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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland, College Park, 2004-2005"


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■M 








UncergradudLe 
C ata og 2004/ 2005 








This catalog is a record of official 
requirements for each degree the 
university offers as well as the 
policies of the university that 
impact undergraduate students. 
Keep it as a reference manual 
throughout your years as a student 
at the U ni versify of M aryland. 


























^ 


/K UN I VE 

Vmar 


RS IT Y OF 

YLAND 



Facts & Figures 



fe 



I 



p 



University of i^laryland 
Administration 

C. D. Mote, J n, President 

William Destler, Senior Vice President 
for Academic Affairs and Provost 

Linda Clement, Vice President for 
Student Affairs 

J acques Gansler, Vice President for 
Research 

J effrey C. Huskamp, Vice President and 
CIO 

J ohn Porcari, Vice President for 

Administrative Affairs 
Brodie Remington, Vice President for 

University Relations 

Administrative Deans 

J udlth K. Broida, Associate Provost and 
Dean, Office of Continuing and 
Extended Education 

Donna Hamilton, Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies 

Charles B. Lowry, Dean of Libraries 

Siba Samal, Associate Dean, College of 
Vetennan/ Medicine, Man/land Campus 

Ann G. Wylie, Intenm Dean of the 
Graduate School 




I 




Number of male participants 346 
Number of female participants 302 



I 



Five JVlost Popular Undergraduate i^lajors 



Criminology & Criminal J ustice 
Computer Science 
Psychology 



Government and Politics 



Economics 






: I 
J I 



I 







I 



I 



A Snapshot of 20Q3 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 



DEAN 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
Undergraduate Graduate 



College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 

College of Arts and Humanities 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Robert H. Smith School of Business 

College of Computer, Mathematical 

and Physical Sciences 
College of Education 
A. J ames Clarl< School of Engineering 
College of Health and Human Performance 
College of Information Studies 

Philip Merrill College of J ournalism 
College of Life Sciences 
School of Public Policy 

Undergraduate Studies 



Bruce Gardner (interim) 770 

Garth Rockcastle 210 

J ames Hams 3,259 

Edward Montgomery 4,492 

Howard Frank 2,776 

Stephen Halpenn 1,791 

Edna Szymanski 1,008 

Nanman Farvardin 2,909 

Roberts, Gold 893 

Bruce Dearstyne n/a 

(interim) 

Thomas Kunkel 496 

Norma Allewell 2,079 

J acques S. Gansler n/a 

(intenm) 

Donna Hamilton 4,729 



347 
170 

1,219 
840 

1,565 



1,110 

1,571 

188 

326 



629 
212 

n/a 




UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT 25,446 



MAJORS OFFERED: 111 



GRADUATE ENROLLMENT 9,883 



DEGREES OFFERED: 96 




Fear the Turtle! 



2003-2004 



ACADEMIC QUALITY 


Top 25 Programs ranked nationally 


70 


FRESHMAN PROFILE 


Average High School GPA 
SAT 25th/75th Percentile 


3.88 
1200/1350 


RESEARCH 


Sponsored research and outreach 


$321M 


DIVERSITY 


Minority Faculty 

Minority Students 

Degrees Awarded to M inority Students 


15% 
32% 
30% 


FUNDRAISING 


Endowment Value 
Private Giving 


$247 M 
$81M 


STATE FUNDING 



] 



I [ 



state Appropriation $330M 

Percent of Budget Funded by State 
Appropriation 30% 



111. 



StadSics 

2003/ 2004 




Where Our Students Live 

STUDENTS LIVING IN UNIVERSITY-OWNED RESIDENCE HALLS 



New Freshmen 


3,725 


Transfers 


136 


Returning Students 


4,556 



TOTAL 8,417 

STUDENTS LIVING IN PUBLIC/PRIVATE HOUSING PARTNERSHIPS 

University Courtyards 694 



South Campus Commons 


1,241 


TOTAL 


1,935 


STUDENTS LIVING IN GREEK HOUSING 


TOTAL 


1,386 


STUDENTS WHO COM MUTE 



TOTAL 



13,708 




Undergraduate Students by Ethnicity 



RACE/ETHNICITY 



African American 
Asian American 
Hispanic American 
Native American 
White American 
Foreign 
Unl<nown 



\^ALE 


FEMALE 


TOTALS 


% 


1,333 


1,798 


3,131 


12 3% 


1,829 


1,673 


3,502 


13,8% 


639 


761 


1,400 


5,5% 


29 


45 


74 


0,3% 


7,949 


7,077 


15,026 


59% 


317 


302 


619 


2 4% 


838 


856 


1,694 


6,6% 



! 



F 





Five Foreign Countries frxjin 
Which JVlost International 
Students Originate 

India 

Republic of Korea 

Nigeria 

Canada 

People's Republic of China 



A 



Did You Know? 

•At the University of Maryland, we have at least one undergraduate student from 
every U.S. state and territory. 

•Minorities comprise 32 percent of the undergraduate student population at Maryland. 

•As of 2004, U. S. News &World Report ranks 70 programs at the University of 
Maryland among the top 25 in the nation. 



I 




Undergraduate 
Programs of Study 



e 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND 
NATURAL RESOURCES (AGNR) 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Agricultural Sciences, General 
Animal and Avian Sciences 
Biological Resources Engineering 
Environmental Science and Poiicy 
Landscape Architecture 
Natural Resources Management 
Natural Resource Sciences 
Nutrition and Food Sciences 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, 
PLANNING, AND PRESERVATION 
(ARCH) 

Architecture 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

American Studies 
Studio Art 

Art History and Archaeology 
Asian and East European 

Languages and Cultures 
Central European, Russian, and Eurasian 

Studies 
Classics 
Communication 
Comparative Literature 
Dance 

English Language and Literature 
French and Italian Languages 

and Literatures 
Germanic Studies 
History 

J ewish Studies 
Linguistics 

M usic/M usic Performance/ 
Music Education 
Philosophy 
Romance Languages 
Spanish and Portugese Languages 

and Literatures 
Theatre 
Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES (BSOS) 

African American Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Economics 

Environmental Science and Policy 

Geography 

Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



ROBERT H. SM ITH SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS (BMGT) 

Accounting 

Decision and Information Technologies 

Finance 

General Business and Management 

Logistics, Transpori:ation, and Supply 

Chain Management 
Marketing 
Operations and Quality M anagement 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, 
MATHEMATICAL, AND PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES (CM PS) 

Astronomy 

Computer Engineenng 

Computer Science 

Environmental Science and Policy 

Geology 

M athematics 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) ~ 

Eariy Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

Secondary Education 

Special Education 

Art: 

English 

Foreign Language 

M athematics 

Science 

Social Studies 

Speech and English 

Theatre and English 

A. J AM ES CLARK SCHOOL OF 
ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

Aerospace Engineering 

Biological Resources Engineenng 

Chemical Engineenng 

Civil and Environmental Engineenng 

Computer Engineenng 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering (B.S. in) 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Matenals Science and Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

COMBINED PROGRAMS ~ 

Art:s - Dentistn/ 

Art:s - Law 

Biochemistry/Pharmacy 

Animal ScienceA/eterinary Medicine 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN 
PERFORMANCE (HLHP) 

Family Studies 

Public and Community Health 
Kinesiological Science 
Physical Education 

PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF 
JOURNALISM (j OUR) 

J ournalism 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES (LFSCT" 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Environmental Science and Policy 

M icrobiology 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES (UGSTT 

Civicus 

College Park Scholars 

Division of Letters and Sciences 

Gemstone 

Individual Studies Program 

Law and Health Professions 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

Pre-Dentistry 

P re-Law 

Pre-Biomedical Science Research 
and M edical Technology 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Nursing 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 

Pre-Optometn/ 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine 

P re-Pharmacy 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Pre-Physician Assistant 

Pre-Podiatnc Medicine 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
University Honors Program 

CAMPUS-WIDE CERTIFICATES ~ 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 
Army ROTC 

African American Studies 
Asian-American Studies 
East Asian Studies 
International Agriculture and 

Natural Resources 
Latin-Amencan Studies 
Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual and 

Transgender Studies 
Science, Technology, and Society 
Women's Studies 

MULTI-COLLEGE PROGRAMS ~ 

Computer Engineenng (CM PS, ENGR) 
Environmental Science and Policy 
(AGNR, BSOS, CM PS, LFSC) 




( 





i 



Dvision of University Ftelations 
Office of University l^blications 6/04 
University of Maryland 
College Park, IVID 20742 

Project Manager: Dame T. Burch 

Editor: Mary Ann Stevenson, Undergraduate Studies 

Photographs: John Consdi ard Scott Suchnran 



VI 



Contents 

INTRODUCTION 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

GUIDE TO INFORMATION,, 



,,vi 



.,VIII 



GENERAL INFORMATION: 
Policy Statements, Residency, Fee Information, Accreditation ix 

1, ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION PROCEDURES 1 

2, FEES, EXPENSES, AND FINANCIAL AID 15 

3, CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION, RESOURCES, AND STUDENT SERVICES,21 

4, REGISTRATION, ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS, AND REGULATIONS „„34 

5, GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (CORE) 49 

6, THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 56 

College of Agricviltural and Natural Resources 56 

School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation* 57 

College of Arts and Humanities 59 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 62 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business* 63 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and 

Physical Sciences 68 

College of Education 70 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 73 

College of Health and Human Performance 77 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism* 77 

College of Information Studies 79 

Division of Letters and Sciences 26 

College of Life Sciences 79 

School of Public Policy 80 

*This college Is not organized by departments. This chapter includes all information 
on the college's program requirements. 



7, DEPARTMENTS AND CAMPUS-WIDE PROGRAMS, 



,81 



Note: The letters in parentheses represent course code prefixes. 

Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 81 

African American Studies Program (AASP) 82 

Agricultural Sciences, General (GNAS) 83 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) 84 

Agronomy (AGRO) 85 

American Studies (AMST) 85 

Animal and Avian Sciences (ANSC) 85 

Anthropology (ANTH) 86 

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation (AMSC) 87 

Architecture, Planning and Preservatiion (ARCH). 

(See listing in Chapter 6) 57 

Art(ARTT) 88 

Art History and Archaeology (ARTH) 88 

Asian and East European Languages and Cultures (See SLLC)....125 

Astronomy Program (ASTR) 89 

Biological Resources Engineering (ENBE) 90 

Biological Sciences Program 91 

Biology (BIOL) 92 

Business and Management. (See listing in Chapter 6) 63 

Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 92 

Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERE) 93 

Chemical Engineering (ENCH) 94 

Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM, BCHM) 95 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENCE) 95 

Classics (CLAS, GREK, LATN) 98 

Communication (COMM) 98 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 99 

Computer Engineering (ENCP) 100 

Computer Science (CMSC) 101 

Counseling and Personnel Services (EDCP) 102 

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJS) 102 

Curriculum and Instruction (EDCl) 103 

Dance (DANC) 107 

Decision and Information Sciences (See BMGT in Chapter 6) 

Economics (ECON) 108 

Education Policy and Leadership (EDPL) 109 

Electrical Engineering (ENEE) 109 

Engineering, General B.S Ill 



English Language and Literature (ENGL) 112 

Entomology (ENTM) 113 

Environmental Science and Policy (ENSP) 113 

Eamily Studies (FMST) 114 

Einance (See BMGT in Chapter 6) 

Eire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 115 

Erench and Italian Languages and Literature (FREN), (ITAL) 

(SeeSLLC) 127 

Geography (GEOG) 116 

Geology (GEOL) 117 

Germanic Studies (GERM) (See SLLC) 128 

Government and Politics (GVPT) 119 

Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP) 120 

History (HIST) 121 

Horticulture (HORT) (See Natural Resource Sciences) 

Human Development Institute for Child Study (EDHD) 121 

Human Resource Management. (See BMGT in Chapter 6) 

Jewish Studies Program (JWST) 122 

Journalism (JOUR) (See listing in Chapter 6) 77 

Kinesiology (KNES) 123 

Landscape Architecture (LARC) 124 

Language, Literature and Cultures, School of 125 

Letters and Sciences 26 

Linguistics (LING) 129 

Marketing (See BMGT in Chapter 6) 

Materials Science and Engineering (ENMA, ENNU) 130 

Mathematics (MATH) 131 

Mathematical Statistics Program 133 

Measurement, Statistics ancl Evaluation (EDMS) 134 

Mechanical Engineering (ENME) 134 

Meteorology (METO) 135 

Music, School of (MUSC) 135 

Natural Resources Management Program (NMRT) 136 

Natural Resource Sciences (NRSC) 137 

Nutrition and Food Science (NESC) 139 

Philosophy (PHIL) 141 

Physical Sciences Program 141 

Physics (PHYS) 143 

Psychology (PSYC) 144 

Public and Community Health (HLTH) 145 

Romance Languages Program 145 

Russian Area Studies Program (See CERE) 93 

Sociology (SOCY) 146 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

(SPAN, PORT) (See SLLC) 128 

Special Education (EDSP) 147 

Statistics (See BMGT in Chapter 6) 

Theatre (THET) 149 

Women's Studies (WMST) 149 

CAMPUS-WIDE PROGRAMS 150 

Study Abroad 151 

Air Force Aerospace Studies (ROTC) 150 

ArmyROTC 151 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 153 

University Honors Program (HONR) 153 

Gemstone 153 

College Park Scholars 154 

Individual Studies Program (IVSP) 154 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 154 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 155 

Pre-Dentistry 155 

Pre-Law 156 

Pre-BioMedical Science Research and Medical Technology 156 

Pre-Medicine 157 

Pre-Nursing 157 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 156 

Pre-Optometry 158 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine 157 

Pre-Pharmacy 158 

Pre-Physical Therapy 159 

Pre-Physician Assistant 159 

Pre-Podiatric Medicine 157 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 160 

vii 



UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 160 

African American Studies 160 

Asian American Studies 160 

East Asian Studies 161 

International Agriculture and Natural Resources 161 

Latin-American Studies 161 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies 162 

Science, Technology, and Society 162 

Women's Studies 162 

Citations 163 

8, APPROVED COURSES 155 

9, UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND AND 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ADMINISTRATORS AND FACUm 248 

lO.APPENDICES 295 

General Summary 295 

A. Human Relations Code 295 

B. Campus Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment 299 

C. Code of Student Conduct and Annotations 300 

D. Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 307 

E. Smoking Policy and Guidelines 309 

F. Resolution on Academic Integrity 309 

G. Statute of Limitations for the Termination of 

Degree Programs 310 

H. Policy for Student Residency Classification for 

Admission, Tuition, and 

Charge-Differential Purposes 310 

I. Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure 311 

J. Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and 

Capricious Grading 315 

K. Policy on Participation by Students in Class Exercises 

That Involve Animals 315 

L. Completion of Interrupted Degree 315 



11, INDEX,, 



,,316 



2004-2005 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

SUMMER SESSION 1, 2004 

First Day of Classes June 1 

Holiday July 5 

Last Day of Classes July 9 

SUMMER SESSION II, 2004 

First Day of Classes July 12 

Last Day of Classes August 20 

FALL SEMESTER, 2004 

First Day of Classes August 30 

Thanksgiving Recess November 25-28 

Last Day of Classes December 10 

Study Days December 11-12 

Final Examinations December 13-18 

Main Commencement Ceremony December 18 

College Commencement Ceremonies ..December 19 

WINTERTERM, 2005 

First Day of Classes January 4 

Holiday January 17 

Last Day of Classes January 24 

SPRING SEMESTER, 2005 

First Day of Classes January 26 

Spring Recess March 21-27 

Last Day of Classes May 12 

Study Day May 13 

Final Exams May 14-20 

Senior Day May 21 

Main Commencement Ceremony May 21 

College Commencement Ceremonies May 22 



GUIDE TO INFORMATION 

VISII HARyLAND'S WEB SITE AT: wwromledi 



PyMications 

Departmental Brochures: Small brochures describing many 
of the departments and programs at the University of Maryland, 
College Park, are available free. Write to the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell Building, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, or contact the department 
directly. 

Graduate Catalog: For information, call (301) 314-4198, or 
write to the Graduate Office, Lee Building, University of Maryland, 
College Park, MD 20742. The online graduate catalog is at: 
www.gradschool.umd.edu/ catalog 

Schedule of Classes: The Schedule of Classes lists course 
offerings, class times and room assignments, registration dates 
and procedures, deadlines, fees, and general information. The 
first edition is available prior to early registration for the spring 
and fall semesters. The second edition, typically published a 
few weeks before the beginning of the semester, updates course 
offerings and registration procedures. The Summer Schedule is 
available on campus in late J anuary. The schedule is available 
to all students free of charge and can be picked up at the 
Mitchell Building, Stamp Student Union, Hornbake Library and 
McKeldin Library. The Schedule of Classes is available online 
at: www.testudo.umd.edu/ ScheduleOfClasses.html 

Undergraduate Catalog: The Undergraduate Catalog is made 
available to all students admitted to the university, and is 
available free to all undergraduates and faculty with a valid 
university ID. Copies are available for consultation in libraries 
and in high schools in Maryland, the District of Columbia, and 
Virginia. Copies are on sale to the general public for $4.95 to 
cover postage and handling. Send a check (payable to University 
Book Center) to the University Book Center, Stamp Student 
Union, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. Write 
"Catalog" on the check. Please allow four weeks for delivery. 
For instructions on how to pay by credit card, please call (301) 
314-BOOK. The catalog is also available online at: 
www.umd.edu/ ugradcat 



FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS 

General Information (301) 405-1000 

Admissions (301) 314-8385 

Advising (301) 314-8418 

Financial Aid (301) 314-8313 

Housing, Off-Campus (301) 314-3645 

Housing, On-Campus (301) 314-2100 

Orientation (301) 314-8217 

Parking (301) 314-PARK 

Registrar (301)314-8240 

Student Accounts (301) 405-9041 

Summer Programs (301) 405-6551 

Undergraduate Studies (301) 405-9363 



VIM 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Policy Statements, Residency Classification, and Accreditation 

The University of JVIaryland is an equal opportunity institution with 
respect to both education and employment. The university does not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, 
sex, age, or handicap in admission or access to, or treatment or 
employment in, its programs and activities as required by federal 
(Title VI, Title IX, Section 504) and state laws and regulations. 
Inquiries regarding compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 
1964, as amended. Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments, 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related legal 
requirements should be directed to: 

Director, Office of Human Relations 
1130 Shriver Lab - East Wing 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
Telephone: (301) 405-2838 

Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and part 34 of 
the C.F.R. to the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 
may be directed to: 

Director, Disability Support Service 

0125 Shoemaker Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone: (301) 314-7682, (voice); (301) 314-7683, (TTY) 

In addition to the university's statement of compliance with federal 
and state laws, the University Human Relations Code notes that the 
University of Maryland, College Park, affirms its commitments to a 
policy of eliminating discrimination on the basis of race, color, 
creed, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, personal appearance, 
age, national origin, political affiliation, physical or mental disability, 
or on the basis of the exercise of rights secured by the First 
Amendment of the United States Constitution. 

(Complete texts of the University Human Relations Code and the 
Campus Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment are print- 
ed in Appendix A and Appendix B.) 

Disclaimer: The provisions of this publication are not to be regard- 
ed as a contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland. Changes are effected from time to time in the general 
regulations and in the academic requirements. There are estab- 
lished procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the 
institution's integrity and the individual student's interest and wel- 
fare. A curriculum or graduation requirement, when altered, is not 
made retroactive unless the alteration is to the student's advantage 
and can be accommodated within the span of years normally 
required for graduation. The university cannot give assurance that all 
students will be able to take all courses required to complete the 
academic program of their choice within eight semesters. 
Additionally, because of space limitations in limited enrollment pro- 
grams, the university may not be able to offer admission to all qual- 
ified students applying to these programs. 

When the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of 
the university community, that person maybe required to withdraw 
from the university. (For the complete University of Maryland Code 
of Student Conduct, see Appendix C.) 

Residency Classification: For admission, tuition, and charge differ- 
ential purposes, students are classified as in-state or out-of-state 
residents. Residency status is initially determined when a student's 
application for admission is being considered. For more information 
on the guidelines used to determine residency classification see 
Chapter 1 and Appendix H of this catalog. Questions regarding resi- 
dency status or petitions for reclassification should be directed to the 
Residency Classification Office, 1118 Mitchell Building, (301) 405- 
2030. 



Important Information on Fees and Expenses: Notwithstanding 
any other provision of this or any other university publication, the 
university reserves the right to make changes in tuition, fees, and 
other charges at anytime such changes are deemed necessary by 
the university and the University System of Maryland Board of 
Regents. Although changes in fees and charges ordinarily will be 
announced in advance, the university reserves the rightto make such 
changes without prior announcement. Tuition increases are expected 
for 2004-2005 and will be considered by the Board of Regents at its 
Spring/ Summer 2004 meeting. 

All students who register incur a financial obligation to the univer- 
sity. Those students who register and subsequently decide not to 
attend must notify the Office of the Registrar Office, 1113 Mitchell 
Building, in writing, prior to the first day of classes. If this office has 
not received a request for cancellation by 4:30 p.m. of the last day 
before classes begin, the university will assume the student plans 
to attend and accepts his or her financial obligation. After classes 
begin, students who wish to terminate their registration must follow 
the withdrawal procedures and are liable for charges applicable at 
the time of withdrawal. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central 
Collections Unit, and in accordance with state law, the university is 
required to turn over all delinquent accounts to it for collection and 
legal follow-up. This is done automatically on a month-to-month 
basis by computer read-out. Collection costs incurred in collecting 
delinquent accounts will be charged to the student. 

Gender Reference: The masculine gender whenever used in this 
document is intended to include the feminine gender as well. 

Smoking Policy: It is hereby established as the policy of the University 
of Maryland, College Park, to achieve a public environment as close 
to smoke-free as practicably possible. (See Appendix E of this catalog 
for the complete "Smoking Policy and Guidelines.") 

Disclosure of Information: In accordance with "The Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" (P.L. 93-380), popu- 
larly referred to as the "FERPA," disclosure of student information, 
including financial and academic, is restricted. Release to anyone 
other than the student requires a written waiver from the student. 
(For complete university policy on access to and release of student 
data/ information, see Appendix D.) 

Accreditation: The University of Maryland, College Park, is accredited 
by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
and is a memberof the Association of American Universities. In addi- 
tion, individual colleges, schools, and departments are accredited by 
such groups as the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism 
and Mass Communications, Accreditation Board of Engineering and 
Technology, American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, 
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, American 
Chemical Society, American Library Association, American 
Psychological Association, American Society for Landscape 
Architecture, American Veterinary Medical Association Council on 
Accreditation, Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education, 
Commission on Rehabilitation Education, Council for Accreditation of 
Counseling and Related Educational Programs, Council on Academic 
Accreditation of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 
Council on Education for Public Health, Institute for Food 
Technologies, National Architectural Accrediting Board, National 
Association of School Psychologists, National Association of School of 
Music, National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
Planning Accreditation Board, Public Relations Society of America. 

Evaluated Rather Than Accredited: Maryland Sea Grant College 
(National Sea Grant Review Panel), Water Resources Center 
(United States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey). 

Validated Rather Than Accredited: Royal Institute of British 
Architects (RIBA). 



IX 



C hapter 1 



Admisaon R equirementsand 
Application Procedures 



FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

The University of l^laryland, College Park, is a publicly supported, land- 
grant, research institution dedicated primarily to the educational needs of 
Maryland residents. Within its responsibilities as a state institution, the 
university attracts a cosmopolitan student body and each year offers 
admission to a number of promising students from other states and 
jurisdictions. Currently all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 3 territories, 
and more than 150 foreign countries are represented in the undergraduate 
population. Admission policies are determined by the Board of Regents. 

We seek academically successful applicants with diverse backgrounds, 
geographic origins, and personal experiences, and who demonstrate the 
potential to contribute significantly to the university's campus and 
community life. The Admission Committee considers each application for 
freshman admission individually, reviewing the student's academic record, 
the rigor of the student's high school academic program, standardized 
admission test scores, class rank (if available), essay, extracurricular 
activities, counselor recommendation, and other letters of recommendation. 
Maryland residency, special talents and/ or abilities, personal background, 
and Maryland alumni/ ae affiliation maybe taken into consideration. 

As prescribed by the Board of Regents, the university expects all applicants, 
at a minimum, to have completed by high school graduation the following 
course work: four years of English; three years of mathematics, including 
Algebra I or Applied Math I and II, Formal Logic or geometry; three years of 
history or social science; three years of science in at least two different 
areas with at least two lab sciences; and two years of a foreign language. 
These criteria represent the minimum requirements to be considered for 
admission. Successful applicants typically present academic credentials 
which exceed the minimum, several honors and/ or Advanced Placement (AP) 
or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses, and additional academic 
electives. A fourth year of mathematics is strongly recommended. 

Admission to the University of Maryland is competitive. Each year, we 
receive more than 22,000 applications for a fall freshman class of 4,100. 
As a result, we are unable to offer admission to all students who have the 
ability to be academically successful at Maryland. 

High Sciiool Record 

In general, the University of Maryland requires freshman applicants to earn 
a high school diploma prior to their first registration at the university. 
Applicants should make sure that final high school transcripts are sent to 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions prior to enrolling. All offers of 
admission are contingent upon satisfactory completion of current work. 

Each applicant's previous academic achievement is reviewed according to 
the information available on the student's high school transcript through 
eleventh grade. In some cases, mid-year grades for the senior year will also 
be considered. The Admission Committee considers the following academic 
criteria when evaluating candidates for admission: nature and rigor of 
course load, grades in academic courses, progress as reflected in grades 
overtime, and performance compared with high school peers. High school 
grades will be reviewed in the context of the level of course work taken. 



Standardized Admission Test Scores 

All freshman applicants must present results from either the ACT or the 
SAT I. Test results should be submitted directly to the University of 
Maryland, College Park, by the American College Testing Program for the 
ACT or the Educational Testing Service for the SAT I. The applicant is 
strongly urged to include his or her social security number when registering 
for either test. The social security number will expedite processing of the 
application for admission. The reporting code for the University of Maryland, 
College Park, is 1746 for applicants submitting the ACT, and 5814 for 
those submitting the SAT I. The university strongly recommends that these 
tests be taken as early as possible, but no later than December for priority 
applicants and January for general applicants. Further information on both 
tests may be obtained from high school guidance counselors or directly 
from the American College Testing Program, Iowa City lA 52243 and the 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540. 

Additional Criteria 

Priority for admission is given to those students who demonstrate 
outstanding academic success as measured by the nature and the rigor of 
their curricula and academic achievements and by their aptitude for college 
success as evidenced by their performance on nationally normed 
standardized tests. We also seek to admit students who will contribute to 
Maryland's campus and community life and look for evidence of this by 
considering applicants' extracurricular activities and personal backgrounds. 
The most successful applicants, however, demonstrate a balance of 
outstanding academic achievement and extracurricular involvement. 

Most successful applicants submit the required personal essay and 
counselor recommendation, a list of extracurricular activities, and one or 
two additional letters of recommendation from academic subject 
area teachers. 

Application Forms 

Undergraduate application forms may be requested and submitted 
on-line via the web at www.uga.umd.edu, by calling 1-800422-5867 or 
301-314-8385, by sending an electronic mail message to urn- 
admit@uga.umd,edu, by writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 
Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235, or 
by visiting your high school guidance office. 

Application Fee 

A non-refundable application fee is required with each application. The fee 
for U.S. citizens and permanent residents is $50; the fee for international 
students and non-immigrants is $50. 

Fall Semester Freshman Admission 

The University of Maryland strongly encourages all applicants to apply by 
our priority application deadline to assure best consideration for admission, 
merit scholarships, and invitation to the University Honors Program or 
College Park Scholars. A completed application includes an official high 
school transcript, SAT I or ACT scores, essay, guidance counselor 
recommendation form, application form, and application fee. 



2 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



The University utilizes a two part application. Students who submit completed 
applications by the priority application deadline of December 1 will be mailed 
a decision letter by mid-February. Students who submit completed 
applications by the general application deadline of January 20 will be mailed 
a final admission decision on April 1. Applications received after January 20 
are reviewed on a space-available basis. Because of space limitations, the 
university is unable to offer admission to all qualified applicants. 

The following calendar describes the admission process for Fall semester 
freshman applicants: 

December 1 Priority application date: Students who submit their 
complete applications by this date (postmarl<ed) will 
receive best consideration for fall admission, merit 
scholarships, and invitation to University Honors or 
College Park Scholars. This is not an eariy decision 
program; aii admitted students have until May 1 to 
confirm their enroliment. 

January 20 General application date. Applications received after this 

date will be reviewed for admission and decisions 
released on a rolling, space-available basis. 

Mid-February Admission decisions released to priority applicants by 
mid-February. Applicants may be admitted, denied, 
placed on a wait list, or asl<ed to submit first-semester, 
senior year grades. 

February 15 Priority financial aid application deadline. For more 
information about need-based financial aid, see 
chapter 2. 

Mayl Confirmation Date. Deadline (postmarked) for confirming 

fall enrollment and requesting on-campus housing/ meals. 

June 1 Students on wait list notified of final admission decision. 

Spring Semester Freshman Admission 

The application deadline for Spring semester freshman admission is 
December 15. Applications received after this date will be considered on a 
rolling, space-available basis. The deadline for Spring Freshman admission 
for U.S. citizens and permanent residents with any foreign academic 
records is November 1. 



Financial Aid Applications 



The priority financial aid application deadline is February 15. Students 
seeking financial assistance should apply for financial aid before receiving 
their letter of admission. More information is available about Financial Aid 
in chapter 2. 

Early Admission Options for High-Achieving 
High School Students 

Concurrent Enrollm ent: Talented high school seniors have the opportunity 
to enroll at the University of Maryland for two courses, or seven credits, 
each semester. Successful applicants will have pursued a rigorous high 
school program and will have indicated exceptional performance and ability 
achieved over time. To apply, students must submit: the completed 
application and fee; high school transcript; an essay explaining why they 
are interested in the program; a letter of recommendation from the high 
school; and a letter of permission from the parents or guardian. Students 
must live within commuting distance. Tuition is assessed on a per-credit- 
hour basis. All mandatory fees apply in full. 

Summer Enrollment: High school students with a strong high school record 
may be considered for enrollment in courses during the summer preceding 
their junior or senior year. They must file a regular application for 
undergraduate admission, including an official high school transcript. 
Tuition is assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply 
in full. 



Early Admission: Although the University of Maryland generally requires 
applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to their first full-time 
registration, the university will admit a limited number of well-qualified 
students without high school diplomas. Successful applicants will have 
pursued a rigorous high school program and will have indicated exceptional 
performance and ability achieved over time. Students must be within two 
credits of high school graduation and have the commitment of the high 
school to award a diploma after successful completion of the freshman 
year at Maryland. To apply, students must submit: the completed 
application and fee, high school transcript and SAT I or ACT results, an 
essay explaining how they will benefit from the program, and a letter of 
permission from the parents or guardian and a letter of support from the 
high school. Early admission students are eligible for on-campus housing, 
scholarships based on academic achievement, the University Honors 
Program, and College Park Scholars. Early application is advised. 

Gifted Student Admission: The university will consider for admission a 
limited number of gifted students who have completed at least the seventh 
grade. Competitive applicants must have superior academic records as 
measured by grades and standardized test scores. Students must have an 
initial conference with a member of the Undergraduate Admissions staff. 
The Admission staff member may if it is deemed helpful to the admission 
decision, make referrals for further assessment to campus counseling 
services. Students admitted under this category are usually limited to six 
credits of enrollment per semester. 

Students With Learning Disabilities 

The University of Maryland expects that all students admitted to its degree 
programs will fulfill all of the published requirements for graduation. These 
requirements are widely published and include fundamental studies in 
English and mathematics, as well as other general education requirements 
of the CORE program, and all curriculum requirements of the major program 
and the degree-granting college or school. Students should not accept an 
offer of admission with the expectation that any requirement will be waived. 
For additional information about the admission process for students with 
documented learning disabilities, please contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

High School Equivalency Examination (GED) 

Maryland residents who are at least 16 years of age and who have not 
received a high school diploma may be considered for admission provided 
they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency (GED) 
certificate. In order to be considered for admission, the applicant must 
present an above average total score as well as above average scores on 
each of the five parts of the test. 

Non-Accredited/ Non-Approved High School 

students from non-accredited/ non-approved high schools who seek 
admission to the University of Maryland should contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions for information. 



Advanced Placement (AP) Credit 

The University of Maryland encourages applicants to seek AP credit so that 
academically successful students may move forward in their programs at 
an appropriate pace. However, credit is not granted for all exams offered by 
the College Board. Credits are accepted and courses are exempted, based 
on departmental approval, according to the chart on the following pages. 
Students should arrange to have their scores sent directly to the University 
of Maryland from the Educational Testing Service; the code is 5814. 
Students should also inform their advisers at Orientation that they 
anticipate receiving AP credit because this information may affect their 
placement in subject-matter courses. 

If a student has already received AP credit at another institution, this credit 
will be reevaluated. The score received must be equivalent to the minimum 
score the University of Maryland accepted at the time the test was taken; 
otherwise, the credit will not be eligible for transfer. AP credits that are 
accepted are recorded as transfer credit on University of Maryland records 
and figure in the total number of credits earned toward graduation. 
Students may not receive AP credit for an equivalent course taken at the 
University of Maryland or elsewhere. If students earn credit in a course 
equivalent to an AP exam for which they also earned credit, the AP credit 
will be deleted from their records. Students should check with their 
advisers for detailed information on the assignment of AP credit. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 3 



2004-2005 University of Maryland Advanced Placement (AP) Exams and Credit Table 



AP Exam Title 


Score 


Related Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Notes 


Art History 


3 
4,5 


ARTH 100 
ARTH 201 


3 
3 


No 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


ARTH 100 or ARTH 201 fills CORE-Arts requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-1479. 


Art 

Art-Drawing 
Art-General 


4,5 
4,5 


ARTT110 
LL Elective 


3 
3 


Yes 
No 


No 
No 


Students interested in establishing credit for specific 
courses must submit portfolio for evaluation; call 405-1442. 


Biology 


4 
5 


BSCI 105 and 
LL elective 
BSC1 105 and 
BSCI 106 


8 
8 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


BSCI fills a major requirement in all Life Sciences; it also 
fills CORE-Lab (Life) Science requirements. Contact the 
College of Life Sciences for placement, 405-2080. 


Chemistry 


4 
5 


CHEM 103 
CHEM 103 and 
CHEM 113 


4 
8 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


CHEM fills a major requirement in all Life Sciences; it also 
fills CORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement. Contact 
department for placement, 405-1791. 


Computer Science 

JAVA (2004+) A 
JAVA (2004+) AB 
C++ (pre-2004) A 
C++ (pre-2004) AB 


5 

4,5 

4,5 

4 

5 


LL Elective 
LL Elective 
LL Elective 
LL Elective 
LL Elective 


4 
4 
4 
4 
6 


No 
No 
No 
No 
No 


No 
No 
No 
No 
No 


Credit will be given for either the A or the AB exam, not 

both. 

Credit may be earned for both the C++ and JAVA exams. 

Students receiving an acceptable score on the JAVA exam 

(5 on A, 4 or 5 on AB) are exempt from CMSC131. Contact 

department for placement, 405-2672. 


Economics 

Macroeconomics 
Microeconomics 


4,5 

3 

4,5 


ECON 201 
ECON 105 
ECON 200 


3 
3 
3 


Yes 

No 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Economics majors must score 4 or 5 to receive credit 
toward the major. Either ECON fills one of two CORE- 
Social/Behav-ioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement, 405-3491. 


English 

Literature & Comp 

Language & Comp 


3 

4,5 

3 
4,5 


LL Elective 
LL Elective and 
ENGL 240 
LL Elective 
ENGL 101 


3 
6 

3 
3 


No 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 


No 
No 
Yes 
No 

* 


Students with score of 4 or 5 on Lang and Comp exam 
satisfy CORE-Fundamental Studies Freshman Writing 
requirement (*ENGL 101). Students with credit for the 
Language exam may not receive credit for ENGL 291 or its 
equivalent. ENGL 240 fills CORE-Literature requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-3825. 


Env. Science 


4,5 


ENSP 101 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ENSP101 fills CORE-Physical Science requirement. 


French 

Language 

Literature 


4 

5 

4 
5 


FREN 201 or 
FREN 202 
FREN 204 and 
FREN 211 
FREN 202 
FREN 204 and 
FREN 250 


4 

6 

3 
6 


No 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 


Language: Students with score of 4 who wish to continue 
must enroll in FREN 204; with score of 5 must enroll in 300- 
level courses. Literature: Students with score of 4 must 
enroll in FREN 250; with score of 5 must enroll in 300-level 
courses. FREN 201, 202 or 204 fills CORE-Humanities 
requirement; FREN 250 fills CORE-Literature requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-4034. 


Geography, 

Human 


3,4,5 


GEOG 202 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


GEOG 202 fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavloral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement 405-4073. 


German 


4 
5 


GERM 201 
GERM 201 and 
GERM 202 


4 

7 


No 
No 
No 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Students with score of 4 who wish to continue must enroll in 
GERM 202; with score of 5"must enroll in GERM 220. 
Contact department for placement, 405-4091. 


Gov't & Poiitins 

United States 
Comparative 


3,4,5 
3,4.5 


GVPT170 
GVPT 280 


3 
3 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
No 


GVPT 170 fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavloral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement, 405-4124. 


History 

United States 


4 
5 


HIST 156 or 
HIST 157 
HIST 156 and 
HIST 157 


3 
6 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


U.S. Historv: A score of 4 will be awarded three credits as 
chosen by the student (HIST 156 or HIST 157). A score of 
5 will be awarded six credits (HIST 156 and 157). Either fills 
CORE-Hlstory requirement. 



4 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



AP Exam Title 


Score 


Related Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Notes 


History (cont.) 
European 

World 


4 
5 
4,5 


HIST 112 or 
HIST 113 
HIST 112 and 
HIST 113 
HIST 219 


3 
6 
3 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
No 


European History: A score of 4 will be awarded 3 credits as 
chosen by the student (HIST 1 12 or HIST 1 13). A score of 5 
will be awarded 6 credits (HIST 112 and HIST 113). HIST 
112 fills CORE-Humanities requirement; HIST 113 fillls 
CORE-History requirement. 
World History: See department for placement. 405-4272. 


Latin 

Vergil 

Catullus & Cicero 
Catullus & Horace 
Catullus & Ovid 


4,5 
4,5 
4,5 
4,5 


LATN 201 
LATN 201 
LATN 201 
LATN 201 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Students with score of 4 or 5 in any AP Latin test may not 
take LATN201 or lower for credit. Students with score of 4 
or 5 in more than one AP Latin test may receive additional 
credit. Contact department for placement and credit 
adjustment, 405-2013. 


{Mathematics 

Calculus AB 
Calculus BC 

Calculus BC w/ AB 
Subscore 


4,5 
4,5 

4,5 


MATH 140* 
MATH 140 and 
MATH 141 

MATH 140 


4 
8 

4 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


*MATH 141 may be completed through credit-by-exam. 
MATH 140 fills both CORE-Fundamental Studies Math 
requirement and CORE-Math & Formal Reasoning non-lab 
requirement. Students who receive credit for MATH 140 or 
140 & 141 may not receive credit for MATH 220 or 220 & 
221 . Contact department for placement, 405-5053. 

The Calculus BC w/ AP subscore is treated as if the BC 
exam was the AB exam. Students may not receive AB 
subscore credit if credit was awarded for the BC exam. 


IMusic 

Listening/Literature 
Theory 


3,4,5 
4,5 


MUSC 130 
MUSC 140 


3 
3 


No 
No 


Yes 
Yes 


MUSC 130 or 140 fills CORE-Arts History/Theory 
requirement. Majors should contact department for 
placement, 405-5563. 


Physics 

Physics B 

Physics C 
Mechanics 

Elec./Magnet. 


4,5 
4,5 

4 
5 


PHYS 121 and 
PHYS 122 
PHYS 141 or 
PHYS 161 or 
PHYS 171 
PHYS 142 or 
PHYS 260/1 
PHYS 142 or 
PHYS 260/1 or 
PHYS 272 


8 
4 
4 

4 


No 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


PHYS 121 and 122 fulfill CORE-Lab (Physical) Science 
requirement. Phvsics C exams fulfill maior requirements in 
Life Sciences, Engineering, or Physics; they also fulfill the 
CORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement. A score of 4 or 
5 on the Physics C exams will be awarded four credits as 
chosen by the student and his/her advisor. 

Students must have credit for AP Calculus BC to take the 
next course in sequence. Contact department for placement, 
405-5979. 


Psychology 


4,5 


PSYC 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The AP exam counts towards the 35 required major credits. 
If a student enters with AP credit, s/he must complete 
PSYC221 with a grade of B or better. PSYC 100 fills one of 
two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement, 405-5866. 


Spanish 

Language 

Literature 


4 
5 

4 
5 


SPAN 201 
SPAN 202 and 
SPAN 207 
SPAN 221 
SPAN 207 and 
SPAN 221 


4 
6 

3 
6 


No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 


Lanauaae: Students with score of 4 who wish to continue 
must enroll in SPAN 202, 21 1 or 207; with score of 5 must 
enroll in 300-level courses. Literature: Students with score 
of 4 or 5 must enroll in 300-level courses. CORE: SPAN 201 
or 202 fills CORE-Humanities requirement; SPAN 221 fills 
CORE-Literature requirement. Contact department for 
placement, 405-6452. 


Statistics 


4, 5 


STAT 100 


3 


* 


Yes 


STAT 100 fills CORE-Fundamental Math requirement and 
CORE-Math & Formal Reasoning non-lab requirement 
* STAT 100 fills program requirements in certain majors. 
Consult advisor. 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for AP courses 
and for equivalent UMCP courses or transfer courses (including IB or CLEP). Credit will be deleted in such cases. 
Decisions about applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for 
most recent information. Native speakers may not earn AP credit for the French, German or Spanish language 
exams. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 5 



2004-2005 University of Maryland International Baccalaureate Exams (IB) and Credit Table 



IB Exam Title 


Score 


Related Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Notes 


Anthropology 

Higher 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








Under review. Students interested in Anthropology should 
contact an advisor for placement. 


Art Design 

Higher 


5,6, 7 


See Notes 








Under review. Students interested in Art should contact an 
advisor for placement. 


Biology 

Higher 
Higher 


5 
6,7 


LL Elective 

BSCI 105 &LL Elective 


4 
8 


No 
Yes 


No 
Yes 


BSC1 105 fills a major requirement in all Life Sciences; also 
fills CORE-Lab (Life) Science requirement. Contact the 
College of Life Sciences for placement, 405-2080. 


Chemistry 

Either 
Either 


5 
6,7 


CHEM 103 
CHEM103&CHEM113 


4 
8 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


CHEM fills requirement for all Life Science majors; also fills 
CORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement. Contact 
department for placement, 405-1791. 


Computing 

Higher 


5,6,7 




3 




No 


Contact department for placement, 405-2672. 


Economics 

Either 
Either 


5 
6,7 


ECON205 

ECON200 & ECON201 


3 
6 


Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


ECON majors must score 6 or 7 to receive credit toward 
major. ECON fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement, 405-3491. 


English A/B 

Higher 


5,6,7 


ENGL 240 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ENGL 240 satisfies CORE-Literature requirement. Contact 
department for placement, 405-3825. 


Env. Studies 

Higher 


6,7 


See Notes 


3 






Under review. Students interested in Environmental Science or 
Policy should contact an advisor for placement. 


French 

Standard 
Standard 

Higher 
Higher 


5 
6,7 

5 
6,7 


FREN 201 or FREN 202 

FREN 204 & 

FREN 211 

FREN 204 & FREN 250 

FREN 204 & FREN 250 & 

FREN 211 


4 
6 

6 
9 


No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 


Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 


Subsidiary: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue 
must enroll in FREN 204; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll in 
300-level courses. Hiqher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 
must enroll in 300-level courses. FREN 201, 202 or 204 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement; FREN 250 fills CORE- 
Literature requirement. Contact department for placement, 
405-4034. 


Geography 

Either 


5,6,7 


GEOG 100 


3 


No 


Yes 


GEOG 100 satisfies one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement, 405-4053. 


German 

Higher 
Higher 


5 
6,7 


GERM 201 

GERM 201 & GERM 202 


4 

7 


No 
No 


No 
No 


Students with score of 5 who wish to continue must enroll in 
GERM 202; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll in GERM 220. 
Contact department for placement, 405-4091. 


History 

(Higher) 
Africa 

Americas 

Europe 

E/SE Asia 

W/S Asia 


5 

6,7 

5 

6,7 

5 

6,7 

5 

6,7 

5 

6,7 


HIST122orHIST123 

HIST122&HIST123 

HIST156orHIST157 

HIST156&HIST157 

HIST112orHIST113 

HIST112&HIST113 

HIST 284 or HIST 285 

HIST 284 & HIST 285 

HIST 120 

HIST 120 &LL Elective 


3 
6 
3 
6 
3 
6 
3 
6 
3 
6 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


A score of 5 will be awarded three credits (as chosen by the 
student-except for West & South Asia). A score of 6 or 7 will 
be awarded six credits. All HIST courses listed at left fulfill 
CORE-History requirement. HIST 120, 122, 123, 284 and 285 
also fulfill Diversity requirement. 


Italian 

Standard 
Standard 

Higher 
Higher 


5 
6,7 

5 
6,7 


ITAL 203 

ITAL 204 & 

ITAL 211 

ITAL 204 & ITAL 251 

ITAL 204 & ITAL 251 & 

ITAL 211 


4 
6 

6 
9 


No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 


Subsidiary: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue 
must enroll in ITAL 204; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll in 
300-level courses. Hiqher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 
must enroll in 300-level courses. ITAL 203 or 204 fills CORE- 
Humanities 

requirement; ITAL 251 fills CORE-Literature requirement. 
Contact depatrment for placement, 405-4031 . 


Info. Tech. 




See Notes 








No credit is awarded for this exam at this time. 



6 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



IB Exam Title 


Score 


Related Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Notes 


Latin 

Either 


5,6,7 


1-ATN 201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


Contact department for placement, 405-2013. 


Mathematics 

Standard 

Higher 


5,6,7 
5,6,7 


See Notes 
Math 140 




7 


No 
Yes 


No 
Yes 


Standard: No credit, but placement in MATH 200 is awarded. 
Higher: MATH 141 may be completed via credit-bv-exam. 
MATH 140 fills both CORE-Fundamental Studies Math 
requirement and CORE-Math & Formal Reasoning non-lab 
requirement. Contact department with questions, 405-5053. 


Music 

Either 


5,6,7 


IVIUSC 130 


3 


No 


Yes 


MUSC 130 fills CORE-Arts requirement. Majors should 
contact department for placement, 405-5563. 


Philosophy 

Higher 


6,7 


PHIL 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


PHIL 100 fills CORE-Humanities i^equirement. 


Physics 


6,7 


See Notes 


4 




Yes 


Under review, the IB exam fills CORE-Lab (Physical) Science 
requirement. Contact department for placement, 405-5979. 


Psychology 

Either 


6,7 


PSYC 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The IB exam counts towards the 35 credits required in the 
major. If a student enters with IB credit, s/he must complete 
PSYC221 with a grade of B or better. PSYC 100 fills one of 
two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement, 405-5866. 


Spanish 

Standard 
Standard 

Higher 

Higher 


5 
6,7 

5 

6,7 


SPAN 201 
SPAN 202 & 
SPAN 207 
SPAN 202 & 
SPAN 221 
SPAN 202 & 
SPAN 207 & 
SPAN 221 


4 
6 

6 

9 


No 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 


Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue must 
enroll in SPAN 202, 21 1 or 207; with score of 6 or 7 must 
enroll in 300-level courses. Hiqher: Students with score of 5, 6 
or 7 must enroll in 300-level courses. SPAN 201 or 202 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement. SPAN 221 fills CORE- 
Literature requirement. Students continuing Spanish study 
should consult department for placement, 405-6452. 


Swahiii 

Either 


6,7 


FOLA 159 


6 


No 


No 


Elective credit In the FOLA program. Students who wish to 
continue should contact the FOLA office in Jiminez Hall. 


Theatre 

Higher 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








Under review. Student should bring relevant materials to THET 
department. 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for IB courses and 
for equivalent UMCP courses or transfer courses (including AP or CLEP). IB credit will be deleted in such cases. 
Decisions about applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for 
most recent information. Native speakers may not earn IB credit for any language exams. 

Students who receive an International Baccalaureate Diploma or Certificate may consider presenting a portfolio to 
the Freshman Writing Office for review. See 

www.inform.umd.edu/ENGL7Programs/FreshmanWriting/Exemptions.html or call the Freshman Writing Office, 405- 
3771, for further information. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 7 



Please note that the chart represents a general outline of AP credit. In all 
cases, credit is available only for grades of 3 or higher, subject to ongoing 
departmental reevaluation. All departments reserve the right to reevaluate 
the content of exams and to change the assignment of credit and course 
equivalencies. Any new exams offered after February 15 may or may not be 
evaluated by the appropriate department. Students should checl< with their 
adviser at Orientation. 

Certain departments, particularly Mathematics and Physics, have separate 
criteria for placement in courses and the assignment of credit. Students 
should check with those departments for additional information. All 
entering freshmen will be placed in math courses according to the 
University of M aryland math placement exam. 

International Baccalaureate (IB) 
Examination Credit 

The University of Maryland awards credit to students who sit for 
International Baccalaureate exams according to the table on the previous 
page 5. Interested students should contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions for additional information. 

Note: Credit awards and course equivalencies are subject to change. 



Admission to Limited Enrollment 
Programs (LEP) 

Certain colleges, schools, and departments within the university have tal<en 
steps to limit enrollment in order to maintain quality programs. For the 
2004-2005 academic year these included the School of Architecture, 
Planning and Preservation, Robert H. Smith School of Business, A. James 
Clark School of Engineering, Department of Government and Politics, 
Department of Biological Resources Engineering, Philip Merrill College of 
Journalism, Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape 
Architecture, Department of Psychology, Department of Communication and 
College of Education. LEP programs are continually reviewed. Students 
should check with the appropriate college or the Limited Enrollment Program 
Admissions Coordinator at 301-314-8385 for updated information. 

Freshmen: Admission for new freshmen to Limited Enrollment Programs is 
competitive. Because space may be limited for a particular major, early 
application is encouraged. Freshmen who are directly admitted to an LEP 
will be subject to a performance review when they complete 45 college 
credits. The review varies from program to program, but always includes 
satisfactory performance in a set of appropriate courses. Students not 
passing the review will be required to choose another major. See the 
academic program description for specific details. 

Freshmen not directly admitted to an LEP may be assigned to the Division 
of Letters and Sciences or to a general major within the LEP college 
requested. Students are not guaranteed admission to an LEP at a later 
date, although they may gain admission by meeting the requirements 
outlined in their particular program by the time they complete 45 or 56 
credits at Maryland. See the following section on LEP transfer admission 
and the LEP program descriptions for further details about this option. 

Transfers: Transfer students and on-campus students wishing to change 
their major to an LEP must meet a set of gateway courses with minimum 
grades in order to be admitted to the program. Space is limited in each 
program, and the most qualified applicants will be admitted each semester. 
Additional information for each of the limited-enrollment programs may be 
found in the descriptions of academic majors in chapters 6 and 7. 

Transfer students who are not directly admissible to an LEP upon 
application to the university will be assigned to an alternate program. 
Those with fewer than 56 credits will be assigned to the Division of Letters 
and Sciences, and will be allowed the opportunity to meet the gateway 
requirements by the time they complete 45 or 56 credits. Students with 
more than 56 credits will be admitted to an interim program possibly within 
the LEP college requested where they will be advised regarding 
their qualifications for the LEP and, in some cases, the need to choose 
another major. 

Second Major: Enrolled students interested in adding an LEP as a second 
major should consult chapter 4. 



P re-Professional Programs 

All students interested in pursuing a professional career in one of the areas 
listed in chapter 7 may need to select and enter an academic major at 
Maryland. Please refer to the "Pre-Professional Information" section 
beginning on page 154 for more detailed information. Students may initially 
choose Letters and Sciences as their major. No particular major is prefen-ed 
or favored by the professional programs. The academic advisers in the 
Division of Letters and Sciences and the pre-professional advisers in the 
Law and Health Professions Advising Office of the Division of Letters and 
Sciences can assist you in selecting a major that is compatible with your 
preparation for entry into a professional school. 



SPECIAL APPLICANTS 



Golden Identification Card Program 

The University of Maryland participates in the Golden Identification Card Program. 
The institution will make available courses and various services to persons who 
are 60 years of age or older, who are legal residents of the State of Maryland 
and who are retired (not engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours 
per week). When persons eligible for this program are admitted to the university 
they register on a space-available basis for credit courses as regular or special 
students in any session and receive a Golden Identification card. Golden ID 
students must meet all course prerequisite and co-requisite requirements. 
Tuition is waived for these courses; however, a Golden ID administrative fee is 
assessed every semester. Golden ID students may register for a maximum of 
three courses per term. Golden ID students are not eligible for Consortium 
courses. The Golden Identification Card will entitle eligible persons to certain 
academic services, including the use of the libraries and the shuttle bus service. 
Such services will be available during any session only to persons who have 
registered for one or more courses for that semester. Golden ID students also 
have the opportunity to become involved with the Golden ID Student Association, 
which provides cultural and social events, course recommendations, and peer 
advising. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, Ground Floor, Mitchell Building: 301-314-8385, or 
the Special Programs Office, 1108 Mitchell Building: 301-314-8237. 



Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to work toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as non-degree-seeking students. 

Non-degree-seeking students who have received a baccalaureate degree 
are advised that no credit earned while enrolled may be applied at a later 
date to a graduate program. These post-baccalaureate students may enroll 
in undergraduate courses for which they possess the necessary 
prerequisites, but may not enroll in courses restricted to graduate students 
only. Students who wish to take courses at the graduate level (600 and 
above) must contact the Graduate School for information concerning 
admission requirements for Advanced Special Student status. 

Non-degree-seeking students who do not have a baccalaureate degree 
must submit transcripts and meet regular admission standards. Transcripts 
are not required from students with baccalaureate degrees from a 
regionally accredited institution. Because of space limitation, several 
departments require permission be given in advance to register for classes 
as a non-degree student. Please contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions for further information. 

Non-degree-seeking students who are taking classes to transfer 
immediately back to another institution may apply without academic 
transcripts. These applicants must, in lieu of transcripts, submit official 
documentation from that institution granting permission to take course 
work at the University of Maryland for that particular semester. 



Returning Students and Veterans 

Applicants who have not attended school for more than five years, or who 
have had military experience, should contact both an admissions counselor 
and the Returning Students Program: 301-314-7693. Veterans should also 
contact the Veterans Affairs Office: 301-314-8239. 



8 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



students returning to the University of l^laryiand after a separation of five 
calendar years may petition the appropriate dean to have a number of grades 
and credits from courses previously tal<en at the University of Maryland, 
College Park, removed from the calculation of their cumulative grade point 
averages and from the credits applied toward graduation requirements. The 
information on academic requirements and regulations is in chapter 4. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADM ISSION 

The University of Maryland seel<s to enroll international students who 
demonstrate strong academic performance with records suggesting 
potential for success at Maryland. Admission is competitive and is offered 
to applicants whose academic credentials indicate marks of "very good" to 
"excellent." Due to space limitations and the competitive nature of 
undergraduate admission at the University of Maryland, an international 
applicant should submit a complete application as early as possible, and 
always before the deadlines listed in this section. Applications completed 
after a deadline will not be considered for that semester, but will be 
reviewed for the following semester. Evaluation of an applicant's 
credentials will take place only after all application materials are received. 
Decisions are released in writing on a rolling basis. 

Applicants currently holding or intending to seek an F-1 Student orJ-1 
Exchange Visitor visa to study in the United States are considered 
international applicants and should observe the following instructions. All 
other non-immigrant visa holders (including A, E, G, H, I, and L) should 
follow the Freshman and Transfer instructions preceding and following the 
International Student Admission section of the catalog. 

Freshman Admission - International 

You are considered a freshman applicant if you have completed fewer than 
12 semester hours of university-level credit past secondary school at the 
time you plan to enter the University of Maryland. Successful freshman 
applicants demonstrate satisfactory completion of diverse college- 
preparatory subjects in secondary school, proficiency in English, and 
evidence of sufficient funds to cover all expenses. Due to space 
limitations, we are unable to offer admission to all students who have the 
ability to be successful academically at the University of Maryland. 

The Fall (August) deadline for applications to be received is December 1. 
The Spring (January) general deadline is August 1. 

All of the following documents must be submitted before the freshman final 
deadline for an applicant to be considered for undergraduate admission: 
International Student Application for Undergraduate Admission; 
nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $50.00); official secondary school 
transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations and, 
where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion from a 
national secondary school examination; all official university or college 
transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations (if 
any); proof of English proficiency; SAT I or ACT official results (if three or 
more years of high school completed in U.S.); statement of activities; an 
essay; and Certification of Finances, including supporting documents that 
demonstrate support of U.S. $28,533 per year. Current F-1 and J-1 Visa 
Holders must also provide photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/ Departure 
Record, visa stamp, and current 1-20 or DS-2019 form. Current other non- 
immigrant Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their 1-94 
Arrival/ Departure Record and visa stamp. 

Transfer Admission - International 

You are considered a transfer applicant if you have completed 12 or more 
semester hours of university-level credit past secondary school at the time 
you plan to enter the University of Maryland. Successful transfer applicants 
demonstrate better than average grades in strong academic courses, 
proficiency in English, and evidence of sufficient funds to cover all 
expenses. Due to space limitations, we are unable to offer admission to all 
students who have the ability to be academically successful at the 
University of Maryland. 

The Fall final deadline for applications to be received is March 1. The 
Spring (January) final deadline is August 1. 

All of the following documents must be submitted before the transfer final 
deadline for an applicant to be considered for undergraduate admission: 
International Student Application for Undergraduate Admission; 
nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $50.00); all official university or college 
transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations; 
proof of English proficiency; statement of activities; and Certification of 
Finances, including supporting documents that demonstrate support of U.S. 
$28,533 per year. Current F-1 and J-1 Visa Holders must also provide 



photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/ Departure Record, visa stamp, and current 
1-20 or DS-2019 form. Current other non-immigrant Visa Holders must also 
provide photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/ Departure Record and visa stamp. 
Students with fewer than 30 semester hours must also provide official 
secondary school transcripts in native language with certified literal English 
translations and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of 
completion from a national secondary school examination. 

English Proficiency 

Non-native English speakers (regardless of citizenship) who seek admission 
to the University of Maryland must verify their proficiency in English by 
taking and submitting an official score report from one of the following 
English proficiency exams: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language); 
orlELTS (International English Language Test System). Those whose native 
language is English, who earn an SAT I verbal score of 480 or higher, or 
who have earned a post-secondary degree from a university in an English- 
speaking country do not need to take or submit scores from an English 
proficiency exam. Transfer credit for an English composition course does 
not waive the English proficiency exam. 

Visa Records 

Applicants Residing Outside of the United States: To enter the United 
States, international students residing abroad will need a passport from 
their government and a visa from the U.S. Consulate. In order to obtain a 
visa for the purposes of studying in the United States, the applicant must 
present a Certificate of Eligibility form to the U.S. Consulate. The university 
will issue this form to admitted students who have submitted proof of 
having sufficient funds to cover the cost of a program of study. Admitted 
students with personal, family or other source of private funding will be 
issued the Certificate of Eligibility form 1-20 in order to obtain the F-1 
Student Visa. Admitted students who are sponsored by agencies, 
foundations, or their home government, or are participating in an 
established exchange program may be issued the Certificate of Eligibility 
form DS-2019 in order to obtain the J-1 Exchange Visitor Visa. 

Applicants Currently Residing in the United States: Applicants currently 
holding F-1 Student or J-1 Exchange Visitor status in the United States 
need to submit a photocopy of their 1-94 Arrival/ Departure Record, visa 
stamp, and current 1-20 or DS-2019 form along with proof of having 
sufficient funds to cover the cost of a program of study Applicants holding 
another type of non-immigrant status need to submit a photocopy of their I- 
94 Arrival/ Departure Record and visa stamp, and must indicate if they 
intend to seek a change to F-1 Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor status. Upon 
admission and submission of the appropriate financial support 
documentation, the university will issue the appropriate Certificate of 
Eligibility form (1-20 or DS-2019) to the student. 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 

A student who has attended any regionally accredited institution of higher 
education following graduation from high school and attempted 12 or more 
credits will be considered for admission as a transfer student. Transfer 
applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary standing at their 
previous institutions to be eligible for transfer to the University of Maryland. 

When the number of students desiring admission exceeds the number that 
can be accommodated at this institution, or in a particular professional 
or specialized program, admission will be based on overall grade 
point average and the strength of the academic program the student 
has pursued. 

Requirements 

Admission for transfer applicants is primarily based on the number of 
credits a student has earned and the cumulative grade point average for all 
college-level work. In calculating eligibility, the university will use the 
average stated on the transcript by the sending institution. When an 
applicant has attended more than one institution, a cumulative average for 
all previous college work attempted will be computed. To be considered, 
course work must have been completed at a regionally accredited college 
or university All students with grade point averages below 3.0 will be 
considered on a space-available basis. Students who were not admissible 
as high school seniors must complete at least 30 semester hours with the 
grade point average as stated above. In accordance with Maryland Higher 
Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer policies, applicants 
from Maryland public institutions are, in some instances, given special 
consideration, and, when qualified and space is available, maybe admitted 
with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 9 



Application Dates 



Semester Date 

Spring December 1 (November 1 with any foreign 

academic records) 
Fall Priority March 1 

Fall July 1 (April 30 with any foreign academic records) 

Transfer from Maryland Public Institutions 

Cumently, applicants who have attended Maryland public Institutions may 
be admitted in accordance with the criteria outlined in the previous 
paragraph. The university subscribes to the policies set forth in the 
Maryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer 
policies. When the number of students desiring admission exceeds the 
number that can be accommodated in a particular professional or 
specialized program, admission will be based on criteria developed by the 
university to select the best qualified students. 

Articulated transfer programs are available at each Maryland community 
college. An articulated transfer program is a list of courses that best 
prepare applicants for a particular course of study at the University of 
Maryland. Applicants who take appropriate courses specified in the 
articulated program and earn acceptable grades are guaranteed transfer 
with no loss of credit. Articulated transfer programs help students plan 
their new programs after changing career objectives. Computerized 
articulation information, called ARTSYS, is available at the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions at the University of Maryland, in the transfer 
adviser's office at each of the community colleges, and at all other 
Maryland public institutions. Applicants can eliminate all doubt concerning 
transfer of courses by following articulated programs. 

General Transfer Information 

Admitted students will receive a preliminary review of transfer credit within 
two weeks after receiving the letter of admission. An official review of 
transfer credit occurs thereafter, with final determination of applicability 
made by an academic adviser/ evaluator in the office of the appropriate 
dean for the major. Generally, college-level courses completed at regionally- 
accredited institutions will transfer provided that grades of at least "C" 
(2.0) are earned and the course is similar in content and scope to work 
offered at Maryland. The regional accrediting bodies are Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools, New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 
Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools, and Western Association of Schools and Colleges. 
Up to 60 credits from a community or two-year college, and 90 credits from 
a four-year college, may be applied toward the degree. Students are 
required to complete at least their final 30 credits at Maryland to earn a 
Maryland degree. 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public colleges and 
universities is covered by the Maryland Higher Education Commission 
(MHEC) transfer policies (see complete text later in this section). Maryland 
will accept grades of "D" or better from appropriate course work completed 
at a regionally-accredited Maryland public institution, including other 
institutions in the University System of Maryland. 

The Transfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assistance 
to students and transfer advisers. The Center, a joint effort between the 
Offices of Undergraduate Admissions and the Office of the Registrar, has 
computerized and consolidated the transfer credit evaluation process. It 
provides incoming students from domestic institutions with information on 
acceptability of credits and transfer equivalencies, subject to adjustment by 
advisers within the student's individual program. Certain courses (e.g., 
those not appearing or not fully elaborated in the sending institution's 
current catalog) may require additional information such as syllabi, 
portfolios, etc., before evaluation. 

Information on transferability of specific courses to the University of Maryland, 
College Park maybe accessed on the web atwww.tce.ymd.edy/TCE/ . 

Each college-level course will be evaluated individually with applicability 
toward major or general education requirements determined by the 
appropriate academic unit. The university does not transfer blocks of 
courses, such as those completed through the Associate's Degree. See 
the appropriate sections of the catalog for specific general education and 
major requirements. 



Credit will be posted to your Maryland record only from official transcripts 
sent from the institution at which the credit was completed. Students who 
have earned credit through Advanced Placement (AP), International 
Baccalaureate (IB), or College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject 
area exams must have scores sent directly from the testing board, even if 
they are already posted on a transcript from another institution. 



SOURCE 



EQUIVALENT GRADES/ SCORES 
ACCEPT OR REQUIRED WHERE 
CREDITS? CREDITS APPROPRIATE 



Note: Some transfer credit policies are under review. Please call 
Undergraduate Admissions for current information. 



ACE Non- 
Collegiate 
Courses 

Advanced 
Placement 

Program (CEEB) 



No 



Yes 



E or Ri 3 or higher (see chart 

in this chapter) 



CLEP 


Yes 


E orRi 




See chart in Chap. 4 


Community 

College of the 
Air Force 


Yes 


EorRi 




C (2.0) or higher 
equivalent grade as 
appropriate to dept. 


Correspondence 
courses 


No 








Dantes 


No 








Defense 

Language 

Institute 


Yes 


EorRi 




Scores as 
appropriate 

to department 


Departmental 
exams from 
other colleges 


Yes 


EorRi 




C (2.0) or higher 


International 
Baccalaureate 


Yes 


EorRi 




5 or higher (see chart 

in this chapter) 


Life experience 


No, unless validated through CLEP or University of 
Maryland, College Park departmental exam 


Military credit 


No 









Nursing school No 
courses: by 
transfer/ by 
challenge exam 



Other 
articulation 
agreements 
(proprietary 

schools, public 
agencies, etc.) 



No, unless a newly-formed Maryland public institution 
operating under auspices of MHEC 



PONSInon- No 

collegiate work 



Portfolio credits No 
from other 
colleges 



Courses must be similar in depth and scope to University of Maryland 
courses. Applicability is detenrined by the appnapriate dean. 

Pnafessional courses are generally not transferable. Courses taken at a 
regionallyaccredited institution maybe reviewed by the appropriate dean. 



10 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



Statement on Transfer of Course Credit 

The University of l^laryland welcomes transfer students and has transfer 
agreements (sometimes referred to as "articulation" agreements) to 
encourage and aid students in their efforts to take appropriate courses prior 
to transfer. Each course is evaluated individually for students seeking to 
transfer to the University of Maryland. Credit is granted for courses that are 
applicable to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and for which 
a grade of C or above was earned. Courses completed at Maryland public 
two- or four-year institutions may be transferred with grades of D or above 
provided that course content is appropriate to our academic programs. 

Maximum Number of Transfer Credits Accepted 

The University of Maryland has direct transfer agreements with all Maryland 
community colleges, as well as other junior and community colleges 
outside of the state. The university will accept for transfer a maximum of 
60 credits from a two-year program and 90 credits from a four-year program 
for courses in which a grade of C or above was earned and which are 
appropriate to an approved curriculum at this institution. See the above 
paragraph for required course grades. 

Maximum Number of Credits Allowed for Non-Traditional Learning 

Students who have acquired college-level learning through work or other 
non-collegiate activities may wish to translate their experience into credits 
at Maryland by validation through the national CLEP examination (College- 
Level Examination Program) or credit-by-examination administered by 
academic departments. The university will accept a maximum of 30 hours 
of credit through examination. 

Minimum Number of Credits Required Through Classroom Instruction in 
the M ajor Field and for the Degree 

The University of Maryland requires a minimum of 120 semester hours of 
credit for an undergraduate degree; some programs require more. 
Regardless of the total number of transfer credits, students must complete 
at least their last 30 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

Statement on Transfer of General Education Requirements 

As directed by the Maryland Higher Education Commission Transfer Policy 
transferable courses taken in fulfillment of general education requirements at 
a Maryland public institution will be applied toward Maryland's CORE 
requirements. Careful planning with an academic adviser will ensure that 
students take appropriate credit and maximize their credit transfer. The total 
number of general education credits for a Maryland public institution transfer 
or post baccalaureate credits will not exceed that required of native students. 



MARYU\ND HIGHER EDUCATION 
COMMISSION (TITLE 13B) 

Subtitle 06 GENERAL EDUCATION AND TRANSFER 

ChapterOl PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

Authority: Education Article, 11-201 -11-206, Annotated Code of Maryland 

.01 Scope and Applicability. 

This chapter applies only to public institutions of higher education. 
.02 Definitions. 

A. In this chapter, the following terms have the meanings indicated. 

B. Terms defined. 

(1) "A.A. degree" means the Associate of Arts degree. 

(2) "A.A.S. degree" means the Associate of Applied 
Sciences degree. 

(3) "Arts" means courses that examine aesthetics and the 
development of the aesthetic form and explore the 
relationship between theory and practice. Courses in this 
area may include fine, performing and studio art, 
appreciation of the arts, and history of the arts. 



(4) "A.S. degree" means the Associate of Sciences degree. 

(5) "Biological and physical sciences" means courses that 
examine living systems and the physical universe. They 
introduce students to the variety of methods used to collect, 
interpret, and apply scientific data, and to an understanding 
of the relationship between scientific theory and application. 

(6) "English composition courses" means courses that provide 
students with communication knowledge and skills 
appropriate to various writing situations, including intellectual 
inquiry and academic research. 

(7) "General education" means the foundation of the higher 
education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual 
experience for all students. 

(8) "General education program" means a program that is 
designed to: 

(a) Introduce undergraduates to the fundamental knowledge, 
skills, and values that are essential to the study of 
academic disciplines; 

(b) Encourage the pursuit of life-long learning; and 

(c) Foster the development of educated members of the 
community and the world. 

(9) "Humanities" means courses that examine the values and 
cultural heritage that establish the framework for inquiry into 
the meaning of life. Courses in the humanities may include 
the language, history, literature, and philosophy of Western 
and other cultures. 

(10) "Mathematics" means courses that provide students with 
numerical, analytical, statistical and problem-solving skills. 

(11) "Native student" means a student whose initial college 
enrollment was at a given institution of higher education and 
who has not transferred to another institution of higher 
education since that initial enrollment. 

(12) "Parallel program" means the program of study or courses 
at one institution of higher education which has com- 
parable objectives as those at another higher education 
institution, for example, a transfer program in psychology in a 
community college is definable as a parallel program to a 
baccalaureate psychology program at a 4-year institution of 
higher education. 

(13) "Receiving institution" means the institution of higher 
education at which a transfer student currently desires 
to enroll. 

(14) "Recommended transfer program" means a planned program 
of courses, both general education and courses in the major, 
taken at a community college, which is applicable to a 
baccalaureate program at a receiving institution and 
ordinarily the first 2 years of the baccalaureate degree. 

(15) "Sending institution" means the institution of higher 
education of most recent previous enrollment by a transfer 
student at which transferable academic credit was earned. 

(16) "Social and behavioral sciences" means courses that 
examine the psychology of individuals and the ways in which 
individuals, groups, or segments of society behave, function, 
and influence one another. The courses include, but are not 
limited to, subjects which focus on: 

(a) History and cultural diversity; 

(b) Concepts of groups, work, and political systems; 

(c) Applications of qualitative and quantitative data to social 
issues; and 

(d) Interdependence of individuals, society, and the 
physical environment. 

(17) "Transfer student" means a student entering an institution 
for the first time having successfully completed a minimum of 
12 semester hours at another institution which is applicable 
for credit at the institution the student is entering. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 11 



.03 General Education Requirements for Public Institutions. 

A. While public institutions have the autonomy to design their 
general education program to meet their unique needs and 
mission, that program shall conform to the definitions and 
common standards in this chapter. A public institution shall 
satisfy the general education requirement by 

(1) Requiring each program leading to the A.A. or A.S. degree to 
include not less than 30 and no more than 36 semester 
hours and each baccalaureate degree program to include not 
less than 40 and no more than 46 semester hours of 
required core courses, with the core requiring, at a minimum, 
coursework in each of the following five areas: 

(a) Arts and humanities 

(b) Social and behavioral sciences 

(c) Biological and physical sciences 

(d) Mathematics and 

(e) English composition 

(2) Conforming with COMAR 13B.02.02.16D(2)(bHc). 

B. Each core course used to satisfy the distribution requirements of 
(1) of this regulation shall carry at least 3 semester hours. 

C. General education programs of public institutions shall require 
at least: 

(1) one course in each of two disciplines in arts and humanities; 

(2) one course in each of two disciplines in social and 
behavioral sciences; 

(3) two science courses, at least one of which shall be a 
laboratory courses; 

(4) one course in mathematics at or above the level of college 
algebra; and 

(5) one course in English composition. 

D. Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues. 

(1) In addition to the five required areas in §A of this regulation, 
a public institution may include up to 8 semester hours in a 
sixth category that addresses emerging issues that 
institutions have identified as essential to a full program of 
general education for their students. These courses may 

(a) be integrated into other general education courses or 
maybe presented as separate courses; and 

(b) include courses that: 

(i) provide an interdisciplinary examination of issue 

across the five areas, or 
(ii) address other categories of knowledge, skills, and 

values that lie outside of the five areas. 

(2) Public institutions may not include the courses in this section 
in a general education program unless they provide academic 
content and rigor equivalent to the areas in §A(1) of this 
regulation. 

E. General education programs leading to the A.A.S. degree shall 
include at least 20 semester hours from the same course list 
designated by the sending institution for the A.A. and A.S. 
degrees. The A.A.S. degree shall include at least one 3-semester- 
hour course from each of the five areas listed in § (A)(1) of 
this regulation. 

F. A course in a discipline listed in more than one of the areas 
of general education may be applied only to one area of 
general education. 

G. A public institution may allow a speech communication or foreign 
language course to be part of the arts and humanities category. 

H. Composition and literature courses may be placed in the arts and 
humanities area if literature is included as part of the content of 
the course. 

I. Public institutions may not include physical education skills 
courses as part of the general education requirements. 



J. General education courses shall reflect current scholarship in the 
discipline and provide reference to theoretical frameworks and 
methods of inquiry appropriate to academic disciplines. 

K. Courses that are theoretical may include applications, but all 
applications courses shall include theoretical components if they 
are to be included as meeting general education requirements. 

L. Public institutions may incorporate knowledge and skills involving 
the use of quantitative data, effective writing, information 
retrieval, and information literacy when possible in the general 
education program. 

M. Notwithstanding §A(1) of this regulation, a public 4-year institution 
may require 48 semester hours of required core courses if 
courses upon which the institution's curriculum is based can^ 4 
semester hours. 

N. Public institutions shall develop systems to ensure that courses 
approved for inclusion on the list of general education courses are 
designed and assessed to comply with the requirements of 
this chapter. 

.04 Transfer of General Education Credit. 

A. A student transferring to one public institution from another public 
institution shall receive general education credit for 
work completed at the student's sending institution as provided 
by this chapter. 

B. A completed general education program shall transfer without 
further review or approval by the receiving institution and without 
the need for a course-by-course match. 

C. Courses that are defined as general education by one institution 
shall transfer as general education even if the receiving institution 
does not have that specific course or has not designated that 
course as general education. 

D. The receiving institution shall give lower-division general education 
credits to a transferring student who has taken any part of the 
lower-division general education credits described in Regulation 
.03 of this chapter at a public institution for any general education 
courses successfully completed at the sending institution. 

E. Except as provided in Regulation .03M of this chapter, a receiving 
institution may not require a transfer student who has completed 
the requisite number of general education credits at any public 
college or university to take, as a condition of graduation, more 
than 10-16 additional semester hours of general education and 
specific courses required of all students at the receiving 
institution, with the total number not to exceed 46 semester 
hours. This provision does not relieve students of the obligation to 
complete specific academic program requirements or course 
prerequisites required by a receiving institution. 

F. Each sending institution shall designate on or with the student 
transcript those courses that have met its general education 
requirements as well as indicate whether the student has 
completed the general education program. 

G. A.A.S. Degrees. 

(1) While there may be variance in the numbers of hours of 
general education required for A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees 
at a given institution, the courses identified as meeting 
general education requirements for all degrees shall come 
from the same general education course list and exclude 
technical or career courses. 

(2) An A.A.S. student who transfers into a receiving institution 
with fewer than the total number of general education credits 
as designated by the receiving institution shall complete the 
difference in credits according to the distribution as 
designated by the receiving institution. Except as provided in 
03M, the total general education credits for baccalaureate 
degree-granting public receiving institutions shall not exceed 
46 semester hours. 

H. Student responsibilities. A student is held 

(1 ) Accountable for the loss of credits that: 

(a) result from changes in the individual's selection of the 
major program of study 



12 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



(b) were earned for remedial coursework; or 

(c) exceed the total course credits accepted in transfer as 
allowed by this chapter and 

(2) responsible for meeting all requirements of the academic 
program of the receiving institution. 

.05 Transfer of Nongeneral Education Program Credit. 

A. Transfer to Another Public Institution. 

(1) Credit earned at any public institution in the State is 
transferable to any other public institution if the 

(a) credit is from a college or university parallel course 
or program 

(b) grades in the block of courses transferred average 2.0 or 
higher and 

(c) acceptance of the credit is consistent with the policies of 
the receiving institution governing native students 
following the same program. 

(2) If a native student's "D" grade in a specific course is 
acceptable in a program, then a "D" earned by a transfer 
student in the same course at a sending institution is also 
acceptable in the program. Conversely, if a native student is 
required to earn a grade of "C" or better in a required course, 
the transfer student shall also be required to earn a grade of 
"C" or better to meet the same requirement. 

B. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college is 
limited to 



(1) 



1/2 the baccalaureate degree program requirement, but may 
not be more than 70 semester hours; and 



(2) The first 2 years of the undergraduate education experience. 

C. Nontraditional Credit. 

(1) The assignment of credit for AP, CLEP, or other nationally 
recognized standardized examination scores presented by 
transfer students is determined according to the same 
standards that apply to native students in the receiving 
institution, and the assignment shall be consistent with the 
State minimum requirements. 

(2) Transfer of credit from the following areas shall be consistent 
with COMAR 13B.02.02. and shall be evaluated by the 
receiving institution on a course by-course basis: 

(a) technical courses from career programs 

(b) course credit awarded through articulation agreements 
with other segments or agencies 

(c) credit awarded for clinical practice or cooperative 
education experiences and 

(d) credit awarded for life and work experiences. 

(3) The basis for the awarding of the credit shall be indicated on 
the student's transcript by the receiving institution. 

(4) The receiving institution shall inform a transfer student of the 
procedures for validation of course work for which there is no 
clear equivalency. Examples of validation procedures include 
ACE recommendations, portfolio assessment, credit through 
challenge, examinations, and satisfactory completion of the 
next course in sequence in the academic area. 

(5) The receiving baccalaureate degree-granting institution shall 
use validation procedures when a transferring student 
successfully completes a course at the lower division level 
that the receiving institution offers at the upper division level. 
The validated credits earned for the course shall be 
substituted for the upper division course. 

D. Program Articulation. 

(1) Recommended transfer programs shall be developed through 
consultation between the sending and receiving institutions. 
A recommended transfer program represents an agreement 
between the two institutions that allows students aspiring to 
the baccalaureate degree to plan their programs. These 
programs constitute freshman/ sophomore level coursework 
to be taken at the community college in fulfillment of the 
receiving institution's lower division coursework requirement. 



(2) Recommended transfer programs in effect at the time that 
this regulation takes effect, which conform to this chapter, 
maybe retained. 

.05 Academic Success and General Weil-Being of Transfer Students. 

A. Sending Institutions. 

(1) Community colleges shall encourage their students to 
complete the Associate degree or to complete 56 hours in a 
recommended transfer program which includes both general 
education courses and courses applicable toward the 
program at the receiving institution. 

(2) Community college students are encouraged to choose as 
early as possible the institution and program into which they 
expect to transfer. 

(3) The sending institution shall: 

(a) Provide to community college students information about 
the specific transferability of courses at 4-year colleges. 

(b) Transmit information about transfer students who are 
capable of honors work or independent study to the 
receiving institution and 

(c) Promptly supply the receiving institution with all the 
required documents provided the student has met all 
financial and other obligations of the sending institution 
for transfer. 

B. Receiving Institutions. 

(1) Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall 
be stated explicitly in institutional publications. 

(2) The receiving institution shall admit transfer students 
from newly established public colleges that are functioning 
with the approval of the Maryland Higher Education 
Commission on the same basis as applicants from regionally 
accredited colleges. 

(3) The receiving institution shall evaluate the transcripts of 
degree seeking transfer students as expeditiously as 
possible and notify students of the results no later than 
mid-semester of the students' first semester of enrollment at 
the receiving institution provided that all official transcripts 
have been received at least 15 working days before mid- 
semester. The receiving institution shall inform students of 
which courses are acceptable for transfer credit and which of 
those are applicable to the student's intended program 
of study 

(4) The receiving institution shall give transfer students the 
option of satisfying institutional graduation requirements that 
were in effect at the receiving institution at the time the 
student enrolled as a freshman at the sending institution. In 
the case of major requirements, a transfer student may 
satisfy the major requirements in effect at the time when the 
student was identifiable as pursuing the recommended 
transfer program at the sending institution. These conditions 
are applicable to the student who has been continuously 
enrolled at the sending institution. 

.07 Programmatic Currency. 

A. Receiving institutions shall provide to the community college 
current and accurate information on recommended transfer 
programs and the transferability status of courses. Community 
college students shall have access to this information. 

B. Recommended transfer programs shall be developed with each 
community college whenever new baccalaureate programs are 
approved by the degree-granting institution. 

C. When considering curricular changes, institutions shall notify each 
other of the proposed changes that might affect transfer 
students. An appropriate mechanism shall be created to ensure 
that both 2- and 4-year public colleges provide input or comments 
to the institution proposing the change. Sufficient lead time shall 
be provided to affect the change with minimum disruption. 
Transfer students are not required to repeat equivalent 
coursework successfully completed at the community college. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 13 



.08 Transfer Mediation Committee. 

A. There shall be a Transfer Mediation Committee, which shall be 
representative of the public 4-year colleges and universities and 
the community colleges. 

B. Sending and receiving institutions that disagree on the 
interpretation of the transfer of general education courses as 
defined by this chapter shall submit their disagreements to the 
Transfer Mediation Committee. The Transfer Mediation Committee 
shall also address questions raised by any institutions about the 
acceptability of new general education courses. As appropriate, 
the Committee shall consult with faculty on curricular issues. 

C. The findings of the Transfer Mediation Committee shall be 
considered binding on both parties. 

.09 Appeal Process. 

A. Notice of Denial of Transfer Credit by the Receiving Institution. 

(1) Except as provided in §A(2) of this Regulation, the receiving 
institution shall inform a transfer student in writing of the 
denial of transfer credit not later than mid-semester of the 
transfer student's first semester provided that all official 
transcripts have been received at least 15 worl<ing days 
before mid-semester. 

(2) If transcripts are submitted after 15 working days before mid- 
semester of the student's first semester, the receiving 
institution shall inform the student of credit denied within 20 
working days of receipt of the official transcript. 

(3) The receiving institution shall include in the notice of denial 
of transfer credit 

(a) a statement of the student's right to appeal and 

(b) a notification that the appeal process is available in the 
institution's catalog. 

(4) The statement of the student's right to appeal the denial 
shall include notice of the time limitations in §B of this 
regulation. 

B. A student believing that the receiving institution has denied the 
student transfer credits in violation of this chapter may initiate an 
appeal by contacting the receiving institution's Transfer 
Coordinator or other responsible official of the receiving institution 
within 20 working days of receiving notice of the denial of credit. 

C. Response by Receiving Institution 

(1) A receiving institution shall 

(a) establish expeditious and simplified procedures 
governing the appeal of a denial of transfer of credit and 

(b) respond to a student's appeal within 10 working days. 

(2) An institution may either grant or deny an appeal. The 
institution's reasons for denying the appeal shall be 
consistent with this chapter and conveyed to the student in 
written form. 

(3) Unless a student appeals to the sending institution, the 
writing decision in §C(2) of this regulation constitutes the 
receiving institution's final decision and is not subject 
to appeal. 

D. Appeal to Sending Institution. 

(1) If a student has been denied transfer credit after an appeal 
to the receiving institution, the student may request the 
sending institution to intercede on the student's behalf by 
contacting the transfer coordinator of the sending institution. 

(2) A student shall make an appeal to the sending institution 
within 10 working days of having received the decision of the 
receiving institution. 

E. Consultation Between Sending and Receiving Institutions. 

(1) Representatives of the two institutions shall have 15 working 
days to resolve the issues involved in an appeal. 



(3) 



As a result of a consultation in this section, the receiving 
institution may affirm, modify or reverse its earlier decision. 

The receiving institution shall inform a student in writing of 
the result of the consultation 



(4) The decision arising out of a consultation constitutes the 
final decision of the receiving institution and is not subject 
to appeal. 

.1 Periodic R eview . 

A. Report by Receiving Institution. 

(1) A receiving institution shall report annually the progress of 
students who transfer from two-year and four-year institutions 
within the State to each community college and to the 
Secretary of the Maryland Higher Education Commission. 

(2) An annual report shall include ongoing reports on the 
subsequent academic success of enrolled transfer students, 
including graduation rates, by major subject areas. 

(3) A receiving institution shall include in the reports comparable 
information on the progress of native students. 

B. Transfer Coordinator. A public institution of higher education shall 
designate a transfer coordinator, who serves as a resource 
person to transfer students at either the sending or receiving 
campus. The transfer coordinator is responsible for overseeing 
the application of the policies and procedures outlined in this 
chapter and interpreting transfer policies to the individual student 
and to the institution. 

C. The Maryland Higher Education Commission shall establish 
a permanent Student Transfer Advisory Committee that meets 
regularly to review transfer issues and recommend policy changes 
as needed. The Student Transfer Advisory Committee 
shall address issues of interpretation and implementation of 
this chapter. 

Administrative History 

Effective date: December 4, 1995 (22:24 Md. R. 1901) 
Regulations .02, .03, and .05 amended. Effective date: July 1, 1996 
(23:13 Md. R. 946) 



RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

Residency Classification Office, 1118 Mitchell Building, 301405-2030, 

Fax: 301-314-9832 

E-mail: resclass@deans.umd.edu 

www .testudo ,um d.edu/ rco 

Petitions, related documents, self-test checklist, deadline information, and 
questions concerning the residency policy of the University of Maryland for 
the determination of in-state status should be directed to the Residency 
Classification unit in the Office of the Registrar. 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, Tuition, and Charge 
Differential Purposes: See Appendix H in this catalog for the complete 
text of this policy. 

An initial determination of in-state status for undergraduates will be made 
by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at the time a student's 
application for admission is considered. The determination made at that 
time, and any determination made thereafter, shall prevail in each 
semester until the determination is successfully challenged. Students may 
challenge their classification by submitting a petition to the Residency 
Classification Office. Determinations are based on the residency policy and 
its requirements. The deadline for submitting a petition and meeting all 
nine criteria for the required 12 months is the last day of late registration 
of the semester in which the student wishes to be classified as an 
in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in 
completing the review process. It is hoped that a decision in each case will 
be made within 90 days of receipt of petition and required necessary 
documentation. During this period of time, or any further period of time 
required by the university, any fees and charges based on the previous 
determination must be paid. The student is solely responsible for any late 
charges incurred by the residency process. If the determination is changed, 
any excess fees and charges will be refunded. 



14 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



students classified as in-state for admission, tuition, and charge- 
differential purposes are responsible for notifying the Residency 
Classification Office in writing within 15 days of any change in their 
circumstances that might in any way affect their classification at the 
University of Maryland. 



READMISSION AND REINSTATEMENT 

students who are admitted and do not register for their first semester or 
cancel registration prior to beginning their first semester must apply again 
for admission (see Freshman or Transfer Admission). Students who are 
admitted as "Term Only" also must apply again for admission if they wish 
to register for a subsequent term. 

Students who have matriculated and registered and did not maintain that 
registration continuously (Fall and Spring semesters) to graduation, must 
apply for readmission or reinstatement to re-enroll at the University 
of Maryland. 

See Chapter 4, "Withdrawal and leave of absence from the University" for 
more detailed information. 

Readmission 

students must apply for readmission if they inteniipt registration for one or 
more semesters and were not academically dismissed at the conclusion of 
the last semester of attendance. 



Winterterm 

students dismissed at the end of the Fall semester may attend Winterterm 
prior to being reinstated. Winterterm is offered to students who have 
attended during the preceeding Fall semester. Students with a breal< in 
attendance must be reenrolled to be eligible to attend Winterterm. Students 
readmitted/ reinstated for a Spring semester may also attend Winterterm. 

Clearances 

Clearances from Judicial Programs, the Bursar, Health Center, International 
Education Services, and/ or the Graduate School maybe requested of the 
applicant. 

Applications 

Applications for readmission and reinstatement are available at the 
Reenrollment Office, 0117 Mitchell Building and may be requested by 
calling 301-314-8382. Applications and information may also be accessed 

via the web at w w w .yga .ym d.edy/ re en roll. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact the Reenrollment Office, 0117 Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5251, 
301-314-8382. 



Reinstatement 

students who are academically dismissed from the University must apply 
for reinstatement. All applications for reinstatement are reviewed by a 
Faculty Petition Board. Students may apply for reinstatement for the 
semester immediately following dismissal or for any subsequent semester. 
Only the Faculty Petition Board can grant reinstatement. 

Students who are denied reinstatement will be required to comply with 
specific recommendations made by the Faculty Petition Board in order to be 
considered for reinstatement in a future semester. 

Reinstatement After Withdrawal 

students who withdraw from the University must apply for readmission if 
they interrupt enrollment for one or more semesters. Students who were 
academically dismissed at the conclusion of the previous completed 
semester must apply for reinstatement. (See Undergraduate Policy on 
Probation and Dismissal.) Students should contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admission for more information about readmission and 
reinstatement. 



GRADUATE ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES (GEMS) 

Those who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally 
accredited college or university in the United States, or the equivalent of 
this degree (as determined by the University of Maryland, College Park) in 
another country, will be considered for admission to the graduate school. 
Criteria are listed in the GEMS' Application Brochure. Requests for 
information about graduate programs or correspondence concerning 
application for admission to GEMS at the University of Maryland should be 
addressed to the Graduate Enrollment Management Services, 2123 Lee 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5121. To request 
an application by telephone, call 301-405-0376. To apply online, visit the 
graduate school's home page on the web at w w w .vprgs ,um d.edu . For 
further information, contact the GEMS Information Center, 301-405-4198. 



Deadlines 

There are no deadlines for readmission. For full consideration, students 
applying for reinstatement must observe the following deadlines: 

Fall Semester— July 1 
Winterterm— November 1 
Spring Semester— December 1 
Summer Session l-A&l-B- Mayl 
SummerSession ll-C&ll-D— June 1 

All students are encouraged to apply early in order to take advantage of 
early registration. 

Summer School 

students who are dismissed at the end of the Fall semester are not eligible 
to attend Summer sessions unless or until they are approved for 
reinstatement. Students dismissed at the end of a Spring semester may 
attend any Summer sessions prior to being reinstated. However, these 
students must be approved for reinstatement in order to attend during the 
subsequent Fall semester. 



15 



c hapter 2 Fees Expense and Financial Aid 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Financial S ervices Center 

1135 Lee Building, 301-314-9000 and 1-888-313-2404 www.umd.edu/ bursar 

Tuition and fees for the University of i^laryiand, College Park, are listed 
below. The university requires that all deposits and fees be paid by stated 
deadlines, or penalties must be imposed. Many potential administrative 
difficulties can be avoided if students carefully follow published procedures 
and notify the appropriate office(s) of any changes that might affect their 
financial obligation to the university. This includes notifying the Bursar's 
Office of changes of address so that mail affecting the student's financial 
relationship with the university will not be delayed or returned. 

College Park sponsors a deferred-payment plan. Information regarding 
the Terp payment plan is available by calling 301-314-9000 or 
1-888-313-2404 or at www.umd.edu/ bursar. 

All charges incurred during a semester are payable immediately. Returning 
students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to the university including library fines, parking violations, and 
other penalty fees and service charges, are paid in full. 

Payment for past due balances and current semester fees is due on or 
before the first day of classes. Students who register in advance must pay 
their bills in full prior to the general registration period. Students who 
register after the initial registration period are required to make full 
payment by due date indicated to avoid cancellation of their enrollment and 
loss of their classroom seats to other students. 

Although the university regularly bills students, it cannot assume 
responsibility for their receipt. Students are reminded that it is their 
responsibility to notify the university of any change in address or to correct 
an address. If a student bill is not received on or before the beginning of 
each semester, it is the student's responsibility to obtain a copy of the bill 
from the Financial Service Center, 1135 Lee Building. The Office is open 
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount due. Student's name and student's social 
security number should be written on the front side of the check. 
University grants and scholarships will be posted to the student's account. 
However, the first bill mailed prior to the beginning of each semester may 
not include these deductions. 

Students are urged to check their residence hall and dining service 
agreements for procedures for cancellation of reservations and for 
deadlines for receiving refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be made after 
these deadlines, even if the student decides not to attend the University of 
Maryland, College Park. 

Students will incur a late payment fee in the event of failure to pay a 
balance on their student account by its due date. A late payment fee of 
$10.00 or 5%, whichever is higher, will be assessed in addition to the total 
past due amount. An additional 1.5% finance charge will be charged 
monthly if the account is not settled. 



Students who fail to pay the indebtedness during the semester in which 
delinquency occurs will be ineligible to advance register for subsequent 
semesters until the debt and the penalty fees are cleared. 

In the event of actual registration for a subsequent semester by a 
delinquent student who has not settled his or her student account prior to 
that semester, such registration will be canceled and no credit will be 
earned for the semester. 

The state has established, under legislative mandate, a Central Collections 
Unit (CCU) within the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning. The 
university is required by state law to refer all delinquent accounts to the State 
Collections Unit. Please note that Maryland law allows the Central Collections 
Unit to intercept state income tax refunds for individuals with delinquent 
accounts, and that CCU is authorized to notify a National Credit Bureau of the 
delinquency at the time the account is refen-ed to it for collection. 

All accounts due from students, faculty, staff, non-students, etc., are 
included within these guidelines. 

Central Collections Unit costs incurred in collecting delinquent accounts will 
be charged to the student. The minimum collection fee is 17% plus 
attorney and/ or court costs. 

No degrees, diplomas, certificates, or transcripts of records will be issued 
to students who have not made satisfactory settlement of their accounts. 

Note: Additional Information on Student Financial Obligations, Disclosure of 
Information, Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can be found in the 
"Policy Statements" section at the beginning of this catalog. 

Payment of Fees 

All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be made payable to the 
University of Maryland. The student's social security number must be 
written on the front of the check. VISA, MasterCard, and Discover credit 
cards are accepted. Sign up now for online billing and payments at 

www.umd.edu/ bursar. 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES* 

*An Important Fee Notice: Notwithstanding any other provision of this or 
any other University publication, the University reserves the right to 
make changes in tuition, fees, and other charges at any time such 
changes are deemed necessary by the University and the University 
System of Maryland Board of Regents. Although changes in tuition, fees 
and charges ordinarily will be announced in advance, the University 
reserves the right to make such changes without prior announcement. 

The following estimated costs of attending the University for an academic year 
are based on current lodging and board rates for 2003-2004 and current 2003- 
2004 tuition and fee charges. Tuition and fee increases are expected to be 
approved in Summer 2004. Tuition and fee information is published in the 
Schedule of Classes each semester and is also available on-line at 
www.testudo.umd.edu 



16 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 
*see previous page for important fee information 

Full-time Undergraduate Students (2004-2005 Academic Year- 
Estimated) 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the 
number of credit hours enrolled is 12 or more.) 



Technology Fee: Charged to undergraduate students, to support the 
improvement of the computer systems on campus. 



a. Maryland Residents 



Tuition 

Mandatory Fees (maximum fees charged to a 

students registered for 9 or more credits) 

Board Contract (Regular Point Plan) 

Lodging 

Technology Fee 



Total Academic Year Costs 
$5,568.00 



091.00 
052.00 
416.00 
100.00 



b. Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States, and 
Other Countries: 

Total Academic Year Cost 
Tuition $16,242.00 

Mandatory Fees (maximum fees charged to all 
students registered for9 or more credits) 1,091.00 

Board Contract (Regular Point Plan) 3,052.00 

Lodging 4,416.00 

Technology Fee 100.00 

2. Tuition and Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 
(For billing purposes, a student is considered part-time 
if the number of credit hours enrolled is 11 or fewer.) 
In-State Tuition (per credit hour) $232.00 

Out-of-state Tuition (per credit hour) $677.00 

Mandatory Fees (per semester) 

9 to 11 credit hours (per semester) 545.50 

8 or fewer credit hours (per semester) 248.50 
Technology Fee 

9 to 11 credits (per semester) 50.00 
8 or fewer credits (per semester) 25.00 

Explanation of Fees 

Mandatory Fees 

student Fees: The mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students 
is based on a number of requested credit hours as follows: Students 
registered for 9 or more credits: $545.50 per semester; Students registered 
for 8 or fewer credits: $248.50 per semester. This credit definition change 
was approved by the Cabinet at their June 28, 2001 meeting. 

Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all undergraduate 
students at the request of the Student Government Association. It is 
used in sponsoring various student activities, student publications, and 
cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students. This fee is 
paid into a fund that is used for capital improvement, expansion, and 
construction of various campus facilities such as open recreation areas 
(tennis courts, basl<etball courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the 
Stamp Student Union. These projects are not funded or are funded only in 
part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support of the 
Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. All students are encouraged to 
participate in all of the activities of this department or to attend the 
contests if they do not participate. 

Shuttle Bus Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support of 
the shuttle bus transportation system. 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to all 
students and is used to expand recreational facilities and Stamp Student 
Union services. 

Recreation Services Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students specifically 
to support the construction and operation of Ritchie Coliseum and the 
Campus Recreation Center, a multi-use facility that includes basketball and 
racquetball courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor jogging tracl<, and 
multipurpose activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee: Charged to all students to 
support the operation of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. 



Other Fees 

Undergraduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable) 
applicants. $50 



Charged to all new 



Graduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all new 
applicants. $50 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $200. All newly 
admitted undergraduate students who intend to matriculate in the Fall or 
Spring semester must submit a $200 deposit which is credited to their 
tuition charges when they enroll. Should the student decide not to enroll for 
the specific semester of application, the $200 deposit is forfeited and 
cannot be used to offset any charges, including orientation charges, the 
student may incur. 

Students admitted for the Fall semester must submit this deposit by May 1 
or within 30 days from their date of admission, whichever is later, to 
reserve their place in the entering class. Students admitted for the Spring 
semester must submit this deposit by December 1 or within 14 days of 
their date of admission, whichever is later, to reserve their place in the 
entering class. 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: $145 (two-day 
program), $101 (one-day program), $60.00 (per person). These charges 
are for Summer 2004. 

Late Registration Fee: $20. All students are expected to complete their 
registration on the regular registration days. Those who do not complete 
their registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee. 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in mathematics 
(MATH 003, 010, Oil, 013 and 015) per semester: $230. (Required of 
students whose curriculum calls for MATH 110 or 115 and who do not 
pass the qualifying examination for these courses.) This Special Math Fee 
is in addition to course charge. Students enrolled in this course and 
concurrently enrolled for nine or more credit hours will be considered as 
full-time students for purposes of assessing fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts, Business, and Science 
(CO-OP 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees: The university offers a number of courses (MBA, ENTS, 
Life Sciences) that have special course fees in addition to, or in lieu of, the 
standard tuition charges. Students are encouraged to contact the 
department prior to registering for the class to determine the total cost of 
the course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses tal<en for audit are the same 
as those charged for courses tal<en for credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Audited credit hours will be added to hours tal<en for credit to 
determine full-time or part-time status for fee assessment purposes. Special 
Students are assessed fees in accordance with the schedule for the 
comparable undergraduate or graduate classification. 

Special Examination Fee (Credit-by-Exam): $30 per course for all 
undergraduates and full-time graduate students; credit-hour charge for part- 
time graduate students. 

Parl<ing Registration Fees: All students enrolled for classes at the 
university and who drive or parl< a vehicle anywhere or anytime on the 
campus must register to parl< on campus each academic year. For 
additional information, please refer to the entry for Department of 
Transportation Services in chapter 3. 

Textbool<s and Supplies: Textbool<s and classroom supplies vary with the 
course pursued, but averaged $886 in 2003-2004 (two semesters). 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checl<s: Payable for each checl< which is 
returned unpaid by the drawee banl< on initial presentation because of 
insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected 
items, etc. 

Forchecl<s up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 



Telecommunications Fee: 
residence halls. 



Assessed to all students living in university 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 17 



When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the checl< 
and pay any outstanding balance in the account within 10 days or late 
fees may be assessed and the account transferred to the Central 
Collection Unit for legal follow-up. Additionally a minimum 17% collection 
charge is added to the charges posted to the student's account at the time 
the transfer is made. When a check is returned unpaid due to an error 
made by the student's bank, the student must obtain a letter from the 
branch manager of the bank or a person of equivalent status admitting the 
error. This letter must be submitted to the Office of the Bursar to have the 
service charge waived. 

Overdue Library Charges: For items from the library's main circulating 
collections, charges are 50 cents per day per item, and recalled item fines 
are $2 per day. If an item is lost or mutilated, the borrower is charged the 
estimated cost of the item plus a processing fee to cover acquisition and 
cataloging costs. Different fine rates may apply to other library collections, 
such as reserve collections. 

Maryland English Institute Fee: Semi-intensive, $2,884. Intensive, 
$5,495. Students enrolled with the Maryland English Institute pay this fee 
in support of the Institute. Students enrolled in the semi-intensive program 
may also enroll for regular academic courses and pay the tuition and fees 
associated with those offerings. The program also offers non-credit courses 
in American English Pronunciation (UMEI 006) for $798 and Fluency 
Program or Advanced Writing (UMEI 007, 008) for $1,060. These charges 
are for academic year 2003-2004 and are subject to cliange. 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to property 
or equipment. When responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the 
individual student will be billed for it; when responsibility cannot be fixed, 
the cost of repairing the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated 
among the individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee: Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, 
whichever is greater, plus an additional 1.5% on each subsequent billing. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees: Students compelled to leave the university 
at any time during the academic year should meet with their academic 
college advising office and secure a form for withdrawal. The completed 
form and identification card are to be submitted to the academic college 
advising office which will communicate results to the Office of the 
Registrar. Students will forfeit their right to a refund if the withdrawal action 
described above is not adhered to. The effective date used in computing 
refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed in the academic college 
advising office. Stop payment on a check, failure to pay the semester bill, 
or failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal. Refund 
requests should be processed by students with the Office of the Bursar, 
otherwise any credit on the student account could be carried over to the 
next semester. If a Cancellation of Registration is submitted to the Office 
of the Registrar before the official first day of classes the student is 
entitled to full credit of semester tuition. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing from the university will be credited for 
tuition and fees in accordance with the following schedule: 



Prior to 1st day of classes 
1st 10 days of classes 
3rd week 
4th week 
5th week 
After 5th week 



100% 
80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 
No Refund 



Note: 



First-semester freshmen who receive Title IV aid and who withdraw 
will receive a refund in accordance with federal regulations. 



Prior to the first day of classes, if full-time undergraduates drop a course 
or courses, thereby changing the total number of credits for which they are 
registered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester will be assessed on the 
basis of the per-credit-hour fee for part-time students. However, if students 
later add a course or courses thereby changing the total number of credits 
for which they are registered to 12 or more, they will be billed for the 
difference between per-credit-hour fees paid and the general fees for full- 
time undergraduates. 

