
E II * 

Akrothiniaii Literary Society, I, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 2; Vice-President, 3; Treasurer 

Class. 4; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4, 



42 




Senior Class 



WlLLARD MELVIN WHITE, A.B. 
CLAtTOK, net. 

Thatcan Literary Society, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A., 3, 4; Ministerial Association. 3, 4; 
Christian Endeavor, 3, 4; Soccer, 3, 4; Winner Society Debaters' Medal, 3; Chaplain 

Society, 4. 






Sallie Wood, A.B. 

1I01.L1STKK, 8. C. 

E. C. T. C, r, 2; Nikanthan Literary Society, 3, 4: Christian Endeavor, 4; Y. W. 
C. A., 4; Athletic Association, 3; College Choir, 4; Assistant Director Physical Edu- 
cation. 4, 






43 




Senior Class 



Eleanor Clare Young, A.B. 

HEXDERSQV, y. c, 

8 * 

Artemesian Literary Society, 1. 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 2; President, 4; Forensic Council, 3 ; 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4; Secretary, 4; Scriblerus Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, 2, 4; 
Intersociety Debater, 2, 3; Modern Priseilla, i, 2, 3, 4; Christian Endeavor, r, 2, 3, 4; 
Dramatic Club, 2, 4; Choral Club, 1, 2; Secretary Class, 1; Junior Marshal, 3; 
"Zenith" Staff, 3 ; Representative State Flay Day Meeting. 



Nat Mason Harrison 

ASHERORfl, H. C, 

Candidate tor Master of Hearts Degree; Senior Mascot. 



44 










Class of 1933 

( >l-l IL'IKS 

Ralph Jacks President 

Jin i m Morgan . . WUe-Prmdtni 

Ei.VA GARTNER , Secretary 

Gl.Anvs Culler Treasurer 

N. P, Vakbokoucu Ftirulty Advisor 

*=— O — ^ 
10 i 




45 




Junior Class 



William 11. Howard 
mocksville, s. c. 

Jbssje Smith 

KE1IKV1LLE, X. C. 

Tow Simeon 

V MO MOWN, PA. 



I'miv Nash 
high point, n, c. 

Carl M, Smith 
HIGH point, n. c. 

Elizabeth Ross 
asheeoro, n. c. 



TYREE LTNULEV 
SAXAPAIIAW, K. C. 

El A' A ('AH I NIK 
MOCKSVILLE, N. C. 

Joe E. Craver 
I eXINGTON, N. C. 



46 
















iKMA PaSCIIALL 
MANSON, S. C. 

C. L. Gray, Jr. 
high point, k. c. 

Katik Sue Stakfield 
h1ch point, n. c. 



Junior Class 

John Morgan 
farmer, n. c. 

Joyce Julian* 
mili.boro, n. c. 

Howard Pickett 
burlington, k. c. 



Pauline Patrick 
high point, n. c. 

Kenneth Swart 
wayn'esbukc, pa, 

Cornelia Howard 
high point, n. c. 



47 




Marion S. Phillips 
tko.vi.ysvili.k, x, c. 

Elk a beth Guklev 
mmi point, S. c. 

Ralph Jacks 
dun lap, N. c. 



Junior Class 

Riilvator English 

AkflNlALE, \. c. 

Hugh McCachern 
linwoob, x. c. 

Marvin Merrick 
high point, n. c. 



Pvvinnr Nifonc 
wall burg, n. c, 

Gladys Culler 
high point, n. c. 

AlIRIAM THOMPSON 
REIIISVILLE, N, C. 



+ S 














Junior Class 



Dwight Davidson Ina McAuams 

cibsonville, b, c. high point, m. c. 

George Pusev James Patch Homer Bivens 

SEAFORD, DEL. CLAVTON, N. V. HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Lester Furr Ollie Knight 

new london, n. c. essex, n, c. 

Agnes Ingram Clarence Morris L. F. Strader 

HIGH POINT, N. C. FALLSTOK, K, C. HIGH POINT, N. C, 









49 



"Simplicity, truth and 
nature are the great fundamental 
principles of the beautiful in all artis- 
tic creation." 

— GLUCK. 
















Class of 1934 
Officers 

John Tavliir - , . President 

Robert Williams . lire-President 

Viri, AnOTBWS Secretary 

GeOKCE Maust Tnasurrr 

Mr, Floyd Garrett Fatuity Adviser 

~o 

1 







5' 




























Soplhomtiore Class 



Frances Taylor Rlbv Varner 

Ivan Crissman Virl Andrews William Cooper 

lli'Wikit Smith Forrest Wagoner 

Ida Johnson Mary Rkid Iool Doris Keener 

Woodrow Morris Robert Williams 



s* 

















Sophomore Class 



Jewel Welch Mary Busby 

Albert Fossa Laura Bkaswell George Crickmore 

Wilton Ki.mmer John Taylor 

Sarah Holmes Meeta Heath Sallie Mae Bivens 

Jos Stone Joe Coble 



S3 







Sophomore Class 



Jake Lingo Alma Andrews 

J oh* Ward Or a Mae Welhorn George Maust 

Curtis Humphreys Herman' Yoklev 

Marv Ella Johnson Helen- Beits Ola Stafford 

Charles Grant Frakk Sudia 



54 













So p h o ni or e C ■ J a s s 






Virginia Beam 
John- AustjK Lilue Mae Stroi'd Alice Havnes 

Marv Elizabeth Crouch Edith Guthrie Lyman Troxt.er 

Smith Nirexc Ethei Favv 



55 



M 



The Editor expresses great appreciation 
to Miss Sloan and Miss Luce, of the 
Music Department, and to Professor 
Yarborough, faculty advisor of the 
Yearbook, for their hearty co-operation 
in compiling the 1932 Zenith. 










