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the Currow 



Vol. 15, No. 10 DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE of Science and Agriculture March 21, 1969 




Standing majesticly behind Dr. Feldsteiris home is this rare specimen sycamore. Known to he over 300 years old, thus 
tree is a fine accent to the historical dwelling which itself dates back to the 18th century. 



EXHIBIT AT PA. 
FLOWER SHOW 
NETS AWARDS 

The Delaware Valley College 
exhibit at the Spring Flower Show 
in Philadelphia has been awarded 
the Pennsylvania Horticulture So- 
ciety Gold Medal and the Pennsyl- 
vania Horticulture Society Special 
Award. The Judges commended the 
exhibit "for educational value de- 
monstrating the importance of 
modern, scientific, growth regu- 
lators." 

The exhibit was planned, staged, 
and is being cared for by the 
students in the Department of Or- 
namental Horticulture. The boys 
began planning the exhibit in 
September. The plant material used 
was grown by the students in the 
greenhouses on campus. 

A tremendous selection of an- 
nuals and perennials was used in 
staging this exhibit. Petunias, 
strawflowers, marigolds, chrysan- 
themums, flowering kale, alyssum, 
bromiliads, orchids, and many 
others could be seen in the Dela- 
ware Valley College exhibit. 



Financial Aid 
Reminder 

All students are reminded that they 
must re-apply for financial aid annually. 
Interested students must have on file 
in the Office of the Dean of Students a 
current Parents Confidential Statement 
for the College Year 1969-1970 processed 
through the College Scholarship Service, 
Princeton, N.J. Students who have not 
already done so should have these forms 
completed immediately. 

Students presently receiving Pennsyl- 
vania Higher Education Assistance Agen- 
cy Scholarships will receive their renewal 
forms from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 
the near future. Presently enrolled stu- 
dents who are interested in obtaining a 
Pennsylvania State Scholarship may 
make application prior to March 31, 1969. 
Forms for these are available in the Of- 
fice of the Dean of Students. 

All financial aid available to students 
is awarded on the basis of need as de- 
termined by the Parents Confidential 
Statement. Any questions concerning 
financial aid should be directed to the 
Office of the Dean of Students. 

Students who did not qualify or did 
not get their Parents Confidential State- 
ment processed on time are reminded to 
investigate the various State Cuaranteed 
Loan Programs. Forms for these are avail- 
able through the local banks. 

This announcement was made by Dean 
Joseph E. Fuleoly, Jr. who is Director 
of Financial Aid. 



PROGRESS 

IN CAMPUS 

BEAUTIFICATION 

This paper has at times been 
quite critical of what we felt was a 
degeneration of our campus with 
regard to landscaping and general 
campus esthetics. Perhaps in a 
sense we have been too critical, 
for there is more to this story than 
meets the eye. It may be true that 
there are weak spots in our present 
campus landscaping but there is a 
massive effort being initiated to 
beautify this campus, and to bring 
to the attention of the Student Body 
the wealth of flora already existing 
on this campus. Through this 
article the Furrow will explore the 

(Continued on page 5) 



GLEANER 
Deadline March 24th 

Articles may be submitted to— 

C. Pfitzenmayer Cooke 221 

or 

Q. Schlieder Cooke 212 



Fall 68 
Dean's List 

Class of 1969 

Bartles, William S. 
Borman, Ronald I. 
Brenner, Paul 
Bucher, Glenn A. 
Crawford, Brodie H. 
Dale, Michael R. 
Develin, Donald B. (4.00) 
Fergus, Edgar R. 
Fox, Raymond I. 
Gallagher, Everett 
Ginople, Charlia M. (4.00) 
Heal, Charles S. 
Heffelfinger, Richard P. 
Hendrickson, William B. 
Kalinowski, Dennis F. 
Lanza, Vincent J. 
Lindemann, Robert 
McMillan, Eric (4.00) 
Martens, Peter 
Myers, George (4.00) 
Ravitsky, Michael A. 
Rocconi, Charles J. 
Sausville, Kenneth N. 
Scudder, Thomas W. 
Seiferth, Marsden M. 
Sickora, James P. 
Sitarski, Stanley 

(Continued on page two) 

Graduate 

Becomes 

Ag Agent 

Donald M. Mohr. Monmouth County 
Senior Agent, announces that Robert 
Schaumloeffel has begun Ins duties as 
a Monmouth County agricultural agent, 
working out of the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service Office, 20 Court Street, 
Freehold. 

He is a former assistant horticulturist 
with the Essex County Park Commission, 
and fills a vacancy that has existed sev- 
eral motnhs. Mr. Schaumloeffel is a na- 
tive of Elizabeth and attended Thomas 
Jeffeifon High School there. He was 
graduated in 1966 with a bachelor of 
science degree from Delaware Valley 
College, Doylestown, Pa., and in 1967 
received a master of science degree from 
Rutgers University. 

The new agent is a member of the 
American Rock Garden Society, the 
American Rhododendron Society, and 
Delta Tau Alpha honor society. 

He is married and has a daughter, 9 
months old. 




MR. SCHAUMLOEFFEL 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



March 21, 1969 




Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

devoted to the interest of the 
students of Delaware Valley College 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 

John Martin 

Bob Edwards 

Harvey Goodwin 

Tim Barman 

Mike Morgan 
Dave Vore, Bob Kraeh, Steve Lyczak 

Bill Stefanowicx 

Loo Strastburger 

Pete Higgint 

Delbert Jonos 
-GENERAL STAFF- 
Walt Ault, Sol Caviness, John Furphy, John Hubbard, Tom Garten, Carl Pfitzonmaytr, 
Bill Strode, Milton Parker, Bob Perry, Larry Martel. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISORS Joteph E. Fulcoly, Allan C. Hartley 
FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Morti 

SPECIAL ART ADVISOR J«me» A. O'Reilly 

SPECIAL CONSULTANT Dr. George Keys 

The Furrow is published twice a month by the above concerned students of 
Delaware Valley College. It should be noted that the opinions expressed in 
this newspaper are those of the respective authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the college. 



EDITOR 

FEATURES EDITOR 
INFORMATION SERVICES 
SPORTS EDITOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 

ASSISTANTS 
ART EDITOR 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
TYPING MANAGER 



FURROW POLITICAL POSITION 

The Furrow has chosen to remain neutral with respect to the 
1969 Class Elections. However at times it may seem that all major 
candidates are not given equal time in each issue. The Furrow does 
not control the subject matter of its writers and we can only print 
that which we receive. If you feel that the candidate of your choice 
is not receiving equal treatment, we urge you to submit your views 
on his behalf. The Furrow itself will remain unbiased. 



Larry's Views 

by 
LARRY MARTEL 

THE STALE ROLLS 

The only exciting happening at 
the Dining Hall these days is the 
odds making on when the first per- 
son will be konked out by a flying 
roll. Yes, as things grow old they 
get tough and hard, and rolls are 
no exception. So, although the 
rolls might break a trash can if 
they were thrown out, it might be 
better than the odds on when the 
first person will be konked out by 
a stale flying roll. 

That One For 
The Mixer 

Just as the mixers are getting a 
little bit better a certain student 
regularly shows up in his state of 
mind and tries to dance without 
falling over. He is not hard to pick 
out since he wears the same outfit 
with that wierd hat and alwavs 
looking like a fanner out on trie 
town. If the mixers are to prove 
that DVC is a swinging place why 
do we need a visual attraction on 
the dance floor, one who, without 
regard to gender, butts, pushes and 
cuts his way in between the danc- 
ers in order to do his funny little 
act. He tries to get laughs with 
his actions but he only adds to the 
wrong kind of image for DVC. The 
question is why, with Student Gov- 
ernment members at the doors and 
faculty at the mixers, is he allowed 
to come in all the time when he 
looks and smells like he has had 
one too many 'Mountain Dews?' 



Early Applications 

Requested By 
The Peace Corps 

The Peace Corps has urged stu- 
dents who wish to be considered 
for summer training programs to 
submit their applications soon, 
preferably by early April. 

Last year, many students who 
planned to enter Peace Corps serv- 
ice' in the summer after graduation 
were disappointed when their ap- 
plications were not processed in 
time, according to the Northeast 
Peace Corps Cetner in Boston. 

An average of 10 weeks passes 
between the receipt of an applica- 
tion in Washington and the issu- 
ance of an invitation to Peace 
Corps training. 

As summer approaches, the proc- 
essing time is longer due to the 
increased work load. Therefore, 
many programs are filled or have 
started training before late appli- 
cations can be completely proc- 
essed. 

Applications and Peace Corps 
information are available on many 
campuses from the Peace Corps 
liaison. The nearest Peace Corps 
office is in Philadelphia at the Fed- 
eral Building, 1421 Cherry Street. 
Phone: (215) 597-2129. 



From S. C. 
Secretary 



by 

ROBERT WINNER 




On March 11, a long awaited policy went into effect. The Student 
Government accepted the Administration's, revision of the Proposed 
Amendment to General Regulations #7 of the Student Handbook con- 
cerning proper grooming. The plan is as follows: "All students are re- 
quired to meet acceptable standards, as established by the College and 
the Student Government, concerning personal cleanliness and proper 
grooming. Students shall be cleanshaven and shall keep their hair cut to 
a conservative length. Moustaches and sideburns will be permitted if 
they are neatly trimmed and meet contemporary standards." 

"The length of sideburns will hot be permitted to extend beyond the 
base of the ear lobe, and the length of the moustaches is not to extend 
beyond the upper lip." 

Student Government has the authority to regulate the enforcement of 
this grooming regulation. Upon the first offense a summons to Student 
Court will be issued and if the defendent is found guilty a fine of $3.00 
will be administered. Also, a manditory correction of the infraction com- 
mitted will be required within one week after the court decision. Upon 
the second offense a fine of $6.00 and possible Student Government pro- 
bation, along with correction of the infraction within one week of the 
decision, will constitute the penalty. 

As outlined by the Student Government, this policy is on a trial basis 
for the balance of this academic year. The Administration stipulates that 
"the Student Government will re-evaluate the situation and submit its 
findings to the Administration for its consideration at the end of this 
college year." 

The success of this project lies in the co-operation of even student, 
because the Administration has also stipulated ". . . that if the Student 
Government does not properly enforce the rule, they will th< a. have to 
take proper steps to correct the situation." 

In speaking for all Student Government members, who are respon- 
sible for the students adhering to these principles, I would like to ask 
you for your full co-operation in this matter. A lack of co-operation will 
result in the relinquishing of this privilege for everyone. Let's not lose 
what has taken us so long to obtain! 
Respectfully submitted, 



it 



A" Day Flower 
Show Plans 

Plans for this year's "A" Day 
Flower Show are now being formu- 
lated. The Flower Show Commit- 
tee of the Ornamental Horticulture 
Society has expanded some areas 
of the show while it has dropped 
other areas due to the lack of in- 
terest in them. 

The show will be staged in All- 
man Hall Lecture Hall on Saturday 
and Sunday, May 3 and 4. 

Interested students, faculty, and 
employees of the College should 
contact Quentin Schlieder in Room 
212 Cooke Hall for Schedules and 
entry forms, or write: 

Quentin Schlieder, Co-chairman 
"A" Day Flower Show Box 908 
Delaware Valley College 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania 18901 

The entry forms must be filed 
with the Co-chairman prior to April 
25, 1969. 



Robert Winner, Secretary 
Student Government 

FALL DEANS LIST— 

(Continued from front page) 

Upton, Charles 
Williams, David J. 
Yant, Samuel J. 

Class of 1970 

t Barychki, Jr. Emil J. 
DiGiantomasso, Leonard 
Evans, David N. (4.00) 

(Continued on page II) 



WATSON - PRICE 

Qualify Shoe Repair 

Fast Professional Service 

52'/2 E. State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5885 



— IN OUR NEXT ISSUE — 

An in depth report on Class Elections. A feature concerning our 
College Dining Service, including results from the Dining Hall 
Poll. A preview of Spring Sports, and much, much more. 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



Com pill* Zfravtl ^Jir 



rran. 



Air Una 
Tickets 



ytmtnt 



Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 343-1223 



March 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Bee Men 
"Buzz" 

The Delaware Valley College 
Apiarist Society's officers for 1969- 
70 are as follows: 

President Gary Christensen 

V. Pres. Richard Hider 

Secretary Philip Irwin 

Treasurer Daniel Helwin 

Publications Representative l 

Richard A. Hoffman 
"A-Day" Repersentative Tom Cook 
Club Photographer Chris Whelan 
Advisor Dr. R. Berthold 

The Apiarist Society is an organ- 
ization concerned with the culture 
and study of bees. Under the guid- 
ance of Dr. Berthold, the Society 
has been active in a number of 
interesting projects throughout the 
past year. The main project con- 
cerning the Apiarist Society at this 
time is the building of a honey 
house. The honey house will be 
used as an extracting room in 
which honey, taken from the honey 
comb of the bee hive, will be ex- 
tracted, poured into jars, and then 
sold. If construction continues as 
planned, the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege Honey House will be one of 
the best of its kind in the East. 

During the "A-Day" festivities, 
various types of honey and other 
bee products will be on sale. In 
addition, displays and exhibits are 
being prepared by the members. 

The Apiarist Society Banquet 
was held at the Water Wheel Inn 
on February 14, 1969. Every mem- 
ber and guest enjoyed dining 
around the old-fashioned open 
hearth fireplace and was stimulated 
by the atmosphere of the Inn. Gary 
Christensen and Richard Hider 
were the lucky winners of the door 
prize. Congratulations! 

An invitation to become a mem- 
ber of the Apiarist Society is ex- 
tended to any student who thinks 
he may have even the slightest in- 
terest in bees. The time, place, and 
date of the next meeting of the So- 
ciety will be posted on yellow hex- 
ogonal signs. If interested, please 
attend. 



Dairy Society 

Elects 

New Officers 

For 1969-70 

The Dairy Society of Delaware 
Valley College held two regular 
meetings during the month of Feb- 
ruary. These meetings laid the 
foundation for a more progressive 
and successful Dairy Society in the 
coming year. At the meeting held 
February 10th the group, lead by 
past president Ken Schoenberg, 
elected officers for the 1969-70 
year. The new officers are as fol- 
lows: 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Donald Koontz 

Ed Lamberton 

Earl Weaver 

Bill Bryant 



The second meeting of the month 
was held February 24th. At that 
meeting committee reports and dis- 
cussion dealt with such subjects as 
the club trip, A-Day exhibits, and 
the showmanship and fitting con- 
test. Wayne Quinn was appointed 
program chairman by the presi- 
dent. President Koontz reported on 
his inquiry into the possibility of 
our group becoming a member of 
the American Dairy Science Asso- 
ciation. 

The speaker for the evening was 
Mr. Earl Waltemyer, manager and 
president of Walebe Farms, Inc., 
Col lege ville, Pa. Mr. Waltemyer 
discussed his operation with the 
Society, pointing out various man- 
agerial practices as well as his 
goals for the future. Mr. Walte- 
myer pointed out that before de- 
claring a profit one should care- 
fullv consider one's own labor and 
depreciation costs. With reference 
to breeding, Mr. Waltemyer advo- 
cates somewhat limited use of 
young and unproven sires. 

The club plans many more edu- 
cational and interesting speakers 
throughout the coming year and 
wishes to extent a warm welcome 
to all those who may wish to at- 
tend. 






Dr. Mertz speaks in the Segal Hall Bio -Lab as guest of the Science Society. 



Mr. Blaxi (left) looks on as Quentin Schlieder, president of the OH. Society 
(right) accepts plant material from Mr. Bruce Keyser (middle) of Morris 
Arboretum. 

0. H. Hosts 
Speakers 

The Ornamental Horticulture So- 
ciety kicked off their second semes- 
ter with a fine speaker, Mr. Bruce 
Keyser. the plant propagator from 
The Morris Arboretum. Mr. Key- 
ser spoke on certain native plans 
which should be used in landscap- 
ing more often. Many of these 
plants have unusual characteristics 
which are desirable to the home 
owner, such as peeling bark in the 
Paperbark Maple and the unique 
drooping flowers of the Bearberry. 
The talk was illustrated with slides 
showing these plants in their nat- 
ural growth habitat. 

Mr. Keyser brought some rare 
plants, such as a variegated Red 
Pine, from the arboretum as a gift 
to the school. These plants were 
greatly appreciated since they will 
boost the plant material inventory 
of the College. 

Other interesting speakers on the 
agenda are Mr. Patrick A. Nutt and 
Mrs. Ernesta Ballard. Mr. Nutt is 
a graduate of The Royal Botanic 
Gardens and The Wisley School of 
Gardening and will speak on trop- 
ical plants. He is a noted authority 
on this topic. Mrs. Ballard is the 
Director or The Pennsylvania Hor- 
ticultural Society which sponsers 
the Philadelphia Flower Show. Her 
topic is, as yet, unannounced. 
Other speakers are in the process 
of being asquired to make the O.H. 
Chlb interesting to all. 

At the March 11 meeting of the 
Ornamental Horticulture Socfety in 
Mandell Hall, the club heard the 
distinguished authority on tropical 
plant material from Longwood Gar- 
dens, Patrick Nutt. Mr. Nutt was 
accompanied by David Gilchrist, a 
foreign exchange student from 
Scotland who is presently on a 
work/study program at Longwood 
Gardens. 

Mr. Nutt discussed the many fac- 
tors involved in tropical plant care 
in artificial environments. This por- 
tion of the lecture was followed by 
a fine collection of slides of plant 
material indigenous to the tropics. 
Up also included a group of slides 



MR. PATRICK A. NUTT 

on different structural designs em- 
ployed in various tropical plant 
houses throughout the world. 

Mr. Nutt was the first plant 
breeder successful in crossing the 
two species of tropical water plat- 
ters, Victoria cruziana and Victoria 
amazonica. His hybrid exhibited 
profound heterosis. The leaves of 
this plant reach more than six feet 
in diameter. 

Mr. Nutt is a graduate of the 
Royal Horticultural Society's School 
at Wisley, England, the Royal Bo- 
tanic Gardens at Kew, England, 
and the University of London's 
Night School. He is presently in 
charge of many of the tropical 
plants and waterlilies at Longwood 
in Kennett Square, Pa., where he 
has been employed since 1957. His 
articles appear in many botanical 
journals. 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

fetveteM 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



March 21, 1969 



Conservation 
In Action 

On March 6, 1969, Jim Kern- 
merer presided over a meeting of 
the Soil Conservation Society as 
club president for the first time. 
Jim's first business was to suggest 
tha twe have bi-monthly meetings 
instead of the monthly meetings 
we had had during the previous 
year. These meetings will be held 
on the first and third Thursdays of 
the month. On the first Thursday 
of each month we will have guest 
speakers and scheduled programs, 
and on the third Thursday of each 
month we will have our regular 
business meeting. 

On April 14th, the members of 
the Soil Conservation Society will 
be taking a trip to the coal mine 
spoils in the anthracite region at 
Kingston, Pennsylvania. We will 
be taken on a tour to witness the 
reclamation of such an area. Also, 
on the same day, we will be going 
to Ashland, Pennsylvania, to see 
how a coal mine operates. 

Our Society also enjoyed the 
presentation of a guest speaker, 
Mr. Robert Burns, who has been 
in the National Park Service for 
twenty-five years. Mr. Burns pre- 
sented us with an interesting slide 
program on American Indian af- 
fairs and the way of life of the 
Indians. 

< 

Circle K Is 

On -The 
Road Again 

The Delaware Valley College 
Circle K Club is on the move. After 
a somewhat slow first semester, the 
club, stimulated by the enthusiasm 
of several new freshmen and the 
experienced sophomores, is again 
among the most active on campus. 

Elections were held on February 
4th. The results were: Treasurer, 
Steve Schwartz 71; Secretary, 
Richard Serwell 71; Vice Presi- 
dent, Tom Menendez 72; and Pres- 
ident, Dana Ingerto 71. 

The Circle K has many campus 
and community service projects 
planned for this spring semester. 
Among them are the second an- 
nual car rally, a hayride for under- 
privileged children from Philadel- 
phia, landscaping and beautifying 
the New Britain train station, a 
night of W. C. Fields films for stu- 
dent entertainment, the showing of 
cartoons for childrcns' amusement 
over the A-Day weekend, and 
many more enjoyable and reward- 
ing ventures. 

The Circle K depends primarily 
upon support from the freshman 
class in the form of active mem- 
bers in our club. We urge fresh- 
men to look in on one of our meet 
ings and give us a try. 




Mr. Lunar studies his next move as 
the Contemporary Club holds its 
Annual Faculty-Student Chess Eve- 
ning. 

CHESS EVENING 
A SUCCESS 

The Contemporary Club hold its an- 
nual Faculty-Student Chess Evening on 
March 5th. As was the case last year, 
the Faculty showed up the students and 
in 'most eases went undefeated for the 
evening. The faculty members in at- 
tendance included Dr. Goldberg, Mr. 
Lugar, and Mr. O'Brien. 

The Contemporary Club would like to 
take this opportunity to thank the Facul- 
ty mentioned and all the students who, 
through their participation, made this 
evening the success we feel it was. 

The club is presently making plans for 
its May 9th mixer, which will be the 
last mixer of the year. The Contemporary 
Club is determined to make this mixer, 
which is one of the first mixers to be 
club-sponsored in recent years, one of 
the, if not the, best mixer of the year. 

FOOD CLUB 
TRIP PLANNED 

Dr. Turner, our faculty advisor, 
thanked the club as a whole for 
surprising him with the clock that 
was given to him at our banquet. 

The F. I. Club would also again 
like to thank Mr. Grau for his help 
in supplying the orchid corsages 
for the wiyes of our guests. 

Larry Young, our intramural 
representative, congratulated t h e 
clubs basketball team on their 
second-place finish with a record 
of 7-2. Members interested in play- 
ing softball are asked to sign up 
now. 

Gary Filko, our president, said 
that plans were now in progress 
for an up-coming trip to the Her- 
shey Plant in Hershey, Pa. He 
also asked for a motion to buy ads 
in both the Senior yearbook and 
the "A-Day" program. Such a mo- 
tion was made, seconded, and 
passed by the club. At the end of 
the meeting a film on safety on skis, 
entitled, "Rules for the Slope," was 
shown. 

Any Food Industry majors or 
Freshmen contemplating majoring 
in Food Industry who wish to join 
the club are invited to attend our 
bi-monthly meetings. 



Business Club 

Holds SO-SO 

Raffle 

On March 6, 1969, the Business 
Administration Club held its reg- 
ular meeting. A new set of officers 
was elected to represent the club 
for the coming year. The officers 



Don Chance 

Tom Wentzel 

Rich Serwell 

Don Sechler 

Dom Cherchio 

Bruce Geise 



arc: 

President 

V. Pres. 

Cor. Secretary 

Rec. Secretary 

Treasurer 

A-Day Rep. 

Homecoming Chrm. Bill Thorne 

Intramurals Rep. Jim Douglass 

The club also discussed their 
A-Day plans. There will be a Data 
Processing Computer exhibit, with 
regularly scheduled demonstra- 
tions throughout both days. The 
club will again sponsor a baby- 
sitting service. 

Currently the club is holding a 
50-50 raffle on campus. The draw- 
ing will be held at the March 21 
mixer, and the money will give 
someone a financial boost for 
Spring Vacation. 

Del. Vol. 
An. Hus. Club 
At Penn State 

On February the nineteenth, the 
Animal Husbandry Club held the 
election of officers for the year 
1969-70. The slate of new officers 

is as follows: 

Raymond Ruch 70 President 

Walter Winkler 70 V. Pres. 

Betsey Maddox 70 Secretary 

Richard Baum 70 Treasurer 

Robert Mickel 70 Program Chrm. 
Eugene Wallace 70 

"A-Day" Representative and 
Intramural Representative 
Ricnard LaBonge 70 

Sergeant-at-Arms 
John Bame 70 

Publications Representative 
On March 8th and 9th, twenty- 
two students and Dr. Pelle will 
represent the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege Animal Husbandry Club at 
Pennsylvania State University. An- 
imal Husbandry Clubs from six 
other schools in the northeast will 
also be represented. Each school 
will have the opportunity to host 
the other schools in the future. 

A-Day animals have been given 
out and all students who have ani- 
mals are urged to take care of their 
animals to make this A-Day the 
best ever. 

Our next meeting is scheduled 
for March 12. All members should 
be present. 



QUALITY FOOT WEAR 
"The Fit* of the Sola" 

Stuart McGuire, with 
Ortho-Vent Spring Step Cushion 
Loafers 
Wingtips 

Brogues Your Representative 

Work Shoes RALPH SPANISH 

Boots New Dorm I 109 



Horticulture 

Society 
Members To 

Attend 

National 
Convention 

The Horticulture Society is plan- 
ning to send three or four members 
to the National Convention of the 
American Collegiate Branch of the 
American Society for Horticultural 
Science. This year the convention 
is being held from August 19-22 at 
the University of Washington in 
Pullman, Washington. Chapters of 
the collegiate branches from all 
over the United States will be rep- 
resented. As a note of significant 
interest, the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege chapter has by far the largest 
membership in the A.GB.H.S. 

Delaware Valley had two arti- 
cles written up in the fall issue of 
the Green Leaf, the A.C.B.H.S.'s 
national booklet. Both articles were 
written by seniors Ron Attarian 
and Dennis Kalinowski. Dennis is 
past president of the Hort. Society 
and is now the president of the 
A.C.B.H.S. This is an achievement 
that Delaware Valley can be quite 
proud of. 

Another first was achieved by 
the Horticulture Society. This 
year's treasury reached in all-time 
high from the sale of apples and 
cider at the football games. This 
is the highest amount in the So- 
ciety's history. 

In coordination with Mr. Howell, 
the Society presently has plans for 
both a spray and pruning schedule 
for the apple orchards. This pro- 
gram should bring better quality 
fruit and much larger yields. 

Mr. Frecon is working on plans 
to plant a new orchard primarily 
for educational purposes. The 
planned orchard will show the dif- 
ferent types of rootstocks as well as 
many varieties of fruit. Details will 
be made available later. 

Later on in the spring the So- 
ciety has planned for several speak- 
ers to come and speak at one of 
the meetings. 



TRAUGER'S ££ ER 

— my shop is your shop 



L. L. TRAUGER, Proprietor 
24 N. Main Street 



Doylestown 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 

Dress Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 

THOAA AAcAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



March 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



A.P.O. Lists 



Plans 



On February 25 the regular bi- 
monthly of Alpha Phi Omega Fra- 
ternity was held in the cafeteria. 
The main purpose for the meeting 
was to install the newly elected 
officers. A regular business meeting 
was conducted by the newly in- 
stalled President, Mark Euter- 
moserf"* flans were discussed for 
having several service projects with 
the local Y.M.C.A. The offices of 
Historian and Sergeant of Arms 
were appointed. Jim Cervelli was* 
appointed the office of Sergeant of 
Arms and Ben Caleb was appoint- 
ed the office of Historian. 

On February 28 and March 1 
the annual sectional conference 
was held at Villanova University. 
Two representatives from our 
chapter attended the sectional con- 
ference. Topics for the conference 
were to elect new officers and plan 
several social functions for the sec- 
tional chapters. 

The next regular bi-monthly 
meeting will be March 12th. Any- 
one interested in joining A.P.O. 
please attend. 

The regular bi-monthly meeting 
of Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity was 
held on March 11, 1969. A regular 
business meeting was held with 
President Mark Eutermoser presid- 
ing. Topics discussed were plans 
for getting new members pledged 
for the spring semester, the service 
project with the Y.M.C.A. in Doy- 
lestown, and the sale of the Co- 
' lumbia Viking Deck Encyclopedia. 

The encyclopedia will be sold in 
the cafeteria during the next sev- 
eral weeks. The price is reduced 
from $1.95 to .75. This is a good 
desk encyclopedia which can be 
used for reports and it has a lot of 
useful reference material contained 
in it. 

If any one is interested in becom- 
ing a member of the fraternity 
please come to the next regular 
meeting. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 



60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phone 348-9021 



ATTENTION 

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS 

You can pick up your 

Furrows at the 

Information Desk 

inside 

Lasker Hail. 



CAMPUS BEAUTIFICATION 

(Continued) 

plans and the work in the area of 
campus beautification as of the pre- 
sent time. 

One must realize that certain 
areas of the campus can't be land- 
scaped until construction has been 
completed in those areas. For ex- 
ample, it would have been foolish 
to beautifully landscape the areas 
surrounding the Library only to 
see it ripped apart by construction 
vehicles and such. Also the students 
can blame themselves for some of 
the problem of campus beauty. 
Walking across the grass, littering, 
and general disregard for campus 
grounds certainly do not help mat- 
ters. Also a problem exists with 
vehicles damaging lawn areas when 
their wheels run off the paved traf- 
fic ways. This is both a College 
and a Student problem and it will 
be up to both to correct it. 

We can now see why certain con- 
ditions exist but this does not 
answer the question of what is be- 
ing planned and what is actually 
being done NOW with regard to 
campus beautification. 

Everywhere one looks one sees 
work being done to develop a more 
beautiful campus area. The new 
dorms are presently being land- 
scaped. The memorial in front of 
Allman Hall will be landscaped as 
soon as the ground is workable. 
The new Farm Machinery Building 
has been beautifully landscaped 
with the help of the Junior OH 
majors. A gazebo has been erected 
near Lake Archer. The new 
Schmieder Arboretum has been 
initiated. These are among many, 
many other beautification projects. 
The Henry Schmieder Arbore- 
tum, presently being developed 
with the help of Mr. Benner and 
his O.H. Field Labs, will add im- 
measurably to the beauty of our 
campus. Moreover, the new arbore- 
tum will aid in the education of 
our students and the visiting pub- 
lic. When completed it will encom- 
pass the entire main campus area 
and will be one of the finest Ar- 
boretums in the East. The main 
path of the arboretum will extend 
around Lake Archer, up to and to 
the side of the greenhouses, and 
behind the dormitories to the park- 
ing area. Much of the plant material 
will be grouped, that is, certain 
Ilex in one area, an Azalea collec- 
tion in another, and the like. Plant 
material throughout the entire 
arboretum will be labeled, giving 
information such as place of origin, 
genus, species, and common name. 
The Plant Science Dept, un- 
der the direction of Dr. Feldstein, 
is now in the process of taking an 
inventory of campus plant material. 
Soon students and visitors will be 
able to obtain a complete listing of 
college plants giving their name 
and location. 

All in all, our College is steadily 
moving forward with ambitious pro- 
grams of campus esthetics. But 
things take time, and they must be 
done in accordance with a plan and 
executed in the proper sequence. 
However, with the patience and 
active support of the Student Body 
the high goals will be attained. 






I u 






A 




'- *■**»■ 






W 





Above: Mr. Benner and his O. H. Field Lab work to complete the Schmieder 
Arboretum Path near Lake Archer. 

Below: The newly erected Gazebo adds to the beauty of the Lake Archer area 
of our campus. 




Mr, Henry Schmieder died on June 12, 1964. He was born on July 22, 1892, and became 
a member of the staff of the National Farm School in March, 1921. He was Professor of 
Biology and Director of the College Arboretum at the time of his death. 

The College has lost a man — an extraordinary man — who made an indelible impression 
on all who knew him. The casual question, "Is Mr. Schmieder around?" asked on unnum- 
bered occasions by alumni visiting the campus, is the most eloquent measure of the place 
he held in the minds and hearts of those who knew him. 

Henry Schmieder, a man who knew so much about so many things, a man who could 
teach English as well as biology or apiculture, was a humble man. He was a scholar; a man 
with an intensely inquiring mind; a man who never ceased to be a student of the life he 
found everywhere about him. He respected and admired knowledge, but he remained a 
teacher who found in ignorance an opportunity to create an understanding that had not 
existed before. He was punctual to a minute, but never lacked the time for worthwhile 
discussion. Like Socrates, he taught by ceaseless questioning. 

His love of plants and animais was as much a part of him as the air he breathed. The 
breadth and depth of his understanding and sympathy for all that was human can be 
plumbed only in the hearts of the many whose lives are better for having known him. 

Mr. Schmieder, ever an individualist, was dedicated to the College, and devoted to his 
family. He gave much, and asked for little. A few lines written by the German poet Heine, 
and known by Mr. Schmieder, reflect his understanding of nature which he loved so dearly. 

One shall sing no mass. 

One shall say no mourning prayer. 

Nothing shall he asked; 

Nothing shall be done. 

On my day of death. 

Supplement to Furrow 
Vol. 10, No. 2 June 1964 




Workmen put finishing touches on 
off -campus parking lot addition. 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 
348-5072 DOYLESTOWN 18901 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



March 21, 1969 



SPRING WEEKEND 1969 






Above: Ed Stepler and John Greigcr get some practice making beds 
in Cooke Hall The fresh linens were being dispensed in anticipation 
of the girls who would occupy the dormitory for Spring Weekend. 
Right: The Drifters brought back memories with their renditions of 
"Under The Boardwalk,' "Up On The Roof," and "This Magic 
Moment" among others. 

Below: Spellbound, the dance floor is still as the Drifters begin 
their performance. Later in the evening the Geator Men followed 
the Drifters and provided the dancers with a change of pace. 






"SHOWTIME" A BIG SUCCESS 

"Brutus with a pie in his eye?" Sound crazy? That's just what Newman 
Gym was like on Saturday night during Spring Weekend. Really wild! 
As far as talent was concerned, the Juniors really "Let it all hang out" 
and their variety show was a roaring success. The student participation 
was good and the turn-out was a "Full house". With everyone sitting on 
bleachers and blankets on the floor, there was an atmosphere of relaxation 
and fun throughout the show. And fun it was! Ranging from a variety of 
very talented Folk music guitar playing and singing to a number of un- 
believably funny, only-an-Aggie-would-do-it, comedy skits. It was really 
worthwhile seeing and also an experience to remember, but most of all, 
a very well planned and executed Variety Show. "Hats off to Rich Pal- 
masano and Wayne Mehalick who were in charge of the show production, 
and to all the other Aggies who participated both by displaying their 
"hidden talents" and by being there. Now, if you ever hear anyone knock 
"Aggie Talent" around, just tell them to check with "Brutus Spanish." 



Right: Fritz Blum prepares 
his car for the Circle K Car 
Rally, that was held Saturday 
of Spring Weekend. Mr. Blum 
was one of the top winners in 
the rally, which provided fun 
and excitement to all who 
entered. 

Belotc: Entrants in the car 
rally get ready to start on the 
first leg of their journey. A 
bad clue gave some of the 
people trouble but all in all 
it proved to be a good con- 
test. 






March 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Seven 



u 



n 



CINEMA 

Romeo & 
REVIEWED 

What's the first thing you think 
of when someone says "Romeo & 
Juliet"? Of course the first thing 
would probably be William 
Shakespeare's famous tragedy and 
the hard -to -remember fines you 
had to learn in lOth-grade English 
class. Whatever you think of, one 
thing is for sure: the modern movie 
version of "Romeo & Juliet" is def- 
initely one of the best pictures of 
the >ear. The actors, Olivia Hus- 
sey, 16 and Len Whiting, 19, are 
truly great performers and each 
line they deliver has the exact live- 
liness and "soul touching" senti- 
ment which Shakespeare intended 
when he wrote his masterpiece. 

Unlike the long, drawn-out and 
complicated story some people 
think it to be, the movie is com- 
pletely and unexpectedly the op- 
posite. It is a beautiful, lively story 
filled with a lot of love, enough 
violence, a bit of humor here and 
there, and sadness. All combined, 
it spells out "a groovy movie": the 
real Romeo & Juliet — the way we 
always wanted to see them. 



CHESTNUT HILL 

COLLEGE HOSTS ART 

FESTIVAL 

The students at Chestnut Hill 
College will offer a week of Arts 
programs that all Philadelphians 
can enjoy. The Arts Festival en- 
titled "Dimensions In Human En- 
counter" will open Sunday, March 
16, to March 23. It will examine 
contemporary society in the arts, 
especially drama, dance, music 
and the visual media. 

The Theater highlight will fea- 
ture The National Players, from 
Catholic University in the Greek 
classic "The Oresteia," on Wednes- 
day, March 19. Louis I. Kahn and 
Richard Saul Worman will partici- 
pate in a symposium on architec- 
ture and urban planning called 
"Building the New City." The con- 
troversial critic, Leslie Fiedler, will 
speak on "The New Mutants" a 
literan' treatment of the younger 
generation. Dr. Maurice Friedman 
of Temple University, a noted au- 
thority on Martin Buber, will lec- 
ture on "Religion and Literature: 

(Continued on page 9) 



BOOK REVIEW 

The Tragedy Of Lyndon Johnson, by Eric Goldman (Alfred A. Knopf, 
New York, N. Y., 1969, 531 pp., $8.95), presents an unbiased account of 
the reasons for the political downfall of former President Lyndon Baines 
Johnson. The book reviewer, Dr. Peter Glick, Jr., is Professor of General 
Studies at Delaware Valley College, Doylestown, Pa. 

Lyndon Baines Johnson emerges from Eric Goldman's The Tragedy Of 
Lyndon Johnson not as a tragic figure but rather as a giant of a man with 
strengths and weaknesses of monumental proportions. The book's value 
rests on its historian-author's attempt at objectivity. Continually temper- 
ing his personal observations with the opinions and quotations of others, 
Professor Goldman succeeds in presenting an exciting and relatively 
impartial appraisal of our thirty-sixth President. 

Obviously disillusioned with his position as "Intellectual-In-Residence" 
at the White House and with the President's Viet Nam policy (Mrs. 
Lyndon Johnson said in mid-1965, "I just hope that foreign problems do 
not keep mounting. They do not represent Lyndon's kind of Presidency" ) 
the author withdrew from the Johnson administration in September, 1966 
to rejoin the Princeton University faculty and to complete this book. 
Other historians have written about other Presidents, but very few of 
them have contributed as much to our understanding of the Presidency, 
its pressures, its operation, its subtle traps. Perhaps some historians will 
learn from Dr. Goldman's approach and attempt their own biographies of 
Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and, later on, Nixon. One wonders if 
these Presidents, exposed to the same probing analysis, will fare as well 
as did Lyndon Johnson. 

The descriptions about the relationships between Johnson, his wife 
and his subordinates provide fresh insights into the character of the 
former President. He demanded absolute lovaltv and dedication from 
everyone who worked for him. Continually stirring up competition among 
his aides, he would favor one for a time and then, without apparent 
cause would switch his attention and the semblance of power to another. 
This type of inconsistency was compatible with his volatile nature that 
moved from bouncy confidence to anger or to moody silence. His chief 
aide, Walter Jenkins, cracked under the strain and Jenkins' successor, 
Bill Moyers, resorted to every means, even dishonesty, to retain his lofty 
position in the White House hierarchy. The author demonstrated that 
there was little fun in working as a White House staff member during 
the Johnson administration and that the undercurrent of fear and intrigue 
and overwork forced many appointees to leave their posts before January, 
1969. Yet, President Johnson discussed almost everything openly with 
his wife and he respected her opinion on everything. She seldom argued 
with him or took a firm stand and, as she once said, explaining her ap- 
proach to her husband, "I infiltrate." Raised in the rough and tumble of 
Texas and national politics, President Johnson rated loyalty as the highest 
virtue and Mrs. Johnson was really the only person whose loyalty he 
never questioned. 

The book's universality is evidenced by its relevence not only to the 
U. S. Presidency, but also to a wide variety of other top executive posi- 

(Continued on page 8) 



The Coming Friday Nights 

by SOL CAVINESS 

The Entertainment Committee of DVC is relieving "Friday Nite 
Boredom" by having Mixers scheduled on every available Friday until 
school tenninates in May. So your Friday Nite Calendar should now 
read: 

March 21 Mixer 

March 28 Vacation 

April 11 Mixer 

April 18 Mixer 

April 25 Mixer 

May 2 Preparation for "A" Day 

May 9 Mixer (presented by the Contemporary Club) 

We are getting quite a reputation for having good Mixers. Because 

of this you will see an increase in the female attendance at the coming 

Friday Nite Jam Sessions. So come do your thing, regardless of what 

it is! 



PMAI 

PSYCHE 





and 



SOUL 



w 



tc« 



$t< 



os* 



to**' 




DID YOU KNOW . ... ? 

that the Animals have broken up and Eric Burdon is going into solo 
singing and acting? His first movie is now under contract. 

that Ed Sullivan wouldn't let the Stones sing "Let's Spend The Night 
Together" on his television show? 

that the Latin Casino will feature Robert Goulet Monday, March 17 
to Thursday, March 27. The 4 Tops will be there Friday, March 28 to 
Sunday, April 6. 

that the music for the movie 'Uptight" was scored by Booker T. Jones 
of Booker T. and the MG's? 

that Ringo, of the Beatles, is moving out of his Surry home, and if 
you are interested in buying it you can for $150,000. 

that the Rolling Stones are planning to do a one-month tour of the 
United States sometime in the very near future? 

that the Brooklyn Bridge has a total of eleven members in their 
group? 

that the Yardbirds don't exist anymore? Instead, they have produced 
one of the most promising groups, the Led Zeplin, including Jimmy 
Page. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE 

DANCE AT 

RIDER COLLEGE 

TRENTON - The big New Jer- 
sey Inter-Collegiate Dance will be 
held this year at Rider College 
Alumni Gym, Trenton, N.J. (Law- 
rence Road, Route #206) on March 
22nd from 8:00 to 12:00 P.M. The 
largest annual dance in the state 
will feature three top bands on the 
East Coast plus other outstanding 
entertainment. 

Students from college campuses 
all over New Jersey, New York and 
Pennsylvania are expected to jam 
this big state social event. Tickets, 
at $1.00 each, will be limited to 
2,000 — first come, first serve basis. 

Ticket orders can be sent to the 
above address. Please make checks 
payable to "New Jersey Inter-Col- 
legiate Committee". Tickets can 
also be purchased at the door if 
anv are still available. 

Proceeds from this famous state 
event this year will go to Multiple 
Sclerosis, the great crippler of 
young people. 



Speak-Up In 
THE FURROW 

Send your Articles, Letters, 

Comments, Etc. 

in care of the Editor, 

JOHN D. MARTIN 

207 Barness 



The Casual Look 

• SPORT COATS 

• AUSTIN HILL SLACKS 

• DEAN SWEATERS 

• SERO SHIRTS 

• DEXTER SHOES 

The Village Gentry 

80 West State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 18901 

(215) 348-4342 



Page Eight 



THE FURROW 



March 21, 1969 





WORLD 



PRISMATIC 
VIEWS 

by JOHN FURPHY 

A. W. O. L ? 

At the present time Sp4 Edwin C. Amett, a GI cook, is on trial for 
desertion. He, like some others, fled to Sweden to get away from what 
he claims is an unjust war. These servicemen are mostly a bunch of kids 
still holding on to their mothers* apron strings. The first time they are 
given an order that displeases them they think they can run away from 
it. Fortuantely their kind is few and far between. We would be in a sorry 
shape if everyone could have his own way and do what he wants to do. 

Many eyes are watching the outcome of this trial. If Arnett does not 
receive the maximum punishment it could set off a chain reaction among 
servicemen and it will be very disasterous to the Uniform Code of Mili- 
tary Justice. As of the present time Arnett claims himself to be guilty of 
A.W.O.L. (absent without leave). According to the Military Code a 
person absent from his assigned post for over 30 days is to be considered 
a deserter. Yet now, after being in Sweden for almost a year, Arnett still 
does not admit to being a deserter. 

He says that he could not live on the $10 a week provided to him by 
Swedish welfare. Many fellows are attracted to the Scandanavian Coun- 
tries because of the supposedly — 'FREE LOVE". I doubt very much 
that you could call it FREE. I believe the reason Arnett returned was 
because he found out, like I did, that there is no other country in the 
world like the United States. In fact many of the so-called Poor-People 
here, who may have no money for food but always manage to have 
enough to buy cars, cigarettes and booze, would be considered very 
rich in many parts of the world. 

Arnett must be made an example of in order to keep discipline in the 
military, for without discipline chaos would prevail. 



ADVERTISING DOESN'T COST 

. . . IT PAYS . . . 
ADVERTISE IN THE FURROW 



BOSTON SHOE STORE 

12 South Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

LATEST STYLES IN 

FOOTWEAR FOR 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. State Street 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• Custom Made Jewelry 
A Specialty 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

348-4675 Doylestown, Pa. 



• CAMERAS 
• FILM 

• PROCESSING 

• ACCESSORIES 

MILTON RUTHERFORD 

23 West State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

RENTALS and REPAIRS 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES - FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 




Mixers are getting better all the time and there's more of them. 
D.V.C. is the Friday night place to be. 



BOOK REVIEW 



(Continued from page 7) 



tions. Many of the character traits of Lyndon Johnson are found in execu- 
tives who nave struggled to the heights in their own fields: a gregarious 
nature; driving ambition; devotion to hard work; exceptional ability; 
thirst for power; and a huge ego. President Johnson possessed all of these 
traits and, unlike many top executives, he was also "at the head of the 
class in intellectual ability". What got him into political trouble was not 
only the Viet Nam War, but was also his inability to sublimate his own 
ego to the point where he could gain the confidence, respect and affection 
of the American people by means of honest communication. Although he 
was a superb politician, he was not a warm, affable person who was , 
capable of easily winning friends and supporters. His political and legisla- 
tive victories, with the possible exception of the 1964 Presidential election, 
were earned through superhuman effort that would have destroyed a 
weaker man. He could not understand why people did not like him, and 
most Americans undoubtedly agreed with the honest, old Washington 
character who told him bluntly during the 1964 campaign, "... Mr. 
President, you are not a very likeable man." Always remembering his 
relatively humble background and the low status of his education at 
Southwest Texas State Teachers College, he felt uneasy with the graduates 
of Ivy League colleges and with intellectuals in general. His feeling of 
insecurity often made him belligerent, and he especially disliked the 
Kennedys who, to him, were symbols of that element of American society. 
Of Bobby Kennedy he said, "The upstart's come up too fast. He skipped 
the grades where you learn the rules of life. He never liked me and that's 
nothing compared to what I think of him." 

In spite of his failure to develop rapport with the American people, 
President Johnson did wheel and deal through Congress almost every 
piece of legislation that he and the public wanted. His unparalleled 
knowledge of Congress and its inner workings gleaned through his years 
as a Congressman and as minority and majority leader of the Senate, 
helped to make him one of the most effective Chief Legislators in all of 
American Presidential history. The Great Society Program, including the 
Civil Rights legislation, stands as a living record of his contribution to 
human progress. The author intimates that Lyndon Johnson also achieved 
his goal of unifying the nation by forcing the South back into the main- 
stream of American life. To explain his personal views of the Presidency, 
Lyndon Johnson frequently told his listeners that, "An old man on the 
Hill said to me a long time ago that there are administrations that do 

(Continued on page 9) 



KERSHNERS 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 

I 



W. J. NYCE'S 
SHOE STORE 

'The Home of Nice Footwear' 

LOW DOWN ON 
LATEST STYLES 

West and State St. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



March 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Nine 



f. 




Mill 



and 




INC. 



Fretz slacks sold Coast to 
Coast by leading Depart- 
ment Stores and specialty 
shops. Priced in our retail 
store to fit the college man's 
budget. Select from the 
largest slack inventory in 
Pennsylvania! 



THE 



You con also choose from 
famous nationally adver- 
tised brands of sport shirts, 
dress shirts, knit shirts and 
sweaters at unbelievably 
low prices. - - - These are 
salesman's sample lines and 
in mostly medium sizes. 

Shop FRETZ 

Retail Store 

( 

and SAVE! 



GHERKIN 



AWARD 



FRETZ STORE 

52 E. Oakland Ave. 

Doylestown, Pa. 




There were no presentations of this coveted award in the last issue 
but we have tried to make up for that by this large scale Gherkin give- 
away- The men listed below nave shown through their actions that they 
have reached that point in their College life when it is time to stand 
among those many other gallant souls who have received the pickle. 

( 1 ) Fred C. Harteis, President of the Sophomore Class. Certain mem- 
bers of his class strongly suggest to The Furrow that Fred be 
awarded the Gherkin for what they termed his 'railroad job' meet- 
ings. Too bad Fred! Guess you can't please everybody. 

(2) Quentin Schleider and other occupants of Cooke Hall. Quentin and 
a few other gallant men of Cooke truly welcomed the girls to their 
dorm this Spring Weekend by removing every lightbulb from every 
light socket in their rooms. Nothing like revenge! 

(3) John N. Nice, Treasurer of the Student Government. Mr. Nice 
missed three SG meetings in a row. His excuses for not attending 
the meetings are somewhat vague. Above and beyond that, there 
are certain clubs on campus that have waited months to receive 
monies for work rendered at this year's mixers. For falling asleep 
at the throttle John gets a 'Green One'. 

(4) Arnie Kolman. At the recent Junior Class Variety Show one of the 
most tasteless and crude offerings was performed by Mr. Kolman. 
The piece which Arnie tried to sing was entitled 'Plastic Jesus.' 

RETRACTION 

An honest mistake brought to our attention has caused us to reconsider 
Stan Sitarski as a Gherkin Award Candidate. We have decided that we 
may have been unfair to Mr. Sitarski and therefore retract our award. 

CHANGE MACHINE 
STOLEN 

March 15, 1969 — It was discover- 
ed today that the Dollar Change 
Machine located in The Levin Din- 
ing Hall had been stolen, probably 
during the previous night or in the 
morning hours. The machine was 
apparently removed by use of a 
hand dolly which was stored in the 
building. The culprits smashed the 
machine, removing its contents of 
about $160 and fled, leaving the 
twisted metal hulk in a wooded 
area behind the dining hall. The 
incident is presently being investi- 
gated by state and local authorities. 




W^ 1 



l. 

2. 
3. 

4. 

.5. 



G. 



TRIVIA 

Who sings the theme song to "Rawhide?" 
Who started "The Original Amateur Hour?" 
What was the famous gunfighter Doc Holi- 
day a doctor of? 
What is Minnesota Fats' real name? 
In many of the Sherlock Holmes movies the 
famous detective was played hy Basil Rath- 
hone. Who played Dr. Watson? 
Who starred in the Western TV series 
"Sugarfoot?" 



ANSWERS 

s«!ipl n H 1I!A\ 
.iituy i.»ai\ 

.>UOJ.>piU! \\ J,»}|V\\ l((l|(>pil}{ 
AJ)V1)U.>(] JO JOpOQ 

uv.»n puojO[) 

STUDENT 
ELECTION 

SCHEDULE 

******** 

CLASS ELECTIONS 
April 11th 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECHES 

April 16th 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 

April 25th 

GET OUT and VOTE 

WHEN PATRONIZING 

OUR ADVERTISERS 

please mention 

THE FURROW 



9 
£ 

C 
Z 
I 



— NOTICE — 

Articles, Letters, Comments, Etc. 

concerning The Furrow or the 

College should be submitted 

to the Editor, 

JOHN D. MARTIN 

207 Barness 



11 



The Best 
at 



Its Best" 



EDS 
DINER 



Franklin and State Sts 
Doylestown, Pa 



CHESTNUT HILL— 

(Continued from oage 7) 

Meeting or Mis-Meeting?" A sym- 
posium, "The Artist In Our Soci- 
ety" will include an art critic, 
Gerd Utescher, artist, and Diane 
Vanderlip, art collector. Gruppe 
Motion/ Berlin, an exciting German 
troupe, is coining directly from 
New York to perform at the festi- 
val. Art exhibits during the week 
will feature Bob McGovern of the 
Philadelphia College of Art, Russ 
Thompson, The Print Club, and 
student artists. 

All Festival events, most of which 
are free, will take place on cam- 
pus. Frances Heitzman and Lor- 
etta Cooper, co-chairmen of the 
Festival, and both seniors at Chest- 
nut Hill, have arranged the events 
for all those interested in the arts, 
in education, and in the social 
problems of our times. For details, 
call Arts Festival CH 7-2173 or CH 
7-4210. 



BOOK REVIEW 

(Continued from page 8) 

and some that don't. This one is gonna do." He was always concerned 
with his place in history and he made it quite clear that he wanted to be 
remembered as a President who accomplished what he set out to do. 

In the final chapter of the book, Professor Goldman summarized his 
own opinion of a selection of President Johnson's most inspiring speeches 
and, thereby, of Johnson, by writing: "History has been generous, and it 
should be, to Presidents who have talked like that and taken action to 
turn the talk into laws. Probably history will be generous — and it should 
be — to Lyndon Johnson." Although he didn't say so in his book, Dr. Gold- 
man would probably rate President Johnson as one of our "great" or 
"near great" Presidents. For, Goldman pointed out that Jefferson and 
Jackson and Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roose- 
velt were vilified during their administrations. And that Wilson and 
Truman were abused and rejected not only by the people but also by 
their own political parties during the latter part of their administrations. 
And that scholars and scholar-historians now rate all of these former 
Presidents as either "great" or "near great". If Goldman and these experts 
are right, isn't it reasonable to assume that Lyndon Baines Johnson will 
be rated by future historians equal or above most of these famous Presi- 
dents? Dr. Goldman seems to agree; and I imagine that the readers of 
this book, who recognize that Presidents — even those with strengths and 
weaknesses of monumental proportions like Lyndon Baines Johnson — 
are only human beings, will agree also. 



Page Ten 



THE FURROW 



March 21, 1969 




WINTER 

SPORTS 

1969 



In The 



sport lite 



TIM 

HUMAN 



Happily, the basketball and wrestling squads ended in tournaments. 
Unfortunately, neither team could make it through to the finals. But all in 
all, it was a fine season for both as Coach Silan's Hoopsters went 13-9, 
finishing third in the Northern Division, and Coach Steiler's Grapplers 
were 8-1 in his first coaching effort at DVC. 

The basketball team rebounded from a last-second loss at Muhlenberg 
to whip Drew, 105-73. At the playoffs in Albright they met second-place 
Scranton in a rematch of Feb. 11 when they lost to the Royals 72-66 in 
Scranton. The Aggies led 35-31 at the half as Bob McEntee bombed 
away for 13 tallies. But Scranton's defense collapsed around Mac and 
Don Sechler, taking away DelVal's 1-2 punch, and won going away by a 
74-63 count. The Royals sophomore guard-forward Gene Mumford was 
outstanding as he scored 39 points, got 13 rebounds and passed off for 
7 assists. McEntee wound up with 19 points followed by Seck's 14 and 
Ralph White's 12. Scranton went on to defeat Juniata in the finals. 

Don Sechler had another superb season. He led the team in every 
offensive category except assists, breaking the records for field goals 
scored, free throws made, rebounds, and points scored. He led the M-A-C 
in rebounds and was third in scoring. Last week he was selected to the 
E-C-A-C Division III Team for the Season, as well as numerous All- 
Opponent Squads. 

Three outstanding careers ended at Albright as seniors Mars Seiferth, 
Bill Eisel, and Captain Ken Schoenberg played their final game. Mo led 
the team in assists for two years and has been one of the finest plavmakers 

(Continued on page 11) 






McEntee is in the heat of the action as Del Val tries its best to topple 
Scranton as Aggie spectators spur the team on. The team kept their 
spirit and determination even to the final seconds of the game. 



Chamberlain goes for the pin. It's clear to see why Ev has his 

10-1 record. 



March 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Eleven 



IN THE SPORT LITE 

(Continued from page 10) 

in DVC history. "Bones" bowed out u one of four players to score more 
than a thousand points in his career and set numerous free-throw standards 
which will be tought to beat. He led the team in rebounds his first two 
years and shared the leadership with Sechler last season. And Ken 
Schoenberg had his finest season both on and off the court; his hustle 
and clutch baskets enabled him to become a starter. 

Named by Coach Stan to DVC's All-Opponent team were Guards John 
Scholl of Albright, Ned Rahn, Muhlenberg, and Ron Coley, Drexel. The 
forwards were Millersville's "Butch" Cleaver and of course Gene Mum- 
ford, Scranton. And at center is Lycoming's Tom Henderson. 

The wrestlers had their ups and downs, barely losing to Lycoming. 
15-12, who defeated Wilkes. But then they travelled to the Colonels' den 
and got clobbered by the number five team in the country, 42-0. 

In the tournament at Muhlenberg, Steve Burnett ( 145) made it to the 
finals before bowing to Dennis Verzera of Wilkes. Stan Lapetz (130) 
lost a heartbreaker in the semis, a 2-1 overtime decision. And Captain 
Everett Chamberlain (177) was eliminated in the semis when his op- 
ponent, last year's champion of his class, scored with ten seconds to go 
in the bout and won, 5-4. Chamberlain, certainly one of the finest wrest- 
lers in the M-A-C, ended his season with a 10-1 mark and his career with 
a gaudy 26-4 dual meet log. 

The Aggies, by the way, finished seventh as a team in the competi- 
tion which includes the University Division as well. Wilkes regain then- 
team title. 

And so the winter sports scene ends, but with the hope of even better 
results next year. 




Ralph White attempts to shoot hut the strong Muhlenberg team is 
just as determined to block it. Muhlenberg captured a win in the 
final seconds of the game. 

JUNIOR VARSITY SCORING 
Won 3 - Lost 9 





G Pts. 


Ave, 




G 


Pts. 


Ave. 


Gary Kardos 


12 172 


14.3 


Mike Clark 


4 


21 


5.2 


Lou Varga 


11 163 


14.8 


Bill Wentworth 


8 


20 


2.5 


Frank Speziali 


12 148 


12.3 


Barry Thomas 


10 


11 


1.1 


Dan Guers 


11 134 


12.2 


Jim Williamson .... 


2 


4 


2.0 


Charlie Smith 


11 81 


7.4 


Bill Devlin 


1 


4 


4.0 


Frank Arcade 


9 74 


8.2 


John Schwartz 


1 





0.0 


Roger Good 


10 23 
High Game 


2.3 
28, Vi 


»rga vs Muhlenberg 










Heiser throws on legs, applies a tight cross-face and with the help 
of a tight gut wrench — ZAP — down goes his man. 



WRESTLING RESULTS 



123 
130 
137 
145 
152 



Lanny Lewis, 3-6 
Stan Lapetz, 8-3-1 
Jim Schlener, 3-5 
Steve Burnett, 9-2 
Wes McCoy, 6-5 



160 - Brian Kauchcr, 5-3 
167 - Harry Heiser, 6-5 
177 - Ev Chamberlain, 10-1 
191 — Jasper Meadows, 4-3-1 
Hvy - Bill Thome, 6-4-1 



Dual Meets - Won 8, Lost 4 




Jake Golley holds a young Aggie rooter on the large foam rubber 
ball representing the spirit of the "Green and Gold." This picture 
was taken at the recent play-off game at Albright. We let Scranton 
know we were there not only by our teams determined playing on 
the court but also by the hundreds of dedicated students and faculty 
who displayed our school's dauntless spirit. 



DEAN'S LIST — (Continued from page two) 



Fennikoh, Frederick W. 
Feparelli, Kathleen M. 
Hart, Allan N. 
Hider, Richard H. 
Hubbard, John W. 
Kater, Janet 
Lewis, Dennis A. 
Lyczak, Stephen J. 
Mann, H. Curtis 
Martin, John D. 
Monfardini, Joseph (4.00) 
Mowrer, R. Terry 
Rayner, David 
Rightler, William D. 
Roux, Kenneth H. 
Schlieder, Quentin 
Sillivan, Jr. Donald R. 



Snively, Jr. Donald 
Timko, Ronald R. 
Uebersax, Mark A. 
Zimmerman, Jr. Harry K. 

Class of 1971 

Beers, William F. 
Bryant, William R. 
Chance, Donald 
Dalrymple, Robert W. 
Fox, Harold 
Fraccaroli, James R. 
Gerberich, Francis (4.00) 
Grunow, Jr. Ernest P. 
Mogel, Norman L. 
Rice, Brian 
Rose, Dennis L. 



Rutherford, Jr. James J. 
Sheaffer, Craig 
Stierly, Jr. Alfred W. 
Thomas, James C. 
Young, Charles 
Young, Roger A. 
Brenneman, J. Roy (4.00) 
Readinger, Jr. Daniel S. 

Class of 1972 

Angstadt, Russell 
Bosenberg, Robert H. 
DeSimone, Dennis N. 
Detrick, Elmer L. 
Eisenhart, Larry 
Funkhouser, Raymond C. 
Howard, Stephen J. (4.00) 
Jones, Delbert E. 



Keesler, Michael A. 
Kravetsky, Nicholas 
Lehman, Richard P. 
Lewis, Lanny R. 
McLean, William 
Myers, Ronald L. 
Neilson, William A. 
Newcomer, Paul C. 
Pendracky, Leon J. 
Porcaro, Richard J. 
Pramick, Michael 
Schlegel, Gerald 
Schuler, Jon D. 
Strunk, Larry P. 
Tourtellott, Glenn S. 
Webb, Kevin R. 
Zielinski, John M. 
Znck, Raymond W. 



Page Twelve THE FURROW 

FINAL BASKETBALL STATISTICS 

Player G. Fg. Fga. Pet. Ft. 

DON SECHLER 22 181 362 .50 106 

BOB McENTEE 22 152 365 .42 59 

RALPH WHITE 22 82 196 .42 29 

BILL EISEL 22 70 158 .44 35 

KEN SCHOEMBERG 21 68 148 .46 11 

MARS SEIFERTH 22 45 103 .44 39 

GARY SCHADE 21 31 61 .51 17 

GREG TEEPLE 19 21 59 .36 20 

KEN CHUBB 16 17 51 .33 1 

DAN GEURS 11 12 16 .75 2 

DAN DOUGHERTY 13 6 21 .29 3 

FRANK SPEZIALI 7 1 3 .33 2 

TOTALS 22 686 1543 .44 324 

OPPONENTS 22 — — — — 



March 21, 1969 



Fta. 

137 

96 

54 

46 

16 

57 

24 

27 

8 

3 

4 

3 



Pet. 

.77 

.62 
.54 
.76 
.69 
.68 
.71 
.74 
.13 
.67 
.75 
.67 



R. 

364 

91 

135 

144 

113 

63 

31 

40 

22 

6 

29 

5 



A. 

32 

69 

56 

18 

18 

89 

33 

11 

5 

3 

7 

2 



Pts. 

468 

353 

193 

175 

147 

129 

79 

62 

36 

26 

15 

4 



Ave. 

21.3 

16.1 
8.8 
7.9 
7.0 
5.9 
3.8 
3.3 
2.2 
2.4 
1.2 
0.6 



475 



.68 



1109 343 
953 — 



1696 
1512 



77.1 
68.7 



PORSHE 

VOLKSWAGEN »nd other selected 
foreign cart. 

Rick & Harrys 
Service 

Factory Trained Mechanics 



PARTS 
SERVICE 



345-9990 

490 E. Butler Ave. 

New Britain, Pa. 



J. CARROLL M0LL0Y 

REALTOR - INSURANCE 

30 S. Main St. 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-3558 



ADVERTISING DOESN'T COST 
. . . IT PAYS . . . 

Advertise In THE FURROW 



AGRONOMY CLUB 

EASTER PLANT SALE 

Easter Lilies $3.25 

(5-6 Bloom) 

Hyacinths $2.50 

(Pink, Blue, White) 

$1.00 DEPOSIT 
REQUIRED 

Order in the Dining Hall 
Before March 24th 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES -FRI 9-7 - SAT. 9-4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes 

RAZOR CUTTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

Samuel Moyer 

Matter Barber 



VISTA 



MIMItl 



TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

6 E. STATE STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

348-4700 345-6776 



NEXT 

FURROW 

DEADLINE 

MARCH 24th 

for 
(ELECTION ISSUE) 




Non-Profit Organization 

U S POST ACE 

PAID 

Permit No 184 
DOYLESTOWN. PA 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



special ELECTION 



SSUE 



STUDENT 

ELECTION 

SCHEDULE 

CLASS ELECTION 

SPEECHES 

April 9th 

CLASS ELECTIONS 
April 11th 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

PRESIDENTIAL SPEECHES 

April 16th 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 

April 25th 

The Furrow urges all responsible stu- 
dents to examine the candidates' plat- 
forms, to sup})ort those uhieh you 
feel will do the best job for you, the 
class, and the college and most im- 
portant of all to vote. Thit is your 
(hauce to shape the class government 
structure you wont. Mak< the best of 
it. Vote and he counted. 



CAR RALLY 

A 

SMASH 

The second annual Circle K car 
rally proved to he another smash- 
ing success in more than one way. 
Fortunately it was only a V.W. fen- 
der and no one was injured. Thirty- 
three ears entered the rally and 
eighteen finished, which was a re- 
markable improvement over last 
year when only seven of thirty- 
three cars crossed the miracle 
mark. The drivers of those cars 
that did finish, and even those that 
did not. deserve a lot of credit for 
showing real determination and 
sportsmanship. Most important, 
everyone had a lot of fun while rid- 
ing through other counties in Penn- 
sylvania. These unfortunate people 
were among those that didn't finish. 

Perhaps the most amusing part 
of the rally was that amazing fresh- 
man team in the gold Dodge 
Charger that made a right turn at 
the end of the school driveway 
after over twenty cars before them 
had turned left. Fortunately they 
re-gained their sense of direction, 
only to get lost again at the second 
clue. Then there was the white 
V.W. that had almost the exact 
mileage but never found the sec- 
ond clue. One could write a book 
on the events of that Saturday aft- 
ernoon. Better yet, if one had only 
installed a tape recorder in one of 
the cars that got lost at the second 
or third clue .... On second 
thought, maybe that's not such a 
good idea. 

Win or lose, the car rallv was a 
unique experience for those who 
dared to enter it. The Circle K 
Club would like to thank all those 
who entered the rally for their co- 
operation and support. We are 
looking forward to seeing you 
again next year. 



the Currow 



Vol. 15, No. 11 DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE of Science and Agriculture 



April 8, 1969 




The present Student C.oiernment has often been attacked and on occasion justly. Yet if we look closely at our Student 
Government it is obvious that some very im)>ortant and unorthodox leuislatioti has been passed throtigh their efforts. The 
up-dated ('.rooming Code,, better and more frequent Mixers, the establishment of the security and open-door committees, 
etc. are among their accomplishments. 



Hart's Woods 
Spared 

by David E. Benner 
Instructor Orn. Wort. Dept. 

After much controversy, this al- 
most virgin 22 acre woods will 
stand where it is for posterity to 
enjoy. The District Engineers of 
the State Highway Department 
have finally agreed to move the in- 
terchange which would have de- 
stroyed the hest part of this fine 
old woodland. 

A special note of thanks is due 
to Robert Hess, who made the in- 
itial contact with KYW-TV station 
re: Hart's Woods. This resulted in 
two excellent T. V. editorials on 
Television by Trudy Haynes. Also, 
I wish to thank the Orn. Hort. Jun- 
iors and Seniors who wrote to Sec- 
retarv Hartlett and anyone else at 
D.V.C. who may have written. 



S. G. PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES IN 

by Larry \f artel 
One thing about this college that receives its share of criticism from 
the students is the Student Government. Two candidates arc willing to 
do something about that situation. Gery Fisher and Bob Winner are 
running for class representative offices and, if elected, they will then 
proceed to run for President of Student Government. The views of the 
two candidates are: 

VIEWS ON STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
Gery Fisher — 

1. A committee of outside student advisors to help the Student Gov- 
ernment should be formed. 

2. Enlarge the S. G. by one person per class because of college's 
growth. 

3. Do work in a certain length of time. 

4. Print a complete summary of meetings even week. 

5. Form a committee to investigate the costs of dorm damage to find 
if they are too high. 

6. More communication with other colleges. 

7. Articles in the newspaper. 

8. Longer meetings to discuss everything fulls. 

9. Have a more active vice president. 

10. Allow clubs to take over more money-making affairs. 

11. Should have a president that is not afraid to back down. 

12. Should have a new faculty advisor each year. 

13. Bring talk out of dorm rooms to the meetings. 

(Continued on page 2) 



mm 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 




Jke *Juztow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

devoted to the interest of the 
students of Delaware Valley College 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR John Martin 

FEATURES EDITOR Rob Edwards 

INFORMATION SERVICES H.rv.y Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Tim Barman 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Mike Morgan 

ASSISTANTS Dava Vora, Bob Krach, Stava Lyciak 

ART EDITOR Bill Stafanowici 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR La* Strataburgar 

BUSINESS MANAGER Pat* Higgins 

TYPING MANAGER Dalbart Jona* 

-GENERAL ST AFF - 
Sol Cavinaa, John Furphy, Carl Pfitianmayar, Bill Stroda, Milton Parkar, Bob Parry, 

Larry Martal. 
- ADVISO R S- 

Joieph E. Mealy, Allan C. Hartlay 

Dr. John Marti 

Jamat A. O'Reilly 

SPECIAL CONSULTANT Dr. Gaorga Kayi 

The Furrow is published twice a month by the above concerned students of 
Delaware Valley College. It should be noted that the opinions expressed in 
this newspaper are those of the respective authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the college. 



ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISORS 
FACULTY ADVISOR 
SPECIAL ART ADVISOR 



FURROW POLITICAL POSITION 

The Furrow has chosen to remain neutral with respect to the 
1969 Class Elections. However at times it may seem that all major 
candidates are not given equal time in each issue. The Furrow does 
not control the subject matter of its writers and we can only print 
that which we receive. If you feel that the candidate of your choice 
is not receiving equal treatment, we urge you to submit your views 
on his behalf. The Furrow itself will remain unbiased. 



VIEWS ON STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

(Continued from front page) 

Bob Winner — 

1. A closely knitted S. G., with a close relationship among the members 

2. President should be a strong individual. 

3. Form a new poll committee. 

4. Should have a closer connection with the student body. 

5. Should have class meetings periodically where S. G. representatives 
can be asked questions. 

6. A weekly carnpii should be printed. 

7. Make the S. G. the same level as the Administration. 

8. Should work closer with the clubs. 

9. Should have a more active vice persident, who should meet with 
the Administration along with the President. 

10. Build a better image in the eyes of the students, through better 
communication by way of the Furrow — a President's column and 
a Secretary's column. 

FURROW EDITORIAL 

In recent weeks complaints concerning College policies with respect 
to sign erection have come to our attention. This paper can only agree 
with those dissatisfied students who feel our campus is being "junked up" 
by this apparent wholesale use of signs. It seems that these signs (they 
appear to increase every day) are being erected with no thought given 
with regard to their detractive effect on the surrounding landscape. Big 
ugly metal signs one after the other on big ugly metal posts are stuck all 
over lawns and among plantings and they are supplimented by ugly little 
wooden signs. 

A sign or two here and there, if carefully placed and of pleasing 
design, can be expected. But. as with anything else, you can go too far. 
It is our contention that the majority of these signs are not really neces- 
sary, are redundant, and are a detraction from our campus' beauty. We 
urge that the College reevaluate the need for erection of so many un- 
attractive signs. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Dwight D. Eisenhower 

34th President of the United States 



* 



From S. C. 
Secretary 



ROBERT WINNER 







. 


% 



At the last Student Government meeting several students questioned 
the existing Citizenship grading system in that a 3.0 Citizenship grade 
is necessary to qualify for the Dean's List. As stated in the College Hand- 
book: "The citizenship grade is derived from four equally weighed com- 
ponents: attendance, professor's rating. Dean's grade, and extra curricular 
rating . . . Each unexcused absence will result in the loss of .25 in the 
attendance component. The professors' rating is based upon the citizen- 
ship grade submitted by each of the students' professors and supposedly 
. . . reflects their estimate of the student's effort and attitude in their 
course during that particular semester. The Dean's grade is made up by 
the Dean and Assistant Deans of students from information available to 
them concerning the integrity and attitude of each student. The extra 
curricular rating is bated upon demonstrated leadership, participation, 
and interest in the extra curricular activities of the College. . . . Students 
not participating in extra-curricular activities are rated at the minimum 
satisfactory rating of 1.0 in this component and others receive ratings up 
to 4.0. Any student with a citizenship grade below 1.0 is automatically 
placed upon citizenship probation. Students in this status loose certain 
privileges and their stancfing in the student body is jeoparized." 

A lengthly discussion followed the question posed by the students at 
the meeting and the following questions are some of those that were 
discussed: 

1. Is the system fair? 

2. Is the College too big for this type of system? 

3. Can the Dean and most professors truly evaluate each student? 

4. Why do unexcused cuts under the limit count against a student's 
citizenship grade? 

5. How can the Dean know and properly evaluate off-campus ac- 
tivities? 

6. Why doesn't a student know his final citizenship grade when he 
gets his other grades? 

7. How can class advisers grade students when they have such little 
contact with the students? 

8. Are the present standards too high? 

The advantages of the system are that a professor can grade a stu- 
dent's personality without lowering the student's academic grade, and 
it is often useful when applying for a job, providing the student has a 
high citizenship rating. 

The cjuestion arises, however, whether or not the system is really 
worthwhile and whether its assets outweigh its disadvantages? Many 
students believe they do not. Since the meeting I have heard many dis- 
cussions in opposition to the system. Many people believe that it is not 
fair and that it is not necessarily just a concern of students who qualify 
academically for the Dean's List. It could also jeopardize a student in 
applying for a job, especially if the rating is not very high. It has also 
been pointed out that some professors do not take the citizenship rating 
seriously in that they do not conscientiously evaluate each student. 

Several suggestions have been offered since the meeting that definitely 
should be considered in the evaluation of the citizenship rating system. 
One improvement would be to include a separate sheet with the class 
cards which would inform the student of his rating along with a break- 
down of each area in which the student is evaluated and the rating that 
he received in those areas so he could defend his position if he felt he 
had not been graded fairly. Another is the possibility of each student 
filling out a form describing his activities after each semester. 

The Student Government voted at that meeting to recommend to the 
Administration that an evaluation of the complete system be held and 
appropriate changes made. 

I do think the general consensus of opinion is that the system is in- 
adequate and that it should be either done away with completely or at 
least have its standards lowered. If you have any definite ideas or feel- 
ings concerning this or any other issue, relate them to your Student Gov- 
ernment Representative so he can convey them to the whole Student 
Government for consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert Winner, Secretary 
Student Government 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Letters to the Editor 

POLITICS BLAMED FOR POOL 
ROOM LAXITIES 

Dear Sirs: 

Robert Winner is responsible for the care and maintenance of the pool room in 
Dorm II. It is obvious .that he lias not been closing the room at 11:00 P.M., Un- 
specified time. In fact the room has often been open past midnight Also the equip- 
ment has been abused without appropriate action. He only mentioned at the last 
Student Government meeting that the pool room will Ik 1 closed if damage continues 
to occur. It is my feeling that this action should have been taken long ago in an 
attempt to curb the misuse of equipment. 

As for the late closing hour, several individuals have offered the explanation that 
since Mr. Saner has moved he cannot see when the room is left open late, so Mr. 
Winner leaves it open. It is my feeling that the reason is a political one since it would 
Ik- advantageous for a candidate for Student Government President to leave the pool 
room open late and not loose favor with the pool room crowd. This also might be 
the reason for the lack of action in response to damage in the pw>l room. 

Sincerely, 

Gary Christenseii 

FURROW ETHICS ATTACKED 

To whom it may concern (Editorial staff, General staff, Advisors): 

Regarding the last Furrow (3/21/69): 

It has come to my attention that there is a definite lack in the putative 
ability of which the Furrow should be concerned! Therefore, it is only 
in a vituperative sense that I write this letter. 

Was it due to a lack of space in the last Furrow (Twelve pages, 12) 
or a lack in quality reporting that the names of first prize takers in the 
Car Rally, Peter Cecchini and William Mehl, were excluded? I would 
have been very willing to replace my "Quality Footwear" ad. (Pg. 4) 
with a picture of their winning auto. Of course the photograph of the 
"gazebo" (Pg. 5) by the banks of Lake Archer deserved its unveiling 
in the volume. Furthermore, I believe your picture on "bed making" 
(Pg. 6) should be one of a series of pictures in sequence in order that 
we. readers learn the proper deftness of the art. Before I forget, allow 
me to express my "compliments" on your allowing the athletics photo- 
graphs to consume only % of the paper instead of the usual %. Certainly 
even you know every chaotic reaction seeks a final state of equilibrium. 
Dr. Feldstein does have an explosively gigantic house (front pg.). Oh 
yes, that Sycamore has lovely branches; they must make a fine haven for 
birds. 

You know, I often wondered what Bob Winner looks like!! (Pg. 2). 
There's one thing I can say for the Furrow, it puts in a good day's work 
... in a week. Generous Nature has provided the Furrow with a big 
cushion to sit around on. I have diagnosed your case as one of lazyosis, 
in an advanced stage of idleingytis, with acute symptoms of worka- 
phobia, and fearemia of activity. Now that we can grow mustaches, and 
as a result of publication inactivity it is probably too much of an effort 
for the editor to make coffee. Its a bet he puts coffeebeans in his stash 
and sips hot water. 

Of more importance to me in particular, is the consideration of those 
unsung heroes who made this year's most vivacious, exuberant and cer- 
tainly refreshing event possible. Allow me to expound on the Furrow's 
enervation in this regard. On March 8th, Delaware Valley College wit- 
nessed a happening; a first; an evening embellished with living enter- 
tainment. Aside from the Furrow's sardonic notation of Mr. Kolman's 
presentation and in particular a concise note from Miss Gloria Fernandez, 
who is not associated with Delaware Valley College or the Furrow except 
for an expected matrimony with Mr. Lee Strassburger, our Furrow 
Publication Staff contributed nothing, not even a tiny photograph of the 
happening. And, I might add, photographs were available. The point of 
the Junior Class' Variety Show's success cannot be underestimated. The 
cast to this day receives compliments continuously. The laxity that the 
Furrow dabbles in, as if caught in a mire of callow placidity, will never 
be forgotten. I can only express a change in the lines of amelioration. 

While on the subject of "publication ethics" as used by the Furrow, 
I personally thought the letter, "That One For The Mixer", (Pg. 2), to 
be in poor taste almost to the point of being a pathetic remiss of sagacity 
or tact. The Furrow has a funny knack of purporting their authority and 
majesty via a vacancy of diplomacy. 

I remain concerned!! 
Mr. Ralph Spanish 
RASP 



PUBLICATIONS ADVISOR 
COMMENTS ON CHARGES 

Dear Mr. Spanish, 

Having translated your verbose remarks (where they are translatable, 
e.g., the word "putative" makes no sense as you use it) and being closely 
associated with student publications, I feel that your letter demands some 
comment. To a limited extent, I fear I must agree with some of your 
critique. The Furrow is not all that it could be. It does, to be sure, reflect 
a continuing trend of improvement in the caliber of the College news- 
paper. But, like any student publication, the strength of the Furrow must 
rest on one essential ingredient: student participation. On occasion that 
lack of help causes the small, hard-working nucleus of students that 
produces your Furrow no little agony when their product is criticized 
as showing a lack of effort. 

It is not my purose to make excuses for some of the apparent weak- 
nesses of the Furrow. I can only wish to note that those weaknesses can 
only be overcome by greater student interest in your newspaper. It is 
true that there are newsworthy and timely events occuring on campus 
that do not get as much coverage as they deserve. It is true that it would 
be quite desirable to have better lines of communication in several areas. 
With regard to the latter point, it is gratifying to see that the Student 
Government is finally availing itself of the opportunity to use the Furrow 
as a vehicle through which students can learn what is being done to seek 
solutions to problems they most often voice. One hears a great many 
complaints about a variety of problems and most of the complaints are 
directed against the Administration as if the Administration were ignor- 
ing them. More often than not, the problem has been, not a lack of con- 
cern on the part of the Administration so much as a failure of the repre- 
sentatives of the students to communicate to the Student Body what is 
being done to meet their problems. 

I encourage you, Mr. Spanish, and anyone else who is concerned 
enough to care about the quality of our student publications to give us 
a hand. It is one thing to sit back and criticize someone else's efforts. 
It is quite another to lend a hand and help alleviate the problem. We 
hope to have a meeting shortly to develop a staff for next year's Furrow. 
When that meeting is announced, I hope you will mark it on your cal- 
endar. Join in and help us make next year's Furrow even better. 

Sincerely, 

Dr. John C. Mertz 

S.G. SIDEBURN LIMITATIONS 
CALLED TRIVIA 

Dear Editor . . . 

Our "progressive" Student Government has recently made a ruling 
as to the length of side burns. The limit is now to the ear lobe, no further. 
A majority of the representatives obviously voted to shorten the present 
length. Why? These men arc supposed to be representatives of the 
students, not of their personal feelings. Didn't they realize that the great 
majority of students feel that any length that looks good should be per- 
mitted? I don't understand this whole situation because there was no 
problem before and no one looked really bad, except for a few that 
should have been taken care of by the Administration. 

Let's face it, not all person's faces are of the same dimensions. As a 
result, one person's side burns extended to the ear lobe might in effect 
be longer than another person's that are Jj" below the ear lobe. It all 
depends on what fits the individual's face. 

One final comment: Why worry about such trivia? Why worry about 
Vi" of hair on a person's cheek or how much he can have on his face when 
this time could have been put towards worrying more about the welfare 
and the needs of 900 men and D.V.C. — Don Snively 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



L^ompief* Jraitl ^Jlt 



Air Line 

Tickets 



'rranatmenls 



Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 3431223 



J. CARROLL M0LL0Y 

REALTOR - INSURANCE 

30 S. Main St. 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-3558 



TRAUGER'S S£F 

— my shop is your shop — 

L. L. TRAUGER, Proprietor 

24 N. Main Street Doylestown 



ADVERTISING DOESN'T COST 

. . . IT PAYS . . . 

Advertise In THE FURROW 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

QetoUext 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



J 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 



Glee Club 

Releases 

Record Album 

The Glee Club has released its 
new album entitled Christmas Pre- 
lude. The album contains many old 
Christmas favorites and many of 
the more contemporary carols. It 
may be purchased from any glee 
club member. 

The club has been working on 
a new program that will be pre- 
sented to the college on A-aay. 
Some of the numbers included will 
be: "Brothers, Sing On!," "Ghost 
Riders In the Sky," "It's A Big 
Wide Wonderful World," "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic," and "The 
Shadow of Your Smile." 

New officers were also elected 
this month. They are: Ben Harvey, 
President; Richard Serwell, Vice 
President; John Bert, Secretary; 
Bill Hanczar, Treasurer; Joe Ker- 
schner, Librarian, and Arnie Kol- 
man, Furrow Representative. 

The club has also decided to buy 
new blazers. They're going to be 
maroon in color and they will be 
tailored to fit every member of the 
club. It appears that the Delaware 
Valley College Glee Club is going 
to dress in style this year. 



PORSH E 

VOLKSWAGEN •>«' °H»- a*«M 

foreign cart. 

Rick & Harrys 
Service 

Factory Trained Mechanics 
PARTS 

SERVICE 



345-9990 

490 E. Butler Ave. 

New Britain, Pa. 



II 



The Best 
at 



Its Best 



i/ 



ED'S 
DINER 



Franklin and Stale Sis 
Doylestown, Pa 



Animal 
Husbandry Club 

Visits Penn State 

On March 12, the Animal Husbandry 
Club held their regular meeting in Segal 
Hall. After the business meeting, one 
student from the junior class, another in 
the sophomore class, and one in the 
freshmen class each gave a report on our 
trip to Penn State. 

The group of twenty-two students and 
Dr. Pelle left on Friday. March 7, and 
stayed at Penn State for two nights. 
They slept with the students of the Fenn 
State Block and Bridle Club in various 
dorms and fraternities. On Saturday 
inomin gthey began touring the campus, 
starting with the new Animal Science 
building. The group then went to the 
dairy barns, which house 5 different 
breeds, the horse barns, and the Beef 
Research Center. At Etoon. lunch was 
served in the meat lab, which was toured 
following lunch. During the afternoon, 
they visited the Swine center, the deer 
center, and the beef and sheep barn. 
Hereford, Angus, Charolais and Short- 
horn herds are owned by Penn State. 

After the tour, the afternoon was free. 
During that time the Presidents and Ad- 
visors of the Block and Bridle Clubs held 
a meeting where they planned another 
similar event next year, but it was not 
decided where it will be. 

At 6:00, a spaghetti dinner was served 
by the girls of the Fenn State An. Has, 
Club. Saturday night was a time of 
recreation. There was square dancing, 
modern dancing, and games. Sunday 
morning they started home. The trip 
was enjoyable as well as educational. 

Mr. Croushore, a new faculty memlx-r 
of the Animal Husbandry Department, 
was introduced to the club also during 
the meeting. Mr. Croushore told the club 
what he has been doing since he grad- 
uated from Delaware Valley College in 
1965. He now has a Masters degree 
from the University of West Virginia. 
The members of the club wish him many 
good years at the College. 

The next meetings will be March 27 
and April 9. 

Edwin Colly 

Addresses Dairy 

Society 

Mr. Edwin Crotty, area representative 
of the American Jersey Cattle Club, was 
guest speaker at the March 10th meeting 
of the Dairy Society. Mr. Crotty made it 
clear that he was not here to sell Jersey 
cattle and that any breed can provide a 
dairyman with a respectable living. Mr. 
Crotty's address was concerned with 
milk marketing and the role of the mod- 
ern dairyman. He pointed out many 
faults in the "sinister and socialistic" 
Federal Milk Marketing Order System 
and said that the dairyman has to get 
more involved with the fundamentals 
of marketing his product if he intends 
to overcome these short-comings. He also 
stated that every producer has the obli- 
gation to advertise his product, to pro- 
duce a high quality product that consum- 
ers want, and should he in the position 
to assert leadership. 

During the business portion of the 
meeting, Fresident Don Koontz an- 
nounced tht A-Day dairy classes. Twek e 
classes will be judged on the basis of 
fitting and showmanship. After a brief 
discussion it was decided that freshmen 
could use either rope or leather show- 
halters as was the case last year. College 
show equipment is availahfe to anyone 
who does not have his own gear. Each 
class will be responsible for an A-Day 
exhibit in the dairy tent. A motion was 
passed that individual dairy proj ec t ! 
took! also 1m- displayed. 

A two day club trip to the famous 
Romandale Farm in Ontario, Canada, is 
iM'ing considered. Homandale Farm 
breeds Reg is t ere d Hobtein* and has pro- 
duced many All-Americans and well- 
known bulls. 




Vice President of Vefietahle Research 
from Campbell's Soup at recent 11 art. 
Society meeting. 

Hort 

Apple-Experiment 

Planned 

An experimental apple planting 
is being planned and will he plant- 
ed prior to A-day, 1969. The plant- 
ing was already initiated and it 
will he planted by the Horticul- 
tural Society under the supervision 
of the College and the Horticulture 

Department 

The planting consists of two 
trees each of 50 different varieties 
& spores of eleven dwarfing, semi- 
dwarfing rootstock and interstoek 
combinations. Approximately 60*/ 
of the trees have been donated by 
various fruit-tree nurseries and al- 
lied personnel in the fruit industry. 
The remaining 40? have been pur- 
chased by the College. 

The objectives in establishing 
this planting are: to acquaint the 
students with the newest and latest 
apple varieties; to provide a col- 
lection to be used for fruit judging 
and identification; to study and ob- 
serve growth patterns and bearing 
habits of dwarfing, semi-dwarfing 
and spur-type trees; to learn and 
demonstrate various pruning and 
training methods as applied to 
specialized and modified systems; 
and finally, to generally observe the 
responses of trees of this nature to 
general orchard cultural practices. 

A 25' by 25' planting of this na- 
ture is an excellent compliment to 
our larger, present plantings of 
rootstocks. The small sizes of the 
trees and of the planting will fa- 
cilitate providing the trees with 
the best of care on the parts by the 
society and the department. It is 
hoped that in the near future more 
varieties and rootstock combina- 
tions may be planted as well as 
supplementary plantings of other 
pome fruits, such as quinces and 
pears. 



QUALITY FOOT WIAR 

"TK» FiUt of Hi* Sola" 

Stuart McGuire, with 

Ortho-Vent Spring Stap Cushion 

loafera 

Wingtips 

Brogues Your Representative 

Work Shoes RALPH SPANISH 

Boott New Dorm I 109 



U 



II 



F I Club 
Explores 

THE DEEP 
FRONTIER 

And The Future 
Of Aquaculture 

At our last bi-monthly meeting 
motions were made and passed by 
active club members on the ac- 
ceptance of our new Constitution 
and also of a point system. With 
the addition of both of these, the 
club now has a format for both 
facets for its purpose. The new 
Constitution will enable us to par- 
ticipate in matters concerning our 
Major and the point system will 
enable those active members to 
participate in the social aspects of 
the club. 

Also at our last meeting we had 
the pleasure of having two repre- 
sentatives of the Kelco Algin Co. 
in attendance. Mr. Frederick Mey- 
er of Technical Sales and Mr. Al- 
bert Risch, Assistant District Su- 
pervisor, lectured on the processing 
of and the products from the Giant 
Kelp. This plant is located mainly 
along our Pacific Coast on what is 
termed the "Continental Shelf." It 
thrives in from 25 to HO feet of 

water, 

To start his program Mr. Meyer 
showed a film called "The Deep 
Frontier." This demonstrated for us 
the way his company acquires the 
Giant Kelp through a process 
called Aquaculture. It also showed 
how they now can grow Kelp on 
ropes inches above the ocean floor. 

From this plant a product called 
Algin is obtained. Because the Kelp 
is mostly water it takes a ton of 
Kelp to produce 40 pounds of Al- 
gin. The importance of Algin in 
American industry is tremendous. 
He said that because Algin is hy- 
drophilic (a water-loving colloid) 
its moisture retention tendency has 
made it invaluable for such pur- 
poses as stabilization, producing 
stable emulsions, and increasing 
the body structure to our foods. 

Mr. Meyer also showed us an 
example of a new product for 
which his company is now apply- 
ing for U.S.D.A. approval to sell to 
the Food Industry. This new prod- 
uct is called "Xanthan Gum." With 
this as an ingredient the shelf t life 
of such a product as salad dressing 
would be doubled. It is not af- 
fected by temperature change and 
it is stable and soluable in acid so- 
lutions and also stable in alkaline 
solutions. It is excellent for many 
types of food preservation. Its ex- 
cellent "freeze-thaw" ability may 
prove to be invaluable to the frozen 
food industry. The lecture was at- 
tended not only by F. I. members 
but also by other interested stu- 
dents as well as a good number of 
the faculty. Afterwards refresh- 
ments were served and Mr. Meyer 
and Mr. Risch made themselves 
available for further questions. 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



SEMESTER S.G. COMMITTEE REPORTS... 

- - - BLAZER COMMITTEE 

PURPOSE: 

To aid the incoming Freshman in choosing a class blazer and a com- 
pany to deal with and methods of choosing a seal. A list of Progress 
made. 

1. The Freshmen have a different company than the classes of the 
past because. 

a. they can receive a better quality garmet; 

b. they don't have to pay postage; 

c. 100% free alteration which was not available before; 

d. receive their blazers earlier; 

e. pay less for their blazers. 

2. The blazer material will be an all weather material, which wears 
well. 

- - - CAMPUS COMMITTEE 

PURPOSE: 

To improve the external appearance of our campus, and to provide 
a neat and attractive landscape to u degree which would be feasible. 
Mainly lighting, pavement and shnibs were discussed. Dr. Fieldstein 
and Mrs. Work were most cooperative in helping us with our ideas. I 
will list some of our projects: 

1. Add lights to college signs to aid visitors in locating our campus. 

2. Have shrubs planted in areas which require additional shrubs, so 
our campus would look more pleasing. 

3. Add additional walks to our campus. 

4. Pave road by alumni lane. 

5. Flood Lake Archer in the winter to provide a smooth finish for 
the ice skaters. 

6. Take out all non-living trees and shrubs. 

7. Fill in all holes in paved roads by entrance closest to Doylestown. 

8. Repair lights burnt out by Administration. 

9. Remove a few parking spaces on campus lot to prevent accidents 
by front entrance near Dormitory II. 

- - - CUSTOMS COMMITTEE 

PURPOSE: 

To orient the Freshman, and to aid them in coordinating themselves 
as a class of Delaware Valley College. Help the class of 72 become aware 
of the college functions, buildings procedures, and general area. 

Customs were successful in their drive to obtain the above goals, 
thanks to the Sophomore class of D.V.C. 

- - - FOOD COMMITTEE 

PURPOSE: 

To strive to provide a more desirable dining area and to provide food 
for the students, which they deserve. We encountered many problems 
through the year; we discussed many of these problems too many times. 
Now we have a new managing service at our college as a result of the 
lack of cooperation on the manager's part. Here is a list of some of the 
things we worked for this year. 

1. Larger salad bowls. 

2. Have a manager present at all times. 

3. Serve seconds on sliced meat for 20 minutes. 

4. Keeping food on serving line warm. 

5. Ho* chocolate dispenser. 

6. Decrease % grease in food. 

7. Clean dining hall floor in dining hall. 

8. Having table spoons available on tables for family style meals. 

9. Serve ketchup when ground beef is served. 

10. Stale rolls, bread and other food. 

11. Better method of serving orange juice. 

12. Cleanliness of food preparation. 

13. A change of all dirty table cloths between meals. 

14. Have salad made just before serving it. 

15. There are plans under way for a permanent wall in front of wash 
room. Soon the dining area will look like a dining hall. 

16. Discussed methods of keeping cake and pies fresh. 

17. Set up a desirable plan for dates to eat on campus for Big Week- 
ends, Homecoming, etc. 

18. The food quality was discussed at almost every meeting. 

We hope our new Managers will adapt to the cafeteria and dining 
hall and provide the men of our campus with a very desirable dining 
service. Respectfully submitted, 

Fred Harteis 

- - - GROOMING COMMITTEE - - - 

The grooming committee was formed in December for the purpose 
of reviewing the present grooming regulations and to liberalize them. 

The committee met and proposed a resolution that all students be 
required to meet acceptable standards, as established by the College 
and the Student Government, concerning personal cleanliness and 
proper grooming. Students shall be clean-shaven and shall keep their 
hair cut to a conservative length. Mustaches and sideburns are per- 



AROUND CAMPUS 




Stan Sitarski, on behalf of the Business Administration Club, accepts a charter 
from a representative of the Administrative Management Society. 




Contracts having been signed work begins on the library additions. The Samuel 
Cooke and Hary Shipiro icings when completed in September icill provide much 
needed shelf space and a student study area. 




The entrance sign to the new Henry Schmieder Arboretum has been erected. 
The hand carved wowlen sign harmoniws with the naturalistic beauty of the area. 

missible if they are neatly trimmed and meet contemporary standards. 
The Office of the Dean of Students will have the authority to regulate 
the enforcement of proper grooming. This resolution was accepted by 
the Student Government and was added as an amendment to General 
Regulation Number 7 of the Student Handbook. The Student Govern- 
ment also decided that this new resolution should be enforced for one 
trial semester. At the end of one semester it will be determind whether 
or not the new policy would continue. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gery J. Fisher, 

Clwirman of Grooming Committee 
Editor's Note: It should be noted that permissable .standards for 
sideburns and hair length liave been more precisely described since the 
sul>misshm of this report. 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 



INTRAMURAL COMMITTEE 

Intramurals have gone rather smoothly for the entire year. Cham- 
pionships have been won by Science (football), Business (volleyball), 
and Horticulture (basketball). Wrestling is now getting underway and 
softball will be starting sometime in March. Bowling also seemed to be 
a success. Intramurals, then, have been pretty good to date. 

Submitted by 
C. Rocconi 

INTERCLUB COUNCIL - - - 

The purpose of the Interclub Council will be to coordinate the 
activities and act in the best interest of every member club. This is 
exactly the type of work that was transacted at this year's Interclub 
Council meetings. We discussed such items as cleaning up at mixers, 
operation of Homecoming affairs, and disputes between clubs. We bad 
announcements made by the clubs. Furrow, and the Student Govern- 
ment. 

Officers for Interclub Council were George Myers. Secretary, and 
Ted Fergus, Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gery J. Fisher, 
Chairman of Interchih Council 

OPEN DOOR COMMITTEE - - - 

We have had no formal meeting with Mrs. Work, but we hope to 
have one in the near future. I have met with two of the classes to get 
their ideas in addition to those we have already. Next week. I plan to 
have a meeting with Mr. Fulcoly and Mr. Sauer to get their opinions of 
our ideas before we go to Mrs. Work. 

Sincerely, 
Steve Peters 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

The recreation committee reports that it has three televisions in oper- 
ation. They are located in the lounges of Work, Cooke, and Dorm I Halls. 
The costs for the year have been one repair of $7.00. 

POOL ROOM: 

Three tables are in operation. Expenditures for the year included 
recovering two of the tables and purchasing twelve new cues for a total 
expenditure of about $200.00. The pool tournament is in progress and 
it will tenninate next week. 

MOVIES: 

We have had a total of eight movies so far this year with a remainder 
of four to be shown. Total cost will be $702.50. The up-coming movies 
are: Night of the Generals on 3/17, Deadlier Than The .Male on 4/14, 
War Wagon on 4/28, and The Silencers on 5/12. 

Total expenditures of the Committee for the year will be $903.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert Winner, Chairman 

■ - - SECURITY COMMITTEE 

Two meetings have been held with Mrs. Work, Captain Hollbrook, 
and Mr. Ross. We have discussed many of the problems that have 
troubled the Student Government in the past. Among these have been 
the inconsistency in ticketing, the stop signs in the parking lot, abuse of 
the students by the guards, and the possibility of a visitors' parking lot. 
There are more meetings planned for the future. 

Submitted by 
Steve Peters 

SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

SUBJECT: MIXERS 1968-1969 

1. We have had 8 mixers so far this year; we have 5 more planned in 
addition to the Contemporary Club Mixer. 

2. By charging students $1.00 for admission vvc have been able to get 
better bands and with this attendance at Mixers has increased stead- 
ily. We are getting close to 500 people at our Mixers now. 

3. We have been getting a good response from some of the local schools. 
The Mixer held February 21 drew a busload of girls from Trenton 
State. This is a big step in improving relations with that school and 
in helping to improve ours and their social lives mutually. 

4. By dealing with agencies we have been able to get fairly good if not 
great quality bands for each Mixer; not too much trouble has oc- 
curred with bands cancelling out because they do not want to lose 
their booking agent and they've showed up well ahead of their start- 
ing times. 

5. Students have behaved in an orderly manner at the last two Mixers. 
Outside agitators were causing a little trouble at some of the previous 
Mixers. 

6. Overall, the yeai has been good and social life has increased greatly 
over that available during previous years, 



- - ■ STUDENT COURT - - - 

Total summons handed out 
Cases paid out of court 
Total court cases 

Cuiltv, no fine 

Guilty, $3.00 fine 

Guilty, $5.00 fine 

Guilty, not paid fine 

Not guilty 



.34 
8 

26 
1 
6 
1 

14 
4 



Respectfully submitted, 
Steve Peters 



VENDING COMMITTEE 

Although the committee encountered a few difficulties, it can report 
the completion of another very successful semester. ARA Vending 
Service and Rosenbergers Dairies have maintained the high quality of 
their products, a better selection, and outstanding service for the students. 

ARA, of the Lehigh Valley region, services our campus with cigar- 
ettes, candy, pastry and cofFee. Rosenbergers Dairies, of Hatfield, ser- 
vices our campus with milk and ice cream. 

The only major change during the semester came in October when 
the Student Government decided to switch to the services of Pepsi-Cola. 
The reason for the change was simple: Coca-Cola lowered their com- 
mission far below that of Pepsi Cola. This change has also offered an 
extra benefit to the College. Pepsi will sponsor advertisements on radio 
WFIL for any major College activity. They have advertised for the 
Homecoming concert. Plans arc in the progress to provide advertising 
for Spring Weekend and "A" Day. 

The committee can report the addition of two new machines on 
campus — the dollar changer and the Fooseball-Match Game. 

After a year of wheeling and dealing, ARA agreed to place a dollar 
changer on campus under the following conditions: 

1. Student Government will forfeit its commission received from 
pastry sold. 

2. Student Government agrees to be responsible for any damage to 
the changer or theft of changer, including replacement of any 
missing money. 

Difficulties have been encountered with the dollar changer, 1 ttc it is 
planned to have them ironed out. 

The Fooseball-Match Game was placed on campus by Karl Werner. 
It was agreed that this recreational game would cost $.20 a game and 
Student Government would receive 50tf of the income. 

The committee's main interest is to provide better and greater vend- 
ing services for the students. 

— VENDING COMMISSION BREAKDOWN — 
Companies on Campus S. G. Coynmission Items 

Pepsi-Cola $.60/Case Soft Drinks 

1($ 

im 

7.5% 
10$ 
10% 



ARA Vending 



Rosenberger Dairies 



Candy 

CofFee 

Cigarettes 

Milk 

Ice Cream 



Respectfully submitted, Gery J. Fisher 



KERSHNERS 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



W. J. MYCE'S 
SHOE STORE 

"The Home of Nice Footwear' 

LOW DOWN ON 
LATEST STYLES 

West and State St. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



• CAMERAS 
• FILM 

• PROCESSING 
• ACCESSORIES 

MILTON RUTHERFORD 

23 West State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

RENTALS and REPAIRS 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES - FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Seven 





WORLD 



PRISMATIC 



VIEWS 



— Bob Edwards 



My great uncle used to be a magician, but I doubt if he could pull 
some of the magic that I witnessed in one night at the cafeteria. First 
of all, as if by some miracle, all the waiters' white jackets seemed to 
vanish from sight. Wait a minute! Oh, I guess they didn't have them on 
in the first place. But I'm sure what I saw next was no hallucination. 
One waiter passed me with a cigarette in his mouth as I glanced at the 
No Smoking sign on the wall. As the meal progressed, things seemed to 
get worse. One waiter decided to join my table as we were having 
dessert. Well, maybe I shouldn't complain, after all, he did give me a 
second dessert. Just about this time I thought I felt a roll hit me in the 
back of the head, and as I turned around I saw another whiz by and 
hit someone at the next table. As the waiter and I played beat the clock 
to see who would finish first, I with my dessert and he with his table 
clean-up, I noticed he had spilled some ketchup on his already dirty blue 

{eans. Notice I said jeans and not "dress pants" like the rest of the student 
>ody is required to wear if they don't want to receive a fine. Need I say 
more? I didn't say anything about food quality or general cleanliness, 
but I think you get the hint. If YOU would only speak up as I have just 
done maybe things will get done, but if everyone remains apathetic 
toward this environment, I can guarantee that no improvements will take 
place. 



PMAI 



PSYCHE 

mi 

SOUL 





bl 



\.c« 



S*< 



0& 



b*** 




DID YOU KNOW ? 

that Jimi Hendrix will be coming to the Spectrum in the very near 
future? 

that the Latin Casino will feature the Phyllis Diller Show on Monday, 
April 7 to Sunday, April 20? They will also feature Liberace on Monday, 
April 21 to Sunday, May 11. 

that there are rumors going around that the Smothers Brothers are 
going to break up? It seems that Tom wants to go on his own. 

that Aretha Franklin was the best-selling recording artist in 1968? 
The Beatles were rated the third best. 

that Herman of Herman's Hermits will be the guest host of the 
Kraft Music Hall on NBC-TV this summer? 

that John Lennon and Yoko Ono finally got married? 

that the Beatles made their first single record on October 5, 1962? 
The title was "Love Me Do." 

that "Magical Mystery Tour" is supposed to be the best LP of the 
year (1968)? 

that the ages of three of the Beatles are: John, 28; Paul, 26 and 
George, 26? 



NOTICE 

This is the eleventh of this yeer's twelve alloted issues. The 
next and last issue will be an "A" Day edition. The deadline 
for this issue will be announced in the near future. It is hoped 
that all campus organizations will participate in this final effort. 



OORS 
Make The 
Wrong Move 



On March 1, 1969, The Doors* Jim 
Morrison, during a performance before 
some 12,000 persons in Miami Beach's 
Dinner Key Auditorium, made the wrong 
move. He is now in exile in the Bahama 
Islands due to the fact that he is facing 
$2,000.00 in fines and more than three 
years in prison. It seems that during the 
above-mentioned performance he was 
charged with statutory rape, assault, in- 
decent exposure, and drunkeness. Also, 
because of this performance, the group 
lost their previous concert engagements 
with the Civic Center and The Spectrum. 
"Objection by Municipal Authorities" 
was the reason for the double cancella- 
tion by Music Fair Enterprises, Inc., 
which had booked the concerts. A Music 
Fair Spokesman also said these cancella- 
tions would mean a loss of more than 
$20,000.00 in advertising and promo- 
tional costs, ticket-printing expenses, the 
cost of giving refunds, and other items. 



BASEBALL 
PREVIEW 



Aggie 
Diamond-Men 
In Full Swing 

by Gene Wallace 

While the Yanks and the Phils 
have been getting ready for the 
oncoming season, so have the Ag- 
gies. 

The catchers and pitchers were 
the initial ones to start. Coach Sav- 
age put the boys through some 
arduous drills, which will prove to 
be helpful as the season draws 
near. 

Officially the team began prac- 
ticing on March 6th. Led by their 
spirited Captain, Warren Hitz, the 
team showed a lot of determination 
and desire in trying to make this 
season an undefeated one. 

Coach Silan has a strong nucleus 
returning. The head mentor has 
only a few losses, mainly through 
graduation. However, one key ab- 
sence will be the "first sacker" po- 
sition, for John Nice has signed a 
Pro Football contract with the 
Pittsburgh Steelers. Last year John 
was the leading offensive power on 
the Aggie diamond squad. 

The previous year's pitching, led 
by Ron "the Ace" Timko and Bob 
"No Hit" McEntee, was strong and 
consistent. This year's staff will be 
strengthened by some topnotch 
Kurlers, including Jim Douglass, 
Bill Roth, Chris Bockrath, Ken 
Rat hey, and freshman Charlie 
Smith. 



Hitting was a big problem for 
the Aggies last season. To say the 
least, nits couldn't be found when 
most needed. If the Aggies want 
to be a top M.A.C. power, many 
more clutch hits will be required 
Everyone is hoping that former 
All-Americans Warren Hitz and 
Bill Roth return to old form. Other 
lusty hitters who should come 
around are Pat Day and Gene Wal- 
lace. Rookies to watch this season 
are Don Shinn, Bob Basenberg, 
and Tom Dobrowski. 

This season should prove to be 
interesting, but teamwork can 
make it victorious. 



QUALITY FOOT WEAR 

"Th. Filrt of th. SoU" 
Stuart McGuire, with 
Ortho-Vtnt Spring Step Cushion 
loaftrt 
Wingtipt 

Brogue* Your Representative 

Work Shoot RALPH SPANISH 

Boots Now Dorm I 109 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. Stat* Street 

'Opposite County Thorn" 

• Custom Made Jewelry 
A Specialty 

e Watch and Jowolry Repair 
348-4675 Doylettown, Pa. 



BOSTON SHOE STORE 

12 South Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

LATEST STYLES IN 

FOOTWEAR FOR 

COUEGE STUDENTS 



Speak-Up In 

THE FURROW 

Send your Articles, Letters, 

Comments, Etc. 

in care of the Editor, 

JOHN D. MARTIN 

207 Barness 



The Casual Look 

• SPORT COATS 

• AUSTIN HILL SLACKS 

• DEAN SWEATERS 

• SERO SHIRTS 

• DEXTER SHOES 

The Village Gentry 

80 West State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 18901 

(215) 348-4342 



Page Eight 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 



1969 CLASS ELECTION CANDIDATES 



CLASS OF 1970 

OFFICE OF PRESIDENT 




RICHARD A. PALMASANO 

An open letter to the Class of 70 
Fellow Classmates: 

This week will mark the ter- 
mination of Gery Fisher's position 
as President of our elass. During 
the past year, I have served as his, 
and your, Vice President. I have 
actively supported the ideas and 
the opinions of our class and have 
gained valuable experience in shar- 
ing the activities and enthusiasm 
of our class. 

