(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The ram [microform]"

* 




10 m*^ 



I.I 



Its 



2.5 
2.2 

2 
1.8 



1 



1.25 IIIIII.4 mil 1.6 



MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART 

ll«IOIII»L iUWAU Of $T»NO»W» - l»«S - A 



■oaicMlpse 





\ 








m 



• •. -1.^ '^-v *-«t«4(...«n«.*E j^j»j.*t.l>,Jij„^i£fc^'>^hihBli«l»*Nf^M 



TH 




AM 



Vol. 23, No. 12 



The Student Newspaper- • Delaware Valley College 



May 7, 1976 



28th ANNUAL "A" DAY A SUCCESS 

"A"-Day enthusiasm this year was dampened only slightly by the 
fact that it rained on Sunday. Saturday, however, was beautiful, and, 
in fact, "A"-Day paid off all expenses on the first day. 

Both days were fun. Student participation and enthusiasm were 
unsurpassed. Even on wet, cold Sunday, the canoe jousters did not 
fear the murky depths of Lake Archer. Most of the livestock even 
made it to the grounds on both days. And, of course, every exhibit 
and demonstration went as planned. In fact, despite the rain, 
"A"-Day only made $3,000 less than last year when there were two 
nice days. Imagine if the weather had held. 

So another "A"-Day is over, and it can definitely be said^that it 
was once again a success. But no slouching, now. . . .start planning 
for next year! 



Club Exhibits 

Club exhibits were judged in both their dynamic (demonstrations) 
and static (displays) exhibit categories. Judges for dynamic exhibits 
included Joseph Way of Montgomery County Extension Service. 
Judges for static exhibits included Richard Bailey of the Bucks 
County Extension Service. 

Dynamic results: 



1st 


Chorale 


2nd 


Apiary 


3rd 


Block and Bridle 


Static results: 




1st 


Ornamental Hort 


2nd 


Apiary 


3rd 


AIBS 


4th 


Horticulture 



The Biology and Chemistry Departments also gave out awards for 
individual exhibitors in each major. 
Chem Awards: 

1st Organic III Class — organic lab display 



Biology Awards; 

1st Bill Gerberich - EKG display 

Embryology class exhibit 
Chris Main and Rose Albert 

Disinfectant and Surfactant display 
George Morgan — Poisonous Plant exhibit 
Gary Ostroff — lecture on the 

Interesting characteristics of Thiobacillus 

ferocidans 
Carol Custis — Genetics exhibit 
Scott Glassford — Serpenterian exhibit 
Lynn Meyers — Nerve Preparation exhibit 
Jack Herbster — Edible weed exhibit 
Glenn Rush — Learning Behavior in Rats exhibit 



1st 
2nd 

2nd 
2nd 



3rd 
3rd 
4th 
5th 
5th 



A-Day Special Events Results 

The winners for this year's special events are: 
Tobacco Putting: Jim Sherry. His farthest distance was 17.5 feet. 
Milking Contest: Nancy Houseknecht/Ken Morgan. Their time 
was 14.5 seconds. 



Egg Throwing: Mike Knonza/HoUy Cummings. 

Canoe Race: The winning team was composed of Cross Country 
Members. They were Mark Wilson, Paul ^mett, Carl Kogel, and 
Mark Werkheiser. Their time was 1:35 minutes. 

Greased Pole: This competition was won by a freshman. 
Unfortunately we have his first name only. The second time around, 
Scott climbed the pole, touched the flag and hit the ground again in 
7.6 seconds. 

Canoe Joust: Chris Elliot/Jon Cassel. 

Log Sawing: Len Mahoney/Mike Szmodis. They cut through the 
log in 1:15 minutes. 

Tug-of-War; The winning team was again composed of Cross 
Country Members. They were Mark Wilson, Bob Gerberich, Al 
Zimba, Paul Bemett, Tim Manning, Hal Dambly, Bob Weidman, 
Mark Werkheiser, Ray Bryson, Carl Kogel. 

The Special Events Committee would like to thank all those who 
participated and added an extra touch to "A" Day. 

Donald Mattes 
Receives Chemical Award 

Donald Mattes, a senior Chemistry major at Delaws^ Valley 
College, has received the American Chemical Society Scholastic 
Achievement Award, for having made the most significant advance 
in his study of the field of Chemistry. 

Mattes is doing senior research under the direction of Dr. Richard 
A. Lazarus, with emphasis on the reduction of organic sulfur 
components. ^ 

Donald is very active in campus extracurricular activities and has 
recently served as Chairman of A-Day, the College's annual Science 
Exposition and open house. 



National Collegiate 
4-H Club Conference 



Cheryl Smith and David R. Miller, members of the Delaware 
Valley College Campus 4-H club, were among 300 4-H'ers from more 
than 35 schools attending the 1976 National Collegiate 4-H Club 
Conference, April 8-11, in Columbia, Mo. 

At the Conference, Smith and Miller participated in a "Consensus 
'76" workshop deflning the long range goals of the national 
organization, and a "Century III" session where they made 
recommendations for future 4-H programming. 

They were also exposed to the International 4-H Youth Exchange 
program and the Generation Allfance Program which involves 4-H 
members and senior citizens in mutually rewarding activities. 

Charles C. Campbell, director of Missouri Extension Youth 
Programs spoke on the potential of collegiate clubs at the closing 
banquet. 

In addition to the workshops and speakers, delegates at the 
business meeting selected a collegiate club to host the 1977 
conference and decided on the next service project. 

The students received copies of the 1976 service project, "4-H on 
the Bicentennial Trail," a booklet containing the names of 4-H 
families willing to host traveling 4-H'ers during the year. 

The national club is a member-financed network of collegiate 
clubs organized three years ago to tie together college clubs and 4-H 
alumni across the nation. 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may be submitted to "THE RAM" c/o Dei- Val Post 
Office. No stdmp is neceswy. Simply hand to the Postmistress. 

Dear Editor: 

The members of the faculty-administration basketball team 
would like to thank Athletic Director Graver, Coach Wolfgang and 
the student participants for the opportunity to compete in the 
intramural league this season. We thoroughly enjoyed the experience 
and hope it was mutually beneficial. We are looking forward to 
playing again next year and wish everyone connected with the 
program the best of luck. 

Sincerely, 
The Members of the Faculty- Administration 

Basketball Team 



Lou Hegyes 

Robert McClelland 

Louis Pontes 

John P. Hardy 



Ronald E. Johnson 

Richard C. Lugar 

Stan Sitarski 

Bob Tasker 



THINK GREEN 

By: Steve Silverstein 
Crested Cacti and Succulents 

Cacti and succulents sometimes mutate and start growing in a 
contorted manner. Such plants are considered collector's items by 
cactus and succulent growers. They are known as crested or cristate 
plants. 

It is not known exactly what causes these plants to mutate, but it 
is thought that ultra-violet rays from the sun or injury to the plant's 
growing tip are causative factors. Although such mutations are rather 
rare, the resulting growth can be propagated by cuttings. 

Many crested plants don't bear flowers. Of those that do most 
bear normal flowers, but some bear crested flowers. Although some 
may produce viable seed, the seed almost never results in more 
crested plants. 

Sometimes, crested plants are grafted on normal plants to speed 
up the arrested growth. Crests require the same cMe as their normal 
counterpart. ' ' 

Althouth there are a fairly large number of cactus crests, crested 
non -cactaceous succulents are rather uncommon. Many are suitable 
for the indoor collection. 



Max Morath Brings Scott Joplin 
to the Walnut 

By: Peggy Braveman 

Ragtime pianist-singercomedian Max Morath will bring his 
one-man show to The Walnut Street Theatre at 9th & Walnut Sts., 
Phila., for a one-night-stand on Sunday, May 9, 1976 at 8:00 P.M. 
Morath 's show, "The Ragtime Years," blends music, humor, history 
and satire in an entertainment exploration of the popular ragtime 
era. 

Max Morath has been personally responsible for stimulating much 
of the current interest in ragtime. His act "The Ragtime Years" 
includes ragtime music ranging from Scott Joplin rags to tunes by 
Bert Williams, Irving Berlin and other ragtime lyricists. 

Tickets for the Max Morath show can be purchased at The Walnut 
box office for $5.50, $4.50, and $3.50 each. Call 629-0700 for 
further information. 



In Remembrance 

William H. Yerkes, Jr., a member of the Board of Trustees, passed 
away on April 17. He was on the Board of Trustees for thirty-two 
years, and in that time he also served as the Chairman of the 
Agriculture Committee. He owned Nonesuch Farms in Buckingham, 
which kept him in constant touch with changes in agriculture, and 
provided him with valuable advice for the school. He believed in 
utilizing Del Val's resources for education as a priority over their 
financial self-support. Mr. Yerkes left a void that will be difficult to 
fill. 



1976 A-Day Flower Show Results 

Plaque — most points 

Champion — Outstanding entry in division 

Reserve Champion — next most outstanding entry in division 

Arrangement Division 
plaque — Ray Davis 
champion — Ray Davis 
reserve champion — Jim Wood 

Horticulture Division 

plaque — Dave Hunsicker 
champion — Dave Hunsicker 
reserve champion — Dave Hunsicker 



Special Display 
1st — champion 
2nd — reserve champion 
3rd 
honorable mention 



Rob Anthony - 
Ray Davis 
Larry Whipple 
Pete Kerch 



Don Stamm 



Thomas Jakubczyk 



You have heard about the little Bee 
Whose sex you cannot hardly see 
You cannot tell a he from she 
But she can tell and so can he 
The Bee is such a busy soul 
He has not time for Birth Control 
And that is why in times like these 
There are so many Sons of B's. 




7 he nZant 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editor Pat Wohlferth 

Cartoonist Jean Dimmler 

Typists . Paul Barrett. "Gerb" 

Disuibution Kathy Grabowski, Cheryl Holowath 

STAFF REPORTERS 

Oavid An$p>ach, Ken Brusstar, Kent Bubbenmoyer, Bryan 
Leh, Dave Miller, Pete Northrop, Steve Silberstein. 

Faculty Adviser Dr. John C. Mertz 



The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the 
student tmdy. BAM staff , Faculty, or Administration. 



Printed on 100% recycled paper 




Pag. 



THE RAM 



Block & Bridle's A-Day Livestock Show 

By: Donna Foley 

The annual "A"-Day Livestock Show presented by the Block & 
Bridle club members on Saturday morning had a different air of 
competition this year. Besides the usual showmanship awards, fitting 
awards were being vied for, which meant that the appearance of the 
animal, gained by weeks of cleaning and clipping, could earn the 
student a trophy or ribbon even if the animal did not cooperate in 
the ring. This addition kept many more deserving students in the 
competition. 

Following are the classes of livestock and the respective winners 
in both fitting and showmanship. 

Mr. Max Smith from the Pennsylvania Agricultural Extension 
Service was this year's Judge, and Diane Cole was M.C. for the show. 
Congratulations to all participants for their accomplishments. 





SWINE CLASS I 


Fitting 
Ken Levris 
Nancy Henkel 
Dave Miller 


1 
2 
3 


Showing 
Nancy Henkel 
Ken Lewis 
Dave Miller 


Barb Novak 


4 


Barb Novak 


Laura DiDonato 


5 


Laura DiDonato 


SWINE CLASS II 


Fitting 

Richard Meyers 
George Schwartz 
Paul Staub 


1 
2 
3 


Showing 
George Schwartz 
Richard Meyers 
Mark Dunn 


Mark Dunn 


— . 4 


^ Paul Staub 



Swine Fitting 

Champion: Richard Meyers 

Reserve Champion: Ken Lewis 

Swine Showing 

Champion: George Schwartz 

Reserve Champion: Nancy Henkel 





I LAMBS 




Fitting 

Cathy Cochlin 
Fran Johnson 
Laura DiDonato 
Barb Novak 


1 
2 
3 
4 


Showing 
Craig Burman 
Cathy Cochlin 
Cathy Kelly 
Fran Johnson 


Craig Burman 


5 ' 


Laura DiDonato 


II YEARLING EWES 


Fitting 
Sonia Shaner 


1 


Showing 

Kurt Weiss 


Jerry Croshaw 
Kurt Weiss 


2 
3 


Dirk Wise 
Sonia Shaner 


Diane Rodgers 
Dirk Wise 
Janice Jensen 


4 
6 
6 


Diane Rudgers 
Jerry Croshaw 
Janice Jensen 


III YEARLING RAMS 


Fitting 
Beth Hines 


1 


Showing 
Beth Hines 


Howard Hoffman 


2 


John Jacob 


John Jacob 


3 


Howard Hoffman 


Greg Krug 


4 


Greg Krug 



BEEF CATTLE 


I YEARLING HEIFERS 


Fitting 




Showing 


Roger Kramp 


1 


Pauline Risser 


Don Duchai 


2 


Roger Kramp 


Pauline Risser 


3 


Don Duchai 


Mena Hautau 


4 


Mena Hautau 


Jerry Croshaw 


5 


Carol Shaffer 


II YEARLING BULLS 


Fitting 




Showing 


Dave Mangione 


1 


Dave Mangione 


Brett Middleton 


2 


Howard Hoffman 


Howard Hoffman 


3 


Brett Middleton 


Craig Burman 


4 


Robert Leech 


Robert Leech 


5 


Craig Burman 


III YEARLING STEERS 


Fitting 




Showing 


Ken Lewis 


1 


Ken Lewis 


Kurt Weiss 


2 


Kurt Weiss 


Eileen Gallen 


3 


Joan Hewett 


Joan Hewett 


, 4 


BU McFadden 


Bill McFadden 


5 


Cathy Cochlin 


Cathy Cochlin 


6 


Eileen Gallen 


IV LATE SPRING CALVES 


Fitting 




Showing 


George Schwartz 


1 


George Schwartz 


Steve Masters ' 


2 


Steve Masters 


Paul Staub 


3 


Ginny Osbahr 


Ginny Osbahr 


4 


Paul Staub 


Barb McDonald 


5 


Barb McDonald 


Barb Colflesh 


6 


Barb Colflesh 


V SPRING CALVES 


Fitting 




Showing 


Nancy Henkel 


1 


Nancy Henkel 


Donna Foley 


2 


Donna Foley 


M. Kay Moscati 


3 


. Pat Vaughn 


Pat Vaughn 


4 


M. Kay Moscati 


Stephen Fecik 


5 


Stephen Fecik 



Sheep Fitting 
Champion: Cathy Cochlin 
Reserve Champion: Fran Johnson 

Sheep Showing 

Champion: Kurt Weiss 

Reserve Champion: Craig Burman 



VI AGED BULLS 
Fitting Showing 

Richard Meyers 1 Dave Miller 

Dave Miller 2 Richard Meyers 

Bryan Leh 3 Bryan Leh 

Rick Gardner 4 Rick Gardner 

Beef Fitting 

Champion: Nancy Henkel 
Reserve Champion: Ken Lewis 

Beef Showing 

Champion: George Schwartz 
Reserve Champion: Nancy Henkel 

GRAND CHAMPION: George Schwartz 
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: Nancy Henkel 



DTA BANQUET: STUDENT AWARDS 

This year, DTA held their annual banquet at the Collegeville Inn. 
The guest speaker was Mr. Dick Bailey, who works with the Bucks 
County Cooperative Extension Office. Mr. Bailey spoke on pesti- 
cides. This year the Senior Agricultural Achievement Award went to 
Gary Seckinger and Brian Kahn. The Sophomore Agricultural 
Achievement Award was given to David Ray. These awards are based 
on academic achievement and school activities. 






Page 



THE RAM 



Equine Neighs! 



On Saturday of A Day, two showmanship classes— nonexperi- 
enced and experienced— were held. The judge was Mr. Max Smith, 
who also judged the general livestock classes. The results for 
Nonexperienced Showmanship were: 1st, Connie Smith; 2nd, Catol 
Kelly; 3rd, Cindy Morton; 4th, Nannette Goodwin; 5th, Cheryl 
Walling. For Experienced Showmanship, the results were: 1st, Mary 
Lou Bowersock; 2nd, Mary Anne Lamb; 3rd, Joan Skerbish; 4th, 
Debbie Limbach. The winners of both classes then competed for the 
day's championship. Grand Champion was Mary Lou Bowersock, 
and Reserve Grand Champion was Connie Smith. 

Following the showmanship classes, demonstrations were given 
and explained by club members. They included: barrel racing, pole 
bending jumping, trail courses, pleasure classes and driving. Most of 
the demonstrations that were planned for Sunday were vheld, but, 
due to the weather and ring conditions, these were held at a slower, 
more cautious pace. A special attraction was Betsy Claypoole's 
Clydesdale, Bryon, who will not be returning next year. We wish to 
thank the Claypooles' for allowing Bryon to visit us these past three 
yearsw 

In the future, the Equine Club hopes to see more horses on 
campus. 



Dairy Livestock Show 

The judge for the dairy show was an alunmus from Delaware 
Valley, Mr. Richard Smith (Class of 1969). Below are the results of 
both the livestock showing and fitting contests, followed by the 
outcome of the student judging. 
Class I — Freshman 

1st showman Leslie Andersen — DVC Elevation Clarrisa 
2nd showman Mike DePetris — DVC Flaming Petula 
1st fitting Mike DePetris - DVC Flaming Petula 
2nd fitting Ray Mealie — DVC Delegate Minerva 
Class 11 — Freshman 

1st showman Roy Malik — DVC Titan Lucy 
2nd showman Jan Stredny — Crystal Spring Don's Juan 
1st fitting Tom Bovmian - DVC Black Night Delight 
2nd fitting Jan Stredny — Crystal Spring Don's Juan 

Champion Freshman Showman — Roy Malik 
Reserve Champion — Leslie Andersen 
Champion Freshman Fitter — Mike DePetris " 
Reserve Champion — Tom Bowman 

Class IV — Sophomore 

1st showman Karen Klein — DVC Peter Pan Daria 
2nd showman Polly Risser — DVC D-Triuve Abigail 
, 1st fitter Susan Herhei - DVC Net Profit Dayle 
2nd fitter Polly Risser - DVC D-Triuve Abigail 

Class V — Sophomore 

1st showman Kathy Shafer — DVC Canadian Peanuts 
2nd showman Mena Hautau — DVC Flashy Jubilee 
1st fitter Laura Post — DVC Pride Janice 
2nd fitter Kathy Shafer — DVC Canadian Peanuts 

Class VI — Sophomore 

1st showman Don Mellon — DVC Titan Allusion 
2nd showman Beth Stephens — DVC Triune Penelope 
1st fitter Cindy Duncan — DVC Elevation Melanie 
2nd fitter Jim Taranto — DVC Marquis Melody 

Champion Sophomore showman — Polly Risser 
Reserve Champion - Karen Klein 
Champion Sophomore Fitter — Susan Herhei 
Reserve Champion Polly Risser 

Class IX - Juniors 

1st showman Nancy Houseknecht — DVC Canadian Daffodil 
2nd showman Kirk Hillegass — DVC Elevation Cynthia 
1st fitter Kirk Hillegass - DVC Elevation Cynthia 
2nd fitter Nancy Houseknecht - DVC Canadian Daffodil 

Class X — Juniors 

1st showman George Gross — DVC Transmitter Dina 
2nd showman April Grosjean — DVC Loa Mickey 



1st fitter April Grosjean — DVC Loa Mickey 
2nd fitter George Gross — DVC Transmitter Dina 

Champion Junior Showman — Nancy Houseknecht 
Reserve Champion — Kirk Hillegass 
Champion Junior Fitter — April Grosjean 
Reserve Champion - George Gross 

Champion Senior Showman — Jed Beshore — DVC Canadian 

Eleanor 
Reserve Champion — Steve Cornman — Pine Lake Zing's Kate 
Champion Senior Fitter — Steve Cornman - Pine Lake Zing's 

Kate 
Reserve Champion — Jed Beshore - DVC Canadian Eleanor 

Champion Ayrshire Award — Steve Cornman 

Pine Lake Zing's Kate 
Champion Brown Swiss Award — Chuck Moose 

DVC Delegate Alexis 
Champion Holstein Award — Jed Beshore 

DVC Canadian Eleanor 

Grand Champion Showman — Jed Beshore 
Reserve Champion — Steve Cornman 

Grand Champion Fitter — Mike DePetris 
Reserve Champion — Polly Risser 

Student Judging Team Results 

High team — Mellon, Robbins, Flick 
Verbal reasons and placings — Duncan — 1st, 

Mellon — 2nd, Gayman — 3rd 
High placings — Mellon — 1st, Robbins — 2nd; Gayman 



&:d^.:ww-tt« 



A Typical Game 

By: Kent Bubbenmoyer 

I thought of this game. It has a square board with 64 squares; but 
the game is played on the eight center squares only. There are five 
categories of men; crows, drobs, fats, teduts, and a neitslef. 

There are two crows whose moves are restricted to the outside of 
the eight square center. A drob can only move in a path previously 
occupied by a crow. The drob's prime function is to clutter up the 
board and prevent any large moves by fats or teduts. There is only 
one neitslef and its function is to block any possible confrontation 
between fats or teduts and one of the crows. The crows, drobs, and 
neitslef make up one side and oppose the fats and teduts. 

The object of the game is to move the teduts through the eight 
squares while attempting to move to the outside of the board. The 
fats are used as defense against the opposing side, because the teduts 
don't defend themselves. If the teduts have completed all eight 
squares before breaking to the outside, the teduts and fats lose. 

When I was finished figuring out this game, I coundn't find 
anyone to play. Would you? 



A-Day Livestock Judging Contest 

By: Donna Foley 

While it drizzled and blew outside, twenty-five assorted DVC 
students stood and stared at cattle, sheep, and pigs for two-and-a- 
half hours on Sunday (A-Day) morning at the Farm *3 Show Bam. 
This was the annual Livestock Judging Contest involving 5 teams (5 
students in each) who competitively judged livestock, and, later in 
the day, gave their placings and reasons to senior members of the 
DVC Collegiate Livestock Judging Team. The incliment weather did 
not seem to phase the students, as the resulting scores were quite 
notable. 

The top students and teams in each livestock category are shown, 
followed by the overall top students and final placings of each team. 
Congratulations to all of the participating students for their 
achievements. 



Pag( 



THE RAM 



Beef (individual achievement) 

1. Eileen Gallen 

2. Dennis McNabb 

3. Kurt Weiss 

4. Robin Petzold 

5. Susan Crane 

Sheep (individual achievement) 

1. Kurt Weiss 

2. Barbara ColHesh 

3. Howard Hoffman 

4. Ro^r Kramp 

5. EdGluntz 



Beef (team placing) 

1. Sophomores 

2. Juniors (Female) 

3. Seniors 

4. Juniors (Male) 

5. Freshmen 

Sheep (team placing) 

1. Sophomores 

2. Juniors (Female) 

3. Freshmen 

4. Juniors (Male) 

5. Seniors 



Svnne (individual achievement) Svtrine (team placing) 

1. Junior (male) 

2. Sophomores 

3. Seniors 

4. Freshmen 

5. Junior (Female) 

Overall Team Placing 

1. Sophomores 

2. Juniors (Male) 

3. Juniors (Female) 

4. Senion 

5. Freshmen 



1. Brett Middleton 

2. Dave Miller 

3. Robin Petzold 

4. Bryan Leh 

5. Dave Delgado 

Overall Individual 

1. Bryan Leh 

2. Robin Petzold 

3. Kurt Weiss 

4. Eileen Gallen 

5. Dave Miller 



IPO i-1 6401 



mi CAXrUJ 11*011] STATIOH • DIUIHIIf VALHV COltFGf DOrKSTOHIM >«l«IISVtV«lll< inOI 

RECORD REVIEWS 

WAPO for some time now has been receiving many albums that 
we have reviewed and sent these revues back to the record 
companies. This was part of our agreement with the various 
corporations that supply us with these promotional copies of their 
music. So now that we have an excellent music staff at the radio 
station, we are going to share these records, reviewed as we receive 
them, and pass them on in the RAM whenever it is published. So 
from now on you can look for these records to be reviewed in the 
forthcoming editions of our college newspaper along with some 
tidbits about your campus radio station. Any questions or com- 
ments about our revues, or anything about the radio station for that 
matter, are always welcome. Simply put a letter in the mail box 
marked WAPO, and we will see that it gets prompt attention. 

Roy Buchanan — A Street Called Straight 
A truly great album for anyone who is a fan of Roy. The music 
and the recording of this album are both excellent, along with the 
artistry that has made Roy Buchanan famous on the guitar. The 
album is a mix of instrumental and vocal work that combines to give 
that mello sound that is both relaxing and easy to listen to. Good 
cuts on the first side are "Good God Have Mercy," "Caruso." On the 
second side there is the Jimi Hendrix tune "If Six Was Nine," and 
another good tune is "The Messiah Will Come Again." 

Pete Northrop 

Led Zeppelin — Presence 
This album features all the artistry of Led Zeppelin combined 
with the style that made them famous. Many people have said 
"We've heard it all before." They're right, in a sense, but this album 
exhibits many new horizons of their talents. Jimmy Page's guitar 
pieces are excellently done with a rhythm that can't be beat. 

The abstract theme of the album contributes certain mythological 
aspects that are new to Led Zeppelin. This gives them the 
appearance of a totally new type of band, which they are. 

This record is a must for everyone's collection and it should do 
very well on the charts. 

Dann Clapp 
Music Director 



Passport — Infinity Machine 

Contemporary Jazz and Disco have made a comeback within the 
past few months. Passport has a super sound with a touch of magic 
to give them a rather unique sound. 

Just about all of the pieces are fast-moving and leave no room for 
boredom. The addition of electronics to the jazz sound has proved 
most beneflclal and Passport uses this technique excellently. The 
constant addition of different sounds also compliments the quality 
presented to the listener. One acquires a content feeling while 
listening to a Sax and Synthesizer harmonizing together in complete 
unison. 

I would recommend this album to anyone who enjoys Jazz or is 
just seeking a mellow tune. 

Dann Clapp 
Music Director 



Track Team Ends 
DUAL SEASON UNDEFEATED 

The Delaware Valley College track team, with their exciting 
triangular meet victory over Ursinus and Haverford on April 26th, 
completed the 1976 dual meet season with a perfect 10-0 record. 

The undefeated season is the first men's unbeaten team at 
Delaware Valley since 1961 's golf squad. The 10-0 campaign is also 
tiK first in tract history at Delavrare Valley College and the ten 
victories establishes a record for the most wins in one season. 

In the meet Delaware Valley scored 87 points, while Ursimus 
(6-4) totalled 74y2 points and Haverford (0-10) managed 18'/^ points. 

Leading by only a few points against Ursinus, Delaware Valley 
swept all four places in the 220 to gain the momentum for the 
victory. Junior Scott Kingsbauer won the 220 with a time of 22.6 
and was followed by Ray Einhom (22.7), John Barry (22.8) and 
Mark Wilson ((22.9). 

The 440 yd. and mile relay teams completed the season unbeaten 
as did junior shot putter Al Zimba, of Philadelphia, Pa. Zimba, who 
broke his own shot put record with a heave of 51' 8'/«" against 
Susquehanna and Albright on April 22nd, is the defending Middle 
Atlantic Conference champion. 

The unbeaten 440 yd. relay team is composed of Scott 
Kingsbauer (Hatfield, Pa.), John Maloney (Sharon Hill, I^.), John 
Barry (Norristown, Pa.) and Mark Wilson (Biglerville, Pa.) while the 
mile relay squad consists of Chuck Moose (New Wilmington, Pa.), 
John Maloney, Ray Einhom (Bricktown, N.J.) and Mark Wilson. 

Other first place finishers for Delaware Valley were Scott 
Kingsbauer (100), Mark Wilson (440), Bob Gerberich, of Bemville, 
Pa. (440 Int. hurdles), Don Stamm, of Womelsdorf, Pa. (long jump), 
and George DeFranca, of Succasunna, N,J. (javelin). 

The Aggies' next competition will be in the M.A.C. Track 
Championships at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. on April 30th 
and May 1st. In the 1975's Championships Delaware Valley placed 
fifth out of ninteen teams. 

LEADING SCORERS 



Name 


Hometown 


High School 


Poin 


S. Kingsbauer 


Hatfield, Pa. 


Pennridge 


54'/4 


J. Barry 


Norristown, Pa. 


Wissahickon 


39y4 


D. Stamm 


Womelsdorf, Pa. 


Conrad Weiser 


36 


M. Wason 


Biglerville, Pa. 


Biglerville 


35 '/4 


A. Zimba 


Phila., Pa. 


Father Judge 


29 


B. Snyder 


Milton, Pa. 


Milton 


25 


J. Maloney 


Sharon Hill, Pa. 


Sharon Hill 


24'/^ 


G. DeFranca 


Succasunna, N.J. 


Roxbury 


23 


R. Einhorn 


Bricktown, N.J. 


St. Rose 


20%. 


B. Weidman 


Denver, Pa. 


Cocalico 


18 


B. Gerberich 


Bernville, Pa. 


Tulpehocken 


16 


M. Danis 


Bristol, Pa. 


Bristol 


16 


C. Moose 


New Wilmington, Pa. 


Mercer 


15Vi 


T. Gunther 


Springfield, Pa. 


Cardinal O'Hara 


14 


B. Dupn 


Fanwood, N.J. 


Scotch Plains- 








Fanwood 


llVi 


P. SoUazzo 


Rariton, N.J. 


Bridgewater-West 


10 



David Anspach 



Gary Ostroff 



Glenn Fahnestock 



Bruce Milstein 




r 



Ronald Wilson 






Donald C . Mattes 



Senior Spe<;ial Problems 

The following students presented papers: 

I. SCIENCE (research coordinator. Dr. Berthoid) 

1. Anspach, David and Gary Ostroff "Growth Rates 
and Coenzye Q Production of Thiobacillus fero- 
oxidans". Advisor, Dr. Jannes Miller 

2. Fahnestock, Glenn "In Vitro Post-ennbryonic 
Developmental Stages of Monienzia expansa (Ces- 
toda; Cyclophyllidea)". Advisor, Mr. John 
Standing 

3. Milstein, Bruce "Effect of a Low Protein Diet on 
Reproduction in the Rat". Advisor, Dr. Robert 

Berthoid ' 

4. Wilson, Ronald "Enzyme Studies of Amino- 
levulinic Acid Synthetase and Dehydrase in Rho- 
dospirillum rubum" . Advisor, Dr. James Miller 

5. Mattes, Donald C. "Synthesis of Benzene- 1, 
2-diethior'. Advisor, Dr. Richard Lazarus 

II. AGRICULTURE (research coordinator. Dr. 
Bru baker) 

1. Catino, Mary Anna and Rodgers, Diane "Virili- 
zation of Newborn Rats by Exogenous Estrogens". 
Advisor, Dr. Fred Hofsaess 

2. Chamberlln, Jay "Feeding Milk and Fermented 
Colostrum to Young Dairy Calves Raised Inside 
and Outside". Advisor, Dr. J.D. McCaffree 

3. Novak, Barbara and Tietjen, Roy M. "The Effects 
of a Zinc Deficiency During the Third Trimester of 
Gestation in Rattus norvegicus". Advisor, Dr. 
Brubaker 

4. Fluchere, Michael J. "Solvent Infusion of Growth 
Regulators and Biologically Active Agents into 
Seeds and Their Effect on Germination and 
Subsequent Growth". Advisor, Dr. Louis Polites 

5. Kahn; Brian A. "Field Bindweed Germination 
Response to Four Temperatures". Advisor. Dr. Lee 
R. Zehnder 

6. Seckinger, Gary R. "Soil-Borne Bacteria Antago- 
nists of Damping-off Fungi". Advisor, Dr. Louis 
Polites 





■-if 




^r ^■ 




r-^* 


%,^ 




J6 


^ 






u 
o 


1 
i 


V 

i 


'-■'■«1*IB 


Q 









f 






c 

m 
U 

c 

< 

u 





THE RAM 

VOL. 24 

1976 




AM 



Vol. 24, No. 1 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



September 6, 1976 



<( 



Welcome Back, My Friends. 



it 



The stage is once again set for another 9 months of academia at 
Del.Val. Allow me to be one of the first to greet you. Let me also 
inform you that I hate "welcome back" letters. The drivel that such 
messages contain usually is some sort of hopeful prediction for the 
future. I say let the future remain known only to the gods, the 
present to us mortals, and the past to the newspapers. The past I am 
speaking of, in this case, is the near past . . .this summer. 

I remained on campus this summer, so I was able to observe the 
changes and renovations which have been made here. I now report to 
you these changes which have already taken place and of which you 
may not be aware. 

A most interesting renovation is that of the snack bar in Segal 
Hall where* the pin ball machines were formerly located. It seems to 
be a good and useful service. However, Messrs. Tasker and Sitarski 
continually remind me that the success of this business enterprise 
remains to be seen. 

The snack bar is to be run by M.W. Wood, the catering service 
currently running the cafeteria. Argh, you may say. But remember, 
the food will be freshly prepared to order. 

The menu includes hot and cold sandwiches, ice cream and other 
things normally found in snack bars. The menu is open for 
suggestions. If there is a demand for an item, it will be made 
available, so I am told. 

The hours, I feel, need improving. At this printing they are 
Mon-Thurs 7:30 AM-1:30PM and 7:30 PM to 10:30 PM; Friday 
7:30 AM-1:30 PM and 7:00 PM to 11:00 PM and Sunday 7:00 
PM-1 1 :00 PM. It is closed'on Saturdays, which to me is illogical, but 
several requests have already been made to change that. 

Another change in Segal Hall is to be fOund downstairs. You will 
no longer find the Placement Office, the Alumni Office or the old 
WAPO office down there. In fact, there are no walls left. They have 
been removed to make a large coffeehouse room. Barry Siroka is in 
the process of overseeing its completion. 

Where is the Placement Office? Mr. McClelland and his parapher- 
nalia have been moved to the 1st floor in Allman Building where the 
old Post Office was located. The Alumni Office, now headed by Mr. 
Henry Sumner '76, is in Lasker Hall. 

Another change took place in Allman Hall. Mr. Tasker's office 
and the Evening Division office were interchanged. At first, the 
purpose of this switch seemed obscure, but it appears to have been 
to accommodate Miss Karen Orbaker, our new assistant to the Dean 
of Students. Her office is located adjacent to Mr. Tasker's. She is in 
charge of the 3 women's dorms, but she is not considered a Dean of 
Women. Exactly what she is to be doing will be explored and will be 
reported in a later issue. In the meantime, stop in and introduce 
yourself. She is very friendly. 

