(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009"

Southern Adventist University 
2008-2009 Catalog 



Mailing Address: 

P.O. Box 370 

Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 

Telephone: 

General Number: 423 236-2000 
FAX: 423-236-1000 

Admissions Information: 

Nationwide: 1-800-768-8437 
(l-800-S0UTHERN)e-mail:postmaster@southern.edu 



In publishing this Catalog, every reasonable effort has been made to be factually 
accurate. The publisher assumes no responsibility for editorial, clerical, or printing errors. 
The information presented is, at the time of printing, an accurate description of course 
offerings, policies, and requirements of Southern Adventist University. The provisions of 
this Catalog, however, are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
University and the student. The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement at any time, without prior notice. 



Something to keep in mind — 

Although this CATALOG is not a textbook, you will refer to it often during your university 
career. It describes the academic program you select and the requirements you must 
fulfill to graduate. Before you enroll at Southern or register for any succeeding semester, 
you should satisfy yourself that you are familiar with this Catalog. 

Two important parts of your academic life are General Education and your field of 
concentration. You will find it especially valuable to read carefully the sections of the 
Catalog that explain these programs. 

Every attempt has been made to prepare this Catalog so everyone may understand it, but 
some of the information may still be confusing to you. Also, because changes may occur 
in your program requirements, you may encounter contradictions between this Catalog 
and advice that you later receive. Talk to someone about the sections of this Catalog that 
are not clear. 

The first person to talk to is your academic adviser. You may also find help from the 
chair/dean of your department/school. It may be necessary to visit with the Director or 
Assistant Director of Records and Advisement. The Vice President and Associate Vice 
President for Academic Administration are also available to assist you. If you need 
explanations about financial questions, talk with the Associate Vice President of 
Enrollment Services or the Assistant Directors of Student Finance. 

Remember that you are the one who selects your program of study and it is your 
responsibility to know the graduation requirements and meet them. 

Do not lose this Catalog. It is your "university manual." 




Table of Contents 



Contents 

Academic Calendar 4 

This is Southern Adventist University 6 

Admissions 11 

Student Life and Services 18 

Academic Enrichment Services 24 

Academic Policies 27 

Financing Your Education 55 

Allied Health 80 

Department of Biology 90 

School of Business and Management 93 

Department of Chemistry 101 

School of Computing 104 

School of Education and Psychology 108 

Engineering Studies 124 

Department of English 125 

Department of History 128 

Interdisciplinary 131 

School of Journalism & Communication 133 

Department of Mathematics 144 

Department of Modern Languages 146 

School of Music 153 

School of Nursing 161 

School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 168 

Department of Physics 173 

School of Religion 176 

Department of Social Work and Family Studies 189 

Department of Technology 196 

School of Visual Art and Design 200 

Interdepartmental Programs 209 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Science 209 

Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies 209 

Associate of Science Degree in General Studies 210 

Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 211 

Anesthesia (CRNA) 211 

Dentistry 211 

Law 212 

Medicine 213 

Optometry 214 

Osteopathic Medicine 214 

Pharmacy 215 

Podiatric Medicine 216 

Pre-Physician Assistant 216 

Veterinary Medicine 217 

Course Descriptions 218 

Index 352 



Academic Calendar 



Academic Calendar 

2008-09 School Year 

The Southern Adventist University summer term consists of three sessions. Students in 
attendance during the 2007-08 school year may register at any time during the week 
immediately preceding the session. 

1st Summer Session, 2008 

May 5 Registration 

May 5 Classes Begin 

May 6 Late Registration Fee 

May 7 Last Day to Add a Course/Fee for Class Change 

May 16 Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

May 23 All Withdrawals After This Date Receive "F" 

May 30 Classes End 

2nd Summer Session, 2008 

Jun 2 Registration 

Jun 2 Classes Begin 

Jun 3 Late Registration Fee 

Jun 4 Last Day to Add a Course/Fee for Class Change 

Jun 13 Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

Jun 20 All Withdrawals After This Date Receive "F" 

Jun 30 Registration 

Jun 30 Classes Begin 

Jul 1 Late Registration Fee 

Jul 2 Last Day to Add a Course/Fee for Class Change 

Jul 11 Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

Jul 18 All Withdrawals After This Date Receive "F" 

Jul 25 Classes End 

3rd Summer Session (SmartStart), 2008 

Jul 16 Online Registration Opens for Fall 2008 

Jul 20 JumpStart Enrollment Services, 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. 

Jul 21 Registration for BIOL 101, 225 

Jul 22 Classes Begin in BIOL 101, 225 

Jul 27 SmartStart Enrollment Services, 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Jul 28 Classes Begin 

Jul 29 Late Registration Fee 

Jul 30 Last Day to Add a Course/Fee for Class Change 

Aug 8 Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

Aug 15 All Withdrawals After This Date Receive "F" 

Aug 22 Classes End 

1st Semester 

Aug 11 ACT Exam, 1:00 p.m. 

Aug 14 ACT Exam, 1:00 p.m. 

Aug 21-27 University Colloquium 

Aug 24-27 Freshman Orientation 



Academic Calendar 



Aug 25-27 


Aug 28 


Aug 28 


Sep 5 


Sep 11 


Sep 22-24 


Oct 15 


Oct 16-19 


Oct 23-26 


Oct 31 


Nov 6 


Nov 7 


Nov 11,12 


Nov 13,14 


Nov 17,18 


Nov 19-21 


Nov 26-30 


Dec 1-Jan 9 


Dec 5 


Dec 14-17 


Dec 17 


Dec 18-Jan 4 


Dec 24-Jan 1 


2nd Semester 


Jan 4 


Jan 5 


Jan 5 


Jan 13 


Jan 19 


Jan 20 


Feb 26 


Feb 27-Mar 8 


Mar 20 


Mar 24,25 


Mar 26,27 


Mar 30,31 


Mar 30 


Apr 1-3 


Apr 17 


Apr 26-29 


May 3 



Registration for Non-registered Students 

Classes Begin 

Late Registration Fee 

Fee for Class Change and "W" Show on Transcript 

Last Day to Add a Class 

View Southern 

Mid-term Ends 

Mid-semester Break 

Alumni Homecoming 

Deadline to request Dec/May Graduation at Records Office 

Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

Withdrawals through Dec 5 receive W or WF 

Seniors Pre-Registration>93 hours 

Juniors Pre-Registration>54 hours 

Sophomores Pre-Registration>23 hours 

Freshmen Pre-Registration<24 hours 

Thanksgiving Vacation 

Online Registration opens for New/Transfer Students 

All Withdrawals After This Date Receive an "F" 

Semester Exams 

Commencement, 7:00 p.m. 

Christmas Vacation 

Wright Hall Closed 

Enrollment Activities for New Students, 12:00-2:00 p.m. Wright Hall 

Classes Begin 

Late Registration Fee 

Fee for Class Change and "W" Show on Transcript 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day/No Class/Community Service Day 

Last Day to Add a Class 

Mid-term Ends 

Spring Break 

Last Day to Drop and Automatically Receive a "W" 

Senior Pre-Registration>93 hours 

Junior Pre-Registration>54 hours 

Sophomores Pre-Registration>23 hours 

Senior Deadline for Correspondence/lncompletes/Homes Study 

Freshman Pre-Registration<24 hours 

All Withdrawals After This Date Receive "F" 

Semester Exams 

Commencement/Semester Ends 



May 4-Aug 21 Summer Sessions 2009 



This is Southern Adventist University 



This is Southern Adventist University 

Southern Adventist University is a co-educational institution established by the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church, offering master's, baccalaureate, and associate degrees, 
and one-year certificates. 

The Mission 

Southern Adventist University as a learning community nurtures Christ-likeness and 
encourages the pursuit of truth, wholeness, and a life of service. 

Vision 

Southern Adventist University, responsive to its diverse constituencies, will provide high 
quality educational benefit, lead in the integration of faith and learning, and model 
academic and professional excellence. The institution will graduate servant leaders 
guided by faith and integrity, and committed to living balanced lives. 

Core Values 

A Christ-centered, Seventh-day Adventist campus 
Academic and professional excellence 
Hospitality and service 
Affordable education 
Balanced lifestyle 

Educational Philosophy 

Rooted in its theological understanding of God and humanity, the educational philosophy 
of the Seventh-day Adventist church is summarized as follows: 

• God, the creator and Sustainer of the universe, is the Source of all knowledge. 

• Created in the image of God for the purpose of communion with Him, humanity 
has sinned and has separated from Him. 

• Through infinite love, God sent His Son to restore this relationship with us— a 
personal relationship that begins now and continues throughout eternity. 

Within the context of this theological understanding, education is viewed as an essential 
element of redemption, and must focus on developing the whole person. Through 
harmonious development of the physical, mental, and spiritual, and social dimensions, 
the individual becomes better equipped to bring wholeness to a broken world. 

Institutional Goals 

Southern Adventist University will 

• Learning Community 

nurture campus learning communities that engage students with ideas that 
mark educated persons, global and multicultural perspectives, and advanced 
technology to develop both ethical principles and intellectual flexibility. 



This is Southern Adventist University 



• Faculty and Staff 

hire and develop a competent and diverse faculty and staff who model balanced 
ethical lives, integrate faith and learning, demonstrate scholarship through 
teaching, research, and other scholarly and creative activities, and celebrate and 
energize the student spirit as they respect and support the different ways 
students develop their minds, their persons, and their citizenship. 

• Students 

recruit, retain, and support a capable, diverse student body. 

• Campus Environment 

provide a safe, nurturing learning community of faith for students, faculty, and 
staff. 

• Student Service 

enable every student to participate in local service and/or mission service 
activities. 

• Partnerships 

pursue and nurture partnerships with alumni, church, community, business and 
industry, civic organizations, and government in order to analyze, project, and 
respond to changing needs to help ensure that graduates are prepared for a life 
of service. 

• Stewardship 

steward resources entrusted to the university through effective fiscal 
management to fulfill its mission, vision and goals. 

Student Learning Goals 

Students of Southern Adventist University will 

• Spiritual 

grow in a vibrant relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, while integrating into 
their lives Bible-based beliefs and values as understood by the Seventh-day 
Adventist church. 

• Intellectual 

develop a commitment to life-long-learning and demonstrate a mastery of the 
cognitive skills of critical reasoning, independent thinking, reflective judgment, 
communication, and creativity needed to confront the issues, ideas, and values 
of historical and contemporary civilization. 

• Occupational 

exhibit excellence and moral leadership in their chosen field of study and/or 
profession. 

• Social 

develop socio-emotional maturity that will enable them to be effective leaders 
and contributing members of their churches, families, groups, and communities 
in a global society. 

• Physical 

take responsibility for their own well-being through a health-promoting lifestyle. 



This is Southern Adventist University 



History 

In 1892 the educational venture that developed into Southern Adventist University had its 
beginning in the small village of Graysville, Tennessee. The school became known as 
Graysville Academy. In 1896 the name was changed to Southern Industrial School and 
five years later to Southern Training School. 

In 1916, because of limited acreage available for further expansion of plant facilities, the 
school was moved to the Thatcher farm in Hamilton County, Tennessee. The name 
"Collegedale" was given to the anticipated community. At its new location, the school 
opened as Southern Junior College and continued as such until 1944 when it achieved 
senior college status and the name was changed to Southern Missionary College. In 1982 
the name was changed to Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists. 

In 1996 graduate studies were added to the curriculum and the name was changed 
again, this time to Southern Adventist University. 

Setting 

Southern Adventist University's one-thousand-acre Collegedale campus is nestled in a 
valley 18 miles east of Chattanooga. The quietness and beauty of the surroundings are in 
keeping with the University's educational philosophy. 

Accreditation and Memberships 

Southern Adventist University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 
30033-4097, telephone number 404.6794501) to award one-year certificates, associate 
degrees, baccalaureate degrees and master's degrees. It is also accredited by the 
Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventist Schools, Colleges, and Universities. 

Schools and departments of the University are also accredited by various organizations as 
follows: 

• Southern Adventist University has received accreditation for its business and 
business-related programs through the International Assembly for Collegiate 
Business Education (ACBE), Olathe, Kansas. The following degree programs are 
accredited by the IACBE: 

• Bachelor of Business Administration degree 

• Bachelor of Science degrees in Business Administration, Computer 
Information Systems, Corporate Community Wellness Management, Long- 
Term Care Administration, and Sports Studies 

• Master of Business Administration 

• Master of Financial Services 

• Master of Science in Administration 

• The Long-Term Care Administration program is accredited by the National 
Association of Boards of Examiners of Long-Term Care Administrators. 

• The School of Education and Psychology teacher education program is 
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. The 
University is approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education for the 
preparation of secondary and elementary teachers. 

• The Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Science degree 



This is Southern Adventist University 



programs in nursing are accredited by the National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, telephone number, 
212.363.5555 ext. 153). The School of Nursing is an agency member of the 
Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs and the Council of 
Associate Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing. The School of 
Nursing is approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing. 

• The Social Work program is accredited by the Council of Social Work Education. 

Southern Adventist University is also a member of the Association of American Colleges, 
the American Council on Education, the Tennessee College Association, and the American 
Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. 

Academic Program 

Southern Adventist University offers 7 master's degree programs with 22 emphases, 58 
baccalaureate degree majors, 50 minors, 16 associate degree majors, and 1 one-year 
certificate. Additional preprofessional and terminal curricula are available to students 
seeking admission to professional schools. (See "Degrees and Curricula," page 37). 
Twelve departments/schools offer secondary teaching certification. 

Online Learning 

Online learning includes undergraduate and graduate programs located on national and 
international Seventh-day Adventist college and university campuses as well as on-line 
courses and degrees. The online learning program provides the same quality of 
educational experience as the main campus to those students who cannot attend classes 
in Collegedale. 

Students 

Sixty percent of the students of Southern Adventist University come from the eight states 
constituting the Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. However, most of 
the additional states and 50 foreign countries are also represented. There are a few more 
women than men. 

Former Southern Adventist University students are now serving in the ministerial, 
teaching, medical, and other services of the Seventh-day Adventist Church at home and 
abroad. Others are engaged in advanced study, business pursuits, government service, 
research activities, private and institutional medical services, and the teaching 
professions on all levels. 

Facilities 

The following buildings house the academic and other activities of the University: 
Brock Hall— Visual Art and Design, Business and Management, English, History, 
Journalism and Communication, WSMC FM90.5 
Daniells Hall— Social Work and Family Studies 
Hackman Hall— Religion 

Hickman Science Center— Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Mathematics, Physics 
Hulsey Wellness Center— Physical Education, Health and Wellness 
J. Mabel Wood Hall— Music 
Ledford Hall— Technology 
Lynn Wood Hall— Heritage Museum, Advancement, Alumni, Development, Learning 



10 This is Southern Adventist University 



Success Services/Counseling and Testing 
Mazie Herin Hall— Nursing 
McKee Library— Main Campus Library 
Miller Hall— Modern Languages 
Sanford & Martha Ulmer Student Center— Computer Center, Campus Ministries, 

Dining Hall, student activity rooms, K.R.'s Place 
Summerour Hall— Education and Psychology, Teaching Material Centers, 

21st Century Classroom 
William lies Physical Education Center— Gymnastics Center, Swimming Pool 
Wright Hall— Administration 

Other facilities on or near campus that may serve student needs: 
Campus Services— Security 

Charles Fleming Plaza— shopping center with businesses serving the University and 
community. Includes: 

Adventist Book Center 

Campus Kitchen— fast foods 

Campus Shop— student bookstore and gift shop 

Collegedale Credit Union 

United States Post Office 

Village Market with grocery, deli, bakery 
Collegedale Academy— secondary laboratory school 
Collegedale Korean Church 
Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church Recreational Area— tennis courts, track, 

playing fields 
Southern Village— student housing 
Arthur W. Spalding Elementary School— laboratory school 
Spanish-American Seventh-day Adventist Church 
Student Apartments 
Student Park 

Talge Hall— men's residence hall 
Thatcher Hall— women's residence hall 
Thatcher South— women's residence hall 
University Health Center— health services 



Admissions 11 



Admissions 

Southern Adventist University welcomes applications from students who seek a university 
career that unites spirituality and academic integrity and who commit themselves to an 
educational program designed according to Christian principles as taught by the Seventh- 
day Adventist Church. The University does not discriminate in admissions on the basis of 
age, gender, race, color, ethnic or national origin, religion, or handicap. 

Admission of Freshman Students* 

Applicants for regular admission as freshmen (less than 24 college credits) must satisfy 
one of the following three conditions at the time of enrollment: 

Regular Acceptance 

1. Graduate from an approved secondary school, including Griggs University and 
International Academy, with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.25 (on a 
4.00 scale) in major subjects,** and have a minimum composite score of 18 on 
the American College Test (ACT) or a minimum of 870 (excluding the writing 
section) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). 

2. Pass the General Education Development (GED) test with a minimum score of 
410 on each section and an average of 450 overall (or 2250 total standard score 
points) and have a composite score of 18 on the ACT or a minimum of 870 
(excluding the writing section) on the SAT. Each GED applicant must have an 
official transcript of his or her grades and credits sent to the Enrollment Services 
Office from the high school most recently attended. 

3. Applicants who have completed their high school education in a home school 
setting must have an ACT minimum composite test score of 18, or an SAT score 
of 870 (excluding the writing section), and submit a portfolio, which must include 
the following documents: 

• If the student participated in or completed a course of study through a 
correspondence school, the student must submit an official transcript from 
that school. If the student was taught partially or completely within the 
home, then it will be necessary to create a transcript of class work of the 
entire high school experience. Include course description, when the course 
was taken, as well as grade achieved. For example, "Algebra I: Fall, 2002, 
B+, 1 unit". The home school transcript must show the graduation date and 
be signed and dated by one of the parents. 

• A copy of an original research paper. 

• A written statement reflecting on the value the student received from his or 
her home school experience. 



*Those planning to enter professions such as business and management, computing, education, journalism and 
communication, nursing, music education, or religion should also consult the respective school for any additional 
admission requirements. 
**Major subjects: English, mathematics, natural science, religion, social science, and foreign language. 



12 Admissions 



Conditional Acceptance 

1. If either the high school GPA or ACT/SAT composite score is below the minimum 
requirements as stated above, the student must appeal to the Admissions 
Committee. 

2. Conditionally accepted students must attend JumpStart, a five week summer 
session that begins July 21, 2008. This session will include a free three-hour 
course (SmartStart) as well as a special Academic Power Tools class for which an 
additional fee is required. 

Subjects Required for Admission 

Applicants to freshman standing must have, at the minimum, the following subjects in 
their secondary program: 

1. Three units of English, excluding journalism and communication. 

2. Two units of mathematics, one of which must be algebra. If Algebra 1 has not 
been taken, MATH 080 must be taken to make up for this deficiency. 

3. Two units of science. A college class in biology, chemistry, or physics must be 
taken in addition to general education science requirements if this condition is 
not met. 

4. Two units of social studies. If one of these two units is not World History, HIST 
174, 175, 364, 365, 374, 375, 386, 387 or 388 must be taken as part of the 
General Education requirements. 

5. Two units in a foreign language are required for a B.A. degree. If deficient, one 
year of a foreign language at the college level will be required. 

6. Computer competency is strongly recommended. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

Regular Acceptance 

Transfer students must submit a transcript from an officially accredited college or 
university, with evidence of a GPA of 2.00 in major subjects, as well as a minimum 
composite ACT (American College Test) of 18 or an SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) of 870 
prior to registration. Students who have a transfer GPA of 2.50 or above in 12 hours of 
major subjects such as general education courses offered at Southern in general 
education areas A, C, D, E (see Catalog under Academic Policies, General Education), may 
exempt themselves from the ACT/SAT requirement unless required by individual 
department or school. 

Conditional Acceptance 

1. If either the college GPA or ACT/SAT composite score is below the minimum 
requirements as stated above, the student must appeal to the Admissions 
Committee. 

2. Conditionally accepted students may take no more than 13 semester hours 
during the first semester. 

3. Conditionally accepted students are required to take Academic Power Tools— a 
class designed for students who want to learn to be successful in college. An 
additional fee is required that is not included in tuition charges. 



Admissions 13 



Transfer Credits 

Transfer credits may be applied toward the requirements for a degree when the student 
has satisfactorily completed a minimum of 12 semester hours in residence. Credit by 
examination taken at other colleges will be accepted according to Southern Adventist 
University standards (see "University Credit by Examination" in the Academic Policies 
section of the Catalog on page 51). A maximum of 72 semester hours may be accepted 
from a college where the highest degree offered is the associate degree. Background 
deficiencies revealed by transcripts and entrance examinations will be given individual 
attention. 

Transfer courses that are comparable to Southern Adventist University courses may be 
recorded with an earned grade of "D" or better in general education and a "C" earned 
grade for a major. 

A student who has been dismissed from another institution because of poor scholarship 
or citizenship, or who is on probation from that institution, is not generally eligible for 
admission until s/he can qualify for readmission to the institution from which s/he has 
been dismissed. 

Transfer students must submit both their official college and high school 
transcripts to the Enrollment Services Office before being allowed to register for 
classes. 

Admission of Non-Degree Students 

Mature individuals who do not meet the above University admission requirements and 
who do not wish to become degree candidates, but who may desire limited credit for 
transfer to another institution of higher learning, may register as non-degree students. A 
non-degree student may enroll for a maximum of five semester hours per term. 

Admission of International Students 

In addition to meeting the freshman or transfer acceptance criteria, an international 
student must send official copies of all credits, degrees, diplomas and other credentials, 
with validation by school or national officials. These should be in the original language, 
accompanied by a translation (not an interpretation) in English, and certified by an 
American Embassy official if possible. 

The deadline for international student applications to be received by the Enrollment 
Services Office is June 30 for the fall registration, and October 30 for the winter 
registration. 

Students from countries which administer the G.C.E. (General Certificate of Education) 
examinations must have earned five (5) or more "0" level academic subject passes 
(generally at one sitting, with marks 1 through 6 or A through D). Subjects must include 
English, a natural science, and three others selected from a second language, 
mathematics, science, and social studies. Proficiency in English, both written and oral, 
must be proven before admission. This may be done by taking: (1) the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) Internet-Based Test (IBT); (2) the TOEFL Paper-Based Test 
(PBT); or (3) the TOEFL Computer-Based Test (CBT). Students whose TOEFL (IBT) score is 
79 (PBT 550 or CBT 213) or higher meet the official admission level. 



14 Admissions 



All students desiring an 1-20 must meet the following criteria. 

1. Be academically accepted 

2. Submit legible copy of passport 

3. Submit Declaration of Finances form to document available funding sufficient to 
pay all expenses for the first year at Southern 

4. Submit bank statements that back-up the Declaration of Finances 

5. Pay the $3,000 International Student Deposit required of all non-U. S. citizens, 
except for citizens of Canada, Bermuda, and the Bahamas 

All international students with student visas are required by current immigration laws to 
be enrolled in a full course study (a minimum of 12 hours) for each semester in 
attendance. NOND 080, Academic Power Tools, may count as part of the international 
student's load. 

According to current immigration laws, international students with student visas may work 
on campus provided that employment is available, and provided that the student is 
enrolled in a full course of study (minimum of 12 hours) for each semester in attendance 
and is making progress to the completion of a degree. On-campus employment is limited 
up to 20 hours per week when there are regular classes held. Such employment may be 
full time (up to 40 hours per week) during school vacation periods provided that the 
student intends to register for the subsequent academic semester. The Human Resources 
Office monitors hours worked and notifies the student and the campus employer when a 
student works in excess of 20 hours per week. If a student's work exceeds 20 hours per 
week, the student will become out of status with Immigration Services. Spouses may work 
only if they have a student visa (or other eligible visa) of their own. 

International students on non-immigrant visas are required by law to secure permission 
before accepting any off-campus employment. 

International students should not leave their homeland until they have in their 
possession: 

1. An admissions letter of acceptance from Southern Adventist University 

2. Form 1-20 (from Southern Adventist University) 

3. A valid passport 

4. A valid visa to enter the United States 

In addition to the regular University expenses, there are other expenses for an 
international student. (Please refer to the Financing Your Education section of the 
Catalog.) 

Admission of English as a Second Language (EESL) Students 

Students that meet the admission criteria of an international student except for the TOEFL 
requirements can be accepted as an English as a Second Language (EESL) student if they 
have a TOEFL IBT score between 45 and 78 (PBT 450-549 or CBT 133-212). EESL 
students must enroll as special advisees of the English Department which administers the 
language classes. Students whose TOEFL IBT scores are below 45 (PBT 450 or CBT 133) 
are not eligible for admission to the University. See page 127 in the English Department 
section of the Catalog for additional EESL information. 



Admissions 15 



Admission to the Schools 

Students majoring in a specific School should refer to that section of the Catalog for 
requirements pertaining to the admission into that School. The following Schools are: 

Business and Management 

Computing 

Education and Psychology 

Journalism and Communication 

Music 

Nursing 

Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

Visual Art and Design 

Extension Classes 

Extension classes are university classes offered on the campuses of Southern Union 
academies as an opportunity for seniors to earn university credit in skills areas that will 
fulfill part of the General Education requirements at Southern Adventist University. 
Instructors are academy teachers who are qualified with appropriate credentials and 
experience. 

To enroll in an extension class, students must be members of the senior class with a 
grade point average of 3.00 or above during the years of their secondary education. 

The extension classes must duplicate their university counterparts in content, degree of 
difficulty, testing and grading. The use of formal Advanced Placement (AP) courses may be 
used where such are available. 

Academies that would like to participate in this program must contact the Vice President 
of Academic Administration to make application. 

Application Procedure for Admission 

• Prospective students should request application forms from the Enrollment 
Services Office or can apply on the Internet at www.southern.edu . 

• Completed applications should be returned to the Enrollment Services Office 
with an application fee of $25. 

• It is the student's responsibility to request any former schools (high school and 
college) to forward transcripts to the Enrollment Services Office in support of the 
application. These will become the property of the University. 

• It is the student's responsibility to forward the ACT or SAT test scores to the 
Enrollment Services Office. 

• Upon receipt and evaluation of the application, transcripts of credits and test 
scores, the Enrollment Services Office will notify the applicant of the action 
taken. 

Southern Adventist University must have received a final official high school 
transcript or GED scores from each new student before he or she will be allowed 
to proceed to registration. 



16 Admissions 



When to Apply or Reapply 

Southern gives acceptance priority to those that submit their application no later than 
March 31. Applications received after March 31 will be processed on a space availability 
basis. 

All new and transfer students who have received academic acceptance will be mailed a 
Commitment Deposit Card. To register for classes, this card must be completed and 
returned to the Enrollment Services Office with a $250 Commitment Deposit. Deadlines 
are July 15 for the fall semester and November 14 for the winter semester. The $250 is 
not an additional fee, it will be used as the housing deposit unless the student will not be 
in university housing. For those not in university housing, the $250 will be applied to the 
student's account. The Commitment Deposit is refundable until the deadlines. After that 
date, the student will forfeit the deposit. The Commitment Deposit is required of any new 
or transfer student seeking enrollment whether residence hall or village. 



Admission to Graduate Programs 



For information on graduate programs or a copy of the Graduate Catalog, please contact 
the Dean of Graduate Studies at 423.236.2912. 

The degrees offered are: 

School of Business and Management 

Master of Business Administration 
Accounting 

Church and Nonprofit Leadership 
Healthcare Administration (available online) 
Management (available online) 
Marketing Management 

Dual Degree— MSN and MBA (MBA component available online) 

Master of Financial Services 

Master of Science in Administration 
Church Administration 
Outdoor Education 

School of Education and Psychology 

Master of Science 

Professional Counseling 
School Counseling 

Master of Science in Education 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Administration and Supervision 
Inclusive Education (available online) 
Literacy Education 
Outdoor Teacher Education (available online) 



Admissions 17 



School of Nursing 

Master of Science in Nursing 
Adult Nurse Practitioner 
Family Nurse Practitioner 
Nurse Educator 

Accelerated RN to MSN 
Adult Nurse Practitioner 
Family Nurse Practitioner 
Nurse Educator 

Accelerated RN to MSN and MBA (MBA component available online) 

Dual Degree— MSN and MBA (MBA component available online) 

Post Master's Certificate 
Adult Nurse Practitioner 
Family Nurse Practitioner 
Nurse Educator 

School of Religion 

Master of Arts 

Biblical and Theological Studies 
Church Leadership and Management 
Church Ministry and Homiletics 
Evangelism and World Mission 
Religious Education 
Religious Studies 



18 Student Life and Services 



Student Life and Services 

A university is not only classroom instruction, but also a mode of association. The 
effectiveness of the University program is enhanced if students develop their interests 
and meet their needs through participation in the nonacademic activities provided. 
Students are encouraged to take advantage of the facilities and opportunities planned for 
their cultural, social, and spiritual growth. 

Campus Safety 

The Campus Safety department safeguards campus residents, property, and facilities. Its 
responsibilities include fire prevention and detection, traffic control, campus escort 
service, assistance with vehicle jump starts and lockouts, vehicle registration, card entry, 
arrangements for emergency after hours transportation, the maintenance of campus 
safety and order. Campus Safety is also responsible for the public address system, 
recording of programs and classroom presentations as per request. Campus Safety is 
located at 5061 Industrial Drive. 

Career Services 

Career development is an integral part of a student's higher education. Career services 
facilitate lifelong career development through self-awareness, career exploration, career 
decision-making, and the implementation of career choices. Professional counselors are 
available to help students: clarify interests, values, and skills; choose an academic major; 
make decisions and explore potential careers; and develop skills in job seeking. 

Recruiters from professional schools and organizations regularly visit the University to 
interview seniors. Meet the Firms, the Health Career Fair, and the Major/Minor Fair 
provide students with opportunities to network with employers and investigate curricular 
and career opportunities. Career Services is a part of the Counseling and Testing Services 
office located in the Student Success Center on the third floor of Lynn Wood Hall. 

Chaplain's Office 

Any student of Southern Adventist University has the opportunity to enrich his/her 
personal relationship with Jesus through Campus Ministries activities. Through the 
programs coordinated from the Chaplain's Office, students can engage in a wide variety of 
on- and off-campus spiritual activities. Student leaders working with the campus chaplain 
direct out-reach activities such as Campus Ministries, CABL (Collegiate Adventist for 
Better Living), Destiny Drama Company, Collegiate Missions, and numerous religious 
programs. 

Southern Adventist University enjoys a reputation of having a strong commitment to 
mission service. There are opportunities for short-term mission projects as well as 
traditional Student Missionary positions or volunteer Task Force positions. The Student 
Missionary assignments from the world divisions are published by the General Conference 
Adventist Volunteer Center on their web site. Students interested in any mission or Task 
Force position may work through the Chaplain's Office for information and placement in 
mission positions. 

The campus chaplain serves as a pastor for the University campus. The chaplain is 
available for spiritual counseling, personal and relationship concerns, or any situation in 
which students desire personal and professional counseling. It is the desire of the 



Student Life and Services 19 



Chaplain's Office to provide a safe, confidential setting for students to discuss personal 
issues. 

Since many university students choose a life partner while here at the University, the 
Chaplain's Office provides various premarital inventories and counseling programs to aid 
in the establishment of healthy Christian relationships. 

Concert-Lecture Series 

Each year a concert-lecture series featuring significant artists and lecturers is provided for 
students, generally in connection with the weekly convocation program. The cost of 
admission for students is included in the tuition. 

Convocation 

Convocation exercises in the residence halls and for the entire student body serve 
educational and spiritual purposes. They also provide an element of unity which is one of 
the most desirable features of private education such as is found at Southern Adventist 
University. The spiritual emphasis weeks and the weekend church services assist in the 
spiritual growth of the students. Students are required to attend these services regularly. 
Failure to do so will jeopardize the student's current status and readmission privileges. 

Counseling and Testing Services 

Each student is assigned an academic adviser who will assist in program planning and 
give advice and guidance on academic questions throughout the school year. Students 
may also seek counseling regarding academic concerns from any member of the faculty. 

Students who wish to seek assistance from a professional counselor should contact 
Counseling Services in the Student Success Center located on the third floor of Lynn 
Wood Hall (423.236.2782). A wide variety of resources to assist students adjust to 
university life are available. Personal and career counseling, consultation, testing, 
advisement for international students, and referral services are provided in a confidential 
caring environment. 

Southern Adventist University is an established non-Saturday National Test Center for the 
administration of entrance examinations for students applying to graduate and 
professional schools. Contact Testing Services in the Student Success Center for test 
applications and test date information. 

Dining 

For the promotion of student health and enjoyment, Southern Adventist University 
provides a complete vegetarian cafeteria service, organized to serve student needs. The 
spacious dining hall is an inviting center of social and cultural life at the University, and 
service by the cafeteria staff is available for the many student and faculty social functions. 
Auxiliary dining rooms are available for meetings of various student or faculty 
organizations. The Food Service Department also operates two vegetarian fast-food shops 
on the campus. K.R.'s Place is conveniently located in the Student Center and the 
Campus Kitchen is at the nearby Fleming Plaza. 



20 Student Life and Services 



Disabilities - Rehabilitation Act (1973) 

Section 504: Services for Students with Special Needs 

Students with disabilities that could impact their learning experiences at Southern must 
contact Disability Support Services (DSS), by phone at 423.236.2574 or in person, to 
schedule an appointment with the Disability Services Coordinator if they want to request 
accommodations. DSS is located on the third floor of Lynn Wood Hall in the Student 
Success Center. It is expected that students with disabilities will make this contact during 
the first three weeks of the semester. Otherwise, the process of certifying eligibility and 
arranging for reasonable accommodations will probably not be completed in time to meet 
their needs before mid-term. Students who contact DSS after the first month of the 
semester should not expect to receive accommodations for that semester. 

Southern is in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973) and is 
dedicated to the elimination of architectural and prejudicial barriers which prevent any 
qualified person from attending. Southern has established DSS to provide academic 
disability services according to the provisions of applicable disability law. 

The University does not assume responsibility of identifying students who qualify for 
accommodations or special services. The student must 1) voluntarily (and confidentially) 
identify to the Disability Services Coordinator as having a qualifying disability and 2) 
provide appropriate documentation to be certified to receive accommodations. 

Details about services as well as the requirements and processes involved in qualifying 
for accommodations at Southern, can be found at http://dss.southern.edu . 

Discipline 

Discipline refers to any action taken by Southern Adventist University relative to a 
student's social standing. All student disciplinary procedures are under the direction of 
the Vice-President for Student Services, who works with the residence hall deans in 
handling student disciplinary cases. The vice-president for Student Services may separate 
a student from the school, suspend a student, deny re-admission, or place a student on 
citizenship probation. For further details, consult the Student Handbook. 

Health Service 

The University Health Center strives to provide high quality health care for the students of 
Southern Adventist University. Services are provided by a nurse practitioner under the 
supervision of a physician/physician assistant. The Health Center is open during regular 
university working hours. To maximize healthcare for all students it is the normal 
procedure for students to be seen at the Health Center. Registered nurses are on-call for 
urgent needs when the Health Center is not open. 

The Health Center is available to all students and student dependents that are on school 
insurance. 

Visits for minor illnesses or injuries, wound care, blood pressure checks, and equipment 
loans are free. Visits requiring prescriptions or expanded medical care, physicals, lab 
tests, immunizations, and medications or supplies will have a charge. The Health Center 
will bill the school insurance but the students should plan to file their own private 
insurance. Charges from the Health Center may be placed on the student's account. For 
further details, consult the Student Handbook. 



Student Life and Services 21 



Orientation Program 

Southern Adventist University has a personal interest in the success of the student 
desiring a university education. There is much that the student must do to get acquainted 
with the academic, social, and religious life of the University by perusing this Catalog and 
the Southern Adventist University Student Handbook. Instruction and counsel are given 
which will help the student better understand the University program and what is 
expected of him/her as a citizen of the University community. 

Orientation for new students is held prior to the fall term. It includes examinations and 
instruction helpful in course planning. The student is introduced to the facilities, purposes, 
and functions of the University. Social occasions are also provided when 

students may meet faculty members and fellow students. All new freshman and 
transferring students are required to attend the orientation program. 

Photo Release 

By enrolling at Southern Adventist University, students authorize the use and reproduction 
by the University, or anyone authorized by the University, of any images taken while 
enrolled at the University, whether video or photo, film or digital, whether distributed by 
print medium, video cassette, CD, DVD, internet, television, or any other mode or medium, 
whether now existing or subsequently developed. All such images, however stored, shall 
constitute Southern Adventist University property solely and completely. Students will not 
be entitled to compensation for the use of the images. 

Residence Hall Living 

Living in a university residence hall with its daily "give and take" prepares the student to 
meet life with equanimity, teaches respect for the rights and opinions of others, and offers 
first-hand experience in adjusting to a social group. Four residence halls that serve the 
needs of our students are: Talge Hall, Thatcher Hall, Thatcher South, and Southern 
Village. 

To assure students this beneficial experience, the University requires those students who 
take more than three semester hours of class work and who are unmarried, under 23 
years of age, and not living with their parents or other approved relatives in the vicinity, to 
reside in one of the residence halls. Those over the age 23 may be asked to find alternate 
housing either in Student Family Housing or off-campus. 

Risk Management 

University policy requires all students to have adequate accident and health insurance 
covering both inpatient and outpatient services. The same coverage is encouraged for all 
spouses and dependents. This requirement can be met by (a) enrolling in the student 
insurance plan, or (b) waiving the student insurance plan by providing information 
regarding coverage from another policy or health care plan. All students living in a 
residence hall or other student housing must purchase the student insurance plan unless 
waiving the coverage. A student taking six hours or more who has not waived the coverage 
will be automatically enrolled in this insurance plan at registration. 

A policy brochure describing benefits, terms, and limits is available from the Risk 
Management department. The waiver is valid for one year and is only effective upon 
providing information regarding other insurance. 



22 Student Life and Services 



Social Activities and Organizations 

The Director of Student Life and Activities plans social activities in consultation with the 
Student Activities Committee. Additional social programs are sponsored during the year by 
clubs and organizations. 

In addition to the Student Association, more than 30 campus organizations provide 
opportunities for enrichment, leadership training, and enjoyment. They include church- 
related organizations— Campus Ministries; Student Ministerial Association; clubs related to 
academic interests sponsored by the departments; social clubs— Sigma Theta Chi 
(women), Upsilon Delta Phi (men), Black Christian Union, Christian Veterans Association 
and the Latin American Club, and special interest or hobby clubs. 

Standards of Conduct 

In harmony with the objectives of the University, high standards of behavior are 
maintained to encourage the development of genuine Christian character. Mature 
Christian students of sound spiritual and social integrity appreciate standards that elevate 
and ennoble. Admission to Southern Adventist University is a privilege that requires the 
acceptance of and compliance with published and announced regulations. Only those 
whose principles and interests are in harmony with the ideals of the University and who 
willingly subscribe to the social program as ordered are welcomed. It therefore follows 
that since students at Southern Adventist University receive an education subsidized by 
the Seventh-day Adventist Church, those who engage in activities determined to be 
detrimental to the church on or off campus will not be knowingly accepted or retained. 

A student who is out of harmony with the social policies of the University, who is 
uncooperative, and whose attitude gives evidence of an unresponsive nature may be 
advised to withdraw without specific charge. 

Each student is expected to become acquainted with the standards of conduct published 
in the Southern Adventist University Student Handbook. The handbook includes levels of 
social discipline and the appeal route. A copy may be obtained from the office of the Vice 
President for Student Services. Interim announcements of policies adopted by the 
administration are of equal force with those listed in official publications. 

Student Association 

Every undergraduate student at Southern Adventist University who is taking eight or more 
semester hours of class work is a member of the Student Association with voting 
privileges in the election of officers. The association affords opportunities for leadership 
development and for cooperation in achieving the objectives of Southern Adventist 
University. The association assists the University administration and faculty in the 
implementation of policies and assumes responsibility in giving direction to campus 
activities entrusted to it. The association's activities are coordinated and communicated 
through the Student Senate and cabinet and their several committees. The activities and 
responsibilities of the officers and the detailed organization of the Student Association are 
outlined in the Student Association Constitution and Bylaws. 



Student Life and Services 23 



Student Employment 

Southern Adventist University encourages every student to balance work and study. If a 
student wants to work, is physically and emotionally able to work, and has arranged 
his/her class schedule to accommodate a reasonable work schedule, he/she may be able 
to obtain employment on campus. Students seeking employment should contact the 
Human Resources Office for information; however, students are responsible for securing 
their own employment. 

Student Publications and Productions 

As a vital part of its community of learning, Southern Adventist University sponsors the 
production of a variety of media by its students. When exercised in the spirit of Christian 
fellowship, responsible freedom of expression and debate of issues enhances the 
university community. Editors and producers are encouraged to express themselves freely 
within the parameters of the philosophy, standards, and mission statement of the 
University. 

Student media are the voices of both students and faculty, representing the visual and 
creative arts, both in print and non-print formats. The student media provides a 
marketplace of ideas in a university environment. Student media serve not only the 
current residents of the campus, but also document the culture and history of the 
institution. 

Approved student-produced media on campus are the Festival Studios (multimedia year in 
review), Joker (pictorial directory), Numerique (student phone directory), Southern Accent 
(student newspaper), Southern Memories (yearbook), and Campus Chatter (weekly 
announcements). Southern Adventist University is the legal publisher of all of the 
approved student-produced media. 



24 Academic Enrichment Services 



Academic Enrichment Services 

E. A. Anderson Lecture Series 

The E. A. Anderson Lecture Series is an annual feature of the business curriculum. The 
series is made possible by the generosity of E. A. Anderson of Atlanta, Georgia, for the 
purpose of giving the student a broader understanding of the business world. The public is 
invited to attend the lectures free of charge; however, for a fee, continuing education 
credit is available. Lectures are presented at 8 p.m. on Monday evenings during the 
second semester, in the E. A. Anderson Business Seminar Room, Brock Hall, Room 333. 

Eugene A. Anderson Organ Concert Series 

The Eugene A. Anderson Organ Concert Series was initiated in 1986 to provide world-class 
organ concerts on the campus of Southern Adventist University. The foremost organists 
from throughout the world present these concerts. Select performances are broadcast 
internationally on the American Public Radio Program, "Pipe Dreams." The series is made 
possible through the generosity of Eugene A. Anderson of Atlanta, Georgia, for the 
education and enjoyment of the students and the general public. 

The Anton Heiller Memorial Organ, a 70-stop 108-rank tracker organ, was dedicated in 
the Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church in April, 1986, and is the largest of its kind 
in North America. A second instrument, a Renaissance mean-tone organ with two 
manuals and 13 stops, is housed in the music building's Ackerman Auditorium. Both were 
built by John Brombaugh and Associates of Eugene, Oregon. 

Chamber Music Series 

Ackerman Auditorium in J. Mabel Wood Hall is the setting for the Chamber Music Series. 
Each semester two or three artists and/or ensembles provide a variety of listening 
experiences for students, faculty, and the community. Artists are chosen in such a fashion 
that over a four-year period a student can become acquainted with solo and ensemble 
music of many style periods. Master classes are often scheduled in conjunction with a 
concert. 

E. 0. Grundset Lecture Series 

The E. 0. Grundset Lecture Series is jointly sponsored by the Southern Adventist University 
Chapter (Kappa Phi) of the Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society and the 
Biology Department. Five or more lectures are presented each semester by guest 
speakers. The general public is invited. 

The lectures are divided into two categories. The Technical Research Seminars are 
designed to update students, faculty, and the community on current biological research 
as well as to illustrate to students how biological knowledge is acquired through research. 
The Natural History Lectures are less technical and provide a general understanding of 
organismic and ecological biology, either by a description of the plants or animals in a 
certain region or an account of the behavior, habits, or ecology of certain species. 



Academic Enrichment Services 25 



Gerhard F. Hasel Lectureship on Biblical Scholarship 

The Gerhard F. Hasel Lectureship on Biblical Scholarship serves to promote biblical 
scholarship, particularly by inviting recognized non-Seventh-day Adventist scholars to 
lecture on the campus of Southern Adventist University each winter semester. The 
lectureship also serves to maintain a mutually helpful interchange between Adventist and 
non-Adventist biblical scholars, and to expose students and faculty to varied research and 
views in order to challenge and fortify reasons for biblical faith. The lectureship is 
sponsored by the E. G. White Memorial Chair in Religion. 

Institute of Archaeology 

The Institute of Archaeology, under the auspices of the School of Religion, coordinates 
archaeological programs through course offerings, the Lynn H. Wood Archaeological 
Museum, laboratories, a research library, excavations, and publications. 

Institute of Evangelism and World Missions 

The Robert H. Pierson Institute of Evangelism and World Missions, under the auspices of 
the School of Religion, provides coordination and funding for students and faculty to 
engage in direct evangelistic and missionary opportunities, as well as research and 
resources through the Evangelistic Resource Center. 

Learning Success Services 

Learning Success Services (LSS), located on the third floor of Lynn Wood Hall, provides 
staff and equipment in a supportive Christian environment to assist and encourage all 
students in their pursuit of learning. One-on-one tutoring by appointment is available in 
most academic areas. Students with expertise in academic areas are encouraged to seek 
employment as tutors. LSS offers seminars, classes, and tutoring in study skills, time 
management, organization, and learning. The Disability Services office is also at LSS. 
Students with documented disabilities should read the section about Disabilities in this 
Catalog on page 20. 

Libraries 

Within a Christian context, McKee Library manages the academic knowledge commons 
and instructs users in its proper use, because knowledge is the foundation for critical 
thinking. A variety of educational resources in print, non-print, and electronic format are 
made available to the students and the faculty of the University. Professional librarians 
and staff are available to help students and faculty with their individual research needs as 
well as providing class instruction and tours. McKee Library's website is a central source 
for accessing information and is located at http://librarv.southern.edu . Research Central 
links students and faculty to the online catalog, over 100 databases, over 21,000 full-text 
periodicals, a journal locator, and selected websites. The Services and About Us pages 
provide information about McKee Library and its services. Students enrolled in online 
courses may access the McKee Library-Distance Education page located at 
http://disted.southern.edu . The print collection contains over 150,000 volumes housed 
in open stacks. Over 4,000 items are housed in the media collection. One thousand one 
hundred print periodicals are currently received which include a large number of titles 
kept permanently on microform. Special collections in the library include the Dr. Vernon 
Thomas Memorial 



26 Academic Enrichment Services 



Civil War and Abraham Lincoln Collection: books, letters, manuscripts, newspapers, 
pamphlets, picture, paintings, maps, and artifacts of this period in American History. 
Individual study carrels and group study tables provide areas for student learning. 

Marine Biological Station 

Southern Adventist University is affiliated with Walla Walla University's Rosario Beach 
Marine Biological Station to enrich and supplement its on-campus programs. 

This Marine Biological Station is located on Fidalgo Island in the Puget Sound in the state 
of Washington and provides students with opportunities to study marine habitats in a 
temperate climate. This station also furnishes facilities for summer class work and 
research. Its close proximity to biomes ranging from sea bottom to Alpine tundra provides 
an excellent opportunity for instruction and investigation. 

Robert H. Pierson Lecture Series 

The Robert H. Pierson Lectureship is sponsored in November of every year by the School 
of Religion under the auspices of the Robert H. Pierson Institute of Evangelism and World 
Mission. The lectures are meant to facilitate the training of ministers and other religion 
majors in Biblical Studies, Theology, History, Adventist Studies, Homiletics, Church 
Leadership, and in other areas of preparation. 

WSMC FM90.5 

Classical 90.5 WSMC is a 100,000 watt, noncommercial, radio station licensed to 
Southern Adventist University. 

WSMC provides training for students in the field of broadcasting. The station regularly 
hires between 10 and 15 students as on-air announcers, production, and development 
assistants. The station is an excellent way for the student to receive hands-on experience 
in the field of broadcasting and public radio/development. 

WSMC represents the University to the Greater Chattanooga community, with a coverage 
area including a 94-mile radius of Chattanooga. Founded in 1961, it is the oldest 
noncommercial fine arts station in southeastern Tennessee. WSMC was the first radio 
station in a seven-state region to receive satellite capability. The station also exists as an 
outreach of the University— striving to enhance the quality of life in the community. 

The station produces high-quality fine arts, informational, educational, and inspirational 
programs. WSMC broadcasts programs from Public Radio International, National Public 
Radio, and American Public Media, as well as news from the BBC. 

WSMC's broadcast studios are located in Brock Hall. The facility includes a studio-quality 
production room, news room, music library, and on-air studios. 



Academic Policies 27 



Academic Policies 

Planning a Course of Study 

When planning their course work, students should acquaint themselves with their chosen 
program of study and graduation requirements outlined in this Catalog. Students who 
have not decided their course of study before entering the University may take a general 
program exploring several fields. This approach need not result in loss of credits if 
carefully planned. 

Freshman students may consult faculty members during the summer months before the 
beginning of the fall term. Students planning to teach should consult the School of 
Education and Psychology to include teacher education courses as a part of their program 
in order to qualify for denominational and state certification. 

Degree candidates are responsible for satisfying all degree requirements. They may 
choose to meet the requirements of any one Catalog in effect during the period of 
residency. If students discontinue their education for a period of twelve months or more, 
they must qualify according to the Catalog in force at the time of their return. 

General Degree Requirements: Master's Degree 

The general and specific degree requirements for a master's degree are described in a 
separate Graduate Catalog, available by writing to the graduate school. Master's degrees 
are available in the fields of Business, Counseling, Education, Nursing, and Religion. 

General Degree Requirements: Baccalaureate Degree 

The general degree requirements for a baccalaureate degree are as follows: 

• Satisfactory make-up of admissions deficiencies. 

• A minimum of 124 semester hours with a resident and cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 (C) or above.* Students earning the Bachelor of Music degree 
will take 138-142 semester hours. 

• A minimum of 40 hours of upper division credit, to include at least 14 upper 
division hours in the major for a B.A. degree and at least 18 upper division hours 
in the major for all other degrees. 

• Completion of a major and minor (two majors accepted) for a B.A. degree or 
completion of a major for other degrees with a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.25 in the major,* completion of the General Education requirements, and 
electives to satisfy the total credit requirements for graduation. Courses 
completed with grades lower than a "C-" will not be applied on a major or minor. 
Grades of "C" or better are required for the Nursing major and grades of "C" or 
better are required for Nursing cognate courses. 



*For educational certification, all secondary and elementary majors must have a minimum overall grade point, 
major, and education average of 2. 75, as well as achieve a minimum grade of "C" (2.00) in all teacher education 
cognate courses. The Nursing Major requires a GPA of 2.50 in cognate courses as well as in the major. The School 
of Religion and the Social Work Department requires a minimum overall GPA of 2.50. 



28 Academic Policies 



General Degree Requirements: Baccalaureate, continued 

• More than one major may be earned provided all courses required for each 
major and its cognates are completed. Each major must include a minimum of 
20 semester hours that do not overlap with any other major or minor. 

• More than one minor may be earned provided all courses required for each 
minor are completed. Each minor must include a minimum of 12 semester 
hours that do not overlap with any other major or minor. 

• Bachelor of Art degrees are exempt from completing a minor if the student is a 
Southern Scholar or working towards certification. 

• Completion of an examination as required by the department or school. 

• Students wishing to obtain a second degree will need to complete, beyond the 
124 minimum hours required, a minimum of 30 hours, including 16 hours upper 
division, and a new major. 

General Degree Requirements: Associate Degree 

• A minimum of 64 semester hours and a resident and cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 (C) or above. Nursing majors need 69 semester hours and a 
minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50. 

• Completion of a major, the General Education requirements, and electives to 
satisfy the total credit requirements for graduation. Courses completed with 
grades lower than "C-" will not be applied on a major. 

• Students who have completed one associate degree and who wish to obtain 
another associate degree may do so upon completion of the curriculum 
prescribed for the second degree. 

The work completed for the second degree must include at least 24 hours in 
residence over and above the number of hours earned for the first degree. If the 
second associate degree is earned subsequent to the first associate degree, the 
requirements for the second degree will be governed by the provisions of the 
Catalog in effect at the time the student re-enters the University for work toward 
the second degree. 

• Students who wish to obtain an associate degree at the time they receive a 
baccalaureate degree may do so if the degrees are in different fields. If 
requirements for an associate and a baccalaureate degree in the same field are 
completed at the same time, only the higher degree will be conferred. 

One-Year Certificate Requirements 

• A minimum of 32 semester hours which meet the requirements of a specific 
one-year program. 

• A resident and cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above. Grades in 
the technical area below "C-" will not be accepted. 

General Requirements: Minor 

• A minimum of eighteen semester hours of which six must be upper division 
credit. 



Academic Policies 29 



Class Standing 

Freshmen 0-23 semester hours 

Sophomores 24-54 semester hours 

Juniors 55-93 semester hours 

Seniors 94 semester hours 

Eligibility for class office requires a grade point average of 2.25 and a good citizenship 
record. 

Graduation Requirements 

Degree Candidacy: A student becomes a degree candidate when s/he enters the school 
term during which it will be possible to complete all requirements for graduation. A senior 
contract for graduation must be made to the Records and Advisement Office by the end of 
October of the senior year. 

Dates of Graduation: The date of graduation will be (a) the date of commencement for 
those graduating in December or May and (b) for others, the last day of the month in 
which graduation requirements are met and an official transcript is received at the 
Records and Advisement Office. Currently, there are two commencement services. One at 
the end of the first semester and another at the end of the second semester. 

Transcripts: Before a student will be allowed to graduate, transcripts of all 
correspondence and transfer credits must be received at the Records and Advisement 
Office. 

Participation in Graduation Exercises: Students are allowed to participate in 
commencement exercises only if they have completed all the courses required for 
graduation. 

Deferred Graduation: Students ordinarily graduate under the requirements of the Catalog 
of the year in which they enter the University. Students who are studying for a 
baccalaureate degree and fail to graduate within six calendar years (four years for an 
associate degree), must plan to conform to the current Catalog. 

Residence Requirements 

Baccalaureate Degree: Twenty-five percent of the total semester hours required for the 
baccalaureate degree must be taken in residency including 30 of the last 36 hours 
completed preceding the conferment of the degree. The total hours taken in residence 
must include fifteen in upper division, nine of which must be in the major and three in the 
minor fields. 

Associate Degree: Twenty-five percent of the total semester hours required for the 
associate degree must be taken in residency including 30 of the last 36 hours completed 
preceding the conferment of the degree. The total hours taken in residence must include 
fifteen in the major field of study and three in the minor if a minor is taken. 

Certificate Programs: Eighteen semester hours of credit must be completed in residence 
immediately preceding the conferment of a one-year certificate. 



30 Academic Policies 



Transfer Credit: Prior arrangements must be made with the Records and Advisement 
Office to take courses for transfer credit at another college or university during any 
session the student is simultaneously enrolled at Southern Adventist University and during 
any summer after initial enrollment. See department/school sections of the Catalog for 
classes which must be taken in residence. 

Prerequisite for Taking Upper Division Classes 

Students must complete forty semester hours of 100 and 200 level courses (lower 
division) before enrolling in a 300 or 400 level course (upper division). The English 
Composition and mathematics requirements in area A, Basic Academic Skills, of 
General Education must be met before enrollment in upper division classes. 

General Education 

General education is an important part of the student's experience at Southern Adventist 
University. The general education structure is designed to provide the student opportunity 
to develop those values and competencies that mark an educated person and prepare 
him or her for leadership in today's complex society. While recognizing the validity of many 
different general education programs, the faculty of SAU have designed the following 
sequence that provides development of academic skills and opportunities for self- 
fulfillment and conveys basic values of both the Seventh-day Adventist Church and 
western civilization. Students may exercise considerable latitude when selected courses 
to comply with General Education requirements. 

As a requirement of graduation, all associate and baccalaureate seniors must take a 
SAU specified standardized test that measures general education proficiencies in the 
fall semester of their senior year. 

Writing Across the Curriculum: The Writing Across the Curriculum program at Southern 
Adventist University is one of the longest-running programs of its kind in the nation. The 
goal of the program is to assist students in developing writing skills suitable to various 
disciplines. Such skills will also make students more competitive in the job market. Thus, 
candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete three writing-emphasis classes as 
outlined in the General Education requirements. These classes are carefully tailored to 
emphasize personal growth in writing skills through both spontaneous and planned 
writing exercises. Students should also expect writing requirements in courses other than 
those designated as writing-emphasis courses. 

Community Service: Promotion of voluntary, unselfish service to mankind is a thread that 
runs through all programs of study at Southern Adventist University. Volunteerism, 
however, cannot be mandated. It can only be encouraged. Students at Southern are 
encouraged to volunteer for community service through government, philanthropic, 
cultural, political, church, medical, educational, environmental, and other organizations 
and agencies or through individual projects. Based on nominations from each academic 
department/school, Community Service Awards are presented each year at the annual 
Awards Convocation to students who have made an exceptional contribution of time and 
effort in serving others. 



Academic Policies 31 



Area A. Academic, Communication, and Computer Skills 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University can use the skills of reading, writing, 
mathematics, oral communication and basic computing skills. 

Underlying all General Education requirements are the basic academic skills of English 
and mathematics. It is important for a graduate to be able to discern an author's 
organization, arguments, and supports, and to write coherently, fluently, and 
grammatically. 

Graduates need numeric and symbolic computation skills to function successfully in our 
scientific and technological society. 

All English Composition and mathematics requirements in Area A must be completed 
before upper division work is undertaken. Upper division transfer students may take Area 
A requirements concurrently with upper division classes. 

1. English 

ENGL 101 and 102 are required for both the associate and bachelor's degrees. A 
student with an ACT English score below 17, an SAT language score below 430, or a 
TOEFL score below 550 (an IBT TOEFL score of 79; a CBT TOEFL score of 213) may 
not take ENGL 101. The English Department recommends completing ENGL 100 or 
an EESL class before retaking the ACT, SAT, or TOEFL. However, passing ENGL 100 
or an EESL class is not a substitute for a passing score on the examination. 

2. Mathematics 

Students with a Mathematics ACT score below 22 must take one mathematics 
course (100 level or above). MATH 080 is required of all students who meet neither 
of the following criteria: 1) ACT Mathematics score of 16 or above, 2) Completion of 
high school Algebra II with a grade of C or better. If MATH 080 is required, it must be 
completed with a grade of C or better before the student registers for any other 
mathematics course. 

3. Candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete three writing-emphasis 
classes. 

These classes are identified by a "(W)" following the course name, [e.g., History of the 
South (W)] in the departmental listings. One such class must be in the student's 
major field and one must be outside the major field. The third may be chosen from 
any area. The writing done as a part of the program overseas completed by students 
majoring in International Studies, Spanish or French will be accepted in place of a 
specially designated "W" course in the major. 

4. Basic Computer Competencies 

Southern Adventist University defines computer competencies as including both 

concept-based competencies and skill-based competencies. 

All students must demonstrate the concept-based computer competencies by: 

• Taking or challenging CPTE 100 which is offered in the classroom and 
online. 

OR 

• Passing the Concept-Based Computer Competency Exam administrated by 
the School of Computing. 

OR 

• Taking BUAD 317, CPTR 103, or EDUC 319. 



32 Academic Policies 



All students must demonstrate skill-based computer competencies by: 

• Taking or challenging two hours or more in computer skill building courses 
that cover different application areas. 

OR 

• Passing two different Skill-Based Computer Competency Exams 
administrated by the School of Computing. 

OR 

• A combination of a and b. 

The computer skill building courses are CPTE 105, 106, 107 109, 110, 
205, 245/345; ARTG 115 (covers two skilled areas); BUAD 104 (covers 
three skill-based areas), 105, 245/345; EDUC 319; MUED 250; TECH 
248. 

5. Oral Communication 

To meet speaking and listening competencies, students are required to take COMM 
135, Introduction to Public Speaking. 

Degree programs with alternate requirements approved by the Oral Communication 
Committee and meeting the criteria for quality oral communication experiences and 
competencies set by the University for minimum general education and accreditation 
standards are B.S.W. Social Work, B.S. Family Studies, and B.A. History. 

Area A Total Associate Bachelor's 

English 6-9 6-9 

Mathematics 0-3 0-3 

Basic Computer 3 3 

Oral Communication 3 3 

Area B. Religion 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University has a knowledge of the Bible and a sense of 
Christian community based on the teachings, beliefs, and history of the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church. 

A correct understanding of the human condition results from a knowledge of the Bible as 
God's word, a commitment that springs from that truth, and a system of values derived 
from such knowledge and insight. 

Bachelor's degree students must take 12 hours of Religion and include one upper-division 
class. Transfer students must Take 3 hours at an accredited SDA college or university for 
each year or part thereof in attendance at an SDA college or university with a minimum of 
6 hours. 

1. Biblical Studies 

All RELB courses. 

2. Religion and Theology Studies 

All RELT courses. 

3. Professional Studies 

One course may be chosen from RELP 240/340, 251, 264, 361, 362, 450, or 468. 
Area B Total Associate Bachelor's 

6 12 



Academic Policies 33 



Area C. History, Political, and Economic Systems 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University has knowledge of history and the skill to 
analyze political and economic systems. It is essential that one have an historical 
perspective in a society that allows its members a voice in shaping its political, social, and 
economic institutions. CLEP exam credit for history will only be accepted for three of the 
six hours required for a bachelor's level degree. Students with less than one secondary 
school credit for World History must include one of the following: 

HIST 174, 175, 364, 365, 374, 375, 386, 387 or 388. 

1. History 

HMNT 210 and all HIST courses except 145, 490, and 497. 

2. Political and Economic Systems 

All PLSC courses; HMNT 215/415; ECON 213, 224, 225. 

[Students studying for licensure in elementary education may take GEOG 204 for C-2 
credit.] 
Area C Total Associate Bachelor's 

History 3 6 

PLSC/ECON 3 

Area D. Language, Literature, Fine Arts 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University can recognize the impact of arts and 
humanities on life and integrate such knowledge into personal experience. 

Language, literature, and the fine arts convey ideas, values, and emotions. An 
acquaintance with these modes of communication enhances the ability to express oneself 
and fosters an appreciation of the cultural heritage of world civilization and the 
complexities of human existence. 

Bachelor's degree students must include at least 3 hours in two sub-areas. Students 
entering Southern Adventist University who have less than two secondary school credits of 
foreign language and who are pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the 
elementary level of a foreign language. Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must 
check with their School/Department prior to taking MDLG 240-241. 

1. Foreign Language 

FREN 101-102, 207-208; GRMN 101-102, 207-208; ITAL 101-102, ITAL 207-208; 
MDLG 240-241, 265; RELL 181-182, 191-192; RUSS 101-102, 207-208; SPAN 
101-102, 207-208, 243. 

2. Literature 

All literature courses offered either by the English Department, Modern Languages 
Department, and COMM 326. 

3. Music and Art Appreciation 

HMNT 205; MUHL 115, 118, 120, 320, 321, 322, 323; MUCH 216; ART 218/318, 
342, 344, 345, 349. 
Area D Total Associate Bachelor's 

3 6 



34 Academic Policies 



Area E. Natural Science 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University comprehends the basic concepts of science 
and can apply the scientific method to problem solving. 

A study of the sciences develops an inquiring attitude toward one's environment. It 
provides individuals with empirical and rational methods of inquiry and an awareness of 
both the potential and the limitations of pure and applied science in solving problems. 

Bachelor's degree students must take at least 3 hours from each of 2 sub-areas or 
complete a science sequence course. Only one of the following may apply: BIOL 424, 
PHYS 317. 

Students who have less than two secondary school units in science must take 3 hours of 
science above the usual requirements; e.g. associate degree students must take 6 hours 
and bachelor's degree students must take 9 hours. 

Southern Scholars must take a sequence of two classes from the same department. See 
the "Honors Studies Sequence" section on page 36 of the Catalog for clarification. 

1. Biology 

BIOL 101-102, 103, 151-152, 225, 226, 250, 314, 421, 424. 

2. Chemistry 

CHEM 107, 111-112, 113-114, 115, 151-152. 

3. Physics 

PHYS 127, 128, 155, 211-212, 213-214, 317. 

4. Earth Science 

ERSC 105. 
Area E Totals Associate Bachelor's 

3-6 6-9 

Area F. Behavioral, Family, Health Sciences 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University will have a knowledge of and be able to apply 
the dynamics of personal relationships, social interaction, and healthful living toward 
effective service. 

The basic social units significantly shape people's lives, and a knowledge of their workings 
is necessary to understand ourselves and others. 

Bachelor's degree students must include at least 2 hours in 2 of the following sub-areas: 

1. Social Work and Family Studies 

PSYC 101, 122, 128, 217, 224, 231, 233, 249, 315, 349, 377, 415; SOCW 211, 
212, 230, 233, 249 265/465, 296/496; EDUC 217, 220; all SOCI courses except 
201, 225, 245, 360, 365. 

2. Family Science 

BUAD 128; SOCI 201, 225, 233, 365; SOCW 233; PSYC 233. 

3. Health Science 

HLED 173; HLNT 135; NRNT 125. 
Area F Total Associate Bachelor's 

2 5 



Academic Policies 35 



Area G. Activity Skills 

A graduate of Southern Adventist University will understand how to live a balanced life by 
following the principles of wellness and using leisure time wisely. The Seventh-day 
Adventist philosophy stresses the balanced development of the whole person. Toward this 
goal, education in the use of leisure time is important, particularly in recreational, 
creative, and practical skills. Three hours are required for both the associate and 
bachelor's degrees. Two of these hours are PEAC 225 and one PEAC activity course. The 
third hour may be from creative, practical, or recreational skills. 

1. Creative Skills 

All MUPF courses; ART 101,104-105, 109-110, 221-222, 223, 235, 300, 310; ENGL 

312, 313, 314; 315; PHTO 125, 315. 

[Students studying for licensure in elementary education may take ART 230 for G-l 

credit.] 

2. Practical Skills 

ACCT 103, 221-222; ARTG 210; BUAD 126; COMM 103; CPIS 220; CPTR 124, 215; 

ENGR 149; JOUR 105, 205; 

All TECH LD courses except TECH 278. 

3. Recreational Skills 

PEAC 225 is required for both the associate and the bachelor's degrees. An 
additional PEAC course is required for the bachelor's degree. Optional pass/fail 
grading is available for all PEAC courses except 225. 
Area G Total Associate Bachelor's 

3 3 

Southern Scholars (Honors Program): 

The honors program is designed for students who bring to their baccalaureate studies a 
high degree of motivation and intellectual curiosity. Special projects, inter-disciplinary 
studies, and designated honors courses provide a challenging and intellectually 
stimulating educational experience. Degrees of depth and breadth are attained in this 
experience beyond those normally attained in regular baccalaureate studies. 

The program is administered by an Honors Committee which admits students to the 
program and discontinues honors status of those who fail to maintain minimum program 
standards. Its members also advise individual Southern Scholars and continually monitor 
their progress. 

Eligible students will be invited to become Southern Scholars. Freshmen are eligible if 
they have a high school GPA of 3.70 or higher. Other students must have completed at 
least 31 and at most 62 semester hours (exceptions may be granted under special 
conditions) with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher. 

To continue as Southern Scholars, students must complete a minimum of twelve credits 
each semester and thirty-one credits each calendar year. They must also enroll in 
appropriate honors sequence courses, receive a B (3.00) average or higher in the honors 
sequence courses and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50. All honors students 
are expected to graduate within a four-year period unless extenuating circumstances 
justify an extension by the honors committee. 

Ordinarily, all courses of the honors sequence must be taken in residence. Limited 
exceptions may be made by the honors committee in the case of transfer students. 
Students already enrolled at Southern Adventist University who wish to take honors 



36 Academic Policies 



sequence classes at another institution must secure prior approval from the honors 
committee. 

After completing one year in the honors program, Southern Scholars may receive a waiver 
for the cost of auditing one class each semester that they remain in the program. Once 
having earned junior status and having finished one year in the program, Southern 
Scholars will receive a tuition refund equivalent to one three-hour class for the last four 
semesters if they are enrolled full-time. The "per hour" rate for a 16-hour class load will be 
the basis for calculating the refund. Southern Scholars also receive a 100 percent tuition 
waiver for Honors Seminar, HMNT 451 and 452. Refer to the scholarship on page 57. 

Honors Studies Sequence 

1. General Education 

• Honors students must meet regular General Education requirements with 
the following stipulations: 

• Area B-2. One of the following courses must be selected: RELT 317, 421, 
424, 458, or 467. 

• Area D-l. Foreign language competency must be attained at the 
intermediate level. 

• Area D-2. ENGL 445 must be selected. 

• Area D-3. HMNT 205 must be selected. 

• Area E. MATH 181 or MATH 215 and one of the following science 
sequences must be selected: BIOL 151-152; CHEM 151-152; PHYS 
211-212 with PHYS 213-214. 

2. Honors Seminar 

HMNT 451, 452, a sequence of eight seminar sessions, one each month, 
September through April taken during the junior or senior year. 

3. Project (2-3 hours, Directed Study) 

A significant scholarly project, involving research, writing, or special performance, 
appropriate to the major in question, is ordinarily completed the senior year. 
Ideally, this project will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship 
between the student's major field and some other discipline. The project is 
expected to be of sufficiently high quality to warrant a grade of A and to justify 
public presentation. The completed project submitted in duplicate must be 
approved by the Honors Committee in consultation with the student's supervising 
professor three weeks prior to graduation. The 2-3 hours of credit for this project 
is done as directed study or in a research class. 

Graduation with Academic Honors 

Students graduating with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above will have the degree 
conferred as follows: 3.50-3.74, cum laude; 3.75-3.89, magna cum laude; 3.90-4.00, 
summa cum laude. The appropriate designations will appear on the diploma. 

Honor Roll/Dean's List 

At the conclusion of each semester of the school year, students who have carried a 
minimum of 12 semester hours and who have attained the following grade point averages 
will be included in the honors group indicated: 



Academic Policies 37 



3.50-3.74 Honor Roll 

3.75-3.89 Dean's List 

3.90-4.00 Distinguished Dean's List 

Student Mission/Task Force Credit 

Students may earn twelve hours of elective credit while participating in the Student 
Mission/Task Force programs. Details are available in the office of the University 

Chaplain. Students who wish to serve as student missionaries or task force workers must 
plan their programs a year in advance to fulfill necessary prerequisites. 

Major and Minor Requirements 

Each major consists of 30 hours or more in the chosen field of specialization of which a 
minimum of 14 for a Bachelor of Arts degree and 18 for all other bachelor's degrees must 
be upper division credit. The total semester hours required for each major for the 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of Music, 

Bachelor of Social Work, and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees varies with the field of 
specialization chosen. 

All minors consist of at least eighteen semester hours. Six hours of a minor must be upper 
division credit. 

The specific requirements for majors and minors are given under the respective 
disciplines in the section "Courses of Study." 

Degrees and Curricula 

A Master's Degree consists of at least one additional year of course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree. It includes a field of concentration and may require a thesis. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree consists of four years of course work that places a student's 
major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. To encourage a wide range 
of studies, a minor is required. A foreign language component is required. 

The Bachelor of Science degree consists of four years of course work that places the 
student's major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. The degree permits 
greater concentration in the field of study. No minor or foreign language study is required 
except as specified for certain majors. 

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree is a professional degree consisting of a 
four-year program with concentrations available in various fields of business. 
Requirements for this degree are outlined in the School of Business and Management 
section. 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree consists of four years of course work allowing the 
student the focus to develop a body of work in drawing and painting. No minor is required. 

The Bachelor of Music degree is a professional degree consisting of four years of course 
work designed to meet the needs of students wishing to receive teaching credentials. 
Requirements for this degree are outlined in the School of Music section. 

The Bachelor of Social Work degree is a professional degree consisting of a four-year 
program of courses designed to meet the needs of students wishing to go into the social 
work profession. Requirements for this degree are outlined in the Social Work and Family 
Studies Department section. 



38 



Academic Policies 



The Associate of Arts degrees is a two-year program designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to pursue a short general studies program. 

The Associate of Science degree is a two-year program designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to pursue a short occupational or pre-professional program. 

The Associate of Technology degree is a two-year program designed to meet the needs 
of students who wish to pursue an occupational program. 

The One-Year Certificate is available for students in the Auto Mechanics Technician 
program. Requirements for this certificate are outlined in the Technology Department 
section. 

Paraprofessional Curricula are programs designed to prepare students to enter 
professional schools. In some cases paraprofessional curricula will lead to an associate 
degree. 



CURRICULUM CHART 

Department/ 

School Degree 

Allied Health B.S. 

A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 
A.S. 



Major Minor 

Clinical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology) 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

Pre-Health Information Administration 

Pre-Nutrition and Dietetics 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Pre-Respiratory Therapy 

Pre-Speech Language Pathology & Audiology 



Biology 



B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 



*Biology 

Biology 

Biology, Biomedical 



Biology 



Business and 
Management 



M.B.A. 



M.F.S. 
M.S.A. 



B.B.A. 
B.B.A. 



B.B.A. 



Business 

Accounting 

Church and Nonprofit Leadership 

Healthcare Administration (available online 

Management (available online) 

Marketing Management 
Dual Degree-MSN & MBA 

(MBA component available online) 
Financial Services 
Administration 

Church Administration 

Outdoor Education 
(See Graduate Catalog) 
Computer Information Systems 
Financial Management 

Accounting 

Finance 

General Management 
Management 

Entrepreneurship 

General Management 

Human Resource Management 

International Business 



Business Administration 
Entrepreneurial Mgmt 
Human Resource Mgmt 
Management 

Marketing 



Academic Policies 



39 



Department/ 






School 


Degree 


Major 


Business and 


B.B.A. 


Marketing 


Management 


B.S. 


Business Administration 




B.S. 


Business Administration/Public Relations 




B.S./A.T. 


Business Administration/Auto Service 




B.S. 


Long-Term Care Administration 




A.S. 


Accounting 




A.S. 


Business Administration 


Chemistry 


B.A. 


*Chemistry 




B.S. 


Chemistry 




B.S. 


Chemistry, Biochemistry 


Computing 


B.B.A. 


Computer Information Systems 




B.A. 


Computer Science 




B.S. 


Computer Science 



Minor 



Chemistry 



Computing 



B.S. 



Computer Science 
Embedded Systems 
Computer Systems Administration 



Education and 
Psychology 



M.S. 



M.S.Ed. 



B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.A. 
B.S. 



Professional Counseling 

School Counseling 

Curriculum & Instruction 

Educational Administration & Supervision 

Inclusive Education (available online) 

Literacy Education 

Outdoor Teacher Education (available online) 

(See Graduate Catalog) 

Psychology Education 

Psychology, Industrial/Organizational Con Industrial/Org Psyc 

Psychology, Psychobiology Concentration Outdoor Leadership 

Liberal Arts Education (K-6 TN/K-8 SDA) Psychology 

Outdoor Leadership 

Business 

Counseling 

Cultural Interpreter 

Naturalist 

Outdoor Ministry 

Public Relations/Advertising 

Recreation 

Technology 



English 


B.A. 


♦English 


General Studies 


A.A. 


General Studies 




A.S. 


General Studies 


History 


B.A. 


*History 
European Studies 



Interdisciplinary 



BS/BA/ Interdisciplinary 
BBA 



English 



History 

Political Economy 
Political Science 
Western Intellectual 
Tradition 



40 



Academic Policies 



Department/ 




School 


Degree 


Journalism and 


B.A. 


Communication 


B.A. 




B.A. 




B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
AS. 



Major 

Broadcast Journalism 
Intercultural Communication 
Print Journalism 
Mass Communication 

Advertising 

Media Production 

New Media 

Photography 

Writing/Editing 
Nonprofit Administration & Development 
Public Relations 

Public Relations/Business Administration 
Media Technology 

New Media 

Web 



Minor 

Advertising 
Broadcast Journalism 
Intercultural Comm 
Journ (News Editorial) 
Media Production 
Nonprofit Leadership 
Photography 
Public Relations 
Sales 



Mathematics 


B.A. 


*Mathematics 




B.S. 


Mathematics 


Modern 


B.A. 


♦French 


Languages 


B.A. 


International Studies 

Emphasis in French, German 
Italian or Spanish 




B.A. 


♦Spanish 


Music 


B.S. 


Music 



Nursing 



B.Mus. 
M.S.N. 





B.S. 




A.S. 


PE, Health 


B.S. 


and Wellness 


B.S. 




B.S. 




B.S. 



Mathematics 



French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 



Music 



General 

Music Theory & Literature 

Music Performance 

*Music Education 

Nursing 

Adult Nurse Practitioner 

Family Nurse Practitioner 

Nurse Educator 
Dual Degree-MSN and MBA 

(MBA component available online) 

Accelerated RNto MSN 

Accelerated Dual Degree 
(See Graduate Catalog) 
Nursing 
Nursing 

♦Health, PE, and Recreation 

Health Science 

Corporate/Community Wellness Management 

Sports Studies 

Human Performance 

Journalism 

Management 

Marketing 

Psychology 



Health & Wellness 
Physical Education 



Academic Policies 



41 



Department/ 








School 


Degree 


Major 


Minor 


PE, Health 


B.S. 


Sports Studies, continued 




and Wellness 




Public Relations/Advertising 
Recreation 




Physics 


B.A. 


*Physics 


Physics 




B.S. 


Physics 






B.S. 


Biophysics 






A.S. 


Engineering Studies 




Religion 


M.A. 


Religion 

Biblical and Theological Studies 
Church Leadership & Management 
Church Ministryand Homiletics 
Evangelism and World Mission 
Religious Studies 
(See Graduate Catalog) 






B.A. 


Archaeology 


Archaeology 






Classical Studies 


Biblical Languages 






Near Eastern Studies 


Christian Service 




B.A. 


Pastoral Care 


Missions 




B.A. 


♦Religious Education 


Practical Theology 




B.A. 


Religious Studies 


Religion 




B.A. 


Theology 


Youth Ministry 




A.A. 


Religion 

Bible Instructor 
Literature Evangelist 




Social Work and 


B.S. 


Family Studies 


Behavioral Science 


Family Studies 


B.S.W 


Social Work 


Family Studies 
Sociology 


Technology 


B.S./A.T. 


Business Administration/Auto Service 


Auto Service 




AT. 


Architecture Drafting 


Technology 




AT. 


Auto Service 






AT. 


Construction Management 






Cert. 


Auto Service Technician 




Visual Art and 


B.A. 


Art 


Art 


Design 


B.A. 


Art-Therapy 


Art Education 




B.F.A. 


*Art Education 


Art-Graphic Design 




B.F.A. 


Fine Arts 






B.S. 


Animation 

Character Animation 
Effects Animation 






B.S. 


Technical Animation 






B.S. 


Film Production 






B.S. 


Graphic Design 
Print Design 
Web Design 






B.S. 


Interactive Media 






A.S. 


Graphic Design 





*Secondaiy teaching certification available for these disciplines 
Cert = One-year certificate program 



42 Academic Policies 



Preprofessional Curricula 

Southern Adventist University offers preprofessional and pre-technical programs in a wide 
variety of fields which may prepare students for admission to professional schools or to 
enter technical careers. The following nondegree pre-professional curricula are offered at 
Southern Adventist University: 

Anesthesia Osteopathic Medicine 

Dentistry Pharmacy 

Law Podiatric Medicine 

Medicine Pre-Physician Assistant 

Optometry Veterinary Medicine 

Detailed requirements for non-degree pre-professional curricula are outlined by 
department or in the section on "Interdepartmental Programs" (See Index). 

Associate degrees in Allied Health are available to students who fulfill pre-professional 
requirements for programs designated in the Allied Health section. Because pre- 
professional and technical admission requirements may vary from one professional 
school to another, students should become acquainted with the admission requirements 
of their chosen school. 

Registration 

Students are expected to register during the scheduled registration periods designated in 
the school calendar. Registration is complete only after the adviser has given approval 
online. New students are required to participate in the orientation activities. 

Late Registration. Permission to register late must be obtained from the Director of 
Records and Advisement. Students failing to register during the scheduled registration 
periods will be charged a late registration fee. The course load of a late registrant may be 
reduced according to the amount of class work missed. No student may register after two 
weeks of the semester have elapsed. 

Changes in Registration. To avoid changes in registration, students should carefully 
consider the program of courses necessary to meet their objectives. To avoid subsequent 
adjustments, a balance should be maintained between the course load, work program, 
and extracurricular activities. 

To make program changes, students must obtain the appropriate change of registration 
voucher at the Records and Advisement Office, obtain the necessary signatures indicating 
approval of the change, and return the form to the Records and Advisement Office. 
Course changes and complete withdrawals from the school become effective on the date 
the voucher is filed at the Records and Advisement Office. A fee will be assessed for each 
change in program after the first week of instruction. 

A student may not change from one section to another of the same course without the 
approval of the professor. 

When a student drops a class during the first week of the semester, the class is deleted 
from the student's record. A grade of "W" is issued when a student drops the class on the 
second week of the semester. A student may withdraw from a class up to two weeks after 
midterm and receive a grade of "W" automatically. A student withdrawing from a class 
after that date and up to two weeks before the last day of classes will be assigned a grade 
of "W" or "WF" by the professor. The grade for any withdrawal during the final two weeks 
of the semester will automatically be "F." 



Academic Policies 43 



Auditing Courses. With the approval of the department/school, students may register on 
an audit basis in courses for which they are qualified. Auditors are to be admitted to 
classes of limited enrollment only if there are places after all students who wish to enroll 
for credit have been accommodated. Class attendance is expected but examinations and 
reports may be omitted. With the approval of the professor, a student may change a 
course registration from audit to credit or from credit to audit only during the first week 
of instruction. No credit is given for courses audited, and the cost is one-half of the 
regular tuition charge. Audit tuition charge is in addition to a flat rate charge. 

Canceled Classes. The Vice President for Academic Administration or a 
department/school may cancel a class for which fewer than six tuition paying students 
enroll. This policy applies to ordinary classes but not to directed study courses, private 
lessons, and other special classes such as special methods of secondary teaching. 
Students enrolled in canceled classes should confer with their advisers to determine 
alternate means to complete their schedules. 

Withdrawal Procedure for Students Called to Active Military Duty. Southern Adventist 
University community recognizes the sacrifices that those in the armed forces make while 
serving our country. We are proud of these individuals and have, therefore, adopted the 
following policy to deal with currently enrolled Southern Adventist University students who 
are called to active military duty. 

• Upon presentation of official military orders, the student will be automatically 
withdrawn from all of his/her courses for the given semester and a grade of "W" 
with notice of reason for withdrawal will be recorded on his/her academic 
record. 

• In addition, the student is eligible for a full-tuition refund or can choose to have 
the monies held on account to be used at a later date. 

• In the case of a resident student, room and board charges will be prorated 
based on the period in the semester when the student is required to leave; and 
the remaining charges will be refunded or held on account based on the 
student's request. 

Course Load 

University courses are expressed in semester hours. A semester hour consists of one 
fifty-minute class period per week for one semester. Thus, two-semester-hour classes 
meet two hours a week and three-semester-hour classes meet three hours a week. 
Physical Education activity courses meet two fifty minute periods for one credit hour. A 
laboratory period of two and one-half to three hours is equal to one class period. For every 
semester hour of credit a minimum of fifteen contact hours should be scheduled. Final 
exam periods may count as one contact hour. Students should expect to study up to two 
hours outside of class for each fifty- minute period the class meets. Ideally, a 
sixteen-semester-hour class load should require up to 32 hours of study each week by the 
student. Except by permission of the Vice President for Academic Administration, a 
student may not register for eighteen or more semester hours. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in four years, a student must average between 
fifteen and sixteen hours per semester. The summer term may be used to advantage by 
students wishing to complete degree requirements in less than four years or by students 
having to take reduced programs of studies during the regular academic year. The typical 
class load during the summer is one three-hour class per session. 



44 Academic Policies 



Online Courses. An online course begins and ends within the same time frame as 
traditional courses during any semester or summer session in which the online course is 
scheduled. 

Student Status. An undergraduate student must be currently enrolled for a minimum of 
12 semester hours to be considered full-time. Part-time status is maintained when a 
student is enrolled in 6-11 semester hours. Non degree status is given to the student 
enrolled in 5 or fewer hours. 

Study-Work Program. It is important that the student adjust the course load to achieve a 
reasonable balance in study and work. During registration the student should confer with 
his/her adviser in planning the proper balance of study and work. 

In determining an acceptable study-work program, the following will serve as a guide: 

Course Load Maximum Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

14 hours 20 hours 

12 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

Academic Advisement 

Southern Adventist University is committed to assist every student in the area of 
academic advisement. Full-time students are assigned an academic adviser from their 
major field and are required to consult with their advisers before registering for classes. 

The responsibility of meeting graduation requirements belongs to the individual student. 
In planning their schedules all students should carefully follow the instructions in the 
Catalog, recommendations of their advisers, and print a degree audit from the web. In the 
event of a discrepancy between an adviser's word and the Catalog, final interpretation of 
graduation requirements rests with the Records and Advisement Office. 

Seniors must file a senior contract in the Records and Advisement Office to graduate in 
October of their senior year. Previous to their senior year students should check 
periodically with the Records and Advisement office to determine whether they are 
meeting all curriculum requirements satisfactorily. 

In the process of curriculum planning, students who have chosen a career in teaching 
should consult the Teacher Certification Officer regarding the requirements for teaching 
credentials. Admission for Teacher Education should be completed during the sophomore 
year. 

Grading System 

Course grades are an expression of the student's mastery of the objectives for a particular 
course. Course objectives, in turn, focus exclusively on discipline-related and content- 
based knowledge and competencies which the student is expected to achieve as a result 
of participating in the particular course. Thus, a grade is a permanent record which 
informs other institutions of higher education, potential employers, and others, of the 
student's fluency in the subject matter. 

The student's grade may be calculated on a normal curve or as a percentage of mastery 
of the course objectives, or some combination of the two. In any case, a grade should 
clearly indicate the level of achievement which the student has reached relative to course 



Academic Policies 45 



objectives. Grades are usually based on both formative (i.e. quizzes, homework, group 
work) and summative (i.e. exams, major projects) activities, although proportions will vary. 

Letter grades are generally defined as follows: 

A Superior; the student demonstrates exceptional capability in handling course 
material 

B Above average; the student's demonstrated capability in handling course 
material exceeds the expectation of the professor 

C Average; the student demonstrates a satisfactory grasp of course material 
which the professor intends students to learn in the class 

D Below average; the student's demonstrated ability to deal with the course 
material is less than the professor intends students to learn 

F Failing; the student does not demonstrate sufficient capability with the course 
material to merit a passing grade 

W Withdrew from the class; is not calculated in the GPA 

WF Withdrew Failing; calculated as an "F" in the GPA 

AU Audit; no credit 

I Incomplete; is not calculated in the GPA 

IP In Progress; a temporary passing grade for interrupted course work still in 
progress; is not calculated in the GPA 

P Pass; is not calculated in the GPA 

NR Not Reported; the professor did not issue a grade; is not calculated in the GPA 

The Pass/Fail option is available only in Physical Education activity classes (PEAC). 
Students enrolling in these classes must make a decision either to receive a grade of 
Pass/Fail or a conventional grade before the final grades are submitted. The decision 
will be final. Nursing Practicum, NRSG 191, is also a Pass/Fail class. 

A student may receive an "I" (Incomplete) because of illness or other unavoidable delay. 
Students who are eligible for an incomplete must secure from the Records and 
Advisement Office the proper form and file the application with the professor to receive an 
incomplete. There is a charge of $20 for processing grades of incomplete. Any incomplete 
which is not removed by the end of the following term (Fall, Winter) will automatically 
become an "F." A professor may assign a temporary "IP" (in progress) when an 
unavoidable problem prevents the issuance of a grade. 

A course may be repeated before the student takes a more advanced course in the same 
field. Only the last grade will be counted on repeated courses. No course may be repeated 
more than twice without permission from the Vice President for Academic Administration. 

Mid-semester and semester grade reports are available online for the student to access. 
Only semester grades are recorded on the student's permanent record. The following 
system of grading and grade point values is used: 



46 Academic Policies 



A 4.00 grade points per hour C- 1.70 grade points per hour 

A- 3.70 grade points per hour D+ 1.30 grade points per hour 

B+ 3.30 grade points per hour D 1.00 grade points per hour 

B 3.00 grade points per hour D- 0.70 grade points per hour 

B- 2.70 grade points per hour F 0.00 grade points per hour 

C+ 2.30 grade points per hour WF 0.00 grade points per hour 

C 2.00 grade points per hour 

The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned 
by the credit hours attempted. 

Outcomes Assessment 

In an ongoing attempt to improve its educational quality, the University administers a 
comprehensive assessment program. This involves periodic measurement of student 
academic achievement, student satisfaction, and personal, professional, and career 
development. Although participation in these assessment activities is expected of all 
students, not every student will be selected for every assessment; but during the course 
of enrollment, students are likely to be involved in at least one assessment activity. 

Student Records 

A student's record is regarded as confidential, and release of the record or of information 
contained therein is governed by regulations of the federal law on "Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy." Only directory information, such as a student's name, photograph, 
address, e-mail address, telephone listing, birthplace and date, major fields of study, 
participation in officially recognized activities and sports, dates of attendance, degrees 
and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution 
attended, may be released by the institution without consent of the student unless the 
student has asked SAU to withhold such information. 

With the permission of the student, parents of students termed "dependent" for income 
tax purposes are entitled to access to the student's educational records. The law also 
provides for the release of information to university personnel who demonstrate a 
legitimate educational interest, other institutions engaged in research (provided 
information is not revealed to any other parties), and certain federal and state 
government officials. 

A student may inspect and review records and is entitled to challenge the content of 
records. Students may access online a history of their coursework, grades, and degree 
audit. 

A more thorough explanation of records may be obtained from the Records and 
Advisement Office. The Director of Records and Advisement will further explain and clarify 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act to students, parents, or interested parties 
upon request. 

Academic Honesty 

Morally and spiritually, Southern Adventist University is dedicated to scholastic integrity. 
Consequently, both students and faculty are required to maintain high, ethical Christian 
levels of honesty. 



Academic Policies 47 



Faculty Responsibilities: 

1. Professors must explain clearly the requirements for assignments, examinations, 
and projects, such as "open book," "take home," or "peer collaboration." 

2. Professors may assume "no collaboration" is the rule unless they state otherwise. 

Student Responsibilities: 

1. Students assume responsibility to avoid plagiarism by learning the proper 
procedures for acknowledging borrowed wording, information, or ideas. Otherwise 
students might innocently misrepresent others' material as their own. 

2. Students unfamiliar with procedures for citing sources should confer with their 
professors. 

3. Students are to assume that all course work is "no collaboration" unless stated 
otherwise by the professor. 

Schools/Departmental Policies: 

Some departments/schools, because of the nature of their programs, have additional 
honesty policies which have the same force as those published here. Such policies will be 
presented to students before implementation. 

Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty: 

1. When a professor suspects that academic dishonesty has occurred, the professor 
should first privately discuss the incident with the student. After the meeting, if 
the professor is convinced the student was dishonest, he or she will file an 
incident report with the Associate Vice-President of Academic Administration 
describing the infraction and the penalty administered. The professor shall also 
give a copy of the report to the student. 

2. In verified instances of academic dishonesty, the commonly applied penalties 
include, but are not limited to the following: 

• Record a failing grade on the exam, assignment, or project. 

• Assign a failing grade in the class. 

• Allow the student to resubmit the assignment with a reduced value for the 
assignment. 

• Assign the student a paper, project, or activity that improves the student's 
understanding of the value and nature of academic integrity. 

3. The University keeps a centralized file of dishonesty reports in the Academic 
Administration office. After two reported incidents of academic dishonesty, the 
Associate Vice President will notify the dean or chair of the student's major. Two 
incidents also make a student eligible for dismissal from the University. 

4. At any point, the student may appeal any of the above actions through the 
established appeal procedures spelled out in the "Academic Grievance 
Procedure" section of this Catalog. 

Conditional Standing and Dismissal 

Any student whose GPA does not meet the criteria for graduation is on conditional 
standing. The following are four categories of students who are on conditional standing: 



48 Academic Policies 



1. Students whose Southern Adventist University or cumulative GPA falls below 
2.00. They are not eligible to hold office in any student organization. 

2. Entering freshmen whose high school GPA is below 2.25 or if their composite ACT 
score is less than 18. 

3. Transfer students whose GPA is less than 2.00. 

4. Students in baccalaureate programs completing their sophomore year with a GPA 
in their major field less than the level required for graduation. For most degrees 
the institutional graduation requirement is 2.25, but some programs may 
designate a higher GPA. 

5. Students on conditional standing may enroll in a maximum of 13 hours and are 
required to enroll in NOND 080 Academic Power Tools.* There is an additional 
cost of $669 beyond the flat rate fee. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.00 after 24 
semester hours have been attempted. Candidates for an associate or certificate program 
must have a GPA of 2.00 before beginning their final semester. Veterans enrolled for 
baccalaureate degrees, associate degrees, or certificate programs must maintain a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.00, or they will not be certified for veterans benefits. 
Veterans may be certified for repeat of "F" grades or for a major that requires a specific 
minimum grade and the grade received was lower than specified. 

Government regulations require all financial aid recipients to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress towards a degree as measured both qualitatively and quantitatively in 
order to receive financial aid. This requirement applies to the entire enrollment at 
Southern Adventist University— even periods during which a student does not receive 
financial aid. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in a student becoming 
ineligible for financial aid. 

This policy defines the minimum standards for eligibility for state and/or federal financial 
aid. 

Students are subject to academic dismissal for any of the following categories: 

1. if they are on conditional standing for two consecutive semesters without 
demonstrating improvement; 

2. if they are on conditional standing for one or more semesters and have not 
received a grade of "C-" or better in NOND 080 Academic Power Tools; 

3. if their Southern Adventist University or cumulative GPA does not reach the levels 
indicated in the preceding paragraph or the levels in the following table: 

Cumulative Credit Hours Attempted Cumulative Grade Point Average 

0-23 1.50 or above 

24 or above 2.00 or above 

""Students enrolled in less than 12 hours are exempt from Academic Power Tools. 

At the end of each semester the Academic Review Committee reviews the records of 
students who are subject to dismissal and the Vice President for Academic Administration 
will notify students in writing whether or not they may continue. A student academically 
dismissed may be readmitted only after demonstrating maturity and motivation for a 
university career. The dismissed student may be required to complete successfully at 
least one term of college-level courses at another institution prior to readmission at 
Southern Adventist University. 



Academic Policies 49 



Students receiving financial aid must also meet an academic progress policy set by the 
federal government. For further explanation see page 64, "Academic Progress 
Requirements." 

Right of Petition 

Students who believe there is a valid reason for requesting variance from or exception to 
an academic policy stated in the Catalog may make a petition to the Director of Records 
and Advisement for consideration of their case after obtaining the advice and signature of 
the department chair or school dean of their major. The petition must contain a statement 
of the request and supporting reasons. Highly unusual requests will be referred to the Vice 
President for Academic Administration. Students will be notified in writing by the Director 
of Records and Advisement of the action on petitions. Petition forms are available from 
the Records and Advisement Office or online at http://records.southern.edu 

Academic Grievance Procedure 

Students who believe that their academic rights have been infringed upon or that they 
have been treated unjustly with respect to their academic program are entitled to a fair 
and impartial consideration of their cases. They should do the following to effect a 
solution: 

1. Present the case to the professor or professors concerned. 

2. If necessary, discuss the problem with the department chair or school dean. 

3. If agreement is not reached at this level, submit the matter to the Vice President 
for Academic Administration. 

4. Finally, ask for a review of the case by the Academic Grievance Committee, 
chaired by the Vice President for Academic Administration or his designee and 
including three other faculty members and two students selected by the 
Academic Affairs Committee. Both the student and the professor involved in the 
case are entitled to appear before the committee or to present a written 
statement of the case. The decision of the committee shall be presented in 
writing to the individuals involved within three days of the committee meeting 
unless a later time is agreed upon by both parties. The decision of the committee 
is binding and will be implemented by the professor involved or the Vice President 
for Academic Administration. 

Absences 

Class. Attendance at class and laboratory appointments is expected. Professors prepare 
an absence policy for each class, which includes an explanation of penalties, if any, for 
absences, and the procedure for making up work, if such is allowed. It is the responsibility 
of professors to publish their policies for each class at the beginning of each semester, 
but it is the students' responsibility to familiarize themselves with the practices of each 
professor from whom they are taking classes. Generally speaking, professors will not 
excuse absences for reasons other than illness, authorized school trips, or emergencies 
beyond the students' control. 

Students are not penalized if they incur absences while participating in school-authorized 
activities, but they are held responsible for work they miss. It is their responsibility to 
initiate arrangements to make up their assignments. One and one-half absences are 
given for missing a 75-minute class, two for missing a 100-minute class, etc. 



50 Academic Policies 



Students who are on conditional standing are not eligible to participate in extra-curricular 
trips if the trip would require them to miss more than one day of classes per semester. 

Examination. Because of problems concerning time, expense and fairness, final 
examinations will be taken as scheduled in the official examinations schedule. In the case 
of illness verified by Student Health Service or a physician, death in the immediate family, 
three examinations scheduled consecutively in one day, or four or more examinations 
scheduled in one day, a final exam may be rescheduled upon approval by the professor 
and the Vice President for Academic Administration. The rescheduled examination will be 
given at a time convenient to the professor. 

When examinations are rescheduled because of three scheduled consecutively in one day 
or four in one day, the last examination of the day will normally be the one rescheduled. 
Examinations rescheduled for any reason other than those listed above, may require a fee 
of $65 per examination. All rescheduling requests will be made on a form available at the 
office of the Vice President for Academic Administration. 

Convocation. Convocations are held each Thursday at 11:00 a.m. During weeks of prayer, 
convocations are held on Monday through Friday as well. Occasionally, convocation will be 
held in the evening or may begin at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday. All students are required to 
attend 14 convocations each semester. Failure to meet this convocation requirement may 
result in suspension of registration. Exceptions to the convocation attendance 
requirement are made by the Office of Student Services only for legitimate direct work 
conflicts with scheduled convocations. Any excuses for absences from convocation must 
be approved by the Vice President for Student Services. A special series of orientation 
convocations is scheduled during the SmartStart summer session. 

Limitations on Class Attendance 

Classes at Southern Adventist University are open to registered students only. The 
learning experiences, class discussions, and the information disseminated in the 
classroom, or other places of learning, are services which the University provides to its 
students. The relationship of trust that is required for honest inquiry and open interaction 
between students and faculty is protected by asking visitors not to attend or participate in 
classes unless they are invited by the professor for a specific purpose. 

Professors and the institution reserve the right to remove students or visitors from classes 
if their speech or behavior threatens the purposes of the class by exceeding the bounds of 
normal academic freedom. 

Professors conducting extension classes from other institutions on the Southern Adventist 
University campus share the rights spelled out by this policy. 

Waiver Examinations 

Upon the approval of the department chair or school dean and the Vice President for 
Academic Administration, students may obtain a waiver of curricular requirements by 
successfully completing a comprehensive examination— written, oral, manipulative, or 
otherwise, as determined by the department/school involved. A fee of $50 per 
examination is charged. 

English as a Second Language 

Southern Adventist University offers a program in English as a Second Language for 
Intermediate and Advanced level students whose English language skills are below the 



Academic Policies 51 



official admission level of the TOEFL score of 550 (CBT 213). For details, see the 
Admissions and English Department sections of the Catalog. 

Nontraditional College Credit 

In addition to credit earned in the traditional classroom setting, Southern Adventist 
University accepts credit earned by two other means— challenge examinations and 
correspondence courses. 

The goals and objectives of the University emphasize not only facts and concepts but also 
values and attitudes which are not easily transmitted through correspondence courses or 
measured by examinations. These values and attitudes can best be developed by the 
student's interacting over a period of time with peers and professors committed to moral 
excellence, critical thinking, and the pursuit of truth. For this reason, most university 
credits should be earned through class participation. However, the University will permit a 
maximum of one-fourth of the credit required for a given degree to be earned by these 
nontraditional means. 

Southern recognizes the International Baccalaureate as nontraditional credit and will 
record up to 12 hours of credit of courses taken on the Highest level (HL). 

University Credit by Examination. The University recognizes three types of examinations 
for credit: challenge examinations prepared by a department/school which must be 
passed at "B" level or above, approved College Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject 
examinations which must be passed at the score of 50 or higher, and the Advanced 
Placement Examinations which must be passed with a score of three or better. 

Not all classes listed in the Catalog are open to challenge examinations. Students must 
obtain clearance from the department chair or school dean for the class they propose to 
challenge before petitioning to earn credit by examination. Students must also furnish 
evidence of adequate preparation to challenge a class before the department chair or 
school dean assigns a professor to prepare a challenge examination. A student may 
challenge a given course by examination only once. No CLEP or challenge exam may be 
attempted after the student has been enrolled in that course beyond the second week of 
a semester. CLEP exam credit for history will only be accepted for three of the six hours 
required for a bachelor's level degree. Students taking the CLEP exam for SOCI 125 must 
pass with a score of 59 or higher. The following subjects are not acceptable by CLEP 
exam: BIOL 151, 152, CHEM 151, and CHEM 152. CLEP credit is not accepted by the 
Modern Languages Department. No course may be challenged as part of the last thirty 
hours of any degree. Grades are recorded for departmental challenge examinations and 
scaled scores are recorded for nationally formed examinations. Permission to take a 
challenge examination while in residence must be obtained from both the department 
chair or school dean and the Vice President for Academic Administration. A challenge test 
may not be taken if the student has audited the class. 

Students may earn a maximum of 12 hours of credit by examination in courses that do 
not appear in the University Catalog if the evaluating tests are approved by the Academic 
Affairs Committee. 

Credit for challenge and/or validation examinations will not be placed on a student's 
permanent record and is, therefore, not transferable until that student has successfully 
completed 12 semester hours in residence at Southern Adventist University. 

Fees charged for challenge examination and credit are listed under "Special Fees and 
Charges" in the financial section of this Catalog. 



52 Academic Policies 



Additional information concerning challenge examinations may be obtained from the 
Records and Advisement Office or the Counseling and Testing Center. 