Last year in my pre-election 
speech I expressed several ideas 
that I thought would encourage 
participation and pride in our class 
functions. My major objective was 
the materialization of a Junior 
Prom for our class, since I felt that 
the members of the class were en- 
titled to benefit from class funds 
in addition to the Senior Prom. 
Next week we shall see the fruits 
of these labors. 

I was a generating force in the 
realization of the College's first 
class-sponsored variety show. Al- 
though I can not claim credit for 
the idea, I did serve, along with 
Wayne Mehalic, as co-chairman 
to put this idea into operation. 

Next year, our senior year, is our 
most important year at Delaware 
Valley College. Among other 
things, we shall have a Senior Prom 
and a yearbook. In striving for suc- 
cess in these functions, I am serv- 
ing on the Yearbook Committee as 
the Business Editor, and I plan to 
serve with those who made our 
Junior Prom a reality to ensure that 
we have a memorable event for all 
at our Senior Prom. 

I would like to propose that our 
class take a Senior Class Trip. The 
trip could be taken between Spring 
Recess and "A" Day of our senior 
year. As an addition to our prom 
and yearbook, a trip, in my opin- 
ion, would stimulate greater par- 
ticipation and pride in our class. 

As a final statement, I would like 
to thank the Furrow editor and 
staff for giving me this opportunity 
to explain my ideas to the class. I 
hope that on Friday the members 
of the Class of 70 choose to en- 
trust the office of president in me, 
so that I can be instrumental in 
keeping our class the best Del Val 
has ever known. 

Sincerely yours, 
Richard A. Palmasano 



OFFICE OF VICE PRESIDENT 

Fellow Members of the Class of 
1970: 

For three years, our Class has 
received noteworthy recognition 
for its many accomplishments in 
all fields. Our Senior year will ex- 
hibit far greater successful feats. 

Class endeavors are spearheaded 
by class officers. The time has come 
to elect these officers for what will 
be our most important and event- 
ful year. I am vying for one of 
these positions: the office of Vice 
President. Certain qualifications 
are required of an individual who 
holds such an office. They include 
the ability and the knowledge 
needed to form a cohesive unit 
with fellow officers that will ac- 
complish for the class new and un- 
precedented heights. One must also 
be dedicated and devoted to class 
ideals and what they stand for. 
And an officer must possess the 
ability to understand, analyze and 
alleviate class problems. 

I earnestly and unostentatiously 
believe that I possess the qualities 
that are needed by an individual in 
this office because of my past ex- 
perience as a class officer in high 
school, and because I have been 
an active member of our Class, 
participating in several successful 
committees and College functions. 

If I am fortunate enough to be 
given the honor of being elected 
to this post, I will strive along with 
the other officers to attain our Class 
goals. 

Sincerely, 

Leonard Di Ciantomasso 




LEONARD Di GIANTOMASSO 





WAYNE QUINN 

My name: Wayne Quinn 
Office sought: Vice President of 
the Great Class of 70. 

My Platform: I am running for 
Vice President of the senior class 
so as to afford vou, the students, a 



change, since a change is what is 
desired. I would base mv office on 
four basic ideas: 

1. Modernize Del Val because it 
is needed. 

2. Tell it like it is — with no holds 
barred. 

3. Cut red tape — I want action. 

4. Have the Administration and 
Doylestown realize that there 
never was nor will there ever 
be a class like The Class of 70. 

I assure you that my living off 
campus will not in any way hinder 
rite from meeting the responsibili- 
ties which you give me. In fact it 
will only help since I will have 
impartial, unadulterated views. I 
look forward to serving you. 

— Wayne Quinn 70 




LEE STRASSBURGER 

Mv Fellow Classmates of 
The Class of 70: 

I, Lee Strassburger, am running 
for the office of Vice President for 
the coming year. In this position 
I plan to make your senior year 
the best year we have ever had at 
Delaware Valley College. I feel 
this can be done by getting more 
student participation in the class 
activities such as the proms, variety 
shows, class meetings, etc. The 
main problem with student par- 
ticipation is that the students really 
don't give our school a chance. In 
order to appreciate something you 
have to learn to live with the good 
arid the bad. Delaware Valley Col- 
lege has a lot to offer, and your 
senior year will only give to you 
what you put into it. I have found 
this past year that by being more 
active in class activities, clubs, and 
sports, etc. one learns to appreciate 
what this school can do for you. I 
feel that the class of 70, with the 
right people as its leaders, can be 
the greatest class to graduate from 
Delaware Valley College. So when 
the time comes to vote, remember 
the name: LEE STRASSBURGER. 

OFFICES OF SECRETARY 
and TREASURER 

It's that time of the year when 
the Class of 1970 gets an opportu- 
nity to elect the officers who will 
lead our class through our final and 
most important year. I, Gary J. 
Filko, have served as your Class 
Treasurer for the past three years 
and now, again, I'm asking for your 
fullest support as a candidate for 
that office during our senior year. 

The job of Class Treasurer is 
basically a monetary post, but by 



being a class officer the position 
should be held by an individual 
who will promote class activities 
and assist the President by what- 
ever means possible. I have served 
on various class committees in my 
Freshman and Sophomore years 
and I am presently on the 1970 
Cornucopia staff and the Junior 
Prom Committee. If elected, I in- 
tend to serve our class to my best 
ability and to help strive towards 
a prosperous and successful senior 



vear. 




GARY J. FILKO 




LARRY GERBER 

As class elections draw near, it 
has become necessary to once again 
choose men to lead our class. For 
our final year, we need the type of 
leadership from our officers to 
carry the class to a successful fin- 
ish. Taking this into consideration, 
each officer and the office he holds 
should be thought over thoroughly. 

I'm Larry Gerber and I'm a can- 
didate for the office of Secretary. 
I have served in that office for the 
past two years. As a class officer, 
I have served on various commit- 
tees and I have worked with the 
other class officers in trying to 
work out any problems or ideas 
that have arisen. At the present, I 
am working on the yearbook com- 
mittee as co-editor with another 
member of our class. 

I feel that this office is important, 
because many times a secretary's 
minutes can be the backbone of a 
meeting. For instance, if an argu- 
ment or some issue on a motion 
comes up, referring to a good set 
of minutes can usually settle the 
matter. 

The best qualification I can of- 
fer, is that I pledge to try to serve 
the members of the class to the 
best of my ability. If elected, I will 
carry out this promise. 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Nine 



OFFICE OF S. G. 
REPRESENTATIVE 




SOL CAVINESS 

Social lift 1 plays a major role in 
colleges throughout the country. 
Through a good social life on a 
campus, problems such as sit-ins, 
protests, and take-overs may he 
avoided. Because the students have 
something to do, it improves the 
college overall. Since 1 I've been at 
DVC, there has been a gradual 
improvement in social activities. 
This pace can be speeded up 
slightly this coming school year if 
the Entertainment Committee of 
Student Government works hard 
in this direction. 

My main objective in Student 
Government will be in bringing 
neighboring girls' colleges in close 
relationship with DVC socially. By 
working with the Entertainment 
Chairman of S. G. this year, I have 
made the acquaintances of the di- 
rectors of student activities of sev- 
eral girls' colleges and they are 
quite optimistic about such a re- 
lationship. With hard work on the 
part of the Entertainment Commit- 
tee of S. G., coupled with enthu- 
siasm* among the students, this re- 
lationship can start in the coming 
school year. Being on this commit- 
tee will be my one contribution to 
all my fellow classmates and to the 
school. 

Sincerely, 
Sol Caviness 




GERY FISHER 
Fellow Classmates and 
Underclassmen : 

The time has arrived when I 
must make a difficult decision. It is 
a personal decision that I have 
thought through thorough. I have 
decided to withdraw from the cam- 
paign for the presidency of the 
Junior Class. Instead I shall be 
seeking the office of Student Gov- 
ernment Representative. If I am 
successful in the class elections, it 
is mv intention to seek the Presi- 
dency of the Student Government. 

I do not run to seek prestige. I 
run because I believe that a num- 
ber of the college policies, regula- 
tions, and procedures must be re- 
vised or amended and some even 
should be disposed of if our college 
life is to progress and coincide with 



the growth of our college and other 
colleges. 

It is quite evident that the only 
way we can bring about changes 
is through an active and truly rep- 
resentative Student Government. I 
run because I feel that there is a 
need for an energetic and power- 
ful President to introduce and mold 
progressive legislation. Any organ- 
ization is only as powerful as its 
leader. It is my desire to make next 
v ear' s Student Government the 
most active and most powerful 
student legislative body yet. I be- 
lieve I have the qualifications to 
energetically lead Student Govern- 
ment. For the past three years I 
have been President of a most ac- 
tive and liberal class. I have been 
a member of our Student Govern- 
ment for three years and in Stu- 
dent Government work for nine 
years. This past year I served as 
its Vice-President and as its chair- 
man of the Interclub Council. Be- 
cause of my personal experience 
working and communicating with 
these various organizations, I have 
gained a knowledge of the prob- 
lems that the Student Government, 
the classes and clubs encounter. 

I feel anyone who seeks an office 
of this nature should inform the 
electors of what he stands for. I 
have drawn up a "Progressive Pol- 
icy" which I support and will work 
hard to accomplish. 

The "Progressive Policv" consists 
of: 

1. More mixers — sponsored by 
the classes, clubs and Student 
Government. 

2. Schedule meetings of class Pres- 
idents for the purpose of aiding 
one another. 

3. Open Door Policy — a. Doors 
closed and unlocked, b. Doors 
partially open only when a girl 
is in a room. 

4. Dress Code — no regulations, 
except if we still have family 
style meals — then only collared 
shirts and jackets required. 
Blue-jeans permitted at all 
times. 

5. Dining Room — Breakfast hours 
7-9 A.M.; Better food quality; 
Cafeteria-style dinner meal. 

6. Grooming — further liberalize 
the new regulations. 

7. Citizenship grade — Lower the 
standards for both the require- 
ments and grading. 

S. Enlarge the Student Govern- 
ment by one additional repre- 
sentative per class. 

9. Committees should be given a 
precise deadline for reporting 
their resolution(s) to Student 
Government. 

10. Better communication between 
the Student Government and 
the Student Body. a. President 
responsible for a column in the 
Furrow; b. More precise and 
detailed minutes, including all 
motions made and all legislative 
transactions. 

11. Investigation of the prices 
charged for dormitory damages. 

12. A stern effort for better security 
enforcement in the area of the 
parking lot. 

13. Parking Lot — The right of a 
violator to try to prove his in- 
nocense either in the Student 



Court or before a commission 
composed of Student Govern- 
ment Representatives. 
11. A "Winter Weekend". 

These are some of the programs 
in the "Progressive Policy". At a 
later date I will reveal the re- 
mainder of my proposed changes. 
And so, my fellow Juniors, I ask 
for your support at the class elec- 
tions on April 11. Then we shall 
continue from there. 

Thank you 
Gery Fisher 




RON C.INGE HIGH 
Classmates (70): 

With the approach of our final 
year it has become quite evident 
that the entire Class of 70 is inter- 
ested in having a very active Stu- 
dent Government. I am in favor of 
this and feel that it can be accom- 
plished. Most of you here at Dela- 
ware Valley College know me but 
for those of you who don't, my 
name is Ron Gingerich. I am a 
Chemistry major. I have served on 
various class committees and I am 
presently editor of the Senior Sec- 
tion of our Yearbook. 

With respect to policy, I have 
many ideas to bring before Student 
Government, but most of all I want 
to represent you, the Class of 1970. 
To anyone who has complaints or 
new ideas, my door will always be 
open and I will guarantee that your 
subject will be brought before Stu- 
dent Government. One of my 
ideas, one that was brought up at 
the last Student Government meet- 
ing by a fellow student, is the elim- 
ination of citizenship grades. Our 
institution is growing and I feel 
that it is no longer possible for 
everyone who issues such grades 
to thoroughly evaluate an individ- 
ual student. It is, therefore, in my 
opinion, an unfair system and it 
should be abolished or otherwise 
adjusted so it is not such a signi- 
ficant factor in determining candi- 
dacy for the Dean's List. To some 
this may seem trite, but I feel it is 
important and another step to- 
wards updating our College. 

I am deeply interested in our 
Student Body and it's functions 
and therefore, if elected, I shall, 
with the best of my abilities, fulfill 
the office of Student Government 
Representative for you, the Class 
of 1970. 

Ron Gingerich — Student 

Government Representative 

Class of 70 

OFF-CAMPUS 

STUDENTS 

SHOW 'EM YOU CARE 

VOTE 




DONALD A. KOONTZ 

Members of the class of 1970, I 
take this opportunity provided by 
the FURROW to further explain 
my position as a candidate in the 
forthcoming class elections. 

The office of Student Govern- 
ment Representative, for which I 
am a candidate, is of utmost im- 
portance to our class and to the 
entire Student Body. My prime re- 
sponsibility as a representative is 
to voice and to actively seek to 
carry out the feelings and desires 
of the members of the Clas of 1970. 

As I see a Student Government 
Representative's job, he has many 
responsibilities; they can be classi- 
fied as basic or additional. Basic 
responsibilities include attendance 
to meetings and active participa- 
tion in discussions and committc s. 
Additional responsibilities assumed 
by the individual are the real 
measure of a good repersentative. 
Such responsibilities entail a con- 
tinuous examination, by tb< in- 
dividual, of the existing situ .tions 
and policies. Recognizing prob- 
lems alone is insufficient, for one 
must be able to convincingly pre- 
sent the problem and a proposed 
solution to fellow students and to 
those in authority. Also, I might 
add, a certain amount of guts and 
conviction can determine success 
in this area. 

Experience as a Student Govern- 
ment Representative is a valuable 
asset to the candidate. Two years 
of Student Government experience 
followed by one year of observa- 
tion from the outside leads one not 
only to be more appreciative of 
some of the anti-Student Govern- 
ment sentiments, but equips one 
to deal more effectively with such 
problems. At least several areas of 
interest should be afforded more 
attention in future Student Gov- 
ernment business. They are: the 
establishment of a "plus system" 
of grading to give the student de- 
served credit for attaining a higher 
degree of a letter grade; the estab- 
lish n lent of a reasonable open door 

(Continued on page 10) 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TU1S.-WI. f-7 - SAT. 9-4 

Save time . . . mike an 

appointment betwean classes, 

RAZOR CUTTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

Samuel Mover 

Matter larbar 



Page Ten 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 



policy, one that will provide a priv- 
ilege without enf ringing upon the 
privacy of everyone; the establish- 
ment of closer contacts with worn- 
ens' colleges in the area to make 
our mixers even more enjoyable; 
and, the establishment of a strong- 
er and more vigorous Interclub 
Club Council that has a consulted 
voice in Student Government busi- 
ness. 

I have stated my basic princi- 
ples, qualifications and objectives. 
Should this leave any questions un- 
answered, I will be happy to visit 
with anyone anytime. 

Thank you. 

Sincerely, 
Donald A. Koontz 




WAYNE MEHALICH 




MARK A. UEBERSAX 

Members of the Class of 1970, 
I am very proud to have the oppor- 
tunity to submit my name as a can- 
didate for the office of Student 
Government Representative. I feel 
this office is more important than 
most realize, for it is through the 
senior representatives that the 
mode of the Student Government 
is derived. A senior representative 
must have a leadership ability that 
will unify and direct the entire Stu- 
dent Government toward a more 
productive year. He has to be a 
person who is willing to work hard 
for not only the members of his 
class but also for the overall im- 
provement of the College. He must 
actively support the opinions 
voiced by its members of his class 
and take appropriate action 
through the Student Government 
to present these opinions to the 
Administration. It is in this manner 
that our Student Government will 
best serve the interests of the Stu- 
dent Body. 

I feel my experience and action 
as your Junior ('lass Representa- 
tive has qualified me for actively 
seeking re-election to this office. I 
will not promise you action on any 
specific issues at this time. How- 
ever, I will promise that, if re- 
elected, I will continue to express 



and actively support your opinions 
and ideas to the best of my ability. 
As a concerned representative, it 
is my hope that in this upcoming 
election each student will evaluate 
all of the candidates and vote re- 
sponsibly to insure an active Stu- 
dent Government. 

Sincerely, 

Mark A. Uebersax 




RORERT A. WINNER 

To the Members of the 
Class of 1970: 

I would like to announce that I 
am a candidate for the office of 
Student Government Representa- 
tive for the Class of 1970. Next 
year will be the biggest and most 
important year of our college ca- 
reer in that our Senior class will 
have more influence than any other 
class in the Government. To fulfill 
this objective it is necessary to have 
experienced and enthusiastic rep- 
resentatives who are well-acquaint- 
ed with the activities of the Stu- 
dent Government and are willing 
to accept the responsibilities of 
this position. 

I am sure that if you are a stu- 
dent who is interested and active 
in the affairs of our Class and this 
College you will already be well 
aware of my qualifications. There- 
fore, I do not feel it is necessary 
at this time to list all the activities 
I have participated in and the ideas 
that I have accumulated during 
the past three years as a Student 
Government Representative. 

Again, as in previous years, I 
am asking for your support in the 
up-coming election. In return, I 
promise my support and repre- 
sentation of vour ideas and view- 
points in order to satisfy your 
wants and desires and at the same 
time upgrade the Government and 
College. I would also like to urge 
every member of the Class of 70 
to attend the rally on April 9th so 
that you may gain a better under- 
standing of the views and qualifi- 
cations of the candidates as they 
present them. 

Sincerely, 
Robert A. Winner 

CLASS OF 1971 
OFFICE OF PRESIDENT 




FREDRICK HARTEIS 



SEEKING RE-ELECTION 

I, Fredrick Harteis, Sophomore 
Class President, am running for 
re-election for the office of Presi- 
dent of the Class of 71, for 1969- 
70 academic year at Delaware Val- 
ley College. 

I must say that I have enjoyed 
very much working for my class 
and with my class on all of our 
projects and in Student Govern- 
ment activities. I feel very honored 
in holding this office and working 
with the fellows of our class. We 
have had many interesting discus- 
sions on plans for such activities as 
the A-Day Dance, Spring Concert, 
Rings, Blazers and problems which 
were related to Student Govern- 
ment. I was very pleased at the in- 
terest among the men of our class 
in committee meetings and class 
meetings. No two people think 
alike, therefore you can expect to 
get conflicting ideas on many prob- 
lems throughout the year. You can 
never please everyone, and no one 
can when it comes to work, espe- 
cially when you .have to deal with 
200 ideas. Because of the cooper- 
ation among our fellow classmates 
we were successful in all of our ac- 
tivities thus far. 

I'm also very pleased to know 
that we are the first class to make 
out well in both the A-Day Dance 
and Spring Concert. We are the 
first class to receive our rings for 
the summer of our Junior year also. 

In Student Government I have 
worked for our class and the entire 
student body by pushing an 
amendment to our Grooming Code 
and dress regulations. As chairman 
of the dining hall I have the oppor- 
tunity to help the fellows at our 
college receive the meals they de- 
serve and better conditions in the 
dining hall. Now I'm more experi- 
enced in the workings of Student 
Government and the procedures of 
our Administration. I can see what 
can be done for our school and I 
can act more quickly and in a 
proper manner more easily. There 
are many things to be done for the 
fellows attending Delaware Valley 
College now and for the future 
Aggies. Some of my ideas to better 
our campus are: 

1. A visitors' parking lot. 

2. Closed door policy. 

3. Student Union room. 

4. Campus laundromat. 

5. Campus car wash. 

6. Narrow communication gap be- 
tween students and administra- 
tion. 

7. Better social life. 

8. Vinyl cover for gym floor. 

These are just a few of the ideas 
I will work for my next two years 
at D.V.C. I'm not going to say we 
will see all of them next week be- 
cause that is impossible. But I will 
say that I'm going to do my best 
to carry out these ideas and all 
other ideas presented to me by 
other students of our college, espe- 
cially those of my class. 

SUPPORT YOUR 

CANDIDATES 

and 

VOTE 

OFFICE OF PRESIDENT 




RRUCE M. GIESE 

Being a candidate for Class Pres- 
ident for 1969-70, I bring as my 
qualifications: I was a Student Rep- 
resentative during this year and I 
showed the ability to unify the 
class and class officers, both the 
class and Student Government hav- 
ing been divided this year. 

I will make the responsibility of 
Class President one to the class 
first and to the Student Govern- 
ment second. I will call on our class 
to build a stronger class and have 
the student representatives lead 
our representation in Student Gov- 
ernment. 

Elected as Class President, I 
would not use it as a stepping 
stone, but instead I would get the 
class active and give the credit to 
the class for any progress made as 
a class. The class will plan ahead 
to make the most of the class and 
to avoid problems before they oc- 
cur. Class committees wflj be made 
up of a broad section of the class. 
Things will not hi' lost in commit- 
tee nor influenced by only one 
group. 

I will initiate a new way of in- 
forming all class members of meet- 
ings. All class officers will be kept 
informed by regular meetings of 
officers. 

I ask those who do not plan on 
voting for me now to attend the 
speeches and those who are going 
to vote for me to come out in sup- 
port of me and to talk to others. 

Thank you. 

Bruce M. Giese 
Class of 1971 




SKIP KLIMAS 

I have decided to run for the 
office of President because I see a 
need for better leadership than 
our class has had in the past. I 
sincerely feel that I can provide 
this needed leadership. I have had 
previous experience in leadership 
by serving my Senior (Mass in High 
School as Vice President and by 
serving the Future Fanners of 
America as President, Vice Presi- 
dent, and North Regional Vice 
President of the State Association, 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Eleven 



I feel that a President should: 
t. Preside over and conduct meet- 
ings according to accepted par- 
limentary procedure. 

2. Keep members on the subject 
and within time limits. 

3. Coordinate class efforts by 
keeping in close touch with the 
other officers and members. 

4. Appoint committees and serve 
as ex-officio member of them. 

5. Keep class activities moving in 
a satisfactory manner. 

6. Follow up class activities and 
check on progress being made. 

7. Call for special meetings if it is 
found necessary, and, if it is 
found necessary, give ample no- 
tice to the students. 

As a class I feel that we should 
take part in more activities and 
money-making projects than we 
have in the past. If the class desires 
we could, for example, sponser the 
following projects: Junior Class 
Prom, Mixer, Movies, Raffle, and 
a Variety Show. We should get 
started on our yearbook so that it 
can develop into something we can 
be proud of. Perhaps it would be 
a good idea to move our classes' 
money into 5 per cent interest 
bonds. This higher interest rate 
would enable us to make more 
money on the money we already 
have. Class by-laws and a Program 
of Work should be developed so 
that we know what we are trying 
to accomplish. 

I would like the opportunity to 
serve our class as President so that 
we can move ahead and develop 
into a superior class. I ask for your 
help as members of the Class of 71 
so that this can be made possible. 
Respectfully yours, 
Skip Klimas 

OFFICE OF VICE PRESIDENT 




GREG EHRENZELLER 

My name is Greg Ehrenzeller, 
and I am running for the office of 
Vice-President of the class of 71. 

Now, to many, the office of Vice- 
President may seem unimportant. 
But that's not so. It is a very im- 
portant office. The office of Vice- 
President is exceeded in impor- 
tance by only the office of Presi- 
dent. 

The main responsibility of a 
Vice-President is to assist his Pres- 
ident. This responsibility is carried 
out in different ways. One way is 
to preside over class meetings in 
the absence of the President. An- 
other way is to be the head of 
various committees set up by the 
President. These committee chair- 
manships require a man of sincer- 
ity, integrity, leadership, honestv, 
dependability, willingness to work, 
and some experience. I, being a 
class officer for the past two years 



here at Delaware Valley after be- 
ing a class officer in high school, 
think I qualify for the office of 
Vice-President very well. 

I urge communication among 
my classmates. We must work to- 
gether if we ever hope to accom- 
plish anything. And to work to- 
gether, we must communicate. 

If elected I will, to the best of 
my ability, represent my class in 
its endeavor to make itself the 
greatest class in the history of Del- 
aware Valley College. 

Sincerely Yours 
Greg Ehrenzeller 




CHRIS HOLLANDS 

Dear Member of the Class of 71, 
The office of Vice-President has 
a popular connotation of being a 
do-nothing office. This is not so. 
The Vice-President performs many 
behind-the-scene activities that re- 
quire a lot of organization and co- 
operation and that help make class 
projects a reality. This is the main 
function of a Vice-President: to 
work closely and cooperate with 
class members, mainly the Presi- 
dent, in the organization of activi- 
ties to insure their success. 

I am running for re-election to 
the office of Vice-President of the 
Class of 71. I am greatl/ interested 
in helping to make our class a great 
class, one to be proud of, and one 
that functions well. I ask your help 
in giving me this opportunity to 
serve you. Thank you. 

Sincerely, 
Chris Hollands 

OFFICES OF SECRETARY 
and TREASURER 





GENE HOCK (Secretary) 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 
348-5072 DOYLESTOWN 1890) 




JOHN ECHTERNACH (Treasurer) 

OFFICE OF S. G. 
REPRESENTATIVE 



PAUL COOPER 




BRUCE BURDICK 

Bruce Burdick: Student 
Government Representative 

I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity afforded to me by THE 
FURROW to announce my candi- 
dacy for the office as Student Gov- 
ernment Representative of the 
Class of 1971. 

I seek this office in hopes of 
achieving certain goals which may 
aid both my class and the College. 
The primary areas which I believe 
can use some modification are the 
following: 

( 1 ) The present system of citizen- 
ship grading; 

(2) Existing policies with regards 
to the cafeteria and the food 
being served there (e.g., break- 
fast hours and the portions that 
are offered); 

(3) The possibility of having the 
dining hall open in the eve- 
nings, enabling students to 
have a place to get a bite to 
eat instead of being confined 
to using vending machines; 
and finally, 

(4) A projection of a better and 
more widespread image of our 
class and, most important, 
D.V.C. 

The above issues, plus a personal 
incentive to get involved with gov- 
ernment, are the reasons why I 
have chosen to seek an opportunity 
to represent you. This is not a sud- 
den decision by me; I have been 
interested in College functions 
throughout my year and-a-half 
here, and have supported various 
activities and participated in them. 
I enjoy assisting in helping to get 
things accomplished and I accept 
this challenge with the idea of 
continuing my involvement con- 
structively. 



BE ACTIVE 
IN YOUR CLASS 

VOTE 




JOHN GEIGER 




DANA INCERTO 

Statement of reasons and qualifica- 
tions for my seeking the office of 
Student Representative for the 
Class of 71. 

My name is Dana Ingerto. My 
home is in North Caldwell, New 
Jersev. I would like to have the 
privilege of representing the Class 
of 71 in the Student Government. 
I fully realize the responsibilities 
of the office of Student Govern- 
ment Representative and I am will- 
ing to spend the time required to 
do a thorough job. I have attended 
almost all of the Student Govern- 
ment meetings this semester and 
I am familiar with the procedures 
of the Student Government. I am 
active on campus: I hold the office 
of President of the Circle K Club 
and I have also been a member of 
the Dairy Society. I have only opti- 
mistic views for the future of our 
class and our College. If elected 
I will do my best to represent our 
class. 




WALT ROCHINKO 



Page Twelve 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 




GORDON GETZ 

Dear prospective voters. 

Like most of the other members 
of our class I have managed to do 
my share of complaining for the 
past two years and I think that it 
is about time that I stopped grip- 
ing and started to see what I can 
do. In the past certain reasons have 
prevented me from running for of- 
fice, so now that I am able, I am 
"psyched up" to get going. I have 
held different offices in various 
clubs and organizations previous to 
my entering college but to me this 
office is more important than any 
three of those. I feel this way be- 
cause now my responsibilities will 
be to men who are not afraid to 
criticize you to your face and who 
can offer helpful suggestions, 
whereas only snide remarks and 
behind the back complaints were 
made by the high school "kids." 

In the past there has been a lot 
of complaining about Student Rep- 
resentatives. I feel they were unjust 
in some cases. I know the present 
, representatives personally and I 
believe that they are doing their 
best. However, their best may not 
be good enough, it seems, to sat- 
isfy our class and it is possible 
that mine will be. I don't want to 
be just a complaint rectifier con- 
cerning old issues but an instru- 
ment in making our class respon- 
sible for some NEW undertakings! 

My goal will be to reflect a de- 
sire to please, and, since you can't 
please everyone all of the time, you 
fellows should have no trouble 
keeping me on my toes. In essence 
I am asking you to let me prove to 
you and to myself that I have what 
it takes to work with, not "kids," 
but men. 

Sincerely, 
Gordon Getz 





Lauchmen 




Printing 




Company 




COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 




SINCE 1923 


In 


this world ot printing, everyone 


want* a masterpiece . . . quite often 




we get the picture. 



CLASS OF 1972 

OFFICE OF PRESIDENT 




DAVE FARRAR 

The purpose of this article is to 
inform the Class of 72 that I, Dave 
Farrar, am running for the office of 
President. 

Delaware Valley College has 
many problems and by pooling and 
directing the energies of our class 
into the right veins changes can 
come about, changes concerning 
the cafeteria system, the grooming 
code, regulations regarding girls on 
campus, and student apathy. 

One of the major problems on 
our campus is a lack of communi- 
cation between the Administration 
and the students. This lack of com- 
munication keeps the students in 
the dark and brings about much 
student discontent. This concern 
can be resolved by orienting the 
students to the problems that face 
the Student Government and the 
Administration. 

There are many problems that 
face the Administration that we as 
students are not aware of. When 
these problems are resolved we 
are given answers with no explan- 
ations. We should know the rea- 
sons behind some of our policies, 
because every administrative deci- 
sion affects the students in some 
way. By developing a strong line 
of communication we will have 
the vehicle through which change 
can come, the vehicle through 
which our explanations can come 
and the vehicle to make Delaware 
Valley College a better college. 

A President must seek out prob- 
lems and guide and direct the re- 
sources of his class to solve those 
problems. If elected as President 
of our class I will direct and guide 
the energies of our class to bring 
about changes that will solve our 
problems. 

Thank you, 
Dave Farrar 72 




There are several reasons why 1 
am running for President of the 
('lass of 1972. The central point be- 
hind those reasons is the fact that 
I care. I intend to spend the next 
three years here at Delaware Val- 
ley College, and I'd like to make 
your stay and mine as pleasant and 
enjoyable as possible. By letting 
me represent you, your ideas and 
your opinions, I feel that we can 
obtain this goal. 

I hold the same opinion as Dr. 
Paul R. Anderson, President of 
Temple University. In his address 
during the Founder's Day Convo- 
cation here at D.V.C. he stated 
that times are changing and so 
must education and the institutions 
of education. These changes can- 
not be brought about by sitting in 
your room complaining. The 
chronic complainers are one of the 
biggest problems here at our col- 
lege. It's true that some of these 
students might not like everything 
about Del. Val. but they are here 
now so why not make the best of 
it. 

What has happened to the "great 

f)oteritial" that our class had in the 
>eginning of the year? Apathy has 
taken over and the class lacks the 
unity it needs to succeed. Lets get 
together and work to make our 
class and our school as great as 
possible. 

In conclusion, I urge every mem- 
ber of the Class of 1972 to attend 
the meeting on Wednesday, April 
9, and to listen to each candidate 
and what he has to sav. Then, and 
only then, vote on Friday, April 11, 
for the man that you think will best 
represent you. 

Russ Kenny, President 
Class of 72 

OFFICE OF VICE PRESIDENT 




Rl SS KENNY 



EARL WEAVER 

Fellow Candidates and 

Classmate! of the Class of 1972, 

I have decided to run for the 
office of Vice President of the Class 
of 1972, because I believe the Vice 
President is a vital link in the chain 
of class leadership. There are many 
duties and responsibilities connect- 
ed with this office. However, I will 
accept them as a challenge to im- 
prove the class. 

The Vice President is responsible 
for establishing all committees and 
coordinating their work. I feel that 
many improvements can be made 
in the committee work of our class 
to increase the amount of partici- 
pation and to improve the com- 
munications between officers and 
members. 

My previous experiences in leatl- 
(Continued on page 13) 




urn 



and 




INC. 



Fretz slacks sold Coast to 
Coast by leading Depart- 
ment Stores and specialty 
shops. Priced in our retail 
store to fit the college man's 
budget. Select horn the 
largest slack inventory in 
Pennsylvania! 

---♦._. 

You can also choose from 
famous nationally adver- 
tised brands of sport shirts, 
dress shirts, knit shirts and 
sweaters at unbelievably 
low prices. - - - These are 
salesman's sample lines and 
in mostly medium sizes. 

Shop FRETZ 

Retail Store 
and SAVE! 



FRETZ STORE 

52 E. Oakland Ave. 

Doyleitown, Pa. 



April 8, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Thirteen 



EARL WEAVER— (Continued) 

ership includes State President of 
the Pennsylvania FFA Association. 
This position has prepared me to 
accept the role of Class Vice Pres- 
ident. I have enjoyed working with 
our class in the past. If I am elect- 
ed, I will work to the best of my 
ability to make the Class of 1972 
the very best. 

— Earl Weaver 



OFFICES OF SECRETARY 
and TREASURER 



ED. NOTE: 



Names of Candidates 

for these offices 

were not available 

at time of printing. 

OFFICE OF S. G. 
REPRESENTATIVE 




RAYMOND C. FUNKHOUSER 

To the Class of 1972: 

Once again I am asking you for 
your support to reelect me as your 
Student Government Representa- 
tive for the 1969-70 year. Earlier 
this year I asked you for your sup- 
port, and I was given it. I am very 
grateful. Between that time and 
now I have tried to give you my 
support by promoting ideas that 
members of the class have had. 

The Student Government has ac- 
complished many things for the 
students this year. I won't go into 
everything that has been done, be- 
cause an entire issue of the Furrow 
could be devoted just to that. Just 
look around campus and look at 
the changes that have occurred 
since we started the year. What is 
important is that the Student Gov- 
ernment is not perfect. Having 
been a m em b er of Student Govern- 
ment for this vear, I have been 
able to see some of our weak- 
nesses that can not be seen unless 
one is associated with the govern- 
ment. This is my major concern for 
next year: to develop a better gov- 
ernment to better serve the mem- 
bers of our College and our Class. 
I can only do this with the support 
of the Class of 1972. 

Sincerely, 

Ravmond C. Funkhouser 



VOTE 




ROBERT HOCKING 

Fellow Students of the Class of 72, 

As you may already know I am 
running for the position of Student 
Government Representative of our 
class. The Student Government is 
a very necessary link between the 
Administration and the Student 
Body. To date the Student Govern- 
ment has increased privileges and 
activities on campus and it will 
continue to do so with proper rep- 
resentation of the students' ideas 
and suggestions by the Representa- 
tives. 

I have had experience in this 
area as a representative in high 
school and I have held active of- 
fices in 4-H for the last four years. 
I feel very strongly that I can fill 
this post and, if elected, I will work 
to the best of my ability to serve 
you. 

— Robert Hocking 




JASPUR MEDOWS 



Every effort has been made to 
give each candidate a chance 
to bring his views and qualifi- 
cations to you via space in 
this paper. If a certain candi- 
date has been missed it has 
been done so unintentionally 
and we apologize. 



VISTA 



MIMMR 




%^%^ 



TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

6 E. STATE STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA 

348-4700 345-6776 




The Student Government tcill be missing some good men when it convenes next 
semester. Pictured above are the Senior Governmment members who will be 
tiraduatinfi this year. They are, from left to right: S. Peters, C. Rocconi, W. Hitz, 
]. Nice, and T. Cottrel. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phone 348-9021 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

peeuetetd 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



ATTENTION 

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS 

Yon can pick up your 

Furrows at the 

Information Desk 

inside 

Lasker Hall. 



SANDWICHES 

FRESHLY MADE • 
AT f / 

HOCKS' i 


C4 

i 

s 

■ 

M 


Food Mkt. 




3 
O 

z 


THURSDAY it 


\ 


E 

3 


HOAGIE DAY 


f i 


* < 

Q-.4- 

? o 


Tuei. - Sat.: 8-6 
Sunday: 10-2 




M 1 



GAUDY'S 



The COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE 



Books and Stationery 



Main and State Sts 



Doylestown, Pa. 



WHEN PATRONIZING 

OUR ADVERTISERS 

please mention 

THE FURROW 



WATSON - PRICE 

Quality Shoe Repair 

Fast Professional Service 

52'/2 E. State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5885 



MATT'S 

SHOE 

REPAIR 

fast quality 
tezvice 

38 E. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



ADVERTISING DOESN'T COST 

. . . IT PAYS . . . 
ADVERTISE IN THE FURROW 



Page Fourteen 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1969 



BARGERS 

CHICKEN HOUSE 

Quality Food 
Low Prices 

• Relaxed Atmosphere 
e Take Out Orders 



70 WEST STATE STREET 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



348-9550 



STAN BOWERS 

MEN'S STORE 



Van Heusen 
Shirts 



Farah 
Slacks 



PBM Suits • Botany 500 

19 N. Main Doylestown 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

end LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phono 348-9021 



Roger W. Kraut 


Jeweler 


• Reed and lotto* — Loot - 
Wallace — Stariiwf , etc. 
Omooe ~- Lonejinoe ■■ 
Ace vtron, etc. 
WeKo. ~~ Clock «- Jewelry 


REPAIRING 


348-4884 


31 Wait Stat* Street Doylestown 



THE ENTIRE STAFF OF 

THE 
FURROW 

Wishes the Best of Luck 

to our 
BASEBALL TEAM 

GO ALL THE WAY 

IN 69 




*Jke 5 "tti tow 

DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE 
of Science and Agriculture 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

devoted to the interest of the students 

of Delaware Valley College 



Non-Profit Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, *A 



A-Day 1969 

Promises To 
Be Better 
Than Ever 

What exactly is "A" Day and 
what does it mean to the students 
of D.V.C? "A" Day, in essence and 
original purpose, is a weekend de- 
voted to the displaying of the 
students' abilities to render to the 
viewing public creative and visual 
aspects of agriculture, biology, 
chemistry, and recently, business 
administration. Through the var- 
ious projects which the students 
create, practical experience in the 
realm of their majors is achieved. 
This fact alone gives the student 
an extremely broad practical back- 
ground which cannot be gleaned 
from textbooks. "A" Day also tends 
to unite the students in activity, 
although the present trend towards 
preoccupation with the commer- 
cial and business aspects of "A" 
Day has seemed to deplete general 
interest to a degree. 

"A" Day 1969 is a study in or- 
ganization. Plans for this spectacu- 
lar weekend were initiated in 
September and they have been 
carried out under the efficient 
leadership of Bill Varano. Meet- 
ings were held every other Monday 




The A-Day Committee, this year head- 
ed by Bill Varano, must be considered 
the backbone of A-Day and in large 
part responsible for its smooth opera- 
tion and success. 

during the first semester and every 
Monday during the second semes- 
ter. Combined with these frequent 
"A" Day Committee meetings, the 
committee, comprised of represen- 
tatives from each club, sent chair- 
man Varano to meet weekly with 
the faculty "A" Day advisors to 
discuss progress and policies. 
Through the faculty advisors, sage 
advice has been given to help the 
gears of the student "A" Day Com- 
mittee mesh more efficiently. 

The "A" Day Committee was not 
the only organization involved in 
pre-planning activities. The major 
clubs on campus have formulated 
advanced strategy and plans for 
"A" Day also. For example, the 
Dairy and Animal Husbandry 
Clubs' members have been groom- 
ing and training their animals since 
February, while the Ornamental 
Horticulture, Horticulture, Agro- 
nomy, and Food Industry Clubs 
have been devising plans for their 
various exhibits, displays, and re- 
(Continued on page 2) 



the 




URROW 



Vol. 15, No. 12 DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE of Science and Agriculture 



May 3, 1969 



DINING HALL 

GETS 

NEW MANAGER 

by Larry Martel 

As there has been a change in man- 
agers, this interview was conducted to 
find out how bright are the prospects 
for more changes. Also it is to inform 
the students of the new development. 
Only four questions were asked of Mr. 
Martin Heaps, who is 24, married, and 
English. His answers, in short form, fall 
under the following headings: 

Experience 

3 years — Hotel School in England. 

1 year — Palace Hotel, England. 

1 year — Zimmerman Hotel, Switzer- 
land. 

1 year — Guys Hospital, England 

6 months — Bayswater Hotel, London. 

1966 — came to the United States be- 
cause he liked our way of dealing with 
the food industry. He joined M.W. Wood 
Incorporated. 

Hi years — Franklin and Marshall; as- 
sistant manager. 

6 months — Kutztown State as senior 
assistant manager; was sent to D. V. C. 
by the company which offers the food 
sen ice for the dining hall. 

New Ideas 

Mr. Heaps is too new to have devel- 
oped new ideas for D.V.C. But he wel- 
comes any ideas or suggestions. He is 
willing to hear complaints either in per- 
son or through the Food Committee. 

Improvement 

Mr. Heaps feels there is room for 
improvement, but needs the students to 
tell him what is wrong. 

First Impessions of this College 

Beautiful campus and good facilities. 
Needs students' help in keeping Dining 
Hall clean. 

In all, Mr. Heaps welcomed the chance 
of coming here. Knowing how a dining 
hall like DVC's works, he is really in- 
terested in the betterment of the food 
and the service. This was shown when 
he took down points I happened to re- 
mark about (an extended breakfast hour 
and seconds on food), because nobody so 
far has approached him about these mat- 
ters. Remember, progress might be made 
if you, the students, will work together 
with the Food Committee, headed by 
Fred Harties, by using it as an avenue 
to reach Mr. Heaps with your sugges- 
tions or complaints. Mr. Heaps promises 
he will work on any suggestions. Also, 
he suggests that you apply now for a 
job in the Dining Hall in September if 
you are interested. By that time, im- 
provements may be seen around the Din- 
ing Hall. 




Gery Fisher (left) shakes the hand of Bob Winner (right) as the ttc< >. G. 
Presidential Candidates prepared for the final thrust in their bid for th< >ffke. 

S.G. PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 
WAGE MEMORABLE CAMPAIGNS 



The election campaigns are over, 
the students have selected then- 
new officers and have chosen Gery 
Fisher as their Student Govern- 
ment President. Looking back on 
the elections one can see the plan- 
ning and effort that went into Gery 
Fisher's and Bob Winner's cam- 
paigns. Messages from the Sky, 
Rallies, Posters, Banners and Signs, 
a full page ad in The Furrow, door 
to door campaigning and hand 
shaking, were some of the means 
employed by the candidates to win 
the votes. It was truly one of the 
most spirited and expansive cam- 
paigns this campus has seen or per- 
haps will ever see. Both candidates 
and those interested students who 
gave of their time and talents in 




The student body turned out in record 
numbers to cast a ballot for the candi- 
dates of their choice. 



the campaign should be congratu- 
lated for their part in making this 
election stand out from those of 
past years. 

Now that the election has taken 
place and the results have been re- 
leased it is the duty of each mem- 
ber of the student body to support 
those selected by the majority, to 
bury the hatchet as it were and 
unite behind the new officers. 
Only if given this support can 
these newly elected officers hope 
to accomplish their objectives. 

1969 ELECTION RESULTS 

Class of 72 
President — Dave Farrar 
Vice President — Earl Weaver 
Secretary — Bradley Wise 
Treasurer 

S. G. Rep. - Ray Funkhouser 
Robert Hocking 
Pete Bracchi 

Class of 71 
President — Fred Harteis 
Vice President — Chris Hollands 
Secretary — Gene Hock 
Treasurer — John Echternach 
S. G. Rep. — Bruce Burdick 
John Geiger 
Gordon Getz 
Dana Ingerto 
(Continued on page 3) 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



May 3, 1969 



Letters 



Edito 



April 24, '69 
Dear Editor . . . 

Although not a serious problem in itself, this did present a very 
serious one at the time it occurred. I'm referring to turning off the lights 
on the day of the Junior Prom. 

The school knew both of the Prom and that they would be turning 
the lights off at this time. I feel that it was a very poor time to do any 
type of work on the electrical system. Couldn't an earlier time have been 
used? Many of us had to wash and shave in the dark in order to be ready 
to pick up our dates. It's a sort of a hit-and-miss deal, trying to shave in 
the dark, and when you miss it's no fun. 

For any situation in the future such as this I hope the person in 
charge of the work or operation will take into consideration the possible 
problem which may arise. 

— Fritz Blum 

Editor's Note: Dorm I and Dorm II were really the only dorms in which light 
in the bathrooms was greatly effected. All the other dorms get sufficient light 
from windows. The few in those dorms I guess will just have to call it a sacrifice 
for progress. 





WORLD 



PRISMATIC 

VIEWS 

— Bob Edwards 

Well, this being my last article of the 68-69 year, one might be expected to 
produce either of two types of article. First, I might kiss the year good-bye by 
cutting everybody up and thus cause a few last-minute hatreds to be carried over 
to next year. Second, I might congratulate everybody on what a wonderful year 
this has been for all the students at the N.F.S. Rather than commit myself to one 
style of article, I thought I might combine the two ideas. So what you are about 
to read might stir you in either direction. 

Let me start by congratulating Steve Peters on his and his peers' gallant effort 
to make this a non-sex-starved campus. Better luck next time, Steve. In my last 
article I mentioned the dining hall conditions and when my comments about the 
dress style of the waiters were read, I received a lot of criticism, all of which would 
be censored if I were to include it in this article, so I won't waste my words. But 
I'll tell the waiters right now that there are pants supplied by the cafeteria manage- 
ment if a waiter wants to keep his precious blue jeans spotless of food stains. 

Censorship is another area that shouldn't go unmentioned in this article. Does 
the average student realize that every article that goes into the Furrow gets censored, 
and that if the censor does not like or understand what has been written he can 
strike it from the article, or worse than that, he can change what has been written? 

There is a plan about campus to aid the student in his promised changes for the 
future years. It is known as the Trust Company, and I will not criticize or condemn 
it. The Administration is trying to figure out just what it wants, but they have a 
sneaking suspicion that this organization wants what every other organization on 
college campuses wants in 1969. 

Finally, I would like to end on a pleasant note by congratulating all the newly- 
elected class officers and student government officers. Good luck and best wishes on 
behalf of everyone on Publications. 



This issue marks the 12th and final issue for the season. The 
Furrow Staff hopes that you, the reader, have enjoyed this 
year's paper. It is true that the The Furrow is far from perfect 
but it can only improve with your support. In the very near 
future publications will hold a special meeting to establish 
next year's staff. If you are interested in helping to shape next 
year's Furrow we urge you to attend this meeting. 




jTfc *Juzzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

devoted to the interest of the 
students of Delaware Valley College 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR John Martin 

FEATURES EDITOR Bob Edwards 

INFORMATION SERVICES Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Tim Barman 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Mike Morgan 

ASSISTANTS Davo Vore, Bob Krach, Sttvo Lyczak 

ART EDITOR Bill Stofanowicz 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Lao Strataburgar 

BUSINESS MANAGER Poto Higgina 

TYPING MANAGER Delbert Jonas 

-GENERAL STAFF- 
Sol Cavinos, John Furphy, Carl Pfifzanmayor, Bill Stroda, Milton Parker, Bob Parry, 

Larry Martal. 
-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISORS Joseph E. Fulcofy, Allan C. Hartley 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

SPECIAL ART ADVISOR Jamos A. CVReilly 

SPECIAL CONSULTANT Dr. George Kays 

The Furrow is published twice a month by the above concerned students of 
Delaware Valley College. It should be noted that the opinions expressed in 
this newspaper are those of the respective authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the college. 



A-DAY (continued from page 1) 

treats all during the second semes- 
ter. The non-agricultural majors, 
such as Biology, Chemistry, and 
Business Administration, have been 
planning to exhibit displays in 
their respective majors, showing 
that "A" Day is not totally concern- 
ed with agriculture. 

Featured along with the regular 
club activities and displays is the 




A-Day workers assemble pens for the 
livestock displays. This is just a frac- 
tion of the preparation and work which 
is needed to ready the grounds for the 
yearly event. 

series of special events which add 
a finishing touch to the "A" Day 
weekend. Among the most popular 
are the Co-Ed Milking Contest, the 
Greased Pig Contest, the Tractor 
Driving Contest, Hay Bides, the 
Glee Club and Band Concerts, 
the Greased Pole Contest, the Log 
Sawing Contest, and, new to "A" 
Day this year, a Log Balancing 
Contest. Along with the selection 
of the "A" Day Queen and the "A" 
Day Dance, these activities will 
most assuredly make "A" Day '69 
a rewarding experience for all who 
attend. 



Lauchmen 
Printing 
Company 

COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 
SINCE 1923 

In this world ot printing, everyone 

wants a masterpiece . . . quite often 

we got the picture. 



PORSH E 

VOLKSWAGEN «nd other selected 
foreign cars. 

Rick & Harrys 
Service 

Factory Trained Mechanics 

PARTS 
SERVICE 



345-9990 

490 E. Butler Ave. 

New Britain, Pa. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phone 348-9021 



TRAUGER'S ££ B P ER 

— my shop is your shop — 



L. L. TRAUGER, Proprietor 
24 N. Main Street 



Doylestown 



QUALITY FOOT WEAR 
"The Filet «f the Sole" 

Stuart McGuire, with 
Ortho-Vent Spring Step Cushion 
Loafers 
Wingtips 

Brogues Your Representative 

Work Shoes RALPH SPANISH 

Boots New Dorm I 109 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

Doylestown Shopping Canter 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



May 3, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



CANDIDATES (cont'd from p. 1) 

Class of 70 

President - Rich Palmasano 

Vice President — 
Leonard DiGiantomasso 

Secretary - Larry Gerber 

Treasurer - Gary Filko 

S. G. Rep. - Sol Caviness 
Gery Fisher 
Ron Gingerich 
Mark Uebersax 
Bob Winner 

Student Government President — 
Gery Fisher 

Suspension 
Stirs Freshmen 

Freshmen residents of Wolfsohn Hall 
were disturbed when they received word 
that a suspended member of their class 
who had been given permission to stay 
in the dorm till the end of the week ( be- 
cause of transportation difficulties) was 
asked to leave sooner. The man, who had 
received a hearing before the Student 
Affairs Committee, was suspended for 
having two female overnight guests in 
his room prior to spring vacation. 

When approached concerning the mat- 
ter Mr. Fulcoly, Dean of Students, point- 
ed out that it is normal policy that a 
suspension to be immediate and that 
permission to stay till the end of the 
week was an exception to the general 
policy. 

Mr. Fulcoly said that the matter was 
reconsidered and it was subsequently 
decided that the freshman in question 
did in actuality have a transportation 
problem and was informed that he could, 
as originally told, stay till the end of the 
week. 



R-E-M-l-N-D-E-R 

PUBLICATIONS 

BANQUET 

May 7th 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.-FRI. 9-7 - SAT. *4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from OVC 

Samuel Moyer 

Master Barber 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



Compute Uravtl ^Mt 



-omp 

Air Una 

Tickets 



rrangimtn 



h 



Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 343-1223 



Contemporary 

Club To Sponsor 

Mixer 

The Contemporary Club will 
hold one of this campus' first club 
sponsored mixers on Friday, May 
9th. The Saturday Niite will be 
the featured group. Also on the 
bill will be The Ovations and a 
light show by the Gettysburg 
Steam and Light Company. The 
club has made a determined effort 
to bring the mixer to the attention 
of many women's colleges and 
nursing institutions, etc., many of 
which have never been approached 
before. It is hoped that this extra 
effort will be rewarded by a good 
female attendance. All aspects of 
our campus mixers for example, re- 
freshments, admission procedure 
and the like have been examined 
and it is the hope of the Contem- 
porary Club that improvements 
can be initiated to make this mixer 
one of the, if not the, best of the 
year. 

Donald Barnhouse 

Addresses 

Business Club 

On Thursday, March 27, the 
Delaware Valley College Collegi- 
ate Chapter of the Administrative 
Management Society was char- 
tered. The purpose of the group is 
to promote the identification, de- 
velopment, and dissemination of 
modern business management tech- 
niques and philosophies. Mr. Spen- 
cer Everhart, manager of the Na- 
tional office of the AMS was the 
main speaker. Also in attendance 
were Mr. Ira Chelton of the Col- 
lege Accounting office, who is also 
a past president of the Montgom- 
ery County Chapter, which spon- 
sors the group, along with various 
members of the faculty. Stan Sitar- 
ski, Chapter president, received the 
charter on behalf of the group. 

Don Chance, Pete Miller, and 
Mr. G. Handler were guests of the 
Montgomery County Chapter at 
their Top Management Night Ban- 
quet on April 15. The guest speak- 
er was Mr. Donald Barnhouse, 
News Analyist for WCAU Tele- 
vision of Philadelphia. 



Boston Shoe 

STORE 

12 South Main Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

LATEST STYLES IN FOOTWEAR 
FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 



f>MAS 



PSYCHE 

and 

SOUL 





bl 



\,e« 



S« 



o* ] 



b*& 



e< 




DID YOU KNOW . . . ? 

that Charles Chaplin, famed baggy-pants comic of the silent screen, 
celebrated his 80th birthday on Thursday, April 17, in Vevey, Switzer- 
land? 

that Goldie of Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In is now filming scenes 
for a new movie called "Cactus Flower" and starring Ingrid Bergman 
and Walter Mathau? 

that the Electric Factory in Philadelphia was once a tire warehouse? 

that the Latin Casino will feature Liberace from Monday, April 21 
to Sunday, May 11? Tony Bennett will be there Monday, May 12 to 
Sunday, May 18. Diana Ross and the Supremes will be there from 
Monday, June 2 to Sunday, June 15. 

that Johnny Cash is going to have a summer television show and 
that his first guest will be Bob Dylon? 

that the Fillmore East in New York City will feature The Who on 
May 16 and 17, and that Sly and The Family Stone will be there on 
May 23 and 24? 

that the Ringling Brothers-Barnum and Bailey Circus is now at Mad- 
ison Square Garden and it will be there until May 11? 

that Carnegie Hall in New York will feature the Buffalo Philhar- 
monic Orchestra on Wednesday, May 7, at 8:30? 

that Broadside Magazine, the foremost folk magazine of the Boston 
area, has published their Broadside Poll? The results: 

best female performer Judy Collins 

best writer Joni Mitchell 

best instrumentalist Pete Janch 

best cut on an album "Clouds" by Dave Van Ronk 

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER 

And what a night it was! Yes, the Class of 70 pulled through with 
another roaring success. On Saturday night, April 19, 1969, the Class of 
70, for the first time ever, sponsored a Junior Prom. The elegant setting 
of this Prom was the Fiesta Mohawk Motor Inn in Willow Grove, Pa. 
Held in the "Cactus Room", those who attended the Prom were full of 
high spirits and great enthusiasm. Greeting the fifty couples that at- 
tended the affair was a receiving line composed of: Dr. and Mrs. Work, 
Dr. and Mrs. Turner, Dean and Mrs. Fucoly, and class advisor, Dr. 
French. The music was provided by the Don Peebles' Orchestra and 
they played a variety of music including the "Hokey-Pockey." The Juniors 
were very grateful for having an "open bar" which made the evening a 
more enjoyable one. As it stands now, the Class of 70 is eagerly antici- 

Eating their Senior Prom next year. Whatever that may be, it will truly 
e another night to remember. 

AROUND CAMPUS 




Work is progressing at a rapid rate and completion of our new library wings 

w an event anticipated by all. 



Pag* Four 



THE FURROW 



May 3, 1969 



Circle K 
Recap 

1968-69 



The Circle K Club held 9 hayride tour 
for a group of underprivileged children 
from Philadelphia on Saturday, April 12. 
This service project was done in con- 
junction with the Circle K Club of the 
University of Pennsylvania, which pro- 
vided the transportation for the children. 
The tour consisted of a picnic lunch at 
Lake Archer, a tour of the College dairy, 
which included a demonstration on milk- 
ing a cow, and a tour of the hog, sheep, 
and beef cattle farm. The children were 
transported to and from these various 
places of interest in hay wagons. 

The forty children participating in the 
hayride are children from the poorer sec- 
tions of Philadelphia. Many of these 
children had never been out of the city. 
They had never seen animals or orchards 
and had never had a chance to take a 
hayride. As a matter of fact, some of the 
boys from the University of Pennsylvania 
that accompanied them had never seen 
such things either. It was quite apparent 
to all those connected with the hayride 
that those forty kids never had so much 
fun as they did that day. 

The hayride proved to be a truly re- 
warding experience to the men of Circle 
K. To see children of rather poor back- 
grounds really enjoying themselves gives 
a guy a sense of pride that he is doing 
his small part for the betterment of man- 
kind. 




Underprivileged children enjoy the 
country which many never dreamed 
existed. 

The Circle K Club of Delaware Valley 
College is adding the finishing touches 
to another successful year of service. Cir- 
cle K is an international organization 
dedicated to the functions of ( 1 ) service 
to campus, community and mankind in 
general, and (2) the development of re- 
sponsible leaders. Circle K and Key 
Clubs are sponsored by Kiwanis Interna- 
tional. 

This year Delaware Valley Circle K 
has undertaken many activities. Among 
them are the following: A hayride for 
underprivileged children from Philadel- 
phia, a car rally for spring weekend, 
campus tours for prospective Delaware 
Valley students, mixer cleanups, Laurel 
and Hardy films for student entertain- 
ment, a hayride during a mixer, aid to 
our local Kiwanis in their amateur tal- 




DAIRY SOCIETY 

VISITS 
HANOVER HILL 

On April 16th the Dairy Society trav- 
eled to eastern New York state, one of 
the top dairy regions in the country. The 
first stop was a visit to the famous Hill 
Holsteins at Amenia, where owners Pete 
Heffering and Ken Trevena have as- 
semhled one of the most impressive herds 
of Holstein cattle in America. Mr. Hef- 
fering was on hand to show the group 
the herd, which includes 15 "Excellent" 
cows and two 1968 All-Americans. 

Next stop was Bel-Air Farms at Mill- 
brook, which is a large commercial op- 
eration where aproximately 1000 Hol- 
steins are housed in a free-stall setup and 
milked in a 24-cow milking parlor. Six- 
teen Harvestore silos and a completely 
automated feeding system provide the 
herd with concentrates and roughage. 

Also visited was nearby Tymor Farms, 
which has a very outstanding Registered 
Jersey herd. Society members were thor- 
oughly impressed by the excellent care 
and management of the herd and the 
immaculate facilities. 

The final stop was a family-type farm 
in La Grange which has a herd of ap- 
proximately 100 Registered Holsteins. 

The eighteen members of the Society 
and advisor Mr. Smith, who made the 
trip, returned to Doylestown at 10:30 
p.m. after traveling over 400 miles and 
seeing over 2000 head of dairy cattle. 

Mr. Jack Miller, area representative 
for Curtiss Breeding Service, Cary, Illi- 
nois, was the speaker at the April 14th 
meeting of the Dairy Society. Curtiss 
has approximately 90 hulls in stud at the 
present time and Mr. Miller discussed 
bull selection and the long process of 
proving the young sires. 



Honey 

Festiva 
Exhibits 



Officers of Circle K (left to right) Rich 
Serwell and Dana In^erto, accept the 
second place Circle K achievement 
award. 



The Delaware Valley College 
Apiarist Society presents the 
"Honey Festival Exhibits" and wel- 
comes all "A-Day" visitors to Man- 
dell Science Building, Room 112. 
The exhibit includes a display of 
many interesting facts about hon- 
eybees, a demonstration bee hive, 
honey extraction equipment and 
your chance to sample many dif- 
ferent types of honey and choose 
your favorite type. "Honey Bears" 
will also be on sale at this location 
so, please come in and see us. 



ent show, and many others. Before sum- 
mer, Circle K plans to show cartoons to 
children on A-Day, hold a bowling 
match against the sponsoring Kiwanis, 
and plan the next year's activities. 

On the weekend of April 19 and 20 
five members of D. V. Circle K attended 
the seventh annual Pennsylvania District 
Convention held in Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
at the Sterling Hotel. At the convention 
Delaware Valley Circle K received the 
second place achievement award in the 
Mnall club category. Last year D.V.C. 
took first in this event. These facts indi- 
cate that D.V. Circle K Cluh is among 
the most active small service clubs in 
Pennsylvania. 



Block and Bridle 
Club Prepare 

For 
Livestock Show 



The Block and Bridle Club held meet- 
ings on March 26th and on April 9th. 
Two films from the Ralston Purina Com- 
pany were shown at the first meeting. 
The films enlightened the members on 
the subject of feedlot management and 
on feeding and the future in beef cattle. 

A film called "The Changing Shape of 
the World Beef Cattle Industry" by the 
Squibb Company was viewed at the 
second meeting. The film was about dif- 
ferent breeds of beef cattle, methods of 
disease control, and how cattle opera- 
tions can make greater profits by em- 
ploying new methods of management 
ana feeding. Examples were drawn from 
all over the world. 

Preparation for "A-Day" has been the 
main activity of club members. Many 
students will be showing animals. All 
people showing livestock must pay their 
dues to the Treasurer before the show. 
The General Livestock show is at noon 
on Sunday, May 4th. 

The Ornamental 

Horticulture 

Society Hosts 

Two Famous 

Speakers 

The Ornamental Horticulture Society 
presented a most interesting and knowl- 
edgeable speaker on rock gardening, Mr. 
Karl Griesnaber of Longwood Gardens 
on April 8th. At Longwood, Mr. Gries- 
haber is in charge of the famed rock 
garden of which he designed and super- 
vised the building. 

Mr. Grieshaber began his informa- 
tive discussion by showing breath-taking 
slides of alpine plants in flower while in 
their native habitat. These slides were 
then contrasted to the way these plants 
look when not given the proper growing 
conditions or when planted out of con- 
text, important factors to consider when 
dealing with the specialized art of rock 
gardening. 

Next, Mr. Grieshaber showed slides 
of rock gardens being built, illustrating 
how a lifeless piece of land can be trans- 
formed into a vihrant landscape of speci- 
men plantings and beauty. During this 
segment of the presentation, Mr. Gries- 
haber imparted to the audience various 
basic principles of rock gardening and 
also some little-known hints pertaining 
to this demanding and thought-provok- 
ing art. 

On April 22nd, the Ornamental Hor- 
ticulture Society had the privilege of 
hearing Mrs. Ernesta Ballard give a talk 
, on house plants. Mrs. Ballard is the di- 
rector of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society which sponsors the Philadelphia 
Spring Flower Show. Among Mrs. Bal- 
lard's accomplishments are two excellent 
books: Garden In Your Home and The 
Art of Training Plants. Along with this, 
she has written numerous articles for 
"Horticulture" magazine and has be- 
come known as an authority on house 
plants. 

The speakers which the Om. Hort. 
Club has presented and will continue 
to present are for the benefit of the stu- 
dents and interested faculty because the 
prime function of our club is to increase 
education by providing out-of-the-ordi- 
nary speakers who present information 
not normally covered in the classroom. 
Many of these speakers are famous in 
their own right and should not be missed. 
Therefore, it behooves anyone concerned 
with horticultural science to attend these 
events and to show some interest and 
initiative in their majors. 



The Ornamental Horticultural Society 
has indeed found itself quite occupied 
since Spring vacation. In addition to our 
regular programs, some of the Society 
members traveled to the George Weid- 
ener Estate, in Erdenheim, where they 
were the guests of the National Associ- 
ation of Professional Gardeners. After 
touring the fantastic greenhouses there, 
they were treated to a program on sys- 
temic pesticides, followed by refresh- 
ments. 

While talking with Angus Heeps, Su- 
perintendent of the Morris Arboretum, 
at the meeting, the Society members 
arranged to obtain some new acquisi- 
tions for the Schmieder Arboretum. The 
Elants were dug the following Thursday 
y one of the Junior Ornamental Horti- 
culture Field Labs. These new additions 
will substantially increase the plant ma- 
terial inventory at the College. 

On Friday April 18th, thirty Society 
members and our advisor, Mr. Blau, 
went by bus to the Brooklyn Botanic Gar- 
den in New York City. Members of the 
Society were given a guided tour of the 
fifty-acre garden. Among the outstanding 
features of the garden is a Japanese 
Stone Garden, a replica of the 500-year- 
old Ryoanji Garden of Kyoto, Japan. 
This garden, with its carefully raked 
white gravel, is an abstraction of islands 
in a sea, and it sets an atmosphere of 
meditation. The Classic Japanese Garden 
features a lake, flowering cherries, water- 
falls, and Japanese architecture. 

Among the species in full bloom were 
the magnolias, narcissi, and old-fashioned 
bleeding hearts. Other points of interest 
were the Bonsai Collection, the Cacti 
and Succulent House, the BromeJiad 
Display and the Tropical Conservatory. 
Many of the members were also im- 
pressed by the Elizabethan Knot Garden 
with its intricate designs, the Rose Gar- 
den, the Garden for the Blind, and the 
Rock Garden. The group was given a 
special tour of the prorogating rucJities 
by a former "Aggie," Mr. Holm urn. 

On the Society's departure the Soci- 
ety's president and the advisor were pre- 
sented with a flat of herbs and house- 
plants to enlarge the College's present 
collection. 

All in all the Ornamental Horticul- 
tural Society has experienced a quite 
active second semester. Members in the 
Society are presently finalizing their 
plans for their "A"-Day exhibits. 



A.P.O.S Past 

And Present 

Events 

The Future 

On May 3 and 4 A.P.O. will sponsor 
the Ugly Man contest. The contest will 
benefit a local branch of either the Re- 
tarded Children's Fund or the American 
Cancer Society. 

The Brothers of the Alpha Phi Omega 
Fraternity are combining forces with 
the fecal Y.M.C.A. to redecorate the 
Y.M.C.A. of Doylestown. 
The Past 

On April 25 the Brothers of Alpha 
Phi Omega joined forces with the Broth- 
ers of Drexel's chapter of Alpha Phi 
Omega on a joint work weekend at a 
nearby Boy Scout camp. 

During the first month of the first se- 
mester A.P.O. had a project of cleaning 
the woods in back of the Dining Hall. 

Also during the first three weeks of 
both semesters A.P.O. sponsors the used 
book store where students can buy books 
in good condition for a discount price. 

The coat checks at the mixers are 
sponsored by A.P.O. as a service project 
for the campus. 



May 3, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



To Read And To 
Listen, To Observe 
- - - - Knowledge 



No, this is not a chemical equation 
but a knowledge equation, whereby the 
reactants bring about a strong reaction. 
It is the college's responsibility to fur- 
nish the student with the materials "to 
Read." This material for the most part 
is theoretical. The applied aspect of 
knowledge must be gained elsewhere. 
This is where the importance of the 
campus clubs come into play. Through 
the guidance of a faculty advisor and 
the initiative of club officers, profes- 
sional people are asked to lecture at 
club meetings and also club trips are 
planned. 

This year the Food Industry Club was 
fortunate enough to be able to blend 
both the "Listen" and the "Observe" 
aspects of the equation. To start this 
year's program, club members attended 
an Open-House held at the United States 
Department of Agriculture (U.S.D.A.) Re- 
search Center located in Wyndmour, Pa. 
This gave our members a chance to see 
what the Federal Government was ac- 
complishing in the field of agricultural 
research. 

To complement the observing portion. 
Dr. Aaron Wasserman, a member of the 
Eastern Utilization Development and Re- 
search Division of the U.S.D.A., in 
Wyndmour, presented to the members 
and guests of our club at our annual ban- 
quet, some interesting information on 
the research being done in the fascinat- 
ing field of Flavor, which many of us 
take for granted. 

We were also fortunate to hear from 
a graduate of our School, Mr. David 
Lustig. Mr. Lustig, who is employed by 
the Tohnson and Johnson Company, re- 
lated to us information concerning his 
company's use of Collagen - the pro- 
tein substance found in animal hides. He 
explained that through research it was 
found that this collagen could be used 
instead of sheep intestines, which once 
dominated the field, for sausage casings. 
This raw material, being much cheaper 
than the sheep intestines, enabled his 
company to cut the cost of such casings 
tremendously. He stated that although 
at times we may think we are not learn- 
ing very much, a good amount of the 
basic knowledge that we aquire at this 
School will be very useful in later years. 

One of the most amazing and interest- 
ing lectures was presented by Mr. Fred- 
erick Meyer of the Kelco Algin Com- 
pany. Mr. Meyer's presentation consisted 
of a 40 minute film on Aquaculture 
(ocean farming) called, "The Deep Fron- 
tier", which showed how his company 
is now growing giant kelp plants in the 
Pacific Ocean. After the movie he ex- 
plained that from the giant kelp, which 
is familiarly called "seaweed," a pro- 
duct known as Algin is obtained. This 
product is now used in many food pro- 
ducts today. Its moisture retention ten- 
dency has made it invaluable for such 
purposes as stabilization, producing 
stable emulsions, and increasing the body 
structure of our foods. 

After much correspondence between 
Dr. Turner, our faculty advisor, and 
club officers with two business con- 
cerns - Knouse Foods of Harrisburg and 
The Hershey Company, Hershey, Pa., our 
annual club trip was planned. Because a 
day off from school was necessary for 
this trip, the club thought that it was 
best to use the time to its best advan- 
tage. That is why tours were arranged 
at both places. 

.At the Knouse Foods plant, where the 
main product in the winter months is 
apples, we were divided into three 
groups with a company supervisor for 
each group showing us their facilities 
and explaining what was occurring as 
we went along. Afterwards, we were 



Varsity Club 
On The Move 

The Varsity Club is doing its 
part to make this year's "A-Day" 
the most successful ever. After the 
members discussed what role the 
club could play in '69's annual 
event, a solution was reached. It 
was decided to pay tribute to the 
"Ambassadors of the College". The 
club members are erecting a bill- 
board to salute athletics in '69, 70, 
71, 72. On the bulletin board will 
be photos of the coaches, action 
shots, and team pictures. Also in- 
cluded are next year's intercollegi- 
ate schedules and the Varsity 
Club's sweater, jacket, and blanket. 

The purpose of this display is to 
encourage high school senior ath- 
letes to engage in Varsity sports at 
D.V.C. This will enable the young 
men to better themselves, their col- 
lege, and America. 

CLUB OFFICERS 
Gene Wallace President 

Don Stump Vice-President 

Don Sechler Secretary 
Jim Douglass Treasurer 
Wayne Mehalick "A-Day" Rep. 
Mr. Linta Advisor 



asked by the company to be their guests 
for lunch. 

After lunch we were off again, this 
time to Hershey. Chocolate Town, I 
guess, would be a more appropriate 
name. Through the correspondence with 
the company, arrangements had been 
made to have supervisory staff direct us 
through the plant there also. We were 
able to see the "behind-the-scene" 
operations, not just the normal tour that 
is usually shown, involved in the pro- 
cessing of cocao and chocolate. Here 
again we were fortunate to follow this 
up with a lecture given at a recent club 
meeting by Mr. Charles Hoffman, Pur- 
chasing Representative of the Tasty Bak- 
ing Company. Mr. Hoffman brought 
along films that he had taken on trips 
to Ghana and the Ivory Coast in Africa. 
His narration of the films gave us an 
idea of how these people live as well 
as what is happening on the cocao plan- 
tations. He described the many experi- 
ments now in progress which demon- 
strate how an increased yield of cocao 
beans per acre can be accomplished. 

This, then, is a review of what our 
club has done to see that its members 
receive the applied knowledge so neces- 
sary in today's business world. It, how- 
ever, would not have been possible 
without the help of Dr. Turner and the 
club members, who, through their ef- 
forts in the club's two financial pro- 
jects — selling pop corn at the football 
games and working at "A" Day weekend 
— gave financial support to the club. 
The money earned from these projects 
enabled us to reimburse the student 
drivers for gas expenses and provide xe- 
freshments after meetings when we had 
speakers. It also enabled us to present 
Dr. Turner with a gift from the club at 
our banquet for the time and effort he 
lias donated to the club. 



AGRONOMY CLUB 

PREPARES FOR 

A-DAY 

In an effort to make a good showing 
for the Agronomy Department of D.V.C. 
at A-Day, the Agronomy Club has begun 
preparations to exhibit many interesting 
and informative projects. Many of the 
club members have announced their in- 
tention of entering a project for the big 
event. Some of these are: Tom Robbins 
and Ted Debnam; Phil Jarinko, Mike 
Cope, and Don Delp; Bill Camerer and 
Bill Beers: Neal Hayes and Joe Kershner; 
Brian Bailey; and Jim Thomas and Craig 
Schaeffer. 

Most of these projects will be shown 
in the field corps lab in the basement of 
Segal Hall. One of our important tasks 
is to prepare this room for the exhibition 
of the projects. 

Many other projects have been started 
for next year. A scrapbook of club ac- 
tivities has been initiated. The main pur- 
pose for this scrapbook is that it will 
accompany the club members to the 
National Agronomy Convention in De- 
troit, Michigan. The club is also plan- 
ning on taking an exhibit along if room 
can be made available in Detroit. 

Another project is the Soil Judging 
team. Though not made only of Agron- 
omy majors, the team is considered to be 
a part of the club. Right now the inter- 
collegiate team is preparing for the con- 
test, which is scheduled to be held next 
Fall at the University of Maryland. 

As one can see, the Agronomy Club 
is really keeping itself busy, and it is 
destined to become one of the most ac- 
tive clubs on campus, through the efforts 
of its members and the advisors, Dr. 
Prundeanu and Mr. Stratton. 

SCSA 

Tours 
Strip-Mine 

On April 14, 1969, the Delaware Valley 
College Student Chapter of The Soil Conser- 
vation Society of America journeyed to the 
anthracite strip mine region of Pennsylvania. 
The region comprises the Counties of Car- 
bon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill. Our guide for 
the day was Dr. Miroslaw M. Czapowskyj of 
the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in 
Kingston, Pa. 

This area tops the list in its need for con- 
servation practices. Many experiments are being 
conducted, but these are just experiments— not 
actual practices which are much needed to help 
this] area. One who hasn't seen this area per- 
sonally cannot realize the full extent of the 
problem nor can they understand the challenge 
this area presents to the conservationist. 

In the morning we saw the largest earth 
moving shovel in Pennsylvania. It holds 84 
cubic yards of earth per load. After this we 
journeyed to actual spoils areas resulting from 
strip mining operations. Tree planting is the 
major effort both in stabilization of these piles 
and in disguising their unsightly appearance. 
Another project we visited was planting of 
crownvetch for stabilization and beauty. The 
acidity of spoils materials makes liming neces- 
sary for existence of any biological activity. 

We ended the afternoon with a trip through 
the Pioneer Coal Tunnel in Ashland. This area 
is part of the heritage of "Penn'i Woods". If 
you get an opportunity to visit this area, don't 
pass it up. 




Hort 

Establishes 

Experimental 

Orchard 



With Mr. Frecon directing, the new 
orchard is officially underway. Several 
weeks ago 120 dwarf and semi-dwarf 
rootstock apple trees were delivered and 
placed in cold storage in the basement 
of the Horticulture building. The orchard 
is being located on the hill behind the 
incinerator on the other side of the rail- 
road tracks, an area provided with ade- 
quate drainage and protection against 
freering. The Junior Field Laboratory 
students measured and laid out the or- 
chard and plowing was done by Jim 
Bowersox. The actual planting is being 
done by the Sophomore Field Labora- 
tory class. Hopefully the new orchard 
will be completed by A-Day. 




Hort Majors (from left to right) Joe 
Petrosky, Ken Raymond and Joe Bert 
plant a young fruit tree under the di- 
rection of Hort instructor Mr. Frecon. 




Many communities in the anthracite region 
are surrounded by a panorama of un- 
sightly coal-mine spoils. This is Girardville, 
in Schuylkill County. 



(Left to right) Brian Steager, Bob 
Precheur, Steve Troth and George 
Lovell construct protective wire guards. 

Also, under the supervision of Mr. 
Howell, the old peach and apple or- 
chards have undergone quite a trans- 
formation. Both orchards have been 
pruned and fertilizer will soon be ap- 
plied. In addition, Mr. Howell hopes to 
set up a regular spray and maintenance 
schedule for the summer months. 

Congratulations to the Horticulture 
Society. Mr. Frecon, Mr. Howell, and 
particularly to those freshmen who so 
generously gave of their time pruning 
the orchards. The College can indeed be 
proud of the outstanding job that these 
fellows have done. 

On Thursday, March 21, Henry Fre- 
con, Bill Williams, and Fran Lippay, 
who represented the Horticulture So- 
ciety and who had worked for the Na- 
tional Apple Institute, a nationwide or- 
ganization for the promotion of apples, 
traveled to the Sheraton Hotel in Phila- 
delphia. While there they attended a 
meeting held by the Philadelphia Dental 
Association. The three seniors answered 
questions about the apple industry and 
the relationship between apples and 
good dental health. They also handed 
out literature and apples. 

The Horticulture Society is making 
plans for a trip to Adams County, Pa., 
on May 9, 1969. There the students will 
visit the Adams County Nursery owned 
by Mr. Baugher. They will also visit the 

(Continued on page 6) 



May 3, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



CANDIDATES (cont'd from p. 1) 

Class of 70 

President — Rich Palmasano 

Vice President — 
Leonard DiGiantomasso 

Secretary — Larry Gerber 

Treasurer — Gary Filko 

S. G. Rep. - Sol Caviness 
Gery Fisher 
Ron Gingerich 
Mark Uebersax 
Bob Winner 

Student Government President — 
Gery Fisher 

Suspension 
Stirs Freshmen 

Freshmen residents of Wolfsohn Hall 
were disturbed when they received word 
that a suspended member of their class 
who had been given permission to stay 
in the dorm till the end of the week ( be- 
cause of transportation difficulties) was 
asked to leave sooner. The man, who had 
received a hearing before the Student 
Affairs Committee, was suspended for 
having two female overnight guests in 
his room prior to spring vacation. 

When approached concerning the mat- 
ter Mr. Fulcoly, Dean of Students, point- 
ed out that it is normal policy that a 
suspension to be immediate and that 
permission to stay till the end of the 
week was an exception to the general 
policy. 

Mr. Fulcoly said that the matter was 
reconsidered and it was subsequently 
decided that the freshman in question 
did in actuality have a transportation 
"problem and was informed that he could, 
as originally told, stay till the end of the 
week. 



R-EM-I-N-D-E-R 

PUBLICATIONS 

BANQUET 

May 7th 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.-FRI. 9-7 - SAT. *4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

Samuel Moyer 

Master Barber 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



L~omoitlt i/ravtl ^tri 



Air line 
Ticksts 



rranaimtnl 



*f 



Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 343-1223 



Confemporary 

Club To Sponsor 

Mixer 

The Contemporary Club will 
hold one of this campus' first club 
sponsored mixers on Friday, May 
9th. The Saturday Niite will be 
the featured group. Also on the 
bill will be The Ovations and a 
light show by the Gettysburg 
Steam and Light Company. The 
club has made a determined effort 
to bring the mixer to the attention 
of many women's colleges and 
nursing institutions, etc., many of 
which have never been approached 
before. It is hoped that this extra 
effort will be rewarded by a good 
female attendance. All aspects of 
our campus mixers for example, re- 
freshments, admission procedure 
and the like have been examined 
and it is the hope of the Contem- 
porary Club that improvements 
can be initiated to make this mixer 
one of the, if not the, best of the 
year. 

Donald Barnhouse 

Addresses 

Business Club 

On Thursday, March 27, the 
Delaware Valley College Collegi- 
ate Chapter of the Administrative 
Management Society was char- 
tered. The purpose of the group is 
to promote the identification, de- 
velopment, and dissemination of 
modern business management tech- 
niques and philosophies. Mr. Spen- 
cer Everhart, manager of the Na- 
tional office of the AMS was the 
main speaker. Also in attendance 
were Mr. Ira Chelton of the Col- 
lege Accounting office, who is also 
a past president of the Montgom- 
ery County Chapter, which spon- 
sors the group, along with various 
members of the faculty. Stan Sitar- 
ski, Chapter president, received the 
charter on behalf of the group. 

Don Chance, Pete Miller, and 
Mr. G. Handler were guests of the 
Montgomery County Chapter at 
their Top Management Night Ban- 
quet on April 15. The guest speak- 
er was Mr. Donald Barnhouse, 
News Analyist for WCAU Tele- 
vision of Philadelphia. 



Boston Shoe 

STORE 

12 South Main Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

LATEST STYLES IN FOOTWEAR 
FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 



PMAI 

PSYCHE 





and 



SOUL 



V>7 



\,ec 



S« 



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**«* 




DID YOU KNOW ? 

that Charles Chaplin, famed baggy-pants comic of the silent screen, 
celebrated his 80th birthday on Thursday, April 17, in Vevey, Switzer- 
land? 

that Goldie of Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In is now filming scenes 
for a new movie called "Cactus Flower" and starring Ingrid Bergman 
and Walter Mathau? 

that the Electric Factory in Philadelphia was once a tire warehouse? 

that the Latin Casino will feature Liberace from Monday, April 21 
to Sunday, May 11? Tony Bennett will be there Monday, May 12 to 
Sunday, May 18. Diana Ross and the Supremes will be there from 
Monday, June 2 to Sunday, June 15. 

that Johnny Cash is going to have a summer television show and 
that his first guest will be Bob Dylon? 

that the Fillmore East in New York City will feature The Who on 
May 16 and 17, and that Sly and The Family Stone will be there on 
May 23 and 24? 

that the Ringling Brothers-Barnum and Bailey Circus is now at Mad- 
ison Square Garden and it will be there until May 11? 

that Carnegie Hall in New York will feature the Buffalo Philhar- 
monic Orchestra on Wednesday, May 7, at 8:30? 

that Broadside Magazine, the foremost folk magazine of the Boston 
area, has published their Broadside Poll? The results: 

best female performer Judy Collins 

best writer Joni Mitchell 

best instrumentalist Pete Janch 

best cut on an album "Clouds" by Dave Van Ronk 

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER 

And what a night it was! Yes, the Class of 70 pulled through with 
another roaring success. On Saturday night, April 19, 1969, the Class of 
70, for the first time ever, sponsored a Junior Prom. The elegant setting 
of this Prom was the Fiesta Mohawk Motor Inn in Willow Grove, Pa. 
Held in the "Cactus Room", those who attended the Prom were full of 
high spirits and great enthusiasm. Greeting the fifty couples that at- 
tended the affair was a receiving line composed of: Dr. and Mrs. Work, 
Dr. and Mrs. Turner, Dean and Mrs. Fucoly, and class advisor, Dr. 
French. The music was provided by the Don Peebles' Orchestra and 
they played a variety of music including the "Hokey-Pockey." The Juniors 
were very grateful for having an "open bar" which made the evening a 
more enjoyable one. As it stands now, the Class of 70 is eagerly antici- 
pating their Senior Prom next year. Whatever that may be, it will truly 
oe another night to remember. 

AROUND CAMPUS 





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Work is progressing at a rapid rate and completion of our new library wings 

is an event anticipated by all. 



THE FURROW 

VOL. 16 
1969-1970 



the 





URROW 



Vol. 16, No. 1 



^mt JUtudtni r/ewjpaptr 
rJj*'awari Va"*if L,oll»a* of ^Sdtnct ana ^faricttiL 



October 2, 1969 



New Courses Offered 



In This Issue 

Page 

Financial Aid 1 

Letters To Editor 3 

S. G, President 4 

Frosh Registration 5 

Club News 6 

Entertainment 6-7 

Customs Regulations 7 

Sports 8 

"Frosh, Guess Whose Birthday It is"? 
Customs started Friday the 26th of 
September and The Furrow camera 
was there to capture this birthday 
salute to the Segal Hall trash tin. 

■MM 



Besides the up-dating which has 
been undertaken in some courses 
offered, a new Ethology course, an 
Advanced Math Program, and a 
new Woodlot Management course 
will be offered this semester. 

The new Ethology course, taught 
by Dr. Mertz, will involve itself 
with the study of animal behavior 
from the standpoint of how an ani- 
mal's behavior helps it to operate 
efficiently in its natural environ- 
ment. The inception of Ethology 
can be traced back to Europe of 
the 1930's, with Konrad Lorenz con- 
cidered the Father of the young 
study. The lab portion of the course 
offered at D.V.C. will be mainly 
devoted to the experimental study 

Open Door Still 
In The Air — 

September 22, 1969. Student Govern- 
ment in an extended session tonight un- 
varied their Open Door proposal which, 
at' least in principle, has been accepted 
by the Administration. A misunderstand- 
ing apparently prompted Government 
Members to assume that the proposal 
had been fully accepted by the Adminis- 
tration and as a result S. G. set October 
5, 1969, for the inititation of Female 
Visitation. Even though Open Door has 
been approved in principle, more defini- 
tion and clarity of the mechanics in- 
volved have to be resolved before the 
Open Door Proposal can be actually im- 
plimented. 

Further developments could possibly 
evolve at the September 30th meeting 
of the Student Government, and these, 
should they develop, will be covered in 
the next issue. 

Financial 
Aid Snag 

Because of both a cut in Federal 
monies for student financial aid 
and State budget problems some 
students may have experienced de- 
lays in receiving their needed finan- 
cial aid this year. The appropria- 
tion for National Defense Student 
Loans was reduced 35% and that re- 
duction affects all colleges. This 
35% reduction is magnified by the 
factors of increased enrollment and 
the increased cost of living. If that 
wasn't enough of a problem, the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education As- 
sistance Agency were extremely 
late in granting their awards. This 
probably was the result of delays 
in the passage of a state budget. 
Also, in most cases, anyone with 
full-time use of an automobile was 
not awarded money. When the 
scholarships finally were awarded 
it meant that adjustments had to 



of the behavior of aquatic animals. 

This year a number of qualified 
Freshmen will have the opportunity 
to take an advanced Matn course. 
Twenty-six men from the areas of 
Agriculture, Biology, and Business 
Administration will be able to sub- 
stitute the more advanced Math III 
for Math I. The individuals were 
selected on the basis of high school 
grades in math and on the results 
of standaradized tests that they 
took. 

The course Woodlot Management 
will be offered again this semester 
after its short absence from the cur- 
riculum. The course, formerly 
taught by Prof. Forbes, will now be 
taught by Mr. Stratton. Woodlot 
Management is an elective course. 

Audubon Society 
On Campus 

A Bucks County Chapter of the Na- 
tional Society has recently been formed 
on campus. The new organization is open 
to members of the Student Body, Facul- 
ty, and any citizen in the county with an 
interest in conservation. The society will 
meet monthly on campus, offering pro- 
grams of lectures, films, field trips and 
community projects dealing with the con- 
servation of natural resources and nature 
lore. Through the efforts of several 
groups of interested citizenry the chapter 
was formed in August. Prominent among 
those involved in the formation of the 
organization are Lester Thomas, former 
Chief Naturalist of the Bucks County 
Park Commission; Mrs. Wilbur Forrest, 
resident of New Hope, Pennsylvania, and 
Florida, and Vice President of the Florida 
Audubon Society; Mr. Raymond Hen- 
(Continued on page 6, col. 2) 

FROSH 
EXTORTED 

(September 26—6:30 P.M.) It was 
reported today that one or more Sopho- 
mores are employing a particular strange 
method of selling the Varsity Club Raf- 
fle tickets. A complaint was registered by 
one Freshmen, who said that he was 
threatened with work-day penalties if he 
refused to purchase a one dollar quantity 
of tickets. This problem is not uncommon 
and it crops up each year. The Furrow 
would at this time like to caution all 
Freshmen against complying with any 
requests other than those of a reasonable 
nature or those specifically discussed in 
the Handbook or List of Rules for Cus- 
toms. If you doubt the validity of a de- 
mand, surrender one work card and reg- 
ister a complaint with the President of 
the Sophomore Class immediately. 

be made here at the College, caus- 
ing further delays and headaches 
for College officials as well as 
students. 

Many students in the Financial 
(Continued on page 2, col. 3) 




Group of frosh sing happy birthday to a randomly selected trash can. 

Compulsory Linen . . . Why? 



As of this school year Delaware 
Valley College has made linen ser- 
vice compulsory for resident stu- 
dents. The charges for the service 
were included on the bill this year 
whether students wanted it or not. 
Some apparently didn't, and a num- 
ber of complaints have been heard 
as a result. In an effort to clear 
matters up a bit the Furrow ap- 
proached the Dean of Men, Mr. 
Fulcoly, about the reasons for the 

Job Interview 
Schedule 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6 

Indus. Hygienist, Water Pollution Control Spec., 

Microbiologist, Sanitarian, and Associate 

Radiation Health Physicist 

A. T. Diresta, Chief 

Manpower Resources 

Pa. Dept. of Health, P.O. Box 90, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 17120 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15 
Supervisory Capacity— Heavy Landscaping 
Turf Management for Turf Farm 
Dominic T. Cacavio, President 
Mercer Contracting Co. of Trenton, Inc., 
53 Flock Rd., Trenton, N.J. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 20 
Sales-Production Management Trainees 
I .avid L. Jeffries, Employment Manager 
Oscar Mayer & Co., P.O. Box 8078, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19101 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22 
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23 
Feed Sales Trainees for Northeastern U.S. 
J. R. Hoover, District Sales Manager 
Ful-O-Pep Div. of Allied Mills, Inc., 
P.O.B. 40, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28 

U.S. Army Officer Candidate Selection Team, 

401 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 29 
Bank Examiner Trainee 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
630 Chestnut Street, Suite 972, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 19106 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30 

Lieut of Marines— management type positions 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31 

Capt. Polyascko, U.S. Marine Corps 

Officer Selection Office, Bldg. 101, 

U.S. Naval Base, Philadelphia, Pa. 19112 



linen service change. The Dean 
first stated that Klines, who former- 
ly supplied student linen, had been 
dropped because of student com- 
plaints about their service. Mary 
Macintosh Student Services, by Al- 
len Laundry, was retained to re- 
place Klines. The change-over 
means greater service to the stu- 
dents. For instance, an Allen repre- 
sentative will be on hand on linen 
distribution days to iron out any 
problems should they arise. Also 
the change creates a number of 
student job openings. Because of 
the increased service and benefits 
from Allen it was necessary to make 
the linen service compulsory for 
resident students in order to reduce 
the cost to students. The cost is 
very nominal at $28 for 30 weeks 
and each student is safeguarded by 
fresh linen each week. Since over 
65% of the resident students request 
linen service anyway, it was felt it 
would be in the interest of the ma- 
jority to keep rates low by making 
the service compulsory. Many other 
colleges have had compulsory linen 
service for years. All in all, it was 
felt that the change was in the best 
interests of the Student Body and 
that was the main reasoning behind 
the switch. 



Voice YOUR Opinions 

Through YOUR 
Student Newspaper, 
THE FURROW 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 




*Jke Juzzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 
devoted to the interest of the 
students of Delaware Valley College 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR John Martin 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Milt. Morgan 

INFORMATION SERVICES Harvty Goodwin 

SPORTS STAFF Bob Edwards, Lou Hedges, Tim Barman, Howard Henderson 

PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF Abbot Loo, Mike Morgan, Bob Krach 

LAYOUT Ulf Wohlfald 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Lao Strassburgar 

BUSINESS MANAGERS Pete Higgins, Dava Taichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dalbart Jonas 

-GENERAL STAFF- 
Sol Cavlnos, John Furphy, Carl Pfitienmayer, Bill Strode, Milton Parker, Bob Perry, 

Allan Gordon, Larry Martal, Walt Ault 
-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR Josoph E, Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Mortz 

The Furrow is published twice a month by the above concerned students of 
Delaware Valley College. It should be noted that the opinions expressed in 
this newspaper are those of the respective authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the college. 



CONVO-6 



Convo 6, the sixth Annual Convention 
of the North Atlantic Association of Col- 
lege and University Resident Halls, was 
held on September 3-6, 1969, at The 
Rochester Institute of Technology, Roch- 
ester, New York. 

Convo 6 was a forum for the exchange 
of ideas by students involved with col- 
lege and university resident halls. It of- 
fered an orientation to new resident hall 
leaders and a perspective for experi- 
enced leaders on the national scene. 

The National Association of College 
and University Resident Halls was 
founded twelve years ago by students to 
exchange ideas and information and to 
stimulate thinking on common problems 
among resident hall leaders. Such com- 
munication will hopefully make a posi- 
tive contribution to the total educational 
process at colleges and universities across 
the nation. 

The North Atlantic Association of Col- 
lege and University Resident Halls is one 
of the six regional organizations which 
comprise the national organization. There 
are twenty-seven member schools in the 
region and it extends from Quebec to 
Virginia. 

Membership of NACURH? Any col- 
lege or university may become a member 
of this organization by applying to their 
regional president and paying of Na- 

Morrelli New 
Admissions Dean 

Mr. Joseph Morrelli, former Business 
Instructor and Assistant Football Coach, 
has been appointed to head the Admis- 
sions Office. The position had, until this 
summer, been headed by Mr. Hartley 
who left Delaware Valley College to 
enter graduate school for his doctorate. 
Mr. Morrelli received his B.S. and M.S. 
at Temple University, and, before com- 
ing to Delaware Valley College, he 
taught and was athletic director at Holy 
Cross High School in River Side, New 
Jersey. Mr. Morrelli said that he took 
the position because of its challenge and 
because the job was in line with what he 
really likes to do. 

Mr. Morrelli and his wife, Marcia, be- 
came parents on July 12th with the birth 
of their son, Peter Joseph Morrelli. They 
have recently moved from their campus 
residence to a home of their own in 
Brittany Farms in Chalfont. The Mor- 
relli family was kind enough to pose for 
the photograph that appears in this issue. 

Being Head of the Admissions Office 
has become an increasingly demanding 
job with the surge in enrollment. This 
year Freshmen and Transfer students 
numbered 320, making it the largest class 
in College history. With this addition 
the enrollment at Delaware Valley Col- 
lege jumped from 860 to 925 day stu- 
dents. A large number of these new 
students chose areas of study in Agri- 
culture. In fact 60% of the increase in 
enrollment is due to students who have 
chosen Agriculture as their area of study. 



tional and Regional dues. Voting privi- 
leges shall be extended only to those 
schools which have paid their dues by 
December 1. 

The convention program included 
speakers from universities that have dealt 
with resident hall problems. There was 
an Architectural Facilities Committee re- 
port and many discussion groups with 
topics such as: 

1 . "Student Goveranoe" 

2. "Drugs in the Resident Hall" 

3. "Freshman Orientation" 

4. "Student Facilities" 

5. "Visitation Programs" 

6. "Resident Hall Damages" 

7. "Conflict and Riot" 

The business meetings and elections 
were of major importance to many stu- 
dents. 

This convention was attended by Mr. 
Gery Fisher, President of Student Gov- 
ernment, and Mr. Fredrick Harteris, Jun- 
ior Class President. They found this con- 
vention very interesting and a learning 
experience. The convention was attended 
mostly by representatives from large uni- 
versities rather than small colleges. 
NACURH is seeking to become known, 
to make new memberships, and set up 

{>olicies which the association can fol- 
ow. Communication between schools is 
a major problem. The member schools 
do riot spend very much time setting up 
programs to find resident hall problems 
and to find solutions to these problems. 
The business meetings were very poli- 
tically-biased because the election of of- 
ficers followed the last meeting and the 
schools attending the meeting were 
mostly concerned about the elections. 

The portion of the convention which 
could be helpful to our resident halls 
was the presentation of guest speaker 
Dr. Harold Grant of Michigan State 
University. He spoke about the type of 
atmosphere a counselor or resident hall 
leader should build. He spoke about 
public relations, making the residents 
feel at home and among friends, and 
how to arrange conditions which would 
make the students responsive to policies 
and rules, without making then feel out 
of place. We feel that NACURH would 
not be very beneficial to us, because of 
its unorganized situation and lack of 
communications. Most of the schools at- 
tending and students present were from 
liberal arts schools, and only a few stu- 
dents were in science curriculums. 

As Non-members we still can receive 
data on problems and solutions from 
the University of Kansas, Kansas. 

We thought this convention might be 
a workshop for dormitory counselors 
where we could learn shout handling 
students and student problems, but there 
were only a few ideas that could aid our 
College in its resident hall situation. 




Test Dates For 
National Teacher 
Exams Announced 

PRINCETON, N. J., September 15. Col- 
lege seniors preparing to teach school 
may take the National Teacher Examina- 
tions on any of the four different test 
dates announced today by Educational 
Testing Service, a nonprofit, educational 
organization which prepares and ad- 
ministers this testing program. 

New dates for the testing of prospective 
teachers arc: November 8, 1969, and 
January 31, April 4, and July 18, 1970. 
The tests will be given at nearly 500 
locations throughout the United States, 
ETS said. 

Results of the National Teacher Exami- 
nations are used by many large school 
districts as one of several factors in the 
selection of new teachers and by several 
states for certification or licensing of 
teachers. Some colleges also require all 
seniors preparing to teach to take the 
examinations. The school systems and 
state departments of education which use 
the examination results are designated in 
the Bulletin of Information for Candi- 
dates. 

On each full day of testing, prospective 
teachers may take the common Examina- 
tions, which measure their professional 
preparation and general cultural back- 
ground, and a Teaching Area Examina- 
tion which measures mastery of the sub- 
ject they expect to teach. 

Prospective teachers should contact 
the school systems in which they seek 
employment, or their colleges, for speci- 
fic advice on which examinations to take 
and on which dates they should be taken. 

The Bulletin of Information for Can- 
didates contains a list of test centers, 
and information about the examinations, 
as well as a Registration Form. Copies 
may be ohtained from college placement 
officers, school personnel departments, or 
directly from National Teacher Examina- 
tions, Box 911, Educational Testing Ser- 
vice, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

FINANCIAL AID— (Continued) 

confusion decided to apply for 
State Guarantee Loans (7% inter- 
est instead of National Defense 3% 
interest). 

Despite all of the problems and 
the delays, the College has manag- 
ed to assist all students who have 
a real need of financial help. Al- 
most 400 students will be receiving 
some sort of financial aid this sem- 
ester. The college also offers a tui- 
tion plan to students to help re- 
lieve some of the financial pressure. 
Students on this plan can pay their 
expenses over a long period, a small 
amount each month. 

All of the College's financial aid 
is based on need as determined by 
the Parents Confidential Statement 
which must be submitted annually. 
Problems can and do result because 
of filing these statements late. It is 
very important that these state- 
ments be correctly filled out and re- 
turned on time to avoid delays and 
possible loss of financial aid. 

Inter - Dorm 
Council Proposed 

This organization will serve to 
strengthen the existing Dorm Counselor 
organization and to expand the jurisdic- 
tion of the Student Court into some dorm 
regulations. The I.D.C. will function in 
the same manner as a club with an ad- 
visor and elected officers. The Council 
will help regulate dorm life: fire drills, 
inter- and intra-dorm activities, dorm 
safety, bulletin boards, and special dorm 
problems. 

(Continued on page 6, col. 3) 



Educational Testing Service 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
For further information contact: 
Graduate Record Examinations Program 
(609) 921-9000 

PRINCETON, N. J. - Educational Test- 
ing Service has announced that special 
testing dates and special test centers in 
seven major cities have been established 
for the Graduate Record Examinations 
for the 1969-70 academic year. 

This special service makes possible the 
testing of candidates who cannot take the 
tests on one of the six regular test ad- 
ministration dates previously announced 
for the Graduate Record Examinations 
National Program for Graduate School 
Selection. Because of the additional ex- 
penses incurred in offering this special 
service, a service fee of $5 is added to 
the regular examination fee. The special 
administration centers will be located in 
Austin, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
New York City, San Francisco, and Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

The Graduate Record Examinations in 
this program include an Aptitude Test of 
general scholastic ability and Advanced 
Tests of achievement in 21 major fields 
of study. Candidates are urged to deter- 
mine from preferred graduate schools or 
fellowship committees which of the 
examinations they should take and when 
they should be taken. Applicants should 
also be sure that they take the test in 
time to meet the deadlines of their in- 
tended graduate school, graduate depart- 
ment, or fellowship granting agency. 
Early registration also ensures that the 
individual can be tested on the test date 
of his choice. 

Full details and registration forms 
needed to apply for the Special Adminis- 
trations are contained in tS<j Graduate 
Record Examinations Sped J Administra- 
tion Prospectus for Candidates. The 
booklets may be requested from: Educa- 
tional Testing Service, 2813 Rio Grande 
Street, Austin, Texas ^O.S; 960 Grove 
Street, Evanston, I'linc .s 60201; Box 
1502, Berkeley, California 94704; P.O. 
Box 955, Princeton. New Jersey 08540; 
One Du Pont Circle, Washington, D.C. 
20036; Fordham University Counseling 
Center, Dealy Hall, Bronx, New York 
10458; and Educational Research Corpor- 
ation, 10 Craigie Street, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts 02138. 

GRADUATE 
AND 

UNDER-GRAD 
WORK AT 
LONGWOOD 

Longwood Gardens, in Pennsylvania's 
Chester County, one of the world's finest 
public display gardens, offers both grad- 
uate and undergraduate programs to 
Horticultural students from the United 
States and abroad. Two Delaware Valley 
College Ornamental Horticulture Grad- 
uates, Walt Bobb and Bill Graham, are 
presently involved in the Longwood Fel- 
low Program at the University of Dela- 
ware. They, along with other top stu- 
dents from American colleges and uni- 
versities, are working for tneir Masters 
degrees with funds supplied by the 
Longwood Foundation. Walt is in his 
final year of study while Bill is in his 
first year of the program. 

Longwood Gardens also offers an un- 
dergraduate Summer Plant Materials 
Laboratory. It is a study-work program 
blending academic and applied study 
and it is conducted in conjunction with 
the University of Delaware for three 
credits. Each year approximately 15 stu- 
dents are selected to participate from 
among colleges and universities through- 
out the United States. This year three 
students from Delaware Valley College, 
Rick Hider '70, John D. Martin '70 and 
Butch Parker '71 were among those se- 
lected to participate in this ten-week 
program. Rick and John are both Orna- 
mental Horticulture majors and Butch 
is in Horticulture. Last year two Orna- 
mental Horticulture Majors, Quentin 
Schleider 70 and Don Snively '70, spent 
their summer of work and study at Long- 
wood Gardens. 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



New Faculty 
Members Announced 

As we return to college this year we 
will be greeted by some new faces: eigh- 
teen to be exact. The following are the 
new men that have been added to the 
faculty for the 1969-1970 academic year. 
The FURROW would like to take this 
opportunity to welcome them and wish 
them the best in their new positions. 

Additions to the Faculty for the 1969- 
1970 academic year: 

Mr. Darryl N. Brown 
Instructor in Agronomy 

Mr. Frederick G. Clark 
Associate Professor of 
Business Administration 

Mr. William S. Croushore 
Instructor in Animal Science 

Mr. Walter A. Gross 
Assistant Professor of 
Animal Science 

Mr. Michael Gross ( Part-time ) 
Special Instructor in Chemistry 

Mr. Edward G. Heinle 
Assistant Professor of 
Animal Science 

Mr. Frank Kappler (Part-time) 
Special Instructor in Chemistry 

Mr. John C. Lukis 

Instructor of Physical Education 

Mr. Floyd G. Marshall 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Mr. William J. Mitchell 
Instructor in Agriculture 

Mr. Michael R. Mocciola 
Assistant Professor of Math. 

Mr. Sheldon Novak 
Assistant Professor in 
Business Administration 

Mr. Richard F. Neulight 
Instructor in General Studies 

Mr. Martin R. Schlissel 
Associate Professor of 
Business Administration 

Mr. Andrij V. Szul 

Special Instructor in Music 

' Dr. Charles W. Weber 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Mr. George F. West 
Assistant Professor in 
Business Administration 

Band Gets 
New Leader 

Meet Mr. Szul, the new band leader. 
His manner immediately appealed to 
the freshmen he met with to discuss 
plans for the new season. Mr. Szul is 
very enthusiastic but also careful not to 
bite off too much. 

His many new ideas will rejuvinate 

DVC's band. First he plans to build a 
band, not a marching unit, to start the 
football season. He would like to de- 
velop small groups to present in a con- 
cert. To encourage band members, plans 
were begun to have field trips and pos- 
sibly hold parties. 

Also he will lead the Glee Club and 
teach Music Appreciation. Mr. Szul will 
be trying very hard. He deserves our 
support. Freshmen and upperclasmen : 
come out and join the group. 




Health Services 
Expanded 

In response to our increased enroll- 
ments, the College's Infirmary has ex- 
panded its facilities to meet the added 
demand. Among the improvements is the 
addition of an office for private medical 
consultation. This is a great improvement 
over the old, crowded, one-room treat- 
ment area. The new private office is 
equipped with an examination table and 
other modern diagnostic equipment. The 
new facility will promote individual pa- 
tient care and a better doctor-patient re- 
lationship. In the expansion, room #105 
of Ulman Hall has been annexed by the 
infirmary for use in overnight treatment. 
Nurse Potts will now reside on campus 
to help Mr. Linta in providing round-the- 
clock medical help should the need arise. 

These improvements and additions will 
increase student health service measur- 
ably and provide more broad medical 
care and more personal medical care to 
an ever-growing student body. 

Students are urged to check the bulle- 
tin boards for the proper procedure to 
follow in the event of an accident or 
emergency. All students should familiar- 
ize themselves with this procedure. 

Big Brother 
Announcement 

The Big Brother program has been a 
part of DVC for many years. As chair- 
man for this year, I have varied the pro- 
gram slightly. Rather than match people 
by locale, I tried it by major. Hopefully 
each Big Brother can help by explaining 
the clubs and other activities of his major 
to the little brother. 

I invite ideas or comments on the pro- 
gram. Last year the program proved to 
be a useful introduction to college life 
for incoming Freshmen. 

I would also like to apologize to those 
who did not receive Big or Little Broth- 
ers. This is due to some of the paper 
work being lost. I would also like to 
thank all of those who have helped in the 
program. Without the cooperation of 
many of the upperclassmen the program 
could not exist. 

A Note of Thanks 

During the summer months much 
work was done in preparation for 
this year's Furrow. The editor 
would like to take this opportunity 
to thank the following who gave of 
their summer to help shape the 
paper: Dr. Mertz, Publication's Ad- 
visor, who was never too busy to 
give help and guidance; Mrs. Por- 
ter, Secretary to the Admissions Of- 
fice, who assisted greatly with re- 
gard to Freshmen showing interest 
in Publications; Quentin Schleider 
70 who helped with publication ad- 
vertising; Pete Higgins 72 who 
handled summer financial matters; 
Rick Hider 70 who contributed 
many ideas and able help; Mike 
Morgan 71, Furrow Associate Edi- 
tor, who handled summer photo- 
graphy and who coordinated cam- 
pus Publications operations during 
the summer months; Case Pfitzen- 
mayer 70, Co-Editor of the Glean- 
er, who assisted in Publications cor- 
respondence; and Miss Mary Ann 
Boettger of the University of Wis- 
consin at Madison who donated her 
time in typing assistance and whose 
interest in the Furrow was greatly 
appreciated. 

Since this is a note of thanks it is 
only fitting that a word or two be 



Letters 



ditor 



GEIGER RESIGNS 

I would like to take this space to announce my resignation as Junior Class 
Representative to Student Government. I am proud that my fellow students elected 
me to this office but for personal reasons I feel I should resign. I plan to do all I 
can to benefit the class and the College from an unofficial view point. 

I know many of the plaas that will come to the front in the S. G. this year. It 
will be an active year of progress if ideas are approached logically and handled with 
the careful time and planning they deserve. Someone said I should remain on the 
government but be "inactive". If I did this I would only be cheating myself, fellow 
students, and S. G. itself. Remember this when electing someone to my now vacated 
position. 

While I have the chance I would also like to take a minute to invite the new 
Freshmen and upperclassmen to attend the S. G. meetings or talk to their repre- 
sentatives for an accurate report of College activities. I would again like to thank 
those who supported me, and I resign only after much debate and consideration. 
I hope I can still remain active and help achieve our common goals. 

