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Full text of "The Zenith Yearbook 1964, High Point College"

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S igns 
and 
S ymbols 

of the 

1 964 ZENITH 



Published by the 
Student Body 

of 
High Point College 



Elaine Greene Editor-in-chief 

Carol Parrish Associate Editor 

Pam Hancox Managing Editor 

Charles Hawks Business Manager 

Dr. S. J. Underwood Advisor 



Many Things Go to Make a Campus Different 




The 1964 ZENITH tells 
of the signs and symbols 
of High Point College — 
those that give it an 
unique personality all its 
own. The residence of 
the president and his 
family (left) is extremely 
close to the new dorm. 
The daffodils add to the 
uniqueness of our campus. 




... • -^'■~°\7:T-'*~ &.-.>.■ I 



— . 







C&- 





Studying in the court 
of the girls' dorm (top 
left) is a treat on a warm 
spring day. College Day 
(top right) sponsored by 
the High Point merchants 
could mean prizes for 
someone. This year's tug- 
of-war resulted (above 
left) in no more Beanies 
for the freshmen, and the 
editor of the ZENITH 




getting dunked. The col- 
legians, (above right) 
made up of campus stu- 
dents, offers great en- 
tertainment for campus 
functions. North Hall, 
(left) the newest girls' 
dorm, houses upperclass- 
men girls. Other dorm 
girls are jealous of the 
modern conveniences 
North Hall affords. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Administration 

& 
Facultv 



is 



35 Student Body 




..:•" ; 



.r 



'• 




Organizations 85 



p&:-\ 



117 Greeks 





Features 139 



161 Athletics 





Campus Life 187 



199 Advertisers 




DEDICA TION 

College is a time of questioning and of doubting; 
yet if one truly searches, it is a time of answers 
and of assurance. Severed from the restraining, de- 
pendent cords of home, the student naively surges 
forth into life only to be caught in the undertow 
of inevitable difficulties in adjustment, learning, 
and growing emotionally and mentally. However, if 
a person is fortunate, he will meet and come to 
know one individual — a cognitive professor, a con- 
fident guide, and a compassionate friend — who will 
open the doorway to erudition and self-realization. 

We, at High Point College, have such an indivi- 
dual, a person who goes beyond the facade of mun- 
dane interest and dedicates his time, his knowledge, 
his being to assisting students. Not only does he 
open vast vistas of information for the academic 
development of the students, but he also strives to 
strengthen individuals to understand and master 
their own emotions and conflicts. 

In appreciation for his ceaseless efforts in the 
continuance of high educational standards and 
Christian ideals, we the Senior Class dedicate the 
1964 edition of the Zenith to the man who leaves 
with us his ideal — "A new commandment I give 
unto you, that ye love one another, as I have loved 
you" — Mr. John D. Martin. 




Mr. Martin spends half of his teaching load counseling students 
who need specialized help with personal problems and study 
skills. Here he is shown helping a student learn to study effec- 
tively. 




Students must have the absolute trust of an individual before he 
talks frankly with an advisor. This picture reflects the confidence 
our student body has in Mr. Martin. 




There is seldom a moment to relax when one as conscientiously 
as does the man we honor. Here he is shown in a rare moment 
of relaxation. 



Physical Properties of Campus Are 
Signs of Its Uniqueness 





A campus is made up of many things — people, trees, 
sidewalks, classrooms, bonks and buildings. These 
things make campuses universal, but each campus has 
its own unique qualities. The uniqueness of High Point 
College endears it to each and every student who passes 
through the portals of Roberts Hall. Roberts Hall is the 




most prominent building on campus. Its spire 
can be seen from any vantage point on the 
campus and when the weather is foggy, the 
tower seems to hover protectively over the 
college. Something new has been added to the 
campus this year. White parking signs have 
made their appearance. 




7 



Freshmen Begin a New and Exciting Year 




A freshman's first day at 
High Point College is a mix- 
ture of new and exciting ex- 
periences. Many willing and 
eager hands are ready to help 
new students unload cars and 
transport belongings to the 
dorms. Several upperelass- 
men boys, like these two 
Larrys, found themselves 
suffering from aching backs 
and strained muscles as the 
result of thousands of heavy 
suitcases, stuffed trunks and 




mysterious boxes. Stuffed 
animals by the b o x 1 o a d s 
f o u n d new homes in the 
rooms of VV Oman's Hall. 
Mass confusion reigned as 
new students became ac- 
quainted with their new 
homes, new friends and said 
goodbyes to their families. 
Sunday night found the fresh- 
men making new friends 
among the oldtimers on cam- 
pus. 









As is true with most colleges, High Point 
abounds with many buildings of different 
shapes and sizes. Colonial architecture pre- 
vails on the campus. The sight of these 
buildings is the first impression that a 
student gets of High Point College. The 
newcomers do not see the students, the 
professors, or the Bookstore. They first be- 
come acquainted with the tower of Rob- 
erts Hall, ascending toward the utmost 
peak of knowledge — the Lamp of Learn- 
ing. With this first look, all the other 
buildings fall into view: Woman's Hall. 
McCulloch Hall, Memorial Auditorium. 




Pictured above is a scene of the Carrick 
Memorial Gardens. These gardens are a 
memorial to Doak Bain Carrick (1888- 
1962), a distinguished horticulturist and a 
citizen of High Point for many years. He 
was the son of the Reverend Thomas and 
Mary Bain Carrick. 

Fourteen benches have been donated by 
Mrs. Mary Stephens Carrick Hewlett and 
Mr. Carey W. Carrick, in memory of the 
Reverend Thomas and Mary Bain Carr- 
ick, parents of Doak Bain Carrick. 



HI" 'jk 



Orientation and Registration 




As a part of Orientation this 
year, all incoming freshmen were 
required to read three books: Look 
Homeward Angel, Conscience On 
Campus, and Lord Of The Flies. 
During Orientation Week, these 
books were discussed by students 
and professors. Dr. Hudgins is 
shown leading one group. 



The freshman year begins with Orientation ... a mix- 
ture of confusion and excitement, a few tears shed, 
the joy of meeting other students, moving in, unpack- 
ing, meeting professors and Dr. Patton, parting, en- 
tertainments, tests and more tests, and finally, those 
few days after classes start. There seems to be an 
electric current that runs through the atmosphere of 



the campus during the first few weeks of school. Or- 
ientation is an important part of the freshman year at 
college, and during this time, the new student becomes 
acquainted with the school ... its quh-ks, its traditions, 
its personality, and its people. The freshman adjusts 
to college life and becomes a vital and moving part of 
the campus. 




An important part of Orientation is 
the taking of many different tests. 
Several students are shown laboring 
over one such test. 



Dr. William Matthews, advisor to 
the freshman class, is shown talking 
to the new students in the auditorium. 
Several members of the Orientation 
Committee are seated behind Dr. 
Matthews. 




Begin a New Year For HPC Students 



Lines, lines, and more lines. A 
student finds himself standing 
in many lines before the painful 
task of registering is over. These 
students look like they have been 
standing in line for a long time, 
even patient Dick Stinson looks 
like he is ready to give up and 
go home. 




With the return of the upperclassmen to the campus 
comes the task of registration for fall semester classes. 
Registration always involves standing in line — to get 
into the gym, to get the necessary cards, to get into the 
desired course sections, to pay the Bursar, to turn the 
completed medical form in to the nurse, to turn the 
cards in to the Registrar's office, and finally, stand- 



ing in line to get out of the K.vm. Registration, in 
spite of all efforts, is always mass confusion. Rushing 
to and fro in the gymnasium . . . trying to find that 
certain English professor . . . breaking for lunch . . . 
grabbing a quick bite to eat . . . and hurrying back 
to the gym to see if registration cannot be finsihed 
before midnight. This is all a part of college life. 



Director of Student Personnel, Mr. 
Taylor, and his assistants seem to be 
relieved by the rest given to them. 





Dean of the College, Dr. David Cole, 
is a very busy person during regis- 
tration. His desk is the scene of many 
conferences about schedules, hours, 
history courses, and many other pro- 
blems. 



Students Are Greeted by 




As the new college year begins, the students are 
greeted by old and familiar sights as well as by 
new ones. These new additions to the campus add 
to the unique personality of High Point College. 
Campus cop, Mr. Allen, is still giving out 
those dreaded parking tickets, and the fine has in- 
creased to $2 this year. The bookstore has added 
a new collection of books to whet the appetite of 
eager, young intellectuals. 



The tower of Roberts Hall still stands as guardian angel over 
the campus. An expansion in the size of the campus brought 
new housing for upperclassmen and fraternity men. Millis 
Dormitory was ready for occupancy at the beginning of the 
semester. A new and most unusual sight around the campus 
these days is the pet "Kitty cat" of one student. The cat sits 
patiently in the car during his master's classes. 




■-' lit ■ in 1 lit 




'J 



the Old and the New 




A familiar sight to everyone is 
the Student Center. Housing the. 
campus Post Office, the Book- 
store, the offices of campus or- 
ganizations, and lounge for stu- 
dent relaxation, this building 
could certainly be called the most 
popular building on c a m p u s. 
From 8 o'clock in the morning 
until 4 o'clock in the afternoon, 
the sounds of popular music can 
be heard wafting from the Book- 
store. 



*m 



Old and familiar sights, if seen from a new 
angle, can often seem new. This picture is a 
prime example of such an experiment. Is this 
the north side of North Hall, or is it the side 
of the library? No, this is a view of the gym- 
nasium that very few people pay attention to ; 
although they see this part of the building, it 
never looks to them as it does in this picture. 





Bright, sparkling white park- 
ing signs are abundant all over 
the campus. These signs which 
are a distinctive feature of our 
campus, aid in solving the cam- 
pus parking problem. Upon reg- 
istration, each student who owns 
a car was given a parking sticker 
with a letter on it indicating a 
certain area in which the student 
is allowed to park his car. A 
parking ticket is the reward for 
anyone who does not obey this 
new rule. 



j 



IN MEM OKI AM 




John F. Kennedy 1917 - 1963 



"John Kennedy reveled in love for the Irish 
patrimony that he had left so far behind. He 
laughed with love at the roguery of his 
grandfather, Honey Fitz, and his trip to Ire- 
land was a pilgrimage to that love. 

He loved his brothers and his sisters with 
a tribal love. All Kennedys were born grear- 
ious, but under seige it could be the Ken- 
nedys against the world. 

John Kennedy loved his children with a 
light that lit up his world. He discovered 
his daughter when election brought them 
finally under the same roof, and he delighted 
in her pride and in her performance. His 
heart leapt up when he saw his son, careen- 
ing through life as if there were no tomor- 
row, and he lit up the hearts of all who saw 
them enjoy each other. 

And John Kennedv loved his wife, who 



served him so well. Their life together began 
as it ended — in a hospital — and through 
sickness and loneliness there grew the speci- 
al love that lights up the soul of the lover 
and the loved alike. 

John Kennedy is dead, and for it that we 
are lesser people in a lesser land." 

— Benjamin Bradlee 

Copied from Newsweek, December 2, 

1963. page 38. 

The editor feels that it is only fitting and 
proper for the ZENITH to pay tribute to our 
late President. We are a part of the youth 
that he was so interested in, and there is 
no better nor more poignant eulogy for 
John F. Kennedy than the one written by 
Mr. Bradlee. 



14 




We 

Pay 

Tribute 

to 



Mrs. Mac is as pentle a person as one could ever know. Her mascot 
shares her delightful apartment where students come to seek a word of 
advice and to share the warm wisdom which commands such widespread 
respect from "her boys." 



Mrs. Frances McMeekin-Kerr 




.jf 




One evidence of her continuing interest in a rich and 
varied life is her manv hobbies. 



Each year the Zenith staff honors one member of the administration 
who has rendered outstanding service to the student body. This year we 
pay tribute to Mrs. Frances McMeekin-Kerr. the housemother of J. Ed 
Millis Dormitory. 

One of the most difficult jobs on any college campus is to be house- 
mother to a group of male students. High Point College is most fortunate 
to have such a devoted person as "Mrs. Mac" to serve in this very important 
position. "Mrs. Mac" is always willing to help students solve their prob- 
lems and to give advice to them when she feels it is needed. Her pleasing 
personality makes her a special friend to each of the ninety men who live 
in Millis Dorm. Her advice and her concern for each student makes her 
a truly unique person who has added much to our campus. 



15 



Charlie Nesbitt— Student Par Excellence 




The ZENITH staff this year is Riving special recog- 
nition to Charlie Nesbitt. Student Body President for 
the 1963-64 school year. We feel that the entire student 
body joins with us in saying. "Congratulations and 
thank you, Charlie, for a job well done." 

From the first day that he arrived at HPC, Charlie 
has worked to help the school and his fellow students. 
His vivacious personality and tact has made him a 
friend of all. Popular with all students, he is also well- 
known and respected by the administration and the 
faculty. 

Being Student Body President has not been one of 
the easiest tasks, but Charlie has fulfilled his duties 
nobely and has always kept the students foremost in his 
mind. High Point College has become a better place be- 
cause of his four years as a student here, and the col- 
lege will always be marked by the improvements that 
he fostered. 

A warm smile and a friendly hello has endeared Char- 
lie to us all, and the ZENITH staff would like to say 
a personal "thank you" for all that you have done for 
everyone. 





■ 



4 A 




President's Message to the Class of '64 



As parting remarks to you may I quote from an unknown 
Professor of Latin in a liberal arts college : 



"The four years a man spends at college should 
be like a hill in a plain. As he ascends the hill, he 
is able more and more to see back over the road that 
humanity has trod — the great things that have been 
thought and said and done and believed and created. 
From this vision of the past history of the world 
and its inhabitants and from a comprehensive view 
of the nature of the universe, he is able to turn 
and #aze along the future course of humanity; to 
judge the future from his knowledge of the past 
and the present ; and to plot his own steps in that 
future. Any man, whatsoever his own work, pro- 
fession or business, will be the better for this vision. 
Perhaps never again will he have the opportunity 
to lift his gaze from the daily routine of life's pedest- 
rian path into the vast reaches of Nature and hu- 
man experience, but the memory of what he has 
seen from the elevation of those years will permeate 
all the remaining years of his life." 




May God always guide you and keep you and 
mav we not be lost to each other. 



^ux^. fy /22&~ 






:■ 




Administrative Personnel 




Dr. Harold E. Conrad 

Dean of the College 



Dr. David W. Cole 

Acting Dean of the 

College 






Mrs. Dot Griffiths 

Assistant Director of 
Student Personnel 




Jesse L. Taylor 

Director of 
Student Personnel 



W. Lawson Allen 
Business Manager 




Mr. Dale Brown 

Alumni Executive 
Secretary 




Mr. L. G. Wright 
Dietitian 




Dr. Clifford Hinshaw 

Director of Evening School 




Miss Marcella Carter 

Head Librarian 



A dministration and Staff 




Mr. Wesley W. Gaynor 
Bursar 




Mr. I). L. Paul 

Director of Admissions 




Mr. W. Lawson Allen 
Director of College Relations 




Mrs. Frances Gaynor 
Bookkeeper 




Mrs. L. G. Wright 
Dietitian 




Mrs. Marguerite Hormachea 
Director of News Bureau 




22 



Mr. N. P. Yarborough 
Registrar 




Mrs. Bobbie Everharl 
Campus Nurse 





Dr. W. B. Donald. Jr. 
CollcKe Physician 




Dr. Edwin L. Auman 
College Physician 



Dr. W. P. Hinson 
College Physician 




Dr. C. W. Surles. Jr. 
College Physician 





Jih 



Dr. Eugene Terrell 
College Physician 




Dr. Eldora Terrell 
College Physician 



Dr. Lee West 
College Physician 




Mrs. Mary Austin, 
housemother in Mc- 
Culloch Hall, is new 
on our campus this 
year, but has proven 
to be a good mother 
to her many charges. 




Mrs. Mary Bennett is substi- 
tute "mother" for the women 
resident students. Always 
willing to help with any prob- 
lems, she is beloved by all the 
girls who are under her care. 



Mrs. Frances McMeekin Kerr is 
"mama" to the boys in the new 
Millis Dorm. A sprightly, little 
lady, she is always ready to help 
wherever she is needed. 




Mr. Paul Austin 
is in charge of 
the Student Cen- 
ter. He spends 
many hours pag- 
ing students and 
keeping appoint- 
ments in order. 




23 




Mr. James Allen 
Campus Policeman 





Miss Helen Brown 
Secretary to Alumni 




Mrs. Louise Blake 
Secretary t<> th.- Registrar 



Mrs. Dorothy Collins 
Switchboard Operator 




Mrs. Adeline Hamilton 
Assistant Librarian 





Miss Zelle Marlin 

Secretary to 
Dr. D. H. Cooke 



• . 