Correspondence. A maximum of 12 semester hours of correspondence or extension 
credit may apply toward a baccalaureate degree program and eight hours toward an 
associate degree. 

Griggs University, a department of Home Study International, Silver Spring, MD, is the 
officially recognized correspondence school. Southern Adventist University recommends 
Home Study International for those students needing correspondence credit and accepts 
all such credits when the study program is approved by the University prior to enrollment. 
The University accepts credits from correspondence schools which are accredited by 
NUCEA (National University Continuing Education Association) on the basis that credits 
are accepted from other regionally accredited colleges or universities. 

A student will be permitted to carry correspondence work while in residence only if the 
required course is unobtainable at the University. Correspondence courses, whether taken 
while in residence or during the summer, must be approved in advance by the University. 

Correspondence work may not apply on the upper division requirements of the major or 
minor. A minimum grade of "B" must be earned to apply on the lower division 
requirements for a major. A course in which the student earned a grade of "D" or "F" while 
in residence may not be repeated by correspondence. No correspondence credit will be 
entered on the student's record until s/he has earned a minimum of 12 hours in 
residence with an average of at least "C." Official transcripts must be in the Records and 
Advisement Office before a diploma will be ordered. The graduation date will be the last 
day of the month after the official transcript is received. 

Praoticum and Internships. Suggested departmental/school guidelines for practicum and 
internships. 

Practicum: 

• A minimum of 50 clock hours per one credit hour. 

• The process of learning a job on a part-time basis. 

• The work may be done at various job sites. 

Internships: 

• A minimum of 100 clock hours per one credit hour. 

• The application of learning the skills of a job on a full-time basis. 

• The work must be supervised on one job site. 

Transient Student 

A Southern Adventist University student acquires transient student status when s/he is 
granted permission through the Southern Adventist University Records and Advisement 
Office to enroll for automatically transferrable credit at another accredited institution. The 
credit that students may transfer must meet Southern Adventist University criteria for 
transfer credit and residence requirements. 

To receive transient status, a student must: 

1. have completed a minimum of 12 hours in residence at Southern Adventist 
University and 



Academic Policies 53 



2. be enrolled simultaneously at Southern Adventist University for a minimum of 
three hours of class credit. (This condition does not apply to summer classes.) 

Students may not receive transient status for more than one semester during which the 
amount of transferrable credit exceeds the amount of simultaneous credit earned at 
Southern Adventist University. 

Extension Classes 

Extension classes are university classes offered on the campuses of Southern Union 
academies as an opportunity for seniors to earn university credit in skills areas that will 
fulfill part of the General Education requirements at Southern Adventist University. 
Instructors are academy teachers who are qualified with appropriate credentials and 
experience. 

To enroll in an extension class, students must be members of the senior class with a 
grade point average of 3.00 or above during the years of their secondary education. 

The extension classes must duplicate as nearly as possible their university counterparts in 
content, degree of difficulty, testing and grading. 

Southern Adventist University will bill each academy for its extension classes at the rate of 
$50 per credit hour. For example: The cost for ENGL 101, three credit hours, would be 
$150 ($50x3). 

Continuing Education 

Southern Adventist University makes continuing education credit available through the 
Records and Advisement Office. Sponsors of organizations wishing to offer Southern 
Adventist University continuing education certificates must complete the following steps: 

1. Secure approval of the program by 

• applying at the Records and Advisement Office at least two weeks before 
conducting the workshop/seminar/conference and 

• submitting with their application the topic of the presentation, an outline of 
the presentation, and the name of the presenter(s) with evidence 
credentials. 

2. File an evaluation of the workshop/seminar/conference following the 
presentation. The University will furnish evaluation forms. 

3. Participants in continuing education events must pay institutional processing fees 
to receive their certificates. 

Transcripts 

Students may obtain transcripts of their academic record upon written request made by 
fax or letter to the Office of Records and Advisement. This request must include a hand- 
written signature as electronic generated signatures are unacceptable. Requests made by 
telephone, E-mail, or third party cannot be honored. Official transcripts given directly to a 
student will be enclosed in a sealed envelope with the registrar's signature across the 
back. Transcripts will be issued for those students whose accounts are current or paid in 
full and who are current in re-payment of student loans. 

Allow five to seven days for regular processing and mailed first class. Transcripts are free 
except for the following services: 



54 Academic Policies 



• Each additional five copies per single request is $10 

• Rush service (picked up or mailed first class within 48 hours) is $10 

• FedEx Service (sent out within 48 hours) is $25 

After the transcript is cleared by Student Finance, payment for special services may be 
made by credit/debit card, cash, money order or cashiers check. No personal checks will 
be accepted. 

A student may receive an unofficial transcript for evaluative purposes by applying in 
person or by fax with the Records and Advisement Office. Services of international faxing 
will cost $15. For further clarification regarding transcripts, diplomas, and test scores see 
page 77. 

Sequence of Courses 

A student may not receive credit for a course which is a prerequisite to a course for which 
s/he has already received credit. 

Course Numbers 

Each course number consists of three figures as follows: 

HIST 354. Latin America (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

The first numeral indicates class year status as follows: 

0— Developmental (no credit) 

1— freshman level (lower division) 

2— sophomore level (lower division) 

3— junior level (upper division) 

4— senior level (upper division) 

Within a given 100 sequence there is no significance in one course number being higher 
than another. For instance, 265 does not necessarily mean that the course is on a higher 
level than 235. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen are two-semester courses in which credit for the 
first course is a prerequisite to the second [e.g., ENGL 101-102. College Composition]. 
However, credit is given for the first semester when taken alone. 

Course numbers that stand alone represent courses of one semester which are complete 
units. Course numbers separated by a comma [e.g., HIST 154, 155. American History and 
Institutions] represent complete units, either one of which is counted for graduation 
without reference to sequence. 

Designation in brackets following course titles, [e.g., MATH 106. Survey of Mathematics I 
(A-2)1 indicates the General Education area and sub-area that the class fulfills. Classes 
designated with a "(W)" are writing classes for General Education credit. 

Students may earn credit for a cross-listed course from only one 
department/school [e.g. HIST 356 and SOCI 356]. 

Cognate Courses 

Required courses related to the major which are not a part of the major are called 
cognate courses [e.g., students majoring in Nursing are required to take Microbiology as a 
cognate course]. 



Finances 55 

Financing Your Education 

Enrollment Services Mission Statement 

Southern Adventist University is committed to providing every student with the opportunity 
to obtain a Christian education. To reach this goal, the Enrollment Services Office will 
make every effort to work together with students toward meeting the students' financial 
obligations. 

Financial Aid Policy 

Southern Adventist University provides financial aid for students in the form of grants, 
scholarships, loans, and employment. The source of these funds is Southern Adventist 
University, private groups, donors, corporations, the Southern Union Conference of 
Seventh-day Adventists, the student's state, and Title IV funds from the United States 
Government. Financial aid applicants will not be denied assistance on the basis of sex, 
race, color, national origin, religion, or ethnicity. The Enrollment Services Office follows 
established procedures and practices which will assure equitable and consistent 
treatment of all applicants. 

Students are urged to contact the Enrollment Services Office, P.O. Box 370, Collegedale, 
Tennessee 37315-0370, phone 1.800. SOUTHERN, or go to our website 
www.southern.edu or information about and applications for financial aid. Applications 
received by the priority deadline of March 31 will be given preference. To meet this 
deadline the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) should be submitted no 
later than March 1. Applications received after March 31 will be processed as long as 
time and funds permit. Southern Adventist University's Title IV code is 003518. 

Financial Aid Available 
Scholarships 

Freshman Academic Scholarship 

Southern Adventist University offers students a variety of opportunities to receive 
scholarships and awards. 

The Freshman Academic Scholarship is based on a combination of the student's ACT 
score* and cumulative high school GPA. The scholarship is available only to future 
Southern freshmen who have just graduated from high school within the past nine 
months OR who have taken no more than ten semester hours of college credit. A full-time 
load (12 or more hours) must be taken to be eligible for the scholarship . This scholarship 
will automatically be awarded once transcripts and test scores are received. 
*To convert an SAT score to an ACT score. Call 1.800. SOUTHERN for an Enrollment Counselor. 

Use this Points Formula to calculate eligibility for the Freshman Academic 
Scholarship: 

Step One. Take high school GPA and multiply by 1,000 Points (4000 pts max) 

Step Two. Take ACT* test score and multiply by 100 Points 

Step Three. Add all points from Step One and Two = Total Points 



56 Finances 



Freshman Scholarship Amount Scholarship Total Points 

$2,000 Honors Scholarship 4,800-5,700 

$4,000 Dean's Scholarship 5,701-6,600 

$6,000 Presidential Scholarship 6,601-7,300 

Full tuition Full Tuition Scholarship 7,301&higher 

Freshman Leadership Scholarship 

Students who have served in the following leadership positions during their senior year 
may qualify for a $,2500 freshman leadership scholarship: Student Association 
President, Student Association Pastor, Senior Class President, Senior Class Vice 
President, Senior Class Pastor, Senior Class Social Activities Director. 

Freshman Florida/Georgia State Scholarship Replacement 

Students from Florida and Georgia, who typically qualify for state scholarship assistance 
to enter college, will be awarded $3,000 for the freshman year as a state scholarship 
replacement. The home address on the undergraduate application will be used to 
determine the state of residence. Students that receive employer tuition assistance are 
not eligible for this scholarship. 

Freshman Lightbearer Scholarship 

Students who have graduated from a public high school, home school, or a private high 
school not run by an Adventist organization, and who have attended for two or more years, 
may qualify for a $2,000 freshman bridge scholarship provided to encourage giving 
Adventist education a try. 

The Student Transferring/Returning Scholarship 

The Transferring/Returning Scholarship is awarded to those students who have earned 
more than six hours of college credit and will be taking a full-time load (12 or more 
undergraduate hours) through the duration of the scholarship. The scholarship is based 
on the cumulative GPA of all transcripts when transferring. For returning Southern 
students, the cumulative GPA is figured from the student's record each January. Southern 
does not round up numbers for this scholarship. 

Bronze Circle Scholarship $1,500 with maintenance of 3.40-3.59 GPA 

Silver Circle Scholarship $2,000 with maintenance of 3.60- 3.79 GPA 

Gold Circle Scholarship $2,500 with maintenance of 3.80 and above GPA 

Placement in National Merit Scholarship Competition* 

Placement 1st Year Scholarship Renewable for three years** 

Finalist Full Tuition 50% Tuition with maintenance of 3.80 GPA 

Semi-Finalists and Commended placements will receive scholarships based on 
requirements for the Freshman Academic Scholarship or the Student 
Transferring/Returning Scholarships. 

*We also scholarship students in the National Hispanic Recognition Program and the National 
Achievement Scholarship Program for African Americans. 

** Qualification for renewable scholarships is based on cumulative Southern Adventist GPA. 



Finances 57 



Taking the PSAT test in the junior year of high school is the first step for entering the 
National Merit Program. If the student qualifies as a National Merit Semi-Finalist or a PSAT 
Commended Scholar, he/she is notified by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 
The list of qualifying students is published and sent to U.S. colleges and universities. The 
semi-finalist may advance to finalist status by taking the SAT during the senior year and by 
meeting other requirements outlined by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 

Summer Ministries Leadership Scholarships 

These scholarships are available to any student who works during the summer at a 
Seventh-day Adventist conference-sponsored summer camp or in literature evangelism 
and then attends Southern during the next academic year. The Enrollment Services Office 
will verify with the student's employing organization that contractual obligations have 
been met over the course of the summer. A student who participates in multiple summer 
ministry projects is eligible to receive only one of the scholarships below. Southern will 
choose the larger of the two scholarships. 

The Literature Evangelism Scholarship - Summer earnings matched 50%, with a cap of 
$2,000. 

Summer Camp Scholarship - $140 per full week worked, with a cap of $1,680. To apply 
for the camp scholarship, the camp director must submit the number of weeks you will 
work based on your camp contract to the Enrollment Services Office by March 1 . This 
information is needed early for budgeting and awarding. 

Departmental Scholarships 

Some departments/schools offer scholarships for students who meet departmental 
criteria. These scholarships are normally awarded to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
who have performed up to certain levels in the department. Scholarships are usually 
awarded at Awards Convocation in April of each academic year. Check with the 
department of your major for more information. 

Cut Your Costs by Working 

Working is another great way to reduce the cost of a college education. On average, 
students can contribute about $2,500 toward their yearly costs by working 15 to 20 hours 
a week. 

Cut Your Costs by Paying the Year in Advance 

Southern offers a 5% discount if payment for the full year's tuition is made by cash or 
check and a 3% discount if payment is made by credit card or Parent Plus Load. To find 
out what that amount would be after financial aid is applied, call 1.800. SOUTHERN. 

Student Missionary/Task Force Scholarship 

Student Missionary/Task Force Scholarships are available to qualified students who 
attend Southern the year following their term of service. The scholarship is $1,500. For 
more information, call the Chaplain's Office at 423.236.2787. This scholarship is not 
available to freshmen or those with less than nine months of service. 



58 Finances 



SmartStart Free Tuition Savings 

To take advantage of FREE tuition for one class (equaling 3 credit hours), entering 
freshmen or first-time transfer students are encouraged to apply for the special summer 
SmartStart session. 

Performance Scholarships 

Each year performance scholarships are awarded by the School of Music (for the 
Orchestra, the Wind Symphony, and the choirs), the Gym-Masters, and the Destiny Drama 
Company. Some of these performance scholarships are by audition only. The scholarships 
may be renewable for each year the student is in college as long as participation in the 
performing group continues. For more information, call the School of Music at 
423.236.2880, the Gym-Masters director at 423.236.2673, or the Destiny Drama 
Company coordinator at 423.236.2787. 

Southern Scholars Honors Program Scholarships 

The Southern Scholars Honors Program is designed to enrich the studies of academically 
motivated students. Students who participate in Southern Scholars for at least a year are 
eligible for 12 hours of tuition rebates, which are distributed over four semesters of their 
junior and senior years. For more information, call Mark Peach at 423.236.2743 or email 
peach@southern.edu . 

Other Potential Scholarship Sources 

Students may qualify for scholarships from national and community organizations like the 
YMCA and Rotary Club, or from parents' employers, or even from a local church. 
Scholarship and financial aid information can be accessed on the Internet at 
www.finaid.org . There are several searchable databases of more than 180,000 private 
scholarships, fellowships, grants, and loans at www.fastweb.com . 

Please Take Note 

• Applicants for admission and financial aid will be awarded scholarship on a first-come, 

first-served basis until Southern scholarship funds are depleted. Plan ahead and 
submit the applications as early as possible. 

• All scholarships are divided and distributed equally over the fall and winter semesters. 

Scholarships are not applicable for summer sessions. 

• For students who apply for and qualify for federal financial aid, determination of the 

total amount of scholarships given by Southern is guided by federal guidelines. 
Southern is not allowed to "overaward" a student who has applied for federal aid. 
In some cases, students who qualify for multiple scholarships may only be eligible 
to receive a portion of their awards, based on the federal formulas for awarding. 

• Scholarships and awards, including employer tuition assistance and National Merit 

Scholarships, cannot exceed costs for tuition (for 12 to 16 hours), general fees, 
room rent, and a capped amount for books and food. All outside grants and 
subsidies will be applied before Southern scholarships and awards. 



Finances 59 



• Scholarships listed here are available only for full-time students taking 12 or more 

undergraduate hours each semester. 

• All scholarship offers are contingent on the student enrolling during the 2008-2009 

school year and are not transferable to a future year. 

• Southern Reserves the right to change or amend any of the scholarship policies at any 

time. 

Grants 

Southern Adventist University need-based institutional grants are awarded from 
institutional and endowment funds to students who have financial need and are achieving 
academically. The amount of these awards is variable per year depending upon the 
student's need and availability of funds. 

The amount of a student's SAU need-based institutional grant award, as well as his/her 
federal grant award, will be determined after all the necessary federal and institutional 
applications are completed and processed. If the student's academic progress falls below 
the required level, the SAU grant may be canceled. Any requests for exceptions should be 
addressed to the Academic Progress Committee. 

SAU Endowment Grants— Southern Adventist University is blessed with a growing 
endowment fund created by donors interested in helping students achieve their 
educational goals. Eligibility for these free grant monies is determined by filling out the 
FAFSA. This application uses a common nationwide formula to determine a family's ability 
to pay for college. Southern uses this formula as a guideline in disbursing the Southern 
Endowment Fund. To file for financial aid, go online at www.fafsa.ed.gov . Awards are 
made on a funds available basis. Notification to eligible recipients will be listed on the 
Financial Aid Award Letter. 

Federal Pell Grants — Federal Pell Grants are awarded through a federal program which 
provides grant assistance directly to eligible first bachelor's degree undergraduate 
students. A student's eligibility for a Pell Grant is based on a congressionally approved 
formula which considers family financial circumstances. Pell Grants are available to full- 
and part-time students with proven financial needs who are making satisfactory progress 
towards a bachelor's degree. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant— Awarded to students with 
exceptional need when funds are available from the federal government. 

Eligibility for Institutional Funds 

Eligibility for Southern Adventist University need-based funds is based upon a minimum of 
six credit hours (except where otherwise noted) being taken on the Southern Adventist 
University's Collegedale campus. Co-op, transient, directed study, distance learning, 
Adventist Colleges Abroad, and off-site campus classes are not eligible for SAU funds, and 
do not count toward the six credit hours. 

Loans 

Federal Nursing Student Loans are available to nursing students only, with demonstrated 
financial need. Repayment and five percent interest assessment begin nine months after 
a student graduates, leaves school, drops below half-time enrollment, or drops from the 
nursing program. 



60 Finances 



Federal Perkins Loan — If eligible and funds are available, students can borrow up to 
$2,875 from the federal government through Southern Adventist University. Repayment 
and five percent interest begin nine months after a student graduates, leaves school, or 
drops below half-time enrollment. 

Federal PLUS Loans are available to parents of dependent undergraduate students who 
have satisfactory credit histories. The student must be enrolled at least half-time. These 
loans, like Federal Stafford Loans, are made by a lender such as a bank, credit union, or 
savings and loan association. The yearly loan limit is a student's cost of education minus 
any estimated financial aid that s/he is eligible. 

The PLUS loan interest rate is variable but not higher than nine percent. Variable interest 
rates are set each June. For more information on the interest rate, parents should contact 
the organization that holds their loan. 

The "origination fee" of up to four percent of the loan principal is deducted proportionately 
from each disbursement made, although many lenders waive this fee. The lender may 
collect an insurance premium of up to one percent of the loan principal, which is 
deducted proportionately from each disbursement. 

The procedure for applying is the same as for a Federal Stafford Loan. Southern Adventist 
University can refuse to certify a loan application, or can certify a loan for an amount less 
than a student's parents would be eligible for. The parents will be notified in writing, with 
a full explanation if such a circumstance should arise. 

Federal law requires lenders to send the loan proceeds to the school in at least two 
payments. Payments will be sent either by electronic transfer or by check made co- 
payable to the school and to the parents. 

Monthly principal and interest payments begin 60 days after the final loan disbursement. 
There is no "grace period" for these loans. 

If a deferment— a postponement of repayment— applies (including a deferment for college 
enrollment), the parents' repayment of the principal amount borrowed will not begin until 
the deferment ends. The interest on the loan is not deferred during the time of the 
deferment, although the organization that holds the loan may allow the interest to 
accumulate until the deferment ends. In such a case, however, the interest will be added 
to the principal, increasing the amount of principal that will need to be repaid. 

Federal Stafford Loans are low-interest loans made to students attending college at least 
half-time. Loans are made by a lender such as a bank, credit union, or savings and loan 
association. These loans are insured by a guarantee agency and reinsured by the federal 
government. A borrower must repay this loan. 

Students enrolled at least half-time may qualify for a "subsidized" Federal Stafford Loan, 
which is based on financial need. Dependent students whose parents were denied a PLUS 
loan and independent students who enroll at least half-time may also apply for an 
"unsubsidized" Federal Stafford Loan regardless of need; that is, regardless of their or 
their family's financial status. 

Dependent undergraduate students may borrow up to: 

• $3,500 if they are first-year students enrolled in a program of study that is a full 
academic year. 

• $4,500 if they have completed at least 24 credit hours, and the remainder of 
their program is a full academic year. 



Finances 61 



• $5,500 a year if they have completed at least 55 credit hours and the remainder 
of the program is at least one academic year. 

The total Stafford Loan debt that a dependent undergraduate student may accumulate is 
$23,000. 

Independent undergraduate students may borrow up to: 

• $7,500 if they are first-year students enrolled in a program of study that is a full 
academic year. (At least $4,000 of this amount must be in unsubsidized 
Stafford Loans.) 

• $8,500 if they have completed at least 24 credit hours and the remainder of the 
program is a full academic year. (At least $4,000 of this amount must be in 
unsubsidized Stafford Loans.) 

• $10,500 a year if they have completed at least 55 credit hours and the 
remainder of their program is at least one academic year. (At least $5,000 of 
this amount must be in unsubsidized Stafford Loans.) 

The total Stafford Loan debt that an independent undergraduate student may accumulate 
is $46,000, with no more than $23,000 in subsidized loans. 

Stafford loan interest rate is variable but not higher than eight and a quarter percent. 
Variable interest rates are set each June. For more information on the interest rate, 
students should contact the organization that holds their loan. 

The "origination fee" of up to four percent of the loan principal is deducted proportionately 
from each disbursement made, although many lenders waive this fee. The lender may 
collect an insurance premium of up to one percent of the loan principal, which is 
deducted proportionately from each disbursement. 

The amounts given are the maximum amounts that can be borrowed; however, students 
cannot borrow more than the cost of education at Southern Adventist University minus 
any other financial aid they receive. 

Southern Adventist University maintains a list of lenders that provide special rates and 
incentives to our students (called a "preferred" lender list), but students can choose any 
lender that they want and are encouraged to compare the different options for 
themselves. 

Associate Degree Students will be considered as having less than 55 credit hours for 
loan purposes. 

Undergraduate Students Attending Less than a Full Academic Year may borrow an 
amount which may be less than the amounts listed above. Information about how much 
may be borrowed can be obtained from the Enrollment Services Office. 

Work 

Federal Work-Study Program — Federal Work-Study funds are available to undergraduate 
students with demonstrated financial need. Under the Federal Work-Study program, the 
employer pays a small part of the student's wages, and the government pays the 
remainder. Most work-study positions are on campus. Students are responsible for 
acquiring their own jobs. 

Students can work part-time while they are in college. They can work full-time during the 
summer and other vacation periods. The basic pay rate is no less than the current 
minimum wage. The rate varies depending on the skill and experience needed for the job. 



62 Finances 



Students who receive Federal Work-Study earnings will receive 100% of their earnings 
unless they give written permission for their earnings to be applied to their student 
account. The Federal Work-Study Program is not a grant, but is the method of payment for 
a student's eligible job. Further information is available from a Student Finance counselor. 

Veterans' Benefits 

Southern Adventist University is approved for the training of veterans as an accredited 
training institution. VA benefits may not be available for students enrolled in classes 
offered off the Collegedale campus. Those who qualify for educational benefits should 
contact the nearest Department of Veterans' Affairs. 

Veterans or other eligible persons are required to attend classes in order to be eligible for 
educational benefits. Southern Adventist University is required to report promptly to the 
VA the last day of attendance when an eligible student withdraws or stops attending 
classes regularly. 

A recipient may not receive benefits for any course that does not fulfill requirements for 
his/her stated degree and major. Audited courses, non-credit courses (except for a 
required remedial course), and correspondence work cannot be certified. VA benefits 
cannot exceed Southern's total cost of attendance. 

Tuition and Fee Waiver for Student Missionaries and Task Force Workers 

Those students planning to serve as Student Missionaries or Task Force Workers and 
enrolling in NOND 227 and 228, Christian Service I and II, will receive a full rebate of 
$3,983/semester to cover 90% of the tuition for these classes ($3,613) and the general 
fee ($370). 

Students enrolled in HMNT 215/415 Cross-Cultural Experience and COMM 291/391, 
Intercultural Communication Practicum, will be given a tuition rebate of $446/semester 
hour. 

Before final authorization may be obtained, all students going as Student Missionaries or 
Task Force Workers must be cleared by the Enrollment Services Office. 

Collegedale Academy Students Tuition Fee Waiver 

Collegedale Academy students may take up to six credit hours at SAU at a rate of Vb of the 
current tuition rate per hour. Students eligible for denominational subsidy will receive the 
subsidy of 35% or 70% of the tuition paid. Private music lessons are at the regular SAU 
tuition rate. 

Senior Citizen Tuition Plan 

Persons 65 years of age or over may audit one undergraduate course free of charge per 
semester, or take for credit, at one-half the normal charge, one undergraduate course. 
There must be space available in the class to be eligible for this plan. 

Financial Aid Application Procedures 

Financial Aid Applications 

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), or Renewal Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (RFAFSA) for returning students must be submitted annually to apply 
for the federal, state, and institutional aid programs. This application should be completed 
online at www.fafsa.ed.gov for fastest processing. 



Finances 63 



Applications received by the priority deadline of March 31 will be given preference. To 
meet this deadline the FAFSA should be submitted no later than March 1. Applications 
received after March 31 will be processed as long as time and funds permit. Southern 
Adventist University's TITLE IV code is 003518. 

Verification 

The following documents must be submitted only if you have been selected by the 
government for verification. The Enrollment Services Office will notify you if these 
documents are needed. 

1. The Federal Verification Worksheet. This worksheet should be completed, then 
mailed to the SAU Enrollment Services Office. 

2. Copies of parents' signed income tax return (exact signed copies of all schedules 
and W-2 forms sent to the IRS). These copies should be mailed to SAU with the 
Federal Verification Worksheet. 

3. Copies of student's signed income tax return including W-2 forms. These copies 
should be mailed to SAU with the Federal Verification Worksheet. 

4. A copy of FAFSA worksheets A, B, and C. This copy should be mailed to SAU with 
the Federal Verification Worksheet. 

Transfer Student Financial Aid Applications 

Financial aid for students transferring from other institutions will be determined by their 
academic standing, which will be calculated on all hours Southern has accepted. Students 
with a GPA below policy will be on financial aid probation for one semester. If the 
cumulative GPA or the completion rates are below the required levels at the end of the 
probationary period, students will be ineligible to receive financial aid. Deletion of transfer 
hours from Southern Adventist University academic records may affect a student's 
financial aid eligibility, depending on the number of hours deleted. Any change in 
academic program, such as changing from a baccalaureate degree program to an 
associate degree program, or from an associate degree program to a one-year certificate 
degree program, may affect a student's eligibility for financial aid. 

Transient Student Financial Aid Applications 

Financial aid for transient students is available when a student receives a transient 
student permission letter from the Records and Advisement Office. 

Eligibility for Federal Pell Grant and Federal Family Education Loans (Subsidized Stafford, 
Unsubsidized Stafford, and Parent PLUS) will be based on total hours enrolled at both 
institutions. Costs at both institutions will be a factor in determining eligibility. 

Financial Aid Award and Disbursement Procedures 

Financial Aid Award Procedures 

A Financial Aid Award Letter will be sent to each accepted applicant after the Enrollment 
Services Office receives the FAFSA results (electronically received from the federal 
processor). To confirm and reserve the funds offered, students should return the signed 
acceptance of the offer within ten days of receipt. It will be assumed that students are 
accepting the full award amounts if the award letter is not returned within the allotted 
time. 



64 Finances 



Financial aid awards are made on a rolling basis, as long as funds are available, with the 
most needy students receiving priority. The financial aid award package may be a 
combination of: 1) Federal Work-Study, 2) federal student loans, 3) federal, state, private, 
or institutional grants or scholarships. 

Disbursement of Financial Aid Funds 

Financial aid awards are disbursed based on enrollment status each semester. The 
disbursement will show as a credit on a student's account. Loan funds received from the 
federal loan programs will in most cases be automatically credited to the student's 
account once entrance interview requirements are met. In the cases where the funds are 
received in the form of a check, the check will be available for signing in the Accounting 
Office. In addition, an entrance interview is required for first-time borrowers prior to 
receiving their loan funds. An exit interview is required when a student graduates or 
terminates his/her studies at SAU. It is the student's responsibility to notify the Enrollment 
Services Office if they do not plan to return. A student's diploma and/or academic 
transcripts will not be released until an exit interview is completed. 

Financial Aid Overaward Procedures 

When financial aid recipients receive additional resources not included in the financial aid 
award letter, it is the student's responsibility to report these funds to the Enrollment 
Services Office. Federal regulations prohibit "overawards;" therefore, when the total of all 
resources exceeds the allowable student budget, financial aid awards must be adjusted. 
When financial aid funds have already been credited to the student's statement, any 
refunds due or overawards will be charged to the student's account. 

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements 

General Requirements 

Financial aid awards are made for one academic year to students who are accepted for 
admission, demonstrate a financial need, and are enrolled for at least six credit hours on 
the Collegedale campus. Recipients of government aid must hold U.S. citizenship or a 
permanent resident visa. Students desiring aid must reapply each year, have a GED or 
high school diploma on file in the Records and Advisement Office, and continue to make 
satisfactory academic progress toward a degree to receive financial aid. 

WARNING: If a student purposely gives false or misleading information on the federal aid 
application, s/he may be fined $10,000 by the US Department of Education, sent to 
prison, or both. 

Academic Progress Requirements 

Academic Progress Policy 

Government regulations require all financial aid recipients to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress toward a degree as measured both qualitatively and quantitatively in 
order to receive financial aid. This requirement applies to the entire enrollment at 
Southern Adventist University— even periods during which a student does not receive 
financial aid. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in a student becoming 
ineligible for financial aid. 

This policy defines the minimum standards for eligibility for state and/or federal financial 
aid. 



Finances 65 



Academic Progress Standards 

Qualitative Standards 

Cumulative Credit Hours Attempted Cumulative Grade Point Average 

- 23 1.50 or above 

24 or above 2.00 or above 

Quantitative Standards: 

Students must complete and pass a minimum of 67.00 percent of attempted credit hours 
toward a degree to be making satisfactory progress. Incompletes, withdrawals, and failed 
courses count toward the total attempted credit hours. A repeated course counts as 
attempted credit hours each time it is taken. 

Time Frame for Receiving Financial Aid 

Degree Program Degree Max. Time to Receive 

Financial Aid 

General baccalaureate 186 attempted hours 

General associate 96 attempted hours 

Art baccalaureate 190 attempted hours 

Music baccalaureate 198 attempted hours 

Nursing associate 103 attempted hours 

Second baccalaureate 231 attempted hours 

Second associate 132 attempted hours 

The above maximum time frame to receive financial aid is based on 1.5 times the number 
of credit hours to attain a degree. Hours from the first degree will be counted as 
attempted hours toward a second degree. Adding a second major does not count as a 
second degree. 

Time frame for transfer students will be evaluated according to the hours accepted from 
previous institutions and the attempted hours toward SAU's current degree program. 

Progress Review 

A financial aid recipient's progress at Southern Adventist University will be reviewed at the 
end of each semester and will be based on the number of attempted hours a student 
completes during each semester of an academic year and the cumulative grade point 
average (GPA). 

Students who do not meet the above satisfactory GPA or completion requirements will be 
placed on probation. If the cumulative GPA or the completion rate is below the required 
level at the end of the probationary period, the student will be ineligible to receive 
financial aid and may file an appeal with the academic dean. 

Students may enroll for the summer sessions or subsequent terms at SAU without 
financial aid assistance or attend another accredited institution to fulfill the progress 
requirements. Academic progress for these students will be reviewed prior to the release 
of financial aid for the following term in which the student reaches the necessary 
academic standard. 

Students accepted to Southern Adventist University on conditional standing will be eligible 
for financial aid for the first semester in attendance. Financial aid thereafter is based on 
the guidelines set above. 

Procedure for Appeal and Reinstatement of Financial Aid 

Students who are found to be ineligible for financial aid based on progress will be notified 



66 Finances 



in writing from the Enrollment Services Office. If unusual circumstances occur that 
include, but are not limited to, personal or family illness, injury, or death in the family, 
students may appeal in writing to the Financial Appeals Committee for continuation of 
financial aid. Students will receive a written notification as to the committee's decision. 

Financial Aid Refund Policy 

The SAU refund policy for students withdrawing from classes is outlined on page 74. 

Since financial aid is considered to be used first for direct educational costs (tuition, fees, 
room, board, and books), when a student withdraws from all classes and under the refund 
policy receives a refund of these charges, any credit will be used to reimburse financial 
aid programs first, and any remaining credit will be refunded to the student. 

According to regulations, refunds due to Federal Title IV programs will be allocated 
according to the following priority: 

1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans 

2. Subsidized Federal Stafford loans 

3. Federal Perkins loans 

4. Parent Federal (PLUS) loans 

5. Federal Pell Grant program 

6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program 

7. Other Title IV aid programs 

Amount of Title IV Aid Earned 

To calculate the amount of Title IV aid earned, the percentage of Title IV aid earned (as 
figured by the withdrawal date) is multiplied by the aid that has been disbursed as well as 
the aid that could have been disbursed. 

Amount of Title IV Aid to Return 

To calculate the amount of Title IV aid to return, the amount of Title IV aid earned (as 
figured above) is subtracted out of the aid that was disbursed as well as the aid that could 
have been disbursed. 

For further explanation, please contact a Student Finance Counselor. 

Financial Aid Repayment Policy 

There are specific repayment policies for students who withdraw completely from SAU and 
have received financial aid in excess of their incurred educational costs. An example 
would be the student who received a Stafford Loan and did not use the full amount for 
educational costs. An amount owing to any federally funded student aid program will be 
covered by SAU and then charged to the student's account. 

Deferment of Financial Aid Repayment for Student 
Missionaries/Task Force Workers 

Any student desiring to serve as a Student Missionary or in a Task Force position needs to 
apply through the Chaplain's Office. General Conference policy requires the completion of 
the course Student Missions Orientation Class, NOND 099, prior to placement in a 
volunteer position. The orientation class is taught the last nine weeks of the second 



Finances 67 



semester. Students who register for NOND 099 will not receive any academic credit 
hours. 

Those students who have not yet received their first bachelor's degree who desire 
deferment on their student loan payments during their mission service placement must 
enroll in NOND 227 Christian Service I, 6 hours, and NOND 228 Christian Service II, 6 
hours. 

To receive 12 hours of academic credit, the student must complete a full academic year 
of service. Students enrolled in NOND 227 and 228 must have taken NOND 099 as a 
prerequisite. A maximum of 12 hours is available during the year of service. Tuition is 
charged at ten percent of the current rate. Specific details regarding academic 
assignments may be obtained from the Chaplain's Office. 

Before final authorization may be obtained, all students going as Student Missionaries or 
Task Force Workers must have their student account paid in full and cleared by the 
Enrollment Services Office. 

Student Labor 

Student Labor Regulations 

Work opportunities are available in departments/schools and industries operated by the 
University and at local private businesses. Students seeking employment should contact 
the Human Resources Office or visit http://hr.southern.edu for a listing of available 
positions or to complete an employment application. 

Although Southern Adventist University cannot guarantee a student employment, the 
University will endeavor to find a work opportunity either at the University or at a local 
business. Students are urged to arrange class schedules that allow blocks of time for 
work. 

All hiring formalities are completed in the Human Resources Office. Students must bring 
their Social Security cards and one identification document, such as a passport, driver's 
license, or original birth certificate, in order to complete the hiring process legally. 
Students who are not American citizens must produce an unexpired employment 
authorization document such as a valid 1-20 or other legal document before employment 
can be arranged. 

Students are expected to maintain satisfactory job performance and meet all work 
appointments, including those during examination week. Work superintendents reserve 
the right to dismiss students if their service and work records are unsatisfactory. Should a 
student find it necessary to be absent from work, s/he must make arrangements with the 
work supervisor and, if ill, with the University Health Center. 

A student accepting employment is expected to retain it for the entire semester except in 
cases where changes are recommended by the school nurse or the Human Resources 
Office. Should a student receive opportunities for more favorable employment at another 
department on campus during the semester, the transfer must be made through the 
Human Resources Office and the two employing departments. A student must NOT drop 
his/her work schedule without notifying the Human Resources Office. 

Students can work part-time while they are in school. They can work full-time during the 
summer and other vacation periods. The basic pay rate is no less than the current 
minimum wage. The rate varies depending on the skill and experience needed for the job. 



68 Finances 



Students who work more than 20 hours per individual week or who are enrolled for less 
than 12 credit hours will have Social Security taxes (FICA) withheld from their earnings. 

International Student Labor Regulations 

International students on non-immigrant visas are required by law to secure permission 
before accepting any off-campus employment. Foreign students with student visas are 
allowed to work on campus up to 20 hours a week. Spouses may work only if they have 
student visas of their own or have immigrant visas. 

Student Payroll Policies and Procedures 

Students will receive 25% of their net earnings for tithe and personal items directly 
deposited into the bank account of the student's choice. 

Students who receive Federal Work-Study earnings will receive 100% of their net earnings 
unless they give written permission for their earnings to be applied to their student 
account or they voluntarily return their earnings to be applied to their student account. 

The payroll period normally covers a two-week time period and students are paid every 
other Friday. 

It is recommended that on-campus summer earnings remain on the students' accounts to 
accumulate toward their first month statement. 

Student Workers' Compensation Insurance 

As provided by the laws of the State of Tennessee, the University carries workers' 
compensation insurance to protect all employees in case of work-related accidents. 

Student Financial Responsibility 

Student Responsibility for University Expenses 

The Enrollment Services Office will assist students in their financial planning. Financial aid 
is available to qualified recipients in the form of scholarships, grants, loans, and work 
opportunities. However, responsibility for payment of University expenses rests with the 
student, regardless of any assistance which may be expected or received from federal 
financial aid, parents, Southern Adventist University, denominational employers, or any 
other source. 

Before registering, each student must submit a Payment Contract to the Enrollment 
Services Office signed by the student indicating acknowledgment of this responsibility. A 
signed payment contract must be on file before registering for the winter semester or any 
future semester thereafter. 

Information on student costs and means of paying those costs is given throughout this 
"Financial Policies" section of the Catalog to assist students in financial planning. Student 
financial responsibility includes awareness of this information. 

Student Check Cashing 

Students are encouraged to use their home banks or a local area bank for their personal 
financial services. SAU does not cash personal checks. 

Student Banking 

For the convenience of students and/or their financial sponsors, no-fee banking is 
available at the Collegedale Credit Union located in Fleming Plaza on the University 
campus. Service is provided six days each week. With a $50 savings account students 



Finances 69 



can open a no-fee checking account with no minimum balance. Several commercial banks 
close to the campus community provide similar opportunities. 

Student Personal Effects Liability 

When determining what to bring to campus, students should remember that the University 
is not responsible for the personal effects of any student even though such effects may be 
required by the University for student use, or required by the University to be stored in a 
designated location. University-carried insurance does not insure the personal effects of 
any individual. The University recommends that students consider carrying insurance 
against possible losses. 

Fees and Charges 

The following fees and charges apply only to undergraduate students on the Collegedale 
campus. Information concerning graduate student charges is available in the Graduate 
Catalog. 

Students taking less than six credit hours must pay the full amount of tuition in advance. 
No discount is available for students who fall in this category. 

Tuition and General Fee Charges 

Tuition per semester hour (1-11 hours) $ 669.00 

Tuition for 12-16 semester hours (flat fee) 7,910.00 

Tuition for each semester hour over 16 511.00 

Tuition for each semester hour of summer school 511.00 

*General Fee per semester (charged to each student enrolled for 6 or more hours) 370.00 

Special Fees and Charges 

The following special fees and charges are assessed separately inasmuch as they may not 
apply to all students nor do they occur regularly: 

Academic Power Tools 669.00 

Add/Drop fee 20.00 

Application for admission (non-refundable) 25.00 

Audit tuition per semester hour (not included as part of 12-16 hour charges) 334.50 

Automobile parking fee (per semester): 

Residence hall students 40.00 

Village students 40.00 

Motorcycle parking fee 40.00 

Collegedale Academy student tuition V2 reg. rate 

Commitment deposit/Housing deposit 250.00 

Continuing Education Units 10.00 

Examinations: 

Challenge or waiver 50.00 

CLEP 50.00 

Credit by examination (per hour) recording fee 40.00 

TOEFL 25.00 

Rescheduling midterm or final 65.00 

Graduation fee 50.00 

Insufficient funds check fee and penalty 25.00 

**lnsurance (Estimate Only): 

Student 660.00 



70 Finances 



Spouse 1,760.00 

Child 715.00 

All Children (2 or more) 1,320.00 

International student deposit 3,000.00 

Lab Fees: 

Lab Feel 10.00 

Lab Fee 2 15.00 

Lab Fee 3 20.00 

Lab Fee 4 30.00 

Lab Fee 5 60.00 

Lab Fee 6 90.00 

Lab Fee 7 120.00 

Lab Fee 8 150.00 

Lab Fee 9 180.00 

Lab Fee 10 210.00 

Lab Fee 11 240.00 

Lab Fee 12 300.00 

Lab Fee 13 325.00 

Lab Fee 14 350.00 

Lab Fee 15 400.00 

Lab Fee 16 500.00 

Lab Fee 17 600.00 

Lab Fee 18 700.00 

Lab Fee 19 800.00 

Lab Fee 20 900.00 

Lab Fee 21 1,000.00 

Late Registration 50.00 

Late return of organizational uniform 40.00 

(The full cost will be charged if irreparably damaged or not returned.) 
Lost housing key or replacement: 

Talge/Thatcher Halls 30.00 

Lost student I.D. or replacement (must be cash payment) 15.00 

Medical Technology recording fee (senior year) 55.00 

Music lesson fee per semester hour 150.00 

Nursing consortium tuition per hour 268.00 

Nursing deposit 400.00 

Online delivery fee per semester hour 100.00 

RN Update 440.00 

Packing and moving fee 75.00 

***Residence Hall rent per semester 1,450.00 

Southern Village rent per semester 1,630.00 

Transcript fees: 

Rush service (48 hours) 10.00 

Single request for 6 or more copies 10.00 

FedEx service (48 hours) 25.00 

International fax service 15.00 

*Fee is used for computer technology, academic transcripts, and registration. 
**Estimated annual fee that is subject to change by insurance company. 
* * *See page 73 for further explanation of rent charges 



Finances 71 



Estimated Student Budget (SAU Campus) 





Residence Hall Student 


NonResidence Hall Student 




Semester 


Year 


Semester 


Year 


Tuition (12-16 hrs/semester) 


7,910 


15,820 


7,910 


15,820 


General Fee 


370 


740 


370 


740 


Residence Hall Rent** 


1,450 


2,900 






Food 


925 


1,850 






Books and Misc. Supplies 


500 


1,000 


500 


1,000 


Total Estimated Costs* 


$11,155 


$22,310 


$8,780 


$17,560 



(Health insurance, automobile parking, Campus Shop, and Village Market personal purchases are in addition, if 

applicable.) 

*With financial aid and/or labor, this total figure can be substantially reduced. 

* *See page 73 for further explanation of rent charges. 

Approved Items to Charge to Student Account 

Any charges to a student's account, outside of the normal educational expenses, must be 
approved by the Enrollment Services Office. Examples of charges which will not be 
approved are student club dues. 

Food Service and Miscellaneous Charges 

Southern's food plan allows residence hall students the privilege of choosing from a large 
variety of dining options. Students may eat at the Campus Kitchen, Dining Hall, and KR's 
Place. Residence hall students will be billed $925 at the beginning of each semester. 

The $925 food allowance for the fall semester begins August 24, 2007, and ends on 
December 31, 2008. The $925 food allowance for the winter semester begins January 1, 
2009, and ends on May 3, 2009. There is no food allowance for the summer months 
(students taking classes during the summer can use their Campus Card and will be billed 
monthly for their charges). 

Once a student has used their $925 per semester for purchases from Food Services, food 
charged to the Campus Card over that amount will be automatically billed to the student's 
statement on a monthly basis. 

Refunds will only be issued if the student discontinues their enrollment at Southern. The 
refund will be pro-rated based on their room assignment end date as determined by the 
Housing Office. A student will not be refunded more than the $925 minus what they have 
already used. 

Community students may charge food at the Campus Kitchen, Dining Hall, and KR's Place 
as long as their school accounts are paid monthly by the due date. 

Both residence hall students and community students may charge up to $100 a month in 
miscellaneous purchases (does not include books) at the Village Market and/or Campus 
Shop as well as making photocopies and/or paying computer lab printing expenses. 

Once a student has charged $100 for miscellaneous purchases during a month, the 
student may use cash or credit card to place additional funds onto their Campus Card to 
be able to make additional purchases. 

Books 

Books may be charged at the Campus Shop. A student will be allowed to charge a 
maximum of $500 to their student account per semester. 



72 Finances 



Students may not charge items from the Adventist Book Center or other book stores to 
their student accounts. 

International Student Deposit 

In addition to the regular University costs, international students must provide an 
International Student Deposit of $3,000 U.S. This applies to all international students 
except documented permanent residents of the U.S. or residents of Canada and 
Bermuda. The deposit must be received by the Enrollment Services Office before a U.S. 
Immigration Form 1-20 is sent to the prospective student for entry to the U.S. Because 
mail service from many foreign countries takes time, this deposit should be sent at least 
six weeks prior to enrollment. This deposit, once paid, remains untouched until the 
student graduates, withdraws from SAU, or is unable to pay his or her student account, at 
which time the international deposit will be applied to the student's account. If the 
student's account has been paid in full, the deposit will be refunded after the final 
statement is issued. 

Health and Accident Insurance 

University policy requires all students to have adequate accident and health insurance 
covering both inpatient and outpatient services. The same coverage is encouraged for all 
spouses and dependents. All students who are taking six or more hours (three or more 
hours during any summer session) or who are living in University housing will 
automatically be enrolled in the University health and accident plan at the time of 
registration, and will continue to be enrolled each successive semester until a waiver form 
is signed and proof of insurance is received. Students who have signed a waiver form may 
later request enrollment at any time. The student may sign a waiver form indicating s/he 
does not want the University insurance because: 

1. The student has adequate US insurance coverage equal to or better than the 
University insurance plan. 

2. The student is covered under the SDA denominational health care plan. 

3. The student does not live in University-owned housing and is enrolled in less than 
six semester hours during the fall and/or winter semester or less than three 
hours during the summer. 

A refund of the premium is allowed only upon entry into the military services 
or by providing evidence of other insurance prior to midterm. 

Residence Hall/Campus Housing Charges 

Residence Hall Costs 

Room charges are based on two students occupying one room. Residence hall 
accommodations costs for each individual are $2,820 (no private bathroom) or $2,900 
(with private bathroom) for the school year. Charges are made on a semester basis. A 
student may, upon application to the residence hall dean, be allowed to room alone at a 
cost of $4,350. Residence hall students living in the Southern Village apartments are 
charged $3,260 for the school year. 

No refunds are made for vacation periods or absences from the campus. When a student 
withdraws, a prorated portion of the semester charge, beginning with the date of non- 
occupancy of the room, will be refunded. 



Finances 73 



Residence Hall Deposit and Deposit Refund 

A room deposit of $250 is required of each resident. To guarantee a room in the 
residence hall, payment of this deposit must be made by July 15. After July 15, no room is 
held for a student whose deposit has not been paid. This deposit should be sent directly 
to Southern Adventist University and is held in reserve until the student graduates and/or 
permanently moves out of the residence hall. The deposit is in addition to any other 
payment, and is refundable if requested in writing to the Associate Dean of Housing 
before July 15. 

University Apartment Costs 

University-owned apartments may be rented by students taking a minimum of six hours 
each semester (preference is given to married students). The apartments range in size 
from one to three bedrooms and are rented unfurnished (furniture rental available). Rents 
range from $350 to $850 and will be charged by semester. Rent will be charged monthly 
during the summer. Charges are based on the date of issue and return of keys and proper 
clearance with the office of the Vice President for Financial Administration. 

University Apartment Deposit and Deposit Refund 

Married students and single students over 23 years of age renting an apartment from the 
University must pay a housing deposit of $250 to reserve an apartment. This housing 
deposit is due before occupancy and is sent directly to Southern Adventist University. The 
deposit is in addition to any other payment. 

If a student gives notice before August 1 that s/he will not be attending, the housing 
deposit will be refunded. Damage or cleaning charges may also be charged to the 
student's account if the deposit is insufficient to cover these costs. The housekeeping 
supervisor at the Service Department will determine whether the apartment has been left 
clean and undamaged. A packing and moving fee may be charged as necessary. 

International Trips 

Tuition for international tours/trips are charged at one-third the normal tuition rate. 
Students eligible for tuition subsidy will receive 70% of the tuition charged. 

Adventist Colleges Abroad Fees 

Students wishing to apply for study abroad under the Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA) 
program must follow the procedures listed below: 

1. Obtain an ACA application from Southern Adventist University's Enrollment 
Services Office or Modern Languages Department. 

2. Complete and return the ACA application to the Modern Languages Department. 

3. Follow one of the following payment plans: 

• Pay the total amount of tuition, room, board, hospital and accident 
insurance, personal account deposit, and tour deposit of the chosen school 
by August 1. 

• Semester System: Pay one-half of the total charges and tour charge by 
August 1. The remaining one-half must be paid by November 1. 

• Quarter System: Pay one-third of the total charges and tour charge by 
August 1; one-third by November 1; and the remaining one-third by 
February 1. 



74 Finances 



Make all payments by cash, check, money order, or credit card. University funded 
scholarships are not available for ACA students. When planning their finances for the ACA 
program students must: 

1. Have their Southern Adventist University account paid in full. 

2. Have completed all necessary paperwork for federal financial assistance and 
received a financial aid award letter before August 1 if relying on financial aid. 

3. Subtract tuition assistance and/or federal financial aid from the total ACA 
charges due. 

4. Pay SAU for charges before the University makes payment to ACA. If payment is 
not received, students will be sent back from ACA. 

SAU Refund Policies 

Refund for Complete or Partial Withdrawal 

Residence hall and University apartment refunds are prorated according to the number of 
days the student occupies the room subtracted from the number of days charged. 

A student who withdraws from school completely during the semester will receive a tuition 
and fees refund based on the date the completed withdrawal form with all required 
signatures is filed with the Records and Advisement Office. 

Refunds are calculated as follows: 



1 st week 


100% 


2 nd and 3 rd weeks 


80% 


4 th and 5 th weeks 


60% 


6 th ,7 th , and 8 th weeks 


40% 


9 th week 


0% 



Refund for Shortened School Term Withdrawal (including Summer Sessions) 

1 st two school days 100% 

3 rd and 4 th school days 60% 

5 th day through end of term 0% 

Refund of Credit Balances 

Credit balances are refundable, upon request from financial sponsor, 30 days after the 
monthly statement is received for the last month the student was in college in order to be 
certain that all charges have been processed. For example, if a student drops out of 
college in December, a full credit refund would not be made until after the January 
statement is prepared during the first week of February. When the credit balance is large, 
a portion may be refunded earlier upon request to the Enrollment Services Office. 

If the student has a credit balance caused by a financial aid over-award, the necessary 
credit will be applied to the aid funds, according to the Financial Aid Refund Policy 
described on page 66. If any credit remains, it will be refunded as described above. 

Any refund will be credited back first to any credit card that was used to make payment 
within 90 days of the refund. If the refund involves a credit card payment exceeding 
$2,000, the refund will be credited back first to the credit card regardless of the date of 
payment. 



Finances 75 



Returned Check Policy 

If a check is returned by a bank for insufficient funds, account closed, or any other 
reason, a $25 returned check fee will be assessed to the student's account. This also 
forfeits the privilege of paying by check. 

Payment Plans 

Two payment plans are available. 

Year in Advance Payment Plan 

SAU offers a five percent discount if payment is made by cash or check and a three 
percent discount if payment is made by credit card or Parent Plus Loan. Students 
choosing to pay the year in advance must, on or before registration, pay the full amount 
required by the plan. Amounts paid as a result of scholarships, grants, and/or student 
loans are excluded from the amount on which the discount is allowed. A worksheet for 
each student desiring the prepayment discount must be completed by the Enrollment 
Services Office. 

Monthly Payment Plan 

A monthly payment plan is available for the 2008-2009 academic year through the 
Enrollment Services Office. 

Methods of Payment 

Credit Card Payments 

The Cashier's Office honors VISA, MasterCard, Discover, American Express and debit (if 
card owner is present) cards for making payments on a student's account. No cash 
withdrawal service is available from these cards— this service may be obtained from a 
local bank. 

When using a credit card to pay on an account, the following information must be 
supplied: 1) name of credit card being used; 2) cardholder's name; 3) credit card number; 
4) expiration date; 5) student's name and ID number; 6) amount to be charged on card; 
and, 7) the billing address of the credit card. 

Any refund will be credited back first to any credit card payments that were made within 
90 days of the refund. The 30 day limitation does not apply when payments made by 
credit card exceed $2,000. In these cases the limitation will be the entire school year. 

Automatic Credit Card Payments 

Payment through automatic credit card deductions may be arranged. This arrangement is 
made through the Enrollment Services Office. A signed written request for automatic 
credit card deductions, stating the amount to be deducted, the date each month the 
deduction should be made, the amount to be deducted each month, and the billing 
address of the credit card will be required. 

Personal Check Payments 

Payments made to a student's account by personal check should have the student's 
University personal identification number (ID number) written on the check. If the ID 
number is not written on the check when it is received by SAU, it will be written on the 
check by an SAU employee for posting purposes. 



76 Finances 

Billing Procedures 

Monthly Statements 

Statements will show all monthly/semester charges and credits and will be mailed to 
students on or before the 7 th business day of each month. The monthly payment is due 
the 28 th of each month. In some cases, the statement may take an extended amount of 
mail time to reach the parent or financial sponsor. It is the responsibility of the student to 
communicate the monthly due to the parents/financial sponsor in these cases. 

Before registering for a new semester, the student account balance must be paid in full. 

Tuition Assistance 

Please notify Enrollment Services if either parent is eligible for tuition assistance from an 
employer. Indicate whether the employer is an educational institution or some other 
organization. Upon receiving this information, SAU will bill the parent's employer for the 
appropriate amount. It is still the responsibility of the parents to ensure that the tuition 
assistance is paid by their employer. If a student receives an award letter that does not 
include tuition assistance, but that student is eligible for tuition assistance, the award 
letter must be adjusted. Please notify the Enrollment Services Office if this is the case. 

Transcript Requests for Currently Enrolled Students 

It is the policy of the University to withhold transcripts if a student has an unpaid or past- 
due account at the University, or any unpaid account for which the University has co- 
signed. 

An official academic transcript will be issued for a currently enrolled student when the 
student's account is current. Exceptions may be considered when the account is current 
except for the pending disbursement of a Federal student loan. 

When payment is made by personal check, the transcript will be held for ten working days 
to allow the check to clear. TO EXPEDITE THE RELEASE OF THESE DOCUMENTS, THE 
STUDENT SHOULD SEND A MONEY ORDER, CASHIER'S CHECK, OR PAY BY CREDIT CARD 
TO COVER THE BALANCE OF THE ACCOUNT WHEN REQUESTING THE DOCUMENTS. Under 
provisions of federal loan programs, Southern Adventist University withholds any records 
when payments for these loans become past due or are in default. 

Collection Policies and Procedures 

Accounts Collection Policy 

Students completing or terminating their studies with the University are required to pay 
their balance in full prior to leaving. Payments due on non-current accounts that are not 
received by the last working day of the month will be charged a one percent finance 
charge. 

When a student who was enrolled first semester does not enroll second semester and has 
left with an unpaid account, that account will be designated a non-current student 
account as of February 15. 

When a student leaves at the end of second semester who does not return for the 
summer session and has left with an unpaid account, the account will be designated a 
non-current student account as of June 15. 

When a student leaves at the end of second semester with an unpaid account and plans 



Finances 77 



to return the following year, the student will have until June 28 to bring the account 
current. If the student decides not to return, then this account will be designated a non- 
current account as of September 15. 

At the time any account is designated non-current, a finance charge of one percent per 
month will apply. 

When a non-current account is 90 days past due and neither satisfactory payments nor 
communication have been received, and unsuccessful attempts have been made by the 
Enrollment Services Office to contact the individual, the account will be submitted to a 
collection agency or attorney. 

If the University deems it necessary to employ a collection agency or an attorney to collect 
defaulted accounts, all charges for these services, including court costs, if incurred, will 
be added to unpaid bills. 

Any student that has an amount that has been written off due to an uncollectible account, 
settlement, or lost account must pay the written off amount prior to receiving transcripts, 
enrolling in any class, or being re-accepted as a student. 

Any student with an account that has not been paid in full due to a bankruptcy filing, must 
be paid in full before acceptance or enrollment unless (1) the student has received a 
hardship discharge from the bankruptcy court and provides a copy of the same to the 
University or (2) the student can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the University that his 
or her account falls outside of the educational benefit discharge exception of Section 
523(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code. 

Policy on Transcript, and Diploma Requests for Non-current Students 

It is the policy of the University to withhold transcripts, diplomas, certificates of 
completion, and other records if a student has an unpaid or past-due account at the 
University or (if a federal loan borrower) has not completed an Exit Interview. 

Official academic transcripts for non-enrolled students will be issued only after students' 
accounts are paid in full and when there are no delinquencies in the payment of student 
loans. No exceptions will be made. 

When payment is made by personal check, the transcript will be held for ten working days 
to allow the check to clear. TO EXPEDITE THE RELEASE OF THESE DOCUMENTS, THE 
STUDENT SHOULD SEND A MONEY ORDER, CASHIER'S CHECK OR PAY BY CREDIT CARD 
TO COVER THE BALANCE OF THE ACCOUNT WHEN REQUESTING THE DOCUMENTS. Under 
provisions of federal loan programs, Southern Adventist University withholds any records 
when payments for these loans become past due or are in default. 

Policy on Legal Proceedings 

Southern Adventist University shall not render services to former students who may be 
involved in any legal proceedings, until court confirmation has been received with regards 
to the legal actions taken. 

Bankruptcy Policies and Procedures 

Recognizing that the discharge of a debt through bankruptcy proceedings prohibits a 
creditor from subsequently pursuing the collection of the debt, the University, upon 
notification by the court of such filing, will comply with this legal prohibition. No further 
services will be extended. The bankruptcy of the financial sponsor in no way changes the 
underlying financial obligation of the student to pay his or her student account. 



78 



Prefix Glossary 



Prefix Glossary 



Prefix 


Subject Area 


AART 


Animation 


ACCT 


Accounting 


ALHT 


Allied Health 


ART 


Studio Art/Art History 


ARTF 


Film Production 


ARTG 


Computer Graphics 


ARTH 


Art History 


ARTI 


Interactive Media 


ASL 


American Sign Language 


BIOL 


Biology 


BMKT 


Marketing 


BRDC 


Broadcasting 


BUAD 


Business Administration 


CHEM 


Chemistry 


COMM 


Communication 


COOP 


Cooperative Education 


CPHE 


Hardware and Embedded Systems 


CPIS 


Information Systems 


CPTE 


Computer Technology 


CPTR 


Computer Science 


ECON 


Economics 


EDOE 


Outdoor Education 


EDUC 


Education 


EESL 


English Skills Language 


ELIT 


Literature 


ENGL 


English 


ENGR 


Engineering 


ERSC 


Earth Science 


FNCE 


Finance 


FREN 


French 


GEOG 


Geography 


GRMN 


German 


HIST 


History 


HLED 


Health Education 


HLNT 


Nutrition for Life 


HMNT 


Humanities 


HPER 


Health, Physical Ed, Recreation 


ITAL 


Italian 


JOUR 


Journalism 


LTCA 


Long-Term Care Administration 


MATH 


Mathematics 


MDLG 


Modern Language 



Depa rtm ent/School 
Section of Catalog 

Visual Art and Design 

Business and Management 

Allied Health 

Visual Art and Design 

Visual Art and Design 

Visual Art and Design 

Visual Art and Design 

Visual Art and Design 

Modern Languages 

Biology 

Business and Management 

Journalism & Communication 

Business and Management 

Chemistry 

Journalism & Communication 

Nondepartmental Courses 

Computing 

Computing 

Computing 

Computing 

Business and Management 

Education and Psychology 

Education and Psychology 

English 

English 

English 

Physics 

Physics 

Business and Management 

Modern Languages 

History 

Modern Languages 

History 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

History 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

Modern Languages 

Journalism & Communication 

Business and Management 

Mathematics 

Modern Languages 



Prefix Glossary 



79 



Prefix Subject Area 

MDTC Medical Technology 

MGNT Management 

MUCH Church Music 

MUCT Music Theory 

MUED Music Education 

MUHL Music History 

MUPF Individual and Group Instruction 

NOND Nondepartmental 

NRNT Nutrition 

NRSG Nursing 

OUTL Outdoor Leadership 

PEAC General Ed Activity Classes 

PETH Physical Education Theory 



PHTO 


Photography 


PHYS 


Physics 


PLSC 


Political Science 


PREL 


Public Relations 


PSYC 


Psychology 


RECR 


Recreation 


RELB 


Biblical Studies 


RELL 


Biblical Languages 


RELP 


Professional Training 


RELT 


Religion and Theology 


RUSS 


Russian 


SOCI 


Sociology 


SOCW 


Social Work 


SPAN 


Spanish 


TECH 


Technology 



Department/School 
Section of Catalog 

Allied Health 

Business and Management 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Nondepartmental 

Nursing 

Nursing 

Education and Psychology 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

Journalism & Communication 

Physics 

History 

Journalism & Communication 

Education and Psychology 

Physical Education, Health, & 

Wellness 

Religion 

Religion 

Religion 

Religion 

Modern Languages 

Social Work & Family Studies 

Social Work & Family Studies 

Modern Languages 

Technology 



80 Allied Health 



ALLIED HEALTH 

Chair: Keith Snyder 

Faculty: Earl Aagaard, Joyce Azevedo, David Ekkens, Ann Foster, Rick Norskov, Lee 
Spencer, Neville Trimm 

Program Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Adjunct Faculty: Renita Klischies, Kathy Tan 

Clinical Laboratory Science: Marcia Kilsby, Albert McMullen, Karen Reiner, Richard Show 

Allied Health 

The Allied Health Professions are rapidly growing areas of specialization within the health 
care industry. Job openings are plentiful and pay scales are comparable to other 
professionals in health care. The department offers a B.S. degree in Clinical Laboratory 
Science and A.S. degrees in a number of Allied Health fields (listed on pages 82-83). 

Mission Statement 

The Allied Health branch of the Biology/Allied Health Department exists to coordinate the 
advising of students who require prerequisite courses for entrance into a variety of clinical 
programs in the medical, dental, and health professions, as well as to promote these 
professions as meaningful career options providing opportunities for Christian service. 

Assessment 

The programs in this department vary extensively depending on the particular health 
career and the requirements of the specific schools which offer the clinical programs. 
Southern Adventist University continually monitors the requirements of these clinical 
programs and modifies its preprofessional curricula to meet the changes when they are 
made. Continual assessment is made essentially by the advisers in the department who 
measure their effectiveness by their success in structuring programs to meet individual 
student needs and to meet requirements of the professional school where the student will 
transfer. The entrance rate of students into professional programs is also used to assess 
adequacy of class offerings and program requirements. 

Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in clinical laboratory science (medical 
technology) consists of three years of prescribed study at Southern Adventist University 
and a 12- to 13-month senior year in a hospital-based medical technology program 
accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the 
American Medical Association. The hospital program affiliated with Southern Adventist 
University is Andrews University. Internship in other CAHEA-accredited programs requires 
prior university approval. 

The Clinical Laboratory Science degree qualifies a person to take a number of national 
certifying examinations, including those offered by the Board of Registry of the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) and the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). Certified laboratory professionals work in hospitals, clinics, 



Allied Health 



81 



physicians' offices, public health agencies, private laboratories, pharmaceutical firms, and 
research institutions. 

The curriculum prescribed by Southern Adventist University is designed to meet the 
requirements of the University and of CAHEA. Hospitals with clinical programs may have 
additional requirements. Students should consult the brochures or advisers of the specific 
hospitals for those requirements. 

Occasionally pre-dental students, pre-medical students, and graduating seniors in biology 
or chemistry may wish to become certified Clinical Lab Scientists. This is possible if the 
student plans courses to fulfill the requirements of the University and the hospital 
program. 

During the fall semester of the third year, students must apply for admission to an 
approved clinical program. Acceptance of the individual student to the senior year 
program is determined by the institution offering the clinical program. To be eligible for 
admission, a student must complete all of the University course requirements prior to 
beginning the clinical year. The overall grade point average must be acceptable to the 
University for graduation. Most clinical programs do not accept students with less than a 
2.75 cumulative average on a 4.00 system. Although clinical acceptances are granted 
during the junior year, they are conditional, pending satisfactory completion of the stated 
admission criteria. 

Written information about the affiliated clinical programs is available through the 
University Allied Health adviser. Acceptance criteria, pre-clinical course requirements, 
application procedures, tuition for the senior year, and program formats may vary at each 
approved clinical program. 

Grades of C- or better and a minimum GPA of 2.50 are required in the major and 
cognates. 

Twenty hours of upper division credit, including two writing (W) courses are required. One 
(W) course must be in a cognate area and one in a noncognate area. 



Major— B.S. Clinical Laboratory Science (25 Hours) 



Required Core Courses 



Hours 



General Education Courses 



Hours 



ALHT 225 


Intro to Clinical LabSci 


2 


BIOL 151-152 


General Biology 


8 


BIOL 311 


Genetics 


4 


BIOL 330 


General Microbiology 


4 


BIOL 340 


Immunology 


3 


BIOL 397 


Intro to Research (W) 


1 




Biology Electives** 


3 



Required Cognates 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 
CHEM 311-312 Organic Chemistry 
MATH 215 Statistics 



Hours 



COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 


6 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra* 


3 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


Area A 


Computer Course 


3 


Area B 


Religion 


6 


Area B 


Upper Division Religion 


3 


Area C 


History 


3.3 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 


3 


Area F 


Behav/Fam/Hlth Sci 


3 


Area G 


Rec Skills 


1 




Electives*** 


12 



*Waived if equivalent math was taken in high school with minimum grade of B. 

**Biology Elective-Recommended 315, 417, 418 3 

***Electives 12 

Recommendations include: 

CHEM 315, 321, 341; MGNT 334; PHYS 211-212, 213-214 
TOTAL PRE-CLINICAL CREDIT HOURS 94 



82 Allied Health 



Prior to the clinical year, 94 total hours must be completed. 

HOSPITAL CLINICAL (SENIOR) YEAR Variable 

Individual approved hospital programs should be consulted for their specific courses and 
credits. Approximately forty credit hours are given in the twelve to fifteen-month clinical 
programs. Courses taught in approved programs include: 

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, Urinalysis, Hematology, Hemostasis, 
Immunology, Immunohematology, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Mycology, Clinical 
Parasitology, Clinical Biochemistry, Instrumentation, Research. 

Associate of Science in Allied Health 

The Associate of Science degree in Allied Health Professions prepares the student for 
admission to professional programs at Loma Linda University, Andrews University, or other 
universities. Admission to any professional school is dependent on meeting the GPA and 
prerequisite requirements of the individual school. Students should consult the bulletin of 
the school of their choice to ascertain the entrance requirements. 

Students who plan to graduate from Southern Adventist University with an Associate 
Degree in Allied Health must meet the A.S. degree General Education requirements of 
SAU as well as the entrance requirements of the clinical program to which they will be 
applying. 

Applications for transfer to the junior year of colleges offering Allied Health programs must 
be made late first semester of the final year at Southern Adventist University. The lowest 
acceptable grade for courses to be transferred is C. A minimum grade point average of 
2.00 is required for the Associate of Science degree at Southern Adventist University, but 
grade point averages between 3.00 and 3.50 are considered minimal for entrance to the 
junior year of most clinical Allied Health programs. Some programs require the Allied 
Health Professions Admissions Test (AHPAT). 

Note." Due to rapidly changing health care requirements, please contact the individual college/university for recent 
curriculum changes. 

The major Allied health areas in which a two year Associate Degree may be earned at 
Southern Adventist University are: 

pre-Dental Hygiene 

pre-Health Information Administration 

pre-Nutrition and Dietetics 

pre-Occupational Therapy 

pre-Physical Therapy 

pre-Respiratory Therapy 

pre-Speech Language Pathology & Audiology 

The department also offers one-year curricula to meet requirements for entrance into the 
following Allied Health degree programs at Loma Linda University and most other 
university programs: 

Occupational Therapy Assistant (Associate in Science Degree) 
Physical Therapy Assistant (Associate in Science Degree) 
Radiation Technology (Associate and Bachelor of Science Degrees) 



Allied Health 



83 



For details on these or other programs not listed here and for Southern Adventist 
University curricula for entrance into them write: 

Allied Health Programs Adviser 
Southern Adventist University 
P.O. Box 370 
Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Dental Hygiene (32 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Dental hygienists provide preventative dental care and encourage patients to develop 
good oral hygiene skills. In addition to carrying out clinical responsibilities such as 
cleaning and scaling teeth, hygienists educate patients in ways to develop and maintain 
good oral health. Although most hygienists work with individual patients, some develop 
and promote community dental health programs. In addition to career opportunities within 
dental offices, dental hygienists apply their skills and knowledge in other career activities 
including office management, business administration, dental hygiene education, 
research and marketing of dental related equipment and materials. 

The program below meets admission requirements for Loma Linda University, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. This program can be 
modified to meet the requirements of other schools. For a complete description of 
Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31-35. 



Required Courses 


Hours 


General Education Courses Hours 


ALHT 111 


Intro to Health Professions 1 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 3 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology 


8 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 6 


CHEM 111-114 


Survey of Chem & Lab 


8 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 1 


BIOL 225 


Basic Microbiology 


4 


Area A 


CPTE 100. 105, 106 3 


HLED 173 


Health for Life** 


2 


Area B 


Religion 6 


MATH 106 


Survey of Math 1 




Area C-l 


History 3 




OR 


3 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts* 6 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra 




Area F-l 


Psychology*** 3 


SOCI 125 


Intro to Sociology 


3 


Area G-3 


PE Activity 1 


SOCI 150 


Cultural Anthropology 
OR 


3 






SOCI 230 


Multicultural Relations 









* Three hours may be substituted by a course in History or Religion 

**May be substituted by NRNT 125 

***May be substituted by a course in Economics, Geography, or Political Science 

NOTE: C is the lowest acceptable grade. 

Recommended: BIOL 255 Intro to Dentistry 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Health Information Administration (37 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Health information Administration is an excellent career choice for those who would like to 
have a profession in healthcare that combines interests in computer science, business, 
management, law, and medicine. These professionals have opportunities to assist in the 
development of health information systems for quality patient care, financial 
reimbursement, medical research, health care planning, and health care quality 
evaluation. One of the many career options chosen by Health Information Administrators 
is the management of a health information department. In this position the manager will 
determine department policies, budget department resources, provide leadership in 
planning and organizing the department, and evaluate and motivate employees. 



84 



Allied Health 



Southern Adventist University offers a two-year associate degree that provides the 
prerequisite courses for entrance into the final two years of the bachelors degree program 
at Loma Linda University. The program can be modified to meet requirements of other 
schools. For a complete description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer 
to pages 31-35. 



Required Courses Hours 


ACCT 103 


College Accounting 


3 


ALHT 111 


Intro to Health Professions 


1 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology 


8 


BUAD 104 


Business Software 


3 


BUAD 310 


Bus Communications (W) 


3 


CHEM 111-114 


Survey of Chemistry & Lab 


8 


HLED 173 


Health for Life** 


2 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


SOCI 150 


Cultural Anthropology 






OR 


3 


SOCI 230 


Multicultural Relations 




PSYC/SOCI/ 


Elective 


3 


PLSC/GEOG 







General Education Courses 



Hours 



COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


CPTE 100 


Computer Concepts* 


1 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 


6 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


Area B 


Religion 


6 


Area C-l 


History (Choose 1 from 






154, 155, 174. or 175 


3 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 
(from 2 different areas) 


6 


Area G-3 


PE Activity 


1 



* May take challenge exam 

**May be substituted by NRNT125, Nutrition 

NOTE: C is the lowest acceptable grade. 

Medical Terminology (not offered atSAU. See Allied Health adviser) 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Nutrition and Dietetics (29-33 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Dietitians and nutritionists use their knowledge of the principles of nutrition to help 
people develop healthy eating habits. Dietitians may be involved in setting up and 
supervising food service systems for institutions such as hospitals, prisons, and schools; 
and promoting sound eating habits through education and research. Clinical dietitians 
provide nutritional services for patients in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, or doctors' 
offices. Community dietitians counsel individuals and groups on nutritional practices 
designed to prevent disease and promote good health. Management dietitians are 
responsible for large scale meal planning and preparation in such places as hospitals, 
nursing homes, company cafeterias, and schools. 

Southern Adventist University offers associate degree programs which provide the 
prerequisite courses for entrance into the final two years of the bachelors degree 
programs of both Andrews University and Loma Linda University. These programs can be 
modified to meet requirements of other schools as well. 

Andrews University Track (33 Hours) 

The program below meets the admission requirements for Andrews University, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. For a complete 
description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31-35. 



Allied Health 



85 



Andrews University Track, continued 



Required Courses 

ALHT111 
BIOL 101-102 
BIOL 225 
CHEM 111-114 
MATH 120 
NRNT125 
PSYC 122 
SOCI 125 



Hours 



General Education Courses 



Hours 



Intro to Health Professions 
Anatomy & Physiology 
Basic Microbiology 
Survey of Chemistry & Lab 
Precalculus Algebra* 
Nutrition 

General Psychology 
Intro to Sociology 



1 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


8 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 


6 


4 


HIST 174-175 


World Civilizations 1 & II 


6 


8 


HMNT205 


Arts & Ideas 


3 


3 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


3 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 


3 


3 


Area B 


Religion 


6 


3 


Area G-3 


Recreation Skills 


1 




Select three (3) hours from the following: 


3 




ARTH 218 


Art Appreciation 






ELIT 216 


Approaches to Literature 






HMNT210 


Intro to Philosophy 






MUHL115 


Listening to Music 






PHTO 125 


Intro to Photography 





*Three years of high school math including Algebra 1, II plus higher math or college algebra taken in college 

Loma Linda University Track (29 Hours) 

The program below meets admission requirements for Loma Linda University, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. For a complete 
description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31-35. 



Required Courses 


Hours 


General Education Courses Hours 


ALHT111 


Intro to Health Professions 1 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 3 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology 


8 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 6 


BIOL 225 


Basic Microbiology 


4 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 1 


CHEM 151 


General Chemistry** 


4 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 3 


NRNT125 


Nutrition 


3 


Area B 


Religion 6 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


Area C-l 


History (Choose 1 from 


SOCI 125 


Intro to Sociology 


3 




154, 155, 174 or 175) 3 


SOCI/PSYC/PLSC Elective 


3 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 6 










(from 2 different areas) 








Area G-3 


Recreation Skills 1 
Electives (or Math)* 6 



*Three years of high school math including Algebra I, II plus higher math or college algebra taken in college 
**Can substitute CHEM 111-114 
NOTE: C is the lowest acceptable grade 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Occupational Therapy (34-35 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

An occupational therapist works with people whose lives have been disrupted by physical 
injury or illness, developmental problems, the aging process, and social or psychological 
difficulties. Occupational therapists use selected educational, vocational and 
rehabilitative activities to help individuals reach the highest functional levels possible, 
become self reliant and build a balanced lifestyle of work and leisure. 

The program below meets admission requirements for Loma Linda University, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. This program can be 
modified to meet the requirements of other schools. For a complete description of 
Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31-35. 
Nine hours of electives to make a total of 64 hours. 

A minimum of 40 hours work experience (volunteer or as an employee) in an occupational 
therapy department is required. 



86 



Allied Health 



Required Courses Hours 


ALHT 111 


Intro to Health Professions 1 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology 8 


BIOL 225 


Basic Microbiology 4 


CHEM/PHYS 


Select from Chem/Phys/ 3-4 




Physical Science 


HLED 173 


Health for Life 2 


NRNT125 


Nutrition 3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 3 


SOCI 125 


Intro to Sociology 3 


Electives (or Mi 


ath)* 4 



General Education Courses 



Hours 



COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 


6 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 


3 


Area B 


Religion 


6 


Area C-l 


History (Choose 1 from 






154, 155, 174 or 175) 


3 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 
(from 2 different areas) 


6 


Area G-3 


Recreation Skills 


1 



*Three years of high school math including Algebra I, II plus higher math or college algebra taken in college 

A minimum of 40 hours work experience (volunteer or as an employee) in an occupational therapy department is 
required. 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Physical Therapy (92 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Physical therapists work to improve the mobility, relieve the pain, and prevent or limit the 
permanent disability of patients suffering from injuries or disease. Their patients include 
accident victims or handicapped individuals with such conditions as nerve injuries, 
amputations, low back pain, arthritis, and heart disease. Some physical therapists treat a 
wide variety of problems and others specialize in such areas as pediatrics, orthopedics, 
and sports physical therapy. The working environment of physical therapists varies from 
specially equipped facilities in hospitals or clinics to schools, private offices, and private 
homes. 

Andrews University Track (38 Hours) 

The program below meets Andrews University admission requirements, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. This program can be 
modified to meet the requirements of other schools. The Doctorate of Physical Therapy 
(DPT) program at Andrews is three years (nine semesters) in length. For a complete 
description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31-35. 



Required Courses Hours 


ALHT 111 


Intro to Health Professions 1 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology* 8 


CHEM 151-152 


General Chemistry 8 


HLED 173 


Health for Life*** 2 


MATH 215 


Statistics 3 


PETH 315 


Physiology of Exercise (W) 4 


PHYS 127-128 


Exploring Physics 1 & II 6 


PSYC 101 


Psyc of Personal & Soc Adj 




OR 3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 3 


Cognates 




Electives**** 


9 


UD Electives 


12 


Medical Terminc 


fogy 1 



General Education Courses 


Hours 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 


6 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 


3 


Area B 


Religion 


6 


Area B 


UD Religion 


3 


Area C-l 


History 


3 


Area D 


Music or Art Appreciation 


3 


Area G-3 


Recreation Skills 


1 


PLSC/GEOG/ 


Elective** 


3 


ECON 







Allied Health 



87 



Andrews University Track, continued 

Medical Terminology (not offered atSAU— See Allied Health adviser) 

*May be substituted by BIOL 151-152, General Biology 

**May be substituted by a course in Sociology 

***May be substituted by NRNT 125, Nutrition 

****To fulfill the total 92 semester credits required, electives should be chosen from service-related courses, 

business, cultural and diversity courses, arts and humanities, and physical activities. At least 15 upper division 

credits (300 or 400 level courses) from three or more content areas are required. 

Andrews University Admission and Degree Requirements: 

Andrews University requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in science prerequisites 
and general education prerequisite courses. C is the lowest acceptable grade for science 
and cognate courses. Also required is a minimum of 80 hours of observation or work 
experience under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist, in at least two distinctly 
different patient care settings. Twenty hours minimum must be spent in an inpatient 
setting. 

Loma Linda University Track (40-41 Hours) 

The program below meets Loma Linda University admission requirements, as well as 
Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. degree. This program can be 
modified to meet the requirements of other schools. The program at Loma Linda is 3-1/4 
years in length. For a complete description of Southern's General Education requirements, 
refer to pages 31-35. 
Required Courses Hours 



General Education Courses 



Hours 



ALHT111 


Intro to Health Professions 


1 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology* 


8 


CHEM 151-152 


General Chemistry 


8 


HLED 173 


Health for Life** 


2 


MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PETH 315 


Physiology of Exercise (W) 






OR 


3-4 


BIOLUD 


Choose UD Biology 




PHYS 127-128 


Exploring Physics 1 & II 


6 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


SOCI/PSYC/ 


Elective 


3 


PLSC 







COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 3 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 6 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 1 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 3 


Area B 


Religion 6 


Area B 


UD Religion 3 


Area C-l 


History (Choose 1 from 3 




(HIST 154, 155, 174, or 175) 


Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 6 




(from 2 different areas) 


Area D 


UD Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 3 


Area G-3 


Recreation Skills 1 


SOCI/PSYC 


UD Elective 3 




UD Electives*** 3 




Electives 10-11 



*May be substituted by BIOL 151-152, General Biology 

**May be substituted by NRNT 125, Nutrition 

***May be lower division, but if planning to apply to Andrews University as well, these need to be upper division. 

Electives to make a minimum total of 92 hours, 15 of which must be upper division. 

Loma Linda University Admission and Degree Requirements: For admission into the 
Physical Therapy Program, Loma Linda University requires a 3.00 GPA in science 
prerequisites and total credits. C is the lowest acceptable grade for any transferable 
course. Also required is a minimum of 80 hours work experience (volunteer or employee) 
in a physical therapy department, 20 of which must be in an inpatient setting. 



88 Allied Health 



Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Respiratory Therapy (32 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Respiratory therapists apply scientific knowledge and theory to practical clinical problems 
of respiratory care. The respiratory therapist is qualified to assume primary responsibility 
for all respiratory care modalities, including the supervision of respiratory therapy 
technician functions. The respiratory therapist may be required to exercise considerable 
independent clinical judgement, under the supervision of a physician, in the respiratory 
care of patients. Respiratory therapy personnel are employed in hospitals, nursing care 
facilities, clinics, physicians' offices, companies providing emergency oxygen services, and 
municipal organizations. 

Southern Adventist University offers a two-year associate degree that provides the 
prerequisite courses for entrance into the final two years of the bachelors degree program 
at Loma Linda University. The program can be modified to meet requirements of other 
schools. For a complete description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer 
to pages 31-35. 



Required Courses Hours 


General Education Courses Hours 


ALHT111 


Intro to Health Professions 


1 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 3 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology* 


8 


ENGL 101-102 


College Composition 6 


BIOL 225 


Basic Microbiology 


4 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 1 


CHEM 111-114 


Survey of Chem & Lab**** 


8 


Area A 


CPTE 100, 105, 106 3 


HLED 173 


Health for Life*** 


2 


Area B 


Religion 6 


PHYS 127-128 


Exploring Physics 1 or II** 


3 


Area C-l 


History (Choose 1 from 3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 




(HIST 154. 155, 174, or 175) 


SOCI 150 


Cultural Anthropology 




Area D 


Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 6 




OR 


3 




(from 2 different areas) 


SOCI 230 


Multicultural Relations 




Area G-3 

PSYC/SOCI/ 
PLSC/GEOG 


Recreation Skills 1 
Elective 3 



Three years of high school math including Algebra I, II plus higher math or college algebra taken in college. 

*May be substituted by BIOL 151-152, General Biology 

**Physics required only if not taken in high school 

***May be substituted by NRNT 125, Nutrition 

****May be substituted by CHEM 151-152, General Chemistry 

NOTE: C is the lowest acceptable grade. 

Major— A.S. Allied Health Pre-Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (34- 
35 Hours) 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Speech-language pathologists identify, assess, and treat persons with speech and 
language disorders while audiologists assess and treat hearing impaired individuals. 
Because both occupations are concerned with communication, individuals competent in 
one area must be familiar with the other. The duties of speech-language pathologists and 
audiologists vary. Most, however, provide direct clinical services to individuals with 
communication disorders. In speech, language, and hearing clinics they may 
independently develop and implement a treatment program. In private medical centers 
and other facilities, they may be part of a team that develops and executes a treatment 
plan. In schools they may help administrators develop individual or group programs, 
counsel parents on prevention of hearing disorders, and assist professors with classroom 
activities. 



Allied Health 



89 



The program below meets admission requirements for Andrews University and Loma 

Linda University, as well as Southern Adventist University's requirements for an A.S. 

degree. This program can be modified to meet the requirements of other schools. For a 

complete description of Southern's General Education requirements, refer to pages 31- 

35. 

Required Courses Hours 



General Education Courses 



Hours 



ALHT 111 


Intro to Health Professions 


1 


COMM 135 


ALHT 265 


T:lntro to Spch-Lang Path 


2 


ENGL 101-102 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy & Physiology 


8 


PEAC 225 


CH EM/MATH/ 


Select from CHEM. MATH 


3-4 


Area A 


BIOL/PHYS 


BIOL, or PHYS* 




Area B 


HLED 173 


Health for Life 


2 


Area C-l 


PHYS 127-128 


Exploring Physics 1 or II** 


3 




PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


Area D 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 


3 




SOCI/PSYC/ 


Select from SOCI, PSYC, or 


3 


Area G-3 


PLSC 


Elective 








Electives (or MATH) 


3 






Electives 


4 





Intro to Public Speaking 3 

College Composition 6 

Fitness for Life 1 

CPTE 100, 105, 106 3 

Religion 6 

History (Choose 1 from HIST 3 
(154, 155, 174, or 175)** 

Foreign Lang/Lit/Fine Arts 6 
(from 2 different areas) 

Recreation Skills 1 



*MATH 215 needed for AU. LLU accepts additional Biology/Physics/Math/Chemistry 
** AU requires HIST 174 or 175, World Civilization 



90 Department of Biology 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Chair: Keith Snyder 

Faculty: Earl Aagaard, Joyce L. Azevedo, David Ekkens, L. Ann Foster, Rick Norskov, Lee 
Spencer, Neville Trimm 

Adjunct Faculty: Roger Hall 

Adjunct Research Faculty: Scott Hodges 

Biology 

The study of Biology constitutes one of the most exciting and important fields of scientific 
investigation, since it provides a better understanding of ourselves and the living things 
around us. Even the casual observer of Biology who pauses long enough to take a course 
may derive a lifetime of pleasure and fulfillment from a hobby such as bird watching, shell 
collecting, or wild flower photography. 

Mission Statement 

The Biology Department exists as an integral part of Southern Adventist University with its 
mission to provide a quality Seventh-day Adventist Christian undergraduate education, 
emphasizing the balanced development of the spiritual, intellectual, physical, and social 
dimensions of men and women. Within the framework of a Christian understanding of the 
origin and workings of biological systems, the department seeks to provide opportunities 
for its academic and local communities to understand the value, process and limitations 
of scientific inquiry as well as to develop an awareness and understanding of the 
biological world and our responsibility to it. Its curricula are designed to provide students 
with high quality preparation for careers in the biological and biomedical professions. 

The Biology Major 

A major in Biology is an excellent starting point for numerous careers which are both 
rewarding and challenging. With a degree in Biology, one may pursue graduate study 
leading to research in the basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, ecology, microbiology, 
cytology, etc.), teaching at the college or graduate level, or employment in industry or 
government. A biology degree is also the degree of choice in preparation for high-school 
teaching, medicine, dentistry, optometry, careers in wildlife, forestry or zoo management, 
health education, public health, biostatistics, epidemiology, and environmental health, to 
name a few. 

The Biology Department makes available a number of experiences, both curricular and 
extracurricular, to enrich its students' academic programs. The department offers courses 
which include field experiences in Indonesia, Canada, Smoky Mountains, and the 
Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. The Tennessee Aquarium in nearby Chattanooga 
provides additional learning resources. The department is also affiliated with Walla Walla 
University's Rosario Beach Biological Field Station (see page 26). 

Extracurricular opportunities include membership in the Beta Beta Beta national 
biological honor society, a yearly lecture series on natural history and research topics (see 
page 24), as well as a premedical preceptorship program (see page 215). 



Department of Biology 



91 



Assessment 

In order to help evaluate the department's teaching effectiveness and the academic 
achievements of its graduates, all seniors are required to take the ETS Major Field 
Achievement Test in Biology prior to their final semester. The results of these exams are 
used by the department staff to evaluate class offerings as well as program requirements. 



Degrees in Biology 
Biology Core (23 Hours) 



BIOL 151-152 


General Biology 


8 


BIOL 311 


Genetics 


4 


BIOL 317 


Ecology 


3 


BIOL 412 


Cell and MolecularBiology 


4 


BIOL 424 


Issues in Natural Sci/Rel (W) 


3 


BIOL 486 


Biology Seminar 


1 



Biology Elective Areas: 

Basic Zoology: 

BIOL 313 Developmental Biology 

BIOL 387 Animal Behavior 

BIOL 416 Human Anatomy 

BI0L417 Animal Histology 

BIOL 418 Animal Physiology 



Botany & Ecology: 

BIOL 250 Intro to Marine Biology 

BIOL 252 Tropical Biology 

BIOL 321 Field Ecology 

BIOL 408 Flowering Plants and Ferns 

BIOL 409 Smoky Mountain Flora 

Clinical Sciences: 

BIOL 315 Parasitology 

BI0L330 General Microbiology 

BIOL 340 Immunology 

Zoology Field: 

BIOL 312 Vertebrate Natural History 

BIOL 314 Ornithology 

BIOL 320 Entomology 

BIOL 411 Mammalogy 



Major— B.A. Biology (32 Hours) Chemistry Minor Recommended 



Required Biology Courses Hours 

Biology Core Courses 23 

Biology Electives* 9 



Hours 



Required Cognates 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 8 

CHEM 311-312 Organic Chemistry 8 

MATH 120 Precalculus Algebra** 3 

Highly Recommended 

MATH 121 Precalculus Trigonometry** 2 

PHYS 211-214 General Physics & Lab 8 



*One course minimum from three of the four biology elective areas. 
**Waived if equivalent math was taken in high school with minimum grade of B 



Major— B.S. Biology (41 Hours) 



Required Biology Courses 


Hours 




Biology Core Courses 


23 




Biology Electives* 


18 


Highly Recommended 




MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


BIOL 397 


Intro to Biological Rsrch (W) 1 


BIOL 497 


Research in Biology (W) 


1-2 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



CHEM 151-152 
CHEM 311-312 
MATH 120 
MATH 121 
MATH 215 
PHYS 211-214 



General Chemistry 8 

Organic Chemistry 8 

Precalculus Algebra** 3 

Precalculus Trigonometry** 2 

Statistics 3 

General Physics & Lab 8 



*One course minimum from each of the four biology elective areas. 

* "Waived if equivalent math was taken in high school with minimum grade of £ 



92 



Department of Biology 



Major— B.S. Biology, Biomedical Emphasis (41 Hours) 



Required Biology Courses Hours 

Biology Core Courses 23 

Biology Electives* 18 

*Se/ect six (6) hours from Basic Zoology and six (6) 
from Clinical Sciences. Select one course from 
each of the two remaining elective areas. 

**Waived if equivalent math was taken in high 
school with minimum grade of B. 



Required Cognates 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 



Hours 



CHEM 311-312 


Organic Chemistry 


8 


CHEM 341 


Biochemistry 


4 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra** 


3 


MATH 121 


Precalculus Trigonometry** 


2 


MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PHYS 211-214 


General Physics & Lab 


8 


Highly Recommended 




ACCT 103 


College Accounting 


3 


BIOL 397 


Intro to Research (W) 


1 


BIOL 497 


Research in Biology (W) 


1-2 


MGNT334 


Principles of Management 


3 



Major— B.A. Biology, Teacher Certification, 7-12 (36 Hours) 

Secondary certification in Biology requires a baccalaureate degree consisting of 36 credits 
of specified biology courses, a minor in chemistry, specified cognates, and completion of 
professional education courses (page 119) for licensure. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 



Required Biology Core Courses Hours 




Biology Core Courses 23 


BIOL 312 


Vertebrate Natural History 3 


BIOL 330 


General Microbiology 4 


BIOL 408 


Flowering Plants & Ferns 




OR 3 


BIOL 409 


Smoky Mt. Flora 


BIOL 418 


Animal Physiology 3 



Chemistry Minor 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 

CHEM 311-312 Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 341 Biochemistry I 

Required Cognates 

ERSC 105 Earth Science 

MATH 215 Statistics 

PHYS 127 Exploring Physics I 



Hours 



Minor— Biology (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

BIOL 151-152 General Biology 8 

Biology Electives* 10 

*A minimum of six hours must be upper division. 

Rosario Beach Marine Biological Field Station 

The Rosario Beach Marine Station is a teaching and research facility operated by Walla 
Walla University in affiliation with Southern Adventist University and other Adventist 
colleges. Located seven miles south of Anacortes, Washington, the station occupies 40 
acres of beach and timberland. In addition to some of the biology courses listed in this 
Catalog, classes taught for five quarter credits through WWU are equivalent to 3.3 
semester hours. For current class offerings, see www. http://rosario.wwc.edu . 



School of Business and Management 93 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT) 

Accredited through the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) 

Dean: Don Van Ornam 

Faculty: Michael Cafferky, Richard Erickson, H. Robert Gadd, Lisa S. Goolsby, Julie Hyde, 
Kimberly Miller, Robert Montague, Braam Oberholster, Cliff Olson, Verlyne Starr, Dennis 
Steele, Leon Weeks, Jon Wentworth 

Adjunct Faculty: Robert Broome, Herbert Coolidge, William Dean, Doug Frood, Henry 
Hicks, MarkWaldrop, GregWillett, Robert Young 

Institute for Ethical Leadership: Carrie Harlin 

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE): Carrie Harlin 

Business Advisory Board: Bud Cason, Joseph Decosimo, Russell Friberg, Charles Martin, 
Jay McElroy, Bill McGinnis, Chris McKee, Denzil McNeilus, Volker Schmidt 

Advisory Councils: 

Long-Term Care Administration: Doug Anderson, Robert Broome, Jo Edwards, Letitia S. 
Erdmann, Michelle Fetters, Doug Ford, Jan Rushing, Jeremy Stoner, Mark Waldrop, 
Robert Young 

Management and Marketing: Barry Anthony, Brian Bergherm, Ray Childers, Franklin 
Farrow, Danny Fell, Mike McKee, D. L. (Pete) Johnson, Debbie Shepard 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the School of Business and Management lies within the mission of 
Southern Adventist University. The mission of the School of Business and Management is 
to develop Christ-centered business leaders who integrate knowledge and application 
with high moral values. 

Objectives 

The courses and programs offered by the School of Business and Management are 
designed to prepare students for business-related careers in the for-profit and not-for- 
profit sectors and/or for further graduate education. 

The objectives of the school are: 

1. To give the student a broad background of knowledge of the free enterprise 
system within a framework of moral and ethical guidelines. 

2. To assist the student in developing a sound Christian philosophy toward our 
current economic environment and the ever-changing business world of the 
future. 

3. To provide the student with a quality academic program with basic business skills 
required for initial job placement. 

4. To encourage Seventh-day Adventist students to serve as workers and in 
positions of business leadership with organizations sponsored by this 
denomination when opportunities are available. 

5. To foster within all students a commitment to excellence and a concept of service 
in the workplace and to community. 



94 School of Business and Management 



6. To provide the necessary academic background for entrance into graduate 
degree programs in business. 

Admission Requirements for School of Business & Management 

Those pursuing a degree program in the School of Business and Management must apply 
for admission before or during their sophomore year (24-54 semester hours). Transfer 
students will be considered on a case by case basis. Students may be admitted who have 
met these criteria: 

• Earned an ACT English score of at least 22; Math as required by major. 

• Completed nine hours of business courses in residence with an earned 
overall 

• major GPA of 2.25 or better with no grade less than "C". 
Applications are available at the Office of the School of Business and Management. 

Accreditation 

Southern Adventist University has received specialized accreditation for its business and 
business-related programs through the International Assembly for Collegiate Business 
Education (ACBE), Olathe, Kansas. The following degree programs are accredited by the 
IACBE: 

• Bachelor of Business Administration degree 

• Bachelor of Science degrees in Business Administration, Computer Information 
Systems, Corporate Community Wellness Management, Long-Term Care 
Administration, and Sports Studies 

• Master of Business Administration 

• Master of Financial Services 

• Master of Science in Administration 

School of Business and Management Probation 

1. If a student's cumulative GPA in the major falls below 2.25, the student will be 
placed on School of Business and Management probation and the course load 
restricted to a maximum of 13 credit hours per semester. 

2. A student will remain on probation, including the restricted course load, until the 
cumulative GPA in the major improves to 2.25. Students must raise their 
cumulative GPA in the major to a minimum of 2.25 within two semesters or be 
dismissed from the program. 

Degree Requirements 

1. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 in the major. 

2. Courses with grades lower than "C" (2.00) in the major studies must be repeated. 

3. The following courses MUST BE TAKEN in residence at Southern Adventist 
University in various School of Business and Management majors: 



School of Business and Management 



95 



B.B.A./B.S. Core 



Hours 



B.B.A./B.S. Core, continued Hours 



BUAD 358 Eth, Soc & Leg Env of Bus (W) 3 

BUAD 288/488 Business Seminar 1 

FNCE315 Business Finance 3 

MGNT464 Business Strategies (W) 3 

10 

Computer Information Systems Major 

Six hours in concentration 6 



Entrepreneurship Concentration 

MGNT371 Prin of Entrepreneurship 

MGNT 372 Small Business Mgmt 



3 
3 
6 

International Business Concentration 

MGNT 364 International Bus & Econ 3 

MGNT 368 Multicultural Management 3 



Financial Management Major 

ACCT450 Advanced Accounting 
Six additional hours in concentration 



Management Major 

Six hours in major including: 
MGNT 410 Org Theory & Design 
UD Management Elective 



Marketing Concentration 

BMKT328 Sales Management 

BMKT424 Marketing Strategy 



LTCA Major 

LTCA 431 
LTCA 432 
LTCA 434 
LTCA 435 
LTCA 492 



Gen Admin LTC Facility 3 

Tech Aspects of LTC 3 

Fin Mgmt LTC Facility 3 

Hum Res Mgmt/Mktg LTC Fac 3 
LTC Internship 4-8 

16-20 



Assessment 



To help the graduates in Business Administration to evaluate their academic progress and 
to aid the School in evaluating teaching effectiveness, students who major in business- 
related fields will be required to: 

1. Participate in the university-wide testing program in general education. 

2. Take the area test in business prepared by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) 
during the last semester of their academic program. This test may be integrated 
into an upper division course and may constitute part of the grade for that course. 

3. Complete teacher evaluations for courses taken each semester. 

Programs 

The School offers the following degrees: 

1. Bachelor of Business Administration degree (B.B.A.) with majors in Financial 
Services, Management and Marketing. 

Within two of these majors, the student may choose a concentration: 
Financial Management major: 

• Accounting 

• Finance 

• General 
Management major: 

• Entrepreneurship 

• General Management 

• Human Resource Management 

• International Business 

with majors in Business Administration and 



3. 



Bachelor of Science degree (B.S. 
Long-Term Care Administration. 

Associate of Science degree in Accounting. 



96 



School of Business and Management 



4. Associate of Science degree in Business Administration. 

5. A BBA/MBA concentration for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree 
and the Master of Business Administration degree or the Master of Financial 
Services degree in a five year period. 



Bachelor of Business Administration Degrees 



B.B.A. Core (40 Hours) 



Required Core 

ACCT 221 
ACCT 222 
BUAD 105 
BUAD 317 
BMKT326 
BUAD 310 
BUAD 339 
BUAD 358 
BUAD 288/488 
ECON 224 
ECON 225 
FNCE315 
MGNT334 
MGNT464 



Hours 

Principles of Accounting! 3 

Principles of Accounting II 3 

Business Spreadsheets 3 

Management Info Systems 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Bus Communications (W) 3 

Business Law 3 

Eth, Soc,& Legal Env Bus (W) 3 

Seminar in Business Admin 1 

Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

Prin of Microeconomics 3 

Business Finance 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Business Strategies (W) 3 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



BUAD 104 


Business Software 


3 


BUAD 128 


Personal Finance 


3 


BUAD 221 


Business Statistics 






OR 


3 


MATH 215 


Statistics 




BUAD 412 


Preparing to Meet the Firms* 


1 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra 


3 


PSYC 


Any 3-hour class 


3 



*Recommend to take in Junior year 



Major— B.B.A. Computer Information Systems (67 Hours) 



Required Courses 

BBA Core 
CPIS 220 Applications Programming 

CPIS 315 Req & Systems Analysis 

CPIS 435 Project Mgmt & Practice 

CPIS 442 Software Evaluation 

CPTE 212 Web Programming 

CPTR 103 Principles of Computing 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 

CPTR 319 Database Mgmt Systems 

CPTR 327 User Interface Design 



Hours 

40 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



Required Cognate 

CPTE 110 Web Development 

OR 
JOUR 242 Intro to Web Design 



Hours 

1 



Major— B.B.A. Financial Management (66 Hours) 
General (66 Hours) 



Required Courses 



BBA Core 
ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACCT 312 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACCT 450 Advanced Accounting 

FNCE 455 Fund of Investment 

UD Electives in Acct/Finance 12 



Hours 

40 
4 

4 
3 
3 



Accounting Concentration (66 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

BBA Core 40 

ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting I 4 

ACCT 312 Intermediate Accounting II 4 

ACCT 450 Advanced Accounting 3 

FNCE 455 Fundamentals of Investment 3 

UD Accounting Electives 12 
Accounting majors need 150 semester hours 
before sitting for the CPA examination in Tennessee 
and most other jurisdictions. 



