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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1935, High Point College"

E X 



L I B ft I S 



COPYRIGHT 

19 3 5 

BURT ASBURY 

EDITOR 

EMMA CARR BIVINS 
MANAGER 



T h 



e 



ANNUAL PUBLICATION 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



z 



e n i 



t h 




VOLUME 
NINE 



■"ITIfTTTTrM 



DEDICATION 



rle is a civic leader, a lawyer, a business execu- 
tive, a scholar, an educator, and a friend of High 
Point College. Because we think ot him as a 
successful personality, — a man who has made 
the most of his opportunities and whose achieve- 
ments are evidence enough that he has been true 
to the ideals that college students on all college 
campuses hold to be the highest, we respectfully 
dedicate the 1935 Zenith to 

0. ARTHUR KIRKMAN 








A & T II U R 



K I P K M A H 



P H E S E H T I N i 

Tower-top, pigeon's eye view of campus 
life ; a panorama or all that High Point 
College means to us — of limping basketball 
heroes . . . chem lab odors . . . mixed bar- 
room melodies from McCulloch . . . cars 
passing on the highway . , . "peanuts for 
sale" in the lobby . . ■ ten o clock bell at 
Woman's . . . cocky-capped freshmen . ■ . 
the gym scoreboard , , . Coach's "Hi-Po" 
blowing about in the wind . . . pipe-smoke 
and talk and sandwiches at the Store , . , 
the fountain looking aimless; Sunday after- 
noon strollers . . . bulletin board gazers . . . 
and thumb-hoisting star gazers . . . the 
eagerly awaited postman; Old Yadkin's 
victory ring . . . Roberts Hall about sun- 
down , . . the tall gates through which we 
entered and through which we shall leave. 
These — and all the other glimpses that 
may suggest rare, rich college days. 




THE COLLEGE 



THE 


CLASSES 


A T H 


L E T I C S 


ORGANIZATIONS 


F E A 


T U R E S 







CONTENTS 



IN M E M M A 



MART ELIZA BUNDY 
1911-1934 

CLASS 1934 



JOSEPH FLAVIUS McCULLOCH, D.D. 
1856-1934 

FOUNDER 



LINDLEY WILLIAM GERRINGER, D.D. 

1883-1934 
FOUNDER 



MANLEFF JARRELL WRENN 

1860-1934 
TRUSTEE 



II 




I s II 




wr 




( 







L 



L E 



* 



E 




(J.liRlN iRI l.\N!) Ml'.MI'HREVS, A.M., D.D. 
President 



G. I. Humphreys 
Mrs. M, J. Wrekn 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Executive Committee 

II. A. Mil us. Chairman 
C. C. Robbins 



G. II. Kearns 

Building and Grounds Committee 



R. T. Amos 
A. M. Raskix 



N. M. Harrison, Chairman 
W. F. Hunsucker C. F. Finch 

L, F. Ross Dr, J. T. Burrus 

Faculty Committee 

<;. I. Humphreys, Chairman 
S. W, Taylor J. N. Willis 



LOHAM PORTRR 



J. M. Mll.I.IK.\N 



IS 





Miss Louise Aiums, A.M. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B.. High Point College, 19=9: A.M., Univrsilj 

of North Carolina. 1930. HiBh Point College. 

1933— 



J. Hob art Allreo, A.M. 
Professor of Modern Languages 

A-B-. University of North Carolina. 1922: A.M.. 
ll.id.. 1929. High Point College. 1921 — 




Paul R, Bowrv, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology, 

A B. li Pauw University. 1925: M.S.. Yule Uni- 

eersiij 1929: Ph.D.. Vale University, 1931. 

High Point College. 1932— 





Miss Sidney Bramp, A.M. 

Director of Physical Education for If 'omen 

A.B., Millsans College, 1930; A.M.. Feabody Col- 
lege, 1932. High Point Collefie. 1934— 



Edmund O. Cummincs, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

U.S.. University ol North Carolina, 1919; Ph.D.. 

M&gaachuaetta institute of Teehnology, 1923. 

High Point College, 1928— 



16 




Miss Bonnie Enoch 

Instruetor in Fine Arts 

Diploma in Art, Greensboro College, 19 23. High 
Pulnt College, 19 28— 



(?) 



In 



John Ewckson, B.S. 

Instructor in PubSie Speaking anJ 

Director oj Dramatics 

B.S. In Speech, Northwestern University, 1935. 
Hitfh Point i'iill< m; 193 I 




R. H. Gunn, A.B. 

hiitruitor in Department of tin sin ess 
A.B.. El 'nii.'L'i'. 1924. High Point College, 

I'll'!! 




W. H. Ford, A.M. 
Instrtiitor in Department of Business 

A.H.. University of South Carolina, 1923: A.M., 
Ibid., 192S. High Point College, 19S1— 




Nathaniel M. Harrison, B.D. 

Promotional Secretary 

A.B., Western Maryland College. 191fi: B.D.. 

Westminster Thoolopk-al Seminary. 1919, High 

Point College, 1939— 



I? 





Clifford R. Hinshaw, A.M., Lin D. 

Professor of Education and Psychology 

A.I!., Guilford Culkge, 191S; A.M., University of 

N.jjlll I ': i ri »] : 1 1 : 1 . lii-l: A M . < Y.'hiliilii.i 1 "n ]^ ' T- 

glty 1 0^7 ■ Lilt.l*. \\V>I--I11 Marvin". .1 . 'iitl- u>\ 

111.:-. HikIi I'.iiiil i -i.II.-lj.>. 11127 — 



Miss Vera Idol, A.M. 

Professor of English 

A. It.. Greensboro < ■ - ■ ] i ■ ■ u- 1 -. 1921; B.S.. Columbia 

University, 1823; A.M.. Jiml.. 192'!. II iitli Point 

Co'lege, 1921 — 




Ml" I.ljl ISI 1 1 \MM.-, A.1J. 

Librarian 

A.B.. High Point ColIeK . 1931: A.R. 111 Llhrary 

gciem . University of North Carolina. 1932. 

Hisrh Point College, 1932 — 





Paul S. Kro^err, B.D., LL.U. 

Professor of History 

\ ]:,. Guilford College, ISO: B.D.. Westminster 

Tl lOKiiiil Seminary. 1917; 1,1, l>.. Adrian i:,\- 

lege. 1»;S. High Point College, 192*— 



Percy E. Linoi.ev, A.M., Litt.D. 
Dean of College and Professor of Religious 

Education 
At:, Elon College, 1920: A.M. Vandcrblil Uni- 
versity. 1921: Litt.D., W stern Maryland Col- 
lege 192S High Point College. 1921 — 



18 





J. Haki.f.y Mdi-kui:, M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics 

. University i>( Nm-ih Carolina, 1922; M.S., 
[bid., 192J. Hieli Point College, 1921— 



DONALD J. RULFS, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B.. University <>r North Carolina, 1932; A.M., 

Harvard University, 1933. Hlsll I'liiin I 'nlli ■(,->-■, 

1931 — 




Miss Margaret Sloan, A.B. 

Head of Piano Department and Instructor in 

Theoretical Subjects 

A. It., Converse College, 1923: Graduate Peabodj 

Conservatory in Piano. 1926: Voic< and Public 

Schuol Music. Ibid., 1927. High Polni College, 

1929— 




Howard I.. Spessard, A.M. 
Professor of Business Administration 

B.S.. Gettysburg College. 192C; A.M.. University 
,,l Mi. hiu-ali, 111.: I. Ilijjh I'.iilll • 'olleK. . IS 




Mrs. Naomi D, Spkssard 
Secretary to the President 



19 





Mrs, C. I.. Whitaker 
Dietitian 



Mrs. Alice Paige White, A.M. 

Professor of Creek and Latin 

A.B.. Boston University, 1S03: A.M.. Teachers 

College, Columbia University, 1907. High Point 

College. 1924 — 




Nathaniel P. Yarborourh, A.M. 
Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

A.n„ Wofford College. 193S; A.M.. rniverslty nf 

South Carolina, 19H8; Diploma from Institute of 

Phonetics, University at Paris. 1931). High 

Point College, 1925 — 





Mrs, Naomi M. Yarroimhicfi, B.S, 
Professor nf Home Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1929. High Point 

I'nili'B.', is::n 



Miss Mary E. Young, A.M. 

.Issocialr Professor of Education 

A.B., Salem College. 1907; A.B.. North Carolina 
College for Women. 1927: A.M., Columbia. Uni- 
versity, 192S. High V I College. 1924— 



2 




( 



L A 



S S 



E S 




Byrum, Raper, Vount, Moss 



OFFICERS 

Larry Yount; Annie L. Moss President 

John Pendleton Vice-President 

Helen Raper Secretary 

Robert Byrum Treasurer 



pi 

£>0 



SENIOR CLASS 



23 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



DOROTHEA HARRIS ANDREWS 

HIGH PO[\T, N\ C. 

Degree: A. 15. Age: 19 

t 'hiistiiin Kiut^a v.ir i'1, ;; 1 ; ArteiU'Siai] Lit.-rary 
Socien CI. 2. 31. Chorister i-i. Debater <2», 
Vice-President (S>; Zenilh staff <2>: Class 
Prnphel 111: V. W. C. A. (1, 2), Vic -Fresldenl 
(2): Choir Cl>; Class Advisory Committee (4); 
purple Players CI. 3. 31, President C2). Secre- 
tary C2>; Student Body Secretary C2). 



GASTON WADE APPLE 

REIDSVILLE, N. C. 

Degree: li.S, in Chemistry Age: 23 

choir CI. 2. 3), Secretary (3); Y. M. C. A. (1, 

2, J), Secretary (3): HI-PO staff fS), S >- 

i;irv to Board C!) : Thalear Literary Society (1. 
2, 2. 4), Marshal (1>. Treasurer (3). Viee- 
l'r..-M,nr Mi; 1 hiistian Endeavor <1, 2); Men's 
Dormitory Council <3, 1), President C3i; Ktu- 
dcnt Council HI; College Marsha] (31. 



BURT ASBURY 

IlICH POINT, W. C. 

Degree: U.S. in Commerce Age: 



2 1 



Edltor-in-Chir! Zenith; Zenith Staff (2); HI-PO 
Staff (3); Cheer Leader |3. 4>. Chi f (1); Choir 
(3. ii, PivsiiU'nt hi; (.'lass Sei ivtary <3): Fine 
1 -lull (3); Purple Players (2. 3): Akrolhinian 
Literary Society (3, 4). Press Agent (3); Or- 
i-li.-sii-i Biiml II. .'i; Chemistry dull (1.2). 

I T K 



NAT GRAHAM BETHEA 

GREENSBORO, H. C. 

Degree: A.B. Age: 29 

Football (I); Basketball (I); ThaHan Literary 

Society (1,1; Baseball (1); Tennis (1). 
Nat is <iuiet ami resigning and never allows 
anything to come between him and his pleas- 
ure, His collection of wild tales verifies the 
fact that he has probably seen more and done 
- 1 1 - - 1 - ih;.]i any of us have or ever expect to do. 



2'. 



EMMA CARR MVINS 

IHCII POINT, N. C. 

Degree: A.U. ./^e.- 2! 

I''i Hi'.-:- M.m.i J.i-i Mi ZeniLh; \| s:iirl Ln 

■ r;iiy sn.i.iy (]>, Worn n's Day Student Coun- 
.11 (3), Secretary (3); Class Vice-President (3): 
The HI-PO staff (2), Excllatig.' Editor (2>: A 
Capella Choir (4>; Little Theatre <4>: Chair- 
man Senior Class Advisory Committee; Publica- 
tions Board (4). 



('All, II. BK1NKEEY 

WELCOME, N. C 



Degree: A3. 



Age: 



2 1 



Appalachian State T.-ii.-li.-i h i -. ill.-i;..- I ;! ) ; Tha- 
lean Literary Society (3, I), Critic (it. Vice- 
President (I): Purple Kittens < :: . ; Basketball 

(I). 
With a cheery smile and ;i enntaKt'.us chuckle 
"Brink" takes chins;* ;.* they come, lie man- 
aged to eet some good grades, too, 
I T K 



ROBERT M. BYRUM 

HICK POINT, N. C. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 22 



Y. M. C. A. (2): Soccer (1, 2. 3. 1), Captain 

(I); Class Treasurer (4), 
Bob, iMe old wag. If he's not collecting class 
dm a, he is collecting for dry -cleaning. But he 
Is well liked in spite of it. The- College with- 
out Bob; Bob without his wise-cracks— two 
tilings hard to imagine. 

a a f. 



KERON K. CANADY 

men POINT, V. C. 

Degree: A.U. Age: 28 

Woman's College University North Carolina tl); 

HiKh Point Coii.-s.-e summer School; Nil than 

Literary Society tl). 
One naturally seems to think m f.l ;i..mi r 1 1 1 1 , - - 
and "Kay." She is one of those "grand' 3 peo- 
ple with gcnuinen.-sK si.nl ^isterousneas and 
friends to spare. 



SENIOR 
CLASS 




2b 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



IRENE HASSEL CHADWICK 

J AMIiSTOH'N, N. C. 

Degree: A.M. Age: 21 

Nlkanthan Literary Society (1, 2. 3, 4). 
Irene with the *iui t ways, She just seems to 
study and study people and things. She can 
always remember the little things that others 
forget but -wish they remembered. Library 
work is her forte. One can fancy Irene house- 
keeping splendidly for "Shake. Mullcary and 
iJii-.-Kh" ;MHl all the rest. 

A 9 * 



OSCAR LEE EASTER 

HIGH POINT, v. C. 

Degree: AM. Age: 25 

Jterea College (1. 2); Ministerial Association <3, 
4), President (4 1; Y. M. C. A. (3. 4). Secretary 
in. Editor Y. M C. A. Handbook [4); Choir 

(4). 
It is *.aay to imagine that Oscar wilt go far in 
Hi.' ministry. With his qulei dignity, bis 

rl"ni-l In..--- ami lii-s seriousness of purpose. 

lie rather approaches our idea of a. Christian 

U'i Mil' num. 