If during the first five days of classes full-time undergraduates drtjp a course 
or courses thereby changing the total number of credits for which they are 
registered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester will be assessed on the 
basis of part-time charges plus 20% of the difference between the full-time 
fees and appropriate part-time charges. After the first five days of classes, 
there is no refund for changing from full-time to part-time status. 

Students who register as part-time undergraduate students and apply for a 
refund for courses dropped during the first week of classes will be given an 
80% refund. No refund will be made for courses dropped thereafter. 



No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students officially withdraw from the university or when they are given 
permission by the appropriate officials of the university to move from the 
residence halls and/ or to discontinue dining hall privileges. In these cases, 
the room refund will be computed by multiplying the number of periods 
remaining by the pro rata weekly rate after adjusting for a service charge. 
Refunds to students having full board contracts will be calculated in a 
similar manner. No room and/ or board refunds will be made after the 14th 
week of the semester. Students are reminded that reservations for room 
and board must be canceled by the date published in the residence hall 
and dining services agreement(s). 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from university funds, the computation will be made 
to return the maximum amount to the scholarship and loan accounts 
without loss to the university 



FINANCIAL AID 

Office of Student F inancial Aid 
Student Financial Services Center 
1135 Lee Building, 301-314-9000 
E-mail: umfinaid@osfa.umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/ fin 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, 
state, and institutional financial assistance programs, and, in cooperation 
with other university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to 
deserving students. The primary responsibility for financing attendance at 
the University of Maryland, College Park, lies with students and families. 
Scholarships, grants, loans, and work -study positions are awarded on the 
basis of academic ability and/ or financial need as determined by a federal 
needs-analysis system. It is the intent of OSFA to provide assistance to 
students who might not otherwise be able to pursue college studies due to 
financial constraints. 

Financial aid funds are limited; therefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students must follow these steps to receive priority consideration for 
financial aid: 

1. Submit admissions applications and all necessary supporting 
documents to the Office of Admission by the appropriate deadlines. 
(Deadlines are listed in chapter 1.) 

2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after 
January 1. FAFSAs are available from OSFA online at www.umd.edu/ 
fin. A new FAFSA is required for each academic year of the student's 
enrollment. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing the FAFSA. 
A financial aid application has no bearing on a student's admission 
application. However, students will not receive final consideration for aid 
until they are admitted to a degree program. 

3. Mail the FAFSA to the Federal Processor no later than February 1, so 
that it is received by the processor by February 15. Applying online 
helps to expedite the process. Income for the previous year may be 
estimated initially and corrected later on the Student Aid Report. 

Applications received before February 15 will be given priority consideration. 

General Regulations Applicable to All Forms of Aid 

Full-Tlme Status. For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 
credit hours through the schedule adjustment period each semester in 
order to receive the full financial aid award. Please refer to the standards of 
Satisfactory Academic Progress when considering dropping below 12 credit 
hours for any given semester. 

Citizenship Status. In order to be eligible for federal, state, or university 
financial assistance, students must be United States citizens or eligible 
non-citizens. 

Default/ Owe Refund: Students cannot be in default on an educational 
loan, nor can they owe any refund on a Pell Grant or Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded at any post- 
secondary institution. 

Degree-Seeking: Students must be working toward a degree or certificate. 
Students must be admitted to the university as "degree-seeking." 



18 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Satisfactory Progress: Students must be making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree or certificate according to the Standards for Satisfactory 
Academic Progress published in the Schedule of Classes. 

Selective Service: To receive federal financial aid, male students must 
register with Selective Service if they are at least 18 years old and born 
after December 31, 1959, unless they are not required by law. The federal 
government will verify compliance of this registration requirement. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non-university source, the university may reduce 
the financial aid awarded by the university It is the student's responsibility to 
notify the Office of Student Financial Aid of all outside awards. 

Change in Financial Situation: It is the student's responsibility to notify the 
Office of Student Financial Aid of any changes to his or her financial 
circumstances during the year. 

Reapplication Requirement: Need-based assistance is not automatically 
renewed from year to year. All students requesting need-based aid must 
reapply by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA annually. Such reappli- 
cation must indicate continued financial need as well as Satisfactory 
Academic Progress. 

Award Policy: Financial aid is normally a combination of grants, loans, and 
student employment. The financial aid "package" is determined by the 
availability of financial aid and the financial circumstances of each student. 
It is not necessary to make any special application for university grants. 
The Office of Student Financial Aid will determine awards that best fit the 
needs and qualifications of the candidates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educational costs is used in determining the amount 
of aid that a student is awarded during the academic year. A typical budget 
for an undergraduate at the University of Maryland, College Park, is as 
follows: 

Dependent Student Living on Campus/ Off Campus 
(not with parent/ relative) 



Tuition and Fees in-state: (2003-2004)* 


$6,759 


Out-of-state: (2003-2004)* 


17,433 


Room* 


4,416 


Board * 


3,052 


Books 


886 


Personal expenses and commuting * 


2,646 


TOTAL In-state * 


17,759 


Out-of-state* 


28,433 



*The above budget is subject to change for the 2004-2005 academic year. 
To determine the final costs for the 2004-2005 academic year, please 
contact the Student Financial Services Center. 



MERIT-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Scholarships 

Several scholarships are available to the highest-achieving students at the 
University of Maryland, College Park. Two types of scholarships are 
available: those based solely on academic or creative talent (merit-based), 
and those based on financial need as well as academic or creative talent 
(need-based). The eligibility criteria for the different scholarships vary and 
are listed below. For more information on these programs, students are 
encouraged to contact the office or department responsible for selecting 
the recipients. Please see the list of departmental scholarships at the end 
of this chapter. Current information about scholarships is also available 
through the World Wide Web at www. umd.edu/ fin. 

Banneker/Key Scholarship: The University of Maryland seeks to identify 
and select some of the brightest high school seniors in the nation to 
continue their education as Banneker/Key Scholars. Students selected for 
this prestigious award will receive full financial support for four years, which 
covers tuition, room, board, mandatory fees, and a book allowance. They 
will also be admitted to the University JHonors Program and will be afforded 
many other opportunities for participation in intellectual enrichment 
programs. For full consideration, students must submit an admission 
application, application fee, official transcript, essay, recommendations, 
and official copies of SAT I or ACT scores to the Office of Undergraduate 



Admissions by December 1 for the following academic year. Selection is 
based upon academic achievement plus extracurricular activities, awards 
and honors, and an essay. Semifinalists are given a personal interview. 
Factors such as a candidate's involvement in community service, talents or 
skills, leadership, and character all play a part in the final awards. Contact 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

Regents Scholars Program: The Regents Scholars Program recognizes the 
extraordinary achievement of outstanding freshmen students. New awards 
are made each year in the amount of full in-state tuition, room, board, and 
mandatory fees. Recipients are automatically admitted to the University 
Honors Program. A select number of the top high school scholars in the 
state will be considered for this most prestigious award. A complete 
admission application, application fee, official transcript, essay, 
recommendations, and SAT I or ACT scores must be submitted to the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions by December 1 for consideration for 
the Regents Scholars Program for the following academic year. Contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

National Merit Scholarships: The University of Maryland, College Park 
is a sponsoring institution in the National Merit Scholarship competitions. 
The university offers $2,000 scholarships for each of four years to in-state 
merit finalists who indicate College Park as their first-choice institution. 
Other merit finalists are awarded scholarships ranging from $1,000 to 
$2,000. To qualify, submit an admission application, application fee, 
official transcript, essay, recommendation, and official copies of SAT I or 
ACT scores no later than December 1. Contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions for more information. 

President's Scholarship: This award provides talented undergraduate 
students with partial tuition support for four years. It is offered to incoming 
freshmen. Students are selected through the admission process 
with primary consideration given to academic performance in high school 
(high school courses and achievement) and standardized test scores (SAT 
or ACT). For full consideration, students must submit a complete 
application for admission by December 1. Contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

Weinberg Regents Scholarship: The Board of Regents has designated the 
Weinberg Regents Scholarship to be awarded to a Maryland community 
college transfer student in order to continue the commitment to 
outstanding students. In order to be selected for this award, a student 
must have exceptional qualifications, including achievement of a 4.0 grade 
point average, completion of the Associate of Arts degree at a Maryland 
community college, evidence of creative and intellectual activities or 
scholarly potential, and have been admitted to one of the University System 
of Maryland institutions. The deadline for submitting the candidate's 
application material is J une 15. The winner may receive the scholarship for 
two years, totalling no more than four semesters including Summer 
sessions. For information, contact the University System of Maryland 
Administration at 301-445-1992. 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are available to 
outstanding students transferring from Maryland community colleges. The 
awards cover in-state tuition and mandatory fees for two years of 
undergraduate study To be eligible for consideration, students must have 
an overall grade point average of 3.5 for all college work attempted, and 
must have completed an Associate of Arts degree or the entire first two 
years of courses for the major in which the student expects to enroll. 
Students who have previously attended the University of Maryland, College 
Park, are ineligible for this scholarship. Candidate nomination forms are 
available in early January from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or 
from community college advisers. The deadline for receipt of the 
application, official transcripts, and scholarship materials is mid-March. 
Contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Honors Scholarship: Honors students already attending Maryland are 
eligible to apply for one of these $500 awards. Financial need is not a 
criterion for selection. Regents, Banneker-Key, and President's Scholarship 
recipients are not eligible for Honors Scholarships. To be considered, 
students must be first- or second-year students, have at least a 3.2 grade 
point average, and be making satisfactory progress toward the completion 
of requirements for an Honors citation. In addition, applicants must submit 
an essay on their academic goals and plans for achieving them. Contact 
the University Honors Program. 

University of Maryland Departmental Scholarships: Some Colleges and 
departments at the university offer a variety of merit scholarships. Most 
departmental scholarships require a student to have a minimum grade 
point average of 3.0 and be registered for a minimum of 12 credits per 
semester. For information regarding departmental scholarships, please 
contact the appropriate College or department. 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 19 



Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships: These are competitive 
scholarships which are awarded annually. Primary consideration will be 
given to entering freshmen and transfer students from community colleges 
who have outstanding talent in art, dance, music, or theater. The 
scholarships cover in-state tuition and mandatory fees and are renewable 
for up to three additional years based upon an acceptable level of 
performance as defined by the respective departments. Auditions and/ or 
portfolios are required. Contact the College of Arts and Humanities. 

Deans' Scholarships: This award provides talented undergraduate 
students with partial tuition support for one to two years. It is offered to 
incoming freshmen. To be considered, students must submit a complete 
admission application no later than December 1. Contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

Maryland State Scholarships: The Maryland State Scholarship 
Administration (MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards both need- and merit- 
based scholarships to Maryland residents. There are currently 16 different 
programs available, including the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educational 
Assistance Grant, the Senatorial Scholarship, the House of Delegates 
Scholarship, the Science and Technology Scholarship, and the 
Distinguished Scholar Award. You may obtain more information about these 
and other awards by calling MSSA at 410-974-5370. All Maryland residents 
are expected to apply for State Scholarship assistance. Initial application 
for many of the awards is made through the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). Please note that filing the FAFSA is sufficient to apply 
for most Maryland State Scholarships at UMCP, although some may require 
additional application forms. The application deadline for most programs is 
March 1. FAFSAs are available from the UMCP Office of Student Financial 
Aid or online at www.umd.edu/ fin. 

Scholarships from Other States: Several states have reciprocal 
agreements with the State of Maryland. Students who are residents of 
these states may receive funds for study in eligible post-secondary 
institutions in Maryland. Interested students should contact their state 
scholarship agencies for information. 

Scholarship Searches: A broad range of scholarships are available from 
private sources. Usually, these awards are not as well publicized as 
the state and university programs. Therefore, students should conduct 
a scholarship search to locate such sources. The University of 
Maryland offers access to several services to students to aid them in their 
searches. Access our World Wide Web site at www.umd.edu/fin to use 
these services. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 
Grants 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers several grant programs for 
undergraduates. Awards are made based on financial need as determined 
by the FAFSA. Grants do not have to be repaid. Access our web site at 
www.umd.edu/ fin for more information. 

Federal Pell Grant: This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 
which aid from other sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are 
seel<ing their first bachelor's degree and have exceptional need may 
receive a Federal Pell Grant. All undergraduates will be considered for this 
grant regardless of when their applications were received. Students may 
receive the Federal Pell Grant for less than full-time attendance, although 
the award will be pro-rated based on the number of credits attempted. 
Awards range from $400 to $4,050. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): The FSEOG 
is awarded to full-time undergraduates with exceptional need. Priority is 
given to Federal Pell Grant recipients. To be considered for FSEOG, 
students must meet OSFA's priority application deadline of February 15. 
The minimum award is $200. The maximum award is dependent upon 
government funding. The funds are divided among as many deserving 
students as possible. 

Institutional Grants: The university awards grants to full-time students who 
demonstrate financial need and meet OSFA's priority application deadline 
of February 15. There are three funds from which institutional grants are 
awarded, the UM Scholarship, Frederick Douglass Grant and the UM 
Grant. OSFA selects the recipients of these awards based on availability of 
funds and the qualifications of the applicants. The UM Scholarship maybe 
awarded to undergraduates with demonstrated need and high academic 
achievement. The UM Grant and Fredericl< Douglas Grant may be awarded 
to any undergraduate with demonstrated need. Award amounts for these 
programs range from $200 to $2,700. 



Self-+Help 

Financial aid also consists of self-help assistance such as employment and 
student loan programs. Most of these programs are awarded based on 
need as determined by the FAFSA. Access our web site at 
www.umd.edu/fin for additional information. 

Federal Worl< -Study: The Federal Worl<-Study (FWS) Program provides 
students with the opportunity to earn money to meet their educational and 
personal expenses. Money earned from the FWS program does not have to 
be paid bacl<. To be considered for FWS, students must meet OSFA's 
priority application deadline of February 15. This award is need-based and 
may range from $800 to $2,500. Pay rates depend on the level of 
complexity of the work, but will be at least the federal minimum wage. Like 
all university employees, FWS employees receive a paycheck every other 
week for the hours worked. Most FWS jobs are on campus, though 
opportunities exist through the Community Service Program for FWS 
students to work off campus at several Federal Government Agencies. The 
number of hours students may work is limited to 20 per week while school 
is in session and 40 per week during vacations and summer break. 

Paid Internships: Students with paid internships sign a contract at the 
beginning of the semester that states the payment amount for the number 
of hours to be worked during that semester. The payment amount is 
advanced to the student's account at the start of each semester. This 
program differs from Federal Work-Study in that students receive all 
"wages" at the start of each semester, as opposed to a bi-weekly pay 
check, and those funds are applied directly to the student's account. 
Several offices and departments on campus, including Shuttle UM, 
Residential Facilities, and Dining Services, offer paid internships. Students 
should contact the department or office for which they are interested 
in working. 

Federal Perkins Loan: The Perkins loan is a low-interest rate (5%) loan for 
students with exceptional financial need. This is a loan borrowed from the 
school, and must be repaid. To be eligible, students must meet OSFA's 
priority application deadline of February 15. The amount of the award will 
depend upon the student's need and may range from $200 to $1,800. 
New borrowers (those who first receive a Federal Perkins Loan afterjulyl, 
1988) have a grace period of nine months after graduating or leaving 
school before they must begin repayment of their Federal Perkins 
Loan(s). Interest will begin accruing at the time of repayment. This loan is 
interest-free while students are attending school and enrolled at least half 
time in a degree-seeking program. 

Federal Stafford Loan: This is a low-interest-rate loan for students who 
attend at least half-time. Application is made through the school's financial 
aid office via the FAFSA. Eligibility for this loan is based on need, not credit 
worthiness. This loan is borrowed by the student and must be repaid. 

There are two types of Federal Stafford Loans, subsidized and 
unsubsidized. The subsidized Stafford loan is awarded to students with 
demonstrated financial need; this loan is interest-free while students are 
attending school and enrolled at least half-time in a degree-seeking 
program. Students who do not demonstrate financial need, or who do not 
demonstrate sufficient need to borrow a fully subsidized Stafford loan, may 
borrow a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The unsubsidized loan is 
interest bearing. Students borrowing an unsubsidized Stafford loan will be 
required to repay the principle and any interest that may accrue during 
school attendance. All students who wish to apply for either Federal 
Stafford Loan must complete the FAFSA. The interest rate for new 
borrowers securing their first Federal Stafford Loan on or afterj uly 1, 1994 
is variable, but capped at 8.25%. The interest rate through June 30, 2004 
is 2.82%. Students who graduate or drop below half-time status are 
granted a six-month grace period before repayment of the Stafford loan is 
required. 

The following are the maximum loan amounts per academic year: $2,625 
for undergraduates with freshman status, $3,500 for undergraduates 
attaining sophomore status, and $5,500 for undergraduate students who 
attain junior or senior status. If students do not demonstrate sufficient 
need to borrow the maximum subsidized Federal Stafford Loan, they may 
borrow the difference in a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The 
maximum borrowing limit for most undergraduates is $23,000. 

Federal PLUS (Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students): This is a 
non-need-based loan, which parents may borrow to help defray the cost of 
their dependent children's education. The Federal PLUS enables parents 
to borrow the full yearly cost of attendance (as determined by the school) 
minus all other financial aid. Otherwise, there is no yearly or cumulative 
borrowing limit. Because this loan is not need-based, submission of the 
FAFSA is not required to apply However, borrowers must first submit the 



20 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



PLUS loan application to the school for calculation and certification of the 
maximum loan amount that the parent may borrow per student per year. 
The Federal PLUS is granted to borrowers based on credit-worthiness as 
determined by the lender whom the borrower selects. The interest rate for 
the Federal PLUS is variable, but capped at 9%. The rate is recalculated on 
July 1 of each year and is equivalent to 52-week Treasury Bill on June 1, 
plus 3.1%. Repayment of the PLUS begins immediately 



UM COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Some UM colleges and departments offer merit-based scholarships. Most 
departments will only consider students who enroll for 12 credits 
per semester, and who have a grade point average of at least 3.0. 
Some of these scholarships are open to prospective freshman and 
transfer students. Some of them are only open to continuing UM 
students. For additional information regarding departmental scholarships 
please contact the appropriate college or department or visit 
www.inform.umd.edu/ Edres/ Scholarships/ departmental.html 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

Biological Resources Engineering 

Landscape Architecture 

Natural Resource Sciences 

Natural Resources Management Program 

Nutrition & Food Science 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History & Archaeology 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparative Literature 

Dance 

English Language and Literature 

French & Italian Languages and Literatures 

Germanic Studies 

History 

Jewish Studies Program 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

African American Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminology & Criminal J ustice 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Joint Program in Survey Methodology 

Psychology 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Applied Mathematics 
Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Meteorology 
Physics 
Statistics Program 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counseling & Personnel Services 
Curriculum & Instruction 
Education Policy Planning, and Administration 
Human Development (Institute for Child Study) 
Measurement, Statistics & Evaluation 
Special Education 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 

COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Entomology 

A.JAMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Aerospace Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering 
Materials Science and Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Reliability Engineering 

ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEM ENT 

Accounting 

Business 

Decision and Information Technologies 

Finance 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 

Management and Organization 

Marl<eting 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND PRESERVATION 

Architecture 

Urban Studies and Planning Program 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY 

Environmental Policy Program 
Public Policy 

Public Sector Financial Management 
Social Policy 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

Chemical Physics Program 
Environmental Science and Policy (BSOS) 
Systems Engineering 

RETURNING STUDENT PROGRAMS 

Gerald G. Portney Memorial Scholarship 

Irwin S . Kamin Adult Learner Emergency Fund 

Charlotte W. Newcombe Scholarship 

Women's Forum Scholarship 

Returning Students Program 

Alpha Epsilon Phi Foundation Returning Students Program 



16 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 
*see previous page for important fee information 

Full-time Undergraduate Students (2004-2005 Academic Year- 
Estimated) 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the 
number of credit hours enrolled is 12 or more.) 



Technology Fee: Charged to undergraduate students, to support the 
improvement of the computer systems on campus. 



a. Maryland Residents 



Tuition 

Mandatory Fees (maximum fees charged to a 

students registered for 9 or more credits) 

Board Contract (Regular Point Plan) 

Lodging 

Technology Fee 



Total Academic Year Costs 
$5,568.00 



091.00 
052.00 
416.00 
100.00 



b. Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States, and 
Other Countries: 

Total Academic Year Cost 
Tuition $16,242.00 

Mandatory Fees (maximum fees charged to all 
students registered for9 or more credits) 1,091.00 

Board Contract (Regular Point Plan) 3,052.00 

Lodging 4,416.00 

Technology Fee 100.00 

2. Tuition and Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 
(For billing purposes, a student is considered part-time 
if the number of credit hours enrolled is 11 or fewer.) 
In-State Tuition (per credit hour) $232.00 

Out-of-state Tuition (per credit hour) $677.00 

Mandatory Fees (per semester) 

9 to 11 credit hours (per semester) 545.50 

8 or fewer credit hours (per semester) 248.50 
Technology Fee 

9 to 11 credits (per semester) 50.00 
8 or fewer credits (per semester) 25.00 

Explanation of Fees 

Mandatory Fees 

student Fees: The mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students 
is based on a number of requested credit hours as follows: Students 
registered for 9 or more credits: $545.50 per semester; Students registered 
for 8 or fewer credits: $248.50 per semester. This credit definition change 
was approved by the Cabinet at their June 28, 2001 meeting. 

Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all undergraduate 
students at the request of the Student Government Association. It is 
used in sponsoring various student activities, student publications, and 
cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students. This fee is 
paid into a fund that is used for capital improvement, expansion, and 
construction of various campus facilities such as open recreation areas 
(tennis courts, basl<etball courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the 
Stamp Student Union. These projects are not funded or are funded only in 
part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support of the 
Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. All students are encouraged to 
participate in all of the activities of this department or to attend the 
contests if they do not participate. 

Shuttle Bus Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support of 
the shuttle bus transportation system. 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to all 
students and is used to expand recreational facilities and Stamp Student 
Union services. 

Recreation Services Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students specifically 
to support the construction and operation of Ritchie Coliseum and the 
Campus Recreation Center, a multi-use facility that includes basketball and 
racquetball courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor jogging tracl<, and 
multipurpose activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee: Charged to all students to 
support the operation of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. 



Other Fees 

Undergraduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable) 
applicants. $50 



Charged to all new 



Graduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all new 
applicants. $50 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $200. All newly 
admitted undergraduate students who intend to matriculate in the Fall or 
Spring semester must submit a $200 deposit which is credited to their 
tuition charges when they enroll. Should the student decide not to enroll for 
the specific semester of application, the $200 deposit is forfeited and 
cannot be used to offset any charges, including orientation charges, the 
student may incur. 

Students admitted for the Fall semester must submit this deposit by May 1 
or within 30 days from their date of admission, whichever is later, to 
reserve their place in the entering class. Students admitted for the Spring 
semester must submit this deposit by December 1 or within 14 days of 
their date of admission, whichever is later, to reserve their place in the 
entering class. 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: $145 (two-day 
program), $101 (one-day program), $60.00 (per person). These charges 
are for Summer 2004. 

Late Registration Fee: $20. All students are expected to complete their 
registration on the regular registration days. Those who do not complete 
their registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee. 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in mathematics 
(MATH 003, 010, Oil, 013 and 015) per semester: $230. (Required of 
students whose curriculum calls for MATH 110 or 115 and who do not 
pass the qualifying examination for these courses.) This Special Math Fee 
is in addition to course charge. Students enrolled in this course and 
concurrently enrolled for nine or more credit hours will be considered as 
full-time students for purposes of assessing fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts, Business, and Science 
(CO-OP 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees: The university offers a number of courses (MBA, ENTS, 
Life Sciences) that have special course fees in addition to, or in lieu of, the 
standard tuition charges. Students are encouraged to contact the 
department prior to registering for the class to determine the total cost of 
the course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses tal<en for audit are the same 
as those charged for courses tal<en for credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Audited credit hours will be added to hours tal<en for credit to 
determine full-time or part-time status for fee assessment purposes. Special 
Students are assessed fees in accordance with the schedule for the 
comparable undergraduate or graduate classification. 

Special Examination Fee (Credit-by-Exam): $30 per course for all 
undergraduates and full-time graduate students; credit-hour charge for part- 
time graduate students. 

Parl<ing Registration Fees: All students enrolled for classes at the 
university and who drive or parl< a vehicle anywhere or anytime on the 
campus must register to parl< on campus each academic year. For 
additional information, please refer to the entry for Department of 
Transportation Services in chapter 3. 

Textbool<s and Supplies: Textbool<s and classroom supplies vary with the 
course pursued, but averaged $886 in 2003-2004 (two semesters). 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checl<s: Payable for each checl< which is 
returned unpaid by the drawee banl< on initial presentation because of 
insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected 
items, etc. 

Forchecl<s up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 



Telecommunications Fee: 
residence halls. 



Assessed to all students living in university 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 17 



When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the checl< 
and pay any outstanding balance in the account within 10 days or late 
fees may be assessed and the account transferred to the Central 
Collection Unit for legal follow-up. Additionally a minimum 17% collection 
charge is added to the charges posted to the student's account at the time 
the transfer is made. When a check is returned unpaid due to an error 
made by the student's bank, the student must obtain a letter from the 
branch manager of the bank or a person of equivalent status admitting the 
error. This letter must be submitted to the Office of the Bursar to have the 
service charge waived. 

Overdue Library Charges: For items from the library's main circulating 
collections, charges are 50 cents per day per item, and recalled item fines 
are $2 per day. If an item is lost or mutilated, the borrower is charged the 
estimated cost of the item plus a processing fee to cover acquisition and 
cataloging costs. Different fine rates may apply to other library collections, 
such as reserve collections. 

Maryland English Institute Fee: Semi-intensive, $2,884. Intensive, 
$5,495. Students enrolled with the Maryland English Institute pay this fee 
in support of the Institute. Students enrolled in the semi-intensive program 
may also enroll for regular academic courses and pay the tuition and fees 
associated with those offerings. The program also offers non-credit courses 
in American English Pronunciation (UMEI 006) for $798 and Fluency 
Program or Advanced Writing (UMEI 007, 008) for $1,060. These charges 
are for academic year 2003-2004 and are subject to cliange. 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to property 
or equipment. When responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the 
individual student will be billed for it; when responsibility cannot be fixed, 
the cost of repairing the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated 
among the individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee: Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, 
whichever is greater, plus an additional 1.5% on each subsequent billing. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees: Students compelled to leave the university 
at any time during the academic year should meet with their academic 
college advising office and secure a form for withdrawal. The completed 
form and identification card are to be submitted to the academic college 
advising office which will communicate results to the Office of the 
Registrar. Students will forfeit their right to a refund if the withdrawal action 
described above is not adhered to. The effective date used in computing 
refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed in the academic college 
advising office. Stop payment on a check, failure to pay the semester bill, 
or failure to attend classes does not constitute withdrawal. Refund 
requests should be processed by students with the Office of the Bursar, 
otherwise any credit on the student account could be carried over to the 
next semester. If a Cancellation of Registration is submitted to the Office 
of the Registrar before the official first day of classes the student is 
entitled to full credit of semester tuition. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing from the university will be credited for 
tuition and fees in accordance with the following schedule: 



Prior to 1st day of classes 
1st 10 days of classes 
3rd week 
4th week 
5th week 
After 5th week 



100% 
80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 
No Refund 



Note: 



First-semester freshmen who receive Title IV aid and who withdraw 
will receive a refund in accordance with federal regulations. 



Prior to the first day of classes, if full-time undergraduates drop a course 
or courses, thereby changing the total number of credits for which they are 
registered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester will be assessed on the 
basis of the per-credit-hour fee for part-time students. However, if students 
later add a course or courses thereby changing the total number of credits 
for which they are registered to 12 or more, they will be billed for the 
difference between per-credit-hour fees paid and the general fees for full- 
time undergraduates. 

If during the first five days of classes full-time undergraduates drtjp a course 
or courses thereby changing the total number of credits for which they are 
registered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester will be assessed on the 
basis of part-time charges plus 20% of the difference between the full-time 
fees and appropriate part-time charges. After the first five days of classes, 
there is no refund for changing from full-time to part-time status. 

Students who register as part-time undergraduate students and apply for a 
refund for courses dropped during the first week of classes will be given an 
80% refund. No refund will be made for courses dropped thereafter. 



No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students officially withdraw from the university or when they are given 
permission by the appropriate officials of the university to move from the 
residence halls and/ or to discontinue dining hall privileges. In these cases, 
the room refund will be computed by multiplying the number of periods 
remaining by the pro rata weekly rate after adjusting for a service charge. 
Refunds to students having full board contracts will be calculated in a 
similar manner. No room and/ or board refunds will be made after the 14th 
week of the semester. Students are reminded that reservations for room 
and board must be canceled by the date published in the residence hall 
and dining services agreement(s). 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from university funds, the computation will be made 
to return the maximum amount to the scholarship and loan accounts 
without loss to the university 



FINANCIAL AID 

Office of Student F inancial Aid 
Student Financial Services Center 
1135 Lee Building, 301-314-9000 
E-mail: umfinaid@osfa.umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/ fin 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, 
state, and institutional financial assistance programs, and, in cooperation 
with other university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to 
deserving students. The primary responsibility for financing attendance at 
the University of Maryland, College Park, lies with students and families. 
Scholarships, grants, loans, and work -study positions are awarded on the 
basis of academic ability and/ or financial need as determined by a federal 
needs-analysis system. It is the intent of OSFA to provide assistance to 
students who might not otherwise be able to pursue college studies due to 
financial constraints. 

Financial aid funds are limited; therefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students must follow these steps to receive priority consideration for 
financial aid: 

1. Submit admissions applications and all necessary supporting 
documents to the Office of Admission by the appropriate deadlines. 
(Deadlines are listed in chapter 1.) 

2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after 
January 1. FAFSAs are available from OSFA online at www.umd.edu/ 
fin. A new FAFSA is required for each academic year of the student's 
enrollment. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing the FAFSA. 
A financial aid application has no bearing on a student's admission 
application. However, students will not receive final consideration for aid 
until they are admitted to a degree program. 

3. Mail the FAFSA to the Federal Processor no later than February 1, so 
that it is received by the processor by February 15. Applying online 
helps to expedite the process. Income for the previous year may be 
estimated initially and corrected later on the Student Aid Report. 

Applications received before February 15 will be given priority consideration. 

General Regulations Applicable to All Forms of Aid 

Full-Tlme Status. For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 
credit hours through the schedule adjustment period each semester in 
order to receive the full financial aid award. Please refer to the standards of 
Satisfactory Academic Progress when considering dropping below 12 credit 
hours for any given semester. 

Citizenship Status. In order to be eligible for federal, state, or university 
financial assistance, students must be United States citizens or eligible 
non-citizens. 

Default/ Owe Refund: Students cannot be in default on an educational 
loan, nor can they owe any refund on a Pell Grant or Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded at any post- 
secondary institution. 

Degree-Seeking: Students must be working toward a degree or certificate. 
Students must be admitted to the university as "degree-seeking." 



18 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Satisfactory Progress: Students must be making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree or certificate according to the Standards for Satisfactory 
Academic Progress published in the Schedule of Classes. 

Selective Service: To receive federal financial aid, male students must 
register with Selective Service if they are at least 18 years old and born 
after December 31, 1959, unless they are not required by law. The federal 
government will verify compliance of this registration requirement. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non-university source, the university may reduce 
the financial aid awarded by the university It is the student's responsibility to 
notify the Office of Student Financial Aid of all outside awards. 

Change in Financial Situation: It is the student's responsibility to notify the 
Office of Student Financial Aid of any changes to his or her financial 
circumstances during the year. 

Reapplication Requirement: Need-based assistance is not automatically 
renewed from year to year. All students requesting need-based aid must 
reapply by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA annually. Such reappli- 
cation must indicate continued financial need as well as Satisfactory 
Academic Progress. 

Award Policy: Financial aid is normally a combination of grants, loans, and 
student employment. The financial aid "package" is determined by the 
availability of financial aid and the financial circumstances of each student. 
It is not necessary to make any special application for university grants. 
The Office of Student Financial Aid will determine awards that best fit the 
needs and qualifications of the candidates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educational costs is used in determining the amount 
of aid that a student is awarded during the academic year. A typical budget 
for an undergraduate at the University of Maryland, College Park, is as 
follows: 

Dependent Student Living on Campus/ Off Campus 
(not with parent/ relative) 



Tuition and Fees in-state: (2003-2004)* 


$6,759 


Out-of-state: (2003-2004)* 


17,433 


Room* 


4,416 


Board * 


3,052 


Books 


886 


Personal expenses and commuting * 


2,646 


TOTAL In-state * 


17,759 


Out-of-state* 


28,433 



*The above budget is subject to change for the 2004-2005 academic year. 
To determine the final costs for the 2004-2005 academic year, please 
contact the Student Financial Services Center. 



MERIT-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Scholarships 

Several scholarships are available to the highest-achieving students at the 
University of Maryland, College Park. Two types of scholarships are 
available: those based solely on academic or creative talent (merit-based), 
and those based on financial need as well as academic or creative talent 
(need-based). The eligibility criteria for the different scholarships vary and 
are listed below. For more information on these programs, students are 
encouraged to contact the office or department responsible for selecting 
the recipients. Please see the list of departmental scholarships at the end 
of this chapter. Current information about scholarships is also available 
through the World Wide Web at www. umd.edu/ fin. 

Banneker/Key Scholarship: The University of Maryland seeks to identify 
and select some of the brightest high school seniors in the nation to 
continue their education as Banneker/Key Scholars. Students selected for 
this prestigious award will receive full financial support for four years, which 
covers tuition, room, board, mandatory fees, and a book allowance. They 
will also be admitted to the University JHonors Program and will be afforded 
many other opportunities for participation in intellectual enrichment 
programs. For full consideration, students must submit an admission 
application, application fee, official transcript, essay, recommendations, 
and official copies of SAT I or ACT scores to the Office of Undergraduate 



Admissions by December 1 for the following academic year. Selection is 
based upon academic achievement plus extracurricular activities, awards 
and honors, and an essay. Semifinalists are given a personal interview. 
Factors such as a candidate's involvement in community service, talents or 
skills, leadership, and character all play a part in the final awards. Contact 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

Regents Scholars Program: The Regents Scholars Program recognizes the 
extraordinary achievement of outstanding freshmen students. New awards 
are made each year in the amount of full in-state tuition, room, board, and 
mandatory fees. Recipients are automatically admitted to the University 
Honors Program. A select number of the top high school scholars in the 
state will be considered for this most prestigious award. A complete 
admission application, application fee, official transcript, essay, 
recommendations, and SAT I or ACT scores must be submitted to the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions by December 1 for consideration for 
the Regents Scholars Program for the following academic year. Contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

National Merit Scholarships: The University of Maryland, College Park 
is a sponsoring institution in the National Merit Scholarship competitions. 
The university offers $2,000 scholarships for each of four years to in-state 
merit finalists who indicate College Park as their first-choice institution. 
Other merit finalists are awarded scholarships ranging from $1,000 to 
$2,000. To qualify, submit an admission application, application fee, 
official transcript, essay, recommendation, and official copies of SAT I or 
ACT scores no later than December 1. Contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions for more information. 

President's Scholarship: This award provides talented undergraduate 
students with partial tuition support for four years. It is offered to incoming 
freshmen. Students are selected through the admission process 
with primary consideration given to academic performance in high school 
(high school courses and achievement) and standardized test scores (SAT 
or ACT). For full consideration, students must submit a complete 
application for admission by December 1. Contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions for more information. 

Weinberg Regents Scholarship: The Board of Regents has designated the 
Weinberg Regents Scholarship to be awarded to a Maryland community 
college transfer student in order to continue the commitment to 
outstanding students. In order to be selected for this award, a student 
must have exceptional qualifications, including achievement of a 4.0 grade 
point average, completion of the Associate of Arts degree at a Maryland 
community college, evidence of creative and intellectual activities or 
scholarly potential, and have been admitted to one of the University System 
of Maryland institutions. The deadline for submitting the candidate's 
application material is J une 15. The winner may receive the scholarship for 
two years, totalling no more than four semesters including Summer 
sessions. For information, contact the University System of Maryland 
Administration at 301-445-1992. 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are available to 
outstanding students transferring from Maryland community colleges. The 
awards cover in-state tuition and mandatory fees for two years of 
undergraduate study To be eligible for consideration, students must have 
an overall grade point average of 3.5 for all college work attempted, and 
must have completed an Associate of Arts degree or the entire first two 
years of courses for the major in which the student expects to enroll. 
Students who have previously attended the University of Maryland, College 
Park, are ineligible for this scholarship. Candidate nomination forms are 
available in early January from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or 
from community college advisers. The deadline for receipt of the 
application, official transcripts, and scholarship materials is mid-March. 
Contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Honors Scholarship: Honors students already attending Maryland are 
eligible to apply for one of these $500 awards. Financial need is not a 
criterion for selection. Regents, Banneker-Key, and President's Scholarship 
recipients are not eligible for Honors Scholarships. To be considered, 
students must be first- or second-year students, have at least a 3.2 grade 
point average, and be making satisfactory progress toward the completion 
of requirements for an Honors citation. In addition, applicants must submit 
an essay on their academic goals and plans for achieving them. Contact 
the University Honors Program. 

University of Maryland Departmental Scholarships: Some Colleges and 
departments at the university offer a variety of merit scholarships. Most 
departmental scholarships require a student to have a minimum grade 
point average of 3.0 and be registered for a minimum of 12 credits per 
semester. For information regarding departmental scholarships, please 
contact the appropriate College or department. 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 19 



Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships: These are competitive 
scholarships which are awarded annually. Primary consideration will be 
given to entering freshmen and transfer students from community colleges 
who have outstanding talent in art, dance, music, or theater. The 
scholarships cover in-state tuition and mandatory fees and are renewable 
for up to three additional years based upon an acceptable level of 
performance as defined by the respective departments. Auditions and/ or 
portfolios are required. Contact the College of Arts and Humanities. 

Deans' Scholarships: This award provides talented undergraduate 
students with partial tuition support for one to two years. It is offered to 
incoming freshmen. To be considered, students must submit a complete 
admission application no later than December 1. Contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

Maryland State Scholarships: The Maryland State Scholarship 
Administration (MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards both need- and merit- 
based scholarships to Maryland residents. There are currently 16 different 
programs available, including the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educational 
Assistance Grant, the Senatorial Scholarship, the House of Delegates 
Scholarship, the Science and Technology Scholarship, and the 
Distinguished Scholar Award. You may obtain more information about these 
and other awards by calling MSSA at 410-974-5370. All Maryland residents 
are expected to apply for State Scholarship assistance. Initial application 
for many of the awards is made through the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). Please note that filing the FAFSA is sufficient to apply 
for most Maryland State Scholarships at UMCP, although some may require 
additional application forms. The application deadline for most programs is 
March 1. FAFSAs are available from the UMCP Office of Student Financial 
Aid or online at www.umd.edu/ fin. 

Scholarships from Other States: Several states have reciprocal 
agreements with the State of Maryland. Students who are residents of 
these states may receive funds for study in eligible post-secondary 
institutions in Maryland. Interested students should contact their state 
scholarship agencies for information. 

Scholarship Searches: A broad range of scholarships are available from 
private sources. Usually, these awards are not as well publicized as 
the state and university programs. Therefore, students should conduct 
a scholarship search to locate such sources. The University of 
Maryland offers access to several services to students to aid them in their 
searches. Access our World Wide Web site at www.umd.edu/fin to use 
these services. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 
Grants 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers several grant programs for 
undergraduates. Awards are made based on financial need as determined 
by the FAFSA. Grants do not have to be repaid. Access our web site at 
www.umd.edu/ fin for more information. 

Federal Pell Grant: This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 
which aid from other sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are 
seel<ing their first bachelor's degree and have exceptional need may 
receive a Federal Pell Grant. All undergraduates will be considered for this 
grant regardless of when their applications were received. Students may 
receive the Federal Pell Grant for less than full-time attendance, although 
the award will be pro-rated based on the number of credits attempted. 
Awards range from $400 to $4,050. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): The FSEOG 
is awarded to full-time undergraduates with exceptional need. Priority is 
given to Federal Pell Grant recipients. To be considered for FSEOG, 
students must meet OSFA's priority application deadline of February 15. 
The minimum award is $200. The maximum award is dependent upon 
government funding. The funds are divided among as many deserving 
students as possible. 

Institutional Grants: The university awards grants to full-time students who 
demonstrate financial need and meet OSFA's priority application deadline 
of February 15. There are three funds from which institutional grants are 
awarded, the UM Scholarship, Frederick Douglass Grant and the UM 
Grant. OSFA selects the recipients of these awards based on availability of 
funds and the qualifications of the applicants. The UM Scholarship maybe 
awarded to undergraduates with demonstrated need and high academic 
achievement. The UM Grant and Fredericl< Douglas Grant may be awarded 
to any undergraduate with demonstrated need. Award amounts for these 
programs range from $200 to $2,700. 



Self-+Help 

Financial aid also consists of self-help assistance such as employment and 
student loan programs. Most of these programs are awarded based on 
need as determined by the FAFSA. Access our web site at 
www.umd.edu/fin for additional information. 

Federal Worl< -Study: The Federal Worl<-Study (FWS) Program provides 
students with the opportunity to earn money to meet their educational and 
personal expenses. Money earned from the FWS program does not have to 
be paid bacl<. To be considered for FWS, students must meet OSFA's 
priority application deadline of February 15. This award is need-based and 
may range from $800 to $2,500. Pay rates depend on the level of 
complexity of the work, but will be at least the federal minimum wage. Like 
all university employees, FWS employees receive a paycheck every other 
week for the hours worked. Most FWS jobs are on campus, though 
opportunities exist through the Community Service Program for FWS 
students to work off campus at several Federal Government Agencies. The 
number of hours students may work is limited to 20 per week while school 
is in session and 40 per week during vacations and summer break. 

Paid Internships: Students with paid internships sign a contract at the 
beginning of the semester that states the payment amount for the number 
of hours to be worked during that semester. The payment amount is 
advanced to the student's account at the start of each semester. This 
program differs from Federal Work-Study in that students receive all 
"wages" at the start of each semester, as opposed to a bi-weekly pay 
check, and those funds are applied directly to the student's account. 
Several offices and departments on campus, including Shuttle UM, 
Residential Facilities, and Dining Services, offer paid internships. Students 
should contact the department or office for which they are interested 
in working. 

Federal Perkins Loan: The Perkins loan is a low-interest rate (5%) loan for 
students with exceptional financial need. This is a loan borrowed from the 
school, and must be repaid. To be eligible, students must meet OSFA's 
priority application deadline of February 15. The amount of the award will 
depend upon the student's need and may range from $200 to $1,800. 
New borrowers (those who first receive a Federal Perkins Loan afterjulyl, 
1988) have a grace period of nine months after graduating or leaving 
school before they must begin repayment of their Federal Perkins 
Loan(s). Interest will begin accruing at the time of repayment. This loan is 
interest-free while students are attending school and enrolled at least half 
time in a degree-seeking program. 

Federal Stafford Loan: This is a low-interest-rate loan for students who 
attend at least half-time. Application is made through the school's financial 
aid office via the FAFSA. Eligibility for this loan is based on need, not credit 
worthiness. This loan is borrowed by the student and must be repaid. 

There are two types of Federal Stafford Loans, subsidized and 
unsubsidized. The subsidized Stafford loan is awarded to students with 
demonstrated financial need; this loan is interest-free while students are 
attending school and enrolled at least half-time in a degree-seeking 
program. Students who do not demonstrate financial need, or who do not 
demonstrate sufficient need to borrow a fully subsidized Stafford loan, may 
borrow a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The unsubsidized loan is 
interest bearing. Students borrowing an unsubsidized Stafford loan will be 
required to repay the principle and any interest that may accrue during 
school attendance. All students who wish to apply for either Federal 
Stafford Loan must complete the FAFSA. The interest rate for new 
borrowers securing their first Federal Stafford Loan on or afterj uly 1, 1994 
is variable, but capped at 8.25%. The interest rate through June 30, 2004 
is 2.82%. Students who graduate or drop below half-time status are 
granted a six-month grace period before repayment of the Stafford loan is 
required. 

The following are the maximum loan amounts per academic year: $2,625 
for undergraduates with freshman status, $3,500 for undergraduates 
attaining sophomore status, and $5,500 for undergraduate students who 
attain junior or senior status. If students do not demonstrate sufficient 
need to borrow the maximum subsidized Federal Stafford Loan, they may 
borrow the difference in a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The 
maximum borrowing limit for most undergraduates is $23,000. 

Federal PLUS (Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students): This is a 
non-need-based loan, which parents may borrow to help defray the cost of 
their dependent children's education. The Federal PLUS enables parents 
to borrow the full yearly cost of attendance (as determined by the school) 
minus all other financial aid. Otherwise, there is no yearly or cumulative 
borrowing limit. Because this loan is not need-based, submission of the 
FAFSA is not required to apply However, borrowers must first submit the 



20 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



PLUS loan application to the school for calculation and certification of the 
maximum loan amount that the parent may borrow per student per year. 
The Federal PLUS is granted to borrowers based on credit-worthiness as 
determined by the lender whom the borrower selects. The interest rate for 
the Federal PLUS is variable, but capped at 9%. The rate is recalculated on 
July 1 of each year and is equivalent to 52-week Treasury Bill on June 1, 
plus 3.1%. Repayment of the PLUS begins immediately 



UM COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Some UM colleges and departments offer merit-based scholarships. Most 
departments will only consider students who enroll for 12 credits 
per semester, and who have a grade point average of at least 3.0. 
Some of these scholarships are open to prospective freshman and 
transfer students. Some of them are only open to continuing UM 
students. For additional information regarding departmental scholarships 
please contact the appropriate college or department or visit 
www.inform.umd.edu/ Edres/ Scholarships/ departmental.html 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

Biological Resources Engineering 

Landscape Architecture 

Natural Resource Sciences 

Natural Resources Management Program 

Nutrition & Food Science 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History & Archaeology 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparative Literature 

Dance 

English Language and Literature 

French & Italian Languages and Literatures 

Germanic Studies 

History 

Jewish Studies Program 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

African American Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminology & Criminal J ustice 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Joint Program in Survey Methodology 

Psychology 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Applied Mathematics 
Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Meteorology 
Physics 
Statistics Program 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counseling & Personnel Services 
Curriculum & Instruction 
Education Policy Planning, and Administration 
Human Development (Institute for Child Study) 
Measurement, Statistics & Evaluation 
Special Education 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 

COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Entomology 

A.JAMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Aerospace Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering 
Materials Science and Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Reliability Engineering 

ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEM ENT 

Accounting 

Business 

Decision and Information Technologies 

Finance 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 

Management and Organization 

Marl<eting 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND PRESERVATION 

Architecture 

Urban Studies and Planning Program 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY 

Environmental Policy Program 
Public Policy 

Public Sector Financial Management 
Social Policy 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 

Chemical Physics Program 
Environmental Science and Policy (BSOS) 
Systems Engineering 

RETURNING STUDENT PROGRAMS 

Gerald G. Portney Memorial Scholarship 

Irwin S . Kamin Adult Learner Emergency Fund 

Charlotte W. Newcombe Scholarship 

Women's Forum Scholarship 

Returning Students Program 

Alpha Epsilon Phi Foundation Returning Students Program 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 21 



21 



C hapter 3 



Campus AdminiSration, 

R esDurces and Student Services 



CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 
Office of the President 

1101 Main Administration, 301405-5803 
Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., President 
www.umd.edu/ PRES 

The president is the chief executive officer of the University of Maryland. 
Six vice presidents, who report to the president, manage different divisions 
of the campus administration. The Office of Human Relations Programs, 
the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics, and the Maryland Fire and 
Rescue Institute report to the Office of the President. The University 
Senate, a representative legislative body of the university, advises the 
president on academic and other matters. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 Main Administration 301405-5252 

William W. Destler, Senior Vice President and Provost 

www.provost.umd.edu/ 

The Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost is the chief 
academic officer of the university with responsibility for guiding the 
academic development and direction of the institution in accordance with 
the university's mission; ensuring that our programs and faculty are of the 
highest caliber; supporting the diversity of our students, faculty, and staff 
as a special strength; and promoting academic excellence across the 
university. The deans of the 13 colleges and schools at the University 
report directly to him as do the deans for undergraduate, graduate, and 
continuing and extended education, the dean of the libraries and the chief 
information officer. The senior vice president and provost oversees the 
development, review, and implementation of all academic policies and 
regulations; consults closely with the University Senate and other faculty 
advisory groups on academic programs and policies; and serves as liaison 
with other university divisions in strategic and long-range planning. 

Administrative Affairs 

1132 Main Administration, 301405-1105 
John D. Porcari, Vice President 

www .adminaffairs.umd.edu/ 

The Office of the Vice President for Administrative Affairs is responsible for 
the effective management of the physical, fiscal, and staff support 
resources of the institution. The office also provides campus safety and 
security, materials management, and other necessary support services. Of 
particular interest to students are the community awareness and security 
programs offered by the Department of Public Safety and the information 
and assistance services provided by the Bursar for concerns of students 
regarding university billings. 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building, 301-314-8428 
Linda Clement, Vice President 

www .studentaffairs.umd.edu 

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs provides administrative 
leadership for 13 departments which oversee student life and health 
developmental needs. This includes services and research that help 
students clarify and fulfill their needs and objectives, and that contribute to 
a constructive campus learning environment. The office serves as a general 
point of contact for students and their families regarding student life. The 
office maintains liaison with the university chaplains, the Student 



Government Association (SGA), and the Graduate Student Association 
(GSA). The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs also provides 
administrative support for the Senior Council and Parent and Family Affairs. 

Office of Human Relations Programs 

1130 Shriver Laboratory, East Wing 
301405-2838 

www , umd.edu/ CHRP 

The Office of Human Relations Programs (CHRP) advises and assists the 
President in the promotion of the university mission as it relates to 
multiculturalism, broadly conceptualized (i.e., race (inclusive of color and 
creed); ethnicity; language; national or geographic origin; socioeconomic class 
(inclusive of educational level, employment status, and familial configuration); 
sex and gender; gender identity and expression; sexual orientation; physical, 
developmental, and psychological ability; religious, spiritual, faith-based, or 
secular affiliation; age and generation; physical appearance, environmental 
concern; and, on the basis of the exercise of rights secured by the First 
Amendment). More specifically, we facilitate partnership building between 
various constituencies of students, faculty, and staff on these issues as they 
impact schooling and are oriented toward the realization of an inclusive and 
therefore affirming environment for every citizen of the university community. 

The Office of Human Relations Programs (OHRP) is responsible for initiating 
action in compliance with institutional, state, and federal directives to 
provide equal education and employment opportunities for university 
students, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the outcomes of 
actions taken in this regard, reporting our findings to the President, the 
Campus Senate, and to the campus community at large. We provide 
students, faculty, and staff with general information on equity efforts and 
on the status of equity and compliance matters at the university. Students, 
faculty, or staff having a concern about possible inequities in educational 
or employment matters, or who wish to register a complaint, may contact 
either the Campus Compliance Officer at 301405-2839, or a member of 
the Campus' Equity Council (see Equity Council below). 

The Office of Human Relations Programs (OHRP) sponsors initiatives that 
promote intergroup relationship building, sexual harassment and hate 
crimes prevention, multicultural organizational development, and processes 
complaints of discrimination following procedures set forth in the 
University's Human Relations Code (the complete text of this Code maybe 
found in chapter 10 herein). 

The efforts of the OHRP are directed toward the development of our 
students, faculty, and staff becoming principled leaders, predisposed to 
progressive action; becoming democratic citizens as outstanding in what 
they do as in who they are with respect to their commitment to furthering 
the tenets of equity and justice for all. 

Equity Council 

1119 Main Administration Building 

301405-5793 

The Equity Council serves as an advisory group to the President and 
supports the longstanding and continuous goal of the University of 
Maryland to be a national leader in recruiting and retaining a diverse 
community of faculty, staff and students. 

The Council provides leadership in the articulation and development of 
affirmative action policies and procedures for the campus community. A 
particular focus of the Equity Council is to review and recommend, as 
appropriate, search and selection policies and procedures for the university 
and its colleges and departments. 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 22 



22 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



The Council consists of equity administrators from each Vice President and 
Dean's office and the Office of the President. The Special Assistant to the 
President for Equity Diversity serves as Chair of the Council. 

Dr. Robert E. Waters, Jr., Chair, Office of the President 301405-5793 

1119 Main Administration Building 

rewaters@deans.umd.edu 

Dr. Amel Anderson, College of Life Sciences, 301405-2080 

1224 Symons Hall 

aanders@deans.umd.edu 

Dr. Vil<i Annand, College of Health and Human Performance 301405-2473 

2302 Health and Human Performance Building 

va5@umail.umd.edu 

Ms. Gloria Aparicio, Office of Administrative Affairs, 301405-5643 

1132 Main Administration 

ga44@umail.umd.edu 

Dr. Cordell W. Black, Office of Academic Affairs, 301405-7227 

1127C Main Administration 

cblack@deans.umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Brown, Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute, 301-226-9963 
pbrown@mfri.org 

Ms. Lavern Chapman, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301405-7103 

2407 Van Munching Hall 

lchapman@rhsmith.umd.edu 

Ms. Roberta H. Coates, Staff Ombuds Officer, 301405-5795 

2148 Tawes Fine Arts Building 

rcoates@deans.umd.edu 

Ms. Ingrid Eusebe-Farrell 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 301405-2314 

3421 A.V.Williams Building 

ifarrell@deans.umd.edu 

Ms. Cynthia Hale, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, 

301405-1684 

2141 Tydings Hall 

chale@bss2.umd.edu 

Dr. Diana R. Jackson, Office of Continuing Education, Summer and Special 

Programs 

301405-6583 

2103 Reckord Armory 

djackson@deans.umd.edu 

Ms. Wendy A. Jacobs, College of Arts and Humanities, 301405-2354 

1103 Francis Scott Key Hall 

wjl@umail.umd.edu 

Mr. Warren Kelley Office of Student Affairs, 301-314-8431 

2108 Mitchell Building 

wkelley@accmail.umd.edu 

Dr. Ron Lipsman, College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences, 301405-2319 
3417 A.V. Williams Building 
rlipsman@deans.umd.edu 

Mr. James Newton, Undergraduate Studies, 301405-6851 

2130K Mitchell Building 

jnewton@deans.umd.edu 

Dr. GaryPertmer, School of Engineering, 301405-5227 
2309 Chemical & Nuclear Engineering 
pertmer@eng.umd.edu 

Mr. William L. Powers, School of Public Affairs, 301405-6336 

2101 Van Munching Hall 

wpl3@puafmail.umd.edu 

Mr. Norman Pruitt, College of Agriculture (Cooperative Extension Service) 

301405-1174 

1105 Symons Hall 

nplO@umail.umd.edu 

Ms. Olive Reid, College of Journalism, 301405-2390 

2115 Journalism Building 

oreid@deans.umd.edu 

Dr. Stephen F. Sachs, School of Architecture, 301405-6314 

1205 Architecture Building 

ssachs@arch.umd.edu 

Ms. KathySoucy Office of University Advancement, 301405-7746 

1230K Mitchell Building 

jnewton@deans.umd.edu 



Dr. Claude E. Walston, College of Information Studies 

301405-2049 

4117 Hornbake Library 

cw6@umail.umd.edu 

Dr. Donna Wiseman, College of Education, 301405-0866 

3119 Benjamin Building 

dw216@umail.umd.edu 

Undergraduate Studies 

2130 Mitchell Building, 301405-9363 

Donna Hamilton, Associate Provost and Dean 

Phyllis Peres, Associate Dean 

Daniel A. Cronin and Lisa Kiely, Assistant Deans 

www.ugst.umd.edu 

Undergraduate Studies is committed to educating students for enriched, 
useful lives in a complex world. We nurture and promote the ideal of a 
broad, human education that is essential for preparing students to be just, 
caring, and active citizens. The units that comprise the Division of 
Undergraduate Studies view the following activities as their mission: 

• To advocate excellence in undergraduate education, with a particular 
focus on excellence in general education, cross-disciplinary study, and 
experimental learning; 

• To collaborate with colleagues on and off campus to improve our 
ability to attract, prepare, retain, and graduate outstanding 
undergraduates; 

• To support the growing national awareness that diversity of all kinds 
enriches the education of every student, to take action to ensure a 
diverse undergraduate community, and to create programs and 
experiences that foster the appreciation of diversity among students, 
faculty, and staff; 

• To create, sustain, and support smaller campus communities that 
assist students in developing their full academic and personal 
potential; 

• To lead the campus in finding ways to help students take full 
advantage of learning and scholarship opportunities available to them, 
particularly those special academic opportunities available only on a 
research campus near the national and state capitals; 

• To encourage faculty to seek new and effective ways to deepen and 
enrich their students' learning; 

• To support, recognize, and reward faculty and staff for their roles as 
teachers, advisors, mentors, and academic facilitators; 

• To help students become engaged in their education through a variety 
of inquiry-based experiences, including original research, practice in 
the process of research, credit and non-credit internships, study 
abroad experiences, and other forms of experimental learning; 

• To work to eliminate economic constraints as the determining factor in 
enrolling and retaining Maryland undergraduates; and 

• To support students in their efforts to win prestigious national 
scholarships and to compete for nationally-competitive research 
opportunities. 

In fulfilling its mission. Undergraduate Studies provides a wide range of 
academic-support services for undergraduates, faculty and staff. All of its 
units work toward enhancing the undergraduate experience at Maryland. 
Undergraduate Studies coordinates the interpretation and implementation 
of academic regulations and requirements with the Office of the Senior Vice 
President for Academic Affairs and Provost and cooperates with academic 
deans and department chairs to assure the overall organization, continuity 
and effectiveness of the undergraduate curriculum. 

Undergraduate Studies includes: 
Academic Achievement Programs 
Air Force Aerospace Studies Program (AFROTC) 
Army ROTC 

Asian American Studies Program 
Beyond the Classroom 
Center forTeaching Excellence 
College Park Scholars 
CORE (general education requirements) 
Division of Letters and Sciences 
Educational Talent Search 
Enrollment Management 
First Year Focus 
Individual Studies 

Law and Health Professions Advising Office 
LGBT Program 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research 
National Scholarships Office 
National Student Exchange 
Orientation Office 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 23 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 23 



Pre-College Programs: Upward Bound and Math Science Regional Center 

Office of the Registrar 

Senior Summer Scholars 

Student Financial Aid 

Summer Freshman Seminars 

Terrapin Reading Society 

Undergraduate Admissions 

Undergraduate Research Assistant Program 

University Honors Program 

Winterterm 

University Relations 

2119 Main Administration, 301-4054680 
Brodie Remington, Vice President 
www.urhome.umd.edu 

The office of the Vice President for University Relations conducts a variety 
of programs to develop greater understanding and support for the 
University of Maryland among its many publics. Units of this office include 
University Development, Constituency Development, University Marl<eting 
and Communications, University of Maryland College Park Foundation 
Administration, University Publications, Special Events, and Alumni 
Programs. University Relations is responsible for all official campus-wide 
advancement programs such as fund-raising, alumni affairs, university 
images, production of official campus publications, films and video 
presentations, media relations, and management of major campus events. 

University Senate 

1100 Marie Mount Hall, 301405-5805 
www.senate.umd.edu 

The University Senate, an integral part of the institution's system of shared 
governance, has representation from all segments of the campus 
community faculty staff, undergraduate students, and graduate students. 
Participation in the Senate or any of its 15 Standing Committees is an 
honor and a responsibility 

The full Senate meets approximately nine times a year to consider matters 
of concern to the institution, including academic issues, university policies, 
plans of organization, facilities, and the welfare of faculty, staff, and 
students. The Senate advises the president, the chancellor, or the Board of 
Regents as appropriate. To become a student senator, students must be 
elected by students in their college or school or the Office of 
Undergraduate Studies in centralized, online elections. Elections are held 
every year during the spring semester. Students are also encouraged to 
participate in Senate Standing Committees, such as Student Affairs and 
Human Relations. These committees draw membership from the campus 
community at large and cover every aspect of campus life and function. 
Details about the election and appointment process are available from the 
University Senate Office. 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Academic Acfiieve merit Programs 

3216 J. M. Patterson Building, 3014054736 
Dr. Jerry L. Lewis, Director 

www .inform.umd.edu/ aap 

Educational Opportunity Center (EGG): A U.S. Department of Education 
grant supported program designed to assist adults 19 and over in three of 
our Prince George's County's inner-beltway communities to enroll in 
institutions of post-secondary education. UM-EOC provides and targets 
academic and financial application assistance, advice, counseling, and 
related services to low-income and first generation potential college-going 
program participants. 
Mr. Andre Nottingham 
For more information, call 301429-5933 

Intensive Educational Development (lED): A state-funded program that 
provides an array of comprehensive academic support (sl<ill-enhancement 
instruction in English, and math and college study skills) and tutorial 
services to first- and second-year students who participate in the Summer 
Transitional Program (STP). Continuing students are eligible for services as 
needed and also participate in career seminars. 

Prospective students attempting to gain admission to the university by 
participating in this program are required to attend the six-week Summer 
Transitional Program, designed to develop, expand and improve English, 
math, and study skills; assist in the transition from high school to the 
university and challenge and evaluate each student's potential for success 
at this institution. 



Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director 
For information, call 3014054749 

Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement: A U.S. Department 
of Education grant-supported program that provides eligible, low-income 
and first generation college students with junior and senior status, 
academic research opportunities and faculty mentorships in preparation for 
graduate study, preferably at the doctoral level. The program offers 
assistance with the completion of graduate school and financial aid 
applications, and preparation for graduate admissions tests. In addition, 
McNair offers a six-week summer session that affords students the 
opportunity to refine skills in written communications, computer 
applications, statistics and research methodology 
Dr. Nthakoana Peko, Associate Director 
For more information, call 3014054749 

Student Support Services (SSS): A U.S. Department of Education grant- 
supported program for low-income and first-generation college students, 
that works in conjunction with the lED Program. SSS provides academic 
and career advising (to first- and second-year students) assistance with 
financial aid applications to fully meet students' tuition needs, individual 
and group counseling, and leadership development workshops. 
Dr. Alice N. Murray, Associate Director 
For more information, call 3014054739 

Academic Advising 

Academic advising is an essential part of an undergraduate's 
educational experience. 

Advantages of Advising 

Students can expect advising to help them: 

• better understand their purposes for attending the university; 

• develop insights about personal behaviors that promote improved 
adjustment to the campus setting; 

• increase their awareness of academic programs and course offerings at 
the University of Maryland; 

• more frequently explore opportunities both inside and outside the 
classroom for intellectual and cultural development; 

• acquire decision-making skills that can accelerate academic and 
career planning; 

• more realistically evaluate their academic progress and its relationships 
to successful planning; and 

• understand the relationship between academic success and 
planning skills. 

Required Advising 

Students enrolled in certain majors are required to see advisers before 
each registration. Even when advising is not mandatory, the university 
expects students in the following categories to consult their advisers. 

• Students in their first year of registration at the University of Maryland 

• Students with more than 56 credits who have not chosen a major 

• Students receiving an academic warning (mandatory) 

• Students dismissed from the university (mandatory) 

• Students who withdraw from the university (mandatory) 

• Students nearing graduation 

• Students with 70-80 credits: senior audit 

• Student athletes 

Finding An Adviser 

Undergraduate students are encouraged to use the many advising 
opportunities available to them. At both college and department levels, at 
least one person has been designated to coordinate advising. A list of 
these persons, including name, room number, and telephone extension, is 
published each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 

Admissions 

Ground Floor, Mitchell Building, 301-314-8385 

www .uga.umd.edu/ 

The services offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions are 
designed to meet the individual needs of prospective students. The office 
provides general information about the University of Maryland through 
brochures, letters, information sessions, and campus tours. Admissions 
staff evaluate the applications of both freshman and transfer students in 
order to select qualified students. The Reenrollment Office, a part of 
Undergraduate Admissions, reviews all applications for readmission and 
reinstatement. For more information about undergraduate admissions, see 
chapter 1. 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 24 



24 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



America Reads* America Counts 

0144 Holzapfel Hall 301-314-READ 
www.umd.edu/ arac 

America Reads*America Counts, part of the Office of Community Service 
Learning, provides federal worl< -study students the opportunity to serve as 
reading and math mentors in nearby Prince George's County elementary 
schools. Students tutor 6-10 hours per week and are matched with 3-5 
children per semester. Mentors receive excellent training and salary. 
Opportunities exist for students to enhance their leadership skills and 
provide administrative support to the program as well. Contact America 
Reads* America Counts to learn whether you can be eligible for federal 
work-study or for more information about the program. 

The Center for Teaching Excellence 

0405 Marie Mount Hall, 301405-9356 

www .cte.umd.edu 

The Center for Teaching Excellence supports campus-wide efforts to 
enhance undergraduate education and learning. The Center offers 
assistance to individual faculty and teaching assistants (TAs), as well as to 
the departments and colleges in which they work. It provides workshops 
and conversations related to teaching and learning issues; assistance in 
organizing and implementing faculty teaching workshops; TA development 
activities and evaluation/ support strategies related to improving teaching 
and learning; consultation on areas of concern in teaching and learning; 
research into teaching practice; and implementation of innovative teaching 
learning strategies. 

The Center also facilitates the Undergraduate Teaching Assistants program; 
the university teaching and learning program for graduate TA's; the annual 
Celebrating Teachers awards for outstanding teaching; the Lilly-Center for 
Teaching Excellence Fellows program; Instructional Improvement Grants 
Program, which supports innovations in teaching; and Scholarship In 
Teaching and Learning (SOTL) grant program. 

For more information, call the Center at 301405-9356. 

Computing Services: Office of Information Technology 

Phone: 301405-7700 
Fax: 301405-0300 
e-mail: oit@umail.umd.edu 

www .oit.umd.edu 

University of Maryland students are part of an academic community that 
enjoys access to networked computer and telecommunications resources 
that are among the best in the nation. The Office of Information Technology 
(OIT) provides technology infrastructures and focuses attention on services 
that support university education and research missions as well as 
underlying business processes. 

Many faculty members have integrated technology into courses as part of 
the learning process, both in and outside of the classroom. Computer 
accounts enable students to store class work on a networked server, use 
on-line classroom support materials, send e-mail, and create web sites. 
Residence Halls provide a "port-per-pillow," and workstation labs across 
the university feature PC, Mac, and UNIX environments for those needing a 
computer, laser printing, or course-related software. An Adaptive 
Technology Lab and equipment are available to users requiring them. 

Testudo (www.testudo.umd.edu) is a web-based, one-stop-shop for on-line 
university resources that students need the most. It allows you access to 
your individual registration and course information. You can view the 
schedule of classes, find the sections with preferred instructors and 
openings, and register on-line, all from the comfort of your dorm room or 
home. You can check the status of your financial aid, see your grades, view 
your outstanding parking tickets, order transcripts, apply for a new 
residence hall room assignment, and much more. It is all password 
protected and secure to ensure your privacy 

Assistance in solving operating system or software problems is available 
from the OIT Help Desk (www.helpdesk.umd.edu, 301-405-1500). 
Additional computer help is offered through short-term, non-credit "peer 
training" classes, (www.oit.umd.edu/ pt) 



Office of Continuing and Extended Education 

2103 Reckord Armory, 301405-6535 

J udith K. Broida, Associate Provost and Dean 

www .contedu.umd.edu 
www . summer. umd.edu 
www .onlinestudies.umd.edu 
www , spoc.umd.edu 

The Office of Continuing and Extended Education (OCEE) manages and 
administers Summer Sessions, professional education, online studies and 
numerous outreach activities on behalf of the university. OCEE partners 
with colleges and departments to meet the learning and research needs of 
corporations, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, government 
agencies and professional associations. Leveraging the university's vast 
resources, OCEE aids in the transfer of knowledge and the application of 
the university's research to external groups. 

In fulfilling its mission, OCEE offers the following programs and services: 

Summer Sessions— More than 1,700 undergraduate and graduate courses 
are offered in six sessions as well as many noncredit seminars and 
workshops. Credit courses offered during the summer are taught by 
University of Maryland faculty and follow the same rigorous standards as 
courses offered during the fall and spring semesters. Smaller classes offer 
students greater student-faculty interaction and emphasis is placed on 
providing classes that fulfill general education requirements. Students use 
summer classes to accelerate their progress toward graduation, fulfill 
prerequisites, meet eligibility requirements for certain majors and explore 
other majors. Summer Sessions offers a young scholars program, as well as 
an arts program, for academically qualified high school juniors and seniors. 
Newly admitted students may find beginning their course work during the 
summer an especially attractive option for easing the transition from high 
school to college. 

Professional Education— OCEE partners with businesses, professional 
associations, government agencies and educational institutions to develop 
and deliver creative and timely learning solutions for employees. Tapping 
into the vast talent pool on campus, OCEE serves as the university's portal 
to leading experts, including some of the world's best thinkers, 
researchers, strategists, entrepreneurs and educators to design the 
programs. Delivery options include campus-based programs onsite at 
organizations and conference centers as well as electronic and Web-based 
learning. 

Online Studies— OCEE provides the infrastructure and service to help 
departments bring a worldwide audience to selected quality professional 
and graduate programs. Online master's programs are available in life 
sciences and fire protection engineering. 

SPOC (single point of contact)— SPOC serves as a convenient one-stop 
shop for students seeking information or wishing to enroll in summer credit 
programs, online studies and other noncredit special programs. It provides 
online access to admissions, registration, course offerings, fees and 
textbooks. 

Student Financial Services Center 

1135 Lee Building, 301-314-9000 

www .umd.edu/ fin 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers a variety of financial 
assistance and student employee programs. Assistance is granted primarily 
on the basis of the applicant's financial need as determined by the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The OSFA staff is available for 
individual counseling on matters pertaining to financing a college education. 
For additional information, see chapter 2, Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid. 

Honor Societies 

www.union.umd.edu/ studentorg/ 

Students who excel in scholarship and leadership may be invited to join the 
appropriate honor society Honor societies at Maryland include: 

Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemistry) 

*Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering) 

* Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-Med) 

Alpha Epsilon Rho (Broadcast Journalism) 

*Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

♦Alpha Lambda Delta (Freshman Scholarship) 

Alpha Phi Sigma (Criminal Justice) 

Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Management) 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 25 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 25 



Black Honors Caucus 

*Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 

Delta Nu Alpha (Transportation) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Pi (Business) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

*Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

* Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

* Golden Key Honor Society (Leadership/ Scholarship) 
*Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

*Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism) 
*Lambda Pi Eta (Speech Communication) 

* Mortar Board National Honor Society (Scholarship) 
*National Society of Collegiate Scholars 

* Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemistry Engineering) 
*Omega Rho (Business) 

*Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

*Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship/ Leadership) 

* Order of Omega (Fraternity/ Sorority Leadership) 
Phi Alpha Epsilon (Health/ Human Resources) 
*Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) 

Phi Chi Theta (Business and Economics) 

*Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Scholarship) 

*Phi Kappa Phi (Senior/ Graduate Scholarship) 

*Phi Sigma (Biology) 

*Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship/ Leadership) 

*Phi Sigma lota (French/ Italian) 

*Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 

*Phi Sigma Theta 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 

*Primannum Honor Society 

*Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Sigma Alpha Omicron (Microbiology) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Journalism) 

*Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon (Geology) 

Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering) 

*SigmaTau Delta (English) 

Society of Fire Prevention Engineering (Fire Prevention Engineering) 

*Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 

Tau Beta Sigma 

*Member of Association of College Honor Societies 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Comcast Center, 301-314-7075 
www.umterps.com 

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is responsible for directing 
intercollegiate athletic programs for both women and men, and for 
managing the campus' athletic complex. 

Women's intercollegiate athletic teams include cross country, field hocl<ey 
soccer and volleyball in the fall; basl<etball, competitive cheer, swimming, 
indoor tracl< and gymnastics during the winter; and lacrosse, Softball, 
outdoor track and water polo in the spring. Tennis and golf competition is 
scheduled in both the fall and spring seasons. 

There are men's teams in football, soccer and cross country in the fall; 
basketball, swimming, wrestling, and indoor track during the winter; and 
baseball, golf, tennis, lacrosse and outdoor track in the spring. 

Men's and women's teams compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) 
and in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 

National Collegiate Athletic Association Requirements for 
Student Athletes' Continuing Eligibility(For student-athletes first 
enrolling at a collegiate institution prior to August 1, 2003) 
(Subject to change) 

1. NCAA eligibility for regular season competition subsequent to the 
student's first year is based upon satisfactory completion prior to each 
fall term of twenty-four (24) semester hours of acceptable degree 
credits or an average of twelve (12) semester hours per term of 
attendance. Students must earn 75% of degree credits (minimum of 18 
credits) during fall and spring semesters. No more than 25% (6 credits) 
may be earned during summer sessions. 

2. The calculation of credit hours shall be based upon hours accepted for 
degree credit at the institution. 

3. Student athletes must declare a major program of study no later than 
the beginning of their fifth full-time term of attendance. 



4. Credit hours earned toward athletic eligibility for students in declared 
majors must be acceptable in their specific degree program. 

5. The 24 credit hours of acceptable credit required each year may include 
credits earned for a repeated course when the previous grade was an F, 
but usually does not include the credits if the previous grade was D 
or better. 

6. Student athletes who enter their third year of college enrollment must 
have successfully completed at least 25% of the course requirements 
in their specific degree program. 

7. Student athletes who enter their fourth year of college enrollment must 
have successfully completed at least 50% of the course requirements 
in their specific degree program. 

8. Student athletes who enter their fifth year of college enrollment must 
have successfully completed at least 75% of the course requirements 
in their specific degree program. 

9. Student athletes entering their third year of college enrollment shall 
present a cumulative minimum GPA that equals 90% of the institution's 
overall cumulative minimum GPA required for graduation. 

10. Student athletes entering their fourth or subsequent year of college 
enrollment shall present a cumulative minimum GPA that equals 95% of 
the institution's cumulative minimum GPA required for graduation. 

National Collegiate Athletic Association Requirements for 
Student-Athletes' Continuing Eligibility (For student-athletes first 
entering a collegiate institution on or after August 1, 2003) 
(Subject to change) 

1. NCAA eligibility for regular season competition subsequent to the 
student's first year is based upon satisfactory completion of prior to each 
fall term or since the beginning of the preceding two semesters of twenty- 
four (24) semester hours of acceptable degree credit, 18 of which must 
be earned during the academic year. In addition, each term a student- 
athlete must pass six credits to be eligible for the upcoming semester. 

2. The calculation of credit hours shall be based upon hours accepted for 
degree credit at the institution. 

3. Student athletes must declare a major program of study no later than 
the beginning of their fifth term of attendance. 

4 Credit hours earned toward athletic eligibility for students in declared 
majors must be acceptable in their specific degree program. 

5. The 24 credit hours of acceptable credit required each year may include 
credits earned for a repeated course when the previous grade was an F, 
but usually does not include the credits if the previous grade was a D or 
better. 

6. Student athletes who enter their third year of collegiate enrollment must 
have successfully completed at least 40% of the course requirements 
in their specific degree program. 

7. Student athletes who enter their fourth year of collegiate enrollment 
must have successfully completed at least 60% of the course 
requirements in their specific degree program. 

8. Student athletes who enter their fifth year of collegiate enrollment must 
have successfully completed at least 80% of the course requirements 
in their specific degree program. 

9. Student athletes entering their second year of collegiate enrollment 
shall present a cumulative minimum GPA that equals 90% of the 
institution's overall cumulative minimum GPA required for graduation. 

10. Student athletes entering their third year of collegiate enrollment shall 
present a cumulative minimum GPA that equals 95% of the institution's 
overall cumulative minimum GPA required for graduation. 

11. Student athletes entering their fourth or subsequent year of college 
enrollment shall present a cumulative minimum GPA that equals 100% of 
the institution's overall cumulative minimum GPA required for graduation. 

University of M aryland Athletic Eligibility Requirements 

Students should contact ICA for updated information. Changes in GPA 
requirenrients are under review. The University of Maryland requires student 
athletes to maintain a specified minimum grade point average to be eligible 
for competition. The following standards are effective beginning fall, 1999: 



Freshman (end of 1st semester) 
End of 1st year 
End of 2nd year 
End of 3rd year 

M id-Year Enrollees 



1.29 cumulative GPA 
1.78 cumulative GPA 
1.86 cumulative GPA 
2.00 cumulative GPA 



Student athletes who first matriculate in the Spring semester are required 
to meet the following grade point average standards: 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 26 



26 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



End of 1st semester 




End of 2nd semester 




End of 3rd semester 




End of 4th semester 




End of 5th semester 




End of 6th semester 


2 


End of 7th semester 


2 


End of 8th semester 


2 



.29 cumulative GPA 
.78 cumulative GPA 
.86 cumulative GPA 
.86 cumulative GPA 
.94 cumulative GPA 
.00 cumulative GPA 
.00 cumulative GPA 
.00 cumulative GPA 



Student athletes who meet the required grade point average and all other 
conference, institutional, and NCAA eligibility requirements will be eligible 
to compete for the full academic year with the exceptions noted below: 

1. Student athletes who fail to meet necessary grade point average 
requirements for the fall semester are ineligible for the entire academic 
year. However, ineligible student athletes may restore their eligibility at 
the end of any semester if they raise their grade point average to the 
minimum standard for the current year. 

2. Ineligible student athletes are not permitted to compete or travel. 

3. First-semester freshmen and transfer student athletes will be required 
to meet established grade point average requirements after their initial 
semester at the university Transfer students are required to attain the 
appropriate grade point averages based upon year of enrollment. 

4. Mid-year matriculants are required to meet the established GPA 
standard for each of their first three semesters. Thereafter, they will be 
reviewed at the beginning of each Fall term. 

5. Student athletes in their final year of eligibility must maintain a 
2.0 cumulative GPA in order to be eligible for competition during 
Spring term. 

6. Eligible student athletes who go on academic warning after Fall term are 
required to attend supervised study sessions and receive academic 
support services as assigned by the Academic Support Unit staff. 

7. Dismissed and later reinstated student athletes are ineligible for 
competition until they meet designated grade point averages. 

The Office of Intercollegiate Athletics also sponsors a number of awards for 
achievement in athletics and/ or scholarship. Consult the Student Athlete 
Handbook for details. 

For further information, contact the Academic Support and Career 
Development unit, 301-314-7043. Fax: 301-314-9997. 

International Education Services 

3116 Mitchell Building, 301-314-7740 
E-mail: iesadv@deans.umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/ INTL/ 

International students and faculty receive a wide variety of services 
designed to help them benefit from their experience in the United States. 
International Education Services (lES) works closely with the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, evaluating academic records from overseas 
and processing applications for English proficiency, visa, and financial 
requirements. lES sponsors orientation programs, immigration and 
employment seminars, and coordinates activities for the International 
House. lES advisers counsel international students concerning immigration 
and personal issues. 

F-1 andJ-1 status students. Students with F-1 orJ-1 status are 
responsible for following the regulations of the U.S. Immigration and 
Naturalization Service pertaining to their visa status. The regulations affect 
extension of stay, transfers, off-campus employment authorization, 
practical training, and course loads. The Office of International Education 
Services is the only office on campus authorized to sign documents which 
must be fon/varded to the Immigration and Naturalization Service. 

Maintaining Status 

• Full-time registration: In order to maintain full-time student status for 
immigration purposes, F-1 andJ-1 undergraduate students are 
expected to register for and complete a minimum credit load of 12 
hours per semester. Pre-approval from lES is required if you are going 
to complete the semester with fewer than 12 credits. 

• Documents: International students must have a valid passport at all 
times unless exempt from passport requirements. If your 1-20 or 
DS-2109 will soon expire you should apply for an extension at least 
30 days prior to the program completion date on the document. To 
travel outside the U.S. and re-enter as an F-1 orJ-1, an adviser in lES 
must sign your 1-20 or DS-2109 before you leave. 



• Health Insurance: F-1 andJ-1 students are required to can^ adequate 
health insurance while attending the university. There are federal 
health insurance requirements forJ-1 students and their dependents. 
Students must either purchase the health insurance plan available in 
the Office of International Education Services or show proof of 
coverage that meets USIA guidelines. Visit the Health Center for 
assistance with insurance. 

English Language Instruction for Non-native Speakers. The University of 
Maryland, through the Maryland English Institute, offers two programs for 
English language instruction for those who are not native speakers of 
English. For those students who are admissible but require part-time 
English instruction, the Maryland English Institute offers semi-intensive 
(part-time) instruction. Semi-intensive study would also require the student 
to enroll in a half-time academic program. For more information about the 
institute, see the College of Arts and Humanities entry in chapter 6. 

Study Abroad Office. American students and faculty receive advice and 
information about study, travel, and work in other countries. Students may 
obtain assistance with transfer credits, reenrollment, pre-registration, and 
housing for the semester they return to campus. The University of Maryland 
offers study abroad programs throughout the world. For more information 
about Study Abroad, see Campus-Wide Programs in chapter 7. 

Division of Letters and Sciences 

Division of Letters and Sciences: 1117 Hornbake Library 

John Bowman, Interim Director 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 or 8419 

Pre-Professional Advising: 301-405-2793 

Credit-By€xam: 301-314-8418 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

Many university students decide to explore their academic interests before 
selecting a major. Working with a staff of trained academic advisers in the 
Division of Letters and Sciences, these students are able to explore 
majors, choose and schedule courses, plan their academic programs, and 
learn about campus-wide resources available for solving problems they 
encounter. The Advise-5 Program, a nationally recognized advising program, 
pairs students with faculty and staff with like interests from across the 
campus who assist them in exploring the CORE general-education program 
and in choosing courses and majors. 

The Division of Letters and Sciences staff work closely with the Career 
Center, the Counseling Center, various tutoring services, and advisers from 
academic departments and programs across campus to provide a 
coordinated advising network that helps students design their personal 
academic plans in the following ways: 

Choosing a Major: Providing information on and referral to the wide 
range of academic programs available to students and coordinating with 
services offered by the Career Center, the Counseling Center, and the 
academic colleges and departments. The Division of Letters and 
Sciences helps students select majors to match their interests and 
abilities and further their career goals. 

Dean's Approval: In the case of students who are advised in the 
Division of Letters and Sciences when Dean's approval is required, the 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies shall assume the responsibilities 
normally delegated to the Dean. 

Markets and Society: A special program for students interested in 
exploring the world of business careers. A select group of first year 
students are invited to participate in this program each year. The 
Markets and Society program allows students to learn more about the 
field of business, refine their career goals, and interact with other 
students interested in business. 

Pre-Professional Advising: Offering pre-professional advising for 
students interested in law and the health professions. For further 
information on pre-professional advising, consult the entry on 
Pre-Professional Programs in chapter 7, or call 301-405-2793 or 
301-314-8418. 

Information and Referral: Maintaining information about academic 
programs and requirements and academic support services at 
the University of Maryland. Workshops designed to help students 
select majors and courses are offered regularly during the early 
registration period. 

Troubleshooting: Helping individual students identify and solve specific 
advising problems and difficulties with administrative procedures, such 
as transfer-credit evaluation, schedule revisions, changing majors, errors 
in academic records, etc. 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 27 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 27 



Policy Interpretation: Keeping students and advisers informed about new 
academic policies, helping to interpret existing policies and practices, 
and determining under what conditions exceptions might be granted. 

Credit-by-Exam, 301-314-8418: Administering the campus-wide program 
of credit-by-examination. 

General Assistance: Giving general assistance to students who have not 
been assigned to a permanent advising home, such as students visiting 
this campus from other institutions. 

Faculty Awards: Teaching and Research 

www.umd.edu/ Faculty/ FacAwards/ 

In addition to the many awards given by individual academic units, the 
university bestows various awards on faculty who demonstrate an 
extraordinary commitment to research and undergraduate teaching. These 
awards include: 

Celebrating Teachers Awards 

Departmental Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Awards 

Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Distinguished University Professor 

General Research Board Awards 

Kin/van Faculty Research and Scholarship Prize 

Kin/van Undergraduate Education Award 

Lilly-CTE Teaching Fellowships 

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grants 

The Office of JVlulti-Ethnic Student Education (OJVISE) 

1101 Hombal<e Library, 301405-5616 or 405-3830 
www.umd.edu/ CM SE 

Academic Support and Leadership Focus. The Office of Multi€thnic Student 
Education (OMSE) provides academic support programs and services to 
enhance the recruitment, retention and graduation of undergraduate multi- 
ethnic students at the University of Maryland (UM), College Park. OMSE's 
academic support activities include a tutorial service, mentoring programs, 
an annual Career and Job Fair, academic classes that develop college 
success sl<ills and peer helping strategies, EDCP-108N and EDCP-312; and 
Academic and Leadership Excellence programs. As an academic unit, OMSE 
strives to identify and meet changing needs that affect the success of our 
undergraduate multi-ethnic students. OMSE collaborates with other campus 
offices and college programs to achieve this goal, as well as to promote a 
positive community of learners who are sensitive to issues of diversity and 
to enhance the academic experience of our diverse undergraduate student 
population at UM. 

Study Lounge and Computer Workstation. The OMSE office suite contains 
a study lounge that serves as a tutorial center and an open workstation 
laboratory. The study lounge provides multi-ethnic students with an 
opportunity to study get assistance from a tutor, and work on state-of-the- 
art computers in a relaxed atmosphere. 

Liaison to Student Organizations. OMSE staff actively support a number of 
multi-ethnic pre-professional undergraduate student societies in law, 
business, science, health, and education disciplines. OMSE also supports 
and works closely with the campus Asian-American Student Union, Black 
Student Union, Latino Student Union, and Native Indian American Student 
Union. 

National Student Exchange (NSE) 

2130 Mitchel Building, 301405-9363 
www.nse.umd.edu 

NSE provides students with the opportunity to study at one of more than 
174 colleges and universities in the United States, including Alaska, 
Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. All NSE schools are 
regionally accredited. To be eligible. University of Maryland, College Park 
students must have a 2.5 GPA. Students must earn their final 30 hours of 
credits at College Park. The application deadline usually falls in late 
February. For more information, call 301-405-9363. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Field House, 301-314-8212 

www .orientation.umd.edu 

The primary goal of orientation is to ease the transition of new students 
into the university community. The transition of each student is both 
individual and ongoing. The Orientation Office offers a wide range of 
programs and services for both students and their families to best meet 
these individualized needs. 



Orientation Programs. Orientation begins when students are admitted to 
the university and ends at the culmination of the first semester. At the 
time of admission, new students will receive the Guide to Orientation that 
outlines the transitional programming available from the office. The 
purposes of the orientation program are to introduce new students and 
their families to the academic community as well as campus student 
services and resources. In addition, the orientation provides students with 
the opportunity to receive academic advising and to register for classes. 
Parent and student orientations are offered prior to the fall and spring 
semesters. 

The freshman program is two days in length while transfer students take 
part in a one-day orientation. At the programs small groups of entering 
students are paired with a student Orientation Advisor who coordinates the 
activities on the schedule and who serves as a peer resource. The primary 
goal during orientation is to ensure that students are prepared to begin 
classes at the University Student rights and responsibilities, advising, and 
registration are fundamental parts of the program. In addition, students are 
exposed to on campus housing or commuter resources, student services, 
and opportunities for involvement on campus. 

Parents of new Maryland students are strongly encouraged to attend a one- 
day program specifically designed to introduce them to the academic, 
social, and cultural opportunities of the university 

Terrapin Expeditions for New and Transfer Students (T.E.N.T.S.) are small 
group, off-campus trips for new students. The trips have an adventure, 
leadership, or community service theme and the intensive experiences are 
utilized to help forge friendships and to further share successful 
transitional strategies with entering students. 

Faulty Forays focus on the continuing transition of parents. These one-day 
programs are offered to parents on the second day of freshman orientation 
and combine a trip to an area attraction with connections to other parents 
and a campus faculty or staff host. 

New Student Seminars. The Orientation Office coordinates new students 
seminar courses, UNIV 100 and 101, designed to introduce student to the 
world of higher education and, more specifically, to the University of 
Maryland. There are seven core educational elements of UNIV including 
career/ major exploration, successful studying and test-taking strategies, 
diversity, and involvement within the university. UNIV 100 courses are 
worth one-credit while UNIV 101 is worth two. The second credit for UNIV 
101 results from intensive technological instruction that is incorporated 
into the course. 

Pre-College Programs 

Upward Bound Program, 301-405-6776 

Higher-educational Opportunities for Latino Achievers (HOLA), 301405-6776 

Math and Science Regional Center, 301405-1773 

1107 West Education Annex 

www.ugst.umd.edu/ precollege/ 

The University of Maryland Pre-College Programs in Undergraduate Studies 
is comprised of the following federally and state funded programs: Upward 
Bound Program (UB), Higher-educational Opportunities for Latino Achievers 
(HOLA), and the Math and Science Regional Center (MSRC). The programs 
are designed to generate in high school students the skills and motivation 
necessary for success in post-secondary education. 

The Upward Bound Programs serve as a supplement to the high school 
experience by providing opportunities for students to further develop the 
skills necessary to acquire a positive self-image, broaden educational and 
cultural perspectives, and, in the process, realize untapped potential. 
Participants are immersed in rigorous academic instruction, tutoring, 
counseling, and innovative educational experiences throughout the school 
year and during the six-week summer residential program. 

The Upward Bound Programs are open to low-income and/ or first- 
generation college bound high school students in grades 9 through 12, who 
demonstrate an academic need and want to pursue a four-year post- 
secondary education. Eligible students must attend target high schools in 
Prince George's County (Bladensburg, Forestville, Northwestern, High Point, 
Fairmont Heights, and Potomac) and Montgomery County (Montgomery 
Blair, Wheaton, and J.F. Kennedy). Students are recommended to the 
program by their high school principals, teachers, and counselors. The 
Educational Talent Search Program, social service agencies, and 
individuals familiar with the Upward Bound program also refer potential 
program participants. Eligibility for HOLA Upward Bound requires that 
students attend Montgomery Blair, Wheaton, High Point, or Bladensburg 
high schools. 



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28 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



The Upward Bound Math and Science Regional Center is open to students 
in grades 10 through 12, who demonstrate an academic need and want to 
pursue post-secondary education programs in fields related to mathematics 
and science. High school students are recruited from Delaware, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. 

College Gateway Programs 

www.ugst.umd.edu/ precollegeoutreach 

Educational Talent Search 
3103 Turner Hall, 301-314-7763 
www.inform.umd/ edu/ ETSP 

Educational Talent Search is a federally funded intervention program 
designed to increase the college participation of low-income and first 
generation college students by creating an academic pipeline from middle 
school to high school to baccalaureate study by providing academic and 
advising programs that promote, encourage, and facilitate high school 
completion or re-entry, college entry or re-entry, school retention, graduation 
and baccalaureate study 

ProjectUNKS 

3103 Turner Hall, 301-314-7768 

www.projectlinlcs.umd.edu 

Linl<ing Information Networl<s and Knowledge to Students) is a "Digital 
Divide E-Tutoring Project" that makes effective use of technology for middle 
school tutoring/ mentoring. ProjectLINKS creates access to resources in 
higher education and worl<s to close the Digital Divide by sharing "effective 
strategies and best practices" for disseminating educational technology 
services to disenfranchised populations so that these groups may equip 
themselves with the knowledge and skills to compete for jobs in the 
emerging world economy. ProjectLINKS provides an electronic model for 
exhibition and replication nationally by using enthusiastic college students 
who serve as tutors and mentors to support achievement and motivation in 
urban schools through supplementary tools such as customized email, 
message boards, and newsgroups. 

Registrar (Records and Registration) 

Office of the Registrar 

Mitchell Building, first floor, 301-314-8240 

www .testudo.umd.edu 

The Office of the Registrar provides services to students and academic 
departments related to the processes of registration, scheduling, 
withdrawal, and graduation. The office also maintains students' academic 
records and issues transcripts. Staff members are available to students for 
consultation. For detailed information about registration procedures, 
student records, and academic regulations, see chapter 4. 

Research: Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research 

McKeldin Library, 301-314-6786 

www .ugresearch.umd.edu 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR), an initiative from 
the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, was created as a 
resource for both faculty and students. The Center, which is located in 
McKeldin Library serves as a clearinghouse for both on- and off-campus 
research opportunities for undergraduate students. Additionally, faculty 
members can share different models of incorporating undergraduate 
students into research programs, and ways that undergraduate research 
has been infused into the curriculum. For more information, please see 
www.ugresearch.umd.edu or call 301-314-6786. 



Tutoring 

3215 J. M. Patterson, 

www .umd.edu/ AAP 



3014054745 



The Intensive Educational Development Program (lED) in the Academic 
Achievement Programs (AAP) provides tutoring services for eligible 
University of Maryland students. The schedule for tutoring, study skills, 
math support, and english support classes is available at 3215 J.M. 
Patterson Building. Academic support classes are offered for many lower- 
level CORE classes, including math and english classes, as well as for 
selected entry-level classes for numerous majors (for example Business or 
Biological Sciences). For a schedule of classes as well as eligibility status 
for AAP's services, please contact the Tutoring Coordinator at 301-405- 
4745 or cserno@wam.umd.edu. Also, please check AAP's webpage at 
www.umd.edu/aap for schedules, job opportunities as tutors, and further 
information about the program. 



STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Alumni Association 

Rossborough Inn 301-405-4678 

www .alumni.umd.edu 

The University of Maryland Alumni Association is a non-profit, membership 
organization for alumni of the University of Maryland, College Park. By 
taking traditional and innovative approaches to alumni programming, the 
alumni association fills many purposes, including the needs of students. 

In conjunction with Senior Council and the Office of Student Affairs, the 
association supports professional development programs to prepare 
students for life in the "real world." Prospective and current students may 
apply for scholarships through the Maryland Alumni Association Scholarship 
Program. New graduates receive a complimentary membership in the 
alumni association that includes its full range of benefits. The alumni 
association also offers graduates early access to the Terp Alumni Network, 
a free online alumni community featuring permanent Terp email and a 
searchable alumni directory. Upon graduation, the alumni association 
invites new graduates to join its Young Alumni Club, which provides 
activities for alumni who have graduated in the last 10 years. 

In addition to student programming, the alumni association honors alumni 
who have distinguished themselves professionally and personally through the 
University of Maryland Alumni Association Hall of Fame and Annual Awards 
Gala. It provides special programs and services, such as consumer 
discounts, that benefit all alumni. It promotes continuing education through 
its cultural seminars and international travel program. Most of all the alumni 
association seeks to build the Terrapin Spirit by supporting more than 30 
alumni clubs and academic chapters throughout tiie country and the world. 

The alumni association has 20 staff members, is governed by a board of 
alumni volunteers, and is supported by countless other alumni volunteers 
around the country. 

Book Center 

stamp Student Union, lower level, 301-314-BOOK 

www .ubc .umd.edu 

The Book Center provides a convenient (on-campus) selection of textbooks 
and general-interest books, including literature, technical books, and best 
sellers. It also offers a large selection of school and office supplies, 
computers and software to meet every educational need. The Book Center 
also carries a wide selection of imprinted clothes and related items. 

The Book Center is open Monday, Tuesday Thursday Friday - 8:30 a.m. 
to 6:00 p.m., Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additional hours for special events. 

Campus Programs 

Olio stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174 
www.union.umd.edu/campusprograms 

The mission of the Office of Campus Programs is to support and 
complement the university's academic mission and to enhance the 
educational experience of students through exposure to and participation in 
social, cultural, recreational, leadership, intellectual, and governance 
activities. 

A primary focus of the mission is the concept of student involvement. The 
Office is committed to providing opportunities for all students to be 
involved in experiences on campus and in the community that enhance 
their overall development. 

Student Organizations. The Office of Campus Programs registers all 
student organizations at the university and makes available a directory of 
more than 400 groups on their web site. Organization support services 
including workshops, accounting assistance, advisors' workshops, and 
leadership training programs for organization leaders as well as 
involvement sessions offered for classes and through orientation are just 
some of the ways involvement is nurtured for organizations and 
individuals. 

Organization Advising. Major student groups such as the Student 
Government Association, the Homecoming Committee, and SEE Events 
as well as multicultural groups such as the Asian American Student 
Union, Black Student Union, Pride Alliance, and Latino Student Union 
receive direct advising from the staff of Campus Programs. Other student 
groups can also obtain help from the staff by request. The OCP staff will 
assist groups in programming, securing a faculty advisor, officer 
transitions, and in efforts to create new organizations. 



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Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 29 



Leadership Development. Campus Programs offers a wide range of 
credit-bearing leadership courses offered in conjunction with the 
Counseling and Personnel Services Department in the College of 
Education. The office's web site details these offerings. In addition, the 
staff offers a wide range of training experiences in interpersonal and 
organizational development ranging in format from half-day seminars and 
weel<end workshops to the full semester Terrapin Leadership Institute. 

Fraternities and Sororities. Social fraternities and sororities are 
advised and supported by the staff in Campus Programs, individually and 
through the four coordinating groups: the Interfraternity Council, the 
Panhellenic Council, the Panhellenic Association, and the United Greek 
Council. The office also manages university-owned fraternity and sorority 
houses and coordinates off-campus houses. 

Commuter Students. The Office of Campus Programs provides 
outreach and advocacy for students commuting to campus. Services 
include outreach via the regular Wednesday lunchtime "Hot Spot" 
informational program. OCP staff coordinates advising for individual 
commuter students and the University's Commuter Association. 

Programs and Leisure Learning Opportunities. The Union and 
Campus Programs staff work with student volunteers and leaders to 
provide options for out of class engagement in recreational options 
including the Hoff Movie Theater, the Art and Learning Center (offering 
non-credit courses), the Union Gallery (featuring regular displays of the 
visual arts), the Union Recreation Center (bowling, billiards, and more), 
and the regular offerings of Weekends at Maryland including First Friday 
programs and Phat Friday concerts. A complete listing of leisure options 
is featured in the Diamondback in a weekly calendar for both weekday 
and weekend events. 

Career Center 

3100 Hombake Library, South Wing, 301-314-7225 

E-mail: career-center-help@umail.umd.edu 

www. Career Center.umd.edu 

8:30 a.m - 4:30 p.m. 

(refer to the Career Center website for current Resource Room and Walk-in 

Assistance hours) 

Mission 

The Career Center supports the University's mission and its academic 
programs by providing a variety of programs and services to meet the 
diverse career development and employment needs of degree-seeking 
students and alumni. The center teaches, advises and counsels students 
to make decisions about career interests, employment and further or 
continued education; it collaborates with academic departments, employers 
and alumni in the delivery of programs and services. All students should 
consider internship and/ or coop opportunities an integral part of their 
academic endeavors. Students should incorporate these opportunities into 
the pursuit of their degree. 

Resources 

Career and Employment Resource Room: The Career & Employment 
Resource Room is a central point to learn about our many services and 
resources on career planning, internships, applying to graduate/ 
professional school, and the job search. The Resource Room contains an 
extensive collection of books and videos; computer-assisted career 
exploration; job listings for part-time, internship, and full-time opportunities; 
computers with internet connection; and employer information. 

The Resource Room is open to students at the University of Maryland and 
University of Maryland alumni, as well as students at other campuses, and 
the public. 

Career Assistance: Career Center staff assist students in identifying 
careers and majors suited to their interest, values, and skills; developing 
job search skills, and preparing for graduate school or a career change. 
Walk-in Assistance (15-minute consultation) is available on a daily basis in 
the Resource Room; also available are individual appointments with 
professional staff. University alumni interested in career change and 
exploration may also use the Center's resources. 

Web Site: Students can visit the Career Center online to explore majors, 
identify potential employers and career fields, get tips on writing a resume, 
search for jobs, investigate internships, research graduate school, and 
connect to recommended career-related web sites. 



TERP (The Employment Registration Program) Online: For fast and 
comprehensive access to employment opportunities, the Career Center 
recommends that every student register for TERP Online. TERP Online 
provides students with free access to Job Listings, On-Campus Interviewing, 
and Resume Referral as well as updated information on career and job fairs. 
TERP Online students receive special email bulletins on upcoming 
employment events related to their major. 

On-Campus Interviewing: On-Campus Interviewing offers students the 
opportunity to interview on campus with a variety of employers for full-time, 
internship, or part-time positions. To participate in On-Campus Interviewing 
students must register on TERP Online. On-Campus Interviewing is also 
available to recent alumni. 

Job Listing: Current job listings— including part-time, internship, graduate 
assistantship, and full-time positions— are accessible 24 hours via TERP 
Online and in the Resource Room during Career Center hours. Additional 
jobs are posted on the bulletin boards outside the Center. Students seeking 
short term part-time jobs should consider our Ouick Bucks email service. 

Credentials Services: Every University of Maryland undergraduate and 
graduate student can establish a permanent professional file which holds 
letters of recommendation and background information to support 
applications for employment and graduate/ professional school. 

Resume Referral: This resume database allows students and alumni to 
present their qualifications to employers who are not interviewing on 
campus. By registering for TERP Online, the student joins a pool of 
candidates accessible to employers requesting applicants with specific 
skills or backgrounds to fill their current job openings. Employers review the 
resume and then contact qualified candidates to arrange office interviews or 
request additional information. 

Terp Network: This online system is available through the Career Center's 
web site, and connects students and alumni with parents of Maryland 
students or with other UM alumni who can offer advice and mentoring in a 
given career field of interest. 

Federal Work Study Students Note: Students eligible for Federal Work 
Study/ Community Service positions should contact the Office of Student 
Financial Aid at: www.umd.edu/ FIN/ or 301-314-9000 

Engineering Majors Note: Additional support for part-time, internship and 
cooperative education positions is available through the Engineering Co-op 
and Career Services office at 301-405-3863. 

Business Majors Note: Additional support for part-time, internship, 
cooperative education, and full-time positions is available through the 
Undergraduate Business Career Center office at 301405-7103. 

Academic Courses: The Career Center offers a variety of career 
development courses. Please see the current schedule of classes for 
listings. 

EDCP108 D - College and Career Advancement: Career Planning and 
Decision-Making: This course helps students identify career interests, skills, 
and values and how they relate to UM majors. Recommended for freshmen 
and sophomores. 1 credit. 

UNIV 099 - Internship Seminar: This seminar is designed to complement 
students' supervised work experiences. Topics include exploring career 
options, developing professional work skills, and examining the relationship 
between internship and academic coursework. Good academic standing, 
submission of transcript and internship description and approval of 
instructor required. 

Career Development 

Special events bring students and employer representatives together for 
information exchange and employment contact. Stay tuned on the following 
special events through the Career Center's website: 

• Career Center Programming 

• First Year Experience Fair 

• Law Schools Day 

• Graduate Schools Day 

• Multi€thnic Student Career and Job Fair 

• National Student Employment Week 

• Spring Career and Job Fair 

• Fall Career Fair 

• Maryland Metropolitan Area Teachers Interviewing Consortium 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 30 



30 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Community Service-Learning 

1120 Stamp Student Union, 301-314-2273 
www.cls.umd.edu 

The Office of Community Service-Learning promotes service-learning, as an 
integral aspect of education and fosters university engagement within the 
larger community. The OCSL website contains information and resources 
such as an interactive database of 800-H community agencies, handouts, 
and step-by-step guidance for getting involved in service. OCSL offers on- 
site personal assistance, a weel<ly listserv of service opportunities, and 
presentations across campus. OCSL educational materials also include 
resources about social issues, leadership, curriculum development, and 
strategies for facilitating reflection. 

Resources For Students 

The office supports students engaged in service through monthly 
networl<ing meetings, an annual Leaders in Service retreat, and a three- 
credit course that links the issues of leadership, service, and social 
change. The office participates in campus-wide resource fairs, coordinates 
volunteer recognition events and programs, and offers a consultation and 
presentations to any student group or organization. Each summer, OCSL 
offers a community-service Terrapin Expeditions for New and Transfer 
Students (Service TENTS). 

