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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1936, High Point College"

COPYRIGHT, 1934 

EDGAR SNIDER, EDITOR 
LOIS HEDGECOCK, MANAGER 



I 



ANNUAL 
PUBLICATION 

O F T H E 

STUDENT BODY 

• . O F • • 

HIGH POINT 
COLLEGE 
HIGH POINT 
N. CAROLINA 




THE 




niTH 



1936 








Jnn. J^ouise 0. ()jr 



remt 



DEDICATION 

For one whose unselfish dreams portray the true spirit of giving, 
reward comes through the hero-worship of grateful adolescents 
of many generations. It is this spirit that has been exhibited 
in the M. J. Wrenn Memorial, from which students may learn 
and share in the knowledge of the centuries. This vision has 
been presented by his wife, who graciously carries forward his 
interest in the education of youth. Therefore, with the deepest 
appreciation and respect, we dedicate this 1936 Zenith to 
Mrs. Louise C. Wrenn. 




present 

• • THE TENTH VOLUME OF THE ZENITH, 
INCORPORATING THE MOST LASTING IM- 
PRESSIONS OF COLLEGE DAYS. IN THESE 
AIRPLANE VIEWS OF CAMPUS LIFE. WE MERE- 
LY SUGGEST ALL THE IMPORTANT MINOR 
EVENTS THAT ARE NOT VISIBLE. ONLY THE 
HILLTOPS STAND OUT; BUT THE LANDMARKS 
REVEAL THAT WITHIN THESE PORTALS LIFE IS 
LIVED, TIME IS USED, PROGRESS IS INSURED. 
IF, WHEN YOU READ THIS BOOK, YOU ARE 
IMPRESSED WITH THE ONWARD MARCH OF 
OUR ALMA MATER AND YOUR GROWTH 
INTO MANHOOD AND WOMANHOOD UN- 
DER ITS INFLUENCE, WE SHALL FEEL THAT 
OUR WORK HAS BEEN A PLEASURE. WE ARE 
HAPPY TO GIVE TO YOU 



CONTENTS 



BOOK ■ • ONE 

THE COLLEGE 

BOOK * ■ TWO 

T H E C LAS S E S 

BOOK • -THREE 

ATHLETICS 

BOOK * • FOUR 

Q R G AN I ZAT IONS 

BOOK • • FIVE 

F EAT URES 



^our '36' annua 



^ 





W V 



c 







/ 

On December 17, 1905, a telegram from 
M tint co. North Carolina, proclaimed to the 
world thai man could soar like a bird. That 
clumsy. kitelike affair in which man made 
his first flight in a heaver-than-air machine 
was the result of a vision of Wilbur and 
Orville Wright, and of their unswerving de- 
termination to make that vision a reality. 
This daring flight marked the birth of a 
new era; it was the beginning of the Age 
of the Air. 



1 





GIDEON IRELAND HUMPHREYS, A.M., D.D. 
PRESIDENT 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Executive Committee 

H. A. Ml [.lis, Chairman 
G. I. Humphreys G. H. K earns 

Mrs. M, J. Wnxm R- T. Amos 

C. C. ROBBINS A. M. RANKIN 

Building and Grounds Committee 
N. M. Harrison, Chairman 
W. F Hunsucker C. F. Finch 

L, F. Ross DR- J- T. Rurrus 

F acuity Committee 
G. I. Humphreys, Chairman 
S. W. Taylor J- N. Willis 

Logan Porter J. M-. Mii.likan 





MISS LOUISE ADAMS, A.M. 

Inttruetor in Mathematics 

A.B., High Point College, 1929: A.M., University 

of North Carolina, 1930. 

High Point College, 193 3— 



J. HOBART ALLRED. A.M. 

Prafeitor of Modern Languages 

A. 8.. University d( North Carolina, 1922; A.M., 
ibid., 1929. 

High Point College, 1924— 





PAUL R. BOWEN, Ph.D. 

PrftftsHit of iitvlvgy 

A.B., DcPauw University, 1925; M.S., Yale Uni- 
versity. 1929; Ph.D., Yale University, 1931. 

High Point College, 1932— 
MISS SIDNEY BRAME. A.M. 

Oirrctar Phytieat Education for Women 

A.B., Miilsaps College, 1950; A.M., Peabody Col- 
lege, 1932, 

High Point College, I9H — 



THE FACULTY 



MISS ELDA CLARK. A.B. 

Aturtant Profenor of Commercial Department 

Secretary to President, 1935 — 



EDMUND O. CUMMINGS. Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of N. C. 1919; Ph.D.. Massa- 

L-lius+rri Institute of Technology, 1923, 

High Point College, 1928 — 





MISS BONNIE ENOCH 

IrtttructOT in Fine Arts 

Diploma in Art. Greensboro CoUcge, 1023 

Hirjh Point College. 1928— 



R, H GUNN, A.B. 

Instructor in Department of Bmtneti 

A.B.. Elon College, 1921. 

High Point College. 1929 — 





Paqe It 



W. H. FORD. A.M. 

Inittuctor in Department of Business 

A.B., University of S. C, 1923; A.M., ibid, 

1928. 

High Point College, 1934 — 

NATHANIEL M. HARRISON, B.D. 

Promotional Secretary 

A.B., Wesrern Maryland College, 1916; B.D, 
Westminster Theological Serotnory. 1919. 

High Point College, 19 JO- 





CLIFFORD R. HtNSHAW, A.M., Litt.D. 

Profesrar of Education and PiycholoRy 

A.B., Guilford College, 1916; A.M.. University of 

N. C, 1924! A.M., Columbia University. 1927; 

Litt.D., Western Maiyland College, 1932. 

High Point College, 1927— 

MISS VERA IDOL, A.M. 

A3., Greensboro College, 1921; B.S. t Columbia 
University, 1923; A.M., ibid., 1927. 

Hi&h Point CoUcrc, 1924— 





THE 



FACULTY 





PAUL S. KENNETT, B.D,, I.L.D. 
Professol of Hit lory 

A.B., Guilford College. 1913; B.D.. Westminster 

Theological Seminary, 191?; LL.D., Adrian College, 
1MB. 

High Point College, 1924— 

PERCY E. I.INDLEY. A.M.. Litt.D. 
Dean o/ College and Ptoftfioi of Rchgioui Education 

A.B., Elon College. 1910; A.M.. VnndaMl Lfoi- 

eeiMty, 1921: Litt.D., Western Maryland College. 

1928. 

High Point College, 1924- 





J. HARLEY MOURANE. M.S. 

Prvfriior of Chemistry •ind Phyiici 

B.S., University of N. C. 1932; M.S., 
1924. 

High Point College 1924— 



ibid. 



CULLEN B. OWENS, A.B. 

Professor of Speech and Dtamasitt 

A.B., Berea, 1933; A.M., Northwestern, 1935; 

High Point College, 1935 — 



Page 17 







DONALD J. RULFS, A.M. 

Anacute Piofeaor of English 

,\ ft , University of North Carolina, 1932; A r M., 

Harvard University,, 1933. 
Hi B h Point College, 1934 — 



MISS MARGARET SLOAN. A.B. 

Httiii of Ptano Drpurtrrrcnf juJ Tnttruetat in 

Theoretical Subject! 

A.B., Cnnverst' College, 1923: Graduate Peabody 
Conservatory in Piano, 1926; Voice and Public 

School Music, ibid., 1927. 

H.uh Point College, 1929— 



HOWARD L. SPESSARD. A.M. 

ProfetsOT of Businetf AdminUiTali&n 

B.S.. Gettysburg Collepe. 1926; A.M., University 
of Michigan* 1934. 

Hi K h Pomt Collegrr, 1930 — 



MRS C L„ WHITAKER 
Dietitian 



THE 



FACULTY 



MRS. ALICE PAIGE WHITE. A.M. 

Pioftnor of fjrfft jnd L-itin 
A.B t , Boston University. 1893: A.M., Teachers 



College, Columbia University, 
High Point College. 1924 



w- 



NATHANIEL P, YARBOROUGH. A.M. 

Atiotititc Pmfetiot of Modem Ljfi^uj^er 

A.B., Wofford College, 1923; A.M.. University of 

South Carolina, 1928; Diploma from Institute of 

Phonetics, University of Paris, 1930. 

High Point College, 1925— 





MRS. NAOMI M, YARBOROUGH. B.S. 

Pntieisor of Momt Economic! 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1929. 

High Point Colle B e, 1930— 

MISS MARY E. YOUNG, A.M. 

L'-'i'iMte Piofeiiot of Education 

A.B., Salem College, 1907; A.B., North Carolina 

College for Women, 1927; A.M., Columbia Uni- 

vetsity, 1928, 

High Point College, 1921 — 





Page IS 



• • 



^ 



11 

lii spite of public doubt and suspicion. 
Aviation has forged steadily ahead. From 
the small bicycle repair shop in which the 
Wright Brothers made their first plane, the 
aircraft industry has grown into huge mod- 
ern factories employing thousands of men. 
The flight of twelve seconds and only a few 
hundred feet, drew the applause of the 
world; but today a continuous flight of 
three weeks or nonstop flights of thousands 
of miles attract scant interest. 




1 t'Ktm !! II 



SENIOR 

CLASS 




Officers 

Edith Crowder President 

Atley Hartman Vice-President 

Julia Williard Secretary 

Leon Thompson Treasurer 



Page 21 



SENIOR 




E. N. C. ANDREWS 

THOMASVII.LE, N. C. 
Degree; A.B. 

Mars Hill, '33. '34; Wate FotMt, '35. 

Being here only tbisyear, Mr, Andrews is not 

so well known'. All that we know is that lie 
is a Baptist preacher who likes in jest, and 
that he says hi* name i> "Eastern North 

( 'ainliua." 



PATTIE GRAVES BARTEE 

RBDSVUXE, H. C. 

Degree; A. is, 
s A # 

Aitemesian Leccoiv' Society, '33, '34. '35. '36, Secre- 
tin". '31. Treasurer. '35, Critic. °36; Christian En- 
deavor Socitrv. •li, H '35, '36. If. W", C. A., '33, 
34 'JJ, '36; Purple Players, '33, '34-, WWVs Stu- 
dent Governtnum Council, '34; College Marshal, '35, 

Pattte never pushes herseti forward, but yet 
she never shrinks from ilutv. 



NELL BROWER 

HIOH POINT, N. C. 

Degree; B.S. 

One never knows whether Nell will make a 
lawyer, a millionaire, or a stenographer. She 
is anywhere from business lau to a typing 
exercise. By the size of the honks she's tugged 
around for the past four years she cert linlj 
must have gained some knowledge. 



( \ CHERINE BROWN 
niiai POINT, s. c. 

Degree; A.B. 

Asheville Normal and Teachers College. *33, '34; Aji 
palachiarr Stare Teachers Cc-Hepc, '35. 

Another new senior this year, hut one that is 
characterized by her gracefulness, Catherine, 
too, doesn't forget her English and History. 

We have been glad to have her as a class- 
to. itr. 



Page 22 




CLASS 



I HI 111 MAXINK CROWUKR 
limit point, \. t. 

Decree: A.B, 

n .].. 

Artenu'sgan Literary Society, '33, '34, '35, f 36. Student 
Council, '34, 35; Secretary Student Body, '36; Secretary 
or Cla», '35; President of Qaas, "36; .Student Absence 

Committee. 36, Athletic Council. 'M; President of Day 
Student Council, "34; Chief Marshal. '31. 

Ilomir came t« her because she deserved if. 



RICI1ARH BROAIK'S CULLER 

IIHUI POINT, K. L'. 

Degree: A.B. 

V. il •!■ 

Soccer. '33. 'J4, 'JJ, '36; Basketball. '33, '34 .'35. *B6: 
Pan-Helleruc Council, '}}, '34; Soccer Coach, '3-f '35 
36; Bluet "H" Club. *34. '35, '36; Hi-Po, *34, "31. 

Broadus, the best all-round boy in the seiiinr 
riass, is all anyone need say about him. 



DAVID EU|AII DIAMONT 

innsdM ii i h, v i_'. 

Dtfrte: A, I;. 

I T K 

Akrothinian 1-iteratv Society, '5.3. '34. '35, "36 

H Club; Council Member,' 36; Vice-Ptesidenc, 

Student Government, '35; Baseball. "33, "34, '3 

BastetbaK, '33. '34. '35. "36; Soccer ' i-l 

"Chili" always has a good-natured 
whether In- is coaching or playing. .Ml 
would like to see "Lij" teaching. 



GEORGE BROWNING ELDER 
HIGH POINT, s. (.:. 

Degree: B.S. 

, Block "5 

Men's Thalean Literary Society, '34, "35. "36; Baseball, '3 3 
', '36; 34. "35. '36; Basketball, "3J. '34. '35. '36; Soccer, 

35 33. "34. '35. '36; Block "H" Club. "34. '35, '36. 

smile, Elder is a man of few words. One can inline 

ot us from liis athletic record that he is a man of 

action. 



Page 23 



■ 



SENIOR 






\**-ft 




CATHERINE ELIZABETH FARLOW 

sopuiA, k. C. 