A few more changes occurred which, really concern only the 
freshman men, but which everyone might Uke to know. The first 
floor of the Alumni House (across from the tennis courts) has been 
totally redone to accommodate 10 freshman men. A bathroom and 
shower have been built where the radio-isotope lab was. All the 
professors' offices have been moved from the house. However, 
Ernest Purnell still resides there. 

The last change of interest has taken place in Goldman and 
Samuel Halls' lounges. A cinderblock (basic DVC decor) wall has 
been erected down the middle of each lounge, and, on either side of 
it, 4 freshman men will reside. Doors have been put in to allow 
private entrances. The front part of the lounges may eventually be 
used as lounges again, but Mr. Tasker informs me the back sections 
are permanent rooms. 

That*s all for the near past. Welcome to the present. Expect the 
future. 



Campus Maintained in Summer 
by Del-Val Students 

Except for a few industrious summer school people, most of the 
students on campus this summer were working at Del. Val. This is an 
article of recognition to these people. 

At the very beginning of the summer I was immediately 
impressed by the vigor with which the grounds crew attacked the 
campus. Not two days out of finals, I saw these people cutting grass, 
trimming hedges and weeding. They were everywhere I turned. I 
thought that it was a shame that the campus looked its best when 
the school year was over and everyone was home. However, the 
results of their labor can still be seen now, and I'm sure everyone 
will agree that they did fine WQrk indeed. 

The campus grounds crew consisted of Michele Choma, Don 
Levitsky, Harry McGoerty, Kay O'Rourke, John Melograna, Mike 
McGarvey and Jay Kravitz. 

As the summer progressed I also became aware of the work the 
other summer workers were doing. The orchard crew (Larry 
Borchardt and Tim Sell) seemed to be exceeding all expectations in 
the produce department. Both the dairy and beef farms brought 
home many awards and honors from farm shows in the arpa. From 
my own point of view, all the animals seem healthy. Thus, these 
people have aptly maintained the ever important Dal-Val farms. 

The dairy crew consisted of Ed Taczanowsky. Kevm Musser, 
April Grosjean and Michael DePetris. The Farm 3 crew was Don 
Duchai, Joan Hewett, Brian Leh, Mena Hautau, Kathy Wolfe and 
Bob Brown. 

Also doing a fine job in their respective positions were George 
Gross and Brett Middleton in General Agriculture, Bert Emerizy and 
Carol Grube in the greenhouses, Frank Bryzowski in the biology 
department, Roy Cohen in the chemistry department and Ginny 
Osbahr in the small animal lab. 

I watched all these people working very hard all summer, and I 
thought I should do my part to give credit where credit is due. 
Campus maintenance is multi-faceted and I believe everyone did 
well, and deserves recognition. 




7ie nZam 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editor Pat Wohlferth 

Cartoonist Jean Dimmler 

Typists Paul Barrett, "Gerb" 

Distribution Kathy Grabowski, Cheryl Holowath 

STAFF REPORTERS 

David Anspach, Ken Brusstar, Kent Bubbenmoyer, Bryan 
Leh, Dave Miller, Pete Northrop, Steve Silberstein. 

Faculty Adviser Dr. John C. Mertz 



The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the 
student body. RAM staff. Faculty, or Administration. 



Printed on 100% recycled paper 




Pau. I 



THE RAIVI 



Something to do on Weekends 

I rum liiuc lo lime the RAM receives information from nearby 
pljLCs ol uUerest. New Hope and Peddfer's Village are two such 
places freqUenled by many Del-Va! students. Another place, 
Brandywine River Museum, is a bit farther away than the other two, 
but well worth a trip. It is located on U.S. Route 1 in Chadds Ford, 
Pa. This museum is constantly hosting art displays by American 
■artists and. as the fallowing schedule indicates a variety of other 
activities as well. So, if you are looking for something to do on a 
weekend, visit the Brandywine River Museum on a date when 
something interesting is happening. 

FALL EXHIBITION 

Sept. 1 1 Nov. 21 History of American Illustration 

A thorough look at major artists and devel- 
opments through 200 years of book and 
periodical illustration. 

Permanent Collection 

Always on view, includes three generations 
of Wyeths, N.C., Andrew and James, 
Howard Pyle, Maxfield Parrish and other 
Brandywine Region artists. 

Sept. 1 1 (10 am-7 pm) Chadds Ford Days.- celebration in the 
Sept. 12(11 am-6 pm) meadovV behind U.S. Post Office on U.S. 

Route 1. Old fashioned country fair, includ- 

' ing craft displays, art sale, mihtia drills and 

rides for children in antique cars and 

coaches. Sponsored by The Chadds Ford 

~ Historical Society. 



Sept. 25/26 

Oct. 3 
Oct. 17 

Oct. 17 



Appalachian Canoe Club - canoe and kayak 
races on the Brandywine, from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. 

Philart String Quartet - concert - 5 p.m. 



John Davison concert 
semble - 5 p.m. 



composer and en- 



Oct. 31 



Nov. 14 



Nov. 26 - Jan. 9 



Nov. 28 : 

Dec. 12 
Dec. 1 8 & 1 9 



Brandywine Ramble - a bicycling tour of 
parts of the scenic and historic Brandywine 
valley. Conservancy members and friends 
invited to join the Wheelmen and Delaware 
Friends of Bikeology. Routes marked for 20, 
40, and 60-mile lengths. Begins at 9:30 a.m. 
at the Museum and ends at 4:30 p.m. 

Lewis Rosenblatt concert - english horn and 
The Amado String Quartet at 5 p.m. 

Temple Painter concert - harpsicord - 5 
p.m. 

WINTER EXHIBITION 

A Brandywine Christmas for Children 
A gallery filled with one of the biggest 
model train layouts ever seen; Christmas 
Comes Naturally - Christmas trees beauti- 
fully decorated by the volunteers with a 
collection of natural ornaments such as stars, 
animals and angels. Open daily except 
Christmas day. 

Aulos Ensemble concert - flute, cello, oboe, 
harpsicord and violin - 5 p.m. 

Arthur Fenimore concert - piano - 5 p.m. 

Medieval Christmas pageant - a variety of 
authentic instruments will be played by a 
cast in colorful costumes recreating the 
Medieval tradition through music, drama and 
street mime. 8 p.m. Tickets: $6.50. 



Enrollment Figures at Del-Val 

This fall semester, total enrollment reaches I 240 students. Out of 
this number 840 will live on campus and 400 will commute. 

Three hundred and seventy-eight women are enrolled, 245 of 
which will live on campus. 

The freshman class numbers around 430, which has been a similar 
figure for the past 3 years 



Evening College at Del-Val 

The Evening College program for the 1976-1977 academic year 
promises to be bigger and better than ever. Many students and some 
faculty do not realize the scope of these operations and it might be 
useful to review them briefly at this time. 

In the academic area, the Evening College operates a program 
which offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration 
entirely during evening hours. Students participating in this program 
normally do not attend day classes and many people do not realize 
they are a part of the College. 

An area somewhat better known is the co-op program. This 
program consists of some 30 credits of courses that are offered only 
during evening hours but are open to both day and evening students 
in order that they may round out and broaden their academic 
studies. Courses in the co-op program currently are: 

Accounting III 

Accounting IV 

Accounting V 

Cost Accounting 

Lab. Animal Management 

Lab. Animal Diseases ^ 

Nutrition &. Reproduction inTaB. ArfTmals 

Lab. Animal Techniques 

Production &, Inventory Control 

Systems Analysis 
Certificate programs form another area of operations. This 
program (;onsists of sequential courses in specialized subject matter 
that would be useful to persons regardless of whether or not they 
possess or are seeking a baccalaureate degree. Certificates are 
currently available in the areas of: 

Accounting 

Laboratory Animal Science 

Quantitative Management Techniques 
Somewhat similar to the certificate programs but operating in the 
non-credit area are the. certification programs which enable an 
individual to become certified in an industrial discipline. These 
programs are usually operated in cooperation with a professional 
organization connected with the specialty area. Current programs 
include: 

Purchasing - Philadelphia Purchasing Association 

Materials Management - American Production and 
Inventory Control Society 
Our newest area of operations is also in the non-credit field. This 
area consists of short-duration courses designed to be concentrated, 
specific and practical. These courses were announced last year and at 
that time were confined to the industrial sector. During the past 
academic year consumer short courses were introduced for the first 
time. In the future we expect the consumer courses to dominate the 
program since most of the industrial short courses will be incor- 
porated into certification programs. Eventually, short courses will be 
offered over the entire spectrum of the College's expertise. Since 
much of that expertise lies in the area of agriculture, we will place 
strong emphasis on the development of short courses in this area. 
During the coming academic year we would expect our short course 
offerings to include: 

Forecasting 

Inventory Planning 

Material Requirements Planning 

Purchasing , 

Nutrition 

Preservation of Foods 

Home Vegetable Gardening 

Bonsai 



TH 




AM 



Vol. 24. No. 2 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley Colfege 



October 4, 1976 



Is Del Val Crowded? 

By: John Melograna 

The number of students attending Delaware Valley this 
year has markedly increased. This has affected both on- and 
off-campus students. 

A number of lounges in the men's dormitories have been 
converted into bedrooms, leaving only two lounges for the 
male students. One of the remaining T.V. rooms will be 
converted to a lounge shortly, according to Mr. Sitarski. 

Fifteen rooms (which are slightly larger than an average 
room) originally built for two men have three men living in 
them. In most cases, the third person is a freshman living with 
two upperclassmen. 

The increase in students has also been felt in classes. Some 
labs have more students than their maximum capacity will 
allow. The General Studies Division seems to have been hit the 
hardest. In certain classes, students must "fetch" a desk from a 
neighboring classroom to get a seat. It seems that for the 
number of additional students admitted to the college, the 
number of classrooms and faculty members has not increased 
proportionally. The sciences are also experiencing the same 
problem. 

A small committee of students brought the problem of 
overcrowding to the attention of Student Government on 
Monday, September 20. The problem is now being investigated 
to fmd out the facts and figures. 

Concerning the dormitories, Mr. Tasker offered the follow- 
ing explanations. The lounges have been converted to allow 
more students to live on campus. The rooms with three 
students are called "cushion" or "buffer" rooms which allow 
extra students to be admitted on campus. A certain number of 
students (based on figures from previous years) are expected 
to drop out during the first few weeks of school. This year, the 
expected numbey have not dropped. People living in the 
"cushion" rooms for the entire semester will receive a partial 
refund of their room bill. 

This will not solve the problem of 45 students living in a 
cramped situation. Classes and labs are currently being 
investigated and no information has, as yet, been collected. 

Off-campus housing (which would be college-owned or 
rented) was researched by the administration last semester. No 
conclusions were drawn. 

Last year we saw an increase in student enrollment. This 
year there is a greater increase over last year. We have all 
entered Delaware Valley College with the expectation of 
finding a small college atmosphere. Is the situation changing? 

Anyone interested in doing something, visit the "Commit- 
tee for a Small College Education," Ullman Hall 110. 



ATTENTION ^UDEWS 

IF YOU ARE NOT RE6fSTf«ED TO VOTE 
MAKE SURE YOU GET REGISTERED. (F YOU 
ARE REGISTERED, WRITE HOME FOR AN 
APPLICATION FOR ^4 ABSENTEE BALLOT AND 




TE. 



THIS IS A 

*• • • • .iL 



TIONAL ELECTION. 



INTRODUCING 
MISS KAREN ORBAKER 

Who is she? She is a local 
girl. She graduated from Cen- 
tral Bucks East High School 
in 1971 and then proceeded 
to Springfield College in 
Massachusetts. There she re- 
ceived her B.S. in Teadier 
Education and Psychology. 

Now she's at Del- Val in 
the capacity of Assistant to 
the Dean of Students, Mr. 
Tasker. How does a psycho- 
logy major fit in that posi- 
tion? She tells me that ^e's 
interested in educational 
psychology and student per- 
sonnel, so it seems to fit 1 
think that she's going to try 
to figure out what makes the 
students of this campus tick. 
She is mainly in charge of the three women's residence halls 
and the eight women R.A.'s. But she insists she's not a Dean of 
Women and that anyone can come and talk with her, male or 
female. She feels that if anyone has any complaints or 
suggestions that they should come and talk about it. She 
thinks that there should be more communication between the 
students and the administration: nothing ever gets done by 
remaining silent and it never hurts to ask. 

Will she be a hard-nose? Well, she knows the rules and 
regulations, and will stick by them. . .but she's not out to look 
for trouble. She's young, and knows what college life is all 
about, but unfortunately she's got her job, too. 

By all means go and discuss things with htr. She's more 
than willing to listen. The more people we can communicate 
with on the administrative staff the better. 
Welcome, Karen Orbaker. 

ON CHOOSING A CAREER 

By: Robert W. McClelland 
Director of Placement 

Beginning with the first week of your freshman year and 
continuing for four years you maintain a rather enviable social 
position within today's society. That social position is re- 
flected by your occupation which is listed on most forms as 
"Student". 

You really don't feel the pressure during your four years of 
study because you're studying and preparing to be an A. B.C. 

When your friends ask you what you're doing you can say 
"well I'm going to college and I am majoring in X.Y.Z. and I 
plan to become an A. B.C." Your friends will respond with 
"that's really cool", and you are accepted for what you are in 
an age of titles and positions. 

Continued from page 6 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1976 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may he submitted to "The Ram" 
c/o DelVal Post Office. No stamp is necessary. Simply hand 
to the Postmistress. 

Dear Editor, 

I feel that the student government of this campus is 
inadequately serving its students. It's true that entertainment 
is provided in the form of mixers, coffeehouses and movies. 
Yet, the essentials of daily life are neglected. What I am 
referring to is the total absence of laundry facilities for our use 
on this campus. Many who hike into town each week or down 
to ChalBrit Plaza must be sympathized with. Precious time is 
lost scrambling for enough washers and dryers, all the while 
competing with the townspeople. Even though the influx of 
business helps local laundromats, it does infringe on their 
regular customers. 

Hearsay informs me that 1) there is not anywhere on 
campus to house a laundromat; 2) there is nobody to supervise 
it; 3) drainage and water supply are non-existent for the 
volume r^uired; 4) the administration does not have the 
funds needed for allocation. Any or all of the above may be 
true, more than likely they are. Yet, if it is in our best interest 
to have a laundromat on campus, there should be one. Red 
tape to get one shouldn't exist. 

An alternative choice would be to contact a willing outfit 
to provide a self-service unit on campus for student use. This 
would be more suitable for us, rather than the personal 
laundry service which is available upon request (as the '76-'77 
student handbook mentions) from the people who provide 
linen service, Mary Macintosh. I know I prefer my clothes 
done the way I do, not like sheets. 

I strongly urge my fellow students to join me in this 
protest; Stand up for your beliefs. Time should not be wasted 
getting to a laundromat that could be spent more worthwhile 
elsewhere, 

Marian Kloter 
Cooke 205 



THINK GREEN 

By: Steve Silbersteln 
AIR CIRCULATION AND INDOOR PLANTS 

One of the problems sometimes encountered with indoor 
plants, especially succulents, is the rotting of the stem or 
roots. In cases in which the plant has not been overwatered or 
is infested with insects, a likely cause is fungi that rot living 
plant tissues. Excessively high humidity and poor air circula- 
tion can enable fungi spores to gain a foothold, putting an end 
to that cactus or other prized plant. 

If you have found poor air circulation to be a problem, 
either a room fan or a small fan placed near the plants is 
helpful. The plants should get a slight breeze, not a harsh draft 
or wind. The proper spacing of plants also helps increase air 
circulation. 

Paul Stookey to Appear at Albright 

Noel Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul and Mary will appear at 
Albright College, 13th and Exeter Sts., Reading, Pa., Sunday, 
October 10 at 2 p.m. in the Chapel. "" 

Stookey, who is devoting most of his time to studio work, 
plans only eight appearances in 1976. The albright concert, his 
last of the year, will have free admission. 

Stookey has put out two albums on the Warner label since 
the pioneering folk group broke up in 1971. The main thrust 
of his work centers around his recording studio. 

Since 1971, the direction of Stookey's music has changed 
The emphasis has shifted to the personal and spiritual aspects 
of life, as typified by his best known work of the past few 
years, 'Wedding Song (There Is Love)." Stookey, who prefers 
to be called Noel, says, "I do just my own songs, .almost 
entirely. My music is tied up with my life." 

Noel Stookey is known for his quick and original sense of 
humor. Many say that his dynamism and energy were the key 
element in the long success of Peter, Paul and Mary. The group 
split up in 1971 when the three chose to follow different 
artistic directions. 

The concert is sponsored by Potter Productions, a Reading 
-based concert promotion and production organization. 



Dear Marian, 

Your point is well taken. The question of laundromats on 
campus has Jjeen asked by every incoming class of freshmen. 
By the next issue of the RAM, the question will have been put 
to the administration and hopefully answered. 

Ed. 

Smokers: 

The audacity of some students amazes me. Clearly posted 
in the cafeteria are "No Smoking" signs, yet several students 
ignore these and continue to smoke. The disregard for rules is 
in itself a fault. But when that disregard causes the discomfort 
of others it is even more despicable. Smokers, you are ignorant 
addicts. Don't pollute my lungs, burn my eyes, or foul my 
clothing with your cancer-causing fumes. Pay attention to the 
"No Smoking" signs in the dining hall and do everyone else a 
favor. 

Tom Simpson '77 



IHINK GREEN is a write-in column meant to answer your 
Questions about your houseplants, especially cacti and succu- 
lents. If you have any questions about houseplants, write to 
THINK GREEN c/o the RAM and drop them off at the P.O. 




7ke nZam 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editorin-Chiaf . .Pat Wohlferth 

Associate Editor Ken Brusstar 

Business Manager Chris Main 

Typist , "Gerb" 

Staff Cartoonist Jean Dimmler 

Faculty Advisors Dr. Keys, Dr. Ziemer 



17w opirtions expressed here are not rtecessarily those of the 
student body. RAM staff. Faculty, or Administration. 

Printed on recyclable paper 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1976 



looking for things to do7 

The Bucks County Historical Society 

Eliot Wigginton who is editor of The Foxfire Book Series 
which documents disappearing hand crafts and culture of our 
American inheritance, will open the four-part Mercer Museum 
Sampler lecture series on Wednesday, October 6. His program, 
and those on October 13, October 20 and November 3, will be 
given at Lenape Junior High School auditorium. Route 202, 
west of the center of Doylestown, starting at 8 p.nu 

Wigginton is nationally known for working with his 
students in hi|^ school English classes at Rabun Gap, Georgia, 
to develop Foxfire first a magazine, which grew into a series of 
books and is now a concept of experiential education being 
implemented in school districts throughout our country and in 
several foreign countries. 

He will cover the initial inspiration and concept for Foxfire, 
its success and future, and its relationship to the Mercer 
Museum collections of "Tools of the Nation Maker." "The 
Foxfire Film," a 20 rhinute color film vf^\ be part of the 
program. Wigginton will be accompanied by one of his 
students who contributed to The Foxfire Book. 

On October 13, Edward LaFond will present a general 
survey of Pennsylvania clocks, with a closer look at the clocks 
of Bucks County, and emphasis on tall case clocks. 

Admission for individual programs will be available at the 
auditorium door, priced at $3.50 for society members, $5.00 
for non-members, and $1.50 for card carrying students. For 
further information, contact the Bucks County Historical 
Society at 345-0210. 



Bucks County Audubon Society 

"It's the most ambitious program ever undertaken by the 
Bucks County Audubon Society," its president George Car- 
michael said about the group's 76-77 program schedule which 
was announced this week. 

"There are an average of two field trips a month including 
two boat tri[K this year to sign ocean birds. There are bus trips 
planned to Hawk Mountain and the Bronx Zoo plus several 
weekend field trips. 

In addition, a special theme and guest speaker are scheduled 
for every regular monthly meeting. 

Carmichael said all members of the local group will receive 
a brochure describing events but other interested persons may 
obtain a copy by writing BCAS: Box 741, Doylestown, Pa. 
18901 or by telephoning 598-7535. 



Ninety Artist- Illustrators 
in new Brandywine Show 

The Brandywine River Museum will celebrate American 
achievement in illustration in a Bicentennial exhibition featur- 
ing 90 artist-illustrators. The show opens Sept. 11 and runs 
through Nov. 21. 

The exhibition includes the work of some of Americans 
greatest illustrators: Edwin Austin Abbey, A.B. Frost, Edward 
Penfield, Charies Dana Gibson, Howard I^le and N.C. Wyeth. 

Also represented are some who became famous as American 
artists: Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, William 
Glackens, John Sloan, Everett Shinn and many others. 

For further information, contact: John Sheppard, Director 
of Community Affairs, Brandywine River Museum, Chadds 
Ford, Pa. 19317. (215) 388-7601. 



The Warrens: 



Seekers of the Supernatural 




Ed and Lorraine Warren, investigators of the supematortl, 
will bring background data, photos, slides and taped interviews 
of their documented case histories of hauntings and witchcraft 
to Mandell Auditorium on Tuesday, October 26th. 

The Warrens have devoted a lifetime to the study of psychic 
phenomenon. Lorraine is a clairvoyant and Ed, a researcher 
and investigator of paranormal activity. Together they have 
worked with psychiatrists, doctors, priests, ministers and 
mediums in over 2000 cases and have documented well over 
300 of these dealing with human and inhuman spirits which 
they consider genuine hauntings, poltergeists, spirit posses- 
sions, astral projection, demonology and witchcraft. Their 
investigations have taken them across the U.S. and to Mexico 
and Canada. 

Ed Warren is considered an expert in his field and is one of 
the few people ever allowed to view the sacred church files of 
the case on which, "The Exorcist" was based. 

In addition to their extensive lecture tours, the Warrens are 
prbfessional artists and maintain their own studio and school 
in New England. It was in fact their interest in painting old 
houses and New England scenes that brought them in contact 
with many varieties of "apparitions" and "spirits" that led 
them to become seriously involved in the supernatural. 

The Warrens have had their own television show and appear 
frequently on radio and television as guests. They have also 
been featured in countless newspapers, magazines and periodi- 
cals. 



m 



Page 4 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1^76 




Block & Bridle News 

By: Donna Foley 

The first meeting of the 1976-1977 Block and Bridle Club 
was held September 22 in the "Birdcage" with a record 115 
students attending including freshmen and new members. The 
activities lined up for the fall semester are varied, interesting 
and hold the promise of involvement of all members: 

1) Construction of another prize-winning Homecoming 
float 

2) Annual Block and Bridle Homecoming Ham Sale 

3) Designing and buying club T-shirts 

4) Annual club trip — this year to Wye Plantation and 
Perdue in Maryland on October 21. 

5) Halloween Party at Farm #3. 

6) Publishing a Club Yearbook 

7) Making a Club Scrapbook of activities, etc. to be 
entered in the intercollegiate Block and Bridle competition. 

8) Volleyball Intramural teams 

9) Christmas Party 

10) Various speakers from the animal industry 

Along with getting all the members familiar with the 
semester's activities, President Howard Hoffman presented a 
demonstration: THE ANATOMY OF A SHEEP, (along with a 
surprise ending. . . ! ) 

The Block and Bridle Club will prove to be one of the most 
involved and educational clubs on campus. Watch for signs in 
the major campus buildings publicizing the upcoming meet- 
ings. . .and join us! 



Help Us While You Help Yourself 

Is your life at a standstill? Have you reached that point in 
time when you feel useless? If so, come join the Sigma Society 
and do something useful and rewarding for yourself and the 
others you will help through your service. The Sigma Society 
has grown and matured from the Women's Service Club and 
would like you to come join and mature with them. You will 
not only help Del Val, but also the Doylestown area with 
many of their service functions. Come and learn how to make 
other people's lives happier, while helping yourself to a more 
fulfilling education. 



Apiary Welcomes New Members 

By: Bob Gerberich, President 

I want to welcome all the freshmen to DVC and take this 
opportunity to invite you to join the Apiary Society. The 
objectives of the Apiary Society of Delaware Valley College 
are to further the knowledge of and interest in apiculture 
(beekeeping) The Society seeks to accomplish this not only 
for its own members but also for the members of the College 
community, and the members of the general public. 

In the past the Society has been active in attempting to 
fulfill its objectives by (1) helping manage the college apiary, 
(2) setting up an exhibit and manning an information booth 
dealing with the topic of "Honey" at the Annual Meeting of 
the American Beekeeping Federation, (3) helping judge the 
Bucks County Honey Show, the New Jersey Honey Show and 
the 1976 American Honey Show, (4) purchasing of education- 
al materials such as posters, slides, and the excellent film 
'Secret in the Hive," (5) participating in A-Day, and (6) 
holding an annual banquet. 

The meetings are held in the Bee House located across the 
railroad tracks behind New Dorm. The meeting time is usually 
7.00 P.M. on Thursdays. These are not definite because they 
are flexible to the members' schedules. Signs are posted in the 
Dining Hall and Post Office as well as in other buildings on 
campus to indicate the meeting dates and times. 

The members of the Society sell various honey products on 
campus and to the public. Among these products are Beeswax 
candles, comb honey, spread honey and liquid honey. Tho 
members sell these honey products in lieu of paying dues. 

I hope that you take advantage of this opportunity' to 
become involved in one of the many activities offered here at 
DVC If you would like more information contact any 
member or me at Goldman 204. 



HONEY PRODUCTS 



THE APIAR 
HON OF HO 
HAVE PURE 






SOCIETY HAS A WIDE SELEC- 
PRPDUCTS^CJR 
, CANDLES^ 
y^AND Ll( 
PES OF ^EADid 
:4NNAM0fV APRI9OI 

T^PES OF lyitaiipr 

GE BLOSSOMd'Wl ' 

PURCHASE ^aUR HONEY F^OfOlANY WlEM- 
BER OF THE APIARY SOCIETY OR FROM ROOM 
204, GOLDMAN. 



Cornucopia 77 



All you upper classmen, remember the Yearbook? Did you 
have any griefs about it? If you did then we want you! The 
Cornucopia staff is now in the process of creating the '77 
Yearbook and is looking for new ideas and a new theme. If 
you have an idea or just want to help, come up to Admissions 
third floor and become one of the group. This year the book 
will be headed by Sonia Shaner and Beverly Tichy. If you 
want to help, talk to either of them and get involved. The 
Cornucopia is for all of us, not just for those who take the 
time to help. Don t complain about it; help make this the best 
Yearbook ever! 



Page 5 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1976 



Ornamental Horticulture Society 

The Ornamental Horticulture Society is once again active 
on the Del-Val campus. Most of the club's first meeting was 
devoted to ideas and plans for this semester. The society has 
scheduled various speakers, the first of these being Mr. Nutt 
from Longwood Gardens. Some other speakers to come are 
Mr. Vick from Vick's Wildflower Gardens, Mr. Lindeman from 
the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society, and Mr. Rosade who is 
an expert in the art of Bonsai. 

Not only will the club be listening to speakers, but it will 
also be listening to speakers of its own. The Society is going to 
offer lectures to interested groups in the Doylestown area on 
various aspects of ornamental horticulture. By doing so the 
club hopes to aid its treasury and get the society known to 
people outside the college. Aside from this the club is planning 
other fund raising projects in hope that this year we can do 
some work on campus beautification. The club is also pleased 
to announce the return of Mr. Blau as the society's faculty 
advisor. 

Meetings for this semester are scheduled for the second and 
fourth Wednesdays of the month. It's not too late to become 
part of the Ornamental Horticulture Society; come on! Times 
will be posted, so watch for the signs. 



Equestrian Team 



CREATIVE WRITING CONTEST OFFERS 
CASH AND BOOK PRIZES 

Writers: You can win $100; $50; or $25 for best 
short story, hunnorous essay, or other short pieces 
between 250 and 1000 words - with free copy of 
winning COLLEGE CONTEMPORARIES Magazine 
for all - if you enter the Collegiate Creative Writing 
Contest whose deadline is NOVEMBER 5. For rules 
and official entry form, send self -addressed, stamped 
envelope to: International Publications, 4747 Foun- 
tain Ave., Suite C- 1 , Los Angeles, CA 90029. 



DVC at Animal Science Convention 

By: Donna Foley 

Four Delaware Valley College Animal Science students 
attended a three-day Joint Regional Meeting of the Northeast 
Division of the American Dairy Science Association and the 
Northeast Section of the American Society of Animal Science 
at the National Agiicultural Library, Beltsville Agricultural 
Research Center in Maryland this summer. Technical research 
papers were presented there to members by research teams 
from universities throughout the Northeast Area with topics 
covering all aspects of reproduction, nutrition, production, 
and management of livestock. The annual business meeting for 
the NE-ADSA-ASAS was held along with an organizational 
meeting for Block and Bridle and Dairy Student Affiliate- 
Groups to be established so that the National Organizations 
will be made more aware of student interests and activities in 
the animal industry. 

Dr. Tibor Pelle and Dr. Craig Hill accompanied Nancy 
Henkel, Dave Miller, Donna Foley, and Mena Hautau to this 
convention in July, and all congratulated members of the West 
Virginia University research team, winners of the competition 
held between research teams for the best research and 
presentation of technical papers. (Bruce Pratt, 1974 alumnus 
of Del Val is a member of the West Virginia team.) 



The Equestrian Team is happy to announce their first 
seasonal Horse Show, October 24, at Coppergate Farms, N.J. 
Fifteen riders will be exhibiting in Beginner, Novice Open, 
and Hunt Team classes. We welcome all new members, and 
those interested, who enjoy horses and showing 
***GOOD LUCK*** 



Dairy Judging in Competition 

By: Nancy Houseknecht 

The 1976 Dairy Judging team started practicing last 
semester for the fall contest in which they are participating 
After three hard weeks of practice under coach Dr. James 
McCaffi«e, the team had its first contest. Members of the team 
are April Grosjean, Beth Stephens, Nancy Houseknecht. Kirk 
Hillegass and John Shirey. On September 18 the team 
competed in the Eastern States Dairy Judging Contest taking 
8th place. Individual awards went to April Grosjean for placing 
6th in Holsteins, and Nancy Houseknecht for placing 4th in 
Brown Swiss, 8th in Jerseys, and 15th in judging of all breeds. 

The next contest was held at Harrisburg, Pa. in conjunction 
with the Ail-American Dairy Show. The team took 2nd out of 
13 teams with the University of Wisconsin being first. The 
team took first in judging Brown Swiss and Guernseys, and 
fourth in Jerseys. Individual winners were Beth Stephens 1st in 
Brown Swiss, Nancy Houseknecht 3rd in Guernseys, and Kirk 
Hillegass 4th in Jerseys. Individual placing in all breeds were 
Kirk Hillegass 5th and Nancy Houseknecht 8th. The team will 
be traveling yet to Madison, Wisconsin and Columbus. Ohio. 



Would you really be surprised if. 



Dei. Val., like any other place, has many idiosyncrasies. We 
think we may have found a few future ones. Being the 
open-minded student you are, read these, and think. 

Would you really be surprised if. . . 

. . . the homecoming game was away? 

. . . you almost choked on a chunk of jello in the "caf"? 

, . . you found out the "Renta Cops" get a commission o.n 
the tickets they write? 

. . . they turned stairwells into 4-man rooms next year? 

. . . they put barb-wire up around the perimeter of the 
campus? 

... a rule is passed that you must forfeit your first-bom 
male child in order to register your automobile? 

... the Partridge Family was featufed at a mixer, with 
special guest Brownesville Station? 

... a succulent concession was suddenly set up in Work 
Hall? 

. . . Burpee's hired attack dogs, and set up a mine field? 

. . . Michale Pentz started wearing a ski cap, just like 
Serpico? 

... it was decreed, "lights out after taps"? 

. . . you threw your line in lake Archer and it dissolved? 

... a death penalty for stealing tea bags and sugar packs 
was instituted? 

. . . Mrs. (Sally) Smith was appointed Chemistry Dept. 
Chairman? 

. . . your book bill for the semseter comes out to more than 
the tuition? 

. . . they bounce a quarter off of your bed during room 
inspection while you stand alongside at attention? 



i 



Page 6 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1976 



ContiniMd from page 1 

THOUGHTS ON CHOOSING A CAREER 

There is only one problem with all this security that you 
are experiencing: commencement day does come around and 
the next day you're on the streets and your friends ask "Say, 
what are you doing these days?" and your response would be 
"Well I just fmished college where I majored in X.Y.Z. and I 
am planning to be an A.B.C." Your friends will then say "How 
do you like working as an A.B.C?" and if you prepared 
yourself you will say "I really enjoy the profession and I am 
moving right along." (Note: If you prepared yourself, then 
you don't need to read any further.) However, if you haven't 
prepared yourself and your answer to your friend's question 
was "Well, I don't know, you see, I can't find a job!" Then 
there are some things you will have to do. 

1. You should identify your skills. Skills are things that 
you learned in school or during a part time job. Maybe you're 
mechanically inclined or have an aptitude for mathematics or 
laboratory work. Maybe you can grow things or are good with 
animals. At any rate, identify your skills and then go to the 
next step. 

2. Determine the professions that can use your skills. You 
can do this by reading company literature or perhaps reading a 
reference such as The Encyclopedia of Careers and Vocational 
Guidance which is available in the Placement Office (1st floor 
Allman Building). This type of reference will outline various 
professions, listing things like the history of the profession, 
educational requirements, salary ranges, methods of entering 
the profession, etc. Once you have completed this task and 
have found the areas that interest you, and that can use your 
skills, then go to the library. 

3. Go directly downstairs and find the periodicals section. 
In this section you can dream a little. Imagine that you are an 
A.B.C. and pull out all the periodicals (Trade Journals) related 
to that profession. Now just go through each one and read 
some of the articles, read the ads, and the classified section. 
This is an easy way to get the feeling of what it would be like 
to be an A.B.C. By the way, if you find a periodical that you 
really like why not subscribe to it and get your own copies. 

If you like what you have read then go upstairs and ask the 
librarian to direct you to the shelves housing references and 
textbooks related to the A.B.C. profession. Browse through 
them and get a sense of the knowle(^e you could absorb if 
you read every book in that section. 

By now you should really be "motivated." 

4. Now it's time to go to class. Your professors have a 
wealth of information that they will present to you during 
lectures and laboratory periods. What they are really teaching 
you is a language. This is the language of your profession and 
you will be exposed to many terms, graphs, data, etc. during 
your four years. Reports indicate that most students retain 
approximately 25% of that information. The important thing 
to remember, however, is that if you get anything out of your 
education plea.se learn how to research a problem and learn 
where you can look up the answer and solve the problem. If 
you do this, you'll be in very good shape. Remember, your 
occupation is "Student" and you owe it to yourself to get all 
you can out of this four year period. 