Sincerely, 
JOHN GEIGER 



New Parking 
Regulations?? 

Dear Editor: 

After two weeks of classes, I have 
found that the new parking system is 
not working. Not only are students park- 
ing in spaces alloted to other people, but, 
according to my information, the Ross 
guards have been ordered not ^ ticket 
these illegally parked vehicles. In fact, 
the Ross guards are only permitted to 
issue tickets to vehicles with invalid 
parking stickers, or if there is a 'serious' 
offense. 

This would surprise most people but it 
doesn't have any effect on me. Why have 
regulations if they are not going to be 
enforced? Late in the summer, when 
officials decided to assign numbered 
parking slots, the reasons and benefits 
stated included a reliable space when 
needed and the security of knowing who 
was parked on either side of you. From 
what I have discovered, if your slot is 
occupied you should seek the nearest 
open space and use it. Since this proce- 
dure has been used in numerous inci- 
dents so far this year, it appears rather 
useless to hold some forty spaces aside 
adjacent to the Ross office. 

Hopefully some improvements in park- 
ing procedures can be immediately af- 
fected. One very important one would 
be the enforcement of all parking regu- 
lations without bias. Those who find their 
slot occupied illegally should be required 
to notify the guard on duty and to tem- 
porarily park in one of the forty reserved 
spaces. 

Idealistically, the College's traffic and 
parking regulations are quite efficient 
but realistically (for the time being at 
least ) they have failed miserably. 
Sincerely, 
Jeff Wohlfeld 

included here thanking the many 
merchants and friends of the Col- 
lege who again this year have help- 
ed Publications by their advertis- 
ing. The best way for us, the stu- 
dents of Delaware Valley College, 
to show our appreciation is to pat- 
ronize these fine establishments. 
Some merchants, besides advertis- 
ing in D.V.C. Publications, have 
gone even farther in an effort to 
help the school and its students. 
For example, a number of business- 
es offer Del. Val. Student Dis- 
counts; others help with our Athle- 
tic Program, etc., etc. One quality 
men's store has donated part of 
their display window to honor Ag- 
gie Athletes and it regularly awards 
gift certificates to the top D.V.C. 
sportsmen. Consideration like this 
should be rewarded by our busi- 
ness. 



NFS Praised 

351 Main St. 
Tidioute, Pa. 16351 
September 18, 1969 

Editor(s) 
The Furrow 

Delaware Valley College 
Doylestown, Pa. 18901 
Dear Editors: 

I noticed, with a certain amount of 
dismay, the picture in the February 20 
Furrow, showing a sign in Doylestown 
stating that "DVC is not the Farm 
School." This attitude baffles me. Why 
is it that some DVC students v.annot or 
will not accept the heritage of their 
school? The Farm School v ,^ the pre- 
cursor, the very sire of the modern day 
DVC we know today. I am certain the 
alumni of the Farm School i:e proud 
their school has grown to >.ts present 
proportion, quality and reputation. Why 
is it that some of today's students cannot 
be just as proud of these achievements? 
DVC is the Farm School and in some 
small part, always will be. 

Sincerely, 
Harry E. Carlsen '67 

EARLY QUEEN 
SELECTION 

Becoming Homecoming Queen of Del- 
aware Valley College will take on added 
dimension and prestige this year. The 
queen, first of all, will be selected earlier 
than in years past. She will be selected 
at the first home football game but will 
not be formally crowned until Home- 
coming. This makes her a reigning queen 
and it allows us time to publicize our 
queen selection. Also our Homecoming 
Queen will be able to remember her 
reign, for it will be captured on the 
canvas of an original oil painting which 
will be awarded to her majesty. It is a 
timeless gift that can be cherished for 
many years to come. The other girls in 
the contest will, of course, receive mem- 
entos of their bid to become Queen of 
Delaware Valley College's Homecoming 
Celebration. It is hoped that this new 
Queen selection process will make the 
title Homecoming Oueen a more coveted 
one at Delaware Valley College. 

DEPARTMENT 
CHAIRMAN NAMED 

As of August 1st of this year three de- 
partments are now under new chairmen. 
Those departments affected are: Animal 
Science, General Studies, and Horticul- 
ture. Dr. Tibor Pelle is now chairman of 
the Animal Science Division. The Gen- 
eral Studies Department is now under 
the chairmanship of Dr. George R. Keys. 
And Dr. Clinton R. Blackmon has be- 
come Chairman of the Horticulture De- 
partment. The appointment of the chair- 
man of the Business Administration De- 
partment has not been announced as of 
this printing. 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



ALUMNI LANE 



TO READ AND TO LISTEN 



From the editor 



'Alumni Lane', an alumni news section, will be a continuing feature of the 
Furrow. It will be comprised of news and comments sent to the paper by alumni and 
stories that would be of particular interest to alumni. Its purpose is to give the Col- 
lege's many alumni an excellent medium in which to express their views to their 
fellow alumni as well as the Student Body, Faculty, and Administration. It can only 
be successful if you, the Alumni of Delaware Valley College, take advantage of this 
space and submit material. 

Bob Templeton '67, Marries 

Bob Templeton, class of 1967, was married to Arlene Hampel on November 
23, 1968. Bob is now serving a one-year tour of duty in Vietnam with the 25th 
Infantry. He left for Vietnam on February 18, 1969. 

Homecoming Party 

Following the sure-to-be-exciting Homecoming Football Game and the college 
football Centennial celebration an alumni after-the-game get-together will be held 
at the lovely, Little Joe's "Casa Collins" Ballroom at 209 Shewell Avenue, Doyles- 
town. The deadline for reservations is Wednesday, October 8, 1969. 

Leonard G. Siegel, A.I.A., Partner in the firm of Adleman, Siegel and Associates, 
Environmental Designers, has recently been appointed to serve on the Board of Gov- 
ernors of the Traffic and Transportation Council, Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. 
Mr. Siegel is a 1958 Delaware Valley College graduate. 



r8\i^irr«o»vr^r^>i>ir^ 



GOVT. PRES. speaks 

Anticipating an even more enthusiastic and progressive year here at 
Delaware Valley College, I express my hearty welcome back to the 
Upperclassmen. To you Freshmen, a very sincere welcome to our beau- 
tiful and friendly campus. With the aspiration of joining us with your 
ideas and involvement, we hope to make our college "The Place To Be." 

This year's Student Government is composed of well-qualified and 
dedicated men who have an anxious desire to help to improve our Col- 
lege, internally and externally. 

The Student Government will approach our internal affairs by dis- 
cussing and proposing recommendations to the Administration concern- 
ing College policies and regulations. The following will be major issues 
that will be acted upon by the Student Government: (1) open door 
policy; (2) dress code; (3) dining room; (4) citizenship grade; (5) 
grooming; (6) "cut" system; (7) student participation on the Curriculum 
and Student Affairs Committees; (8) assemblies; (9) parking lot; and, 
(10) other college policies. These are just a few of the issues that the 
Student Government will be debating. Many of the issues we will tackle 
will be of a lesser degree of impact, and these will be fully legislated by 
the Student Government itself. 

Each major issue that requires a recommendation to the Administra- 
tion will be intensively researched first in committee. There will be no 
rush to make judgment. Then the Student Government will decide what 
it thinks is the most logical resolution and forward it as our recommenda- 
tion to the Administration. And then, as President, I shall wholeheartedly 
support and present the recommendation to the Administration. 

Democracy requires patience. Likewise change requires patience. Un- 
fortunately many college students lack patience when it relates to change. 
The Delaware Valley College Student Government will act with patience, 
because then, I feel, change will come sooner in the end. 

The Student Government's approach to our external affairs will be 
more intensified and it will be broadened further than any former Stu- 
dent Government's tactics. We have planned a vigorous campaign to 
make our fine reputation known in the local community and neighboring 
colleges. At this year's Homecoming, the College has planned the best 
parade ever to march into Doylestown. Then, on November 8th, the 
Student Government will present in concert the fine sounds of THE 
BOXTOPS. The Student Government has great hopes of scheduling 
more mixers and concerts with fine entertainment. 

A new technique has been incorporated this year that will assuredly 
aid in our campaign for expanded recognition beyond our campus. In 
the beginning of September, Fred Harteis and I had the honor to attend 
a conference of 200 national residence hall leaders at Rochester Institute 
of Technology. Mr. Harteis intends to write a full report on the confer- 
ence for The Furrow. 

On September 19, 20, and 21, a member of the Administration and 
I will be attending a "Presidents to Presidents" Conference in Washing- 
ton, D. C. There we will meet members of the House and Senate, H.E.W., 
the Supreme Court, the Press, and representatives of Business. Mr. Robert 
Finch, Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, will address the 
conference. There is also the possibility that President Nixon or Vice 
President Agnew may address the conference. The objective of this 



KNOWLEDGE 



No, this is not a chemical equation but a knowledge equation, whereby the 
reactants bring about a strong reaction. It is the Colleges responsibility to furnish 
the student with the materials 'to read.' This material for the most part is theoretical. 
The applied aspect of knowledge must be gained elsewhere. This is where the im- 
portance of the campus clubs comes into play. Through the guidance of a faculty 
advisor and the initiative of club officers, professional people are asked to lecture at 
club meetings and club trips are also planned. 

Last year the Food Industry Club was fortunate enough to be able to blend 
both the 'Listen' and the 'Observe' aspects of the equation. To start this year's 
program, club members attended an Open-House held at the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture (U. S. D. A.) Research Center located in Wyndmour, Pa. This 
gave our members a chance to see what the Federal Government was accomplishing 
in the field of agricultural research. 

To complement the observing portion, Dr. Aaron Wasserman, a member of the 
Eastern Utilization Development and Research Division of the U. S. D. A. in Wynd- 
mour, presented some interesting information on the research being done in the 
fascinating field of Flavor, which many of us take for granted, to the members and 
guests of our club at our annual banquet. 

We were also fortunate to hear from a graduate of our College, Mr. David 
Lustig. Mr. Lustig, who is employed by the Johnson and Johnson Company, related 
information to us concerning his company's use of collagen— the protein substance 
found in animal hides. He explained that through research it was found that collagen 
could be used instead of sheep intestines, which once dominated the field, for sausage 
casings. This raw material, being much cheaper than sheep intestines, has enabled 
his company to cut the cost of such casings tremendously. He stated mat although 
at times we may think we are not learning very much, a good amount of the basic 
knowledge that we acquire at this College will be very useful in later years. 

One of the most amazing and interesting lectures was presented by Mr. Fred- 
erick Meyer of the Kelco Algin Company. Mr. Meyer's presentation consisted of a 
40-minute film on Aquaculture (ocean farming) called, "The Deep Frontier", which 
showed how his company is now growing giant kelp plants in the Pacific Ocean. 
After the movie he explained that from the giant kelp, which is famiUarly called 
"seawood", a product known as Algin is obtained. This product is now used in many 
foods today. Its moisture retention tendency has made it invaluable for such purposes 
as stabilization, producing stable emulsions, and increasing the body structure of our 
foods. 

After much • correspondence between Dr. Turner, our faculty advisor, club of- 
ficers, and two business concerns — Knouse Foods of Harrisburg and The Hershey 
Company, Hershey, Pa. — our annual trip was planned. Recause a day off from 
school was necessary for this trip, the club thought that it was best to use the time 
to its best advantage. That is why tours were arranged at both place*. 

At the Knouse Foods plant, where the main product in the winter months is 
apples, we were divided into three groups with a company supervisor showing each 
group their facilities and explaining what was occurring as we wen! jlong. After- 
wards, we were asked by the company to be their guests for lunch. 

After lunch we were off again, this time to Hershey. Chocolate Town, I guess, 
would be a more appropriate name. Through the correspondence with the company, 
arrangements had been made to have supervisory staff direct us through the plant 
there, also. We were able to see the 'behind-the-scene' operations that are involved 
in the processing of cocoa and chocolate, not just the normal tour. Here again we 
were fortunate to follow this up with a lecture given at a recent club meeting by 
Mr. Charles Hoffman, Purchasing Representative of the Tasty Raking Company. 
Mr. Hoffman brought along films that he had taken on trips to Ghana and the Ivory 
Coast in Africa. His narration of the films gave us an idea of how these people live 
as well as what is happening on the cocoa plantations. He described the many 
experiments now in progress which demonstrate how an increased yield of cocoa 
beansper acre can be accomplished . 

This, then, is a review of what our club has done to see that its members 
receive the applied knowledge so necessary in today's business world. It, however, 
would not have been possible without the help of Dr. Turner and the club membrs, 
who, through their efforts in the club's two financial projects — selling pop com at 
the football games and working at 'A' Day weekend — gave financial support to the 
club. The money earned from these projects enabled us to reimburse the student 
drivers for gas expenses and provided refreshments after meetings when we had 
guest speakers. It also enabled us to present Dr. Turner with a gift from the club at 
our banquet for the time and effort he has contributed to the club. 

With this article, I hope to give the new students, Freshmen as well as upper- 
classmen, and those who have decided to major in Food Industry, an idea of just 
what the Food Industry Club does throughout the year. This year we are hoping 
that more students will join the club and possibly bring new ideas with them. 
Unfortunately, by the time this edition is out we will already have had our first 
meeting. Hut our club is always open for anyone desiring to attend our meetings. 
The meetings are generally held on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each 
month, usually at 7:30 P. M. 

-JOHN FURPHY 

conference is to give us an opportunity to express our thoughts concern- 
ing campus problems with those involved in higher education in gov- 
ernment. 

Then, in late September, another conference is scheduled which will 
be of the utmost importance. Holy Family College will host the Phila- 
delphia area colleges for a conference to establish better relations among 
student leaders and for exchanging plans for the year's activities. Robert 
Winner, Solomon Caviness, and I will be representing our college. 

It is quite evident that these conferences will be very beneficial to 
our College for many reasons, our reputation, and our nation. 

We will assure that this year's Student Government will be an active 
governing organization. However, as former President Warren Hitz 
once wrote, "You, as students of Delaware Valley College, possess the 
potential to make this the greatest year in the history of our College. 
This goal, however, can only be achieved through your support of all 
the Student Government sponsored activities and functions.' 

As your President, I ask you for your support of Delaware Valley 
College and all its activities, so that we can say that our College is "The 
Place To Be." 

— Gery J. Fisher 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



W. C. FIELDS b&k 

Ah yes, it is the start of another school year at good old D.V.C. which 
must mean that Fall is fast approaching. But let us not forget what a 
great summer we all had working and slaving to meet the high cost of 
inflation. Well, that's how it was on my end of the stick. But what did 
we do for recreation this summer? Some of us, no doubt, spent a lot of 
time at the shore as there are numerous bronze bodies about the campus. 
Me? Well, if you really want to know I spent a lot ox time in front of 
that great pacifier of nerves, the boob tube. 

It seems to me that there is a trend in modern day television to re- 
vamp upon some of the movies of eras gone by. Whether this correlates 
with the fact that there is nothing left to show for summer viewing I 
cannot say, as I am not the large movie-goer type. One series of movies 
I did enjoy, however, ran for a week and was called, "The W. C. Fields 
Film Festival". It seems that the popularity of this picklenosed comedian 
of past decades is on a constant upswing, and T. V. personalities such as 
Johnny Carson and Merv Griffin have been giving Fields some free 
publicity. 

Comedy is a mercurial substance based on cruelty and stupidity. 
Some proclaim Charlie Chaplin as a genius. Others admire Laurel and 
Hardy. Jackie Gleason and Bob Hope have hold on millions of laughers. 
Who is the fairest of them all? No one can say, but I lean toward Fields. 



"Anybody who hates children and dogs can't be all bad." Fields de- 
spised — and was suspicious of — almost everybody and everything. When 
success came, he deposited his riches in many oanks across the nation, 
under many aliases. He figured they couldn't all collapse. 

Sadly, when he sobered up, he couldn't remember which banks or 
under what names. He was a pig-eyed juggler with a nose like a lavender 
doorknob. He couldn't bear to watch other comics at work. He walked 
out on a Charlie Chaplin movie. "What do you think of Chaplin?" some- 
one asked him later. Fields opened one corner of his mouth and snarled: 
"He's a goddamn ballet dancer." 

His real name was Claude William Dukenfield, born in Philadelphia 
to parents who beat him frequently for minor infractions. When he was 
about 11 or 12 he had had enough. He waited in the layloft for his father 
to harness a horse to a vegetable wagon, and promptly dropped a heavy 
crate on his old man's head and headed outward and far from home. He 
was arrested so many times by the age of 14 that the cops bought tickets 
to a benefit to help the young juggler get out of town and stay out. 

There is an old libel that Fields, fearful of losing a movie scene to 
an infant named Baby Leroy, spiked the kid's bottle with gin. Anyone 
who know Fields was aware that he would never share a drink with a 
stranger. He might have dropped the youngster on a concrete floor, but 
that is self-protection. 

Years after he expired, the cult of W. C. Fields worshippers began. 
Perhaps his true genius lies in the fact that like Chaplin, Hope and 
Gleason, he was one of a kind. 

— Bob Edwards 




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Page Six 



THE FURROW 



CLUB NEWS 

Ornamental Animal 
Horticulture Husbandry 



The Ornamental Horticulture Society 
initiated what promises to be one of its 
busiest semesters by having a delegation 
of Seniors attend "Horticultural Hori- 
zons", the 24th American Horticultural 
Congress of the American Horticultural 
Society. The Congress was held at the 
Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Philadelphia 
and featured panel discussions, trips to 
local points of interest, and dinners. Our 
delegation attended the program on 
Thursday, September 18, which included 
a rare plant sale, the Sixty Annual AHS 
Film Festival, two lectures, and a lunch- 
eon honoring young horticulturists. 

At the luncheon the delegates were 
able to mingle with some of the top men 
in the horticultural world. These includ- 
ed Donald Wyman of The Arnold Ar- 
borteum, Edmund de Rothchild of the 
famed Exbury Estates in England, and 
Russel J. Seibert, Director of Longwood 
Gardens. 

Over the summer, the Society was able 
to get many of the plants in the green- 
house labeled as to family, genus and 
species, common name, and origin. We 
were also able to get a nice assortment 
of ferns to enlarge our plant material in- 
ventory. One of the substantial improve- 
ments is that now most plant families arc 
concentrated in separate areas. It is hop- 
ed that the Society members will be able 
to take care of this collection. 

Our meeting place has been changed 
from Segal Hall Auditorium to the 
Greenhouse Classroom for this coming 
year. However, we still plan to continue 
to have a number of good speakers as we 
did second semester last year. Included 
on the list for the first semester this year 
are Angus Heeps, Superintendent of The 
Morris Arboretum, and Oliver Stark, Park 
Botanist of the Bowman's Hill Wildflower 
Preserve. 

Students from all classes and majors 
are cordially invited to attend our meet- 
ings. Our first speaker will be Mr. Heeps. 
He will speak about Botanic Park Man- 
agement. He will address our October 
14 meeting. Our first meeting will be an 
orientation presentation, and it will be 
held Tuesday, September 23, at 7:15 p.m. 



Circle K 



The Circle K Club, a Kiwanis 
sponsored service organization, has 
a number of projects planned for 
this fall semester. We will hold a 
hayride for underpriviledged Phila- 
delphia children in October. We 
also plan to challenge the Doyles- 
town Kiwanis to a bowling match, 
provide a film night for campus 
entertainment, and possibly spon- 
sor a mixer. Our first meeting will 
be posted soon. 

Horticulture 

Dave Reynolds 70, President of 
the Horticulture Society of DVC, 
was elected National Reporter of 
the ASHS (American Society of 
Horticulture Science - Collegiate 
Branch). Congratulations Dave. 

The Horticulture Society will be 
announcing a meeting soon. Fresh- 
men are encouraged to join. The 
Hort Club is an assential part of the 
Horticulture Major. 



The Livestock Judging team rated 
fourth at the Eastern States Exposition 
in Springfield, Massachusetts on Septem- 
ber 13. The members of the team were 
John Bame, Richard Labonge, Betsy 
Maddock, Bohert Mickel, and David Sol- 
lenberger, William Begenau, Walter 
Winkler, and John Reed. Dr. Pelle is the 
coach of the Livestock Judging team. 

The team was first in the sheep divi- 
sion with Betsy Maddock being top indi- 
vidual in sheep. John Reed was top in- 
dividual in swine. There will be three 
more contests concluding with the In- 
ternational Livestock Show in Chicago. 

The Springfield contest followed one 
and a half weeks of practice that started 
on September 4. The team visited some 
of the top beef farms in the east. They 
visited Ankony Angus Farms, Meadow 
Lane Angus Farms, Nutmeg Charolais 
Farm, and Johnny Cake Charolais Ranch. 

Dairy 
Husbandry 

Nine Dairy Husbandry majors return- 
ed to campus September 2nd to begin 
training for the 1969 Intercollegiate 
Dairy Judging Team. Team hopefuls re- 
turning included seniors Larry Gerber, 
Donald Koontz, Ed Lamberten and Bob 
Winner. Juniors returning for the work- 
out were Roy Brenemen, Fred Harties, 
Guy Hitz, Ed McAllister and Wayne 
Sollenberger. 

After two weeks of hard practice under 
the coaching of Mr. Smith a team was 
chosen to represent Delaware Valley Col- 
lege at the Eastern States Intercollegiate 
Dairy Judging Contest in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. The team consisted of Roy 
Breneman, Ed Lamberten, Bob Winner, 
Guy Hitz and Fred Harties. 

The contest held on September 15th 
produced the following team placings: 

1. Cornell University 

2. Ohio State University 

3. University of Maryland 

4. University of Connecticut 

5. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

6. Delaware Valley College 

7. Pennsylvania State University 

8. University of New Hampshire 

9. University of Rhode Island 

10. University of Massachusetts 

11. Butgers University 

The team is still looking forward to 
even more favorable results as they are 
entered in The Pennsylvania All-Ameri- 
can Contest in Harrisburg September 
22 and the North American Dairy Show 
Contest in Columbus, Ohio, October 13. 



AUDUBON— (Continued) 

drick of Doylestown, a 1957 N.A.C. 
graduate; and Doctors French and Mertz, 
instructors at D.V.C. The society held its 
first regular meeting on August 27th. 
The meeting featured as guest speaker 
Mr. Charles Callison, Executive Vice 
President of the National Audubon So- 
ciety. Mr. Callison spoke on the purpose 
and program of the National Audubon 
Society of which the Bucks County Au- 
dubon Society is a chapter. He also show- 
ed an interesting and disturbing film 
concerning the life and tragic decline of 
our American Symbol, the Bald Eagle. 
Anyone interested in further informa- 
tion concerning the Society should con- 
tact Dr. Mertz, provisional President of 
the organization. All interested students 
and faculty members are welcome to join 
this young and worthwhile organization. 



ENTERTAINME 



- REVIEW - 

The Demise 
Of A King 

Th opening night of Exit The King 
at The Pocket Playhouse was a definite 
success. Your first impression of the 
stage is the simplicity of the props. The 
props are modem art designs made of 
iron rods. 

The antagonist, Queen Marguerite, 
played by Edith Egan, portrays reality 
in life. The central theme is a well- 
constructed idea of the relationships be- 
tween God, man, and the universe. 
S>ueen Marie, played by Phebe Field, 
isplayed anguish at the thought of the 
King's death by whimpering "Oh God." 
This is answered by reality. Queen Mar- 



guerite discredits the plea as "only a say- 
ing." 

Society, as portrayed by Mark Conti, 
is doomed to die. And when the King 
dies, so does all society and all of Man's 
accomplishments. What has Society's 
existence meant? Do we appreciate what 
we have? Do " f e live life to the fullest? 

Many provocative questions are asked 
and answers are attempted. The Guard 
(Roger McBride) loudly echoes basic 
ideas stated by the others. Sue Dakin 
plays the part of the ever-present poor 
people. The unemotional business society 
is portrayed by Frank Hooven in his 
part as the Doctor. 

The Pocket Playhouse will be present- 
ing THE DEATH AND LIFE OF 
SNEAKY FITCH from November 12th 
through December 8th. I strongly rec- 
ommend going to 2601 Lombard Street, 
Philadelphia, to see truly great acting. 
All of the actors were skillful in present- 
ing their parts in Exit The King. In the 
relaxed atmosphere of the playhouse you 
can truly enjoy a fine play. 




The steam machine did their thing at the September 26th Mixer, Girls were at 
a premium but the Music men did their best to make up for it. 

As a special service to the students of Delaware Valley College, the 

Furrow will regularly run a movie listing for area theaters. 

Doylestown County Last Summer Starts — Currently 

Thankyou All Very Much Starts— 10/8-14 

Barn Cinema Midnight Cowboy Starts— Currently 

J f Starts — Currently 

Some Kind of a Nut Starts— 10/8-14 

DeSade Starts— 10/8-14 

309 Cinema 7/ Starts— Currently 

DeSade Starts— 10/8-14 

Bucks Co. Drive-in Castle Keep Starts— Currently 

The Wrecking Crew Starts— Currently 

Hells Angels 1969 Starts— 10/8-14 

3 In The Attic Starts— 10/8-14 



INTER-DORM— (Continued) 

Violations of Dorm Regulations 

All violations in the dorm, with the 
exception of drinking, girls in the dorm, 
fire crackers, guns, etc., and drugs, will 
be taken to Student Court. The coun- 
selor and the alleged violater must be 
present and if the defendant is found 
guilty the court may impose a fine. 

Dorm Damage 

The damage will be evaluated by the 
College and the bill given to the court. 
The court will then hand the bill to the 
persons responsible or the dorm if the 
P( -rsons are not known. 

Meetings 

Meetings should be held twice a 
month or when needed. The purpose of 
these meetings will be to discuss prob- 
lems in the dorm, to be instructed in 
dorm safety and special cases, to evalu- 



ate the I.D.C. to determine when spe- 
cial events will be held (fire drills, etc), 
AND to make recommendations of dorm 
improvement to the Administration. 

Members 

Dorm Counselor and elected repre- 
sentative from each floor. 

Advisor 

An administrative advisor should be 
present at all I.D.C, meetings because 
this organization is concerned with the 
life of all students living at D.V.C. 

CnecJt 

Student Government will be the check. 
A member of Student Government will 
sit on the Council, observe, give Student 
Government views, and bring back to 
Student Government I.D.C. problems or 
progress. 

President Class of 72 
David C. Farrar 



THE FURROW 



Page Seven 



NT SECTION 



"Midnight Cowboy" starring Dustin 
Hoffman and Jon Voight currently at 
The Barn Cinema is based on the 
controversial best seller by James Leo 
Herlihy. The unusual drama of a 
youthful drifter and a contemporary 
con-man was produced by Jerome 
Hellman and directed by John Schles- 
inger. 





Sandy Dennis stars in "Thank You 
All Very Much," as a young unmar- 
ried determined to bring up her baby 
her way, without regard for what her 
family and friends might say. 



Burt Lancaster, playing a determined American Army Major facing overwhelm- 
ing German forces in the Battle of The Bulge, teaches the ladies of a village 
Bordello how to make Molotov cocktails to drop on enemy tanks. It's a scene 
from "Castle Keep" coming soon to The Barn Cinema. 




Freshman Customs— 1969 



Purpose; To aid the freshmen in gaining a 
knowledge of the college, to promote class and 
college spirit, and to enable the freshmen to 
become acquainted with their fellow students. 

1. Certain traditions have evolved with re- 
spect to the conduct of the members of 
the freshman class. Every freshman is ex- 
pected to adhere to these customs, includ- 
ing coeds and off -campus students 

2. Customs will run for a period of weeks 
in the beginning of the school. 

3. The sophomore class is fully in charge of 
freshman customs. Members of the class 
will be in charge of the different phases 
of customs. 

4. Hazing of freshmen is banned by the col- 
lege. All sophomores extending customs 
beyond the limits prescribed shall be re- 
garded as guilty of hazing. 

5. Freshmen will wear collared shirts, ties, 
and dinks at all times when on campus, 
except while in their rooms. Coats will be 
worn to all meals except breakfast. 

6. Rooms, halls, and outdoor areas adjacent 
to the rooms will be checked for cleanli- 
ness by an assigned committee. 

7. At the sound of "Button Frosh" all fresh- 



men are required to answer "Beat , 

Sir". (Fill in the name of the college we 
are playing that week). 
Freshmen are required to walk via Ginko 
Lane to and from all buildings on the 
south side of an imaginary line running 
parallel to Ulman Hall, and extending 
from Route 202 to the railroad tracks. 
Freshmen are required to know the Alma 
Mater, the Handbook and the fight songs 
by the end of the first week, and are sub- 
ject to questioning at any time by all 
upper-classmen. 

A 5" x 8" cardboard sign will be isrsued 
to all freshmen. It will be worn at all 
times while on campus. It will be kept 
neat and clean. On it will appear in large, 
neat print, the freshman's name, home ad- 
dress, prospective major, sports and activi- 
ties in which he is interested. 
Freshmen will build a bonfire not to ex- 
ceed 15' high and 15* m diameter. The 
bonfire will be built on the same day that 
it will be burned and consist solely of 
wood. 
12. All sophomores and other upperclassmen 
will be addressed as "Sir" or "Miss". 



8. 



9. 



10. 



11 



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All freshmen must attend all home foot- 
ball games during customs. 
Customs are in effect from midnight Sun- 
day through the end of the football game 
on Saturday on dates of home football 
games. Customs are not in effect from 
Saturday morning until Sunday midnight. 

15. Freshmen must carry matches or a lighter 
and light cigarettes for upperclassmen. The 
Student Handbook, cheering sheets, and 
change for a dollar must be carried at all 
times. 

Every freshman will be required to carry 
a supply of 3" x 5" cards. On each will 
be printed his name. When he is assigned 
work duty, the signature of the person as- 
signing the work duty will appear, along 
with the number of work days given, and 
also the reason. The sophomore will take 
the card and turn it in to the work-duty 
chairman. 

Every freshman is expected to be present 
each afternoon from 4:30 P.M. in the foot- 
ball stands. Only those people on work 
duty will be excused, and failure to re- 
port will result in additional work duty. 

18. Those freshmen having work duty detail 
will meet in front of the gym each after- 
noon at 4:30 P.M. Work duty will last one 
hour and all freshmen having duty must 
be present. Failure to do so will result in 
additional days. 

Frosh must answer both phones in the 
dorm within three (3) rings, between the 
hours of 7 A.M. and 11 P.M. 
Frosh must be neat and clean shaven at 
all times during customs. 
Frosh must wake any upperclassmen upon 
request. 

On Saturday home games, Frosh must 
cheer the team in front of the gym and 
march to the game as a group (cheering). 



17 



19 



20. 
21. 

22. 



• Jewelry — Watches 
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Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



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DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

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23. Frosh must construct a chain of Pop-tops 
which will stretch across Lake Archer at 
its widest point without breaking. This will 
be done at the end of customs (Homecom- 
ing Weekend). 

24. Frosh can not use cars during the parade 
through Doylestown. 

25. Frosh must make up their own cheer about 
their class, the class of '73. 

26. These customs are sanctioned by the Col- 
lege and enforced by Student Government. 
Any freshman failing to comply with these 
regulations will be summoned to appear in 
Student Court. 




N-0-T-l-C-E 

This is to formally warn the 
entire campus community that 
"THE GREEN ONE" will be 
awarded in our next issue. The 
coveted Gherkin Award will 
again be directed to some de- 
serving bum. As in the past 
your nominations will be gladly 
accepted for consideration. 



Page Eight 



THE FURROW 





CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY 



Pigskin Preview 

The 1969 football schedule promises to 
be tougher than that of the previous year. 
This year we will play some new, strong- 
er teams. We have four home games, the 
first on October fourth with Lycoming 
College. 

There are eleven returning Seniors on 
this year's squad. 
Don Stump— Co-captain 
Wayne Mehalick— Co-captain 
Joseph Urban— Defensive Halfback 
James Smith— Defensive Halfback 
Chris Bockrath— Defensive Halfback 
Ronald Timko— Quarterback 
Dennis Shank-Offensive Halfback 



Joe Carroll -Defensive End 
Michael Hannan— Offensive Center 

and Tackle 
Gene Wallace— Defensive Linebacker 
Joe Brook— Offensive Guard 

Freshmen will have a better chance 
to play this year because of the smaller 
number of returning players. Of fifty-one 
players, seventeen are freshmen. 

Coach Craver is looking forward to a 
good year. In a personal interview on the 
18th, he said practice had progressed as 
was expected and that the team was 
shaping up. 

Let's get behind our team and cheer 
them on. They can really get psyched-up 
when the home stands are cheering them 
on. 



The Homecoming game is always ex- 
citing but this year all the stops have 
been pulled to make mis one of the 
most memorable of all times. The Home- 
coming game will be Delaware Valley 
College's tribute in honor of one hundred 
years of College Football. 

The first intercollegiate game was be- 
tween Rutgers and Princeton in the year 
1869. Today Football is played by over 
three million young men and viewed by 
a staggering 25 million spectators. Col- 
lege Football is truly an American in- 
stitution. Today there are over 600 foot- 
ball-playing colleges and Delaware Val- 
ley College is proud to be among those 
participating in this great American tra- 
dition. 



Mr. Ned Linta, Director of Athletics, 
has been working diligently in an effort 
to make this Centennial Celebration at 
Delaware Valley one of the finest to be 
observed anywhere in the nation. 

On October 18th Delaware Valley 
College will salute College Football's 
one hundredth year and honor its own 
football greats who have been part of 
this fine tradition since 1899 when the 
first team representing the Farm School 
was formed. 

It will be up to the Student Body, 
Faculty, Alumni, and friends of the Col- 
lege to make this special centennial 
Homecoming Day the success it deserves 
to be. Make it a point to participate in 
this year's extraordinary Homecoming 
Celebration. 




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Harriers Open Camp 

The 1969 Delaware Valley College Cross-country team, under the 
able leadership of Coach Berthold and senior captain Howard Hender- 
son, returned to campus on Sept. 11 for a training camp to prepare for 
the fast-approaching season that begins on Sept. 27 with a triangular 
meet against Dickinson and Muhlenberg here on our campus. 

Only two returning lettermen from last year's squad were present in 
camp, seniors Howard Henderson and Lou Hegyes. 

The season promises to be an exciting one with the outcome balanc- 
ing on the shoulders of newcomers to the team, senior Larry Young, 
sophomores Bob Edwards and Rich Carver and promising frosh Paul 
Ray, Jim LaBaugh, Ed Sullivan, Bud Dacko and Joel Kravitz. 




*Jke Juttow 

DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE 
of Science and Agriculture 

Doyleetown, Penna. 18901 

devoted to the interest of the students 
of Delaware Valley College 



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JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



the 




Vol. 16, No. 2 



The Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



October 17, 1969 



Pop-Top Chain 

Crosses 

Lake Archer 

Dateline: October 8, 1969 
Location: Lake Archer, Aggieland 

A foul was called just minutes 
before the class of 73 was about 
to stretch their pop-top chain 
across Lake Archer: One illegal 
wiring. One frosh (Walt Smolyn) 
was given the assignment of count- 
ing the links in the long chain and 
at last count there were 4,357 pop- 
tops in it. 

Fifteen swimmers accompanied 
by sophomore Willie Wottley and 
Dave Farrar, the president of the 
class of 72, entered the murky 




Photo Credit — Dave Thomas 

4,357 Pop-tops and 15 Wet Frosh 
Extend Across Lake Archer. 

depths of Lake Archer to support 
the chain. After several failures to 
complete the linkage across the 
lake, the Freshmen succeeded in 
their attempt. Then, in unison, they 
gave it the mandatory thirty-sec- 
ond count. 

But that was not the end of 
things for the afternoon. Just as 
Dave Farrar walked up and re- 
ported that someone stole his 
sneakers, the frosh appeared on the 
hill above us and I could see that 
there was someone being borne 
aloft on their shoulders. Who do 
you think it was? Bill Strode, of 
course! Bill hit the water quickly, 
but didn't get very wet because he 
landed on the fringe of the man- 
made lake. So, one daring frosh, 
Gerry Simons, decided to give Bill 
a crossbody block and they both 
went under for a grand finale. 



Intercollegiate 
Leadership 
Workshop 
A Success 

On Sunday, September 28 three mem- 
bers of your Student Government, Gery 
Fisher, Sol Cariness and Gordon Getz, 
attended the first Intercollegiate Leader- 
ship. Workshop at Holy Family College. 
Colleges invited to this meeting includ- 
ed Villanova, LaSalle, Delaware Val- 
ley College, Cabrine, Holy Trinity, 
Manor Junior, Harcum, Pierce and Im- 
maculatta. 

The purpose of this assembly was to 
make all of the neighboring colleges 
more aware of each other and hopefully 
to initiate the beginnings of intercolle- 
giate activities. 

The workshops began with an intro- 
ductory session lead by Dr. Carberry, a 
psychologist at Holy Family College. It 
seemed that Dr. Carberry s main aim 
was to find out why we had become 
leaders and to discover how we cope 
with the problems that accompany our 
position. He was relatively successful 
in this attempt and everyone's partici- 
pation resulted in a more relaxed and 
informal atmosphere. After about 45 
minutes the group divided up into three 
areas of discussion in each of which 
each school had a representative. The 
three topics related to the policies of 
each school concerning Student Govern- 
ment, social activities, and residence 
halls, and all three discussions were en- 
thusiastic and informative. 

The mainstream of the conference 
eventually led to exploring the possibili- 
ties of Intercollegiate events. 

Your Student Government members 
can only wish that the rest of the Student 
Body could have witnessed the eager- 
(Continued on page 2) 

TRAFFIC COURT 
INITIATED 

The Student Government has 
established a Traffic Court sep- 
arate from and in addition to the 
present Student Court. All mem- 
bers are to be selected by the Stu- 
dent Government President from 
among the members of the Student 
Court. 

Members of the Traffic Court in- 
clude four seniors and the Judge 
of the Student Court. The present 
members are: 
Gery Fisher 
Ron Gingerich 
Solomon Caviness 
Bob Winner and 
Richard Palmasano — 
Judge of Student Court 
Richard Palmasano is the Judge 
of the Traffic Court, but will only 
vote when there is a tie. A majority 
vote will be required for a deci- 
sion. 

The Student Court Secretary 
will be present to introduce the ac- 
cused violator. He will also collect 
(Continued on page 3) 



Miss Cathy Newhard 

representing the Varsity Club and 

this years Delaware Valley College 

Homecoming Queen is escorted 

by Student Government President 

Gery Fisher as she is introduced to 

the student body at the Lycoming 

football game. Miss Newhard 

is the first reigning Homecoming 

Queen in Del. Vol. history. 




Photo Credit J. and D. 



Homecoming Weekend 1969 

— SCHEDULE OF EVENTS — 
Friday, October 17, 1969 



12:00 Noon 



2:00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 



3:30 
4:00 
5:30 
7:00 
7:15 
9:00 



p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 



1:00 a.m. 



— Classes terminate. 

Dorm vacated for women guests. 

Senior Drivers to pick-up parade cars. 
— Women guests register. 
3:00 Floats line up on practice football field for parade. 
— Floats to be judged. 

College Band, guest band, student body and student car* lined 

up for parade. 
— Parade leaves campus — main gate. 
— Judging Floats — Doylestown. 
— Dinner — Guests. 
6:30 — Assemble at site of bonfire. 
—Pep Rally. 

Guest speaker Tommy McDonald. 
— Movies — Price two for one. Must show I.D. cards at "County 

Theatre and The Barn". 
— Curfew for girls. 



Saturday, October 18, 1969 



7:00 a.m. 


■ 8:30— Breakfast — Guests. 


10:30 a.m. • 


■ 2:30 — Alumni Registration. 


10:00 a.m. ■ 


11 :00— Floats line up — football field. 


11:00 a.m. ■ 


•12:00 —Floats to be judged. 


12:45 p.m. 


— Turkey Trout Run. 


1:00 p.m. 


— Queen and Attendants line up. 
— College Band. 


1:00 p.m. 


1:05 p.m. 


— Official Crowning of the Queen. 


1:08 p.m. 


— Floats on Parade. 


1:25 p.m. 


— Welcome by Mr. Poley, Dr. Work, Dean Fulcoly, Gery Fisher. 


1:28 p.m. 


— Captain's Toss of Coin. 
—Kick-off. 


1:30 p.m. 


Half time 


— College Band "A". 




Aggie Gridiron Greats Line-up. 




Program. 


4:30 p.m. 


■ 7:30 — Alumni Dinner. 


5:00 p.m. 


■ 6:00— Buffet— Students and Dates. 


8:30 p.m. 


- 12:30 — Green and Gold Dance. Featuring the music of Don Peebles. 


2:00 a.m. 


— Curfew for girls. 


THIS 


SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



VISA Comes 

To Del Vol 

A small purple and white card 
will serve as a passport to savings 
for college students participating 
in a student discount program, co- 
ordinated on campus by Student 
Government. 

This two-dollar card, represent- 
ing membership in the Varsity 
International Sales Association 
(VISA), will bring students sav- 
ings of 10 to 50 per cent at par- 



ticipating businesses in Doyles- 
town, Philadelphia, and the Sub- 
urban area. Among the local mer- 
chants are Rudolph's, Key Bowling 
Alleys, 76'ers, Oakland Luncheon- 
ette and the Doylestown Chevron 
Service Station. 

To sum up and also illustrate the 
value of VISA, my roommate had 
two sport coats, two pairs of pants, 
and four shirts cleaned at Bo-peep 
Cleaners in Doylestown for only 
$2.45. You, too, can get these sav- 
ings by simply purchasing a VISA 
card, on sale in the cafeteria or in 
Work Hall, Room 214. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



CUJB NEWS 



Horticulture 

On Wed., September 24, 1969 the 
Horticulture Society held its first bi- 
weekly meeting. Present at the meeting 
were 43 members and interested fresh- 
men, as well as Mr. Howell, Mr. Frecon, 
Dr. Feldstein and Dr. Blumenfield. Pre- 
siding officer was Dave Reynolds, Pre- 
sident. A float committee was set up 
with Dave Reynolds, Milt Parker, Ron 
Meyers, Tim Powell and Al Schultz as 
members. 

Also discussed was the picking and 
selling of apples. With the orchards be- 
ing much improved bv the efforts of the 
Hort. students under the direction of Mr. 
Howell, apple production has been 
greatly increased. Apples will be sold to 
Nice's Orchards in Harleysville, Pa. in 
return for clean, bottled apple cider. 
This cider along with U.S. Fancy apples 
are to be sold at all home football 
games. 

The club now has a grader set up in 
die basement of the Hort. Bldg. This 
grader will gready aid in the grading 
and sizing of quality apples. The next 
meeting will be held on Oct. 8, 1969 at 
8 P.M. in the Hort. Bldg. 



The national convention of the 
American Collegiate Branch of the 
American Society for Horticultural Scien- 
ces was held from August 18-22 in Pull- 
man, Washington. Those colleges which 
are members of the A.C.B. attended 
were as follows: Delaware Valley Col- 
lege, Michigan State University, Iowa 
State, University of Florida, University 
of Massachusetts, Texas A&M, Washing- 
ton State University, University of Geor- 
gia and North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 

The following members were elected 
officers for the 1969-70 college year: 
President: Ronnie Shaw from Texas 
' A&M, Vice-Pres.: Bruce Cook from the 
University of Florida, Secretary: Dwight 
Huges from Iowa State, Treasurer: Jim 
Berry from Texas A&M and A.C.B. Re- 
porter: Dave Reynolds from D.V.C. Dave 
is president of Del. Val's Horticulture 
Society. 

At the convention, research papers 
were presented by members from the 
various college chapters of the A.C.B. 
Those members representing Delaware 
Valley College were Dave Reynolds and 
Dennis Kalanowski. Both Dave and Den- 
ny had the opportunity' to meet various 
people who were officers of the A.S.H.S. 

A first was achieved at the conven- 
tion. The members of the A.C.B. pre- 
sented slides of their club activities and 
campus life of their respective colleges. 
As a result of this slide program, those 
member colleges were brought closer to- 
gether as well as the individual students. 



Apiary 
Society 



The Delaware Valley College Apiarist 
Society held its opening kickoff meet- 
ing on September 22, 1969. There were 
20 members in attendance, which gives 
good reason to anticipate plenty of acti- 
vity in the year to come. Dr. Berthold, 
the Society's Advisor, gave a brief his- 
tory of the Society along with a dis- 
cussion of what the Society hopes to do 
in the up-coming year. Some of the pro- 
tects will include: selling honey at the 
home football games, showing members 
the principles of beekeeping, extracting 
honey from hives, the Society's Ban- 
quet, and many other interesting and 
exciting activities. We hope to see any- 
one with even the slightest interest in 
bees and beekeeping at our business 
meetings and working with the bees at 
the College Apiary. The time and place 
of each meeting will be posted on yellow 
hexagonal signs. 

Dairy 
Husbandry 

The first meeting of the Dairy Society 
was held Monday, September 29th with 
an outstanding attendance. President 
Don Koontz welcomed the many pros- 
pective freshmen members and greeted 
upper classmen back for another suc- 
cessful year. 

During officer and committee reports, 
vice president Ed Lamberton gave a 
descriptive summary of Society activities 
and events for the benefit of the fresh- 
men. Bob Winner discussed the plans 
for our "Super Homecoming" October 
17th and 18th. He urged all members 
to help in making this the greatest 
Homecoming in the history of DVC. 
Larry Gerber discussed meeting pro- 
grams for the year and mentioned sev- 
eral new and interesting ideas. He also 
asked members to submit ideas for pro- 
grams they would like to have. 

The new semester left two offices 
vacant. Wayne Quinn has been elected 
treasurer and Tom Wilkinson is the new 
A-Day representative. Seniors Larry Ger- 
ber, Bob Winner and Ed Lamberton 
have been named to head the float com- 
mittee but all members are urged to 
assist in the float project. 

Mr. Croushore is acting as tempor- 
ary advisor until a new dairy professor 
arrives in November. Mr. Smith and 
Mr. Gross were also in attendance. 

The Dairy Society is expecting a busy 
and very successful year and all in- 
terested students are welcome to join in. 




*e** Ike Juttou? 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR ~~. John Martin 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mik« Morgan 

INFORMATION SERVICES Harvty Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITORS Bob Edwards, Lou Hodgot, Howard Hondorson 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Davo Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Ahmo Colman 

ART EDITORS Bill Jtffray, JofJroy Kior 

BUSINESS MANAGER Davo Ttichmsn 

TYPING MANAGER Dotbort Jonas 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 
Sol Cavinos, John Furphy, Carl Pfitsonmayor, Bill Strode, Milton Parkor, Allan Gordon, 

Larry Martol, Walt Ault, Abbot Loo 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR Josoph E. Fukoh/ 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

It should bo noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



Letters To The Editor . . . 

Are Customs That Bad? 

By the time this article is out, the problem I am about to discuss will have been 
long solved. I am referring to the present customs status. 

At this time it appears that the Freshman class is in an uproar over the technical 
involvements concerning customs. Maybe it is only a select few that make this 
problem seem monstrous, but they have succeeded in attracting the attention of 
most of the upperclassmen. 

It is a sad fact that the sophomores did not have very difficult customs, and they 
were no harder than what the Frosh are getting this year. 

If a Frosh is inquisitive enough, he can ask any student whose father went to 
Del-Val about customs years ago. If it was decided that a group of Freshmen were 
going to go down to the dairy at three o'clock in the morning for the purpose of 
having a manure fight with upperclassmen involved, then that was what was done. 
Or ask Mr. Linta about his college days. He could probably tell you a few stories 
that would make you thankful customs are as they are at D. V. C. 

Actually customs are getting easier each year. There are a few Freshmen with 
the right idea and these, you will find, will probably wind up being your class leaders 
and student representatives. 

Customs have been with this school for many moons and they are definitely not 
going to be stopped in one year. You will find that after customs are over, the class 
of *73 will be united and bonded as one with the rest of the Aggies on campus. 

Signed, Bob Edward* 

Answer to the Trust Company 
Editorial by Associate Editor, Mike Morgan 

I feel the goals of the Trust Company are biased and restricted. The first position 
stated is support of the Student Government as long as the SG is completely oblivious 
to the Administration. Part of the reason for Faculty Advisors is just that: advice 
and direction. Many times what at first seems right for us isn't always best in the 
long run. Are you only a fair weather friend? 

Your second goal of presenting the student's views will be difficult to achieve. 
I wish you luck. How can a few dissatisfied students represent a majority? You can't 
claim to hold an open discussion of issues. True, you can get some idea of feelings, 
but isn't it also true that those not directly affected by some issue are apathetic? 

Dear Zelch, all changes at first are questioned. Your criticisms of the parking 
facilities were voiced by many, even in the Furrow. But provisions have been made 
for illegally parked cars. If students with cars cooperate and use only their space a 
greater security will be achieved. 

I agree the design of the off-campus lot is a maze. Something should be done to 
alleviate the problem. 

The Trust Company squeals before it is hurt. You present generalities and criti- 
cisms. Where are the alternative plans or constructive ideas? It s easy to criticize, as 
I am criticizing you. I offer a solution: try presenting your ideas and criticisms in 
Furrow articles. Give them to me, in Dorm I room 220. 



— Michael A. Morgan 



Leader Workshop*— (Continued) 

ness and enthusiasm which persisted for 
the duration of the meeting. All of the 
colleges, and especially those with an 
all-female enrollment, are extremely in- 
terested in coordinating activities with 
Delaware Valley College and our stu- 
dents can expect to see fewer high school 
and more college eirls at future mixers. 
They can also look forward to a com- 
puter mixer to be held tentatively on 
November 21st in which four or five of 
the girls' colleges will be involved. The 
details of this mixer will be explained 
at a later date. 

The meeting formally ended at 3 P.M. 
after a lunch served by the girls of Holy 
Family. But most of the representatives 
remained to discuss already formulated 
plans for the future. All three members 
from D.V.C. have agreed that this was 
the most constructive and enjoyable con- 
ference they had ever attended and 
view it as a perfect start to closer re- 
lationships with our neighboring colleges. 



Gleaner Deadline Oct. 26th 

The GLEANER has initiated an 
extensive campaign of reorganization 
this semester. By incorpating separate 
staffs, it is hoped that the GLEANER 
can more effectively carry out its ob- 
ligation to the Student Body. 

This obligation is to give the stu- 
dents a medium in which to express 
themselves in the fields of Literature. 
Art, Photography, Agriculture, and 
Science. 

Any student interested in submit- 
ting material should contact either 
Norman Mogel ( 102 Barness Hall ) or 
Case Pfitzenmayer ( 220 Cooke Hall ) 
before October 26. 



DELAWARE VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

STUDENT STORE 



• Shakers 
e Pennants 
e T-shirts 

• Jackets 

ULMAN HALL BASEMENT 

OPEN: 

Halt Time and 
Altar Game 



GERHARD'S 

INC 

34 S. Main St., Doylestown 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



GOVT. PRES. speaks 

The "Presidents to Presidents" Conference 

Sheraton Park Hotel, Washington, D. C. 

September 19, 20, 21, 1969 

Mr. Joseph Morelli, Director of Admissions, and I have recently returned from 
a conference in Washington, D. C. which we have evaluated as being the best 
organized, most constructive, and beneficial conference that we have experienced. 
It was a requirement of the Association of Student Governments that each school 
attending the conference be represented by a member of the Administration and 
the President of the Student Government. Therefore Mr. Morelli, a member of the 
Administration, and I as the President of the Student Government had the honor to 
represent our college at the "Presidents to Presidents" conference. 

The Association of Student Governments is an unique and rapidly-growing or- 
ganization of College student governing bodies. It strives to strengthen Student 
Governments by assisting them in becoming more responsive, effective, and relevant 
to the needs of today's better-informed, more aware students. It urges stable, in- 
telligent, and responsive leadership on our campuses. 

The purposes of the conference were: 1) to show the nation the responsive 
leadership on America's Campuses; 2) to draw attention to the true image of the 
majority of today's students; 3) to strengthen the channels of communication and 
cooperation between the leaders of today and those of tomorrow; 4) to create a 
situation where those in charge of higher education can respond to those involved and 
vice versa; 5) to prove the willingness of young people to work with reason to solve 
the problems of their campuses; 6) and to develop some meaningful relationships 
among those in attendance. 

The conference did accomplish some of its purposes, but one conference alone 
cannot fulfill all of these objectives. It was a very well organized conference that 
retained everyones' interest. The Press and the three major television networks gave 
the conference excellent coverage. Their coverage should nave been instrumental in 
showing the nation the responsible leadership and true image of the majority of 
today's students. 

The "Presidents to Presidents" Conference gave us an opportunity to express our 
thoughts concerning campus problems with those involved in higher education in 
the Nixon Administration. A number of prominent educators and experts from related 
fields briefed us with the knowledge of their experiences. 

There were several panel discussions involving prominent educators, experts, and 
Student Government Presidents. One of the panels, composed of four presidents, 




Photo credit — Gery Fisher 
Mr. Morrelli, Director of Admissions, shakes the hand of President Nixon during 

ceremonies at the Conference. 

led a discussion on their role, attitudes and experiences at their individual colleges. 
Their attitudes and experiences were quite liberal. One president even invited and 
recommended student involvement and investigation in college policy-making. It was 
his philosophy that in doing so we would develop a better educational system. 

In another panel discussion we discussed free speech, assembly, and expression 
in relation to the campus community. 

Finally there was a panel discussion on the purpose of Student Government and 
its role in the college structure. 

Mr. Arch N. Booth, Executive Vice-President of the Chamber of Commerce, ad- 
dressed the conference concerning the importance of campus-community relations. 
He spoke to us about the great advances in technology and its impact upon our 
society. The key to our great success, he notes, has been our educational svstem| 
It is his philosophy that it is the responsibility of business and the professional com- 
munity to become involved and committed in the search for solutions to the entire 
range of economic, social, and political problems in the community and nation. 

Dr. James E. Allen, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Education and U. S. Commissioner 
of Education, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, addressed the confer- 
ence on the topic of Federal funding to individuals and institutions of higher educa- 
tion. 

Mr. Robert Finch, Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, described the 
role of Federal Government in higher education. He also explained the aims of the 
Nixon Administration in the field of health and welfare. He said that there were some 
difficult problems facing the Nixon Administration for which they had no solution as 
yet. 

We had the honor of hearing General Lewis B. Hershey speak to us about the 
present and the future of the draft and ROTC. He used the occasion to announce 
to the conference and the public his decision to remain as the Director of the Selective 
Service System even if the draft is changed to the system proposed by the Nixon 
Administration. 

In the course of the conference I also attended two interesting discussion groups. 
One of the discussion groups was concerned with student involvement in faculty 
development. In the other discussion group we directed our discussion toward find- 
ing answers to racial problems on college campuses. Mr. Morelli attended a discussion 
group on admissions and scholarships policies. 



The conference was a great personal experience which I will long recall. One 
does not always get the opportunity to meet the most influential men in our educa- 
tional field and in our government as Mr. Morelli and I have experienced. 

I had the privilege of meeting Congressman Edward Biester Jr., the Representa- 
tive to Washington, D. C. from this area. I was also very fortunate in meeting 
Senator Eugene McCarthy as he was passing through the lobby of the Sheraton Hotel 

The highh'ght of the conference was President Nixon's personal invitation to the 
conference to visit the White House. The President voiced his concern over campus 
issues. He said he wants to find the answers with us, but he urged us to "listen . . . 
and have respect for the opinions of others." After his short address we all had the 
opportunity and honor of personally meeting the President and his lovely daughter, 
Tricia. According to Mr. Morelli's conversation with the President, Mr. Morelli and 
I were quite surprised to learn that the President is familiar with our College. 

The Association of Student Governments is concerned with only those issues which 
involves college students and colleges. It does not interfere or make stands on political 
issues. 

"The Association of Student Governments stands for universities where all ques- 
tions are open to inquiry, deliberation, and debate. We will not stand for universities 
where these questions are decided by violence and the arbrtary use of authority."* 

Again I would like to thank the Administration for their support in making our 
participation in the conference possible. The conference was most beneficial for our 
college, our reputation, and our nation. 



•— ASG Statement U. S. Senate Subcommittee 



—Gery Fisher (7/1/69) 



— ENTERTAINMENT SECTION — 



AT THE CINEMA 



THE COUNTY 



Here's the latest news on the "cinema" 
Situation: 

Guess what movie is coming back to 
the County Theatre for the third time 
on October 15? Yep! Get out your cigars 
and machine guns 'cause Bonny and 
Clyde are coming again. Warren Beatty 
and Faye Dunaway do a phenomenal 
job portraying the ever-running, ever- 
killing, Bonny and Clyde. It's a real 
killer! 

Along with Bonny and Clyde will 
come Bullit (with Steve McQueen) 
same date and same place. This, too, is 
a great movie packed with thrills and 
suspense. Don't miss this one-in-a-mil- 
lion opportunity to see two fabulous 
flicks together. It's guaranteed excite- 
ment! 

TRAFFIC COURT— (Continued) 
the fines from those who are found 
guilty during the court procession. 
Fines must be paid immediately 
upon conviction. 

If you believe you are innocent 
of an alleged parking lot violation, 
you have the right to appeal to the 
Traffic Court. 

If a student wants to appeal his 
case, but does not appear at the 
Traffic Court session, he will be 
considered to be guilty. 

If a student is found guilty, he 
will be fined according to rule 10 
under Regulations Governing the 
Use of Motor Vehicles in the Stu- 
dent Handbook. 

There will be a charge of $2.50 
for each traffic violation, payable 
within one week at the Accounting 
Office. If the fine is not paid within 
one week, it will be increased to 
$3.50. All appeals must be made 
to the Student Government Traffic 
Court. 

Any further action made neces- 
sary by non-payment will be han- 
dled by the Dean of Student's Of- 
fice. 

Traffic Court is to be held at 
least once a month and Captain 
Holbrook or a representative of the 
Ross Detective Agency will be at 
each session. 

The Gherkin Award 

As promised the infamous Gherkin 
Award is once again being offered. 
This issue we are awarding one green 
one to the person or persons respon- 
sible for flying the American flag in 
front of Allman Hall upside down one 
day hut week. 




Scene from Medium Cool coming 
to the Doylestown County 

"Medium Cool" is based on the poli- 
tical and social troubles this country is 
S>ing through. It is considered one of 
e best pictures of 1969. The movie 
centers on Chicago, in the summer of 
1968. Riots and the depressing life in 
the ghetto sections of Chicago, are only 
two of the many factors that make this 
the realistic powerful and magnificent 
movie that it is. 

It starts at the Doylestown County 
Oct. 22nd and will be there until the 
28th. 



BUCKS CO. DRIVE-IN 

Two features — 

GOOD-BYE COLUMBUS and 

ROSEMARY'S BABY are currently 

playing until Oct. 21st 



THE BARN CINEMA 

"de Sade" is the most distinguished 
and daring movie of the year. This is 
the first movie to seriously probe the 
life of the French Revolutionist. It is a 
story of passion, violence and highly con- 
temporary protest. It's based on tthe true 
story of the French Marquis de Sade. If 
you like something different and ex- 
citing, don't miss this one. 

Both deSade and the musical Sweet 
Charity are currently playing at the 
Barn Cinema and will be shown till the 
28th of October. 



**+NO£fir#ALS 



Zi-t 



*r 



LUtCH 







Page Four 



THE FURROW 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEDGES 



I had the pleasure of interviewing 
Tommie McDonald, former Philadelphia 
Eagle and Los Angeles Ram football 
star, during half-time of the DVC-Ly- 
coming game. He is really a very per- 
sonable guy and doesn't look the type 
of person that you would associate with 
no football. I asked him if he wanted 
\is four year old son, who accompanied 
u'm, to play football. He said "no." He 
said that he wants him to play golf. 

What happened to Pennsylvania? The 
first four runners on our cross-country 
team are from New Jersey. Eight of 
the eleven on the team are from the 
"Garden State" and this even includes 
an Ed Sullivan. 

Don Sechler, basketball and baseball 
star, who is 6'11" and Tommie Debrow- 
ski, the 5*4" second sacker on the base- 
ball team, should be roommates so they 
could share each others' clothes. 

Frosh footballers Richie Glenn, Andy 
Timko, Ray Johnson, Frank Bryant and 
Jim Foote look like real good ones. 

Mr. David Benner. instructor in the 
Ornamental Horticulture Department, 
was quite an athlete in his day. He re- 
ceived four varsity letters in the tough 
sport of gymnastics, one at Lock Haven 
and three at Penn State. In his senior 
year he placed fourth in the Nationals 
in the sidehorse competition. 

Floyd Marshall, who has replaced 
Dave SteUer as head wrestling coach, 
was the Y.M.C.A. wrestling champ in 
1961 and participated in the Olympic 
trials. 

Robert Berthold, head cross-country 
coach and Biology Department mem- 
ber, was the M.A.C. two-mile champ in 
1963. 

D.V.C. Crushes 
Lycoming 

After losing to Moravian the previous 
week, Delaware Valley came on strong 
to defeat Lycoming, 20-6, before a capa- 
city crowd. The offense got off to a slow 
start, but it really didn't matter, for the 
defense showed its strength. The fear- 
some defense and a few bright spots in 
the offensive game gave the Aggies a 
well-deserved win. The defense, led by 
End Don Stump (70) and Geno Wal- 
lace (70) showed what it should have 
showed a week earlier. 

The first half opened with D.V.C. win- 
ning the toss and receiving, but the 
initial drive was halted at midfield. Jim 
Foote was called to punt. After the ball 
was exchanged a few times, Jim was 
again called in to punt. On the next 
play, Lycoming's quarterback fumbled 



and Defensive Captain Don Stump re- 
covered the loose ball on the Lycom- 
ing 22 yard line. As the Offense took 
over, Freshman Richie Glenn carried 
to the 17 and on the next play Dennis 
Shank plunged to the 11 for a first 
down. Shank then carried twice in a 
row, from the 11 to the 1, and from 
there he scored for the opening tally of 
the day. Soph Pete Bracchi kicked the 
extra point to make the score 7-0. 

Following the DVC kickoff, Lycom- 
ing then went 69 yards in five plays to 
tie the score. 

The defense played key roles through- 
out the remainder of the first half as 
Andy Timko and Geno Wallace both 
intercepted passes. Another fine play 
occurred when Dominick Cerchio broke 
up a screen play and tackled the re- 
ceiver for a five yard loss. 

Foote was in several times to punt 
but the offense finally got moving late 
in the second quarter. .With a little over 
a minute remaining, Quarterback Ron 
Timko moved the team to the Lycoming 
6-inch line. On his second attempt, Ron 
made it over to put the Aggies ahead, 
and with Pete Brfacchi's kick, the first 
half ended 14-7. 

Coach Craver seemed to spark some 
life into the offense, for in the second 
half the team began clicking and quar- 
terback Timko lead the team to their 
third score on a crucial fourth down 
play. With one yard to go for the first 
down from the Lycoming twelve yard 
line, halfback Glenn carried to the 5 as 
he blasted through the Warrior line. 
From there, Timko passed to tight end 
Bill Thorn to make the score 20-7. 
Bracchi's kick was good, but an off- 
side penalty brought the ball back and 
Pete's second kick was wide of the up- 
rights. 

For the remainder of the game, key 
plays, such as when Rick Jannotti's tip- 
ped pass fell into the hands of Geno 
Wallace for an interception, acted as in- 
centives. The Aggies held to a fine 20-7 
win over the Lycoming Warriors. 



THE FURROW 

urges all students to 

SUPPORT YOUR TEAMS 

Both Home and Away 





Photo Credit J. and D. 

Aggie defense hit hard helping Del. Val 
attain its first victory. 

AGGIE HARRIERS 
SPLIT 

September 27 sucessfully marked 
Cross Country season under the 
new coaching of Dr. Robert Bert- 
hold. 

Against the Muhlenberg team 
the Aggies, led by Howie Hender- 
son, finished first, with John Ahearn 
placing second, Lou Hegyes plac- 
ing fourth, and Ray Funkhouser 
and Rich Carver placing sixth and 
seventh to complete the Aggie scor- 
ing against Muhlenberg. 

Against a swift Dickonson team 
Aggies placed fourth, fifth, tenth, 
eleventh and twelfth. 

Weinhohz of Dickonson won the 
meet with a time of 24:18 over the 
4.6 mile course. Weinhohz's win 
sparked Dickonson to a 19 to 42 
victory over Del Val, but the Ag- 
gies retaliated by smashing the 
Muhlenberg Mules 21 to 40 in the 
triangular meet. 

The next encounter for the har- 
hiers will be October 3, against 
Ursinus at home. 



Tommie McDonald, Grand Marshal of 
this year's Homecoming Parade. 



NEXT FURROW 

DEADLINE 

Wed., Oct. 22nd 

12 Noon 



Wilkes Downs 
Aggies 
27-10 

Saturday, October 11th Wilkes College 
defeated Delaware Valley 27-10 before 
6.500 fans to extend the nation's longest 
collegiate winning streak to 32 games. 

Wilkes using a tough defense, which 
intercepted four passes, and a pass catch- 
ing record, rolled up twenty of their 
twenty-seven points in the fast moving 
second half. 

Bill Lazor of Wilkes set two pass 
catching records with most receptions at 
9 and most yardage with 158 yds. 

Pete Bracchi opened the scoring for 
D.V.C. by kicking a 32 yd. field goal 
with 7:33 remaining in the first quarter 
but Wilkes responded with a 77 yd. 
touchdown run by Tom Yeager. 

The exciting first half ended when, 
with no time remaining, Glenn Hawks- 
well intercepted a Colonels pass on the 
Wilkes 30 yd. line and was stopped 
inches from the goal line. 

In the second half Wilkes scored 
three times on 1 yd. runs by Bob Genaro, 
and with 2:11 remaining in the game 
Ron Timko hit Dan Guers in the end 
zone to finish the scoring at 27-10. 

Frosh Richie Glenn impressed many 
when he often broke tackles to pick up 
yardage. Also playing well were Don 
Stump, Glenn Hawkswell, Gene Wallace, 
Dennis Shank, Larry Hare and Wayne 
Mehalick. 

The Aggies record is now 1-2. They 
meet Swarthmore this Saturday for 
Homecoming. 
DVC 3 7—10 

Wilkes 7 6 14—27 

DV— Bracchi, 32 yd. FG 
W— Yeager, 77 yd. run, PAT good 
W — Gennaro, 1 yd. run, PAT good 
W— Gennaro, 1 yd. run, PAT failed 
W — Gennaro, 1 yd. run, PAT good 
DV — Guers, 30 yd. pass from Timko, 
PAT good 




SPECIAL THANKS 

TO MR. NED LINTA 

The Furrow would like to take this 
opportunity on behalf of the entire 
student body to thank Mr. Ned Linta, 
Director of Athletics, for the excep- 
tional job he has done to make this 
year's Homecoming Weekend a spe- 
cial one for all of us. 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the 




Vol. 16, No. 3 



The Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



Aggies Swamp Swarthmore 

40-0 

To Capacity Homecoming Crowd 




Del-Val just couldn't be stopped, rotting up twenty-six first downs and a 40-0 victory. 



A vicious ground attack provided 
4,000 Homecoming fans with an enjoy- 
able afternoon of football. Scoring twen- 
ty points in the first ten minutes, the 
Aggies eventually went on to a 40-0 
victory. Rolling up twenty-six first downs 
to Swarthmore's four, three of which 
were on penalties, along with 425 total 
Aggie yards, compared to Swarthmore's 
total of five, the Aggies moved easily 
toward the goal line on each set of 
downs. 

Sophomore halfback Jasper Meadows 
scored two of the three Aggie TD's in 
the opening quarter. Both scores were 
set up by Don Chance on long gains. 
Chance also scored in the quarter on a 
two yard run. The Aggie defense, con- 
tinually applying pressure to Mike 
O'Neal, Swarthmore's QB, forced him 
to throw quickly, making many of his 
passes incomplete. 

Coach Craver, utilizing the opportu- 



nity to use reserves, substituted freely 
as Del-Val continued to roll over the 
hapless Quaker team. Jim Foote, Fresh- 
man QB, scored the only TD in the sec- 
ond quarter, while Richie Glenn and Joe 
Lepre scored in the third and fourth 
quarters respectively to complete the 
scoring for the afternoon. Place kicker 
Pete Bracchi also contribtued four points 
on six attempts. 

The victory evened the Aggies' record 
to 2-2 while Swarthmore is now 1-2. The 
next encounter for Delaware Valley is 
Saturday, October 25, against Western 
Maryland at home. 
DV — Meadows, 1 yd. run. PAT good 
DV— Chance, 2 yd. run. PAT failed 
DV— Meadows, 18 yd. run. PAT good 
DV— Foote, 2 yd. run. PAT good 
DV— Glenn, 20 yd. run. PAT failed 
DV — Lepre, 1 yd. run. PAT good 

DVC 20 7 6 7—40 

Swarth 0—0 



B ?* T ? P * IN C ° NCER J What Is Alpha 



The Box Tops became overnight 
sensations when they recorded 
"The Letter". It was an interna- 
tional four-million seller that was 
the Number One record of 1967. 

But unlike most overnight sen- 
sations, The Box Tops have proven 
themselves by coming up with four 
more solid hits, "Neon Rainbow", 
"Cry Like A Baby", "Choo Choo 
(Continued on page 4, col 3) 



Alpha Phi Omega is a national service 
fraternity. Our aim is service to the 
school and community. We sponsor work 
projects on campus and in the local area. 
Combined with the projects there are 
social activities. Some of the projects are 
combined with other chapters from col- 
leges in the area or service sororities in 
the area. 

This is a way to serve the school and 
community and have fun and enjoyment 
at the same time. 



Honey Hollow 

Made 

Historic Landmark 

In 1939, the Honey Hollow Wa- 
tershed Conservation area in Sole- 
bury Township, Bucks County, Pa., 
was established by a small group 
of fanners. On August 4, 1969, 
thirty years later, this five hundred 

____^ acres was set aside by the United 

States Department of the Interior 

October 24, 1969 as a National Historic Landmark. 

It is the first watershed area in the 

United States to practice soil, wa- 
ter, and wildlife conservation with- 
in an entire ecosystem. These con- 
servation and proper land use 
management programs have been 
faithfully carried out to the pres- 
ent day. Here is a sacred small 
segment of land in our country 
carefully preserved for posterity to 
enjoy and to use as an educational 
center for children, teachers, and 
adults. 

The objectives of this unique 
project include the preservation of 
the historic value or the area, de- 
velopment of a Nature and Con- 
servation Education Center, dem- 
onstration of proper soil and water 
conservation practices, and the 
preservation of early farming life 
and agricultural practices. Finally, 
this area will serve as open space, 
preserving much of the native veg- 
etation, including rare species of 
plants, and give thousands of peo- 
ple a chance to relax and to enjoy 
the therapeutic effects of our nat- 
ural environment. 

This area must never be violated 
by any type of development such 
as highways, housing develop- 
ments, high-tension lines, etc., or 
its purposes and significance as a 
National Historic Landmark will 
be destroyed. 

David E. Benner, Instructor, 
Om. Hort. Department 



Dennis Gural '65 
Is Cuesf of F.I. 

On October 8, we were fortunate to 
have Mr. Dennis Gural, Class of '65 
graduate of our College. Mr. Gural is 
now in charge of quality control of the 
Acme Market Chain Baking unit on the 
East coast. 

It was a great advantage to have a 
past graduate come to speak. It enables 
us to visualize ourselves in his place and 
also hear what he has to say about his 
feelings when he was in our positions. 

Mr. Gural explained about the many 
opportunities in the field of Food Tech- 
nology and how we may go about get- 
ting such positions. He stated that the 
normal trend is to switch employers 
about two or three times before you 
really find the job which best suits you. 
He was asked if switching jobs was det- 
rimental in his resume to a new employer 
and his reply was that it depends on the 
time spent with each of the former em- 

Eloyers that was observed. He explained 
ow he himself had changed jobs twice, 
both times with an increase in position. 

He also firmly stated that although we 
may think that the summer job require- 
ment of the college may not mean much 
that it was of great help to him in the 
jobs that he has had so far. Although 
many companies will not hire students 
(Continued on page 4, col. 3) 



- INTERVIEW - 

with Tommy McDonald 



Tommie McDonald, former Philadelphia Eagle and Los Angeles Ram football 
star, was the guest of Furrow Sports Co-Editor Lou Hegyes during half time at the 
Delaware Valley - Lycoming football game. 

LOU — Tommie, I know that you haven't been on campus very long and you haven't 
seen very much of our surroundings. But could you give me a brief rundown 
of your first few impressions of our campus? 

TOM — Well, it sort of reminds me a lot of Oklahoma because you have many grassy 
areas and there's plenty of nx)m for walking around. This is more or less the 
type of college I think I'd like to go to . . . this is the type of campus that 
I think you could enjoy. 

LOU — What line are you in now? Is there any connection with football or any other 
sports? 

TOM — No. I'm not involved in any athletics in any way but I am still involved with 
sports somewhat because we do oil portraits of atheltes on award presentations 
such as the Heisman award, Maxwell award, Washington and Cleveland 
Touchdown Clubs and we also do the Miss America contest. 

LOU — Do you think that size is very important in especially pro football? 

TOM — No. I don't think that the size of a person is important anywhere. I think 
that if a person is the type of individual that has a heart as big as a washtub 
and he thinks absolutely positive there is no way in the world that he can't be 
successful in life. I know that's the way I have always thought. 

LOU — Through the years you have probably been in contact with many people. Can 
you point out one person that has been the most influential to you? 

TOM — I would have to say my father and mother were quite influential to me 
especially in getting an education plus I think that the association with Bud 
Wilkinson was probably the best thing that ever happened to me because he 
teaches not only the athletic side but also he tries to teach you what type of 
person to become to get along in life and with people. So I would have to 
say my parents and Bud Wilkinson. 

LOU — One last quest on. Knowing that you were a receiver when you played, can 
you name your toughest defender through the years? 

TOM — It's hard to pin down an individual. They are all pretty good. I would say 
that Nighttrain Lane was probably one of the best defenders I played against. 
So was Lem Barney, who is now playing with the Detroit Lions. That kid 
has tremendous reflexes and great speed. I think that today he is the best 
defensive halfback in the N.F.L. 



i?ms> IIOMECOMIK 




A sight not Men very often at DVC. Too bad It hat to be that way. The eight 
lovely girls above were club entries in the Homecoming Quesn Contest. The 
Furrow extends its thanks to all eight girls, Mr. Llnta and the student body for 

making the 1969 Homecoming an excellent one. 

Photo Credit— B. Weissman 






An attractive attraction of 
Homecoming '09. 




An exciting play during the 

Homecoming game. 

Nice play, Gene Wallace. 



A before and after picture of the Freshmen Class Homecoming bonfire. The flames 

soared high but not as high as our spirit. 




A picture all Aggies like to see all 
the time. Good work, Harriers. 




A 

COMING 

ATTRACTION 

ON 

NOVEMBER 8. 

MARK THAT 

ON YOUR 

CALENDARS 



Bell recording artists, the Box Tops sre coming to D.V.C. with their bag of 
golden hits — See front pege for story. 




;<; 



IN REVIEW 




Many of our school's football greats 

were honored — the forerunners of 

today's Green and Gold. 










To you, Class of 1972, a souvenir 
from Customs 1969. 



Photos by DAVE THOMAS 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF 
COLLEGE FOOTBALL .... 
ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF 
GREAT PLAYS .... and we 
were a part of it all. 





A scene that will not be seen next Homecoming. 
Completion date: January 1970 



«- Central Bucks East 
High School Band 




Two marvelous bands that provided 
the music for the Homecoming pa- 
rade. What's a parade without the 
pulsating music of the marching 
band? 



Delaware Valley College's 
Own i 






N T A I 

icuiT u aji 






Ornamental Horticulture 






THE TOP FIVE CLUB 
HOMECOMING FLOAT WINNERS 

The 1969 Homecoming Theme 
— / HAVE A DREAM — 

— JUDGING RESULTS — 

1st Place — ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE SOCIETY 
2nd Place — DAIRY HUSBANDRY SOCIETY 
3rd Place — BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB 
4th Place — HORTICULTURE SOCIETY 
5th Place — FOOD INDUSTRY CLUB 




mam 



«mM«Mltak 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



LETTERS TO THE EDITORS 

I'd Like To See A Change 

One of the criticisms of the Administration is its requirement of in- 
surance for parking privileges. The particular insurance I object to is 
fire and theft insurance. Many companies charge exorbitant rates for 
cars over five years old. How many cars sitting in the parking lot are 
over five years old? 

Why can't the student sign a waiver of responsibility for the College? 
Also, "The College is not liable for any damage to or items stolen from 
cars parked on campus . . . ." Does the fact tnat insurance covers theft 
relieve the responsibility of the College and security guards? 

Myself, I cannot get insurance for fire and theft through my father's 
policy because my car is eight years old. I have a completely different 
policy with another company for fire and theft. Buying such a limited 
amount of insurance costs more money. 

A student with a relatively new car with parts likely to be stolen will 
want theft insurance. But unlike the Mary Macintosh linens service, 
theft insurance isn't desired by a slim majority of 65% of the student 
body. And it certainly isn't cheaper if all take fire and theft insurance. 

— Michael A. Morgan 

Mr. Wood Thanks A-Day Workers 

May 29, 1969 
The Editor 
The FURROW 
Delaware Valley College 
Doylestown, Pa. 

This is a THANK-YOU to those students — especially William Varano, 
George Myers, and Robert Tones — who worked so diligently and hard 
to make the 1969 "A" Day the most successful ever at Delaware Valley 
College. These fellows, and others like them, literally worked night and 
day, from last Autumn, through the Winter and Spring, and even after 
"A" Dav, to help bring to our campus a crowd of people estimated at 
28,000 to 38,000. 

There is a great deal of goodness involved here and it was made 
possible solely by the students' efforts, with the cooperation of the faculty 
and the administration. 

It was my pleasure to work closely with these fellows and, if I were 
in the business world today, I would not hesitate to hire them — and be 
very glad to get them. 

Again, many thanks to all of those who participated. Your efforts 
have helped all of us along the way to enriching Delaware Valley 
College and ourselves — not in money, but in qualities like LEADER- 
SHIP and COOPERATION and HELPING OTHERS which are vastly 
more important. 

Cordially, 

Walter E. Wood, Chairman 

Faculty "A" Day Committee 



DELTA TAU ALPHA 
VOTES FOR NEW MEMBERS 

The first meeting of the fall semester 
of Delta Tau Alpha was called on Thurs- 
day, October 2, at 7:30 p.m. 

The major order of business was a dis- 
cussion of and voting on the acceptance 
of students eligible for membership in 
the society. 10 seniors and 26 juniors 
were elected as new members. 

The annual tutoring service offered by 
Delta Tau Alpha will again be initiated 
this semester. A complete list of courses 
and their tutors will be posted on all 
campus bulletin boards in the near fu- 
ture. Any student at DVC is welcome to 
take advantage of this service. 

A special initiation meeting for new 
members was held on October 7 in Segal 
Hall Auditorium. 



Cross Country Tried 

The Aggies dropped their second 
contest of the season in a dual 
meet with Ursinus College. Ur- 
sinus, the defending M. A. C. 
champs, proved to have too much 
speed and depth as they finished 
first, second, third, fifth, and sixth 
while the Aggie five finished fourth, 
ninth, twelfth, fourteenth, and fif- 
teenth to round out the field. The 
final score was Ursinus 17, Del- 
Val 55 which gives Del-Val a 1-2 
record thus far. 



BOX TOPS— 

(Continued from page I) 
Train" and "Soul Deep', and two 
best-selling albums, "The Letter" 
and "Cry Like A Baby", all on Bell 
Records. 

Lead singer Alex Chilton, 18, 
bassist Bill Cunningham, 18, and 
Gary Talley, 20, lead guitarist, 
have been Box Tops since the be- 
ginning. Recently, when two of the 
original members decided to return 
to school, musicians working in 
other Memphis groups were hand- 
picked as replacements. Drummer 
Tom Boggs, 20, and organist Rick 
Allen, 21, are the new Box Tops. 

The Box Tops are on top, and 
plan to remain there. This is one 
concert not to miss. 

— Sol Cavinese 

FOOD INDUSTRY— 

(Continued from page 1) 
for summer employment, his company 
does have a work-study program set up 
with Drexel Institute. 

After the meeting was adjourned Mr. 
Gural made himself available for in- 
dividual questions from the members. 

CLUB BUSINESS: Dr. Turner re- 
ported that the Philadelphia Chapter of 
the International F(xxl Technologists In- 
stitute has agreed to sponsor our goal for 
membership into this association. At the 
present time our curriculum is now being 
evaluated and the results will be forth- 
coming in the near future. Student mem- 
bership is not required but is a worth- 
while step in bringing the student closer 
to those in the area or Food Technology. 



J. CARROLL MOLLOY 

Realtor - Insurance 

Molloy Building 

30 S. Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 



FIFE and DRUMS 

"Where Quality and Good Taste 
are not Expensive" 

10% DVC Discount 

156 West State St. 
Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa. 18901 

Monday Closed 
Tues.-Sat. 9:30-5:30 

THOUGHTFUL GIFTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



THE FRAMER 

80 West State St. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

ELSIE WEISS 

10-5 Daily 
Friday 10-9 P.M. 

Phone 348-9262 



DID YOU KNOW? 

.... That Graham Nash left the Hollies because he refused to record 
(words and music) by Bob Dylan? 

.... That Joan Baez is forming her own "peace revolution"? 

.... That there are rumors that Tiny Tim will marry his 17-year-old 
girl friend on the Johnny Carson show on New Year's Eve? 

.... That Ringo Starr will be sporting a crew-cut in his next picture? 

.... That there are rumors that Diana Ross of the Supremes has been 
secretly married for months? 

.... That the Latin Casino will feature Engelbert Humperdink from 
Monday, October 27, to Sunday, November 2? 

.... That the 4th annual Quaker City Jazz Festival w'lll be held Sunday, 
November 2, at 7 P.M.? 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. State Strati 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• Custom Made Jewelry 
A Specialty 

• Watch and Jawelry Repair 
348-4675 Doylestown, Pa. 



GAUDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



* Reed and Barton — Lunt — 
Wallace — Starling, etc. 

* Omega — Long i net — 
Accutron, etc. 

Watch - Clock - Jewelry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348*2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



• Jewelry — Watches 
e Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

flewelenA 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



DVC HARRIERS BEAT ALBRIGHT 

An unusually warm day set the 
scene for the Aggies second vic- 
tory. Good combined team running 
enabled the Aggie harriers to beat 
Albright 27-33 on their 4.3 mile 
course. The Aggie top finisher was 
John Ahern who placed second, 
with Howie Henderson (3), Ray 
Funkhouser (5), Lou Hegyes (7), 
and Jim La Baugh (8) following 
close behind. The win brought the 
Aggie record to a 2-2 mark. 



the 





URROW 



Vol. 16, No. 4 



The Student Newspaper 



Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture November 14, 1969 




. Photo Credit— Jeff Wohlfeld 
November 9th, 1 969 — In brief ceremonies today the new dormitories formerly 
designated Dorms I and II were properly dedicated. Dorm I was dedicated in 
lionor of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Morris Goldman, whose efforts 
have helped to make our college the fine institution of higher learning it is today. 
Dorm II was dedicated in memory of J. Bunford Samuel who was a generous 
benefactor and friend of the college. Mr. Samuel was an admirer of Dr. Kraus- 
koph and this school. Pictured from right to left are: Dr. James Work, President 
of the College; Mrs. Morris Goldman, and Mr. Morrii Goldman, Chairman of 
the College's Board of Trustees, after the dedication ceremonies. 



Computer-Match 
Mixer To Be Held 

At a recent Intercollegiate Con- 
ference a number of the small col- 
leges in our area, including several 
womens' colleges, expressed inter- 
est in intercollegiate mixers and 
concerts. The Class of 71 has de- 
vised a mixer that will enable girls 
from four colleges to attend a mixer 
on our campus. Representatives 
from the colleges ana your junior 
class are working together on the 
final arrangements. 

Applications have been sent out 
to the cooperating womens' col- 
leges. They have also been avail- 
able at DVC. Applicants will be 
divided into groups of six (three 
men and three women). Members 
of each group will receive a com- 
mon code number so each group 
can get together with partners 
matched by common interests. 

The mixer itself is on Nov. 21st 
featuring the Delcords and Salt 
and Pepper. It'll be a great evening 
and an entertainment "first" on our 
campus. 

Profs To Judge 

Drs. Ellery French and Robert 
Berthold, both members of the 
Biology Department faculty, will 
serve as judges at the Annual Penn- 



Cafeteria Style 

Meals 

Extended 

Starting Sunday, November 16th 
Sunday dinner will be served cafe- 
teria style. These cafeteria style 
dinners will be served from 11:45 
a.m. 'till 12:45 p.m. every Sunday 
starting the 16th and will replace 
the current family style Sunday 
dinner. 

Starting Tuesday, Dec. 2nd, the 
first day of classes after Thanksgiv- 
ing recess, all evening meals will 
be served cafeteria style, terminat- 
ing family style meals. Dinner on 
weekdays and Saturday will be 
served from 5:15 p.m. till 6:30 p.m. 

It should be noted that these 
dining hours are in effect on a trial 
basis and will be changed if they 
are inconvenient to the student 
body. 

These cafeteria style meals will 
(Continued on page 2) 

sylvania Farm Show. What's this, 
biology faculty at the farm show? 
Dr. French will judge 4-H ex- 
hibits in entomology (Department 
16), while Dr. Bertnold will judge 
(of course) apiary products (De- 
partment 15). 



LINEN STOLEN 

Fourteen complete sets of linen 
still sealed in their plastic bags as 
received from Mary Macintosh 
were stolen from Work Hall dur- 
ing Homecoming Weekend. These 
were extra sets stored in the hall 
to be returned with the used sets 
when collected after the weekend. 
Student Government will be re- 
sponsible for the cost of the linen 
if it is not recovered. The cost to 
S. G. could be as high as $150. 

F.S.E.E. Walk-In 
Test Offered 

College seniors will have an op- 
portunity to compete in the very 
popular Federal Service Entrance 
Examination (FSEE) when it is 
given on a walk-in basis at our 
campus on Saturday, Nov. 22 at 9 
a.m. in the Segal Hall auditorium. 
Complete details and FSEE an- 
nouncements are now available at 
the Placement Office. 

During the past year 728 on- 
campus tests were given through- 
out the country. More than 19,000 
men and women were tested on 
campus in 1968-69. Overall, more 
than 47,000 competitors were eligi- 
ble under the FSEE program. In 
1968-69, more than 8,000 eligibles 
were hired through the FSEE. 

The FSEE was designed with 
the college student in mind. One 
test, taken one time in one place 
opens the door to approximately 60 
different and challenging career 
fields in many Federal agencies at 
locations all over the country. 

Open to seniors and graduates 
in any academic major the program 
is appropriate for students in all 
curricula except Engineering, Phy- 
sical Sciences, Accounting and a 
limited number of other technical 
fields. This examination is unques- 
tionably the most popular avenue 
for Federal employment ever de- 
vised. 



Senior Pictures 

Pictures of seniors for the 1970 
year book will be taken December 
2nd, 3rd and 4th. Seniors are ad- 
vised to check the bulletin board 
in the cafeteria for the particular 
time and place of their picture. 
Dark jacket and tie are required 
for the pictures. 



Special 
Notice 

With this issue The Furrow will 
initiate a weekly schedule. The 
paper will be distributed to dor- 
mitories every Friday afternoon. 
Off - campus students may get 
their copies at Dean Fulcolys 
office. This weekly schedule will 
continue only as long as student 
interest warrants it. 



Student Killed 

In Tragic 
Auto Accident 

Barry Harter 72, a 19-year-old 
agronomy major was killed instant- 
ly in a violent three-car crash on 
Route 100 in Lowhill Township. 
The accident occurred along a 
curve in the highway at Lyon Val- 
ley. The coroners report listed a 
broken spine as the cause of death 
with other multiple fractures and 
internal injuries. 

Police on the scene reported that 
a northbound car travelling an esti- 
mated 80 to 85 mik»s per hour 
crossed into the southbound lane 
on the curve and hit the left front 
of Harter's vehicle, then spinning 
into a third vehicle. 

Barry Harter's body was taken 
to the Huhn Funeral Home in 
Slatedale, Pa. 

Many of Barry's classmates, the 
president of Student Government, 
the Dean and Assistant Dean of 
Men, and membes of the Faculty 
paid their last respects to a fine 
youth whose life was taken by an- 
other's carelessness. 

Barry was laid to rest in the 
Heidelberg Union Cemetery. 

The Furrow on behalf on the en- 
tire Student Body, Faculty and Ad- 
ministration extends its sincere 
sympathy to Barry's family and 
friends. 




BARRY HARTER 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



November 14, 1969 



MEALS— (Continued) 

offer the student a wider variety 
of dining fare. Usually two main 
meat courses will be offered to 
choose from except with meats such 
as steak, etc. 

All menus will be planned and 
posted for the students' conveni- 
ence. 

Because of the fact that it is im- 
possible to accurately determine at 
all times the mfrnber of students 
who will be eating at these cafe- 
teria style meals main course dish- 
es may have to be substituted at 
times. 



Holiday Dinners 

This year's Thanksgiving dinner 
will be held Monday, November 
24th for students, faculty and 
administration. Monday, Decem- 
ber 15th has been set for the 
annual Christmas dinner. 



What Ever Happened 
To The GLEE CLUB? 

The Delaware Valley College Glee 
Club, is going on Cross Country tour, 
during Spring Recess. We are going to 
have exchange concerts with schools like, 
Penn State, Gwynedd-Mercy, Douglass- 
at-Rutgers. Not to mention many other, 
never - before - heard - of - in - Aggie - 
Land, goodies. So said Mr. Andrij Szul, 
our new Glee Club director. When he 
spoke of these ideas, he had in mind a 
group of forty or better Aggies. At pre- 
sent there are twenty members, and this 
lot is becoming unnerved by lack of 
spirit in their comrades. 

In the beginning, during orientation, 
there were twenty-eight freshmen who 
-signed up and tried out for the Glee 
Club. Where are they now? And there 
are those upperclassmen who belonged 
last year and figured, "Well, a new 
director will change ways and everything 
will be different. When there is change 
there are bound to be problems, so any 
change is bad!" 

This is far from the truth. Mr. Szul 
is making the Glee Club produce better 
sounds than ever before produced at this 
college. But, the question is, "Where have 
all the members gone?" There should 
have been nearly sixty or more members, 
and now, with one-third of that it looks 
like the "old lady's home" will be enter- 
tained at Xmas instead of N.Y.U. or 
Douglass. 

Is this the way of Aggies, to back out 
when there's a chance of coming out 
ahead? I hope not, for our College has 
had good Glee Clubs in the past. Now 
let's have a great one! 

Dollar Changer 
Still A Problem 

Last spring the dollar changer 
was removed from the cafeteria. 
Supposedly a person or persons hid 
inside the cafeteria after the mixer 
and removed the machine some- 
time early Saturday morning. Be- 
cause the cafeteria wasn't forcibly 
entered the insurance policy did 
not provide coverage. As a result 
Student Government will pay for 
the machine, worth somewhere 
around $900. The price of the ma- 
chine couldn't be immediately de- 
termined for the Student Govern- 
ment Report. It was proposed that 
SG split the commission from the 
vending machines with Ar\A to pay 
for the dollar changer. 



Parent's Day 
Best Ever 

This years Parents Day proved 
to be the best to date. Over 350 
tickets were sold for reserved 
grandstand seats. It was a sell-out 
crowd. And it was a great game for 
the Green and Gold; Walloping un- 
defeated Susquehanna. 

It was the first time parents were 
asked to register ana the coffee 
served at the registration tent sure 
tasted good on a crisp November 
afternoon. 

Six hundred took advantage of 
the Annual Parents' Day Dinner. 
Some delays resulted because of 
the large number to be served, but 
steps are being taken to eliminate 
this problem for next year. 

Parents' Day provided an excel- 
lent opportunity for parents, stu- 
dents, and faculty to get together, 
for parents to see the college team 
in action, to see the campus in fall 
and have a good dinner. 

A good time, a worthwhile time, 
was had by all in the most success- 
ful Parents' Day ever to date. 




Photo Credit — Dave Thomas 
A* a symbol of honoring all parents 
the mothers of the football captains, 
Student Government president and 
track captain are presented corsages by 
their sons. 



PATRONIZE 

"FURROW" 

ADVERTISERS 



KERSHNERS 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



STAN BOWERS 

MEN'S STORE 

Van Heusen • Farah 

Shirts Slacks 

PBM Suits • Botany 500 

19 N. Main Doylestown 



Dr. Kahan To Speak 

Dr. I. H. Kahan, Director of the 
Regional Poultry Diagnostic Lab- 
oratory at Delaware Valley Col- 
lege, will be the guest of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania's New Bol- 
ton Center, Monday, Nov. 24th. 
Dr. Kahan 's talk, part of the Cen- 
ter's Poultry Health Symposium, 
will concern fowl cholera in tur- 
keys. 

Golden Eagle 
Rescued 

Early Sunday afternoon Joseph Pear- 
son, Sellersville, a member of the Bucks 
County Audubon Society, was called by 
Edwin Fox, of rural Quakertown. Fox 
and several members of his family had 
spotted a huge hawk-like bird in a 
wood lot near Richlandtown that they 
had identified as an immature but nearly 
full grown Golden Eagle. The bird was 
either very tame or injured and Fox 
was afraid that it might become the 
target of a misinformed hunter. 

Pearson called Dr. John Mertz or the 
college, president of the Bucks County 
Audubon Society who, in turn, put him 
in touch with Roy Frock of Feasterville, 
an expert falconer and bird handler. 
Frock, Mertz, Pearson and his wife, Fox 
and his two brothers met and combed 
the upper Bucks area until the bird was 
spotted. Evidendy weak, it did not fly 
away as they approached. The bird was 
picked up without a struggle by Frock 
who took it home for treatment. The 
eagle was badly scarred on one foot and 
evidently starving. Frock, experienced in 
handling such birds, will feed the eagle, 
see that it gets veterinary care, and 
release it after he nurses it back to health. 

The Golden Eagle is an extremely 
rare visitor in Bucks County. Eagles are 
spotted very occassionally over the county 
as they migrate from their northern nest- 
ing grounds in Canada to their winter 
range, primarily along the Southern Ap- 

Kalacians in the East. Larger than a 
awk, with a wing spread exceeding six 
feet, the Golden Eagle feeds primarily 
on rats, mice and rabbits. 




RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarter! for Work and 

Dress Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 

THOM McAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



Photo Credit— Abbott Lee 

Things started to get a little moist as 
the Hort. Society readied for their 
yearbook pictures. Most of the later 
pictures had to be taken indoors. 

Agronomy Club 

On 
The Road Again 

The Agronomy Club is once again a 
very active club on the campus of D.V.C. 
At the first several meetings, many upper- 
classmen returned to help in the activi- 
ties for this year. Also on hand were 
many freshmen, who, it is hoped, will 
take an interested and active part in the 
club's activities. 

Among the activities already begun this 
year was the Homecoming float. A fine 
job was done by chairman Ted Debnam, 
but we ran into unfortunate straits when 
our world deflated. That's the end of 
balloons on Agronomy floats. 

One of the most active parts of the 
club is the Soil Judging Tcurt. The team 
left on Friday, Oct. 24 for the Regional 
Contest at the University of Maryland. 
The team garnered a third ptaje at Penn 
State last year and it is h ping to im- 
prove upon that finish this time around. 

Among the other activities are active 
participation among members in the In- 
tramural Program. Agronomy ?s presently 
tied for first in volleyball with Animal 
Husbandry, both with 4-0 records. In 
football, Agronomy has a record of 2-1. 

At the present time, the club is dis- 
cussing a field trip for sometime this fall. 
Another big item is the trip to the 
661st annual meeting of the National 
Agronomy Convention, held from Nov. 
9-14 in Detroit, Michigan. Several mem- 
bers are planning on attending, including 
George Umholtz, present President, Wil- 
liam Camerer, Neal Hayes, Chuck Reese, 
John George, and Wayne Knerr. 

It can easily be seen that the Agronomy 
Club is again an active force on campus. 
The club can feel sure it will progress 
with the help of Dr. Prundeanu, Mr. 
Stratton and its new acquisition from the 
University of Maine, Mr. Brown. We 
are sure the 69-70 year will prove to be 
both active and interesting for all Agro- 
nomy Club members. 




Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 

EDITOt John Martin 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mike Morgan 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Low Hedge* 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Day* Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Arnio Colnun 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Loo Strassberger 

ART EDITORS Rill Jeffrey, Jeffrey Kior 

BUSINESS MANAGER Dovo Taiehman 

TYPING MANAGER D.lb.rt jonos 

-GENERAL STAFF- 

Sol Cavines, John Furphy, Carl Pfitienmeyer, Bill Strode, Milton Parkor, Alton Gordon, 
Lorry Mortal, Walt Auk, Abbott Loo, Dovo Sustalt, Howard Henderson, Bob Edwards, 

Bruce Richard 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR Joseph I. FuUoh/ 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Morti 

It should bo noted that the opinions axprossod in this newspaper art those of 
the respective authors end do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



November 14, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



- LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - 

NEW POLICY — Starting with this issue The Furrow will print letters for 
publication as they are received. No corrections or changes will be made 
unless otherwise directed by the author prior to publication. Letters for 
publication MUST be signed. Letters which are libelous in content or 
otherwise non-factual will not be considered for publication. 



More Comments About 
The 'Trust Company" 

David Jay Kamison 
Delaware Valley College 
Doylestown, Pa. 

The Furrow 

Delaware Valley College 

Dear Associate Editor: 

Having recently read your editorial in the October 17th issue of the 
Furrow, I was amazed at the total lack of insight you showed to what 
has been printed in the Trust Company. 

In your editorial you state that you feel that the T. C.'s goals are 
"biased and restricted." Their whole issue seems to echo "we support 
the student body as a whole, and we hope to promote more rights for 
the students." You obviously did not read the paper very well. 

You also state that they, the T. C, want the Student Government to 
be completely oblivious of the Administration. Nowhere in my copy is 
it stated as such. According to my interpretation, they feel that the 
Student Government should not be a puppet in the hands of the Admin- 
istration, a point upon which I am forced to agree. 

, Since, most of the students on campus, if they did not come here, 
would be out working, the T. C. appears to feel that they should be 
treated as adults while attending D.V.C. and not as children. Part of 
this treatment is the privilege of making their own decisions. That is the 
job of a college, teaching people to "make it on their own." 

In past issues the Furrow, the staff has hollered about student apathy. 
I feel that the Furrow owes a vote of commendation to the T. C. for not 
being apathetic, and for trying to do something on this campus. The 
crew who publish the Trust Company, are the few students on this 
campus who are not totally apathetic. They present views about this 
' campus that nobody else is willing to publicly discuss. It is the job of 
the Furrow to voice these obvious student grievances. Yet, you continue 
to put forth with the drivil about this dub that showed slides and that 
club that looked at an animal. I feel that you, the Furrow, are neglecting 
your duties to the student body. 

In reference to the T. C. squealing before it is hurt, I feel that the 
same could be said for yourselves. The Furrow has in the immediate 
past published many criticisms, yet the constructive suggestions are few 
in number. Everybody is entitled to voice his opinion and what those 
who write for the T. C. have to say would probably not get through the 
censorship board that the Furrow must submit to. Your solution for turn- 
ing their articles into you is completely emmoneous, because the Admin- 
istration will find out who they are in that manner and their future here 
will be quite unstable. This does not show forethought and logic, two 
most necessary items a Student Newspaper leader should possess. 

Lastly, you should learn how to read, as it is very clear in my copy 
that the man's name is Zilch. 

Sincerely, 

David Jay Kamison 



Associate Editor Replies 



Mr. Kamison, 

Let me open my door to articles from every student as well as the 
Trust Company crew. If I was unclear in asking for articles, I am sorry. 

To my knowledge, thus far this academic year, the Furrow has only 
eliminated very poorly written articles and articles so out-of-date that 
they read like club histories. True, club articles are sometimes old hat 
ana boring, but that's what the clubs' publicity men are writing. 

The student's opinions need to be expressed. We regret your help in 
writing articles. We need articles written by you, the students. Apathy 

on the students' part is the most deadly enemy the Furrow has. But the 

articles need to be properly presented in the Furrow. 

Your letter appearing in this issue is proof that not all articles are FHitor'c Nfttp 
eliminated that critize the Furrow or the Administration. fcWIWJI a I^UIV 



An Open Letter To Dr. Work 

October 29, 1969 
Dear Dr. Work, 

Moratorium Day, October 15, 1969, will be remembered as one of the biggest 
farces of all times. Yes, Dr. Work, a farce and you may have been totally against 
the Moratorium but by having voluntary classes you put your sign of approval on it. 
Why a farce? Because all you did was tell the students that they could stay in their 
dorms and homes and sleep all day. It was being in high school again and being able 
to play hookie from school and not having to bring a note from your mother! 

Your position as head of this school is to teach students to become men and 
women, to teach them the responsibilities that go with the education. Yes, "respon- 
sibilities" — teach them the fact that with every RIGHT there is an equal respon- 
sibility. Education is a RIGHT in this country and the responsibility to use what 
we learn is of the greatest importance not only to ourselves but to our country and 
the rest of the world. / 

You also, Dr. Work, have a responsibility, and that is to the parents of the students 
at Delaware Valley College. They are the ones paying for their sons' and daughters' 
educations. They expect their children, and that is what the greater percentage of 
them are, to be in class learning on school days and not running around denouncing 
our flag or sleeping. It costs a great deal of money to come here to school and un- 
fortunately these kids do not realize this. They think just because they are away from 
home that they are men and need no supervision. Little do they really know. They 
walk around this campus crying, "Treat us like men," yet they act like first graders. 
There is an old adage— "Don't bite the hand that feeds you." Well, Dr. Work, the 
parents, not the students, are feeding you. 

The papers and the television news media built up the Moratorium as a great 
success — 12,000 people mobbed Kennedy Plaza, in Philadelphia. I have been to a 
high school football game with more people in attendance. 12,000 sounds like a lot, 
but then, just how many college students are there in Philadelphia? This is where 
the news media are at fault. They, not the leaders of the Moratorium, have blown 
what happened way out of proportion. Unfortunately the news media think that the 
people are tired of watching Cowboy and Indian movies where the bad guys 
(Indians) always lose in the end. Now the bad guys (dissidents) get the headlines. 
For example, the Moratorium got a big build-up across the country, yet these people 
were a minority of our population. I do not know why they called it "Moratorium 
Day". It should have been called "Isolation Day" or "Chicken Delight". There are 
two factions in this group— one wants us to stay home and forget about the rest of 
the world and the others are the draft dodgers who are afraid to put on a uniform 
and serve their country. 

The Moratorium was supposed to honor our soldiers who have died in Vietnam. 
This brings me to the heart of this letter. 

On November 11, the Veterans associations and the rest of the country will 
honor our people who have served their country: to honor the living and thank 
them for what they have done for us and wish them all the happiness in the world; 
to honor the dead for giving us the greatest sacrifice that could be asked — their 
lives. 

Now, speaking as an ex-serviceman, I ask you, Dr. Work, "Who should be re- 
sponsible for commemorating a day for our people who have served and served this 
country well? The peopel who have fought and the relatives of those who have died 
fighting, or a bunch of young kids who are afraid to cut the strings between them 
and their mothers' aprons?" Think about it. Will you bend towards experience, 
which is the greatest of all teachers, or to the so-called educated mind? 



So now, Dr. Work, I ask you, "What are you going to do about November 11th, 
Veterans Day?" This Day our students should have off from school so that they may 
honor their parents, relatives, and friends who have fought to preserve the very 
freedoms they so willingly use (or abuse) today. 

Sincerely, 

JOHN A. FURPHY 

Class of '72 



Thank you for your letter, I am glad there are other people who can't 
spell. (Drivil — "Look that up in your Funk and Wagnalls.") 

Associate Editor 

Michael A. Morgan 



Because of a slack in Furrow issues in preparation for our weekly 
schedule, Mr. Furphy's letter could not be printed before Nov. 11th. 
We apologize to Mr. Furphy for our printing delay. 



*B 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



November 14, 1969 




Photo Credit J. and D. 



BOX TOPS ... A SUCCESS ? 



A small town group gets together, they write a song and it's a hit! They give 
themselevs a name — then maybe they make another hit. So, does that necessarily 
make them 'Concert Material? 5 The answer, unfortunately, is NO! And it's very^ un- 
fortunate that the "Box Tops" were the ones to prove it at the "Fall Concert" on 
Saturday night, Nov. 8, at Sidney Newman Gymnasium. 

The concert, to say the least, was definitely not a success. It was really more of 
a let down! However, giving credit where credit it due, I must say the Box Tops 
are a talented group of musicians . . . But I have seen the same in groups here at 
our mixers. The key to a successful concert, along with good music, is good enter- 
tainment. As far as entertainment was concerned, the Box Tops rated "zero". Their 
so-called "jokes" were so unbelievably bad. They really shouldn't even had tried. 

Personally, I don't think the Box Tops were worth the $3.00. It was a real dis- 
appointment. 

For our next concert, let's get a group that will draw the crowds for their well- 
known talents and entertainment, even it it costs a few dollars more per picket (at 
least it will be worth the money), and let's forget about this "over the hill" material. 



- ott 7 he Movies - 

Doylestown County 

November 12—"Best House In London" 
November 19 — "Krakatoa East of Java" 
November 26 — "Krakatoa East of Java" 

Barn Cinema 

November 19— "Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid" 
November 19 — "Lion In Winter" 
November 26 — "Lion In Winter" 

309 Cinema 

November 12— "Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid" 
November 19— "Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid" 
November 26— "The Gypsy Moths" 

Bucks County Drive-In 

November 12— "Journey To The Far Side of The Sun" 
November 12 — "Devil's Bridge" 
November 19 — "Krakatoa East of Java" 
November 19— "Hell In The Pacific" 
November 26 — "Krakatoa East of Java" 



ADVERTISING DOESN'T COST 

. . . IT PAYS . . . 

Advertise In THE FURROW 



GAUDY'S 

Th« COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.-FRI. 9-7 - SAT. 9-4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

SAMUEL MOVER 
Master Barber 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEDGES 



Ted Cottrell, the former Aggie 
football great, was placed on the 
active roster of the Atlanta Falcons 
after all-pro linebacker Tommy 
Nobis was injured. Ted had spent 
the first few weeks of the season on 
the Falcon taxi squad. 

Another former Aggie football 
star, John Nice, is now spending 
his days playing for the Indianapo- 
lis Capitals in the Continental 
Football League. Its just a matter 
of time before a AFL or NFL team 
grabs him. 

Frosh Richie Glenn in the West- 
ern Maryland game established a 
new DVC single game rushing rec- 
ord of 181 yards in 21 carries, 
breaking the old standard of 177 
yards held by John Nice. 

Wrestling Coach Floyd Marshall 
was undefeated in dual meets for 
Findlay College in the 157 lb. 
class. Coach Marshall was also the 
small college national champ in 
1964 and he placed second and 
third in two other events in that 
same tourney. 

7 earn Ttfazk 
Gvezpowetd 'Jextite 

The Del-Val harriers proved to 
be too powerful for the Philadel- 
phia Textile aggregation, as the 
Aggies handed the Rams a 24-37 
defeat Nov. 3rd. 

First place honors went to Rapp 
of Textile, who covered the 4.6 
mile course in 25:35. The only 
other Ram to finish in the top ten 
was Corr who finished third. 