Finance Concentration (66 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 




BBA Core 40 


ACCT 311 


Intermediate Accounting 1 4 


ACCT 312 


Intermediate Accounting II 4 


ACCT 450 


Advanced Accounting 3 


FNCE 455 


Fund of Investment 3 




UD Finance Electives 12 



School of Business and Management 



97 



Major— B.B.A. Management (61-64 Hours) 



Entrepreneurship Concentration (64 
Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 





BBA Core 


40 


ACCT 321 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


MGNT344 


Human Resources Mgmt 


3 


MGNT368 


Multicultural Management 


3 


MGNT371 


Prin of Entrepreneurship 


3 


MGNT372 


Small Busin Management 


3 


MGNT410 


Org Theory and Design 


3 


MGNT420 


Organizational Behavior 


3 




UD Business Elective 


3 



General Management (64 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

BBA Core 40 

ACCT 321 Managerial Accounting 3 

MGNT344 Human Resources Mgmt 3 
MGNT358 Operations Management 

OR 3 
MGNT368 Multicultural Management 

MGNT364 International Busin & Econ 3 
MGNT372 Small Business Management 3 

MGNT410 Org Theory and Design 3 

MGNT420 Organizational Behavior 3 

UD Management Elective 3 



Human Resource Management 
Concentration (61 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

BBA Core 40 

Social Psychology 3 

Industrial/Org Psyc 3 

Psychological Testing 3 

Human Resource Mgmt 3 

Multicultural Management 3 

Organizational Behavior 3 

Compensation & Benefits 3 



PSYC 224 

PSYC 253 

PSYC 357 

MGNT344 

MGNT368 

MGNT420 

MGNT460 

International 
(61 Hours) 

Required Courses 

ACCT 321 

BMKT375 

MGNT344 

MGNT364 

MGNT368 

MGNT410 



Business Concentration 



Hours 



BBA Core 40 

Managerial Accounting 3 

International Marketing 3 

Human Resources Mgmt 3 

International Busin & Econ 3 

Multicultural Management 3 

Org Theory and Design 3 

UD Business Elective 3 
Required Cognates 

COMM 330 Intercultural Communication 3 

GEOG 204 World Geography 3 

RELT458 World Religions (W) 3 

SOCI 150 Cultural Anthropology 3 

Intermediate Foreign Lang 6 

Suggested Cognates 

HIST 174/175 World Civilizations 3,3 

PSYC 231 Multicultural Relations 3 

RELP 340 World Missions 3 



Major— B.B.A. Marketing (67 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ACCT 321 

BMKT327 

BMKT328 

BMKT410 

BMKT423 

BMKT424 

BMKT497 

MGNT364 

MGNT420 



Hours 



BBA Core 40 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Consumer Behavior 3 

Sales Management 3 

Service Marketing 3 

Promotional Strategy 3 

Marketing Strategy 3 

Marketing Research 3 

Int'l Business & Economics 3 

Organizational Behavior 3 



Required Cognate Hours 

BUAD 345 Computer-Aided Publishing 3 



98 



School of Business and Management 



Bachelor of Science Degrees 

Major— B.S. Business Administration (46 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



ACCT 221 


Principles of Accounting 1 


3 


BUAD 104 


ACCT 222 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 


BUAD 128 


ACCT 321 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


BUAD 221 


BMKT326 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


BUAD 412 


BUAD 105 


Business Spreadsheets 


3 


MATH 107 


BUAD 310 


Bus Communications (W) 


3 




BUAD 317 


Management Inf Systems 


3 


*Recommf 


BUAD 339 


Business Law 


3 




BUAD 358 


Eth, Soc,& Leg Env of Bus (W) 


3 




BUAD 288/488 


Seminar in Business Admin 


1 




ECON 224 


Prin of Macroeconomics 


3 




ECON 225 


Prin of Microeconomics 


3 




FNCE315 


Business Finance 


3 




MGNT334 


Principles of Management 


3 




MGNT464 


Business Strategies (W) 


3 






Elective in Business 


3 





Business Software 3 

Personal Finance 3 

Business Statistics 3 

Preparing to Meet the Firms* 1 
Survey of Math (or above) 3 



Major— B.S. Long-Term Care Administration (55-59 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ACCT 221 
ACCT 222 
ACCT 321 
BUAD 105 
BMKT326 
BUAD 310 
BUAD 339 
BUAD 358 
ECON 224 
ECON 225 
FNCE315 
LTCA 431 
LTCA 432 
LTCA 434 
LTCA 435 
LTCA 492 
MGNT334 
MGNT464 



Hours 

Principles of Accounting I 3 

Principles of Accounting II 3 
Managerial Accounting 3 

Business Spreadsheets 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Business Communications 3 
Business Law 3 

Eth, Soc, & Leg Env of Bus (W) 3 
Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

Prin of Microeconomics 3 

Business Finance 3 

Gen Adm of LT Care Facility 3 
Tech Aspects of LT Care 3 

Fin Mgmt of LT Care Facility 3 
Hum Res Mgt& MrkgLTFac 3 
LT Ca re Ad m I ntern 4-8 

Principles of Management 3 
Business Strategies (W) 3 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



MATH 107 Survey of Math (or above) 3 

PSYC 349 Aging and Society (W) 3 

Recommended Cognates 

BUAD 104 Business Software 3 

BUAD 128 Personal Finance 3 

BUAD 221 Business Statistics 3 

BUAD 412 Preparing to Meet the Firms* 1 

RELT373 Christian Ethics 3 

SOCI 249 Death and Dying 2 

*Recommend to take in Junior year 



Students who have previously earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or 
university and who have completed all course work equivalent to the B.S. Business 
Administration required courses excluding BUAD 317, BUAD 310, and BUAD 488, may 
receive a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in long-term care upon the completion 
of 20 hours of courses including (LTCA 431, 432, 434, 435, 492; MGNT 344). 

This exception to the 30-hour residence requirement applies only to those who have 
completed all other major course requirements for the long-term care degree at another 
institution and have received a bachelor's degree. Regular admission to the LTCA program 
is subject to receipt of an official transcript showing completion of the bachelor's degree 
from an accredited institution. 



School of Business and Management 



99 



Combined Majors— B.S. Business Administration and Public Relations (85 
Hours) 



Business Administration (40 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


ACCT 221 




Principles of Accounting 1 


3 


ACCT 222 




Principles of Accounting II 


3 


ACCT 321 




Managerial Accounting 


3 


BUAD 105 




Business Spreadsheets 


3 


BUAD 310 




Business Communication (W) 


3 


BUAD 317 




Management Inf Systems 


3 


BUAD 339 




Business Law 


3 


BUAD 288/488 


Seminar in Business Admin 


1 


BMKT326 




Principles of Marketing 


3 


ECON 224 




Prin of Macroeconomics 


3 


ECON 225 




Prin of Microeconomics 


3 


FNCE315 




Business Finance 


3 


MGNT334 




Prin of Management 


3 


MGNT464 




Business Strategies (W) 


3 


Required Cognates Hours 


BUAD 104 


Busi 


ness Software 


3 


BUAD 128 


Personal Finance 


3 


BUAD 221 


Business Statistics 


3 



Public Relations (45 Hours) 

Required Courses 

BRDC201 
COMM 103 
COMM 397 
JOUR 105 
JOUR 205 
JOUR 208 
JOUR 242 
JOUR 313 
JOUR 488 
PHTO 125 
PREL344 
PREL406 
PREL482 
PREL485 



Hours 

Foundations of Broadcasting 3 

Intro to Communication 3 

Communication Research 3 

Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 

Publication Tools & Tech 3 

Intro to Web Design 3 

Publication Editing 3 

Mass Comm & Society (W) 3 

Intro to Photography 3 

Fundamentals of Advertising 3 

Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 

Public Relations Campaign 3 

Public Relations Techniques 3 



Select three (3) hours from the following courses:3 
BUAD 358 Eth, Soc, & Legal Env of Bus (W) 
JOUR 427 Mass Media Law & Ethics 



The dual major provides students with the option to develop skills in two fields of study. Because of the joint course 
requirements, the dual major requires only four hours above the graduation requirements from a single major in 
Business Administration. 

Majors— B.S. Business Administration and A.T. Auto Service (80 Hours) 



Business Administration (43 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACCT 222 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ACCT 321 Managerial Accounting 3 

BUAD 105 Business Spreadsheets 3 

BUAD 310 Business Communication (W) 3 

BUAD 317 Management Information Sys 3 

BUAD 339 Business Law 3 

BUAD 358 Eth, Soc, & Leg Env of Bus (W) 3 
BUAD 288/488 Seminar in Business Admin 1 

BMKT326 Principles of Marketing 3 

ECON 224 Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 225 Prin of Microeconomics 3 

FNCE315 Business Finance 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 

MGNT464 Business Strategies (W) 3 

Required Cognates Hours 

BUAD 104 Business Software 3 

BUAD 128 Personal Finance 3 

BUAD 221 Business Statistics 3 

*BUAD412 Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 

*Recommend to take in Junior year 



Auto Service (37 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding 1 

Arc Welding 2 

Auto Electrical Systems 2 

Suspension. Steering & Align 3 

Manual Drive Train & Axles 3 

Engine Rebuild & Machining 4 

Heatings Air Conditioning 2 

Automatic Transmission 3 

Automotive Repair 3 

Estimating &Auto Busin Prac 1 

Engine Performance & Cptrs 3 

Eng Fuel & Emission Controls 4 

Practicum 3 

Adv Engine Performance 3 

Required Cognates Hours 

MGNT371 Prin of Entrepreneurship 3 

MGNT372 Small Business Management 3 



114 


115 


166 


167 


168 


175/375 


178 


230 


264 


273 


276/377 


277 


291 


299 



100 



School of Business and Management 



Major— A.S. Accounting (33 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ACCT 221 
ACCT 222 
ACCT 311 
ACCT 312 
ACCT 323 
ACCT 326 
BUAD 105 
BUAD 128 
BUAD 358 
ECON 224 



Hours 



Principles of Accounting I 3 

Principles of Accounting II 3 

Intermediate Accounting I 4 

Intermediate Accounting II 4 

Cost Accounting 2 

Accounting Software Tools 2 

Business Spreadsheets 3 

Personal Finance 3 

Eth, Sod & Legal Env Bus (W) 3 

Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

Business Elective 3 



Required Cognates 

BUAD 104 Business Software 



Major— A.S. Business 
Administration (30 Hours) 

Required Courses 

ACCT 221 
ACCT 222 
ACCT 321 
BMKT326 
BUAD 105 
BUAD 310 
ECON 224 
ECON 225 
MGNT334 



Principles of Accounting I 
Principles of Accounting II 
Managerial Accounting 
Principles of Marketing 
Business Spreadsheets 
Bus Communications (W) 
Prin of Macroeconomics 
Prin of Microeconomics 
Prin of Management 
Business Elective 

(Recommended elective BMKT328 Sales 

Marketing) 



Hours 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Minors in Business Administration, Entrepreneurial 
Management, Management, and Marketing 



Minor— Business Administration 
(18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACCT 222 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ECON 224 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 

OR 3 

MGNT344 Human Resource Mgmt 

UD Electives in Business 6 



Minor— Entrepreneurial 
Management (18 Hours) 

Required Courses 

*ACCT 103 
*EC0N 213 
MGNT371 
MGNT372 



Minor— Management (18 Hours) 



College Accounting 
Survey of Economics 
Prin of Entrepreneurship 
Small Business Management 
Electives in Mgmt/Mktg 
* Does not apply for business majors 

Minor— Human Resource 
Management (24 Hours) 



Hours 

3 

3 
3 

3 
6 



Required Courses 



Hours 



BUAD 310 Bus Communications (W) 3 

BUAD 358 Eth, Soc & Legal Env Bus (W) 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 

MGNT344 Human Res Management 3 

MGNT420 Organizational Behavior 3 

PSYC 224 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC253 Industrial/OrgPsyc 3 

PSYC 357 Psychological Testing 3 

Required in General Education 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 



Required Courses 

ACCT 221 
MGNT334 
MGNT344 
MGNT371 



Hours 



MGNT372 



Principles of Accounting 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Human Resource Mgmt 3 
Prin of Entrepreneurship 

OR 3 
Small Business Management 

UD Electives Business 6 



Minor— Marketing (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting 

BMKT326 Principles of Marketing 

BMKT327 Consumer Behavior 

BMKT328 Sales Management 

BMKT424 Marketing Strategy 

UD Electives in Marketing 

Recommended Cognate 

ECON 225 Principles of Microeconomics 



Department of Chemistry 101 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Chair: Rhonda Scott 

Faculty: Loren Barnhurst, Brent Hamstra, Mitch Menzmer, Bruce Schilling 

Chemistry 

A major in chemistry can prepare you for a rewarding and challenging career in traditional 
areas such as chemical engineering, environmental chemistry, quality assurance, basic or 
applied chemical research, and teaching at the high school or post secondary level. A 
major in chemistry is also excellent preparation for a career in biomedical research, 
medicine or dentistry, pharmacology, patent law, and forensic science. In a recent article 
published in the Journal of Forensic Science, crime lab directors stated they would 
preferentially hire individuals with a B.S. in chemistry. The B.S. degree in Chemistry is 
recommended in preparation for graduate study leading to research oriented careers in 
chemistry, professional applications of chemistry, or post-secondary education. The B.S. 
degree in Chemistry, Biochemistry emphasis, is recommended for students preparing for 
careers in medicine or dentistry as well as graduate study, research or teaching in 
biochemistry, molecular biology, or biotechnology. The B.A. degree is the preferred degree 
for high-school teaching, pre-paramedical fields, and some business applications. 

Mission Statement 

Within a Christian environment of learning, the Chemistry Department seeks to provide 
undergraduate students with the knowledge and skills necessary for distinguished 
professional performance in chemistry or other fields that require a strong background in 
chemistry. 

Assessment 

To aid the chemistry department in evaluating teaching effectiveness, nationally 
standardized tests prepared by the American Chemical Society are administered at the 
end of each course for which an appropriate test is available. Students majoring in 
chemistry are expected to achieve a minimum score of 40 th percentile on these exams 
and achieve a grade of C- or above in their chemistry courses. Students who score below 
the 40 th percentile but have passed the corresponding course will be given self-paced 
instructional materials to strengthen areas of identified weakness. 

Major— B.A. Chemistry (30 hours) 



Required Courses 


Hours 


Required Cognates 


Hours 


CHEM 151-152 


General Chemistry 


8 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


CHEM 311-312 


Organic Chemistry 


8 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 




CHEM 315 


Quantitative Analysis 


4 




OR 


3-4 


CHEM 385 


Chemistry Seminar 


1 


MATH 215 


Statistics 




CHEM 411 


Physical Chemistry 1 (W) 


4 


PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 


CHEM 497 


Intro to Research (W) 
Chemistry Electives 


1 
4 


PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 



NOTE: Some upper division courses are offered in 
alternate years; the student should plan 
accordingly. 



102 



Department of Chemistry 



Major— B.S. Chemistry (41 Hours) 



Required Courses 

CHEM 151-152 
CHEM 311-312 
CHEM 315 
CHEM 321 
CHEM 341 
CHEM 385 
CHEM 411 
CHEM 415 
CHEM 435 
CHEM 497 



Hours 



General Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry 
Quantitative Analysis 
Instrumental Analysis 
Biochemistry I 
Chemistry Seminar 
Physical Chemistry I (W) 
Physical Chemistry II 
Inorganic Chemistry 
Intro to Research (W) 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



8 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


8 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 


4 


4 


MATH 315 


Differential Equations 


3 


4 


PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 


4 


PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 


1 
4 

3 
4 
1 


PHYS 215-216 


General Physics CalcAppI 


2 



NOTE: Some upper division courses are offered in alternate years; the student should plan accordingly. 

Major— B.S. Chemistry, Biochemistry Emphasis (40 Hours) 



Required Courses 

BIOL 412 
CHEM 151-152 
CHEM 311-312 

CHEM 315 
CHEM 341, 342 
CHEM 343 
CHEM 385 
CHEM 411 
CHEM 497 



Hours 



Cell & Molecular Biology 
General Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry 
Quantitative Analysis 
Biochemistry 
Biochemistry Lab 
Chemistry Seminar 
Physical Chemistry (W) 
Intro to Research (W) 
Chemistry Electives 



Required Cognates 

BIOL 151,152 General Biology 



Hours 



8 


BIOL 311 


Genetics 


4 


8 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


4 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 




6 




OR 


3-4 


1 


MATH 215 


Statistics 




1 


PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 


4 

1 
3 


PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 



NOTE: To meet the recommendations of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and 
the American Chemical Society (ACS) the second math course must be MATH 182. Some upper division courses 
are offered in alternate years; the student should plan accordingly. 



Major— B.A. Chemistry, Teacher Certification (30 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



CHEM 151-152 


General Chemistry 


8 


BIOL 151 


General Biology 


4 


CHEM 311-312 


Organic Chemistry 


8 


ERSC 105 


Earth Science 




CHEM 315 


Quantitative Analysis 


4 




OR 


3 


CHEM 341 


Biochemistry 


4 


PHYS 155 


Descriptive Astronomy: 




CHEM 385 


Chemistry Seminar 


1 




Creation and Cosmology 




CHEM 411 


Physical Chemistry 1 (W) 


4 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


CHEM 497 


Intro to Research (W) 


1 


MATH 182 
MATH 215 


Calculus II 

OR 

Statistics 


3-4 








PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 








PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 








RELT317 


Issues in Phys Sci & Rlgn 


3 



It is strongly recommended that students work towards certification in a second area of 
study such as mathematics or another science area. See the School of Education and 
Psychology for listing of professional requirements (35 hours, listed on page 119) and 
general education requirements (31-35 hours). 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 



Department of Chemistry 103 



The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 

Endorsement for Teacher Certification (20 hours) 

An endorsement to teach chemistry as an additional field may be obtained by completing 
a major in another field (preferably mathematics or another science with secondary 
certification), completing a minor in chemistry that includes the courses listed below, and 
taking and passing the PRAXIS II licensure exams required for certification in chemistry. 

Required Courses Hours 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 8 

CHEM 311-312 Organic Chemistry 8 

Upper Division* 4 

20 

*The upper division course should be carefully chosen in consultation with your adviser and a faculty member in 
the chemistry department to determine what course will best help you prepare for the PRAXIS exams needed for 
certification in chemistry. Most often this course will be either CHEM 315 Quantitative Analysis or CHEM 341 
Biochemistry I. 

Minor— Chemistry (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 8 

♦Chemistry Electives 10 

*A minimum of six hours must be upper division. 



104 School of Computing 

SCHOOL OF COMPUTING 

Dean: Rick Halterman 

Faculty: Scot Anderson, John Beckett, Tyson Hall, Timothy D. Korson, P. Willard Munger 

Mission Statement 

The mission of Southern Adventist University's School of Computing is to provide an 
exemplary Christian learning environment that enables students to become Christian 
computing professionals, who, in addition to being competent in their chosen profession, 
realize their responsibility to God, church, family, employer, colleagues, and society. 

Majors in Computing 

The rapidly expanding field of computing continues to demand an ever-increasing number 
of technically educated people. The type of computer education needed also continues to 
shift. Computer graduates this year will be taking jobs that were not even available when 
they entered college four years ago. Southern Adventist University offers several computer 
curricula designed to meet the needs of students desiring to enter the computing field but 
coming to the University with a wide-range of interests and abilities. 

The B.S. degree in Computer Science, Computer Science Concentration, is designed to 
prepare for a wide range of computing professions. Software engineers, software 
developers, systems analysts, programmer/analysts, network engineers, database 
administrators, and data specialists are among the professions held by computer 
scientists. The computer science concentration curriculum is based on the guidelines 
developed by the ACM, AIS, and IEEE Computing Curricula 2005. The B.S. degree in 
Computer Science, Embedded Systems Concentration, is designed to prepare students for 
work in the exciting field of embedded systems. Embedded systems professionals are a 
type of computer engineer who deals with the use of computers which are embedded in 
other systems, such as automobiles, robots, PDAs, etc. Computer science professionals in 
both areas are distinguished by the high level of theoretical expertise and innovation they 
apply to complex problems and to the application of new technologies. 

The B.A. degree in Computer Science allows students to combine a computing degree 
with a minor or major in another academic area offering a B.A., for instance English, 
history, or music. This combination is useful in occupations such as teaching high school. 

The B.B.A. in Computer Information Systems combines classes in computing and systems 
management with classes in accounting, economics, and business administration. With a 
few years experience graduates will be equipped to manage a data processing 
department in a hospital, business, or industry. The bachelor degree in Computer 
Information Systems, offered in conjunction with the School of Business and 
Management, is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business 
Education. 

The B.S. in Computer Systems Administration is designed to prepare graduates who will 
administer the complex computer systems and networks now common in the business 
world. It requires a minimum of programming, mathematics, and business courses, while 
concentrating on the technical issues needed to administer and support modern network 
computing systems and software. 



School of Computing 105 



Admissions and Graduation Requirements 

Admission to the School of Computing is required to graduate with a major offered by the 
School of Computing. Declaration as a major is not the equivalent of acceptance to the 
School of Computing. Minimum requirements for admission to the School of Computing 
are: 

1. Acceptance to Southern Adventist University. 

2. Complete general education: ENGL 101 and 102. 

3. Completion of 6 hours of computer courses required in the major with a grade of 
"C" or better. 

4. Earned overall GPA of 2.25 or better. 

5. Earned School of Computing GPA of 2.25 or better. 

Students pursuing a major offered by the School of Computing should apply for admission 
at the end of the freshman year. Transfer students will be considered for admission after 
completing 6 hours of major courses in residence. 

School of Computing Probation 

If a student's GPA falls below 2.25 in either the major or overall, the student will be placed 
on School of Computing probation. If the GPA does not improve to 2.25 by the end of one 
semester on probation, the student must repeat courses in an effort to increase the GPA. 
The faculty of the School of Computing must approve each probation student's course 
load before the student may register. 

Assessment 

In the last semester of the senior year all computing students will be required to take a 
written two-hour exam. The results of this exam are used by the School's staff to evaluate 
class offerings as well as program requirements. 

Internship Program 

The School of Computing coordinates an internship program that encourages employers 
to utilize the skills of our students in exciting and productive ways and allows students to 
take advantage of the opportunities these employers provide. Currently the core of this 
effort is an innovative program called Meet the Firms, which includes job fair events and 
Preparing to Meet the Firms, a course that prepares students for finding jobs. Most of the 
internships are paid summer internships for which the student may also register to 
receive academic credit. 

Network Usage Policy at Southern Adventist University 

Students must comply with the Network Usage Policy. 

See http://www.computing.southern.edu/netpolicv . A hard copy of the policy is available 
from the Campus Card Desk. 



106 



School of Computing 



Programs in Computing 

Major— B.A. Computer Science (30 Hours) 



Required Courses 

CPTR 103 
CPTR 124 
CPTR 215 
CPTR 220 
CPTR 314 
CPTR 319 
CPTR 365 
CPTR 405 
CPTR 486 



Hours 



Principles of Computing 3 

Fund of Programming 4 

Fund of Software Design 4 

Org, Archit,& Assembly Lang 4 

Data Struc, Alg, & Know Sys 4 

Database Mgmt Systems 3 

Operating Systems 3 

Organization of Prog Lang 3 

Senior Seminar (W) 2 



Required Cognates Hours 

MATH 181 Calculus I 3 

MATH 215 Statistics 3 

MATH 280 Discrete Math Structures 3 



Major— B.S. Computer Science (47-49 Hours) 



Required Core 

CPTR 103 
CPTR 124 
CPTR 215 
CPTR 220 



Hours 

Principles of Computing 3 

Fund of Programming 4 

Fund of Software Design 4 

Org, Arch & Assembly Lang 4 



Required Core continued Hours 

CPTR 314 Data Struc, Algor& Know Sys* 4 

CPTR 365 Operating Systems 3 

CPTR 486 Senior Seminar (W) 2 

CPTR 488 Senior Project 2 



*CPTR 314 is recommended in sophomore year 

Computer Science Concentration (47 
Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

Core 26 

CPTR 209 Intro to Software Engineering 4 

CPTR 319 Database Mgmt Systems 3 

CPTR 405 Organization of Prog Lang 3 

Cptr Electives (CPHE/CPTR) 11 

(3 hrs must be UD; 8 hrs may be 

from CPHE) 

Required Cognates Hours 

MATH 181 Calculus I 3 

MATH 182 Calculus II 4 

MATH 200 Elementary Linear Algebra 2 

MATH 215 Statistics 3 

MATH 280 Discrete Math Structures 3 

Select twelve (12) hours from the following courses 
including one two-semester sequence with lab: 
BIOL 151,152 and any upper division BIOL except 
BIOL 421 or 424; CHEM 151,152 and any upper 
division CHEM course; PHYS 12,213,214,215,216 
and any upper division PHYS course. 

Select an additional three (3) hours from the above 
list, MATH 218, or any upper division MATH course. 



Embedded Systems Concentration (49 
Hours) 

Required Courses 

Core 
CPHE 200 Digital Logic & Design 

CPHE 310 Intro to Signal Processing 

CPHE 320 Circuit Analysis 

CPHE 380 Microcontroller Design 

CPHE 410 Computer Interfacing 

CPTR 328 Principles of Networking 

Required Cognates 



ENGR 121 
MATH 181 
MATH 182 
MATH 200 
MATH 215 
MATH 280 
MATH 315 
PHYS 211-214 



ntro to Engineering 

Calculus I 

Calculus II 

Elementary Linear Algebra 

Statistics 

Discrete Math Structures 

Differential Equations 

Gen Physics with Lab 



Hours 

26 

4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
3 

Hours 

1 
3 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 



Select four (4) hours from the following courses: 4 
BIOL 151 General Biology 

CHEM 151 General Chemistry 



School of Computing 



107 



Major— B.S. Computer Systems Administration (47 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



CPIS210 


Inform Tech Hardwr & Softwr 


3 


BUAD 126 


CPIS442 


Software Evaluation 


2 


JOUR 242 


CPTE 212 


Web Programming 


3 


MATH 120 


CPTE 228 


Becoming a Power User 


3 


MATH 215 


CPTE 254 


UNIX Systems Administration 


3 


PSYC 


CPTE 316 


Application Software Support 


3 




CPTE 433 


Network Administration 


3 




CPTR 103 


Principles of Computing 


3 




CPTR 124 


Fund of Programming 


4 




CPTR 319 


Database Mgt Systems 


3 




CPTR 327 


User Interface Design 


3 




CPTR 328 


Principles of Networking 


3 




CPTR 427 


Network Security 


3 




CPTR 446 


Web Services 


3 




CPTR 486 


Senior Seminar (W) 


2 






Computer Elective 


3 





Intro to Business 3 

Intro to Web Design 3 

Precalculus Algebra 3 

Statistics 3 

Any 3 hr Psychology course 3 



Major— B.B.A. Computer Information Systems (67 Hours) 



B.B.A. Core (40 Hours) 



Required Core 

ACCT 221 
ACCT 222 
BMKT326 
BUAD 105 
BUAD 310 
BUAD 317 
BUAD 339 
BUAD 358 
BUAD 288/488 
ECON 224 
ECON 225 
FNCE315 
MGNT334 
MGNT464 



Hours 

Principles of Accounting I 3 

Principles of Accounting II 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Business Spreadsheets 3 

Bus Communications (W) 3 

Management Info Systems 3 

Business Law 3 

Eth, Soc,& Legal Env Bus (W) 3 

Seminar in Business Admin 1 

Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

Prin of Microeconomics 3 

Business Finance 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Business Strategies (W) 3 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



BUAD 104 


Business Software 


3 


BUAD 128 


Personal Finance 


3 


BUAD 221 


Business Statistics 






OR 


3 


MATH 215 


Statistics 




*BUAD 412 


Preparing to Meet the Firms 


1 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra 


3 


PSYC 


Any 3-hour class 


3 



*Recommend to take in Junior year 



Required Courses 

BBA Core 
CPIS 220 Applications Programming 

CPIS 315 Req & Systems Analysis 

CPIS 435 Project Mgmt & Practice 

CPIS 442 Software Evaluation 

CPTE 212 Web Programming 

CPTR 103 Principles of Computing 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 

CPTR 319 Database Mgmt Systems 

CPTR 327 User Interface Design 



Hours 

40 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



Required Cognate Hours 

CPTE 110 Web Development 1 

OR 

JOUR 242 Intro to Web Design 3 



Minor— Computing (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

CPTR 103 Principles of Computing 3 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 4 

Electives 11 

(A minimum of 6 hrs must be UD) 



108 School of Education and Psychology 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Dean: Denise Dunzweiler 

Faculty: Krystal Bishop, Charles D. Burks, Myrna Colon, Robert Coombs, Alberto dos 
Santos, Suzy Gloudeman, lleana Freeman-Gutierrez, Michael Hills, Cathy Olson, Carleton 
Swafford, John Wesley Taylor V, Ruth Williams Morris 

Adjunct Faculty: Linda Dickinson, Jeff Francis, Tara Hills, Jean Lomino 

Teacher Education Council: Denise Dunzweiler, Chair 

Philosophy and Objectives 

The School of Education and Psychology subscribes to the philosophy that human beings 
were created in the image of God but as a result of willful disobedience sin has marred 
their God-given attributes and divine likeness. This philosophy recognizes that the object 
of education is also the object of redemption— to restore in people the image of their 
Maker and bring them back to the perfection in which they were created. Thus the work of 
redemption is also the work of education, involving the development of the whole person- 
physical, mental, spiritual, and social. 

The teacher education, outdoor leadership, and psychology programs are founded upon 
the basic assumption that there is a body of critical knowledge and practice for the 
professions of teaching, outdoor leadership, and psychology. 

Statement of Mission 

The mission of the School of Education and Psychology at Southern Adventist University is 
to prepare students at both undergraduate and graduate levels who can function 
effectively in a culturally pluralistic society and who are dedicated to assisting individuals 
in reaching their maximum potential in service to God and humanity. 

Policies 

Students required to perform field or practicum experiences will accept personal 
responsibility for their learning and professional behavior. Each student contracts to abide 
by policies of the School of Education and Psychology. 

Students will be expected to provide their own transportation for all field and practicum 
experiences. 

Education students will be required to provide evidence of having passed a fingerprinted 
Tennessee Board of Investigation background check prior to entering classrooms. 
Students admitted to Student Teaching are encouraged to become familiar with policies 
outlined in the Student Teaching Handbook. 

The School of Education and Psychology reserves the right to revise, add, and withdraw 
policies and/or courses as necessary to ensure a quality program. 



School of Education and Psychology 



109 



Graduate Degrees 

The School of Education and Psychology offers two Master of Science degrees: 

1. Master of Science in Education (five emphases) 

• Curriculum and Instruction 

• Educational Administration and Supervision 

• Inclusive Education 

• Literacy Education 

• Outdoor Teacher Education 

2. Master of Science in Counseling (two emphases) 

• Professional Counseling 

• School Counseling 

Degree requirements are described in a separate Graduate Catalog, available by 
contacting the School of Education and Psychology. 

Undergraduate Psychology Degrees 

Undergraduate programs in psychology are pre-professional in that they are designed to 
introduce students to a wide knowledge base in the field and to prepare them for further 
training and education in specialized fields of psychology at the graduate level. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology 

The B.A. degree in psychology is recommended for students who wish to become 
psychologists or professional counselors, and are planning to gain admission into 
graduate programs. In addition, this degree is recommended for students who desire to 
combine psychology with another academic discipline such as law, business, English, or 
history. 

Major— B.A. Psychology (33 Hours) 



Major 


33 


Cognates 


12-13 


Minor 


18 


General Education 61 


TOTAL 


124-125 


Required Courses Hours 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 3 


PSYC 227 


Cognitive Psychology 3 


PSYC 297 


Research Design &Stats 1 (W) 3 


PSYC 315 


Abnormal Psychology 3 


PSYC 346 


Intro to Personality Theories 3 


PSYC 357 


Psychological Testing 3 


PSYC 416 


History & Systems of Psyc (W) 3 


PSYC 490 


Psychology Seminar 1 


PSYC 491 


Psychology Practicum* 2 


PSYC 497 


Rsrch Design & Stats II (W) 3 


PSYC 


Psychology Electives 3 



Required Cognates Hours 


BIOL 421 


Issues in Science & Soc (W) 3 


RELT373 


Christian Ethics 3 


MATH 


One math course 




(MATH 106 or higher) 3 




Science course with lab 3-4 



*Start in the junior year 



110 



School of Education and Psychology 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology Concentration 

This B.S. degree is recommended for students planning to gain admission into graduate 
programs in industrial or organizational psychology. The degree program is general 
enough to allow entrance into several other areas of psychology at the graduate level, or 
to consider moving into the more applied aspects of psychology, such as human resource 
management, ergonomics, or business related fields. No foreign language is required for 
this major. However, a foreign language is encouraged as an elective. 

Major— B.S. Psychology, Industrial/Organizational Concentration (57 Hours) 

Psychology 39 

Business 18 

Cognates 12-13 

General Education 55-56 

TOTAL 124 

Required Courses Hours 

Psychology (39 hours) 



PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 

PSYC 224 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 227 Cognitive Psychology 3 

PSYC 231 Multi-Cultural Relations 3 

PSYC 253 Industrial/Organization Psyc 3 

PSYC 297 Rsrch Design & Statistics I 3 

PSYC 315 Abnormal Psychology 3 

PSYC 346 Intro to Personality Theories 3 

PSYC 357 Psychological Testing 3 

PSYC 416 Hist & Systems of Psyc (W) 3 

PSYC 460 Group Processes 3 

PSYC 490 Psychology Seminar 1 

PSYC 491 Psychology Practicum* 2 

PSYC 497 Rsrch Design & Stats II (W) 3 



Required Courses Hours 

Business and Management (IS hours) 

BMKT327 Consumer Behavior** 3 
BUAD358 Eth,Soc& Leg Env of Bus(W) 3 

EC0N 213 Survey of Econ (orequiv) 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 

MGNT344 Human Resource Mgmt 3 

MGNT420 Organizational Behavior 3 
Required Cognates 

BIOL 421 Issues in Sci & Society(W) 3 

RELT373 Christian Ethics 3 

MATH One math course 3 

(MATH 106 or higher) 

Science Course with Lab 3-4 



*Practicum for this degree would be particularly geared towards a placement that matches the major (i.e. in an I/O 
or HR area). It should be started in the junior year. 

**BMKT 327, Consumer Behavior, stipulates BMKT 326, Principles of Marketing, as prerequisite. Completion of 
this prerequisite as an elective or permission of instructor would be required to take this course. 

Psychobiology Concentration 

This B.S. degree is recommended for students planning to gain admission into graduate 
programs in specific areas of psychology such as neuroscience, and in related professions 
such as behavioral medicine, behavioral ecology, genetic counseling, and health 
psychology. This degree may also be desirable for those students planning for medical 
careers. 



School of Education and Psychology 



111 



Major— B.S. Psychology, Psychobiology Concentration (58-60 Hours)* 

Psychology 37 

Biology 21-23 

Cognates 17 

General Education 47-49 

TOTAL 124 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Psychology (37 hours) 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 

PSYC 227 Cognitive Psychology 3 

PSYC 297 Research Design & Stats I 3 

PSYC 326 Physiological Psychology 3 

PSYC 384 Experimental Psychology 3 

PSYC 387 Comparative Psychology 3 

PSYC 390 Health Psychology 3 

PSYC 416 Hist & Systems of Psyc (W) 3 

PSYC 490 Psychology Seminar 1 

PSYC 497 Rsrch Design & Stats II (W) 3 

Psychology Electives 3 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

PSYC 349 Aging and Society (W) 

PSYC 422 Adolescent Psychology 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

PSYC 224 Social Psychology 

PSYC 315 Abnormal Psychology 

PSYC 346 Intro to Personality Theories 

♦Students should avail themselves of advisement 
in both psychology and biology. 



Required Courses 

Biology (21-23 hours) 

BIOL 151,152 General Biology 

BIOL 311 Genetics 



Hours 



Select one of the following course sequences: 
BIOL 101,102 Anatomy & Physiology 4,4 

OR 
BIOL 416,418 Hum Anatomy/Animal Phys 3,3 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

BIOL 313 Developmental Biology 

BIOL 340 Immunology 

BIOL 412 Cell and Molecular Biology 

BIOL 417 Animal Histology 

Required Cognates 



CHEM 151,152 


General Chemistry 






OR 


8 


CHEM 111-114 


Survey of Chemistry 




HMNT210 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


MATH 


One MATH course (MATH 






120 or higher) 


3 


RELT 421 


Issues in Science & Soc (W) 


3 



Minor— Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology (21 Hours) 



Required Courses 

MGNT334 
MGNT344 
MGNT420 
PSYC 224 
PSYC 253 
PSYC 297 
PSYC 357 



Principles of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt 
Organizational Behavior 
Social Psychology 
Industrial/OrgPsyc 
Rsrch Design & Statistics I 
Psychological Testing 



Hours 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Minor— Psychology (18 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 3 

PSYC Electives (6 hrs must be UD) 12 



Required in General Ed 

(pre-req for PSYC 297, 357) 

AREAF 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 

Strongly Recommended 

AREAC 

ECON 213 Survey of Economics 

(or equivalent) 



Assessment of Psychology Majors 

During their last academic year in the undergraduate program, students are required to 
write a major position paper and take the Psychology Major Field Test. 



112 



School of Education and Psychology 



• The position paper demonstrates both knowledge and application of various 
issues in the field of psychology from the student's point of view. This paper is 
part of the capstone course, History and Systems of Psychology. 

• The Major Field Test is produced by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and is 
administered by the School of Education and Psychology. All psychology seniors 
are required to complete this examination during their final semester of 
enrollment. 

Undergraduate Outdoor Leadership Degree 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Outdoor Leadership 

The Outdoor Leadership degree program prepares students for a profession in or related 
to the outdoors. A student may choose from several areas of concentration. Each area 
allows the student to develop skills in wilderness experiences and obtain outdoor 
professional certification necessary for employment in the area of choice. Graduates from 
this program find opportunities in state and national parks, environmental interpretative 
centers, camps, outdoor schools, adventure business, therapeutic outdoor programs, and 
mission organizations. 

Major— B.S. Outdoor Leadership (55-62 Hours) 



Hours 



Major 




55-62 




Required Cognates 


17 




General Education 


52-53 




TOTAL 




124-132 




Required Core Courses 


Hours 


Required Cogna 


ED0E301 


Outdoor Ministries 


3 


EDUC325 


ED0E 345 


Environmental Education 2 


ERSC 105 


OUTL 138 


Outdoor Basics 


3 


MATH 215 


OUTL 391 


Outdoor Education Sem (W) 1 


PSYC 122 


OUTL 420 


Nat & Cultural Interpretation 3 




OUTL 430 


Adventure Leadership 


3 


PSYC 128 


OUTL 492 


Outdoor Education Inte 


■rn 10 


PSYC/0UTL221 


OUTL 


Electives 


10 


RELT317 


Select two (2) or three (3) hours from 




*Both classes re 


the following: 




2-3 


Concentration 


OUTL 154 


Wilderness First Aid 






OUTL 319 


First Responder 






OUTL 465 


T WEMT 







Phil of Christian Educ(W) 

Earth Science 

Statistics 

General Psychology* 

OR 

Developmental Psychology* 

Challenge Course Facilitator 

Issues in Physical Sci & Rlgn 



Select eighteen (18) -twenty-four (24) hours from one of 

Business Concentration Hours 

Select any School of Business and 18-24 

Management minor 



Counseling Concentration 



Hours 



PSYC 122 


General Psychology 3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 3 


PSYC 377 


Fund of Counseling (W) 3 


PSYC 422 


Adolescent Psychology 3 


PSYC 460 


Group Processes 3 


PSYC 479 


Family Counseling 3 




18 


Cultural 


Interpreter Concentration 


Hours 






Any HIST or GEOG courses 10 




UD HIST or GEOG courses 8 




18 



the following concentrations: 

Naturalist Concentration Hours 

BIOL 151,152 General Biology 8 

Select three (3) hours from: 3 

Any Ecology Course 

Select seven (7) hours from: 1 

Any Botany, Ecology, or Zoology Field Courses 

18 



Outdoor 
Hours 

RELP 251 
RELP 264 



Ministry 



Concentration 



Intro to Youth Ministry 3 

Christian Witnessing 3 

Any RELB, RELP or RELT 4 

UDRELB, RELPorRELT 8 

18 



School of Education and Psychology 



113 



Public Relations/Advertising Concentration 



Hours 




COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


JOUR 205 


News Reporting 


JOUR 208 


Publication Tools & Tech 


PREL235 


Public Rel Prin & Theory 


PREL344 


Fundamentals of Advertising 


Select six (6) hot 


jrs from the following: 


JOUR 427 


Mass Media Law & Ethics 


JOUR 488 


Mass Comm & Society (W) 


PHTO 125 


Intro to Photography 


PREL354 


Advertising Copywriting 


PREL406 


Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 


PREL485 


Public Relations Techniques 



24 



Recreation 


Concentration 


Hours 






ACCT 103 


College Accounting 


3 


HLNT135 


Nutrition for Life 


3 


RECR 210 


Aerobics Instructor Trainer 


2 


RECR 254 


Lifeguarding 


1 


RECR 255 


Water Safety Instruction 


1 


RECR 268,269 


Officiating Sports Analysis 


2.2 


RECR 325 


Personal Trainer 


2 


RECR 491 


Recreation Practicum 


2 


Select six (6) hours from the following: 


6 


OUTL 148 


Basic Horsemanship 




OUTL 156 


Land Navigation 




PEAC 141 


Fly-Fishing 




PEAC 142 


Canoeing 




PEAC 146 


White Water Rafting Guide 




PEAC 151 


Scuba Diving 




PEAC 155 


Basic Kayaking 




PEAC 212 


Backpacking 




PEAC 214 


Mountain Biking 


24 


Technology Concentration Hours 


Select twelve (12) hours lower division 


12 


Technology classes 




Select six (6) hoi 


jrs upper division 


6 


Technology classes 








18 



Minor— Outdoor Leadership (19 Hrs) 

Required Courses Hours 

ED0E301 Outdoor Ministries 3 

EDOE 345 Environmental Education 2 

OUTL 138 Outdoor Basics 3 

OUTL 356 Outdoor Field Experience 3 

Outdoor Leadership Electives 8 

Undergraduate Degrees in Teacher Education 

The School of Education and Psychology is approved by the Tennessee State Board of 
Education for the preparation of secondary and elementary teachers. It is accredited by 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and by the 
Accrediting Association of Seventh-day Adventists Schools, Colleges and Universities, Inc. 

Praxis II Pass Rate 

The completers of the Teacher Education Program at Southern have achieved a 100% 
pass rate in the Praxis II licensure exams. 

Objectives of the Teacher Education Program 

The goal of the Teacher Education Program is to nurture the development of the wholistic 
teacher. This goal is reflected in the conceptual framework, a goal in which we seek to 
provide opportunities for the candidate to become effective in the following roles: (a) a 
caring person, (b) an informed facilitator of learning, (c) a reflective decision maker, (d) a 
committed professional. 

Southern Adventist University has approved teacher certification programs at three levels: 

K-8 SDA Elementary Education 

B.A. in Liberal Arts Education Leading to Licensure (K-6TN) 



114 School of Education and Psychology 



K-12 Secondary Education 

B.F.A. in Art Education 

B.Mus. in Music Education 

B.S. in Physical Education/Health 
7-12 B.A. in Biology Education 

B.A. in Chemistry Education 

B.A. in English Education 

B.A. in History Education 

B.A. or B.S. in Mathematics Education 

B.A. in Physics Education 

B.A. in Religious Education 

B.A. in French Education 

B.A. in Spanish Education 

Admission Procedures 

Admission to Southern Adventist University does not automatically admit the student into 
teacher education. There are three stages that students must go through to successfully 
complete the Teacher Education Program prior to student teaching. 

A. Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program 

Each student accepted at Southern Adventist University who indicated that teaching is 
his/her professional objective is assigned an educational program adviser by the Records 
and Advisement Office. The advisers assist in planning a student's academic program 
each year and guide their advisees through the stages of the Teacher Education Program. 
Advisers and advisees should work closely to follow the professional sequence of courses. 

Students assume responsibility for making necessary applications, meeting the 
requirements, and other relevant deadlines. 

At the time of a student's Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program, the 
current and subsequent catalogs will determine the requirements for completion of 
the program and graduation. Deviations to this policy will be valid only if mandated by 
the North American Division and/or the State of Tennessee Department of Education. 
Note: Courses with grades lower than "C-" in the major studies or "C" (2.00) in the 
professional education must be repeated. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the third semester) after completing all requirements as outlined below. Initial 
admission is required before the student can enroll in most upper division education 
courses. The following criteria are required for each applicant. 

1. Be in residence at the University 

2. Show evidence of physical, mental, spiritual and moral fitness 

3. Possess an overall grade point average of 2.75 or above 

4. Successfully complete EDUC 129 Introduction to and Foundations of Elementary 
Education or EDUC 138 Introduction to and Foundations of Secondary Education 
and ENGL 101 and 102 with a grade of C (2.00) or higher 

5. Possess an enhanced ACT/SAT composite or average score of 22 OR have 
passed all three sections of the PRAXIS I (Pre-Professional Skills Test) which is the 



School of Education and Psychology 115 



entrance competency test required by the State of Tennessee. The ACT 
composite or average score of 22 or above will EXEMPT the PPST 

6. Submit a formal application with an attached, typed essay about the kind of 
teacher he/she plans to become, including goals for students, classroom 
setting, and personal goals 

7. Complete a self-assessment instrument and obtain recommendations from the 
Vice President of Student Services and the student's academic adviser as part 
of the application process 

8. Present a beginning professional portfolio to the Teacher Education Faculty 

9. Complete successfully an initial interview with the Teacher Education Faculty 

10. Provide evidence of having passed a fingerprinted Tennessee Board of 
Investigation background check. 

11. Provide evidence of membership in a professional organization 

Applications meeting the above criteria are approved by the School of Education and 
Psychology Faculty and recommended to the Teacher Education Council. The student will 
be informed in writing as to the status of the application for admission following the action 
of the Teacher Education Council. 

B. Candidacy and Retention in Teacher Education 

After the applicant has been admitted to the Teacher Education Program, his/her 
progress may be reviewed by the Candidacy Committee. As a teacher candidate, the 
applicant will be given an opportunity to interact with the Candidacy Committee in a non- 
threatening atmosphere. During the interview the candidate can strengthen his/her 
commitment to teaching or express his/her concerns and questions about the teaching 
profession. 

Retention in the Teacher Education Program is contingent on successful completion of 
courses attempted and maintenance of the academic standard required for initial 
admission to the program. Teacher candidates are expected to maintain consistent 
personal representation of the standards and objectives of Southern Adventist University 
and the Teacher Education Program. 

C. Authorization to do Student Teaching 

The teacher candidate must file a formal application with the faculty of the School of 
Education and Psychology for authorization to do student teaching. Application forms may 
be obtained from the School secretary in Summerour Hall. A late application may delay 
the student teaching experience. Student teaching is regarded as the culminating 
experience of the Teacher Education Program. 

NOTE: Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass the PRAXIS 
II licensure exams— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning and 
Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). Each student 
must arrange for a Designated Institution Report to be sent by the testing service to 
Southern Adventist University as evidence of passing scores. All students planning to 
student teach in the fall semester must complete all required Praxis II exams by the 
preceding June test date. All students planning to student teach in the winter 
semester must complete all required Praxis II exams by the preceding September test 
date. 



116 School of Education and Psychology 



The following criteria are required for each applicant: 

1. Completion of all professional education courses 

2. Cumulative minimum GPA of 2.75 

3. Major Studies minimum GPA of 2.75 

4. Professional Education minimum GPA of 2.75 

5. Professional education courses with grades lower than "C" (2.00) must be 
repeated 

6. Courses in the major with grades lower than "C-" must be repeated 

7. Evidence of good physical and mental health 

8. Adherence to standards and objectives of Southern Adventist University and the 
Teacher Education Program 

9. Submission of the following documents at least one semester in advance: 

• Application 

• Recommendation forms (adviser and recent education professor) 

• Self-assessment instrument 

• Typed essay on the kind of teacher he/she desires to become 

10. Completion and passing of all applicable PRAXIS II examinations 

11. Completion of a successful student teaching interview 

12. Presentation of completed Professional Development Portfolio. Minimum 
acceptable score is 75% 

13. Evidence of having passed a fingerprinted Tennessee Board of Investigation 
background check 

14. Evidence of CPR Certification current through the student teaching semester 

15. Evidence of First Aid Certification current through the student teaching semester 

Teacher candidates who meet the above criteria are approved by the School of Education 
Faculty and recommended to the Teacher Education Council. Candidates are informed in 
writing as to the status of their application following the action of the Teacher Education 
Council. 

In the event that the candidacy committee recommends a conditional acceptance student 
teachers will be notified of the condition(s). Student teachers accepted conditionally will 
receive additional coaching from the supervisor. Failure to meet the conditions will result 
in termination of the student teaching placement. The candidacy committee will then 
determine eligibility for continuing student teaching. 

Advisement 

The major goal of the advisement process is to orient the teacher candidate with the total 
teacher education program, with major emphasis on its three components, namely, 
general education, professional education, and major studies. This is accomplished by the 
academic adviser as he/she interacts with his/her advisees during advisement sessions. 

Secondary majors have an adviser in their major. However, they should seek advisement 
related to the Teacher Education Program from the Secondary Coordinator and/or the 
Certification Officer in the School of Education and Psychology. 



School of Education and Psychology 117 



Appeal Procedures 

Criteria and standards for admission to teacher education are explicit, but allow for 
second chance attempts. Courses may be repeated to raise GPA or students may follow 
the Grievance Procedures found under Academic Policies (page 49). Also, students who 
do not meet all the criteria required to do Student Teaching may appeal to the Teacher 
Education Council. Any applicant who determines to follow this alternative policy must 
seek counsel from the Dean of the School of Education and Psychology. 

Assessment of Education Majors 

Final assessment of senior education majors takes place during their full semester of 
student teaching. It involves continuous monitoring of the student's classroom 
performance using both verbal and written feedback. Senior assessment consists of two 
phases. 

Phase One, Formative Evaluation, consists of ongoing monitoring and feedback. The 
cooperating teacher conducts informal conferences as well as a one-hour weekly formal 
conference providing anecdotal records. A formative evaluation is completed by the 
University supervisor and the cooperating teacher at midpoint of each placement. 

Phase Two, Summative Evaluation, is completed by both the cooperating teacher and the 
University supervisor. Performance assessments used are the Student Teaching 
Summative Evaluation and the Student Teaching Portfolio. The student teacher is also 
evaluated by his/her students when they complete the Pupil Evaluation of the Student 
Teacher. A self-evaluation is completed by the student through a video-taped lesson. A 
capstone interview is conducted with all student teaching candidates. 

The faculty of the School of Education and Psychology will monitor a candidate's 
academic progress, emotional stability, and social and professional skills during the 
student teaching placements. If at any time, after being admitted to student teaching, a 
teacher candidate gives evidence of failing to maintain commitment to criteria or 
preparation for teaching, he/she may be asked to postpone student teaching placements 
and submit to further requirements as deemed necessary to ensure success in the 
teaching profession. 

The final letter grade for the student's performance is decided by the Education Faculty. 
Failure to complete student teaching with a satisfactory grade of C (2.00) or above results 
in students being reassigned for an additional practicum. 

Graduate follow-up is carried out through the Program Effectiveness Assessment 
completed by the first-year teachers. Feedback for the Teacher Education Program is 
solicited from administrators of school systems using the Program Effectiveness 
Assessment. 

Teacher Licensure 

Licensure and certification are synonymous terms for the process of granting legal 
authorization to teach in the public or private elementary or secondary schools of a state 
or of the Seventh-day Adventist Church based on meeting predetermined qualifications. 
Certification has been established to give professional status to qualified teachers and to 
assure school boards and parents that the teacher is well prepared. 



118 School of Education and Psychology 



Who can obtain certification? 

Every student who successfully completes the requirements for teaching in the 
elementary or secondary school and graduates from Southern Adventist University will 
receive recommendation for certification based upon the following criteria: 

1. Successful completion of student teaching assignments 

2. Satisfactory completion of all credential requirements 

3. Recommendation of major departments/schools 

4. Passing scores on the following PRAXIS II Examinations: 

• Principles of Learning and Teaching 

• Appropriate specialty area(s) 

Certification is not automatic. The eligible candidate must make the necessary 
application to the Southern Union Conference, and to any other appropriate union 
conference for denominational certification; and to the State of Tennessee and to any 
other specific state department of education where the candidate expects to teach. 

Information regarding certification is available from the Southern Adventist University 
certification officer. Since teacher certification regulations are always in the process of 
change, graduating teacher education candidates are urged to make their applications for 
certification immediately. If the candidate does not make application within two years for 
denominational certification, or within three years for Tennessee State certification, 
she/he will have to take additional courses before certification can be issued. 

What certificates may be obtained? 

1. Initial Certificate (Tennessee) 

A certificate is issued on the basis of a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree with a 
major in at least one subject teaching field and the completion of an approved 
teacher education program. Passing scores on the following PRAXIS II 
Examinations: (1) Principles of Learning and Teaching, and (2) appropriate 
specialty area(s) must be obtained. 

2. Basic Certificate (SDA denominational) 

Required by the Department of Education of the North American Division of 
Seventh-day Adventists. This three-year denominational certificate is issued on 
the basis of completing the following courses in addition to the above 
requirements: 
EDUC 220 Growth Years 

OR 3 hours 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

HLED 173 Health for Life 2 hours 

RELB Biblical Studies 3 hours 

REL Upper division religion elective 3 hours 

RELT 255 Christian Beliefs 3 hours 

RELT 138 Adventist Heritage 3 hours 

Requirements for Certification 

Candidates for state certification must complete the appropriate teacher preparation 
curriculum. This consists of three components: general education, professional education, 
and major studies. 



School of Education and Psychology 119 



General Education: 

This component represents that portion of the total teacher education program 
designed to foster the development of those competencies that are basic to all 
life's responsibilities and provide intellectual foundation in the liberal arts. 
Students pursuing a teacher education curriculum must work closely with their 
advisers for guidance in the selection of general education courses that are 
appropriate to their individual needs. Relevant courses are listed in this Catalog 
under the seven main areas of the General Education requirements, pages 31- 
35. 

Professional Education: 

Elementary : The elementary program with the degree requirements is listed on 
page 121 of this Catalog. 

Secondary : The following courses are required for secondary teaching 
certification. In order to be eligible for certification, students must have a 
minimum grade point average of 2.75 in the major, professional education, and 
cumulative areas. They must also include one literature class and one 
mathematics class in their programs, each at the 100 level or above. 

EDUC 138 Intro to & Foundations of Secondary Education 3 hours 

EDUC 217 Psychological Foundations of Education 2 hours 

EDUC 220 Growth Years 

OR 3 hours 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 3 hours 

EDUC 325 Philosophy of Christian Education (W) 2 hours 

EDUC 340 Foundations of Inclusive Education 2 hours 

EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment 2 hours 

EDUC 422 Behavior Management— Secondary 2 hours 

EDUC 434 Literacy in the Content Areas 2 hours 

EDUC 437 Curriculum and General Methods, Grades 7-12 1 hour 

EDUC 438 Curriculum Content Methods, Grades 7-12 1 hour 

EDUC 464 Teaching Seminar 2 hours 

EDUC 472 Enhanced Student Teaching 7-12 

OR 10 hours 

EDUC 473* Enhanced Student Teaching K-12 

TOTAL HOURS 35 hours 

*Art, music, and physical education majors must enroll in EDUC 473 

Note: Art, music, and physical education majors should consult the Catalog 

sections corresponding to their major for professional education requirements. 

Major Studies: 

Major studies requirements: Preparation for teaching in the elementary school 
requires a B.A. in Liberal Arts Education leading to licensure K-8 SDA (K-6 TN). 
See program descriptions on page 121 of this Catalog. 

The following departments/schools offer majors that can be combined with 
professional education courses resulting in licensure to teach: 



120 School of Education and Psychology 



Art 


Modern Languages (French and Spanish) 


Biology 


Music 


Chemistry 


Physical Education 


English 


Physics 


History 


Religion 


Mathematics 





Students are to complete the degree requirements as specified by their chosen 
majors plus the professional education courses as listed under B above. 

4. Miscellaneous Information Relative to Teacher Training: 

• A minimum grade of "C" (2.00) is required in each teacher education 
cognate. 

• Because of time commitments during the student teaching experience, it is 
expected that any student entering student teaching will not be enrolled in 
additional classes without approval of the Candidacy Committee. 

• Correspondence credit will be accepted to the extent of one-fourth of the 
credit required for the certificate provided that no more than four semester 
hours in education are applied on the professional education requirement. 
If personal circumstances demand a correspondence course, a petition 
must be filed with the School of Education and Psychology and its approval 
obtained before registering for the course. The course must be completed 
and the grade filed in the Records and Advisement Office before student 
teaching is begun. 

• For certification, a major is not always required for additional 
endorsements. A minor may be acceptable in some disciplines as a second 
field endorsement area. 

• Students should contact the Certification Officer in the School of Education 
and Psychology for information on specific requirements in the area(s) of 
endorsement sought. 

NOTE: The Teacher Education Program at Southern Adventist University is constantly 
being refined to meet any and all North American Division, NCATE, and/or State of 
Tennessee's changing and mandated licensure requirements for teacher preparation. 
As a result, changes may occur in the course offerings and in the program 
requirements for students preparing to become teachers. 

Teacher education students must meet any and all such additional requirements 
mandated by NAD, NCATE, or the State of Tennessee, even though such changes may 
not be listed in the Teacher Education programs in the particular catalog under which 
the student entered. Students should stay in contact with the School of Education and 
Psychology to be aware of any changes that may affect them. 



School of Education and Psychology 



121 



Degree for Elementary Teaching Licensure 

Major— B.A. Liberal Arts Education (41 Hours) 

Leading to Licensure K-8 SDA, K-6 TN* 

Major 41 

Cognates 9 

General Education 32-38 

Professional Education 43 

TOTAL **125-131 

""Meets K-8 standards for Seventh-day Adventist teaching certification and K-6 standards for state of Tennessee 
teaching licensure. 

**A student who has two units of sequential high school foreign language can complete this degree program in 
125 semester hours 



Required Courses 



Hours 



BIOL 103 


Principles of Biology 


3 


CHEM 115 


Introductory Chemistry 


3 


EDUC 319 


Technology in Education 


3 


EDUC336 


LangAcquisition & Dev 


2 


ENGL 304 


Grammar & Linguistics 






OR 


3 


ENGL 312 


Creative Wrtg: LA Elem Tchr 




ERSC 105 


Earth Science 


3 


GEOG 204 


World Geography 


3 


HIST 174 


World Civilization 1 


3 


HIST 356 


Natives and Strangers (W) 


3 


MATH 106 


Survey of Math 1 


3 


MATH 107 


Survey of Math II 


3 


PLSC 254 


Amer National & State Gov't 


3 


ELIT LD 


Literature Elective 
3 hrs UD Electives in 


3 




COMM/ENGL/HIST/SCI 


3 



Required Cognates Hours 

ED0E345 Environmental Education 2 

EDUC 232 Survey of Children's Lit 2 

EDUC 322 Educational Rsrch & Stat (W) 3 

PETH 463 Elem School PE Methods 2 



General Education (32-38 Hours) 

AREA A ENGL 101, 102; COMM 135; A-2, A-4 included in major 9 

AREA B RELB, 3 hours; RELT 138, 255; UD RELB or RELT 3 hours 12 

AREA C C-l, C-2 (GEOG 204; HIST 356(W); PLSC 254) included in major 

AREA D D-2 in major, Foreign Lang (or two years in high school) 0-6 

AREA E E-l (BIOL 103; CHEM 115; ERSC 105) included in major 

AREA F EDUC 220; HLED 173, EDUC 217 7 

AREAG PEAC225, PEAC elective 2 

AREA D/G Select either MUED 231 or ART 230 2 



Professional Education (43 Hours) 

EDUC 129 Intro/Found Elem Education 3 

EDUC 320 Emergent Literacy 2 

EDUC 325 Phil of Christian Educ (W) 2 

EDUC335 Readings Lang Arts Methods 4 

EDUC 340 Fnds of Inclusive Education 2 

EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment 2 

EDUC 421 Behavior Management-Elem 2 



Professional Education, continued (43 Hours) 



EDUC 426 
EDUC 450 
EDUC 458 
EDUC 463 
EDUC 464 
EDUC 465 
EDUC 471 



K-2 Multiage Methods 2 

Rdg Assessment & Instruc 3 

K-6 Tchg Meth & Strategies 6 

Small Schools Seminar 2 

Teaching Seminar 2 

Pre-Session Practicum 1 

Enhanced Student Tchg K-6 10 



Minor— Education (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

Select eighteen (18) hours from the following: 18 

ED0E301 Outdoor Ministries 

EDUC 129 Intro to & Fnd Elementary Educ 

OR 
EDUC 138 Intro to & Fnd Secondary Educ 

EDUC 220 Growth Years 

EDUC 217 Psyc Foundations of Education 



Required Courses, continued 

EDUC 232 Survey of Children's Literature 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 

EDUC 325 Philosophy of Christian Educ (W) 

EDUC 336 Language Acquisition & Dev 

EDUC 340 Foundations of Inclusive Educ 

EDUC 423 Adolescent Psychology 



122 School of Education and Psychology 



This minor does not lead to either elementary or secondary certification, both of which 
require a baccalaureate degree and completion of professional education courses for 
licensure. See the Requirements for Certification beginning on page 118. 

Program for Elementary Endorsement for Individuals Meeting 
Requirements for Secondary Certification 

Twenty-four (24) to twenty-six (26) semester hours selected from the courses listed below 
are required. A minimum of 12 semester hours from these courses must be completed 
after the date the applicant became eligible for the original certificate endorsed in a 
subject area in grades 7-12 or in a subject area in grades K-12. Grades must be C (2.00) 
or better. 

1. Required Courses: 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 3 

EDUC 335 Reading and Language Arts Methods 4 

EDUC 426 K-2 Multiage Methods 2 

EDUC 453 Mathematics Methods* 2 

EDUC 455 Bible Methods* 2 

EDUC 457 Social Studies Methods* 2 

2. Six semester hours to include three of the following four areas: 

ART 230 Intro to Art Experiences 2 

EDUC 454 Science and Health Methods* 2 

MUED 231 Music and Movement 2 

PETH463 Elementary School PE Methods 2 

3. Two semester hours must be in Education of Exceptional Children if not previously 
successfully completed. If Foundations of Inclusive Education (EDUC 340) or any 
of the above required courses in Section A or Section B have been previously 
completed, the remaining semester hours must be taken from the following 
courses: 

• EDUC 232 Survey of Children's Literature 

• EDUC 463 Small Schools Seminar 

• HLED 173 Health for Life 

4. Two semester hours of student teaching. 

*Can be met by EDUC 458 K-6 Teaching Methods and Strategies 6 

Programs for Secondary Endorsement for Individuals Meeting 
Requirements for Elementary Education Certification 

The student must take ten hours of credit after the date the original certificate was 
earned. Six semester hours of the ten must be in specialized professional education 
appropriate to grades 7-12 and must include a minimum of 2 semester hours of 
appropriate methods. The credit for at least one area of endorsement in grades 7-12 may 
have been earned at any time prior to the application for adding the endorsement. Grades 
must be C- or better. The student must also fulfill the following: 



School of Education and Psychology 123 



1. Meet the State of Tennessee requirements for endorsement in at least one 
teaching field (this will vary from 18 to 51 hours). 

2. A minimum of six semester hours of professional education including: 

a. EDUC 434 Literacy in the Content Areas 

b. EDUC 437 or EDUC 438 Curriculum and General or Content Methods 

c. Any other courses designated by the School of Education and Psychology. 

3. Four semester hours of electives. 



124 Engineering Studies 



ENGINEERING STUDIES 

Engineering Studies Committee: 

Henry Kuhlman (Chair), Ray Carson Ken Caviness 

Southern Adventist University Physics Department offers the first two years of a 
baccalaureate degree in engineering. Upon completing the two-year engineering studies 
program, students transfer to the Walla Walla University School of Engineering, with which 
Southern Adventist University is affiliated, for the final two years. Southern Adventist 
University awards an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Studies. Walla Walla 
University, located in Washington State, awards a Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
degree with concentrations in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering and a pre- 
professional Bachelor of Science degree in bioengineering. 

The WWU School of Engineering offers a high quality program that is fully accredited by 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology— the only nationally recognized 
organization which accredits engineering programs. It has an enrollment of approximately 
250 students, many of whom are transfer students from affiliated Seventh-day Adventist 
colleges or universities. 

The Southern Adventist University affiliation with Walla Walla University makes the 
transition to the final two years of the baccalaureate engineering program essentially the 
same as if the first two years were taken there. Even though transfer to Walla Walla 
University is simpler than to a non-affiliated school, the Southern Adventist University 
engineering studies program is compatible with baccalaureate engineering programs of 
many colleges and universities. 

Assessment 

The engineering studies program is designed to parallel the first two years of the 
baccalaureate engineering degree at Walla Walla University. It is regularly assessed by 
means of one or two campus visits each year by engineering faculty from their College of 
Engineering. 

Program in Engineering Studies 
Major— A.S. Engineering Studies (33 Hours) 

Required Courses, continued Hours 

PHYS 211-212 General Physics 6 

PHYS 213-214 General Physics Lab 2 

PHYS 215-216 Gen Physics CalcApp 2 

Required Cognates Hours 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 8 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 4 



The total number of hours for the A.S. degree in engineering studies is 64. Students who 
plan to continue their education at an engineering school other than Walla Walla 
University should take that school's Catalog to the engineering adviser for guidance in 
selecting general education courses. 



Required Courses Hours 


ENGR121 


Intro to Engineering 1 


ENGR 149 


Intro to Mech Drwg & CADD 3 


ENGR211 


EngMech: Statics 3 


ENGR 212 


Eng Mech: Dynamics 3 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 3 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 4 


MATH 200 


Elem Linear Algebra 2 


MATH 218 


Calculus III 4 



Department of English 



125 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Chair: Jan Haluska 

Faculty: Rachel Byrd, Joan dos Santos, Debbie Higgens, Dennis Negron, Helen Pyke 
(Composition Coordinator), Jodi Ruf, Keely Tary 

English 

The English Department offers two categories of classes that view man's search for truth 
and its most convincing expression through a Christian perspective. Language courses aid 
students in developing ease, confidence, and competence in the art of effective 
communication and in acquiring knowledge of the science of language; literature courses 
develop the ability to discern and appreciate the best literary works. 

Students majoring or minoring in English must meet the specific requirements of the 
English Department (below) and the General Education program (pages 31-35). For the 
English major, intermediate foreign language is required. College Composition does not 
count toward an English major or minor, but students majoring or minoring in English 
must earn a grade of C or higher in College Composition. The upper division literature 
classes are all writing (W) courses and hence require word processing skills. 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of English is to provide general education students with 
basic communication and literary analysis skills in a Christian context, to offer support 
services for students needing help with their writing, and to prepare English majors for 
graduate school and/or the job market. 

Assessment 

As a requirement for graduation and as part of a departmental assessment process, 
senior English majors take a written exam (Literature in English Major Field Test) and do a 
written evaluation of departmental programs. Results provide information used to improve 
departmental programs. 

Programs in English Language and Literature 



Major— B.A. English (30 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ELIT214 Survey of American Lit 3 

ELIT 215 Survey of English Lit 

ELIT 216 Approaches to Literature 

ELIT 445 Ancient Classics (W) 

ENGL 313 Expository Writing (W) 

OR 
ENGL 314 Creative Writing (W) 

ENGL 316 Modern Engl Gram & Ling 



3 


ELIT 323 


3 


ELIT 332 


3 


ELIT 333 




ELIT 337 


3 


ELIT 338 




ELIT 368 


3 


ELIT 417 




ELIT 442 




ELIT 444 




ENGL 313 




ENGL 314 




ENGL 491 




ENGL 492 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select twelve (12) hours from the following : 12 
19th-century Amer Lit (W) 
Studies in Medieval Lit (W) 
Studies in Renaissance Lit (W) 
19th-century Brit Lit (W) 
Twentieth-Century Writers (W) 
Studies in Milton (W) 
World Lit in Translation (W) 
Shakespeare (W) 
Restor & 18th-century Lit (W) 
Expository Writing (W) 
OR 

Creative Writing (W) 
English Practicum 
OR 
English Internship 



126 



Department of English 



Majors may substitute a journalism writing class or English topics course for one English 
elective. 



Required Cognates Hours 

HMNT205 Arts and Ideas 3 

HIST 374 History of England 3 

Intermediate Foreign Lang 6 



Recommended for teaching majors: 

JOUR 205 News Reporting 

OR 
JOUR 175/ Journalism Workshop 

475 



Hours 

3 



Students planning to obtain educational certification will need to include the required 
professional education courses and additional General Education requirements in their 
program as outlined in the Education and Psychology section of this Catalog. Students 
preparing for secondary teacher certification must also take ENGL 430. English majors 
who minor in journalism or public relations are eligible for internships through the School 
of Journalism and Communication. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 



Teaching Endorsement (21 Hours) 

Students certified in another area who want an endorsement for teaching English must 
take the following classes: 



Required Courses Hours 


ELIT 214 


Survey of American Lit 3 


ELIT 215 


Survey of English Lit 3 


ELIT 216 


Approaches to Literature 3 


ELIT 430 


Library Mat for Young Adults 2 


ELIT 445 


Ancient Classics 3 



Required Courses, continued 



Hours 



ENGL 313 Expository Writing 

OR 
ENGL 314 Creative Writing 

ENGL 316 Modern Engl Gram & Ling 

EDUC438 English Methods 



Minor— English (18 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ELIT 214 
ELIT 215 
ELIT 216 
ENGL 304 



ENGL 316 
ENGL 313 



ENGL 314 



Hours 

3 



Survey of American Lit 

Survey of English Lit 

Approaches to Literature 

Grammar & Lingfor Elem Teh 

OR 

Modern Engl Gram & Ling 

Expository Writing (W) 

OR 

Creative Writing (W) 

Upper Division Electives 



Department of English 



127 



English as a Second Language Program (EESL) 

Students whose native language is not English and whose TOEFL (paper-pencil test) 
scores are between 450-549, or whose TOEFL Computer Based Test (CBT) scores are 
between 133-212, or whose TOEFL Internet Based Test (IBT) scores are between 45-79 or 
whose English ACT score is below 17 will be required to take special English classes 
offered by the English Department. These students are ineligible for Basic Writing or 
College Composition until they have completed these special English classes. Students 
with TOEFL scores below 450 (CBT 133; IBT 45) have not met admissions requirements 
and hence are ineligible to take classes in the English Department. 

Southern Adventist University offers an ESL program with Intermediate and Advanced 
levels to aid students whose native language is not English. The EESL program is 
designed to help EESL students improve their English reading, speaking, and writing skills 
and to prepare for their success in regular academic programs. For details on 
international EESL students, see the Admissions section of the Catalog. Placement in the 
EESL program is based on the TOEFL score of the past 12 months. 

Intermediate Level: 

1-450-474 (CBT 133-151; IBT 45-52) (EESL 031,041,051) 

2-475-499 (CBT 152-172; IBT 53-60) (EESL 032,042,052) 

Advanced Level: 

1-500-524 (CBT 173-195; IBT 61-70) (EESL 121,131) 

2-525-549 (CBT 196-212; IBT 71-7) (EESL 122,132) 

To progress from one level to the next, students must earn a minimum grade of C in the 
course work and achieve a minimum TOEFL score as follows: 

Intermediate Level: 

1-475 (CBT 152; IBT 53) (EESL 031,041,051) 

2-500 (CBT 173; IBT 61) (EESL 032,042,052) 

Advanced Level: 

1-525 (CBT 196; IBT 71) (EESL 121,131) 

2-550 (CBT 213; IBT 79) (EESL 122,132) 

Intermediate Level Courses (Non-Credit) Hours 

EESL 031 
EESL 032 
EESL 041 
EESL 042 
EESL 051 
EESL 052 
EESL 061 



Language Skills I: Writing 1 3 
Language Skills I: Writing 2 3 
Language Skills I: Grammar 1 3 
Language Skills I: Grammar 2 3 
Language Skills I: Rdg/Disc 1 3 
Language Skills I: Rdg/Disc 2 3 
Language Skills I: TOEFL Prep 1 



Advanced Level Courses: 

EESL 121 Lang Skills 

EESL 122 Lang Skills 

EESL 131 Lang Skills 

EESL 132 Lang Skills 

EESL 141 Lang Skills 



* Hours 

: Grammar 1 3 

: Grammar 2 3 

: Wrtg/Rdg 1 3 
: Wrtg/Rdg 2 3 

: TOEFL Prep 1 (n/c) 



Students are allowed to take three additional non 
EESL credit hours for elective college credit. 



*ln the Advanced level students may earn up to a 
maximum of 6 elective credit hours based on the 
highest grades earned. Students are allowed to 
take 6 additional non EESL credit hours for elective 
college credit 



128 Department of History 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Chair: Benjamin McArthur 

Faculty: Lisa Clark Diller, Mark Peach, Dennis Pettibone 

History 

History is the study of the human experience. It investigates mankind's ideas, institutions, 
and activities. In pursuing this investigation, history courses at Southern Adventist 
University emphasize the Christian view of humanity. This perspective recognizes both the 
potential and the limitation of human endeavor and thereby permits a broader 
comprehension of the past and a greater hope for the future. 

Approval of Study Programs for History Majors 

Departmental approval is necessary for all programs. A student majoring in history must 
plan his/her entire study program with a member of the history faculty. Approval is then 
considered on an individual basis and is granted on the following conditions: 

1. Compliance with graduation requirements as explained elsewhere in the Catalog. 

2. Fulfillment of the professional and individual needs of the student. 

3. Embodiment of academic balance and continuity. 

4. Completion of senior year assessment. 

Assessment 

Assessment of seniors consists of two parts. First, in the spring semester of their senior 
year students will take the ETS Major Field Achievement Test in history. Second, at the 
beginning of the fall semester seniors will take a departmental exam. Preparation for this 
exam will constitute a one-hour independent study course involving: 1) reading a selected 
few classics of historical literature; 2) reviewing one's history course work utilizing several 
thematic questions provided by the history faculty. The subsequent examination will be in 
the form of a one-hour interview of the candidate by the history faculty. This will be based 
on the above mentioned materials and also on the student's portfolio of major papers 
accumulated during his/her history course work. The oral examination is graded on an 
Honors, Pass, or Fail basis. A failure requires further preparation by the student and 
another interview before graduation. 

Upper division history classes seek to improve skills of writing and speech. All such 
classes require analytical writing as part of the course work. Additionally, many classes 
involve discussion and oral class reports as partial basis for the student's grade, most 
notably HIST 497, Research Methods in History, which requires an extended formal 
presentation of student research. 

History majors must display the ability to apply computer usage to their discipline in two 
ways: first, a facility with word processing; and second, by a facility in accessing 
information via the Internet. 



Department of History 



129 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



Bachelor of Arts Degree in History 

Major-B.A. History (30 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

HIST 154, 155 American History & Instit 6 

HIST 174, 175 World Civilizations 6 

HIST 297 Historiography 2 

HIST 490 Senior Exam Preparation 1 

HIST 497 Research Meth in History (W) 3 

Of the remaining 12 hours, 10 UD hours are required, two from American and two from 
non-American courses. Six hours of political science may apply to the major. 



Inter Level of Foreign Lang 3-6 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

PLSC 224 Prin of Macroeconomics 

GEOG 204 World Geography 



Required Courses: 

Select six (6) hours from the following: 



Hours 

6 



Required Courses: Hours 

Select six (6) hours from the following courses: 6 



(American History) 


HIST 351 


Colonial Latin America (W) 


HIST 353 


From Colony to Nation (W) 


HIST 355 


History of the South (W) 


HIST 356 


Natives and Strangers (W) 


HIST 357 


Modern America (W) 


HIST 359 


Trans of American Culture (W) 


PLSC 254 


American National & State Gov 


PLSC 353 


From Colony to Nation (W) 


PLSC 357 


Modern America (W) 



(European History) 


HIST 345 


Middle Eastern Politics & Hist (W) 


HIST 374 


History of England (W) 


HIST 375 


Ancient Mediterranean World (W) 


HIST 386 


Rise of the West (W) 


HIST 387 


Europe in the 19* Century (W) 


HIST 388 


Contemporary Europe (W) 


HIST 389 


History of the Holocaust 


HIST 471 


Classics of West Thought 1 (W) 


HIST 472 


Classics of West Thought II (W) 


PLSC 345 


Middle Eastern Politics & History 


PLSC 388 


Contemporary Europe (W) 


PLSC 471 


Classics of West Thought 1 (W) 


PLSC 472 


Classics of West Thought II (W) 


HIST 364 


Christian Church 1 (W) 

OR 

Christian Church II (W) 


HIST 365 



European Studies Concentration (33 Hours) 

In addition to completing the above-described program for the history major, a student 
must: 1) complete an additional three hours of upper-division European history; 2) 
complete as a cognate requirement a minor or a major in a modern European foreign 
language (including a summer, a semester, or a year of study abroad in an ACA program). 

Minor— History (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

HIST 174 World Civilizations 3 

HIST 175 World Civilizations 3 

The additional twelve hours will be chosen from remaining history courses, six hours of 
which must be upper division. A minimum of three hours must be chosen from each of the 
American and European areas. Three hours of political science may be taken in lieu of 
three hours of history. 

Denominational Certification in History 

A non-history major planning to obtain denomination teaching certification in history must 
take the following 18 hours of classes: HIST 154, 155, 174, 175, PLSC 254, and either 
GEOG 204 or PLSC 224. A student wishing a minor in history must take an additional six 
hours of upper-division history courses. 



Minor— Political Economy (18 Hours) 

Combines an interdisciplinary selection of courses helpful for law school preparation, 
a further description of this pre-law preparation program, see page 214. 



For 



130 Department of History 



Minor— Political Science (18 Hours) 

This minor provides opportunity for students to gain practical experience in governmental 
work as part of an academic program. Internships are intended to give intensive exposure 
to state or federal government or to public advocacy work. 

The Political Science minor is an 18-hour program, 9 or 12 hours of which (depending on 
whether a summer or semester-long internship was taken) would consist of the internship 
credit. The balance of the minor would require: 

• PLSC 254 American Government 

• 3 to 6 hours of other PLSC courses 

For more details on the program, see the History Department chair. 

Minor— Western Intellectual Tradition (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ELIT445 Ancient Classics (W) 3 Select three (3) hours from the following 3 

HIST 471 Classics of Wstrn Thought I (W) ELIT417 World Lit in Translation 

OR 3 



HIST 472 Classics of Wstrn Thought II (W) HIST 472 Classics of Wstrn Thought II (W) 

HIST 295/495 Directed Study ~ 1 PHYS/RELT 317 Issues in Phys Sci & Religion (W) 

HMNT205 Arts and Ideas 3 RELT467 Christian Phil & Worldviews (W) 

HMNT210 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

HMNT451 Honors Seminar 1 

HMNT452 Honors Seminar 1 

History as a preprofessional degree: A student majoring in history who plans to enter a 
professional school in an area such as medicine or law must present a balanced program 
of general education classes and electives that will support the professional objectives. 

History Department tours: The Department of History regularly sponsors study tours to 
foreign countries. The purpose of these tours is to provide students and other participants 
with an enhanced understanding of history and culture through a combination of 
traditional lecture and reading with direct observation of historical sites. Academic 
activities connected with the tours require students to spend an amount of time equal to 
that expected in a regular classroom setting. Preparatory meetings and assigned reading 
are included in this computation. Course credit is offered under HIST 295/495 Directed 
Study in History. Cost of the tours includes charge for academic credit. 

History as general education: Freshman and sophomore students earning general 
education credit in history normally take courses from the 100 and 200 level. Junior and 
senior students meeting General Education requirements in history should select courses 
from the 300 and 400 level. 



Interdisciplinary 131 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 

The student-designed major is an interdisciplinary program available to any student who 
wishes to develop a more individualized program of study than those provided by existing 
majors. It is a coherent program of study that crosses disciplinary lines. One of the major 
disciplines must be chosen as the primary discipline to provide a coherent focus for the 
major. In planning the interdisciplinary major, the student selects an advisory committee 
of three faculty members, two from the primary discipline (including the 
department/school chair or dean) and one of the secondary disciplines. The Associate 
Vice-President of Academic Administration also serves on the advisory committee. 

All students interested in developing an interdisciplinary major or in applying to the major 
must meet with the Associate Vice-President of Academic Administration. The 
requirements are intended to ensure that the interdisciplinary major is integrally related to 
the goals of a liberal arts education and appropriately reflect the disciplines involved. 
Each course of study is approved only on a case-by-case basis. 

Interdisciplinary major is a privilege granted by the University to students who display 
unusual motivation to study an area not included among its degree programs. Although 
the individual student is responsible for the design and planning of the program, he or she 
must fulfill the following requirements: 

1. Completion of General Education requirements (including the intermediate level 
of a foreign language for B.A. degree). 

2. The advisory committee must approve the admission to the major. Applications 
must be made no later than fall semester of the junior year. An applicant should 
have a minimum grade point average of 3.50. Continuation in the program 
requires a grade point average of at least 3.30 each semester. 

3. Majors will be approved only where university faculty and courses can provide a 
degree program of high quality. New courses will not be created for a student; 
however, a directed study course may be provided. In special cases up to nine (9) 
hours of transfer credit from another institution may apply to a major, particularly 
of specialized courses not available at SAU. 

4. Bachelor of Art degree majors must have 30 hours, of which a minimum of 14 
hours will be upper division. A second major or a minor from SAU's degree 
programs must be included. 

5. Bachelor of Science majors must have 42 hours, of which a minimum of 18 hours 
will be upper division. 

6. Courses for the major shall be chosen from at least two and not more than four 
disciplines. 

7. Both B.A. and B.S. majors must include a three (3) hour research project 
(accomplished under a directed study number). Students will provide a defense of 
their project before their advisory committee. 

8. In order to graduate, the student must have a minimum of 124 semester hours, 
40 upper division hours, and three writing classes. 



132 Interdisciplinary 



At least 30 of the semester hours in the major must be taken in residence after the 
student's application and proposal for the major have been approved by the advisory 
committee. A grade of C or better must be obtained in all courses in the interdisciplinary 
major. 

For the students who design their major, their transcript will give the degree and major: 
"Interdisciplinary" with the concentration as approved by the Advisory Committee. 

It should be noted that any students receiving VA education benefits must have their 
interdisciplinary major and course of study submitted to and approved by the Tennessee 
Higher Education Commission as the State Approving Agency before certification to the 
VA. 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 133 



SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 

Dean: Greg Rumsey 

Faculty: Lorraine Ball, A. Laure Chamberlain, Denise R. Childs, Linda Potter Crumley, Andy 
Nash, Stephen Ruf 

Adjunct Faculty: David Barasoian, Wesley Hasden, John Keyes, Billy Weeks 

Advisory Council: A current list of Advisory Council members is kept in the School of 
Journalism & Communication. 

Mission Statement 

In harmony with Southern Adventist University's Christian environment, the School's 
programs integrate theory and practical skills necessary for graduates to serve in 
communication-related careers or to enter graduate school. 

Admission Criteria 

To graduate with a degree from the School of Journalism & Communication, acceptance 
to the School is required. Declaration as a major is not the equivalent to acceptance to 
the School of Journalism & Communication. Minimum requirements for admission to the 
School of Journalism & Communication are: 

• Acceptance to Southern Adventist University 

• A minimum English ACT score of 17 or SAT equivalent 

• Completion of category A general education English and Math requirement 

• Completion of COMM 103, or for Nonprofit majors, PREL 233 

• Completion of JOUR 105 with a grade of "C" or better 

• Earned overall GPA of 2.25 or better 

Students pursuing a major offered by the School of Journalism & Communication should 
apply for admission at the end of the freshman year (24-32 hours). Declared School of 
Journalism & Communication majors may not take upper-division departmental classes 
without admission to the School. Transfer and change-of-major students will be 
considered for admission on a case-by-case basis. 

The School of Journalism & Communication provides an educational environment in which 
future leaders in telecommunications, journalism, public relations, and related areas can 
acquire the enduring ethical concepts, the intellectual discipline, and the professional 
abilities necessary for the mastery and management of a wide range of writing, editing, 
and other journalistic and public relations skills and techniques. 

The School offers the Bachelor of Arts Degree with majors in Broadcast Journalism, 
Intercultural Communication, and Print Journalism, a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mass 
Communication, Nonprofit Administration and Development, Public Relations, and a 
Bachelor of Science Degree (combined major) in Public Relations and Business 
Administration as well as an Associate of Science Degree in Media Technology. Minors are 
also available in Advertising, Broadcast Journalism, Intercultural Communication, 
Journalism (News Editorial), Media Production, Nonprofit Leadership, Photography, Public 
Relations, and Sales. 

All students completing a bachelor's degree in 1) Print Journalism or 2) Mass 
Communication with a Writing/Editing emphasis will be expected to submit a portfolio 



134 School of journalism & Communication 



during their senior year, including a representative collection of significant work done for 
class assignments in their major courses, along with a self-critique and discussion of skills 
and knowledge gained through those projects. 

Students enrolling in the Broadcast Journalism major receive preparation for careers in 
commercial and non-commercial radio and television as reporters, producers, 
videographers, and managers. 

Students graduating with a degree in Intereultural Communication may find work in multi- 
national corporations, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and a variety of 
religious and educational institutions. Students who pursue this degree are prepared to 
seek employment as communication specialists in culturally diverse settings. 

The Print Journalism major prepares students for careers as reporters, writers and editors 
for daily and weekly newspapers, magazines, wire services, publishing houses and for the 
vast array of publications that serve the church, business, industry, governmental 
agencies, the medical field, colleges and universities, and other nonprofit organizations. 

Students graduating with the Bachelor of Science in Mass Communication have a broad 
communication education with a selected specialty that prepares them for a large variety 
of communication jobs in the church, in corporations, and also in nonprofit organizations. 

Southern Adventist University's Nonprofit Administration and Development degree is 
designed to meet the demand for entry-level managers with fund development expertise. 

Public Relations majors are prepared for careers in business, industry, government, the 
church, colleges, universities, hospitals, and other medical institutions, and in a wide 
range of organizations. 

The dual major of Public Relations and Business Administration is a unique degree 
program. Because it contains the core classes from both majors, it equips students with 
public relations and business skills and makes graduates especially competitive in the 
corporate world. 

All of the School's bachelor's degree majors prepare students for entry into graduate 
schools nationwide. 

The associate degree in Media Technology prepares the student for entry level positions 
in media production, desktop publishing, or web design. 

Members of the faculty will advise each student in planning a study program that is 
supportive of individual career goals, that meets degree requirements of the School of 
Journalism & Communication, and fulfills General Education requirements. 

Residency 

All baccalaureate degrees offered by the School of Journalism & Communication require 
that at least 12 upper division hours of the respective degree requirements must be taken 
at Southern Adventist University. 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 135 



American Humanics Certification 

The Nonprofit Administration and Development program is affiliated with American 
Humanics, Inc., in Kansas City, MO, which offers certification for students who graduate 
with this degree. American Humanics is an alliance of colleges, universities, and nonprofit 
organizations preparing undergraduates for careers with youth and human service 
agencies through specified curriculum, co-curricular activities, and internships. American 
Humanics focuses on leadership and service to humanity, professionalism, measurable 
competencies, and certification. 

American Humanics' mission is "to prepare and certify future nonprofit professionals to 
work with America's youth and families." American Humanics is affiliated with national 
nonprofit partners including: 

• American Red Cross 

• Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 

• Boys & Girls Clubs of America 

• Boy Scouts of America 

• Camp Fire Boys and Girls 

• Girls Incorporated 

• Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. 

• Habitat for Humanity International 

• Junior Achievement Inc. 

• National Network for Youth 

• Special Olympics, International 

• United Way of America 

• Volunteers of America 

• YMCA of the U.S.A. 

• YWCA of the U.S.A. 

• and other nonprofits 

Certification is not automatic with the completion of the degree; American Humanics 
certification requires competencies in the following: 

• career development 

• communication 

• personal leadership attributes 

• historical and philosophical foundations 

• youth and adult development 

• board/committee development 

• fund-raising principles and practices 

• human resource development and supervision 

• general nonprofit management 

• nonprofit accounting and financial management 

• nonprofit public relations 

• program planning 

• risk management 



136 School of journalism & Communication 



Besides nonprofit certification, the American Humanics certification program offers the 
following: 

• one-to-one mentoring 

• networking with prospective employers 

• opportunity to "try out" various nonprofit roles 

• potential for references and referrals 

• exposure to national nonprofit network 

• scholarships 

American Humanics Certification for Other Majors 

Certification in American Humanics for students majoring in other areas is also available. 
Certification can be attained by means of the Nonprofit Leadership minor. To make 
arrangements and apply for certification, contact the campus director. 

American Humanics Assessment 

Assessment will take place through the American Humanics certification process and with 
internship and practicum supervisors. 

Job Outlook 

Because of the decline in government support of nonprofit, it is more valuable than ever 
that nonprofit managers have fund development skills. The B.S. in Nonprofit 
Administration and Development degree is designed to provide both training and 
internships in fund development as well as in management. 

The demand for graduates with these competencies is high with an estimated 50,000 
needed annually to fill new staff vacancies. More than one million nonprofit organizations 
are at work across the country, employing 9 million people and aided by nearly 90 million 
volunteers. 

Meet The Firms 

Meet the Firms is a program sponsored by the School of Journalism & Communication, 
and other schools on campus to facilitate students in locating internships and jobs in their 
fields of study. Meet the Firms seminars are held each fall and a one-hour seminar style 
class is offered each winter semester in preparation for the Meet the Firms event. A 
variety of invited companies meet with students to interview, network, and mentor in 
preparation for placement. 

Internships and On-the-Job Training 

Because of the strong relationships which the school has developed with the Chattanooga 
area mass media, students in journalism, broadcasting, and public relations have many 
opportunities to meet and work with professionals in television and radio news, in public 
relations, advertising, and on daily and weekly newspapers. 

Internships: Helping students locate internships on newspapers, in publishing houses, in 
public relations and fund development departments in hospitals, in advertising agencies, 
and in radio and television newsrooms is a vital part of the education program provided by 
the school. 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 137 



An Advisory Council and a Consulting Board advise the school in providing internships that 
give on-the-job experience. The school also participates in the General Conference 
internship program in which students work in various denominational institutions. The 
University radio station, WSMC FM90.5, and other media outlets provide learning 
opportunities for students in a number of courses. 

Campus Publications: Students can gain valuable experience as writers, editors, and 
producers by working on Student Association productions such as Southern Accent, the 
campus newspaper; Southern Memories, the yearbook; and Strawberry Festival, the 
annual multi-media review of the year. 

Assessment 

To make satisfactory progress toward preparation for the job market, students majoring in 
the school will be expected to attend school assemblies and other professional meetings 
sponsored by the school. 

Students should demonstrate their growing professionalism through involvement in the 
operation of WSMC FM90.5; in the publication of the Southern Accent, Southern 
Memories, or some other publication; or in communication activities for a campus, 
church, or community organization. 

Participation in the School Communication Club and the Society of Adventist 
Communicators as well as student membership in a national professional organization 
such as the Society of Professional Journalists, or the Public Relations Student Society of 
America are also evidence of professional commitment. 

School files for each student majoring in the School serve as a source of information for 
professors asked to provide recommendations for students seeking practicum, 
internships, or job positions. 

Students in the School will be given a writing skills test when they take JOUR 105. On the 
basis of the results, advisers will recommend any needed remediation, which students 
must complete before registering for other writing courses offered by the School. 

School effectiveness will be assessed by combining the results of the cumulative 
evaluations, student evaluations of courses, and questionnaires completed by supervisors 
of interns and alumni. To determine that the curriculum meets the objectives of the 
School and the standards of the Accrediting Council of Education in Journalism and Mass 
Communication, the faculty makes an ongoing analysis of courses required for majors. 

Programs in Journalism 

Major— B.A. Broadcast Journalism (33 Hours) 

(If a student both majors and minors in the School, at least 12 hours must not overlap 
between the major and the minor.) 

Required Courses Hours Required Courses continued Hours 

Communication Research 

OR 3 
Mass Comm & Society (W) 

Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 

Mass Media Law & Ethics 3 



BRDC 201 


Foundations of Broadcasting 


3 


COMM 397 


BRDC 202 


Digital Audio Production 


3 




BRDC 227 


TV Studio Production 


3 


JOUR 488 


BRDC 314 


Broadcast News Writing (W) 


3 


JOUR 105 


BRDC 327 


Digital Video Production 


3 


JOUR 205 


BRDC 417 


Electronic Media Mgmt 


3 


JOUR 427 


BRDC 426 


TV News Reporting &Perform 


3 





138 



School of journalism & Communication 



Major— B.A. Broadcast Journalism (33 Hours), continued 

Required Cognates 

COM M 103 Intro to Communication 

EC0N 213 Survey of Economics 

JOUR 208 Publication Tools & Tech 

JOUR 242 Intro to Web Design 

PLSC254 Amer National & State Govt 

Intermediate foreign language 6 

Major— B.A. Print Journalism (32 Hours) 

(If a student both majors and minors in the School, at least 12 hours must not overlap 
between the major and the minor.) 



Hours 


Recommended Electives 




3 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphics 


3 


3 


C0MM 330 


ntercultural Co mm (W) 


3 


3 


HMNT205 


Arts & Ideas 


3 


3 


JOUR 492 


lnternship:Broadcasting 


3 


vt 3 


MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 



Required Courses 

JOUR 105 
JOUR 205 
JOUR 208 
JOUR 242 
JOUR 313 
JOUR 315 
JOUR 316 
JOUR 356 
JOUR 427 
JOUR 488 
PHTO 125 



Hours 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 

Publication Tools & Tech 3 

Intro to Web Design 3 

Publication Editing 3 

Photojournalism 2 
Mag & Feature Art Writing (W) 3 

Advanced Reporting (W) 3 

Mass Media Law & Ethics 3 

Mass Comm & Soc (W) 3 

Intro to Photography 3 



COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 


COMM 397 


Communication Research 


3 


ECON 213 


Survey of Economics 


3 


HMNT205 


Arts & Ideas 






OR 


3 


SOCI 150 


Cultural Anthropology 




PLSC 254 


American Nat & State Gov 


3 




Literature Electives 


3 




Inter level Foreign language 


6 


Recommended Electives 




JOUR 492 


Journalism Internship 






OR 


1-3 


JOUR 391 


Journalism Practicum 




MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PREL235 


Public Rel Princ & Theory 


3 


TECH 244 


Graphic Production 


3 



Programs In Communication 

Major— B.A. Intercultural Communication (31-33 Hours) 



Required Courses 

COMM 103 
COMM 330 
COMM 336 
COMM 397 
COMM 406 
JOUR 105 
JOUR 427 
JOUR 488 
PREL235 
RELT 458 



Hours 

Intro to Communication 3 

Intercultural Comm (W) 3 

Interpersonal Communication 3 
Communication Research 3 
Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 
Writing for the Media 3 

Mass Media Law & Ethics 3 
Mass Comm & Soc (W) 3 

Public Rel Principles & Theory 3 
World Religions (W) 3 



Required Cognates Hours 

ENGL 316 Modern Engl Grammar & Ling 3 

HMNT205 Arts & Ideas 3 

SOCI 150 Cultural Anthropology 3 

SOCI 230 Multicultural Relations 3 

Select nine (9) hours from the following courses: 9 



Select one (1) from the following courses: 
COMM 291/391 Intercultural Comm Prac 
COMM 495 Directed Study (with an 

intercultural topic) 
JOUR 492 Journalism Internship 



Required Minor (IS hours) 

An Intercultural Communication major will complete 
a non-English language minor. 
Option 1 A language minor with a minimum of nine 
hours completed at an "overseas* school. 

Option 2 A language minor with courses completed 
on our campus, but with one school year traveling 
or serving abroad. 



ARTH 345 
ELIT 445 
HIST 356 
MGNT368 
HIST/PLSC 345 

HIST/PLSC 388 
RELB 237 

RELB 247 
RELB 340 
RELB 455 
RELP 240/340 



Contemporary Art (W)* 
Ancient Classics (W)* 
Natives & Strangers (W) 
Multicultural Management 
Mid Eastern Pol & His (W) 
OR 

Contemporary Europe (W) 
Archaeology & the OT 
Archaeology & the NT 
Middle East Study Tour 
Archaeological Fieldwork 
World Missions 



*SafJsfies humanities component for International 
Studies 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 



139 



Major— B.A. Intercultural Communication (31-33 Hours), continued 

Recommended Electives 

BMKT375 International Marketing 3 

MGNT364 International Bus & Econ 3 

SOCI 125 Intro to Sociology 3 

SOCI 296/496 Study Tour 3 

Major— B.S. Mass Communication (49-55 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



BRDC 201 


Foundations of Broadcasting 


3 


Select nine 


COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 


ACCT 103 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


3 


ART 109 


JOUR 205 


News Reporting 


3 


ARTI 115 


JOUR 208 


Publication Tools & Tech 


3 


BUAD 126 


JOUR 242 


Intro to Web Design 


3 




JOUR 427 


Mass Media Law & Ethics 


3 


MGNT371 


JOUR 488 


Mass Commun & Society (W) 


3 


CPTE 107 


PHTO 125 


Intro to Photography 


3 


COMM 412 


PREL235 


PR Principles & Theory 


3 


TECH 244 



Concentration 



19-25 



Required Cognates Hours 

Select nine (9) hours from the following courses: 9 
College Accounting 
Design Principles 
Intro to Interactive Media 
Intro to Business 
OR 

Principles of Entrepreneurship 
Intro to Database 
Preparing to Meet the Firms 
Graphic Production 



*Electives: In consultation with your adviser choose 19-25 hours of electives within one of the following 
concentrations. Your selections must include at least 12 hours of upper division credit with most selected 
from JOUR/PREL courses. 



