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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland, College Park, 2008-2009"

Under^-aduabeCat^og 200G/2009 



A bout the Catalog Page 2 

About the Catalog 

Dry ineCat^og The contents of the 2008-09 onl i ne Catal og i s current as of M ay 30, 2008. 

Prog'am reqii remenbs contai ned i n the U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ndergraduate Catal og supersede 
any i nf ormati on whi ch may be contai ned i n any bul I eti n of any school or department. H owe/er, the 
provi si ons of thi s publ i cati on are not to be regarded as a contract between the student and the U ni versi 1 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change its policies, rules, regulations, 
requi rements for graduation, course offeri ngs, tuition, fees, other charges, or any other contents of 
this catalog at any ti me. 

Hyperlinte: This catalog contains hyperlinks to other informational resources at the University of 
M aryl and. The i nformation contai ned i n these I i nks is not a part of the official catalog. 



Piislications 

Under^aduate Catalog The current U ndergraduate Catal og, as wd I as past versi ons, are aval I abl e 
at this site. 

GraduabeCatalog The online graduate catalog is at: www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog. For 
i nf ormati on cal I 301-314-4198. 

Regdration Glide: The Registration Guide I ists registration dates and procedures, deadi i nes, fees, 
and general i nf ormati on. 1 1 i s aval I abl e pri or to earl y regi strati on for the spri ng and f al I semesters. 
There i s a second editi on for the f al I semester that i s aval I abl e several weeks before the begi nni ng of 
the semester. T he Regi strati on G ui de i s aval I abl e to al I students free of charge and can be pi eked up 
attheMitchdl Building, Stamp Student Union, HornbakeLibraryandMcKeldin Library. The 
Schedule of Classes is aval I able online at: www.testudo.umd.edLyScheduleOfClasses.html. 

Departmental Brochires Smal I brochures descri bi ng many of the departments and programs at 
the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park, are aval I abl e free. Wri te to tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admissions, Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, Col I ege Park, MD 20742, or contact the 
department di recti y at 301-314-8385. 



A txiuc tne u ni versi ty 



FcQed 



About the University 

Campus Achrini^ation atxJ Deans 

C d lege Park Adnri nistration 

C. D. MobE^J r., President 

Nari man Farvardi n, Seni or V i ce P resi dent for A caderni c Aff ai rs and P rovost 

L inda C lement; V i ce Presi dent for Student Affai rs 

Mel BernstEln, Vice Presi dent for Researcin 

J effrey C. Huskamp Vice President and Chief I nformation Officer 

Dou^asM. Duxan, VicePresidentforAdninistrativeAffairs 

BrodieRemln^bon, Vice Presi dent for University Relations 

College Park Administrative Deans 

Doma B. Hanriltion, Associ ate Provost for Academi c Affai rs and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

Deader Vikor, I nteri m Dean of L i brari es 

Siba Samal, Associ ate Dean, Col I ege of Veteri nary M edi ci ne, M aryl and Campus 

CharlesA. Caramello, Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School 



Academic Csiendar 2008-2009 



Suirmer Session 1, 2006 

First Day of Classes June2, 2008 

Holiday July 4, 2008 

Last Day of Classes July 11,2008 

Suirmer Session 1 1 , 2006 

First Day of Classes July 14, 2008 

Last Day of Classes August 24, 2008 

Fall SemeSber, 2006 

First Day of Classes September 2, 2008 

Thanksgiving Recess November 27-28, 2008 

Last Day of Classes December 12, 2008 

Study Day December 13-14, 2008 

Final Examinations December 15-20, 2008 

Main Commencement Ceremony December 20, 2008 

Col I ege Commencement Ceremonies December 21, 2008 



Atxiuctneuniversity FSQeA 



WinberTernrv2009 

First Day of Classes J anuary 5, 2009 

Martin Luther King Holiday J anuary 19, 2009 

Last Day of Classes J anuary 23, 2009 

Spring Semester, 2009 

First Day of Classes J anuary 26, 2009 

Spring Recess March 16-20, 2009 

Last Day of Classes May 12, 2009 

Study Day May 13, 2009 

Final Exams May 14-20, 2009 

SeniorDay May 21, 2009 

Main Commencement Ceremony May 21, 2009 

Col lege Commencement Ceremonies May 22, 2009 

F utijre acadenni c cal endars can be vi ewed at www. provost. umd.edu/cal endar/ 

Acxreditation 

The University of Maryland, College Park, is accredited by the Middle States Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools and is a member of the Association of American Universities. I n 
addition, individual colleges, schools, and dqDartments are accredited by such groups as the 
Accrediting Council on Education in J ournalismand Mass Communications, Accreditation Board of 
E ngi neeri ng and Technol ogy, A meri can A ssembi y of Col I egi ate School s of B usi ness, A meri can 
Association for Marriage arid Family Therapy, American Chemical Society, American Library 
A ssoci ati on, A meri can Psychol ogi cal A ssoci ati on, A meri can Soci ety for L andscape A rchi tectijre 
A meri can V eteri nary M edi cal A ssoci ati on Counci I on A ccredi tati on, Comrni ssi on on A ccredi tati on 
for Dietetics Education, Commission on Rehabilitation Education, Council for Accreditation of 
Counseling and Related Educational Programs, Council on Academic Accreditation of the 
American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Education for Public Health, Institute 
for Food Technologies, National Architectijral Accrediting Board, National Association of School 
Psychologists, National Association of School of Music, National Council for A ccredi tati on of 
Teacher Education, Planning Accreditation Board, Public Relations Soci ety of America. 

Evaluated Rattier Than Accredited: 

M aryl and Sea G rant Col I ege ( N ati onal Sea G rant Revi ew Panel ) , Water Resources Center ( U ni ted 
States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey). 

Vdidated Rattier Thai Accredited: Royal I nstitute of Briti sh Architects (RIBA). 

For more information about Accreditation seewww.provost.umd.edu/campus_review_2007/ 

Colleges atxJ Schools 



A txiuc tne u ni versi ty 



FSQeb 



Colleges and Schools 

Collegeof AgricultureSf Natural Resources 

School of ArchitBcture, Planning & Preservation 

Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Collegeof Computer, MatiTematical & Physical Sciences 

Collegeof Education 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 

Collegeof I nformation Studies 

Phillip Merill College of Journalism 

Collegeof Chemical and Life Sciences 

School of Public Health 

School of Public Policy 
U ndergraduate Studi es 



Dean 

Cheng-i Wei 
Garth Rockcastie 
James Harris 
Edward Montgomery 
Stephen Hal peri n 
Donna L.Wiseman 

Herb Rabi n, I nteri m Dean 

J enniferj . Preece 

Lee Thornton (I nteri m) 

Norma A Newel I 

Roberts. Gold 

StEveFettsr 
DonnaB. Hamilton 



Admission Kequirarots and Application Procedures Psget 

AcMsaon Reqiirementsand Application Prooedires 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 



The University of Maryland is a publicly funded land grant institution and tine flagship of tiie University 
System of Maryland. The University's Mission Statement commits i t to achio/ing excellence as the Staters 
pri mary center for research and graduate education and tine i nstitution of choice for undergraduate shxients of 
exceptional ability and promise. Consistent witiitiiisMission, tine University counts the diversity of its 
shxients arrong its greatest sb'engtiis and as an i ntegral component of the educational process arid academic 
excellence. 

The undergraduate admissions process, which reflects tiie University's educational M ission, seeks to identify 
tiiose applicants, who as individuals and as a group, will enrich and benefit from tiie carrpus learning 
envi ronment, arxJ tiius benefit tiie enti re shxient body. The process is sb'uchjred to bui Id enteri ng classes of 
shxients whose vari ed backgrounds and experi ences provi de substanti al ^i dence of tiiei r potenti al to: 

1. Meet tiieUniversity's requirements for acadenricsuccess. 

2. Enrich tiie University as a heterogeneous community. 

3. Add new perspectives to tiie Universit/'s curriculum and scholarly pursuits. 

4. DQ/d op personal ski 1 1 s, i ncl udi ng I eadershi p, self-corf i dence, and i ntd I echjal 
engagement. 

5. Conhibutetotiieintellechjal, cultural, social and political life of tiie University, 
State, and Nation. 

As tiie University nxBt rreke fine distinctions arrong large numbers of highly qualified applicants, tiie 
ability to assess consistentiy all irforrration presented in tiie application becomes increasingly important 
Therefore, tiie University employs a rigorous ro/iew process tiiat engages tiie expertise of professional 
educators i n perform! ng i ndividual ized and hoi istic eval uations of each application. Each appi leant is 
assessed on tiie basis of achiew'ements and potential i n a broad range of academic categories, viewed i n tiie 
context of tiie opporhjni ti es and chal I enges tiie appI i cant faced. 
These categori es i ncl ude: 

1. Sfrengtii of educational perforrrence, as measured by tiie nature and rigor of high 
school curri cul um and academi c achi o/ements. 

2. Potential for col lege success, as^idenced by performance on nationally norrred 
standardized tests. 

3. Potential to promote beneficial educational outeomes and to make a positive 
corrtri bution to carrpus and community I ife. 

4. Persistence, and commitinent to educational excellence, as evidenced by 
demonshBted success i n faci ng adversity and overcomi ng obstacles. 



Application FornrE 

U ndergraduate appI i cati on forms rray be requested and submi tted on- 1 i ne vi a tiie web at www.uga.umd.edu . 
by calling 1-800-422-5867 or 301-314-8385, by sending an decbionic mail message to um-admitta>umd.edu . 
ty writing to tiie Off ice of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchdl Building, University of Maryland, College 
Park, M D 20742-5235, or by visiti ng your high school guidance office. 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures P^e / 

Application Fee 

A non- ref undabi e $55 appi i cati on f ee i s requi red wi th each appi i cati on. 

Fall SemeSber Freshman Adrrisaon 

The University of Maryland strongly encourages all applicants to apply by our priority application deadline 
to assure best consideration for admission, merit scholarshi ps, and i nvitation to tine U niversity Honors 
Program or College Park Scholars. Admission to the University of M aryland is competitive. We 
receive nDretiian 25,000 applications for a fall freshman class of over 4,000. As a result, we are unableto 
offer admission to al I students who have the abi I ity to be academical ly successful at M aryland. A completed 
application includes an official high school transcript, SAT or ACT scores, essay, guidance counsel or 
recommendati on form. Part I appi i cati on f ormi and appi i cati on fee. 

The University uti I izes a two part appi ication. Students who submit completed appi ications by tiie priority 
appi ication deadi i ne of Decerriber 1 wi 1 1 be mai led a decision letter by mid-February. Students who submit 
completed appi ications by tiie general appi ication deadline of January 20 will be mailed a final admission 
decision on April 1. Applications received afterj anuary 20 are re»/iewed on a space-available basis. Because 
of space I i mitations, tiie university is unable to offer admission to al I qual if led appi icants. 

The fol I owi ng cal endar descri bes tiie admi ssi on process for Fal I semester freshman appi i cants: 

Deoarlxr 1: Priority application date: Students who submit tiiei r compi ete appi i cati ons by 
this date (postmarked) will receive best consideration for fal I admission, merit scholarships, and 
invitation to University Honors or Col lege Park Scholars. This is not a binding early decision 
program; all admitted students have until May 1 to confirm tiiei r enrollment. This is also 
tiie deadline for international students, as well as U.S. citizens and permanent resi dents wi tin any 
non-U. S. academic records. 

J anuary 20: General application date: Applications received after tills date will be re»/iewed 
for admi ssi on and deci si ons rd eased on a rol I i ng, space-aval I abl e basi s. 

Mid-February: Adrrisaon dedsions released to priority applicants by rrid-February: 

Applicants may be admitted, denied, admitted for Spring, or asked to submit first-semester, 
senior year grades. 

February 15: Priority financial aid application deadline: For nx>re i nformation about 
need- based financial aid, see chapter 2. 

May 1: Confirmation Date: DeadI i ne (postmarked) for conf i rni ng fal I enrol I ment and 
requesti ng on- campus housi ng/meal s. 

Spring SemeSber Fre^nron Adrrisaon 

The appi ication deadlinefor Spring semester freshman admission is December 1. Applications received after 
thi s date wi 1 1 be consi dered on a rol I i ng, space-aval I abl e basi s The deadI i ne for Spri ng F reshman admi ssi on 
for i nternational students, as wd I as al I U .S. citizens and permanent residents witii any non-U .S. academic 
records is August 1st. A completed application includes an official high school transcript, SAT or ACT 
scores, essay, gui dance counsd or recommendati on formi Parti appi ication form, and appi ication fee. 

Financial Aid Applications 

The priority deadline for Financial Aid is February 15. Students seeking financial assistance should complete 
the FA FSA before reed vingtiidr letter of admission. More information is aval I able about Financial A id in 
chapter 2. 

Early Adrrisaon Options for Hi^Achie/ing Hi^ School Students 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures P^e t 

Concirrent Enrollment: TalentBd high school seniors have the opportunity to enrol I atthe University of 
M ary I and for two courses, or so/en credi ts, each semester. Successful appi i cants wi 1 1 have pursued a 
ri gorous hi gh school program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and abi I i ty achi ^ed over 
time.Toapply, students must submit: the completed application and fee; high school transcript; an essay 
explaining why they are interested in the program; a letter of recommendation from the high school; anda 
letter of permission from the parents or guardian. Students must live withi n commuti ng distance. Tuition is 
assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply infull. 

Sunmer Enrdlnrenb High school students with a strong high school record may be considered for 
enrol I ment i n courses duri ng the summer precedi ng thd r j uni or or seni or year. They must f i I e a regul ar 
appI i cati on for undergraduate admi ssi on, i ncl udi ng an off i ci al hi gh school transcri pt. Tui ti on i s assessed on a 
per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply infull. 

Application Deadlines 

Spring: January 2 
Summer: M ay 1 
Fall: August 1 

Early Adnrisaon: Although the University of Maryland generally requires applicants to earn a high school 
diploma prior to thdrfirstfull-time registration, the university will admita limited number of well-qualified 
stLidents without high school diplomas. Successful applicants will have pursued a rigorous high school 
program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and abi I i ty achi e»/ed over ti me. Students must be 
withi n two credits of high school graduation and have the commitment of the high school to award a di ploma 
after successful completion of thefreshrren year at M aryland. To apply, students must submit: the 
compi eted appI i cati on and fee, hi gh school transcri pt and SAT or A CT resul ts, an essay expl ai ni ng how they 
will benefit from the program, and a letter of permission from the parents or guardian and a letter of support 
from the high school. Early admission students aredigibleforon-campus housing, scholarships based on 
academic achiew'ement, the University Honors Progran^ and College Park Scholars. Early application is 
advised. 

Hi^ School Equivalency Exanrination (GED) 

M aryl and resi dents who are at I east 16 years of age and who have not received a hi gh school di pi oma may 
be considered for admission provided they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency 
(GED) certificate. In order to be considered for admi ssi on, the applicant must present an above average total 
score as wd I as above average scores on each of the five parts of the test. 

Non-AccreditGct/Non-App-OMod Hi^ School 

Students from non-accredited/non- approved high schools who seek admission to the University of Maryland 
shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduabe A dmi ssi ons for i nf ormati on. 

Home-Schooled Students 

H ome-school ed appI i cants shoul d meet the same mi ni mum hi gh school course requi rerrents expected of al I 
applicants. Additional information from homeschooled students is required in the foil owing areas of the 
application: 

Tmnsaipt should recave course descri ptions, books used, methods of e»/al uation, and the 
grades reed ved, as wd I as a statement provi di ng general i nformati on about the homeschool 
curriculum. If college-le»/d courses have been taken simultaneously and official college 
transcript should be included with the application. 

LdttsrsdF Reocxnrendsidon the University of Maryland requi res two recommendations from 
al I freshman appI i cants. I n the case of homeschool students these recommendati ons can be 
provided by 1) and individual acting inasupervisoryorevaluativecapacity with regard to the 
students curriculum, and 2) from a teacher in any setting (homeschool program, community 
col lege course, etc.). 



Aam SSI cfi Kequi raretB ana Appt I ca on Procedures 



p^ey 



ADVANCED PLACEMEISTT (AP) CREDIT 

TheUniversity of Maryland encourages applicants to seek A P credit so that academically successful 
students may move forward i n thd r programs at an appropri ate pace. H ow^er, credi t i s not granted for al I 
exams offered by the Col lege Board. Credits are accepted and courses are exempted, based on departmental 
approval , accordi ng to the chart bd ow. Students shoul d arrange to have thd r scores sent di rectJy to the 
University of M aryland from the Educational Testi ng Service; the code is 5814. Students should also i nform 
their advisors at Orientation that they anticipate receiving A P credit because this information may affect 
thei r pi acement i n subj ect- matter courses. 

If a student has already received AP credi tat another institution, this credi twill bereew'aluated. The score 
received must be equivalent to the minimum score the University of Maryland accepted at the time the test 
was taken; otherwi se, the credi t wi 1 1 not be d i gi bl e f or transfer. A P credi ts that are accepted are recorded as 
transfer credit on University of Maryland records and figure in the total number of credits earned toward 
graduation. Students may not recaveAP credit for an equivalent course taken at the University of Maryland 
or dsewhere. If students earn credit in a course equivalent to an A P examfor which they also earned credit; 
the A P credi twill be ddeted from thd r records. Students should check with thd r advisors for detailed 
information on the assignment of AP credit. 

PI ease note that the chart represents a general outiineof A P credit. Inall cases, credit is available only for 
grades of 3 or hi gher, subj ect to ongoi ng departmental reeval uati on. A 1 1 departments reserve the ri ght to 
reew'aluate the content of exams and to change the assignment of credit and course equivalencies. Any new 
exams offered after February 15 may or may not be ew'al uated by the appropriate department. Students 
should check with thd r advisor at Orientation. 

Certain departments, particularly Mathematics and Physics, have separate criteria for placement in courses 
and the assi gnment of credi t. Students shoul d check wi th tiiose departments for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. A 1 1 
entering freshmen will be placed in math courses according to the University of Maryland math placement 
exam. 

2008- 2009 Univeraty of Maryland Advanced Placement (AP) Exansand Credit Table 



AP ExanTitle 


Score 


RdabQd 
Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


NntF! 


ArtHidxry 


3,4,5 


ARTH 
100 


3 


No 


Yes 


ARTH 100 fills CORE-Arts requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-1479. 


Art 












Students i nteresled i n establ i shi ng credi t for 
specific courses must submit portfol io for 
valuation; call 405-1442 


Drawing 


4,5 


ARTT 
110 


3 


Yes 


No 


General 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Bidociv 


4 


BSCI 
105 aid 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


BSCI fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sdences; italsofillsCORE-Lab(Life) Sdence 




LL 
Elective 



Adm SSI oi Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures 



P^eic 





5 


BSCI 
105 axl 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


requirements. Lontacc tneLOiiegeor Lire 
Sciences for placement, 405-2080. 




BSCI 
106 


Chenidry 


4 


CHEM 
131/132 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


CHEM fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sciences; italsofillsCORE-Lab(Physical) 
Sci ence requi rement. Contact department for 
placement, 405-1791. 


5 


CHEM 

131/132 

and 


6 


Yes 


Yes 




CHEM 
271 


1 
N/A 


N/A 






CcnrfxitEr Science 












Creditwill begivenfordtiiertiTeA ortiieAB 
exam, not botii. Credit may be earned for botii 
tiieC-H-andJ AVA exams. Students receiving an 
acceptabi e score on tiie J AVA exam (5 on A , 4 
or 5 on A B) are exempt from CM SC 131. Contact 
department for placenrent, 405-2672. 


1 
JAVA (2004+) A 5 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


'1 
JAVA (2004+) A B 4,5 

II 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


C++(pre-2004) A 4,5 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


C++(pre-2004) ' 
AB 


1 
4 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 




5 


LL 
Elective 


6 


No 


No 




Economcs 












Economi cs maj ors must score 4 or 5 to receive 
credittoward the major. Eitiier ECON fills one 
of twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requi rements. Contact department for pi acement; 
405-3513 


1 

Macroeconomics 

1 


1 

4,5 

1 


ECON 
201 


3 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 


1 
Microeconomics 


1 
3 


ECON 
105 


3 


No 


Yes 




4,5 


ECON 
200 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 




En^i^ 












Students witii score of 4 or 5 on Lang and Cor t ip 
exam satisfy CORE-Fundamental Studies 
Freshman Writing requi rement (*ENGL 101). 
Students witii credit for tiie Lanauaae exam may 
not receive creditfor ENGL 291 or its 
equivalent. ENGL 240fillsCORE-Literature 
requi rement. Contact department for pi acement, 
405-3825. 


1 
Literature &Comp 


1 
3 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 




4,5 


LL 

Elective 

and 


6 


No 


No 






ENGL 
240 




Yes 


Yes 


Language & Cortip 


3 

1 


LL 
.Elective 


3 


No 


No 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures 



P^ell 





4,5 


ENGL 
101 


3 


No 


* 






Env. Sdenoe 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


Yes 


ENSPlOl fills CORE-Physical Science 
requirement. 


French 












Lanquacie Students witii score of 4 who wish to 


Language 


4 


FREN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 


1 

1 


5 


FREN 
204 aid 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


continue should enroll in FREN 204; witii score 
of 5 must enroll in FREN 250 or higher. 
L i terature Studer its wi tin score of 4 shoul d enrol 1 
in FREN 250; witii score of 5 may enroll in 
300-l^el courses. FREN 203, 204 or 211 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement; FREN 250 fills 
CORE-Literature requirement. Contact 
department for placement, 405-4034. 






FREN 
211 


No 


Yes 


Literature 


4 


FREN 
204 


3 


Yes 


Yes 




5 


FREN 
204 aid 


6 


Yes 


Yes 






FREN 
250 


Yes 


Yes 




Geo^-aphy, Human 


4,5 


GEOG 
202 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


GEOG 202 fi 1 Is one of two CORE 
Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement 405-4073. 


GernrBii 


4 


GERM 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 


Students witii score of 4 who wi sh to conti nue 
must enrol 1 i n GERM 204; witii score of 5 m ist 
enroll in GERM 301. Contact department for 
placement, 405-4091. 


5 


GERM 
203 aid 


7 


No 


Yes 




GERM 
204 


Yes 

1 


Yes 


Go^t& Pditics 












GVPT 170 fills one of two 
CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement, 405-4124. 


UnitPTl States 

1 


3,4,5 

1 1 


GVPT 
170 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 


1 
Comparative 

1 


1 
3,4,5 

1 


GVPT 
280 


3 


1 
Yes 

1 


No 


Hidory 












U.S. History: A score of 4will be awarded tiiree 


United States 

1 


4 

1 


HIST 
156 or 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 






HIST 
157 


1 
Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 

1 


credits as chosen by tiie student (HI ST 156 or 
HIST 157). A scoreof 5will beawardedsix 
credits (HIST 156aid 157). Eitiierfills 
CORE- History requirement 




5 


HIST 
156 aid 


6 


1 
Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 






HIST 
157 


Yes 


Yes 





Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures 



P^el^ 



European 


4 


HIST 
112 or 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


European Historv: A scoreof 4 will be awarded 






HIST 
113 


Yes 


Yes 


3 credits as chosen by the student (HIST 112 or 
HIST 113). A scoreof 5 will be awarded 6 
credit5(HIST112aidHIST113). HIST 112 
fills CORE-Humanities requirement; HIST 113 
f i 1 1 s CORE- H i stnry requi rement. 




5 


HIST 

112 

and 


6 


Yes 


Yes 






HIST 
113 


Yes 


Yes 




World 


4,5 


HIST 
219 


3 


1 
Yes 


Yes 


World History: fil Is CORE-History requirement 


see department for placement, 405-4272. 


Itryiai 


4,5 










U nder r^i ew; contact department for pi acement. 
405-4031. 


Latin 












Students with score of 4 or 5 i n any A P Lati n tpst 
may not take LATN 201 or 1 ower for credi t. 
Students with scoreof 4 or 5 in rrurethan one 
AP Latin test may receive additional credit. 
Contact department for placement and credit 
adjiishnent, 405-2013. 


Vergil 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 

1 


Catul 1 us & Cicero 

1 


4,5 

1 


LATN 
201 


4 


1 
Yes 


Yes 

1 


1 

Catul 1 us & Horace 

1 


1 

4,5 

1 


LATN 
201 


4 


1 

Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 


1 
Catul 1 us & Ovid 


1 

4,5 

1 


LATN 
201 


4 


1 
Yes 


Yes 




MathenrBtics 












*MATH 141 may be completed through 
credit-by-exam. MATH 140 fills both 
CORE-Fundamental Studies MaQi requirement 
andCORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non- lab 
requi rement. Studei ils who receive credit for 
MATH 140 or 140 & 141 may not receive credit 
for MATH 220 or 220 & 221. Contact 
department for placement, 405-5053. 


CalculusAB 


4,5 


MATH 
140^ 


4 


1 

Yes 

1 


1 

Yes 

1 


Calculus BC 


4,5 


MATH 
140 and 


8 


1 
Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 

1 






MATH 
141 


1 
Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 


1 




Calculus BC 
withAB Subscore 


4,5 


MATH 
140 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


TheCalculus BC w/ AP subscore istreated as if 
theBC exam was theAB exam. Students may 
not recdveAB subscore credit if credit was 
awarded for the BC exam. 


Music 












MUSC 130orl40fillsCORE-Arts 

H i story/Theory requi rement. M aj ors shoul d 

contact department for placement, 405-5563. 


LisLening/Literature 


3,4,5 


MUSC 
130 


3 


No 


Yes 


Theory 


4 
5 


MUSC 
140 
MUSC 
150 


3 


No 
No 


Yes 
No 





Adm SSI oi Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures 



P^elji 



Phyacs 












PHYS 121 and 122 fulfill CORELab 
( Physi cal ) Sci ence requi rement. Physi cs C 
exams f ulf i 1 1 maj or requi rements i n L if e 
Sciences, Engineering, or Physics; they also 
fulfill the CORE Lab (Physical) Science 
requirement. A score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C 
exams wi 1 1 be awarded four credits as chosen by 
the student and hi s^her advi son 
Students must have credit for A P Calculus BC to 
take the next course i n sequence. Cor iLact 
departnnentfor placement, 4055979. 


Physics B 


4,5 


PHYS 
121 axl 


8 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
122 




No 


Yes 


Physics C 












Mechanics 


4,5 


PHYS 
141 or 


4 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
161 or 


Yes 


Yes 






PHYS 
171 


Yes 


Yes 


Elec./Magnet 


4 


PHYS 
142 or 


4 


No 


Yes 


1 





PHYS 
260/1 


Yes 


Yes 




5 


PHYS 
142 or 


4 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
260/1 or 


Yes 


Yes 






PHYS 
272 


Yes 


Yes 




Psychology 


4,5 


PYSC 
100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The A P exam counts towards the 35 requi red 
major credits. If astudent enters withAP credit, 
S^he m rst cor ripl ete PSY C221 with a grade of B 
orbFtter. PSYC 100 fills one of two CORE - 
Social / Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement, 405-5866. 


Sp»ii^ 












Language Students with score of 4 who wish to 


Language 


4 


SPAN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 




5 


SPAN 
204 aid 


6 


No 


Yes 


conti nue must enrol 1 i n SPA N 204, 211 or 207; 
with score of 5 m rst enrol 1 i n 300-l^el courses. 
Literature Students with score of 4 or 5 must 
enroll in300-l^el courses. CORE: SPAN 203 
or 204 fi 1 Is CORE-H umanities requi rement; 
SPAN 221 fills CORE-Literature requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-6452. 






SPAN 
207 




Yes 


No 


Literature 


1 
4 


SPAN 
221 


3 


Yes 


Yes 




5 


SPAN 
207 aid 


Fi 


Yes 


No 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures 



P^el4 







SPAN 
221 




Yes 


Yes 






Staddics 


4,5 


STAT 
100 


3 


* 


Yes 


STAT 100 fills CORE Fundamental Math 
requirement and CORE MdUi& Fomial 
Reasoning nonlab requirement. 
* STAT 100 f i 1 1 s program requi rements i n 
certai n maj ors. Cor bul t advi sor. 





PleBseNGte LL referstoaxirsesatthelovuer (lOOand 200) leud. Studentsrmy not receive credit for 
APaxjrsesand equivalent Ui^lCPcDursesor transfer GOursesOnduding IB or CLEP). Credit vuill be 
ddeted in such casesL Decisions about applicability of axjrsestoCORE are updated on an ongoing 
basis Consult ScheduleofClassesformogt recent information. Native speakers nrey not earn AP 
credit for French, Gernron or Spani^ languagee(anrEL 



IISTTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMS (IB) AND CREDIT TABLE 

2008-2009 

The University of M aryland awards credit to students who sitfor I nternational Baccalaureate exams 
accordi ng to the tabi e bd ow. I nterested students shoul d contact the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons for 
additional information. Note: Creditawardsand course equivalencies are subject to change 

International BaccalaLreabeExamsOB) and Credit Table 





IBExan ' 
L Title _j 


1 

Score 

1 


Related 
Coirse 


Cr 


1 
1 


1 

Core 

1 


Notes 


Anttirqx]lcgy! 

|_Higher 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








U nder revi ew. Students i nterested i n A rrthropol ogy shoul d contact 
an advisor for placement 


ArtDesi^ 

|_ Higher _| 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








Under review. Students interested in Art should contact an advisor 
for placement. 


Bidogy 














|_ Higher _| 


5 


LL Elective' 


4 ' 
8 


No 


No 


BSCI 105 fills a major requirement in all Life Sciences; also fills 
CORE-Lab(Life) Science requirement ContarttiTeCollegeof Life 
Sciences for placement 405-2080. 


Higher 


6,7 


BSCI 105 

&LL 

Elective 


Yes 


Yes 
















Chemistry 














1 
Either 

1 


5 


CHEM 131 

&CHEM 

132 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


CHEM fillsrequirementforall Life Science maj ors; also fills 
CORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement. Contact department for 
placement 405-1791. 














EitiTer 

1 


6,7 

1 


CHEM 131 
&CHEM 
132 & _ 


6 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 














CHEM 271 


Yes 


No 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures 



P^eli) 



CcmpijKng 

Higher 


5,6,7 




3 




No 


Contact department: for placement; 405-2672. 
















Eccncmics 




























Higher 


5 


ECON 205 


3 




Yes 


ECON majors must score 6 or 7 to receive credit toward major. 
ECON fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement; 405-3513. 














Higher 


f 
6,7 


ECON 200 

&ECON 

201 


6 


1 
Yes 


Yes 
















En^ishA/B 

Higher _| 


5,6,7 


ENGL 240 


3 


Yes 


Yes 

1 


ENGL 240 satisfies CORE-Literature requirement. Contact 
departmentfor placement; 405-3825. 
















Env. Studes 

Higher 


6,7 


See NoLeb 


3 






U nder review. Students i ntsrested i n E nvi ronmental Science or 
Pol i cy shoul d contact an advi sor for pi acemert 


FraxJi 












Standard ■ Sti rjpnt'; wi th srnrp nf5whnwi<;htr)rnnHniip<;hniilri 














Standard 


5 


FREN 203^ 


4 
6 


No 


Yes 


enroll inFREN 204; with score of 6 or 7 should enroll inFREN 
250 or hiaher level courses. H iaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 
may enroll in300-level courses. FREN 203, 2M or 211 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement; FREN 250fillsCORE-Litsrature 
requirement. Contact defflrtment for placement; 405-4034. 


Standard 


^^ 1 


FREN 204 


Y«l 


Y^ , 
















FREN 211 


No 


Yes 














1 
Higher 


1 
5 


FREN 204 

&FREN 

250 


6 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 














Higher 


6,7 


FREN 204 
&FREN 
250 & 


9 


Yes 


Yes 














FREN 211 


No 


Yes 
















Geog-aphy 

Either 


5,6,7 


GEOG 100 


3 


No 


Y. 1 


GEOG 100 satisfies one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement; 405-4053. 
















German 












Students with score of 5 who wi sh to conti nue must enrol 1 i n 
GERM 204; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll inGERM 301. 
Contact department for placement; 405-4091. 














Higher 


5 


GERIVI203' 


4 


No 


No 












Higher 


I 
6,7 


GERJVl 203 

&GERIV1 

204 


7 


1 
No 


No 
















History 

(Higher) 












A score of 5 wi 1 1 be awarded three credits (as chosen by the 
student-except for West & South A si a) . A score of 6 or 7 wi 1 1 be 
awarded six credits. All HIST coursps listed at leftfulfill 
CORE-History requirement HIST 112 fillsCORE-Humanities/ 
Other. HIST 120, 122, 123, 284 and 285 also fulfill Diversity 
requirement. 














Africa 


5 


HIST 122 
or HI ST 123 


3 


Yes 


Yes 






6 








6,7 


HIST122& 
&HIST123| 


Yes 


Yes 














1 
Americas 


I 
5 


HIST 156 

orHIST 

157 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST156& 
&HIST157| 


6 
1 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 














Europe 


5 


Hism?o 

orHIST 
IB 


3 


Yes 


Yes 



Adm SSI oi Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures 



P^elfc 





6,7 


Hism?& 

& HI ST 113 


6 


Yes 


Yes 














E/SE Asia 


5 


HIST 284 

orHIST 

285 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST284& 
&HIST285 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


Islamic World 


5,6,7 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


1 
Yes 














WestAsia 


1 
5 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


1 
Yes 
















6,7 


HIST120& 

&LL 

Elective 


6 


Yes 


Yes 
















Italian 












Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish \d conti nue must 














Standard 


5 


ITAL 203 


4 


No 


Yes 














enroll in ITAL 204; with score of 6 or 7 may enroll in300-la/el 
courses. H iaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 nxBt enrol 1 i n 
300-la/el courses. ITAL 203or204fillsCORE-Humanities 
requirement; ITAL 251 fillsCORE-Literature requirement 
Contact department for placement 405-4031. 


Standard 


6,7 


ITAL 204 


6 


Yes 


Yes 
















ITAL 211 


Yes 


No 














Higher 

1 


5 

1 


ITAL 204 

&ITAL 

251 


6 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 














1 
Higher 


1 
6,7 


ITAL 204 
&ITAL 
251 & 


9 


1 
Yes 


Yes 
















ITAL 211 


Yes 


No 


InfaTerfi. 




See Notes 








No credit i s awarded for thi s exam at this ti me. 
















Latin 

Either 


5,6,7 


LATN 201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


Contact department for placement 405-2013. 
















Mathematics 












Standard: No credit, but placement in MATH 220 is awarded. Hiqhe- 


Hiqher MATH 141 may be completed via credit-by-exam. MATH 


Standard 

1 


5,6,7 

1 


See NoLes 





No 

1 


No 

! 


140fills bothCORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement and 
CORE-MathS( Formal RfflRoning non- lab requirement Contact 
departn let iL with questions, 405-5053. 














Higher 


1 
5,6,7 


MATH 140 


7 


Yes 


} 

Yes 
















Music 

Either _, 


5,6,7 

1 


M use 130 


3 


No 

1 


Yes 

1 


MUSC BOfillsCORE-Arts requirement Majors should contact 
departmentfor placement 405-5563. 
















Philosophy 

Higher 


6,7 


PHIL 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


PHIL lOOfillsCORE-Humanities requirement 
















Physics 

Higher 


5,6,7 

1 


PHY S 121 
&122 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


PHYS220and221fillCORE-Lab (Physical) science 
requirements. Students continuing Physics study should 
consult department for placement, 405-5979. 



Admssi on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures 



P^el/ 



1 

Psychology 

Either 


1 
6,7 


PSYCIOO 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


Tine 1 B exam counts towards the 35 credits required in the major. If 
a student enters with 1 B credit s/he nxBt complete PSYC221 with a 
gradeof BorbPttpr. PSYC lOOfillsoneof two 
CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
departmentfor placement; 405-5866. 


Spanish 












Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to conti nue must 














enrol 1 i n SPA N 204, 211 or 207; with score of 6 or 7 must enrol 1 i n 
300-la/el courses. Hiaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 nxet 
enroll in 300-la/el courses. SPAN 203or204fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement SPAN 221 fills CORE-Literature 
requirement. Students continuing Spanish stiidy should consult 
departmentfor placement 405-6452. 


Standard 


5 


SPAN 203 


4 


No 


Yes 


i 
Standard 


1 
6,7 


SPAN 204 


6 


1 
No 


Yes 






SPAN 207 


Yes 


No 


Higher 


5 


SPAN 204 


6 


No 


Yes 
















SPAN 221_ 


Yes 


Yes 


1 

Higher 

1 


1 
6,7 


SPAN 204 


9 


1 

No 

1 


Yes 






SPAN 207 
& 


Yes 


No 
















SPAN 221_ 


Yes 


Yes 


SvuQhili 

Either 


6,7 


FOLA 159 


6 


No 


No 


ElectivecreditintheFOLA program. Students who wish to 
conti nue should contact the FOLA officeinJiminezHall. 


Theatre 

HiglTer 


5,6,7 


THET 110 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


THET llOfillsCORE-Arts requirement. Majors should contact 
departmentfor placement 405-6694. 


1 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for IB courses and for 
equivalentUMCP coursesortransfer courses (including APorCLEP). IBcreditwill be deleted in such cases. Decisions about 
applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent information. 
Native speakers may not earn I B creditfor any language exams. 

Students who receive an I nternational Baccalaureate Di ploma or Certificate rray consider presenti ng a portfolio to the Freshman 
Writing Off icef or ra/iew. See the Department of E ngl ish web site or cal I the Freshrren Writing Office, 405-3771, for furttier 
information. 



ADMISSION TO LIMITED ENROLLMEISrr PROGRAMS (LEP) 



Certain colleges, schools, and departments within the univeratyha^/e taken steps to limit enrol I nient in order 
to maintain quality programs. For the 2(X)7-2008 academic year these included the School of Architecture, 
Planning and Preservation, Robert H. Smith School of Business, A. James Clark School of Engineering, 
Departmentof Government and Politics, Philip Merrill Collegeof Journalism, Department of Natural 
Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture, Departmentof P^chology, Departmentof Communication 
and Collegeof Education. LEP programs are continually reviewed. Studentsshouldcheckthe LEP Website 
a twww.lep.unxl.edu or contact the Li mi ted Enrol I ment Program Admissions Coordi nator at 301-314-8385 
for updated irformation. 

Freshmen: A dmissi on for new freshmen to Limited Enrollment Programs is competitive. Because space 
rray be limited for a particular major, early application is encouraged. Freshmen who are directly admitted to 
an LEP will be subject to a performance ra/iew when they complete45 col lege credits. The r^iew varies 
from program to program, but always i ncl udes satisfactory perforrrance i n a set of appropriate courses. 
Students not passi ng the rew'i ew wi 1 1 be requi red to choose another rraj or. See the acadenri c program 
descri ption for specific detai Is. 



Admssi on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures P^e it 

■ ' 

Freshmen not di rectiy admitted to an LEP may be assigned to Letters and Sciences or to a general major 
within the LEP college requested. Students are not guaranteed admission to an LEP at a later date, although 
they may gai n admi ssi on by nieeti rg the requi rernents outi i ned i n the r parti cul ar program by the ti nie th^ 
complete45 or 60 credits at Maryland. See tiie foil owing section on LEP transfer admission and tine LEP 
program descri pti ons for further detai I s about tiii s opti on. 

Transfers Trarefer shxients ard orhcanpus shxients wi shi rg to charge tiia r niaj or to an L E P nxBt meet a 
set of gateway courses witii mi ni rnium grades i n order to be admitted to tine program Space is I i mited i n each 
program, and tiie most qual if i ed appi i cants wi 1 1 be adni tted each semester. A ddi ti onal i nf ormati on for each 
of tiie limited-enrollment programs may befound in tiie descri pti ons of academic majors in chapter 7. 

Transfer shxients who are not di rectiy admissible to an LEP upon application to tiie university will be 
assi gned to an al ternate program. Those wi tin fewer tiian 60 credi ts wi 1 1 be assi gned to L etters and Sci ences, 
and wi 1 1 be al I owed the opportunity to meet the gateway requi rements by tiie ti me tiiey compi ete 45 or 60 
credits. Students witii more tiian 60 credits will be admitted to an interim advising program in Letters and 
Sci ences where tiiey will be advised regardirgtiieir qualifications for tiie LEP and, in some cases, tiie need to 
choose anotiier maj or. 

Second Major: Enrolled students interested in adding an LEP as a second major should see "Degree 
Requi rements" i n chapter 4. 

Pre-Profesaonal Pro^'anrs 

While professional schools do not require, favor, or prefer specific majors, pre- professional advisors can 
provide guidance concerning tiie choice of major. Undecided shxients may enter Letters and Sciences, but 
mustadheretotiieUnivensity of Maryland policy, tiiat students declare a degree-granting major by tiietime 
tiiey reach 60 credits. See www.ltsc.unid.edu/ 

For further irf ormati on on pre- professional programs, see "Otiier for Credit Programs" in Chapter 7, 
www.prelaw.unid.edu or www.prehealtii.urtid.edu . 



SPECIAL APPLICAISrrS 

Golden Identification Card Pro^'am 

TheUniversityof Maryland participates in tiieGol den Identification Card Program. The institution will 
make aval I abl e courses and vari ous servi ces to persons who are 60 years of age or ol der, who are I egal 
resi dents of tiie State of M aryl and and who are reti red ( not engaged i n gai rf ul empi oyment for rrore tiian 20 
hours per week). When persons digi blefor tills program are admitted to tiie university, tiiey register on a 
space-aval I able basis for credit courses as regular or special shxients i n any session and receive a Golden 
I dentifi cation card. Golden I D shxients must meet al I course prerequisite and co- requi site requi rements. 
Tuition is waived for tiiese courses; howo/er, a Golden I D admi nisb'ativefee is assessed every semester. 
Golden I D shxients may register for a maxi mum of tiiree courses per term Golden I D shxients are not 
digibleforConsortiumcourses. The Golden Identification Card will enti tie eligible persons to certain 
academic sen/ices, i ncl udi rg tiie use of tiie libraries and tiie shuttie bus sen/ice. Such sen/ices will be 
aval I abl e duri rg any sessi on only to persons who have regi stered for one or more courses for tiiat semester. 
Gol den I D shxients al so have tiie opportuni ty to become i nvol ved wi tii tiie Gol den I D Student A ssoci ati on, 
which provides cultural and social o/ents, course recommendations, and peer advising. Additional 
i rf ormati on rray be obtai ned from tiie Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, G round F I oor, M i tchd I 
Building: 301-314^8385. 

Non-De^'ee Seeking Students 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do notdesireto work toward a baccalaureate degree may be 
admitted as non-degree-seeking shxients. 

Non-degree- seeki rg shxients who have received a baccalaureate degree are advised tiiat no credit earned 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures P^e ly 

while enrol led may be applied at a later date to a graduate program These pest- baccalaureate students may 
enrol I i n undergraduate courses for whi ch they possess the necessary prerequi si tes, but may not enrol I i n 
courses restricted to graduate students only. Students who wish to take courses at the graduate le»/el (600 and 
above) nxBt contact the G raduate School for i nf ormati on concerni ng admi ssi on requi rements for A dvanced 
Special Student status. 

Non-degree- seeki ng students who do not have a baccalaureate degree must submit transcri pts and meet 
regul ar adni ssi on standards. Transcri pts are not requi red from students wi th baccal aureate degrees from a 
regionally accredited institution. Because of space limitation, so/eral departments require permission be 
given i n advance to regi ster for cl asses as a non-degree student. PI ease contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
A dni ssi ons for further i nf ormati on. 

Non-degree-seeking students who are taking dassesto transfer immediately back to another institution may 
apply without academic transcri pts. These appi icants must, i n I ieu of transcri pts, submit official 
documentation from that i nstitution granti ng permission to take course work at the U ni versity of M aryland 
for that parti cul ar semester. 