Resources For Faculty 

OCSL promotes service-learning within academic courses across 
disciplines and within the living and learning communities. To that end we 
offer faculty workshops, individual consultation, sample syllabi, a lending 
library, and an on-line faculty handbook for service-learning. Programs for 
faculty include the service-learning undergraduate teaching assistant 
program, annual instructional improvement grants, and an ongoing 
assessment program. 

America Reads 

In collaboration with UM's office of financial aid and the Prince George's 
County Public School system, over 100 Maryland federal work -study 
students serve as reading mentors in eleven under-sources schools in our 
county. America Reads also sponsors Partners in Print which encourages 
family literacy in America Reads schools. 

Resources For the Community 

Community agencies recruit students, faculty and staff by attending the 
annual involvement fair, participating outreach tables in the student union, 
and posting information on our interactive database and weekly listserv. 
OCSL sponsors agency orientation programs and offers individual 
consultation to assist agencies with more targeted recruiting. 

Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Building, 301-314-7651; Fax: 301-314-9206 
www.umd.edu/ cc 

Seeking help is a sign of strength! Many students encounter a variety of 
personal, social, career, and academic issues that call for assistance 
beyond advice provided by friends and family Fortunately the Counseling 
Center provides free and confidential counseling services to all University 
of Maryland students. To schedule an appointment call 301-314-7651 or 
stop by Shoemaker Building. Walk-in counseling is available to minority 
students every day from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Counseling Center Services 

Personal/ Social Counseling. You don't have to deal with your problems 
alone. In a warm and supportive environment, you can meet with a 
professional counselor to discuss any concern you may have related to your 
personal and social well-being. Among the topics many students discuss in 
counseling are self-esteem, stress, relationship issues, sex, family 
problems, and loneliness. You may see a counselor for individual 
counseling or join one of the many counselor-led support groups. Call 301- 
314-7651. 

Career Counseling. A normal part of your development in college is 
identifying who you are in relation to a future career. You can get help with 
this process in individual career counseling at the Counseling Center. Your 
exploration may include taking career interest tests and interpreting the 
results with a professional counselor or taking advantage of a 
computerized career information system. Whether you are choosing a 
major, establishing career goals, or considering job opportunities, it is 
important to understand how your personality values, and interests relate 
to your future professional life. Career counseling at the Counseling Center 
is a good place to begin. Call 301-314-7651. 



Academic Skills Counseling. Many students have academic skills that 
they would like to improve. If you're tired of struggling because of your own 
weak areas, schedule an appointment to see the Counseling Center's 
education specialists. They can help you enhance such skills as reading, 
writing, note-taking, learning science and math material, and learning 
statistics. Workshops cover a range of topics, including study skills, exam 
skills, time management, English conversation, end-of-semester survival 
skills, and completing your thesis or dissertation. Call 301-314-7693. 

Workshops and Group Counseling. You can gain strength to deal with your 
concerns by getting together with other people who share similar 
problems, interests, and goals. Each semester, the Counseling Center 
offers weekly support groups addressing a variety of topics, such as career 
exploration, dissertation support, procrastination prevention, and stress 
management. Recent group offerings have included, "Circle of Sisters," a 
support group for black women; "My Body-My Self A Woman's Group," 
which addresses problems of body image and eating; and "Living with 
Illness," a group that assists people living with chronic illness. Call 301- 
314-7651. 

Support for Students with Disabilities. The Counseling Center provides a 
range of services for students with disabilities, including help in locating 
interpreters for deaf or hard-of-hearing students; readers for visually- 
impaired students, blind students, and students with learning disabilities; 
and assistance with access to various buildings and facilities on campus. 
If you are a new or returning student, contact the Disability Support 
Services Office in the Counseling Center as soon as possible. Call 301- 
314-7682, voice and TTY. 

Returning Students Program. If you are over 25 and returning to school 
after a break in your formal education, you probably have different needs 
than the traditional college student. The Returning Students Program is 
designed to help you with the transition to academic life. Workshops, 
counseling, and publications are available at the Counseling Center to 
make your adjustment to the university successful. Call 301-314-7693. 

Testing Services. The Counseling Center administers tests for counseling 
purposes, such as career interest inventories, and also administers 
national standardized tests, such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and 
Miller Analogies. Call 301-314-7688. 

Research Services. Group and individual consultation are available if you 
need assistance with research design and statistics and writing project 
proposals, theses, and dissertations. Call 301-314-7687. 

Support for Parents of College Students. The Parent Warmline is a 
confidential telephone and email service for any parent concemed about his 
or her child's adjustment at college, including concerns impacting academic, 
social, and emotional realms, and overall mental health. Parent Warmline 
staff can be contacted at 301-314-7651 orwarmline@wam.umd.edu. 

Parent and Child/ Adolescent Counseling and Evaluation. University- 
connected families with children (ages 4 to 18) can receive a range of 
services, including individual and group therapies, school consultation, and 
parent consultation. Intellectual and emotional/ behavioral evaluation is also 
available for youth with school and learning concems. Call 301-314-7673. 

Counseling Center Hours 

Counseling appointments (all students): 

Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Students of Color and Rainbow walk-in counseling (no appointment 
needed): 

Monday-Friday 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Dining Services 

1150 South Campus Dining Hall 
Meal Plan Information, 301-314-8069 
Terrapin Express, 301-314-8068 
Student Employment, 301-314-8058 

www.dining.umd.edu 
umfood@dining.umd.edu 

The University of Maryland Department of Dining Services is one of the top 
ten self-operated and self-supported dining services programs in the 
country. The Dining Services team is delighted to have the opportunity to 
support your academic endeavors! Several meal plan alternatives are 
available to meet your dining needs. These meal plans provide 
convenience and flexibility Dining locations are located across campus - 
close to academic buildings and residence halls, and our two main dining 
rooms are even open until midnight on most weekday nights. 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 31 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 31 



Our dining options include a large selection of traditional entrees as well 
as popular food choices. Dining rooms, designed as food courts, feature a 
total of 21 culinary stations including Sprouts, and all vegan station; 
Jalapeno Grill, Tex-Mex fare featuring made-to-order burritos; Clucl<ers, 
classic comfort food such as rotisserie chicl<en, mashed potatoes and 
seasonal vegetables; Global Gourmet, unique to The Diner and serves a 
different featured entree nightly; and Don Lee's Asian Cuisine, South 
Campus' very own rice and noodle bowl concept. Many cafes and quicl< 
food locations as well as convenience shops are also available across 
campus to meet the needs of our students and campus community. For a 
complete list of our dining locations, hours and general information, please 
visit our Web site, www. dining.umd.edu or call us to apply for one of our 
meal plans, 301-314-8069. Restaurants, Cafes and Dining Rooms are 
also open to the public. 

The Meal Plan. Our declining balance meal plan allows students the 
flexibility to spend their points throughout the day and weel< within 
three-week time periods. Our students have increased flexibility to dine 
during our hours of operation with increased responsibility to use their 
points by set dates. This plan, designed by University of Maryland 
students, offers variety flexibility and convenience. Flexible hours allow 
for carryout and late night service. The meal plan is accessed using 
students' University of Maryland issued Student ID/ Meal Plan card and 
must be presented at the time of purchase. The Meal Plan Agreement 
is included in the Housing Agreement and is required if you reside in 
residential housing on campus. Several meal plan alternatives are 
available; please visit our Web site, www.dining.umd.edu. 

Terrapin Express. Terrapin Express is a pre-paid debit account, not a 
substitute for the meal plan. It is a wonderful option to supplement the 
meal plan or a great alternative for non-resident and apartment students. 
Terrapin Express accounts are available through the Contract Office 
located on the mezzanine level of South Campus Dining Hall. Terrapin 
Express accounts are available to all students, faculty and staff. Add 
money as needed and the money rolls over between semesters. Check 
online for a complete listing of participating dining and non-dining 
locations. 

We are confident that you will be impressed by the quality and exceptional 
selections available throughout the dining locations across campus. 

University Health Center (UHC) 

www.umd.edu/ health 

The University Health Center, located on Campus Drive, across from the 
Stamp Student Union, is a nationally accredited health care facility The 
UHC is open Monday through Friday 8 am to 7 pm, Saturday 11 am - 
3 pm, and closed Sunday with varied hours during semester breaks, 
holidays, and summer sessions. Students are seen by appointment for 
routine care between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays. Medical services 
are limited after 5 p.m. and on Saturdays. Urgent Care services are 
available without an appointment. Some departments schedule their own 
appointments. Telephone numbers are available below. The Center for 
Health and Wellbeing (CHWB), a satellite of the UHC, is located in 0102 
Campus Recreation Center. The CHWB is open 12:00 to 6:30 pm, Monday 
- Friday 

Every currently registered student is eligible to use the UHC. There is a 
$10 co-payment for visits with most of our providers. There is a no-show 
fee for missed appointments not canceled within 24 hours. There are 
additional fees for laboratory, radiology/ imaging, pharmacy, 
immunizations, allergy injections, casts, physical therapy (located in HHP), 
massage, acupuncture, some health education programs, counseling 
services, and medications and or supplies dispensed through the 
pharmacy and/or medical units. These charges are posted to the 
student's account at the Bursar's Office, or paid at the UHC Cashier's 
Office (charges paid for at the UHC will not appear on the student account). 

MAMSI provides a group health insurance policy to University of Maryland, 
College Park students. Students are eligible to enroll at the beginning of 
the fall and spring semesters and Summer Session I. The UHC is NOT a 
participating provider with any other health insurance company. Your 
insurance company may or may not reimburse you for services you receive 
at the UHC. At the request of the student, via a signed "authorization" 
form, a coded bill will be provided. The student may submit this bill to the 
insurance company of choice for reimbursable services. 

All students' medical records are strictly confidential and may only be 
released by the student's consent or through a court ordered subpoena. 
Enhanced procedures will be instituted this year in compliance with the 
new Federal regulatory Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. 



In addition to the services listed above, the UHC also provides: urgent care 
and primary care for illness and injury, men's and women's reproductive 
health, anonymous HIV/ AIDS testing, asthma management and education, 
sports medicine, nutrition education, mental health services, travel clinic, 
substance abuse counseling, and a Faculty/ Staff Assistance Program. 
Individual and group health education programs are available on topics 
such as sexual health and contraception, sexual assault, stress 
management, substance abuse, eating disorders, and health promotion. 

Maryland State Law requires that ALL students living in campus owned 
housing receive the Meningitis vaccine or sign a waiver stating that they have 
chosen not to receive the vaccine. The vaccine and waiver are available at 
the UHC. The waiver is also available on-line at www.umd.edu/ health. 

The UHC will remain open during construction. For more information on the 
University Health Center, visit www.umd.edu/health, or e-mail: 
Health@umail.umd.edu 

UHC Phone Numbers 



Appointments 


301-314-8184 


Pharmacy 


301-314-8186 


Information 


301-314-8180 


Sexual Assault 








Info Line 


301-314-2222 


Acupuncture 


301-314-8128 


Substance Abuse 








Program 


301-314-8128 


Center for Health 








and Wellbeing 


301-314-1493 


Stress Managemen 


301-314-8128 


Health Education 


301-314-8128 


Student Health 




Health Insurance 


301-314-8165 


Advisory Committee 


301-314-8143 


Mental Health 


301-314-8106 


Therapeutic 




Victim Advocate 


301-314-2222 


Massage 


301-314-8128 


Nutrition 


301-314-8128 


Women's Health 


301-314-8190 



Housing: Resident Life 

Annapolis Hall, main level, 301-314-2100 
E-mail: reslife@accmail.umd.edu 

www.resnet.umd.edu 

The Department of Resident Life is responsible for management of the 
residence halls as well as the cultural, educational, recreational and social 
programs and activities therein. 

While living in a Maryland residence hall is not required, nine of every ten 
students in Maryland's freshman class make the choice to live on campus. 
More than 70 professional and graduate staff and over 300 undergraduate 
student employees meet the needs of resident students. 

There are rooms for approximately 8,200 undergraduate students in 36 
residence halls. Three different styles of living are available to campus 
residents: traditional, suites and apartments. Within traditional housing, 
where most first- and second-year residents live, single, double, triple and 
quadruple room occupancy exists. Our nationally acclaimed living-learning 
programs include: Beyond the Classroom, CIVICUS, College Park Scholars, 
Hinman CEOs, Gemstone, Global Communities, Jimenez-Porter Writers' 
House, Language House, Honors Humanities and University Honors. All of 
these programs add to the diversity of on-campus housing options. All 
rooms have a cable, data and telephone jack for each student. 

First time freshmen are guaranteed on-campus housing provided they return 
their Maryland P/anner including the Enrollment Confirmation and Housing and 
Dining Services Agreement along with the $200 enrollment deposit, byMayl. 
Transfer students who want to live on campus should complete the Maryland 
Planner as well and will be allotted housing on a space available basis. 

Off-Campus Housing 

1120 Stamp Student Union, 301-314-3645 
www.och.umd.edu 

Off-Campus Housing maintains up-to-date computerized listings of various 
rental housing options (both vacant and to share). Area maps, apartment 
directories, transportation information and resources about living off 
campus are available in the office and on-line. 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 32 



32 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Judicial Programs and Student Ethical Development 

2118 Mitchell Building, 301-314-8204 

(To report instances of academic dishonesty, 301-314-8204) 

www.umd.edu/JPO 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected to 
conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the university 
responsibility of ensuring to all members of the community the opportunity 
to pursue their educational objectives, and of protecting the safety welfare, 
rights, and property of all members of the community and of the university 
itself. Students should consult the Code of Student Conduct, Appendix C, 
the Code of Academic Integrity in Chapter 10 for further information. 

Students are invited to assume positions of responsibility in the university 
discipline system so they might contribute their insights to the resolutions 
of disciplinary cases. Final authority in disciplinary matters, however, is 
vested in the campus administration and in the Board of Regents. 

Disciplinary Procedures. Students accused of violating university 
regulations are accorded fundamental due process in disciplinary 
proceedings. Formal rules of evidence, however, shall not be applicable, 
nor shall deviations from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a 
decision or proceeding unless significant prejudice to one of the parties 
may result. University hearing and conference procedures are outlined in 
the documents titled "Preparing for a Hearing," "Preparing for Honor 
Review," and "Preparing for a Conference," available from the Office of 
Judicial Programs and Student Ethical Development. 

Honor Pledge: The University of Maryland has a nationally recognized 
honor code, administered by a Student Honor Council. In 2002, the 
University adopted an honor pledge students are asl<ed to write and sign 
on major assignments, as designated by the instructor. The pledge states: 
"I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized 
assistance on this assignment/ examination." 

The University's honor pledge language was sponsored by the Student 
Honor Council, endorsed by majority vote of the Student Government 
Association, and adopted by the University Senate. 

The Honor Pledge is a community building tradition, designed to encourage 
teachers and students to reflect upon the University's core institutional 
value of academic integrity. Professors who invite students to sign the 
Honor Pledge signify that there is an ethical component to teaching and 
learning. Students who write by hand and sign the Pledge affirm a sense of 
pride in the integrity of their worl<. 

Details about the University of Maryland honor pledge are available at: 
www.inform.umd.edu/ honorpledge/ 

Nyumburu Cultural Center 

www.umd.edu/ nyumburu 
301-314 -7758 
301-314-8303 Fax 
Campus Drive 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center has served as a major resource of cultural, 
historical, and social programming at the University of Maryland, College 
Park for more than thirty years. The Center works closely with student, 
faculty, and community organizations. The Nyumburu Cultural Center offers 
a variety of socio-cultural, musical, educational and artistic programs to 
the campus community. The nature of the diverse programming and 
activities is based on the African American, African and Caribbean 
Diaspora experience(s). Nyumburu is home of the Maryland Gospel Choir, 
Shades of Harlem (performing arts ensemble). The Black Explosion 
Newspaper, Male Spokesmodel Competition, Miss Unity Scholarship 
Pageant, Juke Joint, Gospel Happy Hour, Leadership Series, Nyumburu 
Jazz Club, Kwanzaa Celebration, Cultural Dinner during Black History 
Month, Literature Conference, Homecoming Alumni Tailgate, Annual Talent 
Showcase, and Annual Student Awards Banquet. 

Nyumburu's staff are advisors to many campus student organizations: 
Black Student Union, African Student Association, The Maryland Gospel 
Choir, The Black Explosion Newspaper, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. 
Delta Sigma Theta Inc., Alpha Nu Omega Sorority Inc., and Sisters in the 
Struggle. 

Nyumburu presents blues, jazz and gospel music concerts as well as 
academic courses in Creative Writing (ENGL 294), Blues (AASP 298V) and 
Jazz (AASP 298U) for three credits each. Maryland Gospel Choir students 
earn 1 -credit. 



The Multi-purpose Room, Conference Rooms, Computer Labs, and 
Amphitheatre of the Nyumburu Cultural Center are open to the students, 
faculty and staff of the University of Maryland. Come in and interact with 
us, meet other students and make your ideas and wishes known. Our 
staff's goal is to make Nyumburu a cultural center that is "Your Home 
Away From Home." 

Recreation Services 

Campus Recreation Services 

1115 Campus Recreation Center, 301-405-PLAY (Information); 

301-314-5454 (Rec-Check) 

www.crs.umd.edu 

Campus Recreation Services (CRS) offers a wide variety of recreation 
programs including aquatics, fitness programs, informal recreation, 
intramural sports, non-credit instruction, outdoor recreation, and sport clubs. 

CRS has some of the most advanced recreation, sports, and fitness 
facilities in the nation. The CRS facilities include the Campus Recreation 
Center (CRC), Ritchie Coliseum, Reckord Armory, and the weight and 
fitness areas in the Health and Human Performance (HHP) building. 

The Campus Recreation Center has two indoor and two outdoor pools for 
lap swimming and diving. The CRS aquatic program also offers swimming 
lessons, scuba diving, and lifeguard training. 

CRS offers a wide variety of fitness programs throughout the week at CRC and 
Ritchie Coliseum. These include low-impact, step, and water aerobics, cardio- 
boxing, and sport conditioning. CRS Informal Recreation programs allow 
students to enjoy their favorite activity at their leisure, whether it 
is using cardiovascular equipment, lifting weights, jogging, or playing 
racquetball, volleyball, basketball or wallyball. CRS has weight rooms 
and fitness centers located in the CRC, Ritchie Coliseum, and HHP. The fitness 
centers feature stairclimbers, bikes, rowers, total body conditioners, and 
treadmills. Weight rooms have a variety of free-weights and weight machines. 
The CRC also has racquetball/ handball/ wallyball and squash courts. 

Students looking to play team or individual sports or take part in special 
sporting events will want to participate in the CRS Intramural Sports 
program. Students can participate year-round in team sports such as 
basketball, football, Softball, and soccer. Individual and dual sports include 
golf, racquetball, and many more. Intramural sports are structured 
activities that are open to all men and women from the campus 
community Participants can select their own level of competition and play 
in either men's, women's, grad/fac/ staff or coed leagues. 

The Outdoor Recreation Center (ORC) is located in the northwest corner of 
the Campus Recreation Center. The ORC offers outdoor adventures and 
clinics throughout the year. Take a backpacking trip, learn how to rock 
climb, or try white-water kayaking. The Terrapin Climbing Center and Ropes 
Course are two features of the ORC where students may challenge 
themselves both physically and mentally increasing interpersonal skills 
and self-confidence. The ORC also has a resource library for planning your 
own trips, a bike repair shop, and equipment rentals. 

University of Maryland Sport Clubs are student organizations that have 
been formed by students with a desire to participate in their favorite sport 
or learn a new sport. CRS has more than 30 clubs to choose from. Some 
current CRS Sport Clubs include: Aikido, Equestrian, Fencing, Field Hockey, 
Lacrosse, Racquetball, Rugby, Sailing, Soccer, andTae Kwon Do. 

Religious Programs 

1101 Memorial Chapel 

Chapel Reservations, 301-314-9866 

www.umd.edu/ cvs/ chapel/ 

The following chaplains and their services are available: 



Baptist 

Mr. Jeffrey Buffkin 



Black Ministries 
Rev. Dr. Ruby Moone 



Christian Science 
Rev. Bob Snyder 



2120 Memorial Chapel 

301405-8443 

jbuffkin@accmail.umd.edu 

1112 Memorial Chapel 

301405-8445 

rmoonejr@aol.com 

2118 Memorial Chapel 

301474-0403 

rsnyder@wam.umd.edu 



C Chapter 3 Admin. pp21-33 7/28/04 10:42 AM Page 33 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 33 



Church of J esus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints 
Mr. David Fremont 

Eastern Orthodox 
Rev. Kosmas Karavellas 
Ms. Patjenl<ins, Assistant 



Episcopal/ Anglican 
Rev. Dr. Peter Antoci 



Hindu 

Rev. Kiran Sankhia 



Jewish - Hillel 

Rabbi Meni Even-Israel 

Ari Israel, Director 



Jewish - Chabad 
Rabbi Eli Backman 



Lutheran 

Rev. Elizabeth Platz 

Ms. Gail Douglas, Assistant 



Muslim 

Rev. All Dan/vish 

Ms. Angela Busby, Assistant 

Roman Catholic 

Rev. William Byrne 

Ms. Angela Busby, Assistant 



United Campus Ministry 
Rev. Holly Ulmer 



United Methodist 
Rev. Kim Capps 



7601 Mowatt Lane, College Park 
301422-7570 
clgprkmd@mstar2. netces@ces.org 

Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek 
Orthodox Church, Riva Rd 
Annapolis, MD 21401 
301-261-8218 
office@schgochurch.org 
jenkins58@hotmail.com 

2116 Memorial Chapel 

301405-8453 

prmantoci@yahoo.com 

2112 Memorial Chapel 

301-570-6426 

klsankhla@hotmail.com 

Hillel J ewish Student Center 
7612 Mowatt Lane, College Park 
301422-6200 
rabbi@hillelmd.org 
aisrael@hillelmd.org 

Chabad J ewish Student Center 
7403 Hopkins Ave., College Park 
301-277-2994 
chabad@wam.umd.edu 

2103 Memorial Chapel 
301405-8448 
lutheran@wam.umd.edu 
www.wamumd.edu/ lutheran 

2118 Memorial Chapel 

301-314-5259 

ali@amcomusa.com 

Catholic Student Center 

4141 Guilford Rd., College Park 

301-864-6223 

frbill@catholicterps.org 

angela@catholicterps.org 

2101 Memorial Chapel 
301405-8450 
ulmer@wam.umd.edu 

2102 Memorial Chapel 
301405-8451 
kim@chapel-52.umd.edu 
chapel-52.umd.edu/wf 



Stamp Student Union and Campus Programs 

Olio stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174 

www.union.umd.edu/ 

The Adele H. Stamp Student Union is the university's "community center." 
More than 17,000 students, faculty staff members, and campus guests 
visit the Union daily to take advantage of its services, programs, and 
facilities. The Union offers lounge space, a variety of information services, 
recreation and leisure activities, student-sponsored programs, visual arts, 
retail outlets, and more than 40,000 square feet of reservable space. 

Information Services 

• Information Center located on the first floor, 301-314-DESK 

• Bulletin boards located throughout the building 

• Display showcases located throughout the building 

Recreation and Leisure 

• Hoff Movie Theatre, 301-314-HOFF 

• Recreation Center, including full-service bowling lanes, (scheduled for 
Fall 2004) "Lunar Bowling," billiard tables, and video games, 301- 
314-BOWL 

Student-Sponsored Programs 

• Student Entertainment Events (SEE), a student-directed program 
board whose committees plan games, tournaments, concerts, 
lectures, outdoor recreation trips, 301-314-8359 



• Student Tutorial Academic Referral Center (STAR Center), offering 
tutor listings and test files, 301-314-8359 

• Student Organization has offices for student groups, including the 
Graduate Student Government and Student Government Associations. 

Visual Arts, 301-314-ARTS 

• Art and Learning Center, a visual arts work and teaching center, 
offering mini-courses and arts services 

• Union Art Gallery, located on the first floor 

Food and Retail Outlets 

• Chevy Chase Bank, 301-864-8722 

• University Book Center (basement level), 301-314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Maryland Food Co-op 301-314-8089, Boar's Head 
Deli, Pizza Shop, Taco Bell, McDonald's (301-314-1489), Adele's 
Restaurant (301-314-8022), Coffee Bar, Panda Express 301-314- 
6111, Sbarros, Steak Escape, Freshens, Chick-FilA 

• Mailboxes Etc., a full-service postal and packaging facility, 301- 
314-9982 

• Ticket Office, offering campus performance tickets, and a full Ticket 
Master Outlet, 301-314-TKTS 

• Union Shop 301-314-7467, featuring snacks, sodas, newspapers, 
and magazines 

Reservable Space 

The Union offers meeting rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 
1,000 people. For reservations, or catering information, contact the Union 
Reservation Office, 301-314-8488. 

Stamp Student Union Hours 

The Union is open Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to midnight; 
Friday 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Saturday 8 a.m. to 1 a.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. 
to midnight. 

Transportation Services 

Regents Drive Garage, 301-314-PARK 

www.transportation.umd.edu 

Parking 

The Department of Transportation Services (DOTS) is responsible for 
managing and maintaining more than 16,000 parl<ing spaces on the 
University of Maryland campus. All students who plan to park a licensed 
motor vehicle in one of these spaces must either register for parking 
permit at the DOTS office, park at paid meters or in a cashier-attended lot. 
Please note: Due to construction projects on campus the number of 
parking spaces could be dramatically reduced. Freshman and sophomore 
campus residents students should not plan to bring a vehicle to campus. A 
limited number of parking spaces will be available for sophomore resident 
students who provide a demonstrated and documented need to park a 
vehicle on campus. 

Because the University of Maryland has limited parking spaces, parking 
regulations are strictly enforced. Illegally parked vehicles, as well as those 
vehicles not displaying a campus parking permit in areas requiring permits 
will be ticketed, and students with outstanding parking fines maybe barred 
from registration. 

Visit the DOTS Website for complete procedures and parking regulations, 
disabled parking information, visitor parking areas, alternative 
transportation information, parl<ing registration rates, motor vehicle 
assistance program information, schedule of fines, and other information 
is available by visiting the DOTS website. 

Shuttle-UM 301-314-2255 

Shuttle-UM is the University of Maryland, College Park's student-managed 
transit system supported primarily by student fees. Shuttle-UM provides 
Commuter, Evening Security, NITE Ride Paratransit, and Charter Service to 
university students, faculty, and staff while classes are in 
session. Schedules are available at the Stamp Student Union Information 
Des, the Department of Transportation Services, Shuttle-UM in lot 4e, and 
on the DOTS website at www.transportation.umd.edu. 

Carpooling 

Commuter students who are able to form a carpool with up to 3 other 
students can register for the Smart Park carpool program, which rewards 
carpoolers by usually offering access to move convenient parking lots as 
well as crediting back a portion of their permit fees.To register, and to 
access the Smart Park database, visit the Dept. Transportation Services 
website at www.transportation.umd.edu. 



34 



Chapter 4 



Registration, Academic 
Requirements, and Regulations 



The University of Maryiand Statement of Expectation of Progress Toward a Degree 

Full-time students are expected to complete the Undergraduate programs at the University of Maryland In four years. In order to graduate in four years, 
students must plan carefully in consultation with an academic advisor, declare a major early, and complete 30 credits each year, w/hich is usually 
accomplished by completing a normal course load of 14 to 16 credits each semester and by completing general education and major requirements in a 
timely manner. Students who change majors, who declare a major late in the sophomore year, who enroll in a limited number of select programs, or who 
take advantage of certain special opportunities that enrich the undergraduate experience may require up to five years to complete a degree. All students 
should develop and regularly review a multi-year course plan for completing their intended programs. If a student has special circumstances that make it 
impossible to complete a normal course load, the student should meet with an advisor to discuss the circumstances, the student's plans for continued 
progress toward a degree, and the implications for full-time enrollment. 



REGISTRATION 



First Floor Mitchell Building, 301-314-8240 
www.testudo.umd.edu 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, it is 
necessary to process an official registration. Specific registration dates and 
instructions are printed in the Schedule of Classes and on the Testudo web 
site. The Schedule of Classes is issued for the spring, fall and summer 
sessions. Winterterm information is printed in the Fall Schedule of Classes, 
and on the Testudo web site. 

Newiy admitted students are invited, and strongly encouraged to attend an 
orientation session (see chapter 3 for Orientation information). Advising 
and course registration are part of the orientation process. All newly 
admitted students must meet with an advisor prior to registration. 
Additionally, newly admitted freshmen and transfer students are required to 
provide proof of immunization for measles, rubella, mumps and 
tetanus/diphtheria. Additionally, Maryland law requires resident hall 
students to either provide proof of vaccination against meningococcal 
disease or seek an exemption from this requirement. 

Registration Process: Currently enrolled students are invited to early 
registration by appointment. Registration appointments for the fall semester 
begin in April, and appointments for the spring semester begin in late 
October. Registration can be processed on the Testudo web site or in person. 
Open registration follows early registration, and continues up to the first day 
of classes. During this time students may make schedule adjustments or 
process an original registration. The schedule adjustment period begins on 
the first day of classes. All registration transactions, either on-line or in 
person, are final unless a student processes a cancellation of registration. 

Canceiiation of Registration: Students who register and later decide not to 
attend the University must cancel their registration with the Office of the 
Registrar prior to the official first day of classes. Failure to cancel registration 
will result in a financial obligation to the University of Maryland even though a 
student does not attend class. The University reserves the right to cancel 
registration for students who fail to meet their financial obligations. 

Sciieduie Adjustment: The schedule adjustment period is the first 10 days 
of classes for the fall and spring semesters, the first 5 days of classes for 
Summer Sessions I and II, and the first 3 days of classes for Winterterm 
and 3-week accelerated Summer courses. Courses may be added, when 
space is available, during the schedule adjustment period, and will appear 
on the student's permanent record along with other courses previously 
listed. Courses dropped during this period will not appear on the student's 
permanent record. 

Departments may identify courses or sections of courses {with the approval 
of the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs), which after 
the first five days of the schedule adjustment period in Spring and 
Fall semesters, shall require faculty or departmental approval for students 
to add. 



During the schedule adjustment period fuli-time undergraduates may 
drop or add courses, or change sections or credit level without 
financial penalty provided they remain full-time students (registered 
for 12 or more credits). Consult the Schedule of Classes for 
information and penalties associated with changing from full-time to 
part-time. 

Part-time undergraduates (fewer than 12 credits) may also add, 
drop and change sections, as well as change credit level, but they 
should consult the deadline section in the Schedule of Classes to 
avoid incurring additional charges. 



Grading Method (including pass-fail) 
schedule adjustment period. 



may be changed only during the 



• In the case of students who are advised in the Division of Letters 
and Sciences when Dean's approval is required, the Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies shall assume the responsibilities normally 
delegated to the Dean. 

After Schedule Adjustment 

• Courses may not be added without special permission of the 
department and the dean of the academic unit in which the student 
is enrolled. 

• All courses for which the student is enrolled shall remain as a part of 
the student's permanent record. The student's status shall be 
considered full-time if the number of credit hours enrolled at this 
time is 12 or more. 

• An official class list for each course being offered is issued to the 
appropriate department by the Office of the Registrar. Electronic 
rosters are provided to all faculty with email accounts. Students are 
not permitted to attend a class if their names do not appear on 
the class list. Instructors must report discrepancies to the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Drop Period 

The drop period for undergraduate students will begin at the close of the 
schedule adjustment period and terminate at the end of the tenth week of 
classes for the fall and spring semesters, and at a comparable time for 
summer sessions and Winterterm. Consult the Schedule of Classes for dates. 



Classification of Students 

Official classifications of undergraduate students are based on earned 
credits as follows: freshman, 1-29 semester hours; sophomore, 30-59; 
junior, 60-89; and senior, 90 to at least 120. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 35 



During this period a student may drop a maximum of four credits. However, 
if the course carries more than four credits, the student may drop the entire 
course, or in the case of a variable credit course, reduce the credit level by 
up to four credits. Drops during this period will be recorded on the student's 
permanent record with a notation of "W" and will be considered to represent 
a single enrollment (one of two possible) in the course. This mark will not be 
used in the computation of a student's cumulative grade point average. 

Withdrawal and Leave of Absence from the University 

students admitted to the University of Maryland are expected to make 
regular and consistent progress towards the completion of their degree. 
However, the University understands that in exceptional circumstances 
a student may find it necessary to completely withdraw from all classes. 
The University considers such an interruption to be very serious as it delays 
normal progress towards the degree. Students should not withdraw 
for frivolous reasons or to avoid the consequences of ignoring their 
academic responsibilities. Any student considering withdrawal is strongly 
encouraged to meet with his or her academic college advisor before leaving 
the University. 

Potential Implications: Withdrawing or taking a leave of absence from the 
University may have serious implications for international students, 
students receiving financial aid or students residing in on-campus housing. 
Students are advised to contact the appropriate offices before finalizing 
withdrawal or leave of absence plans. 

Student Financial Services Office: 1135 Lee Building, 301-314-9000 
Department of Resident Life: 2100 Annapolis Hall, 301-314-2100 

International Education Services: 3117 Mitchell Building, 301-314-7740 

WItiidrawai: A withdrawal is available anytime between the first and last 
day of classes. Students must submit written notice of withdrawal to the 
Office of the Registrar no later than the last day of classes. A student's 
return to the University is contingent upon the conditions outlined in 
"Return to the University" below. 

Leave of Absence: A leave of absence is a type of withdrawal and is 
available for students wishing to take time away from the University with 
the intention of returning the following semester. The leave of absence 
status is especially helpful for recipients of federal financial aid because 
they are not considered to be withdrawn provided they do return and 
complete the following semester. Students may apply for a leave of 
absence only during the last 60 days of the semester. A student's return to 
the University is contingent upon the conditions outlined in "Return to the 
University" below. 

Return to the University: Normally, a student may withdraw or take a leave 
of absence from the University only once during matriculation as an 
undergraduate. Students who find it necessary to leave the University are 
required to petition the Faculty Review Board in order to return. Students 
who have earned a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA, with no previous 
withdrawal or leave of absence, are exempt from this requirement. 
Students who withdraw or take a leave of absence while on academic 
probation, or those returning from dismissal, are always required to petition 
the Faculty Review Board. Students are also required to complete a 
Reinstatement Advising Meeting with their academic college advising office 
before the petition will be considered by the Faculty Review Board. 

Additional Witlidrawal/Leave of Absence Information: 

• The effective date of withdrawal or leave of absence for the 
purposes of refunds is the date that the notice is received by the 
Office of the Registrar. Notation of withdrawal/leave of absence and 
the effective date will be posted to the student's academic record. 
Instructors and college offices will be notified of all withdrawn 
students. The deadline date for submitting the withdrawal for each 
semester is the last day of classes. Students should contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions for reenrollment information. 

• The repeat policy will not apply to courses taken during the academic 
semester from which the student is officially withdrawn. 

IVIilitary Call-ups: It is the intent of the University of Maryland, College Park, 
to facilitate the withdrawal or change in registration and the reenrollment of 
students who are called to active military duty during the semester. The 
student (or a representative) should take a copy of the military orders to 
the Office of the Registrar and process "withdrawal" or "change in 
registration" papers. Detailed information about this process may be 
obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Withdrawal for active military 
service will have no effect on any subsequent request to withdraw from 
the University. 



General Education Requirements 

See chapter 5. 

Enrollment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at the University of Maryland, College 
Park, may transfer among curricula, colleges, or other academic units 
except where limitations on enrollments have been approved. By the time 
they complete 56 credits, students are expected to declare a degree- 
granting major. Students must be enrolled in the major program from which 
they plan to graduate, when registering for the final 15 hours of the 
baccalaureate program. This requirement also applies to the third year of 
the combined, pre-professional degree programs. See pg. 43 for 
information on double majors and double degrees. 

Credit Hours and Maximum Credits Each Semester 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer than 120 semester hours. The 
semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject 
pursued one period a week for one semester. Two or three hours of 
laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. 

In order for undergraduate students to complete most curricula in four 
academic years, their semester load must range from 12 to 19 hours (30 
to 36 hours each year) toward the degree. By policy, undergraduates may 
not exceed the following maximum credit loads without the prior approval of 
their Dean: 20 credits in a 15 week semester; 8 credits in a 6 week 
summer term, or 4 credits in an accelerated 3 week term. 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate Registration 

An undergraduate degree seeking student at the University of Maryland 
may, with the approval of his or her Dean, of the department and the 
instructor offering the course, and of the Graduate School, register for 
graduate courses (600 level and above) that will be recorded as "for 
graduate credit only" and that may be applied towards an advanced degree 
at this university or elsewhere. Students eligible for this option normally will 
have achieved Junior standing, will have a GPA of at least 3.0, and will 
have successfully completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of °B" 
or better. The student must submit a plan of study that shows that taking 
graduate courses will not unduly delay completion of requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate credits 
attempted in any semester may not be more than eighteen. The graduate 
credits so earned will not count towards any of the requirements for the 
Baccalaureate degree. A maximum of twelve credits may be taken for 
graduate credit by a student while enrolled as an undergraduate. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty of the 
department or program offering the course, undergraduate degree-seeking 
students may register for graduate-level courses, i.e., those numbered from 
600 to 898, with the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit. The 
student must obtain the prior approval of the department and instructor 
offering the course. 

Students eligible for this option normally will have achieved Junior standing, 
will have a GPA of at least 3.0, and will have successfully completed the 
prerequisite courses with a grade of "B" or better. 

Enrollment in a graduate-level course does not in any way imply subsequent 
departmental or graduate school approval for admission into a graduate 
program, nor may the course be used as credit for a graduate degree at the 
University of Maryland. 

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs 

In a combined bachelor's/master's program, some graduate level courses 
initially taken for undergraduate credit may also be applied towards the 
graduate credit requirements for a master's degree program at the 
University of Maryland. A bachelor's/master's program may be developed 
for an individual student, or it may be a structured program. 

A. Individual Student Bachelor's/Master's Program: A program may be 
developed by an individual student in consultation with his/her 
academic advisor. Such a program is available only to students whose 
academic performance is exceptional, it is to be developed according 
to the individual career interests and goals of the student and should 
be an integrated learning experience rather than merely the completion 
of a certain number of graduate and undergraduate credits. The 



36 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



program requires the approval of the directors of both the 
undergraduate and the graduate programs involved and of the Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies and the Dean of the Graduate School. Normally 
no more than nine credits of graduate courses applied to the 
bachelor's degree may be counted also for graduate credit in an 
individual student program. Courses to be double-counted must be at 
the 600 level or above and must be passed with at least a "B" grade. 
Individual study courses, internships, or courses given credit by 
examination are not eligible. The credits to be double-counted will be 
designated as applicable to the graduate program after the student 
receives the bachelor's degree and matriculates in the Graduate 
School. This designation will be canceled if the student withdraws from 
the graduate program before completing the master's degree. 

B. Structured Bachelor's/Master's Program: A structured bachelor's/ 
master's program is an articulated curriculum combining an existing 
undergraduate program and an existing master's program at the 
University of IVlaryland, offered by the same or by different departments. 
Such a program is to be designed for students whose academic 
performance is exceptional and should be an integrated learning 
experience rather than merely the completion of a certain number of 
graduate and undergraduate credits. A proposal for such a program 
should be submitted by the college(s) housing the academic programs 
concerned and requires the approval of the Graduate Council, the 
Graduate Dean, the Senate PCC Committee, and the Provost. 

Necessary features of a structured bachelor's/master's program 
include the following: 

a. There must be specific requirements for admission to the combined 
program that speak to the exceptional performance of the students 
to be admitted. At a minimum, students accepted for the program 
must be clearly admissible to the graduate program portion. 

b. The program should be designed so as not to unduly delay the 
students' receipt of their bachelor's degrees. Taking graduate 
credits should not unduly limit the breadth of the student's 
experience through premature specialization. 

c. All requirements of the bachelor's program and of the master's 
program must be completed to receive the two degrees. Where 
appropriate, graduate courses taken while an undergraduate 
may substitute for courses required in the undergraduate major 
program. 

d. The students may be offered deferred admission to the graduate 
school at the end of the Junior year program, subject to 
completion of the senior year program in a timely fashion and with 
a specified level of achievement. Formal admission to the 
graduate school will require completion of all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. 

e. The credits to be double-counted will be designated as applicable 
to the graduate program after the student receives the bachelor's 
degree and matriculates in the Graduate School. This designation 
will be canceled if the student withdraws from the graduate 
program before completing the master's degree. 

A structured bachelor's/master's program may normally include up to 
nine credits of graduate level courses (600 level and above) that are 
counted both for the bachelor's program and the master's program. 
More than nine double-counted credits may be allowed if both of the 
following conditions are satisfied. 

a. The additional graduate credits applied to the undergraduate 
program do not unduly limit the breadth of the student's 
experience through premature specialization. This condition may 
be satisfied, for example, if the graduate credits substitute for 
courses required in the undergraduate program that would have 
been taken in any case, but at a less advanced level. 

b. The master's program requires substantially more than thirty 
credits. This condition will be deemed to be satisfied if the 
combined program, with double-counting, still requires 150 or 
more credit hours to complete. 

Courses Taken at Other Institutions or Tlirougli the 
Inter-institutional Registration Program 

Courses taken at another institution may not be credited toward a degree 
without approval in advance by the dean of the college from which the 
student expects a degree. The same rule applies to off-campus registration 
in the summer program of another institution and the USM Concurrent 



Inter-Institutional Registration Program. Courses taken through The 
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area are treated 
as resident credit. (See section on the Consortium, below.) Permission to 
enroll in off-campus courses must be requested for any course which will 
eventually be added to the University of Maryland transcript. 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington 
IVIetropolitan Area 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 
consists of American University, The Catholic University of America, 
Gallaudet College, George Mason University, Georgetown University, George 
Washington University, Howard University, Marymount University, 
Southeastern University, Trinity College, University of the District of 
Columbia, and the University of Maryland, College Park. Students enrolled 
in these institutions are able to attend certain classes at the other 
campuses and have the credit considered as resident credit at their own 
institutions. The intention is to allow students to take an occasional course 
to augment a program rather than to develop an individual program. 
Payment of tuition for courses will be made at the student's home campus. 

Currently registered, degree-seeking University of Maryland, College Park 
undergraduates may participate in the consortium program according to the 
stipulations listed in the current edition of the Schedule of Classes. Golden 
ID students are not eligible to enroll in courses through the consortium with 
waiver of fees. Students interested in additional information about the 
consortium program should contact the consortium coordinator in the Office 
of the Registrar, first floor, Mitchell Building. 

Enrollment in courses is on a space-available basis. Visiting students are 
expected to meet prerequisites or other criteria set by the host institution 
and comply with the host institution's registration procedures and deadlines. 

USIVI Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration Program 

College Park undergraduates participating in the USM Concurrent Inter- 
Institutional Registration Program should have sophomore standing, be in 
good academic standing, have approval from their dean for the course(s) to 
count as resident credit, and be enrolled full time in a degree program at 
the university for the semester in which the course(s) are taken. Full-time 
status is defined as a combination of credits registered at the University of 
Maryland, College Park and the registered credits at the host institution. 

Veterans Benefits 

students attending the university under the Veterans Education Assistance 
Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) may receive assistance and enrollment 
certification at the Veterans Certification Office, in the Office of the 
Registrar, first floor, Mitchell Building. Consult the Schedule of Classes for 
further information. 

Identification Card 

The photo ID card is issued at the time the student first registers for 
classes. This card is to be used for the entire duration of enrollment. 
Additionally, students who have food service contracts will use this photo 
identification card. Contact Dining Services (information in chapter 3) 
directly for further information. 

The photo identification card can be used by students to withdraw books 
from the libraries, for admission to most athletic, social, and cultural 
events, and as a general form of identification on campus. 

There is a replacement charge of $20 for lost photo identification cards. 
Questions concerning the identification card system should be addressed 
to the Office of the Registar. 

Change of Address 

students are expected to notify the Office of the Registrar of any change in 
their local, permanent or e-mail address. Use the internet to keep address 
information current and accurate. Change of address forms are available at 
the following places: 

Testudo web site: www.testudo.umd.edu, select Records and Registration 

Office of the Bursar, Room 1115 or 1135, Lee Building 

Student Services Counter, first floor, Mitchell Building 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 37 



ATTENDANCE AND ASSESSMENT/ 
EXAMINATIONS 

Attendance 

1. The university expects each student to take full responsibility for his 
or her academic work and academic progress. The student, to 
progress satisfactorily, must meet all of the requirements of each 
course for which he or she is registered. Students are expected to 
attend classes regularly, for consistent attendance offers the most 
effective opportunity open to all students to gain command of the 
concepts and materials of their courses of study. Except as provided 
below, absences will not be used in the computation of grades, and 
the recording of student absences will not be required of the faculty. 

2. It is the policy of the university to excuse the absences of students 
that result from the following causes: illness of the student, or 
illness of a dependent as defined by Board of Regents policy on 
family and medical leave; religious observance (where the nature of 
the observance prevents the student from being present during the 
class period); participation in university activities at the request of 
university authorities; and compelling circumstance beyond the 
student's control. Students claiming excused absence must apply 
in writing and furnish documentary support for their assertion that 
absence resulted from one of these causes. 

3. In some courses, attendance and in-class participation are ongoing 
requirements and an integral part of the work of the course. In other 
courses, occasional in-class assessments may occur, sometimes 
without advance notice. It is the responsibility of the instructor to 
inform each class at the beginning of the semester of the nature of 
in-class participation expected and the effect of absences on the 
evaluation of the student's work in the course. 

4. Absences in courses where in-class participation is a significant 
part of the work of the course shall be handled by the instructor in 
the course in accordance with the general policy of his or her 
academic unit. 

5. Permanent changes in the scheduling or location of classes must 
be approved by the chair, the director or the dean of the 
department, non-departmentalized school or college, as appropriate. 

Assessment 

1. The university provides students with excused absences the 
opportunity to reschedule significant assessments, except in 
cases where the nature of the assessment precluded the 
possibility of rescheduling, OR to perform a substitute assignment 
without penalty. An instructor is not under obligation to offer a 
substitute assignment or to give a student a make-up assessment 
unless the failure to perform was due to an excused absence, that 
is, due to illness (of the student or a dependent), religious 
observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the 
student from being present during the class period), participation 
in university activities at the request of university authorities, or 
compelling circumstances beyond the student's control. Students 
claiming excused absence must apply in writing and furnish 
documentary support for their assertion that absence resulted 
from one of these causes. 

The make-up assessment or substitute assignment must be at a 
time and place mutually agreeable to the instructor and student, 
cover only the material for which the student was originally 
responsible, and be at a comparable level of difficulty with the 
original assessment. In the event that a group of students 
requires the same make-up assessment or substitute assignment, 
one time and place may be scheduled. The make-up assessment 
or substitute assignment must not interfere with the student's 
regularly scheduled classes or in-class final examination. 

Students who have a concern regarding religious observances 
should see their instructors at the start of the semester. Although 
the university attempts to accommodate the religious beliefs of 
all of its members, it functions within a secular environment 
and is limited in the extent to which it can interrupt its 
normal operations. The president shall determine when it is 
appropriate for the campus community to restrict rescheduling 
examinations or other significant assessments on the dates of 
religious observance. 



At this time, examinations or other significant assessments may 
not be scheduled on Rosh Hoshanah, Yom Kippur, Good Friday, or 
the first two days of Passover. 

In cases of dispute, the student may appeal to the chair, the 
director or the dean of the department, non-departmentalized 
school or college offering the course within one week from the 
date of the refusal to schedule a make-up assessment. In those 
instances where the instructor is the chair, director or dean, the 
appeal shall be made to the next higher administrative officer, 
whose decision shall be final. 

2. The student must notify his or her instructor of the reason for 
absence as soon as possible. Where the reason for absence from 
a scheduled assessment is known well in advance (for example, in 
cases of religious observance or participation in university 
activities at the request of university authorities), the student 
must inform the instructor by the end of the schedule adjustment 
period. Prior notification is especially important in connection with 
final examinations, since failure to reschedule a final examination 
before conclusion of the final examination period may result in 
loss of credits during the semester. Where the reason is not 
known well in advance (for example, in cases of illness or 
compelling circumstances beyond the student's control), the 
student must inform the instructor as soon as the reason 
develops, or as soon as possible after its development. 

3. Ordinarily, assessments are given during class hours in 
accordance with the regularly scheduled (or officially "arranged") 
time and place of each course listed in the Schedule of Classes. 
No less than seven calendar days' notice shall be given for 
assessments scheduled at other times and places. It shall be the 
instructor's responsibility to ensure that the change in schedule 
does not interfere with any student's regularly scheduled classes 
or in-class final examinations. It is the responsibility of the student 
to be informed concerning the dates of announced quizzes, tests, 
and examinations. Performance assessments may take a variety 
of forms and need not be classroom-based written examinations. 

4. A final examination shall be given in every undergraduate course. 
Exceptions may be made with the written approval of the chair, the 
director or the dean of the department, non-departmentalized 
school or college, as appropriate. However, a student's final 
course grade shall be based on a combination of assessments 
that is at least the equivalent of a comprehensive final 
examination. No final examination or equivalent may be given or 
due during the last week of classes. All in-class final examinations 
must be held on the date and at the time listed in the official final 
examination schedule. Out-of-class final examination or equivalent 
assessments shall be due on the date and at a time listed in the 
official final examination schedule. 

5. The chair, the director or the dean of the department, non- 
departmentalized school or college, as appropriate, is responsible 
for the adequate administration of assessments in courses under 
his or her jurisdiction. 

6. No in-class assessment shall exceed the allotted time for a 
regularly scheduled class period. In the case of in-class final 
examinations, the time allotted shall not exceed the scheduled 
final examination period. 

7. Each student shall be given the instructions and performance 
requirements for all assessments intended to require more than 
one-half class period in a form translatable to hard copy, unless 
the chair, the director or the dean of the department, non- 
departmentalized school or college, as appropriate, has authorized 
another procedure. The instructions and requirements of the 
assessment shall be archived in an appropriate medium in a 
suitable place. 

8. The following rules shall govern all in-class examinations, unless 
the instructor for a specific course stipulates alternate rules for 
that course. A breach of any of the rules shall constitute 
"disruption of class," a disciplinary offense (Code of Student 
Conduct, section 9.m.), or may serve as the basis of an allegation 
of academic dishonesty. 

a. Students arriving late for an examination may not 
unreasonably disrupt the examination room. 

b. Students must leave all unauthorized materials (e.g., books, 
notes, calculators) with the proctor before being seated. 



38 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



c. Where seating arrangements are established by proctors, 
student must conform to these arrangements. 

d. Students may not return to an examination room after leaving, 
unless permission to do so has been granted by the proctor 
prior to the student's departure. 

e. Students must cease conversation prior to the passing out of 
examination papers and maintain silence during the entire 
examination period. 

f. Students must place examination papers face down on 
the writing desk until the examination is officially begun by 
the proctor. 

g. Students must keep examination papers flat on the writing 
desk at all times. 

h. Students at an examination must be prepared to show current 
University identification. 

9. Each faculty member is to retain, for one full semester after a 
course is ended, the students' final assessments in the appropriate 
medium. If a faculty member goes on leave for a semester or 
longer, or leaves the university, the final assessments and grade 
records for the course must be left with the chair, the director or the 
dean of the department, non-departmentalized school or college, as 
appropriate. 

Statement on Classroom Climate 

The University of Maryland values the diversity of its student body and is 
committed to providing a classroom atmosphere that encourages the 
equitable participation of all students. Patterns of interaction in the 
classroom between the faculty member and students and among the 
students themselves may inadvertently communicate preconceptions about 
student abilities based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, 
race, religion, or sexual orientation. These patterns are due in part to the 
differences the students themselves bring to the classroom. Classroom 
instructors should be particularly sensitive to being equitable in the 
opportunities they provide students to answer questions in class, to 
contribute their own ideas, and to participate fully in projects in and outside 
of the classroom. 

Of equal importance to equity in the classroom is the need to attend to 
potential devaluation of students that can occur by reference to demeaning 
stereotypes of any group and/or overlooking the contributions of a 
particular group to the topic under discussion. Joking at the expense of any 
group creates an inhospitable environment and is inappropriate. Moreover, 
in providing evaluations of students, it is essential that instructors avoid 
distorting these evaluations with preconceived expectations about the 
intellectual capacities of any group. 

It is the responsibility of individual faculty members to review their 
classroom behaviors, and those of any teaching assistants they supervise, 
to ensure that students are treated equitably and not discouraged or 
devalued based on their differences. Resources for self-evaluation and 
training for faculty members on classroom climate and interaction patterns 
are available from the Office of Human Relations. 



RECORDS 

Marking System 

The Office of the Registrar, located on the first floor of the Mitchell 
Building, is responsible for maintaining student records and issuing 
official transcripts. 

The following symbols are used on the student's permanent record for all 
courses in which he or she is enrolled after the initial registration and 
schedule adjustment period: ^+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, XF, 
I, P, S, and W. These marks remain as part of the student's permanent 
record and may be changed only by the original Instructor on certification, 
approved by the department chair and the dean, that an actual mistake 
was made In determining or recording the grade. 

A+, A, A — denotes excellent mastery of the subject and 
outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester 
averages, a mark of A+, A, A- will be assigned a value of 4 quality 
points per credit hour. 



B + , B, B — denotes good mastery of the subject and good 
scholarship. A mark of B+, B, B- is assigned a value of 3 quality 
points per credit hour. 

C+, C, C — denotes acceptable mastery of the subject. A mark of 
C+, C, C- is assigned a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

D+, D, D — denotes borderline understanding of the subject. It 
denotes marginal performance, and it does not represent 
satisfactory progress toward a degree. A mark of D+, D, D- is 
assigned a value of 1 quality point per credit hour. 

F — denotes failure to understand the subject and unsatisfactory 
performance. A mark of F is assigned a value of quality points per 
credit hour. 

XF — denotes failure due to academic dishonesty. 

S — Is a department option mark that may be used to denote 
satisfactory performance by a student in progressing 
thesis projects, orientation courses, practice teaching, and the like. 
In computation of cumulative averages a mark of S will not 
be Included. 

W — is used to indicate withdrawal from a course In which the 
student was enrolled at the end of the schedule adjustment period. 
For Information and completeness, the mark of W is placed on the 
student's permanent record by the Office of the Registrar. The 
instructor will be notified that the student has withdrawn from the 
course. This mark Is not used in any computation of quality points 
or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester. 

Audit — A student may register to audit a course or courses which 
have been designated as available under the audit option and 
in which space is available. The notation AUD will be placed on 
the transcript for each course audited. A notation to the effect that 
this symbol does not imply attendance or any other effort in the 
course will be included on the transcript in the explanation of the 
grading system. 

Pass-Fail — The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to 
A4-, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D-I-, D or D-. The student must Inform 
the Office of the Registrar of the selection of this option by the end 
of the schedule adjustment period. 

The following Pass-Faii policy was approved by the Board of Regents for 
implementation beginning with the Spring 1989 semester: 

1. To register for a course under the pass-fall option, an 
undergraduate must have completed 30 or more credit hours of 
college credit with a GPA of at least 2.0. At least 15 of these 
credit hours must have been completed at University of Maryland, 
College Park with a University of Maryland GPA of at least 2.0. 

2. Courses for which this option applies must be electives in the 
student's program. The courses may not be college, major, field of 
concentration, or general education program requirements. 

3. Only one course per semester may be registered for under the 
pass-fall option. 

4. No more than 12 semester hours of credit may be taken under the 
pass-fall option during a student's college career. 

5. Students may not choose this option when re-registerlng for 
a course. 

6. When registering under the pass-fail option, a course that is 
passed will count as liours in the student's record but will not be 
computed in the grade point average. A course that Is faiied will 
appear on the student's record and will be computed both In the 
overall average and the semester average. 

7. Students registering for a course under the pass-fail option are 
required to complete all regular course requirements. Their work 
will be evaluated by the Instructor by the normal procedure for 
letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. The 
grades A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D- will automatically 
be converted by the Office of the Registrar to the grade P on 
the student's permanent record. The grade Fwlll remain as given. 
The choice of grading option may be changed only during the 
schedule adjustment period for courses in which the student is 
currently registered. 

incompietes. The mark of "I" is an exceptional mark that is an instructor 
option. It is given only to a student whose work In a course has been 
qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other circumstances 
beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable to complete some 
small portion of the work of the course, in no case wiil tiie mari< "i" be 
recorded for a student wiio iias not completed tiie major portion of the 
work of tiie course. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 39 



1. This Incomplete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of 
the college offering the course within six weeks after the grade 
submission deadline (if a grade hasn't already been submitted.) If 
any Incomplete Contract isn't completed within the six week 
period, the instructor wiil convert the "I" to the appropriate grade. 

2. The student wili remove the "I" by completing work assigned by 
the instructor; it is the student's responsibiiity to request 
arrangements for the completion of the work. The work must be 
completed by the time stipuiated in the contract, usuaily by the 
end of the next semester, but in any event, no iater than one year. 
If the remaining work for the course as defined by the contract is 
not completed on schedule, the instructor will convert the "i" to 
the grade indicated by the contract. 

3. Exceptions to the stated deadline may be granted by the student's 
dean (in negotiation with the faculty member or the facuity 
member's dean) upon the written request of the student if 
circumstances warrant further delay. 

4. If the instructor is unavailable, the department chair, upon request 
of the student wiil make appropriate arrangements for the student 
to complete the course requirements. 

5. It is the responsibiiity of the instructor or department chair 
concerned to submit tlie grade promptly upon completion of the 
conditions of the incomplete Contract. 

6. The "I" cannot be removed through re-registration for the course 
or through "credit by examination." An "I " mark is not used in 
the computation of quality points or cumulative grade point 
averages. 

Record Notations 

In addition to the above marks, there are provisions for other record or 
transcript notations that may be used based on university poiicy and 
individual circumstances. 

Duplicate course: Used to indicate two courses with the same course 
content. The second course is counted in the cumuiative totals earned; 
both courses are counted in the cumulative attempted credit and in the 
calculation of grade point average. 

Non-appiicabie (Non-AppI): In all cases of transfer from one college to 
another at the University of Maryland, Coliege Park, the dean of the 
receiving college, with the approvai of the student, shall indicate which 
courses, if any, in the student's previous academic program are not 
applicable to his or her new program, and shall notify the Office of the 
Registrar of the adjustments that are to be made in determining the 
student's progress toward a degree. Deletions may occur both in credits 
attempted and correspondingly in credits earned. This evaiuation shali be 
made upon the student's initial entry into a new program, not thereafter. If 
a student transfers from one program to another, his or her record 
evaluation shall be made by the dean in the same way as if he or she were 
transferring colieges. If the student subsequently transfers to a third 
college, the dean of the third coilege shall make a similar initial 
adjustment; courses marked "nonapplicable" by the second dean may 
become applicabie in the third program. 

Excluded Credit (Exci Crd); Excluded credit is noted when Academic 
Clemency has been granted. 

Campus Repeat Policy 

The following policies appiy to ALL courses that may not be repeated for 
additionai credit. 

1. The foilowing students are required to foilow the new 
repeat policy: 

a. All new freshmen who began at University of Maryiand, College 
Park Fall 1990 and after. 

b. Transfer students from schoois other than IVlaryland 
community colleges who began at University of Maryland, 
Coliege Park, Fall 1990 and after. This inciudes transfer 
students from another University of Maryland institution. 

2. There is a iimit to the number of times a student may repeat a 
course. Students may have one repeat of any course in which they 
earned an A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, P, S, W, 
NGR or Audit; they cannot be registered (after the schedule 
adjustment period) for any given course more than twice. A 
student's dean's office may grant an exception allowing an 



additionai course repeat. In this case, students must present a 
plan for successfully completing the course. Ali attempts will be 
counted toward the total limit for repeatable credits. 
Note: Students may not choose the Pass-Faii option when re- 
registering for a course or re-register for a course in which a 
grade of "i" has been noted. 

3. Students may repeat no more than 18 credits. Additionally, if a 
student withdraws from all courses during a semester, those 
courses are not included in this limit. 

4. The grade point average will include all attempts at a given course 
that resuit in a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, 
or F. However, to heip freshmen and transfer students adjust to 
the University of Maryiand, College Park, the foliowing two 
exceptions ailow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so that 
only the higher grade is included; 

a. When the repeated course was taken within the student's first 
semester at University of Maryland, Coilege Park, or 

b. When the repeated course was taken within the student's first 
24 credit hours attempted (including transfer credits) or within 
the semester during which the student reached the 24th credit 
hour attempted. 

5. Any grade earned in prior attempts of a repeated course 
will appear on the student's transcript, regardless of whether 
the grade is dropped from, or included in, the cumulative grade 
point average. 

6. Repeat by transfer — if a student repeats by transfer a course that 
was taken before or during the semester in which the student 
reached 24 credits attempted (including transfer credits) and the 
transfer grade is higher, then the originai grade in the course wiil 
be exciuded from the GPA calculation. 

a. If the course was taken after the semester in which the 
student reached 24 credits attempted, the original grade 
remains in the GPA calculation. 

Repeat Policy Prior to Fall 1990: 

The foliowing students follow the previous repeat poiicy; 

• Students who began at University of Maryland, Coilege Park, 
before the Fail 1990 semester (including students who enter 
University of Maryland, Coliege Park for summer 1990). 

• Transfer students who began at a Maryland community coilege 
before Fail 1990. 

• UMBO Coilege of Engineering students who began 
before 1990. 

The highest grade received in the repeated course is used to caiculate the 
GPA. A student may repeat any course; however no student may be 
registered for a course more than three times. 

If a student repeats a course in which he or she has already earned a mark 
of A, B, C, D, P, or S, the subsequent attempt shail not increase the total 
hours earned toward the degree. Only the highest mark will be used in 
computation of the student's cumuiative average. Under unusual 
circumstances, the student's dean may grant an exception to this policy. 

Academic Clemency Policy 

Undergraduate students returning to the University of Maryiand, College 
Park in pursuit of their initial baccalaureate degree, after a separation of 
five calendar years may petition the appropriate dean to have a number of 
previously earned grades and credits removed from the caiculation of their 
cumulative grade point average. Up to 16 credits and corresponding grades 
from courses previously completed at the University of Maryland, Coilege 
Park, will be removed from caiculation of the grade point average and will 
not be counted toward graduation requirements. The petition for clemency 
must be filed in the first semester of return to the institution. Approval is 
neither automatic or guaranteed. 

Proficiency Examination Programs 

The University of Maryland, Coilege Park offers new, continuing, and 
returning students several opportunities to earn college credit by 
demonstrating achievement in a subject field through examination. Coilege 
Park recognizes three proficiency examination programs for credit; 
Advanced Placement (AP), Departmental Proficiency Examination Program 
(Credit-by-Examination), and Coliege-Level Examination Program (CLEP). 
Undergraduate students may earn a total of up to one-haif of the credits 
required for their degree through examination. Usually, this is no more than 
60 credits. Students are responsible for consulting with the appropriate 
dean or adviser about the applicability of any credits earned by examination 
to a specific degree program. Students should also seek assistance in 
determining which University of Maryland, Coilege Park courses duplicate 
credits earned for an examination. Students wili not receive credit for both 
passing an examination and completing an equivalent course. 



40 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



Advanced Placement (AP) Credit. For complete information about 
the applicability of AP exams and the assignment of credit, please see 
chapter 1. 

Departmental Proficiency Examination (Credit-by-Examination)* 

College Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, customarily referred to as 
"credit-by-examlnation," are comparable to comprehensive final examinations 
in a course. Although the mathematics and foreign-language departments 
receive the most applications for credit by examination, many departments will 
provide examinations for certain of their courses. Initial inquiry as to whether 
an examination in a specific course is available Is best made at the academic 
department which offers the course in question. 

If an examination for a course is available, the department will provide 
information regarding time and place, type of examination, and material which 
might be helpful In preparing for the examination. An undergraduate who 
passes a departmental proficiency examination is given credit and quality 
points toward graduation in the amount regularly allowed in the course, 
provided such credits do not duplicate credit obtained by some other means. 

After making arrangements with the department, apply through the 
Undergraduate Advising Office, 1117 Hornbake Library, 301-314-8418. 

Policies governing credit by examination: 

1. The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of 
Maryland, College Park. Posting of credit earned, however, will be 
delayed until the student is registered. 

2. Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be taken for 
courses in which the student has remained registered at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, beyond the Schedule 
Adjustment Period even with a transcript notation of "W." 

3. Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be used to 
change grades, Including Incompletes and Withdrawals. 

4. Application for credlt-by-examinatlon is equivalent to registration 
for the course; however, the following conditions apply: 

a. A student may cancel the application at any time prior 
to completion of the examination with no entry on his/ 
her permanent record. (Equivalent to the schedule 
adjustment period.) 

b. The Instructor makes the results of the examination available 
to the student prior to formal submission of the grade. Before 
final submission of the grade, the student may elect not to 
have this grade recorded. In this case, a mark of W is 
recorded. (Equivalent to the drop period.) 

c. No examination may be attempted more than twice. 

d. The instructor must certify on the report of the examination 
submitted to the Office of the Registrar that copies of the 
examination questions (or identifying information in the case 
of standardized examinations), and the student's answers 
have been filed with the chair of the department offering 
the course. 

5. If accepted by the student (see 4.b, above), letter grades earned 
through credit-by-examlnatlon are entered on the student's 
transcript, and are used in computing his/her cumulative grade 
point average. A student may elect to take a "credit-by- 
examination" "Pass-Fall" only if the credit fulfills an elective in the 
student's degree program. No college, major, field of 
concentration, or general education program requirement may 
be taken under tiie pass-fail option. Please refer to the Pass-Fail 
policy under the "Records" section in this chapter. 

Coiiege-Levei Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) recognizes college-level 
competence achieved outside the college classroom. Two types of CLEP 
tests are available: General Examinations, which cover the content of a 
broad field of study; and Subject Examinations, which cover the specific 
content of a college course. Credit can be earned and will be recognized by 
College Park for some CLEP General or Subject Examinations, provided 
satisfactory scores are attained. Credits earned under CLEP are not 
considered "residence" credit, but are treated as transfer credit. 

CLEP exams are administered at CLEP testing centers throughout the 
country. The University of Maryland, College Park Is a CLEP Test Center 
(Test Center Code: 5814). To obtain an application or additional 
information, contact the CLEP Administrator In the Counseling Center, 
Room 0106A Shoemaker Hall, (301-314-7688), or write to CLEP, CN 
6600, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6600. 

Students who want to earn credit through CLEP must request their official 
score reports to be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admission, 
Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235. 
(The University of Maryland, College Park, Score Recipient Code Is 5814.) 



Policies governing CLEP are as follows: 

1. A student must matriculate at the university before CLEP credits 
are officially posted. The posting will not be done until a student 
has established a record. 

2. Each institution of the University System of Maryland establishes 
standards for acceptance of CLEP exemptions and credits. 
Students must check with the institution to which they will 
transfer to learn If they will lose, maintain, or gain credit. 

3. College Park will award credit for a CLEP examination 

(a) provided the examination was being accepted for credit here 
on the date the student took the examination, and 

(b) provided that the examination was not taken during a 
student's final 30 credits. The final 30 hours of credit are to 
be taken in residence, unless prior approval has been 
granted by the student's dean. 

4. Credit will not be given for botii completing a course and passing 
an examination covering substantially the same material. 

5. Furthermore, credit will not be awarded for CLEP examinations If 
the student has previously completed more advanced courses in 
the same field. 

6. CLEP examinations posted on transcripts from other institutions 
will be accepted if the examination has been approved by College 
Park and the scores reported are equal to or higher than those 
required by this Institution. If the transcript from the prior 
institution does not carry the scores, it will be the responsibility of 
the student to request Educational Testing Service to forward a 
copy of the official report to the Office of Admissions. 

The university awards credits for CLEP Examinations only as indicated on 
the chart provided in this chapter (if an examination is not listed, it is not 
accepted for credit at this institution). 

If you have questions about the applicability of specific credit to 
your program, consult the list provided in this catalog or contact your 
Dean's Office. 



TRANSFER CREDIT 

(For current University of IVIaryland, College Park students) 

The Office of the Registrar posts all transfer credit that would be 
acceptable to any of the degree programs at the University of Maryland, 
College Park. The dean of the college in which the student Is enrolled 
determines which transfer credits are applicable to the student's degree 
program. In general, credit from academic courses taken at institutions of 
higher education accredited by a regional accrediting association will 
transfer, provided that the course is completed with at least a grade of C 
and the course is similar In content and level to work offered at College 
Park. The title of courses accepted for transfer credit will be noted on the 
student's record; however, the grade will not. Grades from transferred 
courses are not Included in the University of Maryland, College Park, grade 
point average calculation. See chapter 1 for additional Information. 

Courses talten at other institutions while attending the University of 
IVIaryland, College Park 

1. Courses taken at another institution may not be credited toward 
a degree without approval in advance by the dean of the college 
from which the student expects a degree. The same rule applies 
to registration in the summer program of another institution. 
"Permission to Enroll in Another Institution" forms are available in 
the office of the student's dean. This form must be submitted 
and approved by the college for any course which will eventually 
be added to the university transcript. 

2. Courses taken at other University of IVIaryland Institutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of 
Maryland, College Park In Fall 1989 or later, all course work taken 
at any University System of Maryland Institution will be posted as 
transfer credit. For all students who attended Maryland prior to 
Fall 1989, courses taken at another University of Maryland Board 
of Regents Institution (UMBO, UMAB, UMES, UMUC) prior to Fall 
1989 will be included In the cumulative GPA. Courses taken at 
any other institution may not be credited toward a degree without 
advance approval. See #1 above for information. 

3. USIVI Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration Program 
University undergraduate students participating in the Concurrent 
Inter-Institutional Registration Program should obtain permission 
from their dean. Course work counts as resident credit. Students 
participating in this program must be enrolled full time In a 
degree program at University of Maryland, College Park, for the 
semester in which these courses are taken. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 41 



4. Consortium of Universities of the Wasliington iVIetropolitan Area 

Courses taken through the Consortium are considered to be 
resident credit. See above under "Consortium" and see the 
Schedule of Classes for information. 



Transfer Credit Center 

The Transfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assistance 
to students and transfer advisers. More information is available in the 
section on Transfer Admission in chapter 1 and on the internet at 
www.tce.umd.edu. 



College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 



Exam Title 



Score Reiated Course Cr Maj Core 



Notes 



General Exams 



Natural Science 



500 



LL Elective 



No 



No 



Humanities 



500 



LL Elective 



No 



No 



Mathematics 



560 



LL Elective 



No 



•Fulfills CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement. 



Social Science & 
History 



500 



LL Elective 



No 



No 



Subject Exams 



Biology 

Gen. Biology 



Chemistry 

Gen. Chemistry 



Economics 

Prin. Macro. 
Prin. Micro. 



Government 

American Govt. 



Mathematics 

Calculus/ Elem. 
Functions 



49 



48 



57 
54 



52 



56 
50 
47 



LL Elective 



LL Elective 



ECON 201 
ECON 200 



GVPT170 



MATH 140 
MATH 220 
LL Elective 



No 



No 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 



Yes 

No 

No 



No 



No 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



Students who receive CLEP credit in Biology and wish to take 
additional BIOL credit should enroll in BIOL 105. 



Students who receive CLEP credit in Chemistry and wish to take 
additional CHEM credit should enroll in CHEM 103 or 103H. 



ECON credits fulfill one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. 



GVPT 170 fulfills one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Students should contact the department for 
gateway applicability, 405-4136. 



MATH 140 or 220 fulfills CORE-Math & Formal Reasoning non-lab 

requirement; also fulfills CORE-Fundamental Studies Math 

requirement. 

•Fulfills CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement. 



Sociology 

Intro. Sociology 



51 



LL Elective 



No 



No 



Sociology majors who receive credit for this exam will be exempt 
from SOCY 100. Other students who wish to fulfill a CORE 
requirement are encouraged to enroll in SOCY 105. 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Any test not listed will not be accepted for credit 
at UMCP. Students may not receive credit both for CLEP courses and for equivalent UMCP courses or transfer 
courses (including Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate). CLEP credit will be deleted in such cases. 
Applicable scores for a particular exam are those in effect when a student takes the exam. Contact your College 
Dean if you have questions. 

Certain CLEP tests may be revised during 2004-05. At the time this catalog was printed, information on the new 
versions of those tests was not available. Changes are possible in UMCP credit acceptance for revised CLEP 
exams. Contact the Testing Office for up-to-date information, 314-7688. 

Computer-based CLEP testing was implemented during 2003 for selected tests at selected test venues. Scoring 
procedures are changing. The scores above apply to NGN-computer based testing. Departments will evaluate the 
new tests and scoring procedures as they become available. Some exams will be considered for credit on a case- 
by-case basis until review is complete. Contact an advisor or the Transfer Credit Center (tccinfo@deans.umd.edu) 
for further information. Students who have matriculated at UMCP are encouraged to speak to their advisor about 
departmental or Advanced Placement exams in lieu of CLEP. Students interested in taking MATH CLEP are 
encouraged to speak to the math advisor on campus, 405-4362. 



42 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



COMPUTATION OF GRADE POINT AVERAGE 
(GPA) 

GPA is computed by dividing tlie total number of quality points accumulated 
in courses for which a grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or 
F has been assigned by the total number of credits attempted in those 
courses. Courses for which a mark of P, S, I, NGR or W has been assigned 
are not included in computing the GPA. Each letter grade has a numerical 
value: A+, A, A- = 4; B+, B, B- = 3; C+, C, C- = 2; D+, D, D- = 1; F = 0. 
Multiplying this value by the number of credits for a particular course gives 
the number of quality points earned for that course. 

See Repeat Policy to determine the effect of repeated courses in the 
calculation of GPA. 



UNDERGRADUATE POLICY ON SEMESTER 
ACADEMIC HONORS 

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) will be awarded to those students 
who complete, within any given semester (excluding winter and summer 
terms), 12 or more credits (excluding courses with grades of P and S) with 
a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher. This recognition will be noted on the 
student's academic record. 



UNDERGRADUATE POLICY ON ACADEMIC 
PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

Consistent with the Statement of Expectations, it is the intent of the 
University that its students make satisfactory progress toward their degree 
objectives, and achieve academic success. If a student has special 
circumstances that make it impossible to complete a normal course load, 
the student must meet with an advisor to discuss the circumstances, the 
student's plans for continued progress toward a degree, and the 
implications for continued enrollment. 

The guidelines for retention of students are as follows: 

a. Academic retention is based solely on grade point average (GPA). A 
minimum of 120 successfully completed course credits is required 
for graduation in any degree curriculum. Individual colleges, 
schools, and departments may establish higher requirements for 
graduation. Students must consult the appropriate college, school, 
or department for specific information. 

b. Satisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Students whose semester GPA 
falls below 2.0 are encouraged to meet with their advisors 
regarding the development of a plan that will appropriately 
respond to the student's academic difficulties and lead to 
academic improvement. Individual colleges, schools and 
departments may establish separate requirements for mandatory 
advising. Students must consult the appropriate college, school, 
or department for specific information. 

c. Unsatisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a 
cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. Students will be placed on 
Academic Probation following any semester in which a 2.0 
cumulative GPA is not achieved. Normally, students will be 
Academically Dismissed if they are unable to raise their 
cumulative GPA to 2.0 or higher at the end of their probationary 
semester. 

Academic Probation: 

Students will be placed on academic probation if their cumulative 
GPA falls below 2.0. Normally, a student is expected to attain a 
2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of any probationary semester. 
Students who fail to achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of 
their probationary semester may be academically dismissed, 
depending on their credit level as detailed below. 

1. Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be 
dismissed from the University in the event their cumulative 
GPA remains below 2.0 at the end of their probationary 
semester. 

2. Students who are on academic probation and have earned 
fewer than 60 credits will be permitted to continue on 
academic probation if a minimum semester GPA of 2.0 is 
achieved in each semester of probation. 



a. Full-time students must complete 9 or more credits in each 
semester. Part-time students will be permitted to satisfy 
this credit requirement in two consecutive semesters. A 
completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which 
a student receives a grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, or S. 

b. Students who meet this requirement will be permitted to 
continue on probation until the close of the semester 
(excluding winter and summer terms) in which they attain a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

c. Students who are on probation will be dismissed if they 
have not achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of 
the semester in which they complete 60 credits. 

3. The Office of the Registrar will notify students when they are 
placed on academic probation. Such notices will include a 
requirement that the students consult an academic advisor in 
their colleges early in the probationary semester and in no 
event later than the beginning of the early registration period 
for the next semester. The Office of the Registrar will notify 
the colleges of students who are placed on academic 
probation and will note the academic probationary status on 
the students' academic record. 

a. The academic advisors will assist students in developing 
appropriate plans for achieving satisfactory academic 
performance. 

b. Students who are placed on probation will not be allowed to 
add or drop courses, or register without the approval of an 
academic advisor in their college. 

Academic Dismissal: 

1. Students who have earned 60 or more credits will be 
dismissed if their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 for two 
consecutive semesters (excluding winter and summer terms). 

2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits will be 
dismissed following any probationary semester in which they 
fail to attain a minimum 2.0 semester GPA and complete the 
requisite credits detailed under 'Academic Probation.' 

3. Students who have been academically dismissed and who are 
reinstated will be academically dismissed again if a cumulative 
GPA of at least 2.0 is not achieved by the end of the first 
semester after reinstatement. Reinstated students will not be 
allowed to add or drop courses, or to register during any 
semester without the approval of an academic advisor in their 
college, unless a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is achieved. 

4. The Office of the Registrar will notify the appropriate University 
offices when students are academically dismissed and will 
note the dismissal on the students' academic record. 

5. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions will notify students in 
writing when they are dismissed. The notices will include a 
statement that registration for the next semester (excluding 
winter or summer terms) will be canceled. 

6. Normally, a student dismissed for academic reasons must wait 
out one semester (fall or spring) before reinstatement. 
Exceptions will be determined by the Faculty Petition Board. 

Application for Academic Reinstatement. 

1. Students who have been dismissed may apply to the Faculty 
Petition Board for reinstatement on the grounds of mitigating 
circumstances, such as (i) demonstrated progress toward a 
degree by successful completion of 24 degree-applicable 
credits in the preceding year, (ii) continuing improvement in the 
cumulative grade point average, and (IN) progress in general 
education and major requirements. 

2. The application for reinstatement must include a written 
statement explaining the circumstances leading to dismissal 
and a proposed plan to remedy those circumstances. Students 
are encouraged to consult with their academic advisors prior to 
submitting their applications to the Faculty Petition Board. 

3. Applications for reinstatement can be obtained from the 
Reenrollment Office in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 
which is responsible for administering the reinstatement 
process in coordination with the Faculty Petition Board. 

Faculty Petition Board. 

1. The Reenrollment Office is responsible for submitting the 
reinstatement applications for review and decision by the Faculty 
Petition Board, which is comprised of tenured faculty appointed 
by the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. 
The Board is the sole arbiter of reinstatement applications. 

2. The Faculty Petition Board has the discretion to establish the 
terms for reinstatement, including the requirements for 
achieving academic improvement and developing an academic 
plan for success. 

3. The Reenrollment Office will forward the Board's decision to 
students at their permanent addresses. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 43 



Dismissal of Deiinquent Students. The university reserves the right to 
request at any time the withdrawal of a student who cannot or does not 
maintain the required standard of scholarship, or whose continuance in the 
university would be detrimental to his or her health, or the health of others, 
or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities of the university. 
Additional information about the dismissal of delinquent students may be 
found in the Code of Student Conduct, Appendix C, in Chapter 10. 



GRADUATION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The University of Maryland, College Park, awards the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Bachelor of Music, 
Bachelor of Science, Master of Applied Anthropology, Master of 
Architecture, Master of Arts, Master of Business Administration, Master of 
Community Planning, Master of Education, Master of Engineering, Master 
of Fine Arts, Master of Historic Preservation, Master of Information 
Management, Master of Journalism, Master of Library Science, Master of 
Life Sciences, Master of Music, Master of Public Health, Master of Public 
Management, Master of Public Policy, Master of Science, Doctor of 
Audiology, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Musical Arts, Doctor of 
Philosophy, and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. Students in specified two- 
year curricula may be awarded certificates. 



Graduation Applications 



Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application 
with the Office of the Registrar. The deadline for application is the end of 
the schedule adjustment period for the semester in which the student 
plans to graduate, or at the end of the first week of the second summer 
session for August degrees. 

In all cases, graduation applications must be filed at the beginning of 
the student's final semester before receiving a degree. The graduation 
applications are available on the internet at www.testudo.umd.edu or at the 
Registrar's Office, 1st floor Mitchell Building. 



Degree Requirements 



The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work in the 
different colleges, schools, departments and academic units. It is the 
responsibility of the colleges, schools, departments and other academic units 
to establish and publish clearly defined degree requirements. Responsibility 
for knowing and meeting all degree requirements for graduation in any 
curriculum rests with the student. Specific degree requirements are listed in 
this catalog under the college and/or department as appropriate. 

Each student should check with the proper academic authorities no later 
than the close of the junior year to ascertain his or her standing with 
respect to advancement toward a degree. For this purpose, each student 
should be sure to review their semester grades and unofficial transcript on 
the Testudo Interactive Student Website (www.testudo.umd.edu) at the 
close of each semester or request a semester grade report. 

1) Residency requirement — Final 30-Hour Rule 

a. All candidates for University of Maryland, College Park, degrees 
should plan to take their final 30 credits in residence since the 
advanced work of their major study normally occurs in the last year 
of the undergraduate program. Included in these 30 semester hours 
will be a minimum of 15 semester hours in courses numbered 300 
or above, including at least 12 semester hours required in the major 
field (in curricula requiring such concentrations). 

b. A student who at the time of graduation will have completed 30 
credit hours in residence at the University of Maryland, College 
Park, may, under unusual circumstances, be permitted to take a 
maximum of 8 of the final 30 credits of record, comprising no 
more than two courses, at another institution. A student who has 
completed 75 credit hours in residence at the University, may, 
under unusual circumstances, be permitted to take a maximum of 
16 of the final 30 credits of record, comprising no more than 4 
courses, at another institution. In such cases, written permission 
must be obtained in advance from the dean and chair/director of 
the academic unit from which the student expects to graduate. 
Any course taken at another institution and intended to satisfy a 
specific major requirement at the University of Maryland must be 
approved as an equivalent course by the chair/director and the 
dean. Normally, no more than two courses required by the major, 
including major and supporting courses, will be approved. 
Exceptions beyond the articulated maximum credits and/or 
courses will be made only under highly unusual circumstances; 
requests for an exception must be made through the Dean's office 
to the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. 



c. For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional 
programs, the final 30 hours of the 90-hour program at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, must be taken in residence. 

2) Enrollment In Majors. A student must be enrolled in the major 
program from which he or she plans to graduate, when registering 
for the final 15 hours of the baccalaureate program. This 
requirement also applies to the third year of the combined, 
preprofessional degree programs. 

3) Credit Requirements. While several undergraduate curricula require 
more than 120 credits, no baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer 
than 120. No baccalaureate will be awarded in instances in which 
fewer than 120 credit hours have been earned. 

It is the responsibility of each student to familiarize himself or 
herself with the requirements of specific curricula. The student is 
urged to seek advice on these matters from the departments, 
colleges, or the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies. 

To earn a baccalaureate from the University of Maryland, College 
Park, a minimum of 30 credits must be taken in residence. 

4) Grade Point Average. A minimum cumulative 2.0 grade point 
average is required for graduation in all curricula. 



MINORS (Formerly Academic Citations) 

Minors afford students the opportunity to pursue a limited but structured 
concentration in a coherent field of study outside their major. The minor 
may be a truncated version of a major or a distinctive intellectual subset of 
a discipline. Minors are not offered in every field of study. Students should 
inquire with departments for current availability of minors or visit: 
www.provost.umd.edu/Minors 

The structures of minors vary in detail, but, with rare exceptions, they all 
require no fewer than 15 and no more than 24 credits with at least 9 
credits in upper division courses (300 level or above). No more than six 
credits (or two courses) may be applied to satisfy both the requirements of 
a minor and a major program. No course may be used to satisfy the 
requirements of more than one minor. All courses taken for a minor must 
be completed with a minimum grade of C. 

To insure appropriate academic advising, students who wish to pursue a 
minor should inform both the college responsible for their major and the 
unit offering the minor. When a student has completed all requirements for 
the minor, the unit offering the minor shall notify the student's college, 
which verifies that the student has met all requirements and officially 
notifies the Registrar's Office. The completion of a minor is posted on the 
student's official transcript only when the student completes all 
requirements for the bachelor's degree. 

In February 2004, the University Senate voted to phase out academic 
citations and replace them with minors. Students pursuing an academic 
citation should contact the respective department or program for 
Information on this conversion process. 



SECOND MAJORS AND SECOND DEGREES 

Second majors 

A student who wishes to complete a second major concurrently with his or 
her primary major of record must obtain written permission in advance from 
the appropriate departments or programs and colleges. As early as 
possible, but in no case later than one full academic year before the 
expected date of graduation, the student must file with the department or 
programs involved and with the appropriate deans, formal programs 
showing the courses to be offered to meet requirements in each of the 
majors and supporting areas as well as those of the college and general 
education programs. A student who wishes to add a Limited Enrollment 
Program as a second major must do so at the earliest possible opportunity 
to assure that specific credit and GPA requirements can be met. In order to 
obtain approval, students must complete all of the requirements specified 
for both the primary and secondary major. Courses taken for one major may 
be counted as appropriate as part of the degree requirements for the 
general education programs. If two colleges are involved in the double 
major program, the student must designate which college will be 
responsible for the maintenance of records and certification of general 
education requirements. Final approval of a double major program must be 
obtained from each of the appropriate departments and college(s). 



44 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



Second Degrees Taken Simultaneously 

A student who wishes to receive two bachelor's degrees simultaneously 
must satisfactorily complete the regularly prescribed requirements of both 
degree programs and a minimum of 150 credits (180 credits if one of the 
degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of the credits applied to one 
degree must be in course work not applied to the requirements of the other 
degree program. As early as possible, but in no case later than one full 
academic year before the expected date of graduation, the student must file 
with the department or programs involved, as well as with the appropriate 
deans, formal programs showing the courses to be offered to meet the 
major, supporting area, college, and general education programs. If two 
colleges are involved in the double degree program, the student must 
designate which college will be responsible for the maintenance of records 
and certification of general education requirements. Final approval of a 
double degree program must be obtained from each of the appropriate 
departments and college(s). 

Second Degrees Taken Sequentially 

A student who has completed the requirements for, and has received one 
baccalaureate and who wishes to earn a second degree from the university 
must satisfactorily complete all of the prescribed requirements for the 
second degree and enough additional credits so that the total, including all 
applicable credits earned at the university or elsewhere, is at least 150 
credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 
18 of the credits applied to one degree must be in course work not applied 
to the requirements of the other degree program. In no case will a second 
baccalaureate be awarded to a student who has not completed a minimum 
of 30 credits in residence at the university. 

Post-Baccalaureate Second Degree 

A student who has completed a bachelor's degree at another accredited or 
recognized college or university and wishes to earn a second degree, must 
satisfy all current degree requirements, including General Education 
requirements. A course by course evaluation of the student's prior 
collegiate work will be undertaken to determine which requirements have 
been satisfied by prior coursework. In no case, will a second baccalaureate 
be awarded to a student who has not completed a minimum of 30 credits 
in residence at the university. 



COIVIIVIENCEIVIENT HONORS 

Summa cum laude, magna cum laude and cum laude are the highest 
commencement honors that the University bestows for sustained 
excellence in scholarship. They are awarded to the top 10% of all students 
graduating in each college over the course of a year. Summa cum laude is 
awarded to students with a GPA equal to the highest two percent of all 
college graduates over the past three terms, magna cum laude to the next 
highest three percent, and cum laude to the following five percent. To be 
eligible for this recognition, at least 60 semester hours must be earned at 
the university or at a program in which credit earned is counted as 
University of Maryland, College Park, resident credit (contact the Office of 
the Registrar to determine program eligibility). No more than 6 credits 
taken pass/fail or satisfactory /fail shall count toward the 60-hour 
minimum. No student with a grade-point average of less than 3.3 will be 
considered for a commencement honor. Because grades for a term 
generally are officially recorded after the term's graduation day, 
computation of the student's GPA will not include grades for courses taken 
during the student's final semester at the university. However, the hours 
taken during that semester will apply toward the 60-hour requirement. 



Election to Phi Beta Kappa 



Organized in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely 
respected academic honorary society in the United States. Invitation to 
membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of 
the liberal arts and sciences. Student members are chosen entirely on the 
basis of academic excellence; neither extracurricular leadership nor 
service to the community is considered. Election is held twice a year, once 
in the fall and once in the spring semester. 



the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record in liberal education 
courses. The final decision for election rests with the resident faculty 
members of Phi Beta Kappa. There is no application procedure for election 
to Phi Beta Kappa (see #3 below for possible exception). 

Requirements for selection to membership in Phi Beta Kappa at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, campus chapter include: 

1. Grade Point Average: For seniors a grade point average of at least 
3.5 overall as well as in all liberal arts and sciences courses taken. 
For juniors the minimum grade point average is 3.75, and possibly 
higher depending on the number of candidates in a particular year. 

2. Residence: At least 60 credit hours must be taken at the University 
of Maryland, College Park. 

3. Liberal Courses: For seniors, at least 90 credit hours in courses in 
the liberal arts and sciences (where "liberal" courses are to be 
distinguished from professional or technical courses), at least 45 of 
which must be taken at the University of Maryland, College Park. For 
juniors, at least 75 total credit hours must be completed, at least 
60 of which are in courses in the liberal arts and sciences; of these, 
at least 45 must be taken at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. Students would ordinarily be majors in one of the programs in 
the liberal arts and sciences. However, students with the requisite 
number of liberal credit hours can be admitted if they have 
completed at least 5 courses (15 credit hours or more) for seniors 
or three courses (9 credit hours or more) for juniors in a single 
liberal arts and sciences department/program at UMCP. 

4. Required courses: One semester of mathematics, which must be 
fulfilled by college-level credit hours (including AP credit), and two 
college semesters of a foreign language at the elementary level, or 
above. The language requirement may also be satisfied by 
completion of four years of one language other than English at the 
high-school level or above, or the equivalent. Students with such a 
foreign language background who wish to be considered for 
admission to Phi Beta Kappa should notify the Phi Beta Kappa 
office in writing and provide the appropriate documentation (such as 
a high school transcript) prior to the month of consideration. 

5. Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi Beta Kappa must 
contain at least three liberal arts and sciences courses (9 credit 
hours or more) in each of the three following areas: a) arts and 
humanities, b) behavioral and social sciences, c) natural sciences 
and mathematics (including a laboratory science course; this 
requirement cannot be fulfilled by AP credit). All the courses in at 
least two of the three required areas must be completed at UMCP 
and in the remaining area no more than one AP course can be used 
to fulfill the requirement. In general Phi Beta Kappa will accept the 
CORE classification of courses but courses which CORE designates 
as having more than one classification may not satisfy any Phi Beta 
Kappa distribution requirement. Students with more cliallenging 
courses and moderately high grade point averages are preferred by 
the committee to those with higher grade point averages but a 
narrow range of courses. Minimal qualifications in more than one 
area may preclude election to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Recommended criteria include: 

Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi Beta 
Kappa. The judgment of the resident faculty members of Phi Beta Kappa on 
the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record is the deciding 
factor in every case. 

Any questions about criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (including 
equivalency examinations in foreign languages) should be directed to 
the Phi Beta Kappa Office, Denis Sullivan, 301-405-8986. 



The process for election to Phi Beta Kappa involves a review in November 
for those who graduated the previous August or those who will graduate in 
December, and a review in March for those graduating in May. The review 
is conducted by a select committee of faculty members representing the 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The committee reviews 
transcripts of all juniors and seniors with qualifying grade point averages. 
Whether a student qualifies for membership in Phi Beta Kappa depends on 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 45 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK 
CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 



Amended Effective Fall 2002 



Introduction 



The University is an academic community. Its fundamental purpose is the 
pursuit of l<nowledge. Lil<e all other communities, the University can 
function properly only if its members adhere to clearly established goals 
and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of the University is the 
commitment to the principles of truth and academic honesty. Accordingly, 
The Code of Academic Integrity is designed to ensure that the principle of 
academic honesty is upheld. While all members of the University share this 
responsibility. The Code of Academic Integrity \s designed so that special 
responsibility for upholding the principle of academic honesty lies with 
the students. 

Definitions 

1. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: any of the following acts, when committed by 
a student, shall constitute academic dishonesty: 

(a) CHEATING: intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized 
materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise. 

(b) FABRICATION: intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention 
of any information or citation in an academic exercise. 

(c) FACILITATING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: intentionally or knowingly 
helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this 
Code. 

(d) PLAGIARISM: intentionally or knowingly representing the words or 
ideas of another as one's own in any academic exercise. 

Responsibility to Report Academic Dishonesty 

2. Academic dishonesty is a corrosive force in the academic life of a 
university. It jeopardizes the quality of education and depreciates the 
genuine achievements of others. It is, without reservation, a responsibility 
of all members of the campus community to actively deter it. Apathy or 
acquiescence in the presence of academic dishonesty is not a neutral 
act. Histories of institutions demonstrate that a laissez-faire response will 
reinforce, perpetuate, and enlarge the scope of such misconduct, 
institutional reputations for academic dishonesty are regrettable aspects 
of modern education. These reputations become self-fulfilling and grow, 
unless vigorously challenged by students and faculty alike. 

All members of the University community-students, faculty, and staff- 
share the responsibility and authority to challenge and make known 
acts of apparent academic dishonesty. 

Honor Statement 

3. Letters informing both graduate and undergraduate students of their 
acceptance at the University, as well as appointment letters for 
members of the faculty, shall contain a short statement concerning the 
role of the Student Honor Council, as well as the obligation of all 
members of the University of Maryland-College Park community to 
promote the highest standards of academic integrity. 

Honor Pledge 

4. On every examination, paper or other academic exercise not specifically 
exempted by the instructor, the student shall write by hand and sign the 
following pledge: 

/ pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized 
assistance on this examination. 

Failure to sign the pledge is not an honors offense, but neither is it a 
defense in case of violation of this Code. Students who do not sign the 
pledge will be given the opportunity to do so. Refusal to sign must be 
explained to the instructor. Signing or non-signing of the pledge will not 
be considered in grading or judicial procedures. Material submitted 
electronically should contain the pledge, submission implies signing 
the pledge. 

5. On examinations, no assistance is authorized unless given by or 
expressly allowed by the instructor. On other assignments, the pledge 
means that the assignment has been done without academic 
dishonesty, as defined above. 



6. The pledge is a reminder that at Maryland students carry primary 
responsibility for academic integrity because the meaningfulness of 
their degrees depends on it. Faculty is urged to emphasize the 
importance of academic honesty and of the pledge as its symbol. 
Reference on syllabuses to the pledge and to this Code, including 
where it can be found on the internet and in the Undergraduate Catalog, 
is encouraged. 

Self-Referral 

7. Students who commit acts of academic dishonesty may demonstrate 
their renewed commitment to academic integrity by reporting 
themselves in writing to the Chair of the Honor Council. Students may 
not exercise the self-referral option more than once during their 
enrollment at the University. 

8. If an investigation by the Honor Council Executive Committee or 
designee reveals that no member of the University had a suspicion of a 
self-referring student's act of academic dishonesty, then the student 
will not be charged with academic dishonesty, or left with a disciplinary 
record. Instead, the Student Honor Council will notify the Dean or a 
designee and the faculty member where the incident occurred. The 
Dean or designee shall then convene a conference between the student 
and the faculty member. The purpose of this conference will be to 
ensure that the self-referral provisions of this Code are followed, not to 
levy a sanction, or to create a disciplinary record. The Dean will notify 
the Student Honor Council in writing of the outcome of the conference.'^' 

9. In all cases where a student self-referral is accepted, the student will 
be required to successfully complete the non-credit integrity seminar 
offered by the Student Honor Council. Also, the student will have any 
grade for the academic exercise in question reduced one letter grade, 
or to an "F" or a zero, in the discretion of the faculty member involved. 

10. If the Honor Council Executive Committee or designee determines that 
a suspicion of academic dishonesty existed at the time the student 
admitted the act, then the matter will be resolved in accordance with 
the procedures specified in this code for resolving academic dishonesty 
allegations. The student's admission may be considered a mitigating 
circumstance for purposes of sanctioning. 

Procedures: Reporting and Informal Resolution 

11. Any member of the University community who has witnessed an apparent 
act of academic dishonesty, or has information that reasonably leads to 
the conclusion that such an act has occurred or has been attempted, has 
the responsibility to inform the Honor Council promptly in writing. 

12. If the Honor Council determines that a report of academic dishonesty is 
supported by reasonable cause'^', the case shall be referred to the 
Dean of the College where the incident occurred.'^' The Dean or 
designee, (who must not be the referring faculty member), will inform 
the accused student in writing of the charges, and shall offer him/her 
an opportunity for an informal meeting to review the case.'" The faculty 
of the course may be included in the meeting. The Dean or designee 
shall also provide the accused student with a copy of this Code, and a 
statement of procedural rights approved by the Honor Council"*', which 
shall include the right of the student to request the presence of a 
member of the Honor Council at the informal meeting. 

13. If the accused student has no prior record of academic dishonesty or 
serious disciplinary misconduct'^', the Dean or designee and the student 
may reach an agreement concerning how the case should be resolved. 
The standard "XF" grade penalty will normally be imposed if it is agreed 
by the student that he/she committed an act of academic dishonesty. 
Any other sanction agreed upon by the student and the Dean or 
designee will constitute a recommendation to the Honor Council, and 
must be supported by a written statement signed by the student and 
the dean or designee. The written statement will be reviewed by the 
Honor Council"', which shall inform both the student and the Dean or 
designee of the sanction imposed. 

Procedures: Resolution by an Honor Review 

14.Cases not resolved in accordance with Part 10 of this Code shall result 
in an Honor Review."' An Honor Review is conducted by an Honor Board. 
The Board is convened by the Student Honor Council. It will normally 
consist of six persons, five of whom will be voting members. 
Determinations of the Honor Board will be by a majority vote (three 
votes or more). Honor Boards are selected as follows: 

(a) Three students selected by the Student Honor Council from among 
its members. In the event the student accused of academic 
dishonesty is a graduate student, then at least two of the student 
members shall be graduate students. 

(b) Two faculty members selected in accordance with procedures 
established by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. In the event 
the student accused of academic dishonesty is a graduate student, 
then at least one of the persons selected shall be a regular member 
of the Graduate Faculty. 



46 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



(c) The Honor Board shall have one non-voting member, who shall serve 
as the Presiding Officer. The Presiding Officer may be a student, 
faculty, or staff member of the University. The Presiding Officer will 
be selected by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

15. If the Vice President for Academic Affairs determines that the Student 
Honor Council or an Honor Board cannot be convened within a reasonable 
period of time after an accusation is made, the Vice President or a 
designee may review the case. If there is reasonable cause to believe 
that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred or has been attempted, 
the Vice President or designee will convene an ad hoc Honor Board by 
selecting and appointing two students and one faculty/staff member. 
Whenever possible, student members of ad hoc Honor Boards shall be 
members of the Student Honor Council. A non-voting presiding officer 
shall be appointed by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

16.The Campus Advocate or a designee shall serve as the Complainant at 
an Honor Review. The principal responsibilities of the Complainant are: 

(a) to prepare a formal Charge of Academic Dishonesty, and deliver It to 
the student and the Honor Board. The student will be deemed to 
have received such notice on the date of personal delivery, or If 
certified mall Is used, on the date of delivery at the most recent 
address provided to the University by the student; 

(b) to present the evidence and analysis upon which the Charge Is 
based to the Honor Board during the Honor Review; 

(c) to perform such other duties as may be requested by the Student 
Honor Council or the Honor Board. 

17. The Charge of Academic Dishonesty serves to give a student a reasonable 
understanding of the act and circumstances to be considered by the Honor 
Board, thereby placing the student In a position to contribute in a 
meaningful way to the Inquiry. It also serves to provide initial focus to that 
Inquiry. It Is not, however, a technical or legal document, and is not 
analogous to an Indictment or other form of process. The charge may be 
modified as the discussion proceeds, as long as the accused student Is 
accorded a reasonable opportunity to prepare a response. 

18. The purpose of an Honor Review is to explore and Investigate the 
Incident giving rise to the appearance of academic dishonesty, and to 
reach an Informed conclusion as to whether or not academic dishonesty 
occurred. In keeping with the ultimate premise and justification of 
academic life, the duty of all persons at an Honor Review is to assist In 
a thorough and honest exposition of all related facts. 

The basic tenets of scholarshlp-fuil and willing disclosure, accuracy of 
statement, and Intellectual Integrity In hypothesis. In argument and in 
conclusion-must always take precedence over the temptation to gain a 
particular resolution of the case. An Honor Review is not In the character of 
a criminal or civil legal proceeding. It is not modeled on these adversarial 
systems; nor does It serve the same social functions. It Is not a court or 
tribunal. Rather, It is an academic process unique to the community of 
scholars that comprise a university. 

19. The role of the Presiding Officer Is to exercise impartial control over the 
Honor Review In order to achieve an equitable, orderly, timely and 
efficient process. The Presiding Officer Is authorized to make all 
decisions and rulings as are necessary and proper to achieve that end. 
Including such decisions and rulings as pertain to scheduling and to the 
admissibility of evidence. If In the judgment of the Presiding Officer 
there Is reasonable cause to question the Impartiality of a board 
member, the Presiding Officer will so inform the Honor Council, which 
will reconstitute the board. 
20. The Presiding Officer or designee will select the date, time and place for 
the Honor Review, and notify the student in writing a minimum of ten 
(10) days prior to the review. 
21. The sequence of an Honor Review Is necessarily controlled by the nature 
of the incident to be investigated and the character of the Information to 
be examined, it thus lies within the judgment of the Presiding Officer to 
fashion the most reasonable approach. The following steps, however, 
have been found to be efficient, and are generally recommended: 

(a) The Complainant, and then the student or the student's advocate, 
summarize the matter before the Honor Board, including any 
relevant information or arguments. 

(b) The Complainant, and then the student, present and question 
persons having knowledge of the Incident, and offer documents or 
other materials bearing on the case. The Complainant, the student 
and all members of the Honor Board may question any person giving 
testimony. 

(c) The members of the Honor Board may ask the Complainant or the 
student any relevant questions. The members may also request any 
additional material or the appearance of other persons they deem 
appropriate. 

(d) The Complainant, and then the student or the student's advocate, 
may make brief closing statements. 

(e) The Honor Board meets privately to discuss the case, and reaches a 
finding by a majority vote. 



(f) The Honor Board will not conclude that a student has attempted or 
engaged In an act of academic dishonesty unless, after considering 
all the Information before It, a majority of members believe that 
such a conclusion Is supported by clear and convincing evidence. If 
this Is not the case, the Honor Board will dismiss the charge of 
academic dishonesty. 

(g) If the Honor Board finds the student has engaged In an act of 
academic dishonesty, both the Complainant and the student or the 
student's advocate, may recommend an appropriate sanction. 
Pertinent documents and other material may be offered. The Honor 
Board then meets privately to reach a decision, which must be by a 
majority vote of its members. 

(h) The Presiding Officer will provide the Complainant and the student 
with a written report of the Honor Board's determination. 

22. Role of Advocate and Adviser: 

(a) The accused student may be assisted by an advocate, who must be 
a registered, degree-seeking student at the University. The role of 
the advocate will be limited to: 

I. Making brief opening and closing statements, as well as comments 
on appropriate sanction. 
II. Suggesting relevant questions which the Presiding Officer may 

direct to a witness 
III Providing confidential advice to the student. 

(b) The accused student may also be accompanied by an advisor, who 
may be an attorney. The role of the advisor during an Honor Review 
will be limited to providing confidential advice only to the accused 
student, not the advocate, provided such advice Is given without 
Interfering with or disrupting the Honor Review. 