Degrt 



A.K. 



Nikanthan Literary Soeiety. '35, '36: Modern rMscilla 
Club. '35, '36; Art Club. '36: W. A. A., '35, '36; 

Chemistty Club, '35, '36, 

To truly appreciate Catherine, one must work 

with her- Whatever she is appointed to do, 

she does it and it is the work oi one who 

tines her work well. 



•si LON GCRNEY FERRJ I 

TOBACCQVILLE, N. L". 

Dsgrte: A.B. 

e n •■■ 

Thalean LlKIii¥ Society, '35, '34. '35. '36; Y. M. C 
A., '33 '34, '31. U, President. '36; Chtistian En- 
deavor Satiety. *33. '34, '35, '36, President, '35; Rep- 
resentative to Student Government, *36. 

Everything that Sulon does, he does it con- 

scienttously. Such a thorough worker must he 

a Kreat help to the M. P. Conference. Never 

hare we seen a buy with finer principles. 



LAURA ELIZABETH FRITTS 

1. 1- vim; I lis, N. C, 

Degree: A.B. 

\ n * 

Nikamhan Literary Society, '33, '34, "35, '36; W. A. 
A.. '35. 36; Anjj.el.us Club. 'Jo, 

The day student room will nut be the same 

without her characteristic chuckle. She ha- a 

tunm, » n -mile rvTi.inr likes. 



AIIK.MIAM 1.IXCU1.N ] I 1 K 

men POINT, N. C, 

Degree: A.B. 

Campbell ColW, '33. 34; Debater. '35; N. C. Cham- 
[ I Debater, r s5 ; Setond in South Atlantic Extem- 
pore Contest. '35; Charter Member of Lighted* Lamp. 
'35, '36; President of Student Body. '36. 

Mr. Fulk is a Baptist preacher who likes to 
argue arid use hi-, wit; but he is also a like- 
able fellow who maintains a rather high scho- 
lastic rating. 



Page 24 




CLASS 



VIRGINIA LEE CRAXT 
04m SBURG, W, C 

Degree: A.M. 

Nikanrhan Literary Society. '33. f 34, '35, '56, Debater. 
"34, Vite-President, '35; Woman'* Student Government, 
Secretary, '35. President, '36; C, E. Society'. '3 ! '34 
'35. '36. Vim- President. '31; Y, W. C. A.. '33, '34. 
'35, '36. Secretary, '54, President. '35; W. A A.. 
"3J, 'H, '15. '36; HiJrine. ManiJKcr, ' it>; .Art Dub. 

(■■ S...I-1-lr.,' 1 IllH. <-l. ZhMJIM Si.-ifT, It.; Stu 

,1, i,r Absence Committee. >o 

Virginia lives near enough Jo the Virginia line 
to have the vernacular "house" anil "about." 
Her work on the ZENITH has been Sp I cm lid. 

MARUARKT Jf ANITA HAYWORTII 

M fOIN'T, M. C. 

Degree: A.B. 

Nilcanthan Litr-raiy Snciety. '33, "54. '35, '36, t PiilMSt, 

'54; Woman's Sport Council, '35, Treasurer, '55; W 
A. A.. '33. '34, '35, '36; Art Club, '36. 

Some people just always manage to be doing 
something worth while all the time, li 
Jnanita tsn'l taking piano lessons, she is 
tampering with "11 paiuls, Inlying favors tor a 
banquet, or struggling with "primary meth- 
ods." 



ATI.KV EUGENE HARTMAN 

ADVANCE, N. C. 

Degree: M.S. 
k II + 



Thatean Lurraiv Society, 
Vice-President t,j Cuba, 



'33, '34. '55; Hi Po, '34; 
56; Baseball Manager '5c, 



Atley, sleepiness, and a cigarette are insep- 
arable; however, this must be only skin deep, 
for he has been a ready helper and worker 
in many phases of school life. 



[>' >KI^ III'I I \ III IHII.COCK 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Degree; A.B. 

Nikanthan Literary Society, J 33. '34. *35, *36; Monitor 

'34; Chaplain, '36; College Marshal, '35; W. A. A, 

'33, ■34. '56 

|)mt i*. a quiet kintl of girl, always ready *n 

lend a helping hand. She evidently must 

ihink a lot, for good grades are sure to come 

her way. 



Page 25 



SENIOR 




I.OIS IS III I. A 1 1]- IX, M. (UK 
HlGil POINT, S, C. 

Degree: A.B. 

Nifcanthan Lircraty Society. '33, '34, "35. '36, Chap- 
lam, '35. President, '36. Debater, '34, '*"»; F.in.-rv.t.. 
Council Represenrartve. '34, 'J^, President, '35; Char- 
ter Member of Lighted Lamp. '35, '36; Business Man- 
.i^l-t of Zenith, "36: Representative to Student Govern. 
ment, '36; Student Government Organization Comtnit- 
Kc, '34; w*. A A- '35; S-iident Absence Committee, 
' J6; "Who's Who." '36. 

I low c - li i ■ anyone snv anything about I.ois? 



RAY JOHN J'KRVY llll.l ON 

'I IIIJMASVII.I.H, N. C. 



Degri 



A.B. 



Rcu jumped tin 1 Junior Class through sum- 
mer school, thus he ranks as a senior. He 
has a kintl, winning personality that comes 
'Hit sn gradually thai he was hardly known 
uniil this vear. Maybe it's his mustache 
shaped like a spreading V, upside down. 



i.l nRGF. ZURINGL1 INGLI 

S1I.ER CITY, X, C, 

Degree: A.E. 

I T K 
Akmthlritan Literary Society. '33, '34. '35. '36; Base* 
ball, '33. '34, '35. '36; Block "H" Club, '34. '3s 

Everyone "picks on" George, who lakes ii 
good-naturedly. (Thev say he goes home ev- 
ery fall to set his rabbit traps.) I don't know. 
But 1 ttii know In- is a jolly good spurt. 
George is everybody's friend. 



MILLARD G. ISLET? 

GRAHAM, N. C 

Degree: A.B. 

Thalean Literary Society, '33. '34, '35, Chaplain. '33; 

Dramatic Clue, 'ii, Y M C A., 'J 3 '34 '35. '56; 

Business Manager of Handbook. '35; C H Society '33 

•34. '35, '36; Soccer. '34. '31. '56; Co-Captain, '36; 

Baseball, '34. •)■>. -!6: Block "H- 1 Club, '35. "36; 
Choir. '35, '34 

"Jerr>" is sort to puil the newest "bite" on 
the campus. 



PoCJe. 26 



• • 




CLASS 



FRANK HOOKER JONES 

l IMBSTQM v, N. C 
Dftjfri-; A.U. 

Aii inhabitant of the underworld! Seldom do 
we net a glimpse nf him, he stays down in 
the "ehem" lab so much. He talks ver) little, 
so we wonder whether he will be thai coun- 
try doctor, or a jjreat medical missionary. 



FRANCES WALKER LAMBETH 

HJCH MINT, N. C 

Dtjffti . A.B. 

Saltm Cbll«g«, '3 3, '34. 

Frances comes out here chiefly for her classes. 
So few ill the Students realli know her. How- 
ever, ive know ihat she li.is a keen sense erf 
humor, and a radiant personality. 



CHRISTINE LAI HAM 
men point, v C 

Degree; A.B. 

Altl'lll, ■■< III [it. I II'. Si.. llTt' S3. H *1 M.i.l I'll. 

.ill.i '34, "35. '36; Art Club. '33; Chemistry Club. '35. 

Her lour years have been divided smoiuj 
cooking, chemistry, and sewing. She has pre- 
pared herself t<> make an excellent housewife 
with this knowledge, being already equipped 
with a sweet disposition and a pleasant, 
friendly "honey." 



Kl BY MARTIN 

MQCKSTO.I.E, \. i. 

Degree: A.B. 

Nikamhan Lirerarv Society, '33. '34, '35, "36; Chris- 
tian EnA.-ai'tir Socieiy, '33. '34. '35. '36; V W 
C. A.. }}. '34; An Club. *36. 

II there are am eats to be planned and pre- 
pared. Ruby is chairman of that committee, 
She ^-eems to know how to work "Ma" YVhil- 
akei mid serves as an intermediary nearly 
ever) time whether we want rolls or fruit 
juices. 



Page 27 



SENIOR 




JAMES NOFF MASSEY 

PLEASANT HILL, S. C 

Degree: B.S. 

Thalean Literary 5ociety, "33, "34, '35, ' 36; Choir, '3', 

'34. "l c >, Christian Endeavor Society, '33, '3-4. '35, '36; 

Y. M. C. A.. 33. '34. >3J, '3< 

The first year James took the regular fresh- 

man courses. The hiIht x t-.i rs he ha*- added 

an extra course tn his daily routine — 'he cara- 

pn» course. It is always James anil Im-m. 



DOROTHY CORDEI.LE McCOLL.'M 

KKIDSVll.LE, N. C, 

Degree; B.S. 

Nikanthan Literary Society. "33. r 34. '35, '36; Art 

Club. '33. '36, President, '36; V. W. C A., '36; W. 

A. A., '36; Modem Priscilla, '34. '35, "36, President, 

"36; Chemistry Club. '35; C. E. Society. '36. 

i >'n '.in invt'i r,,r^ii hv\ ua\\, :i i tl < u r 1 1 luir, 

her dainty turned-Lip nose, and her beautiful 

complexion. 



JOSIE MAE McNEILl, 

ASrtEVll.I.E, N. C. 

Degree: A.B. 

Nikanthan Literary Society. '33, '35: Choir. '33; W 
A A . '35. 36; V. \\\ C. A., '33. 

Although Jo is a senior, she still looks like a 
kid. She is always smiling, skipping, or hum- 
ming. Yet, she plans to teach science and 
math. She succeeded well in her practice 
teaching. Her accomplishments reveal that 
she is grown up. 



ROBERT E, LEE MOSER 

BURLINGTON, X. c. 

Thale.in Literary Society. '33, '34. "35, "36; Society 
Debater, '35. President. '36; Ministerial Association. 
'33, '34. '35. "36. Secretary, '34, President. '35; Men's 
Dormitory Council, "36, Secretary, "36; Christian En- 
deavor Society, '33. '34, '35, '36; Purple Kittens. 3 4; 
Y. M. C. A.. '33. '34, '31. '36. Treasurer. "36. 

Lee is a happy-go-lucky Southerner, by all 
outward appearances, hut he has what it 
fakes. His important offices are evidence of 
this, among them being pastor-hip of a church. 



Page 28 




CLASS 



MARY ALICE NESBIT 

HICH POIKT, S'. C. 

Degrir: B.S. 

ii •]■ 

ArttrncsUn, °33; Modecn PriwfUa, "33. '34, '35, '36. 

Chemistry Club, *34, 

Alire came ni "-clioul seeking a degree in Die- 
tetics. Most laboriously did 'he pursue her 
studies, aiming high fur the Future. But, In. 
:in- fall she ■ 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 with i diamond flashing 

from i finger nti her left hand. Anyway, the 
dietetics will prohahly save a doctor's nil!. 



marv ELIZABETH pariiam 

KEJJOERSOK, V c. 

i A * 

Artemeataii Literary Society, '33, ' 3 4 .^ " i 5 . '36. Mom 
tot. '34. President. '36; ChrrMian Endeavor Soctetv. 
'33, '34. '35. '36; Purple Players, '3}, '34; Unit 
Theater, '3tS; CoMeRe Marshal, '35; Y. W. C. A.. '}}, 
'34. '}5. '36; Class Tr.asuter. '35. 

One associates with Man her beautiful, long, 

blonde plaits. The library will tint seem the 

same it we return and "lie i> no! there. 



DOT PERRY 

TlJOMASV'lU.ti, P, C. 

Degree: A.B. 
e * 

Artemesian Literary Society, '33, '34, '35, '36; Chor- 
ister. '35: Chen Leader. 34. "3J '36; Chief '?6: '#, 
A. A.. '35. ')6; Secretary of Qass, '}); Vice-Preji- 
dent, *34: Little Theater, "16. 

Dot is always the same Doi — always full of 

pep — whether leading the college wing from 
the stage or before the bleachers. We cannot 
forget her dimpled cheeks ant I ready smile. 



JESSE LEO PITTARD 

ROAKOKB RAPIDS, H, t:. 

Degree: All. 

Thalean Literatv Society, '33, '34, '35, '36; Ministerial 
Alaociation '33 11 '■'■ 16; Choir. '33 ' ■ 
"36; Y. M. C. A.; Christian Endeavor Son.p. 

Leo has the bearing of a ministerial student 

full of integrity, Above all things, he i-- a 

student and a shrewd salesman. 



Psqa 2J 



SENIOR 




EDGAR HOWARD SNIDER 

iiii:ii POINT, K. C 

Degree: B.S. 

E A * 
Zenith, '35, '36; Editor of Zenith. >t> 

J'he belter one kunu's Fd, the better one likes 
hint. But he has been m> busj that !i is hard 
to know him. 