Returning Students and Veterans 

Applicants who have not attended school for nx)re than five years, or who have had military experience, 
should contact both an admissions counselor and the Retumi ng Students Program 301-314-7693. Veterans 
should also contacttheVeterans Affairs Office 301-314-8239. 

Students returning to the University of M aryland after a separation of five calendar years may petition the 
appropriate dean to have a number of grades and credits from courses pre»/iously taken at the University of 
M aryl and. Col I ege Park, removed from the cal cul ati on of thd r cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages and from the 
credits applied toward graduation requirements. See information under "Registration, Academic 
Requi rements and Regulations" in chapter 4. 



IISTTERNATIONAL STUDEISTT ADMISSION 

The University of Maryland seeks to enroll international students who demonstrate strong academic 
performance with records suggesting potential for success at Maryland. Admission is competitive and is 
offered to applicants whose academic credentials indicate marks of "very good" to "excellent." Due to space 
limitations and the competitive nature of undergraduate admi ssi on at the University of Maryland, an 
international applicant should submitacomplete application as early as possible, and always before the 
deadi i nes I i sted i n this section. A ppl i cations completed after a deadline will not be considered for that 
semester, but wi 1 1 be re»/i ewed for the f ol I owi ng semester. E val uati on of an appI i cants credenti al s wi 1 1 take 
place only after al I appI ication materials are received. Decisions are released i n writi ng on a rol I i ng basis. 

Applicants currently holding or intending to seek an F-1 Student orj -1 Exchange Visitor visa to study in the 
U ni ted States are consi dered i nternati onal appI i cants and shoul d observe the f ol I owi ng i nstructi ons. A 1 1 
other non- immigrant visa holders (including A, E, G, H, I, andL) should follow the Freshman and Transfer 
instructions preceding and following the I nternati onal Student Admission section. 

Freshnron Ackrisaon - 1 nternational 

You are considered a freshman appI leant if you have completed fewer than 12 semester hours of 
university- 1 ew'd credit past secondary school atthetimeyou plan to enterthe University of Maryland. 
Successful freshman applicants demonstrate satisfactory completion of diverse col I ege- preparatory subjects 
i n secondary school , prof i ci ency i n E ngl i sh, and ^i dence of suff i ci ent funds to cover al I expenses. Due to 
space I imitations, we are unable to offer admi ssi on to all students who have the ability to be successful 
academical ly at theUniversity of M aryland. 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures P^e 2C 

The Fal I (A ugust) deadi i ne for appi i cati ons to be received i s December 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) general 
deadline is August! 

All of the foil owing docunientsnxBt be submitted before the freshnian final deadline for an applicant to be 
consi dered for undergraduate adni ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on; 
nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $55.00); official secondary school transcripts in native language with 
certified literal English translations and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion from 
a national secondary school examination; all official university or col lege transcripts in native language with 
certified literal English translations (if any); proof of English proficiency; SAT or ACT official results (if 
three ornx)re years of high school completed in U.S.); statement of activities; an essay; and Certification of 
Fi nances, i ncl udi ng supporti ng documents that demonsb'ate support of U .S. $40,191 per year. Current F-1 
and J -1 Visa Holders nxBt also provide photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure Record, visa starrp, and 
current I - 20 or DS- 2019 form. C urrent other non- i mmi grant V i sa H ol ders must al so provi de photocopi es of 
thei r I -94 A rri val/Departure Record and vi sa stamp. 

Transfer Adrrisaon - 1 ntErnational 

You are considered a transfer appI leant if you have completed 12 or nx)re semester hours of university-level 
credit past secondary school attlietimeyou plan to enter the University of Maryland. Students who have 
completed fewer than 28 transferable credits must submit high school transcri pb. Successful transfer 
appI i cants demonsb^te better than average grades i n sb'ong academi c courses, prof i ci ency i n E ngl i sh, and 
e»/idence of sufficient funds to cover al I expenses. Due to space I i mitations, we are unable to offer admission 
to all studentswho have the ability to be academically successful attheUniversity of Maryland. 

The Fal I f i nal deadI i ne for appI i cati ons to be received i s M arch 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) f i nal deadI i ne i s 
August! 

All of the foil owing documents must be submitted before the transfer final deadline for an applicant to be 
consi dered for undergraduate adni ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on; 
nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $55.00); all official university or college transcripts in native language 
witii certified literal English translations; proof of English proficiency; statement of activities; and 
Certif i cati on of F i nances, i ncl udi ng supporti ng documents tiiat derronsb'ate support of U .S. $40, 191 per 
year. Current F-1 and J -1 Visa Holders nxBt also provide photocopies of tiidr 1-94 Arrival/Departure 
Record, vi sa stamp, and current I - 20 or DS- 2019 form. C urrent other non- i mmi grant V i sa H ol ders must al so 
provi de photocopi es of tiiei r I -94 A rri val/Departure Record and vi sa stamp. Students witii fewer tiian 30 
semester hours must also provide official secondary school ti^nscripts in native language witii certified literal 
E ngl i sh ti^nsl ati ons and, where appropri ate, off i ci al resul ts and certif i cate of compi eti on from a nati onal 
secondary school examination. 

En^ish Proficiency 

Non-native English speakers (regardless of citizenship) who seek admission to tiie University of Maryland 
nxBt verify tiidr proficiency in English by taking and submitting an official score reportfrom one of tiie 
foil owing English prof id ency exams: TOEFL (Testof English as a Fordgn Language); orlELTS 
(I ntemational English Language Test System). Those whose native language is English, who earn an SAT 
critical reading score of 480 or higher, or who have earned a post-secondary degree from a university in an 
English-speaking courrtiy do not need to take or submit scores from an English proficiency exam. Transfer 
credit for an English composition course does not waive tiie English proficiency exam. 

Visa ReGords 

Applicants Residing Outside of tiie United States: To enter tiie United States, international shxients residing 
abroad wi 1 1 need a passport from tiid r government and a vi sa from tiie U .S. Consul ate. I n order to obtai n a 
vi sa for tiie purposes of shxiying in tiie UnitedStates> tiie applicant must present a Certificateof Eligibility 
formtotiieU.S. Consulate. The university will issue tills form to admitted shxients who have submitted 
proof of having sufficient funds to cover tiie cost of a program of shxiy. Admitted shxients witii personal, 
family, or otiier source of private funding will beissued tiie Certificateof Eligibility forml-20inorder to 
obtai n tiie F- 1 Student V i sa. A dmi tied shxients who are sponsored by agenci es, f oundati ons, or tiid r home 



Admssi on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures P^e 21 

■ ' 

govemmert, or are parti ci pad ng i n an estabi i shed exchange program may be i ssued the Certif i cate of 
E I i gi bi I i ty form DS- 2019 i n order to obtai n the J - 1 Exchange V i si tor V i sa. 

Applicants Currently Residing in the United States: Applicants currently holding F-1 Student orJ-1 
Exchange Visitor status in the United States need to submit a photocopy of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure 
Record, vi sa stamp, and current I - 20 or DS- 2019 form al ong wi th proof of havi ng suff i ci ent funds to cover 
the cost of a program of study. Applicants holding another type of non- immigrant status need to submit a 
photocopy of thd r I -94 A rri val/Departure Record and vi sa stamp, and nxBt i ndi cate if they i ntend to seek a 
change to F-1 Student orj -1 Exchange Visitor status. Upon admission and submission of the appropriate 
financial support documentation, the university will issuetheappropriateCertificateof Eligibility form(l-20 
or DS-2019) to the student. 

General Certificabeof Education E^onrE 

The University of M aryland awards between 4 and 8 semester credits for most A-lo/d exams completed 
with a grade of C or better. Up to 4 semester credits may be awarded for certain AS- 1 ew'd exams completed 
with acceptable grades. 

For further i nformati on, contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dni ssi ons vi a emai I at um-admitta>umd.edu or 
301-314^8385. 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 

A student who has attended any regional ly accredited i nstitution of higher education fol lowi ng graduation 
from hi gh school and attempted 12 or more credi ts wi 1 1 be consi dered f or admi ssi on as a transfer student. 
Transfer applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary standing at their prew'ious institutions to be 
digiblefor transfer to the University of Maryland. 

When the number of students desi ri ng admi ssi on exceeds the number that can be accommodated at thi s 
institution, or in a particular professional orspecializedprogrami admission will be based on the overall 
strength of the students academic performance. 

Reqiirenrcnts 

Admission for transfer applicants is primarily based on the number of credits a student has earned and 
academicachiei/ementforall college-l^d work. I n calculati ngdigibi I ity, the university will use the 
average stated on the transcri pt by the sendi ng i nsti tuti on. When an appi i cant has attended more than one 
i nsti tuti on, a cunxil ati ve average for al I prew'i ous col I ege work attempted wi 1 1 be corrputed. To be consi dered, 
course work nxBt have been corrpleted at a regionally accredited college or university. All students with 
grade poi nt averages bd ow 3.0 wi 1 1 be consi dered on a space-aval I abl e basi s. Students who were not 
admi ssi ble as high school seniors must complete at least 30 semester hours with the grade poi nt average as 
stated above. I n accordance with M aryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer 
policies, applicants from Maryland public institutions are, in some instances, given special consideration, 
and, when qualified and space is available, may be admitted with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or 
higher. 

Application Dates 

SemeslEr Date 

Spri ng N ovember 15 (A ugust 1 wi th any non- U S academi c records) 

Fal I Priority M arch 1 (Students with non-US academic records must apply by this date) 



Admission Kequirarots and Application Procedures P^e ll 



Fall Junel 



Transfer from Maryland Public I nditutions 

Currentiy, applicants who have attended Maryland public I nstitutions may be admitted in accordance with 
the criteria outlined in the pro/ious paragraph. The university subscribes to the policies set forth in the 
Maryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer policies. When the number of 
students desi ri ng admi ssi on exceeds the number that can be accommodated i n a parti cul ar prof essi onal or 
special ized program, admission wi 1 1 be based on criteria do/doped by the university to select the best 
qualified students. 

A rti cul ated transfer programs are aval I abl e at each M ary I and communi ty col I ege. A n arti cul ated transfer 
program is a list of courses that best prepare applicants for a particular course of study at the University of 
M aryl and. A ppl i cants who take appropri ate courses specif i ed i n the arti cul ated program and earn acceptabi e 
grades are guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit Articulated transfer programs hd p students plan the r 
new programs after changi ng career obj ecti ves. Corrputeri zed arti cul ati on i rf orrrati on, cal I ed A RTSY S, i s 
availableattheOfficeof UndergraduateAdmissions at theUniversity of Maryland, in the transfer advisor's 
office at each of the community colleges, and at all other Maryland public institutions. Applicants can 
d i mi nate al I doubt concerni ng transfer of courses by f ol I owl ng arti cul ated programs. 

General Transfer I nforrradon 

Admitted students wi 1 1 reed ve a prd i mi nary review of transfer credit withi n two weeks after recdvi ng the 
I etter of admi ssi on. A n of f i ci al rew'i ew of transfer credi t occurs thereafter, wi th f i nal detemni nati on of 
appi i cabi I i ty rrede by an academi c advi sor/ew'al uator i n the of f i ce of the appropri ate dean for the maj or. 
Generally, college-lo/d courses completed at regionally-accredited institutions will transfer provided that 
grades of at I east "C " (2.0) are earned and the course i s si mi I ar i n content and scope to work offered at 
M aryl and. The regi onal accredi ti ng bodi es are M i ddl e States A ssoci ati on of Col I eges and School s, N ew 
EnglandAssociation of Schools and Colleges, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 
Northwest A ssoci ati on of School sand Col I eges. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and Western 
Association of Schools and Col leges. Up to 60 credits from a community or two-year col lege, and 90 credits 
from a four-year col I ege, may be appI i ed toward the degree. Students are requi red to compi ete at I east thd r 
fi nal 30 credits at M aryl and to earn a M aryl and degree. 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public col I eges and universities is covered by the Maryland 
Higher Education Commission (MHEC) transfer policies (see corrpl ete text later in this section). Maryland 
will accept grades of "D" or betterfrom appropriate course work completed ata regionally-accredited 
Maryland public institution, includingotiier institutions in the University System of Maryland. 

The Transfer C redi t Center provi des arti cul ati on i rf orrrati on and assi stance to students and transfer advi sors. 
The Center, a j oi nt effort between the Off i ces of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons and the Off i ce of the Regi strar, 
has computeri zed and consol i dated the transfer credi t o/al uati on process. 1 1 provi des i ncomi ng students from 
domestic i nstitutions with i rf ormation on acceptabil ity of credits and transfer equivalencies, subject to 
adjustment by advisors within the students individual program. Certain courses (e.g., those not appearing or 
notfullydaborated in the sending institution's current catalog) may requi re additional irformationsuchas 
^llabi, portfolios, etc., before ew'al uati on. 

I rf ormation on transferabi I ity of specific courses to the University of M aryl and. Col lege Park rrey be 
accessed on the web at www.tce.umd.edu/TCE/ . 

Each col lege-levd course will beo/aluated individually, with applicability toward major or general 
education requi rements determi ned by the appropriate academic unit. The university does not transfer blocks 
of courses, such as those corrpl eted through the Associatds Degree. See "Departments, M ajors and 
Programs" for specific general education and major requirements. 



Aam SSI on Kequi rerrets ana A ppl i cao on Procedures 



FcQSZi 



Credit will be postBd to your Maryland record only from official transcripts sent from the institution at which 
the credi t was compi eted. Students who have earned credi t tiirough A dvanced PI acement (A P) , I nternati onal 
Baccalaureate (IB), orCollege-L^d Examination Program (CLEP) subject area exams must have scores 
sent di rectiy from tine testi ng board, e»/en if tiiey are al ready posted on a transcri pt from anotiier i nstituti on. 



SOURCE 


ACCEPT 
CREDITS? 


EQUIVALEISrr OR GRADES^SCORES WHERE 
REQUIRED CREDITS APPROPRIATE 


Ncte Sometransfer credit pdidesareuxler re/ieuv. Pfeosecall Under^-aduateAdirissionsfior 
oirrent informabon. 


[ACE Non Collegiate Courses 


No 


Advanced Placement Program 
(CEEB) 1 


1 
Yes 


EorRl 


3 or higher (see chart in 
Chapter 1) 


CLEP 


Yes 


EorRl ' 


Seechart in Chapter 4 


Community College of tiieAir 
Force 


Yes 


EorRl 


C (2.0) or higher equivalent 
l^rade as appropriate to depL J 


Correspondence courses 


No 


Dantes 


No 


Defense 


Yes 

Language 

Institute 


1 

EorRl 

1 


Scores as appropri ate to 
department 


Departmental exams from 
otiier col leges 


Yes 


EorRl 


C (2.0) or higher 


International Baccalaurate 


Yes 


EorRl 


5 or higher (seechart in 
Chapter 1) 


Life experience 


No, unless validated tiirough CLEP or University of Maryland, College 
Paric departmental exam 


Military credit 


No 


Nursing school courses: by 
U ansf er/by chal 1 enge exam | 


No2 


Otiier arti cul ati on agreements 
(propriety schools, public 
agencies, etc.) 


No, unless a newly-formed Maryland public insbtution operabng under 
auspices of MH EC 


PONSI non-col legi ate woric 


No 


Portf ol i credi ts from otiier 
colleges 


No 



1. Courses must besinilar in deptii and scope to University of Maryland courses. Applicability is 
determi ned by tiie appropri ate dean. 

2. Professional courses are general ly not transferable. Course taken at a regional ly-accredited i nstituti on 
may be ro/i ewed by tiie appropri ate dean. 



Statarent on Transfer cF CourseCrecf t 



Admssi on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures P^e 24 

■ ' 

The UnivQ^ity of M aiylaixl wd comes transfer studeits aixl has transfer 

as "articulation" agreements) to encourage and aid students i n tiiei r efforts to take appropriate courses prior to 

transfer. Each course is o/aiuated individually for students seeking to transfer to tiie University of Maryland. 

Credit is granted for courses tiiat are appi icable to a Bachelor of A rts or Bachelor of Science degree, and for 

which a grade of C or above was earned. Courses completed at Maryland public two- or four-year 

i nsti tuti ons rrey be transferred wi tin grades of D or above provi ded tiiat course content i s appropri ate to our 

academic programs. 

Maxinrum Number of Transfer Credits AGcepted 

TheUniversityof Maryland has directtransfer agreements witii all Mary I and community col leges, as well as 
other j unior and community col leges outside of tine state. The university wi II accept for transfer a maxi mum 
of 60 credi ts from a two-year program and 90 credi ts from a four-year program for courses i n whi ch a grade 
of C or above was earned and whi ch are appropri ate to an approved curri cul um at tiii s i nsti tuti on. See tiie 
above paragraph for requi red course grades. 

Maxinrum Number of C redits Allovued for iSlon-Traditional Learning 

Students who have acqui red col lege-lew'd learni ng tiirough work or otiier non-col legiate activities rrey wish 
to transi ate tiiar experience into credits at Maryland by validation tiirough tiie national CLEP examination 
(College-L^d Examination Program) or credit- by-examination administered by academic departments. The 
university will accept a maximum of 30 hours of credit tiirough examination. 

i^linimum Number of Credits Required Throu^ Class'oom I ndruction in the i^lajor Field and for the 
De^ee 

The University of Maryland requires a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit for an undergraduate 
degree; some programs requi re more. Regardless of the total number of transfer credits, students must 
completeat leasttiidr last 30 credits at tiie University of Maryland, College Park. 

StatEment on Transfer of General Education Requirements 

As directed by tiie Maryland Higher Education Commission Transfer Policy, transferable courses taken in 
fulfillment of general education requirements at a Maryland public institution will be applied toward 
Maryland's CORE requirements. Careful planning with an academic advisor will ensure tiiat students take 
appropriatecreditand maximize thdrcredittransfer.Thetotal number of general education credits for a 
Maryland public institution transfer or post baccalaureate credits will not exceed tiiat requi red of native 
students. 

Transfer credit Policy 

Maryland Hi^ier Education Conrrrisaon (Title ISB) 

See Chapter 10, Appendix N, for complete policy 



RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

Readency Classification Office^ UBOMitchell Biilding 

301-314^9596; Fax: 301-314^7915 
E-mail: resclass@unid.edu 
www.testudo.umd.edu/rco 

Peti ti ons, rd ated documents and questi ons concerni ng tiie B oard of Regents Pol i cy on Student C I assif i cati on 
for Admission and Tuition Purposes should be di rected to tiie Residency Classification Office i n tiie Office 
of tiie Registrar. 

Determination of I n-Stabe Statusfor Adnission and Tiition Pirposes: See 
vwuw.usnnh.u9Td.ediVregent^bylavu^SectionVi I i/Vi 1 1 270Lhtnnl for the complete tad of this policy. 

Aninitial determination of in-state status will be rrede by tiie Office of Undergraduate Admissions at tiie 



Adm SSI on Kequi rarets and A ppl i cat: on Procedures P^e 2b 

ti me a students' appi ication for admission is considered. Tine debermi nation made at that ti me, and any 
determi nati on made thereafter, slial I pre»/ai I i n eacli semester unti I the determi nati on i s successful ly 
cliallenged. Students Hiaycliallergethar classification by submitting a timely petition to the Residency 
Classification Office. Determinationsarebasedontiieresidency policy and requirements. The deadline for 
submitting a complete petition along witii all supporting documents, is the first day of tine semester in which 
the shxient wi shes to be d assif i ed as i n-state. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in completing tiiere^/iew process. A 
decision in each case will bemadewithin60daysof receipt of a complete petition and all required 
documentation. During tills period of time, oranyfurtherperiodof time required by tiie university, any fees 
and charges based on tiie prew'ious determination must be paid. The shxient is solely responsible for any late 
charges i ncurred by tiie resi dency process. I f tiie determi nati on i s changed, any excess fees and charges wi 1 1 
be refunded. 

Students classified as in-state for admission and tuition purposes are responsible for notifying tiie Residency 
Classification Office in writing wi till n 15 days of any change in tiieir circumstances tiiat might in any way 
affect tiieir classification at tiie University of Maryland. 



READMISSION AND REINSTATEMEISrr 

Students who are admitted and do not register for tiiei r f i rst semester or cancel regisb^on prior to 
beginning tiieir first semester nxBt apply again for admission (see Freshman or Transfer Admission). 
Students who are admitted as "Term Only" also must apply agai n for admission if tiiey wish to register for a 
subsequent term. 

Students who have matri cul ated and regi stered and di d not mai ntai n tiiat regi strati on conti nuously ( Fal I and 
Spring semesters) to graduation, nxBtapplyforreadnissi on or reinstatement to re-enroll attiie University of 
Maryland. 

See "Witiidrawal and Leave of Absence from tiie University" inchapter4fornioredetailedirfomiation. 

Reodrrission 

Students must apply for readmission if tiiey i nterrupt regisb'ation for one or more semesters and were not 
academical ly dismissed at tiie conci usion of tiie last semester of attendance. 

RdnStaLatdiL 

Students who are academically dismissed from tiie University must apply for reinstatement. All applications 
for reinstatement are rew'iewed by a Faculty Petition Board. Students may apply for reinstatement for tiie 
semester immediately following dismissal or for any subsequent semester. Only tiie Faculty Petition Board 
can grant rd nstatement 

Students who are denied rd nstatement will be required to comply witii specific recommendations made by 
tiie Faculty Petition Board in order to be considered for rd nstatement in afuhjre semester. 

RdnStabement After Withck-avual 

Students who witiidraw from tiie U ni versity must apply for rd nstatement if tiiey i nterrupt enrol I ment for one 
or more semesters. Students who were academi cal I y di smi ssed at tiie concI usi on of tiie pre»/i ous compi eted 
semester al so must apply for rd nstatement (see U ndergraduate Pol i cy on Probati on and Di smi ssal ) . Students 
shoul d contact tiie Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on for more i rf ormati on about readmi ssi on and 
rd nstatement 

Deadlines 



Admssi on Kequi rarets and A ppl i caD on Procedures P^e it 

■ ' 

There are no deadi i nes for readmi ssi on. For f ul I consi derati on, shxlents appiyi ng for rd nstatement nxBt 
observe the f ol I owi ng deadI i nes: 

Fall Semester Julyl 

Wi nber Term N ovember 1 

Spri ng Semester December 1 

Summer Session I May 1 

Summer Session II Junel 

A 1 1 students are encouraged to apply early I n order to take advantage of early regi strati on. 

Sunrmer School 

Students who are dismissed at the end of the Fall semester are notdigibleto attend Summer sessions unless 
or unti I they are approved for ra nstatement. Students di smi ssed at the end of a Spri ng semester may attend 
any Summer sessi ons pri or to bei ng rd nstated. H owo/er, these students must be approved for rd nstatement 
i n order to attend duri ng the subsequent Fal I semester. 

WintET Term 

Students dismissed at the end of the Fal I semester may attend Winter Term pri or to bdng rdnstated. Winter 
Term is offered to students who have attended duri ng the precedi ng Fal I semester. Students with a break i n 
attendance must be reenrolled to bed igible to attend Winter Term. Students readmi tted/rd nstated for a 
Spri ng semester may al so attend Wi nter Term. 

Cleorances 

Clearances fromjudicial Programs, tine Bursar, Healtii Center, International Education Services, and/or tiie 
Graduate School may be requested of the appi leant. 

Applications 

A ppl i cati ons for readmi ssi on and rd nstatement are aval I abl e at tine Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, 
ground floor, Mitchdl Building and may be requested by calling 301-314-8385. Applications and 
information may also be accessed via tine web at www.uga.unxl.edu/adnissions/apply/reenrol I mentasp. 

Additional information 

For additional information contact tine Of flee of Undergraduate A dmi ssi ons, ground floor, 0117 Mitchdl 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5251, 301-314-8385 o rwww.uaa.umd.edu . 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applicants who have earned or will earn a bachdor's degree at a regionally accredited col lege or university 
intiieUnited StatesCortiieequivalentof a baccalaureate degree in anotiier country) aredigibleto be 
considered for admission to the Graduate School attheUniversity of Maryland. Graduate School and degree 
program cri teri a for admi ssi on are aval I abl e i n tine G raduate Catal og, aval I abl e onl i ne at 
httpV/www.gradschool .unxl.edu/catalog . For rrore i rf orrrati on on graduate degree programs, f i nanci al ai d 
for graduate shxiy, deadI i nes, and onl i ne appI i cati on i nstructi ons, pi ease vi si t tiie G raduate School 's websi te, .htt 
http://www.gradschool .umd.edu email gradschool(a>unxl.edu . or call tiie Graduate School I rf orrrati on 
Center at 301-405-0376. Hard-copy correspondence can be addressed to tiie Graduate School, 2123 Lee 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742-5121. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page27 

Fees^ Expensesand Financial Aid 

TUITION AND BILL PAYMENT INFORMATION 

1135 LeeBuilding, 301-31^9000 and 1-888-313-2404 
www.unnd.edu/bursar 

TuitionandfeesfortheUniversity of Maryland, College Park, arelisted inthe 
next sect! on. The uni vers! ty requi res that al I deposi ts and fees be pal d by stated 
deadi I nes, or penal ti es must be I mposed. M any potent! al admi ni strati ve 
di ff I cul ti es can be avoi ded I f students careful I y f ol I ow publ I shed procedures and 
notify tine appropri ate off I ce(s) of any changes that ni ght affect tfiei r f I nanci al 
obi I gati on to the uni vers! ty . Thi s I ncl udes updati ng your emai I address so 
communi cati on concern! ng your b! 1 1 ! ng ! s pronpt, and notify! ng the B ursar's 
Off! ce of changes of address so tiiat ma! I aff ecti ng the student's f ! nanc! al 
rel ati onsh! p w! tin the un! vers! ty w! 1 1 not be del ayed or returned. 

Col I ege Park sponsors a deferred- payment pi an. I nf ormat! on regard! ng the Terp 
payment pi an ! s aval I abl e by cal I ! ng 301-314-9000 or 1-888-313-2404 or at 
www.umd.edu/bursar . 

A 1 1 charges ! ncurred dur! ng a semester are payabi e ! mmed! atel y . Return! ng 
students w! II not be perm! tted to conpl ete reg! strati on unti I al I f ! nanc! al 
obi ! gat! ons to tine un! vers! ty, ! ncl ud! ng I ! brary f ! nes, park! ng v! ol at! ons, and 
other penal ty fees and serv! ce charges, are pa! d ! n f ul I . 

Payment for past due bal ances and current semester fees ! s due on or before tine 
f ! rst day of cl asses. Students who reg! ster ! n advance must pay the! r b! 1 1 s ! n f ul I 
pr! or to tine general reg! strati on per! od. Students who reg! ster after the ! n! ti al 
reg! strati on per! od are requ! red to make f ul I payment by tine due date ! nd! cated to 
avo! d cancel I at! on of tine! r enrol I ment and I oss of the! r cl assroom seats to other 
students. 

A I though the un! vers! ty b! 1 1 s students month! y, ! t cannot assume respons! b! I ! ty 
for the! r rece! pt. Students are rem! nded tiiat ! t ! s tine! r respons! b! I ! ty to noti f y tine 
U n! vers! ty of any change ! n the! r ema! I address. I f a student b! 1 1 ! s not rece! ved 
on or before the beg! nn! ng of each semester, ! t ! s the students respons! b! I ! ty to 
obta! n a copy of tine b! 1 1 e! tiier on! ! ne at www.umd.edu/bursar and choose 
"Student Account I nqulry" or go to tine Financial Service Center, 1135 Lee 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page28 

b ui I ai ng. i ne orn ce i s open ivi onaay inrougn i- n aay, «: :ju a. m. lo 4: :ju p. m. 

A 1 1 checks or money orders shoul d be made payabi e to the University of 
l^laryland for the exact amount due. Students name and students University 
I D number should bev^ff'itben on thefront side oF the chedc. University grants 
and schol arshi ps wi II be posted to the student's account. H owe/er, the f i rst bi 1 1 
mai I ed pri or to the begi nni ng of each semester may not i ncl ude these deducti ons. 

Students are urged to check thei r resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ce agreements 
for procedures for cancel I ati on of reservati ons and for deadi i nes for recei vi ng 
refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be made after these deadI i nes, even if the 
student deci des not to attend the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Students wi 1 1 i ncur a I ate payment f ee i n the event of f ai I ure to pay a bal ance on 
thei r student account by its due date. A I ate payment fee of $10.00 or 5%, 
whi cho/er i s hi gher, wi 1 1 be assessed i n addi ti on to the total past due amount. A n 
addi ti onal 1. 5% f i nance charge wi 1 1 be charged montiil y i f the account i s not 
s^ed. 

Students who f ai I to pay the i ndebtedness duri ng tine semester i n whi ch 
del i nquency occurs wi 1 1 be i nel i gi bl e to advance regi ster for subsequent 
semesters unti I the debt and the penalty fees are cl eared. 

I n the event a student wi tin a del i nquent account becomes regi stered for a future 
semester, the account must be setti ed i n f ul I pri or to the ons^ of tine future 
semester, to avoid cancellation of registration. 

T he state has estabi i shed, under I egi si ati ve mandate^ a Central Col I ecti ons U ni t 
(CCU) withi n tine Department of Budget and Fiscal Planni ng. The university is 
requi red by state I aw to refer al I del i nquent accounts to the State Col I ecti ons 
U ni t. PI ease note tiiat M aryl and I aw al I ows the Central Col I ecti ons U ni t to 
i ntercept state i ncome tax refunds for i ndi vi dual s wi tin del i nquent accounts, and 
tiiat ecu i s autiiori zed to notify a N ati onal Credi t B ureau of the del i nquency at 
tine ti me tine account i s referred to i t for col I ecti on. 

All aocxxjnts due from studenbSy faculty, staff, non-studentsy etc., are 
included v\iithin 



Central Col I ecti ons U ni t costs i ncurred i n col I ecti ng del i nquent accounts wi 1 1 be 
charged to tine student. The mi ni mum col I ecti on fee i s 17% pi us attorney and/or 
court costs. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page29 



N degrees, di pi omas, certif i cates, or transcri pts of records wi 1 1 be i ssued to 
students who have not made sati sf actory s^ ement of thei r accounts. 

Note A ddi ti onal I nf ornnati on on Student F i nanci al Obi i gati ons, D I scl osure of 
I nf ornnati on, Deli nquent Accounts, and Speci al Fees, can be found i n the " Pol i cy 
Statements" seed on at the begi nni ng of thi s catal og. 

Payment oF Fees 

All checks, nnoney orders, or postal notes should be made payable to the 
U ni versity of M aryl and. The student's U ni versity I D number must be written on 
thefront of the check. VISA, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover 
credi t cards are accepted. Onl i ne payments can be made by cl i cki ng on the bl ue 
box atwww.umd.edu/bursar. 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 



*yAn / irportant Fee Notice Notwitiistanding any otiier provision of tiiis or any 
otiner University publication, tine University reserves the right to /tb/cb changes 
in tuition, fees, and otiier charges at any time deemed necessary by tine 
University and tine University System of 1^ aryl and Board of Regents. Tuition and 
fee information is published in tine Registration Guide each semester and is also 
available on-line at www.umd.edu/bursar. 

2008-2009 Academic Yeo'-Estimatecr'^ 

Full-time Under^aduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the nurrber of credit hours enrolled is 12 
or more.) 

Maryland Residents (I n-stat^ 

Total Acaderric 
Year Cost 

Tuition $6,566 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech fee) ^ 438 90 

Maxirrum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits 

B oard Contract (Regular Point Plan) 3, 707 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid PageBO 

L oagi ng (includes Telecom fee) b, W-^ 

ResiderrtsoF the District oF Columbia, Other Statesy and Other Countries 

Total Academic 
Year Costs 

Tuition $21,637 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech fee) ^ 438 90 

Maxinrum charged to all sbxients registered for 9 or more credits 

Board Contract (Regular Point Plan) 3,707 

L odgi ng (includes the Telecom lee) 5,402 



Tuition and Fees for Part-time Under^aduate Students 

(For billing purjooses, a student is considered part-time if tine number of credit hours enrolled is 11 
orf&/ver) 

I n- State Tui ti on (per credit hour) $ 273 

Out-of- State Tui ti on (per credit hour) 902 
JVJ andatory Fees Ooer semester) 

9- 11 credi t iiours (per semester) 719.45 

8 or fewer credi t Iiours (per sen^ster) 328. 15 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 



MandaboryF 



Student Fees: Tine mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students i s 
based on a number of requested credit Iiours as f ol I ows: Students regi stered for 9 
or more credits: $719.45 per semester; students regi stered for 8 or fewer credits: 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid PageBl 

it>:J-^».i:D per semescer. 

Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to al I undergraduate students at 
the request of the Student Government Associ ati on. 1 1 i s used i n sponsor! ng 
various student activities, student publications, and cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Ref undabi e) : Charged to al I students. Thi s f ee i s pai d 
i nto a fund that i s used for capi tal i mprovement, expansi on, and construct! on of 
vari ous campus f aci I iti es such as open recreati on areas (tenni s courts, basketi^al I 
courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the Stamp Student Union. These 
proj ects are not funded or are funded onl y i n part from otiier sources. 

Athletic Fee (Ref undabi e) : Charged to al I students for the support of tine 
Department of I ntercol I egi ate AthI eti cs. A 1 1 students are encouraged to 
parti ci pate i n al I of the acti vi ti es of thi s department or to attend the contests i f 
tii^ do not parti ci pate. 

ShuttJe Bus Fee (Ref undabi e) : Charged to al I students for the support of tine 
shutti e bus transportati on system. 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to all 
students and i s used to expand recreati onal f aci I i ti es and Stamp Student U ni on 
services. 

Recreation Sen/ices Fee ( Ref undabi e) : C harged to al I students speci f i cal I y to 
support the construct! on and operati on of Ri tchi e Col i seum and the Campus 
Recreati on Center, a mul ti - use f aci I i ty that i ncl udes basketiDal I and racqu^bal I 
courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor jogging track, and multipurpose 
activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee Charged to al I students to support 
tine operati on of the C I ari ce Smi th Perf ormi ng A rts Center. 

Telecommunications Fee Assessed to al I students I i vi ng i n university residence 
halls. 

Technology Fee Charged to undergraduate students, to support the 
i mprovement of tine computer systems on campus. 

OtherFees 

U nder^aduate AppI ication Fee ( N on- Ref undabi e) : C harged to al I new 
applicants. $55 

GraduateApplication Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all new applicants. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page32 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $200. All newly 
admitted undergraduate students who I ntend to matri cul ate I n the Fal I or Spri ng 
semester must submi t a $200 deposi t whi ch I s credi ted to thei r tui ti on charges 
when th^ enrol I . Shoul d the student dec! de not to enrol I for the specif I c 
semester of appi i cati on, the $200 deposi t i s f orf ei ted and cannot be used to offset 
any charges, i ncl udi ng ori entati on charges, the student may i ncur. 

Students admitted for the Fal I semester must submit this deposit by M ay 1 or 
wi thi n 30 days from thei r date of admi ssi on, whi cho/er i s I ater, to reserve thei r 
pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. Students admitted for the Spri ng semester must 
submi t thi s deposi t by December 1 or wi thi n 14 days of thei r date of admi ssi on, 
whi cho/er i s I ater, to reserve thei r pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. 

PreCd lege Orientation Pro-am Re^stration Fee: $145 (two-day program), 
$101 (one-day program), $60.00 (per person). These charges are for Summer 
2008. 

Late Re^stration Fee: $20. A 1 1 students are expected to compi ete thei r 
regi strati on on the regul ar regi strati on days. Those who do not compI ete thei r 
regi strati on duri ng the prescri bed days must pay thi s fee. 

Special Feefbr students requiring additional preparation in mathematics 
(MATH 00?, 020, 010, 013 and 015) per semester: $250. (Requi red of students 
whose curri cul um cal I s for M ATH 110 or 115 and who do not pass the 
qual ifyi ng exami nati on for these courses.) Thi s Speci al M ath Fee i s i n addi ti on 
to course charge. Students enrol I ed i n thi s course and concurrent! y enrol I ed for 
ni ne or more credi t hours wi 1 1 be consi dered as f ul I -ti me students for purposes of 
assessing fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal ArtSy Businessy and Science 
(UNI V 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

EngneeringCOOP Pro-am (ENCO 096-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees: The university offers a number of courses (M BA, ENTS, 
C hemi cal and L i f e Sci ences) that have speci al course fees i n addi ti on to, or i n 
I i eu of , the standard tuiti on charges. Students are encouraged to contact the 
department pri or to regi steri ng for the cl ass to determi ne tine total cost of the 
course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as 
those charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page33 

I B/Q s. A uai lea creai i nours wi 1 1 oe aaaea lo nours laKen ror creai i lo aecerm ne 
f ul I -ti me or part-ti me status for fee assessment purposes. Speci al Students are 
assessed fees i n accordance with the schedul e for the comparabi e undergraduate 
or graduate cl assi f i cati on. 

Special Examination Fee(Credit-by-Exam): $30 per course for all 
undergraduates and f ul I -ti me graduate students; credit- hour charge for part-ti me 
graduate students. 

Parldng Re^stration Fees All students enrol led for classes at the university 
and who drive or park a vehi cl e anywhere or anyti me on the campus must 
regi ster to park on campus each academi c year. For addi ti onal i nf ormati on, 
pi ease refer to Department of Transportati on Servi ces. 

Te9ctixx3lc5 and Supplies Textbooks and cl assroom suppi i es vary wi tin the 
course pursued, but averaged $1025 in 2007-2008 (two semesters). 

Service C harges for Dishonored C hedcs PayabI e for each check whi ch i s 
returned unpai d by tine drawer bank on i niti al presentati on because of i nsuff i ci ent 
funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected items, ^c. 

For checks up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 

When a check i s returned unpai d, tine student must redeem tine check and pay 
any outstandi ng bal ance i n tine account witiii n 10 days or I ate fees may be 
assessed and the account transferred to the Central Col I ecti on U ni t f or I egal 
f ol I ow-up. Additi onal ly, a mi ni mum 17% col I ecti on charge i s added to the 
charges posted to tine students account at the ti me the transfer i s made. When a 
check is returned unpaid due to an error made by tine students bank, tine student 
must obtai n a I ^er from tine branch manager of tine bank or a person of 
equi val ent status admi tti ng tine error. Thi s I etter must be submi tted to tine Off i ce 
of the B ursar to have the servi ce charge wai ved. 

Overdue L ibrary C harges For i tems from tine I i brary's mai n ci rcul ati ng 
col I ecti ons, charges are .50 cents per day per i tem, and recal I ed i tem f i nes are $2 
per day. I f an item i s I ost or muti I ated, the borrower i s charged tine esti mated cost 
of the i tem pi us a processi ng fee to cover acqui si ti on and catal ogi ng costs. 
Different f i ne rates may apply to otiier I i brary col I ecti ons, such as reserve 
collections. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page34 

maryiana tngisn insDiuiei-eeE bem-miensivei it>A^tuc).uu. i niensive, 
$5972.00. Students enrol I ed wi th the M aryl and E ngl i sh I nsti tute pay thi s f ee i n 
support of the I nsti tute. Students enrol I ed I n the semi-i ntensi ve program may 
al so enrol I for regul ar academi c courses and pay the tui ti on and fees associ ated 
with those offerings. The program also offers non-credit courses in American 
Engl ish Pronunciation (UM El 006) for $943.00and Fl uency Program or 
Advanced Writing (UM El 007, 008) for $1,253. 00. These charges are for Fall 
2008 and are subj ect to change. 

Property Damage C hargs Students wi 1 1 be charged for damage to property or 
equi pment. When responsi bi I i ty for the damage can be f i xed, the i ndi vi dual 
student wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or i t; when responsi bi I i ty cannot be f i xed, the cost of 
repai ri ng the damage or repi aci ng equi pment wi 1 1 be prorated among the 
individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee: Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, 
whi cho/er i s greater, pi us an additi onal 1.5% on each subsequent bi 1 1 i ng. 

Withdrawual and Refund of Fees Students compel I ed to I eave the uni versi ty at 
any ti me duri ng the academi c year shoul d meet wi tin tiiei r academi c col I ege 
advi si ng off i ce and secure a form for withdrawal . The compi eted form and 
i dentif i cati on card are to be submi tted to the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce 
whi ch wi 1 1 communi cate results to tine Off i ce of tine Regi strar. Students wi 1 1 
f orf ei t tiiei r ri ght to a refund i f tine wi thdrawal acti on descri bed above i s not 
adhered to. The eff ecti ve date used i n computi ng refunds i s the date tine 
wi thdrawal form i s f i I ed i n the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce. Stop payment 
on a check, f ai I ure to pay tine semester bi 1 1 , or f ai I ure to attend cl asses does not 
constitute witiidrawal . Refund requests should be processed by students with tine 
Off i ce of tine B ursar, otiierwi se any credit on tine student account coul d be 
carri ed over to tine next semester. I f a C ancel lation of Re^stration is 
subnritted to the Office of the Re^strar before the official first day of classes 
thestudent is entitled to full credit of semester tuition. 

U ndergraduate students wi tiidrawi ng from tine uni versi ty wi 1 1 be credi ted for 
tuiti on and fees i n accordance with tine f ol I owi ng schedul e: 

Pri or to 1st day of cl asses 100% 

1st 10 days of cl asses 80% 

3rd week 60% 

4tii week 40% 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page35 

btn week z^u% 

After 5th week i^°^ 

refund 



Note: First-semester freshmen who receiveTitie I V aid and who withdraw will 
recei ve a refund i n accordance wi th federal regul ati ons. 

Prior tothefirst day of dassesy if f ul l-ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses, thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of the per-credit-hour fee for part-ti me students. However, if students later add a 
course or courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they 
are regi stered to 12 or more, they wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or the difference between 
per-credit-hour fees pai d and the general fees for f ul l-ti me undergraduates. 

I f during thefirst five days oF dassesf ul I -ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch th^ are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of part-ti me charges pi us 20% of tine difference between tine f ul I -ti me fees and 
appropri ate part-ti me charges. After the f i rst f i ve days of cl asses, tiiere i s no 
refund for changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me status. Students who regi ster as 
part-ti me undergraduate students and apply for a refund for courses dropped 
duri ng tine f i rst week of cl asses wi 1 1 be gi ven an 80% refund. N o refund wi 1 1 be 
made for courses dropped tiiereafter. 

No part oF the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students off icial ly withdraw from tine university or when they are given 
permi ssi on by the appropri ate of f i ci al s of the uni versi ty to move from tine 
resi dence hal I s and/or to di sconti nue di ni ng hal I pri vi I eges. I n tiiese cases, the 
room refund wi 1 1 be computed by mul ti pi yi ng tine number of peri ods remai ni ng 
by the pro rata weekly rate after adj usti ng for a servi ce charge. Refunds to 
students havi ng f ul I board contracts wi 1 1 be cal cul ated i n a si mi I ar manner. N o 
room and/or board refunds wi 1 1 be made after the 14tii week of tine semester. 
Students are remi nded that reservati ons for room and board must be cancel ed by 
tine date publ i shed i n tine resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ces agreements) . 

I n computi ng refunds to students who have received tine benefit of scholarshi ps 
and I oans from uni versi ty funds, tine computati on wi 1 1 be made to return the 
maxi mum amount to tine schol arshi p and I oan accounts without I oss to the 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page36 

universiiy. 
FINANCIAL AID 

301-31^9000 

unnfinaid@umcl.edu 

Off i ce of Student F i nanci a! A i d 

Student F i nanci a! Servi ces Center 

1135 LeeBuilding, 301-31^9000 

Ennail: unnfinaid(a) unnd.edu 

www.fi nanci a! ai d. unxl.edu 

Tine Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, 
state, and institutional financial assi stance progranns, and, in cooperation with 
other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n tine awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. The pri mary responsi bi I ity for f i nanci ng attendance at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and. Col I ege Park, I i es witii students and f ami I i es. Schol arshi ps, grants, 
I oans, and work- study positi ons are awarded on tine basi s of academi c abi I ity 
and/or f i nanci al need as determi ned by a federal needs analysi s system. 1 1 i s the 
i ntent of OSFA to provi de assi stance to students who mi ght not otherwi se be abl e 
to pursue col I ege studi es due to f i nanci al constrai nts. 