JOHN ALFRED ESHELMAN 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Degree: AM. Age: 21 

.Mars Hill College U); North Carolina State 
College (2): Akrothlnlan Literary Society (3. 
4). President (II; Choir (4); Orchestra <3>. 
Things good, bad. wise, foolish, literary, mu- 
sical — in fact, anything can find an appreci- 
ative audience in John. 

EH* 



JAMES HENRY HIGHT 

HEN' PERSON, N. C. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 22 



Akrothlnlan Literary Society (2, 3, 4). Assistant 
Secretary 14); Baseball (2, 3, 4); Manager Ras- 

kethall H). 
"Chunker" Mas the originator of a host of 
in tiny expressions and immortalized the old 
ones by adding a new tone to them. "We can't 
forget his "hey" and "sto's open". 
A A E 



26 



MARY EDYTHE HUGHES 

CONCORD, N. C. 

Degree: B.S, in Dietetics Age: zo 

Christian Endeavor (1, 2, 3. 4): \. W. C. A M. 
2. Si. Secretary (2); Scribierus Club (t. 2); 
Purple Players It, 2, 3, it; Modern Prlscllla 
cluli (1, 2, :t. 4>, Vice-President (31. Pn lldenl 
(4); Artemesian Literary Society (1. 2. 3, 4), 
S cretary (2j. Chaplain 14); Wrmu'n's Itrn- 

mitnry ['.iijinil ilil. Tl't-iiBUI-iT l-l- 

Z A •> 



WALTER WILBUR HUTCH INS 

HIOII POINT, ^. c. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 23 



rnivirsity ■ ■ r" Nurrfb < nn,|iri:< Mi: W'-ilo- I ■• ■ 1 . -- f 
College (21; Thalean Literary Society (3. 4 1, 
President (4), Chaplain IS, 4): Ministerial As- 
sociation (3, 41: student Council 1:: it; Vice- 
President Studrtit I4rnly I 3 t : I'l-H-sid nt Student 
Body in. High Point College Student Govern- 
eniut ui'uniii/,;itii>ti > 'uriiinii 1 1 ■■■ : D bating Team 

(4). 



JOHN HAROLD JENNINGS 

HIGH POINT, N, C. 

Degree: B.S. in Commerce Age: 20 

North Carolina State College (t, 21: Baseball 

<4i; Alcrothlnlan Literary sini.iy 111. 
Stocks, bonds, public utilities, baseball, basket- 
ball, and power all eo to make up Mr. Jen- 
nings' boy, John, He takes life alow and easy, 
can argue rather convincingly the n gatlve aide 
of ;i proven fact, and "ill bei you thai Ihe sun 

wen't shine ln>lll"n"U\ 



MARY WARD JOHNSON 

HI NGTOK, N*. C. 

Degree: B.S. in Dietetics Age: 20 

Christian Endeavor it. 2, 3, 41; Artemeaian 
Literary Society (1, 2, 3, 41, Forensic Council 
R preservative (3), Monitor (2); Art club (1, 
2. 3, 4); V. W. C. A, (1, 2. 3. 4>, President 
(3); Purple Players (1, -t; Modern Prlscllla 
Club <2. 3, 4). Secretary-Treasurer (SJ, Vice- 
President (II. 

S A 4 



SENIOR 
CLASS 




2 7 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



JASPER LEE JONES 



lht/r, 



ViASMIM.lOV, I). C, 

A.B. 



Age: 



Thalean Lin ran Soi-ii-ty (2. 3. 4), Press Re- 
port r l->, s.-crctary [':'.), I:, purler H). Crllir 
III; V. M. C. A. (3. 4), Presiilciil III. Il.-l.:it- 
iii-j. Ti II . I ! I - II > S1nlf ' I ' : ■ ''Icb ( J) . 

I'm ii|i- Players (4); Ministerial Association 
mi. Christian Endeavor (4); Purple Kittens (3. 

ii. 3occer 12. 3, I); Tumi. lint- (3, J). Tra<:k 

i : I .. 



VIRGINIA DARE MASSE Y 

PLEASANT Hil.!,, N. C. 



Degree: A,B. 



Age: 22 



Nlkanthan Literary Society II. 2, B, <), Vice- 
President (3), Becr.tary (2), Critic <4>; Chrls- 
tlan Endeavor (1, 2. 3. 4); Y. W. c. A. (1, 2, 
;;. 1), Treasurer (2>; Girls' Glee Club lli; Etude 
Music 1 ■nil. Hi: an Club (3. *), Vice-President 
(3); President Women's Dormitory Council 44); 
Modern Priscilla Club <3>. 
E A * 



CLARA ADYLENE McCOLLUM 

REIDSV1I.I.E, N. C. 



Degree: AM. 



Age: 19 



Artemcsian Literary Society (1, 2, 3, 41. Vice- 
Presldeni IS), Critic i4i; Class Treitsurer (1); 
Christian Endeavor (1, 2. 3, 4i; Dramatic Cluh 
11. 2. 3, 4>; Girls' Glee Club tl); Choir t3. 4)1 
Scrlblerus Club (1, 21; Woman's Sports Associa- 
tion 1 IK Zenith Staff (3); Pan-Hellenic Council 
III: Chief Marshal (3>: Basketball (3>; Soccer 
(3). 

ii ,|, 



CLARENCE TILCHMAN MORRIS 

SALISBURY, MD. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 20 



university Delaware (1): Inter-Collegiate De- 
bater (2); Akrothinian Lilerary Society (2, 3, 
41, Criti. i::j. Vice-President (4), President <4); 
Hl-PO Staff (3). Business Manager I3>, Edi- 
tor (1); College Marshal (3); Little Theatre 
(3, 4); Purple Play rs <3. 4); Choir (3, 4); Pipe 
Club (3>; Director Press Club (3. 4). 

i A E 



id 



ANNIE LAURIE MOSS 



men wiiM-, \. c. 



D egret: A.M. 



A lie: 20 



Fan-Hellenic Council (4i; Nlknnthan Literary 
Society (1, 2. 3, 1), President C4), Treasurer 
(3): College Marshal (3); Women's Day stu- 
'I'-rit * 'eunoll (1, 2, 3, 1). Horn tftry-Tr'-;'i.-:nr- t 
(21, Head Proctor (3); Class Treasurer <31, 
Vice-President 14). President (4); Student 
Council <0: Choir 13. 4); Aneelus Art Club ft. 
2, 3>. 

A O + 



RAYMOND NORTH CCTT 

MCFARLAN, N. C. 

Dijfee: B.S. in Chemistry ./f/,. 21 

Wlngate Junior College i '■'■ i : Chemistry Orb (1 

2); Football (1, S>; Basketball (1». 
"*Slnlcy" is quite nti artssl :ir mn ni]m]al irtw fig- 
ures, esp h ially in rh- . fi. oi:-rry l:i i«iT-:iTf»r>-, lie 

e:m ]ii>hl hi* t.^\ n in : 1 1 1 \ 1-. tin I ,, . :■ ■ - 1 ■-■ .inn- 

but prefers a more <iuiei and rriendly round of 
checkers with Professor V:n imnnKlb. 



JOHN PENDLETON 

LAWNEMLE, V, C. 

Degree: 13, S. in Chemistry ^j/rv 23 

TliEilean Literary Society (1, 2 h 3, 4), Trf?is- 
urer M); Class Vice-President i\\\ Christian 
Endeavor (1, 2 h 3. 4); <h mtetry f'luii ( -I ) ; V. 

M. C. A, UK 
Jnhii i* Eini't, siTJui]* :irni f j jh -I -n 13 * Irnis. He is 
persistent and efficient in his search for knowl- 
<-0 k;i-. ami i'H. mst nYraSil in +\jn _ i j ris his convic- 
tions. 



MX A :RNDX I'KIMM 

THQMASVILLE, N. C 

Degree: A,B. /?^f: 2t 

Tennis (1. 2, 3. 4). 
A] i* ;i well -met friend and much, mur-h more, 

S]hj|-[stii.'i n Al i^ :l 1'irikiii^ r ■■■■■■! -hs I'hiy r -uih- 
nil the rea] threats on \\\- L-amj>us. Student Al 
j.-: a worker m.r afraid ..i the studj thai -\ law 
degree will r*<iulre. Plain Al is w h l . - 1 . . ■ ^ i ■ I ; 1 1 . 1 > ■ 

fellow Willi a i-hjn.M i'i l-i i. ..li nh -y-Jiii"' ">:si 
i v rj api at«'a. 



SENIOR 
CLASS 







1 % 




4 911 ft. a 




I 




2V 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



III] f X Ml K3 Ml [ Fl K \l k l K 
HIGH POIS'T, \\ C. 



Degree: A.B. 



j4#?: 20 



Xikanthau l.iU-niy L*nivty H. '-. i", Treas- 

urer <4); Class Secretary (4); Treasurer Wo- 
men's Day Student Council I4»; College Mar- 
shal (3). 
Helen, arranging the Junior-Settlor* Helen serv- 
ing at t< as, or marshaling:, or substitute teach- 
ing, Shfc likes thjin^ things ^uirlly an<l cdi- 
t \- nil v, 
A 9 * 



JOHN ARLIE RHOADES 

HIGH POINT, S. C. 



Degree: A.B, 



^*: 34 



Mountain Park Junior College (l, 2>; Appa- 
lachian State Teachers College <3>r 
Arlie is married, has a boy, and isn't half 30 
serious as he looks. He can talk about a brew- 
ing company's stocks and bonds all day long. 
He'll argue with you wh n he knowx he's wrong 
just for r hi atiUt: of an argument. 



MARY INEZ RIDGE 



.EXINtTlClN', N, C. 



Degree: A.B, 



.1,/, : 



1 1 



Nikanthan Literary Society (1, 2. 3); Choir <1. 
1. ■:, i : i hristian Kiiil.-:ivm- (1, 2, 3), Pianist (2); 
v. w. <\ A ii. -j. :;i. I'iiiuist tii. Vi<-e-Pivsi- 
dent (3|; Modern Priscllla Club <2. 3), Critic 

(3) i Art Cluli (!')■ 
Quiet Inez with quite a domestic turn, a knack 
for teaching, and a perfect complexion. 
E A -4' 



ZOLTAN D. RONYECZ 

AMBR10GE, PA. 

Degree: AM. Age: 26 

Akrothinian Literary Soci ty (1, 2. 3); Men's 
Dormitory Council (41; Senior Representative 
to Student Council; Basketball (2, 3. 4>. Cap- 
tain (J): Football (1, 2); Track (1, 2): Clasa 
Treasurer (31; Manager Baseball (3); Block 
"H" Club (3. 1), President (3. i). 

a a k 



3 



LUCY CLYDE ROSS 

ASIIRRUKn, M. C. 

Degree: B.S, in Commerce Age: 20 

Woman'? Colleg University of North Carolina 
(1, 21; Student Council (3. I), Class Represent- 
ative <3|. .Secretary Mi; Women'* Ili.rmitory 
Council (*>, Vice-President Mi: Athletic Coun 
ell (3). Secretary (3); Woman's Sports Associa- 
tion (4>; Soeepr (Si; Artemesian Literary So- 
ciety (3, 1); Christian rami avor (3, il: Choir 
(4). 

6 f 



RAY CORDON RUSSELL 

LONDON', TENN. 

Degree: A. IS. jf^f.' 21 

Btfaryvltle College n r 2. J); Student Track 

Coach (4), 
When this pane «as ln'iiiL' ni;iii>' u]i in Hat' full. 
Ray had full intentions of receiving his diploma 
at the close of the term lloivrver. he wits ahle 
tit flntsh at the close of the firs! semester, hut 
► \| .pi- r,, iitutn for yruoluat ion in May, 



MARY LEWIS SKF.F.N 



FARMER, N. C. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age; 20 



A 1 J, 11, .^1. Hi l.il. 1 : 1 * ;-:*,.■!. -I 1 il. :, ;: I 1, Ti, ;,-■- 

urer (3), President ii»; Christian Endeavor (1, 
2, 3. 4); Women's Dormitory council (3): Pan- 
Hellenic Council <4i; s--'Trt:ir\ to I'm.ih..i maul 

Secretary 12. :i. 11 
We admire her enthusiasm for literary socie- 
ties, her toasts, her very blue eyes and that 
dash of pluck In her make-up. 
£ A -1. 



AKBF.RT MARIAN SMITH 



HICIl POINT, N. C. 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 33 



Tiiiil.riii Literary Society (1, 2. 3. 4>, Chaplain 
(3). So.iety Debater 111. President (4»; Inter- 
collegiate I' bater (I, 2. ?,. Ii. V. M, 1'. A. (2), 

I I . ■ 1 ■ ■ I i I M.ia.iu>r (2l; M in i-r.j i;il \ -*.,,, ,., I mn 

(1, 2, 3. Ii. .Hi-.rrrnry Treasurer E 2 I . President 

I'M; Marshal 'lass !'i-,-.siil,ii[ i 2 i : Student 

Council (3): Pan-Hellenic Council (3); Zenith 
Staff (4>; Choir (4). 

A A E 



SENIOR 
CLASS 




31 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



Jul' [■:. STUM 



Degree: A.B. 



Age: 



1 1 



,jhi.*'s r\i«. i]i^t nnit-r-ni-lniL.' iliara.-l fii.s[ j'S ;il.- 
Ills tlHn|i'S<> llliij Ins -1.1|Usi\ IIh^S. VihU have 

nevei heard him speak ■■! hVmaell and as .. 
r, suit *y.- Iimi none of liis honors. We do 
know, however, that ho has taken an active 

liart in 'ii atlcs and has bolstered tin- sm- 

'I-- nt s vera! plays here with his realiatlc 
1 1 lj 1 1 1 iii— .fJVets, 

a i [■; 



Degri 



FRANK SUm A. JR. 

AM BRIDGE, PA. 

■ U.S., Chcm. Eng. Age: 27 



Akrolhlnian Literary Society (1, B, 4); Chem- 
Istrj Cluh (2. 3. 4 1. Vice-President {i\. Presi- 

ilnit (4); Choir (4), 
A Pennsylvania UKranlan with a head full of 
chemistry, "Shorty" is jovial, efficient, and 
persistent, and lias an appreciation for things 
literary. 