Class of 1935 
Officers 

Monroe Taylor President 

James Bowers Viie-Presidrnt 

Wilma Pi.ansier Seerttary 

AOYLENE McCoiAUM ... Treasurer 

Mrs. H. A. White Faculty Advuor 

X=Z=Z O == 

10 j 




<7 









Freshman 


Class 




Nicholson Neville 


Mary Ward Johnson 


Larry Yolnt 


Evelyn Cress 


ROBERT livKL'M 


Imocbne Kennedy 


Clyde Williams 


Ebith Lee 


Herbert Garmon 


Catherine Cress 


Walter Lanier 


Virginia Massey 


Alva Mac Donald 


Stacy Shackleforb 

58 


Edward White 


Mary Parsons 



























Freshman Class 



Geke Reece 
Paul Voncankon 
Burt Asburv 
Aubert Smith 



Abtlens McCollom 
Mildred Russell 

H.\ri Kin in Wnnni 
Stella Moore 



Harris Jarrell 
Ben- James 
Alexander Proctor 

( 111! I I I'.Kii'A \ 



Dei.phi.ve Welborn 
Ada Penn 
Emily Racsdale 
Rvth Miller 






S9 









Freshman 


Class 




Russell Brown- 


Emma Cakr Bivens 


Car lis Kennedy 


Frances Kester 


Sam Troutman 


Hyacinth Hdnter 


Glenn Hedcecock 


Madelvx Packer 


Ernest Howell 


Hazel Stewart 


JOHN PENOLETON 


Ruth Payne 


Raymond Northcott 


Annie Laurie Moss 


Algernon Penn 


Frances McCrary 




So 








FresHieiiaiflL Class 



Arthur Lamer 
James Bowers 
Paul Brinkley 
Monroe Taylor 



Juanita Reio 
Frieda Rucker 
Wilma Rogers 
Irene Chadwick 



W'yatt Wall 
Harry McComans 
Tom Robertson- 
Noble Oliten 



t,i 



























Helen Raper 






Ruth Braswell 






Mavis Hester 






Rachel Ingram 


































Freshman Class 



Vivian Crawford 
Lois Hvman 
Edith Hughes 
Violete Weaver 



Sin vi \ Smiiii 
Ki MNETH Royals 
G. W. Apple 
Harry Fivch 



Margaret Bundy 
Mae Haves 
Virginia Fritz 
Ekma Suns 






£2 







Special Students 



Frances Wachbr Bessie Hedrick Ruth Coffield 

Lucia LinvTLLE Dorothy McCaxless Dorothy Willis 

Orest Hepciecock Rae Smith 

Myktle Troxler Holt Bwvm 



<>i 






Special Students 


Thomas Ellis 


Maude IIamil 


Willi am Penx 


Ethel Hyman 


Tempie Carter 


Irexe Plummer 



James Might 
Arthur Dickens 
Virginia Bennett 



<,4 



.^T^EETHOVEN. Ludwig Van (1770- 
i^yj 1827), was born in Bonn, a small 

t * <— & university town in the lovely Rhine 
valley, near Cologne. The life of Beethoven 
is thai of a great artist who was equally great 
as a man. His genius enlarged the language 
of music, for his compositions speak to the 
world of the struggles, aspirations and 
triumphs of the soul. They are deeply emo- 
tional, yet full of intellectual power and 
grandeur, expressing in their beauty the 
feelings of all humanity. His character was 
a noble one, and one bows in reverence 
before his mighty genius and lores him for 
his goodness and the purity of his soul. He 
has been called the Emancipator and holds 
the place in music history that Lincoln holds 
in United States history, Bottt had rough 
and uncouth exteriors, but high ideals. They 
were both misunderstood but had the cour- 
age of their convictions. They reached, as 
far as possible, the goals they set. Someone 
has compared his music to a beautiful color- 
ful sunset in the late fall. 




Athletic Council 



C. R. HlNSHAW . , 

H. L. Spessard 



. . Chair inn ii 
Secretary 






Members 
J. F. Beall N. P. Yakborih i,ii 

\V. A. Hastings J. N. Cravf.r 

.1. II. Al.LKF.I> 



67 




Julian F. Beau., Coark 
Robert Watkivs, .Issistatit Cmuh 




>,s 







>^ 



FOOTBALL 

Harry Johnson, Captain 
Taltojn Johnson, Manager 







6<) 




FOOTBALL 



LUDWIGj Halfback — "IjUd" was handicapped 
throughout the entire season by Injuries, Nev- 
erthelesa, his aggressiveness and fighting spirit 
1 airicd him through a large part of the Karnes, 
A shoulder injury in the Catawba game brought 
his career as a Panther to an abrupt close- 
His best game was against W afford. 

COUY, Fullback — "Boh" was one of the trlp'e 
threat twins of the Panther backfleld. His Ions 
run for a touchdown in the Catawba game al- 
most upset the "dope bucket" of experts. H, Bob" 
possesses the drive of a young locomotive and 
Eh expected to be a big tog in the Panther of- 
fense next fall. 



JOK Clt.WKK — Joe continued his brilliant 
work In the Panther line and put a climax on 
his third year of varsity play by receiving a 
guaid berth on several mythical all-conference 
teams selected by various coaches and sport 
writers. He was elected at the opening of the 
spring practice session to captain the 1932 Pan- 
i h.<i E'ark. 




JOHNSON <Ciiptiim) llnlfbacli — Harry proved 
to be one of the most capable leaders the Pan- 
thers have had in the history of football at 
High Point College. He was the dynamo that 
kept the secondary defense of the Pack buz- 
zing. Opponents accused him of being a "moun- 
tie"; he always got his man. 



ZKIt DKNNV — Zeb is another flankman who 
has roamed his last on the end of a Panther 
tine. He did not appear in the line-up this 
year as steadily as he would have had It not 
been for injuries that held him back. He was 
one of the best pass-snaggers in the Panther 
cramp' 



BAJRKBV, End — "Buck" was a forward-pass 
specialist. He handled a couple to put the 
skids under American University, He was a 
clean, hard fighter, and his fine defensive work 
will be missed a great deal next year* May you 
be as consistent in life as you were in football, 
■Buck." 



ROGER WATSON — ' 'Red" hrought bis fourth 
year of work on the Panther squad to a close 
by turning in an excellent brand of football. 
He was a. bard, clean fighter, and the game he 
put up against thi. Fighting Christians of Elon 
wniuld I..- .,: .1-. .in i', a rente i nm ani One's 
ball club. 