Financial aid funds are United; tiierefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students nnust f ol I ow tiiese steps to recei ve pri ori ty consi derati on for f i nanci al ai d: 

1. Submi t admi ssi ons appi i cati ons and al I necessary supporti ng 
documents to the Off i ce of Admi ssi on by tine appropri ate deadi i nes. 
(DeadI i nes are I i sted i n chapter 1.) 

2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 

after J anuary 1. The FAFSA is aval I able on the OSFA web site at_www.fi nar 
www.fi nanci alaid.umd.edu. A new FAFSA is requi red for each 
academi c year of tine students enrol I ment. 

NeA/studerrts should iKtvuaittDbeadmittBd beforefilingthe 
FAFSA. A financial aid application has no bearing on a students 
admi ssi on appI i cati on. H owe/er, students wi 1 1 not recei ve f i nal 
consi derati on for ai d unti I tiney are admitted to a degree program. 

3. Mail the FAFSA to the Federal Processor no later than 
February X so that it is reoeivGd by the processor by February 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page37 

rx Applying online napsio escpeaiieine processL i ncome ror ine 
pro/i ous year may be esti mated i ni ti al I y and corrected I ater on the 
Student Aid Report. 

A ppl i cati ons recei ved before F ebruary 15 wi 1 1 be gi ven pri ori ty consi derati on. 
General Regulations ApplicabletD All Forms oF Aid 

Full-TimeStabusL For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 credit 
iiours througii the sciiedu! e adj ustment peri od eacii semester i n order to recei ve 
the f ul I f i nanci al ai d award. PI ease refer to the standards of Sati sfactory 
Academi c Progress when consi deri ng droppi ng bel ow 12 credit hours for any 
given semester. 

C itizenshi p StabusL I n order to be el i gi bl e for federal , states or uni versi ty 
f i nanci al assi stance, students must be U ni ted States ci ti zens or el i gi bl e 
non-citizens. 

Defaull/Owe Refund: Students cannot be in default on an educational loan, nor 
can \he/ owe any refund on a Pel I Grant or SuppI emental Educati onal 
Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded at any post- secondary institution. 



Students must be worki ng toward a degree or certif i cate. 
Students must be admitted to tine university as "degree-seeki ng." 



Students must be maki ng satisfactory progress toward a 
degree or certif i cate accordi ng to the Standards for Sati sfactory Academi c 
Progress publ i shed i n the Schedul e of CI asses. 

Selective Sen/ice To receive federal financial aid, male students must register 
with Selective Service if th^ are at least 18 years old and born after December 
31, 1959, unl ess tiiey are not requi red by I aw. The federal government wi 1 1 verify 
compi i ance of tiii s regi strati on requi rement. 

Receiving a Non-U niversityAv\iard: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non- university source^ tine university may reduce the 
f i nanci al ai d awarded by tine uni versi ty . 1 1 i s the student's responsi bi I i ty to noti f y 
tine Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of al I outsi de awards. 

Changein Financial Situation: 1 1 is tine students responsi bi I ity to notify the 
Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of any changes to hi s or her f i nanci al 
ci rcumstances duri ng the year. 

Reapplication Requi remenb N eed- based assi stance i s not automati cal I y 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page38 

renewea rrom year lo year, am scuaenrs requesa ng neea-oasea aia muse reapply 
by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA annually. Such reappli cation must 
I ndi cate conti nued f I nanci al need and mai ntai n Sati sf actory Academi c Progress 
(SAP). 

Avuard Policy: Financial aid is normally a combination of grants, loans, and 

student empi oyment. The f i nanci al ai d "package'' i s d^ermi ned by tine 

aval I abi I i ty of f i nanci al ai d and the f i nanci al ci rcumstances of each student. 1 1 i s 

not necessary to make any speci al appi i cati on for uni versi ty grants. T he Off i ce of 

Student F i nanci al A i d wi 1 1 d^ermi ne awards that best f i t tine needs and 

qual if i cati ons of the candi dates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educati onal costs i s used i n d^ermi ni ng tine annount of ai d 
tiiat a student i s awarded duri ng tine academi c year. A typi cal budget for an 
undergraduate at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park, i s as f ol I ows: 

Dependent student living on campu^off campus^ 

(not with parent/relati\/e) 

The 2008-2009 budg^ has not yet been d^ermi ned, use tine f ol I owi ng 
2007-2008 budg^ as a gui del i ne. To d^ermi ne the f i nal budget for the 
2008-2009 academi c year, pi ease contact the F i nanci al Servi ce Center at 
301-31^9000. 

Tuition and Fees 

I n-State: M aryl and Resi dent $7,969 

Out-of- State: DC, otiier states, other countries 22,208 

Room 5,287 

Board 3,567 

Books 1,025 

Personal expenses and commuti ng 3,024 

Total I n-State $20,872 

Total Out-of-state $35,111 



MERIT BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page39 



301-31^9000 
unnfinaid(a)umcl.edu 

Scholarships 

So/eral schol arshi ps are avai I abl e to the hi ghest-achi e/i ng students at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. Two types of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e: 
those based solely on academic or creative talent (nnerit- based), and those based 
on f i nanci al need as wel I as academi c or creati ve tal ent (need- based) . The 
el i gi bi I i ty cri teri a for the di ff erent schol arshi ps vary and are I i sted bel ow. F or 
more i nf ormati on on these programs, students are encouraged to contact the 
off i ce or department responsi bl e f or sel ecti ng the reel pi ents. PI ease see the I i st of 
departmental schol arshi ps at the end of thi s chapter. Current i nf ormati on about 
schol arshi ps i s al so avai I abl e on the Web at www.uqa.umd.edu . 

Banneker/Key Scholarship: The University of M aryl and seeks to identify and 
sel ect some of the bri ghtest hi gh school seni ors i n tine nati on to conti nue thei r 
education as Banneker/Key Scholars. There are two award lo/elsfor Banneker 
K ey Schol arshi ps. T he f i rst award I evel covers the costs of tui ti on, mandatory 
fees, room and board, and a book al I owance each year for four years. The second 
award I e/el provi des $8,000 toward tuiti on and a book al I owance each year for 
four years. Schol arshi p reel pi ents wi 1 1 al so be admi tted to tine U ni versi ty H onors 
Program and wi 1 1 be afforded many otiier opportuniti es for parti ci pati on i n 
i ntel I ectual enri chment programs. For f ul I consi derati on, students must submi t an 
admi ssi on appi i cati on, appi i cati on f ee^ off i ci al transcri pt, essay, 
recommendati ons, and off i ci al copi es of SAT or ACT scores to tine Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons by December 1 for tine f ol I owi ng academi c year. 
Sel ecti on i s based upon academi c achi evement pi us extracurri cul ar acti vi ti es, 
awards and honors, and an essay. Semif i nal ists are given a personal i nterview. 
Factors such as a candi date's i nvol vement i n community servi ce^ tal ents or ski 1 1 s, 
I eadershi p, and character al I pi ay a part i n tine f i nal awards. Contact tine Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Presidents Scholarship: This award provi des talented undergraduate students 
with tuition support for four years. Awards rangi ng from $2,000 to $8,000 per 
year are offered to i ncomi ng freshmen. Students are sel ected through the 
admi ssi ons process wi tii pri mary consi derati on gi ven to academi c performance 
in high school (high school courses and achievement) and standardized test 
scores (SAT or ACT). For ful I consideration, students must submit a conplete 
appi i cati on for admi ssi on by December 1. Contact tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admi ssi ons at www.uqa.unnd.edu for nnore i nf ormati on. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page40 

ueons bcnaarsnip: i nisawara proviaesiaieniea unaergraauacescuaenrs wiin 
tui ti on support for one to two years. Awards rangi ng from $1,500 for one year to 
$4,500 for two years are offered to i ncomi ng f reshnnen. To be consi dered, 
students must submi t a compi ete appi i cati on for admi ssi on by December 1. 
Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more 
information. 

President sTransfer Schdarship: Tiiis sciioiarsiiip is a two-year $5,000 per 
tui ti on scliol arsiii p for transfer students. Students do not iiave to fi II out a 
separate appI i cati on to be consi dered as they wi 1 1 be e/al uated based on tiiei r 
appI i cati on to tine U ni versi ty of M aryl and. T he schol arshi p wi 1 1 be awarded to 
tfie most competi ti ve transfer students wi tin the strongest academi c records and 
col I ege grade poi nt averages. Students who are awarded tine schol arshi p wi 1 1 
receive notif i cati on by mai I about two weeks after tiiey receive tiiei r I etter of 
admi ssi on. Contact tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at 
www.uqa.unnd.edu for nnore i nf ormati on. 

Regents Scholars Program The Regents Schol ars Program recogni zes tine 
extraordi nary achievement of outstandi ng freshmen students. New awards are 
made each year i n tine amount of f ul I i n-state tui ti on, roorrt board, and 
mandatory fees. Reel pi ents are automati cal I y admi tted to the U ni versi ty H onors 
Program. A sel ect number of the top hi gh school schol ars i n the state wi 1 1 be 
consi dered for thi s most presti gi ous award. A compI ete admi ssi on appI i cati on, 
application fee, official transcript, essay, recommendations, and SAT or ACT 
scores must be submi tted to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons by 
December 1 for consi derati on for the Regents Schol ars Program for the 
f ol I owi ng academi c year. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons for 
more information. 

National Merit Schdarship/Cdlege-Sponsored Merit Av\iard: The National 
M eri t Schol arshi p Corporati on (N M SC) has a vari ety of schol arshi ps that are 
awarded to students based on academic performance. The University of 
M aryl and serves as a sponsori ng i nsti tuti on for students sel ected by N M SC to 
receive the Col I ege-Sponsored M eri t Schol arshi p award. Students sel ected for 
the U M Sponsored M eri t award wi 1 1 receive a four-year renewabi e schol arshi p 
rangi ng from $1,000 - $2,000/year. All finalists should follow NMSC's 
i nstructi ons for f i rst choi ce noti f i cati ons careful I y and observe deadi i nes to 
remai n el i gi bl e for awards. 

T he N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p al so awards Corporate- Sponsored meri t 
schol arshi ps and N ati onal Achi evement awards. For more i nf ormati on on the 
N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p program pi ease vi si t: www, nati onal meri t. orq . 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page41 

wanoerg Kegems bcnaarsnip: i ne boara or Kegenrs nas aesignacea me 
Wei nberg Regents Schol arshi p to be awarded to a M aryl and conmuni ty col I ege 
transfer student i n order to conti nue the commitment to outstandi ng students. I n 
order to be sel ected for thi s award, a student must have excepti onal 
qual if i cati ons, i ncl udi ng achi e/ement of a 4.0 grade poi nt average, compi eti on of 
the A ssoci ate of A rts degree at a IV| aryl and communi ty col I ege, B/i dence of 
creati ve and i ntel I ectual acti vi ti es or schol arl y potenti al , and have been admi tted 
to one of the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and i nsti tuti ons. T he deadi i ne for 
submi tti ng the candi date's appi i cati on materi al i s J une 15. The wi nner may 
receive the schol arshi p for two years, total i ng no more than four semesters 
i ncl udi ng Summer sessi ons. F or i nf ormati on, contact the U ni versi ty System of 
M aryl and Adni ni strati on at 301-445- 1992. 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are aval I abl e to 
outstandi ng students transferri ng from M aryl and community col I eges. The 
awards cover i n- state tuiti on and mandatory fees for two years of undergraduate 
study. To be el i gi bl e for consi derati on, students must have an overal I grade poi nt 
average of 3.5 for al I col I ege work attempted, and must have compI ^ed an 
A ssoci ate of A rts degree or the enti re f i rst two years of courses for the maj or i n 
whi ch the student expects to enrol I . Students who have pre/i ously attended the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park, are i nel i gi bl e for thi s schol arshi p. 
Candi date nomi nati on forms are aval I abl e i n earl y J anuary from the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons or from communi ty col I ege advi sors. The deadI i ne 
for recei pt of the appI i cati on, off i ci al transcri pts, and schol arshi p materi al s i s 
mi d- M arch. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons. 

Honors Scholarship: H onors students al ready attendi ng M aryl and are el i gi bl e 
to appI y for one of these $500 awards. F i nanci al need i s not a cri teri on for 
selection. Regents, Banneker-Key, and Presidents Scholarship recipients are not 
el i gi bl e for H onors Schol arshi ps. To be consi dered, students must be f i rst- or 
second-year students, have at I east a 3.2 grade poi nt average^ and be maki ng 
sati sf actory progress toward the compI eti on of requi rements for an H onors 
ci tati on. I n addi ti on, appI i cants must submi t an essay on thei r academi c goal s 
and pi ans for achi e/i ng tiiem. Contact the U ni versi ty H onors Program. 

University oF Maryland Departmental Scholarships Some Col I eges and 
departments at tine uni versi ty offer a vari ety of meri t schol arshi ps. M ost 
departmental schol arshi ps requi re a student to have a mi ni mum grade poi nt 
average of 3.0 and be regi stered for a mi ni mum of 12 credits per semester. For 
i nf ormati on regardi ng departmental schol arshi ps, pi ease contact tine appropri ate 
Col I ege or department. 

Creativeand Performing Arts Scholarships These are competitive 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page42 

scnoi arsni ps wni en are awaraea annual i y . kh mary consi aeraa on wi 1 1 oe gi ven lo 
enteri ng freshmen and transfer students from community col I eges who have 
outstandi ng tal ent i n art, dance, musi c, or theater. The schol arshi ps cover i n-state 
tuition and mandatory fees and are renewable for up to three additional years 
based upon an acceptabi e I o/el of performance as def i ned by the respective 
departments. A udi ti ons and/or portf ol i os are requi red. Contact the Col I ege of 
Arts and Humanities. 

Maryland State Scholarships The M aryl and State Schol arshi p Admi ni strati on 
(MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards botii need- and merit- based scholarships 
to M aryl and resi dents. There are currenti y 16 different programs aval I abl e, 
i ncl udi ng the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educati onal Assi stance Grant, the 
Senatori al Schol arshi p, the H ouse of Del egates Schol arshi p, and the 
Di sti ngui shed Schol ar Award. Y ou may obtai n more i nf ormati on about tiiese 
and other awards by cal I i ng M SSA at 800-974- 1024. A 1 1 M aryl and resi dents are 
expected to apply for State Schol arshi p assi stance. I niti al appi i cati on for many 
of the awards i s made through the F ree A ppl i cati on for Federal Student A i d 
(FAFSA). Please notethat filing the F A FSA is sufficient to applyfornnost 
M aryl and State Schol arshi ps at U M C P, al though some may requi re addi ti onal 
appI i cati on forms. The appI i cati on deadi i ne for most programs i s M arch 1. The 
FAFSA is aval lable on the OSFA web site atzvww.financialaid.umd.edu . 

Scholarships from Other States Several states have reciprocal agreements 
with tine State of M aryl and. Students who are resi dents of these states may 
recei ve funds for study i n el i gi bl e post- secondary i nsti tuti ons i n M aryl and. 
I nterested students shoul d contact thei r state schol arshi p agenci es for i nf ormati on. 

Scholarship Searches A broad range of schol arshi ps are aval I abl e from pri vate 
sources. U sual I y, tiiese awards are not as wel I publ i ci zed as tine state and 
university programs. Therefore, students should conduct a scholarship search to 
locate such sources. The U ni versity of M aryl and offers access to several services 
to students to ai d tiiem i n tiiei r searches. Access our Web site at 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu to use tiiese servi ces. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

301-31^9000 
unnfinaid(a) unnd.edu 

Grants 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page43 

I ne UTTi ce or biuaeni i- 1 nanci ai a i a aam ni seers so/erai gram programs ror 
undergraduates. Awards are made based on f i nanci al need as determi ned by the 
FAFSA. Grants do not have to be repaid. Access our web si teat.www.fi nanci al aid. 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 



Pdl Granb This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 
which aid from otiner sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are 
seeki ng tiiei r f i rst bachel or's degree and have excepti onal need may receive a 
Federal Pel I G rant. A 1 1 undergraduates wi 1 1 be consi dered for thi s grant 
regardi ess of when tiiei r appi i cati ons were received. Students may receive tine 
Federal Pel I G rant for I ess tiian f ul I -ti me attendance, al tiiough the award wi 1 1 be 
pro- rated based on the number of credits attempted. Awards range from $523 to 
$4,731. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity G rant (FSEOG): The 

FSEOG i s awarded to f ul I -ti me undergraduates with excepti onal need. Pri ority i s 
given to Federal Pell Grant recipients. To be consi dered for FSEOG, students 
must meet OSFA's priority application deadline of February 15. The minimum 
award i s $200. The maxi mum award i s dependent upon government fundi ng. 
The funds are di vi ded annong as many deservi ng students as possi bl e. 

Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) and National Science and 
MatiieiiBtics Access tD Retain to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants Academi c 
Competitiveness Grant, Secti on 401A of tine " H i gher Educati on Reconci I i ati on 
Act of 2005" estabi i shes a grant program for students who have concentrated i n 
math/sci ence or a f orei gn I anguage cri ti cal to U .S. Securi ty. 

Grants for f i rst or second year undergraduate students are cal I ed "Academi c 
Competitiveness Grants (ACG) ." Grants for tiii rd or fourth year undergraduate 
students are cal I ed " N ati onal Sci ence and M atiiemati cs Access to Retai n Tal ent 
(SMART) Grants." 

Students who are el i gi bl e for tine ACG grants must be a U .S. citi zen, enrol I ed 
f ul I -ti me i n an undergraduate program, must have compi eted a " ri gorous hi gh 
school program' ' , f i I e tine F ree A ppl i cati on f or F ederal Student A i d ( F A F SA ) and 
el i gi bl e for tine federal Pel I grant. The ACG grant amount i s up to $750 for f i rst 
year students and $1300 for second year students over two semesters. 

Students who are el i gi bl e for tine SM A RT grants must be a U .S . ci ti zen, enrol I ed 
f ul l-ti me i n an approved undergraduate prograrrt must have a 3.0 GPA, f i le tine 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and el igible for tine federal 
Pel I grant. The SM A RT grant amount i s up to $4000 over two semesters. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page44 

I eacner taucaoonAsascanceior ^aiegeana Hi^ier taucanon u tA^Hj 
Grant 

Through the Col I ege Cost Reducti on and Access Act of 2007, Congress created 
theTeacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) 
Grant Program that provides grants of up to $4,000 per year to students who 
i ntend to teach i n a publ i c or private el ementary or secondary school that serves 
students from I ow- i ncome f ami I i es. 

To receive the TEACH Grant students must complete the FAFSA, be a U .5. 
ci ti zen or el i gi bl e non-ci ti zen, enrol I ed as an undergraduate, post- baccal aureate 
or graduate student, enrol I ed i n a coursework necessary to begi n a career i n 
teachi ng or plan to complete such coursework, mai ntai n a cumulative 3.25 GPA 
and sign aTEACH Grant Agreement to Serve. Questions regarding tiieTEACH 
G rant Program can be di rected to the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. 

I nstitutional Grants The university awards grants to f ul l-ti me students who 
demonstrate f i nanci al need and meet OSF A 's pri ori ty appi i cati on deadi i ne of 
February 15. There are tiiree funds from whi ch i nsti tuti onal grants are awarded, 
tiieUM Scholarship, Frederick Douglass Grant and tine UM Grant. OSF A selects 
tine reel pi ents of tiiese awards based on aval I abi I i ty of funds and tine 
qual if i cati ons of the appI i cants. The U M Schol arshi p may be awarded to 
undergraduates witii demonstrated need and high academic achie/ement. The 
UM Grant and Frederick Douglas Grant may be awarded to any undergraduate 
with demonstrated need. Award announts for these programs range from $500 to 
$3,800. 

Sdf-Help 

F i nanci al ai d al so consi sts of sel f - hel p assi stance such as empi oy ment and 
student loan programs. M ost of these programs are awarded based on need as 
determi ned by the FA FSA . Access our web site at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 
for additional information. 



Work-Study: The Federal Work- Study (FWS) Program provides 
students with tine opportunity to earn mon^ to meet tiiei r educati onal and 
personal expenses. M on^ earned from tine FWS program does not have to be 
paid back. To be considered for FWS, students must medt OSFA's priority 
appI i cati on deadI i ne of February 15. Thi s award i s need-based and may range 
from $800 to $2,500. Pay rates depend on tine level of complexity of the work, 
but will be at I east tine federal mini mum wage. Like all university employees, 
FWS empI oyees receive a paycheck every other week for tine hours worked. 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page45 

ivi osc I- vvb J ODS are on campus, mougn opponuni d es exi sc inrougn ine 
Comnxinity Service Program for FWS students to work off campus at SB/eral 
Federal Government Agencies. Tine number of iiours students may worl< is 
I i mited to 20 per week wiii le scliool is i n session and 40 per week duri ng 
vacations and summer break. 

Paid I nternships: Students wi tin pai d i nternsiii ps si gn a contract at tine 
begi nni ng of tine semester tiiat states tine payment amount for tine number of 
Iiours to be worked duri ng tiiat semester. The payment amount i s advanced to tiie 
students account at the start of each semester. This program differs from Federal 
Work- Study i n that students receive al I "wages" at the start of each semester, as 
opposed to a bi - weekl y pay check, and tiiose funds are appi i ed di recti y to tiie 
students account. Several off i ces and departments on campus, i ncl udi ng ShuttI e 
UM, Residential Facilities, and Dining Services, offer paid internships. Students 
shoul d contact the department or off i ce for whi ch they are i nterested i n worki ng. 



Perkiris Loan: The Perki ns I oan i s a I ow- i nterest rate (5%) I oan for 
students with excepti onal f i nanci al need. Thi s i s a I oan borrowed from tiie 
school , and must be repai d. To be el i gi bl e^ students must meet OSF A 's pri ori ty 
appI i cati on deadi i ne of February 15. The amount of tiie award wi 1 1 depend upon 
the students need and may range from $200 to $2,000. New borrowers (tiiose 
who f i rst receive a Federal Perki ns Loan after J uly 1, 1988) have a grace peri od 
of ni ne montiis after graduati ng or I eavi ng school before tiiey must begi n 
repayment of tiiei r F ederal Perki ns L oan(s) . I nterest wi 1 1 begi n accrui ng at tiie 
ti me of repayment. Thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attendi ng school 
and enrol I ed at I east half ti me i n a degree- seeki ng program. 



Stafford Loan: Thi s i s a I ow-i nterest- rate I oan for students who attend 
at I east half-ti me. A ppl i cati on i s made through the school 's f i nanci al ai d off i ce 
viatiieFAFSA. Eligibilityfortiiisloanisbiedonneed, not credit worthiness. 
Thi s I oan i s borrowed by tiie student and must be repai d. 

There are two types of Federal Stafford Loans, subsidized and unsubsidized. The 
subsi di zed Stafford I oan i s awarded to students with demonstrated f i nanci al 
need; tiii s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attendi ng school and enrol I ed at 
least half-ti me i n a degree- seeki ng program. Students who do not demonstrate 
f i nanci al need, or who do not demonstrate suff i ci ent need to borrow a f ul ly 
subsidized Stafford loan, may borrow a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. 
The unsubsidized loan is interest bearing. Students borrowing an unsubsidized 
Stafford I oan wi 1 1 be requi red to repay the pri nci pi e and any i nterest that may 
accrue duri ng school attendance. All students who wish to apply for eitiier 
Federal Stafford Loan must complete tiie FAFSA. As of J uly 1, 2008 tiie 
subsi di zed I oan i nterest rate wi 1 1 be f i xed at 6. 0%. T he unsubsi di zed I oan 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page46 

I nieresc wi 1 1 oe ti xea ac o.ayo. biuaenrs wno graauace or arop dq ow nai t-ii me 
status are granted a six- month grace peri od b&ore repayment of the Stafford 
loan is required. 

Tine f ol I owi ng are the maxi mum I oan amounts per academi c year: $5,500 for 
undergraduates with f resiiman status, $6,500 for undergraduates attai ni ng 
sopiiomore status, and $7,500 for undergraduate students wiio attai n j uni or or 
seni or status. I f students do not demonstrate suff i ci ent need to borrow the 
maxi mum subsi dized Federal Stafford Loan, th^ may borrow the difference i n a 
Federal U nsubsi dized Stafford Loan. The maxi mum borrowi ng I i mit f or most 
undergraduates is $31,000. 

Federal PLUS (Parent Loans For Under^aduate Students): This is a 
non- need- based I oan, whi ch parents may borrow to hel p defray the cost of thei r 
dependent chi Idren's education. The Federal PLUS enables parents to borrow the 
f ul I yearly cost of attendance (as determi ned by the school ) mi nus al I other 
f i nanci al ai d. Otherwi se, there i s no yearl y or cumul ati ve borrowi ng I i mi t. 
B ecause thi s I oan i s not need- based, submi ssi on of the F A F SA i s not requi red to 
appi y . H owB/er, borrowers must f i rst submi t the PL U S I oan appi i cati on to the 
school for cal cul ati on and certif i cati on of the maxi mum I oan amount that the 
parent may borrow per student per year. The Federal PLUS is granted to 
borrowers based on credit- worthi ness as d^ermi ned by the I ender whom the 
borrower sel ects. The i nterest rate for the Federal PL U S i s f i xed at 8.5%. The 
borrower has the opti on of begi nni ng repayment on the PL U S I oan ei ther 60 
days after the I oan i s f ul ly di sbursed or not unti I six (6) months after the 
dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrol I ed on 
at I east a half-ti me basi s. 



COLLEGE AND DEPARTMEISTTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

301-31^9000 
umfi nai d(a) umd.edu 



Some U M col I eges and departments offer meri t- based schol arshi ps. M ost 
departments wi 1 1 only consi der students who enrol I for 12 credits per semester, 
and who have a grade poi nt average of at I east 3.0. Some of these schol arshi ps 
are open to prospecti ve freshman and transfer students. Some of them are onl y 
open to conti nui ng U M students. F or addi ti onal i nf ormati on regardi ng 
departmental schol arshi ps pi ease contact the appropri ate col I ege or department 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page47 

or VI SI I www.Ti nanci ai ai a.uma.eau/bcnoi arm ps/aepanmeniai .nim . 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences 

B i ol ogi cal Resources E ngi neeri ng 

Environmental Sciences 

I nsti tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture 

Natural Resource Sci ences 

Natural Resources M anagement Program 

N utri ti on & F ood Sci ence 

PI ant Sci ence and L andscape A rchi tecture 

Veterinary Medicine 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History & Archaeology 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparati ve L i terature 

Dance 

E ngl i sh L anguage and L i terature 

F rench & I tal i an L anguages and L i teratures 

Germanic Studies 

History 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page48 

J B/vish Studies Program 

Linguistics 

jviusic 

Piiiiosopiiy 

Spanisii & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Tiieatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es 

Antiiropoiogy 

Cri mi no! ogy & Cri mi nal J usti ce 

Economics 

Geograpiiy 

Government and Pol i ti cs 

Heari ng and Speecii Sci ences 

J oi nt Program i n Surv^ |V| ethodol ogy 

Psychology 

Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terrori sm 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Applied Mathematics 
Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Matiiematics 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page49 

Meteorology 
Physics 
Statistics Program 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counsel ing& Personnel Services 

Curri cul urn & I nstructi on 

Education Policy, Planning, and Administration 

H uman Do/el opment (I nsti tute for Chi I d Study) 

M easurement, Stati sti cs & E val uati on 

Special Education 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Family Studies 
Heal til Education 
Kinesiology 

PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 

COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

COLLEGE OF CHEMICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Entomology 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid PageSO 

tnvironmenLai :DCience5 

M ari ne- E stuari ne E nvi ronmental Sci ences 

A. J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Aerospace E ngi neeri ng 

Chemical Engineering 

C i vi I and E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng 

E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng 

F i re Protecti on E ngi neeri ng 

Hill man E ntrepreneurshi p Program 

M ateri al s and N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng 

Mechanical Engineering 

Rel i abi I ity E ngi neeri ng 

ROBERT H.SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Accounting 

Business 

Deci si on and I nf ormati on Technol ogi es 

Finance 

H i nman E ntrepreneurshi p 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 

M anagement and Organization 

M arketi ng 

Quest Program 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING aid PRESERVATION 

Architecture 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid PageSl 

U rban Studi es and PI anni ng Program 

School of Public Policy 

Environmental Policy Program 

J ames M acGregor Burns Academy of Leadershi p 

Public Policy 

Publ i c Sector F i nanci al M anagement 

Social Policy 

Interdepartmental Programs 

Chemical Physics Program 

E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy (BSOS) 

Systems E ngi neeri ng 

RETURNING STUDENTS PROGRAM/COUNSELING CENTER 

IrwinS. K ami n Adult Learner Emergency Fund 
C harl otte W . N ewcombe Schol arshi p 
Geral d G . Portn^ M emori al Schol arshi p 
Returni ng Students Program 
Women's Forum Schol arshi p 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

Academi c Achi o/ement Programs 

A i r Force Aerospace studi es Program 

Army ROTC 

Col I ege Park Schol ars Program 

Individual Studies Program 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equity 

Letters and Sciences 



Fees, Expensesand Financial Aid Page52 

N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce 
University Honors Program 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Alumni Association 



carTpusAamnistraQCTi, Kesources, and btudentberviceE P^ebji 

■ ■ 

Campus Administration, Resourcesy and Student Services 

CAM PUS ADM INI STRATI ON 

Office oF the President 

1101 Main Administration Building 
301-405-5803 

C. Daniel Mote J r., President 
www.unxl.edLi/PRES 

The president is the chief executiveofficerof the University of Maryland. Six vice presidents, who 
report to the president, manage different divisions of the campus adninisti'ati on. TheOfficeof 
H uman Rd ati ons Programs, the Department of I ntercol I egi ate AthI eti cs, and the M aryl and F i re and 
Rescue Institute report to the Office of the President. The University Senate, a representative 
I egi si ati ve body of the uni versi ty, advi ses the presi dent on academi c and other matters. 

Acadenfic Affairs 

1119 M ai n A dmi ni sti'ati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5252 

Nariman Farvardin, Senior Vice Presi dent and Provost 
www. provost, umd.edu 

The Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Academi c Affai rs and Provost i s the chi ef academi c off i cer of the 
uni versi ty wi th responsi bi I i ty f or gui di ng the academi c devd opment and di recti on of the i nsti tuti on 
i n accordance with the university's mission; ensuri ng that our programs and faculty are of the highest 
cal i ber; supporti ng the diversity of our stixlents, faculty, and staff as a special sti-engtin; and 
pronioti rg acaderni c excd I ence across the uni versi ty. The deans of the 13 col I eges and school s at the 
U ni versi ty report di recti y to hi m as do the deans for undergraduate stixli es, the graduate school , and 
prof essi onal stixli es, the dean of the I i brari es and the chi ef i nf ormati on of f i cer. The seni or vi ce 
presi dent and provost oversees the devd opment, revi ew, and i mpl ementati on of al I academi c 
pol i ci es and regul ati ons; consul ts cl osd y wi th the U ni versi ty Senate and other f acul ty advi sory 
groups on academi c programs and pol i ci es; and serves as I i ai son wi th other uni versi ty di vi si ons i n 
sti'ategi c and I ong- range pi anni ng. 

Achrini^ativeAffairs 

1132 Main Administi'ation Building 

301-405-1105 

Douglas M . Duncan, Vice President 

www.admi naffai rs.unxl.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for A dmi ni sti'ati ve Affai rs i s responsi bl e for the eff ecti ve 
management of the physi cal , f i seal , and staff support resources of the i nsti tuti on. The off i ce al so 
provides campus safety and security, materials management, and other necessary support services. 
Of parti cul ar i nterest to students are the community awareness and security programs offered by the 



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Department of Publ i c Safety and the i nf ormati on and assi stance servi ces provi ded by the B ursar for 
concerns of students regard! ng university bi 1 1 i ngs. 

StudentAffairs 

2108iviitchell Building 

301-314-8428 

Linda Clement, Vice President 

www.studentaffai rs.unxl.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for Student Af f ai rs provi des admi ni strati ve I eadershi p for 15 
departments whi ch oversee stixlent I if e. The off i ce serves as a general poi nt of contact for stixlents 
and thd r f ami I i es regardi ng housi ng, di ni ng, transportati on, recreati on, wd I ness and stixlent 
services. The office mai ntai ns I iaison with the university chaplai ns, the Student Government 
Association (SGA), and the Graduate Student Government (GSG). I n addition, it provides 
admi ni sti'ati ve support for the Seni or Counci I , Parents and Fami I y Aff ai rs, and Student Aff ai rs 
Development. 

OfficeoF Human Relations Pro-ams 

1130 Shri ver Laboratory, East Wi ng 
301-405-2838 
www.umd.edu/OH RP 

The Off i ce of H uman Rd ati ons Programs (OH RP) advi ses and assi sts the Presi dent i n the promoti on 
of the university mission as it rdates to nxiiti cultural ism broadly conceptual i zed (i .e., race 
( i ncl usi ve of col or and creed) ; etiini ci ty; I anguage; nati onal or geographi c ori gi n; soci oeconomi c 
cl ass ( i ncl usi ve of educati onal I evd , empi oyment statijs, and fami I i al conf i gurati on) ; sex and 
gender; gender identity and expression; sexual orientation; physical, devdopmental, and 
psychol ogi cal abi I i ty; rd i gi ous, spi ri tual , f ai th- based, or secul ar aff i I i ati on; age and generati on; 
physical appearance, environmental concern; and, on the basis of the exercise of rights secured by 
the First Amendment). More specifically, we facilitate partnership bull ding between various 
constituenci es of stixlents, faculty, and staff on these i ssues as they i mpact school i ng and are 
ori ented toward the real i zati on of an i ncl usi ve and therefore aff i rmi ng envi ronment for every ci ti zen 
of the university community. 

The Off i ce of H uman Rd ati ons Programs (OH RP) i s responsi bl e f or i niti ati ng acti on i n compi i ance 
with institutional, state, and federal directives to provide equal education and employment 
opportunities for university stijdents, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the outcomes of 
acti ons taken i n thi s regard, reporti ng our f i ndi ngs to the Presi dent, the Campus Senate, and to the 
campus community at large. We provide stixlents, faculty, and staff with general i nf ormati on on 
equity efforts and on thestatijs of equity and compliance matters at the university. Students, faculty, 
or staff havi ng a concern about possi bl e i nequiti es i n educati onal or empI oyment matters, or who 
wi sh to regi ster a compI ai nt, may contact dtfier the Campus CompI i ance Off i cer at 301-405-2839, 
or a member of the Campus' Equity Counci I (see Equity Counci I i n chapter 3). 

The Office of Human Rdations Programs (OHRP) sponsors i niti ati ves that promote intergroup 
rd ati onshi p bui I di ng, sexual harassment and hate cri mes preventi on, nxil ti cul tural organi zati onal 
devd opment, and processes compI ai nts of di scri mi nati on f ol I owl ng procedures set forth i n the 
U ni versi ty's H uman Rd ati ons Code (the compI ete text of thi s Code may be found i n chapter 10) . 



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Theeffortsof theOHRP are directed toward the devdopment of our students, faculty, and staff 
becomi ng pri nci pi ed I eaders, predi sposed to progress! ve acti on; beconi ng democrat] c ci ti zens as 
outstanding in what they do as in who they are with respect to their commitnient to furthering the 
tenets of equity and j usti ce for al I . 

Equity Council 

1119 M ai n A dmi ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5793 
www.president.umd.edu/EqCo/i ndex.cfm 

The Equity Counci I serves as an advi sory group to the Presi dent and supports the I ongstandi ng and 
continuous goal of the University of Maryland to be a national leader in recruiting and retaining a 
diverse community of faculty, staff and students. The Counci I provides leadershi p i n the articulation 
and devd opment of aff i rmati ve acti on pol i ci es and procedures for the campus communi ty . A 
particular focus of the Equity Counci I is to review and recommend, as appropriate, search and 
sdection pol icies and procedures for the university and its col leges and departments. The Counci I 
consi sts of equity admi ni sti'ators from each V i ce Presi dent and Dean's off i ce and the Off i ce of the 
President. The Special Assistant to the President for Equity Diversity serves as Chai r of the Counci I . 

Dr. Robert E. Waters, J r.. Chair, Office of the President 

301-405-5793 

1119 M ai n A dmi ni sti'ati on B ui I di ng 

rewaters(a)umd.edu 

Dr. J avaune Adams-Gaston, Division of Student Affairs 

University Career Center and The Presidents Promise 

301-314-7236 

3100 H ornbake L i brary 

jadams(a)umd.edu 

Dr. Viki Annand, School of Public Health 

301-405-2473 

2302 Health and Human Performance Building 

vannand(a)umai I .umd.edu 

D r. D i anne B arl ow. Col I ege of I nf ormati on Studi es 

301-405-2042 

4105 H ornbake L i brary 

dbarlow(a)umd.edu 

Dr. Corddl W. Black, Division of Academic Affairs 

301-405-6810 

1127 M ai n Admi ni sti^ati on 

cblack@umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Brown, Maryland Fire and Rescue I nstitute 

4500 Pal nt Branch Parkway 

301-226-9963 



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skypaul(a)umd.eclu 

Ms. LaVern Chapman, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-1951 

4570 Van jvj unchi ng Hal I 

I chapman(a)rhsmitli. umd.edu 

M s. Roberta H . Coates, Off i ce of the Presi dent 

301-405-5795 

1112 ColeStudent Activities Building 

rcoates(a)unxl.edu 

Ms. Barbara Durxan, Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

301-405-0044 

1122 Symons Hall 

bduncan(a)umd.edu 

Ms. Ingrid Farrdl, School of Architecture Planning and Preservation 

301-405-6310 

1200 A rchitecture B ui I di ng 

ifarrd I ©umd.edu 

Mr. GeneFerrick, Collegeof Chemical & Life Sciences 

301-405-7019 

2300G Symons Hall 

gene(a)unxl.edu 

Ms. Cynthia Hale, Collegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences 
301-405-1684 
2141 Tydings Hall 
chal e(a)bsos. umd.edu 

Ms. Lee Ellen Harper, Office of Professional Studies 

301-405-2224 

2103 Reckord Armory 

lharper(a)umd.edu 

Ms. Wendy A. Jacobs, Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

301-405-2345 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall 

wajacobs(a)umd.edu 

Ms. Vicki Kesler, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-2308 

2570D Van M unchi ng Hal I 

vkesler(a)umd.edu 

Mr. Dean Kitchen, Collegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

301-405-2314 

3421A.V. Williams Building 



carTpusAamnistraQCTi, Kesources, and btudentberviceE P^eb/ 

clkitchen(a)umd.eclu 

Dr. Stephen Koziol, Col lege of Education 

301-405-3324 

2311 Benj ami n B ui I di ng 

skoziol(a)unxl.edu 

Dr. Ronald Lipsman, Col lege of Computer, Matiiematical and Physical Sciences 

301-405-2313 

3417A.V. Williams Building 

rlipsman(a)umd.edu 

M s. J ohnni eque L ove, U ni versi ty L i brari es 

301-405-9048 

7233 McKddin Library 

jlovel(a)umd.edu. 

M r. J ames N ewton, Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es 

301-405-6851 

2130K Mitchell Building 

jnewton(a)umd.edu 

M s. A pri I Patty, Col I ege of Educati on 

301-405-3130 

3203 Benj ami n B ui I di ng 

apatty(a)umd.edu 

Dr. Gary Pertmer, A.J ames Clark School of Engineering 

301-405-3936 

1124 Martin Hal I 

pertmer(a)umd.edu 

Mr. William L. Powers, School of Public Policy 
301-405-6336 
2101Van Munching Hall 
wpowers(a)umd. edu 

Ms. Olive Rdd, Philip Merrill Col I ege of Journalism 

301-405-2433 

1117 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng 

oreid(a)umd.edu 

Ms. Carolyn Trimble, University Human Resources 

301-405-5648 

3100 C hesapeake B ui I di ng 

ctrimble(a)umd.edu 

Ms. CyntiniaTrombly, University Relations 

301-405-2532 

3144 R i ggs A I umni Center 



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ctrombi y(a)umd. edu 

Office oF Undergraduate Studies 

2130 Mitchell Building 

301-405-9363 

www.Ligst.unxl.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

A ssoci ate Deans: K atheri ne M c A dams, Scott Wol pert 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Rdd Bryant, Lisa Kidy, J ames Newton 

Assistants to the Dean: Kathryn Robi nson, Laura Slavi n 

Through its many programs, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students 
at the University and tine faculty and staff that support the undergraduate mission of the campus. The 
Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and responsi bl e 
for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar and co-curri cul ar educati on. 

University Relations 

2119 M ai n A dmi ni strati on B ui I di ng 

301-405-4680 

B rodi e Rerni ngton, V i ce Presi dent 

www.urhome.umd.edu 

The Division of University Rdations conducts a variety of programs to share news, buildties, 
and rai se phi I anthropi c support for the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. U ni ts of thi s di vi si on i ncl ude 
Devdopment, Marketing and Communications, University of Maryland College Park Foundation 
Administi'ation, Special Events, and Alumni Relations. University Rdations is responsible for 
campus- wi de programs i n fund- rai si ng, al umni affai rs, publ i cati ons, f i I m and vi deo presentati ons, 
media rdations, and management of major campus e/ents. The Great Expectatiors fundi raising 
campai gn to rai se $1 bi 1 1 i on i n pri vate support for uni versi ty pri ori ti es such as schol arshi ps and 
facilities, is coordinated by University Rdations. 



University Senate 

1100 Marie Mount Hall 
301-405-5805 
www.senate.umd.edu 

The University Senate, anintegral partof the institution's system of shared governance, has 
representation from all segments of the campus community: faculty, staff, undergraduate students, 
and graduate students. Parti ci pati on i n the Senate or any of its 15 Standi ng Committees i s an honor 
and a responsibility. 

The f ul I Senate meets approxi matd y ni ne ti mes a year to consi der matters of concern to the 

i nsti tuti on, i ncl udi ng academi c i ssues, uni versi ty pol i ci es, pi ans of organi zati on, f aci I i ti es, and the 

wdf are of faculty, staff, and students. The Senate advi ses the presi dent, the chancd I or, or the Board 



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of Regents as appropri ate. To become a student senator, students nxst be el ected by students i n thd r 
col I ege or school or the Off! ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n central i zed, onl i ne el ecti ons. E I ecti ons 
are hd d every year duri ng the spri ng semester. Students are al so encouraged to parti ci pate i n Senate 
Standi ng Committees, such as Student Affai rs and H uman Rd ati ons. Thse committees draw 
membershi p from the campus community at I arge and cover every aspect of campus I if e and 
f uncti on. Detai I s about the d ecti on and appoi ntment process are aval I abl e from the U ni versi ty 
Senate Office. 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Academic Achie/ement Pro-ams 

2110 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-4736 

Executive Director: Dr.JerryL. Lewis 

www.aap.umd.edu 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) pri marl ly provides resources and opportunities for 
I ow- i ncome i ndi vi dual s, f i rst generati on col I ege students, di sabi ed students and tradi ti onal I y 
under- represented students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Achrisaons 

Ground Floor, Mitchdl Building 

301-31^8385 

www.uga.umd.edu 

The services offered by the Office of U ndergraduate Admissions are designed to meet the i ndi vi dual 
needs of prospective students. The office provides general information about the University of 
M aryl and through brochures, I etters, i nformati on sessi ons, and campus tours. Admi ssi ons staff 
B/al uate the appi i cati ons of both freshman and transfer students i n order to sd ect qual if i ed students. 
U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons al so revi ews al I appI i cati ons for readmi ssi on and rd nstatement. For 
more i nformati on about undergraduate admi ssi ons, see chapter 1. 