5. Finally, sometime during your stay at Delaware Valley, 
tr>' to contact a person who is an A.B.C. Ask that person if 
you may spend a day with them. This would be a day in which 
you could shadow this person — a day in which you could find 
out what types of situations might occur in a typical day. 
What time do you get up in the morning? What types of 
people would you be working with? What kind of working 
conditions would you be exposed to? 

Hopefully you will find the day rewarding. Hopefully you 
will also experience some of the aggravations of the job, some 
of the frustrations, for as you should know there is no such 
thing as the perfect job or profession There are, however, jobs 



and professions that come close to being perfect and you are 
the only one who can determine which profession or job is for 
you. 

If all of this sounds like a lot of woric, it is. But then, of 
course, there are 24 hours in every day and that should be 
time enough. Remember it's your future and your happiness 
and it's your responsibility to yourself to make the most of it. 

Senior Special Problems 

The Faculty Research Committee ia urging the 
Seniors, arul particularly those interested in graduate 
studies to avail themselves of the Senior Special 
Problems program. Information regarding the program 
can be obtained from Dr. Berthold for students enrolled 
in the Biology and Chemistry Departments, Dr. Brubaker 
for the Agriculture area, Mr. McCool for the Business 
Administration, or from the Chairman of the Research 
Committee. 

PROCEDURES FOR SENIOR SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

1. Students in Senior Special Problems should have a 
minimum cumulative academic average of 2.5 
before registration for Special Problems. This 
figure (2.5) may be subject to revision for a 
specific departnnent on the approval of the depart- 
ment and division chairmen in consultation with 
the Chairman of the Research Committee. 

2. Students may register for a maximum of three 
credits of Senior Special Problems with the ap- 
proval of their Departnnent Chairman. 

3. The deadlines for the Senior Special Problems to 
be completed during the Fall or Spring Semester 
of any given academic year are as follows: 



I Research Proposals 

- oral presentation 

- written proposal 

11 Final Results 

oral presentation 

- written final paper 



FALL 
SEMESTER 

April 30 
May 10 



Nov. 30 
Dec. 10 



SPRING 
SEMESTER 

Nov. 30 
Dec. 10 



April 30 
May 10 



4. The original and one copy of the final draft are to be 
submitted to the Research Committee by the Department 
Chairman one week following the oral presentation. 

5. No credit shall be recorded for Senior Special Problems 
until the Registrar has been advised in writing by the 
Chairman of the Research Committee that requirement #4 
has been complied with. 

6. The format of the final report must follow a specific and 
acceptable arrangement as recommended by the standard 
research journals in the field of the project or the Research 
Committee. 

7. The Research Committee will submit the original copy of 
the final report given to them by the Department Chairman 
to the library for future reference. 

Julian Prundeanu, Chairman 
Research Committee 



Page 7 



THE RAM 



October 4, 1976 



Del Val Cross Country Shines Again 



Soil Conservation Meeting Held 




By: Fooj 

At press time, the Delaware Valley College Cross Country 
team is 4-0 and still running strong. Frequently the bright spot 
in our struggling fall sports season, the runners, coached by Dr. 
Robert ("Doc") Berthold, began this year's practice at an 
advantage after losing only two seniors to graduation: Chuck 
Moose and Mark Wilson. 

At a triangular nwet at Ursinus on September 18, Del Val 
finished victorious 27-29 against Ursinus and 17-42 against 
Haverford (low score wins). Senior Bob Weidman placed 2nd 
in the race to lead the team, with Senior Captain Paul Bernett 
close behind at 3rd place. Sophomore Vic Prey (5th), Junior 
Ray Bryson (9th), Senior Dave Stull (10th), and Freshman 
Bob Gabel (11th) rounded out the top finishers. 

Last Saturday, September 25, Del Val marked up two more 
wins against Muhlenburg (15-48) and Dickinson (18-45) at 
Muhlenburg. Bernett and Weidman ("The Bobsey Twins") 
finished first in a tie with a time of 27:05 to be joined by six 
more DVC men in the top ten finishers: Junior Jerry 
O'Connor (4th), Vic Frey (5th), Ray Bryson (6th), Dave Stull 
(8th) Bob Gabel (9th), and Senior Carl Kogel (10th). 

Delaware Valley hosts its season's first home meet this 
Friday, October 1. in a quadrangular meet against Wilkes, 
Albright, and Philadelphia Textile starting at 3:00 P.M. by the 
Alumni House and finishing on the football field. Coach 
Berthold urges all Aggies to come and cheer our team on to 
another victorious season for Cross Country. 



Soccer Revue 

By: Richard Grabowski 

This year there are 28 players on the Del Val soccer squad. 
The team is made up of 11 Freshmen, 8 Sophomores, 6 
Juniors'and 3 Seniors. The team is designed on a club basis and 
is not officially designated as an Inter-collegiate sport. 

The coach is Mr. Marshall and the captain is Greg 
Swidersky. Last week the team lost their opener (5-0) to 
Widener. In the coaches' eyes, the men did OK in the first half 
and fell apart in the second half. This is partially due to having 
only 2 weeks to practice before the season started. These 3 
players did some of the best jobs on the field: Freshman, Dave 
Loesser, good in playing center and half-back; Senior, Bill 
Gerberch, goalie — good saves made and Freshman, Bob Stille, 
good job as full-back. 

The coach says that in the 5 games, he is hopeful and they 
have less experience, but they'll develop as time goes on. 




Benny Martin of the Soil Conservation Service 



By: Jessie A. Daubert 

The peaceful atmosphere of DVC's summer life was broken 
at one point last July when many prominent conservationists 
and their families arrived at our campus. The two-day affair 
was the annual joint meeting of the Keystone and William 
Penn Chapters of the Soil Conservation Society of Anwrica 
which was hosted by Delaware Valley College. The important 
and complex theme of this conference was The Next Hundred 
Years New Concepts in Land Use and Preservation of Natural 
Resources. This topic was presented in two diverse methods: 
one afternoon was devoted to a panel discussion between 
experts on different governmental levels, and another was 
devoted to members of the society who presented papers in 
the following day's technical session. 

The panel discussion was moderated by Karl Davidson of 
the United States Forestry Service, and members were 
officially welcomed to DVC by Dr. Feldstein. Dr. Maurice 
Goddard, Secretary' of the Department of Environmental 
Resources of the Commonwealth, had been slated as the 
keynote speaker of the afternoon, but his presence was 
required in Washington for testimony on the proposed Tocks 
Island Dam project. The speech he had prepared was presented 
by Benny Martin, a conservationist with the Soil Conservation 
Service. 

Dr. Goddard 's major concern is with the apathy of the 
general public regarding land use, planning, and management, 
and the difficulty in communicating with the people of 
Pennsylvania. One example of this indifference is the public's 
acceptance of a policy which permits the building of homes 
upon floodplains; if a program as obvious as fioodplain 
management is doomed to failure, a general land use control 
bill will never succeed. It is absolutely necessary to convince 
people of the importance of becoming involved with the 
broad, basic polic>' planning instead of waiting for the local 
problems which directly influence their lives; protests of these 
narrow issues are often too late. 

The five panel members then expres.sed their views upon 
the same theme. These gentlemen presented the opinions of 
the federal, state, and county levels of land management as 
well as the views of the Bucks County Land Use Task Force 
and of the Bucks County realtors. The audience gained a 
further understanding of the problems of land management 
and came away from the meeting with much food for thought. 

Our report in the next issue of THE RAM will involve the 
technical session of the meeting. 



TH 




AM 



Vol. 24, No. 3 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



October 26, 1976 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may he submitted to "The Ram" 
c/o Dei- Val Post Office. No stamp is necessary. Simply hand 
to the Postmistress. 



Dear Editor, 

Being a 1975 graduate of the Animal Science Department 
of Delaware Valley College I feel an obligation to explain to 
the graduate candidate of this department and others "What to 
Expect!" 

I can remember that my class in the Animal Science 
department thought they had two types of people. These were 
the practical-productionists and the studious scientists. Un- 
fortunately these groups did not always enjoy each other's 
company and somehow thought they were enrolled in differ- 
ent departments. 

Do you realize how fortunate you all are to be forced to 
select your course work within several restrictions? Some 
larger schools allow the student full freedom in his selection of 
program and the result is unfortunate. Larger universities have 
obligations to research and extension which greatly stifle their 
flexibility to work with the student. 

Several programs are available at D.V.C. that I urge every 
student to utilize. I wptsh I had taken the opportunity in my 
time. Either type of the student above should attempt to do 
an independent study while in undergraduate school. The 
livestock production courses offered at D.V.C. have placed 
you at or above the graduate of several other universities. You 
may not think your education in this direction is significant, 
but believe me, I don't care if you want to study physiology or 
veterinary medicine, it is the study of livestock management 
that puts your courses in nutrition, diseases, feeds and feeding, 
meats, physiology, and others in formal perspective. I realize 
that large animale research is conducted to a greater extent at 
larger institutions but I know for a fact that the interest can 
bring results. 

I always enjoyed those classmates who wore invisible signs 
saying, "I am a stockman!" I know you have seen them at A 
Day. Some wear western apparel, cowboy hats, stock caps and 
even chaps. Other more science-oriented students found this 
less interesting. Although everyone is entitled to his own 
wished exposures, you had better get involved. Those courses 
in biometrics may appear unappetizing, but today's produc- 
tion records require a student versed in statistics and breeding- 
selection courses to determine their true value. 

What you can expect upon graduation is that every course 
you have taken at D.V.C. will be useful. If you attempt to do 
independent study I know you will be exposed to courses and 
work that may not be too palatable, but I am sure you will 
assimilate in your digestive process not only interesting 



RAM Readers, 

Are you enjoying the Homecoming issue? Note the lack of 
Homecoming articles. Rotten newspaper and terrible coverage, 
you may say. Well, you are right, of course. But my question 
to you is what do you expect from a handful of contributors? 
And NO photographer? I'm sorry this Homecoming issue is 
not better, but attendance at RAM meetings show that I 
haven't a copious number of quick, creative minds to draw 
upon. What's your mind doing these days? 



A COLLEGE RING 

It's a symbol for life 



SPBDIAL OFFER! 



OFF 



i'l\%ZX 




Josten's 

is a ring for life 



Myers Jewelry Store 
State St., Doylestown 



continued on page 2 



AREA EVENTS 



10/29 



JOHNNY'S DANCE BAND will be 
here (yes, at D.V.C.) for the Hallo- 
ween Masquerade Dance. Be there in 
your favorite costume. Admission is 
$2.00. 

Johnny's D.B. will also be appearing at 
the Buck's County Play House in New 

continued on page 2 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



October 26, 1976 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR continued from page 1 

information but an appreciation for your education and those 
people who have devoted their lives to animal science. 

Thomas F. Park, Jr. (FS) 

Graduate Assistant & Staff 

Animal Industries Department, U. of C!onn. 



Marion, 

This letter is in reply to your letter concerning laundry 
facilities on campus in the last issue qi the RAM. 

I can promise you that the question you asked has been 
asked countless times before. I shall try to provide you with 
some honest answers. I talked to Mrs. Work concerning the 
problem because I felt she could provide me with the most 
substantial answers. Please note that the basic answers are Mrs. 
Work's; the opinions are mine. 

The major problem is water. The school has its own wells. 
Whether one realizes it or not, water in this area and the 
surrounding area^ is vanishing quickly. Thus, the school would 
prefer to conserve what water it has left. The question of 
tapping into public water lines is a possibility, but water 
authorities are discouraging additional hook-ups. 

Basically the same type of situation exists with sewage. The 
school has both septic systems and public sewage. Obviously 
run-off from washing machines cannot be dumped in a septic 
system without grave consequences. The question of sewage 
might be investigated although one will find that the New 
Britain-Chalfont sewage treatment plant is operating above 
maximum capacity. 

The problem of space is probably the easiest to solve, but 
would be costly. I feel, though, that money should not be a 
deterrent to a needed student service. 

My recommendation to you would be to go to student 
government or the administration and push the issue. I can all 
but guarantee you that nothing will happen immediately but if 
you and other people have enought determination and interest 
to make your needs known, then we may in the future have 
ourselves a laundromat. 

Just in closing, one point frequently missed by the student 
body on this campus is that if they make themselves and their 
needs known, things can be changed. I know, I have done it. 

Sincerely, 
Christopher Main 



10/29 



10/31 



11/7 



10/29 



11/3 



11/12 



(Master's Degree in Business Adminis- 
tration). It will be held on Nov. 4, 5, 6 
at the Roosevelt Hotel near Grand 
Central Station in New York City. 
Administration is free. For more in- 
formation contact the Placement 
Office in Segal Hall. 

Frank Zappa appearing with Flo & 
Eddie, Spectrum Theatre. Tickets are 
$4.50, 5.50 & 6.50. 

Lou Reed Halloween Concert at the 
Tower Theatre in Philadelphia. Call 
Electric Factory at LO 3-9284 for 
more information. 

An Adult Nature Hike is being offered 
on Sunday, Nov. 7 by the people at 
Bowman's Hill Stete Wild Flower Pre- 
serve. It begins at 2 p.m. and inter- 
ested people should meet at the Pre- 
serve Headquarters. Phone No. is (215) 
862-2924. 



Montgomery County Community 
College will be sponsoring several pro- 
grams thru October and November. 

Dance Nite with JACK FLASH at the 
Cafeteria. It begins at 8 p.m. Student 
admission is $1.00. 

MANFRED MANN & the EARTH 
BAND appears in concert. One show 
at 8 p.m. in the Science Center Audi- 
torium. Tickets are $4.00, $5.00 & 
$6.00. They may be purchased at the 
Student Activities Office. 



HOUSE of ASSEMBLY, a Reggae Mu- 
sic Group, in concert. This one will be 
held in the Cafeteria at 8 p.m. and 



AREA EVENTS continued from page J 

Hope, PA on Nov. 1. Tickets there will 
be $4.50, so take advantage of your 
Student Government Program. 

The Bucks County Playhouse, in New 
Hope, PA will be producing the plays: 

10/26-11/7 An Act of Love 



11/9 - 11/21 The Chalk Garden For more informa- 
tion and tickets call (215) 862-2041. 

11/4, 5, 6 For the first time on the East Coast 
admissions officers from more than 70 
graduate schools of business and man- 
agement vtrill be available to answer 
general questions about their institu- 
tions. PURPOSE: to help students 
leam more about how to get a MBA 




7Jke nSam 



\ 



Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief . .Pat Wohlferth 

Associat* Editor Ken Brusstar 

Business Manager \ Chris Main 

Typist "Gerb" 

Staff Cartoonist Jean Oimmler 

Faculty Advisors Dr. Keys, Dr. Ziemer 



STAFF REPORTERS 



^ 



Marion Fulton, Steve Silberstein, Judy Carkhuff, Rich 
Grabowski. 

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the 
student body. RAM staff. Faculty, or Administration. 

Printed on recyclable paper 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



October 26, 1976 



11/19 



12/7 



admission is only $1.00 for students 
with I.D. 

DIALOGUE, Admission only $.50 for 
students will be at the Cafeteria at 8 
p.m. 

NOTE: Mont. Co. Community College 
is located at the intersection DeKalb 
Pike & 202 South in Blue Bell, PA. 
For tickets & information call the 
Student Entertainment Association at 
643-6000, Ext. 450. 

BLOOD DONORS for the Red Cross 
volunteer program are again needed 
this year. The date is December 7 and 
the place will be the gym. Prospective 
donors are being asked this year to 
sign up NOW in the nurse's office, 
Ullman Hall, 1st floor. 



THINK GREEN 

Q. How do I get rid of mealybugs on houseplants? 
A. An aerosol insecticide (containing Pyristhrisn) meant for 
mealybugs on indoor plants is effective, but it must be applied 
about once every three days for about a week or ten days. This 
is to kill the next generation of insects before they produce 

«ggs- 

If you would rather not use insecticides, 70% rubbing 
alcohol can be brushed or misted on affected plant parts. 
Although I have drenched entire plants with alcohol, it is 




PHONE 699-4530 



WIND OVER NURSERY 

ROUTE 202 - BETWEEN ROUTES 309 & 63 
GWYNEDD, PA. 



Specializing in Indoor Plants 
and Nursery Stock 



10% off to D.V.C. Students 



better to apply only when and where needed, since too much 
alcohol can be toxic to plants. Alcohol sho uld y ot get into the 
soil. 

Aside from these methods, promp^ remojj»P^f dead or 
dying leaves and regular rinsing of plaiKsJs^g^d preventative 
medicine. 

(Editor's Note: I have read that 24 hrs. after dosing with 
alcohol, you should wash your plant with warm H2O. This 
helps avoid poisoning your plant. Also, after you are sure 
mealybug is gone from the plant, repot it, as the female 
mealybug lays her eggs in the soil.) 



Wouldn't you be surprised if. . . 

Wouldn't you be surprised if. . . 

In the last issue of the RAM, I, and staff prepared an article 
entitled, "Would you really be surprised if. . ." Well, this being 
an election year we, being part of the news media, are obliged 
to give equal time to "the other side". Therefore, reader, tell 
us, wouldn't you be surprised if. . . 

. . .you met Dr. Work on campus? 

. . .you got HOT eggs or pancakes for breakfast? 

. . .you could see the bottom of Lake Archer? 

. . .a mixer turned a recognizable profit? 

. . .your dorm was quiet the night before you had an exam? 

. . .you could tell what was on your dinner plate, vnthoot 
looking at the menu? 

. . .you had to wait in line for Saturday breakfast? 

. . .you didn't get a parking ticket, despite the fact that 
your C.B. aerial hangs over the yellow line? 

. . .Dr. Orr gave a lecture you could keep up with? 

. . .the security guards caught a thief, or even saw one? 

. . .a new dormitory was built? 



If Only We Were so Lucky! 

By: Ken Brusstar and Paul Zmoda 

Does anyone remember when, last year, Mrs. Work an- 
nounced to the public via the "Intel", how she periodically 
serves as "King's Taster" in the school cafeteria? Well, we can't 
speak for Mrs. Work; however, being the crack reporters we 
are, we did find a tantalizing menu for a dinner served on 
October 11 in the David Levin Dining Hall. Here are a few of 
the selections prepared that Monday evening. 

A. Fresh melon slice OR 

B, Jell-0 

A. Poached Canadian salmon OR 

B. Whaler sandwich 

A. Steamed new potatoes with mint OR 

B. Home fries 

A. Broccoli Hollandaise OR 

B. Mixed vegetables 

A. Tossed salad with choice of dressings OR 

B. Choice of salads 

A. Dinner rolls, muffins, butter OR 

B. Dinner rolls, bread, butter 

A. Pumpkin pie with whipped cream OR 

B. Assorted desserts 

A. Coffee, tea, milk, booze OR 

B. Coffee, tea, milk, soda 

Well gang, how does that sound? Good? You bet! 
Unfortunately, we were stuck with "column B" while the 
Board of Trustees was treated to "column A." Who says 
there's a double standard here at DVC? 



m 



Page 4 



THE RAM 



October 26, 1976 



Halloween Week At D.V.C. 

26th Come to the "Spooky" lecture by the Warrens, titled 
"Haunted Houses and Ghosts". The Warrens are con- 
sidered experts in the field of ghosts and spirits. For the 
small price of a dollar you can find out who or what has 
been making those noises in your room at night. The 
lecture starts at 8 p.m. in Mandell 114. 

27th If the lecture by the Warrens doesn't scare you this film 
will. The name of the film is "Night Watch". Liz Taylor 
is the beautiful star of this classical horror film. Critics 
have rated this film one of the scariest films of this 
decade. Come to Mandell 114 at 7 p.m. and bring a 
friend to hold onto. The cost will be $.25 per person. 

29th This is the night of the Annual Halloween Masquerade 
Ball and Mixer. All you have to do tonight is come 
dressed up and look ugly. So dig out your ^ost and 
witch costumes and fly over to the gym. Brewing time is 
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

30th The college is sponsering a bus to take interested 
students to Juniata Colle^ to see our great football and 
cross country teams compete. Sign up sheets are posted 
in the cafeteria and Segal Hall. Check the sign up sheets 
for time of departure. Hie bus ride will be Free. 



Soil Conservation Meeting Held 

By: Jessie A. Daubert 

Our article in the last issue of The RAM described the joint 
annual meeting of the Keystone and William Penn Chapters of 
the Soil Conservation Society of America which took place at 
DVC last July. The panel discussion, which involved several 
prominent experts in different areas of land use and develop- 
ment, was reported in that issue. 

The second day of the conference consisted of a technical 
session where several members of the society presented papers 
in fields of their interest. The program was moderated by our 
own Dr. Palkovics, who was assisted by Agronomy Major 
Jessie Daubert. One of DVC's agronomy graduates, Larry 
Hepner, who is now with the Bucks County Health Depart- 
ment, discussed techniques involved with soil analysis for land 
use and planning. The effect of the physical environment on 
land use was considered by Dr. Thomas Dumper, an environ- 
mental specialist, while two computer experts from the U.S. 
Forestry Service described a method of studying available 
resources. The theme of governmental techniques of land 
management reappeared in the discussion of two economists 
with the USDA. They spoke about transferable development 





1 THE STUDENT STORE 1 


-SERVES YOU- 

* 


STUDENT STORE 


20% OFF 


MUGS & CUPS 


WITH THIS COUPON 



rights, and this discussion was continued by a local repre- 
sentative who described Buckingham's zoning ordinances. The 
session concluded with a turn to agricultural machinery when 
a member of the Soil Conservation Service provided directions 
for the construction of a "blower seeder" — a device which 
can broadcast seeds of a cover crop between rows of existing 
crop plants. 

While the scientists were involved with these meetings, their 
wives and children visited the local attractions of the area; 
New Hope, Peddler's Village, and Burpee's Fordhook Farms 
were among the favorites. The children were also given a 
hayride tour of the campus. 

Many long, hard hours brought about the success of this 
event. The efforts of Dr. and Mrs. Prundeanu, Dr. Mertz, Dr. 
Palkovics and Mr. Kemmerer were instrumental in the planning 
and administration of this involved affair. 



IT'S ONLY A CARTOON. 










Wttfw Yws I » 

^:-'? I ' 








?z-Ke 



Page 5 



THE RAM 



October 26, 1976 



Dear Sports Readers: 

If you want sports news on your favorite professional team, 
it's easy enough to go to aay newspaper and read to your 
heart's content. True? The best place for college in-depth 
sports reports is the college newspaper. True? Well, obviously 
at Del-Val this is not the case. In the RAM there has been no 
real organized sports writing for close to a year, and for the 
most part I have been powerless to do anything about it. 
Everyone seems to foi^et that the RAM depends on student 
contiibutions for its publication materials. I can't personally 
go twist people's fingers and make them write. Hence, the 
RAM directly reflects only the interests of the active contri- 
butors. 

Absence of any basic feature in the RAM is not the RAM> 
fault. Remember, you can be working on the RAM yourself. 
It's your fault! 

Field Hockey Revue 

By: Richard Grabowski 

This year, the Field Hockey team is comprised of 23 
players. There are 7 Freshmen, 7 Sophomores, 7 Juniors and 2 
Seniors. The team is coached by Mrs. Vellner, managed by 
Helen Otte and Donna Kaledinskas. The captain is Audrey 
Mather, a Senior. 

Del-Val Field Hockey is an inter-collegiate sport and the 
team plays 6 games. Freshman, Patty Reese, playing the 
offensive position, has done exceptionally well; Junior — 
Janice Kirk and Senior — Audrey Mather, defensive half-backs, 
played terrifically. 

Coach Vellner says the team has the potential to win the 
rest of the games. She is hopeful about the women and also 
says that this year's team has more talent and ambition than 
last year's team. 



Soccer Rap-Up 



The soccer team steadily improves its overall record'^y 
beating Ursinus 4-3 on Homecoming Weekend. They also beat 
Albright 4-2 in a previous game. Their only loss was their first 
game to Widner. 

Come watch the team's next home game against Albright 
on the 29th of October at the soccer field. 





Seniors Weidman and Bernett finish in a tie for first place at 
the Oct. I quadrangular meet. 

(Photo compliments of The Daily IntelUtencer) 



DVC's Gil Schieber, Jerry Volack, Ray Bryson, Paul Bernett, 
Paul Zmoda and Mark Werkheiser at the start of the Oct. 1 

quadrangular meet. (Photo compUmenU of The Daily Intellieencer) 

C-C Boys Run Away With Victories 

By: Fooj 

On Friday, October 1st the Delaware Valley College Cross 
Country Team hosted its first home race of the season despite 
rain, mud and chill against Wilkes, Albright, and Philadelphia 
Textile. Completing the race with six Aggies in the first ten 
finishers, Del Val beat Wilkes (17-46), creamed Albright 
(16-45), and swamped Philadelphia Textile (15-50). . .(low 
score wins). "The Bobsey Twins" (Seniors Paul Bernett and 
Bob Weidman) tied for first place with the time of 27:29, with 
Juniors Jerry O'Connor and Ray Bryson placing 3rd and 5th, 
with Sophomore Vic Frey (7th) and Senior Dave Stull (8th) 
following close behind. Freshman Matt Hengel (11th) also 
counted in the scoring. 

The results, however, from the team's Saturday, October 
9th race at Philadelphia's Belmount Plateau against University 
of Scranton, Lebanon Valley, and Philadelphia Textile were 
not as cheery. Finishing third behind Lebanon Valley's man 
(1st) and Scranton's man (2nd) was Paul Bernett with a time 
of 28:48; Bob Weidman followed in 7th place (29:48) and 
Ray Bryson in 9th place (30:10) being the only Aggies in the 
top ten runners. Freshman Bob Gabel ran fourth for the 
Aggies placing 12th in the race. The final scores were Lebanon 
Valley over Del Val (22-33), Scranton over Del Val (27-29); 
but the Aggies once again downed the Philadelphia runners 
(15-50), finishing seven DVC men before Textile's leader 
completed the race. 

On Homecoming last Saturday, October 16th, Del Val 
raised its record to an impressive 9-2 defeating Elizabethtown 
on our home 5-mile course. It was an easy wipe-out starting 
with Bernett in first place with his best time ever: 26:50, 
Weidman right behind at 26:51, Bryson third at 27:25, and 
Frey, Gabel, Stull and O'Connor finishing the top seven 
runners before E-Town's first runner crossed the line. The final 
score was 15-50. 

However, winning this race was not the only thing the DVC 
team had wanted. It was "planned" that the race would end 
on the football field at the game's half-time to recognize the 
team's victory, so that parents and friends packed the stands in 
anticipation. Unfortunately, though, the race was begun a few 
minutes late, making the finish extend into the football game's 
third quarter of play. The runners were then forced to finish 
the race running behind the visitor's stand instead of on the 
field, receiving no recognition at all from the home crowd. 
This was a big disappointment, expecially for the nine Senior 
members running in their last home race: Captain Paul 
Bernett, Bob Weidman, Dave Stull, Carl Kogel, Harold 
Dambly, Mark Werkheiser, Joe Szewczyk, Tom Simpson and 
Paul Zmoda. Cross Country is one of the most physically 
demanding sports on campus, and it says a lot when the Del 
Val cross country team has continued to produce a winning 
season and MAC champs year after year. And all they wanted 
was some recognition. 



TH 




AM 



Vol. 24, No. 4 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



November 8, 1976 



IT JUST GOES TO SHOW, 
THE BEST THINGS ARE FREE 

On Thursday, October 19th, Samuel Hall 2nd floor got 
together and did something fantastic. Approximately forty 
students worked as a unit and built a "haunted house" in the 
hall. Bizarre, you might think. It was fantastic. Small groups of 
students were let into the building, and were subjected to 
spooky sights, nauseating scenes, and bombardment by various 
objects. . .and everybody loved it. It is estimated that the 
estimated 500 Aggies who saw this spectacle had nothing but 
praise for it. It was the most imaginative idea that has hit 
DelVal in a while. 

Where did it all begin? About a week before the 29th, R.A. 
Vinnie Naylor called a dorm meeting and suggested it. Then he 
held a second meeting to finalize the plans. But, of course, 
things didn't start happening until the afternoon of the night it 
was supposed to take place. At 4:30 p.m. people were slowly 
starting to work. By 9:00 it was ready and the whole event 
was over by 11:30. Clean-up was done by 1:00 a.m. And it 
was all free (though a 25« charge wouldn't have been 
outrageous). 

This just goes to show that some of the best things in life 
are spontaneous and aren't to be found in any schedule of 
events. GOOD WORK, GUYS. 

CHARACTER, PLAYERS AND OTHER FELLOWS. 



Vinnie Naylor — mastermind 
Scott Strang - graveyard body 
John McFadden — utility 
Teddy Fleming — utility 
John Simon — hangman 
Mark Clauss — manned 

wobbly floor 
Greg Krug — transportation 
George Mayo — attic crew 
Don Johnson — ghost 
John Puglisi — utility 
Tim Mauk - attic crew 
Dan Ubersax — attic crew 
Karl McShane - utility 
John Fleck— hangman assistant 
Rich Gardner — utility 
Ed Taczanowsky - monster 
Kurt Weiss - headless man 
Mark Cantarello — manned 

wobbly floor 
PLUS. All of those whose names 



Tony Adamo - utility 
Bob Cassel - utility 
Tim Stawovy — surgeon 
Dan McCleary — patient 
Doug Nemeth - set-up 
Tim Robbins — set-up 
Don Mellon — set-up 
Lance Lipton — set-up 
Joe Russo — set-up 
Herb Hickmott — attic crew 
Eric Nelsom — chainman 
Dull Carothers — slave ' 
Chip Kern -surgeon 
Pete Huran — surgeon 
Tom Smith - utility 
Fran Cambell — whipmaster 
Russ Doughty — equipment 
Gordon Snyder — Igor 
Bruce VanLaere — mummy 

could not be found. 



UPDATE ON DESTRUCTION 
OF STORAGE BARN 

By: Marian Kloter 

On August 31st this year, DVC suffered a financial loss in 
the destructive fire of a storage barn located at the dairy. In a 



recent interview Dr. Joshua Feldstein, College President, 
informed me as to the specifics of this incident. 

The barn was described as being a wooden structure, circa 
1925. At approximately noon that Tuesday, a fire was sighted 
by college personnel and was reported immediately. Arrival of 
fire fighting apparatus from Doylestown and neighboring 
communities was punctual. Even though the barn was lost, 
further spread of the flames was prevented. This proved to be 
valuable because three main barns nearby housing cattle and 
the hay barn were spared. It should also be noted that neither 
animal nor human life was lost. 

Dr. Feldstein gave an approximation as to the insured value 
of the structure at $26,000. Contained within the bam were 
60 tons of straw and a hay wagon, all of which were lost. The 
College intends to replace the original structure with one of 
similar purpose and size. Because of the limited amount of 
ground area, it will be built on the exact same spot. Even 
though the structure was covered by insurance, some of the 
expenses must be absorbed by the college on account of the 
rise in prices when putting up a new structure. As this goes to 
press, replacement structures are being considered. 

The cause has been recorded as an accident, origin 
unknown. At the time of occurrence there were no 
environmental or weather factors involved (i.e. lightning 
storm). 

Dr. Feldstein praised the men involved in combating this 
fire and the prevention of further losses. 

In addition to the destruction of the storage bam, vehicle 
damage occurred. Automobiles owned by several members of 
the judging team received various amounts of damage from the 
excessive heat emitted from the bam during the blaze. I was 
informed however, by Dr. Feldstein, that these cars were not 
"legally parked" according to the Student Handbook. 



DVC STUDENT AWARDED 
NATURE CLUB SCHOLARSHIP 

The Doylestown Nature Club presented a $500.00 
Scholarship Award to Denise Baun at their annual luncheon, 
held at the Conti Cross Keys Inn recently. 

Denise is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Baun of 980 
West Maple Drive in Southampton, Pennsylvania. 

The Nature Club awards two scholarships annually to 
students who are residents of Bucks County and who achieve 
high academic excellence in the field of Ornamental 
Horticulture. 

Each year an award goes to a student from Delaware 
Valley College located in Doylestown, Pa., while the other 
scholarship goes to a student from the Ambler campus of 
Temple University. Mrs. Mary Fritz was the recipient of this 
years scholarship from Ambler campus. 

Miss Baun is a Junior at Delaware Valley College where she 
is majoring in Ornamental Horticulture. Following her 
graduation, Denise plans to become a floral designer and open 
her own florist shop. 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



November 8, 1976 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may be submitted fa "The Ram" 
do Del- Vol Post Office. No stamp is necessary. Simply hand 
to the Postmistress. 

To the Editor, 

In passing, I have read the RAM's posters saying: Drinking 
on campus? etc? etc? Why we shouldn't be allowed to drink 
on campus? That is the major question. There is a problem 
here in that being 21 I am given the right by the state of 
Pennsylvania to drink, yet denied this right and privilege by 
D.V.C. administration. My belief is that "those who identify 
the offender as one who willfully violates the law or rules 
demand his punishment to reinforce their own ambivalent 
feelings about conformity. They feel that if they must sacrifice 
to obey the law, someone who does not should not be allowed 
to get away with it." This of course is very childish on their 
part. I hope everyone realizes there is need for a change in this 
and other rules. 

Sincerely, 

Ward Schultz 

age 21, able to drink in any state, 

except a totalitarian state. 



THINK GREEN 

Q) Of the plant families containing foliage house plants, 
which is a favorite one of house plant growers? 
A) I would say that the Begonia family (Begoniaceae) is a 
favorite foliage plant family. There is such a wide diversity and 
variation injeaf shape, size and coloration. One of the types 
most commonly grown indoors is the group known as rhizona- 
tous begonias. They have rhizomes from which leaves and buds 
develop. Although the flowers are usually insignificant, the 
foliage is often variegated, hairy, or unusually shaped. Mature 
plants vary in size from a few inches to a few feet tall. Most of 
the many species prefer filtered sunlight (6-8" from fluores- 
cent tubes) and moderate humidity. They should be allowed 
to become slightly dry between watering. 



NOTE: In the last issue the editor mentioned having read 
that alcohol drenched plants should be rinsed in water 24 
hours later to help prevent poisoning the plants. Although I 
have not read anything to the contrary, I feel that the water 
would help prevent poisoning only if it were used before the 
alcohol had evapcnrated. Once the alcohol has completely 
evaporated (15-30 minutes), there is no alcohol left on the 
surface of the plant and what has been absorbed cannot 
be removed. 



UPDATE FROM 
THE STUDENT AID OFFICE 

Recently Bill (S.2657) was passed and signed by the 
President. The new bill has impacts upon many programs, 
including all of the student assistance programs. Specific 
changes which have been made are as follows: 

BASIC GRANTS 

1. The program is extended for three years. 



2. Maximum Basic Grant award will remain at $1,400 for the 
1976-77 and 1977-78 school years, but will increase to 
$1,800 In 1978-79. 