CLARA ALICE TANNER 

I IT IT ETON, N. L, 



Degree: AH. 



'35. '36. dm, 
'36: W. A A . 



Nikanrhan Literary Society. '33, "34. 
run Endeavor Society. *33. '34. '35. 
'33. '34. 

II Clan is nut helping in the kitchen, she i> 

helping somewhere else. It seems a natural 

gift— and a jtifi that will make it hard fur 

others tn do Without her. 







ERNEST I NE VONC AN NON 








STRICKLAND 










Mil. 11 POINT, K, C 










Degree: A.B. 










A 6 * 






O. 


etimtti. '33. '}4, '35, *36: Vi 


ce-PtpAideni. 


'34 


Ch 


iii . 


*3J, '34, 'J5 '}g; Dramatic 


Club. '33; 


Arte 


Indian 


Literary Society. '33. "34. '35j 


Pranr.'.t,, '33 


'3+ 



Ernestine certain!} pulled a big surprise on 
II- this year — that oi becoming Mrs. Strk'k- 

I I. 



rHOMAS CARSICK TEAGUE 

KERNERSVOJ t, N. c. 

Degree: A.B. 



V.! 



H.I 



Coltega, '-6. 
H. P. C, 



'28, '31; Sumrnc-f School, 
33. '34. '35. 



After teaching foi several years he decided 
that he wanted his "-hi-ep-sliin." He's inter- 
ested in Sociology, and he is a K"od speaker 
and singer. 



Page 30 




CLASS 



K[ INK I I EON THOMPSON 
HIGH hum, H. C. 

I)ff/)i;\- A.M. 
Football, '33: Gass Treuurer, "36. 

Leon is a friend who knows how l"o cu-nper- 
ate. lit- has held down a regular job and 
passed his courses, although he has not had 
time to engage in extra activities at the col- 
lide. Truly here is one of whom we call all 
say, "Well done, Leon." 

MARY LILLIAN VARNER 
M0RGAKTON, M, C 

Degree: U.S. 

t\ * 

Artetnesian Literary Society. '33„ 'M. '35, '36: Wi>m- 

an's Student Government, '35, '36; Vice-President. '36; 

Modern PrisdlU Club. '34, '35. '56; Class Treasurer, 

'34; W. A. A., 'JS, "3S. Pwsidtnt, '36. 

"Cricket" i- a hard player in the game. A 
good winner and a good Eoser« 



CHARLES FAWCETT TOMLINSON, JR. 
HIGH POIM, s.'. a 

Degree; A.B. 

U. N. C, '33. '34. 

Charles has withheld his talents and resources 
from the student hotly. We know he studies 
math. For appearance he is one of the smart- 
est dressed hoys mm the campus, and does he 
know liruv to comlimt' hiv color*? 



HAZEL 1RMA WEI.BORN 

1 HI1MASVH.I.K, H. C. 

Degree; A.B. 
a e * 

Nikanthan Litct.Tr>' Society, '33. '34, '35. '36. Secre- 
tary. '34; Choir, '34, '35; W. A. A., "35. 

When Hazel did her practice teaching last 

fall, the children liked her so well that she 

secured a regular job reaching two days .i 

week. That's saying a lot for her. 



Pdo,e 31 



SENIOR 




LEONARD WHITE 

VVINSTON-SALBM, H. (. . 

Degree: B.S. 

Weaver College, "33, '34; Tennis T«m, T 35, '36, 

Leonard always sits on the front seat in 
classes, vet he never talks vcr> much n-uli 
the classroom or out. Somehow, lie usuall) 
manages to make the Vogue so it seems he 
knows when to converse. 



HOYT HAMPTON WOOD 

MiAliiv, Kf, C. 

Degree: A.E, 

l T K 

Thalean Literary Society. '33. '34, *J5, '36. Qraplain 
"36; Foren<rc Cnuncil Representanvc, '33. '34. "35; V 
M. C. A.. '33, '34, '35; Secretary Treasurer, '34: So 
,.ien Dih.ir.'i. ?4; Intcii:ollei;j.iu- Dch.irn . 31. '}S, 'J6 
Soccer, "34; Ministerial Association. '33. '34. "35. '36 
Chaplain. '33, SccretarV'Treasurer, '34; Tumbling, 'H 
'35; Men's SruoVnt Government, 34 |J **,. p re j,j 
dent, 36; H Po, '36. 



JULIA EDNA \\ II I IARI1 

1111,11 fill VI, s. c. 

Degree: A.B. 

A O + 

Arrernesi.in Lltrrare Society. '33. T 34, '36; W. A. A.. 

'35. '36; W. A, C. '35; Pan-Hellenic Council, '36; 

ftiology Assisrant. '36; Class Trcastmr, "36, 

1'ili.i i- rvci .i pal, ;i unrki-r and a student 
Nevei ,r dull liniment, am) never an ittle one, 
1 his Senioi Class nwts a lot of its success to 

I II 1 !, |. 



M \KV ALICE FULTON 

111', II I'ntS I, X, c. 

Mascot 

Chosen i'j.5i eo he mascol "rl 1036 graduating 
class. 



Page 3; 




JUNIOR 

CLASS 



Alton Hartman 







Officers 

Alton Hartman President 

Charles Ridge Vice-President 

Julia Coe Secretary 

Gladys Maxwell Treasurer 



Page 33 



JUNIOR 




Allen Austin 


Mari Margaret Bates 


William BarnhoUSE 


High Point, N. C. 


Winston-Salem, N. ('. 


Belle Valley, Ohio 


William Booth 


Dot Bell 


Ooeu Brown 


Oxford, N. C. 


Soutbport, N, C. 


lliuh Poim, N. C, 


Jliia Coe 


Jcjk CSOWDER 


SlILI IKJ\ D \1WI\ 


lliuli Point, N. C. 


High Point, N. C. 


Salisbury, Mil. 



Page 34 









CLASS 



M A RCA It K I I>t.\n^ 

I Hah Point, N. C. 



IsMMAH Dl IRS HIT 

ThomasviHe, N. C. 



Vadalia Faklow 
Sophia, N. 0. 



LL'CV Fl'I.I.EK 

Tbomasville, N. C, 



| VUI- C,\ Will I IS 

High Point, N. ('. 



In tNCES GLETi] 

Hij-li Point, N. C. 



Sara Harris 

Summerfkkl, N. C. 



Ai rON Hartman 

Advance, N. C. 



Is/a Hill 

Dtntiin, N. C. 



Page 35 



JUNIOR 




Fai Hi ii i 

(ir;iliunr, N. C. 



G. 1. Ill 'MP1IRFVS, Jd. 

JtiLib Point, N. C. 



MARV K LLP AT RICK 

Havnesville, La. 



W, C. Kdiim/, Jk. 
High Point, N C. 



i .1 idys MaXweix 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



Samuel Mvers 

Thmnasvilfe, N. C. 



Paul Ovve.v 

Shoals, N. C. 



f.U.11 IM I' \RM K 

Rk-hmmitl, Va. 



James Parsons 

LaiiJeiiherg, Pa. 



Page 34 




CLASS 



High Point, N. C. 



Pl.KK\ PETERSON 

Wallace, N. C. 



Euz vbeth PiUTti 

MruiI^nilHTV, Ala, 



Charles Rm>oe 

Lexington, N, C. 



Wilson Rogers 
Denton, N. C. 



V. Smii n 
High P«int, X. ('. 



ALSON THOMP50S 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



VfiS'l A TttOfcCI Hi 

Lawndale. N. C. 



Quentm Veach 

T horn asvi lie, N. C. 



f.nt 37 




JUNIOR CLASS 



Francis Waklick 


William Whsner 


Iris Welch 




Lawndale, N. C, 


Hi^h Point, N. C. 


High Puim, 


N. C. 


Agnes Louise Wilcox 


Furman Wright 


Joan Ckowdex, 


Mascot 


Greensboro, N. C. 


Lawndale, N. C. 


High Point, 


N, C. 



Page 33 




Frank Niernsee 



SOPHOMORE 

CLASS 




Officers 

Frank NieRnsee President 

Katherine Bivins V ice-President 

Caroline Pirtle Secretary 

Robert Rankin Treasurer 



Page 3? 








SOPHOMORE GIRLS 



Ei tzABETH Bach bll 
RijTir Awhson Hrii.es 
Jacqueuni Rliu Cameron 

I .III* Kill I HIS K t'MlilKS'J ir 

Marion Gadsen Dickson 

ECLEHN \ M IRi Fusi KR 
Marjorie Fred Ei.kjns 

111! ORETM Villi IT GABRIEI 

Maki Frances < >urincer 
MjIri Kiiii Hendricks 

I'AI 111 RllAVh IIendrick 
K I I li I KEN I [EPTINSI all 

Berraroine Richard Hurley 

Kathleen |ihjnston t 

Marguerite Et 
Mary F.li/abi u 



Louise Jones Gord^ 

Hazel B. Kizkr 
Mam Nbison Kishk 
Cl ri i da Cei.ia Lackey 
Mm hhed Lamb 
Bonn it Lumpkin 

Maui LOU MokfIIJ 

(Catherine Elizabeth Piiibbs 
Caroline Pirti.e 
De Lois Esiellh Pressley 
Helen Celeste ReaddiCK 
Anne Cilberi Ross 
Elsie Mae Sink 
Mary Bailey Tice 
ijise Jenkins 
ll Phillips 



Page 40 




SOPHOMORE BOYS 



J. Lawrence Austin 
Clyde H. Bass, Jr. 
Emery Anthony Bencini 
Arnold Lee Bolen 
W. Howard Bkadnek 
William Earl Brinklei 
Lawrence Combs 
David Francis Cooper 
j. ezell garlington 
Occo Dermont Gibes 
June Ai.son Gray 
Thermos Erastus Gfticc 
Wayne T. Harris 
Thomas H. Hillakd, Jr, 
Herbert B. Hauchtaung 
D. Clark Johnson 

Raymond 



Edward Grimes 
Whitman Carter Kearns 
Elbert Wilson Lake 
Charles Wiluam M irtin 
James Richardson Mattocks 
John Miller McDnu h i 
Frank McIIenrv Xiernsee 
Allen Julian Parker 
Riiihri BLAIR Rankin 
Charles Evans Ridge 
Robert Assison Rogers 
Donald Raymond Smith 
Louis Van Smith 
Edwin Goods Watkiss, Jr. 

n. i\ win 1 1 li 

Tasker FrrZCERALD Williams 
Joseph Intrieri 



• 



P n g i". A) 




oAlma iMater 



In our hearts we hold the Mem'ry 
Of a place we love the best; 
O'er it waves the purple banner, 
Emblem of its fearlessness. 



When we're on the field of battle, 
When we strive for praise to thee; 
May our teams be undefeated 
Ours the crown of Victory. 



Chorus 

We praise thy name and honor true, 

They stand for loyalty and love: 

May yours be fame that to you is due, 

For we will always fight. 

We wdnt the right 

To uphold thy standards high; 

To give the best we have to thee, 

Mem'ries of you we will cherish, 

H. P. C. 



Page 42 




FRESHMAN 

CLASS 



Max RnriF.Ks 




MUlWl^ rft lik I , 



Officers 

Max Rogers President 

Mary- Mitchell Baity Vice-President 

Virginia Curry Secretary 

Wayne A. Hornaday Treasurer 




FRESHMAN GIRLS 



Olivia Amos 
Margaret Austin 
Mary Mitch eli. BArn 
Hilda BaRBEe 

N IN< \ li.WM'i I E 
Hfj F.N B VI 1- 

Nelle Blonde Bess 
Virginia Burton 
Christine Cakroi i. 

t \ I IttKIM' COCHRANE 

Nina Graham Crawford 
Virginia Curry 

Kl IZ.VBETU Cl'I.H'M 

Ruth Ler 

EvEl VN UNO] El 
OtCA Mari i i 1 (■ 
Grace Moody 
Frances Mi si 
Juantta Nelson 
Nanci Parham 
Lillian Pearson 
Gilbert Primm 
Pairilta Redman 
Kathryn SeSston 



Elizabeth D VRR 
Virginia DttON 

I 1.1/ 1J1MII Hi 1.EK13E 

Virginia Ellison 
Vera Mae Ferree 
Rebecca Finch 

MaRC.IIU I I .H.l I M \\ 

Mm iikhi Grant 
Ci.eo Hardee 

MaHEI 1] AKCETT 

Grace Hicks 
Elizabeth Hoffman 
Laura Jane Holt 

Edna Sink 



Helen Rae holton 
irma Grey Hornaoai 
IIei en Hunter 
Olive Hutchins 
Bessie Hyman 
Lucille Ingram 
Ercelle Ivev 
Violet Jenkins 
PuKuun Junes 
Sarah Jcines 
Kim Keller 
[ icqi elini: Kinney 
Loreni KOONTS! 