BIIX COOPER— The air of laziness that fol- 
lowed Cooper around the campus was always 
missing when he reached the gridiron. Cooper 
was a scrapping tackle with a strange knack for 
recovering fumbles. This year marked Cooper's 
third year on the varsity, and he turned in a 
very consistent tfamtj in the line. 



DWIGHT OAVIPKON— "Doc" Davidson was 
the squad's chief trainer this year, and as he 
is a senior next year, he will take over Talton 
Johnson's job as manager. Davidson should 
make a very thorough and capable manager, as 
lie has had several years of training as assist- 
ant manager, Dwlght attended to his duty as 
trainer this year in fine style and was always 
on hand when something was needed. 



FOOTBALL 



FRANK KOBIMXft— To Rubbing emb the dis- 
tinction of being selected as all-conference cen- 
ter his first season as a varsity player. He 
worked hard for three years for a. chance and 
then made good in a big way, 1 1 i.s ^raduat o-i 
is going to I avc a gap in the Panther line as 
large as the Grand Canyon. 



GKOltOE PtJSET — 'The red terror" from Del- 
aware was one of the hardest and surest 
tack 1 e ra on the Pa n t h er squad. He h ad h is 
btst days against Catawba and I-.enoir-R.hyne. 
In the latter he played the second half with 
three cracked rlba. Besides being mentioned on 
the all-conference team, many claimed he was 
of All-American calibre. 



I'IKIM'K, Quarterback— "Jet," playing his first 
year as varsity signal-barker, came through in 
great style. He was a smart field general, and 
his blocking and fine defensive play made him 
one of the most dependable men in the back- 
field. He blazed forth in all his glory in the 
Lenoir-Rhyne battle. 



KWAKT, End — "Ken" played his usual steady 
game on one of the flank a. It was seldom an 
opponent made the mistake ef trying to run a 
play around bis side of the field. His speed 
made him a good man in covering punts. He 
is a junior and will have one more year of 
hunting: as a Panther. 



REESE, Fullback— "Gene" is the other triple 
threat man on the Panther team. Although 
only a freshman. Reese broke in nearly every 
game scheduled this year. His broken-field run- 
ning was a feature of almost every csmc, and 
with three more years of football before him 
he should go far in conference circles. 



MATJST, llnlflMiclc— "Maustle" was the Pan- 
ther "handy man." He was shifted from line 
to hackfield and bark again only to keep up 
the same high calibre of work. His last-min- 
ute passing In the Wofford game was one of the 
classics of the year. 



ItOBKKT WILLIAMS — "Pinkie" was one of 
the chief undcr-studies for the guard or tackle 
positions. He had several opportunities to prove 
his mettle, and in each instance came through 
and delivered a good game. He is almost cer- 

1;iin mi ;,,-,■ ,m'1 ion on tlli- \.ir:-:i1 v nrxl j .;ir\ 



CENNFIH KOYALS — Royals will always be 
remembered as the 155 pounds of dynamite that 
blasted a aOO-pound mountain of flesh from the 
center of the American University line a couple 
of years ago. His work this year was just as 
outstanding as that of last year, and he has 
two more years in which to howl as a Panther. 



JOE t OmJC — Joe acted as one of the train- 
ers this year; and when it tame to giving the 
boys medical aid, he was right on the spot. 
Joe always carried about fifty yards of tape in 
his pockets. He could always be counted on to 
have a small bottle of iodine in his possession, 
Joe is a sophomore and will probably be head 
trainer next year. 





c 



Although the Purple Panthers won only two of the nine scheduled games, the past season 
cannot be considered a total loss. All of the defeats came after playing good, consistent foot- 
ball, and a number of them were by very narrow margin. 

For the first game, the Panthers journeyed up to Lynchburg, Va., to take on Lynchburg 
College. The result of this trip was a one-point defeat . 

The Mountaineers of Appalachian took the second game to the tune of 20-0. The Panthers 
made twenty-one first downs in this game, but "Lady Luck" was, evidently, talking to a gen- 
tleman in the grandstand and had no time to sympathize with a hard-working football team. 

Wofford tamed the Panther in his own lair 9-0, to put the third game in the red for the 
Panther supporters. 

The longest trip of the season brought sorre SLnhine through the clouds when the Beall- 
men took American University into camp 12-6 in the capital city. 

Hostilities were resumed with Guilford Quakers, and "the silent ones" made a big noise in 
turning the Panthers back, 13-0. 

Catawba Indians went up in the air to take one of the most thrilling games of the year, 7-6. 
The Panthers put up a great scrap, but the aeria! route taken by the Indians proved to be 
without a detour. 

Elon upset the dope bucket to take the seventh game on the Panther schedule. The Chris- 
tians had things well under control and crossed the Purple and White line five times to pile up 
a score of 30-0. 

The Lenoir-Rhyne Bear proved to be a cub, and the Panthers smashed out a hard-fought 
12-6 victory for the first conference win of the season. 

The ninth and final game of the year was played against the Birdmen at Langley Field. 
Uncle Sam's men took the situation in hand and ripped out a 25-0 win. 




William Ludwic, Captain 
Alrerj Fossa, Manager 





Ken Swart 

This boy is another product of Pennsylvania and 
has developed into one of the best guards in school. 
Ken is able to hold any man in the conference to a 
low score. Swart never lets up from the time the 
game starts until it stops. He has one more year on 
the Panther quint and great things are expected of 
him. 

Alexander Proctor 

Proctor as a freshman didn't get miny chances to 
show his real form, but he did prove to Coach that 
he has the makings of a real basketball man for fu- 
ture years. He has a good eye for the basket and 
can handle the ball well. With a little more expe- 
rience he is going to give the teams in the "Little 
Seven" same trouble. 



Noble Outten 

"Big Shad" is at home in either the guard or cen- 
ter position. He has been an understudy to Hast- 
ings at center all season and should be able to take 
care of that position next year. He is a freshman 
and has three more years in which to prove his wares. 



Bob Cory 

Changing from football toggery to basketball re- 
galia, Bob again gave a good account of himself on 
the hardwood. Bob is fast, and his uncanny ability 
for hooking goals has won for him the respect of all. 
This Keystoner has been on the Panther team for 
three years and has one more in which to gain more 
fame for himself and High Point. 