I T K 



MARGARET VIRGINIA WALKER 

BL'RUNCTON, V. C, 



Degree: A.Ii. 



Age: 2 1 



Woman's CoM.ge University North Carolina (1, 

Ii; Artemesian Literary s...i.ry i :',, I I ■ I'rexi 
denl Women's Day Student Government (4); 

W'lMLLLlLL'S Si, I. LIS Asmm f, J l-ltl t l | . 

Where there is a merry uproar there 13 Vir- 
ginia. Her "hellelinniiy", her Infectious laugh 
mnl thai good-timose) personality are blessings 
on any sloumy old day. 

A 9 + 



JAMES WARI1CK 

I AWS'DAl.E, N. C. 
Degree: AM. Age: 



23 



Appalachian State Teachers Colleee (1. 2); Y. 

M ''. A. (3. 4): Men's I >-,, rnilnry Council (41, 

President < 4 I . 
"Bugger" Arid? his tinve so completely utlllz d 
that he has to catch his shut-eye in class. A 

cv|.i,.il Smith. nier, he lakes lid/ ni^v ami is al- 
ways just before duinjs' something. 
E II + 



12 



JOHN WARLICK 

l.AWNDAI.E, M. C. 

Degree: H.S, in Chemistry Age: 20 

The Citadel (1, :): Akrothinian Literary So- 
ciety (3, 4). 
John has his mind made up to be a country 
doctor, but ho still has airplanes, army tanks 
and guns at heart. He is an amiable sort of 
fellow who hasn't much to say until you start 
telling t:*ll B-torles. or talking about the army. 



A SIGN 

fir 
IMPROVEMENT 

The sign, which graces the front campus, was 
the gift of the A rtemeaian -Akrothinian Lit- 
erary Societies on their .sixth Society Hay last 
spring. Since the sign has no plate bearing 
the names of its donors, we wish to acknowl- 

,,li:,- li.vi' Hi,/ ^i,,,.1 u,,ik ii]' these two soriei ieS 

in beautifying and promoting the interest of 
High Point College. 



WHAT, WHERE 



AND 

WHY 

\.. hi, Mil, .111. II. ill i.l ..II. M.l ,|, I ll.l \ ;|.||,in )|| 

unconventional nose. It, is an x-ray, if you 
please, of the very heart of that noisy old Col- 
lege Crier that has been shouting things at 
these Seniors for years. And the greatest news 
it has to tell is not "soup's on" but Victory! 
Then to please us — ring on and on. Old Yadkin, 
College Bell. 



I.ARRY COLEMAN YOUNT 

RKIDSVII.LE, N. C. 

Degree: U.S. in Commerce Age: 22 

Akrothinian Literary Society (1, 2. 3. 4), Treas- 
urer (2), Vice-President C3>: Purple Players t2. 

::i : i-iuss Yi.-.-l'r, si-l, ut i Li i . President (3. 4>; 
Pan-Hellenic Council ill; Athletic Council <3); 
Editor the Hl-Pu (3), President (4>; Zenith 
Staff (21; Block "H - ' Club (3, 4); Tennis 1 LI. :;. 
II. Miiiiiih'<'i' l-'i; Soccer CI, 2. 3. 4), Captain 
C3>. 

i A E 



SENIOR 
CLASS 




53 



FINALE 

THE class that came to High Point College in 1931 was the best class that had ever 
registered at this institution. There were not, nor should there be, any apologies. 
We found out later that they flattered every class every year with the same remark. 
Whatever our deeper convictions may be, we shall modestly admit that we were only an 
average group with high aspirations for improvement and achievement. It is true that 
great things come in small packages; the package that is our class has grown smaller 
with the years and has, we realize, rather decreased than increased in value. To phrase 
it in old tried and true language, the proverbial ship (the class, of course) has lost many 
of its ablest hands. Although there are fewer sailors on board, the ship is still in smooth 
sailing. It is ready now to make port, not because the crew is too weak to man the old 
vessel but because the welcome land is in sight. (Indeed the land is welcome, yet why do 
we grieve? From salty seas to salty tears — ) 

Since figures of speech are in order (see above) and all true-to-form class histories 
must somehow manage to refer to an army at war, may we continue to confuse our 
metaphors by suggesting that the Class of 1935 has had its war on the seas? Our pirate 
foes are the same creatures that always attack college cruisers. We met our share of 
opposing forces of valences, bisections, Beowulfs, Renaissances, logarithms, and dates 
(the Dr. Kennett or the regulated "skirt barn" variety — as you liked them or as you 
didn't) . The most distressing fact that we have come to realize is that we have acquired 
a kind of affection for those apparent enemies and are loath to declare the final victory. 
Perhaps if we absorb those conventional end-of-the-season lectures that are bound to 
assure us that we are on the threshold of life's door and that we are only beginning, we 
may see that this victory is not so truly final — that we may look forward to many another 
worthy battle. 

Perhaps, after all, we have not really done spectacular things. It is more important 
that we have accomplished something memorable in our lives; that we have partaken of 
something that we leave as a heritage to the classmen who follow us. We cherish in 
memory these four years, our associations, our accomplishments (and dare we say even 
the demerits or the memory of their cause?) We wish to acknowledge with sincerest 
gratitude the inspiration and help of our class adviser, Mrs. White. We express similarly 
our appreciation of a most understanding and inspiring faculty. 

It will be with a mingled feeling of sentiment, of regret, and of joy that we receive our 
diplomas in May. As a class we shall have reached a certain height together. As in- 
dividuals we shall cherish our own memories of the years. And individually and together 
we shall anticipate the Future, equipped with all it has been our privilege to have gained. 

Adylene McCollum. 



34 




Parham, O.onicer, Crowoer, Hedcecock 



OFFICERS 

D. Kermit Cloniger President 

Lois Hedcecock Vice-President 

Edith Crowder Secretary 

Mary Parham Treasurer 






JUNIOR CLASS 



35 




JUNIOR CLASS 



* \L 'I* 




PATTIE BARTEE 

REIDSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

NELL liROWKR 

HIGH POINT. NORTH CAROLINA 



D. KERMIT CLONIGER 

L1NCOLNTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

EDITH CROWDER 

HlCll POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



BROADUS CULLER 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

ELIJAH MIAMI )\ I 

CLBSONVH.I.K, NORTH CAROLINA 



GEORGE ELDER 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

CAITIIKlXr I AR1 ()\V 

SOPHIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



16 



JUNIOR CLASS 



SIM. ON I' ERR FT, 

TOBACCOVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

LINCOLN FULK 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



Virginia grant 

GARYJBURC, NORTH CAROLINA 

AM TV 1IARTMAN 

ADVANCE, NO HTI1 CAROLINA 



J (ANITA HAYWORTH 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

LOIS HEDGECOCK 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



DORIS IIKDGKCOCK 

HICK POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

DONALD HUNTER 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




37 




JUNIOR CLASS 



GEORGE INGLE 

SI IK HOPE, NORTH CAROLINA 

FRANK JONES 

JAMESTOWN, NORTH CAROLINA 



CHRISTINE LATHAM 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

RUBY MARTIN 

MOCKSVII.I.E, NORTH CAROLINA 



JAMES MASSE V 

PLEASANT HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

DOROTHY McCOLLUM 

REIDSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



LEE MOSER 

BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

ALICE NESMT 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



33 



JUNIOR CLASS 



MARY PAR 1 1 AM 

HENDERSON, NOR 111 CAROLINA 

DOROTHY PERRY 

TIIOMASVII.I R, NORTH CAROLINA 



LEO PITTARD 

TTIKI.MA, NORTH CAROLINA 

kiuvin siiakpi- 

CRKENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



T. G. SHELTON 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

LEE SHERRILL 

8TATESVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA 



EDGAR SNIDER 

HICII POIVJ, NIIIUJI l WJMI J S 1 

CLARA TANNER 

LITTLETON, NORTH CAROLINA 




11 




JUNIOR CLASS 



LEON THOMPSON 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

LILLIAN VARNER 

MUKI.AS |[)\, VOKTII (.'AUDI l\ \ 



HAZEL WELUORN 

TIIOMASYIL1 K, M.WTH CAKOi.LNA 

LEONARD WHITE 

WEAVERVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



J M.I A WILLI ARD 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

HOYT WOOD 

DENTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Unquestionably, the Junior Class has done things this year. The three-mile post 
(tritely put, of course) has been reached and the class is already a bit proud of its 
accomplishments. Another year, sav the Juniors, and we'll — 

Well, consider what the Class of '36 has contributed to the College in the past 
eight months, and perhaps any boast will not seem too extravagant. 

Alpha — a large share in Harrison Gymnasium's invaluable new heating system. 

Beta — that mad, merry Fall Carnival when Becky Kearns was crowned College 
Queen and Kermit Cloniger was dubbed "the power behind the throne". 

Gamma — a gay spring cabaret. 

Delta — the Junior-Senior in April, Positively the banquet to end banquets. 

Giving orchids whrre orchids are due, the fragrant blooms this year go to all the 
officers — particularly to Lois Hedgecock, busy chairman of the executive committee 
and to President Cloniger — as well as to Professor Mourane, the private patron saint 
ut the junior Class. 



40 




Chowder, Veacm, Weisner, Humphreys 



OFFICERS 

Quentin Veach President 

G. I. Humphreys, Jr. Vice-President 

Mildred Crowdeh Secretary 

Gray Jackson Treasurer 

W. W. Weisner Class Reporter 

CO 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



41 




J 



r. 



— 



4; 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Mary Margaret Bates 
Dorothy Bell 
Berta Carraway 
Julia Coe 
Gertrude Clark 
Mildred Crowder 
Margaret Curry 
Margaret Dixon 
Vadalia Farlow 
Laura Fritts 



Frances Gueth 

Sara Harris 

Inza Hill 

Annie Fay Holt 

Gray Jackson 

Rebecca Kearns 

Mabel Koontz 

Bertha Kotsios 

Frances Walker Lambeth 

Gladys Liner 



Gladys Maxwell 
Josie McNeill 
Pauline Parker 
Stacy Payne 
Elizabeth Pirtle 
Anne Russell 
Mary Shepard 
Annie Rhu Stanton 
Vesta Troxler 
Ernestine Voncannon 



Iris Welch 
Agnes Louise Willcox 
Howard Apple 
Allen Austin 
William Barnhouse 
Odell Brown 
Russell Brown 
Joe Crowder 
John Davis 
Sheldon Dawson 
Ishmael Dorsett 
John English 



James Gianoulis 
Alton Hartman 
Sprigg Harwood 
Ray Hilton 
G. I. Humphreys, Jr. 
Millard Isley 
W. C Koontz 
Claude Kimrey 
Lee Moser 
Samuel Myers 
Paul Oakley 
Paul Owen 



Joseph Payne 
Perry James Peterson 
Charles Ridge, Jr. 
Wilson Rogers 
John Rudisill 
Alson Thompson 
Quentin Veach 
William W. Weisner 
Edward Woollen 
Furman Wright 
William Booth 



43 



\JTor her helpful advice and criti- 
cism, the Staff of the 1 93 5 
Zenith wishes to express its 
sratitude and appreciation 
to 
MISS VERA IDOL 



44 




PUI.I.EK, PlRTI.E, NlERVSEE, SAUNDERS, WACGER, BlVINS 



OFFICERS 

Hill Saunders President 

Margaret Pullen Vice-President 

Caroline Pirtle Secretary 

Frank Niernsee Treasurer 

Lawrence Wagger Cheer Leader 

{Catherine Bivins Cheer Leader 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



45 



w ^mmmmmmm 




u 
V 



4t 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



lawrence austin 
james barr 
clyde bass 
emery bencini 
herman bernard 
sam j. best 
howard bradner 
william brinkley 
gilbert dark 
sam coble 
lawrence combs 
david cooper 
charles drakos 
william fitzgerald 
j. e. garlington 
occo gibbs 
joe gillispie 
j. f. goree 
alson gray 
erastus grigg 
edward grimes 
william groome 
wayne harris 
blake houghtaling 
thomas hilliard 
perry e. hilton 
raymond intrieri 
d. dark Johnson 
torn jones 
thurlow kearns 
whitman kearns 
robert kennedy 



elbert w. lane 
dewitt littleton 
james mattocks 
john mcdowell 
wesley morris 
hoke myers 
frank niernsse 
alien parker 
leo palmer 
h. o. peterson 
decourcy pollock 
robert rankin 
marion rogers 
robert rogers 
john shannon 
raymond smith 
francis m. southerland 
jesse stone 
t. e. Strickland 
marx teague 
john thacker 
banks thayer 
lawrence h. wagger 
edwin g. watkins, jr. 
john w. watson 
m. h. waynick, jr. 
james a. welch 
raymond g. white 
d. p. whitley, jr. 
tasker williams 
cary 1. wright 
elizabeth bagwell 
ruth briles 
Jacqueline cameron 
mary m. crawford 
helen dameron 
vera york 
louise davis 
marjorie elkins 



jane erickson 
margaret fowler 
hildreth gabriel 
mozelle garner 
mary f. gerringer 
alta j. hamill 
jeanette harris 
pattie hendrick 
mary r. hendricks 
kathleea heptinstall 
bernardine hurley 
olga ivachiw 
katherine 1. jones 
ruby jones 
kathleen Johnson 
margaret 1. kimrey 
hazel kiser 
mary n. kiser 
florence kivett 
cerelda lackey 
mildred lambe 
bobbie lumpkin 
myrtle matthews 
mary lou moffitt 
sara m. neese 
elizabeth phillips 
Caroline pirtle 
delois pressley 
helen readdick 
ann ross 
elsie mae sink 
marie Stephens 



47 



■B! 