Advertising Concentration (52 Hours) 


New Media Concentration (53 Hours) 




Mass Communication Core 


30 




Mass Communication Core 


30 




Advertising Core 






New Media Core 




COMM 397 


Communication Research 


3 


BRDC 227 


TV Studio Production 


3 


PREL244 


Sales 


2 


BRDC 327 


Digital Video Production 


3 


PREL344 


Fundamentals of Advertising 


3 


CPTE 110 


Intro to Web Development 


1 


PREL354 


Advertising Copywriting 


2 


CPTE 212 


Web Programming 


3 


PREL406 


Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 


CPTR 124 


Fund of Programming 


4 








JOUR 342 


Interactive Online Journalism 3 


Select nine ( 


'9) hours from the following: 


9 


JOUR 445 


Senior Project 


1 


ARTG 210 


Vector Graphics 










ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 




Select five (5) hours from the following: 


5 


ARTG 332 


Advertising Design 




BRDC 202 


Digital Audio Production 




BMKT326 


Principles of Marketing 




CPTR 446 


Web Services 




BMKT327 


Consumer Behavior 




JOUR 313 


Publication Editing 




COMM 330 


Intercultural Communication (W) 


JOUR 492 


Internship 




PHTO 315 


Photojournalism 




PREL391 


Practicum 




PREL391 
PREL492 


Practicum 
Internship 




Photography Concentration (56 Hours) 

Mass Communication Core 30 


Media Production Concentration (52 Hours) 




Photography Core 






Mass Communication Core 


30 


ARTF 215 


Lighting 


3 




Media Production Core 




ARTG 226 


Digital Imaging 


3 


ARTF 215 


Lighting 


3 


BRDC 227 


TV Studio Production 


3 


BRDC 202 


Digital Audio Production 


3 


COMM 326 


Film Evaluation (W) 


3 


BRDC 227 


TV Studio Production 


3 


JOUR 445 


Senior Project 


1 


BRDC 327 


Digital Video Production 


3 


PHTO 315 


Photojournalism 


3 


BRDC 426 


TV News & Performance 


3 


PHTO 320 


Digital Photography 


3 


BRDC 445 


Senior Project 


1 


PHTO 391 


Photojournalism Practicum 


1 


COMM 315 


Scriptwriting(W) 












OR 


3 


Select six (6) hours from the following: 


6 


BRDC 314 


Broadcast News Writing (W) 




BRDC 327 


Digital Video Production 





Select three (3) hours from the following: 

ARTI 230 Sound Design 

BRDC 391 Practicum 

BRDC 417 Electronic Media Management 

BRDC 492 Internship 



JOUR 391 Practicum 

JOUR 465 Topics in Journalism 

PHTO 492 Photography Internship 



140 



School of journalism & Communication 



Major— B.S. Mass Communication (49-55 Hours), continued 



Writing/Editing Concentration 



(49 Hours) 

30 



Mass Communication Core 
Writing/Editing Core 
C0MM 397 Communication Research 3 

JOUR 313 Publication Editing 3 

JOUR 316 Mag & Feature Article Wrtg (W)3 

JOUR 356 Advanced Reporting (W) 3 



Select seven (7) hours from the following: 



BRDC314 
C0MM 315 
ENGL 313 
ENGL 314 
JOUR 342 
JOUR 291/391 
JOUR 175/475 
JOUR 492 
PREL354 



Broadcast News Writing (W) 
Scriptwriting (W) 
Expository Writing (W) 
Creative Writing (W) 
Interactive Online Journalism 
Practicum 

Communication Workshop 
Internship 
Advertising Copywriting 



B.S. Nonprofit Administration and Development (46 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 

COMM 336 Interpersonal Comm 3 

Communication Research 3 

Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 

Publication Tools & Tech 3 

Intro to Web Design 3 

Intro to the Nonprofit Sector 3 

PR Principles & Theory 3 

Fund of Advertising 3 

Fund Development 3 

Amer Humanics Mgmt Instit 1 
Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 

The PR Campaign 3 

PR Techniques 3 

American Humanics Intern 3 

UD Elective 3 



COMM 397 

JOUR 105 

JOUR 205 

JOUR 208 

JOUR 242 

PREL233 

PREL235 

PREL344 

PREL368 

PREL370 

PREL406 

PREL482 

PREL485 

PREL498 

PREL/COMM 

Required Cognates Hours 

Accountings Management 

ACCT103 College Accounting 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 

MGNT344 Human Resource Mgmt 3 

MGNT354 Principles of Risk Mgmt 3 

MGNT371 Princof Entrepreneurship 3 



Required Cognates, continued Hours 

Child & Human Development 

(Choose 1) 3 

PSYC128 Developmental Psychology 

PSYC 224 Social Psychology 

PSYC 422 Adolescent Psychology 

Human Services & Social Work 

(Choose 1) 3 

S0CW211 Intro to Social Work 

SOCW 212 Social Welfare as an Institution 

SOCI 230 Multicultural Relations 

SOCI 365 Family Relations 

Recommended Electives 



HLNT135 
HLED 476 
PEAC 262 
RELP 251 
RELT373 
RELT458 
RELT467 



Nutrition for Life 3 

Wellness Meth, Mat & Mgmt 3 

Intro to Camping 1 

Intro to Youth Ministry 3 

Christian Ethics 3 

World Religions (W) 3 

Christian Phil & Worldview (W) 3 



Major— B.S. Public Relations (52 Hours) 



Required Courses 

COMM 103 
COMM 397 
COMM 412 
JOUR 105 
JOUR 205 
JOUR 208 
JOUR 242 
JOUR 313 
JOUR 316 
JOUR 427 
PHTO 125 
PREL233 
PREL235 
PREL344 
PREL406 
PREL482 



Hours 

Intro to Communication 3 

Communication Research 3 
Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 
Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 

Publication Tools & Tech 3 

Intro to Web Design 3 

Publication Editing 3 

Mag & Feature Art Writing (W) 3 
Mass Media Law & Ethics 3 
Intro to Photography 3 

Intro to the Nonprofit Sector 3 
Public Rel Principles & Theory 3 
Fund of Advertising 3 

Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 
Public Relations Campaign 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

PREL485 Public Relations Tech 3 

PREL 492 Public Relations Internship 

OR 3 

UDJourn/Comm Elective 

Required Cognates Hours 

FREN/GRMN Elementary Foreign Lang 6 

ITAL/SPAN 

ACCT/BUAD Business Elective 3 

ECON/FNCE/ (Upper division recommended) 

MGNT/BMKT 

Strongly Recommended Electives 

COMM 336 Interpersonal Commun 3 

PHTO 315 Photojournalism 2-3 

PREL 368 Fund Development 3 

Intermediate Foreign Lang 6 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 



141 



Combined Major— B.S. Public Relations and Business Administration (85 
Hours) 



Public Relations (45 Hrs) 

Required Courses 



Hours 



Business Administration (40 Hrs) 

Required Courses 



BRDC 201 


Foundations of Broadcasting 


3 


ACCT 221-222 


COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 


ACCT 321 


COMM 397 


Communication Research 


3 


BUAD 105 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


3 


BUAD 310 


JOUR 205 


News Reporting 


3 


BUAD 317 


JOUR 208 


Publication Tools & Tech 


3 


BUAD 339 


JOUR 242 


Intro to Web Design 


3 


BUAD 288/488 


JOUR 313 


Publication Editing 


3 


BMKT326 


JOUR 488 


Mass Comm & Society (W) 


3 


ECON 224 


PHTO 125 


Intro to Photography 


3 


ECON 225 


PREL344 


Fund of Advertising 


3 


FNCE 315 


PREL406 


Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 3 


MGNT334 


PREL482 


Public Relations Campaign 


3 


MGNT464 


PREL485 


Public Relations Tech 


3 


Roniiirorl Oncfn: 



Hours 

3,3 
3 



Select three (3) hours from the following courses/3 
BUAD 358 Eth,Soc& Legal Env of Bus (W) 

JOUR 427 Mass Media Law & Ethics 



Principles of Accountin 
Managerial Accounting 

Business Spreadsheets 3 

Business Communication (W) 3 

Mgmt Information Systems 3 

Business Law 3 

Seminar in Business Admin 1 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Prin of Macroeconomics 3 

Prin of Microeconomics 3 

Business Finance 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Business Strategies (W) 3 

Required Cognates Hours 

BUAD 104 Business Software 3 

BUAD 128 Personal Finance 3 

BUAD 221 Business Statistics 3 



The combined major provides students with the option to develop skills in two fields of study. A student will be 
assigned an adviser in their first-chosen major and a secondary adviser in the other major 



Major— A.S. Media Technology (30 Hours) 



Required Courses 


Hours 


BRDC 291 


Practicum: Media Tech 


2 


COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 


CPTE 109 


Presentation Technology 


1 


JOUR 208 


Publication Tools & Tech 


3 


JOUR 242 


Intro to Web Design 


3 


PHTO 125 


Intro to Photography 


3 


TECH 244 


Graphic Production 


3 



New Media Concentration 

Select twelve (12) hours from the following: 



12 



ARTG 226 Digital Imaging 

CPTE 110 Intro to Web Development 

CPTE 212 Web Programming 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 

JOUR 342 Interactive Online Journalism 

JOUR 445 Senior Project 

Production Concentration 

Select twelve (12) hours from the following: 12 

BRDC 201 Foundations of Broadcasting 

BRDC 202 Digital Audio Production 

BRDC 227 TV Studio Production 

BRDC 327 Digital Video Production 

PHTO 315 Photojournalism 



Minor— Advertising (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

PREL244 Sales 2 

PREL344 Fundamentals of Advertising 3 

PREL354 Advertising Copywriting 2 



Minor— Broadcast Journalism (18 Hours) 



Required Courses 

BRDC 201 
BRDC 202 
BRDC 314 
JOUR 105 
JOUR 205 



Hours 



Foundations of Broadcasting 3 

Digital Audio Production 3 

Broadcast News Writing (W) 3 

Writing for the Media 3 

News Reporting 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select eleven (11) hours from the following 11 
ARTG 332 Advertising Design 

BMKT326 Principles of Marketing 

BMKT328 Sales Management 

COMM 103 Intro to Communication 

COMM 330 Intercultural Communication (W) 

JOUR 242 Intro to Web Design 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

BRDC 417 Electronic Media Management 

JOUR 427 Mass Media Law & Ethics 

JOUR 488 Mass Communication & Society 



142 



School of journalism & Communication 



Minor— Intercultural Communication (18 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 

C0MM 330 Intercultural Comm(W) 3 

C0MM 336 Interpersonal Comm (W) 3 

SOCI 150 Cultural Anthropology 3 

S0CI 230 Multicultural Relations 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select six (6) hours of which three (3) must be 
upper division: 6 

COMM 291/391 Intercultural Comm Practicum 

OR 
COMM 295/495 Directed Study (non-Anglo- 
American topic) 
GEOG 204 World Geography 

OR 
HMNT 215/415 Cross-Cultural Experience 
JOUR 488 Mass Comm & Society (W) 

RELT 458 World Religions (W) 



Minor— Journalism (News Editorial) (18 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 

JOUR 105 Writing for the Media 3 

JOUR 205 News Reporting 3 

JOUR 208 Publication Tools & Tech 3 

JOUR 313 Publication Editing 3 



Minor— Media Production (19 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


ARTF 215 


Lighting 3 


BRDC 201 


Foundations of Broadcasting 3 


BRDC 202 


Digital Audio Production 3 


BRDC 227 


TV Studio Production 3 


BRDC 327 


Digital Video Production 3 


BRDC/COMM/ 


Elective 1 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

J0UR316 Mag & Feature Art Wrtg (W) 

OR 3 

JOUR 356 Advanced Reporting (W) 

JOUR 427 Mass Media Law & Ethics 

OR 3 

JOUR 488 Mass Comm & Society (W) 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

BRDC 417 Electronic Media Mgmt 

JOUR 427 Mass Media Law & Ethics 

JOUR 488 Mass Comm & Society (W) 



Minor— Nonprofit Leadership (22 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


ACCT 103 


College Accounting 3 


MGNT334 


Principles of Management 3 


MGNT344 


Human Resource Mgmt 3 


PREL233 


Intro to Nonprofit Sector 3 


PREL368 


Fund Development 3 


PREL370 


Amer Humanics Mgmt Inst 1 


PREL482 


The PR Campaign 3 


PREL498 


American Humanics Intern 3 



Cognate for American Humanics Certification 

S0CW211 Intro to Social Work 3 



Minor— Photography (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

JOUR 208 Publication Tools & Tech 3 

PHTO 125 Intro to Photography 3 

PHTO 315 Photojournalism 3 

PHTO 320 Digital Photography 3 



Required Courses, continued 

Select six (6) hours from the following: 



Hours 



ARTF 215 
ARTG 226 
BRDC 291/391 
BRDC 227 
BRDC 327 
COMM 326 



Lighting 

Digital Imaging 

Practicum 

TV Studio Production 

Digital Video Production 

Film Evaluation (W) 



SCHOOLOF JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATION 



Minor— Public Relations (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

JOUR 105 Writing for the Media 3 

PREL235 Public Rel Prin & Theory 3 

PREL482 Public Relations Campaign 3 



Minor— Sales (19 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

BMKT327 Consumer Behavior 3 

BMKT328 Sales Management 3 

COM M 103 Intro to Communication 3 

PREL244 Sales 2 
PREL344 Fundamentals of Advertising 3 

PREL354 Advertising Copywriting 2 



143 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select nine (9) hours which three (3) 9 

hours must be upper division: 

CPTE 245/345 Computer-Aided Publishing 

JOUR 205 News Reporting 

JOUR 208 Publication Tools & Techniques 

JOUR 313 Publication Editing 

JOUR 465 Topics in Communication 

PREL344 Fundamentals of Advertising 

PREL368 Fund Development 

PREL406 Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 

PREL 485 Public Relations Techniques 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

BMKT375 International Marketing 

PREL 291/391 Practicum: Sales 
PREL 406 Persuasion & Propaganda (W) 



144 Department of Mathematics 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Chair: Kevin Brown 

Faculty: Patricia Anderson, Ronald D. Johnson, Arthur Richert 

Adjunct Faculty: Al Morford 

Mathematics 

Throughout recorded history mathematics and mathematical thinking have influenced 
man's culture to an extent that even many well-educated people fail to appreciate. The 
Elements of Euclid, the invention of a place-value numeration system, the invention of the 
calculus, the development of statistical inference, and more recently the development of 
computers, to name just a few, are mathematical contributions to civilization which have 
significantly affected the philosophies, commerce, science, and technology of mankind. 

The Mathematics Department seeks to transmit this mathematical heritage to the 
students of Southern Adventist University by (1) introducing students to mathematical 
concepts and techniques and the disciplined, logical thinking required to successfully 
apply them to a variety of problem-solving experiences, (2) providing a stage in the formal 
education of professional mathematicians, (3) educating teachers of mathematics, and 
(4) providing appropriate courses for users of mathematics. 

Mission Statement 

Within a Christian environment of learning, the Mathematics Department seeks to provide 
students with mathematical skills and concepts appropriate to their chosen field of study 
and to prepare mathematics majors and minors for distinguished professional 
performance in mathematics or other fields that require a strong mathematical 
background. 

Assessment 

All mathematics majors are required to take the Educational Testing Service Major Field 
Achievement Test in mathematics during their senior year. The results of this examination 
are used in ongoing review of the departmental curriculum. 



Programs in Mathematics 
Major— B.A. Mathematics (30 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 3 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 4 


MATH 200 


Elementary Linear Algebra 2 


MATH 218 


Calculus III 4 


MATH 219 


Set Theory and Logic 3 


MATH 312 


History of Mathematics 3 


MATH 318 


AbstractAlgebra 3 


MATH 411 


Intermediate Analysis 3 


MATH 485 


Mathematics Seminar (W) 1 




UD Math Electives 4 



Required Cognates Hours 

CPTR 124 Funds of Programming 4 



Department of Mathematics 



145 



Major— B.S. Mathematics (40 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


MATH 181 


Calculus 1 3 


MATH 182 


Calculus II 4 


MATH 200 


Elementary Linear Algebra 2 


MATH 218 


Calculus III 4 


MATH 219 


Set Theory and Logic 3 


MATH 317 


Complex Variables 3 


MATH 318 


AbstractAlgebra 3 


MATH 411 


Intermediate Analysis 1 3 


MATH 412 


Intermediate Analysis II 3 


MATH 485 


Mathematics Seminar (W) 1 




Math Electives (5 UD) 11 



Required Cognates 


Hours 


Select Option 1 


or Option 2 




Option 1 






CPTR 124 


Fund of Programming 


4 


CPTR 215 


Fund of Software Design 
OR 


4 


Option 2 






PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 


PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 



See pages 27-28 and 31-35 for General Degree and General Education requirements. Note especially 
requirements of make-up of admissions deficiencies, three writing emphasis courses, and 40 upper division 
credits. 

Teacher Certification, 7-12 

Secondary certification in Mathematics requires a baccalaureate degree and completion 
of professional education courses (page 119) for licensure. Students preparing for 
secondary teacher certification must include MATH 215 Statistics, MATH 312 History of 
Mathematics, and MATH 415 Geometry in the major. See further explanations in the 
Education and Psychology section, beginning on page 108. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 

An endorsement to teach mathematics as an additional field may be obtained by 
completing a major and secondary certification in another field and by completing a minor 
in mathematics that includes the following courses (22 hours): MATH 181 Calculus I, 
MATH 182 Calculus II, MATH 200 Elementary Linear Algebra, MATH 215 Statistics, MATH 
219 Set Theory and Logic, MATH 415 Geometry, one three-hour upper-division MATH 
course, and EDUC 438 Curriculum and Content Methods, Grades 7-12/Mathematics. 

Actuarial Studies 

Students interested in the actuarial profession should consult with departmental faculty 
regarding appropriate courses from the School of Business and Management to include in 
their course of study. 

Minor— Mathematics (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

MATH 181 Calculus I 3 

MATH 182 Calculus II 4 

Math Electives (6 UD) 11 



146 Departmentof Modern Languages 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

Chair: Carlos H. Parra 

Faculty: Carmen Jimenez, Pierre Nzokizwanimana 

Adjunct Faculty: Darwin Ayscue, Claryce Caviness, Magdalena Jesiak, Jeffrey Jordan, 
Gwendolyn Smith 

Modern Languages 

The Modern Languages Department at Southern Adventist University combines language 
study with experience abroad and academic courses. Southern offers interdisciplinary 
degrees in French, French Teaching, International Studies, Spanish, and Spanish 
Teaching. The International Studies degree will enhance students' ability to live and work 
in an international setting. Students discover French, German, Italian, Spanish and 
Russian not only as living languages but also as reflections of many cultures. 

The Modern Languages Department also offers majors in French and Spanish, minors in 
French, German, Italian, and Spanish; and language courses in Italian and Russian, for 
those students wishing to gain a deeper understanding of cultures within a global context 
through the study of language, literature, and society. The French and Spanish majors 
also provides the necessary background for graduate study. In addition, the department 
offers French and Spanish Teaching Licensure majors for students interested in 
secondary education. Students seeking teacher certification should also pursue the 
teaching major. 

The ability to communicate with people is increasingly essential in today's global 
community, and knowledge of other cultures and cultural experiences should be a key 
part of the background of a well-educated individual, particularly of those with a sense of 
world mission. By introducing students to another language and giving them opportunity 
and exposure to experience other cultures, the Modern Languages Department at 
Southern Adventist University strives in helping to overcome stereotypes and prejudices, 
foster a spirit of appreciation and inclusiveness, and facilitates easier communication and 
interaction with persons of other languages and cultures. 

Mission Statement 

The Modern Languages Department at Southern Adventist University provides a Christian 
learning environment that enhances the understanding of other cultures, and promotes a 
global dialogue by widening horizons, broadening, perspectives, and deepening self- 
understanding as a worldwide family. 

Assessment 

The assessment of majors in International Studies consists of three basic sections: First 
the candidates write an evaluation of the departmental program to state their perception 
of the program's effectiveness in achieving its objectives. Second, the candidates take a 
departmental exam to demonstrate their degree of success in achieving near native 
mastery of the target language in the areas of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. 
Third, the candidates take an oral examination focusing on their knowledge and 
appreciation of the culture of the peoples who speak the target language. A key element 
of this interview is the candidates' ability to compare and contrast the target culture with 
their own, and to show how they relate, contribute to, and enrich each other. 



Departmentof Modern Languages 147 



The assessment of students majoring in Spanish, and Spanish Teaching consists of a 
departmental oral and written examination. Candidates will demonstrate a passing degree 
of knowledge and appreciation of Spanish speaking cultures, their literary expression, and 
the ability to understand many of the complexities affecting and resulting from the 
Spanish, and Spanish-American experience in their own context and when in contact with 
other cultures not only in the American continent, but in relation to global society. The 
assessment of students majoring in French and French Teaching is also a departmental 
oral and written examination. Candidates will demonstrate a passing degree of knowledge 
and appreciation of French speaking cultures, their literary expression, and the ability to 
understand the complexities in their own context not only in Europe and America, but as 
part of global society. 

Foreign Study 

Adventist Colleges Abroad. Southern Adventist University is a member of the consortium 
of colleges and universities which, under the auspice of the General Conference of 
Seventh-day Adventists, supports the Adventist Colleges Abroad program. ACA provides an 
opportunity for students of French, German, Italian, or Spanish to achieve proficiency in 
the foreign language amid the added advantages of an authentic cultural setting. 

Students can also contact ACA at: www. http://aca-noborders.org 

The language schools operated by the following institutions are affiliates of ACA: in 
Austria, Seminar Schloss Bogenhofen, Braunau; in France, Centre Universitaire et 
Pedagogique du Saleve, Collonges-sous-Saleve; in Spain, Colegio Adventista de Sagunto, 
Sagunto; in Argentina, Universidad Adventista del Plata, Libertador San Martin; in Italy, 
Istituto Avventista Villa Aurora; in Germany, Friedensau Adventist University; and in 
Mexico, Universidad de Montemorelos. 

Major Programs 

Degrees. B.A. French, International Studies, Spanish, French and Spanish Teaching. 

Placement Level. Students who intend to enroll in a French or Spanish language course, 
who have had any background in the language must take the "Placement Examination." 

Exceptions. Students who are native speakers or who have otherwise acquired advanced 
language proficiency are encouraged to take the "Challenge Examination" offered by the 
department. Otherwise, students with no background in a language must begin at the 101 
level. 

Departmental Majors. The Modern Languages Department offers language courses to 
satisfy the B.A. language requirement. A major in International Studies with emphasis in 
Spanish, French, German or Italian is offered. Majors in French, Spanish, and French or 
Spanish Teaching are also offered. 

Students planning majors or minors should contact the department early in their studies 
for a list of required courses. Those students with questions about their major or minor 
should refer to the Catalog and/or contact Modern Languages faculty. Those students 
with transferred language credit from another college or university should meet with a 
faculty adviser early in their studies regarding major or minor course equivalents. 

Students must earn a grade of C or better in all course work that is to count toward a 
department major or minor. 



148 Departmentof Modern Languages 



Departmental Minors. The department offers minors in Spanish, French, German, and 
Italian. 

Language Emphasis. American Sign Language (ASL) and Russian. 

Teaching Major, Certification. Students planning to obtain Teaching certification must 
include the required professional education courses and any additional General Education 
requirements in their program as outlined in the School of Education and Psychology 
section of this Catalog under "Requirements for Certification." 

The student must apply for initial admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before a student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 

Students returning from any of Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA), after fulfilling studies in 
French, Spanish, German, or Italian languages must meet with a Modern Languages 
Department faculty upon returning to SAU. This meeting is an assessment of the course 
work finished abroad, and advising of subsequent required course work towards a major 
offered at Southern. 

International Studies Majors 

ALL International Studies majors in Spanish or French MUST take from the Modern 
Languages Department at SAU, two (2) upper division courses upon returning from ACA 
and before graduation. These students will earn a minimum grade of "C" (2.00) in these 
courses. ALL students majoring in International Studies with emphasis in French, German, 
Italian, or Spanish MUST take a "Departmental Exit Examination" (DEE) during their last 
semester prior to graduation. Students will earn a minimum grade of "B-" in this 
examination. 

French and Spanish Majors 

ALL Spanish/French majors who studied abroad for one (1) full academic year at any of 
our ACA locations (Argentina, France, or Spain), who took a Culture and Civilization course 
equivalent to 3 SH, a literature course also equivalent to 3 SH, upon returning to SAU will 
need to take three (3) upper division courses in their majors from the required course list, 
SPAN/FREN 490, and cognate courses, if necessary. These courses MUST be taken at 
SAU. These students will earn a minimum grade of "C" (2.00) in all courses. 

If any Spanish/French major has not taken any of the courses mentioned above, they 
MUST take five (5) upper division courses from the Modern Languages Department at 
SAU, SPAN/FREN 490 and cognate courses, if necessary. These students will earn a 
minimum grade of "C" (2.00) in all courses. ALL SPAN/FREN majors MUST pass a 
written/oral "Major Comprehensive Examination" (MCE) during their last semester and 
prior to graduation. This examination evaluates candidate's writing, reading, speaking, 



Department of Modern Languages 



149 



and listening skills in the language of study, and provides a platform for analysis and 
discussion of courses' content in their respective majors. Students will earn a minimum 
grade of "B-" in this examination. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 



Major— B.A. French (34 hours) 

Required Core Hours 

ELIT216 Approaches to Literature 3 

FREN 490 Comprehensive Exam Prep 1 

Required Courses 

Select 27 hours from the following: 27 

FREN 207 Intermediate French I 

FREN 208 Intermediate French II 

FREN 244 French Comp & Conv 

FREN 305 French for Business 

FREN 344 Adv French Comp & Conv 

FREN 350 French Linguistics 

FREN 353 Contemp French Culture & Civ 

FREN 357 Survey Fren Med & Renais Lit 

FREN 358 Survey Fren 17* & 18 th Cent Lit 

FREN 458 Survey Fren 19* & 20* Cent Lit 

FREN 459 Francophone Cultures & Lit 



Required Courses Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History 

OR 
ARTH 349 Medieval Art History 

HIST 471 Classics of Wstrn Thought I (W) 

HIST 472 Classics of Wstrn Thought II (W) 



Students majoring in French are required to travel abroad for one (1) academic year to 
conduct studies at ACA (Collonges, France). They are also highly recommended to fulfill 
this requirement during their sophomore year. Students who minor in French are 
STRONGLY ADVISED to study one semester or one summer at ACA (Collonges, France). 

NOTE: French-speaking students who completed secondary education in France or in a 
French-speaking country are exempt from this requirement. 

Major— B.A. French, Teacher Certification, 7-12 (31 hours) 



Required Core 

ELIT 216 

FREN 207 
FREN 208 
FREN 244 
FREN 344 
FREN 350 
FREN 353 
FREN 357 
FREN 490 



Hours 

Approaches to Lit 3 

Intermediate French I 3 

Intermediate French II 3 

French Comp & Conv 3 

Adv French Comp & Conv 3 

French Linguistics 3 

Contemp Fren Culture & Civ 3 

Survey Fren Med & Ren Lit 3 

Comprehensive Exam Prep 1 



Required Courses Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

FREN 358 Surv Fren 17* & 18* Cent Lit 

FREN 458 Surv Fren 19* & 20* Cent Lit 

FREN 459 Francophone Cultures & Lit 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 

HIST 386 Rise of the West (W) 



Students majoring in French who are seeking teaching certification are required to travel 
abroad for one (1) academic year to conduct studies at ACA (Collonges, France). They 
are also highly recommended to fulfill this requirement during their sophomore year . 
Students who minor in French are STRONGLY ADVISED to study one semester or one 
summer at ACA (Collonges, France). 

NOTE: French-speaking students who completed secondary education in France or in a 
French-speaking country are exempt from this requirement. 



150 



Department of Modern Languages 



Major— B.A. Spanish (34 hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Required Courses, continued 



ELIT216 


Approaches to Literature 


3 


Select six 


SPAN 207 


Intermediate Spanish 1 


3 


HIST 351 


SPAN 208 


Intermediate Spanish il 


3 


HIST 386 


SPAN 243 


Spanish Comp & Conv 


3 


HIST 471 


SPAN 354 


Hispanic Civ &Culture 


3 


HIST 472 


SPAN 355 


Survey of Spanish Lit(W) 


3 




SPAN 356 


Survey of Span-Amer Lit (W) 


3 




SPAN 457 


Latino Literature (W) 


3 




SPAN 458 


Mexican-American Lit(W) 


3 




SPAN 490 


Comprehensive Exam Prep 


1 





Hours 

6 



Colonial Latin America (W) 
Rise of the West (W) 
Classics of Wstrn Thought I (W) 
Classics of Wstrn Thought II (W) 



Students majoring in Spanish are required to travel abroad for one (1) academic year , 
to conduct studies at one of the ACA locations (Argentina or Spain). It is highly 
recommended that students fulfill this requirement during their sophomore year . 

NOTE: Native Spanish-speaking students who completed secondary education in a 
Spanish-speaking country are exempt from this requirement. 

Major— B.A. Spanish, Teacher Certification, 7-12 (31 hours) 



Required Courses 

ELIT 216 
SPAN 207 
SPAN 208 
SPAN 243 
SPAN 354 
SPAN 355 
SPAN 356 
SPAN 457 
SPAN 458 
SPAN 490 



Hours 



Approaches to Literature 3 

Intermediate Spanish I 3 

Intermediate Spanish II 3 

Spanish Comp & Conv 3 

Hispanic Civ & Culture 3 

Survey of Span Lit (W) 3 

Survey of Span-Amer Lit (W) 3 

Latino Literature (W) 3 

Mexican American Lit (W) 3 

Comprehensive Exam Prep 1 



Required Courses continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

HIST 351 Colonial Latin America (W) 

HIST 386 Rise of the West (W) 

HIST 471 Classics of Wstrn Thought I (W) 

HIST 472 Classics of Wstrn Thought II (W) 



Students majoring in Spanish who are seeking teaching certification are required to travel 
abroad for one (1) academic year , to conduct studies at one of the ACA locations 
(Argentina or Spain). It is highly recommended that students fulfill this requirement during 
their sophomore year . 

NOTE: Native Spanish-speaking students who completed secondary education in a 
Spanish-speaking country are exempt from this requirement. 

Major— B.A. in International Studies with emphasis in French, German, Italian, 
or Spanish (36 Hours) 

Language Component 24 hours 

• Elementary level of language (French, German, Italian or 

Spanish) prior to travel to ACA is strongly recommended 6 hours 



One year of Interm-Adv language courses at ACA including 3 
semester hours in Culture and Civilization and and 3 semester 
hours in Literature/History 



18 hours 



Department of Modern Languages 



151 



Humanities Component (at SAU) 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

COMM 330 Intercultural Communication (W) 

ELIT 445 Ancient Classics (W) 

HIST 387 Europe in the Nineteenth Century (W) 
OR 

HIST 388 Contemporary Europe (W) 
TOTAL 



. 12 hours 



. 36 hours 



Major— B.A. International Studies, French Emphasis (36 Hours) 



Required Courses 

FREN 207 
FREN 208 
*FREN 221 
*FREN 251 
*FREN 321 
*FREN 331 
*FREN 341 
*FREN 351 
*FREN 361 
*FREN 376 



Semester Hours 



Intermediate French I 

Intermediate French II 

Intermediate Composition 

Intermediate Oral Exp 

Adv Composition I 

Orthography 

Adv Grammar 

Adv Oral Expression I 

Text Analysis 

French Civilization 



*See Adventist Colleges Abroad Catalog for course 
descriptions 



Major— B.A. International Studies, German Emphasis (36 Hours) 



Required Courses 

GRMN 207 

GRMN 208 

*GRMN211 

*GRMN 221 

*GRMN254 

*GRMN306 

*GRMN311 

*GRMN325 

*HIST204 



Semester Hours 



Intermediate German 
Intermediate German 
Intermediate Written Expr 
Intermediate Rdg Compreh 
Survey of German Lit 
Adv Oral Expression 
Adv Written Expression 
Adv Reading Comprehension 
European Civilization 



*See Adventist Colleges Abroad Catalog for course 
descriptions 



Major— B.A. International Studies, Italian Emphasis (36 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ITAL 207 
ITAL 208 
*GE0G 310 
*ITLN 212 
*ITLN 313 
*ITLN 351/451 
*ITLN 361/461 
*ITLN 471 
*ITLN 303 
*ITLN 333 
*ITLN 431 
*ITLN 230/330 



Semester Hours 



Interm Italian I or equiv 
Interm Italian II or equiv 
Geography of Italy 
Italian Culture 
Italian Culture II 
Italian Grammar 
Italian Composition 
Italian Conversation 
Italian History 
Italian Literature 
Italian Literature II 
History of Italian Art 



*See Adventist Colleges Abroad Catalog for course 
descriptions 



Major— B.A. International Studies, Spanish Emphasis (36 Hours) 



Required Courses 

SPAN 207 
SPAN 208 
*SPAN 261 
*SPAN 271 
*SPAN 351 
*SPAN 361 
*SPAN 371 



Semester Hours 

Intermediate Spanish I 3 

Intermediate Spanish II 3 

Interm Spanish Composition 
Interm Span Conversation 
Adv Spanish Grammar 
Adv Spanish Composition 
Adv Spanish Conversation 



ACA in Spain: 

*SPAN 312 Spain and Its Culture 

*SPAN 331 History of Spanish Lit 

ACA in Argentina: 

*SPAN 332 Latin American Literature 

*SPAN 342 History of Argentina 

*See Adventist Colleges Abroad Catalog for course 
descriptions 



152 Departmentof Modern Languages 



Minor— French (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

FREN 207 Intermediate French I 3 

FREN 208 Intermediate French II 3 

FREN 244 French Comp & Convers 3 

FREN 344 Adv French Comp & Conv 3 

FREN 350 French Linguistics 3 

FREN 353 Contemp Fren Culture & Civ 3 

Minor— German (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

207-208 Intermediate Language 6 

UD Language Courses 6 

Elective Language Courses 6 

Minor— Italian (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ITAL 207 Interm Italian I (or equiv ACA) 3 

ITAL 208 Interm Italian II (or equiv ACA) 3 

At Villa Aurora (Italy): 

GEOG 310 Geography of Italy 

ITLN 303 Italian History 

ITLN 313 Advanced Italian Culture 

ITLN 351 Advanced Grammar 

ITLN 361 Advanced Composition 

ITLN 381 Advanced Conversation 

Minor— Spanish (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

SPAN 207 Intermediate Spanish I 3 

SPAN 208 Intermediate Spanish II 3 

SPAN 243 Comp & Conversation 3 

SPAN 354 Hispanic Culture & Civ 3 

SPAN 355 Survey of Spanish Lit 3 

SPAN 356 Survey of Span-Amer Lit 3 

*The beginning language courses, 101-102, are excluded from the minor Students desiring a language minor 
must earn 12 credits beyond the intermediate level either at SAU or through ACA . 

See ACA Catalog for course descriptions. 



School of Music 153 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Dean: W. Scott Ball 

Faculty: Gennevieve Brown-Kibble, Peter J. Cooper, Judith Glass, Laurie Redmer Minner, 
Ken Parsons, Julie Penner 

Adjunct Faculty: Bob Burks, John Burroughs, Jan Cochrane, Patricia Dusold, Laura Elder, 
Robert Hansel, Gordon James, Elaine Janzen, Nora Kile, Adrienne Olson, Mark Reneau, 
Sherilyn Samaan, Clinton Schmitt, Patricia Silver, James Stroud, Nikolasa Tejero 

Music 

The faculty of the School of Music believes that music is one of the arts given to 
humankind by the Creator to be used in the worship of God and to enhance the quality of 
life. In harmony with this philosophy, course work is offered that meets the needs of the 
general university student as well as music majors and minors. 

The School of Music offers two baccalaureate degrees, the Bachelor of Music degree in 
music education and the Bachelor of Science degree in music. Both degrees require 
courses in music theory and history, as well as a high level of achievement in a major 
performance area. The Bachelor of Music degree emphasizes the skills necessary for 
teaching music, with special emphasis on the training of teachers for the Seventh-day 
Adventist school system. The Bachelor of Science degree affords the student the 
opportunity to choose one of three tracks: (1) General, (2) Music Theory and Literature, (3) 
Music Performance. 

Admission Requirements 

Music majors must fulfill all the general admission requirements of the University. 
Acceptance to the University, however, does not guarantee admission to the School of 
Music as a music major. The prospective music major is required to take written and aural 
entrance examinations in music theory and a performance examination in the applied 
area. To obtain Freshman Standing as a music major, the student must qualify for MUCT 
111, Music Theory I and MUPF 189, Concentration. Continuation in the music program is 
contingent upon satisfactory progress toward a degree measured by regular assessment 
checkpoints, described in the following pages. 

General Requirements 

Functional Piano 

All music majors must demonstrate keyboard proficiency by passing a piano proficiency 
examination or successfully completing Class Piano 1-4. Keyboard proficiency includes 
the ability to play hymns, scales, triads, arpeggios, several moderately easy compositions 
and accompaniments, and harmonize simple folk melodies. Students will take a piano 
placement test during the first week of the first semester in residence. 

Applied Music Credit 

One semester hour of credit will be given for twelve half-hour lessons with a minimum of 
four hours of practice per lesson. Performance Concentration grades are assigned 
following a jury examination at the end of each semester. 



154 School of Music 



Concert and Recital Attendance 

Full-time music majors (students taking 12 or more credits) are required to attend, as a 
non-performer, six School approved concerts per semester, except for the student 
teaching semester. Attendance shall include faculty recitals, student junior and 
senior recitals, and music general recitals. Failure to meet this requirement will nullify 
music major status. 

Music Ensemble Participation 

All music majors are required to participate in an appropriate music ensemble every 
semester in full-time residence (12 or more hours). During the student teaching semester, 
students are exempted from this requirement. Teacher certification candidates must, 
however, complete eight hours of appropriate ensembles. Appropriate ensembles are 
defined as follows: string majors, Symphony Orchestra; wind and percussion majors, Wind 
Symphony; voice majors, I Cantori; keyboard majors, ensembles chosen in consultation 
with the School of Music faculty. All ensemble assignments are determined by audition. 
Music majors and minors may be placed in an ensemble that is not listed above. 
Students are encouraged to participate in a variety of other ensembles as time permits. 

Assessment 

The School of Music has an ongoing program of student assessment. This program 
includes the following: 

Performance Evaluations (Concentration) 

Music Performance Concentration (MUPF 189, 389) grades will be based on the student 
having met the following criteria: 

• Completed at least 12 lessons for the semester. (One-half hour lesson=one 
semester hour credit; one hour lesson=two semester hours credit.) 

• Practiced a minimum of four hours each week for each semester hour of credit. 
The student will keep a "Daily Practice Log" for his/her verification of meeting 
this requirement. (Two semester hours of credit=eight hours of practice per 
week.) 

• Studied, completed, and performed sufficient literature to warrant the credit 
hours for which the individual is registered. (The number, length, and/or 
difficulty level of the work(s) studied and of the work(s) prepared for 
performance are the basis for this criterion. Where appropriate, other factors 
such as memorization will be considered.) 

• Performed on at least one Music General Recital during the semester. Organ 
students may meet this requirement through a service performance (e.g. 
convocation, evensong, worship service). 

• Completed the end of the semester jury examination and received a 
performance grade as determined by the Music Faculty (50%) and the Private 
Lesson Instructor (50%). 

• Unsatisfactory performance in any item above will negatively affect the final 
Performance Concentration grade. 

A grade of C- or lower will not count toward the Performance Concentration requirements. 

A grade of C or lower for two consecutive semesters may result in the student being 
dropped as a Music Major. Reinstatement can be achieved only by applying to the Music 



School of Music 155 



Faculty and successfully completing an audition for reinstatement in the Performance 
Concentration area. Audition for reinstatement may be requested only once. 

Performance Evaluations (Applied Music) 

Applied Music (MUPF 129, 329) grades will be based on the student having met the 
following criteria. 

• Completed at least 12 lessons for the semester. (One-half hour lesson=one 
semester hour credit; one hour lesson=two semester hours credit.) 

• Practiced a minimum of four hours per week for each semester hour of credit. 
The student will keep a "Daily Practice Log" for his/her verification of meeting 
this requirement. (Two semester hours credit=eight hours practice per week.) 

• Studied, completed, and performed sufficient literature at the individual 
student's level to warrant the credit hours for which the individual is registered. 

Unsatisfactory performance in any item above will negatively affect the final Applied Music 
grade. 

Application to Music Major Track 

Music majors with Freshman Standing must apply to the Music Faculty for acceptance to 
a specific track upon completion of the freshman year. The following tracks are available: 
B.Mus. Music Education; B.S. Music/General; B.S. Theory and Literature; B.S. 
Performance. The faculty's decision is based upon the following: 

• Satisfactory progress in academic coursework (minimum of 2.5 grade point 
average in MUCT and MUHL courses). 

• Satisfactory progress in performance area (based on jury evaluations). 

• Other criteria specific to Music Education and Performance concentrations. 

Sophomore Evaluation and Junior Standing 

Music majors must apply for junior standing at the end of the sophomore year. These 
requirements are as follows: 

• An overall grade point average of 2.00 for the Bachelor of Science degree and 
2.75 for the Bachelor of Music degree. 

• A grade point average of 2.75 in all music courses. 

• Demonstration of keyboard proficiency. 

• Completion of MUCT 211-212,221-222. 

• Completion of at least four hours of MUPF 189: Concentration. 

Faculty evaluation of the application for junior standing will result in the student's 
receiving one of the following classifications: (a) Pass, Bachelor of Music; (b) Pass, 
Bachelor of Science; (c) Probation; (d) Fail. Junior Standing requirements must be met at 
least two semesters before graduation. 

Senior Recital 

All music degree candidates will present a senior recital. The student must be registered 
for private instruction until the senior recital requirement is satisfied. A faculty audition of 
the complete program must be scheduled at least three weeks before the recital date. 
Junior Standing as a music major is prerequisite to scheduling the faculty audition of the 
senior recital. Unsatisfactory performance at this audition will result in a rescheduling of 
the recital date. 



156 School of Music 



Following the senior recital, the music faculty will vote either to accept the performance or 
to require all or portions of the recital to be repeated. The student will not be cleared for 
graduation until successful completion of the senior recital. Upon music faculty approval, 
the senior recital requirement may be partially fulfilled through a conducting or chamber 
music performance. 

Senior Assessment Examination 

During the senior year each graduating senior will take the nationally standardized Major 
Field Achievement Test. The results of this examination will be used to help determine the 
effectiveness of the music program and the competency level of the graduates. 

Bachelor of Music Degree In Music Education 

The Bachelor of Music degree in music education meets state and denominational 
certification requirements. Students must apply for admission to the Teacher Education 
Program through the School of Education and Psychology prior to taking upper division 
education courses. Each student will be responsible to determine the additional courses 
that may be required for certification in the state of his/her choice. This information can 
be obtained at the School of Education and Psychology. 

State certification and graduation requirements for Music Education majors include 
passing the Praxis II Specialty Test in Music Education at the 480 level. 

The following General Education requirements apply only to students pursuing a Bachelor 
of Music degree: 

A. Basic Academic Skills 15 hours 

1. English 6 hours 

2. Mathematics 3 hours 

3. Computer 3 hours 

4. Intro to Public Speaking 3 hours 

B. Religion 12 hours 

1. Biblical Studies (RELB) 3 hours 

2. Religion: RELT 138, 255 6 hours 

3. Upper division elective 3 hours 

C. History 6 hours 

D. Language, Literature, Fine Arts 3 hours 

1. Literature 3 hours 

E. Natural Sciences 6 hours 

1. Biology 0-3 hours 

2. Chemistry 0-3 hours 

3. Physics 0-3 hours 

4. Earth Science 0-3 hours 

F. Behavioral, Family, Health Sciences 5 hours 

1. HLED 173, PSYC 128 

G. Activity Skills 2 hours 

1. Recreational Skills (PEAC 225 required) 2 hours 
TOTAL 49 hours 



School of Music 157 



Music Core (34 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

MUCT 111-112 Music Theory I, II 6 

MUCT 121-122 AuralTheoryl.il 2 

MUCT 211-212 MusicTheorylll.lV 6 

MUCT 221 222 Aural Theory III, IV 2 

MUCT 313 Orchestration & Arranging 3 

MUHL118 Musical Styles & Repertories 2 

MUHL 320-323 Music history courses (W) 8 

MUPF273 Basic Conducting 1 

MUPF373 Choral Conducting 2 

MUPF374 Instrumental Conducting 2 



Vocal/General Endorsement (28-32 Hours) 

A. Voice Concentration (28) 

Applied Concentration 14 hours 

Appropriate Ensemble(s) 8 hours 

MUED 317 Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

MUPF 225 Singers Diction I 2 hours 

MU Elective 2 hours 

B. Keyboard Concentration (32) 

Applied Concentration (Piano or Organ) 14 hours 

Applied Music (Voice) 4 hours 

Appropriate Ensembles 8 hours 

MUED 317 Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

MUPF 279 Service Playing (Organ majors) 

OR 1,1 hours 

MUPF 289 Accompanying (Piano majors) 
MUED 316 Piano Pedagogy 

OR 2 hours 

MUED 318 Organ Pedagogy 

Instrumental Endorsement (32 Hours) 

Concentration (one instrument: wind, string, or percussion) 14 hours 

Applied Music 

(one instrument from family outside of concentration 1,1) 2 hours 

Appropriate Ensembles 8 hours 

MUED 236 String Methods &Tech 2 hours 

MUED 246 Brass Methods and Tech 2 hours 

MUED 256 Woodwind Meth &Tech 2 hours 

MUED 266 Percussion Meth &Tech 2 hours 

Vocal/General and Instrumental Endorsement 

An applicant for endorsements in both areas above may complete a minimum of ten 
semester hours in methods and materials, provided both are represented. 



158 School of Music 



Professional Core (36 Hours) 

MUED Courses: 

MUED 250 Technology in Music Education 2 

MUED 331 Music in the Elementary School 3 

MUED 332 Music in the Secondary School 3 

MUED 439 Pre-Student Teaching Seminar 1 

EDUC Courses: 

EDUC 129 Introduction to and Foundations of Elementary Education 

OR 3 

EDUC 138 Intro to and Foundations of Secondary Education 

EDUC 217 Psychology Foundations of Education 2 

EDUC 325 Philosophy of Christian Education (W) 2 

EDUC 340 Foundations of Inclusive Education 2 

EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment 2 

EDUC 422 Behavior Management- Secondary 2 

EDUC 434 Literacy in the Content Areas 2 

EDUC 464 Teaching Seminar 2 

EDUC 473 Enhanced Student Teaching K-12 10 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 

Bachelor of Science Degree In Music 

The Bachelor of Science in Music degree indicates the study of music within a liberal arts 
degree framework. This program is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to 
major in music irrespective of specific career aspirations. 



School of Music 



159 



Major— B.S. Music (46-60 Hours) 
Music Core (35 Hours) 



Required Courses 

MUCT 111-112 
MUCT 121-122 
MUCT 211-212 
MUCT 221-222 
MUHL118 
MUHL320 



Hours 



Music Theory I, II 

Aural Theory I, II 

Music Theory III, IV 

AuralTheorylll.lV 

Music Styles & Repertories 

Music of Mid Ages & Ren (W) 



Required Courses, continued 



Hours 



6 


MUHL321 


Mus Late Ren & Baro Era (W) 


2 


2 


MUHL322 


Classic & Romantic Mus (W) 


2 


6 


MUHL323 


Music in the 20* Cent (W) 


2 


2 


MUPF273 


Basic Conducting 


1 


2 




Appropriate Mus Ensembles 


8 


2 




(3 hrs must be UD) 





General Track (11 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


MUPF189 


Concentration 4 


MUPF389 


Concentration 4 




UD Theory Elective 3 


Music Theory and Literature Track (16 


Required Courses Hours 


MUPF189 


Concentration 4 


MUPF389 


Concentration 4 


MUCT 313 


Orchestration & Arranging 




OR 3 


MUCT 315 


Compositional Techniques 


MUCT 413 


Analysis of Musical Forms 3 


MUHL485 


Music Seminar 2 



Cognate Requirement Hours 

HMNT205 Arts and Ideas 3 

Foreign Language through the Beginning Level 6 
(French or German required) 



Music Performance Track (23-25 Hours) 

Students are accepted into this track by audition only. 
Required Courses Hours 

MUPF189 Concentration 8 

MUPF389 Concentration 8 

MUCT 413 Analysis of Musical Forms 3 

Cognate Requirement 

Foreign Langthrough the Beginning Level 6 

(French or German required, except for voice 
majors who may elect Italian) 



Specific area requirements as follows: Hours 

For Piano Majors (4 Hours) 4-6 

MUED316 Piano Pedagogy (2) 

MUPF 289 Accompanying (1, 1) 

For Voice Majors (6 Hours) 

MUED317 Voice Pedagogy (2) 

MUPF 225-226 Singers Diction 1,11 (2,2) 
For Organ Majors (4 Hours) 

MUED 318 Organ Pedagogy (2) 

MUPF 279 Service Playing (1,1) 

For Orchestra/Band Instrument (4 Hours) 

MUPF 334 Chamber Music (1,1) 

MUPF 344 Instrumental Literature (2) 



160 School of Music 



Minor— Music (20 Hours) 

The School of Music offers a minor in music for students who desire to deepen their 
knowledge and ability in this discipline while majoring in another academic area. It 
consists of coursework in Music Theory, Music History and Performance studies, as listed 
below. An audition is required for acceptance into the music minor. At least twenty-five 
percent of the coursework toward the minor must be taken in residence at Southern 
Adventist University. 

Required Courses Hours Select one (1) of the following courses: 2 

MUCT 111-112 MusicTheorylandll 3,3 ^, L32 ° Musicof Mid Ages &Renaiss 

MUHL118 Musical Styles and Rep 2 "S" 321 Musicof Late Ren & Baroque 

MUPF189 Concentration 1,1 "" Cassic& Romantic Music 

MUPF273 Basic Conducting 1 MUHL323 Music in the 20* Century 

MUPF389 Concentration 1,1 

♦Ensemble (at least two hours must be UD) 4 
MU elective 1 

*Each Music minor shall register for credit and maintain membership for at least four semesters in a major music 
ensemble appropriate to the student's major instrument and ability. 

Individual and Group Instruction 

Courses MUPF 108, 129, and 329 are open to any student of the University as general 
education and/or elective credit toward all degrees. The music major or minor may not 
apply these toward his/her applied music concentration. Students desiring to study organ 
must pass the Functional Piano Examination. 

Courses MUPF 189 and 389 are courses primarily for the music major and minor, but 
they may be taken by anyone who passes a prerequisite audition. Jury examinations are 
required with these course numbers. 

Students enrolled in individual instruction MUPF 129, 189, 329, and 389 will be charged 
$150 per semester hour (12 half-hour lessons) in addition to tuition (regular or audit 
rate). 

Choral and Instrumental Ensembles 

Choral and instrumental ensembles are open to all University students through audition. 
Each ensemble offers one hour credit each semester. Regular attendance at 
performances and rehearsals, including dress rehearsals, is required. Ensembles for 
which academic credit is granted are organized and sponsored by the members of the 
music faculty. All may be repeated for credit. 



School of Nursing 161 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dean: Barbara James 

Faculty: Pamela Ahlfeld, Desiree Batson, Judith Dedeker, Bonnie Freeland, Holly Gadd, 
Pam Gammenthaler, Lorella Howard, Jaclynn Huse, Cynthia Johnson, Dana Krause, Sylvia 
Mayer, Callie McArthur, Christine Moniyung, Christy Showalter, Elizabeth Snyder, Jillian 
Wills, Judy Winters 

Adjunct Faculty: Shirley Spears 

Coordinator of Nursing Admissions and Progression: Linda Marlowe 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the School of Nursing is to provide a Christian learning environment that 
values academic excellence and fosters personal and professional growth to meet the 
diverse needs of individuals, families, and communities. 

Associate and Baccalaureate Programs 

The School of Nursing (SON) program at Southern Adventist University leads to a 
baccalaureate degree (BS) in nursing with the option to exit at the associate degree (AS) 
level. Students entering the nursing program are encouraged to declare the BS degree 
when they apply to the University. Registered nurses with an AS degree from a nursing 
program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 
may progress into baccalaureate level nursing or accelerated Registered Nurse (RN) to 
Master of Science (MSN) program. Diploma and AS degree graduates from a 
non-accredited program will be evaluated on an individual basis. 

The nursing curriculum is based on the Neuman Systems Model (NSM) which emphasizes 
wholistic health. The curriculum leads to an Associate of Science degree in nursing which 
may be completed in four semesters, plus a summer once the student begins clinical 
nursing courses. Upon completion of the AS degree requirements, the student is eligible 
to take National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). 

The curriculum in the BS Program enhances professional opportunities through study in 
theoretical and clinical nursing. The program may be completed in two to three semesters. 

The accelerated RN to MSN program allows the RN to combine baccalaureate and 
masters level course work in a condensed program of five to six full-time semesters. 
Accelerated program emphases include Adult and Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse 
Educator, and a dual degree MSN/MBA with a focus on Health Care Administration (see 
SAU Graduate Catalog for complete program information). 

A limited number of students are accepted into each program in Fall and Winter 
semesters of each year. 

A well-equipped Learning Resource Center (LRC), clinical skills laboratory, and a tutorial 
program, Assisting Students to Achieve Professionally (ASAP) are provided to facilitate 
learning. 

Policies 

The SON has a zero tolerance policy with respect to illicit drug use. Students will be 
randomly screened for chemicals during their first nursing course and at any other time 



162 



School of Nursing 



for reasonable suspicion or evidence of alcohol or drug use. Violation will result in 
disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. 

The Tennessee Board of Nursing (TBN) and other State Boards reserve the right to deny 
licensure if the applicant has committed a crime other than a minor traffic violation. The 
SON reserves the right to deny admission to or remove students from 

the nursing program who have records of misconduct, legal or otherwise, that would 
jeopardize their professional performance. 

The SON reserves the right to revise, add, or withdraw policies and/or courses as 
necessary to ensure a quality nursing program. 

Accreditation 

The programs in nursing are fully accredited by the National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, (212)363-5555, ext. 153). 
They are approved by the TBN. 



Assessment 

The SON has a comprehensive assessment program. AS and BS students are required to 
complete standardized competency examinations throughout the nursing curriculum. The 
AS graduate is eligible to take the NCLEX-RN examination. The TBN requires an annual 
pass rate of 85% or higher on the NCLEX-RN for a school to maintain approval. 

Programs in Nursing 

Major— B.S. in Nursing (68 Hours) 

(Includes 29 hours of AS level courses) 



Required Courses* 



NRSG 305 
NRSG 309 
NRSG 316 
NRSG 322 
NRSG 328 
NRSG 340 
NRSG 389 
NRSG 434 
NRSG 485 
NRSG 491 
NRSG 497 



Hours 

AS Level Courses 29 

Adult Health III 4 

Nursing Seminar 4 
Applied Statistics for Hlth Prof 3 

Transitions in Prof Nrsg 3 

Nursing Assessment 3 

Community Hlth Nursing (W) 5 

Nursing Pharmacology 3 

Pathophysiology 3 

Nursing Leadership & Mgmt 3 

Senior Nursing Practicum 2 

Rsrch Methods in Nrsg (W) 3 

Nursing Electives*** 3 



Required Cognates Hours 

CHEM 111 Surveyof Chemistry I 3 

CHEM 112 Surveyof Chemistry II 3 

RELT373 Christian Ethics 3 

SOCI 349 Aging and Society (W) 3 

Required General Education** Hours 

Area B, Religion 3 

Area C-l, History 3 

Area C or D 3 

Area G-3, PE 1 



Contact the School of Nursing for a suggested sequence of courses. 



*Course requirements vary for students in the accelerated RN-MSN program (See SAU Graduate Catalog). 
**Graduates of a state-approved associate degree nursing program will be considered to have met the general 
education requirements for the first two years of the program, with the exception of Introduction to Public Speaking, 
English, Fitness for Life, and Computer Competency If ENGL 101-102, COMM 135, PEAC225, math, or computer 
competency requirements were not included in the AS program, they must be taken in fulfillment of the BS degree 
General Education requirements. A maximum of 72 semester hours will be accepted from a college where the 
highest degree offered is the AS degree. 
***Nursing electives must be at the upper division level. 



School of Nursing 



163 



Major— A.S. Nursing (37 Hours) 



Required Courses 

NRSG 106 
NRSG 107 
NRSG 126 
NRSG 130 
NRSG 191 
NRSG 212 
NRSG 226 
NRSG 231 
NRSG 305 
NRSG 309 



Fundamentals I 
Fundamentals II 
Adult Health I 
Mental Health 
Nursing Practicum 
Childbearing Family 
Adult Health II 
Child Health 
Adult Health III 
Nursing Seminar 



Hours 

4 
4 

4 
4 
1 

4 
4 

4 
4 
4 



Required Cognates Hours 

BIOL 101-102 Anatomy & Physiology 8 

BIOL 225 Basic Microbiology 4 

NRNT125 Nutrition 3 

PSYC128 Developmental Psychology 3 

Required General Education 

COMM 135 Intro to Public Speaking 3 

ENGL 101-102 College Composition 6 

Area A-2, Math (if needed) 3 

Area-A-4, Cptr Competencies 3 

(or waiver) 

Area B, Religion 6 

PEAC 225 Fitness for Life 1 



Admission Requirements 

The final decisions on acceptance and progression in nursing are made by the SON. 
Declaration as a nursing major is not the equivalent of acceptance to the SON. Minimum 
requirements for admission to nursing courses are listed below: 

1. Acceptance to Southern Adventist University. 

2. A diploma from a four-year accredited high school or the equivalent. 

3. Evidence of mental and moral fitness. References or information may be 
required. 

4. A minimum of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for 
students whose native language is not English. 

5. Current American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR certification that 
must be maintained throughout the nursing program. 

6. Signed release for a background check. 

7. Signed release for drug screen. 

8. Foreign student transcript evaluation by World Education Services. The cost for 
this evaluation will be paid by the applicant. The number of credits accepted for 
transfer to Southern Adventist University may vary from those listed on the 
evaluation, in accordance with the policies of Southern Adventist University. 

9. Evidence through a health verification form and all required tests, including 
immunizations, that student is in good health and free from communicable 
diseases. 

10. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, students must be, with 
reasonable accommodation, physically and mentally capable of performing the 
essential functions of the program. The Core Performance Standards for 
Admission and Progression developed by the Southern Council on Collegiate 
Education for Nursing include: 

• Critical thinking ability sufficient for clinical judgment. 

• Interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with individuals, families, and 
groups 

• Communication abilities sufficient for interaction with others in verbal and 
written form. 



164 School of Nursing 



• Physical abilities sufficient to move from room to room and maneuver in 
small spaces. Gross and fine motor abilities sufficient to provide safe and 
effective nursing care. 

• Auditory abilities sufficient to monitor and assess health needs. 

• Visual abilities sufficient for observation and assessment necessary in 
nursing care. 

• Tactile ability sufficient for physical assessment. 

Associate Degree 

Enrollment in the AS Nursing Program is limited, therefore admission is a competitive 
process. Meeting minimum admission requirements does not guarantee acceptance into 
clinical nursing courses. The SON faculty consider overall and cognate G.P.A., ACT scores, 
university courses completed, adviser recommendation, and length of time at SAU when 
determining the fall and winter nursing classes. 

Minimum requirements for admission to associate degree nursing courses are as follows: 

1. Two semesters of high school chemistry with a minimum grade of "B" or CHEM 
111 with a minimum grade of "C." 

2. ACT scores with a minimum standard enhanced Math score of 16 (if less than 16, 
a college math course is required); 20 in Reading (or Nelson-Denny); and 19 in 
English (if less than 19, an English class is required). 

3. Science credits (Anatomy & Physiology, Chemistry, Microbiology, Nutrition) earned 
more than eight years prior to admission will not be accepted. Applicants may 
choose to validate knowledge by examination or by repeating the course. 

4. A minimum current and cumulative university grade point average of 2.80 on a 
4.00 scale in nursing cognate and solid courses (math, science, English, history, 
foreign language) is required before consideration for clinical nursing courses is 

given. 

5. Students may be asked to take a standardized nursing admission assessment 
examination. Scores on this examination will be utilized in the selection process 
for admission to clinical nursing courses. 

6. Transfer students from another nursing program will be evaluated individually 
and accepted on a space available basis. 

7. Students who have successfully completed a practical nurse program and NRSG 
103, Associate Nurse Perspectives, may receive eight (8) credit hours of 
advanced placement in nursing and will articulate directly into the second 
semester of the nursing curriculum on a space available basis. 

8. ACT-PEP examinations in Anatomy and Physiology (8 credits) and microbiology (4 
credits) will be accepted as an alternative method of college credit for LPNs if 
these credits are already on the transcript when applying to the nursing program. 

The following should be sent by February 1 (Fall Admission) or September 1 (Winter 
Admission) to the University Director of Admissions: (1) application to the University (2) 
application to the SON (3) high school and college transcripts (4) ACT scores. The 
applicant is responsible to see that all application materials are received by the SON. 

Students accepted to clinical nursing are required to send a Nursing Education deposit of 
$400 to hold their place in the class. 



School of Nursing 165 



Baccalaureate Degree 

Students wishing to enter BS nursing courses must send an application to the SON's 
Admissions Coordinator. Upon acceptance to the nursing program, courses listed in the 
current catalog will be required. All non-nursing course requirements must be met in order 
to complete BS nursing courses in one year. 

Minimum requirements for admission to the baccalaureate nursing program are as 
follows: 

1. Current license as a registered nurse in Tennessee or current multistate license 
with privilege to practice in the state of Tennessee prior to registering for the final 
semester. 

2. A minimum grade point average of 2.50. 

3. Recommendation from nursing faculty in the student's basic nursing program. 

4. An interview with the BS program coordinator or designee, if requested. 

5. Experience: Documentation of clinical experience (satisfactory work performance 
recommendation), and/or RN Update or additional clinical experience may be 
required. 

6. Nursing Credits: Graduates of NLNAC accredited AA/AS and Diploma Nursing 
Programs: When entering the baccalaureate nursing program, a transfer student 
will have placed in escrow 29 credits of associate degree level nursing and eight 
(8) credits of upper division nursing (NRSG 305,309). After successfully 
completing 10 semester hours of BS nursing courses at Southern Adventist 
University, these credits held in escrow will be placed on the transcript as 
accepted credits toward a BS degree with a major in nursing. 

7. General Education and Cognates: ACT-PEP examinations in Anatomy and 
Physiology (8 credits), Chemistry 111 (3 credits), and Microbiology (4 credits) will 
be accepted as an alternative method of university credit for RNs if these credits 
are already on the transcript when applying to the nursing program. 

Associate Degree 

Graduates of a state approved associate degree program will be considered to 
have met General Education requirements for the first two years of the program 
with the exception of Introduction to Public Speaking, English, Math, Fitness for 
Life, and Computer Competency provided that the GPA is 2.5 or above. If ENGL 
101, 102, COMM 135, PEAC 225, math and computer competency requirements 
were not included in the associate degree program, they must be taken in 
fulfillment of the Bachelor of Science degree General Education requirements. 
Diploma Graduate 

• Credit is acceptable for courses comparable to those required at Southern 
Adventist University if received from an accredited senior or junior college or 
by examination according to the policy stated in this Catalog. 

• All cognates for the associate degree level must be completed before 
entering baccalaureate nursing courses. General Education requirements 
may be taken concurrently. 



166 School of Nursing 



8. Students in third semester associate degree nursing courses may take: Applied 
Statistics for Health Professions (NRSG 316), Nursing Assessment (NRSG 328), 
Nursing Pharmacology (NRSG 389), or Pathophysiology (NRSG 434) if they have 
taken all general education and cognates for associate and baccalaureate 
nursing and if approved by BS faculty and student adviser. 

Progression Requirements 

Associate Degree 

1. A minimum grade of "C+" (2.30) is required in each nursing course for 
progression with a cumulative GPA of 2.30 in nursing and a 2.50 overall GPA on a 
4.00 scale for graduation. 

2. A minimum grade of "C" is required in each nursing cognate. Cognate courses are 
BIOL 101, 102; NRNT 125; PSYC 128; BIOL 225. 

3. One failed nursing course may be repeated. 

4. If a student is unable to progress due to a second nursing failure in the third or 
fourth semester, he/she may reapply one time to restart the program (See 
readmission requirements). No courses may be repeated after the student 
restarts. Readmission to the nursing program is on a space available basis. 

5. Students who do not complete a semester or progress with their class, cannot be 
assured placement in their choice of a subsequent course. 

6. Students are required to demonstrate satisfactory performance on standardized 
tests. If the required performance level is not achieved, remedial work must be 
completed to progress in the program. 

7. Any cognate course taken off campus during the time the student is enrolled at 
Southern Adventist University (school year or summer) must be approved by the 
Dean of the SON. 

8. A student who withdraws from a nursing course or chooses not to progress to the 
subsequent course in the next semester that it is offered should notify the 
Admission and Progressions Coordinator immediately. The process for re-entering 
the nursing program is outlined under "Readmission Requirements". 

Baccalaureate Degree 

1. A minimum grade of "C" (2.00) is required in each nursing and cognate course for 
progression. Cognate courses are CHEM 111, 112; RELT 373; SOCI 349. 

2. A cumulative GPA of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale is required for graduation. 

3. One failed nursing course may be repeated. 

4. Any cognate course taken off campus during the time the student is enrolled at 
Southern Adventist University (academic year or summer) must be approved by 
the Dean of the SON. 

Readmission Requirements 

1. Apply for acceptance to Southern Adventist University. 

2. Submit a nursing reapplication form to the SON. 



School of Nursing 167 



3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale is required for 
readmission to the nursing program. 

4. Specified requirements as set forth by the SON relating to the individual applicant 
must be met. 

5. A personal interview with a designated nursing faculty member is required. 

6. If a lapse of time greater than two years occurs in a student's AS program, prior 
nursing credits will not be accepted unless an applicant can validate nursing 
knowledge and skills through written examination and clinical performance. 

7. Students will be readmitted on a space available basis. 



168 School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND 
WELLNESS 

Dean: Phil Garver 

Faculty: Robert Benge, Mike Boyd, Harold Mayer, Richard Schwarz, Judy Sloan 

Adjunct Faculty: Susan Dawn, Jeff Erhard, Dwight Magers, Dennis Thompson, Diedri 
White 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness is to provide: 1) 
opportunities for students to experience a balanced Christian lifestyle, 2) major courses of 
study leading to professional careers and/or graduate school, 3) general education 
courses suitable for all students, 4) recreation for all students and employees, 5) campus- 
wide leadership for wellness, and 6) public relations opportunities through the Gym 
Masters' program. 

Degrees Offered 

• B.S. Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

• B.S. Health Science 

• B.S. Corporate/Community Wellness Management 

• B.S. Sports Studies 

The courses in Physical Education, Health and Wellness propose to: acquaint students 
with principles of healthful living, develop physical efficiency, develop life-long fitness and 
recreational habits, and/or prepare students for careers in physical education, health, 
wellness management, or related professions. 

No grade lower than a C- will be accepted in cognate courses for degrees in the School of 
Physical Education, Health and Wellness. 

To receive a B.S. degree in Health, Physical Education and Recreation, students must 
successfully complete ALL Teacher Education requirements including student teaching. All 
non teacher education track Physical Education students will be directed to a Sports 
Studies track of their choosing. 

Assessment 

To help the graduates in Physical Education, Health, and Wellness evaluate their 
academic progress and to aid the school in evaluating teaching effectiveness, each senior 
is required during their final semester to: 

• Take an exit exam. 

• Review annual evaluations with adviser. 

The results of the assessments are used to evaluate the school programs. 

Accreditation 

The bachelor degrees in Corporate/Community Wellness Management and Sports 
Studies, offered in conjunction with the School of Business and Management, are 
accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. 



School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 



169 



Course Descriptions 

HLED Health Education and Wellness 

HLNT Nutrition 

PEAC Physical Education Activity 

PETH Physical Education Theory 

RECR Recreation 



Programs in Physical Education, Health, and Wellness 

Major— B.S. Health, Physical Education and Recreation (42 Hours) (Leading to 
Licensure K-12) 

Required Courses Hours Required Courses, continued Hours 

PEAC 254 Lifeguarding 1 PETH 315 Physiology of Exercise (W) 4 

PEAC 255 Water Safety Instr 1 PETH 363 Intro Meas/Rsrch Hlth & PE 3 

PETH 113 ProAct-Racquetball 1 PETH 364 Prin & Admin PE & Rec (W) 3 

PETH 114 ProAct- Softball 1 PETH 375 Motor Learning and Dev 3 

PETH 115 ProAct- Flagball 1 PETH 437 Adaptive Physical Ed 2 

PETH 116 ProAct -Volleyball 1 PETH 463 Elementary School PE Meth 2 

PETH 117 ProAct- Basketball 1 PETH 474 Psych and Soc of Sports 2 

PETH 119 ProAct-Soccer 1 RECR 268/269 Officiating Sports Analysis 2,2 

PETH 214 ProAct -Tennis 1 Required Cognates Hours 

PE™ 215 P/^-Golf 1 O is the minimum grade accepted 

PETH 216 ProAct -Fitness for Life 1 nl _, „„„„„,, f t . nL . . , „ 

PETH 217 ProAct- Badminton 1 Lfr>n°, Anatomy and Physiology 8 

PETH 218 ProAct-Track and Field 1 W^lll ^ ? r ^ , ■ ■ I 

PETH 219 ProAct -Gymnastics 1 HLED373 Prev/Care Athl Injunes 2 

PETH 240 Coaching for Success 2 HLED 473 Health Education Methods 2 

PETH 314 Biomechanics 3 HLNT135 Nutrition for Life 3 

Professional Core (38 Hours) Hours 

EDUC 129 Intro to Education 

OR 3 

EDUC 138 Intro to and Foundations of Secondary Education 

EDUC 217 Psychological Foundations of Education 2 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

OR 3 

EDUC 220 Growth Years 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 3 

EDUC 325 Philosophy of Christian Education (W) 2 

EDUC 421 Behavior Management Elementary 

OR 2 

EDUC 422 Behavior Management Secondary 

EDUC 434 Literacy in the Content Areas 2 

EDUC 464 Teaching Seminar 2 

EDUC 472 Enhanced Student Teaching K-12 10 

HLED 473 Health Education Methods 2 

PETH 363 Intro to Tests and Measurements in Health & Physical Education 3 

(In place of EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment) 

PETH 437 Adaptive Physical Education 2 

(In place of EDUC 340, Differentiating Instruction for Diverse Students) 

PETH 441 Secondary Methods of Teaching PE 2 

(In place of EDUC 437 Curriculum and General Methods, Grades 7-12) 

All non teacher education track Physical Education students will be directed to a Sports 
Studies track of their choosing. 

Competency required in PEAC 143, Beginning Tumbling. 



170 



School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 



Skill deficiencies in each PETH activity unit, 113 through 119 and 214 through 219, will 
be indicated by grade of C- or less. Deficiencies for these units must be met by taking for 
no credit the corresponding general education activity course, when available. 

Intramural participation is recommended for all majors and minors. 

All Pro Act students will be required to dress in t-shirts provided by the school with a 
portion of the cost charged to the students (approximately $50— a one time expense). 

Students who desire teacher certification must meet the State of Tennessee certification 
requirements set forth by the School of Education and Psychology. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). Teaching 
endorsement in Health Education K-12 is available by taking an additional Praxis exam. 

Non-academic classes such as Kick, Step, and Hydro Aerobics are offered at nominal fees 
ranging from $40 - $75 per semester. These are not for credit. 



Major— B.S. Corporate/Community Wellness Management (42 Hours) 



Required Courses 

BIOL 101-102 
CHEM 111 
HLED 129 
HLED 173 
HLED 229 
HLED 356 
HLED 373 
HLED 470 
HLED 476 
HLED 491 
HLNT 135 
PEAC 225 
PETH 314 
PETH 315 
PETH 364 



Hours 



Anatomy and Physiology 
Survey of Chemistry 
Introduction to Wellness 
Health for Life 
Wellness Applications 
Drugs and Society 
Prev/Care Injuries 
Current Issues in Health 
Wellness Meth. Mat& Mgmt 
Wellness Practicum 
Nutrition for Life 
Fitness for Life 
Biomechanics 
Physiology of Exercise (W) 
Prin & Admin of Phys Ed (W) 



Required Cognates 

C- is the minimum grade accepted 



3 


ACCT 103 


College Accounting 


2 


BMKT326 


Intro to Marketing 


2 


BUAD 358 


Eth, Soc & Legal Env Bus (W) 


2 


CPTE 105 


Intro to Word Process 


2 


EC0N 213 


Survey of Economics 


2 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


2 


MGNT334 


Prin of Management 


3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psych 


2 


PSYC377 


Fund of Counseling (W) 


3 
1 

3 

4 
3 


SOCI 225 


Marriage & Family 



Hours 



Major— B.S. Health Science (47 Hours) 



Required Courses 

BIOL 101-102 
BIOL 225 
CHEM 151-152 
HLED 173 
HLED 356 
HLED 373 
HLED 470 



Hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 8 

Microbiology 4 

General Chemistry 8 

Health for Life 2 

Drugs and Society 2 

Care/Prev Injuries 2 

Current Issues in Health 2 



Required Courses, continued 



Hours 



HLNT 135 


Nutrition for Life 


3 


MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


PETH 314 


Biomechanics 


3 


PETH 315 


Physiology of Exercise (W) 


4 


PETH 375 


Motor Learning & Dev 


3 




PETH/HLED UD Elective 


2 



School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 



171 



Major— B.S. Sports Studies (67-71 Hours) 



Required Core Courses Hours 


Required Core Courses, continued Hours 


BIOL 101-102 


Anatomy and Physiology 


8 


PETH 113 


ProAct— Racquetball 


1 


MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PETH 114 


ProAct-Softball 


1 


HLED 173 


Health for Life 


2 


PETH 115 


ProAct-Flagball 


1 


HLED373 


Prev & Care of Athl Injuries 


2 


PETH 116 


ProAct-Volleyball 


1 


PETH 240 


Coaching for Success 


2 


PETH 117 


ProAct-Basketball 


1 


PETH 314 


Biomechanics 


3 


PETH 119 


ProAct— Soccer 


1 


PETH 315 


Physiology of Exercise (W) 


4 


PETH 214 


ProAct— Tennis 


1 


PETH 364 


Prin&AdmofPE&Rec(W) 


3 


PETH 215 


ProAct-Golf 


1 


PETH 375 


Motor Learnings Dev 


3 


PETH 216 


ProAct— Fitness for Life 


1 


PETH 474 


Psyc & Sociology of Sport 


2 


PETH 217 


ProAct— Badminton 


1 




Professional Activities 


12 


PETH 218 


ProAct— Track and Field 


1 




Concentration 23-27 


PETH 219 


ProAct— Gymnastics 


1 


Human Performance Concentration (67 Hours) 


Psychology Concentration (70 Hours) 




Sports Studies Core 


44 




Sports Studies Core 


44 


BIOL 418 


Animal Physiology 


3 


EDUC 422 


Behavior Management— Sec 


2 


CHEM 111 


Survey of Chemistry 1 


3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


CHEM 113 


Survey of Chemistry Lab 1 


1 


PSYC 297 


Research Design & Stat 1 (W) 


■ 3 


HLNT135 


Nutrition for Life 


3 


PSYC 315 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


PETH 325 


Personal Trainer 


2 


PSYC 326 


Physiological Psychology 


3 


PETH 363 


In Meas/Rsrch Hlth & PE Ed 


3 


PSYC 346 


Intro to Personality Theories 


3 


PETH 437 


Adaptive Physical Education 


2 


PSYC 377 


Fund of Counseling (W) 


3 


PHYS 127 


Exploring Physics 1 


3 


PSYC 384 


Experimental Psychology 


3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


PSYC 497 


Research Design & Stat II (W) 3 


Journalism Concentration (68 Hours) 


Public Relations/ Advertising Concentration 


(70 




Sports Studies Core 


44 


Hours) 






COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 




Sports Studies Core 


44 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


3 


COMM 103 


Intro to Communication 


3 


JOUR 205 


News Reporting 


3 


JOUR 105 


Writing for the Media 


3 


JOUR 316 


Mag & Feature Article Wrt (W) 3 


JOUR 205 


News Reporting 


3 


JOUR 427 


Mass Media Law & Ethics 


3 


JOUR 427 


Mass Media Law & Ethics 


3 


JOUR 488 


Mass Comm & Society (W) 


3 


JOUR 488 


Mass Comm & Society (W) 


3 








PREL235 


PR Principles & Theory 


3 


Select six (6) hot 


jrs from the following: 


6 


PREL344 


Fund of Advertising 


3 


BRDC314 


Broadcast News Writing (W) 




PREL354 


Advertising Copywriting 


2 


JOUR 208 


Publication Tools & Techniques 


PREL406 


Persuasion & Propaganda(W) 3 


JOUR 313 
JOUR 356 


Publication Editing 
Advanced Reporting (W) 




Recreation Concentration (71 Hours) 

Sports Studies Core 44 


Management Concentration (68 Hours) 


ACCT 103 


College Accounting 


3 




Sports Studies Core 


44 


HLNT135 


Nutrition for Life 


3 


ACCT 221 


Principles of Accounting 


3 


OUTL 221 


Challenge Course Facilitator 


3 


ACCT 321 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


RECR 210 


Aerobics Instructor Trainer 


2 


BMKT326 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


RECR 254 


Lifeguarding 


1 


MGNT334 


Principles of Management 


3 


RECR 255 


Water Safety Instructor 


1 


MGNT344 


Human Resource Mgmt 


3 


RECR 268,269 


Officiating Sports Analysis 


2,2 


MGNT368 


Multicultural Management 


3 


RECR 325 


Personal Trainer 


2 


MGNT372 


Entrepren & Sm Bus Mgmt 


3 


RECR 491 


Recreation Practicum 


2 


MGNT420 


Organizational Behavior 


3 








Marketing Concentration (68 Hours) 

Sports Studies Core 44 
ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting 3 
BMKT326 Principles of Marketing 3 
BMKT328 Sales Management 3 
BMKT375 International Marketing 3 
MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 
MGNT344 Human Resources Mgmt 3 
MGNT368 Multicultural Management 3 
MGNT372 Entrepren & Sm Bus Mgmt 3 


Select six (6) hours from the following: 

OUTL 148 Basic Horsemanship 

OUTL 156 Land Navigation 

PEAC 141 Fly-Fishing 

PEAC 142 Canoeing 

PEAC 145 Rock Climbing 1 

PEAC 146 White Water Rafting Guide 

PEAC 151 Scuba Diving 

PEAC 155 Basic Kayaking 

PEAC 212 Backpacking 

PEAC 214 Mountain Biking 


6 



Note: In the Concentration that does not have a "W" course, students must take two "W courses outside the major 
for graduation. 



172 



School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 



Teaching Endorsement in Physical Education as a Minor (23 hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

HLED373 Prevention & Care of Injuries 2 
PETH 114-119 & 

214-219 12 Pro Skills Courses 12 

PETH 364 Admin of PE & Recreation (W) 3 

PETH 441 Sec Phys Educ Methods 2 

RECR 268/269 Officiating Sports Analysis 2,2 

For those getting teacher certification in another area, these courses will be required for an additional 
endorsement in Physical Education rather than just a minor 



Minor— Health and Wellness (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

HLED 173 Health for Life 2 

HLED 229 Wellness Applications 2 

HLED 356 Drugs and Society 2 

HLED 470 Current Issues in Health 2 

HLED 473 Health Education Methods 2 

HLNT 135 Nutrition for Life 3 



Minor— Physical Education (21 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

PETH 364 Prin/Admin Phys Ed (W) 3 

RECR 268/269 Officiating Sports Analysis 2,2 

Electives (3 must be UD) 6 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select five (5) hours from the following: 5 

HLED 129 Intro to Wellness 

HLED 373 Prev & Care of Athletic Injuries 

HLED 476 Wellness Meth, Mat & Mgmt 

PETH 325 Personal Trainer 

PETH 495 Directed Study 

RELP 468 Health Evangelism 



Required Courses, continued 

Select eight (8) hours from the following: 



Hours 



PETH 113 


ProAct- 


- Racquetball 


PETH 114 


ProAct- 


-Softball 


PETH 115 


ProAct- 


-Flagball 


PETH 116 


ProAct- 


-Volleyball 


PETH 117 


ProAct- 


- Basketball 


PETH 119 


ProAct- 


- Soccer 


PETH 214 


ProAct- 


-Tennis 


PETH 215 


ProAct- 


-Golf 


PETH 216 


ProAct- 


- Fitness for Life 


PETH 217 


ProAct- 


-Badminton 


PETH 218 


ProAct- 


-Track and Field 


PETH 219 


ProAct- 


-Gymnastics 



Department of Physics 173 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Chair: Chris Hansen 

Faculty: Ken Caviness, Henry Kuhlman 

Professor of International Research in Physics: Ray Hefferlin 

Adjunct Faculty: James Engel 

Physics 

Many doors of service await students who study physics. Southern Adventist University 
physics major graduates have become academy and high school teachers, and professors 
and researchers in physics, in the U.S.A. and overseas. Also, one or more of them has 
served as aerospace researcher for the Apollo project, anesthetist, chemical researcher, 
computer systems manager, computer network manager at large factory, corporation 
pilot, dentist, family-practice medical doctor, full-time homemaker, geologist, historian of 
science, instructor for fossil-fuel power-plant operators, instructor for nuclear-reactor 
operators, lawyer, mathematician, nuclear-plant walk-down engineer, oceanographer, oil- 
drilling engineer, planner for Space Station Freedom, radiologist, reliability designer for 
long-distance telephone systems, radio station engineer, and researcher in educational 
statistics. 

The Physics Department offers B.S. and B.A. degrees in Physics, B.S. in Biophysics, and 
A.S. in Engineering Studies (see page 124). 

The B.S. degree in Physics gives the strongest physics foundation for any physics-related 
career. The B.A. degree in Physics with teaching certification is recommended for a career 
in secondary teaching. The B.S. degree in Biophysics should be considered by students 
planning on advanced study in the fields of medicine, biophysics, physiology, radiation 
biology, and bioengineering, particularly in view of a career in medical research. 

Assessment 

To help the graduates in Physics evaluate their academic progress and to aid the 
department in evaluating teaching effectiveness, each senior is required to: 

• Take the ETS Major Field Test in Physics. 

• Take the physics portion of the GRE if planning to apply to a graduate program 
in physics. A score above the 35th percentile is necessary for recommendation 
for graduate study. 

• Take PHYS 480 and do original research as a prerequisite. 

Alumni are surveyed and studies are prepared comparing GRE results, careers, and 
graduate-study success. Information gained from the assessments and studies is used to 
evaluate departmental programs. 



174 



Department of Physics 



Programs in Physics 

Major— B.A. Physics (30 Hours) 



Required Courses 

PHYS 155 



PHYS 211-212 
PHYS 213-214 
PHYS 215,216 
PHYS 310 
PHYS 412 
PHYS 480 



Hours 

Descriptive Astronomy: 

Creation & Cosmology 3 

General Physics 6 

General Physics Lab 2 

General Physics CalcAppI 2 

Modern Physics 3 

Quantum Mechanics 3 

Sci Wrtg & Presentation (W) 1 

Physics Electives (7 UD) 10 



Strongly Recommended Electives 

CPTE 105 Intro to Word Processing 
CPTE106 Intro to Spreadsheets 
CPTE 107 Intro to Database 
PHYS 400 Physics Portfolio 



Major— B.S. Physics (40 Hours) 



Required Courses 

PHYS 211-212 
PHYS 213-214 
PHYS 215,216 
PHYS 310 
PHYS 412 
PHYS 413 



! 


Hours 


Required Courses 


General Physics 


6 


PHYS 414-415 E 


General Physics Lab 


2 


PHYS 418-419 / 


General Physics CalcAppI 


2 


PHYS 295/495 [ 


Modern Physics 


3 


( 


Quantum Mechanics 


3 


PHYS 297/497 I 


Analytic Mechanics 


3 


PHYS 480 5 



Hours 

Electrodynamics 6 

Advanced Quantum Mech 6 

Directed Study 1-3 

OR 

Undergrad Research 1-2 

Sci Wrtg & Presentation (W) 1 

Physics Electives 5-7 



Note: Computers are used routinely in all of these courses. 

Students are encouraged to become student members of the American Physical Society and to purchase a book of 

mathematical tables or a computer-based mathematics resource 



Major— B.S. Biophysics (40 Hours) 



Required Courses Hours 


BIOL 151-152 


General Biology 


8 


BIOL 311 


Genetics 


4 


BIOL 197 or 397 Intro to Biological Research 


1 


BIOL 412 


Cell & Molecular Biology 


4 


BIOL 418 


Animal Physiology 


3 


PHYS 211-212 


General Physics 


6 


PHYS 213-214 


General Physics Lab 


2 


PHYS 215,216 


General Physics Cal Appl 


2 


PHYS 305 


Biophysics 


3 


PHYS 310 


Modern Physics 


3 


PHYS 325 


Adv Physics Lab 1 


1 


PHYS 295/495 


Directed Study 






OR 


1 


PHYS 297/497 


Undergrad Rsrch in Physics 




PHYS 480 


Sci Wrtg & Presentation (W) 


1 




Physics Elective 


1 



Required Cognates 



MATH 200 Elementary Linear Algebra 

MATH 215 Statistics 

MATH 218 Calculus III 

MATH 315 Differential Equations 

CHEM 151-152 General Chemistry 

CHEM 311-312 Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 341 Biochemistry I 

Recommended Electives 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 

CHEM 342 Biochemistry II 

PHYS 411 Thermodynamics 

PHYS 412 Quantum Mechanics 



Hours 

2 

3 
4 
3 



Major— B.A. Physics, Teacher Certification, 7-12 (30 Hours) 

Secondary certification in Physics requires a baccalaureate degree and completion of 
professional education courses (page 119) for licensure. Students preparing for 
secondary teacher certification must also take BIOL 103; CHEM 111-112; ERSC 105; and 
RELT 317. See explanations in the School of Education and Psychology. 

The student must apply for Initial Admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 



Department of Physics 



175 



Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for Admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 



Required Courses 

PHYS 155 
PHYS 211-212 
PHYS 213-214 
PHYS 215,216 
PHYS 310 
PHYS 400 
PHYS 412 
PHYS 480 



Hours 



Descriptive Astronomy 3 

General Physics 3,3 

General Physics Lab 2 

Gen Physics Calculus Appl 2 

Modern Physics 3 

Physics Portfolio 1 

Quantum Mechanics 3 

Sci Wrtg & Presentation (W) 1 

Physics Electives (6 UD) 9 



Required Cognates Hours 

BIOL 103 Principles of Biology 3 

CHEM 111-112 Survey of Chemistry 6 

ERSC105 Earth Science 3 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 
PHYS 317 Issues in Phy Sci/Religion 
BIOL 424 Issues of Nat Sci & Rlgn (W) 



Minor— Physics (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

Physics Electives 12 

Upper Div Physics Courses 6 



176 School of Religion 



SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

Dean: Greg A. King 

Faculty: Stephen Bauer, Michael G. Hasel, Douglas Jacobs, Judson Lake, Donn W. 
Leatherman, Carlos G. Martin, Alan Parker, Edwin Reynolds, Philip G. Samaan, Douglas 
Tilstra 

Research Professor of Systematic Theology: Norman R. Gulley 

Adjunct Faculty: Gordon Bietz, Jack J. Blanco, Fred Fuller, Greg Harper, John Nixon, Maria 
Samaan 

Adjunct Faculty for Evangelism: Ron E. M. Clouzet, Jac Colon, Mark Finley, Robert 
Folkenberg Sr. 

Evangelism Resource Coordinator: Stephanie Sheehan 

Museum Coordinator: Justo Morales 

Mission Statement 

The School of Religion provides biblical, theological, and practical courses to help all 
university students experience a growing relationship with Jesus Christ, understand His 
teachings in the context of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and live ethical lives in 
harmony with the Scriptures. It also provides quality training in the fields of theology, 
pastoral care, religious education, religious studies, and archaeology, so its graduates, 
solidly grounded in Scripture and with a clear burden for others' salvation, become 
instruments in God's hands to impact the world. 

Programs and Course Offerings 

General Education Courses 

1. To provide instruction in the Scriptures that enhances an intelligent faith in Jesus 
Christ. 

2. To encourage development of a set of values that will provide a basis for moral 
decision-making in the Christian life. 

3. To acquaint the students with the teachings, history, and global mission of the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

Theology Major 

1. To provide professional training that prepares graduates to serve the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church effectively in ministry. 

2. To provide an adequate pre-Seminary training in biblical backgrounds, languages, 
history, theology, and church ministries to meet entrance requirements to the 
M.Div. degree program offered by Andrews University. 

3. To provide instruction and practical experience in church ministries and public 
evangelism as outlined in the requirements of the Certification for Ministry. 

Pastoral Care Major 

1. To provide comprehensive, theological, pre-Seminary training for chaplaincy and 
pastoral care ministries. 



School of Religion 177 



2. To supervise pre-Clinical Pastoral Education training for ministries requiring 
chaplaincy certification. 

3. To furnish instruction and practical experience in pastoral and other spiritual 
caring ministries as outlined in the requirements for the Certification for Pastoral 
Care and required cognates. 

Religious Education Major 

1. To prepare the student for state and church certification (in cooperation with the 
School of Education and Psychology) on the elementary or secondary levels. 

2. To support candidates in meeting the requirements of the School of Education 
and Psychology and its certifying officer by offering a course in Curriculum and 
Content Methods/Bible and by supervising student teaching. 

3. To qualify students to pursue graduate work in biblical and religious studies. 

Religious Studies Major 

1. To provide a basic education in biblical and religious studies without meeting the 
professional requirements of other majors. 

2. To provide a major for students who are involved in pre-professional programs or 
who electa double major, one of which is Religion. 

3. To prepare students to become well-informed local church leaders. 

Archaeology Major 

1. To provide instruction in the methodology and interpretation of archaeological 
data as it relates to the people, places, and events of the Bible. 

2. To provide the necessary tools and skills for linguistic/exegetical, historical, 
archaeological, and anthropological analyses. 

3. To qualify students to pursue graduate work in Classical or Near Eastern 
archaeology, museum studies, and to provide a major for students involved in 
pre-professional programs. 

Bible Instructor or Literature Evangelist (Associate Degree) 

1. To provide courses in biblical and theological studies that will give the student a 
foundational knowledge of Scripture. 

2. To provide instructional and practical experience in the student's chosen 
emphasis. 

3. To prepare students to function within the context and structure of church 
organization. 

Effectiveness 

The School of Religion is committed to developing an ongoing assessment and strategy to 
measure its effectiveness in harmony with the Mission Statement of Southern Adventist 
University, its own mission statement, and the recommendation of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools. 



178 School of Religion 



Faculty Assessment 

The effectiveness of the School of Religion's faculty and programs is directly or indirectly 
assessed by: 

1. Student evaluations of all classes administered regularly through the office of the 
vice president for academic administration. 

2. Majors in the final semester of their senior year. 

3. Periodic meetings of the faculty with the chair of the Board and the presidents of 
conferences within the Southern Union. 

Student Assessment 

The following forms of assessment pertain to students taking a major in the School of 
Religion: 

1. The 16PF Test is required for all Theology and Pastoral Care majors in their 
sophomore and senior years. The results are compared with norms established 
from the performance of successful Adventist pastors on the same test. If a 
student's scores differ greatly from these norms, the faculty member assigned to 
administer the test meets with the student to discuss the potential difficulties and 
to suggest strategies for improvement. This may involve referral to a professional 
for personal or career counseling. 

2. The 16PF Test is administered by the School of Education and Psychology to all 
Religious Education majors. If the student's scores indicate potential difficulties, 
the School of Religion is asked to assist in strategies for improvement. 

3. A cumulative record of Religious Studies and Archaeology majors is kept as a 
source of information for recommendation purposes. This record includes 
academic data and other relevant information. 

NOTE: A summary of the evaluations referred to above will be made available in the form of a check sheet to 
prospective employers who request it and will be signed by the School dean on behalf of the Religion faculty The 
School itself cannot guarantee employment 

Program Requirements 

Admission to the Theology and Pastoral Care Programs 

Students who are taking a major in either Theology or Pastoral Care are required to make 
formal application to the ministerial program to become a trainee, normally during the 
first semester of their sophomore year. Transfer students who have sophomore standing 
or beyond must apply during their second semester in residence. In evaluating 
applications, the Religion faculty will consider the student's spiritual and theological 
commitment, moral character, integrity, emotional stability, grade-point average, and 
social and professional skills in order to determine the applicant's fitness for the program 
and overall potential for success in ministry. Students will be notified of the faculty's 
decision, and those whose applications are accepted will become ministerial trainees. If 
at any time after being admitted to the program, trainees give evidence of failure to 
maintain commitment to the criteria of the ministerial program, including its expectations 
about spiritual commitment, moral character, or grade-point average, they forfeit their 
standing as trainees and the privilege of being recognized as ministerial candidates in 
their senior year. Those who have already been accepted as ministerial candidates and 
then manifest a lack of commitment to the aforementioned criteria of the program will 



School of Religion 179 



have their candidacy rescinded. Acceptance into the ministerial program as a trainee and 
approval as a candidate are both required for the completion of either a Theology or a 
Pastoral Care major. Students not accepted into the program as trainees and/or 
candidates and those students whose trainee or candidate status is rescinded are not 
eligible to receive a Theology or Pastoral Care major. However, they may apply to the 
School of Religion faculty to be allowed to complete a major in Religious Studies. 

Trainees: 

Students may apply to the ministerial program for trainee status by mid-term of the first 
semester of their sophomore year. These applications will be considered during the last 
half of the first semester and announced by the start of the second semester. 

Qualifications 

1. Successful completion of 40 hours of academic credit, including ENGL 101, 102; 
COMM 135; RELB 125; RELT 138; RELP 150; RELL 221. 

2. An overall grade point average of at least 2.50 and a grade point average of 2.50 
in all religion classes (including biblical languages) completed at the time of 
application. 

3. Completion of at least two semesters in residence at SAU. 

4. A record of regular attendance at required activities of the SAU School of Religion. 

5. Completion of the 16PF Test within six months prior to application. 

6. Completion of the Jackson Vocational Interest Survey (JVIS). 

7. Successful completion of the SAU School of Religion Test of Elementary Biblical 
Knowledge. 

8. Successful completion of the SAU School of Religion Test of Elementary Doctrinal 
Knowledge or RELT 255 Christian Beliefs. 

9. Submission of four references, including at least one from each of the following: 

• A local pastor. 

• A local church elder or church leader. 

• An employer OR work supervisor, OR supervisor of volunteer ministries. 

10. Completion of a prescribed semi-structured interview with the student's adviser. 

11. Development and submission of a typewritten ministry experience portfolio, 
including the following: 

• A statement of call (similar, though not necessarily identical to the one 
written for RELP 150 Introduction to Ministry). 

• Description of church and ministry activity. 

• Description of any volunteer or employment experience in any setting. 

• A statement of personal goals and values. 

• A growth plan based on self-evaluation, the results of standardized tests, 
and the interview with the adviser. 

12. Approval by the School of Religion Faculty Committee based on the following 
factors: 



180 School of Religion 



• Evaluation of the Ministry Experience Portfolio. 

• Consideration of written recommendations and the recommendation of the 
adviser. 

• Consideration of academic performance. 

• Consideration of standardized test results. 

Consideration of the student's reputation in the university, church, and community. 

Procedure 

The process of application and admission is as follows: 

1. Complete the 16PF during the first semester of the sophomore year. This test will 
typically be offered in early September. 

2. Complete the trainee application form (available from the resource secretary) 
during the Fall semester. 

3. Applications for admission as trainees will be considered by the faculty in 
December. This will allow time for evaluation and additional consultation with 
students, if necessary. 

4. Trainees will be officially inducted into the program at the time of the annual 
Trainee Induction weekend. 

Candidates: 

Students will be considered for approval as ministerial candidates at the beginning of the 
first semester of their senior year. These applications will be considered during the early 
part of the first semester and announced about the end of September. 

Qualifications 

Prior to admission to candidate status, the student should complete the following 

requirements: 

1. Be in the process of completing (within one academic year) the 34-hour major in 
Theology or the 33-hour major in Pastoral Care. 

2. Be in the process of completing (within one academic year) the 20-hour minor in 
Biblical Languages. 

3. Be in the process of completing (within one academic year) the 25 hours required 
for certification for ministry or the 19 hours required for certification for pastoral 
care, whichever may apply. 

4. Be in the process of completing (within one academic year) the General 
Education requirements and the required cognates for the B.A. in Theology or 
Pastoral Care. 

5. Maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.50, and a GPA in Religion of 
2.50. 

6. Complete the ministerial candidate requirements. 

7. Complete a second 16PF test within 12 months prior to application for candidate 
status. 

8. Maintain a record of regular attendance at required activities of the SAU School of 
Religion. 

9. Complete the first Ministerial Externship year with the assigned local 
congregation. 



School of Religion 181 



10. Submit the student's ministerial experience portfolio, including all items required 
for trainee status (updated to the time of the candidature interview), as well as 
the following: 

• A current resume 

• A description of goals for ministry and plans for further education 

• A recommendation by the mentoring pastor 

• A recommendation by a member of the board from the mentoring church 

11. Go through the candidature interview. 

12. Be approved by the School of Religion Faculty Committee based on the following 
factors: 

• Evaluation of the ministry experience portfolio. 

• Consideration of the recommendations and the recommendation of the 
adviser. 

• Consideration of the student's performance in ministry activities. 

• Consideration of academic performance. 

• Consideration of the student's reputation in the university, church, and 
community. 

Theology students may apply to the School for variances from #2, #3, and #4 of the above 
qualifications, including exemptions from one biblical language (Hebrew or Greek), 
intermediate languages, HIST 364 and 365, and RELP 423, provided they meet the 
following criteria: 

1. Must have attained the age of 35 years prior to applying for these variances. 

2. Must transfer in a minimum of 48 semester hours applicable to a degree in 
theology. 

3. Must have been active in church work and be recommended by their local pastor 
or conference for ministerial training on the basis of this work. 

4. Must have individualized study programs accepted by the faculty prior to being 
approved for the variances indicated above. 

Procedure 

The process of admission is as follows: 

1. Complete the 16PF during the first semester of the senior year. This test will 
typically be administered in early September. 

2. Ministerial candidates will be considered by the faculty in September. This will 
allow time for evaluation and additional consultation with students, if necessary. 

3. A list of candidates approved in this program will be posted about the end of 
September. In addition, the individuals admitted as candidates will be notified by 
letter. 

4. Candidates will be considered officially approved at the time the list is posted and 
will be honored in the Ministerial Candidate Recognition service. 

5. Students will be eligible to sign up for conference interviews for graduating 
seniors only following their approval as candidates. If interviews for juniors are 
requested, students will be eligible only if they have been admitted as trainees. 



182 School of Religion 



Ministerial Externship 

The School of Religion requires field education of Theology and Pastoral Care majors. The 
Ministerial Externship Program is designed to enhance professional development by 
acquainting the student with the multi-faceted responsibilities of ministry. It provides a 
laboratory setting in membership care, evangelism, church leadership, worship, and 
preaching by working with experienced mentoring pastors and lay leaders in a local 
church. The education is necessary before the student can be recommended by the 
School of Religion for church employment. 

Field School of Evangelism 

Full-scale evangelistic meetings will be conducted for six weeks each summer, under the 
auspices of the Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. In addition, during 
some summers students may be permitted to participate in a three-week evangelistic 
series in a mission setting overseas. All Theology majors are required to participate in one 
such field school. Students planning to take the summer field school program must have 
earned 55 hours with a 2.50 cumulative grade point average, have taken RELP 321, 322, 
361, 362, and 405, and must be accepted as a ministerial trainee in order to be 
approved for participation in field school. Applications and scholarship information may 
be obtained from the field school coordinator. 

Pastoral Care Practicum 

All Pastoral Care majors are required to participate in a pre-approved ministry practicum, 
normally offered during the summer. Students planning to take the Pastoral Care 
practicum must have met all application requirements for consideration. Applications will 
be available to upper classmen and can be obtained from the School of Religion. 

Admission to the Religious Education Program 

The Religious Education Program is coordinated with the School of Education and 
Psychology of the University. Planning for certification by the states and/or endorsement 
by the Seventh-day Adventist church for Bible teaching is made with the certifying officer 
of the School of Education and Psychology, both for admission to the Religious Education 
program in the sophomore year and to the professional semester before the senior year. 

The student must apply for initial admission to the Teacher Education Program (usually by 
the end of the sophomore year) after completing all requirements as outlined under 
"ADMISSION PROCEDURES" in the School of Education and Psychology section of the 
Catalog. Initial admission is required before the student can enroll in upper-division 
education courses. 

The student must also complete an application and all other requirements for admission 
to Student Teaching. Prior to the professional semester, the student must take and pass 
the PRAXIS II licensure exam— both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning 
and Teaching, and the particular specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 

The criteria for admission to Religious Education, requirements for secondary Bible 
teaching, and policies and procedures related to student teaching may be found in the 
University Catalog under the School of Education and Psychology and obtained from the 
secretary of the School of Education and Psychology in Summerour Hall. 



School of Religion 183 



Teacher Certification and Endorsement 

Those seeking Tennessee State Certification must fulfill requirements listed on page 119 
of this Catalog. 

Admission to Religious Studies 

The Religious Studies major is a liberal arts major for students interested in preparing for 
professional fields such as medicine, dentistry, law, and other graduate studies. 

It provides a balanced selection of both biblical studies and theology courses. The four- 
year degree candidate may apply the required 12 hours of General Education courses in 
religion toward the hours needed for the major, thus reducing the number of extra 
courses needed to qualify. 

Admission to Archaeology 

The Archaeology major is a liberal arts major for students interested in preparing for 
graduate studies in archaeology, museum studies, cultural resource management, or as 
preparation for a professional field such as medicine, dentistry, law, or education. 
Students choosing to major in Archaeology must consult with the director of the Institute 
of Archaeology to determine their area of interest in Near Eastern or Classical Studies and 
to lay plans for participation in the Middle East Study Tour and in the archaeological 
fieldwork. 

The four-year degree candidate may apply the required 12 hours of General Education 
courses in religion toward the hours for the major, thus reducing the number of extra 
courses needed to qualify. 

Admission to the Bible Instructor or Literature Evangelist 
Program 

The Bible Worker and Literature Evangelist Program is a 64-hour, two-year degree leading 
to an A.A. in Religion. Students wishing to be recommended for employment as Bible 
instructors or literature evangelists must be approved by the School of Religion. The 
School of Religion cannot recommend for employment anyone whose course of study has 
been inadequate or unapproved. 

General Education Courses in Religion 

The objective in all religion courses is to enhance knowledge of and appreciation for the 
Scriptures, and to assist the student in gaining and maintaining a vital involvement with 
Jesus Christ and a personal commitment to serve family, church, community, and the 
world. Six semester hours of religion are required of the two-year graduate, and 12 
semester hours of the four-year graduate. This is equivalent to one three-hour course per 
year, which may be selected from any of the religion courses offered. Bachelor degree 
students must take at least three semester hours at the upper-division level. (Detailed 
information on General Education requirements are found in this Catalog.) 

Graduation Requirements 

The candidates for graduation in the program for Theology or for Pastoral Care must 
have a grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 overall, (the same GPA required for entrance to 
the Seminary), along with a 2.50 aggregate GPA in all required religion classes, including 



184 



School of Religion 



biblical language classes. In addition to their major, they must take 20 hours for the 
Certification in Biblical Languages, 24 or 19 hours for the Certification in Ministry/Pastoral 
Care with no more than two classes with a grade below "C" in any area of certification, 
and 12 or 17 hours in cognates to qualify for ministerial candidacy— whichever apply. They 
must also give evidence of moral, physical, social, and intellectual fitness and 
demonstrate professional commitment in order to achieve and retain trainee and 
candidate status and for the School of Religion to recommend them as prospective 
ministerial employees. Students who are not accepted as trainees and/or candidates or 
who lose said status are not eligible to graduate with a Theology or Pastoral Care major. 
However, with the permission of the Religion faculty, these students may be allowed to 
complete a Religious Studies major. Those students pursuing the Religious Education 
major must have a GPA of 2.75 overall, and a 2.75 in education and in the field of 
certification as outlined by the School of Education and Psychology. The Religious 
Studies, as well as the A.A. in Religion candidates for graduation, must have a GPA of 
2.25 overall and a 2.25 in their major as outlined in this Catalog. Archaeology graduation 
candidates must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 and 2.75 in their major. Where exit 
examinations are required, the candidate must pass with a score of 75 percent or above 
prior to graduation. 



Major— B.A. Theology (34 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



Required Courses, continued 



RELB 125 


Life and Teachings of Jesus 


3 


RELB 436 


RELB 245 


Old Testament Studies 1 


3 


RELT138 


RELB 246 


Old Testament Studies II 


3 


RELT175 


RELB 425 


Studies in Daniel (W) 


3 


RELT439 


RELB 426 


Studies in Revelation 


3 


RELT4S4 


RELB 435 


New Testament Studies 1 


3 


RELT 485 



New Testament Studies II 
Adventist Heritage 
Christian Spirituality I 
Prophetic Ministry of EGW 
Christian Theology I 
Christian Theology II (W) 



Hours 

I 3 

3 
2 
2 
3 
3 



In order to graduate with a major in Theology, a student must also complete 20 
hours for Certification in Biblical Languages, 24 hours for Certification in Ministry, 
and cognate requirements as follows: 

Certification in Biblical Languages 



RELL 181-182 
RELL 191-192 
RELL 221 
RELL 330 
RELL 331 



Biblical Hebrew I, II 
New Testament Greek I. II 
Intro to Biblical Exegesis 
Intermediate Hebrew 
Intermediate Greek 



Hours 

3,3 

II 3,3 
2 
3 
3 



Certification in Ministry 



RELP 150 
RELP 270 
RELP 321 
RELP 322 
RELP 361-362 
RELP 405 
RELP 423 
RELP 450, 452 
RELP 466 



Introduction to Ministry 2 

Interpersonal Ministry 2 

Intro to Biblical Preaching 2 

Interm Biblical Preaching 2 

Personal Evangelism I, II 2,2 

Evangelistic Preaching 1 

Adv Biblical Preaching 2 

Church Ministry I , II 3,3 

Public Evangelism 3 



Required Cognates Hours 

HIST 364-365 Christian Church I (W), II (W) 3,3 
PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 

Select one (1) course from the following: 3 

BIOL 421 Issues in Sci & Society (W) 

BIOL 424 Issues in Nat Sci & Religion (W) 

PHYS317 Issues in Phys Sci & Religion 



Note: The School recommends that those majoring in Theology or Pastoral Care not simultaneously take RELL 
181-182 Biblical Hebrew I, II; RELL 191-192 New Testament Greek I, II; or RELL 330 Intermediate Hebrew and 
RELL 331 Intermediate Greek. 