America Readsr^America Counts 

0144Holzapfd Hall 

301-314'READ 

www.arac.umd.edu 

Do you I i ke worki ng with ki ds? A meri ca Reads*A meri ca Count(A RAC), part of Community 
Service- Learning, is a partnership between the University of Maryland and PrinceGeorge^s County 
Publ ic Schools. ARAC strives to provide high qual ity mentori ng i n local schools that enriches 
I earni ng opportuniti es for both col I ege and d ementary school students. Vol unteer, I ntern, and 
Federal Work Study mentor positions (starti ng at $10/hour) are aval I able. M entors are matched with 
chi Idren i n a Pri nee George^s County dementary school and tutor 3-10 hours per week for a 



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semester or more. M entors recei ve excel I ent trai ni ng i n tutori ng, I eadershi p and communi ty work, 
and have the opportunity to connect with other students who share thd r i nterests. Contact the A RAC 
off i ce for more i nf ormati on or to I earn whether you are el i gi bl e for federal work-study. A ppl y today 
at www.arac.umd.edu. 

Computing Services Office oF I nformatiotiTedinoiogy 

Phone 301-405-7700 
Fax: 301-405-0300 
oit@umd.edu 
www.oit.umd.edu 

The Office of Information Technology (01 T) ispartof a University of Maryland stixlents everyday 
academic and social life. 01 T plans, develops, supports, and maintains computing, networking, and 
telecommunications services for the university community to enhance both day-to-day academic and 
busi ness goal s and to further the uni versi ty's standard of excel I ence i n educati on and research. 

M any faculty mennbers have i ntegrated technol ogy i nto courses, both i nsi de and outsi de of the 
cl assroom Some professors use cl i ckers to col I ect stixlent feedback duri ng cl ass. Through ELMS 
(the university's Enterprise Learning Managennent System powered by Blackboard Academic Suite) 
( www.elms.umd.edu ). i nsti'uctors can provi de onl i ne course materi al s, col I ect assi gnments, and post 
grades dedronical ly, and hold discussion sessions. The university's robust wi rdess network (one of 
the nati on's I argest for a uni versi ty our si ze) gi ves stixlents the abi I i ty to connect to the I nternet from 
al most anywhere on campus. Computer I abs across campus f eatijre Wi ndows, M aci ntosh, and U N I X 
envi ronments and provi de I aser pri nti ng servi ces and course- rd ated software. 

The MyUM portal ( www.my.umd.edu ) gives stixlents a one-stop gateway to numerous university 
resources, including e-mail, a personal calendar, and custom! zableRSS feeds, as wdl aseverytining 
offered through Testijdo (www.teshjdo. umd.edu) . whi ch al I ows you to regi ster for cl asses onl i ne see 
your financial aid statijs, check your grades, and more. 

The 01 T Student H d p Desk (www, hd pdesk. umd.edu. 301.405. 1400) provi des answers to your I T 
questions and offers technical assistance. Discounts on computers, printers, software programs, and 
cd I ular devices and service are also availableto University of Maryland students. Visitthe 
Acadenic Computers for Terps (ACT) Web site ( www.act.umd.edu ) or theTerrapi n Technology 
Store (www.oit. umd.edu/techstore. 301.314.7000) for more information. 

Educational Talent Search College GatB/^ay Pro-ams 

3103 Turner Hall 

301-324-7763 

Educational Talent Search: www.etsp.umd.edu 

E ducati onal Tal ent Search i ncreases the col I ege parti ci pati on of I ow- i ncome and f i rst-generati on 
col lege stixlents. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 
OfficeoF Extended Studies 

0132 Main Administi'ation Building 



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301-405-6551 

C huck Wi I son, D i rector 

www.oes.umd.edu 

TheOfficeof Extended StLdies administers the University's SumrnerTern^ Winter Term and the 
Freshmen Connection Program 

Surmer Term serves more than 12, 000 students i n over 1, 700 undergraduate and graduate courses 
offered i n si x sessi ons duri ng the U ni versi ty's twel ve- weel< Summer Term A ddi ti onal I y, speci al 
summer programs i ncl ude the Young Scholars Program enrol I i ng academi cal I y qual i f i ed hi gh 
school j uniors and seniors, and Freshmen First, providi ng fal I and spri ng newly admitted freshmen 
an opportuni ty to transi ti on i nto col I ege whi I e earni ng academi c credi t. N oncredi t workshops al so 
are aval I abl e i n Summer Term. 

Winter Term i s a three- week sessi on i n J anuary offeri ng more than 200 undergraduate and 
graduate courses as wd I as noncredit workshops. Wi nter Term provi des an opportunity for students 
to accd erate the r progress toward graduati on, f ulf i 1 1 prerequi sites, and meet d i gi bi I ity requi rements 
for certain majors. 

TheFreshmen Connection Pro-am is a fal I semester academic program specif i cal ly designed for 
students who have accepted spri ng admi ssi on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Students enrol I i n thi s 
extensi on program to earn up to 16 credits toward thd r undergraduate degree. 

Student Financial Services C enter 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
umfinaid(a)unxl.edu 
www.financialaid.unxl.edu 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) admi ni sters a vari ety of f i nanci al assi stance and student 
empi oyee programs. A ssi stance i s granted pri marl I y on the basi s of the appi i cants f i nanci al need as 
determined by the Free Application for Federal StudentAid (FAFSA). The OSFA staff isavailable 
for i ndi vidual counsd i ng on matters pertai ni ng to f i nanci ng a col lege education. For additional 
information, see chapter 2, Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid. 

Honor Societies 

www. uni on. umd.edu/stixlentorg/ 

Students who excd i n schol arshi p and I eadershi p may be i nvited to j oi n the appropri ate honor 
society. Honor societies at Maryland include 

Alpha Chi Sigma (Cherristiy) 

* A I pha E psi I on (A gri cul tural E ngi neeri ng) 

*Alpha E psi I on Ddta (Pre-Med) 

A I pha E psi I on Rho (B roadcast J ournal i sm) 

*Alpha Kappa Ddta (Sociology) 

*Alpha Lambda Ddta (Freshman Scholarship) 

A I pha Phi Si gma (Cri mi nal J usti ce) 

A I pha Zeta (A gri cul ture) 



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B eba A I pha Psi (A ccounti ng) 

Beba Gamma Sigma (Business Management) 

Blacl< Honors Caucus 

*Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 

Delta N u A I pha (Transportati on) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Pi (Business) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

*Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

*GammaTheta U psi I on (Geography) 

*Golclen Key Honor Society (Leadership/Scholarship) 

*Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

* K appa Tau A I pha (J ournal i sm) 
*LambdaPi Eta (Speech Communication) 

* M ortar B oard N ati onal H onor Soci ety (Schol arshi p) 

* N ati onal Soci ety of Col I egi ate Schol ars 
*OmegaChi Epsilon (Cherristiy Engineering) 
*Omega Rho (Business) 

*Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

*Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Order of Omega (Fraternity/Sorority Leadership) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (HealtlYHuman Resources) 

*Phi AlphaTheta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) 

Phi Chi Theta (Business and Economics) 

*Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Scholarship) 

*Phi Kappa Phi (Senior/Graduate Scholarship) 

*Phi Sigma (Biology) 

*Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Phi Sigma lota (French/I tali an) 

*Pi Sigma A I pha (Political Science) 

*Phi SigmaTheta 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 

*Pri mannum Honor Society 

*Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Si gma A I pha Omi cron (M i crobi ol ogy) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Journalism) 

*Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

*SigmaTau Delta (English) 

*TauBetaPi (Engineering) 

Tau Beta Sigma 

* M ember of A ssoci ati on of Col I ege H onor Soci eti es 
I nterojlle^ate Athletics 

Comcast Center 
301-314-7075 
www. umterps.com 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate AthI eti cs i s responsi bl e for di recti ng i ntercol I egi ate atinl eti c 



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P^ebii 



programs for both women and men, and for managi ng the campus' athi eti c compi ex. 

Women's i ntercol I egi ate athI eti c teams i ncl ude cross country, f i el d hockey, soccer and vol I eybal I i n 
the f al I ; basketi^al I , competi ti ve cheer, swi mmi ng, i ndoor track/f i el d and gymnasti cs duri ng the 
wi nter; and I acrosse, softbal I , outdoor track/f I el d and water pol o I n the spri ng. Tenni s and golf 
competi ti on I s schedul ed I n tx)th the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

There are men's teams i n f ootbal I , soccer and cross country i n the f al I ; basketi^al I , swi mrni ng, 
wresti i ng, and i ndoor track/f i el d duri ng the wi nter; and basebal I , I acrosse and outdoor track/f i el d i n 
the spri ng. Tenni s and golf competi ti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

M en's and women's i ntercol I egi ate atinl eti c teams compete i n the N ati onal Col I egi ate AthI eti c 
Association (NCAA) atthe Division I level and in the Ati antic Coast Conference (ACC). 

E I ig bi I ity ReqiJ remenbs 

Student-atinletes must meet all NCAA, ACC and University of Maryland requirements for 

el igi bi I ity. The chart below serves as a guidd i neto el igi bi I ity rules and does not provide complete 

detail. All NCAA requi rements are aval I abl e vi a www. N CA A .org . 



NCAA Continung Eligbilityaixl Progress TovuardsDeg'eeGuidelines 



YeBraFlratid 
Collegabe E rrollment 


SemeSfer of FiJI-Time 
[Enrollment 


NCAA Rcqii remenbs 


Fall 2003- present 


Entering 1st sennester 
(1st year) 


Must be certified by the NCAA Eligibility 
Clearinghouse 


1 
E nteri ng 2nd semester 


* 6 degree appi i cabi e credits earned previ ous 

semester 

*1.29UMGPA 


! 

E nteri ng 3rd semester 
(2nd year) 


* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
academ c year and 24 for the year 
*6 degree appI i cabI e credits earned i n 
previ ous sennester 
*1.8NCAAGPA 


Enteri ng 4th semester 


* 6 degree appI i cabI e credits previ ous 
semester 

* 1.80 NCAA GPA 


E nteri ng 5th semester 
(3rd year) 


* 40% (*48 degree appI i cabI e credits) of 
degree requi rement compI eted 

* 18 hours duri ng previ ous regul ar academi c 
year 

* 6 degree appI i cabI e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 

* declaration of degree program 



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P^eM 





1 

E rteri ng 6th semester 

1 


* 6 degree appi i cabi e credits earned previ olb 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 


E rteri ng 7th semester 
(4th year) 


* 60% (*72 degree applicable credits) of 
degree requi rement compi eted 

* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appI i cabI e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


1 
Enteri ng 8th semester 


* 6 degree appI i cabI e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


Enteri ng 9th semester 
(5th ymr) 


* 80% (*96 degree appI i cabI e credits) of 
degree requi rement compI eted 

* 18 hours earned in previous regular 
acadet tic year 

* 6 degree appI i cabI e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 



*Based on 120 credit degree program 



1. Student-athI etes are al I owed 4 seasons of el i gi bi I ity withi n 5 cal endar years from the ti me they 
f i rst enrol I f ul l-ti me i n a col legiate i nstitution. When they parti ci pate i n any competition i n thd r 
sport (i ncl udi ng a scri mmage with outsi de competiti on), whetiier it i s f or one mi nute or an enti re 
contest, they have used a season of competiti on and one of thd r four years of el i gi bi I ity. 

2. Student-atinl etes nxst be enrol I ed f ul I -ti me, that i s, carry a mi ni nxim of 12 credit hours each 
semester to be el i gi bl e to practi ce or compete with tinei r team I f a student-atinl ete drops bd ow 12 
hours he/she wi 1 1 i mmedi atd y be i nd i gi bl e to practi ce or compete, and hi s/har atinl eti cs grant- i n-ai d 
wi 1 1 be revoked unl ess otherwi se approved by the Department of AthI eti cs. G raduati ng seni ors who 
need I ess than 12 credi t hours to compI ete degree requi rements may reed ve an excepti on to enrol I i n 
less than 12 credit hours by completi ng a Less Than 12 form aval lable i n the ASCDU . 

3. Student-atinl etes are requi red to nneet nnuiti pi e sets of academi c standards i n order to nnai ntai n 
d i gi bi I ity f or atinl eti c competiti on. These standards are di dated by the N CAA and the AthI eti c 
Counci I . I n additi on, student-atinl etes nnay be requi red to nnai ntai n standards di dated by the col I ege 
of thd r nnaj or for dtiner admi ssi on i nto a degree program or nnai ntai ni ng enrol I nnent. 

4.Transfer student-atinl etes nnust meet al I N CAA , A CC and U M D requi rements i n order to be 

i mmedi atdydigible. PI ease note that in certain cases NCAA and A CCdigibi I ity requi rements are 

nnore sti'i ngent than U M D admi ssi ons requi rements. 

5. 1 nd i gi bl e student-atinl etes are not permitted to compete or travd . 



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6. F i rst semester freshman who do not meet the cunxil ati ve G PA requi rements, may seek an appeal 
under certai n ci rcumstances. Transfer student-athl etes are requi red to attai n the appropri ate 
cunxilati ve GPA based upon the number of f ul l-ti me semesters they have been enrol led i n any 
institution. 

y.Dismissed and later rd nstated stixlent-atiiletes are i nd igi blefor competition unti I they meet 
desi gnated grade poi nt averages. 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athletics (I CA) also sponsors a number of awards for 
achievement i n atinletics and/or scholarshi p. For further i nformation, contact the Academic Support 
and Career Devdopment unit (ASCDU), 301-314-7043. 

International Education Services 

3116Mitchdl Building 

301-314-7740 

D i rector: V al eri e Wool ston 

E-mail: iesaclv(a)deans.unxl.edu 

www. i nternati onal . umd.edu/l E S 

I nternati onal stixlents and f acul ty reed ve a wi de vari ety of servi ces desi gned to hd p them benef i t 
fromthdr experience in the United States. International Education Services (lES) worksdosdy 
wi th the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, eval uati ng academi c records from overseas and 
processi ng appi i cati ons for E ngl i sh prof i ci ency, vi sa, and f i nanci al requi rements. I E S sponsors 
ori entati on programs, i mrni grati on and empi oyment serni nars, and the G I obal Communi ti es, 
I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program i n Dorchester H al I . I E S advi sors counsd i nternati onal stixlents concerni ng 
i mrni grati on and personal i ssues. 

F-landJ -1 status studenbSL Students with F-1 or J -1 statijs are responsible for foil owing the 
regul ati ons of the U .S. Customs and I mmi grati on Servi ce(U SCI S) pertai ni ng to thd r vi sa statiJs. The 
regul ati ons affect extensi on of stay, transfers, off -campus empI oyment autinori zati on, practi cal 
trai ni ng, and course loads. The Office of I nternati onal Education Services is the only office on 
campus autinori zed to si gn i mrni grati on documents. 

Maintaining Status 

• Fiil-time re^stration: I n order to mai ntai n f ul I -ti me stixlent statiJs for i mrni grati on purposes, 
F-1 and J -1 undergraduate stixlents are expected to register for and compld:e a mi ni nxim credit 
load of 12 hours per semester. Pre-approval from I ES is requi red if you are goi ng to complete 
the semester with fewer than 12 credits. 

• Dociments I nternati onal stixlents nxist have a val id passport at al I ti mes unless exempt from 
passport requirements. If your 1-20 or DS-2109 will soon expire you should apply for an 
extensi on at I east 30 days pri or to the program compi eti on date on the document. To travd 
outside theU.S. and re-enter as an F-1 orj -1, an advisor in I ES nxst sign your 1-20 or 
DS-2109 before you leave. 

• Health I nsLranoe: J -1 stixlents are requi red to carry adequate health i nsurance whi le 
attendi ng the uni versi ty . Students nxst d ther purchase the heal th i nsurance pi an aval I abl e i n 
the H eal th Center or show proof of coverage that meets Department of State gui dd i nes. F - 1 
stixlents are sti'ongly encouraged to purchase university health i nsurance. Visit the Health 
Center for assi stance with i nsurance. 



carrpusAdmnisuaQcn, Resources, an btuaentberviceE P^ebfc 



Letters and 

1117 Hornbake Library 

Assistant DearYDi rector: Deborah Rdd Bryant, Pin. D. 
General Advising: 301-314-8418^9 
Pre-Law Advising: www.prelaw.unxl.edu 
Credit-by-Exam 301-314-942 
www.ltsc.umd.edu 

Letters and Sci ences i s the academi c JDme for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i el ds before sd ecti ng 
a maj or, for post-baccal aureate students taki ng additi onal course work, arid for non-degree seeki ng 
students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sci ences may al so serve as the academi c home 
for students compi eti ng requi rements for entry i nto a L i mited E nrol I ment Program 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Ms^and En^ish liigtitute(MEI) 

1121 Holzaphd Hall 
301-405-8634 
Di rector: M arsha Sprague 
www. i nternati onal . umd.edu/mei 



The Maryland English I nstitute (M El ) provides English language instruction and assessment at the 
postsecondary I evd for non- nati ve speakers who wi sh to I earn E ngl i sh f or academi c, prof essi onal , 
or personal reasons. M E I f ulf i 1 1 s its nri ssi on by provi di ng 

• courses for rretriculated students 

• courses for i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 

• afull-time, multi-levd Intensive English Program 

• short courses for members of the campus and I ocal community 

• custom-designed programs 

• eval uati on of the E ngl i sh I anguage prof i ci ency of prospecti ve and provi si onal I y admi tted 
students 

• assessment of oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s of i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 

M E I offers ri gorous courses of study whi I e provi di ng a posi ti ve and supporti ve I earni ng communi ty 
and promoting cross-cultural understanding. 

Two regular i nstructional programs are offered for provisional I y admitted and prospective 
undergraduate students who are non- nati ve speakers of E ngl i sh: a serri - i ntensi ve program for 
provi si onal I y admi tted students and a f ul I -ti me i ntensi ve program for prospecti ve students. 

Senri-I nbenaveCUMEl 005): This program is open only to students admitted to the University of 
Maryland. For information on University of Maryland English proficiency requirements, please see 
the I nternati onal E ducati on Servi ces web si te at http://www.international.umd.edu/ies/ . Students 
who are provisional I y admi tted to the University satisfactorily complete UM El OOSthdr first 
semester in order to become fully admi tted, full -time students at tiie University. UMEI OOSdasses 



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meet f i ve days a week, two hours a day. The program i s desi gned especi al I y to perfect the I anguage 
skills necessaryfor academic work at the University of Maryland. Enrol I mentis by permission of 
the di rector, and no credit is given toward any U ni versity degree. 

I nbenave: This f ul l-ti me Engl ish language program is open to non-native speakers who wish to 
i mprove thd r E ngl i sh for academi c, prof essi onal or personal reasons. There are three i ntensi ve 
E ngl i sh sessi ons per year: One for f al I semester, one for spri ng, and a seven-week sessi on i n the 
summer. Each consists of approxi matdy 23 hours of i nstruction weekly. The program offers five 
I evd s of i nstructi on, advanced begi nni ng through advanced. 

Sati sf actory compi eti on of the program does not guarantee acceptance at the U ni versi ty . E nrol I ment 
is by permission of the director, and no credit is given toward any University degree. Tuition 
rerni ssi on can not be appi i ed to M E I courses. 



OffiGeoF Miiti-Ethnic Student Education (OMSE) 

1101 Hornbake Library 
301-405-5615 or 405-5616 
www.umd.edu/OM SE 

Acadenric Si^Dport ard LeadersNp FocusL The Office of M uiti -Ethnic Student Education (OM 
provides academic support programs and services to enhance the recruitment, retention and 
graduati on of undergraduate nxil ti -etinni c stixlents at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and ( U M ) , Col I ege 
Park. OM SE's academic support activities i ncl ude a tutorial service, peer mentori ng programs, 
academic classes that devdop col lege success ski I Is and peer hd pi ng sti'ategies, EDCP-108N and 
EDCP-312; and Academic and Leadershi p Excd lence programs. As an academic unit OM SE 
sti'i ves to i denti f y and meet changi ng needs that affect the success of our undergraduate nxil ti -etinni c 
stixlents. OM SE col I aborates with other campus off i ces and col I ege programs to achi eve thi s goal , as 
wd I as to promote a positive community of learners who are sensiti veto issues of diversity, and to 
enhance tine academi c experi ence of our di verse undergraduate stixlent popul ati on at U M . 

Study Loifigeand Computier Workdation. The OM SE off i ce suite contai ns a stixly I ounge that 
serves as a tutori al center and an open workstati on I aboratory. The stixly I ounge provi des 
nxil ti -etinni c stixlents with an opportunity to stixly, get assistance from a tutor, and work on 
state-of-the-art computers i n a relaxed atirosphere. 

Liaison to Student OrganizationsL OMSE staff members activdy support a number of nnulti-etinnic 
pre- professional undergraduate stixlent societies in law, business, science, health, and education 
disciplines. OMSE al so supports and works dosdy with the campus A si an- American Student Union, 
B I ack Student U ni on, Lati no Student U ni on, and tine A meri can I ndi an Student U ni on. 

Oak RidgeAsBodated Universities 

Mdvin Berstdn, Vice President for Research 
ORAU Councilor, University of Maryland 
www.orau.org 

Si nee 1951, stixlents and f acul ty of U ni versi ty of M aryl and have benef i ted from i ts membershi p i n 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortiumof 98 colleges and universities 
and a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE) located i n Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU 
works with its member i nstituti ons to hd p thd r students and faculty gai n access to federal research 



carrpusAdmnisuaQcn, Resources, an btudentbervsceE P^efcfc 

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f aci I iti es throughout the country; to keep its member i nformed about opportuniti es for f el I owshi p, 
scholarshi p, arid research appoi ntments; and to organize research al I iances among its members. 

Through the Oal< Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), theDOE facility that ORAL! 
operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as well asfacultyenjoyaccesstoanxiltitudeof 
opportuniti es for study and research. Students can parti ci pate i n programs coveri ng a wi de vari ety of 
di sci pi i nes i ncl udi ng busi ness, earth sci ences, epi derni ol ogy, engi neeri ng, physi cs, geol ogi cal 
sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, arid mathematics. 
A ppoi ntment and program I ength range from one month to four years. M any of these programs are 
especi al I y desi gned to i ncrease the numbers of underrepresented mi nori ty students pursui ng degrees 
i n science-and engi neeri ng- related disci pi i nes, and debai Is on locations and benefits can be found i n 
the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, whi ch i s aval I abl e at www.orau.gov/ori s^e 
www.orau.gov/ori s^educ. htm or by cal I i ng the contacts below. 

ORA U 's Off i ce of Partnershi p Devd opment seeks opportuniti es for partnershi ps and al I i ances 
among ORUA's members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty 
development programs, such as the Ralph E. PoweJ unior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the 
Visiting I ndustrial Scholars Program consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research and 
support programs as wd I as servi ces to chi ef research off i cers. 

For more i nformation about ORAL! and its programs, contact: 

MdvinBernstdn 

V i ce Presi dent for Research 

ORAU Councilorfor University of Maryland 

MonnieE. Champion 
ORAU Corporate Secretary 
865-576-3306 

Visit the ORAU homepageatwww.orau.org. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Fidd House 
301-314-8217 
Director Gerry Strumpf 
www.orientation.umd.edu 

The goal of Orientation is to i ntroduce new students to the University of M aryland community. The 
Ori entati on Off i ce offers a wi de range of transiti onal programmi ng and servi ces for students and 
thdr families as they prepare to attend the University of Maryland. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

PreC oi lege Pro-ams 

1101 West Education Annex 

Executive Di rector Georgette Hardy D^ esus 

www. precol I ege. umd.edu 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound-Math and Science Program (UB-MS): 301-405-1773 



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The University of JMaryland Pre-College Programs in Office Of Undergraduate Studies is comprised 
of the federal I y and state funded programs. Tinese programs generate tine sici 1 1 s and moti vati on 
necessary for success i n post-secondary education. Pre-Col lege Programs is part of the Federal TRI O 
Programs, which provides educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and 
provi de support to I ow-i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Office oF the Re^^ar 

First floor Mitchell Building 
301-314-8240 
Registrar: David Robb 
www.testudo.unxl.edu 

The Off i ce of the Regi strar provi des servi ces to students and academi c departments rel ated to the 
processes of regi strati on, schedul i ng, withdrawal , and graduati on. The off i ce al so mai ntai ns students' 
academi c records and i ssues transcri pts. Staff members are aval I abl e to students for consultati on. For 
detailed information about registration procedures, student records, and academic regulations, see 
chapter 4. 

MarylatxJ Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2nd Floor McKddin Library 

301-314-6786 

www.ugresearch.umd.edu 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative from the Off ice of the 
Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Created as a resource for faculty and students, the Center serves as a 
cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and off-campus research opportuniti es for undergraduate students. 
Additional I y, faculty members can share different models for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students 
i nto research programs, and ways of i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the curri cul um 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

0405 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-9356 

Davi d E ubanks, I nteri m Di rector 

www.cte.umd.edu 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , i ndi vi dual and campus- wi de efforts to 
enhance teaching and learning at the University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to 
departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants. The Center provides 
workshops, teachi ng assi stant de/el opment, e/al uati on and support strategi es for i mprovi ng teachi ng 
and I earni ng, i ndi vi dual consul tati ons for f acul ty and graduate students, research on current teachi ng 
practi ces, and i mpl ementati on of i nnovati ve teachi ng and I earni ng strategi es. 

The Center also administers the Undergraduate Teaching Assistants program a University- wide 
teachi ng and I earni ng program for graduate teachi ng assi stants, the L i 1 1 y Teachi ng Fd I ows program 



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the I instructional I mprovement Grants program, and various Scholarshi p of Teachi ng and Learni ng 
programs. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Tutoring 

2110 Marie Mount 
301-405-4745 
www. unxl.edu/AA P 

The Intensive Educational De/dopment Program (I ED) intineAcademic Achievement Programs 
(AAP) provides tutoring sen/ices for eligible University of Maryland stixlents. The schedule for 
tutori ng, stixly ski 1 1 s, matin support, and engi i sh support cl asses i s aval I abl e at 2110 M ari e M ount. 
Academi c support cl asses are offered for nnany I ower-l evd CORE cl asses, i ncl udi ng nnatin and 
engI i sh cl asses, as wd I as f or sd ected entry- 1 evd cl asses for numerous nnaj ors (for exampl e 
Business or Biological Sciences). Forascheduleof dassesaswdl asdigibilitystatijsforAAP's 
servi ces, pi ease contact tine Tutori ng Coordi nator at 301-405-4745 or yukako(a)deans. umd.edu. 
A I so, pi ease check A A P 's webpage at www. umd. edu/aap for schedul es, j ob opportuni ti es as tutors, 
and further i nf ornnati on about tine program 



sruDEisrr programs and services 

Alumni Association 

Samud Riggs IV Alumni Center 

301-405-4678 

www.al umni .umd.edu 

The University of Maryland Alumni Association is a non-profit membership organization for 
alumni of tine University of Maryland, College Park. By taking traditional and innovative approaches 
to al umni programmi ng, tine al umni associ ati on f i 1 1 s nnany purposes, i ncl udi ng tine needs of stixlents. 

I n conj uncti on witin Seni or Counci I and tine Off i ce of Student Affai rs, tine associ ati on supports 
professional devdopment programs to prepare stixlents for life in tine "real world." Prospective and 
current stixlents nnay appi y for schol arshi ps tinrough tine M aryl and A I umni A ssoci ati on Schol arshi p 
Program N ew graduates reed ve a one-year compi i mentary nnembershi p i n tine al umni associ ati on 
tinat i ncl udes its f ul I range of benefits. Y ears two and tinree after graduati on are offered at a 
di scounted rate of $25 per year. The al umni associ ati on al so offers graduates access to the 
TerpN ati on N etwork-a free onl i ne soci al and career tool al I owl ng graduates to connect wi tin 
M aryl and al umni and f ri ends based on shared i nterests, common acquai ntances, prof essi ons, 
I ocati ons and more. U pon graduati on, tine al umni associ ati on i nvites new graduates to j oi n its Y oung 
A I umni C I ub, whi ch provi des acti vi ti es for al umni who have graduated i n tine I ast 10 years. 

I n additi on to stixlent programmi ng, tine al umni associ ati on honors al umni who have di sti ngui shed 
tinemsd ves prof essi onal I y and personal I y tinrough tine U ni versi ty of M aryl and A I umni A ssoci ati on 
Hall of Fame and Annual Awards Gala. It provides special programs and services, such as consumer 
di scounts, tinat benefit al I al umni . 1 1 promotes conti nui ng educati on tinrough its cultural serni nars and 
i nternati onal ti^avd program M ost of al I tine al umni associ ati on seeks to bui I d tine Terrapi n Spi rit by 
support] ng more tinan 30 al umni cl ubs and academi c chapters tinroughout tine country and tine worl d. 



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The al umni associ ati on has 30 staff members, i s governed by a board of al umni vol unteers, and i s 
supported by count] ess other al umni vol unteers around the country. 

Book Center 

Stamp Student U ni on, I ower I evel 

SOl-Sl^-BOOK 

www.shopterp.com 

The Book Center provides a convenient (on-campus) selection of textbool<s and 
general - i nterest books, i ncl udi ng I i terature^ techni cal books, and best sel I ers. 1 1 
al so offers a I arge sel ecti on of school and off i ce suppi i es. The B ook Center al so 
carri es a wi de sel ecti on of i mpri nted cl othes and rel ated i terns. 

The Book Center is open M onday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday - 8:30 a.m. to 
8:00 p.m., Friday, 8:30 am. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 
Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additional hours for special events. 

University Career Center and the Presidents Promise(UCC/rPP) 

3100 H ornbake L i brary. South Wi ng 
301-314-7225 
UCC: help(a)umd.edu 
www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

The Presidents Promise 
presi dentspromi se(a)unxl. edu 
301-314-7888 

Refer to our i/ieb site for current hours of operation and hours of career assistance. 
Misaon 



The University Career Center (UCC) supports the University's mission and its academic programs 
by provi di ng a vari ety of programs and servi ces to meet the di verse career devd opment and 
empi oyment needs of degree^ seeki ng students and al umni . The center teaches, advi ses and counsel s 
students to make deci si ons about career i nterests, empI oyment and further or conti nued educati on; it 
col I aborates wi th academi c departments, empI oyers and al umni i n the del i very of programs and 
servi ces. A 1 1 students shoul d consi der i nternshi p and/or coop opportuniti es as an i ntegral part of thd r 
academi c endeavors. Students shoul d i ncorporate these opportuniti es i nto the pursuit of thd r degree. 

The Presidents Promise (TPP) i nitiati ve encourages undergraduate students to have an i ntegrated 
I earni ng experi ence that goes far beyond the cl assroom Students may f i nd opportuniti es i n 
programs such as I i vi ng/l earni ng programs, research experi ences, publ i c and pri vate sector 
i nternshi ps, I earni ng communi ti es, i nternati onal experi ences, servi ce- 1 earni ng experi ences, and 
opportuniti es for I eadershi p. Presi dents Promi se staff wi 1 1 hel p students navi gate through al I opti ons 



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to sd ect the best opportuniti es to compi ement academi c pursuits. I n additi on, dedi cated faculty and 
staff are al so avai I abl e to hd p students chart a course to enhance thd r academi c experi ence. To get 
started vi si t www, presi dentspromi se. umd. edu . 

Resoirces 



Career and E mployment Resotrce Roomc The Career & E mpl oyment Resource Room i s a central 
pi ace to I earn about our many servi ces and resources on career pi anni ng, i nternshi ps, appi yi ng to 
graduate^ professional school, and thejob search. The Resource Room contains a comprehensive 
col I ecti on of books, computers with i nternet connect] ons, and empi oyer i nformati on. Peer Career 
Educators are al so avai I abl e to answer questi ons and assi st i n the use of avai I abl e resources. The 
Resource Room i s open to al I graduate and undergraduate students and al umni of the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and Col I ege Park and Shady G rove campuses. 

Career Asadanoe: Thi rty-mi nute Same Day Career assi stance appoi ntments and pre-schedul ed 
I ndi vi dual Career A ssi stance appoi ntments are avai I abl e wi th our staff. D uri ng thi s ti me assi stance i s 
provi ded to students i n i dentifyi ng maj ors suited to thd r i nterests, hd pi ng them to understand the 
worl d of work, and prepari ng them for the j ob search by f ocusi ng on thd r ski 1 1 s and i nterests. We 
al so provi de gui dance i n the graduate school appI i cati on process, and work with al umni i n begi nni ng 
thd r career changes. (Phone 301.314.7233) 

University Career Center Web sitE The Web site provi des a cal endar of events, j ob search 
information, a wealth of career information, and general announcements. Our homepage features 
conti nuousi y updated career i nformati on for al I . 

CareersTTerps (C4r): For fast and comprehensive access to employment opportunities, al I students 
shoul d regi ster for Careers4Terps, whi ch provi des students free access to J ob L i sti ngs, O n-Campus 
I ntervi ewi ng and Resume Referral . 1 1 al so gi ves you updated i nformati on on career and j ob f ai rs and 
ennpl oyer i nformati on sessi ons. C4T students reed ve speci al e- mai I bul I eti ns on upcomi ng 
empI oyment events rd ated to thd r maj or. 

On-Campus I ntEn/ieuuing (OC I ): OCI offers students the opportunity to i ntervi ew on campus with 
a vari ety of organi zati ons for f ul I -ti me, i nternshi p, or part-ti me posi ti ons. To parti ci pate, students 
nxst regi ster for Careers4Terps. OC I i s al so avai I abl e to recent al umni . 

J ob L isti n^ C urrent j ob I i sti ngs- i ncl udi ng part-ti me, i nternshi p, graduate assi stantshi p, and 
f ul I -ti me posi ti ons are accessi bl e 24 hours vi a C4T. Additi onal j obs are often posted on the bul I eti n 
boards i nsidethe UCC/TPP suite. Students seeki ng short term part-ti mejobs should consider our 
Quick Bucks e-mail service. 

C redentials Services U ndergraduate^graduate students and al umni of the U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
Col I ege Park and Shady G rove campuses can estabi i sh permanent prof essi onal f i I es to hoi d letters of 
reconmendatjon and background i nformati on i n support of appI i cati ons for empI oyment and 
graduate'prof essi onal school . There is a smal I fee. 

Resune Referral : Students and al umni can present thd r qual i fi cati ons to empI oyers who are not 
i ntervi ewi ng on campus. By regi steri ng with Careers4Terps you j oi n a pool of candi dates accessi bl e 
to empI oyers who are requesti ng appI i cants with specif i c ski 1 1 s or backgrounds to f i 1 1 thd r current 
j ob openi ngs. E mpl oyers revi ew resumes and then di recti y contact qual i f i ed candi dates to arrange 



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off i ce i ntervi eiws or to request addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 

Virtual Mock I nberviaAis These are self- produced practice i ntervi ews. Through use of an 

i nteracti ve kiosk located i n the UCC/TPP suite, sessions are digital ly recorded and streamed to an 

onl i ne account for your revi ew. 

Terp Exbernshipc A n externshi p i s a short j ob shadowi ng experi ence that provi des you with the 
opportunity to observe and network with prof essi onal s, i nvesti gate a career f i el d, cl arify career goal s 
and i nterests, and f uncti on wi thi n a work envi ronment. A ppl i cati ons are accepted mi d-f al I semester 
for wi nter term experi ences. 

Academic Coirses 

The UCC/TPP offers several career development courses: 

EDCPIOS *- Academic Transition into internships A one-credit course designed to provide 

students wi th the ful I experi ence of searchi ng for searchi ng and successful I y obtai ni ng an i nternshi p. 

Themes may i ncl ude understandi ng the rd ati onshi p of i nternshi p experi ences to maj ors and/or 

career paths, setti ng I earni ng obj ecti ves, maki ng the most of an i nternshi p experi ence, and 

B/aluating offers. (Recommended for Freshmen, Sophomores, and J uniors.) 

E DC P lOq *- J ob Search Strate^es Desi gned for students who are seeki ng to I earn more about 

strategi es for I andi ng f ul I ti me empi oyment and succeedi ng at work. Thennes may i ncl ude 

correspondence and i ntervi ew preparati on, determi ni ng f it and appropri ateness of positi ons, setti ng 

real i sti c expectati ons for sal ari es and duti es, appropri ate work eti quette, networki ng, sd ecti ng 

references, on-the-job success, and managing work cultures and dynamics. (Recommended for 

J uniors and Seniors.) 

UNI V099* I nternship Experience Designed to complennent students supervised work 

experi ences. Topi cs may i ncl ude expl ori ng career opti ons, devd opi ng prof essi onal work ski 1 1 s, and 

exami ni ng the rd ati onshi p between i nternshi p and academi c coursework. Good academi c standi ng, 

submi ssi on of transcri pt, and i nternshi p descri pti on and approval of i nstructor requi red. 

Career De^opment 

Speci al events bri ng students and empI oyer representati ves together for i nf ormati on exchange and 
ennpl oyment contact. Stay tuned on the f ol I owl ng speci al events through our Web si te 

• University Career Center Events 

• I nternshi p and Part-Ti mej ob Fai r 

• Law Schools Day 

• Graduat^Prof essi onal Schools Day 

• Fall Career Fair 

• Winter] obs Fair 

• Spring Career Fair 

• M aryl and/M etropol itan Educati on Expo 

• Diversity] ob Search Series 

• N ati onal Student E mpl oyment Week 



Federal Work Study Students Note: Students d i gi bl e for Federal Work Study/Community Servi ce 
positions should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid: www.umd.edu/FIN/ or 301-314-9000. 

E n^ neeri ng Maj ors Note A ddi ti onal support for part-ti me, i nternshi p and cooperati ve educati on 



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positi ons i s avai I abl e through the E ngi neeri ng Co-op and Career Servi ces off i ce at 301-405-3863. 

Business Majors Note Additional support for part-time, internship, cooperative education, and 
f ul I -ti me posi ti ons i s avai I abl e through the U ndergraduate B usi ness Career Center off i ce at 
301-405-7103. 

University Counseling Centier 

Shoemaker Building 
301-314-7651 
301-31^9206 (fax) 
www.counsd i ng.umd.edu 

Seeki ng hd p i s a si gn of strength! M any students encounter a vari ety of personal , soci al , career, and 
academi c i ssues that cal I for assi stance beyond advi ce provi ded by f ri ends and f ami I y. Fortunatd y, 
the U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center provi des free and conf i denti al counsel i ng servi ces to al I U ni versi ty 
of M aryl and students. To schedul e an appoi ntrrent cal I 301-314-7651 or stop by the Shoemaker 
B ui I di ng. Wal k-i n counsel i ng i s avai I abl e to students of col or who woul d I i ke a consul tati on with a 
counsel or of col or and G L BTQ students who woul d I i ke a consul tati on wi th a gay, I esbi an or a gay 
al ly counselor, dai ly f rom 3:00 p.m to 4:00 p.m Students who seek hd p i n choosi ng a major can 
wal k-i n for consul tati on with a career counsd or on Wednesdays from 1: 00 p. m to 3: 00 p. m 

Counseling Center Sen/ices 

Personal/Social Couiselingi You don't have to deal with your problems alone. I n a warm and 
supportive envi ronment, you can meet with a professional counsd or to discuss any concern you may 
have rd ated to your personal and soci al wd I -bd ng. A mong the topi cs many students di scuss i n 
counsd ing are sdf -esteem stress, anxiety, depression, rdationship issues, sex, family problems, and 
I ond i ness. Y ou may see a counsd or for i ndi vi dual counsd i ng, coupl es counsd i ng, or j oi n one of 
the many counsdor-led support groups. Call 301-314-7651. 
www.counsd i ng. unxl.edu/Structur/csl gservi ce. htm 

Career Counseling. A normal part of your devd opment i n col I ege i s i dentifyi ng who you are i n 
rd ati on to a future career. Y ou can get hd p wi th thi s process i n i ndi vi dual career counsd i ng at the 
U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center. Y our expl orati on may i ncl ude taki ng career i nterest tests and 
i nterpreti ng the results with a professional counsd or or taki ng advantage of a computerized career 
i nf ormati on system Whether you are choosi ng a maj or, estabi i shi ng career goal s, or consi deri ng j ob 
opportuniti es, it i s i mportant to understand how your personal ity, val ues, and i nterests rd ate to your 
future prof essi onal I if e. Career counsd i ng at the Counsd i ng Center i s a good pi ace to begi n. The 
M aj ors Wal k-i n program i s avai I abl e on Wednesdays from 1: 00-3: 00 p. m Cal I 301-314-7651. 
www.counsd i ng. urnd.edu/Servi ces/srv_car. htm 

Academic SIdllsCoiJiseling. Many students would liketoimprovethdracademicskills. If you're 
ti red of struggi i ng because of your own weak areas, schedul e an appoi ntment to see the U ni versi ty 
Counsd i ng Center's education special ists i n the Learni ng Assistance Service (LAS). The counsd ors 
i n L A S can hd p you enhance such ski 1 1 s as readi ng, wri ti ng, note-taki ng, I earni ng sci ence and math 
materi al , and I earni ng stati sti cs. Workshops cover a range of topi cs, i ncl udi ng study ski 1 1 s, exam 
ski 1 1 s, ti me management, E ngl i sh conversati on, end-of -semester survi val ski 1 1 s, and strategi es for 
compi eti ng your thesi s or di ssertati on. Cal I 301-314-7693 or emai 1 1 as-cc(a)umd.edu. 
www.cour^ i ng. unxl.edu/LA S 



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Workshopsand Groif) Comseling. Y ou can gai n strength to deal with your concerns by getti ng 
together with other peopi e who share si mi I ar probi ems, i nterests, and goal s. Each semester, the 
U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center offers weekl y support groups addressi ng a vari ety of topi cs, such as 
career exploration, dissertation support, procrastination prevention, and stress management. Recent 
group offerings have included, "Circle of Sisters," a support group for black women; "MyBody-My 
Self: A Woman's Group," which addresses problems of body i mage and eati ng; and a Self Care and 
Wd I ness group that assi sts peopI e wi th strategi es for stayi ng heal thy, psychol ogi cal I y and 
physi cal I y. Cal I 301-314-7651. www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Servi ce£/sr/_grp. htm 

Sifiport for Students vujth Disabilities^ The U ni versity Counsel i ng Center's Di sabi I ity Support 
Servi ces, provi des a range of servi ces for students with di sabi I iti es, i ncl udi ng hd p i n I ocati ng 
i nterpreters for deaf or hard-of - heari ng students; readers for vi sual I y- i mpai red students, bl i nd 
students, and students with I earni ng di sabi I iti es; and assi stance with access to vari ous bui I di ngs and 
f aci I iti es on campus. I f you are a new or returni ng student, contact the Di sabi I ity Support Sen/i ces 
Off i ce i n the Counsd i ng Center as soon as possi bl e. Cal I 301-314-7682, vol ce and TTY . 
www.counsd i ng. unxl.edu/DSS/ 

Retirning Students Prog'am. I f you are over 25 and returni ng to school after a break i n your 
formal education, you probably have different needs than the traditional col lege student. The 
Returni ng Students P rogram i n the U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center's L earni ng A ssi stance Servi ce 
(LAS) is designed to hd p you with the transition to academic I ife. Workshops, counsd i ng, and 
publ i cati ons are aval I abl e at the Counsd i ng Center to make your adj ustment to the uni versi ty 
successful. Call 301-314-7693. www.counsding.umd.edu/LAS 

Testing ServicesL The Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit in the University Counsd ing 
Center admi ni sters tests for counsd i ng purposes, such as career i nterest i nventori es, and al so 
administers national standardized tests, such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and Miller 
Analogies. Call 301-314-7688. www.counsding.umd.edu/Structur/str_trdp.htm 

Researcii ServicesL G roup and i ndi vi dual consul tati on are aval I abl e i f you need assi stance wi th 
research design and statistics and writing project proposals, theses, and dissertations. Call 
301-314-7687. www.counsd i ng.umd.edu/Structur/trdpurschgrp.htm 

Sifiport for ParentsoF Ccliege Students The Parent WarmI i ne i s a conf i denti al td ephone and 
emai I servi ce for any parent concerned about hi s or her students adj ustment at col I ege, i ncl udi ng 
concerns impacting academic, social, and emotional realms, and overall mental health. Parent 
WarmI i ne staff can be contacted at 301-314-7651 or parentwarmi i ne(a)umd.edu. 