I & 2 YEAR COMMERCIAL STUDENTS 



[Catherine Bivins 
Ruth Brown 
Evelyn Dorseit 
Him; if i i \ Frazier 
Li Della Huun 
Emogene Kearns 

FR 1NCES KeS'I ER 

Allene Lambe 



Mildred Milks 

K VI II erine Phibbs 
Margaret Pollen 
Katrine Sykes 
Mary Bailey Tice 
Virginia Williams 
M. T. Hicks, Jr. 
Fred Julian 



Charles W. Martin 
William B. Shields 
O. R. York, Jr, 
Annie Fay Holt 
Stacy Payne 
Russell Brown 
Jons, G. English 
G. I. Humphreys, Jr. 



ch uk bass 
Lawrenck Comes 
Edward CI rimes 
William Groom e 
Blake Houghtaling 
John McDowell 
Wesley Morris 
Marios; Rogers 



Edwin G. Watkins, Jr. 
James Arthur Welch 
Gladys Liner 
Miles DAMiknv 
Marjorie Elkins 
Mozelle Garner 
Marv F. Gerringer 
|p inette Harris 



Kathleen Heptinstat.l 
Martha Oi.ga Ivachiw 
Mildred I.ambi; 
Myrtle Matthews 

( ' \R(N I M PlRl I 

Margaret Fowler 



48 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Nell Ainsley Mrs. H. L. Spessard James Brandon 

Sarah Holmes Josephine Williams Paul Bulla 

Vista Dixon Arnold Bolen Charles Tomlinson 

William Von Drehle George Williams 
Joe Weaver William Howard 

Ray Russell 
Hill Saunders 



•?*» 



^ MUSIC 

>\ 

^ Pauline Kennett Phyllis Strickland 

Sarah Scruggs Eleanor Welch 

Thom\s Dodamead 
J. H. Mourane 
James Whichard 



ART 



Louise Hamlin Mrs. Riley Martin 

Phyllis Strickland 



49 







4P 



c/?/md <SMdter 



In our hearts we hold the mem'ry 
Of a place we love the best; 
O'er it waves the purple banner. 
Emblem of its fearlessness. 



When we're on the field of battle, 
When we strive for praise to thee; 
May our teams be undefeated 
Ours the crown of victory. 



CHORUS 
We praise thy name and honor true, 
They stand for loyalty and love; 
May yours be fame that to you is due, 
For we will always fight, 
We want the right 
To uphold thy standards high; 
To give the best we have to thee, 
Memories of you we will cherish, 
H. P. C. 



SO 




ATHLETICS 




C. Virgil Vow 

('nil i I, 

The ability to work with men, the 
determination to win, regardless of 
the odds, the power to imbue his men 
with his own spirit of determination 
and fine sportsmanship — these qual- 
ities have distinguished Conch Yow 
as an outstanding athletic mentor. 



ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 

All athletics at the Col lege are under the con- 
trol or the Athletic Association. This group, 
guided by Dr. C. R. Hinshaw as president, has 
provided a well-rounded athletic program for 
the College — one that rates near the top among 
the other colleges of the North State Con- 
ference. 

The Athletic Council supervises the schedul- 
ing of all games, the determining of the eligi- 
bility of players, and the enforcement of all 
conference rules. The Council also awards all 
athletic monograms. 

The Association has so directed athletics at 
the College that the fundamental aims and pur- 
poses back of all its programs have been and 
will continue to be realized — namely, that all 
participants may be trained in initiative, self- 
con ttol, cooperation, and fine sportsmanship, 
and that a fine, wholesome college spirit may 
prevail. 




VULM', Spess.ird, Hi\siiaw, Varborougi 



53 



BASKETBALL 



Taking second honors in the North State Conference and winning two victories over 
Big Five teams, the Purple Panther basketeers finished another successful season under 
the tutelage of Coach C. Virgil Yow. 

The Elon Christians proved to be the main obstacle in the Panthers' march toward 
the conference title. After winning the first five conference tilts, the Yowmen fell before 
the Christians twice in one week to give the championship to Coach Walker's boys. The 
old jinx held good again in the contests with Guilford as the Quakers came out on top 
in both the loop tilts. Elon and Guilford were the only teams able to beat the High Point 
club this year. 

The Panthers won 18 out of 22 g:imes played. Thirteen 

^^Mt were conference tilts while the others were with "Y" clubs 

r t, and industrial teams. The Panthets won nine loop games and 

dropped four to Elon and Guilford. A total of fourteen 

different teams were played, two of which belonged to the 

Big Five. The outcome of the two contests with Davidson 

; and Wake Forest, in which the Panthers were victorious, was 

\ a surprise to basketball fans throughout the State. 

Men who saw action in the 1935 line-up are shown in the 

*k|TiJf> group to the left. (top) Captain Ronyecz; (middle row) 

Y»|XI»— Culler, Niernsee, and 

Harris; (bottom row) 
Intrieri, Martin, Dia- 
mont and Elder. 





I 



wA LhtwM ( Umtwm 




•r 




. 




H«n ty* |*"i"o\ ■i, ! „, 



54 








Fren/ row: IIakkis, Cui.i.er, Captain Ronyelv., Oakley, Diamoni, [mkiiki. I'.uiik, Nii:r\ski:, 
Back rets: Manager Higiit, Rkimki.ky, Rcjcurs, IIl mi'iiki.vs, Ktinviv, Mariiv, C.tiath Vow. 



The Panthers conquered E. C, T. C. and A, C. C. in the first inter-collegiate matches 
on the opponents' courts. The following week a trip to the western part of the State 
netted three more victories to give them first place in the conference standings 

The Panthers won their first home game from W, C. T. C. and rhen lost to Elon on 
the Elon court for the first defeat of the season. Returning to the home court for two 
weeks, the scrappy basketeers won seven games and lost 
two, defeating the strong Wake Forest and Davidson teams 
and losing to Elon and Guilford. 



1935 RESULTS 



High 
High 

Hi K h 
fliu'll 

High 
High 
High 

Hifih 
High 

HiKh 
High 

HiKh 
II irfi 
Hi K h 
Hi K h 
High 



Point 43; 

Point . . . . . 4+ : 

Point 43 ; 

Point 41 ; 

Point 36; 

Point . . . .37; 

Point 21 ; 

Point 4; ; 

Point 25; 

Point 31 ; 

Point 52; A 

Point 19 ; 

Point 51 ; 

Point 3 J ; 

Point 51 ; 

Point 43 ; 

Point . , . 32 ; 



E. C. T. C 12 

A. C. C 27 

Appalachian 27 

Lenoir-Rhyne 29 

Catawba 28 

W. C. T. C 33 

Elon 43 

Appalachian 27 

Elon 33 

Catawba . 30 

C. C 29 

Wake Forest 13 

Davidson . ....... 43 

Guilford 32 

Lenoir-Rhyne 40 

E. C. T. C 23 

Guilford 47 

J amis IIiCHT, Manager 



1 1 
w -Mm 

\ '-ML 

■ ' :%* 




a 1 * 


W- * * " 1 



55 







PURPLE KITTENS 

Tile Purple Kittens squad, composed of players who were not quite good enough to 
get on the varsity, enjoyed a very successful season this year. Coach Yow spent quite ,i 
bit of time with the Kittens, coiching and drilling them in the fundamentals of the game. 
All of the Kittens were first year men, hence, they had had no previous experience in 
college ball. Coach has hopes of adding to the strength of the Panther squad next year 
!rom tins year's, Kitten material. 

Grigg, scrappy freshman from near Shelby, has plenty of the old fighting spirit — 
always going after the ball with the zest that bespeaks a determination to win. He 
should develop into a valuable man. 

Shannon, flashy little forward from "down east", is another freshman who should see 
plenty of varsity action in the ncxi three years. Shannon shows unusual speed and 
accuracy in passing and shooting. 

Morris comes to us from Denton. Calmness, speed, and dependability characterize 
him. We expect him to develop into one of our most dangerous Panthers before be 
reaches for his sheepskin in '38. 

Rogers, tall, lanky center from Henderson, proved himself to be a mainstay in the 
Kitten lineup, and we are depending on him to develop into a first-rate pivot man. 

Other prospects on the Kitten squad were Kearns, Brinkley, Watkins, Barr, Jones, 
and Watson. 

The men in the above group are: (front row) Alton Hartman, Manager; Watkins, 
Morris, Grigg, Barr, and Gibbs, Assistant Manager; (back tow) Shannon, Jones, 
Brinkley, and Watson. 



S6 




SOCCER 

The Purple Panther shin-busters held their own again this year to boost their non- 
defeat record to five consecutive years. Out of nine games played this season the 
Panthers won eight and tied one with Duke. 

Considerable interest has been displayed in soccer here at the College especially since 
football was abandoned several years ago. So great has been this interest that steps have 
been taken to introduce soccer as a major sport in the North State Conference. It is now 
considered a major sport at High Point and has become the chief item of the fall 
athletic program. 

The prolonged success of the soccer team is due largely to Broadus Culler, student 
coach. His efficient coaching and outstanding offensive play have been prime factors in 
making the team recognized as one of the best in the State. 

Captain Byrum and Manager Davis are also worthy of a considerable amount of 
praise. Byrum will be missed in the line-up next year, but Davis is expected to form an 
important cog in the 1935 machine cy. Two other men who were seen in action for the 
last time this year are Yount and Jones. 



High Point 3; 

1 n^h l'"im - ■ s; 

High Point 3 ; 

High Point 2; 

High Point 3; 

High Point 6; High Point Y. M. C. A. . 

High Point 6; Catawba 



High Point 4; 

High Point 3 ; 



1934 Results 

High Point V. M. C. A 

Poke 

High Point Y.M.C. A . 1 

Duke 2 

Kernersvilk Y. M. C. A. 1 

3 

3 



Catawba 

Alumni , 



57 



I 



I BVninMMrl]M>. 




C\F'I US' Sherrill 

Shi-i r ii:'> 1 !!■■■! • -iilj h :-.3i..u l.-.i^n 

ot bH^^lial) and his ability to 
rui ihat knowledge inn. prac- 
iii^ has merited him i he cap- 
iHitHY or his team And th" 

sr ji1 i.-- wnii- r <■' ns: 11 ii inn whi'-h 

hi- has '-■< rived both In ama - 
1- in and colli giate circles, 




BASEBALL 

High Point's baseball representatives of 1934 whip- 
ped through to second place in the North State Confer- 
ence, with Elon slipping into first. The Panther team 
took thirteen games and lost seven for the best season 
since inter-collegiate baseball competition was started in 
1933. 

The first three games of the season were dropped to 
Elon, Catawba, and Western Carolina Teachers, but 
were followed up by a winning streak of eight con- 
secutives. The Lenoir-Rhyne Bears put a stop to this 
victory march by handing the Panthers a severe defeat 
on May 1. However, the next day the Purple base- 
runners came back to take a double-header from 
Atlantic Christian and tie with Elon for first place. 
In a. return game, Elon eked out a close victory over 
the Panthers to take the lead in the titular race. High 
Point took the next two games from the Catawba 
Indians and the Lenoir-Rhyne Bears, but bowed to 
Catawba in the last two games of the season, to finish 
in second place. 

Sherrill was star hurler, having won eleven out of 
his fourteen games, Rudisill, the team's only left- 
hander, saw very little action on account of an injured 
arm, but will catch plenty of mound duty this spring, 
since Captain Sherrill will be shifted to the outfield 
for rests now and then. Diamont, Culler, Hight, 
Dorsett, and Ingle will be seen in action again this 
year. 



se 



At High Point College tennis has become one of 
the outstanding sports among the students, both in in- 
terest and activity. Last fall the men's tournament 
created much interest and simultaneously revealed 
some choice ability in the freshmen. Frank Niernsee, 
a first-year man, battered his way to the top round 
in the singles and with the aid of Larry Yount, vet- 
eran netman, succeeded in capturing the doubles 
crown by defeating the Primm-Cloniger duo. Wilson 
Rogers and Humphreys, sophomores, Cary Wright 
and Gray, freshmen, turned in stellar performances, 
but could not withstand the steady fire of Niernsee 
in the singles tournament, nor the overwhelming op- 
position of Yount and Niernsee in the doubles race. 
Last year the Panther netmen took Elon and Western 
Carolina Teachers into camp, but bowed twice to 
Lenoir-Rhyne and once to Appalachian. The defeat 
of Elon marked the first win of the season and the 
first victory in inter-collegiate competition at High 
Point College. 

With improved courts and a variety of material, 
Coach Yarborough hopes to build a team that will 
make a definite bid for conference leadership this 
Spring. 




Frank Niernsee 

Frank' - smash log serve and 
remarkable defensive play won 
him the cov ted bei i h ol men's 
singles rhampion of High Point 
Collegi Though just a fresh- 
man, he has already proven his 
worth to the Panther team in 
Inter-collegiate compel 1 1 Ion. 



TENNIS 




59 




I 



TROXLER, HlL.L, Wll .1 ,.\Rh, OlXDN, PARKER 

Hayyvorth, Grant, Perry, Holt 



WOMAN'S SPORTS COUNCIL 

T lie newly organized Woman s Sports Association of High Point Collect- is repre- 
sented by a governing board composed of the officers of the Association antl all the vari- 
ous sports managers. 

General affairs of the girls' athletics club are carried on by this selected group 
known as the Sports Council. The Council looks after such routine duties as the nom- 
ination of officers, the selection of Pledge Week, and the awarding of honors. When 
there is apparently enough interest shown in a new sport, it is the duty of the govern- 
ing board to organize that sport on the campus. 

At the end of each semester the Sports Council must thumb the files in Dr. Ken- 
nett's office to find the scholastic records of individual Association members, and to 
make sure that no candidate for a class team falls below a "C" average. Finally, it 
is the purpose of the Conned to see that the fundamental aims of the entire Associa- 
tion are carried out, and to recommend to the society worthwhile activities. 