School of Religion 



185 



Major— B.A. Pastoral Care (33 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



RELB 125 


Life and Teachings of Jesus 


3 


RELB 436 


RELB 245 


Old Testament Studies 1 


3 


RELP 150 


RELB 246 


Old Testament Studies II 


3 


RELT138 


RELB 425 


Studies in Daniel (W) 




RELT 175 




OR 


3 


RELT439 


RELB 426 


Studies in Revelation 




RELT 484 


RELB 435 


New Testament Studies 1 


3 


RELT 485 



In order to graduate with a major in Pastoral 
hours for Certification in Biblical Languages, 
Care, and cognate requirements as follows: 

Certification in Biblical Languages 

RELL 181-182 Biblical Hebrew I, II 
RELL 191-192 New Testament Greek I, I 
RELL 221 Intro to Biblical Exegesis 

RELL 330 Intermediate Hebrew 

RELL 331 Intermediate Greek 

Certification in Pastoral Care 

RELP 270 
RELP 321 
RELP 322 
RELP 361 
RELP 362 
RELP 391 
RELP 450 
RELP 452 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

New Testament Studies II 3 

Intro to Ministry 2 

Adventist Heritage 3 

Christian Spirituality I 2 

Prophetic Ministry of EGW 2 

Christian Theology I 3 

Christian Theology II (W) 3 

Care, a student must also complete 20 
19 hours for Certification in Pastoral 



Interpersonal Ministry 
Intro to Biblical Preaching 
Interm Biblical Preaching 
Personal Evangelism I 
Personal Evangelism II 
Practicum 
Church Ministry I 
Church Ministry II 



Hours 


Required Cognates Hours 


3,3 


HIST 364-365 


Christian Church 1, II (W) 3,3 


3,3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


2 




OR 3 


3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


PSYC 377 


Fund of Counseling (W) 3 


Hours 


SOCI 225 


Marriage and the Family 3 


2 


SOCI 249 


Death and Dying 2 


2 
2 


Select one (1) < 


:ourse from the following: 3 


2 


BI0L421 


Issues in Sci & Society (W) 


2 


BIOL 424 


Issues in Nat Sci & Religion (W) 


3 
3 
3 


PHYS 317 


Issues in Phys Sci & Religion 



Major— B.A. Religious Education Licensure 7-12 (34 Hours) 



Required Courses 

RELB 125 
RELB 245 
RELB 246 
RELB 425 
RELB 426 
RELB 435 



Hours 

Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 

Old Testament Studies I 3 

Old Testament Studies II 3 

Studies in Daniel (W) 3 

Studies in Revelation 3 

New Testament Studies I 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELB 436 New Testament Studies II 3 

RELT 138 Adventist Heritage 

RELT 175 Christian Spirituality I 

RELT 439 Prophetic Ministry of EGW 

RELT 484 Christian Theology I 

RELT 485 Christian Theology II (W) 



Must include 35 hours in Education and 16 hours of cognate requirements as 
follows: 



Professional Education Requirements Hours 

EDUC 138 
EDUC220 



Intro to & Fnd Sec Educ 

Growth Years 

OR 
PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

EDUC 217 Psyc Foundations of Educ 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 

EDUC 325 Phil of Christian Educ (W) 

EDUC 340 Fnds of Inclusive Educ 

EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment 

EDUC 422 Behavior Management-Sec 

EDUC 434 Literacy in the Content Area 

EDUC 437 Curric & Gen Meths, 7-12 

EDUC 438 Curric Content Meths/RIgn 

EDUC 464 Teaching Seminar 

EDUC 472 Enhanced StuTchg 7-12 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



3 


HLED 173 


Health for Life 


2 




RELL 181-182 


Biblical Hebrew I, II 




3 




OR 


3, 3 




RELL 191-192 


New Testament Greek, 1, II 




2 


RELL 221 


Intro to Biblical Exegesis 


2 


3 


RELP 150 


Introduction to Ministry 


2 


2 


RELP 321 


Intro to Biblical Preaching 


2 


2 
2 

2 


RELP 322 


Interm Biblical Preaching 


2 


Select one (1) course from the following: 


3 


2 


BI0L421 


Issues in Sci & Society (W) 




1 


BIOL 424 


Issues in Nat Sci & Religion 


(W) 


1 
2 


PHYS 317 


Issues in Phys Sci & Religion 


10 









186 



School of Religion 



Major— B.A. Religious Studies (32 Hours) 



Required Courses 


Hours 


Required Courses Hours 


RELB 125 


Life and Teachings of Jesus 


3 


RELT 255 


Christian Beliefs 3 


RELB435 


New Testament Studies 1 




3 


RELT 373 


Christian Ethics 3 


RELB 436 


New Testament Studies II 




3 


RELT 458 


World Religions (W) 3 


RELP 264 


Christian Witnessing 




3 


RELT 467 


Christian Phil & Wrldview (W) 3 


RELT 138 


Adventist Heritage 




3 


RELB 245 


Old Testament Studies 1 


RELT 175 


Christian Spirituality 1 




2 


RELB 246 


OR 3 
Old Testament Studies II 



Major— B.A. Archaeology (32-35 Hours) 



Core Courses 

RELB 237 
RELB 247 
RELB 340 
RELB 455 
RELB 497 



Archaeology and the OT 
Archaeology and the NT 
Middle East Study Tour 
Archaeological Fieldwork 
Archaeological Method 
& Theory 



Hours 

3 

3 
3 
3 



Choose one (1) concentration: 

Classical Studies Concentration (17 hours) 

RELL191 New Testament Greek I 

RELL192 New Testament Greek II 

RELL 221 Intro to Biblical Exegesis 

RELL331 Intermediate Greek 

RELB 435 New Testament Studies I 

RELB 436 New Testament Studies II 
Required Cognates 

ELIT445 Ancient Classics (W) 3 

HIST 497 Rsrch Methods in History (W) 3 

Recommended 

Interm French or German 6 



Major— A.A. Religion (29-31 Hours) 



Hours 


near cast* 


3 
3 


RELL 181 


2 


RELL 182 


3 


RELL 221 


3 


RELL 330 


3 


RELB 245 




RELB 246 


Hours 


RELT 458 



Near Eastern Studies Concentration (20 Hours) 

Hours 

Biblical Hebrew I 3 

Biblical Hebrew II 3 

Intro to Biblical Exegesis 2 

Intermediate Hebrew 3 

Old Testament Studies I 3 

Old Testament Studies II 3 

World Religions (W) 3 

Required Cognates Hours 

HIST 497 Rsrch Methods in History (W) 3 

Recommended 

Interm French or German 6 

HIST 375 Ancient Mediter World (W) 3 



This degree is designed to prepare the student to be effective in lay ministry as a Bible 
instructor or literature evangelist. 



Core Courses 

RELB 125 
RELB 245 

RELB 246 
RELB 435 

RELB 436 
RELP 361 
RELP 362 
RELT 138 
RELT 175 
RELT 255 



Hours 



Life and Teachings of Jesus 

Old Testament Studies I 

OR 

Old Testament Studies II 

New Testament Studies I 

OR 

New Testament Studies II 

Personal Evangelism I 

Personal Evangelism II 

Adventist Heritage 

Christian Spirituality I 

Christian Beliefs 



Choose one (1) concentration: 

Required Courses for Bible Instructor 

RELB 425 Studies in Daniel 

OR 
RELB 426 Studies in Revelation 

RELP 291 Practicum: Evangelism 

RELP 321 Intro to Biblical Preaching 

RELP 270 Interpersonal Ministry 

Required Courses for Literature Evangelist 



Hours 

3 

3 
2 
2 

Hours 

2 



PREL244 Sales 

PREL 291/391 Practicum: Sales 

OR 3 

PREL 492 Public Rel Internship: Sales 

PREL 406 Persuasion and Propaganda 3 

Cognate for both emphases Hours 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 

OR 3 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 



School of Religion 



187 



Minors in Archaeology, Biblical Languages, Christian Service, 
Missions, Practical Theology, Religion, and Youth Ministry 



Minor— Archaeology (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

RELB 245 Old Testament Studies I 

RELB 246 Old Testament Studies II 

OR 3,3 

RELB 435 New Testament Studies I 

RELB 436 New Testament Studies II 

Minor— Biblical Languages (20 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

RELL 181, 182 Biblical Hebrew I, II 3,3 

RELL191, 192 New Testament Greek I, II 3,3 



Minor— Christian Service (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

RELB 125 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 

RELT138 Adventist Heritage 

OR 3 

RELT 255 Christian Beliefs 

Minor— Missions (23 Hours) 



Required Courses 

RELB 125 
RELP 240 
RELP 361 
RELP 466 



Hours 



RELT 255 
RELT 458 



Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 

World Missions 3 

Personal Evangelism I 2 
Public Evangelism (must be 

outside USA) 3 

Christian Beliefs 3 

World Religions (W) 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELB 237 Archaeology and the OT 3 

RELB 247 Archaeology and the NT 3 

RELB 455 Archaeological Fieldwork 3 

RELB 497 Archaeological Meth & Theory 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELL 221 Intro to Biblical Exegesis 2 

RELL 330 Intermediate Hebrew 3 

RELL 331 Intermediate Greek 3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELP 264 Christian Witnessing 3 

RELP Electives (6 hrs must be UD) 9 

(May inclHM NT 215/415 
Cross-Cultural Experience) 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

COMM 291* Intercultural Comm Prac 

OR 3 

HMNT 215/415* Cross-Cultural Geography 

SOCI 150 Cultural Anthropology 

OR 3 

SOCI 230 Multicultural Relations 



*These courses require admission to the Student Missions Program and successful completion of one academic 
year of student mission experience. 

Minor— Practical Theology (19 Hours)* 



Required Courses Hours 

RELP 270 Interpersonal Ministry 2 

RELP 321 Intro to Biblical Preaching 2 

RELP 322 Interm Biblical Preaching 2 

RELP 361-362 Personal Evangelism I, II 2,2 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELP 450, 452 ChurchMinistryl.il 3,3 

RELP 466 Public Evangelism 3 



*Non-theology majors must obtain permission from the School of Religion. 
Prerequisites apply to RELP 321. 

Minor— Religion (18 Hours) 

Those seeking state certification and/or denominational endorsement for teaching in 
other areas could, with careful selection, also acquire a minor in Religion. 

All who wish to obtain teacher certification in Religion must have a Religion minor plus 
EDUC 438 Curriculum and Content Methods/Bible, Grades 7-12 (1 hour). 



188 



School of Religion 



Minor— Religion (18 Hours), continued 

Required Courses Hours 

RELB 125 Life & Teachings of Jesus 3 

RELT138 Adventist Heritage 3 

AND 

UD RELB or RELT Courses 6 

Religion Electives 

(may incl RELP) 6 

No more than one of the following courses may be chosen to apply toward the minor: 
RELT 317, 424. 



Minor— Youth Ministry (20-21 Hours) 



Required Courses 

RELP 251 
RELP 252* 
RELT 255 
RELB 245* 



RELB 246* 



Intro to Youth Ministry 

Interm Youth Ministry 

Christian Beliefs 

Old Testament Studies I 

OR 

Old Testament Studies II 



Hours 

3 

3 
3 



^Academic requirements apply 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

RELB 435 New Testament Studies I 

OR 3 

RELB 436 New Testament Studies II 



0UTL138 
ED0E301 
PSYC422 



Outdoor Basics 

OR 

Outdoor Ministries 

Adolescent Psychology* 



Department of Social Work and Family Studies 189 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK AND FAMILY 
STUDIES 

Chair: Rene Drumm 

Faculty: Christopher Atkins (Stipend Program Coordinator), Terrie Long (Director of Field), 
Octavio Ramirez (Director, Social Work Program), Stanley Stevenson (Director, Child 
Welfare Program) 

Adjunct Faculty: Shelley Kennedy, Edward Lamb 

Social Welfare Consortium: Evie Nogales Baker, Gary L. Jones 

Website: swfs.southern.edu 

Philosophy 

The philosophy of the Social Work and Family Studies Department and faculty rests on the 
cornerstones of social justice and service. Social justice encompasses protecting human 
rights, caring for God's creation, peacemaking, advocating for the poor and vulnerable, 
and empowering individuals, families, and communities. Active service to others on 
campus and to the larger community demonstrates the Biblical message of peace and 
social justice. 

Academic Standing 

The Social Work and Family Studies Department is committed to academic excellence in 
both majors. A grade of a C or better is required in all core social work (SOCW) classes. 
Social work majors must maintain an overall GPA of 2.50 or higher to be admitted into the 
program and to remain in the program. 

Programs in Social Work and Family Studies 

The Social Work and Family Studies Department offers a degree in Social Work 
(accredited by the Council on Social Work Education) and in Family Studies. Minors are 
also available in Behavioral Science, Family Studies, and Sociology. 

The curricula for both the BSW and Family Studies degrees include computer content and 
hands-on experience intended to enable majors to develop elementary skills including 
word processing, spreadsheet, database, Internet, CD ROMS, video— interactive, and 
statistical analysis. Majors are encouraged to have their own personal computers (PCs) if 
possible. 

Social Work 

The study of social work is one of the most exciting and important fields of inquiry and 
practice within the people sciences. A historic and defining feature of the social work 
profession is its focus on individual well-being within a social context coupled with a keen 
interest in the well-being of society as a whole. Particular attention is given to the needs 
and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty. 
Fundamental to social work is its emphasis on environmental forces that create, 
contribute to, as well as ameliorate problems of human existence. 



190 Department of Social Work and Family Studies 



Social Work Program Mission Statement 

The mission of the Bachelor of Social Work program is to provide a quality generalist 
baccalaureate education based upon a Christian service value system. The graduates of 
this program are expected to be able to function in entry level positions working with 
individuals, families, small groups, organizations, communities and with diverse peoples. 
The social work practice skills and theoretical orientations used by these professional 
social workers are informed and guided by evidence-based research findings. These 
professional social workers will demonstrate this professionalized value system by 
exemplifying a dedication to the promotion of social and economic justice through an 
understanding of and a commitment to social change for the benefit of the poor, the 
disenfranchised, and other populations-at-risk. 

Bachelor of Science in Social Work 

The Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSW) prepares students for entry-level social 
work generalist baccalaureate practice. The BSW is the foundation degree for social work 
careers in mental health, child welfare, health care, public welfare, schools, family service, 
developmental disabilities, service to the aged, industry, business and labor, and criminal 
justice. The degree is designed to also prepare students for informed community 
participation in social welfare issues. The BSW is the preferred preparation for the 
terminal graduate practice degree, the Masters of Social Work, (MSW). Job opportunities 
in the social work field are projected to grow at an above average rate during the near 
future. 

The program makes available a number of experiences, both curricular and 
extracurricular, to enrich its students' academic experience. Multiple volunteer 
opportunities deepen understanding and compassion. A number of field experiences 
enhance commitment and skill building. National and international study tours are 
available to engender cross-cultural and global perspectives (see below). The center piece 
of the applied dimension of the curriculum is the 400 hour FIELD PRACTICUM in which 
each student participates in "real life" experience while being supervised by a seasoned 
and credentialed professional social worker. 

Extracurricular opportunities include membership in the National Association of Social 
Workers and the Phi Alpha Honor Society. Social Work Month is celebrated each March. 
The Edward Lamb Community Scholarship Fund provides opportunity to develop fund 
raising skills, socialization for social service commitment, and monies for the educational 
expenses of exemplary students. 

Professional Advisory Board Agencies 

Moccasin Bend Mental Health Institute 
UT College of Medicine, Family Practice Unit 
Chattanooga State Technical Community College 
Chattanooga Headstart/Early Headstart 
Family & Children's Services 
Hamilton County Juvenile Court 
TC Thompson Children's Hospital 
Martin-Boyd Christian Home (Assisted Living) 



Department of Social Work and Family Studies 191 



• Chattanooga CARES AIDS Resource Center 

• Alexian Brothers Community Services PACE Program 

• Clinical Social Work Private Practice Community 

Student Advisory Committee 

This committee is made up of two elected students from each class, freshman through 
senior, and two students elected at large. This committee provides a formalized student 
voice concerning any aspect of the social work program (see Student Handbook). 

Social Work Program Policies 

Students who are admitted to the social work program are considered adequately mature 
to realize the importance of accepting personal responsibility for their learning and 
professional behavior. 

The social work program Student Handbook outlines the policies of the program. Each 
student accepted into the program is responsible to become acquainted with and to abide 
by these policies. 

Transportation for volunteer and practicum experiences is not provided by the program. 
Students will be expected to provide their own transportation and make arrangements to 
share this expense with fellow students participating in the same experiences. 

The social work program reserves the right to deny admission to and to remove students 
from the social work program who have an unresolved felony on record in any state and 
who have records of misconduct, legal and otherwise, that would jeopardize their 
professional performance. 

The social work program reserves the right to revise, add, and withdraw policies and/or 
courses as necessary to ensure a quality social work program. 

Accreditation 

The social work program is accredited with the Council on Social Work Education. 

Admission Procedures 

Admission to Southern Adventist University does not automatically enroll the student in 
the social work program. Declaration as a social work major is not equivalent of 
acceptance to the program. The final decision on acceptance and continuation in the 
program is made by the program Admissions and Progressions Committee. 

During the second semester of the freshmen year the student is to complete an 
autobiography and a written essay on a specific social issue. 

During the first semester of the sophomore year the student is to file a formal application 
to the social work program (refer to the Student Handbook for specifics). Application 
forms may be obtained from the office manager in the program office. Minimum 
requirements for admission to the program and upper division courses are listed below: 

1. Acceptance to Southern Adventist University. 

2. Completion of application form, autobiographical statement, and a writing sample 
on specific social policy. 

3. Submission of a current unofficial transcript. 



192 Department of Social Work and Family Studies 



4. Have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher (exceptions may be made 
for persons who do not meet the grade point average requirements if they are 
strong candidates on the basis of other criteria). Have completed SOCW 211: 
Introduction to Social Work, SOCW 212: Social Welfare as an Institution, and 
SOCW 213: Interviewing Skills with a grade of C or higher. 

5. Show evidence of physical, mental, and moral fitness. Further references may be 
required regarding character, attitude, and coping ability in case of a question in 
this area. 

6. Students whose native language is not English must achieve at least 550 on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

7. Have taken the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Test. The student is to 
make arrangements with the University Counseling and Testing Center to take 
this test. 

8. Completion of a successful interview with the Admissions and Progressions 
Committee. 

The Committee reviews the application material, conducts the interview, and makes a 
decision concerning the application. Applicants are notified of the Committee's decision 
by a letter from the program director. An applicant denied admission to the social work 
program may appeal the denial decision in person and/or in writing to the Admission and 
Progressions Committee. If this process is unsatisfactory to the student, the University 
appeals process described in this Catalog may be followed. 

Field Practicum Admission 

In the winter semester of the junior year, following the completion of most required pre- 
requisite courses, students begin the application process for the social work field 
practicum, which is a requirement for graduation with a BSW degree. All students entering 
the field practicum must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher in order to be considered 
academically eligible for the field practicum. Since the primary purpose of social work 
education is to prepare students for entry-level social work positions, quality field 
placements are essential. The placements are designed to provide students with a 
chance to put into practice the theories and skills they have learned in the classroom. 

All students applying to the Field Practicum must have completed these courses or have 
these courses completed by the end of the semester in which they apply. 

These courses are: 

SOCW 311, Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 

SOCW 312, Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 

SOCW 314, Social Work Practice I 

SOCW 315, Social Work Practice II 

SOCW 318, Social Work Practice Skills Lab 

SOCW 391, Junior Field Practicum 

Transfer Students 

Students intending to major in social work who are attending other colleges or 
universities, or who are transferring from another major at Southern Adventist University, 
will be expected to apply for admission to the Social Work Program by April 1 of their 



Department of Social Work and Family Studies 193 



sophomore year. IN ORDER TO STAY ON SCHEDULE WITH THE SEQUENCE OF SOCIAL 
WORK PROGRAM COURSES, AN INTRODUCTORY SOCIAL WELFARE/SOCIAL WORK 
COURSE, INCLUDING 40 HOURS OF DOCUMENTED VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE, MUST BE 
TAKEN BEFORE ENTERING THE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM. 

Those applying to the social work major after their sophomore year will be considered on a 
case by case basis. If the introductory course has not been completed, 

it is taken the first semester after declaring social work as a major. This will delay 
admission consideration until the following semester and may result in graduation taking 
more than four years. 

The social work program seeks to maintain a heterogenous student body by enrolling 
students who represent diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives. 

Field Practicum 

The social work field practicum is designed to provide students with a chance to put into 
practice the theories and skills they have learned in the classroom. The practice of social 
work is a combination of theory and interpersonal skills with the field practicum a key 
component of the educational process. The focus of the field practicum is on the 
interactional process between student worker and client system(s) and the testing and 
use of specific interventions; students have the opportunity to connect the theory and 
knowledge with actual practice experience. This experience is essential to developing the 
entry level helping skills required of all undergraduate social work professionals. The 
nature of the field practicum is practice-oriented, builds on skills and theories learned in 
cognate social work classes, and involves direct contact and intervention with individuals, 
families, and groups; only social work majors may take the field practicum and must have 
met the required prerequisites. The field practicum experience is eight (8) credit hours 
which are taken concurrently with the Integrative Field Seminar. 

Assessment 

The social work program maintains a comprehensive assessment policy. In order to 
provide for evaluation of the program and monitoring teaching effectiveness, as well as 
measuring the achievements of graduates, all seniors are required to: 

1. Take Social Work Knowledge and Competency Skills Exam in the winter semester 
of the senior year. 

2. Successfully complete both the oral and written sections of the Senior Exit Exam 
which includes presentation of a piece of original research designed in the social 
work research class and completed during the field practicum. This research 
project is part of the Field Practicum. Also included is the presentation of the 
completed Policy/Case Study Project which is done during the Field Practicum. 

Program effectiveness will be assessed by combining the results of the above cumulative 
evaluations. An ongoing analysis of courses and course content required for majors is 
made by the social work faculty to assure that the curriculum meets the objectives of the 
program and the standards of the national accrediting body, the Council on Social Work 
Education. 



194 Department of Social Work and Family Studies 



Family Studies 

The Family Studies degree is interdisciplinary in nature and combines various dimensions 
of the social sciences along with a strong liberal arts foundation to gain an understanding 
of individuals and families. The major is for those students wishing to prepare for 
graduate study in community and/or family counseling, law, personnel work, sociology of 
the family, or family life education. 

Assessment 

To help the graduates in Family Studies evaluate their academic progress and to aid the 
department in evaluating teaching effectiveness, each senior is required to: 

1. Take a written knowledge and competency skills exam during the fall semester of 
the senior year that will be based on selected course work. 

2. Present a research paper or family life case material to the departmental faculty. 

Information gained from the above assessments is used to evaluate departmental 
programs, but it will not affect graduation eligibility. 

Department Study Tours 

The Social Work and Family Studies Department sponsors a study tour to New York City 
yearly during Thanksgiving vacation and a study tour to Europe every other summer. The 
objectives of these tours are to facilitate a better understanding of peoples and cultures 
and to enable the participants to work with people more effectively. Academic credit is 
given for these tours and each requires classroom time (see SOCI, SOCW 296/496). 



Major— B.S. Family Studies (44 Hours) 



Required Courses 


Hours 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psych 


3 


PSYC 315 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


SOCI 125 


Intro to Sociology 


3 


SOCI 150 


Cultural Anthropology 


3 


SOCI 201 


Parenting 


3 


SOCI 225 


Marriage and the Family 


3 


SOCI 233 


Human Sexuality 


3 


SOCI 245 


Appalachian Studies 


2 


SOCI 349 


Aging and Society (W) 


3 


SOCI 360 


Family Life Education 


3 


SOCI 365 


Family Relations 


3 


SOCI 491 


Family Studies Practicum 


3 


SOCW 211 


Intro to Social Work 


3 


SOCW 497 


Research Methods (W) 


3 



Required Cognates Hours 

MATH 215 Statistics 3 

Area E-l, Biology 3 



Department of Social Work and Family Studies 



195 



Major— B.S.W., Social Work (42 hours) 



Required Courses 

SOCW 211 
SOCW 212 
SOCW 213 
SOCW 311 
SOCW 312 
SOCW 314 
SOCW 315 
SOCW 318 
SOCW 391 
SOCW 433 
SOCW 434 
SOCW 435 
SOCW 436 
SOCW 441 
SOCW 442 
SOCW 497 



Hours 



Intro to Social Work 3 

Social Welfare as Inst 3 

Interviewing Skills 3 
Human Behav & Social Envir I 3 

Human Behav &SocEnvir II 3 

Social Work Practice I (W) 3 

Social Work Practice II (W) 3 

Social Work Prac Skills Lab 1 

Junior Field Practicum 1 

Social Work Practice III 3 

Social Welfare Issues 3 

Social Work Practicum I 4 

Social Work Practicum II 4 

Integrative Seminar I 1 

Integrative Seminar II 1 

Research Methods (W) 3 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



BIOL 103 


Principles of Biology 


3 


ECON 213 


Survey of Economics 






OR 


3 


PLSC 254 


American Natl & State Govt 




MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


SOCI 125 


Intro to Sociology 


3 



Minor— Behavioral Science (18 
hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

PSYC 122 General Psychology 3 

SOCI 125 Intro to Sociology 3 

SOCW 211 Intro to Social Work 3 

*Electives (6 UD) 9 



Minor— Sociology (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

SOCI 125 Intro to Sociology 3 

SOCI 150 Cultural Anthropology 3 

Sociology Electives (6 UD) 12 



*An additional nine hours selected from any Social Work and Family Studies areas with a minimum of six hours of 
upper division Social Work and Family Studies classes. 



Minor— Family Studies (20 hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

SOCI 201 Parenting 3 

SOCI 225 Marriage and Family 3 

SOCI 233 Human Sexuality 3 

SOCI 365 Family Relations 3 



Select eight (8) hours from following Hours 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psych 3 

PSYC 422 Adolescent Psychology 3 

PSYC 479 Family Counseling 3 

SOCI 349 Aging and Society 3 

SOCI 360 Family Life Education 3 



196 DepartmentofTechnology 



DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY 

Chair: Dale Walters 

Faculty: Ray Carson 

Adjunct Faculty: Ron Smith 

Professional Advisory Board: The Advisory Board serves in a consultancy capacity and 
assists in referrals for practicum. 

Don Britton, Owner, Don Britton Transmission 

Kel Burgoyne, Structural Steel Drafting Detailer 

Joe Farrow, Engineer 

Dan Gebhard, Plumber 

Michael Holman, General Contractor/Drafter 

Steven Karst, General Contractor 

Dave Turner, General Contractor 

Fred Turner, Architect 

J. B. Underwood, Owner, Collegedale Central Exxon 

The Technology Department offers courses which provide opportunity to balance learning 
with practical experience in the areas of woods, metals, printing, drafting, auto service 
and construction. Objectives of these classes are: 

1. To develop practical skills which will be useful throughout life as professional 
enhancement as well as hobby and recreational activities. 

2. To introduce the student to opportunities in technical and service occupations. 

3. To provide background for entrance into specialized technical and professional 
degree programs and occupations. 

4. To help the student learn to meet the challenges of daily living by providing 
"hands-on" experiences with elements of the environment. 

5. To provide opportunity for the student to develop tactile learning skills. 

6. To assist the student in growing toward his potential by providing classroom and 
lab experiences that nurture critical thinking and creativity. 

Assessment 

All automotive technology students will be given the NIASE (National Institute of 
Automotive Service Excellence) certification exams as specified by the department. 
Students who pass the exams become eligible for ASE certification after two years of 
experience following their training. Students completing the two year degree will have one 
year of the two years of experience required for certification completed. 



DepartmentofTechnology 



197 



Majors— B.S. Business Administration and A.T. Auto Service (80 Hours) 



Business Administration (43 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 



Auto 



Service 



(40 



ACCT 221-222 Principles of Accounting 3,3 

ACCT321 Managerial Accounting 3 

BUAD 105 Business Spreadsheets 3 

BUAD 310 Business Communication (W) 3 

BUAD 317 Mgmt Information Systems 3 

BUAD 339 Business Law 3 

BUAD 358 Eth, Soc, & Leg Env of Bus(W) 3 

BUAD 288/488 Seminar in Business Admin 1 

BMKT326 Principles of Marketing 

ECON 224 Prin of Macroeconomics 

ECON 225 Prin of Microeconomics 

FNCE315 Business Finance 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 

MGNT 464 Business Strategies (W) 
Required Cognates Hours 

BUAD 104 Business Software 3 

BUAD 128 Personal Finance 3 

BUAD 221 Business Statistics 3 



Required Courses 



Hours) 

Hours 



Oxy-Acetylene Welding 1 

Arc Welding 2 

Auto Electrical Systems 2 

Suspension. Steering & Align 3 

Man Drive Train, & Axles 3 

Automotive Brakes 3 

Engine Rebuild & Machining 4 

Heating& Air Conditioning 2 

Automatic Transmission 3 

Automotive Repair 3 

Estimating & Auto Bus Prac 1 

Engine Performance & Cptrs 3 

Eng Fuel & Emission Controls 4 

Practicum 3 

Adv Engine Performance 3 



Required Cognates Hours 

MGNT 371 Prin of Entrepreneurship 3 

MGNT 372 Small Business Management 3 



114 


115 


166 


167 


168 


169 


175/375 


178 


230 


264 


273 


276/377 


277 


291 


299 



Major— A.T. Architectural Drafting (24 Hours) 

Students are taught drafting skills and standards using the tools and software used by the 
industry. Computer-Aided Design (CAD) drafting training will educate you in preparing 
technical drawings used in construction and manufacturing. This includes such things as 
residential home construction, commercial building construction, mapping and survey 
information, machinery, aviation and spacecraft, and more. 



Required Courses Hours 


Required Cognates Hours 


TECH 148 


Methods & Materials of Const 3 


ACCT 103 


College Accounting 3 


TECH 149 


Intro to Mech Drwg&CADD 3 


ART 104 


Drawing 1 3 


TECH 150 


Blueprint Reading 3 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 3 


TECH 151 


Introto Arch Draftings CADD 3 


BUAD 126 


Intro to Business 3 


TECH 248 


CADD Mechanical 3 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra 3 


TECH 328 


Adv Architectural Drafting 3 


MATH 121 


Precalculus Trigonometry 2 


TECH 348 


3D CAD Drafting 3 


MGNT 371 


Prin of Entrepreneurship 3 


TECH 492 


Internship 3 


MGNT 372 


Small Business Management 3 






TECH 278 


History of Architecture 3 






General Education Hours 






COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 3 






BUAD 104 


Business Software 

OR 3 






CPTE 100/5/6 


Cptr Cone/Word Processing/ 
Spreadsheets 






ENGL 101 


College Composition 3 






PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 1 






PSYC/SOCI 


Behavioral Science 2-3 






RELB/RELP/ 


Religion 3 






RELT 





198 



Department ofTechnology 



Major— A.T. Auto Service (40 Hours) 

The auto service technician program is designed to train the student to repair late model 
automobiles. The student is trained to provide repair services in transmission, transaxles, 
drivetrain/axles, heat/air-conditioning, ignitions, fuel systems, and computerized 
automobiles. Students will be working on projects in a live operating repair shop 
environment. By the end of the second year the student will have completed over 1,124 
hours of instruction and lab experience. They will have developed skills in the following 
areas: 

Major engine repair 

Driveability diagnosis and computer systems repair 

Alignments and chassis repair 

Manual and automatic transmissions 

Brakes and drivetrain 

Heating and air conditioning 

Electrical repair 



Required Courses 


TECH 114 ( 


TECH 115 ; 


TECH 166 / 


TECH 167 


TECH 168 


TECH 169 I 


TECH 175/375 


TECH 178 


TECH 230 / 


TECH 264 I 


TECH 273 


TECH 276/377 


TECH 277 


TECH 291 


TECH 299 / 



Required Cognates Hours 

ACCT103 College Accounting 3 

BUAD 126 Intro to Business 3 

MGNT371 Prin of Entrepreneurship 3 

MGNT372 Small Business Management 3 

General Education Hours 

AREA A ENGL 101; MATH 106 or Higher: 

BUAD 104 or CPTE 100,105.106 9 
AREA B Religion 3 

AREAF Behavioral, Family, Health Sciences 2 
AREA G PEAC 225 1 



Hours 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding 1 

Arc Welding 2 

Auto Electrical Systems 2 

Suspension, Steering, Align 3 

Man Drive Train, & Axles 3 

Automotive Brakes 3 

Eng Rebuilding & Machining 4 

Heating and Air Conditioning 2 

Automatic Transmission 3 

Automotive Repair 3 

Estimating & Auto Bus Prac 1 

Engine Perform & Computers 3 

Eng Fuel & Emission Controls 4 

Practicum 3 

Adv Engine Performance 3 

Major— A.T. Construction Management (33 Hours) 

This program prepares the students to become professional constructors/managers in 
the construction industry. This program focuses on the use of State of the Art 
Technologies in Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD), reading plans, using spreadsheets and 
databases, and construction equipment and process used on the job. Students are taught 
to manage the functions and processes of every aspect of the construction industry. The 
curriculum is a well-rounded study and offers hands-on experience along with guidance of 
industry professionals. 
Required Courses 



TECH 105 
TECH 117 
TECH 124 
TECH 130 
TECH 148 
TECH 150 
TECH 151 
TECH 155 
TECH 160 
TECH 165 
TECH 252 
TECH 255 
TECH 262 



Hours 

Field Engineering 3 

Industrial Safety 2 

Plumbing 2 

House Wiring 2 

Methods & Materials of Const 3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 



Required Cognates Hours 

ACCT103 College Accounting 3 

MGNT334 Principles of Management 3 

MGNT371 Prin of Entrepreneurship 3 

MGNT372 Small Business Management 3 



Blueprint Reading 

Intro to Arch Drafting & CADD 

Masonry and Foundations 

Carpentry 

HVAC 

Building Codes 

Construction Estimating 

Construction Contract Admin 



DepartmentofTechnology 199 



Major— A.T. Construction Management (33 Hours), continued 



General Education Hours 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


BUAD 104 


Business Software 






OR 


3 


CPTE 105/6/7 


Word Proc/Spreadsheets/ 
Database 




ENGL 101 


College Composition 


3 


MATH 107 


Survey of Math or 






Math Elective 


3 


PEAC 225 


Fitness for Life 


1 


PSYC/SOCI 


Behavioral Science 


3 


RELB/RELP/ 


Religion 


3 


RELT 






Minor— Auto Service (18 Hours) 




Required Courses Hours 


TECH 115 


Arc Welding 


2 


TECH 166 


Auto Electrical Systems 


2 


TECH 264 


Automotive Repair 


3 


TECH 175/375 


Engine Rebuilding & 






Machining 


4 


TECH 276/377 


Engine Perform & 






Computers 


3 




Auto Service Elective 


4 




(Six [6] hrs must be UD) 





Minor— Technology (18 Hours) 

Twelve (12) hours lower division Technology classes 
Six [6] hours upper division Technology classes 

Certificate Program 

Auto Service Technician (32 Hours) 

A one year certificate will be awarded for completing the technical classes of the 
associate program listed below plus one religion class. 

Required Courses Hours Required Courses, continued Hours 

TECH 114 Oxy-Acetylene Welding 1 TECH 178 Heating & Air Conditioning 2 

TECH 115 Arc Welding 2 TECH 264 Automotive Repair 3 

TECH 166 Auto Electrical Systems 2 TECH 276 Engine Perform & Cptrs 3 

TECH 167 Suspension, Steering, Align 3 TECH 277 Eng Fuel & Emission Control 4 

TECH 168 Man Drive Train, & Axles 3 Auto Service Elective 2 

TECH 175 Eng Rebuilding & Machining 4 RELTorRELB 3 

Students will be encouraged to purchase a basic set of tools as employers require 
employees to provide their own air and hand tools. 



200 School of Visual Art and Design 



SCHOOL OF VISUAL ART AND DESIGN 

Dean: John Williams 

Faculty: Aaron Adams, Randall Craven, Brian Dunne, David George, Zachary Gray, Ed 
Guthero, Giselle Hasel, Dean Scott, Clint Ratliff, Kenneth Willes 

Adjunct Faculty: John Cline, Terry Dietrich, John Simmons, Andrew Strong 

Visiting Professors: Hendel Butoy, Rick Swartzwelder 

Production Manager: Mark Thomas 

Advisory Councils: 

Animation: Hendel Butoy, Kevin Lee 
Film: Bill Hulsey 

Mission 

The School of Visual Art and Design at Southern Adventist University provides an 
environment of artistic and technical excellence that equips students to make a positive 
impact in their world, acknowledging God as the source of their creativity. 

Programs of Study 

Art Film Production 

• B.A. Art • B.S. Film Production 

• B.A. Art Therapy (pre-professional) Graphic Design 

• B.F.A. Fine Arts . B.S. Graphic Design (Print & Web) 

• Minor-Art . A.S. Graphic Design 
Art Education • Minor— Graphic Design 

• B.F.A. Art Education Interactive Media 

• Minor-Art Education . B.S. Interactive Media 
Animation 

• B.S. Animation 
(Character & Effects) 

• B.S. Technical Animation 

Assessment 

Our primary focus is to help develop individual creativity, commitment, and a strong 
portfolio, regardless of the discipline. Students in the School of Visual Art and Design will 
produce and maintain a portfolio of their work from their freshman year onward and will 
be reviewed by the school's faculty at specified intervals for each major. 
Recommendations are made, on the basis of these reviews, to aid in student advisement 
and to guide optimal growth. The effectiveness of the school is determined by scheduled 
reviews by a portfolio review committee and curriculum assessments by visiting 
professionals. Due to this School's emphasis on preparation for professional work and 
service a grade point average of 3.00 (B) is required for all internships. In considering the 
level of discipline and skill required to produce art at a competitive level, for either 
preparation for graduate school or viability in the industry, we strongly recommend that 
students achieve a grade point average of B before going on to a subsequent course. 



School of Visual Art and Design 201 



Transfer Credit 

Transfer students who wish to enroll in an academic program offered by the School of 
Visual Art and Design may receive credit for art courses taken elsewhere. Transfer credits 
for art courses are subject to a review and approval process by the School of Visual Art 
and Design. All credits, which are intended for transfer, must be accompanied by all 
relevant course work and course descriptions (or syllabus) from the previous institution 
that is commensurate with the course in question. A review committee will assess the 
portfolio and course description for each credit transfer request and then ascertain 
whether credit can actually be transferred. This is designed to help ensure the student's 
success in a subsequent course. Enrollment is subject to this approval process. All 
transfer credits, that are specific to the major, must be approved by this review process 
before a student is allowed to register for classes in the School of Visual Art and Design. 

Studio Courses 

Many courses offered by SVAD are considered Studio Courses. Studio Courses are 
provided in large blocks of time because much of the coursework involves 
individual/collaborative creativity, problem solving, and is skill-based. The extended time 
is designed to give the student an opportunity to work on projects and assignments under 
the direct guidance of the instructor. For a typical three credit hour course the student 
will receive five contact hours per week. 



Select six (6) hours from the following courses: 6 



Major— B.A. Art (31 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

ART 104 Drawing I 3 ^™ 318 Art Appreciation (W) 

ART 105 Drawing II 3 ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ART 109 Design Principles I 3 ARTH 344 Ancient Art History (W) 

ART 499 Senior Project 1 ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

ArtElectives 15 ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 

(incl 7 hrs UD) 

Major— B.A. Art-Therapy Emphasis (31 Hours) 

This emphasis is intended for those students who plan to enter a graduate program in art 
therapy. Graduate school for this career choice is mandatory. The program endeavors to 
focus the pre-art therapy student on learning to appreciate art, to understand creative 
processes, and to develop artistic skills in studio art. In light of available scholarships we 
recommend a GPA of no less than 3.25 and a portfolio of original works, with no less than 
twenty pieces, are required for graduate school enrollment. A basic knowledge of human 
development and psychological theories for understanding human behavior are gained by 
the completion of the psychology minor. Undergirded by a Christian perspective of human 
kind and healing this is an interdisciplinary emphasis that conjoins the studio arts with the 
behavioral sciences. 



202 



School of Visual Art and Design 



Major— B.A. Art-Therapy Emphasis (31 hours), continued 



Required Courses Hours 

ART 104 Drawing I 3 

ART 105 Drawing II 3 

ART 109 Design Principles I 3 

ART 238 Intro to Art Therapy 3 

ART 499 Senior Project 1 
Studio Art elec (inc 7 hrs UD) 12 

Select six (6) hours from the following: 6 

ARTH318 Art Appreciation (W) 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ARTH344 Ancient Art History (W) 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 

Recommended General Education 

AREAA-4 ARTG 115 

AREAB RELP251, RELT373 

AREAC H 1ST 356 (W) 

AREA E-l BIOL 103 

AREA F-2 SOCI 225 



Required Cognates 



Hours 



EDUC325 


Phil of Christian Educ(W) 


2 


EDUC340 


Fnds of Inclusive Educ 


2 


PSYC 122 


General Psychology 


3 


PSYC 128 


Developmental Psychology 


3 


PSYC 224 


Social Psychology 


3 


PSYC 315 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


PSYC 346 


Intro to Personality Theories 


3 


PSYC 377 


Fund of Counseling (W) 


3 


Recommended Electives 




HLED 356 


Drugs and Society 


2 


PSYC 422 


Adolescent Psychology 


3 


PSYC 460 


Group Processes 


3 


PSYC 479 


Family Counseling 


3 


SOCI 349 


Aging and Society (W) 


3 



Major— B.F.A. Art Education K-12 (44 Hours) 

The B.F.A. in Art Education K-12 prepares students for a rewarding professional career to 
teach art in various settings including elementary and secondary schools. Students must 
apply for admission to the Teacher Education program through the School of Education 
and Psychology prior to taking education courses. 

Students enrolled in this program will be required to maintain a GPA of 2.75 for all major, 
cognate, education course work, and an overall GPA of 2.75. For further information see 
the School of Education and Psychology section in the undergraduate Catalog. 

Required General Education (49-55) 



Required Courses 


Hours 


ART 104,105 


Drawing 1, II 


3.3 


ART 109-110 


Design Principles 1, II 


3 : 3 


ART 221 


Painting 1 


3 


ART 223 


Principles of Color 


2 


ART 325 


Sculpture 


3 


ARTE 335 


Elementary Methods ir 


i Art 2 


ARTE 368 


Secondary Methods in 


Art 3 


ART 499 


Senior Project 
Studio Art Electives in 


1 




one discipline 


6 



AREA A 



AREAB 



AREAC 
AREAD 



AREAE 
AREAF 



AREAG 



ENGL 101, 102; MATH 106; 12 

COMM 135 (EDUC 319 

meets A-4 credit) 

RELB3hrs; RELT 138 

and 255; 12 

3hrsUD;RELTorRELB 

As specified by the Catalog 9 

Elem Foreign Lang I & II* 0-6 

Literature 3 

As specified by the Catalog 6 

HLED 173; EDUC 220 

or PSYC 128 5 

PEAC 225 & PE Elective 2 



*Or two (2) years of high school foreign language 
receiving a C grade or higher 



Select twelve (12) hours from the following 12 

ARTH 318 Art Appreciation (W) 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ARTH 344 Ancient Art History (W) 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 

Recommended Minor Endorsements: Math, English, History, or Science. 

Professional Education Leading to Licensure K-12 (34 Hours) 

During the sophomore year, the student must apply to the School of Education and 
Psychology after completing all the requirements as outlined in the Catalog under 
Admission Procedures in the School of Education and Psychology section. Prior to the 
professional semester and student teaching, the student will take and pass the Praxis II— 
both the appropriate section of the Principles of Learning and Teaching and the particular 
specialty test(s) for the licensure area(s). 



School of Visual Art and Design 



203 



Professional Education (34 Hours), continued 



Required Education Courses 



Hours 



Required Education Courses, continued Hours 





EDUC421 


Behav Management— Elem 


3 




OR 2 




EDUC 422 


Behav Management— Sec 


2 


EDUC434 


Literacy in the Content Areas 2 


3 


EDUC 437 


Curr/General Meth, Gr. 7-12 1 


3 


EDUC 464 


Teaching Seminar 2 


2 
2 
2 


EDUC 472 


Enhanced StuTchgK-12 10 



EDUC 129 Intro to & Fnd Elem Educ 

OR 

EDUC 138 Intro to & Fnd to Sec Educ 

EDUC 217 Psychological Found of Educ 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 

EDUC 319 Technology in Education 

EDUC 325 Phil of Christian Educ (W) 

EDUC 340 Fnds of Inclusive Educ 

EDUC 356 Classroom Assessment 

Major— B.F.A. Fine Arts (63 Hours) 

The B.F.A. (Bachelor of Fine Art) is a professional degree. It is designed to facilitate the 
development of the artist, and their art, for those who desire to enter the field of fine art 
professionally or to further develop their abilities, and their work, at the graduate level. 
We desire to discover the creative strengths and interests of each individual and guide 
their optimal development. A broad knowledge base comprised of Christianity, 
philosophy, media, culture, art history, and world history is encouraged for developing 
understanding and self-awareness as it pertains to the artist's personal content, and 
form. An art history background, covering four major art periods, is necessary in 
preparation for entrance into a graduate program. Individuals working toward the B.F.A. 
are required to have a high level of commitment and integrity towards the creative 
process and the production of their body of work (portfolio). Students learn, in a studio 
setting, about the materials and methods of art making. Traditional media is the primary 
focus but experimentation with non-tradition and new media is encouraged. All fine art 
majors are expected to have a Solo Senior Exhibit prior to graduation. This is conditional— 
they must have demonstrated a commitment to their own growth as artists and 
consistent/contiguous focus on the production of their artwork resulting in no less than 
twenty original works. 

Required Courses, continued Hours 

ARTG 115 Intro to Computer Graphics 3 

ARTH 318 Art Appreciation (W) 3 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 3 

ARTH 344 Ancient Art History (W) 3 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 3 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 3 

Required Cognate Hours 

Foreign Language 6 

(Intermediate) 

Character Animation and Effects Animation Admission 
Requirements 

Admission to the Animation program is required before beginning sophomore level 
animation courses. Students admitted must meet the following criteria: 

1. Completion of general education: ENGL 101 

2. Completion of drawing sequence ART 104-105 with a "B" grade or better. 

3. Completion of design sequence ART 109-110 with a "C" grade or better. 



Required Courses 


Hours 


ART 104,105 


Drawing 1, II 


3,3 


ART 109-110 


Design Principles 1, II 


3,3 


ART 206 


Drawing III 


3 


ART 207 


Drawing IV 


3 


ART 221-222 


Painting 1, II 


3.3 


ART 223 


Color Principles 


2 


ART 308 


Drawing V 


3 


ART 310 


Painting III 


3 


ART 410 


Painting IV 


3 


ART 499 


Senior Project 


1 


ART 


Electives 


9 



204 School of Visual Art and Design 



4. Completion of animation sequence AART 104, 106, and 108 with a "C" grade or 
better. 

5. Freshman portfolio review committee recommendation. 

Freshman Portfolio Review 

A faculty panel will meet, at the end of the freshman year, to review each student's entire 
portfolio and then determine acceptance in the Animation Programs. The student 
participating in the Freshman Portfolio Review is expected to display a collection of work 
completed during their time in the School of Visual Art and Design and, if applicable, any 
work completed prior to enrollment. This review is an evaluation of the student's overall 
development and performance in the foundation sequences. This review process 
considers the student's growth in knowledge and comprehension, artistic thinking, and 
significant skill development. 

Open Drawing Sessions 

The animation students are expected to develop a lifestyle that includes the habit of 
drawing, from direct observation, in order to nurture and maintain their skills. An 
opportunity for this goal is provided through Open Drawing Sessions. These sessions are 
organized by the School of Visual Art and Design as learning opportunities offered outside 
of formal classes. Any animation major taking a course, that includes an emphasis in 
drawing, may be required to attend these sessions. The quantity and quality of the time 
commitment expected by required attendance will be stated on the course's syllabus. 

Major— B.S. Animation (66 Hours) 

The B.S. in Animation is designed for students who will aggressively pursue a career in 
computer animation. The animation program concentrates on drawing, the fundamentals 
of motion, 3D design, collaborative work, and personal portfolio development. The 
curriculum focuses on computer generated (CG) animation to develop professional skills 
for working in the animation industry and for graduate school placement. A student who 
develops the required working skills for character animation can pursue careers in visual 
effects, videogame art, and commercial animation. Two concentrations are offered: 
Character Animation and Effects Animation. In the Character Animation Concentration 
animators will develop advanced skills in animation performance, movement, story 
development, and acting. Animators in the Effects Animation Concentration focus on 
visual effects animation, compositing, and rendering techniques. 

Animation Core (57 hours) 



Required Core 




Hours 


Required Core, 


continued 


Hours 


AART 104 


Principles of Animation 1 


3 


AART 480 


Self Promotion 


1 


AART 106 


Principles of Animation II 


3 


ART 104 


Drawing 1 


3 


AART 108 


Intro to 3D 


3 


ART 105 


Drawing II 


3 


AART 212 


Storyboarding& Previsua 


1 3 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 


AART 216 


Character Animation 1 


3 


ART 110 


Design Principles II 


3 


AART 316 


Collaborative Studio 1 


3 


ART 223 


Principles of Color 


2 


AART 318 


Collaborative Studio II 


3 


ART 227 


Digital Illustration 


3 


AART 322 


Motion Design 


3 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphi 


cs 3 


AART 426 


Senior Studio 1 


3 


ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 


3 


AART 428 


Senior Studio II 


3 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


3 



School of Visual Art and Design 



205 



Character Animation 
(66 Hours) 



Concentration 



Required Courses 


Hours 




Animation Core 


57 


AART 218 


Character Animation II 


3 


AART 242 


Character Design 


3 


ART 107 


Drawing in Motion 


3 


Required Cognates 


Hours 


ART 325 


Sculpture 


3 


ARTF 234 


Intro to Field Production 






OR 


3 


ARTF 215 


Lighting 




ARTF 320 


Post Production 


3 


ARTI 230 


Sound Design 


3 



Effects Animation 
Hours) 

Required Courses 



Concentration (66 



AART 244 



AART 256 
AART 356 



Animation Core 
Solid Modeling 
OR 

Compositing 
Effects Animation 



Hours 

57 



Required Cognates 

ART 325 Sculpture 

OR 
ARTI 230 Sound Design 

ARTF 215 Lighting 

OR 
ARTF 234 Intro to Field Production 

ARTF 320 Post Production 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 



Hours 



Major— Technical Animation (85 Hours) 

Technical Animation Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Animation program is required before beginning sophomore level 
animation courses. Students admitted must meet the following criteria: 

• Completion of general education: ENGL 101. 

• Completion of drawing sequence ART 104-105 with a "C" grade or better. 

• Completion of design sequence ART 109-110 with a "C" grade or better. 

• Completion of animation sequence AART 104 and 106 with a "C" grade or better. 

• Completion of AART 108 with a "B" grade or better. 



Required Courses 



Hours 



AART 104 


Principles of Animation 1 


3 


AART 106 


Principles of Animation II 


3 


AART 108 


Intro to 3D 


3 


AART 212 


Storyboarding& Prev 


3 


AART 216 


Character Animation 1 


3 


AART 316 


Collaborative Studio 1 


3 


AART 318 


Collaborative Studio II 


3 


AART 322 


Motion Design 


3 


AART 426 


Senior Studio 1 


3 


AART 428 


Senior Studio II 


3 


AART 480 


Self Promotion 


1 


ART 104 


Drawing 1 


3 


ART 105 


Drawing II 


3 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 


ART 110 


Design Principles II 


3 


ART 223 


Principles of Color 


2 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphics 


3 


ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 


3 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


3 



Required Courses, continued 


Hours 


Select four (4) of the following courses: 


12 


AART 242 


Character Design 




AART 244 


Solid Modeling 




AART 256 


Compositing 




AART 356 


Effects Animation 




ART 227 


Digital Illustration 




ART 325 


Sculpture 




ARTI 230 


Sound Design 




Required Cognates 


Hours 


ARTF 215 


Lighting 






OR 


3 


ARTF 234 


Intro to Field Production 




ARTF 320 


Post Production 


3 


MATH 120 


Precalculus Algebra 






OR 


3 




High School Precalculus 




MATH 181 


Calculus 1 


3 


MATH 200 


Elementary Linear Algebra 2 



Technical Animation Required Minor- 
Computing (18 Hours) 

Required Courses Hours 

CPTR 103 Principles of Computing 3 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 4 

CPTR 215 Fund of Software Design 4 

CPTR 314 Data Struc, Algor & Know Sys 4 



Required Courses, continued 

Select one (1) of the following courses: 
CPTR 327 User Interface Design 

CPTR 425 Computer Graphics 

CPTR 418 Artificial Intelligence 



Hours 

3 



206 



School of Visual Art and Design 



Major— B.S. Film Production (69 Hours) 

The major in Film Production is for those students who desire to pursue a career in film, 
video, or commercial production. The program is designed to enable students to fill 
decision-making positions and create or influence the content of the projects they work 
on. Film production majors will become familiar with every aspect of the narrative 
filmmaking process. Students are given the opportunity to work on collaborative projects 
that provide an actual workflow that results in greater self-awareness and accountability 
to a team, budgets, and a production schedule. Upon graduation, each student portfolio 
will include two short film productions and a feature length screenplay. 

Internship 

The Film Production Internship of 300 clock hours is required of all film production majors 
before being eligible for senior level courses. Fulfillment of this requirement can include 
customary employment in the field or significant non-coursework projects in the visual 
arts. It is the student's responsibility to seek and make all arrangements towards 
obtaining acceptance into this internship. The School of Visual Art and Design assists in 
the process but does not guarantee acceptance into any position or internship. This 
valuable experience in production will give the student a perspective on the workplace 
environment as well as valuable job references. 



Required Courses Hours 


Required Courses, continued Hours 


AART 212 


Storyboarding& Previsual 


3 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphics 3 


AART 256 


Compositing 




ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 3 




OR 


3 


ARTH 318 


Art Appreciation (W) 


AART 322 


Motion Design 






OR 3 


ART 104 


Drawing 


3 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 


ARTI 230 


Sound Design 3 


ART 110 


Design Principles II 


3 


Required Cognates Hours 


ART 223 
ARTF 112 
ARTF 114 
ARTF 215 


Principles of Color 

Intro to Film 

Film Business & Mgmt 

Lighting 


2 
3 
3 
3 


BRDC202 
COMM 326 
PHTO 125 


Digital Audio Production 3 
Film Evaluation (W) 3 
Intro to Photography 3 


ARTF 226 


Screenwriting 1 


3 


Recomm 


ended General Education 


ARTF 234 


Intro to Field Production 


3 


AREA A 


CPTE 100; ENGL 101,102; 9-10 


ARTF 235 


Cinematography 


3 




(MATH 100 and above) 


ARTF 320 


Post Production 


3 


AREAB 


RELB125; RELT225; 12 


ARTF 328 


Screenwriting II 


3 




RELT 368(W); Elective 


ARTF 353 


Documentary Filmmaking 


3 


AREAC 


HIST 174, 359; PLSC 472(W) 9 


ARTF 370 


Senior Project 1 


2 


AREAD 


Completed in the Major 


ARTF 422 


Directing 


3 


AREAE 


BIOL 421 or PHYS 317; 


ARTF 445 


Self Promotion 


1 




ERSC 105 6 


ARTF 470 


Senior Project II 


2 


AREAF 


SOCI 150; HLED 173 5 


ARTF 471 


Senior Project III 


2 


AREAG 


G3, in major; PEAC 225; 2 


ARTF 492 


Film Production Internship 


3 




PEAC Elective (2 hrs) 



Major— B.S. Graphic Design (65 Hours) 

The Graphic Design program will prepare students to enter the professional practice of 
design. Today's graphic designers need a broad knowledge base that includes, but is not 
restricted to, world history, art history, design history, and popular culture and trends. 
Graphic Designers must be familiar with a variety of methods, materials, and techniques 
that span from traditional, to non-traditional, to digital. Graphic design provides 
multilayered synergistic opportunities beyond print design alone. A graphic designer has 
multiple creative outlets such as; environmental design, industrial design, web design, to 
print design. Students will need to master approaching creativity within structure and 
restriction. Necessary skills will range from ideation to computer applications to physical 



School of Visual Art and Design 



207 



model constructions. Creativity, problem solving, and a committed and disciplined 
approach help graduates thrive in this field. Students will be assisted by instructors in an 
environment that promotes individual creativity in concert with the highest principles and 
moral values. 

Graphic Design Core (59 Hours) 

continued Hours 

Design Studio II 3 

Editorial Design 3 

Advertising Design 3 

Three-dimen Graphic Design 3 

Design Studio III 3 

Corporate Identity 3 

Senior Design Studio 3 

Graphic Design Practicum 3 

Digital Portfolio 3 



Required Core 




Hours 


Required Core, 


ART 104 


Drawing 


3 


ARTG 238 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 


ARTG 324 


ART 110 


Design Principles II 


3 


ARTG 332 


ART 223 


Principles of Color 


2 


ARTG 335 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


3 


ARTG 338 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphi 


cs 3 


ARTG 420 


ARTG 121 


Typography 1 


3 


ARTG 432 


ARTG 138 


Design Studio 1 


3 


ARTG 491 


ARTG 210 


Vector Graphics 


3 


ARTI 440 


ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 


3 




ARTG 226 


Digital Imaging 


3 





Graphic Design Print Concentration 
(65 Hours) 



Graphic Design Web Concentration 
(65 Hours) 



ART 227 



ART 331 



ARTI 115 
ARTG 122 



Required Courses 

Graphic Design Core 

Digital Illustration 

OR 

Illustration Methods 

OR 

Intro to Interactive Media 

Typography II 

Required Print Cognates 

AART322 Motion Design 

TECH 244 Graphic Production 



Major— B.S. Interactive Media (65 Hours) 

The Interactive Media program at the School of Visual Art and Design prepares students 
to design and create interactive experiences. Entering students begin with a thorough 
introduction to both the principles of design and the digital tools used by industry 
professionals. Building on this foundation, subsequent courses equip students to create 
websites, serious games, dynamic sound synthesis, multimedia CD ROMs, 2D and 3D 
simulations, immersive environments and virtual communications. 



Hours 


Required Courses 


Hours 


59 




Graphic Design Core 


59 




ARTI 115 


Intro to Interactive Media 


3 


3 


ARTI 223 


Interactive Media 1 


3 




Required Web Cognates 


Hours 


3 


AART322 


Motion Design 


3 


CPTR 124 


Fund of Programming 


4 


Hours 


Recommended General Education 




3 
3 


AREAC 


HIST 359 (W), PLSC 472 (W) 6 


AREAD 


COMM 326 (W) 


3 




AREAE 


BIOL 424 (W), ERSC 105 


6 




AREAF 


BUAD 128, HLED 173 


5 




AREAG 


BUAD 126, PHTO 125 


6 






(PEAC 225 and a PEAC course 






is required) 





Required Courses 


Hours 


Required Courses, continued 


Hours 


ART 104 


Drawing 


3 


ARTI 230 




Sound Design 


3 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 


ARTI 323 




Interactive Media II 


3 


ART 110 


Design Principles II 


3 


ARTI 329 




Multimedia 


3 


ART 223 


Principles of Color 


2 


ARTI 440 




Digital Portfolio 


3 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphics 3 


ARTI 480 




Self Promotion 


1 


ARTG 121 


Typography 1 


3 


ARTI 491 




Interactive Design Prac 


1-3 


ARTG 122 


Typography II 


3 










ARTG 210 


Vector Graphics 


3 


Select nine 


(9) hours from the following: 


9 


ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 


3 


ARTI 423 




Interactive Media III 




ARTG 226 


Digital Imaging 


3 


ARTI 427 




Interactive Video and Sound 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


3 


ARTI 432 




3D Environments 




ARTI 115 


Intro to Interactive Media 


3 


ARTI 437 




New Media Applications 




ARTI 223 


Interactive Media 1 


3 


ARTI 265/465 


Topics in Interactive Med 


ia 



208 



School of Visual Art and Design 



Major— B.S. Interactive Media (65 Hours), continued 



Required Cognates Hours 

AART 104 Principles of Animation 3 

AART 108 Introduction to 3D 3 

AART 322 Motion Design 3 

ARTF320 Post Production 3 

CPTR 124 Fund of Programming 4 



Major— A.S. Graphic Design (32 Hours) 



Required Courses 



Hours 



ART 104 


Drawing 


3 


ART 109-110 


Design Principles 1, II 


3 : 3 


ART 223 


Color Principles 


2 


ARTG 115 


Intro to Computer Graphi 


cs 3 


ARTG 121 


Typography 1 


3 


ARTG 210 


Vector Graphics 


3 


ARTG 212 


Raster Graphics 


3 


ARTG 338 


Design Studio III 


3 


ARTG 


Elective 


3 


ARTH 345 


Contemporary Art (W) 


3 


Minor— Art (18 Hours) 




Required Courses 


Hours 


ART 104-105 


Drawing 1, II 


6 


ART 109 


Design Principles 1 


3 




Electives 


3 




Upper Division Electives 


3 



Minor— Art Education (24 Hours) 

*For Education majors only 

Required Courses Hours 

ART 104-105 Drawing I, II 6 

ART 109 Design Principles I 3 

ART 221 Painting I 3 

ART 325 Sculpture 3 

ART 499 Senior Project 1 

ARTE 335 Elementary Methods in Art 2 

ARTE 368 Secondary Methods in Art 3 



Recommended Electives 



ART 227 
CPTR 215 
JOUR 105 
MATH 120 
MATH 121 
SOCI 150 


Digital Illustration 

Fund of Software Design 
Writing for the Media 
Precalculus Algebra 
Precalculus Trigonometry 
Cultural Anthropology 


3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 


Required Cognate 

TECH 245 Graphic Production 


Hours 

3 


Recommended General Education 

AREA D COMM 326 (W) 
AREA F BUAD 128 


3 
3 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

ARTH 318 Art Appreciation (W) 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ARTH 344 Ancient Art History (W) 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 



Required Courses, continued Hours 

Select three (3) hours from the following: 3 

ARTH 318 Art Appreciation (W) 

ARTH 342 Renaissance Art History (W) 

ARTH 344 Ancient Art History (W) 

ARTH 345 Contemporary Art (W) 

ARTH 349 Medieval Art History (W) 



*Note: The education core should be fulfilled in the major area. These art methods classes do not exempt the 
student from general methods or specific methods required in the major area. 



Minor — Graphic Design (21 Hours) 



Required Courses 

ART 104 

ART 109 
ARTH 345 
ARTG 115 
ARTG 210 
ARTG 212 
ARTG 338 



Hours 

3 



Drawing 

Design Principles I 3 

Contemporary Art (W) 3 
Intro to Computer Graphics 3 

Vector Graphics 3 

Raster Graphics 3 

Design Studio III 3 



Interdepartmental Programs 209 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Science 

Adviser: Keith Snyder 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Science will be conferred upon students not 
already in possession of a bachelor's degree who satisfy the following three conditions: 

1. Complete 93 semester hours in an accredited undergraduate university program 
of which at least the last 30 were taken in residence at Southern Adventist 
University and at least 12 of which were at the upper division level. 

2. Meet the General Education and Cognate requirements equivalent to those 
outlined for the current Clinical Laboratory Science program, except BIOL 330 and 
340 listed under the cognates. These may be replaced by any other biology 
elective in the Clinical Sciences or Basic Zoology areas or upper division 
chemistry. (See page 81) 

3. Provide certification from an accredited professional school of dentistry, 
chiropractic, medicine, pharmacy, or optometry that the first year of the 
respective professional program has been successfully completed and that the 
applicant is eligible to continue. 

Request for the conferral of this degree is made to the Director of Records and 
Advisement. 

General Studies 

Advisement Coordinator: Sharon Rogers 

The Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees with a major in General Studies 
are designed for students who have not made a career decision at the time they enter the 
University. These degrees offer them an opportunity to earn a large part of the general 
requirements for a baccalaureate degree while leaving some semester hours free for 
exploration in areas of their choice. 

Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies 

Major: The completion of the General Education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with the exception: Six hours instead of 12 will be required for Area B, Religion. Six 
hours of an elementary foreign language must be included unless two units of the same 
language were earned in high school. A minimum total of 64 semester hours with a 
cumulative minimum grade point average of 2.00 is required. Students who plan to 
eventually complete a bachelor's degree should include some upper division credit and a 
"W" (writing emphasis) course in the second semester of their second year. 

*S/x hours of elementary foreign language must be included unless two units of the same language were earned in 
high school. 



210 



Interdepartmental Programs 



Semester 



Year 2 



Typical Sequence of Courses for A.A. General Studies 

Yearl 

CPTE 100 Computer Concepts 
ENGL 101-102College Composition 
PEAC 225 Fitness for Life 

Area B, Religion 

Area C, History 

Area E, Nat Science 

Area F, Beh Science 

Area G-l 

Eiectives 



Semester 



1=« 


2nd 






1st 


2nd 




1 


COMM 135 


Intro to Public Spkg 




3 


3 


3 


CPTE 105-106 Word Proc/Sprdsheets 




2 


1 






Area A, Math 


0-3 




3 






Area B, Religion 


3 




3 


3 




Area C, Govt/Econ 




3 


3 






Area D, Literature 


3 






3 




Area E, Natural Sci 


3 






3 




Area F, Beh Science 




2 


3 


3 




AreaG, PEAC Skill 


1 




16 


16 




Foreign Language 


3 


3 








Eiectives 


T6 


3 
16 



See pages 27-28 and 31-35 for General Degree and General Education requirements. Note 
especially requirements for make-up of any admissions deficiencies. 

Associate of Science Degree in General Studies 

Major: The completion of the General Education requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree with the following exception: Six hours instead of 12 will be required for Area B, 
Religion. A minimum total of 64 semester hours with a cumulative minimum grade point 
average of 2.00 is required. Students who plan to eventually complete a bachelor's 
degree should include some upper division credit and a "W" (writing emphasis) course in 
the second semester of their second year. 



Typical Sequence of Courses for A.S. General Studies 



Yearl 



Semester 





1st 


2nd 


CPTE 100 Computer Concepts 




1 


ENGL 101-102College Composition 


3 


3 


PEAC 225 Fitness for Life 


1 




Area B, Religion 


3 




Area C. History 


3 


3 


Area E, Nat Science 


3 




Area F, Beh Science 




3 


Area G-l 




3 


Eiectives 


3 


3 




16 


16 



Year 2 


Semester 




1st 


2nd 


COMM 135 Intro to Public Spkg 




3 


CPTE 105-106 Word Proc/Sprdsheets 




2 


Area A, Math 




0-3 


Area B, Religion 


3 




Area C, Govt/Econ 




3 


Area D, Literature 


3 




Area E, Natural Sci 


3 




Area F, Beh Science 




2 


AreaG, PEAC Skill 




1 


Eiectives 


7 


2 




16 


16 



See pages 27-28 and 31-35 for General Degree and General Education requirements. Note 
especially requirements for make-up of any admissions deficiencies. 



Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 211 



NON-DEGREE PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Preprofessional and pretechnical curricula are offered in a wide variety of fields. Below 
are listed the curricula most frequently chosen. If other preprofessional programs are 
desired, faculty advisers are prepared to assist the student in working out a satisfactory 
sequence of courses needed to meet the admission requirements of the chosen 
professional school. 

Anesthesia (CRNA) 

Adviser: Barbara James 

Registered nurses who are experienced and comfortable working in critical care areas 
may become registered nurse anesthetists. Graduation from an approved baccalaureate 
program of nursing and a valid nursing license is required. Additional requirements may 
be determined by consulting the School of Nursing. 

Dentistry 

Adviser: Keith Snyder 

Pre-dental training in college/university requires a minimum of three years of study; 
however, a preference is given to those who have completed a fourth year, earning a 
bachelor's degree. Students may major in the field of their interest. Although a thorough 
background in the biological and physical sciences is essential to the study of dentistry, a 
broad educational background in the humanities is desirable. Upper division biology 
courses are recommended to prepare for the Dental Admissions Test and for the first year 
of basic science courses in dental school. 

Application to dental school should be made one year previous to the one for which 
admission is desired. Successful applicants should have a minimum GPA of 3.00 in both 
science and non-science courses as well as satisfactory performance on the Dental 
Admissions Test. Information regarding the Dental Admission Testing Program may be 
obtained from the American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 
69611 or on the web (http://ada.org/prof/ed/testing/dat.as). 

The following courses must be included to meet the minimum requirements for admission 
to Loma Linda University School of Dentistry: 

BIOL 151-152 8 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311-312, 341 20 hours 

ENGL 101-102 6 hours 

MATH 120*, 121* 5 hours 

PHYS 211-212, 213-214 8 hours 

*Waived if equivalent math was taken in high school with minimum grade of B. 

Strongly recommended courses : Anatomy (BIOL 416), Animal Physiology (BIOL 420) 

Recommended courses : Business classes such as Accounting/Management, and a 
hands-on class such as Ceramics/Sculpture. 



212 Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 



Law 

Adviser: Ben McArthur 

Students interested in the study of law as a profession should become acquainted with 
the entrance requirements of various law schools. This will make possible the planning of 
a preprofessional program which will qualify the student for admission to several schools. 

It is a general requirement that students complete a bachelor's degree before entering 
law school. Although no particular major is required, five fields should be especially 
considered by the student serious about law school. These are: business, history, English, 
journalism, and behavioral science. Certain courses recommended by all law schools 
include American history, freshman composition, principles of accounting, American 
government, principles of economics, English history, business law, and mathematics. 
Pre-law students should concentrate on developing their analytical, verbal, and writing 
skills. 

Southern Adventist University offers a Political Economy minor, which combines an 
interdisciplinary selection of courses helpful for law school preparation. This 18 hour 
minor consists of: 

1. ECON 224, Principles of Economics 3 hours 

2. PLSC 254, American Government 3 hours 

3. PLSC 471, Classics of Western Thought I OR 

PLSC 472, Classics of Western Thought II 3 hours 

4. ENGL 313, Expository Writing 3 hours 

Plus six hours of electives selected from the following courses: 

5. ACCT 221, Principles of Accounting 

6. ECON 225, Principles of Economics 

7. BUAD 358, Ethical, Social, and Legal Environment of Business 

8. BUAD 339, Business Law 

9. HIST/PLSC 357, Modern America 

10. HIST 374, History of England 

11. HMNT 210, Introduction to Philosophy 

12. JOUR 427, Mass Media Law and Ethics 

13. COOP 265/465, Cooperative Education (3 Hours) 

Such coops would include work with one of the following: a lawyer, a legal clinic, a 
public defender's office, a state or U.S. attorney's office. 

Information about preparation for law school may be obtained from the Section of Legal 
Education and Admissions to the Bar, American Bar Association, 1155 East 60th Street, 
Chicago, Illinois 60637. For information about the Law School Admissions Test, see the 
pre-law adviser. 



Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 213 



Medicine 

Advisers: Earl Aagaard, Joyce Azevedo, Loren Barnhurst, Ann Foster, Rick Norskov, 
Rhonda Scott, Keith Snyder, Lee Spencer, Neville Trimm 

Secondary school students who look forward to a career in medicine are advised to 
include mathematics and science courses during their high school years. 

Most applicants complete a Bachelor's Degree prior to entrance into medical school. 
Exceptional students may be eligible to apply after completion of a minimum of 85 
semester hours. Applicants for admission to the Loma Linda University School of Medicine 
should maintain a grade point average of at least 3.50 in both science and non-science 
courses. The following courses without an asterisk must be included in the applicant's 
academic program. Medical schools generally do not accept CLEP or AP credits for these 
basic science courses. Classes with (*) asterisks mathematics are recommended. Please 
check the specific requirements for individual medical schools. 

BIOL 151-152 8 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311-312 16 hours 

ENGL 101-102 6 hours 

MATH 120*, 121* 3 hours 

PHYS 211-212, 213-214 8 hours 

*Waived if equivalent math was taken in high school with minimum grade of B. 

Strongly recommended courses : Biochemistry (CHEM 341), Cell and Molecular Biology 
(BIOL 412), Animal Physiology (BIOL 420), Developmental Biology (BIOL 313) Animal 
Histology (BIOL 417), Human Anatomy (BIOL 416), Statistics (MATH 215). 
NOTE: The first three of these are recommended before taking the MCAT 

Recommended courses : General Microbiology (BIOL 330), Immunology (BIOL 340), 
Calculus I (MATH 181), Business courses such as Accounting/Management. 

Applicants are also encouraged to obtain experience where they are directly involved in 
the providing of health care. The Biology Department collaborates with Chattanooga's 
Erlanger Medical Center in a premedical preceptorship program. This program provides 
the opportunity for upper division pre-medical students to shadow resident physicians in 
the hospital for up to 24-hour periods. 

The applicant is required to have taken the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) prior 
to consideration by the admissions committee. For entrance into medical school following 
graduation, the student should plan on taking the MCAT by September preceding the 
senior year. All of the above required science courses should be completed by this time to 
insure maximum performance on the MCAT exam. To register for specific dates, see the 
http://aamc.org/mcat website. 

Once or twice each year representatives from LLU and other schools of medicine visit the 
campus to interview prospective students. Premedical students are encouraged to make 
appointments to speak with them. 

Most medical schools are members of the American Medical College Application Service 
(AMCAS). Applications must be submitted through this service. The AMCAS application 
may be obtained from the Counseling and Testing Office, directly from AMCAS, or filled out 
electronically on the web. Applications are available between May 1 and November 1 for 
entry into medical school the following year ( http://aamc.org ). 



214 Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 



After receiving the applications from AMCAS, the admissions office of the medical school 
reviews the candidates and determines whether or not supplementary information is 
needed. 

Medical schools usually require a letter of recommendation from the pre-professional 
recommendation committee of the applicant's undergraduate college. Senior pre-medical 
students are asked to provide the names and addresses of all medical schools to which 
they are applying to the Vice President for Academic Administration's office at Southern by 
the first week of September. 

Following a careful evaluation of the supplementary application and letters of 
recommendation submitted to the admissions office, selected applicants may be invited 
for a personal interview by the medical school. 

Optometry 

Adviser: Ken Caviness 

The admission requirements to colleges of optometry vary, so the student should follow 
the catalog from the school of his/her choice. (See the Association of Schools and 
Colleges of Optometry's website for a list of accredited optometry programs— 
http://opted.org ). However, all place emphasis on biology, chemistry, mathematics and 
physics. Additional courses in the areas of fine arts, language, literature, and the social 
sciences are usually necessary. 

A minimum of two years of preoptometric study is required. However, additional study 
increases the prospects of acceptance into professional training. 

Following is a list of preoptometry courses required by most schools: 

BIOL 151-152, 330, 416, 418 19 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311 12 hours 

ENGL 101- 102 6 hours 

MATH 120, 121, 181 9 hours 

PHYS 211-212, 213-214 8 hours 

PSYC122 3 hours 

Direct individual inquiries are welcomed by the American Optometric Association 
( http://www.aoa.org ). 

Osteopathic Medicine 

Adviser: Earl Aagaard, Joyce Azevedo, Ann Foster, Rick Norskov, Keith Snyder, Lee 
Spencer, Neville Trimm 

An alternative to allopathic medical schools, which grant the M.D. degree, are the 
osteopathic medical schools whose graduates receive the D.O. degree. 

Many Seventh-day Adventists have attended the University of Health Sciences, College of 
Osteopathic Medicine in Kansas City, Missouri, one of nineteen osteopathic medical 
colleges in this country. 

Requirements for admission are similar to those for allopathic medical schools such as 
Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Students apply to schools of osteopathic 
medicine through the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine 
Application Service (AACOMAS) ( http://www.aacomas.aacom.org ). 



Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 215 



For a reasonable chance of acceptance, a minimum grade point average of 3.00 should 
be maintained in both science and non-science subjects. 

Pharmacy 

Adviser: Bruce Schilling 

Those students interested in a career in the field of pharmacy may take their 
prepharmacy classes at Southern Adventist University before applying to a school of 
pharmacy. The doctor of pharmacy degree (PharmD) is a four year program. Prepharmacy 
requirements take from two to four years to complete depending on the pharmacy school 
and the student, and many pharmacy schools are now giving admissions preference to 
students with a bachelor's degree. 

Admission requirements to colleges of pharmacy vary from school to school so the 
student should consult the catalog or web page of the school of his/her choice for specific 
course requirements. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy maintains links 
to all schools of pharmacy at its web page http://www.aacp.org . All schools place a 
strong emphasis on chemistry, biology, physics, and mathematics. 

Minimum admission requirements for the Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy 
include the following 78 semester credit hours: 

BIOL 101, 151-152, 330 16 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311-312, 341 20 hours 

COMM 135 3 hours 

ECON 224 or 225; PSYC 122 6 hours 

ENGL 101-102 6 hours 

MATH 181-182 7 hours 

PHYS 211-212, 213-214 8 hours 

Humanities/Fine Arts 12 hours 

Social/Behavioral Studies 6 hours 

One semester of an introductory computer class must also be included or the student 
must demonstrate computer competency. Loma Linda indicates that preference will be 
given to students who have completed a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, biology, 
physics, or a related scientific field. BIOL 340, 412, and 417 are highly recommended. 

University of Tennessee Memphis has increased its prepharmacy requirements to a 
minimum of 90 semester credit hours. Minimum admission requirements to the University 
of Tennessee College of Pharmacy at Memphis are: 

BIOL 151-152; 101-102 or 416 and 418, 225 or 330, 340 23 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311-312, 341-342, 343* 23 hours 

COMM 135 3 hours 

ENGL 101-102 6 hours 

PHYS 211, 213 4 hours 

MATH 181,215 6 hours 

Humanities 6 hours 

Social Sciences 6 hours 

General Electives 14 hours 

*recommended 



216 Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 



Pharmacy is an excellent, lucrative career with a current shortage of qualified 
pharmacists. However, this has led to much more competition for the available positions 
in pharmacy schools. The average GPA for accepted students is approaching 3.5. In 
addition, a satisfactory score must be achieved on the National Pharmacy Admission Test. 

Podiatric Medicine 

Adviser: Keith Snyder 

An alternative to allopathic (M.D.) and osteopathic (D.O.) medical schools are the podiatric 
medical schools whose graduates receive the D.P.M. degree. Doctors of podiatric 
medicine are physicians trained in the medical and surgical treatment of the human foot 
and ankle. 

To gain acceptance to a school of Podiatric Medicine, a bachelor's degree is highly 
desirable. Preprofessional course work, with a minimum of 90 semester hours, is required 
of all students. Applicants are required to take the Medical College Admission Test 
(MCAT). In addition, most D.P.M. schools require the same prerequisite science classes as 
the M.D. and D.O. schools. 

There are seven colleges of podiatric medicine, six of which participate in the American 
Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine Application Service (AACPMAS). The six 
schools in the AACPMAS are located in California, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, and 
Pennsylvania. An application packet can be obtained thru the website http://www.e- 
aacpmas.org . 

Pre-Physician Assistant 

Adviser: Renita Klischies 

Physician assistants are trained to perform many of the essential tasks involved in patient 
care. They take medical histories, perform physical evaluations, order laboratory tests, 
make preliminary diagnoses, prescribe appropriate treatments, and recommend 
medications and drug therapies. They also treat minor problems such as lacerations, 
abrasions, and burns. Physician assistants work in a variety of practice settings and 
specialty areas. The most important practice setting is in a physician's office. They also 
work at hospitals and clinics. Specialties using PA's are family practice, internal medicine, 
general and thoracic surgery, emergency medicine, pediatrics, and various medical sub- 
specialties. 

The entrance requirements to physician assistant clinical programs vary considerably 
from school to school. Prerequisite course requirements vary, but generally require a 
science undergraduate baccalaureate degree. Prior patient care requirements also range 
from being recommended through two years of direct clinical work experience. 

SDA programs offering the Physician Assistant degree are: 
Kettering College of Medical Arts— http://www.kcma.edu 
Loma Linda University— http://www.llu.edu 
Union College— http://www.ucollege.edu/pa 

Students may obtain information on these programs by contacting the schools directly, or 
from the Southern Adventist University pre-PA adviser. A complete list of PA programs can 
be found on the American Academy of Physician Assistants website at httpy/aapa.org^ 
Southern Adventist University can structure a course of study to meet the requirements of 
any clinical program to which a student wishes to apply. Students are advised to begin 



Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs 217 



early in their academic studies to gather information on prospective PA schools and the 
pre-requisite course work required. 

Veterinary Medicine 

Adviser: Earl Aagaard 

Competition for admission to colleges of veterinary medicine is keen. Consequently, most 
successful applicants have completed a degree rather than the minimum requirements 
listed below. It should also be noted that it is often more difficult to be accepted in a 
veterinary institution other than the school in the state where the applicant resides. 

The applicant must make a satisfactory score on the Veterinary College Admission Test 
(VCAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) in addition to meeting grade point average and 
personal qualifications for admission. Professional training involves four years of 
veterinary school beyond college. 

Minimum admission requirements to the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary 
Medicine in Knoxville are: 

BIOL 151-152, 316, 412 16 hours 

CHEM 151-152, 311-312, 341 20 hours 

ENGL 101- 102 6 hours 

PHYS 211-212, 213-214 8 hours 

Additional requirements include: 

Humanities and Social Sciences 18 hours 

Admission requirements will vary among veterinary schools; therefore, it is recommended 
that the pre-veterinary student work closely with his/her adviser in assuring that the 
specific requirements for the schools of his/her choice are met. 

Information on veterinary schools and applications, through the Association of American 
Veterinary Medical Colleges, are available online http://www.avmc.org . 



218 Course Descriptions 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Animation 

AART 104. Principles of Animation I 3 hours 

This course is an introduction to the mechanics of animation and the elementary 
components of motion. Hand-drawn techniques such as inbetweening and simple 
movements will be used to give the student experience in this medium and to equip them 
with skills to be applied in computer animation. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 106. Principles of Animation II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 104. 

This course is designed to broaden the student's experience of walk and run cycles through 
the incorporation of personality and attitude into their characters. Lab fee 6 will be assessed 
for this course. 

AART 108. Introduction to 3D 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 115. 

This course will cover the basics of creating and manipulating assets in the 3D computer 
environment. The course is an introduction to basic modeling, rigging, animating, texturing, 
lighting, and rendering. It is designed to prepare students for further exposure to 3D work in 
Animation and Interactive Media. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 212. Storyboarding and Previsualization 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104. 

This course is constructed to give animation and film students the ability to effectively 
communicate ideas in a preproduction setting. Presentation quality and clarity are 
emphasized. The course will also cover traditional and experimental plot and structure 
issues. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 216. Character Animation I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: AART 106, 108. 

This course focuses on the fundamentals of animation through the exploration of body 
attitudes, classic actions, and facial expressions. The course will give students a better 
sense of what is needed to communicate thought and emotion. Lab fee 12 will be assessed 
for this course. 

AART 218. Character Animation II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 216. 

This course furthers the animation students skills with the addition of dialog based 
performances. The course seeks to combine the principles of facial expression and dialogue 
timing to create believable characters. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 242. Character Design 3 hours 

Prerequisites: AART 106, 108; ART 227. 

This course teaches students the process of designing characters through the development 
of personas, character packs, modeling, texturing, and rigging. Character development 
includes extensive research, drawing matrices of character elements, settings, and 
accessories. Special emphasis will be placed on modeling for effective body and facial 
rigging for animation. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 244. Solid Modeling 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 108. 

This course deals with product modeling which describes most mechanical or generally non- 
deformable objects. This course will cover all surface types, their uses, and a complete 
understanding of modeling and the relationship between geometry, shading, and lighting 
technologies. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 219 



AART 256. Compositing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212. 

Node-based compositing for live action and computer graphic film-making enhances source 
material with time based image manipulation. Concepts in tracking, retouching, color 
correction, camera stabilization, automated and manual matting, layering, and effects 
generation are addressed. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 265. Topics in Animation 1-3 hours 

This course is designed to be an access point to a broad variety of subjects in animation. 
May be repeated with permission. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 292. Internship in Animation 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Acceptance by a professional studio. 

Professional work experience in an animation production environment for a minimum of 100 
clock hours per credit hour with supervisor evaluation. This experience can come from 
customary employment in the field or significant non-coursework projects in the visual arts. 
Must be approved by a faculty adviser in the program. Students will maintain a log sheet 
and samples of work. May be repeated. 

AART 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Animation. 
Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 

AART 316. Collaborative Studio I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 216. 

In this course students work together as a team to create a finished animation production. 
Students are encouraged to work in roles that will help them generate portfolio material in 
line with their career goals. Issues in effective project management, personal discipline, and 
working together are explored. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 318. Collaborative Studio II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 316. 

In this course students continue working together to finish the animation production started 
in Animation Collaborative Studio I to continue producing portfolio quality work in line with 
their career goals. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 322. Motion Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212. 

In this course, graphic design, interactive media, animation, and film students will explore 
elements of moving compositions by incorporating the fundamentals of design and 
animation principles and techniques. The course covers how motion design is used by 
broadcast, film, interactive, and fine art professionals. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 

AART 356. Effects Animation 3 hours 

Prerequisites: AART 108; CPTR 124. 

Procedural animation for effects focuses on creating and rendering dynamic non-character 
movements such as cloth, hair, particles systems, and fluid simulations. This course also 
covers concepts in node-based shader networks and introductory embedded scripting. Lab 
fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 426. Senior Studio I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 318. 

In this course final year students will have the opportunity to produce a significant project 
needed to complete their portfolio. Class time features structured labs, regular 
presentations, professor/student meetings, and group discussions concerning each 
students work. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 



220 Course Descriptions 



AART 428 Senior Studio II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 426. 

In this course final year students will finish any projects needed to complete their portfolio. 
Class time features structured lab times, regular presentations, professor/student meetings, 
and group discussions concerning each students work. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 

AART 465. Topics in Animation 1-3 hours 

See AART 265 for course description. 

AART 480. Self Promotion 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Students enrolled in this course will be trained in aspects related to presenting themselves 
as professionals applicable to various career settings like jobs and internships or graduate 
school. Skills in art preparation, job hunting, and the importance of developing an artistic 
statement will also be addressed. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

AART 492. Internship in Animation 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Acceptance by a professional studio. 
See AART 292 for course description. 

AART 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See AART 295 for course description. 

Accounting 

ACCT 103. College Accounting (G-2) 3 hours 

This course covers the fundamental accounting processes dealing with the bookkeeping and 
accounting functions for the small business, professional offices, merchandising firms and 
service organizations. This course does not apply for credit to a BBA or BS business major. 
(Fall) 

ACCT 221. Principles of Accounting I (G-2) 3 hours 

Principles of Accounting I focuses on how accounting events affect financial statements. 
Topics include accruals/deferrals, receivables, inventory, long-term operational assets, long- 
term liabilities, stockholders' equity, recording procedures, and financial statement 
preparation. This course should be taken in the freshman year. 

ACCT 222. Principles of Accounting II (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: A final grade of C or higher in ACCT 221. 

This course continues the study of financial accounting and introduces managerial 
accounting. Topics may include accounting for partnerships and corporations, the cash flow 
statement, financial statement analysis, and various managerial accounting topics such as 
job order and process cost systems, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, and 
budgeting. This course should be taken in the freshman year. 

ACCT 265. Topics in Accounting 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

ACCT 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School 

A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty 
adviser and the student. 



Course Descriptions 221 



ACCT 311. Intermediate Accounting I 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 221. 

An in-depth course in financial accounting. Topics include the accounting conceptual 
framework, the hierarchy of GAAP, accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, plant 
assets, intangibles, and current and long-term liabilities and accounting for investments. 
(Fall) 

ACCT 312. Intermediate Accounting II 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 311. 

This course is a continuation of ACCT 311. Topics include; accounting for contributed capital, 
retained earnings investments, income taxes, pensions, and OPEB's, leases, reporting 
earnings per share, the Statement of Cash Flows, financial statement disclosure 
requirements, and financial statement analysis. (Winter) 

ACCT 316. Governmental and Fund Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 222. 

Accounting theory and practice are applied to governmental units and nonprofit 
organizations, including universities and hospitals. The classification and use of funds, fiscal 
procedures, budgetary controls, and financial reporting are covered. (Fall, even years) 

ACCT 321. Managerial Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 105; ACCT 222. 

This course is a study of selected quantitative management decision-making tools. Topics 
may include cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, pricing decisions, relevant 
costs, out-sourcing decisions, the effect of constraints, capital budgeting, and performance 
measurement. 

ACCT 323. Cost Accounting 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 222. 

An in-depth study of the more technical aspects of cost accounting systems, including job 
cost and process cost allocations, joint product and by-product accounting, actual, standard, 
and direct cost methods. Process cost is emphasized. Quantitative techniques are covered, 
and may include decision-making under uncertainty, inventory control, cost behavior and 
regression analysis, and variance investigation. (Fall) 

ACCT 326. Accounting Software Tools 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 222. 

This course introduces students to the utilization of computerized accounting software for 
maintaining a business accounting information, including controls in a computerized 
accounting environment. Students will be introduced to low, medium, and high-end software 
programs. (Fall) 

ACCT 450. Advanced Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 312. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 550 in the MBA and MFS programs. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is an in-depth study of selected accounting topics such as consolidated financial 
statements, partnerships, business firms in financial difficulty, estates and trusts, foreign 
exchange, and segment reporting. (Winter) 

ACCT 452. Auditing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 312. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 552 in the MBA and MFS programs. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

Basic auditing theory and practice with emphasis on the application of current auditing 
standards and the preparation of working papers and audit reports are addressed. Topics 
include generally accepted auditing standards, ethics, audit planning procedures, types of 
audit evidence internal controls, and sampling methods. Provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley 
Act are also discussed. (Winter) 



222 Course Descriptions 



ACCT 456. Federal Taxation 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 222. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 556 in the MBA and MFS programs. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is a study of the Federal tax system. The primary emphasis is the Federal income 
tax as it applies to individuals. A study of other selected Federal taxes and the taxation of 
other entities is included. (Winter) 

ACCT 457. Advanced Federal Taxation 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 456. 

This course is cross-listed with ACCT 557 in the MBA and MFS programs. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is a continued study of the Federal tax system. The primary emphasis is the 
Federal income tax as it applies to for-profit and not-for-profit entities other than individuals. 
A study of other selected taxes is included. (Fall) 

ACCT 465. Topics in Accounting 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See ACCT 265 for course description. 

ACCT 491. Accounting Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status. 

A practicum consists of supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of accounting 
on a part-time basis. The work may be done at various job sites. A minimum of 50 clock 
hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A maximum of 
3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.) 

ACCT 492. Accounting Internship 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status. 

An internship consists of on-the-job experience working under supervision in an accounting 
office on a full-time basis. All hours must be completed on one job site. A minimum of 100 
clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A 
maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the 
major.) 

ACCT 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School 
See ACCT 295 for course description. 

ACCT 497. Accounting Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 450; BUAD 221. 

This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data 
leading to the completion of a research project. 

Allied Health 

ALHT 111. Introduction to the Health Professions 1 hour 

A survey course that heightens awareness of the options, expectations, and realities of the 
health professions. Students gain an overview of professional health careers through 
lectures, guest speakers, observation, and research. (Winter) 

ALHT 225. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science 2 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint prospective clinical laboratory scientists with the 
profession. The history and standards of medical technology and employment opportunities 
will be surveyed. Elementary clinical laboratory procedures will be taught and laboratory 
tours will be conducted. 

ALHT 265. Topics in Allied Health 2 hours 

Formal course work designed to meet the needs and interests of students in specialty areas 
of the Allied Health professions not covered in regular courses. 



Course Descriptions 223 



Studio Art/Art History 

ART 101. Introduction to Drawing (G-l) 3 hours 

A course designed for the general education student or the art student who has had no 
formal training in drawing or who does not have a portfolio of their art work. This course 
introduces the beginning student to the basic principles of drawing such as perspective, 
value, and form. Does not apply to the major. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 104. Drawing I (G-l) 3 hours 

The objective of this class is to introduce the beginning art student to the elements and 
principles of art focusing on drawing using a ten value scale, one, two, and three point 
perspective, and exploring character of line using various pencils, charcoal, conte crayon, 
and ink. The majority of the assignments are carried on in the drawing studio using set-ups 
set by the instructor. In addition to drawing done in class, daily sketching and finished 
drawings done outside of class are required. Maintenance of a journal-sketch book 
documenting the creative process is required with a minimum of one sketch per school day. 
Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 105. Drawing II (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104. 

This course emphasizes three point and multiple perspective, modeling, and composition. 
During the first half of the course the students draw in the studio setting up their own 
lighting and still lifes. Texture, composition, and reflection is focused on during the second 
half of the course by drawing outdoors from the landscape. In addition to drawing in class, 
daily sketching, and finished drawings done outside of class are required. Maintenance of a 
journal-sketch book as in Drawing I is required. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 107. Drawing in Motion 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 105. 

This course will focus on capturing an active figure with drawing. The course is designed to 
give the animation student skill in gestural drawing that incorporates the use of the line of 
action, weight, and force. The course includes sequence based studio time with models and 
observation studies in the field. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 109. Design Principles I (G-l) 3 hours 

The most fundamental course in design. The student learns how principles of design and 
elements are used in composition. The main focus of the course is to create an individual 
and separate understanding of elements and then work collectively with principles and 
elements for superior design. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 110. Design Principles II (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 109. 

A more advanced course in design that focuses on three dimensional design using the cube 
as a basic structure. The basic elements are added or subtracted to the cube to gain a more 
complete example of dimensional space. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 206. Drawing III - Anatomy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 104, 105. 

A course designed for fine art majors and animators that focuses on the study of the 
structure of the human body for the purpose of becoming visually sensitive to all the 
deformations on the surface with respect to form and light during movement and be able to 
draw from the live model both posed and during motion. This course includes a lab. Daily 
sketching and one portfolio quality finished drawing per week are required in addition to 
drawing done in class. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 207. Drawing IV 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 104, 105, 206. 

This course is devoted to the advanced study of multiple point perspective in the urban 
setting and to drawing the landscape as well. Weekly field trips are taken to draw on 
location. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 



224 Course Descriptions 



ART 221. Painting I (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 104, 105, 109, 223 or permission of instructor. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the material paint. The 
student is exposed to portraiture, still life, landscape, and the objective forms of painting 
with an emphasis on basic composition. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 222. Painting II (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 221. 

This intermediate course is designed to allow the painting student to explore the styles and 
techniques of the masters focusing on light, brush strokes, glazes, and color. Lab fee 4 will 
be assessed for this course. 

ART 223. Principles of Color (G-l) 2 hours 

A basic course in the study of the phenomenon of color as it applies to the realm of the 
visual arts with emphasis of the relationships and interactions of colors. Lab fee 4 will be 
assessed for this course. 

ART 227. Digital Illustration 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 105, 223 or permission of instructor 

This course develops the creative process through the designing of characters, 
environments, and props for animation or film production. Students will learn to research 
and observe as well as explore various approaches in visual concept development using 
traditional and digital tools. 

ART 228. Watercolor I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 104,105 or permission of the instructor. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the techniques of 
transparent watercolor. The student studies brush-strokes, painting surfaces, paint 
characteristics, masking, and the overlay of colors using the white surface for tinting. A 
variety of subjects will be studied that require specific painting techniques in rendering 
surface textures such as water, clouds, and trees. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 230. Introduction to Art Experiences 2 hours 

A course designed to give education majors who don't have an art background an 
introduction to the creative art process and hands-on experience with a variety of art media 
and materials. Emphasis will be given to the aesthetic expression, media exploration, and art 
appreciation. Attention will also be given to the development of lesson plans that incorporate 
an artistic use of media, design, and composition. This course does not apply on a major or 
count toward any major or minor in the School of Visual Arts and Design. Lab fee 5 will be 
assessed for this course. 

ART 235. Ceramics (G-l) 3 hours 

Fundamentals of the preparation and use of clay. Methods of fabrication from hand building 
to wheel-thrown wares, chemistry and application of glazes, and stacking and firing of kilns. 
May be repeated for credit. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 265. Topics in Art 1-3 hours 

Selected areas in art such as watercolor, printmaking, concept drawing, stage set design, 
advanced figure drawing, cartooning, and other related topics are chosen each semester as 
the topic of focus. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 238. Introduction to Art Therapy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 105, 109; PSYC 122, 128. 

An introductory course designed to introduce the pre-art therapy student to the field and 
practice of Art Therapy. A minimum of thirty contact hours in the practice setting of Art 
Therapy with hands on experience is required. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 225 



ART 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

For students electing to take ART 295, permission of the instructor must be obtained. ART 495 is for majors and 

minors only. 

The course is designed for students who wish directed study or for a group of students who 
wish a special course not taught under the regular class offering. Students taking the class 
as directed study may choose from art history, ceramics, design, drawing, painting, 
printmaking, and sculpture. (Students must have had maximum classes offered in area.) 
This course also includes credit offered by the Art Department on directed study tours. May 
be repeated for credit up to four times. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 300. Printmaking (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor. 

A course designed to give the art major experience in printmaking media. Relief, intaglio, and 
silk-screen will be covered. Course will be taught in odd years. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for 
this course. 

ART 308. Drawing V 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 104, 105, 206, 207. 

An advanced course for the drawing or painting focused student where a personal style of 
drawing and a body of work focused on content are developed. Lab fee 4 will be assessed 
for this course. 

ART 310. Painting III (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 222 or permission of instructor. 

An advanced class in painting in which the student begins his or her personal idea search. It 
is expected that the student will develop content in this class that will be developed over the 
next two years. Constancy in style and focus are expected resulting in professional portfolio 
pieces. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 325. Sculpture 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor. 

Introduction to the problems of form in sculpture and three-dimensional design using various 
media such as clay, plaster, wood, and metal casting. Lab fee 9 will be assessed for this 
course. 

ART 328. Advanced Watercolor 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 228. 

Advanced problems in watercolor technique where a personal style of painting and a body 
work focused on content is developed. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 331. Illustration Methods 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 105. 

Students will learn illustration techniques using pencils, ink, markers, colored pencils, and 
photo retouching. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 410. Painting IV 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of portfolio development from Painting III with an emphasis on more mature 
studio practices such as time and portfolio management. Continuing the same content as in 
Painting III. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 412. Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 hour 

This course is made up of a series of topics presented in a seminar setting to provide 
students with necessary tools to actively pursue and acquire internships and jobs. Topics will 
include but are not limited to: Resumes, Networking, Corporate Climate, Interviewing, Dress, 
Portfolios, Company Research, Etiquette. Besides listening to guest presentations, 
opportunities will exist to interact with guest lecturers and professors about thoughts and 
theories regarding the area of job acquisition. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 465. Topics in Art 1-3 hours 

See ART 265 for course description. 



226 Course Descriptions 



ART 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

For students electing to take ART 295, permission of the instructor must be obtained. ART 495 is for majors and 
minors only. 

See ART 295 for course description, times. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

ART 499. Senior Project 1 hour 

Major projects in area of interest for seniors and preparation of permanent portfolio of 
college art work. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

Art Education 

ARTE 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Art 
Education. Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 

ARTE 335. Elementary Methods in Art 2 hours 

This course introduces the art education student to lesson plan design specific to art. The 
teacher is required to produce demonstration pieces for lessons, and incorporate Discipline 
Based Art Education methods recommended by the National Art Education Association into 
the lesson format. Text with a specific focus on art education learning process for K-6 will be 
covered also. The student will participate in the observation of professional teachers and will 
teach a lesson of their own creation. The application of art criticism, relative to K-6 
understanding will also be covered in the class. 

ARTE 368. Secondary Methods in Art 3 hours 

This course introduces the art education student to lesson plan design and unit design 
specific to art. The teacher is required to produce demonstration pieces for lessons, and 
incorporate Discipline Based Art Education methods recommended by the National Art 
Education Association into the lesson format. Text with a specific focus on art education 
learning process for secondary level students will be covered also. The student will 
participate in the observation of professional teachers and will teach a lesson of their own 
creation. Art criticism relative to secondary level students understanding will also be 
explored. 

ARTE 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ARTE 295 for course description. 

Film Production 

ARTF 112. Intro to Film 3 hours 

This course provides an overview of the entire film production model including development, 
pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution. Special attention will be given 
to exploring the various jobs required to produce a film, and how to identify key elements of 
a good story. This is a lecture course. 

ARTF 114. Film Business and Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 112. 

Students act as producers on a short film. Special attention is given to hiring cast and crew, 
making proper use of legal documents, budgeting, scheduling, and distribution. This is a 
lecture/studio course. 

ARTF 215. Lighting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor. 

Students learn the fundamentals of how to use light to create moods and effects. Lab fee 8 
will be assessed for this course. This is a lecture/lab course. 



Course Descriptions 227 



ARTF 226. Screenwriting I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102. 

This is intended for Film Production and Animation students to develop skills in the art of 
writing for the screen. Attention will be given to audience, theme, character, plot 
construction, dramatic structure, dialogue, and elements of film space and timing. This is a 
lecture/lab course. 

ARTF 234. Intro to Field Production 3 hours 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ARTF 215 or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and tools of narrative 
filmmaking, including the use of film and digital video cameras. Lab fee 8 will be assessed 
for this course. This is a lecture/lab course. 

ARTF 235. Cinematography 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 234. 

This course continues instruction in the craft of capturing moving images with film and digital 
video cameras. Special emphasis is placed on camera movement, blocking, and shot flow. 
The course is project-oriented, and students will work with seniors enrolled in ARTF 370, 
470, or 471 to produce complete short films. Lab fee 16 will be assessed for this course. 
This is a studio course. 