Parent and Chiid/AdolesoentCoifiseling and EA^uaticn. The University Counsd ing Center's, 
University Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service (UPCCES) provides 
U ni versi ty-connected f ami I i es wi th chi I dren (ages 4 to 18) wi th a range of servi ces, i ncl udi ng 
individual and group therapies, school consultation, and parent consultation. Intdlectual and 
emoti onal/behavi oral eval uati on i s al so aval I abl e for yoiih with school and I earni ng concerns. Cal I 
301-314-7673 or parentchi I d(a)umd.edu. www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Structur/str_pccs. htm 

University Couiseling Center Hoirs 

Counseling Service apfxtintments (all sbxients) 301-314'7651 

M onday-Thursday 8: 30 am to 9: 00 pm 

F ri day 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



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Students of Color Walk-In Hour 
Monday- Friday 



no appoi ntment needed 
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm 



Rainbow Walk-In 
Tuesday-Friday 



no appoi ntment needed 
3:00 pm- 4:00 pm 



Majors Walk-in 
Wednesdays 



no appoi ntment needed 
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm 



L earning Assignee Service 
jviondays 
Tuesday-Friday 



301-314'7e93 

8:30 am to 7:00 pm 
8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Disability Support Services 
IMonday- Friday 



301-314'7682 

8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Testing, Research and Data Procesang Unit 
jvionday- Friday 
Vari abl e eveni ng inours for testi ng purposes 



301-314'7688 

8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



UniversityParentCorsultation and Child Evaluation Service 301-314-7673 
|V| onday- F ri day 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 

Eveni ng inours by appoi ntment 



Dining Services 

1150 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I 

Dining Plans: 301-314-8069 

Terrapin Express: 301-314-8068 

Student Employment: 301-314-5058 

umfood(a)di ni ng. unxl.edu 

www.di ni ng.umd.edu 

The U ni versity of M aryl and offers one of the top ten self-operated and self -supported di ni ng 

servi ces programs i n the country. Our goal i s to provi de popul ar and nutriti ous food i n a wd comi ng 

setti ng every day. We offer a vari ety of di ni ng pi an al ternati ves to maxi mi ze conveni ence and 

f I exi bi I i ty and meet your di ni ng requi rements. D i ni ng I ocati ons are si tuated across campus cl ose to 

academi c bui I di ngs and resi dence hal I s, and our two mai n di ni ng rooms are open unti I mi dni ght on 

most weekday ni ghts. 

Di ni ng opti ons i ncl ude a I arge sd ecti on of traditi onal entrees as wd I as popul ar food choi ces. 
Di ni ng rooms feature a total of 21 cul i nary stati ons i ncl udi ng Sprouts, an al I vegan stati on; The 
J alapeno Grill, featuring made-to-order burritos; Cluckers, serving dassic comfortfood; TheGlobal 



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Gourmet at The Diner offeringiit:ernatiorally-tlTemedeitr(^nigl^ and Season's 12, South 
Campus' new M ongol ian Gri 1 1 . 

I n additi on to the di ni ng rooms, there are cafes, qui cl< food I ocati ons, and conveni ence shops 
scattered across campus to meet the needs of U ni versi ty of IM aryl and students and the campus 
community. For a compi ete I i st of our di ni ng I ocati ons, hours and general i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
di ni ng. umd.edu or cal I us at 301-314-8069. We are whiere you are - and we wd come students, 
faculty, staff and visitors i nto al I of our locations across campus. 

Resident Dining Plans Y our di ni ng pi an works I i ke a debit card: you can use poi nts whenever and 
as often as you woul d I i ke. Y ou purchase food "la carte even i n our resi dent di ni ng rooms. E nj oy 
a I i ght snack, a qui ck meal to go, a f ul I di nner, bri ng guests i ts al I up to you! 

Access di ni ng poi nts usi ng your U M I D card. Y our pi cture i s on the front and you nxst be present 
B/ery ti me the card i s used. Check poi nt bal ances onl i ne 24/7 or ask for a reed pt showi ng your 
bal ance after any transacti on. 

Every resi dent di ni ng pi an consi sts of two accounts, Resi dent Poi nts and Terp B ucks. Resi dent 
Poi nts may be used i n the South Campus Di ni ng Room and The Di ner. Add e^s Restaurant accepts 
Resi dent Poi nts for di nner. I f you use al I your Resi dent Poi nts, these I ocati ons wi 1 1 automati cal I y tap 
i nto your Terp B ucks. Terp B ucks provi de you with f I exi bi I ity i n spendi ng poi nts and are accepted 
at many of the caf @, quick food locations, and convenience shops across campus. A thi rd account, 
Terrapi n Express, may al so be I oaded onto the U M I D card. Terrapi n Express i s not a di ni ng pi an, 
its a pre-paid debit account accepted vi rtual ly everywhere on campus. 

TheApartment Dining Plan. For students living off-campus who would like to partidpate in a 
di ni ng pi an, we offer the A partment PI an, whi ch paral I d s the resi denti al pi ans. The A partment PI an 
offers students the abi I ity to purchase food on campus without carry i ng cash or a credit card; the 
security that if the I D card i s I ost, the account can be frozen and then attached to a repi acement I D; 
and the conveni ence of payi ng through the B ursar's Off i ce duri ng the regul ar bi 1 1 i ng cycl e or by 
usi ng f i nanci al ai d or schol arshi p money. A partment PI an poi nts can rol I over from semester to 
semester. For detai I s see our web site. 

We are conf i dent that you wi 1 1 be i mpressed by the qual i ty and excepti onal sd ecti ons aval I abl e 
throughout the di ni ng I ocati ons across campus. See you at I unch! 

Terrapin Express 

Terrapi n Express i s a pre-pai d debit account, not a substitute for a di ni ng pi an. 1 1 i s a wonderful way 
to suppi ement a di ni ng pi an and a great al ternati ve for students I i vi ng i n campus apartments or 
off-campus. Terrapi n Express accounts are aval I abl e to al I students, faculty and staff through the 
Terrapi n Express Office at 1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I and at M cKddi n Li brary or onl i ne 
through Tesbxio web servi ces. C heck our web si te for a compI ete I i sti ng of parti ci pad ng di ni ng and 
non-dining locations. 

Office oF Fraternity and Sorority Life 

1110 stamp Student Union 
301-314-7172 
www.greek.umd.edu 



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Office Hours: Monday- Friday. 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m 

Social and community service- based fraternities and sororities, and tineir leadership, are advised and 
supported by tine staff in tine Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life. The office also advises tine four 
student governing councils: The I nterfraternity Council (IFC), tine Panhd I enic Association (PHA), 
tine Pan- Hellenic Council (PHC) and tine United Greek Council (UGC). The office also manages 
university-owned fraternity and sorority houses and coordi nates off-campus houses. 

Uraversity Hedth Center (UHC) 

Campus D ri ve, B ui I di ng 140 
301-314-8180 
310-31^7845 (fax) 
www.healtli.umd.edu 



The University Health Center, located on Campus Drive across from tine Stamp Student Union, isa 
national ly accredited healtii carefaci I ity. Every registered student I i vi ng on or off campus is el igi ble 
to use UHC services. 

TheUHC i s open Mondaytinrough Friday, 8a.mto7p.m, Saturday, 11a.m. to3p.m and closed 
on Sunday. M edical services are I i mi ted after 5 p.m. and on Saturdays. Hours vary duri ng semester 
breaks and hoi i days. A ppoi ntments are requi red. A I i mi ted number of same-day appoi ntments are 
available. Urgent Care services are aval I ablewitinout an appointment. TheAfta" HoLrsNirseLine 
(301.314.9386), a free medi cal advi ce and i nformati on servi ce, i s aval I abl e to regi stered students 
whentineUHC isdosed. I n an emergency, students should cal I 911. Studentswho are seriously ill 
or i nj ured wi 1 1 be transported by ambul ance to tine emergency department of a I ocal hospital . 

There i s a $10 fee for vi sits witii most of our provi ders. There i s a " M i ssed A ppoi ntmenl/Late 
Cancel I ati on" fee To avoi d tine charge, appoi ntments nxst be cancel I ed or reschedul ed at I east 24 
hours i n advance. Some departments schedul e tinei r own appoi ntments. A td ephone I i st i s provi ded 
bdow. Additional fees are charged for dental heal tin, laboratory, radiology, pharmacy, 
i mmuni zati ons, al I ergy i nj ecti ons, casts, physi cal tinerapy, mental heal tin counsd i ng, medi cati ons 
and suppi ies dispensed tinrough medical units, massage and acupuncture Charges are posted to the 
students Bursar Account or can be paid at tine time of visit in tiie UHC. Charges paid for at tine UHC 
wi 1 1 not appear on tine B ursar Account. 

The f ol I owl ng servi ces are aval I abl e at tiie U H C : Pri mary Care, U rgent Care, men's and women's 
reproductive heal tin care, HIV testing, sports medi dne, nutrition, mental heal tin, eating disorders, and 
substance abuse travd clinic, occupational heal tin, heal tin promotion, dental heal tin. Sexual Assault 
Response and Prevention Program (formerly OVA), and Faculty Staff Assistance Program Tiie 
Center for Hedth axl Wellbeing (CHWB), a satd I ite of tine U HC located i n tine Eppley 
Recreation Center, is open 12 p.m to 8 p.m M onday tinrough Thursday and 12p.m to 5 p.m, 
Friday. CHWB provides heal tin promotion programs and services; it does not provide medical 
services. 

A 1 1 medi cal records are sti'i cti y conf i denti al and may onl y be rd eased by tiie pati ents wri tten 
consent or tinrough a court ordered subpoena. The U H C i s compi i ant witii tine federal Health 
I nsiranoe Portabi I ity and AcGOifitabi I ity Act. 



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A group heal th i nsurance pol i cy i s aval I abl e to U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park students. 
Students are el i gi bl e to enrol I at the begi nni ng of the Fal I and Spri ng semesters and Summer Sessi on 
1. The U H C i s not a parti ci pati ng provi der with any other health i nsurance company. At the pati ents 
request, via a signed AutiDrization Form a coded bill will be provided. The patient may submitthe 
coded bi 1 1 to the i nsurance company of choi ce for rd mbursabi e servi ces. Y our i nsurance company 
may or may not reimburse you for services received at the UHC. As of Fall 2009, health insurance 
wi 1 1 be mandatory for some stixlents. 

The University oF Maryland reqiiresALL stixlents (including: credit/non-credit degree 
non-degree seeking, full/parl/half-time, undergraduate, graduate, transfer. International, Golden ID 
or other stixlent statijs) to provi de proof of i mmuni zati on dates for: M easi es, M umps and R ubd I a 
(M.M.R., 2 doses) Immunizationspriortothefirstdayof classes. All International stixlents nxst 
document: Measles, MumpsandRubella(M.M.R., 2doses) ImmunizationsandaTuberculosis(TB) 
test completed withi n the past 6 months. M aryl and State Law requi res stixlents I i vi ng i n campus 
owned housing to recdvethemeningitisvaccineor si gn a waiver stating they have chosen not to 
reed ve the vacd ne. The I mmunization Record Form and M eni ngitis Waiver is 
aval I abl e on-l i ne at www, heal th.umd.edu/form6/l mmuformpdf For more i nf ormati on, vi sit the 
website, email healthOumd.edu or cal I 301.314.8180. 



University Health Center Phone NuTibers 



Acupunctijre 

After H ours N urseL i ne 

Business Office 

Center for Health & Wd I Bd ng 

Dental Health 

Information 

Massage 

Mental Health 

Pharmacy 

Physical Therapy 

Substance A buse Program 

Sexual Assault Response & 

Women's Health 



Prevention Program 



301-314-8184 
301-31^9386 
301-314-8165 
301-314-1493 
301-31^9500 
301-314-8180 
301-314-8128 
301-314-8106 
301-314-8186 
301-405-2557 
301-314-8106 
301-324-2222 
301-314-8190 



Housing Resident Life 



1102 Annapolis Hall 
301-314-2100 
reslife@umd.edu 
www. resnet. umd.edu 



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The Department of Resi dent L if e i s responsi bl e for management of the resi dence hal I s as wd I as the 
cultural, educational, recreational and social programs and activities for residential stixlents. 

Whi le I i vi ng i n a M aryland residence hal I is not requi red, ni ne of every ten stixlents i n M aryland's 
freshman cl ass make the choi ce to I i ve on campus. M ore than 80 prof essi onal and graduate staff and 
over 400 undergraduate stixlent empi oyees meet the needs of resi dent stixlents. 

There are rooms for approxi matdy 8,250 undergraduate stixlents i n 36 residence hal Is. Three 
di ff erent styl es of I i vi ng are aval I abl e to campus resi dents: tradi ti onal , sui tes and apartments. Wi thi n 
tradi ti onal housi ng, where most f i rst year resi dents I i ve, si ngl e, doubl e, tri pi e and quadrupl e room 
occupancy exists. Our national ly acclai med I i vi ng-learni ng programs i ncl ude Beyond the 
Classroom CIVICUS, Col lege Park Scholars, HinmanCEOs, Gemstone, Global Communities, 
J imenez- Porter Writers' House, Language House, Honors Humanities and University Honors. All of 
these programs add to the di versi ty of on-campus housi ng opti ons. A 1 1 rooms have a cabi e and data 
for each stixlent. One td ephone j ack i s provi ded i n each room 

F i rst ti me freshmen are guaranteed on-campus housi ng provi ded they retijrn thd r M aryl and PI anner 
i ncl udi rg the E nrol I nient Conf i rniati on ard H ousi rg and D i ni rg Servi ces A greernent al ong wi th the 
$200 enrol I ment deposit by M ay 1. Transfer stixlents who want to I i ve on campus should complete 
the M aryland Planner as wd I and wi 1 1 be al lotted housi ng on a space aval lable basis. 



Office oF Student Conduct 

2118Mitchdl Building 
301-314-8204 
www.stijdentconduct. umd.edu 

1 1 i s the mi ssi on of the Off i ce of Student Conduct to resol ve al I egati ons of mi sconduct under the 
Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academi c I ntegrity i n a manner consi stent with the core 
val ues of f ai rness, honesty and i ntegri ty whi I e promoti ng the U ni versi ty's educati onal mi ssi on. 
E ssenti al to thi s mi ssi on i s to enhance the devd opment of character, ci vi I i ty, ci ti zenshi p, 
i ndivi dual/community responsi bi I ity, and etinics. University stixlents play a significant role i n 
consi deri ng the behavi or of thd r peers and are asked to assume positi ons of responsi bi I ity as 
members of the university's stixlent judiciary. The foil owing tenets guide this mission: 

• To regard each stixlent as an individual, deserving individual attention, consideration, and 
respect. 

• To consi der the facts f ul I y and careful I y before resol vi ng any case. 

• To speak candidly and honestiy with each stixlent. 

• To hoi d each stixlent to a hi gh standard of behavi or, both to protect the campus community, 
and to promote stixlent etini cal devd opment. 

• To recognize the real ity of human fal I i bi I ity, as wd I as the sti'esses associated with col legiate 
I ife, and to demonsti'ate compassion, understandi ng, and a sense of humor. 

• To conti'i bute to the educati onal mi ssi on of the U ni versi ty by desi gni ng pol i ci es, conducti ng 
programs, and off eri ng i nsti'ucti on that conti'i bute to the i ntd I ectijal and etini cal devd opment 
of the enti re stixlent body. 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected to conduct themsdves at al I 
times in a manner consistent with the University responsibility of ensuring to all members of the 
campus communi ty the opportuni ty to pursue thd r educati onal obj ecti ves, and of protecti ng the 



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safety, welfare, rights, and property of al I members of the U ni versity. Specific expectations for 
student conduct are outi i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct, A ppendi x C, and the Code of 
Academic I ntegrity. Appendix O in Chapter 10. 

Disci pi i nary ProGediresL Students accused of vi ol ati ng U ni versi ty regul ati ons are accorded 
fundamental due process i n di sci pi i nary proceedi ngs. Formal rul es of evi dence, however, shal I not 
be appi i cabi e, nor shal I devi ati ons from prescri bed procedures necessari I y i nval i date a deci si on or 
proceedi ng unl ess si gni f i cant prq udi ce to one of the parti es may resul t. U ni versi ty procedures are 
outi i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academi c I ntegrity suppi emented by materi al s 
provi ded by the Off i ce of Student Conduct to assi st students who are f aci ng accusati ons of 
misconduct. 

Nyumburu Cultural Center 

Campus Drive 
301-314-7758 
301-31^0383 (fax) 
www.nyumburu.umd.edu 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center has served as a maj or resource of cultural , hi stori cal , and soci al 
programming attheUniversity of Maryland, Col lege Park formore than thirty-five years. The 
Center works closely with student, faculty, and community organizations. The Nyumburu Cultural 
Center offers a vari ety of soci o-cultural , nxBi cal , educati onal and arti sti c programs to the campus 
community. The nature of the diverse programmi ng and activities is based on the African 
A meri can, Af ri can, and Carl bbean D i aspora experi ence(s) . N yumburu i s home of the M aryl and 
Gospel Choir, Shades of Harlem (performing arts ensemble). The Black Explosion Newspaper, Male 
Spokesmodd Competition, M iss Unity Scholarship Pageant, J ukej oint. Gospel Happy Hour, 
L eadershi p Seri es, N yumburu J azz C I ub, K wanzaa Cd ebrati on, C ul tural D i nner duri ng B I ack 
H i story M onth, L i terature Conference H omecomi ng A I umni Tai I gate, A nnual Tal ent Showcase, 
Annual Student Awards Banquet, Black M ale I nitiative (BM I ) Program and Sisterhood of Unity 
and Love (SOUL). 

N yumburu's staff are advi sors to many campus student organi zati ons: B I ack Student U ni on, Af ri can 
StLident Association (ASA), The Maryland Gospd Choir, The Black Explosion Newspaper, Sigma 
Gamma Rho sorority I nc., Ddta SigmaTheta I nc.. Alpha Nu Omega Sorority I nc., and Dimensions 
M odd i ng Group to name a few. 

Nyumburu presents Bl ues, J azz, and Gospd nxBic concerts as wd I as academic courses i n Creative 
Writing (ENGL278C), Blues (AASP298\/) andj azz (AASP298U) for three credits each. Maryland 
Gospd Choi r students earn 1-credit (M USC329E), and students who take EDCP108N, Col lege and 
Career Advancement earn 1-credit. 

Duri ng the summer, Nyumburu sponsors a Summer Camp Program for students from the age of five 
to sixteen. Through this dynamic dght week program opportunities for youth to explore academic, 
arti sti c, and athi eti c i nterests i n a rd axed and creati ve envi ronment are provi ded. Camp Shul e was 
estabi i shed to provi de the chi I dren of M aryl and f acul ty/staff and I ocal youth wi th a di verse 
educational experience. 

The M uiti purpose Room Conference Rooms, Computer Labs, and the Nyumburu Amphitheatre of 
the Nyumburu Cultural Center are open to the students, faculty and staff of the U ni versity of 
M aryl and . Room reservati ons are al so aval I abl e at a nomi nal cost for departmental and off-campus 
B/ents and programs. Come i n and i nteract with us, meet: other students and make your i deas and 



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wishes known. Ourstaff goal is to make Nyumburu a cultural center that is, "Your Home A way 
from Home." 

Recreeftion Services^ Campus 

1115 Eppley Recreation Center 
301-405-PLAY (Information) 
301-314-5454 (Rec-Check) 
www.crs.umd.eclu 

Campus Recreati on Servi ces (CRS) offers a wi de vari ety of recreati on programs i ncl udi ng aquati cs, 
fitness programs, informal recreation, intranxiral sports, non-credit insti'ucti on, outdoor recreation, 
and sport clubs. 

CRS has some of the most advanced recreati on, sports, and fitness f aci I iti es i n the nati on. The CRS 
facilities include the Eppley Recreati on Center (ERC), Ritchie Coliseum Reckord Armory, Cole 
F i el dhouse and the weight and fitness areas in the Health and Human Performance (HHP) building. 

The E ppl ey Recreati on Center has two i ndoor and two outdoor pool s for I ap swi mrni ng and di vi ng. 
The CRS aquati c program al so offers swi mrni ng I essons, and I if eguard trai ni ng. 

CRS offers a wi de vari ety of fitness programs throughout the week at E RC and Ritchi e Col i seum 
These i ncl ude low-i mpact, step, and water aerobics, cardio-boxi ng, and sport conditioni ng. CRS 
I nf ormal Recreati on programs al I ow stixlents to enj oy thd r f avori te acti vi ty at thd r I d sure, whetiner 
i t i s usi ng cardi ovascul ar equi pment, I i fti ng wd ghts, j oggi ng, or pi ay i ng racquetiDal I , vol I eybal I , 
basketi^al I or wal lybal I . CRS has wdght rooms and fitness centers located i n the ERC, Ritchie 
Col i seum and H H P. The fitness centers f eatijre stai rcl i mbers, bi kes, rowers, total body conditi oners, 
and treadmi 1 1 s. Wd ght rooms have a vari ety of f ree-wd ghts and wd ght machi nes. The E RC al so 
has racqueti^al l/handbal l/wal lybal I and squash courts. 

Students I ooki ng to pi ay team or i ndi vi dual sports or take part i n speci al sporti ng events wi 1 1 want to 
parti ci pate i n the CRS I ntranxiral Sports program. Students can parti ci pate year-round i n team sports 
such as basketi^all, football, and soccer. I ndi vi dual and dual sports include golf, racqueti^all, and 
many more I ntranxiral sports are sti'uctured acti vi ti es that are open to al I men and women from the 
campus community. Parti ci pants can sd ect thd r own I evd of competiti on and pi ay i n dther men's, 
women's, grad/fac/staff or coed leagues. 

The Outdoor Recreati on Center (ORC) i s I ocated i n the northwest corner of the E ppl ey Recreati on 
Center. The ORC offers outdoor adventures and cl i ni cs throughout the year. Take a backpacki ng 
tri p, I earn how to rock cl i mb, or try white-water kayaki ng. The CI i mbi ng Wal I and Chal I enge Course 
are two f eatijres of the ORC where stijdents may chal I enge themsd ves both physi cal I y and mental I y, 
i ncreasi ng i nterpersonal ski 1 1 s and sdf-conf i dence. The ORC al so has a resource I i brary for pi anni ng 
your own tri ps, a bi ke repai r shop, and equi pment rental s. 

A Sport Cl ub is a stixlent organization, registered with Campus Recreation Sen/ices, formed by 
i ndi vi dual s moti vated by a common i nterest and desi re to parti ci pate i n a f avori te sport acti vi ty . 
Cl ubs vary i n focus and programmi ng, si nee stixlent merrtDers manage the operati on of the cl ub and 
decideon club activities. A sportdub may be competitive recreational, insti'uctional, social, or all 
of these. 



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Religous Programs 

1101 Memorial Chapel 
301-314-9866 (Chapel Reservations) 
www.chapel .umd.eclu 

The f ol I owl ng chapl ai ns and tinei r servi ces are aval I abl e 

M s. J essi ce Schulte 2120 M enx)ri al Chapel 

301-405-8443 
jessbcnKa)unxl.eclu 

Black Ministries 

Rev. Dr. Ruby M oone 1112 M enx)rial Chapel 

301-405-8445 
Rrmoon^@aol .com 

Chridian Science 

Bob Snyder 2118 M emori al Chapel 

301-474-0403 
rsnyder(a)umd.edu 

C injxii oF J esLS C lirist oF Latter Day Sstrts(MormDn) 

Denni s M onson 7601 M owati: Lane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-7570 
monsondb (a)| dsces.org 

OrthodcBc 

Rev. K osmas K aravel I as 2747 R I va Road 

Annapolis, MD 21401 

301-261-8218 

f atiierkosmas(a)schgochurch. org 

E pisoopal/An^ ican 

Rev. Peter A ntoci 2116 M emori al Chapel 



carrpusAamnistraQai, Kesources, and btudentberviceE 



P^et^ 



301-405-8453 
eaterps(a)umd.eclu 



Hindu 

Ms. KiranSankhIa 



2112 Memorial Chapel 

301-570-6426 

nxirari s2002(a)yahoo. com 



JeuuJsh-Hillel 

Rabbi Ari Israel 



Hillel J ewish Student Center 

7612 M owatt Lane, Col lege Park 

301-422-6200 

ai srael ©maryl andhi 1 1 el .org 



JeMsh-Chabad 

Rabbi Eli Backman 



Chabad J ewish Student Center 
7403 H opki ns A ve. , Col I ege Park 
301-277-2994 
chabad(g)unxl.edu 



Lutheran 

Rev. Elizabeth PI atz 
Ms.Gail Douglas, Asst. 



2103 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8448 

lutlieran(a)umd.edu 



Muslim 

Mr. Tarif Shraim 



2118 Memorial Chapel 

24a899-8197 

tshraim(a)gmail.com 



Roman Cattiolic 

Fr. Kylelngels 



Cathol i c Student Center 

4141 Guilford Rd., College Park 



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301-86^6223 

f rkyi el ©cathol i cterps.org 

United Campus Minidry 

(Presbyterian, Disciples of Christ, UnitedCturctiofCtrisO 

Rev. Holly Ulmer 2101 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8450 

ulmer(a)umd.eclu 

UntBd Methodic 

Rev. K i m Capps 2102 M emori al Chapel 

301-405-8451 
umc(g)umd.eclu 



Transportation Services 

Regents Drive Garage 

301-314'PARK 

www.transportation.umd.eclu 

Parking 

The Department of Transportati on Servi ces (DOTS) i s responsi bl e for managi ng and mai ntai ni ng 
more than 19, 000 parki ng spaces on the U ni versi ty of M aryl and campus. A 1 1 stijdents who pi an to 
parka licensed motor vehicle in one of these spaces nxst either registerfor a parking permit at the 
DOTS off i ce, park at pal d meters or i n a cashi er-attended I ot. PI ease note Due to consti'ucti on 
proj ects on campus the number of parki ng spaces coul d be dramati cal I y reduced. Campus resi denti al 
freshmen and resi dent sophomores are el i gi bl e to regi ster for a parki ng permit. 

Because the University of Maryland has limited parking spaces, parking regulations aresti'ictiy 
enforced. 1 1 1 egal I y parked vehi cl es, as wd I as those vehi cl es not di spl ayi ng a campus parki ng permi t 
i n areas requi ri ng permits wi 1 1 be ti cketed, and stixlents with outstandi ng parki ng f i nes may be 
barred from regi sti'ati on. 

V i sit the DOTS Web site for compi ete procedures and parki ng regul ati ons, di sabi ed parki ng 
information, visitor parking areas, green transportati on options, parking registi'ation rates, motor 
vehi cl e assi stance program i nf ormati on, schedul e of f i nes, and other i nf ormati on. 

Carpooling 

Commuter stixlents who are abl e to form a carpool with up to three other stixlents can regi ster for the 
Smart Park carpool program which rewards carpool ers by usual I y offeri ng access to more 



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conveni ent parki ng I ots as wd I as crediti ng back a porti on of thd r permit fees. To regi ster, and to 
access the Smart Park database, vi sit the Department of Transportati on Servi ces Web site at 
www.transportation.umd.edLValt_trarE/carpool .html . 

Park and Rides (Bowies Burton^/illeand Lairel) 

The Department of Transportati on Servi ces i s off eri ng FRE E waekday transportation to faciJty, 
staffandcornniuter students in theformoF park & rids TJiisserviceriJisfromtiieparkaid 
ride iotstotheColiege Park campusL The Laurel Park& Ride lot is located on the northbound 
side of Route 197 (Laurel -Bowie Road) - approxi matdy 1/8 mi I e north of the i ntersection of Route 
197 and Contee Road. The B urtonsvi 1 1 e Park & Ri de I ot i s I ocated about 10 mi I es from campus and 
is between routes 198 and 29. The Bowie Park & Ride lot is located between routes 197 and Northviev 
N orthvi ew D ri veabout 13 mi I es from campus. F i nd more i nf ormati on about these routes onl i ne at 
www.transportation.unxl.edu/alt_trarE/pSir.htiTl . 

Shuttie-UIM (301-314'2255) 

Shutti e-U M transit system i s a unit withi n the Department of Trans- portati on Servi ces whi ch i s 
predominantiy supported bystixlentfees. Shuttie-UM provides commuter, evening, NITE Ride, 
parati'ansi t and charter servi ces to U ni versi ty stixlents, f acul ty, and staff whi I e cl asses are i n sessi on. 
Schedul es are aval I abl e at the Stamp Student U ni on I nf ormati on Desk, the Department of 
Transportation Services Regents Drive Garage office, the residence hal Is, and on the DOTS Web site 
at www.transportati on. umd.edu. 



C ommunity Service-L ear ni ng 

Olio Add e H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L if e 

301-314-2273 

www.csl.umd.edu 

Cormmunity Service- Learning (CSL) promotes service- 1 earning, as an integral aspect of education 
and fosters university engagement withi n the larger comnxinity. The CSL website contai ns 
i nf ormati on and resources such as an i nteracti ve database of 800-1- community agencies, handouts, 
and step-by-step guidance for gettirig involved in service. CSL offers on-site personal assistance, a 
weekly I istserv of service opportunities, and presentations across campus. CSL educational materials 
al so i ncl ude resources about soci al i ssues, I eadershi p, curri cul um devd opment, and sti^ategi es for 
facilitating reflection. 

ResoiTGes For Students 

Supports stixlents engaged in service through Alternative Break programs, Comnxinity I nvolvement 
I nterns, and TERPcorps, a stixlent service programrri ng body. CSL parti ci pates i n campus-wide 
resource fai rs, coordi nates vol unteer recognition events and programs, and offers a consultation and 
presentations to any stixlent group or organization. 

ResoiTGes For FaciJty 

CSL promotes service- 1 earni ng withi n acadenric courses across disci pi i nes and withi n the I i vi ng and 
I earni ng communi ti es. To that end we offer f acul ty workshops, i ndi vi dual consul tati on, sampi e 
syllabi, a lending library, and an on- line faculty handbook for service- 1 earning. Programs for faculty 
i ncl ude the servi ce- 1 earni ng undergraduate teachi ng assi stant program annual i nsti'ucti onal 



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i mprovemert grants, and an ongoi ng assessment program 

America ReadS'^America Combs 

I n col I aborati on with the Pri nee George^s County Publ i c School system and U M 's off! ce of f i nanci al 
ai d, A meri ca Reads* A meri ca Counts provi des hi gh qual i ty mentori ng i n I ocal school s that 
enri ches I earni ng opportuni ti es for both col I ege and el ementary school students. A pproxi matd y 200 
M aryl and federal work-study, vol unteer, and i ntern students serve as readi ng and nrth mentors and 
work with f ami I i es on I iteracy i n 18 Pri nee George^s County el ementary school s. 

ResoLTGes For the Conmruiity 

Community agencies recruit students, faculty and staff by attendi ng the annual i nvol vement fai r, 
parti ci pad ng outreach tabi es i n the student uni on, and pc^ ng i nf ormati on on our i nteracti ve 
database and weekly I istserv. CSL sponsors agency orientation programs and offers i ndi vidual 
consultation to assist agencies with more targeted recruiti ng. 

C ampus Pro-ams 

Olio stamp Student U ni on 
301-314-7174 
www.thestamp. umd.edu 

The mission of Campus Programs is to support and complement the university's academic mission 
and to enhance the educati onal experi ence of students through exposure and parti ci pad on i n soci al , 
cultural, recreational, leadership, intellectual, and governance activities. 

Student Organization. Regi sters al I student organi zati ons at the uni versi ty and provi des an onl i ne 
di rectory of more than 500 groups. Organi zati on support servi ces i ncl udes: accounti ng assi stance, 
advi sors' workshops, I eadershi p trai ni ng programs for organi zati on I eaders, i nvol vement sessi ons 
offered for cl asses and semester ori entati ons are some of the ways i nvol vement i s nurtured for 
organizations and i ndi vidual s. I n addition, Fi rst Look Fai r and Stampfest are large-scale i nvol vement 
f ai rs hd d at the begi nni ng of each semester to showcase the student groups and organi zati ons. 

Organization Advising. M aj or student groups such as the Student Government Associ ati on. 
Graduate Student Government, Peer Leadershi p Counci I , the Homecomi ng Committee, and Student 
Entertai nment Events receive di rect advi si ng from Campus Programs staff. Other student groups 
can al so obtai n hd p by request. Assi stance i n programmi ng, securi ng a faculty advi sor, off i cer 
transi ti ons, and efforts to create a new organi zati on i s aval I abl e. 

Leadership De^opment. Offers a wide range of credit-beari ng leadershi p courses i n conj unction 
with the Counsd i ng and Personnd Servi ces Department i n the Col I ege of Educati on, i ncl udi ng a 
M i nor i n Leadershi p Studi es. The off i ce^s web site detai I s these offeri ngs. I n additi on, the staff 
offers a wi de range of trai ni ng experi ences i n i nterpersonal and organi zati onal devd opment rangi ng 
from half -day serni nars and weekend workshops such as the M aryl and Leadershi p Conference to 
f ul I semester I eadershi p programs, Terrapi n Leadershi p I nstitute and Turti e Camp. 

OfF-Campus Student I n\^vement. (OCSI ) provi des servi ces to support and enhance the 
educati onal experi ence of A L L students who I i ve off-campus. Thi s i s achi eved through soci al , 
educati onal , i nf ormati onal , and devd opmental programs to hd p students be connected to campus, 
di scover i nvol vement and I eadershi p opportuni ti es, and I earn more about campus I i f e. 

Pro^amsandLeisLreLearningOpportifiitiesL Staff mentors student volunteers and leaders to 
provi de opti ons for out of cl ass engagement through recreati onal opti ons that i ncl udes: the H off 



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Theater, the A it and Learning Center (offering non-credit courses), the Union Gallery (featuring 
regul ar di spl ays of the vi sual arts) , the TerpZone ( bowl i ng, bi 1 1 i ards, and more) , B rown B ag 
Concerts ( Phat Phridays), and late night and Wed<end Programmi ng. A complete I isti ng of weekday 
and weekend events i s featured i n the weekl y cal endar of the Diarmndback. 



Multioiltural I nvdvement atxJ Community Advocacy 

1120 Stamp Student U ni on 

301-31^8600 

mi ca-contact(a)unxl.edu 

A 1 1 of the acti vi ti es, programs, servi ces and research of the Off i ce of M ul ti cul tural I nvol vement and 
Community Advocacy strive towards meeti ng the common outcome of devdopi ng "good citizens" 
towards thd r graduation, with a particular focus on be ng cultural I y competent, effective i n diverse 
group envi ronments, and engaged i n a sti'ong etinni c of servi ce to and I eadershi p towards a soci al I y 
j ust nxil ti cul tural communi ty . We organi ze our work around aff i rmi ng i denti ti es and nurturi ng thd r 
devdopment (i .e, advocacy for stixlents who are Asian Pacific American, Black, Lati nd/o, 
Indigenous/Native American, Multiracial, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Transgender); building 
inclusive communi ties based on our individual and organizational diversity; and creating positive 
soci al change through I eadershi p i n our communi ti es and campus- wi de. 

OfF-Campus Housing Services 

1110 stamp Student Union 

301-31^3645 

www.och.umd.edu 

Off-Campus H ousi ng Servi ces mai ntai ns up-to-date computeri zed I i sti ngs of vari ous rental housi ng 
opti ons (both vacant and to share) . A rea maps, apartment di rectori es, transportati on i nformati on and 
resources about I i vi ng off campus are aval I abl e i n the off i ce and on- 1 i ne. 

Adeie IH. Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life 

3100 Stamp Student U ni on 

301-314'DESK 

www.union.umd.edu 

The Adde H . Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life is the university's "community 
center." More than 25, 000 stixlents, faculty, staff menibers, and campus guests visit the Stamp daily 
to take advantage of its servi ces, programs, and f aci I iti es. Our mi ssi on i s to create and sustai n a 
stixlent-centered envi ronment that promotes academic success and personal de/dopment; serves as 
a safe and i nvi ti ng campus center; and i s characteri zed by a sti'ong comrni tment to nxil ti cul tural i sm 
excd I ence, and a posi ti ve work envi ronment. 

The Stamp offers lounge space, a variety of i nformati on services, recreation and I d sure acti vi ties, 
stixlent-sponsored programs, visual arts, retail outiets, and more than 40,000 square feet of 
reservable space 



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I nforiTBtion Services 

• I nformation Center located on the first floor, 301-314-DESK 

• B ul I eti n boards I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

• Di spl ay showcases I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

Recreation and Leisure 

• Hoff MovieTheatre, SOl-Sl^-HOFF 

• Terp Zone, i ncl udi ng f ul I -servi ce bowl i ng I anes, " L unar Bowl i ng, " bi 1 1 i ard tabi es, vi deo 
games, and three big-screen TVs, 301-314-BOWL 

Student-Sponsored Pro-ams 

• Student Entertai nment Events (SEE), a student-di rected program board whose committees 
plan games, tournaments, concerts, lectures, outdoor recreation trips, 301-314-8359 

• Student Tutorial Academic Referral Center (STAR Center), offering tutor listings and test 
files, 301-31^8359 

• Graduate Student Government 

Art and Learning Center, 301-314-ARTS 

• A rt and Learni ng Center, a vi sual arts work and teachi ng center, offeri ng mi ni -courses and arts 
services 

• Union Art Gallery, I ocated on the first floor 

FoodaxlRetaiOutiets 

• Chevy Chase Bank, 301-864-8722 

• University Book Center (basement level), 301-314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Maryland Food Co-op (301-314-8089), Saladworks (301-314-0947), Taco 
Bell (301-31^6569), McDonald's (301-31^1489), Add^s Restaurant (301-31^8022), 
Coffee Bar (301-31^CAFE), Panda Express (301-31^6111), Sbarros (301-31^4105), Steak 
Escape (301-31^9665), Sushi by Pandy (301-31^6111), Chick-Fil-A (301-31^6568), 
Subway (301-266-7827) 

• M ai I boxes Etc., a f ul I -servi ce postal and packagi ng f aci I ity, 301-314-9982 

• Ti cket Off i ce, offeri ng campus performance ti ckets, and a f ul I Ti cket M aster Outi et, 
301-314-TKTS 

• Union Shop 301-314-7467, featuring snacks, sodas, newspapers, and magazines 

Resen^ble Space 

The Stamp offers meeti ng rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 1, 000 peopi e. For reservati ons, 
or catering information, contact the Stamp Reservation Office, 301-314-8488. 

Adele H . Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus L ife Hoirs 

The Stamp is open Monday through Thursday, 7 am to midnight; Friday, 7 am. to 1:30 am; 
Saturday, 8 am to 1:30 am, and Sunday, 11 am. to midnight. 

See other Adde H. Stairp Student Union - Center for Canrpus L ife l-iours offices and services 
dsewlTere in Cliapter 3 

Communi ty Servi ce- L earni ng Off i ce 

Campus Programs 

M ul ti cul tural I nvol vement and Communi tv A dvocacy 

Off-Campus Housing Services 



carrpusAdmnisuaQcn, Resources, an btuaentberviceE p^eyc 



ReligioLS Programs 



Regdrdicn AcadETricReqirerret^ andRegjai 



Re^stradon, Acadenric Requirements^ and Regulations 

De^eel nfcrmatian 

De^ee Requi rements 

T he requi rerrents for graduati on vary accordi ng tD the character of work i n the di ff erent col I eges, school s, departrrents and academi c uni ts. 1 1 i s the responsi bll i ty of 
the colleges, schools, departrrents and otha- acaderric units to establish and publishd earl ydrfined degree requi rerrents. Responsi bi I ity for l<ncwing and rr^ing all 
degree requi rerrents for graduati on i n any curri cul urn rests wi th the student. Speci f i c degree requi rerrents are I i sted i n thi s catal og under the col I ege and/or 
departrrent as appropri ate. 

E ach student shoul d check wi th the proper acaderri c authori ti es no I ater than the d ose of the j uni or year to ascertai n hi s or her stardi ng wi th respect to advance 
toward a degree. For this purpose, each student should be sure to ra/ia/vtheirserrester grades and unofficial transcript on the MyUM website ( www.rrv.urrd.edu ) at 
the cl ose of each serrester or request a serrester grade report. 

L Residency requirement- Final 30-l-loir Rule 

a. All candidatesfor University of Maryland, CollegePark, degrees should plan to taketheirfinal 30 credits in residence si nee the 
advanced work of thei r maj or study normal I y occurs i n the I ast year of the undergraduate program I ncl uded i n these 30 serrester hours 
will be a mini mum of 15 serrester hours in courses numbered 300 or above, includingatleastl2serrestehoursrequiredinthemajor 
fi el d ( i n curri cul a requi ri ng such concentrati ons) . 

b. A student who at the tirre of graduati on will have completed 30 credit hours in residence at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, 
may, under unusual ci rcumstances, be perrri tted to take a maxi mum of 8 of the fi nal 30 credi ts of record, compri si ng no rrore than two 
courses, at another i nsti tuti on. A student who has compi eted 75 credi t hours i n resi dence at the U ni vesi ty, may, under unusual 

ci rcumstances, be perrri tted to take a maxi mum of 16 of the fi nal 30 credi ts of record, compri si ng no rrore than 4 courses, at anothe 

i nsti tuti on. I n such cases, wri tten perrri ssi on must be obtai ned i n advance from the dean and chai r/di rector of the acaderri c uni t from 

whi ch the student expects to graduate A ny course taken at another i nsti tuti on and i ntended to sati sfy a speci f i c maj or requi rerreit at thfel ni vesi ty 

University Maryland must be approved as an equivalent course by the chai r/di rector and the dean. Normally, no rrorethan two courses 

required by the maj or, including maj or and supporting courses, will be approved. Exceptions beyond thearticulatedmaximumcredits 

and/or courses will bemadeonlyunde highly unusual circumstances; requests for an except: on must be rrade through the Dean's office to 

the Off i ce of the Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs. 

c. For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional programs, the final 30hoursof the9G-hourprogramattheUnivesity of 
M aryl and. Col I ege Park, must be taken i n resi dence. 

Z Credit ReqiirenBnts 

Whilesa/eral undergraduatecurricula require morethan 120 credits, no baccalaureate curri cul um requi res fs/ve than 120. No baccalaureate will beawardedin 
instances in which fewer than 120 credit hours have been earned. Itistheresponsibilityof each student to familiarize himself or herself with the requi rerrents of 
speci f i c curri cul a. The student i s urged to sffik advi ce on these mattes from the departrrents, col I eges, or the Off i ce of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es. 
To earn a baccalaureate from thdJnivesity of Maryland, CollegePark, a minimum of 30 credits must be taken in resi dence. 