Even if accompanied by an advocate and/or an advisor, the student 
must take an active and constructive role in the Honor Review. In 
particular, the student must fully cooperate with the Honor Board 
and respond to its inquiries without undue Intrusion by an advocate 
or advisor. 

In consideration of the limited role of advocates and advisors, and of 
the compelling Interest of the University to expeditiously conclude the 
matter, the work of an Honor Board will not, as a general practice, be 
delayed due to the unavailability of an advocate or an advisor. 

(c) Honor Reviews may be tape recorded or transcribed, if a recording 
or transcription Is not made, the decision of the honor board must 
Include a summary of the testimony and shall be sufficiently 
detailed to permit review on appeal. 

(d) Presence at an Honor Review lies within the judgment of the 
Presiding Officer. An Honor Review Is a confidential Investigation, it 
requires a deliberative and candid atmosphere, free from 
distraction. Accordingly, It Is not open to the public or other 
"Interested" persons. However, at the student's request, the 
Presiding Officer will permit a student's parents or spouse to 
observe and may permit a limited number of additional observers. 
The Presiding Officer may cause to be removed from the Honor 
Review any person who disrupts or Impedes the investigation, or 
who fails to adhere to the rulings of the Presiding Officer. The 
Presiding Officer may direct that persons, other than the accused 
student or the Complainant, who are to be called upon to provide 
Information, be excluded from the Honor Review except for that 
purpose. The members of the Honor Board may conduct private 
deliberations at such times and places as they deem proper. 

(e) It Is the responsibility of the person desiring the presence of a witness 
before an Honor Board to ensure that the witness appears. If 
necessary, a subpoena may be requested, in accordance with Part 32 
(b) of the Code of Student Conduct . Because experience has 
demonstrated that the actual appearance of an Individual Is of greater 
value than a written statement, the latter Is discouraged and should 
not be used unless the Individual cannot or reasonably should not be 
expected to appear. Any written statement must be dated, signed by 
the person making it, and witnessed by a University employee or by a 
person approved by the Director of Judicial Programs {e.g., a notary). 
The work of an Honor Board will not, as a general practice, be delayed 
due to the unavailability of a witness. 

(f) An Honor Review Is not a trial. Formal rules of evidence commonly 
associated with a civil or criminal trial may be counterproductive In 
an academic investigatory proceeding, and shall not be applied. The 
Presiding Officer will accept for consideration ail matters which 
reasonable persons would accept as having probative value In the 
conduct of their affairs. Unduly repetitious. Irrelevant, or personally 
abusive material should be excluded. 

23. If the Honor Board finds that an attempt or act of academic dishonesty 
did occur, it shall impose an appropriate sanction. The normal sanction 
shall be a grade of "XF" in the course, but the Honor Board may impose 
a lesser or more severe sanction. Generally, acts involving advance 
planning, falsification of papers, conspiring with others, or some actual 
or potential harm to other students will merit a severe sanction, I.e. 
suspension or expulsion, even for a first offense. An attempt to commit 
an act shall be punished to the same extent as the consummated act. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 47 



Appeals 

24. In cases where an Honor Board has determined the appropriate 
sanction to be less than suspension or expulsion, both the finding of 
responsibility and the sanction(s) of an Honor Board will be final, 
unless, within 15 business days after the Board's written decision is 
sent to the student, and the Dean of the college where the incident 
occurred, the student or the Dean or designee notifies the Honor 
Council in writing of the intention of filing an appeal. The student may 
appeal both the findings and the penalty. The Dean or designee may 
appeal the penalty only. 

A written brief supporting any appeal must be submitted in writing to 
the Student Honor Council Executive Committee within an additional 
ten business days. The Executive Committee or designee will provide 
the opposing party a reasonable opportunity to make a written 
response. 

25. Any member of the Executive Committee who has taken part in an 
Honor Review that is the subject of an appeal is not eligible to hear the 
appeal. Substitute Executive Committee members may be selected 
from experienced Honor Council members, appointed in accordance 
with Honor Council bylaws. 

26 Decisions of the Executive Committee will be by majority vote, based 
upon the record of the original proceeding and upon written briefs. De 
novo hearings shall not be conducted. 

27. Deference shall be given by the Executive Committee to the 
determinations of Honor Boards. 

(a) sanctions may only be reduced if found to be grossly 
disproportionate to the offense. Likewise, upon an appeal by a 
Dean or designee, sanctions may be increased only if the original 
sanction is deemed to be grossly disproportionate to the offense. 

(b) cases may be remanded to a new Honor Board if specified 
procedural errors or errors in interpretation of this Code were so 
substantial as to effectively deny the accused student a fair 
hearing, or if new and significant evidence became available that 
could not have been discovered by a diligent respondent before or 
during the original Honor Board hearing. On remand, no indication 
or record of the previous hearing will be introduced or provided to 
the members of the new Honor Board, except to impeach 
contradictory testimony, at the discretion of the presiding officer. 

(c) Cases may be dismissed only if the finding is held to be arbitrary 
and capricious. 

28. If an Honor Board determines to suspend or expel a student, then the 
student may submit a written appeal to the Campus Senate Adjunct 
Committee on Student Conduct, in accordance with procedures set 
forth in Parts 42-47 of the Code of Student Conduct. 

29. Regardless of whether an appeal is filed, suspension requires approval 
by the Vice-President for Student Affairs, and may be altered, deferred, 
or withheld. Expulsion requires approval by the President, and may be 
altered, deferred, or withheld. 



with Parts 47 and 48 of the Code of Student Conduct. The decision of the 
Honor Council shall not be subject to subsequent Honor Council review for 
four years, unless the Honor Council specifies an earlier date on which the 
petition may be reconsidered. Honor Council determinations pertaining to 
the removal of the "XF" grade penalty may be appealed to the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. If the Vice President removes the grade of 
"XF" from the student's transcript, the Vice President shall provide written 
reasons to the Honor Council. 

The Student Honor Council 

34. There shall be a Student Honor Council. The Honor Council is 
composed of qualified graduate and undergraduate students in good 
academic standing, normally appointed in the Spring for the following 
academic year, and who may each be reappointed for additional one 
year terms. '"' 

35. The members of the Honor Council are appointed by a committee 
consisting of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Vice 
President for Student Affairs, the Chair of the Graduate Student 
Association, the President of the Student Government Association, and 
the Chair of the Honor Council. 

36. All council members are subject to the training and conduct 
requirements of Parts 24 and 25 of the Code of Student Conduct. 

37. The Student Honor Council has the following responsibilities and 
authority: 

(a) To increase awareness throughout the campus of the importance of 
academic integrity. 

(b) To develop bylaws subject to approval by the University for legal 
sufficiency and consistency with the requirements of this Code of 
Academic Integrity, and the Code of Student Conduct. 

(c) To designate from its members students to serve as members of 
Honor Boards as specified in this Code. 

(d) To consider petitions for the removal of the grade of "XF" from 
University records in accordance with Part 29 of this Code. 

(e) To receive complaints or reports of academic dishonesty from any 
source. 

(f) To assist in the design and teaching of the non-credit seminar on 
academic integrity and moral development, as determined by the 
Director of Judicial Programs. 

(g) To advise and consult with faculty and administrative officers on 
matters pertaining to academic integrity at the University. 

(h) To issue an annual report to the Campus Senate on academic integrity 

standards, policies, and procedures, including recommendations for 

appropriate changes. 

38. The campus administration shall provide an appropriate facility, reserved 

for the primary use of the Honor Council, and suitable for the conduct of 

hearings. Clerical and secretarial assistance will also be provided. 

Future Self Governance 



The Grade of "XF" 

30. The grade of "XF" is intended to denote a failure to accept and exhibit 
the fundamental value of academic honesty. The grade "XF" shall be 
recorded on the student's transcript with the notation "failure due to 
academic dishonesty". The grade "XF" shall be treated in the same 
way as an "F" for the purposes of Grade Point Average, course 
repeatability, and determination of academic standing. 

31. No student with an "XF" on the student's transcript shall be permitted 
to represent the University in any extracurricular activity, or run for or 
hold office in any student organization which is allowed to use 
University facilities, or which receives University funds. 

32.The student may file a written petition to the Student Honor Council to 
have the grade of "XF" removed and permanently replaced with the 
grade of "F". The decision to remove the grade of "XF" and replace it 
with an "F" shall rest in the discretion and judgment of a majority of a 
quorum of the Council; provided that: 

(a) at the time the petition is received, at least twelve months shall 
have elapsed since the grade of "XF" was imposed; and, 

(b) at the time the petition is received, the student shall have 
successfully completed a non-credit seminar on academic integrity, 
as administered by the Office of Judicial Programs; or, for the 
person no longer enrolled at the University, an equivalent activity as 
determined by the Office of Judicial Programs; and, 

(c) the Office of Judicial Programs certifies that to the best of its 
knowledge the student has not been found responsible for any 
other act of academic dishonesty or similar disciplinary offense at 
the University of Maryland or another institution. 

33. Prior to deciding a petition, the Honor Council will review the record of 
the case and consult with the Director of Judicial Programs. Generally, 
the grade of "XF" ought not to be removed if awarded for an act of 
academic dishonesty requiring significant premeditation. If the "XF" 
grade is removed, records of the incident may be voided in accordance 



39. Insofar as academic dishonesty is most immediately injurious to the 
student body, and because the student body is in a unique position to 
challenge and deter it, it is the intent of the University that ultimately 
this Code will evolve into one where the provisions are marked by 
complete student administration. 

In the Spring 1996 semester, the Campus Senate Adjunct Committee 
on Student Conduct shall conduct an open hearing to review the Code 
and its administration. Recommendations for change, as needed, shall 
be proposed in accordance with the rules of the Senate. 

Terms 

AD HOC HONOR BOARD-board consisting of two students and one faculty 

member appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and a 

Presiding Officer appointed by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY-see Part 1 of this Code. 

CHARGE OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY-a formal description of the case 

being considered by the Honor Board. 

CLEAR AND CONVINCING EVIDENCE-that evidence which results in 

reasonable certainty of the truth of the ultimate fact in controversy. It 

requires more than a preponderance of the evidence but less than proof 

beyond a reasonable doubt. Clear and convincing evidence will be shown 

where the truth of the facts asserted is highly probable. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE-a committee of Honor Council officers, selected 

in accordance with Honor Council bylaws. 

HONOR BOARD-body appointed by the Student Honor Council to hear and 

resolve a case of academic dishonesty. The board consists of five voting 

members {three student members of the Honor Council and two faculty 

members). 

HONOR REVIEW-the process leading to resolution of an academic 

dishonesty case. 



48 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



COMPLAINANT-officer responsible for preparing the charge of academic 

dishonesty and presenting the case before the Honor Board. The 

Complainant must be a registered, degree-seeking student. 

PRESIDING OFFICER-individual on the Honor Board responsible for 

directing proceedings during the Honor Review. The presiding officer is a 

non-voting member of the Honor Board selected by the Director of Judicial 

Programs. 

STUDENT HONOR COUNCIL-students appointed by the Vice Presidents for 

Academic and Student Affairs, as well as by the President of the Student 

Government Association, the Chair of the Graduate Student Association, 

and the Chair of the Honor Council. 

Footnotes 

{1} The Dean's notice shall be maintained in a file of self-referrals, but 

shall not be considered a disciplinary record. 
{2} Pertinent procedures for determining reasonable cause shall be set 

forth in the Honor Council bylaw/s. 
{3} Cases involving graduate students should be reported to the Dean of 

the Graduate School. 
{4} It is recommended that the meeting be held within ten business days 

after receipt of the Honor Council report by the Dean. 
{5} The statement shall include a reference to the right to be 

represented by an advocate, as specified in Part 18(a) of this code. 
{6} In every case the Dean or designee shall check with the Office of 

Judicial Programs to determine if a prior record exists. 
{7} The term "Honor Council," used throughout the Code, permits 

reliance upon Honor Council committees, appointed in accordance 

with Council bylaws. 
{8} Statements made by the parties in informal settlement discussions 

shall not be considered by the Honor Council. However, a student 

who provides false information to the Dean or designee or the Honor 

Council may be charged with a violation of the University Code of 

Student Conduct. 
{9} Before issuing a subpoena, the Director of Judicial Programs may 

require that a party requesting the subpoena make a reasonable 

effort to secure voluntary compliance by a potential witness. 
{10} The screening committee shall try to create a broadly based Honor 

Council that reflects the diversity of the campus, and is of sufficient 

size to resolve cases as promptly as possible. 

The determination whether an Honor Council applicant is "qualified" 
rests within the discretion of the selection committee, provided 
that no uniform grade point "cutoff" is applied. A history of disciplinary 
or felonious misconduct may be sufficient grounds to disqualify 
any candidate. 



49 



c hapter 5 General Education R equirements 



CORE LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES STUDIES PROGRAM (CORE) 
General Education Program and Requirements 

Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
2130 iviitchell Building, 301405-9359 
www.umd.edu/ CORE 

To earn a baccalaureate at the University of Maryland all students complete both a major course of study and a campus-wide general education program. 

The Purpose of General Education 

Participation in a democratic society requires more than the central instruction provided by one major field of study In our world of rapid economic, social, 
and technological change, a strong and broadly-based education is essential. 

General education helps students achieve the intellectual integration and awareness they need to meet challenges in their personal, social, political, and 
professional lives. General education courses introduce the great ideas and controversies in human thought and experience. Maryland graduates may claim 
to be "educated people" because of the breadth, perspective, and rigor provided by the core curriculum. 

Most Americans change their careers three times during their lifetime. A solid general education provides a strong foundation for the life-long learning that 
makes career-change goals attainable. 

General Education at UM = CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies 

•CORE makes up about one-third of your undergraduate courses. 

• CORE helps you choose or change your major and the shape of your whole life by introducing you to new ways of viewing yourself 
and the worid around you. 

• CORE offers one of the best opportiunities you will ever have to explore different fields of study. 

Get the Most Out of CORE and Other General Education Opportunities at UM 

•PLAN ahead and see an academic adviser regulariy 

• INVEST in yourself; select CORE courses that will add to your understanding and appreciation of social, cultural, national, 
and international issues in the years ahead. 

• EXPLORE the wide range of opportunities offered by the university as well as the speakers, events, theaters, museums, 
galleries, libraries, and many more general education resources outside the classroom. 



50 General Education Programs 



CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies Program 
At M aryland, the CORE Program has four major components: 

FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES build competence and confidence in basic writing and mathematics. Mastery of these basics greatly enhances success both during 
and after college. Students begin fulfilling Fundamental Studies requirements in their first year at the university 

DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES introduce broad areas of learning in many disciplines. Through these courses, students explore different l<inds of l<nowledge and the 
very nature of scholarship in the humanities, arts, natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and history. Students generally pursue Distributive 
Studies in the first two years of their course work. 

ADVANCED STUDIES allow students to enhance their degree and strengthen their critical thinl<ing and writing sl<ills by tal<ing two upper-level courses outside 
their major after 56 credits. Students may substitute an approved CORE Capstone course in their major after 86 credits or a senior or honors thesis for 
one of these two courses. 

HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY encourages all members of our diverse undergraduate community to learn about attitudes and cultures different from their 
own. Students may complete the Cultural Diversity requirement at anytime before graduation. 



CORE Program Outline 



Coy rses ysed to fylfill C OR E Fyndam enta I and D istriby live Sty dies Reqyirem ents: 

• MUST be selected from the approved CORE course lists. 

• MAY also be used to satisfy college, major, and/ or supporting area requirements if the courses also appear on CORE Fundamental or Distributive 
Studies lists. 

• MAY NOT be talcen on a Pass-Fail basis. 



CORE Fundamenta 



Three Courses (9 credits) Required 



1. One course in Introduction to Writing (Must be attempted within the 
first 30 credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits.) 

Approved CORE Introduction to Writing Courses: 

(Select the appropriate course based on requirements listed.) 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 

ENGL lOlA Introduction to Writing (Must be tal<en if student has TSWE 

[SAT verbal subtest] score below 33) 
ENGL lOlH Introduction to Writing (Honors Students) 
ENGL lOlX Introduction to Writing (Students for whom English is a second 

language may register for ENGL lOlX instead of ENGL 101. 

To register for ENGL lOlX, a student must present one of 

the following: 

(1) 33 or below on the TSWE, OR 

(2) 575 or above on the TOEFL (with no sectional score lower 
than 50), OR 

(3) 230 or above on the Maryland English Institute Program 
(MEIP) Exam (with a Listening score above 70, a Grammar 
score above 70, and a Reading score above 60), OR 

(4) successful completion of the MEI's semi-intensive course 
in English. 

Note: Based on scores from either the TOEFL or MEIP, students may 
be required to complete a program of English language instruction for 
non-native speal<ers through the M El before being allowed to register for 
ENGLIOIX. 

Exemptions from Introduction to Writing requirement: 

• AP English Language and Composition test score of 4 or 5, OR 

• SAT verbal score 670 or above. (In April 1995, the Educational 
Testing Service recentered the scores on the SAT. Students whose 
test scores are from before April 1995 must have received a score of 
600 or above to be exempt from Freshman Writing. This recentering 
does not reflect a raising of the requirement for exemption, but a 
change in the scoring system used by ETS.) 

2. One course in Mathematics (Must be attempted within the first 30 
credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits.) 

Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics Courses: 

MATH 110 Elementary Mathematical Models; OR 

MATH 112 College Algebra with Applications and Trigonometry; OR 

MATH 113 College Algebra with Applications; OR 

MATH 115 Pre-calculus; OR 



Any 100- or 200-level MATH or STAT course except MATH 210, 211, 212, 
213, 214, and MATH 274. 

Exemptions from Mathematics requirement: 

• SAT Math score of 600 or above; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above in Calculus AB or BC; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above in Statistics; OR 

• CLEP Calculus Exam score of 50 or higher. 

If you are placed in the Developmental Math Program by the Mathematics 
Placement Exam, you may be offered the opportunity to combine your 
Development course with the appropriate subsequent course of Math 110, 
111, 113, or 115 and thus finish both in one semester. For further 
information, please see the Developmental Math Program web site: 
www.math.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ courses/ fsm.html. 

3. One course in Professional Writing (Tal<en after reaching junior standing). 

Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses: 

(Select the appropriate course based on requirements or interests listed.) 

ENGL 391 Advanced Composition 

ENGL 391H Advanced Composition (Honors Students) 

ENGL 391X Advanced Composition (English as a Second Language) 

ENGL 392 Advanced Composition (Pre-Law) 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

ENGL 393H Technical Writing (Honors Students) 

ENGL 393X Technical Writing (English as a Second Language) 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 

ENGL 395 Technical Writing (Pre-Med and Health careers) 

Exemption from Professional Writing Requirement: 

• Grade of "A" in ENGL 101 (NOT ENGL lOlA or ENGL lOlX), except 
for students majoring in Engineering. All Engineering majors must 
tal<e ENGL 393. 

Note: No exemption from the Professional Writing requirement will be 
granted for achievement on SAT verbal exam. Professional Writing courses 
cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements. 



General Education Programs 51 



CORE Distributive Studies Requirements 



Nine Courses (28 credits) Required 

See lists of approved CORE courses in Schedule of Classes. 

1. Humanities and the Arts— three courses required: 

• One course from Literature list, and 

• One course from History or Theory of the Arts list, and 

• One more course from Literature, OR History or Theory of the Arts, 
OR Humanities lists 

Note: There is no specific requirement for a course from the 
Humanities list. 

2. M athematics and the Sciences— three courses required: 

• Up to two courses from Physical Sciences list, and 

• Up to two courses from Life Sciences list, and 

• Up to one course from M athematics/ Formal Reasoning list 

Notes: One course MUST include or be accompanied by a lab taken in 
the same semester. More than one lab course may be taken. Courses 
must be taken from at least two of the three lists. There is no 
specific requirement for a course from the Mathematics and Formal 
Reasoning list. 

3. Social Sciences and History— three courses required: 

• One course from Social or Political History list, and 

• Two courses from Behavioral and Social Sciences list 



It is not enough to offer a smorgasbord of courses. We must 
insure that students are not just eating at one end of the table. 

—A. Bartlett Giamatti 



CORE Advanced Studies 



Two Courses (6 credits) Required 

The CORE Advanced Studies requirement allows you to choose your two 
Advanced Studies courses from a wide range of upper-level offerings 
outside your major. Please select courses that make sense in terms of 
your educational goals and interests, that increase your knowledge, and 
that strengthen your critical thinking and writing skills. Consult with faculty 
and contact your adviser for assistance in planning. A list of recommended 
courses is available from 2130 Mitchell Building, 301-405-9359. 

CORE Advanced Studies Requirement: Two upper-level (300- or 400-level) 
courses outside the major taken after 56 credits. Students may substitute 
a CORE-approved senior capstone course in their major taken after 86 
credits, or a senior or honors thesis for one of the two required Advanced 
Studies courses. The other course must be outside the major. Students 
completing double majors or double degrees will have fulfilled the campus 
Advanced Studies requirement, unless their primary major or college has 
additional requirements. 

The following may not be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements: 

• Professional Writing courses (courses that meet the Fundamental 
Studies upper-level writing requirement); 

• courses used to meet Distributive Studies requirements; 

• internships, practica, or other experiential learning types of courses; 

• courses taken on a pass/ fail basis. 

One independent studies course (minimum of three credits, outside the 
major) may be used toward Advanced Studies requirements as long as it is 
consistent with the rules above and the faculty member supervising the 
independent study agrees that it is appropriate for Advanced Studies. 

If you have questions about the requirements, call the Office of 
Undergraduate Studies at 301405-9359. 

Notes: CORE Capstone courses must be taken within the major and after 
86 credits. A senior thesis (minimum of 3 credits) or successful 
completion and defense of an honors thesis in either the General Honors 
or a Departmental Honors Program (minimum of 3 credits) counts as 
CORE Capstone credit. 



CORE Human Cultural Diversity 



One Course (3 credits) Required 
See list of approved CORE Diversity courses in Schedule of Classes. 

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on: (a) the history, status, 
treatment, or accomplishment of women or minority groups 
and subcultures; (b) non-Western culture, or (c) concepts and 
implications of diversity. 

Note: A number of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy 
CORE Distributive Studies, Advanced Studies, or a college, major, 
and/ or supporting area requirement. 



..All life is interrelated, zvhatever affects one of us, affects all. 

— Martin Luther King, Jr. 



Forcomplete CORE course lists and more information consult: 

• Schedule of Classes, revised each semester. 
www.testudo.umd.edu/ ScheduleOfClasses.html 

• CORE Website, www.umd.edu/ CORE 



I 



• To obtain a CORE Academic Recordkeeper, see your college 
advising office, or Undergraduate Studies (2130 Mitchell Building). 



Who Completes CORE? 

students who enter the university with nine or more credits earned 
before May 1990 from the University of Maryland, College Park, or any 
other college may complete their general education requirements under 
the University Studies Program (USP), subject to certain limitations. (See 
USP and "Statute of Limitations. . ." section below.) Advanced 
Placement (AP) and other examination-based credits will not be 
considered in these determinations. 

University Studies Program (USP) 

For detailed information about USP requirements, see undergraduate 
catalogs dated 1992 or earlier, or contact the CORE program at 2130 
Mitchell Building, 301-405-9359. Information on USP is also contained 

at: www .ugst.umd.edu/ core/ us p. html. 

NOTE: Students who graduate under USP requirements August 1994 
and thereafter must fulfill the Advanced Studies requirements 
described in the Fall 1994 and subsequent catalogs. (See CORE 
Advanced Studies section above.) 

Maryland Public Community College Students 

For the purpose of determining which general education program 
is required (CORE or USP), students transferring to the University 
of Maryland from Maryland public community colleges shall be treated 
as if their registration dates were concurrent with enrollment at 
this university. 

Statute of Limitations for Previous General Education 
Programs at UMCP (GEP, GUR, USP) 

Undergraduate students who return to the university after August 1987 
no longer have the option of completing general education requirements 
under the older General Education Program (GEP) or the General 
University Requirements (GUR). Thereafter, following any substantive 
change in general education requirements (like the change in Fall 1990 
from USP to CORE), undergraduate students returning or transferring to 
College Park after a separation of five continuous years must follow the 
requirements in effect at the time of re-entry. An exception may be 
granted to those students who at the time of separation had completed 
60 percent of the general education requirements then in effect. 



52 General Education Programs 



Approved Courses for the CORE Program 

About the lists: 

Please refer to the program description above for the requirements in each CORE Category. 

1. These lists were current as of 1/ 23/04. Some additional courses may have been approved and some may have been deleted since that date. Please 
check the current Schedule of Classes and the online resources for the most current information on approved CORE courses being offered during a 
partiicular semester A selection of the approved courses is offered each semester 

COREOnline www.ymd.edy/CORE 

Schedule of Classes www.testudo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.html 

2. Some courses are approved for CORE for one semester only. This list, which offers special opportiunities, changes each semester It is listed in the 
current Schedule of Classes for the particular semester; however, these courses are often added after the Schedule goes to press so the online 
resources are the best reference for these special courses. 

3. Course numbers and titles change from time to time. The online CORE and scheduling resources (see note 1. above for site addresses) will have the 
most current information on any changes. 

4. In a partiicular semester, courses may be cross-listed or shared by more than one departiment and may appear under more than one course number If 
cross-listed or shared courses are approved for CORE, this information will be available in the online listings. Frequent instances include courses in AASP, 
AAST, AM ST, CMLT, LGBT, and WMST. 

5. Honors (HONR) courses are not included in the lists. For information about HONR courses that are approved for CORE, please refer to the online 
resources noted above. Other resources include the current "The University Honors Program Information and Course Description Booklet" and the 
University Honors Program website: www.honors.umd.edu 

5. For information about CORE Fundamental Studies courses, please see the Fundamental Studies section above. 



CORE Distributive Studies 

In the following CORE Distributive Studies list, 
courses noted "(D)" also meet the CORE Diversity 
Requirement. 

Humanities and the Arts 

Literature (CORE CODE: HL): 

AASP 298L Introduction to African-American Literature 

(also as ENGL 234) (D) 
AAST 298L Introduction to Asian American Literature 

(also as ENGL 233) (D) 
CHIN 213 Chinese Poetry into Engiish: 

An Introduction (D) 
CLAS 100 Classical Foundations 
CLAS 170 Greek and Roman Mythology 
CLAS 270 Greek Literature in Translation 
CLAS 271 Roman Literature in Translation 
CMLT 235 Introduction to Literatures of the African 

Diaspora (also as ENGL 235) (D) 
CMLT270 Global Literature and Social Change (D) 
CMLT275 World Literature by Women 

(also as WMST 275) (D) 
CMLT277 Literatures of the Americas (D) 
ENGL 201 Western World Literature: Homer to 

the Renaissance 
ENGL 202 Western World Literature: Renaissance 

to the Present 
ENGL 205 Introduction to Shakespeare 
ENGL 210 Themes in Early English Literature: 

Love, Adventure, and Identity 

(formerly ENGL 278C) 
ENGL 211 English Literature: Beginnings to 1800 
ENGL 212 English Literature: 1800 to the Present 
ENGL 221 American Literature: Beginning to 1855 
ENGL 222 American Literature: 1865 to the Present 
ENGL 233 Intro, to Asian American Literature (D) 

(also as AAST 298L) 
ENGL 234 Introduction to African-American Literature 

(also as AASP 298L)(D) 
ENGL 235 Introduction to the Literature of the African 

Diaspora (also as CMLT 235) (D) 
ENGL 240 Introduction to Fiction, Poetry and Drama 
ENGL 241 Introduction to the Novel 
ENGL 243 Introduction to Poetry 
ENGL 244 Introduction to Drama 
ENGL 250 Introduction to Literature by Women 

(also as WMST 255) (D) 
ENGL 252 The Hebrew Bible: Narrative 

(alsoasJWST262) 



ENGL 253 The Hebrew Bible: Poetry and Rhetoric 

(also as J WST 253) 
ENGL 255 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual 

Literatures (D) 
ENGL 277 Mythologies: An Introduction 
ENGL 278S The American Short Story in Its 

Worid Context 
ENGL278W Literature in a Wired Worid 
FREN 240 Masterworks of French Literature 

in Translation 
FREN 241 Women Writers of French Expression in 

Translation (also as WMST 241) (D) 
FREN 242 Black Writers of French Expression in 

Translation (D) 
FREN 250 Introduction to French Literature 
GERM 281 Women in German Literature and Society 

(also as WMST 281) (D) 
GERM 282 Germanic Mythology 
GERM 283 Viking Culture and Civilization 
GERM 284 Germanic Chivalric Culture 
GERM 285 German Film and Literature 
GERM 286 Ancient Indie Culture and Civilization 
GERM 287 Ancient Celtic Culture and Civilization 
ITAL 241 Modern Italian Women Writers - 

in Translation 
ITAL 251 Aspects of Contemporary Italian Literature 

and Culture 
JAPN 217 Japanese Literature in the Age of the 

Samurai (D) 
J WST 154 Reading the Bible: An Introduction to 

Critical Methods 
JWST219G Fantasy and the Supernatural in 

Jewish Literature 
J WST 252 The Hebrew Bible: Narrative 

(also as ENGL 252) 
JWST253 The Hebrew Bible: Poetryand Rhetoric 

(also as ENGL 253) 
JWST272 Jewish Literature in Translation 

(formerly HEBR 231) 
PORT 228A Latin American Literature and Society An 

Interdisciplinary Approach to the Amazon 

Ecosystem (also as SPAN 228A) (D) 
PORT 231 Introduction to the Literatures of the 

Portuguese Language (D) 
RUSS 221 Masterworks of Russian Literature I 
RUSS 222 Masterworks of Russian Literature II 
SPAN 221 Introduction to Literature 
SPAN 222 Cultural Difference in Contemporary Latin 

American Culture (D) 
SPAN 224 Violence and Resistance in the 

Americas (D) 
SPAN 228A Latin American Literature and Society An 

Interdisciplinary Approach to the Amazon 

Ecosystem (also as PORT228A) (D) 



WMST241 



WMST255 



WMST275 



WMST281 



Women Writers of French Expression in 
Translation (also as FREN 241) (D) 
Introduction to Literature by Women 
(also as ENGL 250) (D) 
Worid Literature by Women 
(also as CMLT275)(D) 
Women in German Literature and Society 
(also as GERM 281) (D) 



Humanities and the Arts 

The History or Theory of the Arts 
(CORE CODE: HA): 

AMST205 Material Aspects of American Life 

ARCH 170 Introduction to the Built Environment 

ARCH 223 History of Non-Westem Architecture (D) 

ARHU298B In Concert 

ARHU 298L The Creative Process in Dance (D) 

ARTH 100 Introduction to Art 

ARTH 200 Art of the Westem Worid to 1300 

ARTH 201 Art of the Westem Worid after 1300 

ARTH 250 Art: and Archeology of Ancient America (D) 

ARTH 275 Art and Archaeology of Africa (D) 

ARTH 290 Art of Asia (D) 

ARTT150 Introduction to Art Theory 

CMLT 214 Film, Form, and Culture 

CMLT 280 Film Art in a Global Society (D) 

DANC200 Introduction to Dance (D) 

ENGL 245 Film and the Narrative Tradition 

FREN 298_ Aspects of French Civilization 

MUET200 Worid Popular Musics and Gender 

(formeriy MUSC248C){D) 

MUET210 The Impact of Music on Life 

(formeriy MUSC210){D) 

MUET220 Selected Musical Cultures of the Worid (D) 

MUSC130 Survey of Music Literature 

MUSC140 Music Fundamentals I 

MUSC205 Historyof Rock Music, 1950- Present 

PHIL 230 Philosophy of the Arts 

RUSS 298K Soviet Film: Propaganda, Myth, Modernism 

THETllO Introduction to the Theatre 

THET 195 Gender and Pert^ormance (D) 

THET 240 African Americans in Film and Theatre (D) 

THET 290 American Theatre 1750-1890 

THET 291 American Theatre 1890-Present 

THET 293 Black Theatre and Peri^ormance I (D) 

THET 294 Black Theatre and Peri^ormance II (D) 

WMST 250 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, 

Art, and Culture (D) 

WRLD 125 The Creative Drive: Creativity in Music, 

Architecture, and Science 

(formeriy ARHU 125) 



General Education Programs 53 



Humanities and the Arts 

Humanities (CORE CODE: HO): 

MSP 200 African Civilization 
AMST201 Introduction to American Studies 
AMST203 Popular Culture in America 
AMST204 Film and American Culture Studies 
AMST211 Technology and American Culture 
ARHU 298A Medieval and Renaissance Humanism, 

Humanists, and Their World 
CHIN 202 Intermediate Written Chinese I 
CHIN 204 Intermediate Written Chinese II 
CHIN 205 Intermediate Chinese -Accelerated Track 
CMLT 291 International Perspectives on Lesbian and 

Gay Studies (D) 
COM M 200 Advanced Public Speaking 
EDPL 210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives 

on Education 
ENGL 280 Introduction to the English Language 
ENGL 282 Introduction to Rhetorical Theory 
FREN 201 Intermediate French 
FREN 202 Intermediate French Review 
FREN 204 Review Grammar and Composition 
FREN 211 French Reading and Conversation 
GERM 201 Intermediate German I 
GERM 202 Intermediate German II 
GERM 280 German-American Cultural Contrast 
HIST 110 The Ancient World 
HIST 112 The Rise of the West: 1500-1789 
HIST 215 Introduction to the Study of World 

Religions (also as J WST 2 19K) (D) 
ITAL122 Accelerated Italian II 
ITAL203 Intermediate Italian 

ITAL 204 Review Grammar and Composition 

ITAL 261 Cuisine, Culture, and Society in Italy 

Yesterday and Today (Taught in Italian) 
ITAL 271 The Italian-American Experience 
J WST 219A The World of the Dead Sea Scrolls 

(formerly 128A) 
J WST 219K Introduction to the Study of World 

Religions (also as HIST 216) (D) 
JWST250 Fundamental Concepts of Judaism 

(also as PHIL 234) 
KNES262 Philosophy of Sport 
KORA212 Reading for Speakers of Korean II 
LARC 160 Introduction to Landscape Architecture 
LASC 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I 

(also as PORT 234 and SPAN 234) (D) 
LASC 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II 

(also as PORT 235 and SPAN 235) (D) 
LATN201 Intermediate Latin 
LING 210 Structure of American Sign Language (D) 
LING 240 Language and M ind 
PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 
PHIL209E Existentialism 
PHIL 233 Philosophy in Literature 
PHIL 234 Fundamental Concepts of Judaism 

(also as J WST 250) 
PHIL 236 Philosophy of Religion 

PHIL 245 Political and Social Philosophy I 
PHIL 250 Philosophyof Science I 
PHIL 256 Philosophyof Biology I 

PHIL 282 Action and Responsibility 
PORT 223 Portuguese Culture (in English) 
PORT 224 Brazilian Culture (in English) (D) 
PORT 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I 

(also as LASC 234 and SPAN 234) (D) 
PORT 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II 

(also as LASC 235 and SPAN 235) (D) 
RUSS 201 Intermediate Russian I 
RUSS 202 Intermediate Russian II 
RUSS 281 Russian Language and 

Pre-Revolutionary Culture 
RUSS 282 Contemporary Russian Culture (D) 
RUSS 298M Building a New Reality: Russian Cinema at 

the End of the 20th Century (D) 
SPAN 125 Spanish Civilizations: From Kingdoms to 

Nationalities 
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish 
SPAN 202 Intermediate Grammar and Composition 
SPAN 223 U.S. Latino Culture (D) 
SPAN 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I 

(also as LASC 234 and PORT 234) (D) 
SPAN 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II 

(also as LASC 235 and PORT 235) (D) 
WMST265 Construction of Manhood and Womanhood 

in the Black Community (D) 



jviathematics and the Sciences, 
the l^b Courses 

Physical Sciences Lab (CORE CODE: PL): 

ASTR 100/ Introduction to Astronomy and 
111 Observational Astronomy Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
ASTR 101 General Astronomy 
ASTR 121 Introductory Astrophysics II -Stars 

and Beyond 
CHEM 103 General Chemistry I 
CHEM 113 General Chemistry II 
GEOG 201/ Geography of Environmental Systems 
211 and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
GEOL 100/ Physical Geology and Laboratory 
110 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
GEOL 103 Water, Earth, and Humans 
METO200/ 
201 Weather and Climate and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
PHYS 102/ 
103 Physics of Music and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
PHYS 105/ Light, Perception, Photography and Visual 
107 Phenomena and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
PHYS 115 Inquiry into Physics 
PHYS 117 Introduction to Physics 
PHYS 121 Fundamentals of Physics I 
PHYS 122 Fundamentals of Physics II 
PHYS 141 Principles of Physics 
PHYS 142 Principles of Physics 
PHYS 260/ General Physics: Vibrations, Waves, Heat, 
251 Electricity, and Magnetism and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) (formerly PHYS 252) 
PHYS 270/71 General Physics: Electrodynamics, 
Light, Relativity and Mod. Physics 
and Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) (formerly PHYS 253) 
PHYS 272/ Introductory Physics: Fields/ Experimental 
275 Physics I: Mechanics, Heat, and Fields 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 

jviathematics and the Sciences, 
the l^b Courses 

Life Sciences Lab (CORE CODE: LL): 

ANTH 220 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (D) 

BSCI103 The World of Biology 

BSCI 105 Principles of Biology I 

BSCI 106 Principles of Biology II 

BSCI 122 Microbes and Society 

BSCI 124/ Plant Biologyfor Non-Science Students 

125 and Plant Biology Laboratory 

(BOTH COURSES MUST BE TAKEN IN THE 

SAME SEMESTER) 
BSCI 201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 
BSCI 223 General Microbiology 
BSCI 224 Animal Diversity 
BSCI 227 Principles of Entomology 
CHEM 104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 
NRSC 200 Fundamentals of Soil Science 
PLSC 100 Introduction to Horticulture 

(formerly HORT 100) 
PLSC 101 Introduction to Crop Science 
(formerly AGRO 101) 

jviathematics and the Sciences, 
the i^b Courses 

M ath or Formal Reasoning Lab 
(CORE CODE: ML): 

NONE 



IMathematics and the Sciences, 
the Non-Lab Courses 

Physical Sciences Non-Lab (CORE CODE: 



PS) 



ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy 

(only if taken Fall 1993 or later) 
ASTR 120 Introductory Astrophysics - Solar System 
ASTR 200 Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics 
ASTR 220 Collisions in Space 
CHEM 121 Chemistryin the Modern World 
ENES 100 Introduction to Engineering Design 
ENES 105 How Things Work -Basic 

Technological Literacy 
ENSP 101 Introduction to Environmental Science 
GEOG 123 Causes and Implications of Global Change 

(also as GEOL/METO) 
GEOG 140 Coastal Environments 
GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History 
GEOL 120 Environmental Geology 
GEOL 123 Causes and Implications of Global Change 

(also as GEOG/METO) 
GEOL 212 Planetary Geology 
GEOL 214 Global Energy: Systems and Resources 
METO 123 Causes and Implications of Global Change 

(also as GEOG/ GEOL) 
M ETO 200 Weather and Climate 
PHYS 101 Contemporary Physics 
PHYS 104 How Things Work : Scientific Foundations 
PHYS 111 Physics in the Modem World 
PHYS 151 General Physics: Mechanics and 

Particle Dynamics 
PHYS 171 Introductory Physics: Mechanics and 

Relativity 
WRLD 135 Technology and the Environment: To Stem 

the Flow, the Nile Technology, Politics and 

the Environment (This course maybe 

counted for CORE in only ONE of these 

three areas: LS, PS, orSH) 

(formerly UNIV138A) 

jviathematics and the Sciences, 
the Non-Lab Courses 

Life Sciences Non-Lab (CORE CODE: LS): 

BSCI 120 Insects (formerly ENTM 100) 
BSCI 205 Environmental Science 

(formerly PBIO 235) 
BSCI 206 Chesapeake: A Living Resource 

(formerly PBIO 255) 
KNES 260 Science of Physical Activity and 

Cardiovascular Health 
NFSC 100 Elements of Nutrition 
NRSC 105 Soil and Environmental Quality 
PLSC 203 Plants, Genes, and Biodiversity 
WRLD 135 Technology and the Environment: 

To Stem the Flow, the Nile Technology, 
Politics and the Environment (This course 
may be counted for CORE in only ONE 
of these three areas: LS, PS, orSH) 
(formerly UNIV138A) 

jviathematics and the Sciences, 
the Non-Lab Courses 

Math or Formal Reasoning Non-Lab 
(CORE CODE: MS): 

GEOG 170 Maps and Map Use 

MATH 111 Introduction to Probability 

MATH 140 Calculus I 

MATH 141 Calculus II 

MATH 220 Elementary Calculus I 

MATH 221 Elementary Calculus II 

PHIL 170 Introduction to Logic 

PHIL209P Philosophy and Computers 

PHIL 271 Symbolic Logic I 

STAT 100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

Social Sciences and History 

Social or Political History (CORE CODE: SH): 

AASP 100 Introduction to African American Studies (D) 
AASP 202 Black Culture in the United States (D) 
AASP 298E Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1800 (D) 
AAST 201 Asian American History 
AAST 222 Immigration and Ethnicity in the United 
States (also as HIST 222) (D) 



54 General Education Programs 



ARHU 2981 American Slaver-American Freedom: Tlie 

African-American Experience Throughout 

Emancipation (D) 
ARHU 298K The History of the Booi<: Authorship, 

Reading, and Publishing from clay tablet 

to Hypertext 
CPSP 288E Americans and the Wilderness 

(also as HIST219T) 
ENGL 250 Introduction to Folklore 
GEMS 104 Topics in Science, Technology, and 

Society (This course may be counted for 

CORE in only ONE of these two areas: 

SH orSB) 
H1ST105 American Jewish Experience 

(also as J WST 141) 
HIST 111 The Medieval World 
HIST 113 Modern Europe: 1789 - Present 
HIST 120 Islamic Civilization (D) 
HIST 122 African Civilizations to 1800 (D) 
HIST 123 Sub-Saharan Africa since 1800 (D) 
HIST 125 Jewish Civilization (also as J WST 121) 
HIST 155 History of the United States to 1865 
HIST 157 History of the United States since 1855 
HIST 174 Introduction to the History of Science 
HIST 175 Science and Technology in 

Western Civilization 
HIST 210 Women in America to 1880 

(alsoas WMST210)(D) 
HIST 211 Women in America since 1880 

(alsoas WMST 211) (D) 
HIST 212 Women in Western Europe, 1750 - 

Present (also as WMST212)(D) 
HIST213 Historyof Sexuality in America (D) 
HIST219T Americans and the Wilderness 

(alsoas CPSP288E) 
HIST 222 Immigration and Ethnicity in the United 

States (alsoas AAST 222) (D) 
HIST 224 Modern Military History 1494-1815 
HIST 225 Modern Military History 1815-Present 
HIST 234 Historyof Britain to 1485 
HIST 235 Historyof Britain 1451-1714 
HIST 235 Historyof Britain 1588 to Present 
HIST237 Russian Civilization (D) 
HIST250 Latin-American History I (D) 
HIST 251 Latin-American History II (D) 
HIST255 African-American History (D) 
HIST 260 The North Atlantic World: 1550-1800 
HIST 266 The United States and World Affairs 
HIST 275 Law and Constitutionalism in 

American History 
HIST 281 Intro, to the Rabbinic Movement History 

and Culture (also as J WST 230) (D) 
HIST 282 Historyofthejewish People I 

(also as J WST 234) (D) 
HIST 283 History of the J ewish People II 

(also as J WST 235) (D) 
HIST 284 East Asian Civilization I (D) 
HIST285 East Asian Civilization II 
HIST 285 The Jew and the City through the 

Centuries (also as J WST 275) (D) 
JOUR 240 Advertising in America 
J WST 121 Jewish Civilization (also as HIST 125) 
JWST141 American Jewish Experience 

(alsoas HIST 105) 
J WST 230 Intro, to the Rabbinic Movement History 

and Culture (also as HIST 281) (D) 
J WST 234 Historyof the J ewish People I 

(alsoas HIST 282) (D) 
J WST 235 History of the J ewish People II 

(alsoas HIST 283) (D) 
J WST 275 The Jew and the City through the 

Centuries (alsoas HIST 285) (D) 
KNES 293 Historyof Sport in America 
WMST 210 Women in America to 1880 

(alsoas HIST 210) (D) 
WMST 211 Women in America since 1880 

(alsoas HIST 211) (D) 
WMST212 Women in Western Europe, 1750 - 

Present (also as HIST 212) (D) 
WRLD 135 Technology and the Environment: 

To Stem the Flow, the Nile Technology, 

Politics and the Environment (This course 

may be counted for CORE in only ONE of 

these three areas: LS, PS, orSH) 

(formerly UNIV 138A) 



Social Sciences and History 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 
(CORE CODE: SB): 

AASP 101 Public Policy and the Black Community 
AAST 200 Introduction to Asian American Studies 

(alsoas AMST298C)(D) 
AMST207 Contemporary American Cultures (D) 
AMST 260 American Culture in the Information Age 
AMST 298C Introduction to Asian American Studies 

(alsoas AAST 200) (D) 
ANTH 240 Introduction to Archaeology (D) 
ANTH 250 Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology 

and Linguistics (D) 
ANTH 262 Culture and Environment (D) 
AREC 240 Introduction to Economics and 

the Environment 
AREC 250 Elements of Agricultural and 

Resource Economics 
CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 
CCJS 105 Introduction to Criminology 
CPSP 124 Issues in International Studies 
CPSP 227 Science, Technology, and Society 
ECON 105 Economics of Social Problems 
ECON 200 Principles of Micro-Economics 

(formerly ECON 203) 
ECON 201 Principles of Macro-Economics 
EDHD 230 Human Development and Societal 

Institutions (D) 
GEMS 104 Topics in Science, Technology and 

Society (This course may be counted for 

CORE in only ONE of these two areas: 

SHorSB) 
GEOG 100 Introduction to Geography 
GEOG 130 Developing Countries (D) 
GEOG 202 The World in Cultural Perspective 
GVPT 100 Principles of Government and Politics 
GVPT 170 American Government 
GVPT 200 International Political Relations 
GVPT 250 Introduction to International Negotiation (D) 
HESP 120 Introduction to Linguistics 
JOUR 150 Introduction to Mass Communication 
LGBT200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, 

and Transgender Studies (D) 
LING 200 Introductory Linguistics 
PHIL 280 Introduction to Cognitive Studies 
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 
SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 
SOCY 105 Introduction to Contemporary 

Social Problems 
SOCY 227 Introduction to the Study of Deviance 
URSPIOO Challenge of the Cities 
WMST 200 Introduction to Women's Studies: 

Women and Society (D) 

CORE Advanced Studies 

Please refer to the program descriptions above for 
Advanced Studies requirements. 

CORE Capstone Option (majors only; after completing 
85 credits) (CORE CODE: CS): 



AMSC420 

ANSC420 
BCHM 465 
BMGT457 
BMGT495 
BSCI426 

BSCI454 
CHEM 399 

CHEM 491 
CHEM 492 
CMSC412 
CMSC424 
CMSC435 
DANC485 
EDSP490 
ENAE482 
ENAE 484 
ENBE485 



ENCE465 



Mathematical Modeling 

(alsoas MATH 420) 

Animal Production Systems 

Biochemistry III 

Marketing Policies and Strategies 

Business Policies 

Membrane Biophysics 

(formerly ZOOL 413) 

Microbial Biology (formerly MICB 480) 

Introduction to Chemical Research 

(Must be taken for at least 3 credits) 

Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 

Operating Systems 

Database Design 

Software Engineering 

Seminar in Dance 

Capstone Seminar in Special Education 

Aeronautical Systems Design 

Space Systems Design 

Capstone Design II (Please note that 

both ENBE 485 and ENBE 485 must 

be completed in order to satisfy CORE 

Capstone Requirements) 

Design of Civil Engineering Systems 



ENCH 445 Process Engineering Economics 

and Design II 
ENME 472 Integrated Product and Process 

Development II 
ENSP 486 Capstone in Environmental Science 

and Policy 
GEOL 394 Research Problems in Geology 
HIST 309_ Proseminar in Historical Writing 
HIST 396 Honors Colloquium II 
HIST408_ Senior Seminar 
KNES 497 Independent Studies Seminar 
LARC471 Capstone Studio 
MATH 420 Mathematical Modeling 

(alsoas AMSC 420) 
NFSC 422 Food Product Research and Development 
NFSC 491 Issues and Problems in Dietetics 
NRMT470 Natural Resources Management 
PHIL 425 Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy 
PHYS428 Physics Capstone Research 

CORE Human Cultural Diversity 
(CORE CODE: D): 

Please refer to the program descriptions above for the 
Diversity Requirements. 

In the following CORE Diversity list courses noted "*" 
also meet CORE Distributive Studies requirements. 
Diversity courses that are also approved for CORE 
Distributive Studies may be double counted. 

CORE Diversity Courses Recommended for Freshmen 
and Sophomores 



AASP 100 
AASP 202 
AASP298E 
AASP298L 

AAST 200 

AAST 222 

AAST298L 

AMST 207 
AMST 212 
AMST298C 

ANTH 220 
ANTH 240 
ANTH 260 

ANTH 262 
ARCH 223 
ARHU 2981 



ARHU298L 
ARTH 250 
ARTH 275 
ARTH 290 
CHIN 213 

CMLT235 

CMLT270 
CMLT275 

CMLT277 
CMLT280 
CMLT291 

CPSP 124 
DANC 138 
DANC 200 
EDHD 230 

EDPL201 

ENGL 233 

ENGL 234 

ENGL 235 

ENGL 250 



Intro, to African American Studies* 

Black Culture in the United States* 

Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1800* 

Introduction to African-American 

Literature* (alsoas ENGL 234) 

Introduction to Asian American Studies* 

(alsoas AMST 298C) 

Immigration and Ethnicity in the United 

States* (alsoas HIST 222) 

Introduction to Asian American Literature* 

(alsoas ENGL 233) 

Contemporary American Culture* 

Diversity in American Culture 

Asian American Experience* 

(alsoas AAST 200) 

Introduction to Biological Anthropology* 

Introduction to Archaeology* 

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology 

and Linguistics* 

Culture and Environment* 

History of Non-Western Architecture* 

American Slavery-American Freedom: 

The African-American Experience Through 

Emancipation* 

The Creative Process in Dance* 

Art and Archeology of Ancient America* 

Art and Archaeology of Africa* 

Art of Asia* 

Chinese Poetry into English: 

An Introduction* 

Intro, to Literatures of the African 

Diaspora* (also as ENGL 235) 

Global Literature and Social Change* 

World Literature by Women* 

(alsoas WMST 275) 

Literatures of the Americas* 

Film Art in a Global Society* 

International Perspectives on Lesbian and 

Gay Studies* 

Issues in International Studies 

Introduction to Ethnic Dance (2 credits) 

Introduction to Dance* 

Human Development and 

Societal Institutions* 

Education in Contemporary 

American Society 

Introduction to Asian American Literature* 

(alsoas AAST 298L) 

Introduction to African-American 

Literature* (also as AASP 298L) 

Intro, to Literatures of the African 

Diaspora* (also as CMLT235) 

Introduction to Literature by Women* 

(alsoas WMST 255) 



General Education Programs 55 



ENGL 255 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, and 

Bisexual Literatures* 
ENGL 277 Mythologies: An Introduction* 
FREN 241 Women Writers of French Expression in 

Translation* (also as WMST241) 
FREN 242 Black Writers of French Expression 

in Translation* 
GEOG 130 Developing Countries* 
GERM 281 Women in German Literature and Society* 

(alsoas WMST281) 
GVPT 250 Introduction to International Negotiation* 

(formerly GVPT288A) 
HIST 120 Islamic Civilization* 
HIST 122 African Civilizations to 1800* 
HIST 123 Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1800* 
HIST 2 10 Women in America to 1880* 

(alsoas WMST 210) 
HIST 211 Women in America since 1880* 

(alsoas WMST 211) 
HIST 212 Women in Western Europe, 1750 - 

Present* (also as WMST 212) 
HIST 213 History of Sexuality in America* 
HIST 216 Introduction to the Study of World 

Religions* (also as JWST219K) 
HIST 222 Immigration and Ethnicity in the United 

States* (alsoas AAST 222) 
HIST 237 Russian Civilization* 
HIST 250 Latin-American History I* 
HIST 251 Latin-American History II* 
HIST 255 African-American History, 1855-Present* 
HIST281 Intro, to the Rabbinic Movement History 

and Culture* (also as J WST 230) 
HIST 282 History of the Jewish People I* 

(also as J WST 234) 
HIST 283 History of the J ewish People II* 

(also as J WST 235) 
HIST 284 EastAsian Civilization I* 
HIST 2 85 The J ew a nd the City through the 

Centuries* (also as J WST 275) 
JAPN 217 Japanese Literature in the Age of 

the Samurai* 
J WST 219K Introduction to the Study of World 

Religions* (alsoas HIST 215) 
J WST 230 Intro, to the Rabbinic Movement 

History and Culture* (alsoas HIST 281) 
J WST 234 History of the J ewish People I* 

(alsoas HIST282) 
J WST 235 History of the J ewish People II* 

(alsoas HIST 283) 
J WST 275 The Jew and the City through the 

Centuries* (alsoas HIST 286) 
KNES 240 Exploring Cultural Diversity 

Through Movement 
LASC 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I* 

(also as PORT 234 and SPAN 234) 
LASC 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II* 

(also as PORT 235 and SPAN 235) 
LGBT200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, 

and Transgender Studies* 
LING 210 Structure of American Sign Language* 
MUET200 World Popular Musics and Gender 

(formerly: MUSC248C)* 
MUET210 The Impact of Music on Life 

(formerly: MUSC210)* 
MUET220 Selected Musical Cultures of the World* 
PORT 224 Brazilian Culture (in English)* 
PORT 225 The Cultures of Portuguese-Speaking Africa 
PORT 228A Latin American Literatures and Society: An 

Interdisciplinary Approach to the Amazon 

Ecosystem (also as SPAN 228A)* 
PORT 231 Introduction to the Literatures of the 

Portuguese Language* 
PORT 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I* 

(alsoas LASC 234 and SPAN 234) 
PORT 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II* 

(alsoas LASC 235 and SPAN 235) 
RUSS 282 Contemporary Russian Culture* 
RUSS 298M Building a New Reality: Russian Cinema 

at the End of the 20th Century* 
SOCY 241 Inequality in American Society 
SPAN 222 Cultural Difference in Contemporary Latin 

American Culture* 
SPAN 223 US Latino Culture* 
SPAN 224 Violence and Resistance in the Americas* 
SPAN 228A Latin American Literatures and Society: An 

Interdisciplinary Approach to the Amazon 

Ecosystem (also as PORT228A)* 
SPAN 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I* 

(also as LASC 234 and PORT 234) 



SPAN 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II* 

(alsoas LASC 235 and PORT 235) 
THET195 Gender and Performance* 
THET 240 African Americans in Film and Theater" 
THET293 Black Theatre and Performance I* 
THET 294 Black Theatre and Performance II* 
WMST 200 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women 

and Society* 
WMST210 Women in America to 1880* 

(alsoas HIST 210) 
WMST 211 Women in America since 1880* 

(alsoas HIST 211) 
WMST 212 Women in Western Europe, 1750 - 

Present* (alsoas HIST 212) 
WMST 241 Women Writers of French Expression in 

Translation* (alsoas FREN 241) 
WMST 250 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, 

Art, and Culture* 
WMST 255 Introduction to Literature by Women* 

(alsoas ENGL 250) 
WMST 265 Constructions of Manhood and 

Womanhood in the Black Community* 
WMST275 World Literature by Women* 

(alsoas CMLT275) 
WMST 281 Women in German Literature and Society* 

(alsoas GERM 281) 

CORE Diversity Courses 
RecommendecJ for Juniors and Seniors 
(after 60 credits) 

AASP 312 Social and Cultural Effects of Colonization 

and Racism 
AASP 441 Science, Technology and the 

Black Community 
AASP 443 Blacks and the Law 
AASP 499R Race and Gender: Political Theory, 

Economics, the Law, and Popular Culture 
AAST498A Special Problems in Counseling and 

Personnel Services: Education and 

Counseling Issues for Asian Americans 

(alsoas EDCP498A) 
AGNR 401 Agricultural Support Systems in 

Developing Countries 
AMST 418S Racism and Whiteness in the U.S. 
AMST 418T Constructions of Difference and Inequality 
ANTH 352 Diversity in Complex Societies 
AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and 

Food Supplies 
AREC 445 Agricultural Development in the Third World 
ARTH 375 Ancient Art and Archeology of Africa 

(formerly ARTH 475) 
ARTH 376 Living Art of Africa (formerly ARTH 476) 
ARTH 384 Art of Japan (formerly ARTH 395) 
ARTH 385 Art of China (formerly ARTH 390) 
ARTH 485 Chinese Painting (formerly ARTH 490) 
ARTH 486 Japanese Painting (formerly ARTH 495) 
ARTT 463 Principles and Theory: African-American Art 
ARTT464 Theory of Contemporary Global Art Making 
CCJS 370 Race, Crime and Criminal Justice 
CCJS498A Special Topics in Criminology and Criminal 

Justice: Women and Crime 
CHIN 313 Chinese Poetry and Prose in Translation 
CHIN 315 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation 
CHIN 316 Traditional Chinese Values 
CLAS 309D Diversity and Classics 
CLAS 320 Women in Classical Antiquity 

(alsoas WMST 320) 
COMM 324 Communication and Gender 

(formerly SPCH) 
COMM 350 The Rhetoric of Black America 

(formerly SPCH) 
COMM 459A Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement 

(formerly SPCH) 
COMM 459B Rhetoric of the Abolitionist and Suffrage 

Movement (formerly SPCH) 
COMM 482 Intercultural Communication 

(formerly SPCH) 
EALL 300 The Languages of East Asia 
ECON 375 Economics of Poverty and Discrimination 
EDCP 312 Mutli-Ethnic Peer Counseling 
EDCP420 Education and Racism 
EDCP 462 Disability in American Society 
EDCP 498A Special Problems in Counseling and 

Personnel Services: Education and 

Counseling Issues for Asian Americans 

(alsoas AAST 498A) 
ENGL 339 Native American Literature 



ENGL348_ Literary Works by Women 

(Topic will vary; also as WMST 348*) 
ENGL 349_ Asian American Literatures 

(Topics will vary) 
ENGL 360 African, Indian, and Caribbean Writers 
ENGL 362 Caribbean Literature in English 
ENGL368_ Special Topics in the Literature of Africa 

and the African Diaspora (topics will vary) 
FMST 381 Poverty, Affluence, and Families 
FMST430 Gender Issues in Families 

(alsoas WMST430) 
FREN 482 Gender and Ethnicity in Modern French 

Literature 
FREN 499B Literature of Francophone 
GEOG 323 Latin America 
GEOG 326 Africa 
GERM 349M Germanic Literatures in Translation: 

Masten/vorks of Yiddish Literature 

(also as J WST 375) 
GVPT 447 Islamic Political Philosophy 
GVPT 471 Women and Politics 
HIST314A Crisis and Change in the Middle East and 

Africa: Nationalism and Nation-Building in 

the Middle East 
HIST 316A Crisis and Change in Latin America: 

Slavery and Race Relations in 

Latin America 
HIST 451 Blacks in American Life: 1865 to Present 

HIST 473 History of the Caribbean 
HIST 474 History of Mexico and Central America I 
HIST 475 History of Mexico and Central America II 
HIST 491 Historyof the Ottoman Empire 
HIST 493 Victorian Women in England, France and 

the United States (also as WMST453) 
HIST 494 Women in Africa (formerly HIST 458B) 
HIST 495 Women in Medieval Culture and Society 
HIST496 Africa Since Independence 
HLTH 471 Women's Health (also as WMST471) 
HLTH 487 Adult Health and Development Program 
JOUR 452 Women in the Media (alsoas WMST452) 
J OUR 453 News Coverage of Racial Issues 
JWST375 Germanic Literatures in Translation: 

Masten/vorks of Yiddish Literature 

(alsoas GERM 349M) 
KNES 492 History of the Sportswoman in American 

Organizations (also as WMST492) 
LGBT327 LGBT Film and Video 
LING 450 Diversity and Unity in Human Languages 
MUET432 Music in World Culture I (formerly: MUSC 

432) 
MUET433 Music in World Culture II 

(formerly: MUSC 433) 
MUSC 320 Epic as Song and Saga: Cross-Cultural 

Perspectives 
NRSC 440 Crops, Soils, and Civilization 

(formerly AGRO 440) 
PHIL 407 Gay and Lesbian Philosophy 
PLSC 303 International Crop Science 

(formerly AGRO 303) 
PORT 322 Survey of African Literatures of Portuguese 

Expression (in Portuguese) 
PORT 378_ Brazilian Cinema (in Translation) 

(topic will vary) 
PORT 475 Africa in Brazil 
PORT478C Women as Authors and Characters in 

Brazilian Literature 
PSYC 336 Psychology of Women 

(alsoas WMST 336) 
PSYC 354 Cross-Cultural Psychology 
SOCY 325 Sociology of Gender (also as WMST 325) 
SOCY 462 Women in the Military 
THET 496 African American Women Filmmakers ( 

alsoas WMST 495) 
THET 497 Non-Traditional Theatre 
URSP372 Diversity and the City 
WMST 320 Women in Classical Antiquity 

(alsoas CLAS 320) 
WMST325 Sociology of Gender (also as SOCY325) 
WMST 336 Psychology of Women (alsoas PSYC 336) 
WMST348_ Literary Works by Women 

(topic will vary; also as ENGL 348*) 
WMST430 Gender Issues in Families 

(alsoas FMST 430) 
WMST452 Women in the Media (also as JOUR 452) 
WMST453 Victorian Women in England, France and 

the United States (also as HIST 493) 
WMST471 Women's Health (also as HLTH 471) 
WMST 4 92 History of the Sportswoman in American 

Organizations (also as KNES 492) 
WMST 496 African American Women Filmmakers 

(also as THET 496) 



56 



c hapter 6 T he C ollegesand Schools 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL 
RESOURCES (AGNR) 

0107 Symons Hall, 301405-7751 
E-mail: eweiss@deans.umd.edu 
www.agnr.umd.edu 

Dean: Bruce L. Gardner (Interim) 
Associate Dean: Leon H. Slaughter 
Assistant Dean: J ohn A. Doerr 

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources offers a variety of 
academic programs that apply science, management, design, and 
engineering to improve the world in which we live and work. Feeding the 
world population, developing scientifically-based land use practices and 
policies, understanding animal and plant biology, improving nutrition and its 
effects on human health, and profitably managing farms and 
agribusinesses in harmony with ecosystems are all vital concerns of the 
College. Integrating the use and protection of natural resources in the 
production of food and nursery crops is a challenge facing students. 

Each student in the College is assigned a faculty adviser to assist in selecting 
courses to meet the individual needs of our diverse student body. In addition 
to course work, undergraduates have opportunities to work closely with faculty 
in state-of-the-art facilities including new biological resources engineering, 
animal sciences, veterinary medicine, and plant sciences buildings. The 
College also serves as the academic home of the Maryland Campus of the 
Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. Nearby resources 
such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural National 
Research Center, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug 
Administration, the Smithsonian Institution and the National Zoo, Maryland's 
Departments of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and the Patuxent Wildlife 
Research Center enhance teaching, research, internship, and career 
opportunities for students. Field study courses offered in Brazil, Belize, Egypt, 
and Costa Rica and studyabroad programs expose students to other cultures 
and environments. Learning opportunities are also strengthened through 
student involvement in such co-curricular activities as the College Honors 
Program, career programs, leadership workshops, and student clubs. 

Graduates are employed in a variety of professions as dieticians, food 
scientists, landscape architects, engineers, natural resource managers, 
environmental consultants, land use planners, agribusiness managers, 
stock and commodity brokers, or lawyers specializing in environmental 
issues. Others work at government and industry research laboratories, 
biotechnology and biomedical firms, and in hospitals, fish and wildlife 
programs, the Peace Corps, public health departments, and large food- 
production operations. Many graduates pursue advanced degrees in 
veterinary medicine, law, medicine, physical therapy, or graduate school. 

Departments in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources offer the 
following programs of study: 

Agricultural and Resource Economics— Business Management; 
Environmental Policy; Farm Production; Food Production; International 
Agriculture; and Political Process. 

Animal Sciences— Animal Management and Industry; Avian Business; 
Laboratory Animal Management; and Professional/ Sciences. 

Combined Vet. Med./ Animal Sciences Degree 

Biological Resources Engineering— Water Resources; Bioenvironmental 
Engineering; Aquacultural Engineering; and Biomedical Engineering. 



Natural Resource Sciences— Conservation of Soil, Water and Environment, 
Horticulture and Crop Production, Landscape Management, Plant Sciences, 
Turf and Golf Course Management, and Urban Forestry. 

General Agricultural Sciences 

Landscape Architecture 

Natural Resources M anagement— Environmental Education/ Park 
Management; Land and Water Resource Management; and Plant and 
Wildlife Resource Management. 

Nutrition and Food Science— Dietetics; Food Science; and Nutritional Science. 

In addition, the college plays a major role in the Environmental Science 
and Policy Program, and sponsors several of its areas of concentration. 

Advantage of Location and Facilities 

Educational opportunities in the College of Agriculture and Natural 
Resources are enhanced by the proximity of several research units of the 
federal government. Teaching and research activities in the College are 
conducted with the cooperation of scientists and professional people in 
government positions. Of particular interest are the National Agricultural 
Research Center at Beltsville, the National Agricultural Library, the National 
Arboretum, and the Food and Drug Administration. 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical sciences, social sciences, 
landscape design, and engineering principles is conducted in well-designed 
classrooms and laboratories. The application of basic principles to practical 
situations is demonstrated for the student in numerous ways. In addition to 
on-campus facilities, several operating education and research facilities are 
located throughout Maryland. Horticultural and agronomic crops, turf, beef, 
dairy cattle, and poultry are maintained under practical and research 
conditions also used for environmental studies. 

Requirements for Admission 

It is recommended that students entering the College of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources have completed a high school preparatory course that 
includes: English, 4 units; mathematics, 3 units; biological and physical 
sciences, 3 units; and history or social sciences, 2 units. Four units of 
mathematics should be elected by students who plan to major in biological 
resources engineering. The Landscape Architecture major is a limited 
enrollment program (LEP). See chapter 1 for general limited-enrollment 
program admission policies. 

Degree Requirements 

students graduating from the College must complete at least 120 credits 
with a grade point average of 2.0 in all courses applicable toward the 
degree. Requirements of the major and supporting areas are listed under 
individual program headings in chapter 7. 

Advising 

Each student in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is 
assigned to a faculty adviser. Advisers normally work with a limited number 
of students and are able to give individual guidance. Students entering the 
freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum are assigned to 
departmental advisers for counsel and planning of all academic programs. 



School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 57 



students who have not selected a definite curriculum are assigned to a 
general adviser who assists with the choice of electives and acquaints 
students with opportunities in the curricula in the College of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources and in other units of the university. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of scholarships are available for students enrolled in the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources. These include awards by the Agricultural 
Development Fund, Arthur M. Ahalt Memorial Scholarship, Attorney General's 
Scholarship, Beltsville Garden Club Scholarship, Chester F. Bletch Fund, 
Bowie-Crofton Garden Club Scholarship, Franl< D. Brown Memorial 
Scholarship, Jonas and Joan Cash Student Award, Chapel Valley Landscape 
Company Honorary Scholarship, George Earle Cook, Jr. Scholarship Fund, 
Ernest T. Cullen Memorial Scholarship, Richard F. Davis Memorial Award, 
Jerry V. DeBarthe Memorial Fund, William R. DeLauder Fund, Mylo S. Downey 
Memorial Scholarship, Robert Facchina/Johanna Foods Scholarship, James 
R. Ferguson Memorial Scholarship, Kenneth S. Fowler Memorial Fund, 
Goddard Memorial Scholarship, Manasses J. and Susanna Grove Memorial 
Scholarship, Marian Maloney Weiss Memorial Fund, Maryland Council of 
Farmers Coop Scholarship, Maryland Greenhouse Growers Association 
Scholarship, Maryland Nurserymen's Association Scholarships, Paul R. 
Poffenberger Scholarship Fund, the Ross and Pauline Smith Fund for 
Agriculture, J . Herbert Snyder Scholarship, Southern States Cooperative, Inc., 
the A.F. Vierheller Award Fund in Horticulture, Siegfried Weisberger Jr. 
Scholarship Fund, Theodore B. and Georgianna Miles Weiss Memorial Fund, 
and the Winslow Foundation. 

Honors 

Students may apply for admission to the College Honors program after 
completing 56 credits with a minimum 3.2 GPA in a program within the 
College. Honors students work with a faculty mentor and must take at least 
12 credits of honors courses including a senior thesis. Interested students 
should contact their faculty adviser. 

Student Organizations 

students find opportunity for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture and Natural 
Resources. These organizations are AGNR Student Council, Alpha Zeta, 
Agribusiness Club, Agronomy Club, Alpha Gamma Rho, Animal Husbandry 
Club, ASAE, the Society for Engineering in Agricultural, Food and Biological 
Systems, Collegiate 4-H, Collegiate FFA, Food and Nutrition Club, 
Horticulture Club, Landscape Architecture Student Association, INAG Club, 
Natural Resources Management Society, Poultry Science Club, Sigma 
Alpha, Soil and Water Conservation Society UMCP Student Chapter, 
Symbiosis, Equestrian Club, DM Food Technology Club, and Veterinary 
Science Club. 



RESEARCH AND SERVICE UNITS 
Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) supports research 
conducted primarily by 120 faculty scientists located within the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources. Faculty use state-of-the-art facilities such 
as a new Research Greenhouse Complex and Environmental Simulator, as 
well as 10 off-campus research locations, for research in the science, 
business, policy and practice of agriculture. MAES supports research that 
benefits consumers and producers alike; for example, our significant focus 
on the environment protects valuable natural resources such as the 
Chesapeake Bay Undergraduate students also benefit from mentoring by 
MAES -supported faculty and instructional use of MAES facilities statewide. 

Cooperative Extension Service 

The Maryland Cooperative Extension Service (MCES) educates citizens in 
the application of practical, research-based knowledge to critical issues in 
agricultural and agribusiness including aquaculture; natural resources and 
the environment; human development, nutrition, diet, and health; youth 
development and 4-H; and family and community leadership. The statewide 
program includes more than 180 faculty and support staff located in 23 
counties, the City of Baltimore, four regional centers, and the University of 
Maryland's College Park and Eastern Shore campuses. In addition, more 
than 15,000 volunteers and citizens in Maryland give generously of their 
time and energy 



VIRGINIA-MARYLAND REGIONAL 
COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, 
MARYL^ND CAMPUS 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 
1202 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, 301-314-6830 
www.vetmed.vt.edu 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine is operated 
by the University of Maryland and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University. Each year, 30 Maryland and 50 Virginia residents 
comprise the entering class of a four-year program leading to a Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine (DVM). 

The first three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 
University in Blacksburg, Virginia. The final year of instruction is given at 
several locations, including the University of Maryland, College Park. 

A student desiring admission to the college must complete the pre-veterinary 
requirements and apply for admission to the professional curriculum. 
Admission to this program is competitive, and open to all Maryland residents. 
All Maryland residents' applications are processed at the College of 
Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus, University of Maryland, College Park. 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 
(Two-Yea r Program) 

E-mail: iaa@umail.umd.edu 

www .iaa.um d.edu 

The Institute of Applied Agriculture (lAA) awards academic certificates in 
Equine Business Management, General Ornamental Horticulture, Golf 
Course Management, Landscape Management, and Turfgrass 
Management. As a two-year program, the lAA has a separate admission 
policy Upon completion of the program, students are welcome to transfer 
to the University of Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland 
University College; and other schools. 

For more information about the lAA, its admissions procedures, and 
requirements, contact the Institute of Applied Agriculture, 2123 Jull Hall, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2525. Phone: 301- 
4054686. Information is also available on the Institute's home page and 
via E-mail (see addresses above). 

Course Code: AGNR 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PL^NNING, 
AND PRESERVATION (ARCH) 

Architecture Building, 301-405-6284 

w w w .arch, um d.edu 

Dean: Garth Rockcastle 

Associate Dean: Stephen F. Sachs 

Associate Dean: John W. Maudlinjeronimo 

Associate Dean: Lee W. Waldrep, Ph.D. 

Professors: Bechhoefert, Bennett, Bowden, Du Puy, Etiint, Francescato, 

Lewis, Schumacher, Vann 

Associate Professors: Bell, Bovill, Elsenbach, Gardner, Gournay Kelly 

Assistant Professors: Oakley Weese 

Lecturers: Mclnturff, Wortham 

Professor Emeritus: Fogle, Hill, Schlesinger 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation offers a four-year 
undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
architecture, and a graduate program leading to the professional degree of 
Master of Architecture. The undergraduate majorin architecture is designed 
to minimize the time required to complete the curriculum leading to the 
professional degree. 

Students receive rigorous and comprehensive instruction from a faculty 
whose members are active in professional practice or research. Many faculty 
members have distinguished themselves across the professional spectrum 
and represent different approaches to architectural design. Their individual 
areas of expertise include architectural design and theory, history, 
architectural archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, and 



58 School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 



historic preservation. Visiting critics, lecturers, and the Kea Distinguished 
Professor augment the faculty; together they provide students with the 
requisite exposure to contemporary realities of architectural design. 

The B.S. degree in architecture will qualify graduates to pursue a career in 
any of a number of fields, such as construction, real estate development, 
public administration, or historic preservation, or to continue in graduate 
work in professional fields such as architecture, urban planning, landscape 
architecture, or law. 

Recruitment 

1298 Architecture Building, 301405-6284 
www.arch.umd.edu 

Associate Dean: Lee W. Waldrep, Ph.D. 

The School's Associate Dean serves as a resource and contact person for 
prospective students interested in the School B.S. in Architecture degree 
and also serves as a liaison to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Admission to Architecture 

Architecture is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See the Admissions 
section in chapter 1 for general LEP admission policies. 

Freshm an Adm ission. Students with the most competitive records from high 
school will gain direct admission to the School of Architecture, Planning and 
Preservation from high school, as allowed by space considerations with the 
School. Because space may be limited before all interested freshmen are 
admitted to the program, early application is strongly encouraged. Freshmen 
admitted to the program will have access to the necessary advising through 
their initial semesters to help them determine if architecture is an 
appropriate major for their interests and abilities. 

Freshmen who are admitted to architecture will be subject to a performance 
review at the end of their third semester, typically 45 credits. To meet the 
provisions of the review, these students must demonstrate their ability to 
complete the following prior to enrollment of the studio sequence: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Distributive Studies CORE requirement 

• ARCH 170, 220, 221 and 242 with a minimum grade of B in each 

• MATH 220, PHYS 121 and 122 with a minimum grade of C in each and 
a 2.67 combined GPA for the three courses 

Students may be enrolled in ARCH 221, PHYS 122 and completing their 
distributive studies contemporaneous with the review process during their 
fourth semester. In addition, the review will include an assessment of a 
portfolio, the nature of which is specified by the School of Architecture, 
Planning, and Preservation essay, two letters of recommendation, and 
transcript. Please contact the School of Architecture, Planning and 
Preservation at 301-405-6284 for portfolio requirements and deadlines. 

Students are admitted to the School of Architecture, Planning and 
Presen/ation during Fall sennester only. 

Transfer Admission. New transfer students to the university as well as on- 
campus students who wish to change majors to architecture, will undergo a 
transfer admission process. Admission of transfer students may be 
severely limited, and capacity is determined each year in accordance with 
the success of incoming freshmen. To meet the provisions of the process, 
these students must demonstrate their ability to complete the following 
prior to enrollment of the studio sequence: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Distributive Studies CORE requirement 

• ARCH 170, 220, 221 and 242 with a minimum grade of B in each 

• MATH 220, PHYS 121 and 122 with a minimum grade of C in each and a 
2.67 combined GPA for the three courses 

Students may be enrolled in ARCH 221, PHYS 122 and completing their 
distributive studies contemporaneous with the review process during their 
fourth semester. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 in all college level 
coursework is also required. In addition, the review will include an assessment 



of a portfolio, the nature of which is specified by the School of Architecture, 
Planning and Preservation essay, two letters of recommendation, and 
transcript. Please contact the School of Architecture, Planning and 
Preservation at 301-405-6284 for portfolio requirements and deadlines. 

Students are adnnitted to the School of Architecture, Planning and Presen/ation 
during Fall semester only. 

Appeals. Students who are denied admission and who feel that they have 
extenuating circumstances may appeal in writing to the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell Building. Students denied admission 
at the 45 credit review may appeal directly to the School of Architecture, 
Planning and Preservation. 

For further information, contact the Counselor for Limited Enrollment 
Programs at 301-314-8385. 

Curriculum Requirements 

In the first two years of college, directly admitted students and those 
seeking to transfer into the School of Architecture, Planning and 
Preservation should adhere to the following curriculum: 

C redit H oyrs 

General Education (CORE) and Elective 29 

UNIVIOO-The Students in the University 1 

ENGL 101-lntroduction to Writing (CORE) 3 

MATH 220-Elementary Calculus I (CORE) 3 

ARCH 170-lntroduction to the Built Environment (CORE) 3 

PHYS 121-Fundamentals of Physics I (CORE) 4 

ARCH 220- History of Architecture I* 3 

ARCH 242-Drawing I 3 

PHYS 122-Fundamentals of Physics II (CORE) 4 

ARCH 221-History of Architecture II 3 

Total Credits 56 

If admitted after completing 56 credits, students are expected to complete 
the following requirements for a total of 120 credits: 

Credit Hours 
Third Year 

ARCH 400-Architecture Studio I* 6 

ARCH 410-Architectural Technology 1 4 

ARCH 4xx-Arch. History/ Area A** 3 

ARCH 401-Architecture Studio II 6 

ARCH 411-Architectural Technology II 4 

ARCH 343-Drawing II Line Drawing 3 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

CORE Requirements 3 

Total 32 

Fourth Year 

ARCH 402-Architecture Studio III 6 

ARCH 445-Visual Analysis of Architecture 3 

ARCH 412-Architectural Technology III 4 

ARCH 403-Architecture Studio IV 6 

ARCH 413-Architectural Technology IV 4 

CORE Requirements 3 

One of the following: 3 

ARCH 460-Site Analysis & Design 
ARCH 450— Introduction to Urban Planning 
ARCH 454-Theories of Urban Form 

ARCH 4xx-Arch. History/ Area B** 3 

Total 32 

Total Credits 120 

* Courses are to be taken in sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in 
course titles. 

** Architecture history courses: Area A, ARCH 422, 423, 432, and 436 
Area B, ARCH 433, 434, and 420. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

The school is housed in a modem, air-conditioned building providing design 
workstations for each student, a large auditorium, and seminar and classroom 
facilities. A well-equipped woodworking and model shop, and computer terminal 
facilities are also provided. The Architecture Library, one of the finest in the nation, 
offers convenient access to a current circulating collection of more than 24,000 
volumes, 6,000 periodicals, and an extensive selection of reference materials. 
Rare books and special acquisitions include a collection relating to intemational 
expositions and the 11,000-volume National Trust for Historic Preservation 
Library. A visual resources facility includes a reserve collection of 320,000 slides 
on architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, architectural science, and 
technology as well as audio-visual equipment for classroom and studio use. 



College of Arts and Humanities 59 



The school provides learning experiences through CADRE Corporation, a 
nonprofit center for architectural design and research, which provides an 
organizational framework for faculty and students to undertake contract 
research and design projects appropriate to the school's fundamental 
education mission. CADRE Corporation projects include building and urban 
design, urban studies, building technology, historic preservation, 
architectural archaeology studies in energy conservation, or other work for 
which the school's resources and interests are uniquely suited. 

Summer programs include travel to Rome, Paris, Turkey Great Britain, and 
other countries. In addition, summer workshops for historic preservation are 
sponsored by the school each year in Cape May NJ, which is a designated 
national historic landmark district, and Kiplin Hall in North Yorkshire, England. 
Students may earn direct credit doing hands-on restoration work and by 
attending lectures by visiting architects, preservationists, and scholars. 

Course Code: ARCH 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1102 Francis Scott KeyHall, 301405-2088 
www.arhu.umd.edu 

Professor and Dean: J ames Harris 
Office of Student Affairs: 301405-2110 
Academic Advisers: 301-405-2108 
www.arhu.umd.edu/ studentresources/ osa 

The College of Arts and Humanities embraces a heterogeneous group of 
disciplines, all of which value the development of critical thinking, fluent 
expression in writing and speech, sensitivity to ethical and aesthetic 
standards, and a complex understanding of history and culture. 
Departments and programs in Arts and Humanities, while they have strong 
individual identities, are also involved in interdisciplinary studies. Thus 
students will find, for example, courses in the Department of English that 
approach literature from political perspectives, courses in the Department of 
History that rely on feminist perspectives, courses in the Department of Art 
History and Archaeology that study African cultures, and so on. 

Further examples of the special opportunities available to students in this 
richly variegated college include an exceptional slide library in Art History and 
Archaeology the English Department's computer-based writing laboratory, 
an AT&T Foreign Language Classroom, a junior-year-abroad program in Nice, 
France, a year-abroad program in Sheffield, England, and Honors programs 
in most departments. In addition, the education vistas open to students in 
Dance, Music, and Theatre have been enhanced enormously by the recent 
opening of the Clarice Smith Center for the Performing Arts, which now 
houses those three departments. 

Recruitment 

1120L Francis Scott Key Hall, 301405-2096 

w w w .ARH U .um d.edy/ adm issions 
Admissions Coordinator: Cariejones-Bamow 

The College's Admissions Coordinator serves as a resource and contact 
person for prospective students interested in Arts and Humanities degrees 
and also serves as a liaison to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Entrance Requirements 

students wishing to major in one of the creative or performing arts are 
encouraged to seek training in the skills associated with such an area prior 
to matriculation. Students applying for entrance to these programs may be 
required to audition, present slides, or submit a portfolio as a part of the 
admission requirements. 



Graduation Requirements 



The following College requirements apply only to students earning Bachelor 
of Arts degrees from the College of Arts and Humanities. These 
requirements are in addition to or in fulfillment of campus and 
departmental requirements. For information concerning the Bachelor of 
Music in the School of Music, students should consult a Music adviser. 

Students who double major in ARHU and another college on campus m yst 
complete the College requirements in ARHU of foreign language to the 
intermediate level, and 45 hours of upper-level credit. 



All Arts and Humanities freshman (excluding students in College Park 
Scholars, Honors Humanities, or University Honors) must take UNIV 101, 
The Student in the University and Introduction to Computer Resources, 
during their first semester on campus. 

Distribution 

A minimum of 45 of the total of 120 semester hours must be upper-level 
work (i.e., courses numbered 300499). 

Foreign Language 

Language proficiency may be demonstrated in one of several ways: 

(a) Successful completion of level 4 in one language in high school. 
Students must provide a high school transcript to verify 
exemption. 

(b) Successful completion of an intermediate-level college foreign 
language course designed by the department. 

(c) Successful completion of a language placement examination in 
one of the campus language departments offering such 
examinations. 

Students who have native proficiency in a language other than English 
should see an adviser in the ARHU Office of Student Affairs, or call 301- 
405-2108. 

Major Requirements 

All students must complete a program of study consisting of a major (a 
field of concentration) and supporting courses as specified by one of the 
academic units of the College. No program of study shall require in excess 
of 60 semester hours. Students should consult the unit in which they will 
major for specific details; certain units have mandatory advising. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the lower-division departmental 
prerequisites, of 24 to 40 hours, at least 12 of which must be in courses 
numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must be taken at the 
University of Maryland, College Park. 

A major program usually requires a secondary field of concentration 
(supporting courses). The nature and number of these courses are 
determined by the major department. 

No grade lower than C may be used to fulfill major or supporting course 
requirements. No course for the major or support module may be taken 
Pass-Fail. 



Advising 



Freshmen and new transfer students have advisers in the Arts and 
Humanities College Office of Student Affairs (301405-2108) who assist 
them in the selection of courses and the choice of a major. After selecting 
a major, students myst see the departmental adviser for that major. All 
first-year students (both freshmen and transfers) and seniors who have 
completed 85-100 credits have mandatory advising in both the College and 
the department. For further information about advising, students should 
see the section on advising in the Mini-Guide, available from the College, or 
call the ARHU Office of Student Affairs, 301405-2108. 

Degrees and Majors 

The College of Arts and Humanities offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
the following fields of study 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History and Archeology 

Chinese Language and Literature 

Classics 

Classical Humanities 

Greek 

Latin 

Latin and Greek 
Communication 
Dance 

English Language and Literature 
French Language and Literature 
Germanic Studies 
History 



60 College of Arts and Humanities 



Italian Language and Literature 

Japanese Language and Literature 

Jewish Studies 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Romance Languages 

Russian Language and Culture 

Russian Area Studies 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

The College also offers the degree of Bachelor of Music; certificate 
programs in Women's Studies, East Asian Studies, and Latin American 
Studies; and a program in Comparative Literature. 

Citations 

The College of Arts and Humanities offers Citations in the following areas 
of study: 

Citation in Archaeology 

Citation in American Literature 

Citation in Ancient Greel< Language & Literature 

Citation in British and American Literature 

Citation in British, Postcolonial and International Anglophone Literature 

Citations in Business Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian 

and Spanish 

Citations in Business Management for Foreign Language majors 

Citation in Chinese Language 

Citation in Chinese Studies 

Citation in Classical Languages & Mythology 

Citation in Classical Mythology 

Citation in Cognitive Science 

Citation in Comparative Religious Studies 

Citation in Comparative Studies 

Citation in French Language and Cultures 

Citation in Germanic Studies 

Citation in Interdisciplinary Multimedia and Technology 

Citation in Italian Language and Culture 

Citation in Japanese 

Citation in J ewish Studies 

Citation in Korean Studies 

Citation in Latin Language and Literature 

Citation in Linguistics 

Citation in Literature by Women 

Citation in Literature of the African Diaspora 

Citation in Music Performance 

Citation in Music Studies 

Citation in Philosophy 

Citation in Philosophy of Science 

Citation in Portuguese Languages & Cultures 

Citation in Renaissance Studies 

Citation in Rhetoric (J oint with Department of Communication) 

Citation in Russian Language 

Citation in Russian Language and Culture 

Citation in Spanish Language & Cultures 

Citation in Value Theory 

Citations in the College of Arts and Humanities offer students in all 
disciplines the opportunity to pursue an in-depth, structured program of 
study in a field outside their major. Each student who successfully 
completes a citation (15-16 credits) will receive a certificate, and the 
accomplishment will be noted on the student's transcript. Consult 
departmental listings for more information. 

Internships 

Several departments within Arts and Humanities have well-established 
internship options. For more information on internships tal<en for academic 
credit, students should contact their departmental academic advisor. 
Typically students must be in good academic standing and in their junior or 
senior year to complete a for-credit internship. They usually complete an 
application and attach a current academic transcript, and the experience 
usually lasts for one semester. In addition to the site experience, students 
write an analysis of the experience in conjunction with a faculty member of a 
class. Internships in literacy and in the Maryland General Assembly are 
available through the English Department 301-405-3827. For assistance in 
locating an internship site, visit the Career Center at 3100 Hornbake Library, 
South Wing or do a search on the web site www.careercenter.umd.edu. 



Certification of High School Teachers 

A student who wishes certification as a high school teacher in a subject 
represented in this College must consult the College of Education in the 
second semester of the sophomore year. Application for admission to the 
Teacher Education program is made at the time that the first courses in 
Education are tal<en. Enrollment in the College of Education is limited. 

Honors 
Honors Programs 

Most departments in the College of Arts and Humanities offer departmental 
Honors Programs (DHP). DHPs are upper-division programs that provide 
students with a transition from the two-year University Honors and College 
Parl< Scholars programs to individual academic units. Students enrolled in 
departmental Honors work independently with faculty members in subjects 
of special interest, develop and deepen their research skills, and in the 
process earn an even stronger degree. Students must have a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 3.0 to be admitted. For further information 
about individual Departmental Honors Programs and policies, consult with 
departmental advisers. 

Honors Humanities 

Olio EastonHall, 301405-6992 
www. honors human ities.umd.edu 
Director: Robert Gaines 
Assistant Director: Tanya J ung 

Entering freshmen participate by invitation in Honors Humanities, a two- 
year living/ learning program. Honors Humanities is for academically 
talented students who have intellectual ambitions in the humanities and 
arts or a desire to develop their education on a liberal arts foundation. The 
program provides students with stimulating seminars, exciting academic 
friendships, a lively home base in Easton Hall, and opportunities to take 
advantage of the intellectual, cultural, and artistic riches of the region 
around Washington, D.C. Upon successful completion of the program, 
students earn a citation in Honors Humanities, and this citation is entered 
upon their university transcripts. 

College Park Scholars 

CPS in the Arts— Peter Beicken, David Solomon 
CPS in American Cultures— Sangeeta Ray 

The College of Arts and Humanities co-sponsors two cross-disciplinary 
College Park Scholars programs in Arts and American Cultures. These two- 
year programs provide exciting living-learning environments in specially- 
equipped residence halls for incoming freshmen. Students with strong 
interests in these areas meet in weekly colloquia with faculty in the Arts 
program with student teachers as well (usually alumni of the program), to 
pursue creative and intellectual endeavors. Field trips, invited speakers, 
and a yearly staged Spring Fair (Arts) stimulate creativity and the sense of 
togetherness while forming a community of learners and teachers. 
American Cultures focuses on the continent allowing students to think 
comparatively. Students present on various aspects of culture and history 
with a culminating festival in the Spring semester. The Scholars program 
gives students the opportunity to study with their peers while being in close 
contact with their faculty advisers and experiencing a small college 
environment that provides a special intellectual, creative and social home 
for 150 students (freshmen and sophomores) in each program. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa in chapter 4. 

Research and Service Units 

Academic Computing Services 

1116 Francis Scott KeyHall, 301405-2104 
www. A RHU.umd.edu/ technology 
Director: Kathleen R. Cavanaugh 

Academic Computing Services (ACS) supports the use of technology by 
faculty, staff, and students in the College of Arts and Humanities. ACS 
maintains a variety of laboratories and instructional facilities to support the 
needs of the College. These include computer-equipped classrooms such 
as the Language Technology Classroom and the English New Media 
Classroom as well as facilities, such as the lab in the St. Mary's Hall, 
designed for individual student use. 



College of Arts and Humanities 61 



The Art Gallery 

1202 Art-Sociology Building, 301405-2753 

www.artgallery.umd.edu 

Director: Scott D. Habes 

The Art Gallery presents a series of exhibitions each year of historic and 
contemporary art in a variety of media and subject matter. Opportunities for 
museum training and arts management experience are available to 
students through intern and worl< -study positions. 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century JVlusic 

2101 Skinner Building, 301405-7780 
www.umd.edu/EdRes/ Colleges/ ARHU/ Depts/ 19thCent/ 
Director: H. Robert Cohen 
Research Coordinator: Richard Kitson 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music promotes research 
focusing on nineteenth-century music and musical life. The center's 
programs are designed to facilitate the study collection, editing, indexing, 
and publication of documentary source materials. 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies 

0139 Taliaferro Hall, 301405-6830 

www .crbs.umd.edu 

Founding Director: S. Schoenbaum (1927-96) 

Director: Adele Seeff 

Associate Director: Karen Nelson 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies promotes teaching and 
research in the Renaissance and Baroque Periods in all disciplines of the 
arts and humanities. The Center sponsors a vast array of programs, 
including annual interdisciplinary symposia, special lectures and 
performances, conferences, summer institutes, and a volume series of 
symposia proceedings published by the University of Delaware Press in 
conjunction with Associated University Presses. As part of its mission to 
support undergraduate education, the Center offers a citation in 
Renaissance studies and coordinates a series of interdisciplinary arts and 
humanities courses. Through its CAST program (Center Alliance for School 
Teachers), the Center provides professional development to secondary 
school arts and humanities teachers throughout the state of Maryland and 
an after-school drama program for at-risk high school students. The 
planning committee for Attending to Early Modern Women-one of the 
Center's standing committees-organizes and coordinates an international 
symposium on the university's campus every three years. 

David C. Drisl<ell Center for the Study of the African Diaspora 

2114 Tawes Fine Arts Building ZIP: 1220 
301-314-2615 

driskellcenterfumail.umd.edu 
www .driskellcenter.umd.edu 
Director: Eileen J uilien 

Established in 2001 through the generous gifts of David C. Driskell, 
Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art, and a community of 
artists, scholars, and friends associated with the University of Maryland, 
the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the African Diaspora is a venue 
for the exploration of the presence of Africa and the African diaspora in 
modern culture. Through performances and exhibitions, conferences and 
symposia, grant and fellowship competitions, and outreach activities, the 
Driskell Center seeks to nurture research and creativity of the highest 
caliber, provide training for scholars and students on issues and 
methodologies in the study of the African diaspora, and encourage the 
growth of future generations of artists and researchers who can bring new 
insights to the phenomenon of the African diaspora and its influence. 

The Driskell Center is a unit of the College of Arts and Humanities. It 
assumes several programs formerly administered by the Committee on 
Africa and the Americas, a joint venture between Arts and Humanities and 
the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity (CRGE) 

2103 Tawes-Fine Arts BIdg, 301405-2931 
www .crge.umd.edu 
Director: Bonnie Thornton Dill 
Assistant Director: AmyE. McLaughlin 

The Consortium is an association of academic units and individual faculty on 
the University of Maryland Campus whose mission is to promote, advance 
and conduct, research, scholarship and faculty development that examines 



the intersections of race, gender and ethnicity with other dimensions of 
difference. The Consortium also offers programs and opportunities aimed at 
student development including fellowships and colloquia. 

language House 

0107 St. Mary's Hall, 301405-6996 
www .umd.edu/ langhouse 
Coordinator: Phoenix Liu 

The Language House is a campus residence for students wishing to 
immerse themselves in the study of a foreign language and culture. A total 
of over 100 students of Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, 
Japanese, Russian, and Spanish share 19 apartments. A live-in graduate 
mentor leads each language cluster. The goal of language immersion is 
achieved through activities organized by the students and mentors, a 
computer-based Language Learning Center, an audio-visual room, an 
international cafe, and foreign television programs received via satellite. 

language JVledia Services 

1204 Jimenez Hall, 301405-6927 

Facsimile: 301-314-9752 

Email: jb434@umail.umd.edu 

cwl88@umail.umd.edu 

www .umd.edu/ Ims 

Janel Brennan Tillman, Coordinator of Foreign Language Instructional 

Technology 

Christopher J . Watkins, Electronics Technician III 

Serving the technology needs of the foreign language programs in the 
College of Arts and Humanities, Language Media Services provides for the 
audiovisual and computing needs of students, faculty and staff. The LMS 
collection consists of instructional materials as well as audio and video 
equipment. The unit supports a computing facility and audio lab, and also 
provides workshops and training for faculty in regards to the integration of 
technology into their instruction. 

FOU\ 

1109 Jimenez Hall, 3014054046 
www .umd.edu/ tola 
Coordinator: Naime Yaramanoglu 

The FOLA (Foreign Language) Program enables qualified students with high 
motivation to acquire a speaking knowledge of a number of foreign 
languages not offered in regular campus programs. While instruction is 
basically self-directed, students meet regularly with a native-speaking tutor 
for practice sessions to reinforce what has already been covered through 
the individual use of books and audio tapes. Final examinations are 
administered by outside examiners who are specialists in their fields. 

Business, Culture and Languages Program 

1109 Jimenez Hall, 301405-8183 orahelmkur@umd.edu 
www .umd.edu/ be! 
Director: Anna Helm 

The Business, Culture & Languages Program offers undergraduate students 
at the University of Maryland a comprehensive education specifically 
designed to help them compete in the global marketplace by bridging the 
two disciplines of business and language. In addition to the studying of 
business and foreign language, BCL attempts to help students develop 
cultural, sensitivity and the ability to adjust to different cultural contexts. 
The Business, Culture & Languages Program distinguishes itself by offering 
a flexible structure of study options, an interdisciplinary curriculum, and a 
menu of "non-traditional" courses. Students have a choice of two options 
in the Business, Culture and Languages Program: 

• A double major in Business and a foreign language. 

• A single major in either Business or one of the following foreign 
languages (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, 
or Spanish with Business Language Option) with citation in the 
other discipline. 

In addition to these study options, this exciting program sponsors interactive 
activities, lectures, panels, and workshops. The BCL Program listserv keeps 
students informed of these events as well as of opportunities for 
international cultural immersion through internships and study abroad. 

Students interested in an international career will acquire essential tools 
for understanding the business, culture, and language of the country or 
region of their interest. 



62 College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



Maryland English Institute (MEI) 

1101 Holzapfel Hall, 301405-8634 

www.mei.umd.edu 

Director: Marsha Sprague 

The Maryland English Institute (MEI) is committed to providing high quality 
instruction, to meeting the needs of non-native speal<ers and their 
sponsors, and to strengthening the ability of non-native English speakers to 
participate in rigorous academic and professional environments. MEI 
serves the University as a resource center in English language teaching and 
testing matters. It evaluates and instructs prospective and provisionally 
admitted international students and teaching assistants. Two regular 
instructional programs are offered: a semi-intensive program for 
provisionally admitted students and a full-time intensive program. 

Semi-Intensive (UMEI 005): This program is open only to students 
admitted to the University of Maryland who have submitted TOEFL scores 
between 475-574 (on the paper-based test) or 153-232 (on the computer- 
based test). Students with these scores are provisionally admitted, and 
must satisfactorily complete UMEI 005 their first semester in order to 
become fully admitted, full-time students at the University. UMEI 005 
classes meet five days a week, two hours a day. The program is designed 
especially to perfect the language skills necessary for academic work at the 
University of Maryland. Enrollment is by permission of the director, and no 
credit is given toward any University degree. 

Intensive: This full-time English language program is open to non-native 
speakers who wish to improve their English for academic, professional or 
general purposes. There are three intensive English sessions per year: One 
for fall semester, one for spring, and a six-week session in the summer. 
Each consists of approximately 22 hours of instruction weekly. The program 
offers two levels of instruction, upper intermediate and advanced. Many 
classes are web-based, and instructors encourage computer-assisted 
learning at all levels. Satisfactory completion of the program does not 
guarantee acceptance at the University. Enrollment is by permission of the 
director, and no credit is given toward any University degree. 

Course Code: ARHU 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCES (BSOS) 

2148 Tydings Hall, 301405-1697 
bsosque@bsos.umd.edu (for BSOS advising questions) 

iiv w w .bsos.um d.edu/ deans, htm I 

iivww .bsos/ um d.edu/ ad»ising_homepage,html 

Professor and Dean: Edward B. Montgomery 

Acting Senior Associate Dean: Charles Stemheim 

Associate Dean: Robert E. Steele 

Assistant Dean: Katherine Pedro Beardsley 

Assistant Dean: Cynthia Hale 

BSOS Advising Center: 301405-1697 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a diverse 
group of disciplines and fields of study all of which emphasize a broad 
liberal arts education as the foundation for understanding the 
environmental, social, and cultural forces that shape our world. At the heart 
of the behavioral and social sciences is the attempt to understand human 
beings, both individually and in groups. Disciplines in the behavioral and 
social sciences use approaches that range from the scientific to the 
philosophical, from the experimental to the theoretical. Integral to all the 
disciplines, however, is the development and application of problem solving 
skills, which in combination with other academic skills, enable students to 
think analytically and to communicate clearly and persuasively. Students 
interested in human behavior and in solving human and social problems 
will find many exciting opportunities through the programs and courses 
offered by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

The College is composed of the following departments, each offering a 
major program that leads to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science 
degree, as appropriate: 

African American Studies Program* 

Department of Anthropology 

Department of Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Politics 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychology 

Department of Sociology 



In addition, the College is a major contributor to the Environmental Science 
and Policy Program, and sponsors several of its areas of concentration. 

*The African American Studies Program also offers an undergraduate 
certificate requiring 21 semester hours of course work (see Undergraduate 
Certificate Programs in chapter 7). 

Advising 

The BSOS Advising Center coordinates advising and maintains student 
records for BSOS students. Advisers are available to provide information 
concerning University requirements and regulations, transfer credit 
evaluations, and other general information about the University by 
appointments taken on a walk-in basis from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 
Undergraduate advisers for each undergraduate major are located in the 
department offices. These advisers are available to assist students in 
selecting courses and educational experiences in their major area of study 
consistent with major requirements and students' educational goals. 

Graduation Requirements 

Each student must complete a minimum of 120 hours of credit with at 
least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. Courses must include the 
credits required in the University's general education requirements (CORE) 
and the specific major and supporting course and grade requirements of 
the programs in the academic departments offering bachelor's degrees. 

Students in BSOS must complete fundamental studies Math and English by 
56 credits. 

Students must complete 15 upper-level credits and 12 major credits in the 
student's final 30 credits. 

All students are urged to speak with an academic adviser in the College 
Advising Office at least two semesters before graduation to review their 
academic progress and discuss final graduation requirements. 

Honors 

Undergraduate honors are offered to graduating students in the Afro- 
American Studies Program and the departments of Anthropology, 
Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography, Government and 
Politics, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Dea n's Academ ic Scholar. To be named a Dean's Academic Scholar is the 
highest academic award that a BSOS student can earn in the College. 
Dean's Scholars are those graduating seniors who have completed 60 
credits at the University of Maryland, College Park and have maintained a 
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.8. 

Dean's List. Any student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic 
work in the preceding semester, without failure of any course and with an 
overall average grade of at least 3.5 will be placed on the Dean's List. The 
Distinguished Dean's list consists of students who have completed 
successfully a minimum of 12 credit hours in a semester with a 4.0. 

College Park Scholars Public Leadership 

CPS in Public Leadership. Director: Nina Harris 

CPS in International Studies. Director: Dorith Grant-Wisdom 

The College co-sponsors two College Park Scholars programs. Public 
Leadership and International Studies. These living/ learning programs focus 
around the academic disciplines of the faculty. In these two-year programs 
for incoming freshmen, students are brought together around common 
intellectual interests. The program seeks to inspire students to develop 
their interests and intellectual capacity by building a community where 
everyone has shared interests in scholarly pursuits. The Scholars program 
allows students to experience a small college environment and to work 
closely with faculty working at the forefront of their fields of expertise. 

Student Organizations and Honor Societies 

students who excel in their academic discipline may be selected for 
membership in an honorary society. Honoraries for which students in BSOS 
are chosen include: 

Alpha Kappa Delta— Sociology 
Alpha Phi Sigma— Criminal Justice 
Gamma Theta Upsilon— Geography 
Lambda Epsilon Gamma— Law 



The Robert H. Smith School of Business 63 



Omega Delta Epsilon— Economics 
Pi Sigma Alpha— Political Sciences 
Psi Chi— Psychology 
Pi Gamma Mu— Social Sciences 

Students who major in the Behavioral and Social Sciences have a wide 
range of interests. The following is a list of student organizations in the 
disciplines and fields of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: 

Anthropology Student Organization 

Conservation Club 

Criminal J ustice Student Association 

Economics Club 

Geography Club 

Government and Politics Club 

Minority Pre-Professional Psychology Society 

National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association 

(NSSLHA), Maryland Chapter 

Pre-Medical Society (Pre-Med/ Psychology Majors) 

The Forum (Sociology) 

Thurgood Marshall Pre-Law Society 

For more information about these student organizations or starting a new 
student group, please contact the Office of Campus Activities, Adele H. 
Stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174. 