Sau.ik Ruth Sui'turi) 
SOPH! \ Taim.in 
Sara Hohresi Thumpson 
Evelyn Turner 
Jane Truesdall 
Jimsi chin i- Walker 
Margaret Walton- 
Patsy Ward 
Ann Watkins 
Dorothy Wiggixs 



Page <H 




FRESHMAN BOYS 



Jons Apple 
A. R. Bookoot, Jr. 
Vaughn Boone 
James Brandon 
Ralph Brii.es 
Kaki Brown 
liril I AMI Brinklev 
Joseph Cecil 

Kai ['II C'ul LETT 

Frei> Cos 

George Craves 

George Croweli 

J \mes Lather 
Dunntr Morgan 
Herman Newell 

CHARLES OSTW u [> 

Rotikr Peeler 
Max Rogers 
Charles Royals 

RlCIIARI! Set/er 

Damel Sharpe 

DEWEY Sl/E.Vt(tRE 

Edward Stireualt 



K"R! k.-j I- 1 K i s - 

Charles Ei lincton 

UaRK\ ErSIILEH 

Bq\ d I "i re 
Kermit Frajiif.r 
OlIELL Gallimore 
ROVCE C iii.:;- 

Jack Gibson 
Rav Giles 
Inns Glasgow 
['■u i Hamulus 
Charles Harvji i e 



Pi IK I Ek llAt'SER 

VI. C. (I i mii WON, Jr. 
William Rested 
(,. W. Mm mi-, 111 
Wayne Hornadai 

Horace [I HER I IIS 

l» A I F ] 1KKI I [ 

Frank Johnson 

I '.«h Jones 
Willis Kerr 
James Leon uto 
Owen Linolev 



Ai i es Thackbr 
Glenn Tow iky 

s, E. Trocben 
Lesi er Valentine 
i in m f-k Wagoner 
Lindsay Walker 
Wtr iiiR Walton 
\i i en Watson 
Edgar Welborn 
S. J. Wei. burs 
Raymond Wfi born 



ClIARI ES Willi 1- 



• o 



Page 45 




FIRST AND SECOND YEAR COMMERCIAL 
STUDENTS 



Joseph Gilbert Cecil 
Fred J from e Cox, Jr. 
Robert L. Elkins, Jr. 
Boyd Conrad Foots 

I I. il - I I II l , M IMuRI 

Ron i I i l i A [ . I- (,ibi;s 

M. C. Henderson, Jr. 
Dale Claud .[.arret! 
Willis Robert Kerr 
James Ci.yui I. i nn-R 
\tm\ Marshall Thomas, Jr. 
Kathryn Fidelia Sexton 
Mara Edna Sink 
Clyde H. Bass, Jr. 
Lawerence H. Combs 
Herbert Blake Hauchtalinc 
John: Mm i m McDmvm.i. 



Robert As si son Rogers 
Edwin Goons W.vtkins, Jr. 
Makjdrik Fred Ei.kins 
Kathleen Hretinstall 
Mary Frances Gerrincer 
Samuel Erman Trocdon 

I In DA 1 LOISl B IRBEE 
Mary M. Hi i \u- 
Frances Louise Muse 
Mn oreo Stalling; 
Mildred Elizabeth Hoffman 
n inca rdystek pakham 
Frances F.vei.vn Turner 
Aw Criciiton Atkins 
Dorothy Marie Wiggins 
Doris Ercei i.e Ivey 
Mildred I.ambe 
[Catherine Elizabeth Piiibbs 
Myrtle Caroline Pirti.e 
M uti Bailey Tice 
Oi ivia Amos 



Nancy Mariaii Barnette 
Frances Christine Carroll 
Nina Graham c r aw for d 
Virginia Elizabeth Cui.lum 
Josephine Elizabeth Hardee 
Grace Bennett Hicks 
La lira Jane Holt 
Hyacinth Hunter 
Lena Virginia Hunter 
Sai.lif Ruth Siiueord 
Margaret Louse Smith 
Josephine Ingle Walker 
Vera Agnes York 
Clarence Ralph Hrii.es 
Eari Martts Brown 
Robert Jim Leonard 
Bessii II y.man 



Page 46 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Sarah Catherine Bivins 
Mrs. Ei.ise Eugenia Clark 
M \rc.l erite Manx Helen Louise Dameron 

Edward Jam its Phisss 
Wilbur Latimer Walton 

MYRTLE WlNNlFRED MATTHEWS 



MUSIC 



N'nu.E Marie Humphreys 

George Emory Humphreys 
Sarah Hutch ins Sarah Scruggs 

Betty Likeback Elsie Thomas 

Phyllis Strickland 

Mrs. \V. T. Tn i 



Page 47 



THE 

1936 ZENITH STAFF 

EXPRESSES 

GRATEFUL APPRECIATION 
TO 

MISS VERA IDOL 

FOR HER BENEVOLENT CRITICISM 
AND COUNSEL 

AN D TO 

ROBERT (BOB) HOSKINS 

FOR HIS INTEREST AND 

DESIGNING OF THE 

ART WORK 



/// 

New types of highly developed planes, 
from the tiny one-passenger sport plane to 
the giant mulli-engined airliners capable of 
carrying dozens of passengers and tons of 
express, are shown to record breaking 
crouds. Morning and evening, Aviation 
is making its thrilling stories of spanning 
an ocean or continent, of the discovery of 
a lost city, of the rescue of the storm-bound 
or the flood-trapped, and of the strength- 
ening of international friendships. 



ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 




Coach C. Virch Ymv 

All athletics of the college are under the guidance and control of the Athletic Associa- 
tion. This group, composed of five faculty members and two representatives ftom the 
student body, provides a well-rounded athletic program which enables us to stand at 
the top in the North State Conference. It supervises the scheduling of games, enforce- 
ment of all conference rules, determining the eligibility of players and the awarding of 
monograms. It srrives for rlie highest in sportsmanship in college athletics. 




Page SI 



DlAMONT 



P[>RW'Atm 



Brinkley 



Martin 



Fo&vaud 



Intrieri 



Culler 



Booi H 



Center 



Harris 

1 ! ■ . I I I.' 



Elder 

Guasli 



ToWERY 

Guard 




VARSITY 



The present year brought the Purple Panther cagers their first North State 
Conference crown under the tutelage of Coach C. Virgil Yow, popular High Point 
mentor for the past four seasons. 

After dropping the opening conference contest to the Appalachian Mountaineers 
by the count of 28-27, rhe Panthers staged one of the most brilliant winning streaks 
in rhe history of the circuit ro take down top honors with eleven victories in twelve 
games. 



Page 52 




i<M<> Cn \mimii\sfiii' Krsi i.ts 

January S — High Point ... i- ■ v. A|.|i.iI.i..Ili.jm . . . . lS— Here 

January n — High Point . .... 43; v<. I.cimir Rliym- 30 — Here 

January 1+ — EJigh Point 33; vs. A. C. C 22 — There 

January 17 — High Point +J ; vs. Appalachian 24 — There 

January 18— High Point 42; vs. Catawba 31— There 

January 23 — High Point 51; vs. W. C. T. C +9 — Here 

January 2;— High Point 41 ; vs. Elon 15— There 

February 3— High Point 41 : vs. Lenoir TChynt 40— There 

February 6— High Point 4;; vs. Catawba 37— Here 

February 8 — High Point 52; vs. Elon . . . . 43 — Hen- 
February 15 — High Point 60; vs. Guilford i; — Here 

February 20 — High Point no; vs. Gailford 28 — There 



BASKETBALL 



This was the first championship five that High Point has produced since 1930, 
when the Panthers captured their third consecutive loop crown. 

Playing host to the conference teams in the first annual North State Tourna- 
ment, held in Harrison gymnasium on February 27th, 28th, and 29th, the Yow-men 
increased their court prestige by annexing the tournament title to their champion- 
ship honors. They displayed a brilliant brand of ball to defeat Catawba, Elon, and 
Lenoir Rhyne on successive nights. 



Page S3 



FRESHMAN 
BASKETBALL 



The Purple Kitten basketeers, under the 
direction of Elijah Diamont, student coach, 
and G. W. Holmes, Freshman manager, 
turned in a very satisfactory record this year. 
They encountered several strong teams on 
courts both at home and away from the cam- 
pus, Besides the preliminary contests, ar- 
ranged for practically ail the home varsity 
games, the Kittens played several nearby 
high schools. On a five-day trip into the 
western part of the state, they won four out 
of five games. 

Giles, Ellington, Edgar Welbome, and 
Hauser displayed real basketball ability, 
which indicates that more material is at hand 
to strengthen the varsity. 

Others who played on the Purple Kitten 
team were: Trogden, S, J. Welborn, Wag- 
oner, Peeler, Setzer, Henderson, Morgan, 
and Gallimore. 







Page 54 



^iif'XVirji^. 

&m **' f 1 ^ >'« * m *»"* #m 



SOCCER 



Although they suffered defeat for the first 
time during the history of the sport here, the 
Purple Panther shinbusters continued to main- 
tain the high standards set by the soccer teams 
during the past six years. 

Boasting one of the most powerful elevens in 
the state, the locals experienced a successful sea- 
son both in collegiate circles and in Central 
Carolina Soccer Association, which is composed 
of fast independent and college clubs. 

In collegiate competition the Panthers lost 
only one game and tied one. They defeated 
Catawba, divided with the Duke Blue Devils, 
and gained a victory and a tie with the David- 
son Wildcats. 

The strong Kernersville club defeated them 
in one league tilt, but the charges of Coach 
Broadus Culler, student coach for the past 
three years, came back to take the title with 
nine victories in ten games. 



page 55 



BASEBALL 



High Point's 1935 baseball team ended the 
season with fourth place in the North State 
Conference, though the club was hurt by the 
withdrawal of Sherrill, star pitcher and captain, 
who signed to play professional ball. The en- 
tire squad deserves credit for its sportsmanship 
and hard work. The combination of Rudisill, 
Harris, and Diamont carried the brunt of the 
battery attack, with Brinkley turning in a few 
creditable performances. As a whole, Culler 
proved to be the most valuable man, and with 
the loss of Jennings only, the team looks for- 
ward to a successful 1936 season. The Panthers 
played a total of eighteen games last season, 
losing nine and winning nine. A total of six 
won and five lost was the team's standing in the 
conference race. Not only colleges, but profes- 
sional and semi-professional teams are included 
in the schedule. 








Page Si 




Humf&rttys, Cooper, Setter, Jartctt, Hornady 
Roger** Nierniee, Whit? 



TENNIS 



I'liiiugh .1 minor spun ai High l\>im < ol 
lege, tennis has become outstanding in interest. 
Perhaps more students are enjoying it than any 
other activity. Competition is keener every year 
and the men that land positions on the team do 
so after several hard-fought battles. With the 
three varsity men, Frank Niernsee, Leonard 
White, and Wilson Rogers, from the team of 
last year, and with the talent brought in from 
the Freshman Class, the team looks forward to 
a very successful year. Dale Jarre tt. Freshman, 
exhibited the most surprising attack by wading 
through the preliminaries to lose a hard-fought 
match to Niernsee, ace netman for the Panthers. 
Buck Setzer, also a Freshman, looks promising 
as varsity material. 

Handicapped last spring by not having courts 
in any condition on which to practice, the sea- 
son passed without a match won, although some 
of the men turned in victories for themselves. 



Page 57 



WO MAN' S 
ATH LET I C 
COUNCIL 



The Woman's Athletic Council is the gov- 
erning board of the association and is composed 
of its officers and various sports managers. 

The Athletic Council looks after such rou- 
tine duties as the nomination of officers, the 
selection of pledge week, and the awarding or 
honors. The main purpose of the council is to 
uphold the fundamental aims of the entire as- 
sociation and to recommend to the society 
worthwhile activities. 

The following are officers who served on the 
Woman's Athletic Council during the past 
year: 



Lillian Varner 
Pauline Parker 
Jacqueline Cameron 
Margaret Dixon 
Marguerite Jenkins 
Virginia Grant 
Dorothy Bell 
Inza Hill 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Editor 

Hiking Manager 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Publicity Chairman 




Page 53 




WOMAN'S 
ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



The Woman's Athletic Association during its 
second year on the campus has inspired great 
interest in athletics for co-eds. The organiza- 
tion, national in scope, opens its membership to 
all girls who care to participate in sports, 

Ail intramural tournaments are sponsored by 
the association. The schedule for the past year 
included volleyball, basketball, baseball, tennis, 
and tumbling. Class teams in each of these 
sports battled for the Sidney Brame Loving 
Cup, which is given each year to the class whose 
teams have the highest percentage rating. 

To recognize individual achievement, the as- 
sociation awards points for the participation in 
athletics. To win an H. P. letter, five hundred 
points are required, but a girl may win the cov- 
eted H. P. sweater by earning 2,000 points. 



?aqe 5? 



VOLLEYBALL 



Fall sports for women began in earnest when 
volleyball season opened. During the intra- 
mural tournament the first week in December, 
the hard-hitting Freshman team defeated ail 
upperclassmen and captured the Brame Loving 
Cup, The final scores were: 



Sophomores 


46; Seniors 


15 


Juniois 


30; Seniors 


26 


Freshmen 


34; Juniors 


23 


Freshmen 


38; Seniors 


37 


Sophomores 


42; Juniors 


24 


Freshmen 


32; Sophomores 


25 



With the culmination of the intramural tilt, 
a student committee selected from those who 
showed outstanding ability the following to 
make an "all-star" team: Ruth Hendricks, Eliza- 
beth Hoffman, Fay Holt, Marguerite Jenkins, 
Violet Jenkins, Olga Marlette, Elbabeth Phil- 
lips, and Ann Watlcins. 