ARTF 265. Topics in Film Production 1-3 hours 

Full participation in workshops and seminars presented by active professionals in the field. 
The presentations are offered in intensive blocks over the weekends two to three times per 
year. Selected topics are related to all areas of the film production field. Lab fee 12 will be 
assessed for this course. This is a studio course. 

ARTF 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Film 
Production. Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 

ARTF 320. Post Production 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212. Co-requisite: ARTF 235. 

Students will learn non-linear film editing techniques. Special attention is paid not only to 
technical proficiency but to the pacing and overall flow and continuity of scenes. Lab fee 12 
will be assessed for this course. This is a lecture/lab course. 

ARTF 328. Screenwriting II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 226. 

Students write several short screenplays, as well as one feature length screenplay intended 
for portfolio use. This is a lecture/lab course. 

ARTF 353. Documentary Filmmaking 3 hours 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ARTF 320. 

Students produce a short documentary film and analyze documentary films paying special 
attention to the kinds of challenges present for the documentary film maker. Lab fee 12 will 
be assessed for this course. This is a lecture/studio course. 

ARTF 370. Senior Project I 2 hours 

Prerequisite or Co-requisites: ARTF 328, 422. 

This is the first class in a sequence in which students will develop, direct, and post produce a 
major project that should represent the skills that they have hone during their academic 
career. Key components should include artistic storytelling, technical proficiency, and 
content that the compatible with the mission of Southern Adventist University. The first 
phase should be taken during the second semester of the Junior year, and will represent the 
development phase of the project. This should include development of the screenplay, 
budget, and funding. 



228 Course Descriptions 



ARTF 422. Directing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 328. 

Film students will be introduced to fundamentals of acting and directing as they direct each 
other in short scenes. Attention will also be given to how to communicate clearly with the 
cast and key department heads. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. This is a 
lecture/studio course. 

ARTF 445. Self Promotion 1 hour 

Co-requisite: ARTF 471. 

Film production majors study the industry as a whole in conjunction with preparing portfolios 
suitable for job placement in the area of their choice. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 

ARTF 465. Topics in Film Production 1-3 hours 

See ARTF 265 for course description. 

ARTF 470. Senior Project II 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 370. 

In this sequence students will develop, direct, and post produce a major project that should 
represent the skills that they have honed during their academic career. This second phase, 
taken first semester of the senior year, will encompass pre-production and production 
phases of the project such as casting, location scouting, hiring crew, and production. Lab 
fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTF 471. Senior Project III 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTF 470. 

In this sequence students will develop, direct, and post produce a major project that should 
represent the skills that they have honed during their academic career. This final phase 
taken during the second semester of the senior year, will include editing, focus group 
screenings, re-shoots, sound design, scoring, visual effects, color correction and mastering, 
and will conclude with public exhibition of the work. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 

ARTF 492. Film Production Internship. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of at least half of the hours required for a major in film production. 

Students will work on a project in the film industry during the summer, preferably an 8 to 12 
week period between the junior and senior year. At least 300 clock hours of work experience 
are required. 

ARTF 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ARTF 295 for course description. 

Computer Graphics 

ARTG 115. Introduction to Computer Graphics (A-4) 3 hours 

Pre- or Co-requisite: ART 109. 

An introductory creative imaging course for those interested in professional visual art fields 
such as graphic design, film, animation, and interactive visual communication. This course 
introduces students to the Adobe Creative Suite's basic tools and principles for the 
acquisition, creation, manipulation, and output of both bitmapped and vector-based digitally 
generated compositions. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 121. Typography I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 109; ARTG 115. 

An introductory course on type history, letter anatomy, classic and modern typefaces, styles 
and attributes such as leading, kerning, alignment, etc. The students will design their own 
typeface based on an existing one or create an original. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 



Course Descriptions 229 



ARTG 122. Typography II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 121. 

A course dealing with the introduction of other visual elements such as photographs, 
illustrations, graphs, and graphics into the typographical design. Emphasis is placed on the 
synergistic relationship between visuals and type that focuses on complementary form and 
style within the context of a specific message to be communicated. Lab fee 12 will be 
assessed for this course. 

ARTG 138. Design Studio I 3 hours 

Pre or Co-requisites: ART 109; ARTG 115. 

A course which surveys the important historical events and technological innovations that 
have contributed to current trends and practices in the field of graphic design. Lecture 
presentations, research, discussion, and visual exercises combine to develop the student's 
awareness of historical and current technologies, and the artists and designers who have 
used them to shape the world through visual communication. Studio components of the 
course give students the opportunity to practice the production techniques needed to create 
visual interpretations of the lecture content. 

ARTG 210. Vector Graphics (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ART 109, ARTG 115, or permission of the instructor. 

A course designed to develop skills needed for producing vector-based digital art. Students 
with a basic knowledge of vector graphic concepts will gain a comprehensive understanding 
of the uses of drawing programs such as Illustrator and FreeHand. Emphasis is placed on 
the application of design principles to the digital environment. Lab fee 12 will be assessed 
for this course. 

ARTG 212. Raster Graphics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ARTG 115; ART 110 or permission of the instructor. 

In this course the student will address the creation and manipulation of raster-based 
imagery in a comprehensive manner using the industry standard image-editing program, 
Adobe Photoshop. Color correction, scanning resolutions, selection tools, image 
adjustments, collage and montage techniques, masking, and the effective application of 
filters, blend modes, and effects to images designed for use in digital and printed media will 
be studied in detail. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 226. Digital Imaging 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212 or permission of instructor. 

In this course the student will explore studio photography techniques with digital SLR 
cameras. Emphasis will be given to image enhancement, stylization, and compositing based 
on an advanced knowledge of Photoshop. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 238. Design Studio II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 138. 

A foundation course that explores both the creative process and the production concerns of 
making images for visual communication. By focusing on methodologies for ideation and 
conceptualization, the development of craft in concept rendering, and the production of 
finished compositions incorporating traditional and digital media, students will practice both 
the conceptual thinking and mechanical skills needed to achieve consistently effective 
design solutions. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 265. Topics in Computer Graphics 1-3 hours 

Participation in workshops and seminars offered by active professional graphic designers 
and adjunct faculty. The presentations are offered in an intensive block two to three times 
per semester. Selected topics include all areas related to the field of Graphic Design. Lab fee 
5 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

ARTG 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Graphic 
Design. Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 



230 Course Descriptions 



ARTG 324. Editorial Design 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ARTG 122, 226, and 238. 

In this course students focus on conceptual design as the foundation for editorial 
expression. The development of page structure is emphasized as the method for effectively 
interweaving the use word and image in multi-page publications. Students learn to balance 
editorial aesthetics, production considerations, and publication time constraints as they 
produce a series of multiple page projects. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 332. Advertising Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212. 

This course deals with the development of a creative concept used to promote a product 
with a variety of computer generated visual images. The class is grouped in teams which 
create and present a professional looking advertising campaign. The course ends with a 
general critique of the entire project. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 335. Three-dimensional Graphic Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 238. 

A course that explores the synergistic potential of applying graphic elements to three- 
dimensional structures and environments. Students learn the fundamentals of dimensional 
construction, while honing their ability to capture audience attention through innovative 
forms and graphics. Diverse market areas are explored, including retail and promotional 
packaging, exhibition design, product design, environmental signage, and wayfinding 
systems. Emphasis is placed on craftsmanship and the imaginative use of materials. Lab fee 
13 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 338. Design Studio III 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 324 or permission of instructor. 

A course in which students continue to expand their intellectual and creative abilities by 
designing portfolio-quality work, using a wide variety of formats and technical specifications. 
The student's ability to articulate a design rationale, in conjunction with visual decision- 
making, is reinforced, along with a thorough investigation of printing production 
considerations. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 420. Corporate Identity 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 212. 

A course in which a logo is created as a base for the development of an identity system 
which an organization will project on various means of visual communication. Lab fee 12 will 
be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 432. Senior Design Studio 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Graphic Design major. 

This course prepares students to transition to a career in graphic design by combining 
instruction in the preparation of a quality portfolio with a comprehensive introduction of 
fundamental design business practices. Degree candidates hone the business, promotional, 
networking, and interviewing skills that will be needed in the professional work environment 
Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTG 465. Topics in Computer Graphics 1-3 hours 

See ARTG 265 for course description. 

ARTG 491. Graphic Design Practicum 1-3 hours 

Students will work in a graphics related business for a minimum of 50 clock hours per credit 
hour with employer evaluation. Students must maintain a log sheet and samples of work. 

ARTG 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ARTG 295 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 231 



Art History 

ARTH 218. Art Appreciation (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

Lecture and travel seminar. Survey and appreciation course of art history from pre-historic to 
modern times. One class is offered in the fall semester, with two hours per week lecture, and 
the week of Thanksgiving spent in and New York City visiting major art museums. When 
offered in the first summer session, there will be one week of two-hour lectures and two 
weeks of travel and museum visits. There is an additional charge for travel. Students will be 
required to write a summary paper. Students taking the class for upper division credit will be 
required to write a research paper. Lab fee 17 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTH 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Art 
History. Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 

ARTH 318. Art Appreciation (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

See ARTH 218 for course description. 

ARTH 342. Renaissance Art History (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

A study of arts of western civilization during Renaissance times with an emphasis on the 
pivotal figures in Art History. 

ARTH 344. Ancient Art History (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the arts of western civilization from antiquity to the mid-600's A.D. with an 
emphasis on pivotal figures in art history. 

ARTH 345. Contemporary Art (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

Nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in European and American arts. (Fall) 

ARTH 349. Medieval Art History (D-3) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the arts of western civilization during Medieval times with an emphasis on the 
pivotal figures in Art History. 

ARTH 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ARTH 295 for course description. 

Interactive Media 

ARTI 115. Introduction to Interactive Media 3 hours 

This course introduces the student to the use of the web as a medium for interactive 
illustration, motion, communication, dynamic publishing, and e-learning. Lab fee 12 will be 
assessed for this course. Three hour lecture. 

ARTI 223. Interactive Media I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ARTG 115; ARTI 115. Pre- or Co-requisite: CPTR 124. 

Students will create aesthetically pleasing websites using XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript with 
attention to accessibility, site management, web administration, graphics optimization, 
internet history, and the World Wide Web architecture. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 

ARTI 230. Sound Design 3 hours 

Students will conduct recordings and use digital audio tools to create sound for motion 
pictures and interactive systems. By integrating visual design with sound theory, students 
will learn ADR, Foley, effects, mixing techniques, sound management, sampling, and MIDI 
music creation. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. Three hour lecture. 

ARTI 265. Topics in Interactive Media 1-3 hours 

This course is designed to be an access point to a broad variety of subjects in interactive 
media. The course may be repeated with permission. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this 
course. 



232 Course Descriptions 



ARTI 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course involves individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Interactive 
Media. Content is chosen by the faculty adviser and the student. May be repeated. 

ARTI 323. Interactive Media II 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ARTG 210; ARTI 230. 

Web animations, illustrations, and e-learning will be developed in this studio class. Lab fee 
12 will be assessed for this course. Three hour lecture and one hour studio course. 

ARTI 329. Multimedia 3 hours 

Prerequisites: AART 108; ARTG 212. 

In this course, students learn how to design and develop interactive products and 
visualizations that incorporate multiple medias, such as sound, text, 2D and 3D assets into a 
usable experience. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTI 423. Interactive Media III 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTI 223; CPTR 124. 

This studio course emphasizes the effective use of visual design with websites that store and 
retrieve information through the use of server-side scripting and databases. Lab fee 12 will 
be assessed for this course. 

ARTI 427. Interactive Video and Sound 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTI 230. 

Students will explore and express their own audio-visual experiences through interactive 
video and sound synthesis programming. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. Five 
hour studio course. 

ARTI 432. 3D Environments 3 hours 

Prerequisite: AART 108. 

This course teaches students to create interactive audio and visual experiences that are 
three dimensional with dynamic motion, programmable triggers and events, sound and 
animation. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. Five hour studio course. 

ARTI 437. New Media Applications 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTI 323. 

This course covers historical influences of technology and art in relation to current trends in 
New Media. Various artists and mediums will be researched for the application of the final 
project. Lab fee 9 will be assessed forthis course. Three hours of lecture. 

ARTI 440. Digital Portfolio 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor. 

This course teaches students to create successful digital portfolios. During the course of 
study students will learn about interface design, informational architecture, flowcharting, 
software and hardware constraints, digital publishing, basic scripting, and asset 
management. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. 

ARTI 465. Topics in Interactive Media 1-3 hours 

See ARTI 265 for course description. 

ARTI 480. Self Promotion 1 hour 

Students will prepare for job placement or higher education enrollment by researching 
specific areas in interactive design. Their portfolio will be refined along with their skills in 
interviewing, job hunting, and resume writing. Select faculty members will conduct a final 
review of the student's portfolio and career preparation. Lab fee 5 will be assessed forthis 
course. 

ARTI 491. Interactive Media Practicum 3 hours 

Students will work the interactive design business for a minimum of 50 clock hours per 

credit hour 

with employer evaluation. Students must maintain a log sheet and samples of work. 



Course Descriptions 233 



ARTI 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ARTI 295 for course description. 

American Sign Language 

ASL 101. American Sign Language I (D-l) 3 hours 

An introductory class in American Sign Language designed for the student with little or no 
signing experience. Course focus is on developing beginning sign communication for basic 
conversational usage. 

ASL 102. American Sign Language II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ASL 101 or equivalent. 

A continuation of American Sign Language I with an ongoing emphasis on expressive and 
receptive sign communication development. Further attention is placed on ASL grammar and 
deaf culture. Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must check with their 
School/Department prior to taking this course. 

ASL 207. Intermediate American Sign Language I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ASL 102 or approval of the department. 

This course offers practice in conversational ASL with an emphasis on increasing fluency and 
expressing concepts with appropriate signs. This course includes vocabulary building, finger- 
spelling drills, grammar instruction, and information regarding the Deaf Culture. 

ASL 208. Intermediate American Sign Language II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ASL 207 or approval of the department. 

This course prepares students for advanced levels of conversation with deaf and for entry 
level interpreting classes. Speed and fluency is emphasized as well as expressing difficult 
concepts with appropriate signs and finger-spelling. This course includes vocabulary 
building, finger-spelling drills, grammar instruction, and information of Deaf Culture. 

ASL 265/465. Topics in American Sign Language 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in American Sign Language presented in a classroom setting. This course 
may be repeated for credit. 

Biology 

BIOL 101-102. Anatomy and Physiology (E-l) 4,4 hours 

Prerequisite: Minimum composite ACT of 18 or permission of the department. 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. The first semester covers 
basic cytology, histology, the musculoskeletal, integumentary, nervous, and endocrine 
systems. The remainder of the body systems are studied the second semester. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in Biology. Lab fee 5 will be charged for each semester. 

BIOL 103. Principles of Biology (E-l) 3 hours 

A basic general education biology course designed to give the student a modern treatment of 
the fundamental processes and principles of plant and animal life. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory each week. Does not apply on a major or minor in Biology. Lab fee 4 
will be assessed for this course. 

BIOL 151-152. General Biology (E-l) 4,4 hours 

Prerequisite: Minimum composite ACT of 18 or permission of the department. 

This is a rigorous introductory course in Biology primarily for science majors and 
pre-professional students. It introduces the student to biology as a science: the scientific 
method; cell structure and function; cell energetics; Mendelian and molecular genetics; 
diversity of life-the plant and animal kingdoms; reproductive patterns; anatomy and 
physiology; and ecological interactions and life origin. It is prerequisite to most all other 
Biology major courses. Three lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour laboratory period 
each week. Lab fee 4 will be charged for each semester. 



234 Course Descriptions 



BIOL 197. Introduction to Biological Research 1 hour 

Prerequisite: BIOL 151. 

An introduction to the principles of scientific research, including the function of the scientific 
method, literature searches, research techniques, writing of grant proposals, and how to 
publish results. (Fall) 

BIOL 225. Basic Microbiology (E-l) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor. 

A study of the principles of microbiology, disinfection, sterilization, elementary immunology, 
and microorganisms emphasizing their relationship to health and disease. Three lectures 
and two one and one-half hour laboratory periods each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in Biology. Lab fee 5 will be charged for this course. 

BIOL 250. Introduction to Tropical Marine Biology (E-l) 3 hours 

A study of the major invertebrates and fish of the tropical coral reef and seashores. 
Emphasis is placed on the life habits of the organisms and their ecological niches. Habitats 
studied are coral reefs, rocky shores, sandy beaches, thalassia beds and mangrove swamps. 
Involves two weeks of on-campus class work and a one to two week field laboratory 
experience on tropical coral reefs. Additional fee required. (Summer) 

BIOL 252. Tropical Biology (E-l) 3 hours 

A general introduction to the tropical habitats of Asia with the plants and animals that inhabit 
them. Both terrestrial and marine habitats are studied through exploration of volcanoes, 
nature parks, and a marine preserve. Involves three weeks in tropical Asia. Additional fee 
required. (Summer, even years) 

BIOL 255. Introduction to Dentistry 1 hour 

An introduction to the field of dentistry covering basic dental terminology, dental 
nomenclature, and tooth morphology. Guest lecturers from various dental specialties share 
perspectives on dentistry as a career as well as giving an overview of the scope of treatment 
in the specialty. Factors necessary for good personal dental health are emphasized. 
Laboratory experiences introduce the student to dental waxing procedures as well as to 
practice manual dexterity carving skills. 

BIOL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

Designed for the individual student or group of students who wish to do independent study 
in an area of biology not listed in the regular offerings. Content and method of study must be 
arranged for prior to registration. This course may be repeated for credit. BIOL 495 open to 
Biology majors or minors only. (Fall, Winter, Summer— upon request) 

BIOL 297. Research in Biology 1-2 hours 

Individual research under the direction of members of the staff. Problems will be selected 
according to the interest and experience of the student. Prior to registration, students are 
urged to contact all biology staff members with respect to the choice of available research 
problems. This course should be taken not later than the first semester of the senior year. 
This course may be repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Summer— upon request) 

BIOL 311. Genetics 4 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 151 or 225. 

A study of heredity as related to man, domestic plants and animals and an investigation of 
gene structure and function. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 312. Vertebrate Natural History 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

Natural history of the vertebrate classes including ecology, physiology, behavior, 
classification and identification, with emphasis on local species. Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory each week. Lab fee 11 will be assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 235 



BIOL 313. Developmental Biology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

An introduction to embryonic development from the formation of germ cells through the 
maturation of major organs culminating in parturition. Special reference is made to humans. 
Emphasis is placed on problems of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Laboratory 
includes microscopic study and experiments with sea urchin, frog, and chick embryos. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 314. Ornithology (E-l) 3 hours 

A systematic study of bird life with special emphasis on external features, taxonomy, nesting 
and feeding habits, flight and migratory patterns. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
each week. An extended field trip, which applies toward laboratory credit, is planned. Lab fee 
8 will be assessed forthis course. 

BIOL 315. Parasitology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic animals. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 317. Ecology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

Ecology is a study of the interrelationships of plants, animals and their environment. This 
course examines these interactions in the context of energy flow, nutrient cycles, limiting 
factors, succession and population dynamics. Field work introduces various ecological 
sampling techniques and the student participates in an ecological analysis of various local 
communities as well as extended field trips. Two lectures and one field trip or three-hour 
laboratory period each week. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this course. 

BIOL 320. Entomology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A systematic study of the insects of the world considering anatomy, physiology, behavior and 
relation to humans. In the laboratory, emphasis is placed on identifying local insects and a 
representative collection is turned in. Short field trips are planned as part of the laboratory 
work. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 321. Field Ecology 3 hours 

This course covers general ecology principles and ecology of a selected field area, usually in 
Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Emphasis will be placed on identification of 
mammals, birds, insects and plants and their ecological interactions. Five days of class 
lectures, approximately nine days of field trip, and post-trip writing assignments will be 
required. Lab fees 7 and 13 will be assessed forthis course. (Summer, odd years). 

BIOL 330. General Microbiology 4 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A general study of bacteria, yeasts, molds and viruses, considering their morphology, 
physiology, genetics and methods of control. Study is given to immunology topics: 
antigen-antibody properties, host-antigen interactions, humoral and cellular immune 
systems. The importance of microorganisms in environmental and applied fields is 
considered. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 340. Immunology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A study of the basic aspects of the human immune system including topics such as antigen 
and antibody structure and reactions, humoral and cell mediated immunity, hypersensitivity, 
immune disease and transplantation immunology. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 365. Topics in Biology (W) 1-3 hours 

Formal course work designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
Biology not covered in regular courses. May be repeated in different specialized areas. 
Additional fee may be required. 



236 Course Descriptions 



BIOL 366. Rosario Beach Topics in Biology 3.3 hours 

Formal coursework designed to meet the needs or interests in specialty areas of biology not 
covered in regular courses. These are offered at Rosario Beach Marine Station owned by 
Walla Walla University. May be repeated in different specialized areas. Additional fee may 
be required. 

BIOL 387. Animal Behavior 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC387. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152 or PSYC 122 and 128. 

The behavior of animals is studied with a focus on both proximate causes (mechanisms) and 
ultimate causes (survival strategies) of behavior. Special importance is placed on 
understanding techniques of experimental study and hypothesis testing. Topics covered 
include: genetic, developmental, and physiological bases of behavior: instinct and learning: 
communication; habitat selection; feeding, antipredatory, reproductive, and parenting 
strategies; mating systems, social behavior and human sociobiology. Three lectures each 
week. 

BIOL 397. Introduction to Biological Research (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: BIOL 151. 

See BIOL 197 for course description. 

BIOL 408. Flowering Plants and Ferns 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

This field study of trees, flowering plants and ferns emphasizes species identification with 
the aid of botanical keys, recognition of plant families and noting habitats where various 
species occur. Other taxonomic methods are introduced. Students prepare a collection of 
herbarium specimens. Two lectures and one field trip or three-hour laboratory period each 
week. 

BIOL 409. Smoky Mountain Flora 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 152. 

A field study of the wild flowers, shrubs and trees in the Great Smoky Mountain National 
Park, which contains the world's finest examples of temperate deciduous forest. Plants are 
identified by means of botanical keys, and observation lists are kept. Special attention is 
given to the different forest types and their associated plants. Involves a 10-day to 
three-week camping study experience. Field trips daily. Lab fee 11 will be assessed for this 
course. (Summer) 

BIOL 411. Mammalogy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A study of the mammals of the world, with emphasis on North America. Includes classroom 
and field study of systematics, distribution, behavior and ecology. A small collection is 
required in the laboratory. An extended weekend field trip will be required as part of 
laboratory credit. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Lab fee 5 will be 
assessed for this course. 

BIOL 412. Cell and Molecular Biology 4 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 311; CHEM 311. 

This course, designed for advanced Biology and Chemistry majors, deals primarily with cell 
structure and function. Building on cellular principles learned in BIOL 151-152 and BIOL 
311, the student is exposed to methods of cellular and molecular research while learning 
about the appearance and operation of cellular organelles. The exciting details of cell 
integration and control provide the framework for this interdisciplinary study. Three lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 416. Human Anatomy 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

An introductory study of human anatomy with an emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, 
nervous, and circulatory systems. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods each 
week. Lab fee 11 will be assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 237 



BIOL 417. Animal Histology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

A descriptive study of normal tissues, primarily those of man. The microscopic identification 
and characteristics of stained sections are emphasized in the laboratory. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 418. Animal Physiology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152; CHEM 151-152 or BIOL 101-102. 

Functional processes used by animals in adjusting to their external environment and 
controlling their internal environment. Laboratories involve analysis of functions of major 
organ systems. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 421. Issues in Science and Society (E-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with RELT 421, School of Religion. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

A study of the philosophical basis of modern natural science as it relates to current issues in 
origins, biotechnology, bioethics, and environmental responsibility. Special attention is given 
to Christian perspectives of the issues discussed. This is a writing class and enrollment is 
limited. Seniors will be given preference. BIOL 421/RELT 421 will not count toward a biology 
major or minor. 

BIOL 424. Issues of Natural Science and Religion (E-l) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

A study of the scientific, philosophical and religious basis of modern science as it relates to 
issues in origins and speciation. The course will involve a comparison of the data related to 
various theories on the origin and history of living organisms based upon current knowledge 
in biology, paleontology, genetics, and other related areas. Special consideration will be 
given to Christian perspectives of the issues discussed. Recommended for the junior year. 
Three lectures each week. (Fall) 

BIOL 430. Biosystematics and Speciation 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 424. 

An introduction to theories and data relating to adaptation and speciation and how these 
theories are inferred in our modern classification of life. A phylogenetic analysis will be 
conducted on a particular group of animals or plants and the results will be compared with 
what is known about the processes of divergence. Tests of the various possible phylogenies 
will be conducted. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

BIOL 486. Biology Seminar 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Biology major or minor with senior standing. 

An introduction to oral scientific communication. Students learn to evaluate scientific 
literature, present their findings orally, and critically and constructively evaluate peer and 
expert presentations. The preparation and delivery of short oral presentations is required. 

BIOL 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 151-152. 

See BIOL 295 for course description. 

BIOL 497. Research in Biology (W) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 397. 

See BIOL 297 for course description. 

Marketing 

BMKT 265. Topics in Marketing 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission 



238 Course Descriptions 



BMKT 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 

A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty 
adviser and the student. 

BMKT 326. Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ECON 213, 225 or concurrent enrollment. 

A study of the nature and functions of marketing. Includes marketing institutions, basic 
problems in the marketing of commodities and services, price policies, and competitive 
practices. 

BMKT 327. Consumer Behavior 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BMKT 326. 

An analysis of the consumer decision-making process where behavioral science is combined 
with marketing theory to enable the marketer to understand and predict consumer behavior 
in the various stages of the buying decision. (Winter) 

BMKT 328. Sales Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BMKT 326 or permission of instructor. 

An examination of the basic sales processes necessary to achieve organizational objectives 
and the professional techniques used in the management of the sales force ranging from 
planning-recruitingto day-to-day management. (Fall) 

BMKT 375. International Marketing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BMKT 326. 

An exploration of the rapidly expanding world of international marketing. Topics include joint 
ventures, partnerships, direct exporting, foreign subsidiaries, licensing, contract 
manufacturing, and direct investment. Doing business across cultural and national 
boundaries are examined in depth to gain an understanding of the nuances necessary to be 
successful with an international marketing venture. (Fall) 

BMKT 410. Service Marketing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT 326. 327. 

A study of the knowledge needed to implement strategies for quality service to provide 
companies a competitive advantage. The customer-focused management model includes 
strategies for increasing customer satisfaction and retention through the design and 
implementation of service strategies. Topics include customer expectations, service 
development and design, service delivery, management and measurement of service quality, 
service recovery, and the financial effect of service strategies. (Winter, odd years) 

BMKT 423. Promotional Strategy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT 326, 327. 

An analysis of integrated marketing communications, with an emphasis on the role of 
advertising, promotion, direct marketing, and public relations. Topics include setting 
advertising objectives and budget, media strategy, creative strategy, and evaluating 
promotional effectiveness. Focus is on the design and management of a complete 
promotional strategy for an organization. (Winter, even years) 

BMKT 424. Marketing Strategy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT 326, 327. 

A case study approach to the solving of major marketing problems of various organizations 
and the ability to formulate appropriate strategies in responding to the presented case 
problems. Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

BMKT 465. Topics in Marketing 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See course BMKT 265 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 239 



BMKT491. Marketing Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

A practicum consists of supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of 
management on a part-time basis. The work may be done at various job sites. A minimum of 
50 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A 
maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the 
major.) 

BMKT 492. Marketing Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and school approval. 

Students obtain on-the-job experience working under supervision at an ad agency, marketing 
department, marketing research company, wholesaler, retailer, or company sales 
department on a full-time basis. All hours must be completed on one job site. A minimum of 
100 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A 
maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the 
major.) 

BMKT 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 
See BMKT 295 for course description. 

BMKT 497. Marketing Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT 326, 327; BUAD 221. 

A study of the role of research in marketing decision-making: research design, 
implementation, and analysis and interpretation of research findings. Students will do 
research for a real business organization, concluding with a research and marketing 
recommendation report to the sponsoring organization. (Winter) 

Broadcasting 

BRDC 201. Foundations of Broadcasting 3 hours 

Provides an understanding of broadcasting and related industries. Basic theories and 
practices of radio, television, cable operations, and other electronic media are covered. 

BRDC 202. Digital Audio Production 3 hours 

An introduction to audio production, including use of microphones, digital media, non-linear 
audio editing, recording, mixing, and post-production. Oral communication emphasis 
includes instruction on announcing, interviewing, and other broadcast techniques. Lab fee 
11 will be assessed for this course. 

BRDC 227. TV Studio Production 3 hours 

An introduction to the basics of producing both studio and multi-camera video programs. 
Students produce individual and group projects in the School's studio in Brock Hall. 
Emphasis also given to lighting, audio, and video editing. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this 
course. 

BRDC 265. Topics in Broadcasting 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in broadcast and related areas presented in a classroom setting. This course 
may be repeated for credit. 

BRDC 291. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 

Supervised work in a broadcast station or media production environment. At least 90 clock 
hours of work experience are required for each semester hour of credit. Procedures and 
guidelines are available from the School. 

BRDC 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

For students who want to do independent research and/or media production. Directed study 
topics will be selected with guidance from the instructor who will serve as a consultant to the 
student in carrying out the project. 



240 Course Descriptions 



BRDC 314. Broadcast News Writing (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BRDC 202; JOUR 205. 

Gathering information, interviewing, writing, and editing for the broadcast media. How to 
start, develop, and polish hard news and feature stories by writing to sound and pictures. 
Students write, copy, and produce sound documentaries for the University radio station and 
Adventist World Radio. Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. 

BRDC 327. Digital Video Production 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BRDC 227. 

An advanced video production class with a focus on digital video acquisition, non-linear 
editing, and the production of television graphics. Students will produce a series of single- 
camera video projects, utilizing non-linear editing and digital effects programs. This course 
will also include an introduction to video streaming on the Web. Lab fee 10 will be assessed 
for this course. 

BRDC 391. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 
See BRDC 291 for course description. 

BRDC 417. Electronic Media Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BRDC 201. 

An analysis of the challenges involved in planning and operating electronic media including 
personnel, programming, business ethics, community relations, sales, FCC policies and 
promotion. Students interview media managers during field trips to area radio, TV, and cable 
operations. Added emphasis on Christian broadcasting and WSMC-FM, the University's 
100,000-watt radio station. Case study method is involved. 

BRDC 426. TV News Reporting and Performance 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BRDC 314, 227/327 or COMM 315. 

Students become reporters, videographers, producers, and anchors for a weekly newscast 
produced in the School's Brock Hall studio. Students learn basics of visual storytelling as 
they use digital equipment to shoot and edit packages for broadcast. In addition, each 
student is required to create a resume (tape) essential for getting a first job. Emphasis on 
visual storytelling and performance skills. Includes lectures and one three-hour lab per week. 
Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this course. (Fall, odd years) 

BRDC 445. Senior Project 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of all B.S. seniors taking the Media Production or Photography Concentration, this 
student-selected, department-approved project demonstrates the student's ability to 
perform in his/her major field. Students in this course meet with their supervising professor 
as needed. A written proposal for a project must be submitted to the advising professor by 
three weeks into the term. Satisfactory completion of this course is required before the 
school grants the bachelor's degree. Graded S for "satisfactory" or NC for "not complete." 
Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

BRDC 465. Topics in Broadcasting 1-3 hours 

See BRDC 265 for course description. 

BRDC 492. Broadcast/Media Production Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Completion of half the requirements for a major or minor in broadcast journalism or media production 

and School approval before arranging for internship. 

Students work at a broadcast station or media production facility to obtain on-the-job 
experience, preferably during an 8 tol2 week period the summer between the junior and 
senior year when no other college course is taken. At least 300 clock hours of work 
experience are required. Procedures and guidelines are available from the School. 

BRDC 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See BRDC 295 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 241 



Business Administration 

BUAD 104. Business Software (A-4) 3 hours 

A hands-on course designed to actively involve the student in the powerful capabilities of 
word processing, database, presentation software, and with document management using 
Adobe. 

BUAD 105. Business Spreadsheets (A-4) 3 hours 

An application course where students use spreadsheets to present business data. In a 
hands-on environment a spreadsheet is the vehicle for classifying, summarizing, analyzing, 
automating, and presenting data to enhance management's decision-making capability. 

BUAD 126. Introduction to Business (G-2) 3 hours 

A course designed to provide a basic understanding of the American business system and 
free enterprise concepts. Business practices, business terminology and contemporary 
business issues are covered. Students who have 18 or more hours of credit in business 
courses are ineligible to take this course for credit 

BUAD 128. Personal Finance (F-2) 3 hours 

A course in basic economic concepts and business terminology and practices designed to 
provide the techniques to manage personal finances. Budgeting, consumerism, insurance, 
home ownership, and investments are included in the topics covered. 

BUAD 221. Business Statistics 3 hours 

The emphasis is on applied statistics as a tool for management decision-making. Topics 
include: descriptive statistics, elementary probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, 
inferences, correlation and regression, time series analysis, forecasting, variance analysis, 
and decision theory. 

BUAD 245. Computer-Aided Publishing (A-4) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with CPTE 245/345, School of Computing. A student may receive credit for this course 

from only one school. 

An introductory course in the use of the computer as an aid in publishing materials such as 
newsletters, flyers, programs. The course gives training in the preparation of camera-ready 
services using specialized desktop publishing software such as Aldus PageMaker and Xerox 
Ventura to do page layout. 

BUAD 265. Topics in Business 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

BUAD 288. Seminar in Business Administration lhour 

Includes the Eugene Anderson Lecture Series in business. Top men and women in their field 
present lectures in insurance, real estate, finance, retailing, production management. 
Attendance at ten lectures is required. This course may be repeated for credit. (Winter) 

BUAD 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 

A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty 
adviser and the student. 

BUAD 296. Business Administration Study Tour lhour 

A trip designed to acquaint the student with important large business centers and facilities. 
Focus will be on financial, merchandising, advertising, and cultural organizations. An 
additional fee will be required to cover travel expenses. Lab fee 18 will be assessed for this 
course. 



242 Course Descriptions 



BUAD 310. Business Communications (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 104; COMM 135; ENGL 101-102. 

Provides students with a theoretical and practical framework for understanding and 
conducting effective oral and written communication. Special emphasis on business letter 
writing, report development, presentation delivery, resume writing, and interviewing skills. 
Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

BUAD 317. Management Information Systems (A-4) 3 hours 

Covers the use and effect of computer information processing in a business environment 
with emphasis on management, internal control, the technical foundations of information 
processing, the systems development life cycle, legal, security, and ethical issues, database 
management, and artificial intelligence. 

BUAD 339. Business Law 3 hours 

A course designed to study the nature and social functions of law including social control 
through law and the law of commercial transactions (uniform commercial code) and 
business organizations. Contracts, the law of commercial transactions (UCC), business 
organizations, torts, agency, strict liability, and property are covered in depth. Evolution of 
legal trends are also noted. 

BUAD 345. Computer-Aided Publishing (A-4) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with CPTE 245/345, School of Computing. A student may receive credit for this course 
from only one school. 

See BUAD 245 for course description 

BUAD 358. Ethical, Social, and Legal Environment of Business (W) 3 hours 

A study of how business should operate within the ethical, social, legal, and political 
environment, and how individuals in leadership should relate to various social and ethical 
problems. Lab fee 2 is assessed for this course 

BUAD 412. Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 hour 

This course is made up of a series of topics presented in a seminar setting to provide 
students with necessary tools to actively pursue and acquire internships and jobs. Topics will 
include but are not limited to: Resumes, Networking, Corporate Climate, Interviewing, Dress, 
Portfolios, Company Research, Etiquette. Besides listening to guest presentations, 
opportunities will exist to interact with guest lecturers and professors about thoughts and 
theories regarding the area of job acquisition. (Should be taken in Junior year of study) 
(Winter) 

BUAD 465. Topics in Business 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

See BUAD 265 for course description 

BUAD 488. Seminar in Business Administration lhour 

See BUAD 288 for course description 

BUAD 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 
See BUAD 295 for course description. 

BUAD 496. Business Administration Study Tour lhour 

See BUAD 296 for course description. 

BUAD 497. Business Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 221; MGNT 334. 

This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data 
leading to the completion of a research project. 



Course Descriptions 243 



Chemistry 

CHEM 107. Chemistry of Everyday Life (E-2) 3 hours 

This course is a qualitative look at the chemistry of everyday living for non-science majors. 
Topics may include household chemicals, drugs (prescription, over-the-counter, or illicit), 
hazards and risks, food chemistry, polymers, cosmetics, forensic science, and sports 
equipment. This course does not apply to a major or minor in Chemistry. 

CHEM 111. Survey of Chemistry I (E-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: A course in high school algebra. A minimum Mathematics ACT score of 16 or a minimum grade of "C* 

in MATH 080 are also required. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of inorganic 
chemistry. Three hours of lecture each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in 
Chemistry. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

CHEM 112. Survey of Chemistry II (E-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 111. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of organic and 
biochemistry. Three hours of lecture each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in 
Chemistry. (Fall, Winter) 

CHEM 113. Survey of Chemistry Laboratory I (E-2) 1 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111. 

Laboratory material designed to illustrate the material in CHEM 111. Two and one-half hours 
of laboratory each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in Chemistry. (Fall) 

CHEM 114. Survey of Chemistry Laboratory II (E-2) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 112. 

Laboratory material designed to illustrate the material in CHEM 112. Two and one-half hours 
of laboratory each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in Chemistry. (Winter) 

CHEM 115. Introductory Chemistry (E-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: A course in high school algebra. A minimum Mathematics ACT score of 16 or a minimum grade of "C* 

in MATH 080 are also required. 

A course for elementary education majors that uses a "hands-on" approach to teach the 
basic principles of chemistry (including the use of basic scientific instruments) and the 
interrelationships among the other disciplines of science and technology. Does not apply to a 
major or minor in Chemistry. (Winter) 

CHEM 151-152. General Chemistry (E-2) 4,4 hours 

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics through high school Algebra II. 

An introduction to the fundamental laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Areas to be 
studied include stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure and bonding, states of matter, 
equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction and 
electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. To enroll in CHEM 152, a 
student must complete CHEM 151 with a grade of C- or better. Three hours of lecture, one 
hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory each week. 

CHEM 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 152. 

A course emphasizing individual directed study by a student who wishes to explore an area 
of chemistry not listed in the regular course offerings. 



244 Course Descriptions 



CHEM 311-312. Organic Chemistry 4,4 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 152 with a grade of C- or higher. 

Many of the fundamental functional groups of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds are 
studied. Attention is given to spectroscopy, relative reactivities, reaction mechanisms, and 
physical properties of these compounds. Laboratory experiments acquaint students with 
basic organic chemistry laboratory techniques and illustrate reactions that are discussed in 
lecture. To enroll in CHEM 312, a student must complete CHEM 311 with a grade of C- or 
better. Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory each 
week. 

CHEM 315. Quantitative Analysis 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 152 with a grade of C- or higher. 

A study of equilibria as it applies to analytical chemistry. Techniques of determinations, 
sampling, handling of data, and the detailed chemistry involved are studied in terms of 
quantitative determinations. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory each week. 
(Fall, alternate years) 

CHEM 321. Instrumental Analysis 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 315 with a grade of C- or higher. 

A study of the theories, techniques, and instruments involved in spectrometry, 
chromatography, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory 
each week. (Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 341. Biochemistry I 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 312 and BIOL 151 with a grade of C- or higher or consent of 

instructor. 

A study of the basic principles of the chemistry of living organisms. Topics presented include 
the structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; an 
introduction to bioenergetics; enzyme kinetics and mechanisms; carbohydrate, lipid, and 
energy metabolism. Four hours of lecture each week. (Fall) 

CHEM 342. Biochemistry II 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 341 with a grade of C- or higher. 

A continued study of the basic principles of the chemistry of living organisms. Topics 
presented include the metabolism of proteins and nucleic acids and the regulation of gene 
expression. Two hours of lecture each week. (Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 343. Biochemistry Laboratory lhour 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 315 and previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 342. 

An introduction to the fundamental techniques used in the study of biochemical systems, 
including the separation and analysis of biological molecules, enzyme kinetics, and 
metabolism studies. Four hours of laboratory each week. Requires computer data analysis. 

(Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 385. Chemistry Seminar lhour 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 312 and COMM 135. 

An introduction to the use of chemical literature as a source of information and the 
techniques involved in making scientific presentations. Oral and written presentations are 
made on specific topics in chemistry. These presentations must utilize Power Point and word 
processing skills. This course is to be taken in the junior year, prior to taking CHEM 497. 
(Winter) 

CHEM 411. Physical Chemistry I (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 152, MATH 181. PHYS 212, with a grade of C- or higher. 

A study of the fundamental concepts of chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, 
properties of pure substances and mixtures, phase changes, kinetic theory, and reaction 
kinetics and dynamics. This class is offered alternate years and is not open to students who 
have taken PHYS 411. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory each week. 



Course Descriptions 245 



CHEM 415. Physical Chemistry II 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 152, MATH 315, PHYS 212, with a grade of C- or higher. 

An introduction to quantum chemistry. Areas to be studied include: wave mechanics: 
boundary problems; the Schroedinger equation and its solution for one electron atoms and 
extension to multielectron systems; chemical bonding; and atomic and molecular 
spectroscopy. This class is offered alternate years and is not open to students who have 
taken PHYS 412. Three hours of lecture each week. (Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 425. Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 312 with a grade of C- or higher. 

Compound types, reactions, and intermediates not considered in Organic Chemistry will be 
studied. Once a sufficient background has been established, an introduction to medicinal 
chemistry and synthesis of medicinal compounds will be studied. (Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 435. Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 312 with a grade of C- or higher; completion of CHEM 411 is 

recommended. 

A study of structures and chemical properties of inorganic compounds. Particular focus is 
placed on the description of chemical bonds between elements, the effects of bond 
properties on the structures, reactivity, and characterization of these compounds, and the 
periodic trends observed in the properties of the elements. Three hours of lecture and four 
hours of laboratory each week. (Winter, alternate years) 

CHEM 465. Topics in Chemistry 1-4 hours 

Selected topics presented in a formal classroom setting in specialty areas of chemistry not 
covered in regular courses. May be repeated for credit for different topics. 

CHEM 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 152. 
See CHEM 295 for course description. 

CHEM 497. Introduction to Research (W) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior chemistry major who has successfully completed CHEM 312. 

Individual or group research under the direction of the chemistry faculty. One hour of lecture 
and four hours of laboratory each week for each hour of credit. 

Communication 

COMM 103. Introduction to Communication (G-2) 3 hours 

Overview of the development and characteristics of mass media, with emphasis on media in 
the United States including newspapers, radio, television, photography, film, sound 
recording, books, magazines, advertising, public relations, and new media technology. 
Attention is given to theories of communication and how to be a critical and discriminating 
consumer of mass media. 

COMM 135. Introduction to Public Speaking (A-5) 3 hours 

Preparing, presenting, listening to, and critiquing speeches of various kinds— particularly 
informative and persuasive ones— with emphasis on the selection and organization of 
supporting material, reasoning, methods of securing interest, persuasive strategies, and 
elements of delivery. (Fall, Winter, SmartStart) 

COMM 230. Intro to Acting 3 hours 

This introductory level course is designed to present fundamental acting techniques to 
students unfamiliar with the theater. In addition, the student will gain a better understanding 
of theater as an art form, as well as learn the basic vocabulary specific to theater and acting. 

COMM 265. Topics 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in speech and related areas presented in a classroom setting. Subjects 

covered will determine general education credit status. This course may be repeated for 
credit. 



246 Course Descriptions 



COMM 291. Intercultural Communication Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 

Supervised work experience in intercultural communication. At least 90 clock hours of work 
experience are required for each semester hour of credit. Work experience may be 
completed in the United States or overseas. Procedures and guidelines are available from 
the School. 

COMM 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the student. Open 
only to students approved by the School dean in consultation with the prospective instructor. 
This course may be repeated for credit. 

COMM 315. Scriptwriting (W) 3 hours 

This course provides an introduction to scriptwriting in a variety of forms. Students will be 
introduced to and get experience in the style and preparation of scripts for television, 
corporate video production, documentary and narrative film, motion pictures, animation 
radio, and stage plays. 

COMM 326. Film Evaluation (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

The primary goal of this class is to help each student develop a set of criteria for critically 
evaluating films. Besides regular assigned reading, class activities include discussion of the 
contributions films make to our culture, studying how films are made, and how to write about 
films. Films are screened as a part of the class and weekly evaluation papers based on the 
screened film are expected. 

COMM 330. Intercultural Communication (W) 3 hours 

This course deals with communication and culture as they relate to perception and values, 
language, nonverbal communication, ethics, intercultural relationships, sociocultural, 
psychocultural, and environmental influences on the processes of communication. 

COMM 336. Interpersonal Communication 3 hours 

Introduces students to the theory, research, and practice of communication in personal 
relationships. Topics include listening, verbal and nonverbal communication, emotions, 
conflict management, and the development and maintenance of effective personal 
relationships. This course utilizes readings and learning activities as well as out-of-class 
activities to help students understand and apply interpersonal communication principles. 

COMM 391. Intercultural Communication Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 
See COMM 291 for course description. 

COMM 397. Communication Research 3 hours 

Introduces students to scientific inquiry and the basic research techniques of advertising, 
communication, journalism, and public relations. Uses interdisciplinary approach to explain 
research methodology and to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations of 
different research designs. Helps students understand the importance of the development 
and exchange of scholarly information. This class should be completed before taking 400 
level classes in the School of Journalism & Communication. 

COMM 406. Persuasion and Propaganda (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PREL 406. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
Historical origin and contemporary uses of propaganda: the concept of public opinion; 
motivational tools and techniques to achieve public response; characteristics of public and 
how they are influenced. 



Course Descriptions 247 



COMM 412. Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 hour 

This course is made up of a series of topics presented in a seminar setting to provide 
students with necessary tools to actively pursue and acquire internships and jobs. Topics will 
include but are not limited to: resumes, networking, corporate climate, interviewing, dress, 
portfolios, company research, and etiquette. Besides listening to guest presentations, 
opportunities will exist to interact with guest lecturers and professors about thoughts and 
theories regardingthe area of job acquisition. (Winter) 

COMM 465. Topics 1-3 hours 

See COMM 265 for course description. 

COMM 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See COMM 295 for course description. 

Cooperative Education 

COOP 265/465. Cooperative Education 1-6 hours 

This course allows students to receive credit for work experience. The assignments must be 
a specific program designed as an internship with an agreed upon description of the type of 
work, arrangements for supervision, and methods of evaluation. One hour of credit requires 
a minimum of 50 work hours. A maximum of six credit hours of cooperative education may 
be applied to a degree. 

Hardware and Embedded Systems 

CPHE 200. Digital Logic and Design 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 220. 

Digital design principles and implementation of digital systems. Number systems, Boolean 
algebra, architectural concepts, combinational and sequential logic, combinational datapath 
elements, memory, I/O design, CAD tools, project design methodologies, and logic synthesis. 
The objective of this course is to prepare the essential and rudimentary basis for students to 
become the next generation of digital circuit designers. Three hours of lecture and three 
hours of laboratory each week. (Fall) 

CPHE 295. Directed Study in Hardware and Embedded Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 

Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of computer science students. 
Formal written report required. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. 

CPHE 310. Introduction to Signal Processing 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 182. 

Introduction to signal processing for discrete-time and continuous-time signals. Filtering, 
frequency response, Fourier transform, Z transform, and sampling. Laboratory emphasizes 
computer-based signal processing. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each 
week. (Fall, odd years) 

CPHE 320. Circuit Analysis 4 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 212, 214. 

Basic concepts of DC and AC circuit theory and analysis. Basic concepts of circuit behavior, 
circuit analysis theorems and methods, RLC circuits and introduction to microelectronics. 
Introduction to test and measurement instrumentation, experimental techniques for analysis 
and characterization of electrical circuits, and technical writing and documentation skills. 
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. (Winter, even years) 

CPHE 380. Microcontroller Design 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 220. 

Microcontroller structure, instruction set and addressing modes. Introduction to embedded 
system development, microcontroller resource allocation, assembly and C language 
programming, interrupt handlers, real-time operation, timing and basic communication 
interfaces. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. (Fall, even years) 



248 Course Descriptions 



CPHE 410. Computer Interfacing 4 hours 

Prerequisites: CPHE 380; CPTR 220. 

Fundamentals of computer interfacing and embedded system development. Processors, 
chipsets, commercial busses, and I/O devices for high-end embedded systems. Embedded 
and real-time operating systems, device drivers, multitasking, instruction set architectures, 
DMA, common bus standards, and current I/O interfaces. The laboratory component 
emphasizes a team design experience and requires students to incorporate concepts from 
the lecture into a capstone embedded system design project. Three hours of lecture and 
three hours of laboratory each week. (Winter, odd years) 

CPHE 495. Directed Study in Hardware and Embedded Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 
See CPHE 295 for course description. 



Information Systems 



CPIS 210. Information Technology Hardware and Software 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 103; skills in using PCs, Word Processing, Spreadsheets, and Database software. 

Hardware: CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets, 
multi processors versus single processors; peripheral devices: hard disks, CDs, video display 
monitors, device controllers, input/output; operating systems functions and types; operating 
systems modules: processes, process management memory and file systems management; 
examples of hardware architectures; examples of operating systems; basic network 
components, switches, multiplexers and media; installation and configuration of multiuser 
operating systems. (Fall) 

CPIS 220. Applications Programming (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 124. 

This course focuses on the design and implementation of business computing systems 
utilizing a modern programming environment such as Visual Basic and/or Dephi. (Winter) 

CPIS 265. Topics in Computer Information Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Topics selected from areas of computer information systems not covered in other courses. 
May be repeated with permission. 

CPIS 295. Directed Study in Computer Information Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 

Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of computer information systems 
students. Formal written report required. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. 

CPIS 315. Requirements and System Analysis 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; CPIS 220. 

Requirements analysis. Object-oriented analysis and design. Use of data modeling tools. 
Emphasizes the factors for effective communications and integration with users and user 
systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, users, team members, 
and other associated with development, operation, and maintenance of the system. (Fall) 

CPIS 430. Physical Design and Implementation 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPIS 315; CPTR 319. 

Selection of development environments and standards; software construction; structured, 
event driven and object-oriented application design; testing; software quality assurance; 
system implementation; user training; system delivery; post implementation review; 
configuration management; maintenance; reverse engineering and re-engineering; 
distributed systems; design and implementation of net-centric applications. (Winter) 



Course Descriptions 249 



CPIS 435. Project Management and Practice 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; CPIS 315; Co-requisite: CPTR 319 or CPIS 430. 

Managing the system life cycle; requirements determination, logical design, physical design, 
testing, implementation; system and database integration issues; network and client-server 
management; metrics for project management and system performance evaluation; 
managing expectations; superiors, users, team members and others related to the project; 
determining skill requirements and staffing the project; cost-effectiveness analysis; reporting 
and presentation techniques; effective management of both behavioral and technical 
aspects of the project; change management. (Winter) 

CPIS 442. Software Evaluation 2 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 124. 

This course focuses on methods for evaluating popular application software packages. 
Performance and feature evaluation, reliability, usability, maintainability, security issues, and 
licensing issues. (Fall) 

CPIS 465. Topics in Computer Information Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
See CPIS 265 for course description. 

CPIS 495. Directed Study in Computer Information Systems 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 
See CPIS 295 for course description. 

Computer Technology 

CPTE 100. Computer Concepts (A-4) 1 hour 

Important computer competencies including understanding how the history of computers 
and the Internet can aid in our capability to prepare for future changes in computing 
technology, the ability to appreciate the potential and limitations of computers and the 
Internet, how to maintain a "healthy" personal computer system, and how to use computers 
and the Internet safely, responsibly, and effectively. 

CPTE 105. Introduction to Word Processing (A-4) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: A typing course or permission of instructor. 

Creating, editing and formatting documents; creating multiple-page reports; simple desktop 
publishing; mail merge; creating styles, outlines, tables, table of contents, form letters, 
mailing labels, and web pages; collaborating with others on a document. 

CPTE 106. Introduction to Spreadsheets (A-4) 1 hour 

Using spreadsheet software to manage data, use formulas and functions, develop 
professional-looking spreadsheets, create charts and graphs, manage lists, work with 
multiple spreadsheets and files, use editing and web tools, and develop spreadsheet 
applications. 

CPTE 107. Introduction to Database (A-4) 1 hour 

Using database software to manage data, create and manage a database, query a database, 
create forms and reports, create advanced queries, create custom forms, create custom 
reports, integrate the database with the Web and with other software applications. 

CPTE 109. Presentation Technology (A-4) 1 hour 

An investigation of various presentation software packages and their use in making effective 
presentations. General presentation design, graphics for presentations, use of animation, 
video and sound in presentations, and display technology. Students will design, create, 
enhance and use electronic overheads, outlines, speaker's notes, and audience handouts. 

CPTE 110. Introduction to Web Development (A-4) 1 hour 

Web development using HTML. Designing and developing web sites using web site creation 
software. Maintaining and updating web sites. 



250 Course Descriptions 



CPTE 212. Web Programming 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 124. 

Pre- or co-requisite: JOUR 242 or CPTE 110 or permission of instructor. 

Programming for e-commerce using the World Wide Web. Application architecture, 
languages, scripting tools, HTML editors, Web design packages and authoring tools. (Fall) 

CPTE 228. Becoming a Power User 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Basic skills in using PC operating systems: word processing, spreadsheet, and database software 
Developing high-level skills in using both applications and systems software: Windows OS, 
Windows Server, utilities, word processor, spreadsheet, database, presentation, charting, 
and planning programs. Integrating applications. Building new applications using off-the- 
shelf software packages. (Winter) 

CPTE 245. Computer-Aided Publishing (A-4) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTE 100. 

This course is cross-listed with BUAD 245/345, School of Business and Management. A student may receive credit 

for this course from only one school. 

An introductory course in the use of the computer as an aid in publishing materials such as 
newsletters, flyers, programs. The course gives training in the preparation of camera-ready 
documents without conventional paste-up and typesetting services using specialized 
desktop publishing software. 

CPTE 254. UNIX Systems Administration 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTE 228. 

Installation and management of UNIX operating systems in the business environment. Use of 
common UNIX tools for support and administration. Comparison of common UNIX variants. 
(Fall) 

CPTE 265. Topics in Computer Technology 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Topics selected from areas of computer technology not covered in other courses. May be 
repeated with permission. 

CPTE 295. Directed Study in Computer Technology 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 

Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of technical computer support 
students. Formal written report required. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. 

CPTE 316. Application Software Support 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing: CPTE 228 

This course focuses on methods of mastering applications software in order to be able to 
provide technical support. Practice in mastering a wide range of software applications. 
Software troubleshooting. Interpersonal issues relative to giving support to non-technical 
personnel. Mentoring and software training issues. (Winter) 

CPTE 345. Computer-Aided Publishing (A-4) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTE 100. 

This course is cross-listed with BUAD 245/345, School of Business and Management. A student may receive credit 

for this course from only one school. 

See CPTE 245 for course description. 

CPTE 433. Network Administration 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; CPTR 328 or permission of instructor. 

Network administration to support internal operations and e-commerce. The role of the 
supervisor in managing user accounts, file systems, directories, security systems, resources, 
etc. Managing backups, printers, application, and operating system updates and Internet 
connections. (Winter) 

CPTE 465. Topics in Computer Technology 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See CPTE 265 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 251 



CPTE 495. Directed Study in Computer Technology 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and school dean. 
See CPTE 295 for course description. 

Computer Science 

CPTR 103. Principles of Computing (A-4) 3 hours 

A comprehensive introduction to the many areas of computing, including algorithmic 
problem solving, computer organization, operating systems, networking, net-centric 
computing, e-commerce and information systems. Introduction to the key issues and 
concepts throughout the field. Social and ethical issues in computing. (Fall) 

CPTR 124. Fundamentals of Programming (G-2) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Math ACT >=22 or MATH 107 or permission of instructor. 

Control structures, data types, data representation, compiling, debugging, modularity, and 
standard programming algorithms are introduced, using an object-oriented language. Three 
hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. 

CPTR 209. Introduction to Software Engineering 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 215 or CPIS 220. 

Techniques for the management, development and maintenance of large complex software 
systems. Life cycle issues, requirements and domain analysis, architecture and formal and 
human-computer interaction design, implementation, testing, and quality assurance. 
Netcentric computing. Team projects. (Winter) 

CPTR 215. Fundamentals of Software Design (G-2) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 124. 

Introduction to software design methods. Elementary data structures. Development of 
reliable, modifiable programs. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each 
week. (Winter) 

CPTR 220. Organization, Architecture and Assembly Language 4 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 103, 124. 

Basic machine organization and architecture. Processor components, instruction sets, 
memory types and hierarchy. Introduction to data representation, instruction formats, 
addressing techniques, and assembly language. Three hours of lecture and three hours of 
laboratory each week. (Winter) 

CPTR 265. Topics in Computer Science 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Topics selected from areas of computer science not covered in other courses. Possible 
topics include: neural networks, information retrieval, distributed computing, advanced 
compiler design, computer architecture, advanced operating systems, systems 
programming, visualization of data, computer simulation, and parallel computing. May be 
repeated with permission. 

CPTR 292. Computing Internship 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and school dean. 

Individual or group work in current computing technologies. May be repeated for credit up to 
six hours. 

CPTR 295. Directed Study in Computer Science 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and school dean. 

Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of computer science students. 
Formal written report required. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. 



252 Course Descriptions 



CPTR 314. Data Structures, Algorithms and Knowledge Systems 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; CPTR 215; MATH 120 or equivalent. Recommended: MATH 

181. 

Advanced data structures including heaps, hash tables, height-balanced trees, and graphs. 
Techniques for data abstraction. Algorithms that have application in many areas of computer 
science including searching, sorting, and graph algorithms. Recursive algorithms. Analysis of 
algorithms including time and space complexity analysis. Criteria for choosing data 
structures and algorithms. Fundamental issues in intelligent systems, search and constraint 
satisfaction, knowledge representation, and reasoning. (Fall) 

CPTR 319. Database Management Systems 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 103 and CPIS 220 or CPTE 212 or CPTR 215. 

Introduction to database management systems, including data modeling, query languages 
and processing, database design, data integrity and security. Issues related to distributed 
database systems, object-oriented database systems, and legacy database systems are also 
discussed. (Winter) 

CPTR 327. User Interface Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 124. 

Applying the basic principles of human-computer interaction to the design of computer 
interfaces. Analysis of interface design and system integration problems. Comparison of 
standard graphical user interfaces (GUI) and application of guidelines for window, menu, and 
other dialogue techniques. Evaluate usability and compare interface design methodologies. 
(Fall) 

CPTR 328. Principles of Networking 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 103. 

Principles and issues related to computer networking and data communications. Network 
topologies, network protocols, network models, routing, congestion control, Internetworking, 
security and privacy. (Fall) 

CPTR 365. Operating Systems 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; CPTR 220, 314. 

Detailed study of operating system concepts. Process management, scheduling, time slicing, 
concurrency, mutual exclusion, semaphores, resource management, memory mapping, 
virtual systems, mass storage, file systems, and security. Case studies of operating systems. 
(Fall) 

CPTR 405. Organization of Programming Languages 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 215, 220. Recommended: CPTR 314. 

Computer language definition via formal syntax and semantics. Design and implementation 
issues of features found in most programming languages but including some features found 
only in modern programming languages. Programming language paradigms. (Winter) 

CPTR 412. Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 hour 

This course is made up of a series of topics presented in a seminar setting to provide 
students with necessary tools to actively pursue and acquire internships and jobs. Topics will 
include but are not limited to: resumes, networking, corporate climate, interviewing, dress, 
portfolios, company research, etiquette. Besides listening to guest presentations, 
opportunities will exist to interact with guest lecturers and professors about thoughts and 
theories regardingthe area of job acquisition. (Winter) 

CPTR 415. Compiler Construction 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 405; MATH 280. 

Principles and techniques of lexical analysis, parsing, semantic analysis, code generation, 
and optimization. Students will be required to design and implement a functional compiler 
for a given programming language. (Winter, even numbered years) 



Course Descriptions 253 



CPTR 418. Artificial Intelligence 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 314. 

Search techniques and methods of knowledge representation. Application to areas such as 
planning, learning, expert systems, neural networks, intelligent agents, natural language 
processing, image processing, and speech recognition. Introduction to the languages used in 
Al. (Fall, even numbered years) 

CPTR 425. Computer Graphics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 314; MATH 182. Recommended: MATH 200. 

This course teaches the principles of generating graphical images on a computer with an 
emphasis on the underlying mathematical theory and its programming implementations. 
Topics include graphics primitives, windowing techniques, clipping, 2-D and 3-D 
transformations, projections, 3-D viewing techniques, cubic interpolating and approximating 
curves, bicubic 3-D surface patches, fractal curves and surfaces, hidden line and surface 
removal, shading, surface mapping, ray tracing, animation techniques. (Fall, odd numbered 
years) 

CPTR 427. Network Security 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 328. Recommended: CPTE 254. 

This course provides an overview to key issues and solutions for information security and 
privacy. Introduction to cryptography and its application to network and operating system 
security; security threats; applications of cryptography; secret key and public key 
cryptographic algorithms; hash functions; basic number theory; authentication; security for 
electronic mail and network scripting languages. (Winter) 

CPTR 430. Algorithms 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 314; MATH 181, 280. 

Techniques for the design and analysis of algorithms, divide-and-conquer, greedy, and 
dynamic programming algorithms. Computational complexity and analysis of particular 
algorithms of practical or theoretical importance in computer science. (Fall, even numbered 
years) 

CPTR 442. Theory of Computation 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 314; MATH 280. 

Formal models of computation such as finite state automata, push-down automata and 
Turing machines. Formal languages. Computability and complexity theory along with the 
practical implications of theoretical results. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

CPTR 446. Web Services 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTE 212 or CPTR 209. 

This is a practical course in web-centric computing from the server perspective. Topics 
include selection of web services servers, technical architecture of web services sites, 
security issues, implementation, management and maintenance of web services servers, 
web services design, and database integration. (Winter) 

CPTR 465. Topics in Computer Science 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See CPTR 265 for course description. 

CPTR 486. Senior Seminar (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Computing; Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

Written and oral reports are made on specific topics treated in current computer science 
literature. Resume writing, interviewing, application to graduate school, GRE testing, social 
and professional issues, witnessing on the job and at graduate school are also discussed. A 
comprehensive assessment exam will be taken as a class requirement. (Winter) 

CPTR 488. Senior Project 2 hours 

Team-based, capstone project that demonstrates the student's ability to integrate various 
elements of the undergraduate computer science experience. Project will include proposal, 
implementation, and presentation phases. Particular attention will be given to literature 
review, budgeting, societal effects, and design process. (Fall) 



254 Course Descriptions 



CPTR 492. Computing Internship 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and school dean. 
See CPTR 292 for course description. 

CPTR 495. Directed Study in Computer Science 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and school dean. 
See CPTR 295 for course description. 

Economics 

ECON213. Survey of Economics (C-2) 3 hours 

A course designed for the general education student. It provides an understanding of the 
United States' mixed economy through a study of the market system, the role of money, the 
government's fiscal policy, and the impact of the foreign sector. No credit is available if ECON 
224 or 225 has been taken. This course does not apply for credit to a BBA or BS Business 
major. 

ECON 224. Principles of Macroeconomics (C-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PLSC 224, History Department. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

A study of economics as it affects the national interest. Topics include total employment, 
output and income, with inflation and recession, and with the variables that influence these 
conditions. (Fall) 

ECON 225. Principles of Microeconomics (C-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ECON 224, PLSC 224, a high school economic class, or consent of instructor. 

Analyzes specific market environments which influence business policy. Topics include 
scarcity and choice, individual goods and markets, and the price mechanism showing how it 
automatically directs the society's resources into the most desirable uses. (Winter) 

ECON 265. Topics in Economics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

ECON 452. Money and Banking 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ECON 224. 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE452. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the Federal Reserve 

System, and other financial institutions are considered. (Winter) 

ECON 465. Topics in Economics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See ECON 265 for course description. 

Outdoor Education 

EDOE 301. Outdoor Ministries 3 hours 

This course is designed to assist teachers and youth leaders in the development of 
relationships between children and nature for the purpose of enriching the spiritual life of 
children and youth. The student will learn to plan object lessons from nature and how to 
enliven Sabbath School programs with nature. Leadership in Pathfindering and summer 
camp ministries will be emphasized. A variety of laboratory skills will be required in area 
school and church programs (up to 30 hours). A knowledge of nature is suggested but not 
required. An extended off-campus trip is required. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this 
course. 



Course Descriptions 255 



EDOE 345. Environmental Education 2 hours 

This course is designed to give "hands-on" learning in the use of the outdoor classroom. 
Recent trends in methods, materials, strategies, laboratory techniques, assessment, and 
professional guidelines for the elementary and senior high school curriculum will be covered. 
Up to four (4) days field experience will be required as a part of the class project. Lab fee 6 
will be assessed for this course. 

Education 

EDUC 129. Introduction to and Foundations of Elementary Education 3 hours 

This course is designed to give college students an opportunity to be immersed in their first 
Professional Development School experience and is required of all students seeking 
elementary education licensure. Additionally, weekly focused reading and discussion will 
include teaching as a profession, current issues and trends (e.g. the natural learning cycle) 
in public and Seventh-day Adventist education, as well as the foundations and history of 
education. Practical experience in diverse classroom settings is gained while assigned to an 
elementary class. Students will be required to show evidence of passing a Tennessee Board 
of Investigation background check prior to entering the classroom. 

EDUC 138. Introduction to and Foundations of Secondary Education 3 hours 

This course is designed to give college students an opportunity to be immersed in their first 
Professional Development School experience and is required of all students seeking 
secondary education licensure. Practical experience in diverse classroom settings is gained 
while assigned to a secondary class. Additionally, weekly focused reading and discussion will 
include teaching as a profession, current issues and trends (e.g. the natural learning cycle) 
in public and Seventh-day Adventist education, as well as the foundations and history of 
education. Students will be required to show evidence of passing a Tennessee Bureau of 
Investigation background check priorto enteringthe classroom. 

EDUC 217. Psychological Foundations of Education (F-l) 2 hours 

The study of psychological information and its application to the processes of teaching and 
learning. The course covers subjects such as theories of learning, pupil characteristics, pupil 
variability, culture and community, motivation, creating learning environments, and student 
assessment. 

EDUC 220. Growth Years (F-l) 3 hours 

A study of life from the prenatal period through the adolescent years. Although the course 
incorporates a holistic perspective and integrates dimensions of physical, social, emotional, 
and moral development, particular emphasis is given to cognitive development and to the 
applications of cognitive processes to the teaching/learning environment. 

EDUC 232. Survey of Children's Literature 2 hours 

A survey of children's literature K-8. Each genre of children's literature will be explored. 
Emphasis is placed on reading for relationship and pleasure, reading aloud as a teaching 
strategy, and using literature to enhance the curriculum. 

EDUC 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to pursue independent 
study in special fields. This course may be repeated for credit. 

EDUC 319. Technology in Education (A-4) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTE 100 and 105 or equivalent high school computer class. 

This course examines educational technology as an effective means for supporting 
instruction and maximizing learning. Particular emphasis is given to the selection, 
development, and utilization of electronic instructional media, as well as educational issues 
related to the use of technology. Students participate in a variety of hands-on experiences in 
the utilization of technology resources, as well as in the creation of technology-rich learning 
elements and environments. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. Note: This course 
meets the technology requirements for NAD recertification. 



256 Course Descriptions 



EDUC 320. Emergent Literacy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 

This course is a professional development experience designed to prepare K-2 teachers to 
incorporate developmentally appropriate practices supporting literacy in the instructional 
program. The course will focus on a comprehensive study of evidence-based practices 
related to phonemic awareness, phonics, reading and writing process, spelling, and oral 
language. A minimum of twelve (12) hours of field experience is required. (Fall) 

EDUC 322. Educational Research and Statistics (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 

This course examines research methodology as well as basic descriptive and inferential 
statistics. The emphasis is on the practical aspects of educational research, including 
research proposals and the critique of published research. APA style and computer-aided 
analysis will be required. (Fall) 

EDUC 325. Philosophy of Christian Education (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of the instructor. 

A study of the scriptural principles and philosophic base of Christian education as 
expounded by Ellen G. White and implemented by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

EDUC 330. Library Materials for Children 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 

This course presents to the student a knowledge of a wide variety of books and related 
materials for children, grades K-8. Develops an appreciation for books and reading that can 
be enthusiastically transmitted to young readers through critical evaluation and selection of 
books and materials. Correlates the use of books and materials to the specific needs and 
interests of young readers. 

EDUC 332. Elementary Reading Methods 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Survey of the materials and methods used in teaching reading in the elementary grades. It 
emphasizes the approaches to teaching reading including phonics instruction. Fifteen (15) 
hours of observations, micro-teaching, and field experience are required. 

EDUC 335. Reading and Language Arts Methods 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Survey of the principles and methods used for effective and evidence-based literacy 
instruction. Emphasis is placed on creating literacy frameworks including literature focus 
units, reading and writing workshops, and basal approaches. Students will learn methods for 
teaching literacy strategies and skills that apply to all content areas. An intensive 
culminating field experience in conjunction with EDUC 421 and EDUC 458 will provide 
opportunities for application. (Winter) 

EDUC 336. Language Acquisition and Development 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC336. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
This course will explore the process of language acquisition through its developmental 
stages (from infancy through adulthood). A review of literature will expand on visual, 
auditory and information processing disorders as well as the major theories of language 
acquisition and development. Five (5) hours of field experience observations are required. 
(Fall) 

EDUC 340. Foundations of Inclusive Education 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of instructor. 

This course is based on the assumption that all students are capable of learning. The course 
seeks to familiarize teacher candidates with the broad range of exceptionalities found in 
elementary and secondary classrooms. Emphasis is placed on learning to differentiate 
instruction (e.g. the natural learning cycle) to meet the needs of diverse students in inclusive 
classrooms. Based on a professional development school experience, this course will include 
an action research project. 



Course Descriptions 257 



EDUC 356. Classroom Assessment 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of school dean. 

This class is designed to prepare preservice teachers in developing, administrating, scoring, 
and reporting different types of assessments for diverse learners. Ten (10) hours of clinical 
and field experience are required. 

EDUC 421. Behavior Management— Elementary 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course examines basic principles of behavior management applicable to diverse 
learners. A variety of philosophical approaches to discipline are reviewed and discussed as 
students observe in a professional development school setting. An intensive culminating 
field experience in conjunction with EDUC 335 and EDUC 458 will provide opportunities for 
application. (Winter) 

EDUC 422. Behavior Management— Secondary 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course analyzes basic assumptions and techniques of classroom management models 
applying them to case studies. Issues of diversity are discussed. Ten (10) hours of field 
experience are required. (Fall) 

EDUC 423. Adolescent Psychology 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC422. A student may receive credit for this course form only one program. 
Prerequisite: EDUC 220. 

See PSYC 422 for course description. 

EDUC 426. K-2 Multiage Methods 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Designed to give the student an understanding of administration, program planning, 
materials, and strategies for teaching in kindergarten and multiage classrooms. Emphasis is 
given to application of the principles of child development and learning to promote 
harmonious physical, mental, social, and emotional growth. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours 
of observations, micro-teaching, and field experience are required. 

EDUC 434. Literacy in the Content Areas 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course will help teachers focus on those literacy skills essential for the needs of each 
student. It will include modeling the process necessary for literacy and learning concepts in a 
subject area and instructing students so they can become independent learners. The 
development of vocabulary, comprehension and study/reference skills in grades 7-12 will be 
covered. Causes of literacy problems, assessment procedures, and organization of a sound 
literacy program are stressed. Principles learned will be applied in classroom settings. A 
minimum of ten (10) hours of field experiences is required. This course meets secondary 
reading methods requirements. 

EDUC 437. Curriculum and General Methods, Grades 7-12 1 hour 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and EDUC 356. 

This course will include the secondary curriculum content— factors that influence change, the 
most important current practices, and critical curriculum issues facing educators today. It 
will provide general knowledge of current teaching methods, strategies of learning, and 
evaluation procedures. A minimum often (10) hours of field-based experience is required. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods, Grades 7-12 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The majors which require methods courses are: Biology, Chemistry, English, French, History, 
Mathematics, Physics, Religious Education, and Spanish. Directed observation in selected 
schools and attendance at local professional meetings are considered part of this course. 
Among the student's responsibilities will be the collection and organization of a file of 
teaching materials, the preparation of lesson plans as set forth in the Teacher Education 
Program, and evaluation of textbooks. Twenty (20) hours of field experiences in selected 
schools and attendance at selected local professional meetings are considered a part of the 
course. 



258 Course Descriptions 



EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Biology 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction; planning, testing, and evaluating 
student performance; and the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Chemistry 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Pre- or co-requisite: CHEM 312. 

Attention is given to national science education standards, methods and materials of 
instruction, planning, testing, and evaluating student performance, the survey and 
evaluation of textbooks, and the planning of laboratory experiments, including safety 
considerations and waste disposal. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum and Content Methods/English, Grades 7-12 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is designed to be the final step before students are placed for their student 
teaching practicum. As such, the class combines discussion, guided practice in various 
teaching activities, and actual teaching experience in area middle schools and high 
schools/academies. Attention is given to Southern Union and Tennessee curriculum 
standards, as well as methods and materials of planning, instruction, and evaluating student 
performance. Requirements for both state and denominational certification are addressed, 
including PRAXIS test preparation. 

EDUC. 438. Curriculum Content Methods/History 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and evaluating 
student performances, and the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Languages 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of language instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performance; they survey and evaluation of textbooks appropriate for 
language teaching and learning is also included. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Mathematics 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and evaluating 
student performance, and the survey and evaluation of textbooks. (Fall, odd years) 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Physics 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and evaluating 
student performance, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

EDUC 438. Curriculum Content Methods/Religion 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials construction, planning, testing and evaluating 
student performance, and the survey and evaluation of textbooks. (As needed) 

EDUC 450. Reading Assessment and Instruction 3 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 335. 

An advanced course in comprehensive reading instruction. Candidates will become familiar 
with classroom reading assessments that inform effective reading instruction. An action 
research project is embedded in an intensive field experience of at least two hours weekly 
for the second half of the semester. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 259 



EDUC 453. Mathematics Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Includes curriculum organization, materials, methods, and instructional aids with emphasis 
on multi-grade classrooms. Attention is given to the sequential skill development and to 
changes in the mathematical contents, technology and pedagogy. Observation and 
micro-teaching required. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of observations, micro-teaching, 
and field experience is required. 

EDUC 454. Science and Health Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Includes curriculum organization, methods, materials and equipment with emphasis on 
multi-grade classrooms. Techniques and materials are examined using basic principles of 
the scientific method. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of observations, micro-teaching, and 
field experience is required. 

EDUC 455. Bible Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A course to develop teaching objectives, materials, and strategies in Biblical education with 
emphasis on the Christ-centered curriculum and integration of faith and learning. Special 
attention will be given to multigrade classrooms. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of 
observations, micro-teaching, and field experience is required. 

EDUC 456. Language Arts Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Curriculum organization, methods, materials, and instructional aids with emphasis on 
multigrade classrooms. Strategies for instruction in writing, spelling, grammar, literature, and 
composition are developed. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of observations, micro- 
teaching, and field experience is required. 

EDUC 457. Social Studies Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A course to develop teaching objectives, instructional strategies, materials, and methods 
when integrating social studies, geography, and the worldwide mission of the church. Special 
attention will be given to multi-grade classrooms. A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of 
observations, micro-teaching, and field experience is required. 

EDUC 458. K-6 Teaching Methods and Strategies 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course focuses on applied K-6 curriculum content for Mathematics, Science, Health, 
Social Studies and Bible. It will provide a general knowledge of current teaching methods, 
strategies of learning, lesson planning, evaluation, textbook selection, and critical issues 
facing education today. An intensive culminating field experience in conjunction with EDUC 
335 and EDUC 421 will provide opportunities for application. (Winter) 

EDUC 463. Small Schools Seminar 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Required of all candidates seeking licensure K-8. Topics will include the specialized needs of 
the multi-grade teacher in administration, record keeping, curriculum management, and 
organization in small schools. (Winter) 

EDUC 464. Teaching Seminar 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. 

This course is designed to provide candidates with opportunities to enhance the student 
teaching experience through in-depth discussion and analysis of topics relevant to student 
teaching. The seminar will include an overview of major principles/theories of learning and 
teaching as they relate to actual classroom practice. Practitioners will make presentations 
related to areas of the teaching experience. Guidance will be given in the development and 
presentation of the Student Teaching Portfolio. 



260 Course Descriptions 



EDUC 465. Pre-Session Practicum 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. 

This course is designed to give experience in the "start up" dynamics of elementary 
programs. It involves 40 clock hours of on-site work with a qualified supervising teacher for 
two (2) weeks prior to the Fall Semester. The student is required to arrange for his/her own 
placement and to submit a practicum application to the School of Education and Psychology 
office by May 15 of the year in which the practicum is to be done. 

EDUC 471. Enhanced Student Teaching K-6 10 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. 

Co-requisite: EDUC 464. 

Designed as a full-time practicum for one semester. Students are assigned to two (2) 
placements (K-3, 4-6). Cooperating teachers, determined by the district and university 
personnel, are selected according to experience, certification, and competence, and share 
supervision responsibilities with university faculty, who assume responsibility for the final 
summative evaluation. 

EDUC 472. Enhanced Student Teaching 7-12 10 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. 

Co-requisite: EDUC 464. 

Designed as a full-time practicum for one semester. Students are assigned to two (2) 
placements (7-8, 9-12). Cooperating teachers, determined by the district and university 
personnel, are selected according to experience, certification, and competence, and share 
supervision responsibilities with university faculty, who assume responsibility for the final 
summative evaluation. 

EDUC 473. Enhanced Student Teaching K-12 10 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. 

Co-requisite: EDUC 464. 

Designed as a full-time practicum for one semester. Students are assigned to three (3) 
placements (K-4, 5-8, 9-12). The time spent will be approximately six weeks in each area. 
Cooperating teachers, determined by the district and university personnel, are selected 
according to experience, certification, and competence, and share supervision 
responsibilities with university faculty, who assume responsibility for the final summative 
evaluation. 

EDUC 475. Workshop in Education (Methodology) 1-3 hours 

Experienced teachers are given opportunity to work under supervision on curriculum 
problems. Credit is also available for preservice students as an elective. 

EDUC 485. Workshop in Education (Content) 1-3 hours 

Experienced teachers are given opportunity to develop new skills and gather new facts in 
content fields at various levels. Credit is also available for preservice students as an elective. 

EDUC 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 
See EDUC 295 for course description. 



English Language Skills 



EESL 031. Language Skills I: Writing 1 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 450-474 (CBT 133-151; IBT 45-52) 

A study of the steps in the writing process, the parts of the paragraph and basic essay, and 
several important patterns of organization. Emphasis on sentence structure and practice in 
academic writing skills. Students who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve 
the minimum designated TOEFL score of 475 (CBT 152: IBT 53) will be required to repeat 
the course. A fee for the TOEFL test will be charged to the student's account. 



Course Descriptions 261 



EESL 032. Language Skills I: Writing 2 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 475-499 (CBT 152-172; IBT 53-60) 

A study of the steps in the writing process, the parts of the paragraph and the basic essay, 
and several important patterns of organization. Emphasis on sentence structure and 
practice in academic writing skills. Students who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and 
achieve the minimum designated TOEFL score of 500 (CBT 173; IBT 61) will be required to 
repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test will be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 041. Language Skills I: Grammar 1 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 450-474 (CBT 133-151; IBT 45-52) 

A study of form, meaning and use of standard American English grammar. Emphasis on the 
application of correct grammatical structures in spoken and written English. Students who 
do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL score 
of 475 (CBT 152; IBT 53) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test will 
be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 042. Language Skills I: Grammar 2 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 475-499 (CBT 152-172; IBT 53-60) 

A study of form, meaning and use of standard American English grammar. Emphasis on the 
application of correct grammatical structures in spoken and written English. Students who 
do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL score 
of 500 (CBT 173; IBT 61) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test will 
be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 051. Language Skills I: Reading/Discourse 1 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 450-474 (CBT 133-151; IBT 45-52) 

A student of basic reading strategies and practice in analysis of interpretation. Emphasis 
also given to oral communication skills in academic and non-academic situations. Students 
who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL 
score of 475 (CBT 152; IBT 53) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test 
will be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 052. Language Skills I: Reading/Discourse 2 3 hours (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 475-499 (CBT 152-172; IBT 53-60) 

A study of basic reading strategies and practice in analysis of interpretation. Emphasis also 
given to oral communication skills in academic and non-academic situations. Students who 
do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL score 
of 500 (CBT 173; IBT 61) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test will 
be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 061. Language Skills I: TOEFL Preparation 1 hour (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the ESL program 

A course designed to help Intermediate students prepare for the TOEFL test, giving practice 
and experience in all areas of the test. 

EESL 121. Language Skills II: Grammar 1 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 500-525(CBT 173-195; IBT 61-70), and for students who have entered the 
program with TOEFL scores below 500 (CBT 173; IBT 61), a minimum grade of C in each of the Language Skills I 
classes. 

This course focuses on the use of grammar to help improve writing effectiveness. Students 
who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL 
score of 525 (CBT 196; IBT 71) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test 
will be charged to the student's account. 



262 Course Descriptions 



EESL 122. Language Skills II: Grammar 2 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 525-549 (CBT 196-212; IBT 71-79), and for students who have entered the 
program with TOEFL scores below 525 (CBT 196; IBT 70), a minimum grade of C in each of the Language Skills I 
classes. 

This course focuses on the use of grammar to help improve writing effectiveness. Students 
who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated TOEFL 
score of 550 (CBT 213; IBT 80) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the TOEFL test 
will be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 131. Language Skills II: Writing/Reading 1 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 500-524 (CBT 173-195; IBT 61-70), and for students who have entered the 
program with TOEFL scores below 500 (CBT 173; IBT 61), a minimum grade of C in each of the Language Skills I 
classes. 

An integrated course to develop writing and reading skills for academic related situations. 

Students who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated 

TOEFL score of 525 (CBT 196; IBT 71) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the 

TOEFL test will be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 132. Language Skills II: Writing/Reading 2 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TOEFL score between 525-549 (CBT 196-212; IBT 71-79), and for students who have entered the 
program with TOEFL scores below 525 (CBT 196; IBT 70), a minimum grade of C in each of the Language Skills I 
classes. 

An integrated course to develop writing and reading skills for academic related situations. 

Students who do not both earn a minimum grade of C and achieve the minimum designated 

TOEFL score of 550 (CBT 213; IBT 80) will be required to repeat the course. A fee for the 

TOEFL test will be charged to the student's account. 

EESL 141. Language Skills II: TOEFL Preparation 1 hour (non-credit) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the EESL program 

A course designed to help Advanced students prepare for the TOEFL test, giving practice and 
experience in all areas of the test. 

Literature 

ELIT 214. Survey of American Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

A study of representative selections from major American authors, colonial through modern, 
with emphasis on ideas, attitudes, and trends having individual, national, and universal 
interest. (Fall) 

ELIT 215. Survey of English Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

A study of representative selections by British writers, with special emphasis on the author's 
philosophy as compared or contrasted with Bible-based thinking, and a review of literary 
trends and influences from the late Roman period to the present. Among writers receiving 
strong attention are Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Wordsworth. 

ELIT 216. Approaches to Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

In this course students read and interpret short stories, poems, and drama in terms of 
current literary theories. Students acquire the basic tools and vocabulary to analyze a 
variety of diverse works including the Bible as literature. Students have interactive 
opportunities to develop philosophical and professional values which can guide them in 
making wise reading and viewing decisions. 

ELIT 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the student. This 
course may be repeated for credit. 



Course Descriptions 263 



ELIT 323. Nineteenth-Century American Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is a chronological study of some of the most important works of American 
literature written during the nineteenth century. Significant authors in this course are 
Washington Irving, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Henry 
David Thoreau, Henry James, and Mark Twain. (Fall) 

ELIT 332. Studies in Medieval Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

A study of literary selections from the English Medieval period. Emphasis placed on the 
works of Old English poetry (including Beowulf), translations of the Bible ranging from 
Caedmon in the seventh century to Wycliffe in the fourteenth century, Arthurian legends, 
Chaucer, sources and analogues of the works, and twentieth-century criticism. (Fall, odd 
years) 

ELIT 333. Studies in Renaissance Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

A survey of literary selections from religious and secular poetry, prose, and drama of the 
English Renaissance period (1485-1608). Emphasis placed on the works of Spencer, 
Shakespeare, Sydney, and translations of the English Bible from Tyndale's New Testament to 
the Authorized (King James) Version. (Winter, even years) 

ELIT 337. Nineteenth-Century British Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

A study of British writers from the Romantic and Victorian periods (1785-1901), with special 
emphasis upon Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Austen, Tennyson, 
Dickens, Arnold, Browning, Carlyle, and Wilde. (Winter, even years) 

ELIT 338. Twentieth-Century Writers (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is a study of twentieth-century literary themes through readings in American and 
British literature. Significant authors to be studied in this course are James Joyce, Samuel 
Beckett, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Franz Kafka, Eugene O'Neill, and Edith Wharton. 
(Winter, even years) 

ELIT 368. Studies in Milton (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

The major poetry of John Milton, including Lycidas, Paradise Lost, selected sonnets, psalms, 
tracts, and important prose. (Winter, odd years) 

ELIT 417. World Literature in Translation (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is a study of selections from significant poetry, drama, and prose of western and 
non-western literature from the Middle Ages to the 20 t " century. (Winter, odd years) 

ELIT 430. Library Materials for Young Adults 2 hours 

A survey of the variety of books and related materials available for grades 7-12. Designed for 
prospective teachers in SDA junior and senior academies as well as those in public middle 
and high schools, this course correlates critical evaluation and selection to the uses, and 
specific needs of your adults as they develop their reading habits and skills. Includes a study 
of censorship and copyright law. (Winter) 

ELIT 440. C. S. Lewis (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

A survey and critical study of the literature of C. S. Lewis. Major fictional work, his 
autobiography, and theological works are selected for study from the post-conversion period 
of Lewis's life. Critical literary theorists and primary source authors are examined in 
connection with the literature. The course will focus on issues of faith and literary techniques 
as demonstrated in this popular 20 th Century author's various literary genres. (Fall, even 
year) 

ELIT 442. Shakespeare (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

Celebrated as the greatest of English writers, Shakespeare continues to influence world 
culture. This course employs a variety of critical strategies to read and discuss several plays. 
Topics discussed include authority and ethical government, art and the shaping of history, 
social unity and the influence of the theatre, staging and performance, music and costume, 
superstition and magic, identity and the self, honor and cowardice, obedience and the 
conscience. 



264 Course Descriptions 



ELIT 444. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course considers British literature written between the Restoration and Romantic 
Revolution. Included are poets and essayists from Milton to Johnson, novelists like Defoe 
and Fielding, and comic playwrights such as Gay and Goldsmith. (Winter, odd years) 

ELIT 445. Ancient Classics (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

After beginning with the three great epics that underlie the literature of the Western World— 
the Iliad, the Odyssey, and The Book of Job— the course considers a range of Greek and 
Roman works. Collateral emphasis is on enhancing a students ability to distinguish between 
classical Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian modes of thought. (Fall) 

ELIT 457. Latino Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SPAN 457. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See SPAN 457 for course description. 

ELIT 465. Topics in Literature 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in literature presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will 
determine how the class applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

ELIT 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ELIT 295 for course description. 

English 

ENGL 100. Basic Writing 3 hours 

Focuses on development of writing skills necessary for successful entry into ENGL 101 and 
for increasing English ACT scores. Students whose English ACT score is 16 or below are 
required to register for this class. In special cases where a Basic Writing student 
demonstrates the skills to succeed in ENGL 101, the composition coordinator and the 
professor of Basic Writing may agree to admit a student to ENGL 101 whose ACT is 16 or 
below. Students successfully completing this course will earn three institutional elective 
credits. To pass this course, students must earn a minimum grade of C. Near the end of the 
course, students will be required to take the English section of the ACT test and must score 
17 or higher in order to progress into College Composition 101. The test fee will be charged 
to their accounts. ENGL 100 does not count toward an English major or minor. 

ENGL 101-102. College Composition (A-l) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite to ENGL 101: ACT score of 17 or higher, or SAT score of 430 or higher, or TOEFL score of 550 or 
higher. ENGL 101 is prerequisite to ENGL 102. 

A two-semester course focusing strongly on the writing process, especially revision. ENGL 

101 emphasizes specific writing skills and principles which readily apply to most writing 
tasks. Students write expository essays organized according to pre-scribed modes. ENGL 

102 reinforces the proficiencies developed in ENGL 101 while focusing on rhetorical and 
reasoning skills which apply to various persuasive and research writing activities. Students 
write persuasive essays and a research paper. This course does not count toward an English 
major or minor. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

ENGL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the student. This 
course may be repeated for credit. 

ENGL 304. Grammar and Linguistics for Elementary Teachers 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

The course is a thorough review of traditional grammar and standard American usage, a 
survey of other grammatical approaches, and an introduction to linguistic topics relevant to 
the prospective elementary teacher. These topics include the history and development of the 
English language, the nature of language and its pedagogical implications, and issues 
surrounding dialects in the classroom. 



Course Descriptions 265 



ENGL 312. Creative Writing: Language Arts Elementary Teacher (G-l) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on placement exam. 

A workshop experience designed to provide teachers with tools and skills needed in the 
elementary classroom. Work provides opportunities to experiment with various genres 
suitable to the student's chosen level of teaching as well as experience in evaluating 
creative writings. (Winter) 

ENGL 313. Expository Writing (G-l) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

A workshop approach that provides practical instruction in expository writing for all 
disciplines. Emphasis on developing a natural writing style; writing economical but lively 
prose: increasing vocabulary; and cultivating a writing process which frees writer's block and 
facilitates thoughtful, cogent, focused, coherent, and fluent writing. Involves reading and 
analysis of a wide variety of writing. Helpful for all students wishing to improve their writing 
skills, particularly those headed for graduate school or for professions in which writing is 
important. Tailored to the needs and interests of students who enroll. (Fall) 

ENGL 314. Creative Writing (G-l) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Three hours of literature. 

A workshop setting in which students study the principles of writing in literary genres. Each 
student will propose the contents of a personal portfolio. Upon approval, the students will 
work closely with the instructor to develop their chosen collection: poetry, fiction, creative 
nonfiction, or drama. They will participate in critiquing the work of classmates online, in hard 
copy, and in the classroom. Students will be encouraged to develop their own style and to 
find possible markets for manuscripts that may be worthy of publication. This class is not 
available for audit. (Winter) 

ENGL 316. Modern English Grammar and Linguistics 3 hours 

This class is both a study of modern English grammar and its structure and an introduction 
to the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. The 
course will familiarize students with Reed-Kellogg diagramming, deep structure 
diagramming, and the theories of transformational-generative grammar. 

ENGL 414. Advanced Creative Writing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ENGL 314 and approval of the instructor. 

A course designed to refine the skills of experienced creative writers who plan to publish 
their work. Students wishing to enroll will submit a collection of their finished writings and a 
proposal outlining their persona goals for the semester; students will be accepted only on 
the approval of the instructor. Reading assignments will be designed to match the needs of 
each student. In order to enrich the workshop environment for both groups, class will meet 
with ENGL 314. Instruction will include marketing strategies and manuscript format. This 
class is not available for audit. (Winter) 

ENGL 491. English Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: 18 hours in the major, ENGL 313 Expository Writing or ENGL 314 Creative Writing, and formal 

approval by the department. 

The student gains on-the-job experience using English skills in a part-time work situation 
(maximum of 25 hours per week). A department coordinator works with the student and a 
local business to oversee placement and evaluation. Both the student and the business 
assess in writing the quality and nature of the work experience. The student receives 1 credit 
hour for each 50 hours of work experience. Positions can be paid or non-paid. Procedures 
and guidelines are available from the department. (Pass/Fail credit). 



266 Course Descriptions 



ENGL 492. English Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: 18 hours in the major, ENGL 313 Expository Writing or ENGL 314 Creative Writing, and formal 

approval by the department. 

The student gains on-the-job experience using English skills in a full-time work situation 
(minimum of 35 hours per week). A department coordinator works with the student and a 
selected business to oversee placement and evaluation. Both the student and the business 
assess in writing the quality and nature of the work experience. A minimum of 150 hours of 
supervised work is required. Positions can be paid or non-paid. Procedures and guidelines 
are available from the department. (Pass/Fail credit). 

ENGL 465. Topics in English 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in English presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine 
how the class applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

ENGL 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See ENGL 295 for course description 

Engineering 

ENGR 121. Introduction to Engineering 1 hour 

Exposure to the diverse aspects of the profession and practice of engineering and 
engineering design. Class will include guest lecturers and engineering design projects. (Fall) 

ENGR 149. Introduction to Mechanical Drawing and CADD (G-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with TECH 149. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
An introductory level course in Computer-Aided Drafting Design (CADD) using AutoCAD 
software in orthographic projection, surface development, sectioning, pictorial 
representation, dimensioning, and working drawings. Drawings plotted to scale on A, B, C, 
and D size paper. Six periods of laboratory each week. Lecture as announced by the 
instructor. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 

ENGR 211. Engineering Mechanics: Statics 3 hours 

Pre- or co-requisites: MATH 182; PHYS 211, 213. 

Two and three-dimensional equilibria employing vector algebra; friction; centroids and center 
of mass, virtual work, and moments of inertia. (Fall) 

ENGR 212. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics 3 hours 

Pre- or co-requisites: ENGR 211; MATH 218; PHYS 212, 214, 215, 216. 

One and two-dimensional kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies by vector calculus; 
dynamics of rotation, translation and plane motion; relative motion; work and energy; 
impulse and momentum. (Winter) 

Earth Science 

ERSC 105. Earth Science (E-4) 3 hours 

A non-mathematical and qualitative introduction, for non-science majors, to the areas of 
physical geography, geology, and meteorology. Special consideration is given the 
environment— conservation or pollution of natural resources. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

Finance 

FNCE 265. Topics in Finance 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

FNCE 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 

A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty 
adviser and the student. 



Course Descriptions 267 



FNCE 315. Business Finance 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 222. 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis is on instruments 
of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to working capital, and corporate 
expansion and reorganization. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

FNCE 450. Working Capital Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 315. 

Includes topics addressing short-term financial management. In addition, the course covers 
the cost to benefit trade-offs of liquidity, management of working capital, management and 
budgeting of cash, and short-term investing and financing issues. (Fall) 

FNCE 452. Money and Banking 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ECON 224 

This course is cross-listed with ECON 452 and FNCE 552. A student may receive credit for 
this course from only one program. Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their 
services, the Federal Reserve System, and other financial institutions are considered. (Fall) 

FNCE 455. Fundamentals of Investments 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 555. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A practical, as well as a theoretical, approach is taken for the potential investor of 
institutional or personal funds through the use of problems, readings, and cases. Topics 
covered will include stocks and bonds in the security market, real estate, and fixed 
equipment investments. (Winter) 

FNCE 461. Portfolio Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE 455 or permission of instructor. 

This course is cross-listed with FNCE 561. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
Includes consideration of investment instrument choices that are available to the investor 
and the purpose and operation of U.S. and global capital markets. The course also covers 
the methods of evaluation for current and future investment opportunities in the expansion 
of a portfolio of investments that satisfies an investor's risk-return goals. (Fall) 

FNCE 465. Topics in Finance 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See FNCE 265 for course description. 

FNCE 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School 
See FNCE 295 for course description. 

FNCE 497. Finance Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 221; FNCE 450. 

This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data 
leading to the completion of a research project. 

French 

FREN 101. Elementary French I (D-l) 3 hours 

This is a foundation course in basic language skills. Students who have any background in 
French must take the language placement examination. Students should contact 
department for details on specific scores. This course develops listening and reading 
strategies with emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Laboratory work 
required. (Fall) 

FREN 102. Elementary French II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 101 or score a minimum of 296 on placement examination orapproval of the department. 
This course is a continuation on the development of basic language skills. Written and oral 
communication is strongly emphasized. It concentrates on developing the ability to use the 
language creatively to deal with daily life situations within the French-speaking context. 
Laboratory work required. (Winter) 



268 Course Descriptions 



FREN 207. Intermediate French I (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 102 or score a minimum of 356 on placement examination orapproval of the department. 
Review and expansion of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, writing, 
reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the culture 
of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. (Fall) 

FREN 208. Intermediate French II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 207 or score a minimum of 440 on placement examination orapproval of the department. 
Continues the review and expansion of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, 
writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the 
culture of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. (Winter) 

FREN 244. French Composition and Conversation 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 208 orapproval of the department. 

Course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion 
and to review grammatical structures. It emphasizes description and narration, extending to 
the broader French-speaking world. FREN 244 and 344 is a sequence particularly suggested 
for students who minor in French. (Fall) 

FREN 265. Topics in French 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in French presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine 
how the course applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

FREN 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Emphasizes individual, directed study. Designed for students who want to conduct 
independent research in a specific subject of modern languages. Faculty will assist student 
with selection of topic and serve as consultant for the project. This course is limited primarily 
to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern Languages. 

FREN 305. French for Business 3 hours 

Prerequisite: A minimum of one (1) academic year at Collonges (ACA) prior to taking this course. 

This course seeks to develop knowledge and proficiency in the French economic and 
business world. It includes vocabulary review; practice of oral and written expression, 
marketing, banking, employment, job hunting, interviewing, accounting, and publicity. 
Written expression of business correspondence are some of the topics discussed. 

FREN 344. Advanced French Composition and Conversation 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 208 and FREN 244 or approval of the department 

Designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion and to 
review grammatical structures. It focuses on Nous and Les Autres, incorporating description 
and narration, extending to the broader French-speaking world, incorporating current events 
and argumentation along with vocabulary study and grammar refinement. FREN 244 and 
344 is a sequence particularly suggested for students who minor in French. (Fall) 

FREN 350. French Linguistics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 208 and FREN 244 or equivalent or approval of the department. 

An intensive course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary 
expansion. It focuses on the study of syntax, morphology, phonetics, and phonology as 
components of the generative grammar of the French language. Open to eligible students 
returning from ACA. This course is required for majors in French. (Fall) 

FREN 353. Contemporary French Culture and Civilization 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 244 orapproval of the department. 

This course focuses on contemporary French culture and civilization and emphasizes social, 
political, and artistic trends, and intellectual movements that have contributed to the 
institutions and character of modern France. Course conducted entirely in French. (Winter) 



Course Descriptions 269 



FREN 357. Survey of French Medieval and Renaissance 

Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 244 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

Close reading and discussion of selected works from the period (eleventh through sixteenth 
centuries) viewed in the socio-historical, intellectual, and artistic context: Chanson de Roland, 
Roman de Renart, Aucassin et Nicolette, Farce de Maitre Pathelin, and works by Chretien de Troyes, 
Villon, Rabelais, the Pleiade, and Montaigne. 

FREN 358. Survey of French 17 th and 18 th Centuries Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 244 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

This course is a study of neo-classical tragedy and comedy as illustrated in select texts of 
Corneille, Mohere, Racine, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. It experiments in narrative fiction, 
including works by Mme de Lafayette and Prevost. The art of epistolarity: Pascal and the 
polemical letter, Mme de Sevigne and the personal letter, Voltaire and the traveler's letter. 
Focus on topics: preciosite and sensibility; feminism and modernity; rationalism and esprit critique. 

FREN 458. Survey of French 19 th and 20 th Centuries Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 244 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

Studies the main literary works and currents in the modern era in their historical context. 
Based on an interdisciplinary approach linking literary theory with history, sociology, and 
psychology. Works studied: Chateaubriand, Rene; Balzac, Le Pere Goriot; Hugo, Hernani; 
Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mat Gide, La Symphonie pastorale; Camus, L'Etranger, Duras, Moderato 
Cantabile. 

FREN 459. Francophone Cultures and Literatures (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FREN 244 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

This course proposes a cultural and literary journey based on a variety of texts throughout 
the main French-speaking regions of the world: the African continent, South East Asia, 
French Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, the French-speaking islands of the Caribbean. This 
approach is inteded to stress and place into perspective these geographical and national 
entities. Guest-speakers closely related, either as native speakers or by their professional 
experience to French-speaking Africa, Canada, or the Caribbean will be invited when 
available. 

FREN 465. Topics in French 1-3 hours 

See FREN 265 for course description. 

FREN 490. Comprehensive Examination Preparation 1 hour 

Designed to provide academic support for French majors who will be taking the 
departmental written examination required for graduation. Faculty will meet with the student 
regularly to assure the student has covered all materials pertinent to this examination. 
French majors must take this course prior to graduation in the last semester. 

FREN 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See FREN 295 for course description. 

Geography 

GEOG 204. World Geography 3 hours 

(C-2 credit for elementary education majors only). 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are considered. Man's 
adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. (Fall) 

German 

GRMN 101. Elementary German I (D-l) 3 hours 

A foundation course in the basic language skills. Laboratory work is required. Students who 
have not taken any German language must enroll in GRMN 101. This course develops 
listening and reading strategies with an emphasis on oral and written forms of 
communication. (Fall) 



270 Course Descriptions 



GRMN 102. Elementary German II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: GRMN 101 or approval of the department. 

This course is a continuation on the development of basic language skills. Oral and written 
communication are strongly emphasized. Laboratory work is required. Those students who 
have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any 
German course other than GRMN 101. (Winter) 

GRMN 207. Intermediate German I (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: GRMN 102 or approval of the department. 

Continued emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. There is, however, an 
increased emphasis on reading and writing skills through short selections in German. 
Laboratory work is required. Students may get credit by passing a "challenge examination" 
with a B grade. For information on the examination, students should refer to SAU Catalog (p. 
44) and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those students who have any background 
in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than 
GRMN 101. (Fall) 

GRMN 208. Intermediate German II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: GRMN 207 or approval of the department. 