G* 



Captain Bill Ludwig 

"Lud" was one of the two seniors on the quint 
and one of the most dependable men on the Panther 
squad. His never-ceasing pep was a big mainstay of 
the team and kept them going when it was tough. 
Bill caul^n't get his eye on the basket unH near the 
middle of the season, but from then on his presence 
was felt keenly by the opponents. His big game was 
against Lenoir-Rhyne when he hit the loop for fif- 
teen points. Au Revoir, Bill. 



G* 




Clarence Morris 

This was Morris' first year out, and he was not 
used as a regular, but he always delivered when called 
upon to do so. Clarence has lots of pep and can hit 
the hoop. He can play either a forward or guard 
and should give some one a run for their position 
next year. 

Gene Reese 

The "hill-billy" came here after an envious reccrd 
in high school and lived up to it by capturing one of 
the forward berths in a short time. Gene is a good 
floor man, adept at handling the ball and ringing 
up points from the most unusual positions. With 
three more years on the Panther qu nt at the rate be 
is going, we predict that he will be one of the best 
basketball men ever to graduate from High Point. 



Carl Smith 

"Smittie" began the season as a forward and gave 
a credirable showing, but near the middle of the sea- 
son he was shifted to a guard position, and it was 
there he stuck. In his first game in the new posi- 
tion agnnsr Appalachian he held his man to a lone 
field goal. Carl seldom tr.cs for the basket; but when 
he does from backcourt, it is usually two more 
points. Smith is a junior, and gteat things are ex- 
pected of him next year. 

Allen Hastings 

"Skipper" finished his fourth season at High 
Point by adding more laurels to his crown. The 
lanky Delawarean was the high scorer for the 1932 
Panther edition and finished well up in the scoring 
columns of the conference. His all-round floor work 
and ability for hitting the basket won for him a 
berth on many all-conference teams. Skip missed 
only about five minutes during the season, and twen- 
ty-one points was the best he could do against Gu 1- 
ford, his last game for H. P. C. Happy huntings, Al. 



G* 



Arthur Lanier 

Arthur had a brilliant record in high school and 
showed that he has ability. He could be used at 
either guard or forward; and when he started drib- 
bling with that left hand, things were bound to pop. 
His bullet-like passes were something to be wondered 
at. Shots from backcourt are Bull's paradise. 



G* 



VJ 




Basketball Eesiune for the Seasoo of 1931*32 

In looking back over the record of the 1932 edition of the Purple Panther basket- 
ball quint we find that six games were marked up in the win column and nine ap- 
pear as losses. The Panthers started the season by defeating Robbins Hosiery Mill 
in a practice game by 35 to 15. Immediately after this game the Panthers journeyed 
to South Carolina to play three games, T bey lost the first game of the series to the 
College of Charleston 54 to 23. The next two games they won from the Paris Island 
Marines by the scores of 19 to in and 32 to 19, respectively. The Winston-Salem 
Y, M, C. A. took the locals into camp at Winston in a heart-breaking contest, nosing 
out the Panthers by two points, tile final score being 211 to 18. 

The sixth and seventh games of tin- season ivrrr lust to Finn College. The first 
game was played 0:1 the Elon floor, the Panthers losing 2fi to \2. In the second con- 
rest which took place in High Point they were defeated 48 to 26. This is the first 
time in the history of High Point College that a hasketball gam:- has been lost to Elon. 
The next two conference games the Panthers won, defeating the Atlantic Christians 
28 t:i 21 and the Catawba Indians 28 to 17. In the next attempt, against the Ap- 
palachian State Teachers' College, the Panthers were defeated 44 to 12. 

On February 12th the locals met the Charleston cagers on the local high school 
court and were defeated in the last few minutes of play 32 to 30. The Panthers lost 
two out of three games on a trip into the mountains. They defeated Lenoir-Rhyne 
3 1 to 27 and lost to A. S. T. C. 28 to 26 and to Catawba H to 23. February 25th 
the Panthers were turned hack by the Guilford Quakers 35 to 28, and on February 
27th were defeated by Lenoir-Rhyne. In the final game of the season Guilford de- 
feated the Panthers on the local court. 



7« 




Minor Sports 

Wc thought that it would be well to introduce minor sports of the 
college with a picture of the Junior Panther Football Team, These 
boys are on hand every afternoon at Boylin Terrace to watch the var- 
sity squad practice. They pay close attention to all lectures given by 
the coach, and while the large boys drill they do a bit of practicing of 
their own on the side lines. 

The Junior Panthers have a complete team, and "Lefty" Taylor is 
their captain. They are all vicious racklers and have so far crushed all 
opposition. They will often don the helmets of the Senior Panthers and 
engage in scrimmage among themselves. It is well worth a trip to 
Buyliit Terrace to sec these boys in action. Tluy hold a warm place in 
the hearts of all the college boys. 



77 




Soccer 



//. I', c 

i 



Opponent 



High Point College Soccer Team's Data 

1930 

. . Greyhounds . , 

I Jamestown 1 

2 H. P. Rangers 1 

1 Catawba College O 

9 H. P. Rangers 2 

2 Catawba College* 1 



'93' 



2 

O Catawba College . 

5 Guilford College . 

4 Catawba College . 

3 All-State High School 

30 



Greyhounds 1 

O 





Standing 




w. 


L, T. 


Pa. 


9 


2 


1 



2 

1 



78 




Wrestling 



This is the first year that High Point College has had a wrestling team. 
Considering the fact that every man on the team was inexperienced, they made an 
excellent showing. Five meets were lost, while they won one. Much credit is 
due Coach Watkins who worked faithfully with the boys, teaching them the 
finer points of the game. With the experience that they gained this year they 
should make an even better showing next year. Frank Robblus and Warlick 
are the only men lost to the team by graduation. 

In the first meet the High Point team lost to Oak Ridge Institution 1 8 to 8. 
Simeon won a fall and Robbins a time decision. Barium Springs won the next 
meet, 14 to 8. Jmrrell and James were the winners in this meet. In a return 
meet at Barium Springs the locals were defeated 22 to tO. Simeon and Wil- 
liams took falls. Knoxville Y, Southern Y, M. C, A, champions for 1931, de- 
feated the locals t8 to 10. The most outstanding men were: Brown, 145 lbs.; 
Simeon, 135 lbs.; Williams. [45 lbs.; James, 155 lbs.; Robbins, 165 lbs.; and 
C raver, unlimited. 