Officers who served on the Woman's Sports Council during the past year: 

Dorothy Perry President 

Virginia Grant {^ire-President 

Margaret Dixon Eligibility Chairman 

Juanita Hayworth , . Treasurer 

Inza Hill , Editor 

Fay Holt Secretary 

Pauline Parker I J Hint/ Manager 

Vesta Troxler Sergeanl-al-.irms 

Julia Wii.larb Class Manager 

DOROTHY BELL Publicity Chairman 



60 




WOMAN'S SPORTS ASSOCIATION 



Women's sports are something more this year than attractive lavender costumes and 
lively exhibitions of "ye oldc folke dances." Since the formation of a local chapter of 
the Woman's Sport Association, there has been a renewed interest in co-ed athletics. 
1 he new organization, national in scope, opens its membership to all girls and faculty 
members who care to participate in sports. Its general purpose is to develop a program 
of athletics that will provide both wholesome recreation and practical training. 
Specifically, the Association sponsors all infra-mural contests and supervises all competi- 
tions in women's sports. 

Soon after its foundation here, the new organization promoted a volley ball tourna- 
ment that brought more than half of the co-eds out for the competing class teams. 
With tlie close of the fall season, basketball became the popular sport and the various 
teams were rivals for the College championship, decided bv a series of contests in 
February. On the sports calendar for Spring were baseball and tennis tournaments. 
The new program has also featured throughout the year, tumbling, tap-dancing, and 
hikes (both the plain and the breakfast variety). 

To recognize individual achievement in athletics, the Woman's Sports Association 
awards points for participation in its various activities. lo win an ill 1 letter, five 
hundred points is the requirement; a girl may win the coveted HP sweater by earning 
two thousand points. 

To the class whose teams have the highest percentage rating. Miss Sidney Brame 
awards a loving cup at the end of the year. 

It is the further project of the Association to work hand in hand with the Admin- 
istration in an effort to establish a department in the College that may in the near 
future award to candidates the B.S. degree in physical education. 




- j-4 .. j |h '^m 




VOLLEY BALL 

High Point co-eds do not have any opportunity to participate in inter-collegiate 
flames. But they are quite willing to leave all athletic exhibitions up to the brawny 
Panthers if they may enjoy the lively mtra-mural games that have been initiated this 
year. 

Fall sports for the College girls begin in earnest when volley ball begins. Almost 
any afternoon during the crisp autumn days a number of lavender-clad players may 
be seen scurrying about on the breezy court back of Woman's Hall. All this enthusiasm 
nivalis heavy practice in prep.-. ration tor the hotly-contested November tournament. 

Class competition during the past season was particularly keen. With a wealth of 
hopeful candidates seeking team positions, it was very easy to select four efficient groups 
of volley ball players of true point-making ability. 

Naturally after months of ardent training a great deal of interest was shown in the 
championship play in November. Though having encountered some lively competition, 
the Sophomores emerged victorious. Final scores were ; 

Freshmen 43 ; Juniors 27 

Sophomores 34; Juniors 27 

Sophomores 25; Freshmen .13 

The following are the members of the 1934 championship team as they appear in 
the above group: (back row) Vesta Troxler, Becky Kearns, Fay Holt, In/.a Hill, and 
Josie McNeill; (front row) Jo Williams, Margaret Dixon, Pauline Parker, and 
Mabel Koontz. 



62 









BASKETBALL 

The same ardent gum-chewing fans who perch high on the boards and supply the 
soprano shrieks at the ball games, are themselves quite adept in the art of basket-making. 
When the Davidson -de pie ting Panthers are not about rheir haunts, Miss Brame's students 
invade Harrison Gymnasium and cavort about the basketball courts to their heart's con- 
tent. This is not to say that the co-eds do not take their basketball seriously. For doubt- 
less if they too could engage in inter-collegiate games the Lavender Kittens would make 
a strong bid for any championship. According to the co-ed coach, games during the past 
season revealed that there are many players of exceptional talent. 

With the advent of spring and the interest in baseball stirring, the girls locked up 
their basketballs and deserted the courts — but not until they had finished the annual 
inter-class tournament that brought championship honors to the Freshman team after 
their defeat of the Juniors and Seniors. 

In the accompanying picture may be seen a representative group of Miss Brame's 
ablest basketeers. They have been selected from the three lower classes. 

The players are: {front row) Dorothy Perry, Lillian Varner, Vesta Troxler, Marjorie 
Hlkins, Margaret Dixon, and Pauline Parker; (back row) Rebecca Kearns, Josephine 
Williams, Vera York, Katherine Bivins, Pattie Hendrick, Helen Dameron, and Fay Holt. 



63 



* ^^*» J^KJSJI^' I 1 1 urn i i . 1E^* w ■»■ i"Ji" ir " " **lt. !***•" — — """— ™_ ' 

"i "s5»2r F £— ~— ~— ■ r- 1 — )— > ' ~-~' 









TUMBLING 

At different points in the above |>yi;!mul m.:n he found the- members of tile tumbling team, :i 
iii-ivli organised group this year, which has shown much skill in executing various teats. The 
tumblers are Dot Perry, Lillian Varner, Dot Bell, Elizabeth Bagwell, Inza Hill, Jacqueline 
Cameron, Pauline Parker, Louise Davis, jeauette Harris, Fay Holt, Virginia Grant, Martha 

Ivachiw, and Josie McNeill, 




BASEBALL 

Baseball is the outstanding spring sport of the co-eds. As in other important sports, an annual 
tournament is held to determine the class champions. Pictured in the above group from left to 
right are: Josic McNeill, Vesta Troxler, Kathleen Heptinstall, Cerelda Lackey, Bernardine Hurley, 
Hot Perry, Virginia Grant, Inza Hilt, Fay Holt, Pauline Parker, Dot Bell, Jo Williams, and 

Rebeeca Kearns* 



64 








ORGANIZATIONS 




W. Wilbur Hutchiss 
President 



D. 



Kf.rmit Cloniger 
Vice-President 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government at High Point College is only an infant; it is just learning to walk, but 
its possibilities are many and varied. The student government movement came as tile result of a 
sincere desire on the part of the student body to have a voice in its own discipline. There was 
a need for a centralizing, unifying force on the campus, and a student government, vested ill a 
student council elected by the students, was the only logical answer. 

Since its inauguration in 1953 it has gone far towards fulfilling its purpose. It has promoted 
proper conduct and worthwhile attitudes among the students; hut it has not forced these attitudes 
and this conduct. Instead it has held them up as ideals. It has founded an Honor System and 
ha> had tin- sati^-facii I H'cing thai >>steii) mirk reasonably well. Finally, It has been instru- 
mental in leading the students towards an enthusiastic, loyal school spirit, 

\V. Wilbur Hutchins 




M. Crowoek, Sharpe, Lambe, E. Crowder, Apple 
Cloniger, Hutchins, Ross, Moss 



6 7 




"AM NEK, Hll.L, ROSS, MASSfiV, GRANT, LACKEY 



WOMAN'S HALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Virginia Massey ..... President Virginia Grant . . 
Lucy Clyde Ross Vice-President Inza Hill 



. Secretory 

Treasurer 




Girbs, Apple, Ronyecz, Warlick, Diamont, Shf.rrill, Owen, Veach 



McCULLOCH HALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

James Warlick President Elijah Diamont . . . 

G. W. Apple Secretory-Treasurer 



1'itf-Presidcrtt 



',;-: 







Morris, Yount, Clowicer, Asbl'rv 

\ \l:l:nk(il i.j I. ]'.]'. I Vs. Ki ll ■- 



PUBLICATIONS BOARD 



The Publications Board is the governing body for the publications on the High Point 
College campus. Its duties are very few, other than endeavoring to enforce its iron-clad 
regulations, to promote harmony between the Zenith and THE HI-PO, and to supervise 
the signing of contracts and appointments to the two boards. 

Last year the board went on a "legislative spree" and passed a group of regulations 
for the purpose of strengthening and adding to the prestige of the two publications of the 
College by creating a closer feeling, cooperation, and fellowship between the two staffs; 
by fostering the student's loyalty to his respective board; and by dividing the responsibility 
and honors more evenly among the Students. Some of the regulations stated that no 
student at the College shall be a member of both the Zenith and THE Hl-PO Staffs; 
that in case a member of one or the other of the two staffs receives an offer for a 
position on the other board, he shall at once declare his ineligibility and withdraw; that 
no member of either board who resigns from that board or is dropped from membership 
shall during his full time at the College become a member of the other board; and that 
all photographs and cuts of each board shall be available to the other without cost or 
delay. Fortunately, these regulations stipulate that they may be set aside in case of an 
emergency. 

The membership of the board consists of the Editors and Managers of the two 
publications, the Adviser to the Zenith, the President of the Senior Class, and a chair- 
man appointed by President Humphreys. 



69 




Burt Asblirv 



THE ZENITH 



STAFF 



Fil.'KJ 


AsBURY 
Editor 




I'!mma 


Carr Bivins 
Manager 




Edgar 


Snider 
Advertising 


.ILni.iy;,:; 



Edwin Sharpe Paul Owen 

Associate Editor Associate Editor 

Dorothy Perry 

Associate Manager 

Aubert Smith 

A <sociate Manager 

N. P. Yarborough 
Adriser 




Skioer, Shakpe, Smith 
Bivins, Asbury, Perry 



70 



THE ZENITH 

Only those who are experienced in the Annual field 
can truly appreciate the difficulties and disappoint- 
ments that a staff experiences in the evolution of a 
yearbook from a chaotic conglomeration of ideas into 
a concrete finished work that is regarded by the 
average man as a pretty picture book. Rest assured 
that we have given our best, and in so doing have 
experienced our share of difficulties and heart-rending 
disappointments. 

This year we have enlarged the book slightly and 
abandoned the standard cover in order to give you 
something different. The loose theme is merely a 
medium rhrough which we have endeavored to portray 
campus life to you more fully. 

Allow us to express our sincerest appreciation to 
W. A. Daniel, M. F. Dunbar, Tom Daniel, and 
Herbert Hitch for their personal interest and counsel. 
To you, students, we offer thanks for your unfailing 
cooperation, and hope that the 1935 TLenith pleases 
you. Burt Asbury. 




Emma Cakk Biviss 

MtlHllili I 




THE ZENITH IN THE MAKING 




C. T. Morris 
Editor 



THE HI-PO STAFF 



C. T. Morris Editor 

D. K, Clonicer Business Manager 

W. W. Weisner Managing Edttcr 

M. A. Hartman Sports Editor 

C. E. Ridge Circulation Manager 

Editorial Board 

L. C. Yount, President J. L. Jones 

Dorothy Bell M. M. Bates 

Julia Coe Mabel Koontz 

Mildred Crowder Josephine Williams 

Inza Hill Lee Sherrill 



Business Staff 
S. W. Myers J. H. Davis 



W. C Barnhouse 



Thurlow K earns 



J. S. B> 




Editorial Board 

Kufivr/, Williams, Jones, Coe, Yount 
Hill, Morris, Weisner, Bell 



17 



THE HI-PO STAFF 

Striving always to present imp.irtiallv th.it which 
the student body desires, THE HI-PO feels that this 
year it has come the closest to that peak of news 
d is :e mi nation desired by every college paper chat it 
has done since it was first established in 1926. 

The aim of THE Hl-PO has been two-fold: first, 
to present impartially all news of student interest; 
second, to drive, editorially, for a better High Point 
College. 

We believe that throughout the entire year THE 
Hl-PO has told the student body what it wanted to 
know as soon as possible. News coverage has been 
complete because and only because of the whole- 
hearted cooperation of an enthusiastic, active board. 

The editorial policy of the paper has without ex- 
ception been constructive. Much improvement has 
been made; we believe that it was motivated by THE 
Hl-PO. We rest our case. 

C. T. Morris. 




D. Kermit Cloniger 
Business Altiiiayt'r 




Business Staff 

Barr, Myers, Davis, Bakshouse 
Austin, Clonicer, Riuce 



73 




Miss Margaret Sloan 
Director 



Through her kindness, patience, 
and perseverance, Miss Sloan has 
endeared herself to the members of 
her choir and taught them an ap- 
preciation of the art and beauty in 
group singing. 



A CAPELLA CHOIR 



The A Cape! la Choir was organized six years 
ago and since that time has achieved recog- 
nition as being one of the few A Capella 
Choirs of musical prominence in America. Its 
membership is limited to thirty-five voices, due 
to the fact that its extensive travels will not 
permit a larger number. A limited number of 
new singers is admitted each year in order to 
fill the vacancies of those who have graduated 
and to replace those whose ability does not 
measure up to the standard of the group. 
Examinations are given just as in academic 
courses and those passing are given three credit 
hours for the year's work. An annual northern 
tour is made of the prominent cities of the 
North with part of the trip being made on 
water. An annual tour of the Southern states 
and Cuba is also made along with week-end 
trips to different sections of North Carolina 
and adjacent states. 








#~ff#£ a 5T3 



mL4 




74 



A CAPELLA CHOIR 

It might be well to recall some of the hippen- 
mgs on the northern tour last year lest we forget 
such an incident as singing in the Hall of Fame 
at the Nation's capitol. You probably remember 
being an hour late for the concert in Wilmington, 
Delaware, tired and hungry, yet comfotted by the 
fact that not a soul had become tired of waiting 
and gone home. Remember how FVhbel Dix sucked 
lemons for two days before we crossed the 
Chesapeake in order to ward off seasickness, and, 
on the same voyage, Furmin Wright was con- 
vinced that he saw a whale? 

In time, we may forget some of these incidents, 
but there is one thing that will always remain 
foremost in our memory — that is the work of 
N. M. Harrison, Promotional Secretary, Were 
it not for him, the Choir might have never re- 
ceived the nation-wide acclaim that it now enjoys 
and its members might not have been privileged to 
travel extensively. We realize our indebtedness to 
him and express our sincere appreciation. 

Burt Asburv. 




Burt Asburv 
President 



Officers 

Burt Asburv President 

Ernestine VonCaunon, y ice-President 
Margaret Curry , . Librarian 

Sheldon Dawson . Prop rty Manager 




75 




AKROTHINIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



First Semester 
John Eshelmam , 
C. T. Morris , . , 
W. W. Weisner . 
II. O. Peterson . . 
Larky Youm . 
William Barnhouse 
Fred Julian . . 



Officers 

. President . 
Vice-President 
. Secretary . 
. Treasurer . 
. . Criti, , . 
. Chaplain . 
, Marshal . 