3. Allows all of a student's Social Security benefits and one 
half of Veteran's benefits to be included in the definition 
of "effective family income." 

4. Allows educational expenses of other dependent children 
to be considered in arriving at a family's contribution. 

FEDERAL INSURED/GUARANTEED 
STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

1. Program extended for 5 years. 

2. Undergraduate students may not borrow more than 
$2,500 or one-half the estimated cost of attendance during 
the first year of attendance at the institution. 

3. Income level for automatic interest subsidy increased from 
the $15,000 to $25,000. 

4. Students may not borrow more than $1,500 from an 
institutional lender unless disbursements are made in two 
or more installments. 

5. Students are required to notify the lender of any change of 
address. 

6. Loan proceeds are to be disbursed by check and require 
borrower's endorsement and certification that such dollars 
must be repaid. 

7. Repayment by a student may be less than $360 annually if 
agreed to by both the lender and the borrower. 

8. Lender and borrower may agree to a shorter repayment 
period and one which starts earlier than nine months after 
the student has left school. 

9. Graduate students may borrow up to $5,000 per year and 
their aggregate loan limit is increased from $10,000 to 
$15,000 for all insured loans. 

10. Insured loans may not be discharged through bankruptcy 
for five years, beginning on the date of commencement of 
the repayment period of the loan, unless the repayment 
imposed undue hardship. This provision is effective 
beginning September 1, 1977. 

Robert M. Sauer 
Director of Student Financial Aid 




7^e nZam 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chiaf Pat Wohlferth 

Associate Editor Ken Brusstar 

Business Manager Chris Main 

Typist "Gerb" 

Staff Cartoonist Jean Dimmler 

Faculty Advisors Dr. Keys, Dr. Ziemer 

STAFF REPORTERS 

Marion Fulton, Steve Silberstein, Judy Carkhuff, Rich 
Grabowski. 

Th6 opirfiom expressed here are not necessarily those of the 
student body. RAM staff , Faculty, or Administration, 

Printed on recyclable paper 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



November 8, 1976 



Be A Blood Donor 




Patients are Banking 
on YOU 

TUES. DEC. Z 1976 
IN GYM B^M - 2iS, 



Amtrieon Red Cion + 



ANNOUNCING THE ECOLOGICAL 
AGRICULTURE SOCIETY of D.V.C. 

There is a new organization on campus, the Ecological 
Agriculture Society of Delaware Valley College. It is a 
collection of students and faculty members interested in the 
problems and applications of ecological agriculture, and in 
disseminating whatever information is found. One of the club's 
first projects is to arrange a library and print a reading list of 
relevant materials. Other goals of the club are to have guest 
speakers, to go on field trips and to present demonstrations. 
Ultimately, field trials will be conducted to critically test new 
techniques in ecological farming. 

Membership is open to anyone who is a student or 
employee of D.V.C. If you're interested in joining, or would 
like to stop by to see what's going on, please feel free. 
Meetings are held every Wednesday afternoon at 4:00 in the 
second floor lounge of Segal Hall. 

SIGMA CLUB KICKS OFF 
TOY COLLECTION DRIVE 

The SIGMA CLUB of DVC, formerly known as the 
Women's Service Club, is organizing a toy collection drive. 
Toys of recyclable quality are asked for from students, faculty 
and staff. If you know of someone with toys to spare, by all 
means contribute them. Toys collected will be turned over to 
the U.S. Maine Corps for refurbishing at their Willow Grove 
Base. Those finished will be distributed to needy children. All 



donations will be used, for the parts from one doll can possibly 
be used to repair another. 

Collections will be gratefully accepted. Toys can be 
dropped off at either Miss Karen Orbaker's office, located in 
the Allman Building (during business hours please), OR, at 
Marian Rioter's residence, Cooke Hall, Room 205 (anytime). 
Large cardboard cartons will be placed at each location for 
deposit of toys. 

If you do not have the opportunity to visit home each 
week-end, remember Thanksgiving vacation is a great 
opportunity to collect a few toys. 



DEL-VAL FOOTBALL 

By: Paul Barrett 

On October 23rd, Del-Val traveled to Selinsgrove, Pa. to 
play Susquehanna University. 

The Crusaders scored twice in the first half, and twice again 
jn the second. Paul O'Neill and Mike Lesch went in for TDs in 
the first half to tally 14 points. Two third quarter scores gave 
the Crusaders 28 points. 

In the fourth quarter, Joe Lamakis scored two TDs and 
set-up one two point conversion for all the Aggie points. Joe 
gained 95 yards in twenty carries throughout the game. Ron 
Haraka threw to Scott Kingsbauer who scored the two pointer. 

Eric Eisnehart, John Itterly, Keith Sipple and Joe Lelli all 
had fumble recoveries for the Aggie defense. Capt. Jim 
Boamen and defensive back Fitzgerald Gittens both had pas 
interceptions. 

The final score was 28-14, putting the Allies at a 
disappointing record of 0-5. 



A COLLEGE RING 

K's a symbol for life 



SPECIAL OFFER! 



OFF 



f V ♦ O 




Josten's 

is a ring for life 



Myers Jewelry Store 
State St., Doylestown 



Page 4 



THE RAM 



November 8, 1976 



WHAT'S HAPPENING AT 
DVC IN NOVEMBER 

812 This is the time for the big PING-PONG 
TOURNAMENT. Bounce on over to the gym 
and show how good you play. The tournament 
is free and prizes will be given to the best 
players. 

10 The film "The Collector" will be premiered 
before an anxious DVC audience. This film is 
one of a kind. The movie starts at 7 and it will 
cost $.25. 

11 Our magnificant APO PLAYERS will present 
"HEROS AND HARD CASES". The play will 
be in dinner theatre form. Get your FREE 
tickets in Mr. Sitarski's office. The play will 
begin at 6:30. This is bound to be one of the 
most interesting plays presented at DVC. 

12 Dance on over to the gym for a MIXER featur- 
ing "CRIZMA". Gather up all your friends and 
come on over and have a good time. A very 
small fee will be charged. The dance will last 
from 7 to 9. 

♦ 

15 Lecture by Lewis Regenstein titled, "THE 
WORLD'S ENDANGERED WILDLIFE". This 
lecture will be of great interest to everyone at 
DVC. Mr. Regenstein has a vast store of knowl- 
edge on this topic. The lecture will be held in 
M114at8p.m. 

17-18 "OUR TOWN" will be presented by the tal- 
ented Drama Club. The play was written by 
Thorton Wilder about small town life. It will 
be nice to see your friends performing. The 
play will be in Ml 14 at 8 p.m. The admission 
will be FREE. 

19 COFFEE HOUSE. Come to the basement of 
Segal Hall for a entertaining and informal 
night. It will start at 9 so don't be late. 



AREA EVENTS 

Compiled By: Madelyn Schneider 

Now through A Streetcar Named Desire, University of Penn., 
11/7 Zellerbach Theater, Information and reser- 

vations call: 245-6791. 



11/2-11/20 Leslie Uggams in West Side Story. Shubert 
Theatre 735-4768. 

11/3 Manfred Mann's Earth Band. Montgomery 

County Community College. Science Center 
Auditorium, 8 P.M. Tickets: $4.00-$5.00-$6.00 
withLD. 643-6000. 

11/5 David Sancious, Rider College Fine Arts Center. 

8 P.M. Tickets: $4.00 (609) 896-0800 Ext. 
625. 

11/6-11/8 Dexter Wansel Band. Tower Theater. Tickets: 
$4.50-$5.50-$6.50. 



11/6 Flo & Eddie. Tower Theater. Tickets: $4.50. 

11/7 Al Stuart. Tower Theater. 7 P.M. Tickets: 

$5.50-$6.50. 561-7298 

11/7 An Act of Love Bucks County Theater. V2 price 

with I.D. 862-2041. 

11/9-11/27 Equus. Forest Theater. W A 3-1515. 

11/12 Jimmy Cliff. Tower Theater. Tickets: 

$4.50-$5.5O-$6.50. 

11/12 Dr. Jean Cousteau. Bucks County Community 

College. 968-5861, ext. 525. 

11/12 House of Assembly (Raggae) Montgomery 

County Community College. 8 P.M. Students: 
$1.00. 643-6000, ext. 450. 

11/14 Movie: Man of La Mancha Bucks County 

Community College. 968-5861, ext. 525. 

11/19 Buddy Milles Rider College Fine Arts Theater. 

8 P.M. Tickets: $4.00 (609) 896-0800. 



EXTINCTION OF WILDLIFE 




Lewis Regenstein, author of "The Politics of Extinction", 
the shocking story of the world's endangered wildlife, will 
present a lecture at Delaware Valley College on Monday, 
November 15th beginning at 8:00 P.M. The wildlife conser- 
vation advocate will speak in Work Hall Lounge located on the 
main campus. Admission is $1.00 

Statistics indicate that at the current rate of extermination 
all 4,062 of the remaining species of mammals could be wiped 
out within thirty years. 

Regenstein talks of this "brink of extinction, and blows 
the whistle on those who are currently engaged in killing off 
these animals for "sport", fashion, profit, even medical experi- 
mentation and scientific research. He exposes the public offi- 
cials with the power, and the responsibility to protect wildlife, 
but who instead allow the carnage to continue. 

This lecture in not only a valuable conservation piece, but a 
complex lesson in politics and governments. 

If you are concerned about wildlife conservation, you 
won't want to miss this. 



■--.^j^to^^^ti^i'- . 





AM 



Vol. 24, No. 5 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



November 22, 1976 



OUR TOWN 



By: D.V.C's Drama Society 

The drama society of D.V.C. entered in its fourth year of 
productions with Thornton Wilder's "Our Town." Two fresh- 
man, Nancy Bailer and Gary Schneider canied out the leading 
roles of Emily Webb and George Gibbs with energy that fitted 
the parts. Such enthusiasm has been and will continue to be 
the backbone of Del Val's drama productions for years to 
come. 

Sharron Blistan in the part of the stage manager narrated 
the story of "Our Town" throughout the entire play. 
Remaining on stage through all three acts, plus acting out 
smaller parts as well> she performed a difficult task very well. 

The play intended to be performed with virtually no set, 
adapted very well to Mandell Hall 114, which has virtually no 
stage. Stage extensions have been built and the student 




government's stage have been used effectively in utilizing 
available space The main props used were stools, which were 
moved around the stage to mimic various settings. 

After a slow start at practices, director Ed Gavin, a DVC 
General Studies Instructor, was happy with the final product. 
He is planning to put on a musical for the spring semester, so 
come out and audition. Help make this viable campus activity 
a continuing success with the addition of your talents. 

Cast - Our Town 



Principals 

Sharron Blistan 
John Appleton 
Denise Hitckcock 
Pat Mclnerney 
Lynn Mazzei 
Gary Schneider 
Manr^ Railer 



Others 

Stephanie Schucker 
Joe Miale 
Perry Lutz 
Steve Skoien 
John Melograna 
Ken Sansone 
Margie Clark 



Carole Kasper 
Tony Zotti 
Marg Mawson 
Patty Wohlferth 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT MEETINGS EVERY 
MONDAY NIGHT AT 7:15. EVERYBODY IS 
INVITED TO ATTEND AT ANY TIME. 
LOCATION: STUDENT GOVERNMENT ROOM IN 
WORK HALL 



WHAT'S HAPPENING 

WITH THE RAM^ 

A few of you who read bulletin boards may have noticed 
RAM emergency meeting posters. The subtitle of the signs 
"the fate of the newspaper" depicted the depths to which this 
publication was falling As editor, I was not satisfied. I wanted 
to know once and for all if there was any student interest left 
for their newspaper. As it turns out, there is still some interest 
left. Many ideas were brought up, hashed and re-hashed at that 
meeting, Nov. 4, 1976, and if most of them could ever be 
worked on, we would have a darn good paper on this campus. 
Below are some of the things that were discussed. If you see 
anything you think you would like to help out on, it's worth 
'/4 of a credit to you. Contact Pat Wohlferth, Cooke 220, or 
better yet, leave a note in the RAM P.O. Box. 

— We are currently planning on only one issue a month 
instead of two a month. However, if interest picks up, this 
could change back. 

— The printing format and the type of paper used are in the 
process of being changed. A new look for the RAM is in the 
yorks! 

— Interviews of professional people from the area are being 
assigned. The people interviewed will be from fields of interest 
to the students of DVC. Hopefully, from these everyone will, 
get an idea of what he is studying for. 

— A history of D V.C. compiled. It has been in the works 
for a while. There are records of the unique origin of this 
learning institution. A rather interesting project is to bring 
them all together. Included in the project is the digging up of 
old issues of the RAM, the FURROW and the GLEANER. Old 
articles and photos will be reprinted. 

— Things are being planned above and beyond the "newsy" 
aspect of the paper. Get involved with us. Remember, the pen 
carries a mighty big impact if used correctly. Here is a way of 
expression available to us all to which people will pay 
attention. 



ONE MORE RAM ISSUE THIS SEMESTER. THE 
BEST YET: THE CHRISTMAS ISSUE! WATCH 
FOR SIGNS, AND COME HELP PUT TOGETHER 
THE CRAZIEST ISSUE OF THE YEAR 
TOGETHER. 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



Letters to 
the^ 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may be submitted to "The RAM," 
c/o Del-Val Post Office. No stamp is necessary. Simply 
hand to the Postmistress. 

Dear Members of the Faculty and all DVC Stu(tents: 

I feel I should "officially" let you know that I have 
resigned from the Dean of Students' Office. I need more time 
at home; therefore, I had to made this difficult decision. 

I do hope you know how much your friendship has meant 
to me, and still means to me. I have thoroughly enjoyed all the 
"fun times", all the problems and have appreciated your 
though tfulness throughout the years! 

As I will remain at the College on a part-time basis, I shall 
enjoy meeting you and "catching up with the news". 

Sincerely yours, 
Gloria Faaet 



Personal to author of "Athletics". Sony we could not print 
your letter. You have a legitimate complaint, however, you 
will find that no publication anywhere can print a letter 
without a name attached. As you may or may not know, your 
name will be withheld upon request and the paper is under no 
obligation to reveal it to anybody except under legal circum- 
stances (and I mean in a normal court, not a kangaroo one). If 
you submit your name, the letter will go into print. Direct any 
questions to me in Cooke 220. 

Ed. 

Think Green 

Plants For Shady Rooms. 
By: Steven Silberstein 

Tm occasionally asked what plants will do well without 
much light. Some members of the Arum family do quite well 
in shade. Aglanema (Chinese evei^reen) is one of the more 
shade tolerant and there are several varieties commonly grown. 
The common Philodendron seen so often in homes and offices 
does best in light shade or diffused sunlight, as does 
Syngonium. Chamaedorea (Neanthe Bella Palm) also does well 
in light shade. Sansevieria (Snake Plant), a member of the Sily 
family, will survive in a deeply shaded room but does best with 
a few hours of sun each day. Another Siiiaceous plant. 
Aspidistra, will tolerate deep shade but prefers more light. 
Rotating plants grown in deep shade with those grown in a 
brighter area is helpful. Nevertheless, no plant will grow too 
well in deep shade, unless it is a mushroom. 



The Honey Bee 



Mention the honey bee to the average person, and the first 
thought usually is — "it stings!". Poor honey bee! She (all 
honey-gathering worker bees are female, of course) is one of 
the least understood and appreciated creatures in the world 
today. Yet it would be difficult to find another which has 
worked so hard or contributed as much to man's development 
and well being through the centuries as the little honey bee. 

The honey bee has been creating her delicious and healthful 
product since long before human civilization. Her very first 



"customers" (althcMigh she undoubtedly called them 
"robbers") were animals and birds. Then the early cave man 
first poked his head into the honey bee's home in a hollow log 
and decided that the taste of honey was more than worth a 
few puny stings. Ever since then, this little insect has been 
literally working herself to death for man over the centuries of 
recorded history. 

The importance of the honey bee and her product to the 
world can hardly be overstated. Almost every civilization has 
valued honey as a food, a medicine, a trading commodity, and 
a social and spiritual force. Let s just look at^ few interesting 
examples. 

In ancient Egypt honey was offered to the gods, was buried 
in tombs with the (fead to provide food in the hereafter and 
was given to new born babies to ward off evil spirits and to 
bestow the gift of health, poetic inspiration and eloquence. 
Almost all Egyptian medicines contained honey. 

In Greek and Roman mythology, honey was considered 
food for kings and gods. Taxes were paid with honey and 
many a Roman or Greek chief became famous for his honey 
recipes Roman hosts greeted ^heir guests with fresh hotiey, 
saying "Here is honey which the gods provided for your 
health." 

In romantic situations, too, honey was king; Amor, the god 
of love, dipped his arrows in honey. Hie Hindus claimed their 
god of love had a bow whose string was a chain of bees, 
symbolizing the sweetness and sting of love. The Romans had 
a saying: "Madame, treat your husband with honey and you 
will possess his heart.' 

In early England, France and Germany, honey was used to 
pay tiuces and tributes to leaders and to make mead, an early 
ale which made men "strong and brawny." Christianity 
brought with it a great increase in honey production because 
of the demand for wax for church candles. 

In the Americas, while the true honey bee was twt known 
in North and South America until Spanish, Dutch and English 
settlers introduced it near the end of the 17th century, there 
were other honey-collecting bees long before the explorers 
came. 

After the settlers brought honey bees to the American 
continent, beekeeping became an important occupation. The 
Indians of North America thought that honey bees brought 
misfortune and called * white man's flies," for when the bees 
arrived it meant that the settlers had come. 




7^e nZam 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Pat Wohlferth 

Associate Editor Ken Brusstar 

Business Manager Chris Main 

Typist "Gerb" 

Staff Cartoonist Jean Dimmler 

Photographers Rich Lewis. Ken Brusstar 

Faculty Advisors Dr. Keys, Dr. Ziemer 

STAFF REPORTERS 

Marion Fulton, Steve Silberstein, Judy Carkhuff, Rich 
Grabowski, Jim Ray. 

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the 
student body, RAM staff. Faculty, or Administration. 

Printed on recyclable paper 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



Student Government House of 
Social Activities for December 



1. Sigma Society is having a Christmas Bazaar to 
be held in the Dining Hall Lounge from 10:00 
- 2:00 . 

Sigma Society is also collecting toys (in good 
shape) for kids. Please drop them off from 9-5 
at Miss Orbaker's office, in Allman Hall or 
Marion Rioter's room, Cooke 205. Collection 
from now until Christmas break. 

2. Bus to Wilkes to see Men's and Women's 
basketball games Bus leaves at 4: 15. 31 people 
must sign up. Sign up in Cafeteria. 

3-4-5 Weekend!!! 

WHY DON'T YOU STAY? 

3. Junior class throws a Mixer. It will be a 
"Whale" of a mixer! The band to be featured is 
named "Whale". Time is from 9-1 and price is 
just a dollar /person. 

Come out and boogie! ! 

4. Skating Party — moved from Friday night. The 
only requirement is a ticket from Mr. Sitarski's 
office. 7 30 - 10:30 p.m. FREE ADMISSION, 
(for map see article) 

5. End the weekend with an evening of music. The 
Annual Chorale and Band Christmas Concert 
will be held in Mandell 114, at 8:00 p.m. Sigma 
Society will have its bazaar at this time also. 

6. Christmas Candle Demonstration. A CRAFTS 
EVENT featuring Mrs. Evelyn Armstrong, 7:30 
New Dorm Lounge 

7. BLOOD BANK - We want your blood. Help us 
to make the goal. At 7 & 9 relax and watch a 
Disney Classic, "Island at the Top of the 
World", a 1907 air ship goes to the Artie to 
search for a friend and fmds a lost island of 
Vikings, killer whales and ^aciers — it combines 
fantasy and science fiction. 

8. 76'ers vs Buffalo Braves at Spectrum. You pay 
$5.00 ticket which includes bus ride and $7.00 
ticket for a good seat. Bus leaves 6:30 p.m. 
from gym entrance. Buy tickets from April 
Grosjean — Barness 217 or buy in Dining Hall 
from 5 — 6 p.m. on Dec. 2 and 6. Remember 
only 37 seats!! 

9. No ice skating. 

10. Rock Band Mixer from 9-1 with Pantom's 
Opera. $1.00 Aggies and $1.50 off campus 
guests. 

11. Coffeehouse moved to 18th at 9 p.m. Segal Hall 
basement. 

Want to go to a 76'ers Basketball Ball Game? 
See April Grosjean, Bamess 217. 



UPS Strike 

By: Jim Ray 

United Parcel Service, the largest and the most efficiently 
operated package delivery service in America has been on 
strike since September 15. The strike has covered the whole 
east coast and other companies such as the United States 
Postal Service, and North Penn Freightways hs& attempted to 
handle the business the Parcel Service has lost. Neither of these 
companies offers the reasonable prices or quick delivery that 
U.P.S. does. To mail a package from Doylestown to Connecti- 
cut through the Postal Service may take a month and for cost, 
consider that North Penn charges a 13-doIlar minimum for all 
packages. 

The strike, which has been in progress for almost 2 months 
now, began over a dispute about the pre-existing contract 
which ended in the middle of May. The men continued 
working until the unions demanded a strike on September 18. 

It was difficult to obtain any precise answers from U.P.S. 
officials, but one of the major contract disputes involves the 
use of part time help while the company claims that this work 
force has been one of the major factors contributing to its 
proclaimed efficiency. 

I have been a part-time employee of the Parcel Service for 
three years. I have seen how efficiently this work force 
operates and I agree with the company totally to hire full time 
employees during the regularly scheduled part time shifts 
would be a form of featherbedding. Featherbedding occurs 
when the work force exceeds the work load and results in 
inefficient use of employees. If the unions get their way the 
Parcel Service may be force to raise its prices. 

Hopefully the unions and the Parcel Service will come to m 
agreement before Christmas, but as Christmas nears the 
likelihood that the company will resume work after the 
holidays becomes greater. 

If you plan to mail any Christmas presents to another state, 
you should consider getting them off soon so that they'll make 
it by December 25. . 



SIGMA SOCIETY TOY DRIVE 
HAS A ROUSING START 

Sigma Society, formerly known as the Women's Service 
Club, initally started a toy drive several weeks ago with the 
purpose of recycling toys for needy children. Response from 
faculty, staff and students was overwhelming. We once again 
invite you to contribute to the drive whatever you may have 
that might suit the occasion. With the Thanksgiving vacation 
coming up soon, we urge students to ask Mom if there might 
be anything of value back home. 

A major collection will take place immediately following 
the Thanksgiving vacation. In the meantime, anyone wishing 
to contribute may drop off toys at Miss Karen Orbaker's 
office, located in the Allman Building, during business hours, 
please. Or you may stop in at Marian Kloter's residence, Cooke 
Hall 205, anytime. Large cartons will be placed at each of the 
designated locations. 

We, the Sigma Society want to thank all those who have 
made this drive possible. Without the many thoughtful people 
who generously contributed toys, this. could have not come 
about. 

Don't forget, fellow students, this upcoming vacation is an 
excellent opportunity for you to help us to brighten up a small 
child's Christmas this year. 

Thank you once again. 

SIGMA SOCIETY 



Page 4 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



SOILJUDGINGTEAMDIGSTHIRD 




DVC'S SOIL JUDGING TEAM. 



Seated I to r: Tom Woller, Cheryl Squier, David Ray and 
Frank Savini. 

Standing I ro r: Nelson Luzzetti, Karen Levy, Katherine 
Henry, Rita Dropp, Gordon Snyder, William Troxell, James 
Spindler, Curtis Lammey, Dr. Palkovics and Mr. Kemmerer. 



By: Jessie A. Daubert 

A successful DVC team brought home a trophy for third 
place from the Intercollegiate Northeast Regional Soil Judging 
Contest hosted by the University of Maryland. In addition, our 
own Cheryl Squier scored eleventh out of approximately 80 
students who competed. 

In order to gain points, each contestant must carefully 
examine three soil pits, describe the characteristics of the soil 
and make decisions regarding practical applications for the 
land; this is all done in a limited time period. The top three 
scores of the four-man first team are then totaled and this is 
used to rank the different schools. 

The University of Maryland's team came in first with a 
grand total of 1214 points. This was expected, however, for in 
addition to having one of the best teams in the nation (six out 
of the top seven individual scores came from Maryland) it was 
also competing on home ground and was obviously familiar 
with the area's soiL The University of Maine landed second 
with 1131 points, while we closely followed with 1122 points. 
It is a tribute to the excellence of our team that only nine 
points separated us from second place. DVC fmished far ahead 
of the so-called prestigious schools of the University of Rhode 
Island (1081 points), Penn State (1079 points), Cornell (1067 
points), and Rutgers (904 points). 

Our first team, which actually won the trophy, consisted of 
Cheryl Squier, David Ray, Tom Woller and Frank Savini, all 
veterans of previous contests. We also had a large number of 
high scores among the new members who composed the 
second and third teams. They were Gordon Snyder, William 
Troxell, Rita Dropp, Curtis Lammey, James Spindler, Karen 
Levy, Katherine Henry and Nelson Luzzetti. The students 
were all under the excellent leadership of Dr. Palkovics and 
Mr. Kemmerer. 

Many long, cold hours were spent after school and on 
weekends to prepare for this contest and DVC can be very 
proud of its success. 

Memorization and Regurgitation 

By: Michael Guidicipietro 

This seems to be the philosophy followed in most colleges 
these days. I am aware that memorization has its place, 
especially in the sciences, but it would not take precedence 
over understanding. We must cultivate our minds so that 
thoughts can penetrate and ideas may grow. This is the essence 



of the creative scientist. 

An over emphasis on rote memorization can result in a hard 
plan of the mind, where thoughts just touch the surface and 
soon erode away, never to really penetrate. How many of us 
have forgotten after only one day those obscure details that 
we are forced to memorize? More often than not when we 
understand we remember, when we memorize we forget. 

And now we come to the most important part of education 
— grades. If you really look at the educational system you will 
see that this too takes precedence over learning. I do not 
propose that we do away with grades, but I do feel their 
importance has been grossly over emphasized. Is the student 
with a 3.8 index more intelligent than one with a 3.0? What 
does a test show but what one knows on that day? 

Emphasis must be put on the practical application of 
knowledge, supplemented with scientific findings. 

Educatros must become aware that it is more important to 
learn how to think than what to think. 



TASTER'S CHOICE 



CHINESE a SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 



• • • 



SHOWCASE PLAZA, CORNWELL HEIGHTS, PA. 
639-6700 



PARK RIDGE SHOPPING CENTER, TROOPER, PA. 

539-5222 



10% off to Aggies with ID. cards 



Got the urge to go ice skating? On Nov. 3, 34 Del Val 
students did. It was a rainy night — but the ice was still good. 
Student activities sponsored this adventure. Join us Dec. 4th 
from 7:30 - 10:00, at Melody Brook Skating Rink. The cost 
is 80« for rentals and Student Government pays your way! 

Stop by Mr. Sitarski's office to get a ticket for admission! 



To get there, 

take 202 S. to Montgomeryville 
and 309 N 2 miles to 
Melody Brook 




202 S. 



Pages 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



Peace Corps Volunteers Speak 
to DVC Agronomy Club 

By: Doug Mason 

Mr. & Mrs. James Diamond were guest speakers for the 
Agronomy Club November 10, sharing with the club members 
their experiences as Peace Corps volunteers in Chad, Africa. It 
wasn't the first lecture Mr. Diamond ever conducted here at 
DVC, though he used to be an instructor for the Agronomy 
Department. 

On his return visit this time Diamond gave us all a little 
more reason to be proud of our institution according to his 
volunteer association, Delaware Valley College graduates have 
conducted more successful programs abroad for the Peace 
Corps than any other school's graduates! Perhaps someday you 
too, reader, will sacrifice something for the suffering mass of 
humanity that doesn't enjoy the blessings we have in the 
U.S.A. (some 10,000 people will starve to death today, 
tomorrow and so ad infinitum). 

Mrs. Diamond took the reins for the first set of slides, 
illustrating the rich and varied culture of Africa. Between 
elephants and monsoons, she mentioned one of the more 
colorful tribes of the Dark Continent — the Ubangis, who 
adorn their lips with plate-like structures that give them bills 
like ducks. Officially, such practices are now forbidden in 
Chad. Among practitioners of animistic religions, women are 
required to have 12 scars inflicted on their face, four each to 
the cheeks and forehead. And since their only purpose in life is 
to have children, their clitoris is removed. Ponder the problems 
of women's liberation when it sweeps Africa. 

When Mr. Diamond took over the lecture he emphasized 
that the Peace Corps isn't in the business of giving handouts. 
Villagers who request aid are taught to utilize natural resources 
with their native methods and talents, while the volunteer 
merely attempts to instill modern principles. Among one of 
the first problems to confront Diamond in his two year stay 
was the fact that a plague every dry season wiped out 80% of 
the chickens. Since a ground-living pathenogen was suspected, 
soon the Chadians were taught by Diamond to build raised 
chicken house. Watching the eggs roll out soon became a 
favorite pastime for rural inhabitants who had never seen 
anything like it before in their life. 

Probably the biggest mark Diamond left on Africa was his 
introduction of sili^e techniques to Chad. Formeriy, oxen 
herds had to be led hundreds of miles across the parched 
Sahelian belt during the dry season to forage enough grass. But 
Diamond taught the people to dig holes and fill them with the 
lush vegetation that sprouted during the rainy season. Soon 
the idea was adopted on an official level and spread to the 
neighboring country of Mali. At this writing, at least 8 
countries in Africa are employing this technique and a 
missionary in Bolivia, South America, read of Diamond's work 
in an English journal, there's since been a story in National 
Geographic and now the idea has crossed the Atlantic Ocean. 
Practicality has gone a long way. 

The better half wasn't just home preparing meals, though. 
Mrs. Diamond taught various recipes to African Women to help 
improve nutritional content and also had a very successful 
program going to teach them sewing and embroidering. 
Diamond's agricultural experience also led to more proper 
methods of triming horse hooves and construction of rabbit 
pens and bread-baking ovens with bracks that could make it on 
Dr. Berthold's Isoptera lectures. The natives realizing the 
adhesive value of termite saliva, gather clay soil near the huge 
insect mounds to shape bricks. 

One of the most backward techniques Diamond conquered 
was the method by which natives tilled their soil with their 
hands and knees using a short handled hoe. By this slow, 
tedious device, it took 10 days to work a chord of land ('/a 
hectare, which equals about VA acre — learn that metric 



system now!) After some friendly advice from Diamond, the 
villagers started using long handled hoes while standing and 
began utilizing their horses for plowing, not just riding. 

There is no reason to assume any cultural superiority on the 
backward seeming farmers of Chad, really. We could stand to 
learn from their ecologically -oriented method of land use: firet 
the weeds are burned off the land and the ashes are plowed 
into add nutrients. Their method of crop rotation includes 
cotton the first year, then millet (sorgum) the next, followed 
by two years of peanuts. After this the land is allowed to 
regrow naturally for five years, keeping erosion and soil 
depletion at a minimum. 

About the most interesting of the 32 projects he pioneered 
was Diamond's idea to stop the 20 mile per year advance of 
the Sahara Desert Southward. He suggested that instead of 
seeding Eucalyptus, S0% of which died, the natives be given oil 
palms as well as guava, mango and citrus trees, which they 
would value and protect. As a result National Arbor Week was 
declared in Chad and 3 million trees were planted to make the 
Sahel a better place in the future. The Diamonds made DVC 
an exciting place to be this week. 

Wow! A Dinner Theater - Here? 




By: Ken Brusstar 

On Thursday, November 11, 1976 in The David Levin 
Dining Hall, the first and I hope not the last. Dinner Theater 
was held. It was fantastic. It was easy to tell that the students 
were "up" for this. Many of us got dressed up, packed into the 
cafeteria and enjoyed a delicious meal, true rarities on this 
campus. We then sat back to a cup of coffee and the 
entertainment. The play, "Hero's and Hardcases" was pre- 
sented by the Alpha Omega Players. The troupe hails from 
Texas and hail they did. They hailed the United States from 
the discovery by Columbus to her Bicentennial celebration of 
Independence. As tired as many of us were of the Bicentennial 
theme, I thought the play was excellent. It took a different, 
humorous view at our nation's heritage. The characters 
included every facet of our history. Featured were George 
Washington, General Grant, Abe Lincoln, Jesse James, 
Dastardly Dave and the main attraction — Uncle Sam himself. 
All of these, and others, were presented in a blend of 
side-splitting humor and excellent singing and guitar playing. 

I, myself enjoyed the entire presentation tremendously and 
am apparently not alone as the play ended with a standing 
ovation. The acting itself was very good and the atmosphere 
made the play even better. It was so much more comfortable 
than sitting in those noisy chairs in Mandell 114. 

Anyone who missed the play truly missed an experience. If 
we are fortunate another such experience will J^e made 
possible soon! 



Page 6 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



SIGMA SOCIETY 

By: Debbie Kupiec 
Corresponding Secretary 

Have you heard of the "newly renovated" club on campus? 
What was once the Women's Service Club is now the Sigma 
Society! For those of you who don't know about the Sigma 
Society, it is a branch of the Soroptimists, an "International 
Organization of the Professional Business Women". The 
women of Soroptimists help out people in the community, 
and also, help out girls who are trying to get into a profession. 
One of the women of the society, Vema Batterer, had a tea 
for all the girls of the society from D.V.C. It was held at her 
home so that all of the Soroptimists could meet the girls from 
Del. Val. It was huge success and the club received badges, a 
photo album and a guest book and pen. 

Some of the other things the society is now in the process 
of organizing are the toy drive, Thanksgiving baskets, the 
Christmas bazaar and going to the Detweiler home for the 
retarded and mentally handicapped to help out. 

The toy drive is now underway and if anyone has any old 
recyclable toys at home that they wish to get rid of please 
drop them off at Miss Orbaker's office, AUman building, 
during office hours or at Marion Kloter's room, Cooke 205, 
anytime. 

For the Thanksgiving baskets, all the girls in the club went 
to Miss Orbaker's home to make homemake bread to put into 
the baskets. 

Come and join in this newly-formed society. You can get 
many things out of the society, one being the satisfaction of 
knowing you are helping others. We meet the second and 
fourth Wednesdays of each month at 4:15 in New Dorm 
Lounge. 



APIARY SOCIETY 
HONEY PRODUCTS 




The Apiary Society has a wide selection of spread honey 
and liquid honey for sale. There are 4 types of spread honey 
(Strawberry, Cinnamon, Apricot and Plain) and 4 types of 
liquid honey (Clover, Orange Blossom, Wildflower and Buck- 
wheat). Purchase your honey from any member of the Apiary 
Society. Honey is an excellent gift for Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. 