3. ErroHment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, may transfer arrong curri cul a, colleges, or othe academic units except where 
I irritations on enrol I rrents have been approved. Bythetirreth^ complete 60 credits, students are expected to declare a degree-grand ngrrBJ or. Students must be 
enrol I ed i n the maj or program from whi ch they pi an to graduate, when regi steri ng for the f i nal 15 hours of the baccal aureate program Thi s requi rerrent al so appi i es 
to the thi rd year of the combi ned, pre-prof essi onal degree programs. A I so see i nforrrati on on doubl e maj ors and doubl e degrffis el se/vhere i n thi s chapte. 

4 Grade PointAverage 

A rrini mum cumulative 2.0 grade point average is requi red for graduati on in all curricula. 

5l Corrplelion of I nterrupted De^^ee 

Students whose regi strati on at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, has lapsed for rrore than 10 years shall be requi red to complete a rrini mum of 15 credit 
hours at Col I ege Park after thei r return to carpus i n orde to earn a baccal aureate degree. 

Recorrrrendati ons about courses nffided to sati sfy the remainingdegrffi requi rerrents will be made at the departrrent I a/el, with approval of the Dean's Office 
requi red. The reason for requi ri ng these credits i s that many f i el ds change suff i d enti y i n 10 years to requi re that students take current courses i f they are to be 
awarded a current degree. Except: ons to the requi rerrent for a rri ni rrum of 15 credi ts earned at Cd I ege Park upon return to the campus can be recorrrrended by the 
Deans for approval in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affai rs. 

Academic Success-De^eeCcmpldcn Pdicy, Studait 

U ni vesi ty of M aryl and pol i cy sti pul ates that f ul I -ti rre degree seeki ng students are expected to compI ete the r undergraduate degree program i n f our years. To rr^: 
thi s expectati on, students must pi an careful I y i n consul tat; on wi th an acaderri c advi sor; compI ete 30 credi ts each year ( whi ch i s usual I y accompi i shed through a 
course I oad ofl4tol6creditsper serrester^) ; sati sfy general educati on, prerequi si te and other course requi rerrents wi th acceptabi e grades i n a ti rrel y manner; and 
rreet the benchmarks. A caderri c uni ts provi de the benchmarks and sarrpi e terrpi ates of rrul ti -serreste pi ans I eadi ng to four-year graduati on. Students are requi red 
to map out i ndi vi dual i zed four-year pi ans, consi stent wi th these gui del i nes and benchmarks, and are responsi bl e for updati ng them as ci rcumstances change. 
Students who do not rreet benchmarks are requi red to sel ect a rrore sui tabi e maj or Students who change maj ors must subrri t a real i sti c graduati on pi an to the 
acaderri c uni t of the na/v maj or for approval . A ny student who compI etes ten serresters or 130 credi ts wi thout compI eti ng a degrffi i s subj ect to mandatory advi si ng 
pri or to regi strati on for any subsequent serrester. Students wi th except: onal ci rcumstances or those who are enrol I ed i n speci al programs are requi red to da/el op a 
rrodi f i ed graduati on pi an that i s appropri ate to the r si tuati ons. I n al I cases, students are responsi bl e for rreeti ng progress expectati ons and benchrrarks requi red for 
the r degrffi programs. 

Every student shoul d contact hi s or her col I ege or departrrent advi sor to obtai n the rel a/ant matei al s for da/el opi ng a four-year gradual; on pi an and requi red 
benchmarks. 

For information about this policy visit: www.ugst.urrd.edu/acaderricsuccess.htrri andwww.ugst.urrd.edu/faqs-successpolicy.htrri 

Miners 

Minors afford studentstheopportunity to pursue a limited but structured concentration in a coheent field of study outside their major The rri nor m^ bea 
truncated vesi on of a maj or or a distinctive intellectual subset of a discipline. M i nors are not offa-edina/ery field of study. Students should inquire with 
departrrents for current aval I ability of minors or see individual listings on this site. 

Thestructuresof minors vary in detail, but, with rareexceptions, they all requi re no fa/ver than 15 and no rrore than 24 credits with at I east 9 credits in upper division 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



courses (300 1 a/el or above). No rrDrettian six credits (ortwo courses) may lae applied to satisfy laotli the requirerrents of a minor and a major program Nocourse 
may be used to satisfy the requirerrents of rrore than one minor. All courses taken for a minor must be completed with a mini mum grade of C. 

To ensure appropriate academic advising, students who wish to pursuearri nor should infonri both the cd lege responsiblefor their rnajor and the unit offering the 
minor as early as possible, but in no case later than one full acaderricyearbeforetheexpecteddateof graduation. When a student has completed all requirerrentsfor 
the minor, the unit offering the minor shall notify thestudents college, which verifies that the student has rret all requirerrents and officially notifies the Registrar's 
Off i ce. The compi eti on of a rri nor i s posted on the students off i ci al transcri pt onl y when the student compi etes al I requi rerrents f or the bachel or's degrffi. 

I n F ebruary 2004, the U ni versi ty Senate voted to phase out acaderri c ci tati ons and repi ace them wi th rri nors. Students pursui ng an acaderri c ci tati on shoul d contact 
the respect] ve departrrent or program for i nf ormati on on thi s conversi on process. 

Seoond Majcr sand Second De^ees 

Second iTBJors 

A student who wishes to complete a second major concun'mtiy with his or her pri mary major of record must obtai n written permission in advance from the 
appropri ate departrrents or programs and cd I eges. A s eari y as possi bl e, but i n no case I ater than one f ul I acaderri c year before the expected date of graduati on, the 
student must f i I e wi th the departrrent or programs i nvol ved and wi th the appropri ate deans, formal programs shcwi ng the courses to be offered to rreet requi rerrents 
in each of the majors and supporting areas as well as those of the col lege and general education programs. A student who wishes to add a Lirrited Enrollrrent 
Program as a second major must do so at the eari lest possible opportunity to assure that specific credit and GPA requirerrents can be rret. I n order to obtain 
approval , students must compi ete al I of the requi rerrents speci f i ed for both the pri mary and secondary maj or. C ourses taken for one maj or may be counted as 
appropri ate as part of the degree requi rerrents for the general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the doud e maj or prograrn the student must 
desi gnate whi ch cd I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi f i cati on of general educati on requi rerrents. F i nal approval of a doud e rraj or 
program must be obtai red from each of the appropri ate departrrents and col I ege(s) . 

Second De^eesTaken SimiitaneGusly 

A student who wi shes to recei ve two bachel or's degrees si mul taneousi y must sati sf actori I y corrpi ete the regul ari y prescri bed requi rerrents of both degree programs 
andarrinimumof 150 credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to onedegrffi must be in course wori< not 
appHedtotherequirerrentsof the other degree program As eari y as possible, but in no case I ater than one full acaderri c year before the expected date of graduation, 
thestudentmustfilewiththedepartrrentorprogramsinvolved, as well as with the appropri ate deans, formal programs showing the courses to be offered to rreet the 
maj or, support: ng area, col I ege, and general educati on programs. I f two cd I eges are i nvol ved i n the cbud e degree prograrn the student must desi gnate which 
col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi fi cati on of general educati on requi rerrents. F i nal approval of a doud e degree program must be 
obtai red from each of the appropri ate departrrents and col I ege(s) . 

Second De^eesTaken Sequentially 

A student who has compi eted the requi rerrents for, and has recei ved one baccal aureate and who wi shes to earn a second degree from the uni versi ty must 
sati sf actori I y compi ete al I of the prescri bed requi rerrents for the second degree and enough addi ti onal credi ts so that the total , i ncl udi ng al I appi i cabi e credi ts earned 
at the university or el sa/vhere, is at least 150 credits (180 credits if oneofthedegrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to onedegree must 
be i n course work not appI i ed to the requi rerrents of the other degree program I n no case wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not 
completed a rri ni mum of 30 credits in residenceat the university. 

Post-Baccalaureate Second De^ee 

A student who has compi eted a bachel or's degree at another accredi ted or recogni zed cd I ege or uni versi ty and wi shes to earn a second degree, must sati sfy al I 
current degree requi rerrents, including General Education requirerrents. A course by course a/al uati on of the students pri or collegiate wori< will be undertaken to 
deterrri ne whi ch requi rerrents have been sati sf i ed by pri or coursa/vori<. I n no case, wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not compi eted a 
rri ni mum of 30 credi ts i n resi dence at the uni versi ty. 

C cmbi ned Badid or ' ^M asber' s Pro-ams 

I n a corriDi ned bachel or'^master's prograrn sorre graduate I a/el courses i ni ti al I y taken for undergraduate credi t may al so be appI i ed towards the graduate credi t 
requirerrentsforamaster'sdegreeprogramattheUniversityof Maryland. A bachel or'^master's program may be da/el oped for an individual student, oritmaybea 
structured program 

Individual Student Bachelor'^Masber'sPro^'ani A programmay be da/el oped by an individual student i n consul tati on with higher acaderri c advisor. Such a 
program i s aval I able only to students whose acaderri c performance is except] onal. It is to be da/el oped according to the individual carsr interests and goals of the 
student and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng experi ence rather than rrerel y the compi eti on of a certai n nurrioer of graduate and undergraduate credi ts. The program 
requi res the approval of the di rectors of botii the undergraduate and the graduate programs i nvol ved and of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es and the 
Dean of ti&aduate School . N ormal I y, no rrore than ni ne credi ts of graduate courses appI i ed to the bachel or's degree may be counted al so for graduate credi t i n an 
individual student program Coursestobedoublacountedmustbeatthe600la/el or aboveand must be passed with at least a 'B' grade Individual study courses, 
i ntemshi ps, or courses gi ven credi t by exarri nati on are not el i gi bl e. The credi ts to be doubl acounted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appI i cabI e to the graduate program after 
the student recei ves the bachel or's degree and rrab-i cul ates i n ttie G raduate Schod . T hi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed i f the student wi thdraws from the graduate 
program before compi eti ng the mast^s degree. 

Structured Badielor' ^Master' s Pro-am: A sbuctured bachel or'^ master's program i s an arti cul ated curri cul um corrbi ni ng an exi sti ng undergraduate program 
and an exi sti ng master's program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, offered by the sarre or by di f f erent departrrents. Such a program i s to be desi gned for shjdents 
whose acaderri c performance i s excepti onal and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng s<peri ence ratiier than rrerel y the compi eti on of a certai n nurrioer of graduate and 
undergraduate credits. A proposal forsuchaprogramshouldbesubrrittedbythecollege(s) housing the academic programs concerned and requi res the approval of 
the Graduate Counci I , the Graduate Dean, the Senate PCC Comrrittffi, and the Provost. 

N ecessary feahjres of a sb-uctured bachel or'^master's program i ncl ude the fol I owl ng: 

a. There must bespecific requirerrents for adrrission to thecorriDined program that speak to theexceptional performanceof the students to be adrritted. 
Atarrinimurn shJdents accepted for the program must bed eari yadrrisside to the graduate program portion. 

b. The program shoul d be desi gned so as not to undul y del ay the student's recei pt of thei r bachel or's degrees. Taki ng graduate credi ts shoul d not undul y 
I i rri t the breadtii of the shjdents s<peri ence through premature speci al i zati on. 

c. A 1 1 requi rerrents of the bachel or's program and of the master's program must be compi eted to recei ve the two degrees. W here appropri ate, graduate 
courses taken whi I e an undergraduate may substi tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate maj or program 

d. The shjdent may be offered deferred adrri ssi on to the graduate schod at the end of thej uni or year prograrn subj ect to compi eti on of the seni or year 
program in a tirrely fashion and with a speci fled I a/el of achia/errent Formal adrri ssi on to the graduate schod will requirecompletionof all 

requi rerrents for the bachel or's degree. 

e The credi ts to be doubl acounted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appI i cad e to the graduate program after the shjdent recei ves the bachel or's degree and 
matri cul ates i n theG raduate School . T hi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed i f the shjdent wi ifidraws from the graduate program before corrpi eti ng the 



Regdrdicn AcadETricReqirerret^ andRegjai 



master's degree 

A structuredbachelor'^master'sprcgramrrBy normally include up to nine credits of graduate I a/el courses (600 la/el and above) that are counted both for the 
bachel or's program and the master'ss program M ore than ni ne doubl e-counted credi ts may be al I owed i f both of the f ol I owi ng condi ti ons are sati sf i ed. 

a. T he addi ti onal graduate credi ts appi i ed to the undergraduate program do not undul y I i rri t the breadth of the students experi ence through premature 
speci al i zati on. T hi s condi ti on may be sati sf i ed, for exampl e, i f the graduate credi ts substi tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate program that 
woul d have been tal<en i n any case, but at a I ess advanced I a/el . 

b. The master's program requires substantially rrorethan thirty credits. This condition will bedeerredtobesatisfiedif the combined prograrn with 
doubl ecounti ng, sti 1 1 requi res 150 or rrore credit hours to compi ete 

Academi c Advi si ng 

Academic advising is an integral part of each student's educational s<peri ence and it takes many forms. Academic advising is a shared responsibility between the 
student and the advisor. For rrore i nformation visit www.advi si na.urrd.edu . Together with a student, an academic advisor can: 

Monitor students! pro^^ss in their rrajor. 

Provide inforrralion on acadenic requirements needed for ^aduation: 

• Discuss how a course of study fits a particular academic or career interest. 

• A n3/ver questi ons concemi ng a speci f i c academi c concern, such as probi ems wi th a parti cul ar d ass. 

• Assist students in da/eloping an academic and career plan. 

• Inform students about possible scholarships or fellowships and how to apply for them 

• G ui de students through the regi strati on process, i ncl udi ng provi di ng i nf ormati on on vari ous regi strati on bl ocks and what needs to be done to remove them 

■Help students plan for future ^aduate study or career: 

• D i scuss how an academi c maj or can prepare a student for hi ^her career, and what career opti ons are aval I abl e. 

• Refer students to the Career Center whi ch provi des career counsel i ng as wel I as workshops on vari ous careers, on wri ti ng resurres, prepari ng for j ob 
interviews, etc. 

• I nf orm students about graduate school requi rerrents and appI i cati on procedures. 

• I nf orm students about i ntemshi p opportuni ti es and how th^ can possi bl y recei ve credi t for them 

• Provi de i nf ormati on on study abroad programs that rri ght enri ch a student's acaderri c experi ence as wel I as enhance thei r resurre. 

Serve asa campus resoiroe: 

• Refer students to vari ous acaderri c support units that provide tutoring or workshops on study ski I Is, tirremanagerrent, stress managerrent, etc. 

• Recomrrend that students seek counsel i ng for stress, addi cti ons, trauma that rray be aff ecti ng thei r acaderri c wori<. 

• Inform students with physical and I earning disabilities of the support aval I able to them 

• E ncourage students to get i nvd ved on campus vi a soci al , pd i ti cal , acaderri c, ethni c^cul tural , sport and/or recreati onal student organi zati ons and acti vi ti es. 

Sorre advisors can provide information on all of theabove. Others specialize in a particular topic or area of concern. For example, acollego'departrrentmay havea 
specific carffir advisor or study abroad coordinator. Furtherrrore, sorre advisors work with specific populations, i.e. returning students, athletes, students with 
physi cal or I eami ng di sabi I i ti es, students of col or, etc. 

W hen request] ng to rreet wi th an advi sor, speci fy what topi cs you wi sh to di scuss to ensure that you are di rected to the appropri ate i ndi vi dual . 



Re^sbErlngfor Classes 

Office of the Re^strar 
Mitehell Building 301-314-8240 
www.testudo.urrd.edu 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, it isnecessary to process an official registration. Specific registration dates and instruct] ons are printed 
i n the Regi strati on Guide and on the MyUM websit^ www.rry.urrd.edu. The Registration Guide is issued for thespring and fall. The Schedule of Classes is issued 
for the sumrrer sessions. WinterTerminformation is printed in the Fall Registration Guide, and on the MyUM website. 

Newly adrritted students are invited, and strongly encouraged to attend an orientation session (see chapter 3 for Orientation information). Advising and course 
registration arepart of the orientation process. All na/vly adrritted students must rreet with an advisor prior to registration. Additionally, rovly adrritted freshrren 
and transfer students are requi red to provi de proof of i rrmuni zati on for rreasi es, rubel I a, murrps and tetanu^di phtheri a. A ddi ti onal I y, M aryl and I aw requi res resi dent 
hal I students to ei ther provi de proof of vacci nati on agai nst rreni ngococcal di sease or seek an exempli on from thi s requi rerrent. 

Re^slration Process: C urrenti y enrol I ed students are i nvi ted to earl y regi strati on by appoi ntrrent. Regi strati on appoi ntrrents for the f al I serrester begi n i n A pri I , 
and appointrrentsfor the springserrester begin inlateOctober. Regi strati on can be processed on the MyUM (rry.umd.edu) web site or in person. Open registration 
follows early registration, and continues up to the first day of classes. D uring thi stirre students may make schedule adjustrrents or process an original registration. 
Thescheduleadjustrrentperiodbeginsonthefirstdayof classes. All regi strati on transact! ons, either on-line or in person, arefinal unless a student processes a 
cancel I ati on of regi strati on. 

ScheduleAcI ustmait and Drq} Period 

Schedule AdjushTBit: The scheduleadjustrrent period is the first 10 days of classes for the fall andspringserresters, the first 5 days of classes for Sumrrer 
Sessi ons I and 1 1 , and the f i rst 3 days of cl asses for Wi nter Term and 3-week accel erated Sumrrer courses. Courses may be added, when space i s avai I abl e, duri ng 
thescheduleadjustrrent period, and will appear on the students perrranent record along with other courses pra/iously listed. Courses dropped during this period will 
not appear on the students permanent record. 

Departrrentsmay identify courses or sections of courses (with theapproval of theOfficeof the Senior Vice President for Acaderric Affairs), which after the first 
f i ve days of the schedul e adj ustrrent peri od i n Spri ng and F al I serresters, shal I requi re f acul ty or departrrental approval for students to add. 

• D uri ng the schedul e adj ustrrent peri od f ul I -ti rre undergraduates may drop or add courses, or change secti ons or credi 1 1 a/el wi thout f i nanci al penal ty 
provided they remain full -ti rre students (registered for 12 or rrore credits). Consult the Registration Guide for information and penalties associated with 
changi ng from f ul I -ti rre to part-ti rre. 

* Part-ti rre undergraduates (fewer than 12 credi ts) may al so add, drop and change secti ons, as wel I as change credi 1 1 a/el , but they shoul d consul t the deadi i ne 
sedi on i n the Regi strati on G ui de to avoi d i ncurri ng addi ti onal charges. 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



• Grading MetlTod (including pass-fail) may be changed only during the schedule adjustnxnt period. 

• Inthecaseof students who areadvised in the Division of Letters and Sciences when Dean's approval isrequired, the Dean for Office of Undergraduate 
Studi es shal I assurre the responsi bi I i ti es normal I y del egated to the Dean. 

After Schedule Adjustmerit 

• Courses may not be added without special permission of the departrrent and the dean of theacaderric unit in which the student is enrol led. 

• All courses for which the student is enrol led shal I remainasapartof the students perrranent record. The students status shal I beconsideredfull-tirreif the 
number of credit hours enrol I ed at this tirre is 12 or rrore. 

• An official class list for each course being offered is issued to the appropriate departrrent by the Office of the Registrar. Electronic rosters are provided to all 
f acul ty wi th emai I accounts. Students are not perrri tted to attend a cl ass i f thei r narres do not appear on the cl ass I i st. I nstructors must report di screpanci es to 
the Off i ce of the Regi strar. 

Drop Period 

The drop period for undergraduate students will beginatthedoseof the schedule adjustrrent period and terrrinate at the end of the tenth week of classes for the fall 
and spri ng serresters, and at a comparable tirre for sumrrer sessions and Winter Term Consult the Registration GuideorSumrrerScheduleof Classes for dates. 

D uri ng thi s peri od a student may drop a maxi mum of four credi ts. H owa/er, i f the course carri es rrore than f our credi ts, the student may drop the end re cours^ or i n 
the case of a vari abl e credi t course, reduce the credi 1 1 a/el by up to four credi ts. D rops duri ng thi s peri od wi 1 1 be recorded on the students pamanent record wi th a 
notation of W and will be consi dered to represent a si ngleenrd I rrent (one of two possible) i n the course. This mari< will not be used in the computation of a 
students cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

Credt Hours and Maximum Sanesber Credts 

N o baccal aureate curri cul um requi res f aver than 120 serrester hours. T he serrester hour, whichistheunitofcredit, istheequivalentofa subj ect pursued one peri od 
a week for one serrester. Two or three hours of laboratory or field wori< are equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. 

I n order for undergraduate students to compi ete rrost curri cul a i n four acaderri c years, thei r serrester I oad rrust range from 12 to 19 hours ( 30 to 36 hours each year) 
toward the degree. Bypolicy, undergraduates may not exceed the following maxi mum credit loads without the prior approval of theirDean: 20creditsinal5wffik 
serrester; 8 credits in a 6 wsk sumrrer terra or 4 credits in an accelerated 3 wsk term 

Cancellation of Regstration 

Students who regi ster and I ater deci de not to attend the U ni versi ty must cancel thei r regi strati on wi th the Off i ce of the Regi strar pri or to the off i ci al f i rst day of 
classes. F allure to cancel regi strati on will result in a financial oWigationtotheUniversity of Maryland a/en thoughastudent does not attend class.TheUniversity 
reserves the ri ght to cancel regi strati on for students who f ai I to rr^: thei r f i nanci al obi i gati ons 

Concurrait Unda'^aduabe-GraduateRe^stration 

AnundergraduatedegrffiseekingstudentattheUniversityof Maryland may, with the approval of his or her Dean, of the departrrent and the instructor offering the 
course, and of the Graduate School, regi ster for graduate courses (600 1 a/el and above) that will be recorded a^r graduate crecf/ton/y and that may beapplied 
towards an advanced degree at this university or elsewhere Students eligible for this option normally will hav/eachia/ed Junior standing, will haveaGPA of at least 
3.0, and will hav/esucceffifully completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of 'B' or better. The student must submit a plan of study that shows that taking 
graduate courses will not undul y del ay compi eti on of requi rerrents for the bachel or's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate credi ts atterrpted i n any 
serrester may not be rrore than ei ghteen. T he graduate credi ts so earned will not count towards any of the requi rerrents for the B accal aureate degree. A maxi mum of 
twel ve credi ts may be taken for graduate credi t by a student whi I e enrd I ed as an undergraduate. 

Under^aduateCrecftfor GraduateLeud Courses 

Subj ect to requi rerrents deterrri ned by the graduate faculty of the departrrent or program offeri ng the course undergraduate degree-sffiki ng students may regi ster 
for graduatal a/el courses, i.e., those nuniDa'edfrom600 to 898, with theexception of 799, for undergraduate creditThestudentrnustobtainthe prior approval of 
the departrrent and i nstructor offeri ng the course. 

Students eligible for this option normally will have achia/ed Junior standing, will haveaGPA of at least 3.0, and will have successfully completed the prerequisite 
courses wi th a grade of 'B ' or better. 

E nrol I rrent i n a graduatal a/el course does not i n any way i mply subsequent departrrental or graduate school approval for adrri ssi on i nto a graduate prograrn nor 
may the course be used as credi t for a graduate degree at thdJ ni versi ty of M aryl and. 

Withck'avvBl and Leave of Absence 

Students adrri tted to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and are expected to make regul ar and consi stent progress tcwards the compi eti on of thei r degree. H owa/er, the 
University understands that in exceptional circumstances a student may find it necessary to completely withdraw from all classes. The University considers such an 
i nterrupti on to be very seri ous as i t del ays normal progress towards the degree. Students shoul d not wi thdraw for f ri vol ous reasons or to avoi d the consequences of 
i gnoring their acaderri c responsi bill ties. Any student considering withdrawal i s strongi y encouraged to rreet with his or her acaderri c college advisor before leaving 
the University. 

Potential Implications: Withdrawingortakingaleaveof absence from theUniversity may have seri ousimplicati ons forintemational students, students receiving 
f i nanci al ai d or students resi di ng i n on-campus housi ng. Students are advi sed to contact the appropri ate of f i ces before f i nal i zi ng wi thdrawal or I eave of absence 
plans 

Student Finaicial ServicsOffice 1135 LeeBuilding, 301-314-9000 

Depalrrent of Resident Life 2100 Annapolis Hal I, 301-314-2100 

I ntemati onal Educati on Servi ces: 3117 M i tchel I B ui I di ng, 301-314-7740 

Wittidrawal : A wi thdrawal i s aval I abl e anyti rre betwsn the f i rst and I ast day of cl asses. Students must subrri t wri tten noti ce of wi thdrawal to the Off i ce of the 
Registrarnolaterthanthelastdayof classes. A students return to the University is contingent upon theconditions outlined irt^etum to tfieL'/Vio'sty'below. 

Leaveof Absence: A leaveof absence is a type of withdrawal and is avail able for students wishing to take tirre away from the University with the intention of 
retumingthefdlcwingserrBster.Thelea/eofabsencestatusisespecially helpful for recipients of federal financial aid because they are not consi dered to be 
wi thdrawn provi ded th^ do return and compi ete the fd I owl ng serrester. Students may appi y for a I eave of absence onl y duri ng the I ast 60 days of the serrester. A 
students return to the U ni versi ty i s conti rgent upon the corrii ti ons outi i ned i nReturn to tfi9 Un/versty bel cw . 

Return tottie University: Normally, a student may witiidraw or takealeav/eofabsencefromtiie University only onceduringmabiculation as an undergraduate. 
Students who find it necessary to leave the University are requi red to petition tiie Faculty Ra/iaw Board in order to return. Students who have earned a rrinimum2.0 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



cumul ati ve G PA , wi tti no pra/i ous wi thdrawal or I eave of absence, are exempt from thi s requi rerrent. Students who wi thdraw or take a I eave of absence whi I e on 
acaderri c probati on, or those return! ng from di srri ssal , are al ways requi red to peti ti on the Facul ty Ra/i ew B oard. Students are al so requi red to compi ete a 
Rei nstaterrent A dvi si ng IM eeti ng wi th their academic col I egead/i si ngofficetiefore the petition will beconsidered by the Faculty Ra/ie/v Board. 

Additional Withdrawal/Leave of Absence I iifaiinUon:The eff ecti ve date of wi thdrawal or I eave of absence for the purposes of refunds i s the date that the noti ce 
i s received by the Off ice of the Regisb^r. Notation of withdrawal/lea/eofabsenceandtheeffectivedatewill be posted to the studerfs academic record. Insb-uctors 
and col lege offices will be notified of all withdrawn students.Thedeadlinedateforsubrrittingthewithdrawal for each serrester is the last day of classes. Students 
should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for reenrdlrrent information. 

The repeat pd icy will not apply to courses tal<en during theacademic serrester from which theshjdent is officially withdrawn. 

1^1 ilitary Call-ups Itistheintentof the University of Maryland, College Parl<, to facilitate the withdrawal or change inregisb^ on and the reenrdlrrent of shjdents 
who are called to active military duty during the serrester. The student (or a representative) shouldtakeacopyof the military orders to the Office of the Register 
and process a wi thdrawal or change i n regi sb^ on papers. Detai I ed i nformati on about thi s process may be obtai red from the Off i ce of the Regi strar. 
W i thdrawal f or acti ve rri I i tary servi ce wi 1 1 hav/e no effect on any subsequent request to wi thdraw from the U ni versi ty . 

CoursesTaken at Other I nstitutions 

Courses taken at anotiier i nsti tuti on may not be credi ted toward a degree program wi thout pri or approval of the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects to 
eamadegree. Eligibleshjdentsmayenrdl i n courses at otiier U ni versi ti es via the University System of Marylands Inter I nsti tuti oral Registration Program or the 
Consorti um of Universities of theWashington MebTDpditan Area. 

Consortium of Universities of the Washingbon Metropolitan Area: 

TheConsortiumof Universities of the Washington MebTDpditan Area consists of Arrerican University, TheCatiidic University of Arrerica, Corcoran Col I ege of 
Art and Design, GallaudetUniversity, Georgetown University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, Howard University, MaryrnDunt 
University,JointMilitary IntelligenceCdIege, National Defense Intelligence Col I ege, Soutiieastem University, Trinity University, University of the Distinct of 
ColumbiaandtheUniversity of Maryland College Park. Students enrol led in these institutions are able to attend certain classes at the otiier campuses and hav/e the 
credi t considered as resident credit at theirhorre institutions. Comparable courses offered at University of Maryland may not be taken through the Consortium The 
i ntenti on i s to al I ow students to take an occasi onal course to augrrent a program ratiier than to da/el op an i ndi vi dual program Payrrent of tui ti on f or courses wi 1 1 be 
made to the students horre campus howa/er, special fees may be assessed by the host institution. 

Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland shjdents with at least junior standing may participate in the Consortium program according to the 

sti pul ati ons I i sted i n the current edition of the Regi sb^ on Guide. E nrol I rrent i n courses i s av/ai I abl e only on a space-avail ad ebasisVi si ting students are expected to 

rreet prerequi si tes or other cri teri a set by the host i nsti tuti on and compi y wi th the host i nsti tuti ons regi strati on procedures and deadl i nes. 

GoldenID students are not el igide to enrol I incourses through theConsortiumwith waiver of fas. University of Maryland shjdents may only enrol I incourses 
offered on the campus of the host i nsti tuti on. Students i nterested i n add ti onal i nformati on about the C onsorti um program shod d ra/i aw the current edi ti on of the 
Regisb^on Guideor contact the ConsortiumCoordinator on thefirst floor of theMitchell Building. 

University Sysbemof Maryland I nter-l nstitutional Re^stration Pro-am 

U ndergraduate students hav/e ttie opportuni ty to take courses at certai n U ni versi ty System of M aryl and I nsti tuti ons to augrrent thei r degree program at U ni versi ty of 
Maryland Col I ege Park under ttie I nter-l nstitutional Regi station Program Participating institutions include Bowie State University, Coppin State University, 
Frostburg State University, Salisbury State University, Towson University, University of Baltirrore, University of Maryland at Baltirrore, University of Maryland, 
Baltirrore County, Universityof Maryland College Park andUniversity of Maryland Eastern Shore. Universit/of Maryland College Park students may not enroll in 
courses at ttie University of Maryland University Cd lege through this program Currently registered, degree seekirl^ni versi ty of Maryland studentswith at least 
sophorrore standing may enrol I i n courses and have ttiat credit considered as resident credit at ttieirhorre institution. Enrollrrentincoursesisavailadeonlyona 
spaceavailable basis and visiting students areexpected to rr^: prerequisites or otiier criteria set by ttie host institution. Payrrent of tuition for courses will be made 
to the students horre campus howa/er special fees may be assessed by the host institution. Students interested in additional information aboutttielnter-l nstitutional 
Regisb^on programshouldra/ia/vtiie current edition of ttieRegisbation Guideor contact theConsortiumCoordinator on ttiefirst floor of ttieMltchell Building. 

Student I D Nunba-s 

The University of Maryland assigns all shjdents a uni que ninadigitidentifi cab on number cal I edttieU ID N umber. T hi s number is used as a shjdentidenbfier for 
rrost uni versi ty bansacb ons. Students are al so requi red to provi de ttiei rSocial SecurityN umber, whi ch i s used for a I i rri ted number of purposes ttiat are requi red by 
law or business necessity. A list of currentiy approved uses is provided in Chapter 10, Appendix M . 

Useof Email for Official Ccmmunication 

T he U ni versi ty has adopted emai I as ttie pri mary rreans for send ng off i ci al communi cab ons to students. A caderri c advi sors, f acul ty, and campus adrri ni strati ve 
off i ces use emai I to convey i mportant i nf ormab on and b rre-sensi ti ve nob ces. All enrol I ed shjdents are provi ded a U ni versi ty emai I address. Students are responsi bl e 
for keepi ng ttiei r emai I address up to date or for forward! ng emai I to anobier address. Fai I ure to check emai I , errors i n forwardi ng emai I , and returned emai I due to/TB/7/ 
rfBilbox fiiibr user unknown will not accuse a student from rri ssi ng announcerrents or deadl i nes 

C hange of Adck'ess 

StudentsareexpectedtonotifybieOfficeof theRegistrarof anychangeinbieirlocal, permanent or amai I address. U se ttie internet to keep address inf ormab on 
current and accurate. C hange of address forms are aval I ad e at the f ol I owi ng pi aces: 

MyUM website www.rry.urrd.edu 

Offi ce of bie Bursar, Room 1115 or 1135, LeeBuilding 

Student Servi ces C ounter, f i rst f I oor, M i tchel I B ui I di ng 

I daitificatiGn Cards 

The photo ID card is issued at biebrrebie student first registers for classes. This card is to be used for ttieenb re durab on of enrollrrent.Addibonally, students who 
have food service contracts will usettiis phohD idenbficabon card. Contact Dining Servicesdirecby for further inf ormab on. 

The photo idenbfi cab on card can be used by students to withdraw books from bie libraries, for adrri ssi on to rrost abilebc, social, and cultural a/ents, and as a 
general form of idenbfi cation on campus. 

T here i s a repi acerrent charge of $20 for I est phcto i denti f i cab on cards. Ouesti ons concemi ng ttie i denb f i cati on card system shoul d be addressed to ttie Off i ce of the 
Regisbar. 

Veterans Ben^ts 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



Students attending the university undertlieVeteransEducationAssistanceAct(Title38, U.S. Code) may receive assistance and enrol I nwit certification at the 
VeteransCertification Office intheOfficeof the Registrar, first floor.ivjitchel I Building. ConsulttheRegistrationGuidefor further inforrration. 

ClaBEJficatiGn of Studaits 

Official classifications of undergraduate students are based on earned credits as follows: freshman, 1-29 serrester hours; sophorrore, 30-59; junior, 60-89; and 
senior, 90 to at I east 120. 

AcadErric Reoords and Regulations 

The Office of the Registrar, located on the first floor of the Mitchell Bui I ding is responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official transcripts. 

MarkingSysban 

T he f ol I cwi ng symbol s are used on the students permanent record for al I courses i n whi ch he or she i s enrol I ed after the i ni ti al regi strati on and schedul e adj ustrrent 
period: A-h A, A-, B-h B, B-, C-H C, C-, D-h D, D-, F, XF, I, P, S, andW.Thesemari<sremainaspartof the students permanent record and may be changed only by 
the ori gi nal i nstructor on certi f i cati on, approved by the departrrent chai r and the dean, that an actual rri stake was made i n determi ni ng or recordi ng the grade. 

• A-h A, A- denotes excel lent mastery of the subject and outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or serrester averages, a mari< of A-h A, A- will 
be assi gned a val ue of 4 qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour 

• B-h B, B- denotesgoodmasteryof the subject and good scholarship. A mari<of B-h B, B- isassignedavalueof 3 quality poi nts per credit hour 

• C-h C, C- denotesacceptaWemasteryof the subject. A markof C-h C, C- isassignedavalueof 2 quality poi nts per credit hour 

• D-h D, D- denotes borderiine understanding of the subject. It denotes marginal performance anditdoesnotrepresentsatisfactory progress toward a degree. A 
mari<of D-h D, D- isassignedavalueof 1 quality point per credit hour 

• F denotes f ai I ure to understand the subj ect and unsati sf actory performance. A mari< of F i s assi gned a val ue of qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour 

• X F- denotes fai I ure due to academi c di shonesty. 

• S i s a departrrent opti on mark that may be used to denote sati sf actory performance by a student i n progressi ng thesi s prqj ects, ori entati on courses, practi ce 
teaching, and the I ike Incomputationof cumulativeav/eragesamarkof S will not be included. 

• W is used to indicate withdrawal from a course in which the student was enrolled at the end of the schedule adj ustrrent period. For information and 
compi eteness, the mark of W i s pi aced on the students permanent record by the Off i ce of the Regi strar T he i nstructor wi 1 1 be noti f i ed that the student has 
withdrawn from the course This mark is not used in any computation of quality poi nts or cumulative average total sat the end of the serrester. 

• Audit -A student may register to audit a course or courses which have been designated as available under theaudit option and in which space is available. 
The notation ADD will be pi aced on the transcript for each course audi ted. A notation to the effect that this symbol does not imply attendance or any other 
effort in the course will be included on the transcript in the explanation of the grading system 

• Pass-Fail - The mark of P is a student option mari<, equivalent to A-h A, A-, B-h B, B-, C-h C, C-, D-h D or D-. The student must infonnthe Office of the 
Regi strar of the sel ecti on of thi s opti on by the end of the schedul e adj ustrrent peri od. 

Additional Record Notations 

I n add ti on to the above marks, there are provi si ons for other record or transcri pt notati ons that may be used based on uni versi ty poi i cy and i ndi vi dual ci rcumstances. 

Dupl icabe axrser U sed to i ndi cate two courses wi th the sarre course content The second course i s counted i n the cumul ati ve total s earned; both courses are counted 
i n the cumul ati ve attempted credi t and i n the cal cul ati on of grade poi nt av/erage. 

Excluded Credit (Excl Crd).; Excluded creditisnotedwhenAcademicClerrency has ban granted. 

I noorrpletes The mark of I is an exceptional mari< that is an i nstructor option. It is given only to a student whose work i n a course has been qualitatively 

sati sf actory, when, because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unaW e to compI ete sorre smal I porti on of the wori< of 

the course. I n no case wi 1 1 the mari< I be recorded for a student who has not compI eted the maj or porti on of the wori< of the course. 

1 . Thi s I nconpl ete Contract form rnust be subrri tted to the dean of the col I ege off eri ng the course wi thi n si x weeks after the grade subrri ssi on deadl i ne ( i f a gra^ 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncorrpi ete C ontract i sn't compI eted wi thi n the si x wsk peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 rerrove the 'I ' by compI eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangerrents for the compI eti on of the 
wori<. T he wori< must be corrpi eted by the tirre stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the nect serrester, butinanya/ent, no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as def i red by the contract i s not compI eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadi i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty rrerrber or the f acul ty rrembers dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the departrrent chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangerrents for the student to compI ete the course 
requi rerrents. 

5. Itistheresponsibilityof the instructor or departrrent chair concerned to subrrit the grade proriTDtiy upon conpletion of the conditions of the I nconp 

6.Thel cannotbererrovedtiirough re-registration fortiiecourseorthroughcreditby examination. An I mari<isnotusedintiiecomputationof quality points 
or cumul ati ve grade poi nt av/erages. 

Non-applicable (Non-AppI); Inall casesof ti^nsfer from one col lege to anotiier at tiie University of Maryland, CollegePari<,thedean of tiie receiving college, 
wi th tiie approval of tiie shjdent, shal I i ndi cate which courses, i f any, i n the student's pra/i ous academi c program are not appi i cabi e to hi s or her na/v prograrn and 
shall noti fytiie Office of tiie Regi sb^r of tiie adj usbraitstiiat are to be rnade in deterrrining tiieshjdents progress tcward a degrffi. Deletions may occur botii in 
creditsattempted and correspondingly in credits earned. Thisa/aluation shall be made upon tiieshjdents initial entiy into a new prograrn not thereafter. If astudent 
ti-ansfers from one program to anotiier, hisorherrecorda/aluationshall be made by the dean i n tiie sarre way as if he or she were ti^nsf erring col leges. If tiie 
shjdent subsequent! y ti^nsf ers to a thi rd col I ege, the dean of tiie till rd cd I ege shal I make a si rri I ar i ni ti al adj usbrent; courses marked nonappi i cabI e by tiie second 
dean may becorre appI i cabI e i n tiie till rd program 

Pass-Fail Pdicy 

Pass-Fail Policy: Thefollowing Pass-Fail policy was approved by tiie Board of Regents for implerrentati on beginning witiitiie Spring 1989 serrester: 

1. To register for a course under tiie pass-fail option, an undergraduate must have completed 30 or rrore credit hours of cd I ege credi twi tin a G PA of at least 2.0. At 
least 15 of tiiese credit hours must have been completed at theUni versi ty of Maryland, College Pari< with a University of Maryland GPA of at least 2.0. 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



2. Courses forwhichthisoption applies rmstbedectivesinthestudentsprogramThecourses may not becollege, major, field of concentration, or general 
education program requi rerrents. 

3. Onlyonecourseperserrestermay beregisteredforunderthepass-fail option. 

4. Norrorethanl2serresterhoursofcreditmay betaken underthepass-fail option during a student's college career. 

5. Students may not choose thi s opti on when re-regi steri ng f or a course. 

6. When regi steri ng under the pass-fai I opti on, a course that i s passed wi 1 1 count as hours i n the students record but wi 1 1 not be computed i n the grade poi nt av/erage. 
A course that i s f ai I ed wi 1 1 appear on the student's record and wi 1 1 be computed both i n the overal I average and the serrester average. 

7. Students registering for a course under the pass-fai I opti on are requi red to complete all regular course requi rerrents. Their work will bea/aluatedbythe 
instructor by the normal procedure for letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. ThegraclesA+, A, A-, B+; B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D- will 
automati cal I y be converted by the Off i ce of the Regi strar to the grade P on the students permanent record. The grade F wi 1 1 remai n as given. The choi ce of gradi ng 
opti on may be changed onl y duri ng the schedul e adj ustrrent peri od for courses i n whi ch the student i s current! y regi stered. 

Incxmplebes 

The mark of 'I' is an exceptional mark that is an instructor opti on. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unaW e to compi ete sorre smal I porti on of the work of the course. I n no 
casewill themarki berecordedforastudentwhohasnotcompletedthemajorportionof the work of the course 

1 . Thi s I nconpl ete Contract form rnust be subrri tted to the dean of the col I ege off eri ng the course wi thi n si X weeks after the grade subrri ssi on deadl i n^ 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncorrpi ete C ontract i sn't compI eted wi thi n the si x wsk peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compI eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangerrents for the compI eti on of the 
work. Thework must becorrpleted by thetirrestipulatedinthecontract, usually by the end of the nsct serrester, butinanya/ent, no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as def i red by the contract i s not compI eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Except] ons to the stated deadi i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty rrerrber or the f acul ty rrembers dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the departrrent chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangerrents for the student to compI ete the course 
requi rerrents. 

5. Itistheresponsibilityof the instructor or departrrHit chair concerned to subrrit the grade proriTDtiy upon conpletion of the ccriditions of thai nc 

6. The 'I ' cannot be renxwed through re-registration for the course or through credit by examination. An 'I ' mari< is not used in the computation of quality points or 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages. 

Grade Point Average Computation of 

GPA is computed by dividing the total numberof quality points accumulated in courses for which a gradeofA-h A, A-, B-h B, B-, C-h C, C-, D-h D, D-, orF has 
been assi gned by the total numberof credits attempted in those courses. Courses for which a mari< of P, S, I, NCR or W has been assi gned are not included in 
computingtheGPA. Each letter grade hasa numerical value A-h A, A- =4; B-h B, B- =3; C-hC, C- =2; D-h D, D- =1; F =0. Multi plying this value by the 
nurrlDer of credi ts f or a parti cul ar course gi ves the number of qua! i ty poi nts earned for that course. 

See Repeat Pd i cy to deterrri ne the effect of repeated courses i n the cal cul ati on of G PA . 
Repeat Policy 

Thefollcwing Campus Repeat Policy applies to ALL courses that may not be repeated for additional credit. 

1. The fd I owl ng students are requi red to fd lew the new repeatpolicy: 

a. All rov freshrren who began at University of Maryland , College Pari< Fall 1990 and after. 

b. Transfer students fromschools other than Maryland community colleges who began at University of Maryland, CdlegePari<, Fall 1990 and after. 
This includes transfer students from another University of Maryland institution. 

2. Thereisalirrittothenumberoftirres a student may repeat a course. Studentsmay haveone repeat of any course in which they earned an A-h A, A-, B-h B, 
B-, C-h C, C-, D-h D, D-, F, P, S, W, NGR or Audit; th^ cannot be regi stered (after the schedule adj ustrrent period) for any given course rrore than twice. A 
students cleans off i ce may grant an excepti on al I owl ng an addi ti onal course repeat. I n thi s case, students must present a pi an for successful I y compI eti ng the course. 
All attemptEw// be counted toward the total limit for repeatade credits. 