79 



.i^Mc0 




Teamis 

Tennis is becoming more and more popular at High Point College every 
year. Much hidden talent was displayed at the annual interclass tennis tourna- 
ment last year, and with the new men in school this year who are "tennis-mind- 
ed," the college should he represented by an excellent team. 

All of the men who participated in the tournament last year are back, with 
the exception of Walters and Dellinger. These men ranked with the best in the 
"Little Seven," and their absence will be felt. However, the team has a good 
man in Harry Johnson, who defeated Walters in the quarter finals fast year. 

IVo matches were played with other schools last year. This year matches 
have been scheduled with Guilford and Catawba, and several other matches are 
pending. The use of courts has been the chief difficulty of the local team, but 
the Athletic Council is planning to have clay put on the college courts and have 
them in readiness for the first match. 



So 



fTAYDN, Franz Joseph (1732- 
* 1809), was born at Rohrau, a 
small town on the confines of 
Austria and Hungary. Haydn is re- 
ferred to as the Gardener, and he was to 
music what Burbank was to nature. A 
gardener is one who cultivates and grafts 
one fortn to another and brings new 
types into existence. Haydn took the 
wild flowers of folk tunes and grafted 
them to make wonderful works of art. 
In many cases he put actual folk tunes 
into his compositions. Like a gardener, 
Haydn's music breathes of the out-of- 
doors, and is always fresh and alive. He 
was good-natured, kindly, independent, 
of very strong character, but not in the 
least domineering. A Haydn symphony 
is like the sunshine after the thunder 
storm. The air is fresh and clear and 
the sun shines on the dew drops on the 
grass. His music is healthy. He is the 
greatest writer of absolute music. 
















WOMAN S STL DENT COL NC1L 







WOMAN S DAY STUDENT COUNCIL 



8| 










Zematlh Staff 

W, Allen HASTINGS . Editor-in-Chief 

Zh IHam . . Business Manage! 

DORIS Keeker Secretary 

Lewis BETHEA Sports Editor 

Fraxk Robbies -issociatc Editor 

El.nisE Best Associate Editor 

Gladys Culler . ........ Associate Editor 

N. P, Yar borough , Faculty Advisor 







HioPo Staff 






William Seymour Lubwic Editor-in-C/iirf 

D wiciiT M. DAVIDS3S Managing Editor 

Zeb Dbstkt Assodatr Editor 

W. Allen Hastings • Associate Editor 

John- K. Ward Sports Editor 

Joe N. Craver Business Manager 

Miss Mabel Williams Fatuity Advisor 



iS 



am Literary Society 



Color*: Lavender and White 



Nf.i.le Marie Humphreys, Mascot 



Mnttii: Victory Crowns Patience 



flower; Lavender Iris 



Officers 



Juan it a Andrews . 
Elva Gartner . . 
Vim, Andrews , . 
Frances Pritcheit 
Ola Sin ujrii . 



. . president 
Vice-President 

. . Secretary 
. . . Pianist 

. . Mutator 



Marc a ret Pickett 
Tut: i. ma Moss . . 
Mrs. H. A. White 
GLADYS Guthrie . 
Nathalie Lackey , 



. . . Treasurer 

. . . Chaplain 
Fatuity Advisor 

. . . . Critic 
. . ■ Reporter 



Mrs. G. I. Humphreys 

Miss Naomi Morris 



Honorary Members 

Miss Naomi Dawson 
Mrs, P. S. Kennett 
Miss Makv E. Young 



Mrs. P. E. Lindley 
Miss Mabel Williams 



Virginia Beam 
Helen Beits 
Sai.lie Mae Bivkxs 
Laura Bkaswei.i 
Mary Lee Briles 
M vRi Hi mji 
Teams Carter 
Elva Cartner 
[rem: Chadwick 
ReuCHA CHAOWtCK 
Ruth Coffibld 
Catherine Cress 
Evelyn Cress 



Members 
Elizabeth Gurley 

I m I II OdllRlE 

Gladys Guthrie 
Alice Haynes 
Mf.eta Heath 
Sarah Holmes 
Acnes Ingram 
Rachel Ingram 
Miriam Kress 
Naihai.ee Lackey 
Lala Lindley 
Dorothy McCanless 
Frances McCrary 
Verdie Marshbanks 
Virginia Masse y 
Ruth Miller 
Stella Moore 
Annie Laurie Moss 
Dotty Nash 
Maoelyn Packer 
Ruth Payne 
Helen Raeer 



Mildred Russell 
Vera Smith 
Hazel Stewart 
Lillie Mae Siroud 
Rae Smith 
Olive Thomas 
Myrtle Troxler 
Margaret Watson 
Violette Weaver 
Ora Mae Welborn 
Jewel Welch 
Sai.lie Woon 
Juasita Reid 



Hi, 













H 

w 

U 
o 



_ 
- 

z 

< 



87 




Thalean 



>ociety 



Colors; Purple ami Gold 



Flower: White Rose 



Motto: Master First Ourselves 



Officers 

Clav Madison President . . . ■ John Morgan 

Carl Smith . . . . , Fiee-Prrshitnt Wh.lakd White 

W. M. Howard . Secretary Lester Furr 

Ollie Knight lssisfant Secretary Forrest Wagoner 

W. M. Hedrick Treasurer . . W. M. Hedrick 

JOHS Morgan Critic L. E. Mabrv 

Willard White . Chaplain W, M. HOWARD 

Harvey Warlick Society Reporter . Ralph Jacks 

Ralph Jacks - - ■ Press Reporter , Carl Smith 

Joe Coble hsistaat Press Reporter Joe Coble 

Woodrou Morris Man/nil . . Ollie Knight 

Howard Pickett Isststant Marshal G. W. Apple 

Clarence Morris Forrnsie Council Representative ..... . Clav Madison 



G. W. Apple 
Joe Coble 

Lester Flrr 



Roll 

Orest Hei>gecock 
Marvin Hedrick 
W. M. Howard 



Ralph Jacks 
Ollie Knight 

TVREE LlNDLEY 



L. E. Mabrv 
Clav Madison 
John Morgan 

( '] HI St I MflKKIS 



Woodrow Morris 
John Pevoletos 
Howard Pickett 
Al'bert Smith 



Carl Smith 
Adrian Thompson 
Forrest Wagoner 
Harvey Warlick 
Willard White 
Herman Voklev 