Wye Angus and Frank Perdue: A Winning Combination 




A top brood cow herd at Wye Plantation. 

By: Donna Foley 

The Block and Bridle Club's annual club trip to Wye 
Plantation and Perdue, Inc. in Maryland on Oct. 21 was quite 
an experience. Having visited other universities livestock 
facilities in previous years, the club felt that the trip this year 



should show its members the business aspect of the animal 
industry. 

The Wye Plantation has been known as one of the top pure 
bred Angus herds in the country. Its superior breed sires are in 
great demand by other Angus breeders, illustrated by the fact 
that the Wye Angus have been sold in 43 states and 9 foreign 
countries. The Block and Bridle members were shown the 
pastures, the superior cow herds, growing steers and the herd 
sires — quite an impressive example of excellence in the cattle 
breeding industry. 

Later that day the club drove to Perdue, Inc. in Salisbury, 
Md. While not meeting Frank Perdue in person, the members 
were taken on an extensive tour of the corporation facilities 
by managers of each division; the hatcheries, brooding houses, 
contract growing farms and the processing plant. Perdue, Inc. 
is the largest privately-held poultry processing corporation in 
the country, being entirely integrated in all phases of its 
production, processing and marketing. After the tour Perdue 
treated the 109 members of the club to a chicken dinner at the 
nearby Holiday Inn. While we were dining a film and slide 
show were presented explaining more details of the 
corporation. 

After that, the tired but satisfied Block and Bridle members 
piled into the busses for the return trip to DVC, dreaming of 
plumper, meatier chickens and leaner more desirable Angus all 
the way home. 



Page? 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 




Adyentures in Aggieland T.V. Guide 

By: Paul Zmoda and Ken Brusstar 

The-following prime time-bomb is brought to you by 

Liquid Plummer 

Mertz Rent-a-buz 

Miller Brew 

Ch. 2 Allison Wonderland — College professor walks 
■ through black board and flnds strange land flUed with 
talking fungi and magical species of ferns. {**^/i) 

Ch. 3 The Great Train Robbery — Mild mannered chem. 
prof, suddenly turns to life of crime when he breaks 
into the Smithsonian by night to make off with 
19,000 tons of antique locomotives (***) 

Qi. 5 The Deadly B's — Ag instructor leads demented 
students to help produce huge subterranean moles 
which bring foriegn countries to their knees by 
attacking their computer base centers ttom below. 
(Poor-'/2) 

Ch. 6 The French Chef — Documentary on modem day 
cannibalism taking place in Pennsylvania College lab 
during lunch breaks. * 

Ch. 9 News — highli^ts include an interesting look at 
Brooklyn Manifold Worship, goat hair weaving for 
charity and the currently raging plague of shrew lice 
in northwest Ontario. 

Ch. 10 Father Knows Best — Sit-com premier, on location at 
the Czestachowa Shrine. 

Ch. 12 One Hour of Music — Starring: The Test Tubes, Rich 
Mulstay and The Duodenums, Spanky and the 
Invertebrates, Xenon and introducing The Bizarre 
Clones Five. Pelvis Trashly is host. 

Ch. 13 Torture Theatre — In toni^t's episode, a pair of 
power-hungry poltergeists hold 1,348 students cap- 
tive and force them to obey their every command lest 
they be made to suffer in ways unthinkable to those 
not involved. Twisted (-**) 

Ch. 17 Thanksgiving Special — An Evening with the Ring- 
worm Family. Good, old-fashioned, pure, wholesome, 
family entertainment. No preservatives added. 

Ch. 29 Phantom of the Campus — Documentary probes into 
the great mystery: "Who is E. Lamb." 

Ch. 48 The Schumacher and the Elves — In tonight's episode, 
the elves fmd out what cold hands their friend has. 

Ch. 50 Sitarski and "Hutch" - repeat. 



D.V.C. SOCCER FINALS 

The first year for Soccer at Delaware Valley College in 
many years, has concluded on a winning note with a 4-2-0 
record. In its first full season as a College Club, the Aggies 
totaled 17 goals against the opposition. 

Leading scorers were Sophomores Don Burrell of Hatboro, 
Pa. and Tom Rudolph from Springfield, Pa. with 3 goals 
apiece. Freshman Dave Loesser of Trenton, N.J. lead the team 
in assists. Team Captain for the 1976 season was Senior Gregg 
Swidersky from Scotch Plains, N.J. where he played soccer 



under Coach Al Formincello at Scotch Plains- Fanwood High 
School. 

Aggie Coach Bob Marshall looks forward to the 1977 
season with an increased schedule and loss of only two 
starters. D.V.C. being a young team, should develop into a top 
threat in the league within the next few years. 

Results 1976 (4-2-0) 



D.V.C. 





Widener 


6 




4 
4 


Albright 
Ursinus 


2 
3 


D.V.C. 


3 
4 
2 


Lycoming 

Albright 

Wilkes 


4 


1 



DVC's Football Coach Al Wilson 

By: Richard Grabowski 
w/help of the Daily Intelligencer 

Just this year, Alfred Wilson has been appointed as head 
football coach and assistant professor of Physical Education. 

Coach Wilson, 37, was selected to replace Tom Shreiner, 
who coached the Aggies for the past three seasons. 

Coach Wilson, who graduated from Cressona High School, 
earned his Bachelor's Degree from Ursinus College in 1959 
where he was a two-way performer at end and earned a total 
of six varsity letters. 

He began his coaching career as an assistant coach at North 
Penn High School and two years later moved to Watchung 
Hills Regional High School, N.J. 

In 1962, Coach Wilson was named head coach at Boiling 
Springs High School where, during the next five years, he 
completely revitalized the football program. It was during his 
first two years at Boiling Springs that he suffered his only 
losing seasons as head coach. 

In 1967, he was named head coach at Bald Eagle High 
School and guided that school to a 9-1 record and the 
championship of the Central Counties Conference. One year 
later, he became head coach at William Penn High School in 
Harrisburg and produced the first winning season in six years. 

The following year, at Carlisle High School, he engineered a 
record of 8-2 and the South Centra] Conference Champion- 
ship. 

In 1970, Coach Wilson joined Wayne Hardin's Staff at 
Temple University where he developed an outstanding pass 
defense and earned the reputation of being an excellent 
recruiter. Three years later he moved to Princeton University 
where he coached the linebackers and ends under Bob 
Casciola. 

Results of the many games played up to now show that 
losing begets losing. One of the reasons for losing that coach 
pointed out was that some players don't have enough talent 
(which is obviously true). 

Also another reason is that much support is desperately 
needed. This includes every thing from showing your spirit at 
the games to full coverage by the "RAM". 

Mr. Wilson thinks the season so far, has been rather 
frustrating. Starting off with high hopes and ending (at this 
writing) with all losses brings about this despair. 

His goals are hopeful for a successful program and 
continuous strong determination. 

The coach's last comment was, "we have ingredients here, 
but people must care to make D.V.C. a winning team." 



Pages 



THE RAM 



November 22, 1976 



Aggie Harriers Hustle to 12-2 Season 




Aggie Harriers at MAC's. 1 to r: Ray Bryson, Paul Bernett, Bob 
Gabel and Bob Weidman. 

By: Gerb 

The Del Val Cross Country Team finished their season 
suffering only two losses, one to Lebanon Valley College and 
the other to Scranton. In the MAC Championships at Belmont 
Park though, the harriers revenged Lebanon Valley College by 
defeating them, but suffered another loss by 1 point to 
Scranton. 

The Cross Country Team finished 5th in MAC's out of 19 
teams. Gettysburg College with 22 points, Franklin & Marshall 
with 88 points, John Hopkins with 127, Scranton 133 finished 
in that order ahead of the Aggies with 134 points. 

Individual finishers for the Aggies at MAC's were Bob 
Weidman and Paul Bernett (both seniors) in 14th and 15th 
places respectively. Freshman Bob Gabel finished 3rd on the 
Aggie squad in 20th place followed by Junior Ray Bryson 
(31st), Junior Jerry O'Connor (47th), Sophomore Vic Frey 
(53rd) and Senior Dave Stull (58th). 

Throughout the season our top performances were by Paul 
Bernett and Bob Weidman with Ray Bryson finishing right 
behind. Other outstanding performances were by Jerry 
O'Connor, Vic Frey, Dave Stull and Bob Gabel. The team this 
year excelled because of the strength and unity of the pack. 
This team not only runs together, but exists together. Next 
year's team looks bright with Juniors Ray Bryson and Jerry 
O'Connor leading the pack. 



D.V.C. SENIOR GRIDIRONS 

On November 13th, six Delaware Valley College Seniors 
played their last game as Aggies. 

For the Aggie Captains, James Boaman and Scott 
Kingsbauer, it has been a frustrating season and one of hard 
dedicated work. Jim Boaman, middle guard from North Wales, 
Pa. played high school football at Lansdale Catholic. He is a 
Business Administration Major at Delaware Valley and future 
plans include graduate school. Scott Kingsbauer, wide-receiver 
and punter-kicker for Delaware Valley has lead the MAC 
Northern Division III punting stats with 38.5 average this 
season. Scott is a Business Administration major from Hat- 
field, Pa. and Pennridge High School. 

Robert Nicholson quarterback from Carteret High School 
and Carteret, N.J. is a Business Administration majorat D.V.C. 
Bob's future plans include a career in sales. 

John Edwards, offensive guard from Chalfont, Pa. comes 
from Central Bucks West High School. John, a Food Industry 
major, plans a position in industry. 

Erich Eisenhart from Collingswood High School and Sewell, 
N.J. is an Agronomy major at D.V.C. "Ike" a defensive end, 
will pursue a career in Agriculture upon graduation. 

Mike Konoza, offensive tackle from Graterford, Pa. is an 
Agronomy major at D.V.C. A graduate of Bishop Kenrick High 
School, Mike's future plans include a career in Agriculture. 



A newly married couple were looking for a place in the 
country to live. In finding one which suited them, they made 
their way home. Reaching there, the wife remembered they 
had not noticed a bathroom commode in the place and 
decided to write to the agent who sold them the house. Being 
modest and shy, she hesitated to write out "bathroom 
commode" so she referred to it as "BC". The agent, not 
understanding what she meant, pondered awhile and he 
decided she meant "Baptist Church" and wrote in reply the 
following: 

Dear Madam, 

I regret very much the delay in answering your letter, and 
take pleasure of informing you the "BC" is about nine miles 
from your place and services the whole community. It can seat 
about 1200 people. This is unfortunate indeed, if you are in 
the habit of going regularly, but you will be interested to 
know that many people take their lunches and make a day of 
it. Others go in the morning, arriving just in time, but generally 
they are in too great of a hurry to wait if the place is crowded. 
The last time my wife and I went was six months ago, and we 
had to stand the entire time. It might interest you to know 
that they are planning a bazaar to raise money for plush-seat- 
ing and that is a long felt need which will add to the comfort 
of the frequent ones. I might add that it pains me greatly not 
to be able to go more frequently. It surely is not lack of desire 
but as we grow older it seems more of an effort particularly in 
the cold weather. 

Yours truly. 




Vol. 24, No. 6 




The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



December 20, ^976(f[•g!f^ 




By: NTB 

On Saturday, November 20, a fire ravaged 
aging Ulman Hall, destroying the third floor. 
A quick evacuation of the building was 
successfully completed and area Are 
companies were promptly summoned. 
Fortunately, there were no injuries, but 
damage to the building and students' 
personal belongings was considerable. The 
cause of the fire is still undetermined, but an 
investigation by State Police and the Bucks 



Attention: RAM officer elections 
wilt be held at the first meeting in 
January. Watch for an announcement 
for date and time. 



The Night Before 
Christmas- 1976 

Twas the night before Christmas and all 
through the house there were botties and 
butts left by some louse. The fifth I had 
hidden by the chimney with care had been 
snatched by some bum who had found it 
right there. My pals, guys and gals, had been 
poured in their beds, to wake in the morning 
with hung-over heads. My mouth, full of 
cotton, dropped down with a snap because I 
was dying for just one wee nightcap. When 
through the south window there came such a 
yell, I sprang to my feet to see what the 
hell . . . and what to my bloodshot eyes 
should I see, but eight drunken reindeer 
caught up in a tree. Way in among the 
branches was a man with a sleigh; I saw it 
was Santa, quite oiled and gay. Staggering 
nearer those eight reindeer came and he 
belched and he hiccoughed and he called 
them by name. "On Whiskey, on Vodka, we 
ain't got all night. You too Gin and Brandy, 
now all do it right. Clamber up on the roof, 
get off of this wall. Get going you rummies. 



ULMAN HALL FIRE 

County Fire Marshall is being completed. 

The cause may still be undetermined, but 
the effects are evident. A total of HI 
students occupying Ulman missed a week or 
more of classes. On Monday, Nov. 27, the 
students from the first and second floors 
were permitted to return to their rooms. 
Students from the third floor were relocated 
to the locker rooms and to the apartment in 
Wolfsohn Hall over the weekend of the 25th. 

Personal losses to the students will not be 





covered by the school's insurance. Any 
claims are being directed to the insurance 
companies of the students' parents. 

A more stringent enforcement of the 
basic safety precautions of the school is 
needed. Spot checks can be expected more 
frequently in the future to enforce tiiese 
policies. 

Repairs and refurbishing of Ulman will 
take place over the Christmas recess. 
Hopefully, students will be in rooms and not 
in gymnasiums by next semester. 

DVC CHRISTMAS GIFT LIST 

By: Ken Brusstar and Paul Zmoda 

Have you reached a quandary about what to get your favorite professor for a 
holiday gift? Here are a few suggestions. 

Dr. Mulstay 
Dr. Mertz 
Dr. Lugar 

Mr. Johnson 
Mr. Moyer 
Dr. Miller 
Mr. Gavin 
Mr. Standing 
Dr. Brubaker 
Dr. Berthold 
Mr. Trembeth 
NJr. Dommel 



A box of D-Con for roaches 

A can of orange paint and a VW hood ornament for his new truck. 

One mole of acetylsalycylic acid (buffered) This year's freshmen are 

next year's sophomores. 

A new lab coat. 

An Easy-Bake oven. 

A pair of faster track shoes and a head start in next year's turkey trot. 

A fez, a pair of sunglasses, a megaphone and a director's chair. 

One pair of gold-plated pruning shears with the initials J.H.S. 

A sterling silver super-dooper pooper-scooper. 

A velvet ant farm. 

2 pies, square. 

A license to turn out 1,000 gallons of beer from the lab each day. 



we've still got a long haul." 

So up on the roof went the reindeer and 
sleigh, but a big branch hit Santa before he 
could sway. And then to my ears like the 
roll of a barrel, a heck of a noise came that 
was no Christmas carol. So I pulled in my 
head, and cocked a sharp ear. Down the 
chimney he plunged, landing smack on his 
rear. He was dressed all in red, and white for 
the trim, by the way that he swayed, he was 
tanked to the brim. The sack on his back 
held nothing but booze, and his breath that 
he blew almost put me to snooze. He was 



both plump and chubby and tried to stand 
right, but he couldn't fool me, he was as 
high as a kite. He spoke not a word but went 
straight to his work and missed half the 
stockings like a plastered old jerk. Then 
putting his thumb to the end of his nose, he 
fluttered his fingers while quoting some 
prose. A spring for his ^eigh, at so hasty a 
pace, he tripped on a shingle and slid on his 
face. But I heard him burp back as he passed 
out of sight, "Merry Christmas, you lushes, 
now really get tight." 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



7k. 




nSam 



Doyiestown, Penna. 18901 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chi«f Pat Wohlferth 

Atioeiat* Editor Ken Brusstar 

Businoa Managtr Chris Main 

Typitt "Garb" 

Staff Cartoonist Jean Oimmler 

Pliotographars . . . Rich Lewis, Ken Brusstar 
Faculty Advisors .... Dr. Keys. Dr. Ziemer 

STAFF REPORTERS 

Marion Fulton, Steve Silberstein, Judy 
Carkhuff, Rich Grabowski, Jim Ray. 

The opinion* expressed here are not 
rwcessarily those of the student body, RAM 
staff. Faculty, or Administration. 

Printed on recyclable paper 



The RAM staff 

would like to wish everyone 

a happy holiday 

The 12 Days of Christmas 

(at DVC) 

Reprinted without permission 
The RAM - Dec. 16, 1974 

On the first day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

A G. E. Electric Frost Free. 

On the second day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Two extension cords and . . . 

On the third day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Three kegs of Mich . . . 

On the fourth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Four coil heaters . . . 

On the fifth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Five stolen plates . . . 

On the sixth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Six poppers popping . . . 

On the seventh day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Seven fishes swimming . . . 

On the eighth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Eight three-way plugs . . . 

On the ninth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Nine fifths of Seagram's . . . 

On the tenth day of Qiristmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Ten toaster ovens . . . 

On the eleventh day of Christmas, 
Sitarski took from me: 

Eleven friends a-flunking . . . 

On the twelfth day of Christmas, Sitarski 
took from me: 

Twelve days of classes . . . 



THINK GREEN 

By: Steve Silberstein 

Christmas Plants 

Two plants commonly sold during the 
holiday season are the Poinsettia 
(Euphorbia) and the Christmas cactus 
[ScMumbergera). 

Poinsettias should be grown in a window 
that gets at least a few hours of sun each day 
and they should receive moderate amounts 
of water. They can also be grown under 
li^ts. In June, Poinsettias should be cut 
back and, if possible, put outside in part sun 
for the summer. During the summer, water 
them frequently and cut the tips back to 
promote bushy growth. In mid-July, 
discontinue the dipping to allow flower bud 
formation. In September, bring the plant 
indoors and give it 12 hours of 
uninterrupted darkness each night. Even 
street lamps can nullify the effect of the 
darkness and result in few or no flower 
bracts. Putting a paper bag over the plant 
may help. The large colorful "flowers" of 
Poinsettia are actually leaf-like structures 
called bracts. 

Christmas cacti will do well in part sun, 
moderate amounts of water, and a humusy 
soil. They should also have 12 hours of 
uninterrupted darkness each night in the fall, 
accompanied by slightly less water and 
temperatures in the '60's. 

There are many varieties of Poinsettias 
and Christmas cacti from which to choose. 



A SPRING TREAT . . . 
NEW ORLEANS! 



7 nights & 6 days in New Orteans; 
your hotel - which is the Warwick 
Hotel - is 3 blocks from the 
Superdome and the French Quarter. 

A "whirlaround tour" will 
familiarize you with New Orleans 
before you begin! 

Should fair weather prevail — the 
beach is only 25 minutes away. 

Jet air via Delta Airlines and trip 
transfers between the airport and the 
hotel are included. 

Of course the optional activities are 
never ending in New Orleans! 

I\terk the dates on your calendar: 
MARCH 12 - 19. The total price is 
$277. A $50 deposit will be due 
January 28. 

Be on the look-out for further 
information. 



Keystone International Livestock Exposition 

November 6-12, 1976, Harrisburg, Pa. 

The Animal Husbandry Department exhibited 3 single barrows and 1 truckload of 
six barrows, 1 Hereford spring yearling bull, 1 Angus April junior yearling bull, 3 
Cheviot spring ewe lambs, 2 Cheviot yeariing ewes, 1 Cheviot spring ram lamb, 1 
Hampshire yeariing ram and 3 Cheviot wether lambs with the following results: 



The single barrow was 

The truckload was 

The Hereford bull was 

The Angus bull was 

The Cheviot ram lamb was 

The Cheviot yearling ewe was 

The Cheviot pen of 3 ewe lambs were 

The Cheviot exhibitor flock was 

The Cheviot pen of 3 wether lambs were 

The Hampshire yearling ram was 



9th, 10th & 11th in his class 
2nd in its class 
2nd in his class 
3rd in his class 
9th in his dass 
15th in her class 
5th in the group 
5th in the group 
3rd in, the group 
7th in his class 




The information about the single barrows on the rail did not arrive yet. 
All the swine were sold according to the rules, the rest of the animals returned to 
Farm 3. 

Several students helped in the fitting, preparation and showing of the animals. 



Consumption of Honey 

Americans consume an average of 
285,000,000 pounds of honey every year. 
That means a fantastic amount of work for 
millions of little honey bees. There is no 
harder worker anywhere in the world. The 
average life of a worker bee is about six 
weeks, after which the bee, its wings literally 
worn to shreds from flying, simply dies from 
exhaustion. It takes 556 worker bees flying 
35,584 miles (1-1/3 the distance around the 
world) to produce one pound of honey! If 
honey were to be priced according to the 
effort that goes into its production, none of 
us could afford to enjoy it. 



Need Money? Books? Tuition? 




Doc Weber wants to buy your (dad's? 
grandfather's?) old trains. Any 
condition. Mandell Hall, Room 111 
Phone Ext. 283 



Pages 



THE RAM 



Things to do 

Around Town 

compiled by Madetyn Schneider 

12/6 - 12/31 

The Pa. Horticulture Society 
Annual Holiday Show. 325 Walnut St. 
Free! WA 2-4801 

12/6-1/2 

Grease. Shubert Theatre. 250 Broad 
St. $5-$12.90. 735-4768 

12/22-1/2 

"The Nutcracker". Pa. Ballet 
Academy. 978-1420 

12/26-1/9 

ice Follies. Civic Center. $5— $7. 
EV 2-8181 

1/1 

Mummer's Parade. Broad St. to 
Snyder. 9-6. $2.00 

Happy Holiday 



Block & Bridle News 

By: Donna Foley 

During this fall semester, the Block and 
Bridle Club has pulled off quite a few 
activities compared to past years. Led by 
President Howard Hoffman and his various 
officers and committees, the club 
constructed a prize- winning Homecoming 
Float; sponsored a Homecoming Ham Sale 
that brought in a substantial sum of money 
as profit to go towards the club's trip; 
traveled to Maryland to visit perdue, Inc. 
and the Wye Plantation; prepared a large 
scrapbook of the club's activities and 
members to be submitted in the National 
Block and Bridle Scrapbook Competition 
where it earned the highest score ever in 
previous years; sponsored a Halloween Fun 
House Party at Farm 3 for members and 
guests; welcomed guest speakers tirom 
various parts of the animal industry; and are 
now in the process of planning tiieir Club 
Banquet to be held in January; organizing 
the makings of an Official Block and Bridle 
T-Shirt; and putting together a yearbook to 
be published and given to all members and 
fellow agricultural colleges and universities 
in the country. 

Elections of new club officers will be held 
on the second meeting of the Block and 
Bridle Club (nominations for President will 
be given at the first meeting) after which the 
retiring officers will step down and 
recuperate from a year of organizing, 
meeting, arguing, agreeing, compromising, 
planning, and enjoying club work. The first 
meeting of the Block and Bridle Club in the 
Spring semester will be January 26, 1977 at 
6:00. (If this changes, the new date and time 
will be publicized in the major campus 
buildings.) Have a happy and safe holiday 



CONSTRUCTION AT 
GREY STONES? 

Developers have purchased a 9.559 acre 
parcel of land which includes the beautiful 
and historfc Grey^ Stones area of Morrisville, 
Pa. The land is situated about 2 miles south 
of Washington's Crossing State Park. It is 
heavily forested, inhabited by numerous tree 
species— the predominant ones being oaks, 
sourgums, tulips and beeches. Some of the 
older trees are as large as 5' in diameter and 
a few are believed to be at least 200 years 
old. 

The developers who have purchased this 
land have proposed a high rise apartment 
building, numerous parking areas, and a 
bridge which would connect River Road to 
the proposed site. Not only would this 
construction strip the land of all existing 
vegetation, but it would also create a death 
trap on two-lane River Road. An additional 
problem would be sewage removal. The 
Department of Environmental Resources has 
already granted that the sewage can be 
dumped directly into the Delaware River. 

On Monday, December 15, twenty O.H. 
students, under the direction of Mr. Benner 
(Plant Materials instructor), will meet at the 
site to identify and approximate the age of 
many of the trees in the area. The data 
accumulated will be used by the Bucks 
County Conservation Alliance m their 
efforts to prevent this gross exploitation of 
beautiful virgin forest. The results of our 
efforts will be included in the next issue. 




Proposed High Rile / 

and Parkii^ lot / 



DtUwarg Biver Canal 



River Road 



Delaware River 



Are Christmas Gifts 
a Problem? 

Do you have a problem person on your 
Christmas list??? Grandparents, Aunt or 
Uncles you're not sure what to give? Let the 
Apiary Society be of help! Give a selection 
of honey. Honey is a perfect gift for anyone 
and everyone on your Christmas list. 

For a selection we have 4 types of liquid 
Honey and 4 types of spread Honey, all at a 
low price of $1.10 per jar. 



Liquid 


Spread 


Clover 


Strawberry 


Orange Blossom 


Cinnamon 


Wildflower 


Apricot 


Buckwheat 


Plain 



We also have 100% PURE Beeswax 
Candles. These make an especially nice gift 
for only $1.50 per pair. 

For your honey contact any Apiary 
Society Member or 204 Goldman. 



NEW CLUB ON CAMPUS 

By: Lewis Barnard 

Are you bored, restless, tired of studying? 
If you are interested in railroads, or model 
railroading, there is now such a club on 
campus. The DVC Railroad Club has been 
given permission to use the basement of the 
Admissions Building for the construction of 
a model railroad layout which will be in HO 
scale, and we hope to begin woiic on it very 
soon. 

Besides becoming involved in model 
railroading, the club also plans to do some 
railfanning, or in everyday language, going to 
visit actual rail facilities and railroad 
museums. 

The club welcomes any interested 
students or faculty and, with the help of Dr. 
"Choo-Choo" Weber, hopes eventually to 
build an extensive model layout and have 
other activities as the club members desire. 

Incidentally, we would greatly appreciate 
any donations of wood, such as 2 x 4's or 1 
X 3's, plywood, and any other useable scrap 
building materials. If you have anything of 
this nature, see Bill Cashin or Dr. Weber. 



season 



lit 




Open till 9 p.m. 
Every night 



A Neighborhood Place 
Where All Heads Shop 

Stop by for a visit - While you're rapping with us. 
Check out our selection of 

Jewelry Headgear Buckles 
African Trade Beads 

25% off on all Plants - with this Ad 

INNER DIMENSIONS 

20 West Bridge St., New Hope, Pa. 

Juit across from the Post Office 



Page 4 



THE RAM 



GLEANER NEWS 

The staff of the 1977 ediUon of the 
Gleaner is looking for contributions. The 
Gleaner is the campus literary magazine and 
is published yearly. We are lookii^ for short 
stories, prose, poems, art work, and 
photographs. Anyone wishing to work on 
the staff will also be welcomed. All those 
interested should see Jim in Work 108 or 
Glenn in Wcdfson 16. 

A-Day Special Events 

A-Day consists not only of various club 
shows and concessions, but also of special 
events, such as tug-of-war, egg-throwing, 
cow-milking, to name a few. Two of the 
most popular events are the canoe races and 
canoe jousts. With the lake shrinking as it is, 
there is a good possibility that neither of 
these two events will be held. 

We shall appreciate any constructive 
suggestions you may have. Please give any 
such suggestions to Deb Grant, Steve Cherip, 
Mike Tarilli or Mark Muir. 



FINAL TIME 

(Sung to the tune of "SUoer Bells") 

by Pat Wohlferth 

(Reprinted from the RAM - Dec. 16, 1974) 

We're in lounges 

We're in dorm rooms 

Cramming for the big test. 

When it's over then we finally 

Get to rest. 

Month vacation 

Is not far off 

We will need it, all right. 

First two weeks are spent sleeping 

Day and night. 

Chorus: 

Final time, 

Final time. 

It's No-Doze boom for store merchants. 

Night lights lit. 

Learn this — (stuff) 

Men in white coats come today. 



A FINAL PRAYER 

Now Ilay me down to study; 
I pray the Lord, I won't go nutty. 
And if I fail to learn this junk, 
I pray the Lord that I won't flunk. 
But if I do, don't pity me at all. 
Just lay my bones in the study hall. 
Tell my teacher I've done my best. 
Then pile my books upon my chest. 
Now I lay me down to rest; 
I pray 111 pass tomorrow's test 
If I should die before I wake 
That's one less test 111 have to take. 



Aggie Basketball 

By: Ridi Grabowskl 

The Men's Basketball coach is Frank 
Wolfgang. The co-captains are Dennis 
Pastucha and John Rodenbaugh. John 
Bernard is the .^ie manager. 

All together on the Varsity and J.V. 
roster, there are 20. There are 2 seniors, 3 
juniors, 3 sophomores and 12 freshmen. 

Their first game against Fairleigh 
Dickinson resulted in an 84-58 win for the 
Aggies. The Aggies lost their second game 
against Wilkes (72-97). Their third game was 
also a loss to Philadelphia Pharmacy (71-93). 

Outstanding players so far this seaton are 
freshman Ken Mitchell, sophomore Jim 
McShea and senior Denny Pastucha. 

Ck)ach Wolfgang has pointed out that the 
DVC basketball team is very young and 
hopeful. And hopefulness might be just what 
the team needs to bring out a victorious 
outcome. 







®IjP U Ail Btaf f 

mmih Itkf tn mtab 



a \^nppn t|oltliag 






THE RAM 
VOL. 

1977 




TH 




AM 



\loL f 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



^bt 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may be submitted to "The Ram " c/o Del- Val Post Office. 
No stamp is necessary. Simply hand to the Postmistress. 

Dear Editor: 

"We of Samuel Hall wish to extend our sincerest congratula- 
tions to Goldman Hall, the first place winners of the Dorm 
Decorating Contest. We only hope that they gained as much of 
the peace and spirit which is Christmas as we had in those 
few weeks. " 

Thank you. 



SamuelHall 

BEEKEEPING SHORT COURSES 

The College will again be offering two special three day short 
courses on beekeeping which are open to both members of the 
College Community and the general public. The courses are 
designed to benefit the experienced beekeeper as well as pro- 
viding enough information and experience to enable someone 
to get started in beekeeping. One course will be held on three 
Saturdays this Spring - April 2, 16 and 30. The summer course 
will be held on June 22, 23 and 24, 1977. 

The course is under the direction of Dr. Berthold who will be 
assisted by Mr. Jack Matthenius, the New Jersey Supervisor of 
Bee Culture. Some of the topics to be covered are: Honey Bee 
Ecology, Beekeeping Equipment, Starting with Bees, Colony 
Management, Colony Establishment, Queen Rearing, Bee 
Diseases and Honey Processing and Sales. Most topics covered 
in discussion will also be observed and/or practived at the DVC 
Apiary and Honey House. 

A number of Del Val students and faculty have taken the 
course, and anyone interested in further information should 
contact Dr. Berthold, Room 203 Mandell Hall or by College 
phone Extension 285. 



D.V.C. PUDDING 

OR 

iRoad Resurfacing in One Easy Lesson) 

The medical profession has been mystified for years by cer- 
tain alimentary disorders produced by the practice of the cu- 
linary arts at Del. Val, This article will attempt to shed some 
light on this practically untouched field by enumerating s^me 
of the more popular ailments . 

The major malfunction at the current time is rather descrip- 
tively known as Bisketti's Revenge (after Antonio Guissepe 
Bisketti- Montezuma's 3rd cousin twice removed). Symptoms 
are quite similar to Montezuma's Revenge. The patient begins 
to blend in with the walls of Elson Hall, becomes inclined to 
expectorate, and buffaloes frequently. Actually, the delicate 
hue of jade, the nausea, and the natural gas crisis are symptoms 
common to all of these afflictions. Others include: Mystery 
Meat Malaise, Chicken Chuck-up, Meatball dysentery and 
Chilli Fever. 

The logic behind the preparation of most meals is unmistak- 
able. In Italian cooking school it is taught that when one throws 
the spaghetti against the wall and it sticks, it is done to per- 
fection. Obviously this principle has been extended to many of 
the comestables one finds so temptingly arranged on ones plate. 
I have personally observed many students examining the quality 
of their dinner in this manner and it almost always passes. 

International cuisine is an obvious speciaUy at D.V.C. It is 
apparant that if one places water chestnuts on the main course 
it becomes Chinese. Also, the substitution of pineapple for the 
water chestnuts gives the meal a definite Hawaiian nature. The 
meal lying under these soggy chestnuts and slimy pineapple 
chunks is of no importance. It is merely a prop for the embellish- 
ments, which provide an appearance of sophistication and all 
of the taste anyway. Try it yourself, you will find that a few 
drops of watery tomato sauce, a half sprig of shamrock, a few 
strands of saurkraut or of some tape can make anything taste 
Italian, Irish, German or Scotch. And 1 bet you thought those 
old boots were too worn out to use. > 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



DO YOU CARE? 

By: Roy Cohen 

Many children in this area are fatherless. These children 
desperately need male guidance. As a member of the Big Bro- 
thers of Bucks County, I am deeply involved with the welfare 
of fatherless boys. These boys grow up lying, stealing and 
cheating • fmally ending up in jail. Just a few hours a week 
spent with an understanding man can change a boy's whole out- 
look on life. He will find that he can trust someone, and that 
someone really cares about him. I have been a Big Brother for 
nearly three years, and it has been a wonderful experience. 
Many of you are searching for a meaningful experience. Being 
a Big Brother, OR a Big Sister, can fulfill many needs, both 
yours and the childs'. Think of what you would have been like 
without a parent, and open your heart and let a youngster in. 
Call 343-9130 if you are a Bucks County resident; if not look 
up Big Brothers/Big Sisters in the white pages. You can save 
the future of a valuable young boy or girl. Please... the children 
are waiting. 

APO ON THE MOVE 

APO your campus service fraternity is off to a roaring start 
this semester. Some of its service projects planned for this 
semester are: 

a) A benefit Coffee House for retarded children, April 29 

b) Reference Book sale 

c) A work weekend at Rodney Scout camp in Maryland with 
other area chapters of the fraternity 

d) Picnic for the children of the Christ Home 

e) And a long term project of helping the Ram get back on its 
feet 

This chapter of APO (Sigma Nu) was founded in 1%7 and 
is now in its tenth year of service to this campus. 

APO dedicated to service to the Campus, the Community 
and to the Nation. 



A&-GRAVAriON 



ATTHE FARM SHOW 

Delaware Valley College was well representwl at the Penn- 
sylvania Farm Show this year as they were awarded two Grand 
Champions during the week long show. 

The first Grand Champion was the College's 3 year old Brown 
Swiss Dairy Cow which placed 1st in class, best udder in the 
show and Senior as well as Grand Champion Brown Swiss Cow 
of the show. 