Mrs. Dorothy Kerr 
Cashier 



Mrs. Lillian Mays 
Secretary to the Dean of 
the College 




*.* 



Mrs. Annis Parks 

Mimeograph Office 





Mrs. Ina Patrick 
Assistant Librarian 




Mrs. Shirley Layton 

Assistant Bookstore 

Manager 



Mrs. Dorothy Price 
Secretary to the Director 

nf Admissions 




Mrs. Mona Saunders 

Secretary to the 
Public Relations Office 





Mrs. Charlotte White 
Audio-Visual Director 




Mrs. Viola Thompson 

SiMTftary to the Business 
Manager 



Mrs. Goolsby 
Panhellenic House 



:■: 



Dr. William Lazaruk 

Department Head 



Dr. Clyde Crobauifh 
Department Head 



Faculty 

Biology Department 





*• 


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mm i Jam 


1 




Mrs. Elizabeth Conner 


Dr. Halsev Miller 


Miss 


Kay Phillip* 



The Biology Department means more than 
the clatter students make as they cut up 
their frogs, grading lab drawings, trying to 
master the fish, and trying to make an "A" 
in lab. 



Business Department 





*▲« 



Mr. Joe C. Allen 



Mr. J. 1.. Nelson t'mdr. (ieorge W. Nelts 



The Business Department means more 
than mastering Gregg shorthand, ruining fin- 
gernails on the typewriter, writing papers 
of consumer goods ; and hoping for at least 
a "B" in Business Law. 




Mr. J. Wilson Rogers 



2 5 



Education and Psychology Department 




Mr. H. E. Coble 



Dr. Dennis H. Cooke 
Department Head 



Doing- student teaching — making at- 
tractive bulletin boards — having con- 
ferences with Dr. Dan Cooke — and 
finally receiving the much sought after 
teaching certificate, are. all part of the 
Education Department. 



Dr. Dan B. Cooke Mr. J. D. Martin 




Mrs. Kathryn Ring Dr. H. H. Peterson 



Dr. W.P. Matthews 
Miss Ruth Worthington 



English Department 




Dr. Samuel Underwood 
Department Head 



Shakespeare — Milton — 
punctuation — term papers — 
poetry — Chaucer — tests — 
new English Club — Drama — 
journalism — all these are Eng- 
lish. 



Dr. Jean Halladav 




Mrs. Shirley Rawley 



Mrs. Peggy Lyles 



Mrs. Emily Sullivan 



26 



Fine Arts Department 




Dr. Lew J. Lewis 
Department Head 




Mr. Donald Drapeau Mr. J. L. Fryhover Mrs. Jane Morgan 

Miss Ernestine Fields Mr. Raiford Porter 



Better practice that piano a little more — go to the 
library for information for the debate tomorrow — try- 
outs for the play next Friday — rehearsals every night 

— work on the sets — dress rehearsal — final performance 

— speech to activate for Monday — sounds of organ com- 
ing from the auditorium. 



History Department 




Dr. David W. Cole 
Department Head 




Dr. Helen Bartlett Dr. Harold Conrad Dr. S. C Deskii 

Dr. A. P. C.ratiot Mr. James R. Prittchett 



The history department this year is re- 
quiring all freshman history classes to meet 
once a week in the auditorium for a lecture. 



27 



Languages Department 





Mr. J. H. Allred Miss Berts Hirtzler 




Mrs. Evelyn Simpson 



Dr. Arthur F. LeVey 
Department Head 




These professors seem to be enjoying their 
meal before their next classes. 



Mathematics Department 





Miss Louise Adams 



1 plus 1 equals 2 — staying 
up all night doing those trig 
problems — calculus giving 
students a headache. 



Col. Carlton J. Cook 
Department Head 



Col. Cook seems to 
be fascinated by 
something on the 
floor as the professor 
rests his hands a few 
minutes before the 




long processional of 
new students begins. 
Even the professors 
sometimes dread the 
Student - Faculty Re- 
ception. 



.'- 



Physical Education Department 





Miss Belly Jo Dory Mr. Robert Davidson Mr. C. F. Ilartri 



Dr. James T. Hamilton 
Department Head 



P.E. classes at 8:20 certainly are 
rough. Some people will never learn to 
hit that little birdie. 




Mr. Tom Quinn 



Dr. W. R. Lorke 
Department Head 



Religion Department 




< 



Dr. Hughes Cox 



Dr. Locke, Head of Religion 
Department, organizes an as- 
sembly. 





Mrs. Dorothy Hays Dr. Walt HudRins 



; » 




Sociology Department 




Dr. L. M. Hays 

Department Hea<I 




Mr. C. R. Hnrmachea 



A petition circulating to get lab priv- 
ileges for Marriage and the Family classes. 
Anthropology term papers are due tomor- 
row. 



Chemistry and Physics Department 





Dr. J. M. Flowers 



Dr. K. O. CumminKs 




Don't you think that someone should inform Mr. Hormachea that one does not go 
swimming with one's clothes on? 



jC 




In Memory of Mr. Jerry Michael 
February 12. 1028 February 20, 1964 



High Point College has lost a scholar. There 
is no other way to describe Mr. Jerry Michael 
— he was a scholar, an intellectual in the finest 
sense of the word, a true example of what an 
educator should be. 

Mr. Michael taught at High Point College 
only a few months, but in that time he left a 
tremendous impression on everyone who came 
into contact with him. The first time you met 
him you said to yourself, "Here is a brilliant 
man." Mot only was he brilliant in his own 
right, but he also had standards which his stu- 
dents admired. He instilled in his students the 
idea that knowledge is much more important 
than mere grades or averages. 

In the field of economics he taught as few 
men could, because of his wide background and 
experience. Having lived under different econo- 
mic systems, he was free from much of the 
bias that many people have. He never stated 
that one theory of economics was right and 



another wrong, rather he pointed out the rela- 
tive merits of each system. He did not condone 
any one philosophy, instead he taught his stu- 
dents to analyze all of them and to make an 
intelligent choice for themselves. 

To the students of High Point College Mr. 
Michael has endowed his profound enthusiasm. 
As a teacher he was demanding But somehow 
you did not really mind working for him. You 
always knew that no matter how hard you work- 
ed for his classes, he always worked that much 
harder to become a more effective teacher. 

Although he was a teacher. Mr. Michael 
never stopped being a student. He was always 
searching, studying, and striving for improve- 
ment and knowledge. 

Yes, we at High Point College have lost a 
scholar. We have lost a concerned friend. We 
knew Mr. Michael for only a short time, yet 
we know that we have known a great man. 



Board of Fellows 



The High Point College Board of Fellows, the direct responsibility of 
the endowment committee of the Board of Trustees, is composed of indivi- 
duals, corporations, and business concerns who are vitally interested in the 
future of High Point College. The deadline for participation in this vital 
phase of the Development Program is February 1 of each year. The Board 
of Fellows sharing their abilities and influences with the college this year 
are: 



Alcoa Foundation 

Warren L. Anderson 

Mrs. Myrtle H. Barthmaier 

Mr. Jack H. Campbell 

Mr. J. Harriss Covington 

Mr. Frank Dalton 

Mrs. Frank Dalton 

Mr. Doak S. Finch 

Mr. Tom A. Finch, Jr. 

Mr. John C. Foy 

Mr. Horace S. Haworth 

Mr. Charles E. Hayworth 

Mr. David R. Hayworth 

Mr. Delos S. Hedgecock 

High Point Bank & Trust Co. 

Mr. I. Paul Ingle 

Mr. C. T. Ingram, Jr. 

Mr. Charles L. Kearns 



Mrs. Eleanor Powell Latimer 

The Lilly Company, Mr. W. R. Campbell 

Mr. Wayland B. Linthicum, Jr. 

McCrary-Acme Foundation, Inc. 

Mr. Holt McPherson 

Mrs. J. E. Millis 

Mr. James H. Millis 

Mrs. L. K. Mobley 

North Carolina National Bank 

Mrs. Ammie Mae Powell 

Mr. John M. Reeves 

Mr. Leon Schute 

Mr. Robert M. Silver 

Mr. Edgar H. Snider 

Western Electric Foundation 

Mr. Elliot S. Wood 

Mr. Frank H. Wood 



High Point College 
Board of Trustees 



Mr. Holt McPherson, Chairman 

Mr. Horace S. Haworth, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Elliott S. Wood, Treasurer 

Dr. Wendell M. Pattern, Secretary 



Rev. J. Clyde Auman 

Mr. Stanford R. Brookshire 

Mrs. D. S. Coltrane 

Mr. J. Harriss Covington 

Mr. Eugene Cross 

Mr. Harry B. Finch 

Mr. Tom A. Finch. Jr. 

Bishop Paul N. Garber 

Dr. C. L. Gray 

Rev. M. E. Harbin 

Nolan B. Harmon. D.D., Ex-Officio 

Mr. Felix Harvey, III 

Mr. Charles E. Hayvvorth 



Mr. Vernon Hodgin 

Mr. Josh Home 

Mr. Charles L. Kearns 

Mr. A. J. Koonce 

Mr. Charles W. McCrary 

Mr. Blaine Madison 

Dr. J. Clay Madison 

Mr. James H. Millis 

Dr. W. Stanley Potter 

Mrs. Katie MacAulay Rankin 

Mr. L. F. Ross. Emeritus 

Mr. William F. Womble 




I ..ft to ritht- First row— Rev. J. Clyde Aumun, Mr. 
Charles E Havworth. Mr. Elliott S. Wood. Mr. Holt Mc- 
pherson Mr. Horace S. Harworth. Second r«»v_Dr. Wen- 
dell Patton, Rev. M. E. Harbin. Dr. J. Clay Madison, 



Mr. Charles W. McCrary, Mr. J. Vernon Hodgin. Third 
row— Dr. C. L. Gray, Mr. S. R. Brookshire, Mr. H. A. 
Koonce. Mr. F. Logan Porter, Mr. William L. Womble. 



33 



Evening School 




The Evening School offers an opportunity 
for students to receive a college education 
while pursuing a full-time career. Approxi- 
mately forty courses are offered in many 
fields of study. Dr. ('. R. Hinshaw is director 
of the Evening School with a staff of twenty- 
one qualified professors. 



Dr. C. R. Hinshaw 
Director of Evening School 




Left to right: Front row: L D. Graham, C. R. Hormachea. Jean 
Hulladay, Jerry Micheal, ('. R. Hinshaw. G. M. Nicholson. Juan 
Miranda, Jane Morgan, Margaret Lyles, Gwendolyn Doggett. 



(■eorge HHobart. Second row: Jack VanAnda, Reid Prillaman, 
Halsey Miller. V P. \arborough. William Kuhn, Jesse Tavlor, 
Wallace Harrelson, Janet McCurry. David Holt, S. C. Deskins 



•■i 




4&r 



UDEN 



F 

R 

E 

S 

H 

M 

A 

N 




The Freshman begins his year with apprehension and ends it with a new 
found confidence, maturity, and an excitement for the future. Because of 
the Sophomore Beanie Program, bonfires, fraternity rush, required courses, 
term papers, and the thousand other little things that fill a freshman's 
hours, he becomes a vital part of the High Point College student body. 



c 

L 

A 
S 
S 




Laurie Abbott 
Jean Allen 
Billie Allen 



Wayne Ashley 
Marizell Austin 
Charles D. Ayei 



Robert W. Bivens 

Thomas Blancink 
Debbie Bolton 



Richard AUigood 
Jean Anderson 



Peter J. Antonakos 



Marianne Beh remit 
William T. Berrier 



Jackie Rrendle 

Winifred Bristow 

Jack Brown 




mmM 





■■ 




Melvin Lawrence Byrd. Mike Cana- 
■lay. Ronald Hendrix Carroll, Anna 
Lee Carter. Thomas A. Carter, 
Thomas A. Carter. Perry Jones 
Cash ion, Max H Cheek 



Gary Chesson, Chalma* Clark. 
i irejcory Chase, Lai ry Cheatham, 
Robert H. Clark. Jr.. Til He Clark. 
Thomas Coleman 



Patricia Ann Cook. Francis David 
Courtney, II. Steve Covin* ton, 
Sarah 1 Craven. Donald Crossley, 

William Cude. Steve Davis 



The Freshman Year_ 



Exciting New Experiences 



Julia Detiooyer. Roger Steve 
De Lappe. Donald R. De- 
Wolfe, Tom Diirnan. David 
Dorsey. Sue Drone. Karen 
Edwards. Terry Edwards 




Robert Stephen Eller. I.eif F. 
Eriksson. Wayne Ervin. Jill 
Eyerhart. Jerry Freedle. Ellie 
Freeman. Carol Feezor. Jane 
C. Fleming 



Dennis Flynn. Clinton Her- 
man Porbis, Jr.. Gainor Good- 
win. Linda Greason, Jeff 
Graul. Sarah Green. Erlene 
Haieht. Linda Hall 



Robert Earl Hamilton. Faye 
Harman. David Harrington, 
Linda Heclrick. Nancy June 
Hill. Dewev Hilliard. Ralph 
W. Hoar. Jr., Carry Holland 










ft 







17 




Judith Ann Hollingsworth 
Thomas W. Mollis 

Susan Hood 
Don Hormachea 



/* 



AiN't-ii N H"w.- 

David Hueks 

Wayne Hughes 






gAtiM 



AMtA 







ilMi* 



Runda Hundley 

Komi» D. Huss 
Judy Hussey 

Verlone Hutchinson 



Gloria Jester 
Dennis Johnson 
Fred I. Jones 
Wanda Joyce 



Tamara Kearns 
Rosemary Kennedy 
Mayada Kiser 
William Kinsey 



Rickie Larrick 



Alan Lashley 
William J. Lawrence 



Jo> Inmati 

Ammie Lee Jenkins 

Christie Jensen 



Delaine Jurney 
Margaret Kaehler 
Rodney 0. Kearns 



Jerry Lambert 

Emma Lou Landed 

George 0. La re, Jr. 



Tony Lefteris 
Gene Le Prade 



Sharon Letherbury 




Sophomore Tickets Plus 





It's about my dandruff! 



Vis Sir, we understand! 



38 




Richard Lew in 

Hutch Lewis 
Don Link 



Ann Litten 
Rachel Little 

Valerie Lochte 
Jean Losten 



Nolan l.tiwi.- 




James Martz 


Christine Low 


eth 


Larry Matthews 


A nn M.-u-kif 




Pat Milhous 



Kaye Moody 
Linda Morgan 

Jan Mollis 



William Mclnni: 
Jackie Melver 



Arthur McKay, Jl\ 



Sandra Newsome 
James Norris 



Stanley North 



Jane Milner 



Juan Muench 
C. Dale McDonald 



Dale T. McDonald 
Hoy McDonald 



Pamela Neal 
Barbara Nalker 



Ronnie Spencer Nelson 
Billy Nesbiti 



Barbara O'Connor 

Nat Oliver 

Carl August Orton 

Barry Phillip Osborne 








I 




Freshman Determination Equals 
No More Beanies 




\' .« 



Hev freshmen, let's net those Sophomores! 




Why do the freshmen have a rope? To pull George Royeroft in the 
creek . . . 






mm* 




tttt* 





Betty Parks 

Linda Perry 

Sue Carolyn Parker 

Eddy Patterson 



George Patterson 
Hattie Patterson 
Lowe) Payne 
Arthur Peterson 



Jim Picklesimer 
Diane Pigott 
Diane Pilecki 

Anne Pirtle 



Catherine Poindexter 
Nancy Poole 
Joseph W. Poole. Jr. 
Carolyn Price 



Robert Pritchard 
David Pulliam 
Linda Pulliam 
Darrell Rayle 



Sally C. Reed 
Howard Regan, Jr. 
Noel Rendell 
Mary Renegar 



Carlos A. Rias 
Henry E. Rivers 
Frank ie Roberts 
Ceta Rogers 




A Study 



Kathy Rogers 
Howard Russell 
Susan Sanders 
Thomas Sharpe 
Richard Simms 



Jeffrey Rumple 
Jean Ruth 
Bill Stewart 
Ruth Sides 
Robert Skwirut 



James Rorrer 
James Russell 
Candy Sarmuk 
Emily Sherrill 
Carol Simpson 



Carolyn Russell 
Jan Samet 
Barbara Searle 
Johnsie Simmons 
Harold Slater 




But Christy you already have an 8:20! 