NcUb, Students rmy rot choose tl-e Pass-Fail option wlien re-registsring for a course or re-registsr for a course in wHchi a grade of I has been rotsd, 

3. Students may repeat no rrore than 18 credi ts. A ddi ti onal I y, i f a student wi thdrews from all courses duri ng a serrester, those courses are not i ncl uded i n thi s 
limit 

4. The grade point average will indudeall attemptsatagivencoursethatresultinagradeof A-h A, A-, B-h B, B-, C-h C, C-, D-h D, D-, orF. Hcwa/er, tohelp 
freshrren and transfer shjdents adjust to the University of Maryland, College Pari<, the fd I owing two excepti ons allow for the currul ati ve GPA to be calculated so 
that only the hi gher grade i s i ncl uded: 

a. When the repeated course was taken within the students first serrester at University of Maryland, College Park, or 

b. W hen the repeated course was taken wi thi n the shxients f i rst 24 credi t hours attempted ( i ncl udi ng transfer credi ts) or wi thi n the serrester duri ng 
whi ch the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted. 

5. A ny grade earned i n pri or attempts of a repeated course will appear on the student's transcri pt, regardi ess of whetiier the grade i s dropped f rorn or i ncl uded i n, the 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

6. Repeat by transfer: I f a shjdent repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or duri ng the serrester i n whi ch the student reached 24 credi ts attempted 
(including transfer credits) and the transfer grade is hi gher, then the original grade in the course will be excluded from the GPA calculation. 

a. If the course was taken after the serrester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted, the original grade remains in the GPA calculation. 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



Repeat Pdicy Prior to Fall 199Q 

T he fol I cwi ng students fd I ow the prewous repeat pd i cy: 

• Students who began at Universitycf Maryland, College Park, beforetheFall 1990 serrester (including students who enter University of Maryland, Cdlege 
Park for sunrrer 1990) . 

• Transfer students who began at a M aryl and comrruni ty col I ege before Fal 1 1990. 

• UMBC Collegeof Engl nffiring students who began before 1^0. 

T he hi ghest grade recei ved I n the repeated course I s used to cal cul ate the G PA . A student may repeat any course; hcwa/er no student may be regi stered for a course 
rrore than three ti rres. 

If a student repeats a course in which heor she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, orS, the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned 
toward thedegree. Onlythe highest mark will be used in computation of the students cumulative average Under unusual circumstances, the students dean may 
grant an s<cepti on to thi s pd I cy. 

Academic Clemency Pdicy 

Undergraduate students returning to the University of Maryland, College Park in pursuit of their initial baccalaureate degree, after a separation of five calendar years 
may peti ti on the appropri ate dean to have a number of pra/i ousi y earned grades and credi ts rerroved from the cal cul ati on of thei r cumul ati ve grade poi nt av/erage. 
U p to 16 credits and corresponding grades from courses pra/iouslycorrpleted at thdJniversity of Maryland, Cdlege Parl<, will be rerroved from cal cul ati on of the 
grade point average and will notbecountedtowardgraduationrequirerreTts.Thepetitionforclerrency rnustbefi led in thefirst serrester of return to the institution. 
A pproval I s nei the- automati c or guaranteed. 

Hcncrs (Dean's L ist) 

Serrester A caderric Honors (Dean's List) will be awarded to those students who complete, within any given serrester (excluding winter and sunrrer terms), 12 or 
rrDrecredits(excludingcourseswithgraclesof P and S) with a serrester GPA of 3.5 or higher. This recognition will be noted on the students academic record. 

Academic Prcbaticn and DisrrisEal, Unda'^aduabe Pdicy en 

ConsistentwiththeUniversity of Maryland Student Academic Success- DegrffiCompletion Policy, it is the intent of the University that its students make 
sati sf actory progress toward thei r degrffi obj ecti ves, and achi a/e acaderri c success. I f a student has speci al ci rcumstances that make 1 1 1 mpoesi bl e to compi ete a 
normal course I oad, the student must rr^: wi th an advi sor to di scuss the ci rcumstances, the student's pi ans for conti nued progress toward a degree and the 
I mpl I cat] ons for conti nued enrol I rrent 

Thefol I cwi ng gui del I nes for retenti on of students refer separately to serrester (Fal I and Spri ng) and Wi nter or Sunrrer terms: 

a. Academic retention is based solely on grade point av/erage(GPA). A mini mum of 120 successfully completed course credits is required for graduation in any 
degree curri cul um I ndi vi dual col I eges, school s, and departrrents may estabi I sh hi gher requi rerrents for graduati on. Students rrust consul t the appropri ate col I ege, 
school , or departrrent for speci f I c I nf ormati on. 

b. Satisfactory Performance is defined as the achi a/errent of a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Students whose serrester GPA fallsbelcw 2.0 are encouraged to 
rreet wi th thei r advi sors regardi ng the da/el oprrent of a pi an that will appropri atel y respond to the students acaderri c di ff I cul ti es and I ead to acaderri c I mproverrent 
Individual colleges, school sand departrrents may establish separate requi rerrents for mandatory advi sing. Students rrust consult the appropri ate col I ege, school, or 
departrrent for speci f I c I nf ormati on. 

c. Unsatisfactory Performance is defined as the achi a/errent of a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. Students will be placed on A caderric Probation foil owing any 
serrester in which a 2.0 cumulativeGPA isnotachia/ed. Normally, students will beAcaderricallyDlsrrissed if they are unable to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 
or higher at the end of their probationary serrester. 

Acaderric Probation: 

Students will beplacedonacaderricprobationif their cumulative GPA fal Is below 2.0. Normally, studentisexpected to attaina2.0 cumulativeGPA attheendof 
any prpbationary serrester. Students who fal I to achia/ea 2.0 cumulativeGPA attheendof their probationary serrester may be acaderri call ydisrrissed, depending 
on their credit I a/el asdetailedbelcw. 

1. Students who have earned 60 credits or rrore will be di srri ssed from the U ni versi ty in the a/ent their currul ati ve GPA remainsbelcw 2.0attheendof their 
probationary serrester. Students who are on probation and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or sunrrer term will not be subject to di srri ssal in 
the subsequent serrester. 

2. Students who are on acaderric probation and have earned fewer than 60 credits will beperrritted to continue on acaderric probation if a rrini mum serrester GPA 
of 2.0 is achia/ed I n each serrester of probation. 

a. Ful I -tirre students must complete 9 or rrore credits in each serrester of probation. A completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which a 
student recei ves a grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, orS. 

b. Students who rreet thi s requi rerrent wi 1 1 be perrri tted to conti nue on probati on unti I the cl ose of the serrester ( s<cl udi ng wi nter and sunrrer terms) 
I nwhichth^ attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

c. Howa/er, students who are on probati on will bedisrrissedif they have not achia/ed a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the serrester in which 
th^ compI ete 60 credits. 

d. Students who are on probati on and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or sunrrer term will not be subject to di srri ssal inthe 
subsequent serrester. 

3. The Off I ce of the R^i strar wi 1 1 noti fy students when th^ are pi aced on acaderri c probati on. Such noti ces wi 1 1 1 ncl ude a requi rerrent that the students consul t an 
acaderri c advi sor I n thei r col I eges eari y I n the probati orery serrester ard I n ro a/ent I ater than the begi nni ng of the eari y regi strati on pan od for the nsd serreS 
The Office of the Regi strar will notify the col I eges of students who are pi aced on acaderric probati on and will note the acaderric probationary status on the students 
acaderric record. 

a. T he acaderri c advi sors will assi st students I n da/el opi ng appropri ate pi ans for achi a/i ng sati sf actory acaderri c performance. 

b. Students who are pi aced on probati on wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or regi ster wi thout the approval of an acaderri c advi sor I n thei r 
college. 

Acaderric Disniseal: 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



1. Students who have earned 60 or rrore credits will bedisrrissedif theircurrulativeGPA remainsbelcw 2.0 for two consecutive serresters (secluding winter and 
sunrrer terms). Students who attain a cumulativeG PA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or sumrrer term will not be subject to dismissal. 

2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits will be di srni ssed fol I owl ng any probationary serrester in which th^ fail toattainarrinimjm2.0serresterGPA 
and completetherequisitecreditsdetailed under Academic Probation. Studentswho attain a cumulativeG PA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or sumrrer term will not 
be subj ect to di srri ssal . 

3. Studentswho have been academically dismissed and who are reinstated will be academically dismissed again if a currulativeGPA of at least 2.0 is not achia/ed 
by the end of the first serrester after reinstaterrent Reinstated students will not be allowed to add or drop courses, or to register during any serrester without the 
approval of an academic advisor in their college, unless a cumulativeG PA of atleast2.0isachia/ed. 

4. The Office of the Registrar will notify the appropriate University offices when students are academically dismissed and will note the dismissal onthestuderfs 
academic record. 

5. TheOfficeof UndergraduateAdrrissionswill notify students i n writing when they are di srri ssed. The notices will include a staterrent that registration for the 
next serrester (s<cl udi ng wi nter or sunrrer terms) wi 1 1 be cancel ed. 

6. Normally, a student dismissed for academic reasons must wait out one serrester (fall or spring) before reinstaterrent Exceptions will be determined by the 
Faculty Petition Board. 

Application for Acadenic Reinstabement 

1. Students who have been di srri ssed nBy apply to the Faculty Petition Board for reinstaterrent on the grounds of rniti gating circurnstances, such as (i) 
derronsb^ed progress toward a degree by successful compi eti on of 24 degree-appi i caW e credi ts i n tiie precedi ng year, ( i i ) conti nui ng i mproverrent i n tiie 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average, and (ill) progress i n general educati on and maj or requi rerrents. 

2. The application for reinstaterrent must include a written staterrent explaining tiie circumstances leading to dismissal and a proposed plan to rerredy tiiose 
circumstances. Students are encouraged to consult with tiieir academic advisors prior to submitting their applications to tiie Faculty Petition Board. 

3. A ppl i cati ons for rei nstaterrent can be obtai ned from tiie Reenrol I rrent Off i ce i n tiie Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, whi ch i s responsi bl e f or adrri ni steri ng 
tiie reinstaterrent process in coordination witii the Faculty Petition Board. 

Faciity Petition Board: 

1. The Reenroll rrent Office is responsibleforsubrnitting the rei nstaterrent applications for ra/ia/v and decision by tiie Faculty Petition Board, which is comprised of 
tenuredfaculty appointed by the SeniorVice President for AcaderricAffairs and Provost. The Board istiiesde arbiter of rei nstaterrent applications. 

2. The Faculty Petition Board has the discretion to establish tiieterms for reinstaterrent, inci udi ngtiie requi rerrents for achia/ingacademici mproverrent and 
da/el opi ng an acaderri c pi an for success. 

3. The Reenrol I merit Office will forward tiie Boards decision to students at tiieir permanent addresses. 

Disniseal of Delinquent Students: 

T he uni versi ty reserves tiie ri ght to request at any ti rre the wi tiidrawal of a shjdent who cannot or does not mai ntai n the requi red standard of schol arshi p, or whose 
conti nuance i n tiie uni versi ty woul d be detri rrental to hi s or her heal th, or tiie heal th of others, or whose conduct i s not sati sf actory to tiie autiiori ti es of the 
university. Additional information about tiiedi srri ssal of delinquent shjdents may be found in tiie Code of Student Conduct. 

Attendance and Assessinaiit^xami nations 

Attendance 

1. Theuniversityexpectseachshjdenttotakefull responsi bi I i ty for his or her academic work and academic progress. T he shxient, to progress satisfactorily, must 
rreet al I of tiie requi rerrents of each course for whi ch he or she i s regi stered. Students are s<pected to attend cl asses regul ari y, for consi stent attendance offers tiie 
rrost eff ecti ve opportuni ty open to al I shjdents to gal n corrmand of ffie concepts and materi al s of tiiei r courses of study. Except as provi ded bel ow, absences will not 
be used i n tiie computati on of grades, and the recordi ng of shjdent absences will not be requi red of tiie f acul ty. 

2. Itistiiepolicyof the uni versi ty to excusetiie absences of students that result fromtiiefol lowing causes: illnessof tiieshjdent, or illness of a dependent as 

def i ned by B oard of Regents pol i cy on f arri I y and rredi cal I eave; rel i gi ous observance (where tiie nahjre of tiie observance pra/ents tiie student from bei ng present 
during tiled ass period); parti ci pati on in uni versi ty activities at the request of uni versi tyautiiori ties; and corrpel ling circumstance beyond tiie shjdents corfrd. 
Students cl ai mi ng excused absence must appi y i n wri ti ng and f umi sh docurrentary support for thei r asserti on that absence resul ted from one of tiiese causes. 

3. In sorre courses, attendance and i n-cl ass parti ci pati on are ongoi ng requi rerrents and an i ntegral part of tiie work of tiie course I n otiier courses, occasi onal 
in-cl ass assessrrents may occur, sorretirreswitiiout advance notice Itistiieresponsibilityof tiieinsbuctor to inform each class at tiie beginning of the serrester of 
tiie nature of i n-cl ass parti ci pati on expected and the effect of absences on tiie a/al uati on of tiie shjdents work i n tiie course. 

4. Absencesincourseswherein-classparticipationisasignificantpartoftiiewori< of tine course shall be handl ed by tiieinstructorintiie course in accordance wi tin 
tiiegeneral pol icy of his or her academic unit 

5. Permanent changes i n tiie schedul i ng or I ocati on of cl asses must be approved by tiie chai r, tiie di rechar or tiie dean of tiie departrrent non-departrrental i zed 
school or col lege, as appropriate. 

AssesEmait 

1. The university provides shjdents wi tin excused absences tiie opportunity to reschedule significant assessrrents, e<cept in cases where the nahjre of tiie 
assessrrentprecludedtiie possibility of rescheduling, OR to perform a sub^tuteassignrrentwitiiout penalty. An insbuctor is not under obligation to offer a 
substituteassignrrent orto givea student a makaup assessrrent unl ess tiie failure to perform was due to an excused absence tiiat is, dueto illness (of thestudent or 
a dependent) , rel i gi ous obsavance (where tiie nahjre of the observance pra/ents tiie student from bei ng present dun ng the cl ass peri od) , parti ci pati on i n uni versi ty 
acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty autiiori ti es, or compel I i ng ci rcumstances beyond tiie students control . Students cl ai mi ng excused absence rrust appI y i n wri ti ng 
and f umi sh docurrentary support for tiiei r asserti on tiiat absence resul ted from one of these causes. 

The makeup assessrrent or substitute assignrrent must be at a tirreand place mutually agrsableto tiie InsbuchDr and shjdent, cover only the material for which tiie 
student was originally responsibly and be at a comparable I a/el of difficulty witiitiie original assessrrent I ntiiea/enttiiat a group of students requi res tiiesarre 
makeup assessrrent or substituteassignrrent, onetirreandplacemaybescheduled. The makeup assessrrent or substituteassignrrent rrust not interfere witiitiie 
students regul ari y scheduled classes or in-cl ass final examination. 

Students who hav/e a concern regardi ng rel i gi ous observances shoul d see tiiei r i nsb-uctors at tiie start of the serrester. A I tiiough tiie uni versi ty attempts to 
accomrrodate the religious bel id's of all of its rrerrbers, it functions witiiin a secularenvironrrent and is limited in the extent to which it can interrupt its normal 
operations The president shall deterrrine when it is appropriate f or tiiecanpuscorrrrijnity to resbictreschedulingexarni nations or otiier significant assessrrents on 
tiie dates of rel i gi ous observance. 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



Atthistirr^ exam nations or other si gnifi cant assessrreitsrray not be scheduled on RcshHcshanah.YomKippur, Good Friday, or tlie first two days of Passover. 

I n cases of di sput^ tiie shjdent may appeal to tiie chai r, tiie di rector or tiie dean of tiie dqsartrrent, non-departrrental i zed school or col I ege off eri ng tiie course 
wi thin one week from tiie date of tiie refusal to schedule a make-up assessrrent. In those instances where the InsbTJCtoristiie chair, di rector or dean, tiie appeal shall 
be made to tiie next hi gheradrrinisb^ve officer, whose decision shall befinal. 

2. The student must notify his or her instructor of tiie reason for absence as soon as possible W here tiie reason for absence from a scheduled assessrrent is known 
well in advance (for exarrple, incasesof religi ous observance or parti cipati on in university activities at the request of university autiiori ties), tiieshjdent must inform 
tiieinsbuctor by tiie end oif the scheduleadjustrrent period. Prior notification is especially irnportant in connection witii final examinations, si nee failure to 
reschedule a final examination before conclusion of the final ecarrinationperiodmay result in loss of credits during tiieserrester. Where the reason is not known 
well in advance (for example, in cases of illness or compel ling circumstances beyond tiieshjdentscontiTDl), tiieshjdent must inform the insbuctor as soon as tiie 
reason da/el ops, or as soon as possible after itsda/eloprrent. 

3. Ordinarily, assessrrents are given during class hours in accordance witii the regularly scheduled (or officially arranged) tirreand pi ace of each course. No less 
tiian sa/en cal endar days noti ce shal I be gi ven for assessrrents schedul ed at other ti rres and pi aces. 1 1 shal I be tiie i nsbuctors responsi bi I i ty to ensure tiiat tiie change 
in schedule does not interferewi til any students regularly scheduled classes or in-class final exarri nations 1 1 is tiie responsi bi I ity of the student to be inforrred 
concemi ng the dates of announced qui zzes, tests, and s<ami nati ons. Performance assessrrents may take a vari ety of forms and need not be cl assroom- based wri tten 
examinations 

4. A f i nal exarri nati on shal I be gi ven i n a/ery undergraduate course Except! ons may be made wi tin tiie wri tten approval of the chai r, tiie di rector or tiie dean of tiie 
departrrent, non-departrrental i zai school or cd I ege, as appropri ate H owa/er, a students f i nal course grade shal I be based on a corria nati on assessrrents that i s at 

I east the equivalent of a comprehensive final exarrination. Nofinal s<arrinationorequivalentrray be given or due during tiie last week of classes. All in-class final 
exarri nati ons must be held on tiie date and at tiietirre I istedintiie official final s<arri nati on schedule. Out-of-d ass final exarri nati on or equivalent assessrrents 
shall bedueontiiedateandatatirrelistedintiieofficial final exarrination schedule. 

5. Thechair, tiie director or tiie dean of the departrrent, non-departrrental i zed school or college, as appropriate i s responsi We for tiie adequate adrrinisb^ on of 
assessrrents i n courses under his or her jurisdiction. 

6. No in-class assessrrent shal I exceed tiieallottedtirrefor a regulariy scheduled class period. I ntiie case of in-class final exarrinations, tiietirre allotted shal I not 
exceed tiie schedul ed f i nal s<arri nati on peri od. 

7. Each student shal I be gi ven tiieinsbucti ons and performance requirerrents for all assessrrentsintended to require rroretiian one-half class periodinaform 
ti-ansl atabi e to hard copy, unl ess tiie chai r, tiie di rector or tiie dean of tiie departrrent, non-departrrental i zed school or col I ege, as appropri ate, has autiiori zed another 
procedure Theinsbuctionsand requirerrentsoftiie assessrrent shall be archived in an appropriate rredium in a suitable place. 

8. The fd I owing rules shal I govern all in-class exarri nati ons, unless tiieinsbuctor for a specific course stipulates alternate rules for tiiat course. A breach of any of 
tiie rules shall constitutedisruption of class, a disciplinary offense (Code of Student Conduct, section 9.m), or may serve as tiie basis of an allegation of acaderric 
dishonesty. 

a. Students arri vi ng I ate for an exarri nati on may not unreasonad y di srupt tiie s<arri nati on room 

b. Students must leave all unautiiorized materials (eg., books, notes, calculators) witiitiie proctor before being seated. 

c. W here seati ng arrangerrents are estabi i shed by proctors, student must conform to these arrangerrents. 

d. Students may not return to an s<arri nati on room after I eavi ng, unl ess perrri ssi on to do so has been granted by tiie proctor pri or to tiie students 
departure 

e Students rnust cease conversati on pri or to the passing out of s<arri nati on papers and rnaintain silence during tiie entire exarri nati on period. 

f. Students must pi ace exarri nati on papers face dcwn on tiie writing desk until the exarri nati on is officially begun by tiie proctor. 

g. Students must keep s<arri nati on papers flat on tiie wri ting desk at all tirres. 

h. Students at an exarrination must be prepared to show current Unl versity identification. 

9. Eachfaculty rrerriaeristoretain, foronefull serrester after a course is ended, tiieshjdents final assessrrents intiie appropriate rredium If a faculty rrerrioer 
goes on I eave for a serrester or I onger, or I eaves the uni versi ty, tiie f i nal assessrrents and grade records for tiie course must be I eft wi tin the chai r, tiie di rector or tiie 
dean of the departrrent, non-departrrental i zed schod or cd I ege, as appropri ate 

ClaBEroomClimatiQ StHbanentcn 

TheUniversity of Maryland valuestiie diversity of its shjdent body and iscorrrritted to providing a cl assroom abrosphere that encourages tiie equitable participation 
of al I shjdents. Patterns of i nteracti on i n the cl assroom between tiie f acul ty rrerrioer and shxients and arrong the students tiiemsel ves may i nadvertentl y communi cate 
preconceptions about student ad I ities based on age, disability, eUinicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, ors©<ual orientation. These patiiems are due in part to 
tiie differences the students tiiemsel ves bring to tiled assroom C lassroom instructors should be particulariy sensitive to being equitable intiie opportunities they 
provideshjdents to answer quesbons in class, to conbibutetiieir own ideas, and to participate fully in projects in and outside of the classroom 

Of equal i mportance to equi ty i n tiie cl assroom i s tiie need to attend to potenti al da/al uati on of students tiiat can occur by reference to derreani ng stereotypes of any 
group and/or overt ooki ng tiie conbi bub ons of a parb cul ar group to ttie topi c under di scussi on. J oki ng at ttie s<pense of any group creates an i nhospi tabi e 
envi ronrrent and i s i nappropri ate M oreover, i n provi di ng a/al uab ons of sbjdents, i t i s essenb al that i nstruchars av/oi d di sharb ng ttiese a/al uati ons wi bi preconcei ved 
expectab ons about ttie i ntel I ecbjal capaci ti es of any group. 

It is the responsibility of individual faculty rrerriaers to ra/iewttieir classroom behav/iors, and ttiose of any teaching assistants they supervise, to ensure ttiat students 
are freated equi tabI y and not di scouraged or da/al ued based on thei r di ff erences. Resources for sel f-a/al uab on and frai ni ng for f acul ty rrerriaers on cl assroom 
cl i mate and i nteracti on patterns are avai I ad e from ttie Off i ce of H uman Rel ab ons. 

Transfier Credt 

For current University of i^laryland, College Park students 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



T he Officecf the Registrar posts all transfer credit that would be acceptable to any cf the degree programs at the University cf Maryland, CollegePark.Thedeanof 
the col I ege i n whi ch the student i s enrol I ed deterrri nes whi ch transfer credi ts are appi i cabi e to the students degree program I n general , credi t from academi c courses 
taken at i nsti tuti ons of hi gher educati on accredi ted by a regi onal accredi ti ng associ ati on wi 1 1 transfer, provi ded that the course i s cornpl eted wi th at I east a grade of C 
(2.0) and the course is similar in content and I a/el to work offered atCollege Park. Thetitieof courses accepted for transfer credit will be noted on the students 
record; howa/er, the grade will not. Grades from transferred courses are not included in the University of Maryland, College Park, grade point av/eragecalculation. 
Sffi chapter 1 for additional information. 

CotrsestakenatoUier inslitutionswhileatbendingtheUniversity of Maryland, College Park 

L Coursestaken at another institution may not be credited toward a degree without approval in advance by the dean of the college from which the student s<pects 

a degree. The sarre rul e appI i es to regi strati on i n the sunTre- program of another i nsti tuti on. Permss/on to £rro// /n /Anotfier / nsftt^^ 

officeofthestuderfs dean. This form must besubmitted and approved by thecdlegefor any course which will a/entual I y be added to the university transcript. 

Z Coursestaken at otlier University of Maryland I nstitutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of Maryland, College Park in Fall 1989 or later, all coursework taken at any University System of 
Maryland institution will be posted as transfer credit. For all students who attoxJed Maryland prior to Fall 1989, courses taken at another University of Maryland 
Board of Regents institution (UMBC, UMAB, UMES, UMUC) priortoFall 1989 will beincluded in thecumulativeGPA. Coursestaken at any other institution 
may not be credited toward a degree without advance approval . See M above for information. 

3. USM Concurrent I nter-l nstitutional Re^stration Pro-am 

University undergraduate students participating in the Concurrent I nter-l nstitutional Registration Program should obtain permission from their dean. Coursework 
counts as resident credit. Students participating in this program must be enrol led full ti rre in a degree programat University of Maryland, College Park, for the 
serrester i n whi ch these courses are taken. 

4, ConsortiianofUniversitiesoftlie Washington Metropolitan Area 

Courses taken through the Consorti um are consi dered to be resi dent credit. See above under Consorti um and the Regi strati on Gui de for i nformati on. 

Transfer Credit Center 

TheTransfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assistanceto students and transfer advisors More information is available in the section on Transfer 
Admission in chapter 1 and on the internet at www.tce.urrd.edu. 

Proficiency ExarrinatiGn Pro-ams (Crecft-by^Exarrv CLEP) 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers new, continuing, and retumi ng students sa/eral opportunities to earn col I ege credit by derrDnstratingachia/errent 
in a subjectfield through examination. College Park recognizestfiree proficiency examination programs for credit: Advanced Placerrent(AP), Departrrental 
Proficiency Examination Program (Credit-by-Exarrination), andCollege-La/el Examination Program (CLEP). Undergraduate students may earn a total of up to 
onahalf of the credits required for their degrffi through scarrination. Usually, this is no rrorethan 60 credits. Students are responsible for consul ting with the 
appropri ate dean or advi sor about the appI i cabi I i ty of any credi ts earned by exarri nati on to a speci f i c degree program Students shoul d al so seek assi stance i n 
deterrriningwhicHUniversity of Maryland, College Park courses duplicate credits earned for an exarri nati on. Studentswill not reoeivecreditfor both passing an 
eDcanination and oorrpleting an eqiivalent course 

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit For complete information about the applicability of AP examsand the assi gnrrent of credit, pi ease see chapter 1. 

Departmental Profidency Eiarrination (Credit-by-Exarrination) 

Col I ege Park Departrrental Proficiency Exarri nati ons, customarily referred to as credit-by-exarri nation, are comparable to comprehensive final s<arrinationsina 
course. A I though the mathemati cs and f orei gn-l anguage departrrents recei ve the rrost appI i cati ons for credi t by s<arri nati on, many departrrents will provi de 
exarri nati ons for certain of their courses. Initial inquiry as to whether an exarrination in a specific course is available is best madeattheacaderricdepartrrent which 
offers the course i n questi on. 

I f an exarri nati on for a course i s aval I abl e, the departrrent will provi de i nformati on regard ng ti rre and pi ace, type of s<arri nati on, and materi al whi ch rri ght be 
helpful in preparing for the exarri nati on. An undergraduate who passes a departrrental proficiency e<arrination is given credit and quality points tcward graduation 
i n the arrount regul arl y al I owed i n the course, provi ded such credi ts do not dupl i cate credi t obtai red by sorre other rreans. After maki ng arrangerrents wi th the 
departrrent, apply through the Division of Letters and Sciences, 1117 Hombake Li brary, 301-405-2793. 

Pdides goMEning creMfyasninstton: 

1. TheapplicantmustbefomiallyadrrittedtotheUniversity of Maryland, College Park. Posting of credit earned, howa/er, will be delayed until thestudentis 
registered. 

2. Departrrental Proficiency ExarrinationsmaynotbetakenforcoursesinwhichthestudenthasremainedregisteredattheUniversity of Maryland, CollegePark, 
beyond the Schedul e A dj ustrrent Peri od a/en wi th a transcri pt notati on of W . 

3. Departrrental Proficiency Exarrinationsmay notbeusedtochangegrades, includinglncompletesandWithdrawals. 

4. Application for credit-by-s<arrination is equivalent to registration for thecourse; hcwa/er, the foil owing conditions apply: 

a. A student may cancel the appli cati on at any ti rre prior to completion of the exarri nati on with no entry on higher permanent record. (Equivalent to the schedule 
adj ustrrent period.) 

b. Theinstructor makestheresults of thes<arrinationav/ailabletothestudentpriorto formal subrrissionof thegrade. Beforefinal subrrissionof the grade, the 
student may elect not to have this grade recorded. Inthiscase, amarkof W isrecorded. (Equivalentto the drop period.) 

c. No exarri nati on may be attempted rrorethan twice 

d. Theinstructorrnustcertifyonthereportcf theexarrination subrritted to theOfficeof the Registrar that copies of theexarri nation questions (or identifying 
i nformati on i n the case of standardi zed exarri nati ons) , and the students answers have been f i I ed wi th the chai r of the departrrent off eri ng the course. 

5. If accepted by the student (see 4b above), lettergradeseamedthroughcredit-by-exarrinationareenteredonthestudentstranscript, and are used in computing 
hi ^hercurrul ati ve grade point average. A student rray elect to takeacredit-by-exarrination Pass-Fail only if the credit fulfil Is an elective in the studerfs degree 
programNocollegE^ rnajor,fidd of concentration, or general education pro-am requirerrEntrnaybetal«en under tlie pass-fail option. PI ease refer to the 
Pass-Fail policy under the Records section in this chapter. 

College-L«el Exanination Pro-am (CLEP) 

TheCollege-La/el Exarrination Program (CLEP) recognizes collegala/el competence achia/ed outside the cd I ege classroom Two types of CLEP tests are 
avai I abl e General Exarri nati ons, which cover the content of a broad f i el d of study; and Subj ect Exarri nati ons, whi ch cover the speci f i c content of a col I ege course 
Credit can beeamed and will berecognizedb^ollegePark for sorreCLEP General or Subj ect Exarri nati ons, provi ded satisfactory scores are attained. Credits 
earned under C L E P are not consi dered resi dence credi t, but are treated as transfer credi t. C L E P exams are adrri ni stered at C L E P testi ng centers throughout the 
country. The University of Maryland, CollegePark isaCLEPTest Center (TestCenter Code 5814). Toobtainan application or additional information, contactthe 
CLEP Administrator in theCounseling Center, RoomOlOeA Shoemd<erHall, (301-314-7688), orwritetoCLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, NJ , 08541-6600. Students 
who want to earn credit through CLEP must request their official score reports to be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Adrri ssi on, Mitchell Building, University of 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235. (TheUniversity of Maryland, College Park, ScoreRecipientCodeis5814.) 
Pdidesgoverning CLEP are as follows: 

1. A studentmustmatriculateattheuniversltybeforeCLEPcreditsareofficially posted. Thepostingwill not be done until a student has established a record. 

2. Eachinstitutionof the University Systemof Maryland establishes standards for acceptanceofCLEP exemptions and credits. Students must checl< with the 
institution to which they will transfer to I earn if they will los^ maintain, or gain credit. 

3. College Park will award credi t for a CLEP examination 

a. provi ded the exarri nati on was bei ng accepted for credi t here on the date the student took the exarri nati on, and 

b. provi ded that the exarri nati on was not taken duri ng a students f i nal 30 credi ts. The f i nal 30 hours of credi t are to be taken i n resi dence, unl ess pri or approval has 
been granted by the students s dean. 

4. Creditwill iKtbegvenfor bathccirpletingaoou'seaivlpasanganesairinationaMeringsubslaiitiallytliesai^ 

5. F urthermDre, credi twill not be awarded f or C L E P s<arri nati ons i f the student has pra/i ousi y compi eted rrore advanced courses i n the sarre f i el d. 

6. CLEP exarri nations posted on transcripts from other institutions will be accepted if thes<arrination has been approved by College Park and the scores reported 
areequal to or higherthan those required by thisinstitution. If the transcript from the pri or institution does not carry the scores, itwill be the responsibility of the 
student to request Educational Testing Service to forward a copy of the official report to the Office of A drrissi ons. University awards credits for CLEP Exarrinations 
only as indicated on the chart provi ded in this chapter (if an exarri nati on is not listed, it is not accepted for credit at this institution). 

If you have questions about the appli cabin ty of specific credit to your prograrn consult the list provi ded in this catalog or contact your Dean's Office. 
College L»el Exairination Pro-am (CLEP) 









ExamTitle 


Score 


Related 
Cowse 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Nrtps 




General Exams 




Natural Science 1 


50 1 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 












Hurranities ^ 


^ , 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


















Social Science & 
Hisbory 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 






Subject Exams 




Bidogy 

Gen. Biology 


49 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receiveCLEPcreditinBiology and wish to takeadditional BIOL credit 
shouldenrallinBIOL105. 
















Chenistry 

Gen. Cherristry , 


50 

1 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receiveCLEPcreditinChemistry and wish to takeadditional CHEM credit 
should enroll in CHEM 131 AND 132. 
















Econonics 

Prin. Maco. 


57 


ECON 201 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ECON credits fulfill oneof twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
dppartrrent for placement, 301-405-3513 














Prin. Micro. 


54 


ECON 200 


3 


Yes 


Yes 














Financial Acdg 


1 
65 


BMGT220 


3 


Yes 


No 


Students who recei ve C L E P credi t i n A ccounti ng and wi sh to take addi ti onal account: ng 
credit should enroll inBMGT 221. 




3 
1 


Yes 

1 






GovernmBnt 

ArrtricanGovt. 


52 


GVPT 170 

J 


Yes 

1 


GVFT 170fulfillsoneof twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirerrents. Students 
should contact the departrrent for gateway applicability, 301-405-4136. 












67 


MATH 140 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


MATH 140 or 220 fulfills CORE-M ath & FohtbI Reasoning non-1 *requiremEnt; also 
fulfills CORE-Fundamentd Studies Math requirement. 

*FulfillsCORE-Fundamentd StudiesMath rpqiiirement. 


MdUicaiuUcs 

Calculu^Elem 
Functions 








^ 1 


Math 220 


3 


No 


Yes 












50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


* 














Sociology 

Intro. Sociology 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Soci ol ogy maj ors who recei ve credi t for thi s exam wi 1 1 be exempt from SOCY 100. Other 
studentswhowishtofulfill aCORE requirement are encouraged to enroll inSOCY 105 1 









Please Ncte 



iLL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) la/el. Any test not listed will not be accepted for credit at UMCP. Students may not receive credit both for 
CLEP courses and for equivalentUMCP courses or transfer courses (including Advanced Placerrent or International Baccalaureate). CLEP creditwill be 
deleted in such cases. Appli cable scores for a particular exam are those in effect when a student takes the exam ContactyourCollegeDeanif youhave 
questions 

> Certain CLEP tests may be ra/ised during 2008-09. Atthetirrethiscatalog was printed, information on the new versions of those tests was not aval I able 
Changes are possible in UMCP credit acceptance for ra/ised CLEP exams. Contact theTesting Office for up-to-date information, 301-314-7688. 

I Corrputer-based CLEP testing was implerrented during 2003 for selected tests at selected test venues. Scoring procedures may change. The scores above 
apply to computer based testing. Departrrentswill a/al uate any na/v tests and scoring procedures as they becorreav/ai I able. Sorre exams may be considered 
for credit on a case-by-case basis until ra/i aw is complete. Contact an advisor or theTransfer Credit Center (tccinfo@. urrd.edu) for further information. 
Students who have matriculated at UMCP are encouraged to speak to their advisor about departrrental orAdvanced Placerrent exams in addition to CLEP. 
All matri culated students must have perrrissi on of their college advisor to take CLEP tests. Students interested in taking MATH CLEP are encouraged to 
speak to the math advisor on carrpus, 301-405-4362. 



Graduation, Applications^ Commenoement Honors 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric RequretTBT^ andRegJai 



Graduation Applications 

Each candidatefor a degree or certificate must file a formal application witiitheOfficeoftiie Registrar. Thedeadlinefor application is tiieend of theschedule 
adj ustrrent peri od for tiie serrester i n whi ch tiie student pi ans to graduate, or at tiie end of tiie f i rst wsk of the second sunrrer sessi on for A ugust degrees. 

I n al I cases, graduati on appi i cati ons must be f i I ed at tiie begi nni ng of tiie students f i nal serrester before recei vi ng a degree. The graduati on appi i cati ons are 
availableontiieintemetatwww.rry.urrd.edu or attheRegistrar'sOffice, IstflootMitchell Building. 

Conrnencement Honors 

Summacumlaude, magna cum I aude and cumlaudearethehighest comrrencerrent honors tiiat the University bestows for sustained excellence in scholarship. They 
are awarded to the top 10% of al I students graduati ng i n each col I ege over the course of a year. Summa cum I aude i s awarded to students wi tin a G PA equal to tiie 
hi ghest two percent of al I cd I ege graduates over tiie past tiiree terms, magna cum I aude to tiie next hi ghest tiiree percent, and cum I aude to tiie f ol I owl ng f i ve 
percent To be eligible for tills recognition, at I east 60 serrester hours rrust be earned at tiie university or at a program in which credit earned is counted as University 
of Maryland, College Park, resident credit (contact tiieOfficeoftiie Registrar to determine programeligibility). N o rroretiian 6 credits taken pas^f ail or 
satisfactory/fail shall count toward tiie 60-hour mini mum Nostudentwitiiagrade-pointaverageof less tiian 3.3 will be considered for a comrrencerrent honor. 
B ecause grades for a term general I y are off i ci al I y recorded after tiie terrrts graduati on day, computati on of tiie students G PA wi 1 1 not i ncl ude grades for courses 
taken duringtiie students final serrester at tiie university. Howa/er, tiie hours taken during tiiat serrester will apply toward tiie 60-hour requirerrent 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

Organized in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is tiie oldest and rrost widely respected academic honorary society in tiie United States. I nvitation to rrembership is based on 
outstandi ngscholasticachia/errent in studies of tiie liberal arts and sciences. Student rrembers are chosen end rely on tiie basis of academic excellence; neitiier 
extracurricularleadershipnorservicetotiiecommjnity isconsidered. Election is held twice a year, once intiie fall and once i n tiie spri ng serrester. 

The process for election to Phi Beta K appa involves a ra/iawinNoverrberf or tiiose who graduated tiiepra/ious August or those who will graduate in December, 
andara/iaw InMarchforthosegraduatinginMay. A numberof qualify! ng juniors are also considered during the sarre serrester. The ra/iaw is conducted by a 
sel ect comrri ttee of f acul ty rrerrbers representi ng tiie human! ti es, soci al sci ences, and natural sc! ences. T he comrri ttee ra/i aws transcri pts of al I j uni ors and sen! ors 
with qual ifyi ng grade poi nt averages. Whetiier a student qual if! es for rrembershi p i n Phi Beta Kappa depends on tiie qual ity, deptii, and breadtii of tiie students 
record in liberal education courses. The final decisionforelectionrestswitiitiieresidentfaculty rrembersof Phi Beta Kappa. There is no application procedure for 
election to Phi Beta Kappa (see* belcw for possible exception). 

Requirerrentsfor consideration of rrembership in Phi Beta Kappa at the University of Maryland,CollegePark, campus chapter include 

1. Grade Point Average For sen! ors a grade point average of at I east 3. 5 overall as well asinall liberal arts and sciences courses taken. Forjuniorstiie minimum 
grade poi nt average i s 3. 75, and poesi bl y hi gher depend! ng on tiie number of candi dates i n a parti cul ar year. 

2. Residence: At least 60 credit hours must betaken at tiie University of Maryland, College Park. 

3. Liberal Courses: For seniors, at I east 90 credit hours in courses intiie I iba^l arts and sci ences (where liberal courses are to be distinguished from professional 
or technical courses), atleast45of which must be taken at tiie University of Maryland, College Park. For juniors, at I east 75 total credit Fours must be completed, 
atleast60of which are in courses in tiie liberal arts and sciences; of tiiese, at I east 45 must be taken at tiie University of Maryland, College Park. Students would 
ordinarily be majors in one of the programs in tiie liberal arts and sci ences. Hcwa/er, students witii the requi site nurrber of liberal credit hourscan be admitted if 
tiieyhav/e completed at least 5 courses (15 credit hours or rrore) for seniors or tiiree courses (9 credit hours or rrore) forjuniors in a single liberal arts and sciences 
departrrent/program at U M C P. 

4. Required coirses: One serrester of matiierratics, whichmustbefulfilledbycdlege-la/el credi t hours ( including A P credit), andtwocollegeserrestersof a 

f orei gn I anguage at tiie el errentary I a/el , or above. T he I anguage requi rerrent may al so be sati sf i ed by compi eti on of four years of one I anguage otiier tiian E ngl i sh 
at tiie high school la/el or above, or tiie equivalent. Students with suchaforeign language background who wish to beconsidered for admission to Phi BetaKappa 
should notify tiie Phi BetaKappa officeinwriting and providetiieappropriatedocurrentation (such asahigh school transcript) prior to tJierronth of consideration. 
Credit is not allowed based on SAT scores. 

5. Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi B eta Kapparrust contain at I east tiirffi liberal arts and sci ences courses (9 credit hours or rrore) ineachofthe 
tiiree f ol I owl ng areas: a) arts and human! ti es, b) behav! oral and soci al sci ences, c) natural sci ences and matiierrati cs ( i ncl udi ng a I aboratory sci ence course; till s 
requi rerrent cannot befulfi I led by A P credit). All tiiecoursesinatleasttwoof the three requi red areas must be completed at UMCP and in tiie remaining area no 
rrore tiian one AP course can be used to fulfil I the requi rerrent In general. Phi Beta Kappa will accept theCORE classification of courses but courses which CORE 
desi gnates as havi ng rrore tiian one cl assi f i cati on may not sati sfy any Phi B eta K appa di stri but! on requi rerrent. Students wi th rrore chal I engi ng courses and 
rrocleratel y hi gh grade pd nt averages are preferred by tiie comrri ttee to tiiose wi tii hi gher grade poi nt averages but a narrow range of courses. 

Minimal qual ifications in rrore tiian one area may preclude election to Phi BetaKappa. Meetingtiie above requi rerrents does not guarantee election to Phi Beta 
Kappa. Thejudgrrent of tiie resident faculty rrernbers of Phi Beta Kappa on tiie quality, depth, and breadth of tiie students record istiie dec! ding factor in a/ery 
case Any questions about criteria for election to Phi Beta K appa (i ncl udi ngequivalencyexarri nations in foreign languages) should be directed to tiie Phi Beta 
Kappa Office Dr. DenisSullivai, 301-405-8986. 

Academic I ntie^ity 

TheUniversity of Maryland is an acaderric community. Itsfundarrental purpose istiie pursuit of knowledge. Likeall other communi ti es, tiie University can function 
properlyonly if its rrembers adhere to clearly establislied goal sand values. Essential totiiefundarrental purposeof the University is tiie comrri trrent to tiie 
pri ncl pies of trutii and acaderric honesty. Accordingly, tiie CocfeoMcaQfemc/ntegrit/ is designed to ensure tiiattiie principle of acaderric honesty is upheld. While 
all rrarters of tiie University sharetiiis responsibility, tiieCocfeoMcac^mc/nteg/'/^is designed so tiiat special responsiiii I ity for upholding the principle of 
acaderri c honesty I i es wi tii tfie students. 

The University's CocfeoMcaobrric/ntegrityis a nationally recognized honor code, adrrinisteredbyaStudentHonorCouncil. Any of tiie foil owing acts, when 
comrri tted by a student, shall constitute acaderric dishonffity: 

C heati ng: / ntsntionally using or attEirpting to use unauthorizBd iralsrials, inforrmtion, or study aids in any acaderric exercise. 

Fabrication: IntEndonal and unauthorized falsification or indention ofanyinfbrrration or citation in an acaderric exercise. 