The other top honor went to the College's Hereford Yearling 
Bull which placed 1st in class and was Junior and Grand 
Champion Hereford bull of the show. 

In all, the College exhibited 2 Ayrshires, 5 Holsteins and 2 
Brown Swiss in the Dairy Contests. 

Severt sheep were entered in the various judging categories 
for sheep and the Hampshire year ram placed 1st in that class. 

In the swine division the College entered the 2 bred gilts which 
placed 13th and 14th in their class. 

In the cattle division, Delaware Valley exhibited 5 Angus, 
and 2 Hereford beef cattle, and in addition to the Grand 
Champion it placed competitively in almost every other contest. 




k/A.- 



VM — U 



^y^< 



WHO'S WHO AT DVC 

By: Roy Cohen 

This Issue: 

The Train Man On Campus 

I'm sure most of you have seen Dr. Weber wandering around 
campus. He periodically visits Segal Hall to get a cup of coffee 
and shoot the breeze. In case you haven't, let me introduce 
Dr. "Choo Choo" Charlie Weber to you. Located in Mandell 
104, along with Dr. Goldberg, Dr. Weber hails from Spring 
City, Pa. At age 12 he came to Norristown, where he's been 
ever since. He attended U. of P. for his PhD. in Chemistry, 
after going to PCPS (Phila. College of Pharmacy and Science) 
for his undergraduate work. He keeps no secret about the fact 

he likes toy trains, and is an _collector 

of Lionel toy trains, as well as the advisor of the Railroad Club. 
He is president of the Local Chapter of the Train Collectors 
Association, and is in charge of building a layout at the TCA 
museum in Strasburg. His chemical specialties include Quant. 
Analysis, Kinetics and Electrochemistry. 

He's been at DVC since 1%9. A collector of golden oldies 
records, he has over 350 records (45's). Mrs. Weber is a nurse 
at Jefferson Hospital, and Dr. and Mrs. Weber have a IVi year 
old daughter, Cardy. 

Dr. Weber is a down-to-earth overgrown teenager, and if 
you want to get to know him, just say, "Doc, 1 have this toy 
train. . ." 



I 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



HONEY TIPS AND TRICKS 
Types of Hoiwy 

Generally speaking, there are five types of honey on the 
market today - liquid, comb, solid (som^imes call^ granulated 
or crystalized), chunk and cut comb. 

Liquid honey is free of visible crystals. It is obtained by un- 
capping the combs and forcing the honey from the cells by 
centrifugal motion and differs from comb honey only in the 
absence of the comb. In America, most people prefer honey in 
the liquid form. 

Granulated or Solid Honey makes use of the fact that most 
honeys crystallize or granulate. Honey in this state is partially 
or wholly solidified or "augarcd" and is often referred to as 
candied, creamed or spread. It is very popular in Canada and 
is fmding an increasing demand in this country. 

Comb Honey, as its name indicates, is honey in the comb as 
stored by the bees. Usually comb honey is served in its original 
size or cut into individual portions. This can be done by cutting 
the comb honey into one-inch squares with a knife dipped in 
boiling water. Chill thirty minutes before serving to prevent 
loss of honey from the comb. Serve the individual pieces with 
a cocktail or other small fork. 

More recently little chunks of sealed comb honey about 4 
inches long and 1 Yi inches in width have been wrapped in cel- 
lophane and packed in individual cartons. In the trade these 
are known as Cut Comb or Honey Hunks. 

In the southern states there is another type called "chunk" 
honey. The combs are built in shallow extracting frames and are 
cut in various sized chunks that will slip into tin pails or glass 
jars. The spaces between the combs and around them are Tilled 
with liquid Honey. 

How to Store Honey 

Honey keeps best stored in a tightly-covered container in a 
dark, warm place. Freezing or refrigeration will not harm the 
honey, but may hasten granulation. 

Granulated Honey 

Granules may form in a jar of honey, but this docs not harm 
it in any way. To reliquify, place the jar in a bowl of warm 
water - not warmer than the hand can bear - until all crystals 
melt. Honey may easily be scorched if overheated. 

Honey in Baking 

To replace sugar with honey in a cake or cooky receipe, a 
general rule is to reduce the amount of liquid called for by 14 
cup for each cup of honey used to replace sugar. 

Cakes and cookies made with honey keep fresher much 
longer. Honey absorbs and retains moisture retarding the drying 
out and staling of baked goods. This is especially important 
when you want to bake in advance or save baked goods for any 
length of time. 



THINK GREEN 
ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING FOR PLANTS 

by Sieve Silberstein 

Plants grown under artificial light need a wide spectrum of 
light to promote sturdy, bountiful growth. This includes blue, 
red and far-red light. 

Some brands of fluorescent tubes, such as "Naturescent" 
and "Gro Lux" are designed specifically for use with plants. 
These types of lights contain a wide spectrum and will promote 
healthy growth and abundant flowering. 

Warm white and cool white fluorescent tubes can be used 
together in a two or four tube fixture. This combination will 
result in a wide spectrum of light that will promote growth 
and flowering equal to that produced by "Naturescent" or 
"Grow Lux". Warm and cool white are also less expensive than 
these lights sold specifically for plant growth. 

I personally use this combination and have obtained results 
equal to those obtained with "Gro Lux". On some of my fix- 
tures I use this combination along with two fifteen watt in- 
candescent bulbs and have found this to promote sturdy growth 
in plants that require high light intensity. I highly recommend 
this type of light for all types of indoor plants. 



REDUCE THE DRINKING AGE 

The drinking age in Pennsylvania is 21 , as everyone knows. 
But with a little bit of luck, all that can be changed. In coopera- 
tion with the Ad-hoc Committee on Alcohol, Lycoming College 
we are urging every Del. Val. student to write to our state 
representatives. 
The state representative for this district is: 
The Hon. Benjamin Wilson 
Room 629-B 
State Capitol Building 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
The state senator for this district is: 
The Hon. Edward L. Howard 
Room 545 

State Capital Building 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
If you want to change the drinking age, write to these people. 
Together we can make a change. 



RESULTS OF QUESTIONAIRE COMING 
SOON IS DEL. VAL. CROWDED? 

Del Val seems to be overcrowded in certain areas. This pro- 
blem was questioned last semester and since improvements in 
class and lab situations seems to be lacking, a questionaire 
was printed. It was recently distributed and collected during a 
lunch period in the cafeteria and student center. 

Results of this questionaire will be printed in the next issue 
of the Ram to inform everyone of the opinions of Del Val 
students on this matter. Personal comments and suggestions 
will also be printed. 



Page 4 



THE RAM 




7he n2am 

Doylestown, Penna. 18901 



STAFF 

Ken Goebel 

Brett Middleton 

Luke Perea 

Glen Michalak 

(not in alphabetical order and 

hopefully not missing anyone) 

Brett Middleton 

Steve Silberstein 
and a cast of thousands (special thanks to the 
brothers of APO for their help in getting this the 
first issue of the new RAM together. ) 



EDITOR 
ASST. EDITOR 
TREASURER 
PHOTOGRAPHER 
REPORTERS 



COMING ATTRACTIONS 



MARCH: 



9 "Mr. Enthusiasm" Howard Peters, 12-lpm in Segal Hall 
10 Middle East Night in the Dining Hall 
10 Craftsmen in Residence, Singer Sewing Demo, 7:30 p.m. 
in Harness Hall 
12-20 Spring Vacation 

22 Feature Film 

23 Character Artist, Joe Duffy, 12-1 p.m. in Segal Hall 

23 Dinner Th«itre featuring the APO Players in "Hackberry 
Caviler" 

24 Swim Party 

24 Craftsmen in Residence-John Mirsch, Acrylic Sculpture 
7:30 p.m. in Work Hall Lounge 

29 Lecturer Lee Frank- "Lochness Monster, Bigfoot and 
other Creatures... are they real? Mandell 1 14, 8:00 p.m. 

30 Easter Egg Exhibit in Segal Hall 

30 Feature Film 

31 Craftsman in Residence-Francis O'Gorman, Lapidary 
Goldman Hall Lounge at 7:30 p.m. 



BECOME A 
CAMPUS DEALER 

Sell Brand Name Stereo Components 
at lowest prices. High profits, NO IN- 
VESTMENT REQUIRED. For details, 
contact; FAD Components, Inc., 20 
Passaic Ave., Fairfield, New Jersey 
07006 ILENEORLOWSHY 
201-227-6884 Call Collect. 



AG-GRAVATION 




■MM 



TH 




AM 



v.'; =)«^7 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



PHILLY FLOWER SHOW 



The PhiOy Flower Show ran from March 1 3th to the 20th at the Gvic Centre. 
During this time many exhibits were aired. The exhibits came from many insti- 
tuti<M)s and businesses. Among the Institutions was Dd Val CoQ^. Dd Val 
reodved first place for its educational exhibit. The award was presented to the 
ooOete by the Penn^Kwiia Horticuhure Society. DVC also reodved the Special 
Achievement Award of the Garden Qub Federation of Pennsyhrania for its 
display. 

The Del Val exhibit was devoted to "Plant Propagation" and features a 
greenhouse setting, which showed a number or propagation methods: pro{Mi- 
^tion by seed, by division, by cuttings, and by tissue culture. 

The exhibit was built under the direction of Dr. John Mertz, chairman of 
the Orn. Hort. Dept. and Dr. Louis Polites, assistant Prof, of Horticulture, 
who were assisted by many O.H. majors and one Hort. major. 

A-DAY SPECIAL EVENTS 

With A-Day approaching a list of the special events is in order. 

There will be six (6) contests and a possibility of a seventh (7). The six contests 
are canoe jousting, canoe radng, tug-of war, milking contest, egg throwing 
contest and the greased-pole. 

Hie canoe jousting is made up of two people, the jouster and the canoer. 
The objective of this contest is to knock dther jouster out of the canoe. Since 
the jouster must be standing in the csmoe, make sure your jouster can stand in 
a canoe. 

The canoe race consists of a team of four members. The objective is to canoe 
down to the clothes line, get a clothes pin and return to the bank. No paddles 
are used, the only thing you can use for paddles is your hands. 

Tug-of- War will be held across Lake Archer. Teams are determined by a 
wd^t fimit of 2,000 pounds. The teams must have all thdr members and wei^ts 
when they sign up. No aew acaiben can be added to tbc tcaa on A-Day, and 
M spiked shoes will be pemlttcd. 

The objtective of the miUdng contest is to fill a cup with fresh milk from a cow. 

The egg throwing contest is self explanatory. 

The greased pole contest. The contestant is given 4wo chances to retrieve a 
flag from the top of the greased pole. 

The possible new contest for this year is a pnnut race. Have a team of two 
membm, a spoon and a peanut. The peanut is in the spoon and the spoon is in 
the contestant's mouth. The starting team member must go to his partner and 
the partner must return to the starting point with the peanut on the spoon and 
in the contestant's mouth. If the peanut is dropped, it must be picked up by 
means other than the hands. 

Sgn up will be on March 29th and 31st and April Sth and 7th from I l:oo to 
12:30 in the hall lobby. 

SPECIAL EVENTS SCHEDULE 



SAT. 

1:30 milking contest 
2:30 canoe Joust 
4:00 tug-of-war 



SUN. 

1:30 canoaivca 

3:00- egg throwing/peanut race 
5:00 and greased pole 

The milking contest will be in the main show tent. The canoe race and joust 
and the tug-of-war will be at Lake Archer. The egg throwing, peanut race and 
greased pole will be at the football field. 

WHO'S WHO 



Dr. James Work, class of 1913, has joined the ranks of the official- 
ly notable when his name was listed for the first time in the new 
"Who's Who in Amerilca." 



A TTENTIONAREA VETERANS 

EDUCATION DAY OFFERED 5<X)UNTY AREA VETERANS 

Harrisburg ~ If you're a vietnam-era veteran with questions about the 
educational bendhs you're cMitled to the PhOaddphia Athktic Ckib at Broad 
and Vine Streets will be the place for you Saturday April 23 . 

That will be the site of Veterans Education Day~from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.- 
spopsored by the Poinsylvania Department of Education and the Sute Bureau 
of Employment Security. 

Represenutives of the PDE's Pr(^ram to Advance Veterans Education, 
die empk)yment security ofRoe, the PennsyKania Higher Education Assistance 
Agency and Veterans Administration, as well as people from colleges and uni- 
versities, technical and business schools and community agencies will be on 
hand to answer any questions veterans may have about what kind of hdp they 
can get and how to further thdr education. 

Mayor Frank Rizzo will issue a sUtemoit proclaiming April 23 Veterans 
EDUCATION Day. 

"This wUl be a one-stop information session fw veterans who want to 
further their education in colkge, technical w business scho<^ but don 't know 
how to go about getting the help they have a right to, " said PA VE Assisttmt 
Chief Richard Shuffner. "We're targeting the meeting especially for those in 
Philadelphia, Bucks, Montgomery, Delaware and Chester Counties, but my 
Pennsylvania veteran in welcome to attend. They owe it to thems^ves to take 
Ms opportunity to get information wAicA could well make a big change in their 
liva-for the better. " 

ROOM SEARCH 

According to the American Civil Liberties Union, Delaware Valley College 
bdng a private institution of higher learning, does have the right and the 
power to enter and search a dorm room. This means that at anytime an offi- 
dal from the college has the right to enter and look around a dorm room. 

However, while th^ do have the right to search a room, the power to search 
through personel property is questionable. 

THINK GREEN 

FLOWERPOTS: CLAY vs. PLASTIC 

by Steve Silberstien 

Some growers will use only clay pots, some will only use plastic pots, and 
others will use whatever is available. 

Clay does have a few advantages over plastic. Clay "breathes", allowing 
water to evaporate from the sides of the container. This is good for cacti, suc- 
culents, and other plants requiring a well-drained soil with periods drying out 
between watering. Clay pots are more attractive than plastic pots and are heav- 
ier; thus they are more suitable for large, unwieldy plants that might fall over 
if grown in lightwdght plastic pots. Clay also helps keep the roots cool. 

Unfortunately, clay does have several disadvantages. It can dry out the soil 
too fast, espedally in small pots, resulting in an unexpectedly dessicated plant. 
Salt deposites tend to build up and are difficult to remove from clay, although 
vinegar will make it easier. Clay pots are thicker than plastic and there are no 
square pots. Thus, they take up more room on a windowsill or under a light 
fboure than wouU piasdc pots. In, addition, they are more expenshre and there 
is a more limited choice of sizes available than in plastic. Clay is also breakable, 
which for some of us would mean more clay chips then could ever be used for 
drainage. 

Although plastic pots do not look as nice as clay and they do not "breath", 
they do have quite a number of advantages. They are lightweight, easier to 
clean, less expensive, come in more sizes (including square- which conserve 
space), and require less storage space than clay pots. 

Personally, I use nothing but plastic pots and have not found any problems 
assodated with them. I advocate using plastic for most plants, but, if you are 
planning to enter plants in a flower show I suggest clay pots. Judges are favor- 
ably impressed with aesthetically pleasing clay pots, and plastic tends to stand 
out unfavorably. 



Page 2 



THE RAM 



WHO'S WHO AT D.V.C. 



BY Roy Cohen 



Mr. Tateckaidi 

If you asked Mr. Michad Tabachnick where he has lived you would need a 
computer memory to remember. He has been through New York, New Jersey, 
and Pennsylvania. At Del. Val. since 1968, he did undergraduate work at 
Temple, and split his graduate work between Rutgm and Columbia where he 
was priviledged to learn from Neils Bohr, one of the greatest physicists of the 
20th century. 

Mr. Tabachnick has numy hobbies, of whkh d ectromcs is probably his most 
favorite. However, when asked what his first love is, he wasted no time in re- 
plying RELATIVITY. He is intrigued by the subject and knows a great deal 
about it. An admitted "Trekkie", he is an avid science fiction reader, as well 
as a concert pianist, and a model builder, not to mention a general household 
handyman (repairing furniture and the like.) 

Married to Roslyn since 1%9, he has two chiklrai, Robert,6, and Susan,4. 
He is the advisor to the Photo Club and is an honorary member of the Temple 
Chapter of Alpha Phi Chn^a. 

He teaches nearly all the math courses that Del. Val. off en and is one of the 
two physics teachers on campus, and teaches an electronics elective. 

Located in the basement of Ulman Hall, along with Mr. Christie, he is an 
interesting person to talk to, and not a bad teacher either. 



TROPICAL FISH CLUB 



The D.V.C. TrofMcal Fish Oub is all wet. Because of the efforu of its mem- 
bers and its advisors, the club has expanded tremendously and now has over 
60 tanks ranging in sizes from one to seventy-five gallons. Most of the tanks 
are owned by members and are used for breeding, rearing, healing sick fish, 
or just as show tanks, and are located in the basement of Lasker Hall. 

The chib supfrfies its members with food and other necessities while the mem- 
bers supply fish and ingenuity. Angelfish and Bettas seem the most popular 
fish bitd at this time ahhou^ attempts have been made to breed guppies, fue- 
mouths, danios, gouramis, and even the difficult ram. Fish are raised umil they 
are a certain size and then are sold to local dealers and petshops. But, since 
the fish are for anyone to buy, if you are thinking about starting an aquarium 
or just adding to your tank, or just curious, come on down and take a look. 
The club room is across from the book store and is usually open at lunchtime 
or at dinner. If no one k down there, find and ask a membCT to give you a tour. 



STAFF 

EDITOR KENGOEBEL 

ASS'T EDITOR BRETT MIDDLETON 

TREASURER LUKE PEREA 

PHOTOGRAPHER GLEN MICHALAK 

REPORTERS KAREN BORGEN 

STEVE SILBERSTEIN 
ROY COHEN 
RICHARD GRABOWSKI 

CIRCULATION BILLCASHIN 
FRED GROSS 

CARTOONIST JOHN APPLETON 

ADVISORS DR.ZIEMER 
DR. KEYS 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Dear Editor: 

The RAM has devoted half its front page to a ruthless attack on the quality 
of food served in the cafeteria. Frankly, most of us are well aware that insti- 
tutional food stinks in geno-al and is tedious at best. 

Like most studenu, however, I did not come to DVC eitho- to eat or to crab 
about the food; 1 came fw an education. Unfortunatdy, that also leaves much 
to complain about. Perhaps it would be more worthwhik for us as students to 
organize and print our acaikmic gripes: 

Why does this college persist in its ante-diluvian English Curriculum? 
Why is there no studat review of teaching quality, w the conspidous lack 
of it, at times? 

When will our economics courses catch up to the realities of the post 

World War I world? Would a course in personal/farm finance be a more 

realistic option? 

If we begin to collect our thoughts, we can use our energy synergistically as a 

prelude to constructive action. We can take part in our education instead of 

merely being processed by it. 

Agronomes 
the Father of Agronomy 

EDITORS NOTE: Dear Agronomes, 

Ymt have some good kkas. but henceforth the RAM wUi be unable tc print 
unsigned letters. We can print a false name if you do not want your true 
rume printed. 



Dear Editor: 

At the recent AOP dinner thearcr, "Hackbery Cavalier," several members 
of the administration blatantly ignored the "NO SMOKING" signs in the 
cafeteria. This not only created some discomfort for nearby students, but re- 
vealed their lack of consideration for mles (However anall those rules may by). 
Surely this was not a good example for these people to set. Hopefully in the 
future they will not complain when students disobey rules that they themselves 
cannot obey. 

Sincerely, 
Susan Harvev 

Dear Susan, 

I cannot agree with you more, and I am in no way trying to defend their ac- 
tions. However, did you or anyone else ask them to stop? 



WHAT IS HONEY?? 



Honey is a natural, unrefined food, unique because it is the 
only unmanufactured sweet available in commercial quan- 
tities. In addition to its sugars, honey contains a considerate 
number on minerals, seven members of the B vitamin com- 
plex, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), dextrins, plant pigments, 
amino acids and other organic acids, traces of protein, esters 
and other aromatic compounds, and several enzymes. 

' Since seventy-five to eighty percent of its composition is 
sugars, honey has an energy-producing value second to few 
foods. The important thing is the way in which honey pro- 
vides the energy. Cane and beet sugars must be broken down 
into simpler sugars by digestive juices before they can be ab- 
sorbed into the blood stream and assimilated into the tissues. 
These resulting simple sugare, dextrose and levulose, make 
up almost the entire sugar content of honey. As a result, 
little digestion of honey is necessary and absorption takes 
place quickly. 

This is one reason why honey is extremely popular among 
athletes of all types. It produces virtually instant energy 
without putting any strain on the digestive system. Crms Country and Track 
runners use honey before and during competition for quick energy; so do all 
types of sportsmen. 




Pages 



THE RAM 



ENGAGEMENTS 



Kenneth Baker '76 
Michel! Modrick 

Barbara Novak '76 
Jim Hopps '75 



Douglas Cope '76 
Judy Egan 

AlanJohn&on '75 
Paula Curley 



Ted King '76 
Beverly Koch 

Richard Meyers '76 
Nancy Henkel '77 

Audrey Mather '77 
Alex Puskas '76 



Cathy Cochlin '76 
Dennis Mason 

Louis Hegyes '7 1 
Kathy Coonan 



AG-GRAVATION 



MARRIAGES 

Vincent Costanzo '76 Theodore Respet '76 
Patricia Martin Brenda Fctzer 



George Kline '76 
Mary Franzoso 



DianneCole '76 
David Allison '76 



L/el Val S Lo.sino Snacks • jlndenU Cnly 



q"^ FIcor 

C. oly On 



y 



COLO DRlN^S 



TRY 



." y r^ K uocK -^^ 



.,AnO H£'$ NfVfR in' 




% 



(^ |^ 



\^ 



^\^ n n n n 



COfFEETCA 



-7 



YOU 
''LCSt... ^ 
^- TRY 
/AGAIN J" 



^/y/^ 



APRIL 

5 

7-11 

13 

14 



18 

20 

21 
22 

23fr24 
23 

29 



COMING EVENTS 

Easter Egg Hunt 

Easter Vacation 

Palmist in Segal Hall - 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Craftswomen in Residence, Doris Bower, 

"Window Shades - Cutout and Painted" 

in Segal Hall - 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Golf vs. Upsala- 1:00 p.m. 

Baseball vs. Moravian - 3:15 p.m. 

Craftsman in Residence, Gerrel Sharp, 

"Blacksmithing" T.B.A. at 7:30 p.m. 

feature film 

Coffee house featuring - Maura McKinney 

A-DAY 

Dance-concert featuring "Ralph" - 9:00 - 

12:00 p.m. 

Coffee House Benefit for Bucks County 

Association for Retarded Children. Live 

music by 4 groups from 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 

a.m.. Dining Hall. 



SEEK & FIND T.V. SHOWS 
Can you find the 32 T.V. Shows concealed in this puzzle? 



H 


T 


Y 


W 


H 


A 


W 


A 


I 


I 


F 


I 


V 


E 





E 





C 


C 


A 


R 


H 





D 


A 


T 


S 


D 


S 


11 


T 


11 


N 


H 


D 


Y 


A 


C 


Y 





E 


T 


N 


£ 


I 








E 





R 


A 


T 








N 


D 


I 


N 


M 


S 


I 


R 


G 


P 





D 


S 


T 





L 


K 


H 


A 


I 


N 


L 


R 


R 


P 


W 





11 


J 


H 


W 


U 


R 


E 


T 





L 





E 


E 


S 


T 


Y 


S 


A 


W 


c 


M 


H 


D 


N 


E 


w 


M 


R 


S 


B 


L 


H 


E 


U 


A 


S 


B 





I 


C 


I 


E 





A 


E 


I 


A 


S 


R 


A 


H 


L 





V 





s 


H 


N 


P 


T 


N 


W 


B 


11 


£ 


U 


E 


G 





D 


H 


R 


E 


T 


N 


E 


c 


L 


A 


C 


I 


D 


E 


M 


Y 


A 


W 


S 


E 


L 


P 


p 


A 


Y 


N 


T 


S 


A 


H 


B 


F 


E 


Y 


B 


E 


S 


N 





N 


N 


A 


C 


S 








T 


I 


Y 


P 


T 





N 


I 


G 


H 


T 


C 


U 


Y 


G 





M 





G 


F 


R 


E 


N 


C 


H 


C 


H 


E 


F 


E 


D 


U 


A 


If 


U 


F 


G 


N 


U 


K 





J 


A 


K 


B 





R 


N 


F 


R 


£ 


E 


K 





11 


S 


N 


U 


G 


T 


H 


E 





D 


D 


C 





U 


P 


L 


E 





R 


L 



STUDENT STOKE 

25 



ci 



ackelo 



210067-^ 



ojj LOitrL coup 



ff 



d SIjSQbX in\rr\j h 



■XjSduSS •pJaau.es 



cfLp.c.H We. c^ftarA-n.r.P. «>vA^ 



MiCRODEX CORRECTION GUIDE (M-9) 



L. 



CORRECTION 



The preceding document has been re- 
photographed to assure legibility and its 
image appears immediately hereafter. 






'% 



KrXMIO 



R£/i\iNaTON RAMJy I 

.O^riCa ■VSTIMm DIVISION f' I 

'• ■ ■ '■, •v-»i,'.|.,.^f^.' •..■■.'••.••••V •*»! 



Page 3 



THE RAM 



A WINNING SEASON; 
DEL VAL'S TYPICAL OPPONENT 



Aftar iMt jfwn gloriout acMoo. we vc wilUnt to take oo aO comen. even 
the MasMchuiettet State Home for tke Bewiklered baa^Ndl team. The team 
it mainly compoaed of memben of the dass of 1913, with a few rookies from 
the chks of 1914. Join Coward HomU now for the rundown on both teams. 

This b Coward HoseO at the Majestic campus of Delaware Valley CoUcge 
on the glorious baseball fidd. Notice the hish green grass and fuO ttands. Here 
we are sitting in a tree above the backstop. 

All you loyal and devoted fans know your home team, a group of healthy 
young lads fresh off the farm, so we'll dispeuM with the misery and move on 
to our opposing team. 

On first base we have (M Eagle-«ye Irving. He is known for his 200-200 vi- 
sion and his Betsy Ross specs. 

Second base is Molasses Mike who is known for his Mag wheeled wheel- 
chair. On a good day he can do a mile an hour with a stiff tailwind. 

Shortstop is played by the famous Pivot Pete, fastest cane on the east coast. 

On third base we have Appen Dextras Andy who is able to scratdi his beard 
with either hand. 

Left field is played by ExLax Jones who can make it to the John in one min- 
ute and ten seconds flat. 

Brittle Bones Bradford is the centerfield player. With his gumey and two 
orderlies he is known for never lying down on the job. 

In right field is Hard of Hearing Hairy. The only way he knows that the 
iiuUng is over is when the Del Val playoi point towards the bench. 
The catcher is Sonuiabulant Sam, wearing his official team sleeping bag. The 
boondng of the b^ off his head keeps him alert to what's happening. 

Pitching this game will be Windup Willie, in full body cast, whose pitches 
are more powerful than a steaming locomotive and who can hit a cuspidor at 
SO feet with the accuracy of city park pigeon. 

DcL Val. takes the fidd aooonixnied by much rgoidng. At bat is oU Eagle- 
eye, the windup, the pitch; the catcher gets the ball. He throws the ball back 
to the iNtcher and Eagle-eye swings; we have our flrst injury. Fortunately, 
MSHFB has its own mobile hospital handy and the attendanu pick up the 
catcher's teeth. An immediate replacement allows the game to continue. The 
pitcher winds and deals. Eagle-eye swings, and the catcher makes a quick re- 
turn and hits the dirt to avoid the bat. The pitcher fires the dedding pitch a- 
cross the plate just in time to meet Eagle-eye's swing form the previous pitch. 
It's a beautiful grounder to left field, allowing Eagle-eye to reach first base. 

One man is on first and no outs; Molasses Mike wheels up to the batter's 
box. Wind-up; pitch; the crack of the bat and the roar of twin Allison airaaft 
engines winding up as Mol.Mike peeb out, laying rubber on home plate. He 
catdies Eagle-eye on first base, rounds second, and throws Eagle-eye to third. 
We're now at the end of the second - batter - two men on and no outs. 




COFFEE HOUSE BENEFIT 

On Friday April 29, 1977 the memben of A.P.O. will host a benefit for the 
Bucks County Association for Retarded Children. The Coffee House will run 
concert style and will feature the sounds of Al Bien, singer-songwriter George 
Hadkett and two local banks from Bucks County. 

There will be a donation of SI .50. There will also be: pizza, soft t>retzels, 
and assorted drinks on sale with table service. 

There will be continues entertainment from 8:oopm till 1 :00 am. The show 
will be MCed by our own John Appleton. 

A night of good music is guaranteed, so come over and enjoy yourself for a 
good cause. 



Ex-Lax Jooci is iq>. He digs in die batters box grasping the hn. flerody, and 
^ares at the oppoung pitcher. The pitcher winds and deals; Ex-Lax swings! 
It's a de cce e e e e ep fly baD. The oirtfiddcr runs bade.. ..bade.... As he faOs into 
the snow fence, the baO drops new Lasker Hall. ExLax rounds the baaes cry- 
ing pitiously, "Where's the John?" followed by an orderly with a brand new 
wper dupa aitfomatic pooper sooopcr. Eagbcye rounds home piMe. fdkwcd 
by Molasses Mike leaving a trail (tfnumgkd botttes in his wake. ExLax reaches 
home and heads for the biuhes, scoring twice: once for himadf and once for 
the attendant. 

Brittle Bones Bradford is up. The pitcher winds and deals, its a high pop. 
The high is the ball, the pop is Brittle Bones' shoukler. The ball is acddentaOy 
snared by the confused Dd. Val. catcher, and that side is retired. 

At the end of the half it's MSHFB^ and Dd Val is up to bat. 

Leading off is Del Val's first baseman, Willie Winds and deals; strike one. 
Willie gets the sign, the stretch, the pitch, and a grounder to Pivot Pete. He 
nimbly scoops up the ball and soids it over to the first baseman for the out. 

Batting next is the second baseman. He digs in the batters box, checks the 
fidd out, and after a few practice swings, is ready for action. Willie throws 
two perfect strikes. On the third pitch he hits a Une drive to center field. Brittle 
Bones scoops it up with his good arm. Ife throws to Ph^ Pete covering second. 
The runner trips on the cane and is called out by Mongo the ump. There is a 
small arguement which dies quickly. 

Two outs and the third basonan is up; the power-hitter of D.V.C. Willie 
throws an easy underhanded fkiater across the plate; the lotta refuses it Strike 
one; Willie takes two steps forward to make it easier for the batter and throws 
it again. A swing and a miss. Strike two. Willie takes two more steps forward 
and tosses it again. The batter swings with all his might and the baO drops at 
his feet. He trips over the ball and is tagged out by Sommaleulant Sam who 
woke up when he heard the thump. The side is retired. 

At the end of the first inning it's MSHFB-4. Del. Val.-O. 

The rest of the game continued as the Bewildered team became slower and 
sk>wa and the Dd. Val. team got khttzier and khitzier. until finally the Bewikl- 
ered team forfdted due to lack of competition. Final score and wrap up are: 



MSHFB 



Del. Val. 2 4 27 

This is Coward Hosell signing off from high in the osk tree over looking the 
majestic baseball field of Del. Val., where the home team has just blown an- 
other one. Thank goodness it was only exhibition. This is Coward Humorous 
Hosell speaking of Sports. 



runs 


hiU 


errw^ 


21 


40 


2 (both on 
Pivot Pete 
for iUegal 
use of cane) 




'(Mtcirc IS J part ol ttwr lift hlkd «iih those 
liiut cxjms viHi'd ttkc to loryri. i\%i\<V mcaK m 
ihtf I nittn. fOo6 friertds and much mmc 
^ t.t»IWtfc rm|t IN a wmNil nl ii all 

In Ihtf \tf»f N lo HHTW. viHjr s.altcfc ni^j 
«illrclltft.i iH(i\« Ja>vpoficbkU>(>ur 
jima mjicT The week of \nril l§ 
thuHifh AfHil -^ I9'7 iNJ|tKHliimc 
lomvcM ihtfNC mcmixws mihcpur 
^.hiNtf ol \our o«n lt>slcn'N vivlkfr rmf 




A SPECIAL DEAL. 

Liki .i(t\.ini.ii*< •)l<<itrtiiif uct-kniiK s|ttf i.il 
nlici , mil I'll ,iii\ (itii or.illiif iIm (li-liiv 
I ini: n|iii4MiN.ii I (it st.iiHt.int rtiic pntc 
III rr*. w tt.it Mill ml *" "■ 



lh«rl^...aitfa»Mlra 



moo odOf m win n tMi« 
MYERS JEWELRY STORE 

!■ W STATI ST 0O*iitTOWN »• 



Page4 



THE RAM 



TRACK OUTLOOK 1977 

The returning lettermen from the i976 season know what it means to win, 
attaining the first undefeated season in Delaware Valtey Colic's history of 
track (10<9. With the majority <^ last yeu-'s ruraien and a mideus of this ym's 
1 1-2 cross country torn, the track squad should have a fine, strong baK of 

SUKXM1. 

Semor Aggies will indude Scott Kinsbauer of Hatfield, Pa.. Al Qmba from 
pyte.. Pa.. Bob Wiedman of Denver, Pa. and Bob GerbCTich from BeroviUe, 

BASEBALL 
DISAPPiONTING START 

It was a cod Saturday for the opening of basdMdl seascm, not only in the air. 
but abo on the field. The Ao^s were bmered twice by tlM tough Susqudttnna 
team, 11-1, 13-4. 

Fighting valiantly the Aggks were just not equal to the task. Liking b<Mh in 
hitting and pitching, the Aggies were at best able to muster up a half-hearted 
effort at winniitg. The game was marked with sevend home ma and many 
strong hits. 

Several questionable coaching chdces were also made. The oiw that sticks 
to mind was when c<»ch Hardy brought first bttsebean John Zisk in from left 
fieM to relief pitch in the second game of the dtnibleheader. (John is listed as a 
1st baseman on the current team roster). 

The Aggie team was backed by a large turnout of fellow studoits, but even 
with support they were unable to win . 

However, with more support, victory is not out of reach. Support you team. 
The next home game is against Albright beginning at 3:13 pm on Monday, 
April 4th. 



G0LFT7 
AN OUTLOOK 

The College had the largest turnout in two years for the 1977 Golf Team. 
What is to be expected from this year's team seems to depend on how much 
team support can be expected from the team's new members. 

Returning lettermen will include senior Captain Timothy Stawovy from 
Belle Vernon, Pa. who will aid the team with his experience. Also adding some 
match knowledge for the Aggies will be Sophmore Michael Stnisiak of Pa^aic, 
N.J, and junior Kent Rickenbach from Milford, Pa. As the underclassmen 
gain vital playing experieiKe, so will the team in confidence. All told, it looks 
Uke a good season with a good chance of upping last year's 2-1 1 record. 