40 




In concentration 



Kenneth Walker 
Robert Wells 
Norman White 
Rebecca Williams 
C. M. Worthy 



Kathleen Ward 
Joseph Whatley 
Horace Whitsett 
Saundra Willians 
Preston Yates 



Ed Wallen 

Charles Westmoreland 
Sherry White 
Ronda Williams 
Joyce Gayle Wright 



Robert Weiss. Jr. 
Frank Wheeler 
Ernie Williams 
Anita Kay Wilson 
Janet Young 




James Slonr 
Angela Smith 
Gene Smith 
Linwood Smith 



I<owianco Smith 
Shirley Snyder 
Donna Sowers 
James Spiridopoulis 



Janet Stayer 
Dina Steed 
John Steimle 
Francis Stewart 



June Carol Stewart 

Judy Stone 

Ella Stout 

Judy Irene Stutts 



John Swan 
Robert Swing 
Nancy Tabor 
Bouglas Thayer 



David Thomas 
Mary Lou Thomas 
Penny Thompson 

Allen Thorburn 



Jo Ann Thorley 
Harriet Tysinger 
Betty Vaughn 
Susan Wagoner 





Bookstore 101a 



s 
o 
p 

H 
O 

M 
O 
R 
E 




Sophomore class officers for 1963-64, Charles Kerr, vice president; Georjre Roycroft. 
president; Carol Tourtree, secretary; and Joe Nucklous. treasurer. 



c 

L 

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S 



Upon his return, the Sophomore finds himself a year older and a year 
closer to his goals and to his college degree. The old memories are revital- 
ized through the Sophomore's associations with the Freshman Orientation 
programs, and new memories are made with anticipations of future ones. 
The Sophomore finds himself fully integrated into college life. He begins 
to make final decisions which will affect the remainder of his life. During 
his second college year, the Sophomore comes closer to the realization of 
adulthood. 




rfJl.fe 




Donald Albert 
Wayne Anderson 
Judy Arminirton 
Tommy Arnold 
Grif Balthia 



42 



Sterling Hank-. 
John W. Barksdale 
Bob Batten 
Linda Beane 
Joseph Beck 




William Bifffferstaff 

Tom Blake 

Elizabeth A. Borrs 

Kenny Borrs 

Vicki Boles 



The Return. 



A Year Older. 



A Year Wiser 



Anne Booth 

Tony Boyle* 

James Bovender 

Robert Brennan 

Bob Brewer 







itkiiJ 






i 



lliitotlifc 



Nan Brown 
Gilbert Brim 
James Brucki, Jr. 
Sieve Buff 
Harold Byerly 



43 








t*ta 



Sandra Cagle 
Ronnie Callicutt 
Carole Calvert 
William Carter 
Anne Casstevens 



HuKh Cates 
John Chilton 
Michael Cobum 
Karen Clodfelter 
Steve Clodfelter 



Keith Conner 
John Conrad 



Hoyle Coppley 
Mary Ruth Corder 





Sophomore Dick Stinson, and Mrs. Hormachea interview Dr. 
Martin, Marty, the Finch Lecturer. 



Larry Craver 
Robert Craver 
James Cross 
Betts Davis 
James Davis 



Raymond Davis 
Ray Davis 
Jean Denton 
Mary Dover 
Jeanne Dudley 



Jim I »ui;;:n n 
Wallace T. Duncan 
Kenneth Elmore 
David Evans 
Nancy Fallon 




JoNell Goodson 
Eddy Greeson 
Richard Guiffredo 
Jenova Haines 
Sandra Hargrove 




Sandra Hutching 
Kitty SttC Hutchins 



Everybody 
Wants 



k*.*** 







Just remember, we had to wear those beanies six weeks. 



4, 



To Get 
into the Act 




Sorry about your weejuns, Dean Taylor. 



Gilbert Jacobs 
Steve Jarrett 




William Jones 
Reggie Joyner 



dtk£ 






Taylor Kennerly 
Charles Kerr 



tfiAfcfc 



(Jene Kesler 
Richard King 





fcifcfcto 



Bill King 
Jill Knuckey 




Dawn Lankford 
Tommy Lilten 



n 




Studies 

and 
are Still 



I hope they like me. 



Trudy Livelihood 

John Loflin 

Ramonia Lomax 

Marilyn Lund 

Joe Luther 



Wynne MacGregor 

Eddie McCormick 

Patricia McCormick 

Mickey McDaniel 

Bobby McDowell 





tlifctfj 



John Marquis 
Aris Mastrogianakis 
Sharon Mathis 
Charlie Miller 
Don Miller 



48 



Parties 

Assemblies 

Here 




Will hi' ever finish???? 



g^ifcft 



Joseph Nuckolls 

Jerry O'Kelley 

John Osborne 

Penny Paquin 

Tom Parker 



Martha Paris 

Barbara Payne 

John Roger Payne 

Steve Pearson 

Nancy Perry 




Judith Miller 
Katy Minis 
Beverly Moody 
Mrs. Linda Morgan 
Myra Morris 




Phillip Moseley 
Jay Motsinger 
Harold Myers 
Jimmy Nance 
Elizabeth Neese 



tiki. 




49 




Reid Perryman 
Ruby Phillips 
Carol Pino 
Jacqueline Poole 
Da\e Pope. Jr. 
Jerry Proffilt 



Kenneth Rich 

Charles Richards 

Fred Rimmer 

William Rimmer 

Kent Riple> 

Kay Robb* 



John Roberts 

Linda Roberts 

Alice Robertson 

Klisa Rodriguez 

Warren Romaine 

Joan Root 



Ellis Rouse 

Elaine Roux 

(ieorge Roycroft 

Alfredo Salltz 

CharltS Schrieber 

Roy Scogffins 




kiim 




Jeffrey Seaford 
Larry Shallcross 
Louise Shelton 
Lennon Shipp 
Judy Shoaf 
Susan Slack 



50 



Lionel Sledse 

Norma Sue Smith 

Jerry Smothers 

Roger Stephens 

L. F. Stevens 
Richard Stinson 





Ann Talley 
Bruce Thorburn 
Carole Tourgee 
Kenneth Truitt 
Karl Tysinger 
David Vrian 



Roberto Vasquez 
Frazier Vereen 
Carl Vuncannon 
Omegia Waldrep 
Wayne Walker 
Helen Wasileski 



Anna Way 
Dodd Webster 
Alan Weisbecker 
Tony White 
Leonard Witt 
Vaughn York 



Katherine Vow 




51 



u 

N 
I 
O 
R 



C 
L 
A 
S 
S 




The Junior is faced with a final decision which will affect his entire life 
— the choice of a major. To make a final decision, he must counsel with 
advisors and make the most intelligent choice. The Junior spends the year 
doing research, writing papers, studying, enjoying himself, and anticipa- 
ting the Senior year. 

The major social event of the Junior year is the Junior-Senior Prom. 
This dance lauds the Seniors and gives the Junior something to look for- 
ward to in his Senior year. 




Nathan Alberty 
Bruce Alexander 
Larry Amick 



Bitsy Andrew- 
Ann Armentrout 
Rebecca Aunian 



52 




Be careful. Joe and don't blow us up! 




Steven Beck 
Beverly Berger 



Frederick Benoit 
Ronald Berrier 



Linda Black 
William Blizzard 


m* * 

t 


James Bohannon 


H^L 


Beth Brearley 





Linda Sue Brewer 
James Broos 
Ken Brown 
Don Bryant 




53 




Whore's that quote? 




Judy Berrier 
Barbara Byerly 
Gail Byerly 
Judy Callaway 



Robert Carlough 
Roger Carmichael 
Margaret Ann Carter 
Linda Cassimus 



Alfred Collins 

Mrs. Faye Kennedy 
Compton 

Delano Conklin 

Susan Cooke 



Judy Cox 
Susan Culbreth 
Kenneth Deal 
Kay DeMik 



Gary Dennis 
.lames Dishman 
Janet Doby 
Jimmy Doolittle 



Jeanne Downs 
Jean Dutton 
Janet Early 
John Eckel 




Won't anyone come help me wait on all this mob? 





Mrs. Wanda Eller 
Betty Ervin 
Doris Fallow 
J. B. Fallow 



Phyllis Farlow 
Yvonne Faucette 
Gerald Fennell 

Bri-uda Flinchum 



Jerold Frye 
Wayne Furman 
Amelia Garmon 
Sue Gibson 



Joe Gosnell 
Roy Greenwood 
Franklin Grice 
Rick Grimsley 



Pain Hancox 
William Harris 
Charles Hawks 
Stanley Hedrick 




Janet Heydenburir 
William Hobson 
Tullie Ann Hoyle 
Roberta Hudson 



Dewey Hutchins 
Phyllis Jarvis 
Sally Jepson 
l.innv Johnson 



Spencer Johnston 
Douglas Jones 
Donald Jones 
Eve Jones 





Jo Anne Kearney 
John Kennedy 
Christine Kennedy 
Shirley Key 



Gary Kieer 
Mae Lambert 
Joseph Lorber 
Carolyn McAllister 




Tracy McCarthy 
Jean McCullom 



Dick McDowell 
Robert Medlin 




Judith Mills 
Rick Mills 



Thomas Minton 
Suzanne Mock 



Steve Montague 
John Thomas Moody 



Kay Moon 
Barrow Mullis 



Charles Myers 
C. J. Neal 



Gayle Nichols 
Nancy Noblett 



One more song, C. J. ! 








Elizabeth Oldham 
Anne Onran 



Thomas Owens 
Thomas Patre 



Helen Paisley 
Joe Parker 
Lucinda Parker 
Carrol Parrish 



Tony Parsons 
Bettyeross Payne 
Russell Pearson 
Obie Peeples 



Michael Pierce 
William P rite hard 
Leslie Puiifoy 
James Ramsey 



■ - 




A I Rauch 
Dcanna Read 
Beth Renfro 
Phyllis Reynolds 



Betty Rogers 
Patty Anne Rogers 
Mike Rosenmarkle 
Sue I.vnne Rothroek 



Whitfield Ruark 
Carleen Samuels 
Henry Sapp 
Michele Schmidley 



Fred Schraplau 
Robert Seaver 
Phillip Seel berry 
Jerry Shackleford 



Sylvia Shapiro 
Orrin Shaw- 
Wayne Shephard 
Eddie Sigmon 



■ 




Joel Silver 
Jerry Sink 

Tony Slate 
Sue Smathers 



Barry Smith 
Bryce Smith 
Fiances Stephenson 
Kirk Stewart 



Graduation 

A Year Closer 



This recital has to be perfect! 




Kenneth Stokes 




Mrs. Martha Stokes 




James Surratt 





Bruce Swanson 
William Swigart 

Sandra Switzer 
Brend a Sv mines 



Sandra Tate 
Joe Ann Taylor 
Tony Taylor 
Henry Thompson 



Problems, Problems — the 




Toni Vaughn 
Janice Voncannon 
Reanza Waldrep 
Arthur Warren 



Bruce Weatherly 
Marcia Wechter 
Betty White 
Gayle White 



-. 




Peggy Ann Wiley 
Jerry Williams 
Rebecca Woody 
Barry York 



Howard York 



Juniors 



Have 



Them 




According to this, tuition is iroinK up $100.00 next semester. 






s 

E 

N 
I 
O 
R 



C 
L 

A 
S 
S 




Senior Class Officers for 1'.m;:S-i',4 arc Ken C'.unn. treasurer; Harriet Finerty, vice 
president; Boh Knrneany, president; and Bonnie Dennis, secretary. 



The Senior year culminates four years of sweat, tears, laughter, and 
heartbreak. With the coming of the Senior year, the student reflects on 
his four college years and the years proceeding, but most importantly, 
he prepares himself for the years to come. 

Before graduation, the Senior must surmount the writing of a thesis, 
block exams, practice teaching, seminars, selection of a graduate school 
or job. final exams, and preparations for the big day. Seniors anxiously 
await the Senior assemblies, and the parties which proceed graduation, 
especially the Junior-Senior climaxing the social life of a High Point 
College student. 

The most important single event of the Senior year is, of course, grad- 
uation. During the few minutes spent receiving the diploma, the Senior 
comes to the realization that now he is expected to be a man. 



CHARLSIE MAIK ABEL 
San Antonio.Texas 



KAY SHORE ALLEY 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



WILLIAM THOMAS ARN'ETTE 

OrBham. North Carolina 





REl'BEN DAVE BAl'GHN 

M.-iVmI.-wi, North Carolin.'i 



GEORGE MARLOWE BEAM. JR. 
Rockville, Maryland 



MILBREV ANNE BELAND 
Wilson, Norlh Carolina 



Senior Year Experiences 
Always to be Remembered 




JANE CAROL BLAIR 

Thomasville, North Cai-olina 



MICKEY WAYNE BOLES 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



MERLE SIZANNE BOOTH 
Ponhook, Virginia 



BOBBY KENNETH BOYD 
Ararat. North Carolina 

HAROLD WAYNE BREWER 

Hinh Point. North Carolina 

MAKLENE SUE BRINLEY 
Tampa. Florida 



65 




ROSA MAE BRIN'KLEY 

Lexington, Norlh Carolina 

WILSON HARVEV BROWNING 

High Point. Norlh Carolina 

DAVID M. BRYANT 

Marlboro. Massachusetts 




SrZANNK HARDIN III 1. LARD 
Cha<lbourn. Norlh Carolina 



BARNEY BURKS 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 




M»i:l, 



Elaine Greene, To 





MARGARET McPHAIL 

BURNS 

Charlotte. North Carolina 

ROBERT Al'STIN BURNS 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

KENNETH WAYNE BIRR1S 
Goldsboro, North Carolina 



... 



CHAKI.ES SAMl'EL BYERS 
Concord. North Carolina 

JUDITH ROGERS COPPEDGE 
High Point, North Carolina 

WALTER L. CARRIKER 
Charlotte, North Carolina 






KIKTIKCMAR CHRIST/AN 
Creensltoro, North Carolina 



MARY LEE COOTES 
Strasburg. Virginia 





Ten Freshman 



JAMES RONALD COVEY 

Talbot. Maryland 

LINDA CAROL CRAVEN 

Hi K h Point. N. C. 

ROGER JAMES CRAWFORD 
Plainfield, New Jersey 




67 




WAYNE CLIFFORD CURRY 
Lexington, N. C. 

BONNIE JO DENNIS 

Clarkton. North Carolina 

HOWARD DENNIS DRAPER 
Fayetteville. North Carolina 



LARRY STEVEN DUNN 
Seaerove. North Carolina 

DONALD MAX DWICCINS 

Winson-Salem. N. C. 

CAROL BROCK EI.LER 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



Seniors Hold Major Offices on Campus 





THOMAS DARRELL ELLER 

Thomasville. N. C. 

REBECCA JOYCE ELLIOTT 
North Wilkesboro. N. C. 

WILLIAM DOl'GLAS FALLIN 

Washington, D. C. 




KI1.KV CLINTON FIELDS. JR. 
Siler City, N. C. 




CAROLYN ELIZABETH FISCHER 

HiKh Point. N. C. 



Surely do wish that I could play those drums! 




HARRIET FINERTV 

New Castle. Delewaie 

HOBBY WAYNE FOGLEMAN 
High Point. N. C. 

FRANK ASHLEY FOSTER 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



CAROLYN ELIZABETH FRYF 
Leesburir. Vircinia 

PHILLIP EARL GARRISON 

Gleenwood, Indiana 

CAROLE LOUISE GEIST 
Setauket. New York 







- > 





<-» 




GAIL JAN GEYER 
Irvington. New Jerse> 





ROBERT RoDol.PH 1.IHBS 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



LINDA FERRAN GIBSON 

Eustis, Florida 



WILLIAM JACKIE GODWIN 

Hik'h Point. North Carolina 







JOSEPH FRANKLIN GOFORTH 
Hith Point. N C. 



DAVID ALEXANDER GRAY 
Hik-h Point. N ( 



GLORIA JEAN GRAY 
Greensboro. N C 



CONNIE ELAINE GREENE 
Candler, N. C. 



KENNETH Gl NN 
Dinwiddie. Virginia 



JANICE ABIGAIL HALL 
Mayorlan. N. C. 






- 




Seniors har.l at work in the library. 



DUANE THOMSON HARTSELL 
Hieh Point. N. C. 



ROBERT PARKER II A RTSEI.I. 

Hiirh Point. N (' 




LLOYD STEWART HARVEY 

Thomasville, N. C. 



BERCIE LEE HATCHER 
Floyd. Virginia 



PATRICK WILLIAM IIEORK K 

l.exincton. N. C. 



fJENE ERWIN HELMS 
Elizabethtown. N. C. 



(;eor(.e leondes hendris 

Hitth Point, N. C. 



CHARLES WARD HUDSON 
East Bend. N. C. 




JAMES GILBERT HODGIN 

Iliirh Point. N. C. 

IK EI) W. HOYT, JR. 

Hit'h Point. N. C. 

CYNDY KOl'I.KS lll'IIAK 
Haddonfield, New Jersey 



LARRY THOMAS HUGHES 

Hi K h Point. N. C. 

FRANK MELVIN JARVIS 

High Point, N. C. 

ROBERT HIATT JESSLP 

Greensboro. N. C. 





BETTIE SPENCER JONES 
Kinston. N. C. 



JAMES AMOS JONES 
Winston-Salem. N. C. 