The Aggie dalers utilizing a good 
team effort placed eight runners 
in the top ten. Leading the pack 
was Howie Henderson (2), fol- 
lowed by Jim LaBaugh (4), Ray 
Funkhouser (5), Bud Dacko (6), 
and Lou Hegyes (7). 

The next home contest will be 
Nov. 8 against Washington College 
and P.M.C. at 4:00. 

The harriers record now stands 
at 3-6. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



* Heed and Barton — Lunt — 
Wallace - Storting, etc. 

* Omega — Longinot — 
Accwtron, etc. 

Watch - Clock - Jewelry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



Del. Vol. 

Topples 

Undefeated 

Susquehanna 

Things started off bleakly for the 
Aggies as Susquehanna successfully con- 
verted an onsides kick into the first score 
of the day. 

After recovering the opening kick, 
Susquehanna marched 50 yards in 5 
plays to score as quarterback Ernie Tyler 
flipped a 20 yarder to halfback Bill Guth 
putting Susquehanna ahead, temporarily. 
DVC retaliated with a strong showing by 
the defense as Joe Carroll intercepted a 
pass, which was deflected by Rick 
jannotti, on the Susquehanna 18 yard 
line. Ritchie Glenn then swept around 
the left end for 11 yards, and the first 
Aggie touchdown, tying the score, 7-7 
with Pete Bracchi adding the first of his 
8 points on th extra point conversion. 

The defense remained active through- 
out the first half. Key plays included 
Glenn Hawkswell's interception, which 
set up D.V.C.'s second T.D. Donny 
Chance carried the ball on a fine run 
from the 28 yard line, and Bracchi's 
kick put DVC on top, 14-7. (The defense 
defense intercepted eight passes in all.) 

Both teams scored once more in the 
second quarter as the Crusaders moved 
in for a score on the ensuing kickoff. 
Ouarterback Tyler maneuvered his team 
from their own 28 yard line to D.V.C.'s 
goal for their second score of the after- 
noon. The T.D. came on a fine pass to 
halfback Steve Smith, and, with the toe 
of Steve Freeh adding the extra point, 
the score was 14-14. 

Glenn Hawkswell came up with two 
of the finest plays of the afternoon. In 
the first, he shook off an intended block, 
and tackled the Crusader runner for a 
four-yard loss. Then, or the neat play he 
intercepted a pass and returned the ball 
into Susquehanna territory ;>t the 47 yard 
line. On combined efforts by Ron Timko, 
Donny Chance, and Ritchie Glenn, 
DVC. rolled to their third touchdown 
as Timko trotted 11 yards up the middle 
on QB sneak. 

In the second half, the defense re- 
mained as sharp as they were in the 
first two periods. Linebacker Gino Wal- 
lace picked off another pass and maneu- 
vered like a fullback as he bulled his way 
down to the 44 yard line of Susquehanna, 
putting the Aggies in fine field position. 
D.V.C. then had to settle for 3 points as 
the Crusader defense tightened and Pete 
Bracchi was called on to kick a 22-yard 
field goal. 

The fourth period was highlighted by 
an outstanding interception by Joe Urban. 
Joe reached high above his head and 
then raced 45 yards to the Susquehanna 
40, to erase any hopes the visitors may 
have had about closing the gap in the 
score. 

Exceptional achievements by Ron Tim- 
ko, Denny Shank, Dan Guers, Richie 
Glenn and the entire offensive line as 
well as Joe Urban, Dominick Cerchio, 
Rick Jannotti, Don Stump, Chris Bock- 
rath, Glenn Hawkswell, Gino Wallace and 
the remainder of the defensive team, 
combined in a unified effort as Delaware 
Valley won their fourth game in six 
starts, 38-20. This was the last home 
game the seniors will be playing. This 
victory marks the first time in the school's 
history that any one class has gone 
through four years of football and each 
year has come out with winning records: 
I960: 5-3; 1967: 6-2; 1968: 6-2; 1969: 
4-3. 

STATISTICS S DV 

First Downs 10 18 

Rushing Yardage 38 318 

Passing Yardage 203 79 

Passes 17-42 7-13 

Passes Int. By 2 8 

Fumbles Lost 2 

Punts 6-33 3-41 

Yards Penalized 60 124 

Susquehanna 7 7 6 — 20 

Del. Valley 14 7 3 14 — 38 



the 




ROW 



Vol. 16, No. 5 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture November 21, 1969 




Photo credit— Dave Thomas 



Warrington Little League football players, wearing green and gold, beat Willow 
Grope at the midget game played here last Saturday. -These kids played their 
hearts out. 

The Rise And Fall Of The 
Third Reich" To Be Shown 



The Contemporary Club will again set 
a precedent with its three-day showing 
of the film "The Rise and Fall of The 
Third Reich." The film is divided into 
three, hour-long segments, and it is de- 
signed to be presented in three succes- 
sive showings. The Contemporary Club 
will present the movie on December 2nd, 
3rd, and 4th at 9:00 p.m. in Segal Hall 
Auditorium. 

The film, "The Rise and Fall of The 
Third Reich," is based on William L. 
Shirer's history of Nazi Germany. This 
widely acclaimed film traces the develop- 
ment of Hitler's Germany, its rise to 
power in Europe and its eventual decline 
and fall. An exciting, informative, and 
artfully-made motion picture, "The Rise 
and Fall of The Third Reich" is a film 
that is not to be missed. 

Admission to the film will be by ticket 
only. Students may procure free tickets 
from any Contemporary Club member, 
the Dean of Students' Office, or Dorma- 
tory Proctors. 



IN APPRECIATION 

We wish to express our sincere 
thanks and appreciation to all of you 
for the beautiful flowers and many 
cards we received during the loss of 
our loved one. 

Sincerely, 

"The Kermit Harter Family" 



Bruce Richards 
To Start 
New Column 

This being the first of a continuing 
series of articles, I hope to expound some 
of the ideas that I shall, in the course of 
the year, deal with. Namely everything. 
If it is pertinent to the world and is 
relevant to the students at Del. Val. I 
hope to at some time or another com- 
ment on it. For a select few of the stu- 
dents at this college this may be a bit 
profound. However, I feel that for the 
vast majority my pseudo-intellectualism 
will go unflurriea. 

To the everpresent minority that has 
an earnest concern for the College I be- 
speak your patience. We can not change 
100 years of "tradition" overnight. Only 
through working together can we over- 
come the apathy for our problems and 
desires. To the concerned who got to- 
gether and formed the 'Trust Company", 
I am asking your patronage to this series. 
With your support and help we can 
change things a lot faster then if you go 
one way and I go another. Since I can 
not contact you, please, at your earliest 
convenience, contact me. 

I have only one thing to say at the 
present time. Fellow citizens of this fine 
educational institution: when you are in 
the supper line please act a little less 
animalistic. I mean, you left the animals 
about two hours before, but sometimes 
I wonder who's teaching you what. By 
the way, there is always enough food . . . 



Class Of 71 and 72 
Eligible For 
Peace Corps 

November 1, 1969 

The officials of the Peace Corps 
and the State University of New 
York College at Brockport announ- 
ced completion of arrangements for 
continuing and extending the uni- 
que Peace Corps/College Degree 
Program to admit a fourth group 
of candidates in June, 1970. The 
members of the first contingent 
completing the fifteen-month pro- 
gram which combines the upper 
division undergraduate education 
with Peace Corps preparation are 
now serving on bi-national edu- 
cational development teams in the 
Dominican Republic; the second 
group is now serving in similar as- 
signments in Peru and Honduras; 
the third group is now in the aca- 
demic year phase of this joint pro- 
ject and is slated for overseas as- 
signment in Latin America in 
August, 1970. 

The candidates will be selected 
from the ranks of students in good 
standing at an accredited college 
who are completing their sopho- 
more or junior year by June, 1970. 
Those selected will be able to earn 
an A.B. or B.S. degree and be eligi- 
ble for a Peace Corps assignment in 
one academic year flanked by two 
summers of fully subsidized and in- 
tegrated academic courses and 
Peace Corps training. They are ex- 
pected to major in mathematics or 
the sciences; those who have com- 
pleted their junior year prior to 
entrance into the program nave the 
opportunity for a double-major. 

At the end of the second summer 
armed with the degree, a teaching 
license, in-depth cross cultural pre- 
paration and fluency in Spanish the 
graduates as Peace Corps Volun- 
teers will be off on their Latin 
American assignment. As members 
of the staffs of teacher training in- 
stitutions and /or consultants to 
secondary teachers of mathematics 
or science, they are important parti- 
cipants in the educational develop- 
ment efforts of their host countries. 
During their two year sojourn they 
have the opportunity to earn up to 
twelve semester hours graduate 
credit. 

Peace Corps and college officials 
pointed out the several features 
which make this joint program uni- 
que including: academic credit for 
Peace Corps training, two fully 
(Continued on page 3, col. 1) 



Revision Of The 
Social Calendar 

by Sol Caviness 
On Friday, November 14, Harcum was 
scheduled to have a mixer hut didn't. At 
the Intercollegiate Council meeting held 
at La Salle on Sunday, November 16, I 
tried to find out why Harcum had sched- 
uled a mixer on our social calendar and 
didn't have one. The reason was that 
Villanova had a concert that night so 
Harcum dropped their mixer so their 
women coula attend. 

I also learned at our council meeting 
Sunday that, because of financial difficul- 
ties, both Holy Family and Manor had 
to drop their mixers scheduled for Dec. 
5. Because of this D.V.C. will have a 
mixer on December 5. 

Sears Gives D.V.C. 
$300 To New 
Library 

Friday the Sears Foundation presented 
the Delaware Valley College Library 
with a grant for $300. The Sears repre- 
sentative, Mr. James O. Murray, was re- 
cently appointed manager of the Doyles- 
town Sears branch. Mr. James Popham, 
chairman of the Faculty Library Com- 
mittee, received the grant in behalf of 
the College Library. 

Briefly, the Sears Foundation requests 
that this grant be used for purchasing 
books. The purpose of such grants is to 
complement the limited purchasing budg- 
ets of small independent colleges. 




Dr. Bulger will present "Wild Rivers" 
at an assembly December 10. 

Wild Rivers 

Filmed and narrated by 
DR. JOHN D. BULGER 

From serene shores where Thoreau 
camped along Maine's Allagash River, to 
craggy pinnacles of Dutch Creek in Brit- 
ish Columbia; from the Buffalo River in 
Tennessee to tundra country of the 
Artric; "Wild Rivers" brings a moving 
story about our wilderness waterways. 

Since pioneer days, streams like the 
Allagash, Hudson, and St. Lawrence 
have furnished travel to Indian and 
white man alike. The camera concen- 
trates on the more exciting of these 
rivers, then moves across northern Can- 
ada ... to the forbidding Ungava Pen- 
insula and the Northwest Territory. 

Much of "Wild Rivers" features an 
astonishing variety of wildlife along the 
river's banks. Over sixty species of wild 
animals live along these rivers. 

The film covers an area in excess of 
20,000 miles with PBY Flying boat, 
canoe, and road used to gather the story. 

N-O-T-l-C-E 

Furrow Deadline for articles 
to appear December 12 is 

December 2. 

Must be in editors' hands 

December 2. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



November 21, 1969 



- LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - 

Open Letter To Dr. Work 
Sparks Replies 

November 14, 1969 
Dear Editor: 

As a student who is tied to his mother's apron, I would like to comment on the 
ex-servicemen who are attending classes here at Delaware Valley College. Their 
status as part-time students and part-time providers is no cause for complaint about 
an extra financial burden put on them because of a decision they made at an earlier 
point in their lives. Let me make myself fully understood; serving your country is a 
fine and essential duty, but to use the military institution as a crutch is as inexcusable 
as burning one's draft card. This is what ex-servicemen on this campus are doing 
when they degrade people because of the way they are going thru college, or because 
of an idea or conviction these people may have. Think it over, when you get a chance, 
ex-servicemen; and you might be saying to yourselves — "Shape up or ship out". 

JOHN POPE *72 



CLUB NEWS 

Hort Club 
Has A 
Sellout 

For the second consecutive year 
the Hort. Society's treasury has 
reached an all time high. The suc- 
cess can be attributed to terrific 
sales of both apples and cider at 
the home football games, particu- 
larly on Homecoming and Parent's 
Day, October 18 and November 1 
respectfully. On both occasions ap- 
ples were completely sold out. 
Cider was sold out on Homecoming 
Weekend. I would like very much 
to mention the fact that Harold 
Fox and George Curley, with the 
aid of the freshmen, were instru- 
mental in picking the apples. 

Agronomy 

Attends 

Convention 

On Sunday, Nov. 9, several members 
of the Agronomy Club will attend the 
61st annual American Society of Agron- 
omy in Detroit, Michigan. Carrying the 
banner for the D.V.C. student chapter 
will be seniors, George Umholtz and 
John George; juniors, Chuck Reese, Bill 
Comerer, and Neal Hayes, and sopho- 
more Wayne Knerr. These six men nope 
to gain knowledge and experience while 
in Detroit. 

These men will present a report ex- 
plaining the college in itself as well as 
explaining various facts about the Agron- 
omy Club. It is also planned that with 
the help of Penn State representatives, a 
few men from D.V.C. will be elected 
officers of the Student Chapter for the 
next convention which will be held in 
Arizona sometime next fall. 

In other activities, the soil judging 
team just came back from Maryland, the 
team scored in a solid block and though 
not taking first, did a good job. Next 
year, the team will go to Maine, they 
hope to do better up there. They are 
sure that with two men from Maine plus 
Mr. Stratton and Mr. Brown coaching, 
they should go far in 1970. 

The intramural program is moving 
along quite well for the Agronomy Club. 
Agronomy presently holds down first 
place in volleyball and intends to remain 
there throughout the season. 

The Agronomy Club is one of the more 
active clubs on campus and it welcomes 
the membership of any person, freshman 
thru senior, who is interested in the field 
of Agronomy. 



Dairy Meets 
New Advisor 



The Dairy Society met on November 
10 to welcome Mr. Ed Heinle as the 
new head of the Dairy Department. Mr. 
Heinle addressed the Society following 
the business meeting and spoke of his 
past experiences. He is a DVC graduate, 
class of '61 and attended the University 
of Minnesota and did graduate work in 
dairy science. After receiving his Masters 
degree he joined the Maryland State Ex- 
tension Service as a 4-H agent and adult 
dairy advisor. Mr. Heinle then went on 
to do research at the University of Mary- 
land. His most recent position was as 
4-H agent in Crawford County, Wiscon- 
sin! Mr. Heinle was well received by the 
students as they were impressed by his 
pleasant manner and friendly personality. 
All are anticipating excellent relations 
and higher goals in the newly revised 
and rejuvenated Dairy Department. 

During the business portion of the 
meeting the use of artificial dairy prod- 
ucts in the college cafeteria was dis- 
cussed. A committee of Jim Musser, Tom 
Boyer and Doug Rodgers was formed to 
look further into the matter. Though 
artificial dairy foods last longer and can 
hang around a kitchen for days, the taste 
is poor and nothing like the real thing 
they replace. This is quite evident in the 
white hard tasteless glob we find on our 
DVC jello. 

Further business included electing Ken 
Risser as A-Day Representative and mak- 
ing further plans for the upcoming Dairy- 
Animal Husbandry Banquet set for Dec. 
10. A committee was also selected to in- 
vestigate the possibility of a Dairy So- 
ciety trip before Christmas. 

Following the meeting, everyone en- 
joyed a large decorated cake honoring 
Mr. Heinle as the new Dairy Society ad- 
visor. 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

Doylestown Shopping Canter 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



Dear Mr. Furphy, 

I would like to congratulate you for exercising your right of Freedom of Speech 
by expressing your views in the November 14th issue. This is a right that very few 
people appreciate. However, you seem to feel that people who do not hold your views 
should not be allowed to express their feelings. The Bill of Rights guarantees this 
for all Americans. When people peacefully gather together to express meir views, 
this cannot be considered a farce, because these people are exercising their Constitu- 
tional rights. 

I am one student who appreciates the fact that I was able to attend the Mora- 
torium on October 15th. I am sorry that a large part of the student body is apathetic, 
but as you go through life, I think that you will find that a large part of the population 
is apathetic. If classes had been called on November 11th, very possibly, less people 
would have observed Veterans' Day than observed the Moratorium. Granted there 
were only 12,000 people at Kennedy Plaza in Philadelphia, but, Mr. Furphy, I don't 
know whether you know, or don't care to know, that many of the area colleges had 
services on their own campuses, Perhaps you should worry a little less about what 
other people do and worry more about yourself. The Moratorium should not have 
kept you from going to class, because more than one class met with only one student. 

I agree with Vice President Agnew and you, when you say the news media 
distorts the actual facts, because I was in Washington, D. C, during the November 
14th and 15th marches. All I could hear on the news was about the violence during 
these marches. Actually, less than one percent of the people in Washington, D. C. 
for these marches were involved in this violence, and yet this is what was played up. 
When a gathering of people is present there will always be the David Dillingers, but 
the people who have done the work for the march do not receive any coverage. 

If you had taken the time to go to the Moratorium, or go to the March on Wash- 
ington to witness the spirit of the people who attended these events, I don't think 
you could call the Moratorium "Chicken Delight" or "Isolation Day". It takes a lot 
of courage to stand up for a belief and to maybe go to jail for that belief. Just be- 
cause someone does not agree with your viewpoint, this doesn't mean he is neces- 
sarily a "bad guy". When you reverted to name-calling in your letter you did show 
your own immaturity and lack of perception. I don't challenge your right to express 
your views but I don't think that you should challenge mine by saying that I should 
have been required to attend classes and therefore miss the Moratorium. 

I feel that more was accomplished on Moratorium Day than would n^ve been 
accomplished if there had been no classes on Veterans' Day. On Moratorium Day, 
we were concerned about the future, rather than attempting to relive tl»e past. The 
past may be important, but the future is the problem of today. 

Sincerely, 
DAVID EVANS 70 



O. H. Hosts Speaker 
— Has Banquet 



trate his program on these plants. He 
recounted many of his unusual and inter- 
esting experiences concerning his collect- 
ing travels. Mr. Whippo is presently on 
the Horticultural staff here at the col- 
lege. 

A week after Mr. Whippo's interesting 
presentation, the Society held its annual 
banquet at the Holiday Inn in New 
Hope, Pennsylvania. Featured guests at 
the banquet included Mr. and Mrs. 
Oliver Stark. Mr. Stark is presently the 
Park Botanist at Bowman's Hill Wild- 
flower Reserve. Mr. Stark spoke about 
Conservation and the future, and brought 
those in attendance up to date on the 
present terminology, and what it really 
means to the individual. 

Mr. Stark is a talented writer, and has 
had an article published in Horticulture 
magazine. Before coming to Bowman's 
Hill he graduated from Cornell Univer- 
sity, was a teacher, and later a seedsman 
and plantsman. 

The Ornamental Horticulture Society 
is a rewarding activity open to all of the 
students of Delaware Valley College. All 
posted meetings are open to the public. 
We hope that anyone interested will feel 
free to attend. 




Photo credit— Evans Smith 
Xerophytic Specialists spoke to 
O. H. Club. 

The club was fortunate to have Mr. 
Paul Whippo of Colmar, Pennsylvania 
as its speaker. Mr. Whippo is a univer- 
sally reknowned specialist on Xerophytic 
plants, and the family Euphorbiaceae in 
particular. He has supplied many bot- 
anical gardens with unusual specimens 
from his own collection. 

Mr. Whippo brought with him a num- 
ber of extremely rare succulents to illus- 



- 






November 21, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



PEACE CORPS— (Continued) 

subsidized summer sessions total- 
ling thirty semester credit hours, 
in-depth Peace Corps training syn- 
chronized with the liberal arts and 
specialized professional prepara- 
tion, individualized programming, 
opportunity for double majors and 
supervised overseas graduate work. 

"This integrated program is 
based on our two fold conviction 
that ( 1 ) to combine the college and 
Peace Corps experiences is to make 
both more relevant and meaningful 
and the personal product more val- 
uable (2) to provide much-needed 
skilled specialists — mathematics 
and science teachers — as Peace 
Corps Volunteers in Latin America 
is to make a significant contribution 
to all concerned," said President 
Albert Warren Brown, of the State 
University College at Brockport in 
announcing the extension of this 
unique partnership. 



Block and Bridle 
Went On A Trip 

Forty-five members of the Block and 
Bridle Club and Dr. Pelle went on the 
annual club trip on October 30th, which 
took them to Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 

Arriving about 9:00 a.m., they met 
Mr. Herman Purdy, the Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pedigreed Livestock, who wel- 
comed, them as host. The first stop was 
the beef and sheep barns. Part of the 
bam is used for show cattle, sheep and 
other special animals. The rest is re- 
served for research projects of various 
kinds. 

Behind the barn were lots in which 
many of Penn State's bulls are kept. The- 
group also had the opportunity to see 
the buffalo which was given to Pennsyl- 
vania by Kansas. Mr. Purdy then brought 
out a class of bulls from which the best 
bull for the show string was to be chosen. 
Dr. Wilson, the Director of Research, 
then related the current projects such as 
dairy-beef crosses, pasture studies and 
research on the utilization of the by- 
products of the fruit and vegetable in- 
dustry. He also shewed the group an 
experiment in which steers were feci car- 
bon to remove toxic substances from the 
intestine. There were also several studies 
being done with sheep. 

Mr. Hazlett, the herdsman at the swine 
barns explained Penn State's hog opera- 
tion. One of the new buildings is an en- 
vironmental controlled Swine barn, in 
which many experiments on hogs are 
carried out. The Swine herd consists of 
both Hampshires and Yorkshires. 

The afternoon began with the Animal 
Industries Building. Dr. King, Head of 
the Department of Animal Science, wel- 
comed the group and gave a history of 
Penn State. Dr. Bortree, the Chairman 
of Animal Science and Industry told 
about some of the opportunities at Penn 
State and the Veterinary Department of 
which he is head. Dr. Beumgeret spoke 
on the graduate school program. 

The group was divided and given a 
tour of the four story building. The 
ground floor houses many small rooms 
in which experiments can be carried out 
on small animals. Some of the rooms are 
environmental rooms in which any clim- 
aticaT condition dan be duplicated. 

The first floor contained the Veterinary 
Science Department. The floor is well 
equipped with labs and tools to carry 
varied research projects in Veterinary 
Science. The second floor accommodates 
the Department of Poultry Science. The 
Department of Animal Science makes use 
of the third floor labs containing equip- 



D.V.C. Band 

Band members are dropping out. 
Contrary to popular belief — the 
D.V.C. Band is not a marching oi 
pep band, but in reality a concert 
band. New members are urged to 
join. Records will be checked of 
those who played instruments in 
high school and these will be 
coaxed into joining. Missing main- 
ly, French horns, trombones, bass- 
es, and clarinets. The Band will be 
touring solo and with the Glee 
Club and taping their entire repe- 
toire. The tour will cover various 
campuses and communities. Con- 
cert Band's season will consist of 
three parts: I. Hit tunes, for ex- 
ample, "Born Free", "King of the 
Road", and the theme song from 
"Romeo and Juliet"; Part II will be 
pieces for the Glee Club and Band, 
20th Century music and electronic 
tapes; Part III will be premieres of 
several pieces by Ukrainian, and 
other Slavic Composers. 

Those interested are urged to 
come out and participate; those 
who don't own instruments, can 
obtain them, free of charge after 
they join. Practice is Monday and 
Wednesday from 4:00 to 5:30 in 
Allman Hall Lecture Hall, new 
members will be accepted this 
week. 



merit suitable for work in nutrition, 
breeding, environment and behavior of 
animals. 

The. Meat Research and Evaluation 
Center was the next stop. Dr. Ziegler is 
the head of the Meats Research. The 
building has facilities for killing, dress- 
ing, and processing meats. There are 
also several labs for meat research. 

The conclusion of the tour was the 
horse barns. After an excellent demon- 
stration of the ability of the Quarter- 
horse to maneuver, Mr. Purdy took the 
group through the bam. 

Those who went on the trip were 
much impressed with the tour and the 
warm reception of the faculty, and espe- 
cially that of Mr. Purdy, who spent the 
■day as our host. 



Cross Country 
Close Out Season 
With Win 

On November 8 the Aggie harriers 
completed their dual meet season by de- 
feating the Washington College runners 
by a score of 20-38. 

David Bird took the first place honors, 
covering the 4.6 mile course in 24:02. 

The next five places were all filled 
with green and gold. Howie Henderson 
(2) led the attack with teammate John 
Thearn (3) close behind. A three way 
tie for fourth, Lou Hegyes, Ray Funk- 
houser, and Jim LeBaugh, rounded out 
the top five for Del-Val. 

The meet also ends the dual meet 
careers for the two seniors on the team, 
Lou Hegyes and Captain Howie Hen- 
derson. The team's final record ended at 
4-6. 

November 21 marks the day for the 
M. A. C. Championship's at Fairmount 
Park course. Dr. Berthold will take his 
top seven runners. Lehigh University has 
been picked to win the University divi- 
sion race for the second year in a row. 
The college division promises to be close 
with Ursinus, Franklin and Marshall, 
Dickinson, and Swarthmore being the top 
bidders. 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEDGES 



Another Pennsylvania football 
team now has taken over the na- 
tions longest unbeaten string now 
that Wilkes was knocked off. Its 
none other than Penn State. Penn 
State, which has not lost in more 
than two years, has been undefeat- 
ed in its last 29 games. 

San Jose State, the 1969 national 
track champion was put on a one 
year probation by the NCAA. San 
Jose was penalized because two 
athletes competed in the Orange 
County Invitational track meet in 
Orange, Calif, on June 15. The 
meet was not certified by the 
NCAA Extra Events committee. 
San Jose State will not be allowed 
to compete in the NCAA Indoor or 
Outdoor Track and Field cham- 
pionships in 1970. SJS last year 
edged Kansas by three points 48- 
45 to capture the national title. 
Should a whole track program suf- 
fer for the actions of two individ- 
uals? 

Bill Cottrell, former Aggie foot- 
baller and now a member of the 
Detroit Lions, once said that he 
has been stung as hard at DVC as 
he has in the pros. The hitting in 
theNFL is not much better than at 
Del Val, the big linemen also men- 
tioned. 

Congratulations to Wayne Meh- 
alick, football co-captain, for being 
named to the ECAC Division 3 AH 
East team at center. The 6'2" and 
245 lb. senior hails from Linden, 
N. J. The ECAC selections released 
on Nov. 6 showed Don Stump, Ron 
Timko, Joe Urban and Richie 
Glenn mentioned as nominations. 

Hats off to Steve Freeh, the Sus- 
quehanna University kicking spe- 
cialist. Despite the fact that he has 
only one arm he has become a 
terror for opposing teams, he has 
booted three fields goals and con- 
converted 24 of 25 extra points for 
the Crusaders to date. The field 
goals include a 42 and 40 yarder. 
Freeh recently received a special 
award from the Maxwell Club for 



his 40 yd. field goal with 25 sec- 
onds to play which gave Susque- 
hanna a 3-0 victory against West- 
minster. Against DVC Freeh con- 
verted two extra points in the same 
number of attempts. 

Will New York City be a three 
championship city? The Knicks 
currently running away with the 
eastern division race of the NBA 
may well be the third tide winner 
for the city of late following in the 
footsteps of the now famous Jets 
and Mets. 

Its not often someone puts one 
over on Michigan State football 
coach Duffy Daugherty. Tiny Hills- 
dale College did and got a record 
62 yard field goal out of sophomore 
Chester Marcol as a result. Mar- 
col, who arrived in this country 
only a few years ago, couldn't pass 
the English entrance exam at MSU. 
So his high school coach, a Hills- 
dale grad, had him enrolled at 
Hillsdale as a foreign student and 
take English as a foreign language. 
Too bad Duffy hadn't thought of 
that. Maybe the record field goal 
would now be in the MSU record 
books instead of those of tiny Hills- 
dale. 

Delaware Valley is now rated 
9th in the balloting for the Lam- 
bert Bowl award. This award is 
presented annually to the top small 
college football team in the east. 




Photo credits-Dave Thomas 
Our defense stopped the opponents. 




The offense startles Susquehanna. 



Student Government Poll 



i 



Yes No 



3. 



Do you feel you should be required to take the linen 

service? 

Would you be in favor of having a private telephone in- 
stalled in your room at a $4-$5 monthly service charge and 
a $50 deposit? 

When a movie is shown on campus on a Friday night it 
does not have to be sent back to the company until Mon- 
day. Would you be in favor of a Saturday night or 
matinee showing as well as the regular showing on Friday? 

4. Under present conditions, the on-campus student pays for 
his meals on a semester basis. He is charged the full price 
for 21 meals a week. Under a meal-ticket system, the 
student would nav for each meal he eats. Which systen 
would you prererr 
Semester price? Meal ticket? 

Editor's Note: The Student Government Poll is designed to get a majority 
opinion of the students on specific issues. Cut out the poll and deposit it in 
the suggestion box in the cafeteria. 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



November 21, 1969 



Notice a change in the Compter Mixer. 
The group the Molly Maguires will take 
the place of the Salt and Pepper group 
who will be able to make it on Nov. 15. 



Lauchmen 
Printing 
Company 

COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 
SINCE 1923 

In this world of printing, mryone 

wants a masfrpioco quite often 

wo got Mo pictur: 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. Stato Stroot 
"Opposite County Thootro" 

• Custom Modo Jowolry 
A Spociolty 
• Watch and Jowolry Repair 

348-4675 Doylostown, Pa. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



• Rod and Barren — Lvnt — 
Wallace — Starling, etc. 

* Om«ga — Lanf mat — 
Atcwtron, ale. 

Watch - Clack - Jewelry 

REFAIIINO 

348-4884 

31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



PATRONIZE 

"FURROW" 

ADVERTISERS 



GERHARD'S 

INC 

34 S. Main St., Doylestown 

• Radios 
• Phonograph* 
e Recorders 

SALES • SERVICE 

20% off ON 

SCOTCH RECORDING TAPES 




Photo credit-M.A.M. 

A POINT OF INTEREST 

Dr Feldstem studied under this tree near the peach orchard while he was a 

student at the National Farm School during 1939-41. 



THE DUTCH 
MAID 

LAUNDERERS 

Coin-Op. 
LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 

191 S. Clinton St. 



GARDY'S 

Ths COLLEGE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

flemtetc* 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. Stato Stroot 
348-2522 Poylostown, Pa. 



N-O-T-l-C-E 

Because of incorrect informa- 
tion submitted to The Furrow 
by the editor of the senior sec- 
tion of 70 yearbook the article 
which appeared on the first page 
volume 16 Number 4 was in er- 
ror. The article should have 
stated that the pictures would 
be taken December 3rd, 4th, and 
5th and that further informa- 
tion would be made available 
through the bulletin board in 
Mandell Hall. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH AAA1N STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phone 348-9021 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 



348-5072 



DOYLESTOWN 18901 




Photo credit-M.A.M. 



Evident by the two pictures, the dining 
hall has been fuU every mixer so far. 
Let's hope the trend continues. 




Photo credit— Dave Thomai 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



the 





URROW 



Vol. 16, No. 6 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



December 5, 1969 



Dairy Judging Team 
Wins National Recognition 



Shattering all team records in our col- 
lege's history, the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege Dairy Cattle Judging Team has 
achieved national recognition for our 
small college. At the National Collegiate 
Dairy Cattle Judging Contest held in 
conjunction with the North American 
Dairy Show in Columbus, Ohio, the 
DVC team placed fifth out of 31 teams 
representing the largest colleges and uni- 
versities from all over the country. This 
is the highest placing a DVC team has 
ever attained at the National Collegiate 
Contest but the honors do not stop here. 
DVC was also represented at the First 
Annual Pennsylvania All American In- 
vitational Dairy Cattle Judging Contest 
held in conjunction with the All Amer- 
ican Dairy Show in Harrisburg. DVC 
senior Larry Gerber was acclaimed as 
highest placing individual and highest 
oral reason individual for the entire con- 
test which was entered by eight other 
large eastern universities. 




Pictured from left to right are: Don 
Koontz, Larry Gerber, Bob Winner 
and Ed Lamberton. 

This year's team made up of seniors 
Bob Winner, Larry Gerber, Don Koontz, 
Ed Lamberton and coached by Mr. 
Smith has spent untold hours of concen- 
trated pratcice and study in preparation 
for the contests and their efforts have 
certainly paid off. The team left for Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, October 8, and spent four 
days travelling and practicing. The con- 
test was held October 13, at the Ohio 
Exposition Grounds. Of the 31 teams, 
these are the first 20 placings that were 



An 
Invitation 

The Ornamental Horticultural 
Society cordially invites the stu- 
dents and faculty of Delaware 
Valley College to a very special 
program on Tuesday evening, 
December 9. The guest speaker 
will be Martha Ludes Garra, 
world traveler and lecturer, who 
will present an illustrated pro- 
gram on "Color In The Land- 
scape." Check posters for exact 
time and location. 



announced during the evening banquet 
held in the Student Union Building at 
the Ohio State University: 

1. Cornell University 

2. Penn State 

3. University of Minnesota 

4. Kansas State University 

5. Delaware Valley College 

6. Ohio State 

7. University of Wisconsin 

8. Iowa State 

9. Washington State University 

10. University of Tennessee 

11. North Carolina State U. 

12. Oklahoma State University 

13. Fresno State College 

14. Michigan State University 

15. South Dakota State U. 

16. University of Maryland 

17. Western Kentucky U. 

18. University of New Hampshire 

19. University of Missouri 

20. University of Connecticut 

Bob Winner was the highest placing 
individual in the Guernsey division and 
received the American Guernsey Cattle 
Club pewter pitcher. Bob was also third 
highest individual for the entire contest 
of 93 contestants and received the Mere- 
dith Publishing Company Award. Larry 
Gerber was third highest individual of 
the Holstein division and third highest 
individual for oral reasons for the com- 
plete contest. 

The results of the Pennsylvania All 
American Judging Contest held Septem- 
ber 22, was as follows: 

1. Cornell University 

2. University of Maryland 

3. North Carolina State 

4. Penn State 

5. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

6. Delaware Valley College 

7. West Virginia State 

8. Western Kentucky University 

9. Ohio State 

There is another contest yet to go, 
that being the International Livestock 
Exposition and Dairy Show in Chicago 
on December 3, and all are confident 
that the team will again make a good 
showing. Even so, Delaware Valley Col- 
lege should be extremely proud of the 
Dairy Judging Team and the recognition 
and honor it has captured for our college. 




Photo credit— Dave Thomat 

Our Aggie basketball team looked good 
in practice but they looked even better 
defeating Eastern Baptist College 97 
to 46. 



Agronomy Club 

Members 

Attend National 

Convention 

As one of two delegates from D.V.C.'s 
Agronomy Club to the national conven- 
tion in Detroit, Michigan, I came away 
very much impressed. To fully appre- 
ciate the convention one would have to 
attend. The delegates were Chuck Reese 
and Bill Camerar. Other D.V.C. students 
attending were: Bill Davis, Joe Matejik, 
George Umholtz, John George, Neil 
Hayes, Wayne Knerr, Wayne Quinn 
(Dairy). We drove from Doylestown to 
Detroit (Motor City) in eleven hours 
leaving Sunday, Nov. 9th at 4 a.m. 

Monday morning at 9 a.m. all under- 
graduates registered before any of the 
student business was carried out. Upon 
completion of registration we then at- 
tended the student business meeting un- 
til 5 p.m. at which time the meeting was 
adjourned. We then returned at 7 p.m. 
for each schools slide presentation of 
their clubs activities; at this time our 
club and college were finally recognized 
on the national level. After the Koda- 
chrome highlights each narrator left his 
slides with a caption under each, form- 
ing a slide bank in which each school 
throughout the year would be able to 
view all slides at their respective college 
club. We then had nominations of of- 
gficers which would be elected on Thurs- 
day, Nov. 13th. 

(Continued on page 2) 



Support The 
Blood Bank 

On December 11th, 1969, Delaware 
Valley College will hold its annual 
Blood Drive from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
in the Newman Gymnasium. Mr. Linta 
announced to the Class of 1973 that this 
event was going to be one of the best in 
the years since it has begun. Mr. Linta 
distributed forms to those interested in 
donating blood. 

The members of APO went to the 
rooms of seniors and found out how 
many would donate. This year, a greater 
turn out than ever before is expected. 
All D.V.C. students are urged to come 
out. Even if donating blood is impossi- 
ble for physical reasons, come to the 
blood bank because it's the thought of 
your wanting to donate that is most im- 
portant. In the words of Mr. Linta, "Do- 
nating blood is a very gratifying experi- 
ence. When you do it once, you'd want 
to do it again." 

The Furrow, along the lines of Mr. 
Line's thinking urges all students to 
sign up, and remember, "If it feels good, 
do it!" 



D.V.C. Lends 
A Hand 

There is someone living in Penn Hall 
again! Yes, the once used dormitory is 
new being housed by the Robinson fam- 
ily. Mr. Purcell Robinson, or better 
known as Blood is the chef at DVC. He 
and his family had a most unfortunate 
experience. Early in the morning Novem- 
ber 4, the Robinson's dog awakened 
them to an awe of fire and smoke. Their 
house was destroyed and the family was 
left without living quarters. When Mrs. 
Work learned of the incident, she quickly 
called Mr. Robinson and arrar ;«A for 
he and his family to temporarily live in 
Penn Hall. 

Mr. Robinson began working %» ith the 
college at the age of 17 as a kitchen 
hand, and now is head chef at the age of 
31. The Robinsons are eternally grateful 
for what the college has done for them, 
and express their sincere thanks. DVC 
does think highly of Mr. Robinscn and 
interpretes generosity through their ac- 
tions. 



Chapter Of American Association 
Of University Professors Formed 
On Del. Val. Campus 



With the approval of the Administra- 
tion and the support of the faculty a 
Delaware Valley College Chapter of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors has been formed on our campus. 
Several weeks ago the twenty-three char- 
ter members of the Chapter ratified the 
constitution and elected the following of- 
ficers: Dr. Peter Glick, Jr., President; 
Mr. Ronald Deering, Vice-President; Dr. 
James Powell, Secretary; Mr. Donald 
Igelsrud, Treasurer; and Dr. John Mertz, 
Dr. David Blumenfield and Mr. Kenneth 
Stratton, Directors-At-Large. The Chap- 
ter will meet on campus once a month, 
and its Executive Committee, composed 
of its officers, will also meet Once a 
month with special meetings convened 
if necessary. Currently the Chapter is 
membership drive among the regular 
faculty members on campus with a goal 
of full faculty participation in the Asso- 
ciation and the local Chapter. 

The local Chapter Joins with the or- 
ganized chapters at over 1,000 colleges 
and universities in fifty states in support 
of the published general purposes of the 
parent Association: ". . . to facilitate a 
more effective cooperation among teach- 
ers and research scholars in universities 
and colleges, and in professional sch(x>ls 
of similar grade, for the promotion of the 
interests of higher education and re- 
search, and in general to increase the 
usefulness and advance the standards, 
ideals, and welfare of the profession". 

The more specific objectives of the 
local Chapter are: 1) to consider ques- 



tions of general interest to college and 
university teachers; 2) to consider cur- 
rent local questions of educational meth- 
od of policy or of professional obligation 
or privilege; 3) to serve as a nucleus in 
initiating faculty action; 4) to take ac- 
tion upon specific matters of Association 
business submitted to the Chapter by 
the Council of officers of the national 
organization; and 5) to cooperate with 
the officers of the national organization 
in dealing with professional problems in 
order that the Association may be as 
representative of the profession as pos- 
sible. 

To attempt to achieve these objectives 
members were elected during the last 
Chapter meeting to the following com- 
mittees: Committee on Academic Affairs; 
Committee on Faculty Benefits and Eco- 
nomic Interests; Committee on Academic 
Freedom, Tenure, and Faculty Promo- 
tion; Committee on Faculty Participation 
in College Government; Committee on 
College Publications; Committee on Ex- 
tramural and Professional Affairs; Con- 
stitution Committee; Membership Com- 
mittee; and Nominating Committee. 
These committees will analyze faculty 
recommendations and report their find- 
ings to the membership during the 
monthly meetings. Recommendations ap- 
proved by the membership will be pre- 
sented at faculty meetings for action. 
The membership agreed that the major 
function of the local Chapter is to work 
toward improving communication be- 
tween the faculty and the Administra- 
tion. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



December 5, 1969 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Numbe r Two 



The Furrow will print letters for publication as they are re- 
ceived. No corrections or changes will be made unless other- 
wise directed by the author prior to publication. Letters for 
publication MUST be signed. Letters which are libelous in 
content or otherwise non-factual will not be considered for 
publication. 

College Counsel Replies 

to Questions on 
Automobile Insurance 

Responsibility is the key to the requirements for student parking 
priveleges on campus. Whether on or off campus, the responsible oper- 
ator of the motor vehicle, which incidentally has been referred to many 
times by our Courts as a "dangerous instrumentality", must be prepared 
to indemnify or portect anyone who becomes involved or suffers loss 
associated with the ownership or operation of the vehicle. This area 
extends beyond incidents of obvious fault and includes the area of 
liability determination which, in itself, is costly. 

The requirement of a comprehensive coverage, while marginal as 
compared to liability coverage, is included because of the possible or 
probable involvement of the College when the incident occurs on cam- 
pus, even though a "waiver" has been filed. Comprehensive coverage 
is one of the better insurance "Buys", and rates, of course, vary with the 
age of the operator owner. The Administration believes that the assump- 
tion of this added responsibility is a reasonable one for the benefit of 
both the campus owner/operator and for the College. 

J. Franklin Hartzel 
College Counsel 

Further Comment on 
Mr. Furphy's Letter 
to Dr. Work 

Dear Mr. Furphy, 

« In your letter to Dr. Work I detected a hint of animosity towards the people 
who took part in the October 15th Vietnam War Moratorium. You said it was "one 
of the biggest farces of all times." I feel you're been mis-informed on how many 
people turned out for this public display against the war. There may have only been 
12,000 people in Philadelphia, but there were many more in other cities across the 
country. 

The fact that most of the students here at Delaware Valley College took the day 
off from classes is unimportant. It is the idea that they, the students, could take 
part in the moratorium that counts. I was a marshall at the Philadelphia rally, Mr. 
Furphy, and I saw several D.V.C. students who participated, and I know of other 
students who took part in rallies held at other schools. Would you deny these students 
the right to voice their opinions peaceably? If you would, this country would no 
longer be the democracy that you fought to support. 

From your letter it is obvious that while you were in the Army your thinking was 
programmed as is that of most servicemen, and for this I feel very sorry for you. 

You have accused a very large group of people of being thickens, draft dodgers 
and, in general, cowards. Is it cowardly to stand up and tell the government that you 
feel it is wrong? Is it cowardly to stand up to a system that you feel morally repug- 
nant and to say no to that system even if you must go to jail for doing so? I think 
not! Remember, we told the Germans that they should have stood up and said no to 

I think that while you were in the Army, you, like so many others, began to think 
of our government as being totally infalliable. I feel that as human beings we all 
make mistakes. I believe that you are making one now. 

In your letter you ask us to honor yourself because you are one of the soldiers 
who fought for we, the people. I don't feel we need to thank you for helping to kill 
women and children, and burning villages to the ground. I don't feel that that kind 
of behavior deserves any kind of kindly recognition. How does it feel to be an acces- 
sory to murder? I will honor those who were sent to their death not knowing what 
they were fighting for, and not wanting to fight, but I will not honor you or any 
others for fighting for something that I feel is wrong. 

I really feel sorry that your conscience is not as clear as mine. Peace, Mr. Furphy. 
Peace is the only way to save this world of ours. 

Peace, 

David Jay Kamison 



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DOYLESTOWN 18901 



by BRUCE RICHARDS 

The opinions expressed in this column 
are those of Mr. Richards and not nec- 
essarily those of the college, staff or 
student body. 

March for Peace, Washington, Novem- 
ber 15, 1969 a brilliant success. About a 
million and one half people were there 
to protest, quietly and peaceably, the 
killing and bloodletting of the Vietnam 
war. For the most part the wish of all 
those many people was a reality, there 
was little violence and the concerned 
general public came to realize that the 
vast majority of young people are not 
anarchists but peaceful revolutionaries. 
However through the helpful eye of the 
ever-so-kind news media the few and 
small incidents of violence were distorted 
beyond all belief. This is what the older 
generation wanted to see about the pro- 
test. Is this what you wanted to see? We, 
the younger generation, have proven our- 
selves to be a serious "threat" to the 
super patriots of this great country. They 
see our quest for peace and love as a 
threat to the stability of our government. 
Are we the threat or are they? Is the 
attitude "my country right or wrong, 
I'll support it" the correct stand? The 
biggest problem of our country is the 
apathy that reeks from everywhere. This 
must stop. Do you blindly accept the 
policy of the government? Do you ques- 
tion what is done? Are you one of the 
sheep? 

Dear Mr. Furphy, do you really be- 
lieve in the bloodletting in Vietnam? I 
really pity you if that is your sincere be- 
lief. Are you serious about your state- 
ments about the people in the Mora- 
torium? I can't oelieve your closed 
minded approach to the problems of this 
world. Is hate part of your personal 
creed? Is bloodletting part of your per- 
sonal makeup? If so I am sorry for you 
and pray that you may change. Can't 
you see a third group, the majority, of 
people that take part in the rallies? A 
group of concerned patriots. A group 
that want to end Hate, Violence, War, 
Bigotry, and all the distinction associated 
with it. A group concerned with this 
country. Does it take more courage to 
go off passively to an immoral war or 
oppose it? This everyone must answer in 
their own minds. 

Dr. Work, you have shown in a small 
way that you have some compassion for 
your students. At least you were consid- 
erate enough to give us the one day to 
express our convictions. Dr. Work I take 
this opportunity to, on behalf of a small 
minority of men, thank you for giving us 
this chance. 

I sincerely hope that each and every 
one of the faculty and students had an 
enjoyable Thanksgiving. I hope that 
there were some who prayed for peace 
in the world. I hope some thought of 



the people being killed while you were 
having your nice big meal. I hope some 
thought of the hate, violence, bigotry, 
and starvation occurring here and around 
the world. To my fellow students of Del- 
aware Valley College may I close with 
this word: PEACE. 



CONVENTION— 

(Continued from front page) 

Tuesday morning we attended papers 
given in the Turf field, Soil Science divi- 
sion, Crop Science division. That after- 
noon we scheduled a tour of Detroit's 
finest brewery, STROHS. We found this 
most interesting and educational. We 
were able to bring back a sample of 
hops, an ingredient in the making of 
beer, which was in the dry form and 
grown out on the west coast. Tuesday 
night was spent listening to speakers in 
the speech contest. The winner was John 
Steer, Clemson University, speaking on 
"The Audio Tutorial Approach to Agro- 
nomic Teaching — What Can It Do?* 

All day Wednesday was spent on the 
scheduled Turf grass tour. The stops in- 
cluded: Oakland Hills Country Club, 
which is one of the oldest clubs in Mich- 
igan, M.S.U. turfgrass research plots and 
facilities at East Lansing, a 40-acre sod 
production farm on organic soil (here 
in Pennsylvania we have mineral soils 
mostly), M.S.U. sod production research 
plots, and a visit to Spartan stadium to 
see the artificial turf. Spartan synthetic 
turf is not the same as the Astro syn- 
thetic turf, the main difference being in 
the last layer put down. 

Thursday morning was again spent 
with student activities, new busi.tss and 
election of new officers and committee 
chairmen. In past years the offices were 
always dominated by the H) id west and 
west chapters, but not so this vear! Pres- 
ident: Steer— Clemson University; Vice 
President: Keeler — North Car hna State; 
Treasury: Brach — North Car tina State; 
Corresponding Secretary: Brovick — 
Southern Illinois; Recording Secretary: 
May — Penn State University and former 
D.V.C. student. Our delegation obtained 
positions as chairman and co-chairman 
respectfully. Essay contest committee — 
Chuck Reese; Membership committee — 
Neil Hayes and Wayne Knerr. 

Soil and Land Uses in Urbanizing 
Areas was the tour for Thursday after- 
noon. This tour showed some of the 
problems urbanization brings and what 
the country is doing to solve these prob- 
lems now and avoid them in the future 
with assistance of the recently com- 
pleted land use and soil surveys. Being 
that very few of us had much time to sit 
in on the papers given thus far we took 
the afternoon to do so, instead of taking 
the tour. We then left late that afternoon. 

Next year's meeting will be held in 
Tucson, Arizona, August 23-28, 1970. 

We would all at this time like to thank 
Dr. Work and the Agronomy Club for 
making this trip possible. We are looking 
forward to next year's meeting in Tuc- 
son, Arizona. 




Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR . . . . John D. Martin 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mike Morgan 

COPY EDITOR Harvay Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR lost Hedges 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Dava Thomas 

CLUS NEWS EDITOR N Milton Parkar 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Lee Stratsberger 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT iob Edwards 

BUSINESS MANAGER Davo Toichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dolbort Jonos 

-GENERAL STAFF- 

Sol Cavines, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allan Gordon, Larry Martel, Walt Ault, 

Abbott Laa, Dava Sustak, Howard Handarson, Bruce Richard. 

' -ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR Joseph E. Foltoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

It should bo noted that the opinion* expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect t ie views of the college. 



December 5, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Students 
Appear 

On TV Show 

On November 11th, a panel, consisting 
of four D.V.C. students, taped a discus- 
sion show for Channel 39 that will be 
aired some time in February, The topic 
was: The Present Crisis in Food Supply 
in Relation to the Growing World Popu- 
lation. The possibility of oceanography 
solving that crisis and the problems of 
air and water pollution were mentioned 
in the show. 

The panelists included regulars Earl 
Weaver and Dan Hellwig, along with 
alterantes Don Koontz and Walt Roga- 
chenko. Mr. Morelli accompanied them. 
Also on the program was a student panel 
from Allentown College of St. Francis. 

On December 9th the group will go 
back to tape another program. Their 
topic: Sports: "Who Tells Who?", with 
a tentative viewing date in March, 

c#t 7 he 
Wovie& 

Starting December 3rd 

COUNTY 

Romeo and Juliet 

BARN CINEMA 

Butch Cassidy and 

The Sundance Kid 
Lion In Winter 

309 CINEMA 

Butch Cassidy and 
The Sundance Kid 

BUCKS COUNTY DRIVE-IN 

Butch Cassidy and 

The Sundance Kid 
Valley Of The Dolls 

309 DRIVE-IN 

"Cycle Rider Spectacular" 
Hell's Angels On Wheels 
Wild Angels 
Glory Stompers 



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Sophomore 

Class Plans 

Spring Concert 

The third Sophomore class meeting 
was rather poorlv-attended but a lot was 
accomplished. The main item of business 
was to develop plans for the upcoming 
Spring Concert, to be held on April 4, 
1970. It was reported that a contract had 
been signed with the Grass Roots and 
that the concert will probably be an in- 
formal affair in the gym. A committee 
was set up to handle publicity, with Pete 
Duane as Chairman. 

President Farrar introduced our new 
class advisor, Mr. Stratton, who reported 
some of his findings concerning the Barry 
Harter Scholarship Fund. Because it 
takes a lot of money to keep a thing of 
this type going, he suggested that we 
investigate other types of memorials be- 
fore making any decisions. One idea 
would be to dedicate a section of the 
new library to Barry and invite anyone 
that cares to to give a book in his mem- 
ory. Pete Brocchii was appointed Chair- 
man of a committee to look into this. 

To help encourage attendance, it was 
decided that the class will meet on sched- 
uled nights twice monthly. Those nights 
will be the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays. 
The next meeting will be on December 
10, in All man Hall Lecture Hall, at 7:30 
p.m. At that time it will be decided 
whether it will be necessary to raise dues 
to finance the concert. 




Photo credit— Dave Thomas 

PASS THE GRAVY, PLEASE 
A good turkey dinner with all of the 
trimmings was enjoyed by students 
and faculty alike at the annual Thanks- 
giving dinner. 



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Eleven Seniors 

Play 

LAST Game 

In this week's soptlieht are the eleven 
graduating members of the football team. 
In the past four years these eleven sen- 
iors have contributed enormously to the 
athletic success of Delaware Valley and 
have been most responsible for the team's 
21-10 record during these four years. 

The many hours of sacrifices that these 
men have given to this sport during the 

i'ears have produced teams that the col- 
ege and alumni can be very proud of. 

It's a shame that these individuals had 
to end their glorious careers with a dis- 
appointing defeat the the hands of out- 
classed Drexel. 

Coach Craver, in looking back at the 
Drexel game, stated that there has never 
been a game that has lasted so long in 
his mind and that he has never seen a 
team so dominated offensively and de- 
fensively and still manage to win. 

As a whole it was a very successful 
season. Many people predicted that this 
year's team woula win only two games 
but the team disproved this by achieving 
a 4-3 record, their fourth winning season 
in a row. 

Head Coach Craver also mentioned 
that the Susquehanna game was the 
finest game that an Aggie team has 
played since he has been at the helm. 
They played up to their potential, not 
over their heads. This alone is a very 
important aspect and Susquehanna at 
the time was the best team in the MAC. 

The future looks very bright with a 
large number of underclassmen seeing 
action even though next year's schedule 
will be the toughest in the Colleges' 
history. 

The following are sketches of each of 
the graduating seniors: 

Wayne Mehalick — co-captain, leader, 
strong blocker; helped make it possible 
for a strong running game; leaves an 
important position to fill in interior 
line. Best games — Western Maryland, 
1968, and Susquehanna, 1969. 

Don Stump — co-captain, good leader- 
ship qualities, finest defensive end 
Craver has ever coached; plays the 
way coaches write the books; has de- 
sire and enthusiasm; started every 
game in four years and has played 31 
good games. 

Gene Wallace — linebacker, old style 
football player — knock 'em down and 
drag them out; very dedicated player 
who was not as gifted as others but 
gave more; very under-rated. 

Dennis Shank — halfback; most under- 
rated back at DVC in recent years; 
sound and steady performer; decep- 
tive moves. Best game — Moravian, 
1966. 

Jim Smith — defense back and quarter- 
back; player quarterback first three 
years, senior year very personally dis- 
appointing year due to injuries and 
sacraficing offensive duties to play de- 
dense; winning attitude. Best game — 
Lock Haven, 1968. 

Joe Urban — defensive back; fine com- 
petitor that came a long way; did good 
job as leader of inexperienced defen- 
sive backfield; good speed. Best game 
— Susquehanna, 1969. 

Ron Timko — quarterback; will be re- 
membered for years after graduation 
for his numerous offensive records; one 
of the greatest Aggie quarterbacks; 
good arm. Best game — Susquehanna, 
1969. 

Joe Brook and Mickey Hannan — offen- 
sive linemen; both possess fine poten- 
tial but were handicapped throughout 
careers by injuries. 

Chris Bockrath — defensive back; pleas- 
ant surprise as he matured and de- 
veloped into a first-string defensive 
beck after offensive duty; didn't play 
freshman year. Best game — Moravian, 
1969. 

Joe Carroll — defensive end; fierce and 
hard-nosed end who loved contact but 
hated practice. 



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Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



For those who don't think Ohio State should 
he rated No. 1 in the nation look at their scor- 
ing average. They are averaging 42.7 points 
per game as compared to 10.4 for their op- 
ponents. 

A series of articles in a local paper praising 
freshman running back Richie Glenn for his 
football abilities mentioned that he has "near- 
shoulder length blonde hair". Who are they 
kidding? You know as well as I do that Ath- 
letic Director Ned Linta and Coach Craver 
would never allow his hair to get near that 
length. 

Bill Mitchell, former DVC football captain, 
presently on the Aggie coaching staff, was se- 
lected Most Valuable athlete in hi* senior year 
at Chester, Pa., high school over Lew Krausse. 
Lew Krausse, who now pitches for the Oakland 
A's, broke into the majors by pitching a shut- 
out. 

If you don't think Ivy League colleges play 
tough football then look at a couple of grads 
now playing pro ball. Calvin Hill, a rookie from 
Yale, is leading the NFL in rushing for Dallas. 
Marty Domres, another rookie, but from Colum- 
bia, is the starting quarterback for the San 
Diego Chargers. 

Another Ivy Leaguer is in the spotlight is 
Ed Marinaro. A sophomore running back from 
Cornell, Marinaro might well be another O. J. 
Simpson. He is currently leading the nation in 
rushing as a sophomore. 

It's a shame that Wilt Chamberlain had to 
get injured. He ruptured a tendon in his right 
knee m a game against the Suns. This is his 
first serious injury in eleven NBA seasons. He'll 
probably be out for the season. Laker coach 
Mullaney still thinks the club has a shot at the 

(ContUied on page 4) 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



December 5, 1969 



LOU'S VIEWS- 

(Continued from page 3) 

title but I rather doubt it. How can you re- 
place a man of the "Big Dippers" ability? 

Senior Sol Caviness has a cousin Greg play- 
ing as a defensive back for the Denver Broncos. 

The 1970 Football Schedule has been re- 
leased: 

September 

28— Moravian 



October 

3— Bloomshurg 

10-Wilkes 

17-Ohio Northern 
24— Lock Haven 
3 1 —Susquehanna 

November 

7— Lycoming 
14-Millersville 



Home 

Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Away 

Away 
Away 



Two Seniors 

End Careers 

At MACs 

November 21 marked the appearance 
of the Del Val harriers in the Middle 
Atlantic Conference championships and 
the final collegiate cross country race for 
the two seniors on the squad. Lott 
Hegyes and Captain Howard Hender- 
son whose leadership guided the team 
throughout the season. 

These two outstanding runners, who 
have run countless miles on the local 
roads, have run in a total of fifty meets, 
including four championship races, dur- 
ing their four-year careers. 

The team finished eighth in a fifteen- 
team college division race that was won 
by Ursinus College at the Fairmount 
Park course. 

Ursinus' Bruce Albert repeated as the 
individual winner. 

The first five finishers for the Aggies 
were John Ahearn, 28th; Howie Hender- 
son, 44th; Ray Funkhouser, 60th; Lou 
Hegyes, 62nd; and Jim Lafiaugh, 63rd. 

In the meet the Aggie runners de- 
feated Junita and Lebanon Valley to 
whom they had lost during the dual 
meet season. They also beat PMC, a 
team they were scheduled to run against 
earlier but never did because of injuries 
to the PMC team. 

The final season record stands at 4-6. 



Fall 
Intramurals 

Concluded 

The fall intramural program was high- 
lighted by the outstanding playing of the 
teams representing Dorm II and Food 
Industry. 

The Food Industry Club, the only 
team posting an undefeated record, 
bested Barness Hall in the football cham- 
pionship game by a 31-6 score. 

In volleyball, Dorm II defeated Ani- 
mal Husbandry 2-0 in a best of three 
series to clinch the volleyball title. 

The following are the completed final 
records. 



FOOTBALL 
Cluh Team* 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry ... 

Dairy Husbandry 

Food Industry 
Horticulture 

Om. Horticulture 

Science . 

Bus. Administration 



W 

2 
2 
1 
6 
2 


4 



Dorm Teams • W 

Cooke 1 

Dorm I 

Dorm II 

Wolfson 2 

Elson 2 

Barness . . 5 

Work 1 

Independents 

VOLLEYBALL 

W 

Agronomy . . 8 

Animal Husbandry 9 

Dairy Husbandry 5 

Food Industry 4 

Horticulture 8 

Om. Horticulture 1 

Science 1 

Bus. Administration 1 

W 

Cooke 3 

Dorm II 7 

Wolfson 1 

Elson 4 

Barness 5 

Work 1 

Independents 



L 
3 
2 
2 

3 
2 
1 
1 

L 
1 

1 
2 
3 

3 
1 



L 

3 
2 
4 

7 
4 

3 

7 
4 

L 

3 
1 
5 
3 
3 
4 
1 



T 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 


T 
2 

1 
1 
1 






T 









T 










1969 FINAL FOOTBALL STATISTICS 



SCORES 

D.V.C. - 14 Moravian 

20 Lycoming 

10 WUkes 

40 Swarthmore 

20 W. Maryland 

39 Susquehanna 

7 Drexel 



RUSHING 



149 

INDIVIDUAL SCORING 



FG 



TD C 

Glenn 4 

Bracclii 18 

Shank 3 

Chance 2 

Thome 2 

B. Timko 2 

Meadows 2 

Guers 2 

A. Timko 1 

Lepre 1 

Bockrath 1 

Foote 1 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. 



Hawkswell 

Wallace 

Carroll 

Urban 

Bockrath 

Bussell 

Jannotti 

Smith . . . 

A. Timko 

Stump 



DVC 
Opp. 



DVC 
Opp. 



DVC 
Opp. 



DVC 
Opp. 



DVC 
Opp. 



RUSHING 

T.C. Yds. Loss 
444 2040 146 

225 750 157 



33 
77 
27 

13 
20 
13 

113 



Tot. 

24 

24 

18 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

6 

6 

6 

6 



Yds. 

43 

90 



75 

92 





I 







Net Av. P/G 

1894 270.8 

593 84.7 



FORWARD PASSING 

No.At. Comp. Int. Net Av.P/G TDS 
183 65 13 685 97.9 5 
211 81 19 1136 162.3 6 

TOTAL OFFENSE 

Plays Net Av. P/G 



607 
436 



2579 
1729 



PUNTING 

T.K. 

45 

56 



Yds. 

1831 

2092 



368.4 
247 



Av. P/P 

40.7 
37.4 



SCORING 

Tds. K.A. K.M. FGA FGM Pts. 
21 21 18 4 2 149 
16 15 10 1 113 



Glenn 
Chance 
Shank 
Lepre 
B. Timko 
A. Timko 
Meadows 
Guers 
Smith . . 
Foote . 



Att. 

116 

109 

99 

29 

35 

16 

10 

6 

7 

12 



PASS RECEIVING 

Bee. 
Thome 21 



Guers . 

Chance 

Glenn 

Meadows 

Poland 

Smith 

Lepre 

Hagberg 



B. Timko 

Foote 



7 
14 
10 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 



PASSING 

Att. Comp. Int. 

132 55 10 

31 10 3 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Att. 

Glenn 116 

Chance 109 

B. Timko 167 

Shank 99 

Lepre 29 

Foote 43 

Meadows 10 

A. Thnko 16 

Guers 6 

Smith - . . . 7 

PUNTING YARDAGE 

No. Yds. 

Foote 45 1831 

PUNT RETURNS 

No. 

Glenn 7 

A. Timko 9 

Guers 2 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. 

A. Timko 8 

Guers 8 

Glenn 3 

Lepre 4 



Yds. 

623 

543 

383 

107 

61 

87 

60 

31 

13 

21 



Yds. 

241 

109 

136 

88 

10 

18 

12 

19 

22 



Yds. 

595 

90 



Yds. 

823 

543 

656 

383 

107 

69 

60 

87 

31 

13 



Av. 
40.7 



Yds. 

113 

131 

20 



Yds. 

155 

114 

64 

52 



Lottery Determines Priorities of Birth - Dates for the Draft 

— Draft Priority of Initials Is Set — 





JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 






MARCH 






APRIL 






MAY 






JUNE 




Data 


Priority 


Data 


Priority 


Data 


Priority 


Data 


Priority 
212 


Doro 


Priority 


Data 


Priority 


Data 


Priority Data Priority 


Data 


Priority 


Data 


»r*fwrtfy 


Data 


Prtarity 


Data 


Priority 


1 


305 


17 


235 


1 


88 


16 


1 


108 


17 


33 


1 


32 


16 


148 


1 


330 


17 


1 


249 


16 


274 


2 


159 


18 


140 


2 


144 


17 


189 


2 


29 


18 


332 


2 


271 


17 


260 


2 


298 


18 


278 


2 


228 


17 


73 


3 


251 


19 


58 


3 


297 


18 


292 


3 


267 


19 


200 


3 


83 


18 


90 


3 


40 


19 


75 


3 


301 


18 


341 


4 


215 


20 


280 


4 


210 


19 


25 


4 


275 


20 


239 


4 


81 


19 


336 


4 


276 


20 


183 


4 


20 


19 


104 


5 


101 


21 


186 


5 


214 


20 


302 


5 


293 


21 


334 


5 


269 


20 


345 


5 


Iftl 


21 


250 


i 


28 


20 


360 


6 


224 


22 


337 


6 


347 


21 


363 


6 


139 


22 


265 


8 


253 


21 


62 


6 


155 


22 


326 


6 


no 


21 


60 


7 


306 


23 


118 


7 


91 


22 


290 


7 


122 


23 


256 


7 


147 


22 


316 


7 


35 


23 


311 


7 


85 


22 


247 


8 


199 


24 


59 


8 


181 


23 


57 


8 


213 


24 


258 


8 


312 


23 


252 


8 


321 


24 


31 


8 


JW) 


23 


109 


9 


194 


25 


52 


9 


338 


24 


236 


9 


317 


25 


343 


9 


219 


24 


2 


9 


197 


25 


381 


9 


335 


24 


358 


10 


325 


26 


92 


10 


216 


25 


179 


10 


323 


26 


170 


10 


218 


25 


351 


10 


65 


26 


357 


10 


208 


25 


137 


11 


329 


27 


335 


11 


150 


26 


365 


11 


136 


27 


268 


11 


14 


26 


340 


11 


37 


27 


296 


11 


134 


26 


22 


12 


221 


28 


77 


12 


68 


27 


205 


12 


300 


28 


223 


12 


346 


27 


74 


12 


133 


28 


308 


12 


272 


27 


64 


13 


318 


29 


349 


13 


152 


28 


299 


13 


259 


29 


362 


13 


124 


28 


262 


13 


295 


29 


228 


13 


69 


28 


222 


14 


238 


30 


164 


14 


4 


29 


285 


14 


354 


30 


217 


14 


231 


29 


191 


14 


178 


30 


103 


14 


356 


29 


353 


15 


17 


31 


211 


15 


89 






15 


169 


31 


30 


15 


273 


30 


208 


15 


130 


31 


313 


15 


180 


30 


209 


16 


121 












16 


166 












16 


55 














JU 


LY 






AUGUST 






SEPTEMBER 






OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 




Dati 
1 


Priority 

93 


Oat* 
17 


Priority 
98 


Data 
1 


Priority 
111 


Data 

17 


priority 
154 


Data 
1 


Priority 

225 


Data 
16 


Priority 
207 


Data 
1 


Priority 
359 


Data Priority 
17 288 


Data 
1 


Priority 

19 


Data 
16 


Priority 
107 


Data 

1 


Priority 
129 


Data 
17 


Priority 
304 


2 


350 


18 


190 


2 


45 


18 


141 


2 


161 


17 


255 


2 


125 


18 


5 


2 


34 


17 


143 


2 


328 


18 


128 


3 


115 


19 


227 


3 


261 


19 


311 


3 


49 


18 


246 


3 


244 


19 


241 


3 


348 


18 


146 


3 


157 


19 


240 


4 


279 


20 


187 


4 


145 


20 


344 


4 


232 


19 


177 


4 


202 


20 


192 


4 


266 


19 


203 


4 


165 


20 


135 


5 


188 


21 


27 


5 


54 


21 


291 


S 


82 


20 


63 


5 


24 


21 


243 


5 


310 


20 


185 


5 


56 


21 


70 


S 


327 


22 


153 


1 


114 


22 


339 


6 


6 


21 


204 


6 


87 


22 


117 


6 


76 


21 


156 


6 


10 


22 


53 


7 


50 


23 


172 


7 


168 


23 


116 


7 


8 


22 


160 


7 


234 


23 


201 


7 


51 


22 


9 


7 


12 


23 


162 


8 


13 


24 


23 


8 


48 


24 


36 


8 


184 


23 


119 


8 


283 


24 


196 


8 


97 


23 


182 


8 


105 


24 


95 


9 


277 


25 


67 


9 


108 


25 


286 


9 


263 


24 


195 


9 


342 


25 


176 


9 


80 


24 


230 


9 


43 


25 


84 


10 


284 


26 


303 


10 


21 


26 


245 


10 


71 


25 


149 


10 


220 


26 


7 


10 


282 


25 


132 


10 


41 


26 


173 


11 


248 


27 


289 


11 


324 


27 


352 


11 


158 


26 


18 


11 


237 


27 


264 


11 


46 


26 


309 


11 


39 


27 


78 


12 


15 


28 


88 


12 


142 


28 


167 


12 


242 


27 


233 


12 


72 


28 


94 


12 


66 


27 


47 


12 


314 


28 


123 


13 


42 


29 


270 


13 


307 


29 


61 


13 


175 


28 


257 


13 


138 


29 


229 


13 


126 


28 


281 


13 


163 


29 


16 


14 


331 


30 


287 


14 


198 


30 


333 


14 


1 


29 


151 


14 


294 


30 


38 


14 


127 


29 


99 


14 


28 


30 


3 


15 


322 


31 


193 


15 


102 


31 


11 


15 


113 


30 


315 


15 


171 


31 


79 


15 


131 


30 


174 


15 


320 


31 


100 


18 


120 






16 


44 












16 


254 












16 


98 


















A - 


22 


E-24 I 


-16 


M 


-21 Q - 11 


U 


- 13 


Y- 12 






















B - 


25 


F-15 J 


- 1 


N • 


- * R - 23 


V 


-28 


Z- 7 






















C- 


14 


G- 2 K 


- 17 





- • S - 19 


w 


- 9 


























D- 


3 


H - 18 


L 


- 20 


P- 


- 10 


T- 8 


X 


- 4 

















the 




URROW 



Vol. 16, No. 7 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture December 12, 1969 



Questions 
Answered 

At a meeting of students presid- 
ed by David Farrar, Chairman of 
Student Government Communica- 
tions, certain questions were asked 
of the administration, which I shall 
endeavor to answer through the 
Furrow in this and subsequent is- 
sues. 

1. How can we keep our park- 
ing lot clean? 

The best solution to this 
problem will be the placing 
of trash receptacles in con- 
spicuous spots on the park- 
ing lot and having everyone 
use them. 

2. Will the Administration look 
into mail service on Satur- 
day. Can we get a student 
to put the mail out on Sat- 
urday? 

The reason the College post 
office is not open on Satur- 
days is that we do not re- 
ceive mail delivery from the 
main post office in Doyles- 
town on Saturday. 

3. What is going to be done 
about Lake Archer? 

I understand that Dr. Prun- 
deanu is working with the 
Soil Conservation service in 
an effort to eliminate the 
algae problem which exists. 

4. Why isn't the Student Acti- 
vity Fee handled by the Stu- 
dent Gov't? 

First of all, there is no such 
thing as a Student Activity 
Fee. The Student Govern- 
ment is given $6.00 per stu- 
dent, per year, from the gen- 
eral fees to use for student 
projects. 

5. Why does each alumnus re- 
ceive a copy of the Furrow? 
Are the students paying for 
this copy? 

The alumni is sent a copy of 
the Furrow so that they may 
keep abreast of things that 
are happening at the Col- 
lege. The College pays for 
these copies. 

6. Could a complete hreak- 
down of the Student's Acti- 
vity Fee be published? Give 
how much money goes 
where — football, basketball, 
Furrow, etc? 

This question was partially 
answered above. Since \\v 
are a private institution, our 
annual budget is not for pub- 
lication. 
(Continued on page 4) 



Who's Who 

Nominations 

Released 

The following names have been 
nominated to be included in 
"Who's Who Among Students" in 
American Universities and Col- 
leges: 

Solomon Caviness 

Leonard DiGiantomasso 

Mark Eutermoser 

Lawrence Gerber 

Ronald Gingerich 

Jimmy Kemmerer 

Donald Koontz 

John Martin 

Wayne Mehalick 

Richard Palmasano 

Quentin Schlieder 

Dennis Strassburger 

C. Donald Stump 

Michael Trainer 

Mark Uebersax 

George Umholtz 

Eugene Wallace 

Solomon Caviness— Animal Husbandry- 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Furrow Staff (entertain- 
ment), 3, 4; Student Government Rep. 4, 
a. Social Chairman, b. Chairman of Cal- 

(Continued on page 5) 



Confidential 
Statements 

Cazty 

All students presently receiving 
financial assistance through the Col- 
lege will soon have renewal forms 
of the Parents' Confidential State- 
ment mailed to their homes. 

These forms must be completed 
and submitted to the College Scho- 
larship Service, no later than Jan- 
uary 31, 1970. Any student apply- 
ing for financial assistance for the 
first time, should obtain this form 
from the Office of the Dean of Stu- 
dents and follow the same proce- 
dure. The analysis of this form 
determines all aid awarded by the 
College, including National De- 
fense Student Loan, Educational 
Opportunity Grants, College Work 
Study and Campus Employment. 
All of this financial assistance is 
based on financial need, number of 
applicants and appropriation of 
funds by the Federal Government. 
(Continued on page 4) 



A Message From Student 
Government President Gery Fisher 

Henry Ford once remarked, "There will never be a system invented 
which will do away with the necessity for work." I believe many of the 
Student Government Representatives would likely be in agreement with 
Mr. Ford's statement. 

The Student Government has been feverishly hard at work in an 
attempt to make Delaware Valley College a better place to live and to 

f;o to college. In just two months of session it has legislated more reso- 
utions than any former Student Government. 

Some of the major resolutions were submitted to the Administration 
as recommendations from the Student Body. Resolutions of lesser im- 
portance, such as those which do not interfere with College policy, be- 
came official upon the Government's decision. 

I am enthused to report that most of the recommendations have been 
accepted by the Administration in the same form or a near facsimile, as 
they had been submitted. We were able to initiate the open door policy 
on a trial basis. We have been able to liberalize the grooming regulations 
somewhat to where sideburns and mustaches may be grown according to 
one's preference so long as they are conservative, in good taste, neat and 
clean. The new grooming policy is on a 60-day trial basis. After the 
expiration date it will be evaluated and it will be determined if it shall 
become a permanent policy. We have made it permissible that any 
faculty member shall become eligible for advisory position to any stu- 
dent organization upon serving one full year on the faculty. In the past 
I three-year tenure on the faculty was required in order to become 
eligible. 

One of the major pieces of legislation whch we have been able to 
deliver this year has been the conversion of family style meals to cafe- 
teria style serving. The conversion to cafeteria meals will cost the College 
more money. The meal itself costs a little more, and more equipment had 
to be ordered by the College. However, the Administration informed the 
Student Government that it will absorb the increase. 

(Continued on page 3) 




Editor — John D. Martin 

MERRY CHRISTMAS 
HAPPY CHANUKAH 

On behalf of the entire publica- 
tions staff I would like to take 
this opportunity to wish the 
campus community, alumni and 
friends of Delaware Valley Col- 
lege the happiest of holiday sea- 
sons, and express an earnest 
hope that the New Year be one 
of PEACE and prosperity. 



DVC Band and 

Glee Club 

Prepare For 

Christmas 

This is the first year that both 
the DVC GLEE CLUB and CON- 
CERT BAND are under the baton 
of Mr. Andrij V. Szul, of the college 
music faculty. 

In addition to teaching at DVC, 
Mr. Szul is a full-time member of 
the music and English faculty at 
Montgomery County Community 
College, in Conshohocken Pa. 

His professional credits include 
appearances with Rav Heatherton 
on New York's WOR-TV "Merry 
Mailman Show"), and various lo- 
cal and national stage, radio and 
television programs since the age 
of five. He is a graduate of Rutgers 
University, studied on a piano scho- 
larship at the Juilliard School of 
Music in New York (1954-62), and 
completed his graduate training at 
the City University of N.Y., Rut- 
gers University and Temple Uni- 
versity. 

The DVC GLEE CLUB has tra- 
ditionally presented an extensive 
Christmas concert tour throughout 
Bucks County in Penna. This year, 
ioined by a newlv-organized 
BAND, the GLEE CLUB has ex- 
tended its concert schedule to in- 
clude a special invitational concert 
for Mayor James Tate of Philadel- 
phia in Center City's City Hall 
Courtyard Square, and an engage- 
ment at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. In addition, the CON- 
CERT BAND will appear as Assist- 
ing Artist at the Annual Christmas 
Concert of the CHORUS of Mont- 
gomery County Community Col- 
lege, also directed by Mr. Szul. 

Procedine this concert season, the 
BAND performed to much acclaim 
at the college home football games. 
At Homecoming Dav's half time 
ceremonies the BAND, joined bv 
the GLEE CLUB, presented a 
special program which was broad- 
cast county-wide by WBUX-Radio. 

On campus, the GLEE CLUB 
and BAND both maintain busy so- 
cial calendar, and each organiza- 
tion publishes its own newsletter. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



December 12, 1969 



- LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - 

Furphy Replies To Dave Evans 

November 30, 1969 

Dear Mr. Evans, 

When informed that my letter brought replies in the November 21 
edition of The Furrow, I was glad to see that one was from you, for, 
while we are both Food Industry majors and have worked together as 
active members in the Food Industry Club during the past year and a 
half, our outlooks on life are quite different. By looking at both of us one 
can readily make this assumption. 

In your article you mentioned that I feel that people who do not hold 
the views "I feel" should not be allowed to express their views. But when 
reading your letter I get the feeling that "y° u ^ ee ^' * ne same way. In my 
letter to Dr. Work, I criticized him for having made classes voluntary so 
that those who wanted to attend such demonstrations may do so. In this 
school, as we all know, we have a "cut system." If you and others from 
this school were that serious about your feelings towards the Mora- 
torium then one of your cuts should have been taken — this is the farce, 
not the "gathering of people to exercise their constitutional rights." If it 
were as you insinuated then it would have been an open letter to the 
students and not to Dr. Work. 

Your statement that had classes been called on Veterans' Day fewer 
people would have observed it than the Moratorium is far-fetched. Al- 
though we did not revert to a mass march on one city or a few gathering 
places throughout the country, I am sure that throughout the land 
Americans or all races, colors, and creeds were thanking God for the 
people who thought enough of the country they live in to fight and 
possibly die for the good of this country and the rest of the world. These 
are people who ask "Is it right for one man to fatten while another man 
starves? ' Yes, we in this country are fattened with freedom while millions 
around us starve for freedom. This is why I mentioned that moratorium 
Day was the wrong name for the day of your gathering. 

Well, Mr. Evans, tell me if there were any other factions present 
besides those who say that we should bring all our troops home and 
forget about the rest of the world because that is what we will be doing 

by pulling out of Vietnam isn't this ISOLATIONISM? As for the 

rest, if they are not true isolationists, then what are they? If you call 
■ this "name-calling" then that is your right but true name-calling would 
be if I had not given a reason for the name. An example of this happened 
in one of my classes. A fellow student told me that I live in a "plastic 
world." When I asked him to explain what he meant by "plastic world" 
he was unable to do so. In fact I thought I was in an echochamber 
because that is all he could say. Naturally I thought that perhaps he was 
increasing his knowledge of the dictionary and I asked him if that was 
his word for the day. I believe the theory behind it is that if you repeat 
it often enough you learn to comprehend what it means easier. His only 
problem was that he remembered to say the word and not the meaning. 

Another incident of "name-calling" occurred with another student with 
whom I work after school. We were discussing the Democratic Conven- 
tion in Chicago and he called the police "Fascist Pigs". When I asked 
him to explain what he meant by "Fascist Pigs" he replied, " Ido not 
know. I heard it and the expression sounded good." This, then, is "name- 
calling". 

I would presume that you might bring up the moral issue of the war, 
whereby many say that it is an immoral war. What war isn't???? Unfor- 
tunately, people who try to coincide morality with war are blinded by 
so-called religious scrupples. They state that it is immoral to kill. I agree. 
But, is it immoral if someone is raping your girl or your sister or perhaps 
even your mother and the only way to stop them is to kill them? Do you 
stand by and let it happen or do you kill? Where do you draw this fine 
line of morality? 

The Bible, just like the Constitution, can be interpreted in many 
ways. The other night I was watching television. I saw a movie titled 
"Sergeant York". It was a movie about a man who cared little about 
religion. Then one day while riding in a rain storm a bolt of lightning 
struck the gun he was holding in his hand and although the gun was 
blown apart he had not a scratch on him. He took this as a sign from God 
that killing was evil because the purpose of his journey was to kill a 
man. He emerged from this incident a very religious man. Just as in real 
life, a person who converts to a new religion, or just accepts religion for 
the first time for that matter, is usually a very staunch follower of the 
religion, more so than most of those born into such religion. He was 
dratted into World War I but he tried to evade going into the army by 
claiming to be a conscientious objector. After being denied, he went to 
Germany, and, as history will recall, became a national hero. When 
asked, "why he had changed his mind about killing" he replied that he 
could not just stand there and watch his friends get killed. 

Now think about the word friends. The people who participated in 
the Moratorium claim that they do not want to see any more of their 
friends killed in Vietnam. Aren't the South Vietnamese our friends? 



Aren't they fighting on our side to stop aggression? Or aren't we supposed 
to call them friends because we do not know them? Now tell me some- 
thing, do you know every American in Vietnam? Do you think it would 
be a moral decision for us to pull out of South Vietnam because you 
cannot think of them as friends? Should we leave these people in the 
hands of the enemy and not care about their well-being? What happens 
if the Communist invade Formosa? Do we say to Chang-kai Shek — 
"Sorry about that!" And why should they stop there? There will be no- 
body to stop them from overtaking the rest of the world. They know 
they will not have to worry about United States intervention because 
the people do not want to get involved in foreign affairs. They may even 
go as far as taking over the Hawaiian Islands. Then what do we do? I 
guess your opinion would be that we never did recognize Hawaii as a 
state anyway and besides they are just a bunch of worthless islanders 
anyway. Morality looks good on paper but interpreting it can be very, 
very involved. 

So you see, Mr. Evans, when you say that I should not worry about 
what others are doing, you are very, very wrong, because I must bear 
part of the responsibility of what you may do someday, and in this case 
"7 am worried? . 

I have already mentioned that statements should not be made without 
some clarification. So Mr. Evans, please tell me why you stated that the 
Moratorium should not have kept me from my classes. Where did you 
get your information that I did not attend my scheduled classes? If you 
would like my schedule for Wednesdays and the names of my teachers 
I would gladly provide them so that you may check to see if I was 
absent or not. In fact, there were some classes that only one or two 
students showed up. I know this for a fact because I attended one such 
class. And if you cneck with Mr. Neulight, my speech teacher, and Ray 
Funkhauser, a fellow student, I am sure they will verify it. 

As for another misconception of yours, you stated that you agree with 
Vice President Agnew and myself that the news media distort the facts 
and only related the violence at the marches. You mean to tell me that 
the November 15th Moratorium received little attention by the news 
media? Every news program on television and radio the week prior to 
the Moratorium had the leaders on their shows and there wen' half-hour 
shows describing it. Not only that, but article after article was written 
about the coming Moratorium. After the 15th more articles were written. 
The Philadelphia Bulletin, for instance, had two columns and 0D6 picture 
on those who caused trouble. But what about the rest of th.it Sunday's 
paper? It had numerous articles, not just short paragraphs but two and 
three columns long, as well as many pictures. How mucn more coverage 
should these people receive to satisfy you? 

In your article you stated that I showed a lack of maturity and a lack 
of perception. Now, then, I ask, "How can you render yourself capable 
of such accusations when you can state that you were not concerned 
about the past but the future was the immediate problem?" Yes, the 
future is the immediate problem of today but what has happened in the 
past will relate to our future. To deny the past is a sign of stupidity and 
gross incompetence on matters of the present and the future. Do we not 
learn by past experiences? If you pick up a piece of hot coal with your 
bare hand, you learn fast that the next time something else besides your 
bare hand is needed to pick up the coal. 

World War II is a good example of the past. We defeated Japan 
and Germany and now these countries are prosperous and have no need 
to war with anybody. The Korean incident, on the other hand ended 
with a truce, thereby our enemy was not defeated and the possibility of 
war was and still is quite evident. The Vietnam War is very similar and 
perhaps nothing but a carryover of the Korean War, in my opinion. Is 
this what you want — a continuous war in different parts of the Orient? 
This is why blindness of the past will not bring about peace and happi- 
ness in the future. 

Are you that little that you would wipe out the memory of those v/ho 
sacrificed much to give you what you have today? I am not asking you 
to relive the past but to REMEMBER THE PAST !!!!!!! 

Sincerely, 
John A. Furphy 
Class of 72 



KERSHNERS 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



J. CARROLL MOLLOY 

Realtor - Insurance 

Molloy Building 

30 S. Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 



December 12, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Furphy Answers Pope 

Dear Mr. Pope, 

I would like to give you an answer, as I did Mr. Evans, in regard to 
your article in the November 21 edition of The Furrow. Unfortunately, 
because I am unable to decipher what you have stated, 1 must ask you 
to write another statement that can be understood. This is not only my 
own opinion but that of others, pro and eon to my ideas. I would hate 
to misinterpret your ideas as I would not like to have others misinterpret 
mine. I ask that you please address the article to me for I alone, and not 
any of the other ex-servicemen on this campus, wrote the letter you refer 
to. I do not believe that the article was signed "J onn A. Furphy and 
fellow ex-servicemen on campus". To help you I would like an explana- 
tion of the following terms: part-time student; part-time provider; military 
institution as a crutch is an inexcusable as burning one's draft card; ana, 
last but not least, "Shape up or ship out." If you have any trouble in 
writing, I think if you ask a member of the faculty, he mignt help you. 
Personally I would refer you to Dr. Ziemer. He helped me a great aeal. 

Sincerely, 
John A. Furphy 
Class of 72 

Dissenters In The Ranks 

Within the White House staff itself, the State Department, the U.S. 
Information Agency and the Pentagon, there are men who disagree 
strongly with President Nixon's public response to the October and 
November anti-war demonstrations. 

It must be noted the Administration "dissenters" known to me are 
loyal to the President and believe in his Vietnam policies. But they 
think Nixon was in error when he snubbed sizable numbers of protestors, 
however misguided and wrong-headed he may believe them to be. There 
are some in their ranks that feel he put the demonstrations down to show 
that he was no going to be pressured into selling out the South Vietna- 
mese and also to show that these concerned people did not represent 
the majority of American people in his estimation. This was done pri- 
marily for the benefit of the two Vietnamese governments, satisfying 
two goals at once. 

A firm stand is one thing, but seeming rudeness to the views of others 
is a horse of a different color. Well, you might ask, what should our 
chief have done? The "dissenters" do not suggest that the President should 
have dickered with the demonstrators or implied in any way that demon- 
startions can substitute for deliberation by government or a vote by 
the people. Also, they don't suggest that he be polite to those who 
carried Viet Cong flags or shouted "Ho Ho Ho Chi Minh", or the Nazi 
types who sought violence. 

The Administration objectors think, rather, that Nixon should have 
announced in advance that he welcomed expressions for peace, that he, 
as much as any man, wanted peace, that he called on the advice of the 
ablest men in the country, that he thought he was on the right path but 
that if anyone had alternative ideas to offer, he would listen. 

After the parades, Nixon could have repeated that he welcomed and 
appreciated any peaceful demonstrations, he also could have said that 
these demonstrations showed the rest of the world that America was 
united in the idea of wanting peace. He could have decried the actions 
of the violent minority as a betrayal of their fellow marchers. Nixon 
could then have stated that he studied the petitions and statements 
turned into him. The President could have announced that it still seemed 
to him that he had no other course to follow than the one on which he 
had embarked but that his door would at all times be open for suggestions. 
But he didn't do these things, did he? 

At this time I would like to bring to your attention something that 
was brought to my attention by a Freshman here at Delaware Valley. 
About a week ago, Mark Pinsker handed me a letter he received from 
his father. I feel the body of this letter should not go unnoticed since 
we are on the topic of Demonstrations. With permission from Mark, 



STAN BOWERS 

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19 N. Main Doylestown 



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• Omaga — Longinas — 
Accutron, ate. 

Watch - Clock - Jawalry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 

31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



I quote: 

Dear Mark; 

... I hope you had a nice time in Washington. I believe that 
if it wasn't for the protests, the Administration would never have 
brought any of the boys home sooner. I admire you for standing 
up to be counted for what you think is right. As long as it is 
done in a peaceful way you have every right to do it. After all 
Mark, that is what I fought for in World War II. In a few years 
the country will be in the hands of the under 30 group and I pray 
to God that you and your generation can do a better job than 
we did. . . . 

Love, 

Dad 

This is the personal opinion of a member of the "older generation" 
who has the basic fear of his son going to fight for his country, and, 
because he has experienced the horror of war and death, does not believe 
that the protests carried out hy concerned citizens of America should be 
condemned. 

Bob Edwards 

S. G. PRESIDENT— 

(Continued from page 1) 

Mr. Robert Winner, the Vice-President of Student Government, of- 
ficially became the first representative of the Student Body to represent 
the Student Body as an active and voting member on the Student Affairs 
Committee. In the very near future, two members of the Student Body 
will be chosen to represent the views of the Student Body as advisory 
members of the faculty Curriculum Committee. 

Another major piece of legislation which we have been able to deliver 
on a 60-day trial basis has been the revision of the dress code. The new 
dress code reads as: Students shall be properly attired in classes and the 
dining hall at all times. Clean bluepjeans will be considered proper attire 
except for mixers, concerts and other special events when the dress will 
be designated. 

Sport or suit jackets and dress slacks will be worn at designated meals. 
In classrooms and dining hall all students will be expected to wear clean 
shirts. White undershirts will not be considered as proper attire. 

The Student Government itself has witnessed a revision to its struc- 
ture. Upon the approval of the Student Body and the Administration it 
grew to become a legislative body of 22 members. This change should 
help the Student Government to become more effective and responsive 
to th students' desires. 

This year's Student Government has taken on another responsibility 
which will prove to be quite beneficial to the Administration, the Student 
Government and the Student Body. The Student Government has initi- 
ated a Traffic Court which will listen to and decide the guilt or innocence 
on the appeal of an accused violator. The Student Government will keep 
all of the records and collect 50$ of all of the fines. Starting on November 
24, all fines have been collected only on Mondays between the hours of 
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Accounting Office. 

The Student Government has sponsored more and better mixers this 
fall than in any previous year. It has also been our policy to hire two 
bands for each mixer to please all types of music lovers. 

One can see that the Student Government has been hard at work and 
has been very successful at it. However, many times the work that is 
being carried out can not always be seen. If a comparison were made 
between the noticed and unnoticed work the amount of unnoticed work 
would win by leaps and bounds. 

The success of the Student Government has been the result of various 
factors: 1) excellent representatives who have been responsive to the 
student's desires; 2) great unity among the members of the Student 
Government; 3) a burning desire to improve the College habitably, 
scholastically, and socially; 4 ) and the policy of submitting recommenda- 
tions to the Administration that are logical, well thought out, and exact 
in clarity. 

The real key to our success has been the advent of better communi- 
cations between the Student Government and the Administration. We 
have not only been able to directly relay the rational deires to Mrs. Work, 
Dean Fulcoly and Mr. Sauer, but a few of us have been able to person- 
ally discuss them with President Work. As a result of these improved 
means of communication we find that the Administration is very coop- 
erative with the Student Government, and, in turn, we are cooperative 
in presenting the students' desires to the Administration. This rational 
and peaceful policy of mutual cooperation has thus far gotten us every- 
thing that we have asked for. This will be the policy that the Student 
Government will follow in the coming months. On the evening of Decem- 
ber 15, Robert Winner, Sol Caviness, Rich Palmasano, and I will once 
again be meeting with President Work concerning various college poli- 
cies. 

Unfortunately not everything has been wine and roses for this year's 
Student Government. All fall we have been faced with financial prob- 
lems. What disturbs me and the members of the Student Government is 
that it has not been the Government's fault. Due to last year's poor book- 

(Continued on page 4) 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



December 12, 1969 



S. 6. PRESIDENT— 

(Continued from page 3) 
keeping, we have had to pay over $700.00 worth of last year's bills. We 
have also been held responsible for a $1900.00 bill to Princeton Sports- 
wear for Student Store supplies which they claimed we had accumulated 
since 1963. The Student Store did not keep records until 1966, and, there- 
fore, we had no records to disprove their claim. We have paid $1000.00 
of this bill, but we still owe the Administration the balance of this bill. 

We have recently received a bill of $178.00 from the Allen Laundry 
for the linens that were stolen by the "Laundry Thief (s)" over the 
Homecoming Weekend. This theft simply means that there will possibly 
be one less mixer during the course of the year. Also, at the present we- 
ar slowly reimbursing ARA Vending Service for the dollar changer 
(worth $1000.00) that was demolished last year. Unfortunately for us 
the insurance company wiggled itself out of this burglary; but yet the 
money was taken and the machine demolished. 

On the evening of November 8, the Student Government and the 
Student Body witnessed its greatest error of the year. It was the annual 
"Fall Concert" featuring the "Box Tops", a group of talented musicians 
who had recorded five solid hits since 1967. The Student Government 
not only lost $700.00 on the concert, but it also failed to bring good en- 
tertainment to the campus. With the connections and contacts which we 
had concerning the "Box Tops", we had anticipated a fine evening of 
entertainment. We are sorry it was otherwise. 

Beyond any doubt we have had more financial problems and have 
been more financially unstable than any other Student Government, but 
we have been able to cope with it. We had $1300.00 in our treasury to 
start the year. Since then we had to withdraw $25.00 from the student 
activities fees, which is not quite half of the total fees, in order to pay 
for all the outstanding bills and the regular expendtures for the current 
year. 

In quoting Henry Ford, "Money is like an arm or leg — use it or lose 
it". I can say there is no doubt we have unconsciously followed his ad- 
vice. At the moment there is approximately $600.00 in the treasury which 
I guarantee we will not lose. 

Many of the upper classmen and I have noticed a lack of spirit, en- 
thusiasm, and participation in college activities by the Freshmen class 
at all of our football games, all of the Homecoming festivities, and the 
Fall Concert. Ordinarily in the past the Freshmen were in the majority 
at these events. However, this year they have been in the minority at all 
of these events. There were also many complaints during Freshmen Cus- 
toms although I saw very little to complain. 

Freshmen, 

You have recently taken a step forward in the right direction 
with the election of very capable men to the offices of your class. 
Give your officers your support and earnest participation, so that 
they can unify your class and make it the most constructive class 
on campus. 

As your President, I ask you again for your support of Delaware 
Valley College and all of its activities, so that we can say that our 
College is "The Place To Be". 

— Gery J. Fisher 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 

Dre»i Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 

THOM McAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.-FRI. *-7 - SAT. »-4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

SAMUEL MOYER 
Matter Barber 



FINANCIAL AID— 

(Continued from pane 1) 
The College will have a limited 
amount of National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan money available for the 
Spring semester. Interested students 
should contact Dean Fulcoly. 

Those students who receive State 
Scholarships will receive renewal 
forms from the various States, and 
those students who are receiving 
State Guaranteed Loans should se- 
cure renewal forms from the lend- 
ing institutions. 

If you have any questions con- 
cerning financial assistance, the 
Office of the Dean of Students will 
be happy to answer them. 

Joseph E. Fulcoly, Jr. 
Dean of Students 



— N-O-T-l-C-E — 

There will be no issue Jan. 9, 
1970. The next issue will be Jan. 
16, 1970. The deadline for that 
issue will be Wednesday, Jan. 
7, 1970, 12 noon. 



Students 

Aid Faculty 

Curriculum 

Committee 

The student government is pres- 
ently involved in aiding the faculty 
curriculum committee in the revis- 
ing of the curriculum. Jim McHugh 
and Rich Russell are the student 
government representatives to the 
faculty committee. The student 
government urges your cooperation 
to make your suggestions known 
as to what changes you would like 
made to improve your curriculum. 

A group of interested students 
have volunteered to help organize 
your suggestions. The following 
may be contacted if you have a 
suggestion: 

Agronomy — 

Bill Camerer, 214 — Dorm II 
Animal Husbandry — 

Sol Caviness, 108 — Dorm I 

Rich Russell 214— Dorm II 
Dairy Husbandry — 

Fred Harteis, Dorm I 

Steve Deppen, 214 — Dorm II 
Food Industry — 

Chris Hollands, 104— Dorm II 
Horticulture — 

Wayne Mehalick, 215 — Ulman 
Orn. Horticulture — 

Lenny D. Giamtomasso, 228 — Dorm II 
Biology — 

Dave Wagner, 104 Cooke 

Jim McHugh, 216— Work 
Chemistry — 

Ron Cingerieh, 219— Dorm II 
Business — 

Alex Vargo, 217— Work 

QUESTIONS ANSWERED— 

(Continued from page 1) 

7. How many people were in- 
volved in making linen ser- 
vice mandatory, and why 
must we take it? 

The number of people is im- 
material. Those people who 
are most concerned with this 
problem were involved, 
namely, the superintendent 
of Housing, the health ser- 
vices, Office of the Dean of 
Students, and the President's 
Office. The reason for this 
being mandatory, has been 
explained several times 
before. 

8. Why is there no Student 
Union? How about convert- 
ing the Library Annex? 
The main reason is due to 
lack of funds. We all appre- 
ciate the need for this and as 
soon as funds are available 
with the projected building 
program, a Student Union 
will be erected. The Library 
Annex will be torn down to 
make way for the construc- 
tion of the new education 
building soon to be started. 

9. Why isn't there now — and 
when will there be a co-ed 
system? 

At the present time we do 
not have the facilities to ade- 
quately provide for co-eds. 
In the past, we have not had 
sufficient interest from pro- 
spective female students to 



warrant provisions of these 
facilities. 

10. Is it possible for more out- 
door recreation areas such 
as basketball courts, volley- 
ball, etc? 

Yes, as soon as funds be- £ 
come available. 

11. Is it possible to get more 
lighting down at the railroad 
stop? 

Yes, if it is necessary. This 
will be investigated. 

12. Why were trees planted be- 
tween Cooke and Barness 
Hall? 

These trees were planted in 
an effort to beautify the 
campus. 

13. What are the chances of ob- 
taining screens for the win- 
dows in the Dining Hall? 

The possibility of air condi- 
tioning the Dining Hall is 
being investigated, and if 
feasible would eliminate the 
need for screens. 

14. There is a need for better 
facilities for the four-men 
rooms in Ulman, Wolfsohn 
and Elson Hall, such as more 
more closets and drawers. 

Hopefully, the completion of 
the new dormitory will eli- 
minate the need for three or 
four-men rooms and thereby 
alleviate this problem 

15. What are the possibilities of 
fixing up the baseball field 
because it is an eyesore in 
the middle of the campus? 
As soon as the new football 
stadium is completed, the 
practice area will be moved, 
thereby eliminating the lar- 
gest cause of this problem. 

16. Why are the fines issued by 
t h e New Britain Police so 
steep? 

This question would have to 
be answered by t h e New 
Britain Boro Council. Some 
lustices of the Peace and 
Magistrates feel that by 
levying the maximum fine, 
they deter repetition and en- 
courage compliance with the 
law. 

17. Why are there regulations 
on this campus against stu- 
dents drinking in their 
rooms, if they are 21 years 
old or older? 

The policy of t h e College 
prohibits drinking by a n y 
student on campus or at any 
College-sponsored affair. 

18. Can the Dean or Assistant 
Dean search your room le- 
Ually and why? 

When a student applies for 
admission at Delaware Val- 
ley College, he agrees to 
abide by the rules and regu- 
lations of the College, one 
of which is that rooms are 
subject to inspection by col- 
lege authorities, dormitory 
counselors, and student go- 
vernment representatives. 

Joseph E. Fulcoly, Jr. 

Dean of Students 



December 12, 1969 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 




Photo credit-Dave Thomas 

Two bands -f a bunch of ready 
Aggies + high-school-age girls =. 
one bad mixer. In order to mix 
properly one must first start with 
the proper ingredients. And the 
most important ingredient, missing 
as of late, is college age women 
— so let's get with it S.G.! 



WHO'S WHO— 

(Continued from page 1) 
endar Committee, c. Juror on Student 
Court; holds a seat at Intercollegiate 
Conference; part-time switchboard oper- 
ator at DVC; from Atlantic City, N. J.; 
majors in: Animal Husbandry; Apiary 
Society, 3; Intramurals (football and 
basketball ) . 

Leonard DiGiantomasso — '70 Class 
Vice President, 4; Delta Tau Alpha, 4; 

1, 2, 3, 4, Ornamental Horticulture So- 
ciety; Variety Show, 3; Football Man- 
ager, 2; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Mark Eutermoser — President Alpha 
Phi Omega, Senior year; Secretary Alpha 
Phi Omega, Junior year; Color Guard, 
Senior year; Planning Committee for 
Junior Prom; Dean's List — Spring and 
Fall ( P 66-'67), Spring ('68), Spring 
('69); Senior Research Project — Senior 
year — Biology (Bucks County Audubon 
Society member); Class Representative 
for Alumni Donation Drive — Junior and 
Senior years. 

Larry Gerber — '70 Class Secretary, 

2, 3, 4; Delta Tau Alpha 3, 4; A-Day 
Rep. 4; Co-Editor of Cornucopia, 4; 
Dairy Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Publications 
Rep. 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Dairy 
Judging Team 3, 4; first place Ail-Amer- 
ican contest; Chr. Sophomore Spring 
Concert Co.; A-Day Committee 4. 

Ronald Gingerich — Science Society; 
Student Government Representative; Stu- 
dent Government Secretary '69-70; 1970 
Cornucopia Staff ( Senior section editor ) . 

Jimmy D. Kemmerer — Agronomy Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Soil Cons. Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres- 
ident 4; Soil Cons. Society National 
Meeting 2, 3, 4; I.C.C. 4; D/T.A. 3, 4; 
Publications 2. 

Donald A. Koontz — Men's Glee Club; 
Publications — Furrow and Gleaner; In- 
tramural football, wrestling, volleyball; 
Dorm Counselor; Student Government; 
Interclub Council; Yearbook sectional 
editor; Dairy Society and president; In- 
tercollegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Team. 

John D. Martin — Gleaner contributor 
2 yrs.; Contemporary Club 3 yrs.; Pres- 
ident '69-70; Photo Club 3; Ornamental 
Horticulture Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Tau 
Alpha 2 yrs; (tutor 2 yrs.); Furrow 
(newspaper staff) 1, 2, 3, 4; Editor '68- 
'69, '69-70; Interclub Council; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3. 

Wayne Mehalick — Student Govern- 
ment; active in class affairs; Co-Captain 
1969 football team; selected to first team 
All-MAC 2 years in a row. 

Quentin Schlieder — Gleaner 2 yrs.; 
Co-Editor 1; Contemporary Club 2 yrs.; 
Parliamentarian 1; A-Day Flower Show 
Co-Chairman; Cornucopia staff — Club 
Editor, Art Editor; Ornamental Horticul- 
ture Society President; A-Day Repre- 
sentative; Delta Tau Alpha — 2 years; 
Dean's List, 1, 2, 3. 

D. Lee Strassburger — Science Society 
1, 2; Ornamental Horticulture Society 3, 
4; Cross Country 1, 2; Furrow Staff 3, 4; 
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Student Store Man- 
ager 4; A-Day Chairman 4. 

C. Donald Stump — Football 1, 2, 3, 
4, (Co-Captain) 4; Tennis 1, 2; Varsity 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; An. Hus. Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, (V. Pres.) 4; Orn. Hort. Club 3; Sci- 



ence Club 1, 2; All-MAC Honorable 
mention 3; All-MAC Defense first team, 
4; Intramural Rep. 2; Opening Section 
Editor, 4. 

George W. Umholtz, Jr. — Agronomv 
Club 1, 2, Secretary 3, President 4; Soil 
Conservation Society 1, 2, Treasurer 3, 
Secretary 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Delta Tau 
Alpha 3, Sergeant-at-Arms 4; Inter-Club 
Council 4; Student Government 2; Var- 
sity Football 2, 3; Secretary- Treasurer 
1970 Student A-Day Committee. 

Eugene Wallace — An. Hus. Club 3, 
A-Day Rep.; 4, Intramural Rep.; Varsitv 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. Varsity Foot- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4 (All-MAC linebacker); 
Varsity baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, (Captain), 4; 
A-Day Committee — Operations Chair- 
man. 

The College is trying to add the 
names of Gery Fisher, Robert Win- 
ner and Gary Filko to this list. 
These boys nad been named to 
last years Who's Who and were 
not included in this year's list in 
an effort to give more people an 
opportunity to be honored by this 
distinction. Hopefully, we can have 
these three students added to this 
list. 

Gery Fisher — President of Class of 
1970 for 3 yrs.; Vice-President of S. C. 
'68-'69; President of S.G. '69-70; Mem- 
ber of Horticulture Club 3 yrs.; Member 
of Delta Tau Alpha 2 yrs.; Dean's List 
five semesters; received the DTA award 
for outstanding sophomore. 

Bob Winner — S. G. Rep. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Sec. 3, UP 4; Business Manager Furrow 
2; Dorm Proctor 2, 3, 4; Dairy Judging 
Team 4; Track 1; Student Affairs Com- 
mittee 4; Traffic Court Judge 4. 

Gary J. Filko — Food Industry Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Class Treasurer 
1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Year- 
book Staff 4; A-Day Co-Chairman Food 
Committee 2. 



Christmas Food 
Fund Drive 

The Circle K Club of Delaware 
Valley this year is holding a fund 
drive for five needy families in the 
Bucks County area. Circle K mem- 
bers will cover our campus asking 
for contributions for this cause. The 
money we receive will buy five 
needy families a Christmas dinner. 

Most fellows here at school are 
from average income families. 
Surely everyone can spare a few 
cents to give someone else a little 
joy in Christmas. There are some 
people in Bucks County who for 
one reason or another just can't 
make ends meet. Help us to help 
them enjoy the holidays as we do. 
We will be accepting contributions 
until vacation, in the dining hall, or 
in Barness 113. 



Lauchmen 
Printing 
Company 

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SINCE 1923 

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THE 

FURROW 

STAFF 

Wishes 

All 



MERRY 
CHRISTMAS 



Merry Christmas from 



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Affirmation Needed 
To Change By-Laws 

At a recent meeting of the Inter- 
Club Council, it was decided that 
clubs should not be required to 
hold their elections for officers dur- 
ing the first two weeks of the spring 
semester. A few clubs wanted to 
hold their elections at the end of 
the spring semester so that the 
senior officer could be more active 
in A-Day and hopefully improve 
that event. Other clubs wanted to 
keep their elections as they are but 
thought they should have the right 
to change if thev wanted. 

In order to change the existing 
policy the Student Government by 
laws, section 4b, must be ammend- 
ed. This entales an affirmation by 
2/3 of the voting student body. 

On Dec. 15 we are asking the 
Student Body to vote to strike out 
section 4b of the Student Govern- 
ment Constitution By Laws. This 
will enable clubs to hold their 
elections whenever they decide. 
Thank you 

Bob Winner, 
President, I.C.C. 



FIFE and DRUMS 

"Where Quality and Good Ta«te 
are not Expensive' 5 

10% DVC Discoun: 

156 West State St. 
Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa. 18901 

Monday Closed 
Tues.-Sat. 9:30-5:30 

THOUGHTFUL GIFTS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



SUPPORT 

The Circle X' Club 

CHRISTMAS 

FOOD FUND 

DRIVE 




^^ Jim Juztow 

US Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

§r EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR John 0. Martin 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Mike Morgan 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Leu Hedges 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Dave Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parlcar 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Lee Straasbergor 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT Bob Edwards 

BUSINESS MANAGER Deve Teichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dalbart Jones 

-GEN ERAL ST AFF- 

Sel Cavines, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allan Gordon, Larry Martel, Walt Ault, 

Abbott Lee, Dave Sustak, Howard Henderson, Brwca Richards, Bruce Giese 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcely 
FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



December 12, 1969 



Aggies Dump 
Eastern Baptist 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Delaware Valley College 
basketball team marked the open- 
ing of the 1969-70 cage season with 
a resounding 97-46 victory over a 
much smaller Eastern Baptist five 
before an enthusiastic home crowd. 