Page 40 




BASKETBALL 



Every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon dur- 
ing basketball season, between the hours of four 
and six, you will find a group of co-eds scrap- 
ping on the floor of Harrison Gymnasium. Al- 
though the girls do not engage in intercollegi- 
ate games, basketball has proved to be the most 
interesting of intramural sports. More class 
enthusiasm and stirring competition are demon- 
strated during the basketball tournament than 
at any other time during the entire program of 
the Athletic Association. 

Fall sports were culminated by the basketball 
tournament, which was scheduled the last week 
in March. Each class team fought hard and 
was urged to victory by loyal boosters; but the 
dashing Freshmen basketeers proved too strong 
for the upperclassmen teams. They stood un- 
dr I enter] champion*. 



Page 61 



TENNIS 



Following the spring baseball tournament, the 
Woman's Athletic Association sponsored an 
intramural tennis tilt. Because of the large 
numbers of entries, the ladder system was used 
for the tournament. Keen class competition was 
displayed as each individual player represented 
her class. Balls flew fast over the courts almost 
constantly. 

After three weeks of fighting across the net, 
Adylene McCoIIum and Faye Holt battled their 
way to the top round in the singles. The final 
clash brought the championship to Adylene and 
the Senior Class. 

The Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior 
classes each sent teams into the doubles. The 
two upperdass teams were unable to withstand 
the fast balls of the Freshmen, Marie Stevens 
and Mary Frances Gerringer, who carried the 
laurels for their class. 




Page il 




TU MBLI NG 



Although tumbling has been taught along 
with the various other sports, it was not Lin til 
last year that a tumbling team was organized 
and special attention given to those girls who 
snowed skill in executing the tumbling feats. 

On April 12th, last year, the four classes held 
a tumbling tournament. It was a contest largely 
between the Freshmen and Sophomores, and the 
Sophomores were declared the winners. The 
Freshmen showed more picturesque stunts be- 
cause of their numbers; but the Sophomores 
displayed more athletic ability and expertness. 
Many of their formations were cteated by the 
girls themselves. 

This year a class in tumbling Has been taught. 
The girls have learned to do hand-springs, head 
and elbow stands, forward and backward rolls, 
to bicycle, to make various figures, and to build 
pyramids. 



Piqe il 



WOMAN'S 
BASE BALL 



When basketball season is over, the co-eds 
of the college immediately turn their attention 
to baseball. As in the other sports, an annual 
tournament is held to determine the champion 
class. 

Last spring the base-runners labored days be- 
fore they were able to transform the wilderness 
behind the girls' dormitory into a baseball dia- 
mond. With each succeeding class pracrice, 
well-trodden paths between the bases became 
visible. 

Teams from the Freshman, Sophomore, and 
Junior classes entered the tournament, which 
occurred the second week in May. Competition 
was very keen. During the first round, each 
team won and lost one game. In the second 
series of games the hard-hitting Sophomore 
team, led by their star hurler, Faye Holt, fought 
through victoriously. 




Page H 



tv 

Those -uibo are familiar with the trend 
in Aviation realise that the first thirty years 
only foreshadow the tremendous develop- 
ment of the next decade. Having demon- 
strated its practicability, its safety, and its 
economy, Aviation has come to its own. 
Great financiers and small investors alike 
are buying stocks in a progressive billion 
dollar industry producing airplanes for 
military, commercial, and private use. The 
public is interested in Aviation; it has taken 
its position as an integral factor oj modern 
life. 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 

Student Government at High Point College is 
no longer experimental. Since 1933 the students 
have proved their ability in matters of cooperative 
self-government. The council has profited by its 
mistakes, and probably its accomplishments have 
now reached a period of quiet growth and devel- 
opment. 

The Student Government has initiated a work- 
able honor system, lias handled matters of disci- 
pline efficiently, and has been instrumental in the 
attainment of a greater srudent unity, a deeper 
regard for school ideals, and a growing, enthusias- 
tic college spirit. 

A. Lincoln Fulk, 




f% rs 




Csowdeh, Stitclar-y; Fulk, PitiiJml; Austis. Vise Pmitttnt; 

Thacreb, Phillips, Feiihee, Weisnek. Bell, Ghat, Hqrnadv, 

Hedglcock. 



Page 47 




Phillips. Mawfeix. Varner, Troxlek. Rates. G&ant 



Viw.inia Grant, , 
Lillian Vaksek . 



WOMAN'S HALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

. . . . President Gladys Maxwell . 

. . Vice-President Elizabeth Phillips 

Hh-eh Bates . . . Freshman Representation 



Secretory 

Ti easui • t 




Diamont. Wood. Mosrb. Intrirpi, Garlington. Myers. Owen 



Il'n i Win-in 



McCULLOCH HALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

. . . . President Elijah Diamont . 

Lee Mosek Secretary-Treasurer 



^ice-President 



Page 68 



PUBLICATIONS 
BOARD 



The Publications Board is an informal or- 
ganization governing the student publications 
of the college. Its purpose is to promote unity 
and good will between The Hi-Po and the 
Zenith; and its duties are to strengthen the 
prestige of the publications, to create a closer 
feeling among the members of the two staffs, 
and to encourage the student's loyalty to bis 
board by dividing the responsibilities. Regula- 
tions are that the board supervise the signing 
of contracts and the appointments to the two 
boards. The student may not be a member of 
both the Zenith and The Hi-Po staff at the 
same time. All cuts and photographs of each 
shall be available to the other without extra 
cost or delay. These rules have brought about 
a congeniality between the staffs that enables 
each to work more successfully. 

The editors and the managers of the two 
publications, the advisor of the Zenith, and a 
chairman appointed by President Humphreys 
constitute the membership of the board. 




Snidek, Austin 
Rulfs. HeogboocKi Wkisneb 



Page 49 



THE ZENITH 



» 




EDGAR SNIDER 
1 ditoi 



This year the staff of your annual has endeavored to give you something different in the field 

of college yearbooks. As you will noli ft- throughout the honk, a hru tvpiiHraphii-a] style is evi- 
dent, there is a touch of color here and there, the cover is new and different- 

Believe us when we say that our task has heen a hard one, but one that each has taken a 
delight in ami has enjoyed. From September until April, we have heen taking pictures, visual- 
izing each page, selling ads. editing ropy, checking and double-checking. Von have the result in 
your hands; it is our very best; each member of the staff hopes that it will be the pride of the 
103*1 class and of the college. We have used as a theme the history of aviation and its rapid 
growth to suggest novelty, progress, and improvement from year to year. 

I " loll Daniels, Herbert Hitch, Tom Dndamead, and Miss Vera Idol, we express our sincere 
thanks, for without their aid and direction there would not be a 193'i ZENITH. 

EDGAR Sniper. 




ZENITH STAFF 

Roger.,, HedgeceKk. Snider, Owen, Grant 



Page 70 




THE ZENITH 



a 



LOIS HEDGECOCK 

BuiitiC't A/dn*Ig<v 




Staff 








Edgar Snider 
Editor 




Vi»(;im,\ Grant 
Associate Editor 






Paw Owen 

./ssoifd/i' Editoi 


„ois Heogecock 
Manager 




Leo Pittard 
Associate Manager 






Wilson - Rogers 
. Idi'i-rtisian Maimiier 


C.nm.y (.'kavkk 
Photographer 




N. P. Yakborgugh 
Faculty Adviser 




L 



Back of the printed page 



Page 71 



THE HI-PO 








WILLIAM WFISNHR 
Editor 



TilE Hl-Po organization has worked siiKitifhly this u 'iir in Iniii^Iny oul each week .1 college 
paper filled with the events ilut wr believe are of Interest to students. We have trieil to continue 
THE Ih-Po tradition of accurate news coverage ami constructive editorial policy, together with 
ideals of our own. 

An important aim of the paper t h i ^ year has been ir> keep the students of High Point College 
in strp with the best thinkers of youth throughout the world. To this idea we have devoted some 
new* spaee and editorial comment, the school has been more interested in cooperative student 
movements this year than ever before, and we feel that THE Hl-Po has been the iuMii^amr. 

The staff has not neglected the local situation, as it has been enthusiastic in its news gather- 
ing, and [ believe that coverage lias been as complete as at an> rime in (lie history of the paper. 
The Ht-Po has been glad to chronicle a vear ol activit} and growth* 

W. W. Weiss er. 




Cooper, Parham. Peterson, Turner, Bates, Hill 
Harcman. Bell. WVisner, M. M. Bates 



Page 72 




THE HI-PO 



ALLEN AUSTIN 



» 



Hi SINESS DEPARTMENT 



Editorial Department 

W. W, Weishbr . Bdhot Allen Austin, Business Vfanayn 

Dorothy Bfj.i Mtutaijiini Editor \V. V. Bahkhouse . Advertising Manager 

M. A. Hartman Sports Editot 5, \v. Mters . . . . Circulation Manager 

Reporters 

Davim cooper, [wza iiur, inn Coe, M. M. Bates, Nahct Parham, Perri Peterson, 

Helen Bates. Virginia ("irry 



lii SINESS Si IFI 

Inns Ai'i'i i Mm i W'uiiii S, B l> UVSON 




Gibbs, Dawson, AppL- 
Myers. Barntlousc, Auscm. Wood 



rsqe 73 



A CAPPELLA CHOIR 



The choir represents the most organized mu- 
sical group on our campus through the forty 
voices that blend in concerts presented through- 
out the Eastern states. Although it was organ- 
ized only six years ago, the choir is now recog- 
nized as one of the few outstanding A Cap- 
pella Choirs of its kind in America. The mem- 
bership consists chiefly of untrained voices; but 
through the pieces selected and the appreciation 
expressed, its presentations have been lauded by 
audiences in many prominent cities. 

Each year the choir makes an extended itin- 
erary into the North or South. Members re- 
turn describing humorous episodes of travel. 

The members express their most sincere grat- 
itude to Mr. N. M. Harrison, whose efforts 
make their trips possible, and to Miss Marga- 
ret Sloan, the director, who is enabled by her 
unequaled patience and her love of music to 
communicate to the members her enthusiasm 
for the truly great compositions. It is to them 
that we owe the advancement of this organi- 
zation. 




Page 74 




Mf.MRERS 



First Soprano 

Julia Cob 

Irma Gray Hornady 
Violet Jenkins 
Pauline Parker 
Dot Perry 
Lois Pressley 
Katkryh Sexton 
Sai.uk Ruth Shutorii 



Second Soprani 

Majorie Elkins 
Elizabeth Hoffman 
Marguerite Jenkins 
Elsie Mae Sink 



First Trittir 

Akmh ii Rolen 
Wii i ^ Kf-kk 

m \s Rogers 

Fir it Ha n 

Georgs Craves 
Gsorgi Crow i i i 
Sheldon Dawson 
Wai ne Hornadi 
Leo Pittard 
Wilson Rogers 

KllWAWI S'llKKUAL] 

First 111*, 

Hyacinth Hunter 
Lena Hunter 
Dot Jones 

El l/AHETII PlKil.F 

Mary Frances Wam.ick 
Vera York 



Second I Uir 

Virginia Curry 
Ruth Hendricks 
Grace Hicks 

Vl -I ', J'ui.M I K 

Stcond Tenor 

Vaughn Boom 

I'M I'll I' 11 M 

Bobbie Rankin 

Kt'auid llass 
[rm N APPI i 

Jin- Crowded 

OWEN I.INjplll 

[ I I \I.i-l K 

Chart f:s Riiige 



Page 75 



AKROTHINIAN 
LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



Officers 

I'm i. Owen . . , ■ President 

Also* Gray I' ice-President 

I). Clark Johnson' Secretary 

Wilson Rogers . ..... Assistant Secretary 

DAVrD Cooper ....-.■■.. Treasurer 

Bilia WeisNER ■ Critic 

Robert Rankin ■ . . Marshal 

Herbert Hauchtalinc .... Assistant Marshal 
William Barnhouse Chaplain 



William Barn-house 
Fred Cax 
Sheldon Dawson 

Al.SON GRAY 

I'nKI es Hausbr 
George Ingle 
Charles Ostward 
Debro Peeler 
Max Roghm 



Members 

Howard Bradner 
george c«a\er 
Elijah Diamovt 
Wayne Harris 
W'.w m- Hornaoav 
D. Clark Johnson 
Paul Owen 
Roger Peeler 
Wilson Rogers 
David Cooper 
George Crowei.i. 