Second Semester 

, . C. T. Morris 
, Lee Sherrill 
. , Paul Ow en 
. H. O. Peterson 
Kkrmit Clonicer 
. Larry Yount 
. . Bill Howard 



C. T. Morris 
Lee Sherrill 
Elijah Diamont 
Larry Yount 
George Incle 
Paul Oakley 
H. O. Peterson 
Jon n Warlick 
Wilson Rogers 
Kermit Cloniger 
Burt Asrury 
Jons Rumsiix 



Roll 

W. W. Weisner 
D. Clark Johnson 
john' eshelman 
James Hicht 
Paul Owen 
Fred Julian 
Frank Sudia 
Sheldon Dawson 
William BarniioujE 
Thurlovv Kearns 
Donald Hunter 
Leo Palmer 
Rih;pki Rankin 
Herman Bernard 
Billy Shields 



David Cooper 
Alson Gray 
Bill Howard 
Herbert Houciitaling 
Hill Saunders 
Marion Rogers 
John Jennings 
James Barr 
Wayne Harris 
D. P. Whitley 
James Mattocks 
Lawrence Waccer 



7 6 



ARTEMESIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



m.yky lewis skekn . 
Dorothea Andrews . 
rebecca k.earns . 
Pattie Bartee . . . 
Adylene McCollum 



Officers 

President Edythe 1 Itches Chaplain 

. . . Vice-President Josephine Williams . ...... Pianist 

. . . Secretary Mildred Crowder Reporter 

. . . . Trea uter Dot Perry , Chorister 

Crilii Mary Shepard Mouilar 

Gladys Maxwell, Foremit Council Representative 



Dorothea AndREW3 
Paiiik Haktke 

K A I III HIM HlUVi 

Ruth Briles 
Ruth Brows' 
Bert a Carraway 
Julia Coe 
Edith Crowd er 
Mildred Crowder 
Margaret Curry 
Helen Daiueron" 
Margaret Dixon 
Marjorie Elkins 
Margaret Fowler 
Hi- mii mi \ I u \/n K 

Hii.iiKETii Gabriel 



Roll 

Frances Guetu 
Sara Harris 
Pattie Hendrick 

F. I ) VI 1 1 F- I [ I i : 1 1 i • 

Martha Ivachiu 
Gray Jackson 
Mary YV. Johnson' 
Loi ist Jones 
Rebecca Keakns 
Emocene K earns 
Hazel Kiser 
Mary N. Kiser 
Margaret Kim key 

Al.F.ENK I.AMBR 

Myrtle Matthews 
Gladys Maxwell 
Adyi I M-: McCollum 
Mildred Milks 



MARY Lou Moffitt 
Mary Pariiam 
Dot Perry 
Catherine Pi units 
Caroline Pirtle 
Elizabeth Pirtle 
Ann Ross 
Lucy Clyde Ross 
Mary Shepard 
Mary I„ Skeen 
Marie Stephens 
Mary Tick 
Lillian Varner 
Virginia Walker 
Ernestine VonCannon 
Vera Yiirk 




7 7 




THALEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Officers 



First Setnesit t 
Aubert Smith . 
G. W. Apple . . 
Si I UN Ferree . 
Allen Austin . 

JOHN 1'kMll kton 
Wilbur Hi um\s 
Paul Brinkley . 

| \Sf I.K 1 1 1 \ I .S . 

Edwin Sharpe . 
Ai i on Hartman 
Howard Apple . 

ClIARI.LS RlDCk . 

Claude Kimrev . 



. . President , . 

. Vice-President . 

. Secretary . 

. Assistant Secretary 

. Treasurer . 

. Chaplain . 

. . Cntir . . 

, Society Repiirhr . 

. Press Reporter . 

.Issl, Press Reporter 

. Marshal . 

. Assistant Marshal 

I hi ,-nst, ( 'mini il A'. /■ 



Second Semester 
Wilbur Hutch ins 
, Paul Brinklei 
, Allen Austin 
, Perky Peterson 
John Pendleton 
. Aubert Smith 
. . Jasper Jones 
. Howard Apple 
. Ciiaki.es Ridge 
Alios* Hartman 
. Samuel Mvers 
, Edwin Sharpe 
, Hove Wood 



Roll 



G. W. Apple 
Howard Apple 
Allen Austin 
Lawrence Ai sun 
Pall Brinkley 
John Davis 

I SI I MAIL Dr.KilTI 

George Elder 

Si i n\ l'l «i:i 

I, E. G ARLINGTON 

Occo GlBRS 

111! I ( iKllllMI 



Altos Hartman 
Ray Hilton 
Wilbur Hutchiss 
Millard Isley 

Jasper Jones 
Elbert Lane 
James Maseev 
John McDowell 

Sam r ki M v eks 
Lee Moser 

JolIS PL S 1)1. LION 

Perry Peterson 

Furmas' Wright 



Claude Kimrev ' 

Charles Ridge 

Rob ere Rogers 

Edwin Sharpe 

T. G. S melton 

Aubert Smith 

T. E. Strickland 

Jesse Stone 

A lson Thompson 

QUENTIN VEACH 

Menter H. Way nick, Jr. 
Taske:r Williams 

1 1..-, i \\'(ini) 



78 



NIKANTHAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Annie Laurie Moss 
Virginia Grant . . 
Inza HlLL . . . 
Helen Raper . . 



Officers 

. . President Acnes Louise Wili.cox Pianist 

Pice-President Vesta Troxler Chorister 

. . Secretary Lois Hrdcecock . Cha/itam 

. . Treasurer Gladys Liner Monitor 



Elizabeth Bagwell 
Mary M. Bates 
Dorothy Bei.i. 
Jacqueline Cameron 
Kerom Canady 
Irene Chadwick 
Gertrude Clark 
Catherine Farlow 
Vadaua Farlow 
Laura Fritts 

Mil/llll (,\KMK 

Virginia Grant 

Alta Jean Hamii.i. 



Roll 

Jeanette Harris 
Jaunita Hayworth 

Doris Hedcecock 
Lois Hedgecock 
Kathleen Hepmnstai.i. 
Inza Hill 
Annie Fay Holt 
Bernardine Hurley 
Florence Olca Kivett 
Cerei.da Lackey 
Gladys Liner 
Ruby Martin 
Virginia Massey 
Agnes L. Willcwx 
Virginia Williams 



Jose McNeill 
Annie L, Moss 
Sara M. Neese 
Pauline Parker 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Lois Pressi.ey 
Helen Raper 
Helen Readdick 
Inez Ridge 
Clara Tanner 
Vesta Troxler 
Hazel Welborn 
Iris Welch 



Honorary Mem hers 



Mrs. Alice P. White 
Mrs, P. E, Lindlev 

Mrs, P. S. Kennett 
Miss Mary E. Young 



Mrs, H. L. Spessard 
Miss Louise Adams 
Mrs, N. P. Yarborou^ii 

MlSS I. in 151 \\ NMsr;s 




T> 




CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR SOCIETY 



Sulon Ferrer . . . 
Virginia Grant . , . 

] nza Hili 

Jacqueline Cameron 



Officers 

. . . . President Sheldon Dawson Treasurer 

V Ice-President Gladys Liner Issisfani Treasurer 

Recording Secretary Willi am Barnhouse Monitor 

Corresponding Set. Furman WRIGHT Chorister 

Vesta Troxlbr Pianist 



lliiKiilin \ AmiRKHS 

G. W. Apple 
Mary M. Bates 
Elizabeth Bagwell 
Pattie Bartee 
William Barnhouse 
Jacqueline Cameron 
Kermit Clonic er 
John Davis 
Sheldon Dawson 
Sulon Ferrer 
j, e. g arlington 
Mozelle Garner 
Mary F. (Jerri ncer 
Occo Gibbs 
Virginia Grant 
Alt a J. Hamill 
An ey Hartman 
Sprigg Harwooo 
Jean ette Harris 
Pattie Hendrick 
Kathleen Hepttnsi all 
Inza Hill 

I U Hill I 



Roll 
h, b, houchtalinc 

Fin I UK Hughes 
Bernardine Hurley 
Millard Isley 
M ART II A IvACHlW 
Mary W. Johnson- 
Jasper L. Jones 
Rebecca Kearss 
Florence Kivett 
Cerelda Lackey 
Gladys Liner 
Ruby Martin 
James M asset 
Virginia M asset 
Myrtle Matthews 
Gladys Ma'kwell 

Alll I.KNE McClHJIM 

Josie McNeill 
Wesley Morris 
Lee Moser 
Sam i ki Mi i:hs 
Sara M. Neese 
Paul Owen 
Mary I'akii \m 
Furman Wright 
Miss Mary E. Younc 



Pauline Parker 
John Pendleton 
Dorothy Perky 
H. O. Peterson 
I'imi Pi [ i rsiis 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Caroline Pirtle 
Elizabeth Pirtle 
Charles Ridge 
Inez Ridge 
Robert Rogers 
Lucy Clyde Ross 
Edwin Sharpe 
Mary Shrpard 
Mary Lewis Skeen 
Marie Stephens 
Thomas Strickland 
Ci ARA Tanner 
Alson Thompson 
Vesta Troxler 
M. H, Way nick, Jr. 
Mrs. C. L. Whitaker 
Tasker Willi avis 
Acnes Louise Will cox 



hO 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



First Semester 

Oscar F.astek . 
1,1-0 PlTTARO . 

William Barn house 
Samuel Mvers . . 



Officers 

. President . 

. Vice-President . 
Secretary- Treasurer 
. . Chaplain . 



Second Semester 
. . . Lee Moser 
Furman Wright 
T, E. Strickland 

. . Ilovr Wool I 



Roll 



William Harm to use 
j. f. g arlington 
James Gorre 
Sprioc Harwood 
Jasper Jones 



Samuel Mvers 
I.i i Musi k 
I. hi I'n i \kii 
Albert Smith 
T. E. Strickland 



Furman Wright 
Oscar F. aster 

W k !li u .'ii '-.-• 

Lincoln Fulk 
Odell 15 ROUS 





Y. M. C. A. AND Y. W. C. A. 



JASPRR JONRS . . . . 
W'li MAM B\KN HOUSE 



Y. M. C. A. 

Officers 

. . . . President Oscar L. Eastrr . 

. . Vice-President Prrry J. Peterson 

Dr. P. E. Linuley. Chairman Advisory Hoard 



, Secretary 
Treasurer 



Howard Apple 
Allen Austin 
Lawrence Austin 
William Barnhouse 
John II. Hams 
Oscar L. Easier 
Sulon Ferree 
J. E. Garlincton 

OCCO GlBBS 



Roll 

Bill Groom e 
Alton IIartman 
Rav Hilton 
Millard Islev 
D. Clark Johnson 
Jasper Jones 
Claude Kim rev 
Lee Moser 
Samuel Mvers 
Furman Wright 



John Pendleton 
H. O. Peterson 
Perry J. Peterson 
Edwin Sharpe 
T. E. Strickland 
Alson Thompson 
M. H. Waynick, Jr. 
Hoyt Wood 
Cary Wright 



Virginia Grant 



Y. W, C. A. 

Officers 

. . . . President Inez Ridce . . . 

Mary M.Bates. . . .Secretary-Treasurer 



lid-President 



Dorothea A mi reus 
Elizabeth Bagwell 
Pa i tie Barter 
Mary M, Bates 
Dorothy Bell 
Mozelle Garner 
Virginia Grant 
Alia Jean Hamill 
Jeaneite [I arris 



Roll 

Kathleen Heptinstall 
Inx.a Hill 

In 1 1..; l 

Edythe Hughes 
Bernardine Hurley 
Martha Ivachiw 
Mary W. Johnson 
Mildred Lambe 
Gladys Liner 
Agnes Louise Willcox 



Ruby Martin 
Josie McNeill 
Virginia Massev 
Sara Marie Neese 
Pauline Parker 
Elizabeth Pirtle 
Mary Parham 
Inez Ridce 
Vesta Troxler 



82 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATERS 



First Team Second Team 

Lincoln Fiji.k Sulon Ferrke 

Auhert Smith Jasper Jones 

Wiir.u Hutch ins Claude Kimkey 

Hoyt Wood QuENTIN Veach 

I). Kermit Cloniger , Lois Hebcecock 



Lincoln Folk 
Wilbur Hutch ins 
Aubert Smith 

Uni i \\'< 



Derate Squad 

I>. Kermit Cloniger 
Sulon Ferree 
Claude Kim rev 

(Jl I S, I ] >. V I Mil 

Jasper Jones 
Lois Hedgecock 



Virginia Grant 
Mabel Koontz 
Iris Welch 
Vera York 



John M. Ericsson, Coach 

The debaters enjoyed this year, the most successful year in the history of inter- 
collegiate forensic competition at the College. They captured the North Carolina 

■arm- i-hairi|)ini]ship and plain! second iii the South Atlantic tournament held at 
Hickory in March. The team, composed of Wilhur II urchins and Lincoln Fulk, 
affirmative, ami lloyr Wood and Aubert Smith, negative, used the query, RF- 
SOLVED: Thai all nations should agree to prohibit the international shipment of 
arms and ammunition. 1 ti the extemporaneous speaking contest held in connection 

with the tour ncut, Lincoln Fulk plrni-d second, taking ;l , his subject "The Future 

of llic Kailuavs". 




31 




LITTLE THEATRE 

Dramatic work at High Point is represented by the Little Theatre, now celebrating 
its second anniversary. Although the Little Theatre is not yet fully equipped, it has 
as its purpose the development of a strong organization that will be in the future even 
more the center of dramatic activities at the College. 

Last year the artistic productions of the Laboratory Class in Drama were favorably 
received by some of the ablest dramatic critics in the State. Despite the fact that the 
department was handicapped by the lack of technical facilities, the few who worked 
daj and night in the old Tower room with hammer and paint brush were able to stage 
performances that were declared outstanding. 

Thus, with the foundations of an active organization already laid, the Little 1 heat re 
has undertaken to do a great deal this year. Under the direction of John M. Erickson, 
the Laboratory jirimp, assisted hv other interested students, has attempted an ambitious 
program of worthwhile plays for the College audiences. 