This course maintains a strong emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Through reading of 
more extensive texts and informal writing as a support for speaking, it develops oral fluency 
toward more effective narrative. Laboratory work is required. Students may get credit by 
passing a "challenge examination" with a B grade. For information on this examination, 
students should refer to SAU Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those 
students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll 
in any German course other than GRMN 101. (Winter) 



History 



HIST 145. Civil War: Soldiers and Civilians 3 hours 

This on-line course covers the American Civil War with particular attention to the experience 
of common soldiers and civilians. A variety of resources are used in the class, including on- 
line material, a compact disc, a textbook, and a Civil War memoir. No general education 
credit given. (Only for qualified academy seniors). 

HIST 154, 155. American History and Institutions (C-l) 3,3 hours 

An introductory survey of the nation from colonial times to the present. The development of 
its politics, government and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. 
This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores. (Fall, 
Winter, Summer) 

HIST 174, 175. World Civilizations (C-l) 3,3 hours 

A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, 

emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European 

civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and 
sophomores. 

HIST 265. Topics in History (C-l) 3 hours 

Selected topics in history presented in classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine 
whether credit is granted in Area I or Area II. This course may be repeated for credit. 

HIST 295. Directed Study (C-l) 1-3 hours 

A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a student is assigned 
will determine whether credit is upper or lower division. This course also includes credit 
offered by the History Department on directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for HIST 
495 only. Approval of the department is required priorto registration. 

HIST 297. Historiography 2 hours 

A course examining historiography, which is the study of historical consciousness and 
historical writing. The class will focus on Western historiography (classical, European, and 
the United States). General education credit will not be given. 



Course Descriptions 271 



HIST 345. Middle Eastern Politics and History (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PLSC 345. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
This course traces the major religious and political developments in the Middle East from the 
rise of Islam through the twentieth century. Any or all of the following topics may be included: 
Islamic empires; Crusades; Ottoman nationalism; Islam's encounter with the West; the issue 
of Islamic-Arab nationalism. 

HIST 351. Colonial Latin America (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

Set in the context of Spanish empire and imperial ideology, the course begins with the 
cultural legacy of high pre-Columbian civilizations in Latin America and traces the interaction 
of the native people with Spanish exploration and conquest. It focuses primarily on Spanish 
political and social organization, the responses of the native people to growing Spanish 
political hegemony, and the gradual development of theories of race, empire, faith which 
culminated in a recognizably unified Spanish American world. 

HIST 353. From Colony to Nation (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A detailed survey of American political and social history from 1607 to 1800, including the 
founding of the thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the new 
nation. 

HIST 355. History of the South (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the American South from the Early National period through Reconstruction. 
Prominent issues will include slavery, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. 

HIST 356. Natives and Strangers (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 356. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A study of immigration and the role of ethnic groups in American society. Special emphasis 
on the tension between assimilation and pluralism in the national character. 

HIST 357. Modern America (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of American History from 1900 on with special examination of the progressive era, 
normalcy, the depression, the New Deal, and the role of the United States in world affairs. 
(Fall) 

HIST 359. Transformation of American Culture (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A topical approach to nineteenth and twentieth-century American history, focusing on the 
modernization of life. Among the topics that may be covered are entertainment, the media, 
urban culture, social relations, transportation, and art and architecture. 

HIST 364. Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the 

Middle Ages (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the history of western Christianity from the end of the apostolic period to the end 
of the Middle Ages, emphasizing both institutional and theological development. (Fall) 

HIST 365. Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth 

Century (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant 
Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends. (Winter) 

HIST 374. History of England (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A survey of the history of Great Britain from Roman times to the twentieth century, 
emphasizing political, cultural, and economic developments which have influenced western 
civilization as a whole. 

HIST 375. Ancient Mediterranean World (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the three stages of ancient civilization, the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and 
the contribution each has made to the development of western culture. 



272 Course Descriptions 



HIST 386. Rise of the West (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of European history from the fall of Rome to the beginning of the modern age, 
focusing on those developments which have influenced the institutions and values of 
modern western civilization. The chronological emphasis is on the eleventh through the 
sixteenth centuries. 

HIST 387. Europe in the Nineteenth Century (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of Europe's "long century." from the French Revolution of 1789 to the beginning of 
World War I in 1914. The course traces Europe's development from a predominantly 
aristocratic and agricultural culture to an emerging democratic and industrial civilization, 
devoting particular attention to cultural and social changes. 

HIST 388. Contemporary Europe (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PLSC 388. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
An assessment of political developments and international relations since the outbreak of 
World War I. Such antithetical forces as peace and war, power and weakness, and 
sovereignty and dependence are studied in their historical setting. Students may earn either 
history or political science credit, depending on individual assignments. 

HIST 389. History of the Holocaust (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the historical and social circumstances leading to and surrounding the Jewish 
Holocaust. This course explores several theories of the event. 

HIST 465. Topics in History (C-l) [465 typically qualifies as a (W) course]3 hours 

See HIST 265 for course description. 

HIST 471. Classics of Western Thought I (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PLSC 471. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
A study of the key thinkers in western thought from the Heroic Age of Greece to the 
Renaissance. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize the discussion and 
analysis of ideas that have formed the basis of western thought. Included in the readings are 
selections from Herodotus, Cicero, St. Augustine, Boccaccio, Montaigne, and St. Ignatius of 
Loyola. 

HIST 472. Classics of Western Thought II (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PLSC 472. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
A study of the key thinkers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading from original 
sources, this class will emphasize discussion of critical ideas that have effected the 
evolution of contemporary social and political thought. Included in the readings are 
selections from Locke, Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Lenin, and Hitler. 

HIST 490. Senior Exam Preparation 1 hour 

Independent Study and reading in preparation for the one hour oral assessment exam taken 
by senior history majors. A student may earn a grade of Honors ("A" on the transcript), Pass 
or Fail. One must earn at least a "Pass" in order to graduate with a history major. 

HIST 495. Directed Study (C-l) (W) 1-3 hours 

See HIST 295 for course description. 

HIST 497. Research Methods in History (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Word processing and familiarity with Internet searches are prerequisites to this course. 

Historical theories, procedures, and research methods are examined in conjunction with the 
preparation of a research project. No general education credit given. (Fall) 

Health Education 

HLED 129. Introduction to Wellness 2 hours 

This course provides an overview of the wellness profession including its history, current 
trends, opportunities, and exposure to the wellness thought process. An understanding of 
the philosophical undergirdings of the wellness profession is explored and developed. This 
course requires ten (10) hours of field based experience. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 273 



HLED 173. Health for Life (F-3) 2 hours 

A study of current health topics, which includes: Integrating healthful living with today's 
scientific research and Christianity into a balanced lifestyle. Topics include: Alcohol, tobacco 
and drugs, mental health, human sexuality, safety, nutrition, stress, death and dying, the 
eight natural remedies with perspectives from Ellen White and others. 

HLED 229. Wellness Applications 2 hours 

Learn how to live life with more passion, peace, purpose, and vitality. Learn how to bring 
more balance into your life through a practical application of the principles of wellness. This 
course teaches what wellness is by empowering the student to personally apply the tools of 
wellness. These tools encourage the development of the dynamic potential of body, mind, 
and spirit. This in turn brings about a balanced development of the whole person. (Winter) 

HLED 356. Drugs and Society 2 hours 

A course focusing on the use and abuse of drugs in our society. Emphasis on strategies to 
assist future health promoters in recognition, intervention, and prevention of substance 
abuse. Oral presentation required. (Fall) 

HLED 373. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

Investigations into the prevention, care, and proper management of injuries related to 
athletics. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

HLED 470. Current Issues in Health 2 hours 

This seminar course is designed to assist students in becoming knowledgeable regarding 
health issues of our time. Library research and class presentations are required. Discussion 
and problem solving are emphasized. A major part of the class focuses on the need of a 
spiritual component in establishing a healthful and balanced lifestyle. (Winter) 

HLED 473. Health Education Methods 2 hours 

Prerequisite: HLED 173. 

A study of the theoretical and scientific basis of health education with emphasis on the 
development and organization of the school health instruction program. Two oral 
presentations required. (Fall) 

HLED 476. Wellness Methods, Materials, and Management 3 hours 

A course in planning, implementing and evaluating: work-site and community health 
promotion activities, including stress management, smoking cessation, cardiovascular 
fitness, body composition, and cholesterol testing. Oral presentation required. (Winter) 

HLED 491. Wellness Practicum 2 hours 

The student will work at a wellness facility for not less than 100 clock hours gaining 
experience with equipment, observing facility scheduling and management, and interacting 
with clients. Arrangements are made in advance with the school dean. (Fall, Winter, 
Summer) 

Nutrition for Life 

HLNT 135. Nutrition for Life (F-3) 3 hours 

A general education course introducing a student to the basic principles of human nutrition. 
Includes study of the nutrients and the requirements for different age groups and normal 
physiological conditions. Attention will be given to religious and sociological influences, 
taking particular note of the counsel of E. G. White. 

Humanities 

HMNT 150. International Travel 1 hour 

One credit hour is available to participants in college tours outside the United States. The trip 
must last seven days excluding travel to and from the tour location, and must include a 
minimum of 20 hours in museums, historical sites, concerts, drama, and sightseeing. 
Students will submit written summaries/reflections of their experiences. Credit for this 
course is not granted simultaneously with credit earned in other tour classes. 



274 Course Descriptions 



HMNT 205. Arts and Ideas (D-3) 3 hours 

This class is administered by the History Department. 

A cultural appreciation class tracing the historical evolution of intellectual movements in 
western civilization. Ideas from leaders in philosophy and the arts will be studied with 
appropriate works from music, art, and literature. Students may participate in activities 
involving specific art forms. Resource persons may assist as available. This course is also 
offered by the History Department as part of the European study tour program during 
selected summer sessions. 

HMNT 210. Introduction to Philosophy (C-l) 3 hours 

An introduction to the major schools of Western philosophy, e.g. Platonic, Aristotelian, 
Medieval, Enlightenment, Hegelian, Analytical. The course will suggest how philosophy can 
help students think more critically and coherently. Issues of logic, epistemology, freedom of 
will, and ethics will be explored. 

HMNT 215. Cross-Cultural Experience (C-2) 3 hours 

A course for student missionaries assigned to a country other than the United States 
Focuses on geographic and social characteristics. Activities include journal of on-site 
observations, and two formal papers after return to campus. Prior to departure, the student 
will make all arrangements with an instructor assigned by the Department of History. A two- 
thirds tuition waiver applies to this class. Refer to policy on page 57. 

HMNT 350. International Travel 1 hour 

See HMNT 150 for course description. 

HMNT 415. Cross-Cultural Experience (C-2) 3 hours 

See HMNT 215 for course description. 

HMNT 451, 452. Honors Seminar 1,1 hour 

A study of great books in religion, philosophy, science and social science that have shaped 
western culture. Required of students in the Southern Scholars program during their junior 
or senior year. Open to other students with permission of department chair. A complete 
tuition waiver for this class applies to Southern Scholars students only. Refer to the 
scholarship on page 58. 

Health, Physical Education, Recreation 

HPER 365. Topics in HPER 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in Health, Physical Education, or Recreation designed to meet the needs or 
interests of students in specialty areas not covered in regular courses. Subjects covered will 
determine how the class applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Italian 

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian I (D-l) 3 hours 

Introduces students to the basic principles of the language necessary for written and oral 
communication. Emphasis placed on developing the ability to use the language creatively to 
talk about oneself and to deal with daily life situations within the Italian cultural context. 
Laboratory work required. (Fall) 

ITAL 102. Elementary Italian II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or approval of the department. 

Continues ITAL 101. This course further develops the student's ability to communicate in 
Italian, both orally and in writing. Students will speak, read, and write about such topics as 
advice and opinions, the future, and hypothetical situations, while at the same time gaining 
insights into the culture of Italy. Laboratory work required. (Winter) 



Course Descriptions 275 



ITAL 207. Intermediate Italian I (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or approval of the department. 

This course requires a fairly good foundation in the basic principles of the language. 
Students improve their communication skills by discussing and writing about various topics 
drawn from readings focused on Italian culture. Review of grammar is included. Laboratory 
work required. Available only through Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA). 

ITAL 208. Intermediate Italian II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ITAL 207 or approval of the department. 

Continues ITAL 207 and requires a good foundation in the basic principles of the language. 
Students improve their communication skills by discussing and writing about various topics 
drawn from readings focused on Italian culture. Although review of grammar is included, it is 
not necessarily stressed. Laboratory work required. Available only through Adventist 
Colleges Abroad (ACA). 

Journalism 

JOUR 105. Writing for the Media (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: No less than a "C" in ENGL 101. 

Basic writing skills for newspaper, magazines, advertising, public relations, online and 
broadcasting, with emphasis on learning the Associated Press Stylebook. 

JOUR 175. Communication Workshop 1-3 hours 

One semester-hour credit will be available for 40 clock hours of active participation in 
workshops conducted by the School in such areas as free-lance writing, news writing, video 
production, editing newsletters, crisis communication, public relations writing, fund raising, 
writing for student publications, editing student publications, and advising student 
publications. Advanced students may earn additional credits by completing a project started 
during the workshop. May be repeated for credit. (Summer) 

JOUR 205. News Reporting (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: JOUR 105. 

News gathering and research techniques; development of news writing skills and style. 
Emphasis on clarity of writing, accuracy, balance and fairness, and on meeting deadlines. 
Students are required to contribute bi-weekly stories to the University's newspaper, The 
Southern Accent Oral communication emphasis: Interviewing. 

JOUR 208. Publication Tools and Techniques 3 hours 

An introductory course in using computer-based tools in the creation of publications such as 
newsletters, brochures and magazines. The course integrates elements of design with 
specialized software packages including Photoshop and InDesign in order to prepare 
photographs, illustrations and text for publication. Lab fee 8 will be assessed for this course. 

JOUR 242. Intro to Web Design 3 hours 

Prerequisites: JOUR 208 or CPTE 245/345 or BUAD 245/345 or CPTR 103. 

This course introduces the student to Web design theory and techniques. Students will learn 
how to use this medium effectively as well as learn how it differs from other more traditional 
media. Besides learning basic design elements and Web writing, students will be introduced 
to HTML programming and CSS Web page creation utilizing Photoshop and Dreamweaver. 
Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. 

JOUR 265. Topics in Communication 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in print journalism or related areas of communication. 

JOUR 291. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 

Supervised work experience in writing or print journalism. At least 90 clock hours of work 
experience are required for each semester hour of credit. Procedures and guidelines are 
available from the School. 



276 Course Descriptions 



JOUR 295. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

For students who want to do independent research and writing in a specialized area of the 
mass media. Directed study topics will be selected with guidance from the instructor who will 
serve as a consultant to the student in carrying out the project. 

JOUR 313. Publication Editing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: JOUR 205, 208. 

Students will learn to edit according to the Associated Press Stylebook; write effective 
headlines and photo captions; select articles, photos, graphics and typefaces; become 
familiar with legal issues and tools that assist in research and fact verification; evaluate 
press estimates; and stay within budget. Use of color and the differences between editing for 
newspapers, magazines, and newsletters will be considered. Students will produce a 
newsletter and develop editing skills through various projects. 

JOUR 315. Photojournalsim (G-l) 2-3 hours 

Prerequisite: PHTO 125. 

This course is cross-listed with PHTO 315. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
Advanced digital photography with emphasis on photojournalism, studio and corporate 
photography. The major focus will be on using the camera in producing photo essays and 
photo collections for exhibit. The course will focus on digital techniques— including film 
scanners, digital processing using Photoshop, and preparing digital photos for publication. 
One hour lecture, three hours of laboratory each week for 2 hours credit. Students 
registering for 3 hours credit will complete extra projects and additional laboratory and field 
work. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this course. Limited supply of digital cameras are 
available for a $100 rental fee. 

JOUR 316. Magazine and Feature Article Writing (W) 3 hours 

The study and practice of researching, writing, and marketing non-fiction feature stories for 
magazines, newspapers, and other periodicals. Discusses the writing process from idea 
development and story focus through final revision and marketing of articles via query letters 
to editors. 

JOUR 342. Interactive Online Journalism 3 hours 

Prerequisite: JOUR 242. 

This course adds a level of interactivity to the skills a student has acquired in Introduction to 
Web Design by focusing on advanced Web design tools. In this course, the student will use 
Flash and other dynamic Web elements to produce online media with increased user 
interactivity (e.g., forms and back-end databases) utilizing best practices for Web site 
navigation and information design. (Winter, odd years) 

JOUR 356. Advanced Reporting (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: JOUR 205. 

Students learn in-depth research and interviewing skills. Emphasis on public affairs reporting 
including assigned articles in politics, government, law enforcement, society, science, 
medicine, education, religion, the arts, and business. Also includes an introduction to 
computer-assisted reporting. 

JOUR 391. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 
See JOUR 291 for course description. 

JOUR 427. Mass Media Law and Ethics 3 hours 

Study of the legal, ethical and constitutional issues affecting the media and the news 
gathering and dissemination process. Concepts of libel, privacy, free press, fair-trial, 
contempt of court, access to information, protection of sources, copyright law, and 
government regulation of the media. 



Course Descriptions 277 



JOUR 445. Senior Project 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of all B.S. seniors taking the New Media or Photography concentration, this 
student-selected, department-approved project demonstrates the student's ability to 
perform in his/her major field. Students in this course meet with their supervising professor 
as needed. A written proposal for a project must be submitted to the advising professor by 
three weeks into the term. Satisfactory completion of this course is required before the 
school grants the bachelor's degree. Graded S for "satisfactory" or NC for "not complete." 

JOUR 465. Topics in Communication 1-3 hours 

See JOUR 265 for course description. 

JOUR 475. Communication Workshop 1-3 hours 

See JOUR 175 for course description. 

JOUR 488. Mass Communication and Society (W) 3 hours 

This course provides for informed student participation in the examination of the role and 
function of the mass media system in the United States. Among the topics considered are: 
the concept of social responsibility as a constraint upon the media; and ethical, social, 
economic and political issues involved in the function of newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, new media advertising, and public relations. Emphasis on reading, writing media 
critiques, and on analysis of concepts and ideas. 

JOUR 492. Journalism Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Completion of half the requirements for a major or minor in broadcast or print journalism and School 

approval before arranging for internship. 

Students work at a newspaper, magazine, broadcast station, or other agency to obtain 
on-the-job journalism experience, preferably during an 8 tol2 week period the summer 
between the junior and senior year when no other college course is taken. At least 300 clock 
hours of work experience are required. Procedures and guidelines are available from the 
School. 

JOUR 495. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

For students who want to do independent research and writing in a specialized area of the 
mass media. Directed study topics will be selected with guidance from the instructor who will 
serve as a consultant to the student in carrying out the project. 

Long-Term Care Administration 

LTCA 265. Topics in Long-Term Care Administration 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

LTCA 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

A directed study involves individual research work open only to business majors. Content to 
be arranged. Approval must be secured from Dean of the School prior to registration. 

LTCA 431. General Administration of the Long-Term Care Facility 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT464 

Introduces the mission, values, organization, and strategies of nursing homes and other 
organizations in the long-term care field and reviews their history and philosophy. Applies the 
concepts of management to the areas of staffing, governance, operations, and physical 
environment of the care facility. Reviews the regulations for licensing, operating, and 
insuring various risks within the regulatory setting of the industry. (Summer) 

LTCA 432. Technological Aspects of Long-Term Care 3 hours 

A detailed study of the technical aspects of long-term care administration. Their relationship 
to other health care facilities in the total health care system, and technically related medical 
relationships and services. A complete review of COBRA is also included. (Summer) 



278 Course Descriptions 



LTCA 434. Financial Management of the Long-Term Care Facility 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FNCE315. 

A review of techniques and interpretation of financial information for management decision- 
making in the long-term care facility. (Summer) 

LTCA 435. Human Resource Management and Marketing of the Long-Term 

Care Facility 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT344 

A study of the organization, training, motivation, and direction of employees with a view to 
maintaining their productivity and morale at a high level. Selection, compensation, financial 
incentives, work standards, and leadership are the topics that will be covered. Marketing 
functions, problems, services, and competitive practices will also be covered. (Summer) 

LTCA 465. Topics in Long-Term Care Administration 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See LTCA 265 for course description. 

LTCA 492. Long-Term Care Administration Internship 4-8 hours 

The internship is a tailored program of 400-1000 clock hours of management training 
experience in a long-term care facility approved by the University. The hours are determined 
by the minimum required by the state in which the student wants to be licensed. Two on-site 
visits by the program director will be arranged by the student. Three reports must be 
submitted at each 100-hour interval: a written narrative description of the experience, an 
intern's report form, and an administrator's report and evaluation form. These are described 
in the Long-Term Care Internship Manual. 

LTCA 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See LTCA 295 for course description. 

LTCA 497. Long-Term Care Administration Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 221; LTCA 431, 432, 434, 435, or permission of LTCA Coordinator. 

This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data 
leading to the completion of a research project. 

Mathematics 

MATH 080. Elementary Algebra (A-2) 3 hours (Non-Credit) 

This remedial course covers the content of first-year high school algebra. It is required of all 
students who meet NEITHER of the following criteria: 1) ACT math standard score of 16 or 
above; 2) high school Algebra II with a grade of C or better. Tuition for three semester hours 
will be charged for this course. (Fall) 

MATH 106. Survey of Mathematics I (A-2) 3 hours 

Topics chosen from problem solving techniques, numeration systems, the real number 
system, the metric system, financial management, probability, statistics. This course does 
not apply on a major or minor in mathematics. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

MATH 107. Survey of Mathematics II (A-2) 3 hours 

Topics chosen from set theory, logic, algebra, functions (polynomial, exponential, 
logarithmic), systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, 
graph theory, geometry, voting and apportionment. This course does not apply on a major or 
minor in mathematics. MATH 106 is not a prerequisite for MATH 107. (Fall, Winter) 

MATH 120. Precalculus Algebra (A-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Either completion of high school Algebra II with a grade of C or better and an ACT Mathematics score 

of 19 or above, or MATH 107 with a grade of Cor better. 

The real and complex number systems; algebraic equations and inequalities; functions and 
their graphs including polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; conic 
sections. This course does not apply on a major or minor in mathematics. (Fall, Winter, 
Summer) 



Course Descriptions 279 



MATH 121. Precalculus Trigonometry (A-2) 2 hours 

Pre or Co-requisite: MATH 120 or equivalent 

The trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric 
equations and identities, trigonometric form of complex numbers, vectors, and other 
applications. This course does not apply on a major or minor in mathematics. (Fall, Winter) 

MATH 181. Calculus I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 120 or a high school precalculus course. 

Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions (non-trigonometric) including 
limits, continuity, the derivative, computation of derivatives, applications of the derivative, 
the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, computation of antiderivatives, 
applications of the definite integral. (Fall, Winter) 

MATH 182. Calculus II 4 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 121 or equivalent and MATH 181. 

Precise definitions of limits, calculus of the trigonometric functions, further topics in 
differential and integral calculus, polar coordinates, analytic geometry, parametric equations, 
sequences, infinite series, Taylor series. (Winter) 

MATH 200. Elementary Linear Algebra 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 181. 

Systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, vector spaces, linear 
transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, applications. (Winter) 

MATH 215. Statistics (A-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: An ACT mathematics standard score of 22 or above, or two years of high school algebra, or MATH 106, 

or MATH 107. 

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics including organization and analysis of 
data, elementary probability, probability distributions (binomial, normal, Student's t, 
chi-square, F), estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. (Fall, Winter) 

MATH 218. Calculus III 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 182. 

Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector calculus including Green's theorem, Stokes's 
theorem, and the divergence theorem. (Fall) 

MATH 219. Set Theory and Logic 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 181. 

An introduction to the ideas, terminology, and notation of logic, sets, equivalence relations, 
and functions. The concept of a mathematical proof will be emphasized. (Winter) 

MATH 265. Topics in Mathematics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Topics selected from areas of mathematics not covered in other courses. This course may be 
repeated for credit with permission. 

MATH 280. Discrete Mathematical Structures 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 120 recommended: Familiarity with a programming language. 

An examination of many of the mathematical concepts of particular use to computer 
scientists. The topics include set theory, relations, graph theory, combinatorics, Boolean 
algebra, digital logic and circuit design, proof techniques, and finite state automata. (Fall) 

MATH 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval by department faculty. 

Individual reading and problem solving in a field chosen in consultation with an instructor. 
This course may be repeated for credit. (On demand) 

MATH 312. History of Mathematics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 182. 

A survey of the development of classical mathematics from ancient times to calculus, 
together with selected topics from the history of modern mathematics. (Winter, odd years) 



280 Course Descriptions 



MATH 315. Differential Equations 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 182. 

Introduction to dynamical systems, solutions of various types of ordinary differential 
equations, systems of linear differential equations, the Laplace transform, applications to 
problems in the physical sciences. (Winter) 

MATH 316. Partial Differential Equations 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 315. 

Partial differential equations, Fourier series, boundary value problems, Bessel functions, 
Legendre polynomials. (Fall, even years) 

MATH 317. Complex Variables 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 218, 219. 

An introduction to the theory of analytic functions of a complex variable, including mappings 
by elementary functions, complex integration, the Cauchy-Goursat theorem, Cauchy's integral 
formula, power series, Laurent series, the theory of residues, and conformal mapping 
(Winter, even years) 

MATH 318. Abstract Algebra 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 218, 219. 

The structure of groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. (Fall, even years) 

MATH 319. Linear Algebra 2 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 200, 219. 

Finite dimensional vector spaces and the attendant concepts of systems of linear equations, 
linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, inner product 
spaces. (Winter, odd years) 

MATH 325. Probability Theory 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 182. 

Basic probability theory, combinatorial problems, independence and dependence, numerical- 
valued random phenomena, mean and variance of a probability law, normal, Poisson, and 
related probability laws. (Fall, even years) 

MATH 326. Mathematical Statistics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 215, 218, 325. 

Random variables, conditional probability, standard distributions of random variables, 
distributions of functions of random variables, interval estimation, point estimation. (Winter, 
odd years) 

MATH 411-412. Intermediate Analysis 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 218, 219. 

The real number system, sequences, limits and metric spaces, continuity, uniform continuity, 
introduction to point set topology, properties of the derivative and integral, convergence and 
uniform convergence of sequences and series of functions, orderings. (Fall, odd years: 
Winter, even years) 

MATH 415. Geometry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 219. 

Topics selected from the following: Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and finite 
geometries, transformational geometry, hyperbolic geometry, projective geometry, other non- 
Euclidean geometries, applications of geometry. (Fall, odd years) 

MATH 465. Topics in Mathematics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See MATH 265 for course description. 

MATH 485. Mathematics Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Permission of mathematics staff. 

Written and oral reports are made on a variety of topics in mathematics including topics in 
current mathematical literature. Mathematics majors obtaining secondary certification must 
choose topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics. (Fall, odd years) 



Course Descriptions 281 



MATH 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval by department faculty 
See MATH 295 for course description. 

Management 

MGNT 265. Topics in Business 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission. 

MGNT 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 

A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty 
adviser and the student. 

MGNT 334. Principles of Management 3 hours 

A study of basic business management including an analysis of business policies viewed 
from the standpoint of the functional characteristics of the management process and 
current ethics. 

MGNT 344. Human Resource Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 334. 

An introduction to the organization, training, motivation, and direction of employees with a 
view to maintaining their productivity and morale at high levels. Among topics covered are 
selection, training, compensation and financial incentives, work standards, techniques of 
supervision and leadership. (Winter) 

MGNT 354. Principles of Risk Management 3 hours 

An introductory study in the field of risk management. Material covered includes insurance 
categories of liability, property, health and life. The primary emphasis will be on business 
applications, but some consideration will be given to the personal risk. (Winter, odd years) 

MGNT 358. Operations Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 334. 

The design, operation, and continued improvement of the systems that create a firm's 
primary products or services. This course presents operations management tools and 
principles, such as total quality management, forecasting, inventory management, just-in- 
time production, waiting line management. (Fall) 

MGNT 364. International Business and Economics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ECON 224, 225; MGNT 334. 

A survey of the world environment of business including aspects of economics, cultures, 
trade theories, governments, exchange and finances, multinational firms' strategies. The 
impact on business operations of each of these is considered, including a study of the 
economic relationships between countries and the cooperation that is necessary for stable 
economic world growth. 

MGNT 368. Multicultural Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 334 or permission of instructor. 

Develops an understanding of the role and impact of cultural diversity in the workplace. The 
course focuses on how multiculturalism influences the local and international environments 
within which organizations operate, including economic, legal, and political aspects: markets 
and business customs: dealing with foreign governments and nationals; formulating, 
implementing, and evaluating cross-functional and cross-cultural decision processes that 
enable an organization to achieve its objectives. (Winter) 



282 Course Descriptions 



MGNT 371. Principles of Entrepreneurship 3 hours 

A study of the theory and practice of initiating a business venture and organizing the 
necessary resources. Provides an understanding of the risks and rewards associated with 
entrepreneurship. Topics include start-up financing, marketing, risk management, 
development and implementation of a business plan. (Fall) 

MGNT 372. Small Business Management 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 103 or ACCT 222; MGNT 334. 

Examines the principles and problems of operating a small business after it is established. 
Topics covered include a procedural system for operating a small business, providing 
physical facilities, financing, organizing, marketing, and managing of the small business. 
(Winter) 

MGNT 410. Organizational Theory and Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 334 

A management capstone course for the development of thinking about organizations 
Missions, goals, strategies, and effectiveness are blended into learning about organizational 
design as it is influenced by external realities. Students learn design alternatives to create a 
fit between the strengths of the organization and its external environment to achieve a 
sustainable competitive advantage. (Winter) 

MGNT 420. Organizational Behavior 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 334 

Investigates the impact that individuals and groups have on values, attitudes, job 
satisfaction, motivation, and how the resultant organizational structure and culture are 
affected. The purpose of the course is the application of this knowledge toward improving an 
organization's effectiveness. Students learn the dynamics of leadership and management as 
they influence organizational behavior. (Fall) 

MGNT 460. Compensation and Benefits 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MGNT 344. 

Part one of the course covers employee and executive compensation components, theory, 
and strategies. Compensation is an integral part of attracting and retaining organizational 
talent. Part two of the course covers executive and employee benefits and strategies. In the 
climate of expensive medical coverage, emphasis will be given to cost containment 
strategies. Great organizations offer benefits that satisfy a wide range of employees' needs 
and delivers competitive advantage in attracting and retaining a quality employee base. 

MGNT 464. Business Strategies (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BMKT326; ECON 225; FNCE 315; MGNT 334 

A capstone course that integrates the functional business areas. It is designed to give the 
student experience in strategic analysis and decision-making using the case method. 
Students learn to identify, analyze, propose alternative solutions, and make decisions about 
business strategy. Attention is given to matching organizational resources to the external 
environment to achieve a strategic competitive advantage. Lab fee 2 is assessed for this 
course. 

MGNT 465. Topics in Business 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

See MGNT 265 for course description. 

MGNT 491. Management Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

A practicum consists of supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of 
management on a part-time basis. The work may be done at various job sites. A minimum of 
50 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A 
maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the 
major.) 



Course Descriptions 283 



MGNT 492. Management Internship 1-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and school approval. 

Students obtain on-the-job experience working under supervision in a management position 
or a tailored program of management experience in a selected office or facility on a full-time 
basis. All hours must be completed on one job site. A minimum of 100 clock hours of work 
experience is required for each semester hour of credit. (Note: A maximum of 3 credit hours 
of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.) 

MGNT 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School. 
See MGNT 295 for course description. 

MGNT 497. Management Research 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BUAD 221; MGNT 410. 

This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data 
leading to the completion of a research project. 

Modern Language 

MDLG 165. Topics in Modern Languages 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in modern languages presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will 
determine how the course applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

MDLG 265. Spanish for Health Professionals (D-l) 3 hours 

This course is designed for physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who need to 
communicate with Spanish-speaking clients. In this course, students will develop health- 
related vocabulary in context: situational dialogues and responses; communication patterns; 
body language; and higher understanding of specific expressions and responses commonly 
used by health professionals when interacting with Spanish-speaking clients. This course will 
not count toward any of the majors offered by the Modern Languages Department. Open to 
all but primarily for Allied Health, Nursing, Pre-Med, Wellness, and Social Work majors. 
(Winter) 

MDLG 266. Topics in Modern Languages 1-3 hours 

See MDLG 165 for course description. 

Church Music 

MUCH 216. Music in the Christian Church (D-3) 3 hours 

A historical, theological, and liturgical survey of music in the Christian Church, from its roots 
in the Jewish synagogue to contemporary trends in worship, with particular emphasis on 
hymnology. (Winter) 

MUCH 315. Church Music Materials and Administration 3 hours 

The study of worship philosophies, denominational political hierarchies, liturgies, ensemble 
organization, appropriate music literature for performance and administrative procedures. 
Students are required to prepare service music for services of various denominations. 



Music Theory 



MUCT 101. Basic Musicianship I 2 hours 

A course designed to introduce students to the elements of music, including pitch and 
rhythmic notation, key and time signatures, major and minor scales, and intervals. A 
keyboard component is included. This course does not apply toward a major or minor in 
music. 



284 Course Descriptions 



MUCT 102. Basic Musicianship II 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 101 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of MUCT 101, studying triads, seventh chords, and their application within the 
tonal system, concluding with principles of voice leading and root position part writing. A 
keyboard component is included. MUCT 101 and MUCT 102 will be accepted as substitute 
for MUCT 111, Music Theory I, if completed with "A" (90 percent or higher.) 

MUCT 111-112. Music Theory I and II 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on placement examination. 

A study of the elements that render music of all periods aurally and visually comprehensible, 
within simple forms and a variety of textures from one to four voices. Music Theory I may not 
be repeated more than once. 

MUCT 121-122. Aural Theory I and II 1,1 hours 

A laboratory for the development of keyboard and sight-singing skills related to the materials 
introduced in MUCT 111-112. Music majors must take this concurrently with MUCT 
111-112. This is a computer assisted course. 

MUCT 211-212. Music Theory III and IV 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: MUCT 111-112. 

An expanded and intensified study of the structure of music as begun in MUCT 111-112. In 
MUCT 212, contemporary music is emphasized. 

MUCT 221-222. Aural Theory III and IV 1,1 hours 

Keyboard and sight-singing applications of materials studied in MUCT 211-212. Music 
majors must take this concurrently with MUCT 211-212. This is a computer-assisted course. 

MUCT 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study open to music majors and other qualified students. Content to be arranged. 
Approval must be secured from the School Dean prior to registration. May be repeated up to 
a total of three hours. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

MUCT 313. Orchestration and Arranging 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MUCT 111-112. 

The ranges, capabilities and limitations, and transpositions of orchestra and band 
instruments. Idiomatic scoring of short works for vocal and instrumental chamber groups, 
small orchestra, and band. Performance of exercises and analysis of scores is emphasized. 
(Winter, even numbered years) 

MUCT 315. Compositional Techniques 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 212. 

An introduction to the process and experience of musical composition. Students will explore 
perceptions of repetition, variation, and contrast as elements in artistic construction. They 
will experiment with rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic aspects of musical gesture and their 
effects, particularly in small musical forms. (Fall, odd numbered years) 

MUCT 413. Analysis of Musical Forms 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MUCT 211-212 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical study of musical structure from the smallest units of form to the more complex 
music of all historical periods. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

MUCT 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See MUCT 295 for course description. 

Music Education 

MUED 231. Music and Movement: A Sequential Approach 2 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 129, EDUC 138, or approval of instructor. 

A survey of the structure of music including music fundamentals, movement to music, 
performance skills, listening skills, and the integration of music into life activities. This 
course does not apply toward a major or minor in music. 



Course Descriptions 285 



MUED 236. String Methods and Techniques 2 hours 

The study of the stringed instruments, including methods and materials for class and private 
instruction. Observation of classroom and private instruction is required. (Winter, even 
numbered years) 

MUED 246. Brass Methods and Techniques 2 hours 

A study of tone production, performance techniques, embouchure, fingerings, practical 
pedagogic techniques, and simple repairs. A survey of literature for the instruments and 
evaluation of teaching methods. Observation of classroom and private instruction is 
required. (Fall, even numbered years) 

MUED 250. Technology in Music Education (A-4) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTE 100 or equivalent. 

A course designed to help music students develop skills in the use of computers in music 
education. Students will become proficient in the use of MIDI, and of music notation and 
sequencing programs. They will sample and learn to use computer programs in the music 
department and teaching administration and in the teaching of music theory, appreciation, 
performance, literature, history, and ear training in grades K-12. (Fall, odd numbered years) 

MUED 256. Woodwind Methods and Techniques 2 hours 

A study of tone production, performance techniques, embouchure, fingerings, practical 
pedagogic techniques, and simple repairs. A survey of literature for the instruments and 
evaluation of teaching methods. Observation of classroom and private instruction is 
required. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

MUED 266. Percussion Methods and Techniques 2 hours 

The study of the percussion instruments, including methods and materials for class and 
private instruction. Observation of classroom and private instruction is required. (Fall, odd 
numbered years) 

MUED 276. Vocal Methods and Techniques 2 hours 

A study of tonal production, performance technique, breath management, vocal diction and 
practical pedagogical techniques with attention to the care and maintenance of a healthy 
voice. Observation of classroom and private instruction is required. (Fall, even numbered 
years) 

MUED 316. Piano Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF189 or equivalent. 

Methods, materials, and procedures for private and class piano instruction: planning a 
complete program for pupils on various grade levels including technic, repertoire, and 
musicianship. Observation and teaching are required. (Fall, odd numbered years) 

MUED 317. Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF189 or equivalent and permission of instructor. 

Methods, materials, and procedures for private and class voice instruction: testing and 
classification of voices: physiological and psychological problems of voice production and 
diction. Observation and teaching are required. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

MUED 318. Organ Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF 189 or equivalent. 

Methods, materials, and procedures for instruction in organ: accompaniment of church 
services: registration of organ literature on various types of organs. Observation and 
teaching are required. (Fall, even numbered years) 

MUED 331. Music in the Elementary School 3 hours 

A study of music teaching-learning methods, materials and strategies for K-8 students. Basic 
concepts of musical organization, musical skills, and literature for the classroom. The course 
will include a survey of age-appropriate choral and instrumental repertories. Observation of 
classroom teaching is required. (Fall, even numbered years) 



286 Course Descriptions 



MUED 332. Music in the Secondary School 3 hours 

A study of music teaching-learning methods, materials and strategies for 9-12 students. 
Theories and practices in secondary school music, attention to music administration, 
discipline, curricular developments in music education, evaluation procedures appropriate to 
the music classroom. The course will include a survey of age-appropriate choral and 
instrumental repertories. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

MUED 439. Pre-Student Teaching Seminar 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A seminar in which the student is oriented to student teaching, including curriculum, lesson 
planning, professional relationships, and other matters related to student teaching. 

Music History 

MUHL 115. Listening to Music (D-3) 3 hours 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the major composers, musical styles, and 
forms of Western music. Two listening periods per week are required. This course does not 
apply toward a major in music. 

MUHL 118. Musical Styles and Repertories (D-3) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 111 or permission of instructor. 

A global introduction to musical style and literature designed for music majors and minors. 
Emphasis is upon aural recognition as folk, popular, and classical traditions are studied 
within their historical and cultural contexts. One listening period per week is required 
(Winter) 

MUHL 120. Music in the United States (D-3) 3 hours 

A study of the significant musical trends that have evolved during the four centuries of the 
nation's history. This course also examines the socio-historical contexts that have fostered 
differing musical traditions. Topics include folk and traditional musics, art music, sacred 
music, popular music, and music for theatre and film. (Fall) 

MUHL 320. Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (D-3) (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: MUHL 115 or 118: MUCT 111-112, or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the important figures, trends, styles, and genres in Western Europe, beginning 
with musical thought and practice in ancient Greece and culminating in the High 
Renaissance of the 16 th century. (Fall, odd years) 

MUHL 321. Music of the Late Renaissance and Baroque Era (D-3) (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: MUHL 115 or 118: MUCT 111-112, or permission of instructor. 

Beginning with the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the course traces the history of 
western music to the mid-18th century with the principal composers, styles, and genres of 
the Baroque period. (Winter, even years) 

MUHL 322. Classic and Romantic Music (D-3) (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: MUHL 115 or 118: MUCT 111-112, or permission of instructor. 

A study of the major composers, genres, and stylistic trends in Europe and the United States 
from the mid-18th century through the 19th century. (Fall, even years) 

MUHL 323. Music in the Twentieth Century (D-3) (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: MUHL 115 or 118: MUCT 111-112, or permission of instructor. 

The diversity of musical styles in the modern and post-modern eras taught from a global 
perspective, emphasizing the expanded musical vocabulary of western art music through its 
incorporation of popular and folk elements, and non-Western theories and techniques. 
(Winter, odd years) 

MUHL 465. Topics in Music 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in music presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine 
how the class applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 



Course Descriptions 287 



MUHL 485. Music Seminar 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

A seminar focusing on a particular composer, style, genre, or issue within the history of 
music. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Choral Ensembles, Individual and Group Instruction 

MUPF 103, 104, 105, 106. Class Piano 1-4 (G-l) 1,1,1,1 hour 

A four-semester course sequence designed to develop basic piano skills, from the playing of 
scales, chords, and simple melodies to the accomplished performance of hymns and piano 
repertoire. Students will study scales, arpeggios, cadences, standard piano literature and 
hymns, accompaniments, and improvised harmonization. Students will be placed at the 
appropriate level based on the results of the piano placement test. 

MUPF 108. Group Instruction (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Class instruction in beginning-intermediate voice, beginning piano, or beginning classical 
guitar. The instruction emphasizes acquisition of basic techniques and solo performance. A 
minimum of four hours of practice and/or listening outside of class is required. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUPF 118. I Cantori (G-l) 1 hour 

A carefully balanced SATB chamber choir comprised of students with advanced vocal 
potential and experience. In addition to their distinctive chamber choir experience, members 
of I Cantori form the leadership core for Bel Canto and Die fvleistersinger. Performance 
opportunities include a variety of on-campus presentations and off-campus tours. Must be 
members of Bel Canto or Die Meistersinger. Membership commitment is expected for the 
entire academic year. 

MUPF 119. Bel Canto (G-l) 1 hour 

A choral ensemble for women with beginning through advanced levels of experience. 
BelCanto functions independently and also with Die Meistersinger as a combined SATB 
ensemble. Performance opportunities include a variety of on-campus presentations. 

MUPF 128. Wind Symphony (G-l) 1 hour 

A large touring ensemble of woodwind, brass, and percussion players performing a wide 
variety of Grade 4-6 (Advanced) wind literature, both sacred and secular. Membership 
commitment is expected for the entire academic year. 

MUPF 129. Applied Music (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half hour lesson and 
a minimum four hours practice per week are required for each hour of credit granted. May 
be repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

MUPF 138. Symphony Orchestra (G-l) 1 hour 

A large touring ensemble that performs standard orchestral works from the Classical, 
Romantic, and Modern periods. Membership commitment is expected for the entire 
academicyear. 

MUPF 158. Die Meistersinger Male Chorus (G-l) 1 hour 

A choral ensemble for men with beginning through advanced levels of experience. Die 
Meistersinger functions independently and also with Bel Canto as a combined SATB 
ensemble. Performance opportunities include a variety of on-campus presentations. 

MUPF 178 Instrumental Ensemble Experience (G-l) lhour 

A course designed to provide credit for chamber ensembles or, in the case of keyboard 
majors, significant accompanying experience. 

MUPF 188. Vocal Ensemble Experience (G-l) 1 hour 

A course designed to provide credit for participants in major choral works, musical 
productions, and other school-sponsored vocal activities. This course does not fulfill the 
music ensemble requirementfor music majors. 



288 Course Descriptions 



MUPF 189. Concentration (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Performance examination for freshman standing. For music majors and minors. 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half hour lesson and 
a minimum four hours practice per week are required for each hour of credit granted. Private 
lessons for voice majors and minors include attendance at a weekly voice performance 
class. All students must perform on at lease one Music General Recital and complete a Jury 
Examination at the end of the semester. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

MUPF 225. Singers Diction I (G-l) 2 hours 

An introduction to the study of Italian, German, French, and English pronunciation, using the 

International Phonetic Alphabet. (Fall, odd numbered years) 

MUPF 226. Singers Diction II (G-l) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUPF 225 or permission of instructor. 

The advanced study of Italian, German, French, and English pronunciation, using the 
International Phonetic Alphabet. (Winter, even numbered years) 

MUPF 273. Basic Conducting (G-l) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: MUCT111 

The development of basic conducting skills, focusing on beat patterns, expressive gestures, 
score preparation and rehearsal techniques. (Fall) 

MUPF 279. Service Playing (G-l) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Two hours MUPF 189 (organ) or permission of instructor. 

The development of skills requisite to playing both liturgical and non-liturgical services, 
including hymn playing, choral and solo accompanying, conducting from the console, 
improvisation and modulation, and selection of appropriate preludes, offertories, and 
postludes. Performance experience required. May be repeated for credit. 

MUPF 289. Accompanying (G-l) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Two hours MUPF 189 (piano) or permission of instructor. 

The development of skills requisite to accompanying solo, choral, congregational, and 

worship service performance. Performance experience required. May be repeated for credit. 

MUPF 308. Group Voice Instruction (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Intermediate to advanced voice. The instruction will emphasize voice techniques through 
vocalises and solo performance (both in class and for recitals.) May be repeated for credit. 

MUPF 318. I Cantori (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 118 for course description. 

MUPF 319. Bel Canto (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 119 for course description. 

MUPF 328. Wind Symphony (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 128 for course description. 

MUPF 329. Applied Music (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF 129 or permission of instructor. 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half hour lesson and 
a minimum four hours practice per week are required for each hour of credit granted. May 
be repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

MUPF 334. Chamber Music (G-l) 1 hour 

Study and performance of chamber literature for various combinations of strings, brass, 
woodwinds, and percussion from the earliest examples to works of the 20 th century. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUPF 338. Symphony Orchestra (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 138 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 289 



MUPF 344. Instrumental Literature (G-l) 2 hours 

Study and performance of solo literature for strings, brass, woodwinds, or percussion from 
the earliest examples to works of the 20 th century. 

MUPF 358. Die Meistersinger Male Chorus (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 158 for course description. 

MUPF 373. Choral Conducting (G-l) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUPF 273. 

The art of communicating with and through a choral ensemble based on the development of 
clear and expressive conducting gestures. Study of the unique processes of individual and 
ensemble vocal development: breath management, phonation, resonation, and articulation. 
Score analysis, repertoire selection, performance practice, program building, and 
administration. (Winter, odd numbered years) 

MUPF 374. Instrumental Conducting (G-l) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUPF 273. 

The study of band and orchestral scores, covering elements of style, form, and 
interpretation. Emphasis on instrumental problems and transpositions. Development of 
baton technique through conducting instrumental ensembles. (Winter, even numbered 
years) 

MUPF 378. Instrumental Ensemble Experience (G-l) lhour 

See MUPF 178 for course description. 

MUPF 388. Vocal Ensemble Experience (G-l) 1 hour 

See MUPF 188 for course description. 

MUPF 389. Concentration (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing as Music Major or approval of music faculty. 

For music majors and minors. Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral 
instrument. One-half hour lesson and a minimum four hours practice per week are required 
for each hour of credit granted. Private lessons for voice majors and minors include 
attendance at a weekly voice performance class. All students must perform on at least one 
Music General Recital and complete a Jury Examination at the end of the semester. May be 
repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

Nondepartmental 

NOND 080. Academic Power Tools hours [Non-Credit] 

This course is designed to assist students make a successful transition to university life. 
Course materials will focus on academic skills, time management, career choice, 
relationships with peers and professors, and sources of assistance to resolve problems. An 
additional fee of $638 is charged above the flat-rate tuition fee. 

NOND 099. Student Missions Orientation hours [Non-Credit] 

This class is administered by the University Chaplain. 

A course designed to help students better understand cultural differences, interpersonal 
relationships, health care for others and themselves, social and monetary problems, 
personal qualifications for service, and relevant denominational policies for overseas 
service. The class is required by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist for those 
under appointment as student missionaries. The class is also a prerequisite for students 
participating in the North American Division Task Force Program. (Winter) 

NOND 101. Southern Connections 1 hour 

This seminar is designed to equip first-year students for success in the university 
environment. Emphasis will be placed on the development of critical and creative thinking 
skills within a student's area of interest. 



290 Course Descriptions 



NOND 227-228. Christian Service I, II 6,6 hours 

This class is administered by the University Chaplain. 

Prerequisite: NOND 099. 

A two-semester sequence for elective credit only, designed for student participants in the 
North American Division Task Force and Student Mission Program. The credit is primarily 
field work characterized by Christian witnessing and other assignments. Other activities may 
be designated. Students may earn six credit hours by completing one semester or twelve 
credit hours by completing a full academic year. Periodic reports from the students and on- 
site supervisors may be required. A rebate of $3,700/semester to cover 90% of the tuition 
($3,445) and the full general fee ($255) applies to these classes. The policy for tuition 
refunds applies. The date the college receives notification of withdrawal will be the official 
withdrawal date. May not be repeated for credit. 

Nutrition 

NRNT 125. Nutrition (F-3) 3 hours 

A study of basic nutrition principles and how to reliably combat disease and achieve optimal 
health through nutrition and lifestyle choices. This course includes current issues in nutrition 
and a practical application in teaching others. 

Nursing 

NRSG 090. Registered Nurse Update Non-credit 

A non-credit course designed for the inactive nurse with a license who is intending to return 
to practice or to reinstate a permanent license as an RN or LPN nurse in the State of 
Tennessee. Includes both theory and clinical experience 

NRSG 103. Associate Nurse Perspectives 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the following: an approved LPN program; Nursing Mobility Profile I 
Examination; examination over basic skills common to all areas of nursing. 

A course designed to supplement and prepare the Licensed Practical Nurse for advanced 

placement and career mobility. 

NRSG 106. Fundamentals I 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Nursing; Chemistry and Math (see AS admission requirement); BIOL 101; 

Co-requisites: BIOL 102; NRNT 125. 

A foundation course that introduces the NSM in which health assessment is viewed from the 
physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual variables of client 
systems. The eight natural remedies will be presented with an emphasis on primary 
prevention. The nursing process and basic skills are introduced. Application of nursing 
assessment, process, and skills will be in long-term care facilities. Three hours theory and 
one hour clinical.* Lab fee 11 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 107. Fundamentals II 4 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 106. 

A second foundation course that builds on the NSM and basic nursing concepts mastered in 
Fundamentals I. The physiological , psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual 
variables of adult clients are discussed and applied to clinical care of hospitalized individuals 
with special emphasis on the surgical patient. Concepts and skills in pharmacology are 
introduced, practiced, and applied in secondary care clinical facilities. Professional concerns 
of management, ethics, legal aspects, and interaction with members of the health care 
delivery system are addressed. Three hours theory and one hour clinical. Lab fee 9 will be 
assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 291 



NRSG 126. Adult Health I 4 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 107; Co-requisite: PSYC 128. 

A course emphasizing basic theory and practice of nursing in dealing with adults who are 
experiencing selected non-critical, medical-surgical stressors. The nursing process is utilized 
to promote physical, psychological, sociological, developmental and spiritual health, 
intervene in illness, and assist in rehabilitation. Practice takes place in secondary-care 
settings. Three hours theory and one hour clinical. Lab fee 9 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 130. Mental Health 4 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 107; Co-requisite: PSYC 128. 

A course that provides theory and practice in nursing of clients across the lifespan with 
mental health stressors. The nursing process is utilized to promote physical, psychological, 
sociological, developmental, and spiritual health, intervene in illness, and assist in 
rehabilitation. Practice takes place in secondary care and community psychiatric settings. 
Three hours of theory and one hour clinical. Lab fee 9 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 191. Nursing Practicum 1 hour 

Prerequisites: NRSG 126, 130. 

A clinical course that provides opportunity for application of theory and skills in an acute 
and/or skilled care facility directed by a preceptor and faculty liaison. Lab fee 7 will be 
assessed for this course. (120 clock hours) (Summer) (Pass/Fail) 

NRSG 212. Childbearing Family 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 126, 130. 

A course utilizing the nursing process in providing care for childbearing families. Emphasis 
will be placed on assessment of stressors that affect the maternal/fetal, newborn, and 
family units. Consideration will be given to variables affecting expectant families and their 
infants before, during and immediately following delivery. Practice will take place in 
secondary-care and community settings. Three hours theory and one hour clinical. Lab fee 9 
will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 226. Adult Health II 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 126, 130. 

A course designed sequentially to provide basic theory and practice of nursing in dealing with 
adults who are experiencing selected non-critical, medical-surgical stressors. The nursing 
process is utilized to promote physical, psychological, sociological, developmental and 
spiritual health, intervene in illness, and assist in rehabilitation. Practice takes place in 
secondary-care and community settings. Two and three-quarter hours theory and one and 
one-quarter hours clinical. Lab fee 9 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 231. Child Health 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 191, 212, 226. 

A course utilizing the nursing process emphasizing primary and secondary prevention with 
special consideration given to developmental and sociocultural variables in the care of the 
child rearing family. Practice includes secondary-care and community settings. Three and 
one-quarter hours theory and three-quarter hour of clinical. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for 
this course. 

NRSG 265. Topics in Nursing 1-3 hours 

Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of 
Nursing not covered in regular courses. This course may be repeated for credit. 

NRSG 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the school dean. 

Individual study in an area of choice shall be worked out with the school prior to registration. 
Either upper or lower division credit may be earned. The area of directed study will appear on 
the transcript. No more than six hours directed study may be applied toward a degree. 



292 Course Descriptions 



NRSG 305. Adult Health III 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 191, 212, 226. 

A course utilizing the nursing process in providing primary, secondary, and tertiary 
preventions and interventions for acutely ill adults and their families in the critical-care 
settings. Three and one-quarter hours theory and three-quarter hour of clinical. Lab fee 10 
will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 309. Nursing Seminar 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305. 

A capstone course that integrates nursing skills with principles of management. Practice 
takes place in secondary and tertiary care settings where the student manages groups of 
clients (70 clock hours). Included is a nursing content review course in preparation for 
NCLEX-RN. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 314. Herbal Therapy 1 hour 

Pre- or Co-requisites: NRSG 212, 226. 

This course is a survey of generally accepted herbal therapies, their efficacy and safety. The 
focus will be on their use in conjunction with over-the-counter and prescription medications 
Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 

NRSG 316. Applied Statistics for Health Professions 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MeetSAU's math requirements or permission of professor. 

A course focusing on applied statistics used in quantitative research studies in the health 
professions. Topics include the research process, ethics used for human participants, 
especially for vulnerable populations such as persons with chronic and terminal diseases, 
descriptive and inferential statistics, probabilities, confidence indexes, hypothesis testing, 
reliability, validity, and sampling. SPSS (statistical software) is used to analyze and display 
data. Basic computer competency is assumed. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 318. Massage and Hydrotherapy 1 hour 

An introductory course that provides a practical and rational approach to noninvasive health 
care covering the topics of massage, hydrotherapy, and wholistic care. This complementary 
approach to health care is designed for all majors. Limited enrollment. Lab fee 5 will be 
assessed for this course. 

NRSG 321. Mission Nursing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 212, 226; Pre- or Co-requisite: NRSG 231. 

This elective class is intended to introduce the nursing student to principles and practices of 
health care in developing and third world countries. Throughout the course emphasis will be 
placed on the role of the missionary nurse in spreading the Gospel while administering 
health care. Concepts of development, basic health education, and prevention of diseases 
throughout the life cycle is a primary focus of the course. Utilization of natural remedies and 
available resources and materials will be promoted. A field trip (at student expense) to a 
developing country in the western hemisphere is optional. Limited enrollment. Lab fee 5 will 
be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 322. Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305, 309. 

A course that assists the registered nurse student in transition from an associate degree or 
diploma level to the baccalaureate level of nursing. Nursing philosophies, theories, current 
concepts, issues relevant to professional nursing are emphasized. Nursing career options 
and the importance of career planning are explored. Field trip may be required. Lab fee 5 will 
be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 328. Nursing Assessment 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305, 309; Co-requisite: NRSG 322. 

A course that provides opportunity for development of more advanced wholistic assessment 
skills. Health is assessed within the framework of the environment, with attention to intra-, 
inter-, and extra-personal stressors and system stability. Health education is integrated with 
the assessment process. Two hours theory, one hour clinical.** Lab fee 5 will be assessed 
for this course. 



Course Descriptions 293 



NRSG 331, 332. Introduction to Nursing Informatics I, II 2, 1 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 126, 130. 

These courses are designed to introduce nursing students to nursing informatics, a 
combination of computer science, information science, and nursing science. The student will 
be introduced to the management and processing of nursing data, information, and 
knowledge in order to support the practice and delivery of nursing care. (Must take NRSG 
331 before or concurrent with NRSG 332; may not take NRSG 332 alone.) Lab fee 5 will be 
assessed for this course. 

NRSG 340. Community Health Nursing (W) 5 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305, 309. Co-requisites NRSG 322, 328, 316. 

A course that focuses on the impact of certain stressors on the health of individuals, 
families, and communities. The NSM as well as Pender's Health Promotion Model are 
utilized in diagnosis of aggregate health needs. Emphasis is placed on interventions in the 
primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Three hours theory, two hours clinical 
Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 364. Transcultural Nursing 2 hours 

This course provides an opportunity for the student to examine the way in which values, 
beliefs, and cultural practices affect health and illness among individuals, families, groups, 
and communities. 

NRSG 365. Topics in Nursing 1-3 hours 

See NRSG 265 for course description. 

NRSG 389. Nursing Pharmacology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305, 309: CHEM 111 or 151; Co-requisite: CHEM 112 or 152. 

A course that focuses on concepts of pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics, adverse 
responses, major classifications of pharmacologic agents and their prototypes, and use of 
the nursing process in pharmacologic therapy across the lifespan. Effect of pharmacologic 
therapy upon client lines of resistance and defense is included. Recently approved 
pharmacologic agents are incorporated into the course content via student presentations. 
Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 412. Preparing to Meet the Firms 1 hour 

This course is made up of a series of topics presented in a seminar setting to provide 
students with necessary tools to actively pursue and acquire internships and jobs. Topics will 
include but are not limited to: Resumes, Networking, Corporate Climate, Interviewing, Dress, 
Portfolios, Company Research, Etiquette. Besides listening to guest presentations, 
opportunities will exist to interact with guest lecturers and professors about thoughts and 
theories regardingthe area of job acquisition. (Winter) 

NRSG 434. Pathophysiology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231 305, 309; CHEM 111 or 151; Co-requisite: CHEM 112 or 152. 

A course that examines alterations in the basic pathologic structure and defense of humans 
Stressors and other internal and external factors that have potential for disrupting 
homeostasis are examined. Understanding of pathophysiologic processes affecting the 
health of individuals is presented as a foundation for nursing interventions. Lab fee 5 will be 
assessed for this course. 

NRSG 449. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 249/449, SOCW 249, and PSYC 249. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See SOCI 249/449 for course description. (Winter) 

NRSG 465. Topics in Nursing 1-3 hours 

See NRSG 265 for course description. 



294 Course Descriptions 



NRSG 485. Nursing Leadership and Management 3 hours 

Prerequisites: TN RN Licensure; NRSG 322, 328, 340. 

A course that provides an opportunity for the student to develop leadership and 
management skills. This is accomplished primarily through leadership, models, 
management, and administrative experiences in selected clinical settings. Emphasis is 
placed on the role of the nurse manager in assuring quality of care to individuals and 
families in primary, secondary, and tertiary care settings. In order to meet the objectives of 
the course, a field trip may be required. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 491. Senior Nursing Practicum 2-3 hours 

Prerequisites: TN RN licensure; NRSG 322, 328, 340, 389; Co-requisites: NRSG 434, 485, 497. 

A practicum that focuses on health needs of aggregates in the community. It is designed to 
give the student opportunity to use critical thinking and decision making skills when 
integrating theory from previous and current courses to clinical practice within selected 
settings. Two hours clinical. Lab fee 9 will be assessed for this course. 

NRSG 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of the school dean. 

See NRSG 295 for course description. 

NRSG 497. Research Methods in Nursing (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 231, 305, 309, 316; ENGL 102. 

A course that introduces the research process and its application to the scientific 
investigation of nursing phenomena and problems related to systems, stressors, and 
preventions focused on achieving equilibrium. The learner completes a review of literature 
on a selected topic. Emphasis of the course is focused on skills required to understand 
critically evaluate, and utilize research in practice. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

Outdoor Leadership 

OUTL 138. Outdoor Basics 3 hours 

This course is a practical survey of outdoor adventure experiences available for recreational, 
educational, and professional use. Instruction in canoeing, top rope rock climbing, caving, 
low-impact camping, orienteering, team building dynamics and processing, and ropes 
courses is included. Leadership skills are emphasized as students learn to apply teaching 
techniques, safety, group dynamics, and basic wilderness ethics to field experiences. An 
extended off-campus trip is required. Lab fee 8 will be assessed for this course. 

OUTL 141. Fly-Fishing 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 141, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 141 for course description. 

OUTL 142. Canoeing 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 142, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 

credit forthis course from only one program. 

A leadership skills course in flat and moving water canoeing (up to Class 111). Students learn 
how to apply current industry standards and techniques to safely lead group trips and 
expeditions. Instruction is done in the classroom culminating with a 5-day canoeing 
expedition. May be taken for American Canoe Association certification. Lab fee 13 will be 
assessed forthis course. (Fall or Spring break) 

OUTL 145. Rock Climbing I 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 145, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 145 for course description 



Course Descriptions 295 



OUTL 146. Whitewater Rafting Guide 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 146, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 

credit forthis course from only one program. 

An entry-level course emphasizing the technical and educational proficiencies necessary to 
be a safe and professional white water rafting guide. Students will work closely with their 
instructor and local guiding organizations to learn skills such as participant safety, reading 
and understanding the river, and customer service. Course leads to certification as a local 
river rafting guide. Lab fee 8 will be assessed forthis course. (Winter) 

OUTL 147. Rock Climbing II 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 147, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 

credit forthis course from only one program. 

Prerequisite: OUTL 145 or permission of the instructor. 

Enhancement of the climbing skills and teaching abilities of students with a basic climbing 
background. Mastering of advanced top rope skills, anchor systems, and advanced rescues, 
as well as traditional (trad) and sport climbing theory and technique, including big wall and 
multi-pitch experience. Additional emphasis will be on teaching techniques for rock climbing. 
Lab fee 6 will be assessed forthis course. (Winter) 

OUTL 148. Basic Horsemanship 1 hour 

This course is an introduction to basic horseback riding, designed for students with no 
previous horse handling experience. Ground instruction teaches proper, safe, and organized 
horse handling as well as horse care. Mounted instruction focuses on teaching the student a 
basic riding position and use of aids to effectively and efficiently communicate with the horse 
at the walk and trot. Lab fee 11 will be assessed forthis course. 

OUTL 151. Scuba 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 151, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 151 for course description. 

OUTL 152. Caving 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 152, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 

credit forthis course from only one program. 

Overview of sport caving as it applies to the outdoor classroom. Students will receive 
instruction in specialized equipment usage, cave selection, Leave No Trace ethics 
conservation and cave ecology, group management, and participant and personal safety 
The course leads to certification in K-12 Project Underground curriculum. Lab fee 6 will be 
assessed forthis course. (Winter) 

OUTL 154. Wilderness First Aid 2 hours 

This class is an excellent starting point for backcountry travelers with little or no medical 
background. The course covers the essentials of Wilderness Advanced First Aid including 
long term care considerations and the American Red Cross Wilderness Protocols. At least 
half of the training is hands-on and outside, with many opportunities to practice assessment 
and treatment techniques. The Wilderness Advanced First Aid course satisfies Forest Service 
requirements for backcountry guides in most jurisdictions and is recognized by the Coast 
Guard for the captain's license first-aid prerequisite. It is recommended for anyone who 
spends time hiking and paddling out of the reach of immediate medical care. Leads to Red 
Cross certification. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

OUTL 155. Basic Kayaking 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 155, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 155 for course description. 



296 Course Descriptions 



OUTL 156. Land Navigation 1 hour 

The use of map and compass is one of the most fundamental of outdoor skills. This class is 
designed to provide information and practical experience that students will use in their roles 
as outdoor educators and adventure leaders. Topics include map symbols, Universal 
Transverse Mercator Coordinate System, latitude and longitude, map scales, declination, 
resection and map and field bearings, and curriculum development. Students will participate 
in several map and compass practica as well as a three-day cross country experience. Lab 
fee 5 will be assessed for this course. Offered on a rotating basis. 

OUTL 212. Backpacking 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 212, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 212 for course description 

OUTL 214. Mountain Biking 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 214, School of Physical Education, Health and Wellness. A student may receive 
credit forthis course from only one program. 
See PEAC 214 for course description. 

OUTL 215. CHA Horsemanship Certification 1 hour 

Prerequisite: OUTL 148 or permission of instructor. 

For group riding instructors dealing with progressive skill building in all levels of riders, both 
in the arena and on the trail. Certification may be earned in English and/or Western 
disciplines; minimum age for assistant certification is sixteen (16), minimum age for 
instructor certification is eighteen (18). Eight levels of certification may be earned in both 
English and Western disciplines, ranging from assistant instructor to CHA clinician. Level of 
certification is the sole discretion of the clinic staff. Previous horse experience is required. 
Lab fee 13 will be assessed forthis course. 

OUTL 221. Challenge Course Facilitator 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC 221. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PSYC 221 for course description. 

OUTL 230. Equine Behavior and Training Management 1 hour 

Prerequisites: OUTL 148 and 248 or permission of instructor. 

This introductory course examines equine behavior and learning and its implications to 
training and management. Students develop an understanding and appreciation of inherent 
and learned horse behavior, become familiar with some of the methods and techniques 
used in training horses, and gain competence and confidence in handling and teaching 
horses basic desirable habits. Lab fee 11 will be assessed forthis course. 

OUTL 248. Intermediate Horsemanship 1 hour 

This course continues to develop the student's basic understanding and application of 
universal horsemanship skills. Ground instruction includes basic horse health care and 
maintenance. Mounted instruction in the arena and cross country focuses on correct riding 
position for the rider and use of aids to effectively communicate with the horse at the trot 
and canter. Students will also be introduced to beginning jumping techniques. Lab fee 11 
will be assessed for this course. 

OUTL 265. Outdoor Leadership Topics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: OUTL 138 or permission of the instructor. Junior or senior standing for OUTL 465. 

Selected topics in outdoor education curriculum, skills, counseling, environmental study, etc. 
May be repeated. Maximum of six (6) hours. A lab fee will be assessed for this course. 

OUTL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to pursue independent 
study in special fields. This course may be repeated for credit. 



Course Descriptions 297 



OUTL 319. First Responder 3 hours 

To provide participants with the skills and knowledge to recognize and care for life 
threatening emergencies. First responders provide advanced first aid care until emergency 
personnel arrive. This course is specifically designed for participants who wish to pursue a 
career in emergency response fields. Topics of discussion include, but are not limited to. 
understanding the EMS system and operations, patient assessment, airway management, 
professional rescue CPR, medical illnesses, care for traumatic injuries, and pediatric 
emergencies. Course leads to American Red Cross certification. Lab fee 8 will be assessed 
for this course. 

OUTL 335. Challenge Course Management 3 hours 

Prerequisite: OUTL 221 or permission of instructor. 

This course equips students with the skills required for the management of a challenge 
course as part of an outdoor education, adventure, or therapy facility. Topics include the 
construction of ropes course elements, instructional techniques, group debriefing skills, site 
inspection, safety and rescue, and equipment maintenance. This course meets the industry 
standards of Project Adventure and The Association of Challenge Course Technology (ACCT). 
(Alternating years) 

OUTL 346. Swift Water Rescue 2 hours 

This course teaches river professionals and recreational users how to handle swift water 
emergency situations. Classroom training combined with hands on, in-water scenarios will 
teach students skills such as swift water safety, self rescue, shore-based and boat-based 
rescues, unpinning boats, use of rope systems, and more. Leads to swift water rescue 
certification. Requires off-campus labs. Participants must be competent swimmers and must 
have their own swift water PFD. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. Offered on a 
rotating basis. (Alternating years) 

OUTL 352. Vertical Caving 1 hour 

Pre- or Co-requisite: OUTL 152 or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed to participate in and to 
lead vertical caving activities. Emphasis will be placed on site use and management, 
specialized vertical caving equipment, descending and ascending single rope techniques, 
selection of personal equipment, group safety and rescue. Due to the nature of this course, 
all students will be required to make class field trips to caving sites in the surrounding area. 
Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. (Alternating years) 

OUTL 354. Rope Technician I 2 hours 

Prerequisite: OUTL 145 or permission of instructor. 

Beyond a "get-to-know-your-knots" introduction, this is an advanced technical level, rope- 
rigging course thatteaches concepts and skills used by high angle search and rescue teams, 
firefighters, event riggers, and other professionals. Students will learn to apply the principles 
of mathematics and forces in the construction and operation of anchoring systems, pulley 
systems, and high lines. Leads to NFPA 1006 Rope Technician certification. An extended 
three day field trip will be required for this class. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this class. 
(Alternating years) 

OUTL 356. Outdoor Leadership— Field Experience 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Five (5) hours of Outdoor Leadership. 

Field experience in an appropriate outdoor school, park, nature center, camp or other 
educational setting approved by the instructor. At least one hundred fifty (150) clock hours 
of work experience are required. Procedures and guidelines are available from the School of 
Education and Psychology. 

OUTL 391. Outdoor Leadership Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 

This course is designed to present an overview of outdoor education issues and 
contemporary problems. 



298 Course Descriptions 



OUTL 420. Natural and Cultural Interpretation 3 hours 

The course will emphasize the development of living and natural history programs for use in 
parks, nature centers, and other outdoor facilities. Included in this course are twenty (20) 
hours of active learning experience, which may include field experiences outside the 
classroom. 

OUTL 430. Adventure Leadership 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Minimum 12 OUTL credit; OUTL 154 or 319. 

This capstone course develops the design, knowledge, techniques and implementation for 
teaching and leading wilderness travel experiences and technical adventure activities 
Topics relative to the wilderness leader covered by this course include: environmental ethics 
and issues, individual and group dynamics, accessibility, safety and liability considerations, 
and permitting agencies. Physical and emotional requirements appropriate to wilderness 
field experiences and the administration of adventure activities are also addressed. 
Students will develop a professional portfolio documenting their leadership experiences, 
professional resume, research project and certifications earned. An extended field trip is 
required for this class. Lab fee 12 will be assessed for this course. (Alternating years) 

OUTL 465. Outdoor Leadership Topics 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: OUTL 138 or permission of the instructor. Junior or senior standing for OUTL 465. 
See OUTL 265 for course description. 

OUTL 492. Outdoor Leadership Internship 10 hours 

Note: Senior status as an Outdoor Leadership major required. 

Students work at an outdoor facility in the area of their specialization. This internship is a 
tailored program of seven hundred (700) clock hours of outdoor training experience in an 
outdoor program approved by the university. The time may be divided between two facilities 
to allow seasonal programming. Two on-site visits by the program director will be arranged by 
the student. Evaluation and reports will be required at one hundred (100) hour intervals. 
Procedures and guidelines are available from the School of Education and Psychology. 

OUTL 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See OUTL 495 for course description. 

General Education Activity Classes 

PEAC courses have optional pass/fail grades available, excluding PEAC 225. 

PEAC 121. Walking/Jogging (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is designed to prepare the student for a lifetime of aerobic activity with low 
intensity but great results. The course will include but not be limited to: equipment, foot care, 
stride, pace, terrain, hydration, nutrition and supplements, calorie burning and metabolism, 
volks walks, race walking, logs and motivation. A wide variety for activities will be part of this 
course. Offered on a rotating basis. A pedometer will be required. 

PEAC 123. Volleyball (G-3) 1 hour 

Development of the skills of passing, setting, serving, and spiking necessary in participation 
in power volleyball. (Fall) 

PEAC 131. Badminton (G-3) 1 hour 

Instruction includes strokes, rules, and playing situations plus physical conditioning for 
badminton. (Winter) 

PEAC 133. Racquetball (G-3) 1 hour 

Focus is given to basic skills, rules, and terminology so that the student can carry on 
successful play. Each student will need to purchase their own racquet, goggles and 
racquetballs. 

PEAC 134. Basic Tennis (G-3) 1 hour 

Emphasis in basic tennis skills including the forehand, backhand, and serve. Each student 
will need to purchase their own racquet and tennis balls. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 299 



PEAC 136. Basic Golf (G-3) 1 hour 

A basic course for the beginning golfer. Transportation needed Lab fee 3 will be assessed for 
this course. 

PEAC 137. Cycling (G-3) 1 hour 

A course for the active cyclist emphasizing various types of cycling, cycling techniques, safe 
cycling, and maintenance. Each student provides his/her own bicycle and helmet. 

PEAC 139. Advanced Tennis (G-3) 1 hour 

For the advanced player. Emphasis is given to the advanced serve, volley, lobs, advanced 
ground strokes and playing strategy. Admission to class must be approved by instructor. 
(Fall) 

PEAC 140. Weight Training (G-3) 1 hour 

A course designed for the beginning weightlifter. Instruction is focused on the basic weight 
training lifts that leads to the students developing their own personal weight training 
program. 

PEAC 141. Fly-Fishing (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 141, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of fly-fishing. The course will include but 
not be limited to: casting, rods & reels, knots, lines, leaders, flies, insectology, fish, 
equipment, wilderness ecology and where to go. This is a great family oriented, lifetime 
activity that will be about catch and release in the great out-of-doors. Several outing will be 
part of this course. Offered on a rotating basis. Minimal fees may be charged for 
transportation. Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. 

PEAC 142. Canoeing (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 142, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See EDOE 142 for course description. 

PEAC 143. Basic Tumbling (G-3) 1 hour 

Mat tumbling leading to gymnastic free-exercise routines in conjunction with acrosport 
exposure. 

PEAC 145. Rock Climbing I (G-3)_ 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 144, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

A safe, enjoyable, introductory course that will include but not be limited to: learn safety and 
belaying techniques, climbing skills, essential climbing knots, self rescue, and issues 
associated with top rope climbing. Offered on a rotating basis. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for 
this course. 

PEAC 146. White Water Rafting Guide (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 146, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See EDOE 146 for course description. 

PEAC 147. Rock Climbing II (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 145, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See EDOE 145 for course description. 

PEAC 151. Scuba Diving (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 151, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

Leads to basic certification by N.A.S.D.S. or N.A.U.I. Lab fees and check out dive expenses 
will be charged in addition to tuition. You must have your own mask, snorkel, and fins. This 
course cannot be added late. Lab fee 15 will be assessed for this course with additional trip 
expenses charged after the check out dive. 



300 Course Descriptions 



PEAC 152. Caving (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 152, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See EDOE 152 for course description. 

PEAC 153. Basic Swimming (G-3) 1 hour 

Development of beginning and intermediate swimming skills coupled with aquatic safety 
principles. 

PEAC 155. Basic Kayaking (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 155, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

Students will safely learn the mechanics for flat, moving, and Whitewater kayaking. The 
course will include but not be limited to: basic strokes for propulsion, combat roll techniques, 
eddy turns, peel outs, upstream and downstream ferrying, surfing, and basic river rescue. 
Offered on a rotating basis. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this course. 

PEAC 160. Snow Skiing (G-3) 1 hour 

A course that involves a spring break trip to Colorado. Tuition does not cover trip expenses. 
Expenses will vary around $800. 

PEAC 212. Backpacking (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 212, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is designed to increase your appreciation of hiking and camping as a life long 
pursuit. This course will include but not be limited to: equipment, clothing, menu planning, 
basic cooking skills, map and compass navigation, on-trail hiking techniques, safety, and 
minimum impact camping. Offered on a rotating basis. Lab fee 6 will be assessed for this 
course. 

PEAC 214. Mountain Biking 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 214, School of Education and Psychology. A student may receive credit for this 

course from only one program. 

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basics of mountain biking. The course 
will include but not be limited to: choosing a mountain bike, bike maintenance, choosing 
places to ride, safety, and equipment. A variety of rides from easy to challenging will be 
required. Students must provide their own bike. Minimal transportation fees may be 
required. 

PEAC 225. Fitness for Life (G-3) 1 hour 

This course includes a study of the basic areas of physical fitness and training, in 
conjunction with a personalized long-range conditioning program for optimal well-being. 
Principles of wellness are presented including assessments for nutrition, stress, and multiple 
areas of physical fitness. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

PEAC 238. Advanced Golf (G-3) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: PEAC 136. 

This course focuses on the short game (putting and chipping), specialty shots (fade and 
draw), and course management. 
Advanced students must have: 

A. Own clubs 

B. Successfully completed Basic Golf 

C. Transportation to golf courses 

D. Fees required 

PEAC 243. Gymnastics Team (Gym-Masters) (G-3) 1 hour 

A "variety show" team which emphasizes acrosport, sports acrobatics, gymnastics, physical 
fitness and health. Admission will be based on satisfactory performance of try-out 
requirements. Participation in all tours is required. This course may be repeated for credit 
Due to program conflicts, second semester Gym-Masters will not enroll in classes that meet 
before 1:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 



Course Descriptions 301 



PEAC 254. Lifeguarding (G-3) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: 500 yards continuous swim. 

This course is cross-listed with RECR 254. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 

Leads to Red Cross Life Guarding certification, First Aid and CPR certification. (Fall, Winter, 

Summer) 

PEAC 255. Water Safety Instructor (G-3) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: PEAC 254 or equivalent. Must meet stroke performance standards for American Red Cross Swim Level 
5. This course is cross-listed with RECR 255. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
Leads to Red Cross Water Safety Instructor certification. 

PEAC 261. Introduction to Recreation (G-3) 1 hour 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience for those 
interested in preparing for different phases of camp life, outdoor living and activities. 

PEAC 262. Introduction to Camping (G-3) 1 hour 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience for those 
interested in preparing for different phases of camp life, outdoor living, and activities. A 
weekend campingtrip with a hike is required. Lab Fee 5 will be assessed forthis course. 



Physical Education Theory 



PETH 113. ProAct — Racquetball 1 hour 

Development of professional skills, including performance and teaching techniques for 
racquetball. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 114. ProAct -Softball 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
Softball. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 115. ProAct - Flagball 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
flagball. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 116. ProAct -Volleyball 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
volleyball. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 117. ProAct - Basketball 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
basketball. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 119. ProAct — Soccer 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
soccer. For majors and minors only. 

PETH 210. Aerobics Instructor Trainer 2 hours 

Prerequisite: PEAC 225. 

This course is cross-listed with RECR 210. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A course that will prepare a student to take the certification exam for Aerobic Instructors. A 
certified Instructor will teach this course that will deal with the theory and practice of a 
variety of aerobic styles. Safety and correct methods will be emphasized. 

PETH 214. ProAct — Tennis 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
tennis. For HPER majors and minors only. 

PETH 215. ProAct -Golf 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for golf. 
For HPER majors and minors only. 



302 Course Descriptions 



PETH 216. ProAct — Fitness for Life 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
conditioning. For HPER majors and minors only. 

PETH 217. ProAct— Badminton 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
badminton. For HPER majors and minors only. 

PETH 218. ProAct - Track and Field 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for track 
and field. For HPER majors and minors only. 

PETH 219. ProAct — Gymnastics 1 hour 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching techniques for 
gymnastics. For HPER majors and minors only. 

PETH 240. Coaching for Success 2 hours 

A study and discussion into sports team organization, recruiting, picking teams, training, 
game preparation, travel budget, crowd control, facilities management, fund raising, game 
safety and control, and coaches decorum. Special emphasis will include keepingthe game in 
a "Christian perspective" and establishing a personal coaching philosophy. (Winter) 

PETH 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

For Physical Education majors or minors only. Gives the student the opportunity to pursue 
knowledge in an area of interest related to health, PE, or recreation. Approval by School 
Dean required. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

PETH 314. Biomechanics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 101-102 . 

A study of the anatomical and mechanical variables influencing human motion for efficient, 
safe, and effective movement. The historical impact of leaders in physical education is 
studied. (Fall) 

PETH 315. Physiology of Exercise (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 101-102. 

Emphasizing the physiological effects of muscular exercise, aerobics, and physical 
conditioning. Significance of these effects for health, skilled performance, and prevention of 
disease. Research required. (Winter) 

PETH 325. Personal Trainer 2 hours 

Prerequisite: PEAC 225. 

This course is cross-listed with RECR 325. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
This course is designed to prepare a student to pass a national exam to become a Certified 
Personal Trainer. This course requires twenty (20) hours of observation/practical experience 
outside of class. (Fall) 

PETH 363. An Introduction to Measurements and Research of Health and 

Physical Education 3 hours 

A survey of tests used in Physical Education and an introduction to statistical procedures for 
analyzing data and how it may be applied to research. Test Construction and historical 
perspectives of physical education are dealt with. (Fall) 

PETH 364. Principles and Administration of Physical Education and 

Recreation (W) 3 hours 

An integrated study of the principles and administrative concepts of Physical Education and 
Recreation with emphasis in management needs and skills. (Winter) 

PETH 375. Motor Learning and Development 3 hours 

A course of study designed to examine motor development and motor behavior as it relates 
to an individual's maturation process, with emphasis placed on implications for the physical 
educator. (Winter) 



Course Descriptions 303 



PETH 437. Adaptive Physical Education 2 hours 

A course designed to develop an understanding of neurodevelopment and functional ability, 
of impairments and their implications for motor performance. Emphasis on teaching 
progressions and exercise programs for special populations. (Fall) 

PETH 441. Secondary Physical Education Methods 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The class is designed to provide instruction to pre-service teachers as to the different styles 
of teaching secondary physical education. Other topics include teacher effectiveness, 
systematic observation analysis, standards based curriculum planning, and authentic 
assessment. The class includes observation and practice teaching at local schools 

PETH 463. Elementary School PE Methods 2 hours 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with the unique aspects of physical 
education and the adolescent. Special activities include teaching and observation in an 
elementary school. (Fall, Summer) 

PETH 474. Psychology and Sociology of Sports 2 hours 

An exploration of sports and their involving impact on American culture. Special attention is 
given to current issues in sports as they relate to the individual in society. (Fall) 

PETH 495. Directed Study (W) 1-3 hours 

See PETH 295 for course description. 

Photography 

PHTO 125. Introduction to Photography (G-l) 3 hours 

Instruction in use of the camera and light meter; study of elements that constitute good 
photo composition, darkroom techniques involving film development, negative enlargement, 
and print finishing. Students supply their own 35mm cameras with adjustable f-stops and 
shutter speeds. A limited number of rental cameras are available. Two hours of lecture, three 
hours of laboratory each week. Lab fee 10 will be assessed for this course. 

PHTO 265. Topics in Photography 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in photography and related areas presented in a classroom setting. This 
course may be repeated for credit. 

PHTO 291. Photojournalism Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 

During one semester or summer, the student will work as a staff photographer for the 
Southern Accent or part-time at another weekly or daily newspaper. Student will gain a wide 
variety of experience shooting news, sports, and feature assignments under deadline 
pressure. 

PHTO 295. Directed Study l-3hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the student. Open 
only to students approved by the School dean in consultation with the prospective instructor. 
This course may be repeated for credit. 

PHTO 315. Photojournalism 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with JOUR 315. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See JOUR 315 for course description. 

PHTO 320. Digital Photography 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PHTO 125. 

Students will learn image-capture processing and outputting of digitized photographic 
images utilizing Adobe Photoshop. Emphasis is on studio, wedding, and even photography. 
Topics include environmental and group portraits, illustrative techniques, industrial and 
commercial photography. Students supply their own digital SLR cameras. A limited supply 
of digital SLRs are available for $100 rental fee. Lab fee 11 will be assessed for this course. 



304 Course Descriptions 



PHTO 391. Photojournalism Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 
See PHTO 291 for course description. 

PHTO 465. Topics in Photography 1-3 hours 

See PHTO 265 for course description. 

PHTO 492. Photography Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Completion of at least half the requirements for a major or minor in photography and School 

approval. 

Students gain field experience in photography in a setting such as a newspaper or other 
publication, a studio, or other professional environment. This would occur preferably during 
an 8 to 12 week period the summer between the junior and senior year when no other 
college course is taken. At least 300 clock hours of work experience are required. 
Procedures and guidelines are available from the School. 

PHTO 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See PHTO 295 for course description. 

Physics 

PHYS 127. Exploring Physics I (E-3) 3 hours 

An in-depth exploration of various fundamental topics in physics in an activity-based, 
directed-inquiry (lab/lecture) format. Topics may include motion, light, sound, and energy. 

PHYS 128. Exploring Physics II (E-3) 3 hours 

An in-depth exploration of various fundamental topics in physics in an activity-based 
directed-inquiry (lab/lecture) format. Topics may include heat, fluids, electricity, magnetism, 
and mathematical modeling. (PHYS 127 is not a prerequisite for PHYS 128.) 

PHYS 155. Descriptive Astronomy: Creation and Cosmology (E-3) 3 hours 

Constellations and eclipses, astronomical instruments, time and the date line and calendars, 
astronomical objects with their motions and distances, energy processes in stars and 
quasars and pulsars, black holes, the infinity (?) and expansion (?) of the universe. 
Cosmology, the formation and subsequent histories of the solar system and the earth, 
radioactive dating, life on other worlds, as seen from observational and Biblical perspectives 
Three hours lecture each week, with optional opportunities for an observation period. (Fall) 

PHYS 211-212. General Physics (E-3) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 120, 121. 

The algebraic and trigonometric treatment of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and 
magnetism, and "modern physics." Applies toward the basic science requirement as a 
non-laboratory science if taken alone and as a laboratory science if taken with PHYS 
213-214. 

PHYS 213-214. General Physics Laboratory (E-3) 1,1 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 211-212. 

Laboratory experience designed to illustrate the material in lectures, to familiarize the 
student with useful measuring apparatus, and to encourage a systematic development of 
scientific curiosity, caution, and method. (Fall, Winter) 

PHYS 215, 216. General Physics Calculus Applications 1,1 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 181; previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 211-212. 

Derivations and problems in General Physics using differential and integral calculus will be 
studied. Students completing PHYS 211-212 and PHYS 215, 216 will have taken the 
equivalent of General Physics with calculus. Two class periods per week. (Winter) 

PHYS 265. Topics in Physics 1-3 hours 

Selected topics presented in a formal classroom setting in specialty areas of physics not 
covered in regular courses. May be repeated for credit for different topics. 



Course Descriptions 305 



PHYS 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

This course consists of individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs in Physics. 
Approval must be secured from the instructor prior to registration. This course may be 
repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter) 

PHYS 297. Undergraduate Research in Physics 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Research under direction of a member of the staff. The topic will be assigned in accordance 
to the interests and capabilities of the student. It is assumed that the student is familiar with 
one or more spreadsheets, mathematics manipulation programs, and graphing software 
packages. May be repeated for up to four hours. (Fall, Winter; May be accomplished on a co- 
op basis during the Summer.) 

PHYS 305. Biophysics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211, 212, 215, 216; MATH 181; High school biology and chemistry. 

Physics principles will be used to address a variety of problems that arise in biological 
systems. Topics may include Brownian motion and diffusion, fluids, self-assembly, molecular 
machines, membranes and nerve impulses. 

PHYS 310. Modern Physics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211-212; MATH 181, 182. 

The origins of modern physics, quantum theory, the theory of relativity, nuclear physics. 
Three hours lecture each week. Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 325. (Fall) 

PHYS 313. Physical Optics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211-212, 310; MATH 182. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light are discussed from the standpoint 
of the ray and especially of the wave theories of light. Laboratory experience is available in 
PHYS 325. (Winter, even years) 

PHYS 315. Spectroscopy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211-212, 310; MATH 182. 

Interpretation of spectral line and band wavelengths, profiles, and intensities in terms of 
stars' composition, temperature, pressure, motions. Design of laboratory experiments to 
obtain atomic and molecular constants. Systematics of atomic and molecular data. 
Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 497. (Fall, even years) 

PHYS 316. Mathematics of Physics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 213-214, 310; MATH 315. 
See MATH 316 for course description. 

PHYS 317. Issues in Physical Science and Religion (E-3) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: One year of high school physics or chemistry or one semester of college physics or chemistry; junior 

standing. 

This course is cross-listed with RELT 317, School of Religion. A student may receive credit for this course from only 

one program. 

Scientific method, truth, reality, logic and derivability, authority/inspiration, faith and reason 
in mathematics and physical sciences. Non-logical factors in acceptance of scientific 
statements as authoritative. Arguments for the existence of God. Causality, determinism and 
miracles. Scientific revolutions and paradigm shifts with relation to trends in religion and 
philosophy. Does not apply to a major in or minor in Physics. (Winter) 

PHYS 325. Advanced Physics Laboratory I 1 hour 

Prerequisites: PHYS 213-214, 310. 

Laboratory experiments pertinent to areas of physics except electricity and magnetism. 
Meets once per week. 

PHYS 326. Advanced Physics Laboratory II 1 hour 

Prerequisites: PHYS 213-214, 310. 

Laboratory experiments pertinent to electricity and magnetism. Meets once a week. 



306 Course Descriptions 



PHYS 400. Physics Portfolio 1 hour 

Each student majoring in Physics may compile a portfolio consisting of records of 
participation in professional activities as suggested by departmental faculty and as initiated 
by the student. Examples of activities include but are not limited to the following: attendance 
at club meetings, professional film showings, visiting-scientist seminar, and research review 
sessions, reading of journals and books, participation at professional meetings, preparation 
for graduate school and for employment, and lists of concepts or new ideas. The portfolio is 
reviewed upon the student's registration for this course during the senior year. The grade 
earned for this credit will depend upon the persistence of the student in participation during 
his/her stay at Southern Adventist University and during summers, and upon the breadth 
and depth of the entries. It also depends upon the student having his/her portfolio reviewed 
by the Department at the end of each preceding semester, and the extent to which the 
Department's suggestions on those occasions are implemented. 

PHYS 411. Thermodynamics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 213-214, 310: MATH 182. 

A study of gases, kinetic theory, and quantum statistics. Emphasis is placed on being able to 
use thermodynamics data in the literature. Three hours of lecture each week. This class is 
not open to students who have taken CHEM 411. Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 
497. (Fall, even years) 

PHYS 412. Quantum Mechanics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 215, 216, 310; MATH 315. 

The limits to classical physics; wave packets, the Schroedinger equation, eigenfunctions and 
eigenvalues, one-dimensional potentials, the solution of the Schroedinger equation in 
spherical-polar coordinates for the hydrogen atom; electron spin and the Pauli requirement 
for antisymmetric wave functions, with applications to states of light atoms; variation 
techniques for small atoms and molecules, Hueckel and LCAO methods. This class is not 
open to students who have taken CHEM 412. (Winter, odd years) 

PHYS 413. Analytic Mechanics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 215, 216, 310; MATH 182, 218, 315 (MATH 316, 317, 318, 319, 411-412 desirable). 
The motion of a particle in gravitational and other classical fields is attacked using the 
techniques of differential equations in the Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms. 
Special functions, vector theorems, transforms, and tensors are introduced as needed. 
Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 497. (Fall, odd years) 

PHYS 414-415. Electrodynamics 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 215, 216, 310; MATH 182, 218, 315, (316, 317, 318, 319, 411-412 desirable). 

Analysis of electrical circuits, electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, and the motion of 
charges therein. Maxwell's equations and the consequent prediction of electro-magnetic 
waves. Applications to modern atomic and nuclear theory are stressed. Complex mapping, 
vector theorems, transforms, and special functions may be used. Laboratory experience is 
available in PHYS 326. (Fall, even years; Winter, odd years) 

PHYS 418-419. Advanced Quantum Mechanics 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 215, 216, 310, 412; MATH 182, 218, 315, (316, 317, 318, 319, 411-412 desirable) 
The structure of quantum mechanics; review of the Thomson, Bohr, and Fermi-Thomas 
models; operator methods; operators, matrices, and spin; time-independent perturbation 
theory; corrections to the hydrogen-atom treatment; other atoms and the periodic table; 
emission and absorption of radiation from atoms; collision theory; elementary particles and 
their symmetries; group dynamics approach to particle classification. (Fall, odd years; Winter, 
even years) 

PHYS 465. Topics in Physics 1-3 hours 

See PHYS 265 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 307 



PHYS 480. Scientific Writing and Presentation (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: COMM 135 

Principles and techniques of writing for news releases, periodicals, and research journals. 
Practice in scientific meeting oral and poster-session presentation. It is expected that the 
written reports be done with a word processor and that the student will have done some 
original research of an experimental, computational, or theorem-proving nature before 
enrolling in this course. PHYS 295/495 and 297/497 exist to fulfill this requirement and 
there are numerous opportunities with pay at universities and national laboratories during 
the student's junior-senior summer. (Fall) 

PHYS 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

See PHYS 295 for course description. 

PHYS 497. Undergraduate Research in Physics 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

See PHYS 297 for course description. 

Political Science 

PLSC224. Principles of Macroeconomics (C-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with ECON 224, School of Business and Management. A student may receive credit for 
this course from only one program. 

See ECON 224 for course description. 

PLSC 254. American National and State Government (C-2) 3 hours 

An examination of the operation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of 
government of the national, state, and local levels. 

PLSC 291. Political Science Practicum 3-6 hours 

Supervised work experience in a state legislative, congressional, or other governmental 
office. A minimum of 50 clock hours for each hour of credit is required. 

PLSC 292. Political Science Internship 9-12 hours 

Supervised work experience in a state legislative, congressional, or other governmental 
office. A minimum of 100 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour 
of credit. 

PLSC 295. Directed Study (C-2) 1-3 hours 

A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a student is assigned 
will determine whether credit is upper or lower division. This course also includes credit 
offered by the History Department on directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for PLSC 
495 only. Approval of the department is required priorto registration. 

PLSC 353. From Colony to Nation (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

A study of the colonial phase of American history with particular emphasis on the political 
texts of the age. 

PLSC 345 Middle Eastern Politics and History (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with HIST 345. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See HIST 345 for course description. 

PLSC 357. Modern America (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

A study of Twentieth-century political developments in the United States, focusing especially 
on the presidency, Supreme Court, and foreign affairs. 

PLSC 388. Contemporary Europe (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with HIST 388. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See HIST 388 for course description. 

PLSC 465. Topics in Political Science (C-2) 3 hours 

See HIST 465 for course description. 



308 Course Descriptions 



PLSC 471. Classics of Western Thought I (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with HIST 471. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See HIST 471 for course description. 

PLSC 472. Classics of Western Thought II (C-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with HIST 472. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See HIST 472 for course description. 

PLSC 491. Political Science Practicum 3-6 hours 

See PLSC 291 for course description. 

PLSC 492. Political Science Internship 9-12 hours 

See PLSC 292 for course description. 

PLSC 495. Directed Study (C-2) (W) 1-3 hours 

See PLSC 295 for course description 

Public Relations 

PREL 233. Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector 3 hours 

This course offers the student an overview of the development and current status of the 
nonprofit sector in the United States with specific focus on youth and human service 
agencies. Students will study the unique philosophical, financial, and administrative qualities 
of this rapidly growing sector of society, as they observe and assess local nonprofit agencies 
at work. 

PREL 235. Public Relations Principles and Theory 3 hours 

Basic Public Relations principles, philosophy, and theory as they relate to the historical 
development and contemporary practice of public relations; analysis of the public relations 
role in business, industry, and nonprofit organizations, and of the functions and 
responsibilities of the public relations practitioner. 

PREL 244. Sales 2 hours 

Principles and techniques of selling products and services based on understanding of buyer 
behavior, time and stress management, and effective persuasion. 

PREL 265. Topics in Public Relations 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in public relations and related areas presented in a classroom setting. This 
course may be repeated for credit. 

PREL 291. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 

Supervised work experience in public relations, advertising, or sales. At least 90 clock hours 
of work experience are required for each semester hour of credit. Procedures and guidelines 
are available from the school. 

PREL 295. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

For students who want to do independent research and writing in a specialized area of public 
relations, advertising or marketing. Directed study topics will be selected with guidance from 
the instructor who will serve as a consultant to the student in carrying out the project. 

PREL 344. Fundamentals of Advertising 3 hours 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough overview of the business of 
advertising. Principal topics considered include advertising theories, the relationship 
between marketing and advertising, Integrated Marketing Communication, media planning, 
and advertising research. The course also includes an introduction to creative direction, 
copywriting, advertising research, and the process of planning and preparing 
advertisements. 



Course Descriptions 309 



PREL 354. Advertising Copywriting 2 hours 

Principles and practices in writing and preparing advertising messages for the mass media. 
Analysis of successful advertising copy as well as opportunity for students to develop their 
own copywriting skills are part of the course. Social responsibility and ethics of the advertiser 
and copywriter are an integral part of instruction. 

PREL 368. Fund Development 3 hours 

Study of fund-raising principles and concepts; techniques used in planning, organizing, and 
carrying out a fund-raising campaign; developing prospect lists, writing proposals, identifying 
and training development leadership, and working with foundations. 

PREL 370. American Humanics Management Institute (AHMI) 1 hour 

This course is designed to help students attain their American Humanics certification. 
Sessions held at AHMI give students certification in skills needed for American Humanics 
certification. Lab Fee 12 will be assessed for this course. Travel, food, and lodging is not 
included in lab fee. (Pass/Fail) 

PREL 391. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor before arranging for practicum. 
See PREL 291 for course description. 

PREL 406. Persuasion and Propaganda (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with COMM 406. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See COMM 406 for course description. 

PREL 465. Topics in Public Relations 1-3 hours 

See PREL 265 for course description. 

PREL 482. The Public Relations Campaign 3 hours 

The public relations function in the context of the organizational communications and 
decision-making process. Application of communications theory and techniques in 
developing both internal and external communications campaigns; selected case studies. 

PREL 485. Public Relations Techniques 3 hours 

Prerequisites: JOUR 205, 208. 

Communication techniques used in public relations to identify and reach specified 
audiences through mass media channels and through controlled media. Preparation of press 
releases, brochures, newsletters, reports, audio-visuals, speeches, and media campaigns; 
planning and conducting special events. 

PREL 492. Public Relations Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Completion of at least half the requirements for a major or minor in public relations, advertising, or 

sales and School approval. 

Students work in the field of advertising, sales, or public relations to obtain on-the-job 
experience, preferably during an 8 to 12 week period the summer between the junior and 
senior year when no other college course is taken. At least 300 clock hours of work 
experience are required. Detailed procedures and guidelines are available from the School. 

PREL 495. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

See PREL 295 for course description. 

PREL 498. American Humanics Internship 3 hours 

Students work in the field of nonprofit organizations to obtain on-the-job experience, 
preferably during an eight to twelve week period during the summer between the junior and 
senior year when no other college course is taken. At least 300 clock hours of work 
experience are required. Detailed procedures and guidelines are available from the School. 



310 Course Descriptions 



Psychology 

PSYC 101. Psychology of Personal and Social Adjustment (F-l) 3 hours 

This course will provide an opportunity for students to gain insight into their own behavior as 
well as that of others. Goals for this course include: understanding strategies for personal 
adjustment and growth across the life span, dealing with life changes and developing 
adequate coping mechanisms for making self-affirming life choices, maintaining health, 
managing stress, relating to others in one's social environments, and developing effective 
interpersonal relationships. Strategies for exploring life options and making effective 
decisions are emphasized. Importance is placed on the role of beliefs and values in the 
decision-making process and the problems that arise out of value conflicts. 

PSYC 122. General Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

A beginning course in the basic principles and concepts of psychology. Special attention is 
given to provide an exposure to a wide variety of human behaviors, which may include but 
are not limited to: sensation, perception, learning, memory, thinking, development 
motivation and personality. Included in this course are twenty (20) hours of active learning 
experience, which may include field experiences outside the classroom. Required of PSYC 
majors. 

PSYC 128. Developmental Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

A study of human development from a lifespan perspective. Emphasis is placed on the 
scientific study of growth and change in the areas of physical, cognitive, socioemotional, and 
spiritual development of the individual. This course requires fifteen (15) hours of community 
service. 

PSYC 221. Challenge Course Facilitator 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDOE 221. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
This course presents the content, methods, and safety measures used for cooperative 
initiatives and challenge course facilitation. Students will learn to use and implement the 
challenge course as a personal growth and development tool for different age groups and 
diverse populations. They will learn how trust, goal setting, peak experiences, challenge, 
stress, problem solving, and fun are key elements in effective challenge course facilitation 
Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 

PSYC 224. Social Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 224. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
A study of human behavior as affected in the context of the social world. Dynamics of 
groups, social roles, communication, and mass behavior are focuses of consideration. (Fall) 

PSYC 227. Cognitive Psychology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122. 

This course is an introduction to the area of psychology which deals with how human beings 
process information about the world. The course focuses on how individuals attend to and 
obtain information about the world, how the brain stores and processes that information, 
and how individuals think, solve problems and use language. Specific topics such as 
attention, perception, memory, problem solving, and artificial intelligence are addressed. 
(Fall) 

PSYC 231. Multicultural Relations (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230 and SOCW 230. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 230 for course description. 

PSYC 233. Human Sexuality (F-l or F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 233 and SOCW 233. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 233 for course description. (Credit not permitted if SOCI 233 has been taken.) 



Course Descriptions 311 



PSYC 241. Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth 2 hours 

This course provides an overview of a wide range of exceptional individuals— from those with 
disabilities to the economically disadvantaged. The course addresses the learning and 
adjustment problems of exceptional children and youth from birth to twenty-one (21) years of 
age. Issues relevant to families with exceptional children, professionals serving this 
population, and community and societal factors are considered. (Winter) 

PSYC 249. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 249/449, SOCW 249 and NRSG 449 . A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See SOCI 249/449 for course description. 