ROBERT M. JIRICK 
Lexington. N. C. 

THOMAS SUTTON KESTER 

High Point. North Carolina 



"." 






BARBARA JEAN KINLAW 
Lake Monroe, Florida 

STANLEY WALTER KINNF 
High Point. N. C. 

R. MARSDEN KITLEY 
High Point. N. C. 



ROBERT DAVID KORNEGAY 

Greensboro. N.C. 

BETTY LEONA KRIMMINGER 

Concord. North Carolina 

JUDY GRAYLAMBETH 

Lexington. North Carolina 



SYLVIA SUSAN I.ECK1E 
Statesville. North Carolina 



ROBERTA WOODRUFF LEDFORD 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



VELMA JOY LEMMONS 
High Point, N. C. 

DARRELL BRENT LEONARD 

Thomasville. N. C. 




73 







PATRICIA ANN LEWIS 
Dunn, Ninth Carolina 

WAI.TKR WAYNE LEWIS 
K.'iston. Maryland 

SANDRA LUCILLE LIGHT 
High Point, N. C. 




CAROLYN McMASTERS 

LINEBERRY 
Greensboro. N. C. 

DORIS SELENE LILES 

Roanoke, North Carolina 

BRENDA JOYCE LINER 

Hiirh Point. N. C. 






DONALD A. LITTLE 

lion Station. N. C. 

MARY ANN LUCK 

Thomasville, N. C. 

ATHKLENE PAYNE MARLOWE 
Thomasville. N. C. 



MARJORIE PATTEN MARROW 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

JANET LOUISE MILLER 

Clemmons, N. C. 

MARLENE B. MOORE 
Spartanburg. South Carolina 




T. GREGORY MORTON 
Raleigh. N. C. 



Pancakes anyone? 



JANICE ELAINE MYERS 
Trinity, N. C. 

CARRIE ESTELLE MYRICK 
Linculnton, N. C. 

CHARLES EDWARD NESBITT 

Asheville. N. C. 




ROBERT WAYNE PENDER 
Mebane. N. C. 

JAMES DONALD PHILLIPS 
Roxboro, N. C. 

JUDITH GAIL PHILLIPS 
Slier City. N. C. 






PATRICIA POINDEXTER REED 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

WILLIAM T. RICHARDS, JR. 

Hi K h Point, N. C. 

NINA RUTH RICHARDSON 
Thomasville, N. C. 



'• 




HAYWOOD ALLEN RIERSON 
Greensboro, N. C. 



CAROLYN ROl'TH 
Greensboro, N. C. 




RITA MURIEL SANDERS 

Hi K h Point. N. C. 

RITA JOYCE SAUNDERS 

Charlotte, N. C. 

HOBART SIMPSON 
Ararat, N. C. 



GLENN THOMAS SMITH 
Hinh Point, N. C. 

HAROLD C. SMITH 

Thomasville, N. C. 

HARRY C. SMITH 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 








K. JANE SMITH 
Richmond Virginia 



MARGARET ROSS SMITH 

Anricisnn. South Carolina 



SYLVIA ANNETTE SMITH 
Albemarle, N. C. 



BONNIE EMALINE STILWELL 
Thomasville. N. C. 

LINDA STRICKLAND 
Lexington, N. C. 

JAMES ROBERT 
SULLIVAN, JR. 

High Point. N. C. 



JAMES EDWARD Sl'RRATT 

Thomasville, N. C. 

EDGAR A. TAYLOR 
Gastonia. N. C. 

A. GERALD TERTZAGIAN 

Wanamassa, New Jersey 



ALBERT S. TROMBETTA 
MeKees Rock. Penn. 

BETTY TREECE 

Concord. N. C. 

JOSE ROBERTO VELADO 
Hi K h Point. N. C. 



JESSE JAMES WALDON. JR. 
Hich Point. N. C. 

GENE WALSH 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

LOUELLA RICHARDS WARD 
Hik'h Point. N. C. 



G. RICHARDS WARE 
Greensboro, N. C. 



JOY WATKINS 
Hich Point. N. C. 



DIANA WATLEY 
Bcthoairc. New York 



CHARLES WELCH 
Charlotte. N. C. 

DIANE S. WESTMORELAND 
Winston-Salem. N. C. 

CARRIE WHITEHl'RST 
Greenville, N. C. 



DAVID WHITI.OCK 
Brevard, Florida 



pe<;(;y whitt 

Roxhoro. N. C. 



DAVID WILI.ARD 

Pilot Mountain. N. C. 




•• 




JAMES WII.MOT 
Seymour, Conn. 



CARROLL DONNA WOOD 
Ran'lloman, N. C. 



DAVID YOUNG 
Chevy Chase. Maryland 



JAMES C. YARBOROl'GH. JR. 
Lexington, N.C. 

GORDON YARBOROl'GH 
Lexington, N. C, 

JOHN SUTTON YORK 
Ramseur. N. C. 



Pomp 
and 



Circumstance 




Graduation comes— a time of sorrow and a time of happiness. 



BO 



Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities 



Eleven seniors were elected to Who's Who among American Colleges 
and Universities— a national honor organization. To be selected for this 
honor, a senior must possess several outstanding qualities. Among these 
qualifications are excellence in scholarship, citizenship, leadership, ser- 
vice to the school, participation in extracurricular activities as well as 
academics, and promise of future success. The seniors selected from High 
Point College possess these qualities and have been recognized for their 
outstanding contributions to the welfare of the school and to the promo- 
tion of the school image to the general public. 





Linda Craven 

Linda, an excellent stu- 
dent, was Chief Marshal in 
her junior year. She is an 
English major and will con- 
tinue her education in grad- 
uate school. 




Bill Fallin 

Bill served this year as 
Chief Justice of the Judici- 
ary Council and as co-captain 
of the Panther basketball 
team. He is an active mem- 
ber in many other campus 
organizations. 




Carolyn Frye 

"Scooter" is the President 
of the Women's Dormitory 
Council this year and also 
serves on the Judiciary Coun- 
cil and is a member of the 
Student Legislature. 




Gail Geyer 

Gail has represented HPC 
as Miss High Point College 
and as Miss High Point City 
in the past years. Gail also 
was chairman of one of the 
standing committees of the 
SGA. 






Linda Ferran Gibson 

Linda has been an active 
member of many campus or- 
ganizations and has served 
as the President of Phi Mu 
Sorority for the past two 

venrs. 



Who's Who 





Rob Kornegay 

Bob has served as Presi- 
dent of both his Junior and 
Senior classes and was also 
a Junior Marshal. He has 
been active in many campus 
activities. 




Don Little 

Don, editor of the campus 
newspaper, served this year 
as Speaker of the Legisla- 
ture. Don is a past presi- 
dent of the Young Republi- 
can Club. 




Charlie Nesbitt 

President of the Student 
Body this year, Charlie has 
taken an active part in many 
and varied campus organiza- 
tions. He is also a membei 
of the Student Legislature. 




Carlos I'rado 

Carlos, an International 
Relations student, has taken 
an active part in many cam- 
pus organizations. He is es- 
pecially interested in music 
and is a member of the band. 




Betty Treece 

Betty has been active in 
SGA, serving as the Secre- 
tary her junior year and as 
Vice-President this year. She 
has participated in many 
other campus activities. 



Carrie Whitehurst 

Carrie has been active in 
the Methodist Student Fel- 
lowship and in the Fel- 
lowship Teams. She has par- 
ticipated in many other cam- 
pus organizations. 



32 



Top Ten Seniors 





Bonnie Dennis is secretary of the 
Senior class, feature editor of the 
Hi-Po, and a member of SNEA and 
Methodist Student Fellowship Teams. 



Carolyn Fry is a member of Zeta Tau 
Alpha sorority and served as presi- 
dent last year. She was a member of 
the ToweV Players, the Dormitory 
Council. SAM. SXEA. SGA committee, 
and the Panhellenic Council. 




Bill Fallin is a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha fraternity and plays var- 
sity basketball. He was Chief Justice 
of Judiciary Council this past year and 
V.P. of his sophomore class. 




Linda Ferran was awarded the Mary 
Lewis Mills Scholarship this year. 
She is a member of Phi Mu sorority 
and has served on the dormitory coun- 
cil, the Judiciary Council, and the Jun- 
ior Marshals. She was also a finalist 
in the Miss HPC Contest for two 
years. 



Gail Geyer is a member of Kappa 
Delta sorority and the Physical Edu- 
cation Majors Club. She has served 
on the Student Legislature and the 
Freshman Orientation Committee. She 
was Miss High Point in 1962 and Miss 
HPC in litfil. 




33 



Top Ten Seniors 





Connie Elaine Greene is Editor-in- 
Chief of the Zenith and last year ser- 
ved as business manager. She is a 
member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. 



Charles E. Newbitt is president of the 
student body this year. He was class 
representative to the lgislaturo in his 
junior year, president of his sopho- 
more class, and a member of the SCA 
Senate. lie sang with the college 
choir in his sophomore year and is a 
member of Kappa Chi. He is also a 
member of Theta Chi frat. 




Robert David Kornegay is a member 
of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity and pre- 
sident of the senior class. He was 
named a Junior Marshal last year and 
was inducted into the Order of the 
Lighted Lamp. 



Donald A. Little is editor of the Hi- 
Po this year. He is also Speaker of 
the Legislature and a former president 
of the Young Republicans Club. 



Betty Treeee is a member of Phi Mu 
sorority and is Pledge Director this 
year. She is presently serving as Vice 
President of the Student Government 
Association. She also served as secre- 
tary of the SGA last year and headed 
the Freshman Orientation this vear. 





■■- 




f 



ORGANIZA TIONS 





A Ipha Delta Theta 




Patricia Lew 

President 






Don Hevener 
Treasurer 



Judy Burrier 
Secretary 



Ann Talley 
Chaplain 



"Sisters in the service of God", this is Alpha Delta 
Theta. The girls of the sisterhood are like all other 
college students. They are searching for Ultimate 
Truth. They face the changes of growth and the strug- 
gles that encircle them as they reach upward toward 



God and outward toward their fellow man. Life lived 
within this sisterhood is one enriched by experiences 
with others and by a striving together of young women 
from varied backgrounds and with varied interests, but 
all with one common goal — to learn to Live — to live a 
life in the service of God. 







^ A 








Bftsy A n.li 



Rebecca A ii man 



Milbiey Beland 



Ann Hotels 



Ann Booth 








Suzanne .tooth 



d.a Cart 



Anna Lee < !ai te 



Susan Cooke 



Wanda Cornelius 







Judy Cox 



BfittS Davis 



Jeanne Downs 



W A 



Jean l>uu<»n 




Nancy Fallon 




-' 







▲ 





Ellie Freeman Amelia (iaimon Carol (Jeisi Sue Gibson Kaihy Hoeckei Roberta Hudson 





'•>*. 



ti 






* 



Rosemary Kennedy Joyce Kirkman Sylvia Leckie (leraMyne I.ockman H<-tsy Neese Nancj Nol-letl 





lb*. A 






Maitha Paris Judy Phillips Carol Pino Kathy Poindextel Nancy P. 



Mane Poweis 







Leslie Purifoy 



Sally Reed 



Mary K.-n.-L-ai Phyllis Reynolds Klisa Rodviguez Kuth Ann Sides 




k r '^B 







Coleen Siirman Jane Smith 



Sandra Tale Betty J" Vauishn Pam Wallace Carrie Whitehurst 





Carol Wood Katherine Vow 



-" 



Student Christian Association 



The work of the Student Christian Association has been to enliven the 
school year with provocative thought, discussion, and activity. Besides 
provoking, the SCA has tried to add meaning to special events and seasons 
of the year. During Orientation Week, the SCA provided for the incoming 
freshmen a vesper welcome service, a ministerial tea, and a picnic at the 
City Lake. The fall assembly "No Man Is an Island" proved its point when 
the laughter occured in the right places. Dr. Martin E. Marty, the Finch 
Lecturer, challenged the mask of "The Living". The Thanksgiving Can-Can 
Party and the Christmas Caroling Service gave pleasure with a purpose — 
cans and cards for cheer. The Summer Service Seminar was a pseudo- 
employment agency for students who needed summer jobs. And the Absur- 
dity Days . . . with the aid of the Tower Players, SCA culminated its year 
within the framework of a zoo, a sandbox, and the song of a bold soprano. 




IB 


* 




' "f 


b L 




Mrs. Dorthory Hays, Dr. William 
R. Locke, Advisors. Elizabeth Old- 
ham, President. 



Ann Talley, Secretary 
Elizabeth Oldham, President 
Jeanne Downs, Second Vice-President 
Chuck Richards, Treasurer 
Henry Thompson, Vice President. 




Seated, Left to right: Dr. William 
Locke, Elizabeth Oldham, Mrs. Dor- 
thory Hays, Jeanne Downs, Ann Tal- 
ley. 



Standing, Left to right: Pat Lewis, 
Susan Cooke, Betsy Neece, Chuck Ric- 
hards, Judy Burrier, Betty Rogers, 
Frank Grice. 



-- 



Methodist Student Fellowship 




OFFICERS 
Left to right: Judy Burrier, S.C.A. re- 
presentative; Carol Pino, Publicity 
Ch.; Frank Griee, President; Jean Dut- 
ton, Secretary; Pam Fletcher, Program 
Ch.; Art Warren, Treasurer; Betsy 
Neece, Vice President. 



The Methodist Student Fellowship is the "Methodist Church at work on 
the college campus." The purpose of this organization is to reach the 
Methodist students in a way that the local church is unable to do during 
the college years. The programs are varied to give insight and useful in- 
formation to its members. All students are welcome to join to the MSF and 
to enjoy the benefits of fellowship, service and worship which it offers 
its members. 



. 


j 




ii 


'H 


I 






A » Vj 


,, 


i 'i 




■1 * 1 i 


ftl \ 




H - 1 \ 










-• 



Fellowship Teams 



Co-Chairmen 



Betty Rogers 



Henry Thompson 



Sandra Tate Secretary 

Kenneth Gilliam Treasurer 

Elisa Rodriguez Publicity 

Carrie Whitehurst Packets Chairman 

Betsy Neese SCA Representative 

Wanda Cornelius Curriculum 

Advisors Dr. William Locke 

Mrs. Dorothy Hayes 




Team No 1 

Beth Brearley * 
Nancy Fallon 
Bob Hamilton 
Collen Sigman 
John Swan 



Team No. 2 

Wanda Cornelius 
Betsy Neese * 
Ellie Freeman 
Jim Piclesimer 
Carol Tourgee 
Judy Burrier 



Team No. 3 

Jean Dutton * 
Kenneth Gilliam 
Chuck Richards 
Johnsie Simmons 
Nancy Tabor 
Ann Talley 



Team No. 4 

Janet Early * 
Ernestine Craig 
Jeanne Downs 
Kenneth Gunn 
Roger Stephens 



Team No. 5 

Frank Grice * 
Betts Davis 
Clyde Henderson 
Kathy Poindexter 
Leslie Purifoy 
Nan Brown 



Team No. 6 

Eve Jones * 
Winfred Bristow 
Pam Fletcher 
David Pulliam 
Bettycross Payne 



Team No. 7 

Janet Miller * 
Marlene Brinley 
Phyllis Foy 
Jenova Haines 
Joe Parker 
Arther Peterson 



Team No. 8 

Elisa Rodriguez 
Susan Cooke 
Dennis Draper 
John Kennedy 
Linda Pulliam 
Phyllis Reynolds 



Team No. 9 

Carrie Whitehurst * 
Wayne Ervi'n 
Emma Lou Landes 
Linda Morgan 
Carol Pino 
Sally Charles Reed 



Alternates 



David Brvant 
Tillie Clark 
Kathy Hoecker 
Kent Ripley 
Bob Hartsell 
Barrow Mullis 



Pam Neal 
George Oxdenford 
Sandra Tate 
Art Warren 
Tony White 



: -0 



Fellowship Teams 




Fellowship singing 



Waiting for food — what food ? 




From the mountains . . . 



to the sea 




Games are played during fellowship period. 



'Serious" discussion 



Women's Dormitory Council 





Carolyn Frye! President 



Mrs. Mary Bennett and Miss Kay Phillips, Resident Counselors 




Suzanne Booth, Carolyn Frye, Eve Jones, and Doris I.iles check 
to see who has how many demerits. 



Other members of the Dorm Council are: I. to r. Pat Lewis. Gail 
Geyer, Ann Talley. Diana Teairue. Jo Ann Taylor, Myra Morris. 
and Wynne MacCresror. 



-. 



Men's Dormitory Council 

The Men's Dormitory Council is the governing l><«lv of the resident 
students in McCullough Hall and J. Ed Millis dormitory. They assist in 
freshmen orientation and handle any minor infractions of the dormitory 
rules. With the guidance of Mrs. Austin and Mrs. McMeekin-Kerr. resident 
housemothers, the officers have made dormitory life a rich and rewarding 
experience for resident men students. 