The fall season began with "Dulcy' , with Pauline Parker in the leading character 
role of a talkative young wife who creates one difficulty after another with her "harm- 
less" chatter. 

In January posters on the campus announced Richard Sheridan's famous period 
play, "The School for Scandal" — "a laugh hit for two centuries". Dressed in vivid 
costumes of silk and velvet, a large cast of snuff-sniffing gentlemen and proud, cruel 
ladies gossiped in the typicalh hnllian: and sparkling seventeenth centurj manner about 
their friends and acquaintances. The scenery, constructed by Professor Rulfs and his 
student workers, -was impressionistic. 

The spring season included the efforts of the Speech Class — a short comedy and 
skits that were presented at a local theatre. 

Perhaps the climax of the year's dramatic work came with the inevitable Senior 
Play — the class of 1935 having as its contribution the mystery melodrama, "Three 
Taps at Twelve". 



B4 



BLOCK "H" CLUB 



Officers 



zoltan ronyecz . . . 

Lee Sherrill . . 

Larry Yount 



......... President 

Vice-President 

Stnetary-Trcasurer 



RoLL 



ZoLTAN RoXYECZ 

Alcernox Prlmm 
Larry Yount 
Jasper Joxes 
Lee Sherrill 
Elijah Diamont 
Bxoadus Culler 
George Elder 
George Ixgle 
Donald Hunter 



Kermit Cloxiger 

RoHERT BV'RL'M 

William Booth 
Johx Rudisill 
\V, C. Kooxtz 
James Right 
Millard Isley 

G. I. HUMPHREYS, Jr. 

Pal l Oakley 
Wilson Rogers 




85 




MODERN PRISCILLA CLUB 



Officers 



Edythe Hughes 

Mary Ward Johnson' 

Elizabeth Pirti.e 

-VlKS. N. P. YaKBOROL'CH 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary- Treasurer 
Supervisor 



Roll 



Gray Jackson 
Elizabeth Pi rile 
Mary M. Bates 
Inez Ridge 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Jacoleline Cameron 
Marv Ward Johnson 



Catherine Farlow 
Vadalia Farlow 
Dorothy McColllm 
Christine Latham 
Lillian V'arner 
Edythe Hughes 
Pattie Hendrick 



36 



PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 





Officers 






Broaous Culler 






Annie L. Moss 


President 






Secretary 




Representatives 




lota Tan Kappa 






Theta Phi 


George INGLE 






Advlene McCollum 


Dr. C. R. Hinshaw 






Miss Margaret Sloan 


Delta Alpha Epsilon 






Sigma Alpha Phi 


Larry Yount 






Marv Lei vis Skein 


Prof. J. H. Alured 






Miss Louise Jenmscs 


Epsilon Eta Phi 






Alpha Theta Psi 


Broaous Culler 






Annie L. Moss 


Prof, J. 11. Mourahi 


Faculty 




Mrs. Alice P. White 


Miss Marv E. 


You KG 


Prof. H. L, Spessard 




£7 




IOTA TAU KAPPA 




Fratres in Collegio 



Burt Asbury 
Howard Apple 
Paul Brinkley 

Rlssell Brown' 
Elijah Diamont 
G. I. Humphreys, Jr. 
Donald Hunter 



( ..MiRCh I \-(',I.K 

Wilson Rogers 
John RuDISlLL 
Edwin Sharpe 
Frank Sudia 
quentin veach 
John Warlick 



Honorari Fratres 

Dr. C. R. Hinshaw Dr. P, S. Kennett 

Dr. P. E. Lindley Dr. II. I!. Hiatt 

G. A, KlRKMAN 



ES 



THETA PHI 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Berta Carraway 

ElHTH CrOWDER 

Mildred Crowder 
Gray Jackson 
Julia Coe 

Adylene McCollum 
Alice Nesrit 



Dot Perry 
Lucy Clyde Ross 
Mary Shepard 
I, [I. max Varner 
Rebecca Kearxs 
Sara Harris 
Frances Gleth 



HONORARI SORORES 

Miss Margaret Sloan Mrs. N. P. Yarborough 




39 



n, f* 




EPSILON ETA PHI 




Fratres in Collegio 



Atlev Hartman 
Edward Woollen- 
Alton' Hartman 
Joseph Crowder 
Proadls Cl - ller 



Kermit Cloniger 
Sl-lon Ferree 
John - Eshelman 
Lee Sherrill 
James Warlick 



HONORARI FRATRES 

Prof. J. H. Moiraxe Prof. N. P. Yarrorough 

Edgar Hartley W. F. Bailey 

David T. Yow 



90 



ALPHA THETA PSI 



VE~^ ^~a7 




SOHORES IN COLLEGIO 



Annie L. Moss 
Helen- Raper 
H.AZEI. W'elborn 
Laura Fritts 



Irexe Chadwick 
Ernestine VonCannon 
Iris Welch 
Virginia Walker 



HONORARI SORORES 

Mrs. Alice P. White Mrs, S. O. Peebles 
Miss Bonnie Enoch Mrs, R. M. Andrews 

Mrs. G. I. Humphreys 





DELTA ALPHA EPSILON 




Fratres in Collegio 

Robert Byrum James Hight Zoltan Ronyecz 

George Elder C. T. Morris Al-bert Smith 

Joe Stone W. W. Weisner 

Bill Von Drehle Larry Yount 



Honorari Fratres 



C. C. Robbins 
Dr. Paul R. Bow en- 
Prof. H. L. Spessard 
Herman - Smith 



Dr. Glenn Perry 
Prof. J. H. Allred 
John Whitesell 
Dr. P. B. Davis 



Dr. W, L. Jackson 



<?2 



SIGMA ALPHA PHI 




sorores in collegio 

Virginia Massey Inez Ridge 

Mary Lewis Skeen Elizabeth Pirtle 

Pattie Bartee Edythe IIiciihs 

Mary Ward Johnson 

Mary Parham 

( !l. U1YS M \X\1 El. I. 



HoNORARI SORORES 

Mrs. P. E. Lindley Mrs. 13. H. Him. 

Mrs. H. L. Spessard Miss Vera Idol 

Miss |,ni LSI JtWIXCS 




»3 



TENTH ANNIVERSARY 

SINCE High Point College is celebrating this year its tenth anniversary, it is well 
that we review some of its brief history and refresh our minds with the efforts and 
sacrifices of those responsible for its existence. 

High Point College had its beginning in the mind of Rev. J. F. McCuIloch, D.D., 
a native of Guilford County, North Carolina, and a graduate of Adrian College, 
Adrian, Michigan. Several years after his graduation he returned to North Carolina 
with the conviction that the North Carolina Methodist Protestant Conference should 
establish within her borders a high grade college. With this purpose in mind he visited 
the Annual Conference at La Grange in 1893 and presented his ideas so well that a 
committee was appointed to investigate, and if possible, to provide means for building 
a college. No sooner had the committee begun its work than it found that the church 
in North Carolina had no need for such an institution. Whereupon, Dr. McCuIloch 
set about to establish a church paper in order that his views, along with other college 
propaganda, might be put into the homes of the members of the Methodist Protestant 
Church. 

Accordingly, the Church Record was established ; the name was later changed to the 
Methodist Protestant Herald. A lot was purchased in the city of Greensboro and a 
building erected upon it. The proceeds from the sale of this property, which had 
greatly increased in value, became a great asset to the college enterprise. 

The college enterprise really began to take shape when Mr. J. C. Roberts of 
Kernersville provided in his will a gift of $10,000 if the college should be built by 1920 ; 
otherwise, the gift was to be used for educating young men preparing for the ministry. 
The gjft created considerable interest in the college project and when the buildings 
were erected, the administration building was named in his honor. 

At the Annual Conference in Enfield in 1920, a committee was appointed to 
inaugurate a campaign for funds and another was appointed to work with the architect 
in drawing up plans for the institution. 

Several cities, notably High Point, Burlington and Greensboro, offered special 
inducements for location. After much consideration High Point, which had agreed to 
give a large tract of land and an additional $100,000, was selected. 

The cornerstone of the first building, Roberts Hall, was laid on June 29, 1922; 
and the first class matriculated September 15, 1924. This class was composed of 
fifteen students coming from other colleges and registering as Sophomores. The first 
Freshman class numbered 101. And there were several special students bringing the 
total registration up to 132. 

Dr. R. M. Andrews, who had served as Field Agent during the campaign for funds 
and as a member of the building committee during the construction of the college, 
became the first president. After his resignation in 1930, Rev. Gideon I. Humphreys 
was elected by the Board of Trustees as his successor. 

The sea of red mud which existed in 1924 has gradually been turned into a beautiful, 
grassy campus, and a new gymnasium has been erected through the efforts of N. M. 
Harrison, Promotional Secretary. 

High Point College successfully weathered the storm of the depression while other 
colleges with much better financial foundations were forced to close. Since it has 
overcome the obstacles of its first ten years of existence, High Point College may 
rightfully expect much from the future. 



44 




)' ; b£j-Mei 




FEATURES 



EXPLANATION 



CO-ED'S LAMENT 



You will find in this section 
A varied collection 

Of limericks which are not true to form. 
They were made by the staff 
To give you a laff 

So please don't look on them with scorn. 



We're cooped in this henhouse 
Instead of a penthouse. 

As the catalogue led us to believe. 
Doing the Dance of Saint Vitus 
For fear of appendicitis 

On account of Ma's half-baked, white beans. 



Consider the rabbits 
in the field: They toil 
not, neither do they 
spin; yet Solomon in all 
his glory was not more 
averse to race suicide 
than one of these. 

—Gumbo, 1904. 



A beer in the hand is 
worth two in the Busch 



factory. 



Where there's a won't 
there's probably a way. 



Love may come and 
love may go, but en- 
dearing epistles will 
always be stationery. 



Sunday spooners . . . 
guys . . . Polly poses 
prettily .... Censored 
. . . "Lij" making time 
(gals?) . . . find the 
baseball . . . waitin' fur 
a drag . . . Perry looks 
them over. 




V7 



The preachers discreet 
Have engagement to meet 

With HI-PO heads each Sunday night 
To help with the Vogues, 
And those scandulous rogues 

Can sheeuurree put a good name to flight. 



When Choir trips begin 
Some suffer chagrin 

Cause the back seats are hurriedly taken. 
They'd rather not ride 
By the chapcrone's side 

But prefer to be mangled and shaken. 
(Note: we are told the bus shakes.) 




Attention 
Commercials ! 

My typist is on her va- 
cation 
Mu trpust's awau for 
a weke 
My ty Yz uat is pn her 
vacation 
Wglie these damu 
keys pluy huds and 
st'kk. 

CHORYS 

Bring back, bronf baxj, 

Oh btonf bsvk mt 

tupisy tp mw, too 

me; 

Btubh bAvI, ntonf bscl, 

Oh bemng nack my 

tupidt to me! 



'Sail right to make 
hay while the sun shines, 
but make love when the 
moon goes behind a 

cloud. 

Holloway and Steph- 
enson , . . frosty morn- 
ing fashions . . . Hi-Po 
showin* off , . . Erick- 
son of Chicago and Cin- 
cinnati . . . Betty, the 
washlady ... the sleet 
or '34 , . . where love 
rules supreme . . . ladies 
smokin' grounds. 



9 S 



On Home-coming Day, 
So the Gov'ment did say, 

A lotta things went all ascrewy. 
There were quair incidents 
And pink elements; 

Some say 'twas all mountain dewy. 



For rest between classes 
The slick-britch-ed masses 

Rush noisily out to the store 
To swallow some candy 
And the first joke that's handy 

And place two keen eyes on the door. 



They're Still That 
Way 

It was just after eight 
The spooner was late 
And she kept work- 
ing her thumb; 
Her nerves were a-thrill, 
She couldn't keep still, 
Oh, why, oh why 
don't he come? 

She'd rush to her room 

For a touch of perfume 

Or to straighten a 

lock gone awry— 

Then she'd pick up a 

book, 
Give a glance or a look, 
When back down tine 
stairs she would fly. 

It was a few minutes 

past 
When at last, at last 
He finally came into 
the hall — 
From the stairway she 

said, 
As she blushed rosy-red, 
"I forgot you were 
coming at all!" 
— Pine Knot, 1924. 



Waitin' for the morn- 
in' mail . . . "Rudy" 
with one of his gals . . . 
you guess . . , innocent 
"Miss Wilmington" . . . 
Bell and De Maupas- 
sant . . . "Egghead's" 
stooge . . , Peterson's 
baby buggy . . , John, 
the College cow. 




V) 




Joe Dokes 



(NOTE: Since the question 
of dancing lias been rather 
prominent on lite Higli Point 
College campus for the last 
two years, we are reprinting 
a letter to the Editor on this 
subject. While the ZENITH 
■welcomes communications, it 
in no way necessarily sub- 
scribes to the doctrines ex- 
pressed therein.) 



Deer Mr. Azberry 

I reeceeved the letr of yourn tuther day astin me 
how i wuz athinkin on this biznis of rown dancin 
at themair larnin sculs. Ill jes tel ya i aim never 
did no rown dancin but im alfard agin it. ther 
aint no sense in it atal cuz thu peepl jes go bak 
and fruntards an rown an thu jaz okrestees aint 
got no teun to um. tha hav tin or 20 mushiners 
thet caint em teun up tu flop eerd meul. now mi 
an the ol lady wint in to thu citi wun tim yu no 
how yu hav to go an git up sum fead an rashuns. 
wel wee wuz astandin owt in frunt ov thu fead 
stor akinda sizin up sum ov thu pulits whin wee 
heard um strik up a teun ther in thu secun stori 
ovr thu stor. well tha plaid ol jo dark so purty 
thet me an thu wumun jes tuk oif an wint up 
ther. yul hav to try an see ifn yu can reed this 
cuz i had to tot in a turn ov wud fur Evileener 
an thu infernul chicens got up on thu papr an 
stepd abowt an everything yu no how tha do. 
wel mi an thu wumun staid up til nin uclock jes 
to say wee had bin out lat. wee shor had a gud 
tim but i wuda hada betern ifn ida had a litl sidr 
but dont tel thu ol ladi i said so. now thu trubl 
with thees rown dancs iz thet thees citi slicers jes 
git undr mi skin an them iz thu felrs thet go to 
them dancs. Evileener iz raizin hel fur me to go 
git thu pig owtn thu tadr hoi an wee aint got no 
mor papr sept whats in thu catalog an tha dont 
put out no mor til a yeer cum this tadr diggn so 
i rekinsow i betr quit, 
yurs truli 

Joe Dokes uv Randolf Counti. 