John Glasgow 

I I ERBERT HAI'GIITALING 

G. I. Humphreys, Jr. 

James Mattocks 
James Parsons 
Robert RahkiM 

D IN SllARPE 

John Thomas 
Bills Wkjsm-k 




Page 74 




ARTEMESIAN 
LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



Officers 

Mary Parham President 

Sara Harris Vice-President 

MARY Frances GekrinceR , . . . . . Secretary 

J I i.l A Coe Treasurer 

Pattif. Bartee Critic 

Lillian Earner Chaplain 

Ernestine Strickland . pianist 

Majorie Elki.vs ... . . . Reporter 

Majokif. Elk ins Chorister 

Helen Dameron . Forensii Councii Representative 
Caroline 1'irti.e Monitor 



Olivia Amos 
Margaret Austin' 
Mary MITCHELL Haiti 
Pattie Barter 

NeLLIE Bl.nNIU' BESS 

(Catherine BlVINS 
Catherine Brown 
Roth Brii.es 
Julia Coe 
Edith Cxowber 
Lois Chioesi er 
Christine Carroll 
Helen' Dameron 
Marion Dickson 
Margaret Di'xon 
Virginia Dixon 
Marjorie F.I. KINS 
Virginia Ellison 
Hildrbth Gabriel 
Mari Frances (Ierrincer 
Frances Goeth 
Mabel Harcett 



Members 

Sara Harris 
Pattie Hendrick 
Helen Raf Hoi rOK 
Irma Gre\ Horn u>ai 
Bessie Hvman 

1 1 ■> HI Mil H I N I 1- R 
Olive BUTCHINS 
].i at.l K [NCR AM 
Marguerite Jenkins 
Violet Jenkins 
Dorothy Jones 
Louise Jones 
Sara Jones 
Jacqueline Kinnei 
Hazel Kiser 
Mary Nelson Kiser 

I.l IK l-N I- KlillNJ/ 

Mildred Lambe 
Ruth Lee 
Marguerite Mans 
Olca Marlette 
Mvkii i \hii.Mni. 



Gladys Maxwell 
Frances Muse 
Mary Loi MOFFn i 
Mary Parham 
Nancy Parham 
I. ii. i. ian Pearson 
Dot Perry 
Catherine Phi bus 

I UtOI im I'lKir i 

Elizabeth Pirtt.f. 
Pattie Redman 
Ann Ross 

\] \ri u:i i SMI] II 

Sophia Tapi.in 
Sara Forrest Thompson 
Mary Tice 
Jane Truesdai.e 
Evelyn Turner 
Lillian Varner 
Ernestine Strickland 
Jo Walker 
Dorothy Wicgins 



• m 



Page 77 



THALEAN 
LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



Officers 

Lit Moser President 

James Masse? . . Vice-President 

Samuel Myers Secretary 

Lawrence Austin • .Issistant Secretary 

J. E, GARUNCTON • Treasurer 

Hovi Wood Chaplain 

Am in. HaRTMAN Stiaety Reporter 

Occo Gibbs . Press Reporter 

I \sm-k Williams , Issistant I'd [j Reporter 

Elbert Lane Marshal 

Slii.on Ferree ■ . Critic 

Ql [\n\ VeACH , Forensic Council Representative 



John Apple 
Ai.LBn Austin 
Lawrence Austin 
Vaughn Boone 
Ralph Briles 
Nisi ui DORSl I I 

George Elder 
Sui.on Ferree 
J. E. Garlincton 

OCCO (JlEBS 

Rove* Gibes 

Palm II vmii roN 



MliMRERS 

Alton Hartman 
G. W. HniMr-s 

M. I . III-. Mil RMiN 

Dale Jarred 
James Jones 
Elbert Lam 
i )r. EH Liniii i v 
James Massev 
John McDowell 
D WIGHT Morgan 
Lee Moser 
Sam in Mm- hi 



Perry Peterson 
Leo Pitiard 
Charles Ridge 
Robert Rogers 
Alson Thompson 
S. E. Troogon 
Quentin Veach 
Wilbur Walton 
Gilmer Wagoner 
Tasker Williams 
Hovt Wood 
Fl'Rmak Wright 




Page JB 



© • 




' 



■■^■■H 



■ 



NIKANTHAN LITERARY 
SOCIETY 

Lois Heocecock President 

Imza Hili Vice-President 

Cerelda Lackey Secrelry 

Vesta Tkoxi.ek Treasurer 

Doris Hedgecock Chaplain 

Bernardinf: Hurley tfonitoi 

Virginia Grant Critic 

Agnes Louise Wilcox Pianist 

I he.s Welch . . . Chorister 



Margaret Walton 

Sallie Shu ford 

Patsie Ward 

Mary Frances Warlick 

Iris Welch 

Ai:ci-j Louise Wilcox 

II \/\ i Wei. burn 

Grace Hicks 

Elizabeth Bach i i i 

Mi i->, Bails 

Mary Margaret Bai es 
Dorothy Bell 
Nancy Baknette 
Virginia Burton 



Jacqueline Cameron 
Kathryn Cochrane 
Nina Graham Crauhikh 
Elizabeth Culi.um 
Virginia Curry 

I I [/ \BET1I El.LERBE 

Vera Mae Ferree 
v ad alia farlow 
Catherine Fari.ow 
Rebecca Finch 
Laura Fritts 
Margaret Fogleman 
Lucy Neal Fuller 
Virginia Grant 



Mil liKI.N CiRAN I 

Juaniia IIwhdriii 
Cleo Hardee 

l.ms HeDCECOCK 

Doris Heocecock 

Kai III EEN Hettinstall 

Inza riii.i 

Faye Holt 

BhK SARDINE Hl'KI I I 

Helen Hunter 
Lena hunter 
Ruth Hendricks 
Elizabeth Hon mas 
ErcEU-E Iyey 
1 I ISI JvII. PATRICK 

Cekelda Lackey 

luivv I ism i ■, 
Ruby Martin 
Josie McNeill 
Grace Moody 
llnKrnin Mi Cm i i u 
Pauline Parker 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Lois Press r i i 
Helen Readdick 
Katiirvn Sfxton 
Elsie Mae Sink 
Clara Tanner 
Vesta Troxi.ek 



• 



taqe It 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR SOCIETY 



Officers 



M AK1 M.Utr.UIH II Ml 

PAU1 I »M EN . . . . 
\ ESI \ I ROM Bit . . . . 
] \CQ( i mm I IMERON . 



. I'ri ridi Itt 

I'n i -President 

Secretary 

Corresponding Sec. 



K/ \ J I : i i . . . . 

fAMES Masses - . . 

! i IZABETH PHILLIPS 

Occo GlBBS . . . 



.■Isshianl 



Treasurer 

Treasurer 

Pianist 

. Monitor 



Jul I Si A I' I'll 

I- 1 1/ m:i i ii Bagwell 
Mars M, Baity 

NANCY BaRNETTE 

Willi VM 1'UHMIOUSE 

Pattv Bartee 

M SKS M SKIISUI I li\l l-s 

Helen Hates 

Nii 1 1- lii iisin- Hess 
|. Vaughn Boone 
i m 0' eline cami rok 

( 1 1 OJtCE Craver 
Xisa Crawford 
VIRGINIA C'uKKY 

Sll El DON I" 1 WSON 

solon ferree 
Rebecca Finch 

\I SHi.AREI |-'rii;l EM \N 

J. E. Gari ingtON 

Mars- Frances Gerrincer 

Ot'CO ( llBBS 

John Glasgow 
Virgini h Grant 
Mildred Grant 
Atles II \m M IN 
Kathleen Heptinsi w i 
Inza 1 1 ii i 



Roll 

(.. W, Holmes 
Fas Hoi i 
Laura Jane Hum 
Ik.ma < .KAi Horn idai 
Wayne Hornaday 
II. \i, Hoochtaunc 
Lena Hi wt eh 
Helen Hunter 
Bernadlne Hurley 
Millard Isley 
Krcem.e Jvey 
ELISE Kii. Patrick 
Cere i. i i i I.ackfv 
Mii.iikiij I \mi;i 

Evelyn I.ism ei 
Owes Li \ dies 
Olga Mari.i .1 1 1 

Ki B1 M UtTJN 
James Massey 
Myrtle Mathews 
Dorothy McCollum 
Grace Moom 

I.KE Mr IS IK 

Frances Must 
Samuel Myers 
Paul Owen 
Mars Parham 
Nanct Parham 



Pauline Parker 
Perks Peterson 
Dot Perky 
Elizabeth Pirtle 
Caroline Pirtle 
Leo Pittard 
Charles Ridge 
Wilson Rogers 
Max Rogers 
Robert Rogers 
Kathryn Sexton 
m irgaret smith 
Clara Pawner 

SlKA I'JIOMI'SON 

Alson Thompson 
VEST i Troxler 

(Iii mkr Wagoner 
Wilbur Walton 
Pa i si e Ward 
Mrs. C. L. Whitaker 
Dorothy Wiggins 
Tasker Williams 
AcNES Louise Wilcox 
Host Wood 
Furman Wright 
Miss Young 
Mrs. Vol m. 




Page SO 




MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



( )|T[LERS 

FuRMAN V\'ki<;ii i President 

J. E. Garlincton Chaplain 

Odei.i. Brown Secretary 









Members 






E, 


N. 


C. Andrews 




Pali. 


II X MILTON 


\\ 


[LLIAM BARNHOUSB 




1 i-i 


K 11, PATRICK 


Odei.i 


Brown 






Lee Moser 


S 1 1 1 1 \ ['I.IRH 






S.XM l' 


i i M', i RS 


I 


1 


Garunc 


I ON 

Leo I'm i 


ARI> 


Ferri 


Peterson 








Wilbur 


W XI 1"-. 










Allen Watson 












Ch xri es 


Will II 










Hon \\ 


onu 







Page 8i 



Y. M. C. A.-Y. W.C. A. 

Officers 

y. m. c. a. r. w. c. .:. 

Sulon Ferree President Elizabeth Pirti.e 

Occo Gibbs Piee-Praident Jacqueline Cameron 

Lee Moses Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Bagwell 



Mf.mkfrs 



John Apple 
J, V. Boone 

William Barniiouse 
Sulon Ferree 
Occo Gibbs 
J. E. Garlincton 
RoyCE Girbs 
John Gi asj.hu 
(.. W, Holmes 
Milliard Isi.ev 
Owen Lindlev 
James Massey 
Samuel Myers 
Lee Moser 
Leo Pittari) 



Elizabeth Bagwell 
Helen Bates 
Mary Margaret Bates 
Nei.i.e Blonde Bess 
Jacqueline Cameron 
Virginia Currv 
Margaret Fqgleman 
Mildred Grant 
Kathleen H e pt i n stall 
Inza Hill 
Fav Holt 
Helen Hunter 
Lena Hunter 
Bbrnadine Hurley 
Elise Kjlpatkick 



Lester Valentine 
Gilmer Wacom er 
Tasker Williams 
Wilbur Walton 

F.VELYN LlNM.EY 

Dorothy McCollum 
Olca Marlette 
( !r ice Moohy 
Poi.lv Parker 
Elizabeth Phillips 
I 1 1/ ABETii Pirti.e 
Vesta Troxi.er 
Acnes Louise Wilcox 
m a roar et w a i .to n 
Paisie Ward 




Page 82 




CHEERLEADERS 

Dot Perry, Chief 
Margaret Dixon, Royce Cibbs, Hobby Rankin 




MARSHALS 

Pavi. Ovvbu, Chief 

Alton Hartman 

Margaret Dixon- 
Mary Margaret Bates 



W'll.l (AM Whsskh 
Tn^a Hll.I. 

Frances Gueth 



Page S3 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
DEBATERS 



Last year the delisting squad met several col- 
leges, both in the North and South, and won 
most of the decisions. Returning from the trip, 
they took first place in the tournament, which 
made them champion debaters of North Caro- 
lina. 

This year the squad is made up largely of 
new men, only one having participated in inter- 
collegiate debates. The major meet of the sea- 
son was the Southeastern Forensic Tournament 
at Rock Hill, South Carolina, where the team 
won five debates. Professor Cullen B. Owens, 
forensic coach, arranged to meet several col- 
leges in the state and a few out-of-state teams. 
The query was, "Resolved, That Congress 
should have the power to override by a two- 
thirds majority vote decisions of the Supreme 
Court declaring laws passed by Congress un- 
constitutional." 

The members of the squad were Leo Pittard, 
Hoyt Wood, Sulon Ferree, Ed Stirewalt, J. E. 
Garlington, and Dwight Morgan. 




Stiuewalt, Morgan. Fuik, Feuree 
Pittard, Gaklington, Wood 



Page 64 



C • 




PARHAM 



PARKtR 



PEKRV 



LITTLE TH EATRE 



The Little Theatre of High Point College 
offered as its major production, "Three-Cor- 
nered Moon," by Gertrude Tonkonogy. This 
rapid-fire comedy, one of the bright spots of 
the 1932-33 theatrical seasons of Broadway, 
depicted the efforts of a madcap family to adjust 
itself in a work-a-day world after the depres- 
sion had relieved it of a comfortable amount 
of stocks and bonds. 