Bob Jessup, President 
Frank Grice, Vice-President 



J. Ed Millis Dormitory 



McCullough Hall 





>3 



Day Students of High Point College 




DAY STIDENT OFFICERS 



Ellis Rouse, Treasurer; Charles Welch. President; Tom Smith, Vice President; 
and Jackie Beamer, Secretary. 



Day students come mostly from the city of High 
Point, but there are also large representation from 
Greensboro. Winston-Salem, and the communities 
surrounding High Point. To spend an hour in the 
book store will bear out this fact, and on fall and 
spring days the steps in front of the student center 
are filled with High Point College students — 
mostly commuters-basking in the sunshine. On 



eld winter days the ping-pong tables are filled, 
and the rooms of Roberts Hall are usually a haven 
for the day students catching up on studies. How- 
ever, mostly the day students finds his car as 
his "home away from home." The Ford, Chevy, 
and small sports car give the commuter a place to 
keep his books and store other materials which are 
needed for college work and life at H.P.C. 




Meeting place of many day students — College Book Store 



International Students Club 



The International Students Club is an organization for foreign students 
and for American students who are interested in learning about other 
lands, and who wish to participate in the activities of the club. 

The purpose of the club is to establish closer unity among foreign stu- 
dents and American students and to create better college community re- 
lations through the services of the club. 

The foreign students are: Roberto Vasquez, president, from Bolivia; 
Carlos Rios, vice-president, and treasurer, from Bolivia; Alfredo Sainz. 
historian, from Bolivia; Elisa Rodriguez, secretary, from Cuba; Carlos 
Prado. from Cuba ; Vang Sieng Lu and Grace Chin Lu Cheng, from Sara- 
wak; Jay Kim, from Korea; Jose Roberto Velado, from El Salvador; Aris 
Mastrogianakis, from Greece, and Kirt Christian from India. Our counsel- 
lor is Mrs. Dorothy Griffiths. 

Some of the American students that participate in our activities are 
Betsy Sullivan, Nancy Fallin. Martha Ward, Joe Goforthh and George Beam. 




,-. , t> „,!„ Y-,nP- Siene Lu, Grace Lu. Mrs. Dot Griffiths, 
quez, Kirtkumar Christian, Jay Kim. 



?! 



Order of the Lighted Lamp 

The Order of the Lighted Lamp is High Point College's oldest honor 
society, having been organized in 1935 under the guidance of Dr. Clifford 
Hinshaw. The present sponsor is Dr. Dan Cooke. A student selected for 
membership must have an average of 1.75 for five semesters, the last five 
semesters. To be eligible, a student must possess excellent, exemplary char- 
acter, have proved himself as a leader, and have delivered outstanding 
service to the college. In making nominations, the society is guided by the 
following organizations: student government, athletics, publications, social 
groups, and religious organizations. Nominations are made by the current 
members and are approved by a faculty majority. 



1963 1964 

Carrie Whitehurst Donald Little 

Linda Craven Carolyn McAllister 

Linda Ferran Gibson Elizabeth Oldham 

Sandra Light Myers Clara Jane Neal 

Robert Kornegay Betty Rogers 

Eve Jones 
Carolyn Frye 



96 



Scholastic Honor Society 

The Scholastic Honor Society was inaugurated in 1957 to stimulate the 
love of learning and to recognize and encourage scholarship. One of the 
greatest honors that a student can receive at High Point College is to be 
selected as a Member of the Scholastic Honor Society. To become a member, 
a junior must have completed 75 semesters of regular college work with a 
quality point ratio of 2.75. The minimum ratio for a senior is 2.25. Mem- 
bership in this society consist of students, honorary and associate members. 



FACULTY STUDENTS 

Harold E. Conrad The student members 

Helen R. Barlett for 1963-1964 have 

William R. Locke not been selected. 

Benjamin Hill 

Alice Paige White 

J. Hobart Allred 

Dennis Cooke 

Stuart Deskins 

Clifford Hinshaw 

Walter Hudgins 

Lew Lewis 

Nathaniel Yarborough 

Vera Idol 

L. Hughes Cox 

William Lazaruk 

Christopher Wilson 



■■>/ 



Junior Marshals 



Each year the Junior Marshals arc selected by the faculty from the 
members of the Junior class with the best over-all averages. The Marshals 
are selected on the basis of their scholastic attainments, leadership, and 
participation in college activities. While serving as a Junior Marshal, the 
duties to be performed include checking assembly attendance, ushering for 
concerts. Tower Player productions, and graduation. 




Left to right: Front row: c. J, Wal 



gass^^a*^^* 



e, 
te, 

ley. 



9 a 



Student Government Association 




The Student Government Association is the govern- 
ing body of the students of High Point College. This 
year, under the leadership of President Charles Nesbitt, 
the SGA sponsored a most successful orientation pro- 
gram. Homecoming Weekend and May Weekend high- 
lighted the Si; A affairs, along with the dances, a newly 
initiated College Bowl, and the Student Congress. The 
three branches of the SGA. the Student Legislature, the 
•Judiciary Council, and the Executive Council, have 
made this year's Student Government Association an 
organization of which we all can be proud. 




President, Charles Nesbitt 



Vice President, Betty Treece 





Secretary, Carolyn MacAllister 



Treasurer, Larry Amick 




99 



Judiciary Council 




Left to rif-ht : Richard Alligood, Bod Harris, Donna Hevener, Joe Lorber, Diana Tea- 
Kue, Bill Fallin, Chief Justice; Joe Ann Taylor, Jack Piatt, Charles Welch, Wayne 
Burris. 




The Judiciary Council has been set up as the highest 
branch of student authority on our campus. The council 
is responsible for trying all cases involving infractions 
of the Student Government Association's laws. This 
year Bill Fallin has served as chief justice of this 
council. 



Bill Fallin 
Chief Justice 



100 



Student Legislature 




High Point College can be proud of its Student Government Associa- 
tion. A vital part of this student governing body is the Student Legis- 
lature. Made up of outstanding leaders on the campus, the Student Legis- 
lature considers and discusses issues of great importance to the campus 
and the students. Don Little acts as Speaker. 




English Club is New on Campus 




The English Department established the English Club this year. The 
club was designed to provide English majors and other interested persons 
an opportunity for fellowship and intellectual growth through the medium 
of speakers, poetry reading and informal discussion. The "esteemed men- 
tor" of the club is Dr. Jean Halladay. and Jerry Proffitt has served as an 
excellent "most exalted ruler". 




Student National Education Association 




The Student National Education Association is open to all students who 
are interested in the teaching profession. Kay DeMik is this year's presi- 
dent. The club usually meets in the private dining room of the cafeteria 
for discussions, speeches, and sharing sessions. 




High Point College Choir 





The High Point College Choir is a source of enter- 
tainment and pleasure for the students. The choir sings 
in assemblies and goes on infamous choir tours. Nothing 
is more inspirational than to hear the choir sing our 
ALMA MATER. Under the direction of Mr. Jay Fry- 
hover, it provides students with an opportunity to share 
their singing talents with others. Tom Page, left, is Pre- 
sident of the group and also sings with the Collegians. 



' )4 



Concert Band 



The High Point College Concert Band is composed of 
students who enjoy and appreciate music. Each year 
the band takes an extended tour and travels to many 
schools to perform. They also perform for college func- 
tions throughout the year. The band is directed by Mr. 
Robert Clark. 




Mr. Robert Clark. Director 





Charles Smith, Al Collins 




Beth Renfro. Robert Batten, George Roycroft 



Rick Benoit. Jim Cross 



)5 



Physical Education Major's Club 




-*>i-__ 



Grimsley. oegreiary, byi\ia bmith; and \ ice President, Rick 



The Physical Education Major's Club of High 
Point College is one of the most rapidly expand- 
ing clubs on campus. The club was organized 
to further the welfare and learning of the mem 
bers; to fester activities in the field of physical 
education; to facilitate interest through' pro 
grams, methods, techniques, and activities' to 
promote a sound campus and community under 
standing of physical education ; and to raise the 
professional standards for the future of the oc 
cupation. 

This is one of the most active clubs on campus 
and has sponsored many programs in which the 
entire student body has been invited to partici- 
pate. ( hief among these, perhaps, has been the 
annual Co-Recreation Night. The latest addition 
to the program of the Physical Education Ma- 
jors Club is the Annual Awards Banquet. At 
this time members of all athletic teams are 
recognized for their performances. 

We hope that through membership in our 
organization the students will ga i n the know 

of t.or'rU- " !S <" b — '-*- j » "he S 




Front row, left to right: Dale Neal, Don Long, Jerry Tertzagian 

Rick Grimsley, Nancy Fallin, Joe Forte Harold ' Mon« , Vi ,' 

£fc? *h *" p Swig ? rt T' Mr " H«*m«n-«lvSor. Second S^lefttJ 
right: Micky Russel, Joyce Kirtman. Judith Armington, Ernestine 



right: Bob Seaverf Oirin Shaw 111 Simth. frh rd row, left to 
Kirt Jones, Bob Brennen, Bob Brewer l6y HendHck > Bob Harris, 



• 



Student Art League 





The Student Art League provides an oppor- 
tunity for students with artistic talent to show 
their best. Of course, Mr. Porter's clog. Bo, is a 
regular occupant of the Fine Arts Building. 




j. 



"A Streetcar Named Desire 



99 







Fred Schraplau, President; Doris Liles, Secre- 
tary; Jerry Proffitt, Treasurer; Don Drapeau, 
Director. 



Tower Players 



The Tower Players is composed of members from the 
student body who enjoy many phases of dramatic pro- 
duel ion. Many hours are spent rehearsing, building 
sets, designing costumes, and selling tickets. 

Because of all the hard work and long hours, the 
members receive a tremendous amount of satisfaction 
when the final curtain closes and they know their pro- 
duction was a success. 

The Tower Players have been successful this year in 
their production of Tennessee Williams' play, "A Street 
Car Named Desire," in the fall. This spring three one- 
act plays, "The Zoo Story", and "The Sandbox" by Ed- 
ward Albee, and "The Bald Soprano" by Eugen Ionesco, 
were presented. 



Production From the Absurd Theater 




Ralph Hoar and Shirley Key 



Jerry Proffitt. Shirley Key, Charlsie Abel and Ralph Hoar 



109 




€ht 



The Hi-Po, our campus newspaper, is, "The voice of the 
students." This year's editor, Don Little, has been keeping 
the presses hot with the latest news from the higher echelons 
in his column, "Little's Bit." Roger Pike has been the number 
two man and has contributed much to the editorial page 
from "Across the Desk." Greek News, Campus Comments, 
Sports, Letters to the Editor, and last, but not least, Gort 
have been regular features in this year's paper. 



Editor-in-Chief Don Little 

Managing Editor Roger Pike 

Business Manager Ken Gunn 

News Editor Phyllis Foy 

Ken (u iv Editor Bonnie Dennis 

Sports Editor Richard Stinson 

Greek Editor C. J. Neal 

Circulation Manager Ernestine Craig 

Faculty Advisor Dr. Sam Underwood 



Don Little, Editor-in-Chief 




Roger Pike, Managing Editor 




: 10 



Ken Gunn, Business Manager 



Wi-^o 




C. J. Neal, Greek Editor 







— ■ « 



Dick Stinson, Sports Editor 




Phyllis Foy. News Editor 



Al Rauch, Associate Editor 



Campus Literary Magazine APOGEE 




Last year, High Point College students produced an excellent literary 
magazine. An able staff will again, this year, publish another APOGEE 
which will enrich the life and intellectual growth of the campus. The 
magazine features creative work done by the students. Our hats go off to 
this venture, and we hope that this will become a tradition with High 
Point College. 




The Editorial staff Roes over material submitted by the students. 



Dr. Eugene 

Editor. 



Mounts. Faculty Advisor and Vera Mclnnis, 



: 




Elaine Greene 
Editor-in-Chief 



1964 ZENITH Staff 



The 1964 ZENITH Staff has 
made an all-out effort to make 
this yearbook a remembrance 
that will be treasured by all for 
years to come. We hope that you 
will enjoy your book, and that 
you will show it to all your 
friends because you are proud of 
it and of High Point College. 




Carol Parrish 
Associate Editor 




The Group 






Dr. Sam Underwood 

Faculty Advisor 



Charles Hawks 
Business Manager 



I'am Hancox 

Manajrini;' Editor 



113 




This, in police terms, is called the "lineup". We simply call it the Editorial Board. 




Lacy Ballard, staff photographer, tries his 
hand at "shooting" the Editor. 














A 





Michelle Schmidley, Art Editor 



■■■ 



Tom Minton, Advertising Manager 





Angie Smith, Layout, and Sandra Newsome, 
Typist discuss a problem. 



Our Copy staff looks extremely energetic! 




The ZENITH Office seems always to be the center 
of activity. What with closet parties and just plain 
work, it is the hideaway of the Editor-in-Chief and 
her "friends". Putting out a yearbook is a lot of 
hard work, tried patience, black circles under the 
eyes, thousands of cigarettes, and just plain exhaus- 
tion. Yet, they tell us that it is worth all these 
things when the finished product comes back. We 
hope so ! 



David Evans, Jean Anderson, and Verlene Hutchinson go over 
some of the finished layouts. 




Carroll Wood Charlie Hawks, and Milbrev Beland don't seem to be worrying Erlene Haight and Rodger Franklin. Class 
about the money problems. Editors have given up trying to find who goes 

where. 




Putting out the yearbook is not all hard work, just most of it. 
Sometimes the staff will break down and pull a few gags. We even 
have a mascot whose name is Jonas Archibald McLamb, III. Dr. 
Underwood will sometimes get after the Editor with a ruler, but 
he has never managed to hit her, yet. This is just an exception, 
though. Producing a yearbook is an experience that we will never 
forget, and if you don't see us when the yearbooks are distributed, 
it will be because we are recuperating in the hospital. 





Caroll Parrish and her staff are busy working 1 out how to feature our campus 
beauties. 



' 






Panhellenic Council 



Rush . . . pledges . . . parties . . . Greek Week . . . 
Sisterhood. All these things and many more help to 
make sorority life what it is. 

The Panhellenic Council is the co-ordinating group 
of the four sororities on the High Point College campus. 
The Council encourages high social and scholastic stan- 
dards and helps to unite the sororities in the true Greek 
spirit. 



Joe Ann Taylor, President 




Seated, left to right: Myra Morris. Joe Ann Taylor. Joan Gale, Charlsie Abel. Stand- 
ing, left to right: Jean McCollum, Gail Geyer, Betty Treeee, Janet .Miller, Linda 
Roberts. 



Interfraternity Council 

The Interfraternity Council is the governing body of the six Greek letter 
social traternities. The Council serves as a media lor the discussion of fra- 
ternity attairs. The Council was established to promote interfraternity re- 
lations and to deal with interfraternity matters. The fraternities realize 
that a strong properly constituted interfraternity organization is necessary 
in order to have a well oriented fraternal life. 

Each year the Council awards a trophy to the outstanding fraternity 
man of the year who has contributed the most to the betterment of the 
Greek system. The IFC also presents annually the IFC Scholarship Award 
to the fraternity who has had the highest academic average of all the 
fraternities. 

This year under the guidance of Commander George Netts, our faculty 
sponsor, the IFC expanded its functions and programs. The first inter- 
fraternity retreat was held this fall in order to advance friendship and 
cooperation among the brotherhoods. In conjunction with the Panhellenic 
Council, the first Greek Week was held. This week was full of events 
which ranged from helping with the Heart Fund to a mass shaving cream 
fight. Co-recreation night and the Greek Sing were highlights. The entire 
week was concluded by the Greek dance. For incoming students next year, 
the Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Council have expanded their 
rush publication to aid new students in all phases of Greek life. 

This year the six fraternities received the Summa Cum Laude Scholar- 
ship Award from the National Interfraternities Conference. This award is 
presented each year to the fraternities on a particular campus who were 
above the all men's average. This year only 35 Greek systems from colleges 
across the United States received this distinction. 




Dick McDowell 
I.F.C. President 




Fron 

McDow 
row 



nt row. left to right: Steve Montague David Parsons, Dick 
)owell. president; Robert Carlough Wayne tt a ke. . Second 
, left to ri K ht: Commander Netts, Lloyd Harvey, Mac Lam- 



beth. Bill Fallin, Dave Willard, Roy Greenwood, Tom Kester. 
Missinp from picture: Bob Sullivan, Dave Baughn. 



- 




1st V. Pres. 