MODEL RAILROADING 



The D.V.C. Railroading Club is now well under way in the construction of 
a mode! railroad layout in HO scale. The club now meets on Tuesday night at 
6:00pm in the Admission Building basement; come on down and visit. 

Much of our success is due to the goierosity of the student body in support- 
ing us in our raffie. The club would also like to say thanks to Mr. Pence, the 
winner of the raffle, who was kind enough to donate the winnings back to the 
club. 

The train platform being buih on is approximately 7* x 21' which in scale 
nuks is dose to a half mile kmg. The aact date of completion is not known but 
the main line is hopefully going to be completed by the end of the semester. 



UNIVERSAL GYM 

byRkhaniOnbowski 

About six weeks ago, Dd. Val. compliaei the new universal gym. Since then 
the gym has been used very miKh by faculty and studems. 

TIk universal g^ cost $4,S00.00. James Bender of "Bender-Milb" 
Chevrolet ga^ funds and supptm as wdl as did the administration, and Lin 
BaslCT of "Barb-Lin Carpett" <k}naied the carpeting. The Vanity Ctub pur- 
chased the "Lcaper MwHiine." 

AU of the instjdiation was made pMsible by maintenance, coadMs and es- 
pedidly the football players who also took the time to paint the room. 

CoBEJi Wason asks die coopcndon of aB those laing the new equpment and 
in ottering uid teavinf the gym by the pr(q)er doors. 



BLOCK Cr BRIDLE 

Block A Bridle started off the spring semester of 1977 with tlw electitMi of 
officers. The results are as follows: 



President- Dirk Wise 

VU»-PnsUient- Mena Hautau 

Secretary- Pauline Riser 

Treasurer- Mary Cook 

Program Chairman- Kurt Wdss 

A-DA YReps. - Edlyn Ehring 

Gerry Rennekamp 
Paul Gubemat 



ICC Reps. - Jvry Crowshaw 
Dave Pratt 

ICC Reps. - Jerry Crowshaw 
Dave Pratt 

Journalist- Jean Dimmler 

Photograplwr- Glen Michalak 

Sergent-at-Arms- G^ Gorra' 



ndck & Bridle is having an Easter Ham Sale. These hams are from Hatfldd 
Packers and are of outstanding quality; to order one, see any Block A Bridle 
member. The deadline for orden is March 28th. They will be ddivered in the 
dining hall lobby on April 4th and Sth. 

Block & Bridle members are starting to get thdr animals ready for A-Day. 
Animals have been selected-so if you happen to see someone zip by, being 
dragged by a steer, it's just a Block A Bridle member. 




<^<^ ffUi 



%J 




^ IS 



T 



w^mmmm 



i^QGG/ij 







Page 5 



THE RAM 



ENGAGEMENTS 



Kenneth Baker '76 
Michell Modrick 

Barbara Novak '76 
Jim Hopps *75 



Douglas Cope '76 
JudyEgan 

Alan Johnson '75 
Paula Curley 



Ted King '76 
Beverly Koch 

Richard Meyers '76 
Nancy Henkel '77 

Audrey Mather '77 
Alex Puskas '76 



Cathy Cochlin '76 
Dennis Mason 

Louis Hegyes '7 1 
Kathy Coonan 



AGGRAVATION 



MARRIAGES 

Vincent Costanzo '76 Theodore Respet '76 
Patricia Martin Brcnda Fetzer 



George Kline '76 
Mary Franjoso 



DianneCole '76 
David Allison '76 



„L)el Val S Co^sino Snacks ^ludeoU Only 



COLD DRINKS 



HCFUNPS : 

Rm.SIH 

*^ ♦wxf en 

Cnly On 



TRY 

YOUR 



>-y /i> ■', LUCK \^ 
[^ y \^ 



AnO \iM'i NEVCR IM 




■w'-^ n n I J n 



COfFEE-TtA 



YOU -- 

LCSt... ^ 
TRY 



'AGAIN 



\ 






^ffi^ 



COMING EVENTS 

Ea$ter Egg Hunt 

Easter Vacation 

Palmist in Segal Hall - 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Craftswomen in Residence, Doris Bower, 

"Window Shades - Cutout and Painted" 

in Segal Hall • 11:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Golf vs. Upsala - 1:00 p.m. 

Baseball vs. Moravian - 3:15 p.m. 

Craftsman in Residence, Gerrel Sharp, 

"Black8mithing"T.B.A. at7:30p.m. 

feature film 

Coffee house featuring - Maura McKinney 



APRIL 

S 

7-11 

13 

14 



18 

20 

21 
22 

23Er24 ADAY 

23 Dance-concert featuring "Ralph" - 9:00 - 

12:00 p.m. 
29 Coffee House Benefit for Bucks County 

Association for Retarded Children. Live 

music by 4 groups from 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 

a.m.. Dining Hall. 



SEEK h FIND T.V. SHOWS 
Can you find the 32 T.V. Shows concealed in this puzzle? 



H 


T 


Y 


W 


H 


A 


W 


A 


I 


I 


F 


I 


V 


E 





E 





C 


C 


A 


R 


H 





D 


A 


T 


S 


D 


S 


M 


T 


U 


N 


H 


D 


Y 


A 


C 


Y 





E 


T 


N 


E 


I 








E 





R 


A 


T 








N 


D 


I 


N 


11 


S 


I 


R 


G 


P 





D 


S 


T 





L 


K 


H 


A 


I 


N 


L 


R 


R 


P 


W 





M 


J 


H 


W 


U 


R 


E 


T 





L 





E 


E 


s 


T 


Y 


S 


A 


W 


c 


M 


H 


D 


N 


E 


w 


M 


R 


s 


B 


L 


H 


E 


u 


A 


8 


B 





I 


C 


I 


E 





A 


E 


I 


A 


S 


R 


A 


H 


L 





V 





s 


H 


N 


P 


T 


N 


W 


B 


M 


E 


U 


E 


G 





D 


H 


R 


E 


T 


N 


E 


C 


L 


A 


C 


I 


D 


E 


11 


Y 


A 


W 


S 


E 


L 


P 


P 


A 


Y 


N 


T 


S 


A 


H 


B 


F 


E 


Y 


B 


E 


S 


N 





N 


N 


A 


C 


S 








T 


I 


Y 


P 


T 





N 


I 


G 


H 


T 


C 


D 


V 


G 





M 





G 


F 


R 


E 


N 


C 


H 


C 


H 


E 


F 


E 


D 


U 


A 


M 


U 


F 


G 


N 


U 


K 





J 


A 


K 


B 





R 


N 


F 


R 


E 


E 


K 





11 


S 


N 


U 


G 


T 


H 


E 





D 


D 


C 





U 


P 


L 


E 





R 


I 



STUDSNT STOKZ 



25 



ci 



ackels 



zippeT-c 



0)j Ujllfb COUpOTb 

k^il- Via. OS 



ff 



xja 



di s TaJ c a^ & ni^ X. b 



aques 






TH 




AM 



VOL.7 



May The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 1 977 



NO. 8 



MERCER MUSEUM FOLK FEST 



On Saturday and Sunday, May 14th and ISth the Mercer Museum will host 
a Folk Fest. The Fest will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. rain or shine. The piu- 
seum IS located on Green Street in Doylestown. 

The festival will feature ISth and 19th Century Craft Demonstration and 
Sale. This part of the fest will include: beekeeping; gunsmithing; Windsor 
chair making; wall and floor cover stenciling; flax processing; wool dyeing; 
stonecutting; quilting; combmaking; rug braiding and hooking; corn husk 
and apple dolls; wallpaper boxes; chair caning; fraktur; theoretn and reverse 
painting; house construction; musical instrument repair and making . . .and 
30 other early American crafts. 

There will also be several special events: 

• 19th Century Grist Mill 

• Pennsylvania German Brass Band 

• Wheelhien 

• 1 8th Century Military Camp Life 

• Farmyard Life 

• Folk Musk 

• Herb Sale and Flower Peddler 
and Special Events to the Kids. 

There will also be a picnic with Brunswick Stew; hamburgers, hotdogs, 

birch beer, punch, lemon sticks, ice cream and funnel cake. 

Admission: (does not include to the Museum) 

ADULTS $2.50 Sr. Citizens $1.00 

Students up to 18 yrs. $.50 Families $5.00 max. 

Member Families $3.00 max. Children under 6 FREE 



FROM THE BEE HIVE 

On March 9, 1977, the Apiary Society voted for next year's officers. The 
outcome of the election was as follows: President--Jim Sheafaer, Vice Presi- 
dent-Jean Dimmler, Treasurer & Honey Sales- Vic Frey, Co-Secretaries- 
Linda Budrewicz and Marian Payer. 

Special A-Day positions were also filled by Pat Curran as A-Day Repre- 
sentative, Walt Kozak as Sergeant-At-Arms, and Russel Rising as Comsort 
to the Queen. The Annual Bee-Scarer Award was declined by all nominees, 
for unknown reasons. 

Honey isn't all Apiary Society members eat. The club held its annual ban- 
quet March 24, at the Warrington Motor Inn. They feasted on a choice of 
prime ribs or sea-kabobs with all the trimmings. Later that evening, a special 
program was presented by Mr. Paul Ziegler, Pennsylvania Field Supervisor 
of Bee Culture, who gave a lecture and slide show on Queen Rearing. This 
presentation, held in Mandell Hall Auditorium, was part of a joint meeting 
of the Bucks County Beekeepers' Association and the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege Apiary Society. 

The club kept as busy as bees during the month of March. On the 31st, in 
conjunction with Doc Berthold's Beekeeping Class, they buzzed down to the 
U.S.D.A. Eastern Utilization Laboratory in Philadelphia. Here, these diligent 
students were enlightened with various facts about foods and how they proc- 
essed. 

The highlight of the trip was a tour of Dutch Gold Honey Bottling Compa- 
ny. The barrels of honey, imported from all over the world, seemed endless. 
So did the line of jars coming down the conveyor belt to be filled, labeled, 
and capped. The taste buds also got a treat as the students were allowed to 
sample exotix flavors of honey. 

Support the club by buying honey. 



ATTN. STUDENTS TAKING GRE's 

PRINCETON, NJ - College seniors planning to take the Graduate Record 
Examinations (GRE) Aptitude Test next fall will see iomt changes in the exam. 
A new section designed to measure analytical skills will be added to the tradi- 
tional area that test verbal and quantitative skills. 

The change, the first since the current form of the Aptitude Test was intro- 
duced in the 1940's, is based on an extensive research effort initiated by the 
Graduate Record Examinations Board that showed that analytical skills can 
be distinguished from verbal and quantitative skills and are related to academic 
success. 

Students, faculty members, and administrators from all over the country 
were consulted in the various planning stages of the change in the exam. 

Educational Testing Service (ETS), which administers the exam for the GRE 
Board, explains that the additional meausre will enable students to demo- 
strate a wider array of academic talents when they apply for admission to 
graduate schools. 

Janis Somerville, GRE program director at ETS, said, "The new measure 
will test a student's skills in a number of areas. Students will be able to show 
their ability to recognize logical relationships, draw conclusions from a com- 
plex series of statements, and determine relationships between independent 
or interdependent categories of groups." 

She explained that, like the traditional measures of the GRE, the new test 
will use various kinds of questions. 

"Three types will be used in the analytical section: analysis of explanations, 
logical diagrams, and analytical reasoning questions, each designed to test a 
different aspect of analytical ability," she said. 

Somerville also explained that no formal training in logic or methods of 
analysis is required to do well on the new measure. 

"Some analytical skills are required and virtually all fields of study," she 
explained. "And, like verbal and quantitative skills, analytical skills are de- 
veloped over a long period of time and are not believed to be improved to any 
significant degree by intensive study in a brief period of time." 

Somerville also noted that the 1977-78 GRE Bulletin of Information will 
describe the new measure and will include sample questions and explanations 
of the answers. The bulletin is sent free to all students registering for the GRE. 

In addition, a Sample Aptitude Test containing the same number and types 
of questions as the actual exam can be ordered at one dollar per copy. Both 
publications will be available on August 1 . 

Despite the new addition, the GRE will remain a three-hour test since the 
verbal and quantitative portions have been shortened and the time saved al- 
located to the new measure. 

"The same research effort that produced the new measure also yeilded 
shorter versions of the verbal and quantitative sections that are comparable 
in reliability and usefulness to the earlier and longer sections," explained 
Somerville. 

The GRE is taken each year by about 300,000 college students as part of 
the admission process to graduate school, the exam is offered six times a year, 
while advanced tests in 20 subjects are offered five times a year throughout 
the nation. 

ORN. HORT SOCIETY on the MbVE 

The Ornamental Horticulture Society has recently held elections of officers 
for the upcoming 1977-'78 school year. The results of these elections are as 
follows: 

President: Thomas S. Jakobczyk 

Vice President: Larry Whipple 

Secretary: Sherry Peechatka 

Treasurer: Rich Kiefener 

/.C.C. Rep. .Karen Fry 

Publications: Bob Schultz 

A -Day Rep. : Clyde Hirt 

Membership to the Ornamental Horticulutre Society is open to all majors. 
What the society needs most of all is your support. Please feel welcome to at- 
tend our next meeting. Dates will be posted in the lobby of the dining hall, the 
Student Center, Ag. Building, and Mandell Science Building. 



Letters to 
the 
Editor 




Letters to the editor may be submitted to "The Ram " c/o Dei- Val Post Office. 
No stamp is necessary. Simply hand to the Postmistress. 



Dear Editor, 

DVC Class elections were held on April 13, 1977, to the surprise of many 
students. There wen no signs posted or ^ they were they were not bright enough 
or large enough to be examined by the average DVC student. 

All class elections were held on the same day. Most students had no idea as 
to what was going on in the Dining Hall Lounge or were so confused they just 
walked out without having a say in anything that their classes will participate 
in the following year. There were also ieveral students who could not make the 
prescribed time of 10:45 to 12:40 pm. since many DVC students do not par- 
ticipate in what is commonly called lunch here. 

The commuters were supposed to have a voting station in Segal HalL But 
to my knowledge they only got to vote for the commuter Representative to the 
Houses of Government. 

I luive stated several facts, all of which were quite obviously wrong with the 
elections. For the average students who live on campus or commuters, the date 
of the elections was not made public. The tables for the different classes were 
not clearly marked, leaving many students confused. The people who ran the 
elections never arrived until approximately 11:00 am. and were gone before 
lunch ended. The commuters did not get to vote for any of their class officers 
unless they went over to the dining hall. 

I would porpose that voting be from 9.-00 am. to 6:00 pm. and an account 
be kept of who voted. 1 also feel that Segal Hall should have a voting facility. 

I hope that in the future that the elections held at DVC will be hdd in a more 
organized manner 

Sincerely, 
Gwen Schubert 



IS THERE LIFE AFTER COLLEGE? 

Discover the Options open to you in your search for a job or career. 
Where can you make these discoveries? In the Library. 
The DVC Library has just started a display of pamphlets about careers 
in horticulture, agriculture, good industry, science, medicine, business, 
veterinary medicine, environmental science, etc. Come and see what 
you can find in your field. 

The display is located in the back reference room of the library-just 
keep walking straight when you come through the door. 
Of course, if you want professional help in planning your life after 
college see Mr. McClelland in the Placement Office. But for supple- 
mentary information and material for browsing, come and sec what's 
new in the library. 



Thank you, 
(Ms.) Jean Winans 
Library: Acquisitions 



HELP WANTED 

Management Trainee 
Why Pay A Fee? 

When the oppportunity to enter a career management training program is 
available, Credithrift of America, a nation-wide consumer finance company, 
will provide a two-year training program and the opportunity for advance- 
ment to the individual with a strong desire to be suoxssful; college is helpful 
but not required, liberal benefit package, call area supervisor Wayne AlUson 
for appointment - 345-6280. 
«••••••••••••««•••• ^ Equal Opportunity Employer ••••••••••••••••• 



FROM THE EDITORS DESK 

What you are about to read is from possibly the most anti-football and anti- 
football coach person on campus. But as of last week aU has changed. 

Last week I had a nice long talk with head football coach Al Wilson. Never 
have I met a man more concerned about colkge life then he is. Not just for 
the football playen, but for all Del. Val. students. 

He is gentry concerned about improving life for evoTone during the week 
and during the weekeitd. With his idns and students work, help is on the way. 

And while we are writing from this beloved desk. I would like to apologize 
to the baseball team. Once in awhile articles are written forgetting that the 
writing date and printing date are often two weeks apart. At the same time I 
would to congradulate the team on their recent victories. 

As editor I would also like to say that all articles written by "BAAH" are 
actually short stories and are meant with no nudice to anyone. 

As editor of the RAM this semester it has been my hope to get more people 
reading the RAM. And if the last RAM was an indicator, 1 have succeded. 
The RAM's policy at this time, as in the past, is to print all submitted items, 
when signed, with as few alterations as possible. Articles and letters can have 
the name withheld, upon request. This is to prevent any problems with the 
meaning of the contents. 



Dear Editor, 

Your readers should know that a course in Agricultural Economics will be 
c0ered in 0te Evinmg CoOege thtfaU. ItwHlbe offered on a co-op basis, whidi 
means that full-time day students can take this course at no additional charge 
provided they do not e3xeed the nineteen credit maximum. 

I have recently earned a Master of Arts in Economics from Temple Univer- 
sity and will be teaching this course. Dr. Prundeanu has offered to advise and 
guide me in this endeavor. 

The course will include such topics as 1) Economic decision making of the 
individual farm, 2) The role of agriculture in the national economy, 3) The im- 
pact of government policy on agriculture, 4) The role of agriculture in inter- 
natiorutl trade, 5) Supply and demand cormderations specific to t^riculture. 

Sincerely, 

Dr. E. L. GoUbtrg 

Dear Editor, 

In the last RAM there were nearly fifteen errors in spelling arul punctuation. 
This does not include numerous typographical errors. I do not knon if this is 
the fault of the typist, printer, or of the contributors themselves. As a contri- 
butor to the RAM I do not like to see the time arul effort put into a grammat- 
ically correct article wasted on a careless printer or typist. 

These errors result in a poor impression of both the contributors arul the 
RAM. 1 hope there is an improvement. 

Sincerely, 
Steve Silberstein 
Dear Steve, 

There were a large number of mistakes in the last issue, owing to no one 
cause. The RAM is proof real once before going to the printer and proofread 
just prior to the final printing. However, even with this double check an ab- 
normal number of mistakes were made. In the future the proof readers will be 
instructed to pay closer attention to the material. 



STAFF 



EDITOR 
ASST EDITOR 

TREASURER 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

REPORTERS 



CIRCULATION 

CARTOONIST 
ADVISORS 



KEN GOEBEL 
BRETT MIDDLETON 

LUKE PEREA 

GLEN MICHALAK 
MARIORKLOTERand 
THE PHOTO CLUB 
KAREN BORGEN 
STEVE SILBERSTEIN 
ROY COHEN 
RICHARD GRABOWSKI 
BILL CASHIN 
FRED GROSS 
JOHN APPLETON 
DR. ZIEMER 
DR. KEYS 



FOOTBALL RECRUITING 
APPEARS SUCCESSFUL 

Coach Wilson reports that he is plmsed with the overall recruiting effort as 
it stands to-date. The Football Staff has conucted approximately 300 high 
school seniors, many of whom have visited the Delaware Valley campus. 
Coach Wilson said that the success in recruiting was due to the cooperation 
and interest of our Admissions Office, many of the Faculty, and the Student 
Body, who went out of their way to help in the r«:ruitment of tl^ Kholar- 
athletes. 

CoiKentrated recruiting by the FootbaU Staff is done in an area within three 
hours drive of our campus. Incoming football players in the Class of IWl 
represent a cross-section of this recruiting philosophy. 

It apprars tint there will be some ouutanding offensive and defensive line 
prosports arriving in the fall. There is both quickness and size in that group 
which includes John Lindenmuth, Mike Bergamo and Jeff Karpinski~Mt. 
Carmel High School; Steve Gehrlein-Downingtown High School; Gary 
Waltcrs-PottsviUe High School; Mike Marshall-State College High School; 
Jim Saner--Pt. Pleasant High School; Bob Giard-Rumson-Fairhaven High 
School; Chuck Alpuche -Bishop McDevitt High School; Ed Kitson- William 
Tennent High School; Mike Conlen-Roxborough High School; Frank Vel- 
lucci~Archbish<q) Ryan High School; and Bill Turner-Plymouth Whitemarsh 
High School. 

Members of the Class of 1981 who will be trying for positions as offensive 
and defensive backs and wide receivers will be Greg Salicondro-Cardinal 
Dougherty H.S.; Kevin Krammes-Blue Mountain H.S.; Mike Rudy -Central 
Bucks East H.S.; Jim Yazujian, Brian Emerich and Les Davies-Schuylkill 
Haven H.S,; Larry Thierolf, Central Bucks West H.S.; Brett Fleming- West 
Morris Catholic H.S.; Rich Mullen-Upper Pcrkiomen H.S.; Bryan BerUmda- 
UppCT Moreland H.S.; Gary Hall-George Washington H.S.; and Phil Boob- 
Bald Eagle Nittany High School. 

At the present time, the coaching staff is awaiting the final decisions from 
some additional talented athletes who include Jim Gordon-Bishop McDevitt 
H.S.; Dave Jefferson-Pennridge H.S.; John Lare-Archbishop Ryan H.S.; 
Paul Boyle-Marian H.S.; Greg Javardian-George Washington H.S.; Mike 
Hoch-Lincoln H.S.; Tom Kenny-Bishop McDevitt H.S.; Steve Callum- 
Central Bucks West H.S.; Bill Connors-Bishop Kenrick H.S.; Matt Flana- 
gan-South Phila. H.S.; Ed Craig-Palisades H.S.; Tom Houpt-Lincoln H.S.: 
Mark Dobies-George Washington H.S.; George Dudo- Bishop McDevitt 
H.S.; and Joe Giacomelli-Cardinal Dougherty High School. Although all of 
these high school seniors will not choose Delaware Valley College, it appears 
that the Class of 1981 has the potntial to substantially u{^rade our football 
program. 

We are looking forward to an improved football season in 1977! 



BASEBALL- 1977 

Inspite of the pessimistic view of the last RAM, the Delaware Valley College 
Baseball Team is enjoying one of the finest seasons in recent history. Although 
John Zisk was listed as a first baseman. Coach Hardy has wisely used him as 
an outfidder and a pitchCT. As an outfielder, John has done a tremendous job; 
he is currently batting over the .450 mark, he set the school home run record 
along with almost every other hitting record and his pitching record is 2-1, 
beating both Upsala and Scranton who are tough M.A.C. League Opponents. 
Not too bad for a guy who is playing out of position! 

The team's league record is 5-3. They lost a tough contest last week to Up- 
sla (a game that could have meant the league championship) on a batted ball 
that bounced owr the center field fence and was called a homerun by the um- 
pire. The game ended the Aggies hopes of a championship, but after the first 
game the fuming Aggies took control and set a school record of 15 hits in one 
baseball game, although it was only a seven innings contest. 

Other outstanding performances have been turned in by the team through- 
out the year. Individuals who contributed greatly have been Dan Whittaker, 
our outstanding lefty (3-1 overall) who is considered by some to be the best 
pitcher in the M.A.C. Peter Wieliczski has bwa the steadying influence for 
the young team at second base. Dennis Helmstetter, John Lewis, Bob Reap- 
some, Phil Butler and Jim Dunbar, along with Zisk, are all hitting above 300. 
Freshman, third baseman, Mark Skelding and Sophomore, Wayne Long, our 
rightfielder, both from C.B. East, have turned in fine years at their respwtive 
positions. Vet^an right-hander. Bob Nicholson, has pitched in almost every 
game and has been our stopper in the late innings. 

Although the 1977 Aggies probably will not win their league, this season is 
a long way from the 4-1 1 record posted last year. With the loss of only three 
seniors (Wieliczki, Whittaker, and Nicholson) the Aggies should be a league 
contender in 1978. 



LIKE TO RUN? 

The Delaware Valley College Cross Country Team is again in search of stu- 
dents both experience and inexperienced who might be interested in partici- 
pating in axm country during the Fall, 1977 season. The 1976 team compiled 
a fine win-loss record of 12-2 with a 5th place finish in the confo'ence cham- 
pionship. At the end of the smson, the squad still numbered 24 athlete. Of 
these, 10 were seniors, and of tiM soiiors 5 were letter winners. Coach Bothold 
is h<^ng to be abte to fill this troimidous loss of taloit due to graduation from 
from the remaining memben of the squad plus the addition of incoming 
freshmen and upperclassmen who did not compete during the 1976 season. 

For thoses interested upperclassmen who may have reservations about try- 
ing out for the team due to lack of experience, Dr. Berthold points out that in 
the past 8 years, 4 of the 8 team captains had no running experience before 
coming to Del Val. Further more, seniors Paul Bernett and Bob Weidman 
who between them scored 6 firsu and 1 1 seconds during the 1976 dual meet 
season began their running carers as Del Val students. 

If you think you might be interested in running with the cross country team 
during the 1977 season, plose omtact Coach Berthold either in person (Room 
203 Mandell Hall, Ext. ^5) or send him your name, home address, and class 
via the College Mail. 







IVEVER Ton LATE 

UNDERSTAND NOVELS, PLAYS 
AND POEMS- FASTER -WITH 
CLIFFS NOTES. 

Over 200 titles 



JUlff^^Joti^ 




v 



SXfic Cfiaffottts 

BanfeSco6&XfiUgs 

40 Main St. 
Chalfont, Pa. 18914 

L (215) 822-2204 
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMi 



5- 



MICRODEX CORRECTION SUIOE (M-9) 



GORRECTION 

The preceding document has been, re- 
photographed to assure legibility and its 
image appears immediately hereafter. 






I 



Kruaio 



1^ . . ^ -.^ 

. '''^^■•- ..■..' • :.• 

■':!',"Wt-^..',' .",,•■ ■..'.' •.• , ■ ; 

REMiNOTofsJ RAISdM 








-3 



ANNUAL AD AY LIVESTOCK 
AND DAIRY SHOW RESULTS 

Delaware Valley College held their 29th Annual "A-Day - Open House" 
over the weekend of April 23rd and 24th, and over 45,000 people attended 
the two-day event. 

One of the highlights of the weekend was the Livestock and Dairy Show, 
and this year was no exception as students from all four classes at the College 
ran their well-groomd animals through their steps before ihe watchful eyes of 
the judges. 

The results includes the following: 



A-DAY LIVESTOCK SHOWMANSHIP AND FITTING RESULTS 



CATTLE 



Angus Steers I 
Donna Foley "77 
Bob Leech '78 
Stewart Kessler '80 
Steve LiUy '80 
Bob Brown "79 

Angus Steers II 
Debra Rohn '80 
Marilynn Kctner '80 
John Wengryn '79 
Gary Pusillo '80 
Cindy Franklin '80 

Angus Steers III 
Nancy Wenger '80 
Gerry Rennekamp '80 
Karen Frank '79 

Angus Heifers 

Howard Hoffman '77 
Sharon Chamberlin '80 
Greg Krug '77 
Cindy Dunton '79 
Dave Miller '77 

Hereford Calves 

Johanna Geiger '80 
Bill McFadden '79 
Marie Pelino '79 
Diane Leahy '80 
Susan Funka '80 

Simmental Class 

David Mangione '77 
Kurt Weiss '78 
Glenn Michalak '79 
Frank lUnick '80 

Yearling Heifers 
Pat Vaughn '78 
Jerry Croshaw '78 
Steve Masters '77 
Steve Fecik '78 
Mary Cook '79 
Mary Kay Moscati "77 
Barb Gobus '80 

Bulls 

Roger Kramp '77 
Rich Gardner '78 
Fred Wojtowicz '80 
Dave Miller '77 



Showman 

I St 

2iid 
3rd 
4th 
Sth 

Showman 
1st 
2oid 
3rd 
4th 
Sth 

Showman 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

Showman 

1st 

2iid 

3rd 

4th 



Showman 
1st 
2iid 
3rd 
4th 
Sth 

Showman 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 

Showman 
1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 
Sth 
6th 
7th 

Showman 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Fitting 
1st 
Sth 
4tli 
2nd 
3rd 

Fitting 
1st 
2nd 
Sth 
3rd 
4th 

Fitter 

2nd 
1st 
3rd 

Fitter 
1st 
4th 
Sth 
2nd 
3rd 

Fitter 

1st 

Sth 

1st 

4th 

3rd 

Fitter 

1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 

Fitter 
2nd 

4th 

1st 

6th 

7th 

3rd 

Sth 

Fitter 

2nd 
1st 
3rd 



Beef Champion Showman - Howard Hoffman '77 
Beef Reserve Champion Showman - David Mangione '77 
Beef Champion Fitter - Marie Pelino "79 
Beef Reserve Champion Fitter - Howard Hoffman '77 



SHEEP 

Yearling Ewes I 
Steve Masters "77 
Scott Birch *80 
Bob Brown '79 
Mary Bruder 'M) 
Diane Hartzel '80 

Yearling Ewes II 
Warren Ames '80 
Mena Hautau '78 
Irma Neckriu '80 
Brett Middleton '78 

Lambs I 

Eileen Flynn '79 
Ginny Osbahr '79 
Fran Johnson '77 
Vincent DeStafano '80 
Holly Barr '77 
Marie Kovacs '80 

Lambs II 

Johanna Geiger '80 
Greg Krug '77 
Peggy Hankes '80 
Deri Grim 'M 
Janice Vandergrift '% 
Lynn Hagerman '80 

Lambs III 

Marian Verrastro '80 
BiU McFadden '79 
Cindy Franklin '80 
Kathy Hozlock '80 
Linda Budrewicz '80 
Steve Homesack '80 

Lambs IV 

Laura DiDonato '77 
Cathy KeUy '78 
Cindy Cybowski '80 
Barbara Karvois '78 
Joan Hewett '77 

Champion Showman - Warren Ames '80 
Reserve Champion Showman - Johanna Geiger '90 
Champion Fitter - Warren Ames '80 
Reserve Champion Showman - Scott Birch '80 

SWINE 

Fall Gilts I 

Mark Lichtenwalner '80 
Dave Miller '77 
Dennis McNabb '77 

Fall Gilts II 
Seth Heller '80 
Brett Middleton '78 
George Gross '77 

Eariy Fall Gilts 
Polly Risscr '78 
Keith Thompson '80 
Dave Pratt '80 . 

Early Summer Gilts 
John Wengren '79 
Nancy Henkel '77 
Carl Hansen '80 

Grand Champion Showman - Mark Lichtenwalner '80 

Reserve Champion Showman - John Wengren '79 

Grand Champion Fitter - Dennis McNabb '77 

Reserve Champion Fitter - Nancy Henkel '77 

Overall Grand Champion of the Show - Howard Hoffman '77 

Overall Reserve Grand Champion of the Show - Warren Ames '80 

The Livestock Judge for the A-Day Show was Dr. Donald Kinsman, Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Kinsman 
is a well-known animal scientist. 



Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


2nd 


2nd 


1st 


3rd 


4th 


4th 


Sth 


Sth 


3rd 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


1st 


2nd 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


4th 


3rd 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


2nd 


2nd 


Sth 


3rd 


4th 


Sth 


6th 


Sth 


3rd 


6th 


1st 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


1st 


2nd 


4th 


3rd 


2nd 


4th 


3rd 


Sth 


Sth 


6th 


6th 


Showman 


Fitter 


tst 


2nd 


2nd 


1st 


3rd 


3rd 


4th 


Sth 


Sth 


6th 


6th 


4th 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


Sth 


2nd 


1st 


3rd 


2nd 


4th 


3rd 


Sth 


4th 



Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


3rd 


2nd 


2nd 


3rd 


1st 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


3rd 


2nd 


1st 


3rd 


2nd 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


1st 


2nd 


2nd 


3rd 


3rd 


Showman 


Fitter 


1st 


2nd 


2nd 


1st 


3rd 


3rd 



-4 



FOOTBALL RECRUITING 
APPEARS SUCCESSFUL 

Coach Wilson reports that he is pteased with the ovo'aU recruiting effort as 
it stands to-date. The Football Staff has conucted approximately 300 high 
school seniors, many of whom have visited the Delaware Valley campus. 
Coach Wilson said that the success in recruiting was due to the cooperation 
and interest of our Admissions Office, many of the Faculty, and the Student 
Body, who went out of their way to help in the recruitment of these scholar- 
athletes. 

Concentrated recruiting by the Football Staff is done in an area within three 
houn drive of our campus. Incoming football players in the Class of 1981 
represent a cross-section of this recruiting philosophy. 

It appears that there will be some outstanding offensive and defensive line 
prospects arriving in the fall. There is both quickness and size in that group 
which includes John Lindenmuth, Mike Bergamo and Jeff Karpinski~Mt. 
Carmel High School; Steve Gehrlein-Downingtown High School; Gary 
Walters-Pottsville High School; Mike Marshall-Sute College High School; 
Jim Saner~Pt. Pleasant High School; Bob Giard-Rumson-Fairhaven High 
School; Chuck Alpuche-Bishop McDevitt High School; Ed Kitson-William 
Tennent High School; Mike Conlen-Roxborough High School; Frank Vel- 
hicci-Archbishop Ryan High School; and Bill Turner-Plymouth Whitemarsh 
High School. 

Members of the Class of 1981 who will be trying for positions as offensive 
and defensive backs and wide receivers will be Greg Salicondro-Cardinal 
Dougherty H.S.; Kevin Krammes-Blue Mountain H.S.; Mike Rudy-Central 
Bucks East H.S.; Jim Yazujian, Brian Emerich and Les Davies-Schuylkill 
Haven H.S.; Larry Thierolf, Central Bucks West H.S.; Brett Fleming-West 
Morris Catholic H.S.; Rich Mullen-Upper Pcrkiomen H.S.; Bryan BerUnda- 
Upper Morcland H.S.; Gary Hall-George Washington H.S.; and Phil Boob- 
Bald Eagle Nittany High School. 