PSYC 253. Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3 hours 

A study of human behavior in industries and organizations. Major theories, issues, research, 
and methods will be introduced. Emphasis is given to acquainting students with the possible 
applications of psychology to the fields of business and organizational management. (Winter, 
even years) 

PSYC 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 

This course permits the student with adequate preparation to pursue independent study in 
specific areas in psychology. The area of study will appear on the transcript. Directed study 
arrangements are to be completed by the student in advance of registration after consulting 
with the adviser and following an application process. Procedures and guidelines are 
available from the school. May be repeated for credit. 

PSYC 297. Research Design and Statistics I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122 or PSYC 128. 

This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry in psychology and other social and 
behavioral sciences. Students are introduced to APA (American Psychological Association) 
style, descriptive statistics, and basic research design. Emphasis is placed on 'doing 
research' in psychology. Students are guided in understanding the role of statistics in 
research design and are introduced to computer-aided data analysis using SPSS (Statistical 
Package for the Social Sciences). (Fall) 

PSYC 315. Abnormal Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122 or PSYC 128. 

A study of the etiology of pathological behavior and the factors relating to good adjustment 
and mental health. Attention is paid to several continuing or recent controversial issues in 
the field of psychopathology. Included in this course are active learning experiences. 

PSYC 326. Physiological Psychology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122. 

A study of the brain: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neural control of behavior. The 
biochemical substrates of behavior such as memory, sleep, emotion, learning, and 
motivation are examined. (Winter, even years) 

PSYC 336. Language Acquisition and Development 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDUC 336. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See EDUC 336 for course description. 

PSYC 346. Introduction to Personality Theories 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122, 128. 

This course is an exploration of the major paradigms of personality theory from a Christian 
perspective. Psychoanalysis, behaviorism, humanism, existentialism, and others will be 
covered. It will focus on the modern theorists, including White, Rogers, Skinner, May, 
Bandura, Mischel, Wilson, and Barash. A study of human motivation and an exploration of 
individual personality perspective will provide useful personal information. 



312 Course Descriptions 



PSYC 349. Aging and Society (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 349 and SOCW 349 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 349 for course description. 

PSYC 357. Psychological Testing 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PSYC 122 and PSYC 297 or Math 215 or BUAD 221. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles of testing, particularly as it 
relates to the practice of psychology. Specifically, the course examines the purpose of 
individual assessment of ability, aptitude, achievement, interest, and personality. Theory and 
basic concepts underlying the individually administered and group tests will be evaluated 
Non-standardized tests and other techniques for psychological assessment will also be 
addressed. (Fall) 

PSYC 377. Fundamentals of Counseling (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

Recommended: PSYC 315 or PSYC 346. 

This is an introduction to the major theories and practices of individual counseling. The 
dynamics of the helping relationship are analyzed. Theory and practice will be integrated. 

PSYC 384. Experimental Psychology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 297. 

This course focuses on experimentation in the field of psychology Specifically, students will 
be introduced to conducting simple experiments in such areas as learning, cognition, 
sensation, perception, and social psychology. (Fall, odd years) 

PSYC 387. Comparative Psychology 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with BIOL 387. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See BIOL 387 for course description. (Winter, odd years) 

PSYC 390. Health Psychology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122. 

A study of the principles of human behavior in understanding how the mind and body 
interact in health and disease. The course examines topics such as alcohol, other drugs and 
behavior, health promotion, psychosomatic illness, stress and coping, pain management, 
and health damaging behaviors. (Winter, odd years) 

PSYC 416. History and Systems of Psychology (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122 and senior standing for BA/BS in Psychology. 

This course examines the beginnings of modern psychology from its origins in theology, 
philosophy, and the natural sciences to its contemporary schools, systems, and theories. 
This is the capstone course of the psychology undergraduate program. (Winter) 

PSYC 422. Adolescent Psychology 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with EDUC 423. A student may receive credit for this course form only one program 

Prerequisite: PSYC 122 or PSYC 128. 

The determinants and implications of behavioral characteristics and developmental patterns 
during adolescence will be studied. Content will include the psychological and social 
dynamics underlying the crises and issues specific to adolescents in modern society. (Fall) 

PSYC 460. Group Processes 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 377. 

This course will offer the advanced student the opportunity to explore through practice the 
various roles of group dynamics. The experience will provide skill development for the 
management of small groups in therapy, school, and church settings. (Winter, odd years) 

PSYC 465. Topics in Psychology 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology major with junior or senior standing 

Selected topics in psychology as chosen from such areas as: psychology of religion, ethics, 
individual differences, psychology of women, sensation and perception, etc. This course may 
be repeated for credit with an appropriate change in topics. 



Course Descriptions 313 



PSYC479. Family Counseling 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC377. 

An advanced counseling techniques course including an emphasis on family and individual 
counseling and how to direct persons to make changes towards more effective interpersonal 
relationships. (Fall, even years) 

PSYC490. Psychology Seminar lhour 

Prerequisite: Psychology major or minor with senior standing. 

This course is designed to present an overview of psychology issues and contemporary 
problems. (Fall) 

PSYC 491. Psychology Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology major with junior or senior standing and approval of the instructor. 

Supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of psychology. At least forty (40) clock 
hours of work experience are required for each semester hour of credit. This class should be 
taken no later than fall of the senior year. May be repeated for credit for up to 3 hours. 
Grades will be assigned on an A, B, or F basis. 

PSYC 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 

See PSYC 295 for course description. 

PSYC 497. Research Design and Statistics II (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 297 or MATH 215, either with a minimum grade of C-. 

This course is the second of the two-part series, Research Design and Statistics. The focus is 
on research methodology, inferential statistics, and non-parametric methods of data 
analysis. Each student is required to complete an independent research project. Data 
analysis techniques utilize SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). 

Recreation 

RECR 210. Aerobics Instructor Trainer 2 hours 

Prerequisite: PEAC 225. 

This course is cross-listed with PETH 210. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PETH 210 for course description. 

RECR 254. Lifeguarding (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with RECR 254. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PEAC 254 for course description. 

RECR 255. Water Safety Instructor (G-3) 1 hour 

This course is cross-listed with PEAC 255. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PEAC 255 for course description. 

RECR 268, 269. Officiating Sports Analysis 2,2 hours 

An introduction to administration of and participation in the organization of officiating in 
team and individual recreational activities. 

RECR 325. Personal Trainer 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PETH 325. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PETH 325 for course description. 

RECR 491. Recreation Practicum 1-3 hours 

The student will spend a minimum of 100 credit hours in observing and working with a 
recreation facility. Appropriate sights will be located in cooperation with your academic 
adviser. 



314 Course Descriptions 



Biblical Studies 

RELB 125. Life and Teachings of Jesus (B-l) 3 hours 

A study of the life, ministry, and teachings of Jesus with special emphasis on His teachings 
as they apply to the personal, social, and religious problems of the individual. (Fall, Winter, 
Summer) 

RELB 175. Acts of the Apostles (B-l) 3 hours 

A study of the development of the church during apostolic times, including an introduction to 
the characters, issues, and events that shaped the earliest Christian communities and the 
theological development of the gospel by the early church. 

RELB 237. Archaeology and the Old Testament (B-l) 3 hours 

A study of cultures, customs, languages, and religions that impact the understanding of the 
Old Testament based on archaeological and other ancient material culture which, 
interpreted from the viewpoint of the Bible, emphasizes its authenticity. (Fall) 

RELB 245. Old Testament Studies I (B-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Six hours of religion courses. 

An introduction to the Pentateuch and Writings, two major divisions of the Old Testament. 
Attention will be given to the structure, themes, theology, historical setting, and significance 
of this literature in Christian interpretation. Various approaches to the study of the Old 
Testament will be surveyed. (Fall) 

RELB 246. Old Testament Studies II (B-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Six hours of religion courses. 

An introduction to the Prophets, a third major division of the Old Testament. Attention will be 
given to the structure, themes, theology, historical setting, and significance of this literature 
in Christian interpretation. (Winter) 

RELB 247. Archaeology and the New Testament (B-l) 3 hours 

A study of the cultures, customs, languages, and religions that impact the understanding of 
the New Testament based on archaeological and other ancient material culture which, 
interpreted from the viewpoint of the Bible, emphasizes its authenticity. (Winter) 

RELB 255. Archaeological Fieldwork (B-l) 1-6 hours 

In conjunction with the archaeological expeditions and sponsored by Southern Adventist 
University, qualified students obtain practical experience and training in archaeological 
fieldwork by assisting in the supervising of excavation drawings, registering, reading of 
pottery, and related work. Fees are assessed to cover the expenses of fieldwork and room 
and board. (Summer) 

RELB 295. Directed Study (B-l) 1-3 hours 

This course is limited primarily to School of Religion majors and must be approved by the 
dean of the School of Religion. Occasionally the course may be conducted as a seminar and 
published in the schedule of classes. This course may be repeated for credit. (As needed) 

RELB 340. Middle East Study Tour (B-l) 1-3 hours 

Sponsored by the School of Religion, the Middle East Study Tour focuses on the 
archaeological, historical, and geographical study of the region, with an emphasis on the 
comparative study of cultures, locations, and events as they relate to the Bible. Fees are 
assessed to cover the expenses of the tour. (Summer) 

RELB 425. Studies in Daniel (W) (B-l) 3 hours 

Recommended: HIST 174, 175. 

A study of selected historical and prophetic portions of Daniel to discover their meaning and 
relevance for today. (Fall, Summer as needed) 



Course Descriptions 315 



RELB 426. Studies in Revelation (B-l) 3 hours 

Recommended: HIST 174, 175. 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of Revelation with their historical fulfillments. 
Special attention will be given to discovering its special message for our day. (Winter, 
Summer as needed) 

RELB 435. New Testament Studies I (B-l) 3 hours 

A brief introduction to and exegetical study of the General Letters of the New Testament 
which include Hebrews; James; 1 and 2 Peter; Jude; 1, 2, and 3 John. Includes a background 
survey of the book of Acts. (Fall) 

RELB 436. New Testament Studies II (B-l) 3 hours 

A brief introduction to and exegetical study of the Pauline Letters of the New Testament 
which include 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Romans, Ephesians, 
Colossians, Philippians, Philemon, 1 and 2 Timothy. (Winter) 

RELB 455. Archaeological Fieldwork (B-l) 1-6 hours 

See RELB 255 for course description. 

RELB 465. Topics in Biblical Studies (B-l) 1-3 hours 

This course is designed to provide an exposure to a wide range of religious studies dealing 
with issues encountered in biblical studies. The content will change as needed, so the 
course may be repeated once for credit. Open to all students. (As needed) 

RELB 495. Directed Study (B-l) 1-3 hours 

See RELB 295 for course description. 

RELB 497. Archaeological Method and Theory (B-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELB 237, 247. 

This course provides a thorough background to archaeological method and theory for the 
advanced archaeology student, including a historical overview of archaeological inquiry, as 
well as the development of procedure, method, and theoretical perspectives in the 
discipline. There will be a focus on ceramic typology and interpretation of site reports in the 
southern Levant and the Aegean world. Open to archaeology majors and minors only. 
(Winter, even years) 

Biblical Languages 

RELL 181-182. Biblical Hebrew I, II (D-l) 3,3 hours 

A foundation course in the grammar, syntax, and lexicography of classical Biblical Hebrew, 
with an emphasis on reading skills. Laboratory work required. 

RELL 191-192. New Testament Greek I, II (D-l) 3,3 hours 

A foundational study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the koine Greek of the New 
Testament. The student will read and translate selected New Testament passages in 
preparation for doing exegesis of the New Testament text. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for the 
National Biblical Greek exam. 

RELL 221. Introduction to Biblical Exegesis 2 hours 

Prerequisite: One semester of biblical language. 

An introduction to biblical exegesis (the application of principles of interpretation) to 
passages of the Bible representing the various genres of the Old and New Testaments. This 
course will acquaint the student with the presuppositions which lie beneath various 
hermeneutical approaches to the text, with guidelines for the steps in the interpretation of 
the text. Opportunity will be given for involvement in the process of biblical exegesis. (Winter) 

RELL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course is limited primarily to School of Religion majors and must be approved by the 
dean of the School of Religion. Occasionally the course may be conducted as a seminar and 
published in the schedule of classes. This course may be repeated for credit. (As needed) 



316 Course Descriptions 



RELL 330. Intermediate Hebrew 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELL 181, 182, 221. 

Application of the principles of exegesis to the text of the Hebrew Bible, with particular 
emphasis on the contribution of Hebrew lexicography, grammar, syntax, and style to the 
understanding of the text. The student will be expected to analyze the text of assigned 
passages and to prepare brief exegetical papers and sermons based on the Hebrew text of 
the Old Testament. (Fall) 

RELL 331. Intermediate Greek 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELL 191, 192, 221. 

An intermediate course which applies the principles of koine Greek grammar and syntax to 
the exegesis of selected passages from the Greek New Testament. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the significance of the results of exegesis for preaching the text. Lab fee 3 will be 
assessed forthe National Biblical Greek exam. (Fall) 

RELL 465. Topics in Biblical Languages 1-3 hours 

This course is designed to provide an exposure to a wide range of religious studies dealing 
with issues encountered in biblical languages and exegesis. The content will change as 
needed, so the course may be repeated once for credit. Open to all students. (As needed) 

RELL 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See RELL 295 for course description. 



Professional Training 



RELP 150. Introduction to Ministry 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Three hours of religion courses. Students whose major does not require this course must obtain 

permission from instructor and School dean. 

An introduction to the basics of ministry, focusing on issues such as the call to pastoral or 
teaching ministry, Christ-centered living, personal spirituality, ethical behavior, relationships 
with others, concern for the lost, time management, and theological study. This course seeks 
to develop personal morality, spiritual growth, and practical life skills in ministers and 
teachers in training. Lab fee 6 will be assessed forthe IDAK career evaluation. 

RELP 240. World Missions (B-3) 3 hours 

An introduction to world missions and mission strategies. This course introduces a theology 
of world mission, the history of missions, various philosophies of mission including the 
Seventh-day Adventist philosophy and strategy of missions and the strategic implementation 
of mission in different cultural settings. Major religious, philosophical and cultural traditions 
will be examined for the purpose of enhancing Christian outreach and cross-cultural 
evangelism. Upper division students are expected to do additional research and writing 
besides the other class requirements. (Winter) 

RELP 251. Introduction to Youth Ministry (B-3) 3 hours 

This course will explore the biblical basis for a specialized ministry to children, youth, and 
young adults. The students will become acquainted with current research, contemporary 
approaches, and available resources to enhance ministry to youth. Practical experience in 
area churches will be required. 

RELP 252. Intermediate Youth Ministry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: RELP 251. 

This course will focus on principles and strategies for specialized ministry among 
adolescents in the local church. Practical experience in area churches will be required. 

RELP 264. Christian Witnessing (B-3) 3 hours 

This course will focus on Christ's model of reaching people and how this approach can be 
integrated in one's spiritual life and implemented with interpersonal relationships and the 
sharing of the gospel. (Winter) 



Course Descriptions 317 



RELP 270. Interpersonal Ministry 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Three hours of religion courses. Students whose major does not require this course must obtain 

permission from instructor and School dean. 

The development of listening skills and interpersonal communication in pastoral visitation, 
with special emphasis on revitalizing inactive members. Laboratory work in area churches 
will be required. 

RELP 291. Practicum 1-3 hours 

Supervised practicum in various forms of ministry as individually designed for each student. 
The program and the supervisor must be approved by the School of Religion prior to 
registration. These programs will involve a minimum of 100 hours of instruction and activity 
for each hour of credit. This course may be applied to a Religion minor but is not a substitute 
for RELP 466 Public Evangelism, or other General Education requirements. (Pass/Fail) 

RELP 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

This course is limited to School of Religion majors and must be approved by the School 
dean. Occasionally the course may be conducted as a seminar and published in the 
schedule of classes. This course may be repeated for credit. (As needed) 

RELP 321. Introduction to Biblical Preaching 2 hours 

Prerequisites: COMM 135; RELL221; Junior status or permission of the instructor. 

This introductory course examines the foundations for effective biblical preaching. Attention 
will be given to the call and preparation of the preacher, principles of biblical hermeneutics, 
the elements of sermon formulation, and principles of sermon delivery. A topical, 
biographical, or narrative sermon will be preached and analyzed in a peer-review setting. 
(Fall) 

RELP 322. Intermediate Biblical Preaching 2 hours 

Prerequisite: RELP 321; Junior status or permission of the instructor. 

This course focuses on the preparation and delivery of expository sermons. Attention will be 
given to the discovery of the exegetical idea of the text, the formulation of the homiletical 
idea, and how to preach with conviction. Expository sermons will be preached and analyzed 
in a peer-review setting. (Winter) 

RELP 340. World Missions (B-3) 3 hours 

See RELP 240 for course description. 

RELP 354. Introduction to Pastoral Counseling 3 hours 

This course is an introduction to pastoral redemptive care. Visitation to correctional and 
rehabilitation centers, hospitals, and nursing homes will be required. This course is not 
designed as an introduction to professional counseling. 

RELP 361. Personal Evangelism I (B-3) 2 hours 

The course covers the principles and practice of one-to-one evangelism, focusing on leading 
people to Christ, giving effective Bible studies, friendship evangelism, ministering to young 
people, and working in local church outreach endeavors. Students must take this course 
immediately preceding RELP 362, Personal Evangelism II. (Fall) 

RELP 362. Personal Evangelism II (B-3) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: RELP 361. 

This course builds on the practical ministry skills introduced in Personal Evangelism I. In 
addition, urban evangelism, small groups outreach, and answering Bible objections will be 
covered. Students whose major or minor requires RELP 466 Public Evangelism, must take 
the course immediately before Public Evangelism. (Winter) 

RELP 391. Practicum 1-3 hours 

See RELP 291 for course description. 



318 Course Descriptions 



RELP 401. Fundamentals of Biblical Preaching 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of the School of Religion. 

A basic homiletics course focusing on the preparation and delivery of expository sermons. 
The student will learn and implement a ten-step method for sermon preparation and will 
preach it in a peer-review setting. The course is intended for students with no academic 
credit in preaching. (Summer as needed) 

RELP 405. Evangelistic Preaching 1 hour 

Prerequisites: RELP 321 and permission of instructor. 

This course concentrates on the development and delivery of distinctively Adventist 
messages, with emphasis on soul-winning decisions and the use of multi-media. This course 
is available to those who will take RELP 466 Public Evangelism in the following summer. 
(Winter) 

RELP 423. Advanced Biblical Preaching 2 hours 

Prerequisites: RELP 321, 322. 

This course explores further methods of biblical preaching, such as the narrative plot and the 
inductive sermon, all the while challenging the student to a complete reliance upon Word 
and Spirit. Preaching is set for specific needs, situations, and the development of a sermonic 
series. Sermons are preached and analyzed in a peer-review setting. (Fall) 

RELP 450. Church Ministry I (B-3) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELP 150, 362, or permission of the instructor and School dean. Senior status only. 

An introduction to church ministry, this course explores a biblical theology of church ministry, 
clergy, and laity roles and relationships, church administration, and the practice of some 
specific ministries in the local setting. Laboratory work in area churches is required. (Fall) 

RELP 452. Church Ministry II 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELP 150, 362, or permission of the instructor and School dean. Senior status only. 

In this course, consideration is given to the personal as well as the professional life of the 
pastor, such as spiritual leadership, life management, worship ministry, priestly functions 
(baptisms, weddings, and funerals), denominational policy, church growth, and the 
empowerment of the Holy Spirit for ministry. The course includes the theology major exit 
exam. Laboratory work in area churches is required. (Winter) 

RELP 465. Topics in Professional Training 1-3 hours 

In this introductory course, Christ's model of personal evangelism will be emphasized, and 
attention will be given to the principles and practice of one-to-one evangelism with people of 
Christian, secular, and non-Christian backgrounds. The presentation of the gospel and giving 
of Bible studies is modeled in class, and laboratory experience is required of the student. (As 
needed) 

RELP 466. Public Evangelism 3 hours 

Prerequisites: RELP 362, 405 and acceptance as a ministerial trainee. 

Principles employed in preparing and conducting public evangelistic meetings are explored 
and experienced in connection with the Field School of Evangelism. The student learns how 
to plan and hold an evangelistic series, as well as visit with evangelistic interests. Consent 
from the School of Religion must be obtained before enrollment. 

RELP 468. Health Evangelism (B-3) 3 hours 

A study of the concepts and methods of creating witnessing opportunities through taking 
advantage of the current interest in preventive health practices and lifestyle changes. The 
objective of these concepts and methods is to obtain decisions for a more abundant way of 
life and to lead men and women to Christ. The course also will provide future church leaders 
with practical ways to utilize the talents of members in health evangelism. Laboratory work in 
area churches and/or community settings is required. 

RELP 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See RELP 495 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 319 



Religion and Theology 

RELT 138. Adventist Heritage (B-2) 3 hours 

A study of the Second Advent Awakening in the nineteenth century and the subsequent 
development of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Special emphasis will be placed on the 
contributory role in the church of the spiritual gift of prophecy through the life and ministry of 
Ellen G. White. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

RELT 139. Adventist Heritage Tour (B-2) 1 hour 

This tour visits sites of major importance to the history of the Millerite movement and the 
founding of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It also considers sites of significance to the 
context in which the Adventist church arose. Course requirements include going on the tour 
and keeping a journal containing written reflections on various tour sites. Lab fee 14 will be 
assessed for this course. (Fall Break) 

RELT 175. Christian Spirituality I (B-2) 2 hours 

This course provides a basic introduction to Christian spirituality and spiritual growth. Using 
Christ as a model, key spiritual disciplines, such as prayer and Bible study, will be explored 
and applied as ways to enrich personal spirituality. Aspects of spiritual growth such as 
understanding grace, obedience, faith and dependence on Christ will be explored from a 
biblical and practical perspective. 

RELT 176. Christian Spirituality II (B-2) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: RELT 175. 

A continued study of the classic spiritual disciplines of the Christian faith, with an emphasis 
on Scripture as a dynamic in personal spiritual development. This course will focus on 
contemplative reading of Scripture, journaling, meditation on Scripture, and Scripture 
memorization. (Winter) 

RELT 201. Biblical Principles for Daily Living (B-2) 3 hours 

A study of the biblical principles for restoring humankind to the image of God holistically, in 
the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual dimensions. The principles studied 
cover many aspects of Christian living, including social relationships, lifestyle choices, ethical 
issues, stewardship, health, and spiritual growth. Students are encouraged to explore 
Scripture to discover these principles for themselves and learn how to apply them in their 
lives. 

RELT 225. Last-Day Events (B-2) 3 hours 

A biblical, theological, and historical study of eschatology rooted in its Christ-centered focus. 
It considers the unique Seventh-day Adventist contribution compared to that of leading 
scholars, both in the past and present. Also it examines, among other movements, the New 
Age Movement and Dispensationalism and focuses on how to be ready for the end event. 

RELT 255. Christian Beliefs (B-2) 3 hours 

A study of Adventist doctrines in a Christ-centered context. This course will involve a study of 
the major teachings, with a view to enhancing the student's understanding and ability to 
provide biblical supportfor his/her faith. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

RELT 295. Directed Study (B-2) 1-3 hours 

This course is limited primarily to School of Religion majors and must be approved by the 
dean of the School of Religion. Occasionally the course may be conducted as a seminar and 
published in the schedule of classes. This course may be repeated for credit. (As needed) 

*RELT 317. Issues in Physical Science and Religion (B-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PHYS 317, Physics Department. A student may receive credit for this course from 
only one program. 

See PHYS 317 for course description. 
*One of the "Issues" courses can apply to General Education natural science requirement for majors, and to 
Religion for non-majors. 



320 Course Descriptions 



RELT 373. Christian Ethics (B-2) 3 hours 

A foundation course in moral decision making in the fields of bio-ethics, social ethics, and 
personal ethics. The objective is to disc over timeless norms by which to make basic ethical 
decisions across the professional spectrum. These norms are then applied to issues relevant 
to the student. Limited to students required to take Ethics for their program or students with 
Junior/Senior class standing. 

*RELT 421. Issues in Science and Society (W) (B-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with BIOL 421, Biology Department. A student may receive credit for this course from only 
one program. 

See BIOL 421 for course description. 
*0ne of the "Issues" courses can apply to General Education natural science requirement for majors, and to 
Religion for non-majors. 

RELT 439. Prophetic Ministry of Ellen G. White (B-2) 2 hours 

Prerequisites: RELT 138; senior status only; and permission of instructor and School dean for non-majors. 

Designed for majors in Theology, Pastoral Care, and Religious Education, this is a course on 
the life, and in particular, the prophetic ministry of Ellen G. White, one of the founders of the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church. Topics will include a biblical study of the gift of prophecy, an 
understanding of the process of revelation and inspiration, and conflict issues often faced by 
pastors, chaplains, and school teachers. (Winter) 

RELT 458. World Religions (W) (B-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status only. 

A study of several major non-Christian religions, including a survey of the history and the 
distinctive characteristics of each. This course will also compare and contrast these 
religions, consider areas of commonality between them and biblical Christianity, and provide 
insights as to how to share Christianity with practitioners of these religions. (Fall, Winter, 
Summer as needed) 

RELT 465. Topics in Theological Studies (B-2) 1-3 hours 

This course is designed to provide an exposure to a wide range of religious studies dealing 
with issues encountered in theology. The content will change as needed, so the course may 
be repeated once for credit. Open to all students. (As needed) 

RELT 467. Christian Philosophy and Worldviews (W) (B-2) 3 hours 

A study of philosophical thinking as applied to understanding worldviews. Attention will be 
given to ancient philosophical systems and their influence on worldviews today. The student 
will also study current worldviews of Christian theism, deism, naturalism, nihilism, 
existentialism, Eastern Pantheistic monism, New Age philosophy, and postmodernism. This 
worldview understanding will be applied in case studies of contemporary movies. The criteria 
for evaluating all worldviews will be the Christian worldview in the context of the Adventist 
understanding of the great controversy. 

RELT 484. Christian Theology I (B-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status only. 

An in-depth study of the 28 Seventh-day Adventist Fundamental Beliefs to equip the student 
to know the doctrines of the church from Scripture and to present them to others. (Fall) 

RELT 485. Christian Theology II (W) (B-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: RELT 484. 

This course examines major theological issues, such as christology, pneumatology, 
anthropology, soteriology, ecclesiology, and eschatology to strengthen confidence in 
Scripture and to equip the student to preach with certainty. (Winter) 

RELT 495. Directed Study (B-2) 1-3 hours 

See RELT 295 for course description. 



Course Descriptions 321 



Russian 

RUSS 101. Elementary Russian I (D-l) 3 hours 

This course offers students an introduction to the Russian language and provides a cultural 
adventure as well. The course develops listening and reading strategies with emphasis on 
oral and written forms of communication. Lab work required. 

RUSS 102. Elementary Russian II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: RUSS 101 or approval of the department. 

This course offers students an introduction to the Russian language and provides a cultural 
adventure as well. The course continues developing listening and reading strategies with 
emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Lab work required. 

RUSS 207. Intermediate Russian I (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: RUSS 102 or approval of the department. 

This course emphasizes intermediate grammar, intensive reading of moderate difficult 
Russian language texts, and oral and written exercises. 

RUSS 208. Intermediate Russian II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: RUSS 207 or approval of the department. 

This course continues an emphasizes on intermediate grammar, intensive reading of 
moderate difficult Russian language texts, and oral and written exercises 

Sociology 

SOCI 125. Introduction to Sociology (F-l) 3 hours 

An objective approach to the analysis and understanding of the social world. Consideration is 
given to the dynamic nature of American society and social institutions. Emphasis is placed 
on the study of social groups including the family, its history and current place in society. 
(Fall, Winter, Summer) 

SOCI 150. Cultural Anthropology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 150. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A study of culture and cultural variation. The contemporary beliefs, values, institutions, and 
material dimensions of people in North America are contrasted with those of people living in 
other regions of the world today and in the past. (Fall) 

SOCI 201. Parenting (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 201. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A study of the family system in preparation for parenthood and the dynamics of parent-child 
interaction. Attention is given to family planning, the childbirth experience, child 
development, techniques for developing close relationships and communication between 
parent and child, understanding and relating to children's individuality, common child rearing 
problems, and methods of modifying behavior. (Winter) 

SOCI 224. Social Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC 224. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See PSYC 224 for course description. 

SOCI 225. Marriage and the Family (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 225. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A course in intimate human relationships, including the place of the family in society and a 
Christ-centered approach to marital and familial issues. 

SOCI 230. Multicultural Relations (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 230 and PSYC 231. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 

program. 

A study of interactional patterns among diverse human groups. Consideration is given to the 
theoretical bases of inter-group relations and to class activities which promote awareness 
and understanding. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 



322 Course Descriptions 



SOCI 233. Human Sexuality (F-l or F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 233 and PSYC 233. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

A study of human sexual behavior, relationships, and values as reflected in the Christian 

cultural setting. (Winter) 

SOCI 245. Appalachian Studies 2 hours 

The purpose of this course is to provide a general knowledge of Appalachian culture. Study 
will be given to current and past characteristics of the region. Lifestyles, subcultures, 
legends, myths, and stereotypes will be studied. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. 
(Winter) 

SOCI 249. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 249, PSYC 249 and NRSG 449. A student may receive credit for this course 

from only one program. 

This course offers a unique and important perspective about cultural differences in death 
and dying. Personal attitudes and beliefs related to loss, dying, death, and bereavement will 
be explored. Cultural beliefs, rituals, and bereavement support strategies that may influence 
attitudes towards death and dying for a variety of ethnic groups are examined. Students 
enrolling for upper division credit will be required to write an application paper beyond the 
course requirements. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

SOCI 265. Topics in Sociology 1-3 hours 

Study of special topics pertinent to the field of sociology. Content will vary among various 
topics, based on the interests or needs of students and the department. This course may be 
repeated for credit. 

SOCI 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCI 125 or permission of the instructor. 

Study of special topics pertinent to the area of sociology and family studies. Open to 
qualified students who want to follow a program in independent study. This course can be 
repeated for credit for a total of not more than three hours credit. 

SOCI 296. Study Tour (F-l) 1-6 hours 

The Social Work and Family Studies Department sponsors a study tour to New York City 
yearly during Thanksgiving vacation and a study tour to Europe every other summer. The 
objectives of these tours are to facilitate a better understanding of peoples and cultures and 
to enable the participants to work with people more effectively. The fall trip to New York City 
focuses on ethnicity, social problems, urban change, and social agencies (1 or 2 hours). The 
European tour focuses on a comparison of cultures, current issues, and social policies (6 
hours). Fees are assessed to cover the expenses of each tour. 

SOCI 349. Aging and Society (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with PSYC 349 and SOCW 349. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 

program. 

The course emphasizes the reciprocal impact of societal attitudes on the process of aging 
and the increasing influence of "mature citizens" in contemporary society. Historical, 
demographic, and future trends are explored. A balance between the theoretical and the 
applied is sought. (Fall, Winter, Summer) 

SOCI 356. Natives and Strangers (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with HIST 356. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See HIST 356 for course description. 

SOCI 360. Family Life Education 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 360. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A study of existing family life education programs, including computer generated resources 
Focus is also given to the design and development of original family life education materials. 
(Fall) 



Course Descriptions 323 



SOCI 365. Family Relations (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with S0CW365. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
A sociological analysis of family structures and functions. Attention will be given to courtship, 
family organization and interaction, family disorganization and reorganization, and the 
post-parental family. Emphasis will be given to findings of recent family studies. (Winter) 

SOCI 374. Criminology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course emphasizes the scientific study of crime as a social phenomenon, of criminals, 
and of penal treatment. The relationship of law and crime to other trends in the social order. 
Research in prevention and treatment of crime. (Fall, odd years) 

SOCI 449. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 249, PSYC 249 and NRSG 449. A student may receive credit for this course 
from only one program. 

See SOCI 249 for course description. 

SOCI 465. Topics in Sociology 1-3 hours 

See SOCI 265 for course description. 

SOCI 491. Family Studies Practicum 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCI 360 

Supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of family studies. At least 50 clock 
hours of work experience are required for each semester hour of credit. May be repeated for 
credit for up to 3 hours. Grades will be assigned on an A, B, or F basis. 

SOCI 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCI 125 or permission of the instructor. 
See SOCI 295 for course description. 

SOCI 496. Study Tour (F-l) 1-6 hours 

See SOCI 296 for course description. 

Social Work 

SOCW 150. Cultural Anthropology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 150. A student may receive credit for this course from 

only one program. 

See SOCI 150 for course description. 

SOCW 201. Parenting (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 201. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See SOCI 201 for course description. 

SOCW 211. Introduction to Social Work (F-l) 3 hours 

This course provides an introduction to the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for 
generalist social work in contemporary society. Social welfare services, policies, and their 
historical origins will be presented along with the unique experiences of diverse and at-risk 
populations affected by various social problems. Provides an overview of the range of public 
and private social services available for meeting these problems. (Fall) 

SOCW 212. Social Welfare as an Institution (F-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 211 or consent of instructor. 

Social welfare systems are viewed from both historical and philosophical perspectives. This 
course also focuses on the impact faith-based organizations are having on the social welfare 
system. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 



324 Course Descriptions 



SOCW 213. Interviewing Skills 3 hours 

This course is an introduction to principles and processes of interviewing and the 
development of a strong helping relationship. The course introduces the student to the 
relationship between values, knowledge, and practice skills in communication and 
relationship building. Students are required to complete in-class role-playing and out of 
class client interviews demonstrating the concepts discussed. Interviewing Skills is a 
prerequisite for Social Work Practice I and Field Practicum I. (Winter) 

SOCW 225. Marriage and the Family (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 225. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
See SOCI 225 for course description. 

SOCW 230. Multicultural Relations (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 230 and PSYC 231. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 230 for course description. 

SOCW 233. Human Sexuality (F-l or F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 233 and PSYC 233. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 233 for course description. 

SOCW 249. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 249/449, PSYC 249, and NRSG 449. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See SOCI 249 for course description. 

SOCW 265. Topics in Social Work (F-l) 1-3 hours 

Study of special topics pertinent to the field of social work. Content will vary among various 
topics based on the interests or needs of students and the department. This course may be 
repeated for credit. 

SOCW 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 212. 

A study of special topics pertinent to the field of social work. Content will vary among such 
topics as child welfare, income maintenance, values and ethics of social work practice, etc 
The selected topic is pursued for the entire semester. This course can be repeated for credit 
for a total of not more than three hours credit. 

SOCW 296. Study Tour (F-l) 1-6 hours 

The Social Work and Family Studies Department sponsors a study tour to New York City 
yearly during Thanksgiving vacation and a study tour to Europe every other summer. The 
objectives of these tours are to facilitate a better understanding of peoples and cultures and 
to enable the participants to work with people more effectively. The fall trip to New York City 
focuses on ethnicity, social problems, urban change, and social agencies (1 or 2 hours). The 
European tour focuses on a comparison of cultures, current issues, and social policies (6 
hours). Fees are assessed to cover the expenses of each tour. 

SOCW 311. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 103; SOCI 125; PSYC 122; SOCW 211. 

Co-requisite: SOCW 314. 

First of a two-course HBSE sequence is a study on the reciprocal relationships between 
human behavior and the social environment from birth through young adulthood. Content 
will include empirically-based theories and knowledge that focus on the biological, 
sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development of infants, children, 
adolescents, and young adults. The course will follow a life cycle model from a systems 
perspective. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 325 



SOCW 312. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 311. 

Second of a two-course HBSE sequence is a study on the reciprocal relationships between 
human behavior and the social environment from middle to later adulthood. Content will 
include empirically-based theories and knowledge that focus on the biological, sociological, 
cultural, psychological and spiritual development of middle and later adults. The course will 
follow a life cycle model from a systems perspective. (Winter) 

SOCW 314. Social Work Practice I (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 103; SOCW 211, 212, 213: Co-requisite: SOCW 318. 

Provides students with theoretical framework for generalist social work practice. Topics 
include the establishment of relationship, assessment, contracts, intervention, utilization of 
resources, social work values and ethics. Work with individuals and families, primarily the 
micro dimension of social work practice, is emphasized in this first semester of a three- 
semester practice sequence. Social Work practice courses can only be taken by non-social 
work majors if ALL prerequisites have been completed. (Fall) 

SOCW 315. Social Work Practice II (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: SOCW 314, 318. 

A continuation of SOCW 314. The primary focus is on working with small groups and families, 
the mezzo dimension of social work practice, in this second semester of a three-semester 
practice sequence. This course focuses on strengths, capacities, and resources of client 
systems as they relate with their broader environments. Students learn to engage clients 
identify issues, needs, strengths, and resources; collect and assess information; and plan 
service delivery. Practice content also includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing 
empirically-based interventions design to achieve client goals, and evaluating their 
effectiveness. Social Work practice courses can only be taken by non-social work majors if 
ALL prerequisites have been completed. (Winter) 

SOCW 318. Social Work Practice Skills Lab 1 hour 

Co-requisite: SOCW 314. 

This skills lab provides students with direct field work experiences in social services agencies 
in the greater Chattanooga community. These field work experiences include application of 
assessment, intervention, and individual/family and group counseling skills. This class is to 
be taken concurrently with SOCW 314. (Fall) 

SOCW 326. Child Welfare I 3 hours 

This course provides an overview of the child welfare system in the United States from a 
generalist perspective. The history of the development of the continuum of child welfare 
services will be examined. Information on at-risk families, child abuse and neglect, foster 
care and adoption will be provided. The course will also review the social and organizational 
systems that are responsible for the delivery of child welfare services, and ways that social 
workers can influence these systems. Emphasis will be placed on increasing sensitivity to 
racial and cultural factors that affect the provision of child welfare services to various 
populations and the implications for practice. The organization and delivery of child welfare 
services in Tennessee will be discussed. (Fall) 



326 Course Descriptions 



SOCW 327. Child Welfare II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 326 

This course is the second in a series of two courses offered as part of the TN Child Welfare 
Certification Program. It is designed to assist students in acquiring the practice skills to 
become culturally competent child welfare workers. The course will analyze the practices of 
various human/social service agencies that provide preventative, case management, out of 
home care, treatment, and rehabilitative services aimed at children, youth, and families. The 
roles of social services in the broad context of formal and informal systems that influence 
the life course of the child will be addressed. This course will prepare students to practice in 
the child welfare field by teaching them about the various contexts in which child welfare 
practice takes place and the skills and modalities that are used with children, youth, and 
families who are the focus of child welfare intervention. Particular emphasis will be placed 
on the services provided by community based agencies, child welfare services and the 
juvenile justice system. Addition emphasis will be given to prepare the students to work the 
multicultural populations including consumers of different ages, races, cultures, 
socioeconomic status, and sexual orientations. The student will be prepared to meet ethical 
issues for social workers dealing with child welfare will be addressed with critical frameworks 
for resolving ethical dilemmas taught. 

SOCW 349. Aging and Society (W) (F-l) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 349 and PSYC 349. A student may receive credit for this course from only one 
program. 

See SOCI 349 for course description. 

SOCW 360. Family Life Education 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 360. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See SOCI 360 for course description. 

SOCW 365. Family Relations (F-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCI 365. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 
See SOCI 365 for course description. 

SOCW 391. Junior Field Practicum 1-3 hours 

This course introduces social work students to the role of the human service professional in 
the community setting. Students participate in an observational learning experience in a 
social service agency for 120 hours during the semester. Total immersion in the agency 
environment will give students a chance to expand their understanding of how human needs 
are met by families and the social service agencies that work with them. Students will apply 
the knowledge and skills they have learned in previous social work courses in their field 
placements. 

SOCW 433. Social Work Practice III 3 hours 

Prerequisites: SOCW 315, 497; MATH 215. 

Third of a three-part practice sequence, the primary emphasis is on the macro-dimension of 
social work practice. Content includes engaging organizations and communities in an 
appropriate working relationship; identifying issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets 
found in organizations and communities; collecting and assessing information; and planning 
for service delivery within organizations and communities. (Winter) 

SOCW 434. Social Welfare Issues and Policies 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 215; SOCW 212; PLSC 254 or ECON 213. 

A study of contemporary issues and policies that influence the delivery of social services 
Course requirements include an analysis of organizational, local, state, national, and 
international issues in social welfare policy and social service delivery, lobbying efforts with 
local and national elected officials, and interactions with community residents and 
stakeholders. Students will understand and implement change for the best interest of 
stakeholders and advocate for policies consistent with social work values. A social welfare 
policy study tour to Washington, DC or the State Capitol is required to complete the course 
Lab fee 14 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 327 



SOCW 435. Social Work Practicum I 4 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 315. Co-requisite: SOCW 497. 

This course provides opportunity for students to apply practice theory and to develop skills 
for generalist social work practice. Through participation in the social service delivery 
system, the student becomes familiar with agency structures, functions, and programs. 
Successful completion of a research proposal for an agency-based research project is 
required for completion of the course. A minimum of 200 clock hours will be spent working 
in an agency setting for each four hours of course work. Social Work practicum courses can 
be taken ONLY by social work majors. (Fall) 

SOCW 436. Social Work Practicum II 4 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 215; SOCW 435, 497. 

This course builds on the experiences of the first semester practicum and progresses to 
more difficult and varied tasks. Social Work practicum courses can be taken ONLY by social 
work majors. (Winter) 

SOCW 441. Integrative Seminar I lhour 

Prerequisites: SOCW 315, 497. Co-requisites: SOCW 433, 435, 497. 

Integrative Seminar I is the companion course to be taken in conjunction with the Practicum 

I field-based course. This course is designed to provide a forum for providing mutual support, 
discussing and completing departmental assignments, exploring on-going practice concerns 
in the field practicum, and creating an arena in which peer learning takes place. Thus, it 
provides a vital link between the theoretical knowledge, skills, and values derived from the 
social work course work and the practice realities of the field practicum. (Fall) 

SOCW 442. Integrative Seminar II lhour 

Prerequisite: SOCW 441, 497. Co-requisites: SOCW 433, 436. 

Integrative Seminar II is the companion course to be taken in conjunction with the Practicum 

II field-based course. It builds on the base provided by Integrative Seminar I. It provides the 
same forum for mutual support, discussing and completing departmental assignments, 
exploring ongoing practice concerns from the field practicum, and creates an arena in which 
peer learning takes place. This course creates this same atmosphere, but explores the same 
areas in more depth. An additional major emphasis in this second course is social work 
record keeping and agency based research. (Winter) 

SOCW 449. Death and Dying (F-l) 2 hours 

This course is cross-listed with SOCW 249/449, PSYC 249, and NRSG 449. A student may receive credit for this 
course from only one program. 

See SOCI 249 for course description. 

SOCW 465. Topics in Social Work (F-l) 1-3 hours 

See SOCW 265 for course description. 

SOCW 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 212. 

See SOCW 295 for course description. 

SOCW 496. Study Tour (F-l) 1-6 hours 

See SOCW 296 for course description.. 

SOCW 497. Research Methods (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 215 or NRSG 316. 

This course examines the basic research design and methodologies commonly used in the 
social sciences. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are examined along with 
relevant data analysis techniques. Ethical considerations for doing research with human 
subjects and vulnerable populations are explored. The content prepares students to 
develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge, including evidence- 
based interventions. Students will be prepared to apply knowledge in practice, policy, and 
evaluation in various social work fields. (Fall) 



328 Course Descriptions 



Spanish 

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I (D-l) 3 hours 

A foundation course in basic language skills. Students who have any background in Spanish 
language must take the language placement examination. Students should contact 
department for details on specific scores. This course develops listening and reading 
strategies with an emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. (Fall) 

SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or score a minimum of 296 on placement examination or approval of the department 

(Winter) 

This course is a continuation on the development of basic language skills. Oral and written 
communication are strongly emphasized. Laboratory work is required. (Winter) 

SPAN 207. Intermediate Spanish I (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or score a minimum of 356 on a placement examination or approval of the department. 
Continued emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills. There is. however, an 
increased emphasis on reading and writing skills through the study of short selections of 
Spanish literature. Laboratory work is required. Students may get credit for this course by 
passing a "challenge examination" with a B grade. For information on this examination, 
students should referto SAU Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. (Fall) 

SPAN 208. Intermediate Spanish II (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 207 or score a minimum of 440 on a placement examination or approval of the department. 
This course maintains a strong emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Through reading of 
more extensive texts and informal writing as a support for speaking, it develops oral fluency 
and more effective narrative. Laboratory work is required. Students may get credit for this 
course by passing a "challenge examination" with a B grade. For information on this 
examination, students should refer to the SAU Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for 
details. (Winter) 

SPAN 243. Composition and Conversation (D-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 208 or approval of the department. 

An intensive course aiming at proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in 
Spanish. This course is conducted in Spanish with a high emphasis on elaboration of formal 
writing. This course offers an opportunity for students to participate at a higher level of 
language fluency, both, oral and written. (Fall) 

SPAN 265. Topics in Spanish 1-3 hours 

Selected topics in Spanish presented in a classroom setting. Subject covered will determine 
how the course applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit. 

SPAN 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

A course emphasizing individual directed study. This course is for students who want to 
conduct independent research in a specific subject of modern languages. Faculty will assist 
student with selection of topic and serve as consultant for the project. This course is limited 
primarily to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern 
Languages. 

SPAN 354. Hispanic Culture and Civilization 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 243 or approval of the department. 

A course designed to study the social, political, economic, artistic, intellectual, and religious 
aspects of Spanish-speaking society, their diversity of cultures, their interaction, and their 
past and present projection toward participation in a global arena. (Winter) 

SPAN 355. Survey of Spanish Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 243 and ENGL 216 for Spanish/Spanish Teaching majors or approval of the department. 
This course is designed to study the history and development of Spanish literature, the 
many factors affecting literary productions, and the analysis of contemporary Spanish 
society. As a survey, this course contemplates Medieval Spanish literary productions to 
present literary movements in Spain. (Fall) 



Course Descriptions 329 



SPAN 356. Survey of Spanish-American Literature (D-2)(W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 243 and ENGL 216 for Spanish/Spanish Teaching majors or approval of the department. 
This course is designed as a survey of Spanish-American literary production from travel 
writing in the Sixteenth Century to contemporary literary productions in the many cultures of 
countries understood as the Americas. (Winter) 

SPAN 360. Spanish Through Genre Analysis (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ENGL 216; SPAN 243. 

This course is a historical study of some major literary works from Spain and Spanish 
America as presented in short story novel, drama, poetry, and essay. Special emphasis 
given to political impact, social context, and individual characteristics of literary works 
chosen. This course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will focus on active speaking, 
reading, text analysis, and writing. 

SPAN 457. Latino Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with ELIT457. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 243 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

This course is designed to approach literary productions of U.S. Latinos and their cultural 
significance in contemporary U.S. society. The inevitable linguistic encounter on a common 
"national" space of literary production presents a variety of works that project a social 
struggle, a political agenda, and a beauty of narrative by non-canonical authors in the U.S. 
(Fall, alternate years) 

SPAN 458. Mexican-American Literature (D-2) (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 243 and ENGL 216 or approval of the department. 

This course is designed to contemplate the literary production of "border" Spanish speakers, 
and their linguistic evolution into what is known today as Chicano/a literature. Such space of 
production also reflects and portrays a level of militancy that affects, and is projected 
through, this literary space. A variety of topics (including participation on U.S. economy) are 
geared to understand the cultural differences among Spanish speakers in the cultural space 
known as "America." (Winter, odd years) 

SPAN 465. Topics in Spanish 1-3 hours 

See SPAN 265 for course description. 

SPAN 490. Comprehensive Examination Preparation 1 hour 

This particular course is a time designed to provide academic support for Spanish majors 
who will be taking the departmental written examination required for graduation. Faculty will 
meet with the student regularly to assure that the student has covered all materials 
pertinent to this examination. Spanish majors must take this course prior to graduation in 
the last semester. 

SPAN 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See SPAN 295 for course description. 

Technology 

TECH 105. Field Engineering (G-2) 3 hours 

Selection of a building site on the available property. Drainage issues, utilities access, and 
sewage preparation of house and supporting access such as sidewalks, driveways, and 
retainer walls will be taught. Fundamentals of construction surveying including taping, 
leveling, angular surveying, bridge layout , circular curves, building layout and grade staking. 
Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 114. Oxy-Acetylene Welding (G-2) 1 hour 

Gas welding and brazing of sheet metal in preparation for typical body shop welding jobs. 
Personal goggles required. Certain specialized welding processes will be taught, such as tig, 
cast iron, or others to be arranged on an individual basis. Lab Fee 4will be assessed for this 
course. (Winter) 



330 Course Descriptions 



TECH 115. Arc Welding (G-2) 2 hours 

A class designed to give basic understanding of arc welding processes. Emphasis will be 
given to MIG, TIG, Heliarc, as well as conventional stick welding. Each student must 
purchase safety glasses and welding gloves. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 

TECH 117. Industrial Safety (G-2) 2 hours 

The content of this course deals with safety of hand tools, work practices, and the 
supervisor's responsibilities of recognizing and avoiding safety hazards. The student will earn 
the 30-hour OSHA Construction Safety Certificate. Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 122. Woodworking for Artists (G-2) 1 hour 

A study of woodworking shop safety, hand and machine tools, jointery, and proper methods 
of picture frame and stretcher construction. One period lecture and one period laboratory 
each week. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 124. Plumbing (G-2) 2 hours 

Instruction in code requirements, procedures in residential plumbing, waste, maintenance, 
proper methods of sewage disposal using soil pipe and plastic, water lines, using copper, 
galvanized pipe and state-of-the-art plastics. One period lecture and three periods laboratory 
each week. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 130. House Wiring (G-2) 2 hours 

Instruction in the National Electric Code, basic electrical principles, complete instruction and 
practice in residential wiring, including electric heating and telecommunications. Some 
industrial wiring techniques will also be included. One period lecture, six periods laboratory 
each week. Lab fee 5 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 148. Methods and Materials of Construction (G-2) 3 hours 

This course is designed to give the students an understanding of the methods, materials, 
and practices used in all phases of residential and commercial construction to include: 
foundations, framing, electrical, heating and plumbing, roofing, interior finishing and trim, 
and cabinetry. Regularly scheduled visits will be made to construction sites to see progress 
and practice used in industry. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 149. Introduction to Mechanical Drawing and CADD (G-2) 3 hours 

This course is cross-listed with ENGR 149. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program 
An introductory level course in Computer-Aided Drafting Design (CADD) using AutoCAD 
software in orthographic projection, surface development, sectioning, pictorial 
representation, dimensioning, and working drawings. Drawings plotted to scale on A, B, C, 
and D size paper. Six periods of laboratory each week. Lecture as announced by the 
instructor. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. (Fall) 

TECH 150. Blueprint Reading (G-2) 3 hours 

For first year Architectural Drafting students. Concepts of the course cover principles of 
technical projection, architectural applications, sections and details, pictorial drawings, 
linetypes, architectural symbols, and notations and specifications. The student will have a 
working knowledge of the various types of drawings that constitute a set of working drawings 
to include floor plans, foundation plans, elevations, roofing, plumbing and heating, electrical, 
interior elevations, and framing plans. Lab fee 1 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 151. Introduction to Architectural Drafting and CADD (G-2) 3 hours 

An introduction to skills and basic knowledge of architectural drafting. Emphasis is on 
lettering, orthographic projection, parallel line pictorial drawings, shades and shadows, and 
perspective drawing. Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. Open to all students. 

TECH 154. Woodworking (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of hand and machine tools, joinery, and proper methods of furniture construction. 
One period lecture, six periods laboratory each week. A supplies fee will be charged for the 
cost of the materials used in project construction. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 



Course Descriptions 331 



TECH 155. Masonry and Foundations (G-2) 3 hours 

A fundamental course in concrete block and brick laying, footings, and foundations for 
residential construction. One period lecture and six periods laboratory each week. Lab fee 3 
will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 160. Carpentry (G-2) 3 hours 

The principles of framing walls, roof systems, floor systems, door and window installation as 
well as trim finishes will be taught. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 164. Automotive Maintenance (G-2) 2 hours 

A course designed to help the car owner become knowledgeable in the matters of buying, 
servicing, and maintaining the auto. The student will work on his own car or on one 
belonging to the shop. One period lecture and three periods laboratory each week. (Fall) 

TECH 165. HVAC (G-2) 2 hours 

Installation principles will be taught along with sizing and relationship of building codes to 
layout. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 166. Auto Electrical Systems (G-2) 2 hours 

A course designed to give a basic understanding of automotive electrical systems. Basic 
electrical principles and trouble shooting techniques will be taught. Emphasis will be given to 
lighting, charging, starting and accessory systems. One period lecture, three periods lab per 
week. (Fall) 

TECH 167. Suspension, Steering and Alignment (G-2) 3 hours 

A course designed to give understanding of automotive suspension and steering systems. 
Chassis service, repair, and trouble shooting will be taught. Alignment of both two and four 
wheel alignment systems will be taught. One and a half period lecture and four and a half 
hours of labs per week. 

TECH 168. Manual Drive Train, and Axles (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of manual drive train operation, diagnosis and repair, clutches, manual 
transmissions and transaxles. Repair of differentials and transfer cones will be taught as 
well as four wheel drive theory, operation, and service. 

TECH 169. Automotive Brakes (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of brake system operations, troubleshooting, and repair. Conventional and antilock 
brake systems will be taught. 

TECH 175. Engine Rebuilding and Machining (G-2) 4 hours 

A course designed to acquaint the student with major engine diagnosis, decision making and 
overhaul procedures. Machining and measuring processes related to engine rebuilding will 
be taught. Each student will be required to rebuild an engine and do engine machine work. 
Two periods lecture, six periods of lab per week. 

TECH 178. Heating and Air Conditioning (G-2) 2 hours 

A course designed to teach the principles of heating and air conditioning systems. Emphasis 
will be given to service and trouble shooting of manual and automatic heating systems of 
late model cars. One period lecture, three periods lab per week. (Winter, alternate years) 

TECH 183. Basic Electronics (G-2) 3 hours 

An introductory course to the properties of electricity/electronics as they pertain to AC and 
DC electrical circuits and devices such as diodes, transistors and integrated circuits. 
Intended to introduce the beginning student to the field of electronics. Two three-hour 
lecture/labs each week. 

TECH 230. Automatic Transmission (G-2) 3 hours 

A course designed to give understanding of automatic transmissions, transaxle overhaul and 
troubleshooting. Transmission removal, installation, rebuilding, and service will be taught. 
One hour lecture and five hours lab time per week. (Winter, alternate years) 



332 Course Descriptions 



TECH 244. Graphic Production (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ARTG 238, BUAD 245, CPTE 245, or JOUR 208 or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of Public Relations, Graphic Design, Journalism 
and Communication students who will be working with a print service provider. Students will 
be working (hands on) with real printing jobs, selecting paper, ink, image carriers, offset or 
digital presses, and screen printing to print materials from single color to four color process 
The knowledge and experience gained from this class will be most beneficial in planning a 
print job for a service provider. Lab fee 7 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

TECH 248. CADD Mechanical (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 149 or 151. 

This course covers the application of CAD skills using AutoCAD software to the areas of 
architecture, structural design, pipe, welding, fasteners, pattern development, cams and 
gears and map drafting. Six periods of laboratory each week. Lecture as announced by the 
instructor. Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. (Winter) 

TECH 252. Building Codes (G-2) 2 hours 

State and local building codes that relate to residential and light commercial projects will be 
taught. They will include but not be limited to: beam span, electrical, plumbing, heating, and 
air conditioning minimums. 

TECH 254. Furniture Design and Construction 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 154. 

Emphasis will be placed on the design and techniques necessary to construct a quality piece 
of furniture. Two-three hour lecture/lab each week. A supplies fee will be charged for the 
cost of the materials used in project construction. Lab fee 4 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 255. Construction Estimating (G-2) 3 hours 

Commercial and residential cost planning techniques will be taught including overhead, 
labor, materials, and hidden costs. How to schedule to efficiently utilize the work for 
subcontractors will be taught, along with bid preparation and cost analysis of materials and 
profit margins. 

TECH 262. Construction Contract Administration (G-2) 2 hours 

Surveys, administrative procedures of general and subcontractors. Studies documentation, 
claims, arbitration, litigation, bonding , insurance, and indemnification. Discusses ethical 
practices. Lecture, and field trips. Lab fee 3 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 264. Automotive Repair (G-2) 3 hours 

A course designed to give basic understanding of the automobile. Main emphasis is given to 
power plant and drive train design, operation and service. One period lecture and three 
periods laboratory each week. All lab learning experience is on actual cars either from the 
community or personal vehicles. 

TECH 265. Topics in Technology 1-3 hours 

Topics selected from areas of technology not covered in other courses. May be repeated with 
permission. 

TECH 273. Estimating and Automotive Business Practices (G-2) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Minimum of 25 hours of Auto courses. 

A course in estimate writing, customer relations, and business practice in an automotive 
shop. Training in how to use an estimated labor time guide as well as parts purchasing will 
be included. 

TECH 276. Engine Performance and Computers (G-2/276) 3 hours 

Electronic and computerized ignition systems operating theory will be emphasized. Each 
student will be taught driveability diagnosis and trouble shooting techniques for electronic 
and computerized systems. Hands on diagnosis practice using diagnostic equipment on live 
vehicles will be given. 



Course Descriptions 333 



TECH 277. Engine Fuel and Emission Controls (G-2) 4 hours 

Both carburetor and fuel injection operation theory, and standard and electronic carburetion 
systems theory will be covered. Fuel injection diagnosis and repair as well as carburetor 
overhaul procedures will be taught. Emission control operation as well as trouble shooting 
and service procedures will be taught. 

TECH 278. History of Architecture 3 hours 

Studies of the history of architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular 
monuments and their settings. Domestic architecture and infrastructure, regional 
constructional, and compositional traditions from ancient, medieval, and renaissance 
through to the present. 

TECH 291. Practicum (G-2) 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval and completion of 27 semester hours of Technology classes. 

Supervised work experience in Auto Body or Auto Service. Procedures and guidelines are 
available from the department. 

TECH 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The study of a specific problem in the field of Technology. A written report of the problem 
may be required by the supervising instructor. Open only to those earning a minor in 
Technology. Offered on demand. 

TECH 299. Advanced Engine Performance (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 276 or equivalent. 

A course in advanced electronic and computerized engine control system theory and 
diagnostics. On board diagnostics II on 1995 and later vehicles will be taught. Lab 
experience will include scan tool and lab scope usage in diagnosing OBDII systems. 

TECH 328. Advanced Architectural Drafting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 151 or equivalent. 

This course covers all aspects of the development of working drawings for complete sets of 
plans for residential and commercial construction. Students will use up-to-date CAD software 
and develop the skill to complete such plans efficiently. One hour of lecture and two hours of 
lab. Lab fee 2 will be assessed for this course. 

TECH 348. 3D CAD Drafting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 151 or equivalent. 

This course is designed to give the student hands-on experience with modern 3D drafting 
software to produce architectural elevations, perspective drawings, walk-through animations, 
and presentations for applications in architectural drafting. One hour lecture and two hours 
of lab. Lab fee 2 will be assessed forthis course. 

TECH 354. Furniture Design and Construction 3 hours 

Prerequisite: TECH 154. 

See TECH 254 for course description 

TECH 375. Engine Rebuilding and Machining 4 hours 

See TECH 175 for course description 

TECH 376. Automation and Robotics 4 hours 

Basic elements and principles of computer integrated manufacturing including terminology, 
computer hardware/software and interfacing, system integration, flexible manufacturing, 
and robotic applications. 

TECH 377. Engine Performance and Computers 3 hours 

See TECH 276 for course description. 

TECH 465. Topics in Technology 1-3 hours 

See TECH 265 for course description. 



334 Course Descriptions 



TECH 492. Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval and completion of 21 semester hours of Technology courses. 

Supervised work experience in architectural or mechanical drafting. Procedures and 
guidelines are available from the department. 

TECH 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See TECH 295 for course description. 



Faculty Directory 



335 



The Registry 



Board of Trustees 

Gordon Retzer, Chair* 
Gordon Bietz* 
John Boskind 
Benjamin Browne 
Michael Cauley 
Donald Chase 
Joan Coggin 
Jim Davidson 
Ken DeFoor 
Faith Durkin 
Mel Eisele 
Conrad L. Gill 
Burton Hall* 
Richard Hallock 
Inelda Hefferlin 
Heather Hilliard 
Scott Hodges 
Danny Houghton 
Lars Houmann 



Todd McFarland 
Bill McGhinnis* 
Ellsworth McKee* 
Vanard Mendinghall 
John Nixon* 
Frank B. Potts 
Randy Robinson* 
Mark Schiefer 
Terry Shaw 
Ron Smith* 
Jeannette Stepanske* 
Willie Taylor 
Izak Wessels 
Jeff White 
GregWillett 
Ed Wright* 
DougZinke 
Vicky Zygouris-Coe 

* Members of the Executive Board 



University Administration 

President 

Gordon Bietz, D.Min. (1997) President 

Ben Wygal, Ph.D. (2003) Assistant to the President 

Information Systems 

Henry Hicks, M.B.A. (1998) Executive Director, Information Services 

Doru Mihaescu, M.B.A. (1997) Associate Director, Digital Networking 

Herdy Moniyung, M.S. (1999) Associate Director, Info Processing 

Mike McClung, B.A. (1996) Assistant Director, Workstation Support 

Judy DeLay, B.A., C.P.A. (1982) Senior Programmer/Analyst 

Bryce Enevoldson, B.S. (2005) Programmer/Analyst 

Luke Miller, B.S. (2004) Programmer/Analyst 

Josh Rhodes, B.S. (2007) Network Administrator 

Randi Raitz, A.A. (2001) Network Administrator 

Institutional Research and Planning 

Hollis James, Ph.D. (2003) Director, Institutional Research and Planning 

Academic Administration 

Robert Young, Ph.D. (2007) Senior Vice President, Academic Administration 

Volker Henning, Ph.D. (1989) Associate Vice President, Academic Administration 

Elaine Plemons, M.A., (2007) Dean, Academic Technology 



336 Faculty Directory 



Library 

Josip Mocnik, Ph.D. (2008) Director, Library 

Genevieve Cottrell, M.lnf. (2001) Cataloger 

Patricia Beaman, M.S.L.S. (1998) Periodicals Librarian 

Stanley Cottrell II, M.L.S. (2004) Technical Services Librarian 

Frank DiMemmo, M.S. (1980) Media Librarian 

Ann Greer, Ph.D. (1995) Distance Education/lnterlibrary Loan Librarian 

Daniel Maxwell, M.S.L.I.S. (2004) Electronic Resource Librarian 

Ron Miller, B.S. (1995) Library Computer Support 

Marge Seifert, M.S.L.S. (1999) Public Services Librarian 

Records and Advisement 

Joni Zier, M.S.Ed. (1993) Director, Records and Advisement 

Sharon Rogers, M.Ed. (1977) Assistant Director, Records and Advisement 

Sandy Tucker, B.S. (1997) Assistant Director, Records and Advisement 

Don Crumley, B.S. (2004) Data Analyst 

Advancement 

Christopher Carey, B.S. CFRE (2005) Vice President, Advancement 

Joy McKee, B.S. (2005) Corporate and Foundation Relations 

Sharon Robberson, B.S. (2007) Major Gifts Officer 

Alumni Relations 

Evonne Crook, B.A. (1980) Director, Alumni Relations 

Development 

Robert Raney, B.S. (2003) Director, Development 

Patrice Hieb, A.S. (1998) Annual Fund Coordinator 

Planned Giving 

Carolyn Liers (1996) Director, Planned Giving 

WSMC FM90.5 

David Brooks, B.A. (2001) Director, WSMC 

Scott Kornblum, B.S./B.A. (2005) Director, Development WSMC 

Financial Administration 

Tom Verrill, M.S. (2008) Senior Vice President, Financial Administration 

Martin Hamilton, B.A. (1998) Associate Vice President, Financial Administration 

Russell Orrison (2003) Director, Purchasing 

Accounting and Financial Services 

DougFrood, M.S. (2001) Controller 

David Huisman, B.S., C.P.A. (1993) Chief Accountant 

Mary Sundin, B.S. (1993) Senior Accountant 

Human Resources 

Pat Coverdale, B.S., SPHR (2001) Director, Human Resources 

David Olson, M.B.A. (1995) Payroll Accountant 

Industries 

Gary Shockley (2006) Manager, Village Market 

Rita Wohlers (1978) Manager, Campus Shop 



Faculty Directory 337 



Risk Management 

Nancy Daily, B.A., CPCU (2004) Director, Risk Management 

Services 

Mark Antone, A.S. (1984) Director, Landscape Services 

Barry Becker (1993) Director, Transportation Services 

Sherri Schoonard (2000) Director, Food Service 

Betty Garver, M.S. (2000) Director, University Health Center 

Clair Kitson (1989) Director, Plant Services 

Ed Lucas (1987) Director, Energy Management 

Dennis Schreiner (1997) Director, Service 

Eric Schoonard, A.S. (2002) Associate Director, Plant Services 

Fred Turner, B.ARCH. (1996) Corporate Architect 

Marketing and Enrollment Services 

Vinita Sauder, Ph.D. (1983) Vice President, Marketing and Enrollment Services 

Marc Grundy, M.B.A. (1997). ..Associate Vice President, Marketing and Enrollment Services 

Admissions and Recruitment 

Marc Grundy, M.B.A. (1997) Associate Vice President, Enrollment Services 

Jackie James, B.A. (2003) Assistant Director, Admissions 

Fred McClanahan, B.A./B.S. (2004) Assistant Director, Admissions 

Adam Brown, B.S. (2006) Enrollment Counselor 

Nathalie Mazo, B.S. (2005) Enrollment Counselor 

Bert Ringer, M.Div. (1996) Enrollment Counselor, Florida 

Marketing and University Relations 

Ruthie Gray, M.B.A. (2000) Director, Marketing and University Relations 

Ingrid Skantz, B.S. (1990) Associate Director, Marketing and University Relations 

Lori Futcher, B.A. (2005) Manager, Communications 

Student Finance 

Marc Grundy, M.B.A. (1997) Associate Vice President, Enrollment Services 

Jason Merryman, M.A. (2005) Assistant Director, Student Finance 

Jayne Wyche, A.S. (1980) Assistant Director, Student Finance 

Lillian Disla, M.S. (2005) Student Finance Counselor 

Ryan Herman, B.S. (2003) Student Finance Counselor 

Sean Johnson, B.S. (2004) Student Finance Counselor 

Lily Loza, B.A. (2006) Student Finance Counselor 

Brenda Seifert, A.S. (2001) Student Finance Counselor 

Paula Walters, B.S. (2005) Student Finance Counselor 

Student Services Administration 

William Wohlers, Ph.D. (1973) Vice President, Student Services 

Kari Shultz, M.A. (1999) Director, Student Life 

Campus Chaplain 

Brennon Kirstein, M.Div. (2007) Chaplain 

Kevin Kibble, M.Div. (2005) Assistant, Chaplain 

Campus Safety 

Kevin Penrod, B.S. (2007) Director, Campus Safety 



338 Faculty Directory 



Health Service 

Family Nurse Practitioner 

Residence Halls 

Dwight Magers, M.A. (1993) Director of Residence Halls Housing and Dean of Men 

Kassandra Krause, M.S. (1987) Dean of Women 

Jeffrey Erhard, M.A.T. (1997) Associate Dean of Men 

Carl Patterson, M.A. (2004) Associate Dean of Men 

Kevin Pride, B.A. (2007) Assistant Dean of Men 

John Sager, B.A. (2001) Associate Dean of Men 

Lisa Woodcock, B.A. (2004) Associate Dean of Women 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Student Success Center 

Jim Wampler, Psy.D. (1993) Director, Student Success Center, Counseling and Testing 

Januwoina Nixon, M.Ed (2006) Director, Learning Success Services 

Sheila Smith, M.A. (1997) Disability Services Coordinator 

Liane de Souza, M.S. (2003) Transition Services Coordinator 

Midge Dunzweiler, M.S. (1993) Counseling Services Coordinator 

Jeremy Moore, M.S. (2007) Career Services Coordinator 

Church Pastors 

John Nixon, D.Min. (2006) Senior Pastor 

Alex Bryan, M.Div. (2007) Pastor of Local Missions 

Tim Cross, M.Div. (2002) Youth Pastor 

Mike Fulbright, M.Div. (2000) Young Adult Pastor/Pastoral Director of Fellowship 

Wolf Jedamski, M. A. (1992) Church Administrator/Pastor of Missions 

Don MacLafferty, M.Div. (2002) Director, Kids in Discipleship Center 

Duane Schoonard, M.A. (1998) Pastoral Director of Spiritual Development 

Paul Smith, M.Div. (2004) Group Life Pastor 



Faculty Directory 339 



Faculty Emeriti 

Bruce Ashton, D.M.A., Professor Emeritus of Music 

Ronald M. Barrow, Ph.D., Vice President Emeritus for Admissions and College Relations 

Peggy Bennett, M.S.L.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Library Science 

Jack Blanco, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Religion 

Joyce Cotham, M.B.Ed., Associate Professor Emerita of Office Administration 

Donald Dick, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Speech Communication 

John Durichek, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Computing and Technology 

Mary Elam, M.A., Associate Vice President Emerita of Academic Administration 

Cyril F. W. Futcher, Ed.D., Vice President Emeritus of Academic Administration 

Orlo Gilbert, D.F.A., Professor Emeritus of Music 

Loranne Grace, M.S.L.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Library Science 

Floyd Greenleaf, Ph.D., Vice President Emeritus of Academic Administration 

Leona Gulley, Ed.D., Professor Emerita of Psychology 

Larry Hanson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

Carole Haynes, Ed.D., Professor Emerita of Education 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Shirley Howard, M.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing 

Bonnie Hunt, M.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing 

Ed Lamb, M.S.S.W., Professor Emeritus of Social Work and Family Studies 

Katie Lamb, Ph.D., Associate Vice President Emerita of Academic Administration 

Robert Merchant, M.B.A., Treasurer Emeritus 

Clifford Myers, Sr., Director Emeritus of Campus Safety 

Louesa Peters, B.A., Associate Treasurer Emerita 

Marvin Robertson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Music 

Cyril Roe, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Education 

Cecil Rolfe, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Business Administration 

Barbara Ruf, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of English 

Kenneth M. Spears, M.B.A., Vice President Emeritus for Finance 

Mitchell Thiel, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Thelma Wearner, M.A., Associate Professor Emerita of Home Economics 

Erma Webb, M.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing 



340 Faculty Directory 



Instructional Faculty 

(Dates in parentheses indicate the beginning year of employment at Southern Adventist University.) 

Earl Aagaard— Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.A. and MA, Pacific Union College; Ph.D., Colorado State University. (2004) 

Aaron Adams— M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.F.A., Savannah Institute of Art and Design. (2002) 

Pamela Ahlfeld— M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S., Georgia State University. (1990) 

Patricia Anderson— Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southwestern Adventist University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington. (2007) 

Scot Anderson— Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computing 

B.S., Southwestern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 
(2007) 

Christopher Atkins, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.W., University of Michigan. (2001) 

Joyce L. Azevedo— Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.S., Union College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Riverside. (1992) 

Evie Nogales Baker— M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.A. and B.S.W., Southern Adventist University; M.S.W., University of Tennessee in 
Knoxville. (2005) 

Lorraine Ball— M.S., Associate Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.S., Clark University. (2001) 

W. Scott Ball— Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Music 

B.Mus, Arizona State University; M.A. and M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., The Ohio 
State University. (2000) 

Loren Barnhurst— Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Denver. (2002) 

Desiree Batson— Ph.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., 
University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (1997) 

Stephen Bauer— Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.Div. and Ph.D., Andrews University. (1999) 

Patricia Beaman— M.S.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., La Sierra University; M.S.L.S., University of Southern California. (1999) 

John Beckett— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computing 

B.S and M.B.A., Southern Adventist University; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University. 
(1975) 



Faculty Directory 341 



Robert Benge— Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.Ed., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., University of 
New Mexico. (1998) 

Krystal Bishop— Ed. D., Professor of Education 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.A. and Ed.D., University of South Florida, Tampa. 
(1996) 

Mike Boyd— M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

B.S., Atlantic Union College; M.S., United States Sports Academy. (2007) 

Kevin Brown— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Central Florida. (1999) 

Gennevieve Brown-Kibble— D.M. A., Professor of Music 

B.A., Andrews University; M.Mus., Indiana University; D.M.A., University of Arizona. (2005) 

Charles D. Burks— Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A. Evangel College; M.S., University of Nebraska, Omaha; Ph.D., Florida State University. 
(1998) 

Rachel Byrd— Ph.D., Professor of English 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., Shippensburg University; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
(1998) 

Michael Cafferky— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.Div., Andrews University; M.P.H., Loma Linda University; 
Ph.D., Southwest University. (2003) 

Ray Carson— M. A., Associate Professor of Technology 

B.S. and MA, Northern Arizona University. (2003) 

Ken Caviness— Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Lowell. (1996) 

A. Laure Chamberlain— M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A., Syracuse University. (2004) 

Denise R. Childs— M.A., Associate Professor of Communication 

B.A., Walla Walla University; MA, Washington State University. (1998) 

Myrna Colon— Ph.D., Professor of Education 

B.A. and MA, University of Puerto Rico; Ed.S. and Ph.D., Andrews University. (2001) 

Robert Coombs— Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
(2004) 

Peter J. Cooper— D.M.A., Professor of Music 

B.Mus. and M.Mus., Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri-Kansas City; D.M.A., 
University of Michigan. (2006) 

Genevieve Cottrell— M.lnf., Associate Professor of Library Sciences 

BBibl, Hons Bibl and M.lnf., University of South Africa. (2001) 



342 Faculty Directory 



Stanley Cottrell II— M.L.S.. Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.S. and MA, Andrews University; M.L.S., University of Maryland. (2004) 

Randall Craven— M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.A., University of Missouri, Kansas City; M.S.Ed., Southern Adventist University. (2000) 

Linda Potter Crumley— Ph.D., Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Texas. (2004) 

Judith Dedeker— M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S. and M.S.N., Southern Adventist University. (2006) 

Lisa Clark Diller— Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. (2002) 

Alberto dos Santos— Ed. D., Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A., University of South Africa; Diploma, Orion Institute of Switzerland; M.A. and Ed.D., 
Andrews University. (1995) 

Joan dos Santos— M.A. , Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Adventist University; MA, Andrews University. (1995) 

Rene Drumm— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S.W., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's 
University. (2003) 

Brian Dunne— M.A.Ed., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.A.Ed., 
Georgia State University. (2002) 

Denise Dunzweiler— Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A. La Sierra University; M.A., Sonomo State University; Ph.D., Andrews University. (1996) 

David Ekkens— Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.A. and M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., Loma Linda University. (1990) 

Richard Erickson— M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.S. and M.B.A., Austin Peay State University. (1984) 

L. Ann Foster— Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of N. Texas. (1996) 

Bonnie Freeland— M.S.N. Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.N., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 
(1998) 

lleana Freeman-Gutierrez— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A. and MA, Andrews University; Ph.D., Ball State University. (2005) 

H. Robert Gadd— Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Business and Management and VandeVere 
Chair Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.B.A., University of Maryland at College Park; 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington. (2000) 



Faculty Directory 343 



Holly Gadd— Ph.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S., Loma Linda University; F.N. P., Midwestern State University 
Ph.D., Texas Woman's University. (2000) 

Pam Gammenthaler— M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N. and B.S., Walla Walla University; M.S.N., Loma Linda University. (2006) 

Phil Garver— Ed.D., Dean and Professor of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S., Eastern Michigan University; Ed.D., University of 
Tennessee, Knoxville. (1976) 

David George— M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design. (1999) 

Judith Glass— M.M us., Professor of Music 

B.Mus. and M.Mus., University of Texas at Austin. (1975) 

Suzy L. Gloudeman— M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S. and M.S.Ed., Southern Adventist University. (2007) 

Lisa S. Goolsby— M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business and Management 

B.B.A., La Sierra University; M.B.A., Indiana Wesleyan University. (2008) 

Zachary Gray— M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design. (2000) 

Ann Greer— Ph.D., Professor of Library Science 

B.G.S., Indiana University; M.L.I.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern 
University. (1995) 

Norman Gulley— Ph.D., Research Professor of Religion 

Diploma in Theology, Newbold College; B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A. and 
M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh (Scotland). (1978) 

Ed Guthero— B.S., Associate Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.S., Andrews University. (2002) 

Tyson Hall— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Computing 

B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. (2005) 

Rick Halterman— Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Computing 

B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., University of 
Tennessee, Knoxville. (1987) 

Jan Haluska— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of English 

B.S., Pacific Union College; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 
Knoxville. (1981) 

Brent Hamstra— Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. (1999) 

Chris Hansen— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Physics 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; Ph.D., Colorado State University. (1996) 



344 Faculty Directory 



Giselle Hasel— M.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Southern Adventist University. (2007) 

Michael G. Hasel— Ph.D., Professor of Religion, Director, Institute of Archaeology 

BA. and MA., Andrews University; MA and Ph.D., University of Arizona. (1998) 

Volker Henning— Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Academic Administration 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div., Andrews University; M.A., University of Central 
Florida; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (1989) 

Debbie Higgens— Ph.D., Professor of English 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., Middle State Tennessee 
University. (1993) 

Michael Hills— M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education (2003) 

B.A., Thomas Edison State College; M.S.Ed., Southern Adventist University. (2003) 

Lorella Howard— M.S.N. , Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , Southern Adventist University; M.S.N., Vanderbilt University. (1994) 

Jaclynn Huse— M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S. and M.S.N., Southern Adventist University. (2003) 

*Julie Hyde— M .Ace, C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Business and Management 

B.S. and M.Acc, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. (2005) 

Douglas Jacobs— D.Min., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div. and D.Min., Andrews University. (2002) 

Barbara James— D.S.N., Dean and Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S.N., University of Texas, Arlington; D.S.N., 
University of Alabama, Birmingham. (1991) 

Carmen Jimenez— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., University of Utah; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. (2004) 

Cynthia Johnson— M.S.N. , Assistant Professor of Nursing 

MSN., Southern Adventist University. (2007) 

Ronald D. Johnson— Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington. 
(2006) 

Gary L. Jones— M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.S.W., Oakwood University; M.S.W., Barry University. (2004) 

Greg A. King— Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., Union Theological 
Seminary. (2004) 



""Study Leave 



Faculty Directory 345 



Timothy D. Korson— Ph.D., Professor of Computing 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., Georgia State University. (1995) 

Dana Krause— M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S., Texas Woman's University. (1992) 

Henry Kuhlman— Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University. (1968) 

Judson Lake— Th.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.Div., Andrews University; D.Min., Reformed 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., University of South Africa. (1997) 

Donn W. Leatherman— Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.Th., Canadian Union College; M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., McGill University. (1992) 

Terrie Long— M.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.A., Columbia College; M.S.W., University of South Carolina. (2006) 

Carlos G. Martin— Ph.D., Professor of Religion; Director, R.H. Pierson Institute of 
Evangelism and World Missions 

B.Div., River Plate College; M.A., Andrews University; M.Div and Ph.D., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. (2001) 

Daniel Maxwell— M.S.L.I.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Walla Walla University; M.S.L.I.S., Indiana University. (2004) 

Harold Mayer— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

B.S., Pacific Union College; M.P.H., Loma Linda University; Ph.D., Walden University. 
(2004) 

Sylvia Mayer— M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S., San Jose State University. (2004) 

Benjamin McArthur— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of History 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. (1979) 

Callie McArthur— M.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Mississippi; M.N., Emory University. (1979) 

Mitch Menzmer— Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Pacific Union College; Ph.D., Clarkson University. (2007) 

Kimberly Miller— M.Acc, Assistant Professor of Business and Management 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.Acc, University of Oklahoma. (2007) 

Laurie Redmer Minner— M.M., Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., Atlantic Union College; M.M., New England Conservatory. (2000) 

Christine Moniyung— M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S. and M.S., Andrews University. (2004) 



346 Faculty Directory 



Robert Montague— Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Business and Management 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.B.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
(1999) 

Josip Mosnic— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Newbold College; M.A., University College London, University of London; Ph.D., 
Bowling Green State University. (2008) 

P. Willard Munger— Ph.D., Professor of Computing 

B.S., Loma Linda University-La Sierra ; MA, M.S., and Ph.D., Andrews University. (2002) 

Andy Nash— M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.A., Andrews University. (2005) 

Dennis Negron— M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A., University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. (1993) 

Rick Norskov— M.D., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.D., Loma Linda University. (2006) 

Pierre Nzokizwanimana— Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., Institut Pedagogique National; M.A., Universite Nationale du Rwanda; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. (2006) 

Braam Oberholster— M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.B.A., Helderberg College; M.B.A., Andrews University. (2003) 

Cathy Olson— M.A., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Union College; M.A., Andrews University. (1996) 

Cliff Olson— Ph.D., Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.S. and Ph.D., Colorado State University. (1989) 

Alan Parker— D.Th., Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Andrews University; M.Th. And D.Th., Stellenbosch University. (2007) 

Carlos H. Parra— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., Weber State University; MA, University of Utah; Ph.D., Duke University. (2000) 

Ken Parsons— M.Mus., Associate Professor of Music 

BA and B.Mus., Walla Walla University; M.Mus., University of Oregon. (2000) 

Mark Peach— Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Walla Walla University; M.A., Washington State University; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. (1987) 

Julie Penner— Ph.D., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Idaho; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music; Ph.D., University of 
Northern Colorado. (1993) 

Dennis Pettibone— Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.A., La Sierra College; M.A., Loma Linda University; Ph.D., University of California, 
Riverside. (1988) 



Faculty Directory 347 



Elaine Plemons— M.A., Dean and Associate Professor Academic Technology 

B.A. and MA, La Sierra University. (2007) 

Helen Pyke— M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Walla Walla University; MA, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. (1990) 

Octavio Ramirez— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.S.W. and M.S.W., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Walden University. (2006) 

Clint Rati iff— M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

BA, Walla Walla University; M.FA, New York Academy of Art. (2007) 

Edwin Reynolds— Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

BA, B.S., and MA, Pacific Union College; MA and Ph.D., Andrews University. (2004) 

Arthur Richert— Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Texas. (1970) 

Jodi Ruf— M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; MA, Andrews University. (2007) 

Stephen Ruf— M.S., Associate Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.S. and M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (1996) 

Greg Rumsey— Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Journalism and Communication 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of 
Tennessee, Knoxville. (2001) 

Philip G. Samaan— D.Min., E.G. White, Chair; Professor of Religion 

B.A., Walla Walla University; M.Div., Andrews University; M.S.P.H. Loma Linda University; 
D.Min., Andrews University. (1998) 

Bruce Schilling— Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Andrews University; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. (1996) 

Richard Schwarz— M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education, Health and 
Wellness 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S., United States Sports Academy. (2000) 

Dean Scott— M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.S., Ferris State University; M.FA, Savannah Institute of Art and Design. (2000) 

Rhonda Scott— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., University of California, Riverside. (1997) 

Marge Seifert— M.S.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.S., Union College; MA, Andrews University; M.S.L.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
(1999) 

Christy Showalter, M.S.— Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S. and M.S., Southern Adventist University. (2008) 

Judy Sloan— Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education, Health and Wellness 

B.S., Union College; M.S., Central Washington University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 
(2001) 



348 Faculty Directory 



Elizabeth Snyder— M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S., Washington State University. (2005) 

Keith Snyder— Ph.D., Chair and Professor of Biology 

B.S. and M.S., Andrews University; Ph.D., Washington State University. (1995) 

Lee Spencer— Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., University of California; M.S. and Ph.D., Loma Linda University. (2004) 

Verlyne Starr— M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A.T., Oakland University; M.B.A., Southern Adventist University. 
(1999) 

Dennis Steele— M.B.A., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.B.A., Kennesaw State University. (1999) 

Stanley Stevenson— M.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work and Family Studies 

B.A., MA, and M.S.W., Andrews University. (2003) 

Carleton Swafford— Ph.D., Graduate Dean and Professor of Education 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 
(1992) 

Keely Tary— Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Adventist University; M.A., La Sierra University; Ph.D., Washington State 
University. (2008) 

John Wesley Taylor, V— Ph.D., Ed.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A. and B.S., Weimar College; M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.A. and Ph.D., 
Andrews University; Ed.D. .University of Virginia. (2003) 

Douglas Tilstra— Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.Div., Andrews University; Ph.D., Capella University. (2000) 

Neville Trimm— Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S. and Ph.D., Loma Linda University. (2004) 

Don Van Ornam— Ph.D., C.P.A., Dean and Professor of Business and Management 

B.A., La Sierra College; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate University. (1997) 

Dale Walters— M.S., Chair and Associate Professor of Technology 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.S., East Tennessee State University. (1988) 

*Leon Weeks— M.S., Assistant Professor of Business and Management 

B.S. and M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. (2005) 

Jon Wentworth— M.Tx., Associate Professor of Business and Management 

B.A. and B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.B.A. University of Tennessee, Nashville; 
M.Tx., Georgia State University. (1996) 

Kenneth Willes— M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.F.A., Savannah Institute of Art and Design. (2004) 



Faculty Directory 349 



John Williams— M.F.A., Dean and Associate Professor of Visual Art and Design 

B.FA, Art Center College of Design; M.F.A., Claremont Graduate School. (2002) 

Ruth WilliamsMorris— Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Oakwood College; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (2000) 

Jillian Wills— M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Alabama, Birmingham; M.S., Sanford University. (2007) 

Judy Winters— M.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Adventist University; M.N., Emory University. (1990) 

William Wohlers— Ph.D., Professor of History/Vice President for Student Services 

B.A., Walla Walla University; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 
(1973) 

Robert Young— Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Administration 

B.S., Columbia Union College; Ph.D., The Catholic University of America. (2007) 

*Study Leave 



350 University Committees 



2008-09 University Committees 

Administrative Committees 

Administrative Council: Gordon Bietz, Chair 

Audio-Visual Services Committee: Volker Henning, Chair 

Employee Wellness Committee: Phil Garver, Chair 

Financial Appeals Committee: Marc Grundy, Chair 

Fund Raising Committee: Chris Carey, Chair 

Heritage Museum Committee: Chris Carey, Chair 

Human Resources Committee: Tom Verrill, Chair; Pat Coverdale, Associate Chair 

Key Committee: Kevin Penrod, Chair 

Loans and Scholarships Committee: Marc Grundy, Chair 

Naming Committee: Ben Wygal, Chair 

New Student Orientation Committee: Liane de Souza, Chair 

Planned Giving Committee: Chris Carey, Chair; Tom Verrill, Vice Chair 

Promotional Tours Committee: Vinita Sauder, Chair 

Public Art Committee: Ben Wygal, Chair 

Safety/Risk Control Committee: Tom Verrill, Chair 

EPA and OSHA Compliance Subcommittee: Nancy Daily, Chair 
Traffic Appeals Committee: Kevin Penrod, Chair 
Web Oversight Committee: Ruthie Gray, Chair 

Other Committees: 

Assessment and Effectiveness Review Committee: Hollis James, Chair 

Retention Committee: Vinita Sauder, Chair 
Budget and Financial Statement Review: Tom Verrill, Chair 
Crises Management Team: Gordon Bietz, Chair 
Diversity Committee: Dennis Negron, Chair 
Faculty Affairs Committee: Kevin Brown, Chair 

Distinguished Service Medallion Subcommittee: Stephen Ruf, Chair 
Faculty Promotions Committee: Robert Young, Chair 
Grievance Committee: Jan Haluska, Chair 
Honorary Degrees Committee: Ken Caviness, Chair 
Sabbatical Committee: Robert Young, Chair 
Social/Recreation Committee: Linda Marlowe, Chair 
Strategic Planning Committee: Gordon Bietz, Chair; Hollis James, Vice Chair 

University Senate Committees 

University Senate: Lorraine Ball, Chair 

University Senate Executive Committee: Lorraine Ball, Chair 



UniversityCommittees 351 



Academic Committees: 

Graduate Council: Carleton Swafford, Chair 

Off Campus Learning Committee: Volker Henning, Chair; Carl Swafford, Co-Chair 

Academic Research Committee: Loren Barnhurst, Chair 

Undergraduate Council: Robert Young, Chair 

Academic Review Subcommittee: Volker Henning, Chair 

Admissions Subcommittee: Marc Grundy, Chair; Volker Henning, Vice Chair 

Advisement Subcommittee: Sharon Rogers, Chair 

General Education Subcommittee: Robert Montague, Chair 

Writing Subcommittee: Denise Childs, Chair 

Honors Subcommittee (Southern Scholars): Mark Peach, Chair 

Student Services Committees: 

Discipline Review Committee: Kari Shultz, Chair 
Student Intervention Committee: Januwoina Nixon, Chair 
Student Personnel Committee: William Wohlers, Chair 
Student Services Committee: William Wohlers, Chair 

Disabilities Services Subcommittee: Sheila Smith, Chair 

Film Subcommittee: David George, Chair 

International Student Subcommittee: Liane de Souza, Chair 

Screening Subcommittee: Scott Ball, Chair 

Spiritual Life Subcommittee: Brennon Kirstein, Chair 

Student Activities Subcommittee: Kari Shultz, Chair 

Student Media Board: Stephen Ruf, Chair 

Student Wellness Subcommittee: , Chair 



352 



Index 



INDEX 



Absences, 49 
Academic Advisement, 44 
Academic Calendar, 4 
Academic Enrichment Services, 24 
Academic Grievance Procedure, 49 
Academic Honesty, 46 
Academic Policies, 27 
Academic Program, 9 
Accounting Major, 100 
Accreditation and Memberships, 8 
Admissions, 11 

ACT/SAT, 11 

Conditional Acceptance, 12 

English as a Second Language Students, 
14 

Extension Classes, 15 

Graduate Programs, 16 

International Students, 13 

Non-Degree Students, 13 

Regular Acceptance, 11 

Transfer Credits, 13 
Adventist Colleges Abroad, 147 
Adventist Colleges Abroad Fees, 73 
Advertising Minor, 141 
Allied Health, 80 

Allied Health Pre-Dental Hygiene Major, 83 
Allied Health Pre-Health Information 

Administration Major, 83 
Allied Health Pre-Nutrition and Dietetics 

Major, 84 
Allied Health Pre-Occupational Therapy 

Major, 85 
Allied Health Pre-Physical Therapy Major, 86 
Allied Health Pre-Respiratory Therapy Major, 

88 
Allied Health Pre-Speech-Language Pathology 

& Audiology Major, 88 
American Humanics Certification, 135 
Anesthesia (CRNA), 211 
Animation Major, 204 
Application Procedure, 15 
Archaeology Major, 186 
Archaeology Minor, 187 
Architectural Drafting Major, 197 
Art Education Major, 202 
Art Education Minor, 208 
Art Major, 201 
Art Minor, 208 
Auto Service Major, 198 
Auto Service Minor, 199 
Auto Service Technician, 199 
Behavioral Science Minor, 195 



Biblical Languages Minor, 187 

Billing Procedures, 76 

Biology Major, 91 

Biology Minor, 92 

Biology, Biomedical Major, 92 

Biology, Department of, 90 

Biophysics Major, 174 

Board of Trustees, 335 

Broadcast Journalism Major, 137 

Broadcast Journalism Minor, 141 

Business Administration and Auto Service 

Majors, 99, 197 
Business Administration and Public Relations 

Majors, 99 
Business Administration Major, 98 
Business Administration Minor, 100 
Business and Management, School of, 93 
Campus Safety, 18 
Career Services, 18 
Certificate Program 

Auto Service Technician, 199 
Chamber Music Series, 24 
Chaplain's Office, 18 
Chemistry Major, 101 
Chemistry Minor, 103 
Chemistry, Biochemistry Major, 102 
Chemistry, Department of, 101 
Christian Service Minor, 187 
Class Standing, 29 
Clinical Laboratory Science Major, 80 
Cognate Courses, 54 
Collection Policies and Procedures, 76 
Computer Information Systems Major, 96, 

107 
Computer Science Major, 106 
Computer Systems Administration Major, 

107 
Computing Minor, 107 
Computing, School of, 104 
Concert-Lecture Series, 19 
Conditional Standing and Dismissal, 47 
Construction Management Major, 198 
Contents, 3 

Continuing Education, 53 
Convocation, 19 
Core Values, 6 
Corporate/Community Wellness 

Management Major, 170 
Counseling and Testing Services, 19 
Course Descriptions, 218 
Course Load, 43 
Course Numbers, 54 



University Committees 



353 



Curriculum Chart, 38 

Deferment of Financial Aid, 66 

Degrees and Curricula, 37 

Dentistry, 211 

Dining, 19 

Disabilities, 20 

Discipline, 20 

E. A. Anderson Lecture Series, 24 

E. A. Anderson Organ Concert Series, 24 

E. 0. Grundset Lecture Series, 24 

Education and Psychology, School of, 108 

Education Minor, 121 

Engineering Studies, 124 

Engineering Studies Major, 124 

English as a Second Language, 50 

English as a Second Language Program 

(EESL), 127 
English Major, 125 
English Minor, 126 
English, Department of, 125 
Entrepreneurial Management Minor, 100 
Estimated Student Budget (SAU Campus), 71 
Extension Classes, 53 
Facilities, 9 
Faculty Emeriti, 339 
Family Studies Major, 194 
Family Studies Minor, 195 
Fees and Charges, 69 
Film Production Major, 206 
Financial Aid Application Procedures, 62 
Financial Aid Available, 55 
Financial Aid Award and Disbursement 

Procedures, 63 
Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements, 64 
Financial Aid Policy, 55 
Financial Aid Refund Policy, 66 
Financial Management Major, 96 
Financing Your Education, 55 
Fine Arts Major, 203, 205 
Foreign Study, 147 
French Major, 149 
French Minor, 152 
General Degree Requirements: Associate 

Degree, 28 
General Degree Requirements: 

Baccalaureate Degree, 27 
General Degree Requirements: Master's 

Degree, 27 
General Education, 30 
General Requirements: Minor, 28 
General Studies Degree, 209 
Gerhard F. Hasel Lectureship on Biblical 

Scholarship, 25 
German Minor, 152 
Grading System, 44 



Graduation Requirements, 29 

Graduation with Academic Honors, 36 

Grants, 59 

Graphic Design Major, 206 

Graphic Design Minor, 208 

Health and Accident Insurance, 72 

Health and Wellness Minor, 172 

Health Science Major, 170 

Health Service, 20 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Major, 169 
History Major, 129 
History Minor, 129 
History of the University, 8 
History, Department of, 128 
Honor Roll/Dean's List, 36 
Honors Studies Sequence, 36 
Human Resource Management Minor, 100 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology Minor, 

111 
Institute of Archaeology, 25 
Institute of Evangelism & World Missions, 25 
Instructional Faculty, 340 
Insurance, 21 

Interactive Media Major, 207, 208 
Intercultural Communication Major, 138 
ntercultural Communication Minor, 142 
Interdepartmental Programs, 209 
Interdisciplinary, 131 
International Students, 13, 68, 72 
nternational Studies Major, 151 
Italian Minor, 152 

Journalism & Communication, School of, 133 
Journalism (News Editorial) Minor, 142 
Law, 212 

Learning Success Services, 25 
Liberal Arts Education Major, 121 
Libraries, 25 

Limitations on Class Attendance, 50 
Loans, 59 

Long-Term Care Administration Major, 98 
Major and Minor Requirements, 37 
Majors 

Accounting, 96, 100 

Allied Health Pre-Dental Hygiene, 83 

Allied Health Pre-Health Information 
Administration, 83 

Allied Health Pre-Nutrition and Dietetics 
Major, 84 

Allied Health Pre-Occupational Therapy, 
85 

Allied Health Pre-Physical Therapy, 86 

Allied Health Pre-Respiratory Therapy, 88 

Allied Health Pre-Speech Language 
Pathology and Audiology, 88 



354 



Index 



Animation, 204 

Archaeology, 186 

Architectural Drafting, 197 

Art, 201 

Art Education, 202 

Auto Service, 198 

Biology, 91 

Biology, Biomedical, 92 

Biophysics, 174 

Broadcast Journalism, 137 

Business Administration, 98, 100 

Business Administration and Auto Service, 

99, 197 
Business Administration and Public 

Relations, 99 
Chemistry, 101 
Chemistry, Biochemistry, 102 
Clinical Laboratory Science, 80 
Computer Information Systems, 96, 107 
Computer Science, 106 
Computer Systems Administration, 107 
Construction Management, 198 
Corporate/Community Wellness 

Management, 170 
Engineering Studies, 124 
English, 125 
Family Studies, 194 
Financial Management, 96 
Fine Arts, 203, 205 
French, 149 
General Studies, 209 
Graphic Design, 206 
Health Science, 170 
Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation, 169 
History, 129 

Interactive Media, 207, 208 
Intercultural Communication, 138 
Interdisciplinary, 131 
International Studies, 151 
Liberal Arts Education, 121 
Long-Term Care Administration, 98 
Management, 97 
Marketing, 97 
Mass Communication, 139 
Mathematics, 144 
Media Technology, 141 
Medical Science, 209 
Music, 159 
Music Education, 156 
Nonprofit Administration and 

Development, 140 
Nursing, 162 
Outdoor Leadership, 112 
Pastoral Care, 185 



Physics, 174 

Print Journalism, 138 

Psychology, 109 

Public Relations, 140 

Public Relations and Business 
Administration, 141 

Religion, 186 

Religious Education, 185 

Religious Studies, 186 

Social Work, 195 

Spanish, 150 

Sports Studies, 171 

Theology, 184 
Management Major, 97 
Management Minor, 100 
Marine Biological Station, 26 
Marketing Major, 97 
Marketing Minor, 100 
Mass Communication Major, 139 
Mathematics Major, 144 
Mathematics Minor, 145 
Mathematics, Department of, 144 
Media Production Minor, 142 
Media Technology Major, 141 
Medical Science Degree, 209 
Medicine, 213 
Methods of Payment, 75 
Minors 

Advertising, 141 

Archaeology, 187 

Art, 208 

Art Education, 208 

Auto Service, 199 

Behavioral Science, 195 

Biblical Languages, 187 

Biology, 92 

Broadcast Journalism, 141 

Business Administration, 100 

Chemistry, 103 

Christian Service, 187 

Computing, 107 

Education, 121 

English, 126 

Entrepreneurial Management, 100 

Family Studies, 195 

French, 152 

German, 152 

Graphic Design, 208 

Health and Wellness, 172 

History, 129 

Human Resource Management, 100 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology, 111 

Interculutral Communication, 142 

Italian, 152 

Journalsim (News Editorial), 142 



University Committees 



355 



Management, 100 

Marketing, 100 

Mathematics, 145 

Media Production, 142 

Mission, 187 

Music, 160 

Nonprofit Leadership, 142 

Outdoor Leadership, 113 

Photography, 142 

Physical Education, 172 

Physics, 175 

Political Economy, 129 

Political Science, 130 

Practical Theology, 187 

Psychology, 111 

Public Relations, 143 

Religion, 187 

Sales, 143 

Sociology, 195 

Spanish, 152 

Technology, 199 

Western Intellectual Tradition, 130 

Youth Ministry, 188 
Mission of Southern, 6 
Missions Minor, 187 
Modern Languages, Department of, 146 
Music Degree, 159 
Music Education Degree, 156 
Music Minor, 160 
Music, School of, 153 
Network Usage Policy, 105 
Non-Degree Preprofessional Programs, 211 
Nonprofit Administration and Development 

Major, 140 
Nonprofit Leadership Minor, 142 
Nontraditional College Credit, 51 
Nursing Major, 162 
Nursing, School of, 161 
One-Year Certificate Requirements, 28 
Online Learning, 9 
Optometry, 214 
Orientation Program, 21 
Osteopathic Medicine, 214 
Outcomes Assessment, 46 
Outdoor Leadership Major, 112 
Outdoor Leadership Minor, 113 
Pastoral Care Major, 185 
Pharmacy, 215 
Photo Release, 21 
Photography Minor, 142 
Physical Education Minor, 172 
Physical Education, Health and Wellness, 

School of, 168 
Physics Major, 174 
Physics Minor, 175 



Physics, Department of, 173 
Planning a Course of Study, 27 
Podiatric Medicine, 216 
Political Economy Minor, 129 
Political Science Minor, 130 
Practical Theology Minor, 187 
Praxis Pass Rate, 113 
Prefix Glossary, 78 
Pre-Physician Assistant, 216 
Preprofessional Curricula, 42 
Prerequisite for Taking Upper Division 

Classes, 30 
Print Journalsim Major, 138 
Psychology Major, 109 
Psychology Minor, 111 
Public Relations and Business Administration 

Majors, 141 
Public Relations Major, 140 
Public Relations Minor, 143 
Registration, 42 
Registry, The, 335 
Religion Major, 186 
Religion Minor, 187 
Religion, School of, 176 
Religions Education Major, 185 
Religious Studies Major, 186 
Residence Hall Living, 21 
Residence Halls, 72 
Residence Requirements, 29 
Right of Petition, 49 
Rosario Beach Marine Biological Field 

Station, 26, 92 
Sales Minor, 143 
SAU Refund Policies, 74 
Scholarships, 55 
Sequence of Courses, 54 
Setting of the University, 8 
Social Activities and Organizations, 22 
Social Work and Family Studies, Department 

of, 189 
Social Work Major, 195 
Sociology Minor, 195 
Southern Scholars (Honors Program), 35 
Spanish Major, 150 
Spanish Minor, 152 
Sports Studies Major, 171 
Standards of Conduct, 22 
Student Association, 22 
Student Employment, 23 
Student Financial Responsibility, 68 
Student Labor, 67 
Student Life and Services, 18 
Student Mission/Task Force Credit, 37 
Student Publications and Productions, 23 
Student Records, 46 



356 



Index 



Technology Minor, 199 
Technology, Department of, 196 
Theology Major, 184 
Transcripts, 53, 76 
Transient Student, 52 
University Administration, 335 
University Committees, 350 
Veterans' Benefits, 62 



Veterinary Medicine, 217 

Visual Art and Design, School of, 200 

Waiver Examinations, 50 

Western Intellectual Tradition Minor, 130 

Work, 61 

WSMC FM90.5, 26 

Youth Ministry Minor, 188