Mary Leo Cootes 




Treasurer 
Kay Rnbbs 




Patty Rogers 




Jane FleminE 




Jo Ann Taylor 




Marizell Austin 





2nd V. Pres. 
Diana Teajjuo 




Social Chairman 
Judy Callaway 




Marlene Moore 




Sarah Shelton 





Rush Chairman 
Gayle Nichols 




Sandra Newsome 




Wanda Joyce 




Joy In man 




Alpha Gamma Delta 
Gamma Eta 






Julia DeGoyer 




Karen Clodfelter 




Rebecca Williams 





Tamara Kearns 




Nancy Pearson 




Linda Roberts 




Wynn MacGregor 





Debra Bolton 




Judy Miller 




Karen Moody 




Nancy Perry 




C. J. Neal 



Margaret Carter 



Beth Rcnfro 



Beverly Moody 



Ellen Siess 



Carol Riser 



I2C 



"When you come to the end of a perfect year" — 
Alpha Gam left school with sisters all. "Like we did 
last summer" we were back at the beach having a ball 
as usual. It may have been crowded, but it was fun. 

"Happy days are here again" — September found all 
sisters excited to be "home". Upperclassmen rush began 
swing- and brought us Bev, Louise, and Ann. "Hello, we 
welcome you to AGD" as we welcomed seventeen pledges 
after first semester rush. 

Basketball sesson starred five Alpha Gam cheerlead- 
ers; Gayle. Kaye. "Clod", Wynne, and C. J. Maggie, Call- 
away, and Mock made the fraternity circuit as sweet- 
hearts. Robbs blinded us with her diamond. 

"Stardust" filled every eye as we entered the room at 
the Mistletoe Ball. What a wonderful night, thanks to 
the pledges. "We'll have a blue Christmas without you." 



Back after vacation, exams were on our minds. Soon 
second semester was here bringing Sonny to Gayle. 
Kirk's "fiancee" was Queen during Homecoming and 
had Joe Ann, Beth, and Jane as attendants. Kay, Betty, 
and C. J. became "ushers." 

"Memories" — Ellen, did you ever get over the "un- 
happy gleep bird"? Teague made the scene in Africa. 
Who's wanted for imitating a funnel. Roberts? Maybe 
rooming with Sylvia will help you. Bones. He always 
calls first, huh. Patty Ann? You really have that "Pan- 
hell" spirit. Cootes! You say it crackled like tissue paper, 
Betsy? 

"In our Alpha Gamma Delta" — Initiation drew near, 
and anticipation filled our hearts. A beautiful Rose Ball 
brought another year to a close for the Alpha Gams. 
"See you in September." 



m sin 




'Looks Greek to me!" 





Cootes and company. 




'Happy, Debbie?" 



The crew. 



121 





"The pledge class strikes again." 



'Point of order, Madame President. 



That wonderful year . . . 1964 . . . and Phi Mil's 
wasted no time . . . Treece orienting the Freshmen . . . 
Mcllvaine's "cheeks of tan". . . Ferrari's "unmention- 
able". Slumber party . . . Fights with the hall proctor 
. . . work, work, and more work . . . Have another hot 
dog, Kathy. Myra and Judy ride the goat . . . Marge 
and her letters from Zanzibar . . . Sal's famous panta- 
loons . . . Song practices that wouldn't quit . . . RUSH, 
and the biggest pledge class on campus . . . Cassimus 
gets her man . . . Mania battles the Winston-Salem 
police force . . . Cokes for everybody. Angie . . . Sue 



Lynne embarks for life in her trailer 
care, as long as he's a Theta Chi . 
Southern-fried . . . 4.032 pennies for F 
Carolyn moans over the checkbook . 
another bill from the florist . . . Oui 
team . . . The alums come through with 
Lizzie finally makes it to the dorm . . . 
how much for Greek Week? . . . The 
soon enough . . . The climax to a vear 
dedicated to LOVE. HONOR. TRUTH 
Phi Mn. 



. . Gainor doesn't 
. The pledges go 
ounder's Day . . . 
. Harriett gets 
7-man speedball 
more goodies . . . 
It's going to cost 
beach can't come 
of friendship . . . 
. . . The spirit of 



'The morning after the night before. 



"We aim to please. 





"22 



Phi Mu 




Membership Chairman 
Elizabeth Oldham 





Vice President 

Marge Hums 




President 
Betty Treeco 



Gamma Zeta 




Chaplain 
Joy Watkins 




Secretary 

Suzanne Bullard 




Treasurer 
Carolyn McAHistei 




Myra Morris 




Jean Allen 




Carolyn Price 




• ."" 




Katy Mi 




Angela Smiih 




Susan LaSalla 




Sharon Leathebury 




Ernestine Craig 




Mary Corner 




Brenda Symes 




Judy Aimington 




Tillie Clark 





Harriet Finirty 




Jean Ruth 




Gainor Goodwin 




Jackie Ivev 




Maix-ia Wecthe*' Janet Hydenburg 

123 




Judy Stone 




Emma Landers 




Mary Renegan 




Pamela Neal 




Ruth Harvey 




Mayoda Kaiser 




Laura Lentz 




Joyce Mcllvaine 




Chaplain 
Sterling Banks 




Treasurer 
Diane Westmoreland 



Kappa Delta 
Gamma Gamma 




Vice President 
Kenny Hoggs 



ft A 




Secretary 
Judy Warlick 





Membership Chairman 

Carrie Myrick 



Assistant Treasurer 

Peggy Wiley 



President 

Gail Geyer 




Von Paucette 




Kathy Rogers 




Marianne Behiondt 





Patsy Mi'Cormick 




Joanne Thurley 




Linda Greaxm 





Omegia Waldrep 




Delaine Jurney 




Judy Hollingsworth 





Liz Jensen 




Christie Jensen 




Karen Edwards 





Sherry Sno 




Ailec-n H»iwe 




Jackie Brendle 



Beverly Bereer 



Barbara Cacy 



Judy Mills 



Jane Logan 





Sandra Hargrove 



Joan Gale 



24 







\M 




Our crest — Convention New Orleans. I.a. 



A bunch of very happy KDs.'!! 



Hep, Hep ... 10 of the sharpest pledges ever . . . ukes 
. . . much KD spirit . . . our president Gail reigns as 
May Queen . . . Peggy grows another inch to reach Dale 
. . . Stinky will always be our very own queen . . . Cacy, 
you sure looked pood leading us in our homecoming 
cheers . . . Kenny which guy is it now, Pika or the one 
from Carolina??? Rev, will we ever get those grades?! 
ILambeth and Norma leave us in January, Maid of Hon- 
or, Diane, beauty queen again . . . Jackie and Delaine 
take a sudden interest in basketball . . . Sterling, please 
don't throw your Pika lavalier around today . . . Sandy 
sticks with her Lambda Chi while Joan moves on to Miss 
HPC contest, and a Theta Chi . . . Omegia and Liz sing 
out about "Dumb Pledges" . . . Leenie. "are you still a 
Bucknell fan?" Mary Allen invites everyone to a "Merry 
Christmas" tea . . . Pledges get hold of bleach-orange 
hair. Sherry yells out another cheer for H. P. C. KDs 



proud of their cheerleaders . . . "Beaver Greason" builds 
another dam. which holds her. Yvonne, finalist in Miss 
H.P.C. — Sam, honeybun! Julie gets hooked up with a 
Pika. Christie on May Court and on a certain Jim's 
mind. Homecoming Court we find five KDs — Marianne 
sure looked cute . . . Carrie plans for her big wedding 
while Karen is leaving for King again. Joann and Kathy, 
please clean up that dirty room!! Judy H. piles more 
potato chips on us. Patsy still commutes and Jane Logan 
and Judy Mills come back to join their KD sisters . . . 
A year full of beatniks, displays which fall . . . dresses 
for Gangster Pall and much Kappa Delta love. We've 
given up Lollipops but the White Rose will stay forever. 
In all seriousness our beloved Kappa Delta means more 
to us than words could ever express. A select few are 
picked to join our group and know our love . . . honor- 
able, beautiful and highest — Kappa Delta, we love you. 



Does KD reallv claim these two? 



I'M a KD happy Jackie!! 





125 




"My, your hand is bright today! 




"For I'm a Zeta Tail Alpha . . ." 



■H 




Zeta Tan Alpha was founded 
at Longwood College. Farmville 
Virginia. October 15, 1898. Del- 
ta Gamma became the 100th Link 
of the now 117 Chapters. Fra- 
ternity colors are the cherished 
turquoise blue and steel pray. 
The white violet is the fraternity 
flower. 

As the year unfolded, it pave 
forth an abundance of varied ac- 
tivities. Biennial workshop at 
Athens. Georgia caused Janet 
M., Marlene, and Ann 0. to be 
counting the miles. 0. D. Beach 
was quite a blast. Huh. Charlsie? 

September brought Zetas back 
from many states. Scooter scoots 
from dorm to dorm getting new- 
comers pacified. Nan starts par- 
ty plans. 

Providence President comes. 
Rush brings lots of fun and hard 
work — and new pledges added to 
the ranks of blue and gray . . . 
Erlene. Rosemary. Valerie, Jean 
L.. Ann M. Sue. Linds, Diane, 
Carolyn R., Candy, Janet Y.. 
Rhonda, and Julie. 

Betty and Barbara are teach- 
ing . . . Elaine has stars in her 
eyes . . . Ann A. is still smiling 
. . . Co-Rec Night brings fun and 
trophy . . . Christmas Caroling 
— Oh. my cold, aching feet! Sur- 
prise Christmas party for 
pledges. Pledge party for sisters, 
spaghetti, hamburgers. Sharon 
returns for 2nd semester. 

Ooops — exams here again. 
Stock in midnight oil goes up. 
Block courses!! Valentine Party. 
Pledge tricks . . . say your room 
just made room check. Scooter? 
Initiation brings new sisters. 

Seniors start frantically ap- 
plying for jobs. 

Through light blue clouds of 
Zeta love, the golden summer 
ties another package of wonder- 
ful Zeta memories. 




"But I don't want to stand up!' 




"Let's go!' 




'Not another call-meeting!" 



"The birds are coming!' 



■.- 




Vice President 
Carolyn Frye 




Recording Secretary 

Ann Avmentrout 



Zeta Tau Alpha 
Delta Gamma 



•JUL-*' O 





Treasurer 
Marlene Brinley 




Corresponding Secretary 
Jan McColtum 




Social Chairman 
Nan Brown 





Membership Chairman 
Ann Orpan 



President 
Janet Miller 









Sharon Mader 



Rosemary Kenndy 



Candy Sarmuk 



Camlyn Russell 



Hotly Jones 



Diane Pilecki 




Elaine Green 








Valcni Locket 



Charlene Alu-I 



Rarhnr.i Randell 



Sue Parker 







Jean Lester 



Rhonda Williams 



Erlene Hai^ht 



Ann Mackie 



:7 




Delta Sigma Phi 
Delta Zeta 



Secretary 
Ray Alley 





Senreant-at-Arms 
Wayne Burris 






Rush Chairman 
Charlie Ken- 




Vice President 
Mac Lambeth 





Gene Kester 



Mike Rosenmarkh 



Robin Russell 





Bob Kornecay 



Larry Amick 







Kirk Jones 



Don Phillip! 



John Moody 



David Haninu'to 







Bill Kinn 



Don Link 



Stephen Buff 



Bau^hn Ymk 



Robert Wells 








Treasurer 
Art Warren 




Pledge Master 
Bob Jessup 




Rush Chairman 
Ray Davis 




Bill Herndon 




James Foster 



Gary Puckett 



Huch Coates 



Ed Turner 



David Evans 



Micky Russell 



128 



1963-64 ... a great year for all Delta Sig's. Fall 
semester begins with new lounge, color T.V., parties, 
and great expectations . . . Again Delta Sig's hold 
important S.G.A. offices on campus . . . Two new 
trophies . . . Third consecutive intramural cham- 
pionship and Henshaw Award for highest scholastic 
average on campus . . . Made out better this year 
on the mountain trip . . . the sun shined, but Lor- 
bor, Rosey, and dates still get lost?!! . . . Fall rush 
... 26 pledges . . . success . . . biggest and best 
pledge class on campus . . . Jessup's, Burris's ser- 
nades . . . Makes a big hit with the girls and a big- 
ger splash with the Brothers . . . Great football sea- 
son . . . almost . . . Rosey and Alley head All-Star 
team . . . Hawaiian party in lounge . . . sphinx shines 
as pledges build traditional Christmas Tree . . . 
Merry Christmas . . . Exams follow quickley as 
Brothers cram at the Rat and the Expresso . . . 
Brothers have party and all pledges with an average 
are invited . . . Some blast . . . Congrats to New 
Brothers . . . Pledges start coat hanger brigade and 
lounge gains a new bar . . . Lewis gives Gail a dia- 
mond . . . Candy is hooked . . . Four more top 
pledges . . . Alligoood leads cheers? ? . . . Delta Sig's 
again undefeated in basketball . . . Rosey-Davis All- 
Stars . . . Champs. Jessup carries Delta Sig Squerril 
gun to H.P.C. ball games . . . Play Boys great . . . 
Beards begin to sprout . . . Harrington ring your bell 
. . . Treasurer Warren drives new car, Fraternity 
funnds??? . . . Lambeth elected president of H.C.A. 
. . . King's hat and Well's head — what a com- 
bination . . . Lightning Alley struggles through 
track practice . . . Jones makes great speeches — 
Ain't dat right . . . Time for Sailor's Ball . . . moon- 
light dance, and raids on sand dunes . . . Great week- 
end .. . Beards gone and so is the year. Expecta- 
tion has gone to reality and then into memories . . . 
Brothers leave for the summer, but the Spirit of 
Delta Sigma Phi remains. 




Are these champs? ? 




These are champs!! 



Brothers welcome best pledge class on campus. 





"Traveling Seranaders" 




Lambda Chi Alpha . . . founded nationally . . . 
Boston University . . . 1909 . . . locally . . . 1954 . . . 
"The Cross and Crescent" . . . official publication 
of Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Flower ... the white rose 
. . . honored colors . . . purple, green, and gold. 

Year's end again and Lambda Chi's look back . . . 
an eventful and successful year it was, too . . . fif- 
teen new pledges start off the year in a great way 
. . . second semester . . . lots of planning, much hard 
work . . . nets . . . nine pledges which didn't hurt us 
either . . . finally hit the fifty mark . . . December 
7 brings another edition of Campus Capers . . . 
Opus IV this time . . . best talent ever . . . talent and 
audience both enjoy themselves . . . Worthwhile 
projects strain the muscles and put more $$$ in 
the "Kitty" . . . Anyone for a Saturday car wash??? 
. . . Let's get out and sell those First Aid Kits, fellows 
. . . Christmas was time to give as well as receive 
. . . Lambda Chis gave a Christmas party to the 
children of Mills Home . . . The smiles and appre- 
ciation made it all worthwhile ... As usual, parties 
brightened the school year . . . starting off, of course, 
with a swinging rush party at I. T. Mann . . . The 
Drifters were even better than last year . . . And, 
of course, don't forget those other combo parties 
either . . . Then there was the Founders' Day Ban- 
quet and White Rose Ball ... A night to remember 
. . . Judy Calloway, the new Crescent Girl . . . Bob 
Fogleman deservedly receives the Outstanding 
Pledge Award . . . The new lounge offers a com- 
fortable gathering place . . . The color T.V. destroyed 
many a test . . . The bar helped to boost our morale 
after failing those tests . . . Spring brings serenades 
. . . White rose bouquets . . . The annual sandy trek 
to the beach ... A spring weekend blast to end the 
year right ... So another tremendous year ends . . . 
See y'all in September when we migrate back to 
H.P.C. 




Joe Gosnell 




Dave Willard 




Gerry TertzaKian 




Gerry Fennell 



Miss Judy Callaway Fraternity Sponsor 
Pledge Class 





John Osborne 



130 




Robert Burns 




Secrctarv 
Charles Welch 



Vice President 




Lamba Chi Alpha 




Treasurer 





Ritualist 
Greg Morton 



Bill Fallin 



Gene Wal-h 




Reccie Joyn« 



PlcdffC Trainer 
Dick McDowell 





President 
Barney Kurks 





Social Chairman 
Rick Gvimsley 





Bruce Swansun 



Linny Johnson 



Cenrce Hendrix 



Clary Kiirvi 



Gary Macy 







Jeff Seafonl 



Spencer Johnson 



Harrv Smith 



Fraxiei Vereen 



Douir Jones 



Jim Suiratt 







Harold Moose 



Wayne Brewer 



Tom Smith 



Jim Davis 



Roger Carmichael 







Buddy Yarhorouph 



Bobby Focleman 



Chuck Schrieber 



Jerry Hughes 



Wayne Eaton 



Dannj Loflin 



131 




it a . . .-' 





is n sis 

. "fl as 





Are there any PiKA's down in H---': 



Everyone enjoys PiKA parties 



Here are those Pika "Forget-Me-Nots" for 1964: Now, 
Van Hook, don't Ret excited, the thing to do is don't 
get excited Bob Harris, What else do they call you be- 
sides "Funnel"? Pete, are you really going to graduate? 
Bulla, why don't you take my picture? Buckey, why do 
they call you "cue stick"? By the way, Newton wasn't 
Martha Ann supposed to be the Sweater Girl? Mouse, 
who is champion of D-6? Bird Bath, what kind of soap 
do you use? Hey Bone-Face, Let's go to Beeson's. Ashley, 
why can't you talk after a weekend at home? 