Coach Silan, utilizing the oppor- 
tunity to use reserves, substituted 
freely as Del-Val easily rolled over 
t h e hapless Baptist team. In the 
non-league contest every member of 
the twelve-man squad saw action 
as they displayed a balanced scor- 
ing attack. 

The first half was at times mark- 
ed with sloppy play even though 
the Aggies held the Eagles to three 
points for the first nine and one 
half minutes. The score at the half 
stood at 42-17. 

Free scoring and better played 
basketball was the tune of the se- 
cond half as at times the Aggies 
led by as many as 45 points. The 
largest point spread of 51 points 
occurred in the closing seconds of 
play. 

Don S e c h 1 e r , Bob McEntee, 
Frosh Bob Polinsky, Ralph White 
and Frank Speziali all played pro- 
minant roles in the victory. 

The next home encounter is Dec. 
12 after two road games against 
Drexel and Drew. 

TEAM SCORING 



Del. Vol 




Eastern Baptist 


Sechler 


14 


Wilson 8 


McEntee 


11 


Taylor 4 


Polinsky 


12 


Rothrock 6 


Teeple 


2 


Thompson 1 1 


Schade 


6 


Houser 13 


White 


14 


Hurst 9 


Rich'son 


4 


Yellis 2 


Zenko 


7 


Sanderson 2 


Wentzel 


8 


— 


Chubb 


10 


TOTAL 46 


Guers 


2 




Speziali 


7 





TOTAL 



97 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



Compute Uravil ^MrranQ*m*nl$ 
MIMMI 

^8B 



Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 343-1*23 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



The United States Nnval Academy recently 
appointed a civilian as their athletic director. 
This may start a new trend and hopefully put 
cinics, who play tough national schedules, have 
more emphasis on athletics. The service acad- 
had a difficult time recruiting top athletes. 
Athletes, who may want a career in professional 
sports, are faced with a five year service com- 
mitment after graduation at the academies. 

The United States again might host the 
Olympics. Los Angeles stands a good chance of 
heing awarded the 1976 games. Moscow, Flor- 
ence, and Montreal are Los Angeles' serious 
competition, 

Philadelphia Textile, scheduled to play our 
basketball team on Feb. 7, lost to nationally 
ranked ViUanova by only five points 57-52 in 
the season's opener for both teams. 

Congratulations to Jerry Virostak, Gene Wal- 
lace, Don Stump, Rich Glenn and Wayne 
Mehalick for heing named to the MAC North- 
em Division All-Star squad. Larry Hare, Ron 
Timko, Don Chance, Fred Jannotti and Fred 
Beach also received honorable mention. Wayne 
Mehalick appeared on last year's first team 
while Don Stump and Fred Jannotti were hon- 
orable mentions. The Aggies had the third high- 
est number of footballers mentioned. Wilkes 
and Albright were the leaders with fifteen and 
eleven respectively. 

Muhammad Ali, previously known as Cassius 
Clay, former world heavyweight boxing cham- 
pion, recently made his acting debut in the 
Broadway black power musical, "Buck White." 

The nation's two top collegiate linemen are 
from Pennsylvania. Notre Dame's famous Mike 
McCoy from Erie was selected the top lineman, 
with Penn State's Mike Reid of Altoona not far 
behind. 

Just when you think you've seen it all, along 
comes something new. For instance this past 
football season Duke University pulled off a 
shoelace sleeper play. The score was tied at 
7-7 with North Carolina. Duke quarterback Leo 
Hart nonchalantly knelt off to the right of the 
football to tie a lace while the other ten Blue 
Devils lined up to the left of the ball. Split 
end Marcel Courtillet suddenly bent over and 
scooped the ball to flanker Wes Chesson, who 
raced 53 yards for a touchdown before North 
Carolina knew what happened. It was a legal 
play and Duke coach Tom Harp warned the 
officials it was coming. Duke eventually won 
17-13. 

See you after vacation. Have a Merry Christ- 




Photo credit— Dave Thomas 

Del. Vol. B-Ball crushed Eastern 
Baptist but let Drexel slip by. 



PATRONIZE 

"FURROW" 

ADVERTISERS 



Aggie Grapplers 

Lose First Match 

The Lycoming wrestlers swamped the Aggies in their first match of 
the season 27-8. The visiting Lycoming team nad seven returning letter- 
men, contrary to only three returning lettermen on the Aggie team. 
Lycoming won eight of the ten matches. The Aggie fans didn't have 
much to cheer for until the 158 pound weight class, where DVC's 
Harry Heiser met Lycoming's Dave Johnson. Dave Johnson was a MAC 
champ his freshman year and has a total collegiate record of 31-3-2. 
Harry gave Johnson a fine match, and only lost 4-2 in a match that could 
have gone either way. DVC's first win came from freshman Ray Johnson 
at 167 weight class. Ray is a good hustler and won the match 4-2 in the 
last 16 seconds with a takedown. The other DVC win came from the 
Aggie Captain Bill Thorne at heavyweight. Bill took advantage of an 
injury of Leonard Moyer and forced the referee to stop the match on de- 
fault. On December 9th the Aggies will travel to Huntingdon, Pa. to 
meet the Indians of Juniata. 

Weight Score 



118— R. Jennings, DVC— 1 

D. Webster, L— 5 
126— G. Cummins, DVC— S 

D. Hopper, L — 11 
134— J. Hopper, DVC— 3 

T. Croyle, L — 9 
142— J. Schlener, DVC— 3 

T. Lewis, L — 8 
150— B. Franklin, DVC— 2 

G. Zellney, L — 5 
158— H. Heiser, DVC— 2 

D. Johnson, L — 4 
167— R. Johnson, DVC— 4 

P. Chambers, L— 2 
177— Forfeit— DVC 

A. March, L— 6 
190— L. Eizenhart, DVC— 

D. Miller, h-3 
H.W.— W. Thome, DVC— 6 
L. Smoyer — Default 



Lycoming 


DVC 


3 




3 




3 




3 




3 




3 






a 


6 




3 






5 


27 


8 



Mention 

"The Furrow" 

When You Shop 



_j 



1 



Happ & Son 
Realtors 

141 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Area Code 215 i 348-3578 



f i 



*T*:*v 



p 



J 



Photo credit— Dave Thomas 

Aggie mat-men started the season 
off with a 27-8 loss to Lycoming 
but they've promised to do better 
against the Indians of Juniata. 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 




Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 



the 




ROW 



Vol. 16, No. 8 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College 0/ Science and Agriculture 



January 16, 1970 



Editor Retires 

Mr. John D. Martin, Editor of 
the student newspaper, The Fur- 
row, for nearly two years, has re- 
tired as provided in a new consti- 
tution which has been approved by 
the staff and its advisors and which 
will be presented to Student Go- 
vernment for their endorsement. 

Under the new constitution a 
new editor is elected by The Fur- 
row staff in January of each year. 
This election process is similar to 
that used at other colleges and 
universities and will eliminate 
many of the difficulties that have 
been encounted in the past by new 
editors when they try to start from 
scratch in the fall. 

Copies of this revised Publica- 
tions constitution, which will re- 
place the obsolete one if it is adopt- 
ed by S.G., will be posted on cam- 
pus bulletin boards for students to 
examine. 

The Furrow Staff in its first 
election for editor under its new 
constitution choose Mr. Michael 
Morgan to head the staff until 
January 71. Mike has been asso- 
ciated with the paper for a number 
of years and has served in several 
capacities including Photography 
Editor and Associate Editor. 

John Martin will remain connect- 
ed with the Furrow staff, writing 
features and special material and 
assisting Mike with any problems 
should they arise. 

The staff would like to take this 
opportunity to thank it's editor of 
two years, John D. Martin for his 
dedicated service to Publications, 
and the College as a whole. He has 
given unstintingly of his time and 
energy to try to produce a college 
newspaper the students of this 
College can be proud of and he has 
helped considerably in the pro- 
gressive development of publica- 
tions on this campus. 

Captains Named 
At Sports Banquet 

On December 11 Delaware Valley 
College held its annual fall sports banquet 
at the Doylestown Country Club. The 
outstanding performers for the football 
and cross country teams were cited and 
presented with their respective awards. 
Next year's captains were also announced. 

Don Stump, the Levittown senior and 
co-captain, received the President's Award 
along with a portrait of himself for being 
selected the best all-around performer 
for the season. The all-MAC end was also 
selected as the best defensve player. 
(Continued on page 3) 



'Sec" Scores 
His 1,000th 

Don Sechler, the 6*11" junior 
basketball captain, scored his 
1,000th point against Millersville in 
the Central Bucks Jaycees Holiday 
tourney. 

He accomplished the feat when 
he tallied his 14th point in the 
second half. He finished with a 
game high of 32 points. 

Sechler, who now ranks second 
in the Aggies' all-time scoring race, 
moved into the second spot with a 
season high of 33 points in the loss 
to Elizabethtown College for a 
career total of 1,059. 

Delaware Valley's basketballers 
have had a 31-21 record since big 
"Sec" has been in the lineup. Don 
has lead the team to the MAC 
playoffs the past two seasons with 
1968 being DVC's best season with 
a 14-6 record. Sechler was selected 
first team All-MAC for two years 
and also first team Suburban Phila- 
delphia Small College All-Stars in 
his frosh year. 



The following 


are 


the members 


of the 1,000 point 


club: 




Richard Prins 




'58 


1482 


Donald Sechler 




71 


1059 


Bill Eisel III 




'69 


1052 


David Bjornson 




'59 


1022 


James Lipari 




'53 


1014 




Don Sechler dunks another bail at the 
Juniata game. He is the second highest 
scorer of the 1,000 point club. 



Constructive Analysis 

Of Student Store's 

Problems 

The Student Store isn't a regular 
busines in economic theory. It sup- 
plies the needs of a college popu- 
lation. The following analysis of the 
student store is therefore unique. 

In the present situation the store 
seems to be lacking in four general 
areas: location, pricing policies, 
merchandise, and services. In es- 
sence all four have an effect on the 
number of customers, which deter- 
mines the volume of sales, which 
ultimately determines the profit 
and prosperity of the store. General 
emphasis on all four factors or con- 
centrated action on any one func- 
tion may save the store from lack 
of utility and efficiency. 

LOCATION 

The student store is in about the 
best possible location. Yet it doesn't 
encourage browsing. In my opin- 
ion a generating unit such as a stu- 
dent union, recreation hall or sim- 
ilar structure may increase sales 
and an overall concern for the 
store among customers. It is upon 
this assumption that I will base 
my theories and conclusions. 

The location in Ulman Hall al- 
lows a regulated traffic flow from 
the dining hall to dorms, and 
dorms to class rooms. It is obvious 
that the store looses purchasing 
power from administration and sal- 
aried personnel. A student union 
offering recreation, and food facili- 
ties for both students and faculty 
would add prospective buyers. 
Commuting students are not great- 
ly using the commuter lunch room 
adjacent to the student store. 

PRICING POLICIES 

In reviewing the prices of a few 
local stores one can see the vast 
difference in identical items. Grant- 
ed these are established retailers 
with high sales volume and dis- 
counts. If students would go to a 
union rather than to town, pur- 
chases would more likely be made 
in the student store in the building. 

In my opinion students are will- 
ing to travel to purchase items that 
are available in the student store. 
This is the wav they come into con- 
tact with otner factors such as 
amusement and art which is not 
offered at D.V.C. A student union 
would provide the recreation and 
art. 

One of the major drawbacks in 
the store's pricing is the lack of 
(Continued on page 2) 



3tcck and Szldle 
2W«j IPett 

The Livestock Judging Team 
ranked 29th out of 36 at the Inter- 
national Inter-collegiate Livestock 
Judging contest at the International 
Livestock Show. The team was 19th 
in the beef division, which is one 
of the highest placings of the Dela- 
ware Valley College Team. They 
were 27th in the swine division. 

The team members were David 
Sollenberger, John Reed, Richard 
La Bonge, Richard Baum, and Ro- 
bert Mickel. The team members' 
standings are in the order in which 
names are listed. La Bonge was top 
in the beef division, Sollenberger 
was first in the sheep judging, and 
Mickel was the best judge in swine. 
In comparsion to former teams, the 
1969 team scored 150 points higher 
at Chicago than the team did in 
1968. They also showed much im- 
provement as they made the best 
performances of the year. 

The trip was a great opportunity 
for the eight team members and 
Dr. Pelle. The general consensus 
of the team was that the trip to 
the Allied Mills Research Center 
was the most interesting, \fter a 
drill in judging several classes of 
swine, the team was given a guided 
tour of the swine center and the 
beef center. The Grand Champion 
Steer Show and beef shows were 
also high points of the hip. 

The Stockyard Inn was the site 
of the meeting of t h e National 
Block and Bridle Club. It was at- 
tended bv Dr. Pelle, Robert Mickel, 
Dave Sollenberger, and John Bame. 
The speaker was Dr. Dean Acker, 
Dean of Agriculture at South 
Dakota State University. The topic 
was 'The Importance of Depart- 
mental Clubs in the Total Function 
o fthe Department". In this speech, 
he stressed four purposes of a club: 
1 ) to meet faculty, 2 ) to meet otber 
students, 3) permit the faculty to 
know the students, and 4) to be- 
come acquainted with the Animal 
Industry. He also pointed out that 
every club should strive to initiate 
activities that would benefit other 
school clubs. 

The speaker at the January 7th 
meeting of our Block and Bridle 
Club was Paul Hann of the Ralston- 
Purina company. He spoke on "New 
Techniques in Beef Production and 
Feeding". This was the last meeting 
of the first semester. 



N-O-T-l-C-E 

January 30th is the deadline for 
articles, pictures, and ads for the 
Feb. 6th issue. Material handed 
in before semester break is ap- 
preciated. Give material to Mike 
Morgan in Dorm I Room 220, or 
Bob Edwards in 312 Ulman 
Dorm. 




Page Two 



THE FURROW 



January 16, 1970 



How To Improve 
The Student Store 

Retailing is the sale of goods or articles individually or in small 
quantities to the consumer. The relation between the D.V.C. student 
store and its customers is an important relationship. It is important to 
note that the majority of off-campus sudents shop in their student store 
about once every two months. The purpose of this paper is to make 
constructive criticisms that might make it easier for off-campus students 
to shop in the student store. 

Note that at least one fourth of the students enrolled at Delaware 
Valley College live off-campus. Also the majority of the commuting 
students are married and belong to a working force; and some have 
families. If the store retailed a specific line of goods for families, wives, 
and children it would bring them into the store. 

The majority of commuting students feel that the store hours should 
vary. A solution might be to hire students to work from 10:00 a.m. to 
3:00 p.m. out of the profits. And in the future the store might consider 
opening a snack shop for students who don't want to leave the campus 
for lunch or for those on-campus students who do not want to eat in the 
cafeteria. 

An expansion of size would permit a greater variety of merchandise. 
Many students agree that the store's prices are not too high. This point 
indicates .prices could be increased to pay for more clerks without ad- 
versely affecting selling. The quality of the merchandise is felt to be good 
and the management is capable or handling it adequately at its present 
level and size. 

Off-campus students feel that the store should be open for special 
events. This would increase sales volume and spread the word about 
Delaware Valley College through the use of the goods. A price list might 
be sent to alumni to make them aware of products available that repre- 
sent their institution of higher learning. Such a list would be convenient 
for student who wish to compare prices and for alumni who want to 
make purchases by mail. 

Students suggest that the store do away with greeting cards, take on 
local newspapers and magazines, and handle special orders for students 
at special prices. 

The majority of the students feel that the store is well run and well 
organized. The store needs to grow and off-campus students feel it is 
about time the students start making up their minds and doing things 
for themselves. 

Editor's Note: This paper has been condensed from a paper written 
by John Hurley and Robert Morgan. It is much shorter, but I hope their 
main ideas are accurately presented. The views and opinions are those 
of the original writers. 



STAN ROWERS 

MEN'S STORE 

Van Heusen • Farah 
Shirts Slacks 

PBM Suits • Botany 500 

19 N. Main Doylestown 



KERSHNER'S 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 




*Jke Juztow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 

EDITOt Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Bob Edw.rdi 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Loo Hogyoi 

PHOTO EDITOR Day* Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parkor 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ue Stratabargor 

BUSINESS MANAGER David Toichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dalbort Jonoa 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 

Sol Cavinesa, John Fvrphy, Bill Strode, Allen Gordon, Larry Martel, Walt Ault, 
Abbott Lee, Dave Swatak, Howard/Henderton, Bruce Richarda, Bruce Gieie. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joaoph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Mortx 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



Constructive Analysis 

(Continued from page 1) 
promotion or simple listing of prices. The use of a fUer or notification of prices would 
make people aware of what is offered and at what price. It may change some minds 
to buy instead of driving to town and comparing prices. Also, notification of discount 
sales during certain periods could cause more profit for the store. 
MERCHANDISE 

A definite problem with the current product line is its lack of depth. The 
monopoly of the clothing line and variety line, jewelry novelties, in D.V.C.-oriented 
goods could cause a lack of buyers. Possibly lines of identical character but without 
the school name, seal, or trademarks would offer the customer a wider variety to 
choose from. Many upperclassmen have filled their supply of D.V.C. shirts, coats, 
glasses and trinkets and would be willing to purchase one that has no application to 
D.V.C. 

In examining the store one is amazed at the lack of high-turnover items. If a 
store relies on low turnover it must operate on few purchases of highly marked-up 
items. In my opinion the student store has saturated its inventory witn low turnover 
items and is not balancing it with a sufficient supply if high turnover items. 
SERVICES 

Possibly the only field in which the store excells is in the service function. It 
seems that more people come in for change than for goods. A hostility exists between 
customers and store employees. Possibly a solution is to locate the proposed change 
machine in the student store. A changing unit could sooth relations as well as help 
generate customers. 

Sometimes a customer will patronize a store because of service available. 
Tickets for student functions have not in my three years at the College been sold in 
advance in the student store. Customers might decide to buy other merchandise or 
get an idea of the capacity of the store while buying advance tickets there. 

Such a service as credit is not highly impossible. The best solution would be to 
collect large amounts of cash in the beginning of the school year or after long vaca- 
tion breaks when large cash amounts are not unconnon and when customers are 
willing to relinquish cash without hurting their financial condition. 

Finally I feel the major weakness in the service field is the available store hours 
of the student store. 

As of now the store hours are 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and a few special hours during special events. The main 
problem of limited hours is the lack of available personnel. Possibly hiring more 
clerks could aid the success. It is obvious that the store is not in a financial condition 
to hire a large number of personnel but increased sales means more profit and more 
money to pay clerks. With the adaptation of a student union, an employee shuttle 
system could eliminate long hours for limited personnel and add to the number of 
hours the store is open to potential customers. 
CONCLUSION 

My consideration of a generating unit is idealistic, yet it is obvious that the 
College as well as the store is lacking in some type of meeting hall where one can 
study or relax, which would aid the school as well as the situation of the store. The 
pricing policies are strict and the managers are obviously unwilling to gamble with 
sales promotion, which hinders growth. It is about time to take a mk, to make a 
profitable venture out of the student store. On top of this, the fluctuations of manage- 
ment in the store over the past four years have thwarted any positive advancement. 

Editor's Note: This paper has been condensed from a paper written by David 
Rayner. It is much shorter, but I hope his main ideas are accurately presented. The 
views and opinions are those of the original writer. 




Mention 

"The Furrow" 

When You Shop 



Dr. John D. Bulger was eagerly re- 
ceived by students and faculty in a 
recent assembly. His program, Wild 
Rtvers, proved to us there is a lot of 
waste in our natural resources. Dr. 
Bulger is a widely recognized expert 
on wildlife photography. 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

@€Wtotf& 

$ecvele%& 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 




Have You CONSIDERED A 
Career In the Food 
Processing Industry? 

Consider our Sales! 

Consider our Products! 

Consider our Growth! 

Consider the Opportunity! 

And You'll Be Sure To 

CONSIDER Visiting Us At 

David Levin Dining Hall on 
January 29, February 3, 4, and 6. 

or contact 
David L Jeffries 
Oscar Mayer and Co. 
P. 0. Box 8078 
Phila., Pa. 19101 
(215) HO 5-9000 



January 16, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEQYES 



Stoadwajf 
jheU Tineet 

Former Aggie gridiron great John Nice 
played a major role for Indianapolis in 
the Continental Football League cham- 
pionship game. 

Nice, running out of the fullback spot, 
rambled 13 yds. with 13 seconds left in 
a sudden-death overtime to give Indiana- 
polis a 44-38 victory over San Antonio 
and the championship. He also scored 
earlier in the game on a 3 yd. run. 

Did you know that Joe Namath had 
his first knee problems here in Doyles- 
town? 

In his hook, "I Can't Wait Until Tom- 
morrow, 'Cauce I Get Better Looking 
Every Day" (Random House, Inc.), 
written by Namath and Dick Schaap, 
Broadway Joe mentions: "My problems 
with my legs go back a long time, back 
to when I was about seven years old and 
I traveled with the baseball team my 
brother was playing on. The team com- 
peted in some kind of state tournament 
in Doylestown, Penn., all the way across 
the state from Beaver Falls, and my 
father and I made the trip. 

I got sick in Doylestown. My legs 
started to hurt something terrible, and I 
rati a high fever. My fattier was afraid I 
was coming down with polio. He took me 
to a doctor in Doylestown, and the 
doctor gave me a prescription, and the 
members of my brother's team took turns 
staying with me all night to give me my 
medicine. 

« The fever finally broke, and my legs 
felt better, until the following spring, 
when they started killing me again." 

The skiing season is now upon us. 
People who ski in New Jersey can send 
for a comprehensive listing of the various 
ski centers throughout New Jersey. Titled 
"New Jersey Ski Areas," the booklet in- 
cludes locations, hours, fees, number of 
lifts, length of trails etc. Copies can be 
obtained by writing the Bureau of Re- 
creation, New Jersey Department of Con- 
servation and Economic Development, 
Box 1240, Trenton, New Jersey 08625. 

The word "Fan", otherwise known as 
an enthusiastic devotee of a sport, is 
derived from the word "fanatic". 

Who's going to be the No. 1 draft 
choice in the professional football draft 
this month? Heisman Trophy winner 
Steve Owens? Maybe. It could well be 
Terry Bradshaw, a 6-foot-3 quarterback 
who, many pro scouts say, has the strong- 
est passing arm in college today. While 
E laying for Louisiana Tech, Bradshaw 
as dominated the NCAA's college divi- 
sion statistics for the past few years. 

The Usherettes at the new Philadel- 
phia stadium will sport miniskirts this 
spring. Maybe this will help bring up 
the league's worst attendance. 

Football Captains 

Other football award winners were 
Eugene Wallace, who received the Out- 
standing Lineman Award and the Ross 
Triol Memorial Award, Wayne Mahelick, 
who was the recipient or the Loyalty 
Award, and junior Don Chance, who re- 
ceived the Outstanding Back Award. 

Howard Henderson, the cross country 
captain, received the Outstanding Harrier 
Award symbolic of the top cross country 
runner. 

The football captains that were an- 
nounced were Fred Jannotti on defense 
and Donald Chance on offense. John 
Ahearn was voted as the cross country 
captain for next year. 

In all, 34 football varsity letters and 7 
cross country letters were awarded. 



Eisenhart's Come-Back 

Not Enough 

To Spark Victory 

On Dec. 9 the DVC wrestling team 
traveled 200 miles west to Huntington, 
Pa., and met the Indians of Juniata. The 
two teams could not have been more 
evenly matched. It was a close match 
all the way. Wins for the Aggies were 
chalked up by George Cummings, John 
Hopper, Brent Franklin, Ray Johnson, 
ana Larry Eisenhart. The most surprising 
wrestler of the evening was Larry Eisen- 
hart at 190 who cams from a 6-0 deficit 
to pin his opponent in 6 min. 42 sec. 
Both teams won five matches each but 
the margin of victory came with Juniata 
pinning twice and DVC pinning once. 
The final score was 17-19. 

On Dec. 13, Western Maryland visited 
DVC to hand our grapplers their third 
loss. Wins for DVC were registered by 
Jim Buck, George Cummings, Harry Hei- 
ser, and Captain Bill Thome. Jim Buck, 
at 118, broke into the lineup for the 
first time and scored a strong 4-1 victory 
over his opponent. George Cummings got 
his second win and he looks better with 
each win. Harry Heiser had good hustle 
and the stamina needed to hold his 
battling opponent down for the last two 
minutes to win his match 4-2. Bill Thome 
took his last week's loss out on Western 
Maryland and won his match 8-2. 

TEAM SCORING 

DVC W. Md. 
118— J. Buck, DVC— 4 3 

J. Schartner, WM— 1 
126— G. Cummins, DVC— 5 

D. Obrien, WM— 2 3 
134— J. Hopper, DVC— 

G. Scholl, WM— 10 3 

142— J. Schlener, DVC— 2 

T. Conover, WM — 8 3 

150— B. Franklin, DVC— 5 

A. Blake, WM— 6 3 

158— H. Heiser, DVC— 4. 3 

T. Barnes, WM— 2 
167— J. Parks, DVC— 2 

W. Gibson, WM— 10 3 

177— R.Johnson, DVC 

R. Schmertzler, WM 5 

pinned in 2:55 
190— L. Eisenhart, DVC— 2 

F. Klemle, WM-^1 3 

HW— B. Tome, DVC— 6 3 

L. Cronce, WM— 2 

12 20 

TEAM SCORING 

DVC Juniata 
118— R. Jennings, DVC— 7 

J. Massingham, J — 12 3 

126— G. Cummings, DVC— 6 3 

J. McCartney, J — 1 
1 34— J . Hopper, DVC— 7 3 

M. McCartney, J — 1 
142— J. Schlener, DVC 

T. Light, J 5 

pinned in 6:81 
150— B. Franklin, DVC— 3 3 

J. Civitts, J— 
158— H. Heiser, DVC— 6 

R. ElwellJ— 14 3 

167— J. Parks, DVC— 4 

D. Greening, J — 6 3 

177— R. Johnson, DVC— 6 3 

S. Taylod, J— 3 
190— L. Eisenhart 5 

pinned in 7:45 
HW-B. Thome, DVC 

P. Schuyler 5 

pinned in 3:00 

17 19 

Aggies Flattened 
By Profs 

by Tom Pyle 

Ian. 7. The Aggie matmen, who are 
still looking for their season's first victory, 
dropped a decision to previously-winless 
Glassboro by a 32-8 score. 

The Aggies' Jim Buck (118) was 
awarded a forfeit victory in the opening 
match to get Del Val off to a good start, 
but Glassboro won the next three match- 
es. Then the Aggies' Brent Franklin de- 
cisioned the Profs' Gerald Gullens, 5-2, 
(Continued at top next column) 



in the 150 pound class for the Aggies' 
only other win. 

The Profs, who won eight of the ten 
bouts, are now 1-2 while the Aggies are 
0-4 on the campaign. 
118— James Buck, DVC won by forfeit. 
126 — Mike Waters, GSC, decisioned Ron 

Jennings, 11-8 
134 — George McArthur, GSC, pinned 

John Hopper, 3:21 
142— Dean Orris, GSC, pinned 

Jim Schlener, 4:30 
150— Brent Franklin, DVC decisioned 

Gerald Cullens, 5-2 
158— Bill Kling, GSC, decisioned 

Harry Heiser, 15-13 
167— John Villecco, GSC, pinned 

Raynard Johnson, 6:40 
177 — Derek Guyton, GSC, pinned 

Ken Sturm, 4:24 
190 — Van Lynch, GSC, decisioned 

Larry Eisenhart, 11-4 
Heavy — Dave Kortz, GSC, decisioned 

Bill Thome, 7-4 

Lead Turns 
To Loss 

Jan. 10 The Crusaders of Susque- 
hanna University, using a ten point surge 
late in the game, defeated the Aggies 
83-73. 

Coach Silan, using a starting lineup of 
Sechler, Varga, Schade, McEntee and 
Guers, watched as the Aggies never trail- 
ed in the first half except for the first 
bucket scored by Susquehanna. 

The first half was sparked by the play 
of Lou Varga, Don Sechler ana sub Tom 
Wentzel as the Aggies built up an eight- 
point lead, their largest of the game, 
with 1:50 remaining in the half. The 
half ended with the Aggies leading by 
a 37-33 score. 

The second half was a different story. 
The DVC five gradually lost its lead 
and with 8:47 remaining in the contest 
the Crusaders went ahead by a point, 
59-58. 

With 7:40 to go Susqeuhanna scored 
the first two of ten straight points that 
put the cover on the game until Ralph 
White pumped in a jumper to put the 
score at 70-60. 

Then in the closing minutes buckets 
by Sechler, Teeple and Dan Guers pro- 
vided a litde excitement as it looked 
like the Aggies would come back. But 
the Crusaders continued to score easily. 

The final score was 83-73. The lose 
was D.V.C.'s fourth straight league set- 
back with now puts our league record 
at 2-5 (4-7 overall). 

The junior varsity squad, coached by 
Frank Wolfgang, held on to a 41-31 lead 
at the half to defeat the Crusader JV's 
by a 71-64 score. 

Delaware Valley College 

FG F T 

McEntee 3 0-0 6 

Sechler 6 5-7 17 

Polinsky 2 1-2 5 

Wentzel 3 0-0 6 

Schade 1 0-0 2 

Teeple 1 0-0 2 

Richardson 0-0 

Guers 6 3-7 15 

White 2 0-0 4 

Varga 6 0-0 12 

Zenko 1 2-2 4 



73 



hosts capitalized on a couple of Aggie 
turnovers to widen the margin to 58-50. 

With only a few minutes showing on 
the clock the Aggies sliced the lead to 
three but they couldn't get any closer 
as E-town held on for the victory. 

Ralph White and Dan Guers also 
scored in double figures for Aggies with 
12 and 11, respectively. 

The team's overall record now stands 
at 4-8 for the season. Elizabethtown also 
won the junior varsity contest by a 75-69 
score. 

Delaware Valley 

G F T 

Sechler 14 5-5 33 

McEntee 2 1-1 5 

Polinsky 0-0 

Wentzel 1-1 1 

Teeple 2 0-0 4 

Schade 3 0-0 6 

Guers 4 3-8 11 

White 6 0-2 12 

Richardson 1-1 1 

Varga 2 0-0 4 

TOTALS 33 11-18 77 



Richardson 

Mock 

Allen 

Snyder 

Danahle 



Elizabethtown 
G 
11 

8 

2 

3 
9 



TOTALS 33 



F 
2-4 
2-7 
4-5 
8-9 
0-1 
16-26 



T 

24 

18 

8 

14 

18 

82 



D. V. C. Host 

Holiday 
Tournament 

Delaware Valley College was host to 
a Holiday Basketball Tournament on De- 
cember 29 and 30. There were four 
teams in the tournament: Lycoming, 
Millersville, Glassboro, and DVC. The 
first game of the tournament was Lycom- 
ing vs. Millersville. Millersville kept a 
steady lead and came out on top, 90-81. 
In the next game DVC tttct Glassboro. 
The Aggies had an easy wm (115-84). 
The top scorers for DVC were Bob Mc- 
Entee, with 19 points, and Don Sechler, 
with 17. In the second day of the tour- 
nament the two losing teams and the 
two winning teams met to determine the 
final standings among the four teams. In 
the consolation game Glassboro beat Ly- 
coming 83-79. DVC met Millersville in 
the championship game. Don Sechler 
played an outstanding game, leading the 
floor with 32 points. But it wasn't enough 
to pull the Aggies over Millersville in 
their 89-80 defeat. 

On January 3 DVC met PMC. PMC 
had a good defense which held the Ag- 
gies to 45 points. The top scorer of the 
game was freshman Bob Polinsky with 
10 points. 

DVC PMC 

McEntee 7 Geter 10 

Sechler 8 Studzinuski 9 

Polinsky 10 Kulbok 6 

Shade 1 Zyla 8 

Teeple 7 Nieland 4 

Richardson 6 Bardenbeger 3 

Guers 2 Rice 23 

Zenko - Kins 2 

Devlin 4 Ruhno 2 

— Flager 5 

45 Pahls 5 



77 





Susquehanna 








FG 


F 


T 


Bolick 


11 


5-7 


27 


Scherer 


4 


5-9 


13 


Mroz 


4 


4-4 


12 


Freeland 


6 


8-8 


20 


Sullivan ... 


5 


3-4 


13 



83 



E-Town Downs Del Val 

Jan. 7. Don Sechler's season high of 
33 points was not enough as Elizabeth- 
town College downed the Aggies 82-77. 

Dedicating their new new, E-town used 
only five players in the contest as they 
surged to a 44-34 half time lead. 

In the second half Del- Val cut E-towns 
lead to only four points (54-50) but the 
(Continued at top next column) 




This is how the campus appeared at 
the time of the Holiday Basketball 
Tournament. 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



January 16, 1970 




Students enjoy the coffee and donuts 
after giving blood at the Red Cross 
annual Christinas blood drive. 222 
pints were given, 22 above this year's 
goal. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



• R«»d and Barton — Lwnt — 
Wallace - Starling, ate. 

• Omaf a — longinat — 
Accurron, ate. 

Watch - Clock - Jawalry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phona 348-9021 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 



348-5072 



DOYLESTOWN 18901 




The D.V.C. Band with the D.V.C. Glee Club presented a tour by music. Anchors 
Aweigh, a favorite of Dr. Work was a choice selection. During the Christmas 
program Dr. Feldstein was named an honorary member of the Band. 



GAUDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. State Street 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• Custom Made Jewelry 
A Specialty 

• Watch and Jewelry Repair 
348-4675 Doylestown, Pa. 



PATRONIZE 

"FURROW" 

ADVERTISERS 




Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



1 rlEs rUKKUW 

VOL. 17 
1970 



the 




Vol. 17, No. 1 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



February 6, 1970 



Sophomore Class 
Makes Plans 

The plans for the 1970 Spring 
Concert, sponsored by the class of 
72, are moving along on schedule. 
The tickets have been ordered and 
will go on sale at the beginning of 
the second semester. They will sell 
for $4.50 per ticket and will be 
available from any class member. 
This is a real bargain; $4.50 to hear 
the "Grass Roots" and also a solid 
rock group, "Walden Pond." The 
concert is on April 4 at 8 p.m. 

At the class meeting on Decem- 
ber 10, it was decided that the class 
will have a full page ad in the 
Cornucopia. Attendance at the 
meeting was poor, and it was de- 
cided to form a class council to ad- 
minister the duties of the class. It 
will be comprised of those students 
interested in what their class is 
doing with their money. All those 
interested should attend the next 
class meeting on February 11 at 
7:30 p.m. in Allman Hall. The 
council will then meet at regularly 
scheduled dates. 

Circle K Christmas 
Fund Drive A 
True Success 

The Circle K Club of Delaware 
Valley College would like to ex- 
press their sincere thanks to the 
Faculty, Administration, students, 
Student Government, and all others 
who contributed to the Christmas 
Fund Drive. 

On Tuesday, December 23, 1969, 
two Circle K members and two 
other DelVal students conducted a 
modern version of the Super-Mar- 
ket Sweep and purchased enough 
food to give six families in the area 
a very pleasant Christmas meal. It 
is hard to imagine that such pov- 
erty exists in our society today. Be- 
ing able to give a little happiness 
to someone on Christmas was a 
very rewarding experience and the 
personnel of Delaware Valley Col- 
lege can be proud that they con- 
tributed to a meaningful cause. The 
people to which the food was given 
were simply overwhelmed, especi- 
ally the cnildren. The Circle K 
would again like to express our ap- 
preciation for your generosity. 



Time For A 
Student Union 

by Bruce Richards 

Students of Delaware Valley 
College, how long has it been since 
you had a place to go, beside your 
room, between classes? Commuting 
students, where do you go between 
classes? How long has it been since 
you had any place to meet in a 
group and talk? How long has it 
been since you could get anything 
to eat on campus during the day 
or night? Just what do you do at 
night when your homework is com- 
plete? Do you not, indeed, find the 
four green walls of your room bor- 
ing? Students of Delaware Valley 
College, I am hereby proposing a 
Student Union! 

This Student Union should go 
into effect with all deliberate speed. 
It should be a non-profit institution. 
It should also be separate from the 
Student Government. However, all 
members of Student Government 
are encouraged to help win the 
Union for all students. I would like 
to see the Student Government 
work for the students on this. 

As for the building, the present 
Library Annex will be vacated 
when the new library building is 
complete. Though rather small, it 
is a start. However, a much better 
Union could be in Penn Hall. 

I have questioned at least 250 
students on the Student Union. The 
overwhelming majority are in com- 
plete support of the Student Union. 
There is even a small group that is 
willing to work on it and run it. It 
is the opinion of these men, and 
myself, that not only the students 
but also the College would benefit 
from such a Student Union. 

The Student Union would pro- 
vide a place for gathering and so- 
cializing. The time has come for 
Del. Val. There must be such a 
place. The lounges are mainly for 
study. If you tire of the same green 
walls of your room and you go to 
a lounge to talk, you disturb some- 
one who is studying. So where do 
you go? Student Union. The Union 
would solve all problems. The 
dorms would quiet down, the 
lounges could be used by those 
who wish to study in some com- 
fort, and the Union would be the 
gathering place. 

Del. Val. must have a Student 
Union! We must have it now. How- 
ever, we need the support of the 
entire student body. Stuff the Stu- 
dent Government Suggestion Box 
with ballots for support. 



Work 
Available 

About this time every year, Sen- 
iors who don't have jobs yet will 
begin to use the placement office. 
It's a crime that they haven't 
started sooner. They have missed 
job interviews, passed-up dead- 
lines for applications, ana missed 
opportunities. 

Attending the job interviews rel- 
evant to your field of interest can 
be an advantage. You will gain ex- 
perience from the interviews. You 
will better know what to expect, 
what questions will be asked of 
you, what questions to ask the in- 
terviewer. You will be more at ease 
and make a better impression. 

The Graduate Placement Office 
is open Monday through Friday 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have 
any questions, Mrs. Tongyai will 
be glad to help you. She is located 
in the next office. Information re- 
quest forms are on a table in the 
placement office if Mrs. Tongyai 
isn't available when you are there. 

Take advantage of what is avail- 
able to you. It's much easier getting 
a job now when the recruiters are 
coming to you. There are many ap- 
plications available for your use, 
including: 

Federal Service Entrance 
Examination Applications 

Pennsylvania Civil Service 
Applications 

City of Philadelphia Service 

Test Applications (to be given 
the second week of February) 

Graduate Record Examination 
Applications 

Admission Test for Gradaute 
Study in Business 

Much information is there con- 
cerning graduate schools. A Grad- 
uate Catalog Library is there to 
help. On one table is a heap of in- 
formation on getting Assistantships 
and Fellowships from Graduate 
Schools. 

Seniors hunting permanent jobs 
should check the company recruit- 
ment notices. They are filed in a 
notebook for reference. Extra 
copies are laying in the table for 
your convenience. If you are still 
having trouble finding a job, do it 
the modern way. See Mrs. Tongyai 
for the use of the free Computer 
Job Finder. 

There is a bookcase full of infor- 
mation about various companies. 
Take a look when you can. 




Photo Credit: D. Thomas 
"Got a groovy thing going" 

Thinking about teaching? The 
information is available for teach- 
er's certification in the following 
states: 

Connecticut 

Pennsylvania 

New York 

New Jersey 
Underclassmen can find summer 
jobs, especially with the Federal 
Government. These could lead to a 
permanent job with higher starting 
salaries. 

There is no reason for any grad- 
uate to leave here without a job. 
The information is available, the 
recruiters are coming. Don t sit in 
your room and complain ... get 
busy and get it done. 



Recruiters' Schedule 

February 8th - 13th 

February 9 — 

George A. Hormel & Co. 

Statistical Quality Control-Prod. 

Dev. -Sales-Prod. Mgmt. 

F. I.; Chem; Bus. Ad. 

Recruitment held in Conference 

Room Lasker Hall 

New Holland Div. of Sperry Rand 

Field Sales — Field Service — 

Accounting — Marketing Research 

Recruitment held in Lounge of 

tfie David Levin Dining Hall 
February 10 — 

Geigy Agriculture Chemical Div. 
February 11 — 

Grant Heilman— CANCELLED 
February 12 — 

F. A. Bartlert Tree Expert Co. 

Sales Rep. Hort. and O. H. 
February 13 — 

Agway, Inc. 

Ag. Majors or Bus. Ad. 




DLLAWARL 

VALLEY 

COLLLUL 



Photo Credit: D. Thomas 

Delaware Valley College was nearly 
buried under snow until the recent 
thaw. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



February 6, 1970 



- LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - 
Rebuttal From Mr. Furphy 

January 29, 1970 
Dear Mr. Richards, 

May I ask you where you re- 
ceived your information that a mil- 
lion and a half people were in 
Washington, D. C. protesting on 
November 15. According to the 
news media quoting both the police 
and the leaders of the Moratorium 
the estimates were between 500,- 
000 and 800,000. Your statement 
that the news media blew the vio- 
lence way out of proportion is stu- 
pid. My last letter win give you my 
reason for saying this. I do not 
believe I should need to repeat it. 

As for a few people being a 
"serious threat" to the thinking of 
the majority of the people, that 
is nothing but foolishness. I would 
like to know how you can call a 
few thousand people "the majority 
of young people?" You must realize 
that our government is run by 
people elected by the people and 
it t n u s represents the people in 
their actions. Being a democracy 
we elect by majority vote and we 
should back winners of such elec- 
tions. 

No, I do not believe in any 
bloodletting in Vietnam, Biafra, Ire- 
land or Israel but I do believe in 
freedom for all. I do not hate every- 
body who does not believe what I 
believe in. If that were so then 
everyone who wanted the Kansas 
City Chiefs to win the Super Bowl 
Came is my bitter enemy and I 
hate them. Don't you think every 
man serving in the Armed Forces 
wants peace? Do you think it is 
fun to be away from home, away 
from your loved ones? No, Mr. 
Richards, it is not. But it is better 
to be away for a little while than 
not to have a home to come back to. 

Yes, I did have a nice big meal 
at Thanksgiving and I did realize 
that throughout the world people 
were dying from wars and starva- 
tion, more so, I think, than you 
appreciate it because I have seen 
how people live in many parts of 
the world. Have you???? 

As I said to Mr. Kamison, 
"PEACE" 
John A. Furphy, Class of 72 



Mention "THE FURROW" 
When You Shop 



KERSHNER'S 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



January 29, 1970 
Dear Mr. Kamison, 

Animosity — no, Mr. Kamison but I do 
feel sorry. Sorry for people who do not 
know wr^ they have in this country. 
Sorry for those who do know but who 
feel they do not have to defend. You, 
like the others who have tried to rebut 
me, have misquoted me. I did not say 
that the Moratorium was a farce. If you 
will read my first letter over again and 
not read what you want to hear into it 
you will realize this. 

My last letter to Mr. Dave Evans I 
also ask you to read. It will answer some 
of your statements. I would like to answer 
a few of your statements here though. 

First of all I was in the Navy and 
not the Army. If I were you, I would 
not state that people in the service are 
programmed to think because do not for- 
get that some servicemen are in your 
ranks. If you say that being in the Army 
is the same as being in the Navy then, 
son, your way of thinking, is programmed 
not mine. Just so you do not make the 
same mistake again, I will give you a 
little English lesson. When talking in 
general about servicemen of our country, 
they are referred to as the Armed Forces 
of the United States. The Navy, the 
Marine Corps, the Army, the Air Force 
and the Coast Guard , are all branches 
of the Armed Forces. I hope this will 
enlighten you a little. 

As far as it being BRAVE to stand up 
to your government, this is really a joke. 
To make a small analogy here I ask you, 
when you were told not to do something 
by your parents but your friends told you 
to do it, which was harder for you to 
defy? — your parents: who you know 
will forgive you if you defy them or — 
your friends: who if defied will ostracize 
you from the gang. Yes, here also you 
are not being BRAVE, but are taking 
the easy way out. 

If you can compare this country with 
that of Hitler's Germany then you really 
do not understand what the common 
American has been fighting for since the 
dawn of our Democracy. I do not believe 
mass murder has been committed in this 
country. I believe that the news media 
more often than not criticize our govern- 
ment to keep the average citizen some- 
what aware of what is going on. As an 
American citizen you are requested to 
serve in the Armed Forces and what you 
seem to know little of is that when in 
the service you are not a robot but a 
human being and have a voice. Just these 
three statements differ from that of Hit- 
ler's Germany. 

Yes, Mr. Kamison, our country does 
make mistakes. I do not believe that the 
government is infallible, but, then again, 
I do not believe that there is a govern- 
ment as great as ours anywhere else in 
the worldl Here again, though, we have 
two different viewpoints — You think the 
government is making a mistake by being 
in Vietnam and I do not. I believe that 
if I make a commitment I should follow 
through with it and in the same manner 
so should our country. 

You say that my conscience is not clear 
because of killing of women and children. 
Well to tell you the truth I have no 
trouble sleeping at night, do you? Yes, 
I am an accessory to murder. Every time 
one of our servicemen kills an enemy I 
am behind him all the way. My hand is 
on the trigger. I ask you, can a women 
kill? - can a child kill? If you think that 
in a battle you can determine who is 
going to try to kill you and who is not 
then we need more people like you over 
there to stop some of this unfortunate 
killing. Remember, self-survival is a very 
strong instinct. Don't you agree? You say 
that peace is the only way to save the 
worla. I agree. But have you ever taken 
the time to realize what price must be 
paid to obtain and maintain peace? 
So to you Mr. Kamison, I say, 

"PEACE" 
John A. Furphy, Class of '72 



New Dormitory 
To Be Built 

The new dormitory, so long a 
fluid idea has now become a con- 
crete idea. According to Dr. Feld- 
stein construction can start at any- 
time. Due to the inclement weather, 
however construction will be de- 
layed until later on. 

The dorm which will be built by 
Walter Brucker and Company In- 
corporated, will help alleviate the 
crowded conditions which exist at 
the beginning of the fall semester. 
It is designed to house 106 stu- 
dents and an apartment for a faculty 
family. A vending machine room, 
student lounges and a television 
room are included in the new 
facility. 

The exterior is designed to keep 
with the pattern set by the existing 
dormitories near it. The location 
being behind Goldman and Samuel 
Hall will be handy to the parking 
lot, and the dining hall. 



TEACH IN GHANA 
OR NIGERIA? 

Yes: — If you 



1. Have a Bachelor's Degree; prefer- 
ably a Masters Degree. 

2. Have at least 30 semester hours 
credit in one ot the following: 

a. physics, b. chemistry, 
c. biology, d. mathematics, 
e, industrial arts, f. French, 
g. geography, 
h. home economics or 
i. business education, 

3. Desire to teach at the secondary 
school level. 

4. Are in good health; single, or 
married (without children). Both 
spouses must teach. 

Write: 

TEACHERS FOR 
WEST AFRICA PROGRAM 
Elizabethtown College 
Elizabeth town, Pa. 17022 



SPRING SEEN IN THE 
NEAR FUTURE! 

Sunday, February 1, 1970 the first 
lamb of the spring was found with 
its mother on Farm Three. DVC 
has spring lambs predicting an 
early spring the day before the ap- 
pearance of Punxsutawney Phil. 



DOYLESTOWN 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

60 NORTH MAIN STREET 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 

Phone 341-9021 



CAMPUS MOVIE SCHEDULE 
SPRING SEMESTER 

February 6 

"Robin And The Seven 
Hoods" 

February 20 

"Cat Ballou" 

March 13 

"Blindfold" 

April 10 

"Counterpoint" 

April 24 

"Rebel Without A Cause" 

May 8 

"Secret War Of Harry Frigg" 



STAN BOWERS 

MEN'S STORE 

Van Heusen • Farah 
Shirts Slacks 

PBM Suits • Botany 500 

19 N. Main Doylestown 



Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 

EDITOR Mich.. I A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS David Teichman, Lou Hagyat 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hegyes 

PHOTO EDITOR Dave Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Loo Stratsbargar 

BUSINESS MANAGER David Taichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dalbert Jonoa 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 

Sol Caviness, John Furphy, Bill Stroda, Alton Gordon, Larry Martol, Abbott Loo, 
Davo Suttak, Howard Handorton, Bruco Richards, Bruca Giaaa, Joff Kair. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph I. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Morti 

It should bo noted that the opinions exproased in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



February 6, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEQYES 



John Carlos and Willie Davenport, two 
of America's premier trackmen, have 
been selected in pro footballs annual 
draft. 

Carlos, the controversial sprinter from 
San lose State, was picked by the Eagles 
on the 15th round and will be used as 
a wide receiver by the local club. 

Davenport was chosen by the Saints 
in the 22nd round. The star hurdler had 
been selected by Houston and later by 
San Diego a year ago but the choices 
were nullified because he still had college 
eligibility. 

Will these runners be able to reach 
the success that another former trackman 
Bob Hayes has? 

S'l" Bob Lanier of St. Bonaventure, 
probably the top big man in college 
basketball today, sports a size 19 shoe. 

This past week Bob McEntee and Don 
Sechler were nominated for the ECAC 
Division III all-star squad. Danny Cuers 
was also cited for being a noteworthy 
sophomore. 

The U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 
New London, Conn, is again fortunate to 
have the services of Otto Graham. 

The Academy, with an enrollment of 
only about 700, hired Graham as the 
new athletic director. Graham, the former 
coach of the Washington Redskins, was 
succeeded by Vince Lombardi. A few 
years ago Graham left the Academy after 
serving as football coach. 

Former heavyweight champion Cassius 
Clay said he would present his champion 
boxer's belt to the winner of the Feb. 
16 Jimmy Ellis-Joe Frazier bout in New 
York, Clay said he would make the pre- 
sentation to "keep boxing legal and keen 
it going and direct all my followers, both 
black and white, to the new champ. 

It would be great if our college band 
attended the home basketball games. Not 
only does a band provide enjoyable en- 
tertainment but it also adds enthusiasm 
to the crowd. 

In the near future the members of the 
Furrow sports staff will select on a 
monthly basis the top DVC athlete. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



* R««d and Barton — Lunt — 
Wallac* — Stirling, ate. 

• Omtgi — Longina* — 
Accutron, ate. 

Watch - Clock - Jawalry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



GARDYS 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Aggies Dump Wilkes 
By 18 Points 

Jan. 24. Don Sechler, who led all 
scorers with 27 points and grabbed 19 
rebounds, guided the Aggies to a 72-54 
victory over the visiting Wilkes College 
Colonels. 

The Colonels scored the first eight 
points and held the Aggies scoreless for 
more than two minutes until, with 17:51 
remaining in the half. Bob McEntee 
pumped in a jumper to break the ice. 

The Aggies gradually chipped away 
the Wilkes lead until Don Sechler tied 
the game up 27-27 with a bucket with 
2:07 left in the half. DVC went ahead 
to stay as Bob McEntee scored two 
baskets before the half ended. The score 
at the balf was 31-28. 

In the second half the Aggies con- 
tinued to widen their margin as they 
reached their largest lead of 22 points 
70-48 on a bucket by Dan Guers with 
1:46 left in the game. The final score 
was 72-54. 

DVC displayed a good all-around team 
effort as McEntee and Teeple also scored 
in double figures. Dan Guers and Ralph 
White contributed with their defensive 
work and ball control. 

Delaware Valley 

FG F T 

McEntee 7 0-1 14 

Sechler 10 7-10 27 

Polinsky 2 2-3 8 

Teeple 5 0-1 10 

Richardson 1 0-0 2 

Guers 4 1-2 9 

White 1 2-3 4 

TOTAL 72 

Wilkes 

FG F T 

Reinel 0-1 

Jones 1 0-0 2 

Umbach 5 0-0 10 

Jannuzzi 1 1-1 3 

Davis 3 0-0 6 

Ockenfuss 1 1-1 3 

Kurosky 5 1-1 11 

Kemp 8 1-1 17 

Breier 1 0-0 2 

Wetzel 0-0 

TOTAL 54 



Sechler Leads 
One More Time 




Photo Credit: D. Thomas 

Teeple stretches to put two points on 
the Aggie score. 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 

Droit Clothing 

STARREST LEE LEENS 

THOM McAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 




Photo Credit: D. Thomas 

103 Points Scored 
In One Game 

Jan. 13 The Aggies, utilizing their 
scoring and rebounding strength, scored 
an impressive 103-75 victory over visiting 
Lincoln University. 

The Lions, who led on occasions in 
the first half, fell victim to the Aggies 
scoring punch. Greg Teeple, Bob Po- 
linsky and Don Sechler led the attack 
as the Aggies mounted a 12-point lead 
with 4:20 remaining in the first half for 
their largest margin of the half. The half 
ended with Del Val up by a 53-42 score. 

In the second half the Aggies con- 
tinued to blow the visitors off the court 
as they widened the margin to twenty 
points with 5:58 on a jumper by Bon 
McEntee and with the largest lead of 
28 points coming at the final buzzer. 

Dan Guers, Boh McEntee and Don 
Sechler provided the scoring punch as 
the Aggies topped the century mark for 
the first time this season on a jump shot 
by Tom Wentzel with 31 seconds left 
to play. 

Captain Don Sechler led both teams 
with 26 points and 17 rebounds, while 
Livisay was the high man for the Lions 
with 22 points. 

The Aggies season record now stands 

at 5-7. 

Delaware Valley 

FG F Total 

McEntee 7 0-0 14 

Sechler 9 8-9 26 

Polinsky 4 1-1 9 

Wentzel 2 0-0 4 

Teeple 7 4-7 18 

Richardson 1 7-7 8 

Guers 5 3-3 13 

White 3 3-4 9 

Varga 1 0-0 2 

Zenko 0-0 

Devlin 0-0 

103 

Lincoln Univ. 

FG F Total 

McMillian 1 1-1 3 

Moore 6 8-11 20 

Livisay 9 4-4 22 

Coleman 3 2-2 8 

Bell 2 2-3 8 

Gooden 2 0-0 4 

Harris 0-0 

Berry 2 6-8 10 

Fischer 1 0-0 2 

75 



FURROW DEADLINE 

for the 

FEBRUARY 20th ISSUE 

is February 10th. Staff Meeting 
Monday, February 9th. Those 
who wish to attend a banquet 
must attend this meeting. Time 
and place to be announced. 



Aggies Are On 
The Move Again! 

Jan. 31. A tough defense and a 30 
point night by Don Sechler led the Aggies 
basketballers over the visiting Lycoming 
Warriors. 

Don Sechler, Ralph White and Danny 
Guers, leading the defensive attack, for- 
ced Lycoming into numerous errors. Sech- 
ler blocked no less then a half dozen 
shots and Ralph White and Guers applied 
tremendous pressure outside. 

Offensively the story was all Sechler. 
Sechler scored 30 points on 12 field goals 
and 6 free throws and easily hit on long 
jumpers all evening. 

Lycoming was lead by a 21 point effort 
from their co-captain Gordon Peiper. 

In the first half both teams continually 
exchanged baskets and leads of only 
three or four points. DVC led at the half 
by a 40-37 score. 

The second half was still very close 
with our largest lead of only eight points 
coming on a pair of free throws by Ralph 
White with 12:33 left on the clock. Over- 
all the victory was a good team effort. 

The victory extends the teams winning 
streak to four games and our overall 
record to 8-7 and conference record to 
5-5. 

It really looks like the Aggies are on 
the move again. 

In the J.V. contest the Warriors drop- 
ped the Aggie J.V.'s by a 81-64 score. 

Start Of Another 
Exciting Game 




Photo Credit: D Thomas 



Aggies Top 
Dutchmen 



Jan. 31. Coach Floyd Marshall's mat- 
men winning five matches, of which four 
were pins, downed the visiting Flying 
Dutchmen of Lebanon Valley College 
(2-3) by a 23-19 score. 

Ron Jennings, George Cummins, Harry 
Heiser and Larry Eisenhart all pinned 
their opponents, along with Raynard 
Johnsons decision victory, as the Aggies 
won their second straight match to bring 
their seasons record to 2-4. 

With DVC leading 18-14 Larry Eisen- 
hart pinned Jim Iatesta at 4:46 to put 
the match out of reach. 

118-Rich Phillips, LVC, pinned Jim 
Buck, 6:48 

126-Ron Jennings, DVC, pinned Scott 
Kopp, 1:26 

134-George Cummins, DVC, pinned 
Thad Wilson, 3:05 

142-Tony Rubbo, LVC, decisioned 
John Hopper, 7-1 

150-Agu Laane, LVC, decisioned 
Brent Franklin, 6-0 

158-Harry Heiser, DVC, pinned Bill 
Hall, 6:04 

167-Raynard Johnson, DVC, decision- 
ed Doren Leathers, 13-5 

177— Tom Koons, LVC, decisioned Ken 
Sturm, 13-7 

190- Larry Eisenhart, DVC pinned Jim 
Iatesta, 4:46 

Hvt.-Ed Thomas, LVC, pinned Rich 
Jannotti, 3:18 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



February 8, 1970 




• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 



$etuele%4 



Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



The old information office in Allman Hall will be converted 
to the off-campus Student's post office starting soon. 



Intramural Basketball 
Standings 

INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 
STANDINGS 
Dorms Clubs 

Dorm I 5-0 Business 5-0 

Ulman 4-0 Food Industry 4-1 

Barness 3-2 Horticulture 2-1 

Work 2-3 Agronomy 2-2 

Wolfson 2-3 Science 2-3 

Cooke 1-2 Dairy 1-3 

Elson 1-4 Orn. Hort. 1-4 

Dorm II 0-4 Animal Hus. 1-4 

Biology 0-0 

Delaware Valley 

FG F T 

McEntee 3 0-0 6 

Sechler 12 6-8 30 

Polinsky 4 2-2 10 

Teeple 3 1-2 7 

Richardson 2 0-0 4 

Guers 2 4-5 8 

White 2 2-2 6 

TOTALS 28 15-19 71 

Lycoming 

FG F T 

Forshee 1 0-0 2 

Smales 5 0-0 10 

Peiper 9 3-3 21 

Paruso 0-0 

Martin 2 2-3 6 

Gage 0-0 

Russel 4 0-0 8 

Jackubowicz 8 1-3 17 

TOTALS 29 6-9 64 
It looks like a close call. 




Mat Men Win 
A Tough Match 

Jan. 24. Larry Eisenhart, winning the 
final match by a 7-1 decision in the 190 
lb. class, supplied the three points need- 
ed to give the Aggies a 17-16 victory 
over Dickinson College for the Green and 
Gold's first win of the season against 
four losses. 

The very close match also featured 
the first head to head battle of the brother 
coaches. Dickinson's coach Bob Marshall, 
brother of our own Floyd Marshall, is a 
former Big Ten wrestling champ. He 
was undefeated three consecutive years 
at Purdue, and was twice awarded All- 
America status. 

Ron Jennings (126 lbs.), George Cum- 
mings (134 lbs.), Harry Heiser (158 lbs.), 
Ray Johnson (167 lbs.) and Larry Eisen- 
hart (190 lbs.) all posted victories as the 
Aggies won five of the nine matches. 

118— Bob Merworth, DC, decisioned 
Jim Buck, 7-4 

126— Jennings, DVC, decisioned Larry 
Kalokow, 6-1 

134— George Cummings, DVC, deci- 
sioned Greg Williams, 7-0 

142- Jim Taylor, DC, pinned Jim Sch- 
lener 4:03 

150-Gary DePlisia, DC, decisioned 
Brent Franklin, 6-0 

158-Harry Heiser, DVC, pinned Bob 
Crobalt, 4:48 

167-Raynard Johnson, DVC, decision- 
ed Craig Kneeland, 8-3 

177-Glen Boyle, DC, pinned Ken 
Sturm, 6:50 

190-Larry Eisenhart, DVC, decisioned 
Rich Horner, 7-1 

Hvt.— No match 



Photo Credit: B. Turner 



The Gherkin 

goes to the person or persons 

responsible For the numerous 

power failures on campus. 




Non- Profit Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



the 




ROW 



Vol. 17, No. 2 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



February 20, 1970 




Photo credit— D. Thomas 

Freshmen hold an important class 
meeting. 

Is D.V.C. 
Going To 

The Dogs? 

Last week the student body was sur- 
prised, amused, and pleased to find "Dog" 
in the dining hall for dinner. This St. 
Bernard, affectionately called "Mutt", 
"Stupid", "Hey-You", and various other 
•names with "Dog" the prevailing one, 
has graced our campus with his presence. 
"Dog" has passed judgement on the 
condition of the dorms, which have been 
found warmer and more comfortable than 
sleeping out-doors; and on the palatablity 
of Aggie food, which, according to "Dog" 
is better than having to scrounge around 
and "dig-up" food. "Dog" has found a 
place in the hearts of the Aggies, first 
because "Dog" is prohibited to exist on 
campus, according to the regulations of 
the college; and secondly by just being 
"Dog"! 



NOTICE 

DEADLINE FOR 

MARCH 6th 

ISSUE IS 

FEBRUARY 24th 




THE GHERKIN 

This week the green one goes to the 
planners of the parking k>t. The off 
campus love their morning constitu- 
tional from the railroad tracks to Man- 
dell or further. Numbers 1-19 also 
love their new locations in outer 
Mongolia. 



Circle K Action 

The Circle K Club is off to a busy sec- 
ond semester. On February 2, 1970, Dr. 
Earl Mc Williams addressed the club con- 
cerning the "Big Brother" program, a 
program in which fellows of college age 
or older act as companions to fatherless 
boys who need someone to confide in. 
Several of the club members are likely 
to participate in this program. 

The new club officers of the Circle K 
Club are as follows: President, John 
Pope; Vice-President, Tim Powell; Sec- 
retary, Ron Good; Treasurer, Al Happ; 
and A-Day Representatives, Abbott Lee 
and Dennis DeSimone. 

This semester, Circle K plans to hold 
its Third Annual Car Rally on April 4, 
1970, to attend the district convention to 
be held in Philadelphia, to landscape the 
New Britain railroad station, to hold a 
hayride for underprivileged children, and 
many other smaller projects of service to 
both the campus and the community. 



Recruiter's Schedule 
February 23-27 

February 23 — 
The Upjohn Company 
Sales — Pharmaceutical Products 
Background in Biological Sciences 

February 24 — 

USDA Farmers Home Admin. 

Farm Management Supervisors 
February 25— 

Africo Chemical Co. ( Baltimore ) 

Production Supervisory Trainee 

February 26 — 
The Grand Union 
Management Trainee 

February 27 

Wilson & Co., Inc. 
Sales — Accounting — 
Production Management — 
Merchandising — 
Product Management 
Ag Majors — Bus. Ad. — F. I. 
SIGN UP IN ADVANCE IN 
PLACEMENT OFFICE 



Join the NEW 
GLEE CLUB 

Practice Tuesday 6-8 

No Experience 

Necessary 

Concerts are scheduled 
soon! 



fnu?? 



VENDING 
ICE 





Photo credit— D. Thomas 

A.P.O. sponsored a successful mixer. 

Audubon Society 

Went To 
Wildlife Refuge 

The Bucks County Audubon Society 
held a field trip to Brigantine National 
Wildlife Refuge and the New Jersey 
shore area to observe birds of the East- 
ern coast on February 8. 

A partial list of the birds seen include: 
bufflehead, red pole, pintail, sparrow 
hawk, and the great blue heron. 

Persons interested in attending field 
trips are not required to be members of 
the society. Dr. John Mertz, president of 
the society, urges anyone interested to 
attend. 

The Audubon Society meets on the 
first Tuesday of every month in the Man- 
dell Science Building. Meetings offer spe- 
cial guest speakers, slides, ana movies on 
conservation and similar subjects. 




Photo credit— D. Thomas 



New work began February 9th ahead 
of schedule. The tentative completion 
date is October 17. 





Photo credit-B. Turner 



Photo credit-D. Thomas 

What do Aggies do for entertainment? 
Park a car on a log. 

Letter To The 
Sophomore Class 

We have been very unsuccessful 
this year in starting and complet- 
ing any projects. The attempt was 
made to set up a number of com- 
mittees in order to increase student 
involvement in the workings of our 
class and of our College. In theory 
this was a good idea, but it failed 
in practice. It failed because the 
officers didn't enforce or stimulate 
the students to work. It failed be- 
cause a great majority of our class 
was unwilling to sacrifice its time 
and effort to the class. This is un- 
fortunate, but we have another se- 
mester to accomplish our goals. 

During our last class meeting we 
discussed the possibilities of form- 
ing a class council. The members 
of this council will not be elected 
or appointed. The members will 
be voluntary. The purpose of this 
"council" will be to have a body 
of interested students who will at- 
tend the class meetings and inform 
those students who were absent as 
to what developed at our meeting. 
If a person is not on the council he 
can come to any of the meetings, 
say what he wishes and vote or 
propose any motion. The council 
will be formed at our next meeting 
which will be held on February 11, 
in Alman Hall at seven o'clock. 
Again the main aim of this council 
is to provide the officers and the 
class with students on whom we 
can depend to attend meetings and 
serve on committees. 

Our concert is coming up in the 
near future and it is no secret that 
the concert is going to cost us over 
$4500. For this reason it is essen- 
tial that each member of our class 
sell five tickets at $4.50 each. The 
tickets will be distributed early in 
the second semester and if the 
money is not turned in by March 
23, the student will be held re- 
sponsible for his five tickets. The 
GRASS ROOTS are the main at- 
traction and Walden Pond is our 
back-up group. We are hopeful of 
having the concert out by Lake 
Archer. If this is impossible or im- 
practical the concert will be held 
in the gym. 

Any student who can help us 
with publicity please see Pete 
Duane. Our concert is April 4, at 
8 p.m. 

Thank you, 

David C. Farrar 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



February 20, 1970 



- LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - 

February 8, 1970 
An Open Letter to Delaware Valley College, 

I address this letter to the Administration and Student Body of Delaware Valley 
College in the hopes of furthering discussion on important issues between the 
Administration and the Student Body, creating support for these issues, and opening 
the eyes and minds of the Administration to these issues. 

As an individual, I find education to be an interesting and necessary aspect of 
life in today's world. However, education is not acquired only from books and 
lectures, but from informal intellectual interaction between students and between 
students and faculty. 

I see DVC in many ways to resemble a book. You can remain lost in its pages 
as long as you let yourself be guided along from page to page .The book dictates 
one thing, just as DVC dictates its one way of education. 

DVC needs change. It needs to throw away the old book and begin a new one. 
But what changes do we start with? 

To begin with DVC does not need more dorms to get more apathetic students. 
DVC needs to satisfy those already here. Why not start with the student's needs? 
We are the ones who came to learn, to get an education. Is this education being 
obtained by being required to attend each class or by staring at the four green walls 
of the dormitory rooms? 

You cannot force a person to team. A student will not learn just because he is 
attending class. I would dare say that a good percentage of the students at DVC 

sit in a classroom, at a certain hour each day, and "listen' to "what's his name 

again?" And why not? He knows you can't flunk out of DVC. 

Why not raise the academic standards at DVC, flunk the non-students out, drop 
the cut system, and give the students an education that they came to get? I realize 
that this would jeopardize a large portion of the student body, and if I were running 
for an office I would most likely lose a lot of votes for just the idea of higher 
standards. But if we aren't here to work for an education, then what are we here for? 

Getting away from the academic aspects of DVC brings me to another change 
or rather addition needed to the DVC campus. Students have a need to meet and 
talk with all kinds of people in an informal atmosphere. We need to talk to our 
professors informally. This does not mean his office or the formal surroundings of 
the classroom. We need a student center or coffee house where both faculty and 
student may go just to talk and relax. We need a place to talk and meet all of our 
fellow students. Where would be a good place? Cerainly not the T.V. rooms, the 
study lounges, or the pool hall. A certain group attends each of these. A student 
union should and would be a place where all of the students could go on an open 
basis to discuss anything. A place where one can obtain a good conversation, not 
the usual bull thrown in the dorm rooms. It could even be a place to get a decent 
meal or cup of coffee, something the dining hall fails to offer. 

But how do we go about obtaining these changes? It cannot be done by a few 
students who are willing to do work day and night to present ideas to the Adminis- 
tration. It takes student support. 

Why doesn't Student Government have power? Because the students don't 
support it. Why should any issue concerning us be passed by the Administration 
when only a few support it verbally? We all may support it in our minds, but what 
good is it there? Speak up! 

I say that if the students of DVC want anything we must say so and work for 
it. All of us must show support. We won't get anything for nothing. We must group 
together in mass support of the issues which confront us here at DVC. I don't mean 
the kind that so many other colleges and universities are using. DVC doesn't need 
ethics of that sort to attain new goals. We have enough sound reason, good thinking, 
and hard workers to get things done the right way. 

There is only one way we can stop saying "I wish I was at some other college." 
That one way is by bettering DVC. We need your support. Show it now. We've 
waited long enough. 

Let's throw away the spoon that feeds us. Let's be the men we are supposed 
to be and stick up honestly for what we feel. 

In summary I would like to make a few proposals, proposals which have been 
made before but need to be made again. I present them to the Administration and 
ask for ideas and support concerning them. 

1 — Raise academic standards of the College. 

2 — Establish an unlimited cut system and let the students learn to work for an 
education. 

3 — Establish a coffee house or construct a student union now. 

4 — Give the students at DVC a chance to be men. Be open-minded and treat 
the students as being the educated students we are. 

I ask that any rebuttals or opinions concerning my comments be made to me in 
person. This column should be left open for new ideas and opinions, not hashing 
over the old. I am in Goldman Hall (Dorm 1), room 217. I am always open to 
discussion and ideas. 

Sincerely, 
Thomas D. Brewer 
Class of 1971 




>-«^a Jke Juzzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-I Dl TO* IAL STAFF- 

EPITOR 7T"" Michul A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS D«vW Ttichman, Low H«gy«» 

CORY EDITOR H«rv«y Goodwin 

SPOUTS EDITOR low Hogytt 

PHOTO EDITOR Divo Tftomai 

CtUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Rarktr 

BUSINESS MANAGER David Toichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dolbort Jonas 

SPECIAL EVENTS J»hn D. Martin 

-GENERAL If AM— 

Sol Cavinou, John Furphy, Bill Strode, A lion Gordon, Lorry Martol, Abbott Loo, 

Dovt Suttok, Howard Hondorton, Brwco Richordi, Bruco Gio««, Joff Koir, BIN Twrnor. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Jotaph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Morti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper ore those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



Is The Livary Open? 

I donnow . . . 

I have a question: Why is the library closed Saturday nights? Talk about a 
colossal mistake, the person or people who made that rule probably had been 
thinking wrongly. The idea that Saturday nights for college students is usually 
taken up by a date or being at home or drinking with the boys is not true for some 
Del Vaf Aggies. Yes, every weekend there is a small minority of Aggies whom can't 
escape either because of no car or they figured they will get assignments requiring 
being in the library. One has to have it all planned out and tries to get it over with 
a visit to the library. There he either finds the doors locked or much worst the 
information needed is in the Annex which will not be open until Sunday night. 
Well, that takes care of Sunday night but what about Saturday night? Doylestown 
being a little more than a dot on the map and a place to see an X movie once in 
a while doesn't relieve his problem so the student is faced with two suggestions. 
One of them is to go back to stare at four green walls trying to study. The other one 
is to watch a movie on T.V. The urge of getting a term paper out of the way is 
gone. He curses the time wasted because he forgot DVC is not like other colleges. 
Other colleges have libraries open on Saturday night. The remaining Aggies who 
stay, not by choice, won't mind using the library as an excuse to escape the green 
darkness of the painted walls of the dorms to the clean lighted place of books 
for studying or to improve their culture. The campaign (is there one?) to try to 
make weekends a pleasure to spend at Del Val is surely hidden by the library being 
closed. Of course a Student Union Building will be lots better then having the library 

— L. Martel 

CLUB NEWS 

Block and Bridle Has A Good Showing 
At the Pennsylvania Farm Show 



The Animal Husbandry Depart- 
ment returned from the Pennsyl- 
vania Farm Show with several sig- 
nificant winnings. Ten head of 
sheep were shown on the Monday 
of the Farm Show week. On 
Wednesday, ten head of Angus 
were exhibited in the Angus show. 

A yearling ram, a ram lamb, a 
yearling ewe, and two ewe lambs 
were shown in the Cheviot Sheep 
Show. Their rankings were 2nd, 
5th, 5th, 8th, and 8th respectively. 
The Cheviot get-of-sire ranked 5tn, 
while the Cheviot group of three 
ewe lambs placed 4th. The Cheviot 
Breeders young flock was placed in 
4th place. 

Caesar, the school mascot, was 
shown in the Dorets division. The 
judge placed him second in his 
class. In the Hampshire show one 
yearling ram and two ewe lambs 
were exhibited. 

Ten head of Angus were shown 
in the Angus division. The results 
of the Angus were the best of all 
the livestock shown by the College. 
In the group classes, the group of 
three bulls and the group of two 
bulls were 3rd and 4th respectively. 
The Junior get-of-sire was 5th and 
the get-of-sire was placed 3rd. The 
Best Ten Head received the first 
place ribbon. 

The other placings in beef are as 
follows: 

Junior heifer calf — 4th 
Junior heifer calf — 8th 
Early Junior heifer calf — 4th 
Late Junior yearling heifer — 1st 
Late Junior yearling heifer — 2nd 
Early Senior yearling heifer — 1st 
Early Senior yearling heifer — 2nd 
Junior bull calf — 5th 
Senior yearling bull — 2nd 
2-year old bull— 3rd 

In the championship class, the 
College took the Senior Champion 
female and the Senior Reserve 
Champion female. 



During the February 4th club 
meeting, the nominations for Pres- 
ident were made. The election of 
the President and the other officers 
was set for February 18th. Signs of 
A-Day are beginning to come alive 
as the animals to be shown on 
A-Day have been chosen by the 
students. There will be approxi- 
mately 35 head of beef, 20 head of 
swine, and a number of sheep 
shown. 

Hort Society 
Held Elections 

The annual election of officers ended 
one of the most successful years on rec- 
ord for the Delaware Valley College Hort 
Club. 

Under the past year's leadership, prof- 
its soared to new heights due primarly 
to an increased apple production and 
the most efficient use of this resource. 
Fresh, quality apples and apple cider 
made a big impression at the football 
games. 

Our Homecoming float saw a majority 
of club members coordinate their efforts 
into one of the most original and sophis- 
ticated floats in the display, capturing a 
solid fourth place. 

Starting out a new year under new 
leadership, the annual Hort Club Ban- 
quet will be held March 4, at the Col- 
legeville Inn. Speaker for the occasion 
will be Wayne Winner, former graduate 
of Delaware Valley College and pres- 
ently employed as an agriculturist for 
the Ortho division of the Chevron Chem- 
ical Company. 

Other items scheduled for the upcom- 
ing year will be upkeep of the orchards, 
A-Day projects, and various educational 
club trips. 

Much has been accomplished in the 
previous year due to good leadership and 
club participation. The coming year 
promises even more dynamic happenings. 
Enthusiasm of our members is nigh and 
the new leadership capability is excellent. 

New officers include: 

President — 'Harold Fox 

Vice President — George Curley 
Secretory — Ron Myers 
Treasurer — Rich Percaro 
Intramural* — Ernie Crunow 
A-Day Rep. — Milton Parker 
Publications — James Ambrose 



February 20, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEQYES 



Pete Pihos, former Philadelphia Eagle 
pass receiving great and coach at Dela- 
ware Valley, has been elected into the 
Professional Football Hall of Fame in 
Canton, Ohio. Pihos coached at DVC 
from 1956 to 1958. 

Lee Edwards a DVC graduate who 
provided a recent film on hunting for 
the Varsity Club will appear on "The 
American Sportsman" some time in 
March. 

The students who have attended the 
recent basketball games against Textile 
and Scranton should be complimented 
for their exhibition of school spirit. 

There was a very small group of stu- 
dents who attended the Moravian game 
in Bethlehem who displayed actions that 
I thought were detrimental to the college 
image. This unsportsmenlike display was 
not a display of spirit but immaturity. 

Could you imagine what the caliber 
of Eastern Collegiate athletics would be 
if even one half of our top athletes stayed 
in the area. In recent years eastern schools 
have taken a back seat to colleges from 
the South, Midwest and West. This can 
be attributed to the higher academic 
quality of the eastern colleges, lack of 
space, and the lack of major or national 
schedules. 

The tri-state area (N.J., N.Y., Pa.) has 
starters and high scorers on almost all 
of the top twenty basketball teams in the 
nation. South Carolina, consistantly in the 
top five teams this year, has nine players 
on their roster from the New York area. 
North Carolina, Duke and North Carolina 
St. have long been known for the re- 
cruiting in the New York area. Louisville 
and Tulsa's top players are from New 
Jersey. 

Imagine what our college records would 
have been if Wilt Chamberlain, Rick 
Barry, and Lew Alcindor had stayed in 
the east instead of Kansas, Miami and 
UCLA. 

New Jersey's all-time high school high 
scorer is presently playing for New 
Mexico Univ. and Pennsylvania's Tom 
McMillian, state high school scoring 
record holder still at Mansfield High 
School has narrowed his college choices 
to Kentucky, North Carolina, Duke, 
Maryland and UCLA. 

Basketball is only one sport and these 
are only a few examples. The same 
applies for all sports. 

I think Eastern colleges should step 
up their recruiting programs and expand 
their schedules to a level that can com- 
pete with schools in other areas of the 
country. Penn State's recent football team 
is an excellent example of what can be 
accomplished. 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 

Nam 



'rranutmtnli 

Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doyleitown, Pa. 
348-3154 3431}V3 



Moravian Downs 
The Aggies 

Feb. 4 The undefeated Moravian Col- 
lege wrestlers (8-0) stopped the Aggies 
by a close 20-15 score and ended the 
Marshallmen's two match winning streak. 

After dropping the first, Del Val (2-5) 
came back with a pin by Ron Jennings 
(126), and a decision by George Cummins 

(134). 

In the 142 lb. match John Hopper 
drew with Gary Ruth, but Brent Franklin 
pinned his opponent in the 150 lb. class 
to move DVC out in front by a 15-5 
score. 

Moravain then went on to win the 
next five matches all on decisions to put 
the match out of reach. 

Going into the final match with Mora- 
vian leading by only two points 17-15 
Nick Mancini defeated Rick Jannotti in 
a close 4-3 decision for the victory. 

118 — Mike Staffieri, Moravian, decision- 
ed Jim Buck, 6-0 

126 — Ron Jennings, DVC, pinned Pete 
Barnes, 3:45 

134 — George Cummins, DVC, decisioned 
Terry Stanglien, 17-4 

142 — John Hopper, DVC, drew with 
Gary Ruth, 5-5. 

1.50— Brent Franklin, DVC, pinned Bob 
Haaz, 3:55 

158 — Rich Sanford, Moravian, decisioned 
Harry Heiser, 16-7 

167 — Steve Miller, Moravian, decisioned 
Ray Johnson, 7-0 

177 — Andy Long, Moravian, decisioned 
Ken Sturm, 17-2 

190 — Jay Rabold, Moravian, decisioned 
Larry Eisenhart, 8-6 

Hvy — Nick Mancini, Moravain, decision- 
ed Rick Jannotti, 4-3 




Mention "THE FURROW 
When You Shop 



Photo credit— D. Thomas 

Brent Franklin won this match 3-2. 

Susquehanna 
Pins Aggies 

Feb. 7 Susquehanna University, win- 
ning six of the ten matches, downed the 
Aggies of Delaware Valley by a 22-12 
score at Selingsgrove, Pa. 

The Aggies did gain four victories 
and all were decisions. George Cummins, 
Brent Franklin, Raynard Johnson and 
Larry Eisenhart were the point scorers 
for DVC. 

118— Rich Bachtel, SU, won by forfeit 

126— Bill Bachtel, SU, decisioned Ron 
Jennings, 18-7 

134 — George Cummins, DVC, decisioned 
Mike Ranage, 10-9 

142 — Doug Grosch, SU, decisioned John 
Hooper, 8-2 

150 — Brent Franklin, DVC, decisioned 
Spencer Pope, 3-2 

158 — Brad Miller, SU, decisioned Harry 
Heiser, 8-4 

167 — Rayhard Johnson, DVC, decisioned 
Tom McGeoy, 9-1 

177 — Ed Horn, SU, decisioned Ken 
Sturm, 10-2 

196 — Larry Eisenhart, DVC, decisioned 
Don McCain, 12-8 

Hvy — Joe Klein, pinned Rick Jannotti, 
2:25 



Aggies Win 
Heartstopper 

Feb. 10. The defending MAC Northern 
Division Champions Scranton University 
with an 11-4 record, good for second 
place in the MAC and Gene "The 
Machine" Munford, were upset by the 
Agpies in by far the most exciting game 
of the season, by a 76-72 score. 

A packed house of enthusiastic Aggie 
rooters witnessed the inspired effort by 
the Aggie five which took 40 minutes of 
regulation play and two overtimes. 

In the first half the Aggies looked like 
they were going to blow the Royals off 
the court as they held their opponents 
scoreless for the first 5:46 and built up 
an 8-0 lead. The largest Aggie lead of 
the half came on a bucket by Greg 
Teeple with 8:52 on the clock for a 
20-9 score. 

The Royals then started hitting and 
overcame the deficit to lead at the half 
by a 39-32 margin. 

In the third period Scranton expanded 
their lead to as many as twelve points. 
The stage was then set for the Aggies 
inspired comeback. Slowly but surely 
the Aggies chipped away until, with 1:36 
left in regulation play, Don Sechler 
scored to knot the score at 68 all. 

The first of the two thrilling overtimes 
ended with the same score as the Aggies 
went for one shot and froze the hall 
for more than three minutes. 

The last overtime proved to be the 
Royals' backbreaker as key buckets by 
Richardson, White, McEntee and Sechler 
provided the final margin of four points 
and the 76-72 score. 

Our league record now stands at 7-6 
and 10-8 overall. 

Delaware Valley College 

FC F T 

McEntee 6 2-5 14 

Sechler 10 6-9 26 

Teeple 3 0-0 6 

Richardson 5 3-5 13 

Guers 3 0-1 6 

White 2 5-7 9 

Polinsky 10-0 2 

Varga 0-2 

30 16-24 76 

Scranton University 

FG F T 

Munford 13 5-10 31 

Yost 6 5-7 17 

Sports 3 0-0 6 

McCue 4 2-3 10 

Kohler 2 2-3 6 

Farrel 0-0 

Brasky 10-1 1 

Steinberg 1 0-1 1 

30 12-21 72 





mm 
Photo credit-D. Thomas 

The winning point in the second 
overtime. 

Aggies Defeated 
By First Place Textile 

Feb. 7. Phila. Textile downed the 
Aggies by an 81-51 score before a full 
house at the Henry Ave. gym. 

The tough Aggie defense nor the one 
hundred vociferous Aggie fans were to 
deny the Rams of their 15th victory in 
17 starts. 

Textile, who is in first place in the 
MAC Northern Division and fresh from 
a big win over previously 2nd ranked 
small college in the nation Kentucky 
Wesleyan, used the press effectively to 
force the Aggies into numerous errors. 

The Aggies also had a poor shooting 
night from the floor and hit on only 11 
of 23 from the free throw line. 

Don Sechler led the Aggies with 17 
points and 17 rebounds. 

Bruce Shively was the games high 
scorer with 26 points. Ralph White was 
also one of the Aggies bright spots v> i'h 
14 points and seven rebounds. 

Delaware Valley College 

FG F T 

McEntee 3 1-2 7 

Sechler 6 5-7 17 

Polinsky 1-1 1 

Teeple 1 1-' 3 

Richardson 0-0 

Cuers 2 1-3 5 

White 6 2-6 14 

Varga 2 0-1 4 

20 11-23 51 

Philadelphia Textile 

FC F T 

Poole 6 2-3 14 

Pieriamozzi .3 3-4 9 

McGilvery 5 4-4 14 

Hamm ,. 2 0-0 4 

O'Rourke 2 1-2 5 

Shively 11 4-5 26 

Lyman 1 0-0 2 
Fry 11-13 

Williams 2 0-0 4 



33 15-19 81 



GARDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



One of the many baskets necessary to 
keep the winning streak. 



J. CARROLL MOLLOY 
Realtor - Insurance 

Molloy Building 

30 R Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



February 20, 1970 



Aggies Win 
Fifth Straight 

Feb. 3 Bob McEntee and Don Sechler 
combined to score 50 of our 81 points 
as the Aggies tripped the host Moravian 
Greyhounds 81-58. 

Tne Aggies, trailing only after the 
opening basket handed the Greyhounds, 
who started three freshman and two 
sophomores, their tenth loss against 
one victory. 

DVC (9-7), extending their winning 
streak to five games, in the first half 
were led by big Don Sechler. Sechler 
scored 19 of his game high of 27 points 
in this half. Don also finished with 21 
rebounds. 

Scoring with ease the Aggies doubled 
their opponents point total 30-15 on a 
bucket by Bob McEntee with 6:34 left 
in the half. 

Bob McEntee supplied the scoring 
pace in the second half with 15 points 
on seven field goals and a free throw. 

Throughout the second half our lead 
reached 20 points with the largest spread 
of 26 points coming with 2:41 on a pair 
of foul shots by Don Sechler. 

The victory raises our league record 
to 6-5 for the season. 

The J.V.'s went down in defeat in a 
very exciting game by a 50-51 score. 

Delaware Valley 

VC F" T 

McEntee 11 1-1 23 

Sechler 11 5-6 27 

Polinsky 1 0-0 2 

Teeple 4 2-2 10 

Richardson 2 2-2 6 

Guers 6-7 8 

White 2 3-6 9 

Kardos 0-2 

Varga 0-0 

Speziali 0-0 

Zenko 0-0 

31 19-26 81 
Moravian 

FG F T 

Knerr 7 5-6 19 

' Joseph 0-1 

Schedler 1 0-0 2 

Kohen 3 5-5 11 

Miller 0-2 

Racosky 4 1-1 9 

Bevan 2 1-1 5 

Thatcher 4 2-4 10 

21 14-20 58 



HOWARD'S JEWELRY STORE 

35 E. Stat* Street 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• Custom Made Jewelry 

A Specialty 

e Watch and Jewelry Repair 
348-4675 Doylestown, Pa. 



Alpha Phi Omega Sponsored 
A Successful Mixer 

The mixer held on Friday, Feb. 
6, was sponsored by Alpha Phi 
Omega fraternity. It featured a 
group called U.S.A. from West 
Chester, Pa. The attendance at the 
mixer was about 412. 

If all things go well the fraternity 
will sponsor another mixer some- 
time in the spring before final 
exams start for the spring semester. 

If Alpha Phi Omega fraternity 
with it's limited resources can spon- 
sor a successful mixer why can't 
the all powerful Student Govern- 
ment? 

Editors Note — The APO mixer 
didn't have continuous music and 
it can't claim there were any fewer 
high school girls. 



e Jewelry — Watches 
e Gifts — Greeting Cards 
e Buxton Wallets 
e Watch and Jewelry Repair 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



WARD 



WARD 



Doylestown s Largest Store 

for Style and Fashions in 

Student Wear 

Select from these top names 

tetany 500, Phoenix, Alligator, 
Levis, Manhattan 

Free Alterations On All 
Purchases 

DOYLESTOWN SHOPPING CENTER 
Open Daily 9 30-530-Wed.-Fri. 'till 9 




GET INVOLVED 

Join the NEW 
D.V.C. Band 

REHEARSAL EVERY 
TUESDAY 

4:00 P.M. 

Mandell Auditorium 

New Members Welcome 

All Instruments Needed 

Instruments Supplied 
Concerts Begin Soon 



Photo credit-D. Thomas 

Ken Sturn of the matmen struggles to 
win his match. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



• toed and Barton — Lunt — 
Wallace — Sterling, etc. 

* Omega — Longines — 
Accutron, etc. 

Watch - Clock - Jewelry 

REPAIRING 

346-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



Free Catalog 

^Meaddnop on vUneeii 

psychedelic 
aeliaMA, 

jtwtlry, 
htadytar ya'ort 

P.O. Box 534 Philadelphia, Pa. 19105 




Photo credit-B. Turner 

SPRING! That favorite time when mud 
and rain and mud and rain .... 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-profit Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the 



f : 





URROW 



Vol. 17, No. 3 



The Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College ot Science and Agriculture 



March 6, 1970 



Cafeteria 
For Students 

As a Student Government mem- 
ber I feel the cafeteria should sat- 
isfy the students. Being chairman 
of the Dining Hall committee in 
Student Government I'm most con- 
cerned about the opinions of our 
students relating to the cafeteria 
service. I'm representing the stu- 
dents in this committee, I have re- 
ceived many answers to students 
questions, and I will explain some 
of the answers in this article. 

In a recent survey concerning the 
Dining Hall, the committee came 
up with many ideas from the stu- 
dents that could improve the cafe- 
teria service. We not only respect 
the students opinions, but we urge 
the students to bring their ideas to 
students government members to 
get results or satisfactory answers. 

In a meeting with the Dining 
Hall manager I discussed problems 
which concerned students men- 
tioned to myself or other Student 
Government members. I must ad- 
mit the manager was concerned 
about all problems existing and he 
gave interesting answers to all ques- 
tions and ideas presented. He said 
more effort will be seen in prepar- 
ing the food, to prevent over- or 
under-cooked food, especially 
meats. The steak sandwiches are 
to contain less onions and more 
meat in the future. The idea of 
more meat at the breakfast meal 
was accepted, but cost will limit 
extensive portions. We are to have 
less onions in the home fries. Choc- 
olate syrup or powder is to be made 
available to the students. More em- 
phasis will be placed on the 
promptness of opening the cafeteria 
doors, especially on the weekends. 
The deserts are to be disgarded 
when they are no longer fresh. 

If a student receives cold food he 
may return them for a warm plate 
of food. Only warm food is to be 
put on the counter for student con- 
sumption. Less toast is to be made 
in advance, to prevent it from get- 
ting cold. The plain cheese sand- 
wich is to be done away with. Even 
though the menu may list only one 
choice for Sunday evening, two 
choices are to be available to the 
students. The coffee is to be made 
fresh for each meal. Students re- 
questing iced tea to add variety to 
tne meal beverages are to have 
their request fulfilled. The women 



RECRUITERS' SCHEDULE — MARCH 1970 

MARCH . . . 

& — Agrico Chemical Company 

Two offices — Maryland and Michigan 

Production trainee 

Good chemical background but not limited to Chemistry Majors. 

10 — Wyeth Laboratories 
Analytical Chemists 
B.S. degree — strong in organic, physical and analytical chem. 

11 — Penn State University Cooperative Extension Service 
Assistant County Agents 
Also, summer positions for Juniors 

12 — Syntex Laboratories, Inc. 

Sales Representatives — agricultural pharmaceutical marketing — from 
fine pharmaceuticals to bulk feed additives. 
Natural Science, preferably in agriculture. 

13— Merck & Co., Inc. 

R & D — Manufacturing — Chem. & Biol. 

Sales — B.S. in any agriculture major. 

SIGN UP IN ADVANCE IN PLACEMENT OFFICE 

16— U. S. Army 

17 — Pennsylvania State Employment Service 

SIGN UP IN ADVANCE IN PLACEMENT OFFICE 

18 — Arthur Poley Landscape Company 

19 — Hanover Brands, Inc. 

Formerly Hanover Canning Company 

Agricultural procurement — quality assurance and research, 

manufacturing — marketing — sales and administration. 

Or Two Year Management Program which involevs all of above. 

Bus. Ad. — Agriculture — F. I. — Science 

SIGN UP IN ADVANCE IN PLACEMENT OFFICE 

SPRING VACATION STARTS EARLY NEXT WEEK 

RECRUITERS' NOTICES 
are posted in notebook in Placement Office 2 weeks before date of visit. 

They are posted on 21 bulletin boards 1 week before visit. 

Professors have notices 1 week before visit. 

Written on Dining Foyer Blackboard 1 day before visit. 



not using hair nets are using a 
special hair spray which is sup- 
posed to be better than a hair net 
according to health agencies. If any 
student receives a plate of food 
with any foreign material in it, he 
is requested to take it back for a 
new serving. 

These are some of the answers 
presented our recent meeting. If 
any student sees these ideas not 
carried out contact Student Gov- 
ernment or myself. I'm in Dorm I, 
room 212. All problems and ideas 
that Student Government gets will 
investigated but they must get to 
Student Government for investiga- 
tion. 

We must realize also that this is 
not home-cooked food and we real- 
ly can't expect to have food just as 
we would have at home. 

Sincerely, 
Fred Harters 



Glee Club and 
Band Receive 
Warm Thanks 

The annual Thanksgiving dinner of the 
Bucks County Association for Retired and 
Senior Citizens was held at the Doyles- 
town Country Club last November. The 
D.V.C. Glee Club and Band presented a 
program of holiday music under the di- 
rection of our music director, Mr. Andrij 
Szul. 

In letters to Mr. Szul and Dr. Work, 
Mrs. Avis Leithiser, Secretary of the As- 
sociation, expressed warm thanks to the 
students for their gifted performance. 
Responses like these, we are sure, make 
the members of the Glee Club and Band 
proud of their community services. And 
they make the rest of us proud of them. 



N-O-T-l-C-E 

Deadline for March 20th 

Issue is Tuesday 

March 10th 




Mr. Armstrong 

Enthusiastically 

Received 

by George T. McCarter 
Mr. Ken Armstrong was enthusastically 
received by students and faculty at a 
recent assembly. His presentation, "A 
Newsman Reports On the Story Behind 
the Headlines," was very informative and 
gave a special insight into the situation 
in Southeast Asia. During his eight an- 
nual trips to that part of the globe he 
has accumulated many heroic and hu- 
morous tales which he shared with us. 
Mr. Armstrong, who has spent twenty- 
two years with the news media, pre- 
sented a very fine program which was 
followed by a question and answer pe- 
riod. 

The quality of this assembly might 
make one wonder why more students and 
faculty don't take advantage of the as- 
semblies that have been made available 
to us. 





In 131 

MP 



Photo credit — B. Turner 
Compliments of F. I. 70 



Mr. Armstrong adjusts the microphone 
before presenting "A fieweman Re- 
ports pn The Story Behind The Head- 
lines." 

Earth Day 
Meeting Slated 

At the suggestion of Wisconsin Senator 
Gaylord Nelson, one of the outstanding 
spokesmen for conservation in Congress, 
Wednesday, April 22 has been desig- 
nated as Earth Day, a day on nation- 
wide concern for the quality of our en- 
vironment. In observance of the theme of 
Earth Day, teach-ins are being organized 
on college and university campuses across 
the nation. These sessions will provide 
students with an opportunity to both be- 
come more intimately familiar with our 
environmental problems and voice their 
desire for a cleaner, healthier America. 

In anticipation of Earth Day there will 
be a joint meeting of the Agronomy Club, 
the Soil Conservation Society, and the 
student members of the Audubon Society 
on Thursday evening, March 12th. A 
short lecture and film on environmental 
problems will be presented by the Audu- 
bon Society. But the main purpose of the 
meeting will be to have an open discus- 
sion of how the students of D.V.C. might 
participate in this national event. All in- 
terested faculty and students are urged 
to attend. 

N.J. Intercollegiate 
Dance 

This year, the big New Jersey Inter- 
collegiate dance will be held at Rider 
College, Route 206, Trenton, New Jersey, 
on Saturday, March 7. 1970. from 8:30- 
11:30 p.m. at the Rider College Alumni 
Gymnasium. Students from all over New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York will 
converge on Rider College for this spec- 
tacular state affair. Outstanding music 
from bands on the East Coast will be 
providing moving music. Tickets cost 
$2.00 and can be purchased by writing 
the Intercollegiate committee. All profits 
from this event will go to the Multiple 
Sclerosis Society to help fight MS, "the 
great crippler of Young Adults." 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



March 6, 1970 



CUB NEWS 



Agronomy Club 

Guest Speaker 

Preceeds Elections 

On February 19, 1970 the Agronomy 
Club of D.V.C. held its annual election 
of officers. Before the voting got under- 
way, President George Umholtz intro- 
udced a representative of the Interna- 
tional Voluntary Service who spoke to 
the group about the need for agricultural 
graduates to help develop some of the 
more underdeveloped nations of the 
world. 

Elections were the next thing on the 
agenda. By a two-thirds majority vote 
the newly elected officers were as fol- 
lows: Wayne Knerr (72), president; 
Neal Hayes (71), vice-president; Joe 
Kerschner (71), recording secretary; 
Bill Hanezar (71), treasurer; Bill Cam- 
erer (71), corresponding secretary; 
Randy Laurich (72), activities chair- 
man; Don Robbins (72), Intramurals 
representative, and Scott Cook (73), 
publications repersentative. Robert Lip- 
pincott held his present office of A-Day 
representative. 

The new officers were wished the best 
of luck as the 1969-70 officers faded into 
the background — not easily to be forgot- 
ten. 

The U.S.A. 
Defeated 

On March 6 and 7 the Manor Theatre 
Workshop will put on a play called The 
Mouse That Roared." A few students 
from DVC will have small roles in this 
very hard-to-put-on play. Most of the 
cast members though, are students of 
Manor Junior College, an all girls school, 
located in Jenkintown, Pa., which also 
belongs to the newly formed Intercol- 
legiate Council. 

The play is about the smallest country 
in the world, Grand Fenwick. Because of 
bankrupcy, this small country is forced 
to declare war on the United States. They 
rationalize that if they lose the war, the 
U. S. will give them enough money to 
restore their country's economy. With no 
intentions of winning the war, the little 
country accidentally captures the great 
American scientist who has just designed 
the new nuclear Q-Bomb. The U. S. has 
to pay them money not to activate the 
bomb. Thus, as a result the smallest 
country in the world won its war against 
the U. S. 

Manor Theatre Workshop 

Presents: 

"THE MOUSE THAT ROARED" 

March 6 and 7 — 8:00 P.M. 

Admission $2.00 

Fox Chase Road and Forrest Ave. 

Jenkintown, Pa. 



Alpha Phi Omega 

Fraternity Initiates 

New Brothers 

The regular meeting of Alpha Phi 
Omega fraternity was held on Feb. 17th. 
The main order of business was the initi- 
ation of new ,brothers. Those initiated 
were David Teichman, James Lutz, 
David Sustak. and William Cooke. 

In attendance were Dr. Blackmon, Dr. 
Orr, Mr. Lawson and all the present 
brothers of the fraternity. After the initi- 
ation there was a regular business meet- 
ing. After the meeting refreshments were 
served. There will De another pledge 
class starting this semester and if you 
are interested in becoming a brother 
just come to a meeting or contact one of 
the brothers of the fraternity. 

Science Society 
Elects New Officers 

The Science Society, under the ad- 
visorship of Dr. Orr, has elected its of- 
ficers for the 1970-71 term. The offices 
were filled as follows: 

President — John Geiger 

Vice-President — Jeff Bloom 

Secretary-^Richard Sauer 

Treasurer — Jim Lutz 
John Geiger and interested officers and 
students hope to offer a dynamic pro- 
gram which will interest ancf involve the 
students as well as members of the com- 
munity. Many new ideas are already in 
the planning stage, some already sched- 
uled for the rest of spring semester. The 
annual banquet is planned for April 15th 
at the Collegeville Inn. A tentative date 
of March 18th is set for a film and lecture 
regarding the Earth Day program. This 
national program, scheduled for April 22, 
is designed to express and explain the 
need for environmental conservation. 
Hopefully we will be able to involve our- 
selves in this national program. The 
club's long-range forecast is for a series 
of interesting films covering a variety of 
topics. We also hope to have a number 
of speakers on pertinent national issues 
or problems. 



GAUDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 




7Ae ^utzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR TTTTT. Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS David Taichman, Lou Hogyas 

COPY EDITOR Harvoy Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hogyat 

PHOTO EDITOR Dave Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parkar 

BUSINESS MANAGER David Taichman 

TYPING MANAGER Dolbort Jonas 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENERAL STAFF- 

Sol Cavinass, John Fwrphy, Rill Stroda, Allan Gordon, Larry Martal, Abbott Laa, 
Davo Sustak, Howard Hondorson, t-ruco Richards, Rruca Giasa, Jaff Kair, Bill Turnar. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Josoph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 




The soundtrack springs to life with a glissando on the harp as the various instru- 
ments of the Philadelphia Orchestra tune up in this scene from Walt Disney's 
"Fantasia." Filmed in Technicolor, this animated classic is re-released by Buena 
Vista. 

Exclusive Showing Of Fantasia 

Walt Disney's Fantasia is being re-released by Buena Vista. The animated film 
appeals to your senses and imagination. The first of eight sequences is a visual ex- 
perience that only animation of Disney can create. I never Knew long hair music 
could be so appealing. It is like being transported to utopia. The thoughts expressed 
in the music flow through unrecognizable patterns. 

It's a beautiful movie that visualizes the popular works of the gerat composers. 
The interpretations are very exacting, terrific, groovy. Disney has produced ■ film 
that appeals to all ages. 

Fantasia will appear at the Baederwood Cinema, in the Baederwood Shopping 
Center starting March 11th: Personally I recommend this as a good movie to see 
with your date. She will love it, you will love it. 

— M. A Morgan 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 



• Reed and Barton — Lunt — 
Wallace - Sterling, etc. 

• Omega — Longines — 
Accutron, etc. 

Watch - Clock - Jewelry 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 
31 W. STATE ST. DOYLESTOWN 



<?4 76ope(e66 
Ga6e 

To prevent high school girls from 
coming to D.V.C. mixers is an assignment 
even the Mission Impossible team won't 
touch. The assignment brings the idiom 
"money speaks" to life. Each dollar paid 
by high school girls is a source of wealth 
that would be missed by Student Gov- 
ernment if high school girls were pro- 
hibited. There is a way to alleviate this 
problem. Advertisement is the word, and 
that is the Student Government's bag. 

They have been doing an all right job 
until the past couple of mixers, and one 
mixer especially. The mixer of February 
20th was like some high school gave a 
dance for the Aggies. Student Govern- 
ment, your laurals are becoming wilted, 
so get on the job of advertising to the 
area's girls colleges the same way you 
did at the beginning of the school year. 

According to my personal observations, 
although there were Aggies moaning 
about the lack of college girls, the ma- 
jority seemed to give it a try. They met 
the whole Arch Bishop Wood junior 
class and the regulars from Central 
Bucks. Of course there was the usual 
crowd of Aggie wallflowers. Also present 
were a few Aggies who appeared to have 
gotten their happiness elsewhere. 




"We don't go for this around here!" 
Joe Presti was caught taking a shower 
last Thursday morning during the fire 
drill. 



GERAGHTY 

TRAVEL 

AGENCY 

INC. 



Compul* ^Jravtl ^Jtn 




h 



'^m®* 



rranycminli 

Geraghty Building 
10 N. Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 
348-3154 343-1223 



Let's face it, the only difference be- 
tween high school girls and college girls 
is ftga. So, students, you might as well 
resign to the fact that there will be a 
high school population at every mixer. As 
for most Aggies, a girl is a girl no matter 
how old. 



March 6, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



The Scranton University basket- 
ball players, who lost to DVC by a 
76-72 score and who's hair was 
longer than average were persuaded 
by the athletic department and the 
Scranton student body to have their 
locks trimmed or else. 

Speaking of hair, there has been 
quite an amount of discussion on 
this topic lately. It seems there are 
a few athletes who disagree with 
the existing policies. These indivi- 
duals fail to realize that the athletes 
in a sense are ambassadors for the 
college and these people also neg- 
lect to consider that these are not 
only Mr. Linta's ideas but also the 
ideas and policies of the NCAA 
and ECAC which he represents. 
Mr. Linta isn't requiring the athle- 
tes to have crew-cuts but to look 
neat and well groomed. He recently 
resigned as Varsity Club advisor 
to undertake a one man campaign 
to challenge an inquiry into his 
athletic department practices by 
the Student Government. As far as 
this writer is concerned I have to 
igree with Mr. Linta and what he 
represents. 

, The basketball team finished the 
season with a 9-1 record on our 
home floor. The only loss was to 
Millers ville during the Holiday 
Tournament. They also won eight 
of the last ten games losing only 
to Phila. Textile and FDU. 

The award given to the most im- 
proved basketball player should un- 
questionably be given to 67" junior 
Frank Richardson. 

Don Sechler in the ABA? Maybe. 
Hal Blitman, former Cheyney State 
coach, now coach of the Miami 
Floridians is very much interested 
in Sechler for his ABA entry. 

Vanderbilt University in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee has the unusual 
distinction of having the tallest bas- 
ketball player in the collegiate 
ranks or even in the pros for that 
matter. He is Steve Turner, a 7*4" 
250 lb. sophomore who is still grow- 
ing. Turner has been averaging 10 
points and 7 rebounds per game. 

There has been mention that he 
might be banned from play because 
of his height and the possibility that 
he might add another 25 lbs. 

Philadelphia Textile defeated 
Scranton Univ. by a 103-83 score for 
the MAC Northern division cham- 
pionship and now advances to the 
Mideast Regionals at Albright on 
March 7 in a game against Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 

Muhlenberg bested PMC 70-68 
for the Southern division champion- 
ship. 



Mat men Win 
Third Straight 

Feb. 24. The Aggie wrestlers, 
winning the first five matches and 
building an unsurpassable 19-0 
lead, dropped Lincoln University 
for their third straight victory and 
fifth in the last seven by a 29-9 
score. 

Pete Bracchi wrestling for the 
first time pinned his opponent in 
the heavyweight class at 1:59 in 
the match. Cummins, Franklin, and 
Eisenhart also pinned their man. 

118- Jim Buck, DVC, decisioned 
Ray Woodard, 15-9 

126-Ron Jennings, DVC, decision- 
ed J. C. Martin, 5-2 

134-George Cummins, DVC, pin- 
ned Mel Robinson, 5:51 

142-Jim Doyle, DVC, decisioned 
Lee Johnson, 4-1 

150-Brent Franklin, DVC, pinned 
Gordon Albert, 4:48 

158-Grezie White, LU, decisioned 
Harry Heiser, 13-2 

167— Bill Palmer, LU, decisioned 
Raynard Johnson, 7-6 

177— Jeff Lewis, LU, decisioned 
Ken Sturm, 12-6 

190-Larry Eisenhart, DVC, pinned 
Len Lewis, 3:58 

Hvy— Pete Bracchi, DVC, pinned 
Victor Wright, 1:59 

Grapplers 
Pin Mules 

Feb. 14. Winning six matches 
and gaining points on two draws 
proved to be enough as the Aggies 
dropped the Muhlenberg College 
wrestlers. 

Jim Buck, Ron Jennings, George 
Cummins, Jim Schlener, Harry 
Heiser and LarryEisenhart all scor- 
ed victories while Brent Franklin 
and Raynard Johnson scored four 
points on two draws. The teams 
record now stands at 3-6 on the 
season. 

118-Jim Buck, DVC, decisioned 
Dave Williams, 5-0 

126-Ron Jennings, DVC, decision- 
ed Rick Ciccantelli, 5-1 

134-George Cummins, DVC, pin- 
ned Steve Hall, 1:56 

142-Jim Schlener, DVC, decisioned 
Judd Wampole, 5-4 

150-Brent Franklin, DVC, drew 
with Jerry Malbre, 10-10 

158— Harry Heiser, DVC, decision- 
ed Jim Romburger, 7-0 

167-Raynard Johnson, DVC, drew 
with Ron Dulch, 4-4 

177— John Montieth, MC, decision- 
ed Ken Sturm, 11-3 

190-Larry Eisenhart, DVC, pinned 
Jim Thatcher, 3:16 

Hvy— Ken Dick, MC, decisioned 
Rick Jannotti, 14-5 



F.D.U. Downs Aggies 

Feb. 23. Fairleigh Dickinson 
Univ. (13-9) with a 30 point night 
by Jim Harmon downed the cold 
shooting Aggies by an 86-72 score 
for their seventh straight victory. 