Field Experiences/ Pre-Professional and 
Professional Training 

Pre-professional training and professional opportunities in the behavioral 
and social sciences are available in many fields. The internship 
programs offered by many departments in the College provide students with 
practical experience worl<ing in governmental agencies, nonprofit 
organizations, corporations, and the specialized research centers and 
laboratories of the College. To earn credit for a BSOS departmental 
internship, a minimum cumulative grade point average (usually a 3.0) is 
required. 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities 

Undergraduate research internships allow qualified undergraduate students 
to worl< with research laboratory directors and faculty in departments and 
specialized research centers, thus giving the student a chance for a unique 
experience in the design and conduct of research and scholarship. 
Students are advised to consult with their department advisers on research 
opportunities available in the major. 

Research and Service Units 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences sponsors several special 
purpose, college-wide research centers. These centers include The Public 
Safety Training and Technology Assistance Agency and the Center for 
Substance Abuse Research. These interdisciplinary centers often offer 
internships and a selected number of undergraduate research assistant 
opportunities for interested students. These research experiences offer 
excellent preparation for future graduate study and/ or job opportunities in the 
private and public sectors. In addition, the college offers computer services 
through its Office of Academic Computer Services. 

Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) 

Director: Eric D. Wish, 301403-8329 

Established in 1990, CESAR is a research unit sponsored by the College of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences. CESAR staff gather, analyze, and disseminate 
timely information on issues of substance abuse and monitor alcohol- and dmg- 
use indicators throughout Maryland. CESAR aids state and local governments in 
responding to the problem of substance abuse by providing the above-stated 
information, as well as technical assistance and research. Faculty members 
from across campus are involved with CESAR-based research, creating a center 
in which substance-abuse issues are analyzed from multidisciplinary 
perspectives. Students obtain advanced technical training and hands-on 
experience through their involvement in original surveys and research. 



Public Safety, Training and Technology Assistance (PSTTP) 

Director: Thomas H. Carr, 301-489-1700 

Established in 1994, the Public Safety Training and Technology Assistance 
Program (PSTT) (formerly the Washington/ Baltimore HIDTA) is co-sponsored 
by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and President Bush's 
Office of National Drug Control Policy This program is funded by Congress 
to help coordinate and fund the fight against drug-related crime and to treat 
drug-addicted criminal offenders. HIDTA efforts integrate prevention and law 
enforcement at the community level to reduce the involvement of high-risk 
youth in drug trafficl<ing careers and criminal behavior. HIDTA also worl<s 
with private industry and government to form partnerships geared toward 
the development of commercial software for use by law enforcement, 
criminal justice, treatment and regulatory agencies. The 
Washington/ Baltimore HIDTA employs a multi-disciplinary approach that 
incorporates law enforcement, treatment/ criminal justice and prevention 
through a regional strategy that includes all these disciplines. Faculty 
members from across campus are involved with HIDTA-based research, and 
students obtain advanced technical training and hands-on experience 
through their involvement in data collection, original surveys, geo-mapping 
and research. 



Office of Academic Computer Services (OACS) 

0221 LeFral<Hall, 301405-1670 

The College believes strongly that the study of behavioral and social 
sciences should incorporate both quantitative and computational skills. 
Consequently curricula in most departments require some course work in 
statistics, quantitative research methods, and information technology. The 
BSOS Office of Academic Computer Services provides undergraduate 
students in the College with both facilities and staff assistance to satisfy a 
broad range of computer-related needs. The OACS operates five computer 
classrooms and a specialized graphics lab that offer a wide variety of 
popular software, color and black-and-white printing, and both text and 
graphics scanning. Undergraduate students are also encouraged to take 
advantage of OACS's learning resources including free computer and 
statistics training courses, help documentation, a library of computer- 
related texts, and free access to research data. 



THE ROBERT H. SM ITH SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS (BMGT) 

Office of Undergraduate Studies: 1570 Van Munching Hall, 301405-2285 

w w w ,rhsm ith.um d.edu 

Professor and Dean: Frank 

Professor and Associate Dean: Assad 

Associate Dean of the Center for Executive Education: Koerwer 

Professor and Director of Doctoral Program: Gordon 

Assistant Dean of the Masters' Programs: Scricca 

Assistant Dean and Directorfor Undergraduate Programs: Cleveland 

Associate Director for Undergraduate Programs: Horick 

Associate Director for Undergraduate Programs at Shady Grove: Glasgow 

Academic Advisors for Undergraduate Programs: Buddenhagen, Martin, 

McAllister, McQueary, Smit 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business recognizes the importance 
of education in business and management to economic, social, and 
professional development through profit and nonprofit organizations at 
the local, regional, national, and international levels. The faculty are 
scholars, teachers, and professional leaders with a commitment 
to superior education in business and management, specializing 
in accounting, finance, decision and information sciences, operations and 
quality management, management and organization, marketing, logistics 
and transportation, and business and public policy. The Smith 
School of Business is accredited by the International Association for 
Management Education (AACSB), the official national accrediting 
organization for business schools. 

Degrees 

The university confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), 
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), and 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Information concerning admission to the 
M.B.A. or M.S. program is available from the School's Assistant Dean of 
the Masters' Programs (301405-2279). 



64 The Robert H. Smith School of Business 



Undergraduate Program 



The undergraduate program recognizes the need for professional education 
in business and management based on a foundation in the liberal arts. In 
addition, the program's internationally integrated curriculum prepares 
students to be effective and responsible managers in today's dynamic 
business environment. 

A student in business and management selects a major in one of several 
curricula: (1) Accounting; (2) Information Systems; Specialization Business; 
(3) Finance; (4) General Business and Management (including an 
International Business option); (5) Operations and Quality Management; (6) 
Marketing; (7) Logistics, Transportation, and Supply Chain Management. 

Honors Program 

The BMGT Honors program offers students with superior academic 
achievements special opportunities and resources, including the opportunity 
to participate in cutting-edge research on business issues, and to graduate 
with honors. Students in the honors program take their upper-level BMGT 
core courses in small, seminar-style honors sections, which allow in-depth 
exploration of business topics in marketing, finance, management and 
organization, business law, and policy and strategy. The BMGT Honors 
Program provides both a non-thesis and a thesis option— in which students 
wori< on an original research project under the supervision of a Smith School 
faculty member. Admission to the BMGT Honors Program is competitive. 
Students are selected on the basis of the following requirements: 

• Minimum 3.5 cumulative grade point average 

• Minimum 45 credit hours earned 

• Completion of all BMGT pre-requisite courses by the end of Spring 
semester: 

Accounting I and II - BMGT 220 and 221 

Statistics- BMGT 230 (or 231) 

Calculus - MATH 220 or 140 

Micro- and Macro Economics - ECON 200 and 201 

The application to the BMGT Honors program includes a personal essay 
and two letters of recommendation from faculty. The BMGT Honors 
application can be downloaded from the Smith School website: 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/ undergrad. 

Advising 

General advising for students admitted to the Smith School of Business is 
available Monday through Friday in the Office of Undergraduate Programs, 
1570 Van Munching Hall, 301405-2286. It is recommended that students 
visit this office each semester to ensure that they are informed about 
current requirements and procedures. 

Transfer students entering the university can be advised during spring, 
summer, and fall transfer orientation programs. Contact the Orientation 
Office for further information, 301-314-8217. 

Admission to Smith School of Business 

See chapter 1 for general LEP admissions policies. 

Current policies affect students entering the University System of Maryland 
or the Maryland Community College system in Spring 2001 and thereafter. 
Students enrolled at the University System of Maryland or in the Maryland 
Community College system prior to Spring 2001 will continue to be admitted 
under the admissions criteria in effect for the Fall 1998 or Fall 1999 term, 
depending upon the student's initial date of matriculation. Grand-fathered 
admission will end in Fall 2003, when all students must meet the current 
admission standards. Grand-fathered students, however, will be given the 
option of entering under the new requirements prior to Fall 2003. 

Freshman Admission 

Admission to the BMGT degree programs is competitive. A limited number 
of freshmen who demonstrate outstanding talent will be admitted directly to 
their BMGT major of choice (e.g. Accounting, Finance, etc.). Admission will 
be on a space available basis. All students are urged to apply early. All 
students admitted directly to BMGT as freshmen must demonstrate 
satisfactory progress (2.00 cumulative GPA or better) plus completion of 
Gateway courses (BMGT 220, BMGT 230, ECON 200 or 201, and MATH 
220 or 140— each with a "C" or better) by the semester in which 45 
credits are completed. 



Students not directly admitted to the Smith School of Business as 
freshman can be admitted to the Division of Letters & Sciences, with some 
of these students enrolling in the Markets and Society program. These 
students can apply for admission to Business by the semester in which 
45 credits are completed. (See Transfer Admission below) 

Transfer Admission for Students from On or Off Campus 

All new transfer students, as well as students presently enrolled at the 
College Park campus in other majors, who wish to pursue majors in the 
Smith School of Business must meet the following requirements by the 
semester in which 45 credits are completed: 

• 3.00 cumulative grade point average (based on all college- 
level work) 

• Completion of Fundamental Studies (Math and freshmen 
composition ENGL 101) 

• Completion of 50% (5 courses) of lower-level CORE (Note: ECON 200 
and 201 satisfy lower-level SB CORE requirements and MATH 220 or 
140 satisfies lower-level MS CORE requirements) 

• Completion of the following Gateway courses, each with "C" 
or better: 

ECON 200 Microeconomics 
BMGT 220 Accounting I 
BMGT 230 or 231 Business Statistics 
MATH 220 or 140 Calculus 

• Note: Only one repeat of one single course to the set of Gateway 
courses will be considered for determining admission to BMGT. 
Appeals will be considered. 

Students who meet the course requirements, and who apply to BMGT after 
the semester in which they reach 45 credits are subject to competitive 
admission for a limited number of spaces in the BMGT program. 

Freshmen who begin study in another major at College Park who would 
have met the direct BMGT admission standards from high school have until 
the last day of instruction in the first semester of their freshmen year at 
College Park to change their major to BMGT. 

Appeals to this Policy 

Appeals to this policy may be filed with the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions, on the ground floor Mitchell Building. Such appeals will require 
documentation of unusual, extenuating, or special circumstances. 

Statement of Policy on Transfer of Credit from 
Community Colleges 

It is the practice of the Smith School of Business to consider for transfer 
from a regionally accredited community college only the following courses in 
business administration: an introductory business course, business 
statistics, introduction to computing (equivalent to BMGT 201), or 
elementary accounting. Thus, it is anticipated that students transferring 
from another regionally accredited institution will have devoted the major 
share of their academic effort below the junior year to the completion of 
basic requirements in the liberal arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a 
community college maybe applied toward a degree from the Smith School 
of Business. 

Other Institutions 

The Smith School of Business normally accepts transfer credits from 
regionally accredited four-year institutions. Junior- and senior-level business 
courses are accepted from colleges accredited by the Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Junior- and senior- level 
business courses from other than AACSB-accredited schools are evaluated 
on a course-by-course basis to determine transferability 

The Smith School of Business requires that at least 50 percent of the 
business and management credit hours required for a business degree be 
earned at the University of Maryland, College Park. 



The Robert H. Smith School of Business 65 



Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 
(all curricula) 

At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work required for 
graduation must be in business and management subjects. A minimum of 
58 hours of the required 120 hours must be in 300- or 400-level courses. 
In addition to the requirement of an overall cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0 (C average) in all university course work. Effective Fall 1989, all 
business majors must earn a C or better in all required courses, including 
Economics, Mathematics, and Communication. Electives outside the 
curricula of the School maybe taken in any department of the university if 
the student has the necessary prerequisites. 

Freshman-Sophomore School Requirements Credit Hours 

MATH 220* or 140**-Elementary Calculus I or Calculus 1 3 or4 

BMGT 201**** -Computer Applications in Business 3 

BMGT 220 and 221-Principles of Accounting I and II 6 

BMGT230 or 231** -Business Statistics 3 

ECON 200 and 201-Principles of Micro -HMacro Economics 8 

COMM 100 or 107— Foundations of Speech Comm. or Speech Comm 3 

Total 26-31 

* MATH 220 and 221 are required for Operations and Quality Management (managerial track) 
majors. 

** MATH 140 and 141 are required for information Systems - Business and Operations and Quality 

Management (technical track) majors. 

*** BMGT 231 is required for Information Systems - Business and Operations and Quality 

Management (technical track) majors. 

****BMGT 201 maybe waived for demonstrated proficiency 

Junior-Senior School Requirements Credit Hours 

BMGT 340— Business Finance 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

BMGT 364— Management and Organizational Theory 3 

BMGT 367— Career Search Strategies in Business 1 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

BMGT 495 or 495H— Business Policies 3 

Econonics (see below) 3-6 

Total 19-22 

Economics Requirements 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are required by the 
Smith School of Business (see above Junior-Senior College Requirements). 
Please see the Undergraduate Studies office in 1570 Van Munching Hall or 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/ undergrad for approved options under each major. 

Major Requirements 

Under each major, 18-21 credits are required. The specific requirements for 
each major are listed on the following pages. 

A Typical Program for the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Freshman Year Credit Hours 

CORE and/ or electives 9 

ENGL 101 or equivalent 3 

MATH (depending on placement)* 3 

First semester total 15 

CORE and/ or electives 9 

COMM 100 or 107 3 

MATH or BMGT 230/231* 3 

Second semester total 15 

Sophomore Year 

CORE 3 

BMGT 201 (Prereq. Sophomore Standing) 3 

BMGT 220 (Prereq. Sophomore Standing) 3 

ECON 200 4 

MATH or BMGT 230/ 231* 3 

Third semester total 16 

CORE and/ or electives 6 

ECON 201 4 

BMGT 221 (Prereq. BMGT 220) 3 

BMGT 230 (Prereq. MATH 220*) or 231* 

(Prereq. MATH 141) or elective 3 

Fourth semester total 16 

* See Freshman-Sophomore Schooi requirements for appropriate math and statistics courses. 



Curricula 

Accounting 

Chain J . Bedlingfield 

Pnafessors: Bedlingfield, Gordon, Kim, M. Loeb, S. Loeb 

Assistant Pnafessors: Campbell, Park, J . Peters, M. Peters, Sengupta 

Visiting Pnafessors: Finch, Rymer 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and reconding 
of financial events and the reporting of the results of such events for an 
organization. In a broader sense, accounting consists of all financial 
systems for planning, controlling, and appraising performance of an 
organization. Accounting includes among its many facets: financial 
planning, budgeting, accounting systems, financial management contnals, 
financial analysis of perfomnance, financial reporting, internal and external 
auditing, and taxation. The accounting curriculum pnavides an educational 
foundation for careers in public accounting, management, whether in 
private business organizations, government or nonprofit agencies, or 
consulting. Two tracks are pnavided: The Public Accounting Track leading to 
the CPA (Certified Public Accounting) and the Management 
Accounting/ Consulting Track. Please note: Currently, only the Public 
Accounting track is available. 

M ajor Requirements: All Accounting M ajors 

BMGT 310— Intermediate Accounting 1 3 credits 

BMGT 311 — Intermediate Accounting II 3 credits 

BMGT 321 — Managerial Accounting 3 credits 

BMGT 326— Accounting Systems 3 credits 

Public Accounting Track Requirements: 

BMGT 323* -Taxation of Individuals 3 credits 

BMGT 422* -Auditing Theory & Practice 3 credits 

Plus Two of the following: 

BMGT-411* (Ethics), 417, 424, 427, 428 6 credits 

Note: * Required for CPA in Maryland 

Management Accounting/ Consulting Track Requirements: 

BMGT 426- Advanced Managerial Acct 3 credits 

Plus three of the following: 9 credits 

BMGT305, 323, 332, 385, 402, 403, 411, 417, 424, 

428, 430, 434, 440, 446 
Total 24 

One of the following: 3 credits 

ECON 305, 306, 330, 340 

Total 3 credits 

The basic educational requirements of the Maryland State Board of Public 
Accountancy to sit for the CPA examination are a baccalaureate or higher 
degree with a major in Accounting or with a non-accounting degree 
supplemented by course work the Board determines to be substantially the 
equivalent of an Accounting major. Students planning to take the CPA 
examination for certification and licensing outside Maryland should 
determine the educational requirements for that state and arrange their 
program accordingly. 

Since June 30, 1999, all applicants who desire to take the CPA 
examination in Maryland have been required to have completed 150 
semester hours of college work as well as other specified requirements. 

Decision and Information Technologies 

Chain Anaud Alingam 

Professors: Anandalingam, Assad, Ball, Bodin (Emeritus), Fu, Gass 

(Emeritus), Golden, Lucus, Raschid, Riley 

Associate Professors: Agan/val, Alt, Sambamurthy 

Assistant Professors: Chen, Darcy Druehl, Faraj, Gopal, Gosain, Jank, 

Karaesmen, Leie, Mishra, Palmer, Parameswaran, Raghavan, Smueli, 

Stewart, Souza, Venkatesh, Viswanathan, Zantek 

Visiting Professors: Edgeman, Ibrahim, Malaga, Prasad, Ruki, Studer€llis 

The Department of Decision and Information Technologies offers two 
majors: Information Systems -Specialization: Business, and Operations and 
Quality Management. 

Information Systems -Specialization: Business 

The Business Area of Concentration in the Information Systems (IS) 
program prepares students to be effective users and managers of 
information technologies and systems in the current environment of the 
technology-enabled business firm. The IS major focuses on the data 



66 The Robert H. Smith School of Business 



processing skills, the analytical sl<ills, and the managerial plus 
organizational l<nowledge required to design and manage information 
systems and applications based on business and customer requirements. 
The major's core emphasizes the concepts of systems analysis and design 
and database management systems. In addition to a broad grounding in 
the key functional areas of marketing, operations, accounting, and finance, 
this major develops in-depth knowledge of information processing 
technology information systems implementation, project management, and 
management science and statistics. 

BMGT 302— Business Computer Application Programming 3 credits 

BMGT 305— Survey of Business Information Systems &Technology3 credits 

BMGT402-Database Systems 3 credits 

BMGT 403— Systems Analysis and Design 3 credits 

BMGT 407— Information Systems Projects 3 credits 

BMGT 485— Operations and Project Management for IS 3 credits 

One of the following: 3 credits 

BMGT 430-Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 434— Introduction to Optimization Theory 

BMGT486-Total Quality Management 
One of the following: 3 credits 

BMGT 405— Business Telecommunications 

BMGT 406— Electronic Commerce Application Development 

Total 24 credits 

One of the following: 

ECON 305, 306, 430, or440 3 credits 

Total 3 credits 

Note: Departmental program title under review. Please see 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/ undergrad for the most current information. 

Operations and Quality Management 

The Operations and Quality Management major involves the management 
of resources for the production of goods or services. This includes such 
functions as workforce planning, inventory management, logistics 
management, production planning and control, and resource allocation; and 
emphasizes total quality management principles. Career opportunities exist 
in manufacturing, retailing, service organizations, and government. 

Students pursuing the managerial track must complete MATH 220 and 221 
and BMGT 230 prior to junior standing. Students selecting the technical 
track must complete MATH 140 and 141 and BMGT 231 prior to junior 
standing; and those interested in graduate work are strongly advised to 
take MATH 240 and 241 as well. 

The course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Operations and Quality Management are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 3 

BMGT 385- Production Management 3 

BMGT486-Total Quality Management 3 

One of the following courses (check prerequisites): 3 

BMGT 321-Cost Accounting 

BMGT 440— Financial Management 

Managerial orTechnical Track Options 6 

Total 18 

Managerial Track, two of the following courses: 

BMGT 360— Human Resource Management 

BMGT 372— Introduction to Logistics Management 

BMGT 472— Advanced Logistics Operations 
OR 
Technical Track, two of the following courses: 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 431 — Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 

BMGT 434— Introduction to Optimization Theory 

BMGT435-lntroduction to Applied Probability Models 

Finance 

Chair: Senbet 

Professors: Bakski, Madan, Maksimovic, Senbet, Unal 

Associate Professors: Phillips, Prabhala, Triantis, Wermers 

Assistant Professors: Avramov, Bevelauder, Chen, Cichello, Heston, 

Hvidjkaer, Ju, Kiss, Marquez, Vandeweghe, White, Willard 

Finance encompasses: 

(1) Corporate finance: The financial management of corporations 

(2) Investments: The management of securities and portfolios 

(3) Financial institutions and markets: The management of financial 
institutions and the study of their role in the economy 



The Finance curriculum is designed to familiarize the student with the 
institutions, theory, and practice involved in the allocation of financial 
resources within the private sector. It provides an educational foundation 
for careers involving corporate financial analysis and management, 
investment analysis and portfolio management, investment banking, risl< 
management, commercial banking, and international finance; it also 
provides a foundation for graduate study in business administration, 
economics, and law. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Finance are as follows: 

Credit Hours 
Both of the following courses: 6 

BMGT 343- Investments 

BMGT 440— Advanced Financial Management 
Three of the following courses: 9 

BMGT 443— Applied Equity Analysis and Portfolio Management 

BMGT 4 4 4— Futures and Options Contracts 

BMGT 445— Banking and Financial Institutions 

BMGT 446— International Finance 

BMGT 447— Internship and Research in Finance 

BMGT 498— Special Topics in Business and Management (Finance) 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 310— Intermediate Accounting 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 434— Introduction to Optimization Theory 
Total 18 

iviarl<eting 

Chair: Rust 

Professors: Greer (Emeritus), Ratchford, Rust 

Associate Professors: Biehal, Kannan, Krapfel, Nickels, Shankar, Wagner 

Assistant Professors: Foultz, Frels, Hamilton, Jain, Lefkoff-Hagius, Nasser, 

Sheinin, Srivastava, Whitney 

The goal of marketing is to satisfy all the stakeholders of the firm- 
employees, dealers, stockholders, and customers— by seeing that quality 
goods and services are developed and provided at fair prices and in a way 
that benefits the community and society. World-class competition has 
forced businesses to develop marketing programs that are as good as the 
best. This means getting closer to the customer, joining other organizations 
to create value for the consumer, and designing integrated distribution and 
communication programs that provide a seamless flow from producers to 
consumers. Pricing, communication/ promotion, product/ service, and 
distribution activities inherent in the development of marketing programs 
are applicable to non-profit organizations, business-to-business 
organizations, and firms that sell to ultimate consumers. 

Many types of careers are available to the marketing major. These include, 
but are not limited to: sales, advertising, retailing, product/ service 
management, and marketing research. Because of the many different 
employment opportunities in marketing, many marketing electives are 
offered along with three core courses required of all marketing majors- 
consumer analysis, marketing research, and marketing strategy 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Marketing are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 451- Consumer Analysis 3 

BMGT 452- Marketing Research Methods 3 

BMGT 457- Marketing Policies and Strategies 3 

Three of the following courses: 9 

BMGT 351-Direct Marketing 

BMGT 353-Retail Management 

BMGT 357— Retailing and Marketing Internship (3 credits only) 

BMGT 372— Introduction to Logistics Management 

BMGT 450— Integrated Marketing Communications 

BMGT 453- Industrial Marketing 

BMGT 454— International Marketing 

BMGT455-Sales Management 

BMGT 484- Electronic Marketing 
Total 18 



The Robert H. Smith School of Business 67 



Logistics, Business, and Public Policy 

Chair: Windle 

Professors: Corsi, Dresner, Grimm, Leete, l^lorici, Prestont, Windle 

Associate Professor: Evers 

Assistant Professors: Bailey, Feinberg, Gillyard, Hutchens, Newberg, 

Somaya 

Visiting Professors: Dewitt, Gardner, Lesser, McClenahan, Olson, Shaffer, 

Turner, Walton 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Logistics, Transportation, and Supply Chain Management 

The supply chain encompasses all organizations involved in production of a 
good or service and its ultimate delivery to the end customer. Supply chain 
managers oversee many varied but inter-related processes including the 
flow of materials, information, and transactions (to name a few). Logistics 
deals primarily with the materials flow component of the supply chain, and 
logistics managers are responsible for fulfilling customer orders while 
simultaneously controlling distribution costs. 

While transportation is the heart of logistics; inventory control, warehousing, 
order processing, materials handling, packaging, and customer service are 
important logistics activities. These logistics activities comprise up to 30 
percent of total costs for many businesses. The cost of freight transportation 
alone is about 8 percent of the nation's annual domestic product. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Logistics, Transportation, and Supply Chain Management are as follows: 

BMGT 370— Introduction to Transportation in Supply 

Chain Management 3 

BMGT 372— Introduction to Logistics and Supply Chain Management 3 

BMGT 476— Applied Computer Models in Supply Chain Management 3 

Two of the following courses 6 

BMGT 373— Logistics, Transportation, and SupplyChain 

Management Internship 
BMGT 470— Advanced Transportation Management 
BMGT 472— Advanced Logistics Operations 
BMGT 475— Advanced SupplyChain Management 

Strategy and Technologies 
BMGT 477— International SupplyChain Management 

One of the following courses 3 

BMGT 305— Survey of Business Information Systems and Technology 

(option forDIS majors only) 
BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 
BMGT 385— Production Management 
BMGT 482— Business and Government 
BMGT 484-Electronic Marketing 
GEOG 373— Geographic Information Systems 

GEOG 430— Location Theory and Spatial Analysis or one of the following 
not selected above from BMGT 373, 470, 472, 475 or 477 

General Business and Management 

The General Curriculum is designed for those who desire a broader course 
of study in business and management than offered in the other College 
curricula. The General Curriculum is appropriate, for example, for those who 
plan to enter small-business management or entrepreneurship where 
general knowledge of the various fields of study may be preferred to a more 
specialized cuniculum concentration. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
General Business and Management are as follows: 

Credit Hours 
Accounting/ Finance 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 321 — Managerial Accounting 

BMGT 440— Advanced Financial Management 
Management Science/ Statistics 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 385— Production Management 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 431 — Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 
Marketing 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT353-Retail Management 

OR a higher number marketing course (check prerequisites) 



Personnel/ Labor Relations 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 360— Human Resource Management 

BMGT 362-Labor Relations 
Public Policy 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 482— Business and Government 

BMGT496-Business Ethics and Society 
Logistics, Transportation and Supply Chain M anagement 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 370— Introduction to Transportation in SupplyChain Management 

BMGT 372— Introduction to Logistics and SupplyChain Management 
Total 18 

International Business 

International Business is an option in the General Business major and 
responds to the global interest in international economic systems and their 
multicultural characteristics. This degree option combines the college- 
required courses with five International Business courses and a selection 
of language, culture, and area studies courses from the College of Arts and 
Humanities and the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
General Business and Management, International Business option, are: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 372— Introduction to Logistics and SupplyChain Management 3 

BMGT 392— Introduction to International Business 3 

BMGT 454- International Marketing 3 

BMGT 477— International SupplyChain Management 3 

BMGT 446- International Finance 3 

Any 400-level BMGT course or an agreed-upon foreign language course. .3 
Total 18 

Students are strongly encouraged to complete the language option to 
increase the applicability of the International Business option. 

Quest Program 

The University of Maryland's Quality Enhancement Systems and Teams 
Program (QUEST) program is a collaborative effort between the Robert H. 
Smith School of Business and the A. James Clark School of Engineering. 
QUEST graduates enter the work force with invaluable skills, excelling in 
teamwork, customer value management, process and product design, 
project management and customer satisfaction. 

The QUEST Program consists of team-based courses led by an 
interdisciplinary faculty with a senior level practicum that places students in 
the workplace for research and group problem-solving. Students will 
complete courses devoted to the integration of quality in the workplace, 
applying the knowledge and skill-set they have gained from their major in 
the field of engineering, business, or computer, mathematical or Physical 
Science. The capstone course gives QUEST students the opportunity to 
apply the principles of cross-functional thinking in a corporate environment. 

For more details on this program including admissions, please visit the 
QUEST Program website at www. rhsmith.umd.edu/ quest. 

Honors 

Honor Societies 

Beta Gamma Sigma. National scholastic honorary society in business 
administration. To be eligible students must rank in the upper 5 percent of 
their junior class or the upper 10 percent of their senior class in the Smith 
School of Business. Students are eligible the semester after they have 
earned 45 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park, and have 
earned a total of 75 credits. 

Student Awards 

For high academic achievement, students in the School may receive 
recognition by the Dean's List and Beta Gamma Sigma, National Business 
Honor Society 

Scholarships 

For details on available scholarships, please visit the following website, 

www .rhsmith.umd.edu/ undergrad/ Scholarships.htm. 



68 College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 



21 



Student Professional Organizations 

students may choose to associate themselves with one or more of the following 
professional organizations: Accounting Club; American Marketing Association; 
Entrepreneurship Club (all business majors); Blacl< Business Association; 
Finance, Banking and Investments Society (finance); Gateway Club; Phi ChlTheta 
(all business majors); Logistics Transportation and Supply Chain Management 
Society Information Systems Society; Global Business Society Quest Student 
Council and BM GT Honor Council. 

Visitwww.rhsmith.umd.edu/susa for more details. 

Course Code: BMGT 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES (CMPS) 

3400 A.V. Williams, 301405-2677 
cmpsque@deans.umd.edu (for CMPS advising questions) 
www.cmps.umd.edu/ 

Dean: Stephen Halperin 
Associate Dean: Ronald L. Lipsman 
Associate Dean: Scott A. Wolpert 
Assistant Dean: Deborah R. Bryant 

"For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public 
relations, for Nature cannot be fooled," Richard P. Feynman. Nationally 
recognized for our education, research, faculty and students, the College of 
Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences is a critical educational and 
scientific resource benefiting the region and the nation. 

The College offers every student a high-quality, innovative and cross- 
disciplinary educational experience. Strongly committed to making studies 
in the sciences available to all, the College actively encourages and 
supports the recruitment and retention of women and minorities. 

Our students have the opportunity of working closely with first-class faculty 
in state-of-the-art labs both on and off campus on some of the most exciting 
problems of modem science and mathematics. We have developed courses 
to reflect the evolving nature of IT subjects and the rapidly changing world of 
science and mathematics. As a new approach to undergraduate education, 
multiple tracks are offered within majors, including tracks for future teachers 
and tracks with an emphasis on computation. 

Students participate in Departmental Honors programs, the Gemstone 
program. Quest and College Park Scholars. They apply their lab and 
classroom skills through internships at area companies. Excellent advising 
and career services are in place to help our undergraduates transition to 
graduate programs, public service or private sector commerce. Qur highly 
skilled graduates pursue careers in a great many fields and professions. 

Structure of the College 

The following departments, programs and research units comprise 
the College: 

Department of Astronomy 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Geology 

Department of M athematics 

Department of M eteorology 

Department of Physics 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling* 

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation 

Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center 

Chemical Physics Program 

Physical Sciences Program 

Statistics Program 

Institute for Advanced Computer Studies 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology 

Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (joint with 

College of Engineering) 

*See the separate listing for the program in chapter 7. 

Degree Programs 

The following Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree programs are offered to 
undergraduates by the departments and programs of the College: 
Astronomy, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Geology, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Physical Sciences. 



In addition. Geology sponsors one of the areas of concentration in the 
Environmental Science and Policy program. 

Citations 

w w w .cm ps.ym d.edy/ yndergra dy ate/ citation.htm 
The College offers Citations in the following areas: 

Astronomy 

Surficial Geology 

Earth Material Properties 

Earth History 

Hydrology 

Meteorology 

Weather and Climate 

Atmospheric Chemistry 

Physics 

Actuarial Mathematics 

Applied Mathematical Modeling 

Statistics 

Discrete Mathematics 

Citations in the College offer students in all disciplines the opportunity to 
pursue a structured program of study in a field outside their major. Each 
student who successfully completes a citation (12-18 credits) will have the 
accomplishment noted on their transcript. Consult departmental advisors 
and websites for further information. 

Honors 

Honors Programs 

Undergraduate honors are offered to students in the Physical Sciences 
Program and the departments of Astronomy, Computer Science, Geology 
Mathematics and Physics. Specific information is provided under the 
individual program descriptions. 

College Park Scholars 

CPS in Science, Discovery & the Universe— Director: John J . Hillman 
CPS in Earth, Life & Time— Director: Thomas R. Holtz, Jr. 

The College co-sponsors two College Park Scholars programs. Science, 
Discovery & the Universe and Earth, Life & Time. These living/ learning 
programs focus around the academic disciplines of the faculty, space 
sciences (in particular planetary science) and the historical natural 
sciences (in particular paleontology and evolutionary biology), respectively 
In these two-year programs for incoming freshmen, students are brought 
together around common intellectual interests. The program seeks to 
inspire students to develop their interests and intellectual capacity by 
building a community where everyone has shared interests in scholarly 
pursuits. The Scholars program allows students to experience a small 
college environment and to work closely with faculty working at the forefront 
of their fields of expertise. 

Dean's List. Each student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic 
work in the preceding semester with an overall average grade of at least 
3.5 will be placed on the Dean's List. 

Associate Dean's Commendation. Each student who has passed at least 
12 hours of academic work in the preceding semester with an overall 
average grade between 3.0 and 3.5 will be placed on the Associate Dean's 
Commendation list. 

J. R. Dorfman Prize for Undergraduate Research. An award is presented at 
the spring Academic Festival for the best research project conducted on or 
off campus by a current College undergraduate major. 

Advising 

The College Undergraduate Education Office, 3400 A.V. Williams Building, 
301-405-2766, centrally coordinates advising and the processing and 
updating of student records. Inquiries concerning university regulations, 
transfer credit, and other general information should be addressed to this 
office. Specific departmental information is best obtained directly from the 
departments. The College has mandatory advising with the basic 
component being 30-minute in-person sessions for registration and future 
course planning. Walk-in advising is available from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., 
Monday- Friday. Students may e-mail cmpsque@deans.umd.edu for 
general questions. Students may also send e-mails to individual advisors, 
or call 301405-2677 or fax questions to 301405-9377. 



College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 69 



Scholarships 

www.cmps.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ index.htm 

Limited numbers of merit-based scholarships are available for new 
students. The College Scholarship Committee reviews admissions 
applications and selects recipients. 

For curently enrolled students the College accepts most merit and need- 
based award and scholarship applications on the College Scholarship 
Application Form. Students should complete one form only and submit 
either electronically or via surface mail. Applicants will be considered for all 
merit and need-based scholarships administered by the College for which 
they are eligible. For best consideration, College scholarship applications 
for each academic year should be submitted by March 15 for the school 
year beginning the following September. 

Departmental scholarships may have different deadlines. For additional 
information visit our website. 

Recruitment 

3400 A.V. Williams 301405-2677 

w w w .cm ps.ym d.edy/ yndergradyate/ prospective_students.htni 
Recruitment Coordinator: William Bisese (bisese@umd.edu) 

The College's Recruitment Coordinator serves as a resource and contact 
person for prospective students interested in bachelor degrees and also 
serves as a liaison to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 



Graduation Requirements 



1. A minimum of 120 semester hours with at least a C average is required 
of all Bachelor of Science degrees from the College. 

2. Forty-three credit hours that satisfy the general education CORE program 
requirements of the University. In some instances, courses tal<en 
to satisfy these requirements may also be used to satisfy 
major requirements. 

3. Major and supporting courseworl< as specified under each department 
or program. 

4. The final 30 semester hours must be completed at College Parl<. 
Occasionally the Dean may waive this requirement for up to 16 of the 
30 credits cited. Such a waiver is considered only if the student already 
has 75 credits in residence. 

5. Students must be enrolled in the program in which they plan to graduate 
by the time they register for the last 15 hours. 

CM PS Internship and Career Services 

3401 A.V. Williams Building, 301405-0486 
www. cmps.umd.edu/ careers/ index. htm 
Director: Desira B. Holman 



for both the College undergraduate and graduate activities of the program. 
STAND supports students by creating a sense of community, rewarding 
excellence through scholarships and fellowships, instilling the importance 
of community involvement through recruitment and outreach activities, 
building lasting relationships through mentoring, and preparing students for 
success in graduate school, professional careers and beyond. 

Current STAND program components include: CM PS SCORE (Student 
Community for Outreach, Retention and Excellence), the PRIME (Providing 
Research, Internships, and Mentoring Experiences) Scholarship Program, 
Community Services Opportunities and the SPIRAL (Summer Program in 
Research and Learning), which is a six-weel< summer institute targeted 
towards sophomore and junior students attending minority institutions. The 
SPIRAL program enables students to gain an understanding of professional 
opportunities in mathematics and science, engage in research with college 
scientists, and prepare for graduate school and professional life. 

Research Units 

Institute for Advanced Computer Studies 

2119 A. V. Williams Building, 301405-6722 

www.umiacs.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: J oseph J aj a 

The faculty at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies conduct 
fundamental research at the interface between computer science and other 
scientific disciplines supported by a state-of-the-art computing 
infrastructure. These interdisciplinary research programs offer opportunities 
for thesis research and classroom instruction, with a planned new focus on 
human-computer interaction, bioinformatics and computational biology The 
Institute is internationally known in computer vision and graphics, parallel 
and distributed computing, information visualization and educational 
technologies, natural language processing and computational linguistics, 
software engineering, and multimedia and internet computing. Courses and 
thesis research guidance by Institute faculty are provided under the 
auspices of the labs, centers, and the academic departments affiliated with 
the Institute. 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

4211 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 3014054874 

www .ipst.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Rajarshi Roy 

The faculty members of the Institute for Physical Science and Technology 
are engaged in the study of pure and applied science problems that are at 
the boundaries between those areas served by the academic departments. 
Areas of emphasis vary but include scientific computation, statistical 
physics and chaotic dynamics, chemical physics, optical (laser) physics, 
and space and upper atmospheric physics. These interdisciplinary 
problems afford challenging opportunities for thesis research and 
classroom instruction. Courses and thesis research guidance by Institute 
faculty are provided either through the graduate program in chemical 
physics, the scientific computation and mathematical modeling program, or 
under the auspices of other departments. 



The College prepares students to succeed in their chosen professions. 
While the classroom provides academic preparation, the Internships and 
Career Services office assists students with career related issues. In 
cooperation with the University of Maryland's Career Center, the 
Internships and Career Services office provides a full array of employment 
resources for students. Please visit the career services website. 

The office facilitates internships for students majoring in astronomy, 
computer science, geology, mathematics, physical sciences and physics. 
Internships are a very important means for students to apply what they 
have learned in the classroom to real life experiences. Internships are also 
an invaluable tool for career exploration and they allow students to 
relevantly build their resumes while still in school. 

STAND Science and Technology: 
Addressing the Need for Diversity 

3400 AV Williams Building, 301405-0127 
www. cmps.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ stand. htm 
Director: Joelle Davis Carter 

The College implemented the STAND program to address the longstanding 
national need to increase the number of underrepresented groups, 
including Black, Latino/ a. Native American and women in the computer, 
earth, mathematical and physical sciences. STAND serves as the umbrella 



Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics 

Energy Research Building, 3014054951 

www .ireap.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Patrick G. O'Shea 

The Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) is jointly 
administered by the College and the A. James Clark School of Engineering. 
The faculty members in IREAP study diverse scientific problems that are on 
the boundaries between physics and engineering, and teach relevant courses 
in the College and Engineering Departments. IREAP conducts experimental 
and theoretical research in nonlinear dynamics (chaos), high-temperature 
plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, relativistic microwave electronics, 
high-brightness charged particle beams, free-electron lasers, laser-plasma 
interactions, ion beam microfabrication techniques, and microwave sintering 
of advanced materials. IREAP is recognized internationally as a leading 
university research center in these areas of research. We actively encourage 
undergraduate participation in our research program through independent 
study special projects, and internships under faculty supervision. 



70 College of Education 



Center for Automation Research 

Center for Automation Research 

4417 A.V.Williams Building, 3014054526 

www.cfar.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Ramalingam Chellappa 

The Center for Automation Research is part of the Institute for Advanced 
Computer Studies. Its faculty conduct fundamental research in areas 
related to spatial data, computer graphics, image processing, and 
computer vision. This interdisciplinary research contributes to classroom 
instruction, and provides opportunities for thesis research, in these areas. 
Courses and research guidance by the Center's faculty are conducted 
under the auspices of the laboratories and academic departments affiliated 
with the Center. 

Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center 

2207 Computer and Space Science Building, 301405-5599 

www .essic.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Antonio J . Busalacchi 

ESSIC is a joint center between the Departments of Meteorology Geology 
and Geography together with the Earth Sciences Directorate at the NASA 
Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the Center is to enhance our 
understanding of how the atmosphere-ocean-land-biosphere components of 
the Earth interact as a coupled system. This is accomplished via studies of 
the interaction between the physical climate system (e.g.. El Nino) and 
biogeochemical cycles (e.g., greenhouse gases, changes in land use and 
cover). The major research thrusts of the Center are studies of Climate 
Variability and Change, Atmospheric Composition and Processes, and the 
Global Carbon Cycle (including Terrestrial and Marine Ecosystems/ Land 
Use/ Cover Change). The manner in which this research is accomplished is 
via analyses of in situ and remotely sensed observations together with 
component and coupled ocean-atmosphere-land models. Together this 
provides a foundation for understanding and forecasting changes in the 
global environment and assessing regional implications. Data assimilation 
and regional downscaling provide the means by which the observations and 
models are linked to study the interactions between the physical climate 
system and biogeochemical cycles from global to regional scales. Courses 
and research guidance by Center faculty are provided through the 
Departments of Geography, Geology and Meteorology, or under the 
auspices of College interdisciplinary listings. 

Center for Scientific Computation and 
Mathematical Modeling 

3301 A. V. Williams Building, 301405-1714 

www .cscamm.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Eitan Tadmor 

The ability to compute at tremendous speeds with gigantic data sets is 
enabling advances in nearly every discipline. Scientific computation plays a 
leading role in the study of protein folding, climate evolution, weather 
prediction, star formation, plasma turbulence, quarl<-gluon interactions and 
high-temperature superconductivity. At the Center for Scientific 
Computation and Mathematical Modeling, graduate students and faculty 
are worl<ing together to develop and to understand fundamental 
computational techniques, algorithms and analytical tools, and to apply this 
understanding to outstanding scientific problems in a variety of fields. 
Undergraduate research opportunities exist for students who are interested 
in learning how to use computers to understand how the world works. 

Materials Research Science and Engineering Center 

2120 Physics Building, 301405-8349 

mrsec.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Ellen Williams 

Part of a national network of NSF-funded Materials Research Centers, 
faculty activities in MRSEC's mandate include materials research, industrial 
collaborations and educational outreach. Faculty research focuses on 
polarization dynamics in ferroelectric thin films, surface nanostructures- 
from fluctuations to driven systems and metal oxides with high spin 
polarization. MRSEC actively encourages undergraduate participation in 
their research program through participation in independent study special 
projects and internships under faculty supervision and pays special 
attention to encouraging women and minorities to enter science. 



Center for Superconductivity Research 

Physics Building, 301405-6129 

www .csr.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Director: Richard L. Greene 

The Center for Superconductivity Research (CSR) conducts interdisciplinary 
research in the fields of superconductivity, magnetism, ferroelectricity the 
synthesis and characterization of advanced materials, the development of 
scanning-probe microscopes, and quantum computing. Their work impacts 
technology areas such as communications, digital and analog electronics, 
medical instrumentation, and computers. The CSR consists of 
approximately 12 scientists who are also teaching faculty members in the 
Departments of Physics, Electrical Engineering, Chemistry, or Materials 
science, as well as another 18 scientists and engineers who are visitors, 
post-docs, or staff members. Approximately 30 graduate students are 
working on their research dissertation projects with members of the CSR 
faculty The CSR is dedicated to supporting undergraduate research, with 
more than 20 undergraduates doing research projects each year. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

Benjamin Building 

Office of Student Services: 301405-2344 

E-mail: educ-umd@umail.umd.edu 

www , education, um d.edu 

Dean: Edna Szymanski 

The College of Education is a professional college committed to advancing 
the science and art of teaching/ learning, including the practices and 
processes which occur from infancy through adulthood in both school and 
non-school settings. The College's mission is to provide preparation for 
current and future teachers, counselors, administrators, educational 
specialists, and other related educational personnel, and to create and 
disseminate the knowledge needed by professionals and policy makers in 
education and related fields. 

The College is organized into six departments, three of which offer 
undergraduate majors in teacher education: the Department of Curriculum 
and Instruction, which offers elementary and secondary education 
programs; the Department of Human Development and Institute for Child 
Study, which offers an early childhood program; and the Department of 
Special Education. Enrollment in the professional teacher education 
programs in the three departments is limited to those who meet the 
selective admission requirements specified below. 

Only students who have been fully admitted to the teacher education 
programs are permitted to enroll in the professional education course 
sequences. Students with other majors who have an interest in the area of 
education may wish to enroll in a variety of other courses offered by the 
College that deal with schooling, human development, teaching/ learning 
styles, and interaction processes. Students with majors in the Arts and 
Sciences who have an interest in teaching may wish to consider one of the 
multiple options for secondary education listed below. 

In canning out its mission, the College is committed to a society which is 
open to and supportive of the educational aspirations of the widest 
population of learners, and to continuous research and evaluation in 
relation to teaching and learning in a multicultural, high-tech world. At 
times, students may be invited to participate actively with graduate 
students and faculty members in research undertakings and evaluation 
processes. Students make use of Educational Technology Services, the 
micro-teaching laboratory, and professional development in school settings. 

In addition to the CORE or USP program requirements, education majors 
have the opportunity to complete classes in the arts, sciences and/ or 
humanities. In the teacher education courses, students develop 
professional skills through active experiences in the college classroom and 
participate in exploring, learning and practicing with children and teachers 
in classrooms in the community 

Secondary Education Program Options 

The College of Education has multiple pathways for students who are 
interested in teaching at the secondary level. 

The Dual M ajor option, which is designed for incoming freshmen or 
sophomores, leads to a Bachelor's degree with a major in an academic 
content area plus a second major in secondary education. All secondary 
education majors are required to have an academic content major. 



College of Education 71 



Candidates who follow the proposed sequencing of courses usually can 
complete both majors in four years with careful advisement. 

The Citation Option, which is intended for sophomores and juniors in a 
content major, permits potential teacher candidates to enroll in a sequence 
of education courses that helps them to determine if teaching is a viable 
career option for them. The twelve to eighteen credit citation option may be 
taken prior to admission into a teacher preparation program. 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certification Program, which is intended for content 
majors entering the junior or senior year, is for talented students with a 
minimum GPA of 3.0 who enroll in a Bachelor's degree program in a content 
area and elect to continue in a graduate program leading to certification in 
secondary education. Nine credits of the program may count for both the 
Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Prior approval is required for students 
electing this option. This program can be completed in two semesters 
following the completion of the Bachelor's degree. Students should contact 
the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (1207 Benjamin) for updated 
information. 

Detailed information about these secondary education program options is 
available through the Office of Student Services 301405-2344 and at the 
College of Education Website, www.education.umd.edu. 

Admission to Teacher Education Professional 
Course Work 

Applicants to the University of Maryland who have declared an interest in 
education are admitted to a department in the College. All majors must 
meet the selective admission requirements for full admission into the 
College of Education in order to enroll in course worl< in the professional 
teacher education degree program. 

For full admission into a teacher education major, a student must (1) 
complete the English and math lower-level fundamental studies (six credits) 
with a grade of C or better; (2) earn 45 semester hours with an overall 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale; (3) submit a 
personal goal statement that indicates an appropriate commitment to 
professional education; (4) have prior experiences in the education field; (5) 
submit three letters of recommendation/ reference; and (6) have passing 
scores on the Praxis I. Admission application forms are available in Room 
1204 of the Benjamin Building. Only those who are admitted are able to 
enroll in the professional education sequence. An overall grade point average 
of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher Education to continue 
in the professional education programs. A Teacher Education Appeals Board 
reviews appeals from students who do not meet the admissions, 
advancement, or retention criteria. Consult the Student Services Office (Room 
1204, Benjamin) for policies and procedures regarding appeals. 

Criteria for admission to the Teacher Education program apply to any 
teacher preparation program offered by the University of Maryland. Thus, 
students desiring a major in music or physical education should apply to 
the College of Education for admission to the professional program in 
Teacher Education. Students who are not enrolled in the College of 
Education but who, through an established cooperative program with 
another college, are preparing to teach must meet all admission, scholastic 
and curricular requirements of the College of Education. The professional 
education courses are restricted to degree-seel<ing majors who have met 
College of Education requirements for admission and retention. 

Gateway Requirements for Early Childhood 
and Elementary Education Programs 

The Early Childhood and Elementary Education programs are Limited 
Enrollment Programs, which admit students on a space-available basis. In 
addition to the requirements for admission to teacher education that are 
listed above, early childhood and elementary education majors must meet 
the following gateway requirements: 

(l)completion of a four-credit CORE laboratory physical science, a four- 
credit CORE laboratory biological science. Elements of Numbers and 
Operations (MATH 212), and Elements of Geometry and Measurement 
(MATH 213) with a minimum cumulative GPA in these four courses of 
2.75 

(2)completion of Introduction to Teaching (EDCI 280) with a grade of B or 
better 



Students admitted to the University as freshmen may be directly admitted 
to the Early Childhood or Elementary Education programs through the end 
of the schedule adjustment period. It is anticipated that no more than 50% 
of the available places in each program will come from these groups. In the 
event that the number of qualified applicants exceeds the available 
program slots, the students with the most competitive records from high 
school will gain direct admission to the College of Education. Students who 
are admitted to campus, but not directly admitted to Education, will be 
advised in the Division of Letters and Sciences. 

At the time of admission, each student directly admitted into the College of 
Education will enter into a contract that states the requirements for 
maintaining enrollment, including the time or credit level by which the 
gateway requirements must be completed. 

All other prospective early childhood and elementary education majors may 
apply for admission during the Spring of the year in which they complete 56 
credits including the coursework and gateway admission criteria listed 
above. Students with advanced credit (56 or more hours) may apply for 
admission when they meet the gateway requirements. Applications will be 
reviewed in the Spring, and students who have completed the gateway 
requirements will be admitted competitively based on GPA, on a space- 
available basis. The minimum admission GPA for internal and extemal 
transfers will be 3.0 for Elementary Education and 2.75 for Early Childhood. 
Students with the required gateway courses and lower grade point averages 
will be considered as space is available. 

Students may be granted admission to the early childhood or elementary 
education limited enrollment programs only once. Therefore, once a 
student has been admitted to the limited enrollment program, if the 
student is later dismissed for failure to complete the gateway requirements 
in a timely manner, the student may not reapply to the program. 

Detailed information regarding admission to the Teacher Education 
program, including the gateway requirements for Early Childhood or 
Elementary Education, is available in the Student Services Office, Room 
1204 Benjamin (301405-2344). 

Yearlong Internship (Student Teaching) 

The yearlong internship, which is the culminating experience in the teacher 
preparation program, takes place in a collaborating school (i.e., partner school, 
PDS - Professional Development School). The yearlong internship consists of 
one semester of methods and one semester of student teaching. Each teacher 
candidate's internship will vary according to the unique attributes of their 
teacher education program. All internships will provide teacher candidates with 
the opportunity to integrate theory and practice through a comprehensive, 
reality-based experience. The yearlong internship is arranged through the 
College of Education in collaboration with the school site coordinators (i.e., PDS 
Coordinators) and the designated schools in the partnership. 

The yearlong internship is a full-time commitment. Interference with this 
responsibility because of employment or course work is strongly 
discouraged. Teacher candidates assigned to schools for this internship 
are responsible for their own transportation and living arrangements and 
should be prepared to travel to whichever school has been assigned. 
Student teaching requires a special fee. Please refer to the Schedule of 
Classes under Financial Inform at Ion: Fees. 

In order to receive a yearlong internship placement, all teacher candidates 
must make application the semester prior to the beginning of the methods 
portion of the internship year. Prospective student teachers must have 
been admitted to Teacher Education and have completed all prerequisites. 
Prior to assignment, all students in teacher preparation programs must 
have: (1) maintained an overall grade point average of at least 2.5 with a 
minimum grade of "C" in every course required for the major; (2) 
satisfactorily completed all other required course work in their program; (3) 
received a favorable recommendation from their department; (4) attained 
qualifying scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxis I and Praxis II 
assessments; (5) applied for a year-long internship placement through the 
College of Education during the semester prior to the internship year; (6) 
received favorable ratings from prior supervised experiences in school 
settings; and, (7) submitted a criminal history disclosure statement. In 
addition, state law gives the local school to which the student teacher is 
assigned the discretion to require a criminal background check prior to 
placement. Early Childhood Education students must have a certificate 
indicating freedom from tuberculosis and proof of immunization. 



(3)passing scores on the Praxis I: Academic Skills Assessments (Students 
will be required to meet the individual cut-off scores for each of the 
three Praxis I assessments. A composite score will not be accepted for 
admission.) 



72 College of Education 



College of Education Repeat Policy 

All registrations in the student teaching portion of the year long internship, 
regardless of whether a student withdraws ortal<es a leave of absence, will 
be counted as an attempt under the campus repeat policy. Only two 
registrations will be allowed. After two registrations, further attempts at 
student teaching must be approved by the department and the school- 
system professionals involved in the teacher candidate's internship 
experience. This policy applies only to students in the College of Education 
during the student teaching portion of the year-long internship. 

Graduation Requirements 

The College of Education confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) depending on the amount of liberal arts study 
included in a particular degree program. Minimum requirements for 
graduation are 120 semester hours. Specific departmental program 
requirements for more than the minimum must be fulfilled. 

In addition to the university's general education requirements (CORE) 
and the specific requirements for each curriculum, the College requires that 
all majors complete a Foundation of Education course (e.g., EDPL 301) 
and, depending upon the teacher education major, six to twelve semester 
hours of reading course requirements. A grade of C or better is required in 
all pre-professional and professional course worl< required for the major. An 
overall grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to 
Teacher Education. A grade of S is required in the student teaching portion 
of the yearlong internship. All teacher candidates are required to attain 
qualifying scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxis I and Praxis II 
assessments. Detailed information about the Praxis assessments is 
available in the Student Services Office, Room 1204 Benjamin. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College of Education 
must be recommended by the student's advisor and department 
chairperson and approved by the Dean. 

Accreditation and Certification 

All bachelor's-degree teacher preparation programs are accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and have been 
approved by the Division of Certification and Accreditation of the Maryland 
State Department of Education. Accreditation provides for reciprocal 
certification with other states that recognize national accreditation. 

The Maryland State Department of Education issues certificates to teach in 
the public schools of the state. In addition to graduation from an approved 
program, the Maryland State Department of Education requires satisfactory 
scores on the Praxis I and II exams for certification. At the time of 
graduation, the College informs the Maryland State Department of 
Education of the graduate's eligibility for certification. Under Maryland law, 
criminal bacl<ground checks may be required and considered by the State 
Department of Education in the awarding of teaching certification, and by 
employers before granting employment in the teaching field. Certification 
may be denied or revol<ed for individuals who have been convicted of 
crimes of violence and/ or child abuse. 

The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) requires completion of 
additional courses in reading. Students in secondary, pre-K-12 (Art, Music 
and Physical Education), and secondary special education must complete a 
six credit sequence. Students in early childhood, elementary and early grades 
special education must complete a twelve credit sequence. Check with your 
department advisor for information on meeting these requirements. 

College of Education Title II 
Institutional Data on Teacher Preparation 

The College of Education pass rates for the Title II reporting period for the 
2002-2003 academic year indicated that we exceeded the statewide pass 
rate in almost all categories. When the data were summarized, the College 
had a 96% pass rate while the statewide average was 95%. (Institutional 
pass rates: Basic Skills -100%; Professional Knowledge -94%; Academic 
Content Areas - 99%; Special Populations - 100%). Data tables reporting 
single-assessment institutional pass rates, aggregate institutional pass 
rates, and summary pass rates are available through the College website, 
www.education.umd.edu. Information on the number of students enrolled 
and the student teaching experiences is highlighted below: 

• Total number of students enrolled during 2002-2003. 1138 

• Total number of students in programs of supervised student teaching 
during academic year 2002-2003. 336 



• Total number of supervising faculty for the teacher preparation program 
during 2002-2003. 57 

• The student teacher/ faculty ratio. 5.9 students per faculty member 

• The average number of hours per week required of student participation 
was 40 hours. The total number of weeks of supervised student teaching 
required is 16 weeks. The total number of hours is 640 hours. 

• The teacher preparation program is currently approved by the state. 

• The teacher preparation program is not currently designated as "low- 
performing" by the state as defined by section 208(a) of the HEA 
ofl998. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

The College of Education offers many special resources and facilities to 
students, faculty and the community 

Center for Accelerating Student Learning 

Center for Children, Relationships and Culture 

Center for Educational Policy and Leadership 

Center for Human Services Development 

Center for the Study of Assessment Validity and Evaluation 

Center for Young Children 

Connections Beyond Sight and Sound 

Educational Policy Reform Research Institute 

Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth 

International Center for the Study of Education Policy and Human Values 

K-16 Partnership Development Center 

Maryland Assessment Research Center for Education Success (MARCES) 

Maryland Institute for Minority Achievement and Urban Education 

Maryland Literacy Research Center 

Mathematics and Science Teaching Centers 

National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice 

National Reading Research Center 

College of Education Honors Program 

Undergraduate teacher education majors meeting certain scholastic 
requirements may participate in the College of Education Honors Program. 
The objective of this program is to examine the field of education at levels 
of depth and breadth that go beyond that provided by any one teacher 
preparation sequence. 

The program consists of there components: group, cross-disciplinary, and 
individual study The Honors Program represents an excellent springboard for 
students with aspirations to on to graduate school. For further information 
contact Dr. Christy Corbin (1117H, Benjamin Building, 301-405-7793). 

College Park Scholars— Advocates for Children 

College Park Scholars is an innovative two-year living/ learning program for 
academically talented students. Admission is by invitation. Students attend 
weekly, faculty-led colloquia, which engage students in discussion and 
debate with prominent experts in the field. 

The College Park Scholars Advocates for Children Program involves 
students in advocacy efforts targeting a broad range of social, educational, 
policy and justice issues affecting diverse children, families and 
communities. The Advocates program is structured so that students 
become informed in areas of personal interest that relate to children, 
families and communities. They then learn to translate their knowledge into 
advocacy for social justice and change. Advocacy involvement includes 
political lobbying, grassroots organizing and service activities in schools 
and communities. 

For more information on the College Park Scholars: Advocates for Children 
Program, visit 1125 Cumberland Hall or phone 301-314-2777. 

The Student Services Office 

1204 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2344 

The Student Services Office provides academic advising for education 
students regarding admission, orientation, registration, graduation, and 
certification. At other times, students who have been admitted to the 
College of Education receive academic advising through their departments. 
Students are required to complete an academic audit in the Office of 
Student Services upon admission to the professional teacher education 
degree program. Information about the Praxis assessments and the College 
of Education Scholarships is also available in Student Services. 



A. James Clark School of Engineering 73 



University Credentials Service, Career Center 

3121 Hornbake Library, 301-314-7225 
www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

All seniors graduating in the College of Education are encouraged to 
complete a credentials file with the Career Center. Credentials consist of 
student teaching evaluations and recommendations from academic and 
professional sources. An initial registration fee is required and enables the 
Career Center to send a student's credentials to interested educational 
employers, as indicated by the student. Students may also file credentials 
if completing teacher certification requirements or advanced degrees and if 
interested in teaching, administrative or research positions in education. 

Other services available through TERP (The Employment Registration 
Program) Online include job listings in public and private schools and 
institutions of higher learning, on-campus interviews with in-state and out 
of-state school systems, and resume referral to employers interested in 
hiring education majors. Information and applications from school systems 
throughout the country, job search publications, and various employment 
directories are available in the Career Center. 

Educational Technology Services 

0234 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3611 

Educational Technology Services helps the College advance the effective 
use of technology in support of student learning. The Center provides a 
range of technology and media resources and services to faculty and 
students. The Center also offers professional development courses, 
technology planning, consulting assistance, and other outreach services to 
educators and policy makers throughout the state and region. A number of 
research, development, and demonstration activities in educational 
technology are also conducted through the Center's grants and contracts 
with federal, state, and private funding sources. 

Center for Mathematics Education 

2226 Benjamin Building, 301405-3115 

The Center for Mathematics Education provides a mathematics laboratory 
for undergraduate and graduate students. Occasionally there are tutoring 
services for children and adolescents. These services are offered in 
conjunction with specific graduate and undergraduate courses in 
elementary and secondary school mathematics. Center faculty are engaged 
in research in mathematics education, serve as consultants to school 
systems and instructional publishers, and provide in-service teacher 
education in addition to graduate degree programs. 

Center for Young Children (CYC) 

Center for Young Children Building, 301-405-3168 

The Center for Young Children is part of the Institute for Child 
Study/ Department of Human Development in the College of Education. It 
offers a creative learning experience for children three, four, and five years 
old whose parents are affiliated with the University The Center engages in 
child study, curriculum development, and teacher training. Its research and 
observation facilities are available to parents, faculty, and other persons 
concerned with the care and education of young children. 

Science Teaching Center 

2226 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3161 

The Science Teaching Center offers undergraduate and graduate courses 
and programs in science teaching and in science education research. 
Center faculty conduct research in science learning and instruction, at 
levels from elementary school to college, as well as contribute to local, 
state, and national science education reform efforts. 

Student and Professional Organizations 

The College sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa; the Teacher Education 
Association of Maryland Students (TEAMS), a state/ national education 
association; the Student Assembly, a student governance organization; and 
Kappa Delta Pi, an honor society in education. The Mary McLeod Bethune 
Society is a pre-professional organization concerned with minority issues and 
education. A Chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children is open to 
undergraduate and graduate students in Special Education. The Plan of 
Organization for the College of Education calls for undergraduate student 
representation on both the College of Education Assembly and College 
Senate. These organizations assume a critical role in policy development for 
the College of Education. The Assembly meets at least once a year during the 
fall semester for its annual meeting. Senate meetings typically occur once a 



month during the fall and spring semesters. Six full-time undergraduate 
students are elected at-large as voting members of the Assembly At least 
one representative from each of the departments with undergraduates serves 
on the Assembly. Of the six Assembly members, one is elected to serve as a 
delegate to the College of Education Senate. Students interested in receiving 
further information about the College Assembly or Senate should contact the 
Office of Student Services, Room 1204 Benjamin. 

In several departments there are informal organizations of students. 
Students should contact the individual departments or, in the case of 
College-wide groups, the Student Services office, for additional information 
regarding these organizations. 



A.JAMES CLARK SCHOOL OF 
ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

1137 Glenn L. Martin Hall (formerly Engineering Classroom Building), 

w w w .engr.um d .edu 

Professor and Dean: Nariman Farvardin 

Associate Dean: Gary A. Pertmer 

Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support: 301405-3855 

Co-op and Career Services: 301-405-3863 

Center for Minorities in Science and Engineering: 301-405-3878 

Women in Engineering: 301405-3931 

The mission of the Clark School of Engineering at the University of 
Maryland is to provide quality engineering education, to conduct strong 
research programs, to foster a close partnership with industry and 
government, and to provide related service to the campus community and 
the community at large. A major focus of the School's activities is to 
provide a quality engineering education with sufficient scope to include the 
basic and specialized engineering training necessary to the current and 
emerging needs of society. The School has related responsibility to 
contribute to the advancement of knowledge by conducting research at the 
cutting edge of science and technology. Since science and technology are 
rapidly advancing, the School also iias a professional responsibility to 
provide continuing education programs so the practicing engineer can 
remain effective. The School faculty and administration also sees as part of 
its mission, an obligation to serve the needs of the campus community and 
the community at large in the spirit of collegial cooperation. 

Engineers also occupy an intermediary position between scientists and the 
public because, in addition to understanding scientific principles, they are 
concerned with the timing, economics, and values that define the use and 
application of those principles. With this in mind the School fosters a close 
partnership with industry and government, and also reaches out to both the 
campus community and the community at large with its services. 

Direct Admissions Requirements 

1. Admission to the Clark School of Engineering is limited. Applicants are 
reviewed and will be admitted directly on a competitive basis. 
Evaluation is based on high school grades, standardized test scores, 
activities, leadership and demonstrations of potential to succeed. An 
applicant may select any of the majors offered within the School 
except Computer Engineering in which a limited number of students 
are admitted for each academic year. Students interested in Computer 
Engineering are encouraged to indicate this as soon as possible. 

2. National Merit and National Achievement Finalists and Semifinalists, 
Maryland Distinguished Scholar Finalists, and Banneker/Key 
Scholars are admitted directly to the School. 

45-Credit Review 

Directly admitted freshmen will be subject to an academic review at the end 
of the semester in which they attain 45 University of Maryland credits. In 
order to successfully complete the review, students must have an overall 
GPA of 2.0 and have completed ENES 100 and the following sequence of 
Gateway requirements: MATH 141, PHYS 161, and CHEM 113 or CHEM 
135 with a grade of C or better. In addition, CMSC 131 with a grade of C or 
better is required for Computer Engineering majors. 

Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at 
the University of Maryland or at any other university or college, will be 
considered to meet the review requirements. A course in which a grade 
of "W" (withdrawn) is earned is counted as an attempt. Students who fail 
to meet these requirements by the semester in which they attain 
45 University of Maryland credits may be dismissed from the Clark School 
and may not reapply 



74 A. James Clark School of Engineering 



Transfer Admission 

Direct Admissions Requirements 

Internal and External Transfer students will be directly admitted to the Clark 
School if they meet the Gateway requirements, MATH 141, PHYS 161, and 
CHEM 113 or CHEM 135 with a grade of C or better, have completed 
Fundamental Studies English, and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, 
and who have not previously been admitted to the Clark School of 
Engineering. Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway 
courses, either at the University of Maryland or at any other university or 
college, will be considered to meet the review requirements. A course in which 
a grade of "W" (withdrawn) is earned is counted as an attempt. Students may 
apply on or before the semester in which they attain 45 earned credits. 

Internal and External Transfer students who do not meet the Direct 
Admissions Requirements but have completed the Gateway requirements 
and have earned 56 or fewer credits may apply and be considered for 
admission on a competitive basis. 

Appeal Process 

All students may appeal. Students directly admitted as freshmen who are 
dismissed because of failure to meet Gateways or to be in good academic 
standing at 45 credits may appeal directly to the Associate Dean for 
Education in the Clark School. All other students who are denied admission 
may appeal to the Office of Admissions of the University 

Special Note 

students with a previous B.A. or B.S. degree will be admitted to the Clark 
School of Engineering with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a completion of 
MATH 140, MATH 141, CHEM 113 or CHEM 135, and PHYS 161 with a 
grade of C or higher in each. 

Graduation Requirements 

structure of Engineering Curricula: Courses in the normal curriculum or 
program and prescribed credit hours leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science (with curriculum designation) are outlined in the sections 
describing each department in the Clark School of Engineering. No student 
may modify the prescribed number of hours without special permission 
from the Dean of the School. The courses in each curriculum may be 
classified in the following categories: 

1. Courses in the CORE Liberal Arts and Science Studies Program. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences, mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Related technical courses, engineering sciences and other courses 
approved for one curriculum but offered by another department. 

4. Courses in the major department. A student should obtain written 
approval for any substitution of courses from the department chair and 
the Dean of the School. The courses in each engineering curriculum, 
as classified below, form a sequential and developmental pattern in 
subject matter. In this respect, curricula in engineering may differ from 
curricula in other colleges. Some regulations which are generally 
applicable to all students may need clarification for purposes of orderly 
administration among engineering students (see the Academic 
Regulations in chapter 4). Moreover, the Clark School of Engineering 
establishes policies which supplement university regulations. 

School Regulations 

1. The responsibility for proper registration and for satisfying stated 
prerequisites for any course must rest with the student as does the 
responsibility for proper achievement in courses in which the student 
is enrolled. Each student should be familiar with the provisions of 
this catalog, including the Academic Regulations. 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics, and chemistry have 
highest priority It is strongly recommended that every engineering 
student register for mathematics and chemistry or mathematics and 
physics each semester until the student has fully satisfied 
requirements of the Clark School of Engineering in these subjects. 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the Clark School of 
Engineering, a student must have an overall average of at least a C 
(2.0) and a grade of C or better in all engineering courses (courses 
with an EN prefix). Responsibility for knowing and meeting all 
graduation requirements in any curriculum rests with the student. 



4. All students are required to complete a number of general education 
courses and must follow the university's requirements regarding 
completion of the general education (CORE) Program. Consult the 
Academic Regulations section of this catalog for additional 
information. Engineering students who began college-level work 
(either at the University of Maryland or at other institutions) during the 
Fall 1989 semester or later are required to complete a junior- level 
technical writing course regardless of their performance in freshman 
English classes. This represents a School policy, not a University-wide 
policy 

5. All degree programs in the Clark School of Engineering require a 
minimum of 120 credits plus satisfaction of all department. School, 
and University general education (CORE) program requirements. 
Students should be aware that for all currently existing engineering 
programs the total number of credits necessary for the degree will 
exceed 120 by some number that will depend on the specific major 
and the student's background. 

Curricula for the various engineering departments are given in this catalog 
to illustrate how the programs can be completed in four years. These 
curricula are rigorous and relatively difficult for the average student. 
Surveys have shown that only about one-third to one-half of the students 
actually receive an engineering degree in four years. The majority of 
students (whether at Maryland or at other engineering schools nationwide) 
complete the engineering program in four and one-half to five years. It is 
quite feasible for a student to stretch out any curriculum; this may be 
necessary or desirable for a variety of reasons. However, students should 
seek competent advising in order to ensure that courses are taken in the 
proper sequence. 

All students are urged to request a senior audit form in the Clark School 
of Engineering, Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support at 
least two semesters before graduation to review their academic progress 
and discuss final graduation requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is available by appointment Monday through Friday, from 8:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Appointments for other hours may be made through 
special request. The Clark School of Engineering Office of Undergraduate 
Advising and Academic Support is located in Room 1124 Glenn L. Martin 
Hall (formerly Engineering Classroom Building), 301-405-3855. In addition, 
advising is available with the individual departments. See advising section 
in the specific engineering department entry for times and location. 

Departments and Degrees 

The Clark School of Engineering offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
the following fields of study Aerospace Engineering, Biological Resources 
Engineering (see also College of Agriculture and Natural Resources), 
Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering, Fire Protection Engineering, Materials Science and 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, B.S. Engineering (Engineering Option 
and Applied Science Option). Except for the Applied Science Option of the 
B.S. Engineering degree, all of the above programs are accredited by the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology 

The Freshman-Sophomore Years 

The freshman and sophomore years in engineering are designed to lay a 
strong foundation in mathematics, physical sciences, and the engineering 
sciences upon which the student will later develop a professional program 
during the upper division (junior and senior) years. During the first two years, 
students are introduced to the concepts of engineering design and work in 
multidisciplinary teams. The School couree requirements for the freshman 
and sophomore years are mostly the same for all students, regardless of 
their intended academic program, thus affording the student maximum 
flexibility in choosing a specific engineering specialization. 

Engineering Sciences 

Engineering Science courses represent a common core of basic material 
offered to students of several different departments. All freshman and 
sophomore students of engineering are required to take ENES 100. Other 
ENES courses, 102, 220, 221, and 230, are specified by the different 
departments or taken by the student as electives. The responsibility for 
teaching the engineering science courses is divided among the engineering 
departments. In addition to the core courses noted above, several courses 
of general interest to engineering or non-engineering students have been 
given ENES designations. See the List of Approved Courses in chapter 8 for 
further descriptions of these courses. 



A. James Clark School of Engineering 75 



Freshman Curriculum 

See individual department requirements in chapter 7. Entering freshman 
math placements are determined by performance on math placement 
exams. Placement in MATH 115 or lower will delay by a semester eligibility 
to tal<e certain engineering courses. 

Sophomore Year 

During the sophomore year the student selects an academic department 
(Aerospace, Biological Resources, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Fire 
Protection, Mechanical, or Materials Science and Engineering) and this 
department assumes the responsibility for the student's academic 
guidance, counseling, and program planning from that point until the 
completion of the degree requirements of that department as well as the 
School. For the specific requirements, see the cumiculum listing in each 
engineering department. 

Dual Degree Program 

The Dual Degree Program is a cooperative arrangement between the Clark 
School of Engineering and selected liberal arts colleges which allows 
students to earn undergraduate degrees from both institutions in a five-year 
program. A student in the Dual Degree Program will attend the liberal arts 
college for approximately three academic years (minimum 90 semester 
hours) and the Clarl< School of Engineering at the University of Maryland for 
approximately two academic years (minimum hours required determined 
individually approximately 60 semester hours). 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the baccalaureate 
programs in the Clark School of Engineering. 

At the present time the participating institutions in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia are American University, Bowie State University, 
Columbia Union College, Coppin State College, Frostburg State University 
Morgan State University College of Notre Dame of Maryland, St. Mary's 
College of Maryland, Salisbury State University, Towson State University, 
Western Maryland College, Trinity College, and Washington College. Also 
participating in the program are Kentucky State University King College in 
Tennessee, Shippensburg State University in Pennsylvania, and Xavier 
University in Louisiana. 

Engineering Abroad 

Preparation for practicing engineering in the global marketplace is 
increasingly important for new engineers and in order for engineers to 
advance in their engineering career. The Clark School of Engineering offers 
opportunities for students to study abroad and/ or work abroad during their 
college career. Specific programs have been established in German and 
Japanese such as the: 

• Dual Degree program in Engineering and German 

• J apan Technological Affairs Program 

Students may elect to participate in these established programs or 
participate in additional programs offered through the Clark School of 
Engineering such as: 

• Global Engineering Education Exchange (Global E3) with opportunities in 
Austria, Denmark, France, Germany Hungary, Japan, Mexico, Singapose, 
Spain, South Korea, Turkey, and the United Kingdom 

• Engineering/ French Studies Summer Program 

• Denmark's International Study Program (DiS) 

• International Association for the Exchange of Student for Technical 
Experience (lAESTE) which provides internship opportunities abroad 

• Regional Academic Mobility Program with opportunities for study in 
Canada and Mexico 

Students may elect to study abroad for one semester or two and to work 
abroad for eight weeks or more. At present, students can study or 
work abroad in many countries around the world such as Europe, Asia, 
Canada, and Mexico. Some study/ work abroad programs require fluency in 
the native language, while other programs offer courses or work 
opportunities in English. 

For further information on study and/ or work abroad programs, students 
should contact the Clark School of Engineering Special Programs Office at 
301405-3857 or visit our web site at www.engr.umd.edu/ organizations/ inti/ . 



Citations 

Citation in International Engineering 14 to 17 credit hours. 

students complete the course "International Business Cultures for 
Engineering and Technology" plus additional courses in language, culture 
studies, or internationally related studies, and an international engineering 
experience abroad. Contact the Director of Special Programs 301405-3857 for 
more information. Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a 
Citation on the official transcript. Students complete the course 
"International Business Cultures for Engineering and Technology" plus 
additional courses in language, culture studies, or internationally related 
studies, and an international engineering experience abroad. Contact the 
Director of Special Programs 301405-3857 for more information. Students 
who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the official transcript. 

Citation in Project Management Preparing to practice engineering 
with a basic understanding of project management is increasingly more 
important for new engineers in order to be prepared to contribute immediately 
and to advance in their careers. In addition to a strong engineering 
background, there is a need for engineers to understand the fundamentals of 
managing projects. The citation requires four courses (12 credits). Students 
who fulfill Citation requirements receive a certificate and a notation on the 
student's transcript. For more information, contact the Citation Advisor, Prof. 
S. Gabriel, at 301405-3242 orsgabriel@eng.umd.edu. 

Engineering Transfer Programs 

Most of the community colleges in Maryland provide one- or two-year 
programs which have been coordinated to prepare students to enter the 
sophomore or junior year in engineering at the University of Maryland. 
These curricula are identified as Engineering Transfer Programs in the 
catalogs of the sponsoring institutions. The various associate degree 
programs in technology do not provide the preparation and transferability 
into the degree curricula as the designated transfer programs. A maximum 
of one-half of the degree credits (approximately 50 semester hours) may be 
transferred from a two-year community college program. 

There may be some courses which are not offered by the schools 
participating in the engineering transfer program. Students 
should investigate the feasibility of completing these courses in summer 
school at the University of Maryland before starting their junior course work 
in the fall semester. 

Financial Assistance 

The Clark School of Engineering awards some merit-based scholarships. 
These awards are designated primarily for juniors and seniors in 
the School. Students must submit an application and all supporting 
documents by May 1 in order to be considered for scholarship assistance 
for the following academic year. For additional information, contact 
the Clark School of Engineering Special Programs Office, 1124 Glenn L. 
Martin Hall (formerly Engineering Classroom Building), 301405-0234 or 
301405-3857. 

Honors 

The Clark School of Engineering offers an Engineering Honors Program that 
provides eligible students the opportunity to pursue an enriched program of 
studies which will broaden their perspectives and increase the depth of 
their knowledge. This program is available to students who meet the 
following criteria: 

1. Upper one-third of class. 

2. J unior standing or 60 applicable credits. 

In completing the program, all engineering Honors students must: 

1. Submit an Honors research project necessitating a paper and oral 
presentation worth three hours of credit. 

2. Successfully complete two semesters of the Engineering Honors 
Seminar (ENES 388, 1 credit each). 

3. Maintain a GPA sufficient to remain in upper one-third of class. 

For additional information, visit the web site at www.eng.umd.edu/current/ 
honors.html 



76 A. James Clark School of Engineering 



Research and Service Units 

The Center for M inorities in Science and Engineering 

1134 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-3878 
Director: Rosemary L. Parker 

The Center is dedicated to increasing the enrollment and graduation rates 
of African American, Hispanic, and Native American students majoring in 
engineering. The Center provides a complete package of services designed 
to assist students from pre-college through completion of the 
undergraduate degree. Services include academic advising, tutorial 
assistance, scholarship information, the BRIDGE Program, outreach 
programs, job information and support of student organizations. 

Engineering Co-op and Career Services 

1137 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-3863 
Director: Heidi W. Sauber 

Whether it's to wire robots in a car plant, monitor a waste water management 
project, or reformulate cough syrup for a pharmaceutical company, the 
Engineering Co-op and Career Services Office assists students in finding 
cooperative education, internship, summer, and parttime engineering positions. 
Visit our Web site: www.coop.engr. umd.edu. 

Through cooperative education, students alternate semesters of fulltime work 
and fulltime study for a total of 50 weeks of work. Co-op students earn a 
Bachelor of Science degree with co-op distinction and complete the same 
academic requirements as all other students. Through the summer employment 
and part-time internship programs, students work fulltime during the summer or 
part-time during the school year. Both programs provide students the 
opportunity to gain professionaNevel experience, integrate theory and practice, 
confirm career choices, and help finance their education. At the same time, 
employers gain access to an energetic new work force, reduce recruitment 
costs, train future employees, and increase their presence on campus. 

Students are eligible to participate in all programs at any time; however, most 
employers prefer to hire students with sophomore standing or above. To apply 
students attend an orientation session and complete a TERP disk that includes 
a resume and other important information. The disk also allows students 
access to TERP Online, our 24-hour, on-line job postings. Workshops on resume 
writing, interviewing skills, and TERP Online are offered weekly and a monthly 
newsletter highlights student work experiences and office programs. In addition, 
students and employers have the opportunity to participate in two campus-wide 
career fairs each year and on-campus job interviews throughout each semester. 

Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support 

1124 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-3855 
Director: Erin Rooney€ckel 

engrhelp@deans.umd.edu 

The Student Affairs Office provides a broad variety of ser^ces to assist students 
during their collegiate careers. Individual advising may focus on a number of 
student related issues including: course selections, schedule planning, university 
policy interpretations, career choices, social and personal adjustments and 
academic concerns. The office also meets with prospective students, clears 
students for graduation, evaluates transfer credits from other institutions, 
provides orientation to new students, and is instmmental in helping students 
process administrative forms. The staff works closely with other campus offices 
to identify resources that address the various needs of our students. 

Women in Engineering Program 

1134 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-3931 
Director: Paige E. Smith 

The Women in Engineering Program (WIE Program) is dedicated to 
increasing the enrollment, retention, and graduation rates of females in 
the School, as well as identifying and addressing this group's unique 
needs. The Program provides a comprehensive set of initiatives designed 
to encourage and assist women students to become successful 
professional engineers. 

Services offered include research fellowships, professional mentoring 
program, workshops on classroom climate issues and careers, outreach 
programs, speakers, conference funding, collaboration with community 
colleges, newsletter and support of women in engineering organizations. 



Undergraduate Research Programs 

Undergraduate research programs allow qualified undergraduate students 
to work with research laboratory directors in departments, thus giving 
students a chance for a unique experience in research and engineering 
design. Projects in engineering allow undergraduate students to do 
independent study under the guidance of faculty members in an area of 
mutual interest. For more information contact your department or the 
Dean's office. 



Engineering Information Technologies 

0123 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-0174 
Executive Director: J ames F. Zahniser 301405-3885 

www .it.umd.edu 

Keeping pace with the latest developments in the area of Instructional 
Technologies worldwide, the Clark School of Engineering provides a state- 
of-the-art computing environment that will be the standard for engineers in 
the years ahead. Faculty and students have open access to workstation 
laboratories; multi-media computer classrooms; and a laboratory of multi- 
media and presentation graphics. In addition, Internet based World Wide 
Web framework serves as a delivery tool for video-teleconferencing, 
collaborating teaching and learning, and both real-time and asynchronous 
multimedia delivery of course material, all adaptable to the newly emerging 
distance learning technologies. 

Distance Education Technology and Services 

2104 Engineering Classroom Building, 3014054910 
Director: Erica Lupo-McCauley 

The University of Maryland's Distance Education Technology and Services 
(DETS) is headquartered in the Clark School of Engineering. Each semester, 
more than 60 regularly scheduled graduate and undergraduate classes are 
held in DETS' studio classrooms and broadcast "live" to government 
agencies and businesses in the greater Washington and Baltimore area. 
Students in the remote classrooms watch the broadcasts on large TV 
monitors. They are able to talk to the instructors and other students using 
a phone-line "talk back" system. In addition to academic courses, 
professional development courses on extremely current topics are offered 
via satellite to engineers and managers throughout the United States. 
Through the DETS system, working adult students are able to progress 
toward graduate degrees, primarily in engineering and computer science, 
without leaving their places of work. 

Student Organizations 

Professional Societies 

Each of the engineering departments sponsors a student chapter or 
student section of a national engineering society. The student chapters 
sponsor a variety of activities including technical meetings, social 
gatherings, and School or University service projects. All students are 
strongly encouraged to join one or more of these chapters. These 
organizations are American Helicopter Society, American Institute of 
Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 
American Nuclear Society, American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 
American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, Black Engineers Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers, Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, Society of Asian 
Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, Society of Fire Protection 
Engineers, Society of Hispanic Engineers, and Society of Women Engineers. 

Honor Societies 

The Clark School of Engineering and each of the engineering departments 
sponsor honors societies. Nominations or invitations for membership are 
usually extended to junior and senior students based on scholarship, 
service and/ or other selective criteria. Some of the honors organizations 
are branches of national societies; others are local groups: Tau Beta Pi 
(College Honorary); Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering); Alpha Nu Sigma 
(Nuclear Engineering); Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering); Eta Kappa Nu 
(Electrical Engineering); Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering); Pi Tau 
Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering); 
and Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering). 



College of Health and Human Performance 77 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN 
PERFORMANCE (HLHP) 

3310 HLHP Building, 301405-2438; Records, 301405-2357 

w w w .hllp.um d .edu/ 

Dean: Roberts. Gold 
Associate Dean: J erry Wrenn 
Assistant Dean: Joseph Murray 

The College of Health and Human Performance provides preparation 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the following professional 
areas: Physical Education (K-12), Community Health and Family Studies. 
The College also offers curricula in Kinesiological Sciences. In addition, 
each department offers a wide variety of courses for all university students. 
These courses may be used to fulfill the general education requirements 
and as electives. 

Programs combining research, service and instruction are provided by the 
Children's Health and Developmental Clinic, the Adults' Health and 
Developmental Program, and the Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 
Center. More detailed information regarding these program offerings is 
available through the individual departments. 

Advising 

At the time of matriculation and first registration, each student is assigned 
to a member of the College faculty who acts as the student's academic 
adviser. These assignments are made by the individual departments and 
depend upon the student's chosen major. Students who are enrolled in the 
College, but are undecided regarding their major, should contact the 
Assistant Dean, 2302 HLHP Building, 301405-2357. 

Departments and Degrees 

The College of Health and Human Performance offers the baccalaureate in 
the following fields of study Physical Education, Kinesiological Sciences, 
Community Health and Family Studies. The degree of Bachelor of Science 
is conferred upon students who have met the conditions of their curricula 
as herein prescribed by the College of Health and Human Performance. 

Each candidate for a degree must file a formal application with the Records 
Office according to the scheduled deadlines for the anticipated semester of 
graduation. 

Honors 

Phi Alpha Epsilon. Honorary Society of the College of Health and Human 
Performance. The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic 
achievement and to promote professional growth by sponsoring activities in 
the fields of physical education, l<inesiology, family studies and health, and 
related areas. 

Students shall qualify for membership at such times as they shall have 
attained junior standing in physical education, kinesiology, family studies, 
or community health, and have a minimum overall average of 3.5 and a 
minimum of 24 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. For 
additional information, please contact the Student Service Center, 301- 
405-2357. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

Gymkana Troupe 

1120 HLHP Building, 301405-2566 
Director: Scott Welsh 

For over 50 years, the University of Maryland Gymkana Troupe has been 
influencing young people to live healthy lifestyles. Founded at the University of 
Maryland College Park campus in 1946, the troupe has traveled throughout 
Maryland and neighboring states promoting drug-free living. Each of its 50-H 
members pledges themselves to be drug-free. Through their role-modeling 
and unique gymnastic performances, they have influenced hundreds of 
thousands of people to join them in living a drug-free life. The troupe, which is 
open to all University of Maryland students of all abilities, is considered a 
one-of-a-kind organization and is believed to be the only collegiate exhibitional 
gymnastic troupe actively touring the United States. One uniqueness of the 
Gymkana program is in its use of peer role models who share their 
experiences and their message of healthy living with others. Students 
influencing students to avoid drugs is the heart of Gymkana's program. 



Research and Service Units 
Center on Aging 

2367 HLHP Building, 301405-2469 
Director and Professor: Dr. Laura B. Wilson 
Associate Professor: Dr. Mark R. Meiners 

The Center on Aging stimulates and supports aging-related activities within 
existing departments, colleges, and schools throughout all of the various 
institutions of the University System of Maryland. The Center coordinates 
the Graduate Gerontology Certificate (master's and doctoral levels), the 
university's first approved graduate certificate program. The Center assists 
undergraduate and graduate students interested in the field of gerontology 
and helps them to devise educational programs to meet their goals. It is a 
research center working in health and aging policy lifelong learning and 
engagement, health care economics, behavioral and social aspects of aging, 
and health service delivery systems. It also conducts community education 
programs, assists faculty in pursuing research activities in the field of aging, 
conducts conferences on adulthood and aging-related topics, provides on- 
and off-campus technical assistance to practitioners who serve older adults 
and sponsors the University of Maryland Legacy College, the Adult Health 
and Development Program, the Legacy Leadership Maryland Program, and 
the University of Maryland Retirees Association. 

For further information on any of the Center's activities call, write or visit 
the Center on Aging. 

Course Code: HLHP 



THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF 
JOURNALISM (JOUR) 

1117 J oumalism Building, 301405-2399 
www.journalism.umd.edu 

Professor and Dean: Kunkel 

Associate Deans: Callahan 

Olive Reid, Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Frank Quine, Assistant Dean for External Affairs 

Professors: Beasley Blumler (Emeritus), Broder, Cleghom, Franklin (Merrill 

Chair in J ournalism), Gomery, Gurevitch, Hiebert (Emeritus), Holman, 

Johnson (Knight Chair in Journalism), Martin (Emeritus), Roberts, Stepp, 

Thornton (Richard Eaton Chair in Broadcast J ournalism) 

Associate Professors: Barkin, Geraci (Emeritus), McAdams, Newhagen, 

Paterson, Zanot 

Assistant Professors: Bonner, Hanson, Moeller 

Lecturers: Burns, Crane, Flynn, Harvey Katcef, Lodato, Huffman, Rogers, 

Penny Bender Fuchs, Executive Director, American Association of Sunday 

and Feature Editors 

Linda Ringer, Assistant Dean Fiscal Affairs 

Lucinda Fleeson, Curator, HumphreyJ ournalism Fellows 

Beth Frerking, Director of CaseyJ ournalism Center for Children and Families 

Carol Guensburg, Director, National Fellowship Program for Child/ Family 

Policyjournalists 

Marchelle Payne, Director of the American Society of Newspaper Editors 

(ASNE) Summer Institute, Executive Director MSPA (Maryland Scholastic 

Pres. Assn.) 

Rem Rieder, Editor, American J ournalism Review 

Carol Homer, Directorof the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism is widely considered one of the best 
journalism programs in the nation, blending a mix of prize-winning 
journalists, communication scholars and nationally recognized professional 
programs. The school's mission is simple: to produce the best possible 
journalists for leading newspapers, magazines, TV, radio and online news 
outlets. Recent graduates are editors, reporters and producers at The New 
York Times, Washington Post, CBS, Los Angeles Times, CNN, America 
Online and many of the nation's other top news organizations. 

Students learn from a faculty that includes Pulitzer Prize winners David S. 
Broder, Haynes Johnson and Jon Franklin, former CBS White House 
correspondent Lee Thornton and former Philadelphia Inquirer Executive 
Editor Gene Roberts. The faculty also include such internationally 
recognized media and communications scholars as Michael Gurevitch, 
Maurine Beasley and Douglas Gomery. 

Located less than 10 miles from the news capital of Washington, students 
participate in internships during the academic year at The Washington Post, 
The (Baltimore) Sun, CNN, and a wide array of Washington news bureaus. In 
the summer, students intern at top news organizations around the country. 



78 Philip JVlerrill College of Journalism 



Broadcast news students produce and anchor a 30-minute nightly news 
show that reaches more than 400,000 households in suburban Washington 
on the College-operated UMTV station, and online students worl< on 
Maryland Newsline, a political and public policy Web-based news magazine. 
Advanced broadcast, online, and print students enroll in Capital News 
Service, an intensive full-time reporting program in Washington and 
Annapolis. Students also participate in some of the school's many 
professional programs, including the monthly magazine American Journalism 
Review and the CaseyJ ournalism Center for Children and Families. 

Admission to the Philip Merrill College 
of Journalism 

Freshman Admission and the 45-Credit Review: Most first-time entering 
freshmen will gain admission to the Philip Merrill College of Journalism 
directly from high school as allowed by space considerations within the 
College. Early application is encouraged. Freshmen admitted to the 
program will have access to the necessary advising through their initial 
semesters to help them determine if J ournalism is an appropriate area for 
their interests and abilities. Academic and career advising is provided to 
journalism students throughout their academic career by qualified 
academic counselors and the College's faculty 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Journalism will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet 
the provisions of the review, these students must complete: (1) The two, 
first-year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) 
at least nine credits of Distributive Studies courseworl<, selected in 
consultation with an advisor; (3) ENGL 101 and J OUR 201 with grades of C 
or higher; and (4) a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Enrollment in JOUR 
201 requires proof of grammar skills competency through attainment of a 
minimum score of 52 on the Test of Standard Written English (TSWE). 
Students who do not meet these requirements will not be allowed to 
continue in the LEP and will be required to select another major. 

Transfer Admission. These requirements apply to new transfer students to 
the University as well as on-campus students. 

Note: No more than 12 transfer credits of communications courses from 
an accred/ted journalism program may be approved by the College to be 
applied toward the degree. Transfer students who wish to receive credit 
for JOUR 201 based on work done in a non-accredited journalism 
program must pass a proficiency exam. 

In order to be admitted to Journalism, transfer students will be required to 
meet the following set of gateway requirements: (1) The two, first-year 
Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at least 
nine credits of Distributive Studies coursework, selected in consultation 
with an advisor; (3) completion of ENGL 101 and J OUR 201 with grades of 
C or higher; and (4) attainment of a 2.8 GPA for all college-level work 
attempted. Enrollment in JOUR 201 requires proof of grammar skills 
competency through attainment of a minimum score of 52 on the Test of 
Standard Written English (TSWE). Contact the Philip Merrill College of 
Journalism or the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for the minimum 
GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to 
Journalism at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have 
extenuating or special circumstances which should be considered, may 
appeal in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The student 
will be notified in writing of the appeal decision. 

Students admitted to Journalism as freshmen that do not pass the 45- 
credit review but believe they have special circumstances, which should be 
considered, may appeal directly to the College. 

For further information, contact The College's Student Services office at 
301405-2399. 

Degrees 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism offers the B.A., M.A., M.J. and 
Ph.D. degrees. 

Graduation Requirements: 

Graduation requirements apply to all Journalism majors, including double- 
major and double-degree students. 



Students are required to earn a minimum of 122 credits. Accrediting 
regulations require 80 credits of a student's course work be in areas other 
than mass communication (i.e. no COMM orJOUR courses.) A minimum of 
65 of those 80 credits must be earned in liberal arts designated courses. A 
grade of C or better must be earned in JOUR 201 and JOUR 202 prior to 
taking courses for which they serve as prerequisites. Students must have a 
C average in their major. 

Accrediting regulations also limit the number of experiential credits that can 
be applied toward a degree in Journalism. Prior approval must be obtained 
to receive degree credit for any experiential courses numbered 386 or 399 
(repeatable up to 3 credits). 

Students are also required to demonstrate abstract thinking skills. Majors 
are offered a language option, a mathematics option, or a combination of 
the two. 

A supporting area consisting of four upper-level courses in a concentrated 
field is also required of Journalism majors. Students must also complete a 
minimum of 58 credits at the upper level of which no more than 28 can be 
journalism or mass communications credits. Finally, in addition to 
University graduation requirements. Journalism majors must complete 
additional liberal arts course work with one course each in economics, 
government and politics, American history, public speaking, and one course 
in anthropology psychology or sociology 

Required courses for all Journalism majors, regardless of whether 
journalism is a student's primary or secondary major: 

A. Nonjournalism course requirements. 

1. Abstract thinking skills requirement: Completion of a minimum of 
nine credits. 

a: Three credits must be one statistics course from the following list: 
AREC 484, BIOM 301, BMGT 230, CCJS 200, ECON 321, EDMS 
451, GEOG 305, GVPT 422, PSYC 200, SOCY 201, or a more 
advanced statistics course, 
b: A minimum of six credits through one or a combination of the 
following options. Should a student choose to combine the 
options, at least one language course must be at the 
intermediate level: 

i. Language-any language skills course(s). Up to two courses 
with at least one course at the intermediate level and no more 
than one course at the introductory level. (High school 
equivalency does not satisfy this requirement.) 
11. Math and Computer Science -up to two courses: 

a. Any mathematics (MATH) course numbered 111 or higher. 

b. Any computer science (CMSC) course. 

2. Public Speaking: one course from COMM 100, 107, 200, 230 or 250. 

3. History: one course from HIST 156, 157. 

4. Behavioral or Social Science: ANTH 260; PSYC 100; SOCY 100 or 105. 

5. Economics: ECON 200 or 201. 

6. Government and Politics: GVPT 100 or 170 

7. Supporting Area: Four upper-level (numbered 300 or higher) courses 
for a minimum of 12 credits in a supporting field (cannot be in 
Communication). 

B. J ournalism course requirements: 

Credit 

JOUR 100-Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 200-History, Roles and Structures 3 

JOUR 201-News Writing and Reporting 3 

J OUR 202- News Editing 3 

JOUR 203-New Media 1 

JOUR300€thics 3 

One of News Writing and Reporting II 3 

JOUR320-Print 

JOUR360-Broadcast 
Advanced Skills: 9 

Any nine-credit J OUR hours numbered 321-389 

JOUR350-Graphics 3 

JOUR 399-Supervised Internship 1-3 

JOUR 400-Law of Mass Communication 3 

Journalism and Society: 3 

Any three-credit J OUR hours numbered 410469 
Research: 3 

Any three-credit J OUR hours numbered 470479 3 

Total Credits 3941 



College of Information studies 79 



Advising 

The Office of Student Services, 1117 Journalism Building, 301-405-2399, 
provides academic advising to majors on an appointment basis. Send 
e-mail inquiries tojourug@deans.umd.edu. 

Honors and Awards 

Although no departmental honors program currently exists within the 
College, academically outstanding students are recognized through Kappa 
Tau Alpha, the Journalism academic honor society 

Hodding Carter III Community Service Award. Awarded at each May 
commencement to the journalism student exhibiting outstanding service to 
his or her peers, campus, and extended communities. 

Sigma Delta Chi/ Society of Professional Journalists Citation. Awarded 
annually to an outstanding journalism student. 

Kappa Tau Alpha Citation. Awarded at each commencement to the 
journalism student earning the highest academic achievement for all 
undergraduate study 

College Park Scholars Media, Self & Society 

CPS in Media, Self and Society- Dr. KathyMcAdams and Dr. Kalyani Chadha 

Co-sponsored by the Philip Merrill College of Journalism, the Media, Self 
and Society Program is one of the living/ learning programs offered by the 
College Park Scholars Program. This two-year program for incoming 
freshman is designed to give students the opportunity to undertal<e a 
critical examination of media organizations, institutions and practices as 
well as gain practical experience through involvement in a media-related 
activity of their choice. 

For more information see College Parl< Scholars Program section in this 
catalog. 

Field Work and Internship Opportunities 

Supervised internships are essential. Penny Benderfuchs is the Director 
of the Journalism Internship Program, 3118 Journalism Building, 301-314- 
2631. 



Accreditation 

The Philip Merrill College of Journalism became accredited in 1960 by the 
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. 
Standards set by the council are generated from professional and 
academic ethics and principles. This accrediting body ensures the liberal 
arts foundation of a journalism curriculum, limiting professional and skills 
courses to one-third of a student's academic program. 

Course Code: J OUR 

Note: For coursework in Intercultural Communication, Mediated 
Communication, Negotiation and Conflict Management, Persuasion and 
Attitude Change, Political Communication, Public Relations and Rhetoric 
and Public Discourse see the Department of Communication in Chapter 7. 



COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES 

4105 Hombake Building, 301405-2033 
E-mail: lbscgrad@deans.umd.edu 

w w w ,clis,um d.edu 

Professor and Interim Dean: Bruce W. Dearstyne 

The College of Information Studies offers degree programs for individuals 
interested in careers in information services and management. At the 
master's level, students may specialize in several fields, including archival 
studies, geographic information systems, health information services, 
school library media services, and science and technology information 
systems. Graduates pursue careers in a wide range of information agencies 
and positions. The College has dual degree programs with the History 
Department, and Geography Department. The Master's degree is 
accredited by the American Library Association. 

The Ph.D. degree prepares students for careers in research and teaching in 
the information field and in management of large information organizations. 

While the College does not currently have an undergraduate major, it offers 
courses at the undergraduate level. These courses are suggested for 
students wishing to develop skills in locating, analyzing, and evaluating 
information and students seeking to learn more about career opportunities 
in the information field. 



The Annapolis and Washington bureaus of the Capital News Service are 
staffed by students and supervised by college instructors. Through curricular 
programs, students cover state and legislative news for client papers around 
the region. Broadcast students have the opportunity to participate in Capital 
News Service in the Annapolis Bureau, developing stories and packages for 
UMTV. Students are required to report breaking news under deadline, write 
profiles, and cover state agencies. This is a full-time, semester-long 
program, on site at one of two bureau locations. Students interested in web 
journalism can report, write and edit for Maryland Newsline, an online 
magazine. This bureau is located in the College's online facility. Capital 
News Service is coordinated by Associate Dean Chris Callahan, 2102 
Journalism Building, 301-405-2399. 

For students interested in broadcast news, opportunities to gain experience 
with cable news programs are presented within the curriculum and by 
volunteering at the campus television station, UMTV. The campus radio 
station is WMUC. The Diamondback, the third most-read college paper in the 
nation, is the campus daily newspaper. Student newspapers of interest to 
special populations include the Eclipse, Black Explosion, and Mitzpeh. 

Student Organizations 

The college sponsors student chapters of the Society for Professional 
Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists, and the Radio 
and Television News Directors' Association. These organizations provide 
students with opportunities to practice skills, establish social relationships 
with other students both on and off campus, and meet and work with 
professionals in the field. 

For infomnation on the organizations listed, contact the Student Services 
Office, 1117 Journalism Building, 301405-2399. 



LETTERS AND SCIENCES (LTSC) 

For information, see entry in Chapter 3. 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES (LFSC) 

1302 Symons Hall, 301405-2080 

www .life.um d.edu/ 

Professor and Dean: Norma M. Allewell 
Associate Dean: Robert Infantino, J r. 
Assistant Deans: Amel Anderson, Lisa Bradley 

The undergraduate academic programs in the College of Life Sciences 
encompass Chemistry, Biochemistry, the Biological Sciences and 
Environmental Science and Policy. Specializations within the Biological 
Science major enable students to focus on specific areas such as 
Behavior, Ecology Evolution and Systematics; Cell, Molecular Biology and 
Genetics; Entomology; Marine Biology, Microbiology; Plant Biology; 
Physiology and Neurobiology; or Zoology. All programs aim to provide 
students a thorough understanding of contemporary biology emphasizing 
recent advances in areas such as genomics, proteomics and 
bioinformatics, a solid background in the physical sciences, and the 
opportunity to engage in research. The College participates in the 
University's Honors and College Park Scholars Programs and provides 
students with a wide range of research and internship opportunities, within 
the University, at federal agencies such as the National Institutes of 
Health, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center and National Institute of 
Standards and Technology and at nearby medical centers. The College also 
offers several Ph.D. programs; qualified undergraduates may take graduate 
courses with permission of the appropriate department. 

The College of Life Sciences includes the following departments 
and programs: 



80 Honors 



a. Departments: Chemistry and Biochemistry, Entomology, Cell Biology 
and Molecular Genetics, Biology 

b. Programs: Biological Sciences; Environmental Science and Policy, 
Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Admission 

students applying for admission should consult the University Admissions 
section for general information about admissions requirements and 
recommended courses. Students who plan to enter an undergraduate 
program in the College of Life Sciences should include the following 
subjects in their high school program: at least two units in the biological 
sciences and physical sciences (chemistry, physics); and four units of 
mathematics - algebra, geometry, pre-calculus and calculus. Math and 
science courseworl< at the honors/ AP/ IB level is strongly encouraged. For 
further information about admissions to the College of Life Sciences, 
contact Eden Garosi, Asst. to the Dean for Admissions, 301-314-8375. 

Advising 

Entering students are advised by professional advisors in the College's 
Student Affairs Office. When a student has selected a major or specialization 
and successfully completed the entry level courses in Chemistry, 
Mathematics, and the Biosciences, (s)he is assigned to a faculty advisor. All 
students must meet with an advisor at least once a semester. 

Students following pre-professional programs will be advised by 
l<nowledgeable faculty. For further information on the pre-professional 
programs offered at College Parl<, see chapter 7. 

Degree Requirements 

students graduating from the College must complete at least 120 credits 
with a grade point average of 2.0 in all courses applicable towards the 
degree. Included in the 120 credits must be the following: 

1. CORE (40 credits) 

2. College Requirements: 

As of Fall 1988, all students in the College of Life Sciences must complete 
the following: 

•CHEM 103, 113, orl03H, 113H 
CHEM 233, 243 or233H, 243H 
*MATH 220, 221 orl40, 141 
PHYS 121, 122 orl41, 142 
BSCI 105t and 106 
UNIVIOO 

•Chemistry and Biochemistry majors musttal<e CHEM 143 and 
153/227. 
* Chemistry and Biochemistry majors must tal<e MATH 140, 141. 
tChemistry and Biochemistry majors complete BSCI 105. 



HONORS 

students in the College of Life Sciences participate in Gemstones, the 
University Honors program and College Park Scholars, and research- 
intensive departmental honors programs. 

College Park Scholars— Life Sciences 

Director: Dr. Lee Hellman 

Assistant Director: Ms. Stacy Richardson 

1119 Cumberland Hall, 301405-0528 



Departmental Honors 

students may apply to participate in research-based departmental honors 
programs in the each of the departments of the College. Based on the 
student's performance in research and defense of a written thesis, the 
department may recommend candidates for the appropriate degree with 
Departmental Honors or Departmental High Honors. Successful completion 
of departmental honors will be recognized on a student's academic 
transcript and diploma. Participation in the University Honors program is 
not required for entry into a departmental honors program. See 
departmental listings or consult with an academic advisor in the College 
for more information. 