E8 




8 9 







Makv Ass COE, Mascot 

Arteiiiesiaini Literary Society 

Motto: Maidenly Virtue anil Purin 
Colon: Green and Gold Flower: Jonquil 

< >i rulR.s 

Eleanor Young President 

Gladys Clm.i.er . Vice-President 

Frances Taylor Secretary 

Irma PaSCKALI . ■ Treasurer 

Sue Moroan Chaplain 

F-LoisE Best . Critic 

Ai.ma Andrews Pianist 

DORIS Keener Monitor 

Tkuth Isley Chorister 

Ax/ki.i in Fki vissT . . . ■ ■ . Forentii C until 

Song 

Dear Artentesia. we strive for thee, 

If c hut'? as oar goal our purity, 

Maidenly virtue, worthy of praise. 

To old Artemesia our songs of joy toe raise. 

Dear Arle/ncsici. all through our lives 
May we he conquerors in our strife. 
Be always faithful, ever be true 
To old Artemesia. as lie now sing to you. 










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91 



Akrothinian Literary Society 



Colitrs: (7rcen and White 



Organized 1926 



Motto: Find a Way or Make One 



Flower; Fern 






Fin I Semester 

Dwight Davidson 
Tuny Simeon . . 
Zer Denny . . 
Lawrence Lee . 
Roger Watson . 
Robert Williams 
Allen Hastings 



Officers 

S.-eand Semester 

. , President Zeu Denny 

. } ice- President Job Craver 

. . Secretary LAWRENCE LEE 

Assistant Secretary Tony Simeon 

. . Treasurer RoGER WaTSON 

. . Marshal Harry FlNCH 

. , . Critic Dwight Davidson 



92 




ill '. 

— - ? 

SIS 



<*«4 



-■St. 

l = H 









E K -' 'i 



'- » a = 
ggSSO 






E-E „t 



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K^h 



93 






Y. W, 


c. 


A.. 




Roll 






Juasita Andrews 




Sue Morgan 




Maloie Bocu 




Irma Paschall 




Tempie Carter 




M A RGARET P If K El T 




Elva Carts ek 




Frances PrITCHETT 




Ethel Faw 




Mildred Russell 




Miss Dawsos' 




Jessie Smith 




Mavis Hester 




()l v Stai-vokh 




Bl.ASCTI llOCKAnAY 




Sali.ie Wood 




Rachel Ingram 




Edith Hughes 




Truth Islet 




Myrtle T ro.v i . t. r 




\ VI If II 1 1 I.VLKI 1 




Hyacinth Hunter 




Verbis Marshbanks 




Miss Makcaret Sloan- 




VIRGINIA MASSEV 




Miss Naomi Morris 



94 










. C. A, 



Roll 



clav madison 
John Morgan 
Ralph Jacks 
Lester Furr 
Jul Com.E 
Forrest Waco neb 

I'.tl I 1.1 ll\\ II, 



Laurence Lee 
Bill Howard 
Clarence Morris 
Harvey Wari.ick 
Wili.ari) White 
(.I. W. Apple 
Albert Smith 



Harrv Finch 



Dr. P. S. Kenneit, Family Advisor 



95 




Debating Team 



John Morgan 

FARMER, S, C. 

Clay Madison 

JENNINGS, n. c. 



Dwight Davidson 

CIBSONVILLEj N, C. 

Albert Smith 
high point, n. c. 



Dr. P. S. Kennett, ddviset 



9 6 













Pa n 5? I I c J J c n i c C • o n n c i J 



W. Allen Hastings , President 

Eleanor Young Secretary 



Thklma Moss , . , 
Vkkdie Marsiiranks 
Eleavor Young . . 
Allen Hastings . . 



Rhi'RESENTATIYLS 

. Alpha T/itta Pit . 
. Sigma Alpha Phi , 
. . ThekiPhi . . 
. Ivta Ttui Kappa . 



, . Mrs. A, P. White 
Miss Mabel Williams 
. Miss Margaret Sloan 
. . . C. R. Hinsiiaw 



WILLIAM LPDWIG . Delta. Ilpha Epsiton . J. H, Am.kfh 

Harvey Warlick Efisilon Eta PJii }. U. Molrane 

Representatives of Faculty 









Dean Mary E. Young 



Dean H. L. Spessard 






97 




Sigma 



HONORAl SoRORE 

MkS. P. F-. LlNDLEY 



Akzeleto Prevost 
Nathai.ee Lackey 




Phi 



SORORES IM Facultate 

Mabel Williams 
Vera Idol 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Vi rdie Marshsasks Elva Gartner 

Olive Thomas Edith Guthrie 

Gladys Guthrie 



Jessie Smith 
Rhuvator English 



SORORES Ex-GlLLEGlO 



Elizabeth Nicholson 

J i >\lt\ Am li k 
LAURA Thompson 
Minnie Caffey 
Gertrude Rule 
Aha Allen 
Annie Livent.ood 
Lelia Wacner Coble 



Mae Wollen 
Eefie Keck 
Bessie Red wine 
Wanda Penny 
Hilda Amick 
Edna Nicholson 
Lucy Nunnery 
Minnie Herman" 
Grace Keck 



Fanny Net Freeman 
Allene Flquav 
Elizabeth Rogers 
Grace Barke i i e 
Ruby Warlick 
Gladys Morris 
Emma Lee Poole 
Paulive Hicks 
Mildred Marlette 



Mildred Redwine 
Louise Jennings 
Mary Beth Warlick 
Elizabeth Crowell 
Hazel Hicks 
Martha Clontz 
Adelaide Crowell 
Mary Doan Rankin 