The hot shooting Jersey Devils 
never trailed after the five minute 
mark. On the other hand, the 
Aggies just couldn't find the range. 
During a period of over five minutes 
late in the first quarter the Aggies 
managed to score only one point 
on a free throw by Richardson 
until Don Sechler scored four 
points. 

FDU's largest margin of 20 points 
(48-28) came with 47 seconds in 
the half. The half ended with a 
48-32 score. Jim Harmon scored 
20 of his game high of 30 points in 
this half to break the Aggies back. 

Even though the Aggies out- 
scored the Devils 40-38 in the 
second half they couldn't close the 
gap to less than ten points. 

The teams final record stands at 
12-9 and 8-6 in the league. This 
marks the third straight winning 
campaign under Coach John Silan. 
Silan has guided the Aggies to a 
48-35 record since taking over the 
helm in 1966. 

DVC 

FG F T 

McEntee • 6 2-4 14 

Sechler 8 6-8 22 

Polinsky 7 4-5 18 

Teeple 3 0-0 6 

Richardson 2-2 2 

Guers 1 2-2 4 

White 1 2-2 4 

Varga 10-0 2 

Zenko 0-0 





27 


18-23 


72 




FDU 








FG 


F 


T 


Harmon 


12 


6-8 


30 


Schriver 


5 


4-6 


14 


Buzzi 


3 


6-7 


12 


Scater 


4 


1-2 


9 


Fix 


4 


1-2 


9 


Everett 


6 


0-0 


12 


Daam 





0-0 





Mazzara 





0-0 







34 


18-25 


86 



ATHLETE OF THE MONTH- 
GEORGE CUMMINS 

George Cummins during the 
month of February had a 5-0-1 re- 
cord. Of his five victories three were 
by pins. The only blemish to his 
record came on the last day of the 
month when he drew against 
Wilkes. 

His overall season record was 
9-1-1 with nine consecutive victo- 
ries. His only loss was during the 
season opener against Lycoming. 

RUNNER-UP- 
DON SECHLER 

Don Sechler, for the month of 
February, had a 23.5 scoring aver- 
age while leading the basketball 
team to a 4-2 record and eight 
victories in their last ten starts. 



Aggies Dump 
P. C. B. 

Feb. 18. The DVC wrestlers top- 
ped Philadelphia College of the 
Rible by a 31-15 score for their 
third straight victory and fourth in 
the last six starts. 

The Aggie grapplers scored 
seven victories of which five were 
pins. Ron Jennings, George Cum- 
mins, Harry Heiser, Raynard John- 
son and Ken Sturm were those who 
pinned their opponents. 
118-Rod Laughin, PCB, won by 

forfeit 
126-Ron Jennings, DVC, pinned 

6 Rich Lewis, 2:58 
134-George Cummins, DVC, pin- 
ned Paul Bidsey, 2:53 
142-Jim Schlener, DVC, decision- 
ed Dave Turner, 9-7 
150-Brent Franklin, DVC, deci- 
sioned Dave Bergstrom, 8-2 
158— Harry Heiser, DVC, pinned 

Lee Gimmins, 6:42 
167-Raynard Johnson, DVC, pin- 
ned Lewis Gardner, 7:07 
177-Ken Sturm, DVC, pinned 

Floyd Garland, 2:56 
190-Robert Maranville, PCB, pin- 
ned John Hopper, 3:25 
Hvy— Butch Norton, PCB, pinned 
Rick Jannotti, 5:35 

Intramural Basketball 
Standings 

DORMS 
Dorm I 9-1 

Ulman 6-2 

Work 6-4 

Barness 6-4 

Wolfson 6-4 

Cooke 2-7 

Elson 1-8 

Dorm II 0-7 

CLUBS 

Business 8-0 

Foodlndustry 7-3 

Horticulture 6-2 

Animal Hus. 4-6 

Agronomy 3-4 

Dairy Hus 3-6 

Science 3-6 

OrnHort 1-7 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



J. CARROLL MOLLOY 

Realtor - Insurance 

Molloy Building 

30 S. Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



March 6, 1970 



Aggies Too Much 
For Profs 

Feb. 16.. Playing uninspired bas- 
ketball all evening the Aggies 
managed to hold onto a slim two 
point advantage to defeat the Profs 
of Glassboro State College by a 
75-73 score. 

The Profs with an average start- 
ing height of only a fraction over 
six feet, couldn't do much against 
the taller Aggies in the first half. 
The Aggies reached their largest 
lead (30-16) of the game and the 
half with 6:30 on the clock as 
Danny Guers scored six consecutive 
points on two three point plays 
within 30 seconds of each other. 
The half ended with a 37-27 score. 

The second half opened with 
both teams displaying cold shoot- 
ing. Both teams remained scoreless 
for 3:27 when Teeple broke the ice 
for DVC on a bucket with 4:06 
gone. 

Glassboro slowly closed the 
Aggie margin until with 41 seconds 
left Carey Ingram put the Profs 
within one point (71-70) of the 
Aggies on a pair of free throws. 
Bob McEntee then put in 4 points, 
all on free throws, to put the Aggies 
on top for good. 

Don Sechler led all scorers with 
30, while Ingram topped the visitors 
with 26. 

DVC 

FG F T 

McEntee 2 5-6 9 

Sechler 12 6-6 30 

Polinsky 1 0-1 2 

Teeple 4 0-0 8 

Richardson 10-0 2 

Guers 6 3-4 15 

White 3 3-6 9 

Varga 0-0 

Speziali 0-0 

Zenko 0-0 



29 17-24 75 

GLASSBOBO 

FG F 

Busso 1 1-2 

Atkinson 4 2-3 

Blazich 4 5-8 

Boss 1 0-0 

James 3 1-2 

Bachman 9 8-9 26 

Ingram 1 2-2 4 

Levin 4 0-0 8 



T 

3 
10 
13 

2 
7 



D.V.C. Wins Home Final 

Feb. 21. A second half scoring 
spurt and a tough zone defense 
helped the Aggies dump MAC rival 
Ursinus College by a 74-52 score. 

The Aggies could do no better 
than a four point lead through most 
of the first half until White, Polin- 
sky and Sechler scored late in the 
half. Then little Danny Guers pull- 
ed the crowd pleaser of the night. 
Guers had a bad pass stolen. He 
raced down court after the thief, 
restole the ball, dribbled back up 
court and drove in for the score. 
At this point the score was 33-22. 
The half ended with the host Aggies 
up by nine points (33-24). 

At the start of the second half 
the Aggies lead remained nine 
points until, with McEntee, Sechler, 
White and Guers leading the way, 
the Aggies exploded to a 19 lead 
and a 59-40 score. 



DVC 



McEntee 

Sechler 

Polinsky 

Teeple 

Bichardson 

Guers 

White 

Varga 

Zenko 



FG 

8 
6 
4 
3 
1 
4 
2 

1 



F 

6-7 
7-8 
0-0 
0-0 
0-0 
2-3 
1-1 
0-0 
0-0 



T 

22 

19 

8 

6 

2 

10 

5 



2 



29 

UBSINUS 
FG 

Zimmerman 2 

Schall 3 

Cattell 2 

Hartline 4 

Long 2 

Weston 

Sturgeon 

Wilkes 4 



16-19 74 



F 
0-0 

1-3 
2-4 
0-0 
2-2 
2-2 
2-3 
1-4 



T 
4 

7 
6 
8 
6 
2 
2 
9 



20 12-21 52 



27 19-26 73 



• Jewelry — Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



— SPECIAL PRICES WITH STUDENT I. D. CARDS 

— LARGE VARIETY OF TAPES 



— ALL DISCOUNTED 



— 8 TRACK, REEL TO REEL TAPES 

— CASSETTES — BLANK & PRE-RECORDED 




• Solid Stats Stereophonic • High Fidelity Speakers 
High Fidelity Phonograph . ^ Rwy| Adap|or 

• FM/AM FM Multiple Radio $100.00 with Speakers 

(bring in this ad) 

BUCKS COUNTY TV and HI-FI 

is the most reliable 
604-06 Easton Road • Rt. 611 • Cross Keys, Doylestown 



Wilkes Pins 
D. V. C. 

Feb. 28. Wilkes College, sporting 
an undefeated MAC record and an 
12-2 overall mark, downed the 
Aggies by a 43-2 score in the sea- 
son final. 

The Colonels registered seven 
pins with two going to John Marfia 
and Dennis Verzera. Both are de- 
fending MAC champs. 

George Cummins scored DVC's 
only points when he drew with 
Tom Morris in the 134 lb. class. 

The Aggies final season mark is 
5-7 with only the MAC Champion- 
ships remaining on March 6 & 7. 



118— Andy Matviak, WC, pinned 

Jim Buck, 8:14 
126-John Marfia, WC, pinned Ron 

Jennings, 4:12 
134— George Cummins, DVC, drew 

with Tom Morris, 8-8 
142— DennisVerzera, WC, pinned 

Jim Schlener, 3:04 
150— Steve Kashenbach, WC, pin- 
ned Brent Franklin, 3:51 
158-Brian Lott, WC, decisioned 

Harry Heiser, 13-6 
167-A1 Zelner, WC, pinned Ray- 

nard Johnson, 5:58 
177-Gary Willetts, WC, pinned 

Ken Sturm, 1:00 

190-Rich Ceccoli, WC, decisioned 
Larry Eisenhart, 8-2 

Hvy— Leo Roan, WC, pinned Pete 
Bracchi, 3:14 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non- Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the 




ROW 



Vol. 17, No. 4 



The Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



March 20, 1970 




Photo Credit— D. Thomas 

March 8th — The new wings of the Library were dedicated. At the doors are 
(left) Mr. Dave Shapiro, and (right) Mrs. Samuel Cook. Those two people are 
primary responsible for donating the money for the additions. The new library 
will be a beautiful landmark at DVC. 

traveling? c#6k 71* 

Our student government is co- 
operating with the Sheraton Hotels 
and the Association of Student 
Governments to bring to you (stu- 
dents and faculty) a unique pro- 
gram. This program entitles you to 
make a reservation through the 
D.V.C.S.G. and get a discount on 
your motel or hotel room. This offer 
is not like the stand-by reservation 
that some airlines offer; it applies 
almost anytime you travel. The spe- 
cial rates are offered during the 
following periods: 

Wednesday preceding Thanks- 
giving through the following 
Sunday. 

December 15 to January 1 

July 1 through Labor Day 



A-Doy Beard 
Growing Contest 

On March 9 and 10, the official 
beginning of beards, Van Dykes, 
and assorted facial hirsuteness pro- 
ceeded calmly. In Aggie-Land, 
these days marked the registration 
for the A-Day beard growing con- 
test. The contestants signed in for 
their "own thing", whether it is a 
full shag or a sculptured master- 
piece. There are approximately 
sixty registered men, who can be 
differientiated from the regular 5 
o'clock shadowers only by the fact 
that they will be issued I.D. Cards, 
which will verify their participa- 
tion. The judging will take place 



A Lumber Jack's 
Bold Adventure 

April 15 Student Government will 
proudly present Don Cooper in assembly. 
Mr. Cooper will show a travelog-docu- 
mentary film of Alaska. 

Don Cooper is a true lumberjack raised 
in the Rocky Mountains. His formal edu- 
cation is negligible, but his practical 
education is earned from the school of 
hard knocks. 

For the last six year's 'Coop' has spent 
his summers in the logging camps and his 
winters on the lecture platform. His 
spectacular film and easy-going approach 
have delighted the most discriminating 
audiences throughout the nation. 

There is something here to satisfy 
every student. Travelog fans will see the 
sights of Alaska, including Mount Mc- 
Kinley, Alaska's virgin forests, a hump- 
back whale leaping and cavorting, and 
the Yukon. 

The hearty Aggie will see how Alaskans 
'live off the land.' The veritable super- 
market of good things to eat includes 
crabs, sea cucumbers, sea weed, 'gum 
boots', and mussels. 

Learn how the Thlinget Indians of 
Yakutat build a dug-out canoe with the 
most primitive tools. 

Conservation-minded people will be 
interested in seeing the sad depletion of 
the salmon and the resultant effect on 
the rural villages of Alaska. 

There will be something for everyone 
as Don Cooper proudly presents his true- 
life adventure, A Lumberjack's Bold 
Adventure. 



Friday, Saturday and Sunday °„ er A " D t a y weekend ' af * r , whi £ 
evenings throughout the year 



If you are planning a trip, con- 
tact me in Room 16 Elson Hall and 
111 make your reservation. Then 
when you arrive at the one of the 
over 120 Sheraton Inns, just pre- 
sent your student card at the desk. 
"Happy Motoring." 



all growths are supposed to be 
gone. So to you Sixty-some men; 
Grow Man, Grow! ! ! 



ATTENTION PUBLICATIONS 
REPRESENTATIVES: 

The Publications Banquet will be 
held April 2, at the Collegeville Inn. 
Dinner will be at 6:30. Tne speaker 
is Mr, Larry Hall of the Intelligencer. 
He will speak about pollution prob- 
lems in northern Bucks County. 

It is of utmost importance tnat you 
see me before the banquet. I am in 
Goldman Hall, Boom 220. 

— Mike Morgan 



Honey Extractor Stolen 

On the night of March 5th the 
ex-poultry house, better known now 
as the Bee House, was broken into. 
The front door was forced by per- 
sons unknown to gain entrance to 
steal the honey extractor and $200 
worth of various other bee equip- 
ment. The equipment which is vital 
in teaching Apiculture, is being 
quickly replaced. The matter of the 
robbery has been turned over to 
the local police for investigation. 
Anyone having information related 
to this incident should contact Mr. 
Sauer confidentially. 




A picture of Alaska from the film which 
will be shown at Assembly April 15. 



Sophomore Class 
Spring Concert: 
Three Groups!! 

The Sophomore class of Delaware 
Valley College is proud to present on 
April 4, 1970, a Spring Concert. This 
concert is to help celebrate the coming 
of spring to the Bucks County area, and 
to usher out the coldness of the past 
winter. 

The concert will feature three top 
recording groups. The top group will be 
"TEN WHEEL DBIVE." This group has 
participated in several rock festivals, and 
has made several nationally-prominent 
recordings. Their first album, "Construc- 
tion #1,' features female vocalist Genya 
Bavan and a powerful nine-piece instru- 
mental group. Singles off this album are 
"I am a Want Ad," "House In Central 
Park," and "Tightrope." 

Along with 7 TEN WHEEL DBIVE" 
will be "FEVEB TBEE." This group is 
well known on the west coast and will 
be making this concert their first appear- 
ance in the Philadelphia area. FEVEB 
TBEE has had three albums, "FEVEB 
TBEE," "ANOTHEB TIME ANOTHEB 
PLACE," and their newest release, 
"CBEATION," all of which have become 
hot items on the progressive rock market. 
Group number three will be "WAL- 
DEN POND." This new group has been 
making it big in all of their concerts. 
They are probably best known for their 
tremendous stage appearance. They really 
get an audience into a frency. This group 
has just signed with MEBCUBY records. 
If you want to get a taste of these 
groups before the concert just listen to 
WMMB FM 93.3 or WDAS FM 105.3. 

You have to help us make this concert 
work. Any festival like tins has to have 
money to make it work, so we have to 
charge a slight fee to see the show. The 
charge is $4.50, and yoo can have any 
seat in the area. You can get tickets at 
Gimbels in Philadelphia or at the en- 
trance, or you can w rite to the Sophomore 
class of Delaware Valley College, Doyles- 
town, Pennsylvania. Please tell us how 
many tickets you want, and enclose a 
check or money order. The Concert 
begins at eight o'clock, hope to see you 
there. 



SPECIAL DEADLINE 
FOR ELECTIONS: 

Students interested in becoming a 
class officer, or a Student Government 
representative can submit an article 
containing campaign promises no later 
than April 2. The size of the article 
is not to exceed one hundred fifty 
words. There will be no time to re- 
write articles submitted. Therefore, if 
an article is too long it will be omit- 
ted. The editor will not be responsible 
for erroneous presentations of ideas 
due to condensing of articles. This is 
your chance to get to the whole stu- 
dent body. 

Deadline for other articles from the 
regular writers is April first. None will 
be accepted later because of extremely 
tight scheduling of time. 

Candidate Deadline — April 2 
All Others— April 1 



APRIL RECRUITERS 

APBIL 1— U. S. Air Force 

2 — Pennsylvania Department of Highways 

Horticulture of Agronomy-Boadside Development 

Chemistry-Materials Engineers 
3 — Tuco Products — Cancelled 
6— Peace Corps 
7— Betail Credit Co. 

Field Bepresentatives 
8 — U.S.N.A.F. and Naval Officer Information Team 
9 — Same as above 
10 — Pennsylvania Department of Welfare 

SIGN-UP IN PLACEMENT OFFICE 

Government Career Trainees 

Caseworker Trainees 

Therapeutic Activities Worker 

Teaching Positions 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



March 20, 1970 



CLUB NEWS 



Hort Club 
Holds Banquet 

The annual Hort Club Banquet 
was held on Wednesday, March 4, 
at the Collegeville Inn in College- 
ville. In attendance were 27 Hort 
Club members, Dr. Feldstein, Dr. 
and Mrs. Blackmon, Mr. and Mrs. 
Howell, Mr. Wood, and our guest 
speaker, Wayne Winner. The smor- 
gasbord-style meal included lobster, 
shrimp, king crab meat, and roast 
beef. 

Mr. Winner, a graduate of Dela- 
ware Valley College and presently 
employed by the Ortho Division of 
the Chevron Chemical Company as 
an agriculturist, gave an extremely 
interesting talk and slide presenta- 
tion about his company. He explain- 
ed the life of a new chemical begin- 
ning in the lab and ending on 
Ortho's various test plots in Cali- 
fornia, Florida, South Carolina, and 
Mount Holly, New Jersey. 

In addition to new chemicals, 
Ortho is constantly searching for 
new and more efficient methods of 
applying these chemicals. Spraying 
undiluted chemicals directly from 
their containers is near the per- 
fection stage. Wayne also pointed 
out that a single seasonal applica- 
tion of fungicides and insecticides 
will soon allow fanners to spray 
only once a season. 

One of the highlights of the night 
was the presentation of the coveted 
Outstanding Senior Horticulturist 
Award to Dave Reynolds. This 
award denotes exceptional dedica- 
tion to the Hort Club and high 
scholastic achievement, both of 
which Dave has exhibited in his 
years as a Hort major. 

Thus ended one of the most in- 
teresting and enjoyable evenings of 
the year. 

F.I. and Latin Casino? 

The Food Industry Club held a 
meeting on Wednesday, February 
25, 1970. The Annual F.I. Club 
Banquet was discussed and it was 
agreed that the club will go to the 
Latin Casino in Cherry Hill, N.J., 
on March 23. The club is going for 
the first performance, with the fea- 
ture attraction being the Tempta- 
tions. 

The club also held a discussion 
on a club trip but no definite plans 
have been made. The A-Day week- 
end was discussed and any member 
wishing to sign up for A-Day work 
hours may do so by contacting Tom 
Brewer. 

After the business part of the 
meeting, Mr. Ted Wazinski, a 
micro-biologist with the Food and 
Drug Administration, gave a talk 
on cyclomates and food additives. 
Mr. Wazinski also talked on the 
history of the F.D.A. 

The next meeting of the Food 
Industry Club will be held on 
Wednesday, March 11, 1970. Any- 
one interested is cordially invited 
to attend. 



Dairy Society 
Elects New Officers 

The Dairy Society, meeting on 
March 10, 1970, welcomed the fol- 
lowing newly-elected officers: presi- 
dent, Guy Hitz (71); vice-presi- 
dent, Tom Boyer (71); secretary, 
Larry Rutter (72); treasurer, Jim 
Musser (72); intramurals repre- 
sentative, Ken Risser (72); publi- 
cations representative, Gino La- 
Bruzo (73). These officers will 
serve the term of 1970-71. 

The club has planned an interest- 
ing trip for April 10-11. This trip 
will be centered around Mereditn 
Farm Ayrshires, owned by David 
Lampert, of Tops Field, Massachu- 
setts. Meredith Farm, the home of 
world's record Ayrshires producing 
32,210 lbs. of milk and 1,110 lbs. 
of fat in 305 days, is internationally 
known for a combination of type 
and production. The Dairy Society 
will also visit Poverty Hollow Hol- 
steins Farm, in Newton, Connecti- 
cut, and Hanover Hill Guernseys at 
Millbrook, New York. Recreation 
will include an overnight stay at a 
camp site in the area of the Hudson 
River Valley. 

Agronomy Club 
Sponsors Flower Sale 

As in past years the Agronomy 
Club will hold a sale of Easter 
flowers on campus before the vaca- 
tion. In order to expand our sales 
this year we will also sell in the 
surrounding community. We urge 
students and faculty to take advan- 
tage of this sale. 

In order to improve upon the 
club's list of activities a committee 
was formed to initiate new club 
projects. A project that will be of 
particular interest to the club and 
all plant majors is the minimum 
tillage plot. The club is also for- 
mulating plans for a trip. At the 
present we are looking into the 
possibility of visiting a Vermont 
watershed project. Aside from get- 
ting ready for this year's A-Day, 
the club is busily working on the 
Annual Agronomy Club Banquet. 
More news on this event will be 
announced at a later date. 

A.P.O. Holds Election 
Of Officers 

The regular meeting of Alpha 
Phi Omega fraternity was held on 
March 10, 1970. The main topic was 
the election of officers. Those elect- 
ed were: 
Bob Badat— President 
Bill Storde-lst V. President 
Rich Himeleski— 2nd V. President 
Ben Caleb— Recording Secretary 
Dave Sustak— Cone. Secretary 
Jim Lutz— Treasurer 
Bill Cook— Historian 
Wayne Scibilia— Sgt. at Arms 
Dr. On— Chrm. of Advisory Bd. 



7 torn Out S. $. Pie&ident 

"Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that 
the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans . . ." From the Inau- 
gural Address of John F. Kennedy. 

The decade had begun so bright. A new President was inaugurated who brought 
class, wit, respect, and culture into the White House. John F. Kennedy was the 
youngest man ever elected to the Presidency of the United States. He was a scholar, 
a writer and a good politician. His youthfulness and vigor attracted both the young 
and the old. He summoned his countrymen of all ages to help get this country moving 
again. The youth of the country respnded not only by joining the Peace Corps but 
also by becoming involved in formulating and improving the quality of American 
life. 

The young President's accomplishments were few: Nuclear Test Ban, cooling off 
of the Cold War, Peace Corps, Cuban Crisis, Youth Fitness, speeded up the space 
race for a 1969 manned moon landing, and a growing respect for America throughout 
the world. The President made mistakes: the Bay of Pigs. And he promised South 
Vietnam advisory assistance against the Communists. But the young and old believed. 

On November 22, 1963, afterjust less than three years in office, he was shot and 
killed in Dallas. The hopes and promises of the New Frontier abruptly came to an 
end and the Great Society was born. 

Lyndon Johnson became the 36th President of the United States. Lyndon John- 
son's first years in the White House saw outstanding congressional action. He was a 
shrewd politician in getting his legislation passed, but as leader he was poor. A good 
leader must have an insight or instinctive knowledge of what has to be done at the 
present to accommodate and better the future. The long-needed federal legislation 
in civil rights was finally enacted, but again the program of eliminating all poverty 
was wholly inadequate. The nation's economy was allowed to run wild, and as a 
result the rate of inflation soared to dangerous levels. 

It is a fact that he inherited the Vietnam Conflict, but it was his administration 
that deepened our involvement in Vietnam. By the end of 1965, Vietnam had become 
a real war — his war. The young and gradually the old became disillusioned with the 
Vietnam War. The American people were witnessing rising disorders in their own 
land, in their own streets and on the campuses. 

When Lyndon Johnson succeeded to the office, the American people were closer 
together as a people than they had ever been before. After five years of Lyndon 
Johnson, the American people were so far apart as a people that internal destruction 
of the American society became a threat. 

The country desperately needed a change in national leadership. Someone was 
needed who could end the Vietnam War, stop the increasing crime rate, and halt 
inflation. However, of greater importance was the need for a leader who could 
regain the respect, strength and support of the American people and settle the 
society's injustices and grievances. 

Lyndon Johnson's Great Society did not succeed. Realizing his failures and lack 
of certainty in developing solutions for the country's foreign and domestic difficulties 
and the ever increasing probability of political defeat in the coming election year, 
Lyndon Johnson wisely decided not to seek a second full term. 

The decade began with the political defeat of Richard Nixon for Preside; it of the 
United States and is ending with him as President of the country. Presideir Richard 
Nixon has inherited more difficulties than any President ever inherited. 

His first year in office has brought very little congressional action. The fights 
against inflation and crime have not shown any reversing effects on the skyrocketing 
trends. The monetary demands of the military have been too high and too often 
supported by the Nixon Administration. 

President Nixon's greatest success, thusfar, has been the policy of a scheduled 
withdrawal of all American troops from Vietnam coupled with the Vietnamizing of 
the Vietnam War. The political future of Richard Nixon will depend upon the 
progress of the de-Americanization of the Vietnam War. 

— by Gery J. Fisher 




A sign showing how Del Vol 
expands to make it a better 
institution for it's students. 



Photo Credit— D. Thomas 




Doylestown, Penna. 18901 

-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR .^^T Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR l»rry Martel 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hogyot 

PHOTO EDITOR Dava Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parkor 

BUSINESS MANAGER David Toichman 

TYPING MANAGER Delbert Jones 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 

Sol Cavinass, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allan Gordon, Abbott Laa, Dava Suitak, 
Howard Handarson, Bruca Richards, Brut* Giasa, JoflF Keir, Bill Turner. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Marti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



March 20, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



The MAC Northern division all-star 
basketball team has been released with 
DVC's Don Sechler a first team selection 
at Center. Philadelphia Textile dominated 
the selections with five players on the 
first and second teams. 

Gene Munford of Scranton University, 
third team Small College All-American 
by the Associated Press, was voted the 
Northern Division's Most Valuable Play- 

FIRST TEAM 
Gene Munford — Scranton — Forward 
Jim McGilvery — Textile — Forward 
Ray Hodge — Wagner — Guard 
Mike O'Rourke — Textile — Guard 
Don Sechler— DVC— Center 

SECOND TEAM 

Joe Pierantozzi — Textile 

John Smith — Juniata 

Bruce Shively — Textile 

Bill McCue — Scranton 

Carl Poole— Textile 

Philadelphia Textile recently won the 
NCAA College Division basketball cham- 
pionship by defeating Tennessee State by 
a 76-65 score. They also beat Youngs- 
town, American International and Uni- 
versity of Califorina at Riverside on the 
way to the crown. 

Ironically the Associated Press All- 
American team did not recognize a sin- 
gle Textile player and this even includes 
Honorable Mentions. This is actually a 
tribute to the great team effort by the 
Rams who ended the season with a 28 
game winning streak and a 29-2 record 
overall. 

DVC sent seven wrestlers to the MAC's 
but could only score 12 points. The tour- 
nament was won by Wilkes with a rec- 
ord 100 points. Jim Buck (118), George 
Cummins (134), Brent Franklin (150), 
Harry Heiser (158), lost in the prelim- 
inary round while teammates Raynard 
Johnson ( 167 ) and Larry Eisenhart 
(177) scored wins to advance to the 
quarterfinals. 



In the quarterfinals Ron Jennings 
(126), Johnson and Eisenhart lost by 
decisions. 

LSU's Pistol Pete Maravich is the lead- 
ing major college performer but he still 
is short of the all-time record of 3,759 by 
Bob Hopkins of Grambling also in 
Louisiana. 

Louisiana now claims that Greg Pro- 
cell is the country's most prolific high 
school basketball scorer of all-time. 

Procell, from Ebarb, Louisiana, has 
scored 6.608 points in 178 varsity games. 
Procell also plans to remain in the state 
to go to college. 

The 3,384 points by Pennsylvania's 
Tom McMillen doesn't even come close, 
although a national mark was recently 
claimed by the 6'11" Mansfield resident. 

McMillen's three year total is just a 
few hundred points above Proceirs out- 
put for the 1969-70 season — 3,079 points 
for a 46.6 average. 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.FRI. 9-7 - SAT. 9-4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTING A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

SAMUEL MOYER 

Master Barber 








500.00 



Fiat celebrates the Age of Motion. The 850 Sport Racer. 
Body by Bertone. Powered with a new 903 cc. engine. Packed with 
luxury features and direct-reading instruments like the 
dash-mounted tachometer. Front wheel disc brakes, radial tires. 
See it now. It's the moving force! 



FIAT 



Keystone Motors 

235 S. MAIN ST., DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
348-9438 



Winter Sports 
Banquet Held 

On March 10 Delaware Valley College 
held its annual winter sports banquet at 
the Doylestown Country Club. A total of 
twenty-three athletes from the basketball 
and wrestling teams received awards. 

Don Sechler received the Most Valu- 
able Basketball Player award and the 
High Scoring trophy while Danny Guers 
won the Most Improved Player award. 

For the wrestling squad Frosh George 
Cummins received the Most Valuable 
Wrestler award and the 'Central Bucks 
Jaycee Loyalty award was presented to 
Ken Sturm. 

Next year's captains were also an- 
nounced. 6*1 1" Don Sechler will again 
serve as the basketball captain and Larry 
Eisenhart will be the new wrestling cap- 
tain. 



THE SPORTS QUIZ 



1. In the 1981 World Series what pitcher 
gave up the series winning home run to 
Bill Mazeroski of the Pirates? 

2. What stadium in the U. S. has the largest 
seating capacity? 

3. Name the person who was the first man to 
nin a suh four minute mile and in what 
year. 

4. Who was selected the Year's Best Athlete 
in 1964? 

5. What player is second in the all-time home 
run hitters list behind Babe Ruth? 

6. Match these teams with their old home 
town. 

u. San Francisco Warriors 

b. Detroit Pistons 

c. Cincinnati Royals 

7. Name the former DVC athlete who holds 
the MAC college division shot put record. 

8. What famous all-pro once was head foot- 
ball coach at DVC? 

In 1962 who won the Heisman award? 
This is awarded annually to the nation's 
leading college football player. 
What college won the first Rose Bowl 
game? 



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Basketball 
Intramural Finals 

by Tim Berman 

Business used a combined team effort 
to defeat Dorm I for the intramural bas- 
ketball crown, 81-61, on March 5. Sam 
"Base" Iancale scored seventeen of his 
game high 28 points in the second stanza 
to break open a close contest and iced 
the win with three baskets and a pair of 
assists in the final two minutes. 

Turnovers and cold shooting proved 
to be the decisive factors in Dorm I's 
loss. The Dorm team threw the ball away 
23 times as compared with 13 for Busi- 
ness, and normally high scoring guards 
Larry Young and Dave Bitter managed 
only five baskets between them, though 
Young was credited with 11 assists. 

Leading by three at the half, Business 
went on a 13-2 streak early into the sec- 
ond period and were never threatened 
after that. Joe Hilton and Jim Douglass 
were strong off the boards, and Charley 
Smith and Denny Snyder getting key 
haskets in that streak. 

The victory gave Business their tenth 
consecutive win while for the Dorm 
team, it was their second loss after six 
victories. 

Dorm I 

FG F T 

Caviness 7 0-0 14 

Ritter 3 1-1 7 

Reisen 3 4-6 10 

Williamson 2 1-2 5 

Young 2 1-1 5 

Monfardini 2 1-1 5 

Bockrath 1 0-C 2 

Buccierelli 4 0-6 8 

Curry 0-0 

Funkhouser 

Regula 2 1-1 5 

Brown 0-0 



c 



TOTALS 26 

Business 

FG 

Douglass 4 

Hilton 6 

Smith 4 

Snyder 6 

Thomas 3 

Iancale 11 

Shank ..... 1 



9-12 61 



F 

1-2 
'-2 
0-0 
1-2 
2-2 



T 

9 
13 

8 
13 

8 



6-10 28 
0-0 2 



TOTALS 35 11-18 81 



A Memorial of the Past Basketball Season and Big "SEC" 



ASSIES 198 1- 

VISITORSJOO) 




Page Four 



THE FURROW 



March 20, 1970 



1969-70 Final Basketball Statistics 



Games 
Played 


Name 


Sfu 
Atts. 


its 
Made 


Pet. 


Att 


Fouls 
Made 


Pet 


Shots 
Missed 


Rbds. 


Fouled 
Out 


Total 
Points 


Assts. 


Fouls 


21 


Sechler, Don 


347 


171 


49 


133 


97 


73 


212 


322 


3 


439 


45 


61 


21 


McEntee, Bob 


266 


107 


41 


63 


41 


65 


181 


84 





255 


68 


40 


20 


White, Ralph 


158 


64 


41 


63 


46 


73 


111 


120 





174 


49 


22 


21 


Guers, Dan 


115 


51 


44 


57 


38 


67 


83 


27 





140 


97 


41 


21 


Polinsky, Bob 


127 


59 


47 


30 


21 


70 


77 


97 


3 


139 


9 


59 


21 


Teeple, Greg 


148 


59 


40 


33 


16 


49 


106 


68 





134 


17 


45 


19 


Richardson, F. 


64 


26 


41 


22 


17 


77 


43 


41 





69 


6 


18 


13 


Wentzel, Tom 


61 


29 


48 


9 


4 


48 


37 


16 





62 


9 


17 


11 


Schade, Gary 


54 


20 


37 


14 


11 


78 


37 


23 


4 


51 


36 


39 


10 


Varga, Lou 


31 


12 


39 


2 


1 


50 


20 


8 


1 


25 


10 


13 


11 


Zenko, Steve 


15 


8 


53 


5 


5 


100 


7 


13 





21 


4 


12 


7 


Speziali, Frank 


6 


3 


50 


2 


1 


50 


4 


11 





7 





5 




Others 


20 


14 




2 







11 


9 





28 


4 


S 


21 


DVC Totals 


1415 


623 


44 


436 


299 


69 


929 


988 


11 


1545 


354 


.380 


21 


Opponents 


1339 


561 


42 


493 


326 


66 


945 


886 


6 


1448 


— 


335 



Wrestling MAC. 
Records At DVC 



Final Intramural 
Basketball Standings 



TEAM RECORDS 

Most pins one match — 
4— Dickinson '66-'67 
•4— Lebanon Valley '69-70 

Most pins one season — 
12— '68-'69 

Most points one match — 
31— Lebanon Valley '68-'69 

Most points one season — 
140— '68-'69 

Most wins one season — 
4— '68-'69(8-4'68-'69) 

Best percentage — 
50.0— '68-'69 ( 66.8% '68-'69 ) 

INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 

*Most wins one season — 

7— Ceorge Cummins '73, '69-'70 

Most wins career — 18 

3— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'69 

•Most season consecutive wins — 
7^George Cummins '73, '69-70 

Most career consecutive wins — 
10— Lloyd Corbett '69, '66-'68 

Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'69 

Most points one season — 

27— George Cummins 73, '69-70 

Most points career — 

66— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'69 

Most pins one season — 

4-^Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'67 



Most pins career — 

6— Everett Chamberlain '69, *66-'67 

Most near falls one season — 

3— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'67 
Everett Chamberlain '69, '68-'69 
Steve Burnett 72, '68-'69 

Most near falls career — 
7— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'69 

Most predicaments one season — 
5— Stan Lapetz 71, '68-'69 

Most predicaments career — 
6— Stan Lapetz 71, '67-'69 

Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'69 

•Most escapes one season — 

10— George Cummins 73, '69-70 

Most escapes career — 

11— Lloyd Corbett '69, '65-'68 

Most reverses one season — 
10— Stan Lapetz 71, '68-*69 

Most reverses career — 

15— Stan Lapetz 71, *67-'69 

Most takedowns one season 
22— Steve Burnett 72, '68-'69 

Most takedowns career — 
23— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'67 

Best season percentage — 
857— Everett Chamberlain '69, '68-69 
Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'67 
Everett Chamberlain' 69, '67'68 
Lloyd Corbett '69, '67-'68 

Best career percentage — 
857— Everett Chamberlain '69, '66-'67 



CLUB STANDINGS 

Bus. Ad 9 

Food Industry 7 3 

Hort 6 4 

Agronomy 4 4 

Animal Hus 5 6 

Science 3 6 

Dairy 3 7 

Orn. Hort 1 7 



DORM STANDINGS 

Dorm I 10 

Wolfson 8 

Barness 7 

Work 7 

Ulman 7 

Cooke 3 

Elson l 10 

Dorm II 7 



CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: 
Business Ad. — 81 
Dorm, 1—61 



EXP/\NS10N? 



-ESTABLISHED DURING THE 1969-70 SEASON 



PATRONIZE 

"FURROW" 

ADVERTISERS 




March 20, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



From Our Critic 
At Large 

by Larry Martel 

There has been more complaining than 
writing about the dining hail. There has 
been more improvements this year than 
last year. Yet, the biggest problem yet 
unsolved is that the dining hall is not 
large enough to accommodate 690 
mothers to cook the meals for their sons 
in college. Another unsolvable problem 
it seems if you listen to the talk is that 
there are lots of weak stomachs in this 
generation of college students. Comments 
about the food run from words like poor 
to unprintable phrases. This writer puts 
forth a question to the student body. 
What kind of food did you expect when 
you went to college? Eh? Think about 
that and try to answer with something 
different from that vein. Then maybe 
you will begin to think of the high food 
prices and all the associated problems 
the dining hall goes through to put a 
plate of hot "what is it?" out for you. 

All you have to do if you want im- 
provements like changing "what is it" 
to something that is known is to find 
Fred Harries. He will lend an ear to your 
gripes and convey your messages to the 
manager of the dining hall. Then the 
wait can be short or long. That might 
be bad as by that time your stomach 

{>robably will be used to the food just 
ike everyone else. 

Lets face it, what do you have to lose 
by seeing Fred Harties? Chances are he 
might be able to do something about the 
dining hall. 

DVCs Movie 
Critic Speaks 

The human degradation of the de- 
pression era is vividly depicted by Di- 
rector Sidney Pollack in his latest film 
"They Shoot Horses Don't They." Dyna- 
mic performances by Jane Fonda, Red 
Buttons and Susannah York etch a por- 
trait of the marathon dances of the time. 
Gig Young acted his heart out as the 
promotor of the Marathon. A change of 
pace from his usual comic parts, he plays 
a heartless, alcoholic, two-faced-slob in- 
terested only in the show's success and 
his. "Yow-sa, Yow-sa, Yow-sa," echos in 
the drab, Pacific Ballroom as the booming 
voice of the promotor tries to stir the 
crowd. "They've come to see some suffer- 
ing," he says behind the scenes, and 
suffering they surely see. Young's per- 
formance has rightfully earned him an 
Academy Award Nomination for Best 
Supporting Actor. 

Another fantastic performance was 
scored by Michael Sarrazin. Dance part- 
ner of Jane Fonda in the marathon, he 
becomes involved in her search for suc- 
cess in a world where the cards are 
stacked against her, and finally in her 
ultimate despair. Sarrazin's face mirrors 
the cruelty of the times and the de- 
struction of the human spirit - HOPE. 
Seeing a fellow human being, like a 
crippled animal, seeking only an end to 
its suffering, he puts it out of its misery. 
"After all they shoot horses don't they." 

The story itself at times may be some- 
what hard to swallow — too contrived. 
The characterization is too shallow, 
weakening the impact and power of the 
story. 

Miss Fonda was probably not the best 
selection for the down-and-out loser she 
portrays, but she is nevertheless effective. 

All in all "They Shoot Horses Don't 
They," is a touching, depressing movie 
about a depressing period in American 
history. It is a meaningful movie and 
certainly one of the year's best. 

John Martin 



c& Wlettage <Jo 

and 
7Ht. Sennez 

Does the campaign to make DVC 
beautiful stop at the railroad tracks or 
has the idea of doing something about 
the incinerator failed to occur to people 
at this college? The incinerator really 
ruins the green scenery of the orchards 
like a gigantic mole on the face of a 
pretty girH There it stands, its three walls 
a dirty monument to the waste that can 
be gotten rid of at DVC. 

During the big kick of removing the 
dumps in the orchards the beautification 
program somehow overlooked the spot 
closer to home. Maybe people standing 
at the train station don t look in that 
direction. But the incinerator stands 
guard to the peach orchard. Maybe the 
maintenance men don't want to lose the 
easy way they have of backing up to 
dump the trash. The point is that there 
is that smelly, dirty, smoking, ugly thing 
jumping out at anybody going through 
the underpass to see the nice orchards. 
We have an Ornamental Horticulture 
Department at DVC and yet there is 
this thing standing in all its sickly glory. 
It just doesn't sound right. The question 
is what is so beautiful looking at a pile 
of ashes? 

A simple way of easing the problem is 
just to turn the wallless side 90° to the 
orchard side. The people on the train 
and elsewhere wont' see the mess. A 
more radical approach is to hide it some- 
place where it wouldn't be a fire hazard. 
It should not be too hard to find a suit- 
able site among the college's 900 acres. 
So, are your wavelengths on the same 
frequency Dr. Fieldstein and Mr. Ben- 
nerr 



THE DUTCH 
MAID 

LAUNDERERS 

Coin-Op. 
LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 

191 S. Clinton St. 



KERSHNERS 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



Mention "THE FURROW 
When You Shop 



STAN BOWERS 

MEN'S STORE 

Van Heusen • Farah 

Shirts Slacks 

PBM Suits • Botany 500 

19 N. Main Doylestown 



FROM THE 
BOWLING LANES 

by Conrad Adatni 
The team from Barness has won 
first place in the DVC Intramural 
league by defeating Elson B in a 
three-game roll-off ending the first 
half of the season. Members of the 
winning team are: Robert Rohr- 
baugh, John Wale ski, William 
Reed, Jim Ambrose and alternate 
Al Stein. 

The highest game of the season 
is a 247 bowled by Robert Abram- 
son with Ted Williams' 221 in sec- 
ond place and Robert Chung's 220 
coming in third. The high series is 
a 633 also rolled by Bob Abramson 
with Ted Williams coming in sec- 
ond with a 574 and Bill Reed one 
pin behind, in third place, with 
573. 

INTRAMURAL BOWLING 
STANDINGS 

End of First Half 

1. Barness 37 11 

2. Elson B 37 11 

3. Lasker 33 15 

4. Mandell 29 19 

5. Wolfson2 28 20 

6. Horticulture 26 22 

7. Cook 24 24 

8. Ulman 20 28 

9. Elson A 20 28 

10. Dairy 18 30 

11. Newman 17 31 

12. Wolfson3 14 34 

13. Orn. Hort 7 41 

14. Wolfson 1 6 42 

Individual Averages 

Barness 

Rohrbaugh 146 

Waleski 138 

Reed 151 

Ambrose 106 

Stein 111 

Dairy 

Ingerto 154 

Hitz 139 

Volk 144 

Harteis 123 

Elson B 

Chung 141 

Briegel 158 

Christensen 145 

Abramson 174 

Cook 

Detrick 142 

Wright 137 

Cook 115 

Stinnard 120 

Elson A 

Burke 120 

Barrow 125 

Chambers 122 

Cobb 130 

Hort. 

Bonner 126 

Edzek 144 

Piotrowski 135 

Ross 133 

Esbenshade 128 

Lasker 

Roux 143 

Williams 168 

t , Roszel 140 

Brietweiser 159 

Neuman 

Taylor 148 

Strom 142 

Sobel 148 

Tower 167 



Ulman 

Piznik 114 

McCarter 131 

Noll 137 

Steele 121 

Wolfson 2 

Herbert 128 

Harris 110 

Best 137 

Hafner 162 

Mandell 

Adami 154 

Nielson 134 

Stoll 123 

Goodwin 165 

Orn. Hort. 
Alim 116 

Dvorak 137 

Stevens 110 

Vibbert 132 

Wolfson 1 

Kier 121 

Gorden 108 

Pettinato 149 

Gould 115 

Wolfson 3 

Bennett 114 

King 104 

Gibson 136 

Hewitt 126 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 

Drtu Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEFNS 

THOM AAcAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 



348-5072 



DOYLESTOWN 18901 




Mr. Don Cooper who will talk about 
his lumberjack experiences on April 15. 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



March 20, 1970 



Fall 1969 Honor Roll of D.V.C 



Academic 
CLASS OF 1970 Average 

Bailey, Brian A 3.75 

Bair, Earl R 3.33 

Barycki, Emil J., Jr 3.41 

Bert, John S., Jr 3.33 

Eutermoser, Mark 3.57 

Evans, David N 3.76 

Fennikoh, Frederick 3.35 

Guzy, Gerald J 3.50 

Hubbard, John W. 3.60 

Irwin, Philip Ross 3.41 

Loveless, Richard 3.82 

Monfardini, Joseph 3.80 

Rathey, Kenneth H 3.60 

Rayner, David 3.37 

Rightler, William D 3.57 

Roux, Kenneth H 3.62 

Schlieder, Quentin 4.00 

Sillivan, Donald R., Jr 4.00 

Snively, Donald, Jr 3.47 

Timko, Donald R 3.42 

Traurig, Joseph C, Jr 3.41 

Uebersax, Mark A. 3.58 

Zimmerman, Harry K, Jr. 3.41 



Academic 
CLASS OF 1971 Average 

Ahearn, John M 3.38 

Babe, Rodney 3.81 

Boyer, Thomas A 3.25 

Breneman, J. Roy 3.81 

Fraccaroli, James R. 3.23 

Gotthardt, Raymond W 3.35 

Grunow, Ernest R., Jr 3.43 

Ingerto, Dana G 3.25 

Readinger, Daniel S., Jr 3.20 

Reed, William A 3.33 

Rice, Brian 3.33 

Robbins, Larry E 3.56 

Rose, Dennis L 3.53 

Roup, Daniel A 3.82 

Rutherford, James J., Jr 3.40 

Sheaffer, Craig 3.81 

Taylor, Robert W 3.40 

Thomas, James C 3.25 

Vargo, Alex W., Jr 3.40 

Young, Roger A. 3.58 



Academic 
CLASS OF 1972 Average 

Adami, Conrad W 3.33 

Angstadt, Russell E 3.82 

Barefoot, Russell E 3.23 

Bracchi, Peter 3.35 

Brebeck, Howard W 3.41 

Buckner, David H 3.20 

Cook, Thomas V 3.82 

DeSimone, Dennis N 3.20 



Citizenship 

3.0 
3.1 
3.0 
3.4 
3.5 
3.3 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.3 
3.4 
3.4 
3.1 
3.0 
3.2 
3.0 
3.2 
3.0 
3.3 
3.0 
3.0 
3.6 
3.0 



Citizenship 

3.2 
3.1 
3.0 
3.1 
3.2 
3.0 
3.3 
3.1 
3.1 
3.0 
3.2 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.2 
3.3 
3.1 
3.2 
3.3 
3.0 



Citizenship 

3.2 
3.2 
3.2 
3.0 
2.7 
3.2 
3.4 
3.0 



DiCola, Charles G 

Esbenshade, Kenneth L. 
Houghton, Richard D. 
Howard, Stephen J. 
Jones, Delbert E. 

Kravetsky, Nicholas 

Kravitz, Joel 

Lehman, Richard P. 
Leinbach, William A., Jr. 
Levine, Eli 
Lewis, Lanny R. 

McLean, William 

Morris, Joseph G. 
Myers, Ronald L. 
Neilson, William A. 

Newcomer, Paul C 

Pancari, Gregory 

Pendracky, Leon J 

Porcaro, Richard J. 
Powell, Timothy S. 
Rossi, Anthony D., Jr. 
Schlegel, Gerald 

Schuler, Jon D 

Smith, Richard S 

Sweeney, Bernard 
Townsend, Kenneth W. 

Weiss, Mark A. 

Zuck, Raymond W 



3.26 
3.23 
3.35 
4.00 
3.82 
3.58 
4.00 
3.82 
3.17 
3.80 
3.76 
3.18 
3.73 
3.64 
3.41 
3.77 
3.23 
3.80 
3.58 
3.35 
3.17 
3.58 
3.80 
3.62 
4.00 
3.46 
3.76 
3.23 



CLASS OF 1973 

Abramson, Robert C. 
Bashnick, David A. 

Bley, Kenneth V 

Cummins, George A. 
DeGraw, William 
Delp, Ronald 
Emenheiser, Timothy 
Helfrich, John 
Hubbs, Gary 
Kabat, Thaddeus L. 
Kane, Theodore 
Klemmer, Bernard J. 
LaBaugh, James 
Laudenslayer, Daniel 
McCarter, George 

McKoy, Dennis 

Matejik, James C 

Nowak, Eugene 

Piznik, Mark 

Porter, Paula S 

Richards, Bruce 

Rife, Harold 

Samulis, Raymond 
Schultz, Herbert 
Seibert, Daniel 

Smith, Clyde 

Vibbert, Bruce 
Webb, Gary 
Wollmann, Fred 



Academic 
Average 

3.75 
3.64 
3.25 
3.22 
3.26 
3.21 
3.66 
3.31 
3.50 
3.20 
3.75 
3.20 
3.53 
3.05 
3.75 
3.53 
3.00 
3.47 
3.25 
3.46 
3.21 
3.05 
3.07 
3.20 
3.44 
3.33 
3.00 
3.36 
3.50 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.2 
3.2 
3.1 
3.1 
3.4 
3.2 
3.1 
3.1 
3.1 
3.1 
3.0 
3.2 
3.1 
3.1 
3.0 
3.1 
3.1 
3.0 
3.1 
3.0 
3.1 
2.9 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 



Citizenship 

3.2 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.1 
3.0 
3.1 
3.0 
3.0 
3.2 
3.0 
3.3 
3.1 
3.0 
3.3 
3.0 
3.1 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Profjt Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the f u 




ow 



Vol. 17, No. 5 



The Weekly Student Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



April 8, 1970 



Sattk ^ay 

When man has polluted the last drop 
of water and the last breath of air, then 
and only then will some of mankind 
realize the problem that it has created. 

Earth Day, April 22, 1970, is going to 
be an environmental teach-in concerned 
with how man is ruining the Earth on 
which we will have to bring our children. 
How would you like your child to walk 
around all day long from the date of 
his birth to the day he dies with a gas 
mask? In Los Angeles already doctors are 
advising their patients by the tens of 
thousands to leave the area because of 
pollution. 

At a meeting on the 1st of April, the 
Earth Day committee set up the follow- 
ing agenda for Earth Day: Gery Fisher 
was the first to speak and he presented 
to Dr. French a check for $150 from 
Student Government. He also stated that 
on Earth Day Philadelphia Electric will 
have methane- and propane-powered 
cars on campus for the students to exam- 
ine. Norristown Ford will ■ also have a 
propane car and there might be a steam 
car too. All of this will be outside Man- 
dell Science Building at 1:00. Along with 
the cars a short lecture will be given 
•about how each car works. 

At 11:00 in the Gym, Congressman 
Edward Biester of Bucks County, Penn- 
sylvania, will give a talk on "Our En- 
vironment." Also that evening Mr. Ed- 
ward Howard, who is running for the 
State Senate will give a talk on "Envir- 
onmental Control In the 70's — A Chal- 
lenge to Government." 

Along with all the guest speakers of 
the day many of the clubs on campus 
will have environmental teach-ins. Agron- 
omy during the week will have a repre- 
sentative from Scot Labs give a lecture 
about Air Pollution. The Soil Conserva- 
tion Club will have a teach-in from 9:30 
to 10:30 on the 22nd and a display. The 
Science Society will have charts on air 
pollution and a speaker in Mandell Hall 
lobby. 

The Horticulture Society will have a 
speaker on Water Pollution. The Orna- 
mental Horticulture Club will have a 
teach-in on Environmental Pollution from 
8:00 to 9:30 on the 22nd. The Contem- 
porary Club will have a display in their 
bulletin board. The Audubon Society 
will present Alan Miller, Regional Field 
Representative of the National Audubon 
Society, as a speaker and a slide show. 
Apriculture ana other clubs will have, on 
Tuesday of that week, a trash picK-up. 

Here is how the tentative schedule 
looks: 
8:00- 9:30 Orn. Hort. Teach-in. 
9:30-11:00 Agronomy Club Teach-in. 
11:00-12:00 Congressman Biester. 
1:00- 2:00 The cars in front of 

Mandell Hall. 
2:00- 3:00 The Biology Dept. 
Teach-in on Water. 
3:30- 4:00 Alan Miller and the Bucks 
County Audubon Society. 
8:00- 9:00 Mr. Edward Howard 
(p.m.) in the Gym. 

Dr. French will ask at the next faculty 
meeting that any student wishing to at- 
tend any of these meetings be excused 
from the necessary class and that no 
exams be scheduled for that day. 



The Student 

Government 

Came Out Of 

Committee 

Student Government, having been tied 
up in committees since no later than 
November, was forced to take action on 
several key matters by four outgoing 
senior representatives. Upon returning 
for the second semester, these seniors 
started to pick at committee reports that 
showed little progress and they finally 
forced action to be taken. The issue of 
phones for student rooms was the first 
victim out of committee by President 
Gery Fisher, who received its approval 
in a fraction of the committee time but 
still too late for this year. 

The extension of the open door policy 
came out and quickly got Student Gov- 
ernment approval for 7-12 p.m. on Sat- 
urdays. The Administration also wasted 
little time in chopping off an hour from 
what government members thought was 
a conservative request. The real slap was 
that no reason for the action was given. 

Recommendations for the elimination 
of citizenship grades and the revision of 
the cut system were the last of the major 
issues to be brought out and sent to the 
Administration. The committee on the 
cut system lead a disorganized discussion 
on recommendations that left several pro- 
visions uncovered. It was on its way 
back into committee, when Gery Fisher 
failed to recognize a motion to table the 
discussion and three seniors forced final 
action to be taken then and there. The 
recommendations have gone to the Ad- 
ministration and are waiting action by 
the Board of Trustees. 

Some sophomore and junior representa- 
tives, speaking in relation to the cut 
system recommendations, showed a will- 
ingness to sell the freshman short by rec- 
ommending proposals that were only 
beneficial to them. Knowing that it might 
be hard to get a liberalized cut system 
past the Administration, their proposals 
showed no change for freshmen and 
acted as a complete about face from po- 
sitions they previously held. They didn't 
succeed, but the attempt to support only 
a segment of the student body showed a 
weakness that had better be changed. 

It is also my recommendation that 
those who would support the rejection of 
apathy like the fine group of sign painters 
should make their presence peacefully 
but definitely known on campus. Unless 
the students make themselves a priority 
in use of campus buildings like the 
library annex, little can be expected. The 
Student Government should make sure 
that students keep their right to put up 
signs. Few students speak up so do what 
you can to protect them. 

—Bruce M. Giese 



In order to make this day an eye- 
raiser to all generations, we need your 
help in all of these programs. Show 
everyone that we do care about the Earth 
and come out and support these programs 
with your attendance. We will have to 
be the ones to live in this world for the 
next generation. I don't know about you, 
but what I like is drinking clean water 
and breathing clean air, not having to 
walk around with a gas mask. 

— David A. Teichman 



Publications 

Enjoyed Their 

Banquet 

The Publications Banquet at the 
Collegville Inn proved to all in at- 
tendance to be an interesting eve- 
ning. After a sumptuous meal fea- 
turing many meats and sauces the 
main speaker, Mr. Larry Hall, 
spoke about his article series "Who 
Killed Rapp Creek?" "Who Cares?" 

Mr. Hall, a graduate of Texas 
State University and presently a re- 
porter for The Intelligencer quickly 
reviewed the series of articles. As 
an interesting sidelight for every- 
one, he discussed the problems of 
obtaining information for the series. 
Getting information for such an ar- 
ticle is no easier than getting in- 
formation for an enlightened article 
for The Furrow. Everyone im- 
mensely enjoyed the meal and talk 
by Mr. Hall. 




Mr. Hall discussed his article series 
which has won a nomination for the 
Pulitzer Prize for Journalism. 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

The next issue, April 17, will fea- 
ture Earth Day news— be watch- 
ing. Clubs-"A"-Day isn't far off. 
Have your Publications Repre- 
sentative write an article — get 
a picture of preparations. 



THERMOMETER 
OR THERMOSTAT 

Are you a thermometer or a 

thermostat in the 

Club? Fill in the blank with the 
club of your major or of your in- 
terest. Are you a thermometer, that 
is, are you a person who does not 
participate in your club but merely 
sits there like a bump on a log or 
are you a thermostat — one who 
brings up his ideas to the club. 

The thermometers are usually 
the ones who say the meetings are 
boring, too long, uninteresting. If 
the ther/nometers became thermo- 
stats they could make their clubs 
more interesting through their par- 
ticipation in club meetings. If the 
club is boring, make motions and 
express your ideas. The club is 
yours, not the officers' nor the ad- 
visors'. Try being a thermostat at 
your next club meeting. 

Gery Fisher 
Clears The Air 

With the approach of April the term 
of this year's Student Government Ad- 
ministration is rapidly coming to an end. 
It has been an excellent year for Student 
Government. 

However, there are questions that still 
persist here at the college that I, myself, 
nave often pondered upon from time to 
time. Therefore, I have taken the initia- 
te to attain official answer* to the fre- 
quently discussed issues. 

In conjunction with Mrs. Work, I have 
received Administrative answers to the 
following questions: 

Why are social fraternities prohibited 
at our college? Will this policy ever 
change? 

Mrs. Work: Social fraternities are not 
permitted on campus as they are secret 
organizations and they are discriminatory. 
This is against the basic philosophy of 
the College, and the policy prohibiting 
them is not likely to change. 



Why are there Saturday classes? 

Mrs. Work: In order to be eligible for 
government funds for new buildings, etc., 
space utilization is of prime importance 
and consideration by the Government. 
Classrooms must be used to capacity at 
least 5X days a week. As you know, Sat- 
urday classes are not peculiar to Dela- 
ware Valley, and in many colleges today 
they are held all day. 



Was Delaware Valley College ever 
given a swimming pool? 

Mrs. Work: Nol The College has never 
been offered or given a swimming pool. 



Why is there not a Student Union 
building on campus? 

Mrs. Work: Several years ago we for- 
mally applied for funds from the General 
State Authority for a Student Center. The 
building was eventually authorized and 
placed on our priority list. However, die 
necessary funds were not appropriated 
by the Legislature and the building was 
delayed. We are now scheduled for 1971, 
depending on the State's appropriation to 
the General State Authority. Until the 
State lends the money or some individual 
donates the money for the building we 
cannot build a Student Center. Funds 
cannot be taken from tuition. 



When will Delaware Valley College go 
co-ed? Explain some of the financial diffi- 
culties that will be encountered with 
going co-ed. 

(Continued on page 2, column 1) 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1970 



CLEARS AIR— 

(Continued from page 1 , column 4) 

Mrs. Work: There are no definite plans 
at this time for going co-ed, although it 
is not unlikely that some day we shall do 
so. Some of the expenses involved are: 

1. Personnel, such as Dean of Women, 
House Mothers. 

2. Facilities for women in all classroom 
huildings. 

3. Separate residence halls. 

4. Enlargement of present buildings, 
etc., due to the change in enrollment 
that will occur if co-eds enter. 

5. Possibility of adding courses or majors 
— expense of personnel to cover 
these. 



Will the linen service be a requirement 
again next year? 

Mrs. Work: No change in the linen 
service is anticipated. 



Why do we have a detective agency 
on campus? 

Mr. Work: We have a security force 
on campus for many reasons. I have not 
listed them in order of their importance. 

1. To direct traffic and parking. 

2. To check heat and boilers at night. 

3. To check lights at night. 

4. To make fire checks. 

5. To protect College property. 

6. For many "safety" reasons. 

7. To aid in emergencies. 

We have two guards on round-the- 
clock, except during certain vacation pe- 
riods when we have only one. 

For special events on campus we in- 
crease the force for obvious reasons. 



These answers from Mrs. Work should 
be very beneficial in answering the ever- 
persistent questions which oftentimes 
cause unwarranted rumors. 

However, I would like to make a com- 
ment on the College's policy on fraterni- 
ties. I do not completely agree with the 
college's policy on fraternities. The defi- 
nition of social fraternities as secret or- 
ganizations connotates that they are 
harmful and dangerous. This I disagree 
with. 

This Student Government Administra- 
tion has not asked for a change in this 
College policy. Why? Well, there are 
many reasons. I, personally, question the 
success of fraternities at an all-male col- 
lege in Doylestown. The cost of living in 
a fraternity is usually more expensive 
than living in an apartment or even on 
campus! 



A. C. FRATTONE 

INCORPORATED 

• WATCHES — FINE JEWELRY 

• ENGAGEMENT RINGS 

• APPRAISALS 

• DIAMONDS 

Special reduced prices 
with I.D. card 

60 E. State Street 
348-2522 Doylestown, Pa. 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 

Dress Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 

THOM McAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



The greatest reason why we have not 
asked for fraternities is that they are 
rapidly diminishing and this trend seems 
to be continuing. I have become aware 
of this from what I have read and from 
the numerous conversations I have had 
with students from other colleges and 
universities. This Student Government 
has not and will not recommend some- 
thing that is contrary of such a national 
trend — a trend that shows a rapid de- 
crease in support or interest. 

I like to remind the Student Body that 
class elections will be held in the very 
near future. There will also be two ref- 
erendums on the ballot. 

Referendum I 

The Student Association at the Amer- 
ican University in Washington, D. C, has 
called for a nationwide college referen- 
dum on the Vietnam War. Its aim is to 
reveal the views of college students to- 
ward an immediate withdrawal of all 
American troops from Vietnam. 

The wording of the ballot is as follows: 
Do you support the immediate with- 
drawal of all American troops from Viet- 
nam? 

D Yes □ No 

Referendum II 

The Delaware Valley College Admin- 
istration and the Student Government 
lie requesting a vote on allowing the 
formation of a ROTC program on cam- 
pus. Joining the ROTC program will be 
on a voluntary basis. 

The wording of the ballot is as follows: 
Do you support a ROTC program on 
campus? 

□ Yes □ No 

The seniors will only vote on Referen- 
dum I on April 9. 

It is important that every eligible stu- 
dent exercise his right to vote, but exer- 
cise it wisely. 

— Gery J. Fisher 

Science Society 
Tutoring 

Three weeks ago there were 
questionnaires distributed to the 
Science majors asking that more 
support be given to the Science 
Society. At the first meeting after 
that there was a substantial turn- 
out and some good ideas were 
brought forward with the hope 
that they could be acted upon if 
there was some support from the 
students. 

One of these ideas was a tutoring 
program. The program is different 
from the ones in the past, in that 
the student desiring help is referred 
to the tutor via the instructor of the 
particular course. It is left up to 
the student to seek out the tutor 
and arrange a time suitable to both 
parties. In the future we hope to be 
able to set up a free tutoring serv- 
ice available to the Central Bucks 
School System. 

Please do not hesitate to consult 
your Professors for the names and 
room numbers of desired tutors. 
The courses available are Fresh- 
man Biology and Chemistry, Or- 
ganic Chemistry, Calculus, Alge- 
bra, Physics, Genetics and German. 
If the program is a success, we 
hope to expand it in the near fu- 
ture. 



RECRUITER— APRIL 10 

Pennsylvania Department of Welfare 
SIGN-UP IN PLACEMENT OFFICE 
Government Career Trainees 
Caseworker Trainees 
Therapeutic Activities Worker 
Teaching Positions 



Alumni Day 

Program 

Slated 

The Delaware Valley College Alumni 
Association will hold its second annual 
Alumni Day on the campus on Saturday, 
June 6th. In keeping with the tradition 
established last year, the Alumni Day 
program is designed to permit visiting 
alumni to renew their acquaintances with 
the College and with old friends, to con- 
duct the annual business of the Associa- 
tion, and to participate in educational ex- 
periences offered in the form of "work- 
shop" sessions. 

This year the program offers two morn- 
ing workshops, both of them oriented 
toward one of today's most pressing is- 
sues: the quality of our environment. 
Dr. John C. Mertz, member of the Biol- 
ogy Department faculty and President of 
the Bucks County Audubon Society, will 
offer a program centering on the respon- 
sibility of the individual citizen toward 
our environmental problems. Congress- 
man Edward G. Biester, Jr., an outstand- 
ing local conservation spokesman, will 
offer the second workshop, dealing witli 
our Government's approaches to the en- 
vironmental issues. 

Following a luncheon in the Levin 
Dining Hall, Dr. Work will address the 
group to up-date the alumni on the prog- 
ress the College has made and its future 
development. Athletic Director Ned 
Linta will then outline the recent suc- 
cesses of the College's athletic program. 

The last scheduled event on the *pro- 
gram is the annual business meeting of 
the Association. Classes enjoying a 5th 
anniversary (or a multiple of 5 years) 
are being encouraged to hold reunion 
dinners in the area on the evening of 
the 6th. 

According to the Corresponding Sec- 
retary of the Association, Mrs. Tongyai, 
registration for the day is slated from 
9:30-10:30 a.m. Advance registration for 
the luncheon must be made no later than 
May 29th and be accompanied by a 
check for $2.25 per person. The program 
itself is designed specifically for the 
alumni. However, should any of the 
alumni bring their wives with them, an 
itinerary of local spots of interest will be 
made available to them. They will have 
to supply their own transportation if 
they arrive after 10:30 a.m. 



The Institute of Food Technologists 
will hold its annual meeting in San 
Francisco, May 24-28. Alumni of 
DVC are planning to hold a dinner 
meeting during the convention. For 
details consult the bulletin boards at 
the IFT meeting or contact Leonard 
Ciani, FOOD PRODUCT DEVEL- 
OPMENT, 2 N. Riverside Plaza, 
Chicago, III. 60606. 



Aggies Defeat 
Trenton 

On March 21st the top five bowlers 
from the DVC Intramural League par- 
ticipated in the 3rd annual Rider College 
Invitational Bowling Tournament, at 
Trenton, N. J. 

The bowlers were: Harvey Goodwin, 
Bob Abramson, Richard Tower, Bruce 
Breitweiser, and David Hafner. The team 
captain, Conrad Adami, reported that the 
DVC team failed to make the semi-final 
round in the tournament by only 157 
pins in the three-game series. The series 
of 2506 was enough to beat the team 
from Trenton State by 120 pins. 

Special mention goes to Harvey Good- 
win's 212 game, 510 series; Dave Haf- 
ner's 200 game, 540 series, and Bob 
Abramson's 210 game, 542 series. 

Team captain Conrad Adami stated 
that the DVC team should improve by 
next year and that he hoped tnat more 
Aggies would join the intramural league 
next year. This would give more bowlers 
an opportunity to participate in next 
year's intercollegiate tournaments. 

Don't forget April 15 

A Lumberjack's Bold Adventure 

Assembly. 



KERSHNER'S 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

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Phone 348-4666 



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-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Urry Martel 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hegyes 

PHOTO EDITOR Dave Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Davie) Toichman 

TYPING MANAGER Delbert Jone* 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 

Sol Cavinett, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allen Gordon, Abbott Leo, Dave Sustalc, 

Howard Henderson, Brwce Richards, Brute Oiese, Jeff Keir, Bill Turner. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John M.rti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



April 8, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Candidates Speak Out 

April 1, 1970 To the Class of 1972: 



To the Class of 1971: 

DVC is a college which is on the 
grow and on the move in many 
aspects. In this growth and move- 
ment, it is becoming more and more 
apparent to the students that there 
is a need to express their view- 
points on college issues, no matter 
the importance of the particular 
issue, and have that viewpoint 
heard. SG is the place for this ex- 
pression of views and the place 
where they should be heard. It is 
time for all of SG to listen to the 
students it represents. 

It is time for SG to become part 
of the change here at DVC; to be- 
come the students' voice. It is time 
for good thinking, reasoning, hard 
work, and student opinion on all 
college issues. 

I cannot promise great changes 
at DVC. Too many factors could 
effect such a promise. However, I 
can promise to work for the class 
and student body, to listen and be- 
come the voice of your opinions, 
not the Administration's, to make 
your vote count. 

As your SG representative, at 
least part of government will be, 
as it should be, the voice of the 
student body. 

Sincerely, 

Thomas D. Brewer 

Candidate for SG Rep. 

Class of 1971 



Classmates of the Class of 1971: 

You may ask yourself why a guy 
like me is running for a position on 
the Student Government. I will tell 
you. I think you, the student, is 
getting the raw end of the deal in 
communications between you and 
S. G. That is why I'm running so I 
can present another view from S. G. 
beside the President's one and the 
minutes which always left me hun- 
gry for explanations. I will use my 
position on the staff of The Furrow 
as the outlet for my comments and 
explanations of the happenings at 
the S. G. I hope to be able to clear 
some of the criticisms the S. G. 
acquired and show how good a 
vehicle it is for improving the col- 
lege life of DVC. I need your 
vote to be able to do what I told 
you above and, if elected, it will 
not be an average done job I prom- 
ise you. 

Laurent M artel 

Class of '71 

Candidate for S. G. Rep. 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

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I have been pleased to see our 
class break away from the tradi- 
tional functions of a class govern- 
ment and get involved in college 
problems. Because of our uncon- 
ventional ideas we have come 
under much criticism, but I feel our 
efforts are channelled in the right 
direction and I will continue to 
pursue them. 

As President I have seen our class 
progress and develop into an out- 
spoken group on campus. I have 
made mistakes this year but I have 
learned from them. If we are to 
see changes come about at DVC 
we must continue to be outspoken 
and involve ourselves in the me- 
chanism of change. 

I feel I can best direct the efforts 
of our class to bring about the 
changes that are necessary. For 
this reason I am seeking re-election 
to the office of President and I need 
your vote. 

President-72 
David C. Farrar 



April 2, 1970 

Members of the Class of 1972: 

Since I'm a new candidate for 
the office of Student Government 
Representative you probably are 
especially interested in my views 
and opinions. 

First, I would like to congratu- 
late this year's Student Government 
on the outstanding job they did in 
bringing in new and much-needed 
policies to this campus. 

Secondly, I would like to present 
my own views on present campus 
policy. I would like to see an ef- 
fectively-run Student Union serv- 
ing hot food, more open door hours 
on weekends (Friday night to Mon- 
day morning), and I intend to sup- 
port the formation of a soccer team, 
extended cuts, and telephones in 
the dorms. 

As you see my opinions compare 
with this year's Student Govern- 
ment's more radical ones. I would 
like to see many of these and more 
"radical" ideas about campus 
changed into concrete motions and 
by-laws of Delaware Valley Col- 
lege. 

Student Government Candidate, 
Kenneth S. Risser 



Fellow classmates of the class of 
1972. My name is Pete Bracchi and 
I am seeking re-election for the 
position of Student Government 
Representative of our class. I am 
not going to spend a lot of time 
telling you of the many changes 
that I may want because I am a 
mere individual and my interpreta- 
tion of a representative is one who 
represents others. This is what I 
intend to do if I am re-elected. You 
placed your confidence in me the 
past year and I hope that I fulfilled 
the position that I held. I enjoyed 
very much working for our class 
and the entire student body as well 



trying to make our college a better 
place to be. The past year I worked 
on many committees, for instance, 
the cut committee, the grooming 
committee, and, at the present time, 
I am the chairman of the Barry 
Harter Memorial Fund. One thing 
that I would like very much to do 
is to get most of the criticism about 
our school out of the dormitory 
rooms and into someplace where 
something can be done about it. 
When I recommended that a sug- 
gestion box be placed in the cafe- 
teria I knew that this was a step in 
the right direction. The rest I now 
leave in your hands. I ask for your 
support and vote in the coming 
election. 

Peter J. Bracchi, 72 



April 2, 1970 

Members of the Class of 72, 

This year's Student Government 
has undoubtedly been the most ac- 
tive and progressive in recent years. 
Through its efforts, things labeled 
impossible have become realities. 
It has been an agent whereby stu- 
dents and administrators have been 
brought closer together. I am proud 
to have been a part of this organi- 
zation. I feel that I have fulfilled 
my duties in representing you dur- 
ing the past year and now I am 
hoping that you will give me the 
opportunity to continue this work 
for another year. I can assure you, 
that to continue serving as a Stu- 
dent Government Representative is 
among my greatest ambitions. 

As in the past, I will be more 
than willing to give the time need- 
ed to perform the duties of this 
office to the best of my ability. In 
closing, I hope you will give me 
your confidence so that I may con- 
tinue serving you for another year. 

Sincerely, 
James Musser 



To the Class of 1972: 

Once again I am asking you, the 
Class of 1972, for your support as 
I run for re-election as your Stu- 
dent Government Representative 
for the upcoming 1970-71 school 
year. 

Since last year when I asked you 
for your support many beneficial 
changes to the College have been 
made, but there are still many 
changes that should be made. 
Many of these changes should 
come about in the near future. I 
would like to help bring about the 
changes that you want. But I can 
only with your support. 

No matter who your class officers 
are, they can only be as effective 
as you want them to be. This is 
why I want to take the time now 
to ask all the members of our class 
to take an interest in our class, be- 
come active, work on committees, 
attend class meetings, think of 
ideas for the class, and let your 
voice be heard. 

Sincerely, 

Student Gov't Representative 

Raymond C. FunJthouser 

Class of 72 



MICHAEL D. NOBLE 
Civil Air Patrol Officer 

A freshman at Delaware Valley Col- 
lege of Science and Agriculture in 
Doylestown, Michael D. Noble of Stock- 
ton, New Jersey, who recently joined the 
Doylestown Squadron of Civil Air Patrol 
as a senior member, was a former CAP 
Cadet at Glassboro, New Jersey. 

He is a graduate of Glassboro High 
School, and is now majoring in the field 
of chemistry. 

While in high school he was active as 
a cameraman, assistant audio director and 
director for WGHS Television. 

He is a member of the Air Force As- 
sociation, an independent, non-profit air- 
power organization, established January 
26, 1946, whose goal is to support ade- 
quate aerospace power for national se- 
curity and world peace, and to help de- 
velop friendly relations among free na- 
tions. 

Since joining CAP, Noble has been as- 
signed the position of aerospace educa- 
tion officer of the Doylestown Squadron. 
His duties consist of teaching CAP 
cadets, ages thirteen to eighteen, the 
fundamentals of aerospace. This includes 
navigation and weather; power for air- 
craft, the engines, instruments, controls, 
accessories and power plants of the fu- 
ture: missile guidance systems, principles 
of flight; airways and air traffic manage- 
ment. 

The Doylestown Squadron of Civil Air 
Patrol has openings for senior and cadet 
members interested in aviation, commu- 
nications, field survival, first aid, radio- 
logical monitoring and administration. 

Interested persons may attend meet- 
ings held Monday evenings from 7:00 to 
9:30 at the VFW Home in Doyletfown. 




Delaware Valley College student, 
Michael D. Noble, has been named 
Aerospace Education Officer of the 
Doylestown Squadron of Civil Air 
Patrol. 



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Phone 348-9021 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



April 8, 1970 



<rf Subjective 
View 

By now I guess everyone is pretty well 
tired of the subject of the Vietnam War. 
So to add to the boredom, here is an ar- 
ticle designed to instill thought in those 
who so vehemently support an end to 
U. S. involvement in southeast Asia. It 
is hoped that even the apathetic in- 
dividual will feel more than just an urge 
to do something about the situation. 

Beginning on page 51 of the February 
issue of Reader's Digest is an article en- 
titled "From Hanoi— With Thanks." This 
article was submitted by a Mr. Berry, 
member of the House of Representatives, 
and, furthermore, was documented in the 
Congressional Record, proceedings and 
debates of the 91st Congress, second ses- 
sion, of February 9, 1970. Mr. Berry's 
documentary was supported by a state- 
ment by Edmund A. Gullion in regard 
to why Hanoi fights on. The documentary 
contains 16 communications from North 
Vietnam, all of which follow the same 
pattern, that is, of praise to Americans 
who march in protest against the war. 

As Mr. Gullion pointed out, "Hanoi 
moves by the same calculations which 
paid off for it in defeat of the French 
in 1954. French power was shaken but 
not shattered by the defeat at Dienbien- 
phu. What broke France was the collapse 
of will on the home front. But North 
Vietnam, having seen one Western power 
worn down by sapping tactics on the 
home front, is sure the same strategy 
will pay off again. Indeed, this is what 
the declarations in the Hanoi press and 
radio are all about." 

The 16 communications in Mr. Berry's 
article range in date beginning February 
27, 1966 and ending November 15, 1969. 
Here are two samples: 

November 6, 1966: Radio Hanoi. 

"The Vietnamese people hail and sup- 
port the struggle waged by the American 
•people against the U. S. war of aggres- 
sion in Vietnam, said Dr. Le Dinh Tham, 
chairman of the Vietnam Peace Commit- 
tee. This struggle is a valuable encour- 
agement and backing for the Vietnamese 
people, who sincerely thank the American 
peace fighters for their efforts to strengh- 
then their solidarity with the Vietnamese 
people and coordinate their struggle with 
them.' " 

November 14, 1969: Speech by Prof. 
Hoang Minh Giam, North Vietnamese 
Minister of Culture. 

"We highly evaluate the great efforts 



of various U. S. antiwar organizations and 
well-known notables who had the initia- 
tive to organize the Moratorium Day, de- 
manding the immediate return home of 
all U. S. troops with slogans suited to the 
American people's urgent needs and just 
aspirations. We enthusiastically welcome 
the peace-loving Americans who have 
stood up and struggled violently and 
bravely against the U. S. Administration's 
stubborn attitude in prolonging the war 
o faggression. Moreover, we regard the 
U. S. people as our comrades-in-arms, 
animated by the common goal of op- 
posing the Nixon Administration's ag- 
gressive policy and war. The fall offen- 
sive drive of the American people has 
made more prominent our people's just 
cause and made our people more reso- 
lute." 

In support of Mr. Berry, Mr. Gullion 
quoted the late Ho Chi Minh, who once 
told the French: "You will kill ten of 
our men and we will kill one of yours. 
And in the end, it will be you who will 
tire of it." 

What can the individual do to get out 
of the rut of apathy and assert himself 
as an individual who can take a stand 
in more than just bull-session support of 
an issue? For one thing, you could write 
your Congressman and let him know 
how you feel. You will probably get a 
reply, too. Formulate your own opinions 
and live by them. But first get all the evi- 
dence. When the President asks for a 
united effort in the Vietnam conflict, give 
him support. Remember, a house divided 
against itself cannot stand. That's North 
Vietnam's strategy. It is ironic that North 
Vietnam can use it to its advantage one 
of the timeless truths set forth in the 
Bible to bring our Nation, whose very 
foundation was in the name of God, to 
its knees. A united effort by the Amer- 
ican people is needed if an end to the 
war is to be realized. 

— Chris Hollands 



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Write seven letters. Find seven relatives to sign them. Address s*nd stamp 
seven envelopes and send them to: 

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There are more than seven million college students in the United States. 
If each did his part, that would be fifty million letters to the President. Fifty 
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the 




ROW 




Vol. 17, No. 6 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



April 21, 1970 



Pago Thro* for Evtnts of 
April 22 at DVC 



TO HELP YOU DECIDE 



At this time I will explain some of my qualifications for this most 
important office here at D.V.C. I will also explain many of the projects 
we will pursue this coming year, and how we will deal with tnese 
projects, if I am elected. 

I have been in Student Government for three years, and I have been 
President of the Class of 71 for three years. In these three years I have 
worked with three Student Government administrations which were 
different from each other in many respects. I saw the advantage of good 
leadership help our College each year. I saw many mistakes and many 
excellent qualities in each Government. I have learned quite a bit these 
past three years, both on how to approach the student body for support 
and their ideas, and on working with the Administration, which I feel 
is very essential for this office. I have worked with our College Admin- 
istration directly with class projects as well as on Student Government 
committees. 

In my first year with S. G. I worked on many committees throughout 
the year with the upperclassmen. I learned how our Government worked. 
In my sophomore year I was Chairman of the Customs Committee, Blazer 
Committee, Campus Committee, and Dining Hall Committee, as well as 
other smaller committees. I also worked on many short- term committees. 
In my Junior year I was Chairman of the Dining Hall Committee, Cam- 
pus Committee, Yearbook Advertisment and other short-term commit- 
tees. I worked on the Grooming Committee, Dress Code Committee, 
Cut System Committee, Citizenship Committee, Student Center Com- 
mittee, curriculum committee, and others. 

I will now explain some of the projects we will work on this year, if 
I'm elected. We will get an accurate report of our activities fee. We 
will have a statement from our Administration showing just what it is 
used for and how they budget this money. I have written to two Uni- 
versities to get some ideas on their Activities Fee Budget Report, and 
these Universities also felt the students should know how their money is 
spent, concerning this item. We will have the faculty minutes printed 
and given to the students so we can work together on issues directly 
relating to students and faculty. Now the faculty sees our minutes and 
know what we do and what we are working for. But the students have 
no idea what the faculty is working on. We must work more in parallel 
with each other to have better results. 

We will use the Furrow as a direct means of communication to ex- 
plain in detail all issues we are working on so we can get the students' 
opinions before we act on any major policies. Now the students are not 
filled in on many projects until S. G. votes on them. We cannot act as 
an effective Government if our students aren't backing us. Our fellow 
students can not back us if we don't encourage it and ask for their 
opinions more often, and explain more fully our goals. Our minutes are 
very brief, too brief for students not attending our meetings. As a repre- 
sentative I have students coming to me asking to explain parts of them 
each week. 




Fredrick (Fred) Harteis is a 
candidate for Student Govern- 
ment President whose above 
article continues on 
page two. 



Cast your ballot on April 23 
for your favorite. 



To the Students of Delaware Valley College: 

I would like to take this opportunity to announce my candidacy for 
Student President of Delaware Valley College. I look upon this position 
as one of enormous responsibility; a responsibility which I am capable 
of fulfilling. When elected I will represent the best interests of the stu- 
dents, both present and future. 

Before you vote, I would like to present a few of the goals I shall 
strive to achieve. 

First, the entire student activities fee, which is paid by the students to 
provide college activities and functions, should go to the Student Gov- 
ernment which sponsors these activities, rather than to the Administration 
which allots money as they see fit. This would mean that nearly $50,000 a 
year would go to government. In order to efficiently handle this greatly 
increased amount of money a budget would have to be created. This 
budget would be subject to the approval of the entire student body. 
Included in the budget will be categories such as: "bie name" entertain- 
ment, athletics, mixers, convocations, yearbook, publications, and the 
basic needs of the student body. 

Second, student body meetings should be held with the Administra- 
tion and the Student Government in order to inform the students of 
major issues. The student body will then vote on these issues in order 
to give Student Government guidelines for action. These meetings would 
lead to open discussion on such important issues as the proposed change 
in the college calendar. 

Third, an unlimited cut system should be instituted for the Fall, 1970, 
semester. 

Fourth, constructive criticism is necessary for the improvement of any 
institution. Therefore, information criticizing any aspect of the College 
should not be discouraged by the Administration. 

Fifth, the many problems between the cafeteria and the student body 
are very apparent. A breakdown of cafeteria cost and operations, and the 
meeting of student requests is necessary. If these requests are not hon- 
ored, then other methods of operating the cafeteria will definitely be 
considered. 

Sixth, facilities for co-eds should be incorporated into the College as 
soon as possible. Co-eds are needed at Delaware Valley College now. 

In conclusion, it is time for the Administration to become equal with 
the student body, to remove the parental approval to student activity 
and regulations, and to respect student views. Thus bringing the students, 
Student Government, and the Administration closer together, working 
together for a common goal of bettering the College in all aspects. 

Student Government should be the voice of the student body. When 
elected, Student Government will not only be the voice of the student 
body it will be the student body. 

Rich Russell 

Candidate for Student Government President 



Rich Russell on ladder 

helping two of his supporters 

with a sign is also a 

Student Government Presidential 

candidate. 



Mark your X on April 23 
beside the best one. 




Page Two 



THE FURROW 



April 21, 1970 



FRED HARTEIS— 

(Continued from front page) 

We will work as a team in S. G., more than this past year. We will 
not have individualism, or a Senior Government. The S. G. effects the 
entire College and the Government must be structured to let the under- 
classmen be more active, because they will be effected by our action 
more than the upperclassmen. The underclassmen must have some re- 
sponsibility if we are to have interest at election time for representatives. 
This year we didn't have much interest from underclessmen leaders be- 
cause of individualism in the Government. 

We will provide awards for intramural winners so we can develop 
more school pride. We had awards given out in my freshman year but 
not very many since then. We must stimulate more participation in such 
programs. This is one way which will help get rid of the "I don't care" 
attitude. 

We will continue our efforts to see our field labs credited. The idea 
of a credit is usually more beneficial on a transcript than units. If we 
have the field labs credited we will improve the present program to be 
more of a learning experience for the students. 

We must improve our Security Guard force here at the College, 'l'hey 
are reluctant in helping with the social events too frequently. They are 
not as efficient as a security force should be in regard to our parking lot. 
We pay $15.00 per year to park our cars on campus. We should be able 
to park our car and come back to it just as we left it. We saw too many 
theft incidents as well as damage this year. Being a representative body 
it is the responsibility of S. G. to pursue such problems effecting our 
students as often as they do. 

The problem of drugs is an ever-increasing problem in our society. 
We must set up a program for our students to nave narcotics representa- 
tives speak to the freshmen at Orientation period to make them aware 
of the dangers of drugs. We should also have a narcotics agent come to 
the campus to talk to the entire student body when new data or infor- 
mation is released to help avoid tragic drug problems from developing. 
It would be pretty sad for an outsider to say, "D.V.C. . . . that is the 
college where you allow drugs isn't it?" 

Tne Dining Hall is pretty tight and the students are suffering. We 
have very few meals in which we receive a decent amount of seconds, 
or, for that matter, the first serving is often light. I noticed too many- 
fellows leaving the Dining Hall hungry. Before we start school next fall 
we will have to straighten out all me problems, so we won't have to 
argue with the managers of the cafeteria all year. 

We have a problem here at D.V.C. with concerts. We don't have the 
support from our college students that we need. The class that sponsors 
the concert has good participation but the other classes are not respon- 
. sive. The financial burden for one class to sponsor a concert is very great. 
We could get all four classes involved in putting on bigger and better 
concerts. Tnis would increase the participation and reduce the financial 
burden for the individual class sponsoring the concert. In speaking with 
our class presidents and students, we feel this would be one solution to 
our problem. We need good social events for our students, but no class, 
or club should have to take a bad loss. 

At a National Student Government Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, 
last fall, I spoke to several S. G. Treasurers. I had asked if they had any 
student loan program which used S. G. funds to help individuals in a 
financial bind. Some of the Colleges had programs set up to aid needy 
students. The limit to loan amounts wouldn't be too great. The interest 
would be small also. We would set up a form for this loan program and 
have a committee evaluate the form and set a deadline to repay the loan 
depending on the amount as well as other factors. 

We will have 22 members on S. G. This will permit us to work on 
several projects at a time. We will work on what will help our College 
and students most. Student Government is to represent the student body 
to help make college life run more smoothly. We will not set up a strict 
outline next year to follow at S. G. Our approach to new ideas will de- 
pend on what is more urgent and the more essential statement, which is, 
Student Government is to represent the student body and to help make 
college life more desirable. 

Sincerely, 
Fredrick Harteis 

1970-71 CLASS OFFICERS 
1971 

President— Chris Hollands Secretary— Gene Hock 

Vice-President— Tom Lichy Treasurer— John Echternach 

Student Government Members — 
Thomas Brewer Fred Harteis Dana Ingerto 

William Gamerer Bruce Giese Richard Russell 

1972 

President— Dave Farrar Secretary— Clad Myers 

Vice-President— Rich Osbom Treasurer— Ron Sollenberger 

Student Government Members- 



Peter Bracchi 
Ray Funkhouser 

President— John King 
Vice-President— Tim Lutz 



Jim Musser 
Tom Powell 



Ken Risser 



Scott Cook 



1973 

Secretary — Steve Zenko 
Treasurer — Chris Lisella 
Student Government Members — 

Tom Logan 

Bob Wischhusen 



Gery Fisher Speaks for the Last Time 

It was last year at this time that I was running as an active candidate for the 
position which I am presently preparing to relinquish. At that time I asked the student 
body to elect me President of the Student Government so that I could pursue and 
eventually present to the College Administration my campaign goals and those of 
the elected members of the Student Government. I assured many of you that I would 
express the general consensus of the student body to the College Administration. 
I can today say that I continuously and vigorously fought hard for the legislation 
which we attempted to obtain for that which we accomplished this year. The legis- 
lation which was enacted was for the general welfare and benefit of every student 
here at the College. 

It was a very good year for legislation. The Student Government of 1969-70 
truly exhibited the real image of a democratic legislative body legislating the de- 
mands of its society. There has not been any other government with a better record 
of accomplishments. Some of the major changes in College policy recommended by 
the Student Government and approved by the Administration were: 

1 ) Liberalization of the grooming code. 

2 ) "A" Day beard, mustache and Van Dyke contest. 

3) Initiation and extension of the Open Door Policy. 

4 ) Conversion of the family-style meals to cafeteria-style serving. 

5 ) Liberalization of the dress code. 

6 ) A voting student body member on the Student Affairs Committee. 

7 ) Two student body members on the faculty Curriculum Committee. 

8 ) Initiation of a Traffic Court. 

9 ) Enlargement of the Student Government by four members. 

10) Faculty can become advistors to clubs with a one year College tenure. 

However, there are at the present time some Student Government recommendations 
which are awaiting Administrative action. They are: 

1 ) Liberalization of the attendance policy. 

2 ) Abolition of the citizenship marking system. 

3) Addition of another voting student body member on the Student Affairs 
Committee. 

4 ) Voting privileges granted to the two student body members on the Faculty 
Curriculum Committee. 

5) College Calendar changed so that the first semester would end right before 
Christmas vacation and that the second semester would start one week 
earlier. 

6) Religious affiiliated clubs be accepted on campus. 

7) A member of the Student Government be present at Board of Trustees 
Meetings when recommendations are being submitted to the Board by 
Student Government on matters dealing directly with the student body. 

I am quite confident that positive Administrative action will be taken on these im- 
portant recommendations. 

The Student Government has sponsored more and better mixers this year than 
any previous year. The clubs and classes have also taken on the responsibilities of 
sponsoring mixers. 

The Student Government took an active role in forming the Philadelphia Area 
Intercollegiate Council. The Student Government has recently become a member of 
the Association of Student Governments which will prove to be quite beneficial for 
the student body next year. 

It is difficult to select the prime accomplishment that the Student Government 
has legislated this year — for there were many. Nevertheless, in my opinion, I feel 
that our major accomplishment this year has been the acquisition of the Library 
Annex for a temporary student center. The formation of the temporary student center 
and the formation of a student union fund-raising drive will hopefully speed up the 
construction date of the permanent student union building. 

The Student Government, like any other similar organization, legislated many 
resolutions of lesser importance which became official upon its own consent. 

Representatives from all of the classes did an excellent job of presenting and 
initiating changes that were responsive to the student body and to the changing times. 

The real key to this Government's success was the advent of personal discussion 
meetings between senior representatives and President and Mrs. Work. The rational 
and peaceful policy of mutual cooperation between the Student Government and 
President Wort proved to be unanimously successful. 

Now the time has arrived when I wish to express my sincere thanks to you for 
giving me the opportunity to serve in this challenging position. The experiences I 
have encountered will be unmeasurable assets to me for many years to come. » 

I hope that in this position I have fulfilled the obligation you had expected of 
someone in this authoritative position. 

It was an honor and a privilege to act in the capacity as your Student Government 
President. 

—Gery J. Fisher 



Dan McEhroy 




*ke Juzuw 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR lorry Martel 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hogyes 

PHOTO EDITOR Dave Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

TYPING MANAGER Delbert Jonot 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENE RAL STAFF- 

Sol Ca vines*, John Furphy, iill Strode, Allan Gordon, Abbott Lta, Dava Sustak, 
Howard Henderson, Bruce Richards, Jeff Keir, Bill Tumor. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph I. Fulcety 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Merti 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the collage. 



April 21, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Another Word 
For Apathy? 

Apathy has been the word used 
to describe how the college func- 
tions, how classes and clubs are 
supported by most of the student 
body at DVC. I think a noun can 
hit the nail head more squarely 
than apathy. The word is laziness. 
Maybe because seeing the cows 
munching their cud while lying 
around at the farms gives the stu- 
dents their example for being un- 
supporting of activities. Granted 
DVC is a suitcase college, but the 
weekdays are getting to T>e like the 
weekends. Where is someone? Most 
of the time the someones are the 
students who sit on their fat fan- 
nies while using cutting remarks 
in what you think of Student Gov- 
ernment and other activities. The 
harm being done is to raise the 
question "Why?" "Why are we 
doing what we are doing when 
there is no support?" Questions like 
that are very effective in discourag- 
ing the few who hold club meet- 
ings, put on a concert, put out a 
paper. Yes, you students do more 
harm without much trouble by the 
lack of movement on your part. 
You always use statements of "I 
don't have time" or "studying is 
more important." Yet the flock of 
Aggies at one of Doylestown's wa- 
tering holes every night is more 
than most club attendances. Ask 
any club or class president, they 
will tell you that without the faith- 
ful few, nothing would have been 
done. So if -you get off your bot- 
toms and join a club or participate 
in your class you will find out there 
is some action at Del Val besides 
sleeping, eating, and going to class- 
es. Just remember that a little sup- 
porting doesn't kill, and to improve 
things requires lots more than the 
kids who are now supporting the 
clubs and activities they like. 

—Larry Martel 




As shown above there is a place to 
play a pinball machine and to listen 
to a juke box while eating micro wave 
cooked hot dogs. Where is it? At 
DVC's first Student Union building. 

From Our Critic At Large 
Elections have been a farce from 
the number of students voting and 
how they have been run. Tlie stu- 
dents who don't cast their votes 
either complain about the people 
who get elected or don't care a 
damn about their class or Student 
Government. Now you students 
who are dissatisfied about Student 
Government, here is your chance 
on April 23 to vote for the guy you 
want to improve your lot at this 
school if you are not too lazy. 

—Larry Martel 



EDITORIAL 

April 14, 1970 

The campaign for Class of 71 
officers and Student Government 
President is disgraceful. Today 
there will be class officer elections. 
Even now there isn't a single cam- 
paign poster for the Class of 71. In 
most offices there is one person 
running for each position. Why 
don't more people care about their 
classes? 

The Senior Class will be poorly 
run if the present attitude prevails. 
When pressure is off the present 
candidates, they cease to exist. The 
candidates haven't made any prom- 
ises. Therefore, they don't have any 
promises to fill. What will happen 
next year? 

The Student Government Presi- 
dential elections will be a cliff hang- 
er. The Student Body is hanging 
over a valley of disaster. Everyone 
has expected Fred Hartis to run 
for this office. After all he was the 
Junior Class President. True to form 
Fred came around announcing his 
intention to run for the position. It 
was merely a formality, or so it 
seems. Among his many accom- 
plishments he called a few class 
meetings that weren't well attend- 
ed. But Fred can't personally ad- 
vertise the meetings. 

Rich Russell suddenly decided 
to run for the position of Student 
Government President. His an- 
nouncement for candidacy mostly 
consists of issues that have already 
been suggested to the Administra- 
tion. The questions will be decided 
before he has a chance to influence 
the outcome. 

The decisions to be made at the 
polling station are either vote for 
every name or abstain. 

The Furrow has been supposedly 
appearing weekly. It will appear 
weekly next semester. But the value 
of the paper depends on the interest 
of the students. A Furrow Staff 
meeting will be held soon. Watch 
the cafeteria bulletin board for the 
time and place. Come out and see 
what is done with the paper. It is 
your paper. A detailed program 
will explain how a paper is formed 
from collection of articles to finish. 




Aggies on the warpath again. 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

APRIL 

25— Phik. Textile DH H 

29— Upsala H 

MAY 

4 — Muhlenberg A 

9— JuniataDH A 

12 — Lincoln H 



14 — Ursinus A 



1:30 
3:15 

3:00 
1:00 
3:15 
3:00 



EARTH DAY PROGRAM 

at 

DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE 

22 APRIL 

A Day of Concern for Man and His Environment 

8:00-9:30 A.M. 

Ornamental Horticulture Teach In 

Mandell Science Building Room 114 
"Environmental Pollution Problems and Their Control" 

9:30-11:00 A.M. 

Agronomy Teach In 

Mandell Science Building Room 114 
"Restoring a Quality Environment Through Education and Action" 

11:00 A.M. -12:00 Noon 

* Address by Congressman Edward G. Blester, Jr. 

Neumann Gymnasium 
"People and Pollution — Causes and Effects" 



1:00-2:00 P.M. 



'Cleaner Air Automobile Exhibit 

Outside Mandell Science Building 



2:00-3:30 P.M. 

Biology Teach In 

Mandell Science Building Room 114 

"Water" 

Speaker: Mr. John Carson 

Executive Director of Natural Resources, Division of Bucks Co. Commissioners 

3:30-5:00 P.M. 

* Audubon Society Teach In 

Mandell Science Building Room 114 

"Environmental Quality — What Can You Do?" 

Speaker: Mr. Alan Miller 

Mid-Atlantic Regional Director of the Audubon Society 

8:00 P.M. 

* Address by Mr. Edward Howard 

Neumann Gymnasium 

"Environment Control In the 70's — 

A Challenge to Government" 

8:00 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 

Soil Conservation Society Exhibit 
Lobby of Mandell Science Building 

♦—EVENTS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 



The Student Government is actively supporting the goals of the 
National Collegiate Association for the Conquest of Cancer. 

Upon the request of the NCACC, we are asking you for an 
earnest effort in participating in and requesting for a National 
Crusade against cancer. 



YOU 



can cure 
CANCER. 

Congressman Rooney has recently introduced a resolution in 
the House of Representatives calling for an all-out war against 
cancer. He has asked Congress to vote the money for a national 
crusade to conquer cancer by 1976. 

If Representative Rooney has the support of the American 
public, Congress will launch this campaign. 

What can you do to help? 

Write ten letters in support of Representative Rooney 's resolu- 
tion. Find ten voting citizens to sign them. Address and stamp ten 
envelopes and send them to: 

The Honorable John J. Rooney 
House of Representatives 
Washington, D.C. 20515 

There are more than seven million college students in the United 
States. If each did his part, that would be more than seventy million 
letters to Congresman Rooney — as many people as voted in the 
entire Presidential election ot 1968! 

More than 330,000 Americans will die from cancer this year — 
nearly 1000 a day. You can help to stop this. Tell Congressman 
Rooney you are behind him in the fight tc conquer cancer. 

Join the 

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ASSOCIATION FOR 

THE CONQUEST OF CANCER 

(NCACC) 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



April 21, 1970 




Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



Bill Cottrell of the Detriot Lions 
and former Aggie football great 
has shown how far someone can 
go if his heart is really set on it. 
The ex-Horticulture major is now 
making $30,000 a year and is also 
employed in the Lion front office 
as the player representative. 

"Big Bill" is also captain of the 
specialty teams and leads the team 
in prayers. 

WBUX, with Roger Conduit, will 
broadcast five Aggie home baseball 
games this season. WBUX is located 
at 1570 oq your dial. If you can't 
make the game tune in. 

April 25 Phila. Textile DH 
29 Upsala College 

May 12 Lincoln Univ. 

The sixteen seniors in the Varsity 
Club were recently honored at the 
annual banquet. They will be pre- 
sented with monogrammed varsity 
blankets for their four years of ser- 
vice. 

On May 4 Delaware Valley Col- 
lege will host the MAC Golf 
Championships at the Doylestown 
Country Club. This will be the 
first year that the University and 
College division championships will 
be held at different sites. 
' This year's golf favorites, by a 
coaches' poll, are Scranton, Western 
Maryland, Upsala, Muhlenberg and 
Moravian. 

Caddies will also be needed for 
the tournament. Sign up now. Ex- 
perienced caddies will carry doub- 
les or singles and non-experienced 
caddies will carry only singles. The 
rates for 36 holes will be $20.00 for 
doubles and $10.00 for singles. You 
may be excused from the day's 
classes upon completing your obli- 
gation. All caddies must sign up in 
the athletic office by April 18 and 
report to the Caddy Master at the 
pro shop by 7:30 a.m. Let's help 
DVC be a good host. 

Don Sechler is in the spotlight 
again. He was recently named for 
the second straight year to the 
Eastern Collegiate Athletic Con- 
ference All East Division III bas- 
ketball team. 



Spring Sports Preview 

The success of the 1970 DVC 
track team will be determined by 
the amount of depth that it will 
be able to muster. 

Being weaker then in past years 
in the distance events and second- 
and third-place finishers will cost 
the thinclads valuable points. 

This year's team will have a 
number of people who will be able 
to score many first place finishes. 

Denny Guers will be the top 
sprinter. Guers holds the school 
record in the 220 and was a mem- 
ber of the record-setting quarter 
mile relay team. 

Captain Lou Hegyes again is 
expected to be the big winner in 
the 440 and 440 intermediate hur- 
dles in which he holds school re- 
cords. Hegyes, last year's high 
scorer, was also on this past sea- 
son's record setting quarter-and 
mile-relay teams. 

Senior George Green will be 
number-one man in the 880 and a 
member of the mile relay squad. 

Coach Craver will be forced to 
use freshmen Jim LaBaugh and 
Bud Dacko in the distance events 
and build for the future. 

The hurdles will probably be the 
Aggies' strongest running event, 
with George Boyer, John Fredrick, 
and John Wolfinger doing the work. 

In the jumping events Senior Joe 
Monfardini will be the top long 
and triple jumper and record-holder 
Steve Howard will try to top his 
14-foot pole vault record. 

Doug Rightler and Fred Beach 
will do most of the scoring in the 
discus and shot put, while Chris 
Nelson and Rich Polgar will be 
fighting for the top spot in the 
javelin. 

Paul Ray, Richie Glenn, Jim Ma- 
loney, Mark Holahan, and Jasper 
Meadows are also expected to do 
some scoring. 

The ability to score runs is the 
big question mark for coach John 
Silan's baseball squad. If the Aggie 
nine can score, the season promises 
to be a great success. 

The strongest department is the 
pitching staff, with Ron Timko, Bob 
Polinsky, Chris Bockrath and Jim 
Foote doing most of the hurling. 

The catching chores will be set 
with hard hitting Captain Gene 
Wallace behind the plate. 



Car Rally Didn't 
Get Lost 

On Saturday, April 4th, the 
Circle-K Club held their third 
annual Car Rally. Fortunately, all 
of the cars returned home safely. 
Unfortunately only seven cars of 
the twenty-three starters success- 
fully completed the journey through 
the mysterious and somewhat "im- 
possible to find" clues. 

Driving the winning car in the 
"seat of the pants" class was Ken 
Painter. Frank Richardson was his 
trusty navigator. The second place 
trophy went to Gary Christensen 
and Steve Burton. In the Novice 
class it was Ben Harvey at the 
wheel of his No. 19 VW for first- 
place honors; his navigator and 
guide was Glen Hawkswell. In a 
close second was Brad Wise and 
his date, Nancy Bicker, the only 
female in the placings. John Hage- 
man and his date, Rum Halstead 
also assisted in the second place 
car. 

For everyone in the rally it 
proved to be an exciting afternoon. 
Win or lose, the scenery was great 
and the car rally was an enjoyable 
experience for all. 

—Dana Ingerto 




A Sensational Act from the past variety 
show during Spring Weekend. 

Again the infield will be strong. 
Jim Williamson and Bob Polinsky 
will be battling for the first base 
job. Tom Dobrowski and Tom 
Wentzel will team up for what looks 
to be one of the top second and 
short combinations in the league. 
Third base seems to be in the cap- 
able hands of Frosh Andy Timko. 

The outfield has seniors Denny 
Shank and Jim Douglas in two 
spots with freshman Jim Kaufman 
in the third spot. 

Getz, Burdick, Hock, Bozenberg 
and Shields are looked to for bench 
strength. 



Soil Conservation 
Club Reports 

On April 9, the Soil Conservation 
Club held elections. Due to our 
small membership, the offices of 
secretary and treasurer were com- 
bined; also, those of activities chair- 
man, corresponding secretary, and 
publications were put together to 
form an office of public relations. 
The election results are as follows: 
president — Joseph Kershner (71), 
vice president — Randy Laurich 
(72), secretary - treasurer — Bill 
Beers (71), and public relations — 
Frank Witmer (71). 

Brian Bailey, a senior in Agron- 
omy, then gave an interesting talk 
on 'The Ecological Crisis in the 
Everglades." 

The Earth Day committee re- 
ported that it will give a slide pro- 
gram and hold group discussions in 
area high schools on Earth Day. 
Also, a display will be in regard 
to conservation plans and practices 
in the Neshaminy Valley watershed. 

The club's A-Day projects will 
include a live display illustrating 
wildlife and habitat relationships 
and tentatively a display on con- 
servation problems and controls. 
The wildlife project, which is being 
done by John George, will show 
the dependence of certain species 
of wildlife, including pheasants, 
quail, grouse, and rabbits, on var- 
ious kinds of vegetation. Dr. Prun- 
deanu mentioned the Ray Y. Gildea, 
Jr. — SCSA scholarship in conserva- 
tion applications, which are now 
available. Anyone interested should 
contact Joe Kershner. He also men- 
tioned that the 25th annual meeting 
of the Soil Conservation Society of 
America will be held in Toronto, 
Ontario, on Aug. 9-12, 1970, with 
the theme being 'Turning Points in 
Time." Mr. Stratton commented 
that the Soil Judging team will soon 
begin meeting in preparation for 
next season. Persons interested 
should sign up with him as soon 
as possible. 

TRACK SCHEDULE 

APRIL 
22— Upsala and DVC at 

Lebanon Valley A 3:30 

24-25 — Penn Relays 

28— Kutztown State H 3:45 

30— Albright A 3:30 

MAY 

5— Rider A 2:30 

8-9 — MAC Championships 
at Dickinson 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Pfofit Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN. PA. 







DAY 1970 



the 





URROW 




Vol. 17, No. 7 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



May 1, 1970 



To The Parents and Visitors 



Biology Seniors 

Present Research 

Findings 



We/come To 

Delaware Valley College 

of Science and Agriculture 



Delaware Valley College's twenty-second annual "A" 
Day exhibition will please people of all ages. The pres- 
entation is by the students working with the clubs of 
their major. Many exhibits have taken weeks of prep- 
aration. 

Don't miss the many scientific demonstrations in 
Mandell Science Building. A large attraction each year 
is the Ornamental Horticulture flower show. For the 
kiddies there are hayrides and pony rides. The man- 
sized appetite will find satisfaction at the outdoor 
chicken barbecue with all the trimmings. 

The "A" Day Committee has done a fine job with 
the contests. Some are new this year and should prove 
interesting. 

We hope everyone leaves "A" Day tired and 
happy. 

Michael A. Morgan, Editor 
Larry Martel, Associate Editor 
Staff of The Furrow 



Those seniors doing research problems 
in biology prevsented their results on 
Tuesday evening, April 14, in Mandell 
Hall. The presentations were made under 
conditions similar to those encountered 
at scientific meetings, and interested fac- 
ulty and students were in attendance. 
The participating seniors and the topics 
of their papers were: Mark Eutermoser, 
"Effects of Varying Salinity On The 
American Oyster Crassostrea Virginica" 
John Hubbard, "Behavioral Responses of 
the Honey Bee to Open and Closed Pas- 
sages;" Ralph Spanish, "The Mechanism 
for the Extension and Contraction of the 
Conducting Giant Net Axon in Lumbri- 
cus;" Ken Roux, "Factors Contributing 
to the Expression of Aggressive Rehavior 
in a Cichlid Fish, Cichlasoma Nigrofas- 
ciatum, Part I;" Don Sillivan, "Factors 
Contributing to the Expression of Ag- 
gressive Behavior in a Cichlid Fish, Cich- 
lasoma nigrofasciatum, Part II;" Randy 
Bair, "A Study of Mineral Nutrition in 
Saprolegnia parasitica;" Gerry Guzy, "A 
Study of Physiological Characteristics of 
Saprolegnia parasitica." Each of the pa- 
pers was well-received by those present, 
and questions and a discussion followed 
each of them. 