Hey Ernnie, what's that extension course you're tak- 
ing in French? McKay, how about paying this Florist off 
so he'll get off our back. Pat. how are the voice lessons 
going? Stan, did you teach Casy how to drive Old 99? 
Kester are you getting discount rates from Burr Pat- 
terson ? Q.T.. when did your brother start working at the 
Express? Who said the Pikas weren't athletes? "Hey 
Pledge, go get Parson's hammer." 





Which hand has the M & M candv. 



Miss Yvonne Fauctte. Fraternity Sponsor 



132 



Pi Kappa A Ipha 
Delta Omega 




President 
Jimmy D<>o|itt|<< 





Vice President 
Tom Kester 





Secretary 
Richard Bulla 





Treasurer 
Tony Parson 



Scholarship Chairman 

Hill Harris 



Pledge Master 
Sam flyers 



Rush ' li.nm.,11 

Charles Van Hook 




Bucky Caldwell 




Norman Simpson 





Stan Kinney 





Pen- Hriiler 





Kelly Philli|.> 



IP 

Pat Hedriek 




John Robert* 



Stan Hedriek 



Hob Harris 



Tom Blake 



J. R. Newton 



Charles Mendenhall 



133 




Hey Rip, look at the commode moon! 



"The Beauty and the Beast*' 



Theta Chi Fraternity was founded in 1856 at Norwich 
University, Norwich Vermont; and is, therefore, in it's 
second century of existence. 

Since then, Theta Chi has taken its place among: the 
educational institutions of America as a promoter of 
knowledge, an advancer of culture, and a builder of char- 
acter. 

Every year more than twenty-five hundred young 
men pledge themselves to the high ideals exemplified by 
Theta Chi. 

On December 11, 1954 Epsilon Eta Phi of High Point 
College was installed as Epsilon Alpha chapter of Theta 
Chi. Since then, Epsilon Alpha has become a leader 
on the High Point campus, supported by over a century 



of brotherhood. 

How can we forget: Hey Greenie, whose got it now 
. . . Roomer turns over a new leaf, oops ... ! . . But 
Len, why Chavis Y.M.C.A.? . . . Jesse, how's ya fern? 
. . . Warren finally reaches puberty . . . Who's got Lew- 
in's P.F.'s? . . . Chase one more time and you'll wish you 
were a Kangaroo . . . Who slipped that ham on my 
tray? . . . Hot Pastrami at 0. D. . . . "Sure Mebane's got- 
ta traffic light"! . . . Cat-Sass becomes Pork & Beans . . . 
Mother Benoit's tuna . . . Did Whip .juggle the books? 
. . . Two more for the stick . . . The 18 best pledges 
. . . Who's Hen-Pecked. Henny???! . . . 

And now, after a year of Academic Excellence, we 
retreat to 0. D. to meditate. 





Whore's Everhart & Simmon — Selling Sandwiches? 



Fraternity Sponsor . . . Rita Saunders 



-.4 




President 
Don Bryan! 



■■■■■■ 




Secretary 
Barry York 



Theta Chi 
Epsilon A Ipha 






Treasurer 

Tony Tayloi 



Vice President 
Roy Greenwood 




Social Chairman 
Rick IVnt.it 




Dick Olson 




Dave Urian 



Jerry Williams 



Charles Neshitt 



Steve Montague 




Tom Arnette 





Wayne Knrman 



Larry Shallcross 




Jim Hrucki 




Warren Rnmaine 




Kent Ripley 



Mickey Boles 



Mickey McDaniel 



Joel Silver 



135 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 
N. C. Eta 



President 
Sill Kimmer 






Vice President 

Tom Minion 




Secretary 
Francis Couvtnej 



Comptroller 
John Can- 



Pledge Trainer 
Don Hormachea 



Today, over 70.000 men wear the "Golden Heart" of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. The Brotherhood of Sigma Phi Ep- 
si Inn is a proud heritage that came forth from Richmond 
College on November 1, 1901. 

High Point "Sig Eps" have enjoyed a pood year on 
campus emphasizing character . . . scholarship . . . lead- 
ership . . . and service . . . Fall Rush . . . Drag Party at 
Schrafft's . . . seven new pledges ... the Marlboro Pack 
Contest . . . First Place . . . new T.V. . . . the pledges vs. 
Rill Rimmer . . . the Christmas Party at Holiday Inn 
. . . one of the best fraternity parties of the year. Mr. 
Hormachea's the "Thinker" juke box . . . the great Or- 
phan's Christmas Party at the Mill's Home . . . begging 
gifts for the orphans . . . their eyes when they got them 



. . . the football game with them . . . the tears when we 
left . . . the gang at Skip's house at Christmas . . . three 
new pledges . . . Dave. Gene, and Louie . . . Second place 
for our Homecoming Display . . . Mr. "H" is Mr. Ugly . . . 
Help Week . . . Three new brothers . . . Skip, Tom, and 
Dim . . . The Sig Fp Rail at Charlotte ... the week-end 
that no one will forget . . . Tom pins Georgie . . . late to 
bed — early to rise . . . the trip back with Rill and Mandy 
. . . The Sweetheart Rail . . . Mandy chosen Sweetheart 
. . . Charlie's Day . . the fabulous week at the beach . . . 
All total up to the great feeling of accomplishment at 
the end of the year ... AS THE SIG EPS GO ROLL- 
ING ALONG! 





"The Knights and their Ladies" 



"Their Royal Majesties'' 

:■■ 



"The Three Stooges" 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 




President 
Phillip E. Garrison 






Secretary 
Vice President 
George Ream 



Historian 
Sereeant-at-Arms 
Wayne Walker 





Pledge Trainer 
Larry Dunn 



Treasurer 
Boh Sullivan 



In January of 1899, five men of Wesleyan University 
landed together and founded what was to become the 
argest international fraternity — both in chapters and 
.indergraduate members. Theta Kappa Epsilon came to 
High Point College in 1954 as Delta Kappa chapter. 

TKE brothers and pledges have played an active role 
in campus activities. Phil Garrison, co-captain of the 
basketball team, high scorer. Vice-President of the 
Men's Dorm Council . . . George Beam, band president, 
lighting director for Tower Players . . . Bob Sullivan. 



College Bowl Team . . . Don Crossley. chorus, lighting 
assistant . . . Steve Deal, track- . . . Tracy McCarthy, 
Junior Marsha], tennis team. College Bowl team . . . 
Larry Dunn. All-Star 3rd baseman. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon. with its keystone of character, 
stands for men. Our first loyalty is to our alma mater. 
We believe that college is primarily the place for attain- 
ing an education and that we should strive for academic 
achievement. 



Pledges 

Don Crossley 
Tracy McCarthy 
Terry Edwards 
Pete Antonokos 
Dave Thomas 
Bob Weiss 
Steve Deal 



137 








■i'» 



' 



*0M 




/ 



f 









<\a 



.■■ 



f 



i 



>*r 




FEA TURE, 




Miss High Point 



Fourth Runner-up 
MISS JOY W ATKINS 



Third Runner-up 
MISS YVONNE FAWCETT 




I 40 



College Finalists 



Second Runner-up 

MISS JAN MORRIS 





First Runner-up 

MISS SHIRLEY KEY 




Miss Congeniality 

MISS BRENDA FLINCHUM 



Miss Congeniality is chosen by the contest- 
ants on the night of the pageant. The girls vote 
for the one they feel has been the most "easy to 
get along with" during the pageant rehearsals. 
Brenda met this qualification with an always 
ready smile and a word of encouragement. She 
was a real "Miss Congeniality" in every sense 
of the word. 





■ 







. 4 3 



Miss High Point College 




Miss Sharon Mathis was chosen Miss High 
Point College of 1964. For the talent portion 
of the contest. Miss Mathis played an organ 
medley. She is the daughter of W. E. Mathis 
of Trinity, N. C. In the picture below, Miss 
Mathis is being crowned by Miss Carolyn 
McAllister, Miss High Point College of 1963. 




.:•: 









<•**' ^ 



/ 










Miss Hettv Treece 



Senior Attendants 



Miss Elaine Greene 



May 




146 



Court 



Miss Joe Ann Taylor 



Junior Attendants 




Miss Suzanne Mock 



-■ 




Miss Judv Miller 



Sophomore Attendants 



Miss Jill Knuckev 



May 




Court 



.Miss Christie Jenson 




Freshman Attendants 




Miss Jean Allen 



149 



y.s 



May Queen 



.-.c^tfH 



..-' 



> x ' *< *ir" 



'4^ -:%W 






;•» * 



. **'* 









. 



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■N ■■ 










"•* 




^Mf 




Miss Gail Geyer 









rfcl*. 



150 



Maid of Honor 




.Miss Diane Westmoreland 



151 



Miss Zenith 




.Miss Gail Geyer 



Miss Diane Westmoreland 




Finalists 



.Mrs. Louella Richards Ward 





Miss .ludv Lambeth 



Miss Zenith 1964 




Mrs. Linda Ferrari Gibson 



155 



Homecoming 




Miss Jane Fleming 

sponsored by Barry Smith 





.Miss Jackie Brindle 
sponsored by Al Trombetta 




Miss lieih Renfro 
sponsored by Bill Fallin 




Miss Delaine Journey 
sponsored by Phil Garrison 



Miss Anne ( aslevens 
sponsored by Bub Bivens 



56 



Court 







.Miss Peggy Wiley 
sponsored by Dale Neel 




> 




Miss Betty Treece 
sponsored by Larry Cheatham 




Miss Judy Warlick 
sponsored by Sam Byers 






Miss Joe Ann Taylor 
sponsored by Jerry Lambeth 



Miss Mary Ann Berhrant 
sponsored by Joe Forte 



157 



Crowning of Homecoming Queen 




Pictured above are Kay I'eMik, Homecoming Queen: Kill Henderson. President of the 
Alumni Association; and Judy Raykes, Homecoming Queen of 1963. 



158 








Homecoming Queen 



Miss Kay DeMik 
sponsored by Kirk Stewart 




Homecoming 






Homecoming is a time for returning to 
High Point College as an alumnus; for re- 
newing friendships made d u ring college 
days; and for observing progress made on 
campus. 

Each homecoming is highlighted by one 
special event. This year's special event was 
the dedication of the new J. Ed Millis Dorm- 
itory. As a part of the dedication ceremony, 
Mrs. Helen Brooks Millis unveiled a portrait 
of her husband the late Mr. Millis. 




' 





Cheer 



Jim Rorrer and Richard Alligood 





■. 



leaders 




Head Cheerleader— Carolyn McAllister, Gail Nichols, Linda Cabot, Karen 
Clodfelter, Joy Watkins, Julie DeGooyer, Sherry Snow. 




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M'Y 




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' 



Basketball 




Coach Tom Quinn 

. . . Compiling a 23-3 record is not an easy task, neither for the team 
nor for the coach. It is a lot of hard work and sacrifice for the players and 
the coach. Regardless of the material or schedule, there are times when the 
going gets tough — and that is the time a coach and his team show what 
thev are really made of. The rewards for victory are sweet . . . 



-.■■■ 



Basketball 




Coach Quinn prepares to review last night's game anil dis- 
cuss mistakes. 



The 1968-61 Panther basketball team enjoyed the best 
season in High Point College history, posting an almost 
unbelieveable 23-3 record which carried them to the NA 
IA national tournament in Kansas City. Missouri. 
Coach Tom Quinn, in his second year with the team, 
credits team spirit and hustle for the Panthers degree 
of success. Coach Quinn. who has been to Kansas City 
before with Newberry College, calls this year's team 
"the best I have ever coached. It is the strongest, fastest, 
deepest, most versatile team since I began coaching. 
They can do more things better." 

The 23-3 record was good enough to seed High Point 
College number two in the NAIA tournament behind 
Pan American College of Texas and Ail-American Lus- 
cious Jackson. The Panthers lost only to Elon in an over- 
time and twice to Lenoir Rhyne by one and two points. 
However, the Panthers downed the Bears in the semi- 
finals of District 26. 36-27. for the right to go to Kansas 
City. Only days before, the Panthers had dropped a 31- 
30 heartbreaker to the Real's for the Carolina Confer- 
ence championship. 

One of the brightest points during the season was the 
night of February 4 when the Panthers broke the school 
record in beating Guilford. 138-85. The Panthers set 
the record for the most points scored by a team, most 
field goals, and for the most points scored in a half. 
Also impressive was High Point's victory over the 
Italian Olympic team on December 30. 

Panther followers were able to follow the team's pro- 
gress during the season by watching the Tom Quinn 
show over WGHP-TV. 




Coach Quinn chats with his co-captains. 



Phil Garrison and Bill Fallin. 



■-■ 





Phil Garrison, F— <i':5". 203 — Glenwood, Ind. 



Bill Fallin, F— 6'6", 185— Washington, D. C. 




Dale Neel, C— fVH", 22<>— Rockville, Md. 




Barry Smith. G — 6'3" 177— Washington, D. C. 



Al Trombetta, G— 5'10", 160 — McKees Rock, Pa. 



•' 





Kirk Stewart. F— 6'5", 200 — Wheaton, Mel. 



Sam Byers, F— 6'3". 194— Concord, X. C. 




Bob Bivens, C -6'6", 174. High Point. X. ('. 





Joe Forte. G — 5'7". 155 — Levittown. X.Y. 



Richard Guiffredo. G 6'2", Port Chester. X.Y 





Elon's coach Bill Miller is apparently not satisfied with the 
results of this one. 



Dale Xeel tries juniper against Lenoir Rhyne. 





Garrison drives for score against Pembroke. 



Big Dale Xeel (li - it") and Al Trombetta (5' 10") ham it 



up. 



168 








There is no doubt about who has this rebound. 



"And if that doesn't work, we'll try something else." 





Forte controls the ball as Guilford's Parker presses. 



"All right you guys, play it your own way!' 







Stewart takes control in Elon game. 



Smith scores as Lenior Rhyne's Deehan defends. 




Stewart. Byers. and Neel reach for the moon. 



Cheatham shoots against Western Carolina. 



I7C 



Panthers warm up for the Lenior Rhyne Bears. 




Back row: Coach Quinn, Bob Bivens, Kirk Stewart. Phil ham. Al Trombetta. Barry Smith. Jerry Lambert, and Assist- 

Garrison, Bill Fallin. Dae Neel, Sam Byers, and .Manager ant manager Xat Oliver. 

Ralph Clements. Front row: Rich Guiffredo, Larry Cheat- 



171 



TOURNAMENT: 

The Panthers finished first in the Carolinas Con- 
ference with a 14-2 record and were seeded number 
one for the first time since 1951. However. Lenoir 
Rhyne's Rears repeated last year's feat of beating 
the Panthers to win the championship. 

On February 27 the Panthers advanced to the 
second round by beating the Mountaineers from Ap- 
palachian 88-57. Dale Neel led the Panthers cause 
with 21 points. 

Guildord's upsurging Quakers almost pulled the 
major upset of the tournament in the semi-finals 
but High Point emerged the victor in a 45-43 slow- 
down contest. Neel was again high man for HPO 
with 12 points. 

In the finals for the fourth straight years the 
Panthers were defeated by Lenoir Rhyne 31-30 in 
another slowdown contest. Joe Forte was the only 
Panther in double figures with 10 points. 

The Panthers got revenge in the District 26 
semi-finals by defeating Lenoir Rhyne 3G-27 in 
Alumni Gymnasium. A 82-61 victory over Erskine 
in the finals propelled the Panthers to Kansas City 
and to the national playoffs. 




Garrison shoots over Apps' Richardson 







KANSAS CITY HERE WE COME! 

' '2 



1963-64 SCHEDULE: 

Pfeiffer 

East Carolina 

Campbell 

Newberry 

Elon 

Italian Olympicc Team 

Newberry 

Campbell 

Catawba 

Western Carolina 

Appalachian 

Elon 

Atlantic Christian 

Lenoir Rhvne 

Guilford 

East Carolina 

Catawba 

Pembroke 

Western Carolina 

Appalachian 

Atlantic Christian 

Pfeiffer 

Lenoir Rhyne 

Tournament: (Lexington) 

High Point 88 Appalachian 69 

High Point 45 Guilford 43 

Lenoir Rhyne 31 High Point 30 

Dist. 26 Tournament: 

High Point 36 Lenoir Rhvne 27 

High Point 82 Erskine 61 



Nov, 


30 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


30 


Jan. 