Joint Biomedical Research Program with the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine 

students may apply for the joint Biomedical Science Research Program 
between the Department of Medical and Research Technology (DMRT), 
University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the College of Life Sciences. 
Students who have successfully completed 60 credits of prerequisite 
courses at the University of Maryland, College Park may be considered for 
the program. Beginning in the junior year within the UM School of Medicine, 
students will develop skills in a variety of biotechnology methodologies as 
well as become familiar with the operation of analytical instruments used in 
clinical laboratories, biomedical science, and biosafety and quality 
assurance issues. Interested students should call the DRMT Admissions 
Office at 410-706-7664. 

For additional information on the College of Life Sciences please check our 
website: www.life.umd.edu. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY (PUAF) 

2101 Van Munching Hall, 301405-6330 

www .puaf.um d.edu 

Professor and Interim Dean: J acques Gansler 

The School of Public Policy provides graduate-level, professional education 
to individuals interested in careers in public service. The core curriculum 
emphasizes economic and quantitative approaches to policy analysis, 
political institutions and processes, ethics and public sector finance. There 
are several specializations offered as part of four academic programs: 
international security and economic policy; management, finance and 
leadership; environmental policy; or social policy 

The School offers separate degrees for early-career and mid-career college 
graduates. Those with a minimum of five years' full-time professional 
experience in the policy process may seek the 36-credit Master of Public 
Management (M.P.M.) degree. Others may enroll in the 48-credit Master of 
Public Policy (M. P. P.) program which can be completed in two years by full- 
time students. Eligible students in the College of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences can enroll in a five-year BA/MPP program. The School also offers 
joint degree programs with the Smith School of Business (M.P.P./M.B.A.), 
the School of Law (M.P.P./J .D.), and the Graduate Program in Sustainable 
Development and Conservation Biology; and accepts a small number of 
Ph.D. candidates each year. 

For further information, please check our website: www.puafumd.edu. 



The College sponsors the College Park Scholars-Life Sciences program for 
entering freshman who are admitted by invitation during the admissions 
process. Students meet weekly in colloquia with faculty where they learn 
more about the diverse areas of study in the life sciences. Scholars are 
also clustered in course sections which fulfill major and general education 
requirements. International travel-study course opportunities led by College 
faculty are available as a part of the program. Students create a community 
of living and learning in a specially-equipped residence hall. 



81 



C hapter 7 



Departments and 
Campus- wide Programs 



ACCOUNTING 

For information, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 6. 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (ENAE) 
A. J ames Clark School of Engineering 

3181 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-2376 
www.enae.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Fourney 

Professors: Cell, Chopra, Lee, Leishman, M. Lewis, Schmitz 

Associate Professors: Al<in, Baeder, Barlow, Pines, Sanner, Wereley, 

Winl<elmann, Yu 

Assistant Professors: Atkins, Cadou, Shapiro, Tolson 

Visiting Associate Professor: Flatau 

Visiting Professors: Bowden, Korl<egi, Nagaraj 

Adjunct Professors: Elias, Zien, R. Lewis 

Lecturers: Benner, Carignan, Haas, Healy, Keller, Smith, Van Wie 

Emeritii: Anderson, J ones 

Department Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Aerospace Engineering is, (1) to provide 
the highest quality education in state-of-the-art aerospace engineering 
principles and practices at undergraduate and advanced degree levels and 
through continuing education programs for practicing engineers, (2) to 
conduct research that will significantly advance the state of knowledge in 
the aerospace sciences and technologies, (3) to advance aerospace 
engineering practice and education through publications in the engineering 
and educational literature and through close relations with industry, 
government and other academic institutions, (4) to contribute to the 
advancement of the College of Engineering, the University of Maryland, and 
the state of Maryland. 

The Major 

Aerospace engineering is concerned with the processes, both analytical 
and creative, that are involved in the design, manufacture and operation of 
aerospace vehicles within and beyond planetary atmospheres. These 
vehicles range from helicopters and other vertical takeoff aircraft at the low- 
speed end of the flight spectrum, to spacecraft traveling at thousands of 
miles per hour during launch, orbit, transplanetary flight, or reentry, at the 
high-speed end. In between, there are general aviation and commercial 
transport aircraft flying at speeds well below and close to the speed of 
sound, and supersonic transports, fighters, and missiles which cruise 
supersonically. Although each speed regime and each vehicle poses its 
special problems, all aerospace vehicles can be addressed by a common 
set of technical specialties or disciplines. 

The subdisciplines of Aerospace Engineering are: aerodynamics, flight 
dynamics, propulsion, structures, and "design". Aerodynamics addresses the 
flow of air and the associated forces, moments, pressures, and temperature 
changes. Flight-dynamics addresses the motion of the vehicles including the 
trajectories, the rotational dynamics, the sensors, and the control laws 
required for successful accomplishment of the missions. Propulsion 
addresses the engines which have been devised to convert chemical (and 
occasionally other forms) energy into useful work, to produce the thrust 
needed to propel aerospace vehicles. Structures addresses material 



properties, stresses, strains, deflection, and vibration along with 
manufacturing processes as required to produce the very light weight and 
rugged elements needed in aerospace vehicles. Aerospace "design" 
addresses the process of synthesizing vehicles and systems to meet defined 
missions and more general needs. This is a process that draws on information 
from the other subdisciplines while embodying its own unique elements. 

The Aerospace Engineering program is designed to provide a firm 
foundation in the various subdisciplines. The Aerospace Engineering 
Department has facilities to support education and research across a 
range of special areas. There are subsonic wind tunnels with test sections 
ranging from a few inches up to 7.75 feet by 11.00 feet as well as a 
supersonic tunnel with a 6 inch by 6 inch test section. There are a number 
of structural test machines with capabilities up to 220,000 pounds for 
static loads and 50,000 pound for dynamic loads. There are experimental 
facilities to test helicopter rotors in hover, in forward flight, and in vacuum 
to isolate inertial loads from aerodynamic loads. There is an anechoic 
chamber for the investigation of noise generated by helicopters, and an 
autoclave and other facilities for manufacturing and an x-ray machine for 
inspecting composite structures. There is a neutral buoyancy facility for 
investigating assembly of space structures in a simulated zero gravity 
environment which is supported by robots and associated controllers. 

There are many personal computers and workstations that provide local 
computing capability and extensive network access to campus mainframes, 
supercomputing centers, and all the resources of the Internet including the 
World Wide Web. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

Freshman Year I II 

CHEM 135- General Chemistry 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics I 3 

MATH 140, 141-Calculus I, II 4 4 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

ENAE 100— The Aerospace Engineering Profession 1 

ENAE 202— Aerospace Computing 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total Credits 14 16 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

Sophomore Year I II 

ENME 232— Thermodynamics 3 

MATH 246- Differential Equations 3 

ENES 220-Strength of Materials 3 

MATH 240-Linear Algebra 3 

MATH 241-Calculus III 4 

PHYS 260/261, 270/ 271-General Physics 11,111 4 4 

ENAE 283— Fundamentals of Aeronautical Systems 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total Credits 17 16 

JuniorYear I II 

ENAE 204- Software Toolbox 3 

ENAE 301 — Dynamics of Aerospace Systems 3 

ENAE 311— Aerodynamics I 3 

ENAE 324— Aerospace Structures I 4 

ENAE 362— Aerospace Instrumentation and Experiments 3 

ENAE 432— Control of Aerospace Systems 3 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 



82 African American Studies Department 



AERONAUTICAL TRACK: 

ENAE 414— Aerodynamics II 3 

SPACE SYSTEM TRACK: 

ENAE 404- Space Flight Dynamics 3 

Total Credits 15 16 

SeniorYear I II 

ENAE 423— Vibration & Aeroelasticity 3 

ENAE 464— Aerospace Engineering Lab 3 

CORE Program Requirements or Electives 3 3 

Aerospace Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 

AERONAUTICAL TRACK: 

ENAE 403-Aircraft Flight Dynamics 3 

ENAE 455— Aircraft Propulsion & Power 3 

ENAE 481-Principles of Aircraft Design 3 

ENAE 482— Aeronautical System Design 3 

SPACE SYSTEM TRACK: 

ENAE 441 — Space Navigation & Guidance 3 

ENAE 457— Space Propulsion & Power 3 

ENAE 483— Principles of Space Systems Design 3 

ENAE 484- Space Systems Design 3 

Total Credits 15 15 

Aerospace Electives 

students must select a track. All courses in either the Aeronautical or the 
Space Systems track must be completed. Students in either track who wish 
to gain a broader education across the aeronautical and space application 
areas can take courses required in the other track as electives. 

The Department offers a range of other electives. The following courses 
have recently been offered as electives for the undergraduate program 

ENAE 415- HelicopterTheory 3 

ENAE 416— Viscous Flow & Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE 424— Design & Manufacture of Computer Prototypes 

ENAE 425— Mechanics of Composite Structures 3 

ENAE 426— Computer-Aided Structural Analysis and Design 3 

ENAE 471- Aircraft Flight Testing 3 

ENAE 488B— Intro to Computational Fluid Dynamics 3 

ENAE 488C— Aerospace Computer Aided Design 3 

ENAE 488J -Helicopter Aerodynamics 3 

ENAE 488M — High Speed Aerodynamics 3 

ENAE 488P-Product Design 3 

ENAE 488R-Hybrid Rocket Design 3 

ENAE 488W-Design of Remotely Piloted Vehicles 3 

ENAE 499— Elective Research (Repeatable to 6 credits) 

The Aerospace Elective is either ENAE 398 or a 400 level ENAE course in 
addition to the student's chosen track sequence. The Technical Elective 
must be a 300 or 400 level course outside of the department. Only one of 
either ENAE 398, a 488 project course or 499 may be used for these 
electives. 

Minimum Degree Credits: The fulfillment of all Department, School, and 
University requirements. 124 credits are required for an Aerospace 
Engineering degree. 

Honors Program 

Academically talented students will be invited to participate in the 
Aerospace Honors program. Honors sections of ENAE 283, ENAE 311, 
ENAE 423 are offered as part of this program, in addition to an honors 
research project, ENAE 398. 

Admission 

Admission requirements the same as those of other Engineering 
Departments. Please consult Chapter 1. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Each student is assigned to one of the full time 
faculty members who must be consulted and whose signature is required 
on the request for course registration each semester. The list of advisor 
assignments is available in the main office, 301405-2376. 



Cooperative Education Program 

Participation in the Cooperative Education Program is encouraged. See 
Chapter 1 for details. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department offers Glenn L. Martin merit-based scholarships and the 
Robert Rivello Scholarship. Space Systems Laboratory, Departmental and 
Alfred Gessow merit-based Scholarships are available as well. 

Scliolarsliips and Awards 

The Department offers the following awards: Academic Achievement Award 
for highest overall academic average at graduation; R.M. Rivello 
Scholarship Award for highest overall academic average through the junior 
year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding Achievement Award for scholarship 
and service to the Student Chapter; American Helicopter Society 
Outstanding Achievement Award for service to the student chapter; 
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Outstanding 
Achievement Award for scholarship and service to the student chapter. 

Student Organizations 

The Department is home to student chapters of the American Institute of 
Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Helicopter Society, and the 
Sigma Gamma Tau honorary society. Aerospace Engineering students are 
also frequent participants in student activities of the Society for 
Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering. 



AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT 
(AASP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 LefrakHall, 301405-1158 

www .bsos.umd.edu/ aasp/ 

Chair and Associate Professor: S. Harley 
Associate Professors: E. Wilson* (GVPT), F. Wilson 
Assistant Professor: J . Nembhard, C. Woods 
Instructor: M. Chateauvert 
*J oint appointment with unit indicated. 

The African American Studies Department offers an interdisciplinary 
bachelor of arts degree in the study of the contemporary life, history, and 
culture of African Americans. The curriculum emphasizes the historical 
development of African American social, political, and economic 
institutions, while preparing students to apply analytic, social science skills 
in the creation of solutions to the pressing socio-economic problems 
confronting African American communities. 

Two program options lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Both require a 
15-credit core of course work that concentrates on African American history 
and culture. 

The Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration provides a broad cultural 
and historical perspective. This concentration requires 18 additional credit 
hours in one or more specialty areas within African American Studies such 
as history, literature, government and politics, sociology or anthropology, as 
well as a departmental seminar. 

The Public Policy Concentration provides in-depth training for problem 
solving in minority communities. It requires 21 additional credit hours in 
analytic methods, such as economics and statistics, nine credit hours of 
electives in a policy area (with departmental approval). Substantive areas 
of study include the family, criminal justice, employment, health care, 
discrimination, and urban development. 



Requirements for Major 



Foundation courses: 
(formerly 299R). 



AASP 100, 101 (formerly 300), 200, 202, 297 



General Concentration Requirements: In addition to the foundation course 
requirements, 18 credits of AASP upper-division electives (300-400 
numbers), AASP 400 or AASP 402 and AASP 397 or AASP 386 and 
AASP 396. 



Agricultural Sciences, General 83 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 

AASP Foundation Courses: (total 15) 

AASP 100— Introduction to African American Studies 3 

AASP 101 (Formerly 300)-Public Policy and Black Community 3 

AASP 200-African Civilization 3 

AASP 202-Black Culture in the United States 3 

AASP 297-Research Methods 3 

Upper-Division Electives in African American Studies 18 

Seminars 

AASP400 or AASP 402— Classic Readings in African American Studies ...3 

AASP 397-Senior Thesis 3 

AASP 386 and AASP 396 6 

Public Policy Concentration Requirements: In addition to the foundation 
courses, three credits of statistics; eight credits of elementary economics 
(ECON 200 and ECON 201); AASP 301, AASP 303, AASP 305; nine credits 
of upper-division AASP electives in the policy area (AASP numbers 499A-Z) 
or, with approval, elective courses outside of AASP; and AASP 397 or AASP 
386 and AASP 396. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 

AASP Foundation Courses: (total 15) 

AASP 100— Introduction to African American Studies 3 

AASP 101 (Formerly 300)-Public Policy and the Black Community 3 

AASP 200-African Civilization 3 

AASP 202-Black Culture in the United States 3 

AASP 297-Research Methods 3 

Analytic Component 

STATlOO-ElementaryStatistics and Probability 
OR SOCY 201-lntroductory Statistics for Sociology 

OR Equivalent Statistics Course (Sophomore Year) 3 

AASP 301 (Formerly 4 2 8J) 3 

AASP 303 (Formerly 428P)— Computer Applications in 

African American Studies 3 

AASP 305 (Formerly 401)— Theoretical, Methodological and Policy 
Research Issues in African American 

Studies 3 

ECON 200— Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON 201— Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

One additional analytical skills course outside of AASP, with 

AASP approval 3 

Policy Electives in African American Studies 9 

Final Option: 

1) AASP 397-Senior Thesis 3 

2) AASP 386 and AASP 396 6 

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course that is to be 
counted toward completion of degree requirements. All related or 
supporting courses in other departments must be approved by an AASP 
faculty adviser. 

Honors Program 

Academically talented undergraduates may enroll in the University Honors 
Program with a specialization in African American Studies. The Honors 
Program includes seminars and lectures presented by distinguished 
University of Maryland, College Park, faculty and guests. A reduced ratio of 
students to faculty ensures more individualized study In addition, AASP 
majors with junior standing may petition to become individual honors 
candidates in African American Studies. 

BA/ MPM Program 

In this innovative joint program, candidates earn a bachelor's degree in 
African American Studies and a master's degree in public management 
after approximately five years. The BA/MPM is designed to integrate the 
study of the history, culture, and life of African Americans with technical 
skills, training, and techniques of contemporary policy analysis. The 
program also features a summer component that includes a lecture series, 
research opportunities, and special seminars. 



Admission into the BA/ JVlPJVi program requires two steps: 

Undergraduate 

(1) Students must major in the public policy concentration within the 
African American Studies program and maintain an overall GPA of 
3.0 or greater. 

Graduate 

(2) Students apply to the joint program after completing 81 credit 
hours of undergraduate work. Applicants must meet both 
University of Maryland, College Park graduate and School of Public 
Affairs graduate admission requirements. 

Eligibility 

Freshmen or University of Maryland, College Park, students in 
good academic standing with fewer than 60 credits may apply to the 
BA/MPM program. 

Contact: The African American Studies Department at 301-405-1158 for 
application details. 

Options for Study with AASP 

For students who major in other departments, the African American Studies 
Program offers three options for study: 

1. Students may obtain a certificate in African American Studies by 
completing 21 credit hours of course work. 

For more information on the African American Studies Certificate, 
see the section on campus-wide programs later in this chapter 

2. Students may designate African American Studies as a double 
major, completing the major requirements for both AASP and 
another program. 

3. AASP can be a supporting area of student for majors such as 
Computer Science, Business, or Engineering. 

Scholarships and Financial Aid: 

John B. and Ida Slaughter Scholarship 

Advising 

Undergraduates in good academic standing may enroll in the African 
American Studies Department or obtain more information about available 
options and services by contacting the Undergraduate Academic Adviser, 
African American Studies Department, 2169 Lefrak Hall, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, 301405-1158. 

Course Code: AASP 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, GENERAL (GNAS) 
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

0115 H.J. Patterson, 301405-1331 

Program Coordinator: D.S. Glenn (sglenn@umd.edu) 

Department Offices -2102 Plant Sciences Building 

301-405-4355 www.nrsl.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Chair: Weismiller 

Professors: Angle*, Coale, Dernoeden, Fretz, R. Hill, James*, Kenworthy 

Mcintosh*, Miller, Ng, Quebedeaux, Rabenhorst, Solomos, Walsh, Weil 

Associate Professors: Bouwkamp, Carroll, Coleman, Costa, Deitzer, Everts, 

Glenn, Grybauskas, M. Hill, Lea-Cox, Ritter, Slaughter, J.B. Sullivan, J.H. 

Sullivan, Swartz, Turner, Vough 

Assistant Professors: Chang, Dzantor, Kratochvil, Momen, Myers, 

Needelman, Neel 

Instructors: Buriel, Nola, Steinhilber 

Professor of the Practice: Cohan 

Affiliate Professors: Fiola, Kearney Tjaden 

Adjunct Professors: Cregan, Daughtry, Meisinger, Rosenberg, Saunders, 

Tamboli 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Christiansen, Izaurralde, Tucker 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Pooler 

Professors Emeriti: Aycock, Axley, Bandel, Beste, Clark, Decker, Fanning, 

Gouin, Hoyert, Kuhn, Link, McClurg, Mulchi, Oliver, Shanks, Thompson, Wiley 

* Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 



84 Agricultural and Resource Economics 



The Major 



The Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture 
offers three undergraduate majors. Two lead to the Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.) degree; one in Natural Resource Sciences and the other in General 
Agriculture Sciences. The third major leads to a Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture (B.L.A.) degree. 

Agriculture is a complex subject, encompassing a range of scientific 
disciplines and professional fields. Majoring in General Agricultural 
Sciences does not require an agricultural bacl<ground, as the curriculum 
gives students a broad overview of both plant and animal agriculture. This 
major is designed for students who are interested in a broad education in 
the field of agriculture. It is ideal for students who would like to survey 
agriculture before specializing, or for those who prefer to design their own 
program. To supplement classroom worl<, students in this major are 
encouraged to obtain summer positions that will provide technical 
laboratory or field experience in their chosen area. This program is 
administered by the Department of Natural Resource Sciences and 
Landscape Architecture. 

Curriculum in General Agricultural Sciences 
GNAS Major 

Semester 
Requirements for Degree Credit Hours 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSCorNRSC** 3 

ANSC 314— Comparative Animal Nutrition 3 

AREC 250— Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

AREC-** 3 

BSCI 105-Principles of Biologyl 4 

BSCI 106-Principles of Biology II 4 

BSCI-** Insect Pest Type Course 3 

CHEM 103-General Chemistryl 4 

CHEM 104— Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry, or 
CHEM 113-General Chemistry II 

and CHEM 233-Organic Chemistryl 4-8 

ENBE 100— Basic Biological Resources Engineering Technology 3 

ENBE 200— Fundamentals of Agricultural Mechanics 3 

MATH 110 or higher (MATH 115 recommended) 3 

NRSC 200-Fundamentals of Soil Science 4 

PLSC 420-Principles of Plant Pathology or 

ANSC 412— Introduction to Diseases of Animals 4 

PLSC 101— Introductory Crop Science 4 

PLSC-** 3 

SOCY 305-Scarcityand Modern Society 3 

Community Development Related, Non-Agricultural Life Science, 

Biometrics, Computer, or Accounting 6 

CORE and General Agricultural Program Requirements* 91-100 

Electives (18 credit hours at 300-level or above) 20-29 

** Student may select any course(s) having required hours in the area 
indicated 



AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE 
ECONOMICS (AREC) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2200 Symons Hall, 301405-1293 
E-mail: arecuinfo@umail.umd.edu 

www.arec.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: J ustttt 

Professors: Bocl<stael, Chambers, Chavas, Gardner, Hueth, Lichtenberg, 

List, Lopez, McConnell, Musser, Nerlove, Olson 

Associate Professors: Alberini, Hanson, Horowitz, Leathers, Lipton, Lynch, 

Parl<er, Wade 

Assistant Professors: Haigh, Leonard, Mell<onyan 

Emeriti: Bender, Brown, Cain, Foster, Hardie, Moore, Stevens, Strand, 

Tuthill, Wysong 

tt Distinguished University Professor 

Agricultural and Resource Economics majors complete a set of prerequisite 
courses, a core of classes offered by the Agricultural and Resource 
Economics Department, and one or more fields comprised of selected 
courses from outside the department. The core includes courses in 



economic reasoning, agribusiness management, environmental and 
resource policy agricultural policy, economic development, and analytical 
methods. The program permits students flexibility in choosing fields to fit 
their career interests. Majors must complete one and should complete two 
fields. The curriculum balances breadth and depth, and lets students 
develop academic skills in two or more areas. The program provides a good 
foundation for careers in economics, resource or environmental policy, 
agribusiness, and international agriculture. 

Advising 

Because the program is flexible, advising is mandatory. Appointments may 
be made in Room 2200 Symons Hall, 301405-1291. 

Awards 

Scholarships honoring Arthur and Pauline Seidenspinner and Ray Murray 
are available. Contact a faculty adviser for more information, 
301405-1291. 

Double Majors 

The department features a double major with Spanish for students 
interested in careers in multinational agribusiness firms or international 
agencies. It features a double major with Government and Politics 
for students interested in law school. Both can be completed within 
120 credits. Other double majors are possible in consultation with an 
advisor. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Prerequisite Courses 

ECON 200— Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON 201— Principles of Macroconomics 4 

ECON 306— Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

ECON 321 (or BMGT 230)- Economic (or Business) Statistics 3 

MATH 220 (orMATH 140)-Calculus 3 

STAT 100 (or MATH 111)- Introduction to Probability 3 

Major Core Courses 

Seven of these courses must be successfully completed. 

AREC 306— Farm Management 3 

AREC 382— Computer Based Analysis in Agriculture and 

Natural Resources 3 

AREC 404-Prices of Agricultural Products 3 

AREC 405— Economics of Agricultural Production 3 

AREC 427— Economics of Agricultural Marketing Systems 3 

AREC 433-Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC 435— Commodity Futures and Options 3 

AREC 445— Agricultural Development in the Third World 3 

AREC 453— Economics of Natural Resource Use 3 

AREC 455-Economics of Land Use 3 

AREC 484— Introduction to Econometrics in Agriculture 3 

Fields 

All majors must complete one of the following fields. Two are 
strongly encouraged. 

• Business Management 

BMGT220-Principles of Accounting 1 3 

BMGT221-Principles of Accounting II 3 

BMGT 340- Business Finance 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

BMGT 364— Management and Organization Theory 3 

BMGT 380- Business Law I 3 

• Farm Production 

PLSC 100 or PLSC 101-lntro. to Horticulture or Crop Science 4 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

Four other courses in animal sciences, natural resource sciences and 
landscape architecture, chosen from a list of selected courses. 

• Food Production 

PHYS 117 (orPHYS 121)- Introduction to Physics 4 

BSCI 105-Principles of Biology 4 

NFSC 100-Elements of Nutrition 3 

NFSC 112— Food Science & Technology 4 



Agronomy 85 



BSCI 223- Introduction to Microbiology 4 

NFSC 430- Food Microbiology 2 

NFSC 431-Food Quality Control 4 

NFSC 398— Seminar in Food Science 1 

• Environmental and Resource Policy 

ECON 381— Environmental Economics 3 

ECON 454-Public Finance 3 

Four other courses in biological sciences and chemistry, political science, 
natural resource management or geography, chosen from a list of 
selected courses. 

• International Agriculture 

ECON 305— Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 3 

ECON 315— Economics Development of Underdeveloped Areas 3 

ECON 340/441-lnternational Economics 3 

BMGT 392— International Business Management 3 

Two other courses in international agricultural production, chosen from a 
list of selected courses. 

• Political Process 

GVPT 100— Principles of Government and Politics 3 

GVPT 170 - American Government 3 

Four other courses in government and politics, chosen from a list of 
selected courses. 

• Advanced Degree Preparation 

ECON 407— Advanced Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 414- Game Theory 3 

ECON 422— Quantitative Methods in Economics I 3 

ECON 423- Quantitative Methods in Economics II 3 

Two other courses in mathematics or mathematical economics, chosen 
from a list of selected courses. 

• Student Designed Field 

This field requires a written proposal listing at least six courses totaling at 
least 18 credits. The proposal must be submitted to the Undergraduate 
Committee of the AREC department. Committee approval must be obtained 
30 or more credit hours before graduation. A student designed field may be 
used to study a foreign language as part of the AREC curriculum. 

Course Code: AREC 



AGRONOMY (AGRO) 



The Agronomy and Horticulture programs have been reorganized into a 
single major. Natural Resource Sciences (NRSC). See Natural Resource 
Sciences elsewhere in this chapter. (Note: Courses formerly offered as 
AGRO and HORT are now offered as NRSC and PLSC.) 



Requirements for M ajor 

Requirements for the American Studies major include a minimum of 45 
upper-level credits completed and the foreign-language requirements of the 
College of Arts and Humanities. The major requires 45 hours, at least 24 of 
which must be at the 300-400 level. Of those 45 hours, 21 must be in 
AMST courses, with the remaining 24 in two 12 credit hour core areas 
outside the regular AMST departmental offerings. No grade lower than a C 
maybe applied toward the major. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory every semester for all majors. 

Distribution of the 45 hours 

AM ST Courses (21 hours required) 

1. AMST 201/ Introduction to American Studies (3): required 
of majors. 

2. Three (3) or six (6) hours of additional lower-level course work. 

3. AMST 330/ Critics of American Culture (3): required of majors. 

4. Six (6) or nine (9) hours of upper-level course work. No more than 6 
hours of a repeatable number may be applied to the major. 
***Students should take AMST 201 before taking any other 
AMST courses and will complete AMST 330 before taking 
400-level courses. 

5. AMST 450/ Seminar in American Studies (3): required of majors. 

Core areas outside American Studies (24 hours required) 

Majors choose two outside core areas of 12 hours each. At least one of 
the cores must be in a discipline traditionally associated with American 
Studies. The other core may be thematic. Upon entering the major, 
students develop a plan of study for the core areas in consultation with an 
adviser; this plan will be kept in the student's file. All cores must be 
approved in writing by an adviser. 

Traditional Disciplinary Cores 

History, Literature, Sociology/ Anthropology, Art/ Architectural History. 

Interdisciplinary or Thematic Cores 

Afro-American Studies, Women's Studies, Urban Studies, Popular Culture, 
Personality and Culture, Comparative Culture, Material Culture, Ethnic 
Studies, Business and Economic History, Folklore, Government and 
Politics, Education, Philosophy Journalism. 

Course Code: AMST 



AJVIERICAN STUDIES (AMST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1102 Holzapfel Hall, 301405-1354 

amst.umd.edu/ index.html 

Professor and Chair: Caughey 

Professors: Kelly Michel, Struna 

Associate Professors: Lounsbury, Mintz, Paoletti, Parks, Sies 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Conroy 

The Major 

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
American culture and society, past and present, with special attention to 
the ways in which Americans, in different historical or social contexts, make 
sense of their experience. Emphasizing analysis and synthesis of diverse 
cultural products, the major provides valuable preparation for graduate 
training in the professions as well as in business, government, and 
museum work. Undergraduate majors, with the help of faculty advisers, 
design a program that includes courses offered by the American Studies 
faculty, and sequences of courses in the disciplines usually associated 
with American Studies (i.e., history, literature, sociology, anthropology, art 
history, and others), or pertinent courses grouped thematically (e.g., Afro- 
American studies, women's studies, ethnic studies). 



ANIMAL SCIENCES (ANSC) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301405-1373 
E-mail: wrstrick@umd.edu 

www.ansc.umd.edu 

Department of Animal and Avian Sciences 

Professor and Chair: Erdman 

Professors: Barao, Douglass, Harrell, Mather, Ottinger, Peters, Russek- 

Cohen, Varner, Vijay Westhoff 

Associate Professors: Christman, Doem, Estevez, Hartsock, Keefer, Kohn, 

Majeskie, Porter, Stricklin, Zimmermann 

Assistant Professors: Angel, Bequette, Woods 

Instructor: Ordakowski 

Emeriti: Flyger, Heath, Mattick, Soares, Vandersall, Williams, Young 

Adjunct Professors: Bakst, McMurtry, Paape, Volstad, Wall 



The Major 



Animal Sciences prepares students for veterinary school, graduate school 
and careers in research, sales and marketing, aquaculture, and animal 
production. The curricula apply the principles of biology and technology to 
the care, management, and study of dairy and beef cattle, horses, fish, 
sheep, swine, and poultry. Students complete the Animal Sciences core 
courses and choose a specialization area: Animal Management and 
Industry, Avian Business, Laboratory Animal Management, and Sciences/ 



86 Anthropology 



Professional to prepare for admission to graduate, veterinary, or medical 
school. The Animal Sciences Center includes classrooms, lecture hall, 
social area, teaching labs, pilot processing plant, and animal rooms 
adjacent to a teaching farm where horses, sheep, swine, and cattle are 
maintained throughout the year. 

ANIMAL SCIENCES CORE: All undergraduates majoring in Animal Sciences 
must complete the following course requirements: 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Sciences 

ANSC 211— Animal Anatomy 

ANSC 212-Animal Physiology 

ANSC 220— Livestocl< Management 

ANSC 314— Comparative Animal Nutrition 

BSCI 105-Principles of Biology I 

BSCI 106-Principles of Biology II 

BSCI 222— Introductory Genetics 

CHEM 103-General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104— Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

OR 

CHEM 113 & CHEM 233-(General Chemistry II & Organic Chemistry I) 

MATH 220 orl40-Precalculus or above 

BSCI 223-General Microbiology 

PHYS 121-Fundamentals of Physics 

AREC 250— Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

OR 

ECON 201 — Principles of Economics 

ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK: All students must complete 23 or 24 credits 
in one of the following five options. 

1. ANIMAL MANAGEMENT AND INDUSTRY (0104A) 

ANSC 214— Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory 

ANSC 315— Applied Animal Nutrition 

ANSC 327— Ouantitative Domestic Animal Genetics 

OR 

ANSC 446— Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 

ANSC 412— Introduction to Diseases of Animals 



BCHM 463-Elements of Biochemistry 

OR 

BSCI 230-Cell Biology and Physiology 

BIOM 301-lntroduction to Biometrics 

CHEM 243-Organic Chemistry II 

PHYS 122-Fundamentals of Physics II 

For additional information, please contact the Associate Dean, VMRCVM, 
1203 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742, 301-314-6830. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Each student will be assigned to a faculty adviser to 
assist in planning his or her academic program. For information or 
appointment: 1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301405-1373. 

Scholarships and Awards 

American Society of Animal Sciences Scholastic Recognition and 
Department of Animal Sciences Scholastic Achievement Awards are 
presented each year at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 
Student Awards Convocation. The ANSC program administers several 
scholarships, including: C.W. England, Dairy Technology Society, the 
Kinghome Fund Fellowship, the C.S. Shaffner Award, the Lillian Hildebrandt 
Rummel Scholarship, and the Owen P. Thomas Development Scholarship. 
For eligibility criteria, visit the ANSC Office, 1415A Animal Sciences Center. 



Student Organizations 



ANSC majors are encouraged to participate in one or more of the following 
social/ professional student organizations. The Animal Husbandry Club, 
Sigma Alpha sorority, the University of Maryland Equestrian Club, the 
Veterinary Science Club, and the Poultry Science Club. For more 
information, visit the ANSC Undergraduate Studies Office, 1415A Animal 
Sciences Center. 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses: 

General Courses 

ANSC 453-Animal Welfare 

ANSC 455— Applied Animal Behavior 

Dairy Courses 

ANSC 240- Dairy Cattle Management 

ANSC 241 — Dairy Cattle Management Practicum 

Equine Courses 

ANSC 330— Equine Science 

ANSC 231 — Equine Science Practicum 

ANSC 232— Horse Management 

Livestock, Aquaculture and Poultry Courses 
ANSC 251 — Beef and Sheep Management Practicum 
ANSC 255— Introduction to Aquaculture 
ANSC 262— Commercial Poultry Management 
ANSC 271 — Swine Management Practicum 

2. EOUINE STUDIES (0104C) 
Required Courses 

ANSC 232-Horse Management 

ANSC 231 — Horse Management Practicum 

ANSC 330— Equine Science 

ANSC 315— Applied Animal Nutrition 

ANSC 455— Applied Animal Behavior 

AREC 306— Farm Management 

3. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (0104D) 
ANSC 214— Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory 
ANSC 412-Animal Diseases 

ANSC 413— Lab Animal Management 

ANSC 446— Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 

ANSC 447— Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 

ANSC 453-Animal Welfare 

ANSC 455— Applied Animal Behavior 

4. & 5. SCIENCES & COMBINED AG AND VET SCI (0104E and 1299D) 
ANSC 214— Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory 

ANSC 315— Applied Animal Nutrition 

ANSC 443— Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 

OR 

ANSC 446— Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 



Course Code: ANSC 



ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1111 Woods Hall, 301405-1423 

www .bsos.umd.edu/ anth 

Professor and Chair: Leone 

Professors: Agar (emeritus). Chambers, Chernela (also LASC), Gonzalez 

(emerita), Jackson, Shackel, Whitehead, Williams 

Associate Professors: Freidenberg, Paolisso 

Assistant Professor: Stuart 

Lecturers: Cuddy Finch, Hall, London, Schamm, Wilczak 

Research Associate: Mortensen 

Faculty Research Assistant: Mumbauer 

Affiliate Faculty: Bolles (WMST), Caughey (AMST), Hanna (DANC), Hanison 

(CMLT, LASC), Kim (WMST), Robertson (MUSC) 

Adjunct Faculty: Crain (Adjunct Professor, LTG Associates), Fiske, 

McManamon (Adjunct Professor, National Park Service), Potter (Adjunct 

Professor, National Park Service), Puentes-Markides (Adjunct Professor, 

PAHO/ WHO), Tashima (Adjunct Professor, LTG Associates) 

Advisor Consultant: Robinson 

The Major 

Anthropology, the study of culture, seeks to understand humans as a 
whole— as social beings who are capable of symbolic communication 
through which they produce a rich cultural record. Anthropologists try to 
explain differences among cultures— differences in physical characteristics 
as well as in customary behavior. Anthropologists study how culture has 
changed through time as the human genus has spread over the earth. 
Anthropology is the science of the biological evolution of human species, 
and the disciplined scholarship of the cultural development of human 
beings' knowledge and customary behavior. 

Anthropology at the University of Maryland offers rigorous training for many 
career options. A strong background in anthropology is a definite asset in 
preparing for a variety of academic and professional fields, ranging from the 
law and business, to comparative literature, philosophy and the fine arts. 
Whether one goes on to a Master's or a Ph.D., the anthropology B.A. 



Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program 87 



prepares one for a wide range of non-academic employment, such as city 
and public health planning, development consulting, program evaluation, 
and public archaeology. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Anthropology department offers beginning and advanced course worl< 
in the three principal subdivisions of the discipline: cultural anthropology, 
archaeology, and biological anthropology. Within each area, the department 
offers some degree of specialization and provides a variety of opportunities 
for research and independent study. Laboratory courses are offered 
in biological anthropology and archaeology. Field schools are offered 
in archaeology. The interrelationship of all branches of anthropology 
is emphasized. 

The undergraduate curriculum is tied to the department's Master in Applied 
Anthropology (M.A.A.) program; accordingly, preparation for non-academic 
employment upon graduation is a primary educational goal of the 
department's undergraduate course worl< and internship and research 
components. 

The Anthropology department has a total of four laboratories, located in 
Woods Hall, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs. The 
department's two archaeology labs, containing materials collected from 
field schools of the past several years, serve both teaching and research 
purposes. The other two laboratories are a teaching laboratory in biological 
anthropology and the Laboratory for Applied Ethnography and Community 
Action Research. 

Cultural Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), a research and program 
development arm of the department, is located in Woods Hall. 

Center for Heritage Research Studies, located in the Department of 
Anthropology, focuses on research devoted to understanding the cultural 
characteristics of heritage and its uses. 

Requirements for Major 

Majors are required to tal<e five courses in the core course sequence (three 
introductory courses and two advanced method and theory courses), for a 
total of 16-17 credit hours. They must also take 15 credit hours in 
anthropology electives and 18 supporting credit hours, courses that are 
primarily outside the major. Anthropology majors must also acquire a 
second language or complete a quantitative methods course. 

Required Courses: 
ANTH 220— Introduction to Biological Anthropology 
ANTH 240— Introduction to Archaeology 
ANTH 260— Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology and Linguistics 

At least two of the following (one must be in major's area of primary 
focus-i.e., cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology): 
ANTH 320— Method and Theory in Biological Anthropology 
ANTH 340— Method andTheory in Archaeology 
ANTH 360— Method andTheory in Sociocultural Anthropology 

Quantitative Methods or Foreign Language Requirement: 

A) a quantitative methods course: 3 credit hours required— for a list 
of classes recommended for this requirement, see the Director for 
Undergraduate Studies; or 

B) Three or more terms of a foreign language, depending 
upon proficiency. Proficiency may be demonstrated in one of the 
following ways: 

1) successful completion of high-school level 4 in one language, 
or 

2) successful completion of a 12-credit sequence or of the 
intermediate level in college language courses, or 

3) successful completion of a placement examination at the 
above levels in one of the campus language departments 
offering such examinations 

Electives: 15 credit hours in anthropology electives, 9 at the 300-level 
or above 



Advising 

Undergraduate advising is coordinated by the director of undergraduate 
studies who serves as the administrative adviser for all undergraduate 
majors and minors. All majors are required to meet with the director of 
undergraduate studies at least once per term, at the time of early 
registration. In addition, the Anthropology department encourages students 
to select an academic adviser who will worl< closely with the student to 
tailor the program to fit the student's particular interests and needs. All 
Anthropology faculty members serve as academic advisers (and should be 
contacted individually). Each major is expected to select an academic 
adviser from the faculty in the field of his/her concentration (Biological 
Anthropology, Socio-Cultural Anthropology, or Archaeology), and to consult 
with him/her on a regular basis. The student's choice of a quantitative 
methods course must be approved by the student's adviser. For additional 
information, students should contact the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies, Dr. William Tafl Stuart, 0106 Woods Hall, 301405-1435; E-mail: 
wstuart@bssl.umd.edu. or Advisor Consultant, Keisha Robinson, 1117 
Woods Hall, 301-405-1436; E-mail: l<robinson@anth. umd.edu 

Honors 

The Anthropology department also offers an Honors Program that provides 
the student an opportunity to pursue in-depth study of his or her interests. 
Acceptance is contingent upon a 3.5 GPA in anthropology courses and a 
3.0 overall average. Members of this program are encouraged to tal<e as 
many departmental honors courses (either as HONR or as "H" sections of 
ANTH courses) as possible. The Honors Citation is awarded upon 
completion and review of a thesis (usually based upon at least one term of 
research under the direction of an Anthropology faculty member) to be done 
within the field of anthropology. Details and applications are available in 
the Anthropology Office, or from your departmental adviser. 



Student Organizations 



Anthropology Student Association (ASA). An anthropology student 
association meets regularly to plan student events and to help coordinate 
various student and faculty activities. Meeting times are posted outside 
0100 Woods Hall. 

The department and the ASA jointly sponsor a public lecture series. 

Course Code: ANTH 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC 
COMPUTATION PROGRAM 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3103 Mathematics Building, 301405-0924 
www.amsc.umd.edu 

Director: Levermore 

Faculty: More than 100 members from 19 units. 

The Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program is a graduate 
program in which the students combine studies in mathematics and 
application areas. All AMSC courses carry credit in mathematics. An 
undergraduate program emphasizing applied mathematics is available to 
majors in mathematics. Appropriate courses carry the MATH and STAT 
prefixes, as well as the AMSC prefix. 

Course Code: AMSC 



ARCHITECTURE 

For information, see the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation 
entry in chapter 6. 



Supporting: 18-H credit hours outside of the department (with your 
academic adviser's approval, 8 hours maybe anthropology course worl<) 

In addition to the above requirements, anthropology majors must meet the 
requirements of the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, as well as 
the requirements of the university's general education program. 



88 Art 



ART (ARTT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211-E Art/ Sociology Building 
Undergraduate Program 301-405-1445 
Graduate Program 301405-7790 
www.inform.umd.edu/ ARHU/ Depts/ Art 

Chair: Ruppert 

Undergraduate Director: Sham 

Graduate Director: Craig 

Professor Emerita: Truittt 

Professor Emeritus: Driskelitt 

Professors: DeMontet, Fabiano, Lapinski, Ruppert, Sham 

Associate Professors: Craig, Humphrey, Kehoe, Klank, Lozner, McCarty, 

Richardson, Thorpe 

Assistant Professor: Gavin, Morse 

Instructor: Jacobs 

Part Time: Tacha 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

tt Distinguished University Professor 

The Major 

The Department of Art is a place where students transform ideas and 
concepts into objects and visual experiences. It is an environment rich in 
art theory, criticism, and awareness of diverse world culture. Students are 
taught to articulate and refine creative thought and apply knowledge and 
skill to the making of images, objects, and experimental works. Courses 
are meaningful to students with the highest degree of involvement in the 
program and those who take electives. Students majoring in Art take a 
focused program of courses folded into a general liberal arts education 
offered by the university. 

The diverse faculty of artists in the department strive to foster a sense of 
community through the common experience of the creative process, 
sharing their professional experience freely with students. 

The areas of concentration within the major are design, drawing, painting, 
printmaking, and sculpture. Areas of study include papermaking, 
photography, art theory, and digital imaging. Internships and independent 
studies are also available. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Undergraduate students are offered a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Art . The 
requirements consist of a curriculum of 36 credits of art studio and art 
theory courses, and 12 additional credits of art history and art theory 
courses as a supporting area for a total of 48 major required credits. No 
course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major or supporting 
area requirements. 

Citation in Interdisciplinary M ultimedia and Technology 

16 credit hours. ARTT 354, ENGL 479, ARTT 689B and three additional 
relevant courses to be pre-approved by the Citation Director. Students 
who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the official 
transcript. Please contact Prof. Brandon Morse, 301-405-1462, 
bml54@umail.umd.edu, for more information. 

Advising 

The name of the adviser for each class is available in the department 
office. Each second-semester sophomore and first-semester senior is 
required to see his or her adviser within the department. Additionally, each 
student is strongly encouraged to see his or her adviser in the department 
each semester. 



Honors Program 



The honors option is available to Art majors for the purpose of creating 
opportunities for in-depth study and enrichment in areas of special and 
creative interest. To qualify students must be Art majors with junior or 
senior status, a major G.P.A of 3.2, and an overall G.P.A. of 3.0. The 
program requires a total of 12 credits in Honors course work. One course 
(3 credits) must be taken at the 300-level, and three courses (3 credits 
each) at the 400-level. There is a thesis component in one of the 400-level 
courses. Please consult the Honors Adviser for additional information. 



FJeldwork and Internship Opportunities 

students in the past have worked in a variety of internship settings. These 
have included assisting professionals complete public commissions, 
commercial or cooperative gallery and exhibition duties, and working in 
professional artists' workshops in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. 
metropolitan areas. Additional information is available in the Department of 
Art office. 

Scliolarsliips and Awards 

The Department of Art administers eight Creative and Performing Arts 
Scholarships (CAPAs) that are available to freshman and entering transfer 
students for the Fall semesters. This is a merit-based scholarship that is 
awarded on a one-year basis, and may be renewed. Additional information 
is available in the main office of the department. The James P. Wharton 
Prize is awarded to the outstanding Art major participating in the December 
or May graduation exhibition. The Van Crews Scholarship is designated for 
outstanding Art majors concentrating in design. It is awarded for one year 
and is renewable. The David C. Driskell Award for the Outstanding 
Graduating Graduate Student is awarded at the end of the academic year. 

Student Art Exiiibitions 

The West Gallery (1309 Art/ Sociology Building) is an exhibition space 
devoted primarily to showing students' art work, and is administered by 
undergraduate art majors assisted by a faculty adviser. 

Lecture Program 

The Department of Art has a lecture program in which artists and critics are 
brought to the campus to explore ideas in contemporary art. A strong 
component of this program is devoted to diversity 

Course Code: ARTT 



ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (ARTH) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211B Art/ Sociology Building, 301405-1479 

www .arthistory_archaeology.umd.edu/ 

Chair: Mansbach 

Professors: Eyo, Hargrove, Kelly Mansbach, Miller, Pressly Promey Venit, 

Wheelock 

Associate Professors: Colantuono, Gerstel, Kuo, Spiro 

Assistant Professors: Ater, Kita, Kornbluth, Pillsbury 



The Major 



The faculty and students of the Department of Art History and Archaeology 
form a dynamic nucleus within a major research university The program, 
leading to the B.A. degree in Art History and Archaeology, provides a 
diverse selection of courses in the art and archaeology of Africa, Asia, 
Europe, and the Americas. The goal of the department is to develop the 
student's critical understanding of visual culture in both art historical and 
archaeological contexts. The numerous teaching awards won by faculty 
members indicate the department's concern for excellence in 
undergraduate education. In addition to its fine undergraduate program, the 
department offers graduate studies leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The department has strong coverage in Western art from the Classical 
period up to the present. In addition, by taking advantage of the unusual 
diversity of faculty interests, students can study in areas not traditionally 
offered in departments of art history and archaeology such as art and 
archaeology of Africa, art of diaspora cultures, art and archaeology of the 
Americas, Eastern European art, Asian art, and feminist perspectives on 
art. Grounding in art historical and archaeological theory and method is 
provided in a number of courses. Students are encouraged to supplement 
their art historical and archaeological studies with courses in other fields. 
Studies in archaeology may be pursued in cooperation with other University 
departments. Faculty fieldwork in Greece, Israel, Mexico, Nigeria, and the 
United States affords undergraduates valuable first-hand experience in 
archaeological methods and practice. 

In addition to the university's excellent libraries, students can use the 
resources of the Library of Congress and other major area archives. The 
department is in the forefront of exploring digital imaging technologies for 
art historical and archaeological teaching, research, and publication. 



Astronomy 89 



The location of the university between Washington and Baltimore gives 
students the opportunity to use some of the finest museum and archival 
collections in the world for their course worl< and independent research. 
The department encourages students to hold internships at a number of 
these institutions. Curator/ professors, exhibitions in the Art Gallery at the 
University of Maryland, interactive technologies, and the extensive use of 
study collections bring regional and distant museums into the classroom. 

Close ties between the faculty and the undergraduate community are 
fostered through directed-study courses and undergraduate research 
assistantships. Selected students also gain valuable experience as 
undergraduate tutors for large lecture classes. The undergraduate Art 
History and Archaeology Association sponsors lectures, departmental 
gatherings, and field trips to museums on the East coast. 

Requirements for the major in Art History are as follows: three ARTH 
courses (9 credits) at the 200 level; seven ARTH courses (21 credits) at 
the 300-400 level; either ARTT 100 orARTT 110 (3 credits); a supporting 
area of four courses (12 credits) in coherently related subject matter 
outside the department of Art History and Archaeology at the 300-400 
level. No credit toward the major can be received for ARTH 100 or 355. No 
course with a grade lower than C may be used to satisfy major or 
supporting area requirements. 

Citation in Arcliaeoiogy 

15 credit hours. ARTH 494 and four courses from approved list of courses. 
Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. Please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
more information. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors. 

Honors Program 

Qualified majors may participate in the department's honors program, 
which requires the completion of ARTH 496 (Methods of Art History) and 
ARTH 499 (Honors Thesis). Consult a departmental adviser for details. 

Awards 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers three undergraduate 
awards each year: the J.K. Reed Fellowship Award to an upper-level major 
and the George Levitine and Franl< DiFederico Bool< Awards to seniors 
nearing graduation. 

Course Code: ARTH 



ASIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES 
AND CULTURES (ARAB, CHIN, EALL, HEBR, 
JAPN, KORA, RUSS, SLAV) 

For information on these programs, consult the School of Language, 
Literature, and Cultures elsewhere in this chapter. 

ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT (ASTR) 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Sciences 

1204 Computer and Space Sciences BIdg., 301-405-3001 

E-mail: astrgrad@deans.umd.edu 

www.astro.umd.edu 

Chair: Mundy 

Associate Director: Trasco 

Professors: A'Hearn, Harrington, Papadopoulos, Rose, Vogel, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Hamilton, Harris, McGaugh, Ostril<er, Veilleux 

Assistant Professors: Miller, Reynolds, Richardson 

Instructor: Deming 

Adjunct Professors: Gehrels, Holt, Mushotzl<y, White 

Senior Research Scientists: Kundu, Lisse, Sharma 

Associate Research Scientists: Arnaud, Balachandran, Killen, McFadden, 



Milil<h, Schmahl, White, Wolfire 

Assistant Research Scientists: Bandler, Golla, Hewagama, Lanz, 

Loewenstein, Ng, Pound, Teuben 

Professors Emeritus: Bell, Earl, Erickson, Kundu, Leventhal, Wentzel 

The Major 

The Astronomy Department offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science 
in Astronomy as well as a series of courses of general interest to non- 
majors. Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation in 
Astronomy Mathematics, and Physics. The degree program is designed to 
prepare students for positions in government and industry laboratories or 
for graduate work in Astronomy or related fields. A degree in Astronomy has 
also proven valuable as preparation for non-astronomical careers. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Astronomy majors are required to take a two-semester introductory 
Astronomy sequence: ASTR 120-121, an observing course ASTR 310 and 
an introductory Astrophysics course ASTR 320. Two additional 400-level 
Astronomy courses are also required. 

Students majoring in Astronomy are also required to obtain a good 
background in Physics and in Mathematics. The normal required sequence 
is PHYS 171, 272, 273 and the associated labs PHYS 174, 275, 276. 
With the permission of the advisor, PHYS 161, 262, 263 and 174 can be 
substituted for this sequence. PHYS 374 and two additional 400-level 
Physics courses are required. Astronomy majors are also required to take a 
series of supporting courses in Mathematics. These are MATH 140, 141, 
240, 241, and 246. 

The program requires that a grade of C or better be obtained in all courses 
required for the major. Students planning to double major (or to seek a 
double degree) in Physics and Astronomy should note that this combination 
does not automatically satisfy CORE Advanced Studies. They should 
discuss the issue with their academic advisors to assure that their program 
meets all degree requirements. 

Detailed information on typical programs and alternatives to the standard 
program can be found in the pamphlet entitled, "Department Requirements 
for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Astronomy" which is available from the 
Astronomy Department office. 

Facilities 

The Department of Astronomy has joined with two other universities in 
upgrading and operating an mm wavelength array located at Hat Creek in 
California. Observations can be made remotely from the College Park 
campus. Several undergraduate students have been involved in projects 
associated with this array. The Department also operates a small 
observatory on campus. There are four fixed telescopes ranging in aperture 
from 20" to 1" . There are also six portable 8" telescopes. Most of the 
telescopes now have CCD cameras and several are computer controlled. 
This facility is used extensively for undergraduate classes. An observatory 
Open House Program for the public is also run. Details are available from 
the Astronomy Department office. 

Courses for Non-Science M ajors 

There are a variety of Astronomy courses offered for those who are 
interested in learning about the subject but do not wish to major in it. 
These courses are designed especially for the non-science major. ASTR 
100 and 101 are general survey courses in Astronomy They cover (briefly) 
all the major topics in the field. ASTR 220 is an introductory course dealing 
with the topic, "Collisions in Space." Several 300-level courses are offered 
primarily for non-science students who want to learn about a particular field 
in depth, such as the Solar System, Stellar Evolution, the Origin of the 
Universe or Life in the Universe. 

Citation 

A Citation in Astronomy may be earned by completing (with grades of C or 
better) ASTR 100 or ASTR 101, ASTR 220 and three of the following: ASTR 
300, 330, 340, 380 or 498. Contact Department for procedures. 



90 Biological Resources Engineering 



Honors 

The Honors Program offers students of exceptional ability and interest in 
Astronomy opportunities for part-time research participation which may 
develop into full-time summer projects. Honors students work with a faculty 
advisor on a research project for which academic credit may be earned. 
Certain graduate courses are open for credit toward the bachelor's degree. 
(Students are accepted into the Honors Program by the Department's 
Honors Committee on the basis of grade point average or recommendation 
of faculty) Honors candidates submit a written proposal on their research 
project and enroll in ASTR 399 for at least 3 credits. In their senior year, 
students complete a research project, write a thesis and do an oral 
presentation before a committee. Satisfactory grades lead to graduation 
"With Honors (or High Honors) in Astronomy." 

For Additional Information 

Further information about advising and the Honors Program can be 
obtained by calling the Department of Astronomy office at 301-405-3001. 

Course Code: ASTR 



BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES ENGINEERING 
(ENBE) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and 
A. James Clark School of Engineering 

1457 An. Sci./Biological Resources Engr. Building, 301405-1198 

E-mail tsl67@umail.umd.edu 

www.bre.umd.edu 

Chair: Wheaton 

Professors: Johnson, Shirmohammadi, Wheaton 

Associate Professors: Baldwin, Kangas, Ross, Tao 

Assistant Professors: Becker, Felton, Montas, Tilley 

Instructor: Carr 

Emeriti: Brodie, Grant, Harris, Krewatch, Merrick, Stewart 

Adjunct Professors: Chen, Rawls 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Adams 

The Major 

This program is for students who wish to become engineers but who also 
have serious interest in biological systems and how the physical and 
biological sciences interrelate. The biological and the engineering aspects 
of plant, animal, genetic, microbial, medical, food processing, and 
environmental systems are studied. Graduates are prepared to apply 
engineering, mathematical, and computer skills to the design of biological 
systems and facilities. Graduates find employment in design, management, 
research, education, sales, consulting, or international service. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Biological Resources Engineers can prepare themselves for a wide variety 
of careers. Each student has the opportunity to specialize by taking 
technical electives in their interest area. Biological and engineering 
technical electives are chosen in consultation with their Departmental 
Advisor. While individuals have chosen to specialize in areas ranging from 
aquacultural engineering to biomedical engineering to food engineering, 
four specific focus areas are supported by the Department. 

Bioenvironmental and Ecosystem Engineering 

Bioenvironmental and Ecosystem Engineering is a focus area that 
concentrates on using principles of biological, environmental and 
engineering sciences to study the interacting processes necessary for a 
healthy environment. Students interested in this focus area need to 
strengthen their background in soils, ecosystem biology natural resources, 
chemistry, fluids, hydrology and pollution processes. 

Biomedical Engineering 

Biomedical engineering is a focus area that examines the wide range of 
activities in which the disciplines of engineering and biological or medical 
science intersect. Representative areas include: design of diagnostic and 
therapeutic devices for clinical use; development of biologically compatible 
materials; physiological modeling; and many others. 



Biotechnological Engineering 

Biotechnological Engineering is a focus area that applies scientific 
and engineering principles to the processing of materials by biological 
agents. Examples of products available as a result of biotechnology 
include antibiotics, vaccines, fuels such as ethanol, dairy products, and 
microbial pesticides. 

Pre-medicine/ Pre-veterinary 

The pre-professional program for pre-medical and pre-veterinary students 
advises students preparing to apply to graduate programs in these areas. 
The Departmental Advisors assist students in setting career objectives, 
and in selecting undergraduate course work to meet the admissions criteria 
of the professional schools. Advisors help students select proper chemistry 
and biological science required course sequences. 

Educational Objectives 

The objective of the undergraduate Biological Resources Engineering 
program is to produce engineers with: 

1. The ability to design products and processes related to 
biological systems. 

2. The ability to communicate well, especially with engineers and non- 
engineering biological specialists. 

3. The ability to work successfully in teams. 

4. The ability to conceptually categorize information, especially 
biological information, in order to deal effectively with technical 
advances coming at a rapid pace. 

5. Provide engineering education with a solid grounding in 
fundamentals that will have lifelong value. 

6. Provide understanding of human behavior, societal needs 
and forces, and the dynamics of human efforts and their effects on 
the environment. 

Biological Resources Engineering Curriculum 

Freshm an Year 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

*MATH 140-Calculus 1 4 

*CHEM 135-General Chemistryl 3 

*BSCI 105-Principles of Biologyl 4 

ENBE 110— Intro, to Bio. Res. Engineering 1 

Total 15 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

*MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

*CHEM 136-General Chemistry II 1 

*PHYS 161-General Physics 3 

ENGLlOl-lntroduction to Writing 3 

Total 14 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 233- Organic Chemistry 4 

BSCI 223- General Microbiology 4 

ENES 220-Mechanics of Materials 3 

*PHYS 260-General Physics 3 

PHYS 261-General Physics Lab 1 

Total 15 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers 3 

ENME 232— Thermodynamics 3 

ENBE 241 — Computer Use in Bioresource Engineering 3 

BSCI 230-Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

*C0RE1 3 

Total 16 

Junior Year 

ENBE 453— Introduction to Biological Materials 3 

ENBE 455- Basic Electronic Design 3 

ENME 331-Fluid Mechanics 3 

or ENCE 330-Basic Fluid Mechanics 

[MATH 241: Calculus III] 4 

*C0RE1 3 

Total 16 



Biological Sciences Program 91 



ECON 200 or201-Principles of Economics 4 

or (approved substitute) 

ENBE 454— Biological Process Engineering 4 

[BIOL SCI: Technical Elective]3 3 

[ENGR SCI: Technical Elective]3 3 

*C0RE1 3 

Total 17 

Senior Year 

ENBE 471-Biological Systems Control 3 

ENBE 422— Water Resources Engineering 3 

or ENBE 456— Biomedical Instrumentation 3 

ENBE 485- Capstone Design 1 1 

[BIOL SCI: Technical Elective]3 3 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

*C0RE1 3 

Total 16 

ENBE 482— Dynamics of Biological Systems 1 

ENBE 484— Engineering in Biology 3 

ENBE 486- Capstone Design II 2 

[ENGR SCI: Technical Elective]6 6 

*C0RE1 3 

Total 15 

Total 124 

* Satisfies General Education Requirements 

^Students must consult with an advisor on selection of apprcipriate courses 
for their particular area of study. 



No 300-level and above courses may be attempted until 56 credits have 



2 

been earned. 

^Technical electives, related to field of concentration, must be selected 
fnam a depa rtmenta I ly approved list. 

Biological Sciences (BIOL SCI) technical electives may be chosen, 
depending on students' interests, from an approved list of courses in the 
following programs: Animal Sciences, Chemistry/ Biochemistry, Entomology 
Nutrition and Food Science, Geography, Geology, Hearing and Speech, 
Health, Horticulture, Kinesiology, Meteorology, Microbiology, Natural 
Resources Management, Natural Resources Sciences, Plant Biology, 
Psychology and Zoology 

Engineering Sciences (ENGR SCI) technical electives may be chosen, 
also depending on students' interests, from among the following programs: 
Aerospace Engineering, Biological Resources Engineering, Civil Engineering, 
Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Fire Protection Engineering, 
Mechanical Engineering, and Materials and Nuclear Engineering. 

Admission/ Advising 

All Biological Resources Engineering majors must meet admission, 
progress, and retention standards of the Clarl< College of Engineering, but 
may enroll through either the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 
or the School of Engineering. 

Advising is mandatory; call 301405-7357 or 301-405-1198 to schedule an 
appointment. 

Contact departmental academic advisors to arrange teaching or research 
internships. 

Financial Assistance 

The department offers four scholarships specifically for Biological 
Resources Engineering majors. Cooperative education (work study) 
programs are available through the Clarl< School of Engineering. Part-time 
employment is available in the department, in USDA laboratories located 
near campus, and at other locations. 

Honors and Awards 

Outstanding students are recognized each year for scholastic achievement 
and for their contribution to the department, college, and university Top 
students are selected for Alpha Epsilon, the Honor Society of Biological 
Resources Engineering, and Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society 



Student Organization 

Join BRES, the Biological Resources Engineering Society. Academic 
advisors will tell you how to become a participant. 

Course Code: ENBE 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM 
College of Life Sciences 

1302 Symons Hall, 301405-6892 

www .life.umd.edu 

Director: Associate Dean Infantino 
Associate Director: Dr. Joelle Presson 

The Major 

The Biological Sciences major is an interdepartmental program sponsored by the 
Departments of Entomology Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, and Biology 
All Biological Sciences majors complete a common sequence of introductory and 
supporting courses refen-ed to as the Basic Program. In addition, students must 
complete an Advanced Program within one of the following specialization areas: 

Plant Biology (PLNT) 

Entomology (ENTM) 

Microbiology (MICB) 

Zoology (Zool) 

Cell and Molecular Biology and Genetics (CMBG) 

Physiology and Neurobiology (PHNB) 

Marine Biology (MARB) 

Behavior, Ecology Evolution & Systematics (BEES) 

General Biology (GENB) 

Individualized Studies (BIVS) 

A complete list of Specialization Area requirements is available from the 
Biological Sciences Program Office, 301-405-6892, and on our website at 
www.life.umd.edu. Changes to the Specialization Areas and requirements 
are under review. Please checl< with the Program Office for updated 
information. 

The undergraduate curriculum in Biological Sciences at the university 
emphasizes active learning through student participation in a variety of 
quality classroom and laboratory experiences. The well-equipped teaching 
laboratories train students in modern research technologies. The program 
requires supporting course worl< in chemistry mathematics, and physics, 
yet allows time for exploration of other academic disciplines. 

Each participating department offers research opportunities that may be 
completed either in a faculty member's research laboratory or field site or 
at one of the many nearby research facilities. The National Institutes of 
Health, the Patuxent Wildlife Refuge, the National Zoo, and the 
Chesapeake Bay Laboratory are just a few of the many sites utilized by 
University of Maryland students. 

Many of our graduates pursue advanced degrees in master's or doctoral 
programs or in medical, dental, or other professional schools. Some elect 
to seek employment as skilled technical personnel in government or 
industry research laboratories. Others pursue careers in fish and wildlife 
programs, zoos, and museums. Other recent graduates are now science 
writers, sales representatives for the biotechnology industry, and lawyers 
specializing in environmental and biotechnology related issues. 

The College also works with students interested in pursuing double degree 
programs with a life sciences discipline and secondary science education. 
Please contact Dr. Joelle Presson, 1326A Symons Hall, 301405-3892 for 
more information. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements 30 

Basic Program in Biological Sciences 

BSCI 105-Principles of Biologyl 4 

BSCI 106-Principles of Biology II 4 

BSCI 222-Principles of Genetics 4 

One or two courses in Organismal Diversity 4 



92 Biology 



Supporting courses 30-32 

MATH 220 orl40-Calculus I 
MATH 221 orl41-Calculus II 
CHEM 103-General Chemistry I 
CHEM 113-General Chemistry II 
CHEM 233-Organic Chemistry I 
CHEM 243-Organic Chemistry II 
PHYS 121 orl41-Physics I 
RHYS 122 orl42-Physics II 

Total Credits in Basic Program 42-44 

Advanced Program 21-24 

Electives 16-19 

A grade of C or better is required for BSCI 105, 106, 222, the diversity 
course, all courses in the Advanced Program and all supporting courses 
(math, chemistry, and physics). Majors in Biological Sciences cannot use 
any Life Sciences course to fulfill CORE Advanced Studies requirements, 
including courses in CHEM or BCHM . 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each pre-registration period for all Biological 
Sciences majors. All freshmen and new transfer students will be assigned 
an adviser from the College of Life Sciences advising staff. Students will be 
assigned to a departmental faculty adviser once a basic sequence of 
courses has been successfully completed. The departmental faculty 
advisers are coordinated by the following persons for the indicated 
specialization areas. These coordinating advising offices can be contacted 
for mal<ing appointments with an adviser or for any other information 
regarding that specialization area. 



Smith 


1219 H.J. Patterson 


301405-2765 


CMBG, MICB 
PLNTGENB 


Compton 


2227 Bio.Psych. BIdg. 


301405-6904 


ZOOL, PHNB, 
MARB, BEES 


Kent 


3142 Plant Sciences BIdg. 


301405-3911 


ENTM, GENB 


Pressor! 


1322 Symons Hall 


301405-6892 


BIVS 



Honors 

Outstanding students are encouraged to apply to departmental Honors 
Programs. Through the Honors Programs students will become actively 
involved in the ongoing scientific research at the university. Information 
about these honors programs may be obtained from the Associate Director. 

Course Code: BSCI 



BIOLOGY (BIOL) 
College of Life Sciences 

2227 Biology-fsychology Building, 301405-6904 
E-mail: biolugrad@umail.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: J effery 

Associate Chair: Compton 

Professors: Borgia, Carr, Cohen, Colombini, Gill, Inouye, O'Connor, Payne, 

Popper, Reaka-Kudia, Sebens, Via, Wilkinson 

Associate Professors: Dietz, Dudash, Pagan, Fenster, Forseth, Higgins, 

Imberski, Shaw, Small, Sukharev 

Assistant Professors: Bely Davenport, Haag, Hare, Lee, Quinlan, Tishkoff 

Lecturers: Arnot, Compton, Infantino, Jensen, Koines, Opoku€dusei 

Jointly Appointed Faculty: Cummings, Mount, Palmer, Poeppel, Simon 

Professors Emeriti: Anastos, Clark, Corliss, Haley, Highton, Pierce 

Director of Graduate Studies: Forseth 

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Compton 

The Department of Biology (comprised of former Zoology and some former 
Plant Biology department faculty) participates in teaching and advising in 
the inter-departmental undergraduate Biological Sciences Program (see 
separate listing). Faculty interest and expertise span levels of organization 
from molecules to ecosystems in animals and plants. 



Requirements for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences Program elsewhere in this chapter, or contact the 
Department of Biology Undergraduate Office. 

Advising 

Advising in the Biological Sciences program is mandatory. Students are 
assigned an advisor based on their area of specialization. The Department 
of Biology faculty coordinate and advise students who specialize in 
Physiology and Neurobiology (PHNB), Marine Biology (MARB), Zoology 
(ZOOL), and Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (BEES). Contact 
the Department of Biology Undergraduate Office, 405-6904, for information 
about advising or to schedule an appointment. For advising in other 
Biological Sciences Specialization areas, see the Biological Sciences 
Program listing in this catalog. 

Honors 

The Department of Biology Honors Program offers highly motivated and 
academically qualified students the opportunity to work closely with a 
faculty mentor on an original, independent research project. Students are 
required to participate in the program for at least three semesters, and 
need not have been admitted University Honors program in order to 
participate. Contact the undergraduate office for more information. 

Course Code: BSCI 



BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT, GENERAL 

For information, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 6. 



CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS 

Note: The Department of M icrobiology has merged with the Department of 
Plant Biology. The new name of the expanded department is the 
Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics. 

College of Life Sciences 

Microbiology Building, 301405-5435 

www .life.umd.edu/ CBM G 

Chair: Ades 

Professors: Bean, Cooke, Gantt, Joseph, Mosser, Simon, Stein, Sze, 

Wolniak, Yuan 

Associate Professors: Benson, Chang, Delwiche, DeStefano, Dinman, 

Hutcheson, Liu, Mount, Song, Stewart, Straney 

Assistant Professors: DiRuggiero, Frauwirth, Kwak 

Instructors: Shields, Smith, Moctezuama 

Professors Emeriti: Colwell, Cook, Doetsch, Hetrick, Kantzes, Lockard, 

Patterson, Pelczar, Reveal, Roberson, Weiner 

Affiliate Professors: Colombini, J effery Mather 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Baehrecke, Culver, Vakharia, Green 

Adjunct Professors: Moss, Nuss, Wickner 

Research Assistant Professors: Brown, del Campillo, Cunningham 

The Majors 

The department participates in the teaching and advising of three 
specialization areas of the interdepartmental major in Biological Sciences. 
They are Microbiology (MICB), Plant Biology (PLNT), and Cell, Molecular 
Biology, and Genetics (CBMG). 

Changes to Biological Sciences Program Specialization Areas and 
requirement are under review. Please check with the Department/ College 
for updated information. 

Microbiology is a field fundamental to all of biology Specialization in the 
field encompasses not only study of the fundamental processes of 
bacteria, but also the examination of animal, plant, and bacterial viruses, 
as well as animal and plant defense systems that counter infection and 
invasion of microorganisms. Microbiology, including the sub-fields of 
virology and immunology continues to be at the forefront. Microbiological 
principles are being applied in ecology, biotechnology, medicine, 
agriculture, and the food industry. 



Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies 93 



The Plant Biology specialization area is designed with a diverse range of 
career possibilities for students in plant biology and plant protection. The 
department offers instruction in the fields of physiology molecular biology 
pathology, ecology, taxonomy, genetics, mycology, nematology, virology, 
and evolutionary plant biology 

Cell, Molecular Biology, and Genetics are combined into one specialization 
are due to their inter-relatedness and overlap. The combined areas will 
allow focus on the internal worl<ing of the cell and the interactions between 
cells, as well as the techniques used to understand processes at the 
molecular level. 

These areas of the biological sciences program will allow students to find 
opportunities in academia, industry, government, medicine, law, 
biotechnology, and public health. 

Requirements for the Specialization Areas 

See the Biological Sciences entry in this catalog or contact an adviser for 
specific program requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Students are assigned to faculty advisers based 
upon their area of specialization. The Department of Cell Biology and 
Molecular Genetics faculty coordinate and advise students who specialize 
in Microbiology (MICB), Plant Biology (PLNT), and Cell, Molecular Biology 
and Genetics (CMBG). Contact the undergraduate program for information. 
Advising web page: www.life.umd.edu/ advising. 
1219 HJ Patterson BIdg., Phone 301405-2766. 

Research Experience and Internsliips 

students may gain research experience in off-campus laboratories or in on- 
campus faculty laboratories. Contact the undergraduate program office, 
301405-2766, for more information. 

Honors and Awards 

The Departmental Honors Program involves an independent research 
undertal<en with a faculty adviser. For information, contact the Honors Co- 
ordinator, S. Hutcheson, 3123 Microbiology Building. The P. Arne Hansen 
Award may be awarded to an outstanding departmental honors student. 
The Sigma Alpha Omicron Award is given annually to the graduating senior 
selected by the faculty as the outstanding student in Microbiology 

Student Organizations 

All students interested in microbiology are encouraged to join the University of 
Maryland student chapter of the American Society for Microbiology the 
professional scientific society for microbiologists. Information on this 
organization maybe obtained from the ASM website, ww w .asm ysa.org. 



CENTRAL EUROPEAN, RUSSIAN, AND 

EURASIAN STUDIES (CERE) 

(FORMERLY RUSSIAN AREAS STUDIES PROGRAM' 



College of Arts and Humanities 

2115 Francis Scott KeyHall, 3014054295 

www .ceres.umd.edu 

Director: Michael David-Fox 

Professors: Herf (History), Mansbach (Art History and Archaeology), Brecht 

(Asian and East European), Tismaneanu (Government and Politics), Lampe 

(History), Murrell (Economics), Robinson (Sociology), Ruzenblit (History) 

Associate Professors: Gor, Hitchcocl<, Lekic, and Martin (Asian and East 

European), Kaminski (Government and Politics), M. David-Fox (History), 

Schuler (Theatre) 

Assistant Professors: Papazian (Asian and East European), K. David-Fox 

(History) 

Departmental advising is mandatory for second-semester sophomores 



The Major 

CERE offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students in the 
program study Russian, Eurasian, and Central/ East European culture as 
broadly as possible, striving to comprehend it in all its aspects rather than 
focusing their attention on a single element of human behavior. It is hoped 
that insights into the region's ways of life will be valuable not only as such 
but as a means to deepen students' awareness of their own society and of 
themselves. 

Course offerings are in a range of departments, including Asian and East 
European Languages and Cultures, Government and Politics, History, 
Economics, Geography, Philosophy, Sociology, Theatre, and Germanic 
Studies. 

Requirements for the CERES major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. The College's 
foreign-language requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the process of 
fulfilling the CERE requirement of taking either Russian, German, or a 
Central/ East European language (including Czech, Polish, Hungarian, 
Serbian and Croatian, Bulgarian, and Romanian). The language requirement 
can also be fulfilled by a Eurasian language (i.e. a language from a country 
formerly part of the Soviet Union). Those interested in fulfilling the CERE 
language requirement through a Central/ East European or Eurasian 
language should consult the Director upon entering the program. 

Students on the Russian language track must complete a minimum of 24 
credit hours in the Russian language and literature courses selected 
among the following equivalent courses: RUSS 101,102, 201, 202, 301, 
302, 303, 321, 322, 401, 402, 403, 404. Students interested in 
specializing primarily on Central/ Eastern Europe have the option of the 
German language track, and must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours 
in the Department of Germanic Studies selected among the following 
equivalent courses: GERM 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302. Students on 
the Central/ East European language track must complete the equivalent of 
24 credits hours of language study Also accepted will be 16 credit hours 
of Russian or German and the equivalent of 8 credit hours of a 
Central/ East European language. Fulfilling the language requirement 
through a Eurasian language (a language of a country of the former Soviet 
Union, such as Ukrainian, a Central Asian orTranscaucasian language) will 
be decided on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the director. 

The student's advisor will be the program director or the designate. The 
student must receive a grade of C or better in all the above-mentioned 
required courses. 

In addition to language courses, the following CERES courses are offered. 
Students must complete 24 hours in CERES courses at the 300-level or 
above. These 24 hours must be taken in at least four different 
departments (with the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
counting as a single department), and may include language-literature 
courses beyond the required 24 hours. Of the 24 hours, at least 9 hours 
must be in those CERES courses with substantial and specific focus on 
Central/East Europe (ARTH 488C, GVPT 359,409, 4**, HIST 319, 340, 
443 and other special courses offered in the CERE area with the approval 
of the director) and at least 9 hours must be in those CERE courses with 
substantial and specific Russian/ Eurasian focus (GEOG 325, GVPT 445, 
451, 459A, 481, HIST 344, 424, 425, 442, SOCY 474, THET 499, and 
other special courses offered in the CERE area with the approval of the 
director). 

GERM 3491 — Germanic Literatures in Translation: Literatures of the 

Holocaust 

GERM 339— German Literature in Translation: Kafka and Film 

GERM 439F— Germanic Literatures in Translation: Berlin und Wien uml900 

GVPT 359*-East European Politics and Societies 

GVPT359*-Rise and Fall of Communism 

GVPT 4** — Communism, Fascism, and Liberal Democracy in 20th-century 

Europe 

HIST 307/J WST 345-The Holocaust of European J ewry 

HIST 419: Empire and Nations-The Habsburg Monarchy 1740-1918 

HIST 419*/JWST 419L-Historyof East European and Russianjewry 

THET 499/ HIST 4** -History of Performance and Theatre in Russia 

The various cooperating departments also offer special (i.e. non- 
permanent) seminars and courses in the Russian, East European, and 
Eurasian field. HIST 237, Russian Civilization, is recommended as a 
general introduction to the program but does not count toward the 
fulfillment of the programs' requirements. 



Examples of advanced Russian literature and culture courses that can also 
count for CERES credit: 



94 Chemical Engineering 



RUSS 328D— 19th Century Russian Literature in Translation: Dostoevsl<y 

RUSS 321-322— Survey of Russian Literature l-ll (in Russian) 

RUSS 382— Russian Civilization (in Russian) 

RUSS 405-Russian€nglish Translation I 

RUSS 409A/798A— Selected Topics in Russian Language Study: Russian 

Television and J ournalism 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (ENCH) 
A. James Clark School of Engineering 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering BIdg., 301-405-1935 
www.ench.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Chair: Barbari 

Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies: Wang 

Associate Chair for Graduate Studies: Adomaitis 

Professors: Anisimov, Barbari, Bentley Calabrese, Choi, DiMarzio**, Greer, 

McAvoy, Weigand, Yang** 

Associate Professors: Adomaitis, Kofinas, Ranade**, Wang, Zafiriou 

Assistant Professors: Dimitrakopoulos, Ehrman, Fisher, Klapa, Pulliam- 

Holoman, Raghavan 

Emeriti: Gentry, Gomezplata, Regan, Sengers, Smith 

** Adjunct 



The Major 



The Chemical Engineering major is intended to equip students to function 
as effective citizens and engineers in an increasingly technological world as 
well as in science and engineering subjects. Depth as well as breadth is 
required in the humanities and social sciences to understand the 
economic, ecological, and human factors involved in reaching the best 
technological solutions to today's problems. 

The basic foundation in mathematical, chemical, physical, and engineering 
sciences is established in the first two years of the curriculum. A core of 
required chemistry and chemical engineering courses is followed by a 
flexible structure of electives that allows either breadth or specialization. 
Appropriate choices of electives can prepare a Chemical Engineering major 
for a career as an engineer and/ or for graduate study. It is also an 
attractive major for those seel<ing a professional degree in medicine or law. 

Areas stressed in the major include biochemical engineering, environmental 
engineering, polymer engineering, systems engineering, and engineering 
science. Project courses allow undergraduates to undertal<e independent 
study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of mutual interest. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Requirements for the Chemical Engineering major include a thorough 
preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering science. 
Elective courses must include both Chemical Engineering courses 
and technical courses outside the department. A sample program is 
shown below. 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

ENES 100— Intro to Engineering Design 3 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

MATH 140-Calculus I 4 

MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

CHEM 135, 136— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 1 

ENGLlOl-lntroduction to Writing 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics I 3 

Core Program Requirements 6 

Total Credits 13 17 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 241-Calculus III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists & Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263-General Physics 4 4 

CHEM 233- Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243- Organic Chemistry II 4 

ENCH 215-Chem. Engr. Analysis 3 

ENCH 250— Computer Methods in Chem. Engineering 3 

ENCH 300— Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

Core Program Requirements 3 

Total Credits 18 17 



Junior Year 

ENES 230— Intro, to Materials and their Applications 3 

ENCH 333-Seminar 1 

ENCH 400— Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 

ENCH 440— Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 

ENCH 442-Chemical Engr. Systems Analysis 3 

CHEM 482-PhysicalChemistryll 3 

CHEM 483-Physical Chemistry Lab I 2 

ENCH 422-Transport Processes I 3 

ENCH 424-Transport Processes II 3 

ENCH 426-Transport Processes III 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total Credits 17 16 

Senior Year 

ENCH 437-Chemical Engr. Lab 3 

ENCH 444— Process Engr. Economics and Design I 3 

ENCH 446— Process Engr. Economics and Design II 3 

Technical Electives* 3 6 

Advanced Chemistry Elective* 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

Total Credits 15 15 

Minimum Degree Credits: 128 credits and fulfillment of all departmental, 

school, and university requirements with a cumulative grade point average 

of2.0. 

*Students must consult with an adviser on selection of appropriate 

courses for their particular course of study. 

Technical Electives Guidelines 

Nine credits of technical electives and three credits of advanced chemistry 
electives are required. It is recommended that they be tal<en during the 
senior year. 

Additional guidelines are as follows: 

The senior technical electives are 400-level chemical engineering courses, 
including ENCH468x, and a limited number of approved 400-level technical 
courses from outside chemical engineering. Students should select 
electives with the help of an academic advisor. In general, at least two of 
the three technical electives should be ENCH4XX; the third one may be 
chosen from ENCH or from an approved list of non€NCH technical courses. 
Business or non-technical courses are normally not approved. The 
advanced chemistry elective is normally a 400-level chemistry course. 

Upon the approval of the academic advisor and written permission of the 
department, a limited amount of substitution may be permitted. 
Substitutes, including ENCH468 Research (1-3 credits), must fit into an 
overall plan of study emphasis and ensure that the plan fulfills 
accreditation design requirements. Students may elect to specialize in a 
specific area such as Biochemical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, 
Polymer Engineering, or Systems Engineering; or they may sample a variety 
of elective courses. Upon graduation, those who specialize in a particular 
technical area will receive a letter in recognition of their accomplishment 
from the Chair and the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Chemical 
Engineering Department. A list of technical electives are posted at: 
www.ench.umd.edu/ ugrad/ 

Admission 

All Chemical Engineering majors must meet admission, progress, and 
retention standards of the Clark School of Engineering. 



Advising 

All students choosing Chemical Engineering as their primary field must 
see an undergraduate adviser each semester. Appointments for advising 
can be made at 2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 
301405-1935. 

Co-op Program 

The Chemical Engineering program works within the Clark School of 
Engineering Cooperative Engineering Education Program. For information on 
this program consult the Clark School of Engineering entry in chapter 6 of 
this catalog or call 301405-3863. 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 95 



Financial Assistance 

Financial aid based upon need is available through the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are available through the Clarl< 
School of Engineering. Part-time employment is available in the department. 

Honors and Awards 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding service 
to the Department, College and University. These awards include the David 
Arthur Berman Memorial Award, the Engineering Society of Baltimore 
Award, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AICHE) Award for 
the outstanding senior in Chemical Engineering. Chairman's awards are 
given to the junior with the highest cumulative GPA as well as to the 
outstanding junior and outstanding senior in Chemical Engineering. 

Student Organizations 

students operate a campus student chapter of the professional 
organization, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Omegi Chi 
Episilon is the honorary Chemical Engineering Society. 

Course Code: ENCH 



CHEM ISTRY AND BIOCHEM ISTRY 
(CHEM, BCHM) 

College of Life Sciences 

0107H Chemistry Building, 301405-1788 

Student Information: 2102 Chemistry Building, 301405-1791 

Professor and Chair: Doyle 

Associate Chair: Ammon, Eichhorn 

Director, Undergraduate Programs: Montague-Smith 

Professors: Alexandertt, Allewell, Ammon, Beckett, Blough, Davis, 

DeShongt, Doyle, Eichhorn, Falvey, Fenselau, Greer, Hansen, Helzt, 

Jarvist, Kahn, Lorimertt, Mignereyt, Miller, Moore, Ondov, Reutt-Robey, 

Rol<ita, Sita, Thirumalai, Tossell, Walters, Weekstt 

Associate Professors: Fushman, Julin, Lee, C, Murphy 

Assistant Professors: English, Hu, Isaacs, Lee, S., Muiioz, Vedernikov, 

Walker 

Instructors: Ebrahimian, Rebbert 

Lecturers: Boehmler, Everett, Jackson, McDermottJones, White 

Emeriti: Bellama, Boyd, DeVoe, Freeman, Henery-Logan, Holmlund, Huheey, 

Jaquith, Kasler, Khanna, Mazzocchi, McNesby, Munn, O'Haver, Pratt, 

Sampugna, Stewart, Stuntz 

Adjunct Professors: Khachik, Kearney, Mazzola 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

tt Distinguished University Professor 



The Majors 



The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers B.S. Degrees 
in both chemistry and biochemistry. The programs are designed with 
the maximum amount of flexibility to prepare students for graduate 
or professional school, career opportunities in chemical and 
pharmaceutical industries, and basic research positions in government and 
academic laboratories. 

Chemistry courses for majors in chemistry or biochemistry begin with the 
two-semester General Chemistry sequence for majors: CHEM 143, 153/227 
(CHEM 153 and CHEM 227 are corequisites). Students who transfer into 
the chemistry or biochemistry programs and do not have the equivalent of 
CHEM 143-153-227 must take a three-semester sequence: CHEM 103-113- 
227. Additional courses common to both biochemistry and chemistry majors 
are the two-semester sequence in organic chemistry (CHEM 237-247), the 
one-credit seminar in professional issues (CHEM 395), the instrumental 
analysis course (CHEM 425), the two-semester lecture sequence in physical 
chemistry (CHEM 481482) the first semester (CHEM 483) of the physical 
chemistry laboratory sequence, and UNIV 100 or 101. 

Supporting courses for majors in both programs include MATH 140, MATH 
141, PHYS 141, PHYS 142, and BSCI 105. 



Requirements for C fie mis try M ajors 

Departmental requirements for chemistry majors include 18 credits of 
lower-level and 23 credits of upper-level courses. In addition to the specific 
courses mentioned above, chemistry majors take the inorganic chemistry 
course (CHEM 401), the second semester of physical chemistry laboratory 
(CHEM 484), and six credits of electives selected from approved chemistry 
and biochemistry courses. In order to meet requirements for a degree to be 
certified by the American Chemical Society, students must select certain 
specific courses, as explained by the undergraduate office. 

Each required chemistry and biochemistry course must be passed with a 
minimum grade of C. Required supporting courses including BSCI 105 must 
be passed with a C average. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University CORE Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 5* 

Departmental Requirements 43 

Supporting Courses 16 

Electives 25 

Total 120 

Requirements for Biochemistry JVlajors 

Departmental requirements for biochemistry majors include 30 credits of 
specific chemistry courses and BCHM 461, 462, and 464. In addition to 
the College of Life Sciences Core Requirement of BSCI 105 (4), 
biochemistry majors must take two additional approved biological science 
courses; certain specific courses, as explained by the undergraduate office. 

Each required chemistry, biochemistry and 200-level or above biological 
sciences course must be passed with a minimum grade of C. Required 
supporting courses, including BSCI 105, must be passed with a C average. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University CORE Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 5* 

Departmental Requirements 46 

Supporting Courses 16 

Electives 23 

Total 120 

* Other College of Life Sciences Core Requirements are satisfied by the 
departmental requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Appointments for advising can be made by 
contacting the secretary in the Office of Undergraduate Studies, Room 
2102 Chemistry Building, 301405-1791. 

Financial Assistance 

Two scholarships are available for majors: the Isidore and Annie Adier 
Scholarship of $500 to an outstanding major with financial need and the 
Leidy Foundation Scholarships of $600 to two outstanding junior majors. 
No application is necessary, as all majors are automatically reviewed by the 
Awards Committee. 

Honors and Awards 

students with a GPA of 3.0 or better who have completed two semesters of 
CHEM 399 (Introduction to Chemical Research) have an opportunity to sign 
up for CHEM 398 (Honors Research) in their senior year and be considered 
for departmental honors. After successful completion of a senior honors 
thesis and seminar, graduation "with honors" or "with high honors" in 
chemistry or biochemistry can be attained. 



Student Organizations 



Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity is a professional fraternity which 
recruits men and women students from chemistry, biochemistry, and 
related science majors during each fall and spring semester. The fraternity 
holds weekly meetings and provides tutoring for students in lower-level 
chemistry courses. The office is in Room 2106A Chemistry Building. Dr. 
Lyie Isaacs (3341 Chemistry Building, 301405-1884)) is the faculty 
advisor. 



96 Civil and Environmental Engineering 



The student affiliate program of the American Chemical Society (SA-ACS) is 
designed to introduce students in chemistry, biochemistry and related 
fields to a variety of professional activities. Student affiliates will gain sl<ills 
and mal<e contacts aimed at launching a successful career in science. 
Activities include networl<ing and meeting with professionals, attending 
national meetings and participating in public outreach programs. Affiliates 
also receive subscriptions to Chemical & Engineering News, the 
undergraduate career in Chemistry, as well as gaining on-line access to 
announcements regarding job and intern opportunities. The student affiliate 
office is located in Room 2112A of the Chemistry Building. For more 
information contact the Faculty Advisor, Dr. Doug English 
(denglish@wam.umd.edu). 

Course Codes: CHEM, BCHM 



CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 
(ENCE) 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 

1173 Engineering Classroom Building, 301405-1974 
www.civil.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Haghani 

Professors: Aggour, Amde, Ayyub, Baecher, G. Chang, Davis, Goodings, 

Hao, Mahmassani, McCuen, Schelling, Schonfeld, Sternberg, Vannoy 

Research Profeeor: Galloway 

Affiliate Professors: Gansler, Golden, Kalnay 

Associate Professors: Austin, Brubaker, P. Chang, Goulias, Lovell, Moglen, 

Schwartz, Seagren, Torrents 

Senior Research Scienctist: Milner 

Associate Research Engineer: Fu 

Assistant Professors: Aydilel<, Clifton, Gabriel, Medina, Miller-Hool<s, Tseng 

Professors Emeriti: Albrecht, Birkner, Carter, Colville, Donaldson, Ragan 

The Major 

Civil and environmental engineering is a people-serving profession, 
concerned with the planning, design, construction and operation of large 
complex systems such as buildings and bridges, water purification and 
distribution systems, highways, rapid transit and rail systems, ports and 
harbors, airports, tunnels and underground construction, dams, power- 
generating systems, and structural components of aircraft and ships. Civil 
and environmental engineering also includes urban design and city 
planning, water and land pollution and treatment problems, and disposal of 
hazardous wastes and chemicals. The design and construction of these 
systems are only part of the many challenges and opportunities for civil and 
environmental engineers. The recent revolution in computers, 
communications, and data management has provided new resources that 
are widely used by the professional civil and environmental engineer in 
providing safe, economical, and functional facilities to serve our society 

Requirements for M ajor 

The Department offers a program of study leading to an ABET-accredited 
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) degree. Each student 
specializes in one of three tracks: Infrastructure Engineering (Structural and 
Geotechnical), Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, and 
Transportation Systems and Project Management. A total of 122 credit 
hours (123 for the Environmental and Water Resources Track) are required 
for a BSCE degree with emphasis in basic science (mathematics, 
chemistry, and physics), engineering science (mechanics of materials, 
statistics, and dynamics), basic civil and environmental engineering 
courses; required courses in the selected track; technical electives; and a 
senior capstone design course. The curriculum provides a sensible blend of 
required courses and electives, permitting students to pursue their 
interests without the risk of overspecialization. 

Program Learning Objectives 

The faculty of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering has 
established the following Program Educational Objectives: 

1. The program should prepare all of our BSCE graduates with 
competitive skills and a comprehensive training in civil and 
environmental engineering, including opportunities for specialized 
training in the major discipline areas of the field. The program 
should be competitive with the top civil engineering programs in the 
nation with respect to degree requirements, educational facilities, 
and faculty expertise. 



2. The program should seek to attract and retain the best possible 
students, from a diverse population, including historically 
underrepresented groups, including women. 

3. The program should be structured with a common engineering 
Freshman year, and a Sophomore year with relatively few 
specialized civil and environmental engineering courses. The focus 
in these first two years should be primarily on basic engineering 
and physical sciences and fundamentals, to accommodate 
undecided students in the Department and throughout the School 
of Engineering, and to allow for the articulated entry of students 
from the State Community College System. 

4. The program should prepare all of our graduates for successful 
careers in industry, government service, and future private practice, 
while seeking to qualify as many of our students as possible for 
admission to advanced study in the nation's best graduate schools 
in engineering, business, or other areas of study where a first class 
civil and environmental engineering education is an excellent 
preparation. 

5. The program should seek to instill in all students an appreciation 
and commitment to self-study and lifelong learning, and should 
ensure that all students have an understanding of the context and 
ethical responsibilities within which the engineering profession is 
practiced. The program should also provide opportunities for 
students to work in teams, develop communication skills, and 
engage in a comprehensive multidisciplinary capstone design 
experience. 

6. The Faculty in the Department should seek to continually enhance 
the quality of the undergraduate program by improving course 
offerings and curricula. 

Decisions are to be based on assessments of the quality of our graduates 
and alumni, feedback from employers of our graduates, and self 
assessment of the faculty and program in meeting our objectives and 
learning outcomes goals. 

Program Outcomes 

In addition to ensuring technical competency of all graduates in the broad 
discipline areas of civil and environmental engineering, the Department 
must encourage the development of skills and abilities that will enhance 
the marketability of its graduates and provide them with the best possible 
opportunity for success in the work place. As a result, the faculty has 
agreed to develop the following abilities and skills within each graduate and 
has approved the following Program Outcomes: 

1. Technical competence in mathematics, physical science, and 
engineering science. 

2. Technical competence in basic civil and environmental engineering 
sciences. 

3. Technical competence in at least one major area of specialization 
within civil and environmental engineering. 

4. Ability to use computers, software, and experimentation as tools to 
solve engineering problems. 

5. Ability to communicate and defend ideas effectively, including oral, 
written, and technical reports writing skills. 

6. Ability to identify engineering problems and propose alternate 
solutions, including the step-by-step analysis and design of a 
system, component, or process. 

7. Teamwork skills as applied to interdisciplinary design projects. 

8. Understanding and appreciation of both the societal context of the 
civil and environmental engineering profession, and the ethical 
responsibilities of practicing engineers. 

9. Appreciation of the need to seek further specialization within civil 
and environmental engineering and commit to life-long learning. 

10. Awareness of the impact of technology and engineering on society 
including life safety and environmental issues. 

11. Interest in contemporary issues, both nationally and internationally 
and the awareness of the impact of engineering in these areas. 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 97 



12. Understanding of the importance of active participation in 
professional societies and organizations in professional practice. 

Technical competence is measured by the ability to apply l<nowledge and 
fundamental principles to the solution of problems in each area noted. The 
students' perceptions of their abilities and growth in the above areas, and 
their opinions of the effectiveness of the program in meeting the program 
objectives, will be surveyed each semester and compared to faculty 
assessments to provide a solid basis for determining the actions needed to 
enhance the program and improve the quality and abilities of all graduates. 

Sem ester 
C redit H oyrs 
Freshm an Year (All Civil & E nvironm ental Engineering) i i 

MATH 140-Calculus I 4 

MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

CHEM 135— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

ENGLlOl-lntroduction to Writing 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics 3 

ENCE 100— Introduction to Civil & Environmental Engineering... 1 

CORE Program Requirements 6 

Total 14 16 

Sophomore Year (All Civil & Environmental Engineering) 

MATH241-Calculus III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers 3 

PHYS 260, 261-General Physics II with Lab 4 

ENES 220- Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENCE 200— Engineering Information Processing I 3 

ENCE 201 — Engineering Information Processing II 3 

ENCE 215— Applied Engineering Science 3 

ENCE 305— Fundamentals of Engineering Fluids 3 

CORE Program Requirements 6 

Total 17 15 

Junior Year 

Infrastructure Engineering Track I II 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

ENES 221-Dynamics 3 

ENCE 300— Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE 301 — Geo-Metrics and GIS in Civil Engineering 3 

ENCE 302-Probabilityand Statistics for Civil & 

Environmental Engineers 3 

ENCE 340— Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering 3 

ENCE 353— Introduction to Structural Analysis 3 

ENCE 355— Introduction to Structural Design 3 

ENCE 361— Applied Numerical Techniques 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

Total 15 15 

Transportation Systems & Engineering M anagement Tracl< 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

ENCE 300— Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE 301 — Geo-Metrics and GIS in Civil Engineering 3 

ENCE 302-Probabilityand Statistics for Civil & 3 

Environmental Engineers 

ENCE 320— Engineering Project Management 3 

ENCE 360— Analysis of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE 370— Introduction to Transportation Engineering 

& Planning 3 

ENCE 472— Transportation Engineering 3 

ENCE 361— Applied Numerical Techniques 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

Total 15 15 

Environmental & Water Resources Engineering Track 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

BSCI 105-Principles of Biologyl 4 

ENCE 300— Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE 301 — Geo-Metrics and GIS in Civil Engineering 3 

ENCE 302-Probabilityand Statistics forCivil & 3 

Environmental Engineers 

ENCE 310— Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3 

ENCE 402— Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 3 

ENCE 431 — Hydrologic Engineering 3 

ENCE Electives* 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

Total 16 15 



Senior Year 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 

ENCE 320— Engineering Project Management 3 

ENCE 441- Foundation Design 3 

ENCE 466— Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives * 3 6 

ENCE Restricted Electives ** 3 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Transportation Systems & Engineering Management Track 

ENCE 402— Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 3 

ENCE 422— Project Cost Accounting & Economics 3 

ENCE 423— Project Planning, Scheduling & Control 3 

ENCE 470— Highway Engineering 3 

ENCE 466— Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives* 6 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Track 

ENCE 411 — Environmental Engineering Science 3 

ENCE 422— Project Cost Accounting & Economics 3 

ENCE 412— Environmental Engineering Unit Operations 3 

ENCE 432-Ground Water Hydrology 3 

ENCE 466— Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives* 5 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Minimum Degree Requirements: 122 credits(123 for the Environmental and 
Water Resources Engineering Track) and the fulfillment of all departmental, 
school, and University requirements with a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 2.0. Additional semester credits will be involved to the extent 
that courses carrying more than three credits are selected. 

*ENCE electives are to be selected as follows: 

Two electives: one from each of the two tracks in which the student is not 
specializing; each must be a 300 or 400 level class chosen from among 
the courses designated as required for that track and not required for the 
student's chosen track. The remaining electives: Any 300 or 400 level 
ENCE class not required for the student's chosen track; other senior level 
mathematics, science, and engineering courses, with the approval of the 
Department. 

**ENCE restricted electives are to be taken from the following list: ENCE 
361, ENCE 444, and ENCE 453. 

Admission/ Advising 

See the entrance requirements for the A. James Clark School of 
Engineering in Chapter 6. Civil and environmental engineering students are 
advised by Dr. Kaye Brubaker, who assists in course selection and 
scheduling until the semester in which the student completes the basic 
requirements common to all tracks. At that point, students will be directed 
to another faculty member who serves as specialty advisor for their track. 
For advising, contact Dr. Brubaker, 301-405-1965, 1159 Glenn L. Martin 
Hall. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Several excellent co-op opportunities are available for Civil and 
Environmental Engineering students. See the A. James Clark School of 
Engineering entry in chapter 6 of this catalog for a full description of the 
Engineering co-op program, or contact Ms. Heidi Sauber, 301405-3863. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering awards a number of 
academic scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for junior 
and senior students. A department committee evaluates applications each 
year. See the School of Engineering web site for information and 
application instructions. 



98 Classics 



Honors and Awards 

See A. James Clark School of Engineering Honors Program. The 
Department of Civil Engineering offers the following awards: 1) The 
Civil Engineering Outstanding Senior Award; 2) The ASCE Outstanding 
Senior Award; 3) The Woodward-Clyde Consultants Award; 4) The Bechtel 
Award; 5) The Chi Epsilon Outstanding Senior Award; 6) The Ben Dyer 
Award; 7) The ASCE Maryland Section Award; and 8) The Department 
Chairman's Award. 

Student Organizations 

student organizations include the American Society of Civil Engineers and 
Institute of Transportation Engineers student chapters, which are open to 
all civil and environmental engineering students. The Civil Engineering 
Honor Society, Chi Epsilon, elects members semi-annually Information on 
membership and eligibility for these student organizations maybe obtained 
from the president of each organization, 0401 Engineering Classroom 
Building. 

Course Code: ENCE 



CLASSICS (CLAS) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

2407 Marie Mount Hall, 301405-2014 
E-mail: jhlO@umail.umd.edu 
www.classics.umd.edu 

Professors: Hallettt (Chair) 

Associate Professors: Doherty, Lee, Rutledge, Staley Stehle 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Major 

Classics is the study of the languages, literature, culture and thought of 
ancient Greece and Rome. Students at the University of Maryland may 
major in Classical Languages and Literatures with four options and may 
enroll in a variety of courses on the classical world. These options include 
Latin, Greel<, Greek and Latin, and Classical Humanities. Changes in 
requirements for supporting courses are under review. Students should 
consult the department for updated information. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors every semester. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Requirements for the Classics major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. 

The College foreign-language requirement will be automatically fulfilled in 
the process of taking language courses in the major. 

Option A: Latin 

Thirty credits of Latin at the 200-level or higher, at least 12 of which 
must be at the 400-level or higher, plus nine credits of supporting courses 
(for example, CLAS 170, HIST 110, and one 300- or 400-level course in 
Roman history). 

Option B: Greek 

Thirty credits of Greek at the 200-level or higher, at least 12 of which 
must be at the 400-level or higher, plus nine hours of supporting courses 
(for example, CLAS 170, HIST 110, and a 300- or 400-level course in 
Greek history). 

Option C: Latin and Greek 

Eighteen credits of either Latin or Greek and 12 hours of the other classical 

language, plus nine hours of supporting courses (for example, CLAS 170, 

HIST 110, and a 300- or 400-level course in Greek or Roman history). 

Students with no previous training in the second language may count 

introductory level courses as part of the 12-hour requirement in that 

language. 



Option D: Classics in Translation (Classical Humanities) 
Eighteen credits in CLAS courses, 12 credits in Latin or Greek courses and 
12-14 credits in supporting courses (normally upper level courses in Art 
History, Archaeology, Architecture, Government, History, Linguistics, or 
Philosophy). NOTE: Students are encouraged to substitute 300- and 400- 
level courses in LATN and GREK for some of the 18 required credits in 
CLAS 100- and 200-level courses in GREK may be included among 
supporting credits if the student's 12 language credits are taken in Latin, 
and 100- and 200-level courses in LATN maybe included among supporting 
courses if the student's 12 language credits are taken in GREK. Students 
are encouraged to take as much language as possible. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially i.e., 101, 
102, 201. Once credit has been received in a higher-level language 
acquisition or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be taken for 
credit. The student should begin the sequence at the appropriate level. 

Citations 

C itations in A ncient G reek Language and Lit era tyre 

16 credit hours. GREK 201, CLAS 270, GREK 301, and two courses from 

approved list of courses. 

Citation in Classical Language and Mythology 

15-16 credit hours. CLAS 170, 470, and three courses from approved list 

of courses. (Includes some Greek or Latin.) 

Citation in Classical Mythology 

15 credit hours. CLAS 170, 470, and three courses from approved list of 
courses. (No Greek or Latin Required.) 

Citation in Latin Language and Literature 

16 credit hours. LATN 201 or 220, CLAS 271, and three courses from 
approved list of courses. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. Please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
more information. 

Course Codes: CLAS, GREK, U\JN 



COMMUNICATION (COMM) 

(FORJVIERLY SPEECH COJVIIVI UNICATION) 



College of Arts and Humanities 

2130 Skinner Building, 301-405-8979 (main office) 
(undergraduate office) 

www.comm.umd.edu 



405-6519 



Professor and Chair: Fink''' 

Professors: J. Grunig, L. Grunig, Wolvin 

Associate Professors: Cai, Gaines, Klumpp, McCaleb, S. Parry-Giles, Tonn 

Assistant Professors: Aldoory, T. Parry-Giles, Turner 

Director of Undergraduate Studies and Lecturer: Waks 

Outreach Coordinator: Gowin 

Visiting Professors: Kendall, Niles 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Byerly Hubbard, Sha 

Lecturers: Cronin, Kirksey Mason, Phillips, Rockland, Tenney, Zhang 

Affiliate Professors: Fahnestock (ENGL), Gurevitch (JOUR), Kruglanski 

(PSYC), Rosenfelt(WMST) 

Affiliate Associate Professors: Gefland (PSYC), McDaniel (KNES) 

Research Associate: Garst 

TDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Communication takes as its subject matter the history, processes, and 
effects of human communication through speech and its extensions. The 
departmental curriculum is designed to provide a liberal education in the 
arts and sciences of human communication as well as preparation for 
career opportunities in business, government, education, and related 
fields. Within the curriculum, students may pursue academic programs that 
emphasize many disciplinary areas, including intercultural communication, 
political communication, public relations, negotiation and conflict 
management, cognition and persuasion, rhetorical theory, history of 
rhetoric, and criticism of public discourse. Departmental advising is 
mandatory for new majors, second semester sophomores, and seniors. 