-w^vO-^-s^s -*s-Xl^-0-~~n~%- *^^-^>»^ VV v^v-->~^-^>^~-v~v^-^^^^^ 



THE GHERKIN 



The Gherkin this issue goes to 
the office that made the deci- 
sion to move Barness Hall resi- 
dents out again this spring. The 
two main reasons Barness Hall 
was chosen was Mrs. Potts is a 
permanent resident and an ex- 
cellent proctor for the visiting 
girls. Also the residents should 
be commended for their clean 
rooms left for the girls during 
Spring Weekend. 



Furrow 
Meetings 

Open To All 

The Furrow will have a meeting 
open to all students and faculty. At 
this meeting Lou Hegyes will speak 
about the need for an optimistic 
view in writing news articles for 
clubs and Student Government. 

Also to be demonstrated will be 
the involved workings of a weekly 
newspaper. The schedule of events 
that precede an issue is a hectic, 
time-consuming process. Examples 
from past Furrows will be dis- 
played for your inspection. Con- 
structive criticisms will be wel- 
comed. Mumblings from behind 
closed doors will not be heard. 

The meeting requires your at- 
tendance as an interested student. 
Come out to Work Hall lounge, 
May 11, Monday at 7:30. Watch 
the cafeteria bulletin board for any 
changes. 

First Meeting 

On April 28th the Student Gov- 
ernment held its first meeting un- 
der the leadership of its new pres- 
ident, Rich Russell. In the pursu- 
ing elections Fred Harteis was 
elected Vice President; Dana In- 
gerto — Secretary; Tom Brewer — 
Treasurer and Chris Hollands 
Judge. Chris Hollands is also in 
charge of the communications com- 
mittee. The Furrow hopes by work- 
ing with the committee and by let- 
ting them see how a newspaper is 
formed that there will be an im- 
provement in the Furrow for the 
students next year. 

Girls ■?!? 

DVC might not be an all male 
college for long now. Dean Fulcoly 
announced at the April 28th meet- 
ing of the Student Government that 
the college will start processing 
applications of off-campus girls for 
admittance next semester. The 
planned number of acceptances 
was not disclosed but any number 
of girls in multiples of one or two 
will be a big change. Right Aggies? 
Now let's hope that the mini wins 
over the midi. 



Dear Lou, 

Just received your March 20th 
copy and wish to call your atten- 
tion to an error in The Sports Quiz. 
Without looking it up I know that 
the World Series game you men- 
tion was in 1960 and not 1961. Just 
take it from an Ole Timer. Please 
extend my good wishes to Prof. 
Josh Feldstein and Dr. Jimmie 
Work. I hope to see you all on "A" 
Day. 

Sincerely yours, 
Archie Toffler 
Class of 1922 



-£«&'« 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



May 1, 1970 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Apathy Pro Con 

After spending a school year at Delaware Valley College, no student can help 
to make observations concerning the school — if an individual has no feelings to 
express, he is either a vegetable or just apathetic to his mode of living. So much has 
been said about the unsuitable aspects of this school. So much that the topic has 
been exploited to no end and is nearly exhausted. 

What has been accomplished? 

The average student living on campus would probably reply "not much." Much 
has been said about the College hut nothing has been directed towards the students 
that make Delaware Valley what it is today. I am not coming to the defense of the 
College, neither am I about to write about my observations on the College. The pur- 
pose of this editorial is to point out some of the general attitudes of the student body 
that have been observed. 

Everyone is demanding and yelling for a change; and a change is needed, and 
has been occurring for a long time. All one has to do is open his eyes. The improve- 
ments may seem inappreciable but the fact remains that changes have been made 
and they have been made for you. The majority of the students yell like little children 
for these changes. The ones that yell the loudest are the ones who just sit back and 
wait for the improvements. There is a very small minority that will take the initiative 
to carry out a project. The people who do all the work are the interesting students 
who do "petty' little things such as attending student government meetings to pro- 
pose their ideas and accomplish their goals. How did our Student Union finally 
become a reality? Ask any student government member or student that worked on 
the project. They did it for everyone; however, they will not receive an ounce of 
gratitude for their efforts. The personal satisfaction must be nice, though. 

The point of initial action is in the hands of the students. It is a powerful tool 
if used correctly. But I've seen more spirit and enthusiasm at a grammarschool track 
meet. There just are not enough interested people who will get their "hands dirty" 
by becoming involved. Too many of the people are content when the changes come 

— like a baby getting a pacifier. These are the people who find something new to 
complain about after a few days have passed and the novelty has worn off — like a 
nagging wife. These are also the same people that just sit back and wait for more to 
come their way — like a spoiled little girl. They've paid their dues and fees — now 
let someone else do the dirty work. There is an apathetic pose among the students 
of Delaware Valley that is running rampant. It has not yet reached the entire student 
population, but it's getting there. The general attitude of many people seems to be 

— "I'll get my grades, get my diploma, and get the hell out." 

You can't get something for nothing. This is a gradeschool concept. If everyone 
on this campus would realize this, much more could happen here. 

A small school has its limitations in many aspects. However, it also has its ad- 
vantages and the good far outweighs the bad. A little thought on every's part will 
prove this. Student-faculty relationships are far more personalized than at a school 
of 30,000 or more. The majority of the faculty members at Del Val seem more than 
ready to listen, help, and advise any student — just for the asking. No matter what the 
'problem is, there is always someone willing to listen. What a better substitute for 
staring at four green walls? A great deal can be accomplished, with an equal amount 
of pleasure derived, if the students would become more involved with their in- 
structors, coaches, and other administrative members. An example is our upcoming 
events in the "A" Day exposition this year. There will be faculty members seeking 
the help of ALL interested students. What does it take to motivate interest in the 
average Aggie? Participation can turn this school into a great school. It's always nice 
to be able to enjoy the events of "A" Day. However, it's even better to know that 
you're a part of it. What are you doing to help? Accomplishment can lead to a more 
fulfilling life now and later on. 

Likewise, in a small school there is a closer knit between the students. There is 
a "knit" here but it is not strong enough to really be of any significance. There are 
numerous clubs and organizations that an individual can become involved in. All one 
needs is the motivation. There is no excuse for a student saying he has no time for 
extra activities due to a loaded schedule, as one student told me the other day as 
an excuse for not running track. Nobody studies for the entire 16 hours that he is 
awake each day. There is no excuse for a student receiving a transcript with no 
extracurricular activities marked on it. 

If you're bored, count the number of activities you take part in. If you wonder 
..hy Del Val is so boring, again count the number of activities you're in. Its not 
the school that's boring you — you're boring yourself. 

The narrow-minded people I have met compare with no others that I have 
confronted. The students here just want their grades — the bare minimum of the 
liberal and fine arts courses and exactly what they need in the sciences to get out. 
No wonder why there are several people who can truly be called "farmers" in this 
school. Not a 20th century farmer, Dut some remote soul from the 1800's who knew 
nothing about the other world which surrounded him everyday. The world of liter- 
ature, music, philosophy, etc., etc., etc., etc. Make yourself interesting! How many 
people in the English and philosophy courses really care about them and participate 
in them? Not many at all. Maybe tnis is why a certain instructor refers to his students 
as "clods." I would tend to agree with him. One freshman stated that most students 
are in the liberal arts courses because they have to fill the extra credit hours. "They're 

}ust there," was his reply. Another inparticular freshman said that all he needs is 
lis agronomy courses. English and philosophy are of no need to him in later life. 
Think again. If you want to become one of the ranks of the combination beer- 
drinking, baseball-watching, bowler Americans that are so common today, just keep 
thinking that way and good luck. To be narrow-minded and limited in your education 
is as good as being a vegetable. 

I personally know one senior very well who is involved in numerous activities, 
works in the cafeteria, and is an outstanding athlete. He is very happy with Del Val 
and will stand up for his feelings. If everyone here could follow his example 
slightly, Delaware Valley could become one of the better schools around — not just 
another institution of higher learning. 

College is primarily a period during which an individual has the opportunity to 
broaden all of the aspects of his life, introduce new ideas and ideals to his basic- 
philosophy of life, and, if necessary, change himself for the better. This can take on 
the form of a complete personality transition or just mere changes where the in- 
dividual sees fit. The whole idea of leaving home seems glamorous and extravagant 
to many; the whole idea of college becomes the final preparation before one con- 
fronts the complexities of today's ever-changing cycle of life. However, everything 
boils down to die single idea in college — You only get out of it what you put into 
it. Another gradeschool concept. This determines your success and happiness in 



w 



college. It doesn't matter if you wish to become a pig farmer or a chemical engineer. 
College can be fulfilling in more ways that the average Aggie is aware of. 

There is adequate time for everything. The life at Delaware Valley is neither 
rushed nor harried. Only the student makes it that way for himself. If a student's life 
is hectic, there is only one solution which Dr. Feldstein has repeated so many times — 
"You must get yourself organized!" 

I've tried to offer suggestions to some of the problems that I feel are present 
amongst the students. Everyone is entitled to an opinion. Del Val has its problems — 
so does every other school in the country. But with the help of a sincere and inter- 
ested student body, many of these problems can be abated. However, if all you can 
do is shout and complain about Delaware Valley — well then your place is in another 
college more suited to yoifr needs and "demands." No one has any right to make 
life miserable for anyone else here at school. Thinking and acting as mature 
INDIVIDUALS with the open minds that are supposed to be characteristic of our 
generation is a basic necessity of every student at Delaware Valley College. It's all 
up to you — It's also your life, so do with it what you please. Just have a little 
consideration for your fellow students. 

—Paul A. Ray 73 

Noth/ng to be Apathetic About 

Editor: 

As a freshman here at DVC, I have become totally disillusioned about college 
life. In the recent "Furrow," a lot of space was devoted to trying to pep up the 
student body and get us to take an interest in our college. Why is it that almost 800 
students simply don't care? No one really cares if we lose a baseball game, basket- 
ball game, or that we can't even fill the wrestling lineup. No one cares who is presi- 
dent of what class. 

As a freshman during orientation, I was constantly besieged with the "Old Aggie 
Spirit." Now I can better understand why it was dwelled upon to such an extent. 
It was because the Administration was afraid that our class would become like every 
other class before us. Just plain old Aggies who don't give a damn about anything 
this college does. Can we be blamed? 

Recently the first DVC Student Union was opened to serve us. Great. It was a 
long overdue improvement. But is it of any great benefit? I realize that it's the best 
we could come up with, but it is lacking in one important respect, as is everything 
else at DVC. Women! I have heard one department head ask: "What do you want — 
a girl in your bed every night?" Well, I think everyone can remember wh.»t cheer- 
leaders used to do toward inspiring a team to victory in high school. There ,ire three 
main topics at DVC: Drinking, Girls, and Sex. And what kind of school spirit can 
be expected from an atmosphere such as this? Delaware Valley College \pgie Spirit, 
that's what. The kind of spirit whereby no one goes out and votes because there's 
only on candidate per office and there's only one candidate per office because no one 
cares enough to want to be a candidate, or is afraid of winning the election and being 
left holding office and unable to get any support from his classmates. 

This feeling of apathy is the main problem on campus. The criticism of the stu- 
dents for their lack of participation in the previous election has prompted me to write 
this letter. I think we are well justified in acting this way and should continue to do 
so until the Administration gives us a reason for feeling differently. 

Respectfully, 

Ulman 104 Aggies 

Tom Lehman and Ray Laet 



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-ED ITORI A L STAFF- 
EDITOR Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Larry Marttl 

COPY EDITOR Harvay Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hogyes 

PHOTO EDITOR Davo Thomas 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Pylo 

TYPING MANAGER Dolbort Jones 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GEN ERAL STAFF- 

Sol Cavinoei, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allen Gordon, Abbott Lee, Dave Sustak, 

Howard Henderson, Bruce Richards, Jeff Keir, Bill Turner. 

- A DVI SORS- 

ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John M.rti 

It should be noted that the opinion! expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



May 1, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



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Page Four 



THE FURROW 



Mav 1, 1970 



All photo credits: 
DAVE THOMAS 




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Mr. Hamilton from Allen Toyota in 
Doylestotvn tells interested students 
about this car. It has a metering device 
that drastically reduces gasoline jyollu- 
tion. Standards met and exceeded were 
set by California law. Students remarked 
about the jtricc tag of over $3,000. 







May 1, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



CUB NEWS 



Animal Husbandry 
"A" Day Activities 

Each class which is active in the Block 
and Bridle Club has been working hard 
to prepare a project for "A" Day. The 
class projects are as follows: 

Seniors — 

Poisonous grass land plants. 

Juniors — 

Physiology of the skeletal system. 

Sophomores — 

Display on cuts of pork. 

Freshmen — 

Employment of Delaware Valley 
College graduates. 

Many of the members of the Block 
and Bridle Club will be showing animals 
on Saturday and they will be judged on 
showmanship and the general appearance 
of their animals. Dr. Merritt from Penn 
State will be the judge of this event. The 
showing will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday. 
Classes of beef, sheep, and swine will be 
shown. 

On Sunday each class belonging to the 
club will provide judging teams. Each 
class team will judge the animal classes 
presented on Saturday. Beasons for plac- 
ings will be given by each individual 
member of the teams. Individuals will be 
scored by the College's senior judging 
team. 

Apiary Society News 

The Apiary Society of Delaware Valley 
College has elected a new slate of offi- 
cers for the 1970-71 school year. These 
officers include: President, Scott Traino; 
Vice-President, Jim Bogaze; Secretary, 
Neil Kratz; Treasurer, Tom Cook; Publi- 
cations Bepresentative, Barry Davis; and 
A-Day Bepresentative, Dick Bogdan. Our 
Advisor is Dr. Berthhold. 

The Delaware Valley College Apiary 
Society is an organization open to all 
interested students. The purpose of the 
Society is to cultivate the art of bee- 
keeping. Beekeeping can be a very lucra- 
tive hobby and members are taught how 
to begin their own colonies. 

Meetings are held twice a month on 
Monday nights in the recently-renovated 
Bee House. The meetings consist of in- 
formative lectures and demonstrations 
with equipment being made available to 
every eluo member. An extracting room 
is also located in the Bee House. 

The Apiary Society would like to take 
this opportunity to welcome everyone 
to see our exhibits and displays in Man- 
dell Science Building, Bm. 112, on 
A-Day, May 2 and 3. On display will be 
an observation bee hive and a demon- 
stration on the extraction of honey. 

Orn. Hort Club 
Trip to Colonial 
Williamsburg, Virginia 

On Thursday afternoon, April 16, a 
total of thirty club members and faculty 
advisors left the D.V.C. campus en route 
to Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Friday afternoon a guided tour was 
provided, featuring the more outstanding 
buildings and gardens in the main recon- 
struction area. 

Colonial Williamsburg, the 18th cen- 
tury Virginia capital nearly a mile in 
length, includes 500 buildings and houses, 
an outstanding display of colonial crafts, 
gardens, greens, and antiques. 

Surrounding the Governor's Palace are 
formal gardens which include an English 
maze, bowling green, pleached arbors, 
and formal displays. 

On Saturday morning the group left 
Williamsburg, making a final stop at 
Gunston Hall, in Lorton, Virginia, before 
returning to campus. Gunston Hall, built 
by George Mason, a great figure in Amer- 
ican History, was typical of 18th century 
architecture. A view of the Potomac from 
the east door of the mansion, was framed 
by a twelve-foot boxwood hedge in the 
midst of a formal garden. 

Upon returning to D.V.C, after a 
weekend of temperatures in the high 
70's, club members found it difficult to 
adjust to a cooler climate. 



Students Represent DVC 
At the 3rd Annual State 
Newman Conference 

On April 10, 11, 12 the Penn Center 
in Philadelphia was the setting of the 
third annual state Newman conference. 
The Philadelphia region was host for the 
conference, which included Temple Uni- 
versity, University of Pennsylvania, West 
Chester State, and Delaware Valley 
College. 

The conference was attended by two 
hundred students from such schools as, 
Pennsylvania State University, Allegheny 
State, Bloomsburg State, Millersville 
State, Slippery Bock State, East Strouds- 
burg State, Bucknell and many others. 
The theme of the conference was "Man 
and Woman. Their Belationship to the 
Universe, Themselves and God." The 
weekend was a happening of college 
students getting together and experienc- 
ing each other intellectually as well as 
socially. 

The program was very well planned. 
On Friday evening a unique multi-media 
presentation was given. Five projectors 
were rolling at the same time. Each pro- 
jector was presenting something different, 
but each relating to create a college of 
man and woman and their relationship 
to their universe. The program ended 
with a very provocative film "Why Man 
Creates." 

By Saturday morning any shyness due 
to being in a strange crowd was gone 
and there was a strong sense of belong- 
ing. The formation of a close knit group 
among two hundred college men and 
women who only twelve hours before 
had never seen each other was over- 
whelming. 

The concept of Man and Women and 
their relationship to themselves and to 
God was discussed and challenged by 
the students. The discussions lasted well 
into Saturday afternoon and many new 
ideas and concepts were brought out. 
Saturday evening a dinner dance was 
given for the delegates, with Temple 
providing a very good band. The evening 
strengthened many newly-formed friend- 
ships. 

Sunday morning, after breakfast, Mr. 
Timothy Hepps of Allegheny State Col- 
lege received the Bill Geary award be- 
cause of his outstanding activities in 
Newman on the campus, regional, and 
state levels. There was a great feeling 
of hesitation in leaving, but after many 
good-byes and exchanges of addresses the 
conference adjourned. The success of 
the conference strengthened the role of 
campus ministry in reaching the student 
at all levels, intellectually, spiritually, 
and socially. 

D.T.A. Elects New Officers 

On April 9, 1970 Delta Tau Alpha 
elected its officers for the 1970-71 school 
year. Those officers are as follows: Presi- 
dent, Susan West; Vice-President, Ernest 
Grunow; Secretary, Thomas Williams; 
Treasurer, Norman Mogul; Sergeant-at- 
Arms, Charles Mauch; Publications Be- 
presentative, Milton Parker; A-Day Be- 
presentative, Louis Makrancy. 

The D.T.A. chapter of Delaware Valley 
College sent Mark Uebersax, past chapter 
President, and Susan West, new chapter 
President, to the Delta Tau Alpha 
National Convention held in Tennessee 
at Tennessee Technological University. 
This convention took place on April 19, 
20, and 21, 1970. Our representatives 
presented the chapter's annual report in 
competition with other college and uni- 
versity D.T.A. chapters for the Corpus 
Award. This award is given to the best 
annual report. 

Those members who worked on the 
Corpus Award Committee were: John 
George; Chairman, Gregg Plotts, Mark 
Uebersax, Susan West and Milton Parker. 

Bespectfully submitted, 

Milton Parker 

D.T.A. Publications Bepresentative 



An. Hus. Club Holds Mixer 

The Block and Bridle Club held a 
mixer on Friday, April 10, featuring the 
"General Store." Tne turnout was con- 
sidered to be very good. Posters had been 
sent to many girls schools in the area. 
Several members of the club helped to 
recruit the girls from such schools as 
Arch Bishop Wood, Holy Family Col- 
lege and Harcum Junior College. Chap- 
erons for the mixer included Dr. Pelle, 
Mr. Wagner and Mr. Gross. 

Club Trip & "A" Day Showmen 

This year's annual dairy club trip en- 
abled both dairy members and advisors 
to see some of the best dairy cattle in 
the northeastern United States. At 5 a.m. 
Friday morning, April 10th, we left for 
Poverty Hollow Holsteins in Connecticut. 
Massachusetts was next on our list and 
we stopped there at Meridith Farm 
Ayrshires, the breed being well exhibited. 
Here we saw the top-producing Ayrshire 
in the country, a record-holding producer 
of 32,000 lbs. of milk. Bv this time it 
was nightfall so we stayed over-night at 
a campsite in Massachusetts, which gave 
the members and Mr. Heinle and Mr. 
Smith a good chance to Jest their cooking 
abilities. The next morning we made a 
side-trip to the Massachusetts seacoast; 
for some members this was the first time 
they had ever seen the ocean and they 
were given a chance to walk on the 
sandy beach. From here we had a long 
ride to Great Brook Holsteins, a fine dairy 
in Connecticut. In New York we made 
our last stop at a Guernsey herd at 
AtteBroc Farm. Exhausted, we made it 
back to D.V.C. at about 10 p.m. 

The following dairy members will be 
showing dairy cattle for A-Day: Seniors- 
Tom Boyer, John Dean, Larry Gerber 
and Don Koontz; Junior— Fred Harteis, 
Guy Hitz, Dana Ingerto and Ed Mc- 
Allister; Sophomores— Everett Halstead, 
John Hagemen, Tom Wakefield and Brad 
Wise; Freshman — Barry Davis, Bon 
Jennings, and Gino LaBruzzo. 




GAUDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Lou's 
Views 

by 

LOU HEGYES 



In two or three years which college 
basketball team will he tops in the East? 
I'll lay my money on Maryland or Prince- 
ton. Both schools have stepped up their 
recruiting programs and have landed a 
number of the top high school pkyers in 
the country. Maryland will have two 
first-team all-city players from Power 
Memorial in New York next season, while 
Princeton has landed its share of all- 
staters. Princeton's freshman team also 
finished this past season undefeated. 

All-American Pete Maravich of LSU 
and hi* teammate Dan Hester were sus- 
pended from school on April Fool's Day 
for missing too many classes. LSU offi- 
cials said both players had been on atten- 
dance probation since last semester but 
will be eligible to re-enter classes this 
summer. 

How far will the Los Angeles Lakers 
go now that the Boston Celtics aren't 
in the NBA finals. This is their seventh 
time in the finals and in six previous 
years the Lakers were defeated by the 
Celtics for the crown. The powerful New 
York Knicks stand in their path this year. 

Will the Mets and Orioles repeat last 
year's performances? Time will tell. Here 
is what I think the standings will be 
next fall. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East 


West 


New York 


Cincinnati 


St. Louis 


Sar Francisco 


Chicago 


Atlanta 


Pittsburgh 


Los Angeles 


Philadelphia 
Montreal 


Houston 


San Diego 


AMEBICAN 


LEAGUE 


East 


West 


Baltimore 


Minnesota 


Detroit 


Oakland 


Boston 


California 


Washington 


Kansas City 


New York 


Chicago 


Cleveland 


Milwaukee 



Eight Rugged Individualists Star In Offbeat TV Special 

What ever happened to that time-honored American figure, the rugged indi- 
vidualist? 

Nothing. He's alive and going strong. 

He lives in the American craftsman. 

Eight of these old-fashioned Americans, tucked in out-of-the-way places around 
the country, are the focus of an unusual television documentary that reveals their 
thoughts and ways of life. 

These six men and two women, who prefer the old and the handmade to the 
new and machine-made, are totally committed to doing their thing: creating highly 
personal objects in clay, wood, fiber, metal or glass. 

Their story, "With These Hands: The Bebirth of the American Craftsman," will 
be colorcast by ABC on May 8 (9 p.m., EDT) and carried in the Philadelphia area 
by WFIL-TV (Channel 6). 

With stage and screen star David Wayne as narrator, the documentary explores 
the ideals, viewpoints and creative insights of these individualists who chose not to 
become faces in the 9-to-5 crowd. 

The producer, Daniel Wilson, traveled 25,000 miles and interviewed 43 craftsmen 
in making "With These Hands," says these artists represent a significant postwar 
development : the resurgence of American crafts. 

"The renaissance of American crafts," he says, "not only reaffirms that rugged 
individualism is far from dead, hut also suggests a reaction to an increasingly com- 
puterized and impersonal world." 

In addition, he points out that nearly 500 colleges, universities, art and technology 
schools now offer craft courses. Also, there are an estimated 13 million teenagers with 
craft experience. 

"What a relatively few are doing today," Wilson says, "many may be doing to- 
morrow." 

The ABC News documentary grew out of the OBJECTS: USA exhibit of Amer- 
ican crafts now touring the country. The exhibit, sponsored by Johnson Wax, includes 
more than 300 objects made by 258 craftsmen, including the eight in the television 
special. 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



May 1, 1970 



SENIORS TAKE SPRING TRIP 

During the past Spring vacation a caravan of Aggies journeyed to the sunny 
Caribbean paradise of Puerto Rico. The group included seniors Jeff Wood; Bill 
Curtis, Howie Flisser, Gery Fisher, Paul Beckerman, junior Charlie Gale, his buddy 
Dave (Hey Jack) Bowe from Conshohocken and myself. 

The trip sponored by Five Dollar a Day Tours, provided for eight days and seven 
nights of beaches, mountains and San Juan nightlife. Included in the initial cost were 
both the air fare and hotel accommodations. Therefore, the only money we really 
needed to bring was for meals and personal fun. 

We stayed at the Olimpo Court Hotel, a haven for any Aggie, and immediately 
realized that this was going to be quite a vacation. Our tour included 89 girls and 
onlv 18 other guys besides ourselves. Most of the tourists were also college students. 
Colleges like Ohio University, Oneonto State, Rutgers and Penn State were well 
represented. 

Hardly having time to unpack we promptly headed for the beach where we 
would spend many wonderful hours in the coming week. As the week passed we 
went sightseeing in the Rain Forest, Lequillo beach, Rincon (surfing area) and of 
course beautiful Old San Juan. 

Probably the most memorable and enjoyable day was spent in the interior at a 
natural water slide. 

Our guides for the day and during a large part of our vacation were three charm- 
ing and attractive girls: Alyce Lowe, Marirvn Shurka and Adlin Johnson. The girls 
are personal friends of Lou Hegyes 70 who had been in Puerto Rico during the 
previous Christmas vacation. Each of us with a girl were led through the Rain Forest 
on the nine motor bikes which we rented, that frequently were in need of repair, 
to a lovely and remote natural water slide. 

Old clothes were in order as we took to the slides. The slides are approximately 
150-200 feet long and were shaped by the natural flow of water down a rock for- 
mation. One after another we sat down into the fast moving stream and were carried 
down over the rocks until being deposited in a large pool of clear calm water. Over 
and over we climbed up the rocks and tried the ride again. 

Most of the people that we toured with were, of course, girls. 

There were also a number of great guys, but for some strange reason I can't seem 
to remember their names. 

I guess the one thing that impressed us the most besides the fantastic weather, 
nightlife, and scenic villages was the genuine friendliness of every Puerto Rican we 
met in our travels. These people could never do enough for us whenever we were 
in need of anything. An excellent illustration of this trait happened on our trip to 
the mountains. Bill Curtis' bike broke down and a group of islanders picked up Bill 
and his bike. They drove him 25 miles so his bike could be repaired and wouldn't 
accept a cent from him when they said, "Adios." 

Our week quickly drew to a close and we departed leaving behind many mem- 
ories, new friends ana good times. 

Speaking for the eight of us I can only say that the next time you plan a vacation 
or a trip forget Miami and Fort Lauderdale and head for sunny San Juan. You'll have 
a great time. — Richard A. Palmasano '70 

McEntee Stars In Loss 

< April 15. The Delaware Valley College 
baseball team lost a 12-inning heart- 
breaker to the Greyhounds of Moravian 
by a 3-2 score. 

Lansdowne junior Bob McEntee went 
the route for the Aggies, striking out 
eight while walking only four. Moravian 
won the game in the 12th when Williams, 
the Greyhound right fielder, blopped a 
double to left, advanced to third on a 
Gene Wallace passed ball and scored on 
a sacrifice fly. 

Moravian pitchers Jim Bevan and Tom 
Machette combined to two-hit the visiting 
Aggies. 

Trackmen Victorious 

April 18. The Delaware Valley College 
track team scored an impressive 85-60 
victory over the host Lincoln University 
Lions. 

The victory was a good team effort 
as the Aggie thinclads registered first 
place points in 12 of the 17 events. 

Danny Guers set the only record of 
the day with a time of 21.6 in the 220. 

The first-place winners for Del Val 
were Dan Guers (100), Captain Lou 
Hegyes (440), George Green (880), Jim 
LaBaugh (2 mile), John Frederick (120 
H.H. and 440 intermediate hurdles), 
Steve Howard (Pole vault), Joe Monfar- 
dini (long jump), Fred Beach (shot put), 
Chris Nielson (discus and javelin), and 
the Wi-mile relay team of Hegyes, Boyer, 
Frederick and Guers. 




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J. CARROLL MOLLOY 

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Baseballers Drop Two 

April 18. Susquehanna University 
swept a doubleheader from the Aggies 
4-2 and 9-6, even though DVC outhit 
the Crusaders in both games. 

With freshman Bob Polinsky on the 
mound in the first game the Aggies took 
a 2-0 lead in the first inning on a single 
by Tom Wentzel, Andy Timko's double, 
and Ron Timko's single, but costly errors 
and timely hitting enabled the Crusaders 
to take a 4-2 advantage with two runs 
in both the second and third innings. 

Susquehanna got to pitcher Ron Timko 
in a hurry in the nightcap. The Crusaders 
scored in the first then walks and errors 
built the lead to 8-0. 

Susquehanna had a 7-0 lead before 
DVC broke the ice with a run in the 
fifth. Two more were scored in the sixth 
and a three-run rally in the seventh fell 
short. 



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Fiat Prices Start at $1500.00 



Fiat celebrates the Age of Motion. The 850 Sport Racer. 
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FIAT 



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the 




RROW 




Vol. 17, No. 8 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



May 15, 1970 




Photo Credit. DAVE THOMAS 

Dr. French, tlxe best received weaker of the afternoon, used his usual casual 
manner in expressing his opinion at the Memorial Service. 

Memorial Service Held For 
Kent State Four 

Friday, May 8th, classes were canceled for a Memorial Service for 
the Kent State Four. Students and faculty alike were strongly impressed. 
It was truly a memorial service. No political opinions were argued — no 
judgments of right or wrong. We have learned from this tragic incident. 

Reverend Vincent opened the Memorial Service with a brief prayer 
that set the atmosphere. Rich Russell's opening speech clearly stated the 
purpose of the gathering — a memorial service. 

In rapid succession the principle speakers followed. Dr. Work asked 
that we learn from the incident. He urged students to make politics a 
part of their careers. Through politics permament peaceful changes are 
accomplished. Rich Palmasano, speaking as President of the Class of 70, 
said he was proud to be a student of Delaware Valley College where 
the students and the Administration do have a dialogue. 

Mr. Adelson reminded everyone that the service was a "symbol of 
sorow for both the parents and Guardsmen who pulled the trigger." 

Dr. French spoke about the "Young Jewish Radical" who had the 
courage to stand up against the conquering Romans two thousand years 
ago. The students responded to Dr. French's speech with a standing 
ovation. 

Mr. Benjamin Wilson, a member of the House of Representatives of 
Pennsylvania, tried to summarize what was said. He urged students to 
visit his office and become active in politics. 

Reverend Horn presented the benediction. After the service the audi- 
ence assembled around the flag in front of Allman Hall. There Dr. Work 
called for a moment of silence before lowering the American Flag to 
half-mast in tribute to the Kent State Four. 

It was a very fine service, very well attended by both students and 
faculty. The majority of Delaware Valley College was well represented. 



"EARTH DAY" IS 
365 DAYS A YEAR 

by John D. Martin 

A graveyard; peaceful and quiet; still 
and dead — the way the Earth may well 
be if we choose to corninue to destroy 
our environment. It is a gloomy yet 
realistic appraisal of our future unless 
constructive action is taken and taken 
NOW. Scientists predict that in a mere 
25 years approximately 75 to 80% of all 
species of currently living animals will 
be extinct. If man does not poison him- 
self out of existence, he will surely popu- 
late himself out of existence. Or do these 
go hand in hand? 

In the brief span of our lives we have 
witnessed the rapidly increasing pace of 
environmental pillage. We have wit- 
nessed our wilderness being transformed 
into an asphalt jungle populated by tens 



of thousands of gas-spewing automobiles. 
Not even our remaining wildernesses 
have gone unscathed, for today in the 
United States there is no such thing as an 
unpolluted river or lake. 

But the cities, from which tons of 
pollutants are dispatched into our en- 
vironment are where the most immediate 
dangers lie. Deadly smog even today 
hangs over our major cities, such as Los 
Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia — 
a blanket of death. Scientists predict that 
by the 1970's urban dwellers will have 
to wear breathing helmets as a health 
measure while they are outdoors. 

We are pouring over our countryside 
at an unbelievable rate-eliminating veg- 
etation which once served to help re- 
plenish oxygen to our atmosphere. And 
we buy automobiles at an even more 
incredible rate — the auto which is by 
far the largest single factor in environ- 
{Continued on page 5, col. 3) 



Credit Where 
Credit Is Due 

I'd like to take this opportunity to do 
some back-patting. The card-core staff 
that made the Furrow possible are due 
a lot of credit. 

Although Dr. Mertz isn't on my staff, 
he is the faculty advisor. Many times I 
have been delinquent getting material to 
Dr. Mertz for proofreading. He gener- 
ously gives up nis free time to do this 
extra work. With his direction and as- 
sistance more issues were printed this 
year. Dr. Mertz has been the greatest 
help to me this semester. 

A dependable writer, and extremely 
valuable sports editor this past semester 
has been Lou Hegyes. Lou's Views has 
been the single most successful column. 
Lou did most of the sports reporting him- 
self. Any games or events that weren't 
printed were probably reported on, but 
because of space limits or irregularity of 
printing were omitted. There have been 
times when Lou had other things to do 
Sundays, but he still managed to write 
and prepare his Lou's Views and reports 
on sports events. 

Sundays are busy days for the Furrow 
editors. Ask Dave Thomas how he spent 
many of his Sunday afternoons and eve- 
nings. Dave has been very faithful about 
getting in finished pictures by 9:00 p.m. 
Sunday evening. Many students watch 
television or waste the evening. It is a 
luxury we hate to relinquish. Dave has 
really been a great help this semester. 
Dave has also spent much of his free 
time on other days taking his pictures. 

Laurent M artel, my associate editor, 
has come through a couple of times when 
I couldn't put the paper together myself. 
Larry has done a lot of work behind the 
scenes for which he never receives 
credit. More than once he proofread the 
Rallies in the car as we hurried to the 
printer in Lansdale. Larry puts the fin- 
ishing touch on other people's work. 
Many times his helpful suggestions pulled 
me through difficult situations. 

Others have contributed great amounts 
of time towards printing the paper. Mil- 
ton Parker has done a good job with the 
club representatives. Milt can tell you 
what a problem it is to build a fire under 
the club representatives. Delbert Jones, 
our typing manager, is the unlucky per- 
son who receives untyped club news and 
articles from the rest of the staff. When 
a student like Delbert doesn't get his 
name on an article he rarely receives 
proper credit. Delbert Jones deserves 
special credit for his effort. 

Many times, too numerous to mention, 
have added to the total picture. The 
number of people who at appropirate 
times added essential advice or material 
is amazing. Looking back I find I had 
much help. 

One final group of fine people deserv- 
ing credit is the Lauchmen Printing Com- 
pany. These fine craftsmen have done 
fabulous work for us. More than once 
they caught one of my blunders. It's been 
ft rare privilege to work with such true 
craftsmen. 



Next year the Furrow and 
S. G. will work closer to- 
gether in a united effort to 
enlighten the students. 




Photo Credit: DAVE THOMAS 
An enthralled crowd listened to Dave 
Farrar's own song about the Kent State 
Four at the Mat/ 7th Rally. 

May 7th Rally 

To report that the rally on May 
7th was a failure in terms of the 
number of students who came to 
watch some Aggies rap about what 
they thought about Viet Nam and 
Kent State, would be a false state- 
ment. It was only a failure in terms 
of the numbers of students who 
didn't come to watch history at 
DVC in the making. 

Personally, I think tht re were two 
phenomena that can be gleaned 
from the rally. The main one is that 
it showed that the College Admin- 
istration, which some students 
thought was back in the Dark Ages, 
is not back there. The President is 
very much up with the modern 
scene. That was proven when 
President Work granted permission 
to a handful of students to hold the 
rally. 

The other phenomenon is that 
some Aggies are with the scene 
also. Although it took such a tragic 
event to give sufficient reason to 
have a rally, it shows that Aggies 
can get together in a peaceful 
mood to exhibit their opinion about 
a happening. 

The rally was a flawless success. 
It went over without a hitch, put- 
ting down any disturbance with no 
outside help. A hand of applause 
should be given to David Kamison, 
Dave Farrar, Rich Russell and 
nameless others for putting on the 
rally. For it can be the dawn of the 
Age of Aquarius at Delaware Val- 
ley College. 

— Larry Martel 

"Woodstock"— Heavy 

by John D. Martin 
Having stood in line for over an hour 
and a half outside the Cinema 19 in 
Philadelphia and having paid $4.00 for 
the privilege, I must admit that I was 
expecting great things of the film that 
was playing inside. The name of the 
film was "Woodstock." The crowd lined 
Chestnut Street for a block — a cross sec- 
tion of young Americans waiting to see 
what they had missed or what they them- 
lervei had generated — the phenomenon 
of Woodstock, the largest single gathering 
of youth in the history of these United 
States, 

(Continued on page 5, col. 2) 



mmmm 



mmmmmmmmmmmm 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



May 15, !970 





It was a warm day for a cool dip in APO's dunking tank. This Aggie 
is surprised again when the hall hit the target. 



DAY 



1970 
EXHIBITS 





" *** «.* | « - ■ . '£ 



With Spring here and Summer coming the exhibit on lawn care 
equipment was well investigated by "A"-Day visitors. 



Many displays were put on by students. Poisonous Plants was an 
agricultural educational display. 





A symbol of wishing for a better Student Union made it's pitch in 
a different way. 



Business showed its concern with current problems by showing a 
propane gas car and an exhibit on tire safety. 



May 15, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



EVERYONE THAT 

WANTED ENTERED 

A CONTEST 




"A"-Day started of at the judging of swine. The ham was hard to 
manage with the judging sticks. 




More than one kid had his day brightened up with a pony ride. 
The hayrides also added to the enjoyment of spending a day at 
D. V. C. 




From the looks of things only the sheep kept its cool as tension 
mounted during judging. 




A winner is recognized for his effort in getting an animal ready for 
"A"-Day showing and there was the pretty "A"-Day Queen who 
handed out the awards. 




Photo Credits — DAVE THOMAS and BILL TURNER 



Everyone watches intently as this couple expertly milked a cow for 
a victory in a special event. It was just another event to spark 
laughter on "A"-Day. 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



May 15, 1970 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO ALL 
CONTEST WINNERS 




* Some went swimming in Lake Archer as they were knocked out 
of the canoe jousting. 

Most people saw logs in their sleep. This team is sawing their ♦ 
way to a first place finish. 





Can Steve Howard stop Dana Ingerto from ivinning his 
fourth straight greased pole contest next year? 

1970 "A"-Day 
Special Event Winners 

Co-ed Milking Contest 

SATURDAY 

1. Bill Hanczer and Margie Funk 

2. Matt Reisen and Joyce Lynch 

3. Tony Regula and Ruth Ann Carson 

SUNDAY 

1. Everett Halstead and Mary Ann Leber 

2. Rich LaBonge and Pam Miller 

3. Jake Golley and Lynn Paul 

Co-ed Egg Throwing Contest 

1. Jim Musser and Elizabeth Lewis 

2. Everett Halstead and Mary Ann Leber 

3. Rich LaBonge and Betsy Maddock 



Greased Pole Contest 

1. Dana Ingerto 

2. Steve Howard 

3. Ray Johnson 

Tractor Driving Contest 

1. Dave Kendig 

2. Richard Steele 

3. Rich Osborn 

Log Sawing Contest 

1. Tony Regula and Matt Reisen 

2. John Reed and Wayne Mehalick 

3. Jim Kemmerer and Phil Jarinko 

Log Balancing Contest 

1. Jim Lutz 

2. Jim Emenheiser 

Canoe Jousting 

1. John Reed and Wayne Mehalick 

2. Dave Walton and Bill Davis 

3. Russ Kenny and Tom Kendig 



Beard Contest 

FULL 

1. Bill Brebeck 

2. Russ Kenny 

3. Dave Seiple 

VAN DYKE 

1. Tom Wakefield 

2. Charles Davis 

MUSTASHE 

1. Howard Flisser 

2. Rich Hmieleski 

3. Gery Fisher 



«■ No, this isn't a police line-up, but "A"-Days first beard 
contest. The third from the left won the blue ribbon. 



May 15, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 




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FIAT 



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HARD LUCK 

The Delaware Valley College tennis 
team has been plagued with problems 
this season. The team started off with a 
very enthusiastic attitude until many 
members decided to leave the team. To- 
day it stages a six-member squad of 
which five are first-year players. The 
only returning letterman is this year's 
captain, Enedio Rick-. Of the six mem- 
bers, three are freshmen and two are 
sophomores. Members on the team in the 
order of the position being played are: 
Skip Block (1), Enedio Ricci (2), Greg 
Roberts (3), Bob Raider (4), Pete Koch 
(5), and Arnie Kolman (6). As of date 
the team holds a 0-5 record, losing to 
Drew University, Scranton, Lycoming, 
PMC, and Philadelphia Textile. 

The closest match of the season thus- 
far was with PMC. Although losing the 
match 9-0 the score does not indicate 
closeness. Commendable efforts were put 
forth by Bob Raider in singles and the 
third, doubles team of Pete Koch and 
Arnie Kolman. The team has come a long 
way since the beginning of the season, 
which can be expected only with hard 
work and thorough experience. 



DVC Gains Split 

April 28 — Ron Timko stopped the Ly- 
coming Warriors with a three-hitter in 
an opening game victory by a 2-1 mark. 
In the nightcap Warrior hurler Charley 
Winner threw the second three-hitter of 
the afternoon as Lycoming topped the 
Aggies 2-0. 

In the first game DVC scored the win- 
ning run in the fifth when Wayne Remo 
rounded the bases with the aid of three 
errors. The Aggies could only manage 
two hits off of loser Meyers, but poor de- 
fense spoiled his effort. 

In the second game Lycoming jumped 
on loser Bob McEntee in the first inning 
and held on to win by a 2-0 score. 

First Game 

pup 

DVC 10 10 0—2 2 2 

Lye 1 0—1 3 5 

Second Game 

RHE 

DVC O—O 3 

Lye. 10 1 x— 2 7 



WOODSTOCK— (Continued) 

As the capacity crowd seated them- 
selves you could feel the anticipation 
saturate the air. Then the lights dimmed 
and the film began with a disappointment 
— a narrow, grainy color shot of a farm- 
er giving his recollections of Woodstock. 
"Oh no — three hours of this," I said to 
myself as the film dragged on with its 
narrow screen shots of site preparation. 
But just as the eventual magnitude of 
the real Woodstock was somewhat of a 
surprise to its creators so the movie sur- 
prised its audience. The small screen 
soon burst beyond its boundaries, using 
split screen, wide screen and then jump- 
ing back to the narrow screen for effect. 
The editing job was superb. And then it 
wasn't long before the whole theater 
vibrated with the heavy sounds of some 
of the greatest names in music singing 
their guts out to hundreds upon hun- 
dreds of thousands of young people. 
Some of the best performances ever 
filmed with names like Joan Baez, Joe 
Cocker, the Who, Santana, Country Joe 
and the Fish, Arlo Guthrie, Crosby, Stills 
and Nash, and Jimi Hendrix, among oth- 
ers, highlight this excellent film from 
Warner Brothers. 

It wasn't hard for the audience to get 
caught up in the excitement, the hard- 
ship, the beauty, the brotherhood, the 
compassion, the bitterness, the hang-ups 
and confusion, the freedom, peace, and 
the love of a new generation, a new 
nation — Woodstock. That's rare in a 
movie theater; but, then again "Wood- 
stock" is an unusual, uninhibited motion 
picture. I recommend that you see it. 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

TUES.-FRI. 9-7 - SAT. *-4 

Save time . . . make an 

appointment between classes. 

RAZOR CUTiNG A SPECIALTY 

Across from DVC 

SAMUEL MOVER 

Master Barber 



EARTH DAY— (Continued) 

mental air pollution. Our automobiles 
spew over 90 million tons of pollutants 
into the air each year. As Americans we 
use more gasoline than the rest of the 
world combined — gasoline which is not 
totally burned — gasoline which contains 
lead and other additives which further 
pollute the environment. And in the end 
the auto litters the countryside. Over 7 
million cars are junked every year. 

Air traffic, likewise, is increasing. Our 
jets not only add measurably to our air 
pollution problem but also to our noise 
pollution. The jumbo jets bum fantastic 
amounts of fuel and the sonic booms the 
SST's will create, when combined with 
the other noises of life — car hom, the air 
hammer, the siren, the blare of the radio, 
the crashing, clanking din of modern 
America — constitutes a real danger to 
our hearing faculties. And the noise level 
in America life doubles every 10 years. 

Industry has not heeded the voice of 
destiny. They have talked of taking ac- 
tion against pollution but have done lit- 
tle other than talk. Industry continues to 
dump sulfur and other pollutants into our 
air and dump deadly chemical waste, in- 
cluding acids and other caustic matter, 
into our streams. 

Our lakes and streams are becoming 
unfit for life — and unfit for mans' use as 
a water and recreation source. They are 
being fouled by man's unwise use of in- 
secticides, washing detergent high in 
phosphorus and industrial chemicals. Our 
remaining lowlands and marshes, home 
to so much wildlife, are becoming hope- 
lessly polluted. Many communities across 
the nation have no sewage treatment 
plants and just dump the stuff into the 
nearest creek. And others which have 
i-eatment plants are so obsolete or in- 
efficient they might as well dump the 
raw sewage in their streams. 

Our lakes and streams also suffer from 
litter. Paper, cans, old tires, and dis- 
carded bits of our society mar our once 
beautiful water areas. Wildlife struggles 
to survive among the litter and pollu- 
tion that have taken over our country- 
sides. 

Litter is an increasing problem to 
Americans who each year throw out over 
30 million tons of paper and over 76 
billion disposable containers. With waste 
of this magnitude it is no wonder some 
of it becomes scattered around the coun- 
tryside as litter. This litter costs us tax- 
payers billions of dollars each year. Can 
our fragile environment continue to with- 
stand this barage of litter, pollution and 
destruction much longer? The answer is 
inequivically: NO! Shall man perish from 
the Earth, a victim of his own stupidity 
and greed — man who conquered outer 
space fail to save his own environment? 
The answer is no, but only if we act now 
to clean our environment and icstore the 
heritage that we have so foolishly squan- 
dered. If we do not act NOW there will 
be no future for you and I and no begin- 
ning for the next generation. Death shall 
still the Earth. 



From the Bowling Lanes 

by Conrad Adami 

The Horticulture team has won first 
place in the DVC Intramural League for 
the second half of the season. They will 
play the first half wanner, Barness, on 
May 13th to determine the league cham- 
pion for the 1969-70 season. 

The high game of the season was Bob 
Abramson's 247 with Conrad Adami's 
236 in second and Ted Williams' 221 the 
third highest game. The high series was 
a 633 rolled by Bob Abramson with Ted 
Williams coming in second with a 574 
and Bill Beed one pin behind, in third 
place, with 573. 

INTBAMUBAL BOWLING 

STANDINGS 

End of Second Half 

1. Horticulture 28X 71 

2. Mandell 25 11 

3. Elson B 22 14 

4. Barness 21 15 

5. Orn. Hort 19X 16!i 

6. Ulman 19 17 

7. Cooke 17 19 

8. Lasker 15X 20)4 

9. Dairy 11)4 24JS 

10. Wolfson 2 9 27 

INDIVIDUAL AVEBAGES 

Barness 

Rohrbaugh 148 

Waleski 141 

Reed 148 

Ambrose 110 

(Continued on page 6, col. 2) 



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• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
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10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



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Dresi Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 

THOM McAN SHOES 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 




Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR Michael A. Morgan 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Larry Martel 

COPY EDITOR Harvey Goodwin 

SPORTS EDITOR Leu Hegyes 

PHOTO EDITOR Dave Thoma$ 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Pyle 

TYPING MANAGER Delberf Jones 

SPECIAL EVENTS John D. Martin 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 

Sol Cavinesi, John Furphy, Bill Strode, Allen Gordon, Abbott Leo, Dave Suitak, 

Howard Henderson, Bruce Richards, Jeff Keir, Bill Turner. 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Mertz 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



May 15, 1970 



J. CARROLL MOLLOY 

Realtor - Insurance 

Molloy Building 

30 S. Main Street 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 18901 



Intramural Bowling 
Individual Averages 



Dear Sir: 



April 28, 1970 



Today, I was a member of a 
group traveling on a chartered 
Hagey Bus. As we passed Delaware 
Valley College, the driver made a 
statement that I think you should 
know about. He apparently had 
taken several of your students to 
sports events and told us that they 
have always been real gentlemen 
and are a great bunch of boys. 
Hearing this at a time when we 
hear so many unfavorable things 
about college students I think this 
bus driver paid a real compliment 
to you and the College and to the 
boys themselves. 

Our family is looking forward to 
"A"-Day this weekend. 

Yours very truly, 
Dores D. Madara 
(Mrs. George W. Madara) 



WARD 



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Open Dally • 30-5:30- Wed -Fri. 'till 9 



Horticulture 




Edzek 


147 


Piotrowski 


137 


Esbenshade 


135 


Ross 


135 



MandeU 

Adami 156 

Nielson 141 

Stoll 127 

Goodwin 163 

Elson B 

Chung 137 

Briegel 159 

Christensen 140 

Ahramson 173 

Lasker 

Roux 144 

Williams 168 

Roszel 140 

Breitweiser 156 

Orn. Hort. 

Taylor 149 

Dvorak 140 

Stevens 116 

Tower 165 

Cooke 

Derrick 141 

Wright 136 

Kyte 140 

Stinnard 120 

Ulman 

Piznik 118 

McCarter 134 

Steele 123 

Samulis 122 

Wolfson 2 

Foote 143 

Harris 114 

Best 143 

Hafner 160 

Dairy 

Ingerto 147 

Hitz 137 

Volk 144 

Harteis 127 

It is hoped that more Aggies will join 
the Intramural League next year. This 
will give more bowlers an opportunity 
to participate in next year's intercollegi- 
ate tournaments. 

Albright Drops Aggies 

April 30 Paul Lahatto finished first in 
the 100, 220, long jump, second in the 
triple jump and anchoring the victorious 
Vk mile relay team powered the Albright 
College track team past the Aggies by a 
93-52 score. 

Albright also got help from double 
winners Dave Boyle and Jim Kuhn. 

The Aggies could manage only five 
first places. George Green (880), John 
Frederick (440 intermediate hurdles), 
Steve Howard (pole vault), Joe Monfar- 
dini (triple jump) and the mile relay 
team scored the victories. 

Steve Howard tied his school record of 
14 ft. in the pole vault, a record he set 
last year at the MAC championships. 

The team's record now stands at 3-4. 



LOU'S VIEWS 

by Lou Hegyes 

This most likely will be my last col- 
umn of the 1969-70 season. First of all, 
I want to thank everyone who has read 
my column and, secondly, I would like 
to discuss a topic that is close to worn- 
out but I feel should continue to be dis- 
cussed. 

The subject is apathy and the apathe- 
tic attitudes of many here at Delaware 
Valley College. Apathetic attitudes are 
apparenlty among both the students and 
professors alike. I think it's high time 
something is done. You ask yourself what 
can be done. Greater involvement and 
concern may be the answers. 

I can honestly say that I have enjoyed 
my years here at DVC. I'm by far not 
the only one who thinks or feels this way. 
Ask the ones who have "gotten involved." 

Many students are constantly yelling 
for change. I agree with some of their 
points; but, things are changing and 
changes require time and money. 

Look at it from the Administration's 
point of view for a change. Few people 
realize that small, private colleges are in 
trouble when it comes to finances. Where 
does a college like DVC get the money 
to survive? Most of the money comes 
from the government, gifts, and alumni. 
Financially, most of the construction on 
campus is subsidized by the government. 
Gifts can't be counted on for that much 
and with only about 2,800 living alumni 
DVC is hurting financially. The students 
who shouted for an immediate student 
union were foolish and ignorant of our 
financial plight. When a facility (library 
annex) became available it was soon 
made available to the students for a tem- 
porary center. 

Most of the complainers can't appre- 
ciate what we already have. They have 
never experienced eating in Lasker Hall, 
the years in a tiny library or having all 
of their classes ana labs in Segal and All- 
man Halls. 

We are in a period of transition and 
expansion. Three new dorms, a fourth 
presently under construction, Mandell 
Science Building, the library wings, and 
the David Levin Dining Hall have all 
been completed in the past few years. A 
new stadium, an addition to the gym and 
an academic building are scheduled for 
the near future. 

I'm not hiding the fact that DVC 
could use certain things. So can every 
other college. But it takes time. I have 
seen a number of other colleges and I 
feel very fortunate for what we now 
have. 

Many complain that there is nothing to 
do on campus. It amazes me how blind 
these people are. How about the many 
clubs? Most of the clubs are understaffed 
and have little student participation. How 
many people show up at a meeting when 
a guest speaker is in attendance? Ath- 
letics are provided for the students on 
the intercollegiate and intramural level. 
How many students are in the Band or 
the Glee Club? The publications are also 
understaffed. The reason the Furrow and 
Gleaner aren't published more often is 
often a lack of material. 

When activities are provided the same 
crowd always attends and the same 
crowd always packs up and goes home 



to see mother. A good example of this is 
the number of studetns that went home 
on the recent "A"-Day weekend. These 
people are also those who do the most 
complaining. Chances are thev can't find 
anytning to do in New York City too. 
You have to get off your behinds and 
look. I think its about time the complain- 
ing stops. Get out and help. DVC will 
never get anyplace without it. 

A teacher in high school once told me 
to get as much out of college as you can 
because these will probably be your best 
years. 

I know that I would feel guilty if I 
didn't at least try to help the situation. 

Let's help DVC so, as alumni, we can 
proudly say "We attended Delaware Val- 
ley College." 

BASEBALLERS SPLIT 
WITH TEXTILE 

April 25 — Freshman Fred Kaufman's 
grand slam homer in the first game pow- 
ered the Aggies to a split with Philadel- 
phia Textile by 7-4 and 5-0 scores. 

Jim Douglass started DVC's big second 
inning with a single. After an out Dave 
Ferenchick singled; and Chris Bockrath 
walked loading the*bases. Kaufman then 
followed with his blast. Tom Wentzel 
also scored in the inning after he singled 
and continued home on a pair of errors. 

In the second game, Textile broke a 
2-2 tie in the fourth inning on Henry 
Arcolese's two-run triple off starter and 
loser Bob Polinsky. 

First Game 

R H E 
Textile 10 3 0—4 7 6 

DVC 5 2 x— 7 5 4 

Second Game 

pop 

Textile 2 2 1—5 7 

DVC 2 10 0—3 8 



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The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-profit Organization 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



THE FURROW 

VOL. 18 
1970 



the 





URROW 



\n 






Vol. 18, No. 1 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



October 2, 1970 




The Charlie Byrd Quintet start to Delaware Valley College for a concert Saturday. 



Audubon Program 
Scheduled 

Again this year the Bucks 
County Audubon Society will hold 
most of its regular meetings on our 
campus. A full slate of meetings, 
film lectures, and field trips has 
been scheduled. Copies of the pro- 
gram are available from Dr. Mertz 
(Room 4, Lasker Hall) or Mr. 
Benner (Alumni House). 

Upcoming events on the program 
include the next regular meeting, 
on October 6 (a Tuesday), at 8:00 
p.m. in Room 114, Mandell Science 
Building. Mr. Lester Thomas will 
present a slide program on Alaska. 
A field trip has been scheduled for 
Saturday, October 10, to the Hawk 
Mountain Sanctuary where the 
group expects to see large numbers 
of migrating hawks and eagles at 
close range. 

The Bucks County Audubon So- 
ciety was founded just thirteen 
months ago as an organization open 
to all of the citizens of Bucks 
County who are concerned with 
maintaining and improving the 
quality of their environment. All 
of the Society's activities are open 
to members and nonrmembers alike. 
Joint membership may be obtained 
in both the local organization and 
the National Audubon Society. 
Members receive a subscription to 
Audubon Magazine, perhaps the 
most vivid publication of its kind, 
and a variety of other publications, 
(Continued on page 4) 



Broadway Shows 

Offer Half -Price 

Ticket to Students 

College and high school students 
may buy tickets to most Broadway 
shows at half-price, through a 
special program of the League of 
New York Theatres. 

Upon the presentation of a stu- 
dent I.D. card at theatre box 
offices, student purchasers may buy 
a maximum of two tickets at pre- 
cisely half the regular price. This 
program, which has been in effect 
since last July and which has been 
encouragingly received, does nof 
apply to every performance of 
every Broadway show, however. 
The student discount tickets are 
made available by and at the dis- 
cretion of each show, depending on 
ticket demand through the regular 
channels. Shows that are currently 
doing capacity business, such as 
"Applause" and "Hair," are not in a 
position to offer the discount tick- 
ets. 

But the majority of Broadway 
productions, including such esta- 
blished hits as "Promises, Promises," 
"1776," "Child's Play," "Butterflies 
Are Free" and "Fiddler on the 
Roof," are offering the student dis- 
counts. Students who wish to take 
advantage of the program are ad- 
vised to check the individual box 
offices in advance, to determine 
where the discounts are available. 
(Continued on page 3) 



D.V.C's Second 
Hall of Fame 

Last year Delaware Valley Col- 
lege instituted a Hall of Fame for 
its outstanding athletes as the 
NCAA marked its 100th anniver- 
sary of college football. At the 
Homecoming game with Blooms- 
burg State College, DVC will honor 
past outstanding athletes inducting 
two players into the Hall of Fame. 

The Hall of Fame will honor 
Aggie athletes who have exempli- 
fied personal character traits usually 
expected of a college athlete and 
who have performed in competition 
in a manner and to a degree that 
is considered outstanding. 

No one is eligible for the award 
until five years after graduation 
and until he has made a definite 
contribution to the College. 

Hall of Fame Inductees 

Greatest "Aggie" — James Work '13 

Football — Michael Scheier '50 
William Cottrell '66 
Ted Cottrell '69 
John Nice '69 

Basketball — Richard Prins '58 

Baseball— Waller Riggins '50 
Warren Hitz '69 
William Roth '69 

Spring 1970 
Dean's List 

CLASS OF 1971 

Academic Ave. 
Baessler, Bruce S. 3.40 

Breneman, J. Roy 3.61 

Burdick, Bruce D 3.23 

Cerchio, Dominick 3.20 

Chance, Donald L. 3.80 

Delp, Donald A 3.29 

Fox, Harold B, Jr 3.40 

Gotthardt, Raymond W. 3.60 
Grunow, Ernest R., Jr. 4.00 
Happ, Albert C, II 3.28 

Mogel, Norman L. 3.13 

Parker, Milton B., Jr 3.39 

Rice, Brian 3.50 

Robbins, Larry E 3.46 

Roup, Daniel A. 3.16 

Rutherford, James J., Jr. 3.80 
Seiple, David J. 3.17 

Sheaffer, Craig 3.52 

Somers, Steven 3.22 

Thomas, James C 3.37 

Traino, Scott R. 4.00 

Weaver, C. Kenneth 3.17 

Witmer, Franklin H. 3.60 

(Continued on page 2) 



"Who Is 
Charlie Byrd 

Anyway?' 

"Who is Charlie Byrd anyway?" 
We have all been hearing that 
question for two weeks now and 
no one seems to be able to answer 
the question, "Who is Charlie 
Byrd?" 

Playboys Jazz Poll tells us that he 
is one of America's foremost classi- 
cal guitarists. His group of five 
musicians is rated, by Playboy, as 
one of the top instrumental groups 
in the country. He has written a 
broadway show that opened in 
September plus he has written the 
scores for more than five Holly- 
wood films. Mr. Byrd and his group 
have travelled all over the world 
giving concerts in places such as 
London, Moscow, Barcelona, Paris, 
Rome, and other cities in Europe 
and Asia. His U.S. tour includes 
college campuses like Syracuse, 
Columbia, Boston University, Berk- 
ley School of Music, Penn State, 
Juniata. And now this man whom 
nobody "has heard of is coming to 
Delaware Valley College. 

All of us heard "San tana." Their 
characteristic "Latin Beat" was 
brought to this country by Charlie 
Bvrd. All of us have neard of 
Segovia, the great Spanish guitarist. 
Charlie Byrd is, and I quote Sego- 
via, "Musically he (Char'ie Byrd) 
has been my most productive stu- 
dent." "His guitar talks to the 
summer winds and compels the 
autumn leaves to respond in live- 
liest of vibrant color, tone and 
softness." 

October 3, 1970 is our Home- 
coming. The College is going to 
celebrate this tradition with a foot- 
ball game with Bloomsburg State 
College, the crowning of our Home- 
coming Queen, a parade of floats, 
a mixer, and a concert with Charlie 
Byrd. Tickets are $2.50. They may 
be obtained from any Student 
Government member or Varsity 
Club member. 

This is a concert not to be missed 
by those who enjoy the Miracle of 
Music. 

Peace 
David Farrar 




Clwrlie Byrd Will Be There 

Will You? 



Page 2 



THE FURROW 



October 2, 1970 



New Film Series at D.V.C. 

Some ninety films are scheduled for The Academic Film Series which 
began on September 23rd at Delaware Valley College. The film series is 
free and is open to anyone interested in seeing quality films on a variety 
of subjects. Each program will be about two hours in length and all but 
one is scheduled for Wednesday evening. The films will be shown in 
Mandell Hall Auditorium from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. 

Many of the films have won national and international awards in- 
cluding the Academy Award. Other films were produced for television 
and two of the films were prepared for world's fair exhibits. The series 
includes several films produced by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration on the space program. Also many of the "film as art" style 
films have been included. The subject matter covered is wide and each 
program will contain films on several subjects. It is hoped that the series 
will function as an efficient means of learning in addition to providing 
an opportunity to see some of the best documentary films available. The 
series should also provide an opportunity for people to see, in full color 
and clarity, many television programs which they saw in black and white. 

The following films were shown at the first program on September 
23rd: "The Louvre: A Golden Prison", a N. B. C. production with Charles 
Boyer. "The Eagle Has Landed— The Flight of Apollo 11", the official 
N.A.S.A. film of the moon landing. "Glossary", an excellent film by I.B.M. 
on computers. "Clay: Origin of Species", an Academy Award nominee. 
"Zen and Now" and "The Moods of Surfing". 

The films were selected from over 7,000 films which are available 
free from two major sources. Fifty-nine of the films were chosen from 
tie more than 2,000 films available through the Bucks County Free 
Library. Most of these films are located in the two Regional Film Centers 
located in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, which make these films available 
to public libraries in Pennsylvania. Another thirty-one films were selected 
from the over 5,000 films listed in "Educators Guide to Free Films". The 
films were selected by D. E. Igelsrud, instructor of biology and member 
of the Faculty Audio- Visual Committee with the assistance of Miss Bar- 
bara Grinder of the Bucks County Free Library and Mrs. Catherine 
Harrison of Delaware Valley College. 

The Academic Film Series is sponsored by the Faculty Audio- Visual 
Committee, The Contemporary Club, The Photography Club, and The 
Science Society at the College. 

Some of the films to be shown at later dates include: Van Gogh: 
A Self Portrait; Martin Luther King, Jr., From Montgomery to Memphis; 
Inside Red China; The Mystery of Stonehenge; Picasso; Dr. Leakey and 
the Dawn of Man; Road Signs on a Merry-Go-Round; I, Leonardo da 
Vinci; Hollywood: The Golden Years; Black History: Lost, Stolen or 
Strayed; Tokyo Olympiad; The Face of Lincoln; The View from the 
People Wall; Stravinsky; Eruption of Kilavea; This is Marshall Mc- 
Luhan; The Medium is the Message; Miss Goodall and the Wild Chim- 
panzees; The Red Balloon; An American Time Capsule: A Very Short 
History of the United States; The Wyeth Phenomenon; and Vietnam: 
Journal of a War. 




Sialag 13 

PHOTO BILL. TUHNER 



A. P.O. Refunds 
Bookstore Money 

The money collected from the sale of 
used books will be returned to the 
persons wbo lent the books to be sold 
in the cafeteria during the lunch pe- 
riod of the week after Homecoming 
(October 5-10). All money and books 
not picked up at this time will become 
the property of A.P.O. Please bring 
the white sales slip with you when 
you come to collect your money. 



Agronomy 
Holds Opener 

The Agronomy Club held its first 
meeting of the year on September 
22. The club's first activity will be 
an overnight trip to the University 
of Maryland Experimental Farms 
and to the Remington Farms. This 
trip, which will be the 9th and 10th 
of October, should give the Agrono- 
mists some interesting information 
about agricultural experiments. 

Before we leave for our trip we 
will engage ourselves in building 
a Homecoming Float that should 
promise to be the best in the club's 
history'. Along with the float we 
have entered Bob Culp's girl, Mar- 
gee Peluso, as our nomination for 
Queen. Win or lose the club will 
be in there fighting for the Aggies. 
All interested students, including 
freshmen, are urged to come out 
and take part in the club's activities. 



Graduate Record 
Exams Announced 

Educational Testing Service 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
For further information contact: 
Graduate Record Examinations Program 
(609)921-9000 

PRINCETON, N. J. — Educational 
Testing Service has announced that un- 
dergraduates and others preparing to go 
to gradaute school may take the Grad- 
uate Record Examinations on any of six 
different test dates during the current 
academic year. 

The first testing date for the GRE is 
October 24, 1970. Scores from this ad- 
ministration will be reported to the grad- 
uate schools about December 1. Students 
planning to register for the October test 
date are advised that applications re- 
ceived by ETS after October 6 will incur 
a $3.00 late registration fee. After Octo- 
ber 9, there is no guarantee that applica- 
tions for the October test date can be 
processed. 

The other five test dates are December 
12, 1970, January 16, February 27, April 
24 and June 19, 1971. Equivalent late 
fee and registration deadlines apply to 
these dates. Choice of test dates should 
be determined by the requirements of 
graduate schools or fellowships to which 
one is applying. Scores are usually re- 
ported to graduate schools five weeks 
after a test date. 

The Graduate Record Examinations in- 
clude an Aptitude Test of general scho- 
lastic ability and Advanced Tests measur- 
ing achievement in 20 major fields of 
study. Full details and registration forms 
for the GRE are contained in the 1970-71 
GRE Information Bulletin. The Bulletin 
also contains forms and instructions for 
requesting transcript service on GRE 
scores already on file with ETS. This 
booklet is available in the Placement Of- 
fice in Lasker Hall. 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

HAVE A HAIRY PREDICAMENT? 

Sam styles, doesn't eliminate hair 

TUFS.-FRI. ©-7 - SAT. 9-4 

APPOINTMENTS 

345-0292 

SAMUEL H. MOVER 

Across from DVC 




Does Your Car Need A Professional 
Car Wash? 

PHOTO DAVE THOMAS 

DEAN'S LIST— (Continued) 
CLASS OF 1972 

Academic Ave. 

Angstadt, Russell E 3.84 

Barefoot, Russell E 3.42 

Browiilee, Barry D 3.12 

Cook, Thomas V 3.31 

Cook, William A 3.37 

Derrick, Elmer L. 3.35 

Dicola, Charles G. 3.16 

Eisenhart, Larry 3.20 

Funkhouser, Raymond C. 3.33 

Goscinsky, Stephen J 3.50 

Hauser, Howard S. 3.20 

Hopper, John C 3.38 

Hotaling, Thomas F 3.16 

Houghton, Richard D. 3.2C 

Howard, Stephen J 3.55 

Jones, Delbert E 3.54 

Kepshire, Thomas S. 3.23 

Kravetsky, Nicholas G. 3.83 
Kravitz, Joel 3.53 

Lehman, Richard P. 3.43 

Levine, Eli 4.00 

McLean, William 3.41 

Miller, Steven 3.11 

Morris, Joseph -".50 

Myers, Ronald L. 3.82 

Neilson, William A 3.55 

Newcomer, Paul C 3.22 

Pancari, Gregory D 3.13 

Pendracky, Leon J 3.77 

Phillips, Gerald H 3.12 

Porcaro, Richard J 4.00 

Rutter, Gary L 3.15 

Schlegel, Gerald 3.87 

Schuler, Jon D 3.44 

Smith, Richard S 3.18 

Strunk, Larry P 3.38 

Sweeney, Bernard 4.00 

Weiss, Mark A 3.83 

Wise, J. Bradley 3.12 

Yarnell, Ronald 3.17 

(Continued on page 4) 




*Jke Juzzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR Michael A. Morgan 

CO-EDITORS Michael A. Morgan, Larry Martel 

PHOTO EDITORS Dave Thomas, Bill Turner 

SPORTS EDITOR Lou Hegyes 

PHOTO EDITORS Dave Thomas, Bill Turner 

CLUB NEWS EDITOR Milton Parker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Pyle 

TYPING MANAGER Delbert Jones 

LAYOUT EDITORS Nancy Dendler, Carol Finnie 

DISTRIBUTION ' Rich Hmioleski, Barry Pistimer 

-GENERAL STAFF- 
Jeffrey Evans, Steve Laurouche, John Quinn 

-ADVISORS- 
ADMINISTRATION ADVISOR Joseph E. Fulcoly 

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. John Mertx 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



October 2, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page 3 



Animal Husbandry Department 
Exhibits at Lamb Carcass Show 

Over the summer months the Animal Husbandry Department ex- 
hibited animals in the Bucks- Montgomery, Goshen Fair ana the Middle- 
town Fair. 

On June 22 and 24 the college entered one Hampshire ewe lamb at 
the Bucks-Montgomery lamb carcass show. Monday, the 22nd, the lambs 
were judged on foot and ours placed first in the lightweight class. 
Wednesday, the 24th, of all the lambs judged en the rail ours was the 
champion of the show. The lamb, from a set of triplets, was seven and 
one-half years old. _ 

The department exhibited ten sheep on July 31 at the Goshen Fair. 
The results are as follows: 



Type 
Ram (lamb) 
Ewe 
3 Ram Lambs 

Type 
Ewe 



THE CHEVIOT DIVISION 

Age Place 

Under 1 year 1st, 2nd, 3rd 

1 year, under 2 2nd, 3rd 

Under 1 year 1st 

THE SUFFOLK DIVISION 
Age Place 

1 year, under 2 3rd 



THE HAMPSHIRE DIVISION 
Type Age Place 

Ram Under 1 year 4th 

Ewe Under 1 year 3rd, 5th, 12th 

Breeders young flock 2nd 

Get of Sire 2nd 

Of the approximate 140 sheep at the Middletown Grange Fair the 
department exhibited twelve head of champion ewe and eleven head of 
sheep. The fair was held on August 14, with strong competition and 
with many good animals competing. The results are as follows: 



Place 
2nd (youngest in class) 
2nd and 3rd 
1st 
2nd 
1st 

1st and 2nd 
3rd, 4th, and 5th 



Type 
Hampshire Rare under 1 year 
Cheviot Ram under 1 year 
Cheviot aged ewe 
Suffolk ewe 1 year and under 2 
Hampshire ewe 1 year and under 2 
Cheviot ewe 1 year and under 2 
Hampshire ewe under 1 year 

CHAMPION EWE OF ALL BREEDS 
Type Place 

Hampshire pen of lambs 2nd 

Hampshire get of sire 1st 

Cheviot get of sire 1st 

Hampshire breeders young flock 2nd 

The Dairy Department exhibited five Holsteins at the same show with 
the following results: 

Type Place 

Junior calf 9th 

Intermediate calf 3rd and 12th 

Junior yearling 4th 

Two year old 3rd 



National Teacher's 
Exam Announced 

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY, Sep- 
tember 14. College seniors preparing to 
teach school may take the National 
Teacher Examinations on any of the four 
different test dates announced today by 
Educational Testing Service, a non- 
profit, educational organization which 
prepares and administers this testing pro- 
gram. 

New dates for the testing of prospec- 
tive teachers are: November 14, 1970, 
and January 30, April 3, and July 17, 
1971. The tests will be given at nearly 
500 locations throughout the United 
States, ETS said. 

Results of the National Teacher Exam- 
inations are used by many large school 
districts as one of several factors in the 
selection of new teachers and by several 
states for certification or licensing of 
teachers. Some colleges also require all 
seniors preparing to teach to take the 
examinations. The school systems and 
state departments of education which 
use the examination results are listed in 
an NTE leaflet entitled "Score Users" 
which may be obtained by writing to 
ETS. 



On each full day of testing, prospective 
teachers may take the Common Examina- 
tions which measure their professional 
preparation and general cultural back- 
ground, and a Teaching Area Examin- 
ation which measures their mastery of 
the subject they expect to teach. 

Prospective teachers should contact the 
school systems in which they seek em- 
ployment, or their colleges, for specific 
advice on which examinations to take 
and on which dates they should be taken. 

The Bulletin of Information for Candi- 
dates contains a list of test centers, and 
information about the examinations, as 
well as a Registration Form. Copies may 
be obtained from college placement of- 
fice or direcdy from National Teacher 
Examinations, Box 911, Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540. 

BROADWAY SHOW— (Con't.) 

The reduced-price tickets are 
available both on an advance-sale 
basis and on the day of perform- 
ance. Shows that are "previewing" 
prior to an official opening night, 
a common procedure in the Broad- 
way theatre today, will also offer 
student discount tickets. 




A small group of active Frosh make 
the Class of '74. 

PHOTO DAVE THOMAS 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
CHEMISTS APPOINT FELLOW 

Dr. Robert S. Oir, Chairman of 
the Chemistry Department of Dela- 
ware Valley College, has been 
elected a Fellow of the American 
Institute of Chemists, it was an- 
nounced by Emerson Venable, 
President. 

The AIC has more than 7,400 
members in 28 chapters throughout 
the United States. It is the only 
chemically - oriented American or- 
ganization whose principal purpose 
is to develop the professional and 
economic status of chemists and 
chemical engineers. Membership is 
limited to those whose principal 
education is in these fields. 

Dr. Orr received his B.A. in 1959 
from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and his M.S. and Ph.D. from 
the University of Delaware. He 
ioined the faculty of Delaware 
Valley College in 1964, was named 
Chairman of the Chemistry De- 
partment in 1966, and Chairman 
of the Delaware Valley College 
Research Committee in 1969. Dr. 
and Mrs. Orr live on Park Avenue 
in Chalfont, Pennsylvania. 



Administration 
Changes 

The new school year 1970-71 was 
greeted with several changes in the 
roster of Administration personnel. 
First, Mr. Robert Sauers has be- 
come the College's Financial Aid 
Officer and his new office is located 
in Lasker Hall. Mr. William Savage 
has been designated to fill Mr. 
Sauers old office in Allman as the 
new Assistant Dean of Students. 

Second and perhaps most im- 
portant to the Class of 1971, Mr. 
Robert McClelland has become the 
Director of Placement. When inter- 
viewed by this reporter he seemed 
very eager to help all seniors who 
wish to see him. His office is lo- 
cated on the first floor of Lasker 
Hall. 

Mr. William Mitchell is now the 
Resident Supervisor of Dormatories 
and he is now the one to see for 
any concerns about the dorms. 

There are two new additions to 
the Admission office, Mr. John Nice 
and Mr. Robert Tasker. They will 
spend most of their time visiting 
high schools to recruit incoming 
students. 

To help accomodate the 11 girls 
on campus, Mrs. Richard Smith has 
been appointed the Counselor of 
women. She shares Mr. Mitchell's 
office on Monday 7:30-9 i0 p.m.; 
Wednesday 2:30-9:30 p.m.; and the 
first and third Saturday of the 
month from 10:00-12:00. This sche- 
dule is subject to change depending 
on the response she gets in counsel- 
ing DVC's first coeds. 



DVC Publications Representatives Attend 
Convention — Return With Awards 

In July the annual convention of Agricultural Communicators of 
Tomorrow, an organization of representatives of agricultural college 
publications, was held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Mike 
Morgan attended to represent the Furrow, along with Rich Polgar, who 
represented the Gleaner. The convention featured a series of speakers 
and workshop sessions designed to help the editors of college publica- 
tions meet their problems more effectively. 

An additional feature of the convention was a competition among the 
ag college publications. Numerous categories were available, and the 
DVC publications entered six exhibits in four categories. The competi- 
tion was stiff, including publications from several agricultural colleges 
that have ag journalism majors. The judges were tough, seasoned, pro- 
fessional agricultural publications people. But all six of the exhibits that 
were entered placed in the competition. 

The Gleaner heads the list or achievements. It won first prize in the 
magazine competition and received numerous compliments from the 
judges for its layout, content, and professional appearance. 

In the Creative Photography competition, DVC placed the first, third, 
and fourth exhibits. Ivans Smith, III, took first place with his "Autumn 
Gold", appearing in the Fall- Winter 1968 issue of the Gleaner, and he 
took third prize with "Just Between Us Girls", which appeared in the 
Fall- Winter 1969 issue of the Gleaner. Fourth place was won by Mike 
Morgan's "Dead End", a photograph. 

Tne Gleaner struck again in the Black and White Photo Story com- 
petition. There Robert Scott took first place for the story he did on the 
birth of a calf in the Fall- Winter 1968 issue of the Gleaner. 

Last, but not least, the Furrow received the fifth place award in the 
Miscellaneous Publication category based upon a display of three of its 
issues. 

All of us in publications agree that there is room for improvement 
and we've still more to learn. But we can be justly proud of these ac- 
complishments. And the editors of other agricultural college publications 
are beginning to think about DVC. How about you? Want to join the 
team? Contact Mike Morgan or Gary Miller. 



Page 4 



THE FURROW 



October 2, 1970 



Homecoming Schedule 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1970 
Selection of Homecoming Queen 

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m; — Work Hall 



2:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
5:30-6:30 
7:15 p.m. 



p.m. 



8:00 


p.m. 




1:00 


a.m. 




SATURDAY, 


10:30 


a.m. 


2:30 


11:00 


a.m. 




1:10 


p.m. 




1:15 


p.m. 




1:20 


p.m. 




1:28 


p.m. 




1:30 


p.m. 




HALF-TIME 


4:30 


p.m. 


■7:30 


5:00 


p.m. 




8:00 


p.m. 




2:00 


a.m. 





Formal Picture — Queen and Court 
-Floats Lined-up for Parade 

— Parade Leaves Campus — Main Gate 

— Judging Floats — Doylestown 

— Dinner 

— Pep Rally 

— Mixer 

— Curfew 

OCTOBER 3, 1970 

p.m. — Alumni Registration 

— Floats In Position — Football Field 

— College Band 

— Formal Crowning of Queen 

— Floats On Parade 

— Captains — Toss of Coin 

— Kick-off 

— Bloomsburg Band — 10 Min. 

— Float Winners Announced 

— Hall of Fame 
p.m. — Alumni Reception 

— Buffet — Dining Hall 

— Concert ( Charlie Byrd ) — Gym 
$2.50 per each 

— Curfew 



Moravian 
Tops Aggies 

by Lou Hegyes 

Managing only 10 yds. rushing 
and 130 yds. through the air the 
Aggies dropped their 1970 home 
opener to the Moravian Grey- 
hounds bv a 13-0 score. 

The Aggies now 0-2, having lost 
to Juniata the week before, yielded 
218 yds. on the ground and 8 of 
19 passes for 146 yds. 

Moravian drew first blood in the 
first quarter when they drove 53 
yds. in 13 plays and scored on a 
keeper by quarterback Joe Dowl- 
ing. 

Moravian scored their final touch 
down in the third period after 
defensive end Bill Ruff recovered 
one of the six Aggie fumbles. Dowl- 
ing hit Bill Glazer in the end zone 
on a 10 yd. pass for the score. 

Throughout the hot afternoon 
the Aggie offense couldn't muster 
much of an attack and the four 
fumbles lost and two interceptions 
killed what offense they had. 

Even though Delaware Valley 
lost, there were bright spots in the 
game particularly trie play of de- 
fensive backs Glenn Hawkswell, 
Bill Dever and Barry Thomas, the 
running of Richie Glenn and Cap- 
tain Don Chance and the punting 
of quarterback Jim Foote. Foote 
punted eight times for 368 yds. for 
a 46 yd. average to tie the DVC 
record set by Floyd Ritter in 1967 
against Nichols College. 

Moravian 6 7 13 
DVC 

Mor.— Dowling, 1 yard run, kick 
failed. 

Mor. Glazer, 11 yard pass from 
Dowling, Schedler kicked extra 
point. 



AUDOBON— (Continued) 

including the local Society's regular 
Newsletter. Special membership 
rates are available for students. 

While the Bucks County Audu- 
bon Society has not met during the 
summer, it has been very active 
nonetheless. A solid waste re- 
cycling program has been initiated 
to recycle glass, aluminum, and 
paper wastes. During the most re- 
cent collection, over 9,000 lbs. of 
glass were collected and delivered 
to a glass manufacturer to be melt- 
ed down and reused. 

In addition the Society has con- 
tinued its efforts to stimulate local 
support for sound conservation leg- 
islation and to develop methods 
and materials to aid local school 
systems in environmental educa- 
tion. 

Cross Country 
Preview 

by Lou Hegyes 

Coach Robert Berthold wel- 
comed a number of veterans and a 
promising group of freshman to this 
year's pre-season camp. 

With only two runners gone from 
last season's team, which posted a 
4-6 mark, Coach Berthold feels a 
definite improvement can be made. 

The veteran harriers who will be 
counted on heavily this season are 
Captain John Ahearn, Jim La- 
Baugh, Rich Carver, Ray Funk- 
houser, Bud Dacko and Ed Sulli- 
van. 

The unusually strong group of 
frosh include Dave Sverduk, Greg 
Thiel, Gary Simpson, Joe Schiavo, 
Rich Osman, Frank Pettit and 
Bruce Pratt. These freshmen will 
be giving the upperclassmen plenty 
of pressure. 

The home opener is Oct. 9 with 
Albright and Phila. Textile. The 
support of the student body will be 
greatly appreciated. 



Lou's 
Views 

by Lou Hegyes 

What has happened to that "Old 
College Spirit?" I was very dis- 
appointed in the student attend- 
ance at the first home football game 
this past weekend. For those who 
weren't there, which is probably 
most of you, there were only a 
handful of freshmen and even less 
upperclassmen present. 

How do you expect the players 
and the coaching staff to do an 
effective job when they know the 
students aren't behind them? 

When the parents and alumni 
show more enthusiasm something 
is wrong. 

And what has happened to the 
College Band? I know we have 
one. Then why wasn't it present? 

The Moravian game was the 
first college football game I ever 
attended in which the Alma Mater 
wasn't played. 

Let's try to improve these pathe- 
tic situations for this upcoming 
special weekend. 

Coaches Craver and Berthold are 
fortunate to have a number of pro- 
mising freshmen on their squads 
this fall. 

Frenchie Strother, Larry Dell, 
Bill Dever, Nick Boyko, John Fal- 
lon, Kevin Foster, Steve Rinaldi, 
Don Capone and the other fresh- 
men have bright football futures 
here at Delaware Valley. 

The cross country team will be 
glad to have the services of Dave 
Sverduk, Greg Thiel, Gary Simp- 
son, Rich Osman, Frank Pettit and 
Bruce Pratt for the next four years. 

Wilkes College has finally lost 
an MAC game. This past weekend 
Lycoming knocked the Colonels 
off 21-19 to end a 31 game MAC 
winning streak. The Aggies play 
Wilkes at home on Oct. 10. 



DEANS LIST— (Continued) 
CLASS OF 1973 

Academic Ave. 
Abramson, Robert C. 3.81 

Bashnick, David A. 3.26 

Bley, Kenneth J 3.05 

Chung, Robert W 3.44 

Clopper, R. Benjamin 3.22 

Cordrey, Thomas D 3.20 

Doyle, Ronald L 3.06 

Emenheiser, Timothy C. 3.83 

Haines, William D 3.22 

Hubbs, Gary 3.08 

Kabat, Thaddeus L., Jr 3.06 

Kane, Theodore J. 3.06 

Kaufman, Frederick, Jr. 3.07 

King, John M 3.38 

Klemmer, Bernard J 3.44 

Kucharewski, Dennis 3.16 

LaBaugh, James W 3.33 

Laudenslayer, Daniel 3.22 

Logan, Thomas E., Jr 3.16 

Lubin, Stephen H 3.06 

Lucas, Richard J. 3.00 

McCarter, George T 3.25 

Mayeri, Stephen J 3.73 

Nowak, Eugene W. 3.78 

Nutinsky, Charles 3.20 

Piznik, Mark 3.00 

Quick', Jonathan D 3.00 

Rice, Richard S. 3.05 

Richards, Bruce 3.31 

Rife, Harold E 3.05 

Samulis, Raymond 3.23 

Schulz, Herbert W. 3.55 

Schwartz, Richard A 3.00 

Segan, Jeffrey J 3.00 

Seibert, Daniel R 3.50 

Shea, Dennis P 3.00 

Sikina, John 3.16 

Simone, Gary 3.00 

Smith, Clyde R. 3.06 

Sturm, Kenneth B 3.12 

Teichman, David 3.21 

Wargo, Leonard 3.44 

Webb, Gary L 3.21 

Wollmann, Fred A., Jr 3.56 

Zanecosky, Gary M 3.00 



Kenny's 
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LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 

191 S. Clinton St, 






the 




Vol. 18, No. 2 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture 



October 16, 1970 



First Assembly 

Falconry, the oldest of field sports 
still practiced today and known to 
date back 2,000 years B.C., has 
been the hobby and sport of Cor- 
nelius 'Corny' McFadden for thirty 
years. 

The History of Falconry, the 
spine tingling thrills and spills en- 
countered in hunting the Falcon 
from the Greenland Ice Caps to 
the Atlantic Barrier reefs and the 
fantastically enthralling pictures are 
part of Mr. McFadden's life. He is 
recognized by his fellow Falconers 
as one of the most skillful, ex- 
perienced and informed Falconers 
practicing today. His program has 
been presented to The Explorers 
Club, The Adventurers Club, The 
Geographic Society of Philadel- 
phia, Audubon Societies, colleges 
and prep schools, and civic forums. 

You, too, will find ADVEN- 
TURES IN HAWKING a light, 
fast and intensely interesting pro- 
gram and one not to be duplicated 
by anyone in the lecture field. The 
Drogram is coming to Delaware 
Valley College, Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 21 at 3:00 P.M. Get free tickets 
in advance from Dean Fucoly's 
office. 




Raymond Broderick, center. Republican 
Candidate for Governor, watches the 
Green and Gold tide roll on to victory 
Saturday. 

Corn Cod Is . . . 

"The Corn god" was designed 
by Margaret Wasserman Levy, par- 
ticularly for Delaware Valley Col- 
lege of Science and Agriculture, 
in honor of the 80th birthday of 
Leon L. Berkowitz, November 24, 
1969. It was given by his relatives 
and friends to honor, not only his 
office of Vice-President of the Board 
of Trustees of the College, but also 
his long association with the "Farm 
School", the parent institution, 
founded by his uncle, Dr. Joseph 
Krauskopf. 

(Continued on page 2) 



An Event Explained 

The following report on the unhappy event that begun Homecoming 1970 is 
based on eye witness accounts. The ingredients of the disaster was a group of about 
twenty seniors who were dissatisfied by the way the freshmen were not participating 
in customs, six frosh guarding the pile of wood, and a GI gasoline can. Those seniors 
decided to make an attempt to burn the pile to show their dissatisfaction. Plus in the 
past years the upperclasses always had tried to burn down the freshman bonfire. 

Anyway as the group of seniors advanced to the pole, a group of two or maybe 
three frosh attacked the senior who was holding the can. Wrestling it away, one 
frosh took off running, holding the can upside down with gas flowing out behind 
him and onto his pants. He was stopped before the can could be emptied out. 
The seniors advanced again. This time the senior with the can was in the middle 
of the group. Again the underclassmen attacked thus gas was soused out on more 
people including seniors and freshmen. Since there were more seniors the gas was 
able to be poured on the pile while pushing and shoving kept the frosh occupied. 
Once the gas was on the pile, uncannily everybody moved back leaving the frosh 
with gas soaked pants on center stage standing in front of where the gas was spilled. 

Then a lighted roll of toilet paper was thrown from the midst of the group of 
seniors. Suddenly the pile and the ground underneath the frosh erupted into flames 
of fire and the frosh didn't have a chance. The flames went tip his pants quickly. 
The moment of unreality ended first with some seniors running away ana some 
running after the kid to bring him down. Maybe because the frosh was all psyched 
up with building and protecting the bonfire it took a senior to tackle him at toe 
level; pinning him against a CM so a bunch of seniors were able to bring him clown 
and they extinguished the flames. It was a good thing the car was there for every 
second meant pain for him. Upon seeing they could not do anymore for the boy 
the seniors who brought him down left like the rest. 

It was a frosh who ran up to get the nurse; another frosh went to call an 
ambulance which the guard didn't do. There were three seniors trying to comfort 
the frosh on the ground. There was a combined effort by both classes to lessen the 
frosh 's troubles and get him to the hospital. He finally made it in a station wagon 
of one not involved in the happening. According to the nurse, the driver was 
great in driving through town. 

Research for this article brought out no support to the rumors that the frosh 
was doused by the seniors then set on fire. If that happened there would be 
nothing left of the kid now. The rumor that the freshmen nad to bring down their 
own classmate was also untrue. Those rumors were probably caused by the heat 
of the event. 

In all respects it was I stupid time for college age men to fool around with fire. 
The only good that might tome out of this unfortunate affair will he a written rule 
that no uppcrclassmcn should attempt to burn down the freshmen's bonfire. Maybe 
customs will be done away from this college. 



Cooperation 
Needed 

The Furrow needs your cooperation 
now! Before Wednesday night put your 
feelings into words on paper. We can 
only discover what each other needs and 
wants through an open student voice in 
the Furrow. Is a department doing a 
good job that you think isn't being 
talked about? Are you happy with the 
mixers? Air your opinions of the Viet- 
nam War, racial problems, Agnew, sex, 
and do it today. Deadlines for material 
is each Wednesday evening, nine days 
before it will appear. Material can In- 
put under the door of the Publications 
Office in the basement of Ulman Hall. 

A weekly paper depends on your 
interest. Students are needed to write 
material, evaluate events on campus, and 
write down the facts. There has always 
been a small nucleus of people doing 
the work. We can't do it aft. Either you 
begin submitting material to the Furrow 
and showing interest or the paper will 
not appear weekly. 

Don t use the argument that there is 
too much censorship. Give us a fair shake, 
try the Furrow. But be fair. If your 
article is written poorly and in haste we 
must re-write it. Often in the editing your 
ideas are lost. Submit early enough so 
that you can rewrite it yourself. I have 
seen students accuse us of censorship 
when their article was handed back to 
be rewritten. They didn't rewrite it and 
it was never printed. But it wasn't cen- 
sored! 

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS-Now you 
don't have to wait until Monday for the 
Furrow. Pick up your copy in the Student 
Center after 6:30 Friday each week. 

Aggies Defeat 
Arch Rival 

by Lou Hegyes 

A tenacious defense coupled with 

ten Wilkes turnovers helped the 

Aggies stop the Colonels for the 

(Continued on page 4) 



Homecoming 
1970 

Homecoming weekend started off 
on a bad foot this year. On Friday 
morning there was an accident at 
the Freshman bonfire. Some of the 
upper classmen were trying to light 
the bonfire with gasoline. The gaso- 
line was accidently spilled on some 
of the Freshmen, who were trying 
to protect it. Butch ( Howard ) Rose 
got more on him than the others. A 
fit match accidently came too close 
to him and part of his clothes went 
on fire. Butch was taken to the hos- 
pital, and it was said that he re- 
ceived second and third degree 
burns on 80$ of the lower half of 
his body. 

The parade into Doylestown was 
quite a colorful one. The theme for 
this year's parade was "America 
The Beautiful". The float that I 
liked most was the one built by the 
Ornamental Horticulture Dept. The 
float by the Science Society won 
first place. This was the first year 
the Freshmen class had a float in 
the parade. It was not the best float 
in the parade, but at least they have 
school spirit. 

Later on Friday night, about 
7:30 P.M., the bonfire was lit by 
the Freshmen. The flames from 
the fire gave an orange-yellow glow 
throughout the parking lot and the 
field. They were not the only 
"flames" burning that night. 

On Saturday afternoon, about 
12:30 P.M., the Alumni 'tudents, 
relatives and girl friend' started to 
pile into the grandstands, to see the 
game. I was surprised that the 
number of students was not higher. 
The students who were there gave 
all the school spirit they had. The 
other team might have won, but 
we give all of our praise to our 
football players, who fought a 
terrific game. 

At 9:00 P.M. Saturday, the con- 
cert starring Charlie Byrd, started 
to swing. D.V.C. really was rocking 
that night. 

The Homecoming schedule end- 
ed with a 2:00 A.M. Sunday morn- 
ing curfew. 

John Quinn 




A sight that made Homecoming '70 more 
is flanked by her court, Sandy Beil, first 
second runner-up. 



beautiful. Mary Valient, A.P.O. Queen, 
runner-up (right), and Melody Echard, 

PHOTO CHEDITS DAVE THOMAS 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



October 16, 1970 



Student Government 
Meeting 

The general feeling of the members of the Delaware Valley Student Government 
at the October 5 meeting seemed to lean strongly in favor of lessened restrictions in 
the present Open Door Policy which came ?nto effect Fall, 1969. Although no 
formal proposal was made concerning this policy, several ideas were expressed. 
It was suggested that the amount of time during which women were to be allowed 
in the dorms should be increased from 4:00 p.m. on Friday to 12:00 Sunday evening, 
excluding 8 hours on both Friday and Saturday nights from 1:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m., 
during which time no young ladies would be permitted in the student's room. Many 
of the student government representatives seemed to feel that the text book which 
must be used to keep the door open should be returned to the desk, and the student 
and his date should be granted the freedom to decide whether or not the door 
would be left open. As one representative put it, "After all, Aggies are mature 
and do not need babysitters." 

The duties of dorm counselors were brought up in relation to the topic of open 
and closed doors. Dean Fulcoly was somewhat dismayed to hear that many of these 
boys were not doing a top-knotch job in checking the dorms during the week-ends. 
According to regulation, counselors are expected to be in their dorms for the entire 
week-end, and it has been rumored that this responsibility is not always met by 
the dorm counselors. 

Another topic that was discussed at some length was that of concerts held at 
the college. A loss of money was suffered from both the spring concert last year 
and from the recent Charlie Byrd concert. Organization and advertising were 
discussed and an idea concerning student selection of performers was proposed. 
The idea suggested that a list of possible groups and performers would dc made 
available to the student body so that they could vote and choose the entertainment 
they would like, thereby insuring a concert that would be appreciated by the students 
and would not be a monitary loss for the college. 

Other business was given less of a spotlight at the meeting. Enforcement of 
freshman customs, a permanent bulletin board outside of the cafeteria, transportation 
of several pinball machines and jukeboxes to the college, the October 16 mixer 
and the student court were some of the other topics discussed. A unanimous vote 
granted the Block and Bridle Club the right to sell hams at the parent's day 
football game, scheduled for Saturday, October 24. These topics were discussed by 
the representatives of the student government and at approximately 8:25 the 
meeting was adjourned. 

Next Film Series 

The positions of two governments on the war in Southeast Asia will 
be presented at the next Academic Film Series program. 

"Vietnam: Journal of War" is a British Broadcasting Company 
( B. B. C. ) film which discusses the history of U. S. involvement in 
Southeast Asia and the war's effect on the Vietnamese. The film presents 
the view of the British Labor Party which does not support the U. S. 
role in Vietnam. 

The position of the U. S. Government will be presented in the best 
film available. The film will present the military and political reasons 
for. the United States presence in Southeast Asia. 

Each film is slightly less than one hour in length. They will be 
presented at 8:00 p.m. in Mandell Hall Auditorium on October 21. 

The Academic Film Series is sponsored by several campus organiza- 
tions and has been the result of the efforts of many people. 

President and Mrs. Work have supported the program from its in- 
ception last spring. Mrs. Catherine Harrison ordered many of the films 
to be shown in addition to scheduling the use of projectors and other 
equipment. 

D. E. Igelsrud selected the ninty films from over 7,000 films and, as 
Chairman of the Academic Film Series, coordinated the efforts of all the 
persons involved. 

Dr. James R. Powell was particularly helpful in advising the Faculty 
Audio-Visual Committee on preparing Mandell Hall Auditorium for the 
film series. The following modifications were made in the auditorium 
which will be of use to both the faculty and students in instruction and 
for other activities: 

1. Films can be shown with little or no space between reels. 

2. The sound level for the public address system and the pro- 
jectors can be controlled from the projection room by means 
of a monitor speaker. 

3. Music or other inputs can be put into the public address system 
from the projection room. 

4. Activities in the auditorium can be recorded in the projection 
room. 

5. Two new microphones have been purchased which can be 
substituted without changing the volume controls. One is a 
cardioid microphone and the other is a lavalier microphone. 

David Thomas and William Turner of the Photographic Club have 
been volunteering as projectionists for the series. In addition they have 
done special photographic work for the series. 

Michael Morgan and Larry Martel of the Contemporary Club and 
John Geiger of the Science Society have been very helpful in putting up 
signs in the New Hope and Doylestown areas. John Magin designed the 
intermission sign. 



CORN GOD— 

(Continued from page 1) 
Mrs. Levy, who lives in Mt. Airy, 
has created many pieces of sculp- 
ture for the Philadelphia area: 
Drexel Institute, Alvathorpe Park 
in Abington, Society Hill, a play- 
ground at 22nd and Columbia Ave- 
nue, and International House. The 
United States Embassy in Switzer- 
land displays another piece of her 
work. Mrs. Levy is a graduate of 
Wellesley College, and studied 
sculpture at the Tyler School and 
the Academy of Fine Arts. 

In researching for an appropriate 
subject for Delaware Valley Col- 
lege, Mrs. Levy chose the young 
Mayan god of Corn, Yum Caax. 
His headdress, although it may ap- 
pear feminine to modern eyes, is 
exactly as depicted in ancient 
Mayan art of the 800 B.C. - 1000 
A.D. period. He is supposed to 
bring blessing and richness to the 
harvest. 




The lovely deck of Queens of 
Homecoming 1970. 



GAUDY'S 

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OVER 20,000 TITLES 

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The bonfire that ended customs for 
the Class of 1974. 



EDITORIAL 

Last spring the Furrow came under direct attack by Student Govern- 
ment candidates. The issues stressed were: 1. The Furrow was censored 
by the administration; 2. The Furrow didn't print what was happening at 
Student Government meetings. The candidates are elected and now 
running Student Government, but not doing a damn thing about the 
problems they talked about. 

Rich Russel can ask me to come to Student Government meetings and 
report. Agronomy, Horticulture, and all other clubs can ask for a re- 
porter, but they must supply their own club representative. Fred Harteis 
is so long winded, why can't he convey the purpose of recent legislation? 
If I wrote what I think is happening, Student Government would prob- 
ably say I was wrong. It is Rich Russel and Fred Harteis' job to keep 
the facts of Student Government straight. Now that Student Government 
meetings are on Monday evenings, the current week's happenings at 
Student Government will be in print four days later. This means that 
you can have a response to the meetings, by the whole student body, 
by the next meeting. Think of it Rich — immediate response. 




Jke Sutzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL 



CO-EDITORS 
PHOTO EDITORS 
SPORTS EDITOR 
CLUB NEWS EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
TYPING MANAGER 
LAYOUT EDITORS 
DISTRIBUTION 



ST AFF- 

Michael A. Morgan, Larry Martol 

Dava Thomas, Bill Tomer 

Low Hegyes 

Milton Parker 

Tom Pyle 

Dolbert Jones 

Nancy Dendler, Carol Finnio 
Rich Hmieleski, Barry Pistimer 



-GENERAL STAFF- 

Jerrrey Evans, Stove Lauroucho, John Qwinn 

-ADVISOR- 

Dr. John Mertz 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



FACULTY ADVISOR 



October 16, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



What Is The 
Peace Symbol? Society News 



by Lou Hegyes 

The next time you draw or scrib- 
ble the peace symbol on a desk or 
an old pair of pants stop and think 
for a moment about the meaning 
that the encircled inverted Y 
carries. 

To most people, who wear it as a 
button, it has been a symbolic ex- 
pression of dissent from United 
States policy in Vietnam. 

However, Young Americans for 
Freedom, a right wing group which 
supports American policy in Viet- 
nam, issued buttons several years 
ago in which they pictured the 
symbol inside the circle as a 
swept-wing bomber. 

A gas station owner in New 
Jersey, who refuses to sell gas to 
anyone with a peace symbol decal 
on his car, through research dis- 
covered that the inverted Y first 
appeared in Rome during the reign 
of Nero and that it was an anti- 
Christian symbol. It reappeared 
during the Middle Ages as the 
"witch's claw" symbolizing the 
Satan. Hitler inverted it and used 
it as the sign of the "broken Jew* 
and Lenin put a circle around it 
and used it to symbolize atheism. 

Still another organization SANE, 
which formerly was known as the 
Committee for a Sane Nuclear 
Policy, states that it first was used 
' in the late 50's by an English group 
for use in an Easter demonstration. 
They incorporated the semaphoric 
flag symbols for the letters N and 
D, which stand for Nuclear Dis- 
armament, in a symbol. 

The semaphoric flag symbol, 
commonly used by Naval flagmen, 
for the letter N is to hold one flag 
directly above the head and the 
other at a 45 degree angle off the 
right leg. The D is the same except 
that the second flag is held off the 
left leg. 

Now it's up to you to decide 
which meaning to accept. 



i\ Conservation Glee Club 

Reports 



Howard's Jewelry Store 

35 E. State Street 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• CUSTOM MADE JEWELRY 
A SPECIALTY 

• WATCH and JEWELRY REPAIR 



348-4675 



Doylestown, Pa. 



UNCLEANED 

WATCHES 

GREEN and 

GOLD T.V. 



Randall Laurich, a Junior in 
Agronomy, is being considered for 
one of two representatives of the 
United States and Canada for the 
Annual Meeting Program Com- 
mittee of the Soil Conservation So- 
ciety of America for 71. This is 
quite an honor, since the society 
has a total membership of more 
than 12,000 all over the world. The 
theme of the convention is "The 
Shape of Things To Come". It will 
be held in Columbus, Ohio on 
August 15-18. 

At the Oct. 6 meeting of our SCS 
chapter, the film "Heritage of 
Splendor" was shown, following the 
business meeting. There was a good 
turnout of Freshmen, as more than 
half of those present were Fresh- 
men. Hopefully, more upperclass- 
men will turn out for future meet- 
ings. In contrast to the opinions of 
some, the Soil Conservation Society 
is not a part of the Agronomy major 
or the Agronomy Club. Those of 
all majors are encouraged to attend, 
as the cause of conservation should 
be everybody's concern. For future 
meetings, the Soil Conservation 
Society hopes to show more conser- 
vation films, in addition to an oc- 
casional speaker. 

This year's club trip involves a 
visit to Remington Game Farm in 
Maryland on Oct. 9 & 10, where 
experiments on wildlife conserva- 
tion are being carried on. 

Scott Cook 

Agronomy Public Representative 

A Good 
Concert 

The Charlie Byrd Quintet Con- 
cert might be the first profitable 
event the Student Government put 
on in a long while. Why? Because 
the Quintet is a bunch of nice 
people. Name any other group who 
would knock off a thousand dollars 
from their concert price because of 
a tie up on the road which made 
their arrival an hour late. They then 
played without an intermission so 
not to end the concert later than 
planned. Unfortunately almost all 
of the college's population was not 
there to enjoy the miracle of music. 
The concert was filled with good 
music from the floating, flying 
notes of the flute, to the thunder- 
ness thumping from the drums, to 
the word speaking music of the 
trumpet, to the hard sharpness of 
the bass; all intermingling together 
with Charlie Byrd's guitar. 

His guitar playing is indescrib- 
able. He plays his guitar like a liv- 
ing organism and it responds to his 
touches in the aliveness; music 
that seems to be unreal. Yet so 
heavy that it is hard to ignore. 
Everyone there was pleased with 
the selection of music played from 
the Latin beat to the Beatles. In all, 
it seemed to be a successful ven- 
ture. 



Mandell Hall is alive with the 
sound of music as D.V.C.'s Glee 
Club prepares for their extensive 
1970-71 program. 

Mr. Ernest Lehrer, the director 
of the music department at D.V.C., 
is a new and welcome addition to 
the faculty. From Atlantic City, 
N.J., Mr. Lehrer graduated from In- 
diana University, Indiana, Pa. with 
a masters in music conducting and 
highest honors. He also received his 
bachelors in Piano and Organ from 
Temple University, Philadelphia, 
Penna. 

The 1970-71 Glee Club officers 
are: Richard Hoverman, President; 
.Arnold Kolman, Vice President; Ho- 
ward Mandel, Secretary; Bruce 
Rinehart, Treasurer, and Joseph 
Kershner, Music Librarian. 

D.V.C.'s Glee Club is preparing 
a broad repertoire for the 1970-71 
season; this includes classical Glee 
Club literature plus show and folk 
pieces. The versatile Glee Club 
sings everything from Schubert to 
Dylan. 

Included in the 1970-71 schedule 
are Christmas and Spring Concerts, 
local engagements, plus two ex- 
change concerts with Holy Cross 
College and Gwynedd-Mercy Col- 
lege. More concert dates are con- 
stantly being set. 

The Glee Club IS alive with the 
sound of music. Remember, there 
is still time for YOU to join — just 
see Mr. Lehrer in Penn Hall or 
drop in any rehearsal, Monday or 
Wednesday from 4:15 to 5:45 in 
Mandell Hall Lecture Hall. 

Howard Mandel, Secretary 



SUPPORT 

YOUR 
STUDENT 

GOVERNMENT 



A Buzz The 
Bee Hives 

by Jeff MacNair 

The ApiarLst Society takes this 
opportunitv to welcome the class 
of 1974 to' D.V.C. Bees are of in- 
terest to many people as proved by 
the turnout for the first meeting. 
Those present bottled honey and 
gained knowledge of agriculture's 
relationships with the various ma- 
jors on campus. These range from 
the chemical analysis of honey to 
pollination of crops, to the market- 
ing of bee products, to the biologi- 
cal functions of the hive. 

During the second meeting sales- 
men from various dorms were pro- 
vided with honey for sale to inter- 
ested students. Eugene Novack 
(Elson) is directing sales. Tom 
McFarland '<74" was elected vice- 
president. Jeffrey MacNair was 
elected publication chairman. 

Up-coming programs of interest 
will be a visit to a local beekeeper's 
home to observe and participate in 
the extracting and processing of 
honey. Future meetings will in- 
clude sildes and movies on bee- 
keeping and the extracting of the 
D.V.C. honey crop. 

Meetings are held at the D.V.C. 
honey house, located across the 
railroad in back of the new dorm. 
Notice of the meetings are posted 
on major campus bafletki boards. 
Look for the hexagon-shaped signs 
and come out to the meeting. Re- 
freshments are served! 



THE DUTCH 

MAID 
LAUNDERERS 

Coin-Op. 
LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 

191 S. Clinton St. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS POETRY ANTHOLOGY 

The NATIONAL POETRY PRESS 
announces 

The closing date for the submission of manuscripts by 

College Students is 

November 5 

ANY STUDENT attending either junior or senior college is eligible 
to submit his verse. There is no limitation as to form or theme. 
Shorter works are preferred by the Board of Judges, because of 
space limitations. 