^ 




a Theta Psi 



Colors: Red and White 
Fl&ooer: Red Rose 



Thelma Moss 
Juanita Andrews 



Lugillb BROWN 
Louise Collett 
Leslie Johnson 
Ciiaklene Chimes 
Evelyn Seward 
Helen Barker 




i\fvtlo: To Seek the Noblest 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Grace Kqontz 
Rbocha Chadwick 

Isa Mc Adams 



< rl \|IVS C'l I M K 

Agnes Ingram 
Jewel Welch 



Soroses Ex-Colleoio 



Kathleen Teague 
Mrs, Carl Brinkley 
Ernestine VonCannon 
Irene Seward 
Helen Snyder 
Lucille Morrison 



Mrs. H. A. White 
Mrs. J. C. Whiteseli 



Blanche Gilliam 

HoMORARl SORORES 

Mrs, R. M. Andrews 



Ruth Jarrell 
Annie Lee Jarrell 
Margaret Davis 
Virginia Stroupe 
Mrs, John Ogeurn 
norine horney 



Virl Andrews 
Vera Smiih 



Velna Teague 
Elizabeth Vokley 
Ruth Henley 
Rosalie Andrews 
Claire Douglas 
Novella McIntyre 



Mrs, E. L, Douglas 
Mrs. F. A. Thomas 



<« 













Thcta Phi 



Fh'u.-iT: Whin- R<w 




Colors: Apple and Olive Green 



Miss Margaret Sloan 



SORORES IN FacL'LTATE 

Miss Mildred Luce 

sorores in collegio 



Miss Naomi Morris 



Elizabeth Gurley 



Sue Morgan 



Ida Johnson 



Jewel Hughes 

I.iluam Buckler Phillips 

Wii.laru Shackelford 

Vista DlXflN 

Helen Haves 
Ann Kobbins 
Hulda Dixon 
Elizabeth Hanker 
Pauline Wh leaker 
Virginia Pickens Garland 
Lila Aaros" 



Doris Keener 



Ruby Varner Eleanor Young 

Frances Taylor 



■Deceased 



SORORES Ex-COLLECIO 

Dorothy IIoskiks 
Fanny Sta.mev 
Margaret Thompson 
Dorothy Kirkman 
Mrs. Madeline Street 
Eugenia Williams Strause 
Margaret Perry Ellington 
Pauline Hunter 
Margaret Gurley 
Lillie Jane Long 



100 



Leona Wood 
Kalopia Antonakos 
Nettie Stewart 
Helen Osborne 
Pauline El kins Whiteside 
Spencer Cutchin Paschai.l 
Ruth Woodcock 
Elizabeth Brown 
Eloise Beam 
*Eva Ellis Hart 
Miss Dorothy St. Clair 






















Iota Tau Ivappa 







HoN'OR.AR] FR.YTRES 



R. N. Mann 

Dr. P. E. Limh iv 


O. A, KlKKMAV. Jr. Dr, 
C", R. Hinshaw Dr, 

Fr.atres in Collegk.) 


H. B. Hi ait 
P. S. Ken'nett 




D wight Davidson 
Joe N. Craver 

C. GEORGE PdSEY 

W. Allen Hastings 
Jester Pierce 


Zeb Dexxy Georce Crickmore 
Clav Madison R. Howard Smith 
Albert Fossa Curtis Humphreys 
Clifford Peace Frank Sldia 

Pledges 


John Taylor 
C. L. CJrav, Jr. 
John Ward 
Burt Asbury 
Sam Troutman 




Wvatt Wall 
Kenneth Rovals 


Eugene Reece Arthur Lanier 

Arthur Dickens 






Epsiloo Eta Phi 




JERRY P, HARIIV 

Walter C. McCant.es* 



IIarvh \V \K I K K 

Roger Watson 
Harvkv Ramci.ih-'e 



Hoxorari Fratres 
N. P. Varborouch 

Fratres in Coli.ecio 

FtBLDIXG Kearus 

Carl Smith 
Robert Williams 



J. Harley MnURAN'E 

Ben H. [Iii.l 



Howard Pickett 
Wooorow Morris 
Hugh McCackern 



Pledge 

Homer Riven 5 







•eka Alpha EpsiSom 



<? 



*&& 







Lewis Bkjhea 
Harkv Johnson 






Fratres in Collegia 

Talton Johnson 
William Luowic 


Frank Rdbbins 
Tony Simeon 












Fratres Ex-Collegio 






Riley Litman 
Charles Rabbins 
Frank WALTERS 
Henry Furches 


R 

I 

ii 
K 


11. EY 

c. 

L'RKE 
ELI II 


Martin *Rav Perdue 
Glasgow Ralph Mulligan 
Furches Harvby Young 

Harrison- David Plummer 


Olin Matthews 
Adam Hunt 

Cf)Y WlLLARD 












Pledges 








Alva McDonald 
James IIight 
Paul VonCannon 






Aubert Smith 
Larry Yount 
James Bowers 
Clyde Williams 


Robert Byrum 
Lyman Troxler 
Nicholson Neville 



•Deceased 



I05 









! 

















CHOIR 




m I 


i < 


^^m' ^ Jm ^ i 






ji 







GIRLS GLEE CLL'B 



104. 







ORCHESTRA 




RAMI 



IDS 












1 






r= 









't*,'*V.. 



-?wff» *s8t .'_»■ 



ETUDE MUSIC GLUB 




MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



106 




MODERN PRISC1LLA CLUB 




COLLEGE MARSHALS 



107 
















SCRNSLRRL'S CLL'B 




DRAMATIC CLIR 



108 










CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CLUB 






t • * , 


> t. 


1 1 1 » 7 . 


Jik^H 


» SO 1 

^J3 ^ it. 