Its spring production was Emlyn Williams' 
melodramatic thriller, "A Murder Has Been 
Arranged," which kept the English playgoers 
gripping their seats when it was produced a 
few seasons ago. The interests of the play lay 
largely in the ingenious manner in which the 
murderer was trapped and in the unique setting 
in that it took place on any stage on which it 
was produced, but that it first was played on 
the stage of the St. James Theatre. 



• 9 



Pagt as 



BLOCK "H" 
CLUB 



Athletes who meet the requirements of 
dependability, sportsmanship, loyalty, team- 
work, and have won a monogram in any 
sport at the college, are eligible for member- 
ship in the Block "H" Club. However, 
every man must be passed on by a unani- 
mous vote of all the active members before 
admission is obtained. Its activities consist 
mainly of furthering a higher type of ath- 
letics at the College by promoting a brother- 
ly spirit among the players, stressing cooper- 
ation and clean play, and striving for a more 
friendly feeling between rival teams. 

Although the work of the club is not vis- 
ible to the students as a whole, there always 
exists that feeling that it is an honor to wear 
the emblem of one's school and to hold its 
name always at the top, representing the 
highest in scholarship, athletics and the ideals 
of manhood. 

May that flame ever burn within the 
breast of one wearing our college block "H'\ 



411 
III 
■ ■I 




Page 84 




MODERN PRISCILLA 
CLUB 



The Modern Priscilla Club was organized in 
1927 by the members of the Home Economics 
Department classes for the purpose of creating 
interest and of givmg to its members a broader 
outlook into the held of home economics. 
Home economics majors and all students taking 
one or more subjects in the department are 
eligible. 

Each year the Modern Priscillas climax their 
work of the year by giving a formal dinner, to 
which the members of the science department 
are invited. Each member has the privilege of 
inviting someone as her special guest. The cus- 
tom is for the club to bring something to be 
used in the Home Economics Department or 
in the Practice House which the department 
sponsors every other year. This model home is 
planned and operated by the junior and Senior 
girls. 

It is the aim of the club to help build a big- 
ger and better High Point College — that each 
succeeding class may be stronger and better 
equipped. 



• d 



Page 87 



PAN-HELLENIC 
COUNCIL 



The Pan -Hellenic Council is an organiza- 
tion composed of one student and one fac- 
ulty member representing each Greek letter 
social club on the campus. It regulates and 
controls all the affairs that are common to 
these clubs, such as the amount of dues, 
scholarship requirements, and the security of 
pledges. It has the power to refuse or grant 
permission for the organization of other local 
clubs, and also to demand at any time the 
disbanding of any or all of these organiza- 
tions. Its name is derived from the ancient 
Greek custom of having a council to govern 
the affairs of different nations in that 
country. 

The Council has been active since it was 
first organized and through its efforts has 
made the fraternities and sororities better 
equipped to handle the social life of the 
students. 




Page 35 




LOIS HEDGECOCK 



LINCOLN FULK 



LIGHTED LAMP 



The Lighted Lamp is a new honor society 
that was organized as a joint movement of the 
faculty and students to promote higher stand- 
ards among the student body. The rules for 
the first tapping were made by a committee 
from the student government and the faculty, 
but the organization is now self-perpetuating. 
The members are elected in the second semester 
of the junior year oc of the senior year. Re- 
quirements for membership are: (1) Scholar- 
ship — an average of B and no failures or con- 
ditions for five semesters; (2) Character — ex- 
cellent; (3) Service- — outstanding; (4) Leader- 
ship) — the candidate must have proved his abil- 
ity as a leader. Members are chosen from 
various student activities such as athletics, 
Christian organizations, student government, 
forensic gtoup. publications, literary societies, 
and social groups. 

Charter members of the society are Emma 
Carr Bivins, Wilbur Hutchens, Lincoln Fulk, 
Adylene McCoIlum, and Lois Hedgecock. 



Pdqt 87 



STUDENT 
ABSENCE 
COMMITTEE 



The Student Absence Committee is composed 
of nine students whose duty it is to pass upon 
the validity of excuses offered for either class 
or chapel absences except those of the Seniors. 

The majority of this committee decides 
whether each absence shall be excused, and 
makes its report to the Dean's office. Those 
absences not excused become a permanent part 
of the student's record. 

This method of handling absences, a new 
experiment in student government this year, has 
not been tried by any other college in this state, 
therefore the outcome may mean a great influ- 
ence in future policies in regard to this phase 
of college life. 

Members of the committee are: Edith Crow- 
der, Lois Hedgecock, Mary Margaret Bates, 
Inza Hill, Virginia Grant, Leo Pittard, Lincoln 
Fulk, Alton Hartman, and Paul Owen. 



II "IJ 






jL- m\ 


Hn *"^H 


in j [ill * 

m^wBUL 






. j| BE^v^V ^tTB ■ 





Folk. Grant. Owen, Pittaihi 
Hedgecock, Him,. Bates, Olowtieh 



Page ?0 





? 


W 




li'l 




hi 


' 4 


* 

> 


t 


- 




1 


» 


- ■ m I- ■ f 



EPSILON ETA PHI 



Fratrbs jn Coi.i I cto 




Alton El act-man 

Sulon Ferref, 

Lee Skkrkill 

Broadus Culler 

Robert Rankin 
R.umund Intrieri 
Frank Nieknsee 
E cigar Snider 
David Cooper 
C. \V. Martin 



Ailev Haki m IN 
Joseph Crqwdkr 
Allen Austin 
At. son Gray 



HoNORARl FrATRES 



David T. Yow 
W. F. Bailev 



Edgar Hartley 
N. F. Yak bo rough 



J. H. Mourane 



Pagp ?l 



THETA PHI 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 




jui-ia coe 
Edith Chowder 
Frances Gubth 
S >«Aii Harris 



Alice Nesbit 
Dorothy Perry 
Lillian Varner 
Kaiherine Bivms 



1 1 men DAHERON 
Pattie Roane Hekdrick 
Louise Jones Gordy 
Mary Lou Mqfeitt 



HtlNORARl SORORES 

Mrs. N. P. Yakborouch Miss Louise Adams 

Mis- M \i»>. vki- r SroA\ 
Mrs. N. M. Harrison 




Page n 




IOTA TAU 
KAPPA 



FRATRES IN CoLl.ECilO 




George Ingle 
Elijah Diamom 
G. I. Humphreys, Jr. 



llnvi Wrxin 

Wilson Rogers 

['All ( i\\ t \ 



I-'llWAKLl WaIKISS 

Occo GiBBS 
Elbert Lane 



llriVnRARI FRATRES 

Dr. C. R. Hiushaw Dr. P. S. KeNNETI 

Dr. P. E. Linliley Dr. 11. B. Hiatt 

0. A. Kirk man 



Page 93 



ALPHA 

THETA 

PS I 




SoRORES IV CoLLEGIO 
Jl'I.IA Wll.l.lARl) 

liKAiviiN'E Von Cannon Strickland 
Makv Tice Iris Welch 

Laura Fritts 1 1 \ Z 1 1 Weliwr n 



HONORAW SoRORES 



Mrs. Alice P. White 
Mrs, M. W. Nash Mrs. S. O. Peebles 







iAJfajfim 


P 4tot M - -— ■ 



•*r^> I 



* iV r 



4 V . 



Page 94 




DELTA 

ALPHA 

EPSILON 



Fratres in Cow.egio 

Georhs Elder Whitman Krarns 

W. W. \V Eisner James Mattocks 

H- H. HOUCHTALING I.. V SMITH 

ISHMAEL Dorsett 




IIdmirari Fratres 



C. C. RORBINS 

Dr. Paul R. Bovvev 
PROF. Ft L. SpessAkH 
Herman Smith 



Dr. Glen Perry 
Proe. J. H. Al.l.RED 
John Whiteseli. 
Dr. P. B. Davis 



Dr. W. L. Jackson 
I'm ii. \V. 11. Ford 



Page ?5 



SIGMA 

ALPHA 

PHI 



SoRORES IN COLLEOIO 




Pattie Barter 
Gladys Maxwell 

Caroline Pirtle 



Marv Parham 
Margaret Smith 
Elizabeth Pirtle 



Marv Frances (Jkrrcnger 



Honor, \ri Sorores 

Mrs. II. L. Spessard Mrs. P. E. Linbi iv 

Miss Vera Inoi. 




Pag« »* 



ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 




C. C, BOBBINS JR. 
Pttttdrnt 



^y 



SP 



C. C. Robbins, Jn President 

Clay Madison Vice-President 

Sue Morgan Secretary 

Lucille Brown Treasurer 

Polly Hicks Registrar 

Rosalie Andrews Sec'y of Alumni Fund 



Page 97 



HOMECOMING 
DAY 



The third annual Homecoming Day, held 
November 30, 1935, brought back many of the 
alumni. The celebration opened with the pro- 
gram in the auditorium at eleven o'clock. Au- 
bert Smith of the Class of '35 presided, and 
William Hunter, '29, introduced the speakers. 
Reverend J. Elwood Carroll, '28, led the devo- 
tional lesson. Dr. Humphreys made the open- 
ing speech, followed by A. Lincoln Fulk, presi- 
dent of the student body, who welcomed the 
visitors. Dr. Glenn Perry, '29; Miss Doris 
Keener, '33, and E. C. Glasgow, '30, were the 
alumni speakers. 

At one o'clock the college entertained both 
the alumni and present students with a buffet 
lunch. The afternoon was filled with athletic 
contests — horseshoe pitching, tumbling exhibi- 
tion, soccer, basketball, and volleyball. The 
annual banquet and dance proved ro be an 
enjoyable entertainment for the evening. 




t 



Page ?8 



V 
From Kitty Hawk. Aviation has now 
gained ground in every progressive spot of 
the world. It has engrained itself as a pail 
of the life of a civilisation. We have used 
the theme of Aviation in this ZENITH to 
suggest that the vision of Mr. Roberts is 
comparable to the vision of the Wrights. 
From a dream our college has become a 
reality and has grown like the field of 
Aviation until its principles aid in influen- 
cing each generation. Its growth has been 
rapid; we believe that success has just 
begun. 



COLLEGE LIFE IN SPOTS 



It was just a romance in the 
fall. 

The Freshmen even knitted in 
the Foyer* 

Yes, ih. 'it's Dawson behind the 
wheelbarrow. 

Headed for the dormitory be- 
tween classes* 
The keeper of the flock. 
Nine-thirty. Dr. Humphrey* 
steps from his Terraplane, 
Kyrl poses for a moment- 
Cherry helps the ice man* 
Oh, it truly must have been ro- 
mance* 

The day after Homecoming* 
The collection and dregs. 
Welcome, Frances Gordon. 
How's Duke? 




iA 



• • 



Page 101 




Two basketball heroes, 
Allah be praised! 
The fountain worshippers- 
Just to be a Freshman, "what a 
life. 

Nikanthan-Thalean picnic at 
the lake. 

A glimpse at the tower through 
the eyes of a camera. 
Cigarette race for the incoming 
fratres. 

Dot dons the derby to pose. 
You guess? 

Just the results of group plan- 
ning. 

Waiting for a ZENITH pic- 
ture. 

The rusty tin can is missing. 
That's what is in Garltngton's 
hand as he goes to get hot water 
for a shave. 



COLLEGE LIFE AT RANDOM 



Page 101 






WHEN THERE ARE NO CLASSES 



When Ruifs isn't sputtering 
Shakespeare. 

Could it be poetry or romance? 

The greatest politician the col- 
lege ever had. 

Meet the impersonators of Hill- 
billy music. 

Garlington has to have hot 
water to shave. 

Members of the national school 
— the knitters. 

Booth and Hi-Po's rival. 

Notice the center of attraction. 

It would almost take hypno- 
tism for it to start. 
The college Ford — 'just buy the 
gas. 

Old Man Winter sets Occo knee 
deep. 
The college belt-Iegger. 




Page 103 




MOST POPULAR 

George Ingle 
Edith Crowder 

BEST LOOKING 

Leon Thompson 
Christine Latham 

MOST ORIGINAL 
Dot McCollum 
Ed Snider 

BEST ALL-ROUND 

Edith Crowder 
Ed Snider 

MOST INTELLIGENT 

Laura F'ritts 
Sulon Ferree 

BEST SPORTS 

George Ingle 
Julia Willard 

MOST ATHLETIC 
Broadus Culler 
Dot Perry 

MOST FRIENDLY 

Lois Hedgecock 
Hoyt Wood 



SENIOR CLASS SUPERLATIVES 



Page 104 



FOUR YEARS 

Gee! What a heterogeneous group that filed past the office of Mr, Gunn 
that first afternoon of registration. All sizes, all expressions, all types. A pro- 
digious taste it would seem to work a process of integration over this crowd; 
but next day faces seemed less strange. After the first week of socials, in fact, 
it seemed that no one was a stranger, and before the year was gone each class 
member seemed to be a real part of the other. 