Comparative Literature Program 99 



Admission to the JVlajor 
First-time Freshman 

All first-time freshmen who designate communication as a major prior to 
the end of the schedule adjustment period of their first semester will be 
admitted directly into the program. They must sign a Memorandum of 
Understanding that states that they understand that by the semester in 
which they attain 45 University of Maryland credits (excluding AP), they 
must meet the following Gateway requirements. 

a. Complete 50% of the CORE requirements, including Fundamental 
Studies requirements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Complete one of the following courses with a grade of C or better: 
BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY201, or equivalent. 

c: Complete COMM 107, COMM 200, or COMM 230 with a grade of C 
or better 

d. Complete COMM 250 with a grade of C or better and 

e. AGFA of 2.0 or better 

Students may repeat only one of the Gateway courses and that may be 
repeated only once in their attempt to meet the requirements and students 
who fail to meet them by the semester in which they attain 45 credits will 
be dismissed from the program and cannot reapply. 

Transfer Students 

Internal and external transfer students who meet the Gateway requirements 
specified above and have a cumulative GFA of 2.7 who apply to the 
program in the semester in which they reach 56 credits will be admitted 
into the program. 

For those students who meet the Gateway requirements and who apply 
after the semester in which they reach 56 credits, admission is competitive 
and on a space-available basis. 

Appeals 

All students may appeal admission decisions. Students directly admitted 
as freshmen, who are dismissed because of failure to meet Gateways or 
be in good academic standing at 45 credits, may appeal directly to the 
Undergraduate Director in the Department of Communication. All other 
students who are denied admission may appeal to the Office of Admission 
of the University 

The Major 

Requirements for the Communication major include a minimum of 45 
upper-level credits and the foreign language requirement of the College of 
Arts and Humanities. No course with a grade less than C may be used to 
satisfy major requirements. 

For courseworl< in Intercultural Communication, Mediated Communication, 
Negotiation and Conflict Management, Persuasion and Attitude Change, 
Political Communication, Public Relations, and Rhetoric and Public 
Discourse, see the Department of Communication (p. 76). For academic 
programs in Print News, Broadcast News, Magazine and On-Line 
Journalism, and copy-editing see the College of Journalism (p. 175-176). 

Requirements for M ajor 

The course of study for a Communication major must satisfy all of the 
following requirements. 

1. One course from the following list: COMM 107, 200, or 230. 

2. COMM 250, 400, and 401. 

3. Completion of one of the following tracl<s: Communication 
Research, Communication Studies, Public Relations, or Rhetoric 
and Public Discourse. 

a. Communication Research COMM 402 



Five courses from the following: COMM 420, 424, 425, 426, 
435, 470, 475, 477, 482. 6 semester hours in COMM at least 
three of which are at the 300-400 level. One course from the 
following (Statistical Analysis): PSYC 200, SOCY 201, BMGT 
230, EDMS 451 or an equivalent course. One course from the 
following (Structural Analysis of Language): LING 200, HESP 
120, ANTH 380 or an equivalent course. 9 semester hours in 
courses related to Communication Research in one department 
other than COMM 

b. Communication Studies COMM 402 

One course from the following: COMM 420, 424, 425, 426, 
435, 470, 475, 477, 482. One course from the following: 
COMM 330, 360, 450, 451, 453, 455, 460, 461, 469, 471, 
476. 15 semester hours in COMM courses at least 12 of which 
must be at the 300400 level. One course from the following 
(Statistical Analysis): PSYC 200, SOCY 201, BMGT 230, EDMS 
451 or an equivalent course. One course from the following 
(Structural Analysis of Language): LING 200, HESP 120, ANTH 
380 or an equivalent course. 9 semester hours in courses 
related to Communication Studies in one department other 
than COMM 

c. Public Relations JOUR231 and JOUR232 ; COMM 350, 351, 
352, 386 (only 3 credits apply to major), and 483. 3 semester 
hours in COMM at the 300400 level. One course from the 
following (Statistical Analysis): PSYC 200, SOCY 201, BMGT 
230, EDMS 451 or an equivalent course. One course from the 
following (Economics): ECON 200 or 201 9 semester hours in 
courses related to Public Relations in one department other 
than COMM orJOUR. 

d. Rhetoric and Public Discourse COMM 450 
Five courses from the following: COMM 330, 360, 451, 453, 
455, 460, 461, 469, 471, 476. 6 semester hours in COMM at 
least three of which must be at the 300-400 level 
One course from the following (Critical Analysis of Discourse): 
AMST 432, CMLT 488, ENGL 453, JWST 263, PHIL 233 
One course from the following (Structural Analysis of 
Language): LING 200, HESP 120, ANTH 380 or an equivalent 
course 9 semester hours in course related to Rhetoric and 
Public Discourse in one department other than COMM 

Because the department's curriculum changes overtime, the department's 
Undergraduate Director may approve other appropriate Communication 
courses to meet the requirements for each tracl<. 

Courses required for the Communication major but tal<en outside COMM 
may be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

Communication offers special opportunities for majors. Superior students 
may participate in an Honors Program; contact the Honors Director. The 
department sponsors a chapter of Lambda Pi Eta National Honor Society 
An internship program is also available to students doing worl< related to 
the major; contact the outreach coordinator. Note: COMM386, only 3 
credits apply to major. 

Course Code: COMM 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PROGRAM 
(CMLT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2107 Susquehanna Hall, 405-2853 

Core Faculty 

Acting Director: Caramello (English) 

Professors: Collins* (English), Fuegi, Harrison* (Spanish and Portugese) 

Associate Professor: Wang* (English) 

Instructor: Robinson 

*J oint appointment with unit indicated 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Affiliate Faculty 

Professors: Alford, Auchard, Ban^, Bolles, Caramello, Caughey Chambers, 
Cross, Cypess, Donawerth, Fahnestock, Flieger, Grossman, Hallett, 
Kauffman, Kelly, Leinwand, Leonard!, M. Smith, Pearson, Robertson 
Associate Professors: Brami, J. Brown, Cate, Cohen, Coustaut, Doherty, 
Falvo, Igel, Kerl<ham, King, Kuo, Mintz, Norman, Peres, Ray Richardson, 
Sherman, Strauch, Williams, Withers, Ziifi 



100 Computer Engineering 



Tine JVlajor 

A pre-structured Individual Studies major is available through 
Undergraduate Studies. This major requires competence in a second 
language and may emphasize either literature or media. Undergraduates 
may also emphasize comparative studies in literature, culture, and/ or 
media as they worl< toward a degree in another department associated with 
the Comparative Literature Program. 

Citation in Comparative Studies 

A student who specializes in 15-16 hours of concentrated study in the 
courses of the Comparative Literature Program will receive a citation on the 
official transcript. Please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
approval of courses. 

Course Code: CMLT 



COMPUTER ENGINEERING (ENCP) 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

2429 A.V. Williams Building, 301405-3685 
E-mail: eceadvis@deans.umd.edu 
www.ece.umd.edu 

Chair: Marcus 

Professors: Agrawal, Aloimonos, Basili, Chellappa, Davis, DeClaris, Elman, 

Gasarch, Gligor, Hendler, Jaja, Minl<er, Mount, Nakajima, Nau, O'Leary, 

Oruc, Perils, Pugh, Reggia, Roussopoulos, Samet, Shankar, Shneiderman, 

Smith, Stewart, Subrahmanian, Vishkin, Zelkowitz 

Associate Professors: Bhattacharyya, Door, Franklin, Holingsworth, Jacobs, 

Keleher, Khuller, Kruskal, Porter, Purtilo, Silio, Srinivasan, Tseng, Varshney 

Assistant Professors: Arbaugh, Barua, Bederson, Bhattacharjee, Chawathe, 

Foster, Getoor, Hicks, Iftode, Jacob, Katz, Memon, Sussman, Yeung 

Emeriti: Chu, Kanal, Ligomenides, Miller, Minker, Pugsley Rosenfeld 

The Major 

The computer engineering major combines the strengths of both the 
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of 
Computer Science to prepare students for careers in the computer industry. 
The program encompasses the study of hardware, software, and systems 
questions that arise in the design development, and application of 
computers and embedded systems. Specifically, computer engineering 
students will have a knowledge of hardware systems (electrical networks, 
electronics, and VLSI); a knowledge of software systems (algorithms, data 
structures, and operating systems); and a knowledge of how these two 
domains interact (digital logic, signal and system theory, computer 
architectural and performance analysis). Computer Engineering students 
will learn about everything that goes into digital and computing systems, 
from solid state physics to CMOS VLSI design, to computer architecture to 
programming, and from operating systems to compiler and language theory. 

The following are the objectives of the Computer Engineering 
Degree Program: 

1. Provide all students with basic training in computer engineering, 
as well as opportunities for specialized training in several 
technical areas; 

2. Prepare students for study in the nation's top graduate schools and/ 
or employment in a variety of positions in government and industry; 

3. Through such tools as honors courses, research programs and 
financial aid packages, facilitate the recruitment and retention of a 
diverse student body, with particular emphasis on historically 
underrepresented groups; 

4. Provide students with an understanding of the social context of the 
computer engineering profession; 

5. Provide students with an understanding of the ethical 
responsibilities of practicing engineers, as stipulated in the IEEE 
Code of Ethics; 

6. Provide students with an ability to communicate and defend their 
ideas effectively; 

7. Provide students with the skills necessary for successful 
participation in interdisciplinary projects; 

8. Provide students with an ability to identify engineering problems 
and propose appropriate solutions, including the step-by-step 
design of a system, component or process; 



9. Provide students with a strong foundation in mathematics, 
sciences and engineering, and the ability to apply said knowledge 
to solving engineering problems; 

10. Provide students with an ability to design and conduct experiments, 
interpret empirical observations and analyze data; 

11. Provide students with opportunities to engage in structured 
research activities; 

12. Maintain technological relevance by introducing students to current 
applications in the field, as well as to state-of-the art laboratory 
equipment and computer simulation tools; 

13. Provide students with a motivation to seek further specialization in 
the field of computer engineering, and to continue learning, 
whether in a formal academic setting or through self-instruction. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Computer Engineering is a limited enrollment program that has special 
requirements for admission and a 45-credit review. See The Department 
for details. 

As in all engineering degrees, the student starts out with a core curriculum 
in mathematics and basic science. Subsequent years of study involve 
courses covering a balanced mixture of hardware, software, hardware- 
software trade-offs, and basic modeling techniques used to represent the 
computing process. Courses covering algorithms, data structures, digital 
systems, computer organization and architecture, software and hardware 
design and testing, operating systems, and programming languages will be 
included. Elective courses must include electrical engineering and 
computer science courses and technical courses outside the departments. 
A sample program is shown below. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Freshman Year I II 

CORE- General Education** 3 3 

CHEM 135— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics 3 

MATH 140, 141-Calculus I, II 4 4 

CMSC 132-ComputerScience I* 4 

ENES 100— Intro. To Engineering Design 3 

Total Credits 13 14 

Sophomore Year 

CORE- General Education** 3 

MATH 246- Differential Equations 3 

CMSC 212- Computer Science II 4 

CMSC 250- Discrete Structure 4 

CMSC 251, 260, and 261-Algorithms 3 

PHYS 260, 261-General Physics II with Lab 4 

ENEE 241 — Numerical Techniques 3 

ENEE 204- Basic Circuit Theory 3 

ENEE 206-Fundamental Lab 2 

ENEE 244-Digital Logic Design 3 

Total Credits 15 17 

Junior Year 

CORE- General Education** 3 6 

CMSC 330— Organization of Prog. Languages 3 

CMSC 412- Operating Systems 4 

ENEE 302-Digital Electronics 3 

ENEE 322— Signal and System Theory 3 

ENEE 324— Engineering Probability 3 

ENEE 350— Computer Organization 3 

ENEE 446- Computer Design 3 

Total Credits 15 16 

Senior Year 

CORE- General Education** 3 3 

Electives 14 10 

Total Credits 17 13 

*Students may need to take CMSC 131, Introduction to C Programming, or 
the computer science exemption exam before taking CMSC 132. 

See the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (CORE) for details about 
CORE program requirements. 

**Note: This sample schedule assumes at least one of the CORE 
Distributive Studies classes also satisfies the CORE Cultural Diversity 
requirement. 



Computer Science 101 



Computer Engineering M ajors 

New Technical Elective Requirements* 

Effective Spring 2001, all BSCP graduates must distribute their 24 credits 
of technical electives among the following course categories: 

Category A. Mathematics and Basic Science Electives: minimum of 5 

credits 
Category B. Computer Science Theory and Applications: minimum of 3 

credits 
Category C. Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications: minimum of 

3 credits 
Category D. Advanced Laboratory: minimum of 2 credits 
Category E. Capstone Design: minimum of 3 credits 
Category F. Engineering (not Electrical of Computer): 3 credits 

Please read carefully, and make a note of, the following special cases and 
other items: 

1. Two credits of ENEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, may be used to satisfy the Advanced 
Laboratory requirement subject to approval by the faculty 
supervisor and the Associate Chair. The maximum number of ENEE 
499 credits that may be applied towards EE technical elective 
requirements if five. 

2. Additional Capstone Design courses can be used as substitutes for 
the required Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications course; 
and/ or the required Advanced Laboratory course, provided one of 
the following is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B, 408C, or 408F. 

3. Completion of ENEE 408A and ENEE 459A satisfies both the 
Capstone Design and Advanced Laboratory requirements. 

4. If you have any questions on how these requirements affect your 
current selection of technical electives, please contact an advisor. 

♦Subject to approval by the Vice President's Advisory Committee 

Admission 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other departments in the 
School of Engineering. (See A. James Clark School of Engineering section 
on Entrance Requirements.) Computer Engineering is a highly selective 
program and only a limited number of students are admitted each 
academic year. 

Advising 

In addition to the ECE Office, faculty in Computer Engineering function as 
undergraduate advisers. Departimental approval is required for registration 
in all upper-division courses in the major. The departiment's Undergraduate 
Office (2429 A.V. Williams Building, 301405-3685) is the contact point for 
undergraduate advising questions. 

Cooperative Education Program 

Participation in the Cooperative Education Program is encouraged. See A. 
James Clark School of Engineering entry for details. 

Financial Assistance 

Several corporate scholarships are administered through the Department. 
Information and scholarship applications are available from either the 
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Undergraduate Office, 
2429 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-3685, or the Clark School of 
Engineering Student Affairs Office, 1124 Engineering Classroom Building, 
301405-3855. 

Job Opportunities 

Computer Engineers have virtiually unlimited employment opportiunities in both 
industry and government. Some of the specific jobs that students of computer 
engineering might acquire are: computer designer, application specialist, 
embedded system designer, interfacing and telecommunication designer, 
data logging and control, industrial systems design, hardware design, 
biomedical device design, real-time software design and development, 
instrumentation analysis and control, computer-integrated manufacturing. 



Researcli Labs 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is affiliated with 
more than 40 specialized laboratories, supporting activities including: 
speech and image processing, high performance systems, mobile 
computing and multimedia, communication networks, robotics, control 
systems, neural systems, systems integration, VLSI design and testing, 
experimental software engineering, semiconductor materials and devices, 
photonics, fiber optics, ion beam lithography real-time systems, human- 
computer interaction, and virtual reality. 

Student Organizations 

Please see listing for ENEE 

Courses (see full descriptions in chapter 8) 

CMSC 132-ComputerScience I (4) 

CMSC 214-ComputerScience II (4) 

CMSC 250-Discrete Structures (4) 

CMSC 330— Organization of Programming Languages (3) 

CMSC351-Algorithms (3) 

CMSC 412-Operating Systems (4) 

ENEE 204-Basic Circuit Theory (3) 

ENEE 206— Fundamental Electric and Digital Circuit Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 241 — Numerical Techniques in Engineering (3) 

ENEE 244-Digital Logic Design (3) 

ENEE 302-Digital Electronics (3) 

ENEE 322— Signal and System Theory (3) 

ENEE 324— Engineering Probability (3) 

ENEE 350— Computer Organization (3) 

ENEE 446-Digital Computer Design (3) 

Course Codes: ENEE, CMSC 



COMPUTER SCIENCE (CMSC) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1119 A.V.Williams Building, 301405-2672 
E-mail: ugrad@cs.umd.edu 

www .cs.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Davis 

Professors: Agrawala, Aloimonos, Basili, Elman, Gasarch, Hendler, Mount, 

Nau, O'Leary, Perils, Pugh, Reggia, Roussopoulos, Samet, Shankar, 

Shneiderman, Smith, Stewart, Subrahmanian, Zelkowitz 

Associate Professors: Dorr, Hollingsworth, Jacobs, Keleher, Khuller, 

Kruskal, Portier, Purtilo, Srinivasan, Tseng, Varshney 

Assistant Professors: Arbaugh, Bederson, Bhattacharjee, Chawathe, Foster, 

Getoor, Guimbretiere, Hicks, Iftode, Katz, Memon, Sussman 

Instructor: Golub, Plane 

Lecturers: Emad, Herman, Hugue, Kaye, Maybury, Padua-Perez, Scolnik, 

Tjaden 

Professors Emeriti: Chu, Kanal, Miller, M inker, Rosenfeld 

The Major 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: 
their theory, design, development, and application. Principal areas within 
computer science include artificial intelligence, computer systems, 
database systems, human factors, numerical analysis, programming 
languages, software engineering, and theory of computing. A computer 
scientist is concerned with problem solving. Problems range from abstract 
determinations of what problems can be solved with computers and the 
complexity of the algorithms that solve them to practical matters (design of 
computer systems which are easy for people to use). Computer scientists 
build computational models of systems including physical phenomena 
(weather forecasting), human behavior (expert systems, robotics), and 
computer systems themselves (performance evaluation). Such models 
often require extensive numeric or symbolic computation. 

The Computer Science Departiment also offers jointly with the Departiment 
of Electrical and Computer Engineering a program in computer engineering. 
For details see the Computer Engineering listing. 



102 Counseling and Personnel Services 



Requirements for Computer Science |V1 ajor 

The course of study for a Computer Science major must include all of the 
following requirements: 

1. A grade of C or better in each of the following courses: 

a. CMSC 131 or a score of 5 on A version of the JAVA Advanced 
Placement exam or a score of 4 or 5 on the AB version of the 
JAVA Advanced Placement exam or an acceptable score on the 
appropriate Department exemption examination, which is to be 
tal<en at the time of entry into the program. 

b. CMSC 132 or acceptable score on the Java Advanced 
Placement examination or acceptable score on the appropriate 
Department exemption examination, which is to be tal<en at the 
time of entry into the program. 

c. CMSC 212 or acceptable score on the appropriate Department 
exemption examination, which is to be tal<en at the time of 
entry into the program. 

d. CMSC 250 or acceptable score on the appropriate Department 
exemption examination, which is to be tal<en at the time of 
entry into the program. 

e. At least 27 credit hours at the 300-400 levels. These must 
include CMSC 311, CMSC 330, CMSC 351, and at least 15 
credit hours from the following CMSC courses with no more 
than two courses from a single category: 

Computer Systems: Up to two of 411, 412, 414, 417 

Information Processing: 420, one of 421 or 424 or 426 

or427; 
Software Engineering/ Programming Languages: 

Up to two of 430, 433, 434,435; 

Algorithms and Computation Theory: 451, one of 452 or 456; 

Numerical Analysis: One of 460 or 466. 
Note: Courses in Numerical Analysis require MATH 240 and 241 as 
additional prerequisites. Students without either of these prerequisites 
must choose their 15 credit hours from the remaining courses in the 
other four areas. 

2. MATH 140 and 141. A STAT course which has MATH 141 (or a 
more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequisite, and one 
other MATH, STAT, or AMSC course which has MATH 141 (or a 
more advanced mathematics course as a prerequisite. A grade of C 
or better must be earned in each of the courses. No course that is 
cross-listed as CMSC maybe counted in this requirement. 

3. A minimum of 12 additional credit hours of 300400 level courses 
in one discipline outside of computer science with an average 
grade of C or better. No course that is cross-listed as CMSC may 
be counted in this requirement. Note: The following general 
guidelines should be observed when selecting courses for this 
upper level supporting sequence: 

a. Courses must have all the same four-letter acronym 

b. Each course should be a minimum of 3 credits. 

c. Only 1 special topics or independent study course (such as 
courses numbered 498 or 499) may be used. 

Any variations must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Director. 
No course used to fulfill another requirement (other than CORE Advanced 
Studies) can be counted in this requirement. 

Advising 

Computer science majors may obtain advising at room 1119 A.V. Williams 
Building. Interested students should call 301-405-2672 to receive further 
information about the program. Additional information can be found at 
www.cs.umd.edu/ Ugrad/ 

Financial Assistance 

Students may find employment as tutors, as undergraduate teaching 
assistants, or as members of the department's laboratory staff. Professors 
may also have funds to hire undergraduates to assist in research. 
Many students also participate in internship or cooperative education 
programs, working in the computer industry for a semester during their 
junior or senior years. 

Honors 

A departmental honors program provides an opportunity for outstanding 
undergraduates to tal<e graduate-level courses or to begin scholarly research 
in independent study with a faculty member. Students are accepted into the 
program after their sophomore year based on their academic performance. 



Additionally the department has a chapter of Upsilon Pi Epsilon which is an 
international honor society to recognize excellence in computer science 
education. 



Student Organizations 



Computer-related extracurricular activities are arranged by our student 
chapter of the ACM, a professional group for computer sciences, and by 
the Association of Women in Computing. Meetings include technical 
lectures and career information. 

Course Code: CMSC 



COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 
(EDCP) 

College of Education 

3214 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2858 
www.education.umd.edu/ EDCP 

Professor and Chair: Kivlighan 

Professors: Birk (Emeritus), Byrne (Emeritus), Fassinger, Hershenson 

(Emeritus), Lent, Magoon (Emeritus), Marx (Emeritus), Power (Emeritus), 

Pumroy (Emeritus), Rosenfield, Schlossberg (Emeritus), Hoffman, Sedlacel< 

(Affiliate) 

Associate Professors: Boyd, Clement (Affiliate), Fabian, Fassinger, 

Greenberg (Emeritus), Jacoby (Affiliate), Komives, McEwen, Strein, Teglasi, 

Westbrook (Affiliate) 

Assistant Professors: Adams-Gaston (Affiliate), Bagwell (Affiliate), Evans 

(Affiliate), Fallon (Affiliate), Flannery (Affiliate), Freeman (Affiliate), Gast 

(Affiliate), Holcomb-McCoy Kandell (Affiliate), Kiely (Affiliate), Lucas, Mieike 

(Affiliate), Osteen (Affiliate), Phillips, Schmidt (Affiliate), Stewart (Affiliate), 

Stimpson (Affiliate), Thomas (Affiliate), Zacker (Affiliate) 

The Department of Counseling and Personnel Services offers programs of 
preparation at the master's degree, advanced graduate specialist, and 
doctoral degree levels for counselors in elementary and secondary schools, 
rehabilitation agencies, business and industry and college and university 
counseling centers. Additional graduate programs of preparation are 
provided for college student personnel administrators and school 
psychologists. The department also offers a joint doctoral program with the 
Department of Psychology in counseling psychology 

While the department does not have an undergraduate major, it does offer 
a number of courses which are open to undergraduates and are suggested 
for students considering graduate work in counseling or other human 
service fields. Specific courses in peer counseling, leadership, and diversity 
are provided. 

Course Code: EDCP 



CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
(CCJ S) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2220 LeFrakHall, 3014054699 

Chair: Wellford 

Professors: Gottfredson, LaFree, Laub, MacKenzie, PaternosterT, Reuter, 

Sherman (Research), Simpson, Smith, Weisburd 

Associate Professors: Russell, Taxman (Research), Wish 

Assistant Professors: Bushway Dugan 

Lecturers: Carr, Cosper, Gaston, Goode, Malm, Mauriello, Zumbrun 

Professor Emeritus: Lejins* (Sociology) 

Instructor: Brooks 

T Distinguished Scholar-Teacher. 

*J oint Appointment with unit indicated. 

The purpose of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice is to 
promote study and teaching concerning the problems of crime, deliquency 
iaw and social control. The department comprises as its component parts: 

1. The Criminology and Criminal Justice Program, leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts degree 

2. The Graduate Program, offering M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in 
Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

3. The Graduate Program, offering a Professional M.A. in Criminal 
Justice 



Curriculum and Instruction 103 



The Criminology and Criminal J ustice M ajor 

The major in criminology and criminal justice comprises 30 hours of 
courseworl< in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Eighteen (18) hours of 
supporting sequence selected from a list of social and behavioral science 
courses (list is available in the department) are required. No grade lower 
than a C may be used toward the major. An average of C is required in the 
supporting sequence. Nine hours of the supporting sequence must be at 
the 300/400 level. In addition, CCJS 200 or an approved course in social 
statistics must be completed with a grade of C or better. A "C" or better is 
required in Math 111 as a prerequisite to CCJS 200. 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

D: Introduction to Criminal J ustice 3 

5: Criminology 3 

D: Criminal Law in Action 3 

D: Criminological and Criminal Justice Research Methods 3 

D: Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 3 

D: Juvenile Delinquency 3 

CCJS 451, 452, or 454 3 

CCJS Electives (3) 9 

Total 30 



Major Requirements 

CCJS 100: 

CCJS 105: 

CCJS 230: 

CCJS 300: 

CCJS 340: 

CCJS 350: 



Supporting Sequence Credit Hours 

18 hours (9 hours at300/400 level) 18 

Social Science Statistics 3 

Total for Major and Supporting 51 

Electives for CCJS Majors (all courses are 3 credits): 

CCJS 234, CCJS 320, CCJS 330, CCJS 331, CCJS 352, CCJS 357, CCJS 
359, CCJS 360, CCJS 398, CCJS 399, CCJS 400, CCJS 432, CCJS 444, 
CCJS 450, CCJS 451, CCJS 452, CCJS 453, CCJS 454, CCJS 455, CCJS 
456, CCJS 457, CCJS 461, CCJS 462, and CCJS 498. 

Note: Criminal Justice (CJUS) majors and Criminology (CRIM) majors, 
which existed prior to 1992, have requirements different from the ones 
outlined here for Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJS) majors. CJUS 
and CRIM majors are strongly urged to speak to a CCJS academic adviser 
regarding their requirements. 

Internships 

Internships are available through CCJS 398 and CCJS 359 in a variety of 
federal, state, local, and private agencies. A GPA of 2.5 and 56 credit 
hours required for internships. 

Honors 

Each semester the department selects the outstanding graduating senior 
for the Peter P. Lejins award. 

The Honors Program provides superior students the opportunity for 
advanced study in both a seminar format and independent study under the 
direction of the faculty The Honors Program is a three-semester (12-credit- 
hour) sequence that a student begins in the spring semester, three or four 
semesters prior to graduation. CCJS 388H, the first course in the 
sequence, is offered only during the spring semester. The second and third 
courses in the sequence consist of a year-long research project (six credits, 
at least three each semester) or an honors thesis (one semester, six 
credits) followed by a graduate seminar in the department (one semester, 
three credits). Honors students may count their Honors courses toward 
satisfaction of the basic 30-hour requirement. Requirements for admission 
to the Honors Program include a cumulative grade-point average of at least 
3.25, no grade lower than B for any criminology and criminal justice course, 
and evidence of satisfactory writing ability 



Advising 



All majors are strongly encouraged to see an adviser at least once each 
semester. Call 3014054729. 

Course Code: CCJS 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (EDCI) 
College of Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301405-3324 
www. education. umd.edu/ EDCI 

Professors: Afflerbach, Dreher, Fey* (Mathematics), Holliday, Johnson, 

Koziol, Oxford, Saracho, Sullivan, Weible, Wiseman 

Associate Professors: Campbell, Chambliss, Chazan, Cirrincione* 

(Geography), Graeber, Hammer* (Physics), Kushner, McCaleb* (Speech), 

McGinnis, O'Flahavan, Price, Slater, Sullivan, Valli, Van Sledright, Van Zee 

Assistant Professors: Coffey Levy, Lynn, Suarez 

Emeriti: Amershek, Blough, De Lorenzo, Duffey, Eley Folstrom, Heidelbach, 

Henkelman, Jantz, Layman, Lockard, Roderick, Schindler, Stant, Tatum, 

Turner, Weaver, Wilson, 

*J oint appointment with unit indicated 

The Major 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers two undergraduate 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree: 

1. Elementary Education: for the preparation of teachers of grades 
1-6 and middle school, and 

2. Secondary Education: for the preparation of teachers in various 
subject areas for teaching in middle schools and secondary 
schools, grades 7-12. 

All secondary education majors are required to have an academic 
content major. 

The Department has multiple pathways for students who are interested in 
teaching at the secondary level. In addition to the dual majors, there are 
citation and Post-Baccalaureate Certification Program options: 

The Citation Option, which is intended for sophomores and juniors in a 
content major, permits potential teacher candidates to enroll in a sequence 
of education courses that helps them to determine if teaching is a viable 
career option for them. The twelve to eighteen credit citation option may be 
taken prior to admission into a teacher preparation program. 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certification Program, which is intended for 
content majors entering the junior or senior year, is for talented students 
with a minimum GPA of 3.0 who enroll in a Bachelor's degree program in a 
content area and elect to continue in a graduate program leading to 
certification in secondary education. Nine credits of the program may count 
for both the Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Prior approval is required for 
students electing this option. This program can be completed in two 
semesters following the completion of the Bachelor's degree. Students 
should contact the department office, 1207 Benjamin BIdg. for updated 
information. 

Detailed information about these secondary education program options is 
available at the College of Education website, www.education.umd.edu. 

Graduates of the Elementary or Secondary Education programs meet the 
requirements for certification in Maryland and most other states. 

Requirements for JVlajor Including Program Options 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre-professional courses 
and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may 
enroll in courses identified as part of the professional sequence, they must 
complete the selective admission requirements and be fully admitted to the 
College of Education's Teacher Education Program. An overall grade point 
average of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher Education. 
All teacher candidates are required to attain qualifying scores for the State 
of Maryland on the Praxis I and Praxis II assessments. Praxis I is required 
for admission, and Praxis II is required for student teaching and graduation. 
Student teaching is a yearlong internship, which takes place in a 
Collaborating School (i.e., partner school, PDS - Professional Development 
School). For more information regarding student teaching, see the College 
of Education entry in Chapter Six 

Admission 



Admission to the Teacher Education Professional Program is competitive. 
Admission procedures and criteria are explained in the College of Education 
entry in Chapter Six. 



104 Curriculum and Instruction 



Advising 

Advising is mandatory for all students. Students receive advising through 
individual appointments orwall<-in hours during the early registration period. 
Information regarding advising schedules is available each semester. Walk- 
in advising hours are also posted each semester. Checl< in the department 
office, 1207 Benjamin Building. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
(Grades 1-6 and Middle School) 

Changes in requirements are under review. Consult the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction for updated information. Students who complete 
the elementary education curriculum receive the Bachelor of Science 
degree and meet the Maryland State Department of Education 
requirements for the Professional Eligibility Certificate in Elementary 
Education. Students admitted to Elementary Education must complete the 
following program, which includes an Area of Emphasis. 

The Gateway Requirements for entrance into the Elementary Teacher 
Education program include: 

Biological science/ lab (4) 

Physical science/ lab (4) 

Math 210 (4)orMath212 (3) 

Math 211 (4) or Math 213 (3) 

EDCI 280 (3) (minimum grade, B) 

as of September, 2004 

The 14-16 credits of math and science must be completed with a GPA of 
2.75. 

Courses which double count with CORE: Courses which may satisfy the 

university's general education requirements (CORE) and which are required 

in the Elementary Education program of studies follow: 

HIST 156 (3) Social and Political History 

Biological Science/Lab and Physical Science/ Lab Gateway Requirements 

(4,4) 

Social Science: (3) (Recommended course options: GEOG 100, GVPT 170, 

SOCYIOO, orPSYClOO) 

Other Pre-Professional Requirements: 

EDCI301 orARTTlOO orARTTllO (3) 

EDCI 443 (3) 

MATH 214 (3) 

MUSC155 (3) 

SOCY230 (3)orPSYC221 (3) 

EDMS 410 (3) 

EDPL301 (3) 

EDHD 411 — Child Growth and Development (3) (typically taken with the 

course work listed under Professional Semesterl) 

EDHD 425— Language Development and Reading Acquisition (3) (typically 

taken with the course work listed under Professional Semesterl) 

Course work to complete the Area of Emphasis (18 semester hours) can 
be chosen from the following areas: Communication, Foreign Language, 
Literature, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. The EDCI Advising 
Office has detailed information regarding each area of emphasis. All pre- 
professional course work must be completed with a C or better prior to 
entering Professional Semester 2. 

Professional Education Courses: 

Professional Semester 1 

EDCI 397— Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools (3) 

EDCI 385-Computers forTeachers (3) 

EDCI 461-Materials for Creating Skilled and Motivated Readers (K-6) (3) 

(Students typically take EDHD 425 and EDHD 411 as part of Professional 

Semester 1.) 



Professional Semester 2 

EDCI 322— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed. 
EDCI 342— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed. 
EDCI 352— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed. 
EDCI 362— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed. 
EDCI 372— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed. 
EDCI 488-Classroom Management (1) 



Social Studies (3) 
Language Arts (3) 
Mathematics (3) 
Reading (3) 
Science (3) 



Professional Semester 3 

EDCI 481 — Student Teaching: Elementary (12) -16 weeks 

EDCI 464— Reading Instruction and Diagnosis across Content Areas (3) 



All pre-professional and professional courses must be completed with a 
grade of C or better. All CORE and pre-professional requirements, as well 
as the courses listed for Professional Semester 1, must be successfully 
completed prior to enrollment in the year-long internship (Professional 
Semesters 2 and 3). The courses listed for Professional Semester 2 must 
be completed with a C or better prior to enrolling in Professional 
Semester 3. A pass on the Praxis II is also required before enrollment in 
Professional Semester 3. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

The Department offers a variety of secondary education programs leading 
to the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees. Students 
who complete a secondary education program at UMCP meet the 
Maryland State Department of Education requirements for the Professional 
Eligibility Certificate. Changes in the secondary education programs are 
under review. Consult the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for 
updated information. 

Foreign-Language Requirement, Bachelor of 
Arts Degree 

Language proficiency may be demonstrated in one of several ways: 

(a) Successful completion of level 4 in one language. Students must 
provide a high school transcript to verify exemption. 

(b) Successful completion of an intermediate-level college foreign 
language course designated by the department. 

(c) Successful completion of a language placement examination in one 
of the campus language departments offering such examinations. 

Students who have native proficiency in a language other than English 
should see an adviser in the EDCI advising office, room 1207 Benjamin. 

Art Education (pre K-12) 

The Art Education curriculum is designed to prepare students to teach art 
in elementary and secondary schools. It provides prospective art teachers 
with a knowledge base about the theories and best practices relevant to 
effective pedagogy, as well as current education and art education goals 
and standards. Students admitted to Art Education complete the Bachelor 
of Arts and are required to have an academic content major. 

For more information on the sequence of pre-professional and professional 
courses, consult the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction's advising office. 

P re-P rofessional/ S ybject Area C ourses 
Note: Course Sequencing is under review. 

ARTT150-lntroduction to ArtTheory(3) 
ARTT 100— Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals (3) 
ARTTllO-Elements of Drawing I (3) 
ARTH 200-Artof the Western World to 1300 (3) 
ARTH 201-Artofthe Western World after 1300 (3) 
ARTT 200— Three-Dimensional Art Fundamentals (3) 
ARTT210-Elements of Drawing II (3) 
ARTT 320- Elements of Painting (3) 
ARTT 41 8- Drawing (3) 
ARTT428-Painting(3) 

EDCI 407— Practicum in Art Education: Three Dimensional (3) (Spring only) 
ARTT340-ARTT 341, ARTT 342, ARTT 343, ARTT 344-Elements of 
Printmaking: Intaglio (3) 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 

EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 

EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas 

1(3) 
EDPL301-Foundations of Education (3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 300- Discipline Based Art Education (C&l Art Methods) (3) (Spring only) 

EDCI 373— Practicum in Ceramics (3) (Spring only) 

EDSP 470- Introduction to Special Education (3) 

EDCI 403— Teaching of Art Criticism in Public Schools (3) (Spring only) 

EDCI 400-Field Experience in Art Education (1) (Fall only)(taken 

concurrently with EDCI 405) 
EDCI 405-Discipline-Based Art Education Methods II (3) (Fall only) 
EDCI 406-Computers, Art, and Chaos Theory (3) (Fall only) 



Curriculum and Instruction 105 



EDCI 401- Student Teaching in Elementary School: Art (6) 
EDCI 402— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Art (5) 
EDCI 404-Student Teaching Seminar (3) 

English Education (Grades 7-12) 

Students who complete the English Education curriculum receive the 
Bachelor of Arts degree and meet the MSDE requirements for the 
Professional Eligibility Certificate. Students admitted to English Education 
are required to have an academic content major and must complete the 
following program requirements: 

Pre-Professional/ Subject Area Courses 

COMM107-Oral Communication: Principles and Practices, orCOMM125- 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication, orCOMM220— 
Small Group Discussion (3) 
COMM230— Argumentation and Debate or COM M 330— Argumentation and 
Public Policy or COMM 383— Urban Communication or 
COM M 402 — Communication Theory and Process (3) 
Foreign Language (Intermediate mastery of a modern or 
classical language is required.) (8 credits) 
ENGL280 (3) 

ENGLlOl — Introduction to Writing or ENGLIOIH— Honors Composition (3) 
(If exempt from ENGLlOl, majors are required to tal<e 
ENGL291- Intermediate Writing or ENGL294- Introduction to 
Creative Writing.) 
ENGL201 — Western World Literature, Homer to the Renaissance, or 
ENGL202— Western World Literature, Renaissance to the Present (3) 
ENGL301-Critical Methods in the Study of Literature (3) 
ENGL304-The MajorWorl<s of Shakespeare or ENGL403-Shal<espeare: 

The Early Works or ENGL404-Shakespeare: The Later Works (3) 

British and American Literature: one upper-level course in five out of the 
following six areas to be taken during the sophomore and junior years (15 
credits total; one of these five courses must be in American Literature): 

a. Medieval Literature 

b. Renaissance Literature other than Shakespeare 

c. Restoration or 18th Century Literature 

d. 19th Century British Literature 

e. American Literature before 1900 

f. 20th Century British or American Literature 

ENGL384— Concepts of Grammar orENGL383— The Uses of Language or 
ENGL385-English Semantics orENGL482-History of the English 

Language (or ENGL483, 484, 486, 489) 
ENGL391— Advanced Composition or ENGL393— Technical Writing or 
ENGL493— Advanced Expository Writing 
ENGL399-Senior Seminar (3) 

ENGL487- Foundations of Rhetoric or COMM360-The Rhetoric of Black 
America or COMM401 — Interpreting Strategic Discourse orCOMM453— 
The Power of Discourse in American Life (3) 
ENGL Elective— Women or minority course (3) 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 
EDPL301-Foundations of Education (3) 
EDHD413-Adolescent Development (3) 
EDHD426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: 

Reading in Content Areas I (3) 
EDCI463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI466- Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI467-Teaching Writing (3) 

EDCI417— Bases for English Language Instruction (3) 

EDCI340— Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: 

English, Speech, Theater (3) (Fall only) 
EDCI447— Field Experience in English Teaching 

(concurrent with EDCI340) (1) 
EDCI440— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

English (concurrent with EDCI441) (1) 
EDCI441— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: English (12) 

For more information on the sequence of pre-professional and professional 
courses, consult the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction (Room 1207, Benjamin). 

Foreign Language Education (Grades 7-12) 

The Foreign Language (FL) Education curriculum is designed for prospective 
foreign language teachers in grades 7-12 who have been admitted to the 
EDCI Teacher Education Program. Currently admission is open to qualified 
students seeking teacher certification in Spanish, French, Russian, Italian, 
and German. Other languages might be added later for teacher 



certification. Students enrolled in foreign language education are required 
to have an academic content major. The foreign language education 
programs are under review. Consult with an advisor in the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction for further information. 

A minimum of six hours of intermediate-level language course work in the 
student's major language must precede the required 300-400 level 
courses. The latter are comprised of a minimum of 30 hours of prescribed 
course work that includes the areas of reading strategies, grammar and 
composition, conversation, literature, civilization and culture, and 
linguistics. Students must also take a minimum of nine hours (three 
courses) of electives in a related area. The second area of concentration 
must be approved by a FL advisor. 

The following requirements must be met with the FL Education program: 

P re-P rofessional/ S ybject Area C oyrses 

Primary FL Area— Intermediate (200 level) (3,3) 

Primary FL Area— Reading Strategies (3) 

Primary FL Area— Grammar and Composition (300-400 levels) (3,3) 

Primary FL Area-Survey of Literature (300400 levels) (3,3) 

Primary FL Area- Conversation (300-400 levels) (3) 

Primary FL Area— Literature (400-above levels) (3,3) 

Primary FL Area— Culture and Civilization (3,3) 

Applied Linguistics (in the Primary FL Area if available; othen/vise, 

LING 200 or ANTH 371— FL Phonetics may satisfy this requirement; check 

with your advisor). (3) 
Electives in Supporting Area/FL-Related Courses (9 hours-minimum of 
three courses). 

In almost all instances. Primary FL Area courses must have been 
completed prior to the Student Teaching semester. Any substitutions for 
the above must be pre-approved by a FL Education Advisor. 

Note: The pre-professional courses vary by subject area. Consult the 
academic department for the specific course requirements for each 
language area. 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 

EDPL 301-Foundations of Education (3) 

EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 

EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas 

1(3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 330— Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: Foreign 

Language (3) 
EDCI 433— Introduction to Foreign Language Methods (3) 
EDCI 438— Field Experience in Second Language Education (1) (Fall only) 
EDCI 430— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: Foreign 

Language (3) 
EDCI 431— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Foreign Language (12) 

Mathematics Education (Grades 7-12) 

students who were accepted into the College of Education's Mathematics 
Education Program prior to January 2001 may complete the requirements 
for that major. Students who wish to be certified to teach mathematics at 
the secondary level and who have not yet been accepted into the College of 
Education must complete the requirements for the Mathematics Major - 
Secondary Education Track. The curriculum is under review. Please check 
with the mathematics department for specific math courses to be taken. 

As of January 2001, the courses that must be taken in the College of 
Education are the following: 

P re-P rofessional/ Education C oyrses 

EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 

EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas 

1(3) 
EDPL 301-Foundations of Education (3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 457— Teaching Secondary Students with Difficulties in Learning 

Mathematics (3) 
EDCI 350— Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: 

Mathematics (3) (Fall only) 
EDCI 355— Field Experience in Secondary Mathematics Education (1) 

(Fall only) 
EDCI 450— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Mathematics (3) 
EDCI 451— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Mathematics (12) 



106 Curriculum and Instruction 



Science Education (Grades 7-12) 

The Science Education program is under review. Please checl< with the 
science department regarding specific course worl<. 

Students may earn credentials in biology, chemistry, earth science, or 
physics. Beginning in 2001, all students admitted to the secondary program 
in science education must complete a major in their area of specialization. 
Students should consult the respective departments for requirements. 
(Students specializing in earth science must complete a major in geology). 
For more information, please see education.umd.edu/science. 

Pre-Professional Education Courses 

EDPL301-Foundations of Education (3) 

EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas 

1(3) 
EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 



Professional Education Courses 
All areas of science education will 
professional education courses: 



be required to complete the following 



EDCI 370— Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education: Science (3) 

EDCI 375— Field Experience in Science Education (1) 

EDCI 470-Practices of Teaching Science (3) 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science (12) 

Speech/ English Education (Grades 7-12) 

Students interested in teaching speech in secondary schools complete a 
minimum of 30 credits in speech and speech-related courses. Because 
most speech teachers also teach English classes, the program includes 
another 30 credits in English and English education. Upon selection of this 
major, students should meet with an adviser to carefully plan their 
programs. Communication is now a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP), and 
the Speech/ English Education program is under review. Please checl< with 
the EDCI Advising Office, room 2311 Benjamin for specific course worl<. 

In addition, intermediate mastery of a modern or classical language is 
required for a B.A. 

P re-P rofessional/ S ybject Area C oyrses 

Speech Area (6): COMM 107 — Oral Communication: Principles and 

Practices, COMM 125-lnterpersonal Communication. COMM 220-Small 

Group Discussion, COMM 230-Argumentation and Debate, COMM 330- 

Argumentation and Public Policy, COMM 340 — Communicating the 

Narrative, COMM 470-Listening 

COMM 200-Advanced Public Speal<ing (3) 

Film elective (3) 

HESP 202— Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences or HESP 305 or 

HESP400 (3) 

THETllO-lntroduction to Theatre (3) 

COMM 401 — Interpreting Strategic Discourse (3) 

COMM 402— Communication Theory and Process (3) 

COMM Upper-level electives (6) 

Engl 101 — Introduction to Writing (3) 

LING 200-lntroductory Linguistics (3)orENG280 (3) 

ENGL 201-or 202 Western World Literature (3) 

ENGL 281— Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction or ENGL 383 

or ENGL 384 or ENGL 385 orENGL482 or ENGL 484 (3) 

ENGL301-Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 (3) 

ENGL 310, 311 or 312-English Literature (3) 

ENGL 313, 430, 431, 432, 433-American Literature (3) 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition orTechnicai Writing (3) 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 

EDPL301-Foundations of Education (3) 

EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 

EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas 

1(3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 417— Bases for English Language Instruction (3) 

EDCI 340— Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education: 

Eng/Spch/ Theatre (3) 
EDCI 447— Field Experience in English, Speech, Theatre Teaching (I) 
EDCI 466- Literature for Adolescents (3) 
EDCI 467-Teaching Writing (3) 
EDCI 440— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: English, 

Speech, Theatre (1) 
EDCI 442— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Speech/ English (12) 



Theatre/ English Education (Grades 7-12) 

The Theatre/ English Education program is presently under revision. Please 
checl< with the EDCI Advising Office, room 1207 Benjamin for specific 
course work. 

Students interested in teaching theatre in secondary schools complete 
a minimum of 30 credits in theatre and theatre-related courses. 
Because most theatre teachers also teach English classes, the program 
includes another 30 credits in English and English education. Upon 
selection of this major, students should meet with an adviser to carefully 
plan their programs. 

In addition, intermediate mastery of a modern or classical language is 
required for a B.A. 

P re-P rofessional/ S ybject Area C oyrses 

THET Ill-Theatre Art & Scholarship (3) 

THET120-Actingl (3) 

THET 170-Theatre Craft I (3) 

THET 273-Scenographic Techniques or THET 476 or THET 480 (3) 

THET 330-Play Directing I (3) 

THET 460-Theatre Management I (3) 

THET 479-Theatre Workshop II (3) 

THET490-Theatre History I (3) 

THET491-Theatre History II (3) 

COMM 107-Oral Communication: Principles and Practices or COMM 200 - 

orCOMM 230 (3) 
ENGL 101-lntroduction to Writing (3) 
LING 200-lntroductory Linguistics (3) or ENGL 280 
ENGL 201 or 202-Westem World Literature (3) 
ENGL 281 — Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction or ENGL 

383 or ENGL 384 or ENGL 385 or ENGL 482 or ENGL 484 (3) 
ENGL 310, 311, or312-English Literature (3) 
ENGL 313-American Literature (3) 

ENGL301-Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 (3) 
ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition orTechnicai Writing (3) 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 
EDHD 413-Adolescent Development (3) 
EDPL301-Foundations of Education (3) 
EDHD 426— Cognition & Motivation in Reading: 

Reading in Content Areas I (3) 
EDCI 463— Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 417— Bases for English Language Instruction (3) 

EDCI 340— Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education: 

Eng/Spch/ Theatre (3) 
EDCI 467-Teaching Writing (3) 
EDCI 466- Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI 447— Field Experience in English, Speech, Theatre Teaching (1) 
EDCI 448— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Theatre/ English (12) 
EDCI 440— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: English, 

Speech, Theatre (1) 

Social Studies Education (Grades 7-12) 

students in the Social Studies Education program may select an area of 
concentration in history, geography, or government and politics. Each 
concentration follows the general requirements of their respective majors in 
addition to the pre-professional/ subject area supporting course work 
required for certification. Students may elect to complete the program for 
certification in Social Studies by choosing one of three options for 
completing the program. 

Option i: HiSTORY: This option, which requires completion of the foreign 
language requirement, is primarily for those students earning their initial 
degree. Requires 68 semester hours of which 39 credit hours must be in 
history. 

NOTE: The history major requires completion of UNIV 101 and a foreign 
language requirement through the intermediate level. See ARHU advisor 
for details. 

Pre-Professional/ Subject Area Courses 
Introductory Courses: 
HIST 156 (3)(C0RE:SH) 
HIST 157 (3)(C0RE:SH) 

100-200 level HIST (non-US, >1500)(3) (See advisor for approved courses) 
HIST 209 or HIST 220 (3) 
HIST 309 (3) 



Dance 107 



History Electives: (24 credits) 
18 credits at the junior/ senior level 
15 credits must be in a concentration 
1 course must be non-Western 

In addition to the required credit hours in history, the social studies 
education program requires 29 credit hours of course work in geography 
and the social sciences as outlined below. 

GEOGIOO (3) (CORE: SB) 

GEOG 201/211 (3/1) (CORE: PL) 

SOCYorANTH (3) 

ECON 200 (4) 

ECON Elective (3) 

GVPT 100, 260, or 280 (3) (CORE: SB) 

GVPT170 (3) (CORE: SB) 

Geography/ Social Science Electives (6) (junior-senior level) 

One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); can be one of the 

above courses in history, geography, or social sciences (3). 

Option II: GEOGRAPHY: This option is primarily for those students earning 
their initial degree. Requires 60 credit hours of Pre-professional/ Subject 
Area course work. Thirty-five credit hours must be in geography. GEOG 201, 
211, 202, 212 are required. Nine credit hours of 300 level Gateway 
courses must be taken in physical geography, human geography, and 
geographic techniques. The remaining 18 credit hours must include a 
quantitative methods course and 15 credit hours of upper level systematic 
geography courses. 

Pre-Professional/ Subject Area Courses 
Primary Courses: 
GEOG 201/211 (3)(1) 
GOEG 202/212 (3) (1) 

Gateway Courses: 
300 level physical course (3) 
300 level human course (3) 
300 level technique course (3) 

Upper Level Geography Electives (15) 
Ouantitative Methods (3) 

In addition to the required credit hours in geography, the social studies 
education program requires 25 credit hours of course work in history and 
the social sciences as outlined below. 

SOCYorANTH (3) 

ECON 200/ CORE (4) 

ECON Elective (3) 

GVPT 100, 260, OR 280 (3) 

GVPT 170/ CORE (3) 

HIST 156 orl57/CORE (3) 

HIST (non-Western 100/200 level) (3) 

History/ Social Science Elective -J unior or Senior level (3) 

One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); can be one of the 
above courses in social sciences or history (3). 

Option III: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: This option is primarily for those 
students earning their initial degree. Requires a minimum of 65 credit 
hours of preprofessional/ subject area course work. Thirty-six hours must be 
in GVPT. GVPT 100, 170, and 241 are required. At least eighteen of the 
thirty-six credit hours must be upper-level courses. 

All GVPT majors must also complete an approved skills option (a foreign 
language or three quantitative courses from a select list - see GVPT 
advising office.) 

In addition, the GVPT program is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See 
GVPT advisor for specific admission requirements. 

Pre-Professional/ Subject Area Courses 

Introductory Courses: 

GVPT 100/ CORE (3) 

GVPT 170/ CORE (3) 

GVPT 241 (3) 

GVPT Electives (9) 

GVPT Upper Level Courses (18) 

Social Science Quantitative Courses or Foreign Language (see GVPT advisor) 



In addition to the required credit hours in GVPT, the social studies 
education program requires 26 credit hours of course work in history and 
the social sciences as outlined below. 

HIST 156 orl57/CORE (3) 

HIST (non-Western 100/200 level) (3) 

SOCYorANTH (3) 

ECON 200/ CORE (4) 

ECON Elective (3) 

Upper Level GEOG/ HIST (3) 

GEOG 201 AND211/C0RE (3/1) 

GEOG 100/ CORE (3) 

One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); can be one of the 
above courses in social sciences or history (3). 

All options must complete the following Education course work: 

Pre-Professional/ Education Courses 

EDPL301 -Foundations of Education (3) 

EDHD 413 -Adolescent Development (3) 

EDHD 426 - Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in the Content 

Areas I (3) 

EDCI463 -Reading in the Secondary School (3) 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI 426 -Materials & Resources in Social Studies (3) 

EDCI 320 - Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education - Social 

Studies (3) (Fall only) 

EDCI 428 - Field Experience in Secondary Social Studies Teaching (1) 

co-requirement EDCI 320 (Fall only) 

EDCI 421 -Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies (12) 

EDCI 420 - Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Social Studies (3) 

Course Code: EDCI 



DANCE (DANC) 



College of Arts and Humanities 

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, 301-405-3180 

Professor and Chair: Wiltz 
Professors: Rosen, A. Warren 
Associate Professor: Bradley 
Assistant Professor: Yatkin 
Instructor: Mayes 
Emeriti: Madden, L. Warren 
Lecturers: Druker, Jackson 
Accompanists: Freivogel, Johnson 

The Major 

The undergraduate curriculum, which leads toward a B.A. degree in Dance, 
is designed to facilitate the acquisition of new movement skills, enhance 
creativity, and develop scholarly insights in the field. Comprehensive studio 
and theory courses provide a foundation for a range of careers in dance. 
Students may choose to study a particular aspect of dance in depth, such 
as performance, choreography or production; or they may choose to merge 
their interest in dance with an interest in another field of study. Graduates 
of the program pursue graduate work in dance as well as careers as 
professional dancers and choreographers, university and secondary school 
teachers, dance managers, and dance critics. They also work in the fields 
of dance medicine and therapy. 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distinguished teachers, 
choreographers, and performers, each one a specialist in his or her own 
field. Visiting artists throughout the year make additional contributions to 
the program. There are performance and choreographic opportunities for all 
dance students, ranging from informal workshops to fully mounted concerts 
both on and off campus. 

Requirements for the M ajor 

students must complete 57 semester hours of dance credits. Of these, 18 
hours of modern technique at the Dance 248 and above level and four 
hours of ballet technique at the Dance 228 and above level are required. 
The remaining 35 credits must be distributed as follows: 



108 Information Systems: Specialization Business 



DANC 102- Rhythmic Training 2 

DANC 109- Improvisation 2 

DANC 200- Introduction to Dance 3 

DANC 210- Dance Production 3 

DANC 208, 308, 388-Choreography I, II, III 9 

DANC 305-Principles ofTeaching 3 

DANC 370- Kinesiology for Dancers 4 

DANC 466— Laban Movement Analysis 3 

DANC 483-Dance History II 3 

DANC 485- Seminar in Dance 3 

A grade of C or higher must be attained in all dance courses. 

New, re-entering, and transfer students are expected to contact the 
department following admission to the university for instructions regarding 
advising and registration procedures. Although entrance auditions are not 
required, some previous dance experience is highly desirable. 

Departmental advising is mandatory each semester. 

Course Code: DANC 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS: 
SPECIALIZATION BUSINESS 

For information, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 6. 



DIETETICS 

For more information, consult Nutrition and Food Science later in this 
chapter. 



ECONOMICS (ECON) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Undergraduate Studies: 3105 Tydings, 301-405-3505 
Undergraduate Adviser: 3127A Tydings, 301-405-3503 
3127C Tydings, 301405-3513 

Professors: Ausubel, Betancourt, Calvo, Cramton, Cropper, Drazen, Evans, 
Haltiwanger, Hulten, Kelejian, Mendoza, Montgomery, Murrell, Dates, 
Prucha, Reinhart, Rust, Sanders, Schwab, Straszheim, Vincent, Wallis 
Associate Professors: Chao, Coughlin, Duggan, Hellerstein, Kranton, Lyon, 
Minehart, Sal<ellaris, Shea, Smith 

Assistant Professors: Broner, Gelbach, Jin, Limao, Pries, Soares 
Professor Emeritus: Adams, Almon, Bennett, Bergmann, Brechling, Clague, 
Cumberland, Dardis, Dorsey, Harris, McGuire, Meyer, O'Connell, Polakoff, 
Schelling, Wonnacott 

The Major 

Economics is the study of the production, pricing, and distribution of goods 
and services within societies. Economists study such problems as inflation, 
unemployment, technical change, poverty, environmental quality, and 
foreign trade. Economists also apply economics to such diverse areas as 
crime, health care and the elderly, discrimination, urban development, and 
developing nation problems. 

Two characteristics of modern economics receive special attention in the 
departiment's program. Government policies have profound effects on how 
our economic system performs. Government expenditures, regulations, and 
taxation either directly or indirectly affect both households and firms. Second, 
there is a growing interdependency among economies throughout the worid. 
Extensive woridwide markets exist in which goods and services are traded, 
and capital and investments move across national boundaries. Economic 
events in one nation are oftien quicl<ly transmitted to other nations. 

Economists study these phenomena through the development of 
systematic principles and analytic models which describe how economic 
agents behave and interact. These models are the subject of empirical 
testing, oftien using computers and extensive data sets. 

The interests of the faculty, as reflected in the course offerings, are both 
theoretical and applied. As a large, diverse department, the economics 
department offers courses in all of the major fields of economic study. The 



department's program stresses the application of economic theory and 
econometrics to current problems in a large number of fields. Many 
courses in the departiment's program analyze the role of the government 
and public policies on the economy. 

The program is designed to serve both majors and non-majors. The 
department offers a wide variety of upper-level courses on particular 
economic issues which can be tal<en after one or two semesters of basic 
principles. These courses can be especially useful for those planning 
careers in law, business, or the public sector. The program for majors is 
designed to serve those who will seel< employment immediately after 
college as well as those who will pursue graduate study. 

Economics majors have a wide variety of career options in both the private 
and public sectors. These include careers in state and local government, 
federal and international agencies, business, finance and banl<ing, 
journalism, teaching, politics and law. Many economics majors pursue 
graduate worl< in economics or another social science, law, business or 
public administration (public policy, health, urban and regional planning, 
education, and industrial relations). 



Requirements for JVl ajor 

In addition to the university's general education (CORE) requirements, 
requirements for the Economics major are as follows: 



the 



(1) Economics (and Mathematics) Courses (36 hours) 

Economics majors must earn 35 credit hours in Economics, and 3 
credit hours in Calculus (MATH 220 or 140), with a grade of C or 
better in each course. All majors must complete 14 hours of 
fundamental requirements. The fundamental requirements include 
ECON 200, ECON 201, ECON 305 and ECON 306. 

Students must also complete 21 hours in upper level 
Economics courses: 

a) three hours in statistics; ECON 321 or STAT 400 (checl< with 
adviser). Majors who declared afterjanuary 1, 1998, must take 
ECON 321 or STAT 400. 

b) three hours in economic history or comparative systems; ECON 
310, 311, 312, 314, 315, 380, or 410; 

c) nine hours in courses with at least one semester of 
intermediate theory (ECON 305 or 306) or economic statistics 
(ECON 321) as a prerequisite. As of September 1, 1999, all 
400 level Economics classes meet this requirement. ECON 
430, 449, 450, 451, 465, and 490 taken before that date do 
not fulfill the requirement; 

d) six other hours in any upper-division economics course except 
ECON 386. 

(2) Additional Supporting Courses (15 hours) 

Students must earn 15 hours of credit in upper-division courses in 
addition to the 38 hours of Economics (and Mathematics) courses 
listed above and the university's CORE requirements. Upper 
division courses include all courses with a 300 number and above 
except the Junior English writing class. Additional mathematics 
courses beyond the required mathematics course (MATH 220 or 
140), and computer programming courses at the 200-level and 
above may be counted as fulfilling the Additional Support Course 
Requirement. Additional economics courses may be included 
among the 15 hours of supportiing courses. All supporting courses 
must be approved by an Economics Departiment Adviser. 

All courses meeting this Additional Support Course requirement must 
be completed with a grade of C or better and may not be taken pass-fail 
except ECON 386, which can only be taken pass-fail. 

Study Sequences and Plans of Study 

Economics is an analytic discipline, building on a core of principles, analytic 
models, and statistical techniques. Students must begin with a foundation 
in mathematics and economic principles (ECON 200 and ECON 201). A 
more advanced, analytic treatment of economics is presented in 
intermediate theory (ECON 305 and ECON 306), which is a necessary 
background for in-depth study by economics majors. 

The departiment urges that the student take ECON 200 and 201 and MATH 
140 or 220 as soon as possible. Honors versions of ECON 200 and 201 
are offered for students seeking a more rigorous analysis of principles, 
departmental honors candidates, and those intending to attend graduate 
school. Admission is granted by the departiment's Office of Undergraduate 
Advising or the University Honors Program. 



Education Policy and Leadersliip 109 



Courses in applied areas at the 300-level may be tal<en at any point after 
principles. However, majors will benefit by completing ECON 305, ECON 
306, and ECON 321 or its equivalent immediately upon completion of 
principles. While most students tal<e ECON 305 and 306 in sequence, they 
may be tal<en concurrently. Courses at the 400-level are generally 
more demanding, particularly those courses with intermediate theory as 
a prerequisite. 

Empirical research and the use of computers are becoming increasingly 
important in economics. All students are well advised to include as many 
statistics, econometrics, and computer programming courses in their 
curriculum as possible. 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study in economics must 
begin to prepare themselves analytically for graduate worl< by focusing on 
theory, statistics, and mathematics in their undergraduate curriculum. 
These students should consider the advanced theory courses and the 
econometrics sequence. Mastery of the calculus and linear algebra is 
essential for success in many of the top graduate schools. Students 
should consider MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 240 (or MATH 400), MATH 
241 and MATH 246 as very useful preparation. 

Advising 

The department has academic advisers providing advising on a wall<-in 
basis in the Office of Undergraduate Advising, 3127A & C Tydings Hall. 

Honors 

The Economics Honors Program provides economics majors with the 
opportunity for advanced study in a seminar format, with faculty supervision 
of seminar papers and an honors thesis. The Honors Program is designed 
for students intending to attend graduate school or those seel<ing an in- 
depth study of economic theory and its application to economic problems. 

The Honors Program is a 12-hour sequence, culminating in the completion 
of a senior thesis. Students must complete ECON 422 prior to their senior 
year. Students must also complete ECON 396 (Honors Workshop) and 
ECON 397 (Honors Thesis) in their senior year, as well as one of the 
following four courses: ECON 407, 414, 423, 425. Students must 
complete these 12 hours with a GPA of 3.5. ECON 396 is offered only in 
the fall term. 

To be eligible for admission, a student must have completed 15 hours of 
economics with a GPA of 3.25. Interested students should meet with the 
Director of Undergraduate Studies at the earliest possible date to review 
their curriculum plans and to apply for admission to the program. 

Awards 

The Dudley and Louisa Dillard Prize, currently $1,000, is awarded to the 
outstanding Economics junior and senior with a broad liberal arts program. 

The Sujon Guha Prize, currently $500, is awarded to the best Honors 
Thesis in Economics. 

The Martin Mosl<owitz Awards provides scholarships to students based on 
academic excellence, financial need, and a demonstrated commitment to 
and philosophy of public service. 



Student Organizations 



Omicron Delta Epsilon is the economics honorary society Please see the 
Undergraduate Economics Secretary in 3015 Tydings for membership 
information. 

The Economics Association of Maryland is an undergraduate club that 
meets regularly to discuss graduate study in economics and other fields, 
employment opportunities, and recent economic trends. Please see the 
Undergraduate Advisor in 3127C Tydings for more information. 

Course Code: ECON 



EDUCATION POLICY AND LEADERSHIP (EDPL) 
College of Education 

2110 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3574 
www.education.umd.edu/ EDPL 

Professor and Interim Chair: Weible 

Professors: Finl<elstein, Hultgren, Klees, Malen, Selden 

Associate Professors: Herschbach, Lin, Mawhinney Milem, Rice 

Assistant Professors: Cossentino, Croninger, Fries-Britt, Honig, Kezar, 

Perna, Spreen, Williams 

Emeriti: Berdahit, Berman, Birnbaum, Carbone, Clague, Dudley, Hawley, 

McLoone, Newell, Schmidtlein, Splaine, Stephens 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

The Department of Education Policy and Leadership offers programs at the 
master's and doctoral degree levels to prepare educational leaders in a 
wide variety of leadership roles including school administrators, policy 
analysts, program directors, program planners, researchers, teachers, and 
professionals in international education development. Students choose a 
specialization from among the following areas: Curriculum Theory and 
Development, Education Policy and Social Foundations, Organizational 
Leadership and Policy Studies, Higher Education and International 
Education Policy. 

While the department does not have an undergraduate major, it does offer 
a number of courses which are open to undergraduates and are suggested 
for students interested in studying the role of education in society or 
considering graduate work in education policy and leadership. Particular 
courses of interest include Foundations of Education and Education in 
Contemporary American Society 

Course Code: EDPL 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (ENEE) 

A.James Clark School of Engineering 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

2429 A.V. Williams Building, 301405-3685 
E-mail: eceadvis@deans.umd.edu 

www .ece.umd.edu 

Chair: Marcus 

Associate Chairs: Blankenship (External Relations), Rhee (Facilities and 

Services), Orloff (Undergraduate Studies), Tit (Graduate Studies) 

Professors: Abed, Antonsen, Baras, Barbe, Blankenship, Chellappat, 

Dagenais, Davist, DeClaris, Destlert, Ephremides, Farvardin, Gligor, 

Goldhar, Goldsman, Granastein, Ho, Jaja, Krishnaprasad, Lawson, Lee, 

Levine, Liu, Makowski, Marcus, Mayergoyzt, Melngailis, Milchberg, 

Nakajima, Narayan, Newcomb, Orloff, Oruc, Otttt, Peckerar (part-time), 

Rabin, Rhee, Shamma, Shayman, Tits, Vishkin, Yang, Zaki 

Associate Professors: Bhattacharyya, Espy-Wilson, Etienne-Cummings, 

Franklin, Gomez, lliadis, O'Shea, Papamarcou, Silio, Tretter 

Assistant Professors: Abshire, Barua, Gansman, Ghodssi, Horiuchi, Jacob, 

La, Murphy Papadopoulos, Ou, Simon, Srivastava, Ulukus, Wu, Yeung 

Emeriti: Davisson, Emad, Harger, Ligomenides, Lin, Pugsley, Reiser, 

Striffler, Taylor, Wagner 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

ft Distinguished University Professor 

The Major 

The Electrical Engineering major is intended to prepare students to function 
as effective citizens and engineers in an increasingly technological world as 
well as in science and engineering subjects. Depth as well as breadth is 
required in the humanities and social sciences to understand the 
economic, ecologic, and human factors involved in reaching the best 
solutions to today's problems. 

The basic foundation in mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences 
is established in the first two years of the curriculum. A core of required 
Electrical Engineering courses is followed by a flexible structure of electives 
that allows either breadth or specialization. Appropriate choices of electives 
can prepare an Electrical Engineering major for a career as a practicing 
engineer and/ or for graduate study. 

Areas stressed in the major include communication systems, computer 
systems, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, microelectronics, 
and power systems. Within these areas are courses in such topics as solid 
state electronics, integrated circuits, lasers, communications engineering. 



110 Electrical Engineering 



computer design, power engineering, digital signal processing, antenna 
design, and many others. Project courses allow undergraduates to 
undertal<e independent study under the guidance of a faculty member in an 
area of mutual interest. 

The following are the objectives of the Electrical Engineering 
degree program: 

1. Provide all students with basic training in electrical engineering, 
as well as opportunities for specialized training in several 
technical areas; 

2. Prepare students for study in the nation's top graduate schools 
and/ or employment in a variety of positions in government 
and industry; 

3. Through such tools as honors courses, research programs and 
financial aid packages, facilitate the recruitment and retention of a 
diverse student body, with particular emphasis on historically 
underrepresented groups; 

4. Provide students with an understanding of the social context of the 
electrical engineering profession; 

5. Provide students with an understanding of the ethical 
responsibilities of practicing engineers, as stipulated in the IEEE 
Code of Ethics; 

6. Provide students with an ability to communicate and defend their 
ideas effectively; 

7. Provide students with the skills necessary for successful 
participation in interdisciplinary projects; 

8. Provide students with an ability to identify engineering problems 
and propose appropriate solutions, including the step-by-step 
design of a system, component or process; 

9. Provide students with a strong foundation in mathematics, 
sciences and engineering, and the ability to apply said knowledge 
to solving engineering problems; 

10. Provide students with an ability to design and conduct experiments, 
interpret empirical observations and analyze data; 

11. Provide students with opportunities to engage in structured 
research activities; 

12. Maintain technological relevance by introducing students to current 
applications in the field, as well as to state-of-the art laboratory 
equipment and computer simulation tools; 

13. Provide students with a motivation to seek further specialization in 
the field of electrical engineering, and to continue learning, whether 
in a formal academic setting or through self-instruction. 

Requirements for Major 

Requirements for the Electrical Engineering major include thorough 
preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering science. 
Elective courses must include both Electrical Engineering courses 
and technical courses outside the department. A sample program is 
shown below. 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

CHEM 135— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics 3 

MATH 140, 141-Calculus I, II 4 4 

ENES 100— Intro. To Engineering Design 3 

ENEE 114— Programming Concepts for Engineers 4 

CORE- General Education* 3 3 

Total 13 14 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 241-Calculus III 4 

MATH 246- Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 260 &261-General Physics II 4 

PHYS 270 &271-General Physics III 4 

ENEE 241 — Numerical Techniques in Engineering 3 

ENEE 244-Digital Logic Design 3 

ENEE 204- Basic Circuit Theory 3 

ENEE 206-Digital and Circuits Lab 2 

CORE- General Education* 3 3 

Total 17 15 

Junior Year 

MATH 4xx*-Advanced Elective Math 3 

ENEE 302-Digital Electronics 3 

ENEE 306— Electronics Circuits Design Lab 2 

ENEE 312— Semiconductor Devices and Analog Elects 3 

ENEE 322— Signal and System Theory 3 

ENEE 324— Engineering Probability 3 

ENEE 350— Computer Organization 3 

ENEE 380- Electomagnetic Theory 3 



ENEE 381 — Electromagnetic Wave Program 3 

CORE- General Education* 6 

Total 15 17 

Senior Year 

CORE- General Education* 3 3 

Technical Electives* (NON€E Technical Electives) 3 6 

Technical Electives** EE Electives 8 5 

Total 14 14 

*Note: The sample schedule assumes at least one of the CORE 
Distributive Studies classes also satisfies the CORE Cultural Diversity 
requirements. 

Electrical Engineering Majors 

New EE Technical Elective Requirements* 

Effective Spring 2001, all BSEE graduates must distribute their 13 credits 
of EE technical electives among the following course categories: 

CategoryA AdvancedTheory and Applications: minimum of 3 credits 
Category B Advanced Laboratory: minimum of 2 credits 
Category C Capstone Design: minimum of 3 credits 

Please read carefully, and make a note of, the following special cases and 
other items: 

1. Two credits of ENEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, may be used to satisfy the Advanced Laboratory 
requirement subject to approval by the faculty supervisor and the 
Associate Chair. The maximum number of ENEE 499 credits that 
may be applied towards EE technical elective requirements is five. 

2. Additional Capstone Design courses can be used as substitutes for 

• the required Advanced Theory and Applications course; and/ or 

• the required Advanced Laboratory course, provided one of the 
following is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B, 408C, or408F. 

3. Completion of ENEE 408A and ENEE 459A satisfies both the 
Capstone Design and Advanced Laboratory requirements. 

4. If you have any questions on how these requirements affect your 
current selection of senior EE electives, please contact an advisor. 

Admission 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other departments. (See 
A. J ames Clark School of Engineering section on Entrance Requirements.) 

Advising 

In addition to the associate chair and the Director of Undergraduate Affairs, 
faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering function as undergraduate 
advisers. Departmental approval is required for registration in all courses in 
the major. The department's Undergraduate Office (2429 A.V. Williams 
Building, 301-405-3685 is the contact point for undergraduate 
advising questions. 

Financial Assistance 

Several corporate scholarships are administered through the department. 
Information and scholarship applications are available from either the 
Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Office, 2429 A.V. Williams Building, 
405-3685, or the A. James Clark School of Engineering Student Affairs 
Office, 1131 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3860. 

Honors and Awards 

The Electrical and Computer Engineering department annually gives a 
variety of academic performance and service awards. Information on 
criteria and eligibility is available from the department's Undergraduate 
Office. Majors in Electrical Engineering participate in the Engineering 
Honors Program. See the A. James Clark School of Engineering entry in this 
catalog for further information. 



Engineering, Baclielor of Science, Degree In 111 



Department Honors Program 

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Honors Program is intended to 
provide a more challenging and rewarding undergraduate experience for the 
best students pursuing the baccalaureate in Electrical Computer 
Engineering. Honors sections are offered in almost all technical courses in 
the freshmen, sophomore, and junior years, and a honors project is taken 
during the senior year. Students completing the program with at least a 3.0 
average on a 4.0 scale will have their participation in the program indicated 
on their B.S. diploma. 

Student Organizations 

There is an active Student Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Information and membership applications are 
available in the Electrical and Computer Engineering undergraduate lounge, 
0107 Engineering Classroom Building. Equally active is the chapter of Eta 
Kappa Nu, the nationwide Electrical Engineering honorary society 

Information on eligibility can be obtained from the departmental 
Undergraduate Office, or from the College Student Affairs Office. PIECE is a 
student-run group, assisting new students as they become acclimated to 
the University 

Course Code: ENEE 



ENGINEERING, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, 
DEGREE IN 

A.James Clark School of Engineering 

1124 Glenn L. Martin Hall (formerly Engineering Classroom Building), 
301405-3855 

General Regulations for the B.S. 
Engineering Degree 

All undergraduates in engineering will typically select their major field 
sponsoring department by the end of their second year regardless of 
whether they plan to proceed to a designated or an undesignated degree. A 
student wishing to elect the B.S. Engineering degree program may do so at 
anytime following the completion of the sophomore year, or a minimum of 
50 earned credits towards any engineering degree, and at least one 
semester prior to the time the student expects to receive the 
baccalaureate. As soon as the student elects to seek a B.S. Engineering 
degree, the student's curriculum planning, guidance, and counseling will be 
the responsibility of the "B.S. Engineering Degree Program Adviser" in the 
primary field department. The student must file an "Application for 
Admission to Candidacy for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering" with the student affairs office of the A. James Clark School of 
Engineering. The candidacy form must be approved by the chair of the 
primary field department, the primary engineering, and the secondary field 
advisers and the college faculty committee on "B.S. Engineering Degree 
Programs." This committee has the responsibility for implementing all 
approved policies pertaining to this program and reviewing and acting on 
the candidacy forms filed by the student. 

Specific university and school academic regulations apply to this B.S. 
Engineering degree program in the same manner as they apply to the 
conventional designated degree programs. For example, the academic 
regulations of the university apply and the school requirement of an overall 
average of an overall average of 2.0 GPA or better and a grade of C or 
better in all engineering courses. For the purpose of implementation of 
such academic rules, the credits in the primary engineering field and the 
credits in the secondary field are considered to count as the "major" for 
such academic purposes. 

Options of the "B.S. Engineering" Program 

The "B.S. Engineering" program is designed to serve three primary 
functions: (1) to prepare those students who wish to use the breadth and 
depth of their engineering education as preparation for entry into post- 
baccalaureate study in such fields as medicine, law, or business 
administration; (2) to provide the basic professional training for those 
students who wish to continue their engineering studies on the graduate 
level in one of the new interdisciplinary fields of engineering such as 
environmental engineering, bio-medical engineering, systems engineering, 
and many others; and finally (3) to educate those students who do not plan 
a normal professional career in a designated engineering field but wish to 



use a broad engineering education so as to be better able to serve in one 
or more of the many auxiliary or management positions of engineering 
related industries. The program is designed to give the maximum flexibility 
for tailoring a program to the specific future career plans of the student. To 
accomplish these objectives, the program has two optional paths: an 
engineering option and an applied science option. 

The engineering option, which is ABET-accredited, should be particularly 
attractive to those students contemplating graduate study or professional 
employment in the interdisciplinary engineering fields, such as 
environmental engineering, bio-engineering, bio-medical, systems and 
control engineering, and manufacturing engineering, or for preparatory entry 
into a variety of newer or interdisciplinary areas of graduate study. For 
example, a student contemplating graduate work in environmental 
engineering might combine chemical and civil engineering for his or her 
program; a student interested in systems and control engineering graduate 
work might combine electrical engineering with aerospace, chemical, or 
mechanical engineering. 

The applied science option, which is not ABET-accredited, should be 
particularly attractive to those students who do not plan to pursue a 
professional engineering career but wish to use the rational and 
developmental abilities fostered by an engineering education as a means 
of furthering career objectives. Graduates of the applied science option 
may aspire to graduate work and an ultimate career in a field of science, 
law, medicine, business, or a variety of other attractive opportunities which 
build on a combination of engineering and a field of science. Entrance 
requirements for law and medical schools can be met readily under the 
format of this program. In the applied science program, any field in the 
university in which the student may earn a B.S. degree is an acceptable 
secondary science field, thus affording the student a maximum flexibility of 
choice for personal career planning. 

Mlnltnutn Requirements 

Listed below are the minimum requirements for the B.S. Engineering 
degree with either an engineering option or an applied science option. 
Students completing the B.S. Engineering degree are required to complete 
the freshman and sophomore requirements in the chosen primary 
engineering field and the general education requirements as outlined by the 
university and the Clark School of Engineering. The student, thus, does not 
make a decision whether to take the designated or the undesignated 
degree in an engineering field until the beginning of the junior year. In fact, 
the student can probably delay the decision until the spring term of the 
junior year with little or no sacrifice, thus affording ample time for decision- 
making. Either program may be taken on the regular four-year format or 
under the Maryland Plan for Cooperative Engineering Education. 

J unlor-Senior Year Requirements 
Engineering Option 

Mathematics/ Physical Science Requirements" 3 

Engineering Sciences^ ' 3 

Primary Field" 24 

Secondary Field' ' 12 

Major Field or related electives' 3 

Approved electives' ' 6 

Total credits 51 

Applied Science Option 

Mathematics/ Physical Science Requirements' 3 

Engineering Sciences'' 3 

Primary Field' 18 

Secondary Field' 12 

Major Field or related electives' 3 

Approved electives" 9 

Senior research project 3 

Total credits 51 

Engineering fields of concentration available under the B.S. Engineering 
program as primary field within either the engineering option or the applied 
science option are: aerospace engineering, biological resources 
engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, 
electrical engineering, fire protection engineering, materials engineering, 
mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering. There is also an 
environmental engineering option. All engineering fields of concentration 
maybe used as a secondary field within the engineering option. 

'All courses used to fulfill the primary and secondary fields of concentration 
must be at the 300- and 400-level. 



112 English, Language and Literature 



^Engineering Science courses are courses offered by the Clarl< School of 
Engineering which have a prefix beginning with EN (e.g., ENES, ENI^IE, 
ENEE, etc.). These elective courses may be in a student's primary or 
secondary field of concentration. 

'Approved electives must be technical (mathematics, physical sciences, 
or engineering sciences) but may not be in the primary or secondary fields 
of concentration. 



The English major has three parts. The CORE Requirements assure that 
students read widely and become aware of the questions an inquiring 
reader might asl< of a text. The specialization offers students the 
opportunity to read more deeply in an area of special interest. The Electives 
allow students to explore other areas of interest. 

CORE Requirements (18 credits) 

All to be tal<en at the 300- or 400-level 



'At least 50 percent of the elective courses (mathematics, physical 
sciences, engineering sciences, appn3\fid electives) must be at the 300- or 
400-level. 

Students are required to complete 15 credits of appnaved electives which 
include a senior-level project or research assignment relating the 
engineering and science fields of concentration, unless specifically excused. 

'In the applied science option, the appnaved electives should be selected 
to strengthen the student's program consistent with career objectives. 
Courses in the primary or secondary fields of concentration maybe used to 
satisfy the appnaved electives requirement. 

'For the engineering option, the pnagram must contain the prciper design 
component, as specified by ABET requirements. It is the responsibility of 
students and their advisers to ensure that the requirements are satisfied 
by the appnapriate selection of courses in the primary and secondary fields 
of concentration. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
(ENGL) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3101 Susquehanna Hall (SQH), 301405-3809 
www.english.umd.edu 

Undergraduate Advisers: 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 301405-3825 
Freshman English Office: 2101 Susquehanna Hall, 301405-3771 
Professional Writing Program: 3119 Susquehanna Hall, 301405-3762 

Professor and Chair: Caramello 

Professors: Auchard, Auerbach, Barry, Bryer, Caramello, Caretta, 

Cartwright, Coletti, Collier, Collins, Cross, Donawerth*, Fahnestocl<, Flieger, 

Fraistat, Grossman, D. Hamilton, Kauffman*, Leinwand, Leonard!, Levine, 

Mack, Pearson, C. Peterson, Plumlytt, Smith, Washington, Wyatt* 

Associate Professors: Cate, Chuh, Cohen, Coleman, G. Hamilton, Kleine, 

Lindemann, Logan, Loizeaux, Marcuse, Moser, Norman, Ray, Richardson, 

Rosenthal, Sherman, Van Egmond, Wang 

Assistant Professors: Arnold, Bauer, Israel, Jarrett, Jellen, Kirschenbaum, 

Mallios, Weiner 

Lecturers: Miller, Ryan 

Professors Emeriti: Beauchamp, Coogan, Freedman, Fry, Hammond, 

Howard, Isaacs, Jellema, Lawson, Lutwack, Miller, Myers, Panichas, 

Salamanca, Trousdale, Vitzhum, Whittemore, Winton 

tt Distinguished University Professor 

♦Distinguished ScholarTeacher 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors each semester. 

The Major 

The English major has been designed by the English Department faculty with 
three purposes in mind: 1) to give students a sense of the history and variety 
of literature written in English, 2) to introduce students to the debates about 
literature and language that shape our intellectual lives, and 3) to use the 
critical study of literature and language to help students think carefully and 
express themselves well. An English major provides professional preparation 
for a career in the law, government, journalism, business, communication, 
teaching, or any field that requires strong analytical and communication skills. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Requirements for the English major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of a minimum of 45 upper-level credits and the 
foreign language requirement. The English major requires 39 credits in 
English beyond the two required University writing courses. 



1. English 301: Critical Methods in the Study of Literature. For all 
majors, a pre- or co-requisite for other 300- or 400-level English 
courses. We recommend it be taken during the sophomore year. 

2. A course in British Literature emphasizing literature written 
before 1670 

3. A second course in British Literature emphasizing literature 
before 1900 

4. A course in American Literature 

5. A course in a) African American literature, b) literature of peoples 
of color, c) literature by women, or d) gay, lesbian and 
bisexual literature 

6. A senior seminar, to be taken after 86 credits and after the 
completion of at least two upper-level English courses 

Specializations (12 credits) 

(Four courses beyond the 6 CORE Requirements above) 

Students choose one of the following: 

1. British and American Literature 

2. American Literature 

3. British, Postcolonial, and International Anglophone Literature 

4. Language, Writing, and Rhetoric 

5. Creative Writing 

6. Literature of the African Diaspora 

7. Mythology and Folklore 

8. Literature by Women 

9. Film and Visual Studies 

10. Student Specified Concentration 

Electives (9 credits): Chosen in consultation with an adviser. 

Only two 200-level courses may be counted toward the major. No course 
with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy the major. For further 
details on requirements, contact the English Department's Office of 
Undergraduate Studies (2115 SOH, 301405-3825). 

English and English Education Double Major 

In conjunction with the College of Education, the English Department offers 
a special 125-credit program for students wishing to double major in 
English and English Education, allowing them to earn a certificate to teach 
English at the secondary level. For a list of requirements, contact the Office 
of Undergraduate Studies (2115 SQH, 301405-3825). 

Honors 

The English Department offers an extensive Honors Program, primarily for 
majors but open to others with the approval of the departmental Honors 
Committee. Interested students should ask for detailed information from 
an English Department adviser as early as possible in their college careers. 

The Writing Center 

The Writing Center, 0125 Taliaferro, 301405-3785, provides free tutorial 
assistance to students with writing assignments. English 101 students 
generally work with student tutors. English 391/2/3/4/5 students usually 
work with tutors who are retired professionals. Appointments are 
recommended, but walk-ins are welcome based on availability of tutors. 
Students, faculty, and staff with questions about punctuation, sentence 
structure, word choice, or documentation can call the Writing Center's 
Grammar Hotline at 301405-3787. 

English Department Citations for Both English 
Majors and Non-English Majors 

Citation in Renaissance Studies 

15 credit hours. At least one course each in History, Literature and Visual 
and Performing Arts from approved list of courses; at least four courses at 
the 300 or 400 level. Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive 
a Citation on the official transcript. Please contact the Director of 
Undergraduate Studies for more information. 



Entomology 113 



English Department Citations for 
Non-English Majors 

Citation in British and American Literature 

15 credit hours 

Citation in Rhetoric 

Contact English Undergraduate Studies or Communication Undergraduate 
Studies. 

Four courses in: British and American literature, two in British and two in 
American, one course of which must be before 1900 

Additional requirements: One additional course in the Department of 
English of the student's choosing. 

At least 9 of the 15 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level (but no 
overlap with freshman or junior/ professional writing requirements). 

Courses used for one Department of English citation may not be used to satisfy 
requirements for other citations in the Department of English or elsewhere. 

Contact English Undergraduate Studies, 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 
301405-3825. 

Citation in American Literature 

15 credit hours 

Four courses in: American literature, one of which must be in literature 
before 1900. 

Additional requirements: One additional course in the Department of 
English of the student's choosing. 

At least 9 of the 15 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level (but no 
overlap with freshman or junior/ professional writing requirements). 

Courses used for one Department of English citation may not be used to satisfy 
requirements for other citations in the Department of English or elsewhere. 

Advisor: English Undergraduate Studies, 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 301- 
405-3825. 

Citation in British, Postcolonial, and International 
Anglophone Literature 

15 credit hours 

Four courses in: British, Postcolonial, and International Anglophone 
Literature, including at least one course in literature before 1830. 

Additional requirements: One additional course in the Department of 
English of the student's choosing. 

At least 9 of the 15 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level (but no 
overlap with freshman or junior/ professional writing requirements). 

Courses used for one Department of English citation may not be used to satisfy 
requirements for other citations in the Department of English or elsewhere. 

Contact English Undergraduate Studies, 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 301- 
405-3825. 

Literature of the African Diaspora 

15 credit hours 

Four courses in: Literature of the African Diaspora 

Additional requirements: One additional course in the Department of 
English of the student's choosing. 

At least 9 of the 15 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level (but no 
overlap with freshman or junior/ professional writing requirements). 

Courses in the Afro-American Studies Program that are cross-listed in 
English maybe used to fill requirements for this citation. 

Courses used for one Department of English citation may not be used to satisfy 
requirements for other citations in the Department of English or elsewhere. 



Contact English Undergraduate Studies, 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 301- 
405-3825. 

Literature by Women 

15 credit hours 

Four courses, including: I Theory, 3 Literature 

Additional requirements: One additional course in the Department of 
English of the student's choosing 

At least 9 of the 15 credit hours must be at the 300 or 400 level (but no 
overlap with freshman or junior/ professional writing requirements). 

Courses in the Department of Women's Studies that are cross-listed in 
English maybe used to fill requirements for this citation. 

Courses used for one Department of English citation may not be used to satisfy 
requirements for other citations in the Department of English or elsewhere. 

Contact English Undergraduate Studies, 2115 Susquehanna Hall, 301- 
405-3825. 

Course Code: ENGL 



ENTOMOLOGY (ENTM) 

College of Life Sciences 

4112 Plant Sciences BIdg., 301405-3911 
www.entm.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Mitter 

Professors: Barbosa, Bottrell, Denno, Dively, Ma, Palmer, Raupp, St. Leger, 

Thorne, Via 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Brown, Hawthorne, Lamp, Nelson, Picl<, 

Shultz 

Assistant Professors: Neel, Shrewsbury 

Instructor: Kent 

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Kent 

Professors Emeriti: Bicl<ley, Davidson, Harrison, Hellman, Jones, Linduska, 

Menzer, Messersmith, Steinhauer, Wood 

The Major 

Entomology is an Advanced Program Specialization in the area of Biological 
Sciences. This specialization area prepares students for careers or 
graduate worl< in any of the specialized areas of entomology. Professional 
entomologists are engaged in fundamental and applied research in 
university, government, and private laboratories; regulatory and control 
activities with Federal and State agencies; commercial pest management 
services; sales and development programs with chemical companies and 
other commercial organizations; consulting, extension worl<, and teaching. 

Advising is mandatory. Students should worl< closely with their advisers in 
choosing electives. 

Requirements for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences elsewhere in this chapter and Entomology adviser 
for specific program requirements. 

Course Code: ENTM 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY 
PROGRAM (ENSP) 

0102 Symons Hall, 301405-8571 

E-m a 11: bj5 @ um aJLum d.edu or jbrow n@ deans. um d.edu 
www .ensp.um d.edu 

Director: James 

Associate Director: Whittemore 

Environmental Science and Policy is a broadly multidisciplinary major, drawing 
courses and faculty from 20 departments and four Colleges (Agriculture and 
Natural Resources; Behavioral and Social Sciences; Computer, 
Mathematical, and Physical Sciences; and Life Sciences). There are 11 areas 
of concentration within the major, most of which are also cross-disciplinary. 



114 Family Studies 



students will choose a particular area of concentration and will be assigned 
an adviser from among the faculty who are responsible for the particular area. 
Students will have the opportunity to change area of concentration from that 
originally selected as they learn about the diversity of the major and its 
offerings. The B.S. degree earned will be in Environmental Science and Policy 
and in the area of concentration chosen. For administrative purposes, the 
students will be associated with the Colleges of their academic advisers. 

Tlie JVlajor 

Environmental Science and Policy students will a tal<e a core of 10 courses, 
including 9 lower-division courses chosen from restricted lists and a 
Capstone course required of all majors during their senior year, and upper- 
division courses defined by the area of concentration. After accounting for 
prerequisites, CORE courses, and upper-division requirements, any area of 
concentration may be completed while allowing approximately 24 hours of 
free electives in a normal 120-hour program leading to the B.S. degree. 
Some areas of concentration require an internship, and students will be 
encouraged to pursue practical work, study abroad, and volunteer 
opportunities as part of their undergraduate programs. 

Requirements for M ajor 

ENSP CORE 

1. Two introductory courses and three credits each semester, 
emphasizing Environmental Science in ENSP 101 and Environmental 
Policyin ENSP 102. 

2. At least one course each from five of the following six groups: a) 
Biology (BSCI 106); b) Chemistry (CHEM 103); c) Earth Sciences 
GEOL 120/110, GEOL 100/110, GEOG 201/211, NRSC 200, 
METO 200); d) Economics (AREC 240, ECON 200); e) Geography 
(GEOG 100, GEOG 170, GEOG 202); f) Government & Politics (GVPT 
273, AREC 332). 

3. One semester of Calculus (MATH 140 or MATH 220) 

4. One semester of Statistics (BIOM 301, ECON 321, PSYC 200, 
SOCY201, STAT 400) 

5. The Capstone course (ENSP 400 in the senior year) 

Areas of Concentration 

Biodiversity and Conservation Biology; Earth Surface Processes; 
Environment and Agriculture; Environmental Economics; Environmental 
Mapping and Data Management; Environmental Politics and Policy; 
Environmental Restoration and Management; Land Use; Society and 
Environmental Issues; Soil, Water and Land Resources; Wildlife Resources 
and Conservation. Changes in concentrations are under review. Students 
should consult the program for updated infornnation. 

Grading Policy 

students who entered the Environmental Science and Policy Program in 
spring 2002, and thereafter, are required to earn grades of C or higher in all 
courses tal<en within the ENSP core, in all required courses, and restricted 
electives of the selected area of concentration. 



Advising 



Advising is mandatory each semester. Before registering, students should 
contact the Associate Director of ENSP to discuss the program 
requirements and options, and to explore their interests in possible areas 
of concentration. 

Course Code: ENSP 



FAMILY STUDIES (FMST) 

College of Health and Human Performance 

1204 Marie Mount Hall, 301405-3672 

www , umd.edu/ fmst 

Professor and Chair: Koblinsky 

Professors: Epstein, Hofferth 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Leslie, Mol<htari, Myricks, Randolph, 

Rubin, Wallen 

Assistant Professors: Braun, Kim, La Taillade, Walker 

Instructors: Werlinich 

Lecturer: Davis 

Undergraduate Coordinator: Oravecz 

The Major 

The major in Family Studies emphasizes an understanding of the family as 
the primary social institution linking individuals to their world. The program 
has three interrelated foci: 1) the family as a unique and dynamic social 
unit, 2) individual and family development throughout the life span, and 3) 
the relationship of the family to its larger socio-cultural, historical, political 
and economic context. Courses examine family dynamics, changing family 
structures, ethnic families, intergenerational relations, family crises, family 
violence, family policy, legal problems, and family economics. 

Students study prevention and intervention strategies for combating family 
problems. The reciprocal relationships between families and the social 
policies, practices and management of institutions and organizations are 
examined. The curriculum prepares students for careers in human services, 
human resource management, family life education, public policy and 
related positions emphasizing the family. Opportunities exist in public, 
private and non-profit agencies and institutions working with family 
members, entire family units or family issues. Graduates are also prepared 
for graduate study in the family sciences, family therapy, human services 
administration, health, law, social work, human resource management and 
other social and behavioral science disciplines and professions. 

Curriculum 

(a) Major subject area: A grade of C or better is required in these 
courses. 

FMST 302-Research Methods (3) 

FMST 330-FamilyTheories and Patterns (3) 

FMST 332-Children in Families (3) 

FMST 381— Poverty, Affluence, and Families (3) 

FMST 383— Delivery of Human Services to Families (3) 

FMST 432— Intergenerational Aspects of Family Living (3) 

FMST 477— Internship and Analysis in Family Studies (3) 

FMST 487-Legal Aspects of Family Problems (3) 

(b) Six additional departmental credits must be selected from any other 
FMST courses, with the exception of independent study (FMST 399, 
FMST 498) and field work (FMST 386, FMST 387). Must receive a 
grade of C or better. FMST 105 and FMST 298F cannot be used to 
meet this requirement unless they are taken before the student 
completes 56 credits. 

(c) Additional courses. Required of all majors. All students must earn 
a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward completion of 
the major. 

FMST 290-Family Economics (3) 

or ECON 200— Principles of Microeconomics (4) 

or ECON 201— Principles of Macroeconomics (4) 
EDMS 451-lntroduction to Educational Statistics (3) 

or STAT 100-Elementary Statistics and Probability (3) 
SOCY 100-lntroduction to Sociology (3) 

or SOCY 105— Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems (3) 
PSYC 100-lntroduction to Psychology (3) 
COMM 100— Foundations of Speech Communication (3) 

or COMM 107— Speech Communication: Principles and Practices (3) 

or COMM 125— Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

Course Code: FMST 



FINANCE 

For infonnation, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 6. 



Fire Protection Engineering 115 



FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING (ENFP) 
A. James Clark School of Engineering 

0151 Martin Hall, 301-405-3992 
www.enfp.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: DiMarzo 

Associate Chair: Milke 

Professors: Brannigan, Quintiere 

Associate Professors: Milke, Mowrer, Trouve 

Assistant Professor: Marshall 

Lecturers (part-time): Gagnon, Koffel, Simone 

Emeriti: Bryan, Spivac 

Adjunct Professor: Kashiwagi 

The Major 

Fire Protection Engineering is concerned with the applications of scientific 
and technical principles to the growth, mitigation, and suppression of fire. 
This includes the effects of fire on people, on structures, on commodities, 
and on operations. The identification of fire hazards and their risk, relative 
to the cost of protection, is an important aspect of fire safety design. 

The practice of fire protection engineering has developed from the 
implementation and interpretation of codes and standards directed at fire 
safety These safety codes contain technical information and prescriptions 
derived from experience and research. Research has also led to quantitative 
methods to assess aspects of fire and fire safety. Thus, fire protection 
engineers need to be versed in the current technical requirements for fire 
safety and in the scientific principles that underlie fire and its interactions. 

The fire protection engineering student receives a fundamental engineering 
education involving the subjects of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. 
The program builds on other core engineering subjects of materials, fluid 
mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer with emphasis on principles 
and phenomena related to fire. Fluid mechanics includes applications to 
sprinkler design, suppression systems, and smoke movement. Heat transfer 
introduces the student to principles of evaporation for liquid fuels. The 
subject of combustion is introduced involving premixed and diffusion flames, 
ignition and flame spread, and burning processes. Laboratory experience is 
gained by being exposed to standard fire tests and measurements. Design 
procedures are emphasized for systems involving suppression, detection, 
alarm, and building safety requirements. The background and application of 
codes and standards are studied to prepare the student for practice in the 
field. System concepts of fire safety and methods of analysis are presented. 
A senior design or research project is required which gives the student an 
opportunity to explore issues beyond the normal classroom environment. 

In general, the curriculum is designed to give the student a grounding in the 
science and practice of fire safety The field touches on many disciplines 
and its scientific basis is expanding. It is an engineering discipline that is 
still growing, and offers a variety of excellent career opportunities. These 
cover a wide spectrum involving safety assessment reviews, hazards 
analysis and research, loss prevention and regulatory issues. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Freshman Year Fall Spring 

CORE Program Requirements (IncI ENGL 101) 3 6 

CHEM 135— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

MATH 140, 141-Analysis I, II 4 4 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

PHYS 151-General Physics I 3 

ENFP 108 (optional)- Hot Topics in Fire 

Total 13 16 

Sophomore Year 

CORE Requirements (incl. Diversity Courses) 3 3 

MATH 240-Linear Algebra or 4 

MATH 241-Analysis III 

MATH 246- Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 260, 270-General Physics II, III 4 4 

ENES 221, 220- Dyriamics/ Mechanics of Materials 3 3 

ENFP 251 — Introduction to Fire Protection Engineering 3 

ENFP 255— Fire Alarm and Special Hazards Design 3 

Total 17 16 

Junior Year 

CORE Requirements 3 3 

ENME 320-Thermodynamics* 3 



ENFP 300-Fire Protection Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENFP 310— Water Based Fire Protection Systems Design 3 

ENFP 312-Heatand Mass Transfer 3 

ENFP 320— Fire Assessment Methods and Laboratory 4 

ENFP 350— Professional Development Seminar 1 

General Elective -see advisor for details 3 

Approved Electives 

(STAT, ENFP, ENES, ENXX)*n 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

CORE Requirements 3 

ENFP 405-Structural Fire Protection 3 

ENFP 411-Fire Protection Hazard Analysis 3 

ENFP 415-Fire Dynamics 3 

ENFP 416— Problem Synthesis and Design 3 

ENFP 421-Life Safety and Risk Analysis 3 

ENFP 425-Fire Modelling 3 

Approved Electives 

(STAT, ENFP, ENES, ENXX)**1 3 3 

Total 15 12 

Total Credit Hours 122 

*ENME 320 is fornon-ME majors. ENME 232 is usually forME majors, but 

maybe substitued w/ permission. 

** At least 3 credits (1 course) of approved electives must be in ENFP. 

3 credits (1 course) must also either be a statistics, mathematics or 

applied mathematics course. 

An additional chemistry course(s) in organic, analytical or physical 

chemistry is recommended. 

See the department for an additional listing of approved electives. 

Admission 

Admission requirements are identical to those set by the A. James Clark 
School of Engineering. (See A. James Clark School of Engineering section 
in chapter 6.) 

Advising 

Mandatory advising by department faculty is required of all students every 
semester. Students schedule their advising appointments in the 
department Office, 0151 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301405-3992. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Part-time and summer professional experience opportunities and paid 
internship information is available in the department Office, 0151 
Glenn L. Martin Hall. See your advisor or the Coordinator: J. Milke, 301- 
405-3992. 

Financial Assistance 

Numerous scholarships and grants are available to students in the 
department from organizational and corporate sponsors. Information is 
available on eligibility, financial terms and retention criteria in the 
department Office. The majority of the scholarships are for junior and 
senior students, but some scholarships are available for first- and second- 
year students. Also refer to our web site atwww.enfp.umd.edu. 

Honors and Awards 

Academic achievement awards are sponsored by the department and the student 
professional-honor societies. These awards are presented at the annual A. James 
Clark School of Engineering Honors Convocation. Eligibility criteria for these awards 
are available in the department Office. Qualified students in the department are 
eligible for participation in the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering honors program. 



Student Organizations 



The departmental honor society. Salamander, is open to academically 
eligible junior and senior students. The University of Maryland student 
chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers is the professional 
society for all interested students in the department. Student membership 
in the National Fire Protection Association is available too. Information on 
these organizations may be obtained from current members in the student 
lounge, 1123 Engineering Laboratory Building, 301-405-3992. 

Course code: ENFP 



116 Food Science Program 



FOOD SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Please see entry for Nutrition and Food Science later in this chapter. 

FRENCH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES (FRIT) 

For more information, consult School of Language, Literature, and Cultures 
elsewhere in this chapter. 



The required courses for geography majors are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Primary Courses (GEOG 201, 202, 211, 212) 8 

An upper-level physical geography course 3 

An upper-level human geography course 3 

An upper-level geographic technique course 3 

Upper-level geography electives 15 

Quantitative Methods or Statistics 

(e.g. GEOG 305 or its equivalent 3 

Total 35 



GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2181 LeFrakHall, 3014054050 
www.geog.umd.edu 

Chair: Townshend 

Associate Chair: Cirrincione 

Professors: Christian, Dubayah, Goward, J ustice. Prince, Townshend 

Associate Professors: Brodsky, Cirrincione* (Curriculum and Instruction), 

DeFries* (ESSIC), Geores, Kasischke, Kearney Liang 

Assistant Professors: Albrecht, Dibble, Kleidon 

Lecturers: Eney Kinerney Zlatic 

Professors Emeritus: Harper, Thompson, Wiedel 

Adjunct Faculty: Douglas, Foresman, Goetz, Izzauralde, Morisette, 

Ramasubramanian, Roseberg, Townsend, Tucker, Walthall, Williams 

*J oint appointment with unit indicated. 

The Major 

The Department of Geography offers programs of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Many students find that the multiple 
perspectives of geography form an excellent base for a liberal arts 
education. The abilities to write clearly and to synthesize information and 
concepts are valued highly in geographical education and practice. 
Students of geography must master substantive knowledge either in the 
physical/ natural sciences or in the behavioral/ social sciences in addition 
to methodological knowledge. Some advanced geography courses, such as 
geomorphology and climatology are physical science oriented; economic 
geography urban systems, and population geography focus on the social 
sciences, while environmental studies, ecology, and the geography of 
human dimensions of global change combine the two. International 
interests are best pursued with complementary study in foreign languages 
and area studies. 

The central question in geographical study is "where?" Geographers 
research locational questions of the natural environment, of social and 
economic systems, and of past human activity on the land. Students of 
geography must master a variety of techniques that are useful in locational 
analysis, including computer applications and mapping, map making or 
cartography, air-photo interpretation and remote sensing, field observation, 
statistical analysis, and mathematical modelling. 

Increasingly, geographers apply their combined methodological and 
substantive l<nowledge towards the solution of society's problems. Some 
graduates find geography to be an excellent background for careers in 
defense and intelligence, journalism, law, travel and tourism, the nonprofit 
sector, and business and management. Most professional career positions 
in geography require graduate training. Many geographers take positions in 
scientific research, planning, management and policy analysis for both 
government and private agencies. 