On the fifth day each week 
He looks not so meek 

This HI-PO Editor of own. 
He has on his hands 
Beaucoup reprimands 

Cause he thinks the whole place needs 



a scourin . 



f- / > 



When the wind blew so cold 
And a chap was so bold 

As to ask me to ride up the street, 
I said, "Mfy friend, 
My uncle condescend 

To be, should we a counsellor meet' 



> / *■ 



On afternoons rainy 

The girls aren't complainy 

They're off to Five Points on a hike. 
With not so much jack 
But a well-loaded pack 

To eat and to do as they like. 



t- f- f- 



We go up to chapel 

To hear someone babble 

On something he knows nothing of; 
Of boosters and kickers, 
Light wines and hard likkers 

And not one little word about love. 



f- f- f- 



The lights on the walk-way 

Keep the girls in the straight way, 

At least from seven til ten, 
When they go to their knittin 
So calmly submittin' 

To the thoughts of what might have 
been. 



100 



<Jtlak Jroint J) ay by J) ay 



SEPTEMBER 

Someone leaves open the front door of Roberts 
Hall on the morning of September 11. The halls 
are overflowing with strange wide-eyed creatures 
that drift in. Alma Mater claims them for her 
own. She dries their tears, registers them, orients 
them with no end of parties, blesses them and calls 
them "My Freshmen." 

Three days later the upperclassmen stroll in 
leisurely to register and are amazed to hear the 
Class of '38 discussing "skirt barn" possibilities in 
manner most familiar. "Shades of C. R.!!" is the 
newest phrase on the campus. 

Classes begin at 8:30 A.M. on the fourteenth. 
"Which one is Miss Wilmington?" is the big ques- 
tion of the day. Everybody knows the answer by 
8:30 P.M. 

The usual initiation schemes make the freshmen 
aware of their humble station by way of hair 
ribbons, pig-tails, "rat" signs, confused make-up, 
and garish garb for the co-eds; buckets, rolled pant 
legs, wholesale paddlings and painful peek-a-boo 
games for the lads. 

Everybody is introduced to the faculty and vice- 
versa at the faculty reception. Four new faces 
are noted in the receiving line — two begoggled 
ones, one be-mustached one and another rather 
cherubic one. 

Everyone is dined and picnicked over and over 
again (at the City Lake mostly) by scads of gov- 
ernments and literary societies and things. 

Freshmen don cunning purple caps and upper- 
classmen turn green with envy. 

Harvest moon complains of too much compe- 
tition from the Roberts Hall-Girls' Dorm string 
of lights. 



OCTOBER 

Hectic rush days are going on and on — hot dogs 
and teas on and on 

Until the night of the fifth when rushees decide 
whether to join or not to join and if so which one 
to join or not to join. 

Theta Phis convert the dining room into the 
Candle Night Club. Gambling tables and bars 
are the order of the night. Whoops! 

Student body has fun and ice cream at the 
M. P. Church reception. 

Dr. Bowen lectures to a garden club on the 
lowest forms of life. 

Mrs. White and the Senior girls serve tea for 
the College brides. 

The Juniors stage a carnival. Becky is made 
Queen of the Fall. Page Kermit! Never mind. 

Hallowe'en party a howling success. 

NOVEMBER 

The Lab presents "Dulcy" to a fair-sized audi- 
ence in fairish manner. 

An autumn Saturday and students sigh for the 
old days when we had a football team, too. 

The HI-PO plays host to the North Carolina 
Collegiate Press Association and entertains royally 
with banquets and a merry dance or two. Place: 
Sheraton Hotel. 

Cheers and cheers for the Sophomore co-eds 
who win the volley ball tournament. 

Hill Saunders is made Freshman president. 

Leo Pittard is chosen president of the Ministerial 
Association in session here. 

"Haven't things changed?" the old grads chime 
in unison. 



101 



ULicjk JPoint J)atj by Jsaij 



The Conference hears the Choir sing. And 
Springhill and Midway. 

State hears our debaters debate. 

The same garden club hears Dr. Bowen on big 
bad mosses. 

The Day Students mourn the loss of their chere 
chat, Julia. 

Faculty won't talk turkey about the petitions for 
more time to eat turkey. 

Thanksgiving! WoXiday — mm-mm. 

DECEMBER 

Freshman "flop party" is a flop. It was no flop. 
Anyhow, it was successful. 

Your Calendarer just can't remember what oc- 
curred in December except 

Classes adjourned — Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year! 

JANUARY 

Back from Christmas vacation to rest for the 
next holiday. 

High Point just beats E. C. T. C, A. C. C, 
Appalachian, Lenoir-Rhyne, Catawba — and some- 
thing fierce! 

The Lab Class presents "The School for Scan- 
dal". Lovely ladies and scandal-mongering and 
an interesting library and "Oh fi, uncle"! 

Edith Crowder, Mary Parham, Pattie Bartee, 
Sulon Ferree and Lincoln Fulk are to marsh for 
the Seniors. 

Wilbur Hutchins and C. T. Morris are elected 
to the presidency of their literary societies, the 
Thalean and Akrothinian, respectively. 

Examinations. Nuff said. 



High Point gets beat something fierce and steps 
right smack into Elon's coffin. 

Second semester begins. "Aw yeah, I'll do 
better this time." Oh, yeah? 

FEBRUARY 

Lelah captivates the audience that turns out to 
see Tony Sarg's Marionettes in "Faustus". Oh 
meeeeee. 

The Modern Priscilla Club entertains with a 
Valentine party. B, B, and B have a heart to 
heart talk — on immortality. 

The debating squad invades the Paramount. All 
Mr. Erickson's ladies are perfect gentlemen. 

In grand uproaring style the debating squad in- 
vades the College stage. 

Annie Laurie Moss is elected president of the 
Senior class. 

Elon again. High Point College basketball team 
defeats Catawba, A. C. C, Wake Forest, DAV- 
IDSON, E. C. T. C, something fierce! 

high point college basketball team gets de- 
feated by GUILFORD something fierce. 

Thaleans and Nikanthans hold a George Wash- 
ington party. 

The Davies Light Opera Singers present the 
second lyceum program of the year. Audience 
marvels at their versatility. 

Rush week goes into full swing. 

MARCH 

Artemesians and Akrothenians have a whole 
day to themselves. The banquet the best in years. 

Flu menace is about gone. Appendicitis germs 
are now all over the place. 

Debaters start on their northern tour. 



102 



Anti-bean campaign gets under way. 

Sororities and fraternities reap the reward 
of their hard work and divide sixteen stu- 
dents among their respective ranks. 

Students hear Bishop William F. Mc- 
Dowell in chapel. 

College is to have an honor society at last. 

The debaters come triumphant out of the 
North. They are State champions! 

Alumni and students dance at the Coun- 
try Club on the Ides of March. The basket- 
ball team members are guests of honor. 

The Man from Vermont does tricky 
things with that violin of his'n. 

Seniors present their annual play, "Three 
Taps at Twelve". 



Again the faculty entertains. Saint Pat- 
rick provides a good excuse for a merry 
party. 

The Zenith rushes madly, madly to press. 

APRIL 

Brings the usual things. Flowers, show- 
ers, investiture services, the Junior-Senior 
banquet, baseball, Easter holidays, and choir 
trips galore and galorious. 

MAY 

Brings all things usual and unusual. 
Rushy days, violent cases of spring fever 
and wanderlust, another lyceum program, 
Thalean-Nikanthan Anniversary Day, mote 
baseball, more choir trips, more and more 
banquets and farewell frolics, the Zenith, 
elections, examinations — Commencement! ! ! ! 

There is nothing more to say, 

So we must close — but by the way — 

Perhaps we'll meet Home-Coming Day. 

P.S. — Hasn't everything been fun? Adieu, 
adieu. 



THE 



HIGH POINT, THOMASVILLE & DENTON 
RAILROAD COMPANY 



Is an outstanding example of accomplishment as the result of 
co-operation and steady hard work. Large or small, any com- 
munity thrives only when there is co-operation and a general 

spirit of service. 



Utility Service and the Community 

More than any other one factor, the quality of its utility services deter- 
mines the desirability and attractiveness of a community for business or as 
a place in which to live. 

In industry and in the home the application of electricity to industrial 
and household operations is multiplying the effectiveness of the labor of 
the worker and relieving the housekeepers of drudgery and fatigue. And 
while it increases the efficiency of the individual, it raises the quality of the 
work accomplished as well. 

We invite attention to the standard of utility services in the cities in which 
we supply these essentials to modern living and modern business. 

SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY 



CAROLINA CASKET CO. 

MANUFACTURERS— JOBBERS 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



DR. NAT WALKER 

EYES EXAMINED 
GLASSES FITTED 



High Point, N.C. Thomasville, N. C. 

Over Hart's Pharmacy, First Nat'l Bank Bldg. 



1935 
OUR 33RD ANNIVERSARY 

1500 STORES 
FROM COAST TO COAST 

A REMARKABLE GROWTH THROUGH 

COURTEOUS SERVICE 
DEPENDABLE MERCHANDISE 
HONEST VALUES 

Where College Students Shop 

J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 



Koonce Funeral Home 

Incorporated 

PROMPT ATTENTIVE 
SERVICE 

Under Personal Supervision of 

ARNOLD J. KOONCE 

Phone 4545 



Patronize our 
Advertisers 



LAY 


YOUR FOUNDATION FOR 


FUTURE 


SUCCESS 


P 


ERFECT 
ROTECTION 


BY BUYING 

WHICH 
PAYS 


T7 VERY DAY 
LIVERY WAY 


AND COVERS ALL INSURANCE NEEDS 

N. L. GARNER, AGENCY 

OCCIDENTAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

80? SECURITY BANK BUILDING 


PHONE 4648 



R O 


B B 1 


N 


s 


K N 


1 T T 1 


N 


G 


C O 


MPANY 


HIGH POINT, N 


. C. 





LOGAN 



PORTER MIRROR 



COMPANY 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



THE PHOTOGRAPHS IN 

THIS ANNUAL 



WERE MADE BY 



DUNBAR & DANIELS 

Incorporated 

132 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



llllllllMHIIIIIIMIIlllllltllimillllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIII 

FINE PORTRAITS 
PROMPT SERVICE 

iiimiiiiiHiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiMii 



The Largest College Annual Photographers 
in the South 



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4Ctt1tlllEVIEMIENT UK ANY ILIINIL 
OF IENIDIEWOR. lUriffltlE NATURAL 
RJEXHJIILT Of ABIIILIITY "AND 
EXIPiEIPJIIENOEJPILllJUr QIPIPORIONIITY 
lFtttlUT OIRJQAM IIZATIIOhl TAIKIEJT IPIPJIIDIE 



^AfcJII/ATIIrflfcJ TAIKIF1I 



;QEJT- JUGCIEJT IEAIRNIEID 



5V TfitlE ABIIIUIlfY Of IITJT MIEMIBIL 
M1IE IEXIPIEIPJIIENCIE GAJINIED 



: OIRI, AND 



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CWAIKiOITIE IENGIKAVIING 
COMPANY II NC. 

AKTIXTJ'-PIIOTO-ENGRAVEfU'-DEJ'IGNEPJ^ 

C++AR-LOTTE 

NO FLT tt 
CAFCOLI N A 



ED N IN ETEEN FIFTEEN 



THIS BOOK PRINTED BV. 




T 



HE 



WORLD'S 

LARGEST 

PUBLISHERS 

OF 

COLLEGE 

ANNUALS 




COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 




Compliments of 
Guilford General Hospital 



Compliments of 

C. F. FINCH 



Compliments of 

CITY FUEL COMPANY 



Mrs. C. F. Blake 



Phone 3335 



Compliments of 

DE LUXE DINER 



' Compliments of 

H. A. MILLIS 



Compliments of 

BEESON HARDWARE CO. 



Compliments of 

J. E. PRITCHARD 



Compliments of 

HIGH POINT FURN. CO. 

High Point's Oldest Furniture Plant 



Compliments of 

EFIRD'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Where Quality And Price Meet 



Conpliments of 

S. C. CLARK 



Compliments of 

G. H. KEARNS 



Compliments of 

BELK - STEVENS DEP'T. STORE 



3- JUL ^>et\\vt%t anh jltm 

^Funeral JBtrrcinrs 
^tnce 1897 



Compliments of 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Students' Headquarters 



EDGAR SNIDER 

PRINTING 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



SHERATON HOTEL 
And COFFEE SHOP 

TED BARROW, M 3 ,. 



J. Arlie Rhoades '35, Steward 



C. C. Fears, Chef 



HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

GIDEON IRELAND HUMPHREYS, A.M., D.D., President 

'In the Heart of the Piedmont" 

MODERN FIRE-PROOF BUILDINGS 
NON-SECTARIAN 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Rated Standard "A" Grade by State Board of Education 

Courses in Education, Language, History, Commerce, Home Economics, Science, Religious 
Education, Music — leading to degrees of A.B. or B.S. 

Low Rates Put College Training in Reach of the Youth With Limited Means 

"A Growing College in a Growing City" 

For Catalogue Apply to 

PRESIDENT OR REGISTRAR 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE HIGH POINT, N. C. 



LINDALE ICE CREAM 

It's a food hecause it is made 

from feure sweet milk 

and cream 



LINDALE DAIRY 
CORPORATION 

W. Lexington Ave. HIGH POINT, N. C. 



FOR 
Quality Printing 



SEE 



THE CREATIVE 
PRINT SHOP 



106 COLLEGE STREET 
Telephone 2645 



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