T 1 






J"l « 



BLOCK H CLUB 


















ioj 




Christian Endeavor Society 



A i. ma Andrews 
G. W. Apple 
Sallie Mae Bivens 
Maloie Bogle 

RuiH Braswei.l 
I i Mini I'akhk 
Elva Gartner 
Joe Coble 
Vivian Crawford 
Ethel Faw 
Harry Iim.ii 

l.ESIEK [l KK 

Cladvs Guthrie 

ElllTII GlTHRIE 

Mavis Hester 
Blanch Hockaoav 
w. ML Howard 

Edith Hughes 
Lois Hvman 
Hyacinth Hunter 
Rachel Ingram 
Truth Isley 



Roll 

Ralph Jacks 
Joyce Julian 
Mary \Varo Johnson 
Doris Keener 
Oi.i.ie Knight 
\ \ 1 1 1 \ i i i Lacked 
Lawrence Lee 
Arthur Lanier 
Lala Lindlev 
Tyree Lindley 
Virginia Masse y 
Virdie Marshbanks 
Si'E Morgan- 
John Morgan 
Clarence Morris 
Woodrow Morris 
Anvi-ENE McCollum 
I* MA Paschall 
John Pendleton 
Margaret Pickett 
Howard Pickett 
Anzeletie Prevost 



Alexander Proctor 
Frances Pritcheit 
Elizabeth Ross 
Mildred Russell 
Stacy Shackle ford 
Mary Lewis Skiem 
Jessie Smith 
Ola Stafford 
Olive Thomas 
Adrian Thompson 
Myrtle Tronlf:r 
Monroe Taylor 
Ruby Varner 
James VonCannon 
Forrest Wagoner 
Harvey Warlick 
Mrs, C. L Whitaker 
Wh.lard White 
Sallie Wood 
Eleanor Young 
Miss Mary Young 
Mrs. 0. 0. Young 



\AGNER, Richard (1813-1SS3), was 

a I born at Leipzig* The career of this 
master is a wonderful one, for he wjs 
remarkable not only as a musician T but as a 
poet and dramatist. At first misunderstood and 
ridiculed, in his later years he was placed on 
the highest pinnacle of art by his adoring f&I' 
towers as well as by most of the musical world. 
fie triumphed where a less courageous man 
would haw failed M for he was filled with a 
faith in his own powers that carried him 
throng k the s to r m y years of his early life. 
Wagner felt that all art must ''suggest some- 
thing, 9 ' and declared that the music and words 
of an opera should be created together, the 
melody expressing the soul of the words. By 
his genius Wagner transformed and developed 
opera to heights never reached by the earlier 
composers, Wagner thought in music, and his 
motives are these ideas embodied in soujid. 
His musical themes express in a few measures 
an idea, short and easy to remember, and form 
a clear musical thought. In Wagner* i creed f 
Art was Religion, and the two could not be 
separated. He responded to all the moods of 
Nature, and gii'es us a vision of Humanity 
uplifted and transformed. 




"3 





"4 




J If! 



HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

Gideon Ireland Humphreys, A.M., D.D. 

President 

In the Heart of the Piedmont 




MODERN FIRE-PROOF BUILDINGS 
NON-SECTARIAN 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Rated Standard "A" Grade by State Board of Education 

Courses m Education, English, Language, History, Commerce, Home Eco- 
nomics, Science, Religious Education, Music — leading to degrees of 

A.B. or B.S. 

Low Rates: $380.00 covers cost of matriculation, room anil board. 

$150.00 pays expense of day students. 

"A Growing College in a Growing City" 

For Catalogue, Apply to 

PRESIDENT OR REGISTRAR 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Utility Service and the Community 

More than any other one factor, the quality of its utility serv- 
ices determines the desirability and attractiveness of a community 
for business or as a place in which to live. 

In industry and in the home the application of electricity to 
industrial and household operations is multiplying the effective- 
ness of the labor of the worker and relieving the housekeepers of 
drudgery and fatigue. And while it increases the efficiency of the 
individual, it raises the quality of the work accomplished as well. 

We invite attention to the standard of utility services in ihe 
cities in which we supply these essentials to modern living and 
modern business. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMPANY 



tor 



Yours fc 

More Happiness 



PARAMOUNT 

BROADHURST 

RIALTO 

THEATRES 



FOR 



Quality Printing 



SEE 



THE CREATIVE 
PRINT SHOP 



106 COLLEGE STREET 
Telephone 2645 



NEW SERVICE LAUNDRY 


205 Centennial 
Laundry ing 

Altering 


Avenue Phone 3J64 
High Point, North Carolina 

Cleaning 
Pressing 

Dyeing 

"Best Work and Quick Serrice" 




Dr. Nat Walker 

Optometrist 

Over Hart Drug Company 

Next to Post Office 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 




Intrinsic Val 



ue 



Whether It Applies to Principles of Character or the Value of 
Property is the First Consideration of Every Man 



Telephone 24 1 4 



S. C. CLARK 



Developer of Emerywood 

Office Second Floor Commercial Bank Bldg. 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 






For Quality Shoe Repairing 
Call 4313 

W. C. BROWN 

SHOE SHOP 

"Work Called For and Delivered" 
128 N. Wrenn Street 



COMPLIMENTS 




OF 




Blue 


Bird Ice 


Cream 


Co. 



Compliments of 

J. W. SECHREST AND SON 



SNOW LUMBER 
COMPANY 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Compliments of 

The Fashion Hosiery 
Company 

High Point, North Carolina 

S- O. CLAPP, President 
C V. YOW, Secretary and Treasurer 



The High Point, Thomasville & Denton 
Railroad Company 

Is an outstanding example of accomplishment as the result of 
co-operation and steady hard work. Large or small, any com- 
munity thrives only when there is co-operation and a general 

spirit of service. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
THE RIGHT WAY 

Modern Plumbing and 
Heating Company 

314 Centennial Avenue 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Agents 

MASTOKER AND STOKAL 

STOKERS 



H. W. Peters Go. 

incorporated 
Boston, Massachusetts 

CLASS RINGS, PINS, EMBLEMS 
FRATERNITY JEWELRY 
FAVORS, INVITATIONS 

J. H. MILLER, District Manager 
P. O. Box 877 Durham, N. C. 



FLYNT STUDIOS 



121 NORTH MAIN ST. 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
228 WEST MARKET ST. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PHONE 2951 
PHONE 21316 



THE OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR 

1932 ZENITH 



1932 ZENITH 
Is Bound in a KINGSKRAFT Cover 




Designed and Produced By the 

KINGSPORT PRESS, Inc. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 



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SEAFORD, DELAWARE 



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