1 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


1 1 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


25 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


6 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


15 


Fel). 


17 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


22 





Smith scores in season's finale 



Final Carolinas Conference Standing: 

1. High Point 14 — 2 

2. Western Carolina 13— 3 

3. Elon 10— 5 

4. Catawba 9—6 

5. Lenoir Rhyne 9 — 8 

6. Appalachian 8 — 9 

7. Pfeiffer 5—13 

8. Guilford 3—9 

9. Newberry 3 — 9 

10. Atlantic <"hristian 3 — 13 

SCORING AVERAGES: REGULAR SEASON 

NAME G REB PTS AV 

1. Phil Garrison 21 197 342 16.3 

2. DaleNeel 21 251 281 13.4 

3. Barrv Smith 20 52 264 13.2 

4. Bill Fallin 21 241 275 13.1 

5. Joe Forte 10 21 103 10.3 

6. Kirk Stewart 21 146 195 9.3 

7. Sam Bvers 20 134 134 6.7 

8. A. Trombetta 19 56 86 4.5 

9. Richard Guiffredo 9 3 17 1.9 
10. Larry Morgan 4 1 5 1.3 

* Statistics on Bob Bivens, Jerry Lambeth, 
and Larry Cheatham not available. 




Garrison hits on favorite shot. 



"' 



Kirk fires against Appalachian. 



Baseball 




Front row: Roger Larick, George Lare, Roy Greenwood, 
Joe Forte, Harold Moose. Joel Silvers, Robert Harris, Tom 
Dignan. Back row: Keith Conner, Tom Blaneak, Dave 



Kemp, Bill Lee. Larry Dunn, Dave Willard, Kirk Stewart, 
Dave Whitlick, Charley Craver, and manager Jerry Tertze- 
gian. 




Co-captains: Pitcher Kirk Stewart and firstbaseman Dave Kemp. 



"- 



Veteran coach Chuck Hartman has a strong nucleous to work with this 
year in returning lettermen Kirk Stewart, Roy Greenwood, Joel Silvers, 
Harold Moose, Bob Harriss, Dave Whitlock, Dave Willard, Dave Kemp, and 
Larry Dunn. Among the newcomers are Keith Conners, Roger Larick. 
George Lare, Tom Dignan. Bill Lee, Charley Craver, and Tom Blanciak. 
The team will play a 25 game schedule. 




."Hit away son, we need a hit." 



175 




The coach discusses pre-game strategy. 




Players relax beforp punc. 




Dave Kemp, the team's top slugger, lashes out a hit. 




Freshman prospects: Roger Larick, George Lare, Tom Dignan, Bill Lee, Charley 
Craver. anil Turn Blanciak. 




Fans soak up sun behind Panther dugout. 




9* - 

> 









- 




Coach Hartman holds pepper same. 



Track 



Coach hob Davidson returns for his second year of coaching the HPC 
track team. Despite the loss of outstanding cindermen Jack Wagoner and 
Bobby Brennan. the coach is very optimistic about this year's team. Letter- 
men .Mike Sabino, Dave Baughn, Tony Boyles, Steve Pearson, Ken Truitt. 
Don Jones. Ken Rich, Griff Balthis. and Bob Seaver form a good founda- 
tion for this year's team. 




Front Row: Griff Ralthis, Jim Pickleseimer, Dave Bauirhn. J. R. 
Newton, Wayne Ashley. George Mastroyiannakis, Alan Lashley, 
and Mike Sabino. Rack row: Dun Jones, Ken Truitt, Steve Pear- 



son. Ray Alley, Boh Medlin, Tony Boyles, Larry Dunlop, and 
Coach Bobby Davidson. 




Coach Boh Uaviilsoii 





Bob Seaver— Javelin 



Steve Parson and Mike Sabino 



'?• 




'■■- ■■ ■'■ , • 



Rav Allcv -Discus 




Dave Young- X>'C* up and over. 





Dave Baugrhn Veteran hurdler 



Bob Medlin— Shot Put 



JC 



Cross Country 



After ;i two year absence, cross country returned to the Hifrh Point 
College campus for the 1963-64 season. Mike Sabino and Jack Wagner were 
instrumental in leading the team to a 4-:: season. Coach Bob Davidson's 
Panther's picked up wins over Atlantic Christian, X. C. State freshmen, 
and Pembroke. In the state cross country meet at Raleigh Jack Wagner 
finished 12th, Grif Balthis •"'.oth. and Tony Boyles 40th out of 60 appli- 
cants. Mike Sabino finished second and Jack Wagner finished ninth in the 
10.000 Meter Road Race held in Lexington, Va. 



THE SCHEDl'I.E 



Oct. 


18 


Atlantic Christian 


High Point (W) 


Oct. 


20 


Wake Forest 


Winston-Salem (L) 


Oct. 


■_>■_> 


Pembroke 


Pembroke (L) 


Oct. 


29 


N.C. State Frosh 


Raleijrh (W) 


Nov. 


4 


State Meet 


Raleijrh 


Nov. 


7 


Atlantic Christian 


Wilson (Wi 


Nov. 


8 


Pembroke 


Hijrh Point (Wl 


Nov. 


12 


Davidson 


Davidson (L) 


Dec. 


8 


10.000 Meter Race 


Lexington, Va. 




- '. -. 



left to right: Tony Bovlcs. Griff Balthis. Jack Wagner. Mike Cabino. Dave 
Whitloek, and Dave Young. Absent from picture: Marshal Hernandez. Bob Harris, and 
Jim Wilmont. 

181 








Golf 



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Stan Kinney 



Stan Kinney and Craven Young — putting practice. 




/ 










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■'.-._ 



Dick i Hson 



( 'raven Y.>unjj 



52 



Golf 



Blair Park pro .Johnny Johnson will again 
serve as golf coach for the Panthers. Stan Kin- 
ney and Dick Olson are the mainstays of the 
team this year and will be looking for help from 
Roger Watson, Dan Hammond. Craven Young 
and Bill Fanning. 




.lohnnv Johnson, Coach 




Left to Right: Dick Olson. Dan Hammond, Stan Kinney, 

Walt Snood, and Craven Young. 



Blair Park, assistant coach 



33 



Tennis 








■ 



Coach Tom Quinn 



Mike Rosenmarkle 





Larry Amick 



Wayne Furnian 



184 



Bowling 



For the second consecutive year High Point College represented Dis- 
trict 26 m the NAIA National Rowling Tournament at Kansas City, Mo. 
The team paced 14th in the nation among small colleges after thhe threee 
day totals were computed. Dave Fancher was High Point's top bowler as 

he converted 2208 pins for a 18 i average. 

INDIVIDUAL AVERAGES 

pins average 

Dave Fancher 2208 184 

Joe Gosnell 2170 181 

Jim Brucki 2084 174 

Garland Kinney 1522 169 

Charlie Miller 1500 167 

Kenny Deal 894 149 

TOP 15 COLLEGES 

1. Southwestern Louisiana State Lafayette. La. 

2. Pacific University Forest Grove, Ore. 

3. Pomona College Claremont, Cal. 

4. William Jewell College Liberty. Mo. 

5. Indiana State College Terre Haute. Ind. 

6. Plattesville State College Plattesville. Wis. 

7. David Lipscomb College Nashville. Tenn. 

8. St. Joseph's College Rensselaer, Ind. 

9. Kearney State College Kearney, Neb. 

10. Detroit* Tech Detroit. Mich. 

11. Arkansas Tech Russeville. Ark. 

12. Christian Brothers College Memphis, Tenn. 

13. Black Hills Teachers College Black Hills. S. D. 

14. HIGH POINT COLLEGE HIGH POINT, N. C. 

15. Emporia State College Emporia. Kan. 




Front row : Garland Kinney, Charlie Miller, and Joe Gosnel 
Jim Brucki, Dave Fancher. and Mr. Netts. 



Hack row: Kenny Deal. 



'-'■ 



Intramurals 



The intramural department at High Point College is a division of the 
Health, Physical Education, and Athletic Department. This department 
promotes, furnishes equipment for, and supervises competition in various 
sports areas. All students and faculty members are encouraged to take 
part in the intramural program which has become an important part of 
the extra-curricular activity of the college. 

Intramural teams are composed of fraternities and independent teams, 
which enable each student enrolled at High Point College to participate in 
the intramural sports program. Hubby Davidson is Intramural Director. 



'- 




■ 







'«£:- 



- ^ 

_ 




— : - -; ... •'-•■■ - 



»►'«*.'■'. 








Delta Sigs and Lambda Chis battle in football game. 



Even the girls play! 




Half-time strategy. 



First and ten. 



B6 



Life at High Point College 

There are many activities that take place on a college campus-academic, 
athletic, social. This sect inn of the yearbook is devoted to portraying the 
many and varied aspects of High Point College campus. It is intended to 
protray, through picture portraits, the typical school year at UPC. You 
have already seen the faculty, administration, classes, organizations, 
sports, Greeks, and campus queens. Now, in an attempt to give your year- 
book a personality all its own. you shall see the more exciting aspects of 
the campus. Let us call this our "behind-the scene" look at our campus. 




Academics Stressed at H. P. C. 



Studying plays an important role in the life 
of a HPC student. He may spend hours pouring 
over a textbook, burn the midnight oil for 
exams; but in the final analysis all this work is 
worth the effort. 







Every student has an opportunity to partici- 
pate in some type of recreation. It may just be 
getting dunked in the creek. 





■ 90 




High Point College offers its student many 
opportunities to hear eminent speakers and lec- 
turers. This year we were fortunate to have Dr. 
.Martin Marty, Finch lecturer, and Mr. Harry 
Bartron, pantomimest. Needless to say. every 
student always enjoys City-College Day. 





191 



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Winter comes to the campus of High 
Point College and brings with it snow, 

snowball fights, Christinas d n r m par- 
ties, caroling, door decorations, and most 
important of all — Christmas Holidays. 




A 



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r' -*f**2g~i «*«*%Mfc. - 



• ' 



■ 



• 



Students go to dances, get Beanie tickets, are awarded campus honors, 
seek job opportunities — why, even the professors take time out to eat. 




- 







S 




A person's college life is filled with many exciting events. He listens to 
speakers, joins in many activities, has a full social life, but the greatest 
event of all is — graduation. Each college student holds his breath until 
that final walk up the aisle, and maybe a tear will fall in sadness for 
all the happy hours he is leaving behind. 



ENGLISH MOTOR 
CO., INC. 

Sales Service 

FORD, FORD TRUCK, FALCON, 

FAIRLANE & T-BIRD 

HEADQUARTERS 

201 E. Washington St. 

Phone 882-6848 
High Point, N. C. 



Compliments of 

NEILL PONTIAC, INC. 

902 N. Main Street 
High Point, North Carolina 



Compliments 

COCA-COLA PLANT 

South Main Street 
High Point, N. C. 



STEELS DINER 

Operated By Frond and Bunny Cochran 
At 5 Points 



FIVE POINT BARBER 
SHOP 

Manager Mr. Chapman 



RATHSKELLER 




Where Good 


Friends Meet 


in a 


Pleasant 


Atmosphere 




High Point, 


North Carol i 


na 


At 


5 Points 





HARRIS DRYCLEANING 
AND SHIRT SERVICE 

Next to Winn Dixie 

College Village Shopping Center 
Five Shirts Only One Dollar 

For Every $3.00 of Drycleaning 
the Customer will Receive One 

Silver Dollar 



■'00 




MILLER-JONES SHOES 

'We Carry all styles in Men's and 

Ladies' Shoes for on and off 

campus." 



TIP-TOP BAKERY 

Bread, Cakes, and Rolls 

Located between High Point 
and Greensboro 



MODEL BARBER SHOP 

325 N. Wrenn 
High Point, N. C. 



HUDSON'S PHILLIPS 66 STATION 
College Village 



HIGHLAND MOTORS, 
INC. 

Cadillac 

Oldsmobile 

F-85 

805 N. Main St 
High Point, N. C. 



MOBIL PAINT STORE 

"High Point's Color Center" 

Featuring a Complete Line 
of Mobil Finishes 

1645 English Road 





COLLEGE 


VILLAGE 




BARBER SHOP 




8-6 Mon. 


thru Sat. 


c 


H. Ward 


H. E. Durham 




C. B. Cecil 


L. 0. Poole 


H. 


D. Cecil 


C. J. Johnson 



. 



TO WORK FOR 

CONE.. 



YOU'VE 
GOT TO BE 

SHARP! 




../- 



A company is only as good as the people who work for it. Cone Mills 
through its people has achieved an enviable position as a major producer 
of high quality textiles. To maintain this position Cone needs sharp 
young people with initiative and intelligence. Cone offers opportunities 
in four areas . . . production, administration, sales and research. 
Interested in joining this progressive organization? Write Industrial 
Relations Department, Cone Mills Corporation, Greensboro, N. C. 



CONE MILLS CORPORATION 

"Where fabrics of tomorrow are woven today." 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

Greensboro, N. C. 



FINISHING PLANTS 

Carlisle & Greenville, S. C. 
Greensboro & Haw River, N. C. 



MANUFACTURING PLANTS— Avondale, Cliffside, Greensboro, Forest City, 
Salisbury, Pineville. Reidsville, Gibsonville, Haw River and Hillsboro in 
North Carolina. Greenville in South Carolina. 




202 



Compliments of 



MYRTLE DESK COMPANY 



FLI-BACK CORPORATION 



GRIFFITH OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



792 North Main 



Good Show Carol! 





now its Pepsi 

for those who think young 




PEPSI-COLA 








2C ■ 



HARLLEE'S 

OF HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Compliments of 

SPORTSMAN'S SHOP, INC. 

College Village Shopping Center 



J. W. SECHREST & SON, 
INC. 

Serving This Community Since 1897 

Phone 882-2555 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Two Oxygen Equipped Ambulances 

Day and Night 



HERITAGE' 

a living tradition in furniture 

HERITAGE FURNITURE CO. HIGH POIXT. SOUTH CAROUSA 



LYLES CHEVROLET CO. 



"Your CHEVY Service Center" 



1800 North Main Street 



RELIABLE CLEANERS 

1253 Montlieu At 5 Points 

One Hour Cleoning Any Time 

Saturday Until Noon 

Phone 888-7229 



PITTSBURGH PLANT GLASS CO. 

101 South Hamilton Street 

High Point, N. C. 

PAINT AND GLASS PRODUCTS 




HALL PRINTING COMPANY 

S. HAMILTON STREET HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Serving HIGH POINT and HIGH POINT COLLEGE with 

QUALITY PRINTING since 1924. 



;cj 




A good company to be insured in, 
and a good company to work for' 



Between High Point and Greensboro 



Tlobias 



Compliments of 

PIEDMONT SAVINGS & LOAN 

Moin St., High Point, N C 



W. F. MAULDIN, INC. 

Buick Special, Le Sabre, 

Invicta, Electra, Riviera 

119 N. Main St. High Point, N C. 




MITCHELL ESSO SERVICE 

1 100 E. Lexington Ave 
"We're Hoppy To Serve You" 



Compliments of 

HORACE G. ILDERTON, INC. 

701-709 S. Moin St. 
High Point, N. C 



Compliments of 

THE LILLY COMPANY 

High Point 




205 



A FRIEND 



VICK PAINT & 
WALLPAPER CO. 

Phone 882-8425 Phone 882-0029 

1 13-1 15 E. Commerce, High Point, N. C 

Point - Wallpaper - Art Supplies 



Compliments of 



HUNTER & CO. 



Compliments of 

CAROLINA CONTAINER 
CO. 




HIGH POINT COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 



:o6 




ROSE'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

At The New South Gate Shopping Center 
1628 South Main 



Compliments of 



ADAMS -MILLIS 




bTUTTS MEN'S STORE 

126 South Moin Street 
Style Clothes for the College Man 



.M'liii//;/ 







,) y 4g&'' — 



JEWELERS 



Just Moved to 124 South Moin 



207 



Compliments of 

GILBERT'S 

8eoutiful Shoe Line Since 1936 











E M 


ElectroMechanics 


nnnm 


COR PORATION 
High Point, North Corolino 



BfBSfl ItoQHB liliSli lElirl EBHHSHI 

Established 1905 

High I > oixt,"N'oktii Carolina 

Member Federol Deposit Insurance Corporation 



to Coast 




HSS$> 
TWO 

the mcst In DRY cleaning 



Mtor/m 



247 SOUTH MAIN STREET 

1530 North Main Street 
1310 North Centennial 



DICK CULLER'S INC. 

142 Church Street 

Complete Campus Wear 

Sports - Dress and Formal Wear 



NORTH 

CAROLINA NATIONAL ^^ 

BANK ^^ 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 




inc. 



■fabrics, i 



1937 W. Green Dr. 



High Point, N. C. 



BEESON HARDWARE CO. 

High Point's Sporting Goods 
Heodquarters 




The book takes its toll! 



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