September — the second year rolled 'round. Now to see all the old gang, to 
look at the Freshman Class, to help in the initiation — for now we were Sopho- 
mores. What a difference! It seemed that no one had come back. Of course, 
there were a few, but what a large group missing! It really didn't seem like 
the same place. Even our president-elect did not return. After a few weeks, 
everything became more organized. Ed Sharpe was elected president, and be- 
fore long we had a closely-knitted class. Somehow, it wasn't so bad, after all, 
to be a smaller group. That year was a full year as the class tried to make a 
name for itself. Parties and various schemes were tried in one form and an- 
other. The Sophomore Cabaret made a name for the class and for the college. 
It was a gala affair! 

The class still had dwindled at the beginning of the Junior year. But, in 
spite of the fact, the class was most vigorous. The chief aim (on the sideline, 
I may say) was to make money. For it was this year that we had to entertain 
the Seniors and help pay for the project of heating the gym. Programs, car- 
nivals, and a fashion show were sponsored by the Juniors, the returns from 
which enabled us to meet our obligations with only a small assessment from 
each person. 

In the beginning of the year 1936, we returned to our Alma Mater only 
to learn that we had lost two of our most valuable members, Ed Sharpe and 
Kermit Cloniger. Yet, the class now numbers forty-three. Our projects have 
been successful, our aims high, our work steady. Four years we have remained 
with an ever-changing student body. During our stay we have seen progres- 
sive movements visualized and realized. How much we have contributed, we 
do not know. 

Tennyson said, "I am a part of all that I have met." 

We know that we are a part of the college, and that the college is a part 
of us. 



Page 105 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 

MONTH BY MONTH 

SEPTEMBER 
'7 — Upperclassmen register. 
10— Groups nl bewildered Freshmen .ire taken into the gates of High Point College to stay For 

one semester, one year, two years, and a small group for four. 
23 — p. K. Cloniger, president oi ihe student body, does not return to school. A. Lincoln Fulk is 

elected to succeed him a* president 
2j — Annual faculty reception. A long receiving line and a blank book im autographs were the 

chief amusements In order. * J t course wc must not forge) refreshments 

OCTOBER 

1— '['he 1 ith starts with a bang as Wallace, the Magician, appears for a Lyceum number. 

4 — Decision nighl tor the literary societies. The Artemesians outnumbered the Nikanthans by a 
few. Student Council convened until about eleven o'clock. Some Sophomore boys had over- 
stepped Freshman Initiation. What a night! 
9 — Frank Nierusee win-- tennis championship. 
10— Individual pictures for the Zekith. 
14 — Cheerleaders are elected. Dot Perry is chief, with underclassmen as assistants — Rankin, 

Dixon, and Gibbs. 
16 — Elder and Isiey are elected co-captains of the soccer team. 
18— First M. P. Church gives reception for all college students, 

Inilieiclual phiiiii-. an back as prool- t"i the /1 N I I II. 
28 — Kyrl Hand Concert is heard in chapel at ten o'clock. The second of the Lyceum ti umbers, 
29 — Senior Carnival, Group pictures for the ZENITH. 
30 — Max Roger- head- Fi oilmen. 

Owen is chosen by faculty as chief marshal. 
31 — Hallowe'en pam held by four literary societies. 

NOVEMBER 

2 — M>ers and Garlington are elected as officers in the State Ministerial Association. 
4- — Peace program in chapel. Students representing the tour literary societies speak. 
S — State Pre" Convention held at Duke. Weisner and Hartman attend all sessions, 
ts — Junior Broadcast Elizabeth Hoffman, representing the Nikanthans, is elected Beauty Queen, 
23 — Alumni Association voted F01 a quick return of football to the college. Homecoming Day — 

One hundred and thirty old grails hack. Many from out of the state. 
1 , — Sigma Alpha Phi banquet at Sheraton. 

DECEMBER 

3 — Third Lyceum number presented by the Twin City Glee Club. 

5 — Four societies vote to combine in project and lay walk for Harrison Gymnasium, 
13 — "Three-Cornered Moon" given by Lab on Friday, the thirteenth, 
is — Culler named captain oi basketball squad. 

JANUARY 

t — National Student Volunteer Movement. Garlington, Gibbs, and Ridge go to Indianapolis. 

s — Appalachian beats the Panthers in onlj conference game that the five lost. 
18 — Second semester elections held for men's literary societies. 
ij— Panthers beat Elon there, Uld Yadkin fall- 011 Dawson. 

FEBRUARY 

8— College hand appears to help cheer the boys to defeat Eton in the most spectacular game of 
ill.- -rn-on in Harrison Gym, 
12 — Spessard leaves for Atlanta. 

nj — ['anthers clinch the cnnli-irn.v championship he defeating Guilford. 
2(i — North State Cage Tournament gets underway in Harrison Gym, 

Debating team opens its season, 
25— Panthers win the tournament. Culler and hitrieri named on the all-conference five, with 

Culler as captain. 
2S— Professor Charles Winterwood, »ho played De Lord in "Green Pastures," speaks in chapel. 



Page 106 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR 

MONTH BY MONTH 

MARCH 

i — Choir presents its first program in Thomasville. 

7 — Artemesian-Akrothinian Society Day, with Davidson as speaker for the morning program. 
Mother Goose Banquet at eight o'clock. 

10 — Junior Class Box Party. 

12 — Choir leaves for a twelve-day Northern trip, including Richmond, Washington, Baltimore, 
and New York. 

H — Dinner and dance for basketball men. Culler is awarded trophy as the most outstanding ath- 
lete ever to attend High Point College. 

17 — Dr. Harding speaks on astronomy as one of the Lyceum numbers. 

21 — Baseball season opens. 

24 — A Cappella Choir returns without having had a bit of bus trouble. 

APRIL 

1 — Tennis team wins match from Appalachian. 

3 — Investiture of the Seniors. Junior-Senior Banquet at the Country Club. 
2, — Nikanthans entertain the Thaleans at annual fete. 

MAY 

2 — Annual Nikanthan-Thalean Society Day. Program in the morning and afternoon. At five 
o'clock the annual May Day under the direction of Miss Sidney Brame, Faye Holt, and Mrs. 
Davis. Hawaiian Banquet is the program for the evening. 

2 till June — Comes all the affairs that a small college could afford. Fraternity and sorority ban- 
quets, parties honoring the Seniors, exams, at last graduation exercises and the presentation 
of the "sheepskins." 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

DUKE POWER COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

High Point Hardware 
Company 



LYLES CHEVROLET CO. 

Incorporated 

Sales - Chevrolet - Service 
CARS— TRUCKS 



LET US TAKE CARE OF YOUR 

FURNITURE NEEDS 

Hendrix Bros. Furniture 
Company 



HEDGECOCK 
LUMBER COMPANY 

1215 WARD STREET 
PHONE 44233 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



CITY FUEL CO, 



ROBERTSON BAKERY 

SPLENDID BREAD 
AND CAKES 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

W. A. DAVIS 
MILLING COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS 




OF 


BURT 


ASBURY 


'35 


EDITOR 



SHERATON 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Mezzanine Floor Sheraton Hotel 



EFIRDS 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Gibson Ice Cream 
Company 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 



CAROLINA 
THEATRE 

'Always a Good Show' 



Ride in a Yellow 
Cat 



YELLOW 
CAB COMPANY 

Pnone 2800 



34th 

Anniversary Values 



AT 



J. C. PENNEY CO. 

It Pays to Shop at 
Penney's 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

VOGUE BEAUTY 
SHOPPE 



HIGH POINT 
STEAM LAUNDRY 

Expert Dry Cleaning, 

Dyeing ana 

Pressing 



228 NORTH WRENN ST. 

Pkone 3325 



MORGAN'S 

JEWELRY AND MUSIC 

210 E. Washington Street 

PHONE 8225 

CERTIFIED REPAIRING 



W. C. BROWN 
SHOE SHOP 

Quality Shoe Repairing 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



SNOW LUMBER CO. 



BEAVANS 
LADIES SHOP 



BELK STEVENS 
COMPANY 



Berger quality Covers 

For the 1936 Zenith 

The H. O. Berger Company 

328 So. Jefferson St., Chicago 



ROSE FURNITURE 
COMPANY 



SEARS, ROEBUCK 
COMPANY 

The World's Largest Store 



GUILFORD GENERAL 
HOSPITAL 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

NEW 
SERVICE LAUNDRY 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



LUTHER R. MEDLIN 

HENDERSON, N. C. 



Garland Distributing 
Company 



PHONE 4610 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

J. W. MONTGOMERY 
AND SON 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

ECKERDS 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HARLLEES 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Koonce Funeral Home 

Phone 4545 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HIGH POINT PAPER- 
BOX CO. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Logan Porter Mirror Co. 

Phone 2657 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CAROLINA CASKET CO. 

Phone 2148 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

JARRETT STATIONERY 
COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

DELUXE DINER 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

PAT BROWN, Inc. 

FORD PRODUCTS 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Richardson's Department 
Store 



Compliments of 

SUNSHINE LAUNDRY 

Phone 3393 

Genuine Dry Cleaning 



HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

GIDEON IRELAND HUMPHREYS, A.M., D.D., President 

i 
"In the Heart of the Piedmont" 

MODERN FIRE-PROOF BUILDINGS 
NON-SECTARIAN 

CO-EDUCATTONAL 

Rated Standard "A" Grade by State Board of Education 

Courses in Education, Language, History, Commerce, Home Economics, Science, Religious 

Education, Music — leading to degrees of A.B. or B.S. 

Low Rates Put College Training in Reach of the Youth with Limited Means 

| 
"A Growing College in a Growing City" 



For Catalogue Apply to 

PRESIDENT OR REGISTRAR 



HIGH POINT COLLEGE 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



After College 

For better business training and 
a good position for YOU, 

ATTEND 

JONES BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

128 l /i W. Commerce St. High Point, N. C. 
The Accredited School 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

North Carolina Theatres 

Incorporated 

PARAMOUNT 

BROADHURST 

RIALTO 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

CECII/S DRUG 
STORE 

A. COKE CECIL, Manager 



Capital Printing 
Company 

DESIGNERS, PRINTERS, 
RULERS AND BINDERS 

In Our New Location 
110 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



O B B I N S 



KNITTING 
COMPANY 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



DR. NAT WALKER 

EYES EXAMINED 
GLASSES FITTED 

High Point, N. C. Thomasville, N. C. 

Over Hart's Pharmacy, First National Bank 
Building 



DALTON FLORIST 

930 Montlieu 

FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

PHONE 2908 and 4366 



HIGH POINT FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF BED ROOM 
FURNITURE 



HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 
Phone 2308 Established 1888 



J. W. SECHREST AND SON 

Funeral Directors Since 1887 
Phone 3349 



THE 

HIGH POINT JHOMASVILLE & DENTON 
RAILROAD COMPANY 



Is an outstanding example of accomplishment as the result of the 
co-operation and steady hard work. Large or small, any com- 
munity thrives only when there is co-operation and a general 

spirit of service. 



EDGAR SNIDER 

PRINTING 
244 NORTH WRENN PHONE 4141 I 



"Better Printing Pays" 

Barber-Hall Printing 
Company 



PHONE 2385 



perfect which 

rotection P a v s 



Every day 
very way 



N. L. Garner, Agency 

Occidental Life Insurance Company 
809 Security Bank Building 

PHONE 4640 



Compliments of 


Tke 


College Book Store 


Students' Headquarters 



By rum's Dry Cleaning 



Bakur s Shoe Store 



J. Clay Madison 



Compliments of 

Lindale Dairy 
Corporation 

PHONE 2442 



Fine Diamonds • Quality Watches • Beautiful Jewelry 



On Convenient Credit Terms 



WAGGER JEWELRY COMPANY 



ELWOOD HOTEL CORNER 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



T. EMILE DODAMEAD 

Artist ani ptjntngrapljn* 

416 Gatewood Avenue 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



S-fyeciahst on 

Fine Copies From Photographs, Tin Types, 
and. Daguerreotyes 



MINIATURES PAINTINGS 

OIL PORTRAITS 
PHOTOGRAPHS 



m 



\U\U-\V^U\ 



RJEXWILT Of ABIIILIITY AND 
EXIPIEIKJIlENCIEJPHUUr QIPIPOIWRUNIITY 



^inuur oipipoipjr 



QIRiGAMZATIION TAWT 



ivj/' j; iui^m^ilJJ ^"^ J iUI 



US IEAJKNIEID 



BY TIME AlBIILIlfY OIE IITJT MIEMIBIERJT, 
TttlE IEXIPIEIPJIIENCIE GAIINIED IN 
1FWIENW YIEAJRJT OIE IEIE IEQIKI AND 
™iEOIPIPOIR]ryNIITIIIEJT OiriEIEIRJEID IBY 



rjr c 



IENTJ 



OTAI^DITIE lENGIRAVIING 
COMPANY II NC. 

AKTI^TJ"-Pt10T0-ENGRAVEPJ o -DEJIGNEPJ , 

CHA FLLOTTE 

N O FLT tt 
CAR-OLI N A 



Wl^ 



\i£Pmzs 



E/TABLIJ"ttED N I N ET E E N Fl FTEEN 



THIS BOOK PRINTED BY 




Th E 

WORLD'S 

LARGEST 

PUBLISHERS 

OF 

COLLEGE 

ANNUALS 




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