At the present time, the coaching staff is awaiting the final decisions from 
some additional talented athletes who include Jim Gordon-Bishop McDevitt 
H.S.; Dave Jcfferson-Pennridge H.S.; John Larc-Archbishop Ryan H.S.; 
Paul Boyle-Marian H.S.; Greg Javardian-George Washington H.S.; Mike 
Hoch-Lincoln H.S.; Tom Kenny-Bishop McDevitt H.S.; Steve Callum- 
Central Bucks West H.S.; Bill Connors-Bishop Kenrick H.S.; Matt Flana- 
pm-South Phila. H.S.; Ed Craig-Palisades H.S.; Tom Houpt-Lincoln H.S.: 
Mark Dobies-George Washington H.S.; George Dudo-Bishop McDevitt 
H.S.; and Joe Giacomelli-Cardinal Dougherty High School. Although all of 
these high school seniors will not choose Delaware Valley College, it appears 
that the Class of 1981 has the potntial to substantially upgrade our football 
program. 

We are looking forward to an improved football season in 1977! 



BASEBALL -1977 

Inspite of the pessimistic view of the last RAM, the Delaware Valley College 
Baseball Team is enjoying one of the finest seasons in recent history. Although 
John Zisk was listed as a first baseman. Coach Hardy has wisely used him as 
an outfielder and a pitcher. As an outfielder, John has done a tremendous job; 
he is currently batting over the .450 mark, he set the school home run record 
along with almost every other hitting record and his pitching record is 2-1, 
beating both Upsala and Scranton who are tough M.A.C. League Opponents. 
Not too bad for a guy who is playing out of position! 

The team's league record is 5-3. They lost a tough contest last week to Up- 
sla (a game that could have meant the league championship) on a batted ball 
that bounced over the center field fence and was called a homcrun by the um- 
pire. The game ended the Aggies hopes of a championship, but after the first 
game the fuming Aggies took control and set a school record of 15 hits in one 
baseball game, although it was only a seven innings contest. 

Other outstanding performances have been turned in by the team through- 
out the year. Individuals who contributed greatly have been Dan Whittaker, 
our outstanding lefty (3-1 overall) who is considered by some to be the best 
pitcher in the M.A.C. Peter Wieliczski has been the steadying influence for 
the young team at second base. Dennis Helmstetter, John Lewis, Bob Reap- 
some, Phil Butler and Jim Dunbar, along with Zisk, are all hitting above 300. 
Freshman, third baseman, Mark Skelding and Sophomore, Wayne Long, our 
rightfielder, both from C.B. East, have turned in fine years at their respective 
positions. Veteran right-hander. Bob Nicholson, has pitched in almost every 
game and has been our stopper in the late innings. 

Although the 1977 Aggies probably will not win their league, this season is 
a long way from the 4-1 1 record posted last year. With the loss of only three 
seniors (Wieliczki, Whittaker, and Nicholson) the Aggies should be a league 
contender in 1978. 



LIKE TO RUN? 

The Delaware Valley College Cross Country Team is again in search of stu- 
dents both experienced and inexperienced who might be interested in partici- 
pating in cross country during the Fall, 1977 season. The 1976 team compilnl 
a fine win-loss record of 12-2 with a 5th pla(« finish in the conference cham- 
pionship. At the end of the season, the squad still numbered 24 athletes. Of 
these, 10 were senion:, ami of the seniors 5 were letter winners. Coach Berthold 
is hoping to be able to fill this tremendous loss of talent due to gr^uation from 
from the remaining members of the squad plus the addition of incoming 
freshmen and upperclassmen who did not compete during the 1976 season. 

For th(»es interested upperclassmen who may have reservations about try- 
ing out for the team due to lack of experience. Dr. Berthold points out that in 
the past 8 years, 4 of the 8 team captains had no running experience before 
coming to Del Val. Further more, seniors Paul Bernett and Bob Weidman 
who between them scored 6 firsts and 1 1 seconds during the 1976 dual mMt 
season began their running careers as Del Val students. 

If you think you might be interested in running with the cross country team 
during the 1977 season, please contact Coach Berthold either in person (Room 
203 Mandell Hall, Ext. 285) or send him your name, home address, and class 
via the College Mail. 




IVEVER Too LATe 

UNDERSTAND NOVELS, PLAYS 
AND POEMS -FASTER -WITH 
CLIFF'S NOTES. 

Over 200 titles 



U^a^ 




v 



fuiiuiiiuiiiiivnj 



itfic Cfiaffouts 

40 Main St I 

Chalfont, Pa. 18914 I 

i (215)822-2204 

IIWIIMHUIIIIHIBMI 



-5 



WHO'S WHO AT D.V.C. 

by Roy Cohen 
This Issue: Dr. Miller 

Wandering around the second floor of Mandell Hall between Bia Labs 
one will often encounter Dr. Miller. From somewhere in Ohio, he has been 
through forty-five states. He has attended various colleges throughout the 
Nation: Denison U. in Ohio, Harvard and Amherst in Mass. He then work«i 
in a lab at UCLA for one year, followed by a post doctoral fellowship in Cali- 
fornia concentrating on Exobiology. Following that, he work«l for Allied 
Chemical in Morristown, N. J., after which he came here five years ago. Mar- 
ried since 1963, he has two children. 

Whai asked about hobbies, it took considerable prodding from Dr. Stenson 
to divulge the following astounding facts: He dapples in painting, likes to 
camp, and eats strange foods (calamus and dandelion crown salads). His fa- 
vorite hobby, however, is (aside from his interest in bacterial physiology) 
amusing his students, (or is it being amused by them?). In a moment of confi- 
dentiality, he told me that of all the jobs he's had, he enjoys teaching at D.V.C. 
the most! 

As for the future, he is planning to install a fireplace in his Chalfont home. 
Oh, and by the way, help will be accepted; advice not wanted. 

Located in Mandell 210 along with Dr. Allison, he teaches most of the 
Micro courses offered. 



A-DAY DIARY SHOWING AND FITTING RESULTS 

Champion Freshmen Showman - Dean Daubert '90 

REserve Champion Freshman Showman - Mike Simpson '80 

Champion Freshman Fitter - Sharon Chamberlin '80 

Reserve Champion Freshman Fitter - Mike Simpson '80 

ChampioB Sopkomorc Sbowman and Chanpion Sophomore Fitter 

Champion Sophomore Showman - Roy Malik '79 

Reserve Champion Sophomore Showman - Marie Pelino '79 

Champion Sophomore Fitter - Roy Malik '79 

Reserve Champion Sophomore Fitter - Diane Petrovich '79 

Champion Janior Showman and Chanpion Junion Fitter 

Champion Junior Showman - Cindy Ducan '78 

Reserve Champion Junior Showman - Beth Stephens '78 

Champion Junior Fitter - Cindy Ducan '78 

Reserve Champion Junior Fitter - Beth Stephens '78 

Ciiampioii Senior Showman and Champion Senior Fitter 

Champion Senior Showman - George Gross '77 

Reserve Champion Senior Showman - April Grosjean '77 

Champion Senior Fitter - Nancy Houseknecht '77 

Reserve Champion Senior Fitter - April Grosjean '77 



THINK GREEN 
SOIL V8 "soilless" PLANT GROWING MIXTURES 

by Steve Silberstein 

Greenhouse and houseplants, with the exception of orchids, have tradi- 
tionally been grown in a mixture containing loam, with the addition of humus 
and sand. Over the past several years, many wholesale growers and even some 
collectors of greenhouse and houseplants have been using a mixture that does 
not contain any loam. These "soilless" mixtures, as they are called, contain 
sphagnum peatmoss, vermiculitc, and perlite in varying preparations. "Soil- 
less" mixtures are uniform in texture, disease-free before use, are lightweight, 
and have good drainage if mixed in the proper proportions. A mixture of two 
parts sphagnum peatm(»s and one part perlite is often used. Some growers 
buy a premixed "soilless" mixture with similar porportions of ingredients. 

The main disadvantage with such mixtures is the need for constant fertili- 
zing. This means giving the plant a light dose of fertiizer every time it is water- 
ed. It is also difficult to wet if it is totally dried out. This makes it rather un- 
suitable for cacti and succulents, unless sand is added to the mixture. 

Mixtures containing soil do have some disadvantages. They are not sterile 
unless they have been sterilized, are not always uniform, can be poorly drained 
if they contain too much clay or too little sand and humus, and plants grown 
in "soilless" mixtures often are not as lush or fioriferous as these grown in a 
good soil mix. I feel that this may be caused by a lack of micro-nutrients (trace 
elements) in a "soilless" mix and which are not all contained in a standard 
fertilizer. 

Personally, I use a soil mix and find it successful. Because of the reason I've 
stated, I really could not recommend a "soilless" mixture, especially to non- 
commercial growers who only have a small collection of plants. 

Nevertheless, the mixture that you find successful is the one to use, no 
matter what it may be. 



AGGRAV/ITION 



H 



■ ■-. .v.. rrT"^!g 



SS&: 



rtOTORCrCLE PARKllslG 
ONLY 



■ U-..1 i-t mil « uu t lAiiw 




J|FW^ 




A^/,/c 



BEST FLICKS of the SIXTIES 

Bob, Carol, Ted and Alice 

Bonnie and Clyde 

Bullitt 

Easy Rider 

Funny Girl 

Goldfinger 

Goodbye Columbus 

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? 

Lawrence of Arabia 

Midnight Cowboy 

The Dirty Dozen 

The Odd Couple 

Tom Jones 



BSYR^BARAGOODSENO 


AfED I^Mll ZELWFENBCRB J 


bU S Y AIDQT YZROCYEOMG 


^BWY0is!5\MBE 1 EDBONU 


L E D L U MB(R)J D C 1 Z T A E E 


PANCYDGUNONORXWRNS 


BUATZ L 1 SOEULYSAESD 


OAOEHOAGR VMB 1 QLQCW 


NN 1 CPGLWG 1 UNVDOADH 


LUBEDS 1 NDTNTUUTSRT 


LKKDADRLSEYL 1 NGAEO 


R 1 TTON 1 XR LY 1 MBMRLC 


OXFECDGBCTRDOCEAMO 


SXHUNNYDOFPEROS 1 NG 


ETRYSANGENUDOXOYGD 


MA 1 K LBENNPOCSWHNTO 


AFXNBA 1 1 WGUESENEVD 


DRYSGN F 1 EHTYSAUAD 1 


PLABEEDNDLL 1 FLFKNA 


VBOZRGOL 1 UET 1 XALNE 


XTLGODYTRBHCAPXDTT 



-6 



THE RAM 

VOL. 25 

1977 






VOL. 25, No. 1 



The Student Newspaper • Delaware Valley College 



SEPTEMBERS, 1977 



SECURITY-- 

For Women On DVC Campus 

Beginning Friday night, September 9 the security alarms will 
become effective in the women residence halls; Barness Hall, 
Cooke Hall and New I>onn. The purpose of the alarm system is 
to improve the security for the women in the residence halls and 
to help eleminate unnecessary damage in the residence halls. 

In order for the system to work effectively, a self- 
awareness towards security must first begin with each resident 
woman. Each woman living on campus must take extra 
measures to prevent doors being propped open and to keep 
windows closed and locked in the hallwavs and^he lounges. 

The alarms will be turned on at 12 midnight Sunday through 
Thursday and at 1 :00 a.m. Friday and Saturday evening. At 7:00 
a.m. the alarms will be disconnected. An alarm will be installed 
on every door of the residence hall except the card lock doors. 

In the event the alarm sounds, it could signal 3 things: 1) 
There is someone in the building who does not belong, 2) 
someone used the exit at the wnmg time, or 3) the doors were 
used by the residents due to an emergency exit. 

WARNINGS) $25 fine imposed when the alarm sounds. When 
action is not taken to find the individual(s) who triggered the 
alarm, the residence hall will be penalized the $25; excluding 
emergency exits. 

We have been very fortunate to have only a minimal number 
of "Night stalk ers" occur in the residence halls. YOU would not 
want to be a VICTIM -- please work together to increase security 
and self-protection for yourselves. If there is any evidence <rf 
unusual "Intruders" please notify a resident assistant, com- 
munity coordinators (staff residents) or security. 



JamesJ. Mapes 



Goshen 
Sheep Show 



The Goshen Sheep Show was 
the place for action by the Del. 
Val. Animal Husbandry Depart- 
ment. All total 15 sheep were 
shown. This included 7 Chev- 
iots, 6 Hampshires, and 2 
Suffolks. The following is a list 
of the show's results. 

In the Hampshire Division: 

Ram, lamb, under 1 year, 6th 
and 9th in their class. 

Ewe, 1 year and under 2, 4th 
and 5th in their class. 

Ewe, lamb, under 1 year. 2nd 
and 3rd in their class. 

In the Group Gasses: 
Pair of ram lambs, 2nd. 
Pair of ewe lambs, 1st. 
Pen of lambs, 1st. 
Breeder's young flock, 1st. 
Flock, 2nd. 
Get of sire, 1st. 

In the Cheviot Division: 

Ram, 1 year and under 2, 2nd 
in his class. 

Ram, lamb, under 1 year, 1st 
and 2nd in their class. 

Reserve Champion Cheviot 
ram, yearling ram. 

Ewe, 1 year and under 2, 1st 
and 2nd in their class. 

Ewe, lamb, under 1 year, 1st 
and 2nd in their class. 

Champion Cheviot ewe, 1st 
lamb. 

Reserve Champion Cheviot 
ewe, 2nd lamb. 

In the Group Classes: 
Pair of ram lambs, 1st. 
Pair of ewe lambs, 1st. 
Pen of lamb, 1st. 
Breeder's young flock, 1st. 
Flock, 1st. 

In the Suffolk Division: 
Ewe, 1 year and under 2, 1st 

and 2nd in their class. 
Champion ewe, 1st yearling 

ewe. 



Allentown Foir 



The Animal Husbandry De- 
partment exhibited 15 sheep 
(seven Cheviot, six Hampshire 
and two Suffolks) and three 
head of Angus cattle at the 
Allentown Fair with the follow- 
ing results: 



In the Cheviot Division: Ram 
1 year and under 2, 2nd in his 
class; Ram Lamb under 1 year, 
3rd and 5th in their class; Ewe 1 
year and under 2, 1st and 3rd in 
their class; Ewe Lamb under 1 
year, 3rd and 4th in their class. 



In the Group Gasses: Pair of 
Ram Lambs, 2nd; Pair of E<ftt 
Lambs, 2nd; Flock, 1st; Pen of 
Lambs, 2nd. 



In the Hampshire Division: 
Ram Lambs under 1 year, 4th 
and 5th in their class; Ewe 1 
year and under 2. 6th and 7th in 
their class; Ewe Lambs under 1 
year, 4th and 5th in their class. 



In the Group Classes: Pair of 
Ram Lambs, 2nd; Pair of Ewe 
Lambs, 2nd; Flock, 1st; Get of 
sire, 2nd; Pen of Lambs, 1st. 

In the Suffolk Division: Ewes 
1 year and under 2, 3rd and 4th 
in their classes. 

In the Angus Division: Senior 
Bull Calf, 1st in class, and 
Junior yearling Heifers, 6th and 
7th in their class. 



James J. Mapes grew up just 
outside Chicago in the rural 
township of Zion, Illinois, the 
son of farming parents. His first 
experience in precognition came 
at the age <A seven while sitting 
at the family dinner table. 
Without previous thought he 
predicted tlw exact date d his 
grandmother's death. A year 
later his ptt^hesy came true. 



After many such experiences, 
Mapes finally came in control of 
his powers once in his teens. 
Encouraged by his psychic 
mother, Mapes explored his 
abilities by anticipating and 
later consciously predicting fu- 
ture events. He ako knew when 
people were lying to him. 

While attending California 
State University Mapes lost 100 
lbs. and stopped smoking three 
packs 01* cigarettes a day with 
the help of a hypnotist. True to 
his Scorpion personality, he 
became inquisitive. "Anything 
that powerful I have to know 
about." In 1969 he studied 
hypnotism in Europe and 
emerged a master of the art. 

Upon graduating with a Mas- 
ter's in the Theater Arts, Jim 
sought an acting career. He 
appeated on stage, radio, televi- 
sion and in films: Star Trek, 
Bonanza, Taxi Driver, and 
Three Days of the Condor to 
name a few. He also produced 
independent theater in Maine, 
Pennsylvania and on a Carib- 
bean cruise liner. 

Jim fmally combined his ex- 
traordinary mental powers, 
mastery of hypnosis and flair for 
showmanship in POWER OF 
MIND. Besides the obvious 
entertainment value, Mapes 
sees its most important role as 
making people realize the limit- 
less potential of the mind. 
Furthering this point, he ela- 
borates on his disbelief of 



E.S.P.: "Extra Sensory Per- 
ception implies that I have 
something unique. That's just 
not true! We're all bom with 
Sensory Perception (SP) but lose 
it unless its existence is acknow- 
ledge and developed." 



"Another important mission, 
of the show is to destroy l^the 
myths about hypnosis. The 
dictionary defines hypnosis as 'a 
sleep-like state' which is simply 
not so. That definition only 
promotes the superstitions that 
have surrounded hypnosis for 
far too long. I want to remove 
the fear and introduce hypnosis 
to people as a vehicle for the 
creation of a more rewarding 
life." 



Besides presenting over 200 
shows a year and making 
television appearances nation- 
wide, Mapes heads The New 
York Center for Hypnosis and 
Mind Contrd. In that capacity 
he has worked with me'mbers of 
the psychiatric, medical and law 
enforcement professions as well 
as sports figures, show business 
personalities, executives and 
others. As an extension of the 
Center Mapes has developed a 
new program for colleges and 
key executive seminars entitied 
The Power of the Inner Self; a 
presentation teaching self-hyp- 
nosis and mind-control for per- 
sonal improvement. 



In his spare time, Jim still 
appears in occasional acting 
roles, meditates faithfully, 
works out in his secluded New 
Jersey home and has authored 
two books on THE POWER OF 
THE MIND. 

James Mapes will be appear- 
ing at Delaware Valley College 
on Thursday, September 29, 
1977, at 8:00 p.m. in the Gym. 



«• 




To all Students 
of Del. Vd. 



On behalf of tiie Stiident 
Government, I would like to 
welcome everyone to the '77-'^ 
school year here at Delaware 
Valley College. Through the 
efforts of Student Government, 
The Dean of Students' Office, 
and the Administration, many 
changes and additions were 
made on campus this past 
summer. 



Below is just a partial list of 
what's new on campus: 



-An unloading lot has been 
added in back of Cockt and 
Barness Dorniitories. (Purpose, 
time of use, and restrictions will 
be announced and posted.) 



-The Pool Room has been 
moved to upstairs Segal Hall- 
the Student Center - to centra- 
lize pool for everyone. 



"the old Pool Room in 
Samuel Hall has been converted 
into a lounge to provide more 
study area. 

-Much of the road surface on 
campus has been repaved. 

"An addition to the main 
parking lot was made to supply 
ample parking. 

"Downstairs Segal Hall has 
been turned into a comfortable 
lounge. 

"A full gameroom has taken 
the place ^ the commuter mail 
room ia Segal Hall. 



There are many other 
changes besides the few men- 
tioned, and 1 hope all of them 
are to your satisfaction. Every- 
one's cooperation is required to 
make our school great. Using 
the facilities carelessly ruins it 
for yourself and your fellow 
students. So please show your 
appreciation by takrg pride in 
what we have. 



I assure you everything was 
done in the best interest of 
every student, new and old, 
resident and commuter. 



I wish everyone a happy and 
fruitful year and I, along with 
the entire Student Government, 
will do our best to make it a 
memorable year. 

Sincerely. 

Stephen J. Makrancy 

President, 

Student Government 



Page 2 The Ram, Thursday, September 8. 1977 

EDITORIAL 

Ihhwan VoHey Nigh School 

( In Reference to Security Page 1) 



It seems like a high schod after the school's latest move to 
control the students. What I am talking about is die placing of 
alarms on the doors of the women's residence halls. 

When 1 first learned of tfiis move I questioned Miss Orbaker 
as to why? Her answer was three fold. Her first reason was to 
protest die women. She stated that several of tfie girls had been 
put in strange situations by waking up and finding strangers in 
their rooms. But would it not be simpler and cheaper to just 
have the girls lock their rooms when they go to bed. 

Miss Orbaker' s second reason was that when she lived in a 
coed dorm, separate floors for each sex, they had alarms on the 
doots. However, since when has D.V.C. done what other 
colleges have done; almost all colleges have a pressbox by their 
foodMtn field, not D.V.C. 

Het diird reason was to help deter dorm damages. 
It is believed dut people will think twice if their nearest escape 
route is through a door with an alarm on it. But alas, (mce die 
alarm is sounded and someone answers it the vandal will be long 
gone. 

Besides these problems the system has several other short 
comings. Once the alarm is sounded, how is it shut off? 
If it shuts off when the door closes then who will bother 
answering it, and if this is not the case then how will it be shut 
off? 

And what of the pe<^le who have to get up early and go to 
woit? Is diis alarm going to wake these people up, and if it does 
then when are these people supposed to sleep. 

The last reason that Miss Orbaker gives is diat the alarm may 
be used to indicate a situaticm when the dorm is being 
evacuated. If the building is being evacuated then why is the 
fire alarm not been pulled. 

Another question I would like to pose to die people who came 
up with dds brain storm, who are these "night stalkers." 
Who are we being protected from, students, guests, outsiders? 
Are these nasty people men or women? 

Government has worked hard to get the dorms mwe open for 
student activities. But, with this latest move, are they being tdd 
to stop? 

The last point I would like to discuss is the idea of locking the 
lounge and hall windows. Windows are put in a buildiug for 
more than just the view. With the windows closed all air 
circulation in the dorm will be cut off . If this is what is supposed 
to be done then the windows should be bricked up, then no one 
can go through them. If we just want to keep peqple out why not 
just put bars on them, then the dorm will even look like a 
PRISON. 

Truly I feel that these alarms are unneeded. They destroy 
the small college atmosphere, they restrict the students' 
movements, they waste the students' tuition. To me they are 
just one more way for the administration of this college to force 
their will upon the students and control their lives. 



IMw 4r« The Resident Assisfants???? 



At the end of the spring semester of last year, the Dean of 
Students Office and the Resident Assistant Executive Com- 
mittee carefully selected the Resident Assistants who are 
responsible for developing and maintaining a productive 
c-ommunity living environment. They are available at all times 
lot whatever reason you may need them. 

Where are they located??? 

ALUMNI HOUSE- Richard Phillips. 103. 

BARNESS HALL- Janet Botti. 105: Annette Capp. 217. 

COOKE HALL Pat Briar. 106; Mary Cook, 206. 

ELSON HALL- Greg Royer. 24: Jim Spindler. 13. 

GOLDMAN HALL- Keith Detrick. 112: Bill Fales 216: Steve 
Hertig. 226. 

NEW DORM- Judy Pawlusiow, 116: Karin Schmid. 101: 
Phyllis Butala, 211: Marianne Lamb. 225. 

MILLER HALL- Jim McShea. A-1. 

SAMUEL HALL- Bryan Leh. 216: Steve McKrancy, 112: Brian 
Ruggeri. 226. 

ULMAN HALL- Pete Northrop. 105: Kevin Musser. 215; 
Richard Pelkofsky. 312. 

WOLFSOHN HALL- Phil Butler, 15: Bob Reapsome. 25: Gary 
Schneider. 1. 

WORK HALL- Roy Malik. 1; Michael Downing. 101: Vince 
Naylor, 2; Dave Bubenheim, 220. 

Staff residents have been assigned to various residence halls 
throughout the campus. They are responsible in helping the, 
resident assistants maintain the community living environment. 
If you find that your resident assistant is not available, the staff 
resident will more than likely be available to assist you. 

The following areas will be covered. 

Mr. & Mrs. Johnson- Cooke Hall. Ulman Hall, Work Hall. 

Mrs. Waddington- Barness Hall. 

Mrs. Gulick- New Dorm. 

Mr. Deacon- Elson Hall, Wolfsohn Hall. Miller Hall. 

Mr. Tasker- Goldman Hall. 

Mr. McClelland- Samuel Hall, Alumni Hall. 



Focuhy Grows 



Four new professors have 
been added to the faculty of 
Delaware ViJley College. Two 
of the additions are in the 
animal division and two of the 
professors are in the plant 
divisions. 



Joel Markeveys will be added 
to the Animal Husbandry field. 
Growing up on a farm be has 
l<rts of practical experience with 
dairy catde, sheep, swine, and 
poultry. Besides home exper- 
ience Joel also helped manage 
the University (rf Connecticut's 
livestock. After receiving his 
B.S. degree from the University 
of Connecticut he taught voca- 
tional agriculture at Suffield 
High School in Connecticut. 

Being added to the Dairy 
Husbandry field is Larry D. 
Morris. Larry has attended 
Trenton Junior College, Tren- 
ton, Missouri, Northwest Mis- 
souri State University (for both 
his M.S. and B.S. degrees.) 
He has done some post-gra- 
duate woric at Iowa State 
University. 



Larry, like Joel, has been 
raised on a farm. But Larry has 
also worked for the Trenton 
Milk Co., The Western Dairy 
and Ice Cream Co. and the fields 
and livestock operation at 
Northwest Missouri State Uni- 
versity. On tq) of this he 
partidpated in many judging 
contests and has taught voca- 
tional agriculture judging. For 
the past year Mr. Morris has 
been an instructor and Dairy 
Plant Director at NMSU. 



Richard Cowhig will be new in 
the Ornamental Horticulture 
field. He has earned his 
Masters degree at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, his B.S. 
degree from the University of 
Massachusetts and has an As- 
sociates degree in Floriculture 
from Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. 



Before coming to D.V.C. Mr. 
Cowhig taught at Anne Arundel 
Comnwnity College, and was 
Assistant Director of Dr. Page 
Horticulture School Inc. Be- 
sides teaching he has held jobs 
with Johnson Brother's Green- 
houses Inc. (wholesale rose 
growers) and was a salesman for 
the Bostcm Flower Maitet. 

Also, added to the Plant field 
is Dr. Ronald Muse. Dr. R. 
Muse obtained his PhD. firom 
Virginia Pdytechnic Institute 
and State University majoring in 
Plant Pathology and Plant 
Physiology. Dr. Muse also 
attended Penn. State obtaining 
degrees in VUnt Pathdogy 
(M.S. degree) and also in 
Agronomy and Turf Manage- 
ment. 

Prior experience includes: 
Horticulture Consultant for Fre- 
derick's Flowers, Assistant 
Professor of Plant Pathology 
(Ohio Agricultural Research and 
Development Center, Wooster, 
Ohio), Research assistant in 
Plant Pathology at Virginia 
Polytech, Teaching assistant in 
Plant Pathology (University of 
Maryland), and a research 
assistant in Plant Pathology at 
Penn. State. Dr. Muse is author 
or co-author of twenty-three 
articles in professional joumah 
dealing with pathology, Qutri- 
tion, and turf management. 

On behalf of the. RAM and all 
D.V.C. we would like to wel- 
come these additions to our 
faculty. 



Tidrofs AvmUUe 
for fiifo Hoys 



D.V.C. has twenty tickets 
available for five plays at the 
Walnut Stieet Theatre. The 
plays being performed by the 
PhUadelphia Drama Guild will 
be: 

The Showofh, by George 
Kelly, November 2. 

Travesties, by Tom Stoppard, 
November 30. 

Sanit Joan, by George Ber- 
nard Shaw, January 4. 

Hobson's Choice, by Harold 
Brighouse, February 1. 

Uncle Vanya, by Anton Chek- 
hov, March 1. 

Curtain time for all the plays 
is 8:00 p.m. 

Watch for mote information. 

Admission is free for all Del. 
Val. students. 



SOCIALLY SPEAKING— 

6 MOVIE..... FRONT PAGE 

8 MOVIE HARRY AND WALTER GO TO NEW YORK 

10 MIXER FMtwini WHALE 

12 D.V.C. at the Valay Forte Music Fair starring LEO SAYER 

22 MOVIE QODSPELL 

29 E.S,P., HYPNOSIS by JAMES J. MARES. 



NAME BRAND 

T1LEVISI0N8 CALCULAT0B8 

STERIO COMPONENTS 
TYPEWRITERS RADIOS 

LOWEST PRICES ANYWHERE 
FACTORY FRESH 

GUARANTEED 

KEN GOEBEL 
Samuel Hall 
Rocm 217 

Phone 348-5986 

or 

ext 314 



The Ram, Thursday, September 8. 1977 Page 3 











1977 Delaware VaHey College Football Preview 



The Delaware Valley CoOege Aggies, winless 
die past two seascns, will report for pre-s^wcm 
drills and preparatioti for their nine game fall 
schedute Saturday. August 27. Coach Al Wilson 
deported. 

Niiwty players are expected in camp, in- 
duding 35 veterans, several upper classmen 

who did not play last season and SO freshmen 
jmspects. Ov die returnees. 13 are starters 
fr<»i last years chib. "We look forward to an 
improved year," Coadi Wilson commented, 
"with the increased quantity and quality of our 
squad cranpetition in camp should be super." 

OFFENSE 

The pass will again be featured in die Aggie 
attack. Ron Haraka, second in passing in the 
Nordmn Divi»on last year, returns at 
Quarterback. Haraka will be pudied by Junior, 
Stan McGlynn, and Freshman, Tom Kenny. 
Scott Kingsbauer, an outstanding Split End 
and Punter has graduated. Scott Melroy, a 
three year starter at safety, will be moved to 
Split End. Seven others will provide much 
competition for Melroy induding: Junicv, Mark 
Breid(H-, Sophomore, Steve Lilly, transfer, Dave 
Anderson and Freshmen, Dave Jefferson, 
Steve Cash, Budiey Lewis, Jim Gordon. Keith 
Trusktn returns at tight end and will battled by 
Sqphomore, Steve Fomoff and Freshman Jeff 
Karpin^. 

The offensive line will be young and appears 
to lack depth. Dick Kling, the 1976 outstanding 
offensive lineman, will return at center. The 
only others witii experience will be Juniors, Bob 
Reapsome and Chariie Thomas and sophomore, 
Bob Root. There will be a host of freshmen who 
will be counted on to improve this area: they in- 
dude: John Lundenmuth, Gary Walters, Mike 
Bergano, Paul Boyle, Jim Fogarty, Jim Saner, 
Mike Marshall, Steve Gehriebi, George Biggs, 
John Lare, and Bill Turner. Sophomores, Andy 
Conley and Marty ChameHne who were injured 
all of last season and Junior, Jim Fretz who was 
moved from line backer will also be in the thick 
of the battle for position. 

The running backs appear to be a strength at 
the outset of die season. Seniors Ed Cini, Mike 
Mackerides and John Maloney provide ex- 
perience and speed. Junior, Joe Laumakis, the 
1976 leading Aggie Rusher and Sophomore, 
Pete Albano and Bill Mullen, who sat out the 
entire '76 season with a broken arm, are also 
key factors in the depth and strength of the 
dfensive backfield. Talented freshmen include: 
Greg Salicondro, Kevin Kramnes, Mike Rudy, 
Tony Strong, Jim Yazujian and Les Davies. The 
'77 scoring punch should show vast im- 
provement. 



DEFENSE 

The Aggie defense must show great im- 
provement if the 1977 win and loss record is 
^ling to change. Coach Wilson believes dwt 
the overall strength of a food>all program is 
indicated by sound defensive fiay. Souwl, 
agressive defensive play will get qiecial 
emphasis with the opening of training camp. 

The defensive line will lad[ size and ^- 
pensive. Jack Mazak and Steve Hertig are the 
(mly returning starters. However, Bruce 
Shickwa, who moves from offensive aiid guard 
and Bryan Felter and Ride Phillips who both 
lettered are expected to become solid pCT- 
formers. The newcomers will have to mature 
quickly. They include: Chuck Alpuche, Mark 
Beale. Ron Bates, Ed Craig, Frank Velhicd and 
Warren Robertson. 

The line backing corps will have limited 
experience, but there are a number of talented 
freshment who should add size and strength to 
this important area. Senior, Mike Hann, who 
returns after a year's absence and sophomcxe, 
Joe Lelli appear to have the inside track. 
However, four talented freshmen figure to be in 
the thick of the battle for a starting assignment. 
They include: Tom Houpt, Phil Boob, Mark 
D<^ius and George Dudo. 

The secondary will be led by senior, Fitz 
Gittens, one of the outstanding players in the 
M.A.C. Junior. Kent Rickenback and Sopho- 
mores Keith Sipple, Gary Scott, Scott Rodkey. 
John Sofia, Nick Cicchino and Metro Mala- 
savage will all battle for starting assignment. 
In addition, Larry Thierolf, Brian Emerick, 
Matt Flanaga, Mark Miller Bryan Berlando, 
Gary Hall. Rich Mullen, Jim Yandrtrfski and 
Eric Weyland, all members of tlte freshman 
dass, will also be in the thick oif the positi<m 
battie in the defensive backfield. 

Overall, the Aggies will have a young club. 
However the attitude of the returning players 
appears positive. This coupled with the abilities 
of the incoming freshmen should indicate an 
improved season. The schedule will be difficult 
as six of the nine opponents are coming off a 
winning season and all nine opponents repcvt 
improved depth and strength. 

Coach Wilson announced that John Hardy, 
Emerson Dromgold and Joe Injaychfxk will 
return from last year's coaching staff. Dan 
Faulkner, Tom Duff and Pete Righi will be 
newcomers in the Delaware Valley Cdlege 
football program. 




«• 



mouth 
«md roll lip your sleeve^. 




^^^^^Kd 



Youkaowwhati 
The iiqustk^ even 
1x) many poor jieod 
imich ig^ioratice anab 



Tthere 



stltobl 
_ !f. GeneratioDS 
- - ^.:^.^ they can, just to. 

stand sliL tvety^^ikk^ed about it for 
years. lliSc is clie# And tlie road to HeO, 
you know what &iri]paved wtth. It's iq) to 
vou, dosomeHir^sdboutttl S(mietiBngcaI> 
led VISTA, \toiteers in Service to 
Amaica. It's coiiiig dlive agm And it 
sotmds ice k^iSMlf be tibe ticket IcHT you. 
YouH w(»k in ycKommunity (»r sofneone 
else's. Whether fm*Te IB or 80, wh^ber**" 
your income is h^ or tow, we^^^'t cam. 

The peo|^ you hfelp to oTTgmiase a St 
l«uiB poverty project or an Appiacten 

community OHM) wcHn'tcaieaslong 

asyouhe^>, Atw you will. N<*^ofk» but 
some of it And we won't ie to you, you'll 
be wc»id{^k>ng and hard and the pay, it's 
nothingtobragabout Butyou'fibeg^tii^ 
Gettii^ back nKMe than you've giv«L And 
the progress you've macfe, that was no 
drop in the bucket either. 

Can VISTA toll6ee: 800424-8580, 
Orwrite VISTA, BoxA, ^shington, 
D.C. 20525. 



CSuKi 



A Pubfic S«fvic« of Th(« N«wsp«p»f 
& The Atfveriisina Council