Each poem must be TYPED or PRINTED on a separate sheet, 
and must bear the NAME and HOME ADDRESS of the student, 
and the COLLEGE ADDRESS as well. 

MANUSCRIPTS should be sent to the OFFICE OF THE PRESS 

NATIONAL POETRY PRESS 



3210 Selby Avenue 



Los Angeles, California 90034 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



October 16, 1970 



Lou's Views 

by Lou Hegyes 

If for some reason you won't be 
able to be there in person, fol- 
low the Aggies football team on 
WBUX, 1570 on your AM dial, at 
1:20 and hear Roger Conduit call 
the play by play. 

Three other Aggie football games 
will be broadcasted this season. 
October 17— 

Ohio Northern Univ. 1:50 p.m. 
October 24— 

Lock Haven State 1:20 p.m. 
November 7 — 

Lycoming 1:00 p.m. 

Congratulations to Larry Eisen- 
hart and Danny Guers for being 
named honorable mentions on the 
ECAC Division III All-Star team 
for their play in the Juniata game 
and to Fred Beach and Al Lehman 
in the Moravian contest. 



FLEET FOOTS WIN TWO 
by Lou Hegyes 

Coach Berthold's cross country 
team scored a double triumph over 
Albright (27-33) and Philadelphia 
Textile (20-42). 

Sparked again by the strong 
group of freshmen, who were the 
first four finishers for the Aggies, 
the team went over the .500 mark 
for the first time this season with 
a 3-2 mark. 

First place went to Norm Belden 
of Textile with a time of 23:23 over 
the 4.6 mile course. 
, Gary Simpson led the Aggies 
with a fourth place finish. Other 
runners placing for D.V.C. were 
Bruce Pratt (5), Don Murphy (6), 
Dave Sverduk (8) and Rick Car- 
ver (9). 

The next home meet is Oct. 21 
against Franklin & Marshall. 



HUSKIES SPOIL 
HOMECOMING 

by Lou Hegyes 

Scoring 21 points in the second 
quarter the Bloomsburg State 
Huskies went on to defeat the Ag- 
gies by a 35-27 score. 

The Aggies scored first in the 
game and looked like they were 
going to have an easy time. Bichie 
Glenn capped a 13-play, 69 yard 
drive with a six-yara run for the 
score. 

Then Bloomsburg quarterback 
Mike Devereux and tailback Bob 
Warner took command of the 
game. 

Between them they scored five 
TD's to break the Aggies back. 

Devereux scored on 63 and 60 
yard option plays and Warner tal- 
lied on runs of 1, 3 and 4 yards. 

Soph quarterback Jim Foote got 
the Aggies' second and third TD's 
on one yard runs after the Huskies 
had lost fumbles deep in their own 
territory. The marches covered 26 
and 11 yards. 

Freshman Larry Dell scored the 
final Aggie touchdown on a four 
yard run after the Aggies recov- 
ered the Huskies third fumble. 

Soph sensation Richie Glenn was 
the top runner for the Aggies, who 
now stand 0-3, with 84 yards in 15 
carries. 

Bloomsburg 21 7 7—35 

DVC 7 8 12—27 

DVC— Glenn, 6 yd. run (Bracchi, 
kick). B — Devereux, 63 yard run 
( Oberholtzer, kick). B — Warner, & 
yard run (Oberholtzer, kick). B— 
Warner, 4 yard run (Oberholtzer, 
kick). B — Warner, 1 yard run 
(Oberholtzer, kick). DVC— Foote, 
1 yard run (Strother, pass from 
Foote). B — Devereux, 60 yard run 
(Oberholtzer, kick). DVC— Foote, 
1 yard run (pass failed). DVC— 
Dell, 4 yard run (pass failed). 



HARRIERS SPLIT OPENER 

by Lou Hegyes 

Coach Berthold's cross country 
team defeated Muhlenberg 27-32 
but lost to Dickinson 17-38 to split 
the season's opener. 

Muhlenberg's Rick Barrett fin- 
ished first in 30:45 over the 5.3 
mile course. 

The Aggie top finisher was fresh- 
man flash Dave Suerduk who plac- 
ed fifth overall. Other DVC runners 
placing were captain John Ahearn 
(9), Don Murphy (11), Rick Pettit 
(12) and Joe Schiave (13). 

Five of the Aggies first six finish- 
ers were freshmen. 

The team record now stands at 
1-1. 



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lift 


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its 


VENTURA S300 
ALSO $150 TO 1975 
WEDDING NINO ISO 

ewelry — Watches 
Gifts — Greeting Cards 
i Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Rep* 

? ,avtoU'& 

^ecuetet 

aylestown Shopping Cento 
» Discount to D.V.C. Studer 




A scene that will he seen every other 
Friday at the dining hall. 

PHOTO CREDITS DAVE THOMAS 



Our photo editor at his best, 

PHOTO CREDIT — BILL TURNER 



Touchdown! Richie Glenn made it 
across the goal line for his second six 
jwints against Wilkes. 



AGGIES DEFEAT— 

(Continued from page 1) 

first time since 1964. 

The little men on the defensive 
unit gave the Colonels the biggest 
headaches. 5'9" Danny Guers in- 
tercepted three Wilkes passes 
while 57" Barry Thomas recovered 
two of the seven fumbles. The ten 
Wilkes turnovers were caused by 
the hard hitting defensive team 
which continually applied pressure 
to the Colonels' offense. 

Richie Glenn, who rushed for 65 
yards in 31 carries, opened the 
scoring in the first quarter when he 
went in from the one. Glenn scored 
again in the second quarter on 
a two yard run following Pete 
Bracchi's 19 yard field goal. 

Wilkes did all the scoring in the 
second half. Yanora scored on a 1 
yard run and Kaschak bouted a 27 
yd. field goal, but it wasn't enough 
to overtake the Aggies. Wilkes had 
other scoring opportunities in the 
half but the Aggie defense tight- 
ened up. 

Jim Foote continued his league 
leading punting as he averaged 
40.3 yards for 10 punts. 

Also playing outstanding games 
were Senior Captain Don Chance, 
who gained 66 yards in 11 carries, 
Alex Varger, Fred Beach and Ben 
Harvey. The team's record now 
stands at 1-3 with Ohio Northern 
the next opponent. 

DVC 7 9 0—16 

Wilkes 3 7—10 



Welcome to the 

TOWNE COBBLER 

Formerly Matt's Shoe Repair 
BAG and SHOE DYEING 

38 E. STATE ST. 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-3984 



October 24, Saturday - 8 p.m. - Council 
Rock High School, Newtown. Audubon 
Film Tour • "Land of the Giant Cactua - 

Allen D. Cruikahank. 

Mr. Cruikshank, noted photographer, 
author and lecturer will narrate his film 
of the desert and mountain sections of 
Saguaro National Monument and sur- 
rounding country near Tucson, Arizona. 
Admission: $1.00 - members, $1.50 - 
non- members, $.50 - children. 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the 




& 



URROW 






Vol. 18, No. 3 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture November 13, 1970 



The Peace 
Symbol 

by Ron Good 

The October 16th issue of "The 
Furrow" carried an article on the 
peace symbol explaining among 
other things that the symbol's his- 
tory goes back many years. I would 
like to expound on this subject with 
information obtained from an ar- 
ticle by Jamie Buckingham in the 
September 1970 issue of "Christian 
Life." 

The peace symbol supposedly 
was designed on Feb. 21, 1958, 
for use in the Aldermaston Easter 
Peace Walk in England. The sym- 
bol was adopted immediately by 
Hugh Brock and Pat Arrowsmitn 
on behalf of the Direct Action 
Committee Against Nuclear War. 

The June 28^ 1970 issue of "Pa- 
rade Magazine" states "The peace 
symbol was first associated with 
tne late Bertrand Russell and his 
'ban the bomb* movement in 1958." 
Bertrand Russell, of course, was 
the renowned philosopher who is 
remembered for his anti-God, pro- 
Communism beliefs. 

However, closer research proved 
that Russell, who by his own -ad- 
mission was in league with Satan, 
did not design the symbol. Rather, 
he adopted an already well-known 
Satanist symbol and suggested it 
be used by the innocent and well- 
meaning peace-marchers as their 
banner. 

In Bernard Koener's Handbuch 
der Herald Kunst (4 volumes, For- 
litz Schlef, 1920) the "peace sym- 
bol" appears both right side up and 
upside down. The Germanic tribes 
who used it attributed strange and 
mystical properties to the sign. It 
was used by "black magicians" in 
pagan incantations and condemna- 
tions. In volume 1, pages 248-261, 
the author discovered that the up- 
right forked symbol represented 
man and was a positive sign. Greg- 
ory the Great wore it on his vest- 
ment. Inverted, it meant "die ges- 
turzte" or the fallen man-rune, the 
dead man-rune. Adolph Hitler or- 
dered the "peace symbol" to ap- 
pear on German death notices, and 
it was a part of the official inscrip- 
tion for tne gravestones of Nazi SS 
officers. In the latter case, it was 
acompanied by the Swastika, an- 
other profaned version of the cross. 

In 711 A.D., the Saracen hordes 
crossed into Spain to establish their 
anti-God Moorish kingdom. The 
shields of the invaders were decor- 
ated with the inverted broken 







ONE? 




cross. In 1099 A.D., the Saracens 
fought the Crusaders under the 
same symbol. 

Even today, forked crosses are 
common in Westphalia and in cer- 
tain areas of Austria and Italy, and 
are considered a "good omen." Up- 
side down, the broken cross sym- 
bolizes evil and death. 

Dr. Gerard Encausse states in 
Traite de Science Occulte that the 
(Continued on page 3, column 2) 

Furrow — Voice Of 
The Students 

Just as student government is a 
representative organization, the 
school newspaper too is a repre- 
sentative institution, organized for 
the purpose of communicating in- 
dividual student views to the en- 
tire campus. Along with objective 
reporting of campus activities and 
happenings, a college newspaper 
provides a voice for the students' 
suggestions, complaints, and crea- 
tive thoughts; a voice which hope- 
fully will reach out to all of the 
student body. 

Unfortunately, the students at 
DVC seem to be lacking a strong 
voice, because the paper is not 
gaining much support. Much com- 
plaining concerning campus activi- 
ties is heard among the students, 
but few people will take the time 
and effort to sit down and write an 
article which will express their 
views to the student body. Hope- 
fully, this situation will change as 
we get further into the semester. 
All articles, letters, or ideas sub- 
mitted by the students will be 
printed. Articles should be submit- 
ted on Wednesday in order to be 
in the Friday paper, ten days later. 
It might be or interest to the 
students that censorship, except 
for certain descriptive four-letter 
words, is now obsolete in the DVC 
newspaper. Remember — all your 
ideas and comments are welcome. 



CUSTOMS 
1970 

The typical reaction to the cus- 
toms procedures for this year by 
the freshman class was thumbs 
down. However, once things got 
started customs became rather di- 
gestable. 

I feel the program was success- 
ful this year. After all the fresh- 
men won the softball game, touch 
football, rope-pulling contest and 
our poptop chain had to be the 
longest ever made. Aside from the 
unfortunate incident to our fellow 
schoolmate, Butch Rose, one can 
>ay the freshman class had fun 
with customs. The second bonfire 
was constructed in honor of Butch, 
so that we could have a pep rally. 
This I feel symbolized the pride 
and spirit of the freshman class. 
The class as a whole was united 
and became acquainted with up- 
per classmen which is an essential 
part of customs. 

And for those of you who feel 
we had it easy this year, I didn't 
see many upperclassmen in the 
lake. So making it easy on us, made 
it easy for you. 

— R. Poinsett '74 



HAROLD ROSE 
FUND 

The Harold Rose Fund isn't too 
well known yet. It does exist and 
was started by our Student Govern- 
ment to help in defraying Butch's 
-medical bills. An account was open- 
ed at a local bank in Doylestown. 
Donations for the Harold Rose 
Fund can be given to Chris Hol- 
lans, Dave Farrar, John King and 
Scott Cooke. 

This terrible accident has cost 
the Rose Family a lot of money. 
Butch is a freshman here at Dela- 
ware Valley College and needs 
your assistance. We would like to 
show him that we are his friends. 

Student Government will contri- 
bute all traffic court fines to the 
Fund. A mixer was proposed to 
benefit the Fund. Student Govern- 
ment is showing its support for the 
Fund by establishing the Harold 
Rose Fund, establishing a commit- 
tee to supervise the Fund, and pro- 
jects to contribute to the Fund. 

Library Additions 

The grandfather's clock and an- 
tique desk in the Joseph Krauskopf 
Memorial Library wnich had be- 
longed to the late Mr. Harold Sha- 
piro, were generously donated to 
the college by his son and daugh- 
ter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Shapiro. The late Mr. Harold Sha- 
piro had been an active board 
member for many years, and was a 
speaker at one Founder's Day sev- 
eral years before his death. 

The stately grandfather's clock 
with its melodic chimes had been 
purchased by Harold Shapiro and 
his brothers in nineteen nine as a 
twenty-fifth wedding anniversary 
present for their parents. The desk 
is a very unique piece of furniture 
in that it has drawers on both the 
front and back. This desk had been 
used by Harold Shapiro in his 
home and office for forty years or 
more. 




Looking at Work Hall in a different dimension. 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



November 13, 1970 




i 






Dynamic Hort 
Moves Ahead 

The Horticulture Society has 
opened its 1970 season with a 
BANG! Under the expert manage- 
ment of George Curley and Harold 
Fox, the apple harvesting has been 
a great success. George has applied 
some of his management ability 
and experience to the D.V.C. or- 
chards. Apple and cider sales have 
soared this season with the aid of 
freshmen customs, in particular 
several outstanding and enthusias- 
tic freshmen. 

Our club treasury has surpassed 
all records set in previous vears. 
AH of this success has been due to 
proper culture and management 
techniques by Mr. John Howell 
and six horticulture students this 
past summer. Those students in- 
clude: Kenneth Weaver, Ronald 
Good, Milton Parker, Laurent Mar- 
tel, Michael Jones and Richard 
Merritt. 

Our chapter of the American 
Collegiate Branch of the American 
Society for Horticultural Science 
has the privilege of sending Harold 
Fox, President; George Curley, 
Vice-President; and Milton Parker, 
A-Day Representative to the Na- 
tional Convention to be held in 
Miami Beach, Fla. from November 
1-4. In the past the Delaware Val- 
ley College chapter has scored 
very impressive victories such as 
4th ranked chapter in the nation 
out of some 34 active colleges and 



1 



i 



Apiarist 
Society 

by Jeff McNair 

The boredom of a Sunday after- 
noon was left in the dorms by stu- 
dents present at the apiculture field 
day. Those present helped in the 
prewinter inspection of the honey 
bee colonies. This was done to 
judge the amount of honey pres- 
ent, the condition of the hives, and 
the health of the bees. Everything 
was found to be in good order, and 
the late fall honey flow from gold- 
enrod and aster provided the bees 
with ample food for the winter. 

On Monday evening, October 
19, Dr. Berthold showed a few se- 
lected slides. These showed the 
types of bees in a hive, brood and 
honey comb, comb building, and 
the destruction of comb by the 
wax moth. The slides were fol- 
lowed by a discussion on bees and 
refreshments. 

On Monday evening, October 26, 
members of the Apiarist Society 
and other interested students will 
visit the home of a local small com- 
mercial beekeeper to observe and 
participate in tne extraction of his 
noney crop. 

Keep looking for the hexagon 
shaped signs; they tell of things to 
do and see. 

universities, and various national 
offices. This year's representatives 
hope to repeat that performance. 



Charley Browns 
Great Pumpkin 
visited Del Vats 
cafeteria Halloween 
night — a few 
remains were 
lying around 
the next day. 



Senior Horticulture 
Technique II Trip 

Mr. Wood's Hort technique II 
class went to Rietz Manufacturing 
Company in West Chester, Penn- 
sylvania. Rietz makes disentigra- 
tors, hollow Thermascrews, and 
food crushers. While there the 
group made a watery applesauce 
using a direct steam-cooking screw 
and a food desintegrator. 

Under the direction of Mr. Rob- 
son Dunwody, manager of the West 
Chester branch of Rietz, the seniors 
made enough applesauce to can one 
pint for everyone there. 

The Thermascrew has the ad- 
vantage of continuous processing. 
Uncooked foodstuff put in the 
screw is cooked on the way through, 



and is let out the end, as more is 
put in at the same time. Another 
great advantage is the sanitary con- 
ditions of the Thermascrew. 

Sanitary cleaning is insured with 
a duff finish. The finish, produced 
by blasting with glass particles, 
doesn't glare. The common high 
gloss finish reflects light and hides 
small amounts of contamination. 

The Rietz Manufacturing Com- 
pany generously supplied lunch be- 
fore taking us to Vincenti Mush- 
room Company near Kennett 
Square. 

Mr. Dom Vincenti gave us a per- 
sonal tour of the processing plant, 
explaining step by step the proce- 
dure of canning of mushrooms. 

The modern air conditioned, 
heated growing buildings make 
possible year around harvesting 
and canning of mushrooms. Here 
again labor makes it necessary to 
have a year around business. A 
labor force simply can't be found 
during selected periods of the year. 

The gourmet will be glad to 
know that well trained harvesters 
carefully select ripe mushrooms 
daily during a growing room's har- 
vest period. Good mushrooms aren't 
grown overnight, the "seed" is 
planted two months before the 
fruiting bodies are formed. Dom 
Vincenti and Company are good 
guys producing good mushrooms. 




Grant presented to Dr. Feldstein by Mr. Murray. 




Jke *Jutzow 

DoylMtown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITOR I A I STAFF- 
CO-EDITORS Mkhaal A. Morgan, Larry Martel 

PHOTO EDITORS Dave Thomas, till Turner 

SPORTS EDITOR low Heayei 

CLUI NEWS EDITOR Whan Parker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Te>m Pyle 

TYPING MANAGER Delbart Jonai 

LAYOUT EDITORS Nancy Dandier, Carpi Flnnla 

DISTRIBUTION Rk" HmiolatW, Barry Pistlmer 

-GENERAL ST AFF- 
J affray Evani, Steve Lauraucha, John Quinn 

-ADVISOR- 

FACULTY ADVISOR D*- John Marts 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
tha respective authors and do not necessarily reflect tha views of the collage. 



November 13, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



Noise Problem In 
Freshman Dorms 

Most of the noise heard in Wolf- 
sohn and Elson is caused by a mi- 
nority of the students. They num- 
ber about 10 to 15 in Wolfsohn and 
about 15 to 20 in Elson. I think 
these students iust come to college 
to enjoy the college life and to just 
about pass their courses. They like 
to play their radios, record players 
and their television sets at a loud 
volume all the time. By doing this 
they show very little common cour- 
tesy to the other students in the 
dorm who want to study. 

In Wolfsohn, there are about 10 
to 15 students who like to take ad- 
vantage of the times when the 
dorm counselors, George McCarer 
and Kenneth Sturm, are not in or 
asleep. Anywhere from 12:00 mid- 
night to 2:00 a.m., they like to 
throw a tin dust pan down the 
length of the hallway. They like to 
let everyone know when they come 
back for the night, by slamming 
doors and talking to their friends 
from the other end of the hall. 
They also like to take an aerosol 
can of hair spray, push the button 
down and lighting the spray. Not 
even caring about the can not hav- 
ing a safety device, which will pre- 
vent the flame from coming back 
into the can and exploding. Many 
women have been disfigured for 
life by spraying their hair when 
having a lit cigarette in their 
mouth. George and Ken are doing 
the^r best trying to keep as much 
noise down to .a minimum during 
the day and night. Two people to 
handle 73 students is a lot of work. 
Even when only about one fifth 
(1/5) of the students make a little 
noise, it sounds loud because it 
echos in the hallway. George and 
Ken said if those students, who arc 
constantly making the most noise 
don't stop, they will be put on re- 
port. 

Elson is not as big as Wolfsohn, 
but they have their noise problems 
too. There are 54 students and two 
counselors, Tom Logan and George 
Boyer. Most of the restless fresh- 
men students seem to live in Elson. 
Here too, most of the noise comes 
from a small minority of 15 to 20 
students. They also like to play 
their radios, record players and 
television sets at a loua volume. At 
almost all times of the day and 
night there is someone in the hall- 
way. They are either making noise 
or planning to have some "Fun". 
Wolfsohn and Elson have about 
the same type of problems. Elson 
probably nas some other noise 
problems that I am not aware of. 
Tom and George are doing the best 
they can to keep the noise down. 
They have already put a few stu- 
dents on report. Anything that hap- 
pens to or about the freshman class 
seems to originates from Elson 
Hall. 

Some of the students act like ani- 
mals and children. The college is 
paying the dorm counselors to keep 
control of the students, not to be 
zoo keepers or baby sitters. 



THE PEACE SYMBOL— 

(Continued from page 1) 
inverted man-rune has for centu- 
ries been a favorite sign of the 
Satanists. He notes, "When (Satan- 
ists ) want to express their ideas in 
a poly-symbolic sign, they formu- 
late their ritualistic condemnations 
by destroying the harmony of the 
figure: they rum the cross upside 
down . . ." This ritual was designed 
to show defiance of God and faith 
in Satan. 

Contemporary Satanist Anton 
LaVey said in November, 1968, "A 
Black Mass consists of such things 
as saying the Lord's Prayer back- 
wards — interspersed witti obseni- 
ties, trampling the cross underfoot 
or hanging it upside down, desec- 
ration of the wafer or host, and 
similar other forms of defilement 
or parodying of the sacred cows 

In the Book of Signs (Dover 
Publications), author Rudolph 
Koch cites the fork-shaped figure 
as "man" and the inverted figure 
as "the man dies" Koch describes 
the inverted figure as "the crow's 
foot" or "witches' foot," symbol 
well-known in the Middle Ages as 
an insignia of Satan. 

Marquis de Concressault says in 
Symbol of the Anti God ( Brittany 
Press, 1969), "This same symbol 
can be found in many archives con- 
taining medieval manuscripts. The 
Museum of Witchcraft in Bayonne, 
France, has several woodcuts illus- 
trating the Black Mass and Witch 
Sabbath with the symbol of the 
Anti-God adorning trie altar as an 
'unholy relic' " 

In a 16th century woodcut which 
hangs in the museum at Bayonne, 
John Knox used the symbol to rep- 
resent the eyes of Satan. Knox said 
this sign, used by the Black Masses 
of Satan during the Middle Ages, 
was known as "the mark of the 
beast." 

Yet the actual origin of the 
"peace symbol" dates back to the 
first century. According to the vol- 
uminous records of Nestorius the 
Syrian, Patriarch of Constantinople 
(428-431 A.D.), the deranged 
Roman Emperor Nero (54-68 A.D.) 

Some of the other students do 
make noise on occasions by playing 
their radios and record players 
loud at the end of the day. You 
really can't blame them because 
they just want to relax for a little 
while before they start to study 
and do homework at night. I guess 
that by playing the music loud it 
helps to drown out their thoughts 
of the rough day. 

The reason why the noise en- 
gulfs the dorms is because Wolf- 
sohn and Elson were very poorly 
constructed. The walls are only one 
cinder block thick. The doors do 
not shut tightly. Where there are 
pipes going from room to room, the 
noles for them are bigger than they 
are, and the noise travels through it 
to the next room. A way to stop the 
noise from going from one end of 
the hall to the other is to put in- 
door-outdoor rugs on the floor and 
sound proofing on the ceiling. 

— John Quinn 



is said to have designed the symbol 
as a "broken cross to show disre- 
spect to God at the time of the 
crucifixion of Simon Peter. From 
that date, the "Nero Cross" (de- 
picted in Fifth Century Illustra- 
tions) was known as the "sign of 
the broken Jew" or the "symbol of 
the Antichrist." 

In 70 A.D. when the legions of 
Titus ravished and destroyed the 
Holy City of Jerusalem, fulfilling 
the prophecy of Christ, they 
marcned in under Nero's signet of 
the Antichrist — the broken cross. 

The Marquis de Concressault 
states, "In tne 20th century this 
same symbol was painted on the 
doors of the churches closed by the 
Bolsheviks in Russia ... it was 
branded on the bodies of Gypsies 
and Jews during the Spanish Civil 
War of 1936-39, just as they had 
been branded during the days of 
the Inquisition." 

Interestingly enough, the Jews in 
the Middle East are today under 
attack by Communist Palestine 
Liberation Front members who 
display on their red arm-bands the 
sign of the broken Tew. 

Those of us who love peace need 
a symbol. If we want a symbol to 
march under, why not march under 
The Cross instead of the peace 
symbol. 

HARRIERS TOP 
DUTCHMEN 

by Lou Hegyes 

Freshmen Don Murphy, Gary 
Simpson and Bruce Pratt finished 
in tne first three places to pace the 
Aggie cross country team to its 
first victory (19-40) over Lebanon 
Valley College since 1963. 

Don Murphy finished first, run- 
ning the 4.8 mile course in 21:16. 
Simpson and Pratt tied for second 
in 30:02. 

Frosh Dave Sverduk and Junior 
Ray Funkhouser also scored in the 
meet placing 6th and 7th respec- 
tively. 

The team's record now stands at 
4-2. 

CRUSADERS TOP 
HARRIERS 

by Lou Hegyes 

Oct. 29— Susquehanna Univ., cap- 
turing the first three places and 
four of the first five, defeated the 
Delaware Valley College cross 
country team by a 19-36 score. 

Crusader freshman John Ombe- 
lets finished first with a time of 
23:32. He was followed closely by 
teammates Bob Hough and Bill 
Hamilton. 

Frosh Bruce Pratt was the Aggies 
top finisher with a fourth place. 
Gary Simpson (6), Don Murphy 
(7), Jim LaBaugh (9) and Ray 
Funkhouser ( 10 ) also placed in the 
meet. 

The team's record now drops to 
5-5 with the possibility of a win- 
ning season being determined in a 
triangular meet against PMC and 
Washington College on Nov. 7. 

The season winds up on Nov. 20 
in Philadelphia at the MAC Cham- 
pionships. Coach Berthold will be 
taking his top seven runners. 



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Diplomats Dump Aggies 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Franklin and Marshall cross 
country team, displaying the 
strength which may be enough to 
catch Ursinus for the MAC title, 
crushed the Aggie harriers on our 
wet course by a 15-50 score. 

A light rain fell during the meet 
but it failed to dampen the F&M 
powerhouse. Junior Henry B< nnett 
who led the Diplomats to ,i sweep 
of the first seven places, covered 
the 4.6 mile course in 22:59, just 
48 seconds off of the course record 
of 22:11 set by Aggie All-American 
Lou Coppens in 1964. 

Freshman Don Murphy was the 
Aggies top runner with an 8th 
place finish. Also placing were 
John Ahearn (9), Rich Carver 
(10), Bruce Pratt (11) and Dave 
Sverduk (12). 

The team's mark now drops to 
4-3 on the season. 



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Page Four 



THE FURROW 



November 13, 1970 




Aggies Shutout 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Ohio Northern Polar Bears 
put the freeze on the Aggies and 
whitewashed them by a 27-0 score 
at Ohio. 

The Aggies offense couldn't do 
anything right as two pitch out 
rumbles put the Aggies deep in 
their own territory in the first quar- 
ter. Taking advantage of the punt- 
ing situations Ohio Northern on the 
second punt, went 60 yards for the 
score as Jim Derfel caught a swing 
pass from quarterback John Smith 
and went 49 yards for the six 
pointer. 

The second quarter saw the 
Polar Bears score fifteen points 
which were set up by a punt re- 
turn, an interception and a fumble, 
all deep in Delaware Valley terri- 
tory. 

Dean Dreher scored on a one- 
yarder after Ren Dynes returned 
a punt 69 yards. Defense end 
George Sarap recovered an Aggie 
fumble in tne end zone for six 
more. 

Chet Looney picked up two 
points when he tackled Kevin 
Foster in the end zone for a safety 
ending the first half scoring. 

The Bears last score came early 
in the third quarter when they 
drove 63 yards in 10 plays as Jim 
Derfel scored on a 2 yd. run. 

The Aggies record now drops to 
1-4. On the season the team has 
yielded 113 points while scoring 
only 49. 



Cross Country 
Split 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Delaware Valley College 
cross country team defeated Juni- 
ata 25-34, but lost a close meet to 
Rider 29-30 in a triangular meet. 

The first five places were divided 
between Juniata and Rider runners 
with freshman Don Murphy again 
the Aggies top finisher with a sixth 
place. The Aggie pack showed its 
strength as Gary Simpson (7), 
Bruce Pratt (8), Dave Sverduk 
(9) and Ray Funkhouser (10) all 
scored valuable points. Delaware 
Valley placed seven runners in the 
top fifteen. The team record was 
boosted to 5-4 with the split. One 
remaining home meet is scheduled 
and that is against Susquehanna on 
October 29. 



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Lock Haven 
52-21 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Lock Haven State Bald 
Eagles were flying high when they 
dumped the Aggies by a 52-21 
score before a large Parents Day 
crowd.. 

The Aggies appeared to be in 
control of the game when they 
jumped off to a 14-7 lead in the 
first quarter and a 21-17 lead at the 
half, but the Eagles exploded and 
ran off with a rant. 

The Aggies opened the scoring 
when BiliDever nit Jim Foote with 
a pass in the end zone for a 6-0 
score. The margin was widened to 
14-0 when Captain Don Chance 
plunged in from the 2 yard line. 

Lock Haven came right back 
when the Eagles quarterback Mike 
Packer hit Tommy Allen for the 
first of his TD passes. Lock Ha- 
ven's Dan Guers put the score at 
14-10 with a 19 yard field goal, but 
before the half ended Don Chance 
scored his second touchdown on 
another 2 yard run after the Aggies 
marched 71 yards in eight plays for 
a 21-17 score. 

In the second half the Aggies 
were shut out while the Eagles ex- 
ploded for 35 points. Statistically 
the Aggies gained 218 yards on the 
ground while holding Lock Haven 
to minus 42 yards but the story was 
told through the air as the Aggies 
managed only 28 yards compared 
to Lock Haven's 382 on 19 comple- 
tions in 44 attempts. 

The team record now stands at 
1-5 with two remaining away 
games against stubborn Susque- 
hanna and Lycoming. 
DV 14 7 0—21 

LH 7 10 21 14—52 



Lou's Views 

by Lou Hegyes 

Which Eastern College football 
team plays the toughest schedule? 
Penn State, DVC? Maybe. This 
season's ratings show Army, Syra- 
cuse and Pittsburgh playing the 
heaviest schedules. Army and Syra- 
cuse play three of the Associate 
Presses' top twenty preseason picks. 
But the roughest schedule must go 
to the Panthers of Pittsburgh who 
play four of the top twenty pre- 
season favorites ( ULCA, West Vir- 
ginia, Notre Dame and Penn 
State). 

It's no wonder that the football 
team is 1-5 thus far. The punchless 
offense and porous defense have 
scored only 70 points while yield- 
ing 165 points but a good future 
can be seen with the large number 
of Freshmen and Sophomores in 
the starting lineups. On occasions 
as many as twelve or thirteen un- 
derclassmen have started. 

Coach Robert Berthold continues 
to do a fine job with the cross 
country. The team has been above 
the 500 mark for most of the season 
even though the top four mnners 
are freshmen. Freshmen Don Mur- 
phy, Gary Simpson, Brure Pratt 
and Dave Sverduk have done a 
sensational job. 

Will John Silan's basketball team 
make it to the MAC's this year? 
This season's 22 game schedule is 
the toughest in the school's history 
with eastern powers Wagner, Phil- 
adelphia Textile and Scranton 
scheduled. Student support will be 
very important in deciding the sea- 
son's outcome. 



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DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

' of 

Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



the fURROW NewCu. 



Vol. 18, No. 4 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture November 20, 1970 



Student Centers 
Future 



By Pete Vicari 

The new Education Building, 
which is to be constructed in the 
near future, will occupy the site 
of the present temporary 
Student Center. As a result of 
this, members of both the 
student body and the Ad- 
ministration feel there is a good 
possibility of relocating the 
present Student Center at 
another temporary site. This 
may be accomplished through a 
contractual agreement to uplift 
the present structure from its 
foundation and transfer it to a 
suitable location. However, in 
order to approve a maneuver as 
such, expert opinion is being 
considered. At this time the 
structural condition is being 
evaluated along with estimates 
for moving costs. It is Jikely 
that if the building structure is 
in movable condition and the 
moving cost is within reason, 
the Student Center will be 
moved to a new location. 



Facts concerning the out- 
come of the above information 
will probably be available very 
shortly. If the present Student 
Center cannot be moved, for 
structural reasons or because 
of high costs, other possibilities 
for temporary sites throughly 
will be examined. 

Looking into the future, we 
find that the go ahead for the 
new permanent Student Center 
may occur any time between 
1971 and 1973. However, since 
the funds will be coming mainly 
from the General State 
Authority, at this time it is 
impossible to pinpoint any 
specific date. Nevertheless, 
from the time the funds are 
received, it will take ap- 
proximately 18 months to 
complete the building. The 
layout, facilities, and location 
for this building will be based 
upon the amount of funds 
received. 



Cheerleaders 
For 

D. V. C. 

Delaware Valley College is in 
for a big surprise on December 
2. Starting at the D.V.C. - 
Drexel basketball game, there 
will be six extra people on the 
floor. The six people are girls - 
the first official all-girl 
cheerleading squad D.V.C. has 
ever known. The five girls who 
are D.V.C. coeds are: Debbie 
Yomer, Melody Smith, Debbie 
Coleman, Betty Scanlon, and 
Carol Finnic The sixth girl is 
Coni Thompson, a York College 
graduate, who is teaching our 
girls the fine art of 
cheerleading. Since the 
December 2 game is a first for 
our cheerleaders, it is hoped 
that there will be a large 
amount of spectators at the 
game. 



SUPPORT OUR 

STUDENT UNION 

FUND 



"Today 



it 




On Saturday evening, 
November 21, 1970, at 7 p.m. 
there will be a basketball game 
between the radio and TV 
stations of the Delaware Valley 
area. The game is for the 
benefit of the Newtown Drug 
Rehabilitation Center, 
"TODAY". Today is a private 
non-state-run drug 
rehabilatation center. The 
center is voluntary only, and 
those persons attending it are 
under no commitment to stay in 
the program. 

APO is sponsoring this game, 

Which Will be called the "Blue B0B baDAT, Prei. A.P.O., presents a check for $100.0© to Pete Brackey for the 
and Gold" game. Some Of the Barry Harter memorial fund 



System 



The question on campus is: 
Can we get the cut system 
changed? Most of the students 
want a new cut system which 
will be more lenient. The 
students don't want the feeling 
that they are living in a prison. 
You have to attend classes 
because, if you don't want the 
feeling that they are living in a 
prison. You have to attend 
classes because, if you don't 
and miss four or more classes 
(in the same course), unex- 
cused, you fail. Right now the 
students are allowed one cut 
per semester credit. Most of the 
students would like this 
changed to two cuts per 
semester credit. This would 
allow the student to be more on 
his own. He could skip a class to 
get some more studying done 
for a test later that day. Some 
students could get home for the 
weekends more often by 
skipping their Saturday 
morning classes. Who likes to 
stay around here on the 
weekends? The faculty has 
already passed through the no 
double cuts before and after the 
vacations. No one wants a 
drastic change, but the students 
don't want some minute ad- 
justment. 

David Farrar, the Junior 
Class President, is in charge of 
making up the new cut system 
(attendance policy). He and the 
committee have been looking at 
more than two hundred colleges 
the same size of D. V. C. and 
their systems. The one which 
seems the best for D. V. C. is 
Susquehanna College's. This 
attendance policy has 
unlimited cuts with the proc- 
tor's regulations. The proctor 
will take attendance at all 
classes. If he finds your grades 
are low because of absences, he 
can require you to attend his 
class. There are no excused 
cuts, from the dean or from the 
nurse. If the system is changed 
this semester, it can go into 
effect for the next semester. 
David Farrar has his doubts 
about the majority of the 
faculty's accepting this at- 
tendance policy, but is hoping 
the administration will 

Continued on Page 2 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



November 20, 1970 



Letters To The 
Editor 

Today, my generation is headed somewhere. Where? No one's really sure. The 
young majority seems to be striving to be different. It seems almost as if it's a 
contest to see who can go the farthest out. 

In this so-called "Woodstock generation", where hair is longer, where morals 
are looser, where maybe true faith has been lost, the intervals between really 
violent crimes seem to grow shorter everyday. It's not unusual to pick up a paper 
and read of mass family slayings, hy jackings or the murder of another policeman . 

We being young yet, "older," cry for more responsibility. Meanwhile, the older 
generation is wondering, where will it all end? Uncle Sam ships us off to Vietnam 
to fight a war which isn't even ours. And we must go, for it is our duty as a citizen of 
this country. Thus we protest and meanwhile the generation is wondering, where 
will it all end? The Negro revolutionaries, the Black Panthers, are demanding 
equal rights as did all the minorities of this country before them. They threaten to 
use violence if their demands aren't met. They are put down, yet they accomplish 
with their means more in two years than the non-violent NAACP accomplished in 
the last 20. Still the older generation is wondering, where will it all end? 

Agnew incites more controversy on campuses than Stokley Carmicheal, S.D.S., 
or even communism could hhope to stir up, yet he is applauded by the ad- 
ministration. 

Dr. Do Good, America, the worlds protector, has made the once-respected U.N. 
a now-laughed-at has-been. And we wonder where it will all end! 

Our hippie freaks get high on marijuana while our elders get high on alcohol. 
What is the difference? Ask the establishment, for they can best tell you. 

Today's mighty manufacturers pollute our waters, our air our very en- 
vironment. Yet their lobbies are so powerful and influential that it seems a 
hopeless effort to halt their pollution. Again we wonder, where will it end? 

The ghettos are starving, yet the government pays our farmers not to grow food. 
Tne hungry wonder, where will it all end? 

So where are we headed? I don't know. I'm afraid because no matter which way 
my generation goes, I know that a little will rub off on me. It's the trend of the time 
so 111 go along with it. Yet the establishment stands there with his shoulders 
squared saying: "Why, when I was coming up, we never had it so easy ; we had to 
..." And tomorrow it will be the same. I'll want to know something about that long- 
haired radical thats taking my daughter out. I don't want my son bussed from here 
to East Hell just to desegregate. Suddenly, I find the generation gap from the other 
side. I find myself saying, "Why, when I was coming up ..." 

Ray Johnson 



Memories Of A Lost Cause 



My stay was brief, only 
because I realized my own 
mistake quickly. My error was 
continuing at DVC for more 
than one day. 

I have to be honest and admit 
that DVC does offer a lot for 
some people, but on the other 
hand ft offers nothing for the 
student who wants to get a 
social education. Book 
knowledge isn't everything. 
This, I gather, is not the feeling 
of our beloved programming 
staff. Learning Chemistry or 
Biology is good for part of your 
head, but much more practical 
knowledge is needed by every 
student who is attending your 
college. 

How many times can you say 
you've talked with your 
roommate or dormmates about 
anything that is going on in the 
world besides how many 
horsepower your friend's car is 
putting out? Let's face it, after 
graduation all of us will have a 
confront mis messed-up world 



To Whom It May Concern 

I have repeatedly heard a great number of students on this campus complaining, 
asking why DVC. is not like other colleges, and why Student Government isn't 
doning something about it. 
What about S.G.? 

Although I hate to disillusion you as to the workings of Student Government, it is 
working this year and working hard. It you took time out from your T. V. watching, 
your mischief, most of all your worthless bull sessions and complaining, and come 
to S.G. meetings or class meetings or club meetings, maybe you would begin to 
realize this fact. 

S.G. does not meet only on Monday evenings. It meets all week long, days and 
evenings, in small groups hashing out the ideas, discussing, making up recom- 
mendations, and compiling sound reasoning for the recommendations. 

Despite what you may feel or thing, recommendations as cuts, alcoholic 
beverages, open door, etc., cannot be written overnight. Research must be done, 
comparisons made, and analysis of possible complications or problems con- 
sidered. 
What about the college? 

Your complaints, your apathetic views, & your non-interest in everything from 
policy to sports have not and will not make changes for the better, only for the 
worse. This is your college, your education, your life, your activity. If you do not 
support this college, if you do not have pride in D.V.C., if you can, only think of 
your criticism and comparisons to other colleges, then why do you bother to say 

If you do have pride in D.V.C., and you want some improvements, why don't you 
work for them? 

There is a quote, "Let each become all he is capable of being." Are you 
becoming all you are capable of being? Are you making the most of the education 
you are getting? 

It was once said that those who help themselves shall prosper and achieve, those 
who don't shall be passed by. Which are you? Are you helping yourself? I think not. 
You are merely a mouth and a body, without a mind. 

You complain of lack of activities. Yet, when there were concerts you went 
home, at student-sponsored A-Day you went home, and at the football games there 
were too, too few students in attendance. 

You expect to be treated like mature induviduals and receive the privileges that 
other colleges might have. But are you yourselves acting like mature individuals, 
that is, actually thinking and reasoning, and working for accomplishment? 
Perhaps if you spoke with your mind and not merely with lots of words, and worked 
in studies and ideas, you would achieve your being, your maturity and those 
things you so bitterly criticize and repeatedly complain about. 

So, before you complain about D.V.C., look at yourself and improve that "self" 
first . You will be amazed at what you discover and the changes you will see around 



our parents have thrown into 
our laps. It's going to be very 
difficult thing for us to handle, 
especially with this limited 
education DVC is trying to 
pawn off on us. 

I hope you, the students of 
DVC who feel that there is need 
and room for change at this 
college, will step forward and 
remind the faculty and ad- 
ministration that "suppression 
breeds violence" and that a 
college operating with stan- 
dares that went out in 1940 will 
soon have to yield to the 
demands of the students, at 
tending DVC in the 1970's. 

Get it together, Aggies! 

Robert Raider 
Note: Today, November 10, 
1970, Bob has left DVC with the 
intention of making up for lost 
time. 

Dr. Feldstein is excepting 
suggestions for our new student 
union. 



you. 



Sincerely, 
Thomas D. Brewer 
Class of 1971 



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BARBER SALON 

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KERSHNER'S 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H KERSHNER, Ph. G. 

DOYLESTOWN, pa. 

Phone 348-4666 




Jke Juzzow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



— E 
EDITOR 

PHOTO EDITORS 
SPORTS EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
LAYOUT EDITORS 
DISTRIBUTION 
STUDENT GOV. EDITOR 



DITORIALSTAF 



F — 

Thomas C Pyle 

Dave Thomas, Bill Turner 

Lou Hegyes 

Jon Quick 

Nancy Dendler, Carol Finnie 

Rich Hmieleski, Barry Pistimer 

John Quinn 



— G ENERALSTAF F — 
David Tachman, Stan Dacko, Joe Russ, Drew Kotalic 

Pete Vicari, John Kolb, Hall Reitz, Ron Schmidt, 
Dave Wade, Larry Martel, Mick Morgan, John Sikina 



FACULTY ADVISOR 



— A D V I S O R — 

Dr. George Keys 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper are those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



November 20, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



EDITORIAL 



MOTIVATE WHOM? 

There is a lack of motivation on the part of the Faculty for the negative 
responsive relationship between students and Faculty in that they do not want 
students to ask questions and have free discourse with such high intellectual 
minds. 

Granted, the problems of class size and the amount of material to cover bear a 
close relationship to this lack of student-Faculty discourse; however, the Ad- 
ministration puts such a rigid requirement oh the Faculty members that they 
unknowingly relate a feeling of insecurity and disorganization to the students. 

The Administration provides the capital incentives for the Faculty, which the 
latter receive whether or not the students learn. The incentive of the students is 
one of five letters from A to F. Even these five letters no longer have an influencing 
factor on motivating the student. 

How can these students speak freely of an idea if at every conceptual thought he 
finds a large hammer of a voice and a sharp sickle in terms of grades ready to cut 
him from the roster if he speaks. This fear of failure hangs over the student's mind 
and makes him unwilling to compete. 

This creates the attitude, "If I sit back unnoticed, I may just skim through the 
stupid course", and in the long run the student probably will. But what has the 
student learned about his feelow students' ideas and what has the professor gained 
by not motivating this unnoticed student who has this fear of failure over his head? 

Maybe this is the time when it is up to the students to start motivating the 
professors. For example, ask questions when something is not clearly understood. 
Try to tear away from the informal group • sit up front and shock the professor into 
finally getting the material across so that everybody can understand it. 

Faculty-student rapport is needed and so is student-Faculty reapport. If there is 
an understanding between everyone, it will create a stronger atmosphere of 
motivation. 



CUT SYSTEM 
Continued From Page 1 



TODAY 

Continued From Page 1 



override the faculty's opinion radio and stations appearing at 

and pass it through. the game are WMMR, WDAS, 

Attending classes will be up WCAU, WFIL, and others. The 

to the student himself. It a doors will open at 6 p.m. and the 

student wants to waste his or game will start at 7 p.m. Ad- 

his parents money, he should be vanced ticket sale is $2.00 and 

allowed to. It is not up to the at the door they are $2.50. 

instructor to tell a student that Once again, all proceeds will 

he has to attend the instructor's go to TODAY. They really need 

classes. This should be the all the help they can get, and I 

student's own concern. can not think of a better way to 

John Quint spend the first part of a 
Saturday night. 

David Tachman 



Your School 



Newspaper 



Y. A. F. 



In this time of political crisis 
it is the responsibility of youth 
to affirm certain eternal truths. 
"Extremism in the defense of 
liberty is no vice." This is not a 
rationalized irrationality, but 
instead of self-defense stance, a 
position that unites all mem- 
bers of Young Americans for 
Freedom. 

Who or what is Y.A.F.? 
According to Joseph Rhoades, 
of the Presidential Commission 
on Campus Disorders, the 
Young Americans for Freedom 
is a student activitist group that 
supports campus violence as a 
political means. Needless to 
say, this type of attack is to be 
expected when dealing with 
Presidential commissions. On 
the record Y.A.F. is a group of 
young people, mostly students, 
who are dedicated to promoting 
the struggle for freedom. It is 
recognized as the only major 
student group presently 
engaging the totalitarian left in 
the nation-wide combat for the 
control of our campuses. 
Although branded as con- 
servatives, one finds that most 
Y.A.F. members are, in reality, 
card-carrying libertarians, but 
they should by no means be 
confused with anarchists. 



Howard's Jewelry Store 

35 E. State Strati 
"Opposite County Theatre" 

• CUSTOM MADE JEWELRY 
A SPECIALTY 

• WATCH end JEWELRY REPAIR 



348-4675 



Doyleetown, Pa. 



Formed in September of 1960, 
in Sharon, Connecticut, Young 
Americans for Freedom has 
been growing in size and 
strength for ten years until now 
it is recognized as the only 
effective and progressive op- 
position to S.D.S. (Students for 
a Democratic Society). Star- 
ting from a posture of vocal 
opposition towards those who 
would usurp academic 
freedom, Y.A.F. has evolved 
into the more militant phase of 
self-defensive tactics, which 
include both education and 
action. 

Even though D.V.C. is hardly 
a seething hotbed of political 
activity, we still are, as 
students, affected by decisions 
and occurrences on other 
campuses, and this is ad- 
mittedly an invitation to in- 
volvement. Should further 
information be desired on 
Y.A.F., make it a point to drop 
a line to Y.A.F., P.O. Box 625, 
D.V.C. or 1221 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
D.C. 20005. 



How many times have you 
had a complaint about school 
policies, cafeteria food, or 
something else pertaining to 
the school in general, but no one 
to hear you besides your 
roommate, or a fellow student? 
If this is your problem, it's your 
own fault, for the purpose of 
your school newspaper is to 
hear and publish your com- 
plaints so that they may be 
heard. 

The Furrow is now newly 
staffed and would like to bring 
about a change in its present 
policies and to bring new ideas 
to the students. As of now the 
paper has mainly been con- 
cerned with club news, sports, 
and student government 
reports. 

Whose fault is it? It is the 
fault of all the students here at 
DVC. The paper is presently 
staffed by fewer than twelve 
students, which is a very poor 



PLEASE 

PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



GAUDY'S 

The COLLECE SUPPLY STORE 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Main and State Sts. 
Doylestown, Pa. 



representation of a school with 
an enrollment of over a 
thousand. 

You don't have to be a 
Thomas Paine to have one of 
your articles printed in the 
paper. It you have an article of 
interest affecting the school, or 
its students, send it in. Simply 
insert it beneath the door of the 
Publications Office in the 
basement of Ulman Hall. 
Poems, themes, jokes, or 
anything else you think your 
fellow students might enjoy 
reading would be appreciated. 
We must get new writers with 
new ideas to submit articles to 
THE FURROW. This is the only 
way we can improve it, so if you 
have something of interest, 
don't be afraid to offer it for 
publication. 

Hall Reitz 

AGRONOMY TRIPS — but 
Doesn't Fall. 

On October 9 and 10 several 
members of the Agronomy Club 
went to the "Free State" in visit 
the University of Maryland's 
experimental farms. The in- 
formative tour was directed by 
Mr. John Shillinger who ably 
led the Aggies around resident 
farms as well as around those 
on the Carroll Estate. 

Later that Friday the club 
journeyed to the Wye Institute 
where we viewed soybean and 
forage experiments. It might be 
pointed out here that Friday 
evening found some of the club 
in the waters of the 
Chesapeake. 

On the tenth the club moved 
on to the Remington Farms 
which are operated by the 
Remington Arms Company. 
There we viewed a film entitled 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



November 20, 1970 



AGRONOMY 

Continued From Page 3 

"The Farm" which dealt with 
aspects of wildlife and 
watersheds. All in all, it was a 
successful trip for members of 
the club and Dr. Prundeanu. 



INTRAMURAL INTERESTS 
By Drew Kotolic 

At press time Dorm 1 and 
Elson Hall were fighting for the 
top notch in dorm football 
action. Elson has been the all 
around team. And have yet to 
be scored upon. It has the 1-2 
punch of offense and defense. 
The following scores should 
prove a point: 

Elson 24 - Wolfson 

Elson 18 - Ulman 

Elson 20 - Work 

Elson 6 - Barness 

Dorm 1 has an unblemished 
record thus far also. They have 
beaten Ulman III 12-6; Barness 
20-14; Wolfson 21-0 and Cooke 6- 
0. 



TEAMS W 



PSPDS 



Dorml 5 79 27 

Elson 4 68 

Ulman III 3 1 70 25 

Barness 2 2 58 26 

Ulman 1 3 9 60 
Work 1 3 7 

Work 1 3 7 59 

Cooke 3 13 33 

Wolfson 4 74 









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• 
• 

6 

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ICo G?T3 « Z3l k: o 


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VENTURA 1300 
ALSO 1150 TO 1975 
WEDDING RING $50 

ewelry — Watches 
Gifts — Greeting Cards 
Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Rep* 

7 avuUi'd 

>yle«town Shopping Contei 
i Discount to D.V.C. Studeri 



WMMR vs. FBI 

The staff of WMMR-FM, the 
Philadelphia rock station 
displayed a lack of athletic 
ability in their football game 
with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation on Sunday, 
November 8, at Belmont 
Plateau in Fairmont Park, 
Philadelphia. The final score of 
the game was 42-0, with the FBI 
winning the game numerically, 
but with WMMR scoring a 
moral victory. The main reason 
for their defeat, claimed a 
WMMR spokesman, was a lack 
of practice. The FBI is playing 
almost every Sunday, whereas 
WMMR played for the first 
time this Sunday. 

The FBI was composed 
almost entirely of young men, 
with short hair, blue sweat- 
shirts, and lots of spirit. The 
WMMR crew were somewhat 
older looking, mostly with long 
hair, and out just to have a good 
time. They succeeded at that, 
and just about everyone there 
enjoyed himself too. 

There was a reasonably good 
turnout for the game, ap- 
proximately two thousand 
people, the majority being 
young, long-haired freaks. The 
crowd was spirited, and almost 
everyone was rooting for the 
"good guys" of WMMR. There 
were small groups of cheering 
sections scattered throughout 
the crowd, singing or playing 
college songs, Souza marches, 
and sundry old television show 
themes with kazoos, tam- 
berines, empty wine bottles, 
and anything else that hap- 
pened to be handy. 

DVC was represented both in 
the spectator's section and on 
the field. Mike Czarnecki, a day 
student here, volunteered his 
services at half time and joined 
the WMMR team. He made 
some key blocks and lead the 
rest of the team in rushing. He 
was the biggest man on the 
field, and seemingly walked on 
the comparatively small FBI 
men. 

The entire game was marred 
by only one injury. An FBI 
agent collided with one of his 
teammates and split his 
eyebrow open, covering his 
face with blood. The Park 
Police brought their van onto 
the field, and loaded the injured 
agent into the truck. Then one 
officer of the law asked the 
crowd for directions to the 
hospital. The game continued 
after this brief interlude with 



renewed vigor, but no more 
injuries resulted. 

Belmont Plateau is a large 
field with several rolling hills, 
all surrounded by trees. If 
you're ever looking for 
something to do on a Sunday 
afternoon, why don't you take a 
trip there. Take along a frisbee 
or a football, meet some people, 
make some friends, start a 
game, and enjoy a leisurely 
afternoon in the city park. The 
people there are quite different 
from those in Doylestown or on 
campus at DVC. 



Lou's 



Views 



The Philadelphia 76ers this 
season are running a series of 
College Nights, on which 
college students will receive a 
$1 reduction on $4, $3, and $2 
seats. 

Students will receive the 
reduction upon showing an I. C. 
card, either at the Spectrum 
starting at 6:30 p.m. or at The 
Sheraton anytime until 3 p.m. 
on the day of the game. 

The list of remaining College 
Nights: 

Sat. Nov. 21 vs Phoenix 
Sat. Jan. 2 vs Boston 
Fri. Jan. 8 vs Los Angles 
Fri. Jan 15 vs Chicago 
Tues. Feb. 23 vs Portland 
Sat. Mar. 6 vs Detroit 

Don't forget the Alpha Phi 
Omega sponsored Benefit 
Basketball Game on Sat. Nov. 
21 at 7 p.m. at Newman Gym. 
The Admission proceeds go to 
the Newtown Drug 

Rehabilatation Center and its a 
great chance to see your 
favorite radio and television 
personalities in action on the 
court. Come out for all the 
laughs and help the Drug 
Rehabilatation Center. 

Congratulations to the ten 
graduating seniors on the 
football team for a job well 
done. Even though this season 
ended with a 1-7 record these 
seniors have helped the team 
immeasurably in the past four 
seasons. The seniors include 
Captain Don Chance, Alex 
Vargo, Glenn Hawkswell, Dave 
Hagberg, Ben Harvey, John 
Echternach, Rich Russell, 
Steve Deppen, Jerry Virostek 
and Dom Cherchio. 

For those who plan to play 
intramural basketball, sign up 
now. Entries will be accepted 
up until Nov. 25. 



Roger W. Kraut 

Jeweler 

• REED and BARTON - LUNT - 
WALLACE - STERLING, «tc. 

• OMEGA - LONGINES - 
ACCUTRON, tic. 

WATCH-CLOCK-JEWELRY-DIAMONDS 

REPAIRING 

348-4884 

31 West State Street Doylestown 



HARRIERS 6-6 
By Lou Hegyes 

The Delaware Valley College 
cross country team split in a tri- 
angular meet with PMC and 
Washington College. The 
Aggies were defeated by PMC 
15-43 and dumped Washington 
1845. 

Freshman Bruce Pratt was 
the Green and Gold's top 
runner with a 6th place finish. 
Other Aggies placing were Don 
Murphy (7), Jim LaBaugh (9), 
Joe Schiavo (10) and Ray 
Funkhouser (11). The final 
regular season record is 6-6, the 
first .500 or above season in four 
years for the harriers. 

The season winds up on Nov. 
20 in Philadelphia at the MAC 
Championships. Coach Ber- 
thold will be taking his top 
seven runners. 



THE DUTCH 

MAID 
LAUNDERERS 

Coin-Op. 
LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 

191 S. Clinton St. 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 
348-5072 DOYLESTOWN 18901 



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A NEW NAME 

FOR OUR PAPER. 

PLACE UNDER 

PUBLICATIONS DOOR. 

WINNER RECEIVES $5. 



the 




ROW 



Vol. 18, No. 4 



The Student Weekly Newspaper 
Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture December 16, 1970 



A New Committee 
For Complaints 



There is now a new committee 
which will take care of the com- 
plaints the students have about the 
professors. The members of the 
committee are: Chairman David 
Farrar, Samuel 110; Richard Wil- 
son, Wolfsohn 27; John Spiegel, 
Wolfsohn 5; Thomas Logan, Elson 
27; and Thomas Brewer, Goldman 
226. If anyone has any complaints 
about a professor, he should see 
one of the members or go to one 
of the meetings and state his com- 
plaint. The committee will an- , 
nounce beforehand all meetings. 

If there are a number of com- 



plaints about a professor, the com- 
mittee will write a letter and in it 
will be stated the complaints they 
have received. Then the letter will 
be given to Dr. Feldstein who will 
give it to that professor. If they 
still get complaints about the pro- 
fessor, they will take stronger ac- 
tions against the professor. 

The students should first try to 
talk the problem over with the pro- 
fessor. If this fails, then go and 
talk it over with the committee. 
The committee will do the best it 
can, but don't think that it will be 
able to solve all your complaints. 



One Year 
Anniversary 
For A.A.U P 

The Delaware Valley College 
Chapter of the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors has 
been in existence for one year. The 
A.A.U.P. is a professional organiza- 
tion for faculty members of higher 
institutional learning in the United 
States. There are 84 chapters in the 
state of Pennsylvania with 8,000 
members. 

The D.V.C. faculty organized the 
chapter only last year even though 
the college has been eligible for a 
chapter since 1962. The local chap- 
ter was formed with the* approval of 
the administration of the college. 
There are 44 faculty members 
which include approximately 69 
percent of the faculty. 

The objective of the A.A.U.P. 
is to improve the educational ele- 
ment on campus. It should be not- 
ed that the A.A.U.P. is not a labor 
union or a federation; the chapter 
does not hold strikes. The D.V.C. 
chapter meets once a month. Some 
of the committees that exist are: 
academic affairs, academic free- 
dom, faculty tenure, and faculty 
promotion. The committees present 
their resolutions at the regular col- 



lege faculty meetings. Some of the 

resolutions that were passed last 

year were: the faculty lounge, a 

choice of two instead of one pen- 
sion plans, a published salary sche- 
dule, and an agreement on ending 
the student citizenship grade. 

The chapter serves as a catalyst 
for the faculty, aiming at improv- 
ing open discussion and faculty 
participation. The officers for this 
year are: Peter Glick, President; 
Ronald Deering, Vice President; 
Donald Iglsrud, Treasurer; and 
David Blumenfield, Kenneth Strat- 
ton, and George West, Directors. 



Dairy 

Judging Team 

Places Third 

Delaware Valley College's Dairy 
Judging Team started its 70-71 sea- 
son by going to the Eastern State 
Intercollegiate Contest held at 
Springfield, Massachusetts, on Sep- 
tember 19. The team placed third 
out of nine teams. They went on to 
the All-American Intercollegiate 
Judging Contest at Harrisburg, Pa., 
placing sixth out of eight teams. 
Fred Harteis was High Individual 
in the Brown Swiss Breed. On 
October 12 the team placed eighth 
out of thirty-two teams at the Na- 
tional Intercollegiate Judging Con- 
test at Columbus, Ohio. The high 
team in Guernseys was Tom Boyer 
who tied for High Individual in 
Guernseys. Members of the team 
were Tom Boyer, Ray Breneman, 
Fred Harteis, Guy Hitz, Jim Mus- 
ser and Warren Thomas. 

On December 9th the Dairy and 
Block and Bridle Clubs will hold 
their annual banquet at the Col- 
legeville Inn. The Dairy Club will 
be sponsoring the speaker for the 
event. 

The club is now in the process of 
drawing up a petition to form a 
Student Affiliate Branch Club of 
the American Dairy Science Asso- 
ciation and planning a mixer 
sometime in the near future. 

by Gino LaBruzzo 




Intercollegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Team (first row, left to right), Gary Hitz, 
Fred Harties, Jim Muster, Tom Boyer; (second row), R. Smith, coach; Warren 
Thomas, Ray Breneman. 



S.G. 
TRIALS 



After speaking with several SG 
representatives, I found out several 
things that I think every student 
at DVC should know. 

How many times have you had 
to borrow a car, or bum a ride, or 
get hung up while hitch-hiking in 
town with a load of laundry? When 
the idea of a laundramat on cam- 
pus was first investigated, the ad- 
ministration informed SG that there 
wasn't an adequate water supply, 
which SG soon disproved. Follow- 
ing this, the school informed SG 
that we weren't hooked up to a 
sewer line* Now that we are hook- 
ed up to one, the school claims 
there is insufficient drainage. If 
there is a real demand for a laun- 
dramat, we just might get one. 
Come on, Aggies, speak out and 
be heard. Complain, and maybe we 
won't have to make that boring trek 
to "Dullsburg" to do a wash. 

Second is the student question- 
naires, which are now being cir- 
culated. Be heard! Fill them out 
honestly and return th«-m to SG. 
There are two polls. One is already 
distributed, and another is now be- 
ing made. This poll will be asking 
for your opinion about a new school 
calendar. We all know that a new 
one is needed. Now SG will have 
an idea of exactly what we are 
thinking and proof that can be 
presented to the administration 
supporting new ideas. The results 
of these ballots will be published 
so that you, too, will know what 
your fellow Aggies are thinking. 

Finally, I'd like to discuss con- 
certs at DVC. As of today, the win- 
ter concert is still undecided. Mc- 
kenzy Spring and Big Brother are 
being investigated. 

There is a new idea for concerts 
here this year. It is possible that all 
four classes and SG will combine 
their resources and have an outdoor 
concert during A-Day weekend. 
The groups being investigated are 
Livingston Taylor and either Ten 
Wheel Drive, who put on a fabu- 
lous concert last year, or the Ides 
of March, an up-and-coming group 
which has several good, but un- 
known, cuts to its credit. 

In conclusion, we ask that you 
support SG and its functions. Also, 
feel free to speak up either at SG 
meetings or through your paper, 
The Furrow. 

Ron Schmidt 



Page Two 



THE FURROW 



December 16, 1970 



Kenny's 
News Agency 

OVER 20,000 TITLES 

to fulfill your reading needs 

17 W. STATE STREET 
348-5072 DOYLESTOWN 18901 



S. G. Court 
Precedent 

November 17 found the Student 
"Kourt" at odds with Hall Reitz 
and crew. 

You all know Hall, the famed 
nemesis of orderly dining halls. 
( According to informed sources he 
has been nominated for the honor 
of being 1970 Collegiate Roll- 
Throwing Champion.) 

Hall was summoned to Kourt for 
having committed the heinous 
crime of "casting bread to the 
winds". 

The defendant engaged the ser- 
vices of a bailiff, Ron Schmidt, and 
a lawyer, Dave Wade. Announce- 
ments were strategically placed, in- 
viting fellow students to the trial. 
In order to place the case in per- 
spective, it was only fitting and 
proper that the threesome be at- 
tired for the occasion. 

The trial was scheduled for late 
in the afternoon. As trial time near- 
ed, the spectators became restless, 
and it was being rumored that the 
defendant was armed with a water 
pistol. Lawyer and defendant were 
having numerous pre-trial confer- 
ences. This, in addition to the 
mounting tension of the packed 
courtroom, had obviously placed a 
strain on court officials. Was there 
a conspiracy to forcefully free the 
prisoner before his trial commen- 
ced? 

Finally the defense's case was 
called. The case was introduced, 
and what ensued proved to be to 
the amusement of all. As the trial 
progressed, it became necessary for 
the Kourt to postpone it, to be con- 
tinued later behind closed doors, 
due to active audience participa- 
tion. No doubt they were over- 
whelmed with enthusiasm for the 
defense. At the time of this writing 
the trial is yet to be concluded. 

As an afternote it should be men- 
tioned that the lawyer was prompt- 
ly summoned to the Kourt for 
"mocking the Student Court", and 
the entire defense was called before 
the Student Affairs Committee. At 
the time of this writing Hall, Ron, 
and Dave are still awaiting the 
administration's decision on their 
fate. 

Dave Wade 



Work In Europe 
This Summer 

Job opportunities in Europe this summer . . . Work this summer in the forests 
of Germany, on construction in Austria, on farms in Germany, Sweden and Denmark, 
on road construction in Norway, in Industries in France and Germany, in hotels in 
Switzerland. 

Well there are these jobs available as well as jobs in Ireland, England, France, 
Italy, and Holland are open by the consent of the governments of these countries to 
American university students coming to Europe die next summer. 

For several years students made their way across the AUantic through A.E.S.- 
Service to take part in the actual life of the people of these countries. The success 
of this project has caused a great deal of enthusiastic interest and support both in 
America and Europe. 

Every year, the program has been expanded to include many more students and 
jobs. Already, many students have made application for next summer jobs. American- 
European Student Service (on a non-profitable basis) is offering these jobs to stu- 
dents for Germany, Scandinavia, England, Austria, Switzerland, France, Italy, and 
Spain. The jobs consist of forestry work, child care work (females only), farm work, 
hotel work (limited number available), construction work, and some other more 
qualified jobs requiring more specialized training. 

The purpose of this program is to afford the student an opportunity to get into 
real living contact with the people and customs of Europe. In this way, a concrete 
effort can be made to learn something of the culture of Europe. In return for his or 
her work, the student will receive his or her room and board, plus a wage. However, 
students should keep in mind that they will be working on the European economy 
and wages will naturally be scaled accordingly. The working conditions ( hours, safety, 
regulations, legal protection, work permits) will be strictly controlled by the labor 
ministries of the countries involved. 

In most cases, the employers have requested especially for American students. 
Hence, they are particularly interested in the student and want to make the work as 
interesting as possible. 

They are all informed of the intent of the program, and will help the student all 
they can in deriving the. most from his trip to Europe. 

Please write for further information and application forms to: American- 
European Student - Service, Box 34733, FL 9490 Vaduz, Liechtenstein (Europe). 




A-Day 
Committee 

Yes, May 1, 1971, is not just 
around the corner according to the 
calendar, but for the A-Day Com- 
mittee it is. Much work in advanced 
planning is now being done. Print- 
ing of tickets, posters and pro- 
grams must be arranged. Arrange- 
ments for tents, awards, booths, 
food stands, food and prizes must 
also be undertaken now. The one 
major obstacle in any undertaking 
such as this is HELP. To perform 
these obligations, hands are need- 
ed. These hands come from but one 
source— the student body. Through 
the many clubs on campus repre- 
sentatives are provided to form 
what is known as the A-Day Com- 
mittee. This has now, as in the past, 
proved to be inefficient since, al- 
though two representatives are re- 
quested, only one and sometimes 
none at all shows up for meetings. 
In the past it has been a sort of 
general rule that to be on the 
A-Day Committee one must be a 
chosen representative of a club. 
This year, nowever, I should like to 
extend an invitation to any mem- 
ber of the student body who might 
desire to be a part of the commit- 
tee. Possibly there are a few stud- 
ents who could give us arw ideas 
or help with old ones. Anyone who 
wishes to participate, please feel 
free to attend our meetings, usual- 
ly held on the first Monday of 
every month. Signs will be posted 
in various buildings on campus. 

Thank you, 

John Furphy 

Chairman, A-Day Committee 



RUDOLPH'S 
ARMY & NAVY STORE 

Headquarters for Work and 
Draw Clothing 

STA-PREST LEE LEENS 
THOM McAN SHOES 
CONVERSE SNEAKERS 

Main and Oakland Streets 
Doylestown, Pa. 

348-5230 



Hall Reitz (center), Dave Wade (below), 
and Ron Schmidt (left), at court with 
several interested friends. 



SUPPORT 
THE 

STUDENT 

UNION 

FUND 




7&* 'Jutiow 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



-EDITORIAL STAFF- 
EDITOR Thomas C. Pyle 

PHOTO EDITORS Davo Thomas, Bill Turnar 

SPORTS EDITOR Lew Hegyes 

BUSINESS MANAGER Jon Quick 

LAYOUT EDITORS Nancy Dandier, Carol F'mnie 

DISTRIBUTION Rich Hmieleskl, Barry Piatimer 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT EDITOR John Qwinn 

-GENERAL STAFF- 

David Tachman, Stan Dacke, Joe Ross, Drew Kotelic, 

Pete Vicari, John Kolb, Hall Reitt, Ron Schmidt, 
Dave Wade, Larry Mattel, Mick Morgan, John Sikina 

-ADVISOR- 
FACULTY ADVISOR , Dr. George Keys 

It should be noted that the opinions expressed in this newspaper ere those of 
the respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the college. 



December 16, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Three 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 

NEW CUT SYSTEM 

Dear Mr. Quinn, 

You have done more with a few hours of careless preparation for your article 
to hinder the proposed attendance policy than I can comprehend. The Student 
Government Committee has heen working on a new policy since last Thanksgiving 
and I am not going to allow a shallow, biased article to snuff out the chances of 
our proposed change before the faculty and administration have the opportunity to 
read it. 

To begin with, Delaware Valley College is not a prison, and a new attendance 
policy is not constructed to let you "cut out of Saturday classes for a weekend." If 
this is as deep as your interest in college life goes, then von are not yet ready for 
college life. The new policy is constructed to give our student body more responsibi- 
lity yet to retain faculty control over classes, not to emancipate the student nor to 
disregard the faculty member. 

Mr. Quinn, you stated in your article that I have my doubts, and this is true; 
I do have doubts about this policy, but you interpreted my doubts to the point where 
you stated: "David Farrar . . . is hoping the administration will override faculty 
opinion and pass it through." Mr. Quinn, do you realize what you have said? You 
have just tola our faculty that their opinions in this matter are going to be com- 
pletely disregarded! This is the biggest falsehood I have ever heard. The attendance 
policy directly involves both the student and the faculty member. True, it is an 
administrative decision, but it involves the entire educational system of the college. 

This system is one of forty (not two hundred) that our committee has surveyed. 
All of the colleges surveyed are M.A.C. colleges about the same size as Delaware 
Valley College. The Susquehanna University policy is, in the opinion of the com- 
mittee, the most functional system we have found. I see no reason why our faculty 
won't accept this system. The Dean of the college at Susquehanna wrote me I letter 
in which be stated: "since the adoption of this attendance policy, two years ago, 
there has been no noticeable drop in classroom attendance or in academic achieve- 
ment." 

If the system works at Susquehanna, I see no reason why it won't work at 
Delaware Valley College. 

I hope this letter sets straight Ixfore our faculty and student body the purpose 
behind our proposed change. 

Mr. Quinn before you begin to interpret another man's statements, please con- 
sider the effects you may have. I pray that no one takes your article seriously and 
that this one can repair the damage you have carelessly caused. 

ATTENDANCE POLICY 

1. Regular attendance at all scheduled classes and laboratory periods and other 
assignments is expected of every student. 

2. There will be no excused or unexcused absences; the number of absences is 
unlimited. In this sense the system is an "Unlimited system. However, there 
are certain stipulations. 

ft. The professor will be expected to take roll in each of his classes and labora- 
tory periods. 

b. If the professor finds a student excessively cutting his class AND main- 
taining a low grade average, the professor can require this student to attend 
class. 

c. If the student continues to cut class, he must appear before the dean of 
the college and the dean of students. 

d. If the student cannot defend himself to the satisfaction of the deans, he may 
then be dropped from that course. 

It is the feeling of the Student Government "Cut Committee" that tlvs policy 
will satisfy both the faculty and student. The policy gives the student more freedom 
yet retains the professor's control over his class. 

David C. Farrar, 1972 




j, 



•ft. ft «T YPV4 

DoVLCSTbwfo.po- +r 




ftU 4.98 ALBUMS 

NOW 2.99 

plus all oTheRs 




Bells D*esses| 

SHtltl** Tops 

Belte 



Beurb 




HERMITS AND A MESSY CAMPUS 

May I suggest that the Student Government at D.V.C. take some constructive 
action concerning the way that many students are destroying the beauty of our 
campus. Walking over the grass in such an obvious place as the area between Elson 
Hall and the Dining Hall is entirely unnecessary. Any student on the campus who 
is so lazy that he cannot walk a few more steps to get to the dining hall should be 
penalized and fined according to existing regulations and/or be made to replace the 
area devoid of grass. This is only one of many such areas on campus. I see no reason 
why anyone (faculty included), has to walk on the grass except when some of the 
existing unpaved walks become sloppy from rain or snow. Such walks should be paved. 

Student Government should also take action to eliminate the littering of the 
campus (especially outside the Student Snack Bar). I pick up cans and bottles almost 
every day around Segal Hall, thanks to some lazy students who can't seem to bother 
to put them in a trash can! To these students, I say, this is your campus, so how about 
taking a little pride in it? The off-campus students litter the parking area below 
Mandell. Perhaps a few more trash cans are in order there! 

On another matter concerning grooming, the original agreement with the ad- 
ministration was that sideburns and long hair would be permissible if kept neat, 
in moderation and carried out with some discretion on the part of the student. 
There seem to be a goodly number of students on campus at present looking like 
hermits and tramps, who have not complied at all with the above stipulations. Their 
appearances and, in some cases, their attitudes are a disgrace to themselves, the 
College, parents and alumni. Why doesn't the Student Government enforce the 
original agreement with the administration? If some action is not taken soon, I 
think the whole idea should be stopped — no long hair and no sideburns! 

A final thought concerning cuts. Faculty and administration agreed last year to 
do away with double cuts before and after holidays. Otherwise, the faculty and 
administration agreed on the present cut system. If some students do not agree, that 
is their privilege, but it is not their responsibility to decide such matters. They are 
not teaching the courses. Before the students consult with faculty or administration 
again, all parents should be contacted to see how they feel. Recent graduates should 
also be contacted. They have gone through four years at D.V.C. What are their views 
on the present cut system? I believe there are still some small colleges which do not 
permit any cuts. So what if Susquehanna College has unlimited cuts? Such a policy 
is* not necessarily an improvement! 

David E. Benner, Instructor 
Orn. Hort. Department 




APO members at the Blue vs. Gold Basketball game. 

RANDOM THOUGHTS OF A MOTHER READING THE FURROW 
FOR THE FIRST TIME . . . NOVEMBER 20, 1970 ISSUE 

The article "Today" caught my eye first — but where is the end of the story? — 
Ah, found on Page 3. 

"Cut System" in next column led me back to first page — Some interesting read- 
ing — Susquehanna College's system sounds good to me too — Why be afraid to put 
the responsibility for learning on the student and the responsibility for enthusiastic 
teaching on the faculty? John, better speak to the printer, you were continued on 
Page 3 not Page 2. 

"Cut System" brings to mind problems of commuting students — bad weather 
brings out a rash of car troubles (at least in our family). The first bitter cold day 
or heavy snow and all we get from the car is the razzzzzberries. About lunch time 
when the sun finally comes out and smiles on us, the car does likewise and starts 
with a purr. Take Pop to work, drop off sister at work, and half hour to school and 
back for one class. New cut system could help here too. Of course, we are the small 
minority there, but we are there, aren't we? 

On to "Letters to the Editor." A standing ovation for Ray Johnson. He writes 
my own thoughts exactly. We could all throw up our hands and say "What's the 
use?" but "Thank God" most of us are not made that way and will continue to light 
our small candle in a vast darkness. 

Editorial "Motivate Whom?" Why are some teachers great on motivating? Why 
are some people so enthusiastic about life in general? Why do some teachers really 
care? Why do some people go out of their way to not become involved? People are 
human beings. Students are people. Tethers are people. Administrators are people. 
COME ON, PEOPLE. GIVE A LITTLE. 

WMMR vs FBI column— chuckle, chuckle. A little tongue in cheek? This kind 
of sports reporting I like. 

HAL: You wanted contributions — this may not be what you consider a con- 
tribution but, at least, one person knows one paper got home and one mother read it. 

I'll get a "comeon, Mom. Cut it out" from my son, so you'd better sign me. 

— One Mother 



Page Four 



THE FURROW 



December 16, 1970 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



In reply to an article in the November 20, 1970 issue of the Furrow I would like 
to raise a few questions concerning the Student Government. 

For the Student Government's information there are some very interested students 
that are doing more than causing mischief or holding bull sessions. We are working 
very hard to organize a horse club that will be beneficial not only to those in the 
club but to anyone who is in anyway interested in horses. The only problem that we 
have had so far is to have the Student Government approve our constitution. It has 
been well over three weeks now since I handed a representative of the Student 
Government a copy of our constitution. 

At the November 30 meeting of S. G. a proposal was made to have the adminis- 
tration make some kind of decision on S. G. recommendations within a month. How 
can the S. G. make such demands on the administration when they themselves cannot 
vote on a club constitution in the same amount of time. 

It was stated in the article that there is no student body interest in the school. 
This seems very funny coming from a member of Student Government. If he will 
go back to the November 23 meeting he will remember that a majority of the S. G. 
representatives did not have enough interest to show up for the weekly meeting and 
therefore the meeting was never held. How can the student body stand behind an 
organization that has members who don't have enough ambition or pride to attend 
meetings? 

WHO HAS NO INTEREST? 

At the November 30 meeting of S. G. it was also brought up that the Student 
Government has no power at all Who's fault is that? There is an old saying, "A 
chain is only as strong as its weakest link." From what I have seen by the attendance 
at the November 23 and 30 meetings it is a wonder that the chain called S. G. can 
hold up its own weight. 

I concede that there are a few members of the S. G. that are hard workers and 
are doing a tremendous job of doing their work and the work of the non-interested 
members. To these people I'd like to offer my sincere thanks for trying to make 
DVC a better school. To the others I can only say that I'm sorry that they were put 
into positions that they cannot handle. 

To the members of Student Government I would like to say, "Try taking a good 
long objective look at yourselves and see if you are not doing the same thing which 
you are trying to change. When you finish taking that look remember that weak links 
can be replaced to make the chain strong and durable enough to stand up under 
the stress of changing times. 

Sincerely, 
Jack Roszel 
Class of 72 



Dear Friends and Fellow Students, 

Our campus sits along the northwest edge of Escambia Bay, 'y/hich empties into 
the Gulf of Mexico at Pensacola, Florida. So far this year, Escambia Bay has suffered 
over 60 major fish kills, each one of close to or more than a million fish — food fish, 
sport fish, 'commercial fish', you name it. 

These kills have been traced to industries and municipalities just north of and 
on the bay, which have been using the Escambia River and the bay for a dump. One 
such industry is Monsanto Co., which, as of January, 1970, was dumping into the 
river, and the bay, the following wastes: 

10,000 Ibs./day 5 day biological oxygen demand 
3,900 Ibs./day total organic carbon 
1,875 UWday TKN 
1,331 Ibs./day nitrite nitrogen 
1,104 Ibs./day ammonia nitrogen and nitrite 

421 lbsyday total phosphate 

264 fcs./day ortho phosphate 

One of Monsanto's most advertised and ecologically deleterious products is 
Astro Turf, an artificial grass; some of its other products are Arochbr (1250) com- 
pounds and herbicides. Because our public officials have been tragically slow to 
respond, and because citizen initiated 'pollution control' legislation is being succes- 
sively weakened and stifled, and will have only moderate 'success' if ever passed, 
we have concluded that only economic sanctions can force the industries involved to 
re-cycle their wastes and quit using the Escambia River — the public domain — for a 
dump. 

We intend to take sanctions against all industries, of which there are six locally, 
dumping into the Escambia River and the bay. To establish our effectiveness, we 
have decided to begin by calling for a boycott of Astro Turf, the Monsanto product 
that depends most heavily on the college market. We desperately need your support. 
There is nothing less at stake than the bay itself — the bay which is a integral part of 
our biosphere, is essential to a balanced environment. 

It doesn't take much thought to realize that Escambia Bay is about as important 
to you as it is to us. By supporting our boycott you not only deny revenue to an 
enemy of the bay, you also help assert, for once, that our waters and our skies are not 
dumps, and that even large industries must be held responsible for their wastes. 

— We ask that you put up with natural grass for a good while longer; 

— We ask that you compel your friends and local industries not to buy Astro Turf 
and other Monsanto products; 

— We very respectfully and urgendy request that you obtain, through your student 
government and alumni associations, a binding, official promise not to purchase 
Astro Turf until Monsanto quits dumping its wastes into Escambia River and 
Escambia Bay. 

— We recommend that before you or your college administration buy any other 
sort of artificial grass, you determine that manufacturer is not, like Monsanto, 
using the environment for a dump. 

We need your active response to this appeal, even if you have no need at your 
institution for Astro Turf. Your support is urgently requested. Please send us Wifica- 
tion of your administration's promise not to purchase Astro Turf as soon as it .an be 
obtained. 

Responsible Env. Act Program 
P. O. Box 294 
Gonzalez, Fla. 32560 
November 11, 1970 



EDITOR'S NOTE: This is one of a series of three articles submitted as a project 
for the Retail Management course, based upon the student store. The past managers 
have evaded previous suggestions. I hope the present managers will evaluate this 
year's ideas. 

As a student returning to school after being away for several years, I was not 
amazed to find that the student store had been moved. After questioning a few 
people I was directed to the basement of Ulman Hall. This building is located in 
about the center of the college community. Once inside the building I ventured into 
the basement to inspect the store. 

In an age of high-pressure salesmen, bright neon lights, and highways bordered 
on both sides by endless rows of billboards, our store doesn't even have a shingle 
to mark the entranceway. I realize that this is only a student store, but let us con- 
sider a few important facts. People today are influenced by advertisements and 
instincts. I am always leary of shabby gas stations or ill-kept store fronts. This type 
of thing creates an image in one's mind that the proprietor has no regard for his 
business or his customers. Therefore, the goods or products he supplies are probably 
cheap or shabby also. The outward appearance of a retail outlet can induce an 
interest in people to know what is inside, convey a feeling of confidence in the 
customer, or in many cases set the person in a buying mood. 

Under the circumstances there are a few things that could be done. Let's give 
the shop a name. Names are easily remembered and in some instances give a clue 
to the location or type of store. An example could be the "Grotto", "Snake Pit", or 
"Cellar Sales". A shingle could be hung from the doorway perpendicular to the 
direction of the hallway. This would command the immediate attention of anyone 
coming down stairs from either direction. 

The primary doorway has no door. Once inside it there is a door to your left 
and right. The one to the left goes into the store and the other to a storage area. 
If the entrance to the primary doorway were fitted with a glass door, this newly 
created space could be used as an area to display some of the goods to be sold while 
the outlet is closed. This, in addition to giving display area, would add to the security 
of the store by addition of another door, provide a place to advertise names and 
store hours plus add a hint of a little prosperity. 

The interior of the store, in my estimation, is perhaps one of the best examples 
of poor "retail mix" in the Delaware Valley. The floorspace, though it is small, is 
used to its greatest disadvantage. Counters are used in food stores, butcher markets 
and Gino's. People who are shopping today seem to want to handle and inspect 
the goods before buying. They are at times reluctant to ask to see things, so in fact 
if the wares are behind counters they tend to draw less interest. The counter bisecting 
the room from east to west is probably the most prominent item in the room. It is 
quite evident that although the walls are full, the floor space has no function except 
to provide walking area for the sales personnel. 

Let's remove the green counter. Put the soft pretzel machine next to the freezer 
on the east wall. In the middle of the entire room there could be located a tiered- 
type shelf. It could contain pens, pencils, protractors, straight edges, "T" squares, 
mugs, glassware, candy and some of the doming. The cash register could be located 
at one end nearest the exit with the cigarettes and jewelry. The space under the 
counter could be used to store some of the articles that are now stored under the 
green counter plus those now on the floor behind the counter. Thus the walls would 
be less cluttered, and more artistic taste could be used in its arrangement. The 
corners could contain those revolving stands now used to display the cards. 

Now that we have made better use of the floor space we can allow the shopper 
to browse, handle, and contemplate the articles we wish to sell. The atmosphere 
will now be more like that of a small specialty shop. 

In addition to being neater the store would be more efficient, easier to clean, 
have higher sales and be an asset to the school and the student body. 



Dear Sirs: 

If I am not misinterpreting Mr. Good's article of Nov. 13 ("The Peace Symbol"), 

his argument is this: The present peace symbol has a long history of anti-Christian as- 
sociations. Therefore, we ought to adopt a symbol with more favorable associations, 
the Cross. 

» First, I would like to point out that symbols are mutable. We can change their 
use and make them represent whatever we wish. Since the peace symbol does repre- 
sent activist pacificism to the public today, it seems to be working well. In fact, the 
great amount of research needed to inform the reader of the forgotten historical 
associations proves that the symbol has now changed its meaning. Unless Mr.* Good 
is saying that symbols become somehow tainted by association, I see no objection to 
its current use. 

Second, it is interesting that Mr. Good intimates that the Cross, while it has 
always been one of the best known symbols of the Western world, it not associated 
with peace. A quick glance through any history book would seem to give us an 
explanation for this strange fact. The Crusades, the Inquisition, the Salem Witch 
Trials, and a host of other Christian Wars and persecutions show that all of the 
blood on the cross is not Christ's. Since these events are not obscure enough to re- 
quire research, we can see why it is harder to associate the Cross with peace than 
with the current symbol. 

Beyond these, the article has raised another; more important question. On the 
day after its publication, I heard several persons say that it should never have been 
printed. This was due to the slanted references to Bertrand Russell as well as to 
the argument presented. While it is true that Mr. Russell is best known for things 
other than "his anti-God, pro-Communism sic beliefs," and, while he, himself, was 
the victim of oppression by Cross-carriers, I do not think that he would have ob- 
jected to the publication of this article. Anyone interested in the truth, as Mr. 
Russell was, realizes that it is only through the publication of all viewpoints that 
an acceptable one is found. 

While I cannot admire summarizing Mr. Russell out of context, third hand, I 
do believe that any censorship of the article would have been an infringement upon 
the rights of the reader as well as the rights of Mr. Good, not to mention a dis- 
service to the confrontationism for which Mr. Russell stood. Certainly, it would have 
stifled discussion, and discussion is what colleges are for. 

Edwin C. Lawrence 






December 16, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Five 



DELAWARE VALLEY 

COLLEGES FIRST 

CHEERLEADING 

SQUAD 



L 

E 
T 
S 

G 
O 




V 

c 



MELODY SMITH 





CAROL FINNIE 



CONI THOMPSON 





DEBBIE YOMER 



BETTY SCANLON 



Chess Club 
Organizes 

Several interested students met 
Wednesday, Dec. 2, and decided to 
proceed with plans for a campus 
chess club and team. Drs. Lugar 
and Goldberg were present and 
agreed to become co-advisors to 
the group. 

The club's purposes will be to 
teach the game's fundamentals to 
interested beginners, to provide in- 
struction and practice in the finer 
points of the game, and to sponsor 
a chess team to compete against 
other schools and colleges and par- 
ticipate in area tournaments. 

At present the members are draft- 
ing a constitution to present to the 
Student government. Funds will 
then be sought for the purchase of 
chess sets and clocks. Hopefully a 
permanent room for the club will 
be found on campus. The club will 
seek improvement in the selection 
of chess books to be found in the 
library. 

While these events are pending, 
the club will start to meet and play 
chess. Already two boys, Richard 
Osman and Edward Hall, have 
been sent by the college to the 
Continental Intercollegiate Chess 
Championship, held in New York 
City over the Thanksgiving Vaca- 
tion. Osman tied for the class D 
championship, losing the trophy on 
the basis of tie-breaking points. 

The club agreed to meet each 
Wednesday afternoon at 4:00, at a 
site to be determined soon. In- 
terested students should watch the 
bulletin boards for an announce- 
ment of these meetings. This will 
be an opportunity for players to get 
back together and play each other, 
and for non-players to learn the 
game. 

Edward Hall 

Abortion 
Referral 
Service 

Temple University has begun an 
abortion referral service for the col- 
lege community. 

Due to the liberality of abortion 
laws of various states, few people 
realize the proper procedures in ob- 
taining an easily accessable and 
inexpensive pregnancy termination. 

Even though liberalized abortion 
reform bills are being passed, cer- 
tain criteria must be met. Depend- 
ing upon the will of the mother 
they can be performed on an out- 
patient basis safely up to the 12th 
week of pregnancy from $200-$350. 

After 12 weeks, hospitalization is 
required and the cost jumps to 
$700-$1000. 

(Continued on page 7) 



Off Campus 
Problems 

The 1970-1971 Student Directory 
indicates there are now close to 300 
D.V.C. students residing off cam- 
pus. Up until the second semester 
of last year, these students were 
desperately in need of two vital 
facilities. One of these was a suit- 
able place at which a packed lunch 
could be eaten or a hot lunch could 
be purchased. The other was an 
adequate recreational area where 
commuters could go between class- 
es. 

Off-campus students have found 
the temporary Student Center as 
the answer to these problems. Be- 
fore this building was in operation, 
the commuter had a choice of eat- 
ing a packed lunch in his car, eat- 
ing a packed lunch in the com- 
muter's lunchroom which held 
eight people, going to Gino's in 
Doylestown, or paying $80 per 
semester to eat lunch in the dining 
hall. The last of these alternatives 
was somewhat impractical since 
most off-campus students could not 
be present every day at a designat- 
ed lunch time. 

This was only half the problem. 
What did the commuter c!'> during 
a two or three-hour time span be- 
tween classes? Most students went 
to a friend's dorm, to the library, or 
to their car. Eventually these al- 
ternatives led to monotony. 

Now the off-campus student is 
able to have a social atmosphere 
through using the present tempor- 
ary Student Center. Although this 
building may seem old and over- 
crowded at times, it has been a tre- 
mendous asset in boosting the 
morale of nearly 300 students. Com- 
muters are just now beginning to 
feel as though they are socially 
involved while attending D.V.C. 

The morale of D.V.C. commuters 
in the future will probably be de- 
termined by the results of continu- 
ing the temporary Student Center 
and adequately facilitating the 
permanent Student Center. 



Mention "THE FURROW" 
When You Shop 



Compliment* 
of 

LITTLE JOE'S 

DOYLESTOWN 
348-3774 






. m , 1 1 I — 



Page Six 



THE FURROW 



December 16, 1970 



nstant 
Maturity? 



Maturity levels are expected to 
make the greatest amount of 
change between grade school and 
junior high school, junior high and 
high school, and the greatest 
change in your four years of col- 
lege. 

If we are expected to undergo 
this period of change into adult- 
hood during our stay here at DVC, 
a few things must change. 

How can we be expected to ma- 
ture between high school and col- 
lege when we're faced with a high- 
school social life and an over-regu- 
lated private life? 

It can be seen by looking at the 
number of people who turn out for 
mixers, sports events, and club 
participation, etc., that social life is 
definitely lacking at our school. 
Looking at the parking lot any Sat- 
urday afternoon also shows that 
social activity is lacking. 

It's pretty bad when you're in 
college for several years, and you 
still can't wait for weekends to get 
out and meet your social commit- 
ments at home. 

Your private life is one thing that 
should be your own. Now that 
you're expected to act mature while 
in college and paying for your own 
room, you should be treated like- 
wise. Why is it that your room can 
be searched when you are attend- 
ing class or trying to study? 

Being hassled about your ap- 
pearance, hair, and clothing is an- 
other thing. You're paying for an 
education, and if you can study, 
and often feel more comfortable in 
your present state, what difference 
does it make to the school, your 
dormmates, or anyone else? 

Hall W. Reitz 



WARD 



WARD 



Doylestown's Largest Store 

tor Style and Fashions in 

Student Wear 

Select from thesa top names 

••taiiy 500, Phoenix, Alligator, 
Levis, Moe h ottaw 

Free Alterations On All 
Purchases 

DOYIISTOWN SHOPPING CENTER 
Ope* Deity • JO-5 lO-Woe 1 -f ri. ffll 9 



Aggies Win 
Opener 

by Lou Hegyes 

The Delaware Valley College 
basketball team started its quest 
for a berth in the MAC Northern 
Division playoffs with a 70-66 vic- 
tory over University Division 
Drexel. 

Even though the game doesn't 
count in the College Division stand- 
ings, the victory proved to the 
team that they could score when 
they have to and that they can win 
the tight ball games. 

The Dragons drew first blood 
when they scored after 40 seconds 
of play, but freshman sensation 
Steve Shelly, who finished with a 
game high of 27 pts., scored twice 
along with McEntee's two pointer 
for a 6-2 margin and a lead that 
they held until 4:47 remained in. 
the game. 

The Aggies slowly widened the 
margin, and held their largest lead 
of 13 pts. (31-18) with 2:19 left 
in the half when Captain Don Sech- 
ler put in two free throws. The 
score at the half was 33-21. 

The second half was a different 
story as frequent Aggie turnovers 
enabled the Dragons to reduce the 
margin; then Don Sechler fouled 
out of the game with 6:18 remain- 
ing and only a five-point lead. 
(55-50). 

Drexel went ahead with 4:47 left 
on Ron Coley's two pointer. Steve 
Shelly and Bob McEntee then 
scored to keep the Aggies close un- 
til with only 39 seconds left on the 
clock Steve Shelly scored again, 
this time on a three-point play, to 
put the Aggies up for good with a 
68-66 score. Ralph White put in 
two free throws to clinch the 70-66 
victory. 

Delaware Valley College 

FG F T 

Sechler 7 5-6 19 

McEntee 2 2-5 6 

Teeple 5 1-1 11 

Shelly 12 3-4 27 

Kain 1-2 1 

White 2-2 2 

Guers 2-2 2 

Richardson 1 0-1 2 

Wentzel 0-0 



"Well I'm Not Worried 
About You Either" 

Physical conditioning is a very 
important factor in the building of 
a student's education; however, be- 
cause of the lack of equipment, 
area and the proper mental atti- 
tude of instructors, the once gym- 
class-student is cast into the stag- 
nant atmosphere of day-to-day lazi- 
ness and the rejection of use of 
this area, unless it is under supervi- 
sion of these highly skilled body 
builders. 

And when there is room for a 
little physical activity, room has to 
be made for the elite athletes of the 
inter-collegiate sports system, with 
which honor should be bestowed 
upon them just for competing 
against the mental brutality the 
staff places on them. They are really 
in fine physical shape, of course, 
and the mental brutality is just for 
fun and games. 

The fun and games really come 
about when an average student has 
some spare time and would like to 
work-out but finds that to be in on 
the activities he has to be a mem- 
ber of a team; well, not all students 
want to play that silly game called 
organized grab-ass. Also, some 
students have only a few hours in 
the week which they can grant to 
physical conditioning. Special pri- 
vileges should not be given, but if 
there is room somewhere on that 
beautiful basketball floor for a 
student that wants physical condi- 
tioning, he should be met with 
open arms by the instructors. To 
the sadness of most students, there 
is a restriction on this because of 
class time, but maybe the student 
would be interested in participat- 
ing with the class or just playing on 
one side of the court. 

With the construction of a new 
gym this problem will probably be 
solved, but it is fun just playing 
games. 

John Kolb, Jr. 



Drexel 

FG F 

Averona 6-6 

Bivins 1 5-6 

Campbell 5 2-5 

Coley 6 3-3 

Gunter 0-0 

Kircher 0-0 

Glick 6 4-6 

Korwek 4 2-5 



70 



T 

6 

7 

12 

15 





16 

10 

66 




VENTURA S300 
ALSO SISO TO 1975 
WEDDING RING fSO 



• Jewelry -* Watches 
• Gifts — Greeting Cards 
• Buxton Wallets 
• Watch and Jewelry Repair 

tyttvelvu 

Doylestown Shopping Center 
10% Discount to D.V.C. Students 



Jetzon Jumpers 
Escape With A Win 

For the first time, eleven students 
from DVC found themselves be- 
hind bars of a city prison for a 
friendly basketball game with the 
Holmesburg inmates. 

Organized by John Kolb and 
sponsored by The Jetzon Tire & 
Rubber Co., the team is scheduled 
for future games on Tuesday and 
Friday evenings. 

Lou Varga stole the game by 
depositing 21 points into the buc- 
ket, with Gary Schade (17) and 
Gary Kardos (14) burning the nets 
for a combined total of 52 points, 
and John Kolb just followed it 
through with 20 points. Barry 
Thomas found it difficult to zip 
around with four fouls in the first 
half and five inmates after him in 
the second half! Gary Kardos want- 
ed to stay behind and find some 
pen pals, but by the time the game 
was over someone had borrowed 
the pen. 

At half time the Jetzon Jumpers 
had a good stable lead (47 to 30 \ 
and with the help of Jim William- 
son at the scoreboard we couldn't 
lose. He can now be reached at 
Cell Ten. However, the final score 
was 88 to 67 and as the inmates 
left the crowded, undersized gym^ 
a chant of "We'll wait for your re- 
turn, brothers, 'cause we can't play 
away games," could be beard 
JETZON 

FG F Pts. 

Kardos 7 14 

Schade S 1 17 

Thomas '. 2 4 

Varga 9 3 21 

Kittles 1 2 

Jones, P. 10 2 

Kolb 9 2 20 

Koehler 

Meadows 1 2 

Christien 10 2 

Leone 2 4 

88 
HOLMESBURG 

FG F Pts. 

Mike 7 14 

English 3 6 

Gage 6 1 13 

Palmer 8 3 19 

Neely 4 8 

Timmie 3 6 

Gardener 

Conbitt 

Carter 11 

Stan 

Page 

67 
John Kolb 



KERRYDALE-BRUCE 
BARBER SALON 

HAVE A HAIRY PREDICAMENT? 
Sam styles, doesn't eliminate hair 

TUfS.-FRI. 9-7 - SAT. 9-4 

APPOINTMENTS 

3450292 

SAMUEl H. MOYER 

Across from DVC 



o 



mm 



December 16, 1970 



THE FURROW 



Page Seven 




The 
Newspaper Staff 

Wishes You 

A Happy Holiday 

Season 




Wrestling 
Reviews 

Coach Floyd Marshall is at the 
helm of his second season here at 
D. V. C. He feels that the Aggies, 
whose record was 5 and 7 last year, 
have a great deal of potential. The 
competition this year is a bit stiffer, 
though. The team is to face the 
likes of squads such as Western 
Maryland, Lycoming, Rider, and 
Wilkes in their 12-meet season. The 
season opener is December 5th in 
our gym against Juniata, who beat 
us last year in the last period, 19-17. 

Problems seen this season include 
the youth of the squad, keeping 
everyone healthy, and figuring to 
forfeit five points every match. The 
probable starting lineup includes 
two freshmen, four sophomores and 
three juniors. This is a very young 
squad, in which a few may suffer 
from inexperience. But Coach 
Marshall believes that "We could 
have a well-balanced attack." Be- 
cause there are so few wrestlers 
out, (only 14), there is a fear that 
if someone gets hurt, it would be 
hard to fill his spot. Finally, the 
most looming of the grapplers' 
problems is that they stand to lose 
five points per match because they 
don't have a heavyweight. Coach 
Marshall, who was undefeated in 
dual meets during his college 
career, says, "To win, the wrestlers 
will need 100$ effort from every- 
one since we are minus five points 
even before the Indians arrive." 

Ray Johnson 

On the brighter side this season, 
big things are expected from sopho- 
more George Cummins and junior 
Larry Eisenhart. George won nine 
in a row, setting a new Aggie re- 
cord, and also placed fourth in the 
M. A. C. championships. Eisenhart 
too, the 190-pound captain, finished 
fourth in the M. A. C. champion- 
ships. 

The 1970-71 roster is as follows: 
118— Ron Jennings, John Brice, Al- 
lan Vorhaver 

Place this form under the publications office ™-£>v Uwis Robert Ebnin 
door in the basement of Ulman. Winning sug- }^j G K" ns 
gestion receives 5 dollars. 15 °-^ s nnis Fredericks ' Steve R °- 

158— Joe Thonus 
167-Brent Franklin 
177-Ray Johnson, Ken Sturm 
190— Larry Eisenhart 
Hwt-None for D. V. C. 

Na"ml~lor~N"ewr P ^7 Support 

Our 

Name oi student student Government 



THINK OF A NEW 

NAME FOR OUR 

NEWSPAPER 



HARRIER'S 
SEVENTH 



by Lou Hegyes 

The Aggie cross country team 
finished the 1970 season with a fine 
7th-place finish in the MAC 
Championships. The 7th place was 
the best finish in our short MAC 
history. 

Swarthmore took the team title in 
the field of sixteen teams. Defend- 
ing champion Ursinus finished i 
third. 

Individual honors went to Rich 
Schultz of Swarthmore. Rich Cul- 
lin of PMC was second and Ursinus' 
Bruce Albert, last year's winner, 
finished third. , 

Delaware Valley's top finisher 
was Don Murphy with a 29th place. 
Other Aggies placing were Bruce 
Pratt (33), Gary Simpson (40), 
Jim LaBaugh (41) and Joe Schiavo 
(51). 

Next season promises to be the 
best in recent years with the top 
seven runners returning. Congratu- 
lations to Coach Berthold and his 
harriers for a job well done. 

ABORTION REFERRAL— 

(Continued from page 5) 

The time element is of the ut- 
most importance. Confirmation of 
the possible pregnancy is the first 
immediate step to insure that the 
pregnancy termination can be done 
within 12 weeks if necessary. 

ARS started as an aid to Temple 
U. only, but their services have 
been demanded by many social ser- 
vices in the Pa. area. They are try- 
ing their best to help everyone; 
however, they still remain non-pro- 
fit and must operate on donations. 

In only a few weeks' time they 
have been flooded by requests for 
help by colleges around the coun- 
try. They are now associated with 
the finest clinics in New York City. 

Their office is presently or- 
ganized by volunteers and is staffed 
day and night. If you need help, 
call 1-215-878-5800, for personal 
consultation. 



NEXT 

DEADLINE 

FOR THE 

FURROW: 

JANUARY 4th 



'■•)• 



Page Eight 



THE FURROW 



December 16, 1970 



\ 



Babson 

Bombed 

by Lou Hegyes 

If the Aggie basketball team can 
play the remainder of the season 
like they played in the second half, 
against an apparently tough Bab- 
son College five, they can beat 
almost anybody. 

After trailing at halftime by only 
one point and at times by as many 
as ten in the first half the Aggies 
came out of the locker room to al- 
most blow Babson back to Welles- 
ley, Mass. 

With only twelve seconds gone 
in the second half, frosh Steve 
Shelly put in a jumper to put the 
Aggies up by one (36-35) and a 
lead which the Green and Gold 
never relinquished. 

The Aggies never let up on the 
visiting Beavers as they scored six- 
ty of their ninty-four points in the 
second half. 

Captain Don Sechler, Bob Mc- 
Entee and Steve Shelly led the 
bombardment with help from the 
remaining squad members as Coach 
Silan emptied his bench. 

It was a fine team victory as 
everyone, with the exception of 
only two, on the squad got into the 
scoring column. 

High scorers for the night were 
Sechler with 21, McEntee with 14 
and Steve Shelly, who added 10 
points. 



KERSHNER'S 
PHARMACY 

JOSEPH H. KERSHNER, Ph. G. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 348-4666 



Aggies 

Pin 
Indians 

by Drew Kotalic 

Revenge was sweet Saturday as 
the Aggies trimmed the Indians of 

Juniata 25-9. The match was dead- 
ocked twice until Aggie, Brent 
Franklin, decisioned Dunne 12-0. 
Ray Johnson and Larry Eisenhart 
took it from there with successive 
pins. Ken Sturm finished things for 
the day with a 4-2 decision in the 
heavy weight class. Freshman 
Fredericks and Thomus along with 
sophomore Cummins gave coach 
Marshall a good look into the fu- 
ture. 

WT. 

115 Messingham (J) dec. Jen- 
nings (DVC) 9-3 

126 McCartney (J) dec. Lewis 
(DVC) 7-0 " 

134 Cummins (DVC) dec. Dan- 
gle (J) 8-1 

142 Fredericks (DVC) dec. Em- 
enheiser (J) 

150 Rudy (J) dec. Hopper 
(DVC) 

158 Thomas (DVC) dec. Fisher 

(J) i-o 

167 Franklin (DVC) dec. Dunne 

(J) 12-0 
177 Johnson (DVC) pinned Rad- 

bill (I) 
190 Eisenhart (DVC) pinned 

Mears (J) 
HWT. Sturm (DVC) dec. Trudy 

(J) 4-2 



SUNNY 
BEVERAGES 

Doylestown's Only 

Drive Thru Service 

BEER and SODA 

Across from A&P Doylestown 
Shopping Center 

Phone 345-6679 

140 CHAPMAN LANE 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



D. V. C vs 
Radio 

On November 21, A.P.O. held a 
basketball game between radio and 
T.V. personalities from the sur- 
rounding area. Despite the predic- 
tion of a full house, only one side 
of the gym was filled. This was a 
very poor turnout for such a worthy 
cause. 

As for the game, the blue team 
consisted of players from WKBS 
and WMMR. They put up a good 
fight, but, despite their younger 
appearance, were beaten by the 
gold team (WCAU, WBUX, 
WDVC) with a final score of 63-48. 
The highlights of the game came 
during the second and last quar- 
ters. During the first 5 minutes of 
the second quarter the blue team 
put in one or its star players, Chris 
Mac Faddin, the wife of one of the 
players. No matter how hard she 
tried, she couldn't seem to hold on 
to the ball and so was taken out. 
An official timeout was called dur- 
ing the last quarter so that the 
A.P.O. cheerleaders (see picture) 
could cheer on the teams and the 
spectators. 

At halftime Bob Badat, A.P.O. 
president, presented Major Case, 
warden of Bucks County Prison, 
with a $160 check to be used to 
help finance T.O.D.A.Y. Inc. 
(Treatment Of Drugs Among 
Youth). The 160 dollars was the 
money received from ticket sales 
at the basketball game. Major Case 
stated that $100,000 will be need- 
ed to run the rehabilitation center 
in Newtown. It will have a 35-bed 
capacity and be staffed by trained 
personnel. The center will go into 
operation in early January. 

Bill Turner 



LOU'S 
VIEWS 



PLEASE 

Patronize 

Our 

ADVERTISERS 



by Lou Hegyes 

Barring any injuries this season 
Basketball Captain Don Sechler 
has an excellent chance of becom- 
ing the all-time scoring leader here 
at DVC. At the start of the season 
"Big Don" was only 167 points be- 
hind the current record of 1482 
points held by Richard Prins *58. 

The only action our basketball 
team will see during the Christmas 
vacation will be the Central Bucks 
Jaycee Holiday Tourney. This sea- 
son the Aggies host Glassboro State, 
Ursinus and Lebanon Valley. The 
two-day tourney is scheduled for 
Dec. 28 and 29th and the first game 
on each day starts at 7:00 P.M. It's 
a great opportunity to return to 
campus for some court action and 
maybe to see Don Sechler crack the 
scoring record. 

Bill Cottrell, former Aggie foot- 
baller and now a member of the 
Detroit Lions, once said that he 
has been stung as hard at DVC as 
he has in the pros. The hitting in 
the NFL is not much better than 
at Del Val, the lineman also men- 
tioned. 

Who is the tallest basketball 
player in the country? The tallest 
player in the collegiate ranks or 
even in the pros for that matter is 
Steve Turner, a 7'4" 250 lb. junior 
from Vanderbilt Univ. 

Congratulations to basketballer 
Steve Shelly and the DVC cheer- 
leaders for their fine debuts. 

The following changes have been 
made in the 1970-71 basketball 
schedule. The game with Eastern 
Baptist on Dec. 14 has been moved 
up to Dec. 10. Susquehanna Univ. 
scheduled for 8:15 p.m. on Jan. 9 
is now scheduled for 3:15 and fin- 
ally the Albright game on Dec. 16 
is rescheduled for Jan. 28. 




DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

? f 
Science 

and 

Agriculture 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Non-Profit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 184 
DOYLESTOWN, PA.