Major Requirements Including Program Options 

Within any of the specializations available in the geography major program 
it is possible for students to adjust their programs to fit their individual 
interests. The geography major totals 35 semester hours. In addition to the 
35 semester hours, the geography major is required to take an additional 
15 semester hours of supporting course work outside of the department. 
The hours can be either in one department or in an area of specialization. 
An area of specialization requires that a written program of courses be 
reviewed and placed on file by the department adviser. See Advising Office, 
Lefrak 2108, 301-405-8085, e-mail geog-advise@umd.edu, web page: 
www.geog.umd.edu. Supporting courses generally are related to the area of 
specialty in geography The pass-fail option is not applicable to major or 
supporting courses. A minimum grade of C in each course is required for 
major and supporting courses. 



Geography Primary Courses 

The following four courses provide the initial base of the Geography 
Program: 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems 3 

GEOG 202-The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 211 — Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

GEOG 212-The World in Cultural Perspective Lab 1 

Upper-Level Elective 

At least one upper-level course each in physical geography, human 
geography, and geographic technique is required regardless of the 
speciality of the individual student's program. These courses build on the 
initial base provided by the Primary Courses, and also serve as the basis 
for selection of upper-level geography courses. 

Suggested Program of Study for Geography 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year 

ENGLlOl-lntroduction to Writing 3 

MATH 110-Elementary Mathematical Models 3 

or MATH 115-Precalculus 

University CORE Distributive Studies 24 

(To be chosen from the three categories of Humanities -Arts, 
Math-Sciences, and Social Sciences) 

Sophomore Year 

University CORE Distributive Studies 4 

(To be chosen from Math-Sciences lecture-laboratory courses) 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems 3 

GEOG 202-The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 211 — Geography of Environmental Systems Lab 1 

GEOG 212-The World in Cultural Perspective Lab 1 

Quantitative Methods (GEOG 305 or its equivalent) 3 

Electives 15 

Junior Year 

ENGL 391 3 

CORE Advanced Studies 3 

Advanced Human Geography 3 

Advanced Physical Geography 3 

Advanced Technique Geography 3 

Geography Upper-Level Elective 3 

Electives 12 

Senior Year 

Geography Upper-Level Electives 12 

Electives 18 

Total 120 

Introduction to Geography 

The 100-level geography courses are general education courses for 
persons who have had no previous contact with the discipline in high 
school or for persons planning to take only one course in geography. They 
provide general overviews of the field or in one of its major topics. Credit 
for these courses is not applied to the major. 

Related Programs 

Geographic Information Science/ Computer Cartography Program 

The Geography Department offers an important area of specialization: GIS 
and Computer Cartography. The Bachelor of Science degree program in 
Geographic Information Science and Computer Cartography is designed to 



Geology 117 



give students the technical sl<ills needed to acquire, manage and analyze 
very large amounts of geographic data. Students will get extensive computer 
training in digital processing of remote sensing observations and cartographic 
vector data, spatial analysis, and the display of information products. Almost 
everything we do involves geographic information, from deciding where to live 
and travel, to environmental monitoring and urban planning. Influenced by 
computer technology, the academic disciplines of geographic information 
science such as remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), and 
computer cartography have evolved dramatically in the past few decades. 
Remote sensing is the science of obtaining geographic information from 
aircraft and satellites. GIS technology manages and analyzes different forms 
of digital geographic data, and this field has been growing at an extraordinary 
rate. Computer cartography has revolutionized traditional cartography to vastly 
improve map mal<ing and visualization of geographic information in a 
multimedia environment. 

Students concentrating in GIS/ Cartography must take the Geography 
Primary courses, totalling eight hours: one upper-level course in physical 
geography, and one in human geography plus six hours of systematic 
electives, totalling 12 hours; and Cartography/ Geographic technique 
courses, totalling 15 hours. Supporting area courses must be taken from a 
list provided by the department. All math programs should be approved by a 
departmental adviser. 

Geography and Social Studies Education Double Major 

In conjunction with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the 
Geography Department offers a special 121 credit hours program for 
students wishing to double major in Geography and Social Studies 
Education - Geography Concentration, allowing them to teach geography at 
the secondary level. Early examination of requirements is encouraged to 
reduce the number of additional hours required. In addition to the 
Geography Departments required credits, the program requires 28 credit 
hours of course work in history and the social sciences. For a list of 
requirements, contact the Geography Undergraduate Advising Office. 
Requirements are also listed under the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction Social Studies Education - Geography Concentration double 
major option. 

Citations 

Citation in Geograpliic information Science (GiS) 

13 credit hours. GEOG 201, GEOG 211, GEOG 371, GEOG 372, GEOG 
373. See undergraduate advising office for details, LeFrak Hall 2108, 301- 
4054073. 

Internsllip Opportunities 

The department offers a one-semester internship program for 
undergraduates (GEOG 384 and 385). The goal of the program is to 
enhance undergraduates' intellectual growth and career opportunities. The 
internship provides an opportunity for the students to expand their 
understanding of the field by linking the theoretical aspects of geography 
acquired in the classroom to the applied aspects operating in a practice 
situation. The internship program is open only to geography juniors and 
seniors. All interns must have completed the following prerequisites: GEOG 
201/211, 202/212, 305 or its equivalent, and the upper-level writing 
requirement. An application form from the undergraduate geography adviser 
must be submitted one semester before the internship is desired. See 
undergraduate advising office, 2108 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-4073 for 
information. 

Honors 

For information on the geography honors program, contact the 
undergraduate adviser. 

Student Organizations 

Gamma Theta Upsilon, the geography undergraduate organization, operates 
a program of student-sponsored talks and field trips. 

Course Code: GEOG 



GEOLOGY (GEOL) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1115 Geology Building, 3014054365 
www .geol.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Brown 

Professors: Candela, Chang, Rudnick, Walker, Wyliet 

Associate Professors: McDonough, Prestegaard, Ridky, Stifel (emeritus) 

Assistant Professors: Farquhar, Jiang, Kaufman, Lower 

Adjunct Professor: Zen 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Luhr, McLellan, Shirey, Sorensen 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Bohike, Hanchar 

Assistant Research Scientists: Becker, Friedmann, Piccoli, Tomascak 

Lecturers: Holtz, Merck 

Affiliate Faculty: Busalacchi, Fahnestock 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

The Major 

Geology is the science of the Earth. In its broadest sense, geology concerns 
itself with planetary formation and subsequent modification, with emphasis 
on the study of planet Earth. Geologists study Earth's internal and surficial 
structure and materials, the chemical and physical processes acting within 
and on the Earth, and utilize the principles of mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and biology to understand our planet and its environments. 

Geological Studies encompass all the physical, chemical, and biological 
aspects of Earth. Increasingly, geologists are taking a holistic approach in 
the collection and interpretation of data about the Earth, which means that 
the wider context of the geological sciences is broad and diverse. In 
studying the Earth as a system, we are concerned with geology and 
geophysics, hydrology, oceanography and marine science, meteorology and 
atmospheric science, planetary science, and soil science. A major in any 
relevant discipline can lead to a satisfying career within the geological 
sciences. In general, graduate training is expected for advancement to the 
most rewarding positions and for academic employment. 

Geologists are employed by governmental, industrial, and academic 
organizations. Geologists work in exploration for new mineral and 
hydrocarbon resources, as consultants on engineering and environmental 
projects, as teachers and researchers in universities, and in many other 
challenging positions. For many, the attraction of a career in geology is the 
ability to divide time between work in the field, the laboratory, and the 
office. Although the employment outlook within geology varies with the 
global economic climate, the long-range outlook is good. This is because 
our dwindling energy, mineral, and water resources, along with increasing 
concerns about natural hazards and environmental issues, present new 
challenges for geologists. 

The Geology Program at Maryland includes a broad range of undergraduate 
courses to accommodate both Geology majors and students within the 
Environmental Science and Policy Program. Within the Geology major, a 
requirement exists for a senior undergraduate research project to be 
performed under the direction of a faculty adviser. This requirement 
provides invaluable experience in writing proposals and reports, gathering, 
analyzing and evaluating data, and delivering scientific talks. In addition, 
a Departmental Honors Program and a combined B.S./M.S. Program 
are available. 

Requirements for the Geology Major, Professional Track 

The geology curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of industry, 
graduate school, and government. For the B.S. degree, the students are 
required to complete the departmental requirements (49 credits) and the 
supporting requirements (23/24 credits) in addition to the CORE (general 
education) Program requirements. The department requires that to receive 
a degree in Geology, students must have a grade of C or better in the 
required Geology Courses, and an average of C or better in the Supporting 
Courses. 

Courses required for the B.S. in Geology are listed below, Some courses 
require field trips for which the students are expected to pay for room (if 
required) and board. Field camp is taken during the summer at institutions 
other than the University of Maryland, College Park, that offer camps 
approved by the department. 



118 Geology 



Semester 

Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements* 46 

Geology Courses 

One of the following: 4 

GEOL 100/110-Physical Geology and Laboratory 

GEOL 120/110— Environmental Geologyand Lab 

GEOL 102- Historical Geology 4 

GEOL 322- Mineralogy 4 

GEOL 340— Geomorphology 4 

GEOL 341- Structural Geology 4 

GEOL 342— Stratigraphy and Sedimentation 4 

GEOL 393-Technical Writing 3 

GEOL 394- Research Problems 3 

GEOL 445- Geochemistry 3 

GEOL 451- Groundwater 3 

GEOL 423- Optical Mineralogy 3 

GEOL 443- Petrology 4 

GEOL 490-Field Camp 6 

49 

Supporting Courses 

CHEM 103-General Chemistryl 4 

CHEM 113-General Chemistry II 4 

MATH 140-Calculus I 4 

MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

PHYS 141-General Physics 4 

One of the following 3-4 

PHYS 142-General Physics 

BIOM 301-lntroduction to Biometrics 

Any upper-level Geology course 

Credit hours-supporting requirement 23-24 

* Of the normal CORE requirements (46 credit hours), at least 13-14 credits 
are met by the major requirements in Mathematics, Chemistry, Geology or 
Physics (Mathematics and the sciences area). 

Requirements for the Geology M ajor, Secondary Education 
Tracic 

The Secondary Education Tracl< in Geology leads to a B. S. Degree in Geology 
with special emphasis on course worl< that helps prepare the student for 
teaching at the secondary school level. Further courseworl< and student 
teaching are required for an education certification. This tracl< also prepares 
the student for worl< as a geologist in government or industry, or for further 
graduate study, although students primarily intending to attend graduate 
school in Geology are advised to choose the Professional Track. 

Relative to the professional Geology track, in the secondary education track 
there is a reduction of two upper-level Geology course requirements, but 
the addition of two Education courses and a Meteorology requirement. 
Further coursework in Education (including student teaching) will be 
required in order to obtain a Maryland State Teaching Certification. 
Although Geology is by nature interdisciplinary, it is recommended that 
students consider taking additional courses in Astronomy Biology and the 
philosophy of science in order to add to their educational breadth. The 
department requires that to receive a degree in Geology students must 
have a grade of C or better in the required Geology Courses, and an 
average of C or better in the Supporting Courses. 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements** 30 

** excluding mathematics, science and one capstone requirement 

Geology Courses 

One of the following: 4 

GEOL 100/110-Physical Geologyand Laboratory 

GEOL 120/110— Environmental Geologyand Lab 

GEOL 102- Historical Geology 4 

GEOL 322- Mineralogy 4 

GEOL 340— Geomorphology 4 

GEOL 341- Structural Geology 4 

GEOL 393-Technical Writing 3 

GEOL 394- Research Problems (Capstone) 3 

GEOL 490-Field Camp 6 



Plus 3 courses selected from: 

GEOL 342— Stratigraphy and Sedimentation 4 

GEOL 445- Geochemistry 3 

GEOL 451- Groundwater 3 

GEOL 423- Optical Mineralogy 3 

GEOL 443- Petrology 4 

Credit hours— Geology requirement 41-43 

Supporting Courses 

METO 200- Weather and Climate 3 

CHEM 103-General Chemistryl 4 

CHEM 113-General Chemistryll 4 

MATH 140-Calculus I 4 

MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

PHYS 141-General Physics 4 

Credit hours— supporting requirement 23 

Education Courses 

6 credits chosen from the following: 

EDPL 301 — Foundations of Education 3 

OR EDPL 401— Educational Technology Policy, and Social Change 3 

EDHD 413- Adolescent Development 3 

EDHD 426— Cognitive and Motivational Basis of Reading I 3 

EDCI 463— Teaching Reading in Content Area II 3 

Credit hours— Education requirement 6 

Recommended: 

ASTR 100 or 101-Astronomy 

BSCI 105 and BSCI 106-Principles of Biologyl and II 

PHIL 250/ HIST 174-Philosophy/ History of Science 

PHYS 142— General Physics, second semester 

The remaining 6 credits of the Education courses listed above 

Combined B.S./ JVl.S. in Geology 

The Combined B.S./M.S. program is designed to permit a superior student 
to earn both the Bachelor's and the Master's degrees following five years 
of study. The combined program is an integrated experience of 
undergraduate and graduate work. Nine credits of graduate courses taken 
as an undergraduate can be counted towards both the B.S. and M.S. 
degrees. The master's thesis may be a continuation of work began as part 
of the undergraduate senior thesis. 

Acceptance into the Combined B.S./M.S. normally would occur after the 
end of the sophomore year. The minimum requirements for acceptance into 
this program are similar to those for the Geology Honors program and are: 

1. An overall GPA of at least 3.0 at the end of the sophomore year and a 
GPA of 3.0 or better in all courses required for the major. 

2. At least three letters of recommendation. 

3. An essay or statement of purpose. 

4. An interview with the undergraduate Honors Director and the Graduate 
Director. 

The Combined B.S./M.S. program allows 9 credits of graduate courses 
(600-level or above) to be counted towards both the B.S. and M.S. 
degrees. A grade of "B" or better must be earned in each of these courses. 

Continued progress in the program requires completion of the 
undergraduate curriculum, a GPA of 3.5 or better in GEOL 393 and GEOL 
394, and maintenance of a 3.0 overall GPA and a GPA of 3.0 or better in 
all courses required for the major. The requirements for admission into the 
graduate program must also be met, including receiving acceptable scores 
in the General GRE exam, usually taken during the fall term of the senior 
year. 

Requirements for the M .S. Degree 

There are no changes from the current requirements. Students must 
complete 24 credits of course work approved by the Graduate Committee 
and 6 credits of thesis research and defend a research proposal and a 
thesis. Students in the Combined B.S./M.S. may bring forward up to 9 
credits at the 600 level from their B.S. program. 



Government and Politics 119 



Geology Department Citations 

An Undergraduate Citation recognizes concentrated study in a designated 
field in the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences. The 
award of a Citation will be noted on the student's transcript at the time 
of graduation. 

These citations maybe earned by students not majoring in Geology and are 
administered by the Geology Undergraduate Studies Director. A grade of 
"C" or better must be earned in all courses required for the citation. See 
www.geol.umd.edu for more information. 

Surficial Geology Citation 

Required: GEOL 120/110 (Environmental Geology/ Lab), GEOL 123 (Global 
Change), GEOL 340 (Geomorphology), Plus one of: GEOL 451 (Groundwater 
Geology), GEOL 452 (Wetland & Watershed Hydrology), GEOL 462 
(Geological Remote Sensing) 

Earth Material Properties Citation 

Required: GEOL 100/110 (Physical Geology/ Lab), GEOL 322 (Groundwater 
Mineralogy), Plus two from: GEOL 210 (Gems and Gemstones), GEOL 341 
(Structural Geology), GEOL 423 (Optical Mineralogy), GEOL 443 (Petrology), 
GEOL 445 (Geochemistry) 

Earth History Citation 

Required: GEOL 100/110 (Physical Geology/ Lab), GEOL 102 (Historical 
Geology), Plus two from: GEOL 331 (Invertebrate Paleontology), GEOL 342 
(Sedimentation & Stratigraphy), GEOL 436 (Biogeochemistry) 

Hydrology Citation 

Required: GEOL 100/110 (Physical Geology/ Lab), GEOL 342 
(Sedimentation & Stratigraphy), Plus two from: GEOL 436 
(Biogeochemistry), GEOL 445 (Geochemistry), GEOL 451 (Groundwater 
Hydrology) (3) GEOL 452 (Wetland & Watershed Hydrology) 

All Geology citations are an appropriate disciplinary combination with 
Astronomy Computer Science, Mathematics or Physics majors within the 
CMPS college. The citations are also targeted at majors outside the 
college, with appropriate matches including: 

Geography/ Remote Sensing Students (Surficial Geology) 
Engineering and Material Science students (Earth Material Properties) 
Evolutionary Biology and Physical Anthropology students (Earth History) 
Biology Biological Diversity and Ecology students (Hydrology) 

Advising 

The Geology Undergraduate Studies Director serves as the advisor for the 
geology majors, 1119 Geology Building, 3014054379. 

Honors 

Admission to the Program is by invitation of the Honors Committee, 
normally at the end of the sophomore year and normally will be extended to 
students with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better and a GPA of 3.0 or better in 
all courses required for the major. 

Graduation with Honors normally requires completion of the curriculum, a 
GPA of 3.5 or better in GEOL 393H and GEOL 394H, and maintenance of a 
3.0 overall GPA and a GPA of 3.0 or better in all courses required for the 
major. Maintenance of a GPA of 3.5 or above and a grade of A in both 
GEOL 393H and GEOL 394H will earn the distinction of Graduation with 
High Honors. 

The curriculum for Honors in Geology follows the University Honors Program 
Track I: Thesis Option with a 15 credit minimum. 

1. The requirement for upper division Honors courses will be met by a 
minimum of 9 hours as follows: 

a. GEOL 489H Recent Advances in Geology (3 credit hours), and 

b. 6 credit hours from the following: 

i) a 3 credit hour graduate-level course approved by the 
Departmental Honors Committee, 



11) Honors Option project in a three or four credit hour upper-level course 
from the offerings in the Geology Department. The Honors Option 
Proposal must be approved by the Departmental Honors Committee, 
the professor teaching the course and the University Honors Program. A 
proposal must be approved by the Department and submitted to the 
University Honors Program by the 10th day of class in the semester in 
which the course will be tal<en and the project completed. 

2. The research and thesis requirement will be met by completion of GEOL 
393H and GEOL 394H with a GPA of 3.5 or better (6 credit hours). 

Honors and Awards 

Bengt Svenonius Memorial Scholarship for graduating senior with the 
highest overall scholastic average; Fernow Memorial Faculty Field Camp 
Awards for geology majors to attend geology summer camp; Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon Award for a senior in geology for Outstanding Scholastic 
Achievement and service to the Society; and Best Senior Research Award. 

Student Organizations 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon, National Honor Society for Earth Sciences, and the 
Geology Club. 

Course Code: GEOL 



GERMANIC STUDIES (GERM) 

For more information, consult School of Language, Literature, and Cultures 
elsewhere in this chapter. 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (GVPT) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

3140 Tydings Hall, 3014054156 

www .bsos.umd.edu/ gvpt 

Professor and Chair: Lichbach 

Professors: Alford''', Alperovitz, Barber, Butterworth''', Elkin, Franda, Gimpel, 

GlassT, Graber, Heisler, Hernson, Lichbach, OppenheimerT, Pearson, 

Pirages, Quester, Terchek, Telhami, Tismaneanu''', Usianer, Walters* 

(JM Burns Academy of Leadership) 

Associate Professors: Conca, Davenport, Haufler, Kaminski, Lalman, 

Mcintosh, Morris, Schreurs, Soltan, Swistak, Williams, Wilson* (African 

American Studies) 

Assistant Professors: Grob, Kastner, Kaufmann, Kim, Schwedler 

Instructor: Vietri 

'''Distinguished ScholarTeacher 

*J oint Appointment with unit indicated 

The Department of Government and Politics offers programs for the general 
student as well as for students who are interested in careers in 
government, the public sector, politics, foreign assignments, teaching, a 
variety of graduate programs, and law schools. Satisfactory completion of 
requirements leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in government and politics. 

The study of politics is both an ancient discipline and a modern social 
science. The origin of the discipline can be traced back to the earliest 
times when philosophers, statesmen, and citizens studied the nature of 
government, justice, responsibility and the consequences of political action. 
More recently the study of politics has also emphasized scientific analysis 
and methods of observations about politics. Today the discipline reflects a 
broad effort to collect data about politics and governments utilizing 
relatively new techniques developed by all of the social sciences. 

The Department of Government and Politics combines philosophical and 
scientific concerns in its overall program as well as in specific courses. It 
emphasizes such broad areas as political development, policy analysis, 
social justice, political economy conflict, and human rights. These broad 
conceptual areas are integral components of study in the discipline. The 
areas are commonly referred to as American government and politics; 
comparative government; political theory; international relations; public 
administration; public law; public policy and political behavior. 



120 Hearing and Speech Sciences 



Majoring in Government and Politics 
and the Academic Review 

Government and Politics is a limited enrollment program that has special 
requirements for admission, such as minimum GPA guidelines and required 
courses. Students planning on transferring into the major should contact the 
department for details on Limited Enrollment requirements. Students admitted 
as incoming freshman will have their academic review after 45 credits. 

Requirements for Major 

Government and Politics majors must complete 36 semester hours of GVPT 
courses with a minimum grade of C in each course. At least 18 of the 36 
credits must be in upper-level courses and all majors are required to 
complete GVPT 100, GVPT 170, and GVPT 241. 

In addition, all majors must complete ECON 200, an approved sl<ills option 
(a foreign language or three quantitative courses from a select list), and a 
secondary area of concentration in another department or approved 
interdisciplinary area. All courses used to satisfy these requirements must 
be completed with a minimum grade of C. 

Honors Program 

All students majoring in government may apply for admission to the GVPT 
Honors Program. Additional information concerning the Honors Program 
may be obtained at the department offices. 

Internships 

The department offers students a variety of internship experiences. Only 
nine hours of graded GVPT internship credit will apply to the 36 hours 
needed in the major. Internship credit graded on a pass/ fail basis may not 
be used to satisfy the GVPT major requirements. In no case may more than 
12 internship credits be counted towards the 120 credits needed to 
graduate. Internships are generally open only to GVPT majors with junior 
standing and a 3.0 GPA. 

Advising 

Academic advising is available daily on a wall<-in or appointment basis in 
the Undergraduate Advising Office, 1155 Tydings Hall. 

Course Code: GVPT 



HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCES (HESP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

0100 LefrakHall, 3014054214 
www.bsos.umd.edu/ hesp/ 

Professor and Chair: Ratner 

Professors: Gordon-Salant, McCall (Emeritus), Yeni-Komshian (Emerita) 

Associate Professors: Roth 

Assistant Professors: Fitzgerald, Haarmann, Newman 

Instructors: Antonisse, Asl<ew, Banson, Brewer, Davis, Fitzgibbons, Frattali, 

Handy, McCabe, Palmer, Parl<, Perlroth, Samlan, Sherlocl<, Sissl<in, 

Sl<inl<er, Sonies, Wijisinghe, Worthington, Zaiewski 

Affiliate Professor: Stone 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Chi-Fishman 

Adjunct Professor: Grafman 

The Major 

Hearing and speech sciences is an inherently interdisciplinary field, 
integrating knowledge from the physical and biological sciences, medicine, 
psychology, linguistics, and education in order to understand human 
communication and its disorders. The department curriculum leads to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. An undergraduate major in this field is an 
appropriate background for graduate training in Speech-Language Pathology 
or Audiology, as well as for graduate work in other disciplines requiring a 
knowledge of normal or disordered speech language, or hearing. The 
student who wishes to work professionally as a speech-language 
pathologist or audiologist must obtain a graduate degree in order to meet 
national certification requirements, and most state licensure laws. 



The hearing and speech sciences curriculum is designed in part to provide 
supporting course work for majors in related fields, so most course 
offerings are available to both departmental majors and non-majors. 
Permission of instructor may be obtained for waiver of course prerequisites 
for non-majors wishing to take hearing and speech courses of interest. 

Requirements for M ajor 

A student majoring in hearing and speech sciences must complete 33 
semester hours of required courses (HESP 120, 202, HESP 300, HESP 
305, HESP 311, HESP 400, HESP 402, HESP 403, HESP 404, or HESP 
406, HESP 407 and HESP 411) and six semester hours of electives in the 
department to satisfy major course requirements. No course with a grade 
less than C may count toward major course requirements. In addition to the 
36 semester hours needed for a major, 9 semester hours of supporting 
courses in statistics and other related fields are required. For these 12 
hours, a C average is required. In addition, when a HESP course has a listed 
pre-requisite, this pre-requisite must have been completed with a grade of C 
or better before registration in the subsequent course will be approved. 

A guide to the major is available through the department office in room 0100 
Lefrak or on the departmental website at www.bsos.umd.edu/ hesp/ 

Course sequencing is extremely important within this major. Advising for 
majors is mandatory. 

Required courses for the HESP major: 

HESP 202— Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences 3 

HESP 120— Introduction to Linguistics 3 

PSYC 100-lntroduction to Psychology 3 

HESP 300— Introduction to Psycholinguistics 3 

HESP 305— Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism 3 

HESP 311— Anatomy Physiology and Pathology of the Auditory System ...3 

HESP 400— Speech and Language Development in Children 3 

HESP 402— Speech Pathology I: Language Disorders in Children 3 

HESP 403— Introduction to Phonetic Science 3 

HESP 404— Speech Pathology II: Voice and Fluency Disorders 3 

OR 

HESP 406— Speech Pathology III: Aphasia and neuromotor disorders 3 

HESP 407-Bases of Hearing Science 3 

HESP 411 — Introduction to Audiology 3 

Electives— Students must take six credits from the following offerings: 

HESP 386— Experiential Learning 3 

HESP 417— Principles and Methods in Speech Language 

Pathology and Audiology 3 

HESP 418— Clinical Practice in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology3 

HESP 420— Deafness and sign language 3 

HESP 422— Neurological bases of human communication 3 

HESP 423— Phonetics for teachers of English as a second language 3 

HESP 469— Honors thesis research 3 

HESP 498— Seminar in Hearing and Speech Sciences (topics vary) 3 

HESP 499- Independent Study 3 

Allied/ Related Fields (12 credits): 

In addition to a required statistics course, the student will take six 
credits from course offerings in Allied/ Related Fields and PSYC 100. A full 
list of these offerings is available in the Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Department undergraduate guide. 

Departmental Honors 

An Honors option in HESP is available to students. This option must be 
declared prior to the junior year, and requires a 3.5 or higher GPA overall 
and in HESP coursework. For specific information on procedures for 
completing the Honors option, consult the Undergraduate Director or the 
department guide. 

Advising 

Information on advising for hearing and speech sciences may be obtained 
by calling the department office, 301-405-4214. An undergraduate program 
guide is available through the department office at 0100 Lefrak, or on the 
web at www.bsos.umd.edu/ hesp/ 



History 121 



Special Opportunities 

The Department operates a sizeable Hearing and Speech Clinic (301405- 
4218) and an award-winning language enrichment preschool, the LEAP 
program. Both serve the campus and greater metropolitan area, and 
provide in-house opportunities for clinical observation and training. The 
department facilities also include a number of well-equipped speech, 
language and hearing research laboratories. 

Student Organizations 

Hearing and speech majors are invited to join the department branch of the 
National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA). 

Course Code: HESP 



c. sample both regional and topical course offerings. Students will 
normally take one or more introductory courses within their 
major area of concentration. 

Major Area of Concentration 

1. The requirement is 15 hours. 

2. Students may choose an area of concentration that is either 
geographic, chronological, or thematic. Areas include: 

a. Geographic regions: Latin America, Middle East, Britain and 
Western Europe, the United States, East Asia, Africa, Eastern 
Europe and Russia; 

b. Chronological periods; ancient, medieval, early modern, 
and modern 

c. Themes: science and technology social and cultural, women 
and gender, African American, Jewish military, religious 
business, and economic. 



HISTORY (HIST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2115 Francis Scott KeyHall, 3014054265 
www.umd.edu/ ARHU/ Depts/ History/ 

Professor and Chair: Lampe 

Distinguished University Professors: Berlin, Brush, Gilbert, Harlant 

(Emeritus) 

Professors: Bedos-Rezal<, Belz, Callcott (Emeritus), Cockburn (Emeritus), 

Colet (Emeritus), Eckstein, Evans (Emeritus), Foust (Emeritus), Friedel, 

Gerstle, Gordon (Emeritus), Gullickson, Harris, Henrettat, Herf, Holum, 

Jashemskit (Emerita), Kent (Emeritus), Michel, A. Olsont, K. Olson, Price, 

Rozenblit, Smith (Emeritus), Sutherland, Vaughan, Warren (Emeritus), 

Weinstein, Wright (Emeritus), Yaney (Emeritus), Zhang 

Associate Professors: Barkley Brown, Breslow (Emeritus), Cooperman, 

M. David-Fox, Flack, Grimsted, Landau, Lapin, Majeska (Emeritus), Mayo, 

Moss, Muncy Palmie, Ridgway, Rowland, Sicilia, Sumida, Williams, Zilfi 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Como, K. David-Fox, Gao, Gordon, Lyons, Mar 

Adjunct: Carr, Papenfuse 

Affiliate: Darden, Moses, Struna 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the student's cultural 
background through the study of history and to provide preparation for 
those interested in law, publishing, teaching, journalism, civil service, 
military, museum work, archival and library work, diplomacy, business 
school, and graduate study 

Undergraduate advisers assist each major in planning a curriculum to meet 
his or her personal interests. We encourage students to meet with an 
adviser, both in the department and in the College of Arts and Humanities, 
once every semester. 

The department sponsors a History Undergraduate Association 
which majors and other interested students are encouraged to join. It 
also sponsors Phi Alpha Theta, study-abroad programs, and experiential 
learning (internships). 

Requirements for JVlajor 

Requirements for the History major are 39 hours of history course work 
distributed as follows: 12 hours in 100-200 level introductory courses 
selected from at least two general geographical fields of history and 
including History 208; 15 hours in one major area of concentration (see 
below); nine hours of history in at least two major areas other than the area 
of concentration; History 408. All courses for the major must be completed 
with a minimum grade of C, and 21 hours of the 39 total hours must be at 
the junior-senior (300400) level. 

At least one course (three credits), must be taken from an approved list of 
courses on regions outside both Europe and the U.S. The list may be 
obtained from the History Undergraduate Adviser's Office. 

I. Introductory Courses 

1. The requirement is 12 hours at the 100-200 level taken in at least 
two geographical fields. 

2. One of these must be History 208. 

3. In considering courses that will fulfill this requirement, students are 
encouraged to: 

a. select at least two courses in a sequence 

b. select at least one course before 1500 and one course 
after 1500 



III. Nine Hours of History in at Least Two Areas Outside the Area 
of Concentration 

1. Students are encouraged to select mainly upper-level courses. 

2. Students are encouraged to consider regional diversity. 

IV. Capstone 

History 408 will be taken in the senior year and may be inside or 
outside the area of concentration. 

V. Supporting Courses Outside History 

Nine credits at the 300400 level in appropriate supporting courses; 
the courses do not all have to be in the same department. Supporting 
courses should study some aspect of culture and society as taught by 
other disciplines. A minimum grade of C is required. 

A.P. and I.B. credits are accepted. 

Honors 

The purpose of the Honors Program in History is to allow promising 
undergraduates to develop historical and historiographical skills, in an 
atmosphere that guarantees personal attention and encourages hard work 
and excellence. The program is a four-semester, 12-credit sequence that 
culminates in a senior thesis, a major research paper written under the 
close supervision of a faculty mentor. The program has two phases. In the 
junior year, students are introduced to the problems of history and writing 
at a sophisticated level via two seminars on problems in historiography In 
the senior year, students take two supervised courses in the writing of the 
thesis. The minimum GPA for admission to the History Honors Program 
is 3.3. 

Course Code: HIST 



HORTICULTURE (HORT) 



The Horticulture and Agronomy programs have been reorganized into a 
single major. Natural Resource Sciences (NRSC). See Natural Resource 
Sciences elsewhere in this chapter. (Note: Courses formerly offered as 
HORT and AGRO are now offered as NRSC and PLSC.) 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (INSTITUTE FOR 
CHILD STUDY) (EDHD) 

College of Education 

3304 Benjamin Building, 301405-2827 

www. education, umd.edu/ EDHD 

Chair: Flatter 

Assistant Director/ Institute for Child Study Battle 

Professors: Alexandert, Byrnes, Fox, Guthrie, Killen, Rubin, Tomey-Purta, 

Wentzel, Wigfieldt 

Associate Professors: Flatter, Klein, Marcus, Nettles, Robertson-Tchabo 

Assistant Professors: Azevedo, Cabrera, Druin, Jones-Hardin, Parault, Wang 

Emeriti: Bennett, Dittmant, Eliot, Fein, Gardner, Goering, Green, Hatfield, 

Huebner, Hunt, Matteson, Morgant, Seefeldt, Tyler 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

The Department of Human Development offers: (1) a major in Early 
Childhood Education; (2) undergraduate courses in human development at 
the 200, 300, & 400 levels; (3) graduate programs leading to the M.A., 
M.Ed., Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees and the A.G.S. certificate; and (4) field 



122 Human Resource Management 



experiences and internships to develop competence in applying theory to 
practice in schools and other settings A concentration in life span human 
development and specializations in educational psychology and 
developmental sciences are available at the doctoral level. Faculty research 
in areas such as educational psychology, social, physiological, cognitive 
and moral development, achievement motivation, and early childhood 
education enhance the instructional program. 

Faculty in the Department of Human Development teach courses designed 
for pre-service and in-service teachers in the College of Education as well 
as students seel<ing teaching citations from other departments across 
campus who will worl< with children and adolescents in school settings. 
These courses focus on child and adolescent development, language 
acquisition, cognition, motivation, and reading. In addition, the department 
offers undergraduate courses that help students meet CORE requirements 
and other degree requirements. 

The Institute for Child Study faculty provide consultant services and staff 
development programs for pre-school programs, parent groups, court 
systems, mental health agencies, and other organizations involved with 
helping relationships. Undergraduates and graduate students may 
participate in these programs through course worl< and internships. 

Early Childhood Education 

Director: Corbin 

Graduates of the Early Childhood Education program receive a Bachelor of 
Science degree and meet the requirements for teaching preschool, 
kindergarten and primary grades. 

Requirements for M ajor Including Program Options 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre-professional courses and 
a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may enroll in 
courses identified as part of the professional sequence, they must first gain 
admission to the College of Education's Teacher Education Program. 

Admission 

Application to the Teacher Education Professional Program must be made 
early in the semester prior to beginning professional courses. Admission 
procedures and criteria are explained in the College of Education entry in 
Chapter Six. The Early Childhood program is a Limited Enrollment Program 
(LEP), which admits students on a space-available basis. In addition to the 
College of Education selective admission requirements, early childhood 
majors must meet the following gateway requirements: 

(1) completion of a four-credit CORE laboratory physical science, a four- 
credit CORE laboratory biological science. Elements of Mathematics 
(MATH 210), and Elements of Geometry (MATH 211) with a 
minimum cumulative GPA in these four courses of 2.75 

(2) completion of Exploring Teaching in Early Childhood Education 
(EDHD 220) with a grade of B or better. 

A description of the Early Childhood LEP is included in Chapter 6. Detailed 
information regarding the gateway requirements is available in the Office of 
Student Services, Room 1204 Benjamin. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for all students desiring acceptance into the Teacher 
Education Program. Students will receive advising through individual advising 
appointments held during the early registration period. Information regarding 
the advising appointment schedule will be available each semester in Room 
1117J Benjamin. Wak-in hours are also posted each semester. 

Honors and Awards 



PSYCIOO 3 

Social Science (ANTH, GEOG, GVPT, ECON SOCY) 3 

HIST 155 3 

Biological Science w/lab: BSCI 4 

Physical Science w/ lab: ASTR, CHEM, GEOL, PHYS 4 

EDPL210 orEDPL301 3 

Other Pre-Professional Requirements 

MATH 212 and MATH 213 6 

Creative Art: One of the following: KNES 181, 182, 183, 421, 

THET120, EDCI 301, ARTTIOO or 110, MUSC 155 2-3 

EDHD 220- €xploring Teaching in EC 3 

EDHD210-Foundations ofECE 3 

EDHD 285— Designing Multimedia Computer Environments 

for Learners 3 

EDHD 222— Literature in the Early Childhood Classroom 3 

MATH 214 or STATION orMATH III 3 

Professional Courses 

The Early Childhood Professional Block I starts only in the Fall semester 
and is a prerequisite to Professional Block II. Professional Block III follows 
Professional Block II, and is taken in the Fall semester preceding student 
teaching. An overall grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained after 
admission to Teacher Education. All pre-professional requirements must be 
completed with a minimum grade of C before beginning the Early Childhood 
Professional Blocks. All professional courses must be completed with a 
minimum grade of C prior to student teaching. See advisor for program 
planning. Additional information regarding the requirements for Student 
Teaching is included in the College of Education entry in Chapter Six. 

Professional Block I: (Fall) 

EDHD 415— Social Competence in Young Children 3 

EDHD 425— Language Development and Reading Acquisition 3 

EDHD 419A— Human Development and Learning 3 

Professional Block II: (Spring) 

EDHD 424— Cultural and Community Perspectives 3 

EDHD 314-Readingin the EC Classroom-Part I 3 

EDHD 313— Creative Experiences for the Young Child 3 

EDHD 419B— Human Development and Learning 3 

EDSP 470— Introduction to Special Education 3 

Professional Block III: (Fall) 

EDHD 427— Constructing and Integrating the EC Curriculum 3 

EDHD 323-Children Study Their World 2 

EDHD 321-The Young Child as Scientist 2 

EDHD 322-The Young Child as Mathematician 3 

EDHD 315-Readingin the EC Classroom-Part II 3 

EDHD 435— Effective Components of EC Classrooms 3 

Professional Block IV: (Spring) 

EDHD 432- Student Teaching 12 

EDCI 464— Assessment of Reading 3 

Course Code: EDHD 



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

For information, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 6. 



JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM (JWST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

0112 Holzapfel Hall, 3014054975 

www .iewishstudies.umd.edu 



Early Childhood majors are eligible for the Ordwein Scholarship. Information 
is available in the Office of Student Services, Room 1204, Benjamin. 

Required Courses 

The following courses are required in the program of studies for Early 
Childhood and may also satisfy the University's general education 
requirements. See departmental worksheets and advisors for additional 
information. 



Director: Hayim Lapin 

Professors: Berlin, Rozenblit 

Associate Professors: Cooperman, Lapin, Manekin 

Assistant Professors: J elen, Zakim 

Instructors: Gonen, Levy 

The Major 

The Jewish Studies major provides undergraduates with a framework for 
organized and interdisciplinary study of the history, philosophy, and literature 
of the Jews from antiquity to the present. Jewish Studies draws on a vast 



Journalism 123 



literature in a number of languages, especially Hebrew and Aramaic, and 
includes the Bible, the Talmud, and medieval and modern Hebrew literature. 
Yiddish language and literature comprise an important sub-field. 

Departmental advising is mandatory. 

Requirements for Major 

Requirements for the J ewish Studies major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. The College 
foreign-language requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the process of 
taking Hebrew language courses. The undergraduate major requires 48 
semester hours (27 hours minimum at 300-400 level) in J ewish Studies. 
These courses may include courses offered by J ewish Studies or cross- 
listed byj ewish Studies with the Departments of Asian and East European 
Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy English, Women's Studies, 
and Comparative Literature. 

A minimum grade of C is required in all courses offered toward major 
requirements. A major in Jewish Studies will normally conform to the 
following curriculum: 

1. Prerequisite: HEBR 111, 112, 211, 212 (or placement exam) 

2. Required courses: HEBR 313, 314; J WST 234, 235, and 309; one 
course in classical Jewish literature (200-level; JWST 272 is 
recommended); one upper-level course in Hebrew literature in 
which the text and/ or language of instruction are in Hebrew. (21 
credit hours) 

3. Electives: 15 credits in Jewish Studies courses. At least nine 
credits must be at the 300-400 level. 

4. Twelve credits of supporting courses in areas outside Jewish 
Studies such as history, sociology, philosophy, psychology, or 
literature, including at least six credits at the 300400 level, to be 
selected with the approval of a faculty adviser. 



The Majors 



Citation injewisli Studies 



Requirements: 15 credits in J ewish Studies, at least 9 of which must be at 
the upper level. Students must take 1 course each in Jewish history, 
literature, and thought, and 2 other courses in Jewish Studies. No more 
than 3 credits of lower level language can count toward the Citation. No 
more than 6 credits may be taken at an institution other than UMCP. 
Students must earn at least a "C" in each course. 

Financial Assistance 

The Meyerhoff Center for J ewish Studies [(301) 4054975] offers scholar- 
ships for study in Israel. Applications for scholarships are accepted in early 
March. 

See entries for Department of Asian and East European Languages and 
Cultures and East Asian Studies certificate elsewhere in this chapter. 
Students may also pursue a Jewish History concentration through the 
Department of History. 

Course Code: JWST 



JOURNALISM (JOUR) 



For information, consult the College of Journalism entry in chapter 6. 



KINESIOLOGY (KNES) 

College of Health and Human Performance 

2351 HLHP Building, 301405-2450 
www.hhp.umd.edu/ KNES 

Professor and Chair: Clark 

Associate Chair: Phillips 

Professors: Clark, Ennis, Franks, Hagberg, Hatfield, Hurley, Iso-Ahola 

Associate Professors: Andrews, Chen, Jeka, McDaniel, Phillips, Rogers, 

Rohm -Young 

Assistant Professors: Brown, Contreras-Vidal, Roth, Silk 

Instructors: Brown, Home, Lindle, Montfort, Scott 

Emeriti: Eyier, Dotson, Hult, Humphrey, Husman, Kelley Steel, Wrenn 



The Department of Kinesiology offers two undergraduate degree programs. 
Students may choose to major in Physical Education or in Kinesiological 
Sciences. Brief descriptions of each program follow. Students should obtain 
a current Student Handbook for the degree program of interest (available in 
HHP 2351, HHP 2301 and on the web at www.hhp/ umd.edu/ KNES. Both 
programs require a grade of C or better in all required course- 
work. Departmental contacts are Mr. Joshua Montfort for Physical Education 
(301-405-2502, jmontfor@umd.edu) or Dr. Marvin Scott (301405-2480, 
mwscott@umd.edu) for Kinesiology 

In addition to University general education classes (CORE), the following 
KNES Core classes are required for all majors (both degree programs): 

KNES 287 Sport and American Society 

KNES 293 History of Sport in America 

KNES 300 Biomechanics of Human Motion 

KNES 350 Psychology of Sport 

KNES 360 Exercise Physiology 

KNES 370 Motor Development 

KNES 385 Motor Control and Learning 

Physical Education Major 

The Physical Education degree program is designed to lead to Pre-K-12 
teacher certification in the State of Maryland. Maryland teaching 
certificates are reciprocal with most other states. While this program is 
designed to provide professional preparation for individuals in public school 
settings, it also provides excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue 
other professional opportunities in sport, exercise, or physical activity Also, 
due to the scientific foundation of the degree program, an appropriate 
background is established for future graduate work for those who desire to 
continue their studies in any area involving human movement and sport. 
Many courses require prerequisites and proper sequencing is very 
important. Not all courses are offered every semester. All interested 
students are urged to schedule an advising appointment with the program 
coordinator before declaring this major. Students should consult the 
department for updated information. 

Physical Education Degree Requirements 

University Core (not included elsewhere* ) 27-30 

KNES Core (KNES 287, 293, 300, 350, 360, 370, 385) 22 

Pedagogical Sequence 25 

(KNES 182, 183, 190, 245, 290, 291, 292, 371, 491) 
Supporting courses 21 

( BSCI 105*, BSCI 201*, BSCI 202, KNES 282, 333, 480) 
College of Education requirements 12 

(EDPL 301, EDHD 413, EDHD 426, EDCI 463) 
Student Teaching 15 

(KNES 390, EDCI 485, EDCI 495) 

Minimum total semester hours for this program is 122 credits. 

Admission to the College of Education is required upon completion of 45 
applicable credits. Students must pass the Praxis I exam and have a GPA 
established by the College of Education in order to gain admission. 
Additional information is available from the College of Education. 

Kinesiological Sciences Major 

This program offers students the opportunity to study the interdisciplinary 
body of knowledge related to human physical activity and sport and to 
pursue specific specializations so that each individual can prepare for a 
particular career goal within the broad discipline. There is no intent to 
orient all students toward a particular specialized interest, orientation or 
career. However, many current students are pursuing careers in medically- 
related fields (i.e., physical therapy physician, chiropractory), in the fitness 
industry (i.e., corporate fitness, personal training, health fitness director) 
as well as in the sport industry (sport management, sport marketing, 
events management, equipment sales, athletic director). The program 
provides a hierarchical approach to the study of human movement. First, a 
broad core of knowledge is recognized as being necessary foundations to 
advanced and more specific courses. Secondly, at the "Options" level, 
students select from approved upper level KNES courses which they 
believe will provide the knowledge to pursue whatever future goal they set 
for themselves. To further strengthen specific areas of interest, students 
should carefully select electives. The program culminates with a senior 
seminar class in which students write a substantial paper and discuss the 
implications of research. 



124 Letters and Sciences 



Kinesiological Sciences Degree Requirements 

University Core (not included elsewhere* ) 30 

KNES Core(KNES 287, 293, 300, 350, 360, 370, 385) 22 

Option Courses (all have KNES core prerequisites 12 

(See departmental Bulletin Board, Handbook or web page) 
Other required courses 18 

( BSCI 105*, BSCI 201*, BSCI 202, statistics, KNES 497) 

Physical Activities Courses (see Handbook or web page) 8 

Electives (approximately) 30 

Minimum total semester hours for program = 120 credits, including the 
general education (CORE) program. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for Physical Education majors and strongly 
recommended (but not mandatory) for Kinesiological Sciences majors. 
Students in both majors are encouraged to join the departmental listserv 
(group electronic information) for weekly departmental and campus updates 
and internship/job information. Instructions for joining the listserv are 
available at the Main Office (HHP 2351). Students should also periodically 
check the Bulletin Boards near HHP 2335 for updated information. 
Kinesiological Sciences majors with greater than 90 credits should meet 
with an advisor to review and sign the senior audit. 

Advisors are not assigned, although certain advisors handle issues related 
to policy exceptions, academic difficulties, change of major, athletes, and 
other special cases. Advising appointments are made through the Main 
Office (301-405-2450). Drop-in hours are available during non-peak 
registration times. Advisors can assist with registration procedures, 
program updates. University resources, career guidance, and related 
issues. Students are strongly encouraged to closely follow the program 
sheets that outline the order in which courses should be taken to allow 
proper and timely progression through the degree programs. 

Honors Program 

The departmental Honors Program complements and extends the University 
Honors Program, although the admission to the University program is not 
required to be admitted to the departmental program. The departmental 
Honors Program provides junior and senior students with opportunities to 
engage in extended study, research and discussions with faculty. The 
program requires 18 credits of Honors versions of courses and a thesis, 
which will be defended before a faculty committee. Applicants must have a 
3.5 overall GPA in a minimum of 45 credits and a 3.5 GPA in at least 9 
credits from the Kinesiology Core. The faculty Honors Committee also 
considers leadership, motivation and maturity in the admission decision. 
Qualified students typically apply in the spring semester of the sophomore 
year. To remain in the program after admitted, students must maintain a 
3.5 GPA. Students may graduate with high honors by completing a thesis 
rated as outstanding and earning a cumulative GPA of 3.7 or higher. 
Inquires about the program should be directed to Dr. Don Franks, Honors 
Program Coordinator, at 301405-2357 ordfranks@umd.edu. 

Course Code: KNES 



LETTERS AND SCIENCES (LTSC) 

For information, see entry in Chapter 3. 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (LARC) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2139 Plant Sciences Building, 3014054359 

Program Coordinator: J ack Sullivan jack@umd.edu mdosh@umd.edu 

www.larch.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Chair: R. Weismiller 

Associate Professor and Coordinator: J .B. Sullivan 

Associate Professor: M. Hill 

Assistant Professors: S. Chang, D. Myers 

Instructor: D. Nola 



The Major 



The Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture 
offers three undergraduate majors. Two lead to the Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.) degree; one in Natural Resource Sciences and the other in General 
Agriculture Sciences. The third major leads to a Bachelor of Landscape 
Architecture (B.L.A.) degree. For additional information on General 
Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resource Sciences, see the entry for 
those programs elsewhere in this chapter. 

The landscape architecture curriculum is a four-year professional program. 
The program is primarily a site-based design discipline that also deals with 
regional and larger-scale environmental issues. The curriculum, a studio- 
based design program, integrates natural and social factor analysis into the 
design process. Digital design studios allow the integration of computer- 
aided design with fundamental design and drawing skills. 

Admission: Landscape Architecture is a limited-enrollment program (LEP). 
See Chapter 1 of the Undergraduate Catalog for general limited-enrollment 
program admission policies. For further information contact the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources at 301-314-8375. 

Freshman Admission: The program's goal is to have the greater proportion 
of program majors admitted as freshmen. Most entering freshmen will gain 
admission to the landscape architecture program directly from high school, 
as space permits. Early application is encouraged to ensure the best 
possible chance for admission. 

Transfer Admission: Admission of transfer students is limited by space 
considerations: Students presenting an acceptable graphic portfolio, 
evaluated by the landscape architecture faculty maybe exempted from one 
or both of the first year studios. Landscape architecture faculty will 
evaluate all other LARC-equivalent courses transferred from another 
institution. 

The Academic Review: All students will be subjected to an Academic 
Review after they have completed the first three design studio courses (or 
their equivalent) in the Landscape Architecture curriculum. To meet the 
provisions of the review, students must complete: (1) MATH 112 or MATH 
115 with a minimum grade of C, (2) LARC 120 and 160 with a minimum 
grade of B, and LARC 140 and 141 with a minimum grade of C, (3) attain a 
successful review of a portfolio (a minimum of 80 points out of a possible 
100) by the landscape architecture faculty to assess graphic and design 
skills, and (4) attain an overall GPA of at least 2.40. Students who do not 
meet these requirements will not be allowed to continue in the landscape 
architecture LEP and will be required to accept another major. 

Other Policies Which Determine a Student's Retention in the Landscape 
Architecture Program: 

• A student can only repeat one of the five gateway courses of the 
Academic Review Course Requirements (LARC 120, 140, 141, 160 and 
MATH 112 or MATH 115). That particular course can only be repeated 
once. 



• A grade of 'W (Withdrawn) in a course is counted as an attempt. 

• A student who does not meet the Academic Review requirements will 
dismissed from the Program. 



be 



• A student who is dismissed from the Program will not be readmitted to 
the Landscape Architecture LEP. 

Appeals: Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to the 
Landscape Architecture LEP and believe they have extenuating or special 
circumstances, which should be considered, may appeal in writing to the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The student will be notified in writing 
of the appeal decision. 

Students in the Landscape Architecture LEP who do not pass the Academic 
Review but believe they have special circumstances that should be 
considered should appeal directly to the Coordinator of the Landscape 
Architecture program. 

BLA Degree Requirements: The courses and credit hours that define the 
cumiculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
(BLA) are described in the next section. The curriculum includes required 
courses for the major as well as additional CORE program requirements 
and electives. Following the successful Academic Review and acceptance 
into the LARC Program, students must have an overall average of a C (2.0) 
to be eligible for the BLA degree. Students must also have grades of C or 
better in all required courses with the LARC designation. 



Languages, Literatures and Cultures, School Of 125 



Curriculum in Landscape Architecture 
Landscape Architecture Degree (B.L.A.) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ENGL 393-Technical Writing 3 

GEOG 340— Geomorphology or 

GEOG 372— Remote Sensing or 

NRSC 444— Remote Sensing: Natural Resources 3 

LARC 120-Digital Fundamentals Studio 2 

LARC 140-Graphic Fundamentals Studio 4 

LARC 141— Design Fundamentals Studio 4 

LARC 160— Introduction to Landscape Architecture 3 

LARC 221-Digital Design Tools 3 

LARC 240— Graphic Communication and Design Studio 4 

LARC 263— History of Landscape Architecture 3 

LARC 265— Site Analysis and Ecological Principles 3 

LARC 320— Principles of Site Engineering 3 

LARC 321— Landscape Structures & Materials 3 

LARC 340-Site Planning and Design Studio 5 

LARC 341-Regional Design and GIS Studio 5 

LARC 389— Internship in Landscape Architecture 3 

LARC 420-Professional Practice 3 

LARC 440-Urban Design Studio 5 

LARC 450— Environmental Resources or 

LARC 451 — Sustainable Communities 3 

LARC 470— Landscape Architecture Seminar 3 

LARC 471— Capstone/ Community Design Studio 5 

MATH 112— College Algebra with Applications and Trigonometry or 

MATH 115-Pre-calculus 3 

NRSC 200-Fundamentals of Soil Science 4 

PLSC 100-lntroduction to Horticulture 4 

PLSC 253-Woody Plant Materials 1 3 

PLSC 254-Woody Plant Materials II 3 

Total Major Requirements 87 

Additional CORE Program requirements 24 

Electives 9 

Total 120 

Internship Opportunities 

Internships are available at nearby federal, state and county agencies as 
well as in private landscape architecture practices. 

Student Organizations 

The Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects 
(ASLA) provides students with opportunities to get involved with on-campus 
activities. The club is chartered by ASLA. 



Scholarships 



Several scholarships and awards are available to Landscape Architecture 
students. Contact the Associate Dean's office at 301-405-2078 for 
additional information. 

Course Code: LARC 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURES AND CULTURES, 
SCHOOL OF (SLLC) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1105 Jimenez Hall, 3014054025 
www .languages.umd.edu 

Director: Michael Long 

Associate Director (Academic): Richard Ernest Wall<er 

Associate Director (Administrative): Charlotte Groff Aldridge 



Professor and Chair: Ramsey 

Professor: Brecht 

Associate Professors: Chin, Gor, Hitchcock, Kerl<ham, Lekic, Martin 

Assistant Professors: Branner, Jones, Liu, Papazian, Yotsukura, Zakim 

Instructors: Levy, Miura, Sano, Shen, Yaginuma 

Lecturers: Gonan, Lee, Qi 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all second-semester sophomores 
and seniors. 

Students must take language-acquisition courses sequentially i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher-level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Chinese Language and Literature 

The Chinese major provides the training and cultural background needed for 
entering East Asia-related careers in such fields as higher education, the 
arts, business, government, international relations, agriculture, or the 
media. Students may also consider a double major in Chinese and another 
discipline, such as business, government and politics, economics, 
or journalism. 

After completing the prerequisite of one year of language (12 credits): CHIN 
101 (Elementary Chinese; six hours per week, fall); CHIN 102 (Elementary 
Spoken Chinese; three hours per week, spring); and CHIN 103 (Elementary 
Written Chinese; three hours per week, spring), students must complete 36 
credits for the major course requirements (18 language, six 
civilization/ history, 12 elective). No grade lower than C maybe used toward 
the major. 

Requirements for the Chinese major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. The College 
foreign-language requirement will automatically be fulfilled in the process of 
taking language major courses. Chinese students have the option of 
applying to live in St. Mary's Hall (Language House) and participating in a 
study-abroad program. 

Chinese Course Requirements 

Language: 

CHIN 201 — Intermediate Spoken Chinese I (3) 
CHIN 202-lntermediate Written Chinese I (3) 
CHIN 203-lntermediate Spoken Chinese II (3) 
CHIN 204-lntermediate Written Chinese II (3) 
CHIN 301-Advanced Chinese I (3) 
CHIN 302-Advanced Chinese II (3) 
Civilization/ History: 

Option I: 

HIST 284-East Asian Civilization I (3) 

and 

HIST 481-A History of Modem China (3) 

or 

HIST 485— History of Chinese Communism (3) 

Option II: 

HIST 285-East Asian Civilization II (3) 

and 

HIST 480-History of Traditional China (3) 
Electives (300-level or above; 12 credits) 

Note: Electives must be in Chinese language, literature, linguistics, or other 
East Asian subjects (one must be in the area of Chinese linguistics and 
one in the area of Chinese literature), and are subject to approval by the 
student's adviser. 

Business Option 

Courses: CHIN 201-203; 202-204; 301-302; 411412; 313 or314 or315; 
421 or 422; HIST 284481 or 485 or HIST 285480 (36 credits). The 
following supporting courses are strongly recommended: CHIN 305-306; 
401402; 431432. 

Citations 



ASIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES (AEEL) 

2106 Jimenez Hall, 3014054239 

www.languages.umd.edu/AsianEastEuropean 



C itation in C hinese Language 

15 credit hours. Five courses in Chinese from approved list of courses. 

Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information. 



126 Languages, Literatures and Cultures, School Of 



Citation in Chinese Studies 

15 credit hours. Five courses from approved list of courses. Contact the 

Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information. 

Citation in Business M anagement for Chinese M ajors (1107B) 
15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of BMGT 
courses. Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 301405- 
2621 for more information. 

Citation in Business Chinese 

15 credit hours. Five courses in Chinese from approved list of courses. 
Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 301-405-2621 for 
more information. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. 

Japanese Language and Literature 

The Japanese major provides the training and cultural bacl<ground needed 
for entering East Asia-related careers in such fields as higher education, 
the arts, business, government, international relations, agriculture, or the 
media. Students may also consider a double major in Japanese 
and another discipline, such as business, international relations, 
economics, or journalism. 

After completing the prerequisite of one year of language (12 credits): JAPN 
101 (Elementary J apanese I; six hours per weel<, fall); and JAPN 102 
(Elementary J apanese II; six hours per weel<, spring), students must 
complete 42 credits for the major course requirements (24 language, six 
civilization/ history, 12 elective). No grade lower than C may be used toward 
the major. 

Requirements for the Japanese major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirement of 45 upper^evel credits completed. The College 
foreign language requirement will automatically be fulfilled in the process of 
taking language major courses. Japanese students have the option of 
applying to live in St. Mary's Hall (Language House) and participating in a 
study-abroad program. 

Japanese Course Requirements 

Language: 

JAPN 201— Intermediate J apanese I (6) 
JAPN 202-lntermediate J apanese II (6) 
JAPN 301-Advanced J apanese I (6) 
JAPN 302-Advanced J apanese II (6) 
Civilization/ History 

Option I: 

HIST 284-East Asian Civilization I (3) 

and 

HIST 483-HistoryofJapan Since 1800 (3) 

Option II: 

HIST 285-East Asian Civilization II (3) 

and 

HIST 482-HistoryofJapan to 1800 (3) 
Electives (300-level or above; 12 credits) 

Note: Electives must be in Japanese language, literature, linguistics, or 
other East Asian subjects (one must be in the area of J apanese linguistics 
and one in the area of Japanese literature), and are subject to approval by 
the student's adviser. 

Supporting Courses for Chinese or J apanese 

students are strongly urged to take additional courses in a discipline 
relating to their particular field of interest, such as art, history, linguistics, 
literary criticism, or comparative literature. The range of supporting courses 
can be decided upon in consultation with the student's adviser. 

Business Option 

Courses: JAPN 201-202; 301-302; 403-404; HIST 284483 or 285482 
(36 credits). An additional six credits at the 300400 level in electives in 
Japanese literature and linguistics are required. 

Citations 

Citation in Business M anagement for J apanese M ajors (1 1 08B ) 

15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of 

BMGT courses. 



Citation in Business Japanese 

15 credit hours. Five courses in J apanese from approved list of courses. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 
301405-2621 for more information. 

Russian Language and Literature 

The undergraduate major in Russian Language and Literature consists of 
39 hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequence (RUSS 101, 
102, 201, 202). No course grade lower than C maybe used to satisfy the 
major requirements. A common set of core courses is required of all 
majors, as well as nine hours of related course work. Students may want to 
consider a double major in Russian language and literature and another 
discipline, such as business, international relations, economics, or 
journalism. Russian students have the option of applying to live in St. 
Mary's Hall (Language House), and the majority of Russian majors 
participate in a study abroad program. 

Russian Course Requirements 

Eight Courses (24 credits) from the following: 

RUSS 210-Structural Description of Russian (3) 

RUSS 211-Applied Russian Phonetics (3) 

RUSS 301-Advanced Russian I (3) 

RUSS 302-Advanced Russian II (3) 

RUSS 303— Russian Conversation: Functional Skills (3) 

RUSS 307-Commercial Russian I (3) 

RUSS 321-Survey of Russian Literature I (3) 

RUSS 322-Survey of Russian Literature II (3) 

RUSS 401— Advanced Russian Composition (3) 

RUSS 402-Practicum in Written Russian (3) 

RUSS 403-Russian Conversation: Advanced Skills (3) 

RUSS 404-Practicum in Spoken Russian (3) 

Two Courses (6 credits) of all content-based courses taught in Russian: 

RUSS 407-Commercial Russian II (3) 

RUSS 409— Selected Topics in Russian Language Study (3) 

RUSS 431-Russian Literature of the 19th Centuryl (3) 

RUSS 432-Russian Literature of the 19th Century II (3) 

RUSS 433-Russian Literature of the 20th Century (3) 

RUSS 434-Soviet Russian Literature (3) 

RUSS 439— Selected Topics in Russian Literature (3) 

Supporting Courses 

An additional 9 credits from among the following to be chosen in 
consultation with an advisor; 6 credits must be at 300400 level: 

RUSS 221, 222, 281, 282, 298, 307, 327, 328, 329, 381, 382, 398, 
405, 406, 407, 409, 410, 411, 439, 473. SLAV 469, 475, 479, 499. 

Business Option 

Courses: RUSS 210 or 211; 301-302; 303; 401; 403; 405406; 307407; 
381-382; 467, for a total of 39 credits. It is strongly recommended that the 
student earn eight credits (such as RUSS 301, 303, 403, 467) in the 
Summer Programs in the Plekhanov Institute in Moscow or the Moscow 
Institute of Finance. 

Citations 

C itation in R yssian Language 

15 credit hours. (For non-native students). Five courses from approved 
list of courses. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
more information. 

Citation in Russian Language and Culture 

15 credit hours. Requirements for non-native students: five courses from 
approved list of courses. Requirements for heritage/ native speakers: five 
courses from approved list of courses. Contact the Director of 
Undergraduate Studies for more information. 

Citation in Business Management for Russian Majors (1106B) 
15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of BMGT 
courses. Contact Business, Culture and Language Program at 301405- 
2621 for more information. 



French and Italian 127 



Citation in Business Russian 

15 credit hours. Five courses in Russian from approved list of courses. 
Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 301-405-2621 for 
more information. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. 

Arabic Language 

The Arabic language program enables students to read and write Modern 
Standard Arabic (the language of radio, television, and newspapers 
throughout the Arab World), as well as to communicate with native 
speakers of Arabic. Two levels, elementary and intermediate, are offered. 
These courses develop students' knowledge of Arabic in reading, writing 
and speaking, while also introducing them to Arabic and Islamic culture. 

Hebrew Language 

The Hebrew Language Program provides, both to beginners and to those 
with previous background, an opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills in 
Hebrew language, culture, and thought. Elementary and Intermediate level 
language courses develop effective communication skills in modern 
Hebrew. Upper-level language courses emphasize reading comprehension, 
vocabulary enrichment, and writing skills. More advanced students focus on 
the analytical study of major classical and modern Hebrew texts. 

While there is no Hebrew major, students wishing to focus on Hebrew 
language as a primary subject may do so through a concentration on 
Hebrew within the J ewish Studies major (see J ewish Studies Program). 

The University of Maryland sponsors a semester program at Tel Aviv 
University. Scholarships for study in Israel are available through the 
Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies. Hebrew students have the option of 
applying to live in St. Mary's Hall (Language House) and participating in a 
study-abroad program. 

Korean 

The Korean language program consists of two tracks. The first consists of 
KORA 101 and KORA 102 and is designed for students with no previous 
background in, or exposure to, Korean language and culture. The second 
track consists of KORA 211 and KORA 212. It is a heritage sequence for 
students who were exposed to Korean as children, but who do not have 
native fluency in the language. Students who wish to enroll in either track 
will need to be placed by the instructor. In addition to these four language 
skill courses, the department offers KORA 242, an introductory course on 
the structure of the Korean language, and KORA 241, a survey of the 
history of the Korean language. 

Citation in Korean Studies 

15 credit hours. Five courses from approved list of courses. Students who 
fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the official transcript. 
Please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information. 

Course Codes: ARAB, CHIN, BALL, HEBR,JAPN, KORA, RUSS, SLAV 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN (FRIT) 

3106C Jimenez Hall, 3014054024 

www. languages. umd.edu/ French Italian 

Professor and Chair: Verdaguver 

Professors: Brami, Julien, Mossman, Verdaguer 

Associate Professors: Black, Campangne, Falvo, Letzter, Scullen 

Assistant Professors: Eades, Wells 

Lecturers: Amodeo, Clough, C. P. Russell 

Emeriti: Fink, Hage, MacBain, Meijer, Russell, Tarica, Thenien 

French and Italian are two of the world's great languages of culture, 
providing access to an outstanding body of literature and criticism, studies 
in the arts, the humanities, the social and natural sciences, and career 
opportunities in commerce, foreign affairs, and the academic world. The 
department seeks to provide an atmosphere conducive to cultural 
awareness and intellectual growth. It hosts active student clubs and a 
chapter of a national honor society It supports two study abroad programs, 
Maryland-in-Nlce and Maryland-in-Rome, and works actively with the French 
and Italian language clusters of the Language House. 



The French Major 

Requirements for the French major include the College of Arts and 
Humanities requirements of 45 upper-level credits completed. The College 
foreign language requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the process of 
taking language major courses. 

Changes in specific requirements are under review. Students should consult 
the department for updated information. The undergraduate major in French 
consists of 36 hours of French courses above FREN 201 or FREN 202. Two 
options, having the same core, lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree: (1) 
French language, culture, and literature, and (2) French/ International 
Business. No grade lower than C may be used toward the major. Students 
intending to apply for teacher certification should consult the Director of 
Undergraduate Advising as early as possible for proper planning. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 
201/202, 204, 301, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher-level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for second-semester sophomores 
and seniors. Undergraduate advisor: L. Clough 

Requirements 

Core required of all majors (12 credits): FREN 204,250,301,401. 

Additional requirements outside French for both options: 12 credits in 
supporting courses as approved by department (six credits at 200- level 
and six credits at 300400 level). 

French Language, Culture and Literature Option 
(24 credits) 

In addition to core: FREN 351, 352; 311 or 312, 302 or 303; four 
additional 400-level courses of which only one maybe in English. 

French and International Business Option (24 credits) 

In addition to core: FREN 302, 303, 306, 311, 312 or 404; 406; two of 
the following: 351, 352, 471, 472, 473, 474. 

Honors 

A student may choose to do a departmental Honors version in the French 
Language Culture and Literature Option. The requirements are the same 
except that at least three of the upper-level courses, beginning with FREN 
351, must be taken in the "H" version, and that, in addition to those 
courses regularly taken for the major, the Honors student will take FREN 
495H (Honors Thesis), for a total of 39 hours in French. For further 
information, consult the coordinator of the French Honors Program. 

The Italian Major 

The undergraduate major in Italian consists of 36 hours of Italian courses 
above ITAL 203. To satisfy the major requirements, students must take the 
following courses: the language sequence: ITAL 204, 211, 301, and either 
302 or 311; the literature sequence: 251, 350; six courses at the 400- 
level, of which only one may be in English. No grade lower than C may be 
used to satisfy the major requirements. Additional requirements outside 
Italian: 12 credits in supporting courses as approved by the department; or 
at least 12 credits (six credits at the 200-level and six credits at the 300- 
400 level) in one specific area, representing a coordinated plan of study 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially i.e., 203, 204, 
301, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher-level language acquisition 
or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be taken for credit. 

Romance Languages 

Either French or Italian, or both, may serve as components of this major 
(see the entry on the Romance Language Program). 

Course Codes: FREN, ITAL 



128 Germanic Studies 



Citations 

Citation in French Language and Cultures 

15 credit hours. Five courses in French above 201/202. Courses tal<en 
through Study Abroad programs maybe applied. Contact the Undergraduate 
Advisor for more information. 

Citation in Business Management for French Majors (1102B) 
15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of BMGT 
courses. Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 301405- 
2621 for more information. 

Citation in Business French 

15 credit hours. Five courses in French from approved list of courses. 
Contact Business, Culture and Languages Program at 301-405-2621 for 
more information. 

Citation in Italian Language and Culture 

15 credit hours. ITAL204, 211, 311 and two courses from approved list 
of courses. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
more information. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. 



Germanic Area Studies Option 

CORE: 220, 301, 302, 321, and 322. Modern Scandinavian 
Specialization: 369, 461; five upper-level courses in the Germanic area 
studies group. Medieval Scandinavian Specialization: 383, 475; five 
upper-level courses in the Germanic area studies group. 

Also available is a German Business Option, an International Business- 
German Business Option, and an Engineering-German dual degree. 
Students should contact a departmental adviser for more information. 

Students must tal<e language-acquisition courses sequentially i.e., 101, 102, 
201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher-level language 
acquisition or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be tal<en for credit. 

Honors in German 

The department offers an extensive Honors Program for majors. The Honors 
Program affords Honors students sustained individual contact with faculty 
members. Honors Students are called on to worl< independently, to pursue 
a project that carries them beyond the regular undergraduate curriculum. 
Interested students should asl< for detailed information from the 
department Honors Studies Director. 

Citations 



GERMANIC STUDIES (GERM) 

3215 Jimenez Hall, 3014054091 

www. la nguages.umd.edu/ germ an 

Professor and Acting Chair: Pfister 

Professors: Beicken''', Oster, Pfister, Frederil<sent 

Associate Professors: Fleck, Strauch, Walker 

Assistant Professor: Alene Moyer 

Emeriti: Best, Herin, Jones 

t Distinguished ScholarTeacher 

Changes in major requirements are under review. For more information, 
please contact the department at 301-405-4091 or Dr. Pfister at 
3014054106. 

The Major 

The undergraduate major in Germanic Studies consists of 36 hours beyond 
the basic language acquisition sequence (GERM 101-201). No course 
completed with a grade lower than C may be used to satisfy the major 
requirements. Three program options lead to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
degree: 1) German language, 2) German literature, and 3) Germanic area 
studies. Secondary concentration and supportive eiectives are encouraged 
in the other foreign languages, comparative literature, English, history, and 
philosophy Majors intending to go on to graduate study in the discipline 
are urged to develop a strong secondary concentration in a further area of 
Germanic studies; such "internal minors" are available in German 
language, German literature, Scandinavian studies, and Indo-European and 
Germanic philology. All majors must meet with a departmental adviser at 
least once each semester to update their departmental files and obtain 
written approval of their program of study 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for second-semester sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors. 

Requirements for Major 

Requirements for the Germanic Studies major include the College of Arts 
and Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. 



The College foreign-language requirement will 
the process of taking language major courses. 



be automatically fulfilled in 



German Language Option 

CORE: 220, 301, 302, 321, and 322. Specialization: three of four German 
language courses (401, 403, 405, 419P); two 400-level German literature 
courses; two upper-level courses in any of the three areas of specialization. 

German Literature Option 

CORE: 220, 301, 302, 321, and 322. Specialization: five 400-level 
German literature courses; two upper-level courses in any of the three 
areas of specialization. 



C itation in Germ anic Studies 

15 credit hours. GERM 202 and 220 and/ or 301. Two or three additional 
courses from approved list of courses. Courses taken through Study 
Abroad programs may be applied. Contact the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies for more information. 

Citation in Business Management for German Majors (1103B) 
15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of BMGT 
courses. Contact Business, Culture and Language Program at 301405- 
2621 for more information. 

Citation in Business German 

15 credit hours. Five courses in German from approved list of courses. 
Contact Business, Culture and Language programs at 301405-2621 for 
more information. 

Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a Citation on the 
official transcript. 

Course Code: GERM 



SPANISH AND PORTUGESE (SPAP) 

2215 Jimenez Hall, 301405-6441 

www. languages. umd.edu/SpanishPortugese 

Professor and Acting Chair: Cypress 

Professor emerita: Nemes 

Professors: Aguilar-Mora, Cypess, Harrison, Pacheco''"'', Sosnowski 

Associate Professors: Benito-Vessels, Igel, Lavine, Naharro-Calderon, Peres 

Assistant Professors: Cabal-Krastel, Lacorte, Mevediz, Rodriguez, Sanchez 

Instructors: Little, Roman 

IT Distinguished University Professor 

The Majors 

Requirements for the Spanish and Portugese majors include the College of 
Arts and Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. The 
College foreign-language requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the 
process of taking language major courses. 

Undergraduate majors can benefit from a wide range of courses in Spanish 
and Latin American literature and civilization; technical courses in translation, 
linguistics, and commercial uses of Spanish. Area studies programs are also 
available in conjunction with other disciplines to provide the student with a 
solid knowledge of the Spanish and Latin American worlds. 

A grade of at least C is required in all major and supporting area courses. 



Linguistics 129 



Departmental advising is mandatory for second-semester sophomores 
and seniors. 

Changes in requirements are under review. 

Language and Literature Major 

Courses: SPAN 207, 221, 301-302, 311 or 312, 321-322 or 323-324, 
325-326 or 346-347; plus four courses in literature at the 400-level; one 
course may be tal<en in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for a total of 39 credits. 
Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which must be at the 300- or 
400-level in a single area other than Spanish, for a combined total of 48 
credits. Suggested areas: art, comparative literature, government and 
politics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese. 

Foreign Area jvjajor 

Courses: SPAN 207; 301-302; 311 or 312; 315 and 415 or 316 and 317; 
321-322 or 323-324; 325-326 or 346-347, plus three courses in literature 
at the 400-level; one course may be tal<en in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for a 
total of 39 credits. Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which must be 
at the 300— or 400-level in a single area other than Spanish, for a 
combined total of 48 credits. Suggested areas: anthropology economics, 
geography government and politics, history, Portuguese, and sociology 

Translation Option 

Courses: SPAN 207; 301-302, 311 or 312; 316 and 317; two courses 
from 318, 356, 357, 416, 417; 321-322 or 323-324; one course from 
325, 326, 346, 347; plus two courses in literature at the 400-level; one 
course may be taken in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for a total of 39 credits. 
Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which must be at the 300- or 
400-level in a single area other than Spanish, for a combined total of 48 
credits. Suggested areas: art, comparative literature, government and 
politics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese. 

Business Option* 

Courses: SPAN 207; 211; 301-302; 311 or 312; 315 and 415; 316 and 
317; 325-326 or 346-347; 422, for a total of 36 credits. Twelve credits of 
supporting courses, six of which must be at the 300— or 400— level in a 
single area other than Spanish. Suggested areas: business and 
management, economics, government and politics, history and geography. 

Students interested in majoring in a combination of two Romance 
languages should see the description of the Romance Languages 
Program, above. 

*A double major program. Business, Language, and Cultures, combines 
International Business and Spanish. 

Citations 

Citations in Spanish Language and Cultures 

15 credit hours. Five courses in Spanish from an approved list of courses. 
Courses tal<en through Study Abroad programs may be applied. Contact the 
Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information. 

Citation in Portuguese Languages and Cultures 

15 credit hours. PORT 205, 231 and three courses from approved list 
of courses. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for 
more information. 

Citation in Business Management for Spanish Majors (1105B) 
15 credit hours. ECON 200 and four courses from approved list of BMGT 
courses. Contact Business, Culture and Language Program at 301-405- 
2621 for more information. 

Citation in Business Spanish 

15 credit hours. Five courses in Spanish from approved list of courses. 
Contact Business, Culture and Language Program at 301-405-2621 for 
more information. 



Students who fulfill Citation requirements will 
official transcript. 



receive a Citation on the 



Honors 

The department Honors Program offers qualified students the possibility of 
working in close contact with a mentor on an original thesis. Honors 
seminars are primarily for students who have been accepted to the 
Program, but are open to others with the approval of the Honors Director. 
Honors students must take six credits of Honor Thesis. Interested students 
should see the Director of the Spanish Honors Program. 

Lower-Division Courses 

The elementary and intermediate courses in Spanish and Portuguese 
consist of three semesters of four credits each (101, 102, 201). The 
language requirement for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and 
Humanities is satisfied by passing 201 or equivalent. Students who wish to 
enroll in Spanish 101, 102, and 201 must present their high school 
transcript for proper placement. See the Schedule of Classes for further 
information. Students may not receive credits for both Spanish 102 and 
Spanish 103. 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of continuing at the 
next level of study 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher-level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower-level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Course Codes: SPAN, PORT 



LINGUISTICS (LING) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1401 Marie Mount Hall, 301405-7002 

Professor and Chair: Homstein 

Professors: Crain, Lasnik, Pietroski, Uriagereka 

Associate Professors: Phillips, Poeppel, Resnik, Thornton, Weinberg 

Research Scientist: Zukowski 

The Major 

The Linguistics Department offers courses on many aspects of language 
study and an interdisciplinary major leading to a Bachelor of Arts. Language 
is basic to many human activities and linguistics relates to many other 
disciplines which include work on language. 

Work on language has provided one of the main research probes in 
philosophy and psychology for most of the 20th century. It has taken on a 
new momentum in the last 30 years and language research has proven to 
be a fruitful means to cast light on the nature of the human mind and on 
general cognitive capacity. Several courses focus on a research program 
which takes as a central question: How do children master their native 
language? Children hear many styles of speech, variable pronunciations, 
and incomplete expressions, but, despite this flux of experience, they come 
to speak and understand speech effortlessly, instantaneously, and 
subconsciously. Research aims to discover how this happens, how a 
person's linguistic capacity is represented in the mind, and what the 
genetic basis for it is. Students learn how various kinds of data can be 
brought to bear on their central question and how that question influences 
the shape of technical analyses. 

The major in Linguistics is designed for students who are primarily 
interested in human language per se, or in describing particular languages 
in a systematic and psychologically plausible way or in using language as a 
tool to reveal some aspect of human mental capacities. Such a major 
provides useful preparation for professional programs in foreign languages, 
language teaching, communication, psychology, speech pathology, and 
artificial intelligence (and thus in computer work). 

Departmental advising is mandatory for second-semester sophomores 
and seniors. 

Requirements for M ajor 

The major in Linguistics is 42 credits. The major consists of a "Core" of 18 
credits plus 24 additional credits required for one of two tracks, "Linguistic 
Theory and a Language" or "Grammars and Cognition". 



130 Logistics, Business, and Public Policy 



The double major is 27 credits -the core of 18 credits plus 3 upper level 
electives (9 credits). The double degree requires all 42 credits needed for 
the major. 

(All linguistics courses are 3 credits each) 

The Core (18 credits) 

LING 200— Introductory Linguistics 
LING 240— Language and Mind 
LING 311-Syntax I (Fall only) 
LING 312-Syntax II (Spring only) 
LING321-Phonologyl (Fall only) 
LING 322— Phonologyll (Spring only) 

Grammar and Cognition Tracks 
PHIL170 orl73 or 271 
PHIL 360— Philosophy of Language 
PSYC 100-lntroduction to Psychology 
PSYC 341 — Introduction to Memory and Cognition 
Two 300/400 level LING electives 

Two electives from LING, PSYC, HESP, PHIL, or CMSC, chosen in 
consultation with the advisor. 

Linguistic Theory and a Language Track 

Six courses of study (or 18 credits total) in one language; one of these 
courses should be in the history or structure of the language, if offered. 
Two 300/400 level LING electives. 

When possible, the language of specialization should be the same as the 
one used to satisfy the College of Arts and Humanities' foreign language 
requirement. The specialization normally includes those courses that make 
up the designated requirement for a major in the chosen language. Special 
provision maybe made for students who are native speakers of a language 
other than English and wish to conduct analytical work on the grammar of 
that language. A student may also study grammatical theory and English; 
the 18-hour concentration in English consists of courses in the history and 
structure of English to be selected in consultation with the student's 
Linguistics adviser. 

For a double major, students need 27 credits in Linguistics, which normally 
include the LING courses for one of the two specializations. 

Citation in Linguistics 

15 credit hours. LING 200, 240, 321, 311 and one course from approved 
list of courses. Students who fulfill Citation requirements will receive a 
Citation on the official transcript. Please contact the Director of 
Undergraduate Studies for more information. 

Course Code: LING 



LOGISTICS, BUSINESS, AND PUBLIC POLICY 

For infonnation, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapters. 



MARKETING 

For information, consult the Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in 
chapter 5. 



MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 
(ENMA, ENNU) 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 

2135 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 301405-5208 
www.mne.umd.edu 

Chair: Briber 

Professors: Armstrong* (Emeritus), Arsenault (Emeritus), Briber, Christou, 

Dieter* (emeritus), Oehriein, Ramesh, Roytburd, Rubloff, Salamanca-Riba, 

Smith (emeritus), Wuttig 

Associate Professors: Al-Sheikhly, Ankem, Lloyd, Martinez-Miranda, Phaneuf 

Assistant Professors: Takeuchi 

Adjunct: Lawn 

Affiliate Associate Professor: Kofinas 

* Member of Mechanical Engineering Department 



The Major 

The development, production and use of novel materials has become a 
major issue in all fields of engineering. Materials which are strong and light 
at the same time are needed for space structures; faster electro-optical 
switching materials will result in improved mass communications; and 
stronger high temperature plastics would improve the efficiency of 
transportation systems. The mission of the materials science and 
engineering program is to provide the student with an interdisciplinary 
science-based education to understand the structure and resulting 
properties of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and electronic materials. 
Students will gain the ability to solve problems in the design, processing 
and use of advanced materials. Students will have the opportunity to work 
with faculty and industry on complex problems through projects, 
internships, and research and co-op experiences. A wide variety of careers 
are open to graduates of this program ranging from production and quality 
control in the traditional materials industries to the molecular construction 
of electronic materials in ultra-clean environments, and to the applications 
of materials in electronic packages. The application of materials to solve 
environmental, energy, and reliability problems are also career options. 

Students may major in the Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and 
Engineering Program or may use Materials Engineering as a field of 
concentration in the Bachelor of Science Engineering Program. 

Requirements for M ajor 

Requirements for the Materials Science and Engineering major include 
thorough preparation in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering 
science as well as the required University general education (CORE) 
requirements. All students will be required to select an area of specialization, 
an upper-class science elective, and two technical electives. A minimum of 
123 credits is required for a bachelor's degree. A sample program follows: 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

CORE Program Requirements 6 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

ENMA 181* — Introduction to Engineered Materials, Seminar ...1 

CHEM 135— General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

CHEM 136-ChemistryLab 1 

MATH 140-Calculus I 4 

MATH 141-Calculus II 4 

ENGLlOl-lntroduction to Writing 3 

ENES 102-Statics 3 

PHYS 161-General Physics I 3 

Total 15 15 

* Recommended, but not required. 

Sophomore Year 

Core Program Requirements 3 3 

MATH 241-Calculus III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists and Engr 3 

PHYS 262-263-General Physics 4 4 

ENES 230— Introduction to Materials and their Applications. ...3 

ENEE 204- Basic Circuit Theory 3 

CHEM 233-OrganicChem, or CHEM 481*, Phys. Chem. I 4 or3 

Total 14 17,16 

*Chem 233 is required for students specializing in organic materials 

Junior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

ENMA 310— Materials Laboratory I, Structural Characterization 3 

ENMA 311 — Materials Laboratory li: Electromagnetic Properties 3 

ENMA 362— Mechanical Propertiies 4 

ENMA460-Physics of Solid Materials 3 

ENMA 461— Thermodynamics of Materials 3 

ENMA 465— Microprocessing of Materials 3 

Specialization Electives 3 3 

Total 16 15 

Senior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

ENMA 463— Macroprocessing of Materials 3 

ENMA 471 — Kinetics, Diffusion and Phase Transformations ...3 

ENMA 490- Materials Design 3 

Specialization Electives 3 3 

Technical Electives 6 

ENRE 445-Principles of Quality and Reliability 3 

Upper-level science elective 3 

Total 18 15 



Mathematics 131 



Minimum Degree Credits: 123 or 124 credits and the fulfillment of all 
department, school, and university requirements. 

Four suggested specialization areas with example classes follow. Students 
are expected to tal<e four specialization electives in one particular area 
during their junior and senior years after consulting with their adviser. 

Materials Science: ENMA 464-Environmental Effects; ENMA 420- 
Intermediate Ceramics; ENMA 489C— Electronic Packaging Materials; 
ENMA 495-Polymeric Materials; ENMA 481-Electronic Materials; ENMA 
499— Laboratory Projects 

Applications of M aterials and M anufacturing: ENMA 472— Technology and 
design of Engineering Materials: ENMA 489A— Design of Composites; 
ENMA 489L— Manufacturing Ceramics; ENMA 489R— Manufacturing 
Polymers; ENME 400— Machine Design; ENME 465— Fracture Mechanics; 
ENAE 424— Design and Manufacturing of Composites and Prototypes; 
ENMA 499- Laboratory Projects 

Organic Materials: ENMA 495-Polymeric Materials; ENMA 496- 
Processing of Polymers; ENCH 490 — Introduction to Polymer Chemistry; 
ENMA 489R— Manufacturing Polymers; ENCH 494— Polymer Technology 
Laboratory; ENMA499— Laboratory Projects 

Microelectric Materials: ENMA 481 — Introduction to Electronic and 
Magnetic Materials; ENMA 489C— Electronic Packaging Materials; ENEE 
302-Digital Circuits; ENEE 460-Control Systems: ENEE 480- 
Fundamentals of Solid State Electronics. 

Admission 

All Materials Science and Engineering students must meet admission, 
progress, and retention standards of the A. James Clark School of Engineering. 



Advising 

students choosing materials science and engineering as their major or 
materials engineering as their primary or secondary field of concentration 
should contact Dr. Kathleen Hart, the Undergraduate Programs Coordinator, 
Room 1113, Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, at 301-405-5989. 
Dr. Hart can set up appointments with Professors Lloyd or Martinez- 
Miranda, the Undergraduate Advisors. Any questions about the program 
should be directed to Dr. RayPhaneuf, Undergraduate Studies Director. 

Co-op Program 

The Materials Science and Engineering program works within the A. James 
Clark School of Engineering Cooperative Engineering education Program. 
For details, see the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering entry in chapter 6. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial Aid based upon need is available through the Office of student 
Financial Aid. Faculty Merit Scholarships are offered to outstanding 
students by the department. Other scholarships are available through the 
A. James Clark School of Engineering. The department offers opportunities 
for research internships with faculty 

Honors and Awards 

Each of the large number of professional-materials-oriented societies such 
as the metallurgical and ceramic societies sponsor awards to recognize 
outstanding scholarship and undergraduate research. All students enrolled in 
the materials engineering program are encouraged to select a faculty adviser 
who in their junior and senior years will guide them towards nomination for 
these awards. Awards from MRS, TMS Societies are available. 

Student organization: There is an active student chapter of The Minerals, 
Metals & Materials Society (TMS). 

Course Code: ENMA 

Nuclear Engineering Program (ENNU) 

2309 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 301405-5832 

www.mne.umd.edu 

Professor and Chair: Briber 

Use of Nuclear Engineering as a field of concentration in the Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering program has been suspended for the time being. 



MATHEMATICS (MATH) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1117 Mathematics Building, Undergraduate Office, 301405-5053 

www .math.umd.edu/ 

Professor and Chair: Fitzpatrick 

Professors: J. Adams, W. Adams, Antmantt, Benedettot, Berenstein, 

Boyle, Brin, Cohen, J. Cooper, Fey**, Freidiintt, GIaz, Goldman, Green, 

Grillakis, Grove, Gulick, Halperin!!!!!, Hamilton, Healy, Herb, Jakobson, 

Johnson, Kagan, Kedem, King, Kirwan !!!!!, Kudia, Kueker, Laskowski, 

Layt, Levermore*** !, Lipsman!!!, Lopez-Escobar, Liu***, Machedon, 

Millson, Nochetto, Novikovtt, Osborn, Pego, Rosenberg, Rudolpht, 

Schafer, Schwartz, Slud, Sweet, Tadmor***!!, Washington, Wolfe, 

Wolpertt!!!, Yang, Yorkett*** 

Associate Professors: Berg, Dancis, Dolgopyat, Helzer, Hunt***, Smith, 

von Petersdorff, Warner, Winkelnkemper, Wu 

Assistant Professors: Dolzmann, B., Haines, Li, Ramachandran, Trivisa, Yu 

Professors Emeriti: Alexander, Auslander, Babuskatt, Brace, Chu, Correl, 

Edmundson, Ehrlich, Ellis, Goldberg, Goldhaber, Good, Heins, Horvath, 

Hubbard, Hummel, Kellogg, Kirwan, Kleppner, Lehner, Markley Neri, Olver, 

Owings, Syski, Zedek 

Associate Professors Emeriti: Sather, Schneider 

Affiliate Professors: O'Leary, Stewart, Young 

Adjunct Professor: Rinzel 

tDistinguished ScholarTeacher 

tt Distinguished University Professor 

**Joint Appointment: Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

***Joint Appointment: IPST 

IDirector, AMSC 

IIDIrector, CSCAMM 

!!!Associate Dean, CMPS 

!!!!Dean, CMPS 

!!!!!Chancellor, USM 

The program in mathematics leads to a degree of Bachelor of Science in 
mathematics and offers students training in preparation for graduate work, 
teaching, and positions in government or industry. Mathematical training is 
integrated with computer use in several courses. Because a strong 
mathematical background is important in several fields, over a third of 
UMCP mathematics majors are double majors. Additional information on 
these topics and mathematics is available from the department website. 

Requirements for Major 

There are three tracks for the major, the traditional track the secondary 
education track, and the statistics track. The secondary education track is 
for students seeking to become certified to teach mathematics at the 
secondary level. Each mathematics major must complete each required 
course with a grade of C or better. 

TRADITIONAL TRACK 

Major Requirements; 

1. The introductory sequence MATH 140,141,240, 241 or the honors 
sequence MATH 350-351. Completion of MATH 340 satisfies the 
requirement for MATH 241; completion of MATH 340-341 satisfies 
the requirement for MATH 240-241. 

2. One of the courses MATH 246, 341, 414, 415, 436, 462. 

3. Eight MATH/ AMSC/ STAT courses at the 400-level or higher, at 
least four of which are taken at College Park. The eight courses 
must include: 

(a) At least one course from MATH 401, 403, 405. 

(b) One course from AMSC 460,466. 

(c) MATH 410 (completion of MATH 350-351 exempts the student 
from this requirement and (e) below; students receive credit for 
two 400-level courses.) 

Students are strongly encouraged to complete MATH 310 prior 
to attempting MATH 410. 

(d) A one-year sequence which develops a particular area of 
mathematics in depth, chosen from the following list: 



(i) 
(ii) 
(ill) 
(iv) 

(V) 

(vi) 



MATH 410411 
MATH 410412 
MATH 403404 
MATH 403405 
MATH 446447 
STAT 410420 



132 Mathematics 



(e) The remaining 400-level IVIATH/ AIVISC/ STAT courses are 
electives, but cannot include any of: I^IATH 400, 461, 478, or 
STAT 464. Also, students with a strong interest in applied 
mathematics may, with the approval of the Undergraduate 
Office, substitute two courses (with strong mathematics 
content) from outside the Mathematics Department for one 
upper-level elective course. 

4. One course from CMSC 106, 114, 131, 132 orENEE114, orPHYS 
165. Students may be exempt from this requirement if he or she 
can demonstrate adequate programming knowledge from prior 
course work experience. 

5. One of the following supporting three-course sequences. These are 
intended to broaden the student's mathematical experience. Other 
sequences might be approved by the Undergraduate Office but they 
would have to make use of mathematical ideas, comparable to the 
sequences on this list. 

(a) (i) PHYS 161-262-263 

(ii) PHYS 161-260/1-270/1 
(iii) PHYS 171-272-273 

(iv) PHYS 141-142, and an upper-level physics course 
approved by the Mathematics Department 

(b) ENES 102, PHYS 161, ENES 220 

(c) (i) CMSC 114-214 and one of CMSC 311, 330 
(ii) CMSC 114-250-351 

(d) CHEM 103-113, and one of CHEM 227, 233 

(e) ECON 200-201 (previously ECON 201-203), and one of ECON 
305 or306 

(f) BMGT 220-221-340. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION TRACK 
Major Requirements: 

1. The introductory sequence MATH 140,141,240, 241 or the honors 
sequence MATH 350-351. Completion of MATH 340 satisfies the 
requirement for MATH 241; completion of MATH 340-341 satisfies 
the requirement for MATH 240-241. 

2. One of the courses MATH 246, 341, 401, 420, 452, 462 or AMSC 
460 or466. 

3. Seven MATH/ AMSC/ STAT courses at the 400-level or higher, at 
least four of which are taken at College Park. The seven courses 
must include: 

(a) MATH 410 (completion of MATH 350-351 exempts the student 
from this requirement; students receive credit for two 400-level 
courses.) Students are strongly encouraged to complete MATH 
310 prior to attempting MATH 410. 

(b) MATH 402 or MATH 403 

(c) MATH 430 

(d) STAT 400 or STAT 410 

(e) At least one course from MATH 406, 445, 446, 447, 450, 456 
or475. 

The remaining 400-level MATH/AMSC/STAT courses are electives, but 
cannot include any of: MATH 400, 461, 478, or STAT 464. 

4. One course from CMSC 106,114, 131, 132, ENEE 114 or PHYS 
165. Student may be exempt from this requirement if he or she can 
demonstrate adequate programming knowledge from prior course or 
work experience. 

5. EDCI 450 and451. 

6. One of the following supporting two course sequences. These are 
intended to broaden the student's mathematical experience. 

(a) CHEM 103 and 104 

(b) CHEM 103 and 113 

(c) PHYS 221 and 222 

(d) PHYS 161 and 262 

(e) PHYS 161-260/1 

(f) PHYS 141 and 142 

(g) BSCI 105 and 106 

(h) ASTR 200 and a second 3-credit ASTR course, excluding ASTR 
100, 101, 110, and 111. 

(i) METO 200 and 201, and any 400 level METO course. 

(j) GEOLIOO and 110, and one of GEOL 322 orGEOL341. 
The student-teaching pair EDCI 450-451 is 15 credits and has 
further prerequisites in the College of Education. In order to take 
these courses the student must be admitted into the College of 
Education. A student in the secondary education track of the 
mathematics major would normally be expected to receive a double 
major in Mathematics and Mathematics Education. 



STATISTICS TRACK 
Major Requirements: 

1. The introductory sequence MATH 140,141,240, 241 or the honors 
sequence MATH 350-351. Completion of MATH 340 satisfies the 
requirement for MATH 241; completion of MATH 340-341 satisfies 
the requirement for MATH 240-241. 

2. One course from MATH 246, 341 and 414. 

3. Eight additional courses, at least four of which must be taken at 
College Park. The eight courses are prescribed as follows: 

(a) One course from MATH 410 and 350 

(b) One course from AMSC 460 and 466 

(c) One course from MATH 401 and 405 

(d) STAT 410 

(e) One course from STAT 401a nd 420 

(f) STAT 430 

(g) Two additional courses from the following list: 

(i) Any 400-level or higher STAT courses except STAT 464 
(ii) MATH 351, 411, 412, 414, 420, 464 
(iii) AMSC 477 
(iv) BIOM 402 

4. One course from CMSC 106, 114, 131, 132 or ENEE 114. Student 
may be exempt from this requirement if he or she can demonstrate 
adequate programming knowledge from prior course or work 
experience. 

5. One of the three-course supporting sequences listed in the 
"Traditional Track" above (part 5). 

AREAS OF STUDY 

Within the Department of Mathematics there are a number of identifiable 
areas which students can pursue to suit their own goals and interests. 
They are briefly described below. Note that they do overlap and that 
students need not confine themselves to one of them. 

1. Pure mathematics: the courses which clearly belong in this area 
are: MATH 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 410, 411, 414, 415, 417, 
430, 432, 436, 437, 445, 446, 447, 452, STAT 410, 411, 420. 
Students preparing for graduate school in mathematics should 
include MATH 403, 405, 410 and 411 in their programs. MATH 
463 (or 660) and MATH 432 (or 730) are also desirable. Other 
courses from the above list and graduate courses are 
also appropriate. 

2. Secondary teaching: When selecting the seven courses for the 
Secondary Education Track, students are encouraged to choose 
the following as they are required for certification to teach 
mathematics at the secondary level: MATH 402 or 403, MATH 

430, and STAT 400. The following additional courses are 
particularly suited for students preparing to teach: MATH 401, 
MATH 406, MATH 445, and MATH 475. 

EDHD 413, EDHD 426, EDPL 301, EDCI 463, EDCI 350, EDCI 355, 
EDCI 457, EDCI 450 and EDCI 451 are required for certification. 
Before registering for the EDCI 350, EDCI 355, EDCI 457, EDCI 
450, or EDCI 451 courses, students must apply for and be 
admitted to the College of Education's Secondary Education 
Program. For more information, see the College of Education 
website: www.education.umd.edu/ studentinfo. 

3. Statistics: For a student with a Bachelors degree seeking work 
requiring some statistical background, the minimal program is STAT 
400-401. To work primarily as a statistician, one should combine 
STAT 400-401 with STAT 430 and at least one more statistics 
course, most suitably, STAT 440 or STAT 450. A stronger 
sequence is STAT 410, 420, 430. This offers a better 
understanding and wider knowledge of statistics and is a general 
purpose program (i.e., does not specify one area of application). 
For economics applications STAT 400, 401, 430, 440, 450, and 
AMSC 477 should be considered. For operations research AMSC 
477 and/ or STAT 411 should be added or perhaps substituted for 
STAT 450. To prepare for graduate work, STAT 410 and 420 give 
the best background, with STAT 405, 411, 430, 440, 450 added 
at some later stage. 

4. Computational mathematics: there are a number of math courses 
which emphasize the computational aspects of mathematics 
including the use of the computer. They are AMSC 460, 466, MATH 

431, 450, 456, 475 and STAT 430. Students interested in this 
area should take CMSC 114, 214 as early as possible, and CMSC 
420, 211 are also suggested. 



Mathematical Statistics Program 133 



5. Applied mathematics: the courses which lead most rapidly to 
applications are the courses listed above in 3 and 4 and MATH 
401, 412, 414, 415, 420, 431, 436, 462, 463, 464, and 
MATH/AMSC 420 and 472. A student interested in applied 
mathematics should obtain, in addition to a solid training in 
mathematics, a good knowledge of at least one area in which 
mathematics is currently being applied. Concentration in this area 
is good preparation for employment in government and industry or 
for graduate study in applied mathematics. 

Advising 

Advising for math majors is mandatory. Students are required to sign up for 
an advising appointment at the math undergraduate office window (1117 
Mathematics Building), beginning the week before preregistration. 

Honors 

The Mathematics Honors Program is designed for students showing 
exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. Its aim is to give a student 
the best possible mathematics education. Participants are selected by the 
Departmental Honors Committee during the first semester of their junior 
year. A precise statement of the requirements may be found at 
www.math.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ opportunities 

The department also offers a special department honors sequence MATH 
340-341 for promising freshmen with a strong mathematical background 
(including calculus). Enrollment in the sequence is normally by invitation but 
any interested student may apply to the Mathematics Department for 
admission. Participants in the University Honors Program may also enroll in 
special honors sections of the lowerlevel mathematics courses (MATH 
140H, 141H, 240H, 241H, 246H). Students in Math 340-341 and the 
special honors sections need not be math majors. 

The department has in the past also offered an even more challenging 
honors sequence for freshmen, MATH 350-351 (previously MATH 250- 
251). This sequence covered MATH 410411, MATH 240 and MATH 241 
with enrichment. 

The mathematics departmental honors sequence and the University Honors 
Program are distinct, and enrollment in one does not imply acceptance in 
the other. 

Combined B.S./ |V| .A. Program in JVlatliematics 

The Department of Mathematics offers a combined B.S./M.A. degree 
program for students with exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. 
Students enrolled in the Combined Degree Program may count up 
to 9 credits of coursework taken for their undergraduate degree 
toward the M.A. degree as well. For further information, please 
consult the Mathematics Department's Web Page: 
www.math.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ majors 

Citations 

The Department of Mathematics offers Citations in the following areas: 

Actuarial Mathematics 

Applied Mathematical Modeling 

Statistics 

Discrete Mathematics 

A Citation offers a structured program of study outside a student's major. A 
student who completes a Citation program (15-17 credits) will receive a 
certificate, and the accomplishment will be noted on the student's transcript. 
See www.math.umd.edu/ undergrad/ citations.html for detailed information. 



Carol Karp Award: A monetary award is made to a senior math major for an 
outstanding achievement in logic. 

Edgar Krahn Scholarship: A monetary award is made on the basis of 
performance in the Maryland High School Mathematics Competition. 

Higginbotham Prize: A monetary award is made to an outstanding junior 
math major in the spring. 

Milton Abromowitz Award: A monetary award is made to an outstanding 
junior or senior math major in the spring. 

Outstanding Senior Award: A monetary award is made to the outstanding 
graduating math major. 

Secondary Education-Mathematics Scholarship: Up to two are awarded in 
the spring to Secondary Education-Mathematics double majors. 

For further information on these and other awards, consult 
www.math.umd.edu/ undergraduate/ opportunities 

Placement in Mathematics Courses 



The Department of Mathematics has a large offering to accommodate a great 
variety of backgrounds, interests, and abilities. The department permits 
students to take any course for which they have the appropriate background, 
regardless of formal course work. For example, students with a high school 
calculus course may be permitted to begin in the middle of the calculus 
sequence even if they do not have advanced standing. Students may obtain 
undergraduate credit for mathematics courses in any of the following ways: 
passing the appropriate CEEB Advanced Placement Examination, passing 
standardized CLEP examinations and through the department's Credit-by- 
Examination. Students are urged to consult with advisers from the 
Department of Mathematics to assist with proper placements. 

Statistics and Probability and 
Applied Mathematics 

Courses in statistics and probability and applied mathematics are offered 
by the Department of Mathematics. These courses are open to non-majors 
as well as majors, and carry credit in mathematics. Students wishing to 
concentrate in the above may do so by choosing an appropriate program 
under the Department of M athematics. 



MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS PROGRAM 
College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1105 Mathematics, 301405-5061 

www .math.umd.edu/ stat 

Director: Kedem 

Professors: Freidlin, Kagan, Kedem, Liu***, Slud, Yang 

Associate Professor: Smith 

Professor Emeritus: Syski 

***Joint Appointment: IPST 

The Mathematical Statistics Program is a graduate program for students 
concentrating in the study of Statistics, Probability and their application in 
real world problems. An undergraduate program emphasizing Statistics is 
available to majors in Mathematics, and undergraduate citations in 
Statistics and in Actuarial Mathematics are also available. All STAT courses 
carry credit in Mathematics. 

Course code: STAT 



Awards 

Aaron Strauss Scholarships. Up to two are awarded each year to 
outstanding junior math majors. The recipient receives full remission of 
(in-state) tuition and fees. Applications may be obtained early in the 
spring semester from the Mathematics Undergraduate Office, 1117 
Mathematics Building. 



Aziz Mathematics Scholarship: A monetary award is made on the basis of 
mathematical excellence. 



134 Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation 



M EASUREM ENT, STATISTICS AND 
EVALUATION (EDMS) 

College of Education 

1230 Benjamin Building, 301405-3624 

www . education. um d.edu/ EDM S 

Professor and Chair: Lissitz 

Professors: Dayton, Hancocl<, l^lacready, l^lislevy, Roberts 

Associate Professors: Roberts, Schafer (Emeritus) 

Assistant Professor: Hendricl<son 

Adjunct Professor: Peng 

Affiliated Professor: Kopriua, Rudner, Wiley 

Affiliated Associate Professor: Von Seeker 

Affiliated Assistant Professor: Fein 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

The Department of Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation in the College of 
Education offers a 5th Year MA program for undergraduates interested in 
quantitative methods. The purpose of this program is to allow highly motivated 
undergraduates the opportunity to develop their skills in quantitative methods. 
Students complete a BA(or BS) in their chosen major area along with an MA in 
Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation in just five years. 

The Department of Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation offers courses 
in classroom management, applied statistics, and computer-based 
simulation (Monte Carlo method) for undergraduates. These courses 
provide a foundation in methods that are very useful for most career 
choices. The depar