Facilitating acaderric dishonesty: IntEntionallyor l<ro\Mrgiyhe)png or atlErrpting to tielp another Id vioiats any provision oftheCode of Acaderric Integrity, 

Pla^arism IriBntionailyor knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as on^s own in any acaderric e>srcix. 

If it is deterrri red tiiat an act of acaderric dishonesty has occurred, agradeof XF isconsideredtiie normal sancti on for undergraduate students. The grade of XF is 
noted on tiie acaderri c transcri pt as f al I ure due to acaderri c di shonesty . L esser or rrore sa/ere sancti ons may be i mposed when tiiere are ci rcumstances to warrant 
such consideration. Suspension or expulsion from tiie University may be imposed a/en for a first offense. 

Students shoul d consul t tiie Code of Acaderric Integrity, at http://www . presi dent urrd.edu/pol i ci e^i i i 100a. htrri for f urtiier i nf ormati on regard! ng procedures for 
report! ng and resol v! ng al I egati ons of acaderri c di sfionesty. 



Regdrdicn AcadETricReqirerret^ andRegjai 



Hcncr Pledge 

I n 2002, the U ni versi ty adopted an honor pi edge i n whi ch students are asked to wri te out and si gn the pi edge on maj or assi gnrrents and exams, as desi gnated by the 
instructor. The Honor Pledge is designed to encourage instructors and students to reflect upon the University's core institutional value of academic integrity. 
Professors who invitestudents to sign the Honor Plalgesignify that there is an ethical componenttoteaching and learning. Student who write by hand and sign the 
PI edge aff I rm a sense of pri de I n the I ntegri ty of thei r work. The PI edge states: 

"/ pledgeonrry honor that I ha\/erotgi\^norreca\^anyurButhori2BdassistarceontNsa^gnnTntye)^rhnation.'' 

Fornr)reirifonrBttonregai^rigtheCodeafAcaf^niclrilE^Tty,theHonorPledgEior1heS1^ 
IheOfHcecfSbKbitConduct 

Theprirrary purpose for thei npositi on of disci pi I ne in the university setting is to protect the carnpusconrrunity. Consistent with that purpose, reasonable efforts are 
also made to foster the personal and social da/eloprrentof those students who are held accountable for violations of university regulations. Compared to disciplinary 
systems at many uni versi ti es, U ni versi ty of M aryl and students are gi ven unusual authori ty and responsi bi 1 1 ty for managerrent of the campus process. M embershi p 
on the student j udi ci ary I s an extraordi nary educati onal experi ence, and opportuni ty to be of servi ce to the communi ty, and a personal honor. 

Cases that may resul 1 1 n suspensi on or expul si on are heard by conduct boards, compri sed end rel y of students. I n such cases, students are accorded substanti al 
procedural protect: ons, I ncl udi ng an opportuni ty for a heari ng and an appeal . L ess seri ous cases are resol ved I n di sci pi I nary conferences conducted by U ni vers ty 
staff rrembers. A cts of vi d ence ( I ncl udi ng any sexual assaul t) , I nti mi dati on, di srupti on, or ri oti ng; substanti al theft or vandal I srn fraud or forgery; use or 
di stri but] on of 1 1 1 egal drugs; and artfode of Student Conducts d ati on mati vated by consi derati ons of sex, race, ethni c ori gi n, sexual ori entati on or rel I gi on are forms 
of mi sconduct that rrost f requenti y resul 1 1 n di srni ssal from the U ni versi ty. Students accused of vi d ati ng U ni versi ty di sci pi I nary regul ati ons are encouraged to 
di scuss the al I egati ons wi th thei r parents or guardi ans, I egal counsel , and wi th appropri ate U ni versi ty staff rrembers. 

Prohibited Conduct 

A compi ete 1 1 St of conduct consi dered prohi bi ted ^ wel I procedures for resd vi ng al I egati ons of rri sconduct may be found I n the Code of Student Conduct aval I abl e 
in Appendix C in Chapter 10 or through theOfficeof Student Conduct websiteat www.studentconduct.urrd.edu. Thefdicwing is general notice of what constitutes 
prohi bi ted conduct and I s subj ect to di sci pi I nary act] on: 

• Us^ possession or storage of any weapon 

• Causi ng physi cal harm or apprehensi on of harm 

• Initiating or causing to be initiated a false report, warning or threat of fire, explosionorothererrergency 

• A cri rri nal offense comrritted off-campus 

• Violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction 

• M I susi ng or darragi ng f I re safety equi prrent 

• Distributionorpossessionforpurposesof distribution of any illegal drug 

• Furnishing false information to the University 

• M aki ng, possessi ng, or usi ng any forged, al tered, or f al si f I ed I nstrurrent of I denti f I cati on 

• I nterf eri ng wi th the freedom of expressi on of others 

• Theftof property or of services; possessi on of std en property 

• Destrqyi ng or damagi ng the property of others 

• E ngagi ng I n di sorderl y or di srupti ve conduct 

• Failure to comply with the directions of University officials 

• Useorpossessionof any illegal drug 

• Useorpossessionof f I ra/vorks on Uni versi typrerrises 

• Violationof published University regulations or pdicies including the residence hall contract, alcohol policy, parking regulations, rioting, hazing policy, and 
sexual assault. 

IMote Effective A pri I 2006, students who viol ate the foil owing section will be disrrissed from the University: 

Rioting, assault thefts vandaiisrr) fire-setting, or ottier serious rriscondjct rdatBd to a University-sfxnsored SMent occurring on- or off-carrpus, that 
results in harmto persons or property or otherwise poses a threat Id thie stability of ttie carrpus or carrpuscomrurityrrBy result in disciplinary action 
regardless of the existence, status, or outcorre ofarycrirrinal charts in a court of I aw related to rri sconduct associated with a Unversity-sponsored 
e^/ent 

Far rrore information regarding student conduct issues, contact the Office of Student Conduct at 301-314-8204 orvisitwww.stuclentconduct.urrd.edu. 

DisnisEal of Delinquent Students 

T he U ni versi ty reserves the ri ght to request at any ti rre the wi thdrawal of a student who cannot or does not mai ntai n the requi red standard of schd arshi p, or whose 
conti nuance I n the uni versi ty woul d be detri rrental to hi s or her heal th, or the heal th of others, or whose conduct I s not sati dfactory to the authori ti es of the 
U ni versi ty . A ddi ti onal I nf ormati on about the di srri ssal of del I nquent students may be found I n th Cocfe of Student Conduct . 

Summary of Pd I d es and Regul ati ens Pertai ni ng to Studaits 

Note: Descriptions of these pdicies are for general information only. Ple^e refer to specific texts for official language. Modifi cati ons may be made or other pdicies 
may be added throughout the year. Pleasecontact theOfficeof StudentConduct for additional information. 

In addition to the pdicies reprinted or identifledelsa/vhere (eg., VneCodeofStudentConductendCodeofAcaderriclrTtEgrity), students enrol led at Cd lege Park are 
expected to be aware of, and to abl de by, the pd I ci es sumrrari zed bel cw. I nformati on about where the compI ete texts may be consul ted fd I cws each summary. Thi s 
I nformati on was compi I ed and provi ded by the Off I ce of Student Conduct. 

Alcolxilic Be«rage Policy and Procedures forbid unauthorized possession, use, or distribution of alcoholic ba/erages on university property. Certain exceptions 
arespecified. ( I nforrrHti on subj ect to change pending legislation. Originally approved by theBoard of Regents, Septerriaer 26, 1969. Legal drinking age in the State 
oM a^land is 21 years. Repri nted I n Student Handbook.) 

PdicyonArr|JifyingEquipnBntrestrictsthehoursandlocationsofuseof certain forrns of sound arrplifyingequiprrEnt, provides a procedure for the 

authori zati on of ottierwi se restri cted uses of sound ampi I fyi ng equi prrent, and I ocates responsi bi 1 1 ty f or corrpi al nts wi th those usi ng the equi prrent. (A dopted by the 

U ni versi ty Senate, J une 2, 1970. Repri nted I n the Student H andbcDok. ) 

CarrpusActivitiesPoliciesregulatereservation of university facilities, advertising, co-sponsorship, cancellationandpostponerrent, and various other matters 
rel ati ng to programs of student organizations. (Published in the Event M anagerrent Handbook. For mare I nformati on, contact the Campus Reservations Office.) 



RegSraicn, Acaclaric Rec|ur6frBT5 andRegJai 



Cotr^xitier UsePolicy defines standarcls for reasorebleard acceptable useofUniveratyconputer resources, including electronic mail. 

Policy on Demonstrations establishes guidelines for demDnstrations and picketing. Stipulates that: the university will take steps necessary both to protect the right of 
i ndi vi dual s or groups to demonstrate and to protect the f rffidom of speech, asserrbl y, and rroverrent of any i ndi vi dual or group. (A dopted by the U ni versi ty Senate, 
J une 2, 1970. Reprinted in the Student Handbook.) 

Exani nation RiJes set general standards for student conduct duri ng exarri nati ons. They are appi i cabi e to al I exspri nati ons gi ven at the Col I ege Par1< campus unl ess 
contrary instructions are provided by thefacultyrrember administering theexami nation. (Printed on rrcst university exarri nati on books See also chapter 4.) 

Policy on hHazing and Statement on hHazing prohibits hazing, which is defined as intentionally or recklessly subjecting any person to the risk of bodily harrn or 
sa/ere erroti onal di stress, or causi ng or encouragi ng any person to comrri t an act that woul d be a vi ol ati on of I aw or uni versi ty regul ati ons, for the purpose of 
i ni ti ati ng, prorroti ng, f osteri ng, or conf i rrri ng any form of aff i I i ati on wi th a student group or organi zati on, as def i ned by theCocfe of Student Conduct T he express or 
implied consent of the victim will not be a drfense For rroreinformation, contact theOfficeof Student Conduct. 

CampusParldngRegiJationscover registration, perrrits, fees, violations, enforcerrent, fines, towing and irrpounding, ra/ie/vs, carpool programs, special a/ents 
parking, errergency parking, and a number of other areas. Notably, the regul ati ons provide that "theresponsibility of finding an authorized parking space rests with 
thedriver." Students who have 55 or fewer credits and live in the "GrahamCrackerCorrplex" cannot register for a parkingperrrit (Current regulations in effect 
sincejuly, 1997. An informational guide is distributed to all who register for parking. For rroreinformation, contact the Dejsartrrent of Transportation Services.) 

Policy Pertaining to Public Displays defi nes standards for perrrissi ble displays, objects or structures not designed to be continuously carried or held by a 
derronstrator or pi cketer so as si mul taneousi y to protect freedom of expressi on and pra/ent unreasonaW e threats to the heal th, safety, securi ty, or rri ssi on of the 
campus (Approved by the President, March 29, 1989. For rroreinformation, contact theOfficeof theVice President for StudentAffairs.) 

Residence Hall Rules define prohibited conduct in and around campus residence and dining halls, buildings, and at Departrrent of Resident Life and/or Departrrent 
of Dining Services-sponsored activities, i n addition to that which falls under the ResiderceHall^Dining Services AgreerreTt,Ccafe of SfrxfentConcijct, and federal, 
stateand local lawsThe rules also specify standard sanctions for ruleviolations, and provide for an adjudication process. (Reprinted in Co/T7nyn/t//./wn5(,tiie 
Residence Hal I sand Dining Services Handbook. For rrore information, contact tiie Departrrent of Resident Life) 

SacualAssaiit Policy offers advice and guidance for corrplainants, i ncl uding assistance infi I ingcri rri nal complaints. Defines and sets penalties for sexual assault 
Specifies tiTat[s]exual assault is a serious off enseandthestandard sanction for any s©<ual assault, including acquaintance rape, isexpulsion. 

Student Organization Registration Giidelines define student organizations, responsibilities of officers, and registration, and establish types of regisb^ on, a 
regi sb^ on process, certai n pri vi I eges of regi stered shjdent organi zati ons i n good standi ng, sancti ons which may resul t from regi sb^ on ra/i a/v, and gui del i nes for 
consti tuti ons. ( F or rrore i nf ormati on, or for a copy of tiie gui del i nes, contact tiie Off i ce of C ampus Programs. ) 

Declaration of Student Ri^its Defines certain rights, including expressi on and inquiry, asserrbly, tiiought, conscience, and religion, privacy, due process, and 
equal protection. Affirms "duties and responsibilities" arising from such rights. 



General Education Requirement5 (CORE) Pagel06 



General Education Requiremerrts (CORE) 

CORE Liberal Artsand Sciences Studies Pro^-am 

General Education Pro-am and Requirements 

Of f i ce of the A ssoci ate Provost for A cademi c Affai rs and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

2130 Mitchell Building, 301-405-9359 

Di rector CORE PI anni ng and I mpl ementati on: L aura SI a^i n 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core 

/ n our world of rapid econorric, social, and technological change; sbudents need a strong and broadly based education. 
General education helps students achi&/e the intellectual integration and awareness the/ need to /TBet challenges in 
their personal, social, political, and professional lives. General education courses introduce the great ideas and 
controversies in hurran thought and experience A sol id general education provides a strong foundation for tiie 
life-long learning ttiat rrakes career-change goals attainable The breadth, perspective and rigor provided by ttye 
CORE curriculum helps Maryland graduates become "educated people." 

Donna B. Hamilton 

A ssoci ate Pro/ost and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

BROAD OUTCOME GOALS FOR THE CORE CURRICULUM 
[Approved Otbcber 6, 2005 liy theUniversity SenateCORE Comrittee] 

After compi dti on of CORE Program requi rements students shoul d be abl eto: 

1. demonstrate understandi ng of maj or f i ndi ngs and i deas i n a vari ety of di sci pi i nes beyond the maj or; 

2. demonstrate understandi ng of mdthods, ski 1 1 s, tool s and systems used i n a vari ety of di sci pi i nes, and 

hi stori cal , theordti cal , sci enti f i c, technol ogi cal , phi I osophi cal , and ebii cal bases i n a vari ety of di sci pi i nes; 

3. use appropri ate technol ogi es to conduct research on and communi cate about topi cs and questi ons and to 
access, e/aj uate and manage i nformati on to prepare and present Vna r work effectively to medt academi c, 
personal, and professional needs; 

4. demonstrate cri ti cal anal ysi s of arguments and e/al uati on of an argument's maj or asserti ons; i ts 
background assumpti ons, the e/i dence used to support i ts asserti ons, and i ts expl anatory uti I i ty ; 

5. understand and arti cul ate the i mportance and i nf I uence of di versi ty wi thi n and among cul tures and 
societies; 

6. understand and apply mathematical concepts and models; and 

7. communi cate effectively, through written and oral communi cati on and through other forms as 
appropriate 

N ote To vi ew L earni ng Outcome Goal s for each of the COR E categori es, pi ease vi si t: 
www. ugst. umd. edu/core^L earni ngOutcome htm 

To obtain a CORE Academic Planner and Record Keeper, visit your col lege advising office or the Office of 
U ndergraduate Studi es (2130 M i tchel I B ui I di ng) . 

Who Conpletes CORE ? 

To earn a baccal aureate degree al I students at the U ni versity of M aryl and. Col I ege Park compI dte both a maj or course 
of study and a campus- wi de general educati on program Students who enter the U ni versity M ay 1990 and after 
complete CORE requirements. 

Exceptions Students who enter the U ni versity with ni ne or more credits earned before M ay 1990 from the U ni versity 
of M aryl and. Col I ege Park, or any other col I ege may compI de thei r general educati on requi rements under tine 
University Studies Program (USP), subjectto certain limitations. (See"USP" and "Statute of Limitations" sections 
below.) Advanced Placement (AP) and otlier examination- based credits do not count in tliese determinations. 



General Education Requirement5 (CORE) Pagelff? 



University Studies Pro-am (USP) 

F or detai I ed i nf ormati on about USP requi rements, see undergraduate catal ogs dated 1992 or earl I er, or contact the 
CORE program at 2130 Mitchell Building, 301-405-9359. Information on USP isalsoat: 

www. ugst.umd.edu/corQ^moreinfo/usp. html. NOTE: Students who graduate under USP requi rements August 1994 and 
thereafter must f ulf i 1 1 the Advanced Studi es requi rements descri bed i n the Pal I 1994 and subsequent catal ogs. (See 
CORE Advanced Studies section.) 

StatuteoF Linfitationsfor Pre/ious General Education Pro-ams (GEP, GUR, USP) 

U ndergraduate students who rdturn to the uni versi ty after A ugust 1987 no I onger have the opti on of compi dti ng general 
education requi rements under the older General Education Program (GEP) ortheGeneral University Requirements 
(GUR). Thereafter, f ol I owi ng any substantive change i n general educati on requi rements (I i ke the change i n Pal I 1990 
from U SP to CORE ), undergraduate students rdturni ng or transferri ng to Col I ege Park after a separati on of five 
conti nuous years must f ol I ow the requi rements i n effect at the ti me of re-entry. A n excepti on ma/ be granted to those 
students who at the ti me of separati on had compI dted 60 percent of the general educati on requi rements then i n effect. 

JNIaryland PiMic Community College Students 

Por the purpose of determi ni ng whi ch general educati on program i s requi red (CORE or U SP), students transferri ng to 
the University of M aryland from M aryland public community colleges shall be treated as if their registration dates 
were concurrent with enrol I merit at this university. 

CORE Pro^'am Components 

L FUNDAMEISTTAL STUDIES build competence and confidence in basic writing and mathematics. M astery of these 
basi cs enhances success both duri ng and after col I ege. Students begi n f ul f i 1 1 i ng P undamental Studi es requi rements i n 
thei r f i rst year at the U ni versi ty . www. ugst. umd. edu/core^el ement^P undaSt. html 

ZDISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES focus on breadth, including courses in the following categories: Literature; The 
History or Theory of the Arts; Humanities; Physical Sciences; LifeSciences; Mathematics and Pormal Reasoning; 
Social or Political History; Behavioral and Social Sciences; and Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues. Students 
general I y pursue D i stri buti ve Studi es i n the f i rst two years of thei r course work, 
www. ugst. umd. edu/core^el ement^D i strSt. html 

3. ADVA NCEDSTUDIESallow students to enhance thei r degree and strengthen thei r cri ti cal thi nki ng and wri ti ng 
ski 1 1 s by taki ng two upper- 1 e/el courses outsi de thei r maj or after 60 credi ts Students may substi tute an approved 
CORE Capstone course in their major or a senior or honors thesis for one of these two 

courses, www. ugst. umd. edu/core^el ement^A dvanSt. html 

4. HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY gives students the opportunity to examine their ideas and values in the light 
of various cultural, intellectual, and social contexts Diversity courses increase knowledge of what constitutes 

di ff erence and i ncrease studentsf abi I i ty to I earn from and appreci ate peopi e, cul tures, i deas, and art forms that are often 
di ff erent from those they know best. Students may compI ete the C ul tural D i versi ty requi rement at any ti me before 
graduati on. www. ugst. umd. edu/core^el ement^D i versi ty . html 

CORE Pro^-am Outline 

(Requirements Outline: vuvuw.u^iind^u/corQ^core_req.html) 

I MPORTAISTT NOTES ^xxit Findanental and Distributive Studies axrses: 

• MUST be selected from the approved CORE course lists to count toward CORE requirements. At 
www. ugst. umd. edu^corei cl i ck on What are Ihe CORE Caused for I i nks to the current I i sts of approved 
courses in each CORE category. 

• M A Y al so be used to sati sfy col I ege, maj or, and^or supporti ng area requi rements i f the courses al so appear on 
CORE Pundamental or Distributive Studies lists. 

• CORE courses MAY NOT betaken on a Pass- Pail basis 



General Education Requirements (CORE) PagelOS 



I . CORE Findanent^ Studies 

Three Courses (9 credits) Requi red 

L One course in I ntroduction to Writing (Must beaUatplBcl within the first 30 credits; must be passed within 
the fi rst 60 credits.) See www. engi i sh. umd. edu/i ndex. php?opti on=com_content&task^/i ew& i d=503& I tern! d=494 

Appro/ed CORE I ntroduction to Writing Courses: Sel ect appropri ate course based on requi rements 
listed. 

ENGL 101 1 ntroduction to Writing 

ENGL lOlA I ntroduction to Writing (M ust betaken if student hasTSWE (SAT verbal subtest) score 

below 33) 

ENGL lOlH I ntroduction to Writing (Honors Students) 

ENGL lOlX I ntroduction to Writing (Students for whom English isasecond language may registerfor 

ENGL lOlX instead of ENGL 101.) 

Note Based on scores from either tiie TOEFL or MEI P, students nray be required to corrpl&e a program 
of English language Irstrucdon for non-native speakers through the MEI b^ore bang allowed to register 
for ENGL lOlX. 

Exemptions fi'om I rrtroduction to Writing requiremenb 

• AP English Language and Composition test score of 4 or 5, OR 

• SAT verbal score 670 or above for scores achi e/ed bdtween M a/ 1995 and F ebruary 2005. ( I n A pri I 
1995, the Educati onal Testi ng Servi ce re centered the scores on tine SAT. Students whose test scores 
are from before A pri I 1995 must have recei ved a score of 600 or above to be exempt from F reshman 
Wri ti ng. Thi s recenteri ng does not ref I ect a rai si ng of the requi rement for exempti on, but a change 

i n the scori ng system used by ETS. 

• I n M arch 2005, ETS began the use of a new SAT test for writi ng. I nformati on about exempti on i n 
connecti on with SAT tests taken after M arch 2005 wi 1 1 be a^ai I abl e at 

www.engi i sh. umd. edu/i ndex. php?opti on=com_content&task=bl ogcategory& i d=144& I temi d=452 

Z One course in |N1atiTenrHtics(|N1ust beaUEiiyted within thefirstSOcredits; must be passed within thefirst GO 
credits.) Seewww.u^iiTid.edu/core^courseE/Findamental/FindaSt-math.html 

Appro/edCORE Findamental Studies JNIathematicsCoirses: 

MATH 110 E I ementay Mathematical Models; OR 
MATH 112 CollegeAlgebra with Applications andTrigonometry; OR 
MATH 113 CollegeAlgebra with Applications; OR 
MATH 115 Precd cuius; OR 
Any 100-or 200-lB/el MATH or STAT course except MATH 199, 210, 211, 212,213, 214, aid 274. 

Exemptions fi'om JNIathematics reqiiremenb 

• SAT M ath score of 600 or above OR 

• AP score of 4 or above in Calculus AB orBC; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above in Statistics; OR 

• C L E P Cal cul us Exam score of 50 or hi gher. 

Note t f you are placed In the Da/elopmental Math Program by the Matherratics Placement E)0m you 
may be offered the opportunity to combine your Da/dopmental course with the appropriate subsequent 
course of MATH 110, 111, 113, or 115 and thus finish both I none semester. For further Information, 
please see the Da/dopmental Math Program web site 
www. rrath. umd. edu/undergraduat^courses/fsm sttri 

3. One course in Professional Writing (taken after GO credits). See 
www.u^.iiTid.edu/core^courseE/F indamental/F inda-St-professional .html 

Approved CORE Profesaonai Writing Courses: Sel ect the appropri ate course based on requi rements or 



General Education Requirements (CORE) Pagel09 

interests listed 

ENGL 390 Science Writing 

ENGL 391 Advanced Composition 

ENGL 392 Legd Writing 

ENGL 393Technicd Writing 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 

ENGL 395 Writing for He^tli Professions 

ENGL 398 Topics in Professional Writing 

Suffixed versions of the above course numbers also fulfil I theCORE Professional Writing requirement. 

Exemption from Professional Writing Requiremenb 

.Gradeof"A"inENGL 101 (NOT ENGL lOlAorENGL lOlX), except for students mooring in 
E ngi neeri ng. A 1 1 E ngi neeri ng maj ors must take ENGL 393. 

Note No exenpion from tiie Professional Writing re:iui revet will be grante:! for achie/enet on SAT 
v&bal exam Professional Writing courses cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements. 

II. CORE Disb-ibutive Studies 

N i ne Courses (28 credits) Requi red 

See the most current I i sti ngs of approved CORE courses at www. ugst. umd.edu/corQ or tine onl i ne Schedul e of CI asses 
at www.testudo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.htmi 

L HimanitiesandtheArts-ttreecourses required: 

• One course fromLiterature(HL) list: www. ugst. umd.edu/core^course^Distributiv^HL. html, and 

• One course from The H i story or Theory of tine A rts ( H A ) I i st: 
www. ugst. umd. edu/core^course^D i stri buti ve^H i storyC o. html and 

• One more course from Literature(HL), OR The Hi story or Theory of tine Arts (HA), OR Humanities (HO) lists. 
HO List: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/course^Di stri buti VQ^H umanitiesCo.html 

Note There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the Humanities (HO) list. 

2. The Sciences and Mattiematics- threecourses reqiired: 

• U p to two courses from Physi cal Sci ences (PL/PS) I i sts 

PL List: www.ugst.umd.edu/corQ^course^DistributivQ^PhysicalLabCo.html 

PS List: www. ugst. umd. edu/core^course^Di stri buti vQ^Physi cal Courses, html and 

• Uptotwo courses from Life Sciences (LL/LS) lists 

LL List: www. ugst. umd. edu/cor^course^Di stri buti VQ^L ifeLabCo.htm 
LS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/corQ^course^Distributiv^LifeCo.html and 

• Up to one course from Mafriematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) list 

MS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/corQ^course^Distributive^M athCo.html 

Notes: At least one science course MUST include or be accorrpanied by a lab taken in tiie same semester 
(L L or PL lists only) . More tiian one lab course rray be taken. Courses rrust be taken from at least two of 
the three lists. There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the Matiierratics and Forrral 
Reasoning (MS) list. At least fvw life and/or physical science courses rrust be taken (PL, PS, LL, andLS 
lists) . The third Sciences and Matiierratics course rray be another science selection or rray be chosen from 
the Mathematics and Forrral Reasoning (MS) course lists. 

3. Sodal Sciences and History-three courses reqiired: 

• One course from Social or Political History (SH) list 

SH List: www. ugst. umd. edu/core^course^Di stri buti vQ^Social Co. html and 



General Education Requirement5 (CORE) PagellO 



• Two courses from B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences (SB ) 11 st 

SB List: www.ugst.umcl.GclLi/corQ^course^DistribiJ:ivQ^BehavCo.htn1 

4.lnterdisciplinaryandEmergnglS5ues(CORE CODE: IE) 

OPTIONAL CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES CATEGORY EFFECTIVE BEGINNING FALL 
2005 

The IE category features courses that provide an interdisciplinary &^nri nation of issues (theory, quesdors, 
nWxds) across CORE areas or present a significant portion of content that does not fit into any of the 
specific CORE areas but deals with conterrporary issues emerging disciplines, or otiier categories of 
knowledge, skills and values that lie outside tiiese areas 

Studerts ma/ take one I E course I n pi ace of one of the f ol I owl ng: 

• Thethi rdcourseintheHumanities and theArts category (oneHL and one HA must betaken) OR 

• The thi rd course I n the Sci ences and M athemati cs category (two sci ence courses chosen from PL , PS, L L , or L S 
I i sts including at I east one course from the LL or PL lists must be taken) OR 

• One SB course i n the Soci al Sci ences category (one SH and one SB must be taken) 

See the COR E websi te at www. ugst. umd. edu/core for detai I s on how to use the I E opti on. 
IMPORTANT NOTES ON THE IE OPTION 

• IE is an optional CORE distributive studies category; Students may fulfil I CORE requirements without taking an 
I E course 

• Only one I E course may be counted toward f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Di stri butive Studi es requi rements. 

• Whdther a student takes an IE course or not, total CORE Distributive Studies course and credit requi rements 
remai n the same at I east 9 courses and 28 credits. 

I E L i St: www. ugst. umd. edu/cor^course^D i stri buti vq^I E . html 

III. CORE Advaiced Studies 

Two Courses (6 credits) Requi red 

Students may choose thei r two A dvanced Studi es courses from a wi de range of upper- 1 e/el off er i ngs outsi de the r 
maj ors. Good choi ces i ncl ude courses that mesh wi th or expand educati onal goal s or other i nterests, i ncrease 
knowl edge and strengthen criti cal thi nki ng and writi ng ski 1 1 s. 

CORE Advanced Studies Requirement: Two upper- 1 B/el (300- or400-le/el) courses outside the maj or taken after 
60 credi ts. Students may substi tute a COR E approved seni or capstone course i n thei r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s 
for one of the two requi red A dvanced Studies courses. Enrollment in CORE Capstone courses will besubjectto 
departmental gui del i nes. The other course must be outsi de the maj or. Students compi di ng doubl e maj ors or doubl e 
degrees wi 1 1 ha^e f ul f i 1 1 ed the campus A dvanced Studi es requi rernent, unl ess thei r pri mary maj or or col I ege has 
addi ti onal requi rements. The student's academi c col I ege ddtermi nes whether or not a course i s "outsi de the maj or" for 
the purpose of f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Advanced Studies. 

Thefollovuing may NOT be used to fulfill Advanced Studies reqiirements 

• Professional Writing courses (courses that meet the Fundamental Studies upper- 1 e/el writing requirement); 

• courses used to medt D i stri buti ve Studi es requi rements; 

• i nternshi ps, practi ca, or other experi enti al I earni ng types of courses; 

• courses taken on a pas^f ai I basi s. 

Oneindependent studies course(mini mum of three credits outside the maj or) may be used toward A dvanced Studies 
requi rements as I ong as i t i s consi stent wi th the rul es above and the f acul ty member supervi si ng the i ndependent study 
agrees that it i s appropri ate for A dvanced Studi es. 

Notes: CORE Capstone courses rrust be taken within the rrajor. A senior thesis (ninimjmof3 credits) or successful 
corrpl^on and deferee of an honors thesis in dtiier the General Honors or a Departmental Honors Program 
(nrinimumof 3 credits) counts as CORE Capstone credit 



General Education Requirements (CORE) Pagelll 



CORE CapstnneLisb www.ugst.umd.edLi/corQ'course^AclvancecyCapstoneCo.htrnl 

IV. CORE HuTWiCultird Diversity 

One Course (3 credits) Requi red 

SeetheCORE Diversity List at www. ugst.umd.edLi/corQ^course^D iversity.html or the online Schedule of CI asses at 
www.testudo. umd. edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on: (a) the hi story, status, treatment, or accomplishment of women or 
mi nority groups and subcultures; (b) non-Western culture or (c) concepts and i mpl i cati ons of diversity. 

NotB A nurrber of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy CORE DistributiveStudies, Advanced Studies, 
or a college rrajor, and/or supporting area requirement 

Study Abroad and Satisfying Core Requirements 

Students may use study abroad to earn credit toward U niversity of M aryl and CORE Di stri buti ve and/or Advanced 
Studi es requi rements. A 1 1 students consi deri ng study abroad must meet wi th a Study A broad A dvi sor and compi dte the 
Perm! ssi on to Study A broad form (avai I abl e at the Study A broad Off i ce) . The Study A broad Off i ce determi nes if the 
course work wi 1 1 be compI dted through an accredi ted acaderri c program and be el i gi bl e for transfer credi t. U pon 
approval, the number of credits will be determined for each course. How the courses will apply to a students 
graduation requi rements will be determined by the student's advising col lege CORE Distributive Studies equivalencies 
( i f appi i cabi e) must be shown cl earl y on the Study A broad form wi th approval s from the U M academi c departments 
which offer si ni I ar courses. C O R E A dvanced Studi es cri ter i a al so appI y to Study A broad courses students wi sh to 
count toward CORE Advanced Studi es. Some col I eg^departmertal gui del i nes and restri cti ons may apply. 

Parti ci pati on i n a study abroad program wi \h the successful compI ed on and transfer of at I east 9 credi ts abroad 
automatically waives a students CORE Human Cultural Diversity requirement. 



Approved Courses for theCORE Pro^'am 

VisittheCORE Websiteatwww.ugst.umd.edu/corefor prcgramdescriptionsfortiie requi rements in each CORE 
Category, course lists and further ddiai Is 

Notes ^xxit the lists: 

1. At the Web site I i sted above, cl i ck on WhatareHieCORE Coursed for I i nks to the current I i sts of approved 
courses i n each CORE category. N ote that courses are added and del dted over ti me A sd ecti on of the approved 
courses i s offered each semester. 

2. Some courses are approved for CORE for one semester only to offer students speci al opportuniti es. The oneti me 
approval I i st changes each semester. Go t o www, ugst. umd. edu/cor^ and cl i ck on WhatareHieCORE Coursed, then 
cl i ck on One-TimsOnlyCoLvses, 

3. Course numbers and titles change from time to time SeetheCORE Web site listed above for updates. 

4. 1 n a parti cul ar semester, courses may be cross- 1 i sted or shared by more than one department and may appear under 
more than one course number. If cross-listed or shared courses areapprovedforCORE, this information will be 
avai lableintheonline listings. FrequentinstancesindudecourseswithprefixesAASP, AAST, AMST, CMLT,JWST, 
LGBT, aidWMST. 

5. For information about Honors(H ON R) courses that are approved for CORE, pi ease refer to the online resources 
noted above Other resources include the current "The University Honors Program I nformation and Course Description 
Booklet" and the University Honors Program website www, honors, umd. edu 

6. For information about CORE Fundamental Studies courses, pi ease see the Fundamental Studies section above 



General Education Requirement5 (CORE) Pagell2 



I he col leges and bchods P^ellji 

■ ■ 

TheCdlegesand Schods 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES (AGNR) 

0107 Symons Hall, 301-405-7761 

www.agnr.umd.edu 

eweiss(a)umd.eclu 

Dean: Cheng- i Wei 

Associate Dean(s): Leon H. Slaughter 

Assi stant Dean(s) : J ohn A . Doerr 

The Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources offers a variety of academic programs that apply 
sci ence, management, desi gn, and engi neeri ng to i mprove the worl d i n whi ch we I i ve and work. 
Feeding the world's population, developing sci entifi call y- based land use practices and policies, 
understandi ng ani mal and plant biology, i mprovi ng nuti'ition and its effects on human health, 
conservi ng and restori ng ecosystems, and profitably managi ng farms and agri busi nesses i n harmony 
with the envi ronment are al I vital concerns of the Col I ege. I ntegrati ng the use and protecti on of 
natijral resources i n the producti on of food and nursery crops i s a chal I enge f aci ng stixlents. 

I n addi ti on to course work, undergraduates have opportuni ti es to work cl osd y wi th f acul ty i n 
state-of-the-art f aci I iti es i ncl udi ng those for ani mal sci ences, di eteti cs, envi ronmental sci ence and 
technol ogy, pi ant sci ences, and veteri nary medi ci ne. The Col I ege al so serves as the academi c home 
of the M aryl and Campus of the V i rgi ni a- M aryl and Regi onal Col I ege of V eteri nary M edi ci ne. 
N earby resources such as the U . S. Department of A gri cul ture^s B el tsvi 1 1 e A gri cul tural N ati onal 
Research Center, the National I nstitutes of Health, the Food and Drug Admi nisti'ation, the 
Smithsonian I nstitution and the National Zoo, M aryland's Departments of Agriculture and Natijral 
Resources, and the Patijxent Wi I dl if e Research Center enhance teachi ng, research, i nternshi p, and 
career opportuni ties for stixlents. Fi el dstixly courses offered in Brazil, Belize, Egypt, England, and 
Costa Rica, and stixly-abroad programs such as those i n Russia and Angers, France expose stixlents 
to other cultures and envi ronments. Learni ng opportunities are also sti'engtinened through stixlent 
i nvol vement i n such co-curricular activities as the Col lege Honors Program career programs, 
I eadershi p workshops, and stixlent cl ubs. 

Special Advantages atxJ Facilities 

E ducati onal opportuni ti es i n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atijral Resources are enhanced by the 
proximity of SB/eral research units of the federal government. Teaching and research activities in 
the Col I ege are conducted with the cooperati on of sci enti sts and prof essi onal peopi e i n government 
posi ti ons. Of parti cul ar i nterest are the N ati onal A gri cul tural Research Center at B el tsvi 1 1 e, the 
National Agricultural Library, the National Arboretijm and the Food and Drug Admi nisti'ati on. 

I nsti'ucti on i n the basi c bi ol ogi cal and soci al sci ences, and I andscape desi gn i s conducted i n modern, 
technol ogi cal I y-equi pped cl assrooms and I aboratori es. The appi i cati on of basi c pri nci pi es to 
practi cal situati ons i s demonsti'ated for the stixlent i n numerous ways. I n addi ti on to on-campus 
f aci I iti es, the col I ege operates several educati on and research f aci I iti es throughout M aryl and. 
Horticultural and agronomic crops, turf, beef, horses, dairy cattie, and poultry are maintained under 
practical and research conditions and may be used by our students. These centers, as wd I as other 



I he col leges and bchods P^ell4 

sd ected I ocati ons on and off campus al so serve as I i vi ng I aboratori es for envi ronmental studi es. 

Achrisaon Requirements 

1 1 i s recommended that students enteri ng the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources have 
completed a high school preparatory course that includes: English, 4 units; mathematics, 3 units; 
biological and physical sciences, 3 units; and history or social sciences, 2 units. The Landscape 
A rchitecture maj or i s a I i mited enrol I ment program (L E P) . See chapter 1 for general 
I i mi ted-enrol I ment program admi ssi on pol i ci es. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOptions 

Departments i n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources offer the f ol I owl ng programs of 
study: 

Ag-iciJtiral and ResoirGe Economics Business Management; Agricultural Science; 
Environmental and Resource Pol icy; Food Production; International Agriculture; and 
Political Process. 

AniiTBJ Sciences Animal Care and Managennent; Equine Studies; Laboratory Animal 
Care; Scienc^Preprofessional; and Animal Biotechnology 

Contiined Ag'iciitirQVeterinary Medicine 

E nvi ronmental Science and Pol icy: E nvi ronment & A gri cul ture, E nvi ronmental 
Economics, Environmental Restoration, Soil, Water, & Land Resources, and Wildlife 
Resources & Conservation. 

Environmental Science and Technology: Concentrations in Ecological Technology 
Design, Environmental Health, Soil and Watershed Science, or Natural Resources 
Management. 

Plant Sciences Horticultureand Crop Production, Landscape Management, Plant 
Sciences, Turf and Golf Course Management, and Urban Forestry 

General Ag-iciJtiral Sciences 

Landscape Architectire 

Natiral Resoirces Management: Environmental Education/Park Management; Land 
and Water Resource M anagement; and PI ant and Wi I dl if e Resource M anagement 

Nutrition and Food Science Dietetics; Food Science; and Nuti-itional Science 

Students graduati ng from the Col I ege nxst compi ete at I east 120 credits with a grade poi nt average 
of 2. i n al I courses appi i cabi e toward the degree. Requi rements of the maj or and supporti ng areas 
are I i sted under i ndi vi dual program headi ngs i n chapter 7. 

Advising 

Each student i n the Col lege is assigned a faculty advisor to assist i n sdecti ng courses, accessi ng 



I he col leges end bchods P^ellb 

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academi c enri chment oppoituni ti es, and maki ng strategi c career deci si ons. A dvi sors normal I y 
work wi th a I i mi ted number of students and are abl e to gi ve i ndi vi dual gui dance. 
Both freshmen enteri ng with a def i nite choi ce of curri cul um and transfer students are assi gned to 
departmental advi sors for counsel and pi anni ng of al I acadenni c programs as soon as possi bl e. 
Students have access to additi onal advi si ng through thd r home departments undergraduate program 
off i ce and through the col I ege^s student servi ces off i ce. A G N R Peer M entors, academi cal I y tal ented 
and university-engaged upperclassmen, provide an additional advi si ng resources for students i n the 
college. 

Specif i cs of advi sor assi gnment are aval I abl e i n the undergraduate off i ce of each department. 

Departments and Centers 

U ndergraduate credit i nstructi on i s offered by the Departments of A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences 
(A NSC), Agricultural and Resource Economics (A REC), Environmental Science and Technology 
(ENST), Nutrition and Food Science (NFSC), and Plant Science and Landscape Architecture 
(PSLA). An additional major, Environmental Scienceand Policy (EN SP) is based and administered 
wi thi n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources; i t offers speci al i zati ons advi sed wi thi n thi s 
col I ege as wd I the col I eges of Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences, Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences, and 
Computer, Mathennatical and Physical Sciences. Additional courses are provided through the 2-year 
certi f i cate program i n the I nsti tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture. 

Minors 

Academi c M i nors provi de students an opportunity to expand or compi ement thd r maj or by taki ng 
additional courses (15-24 credits) i n a coherent f idd of study. Students i nterested i n a mi nor should 
contact the undergraduate program off i ce of the department off eri ng the mi nor. C urrenti y the 
f ol I owl ng are approved mi nors (with the off eri ng department i n parentheses) i n the col I ege 

AyibusinesB Economics (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Environmental Economicsand Policy (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Resoirceand A^-icultiral Policy in Economic De^opment (Agricultural and Resource 
Economics) 

Landscape Management (PI ant Sci ence and Landscape A rchitecture) 

Soi I Science ( E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Technol ogy) 

Living-Learning Pro-ams 

New for Fal I 2007 i n the col lege is EcoHouse a Li vi ng-Learni ng programfor undergraduates 
i nterested i n I earni ng about and promoti ng i nnovati ve, ecol ogi cal I y-sound I i f estyl es. I nf ormati on i s 
aval I abl e through the E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program and through Department of 
Resident Life (www.resnet.umd.edu or email to reslifeOunid.edu ). 

The col I ege al so sponsors, through its E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program the 
E nvi ronmental Studi es curri cul um i n Col I ege Park Schol ars. Admi ssi on to Col I ege Park Schol ars i s 
a sdective and by- invitation. (For further information, see Undergraduate Studies, College Park 
Scholars Program i n Chapter 6). 

Specialized Acadenric Programs 



I he col leges and bchods P^ellfc 

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The I nstitute of A ppl ied Agriculture offers 60-creclit certificate programs designed pri mari ly for 
prof essi onal de/el opment. ivi aj ors offered i ncl ude Agri busi ness M anagement, Golf Course 
Management, Equine Business Management, Landscape Management, Ornamental Horticulture, and 
Turfgrass M anagement. Some two-year program stixlents conti nue on i n regul ar four-year programs 
i n the col lege and several of the col lege^s majors al low I i mited use of I nstitute courses i n thd r 
programs. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

Four-year degree stixlents contempi ati ng earl y admi ssi on to veteri nary school s may choose the 
Combi ned A gri cul ture-V eteri nary M edi ci ne program I n thi s opti on, stixlents compi ete basi c 
science courses and University CORE in three years. They apply to veterinary schools in the Fall 
semester of the j unior year, and, if they are granted early admission to an accredited school of 
veteri nary medi ci ne, the B . S. degree i s awarded after compI eti on of the f i rst year of vet school . 
Debai I s of the curri cul um are found i n the A ni mal Sci ences maj or el sewhere i n thi s catal og. 

College Hotxrs Pro-am 

Students may appi y for admi ssi on to the Col I ege H onors program after compI eti ng 60 credi ts wi th a 
mi ni nxim 3.2 GPA i n a program withi n the Col lege. Honors stixlents work with a faculty mentor and 
nxst take at I east 12 credits of honors courses i ncl udi ng a seni or thesi s. I nterested stixlents shoul d 
contact thd r faculty advi sor. 

ApprcMBd Student Societies atxJ ProfiesEional Organizations 

Student parti ci pati on i n prof essi onal soci eti es, cl ubs, and i nterest groups i s extensi ve i n the col I ege 
and stixlents f i nd opportijni ty for vari ed expressi on and growtin i n the f ol I owl ng organi zati ons: 

AGNR Peer Mentors; AGNR Student Ambassadors; AGNR Student Council; Alpha Zeba; Alpha 
Gamma Rho; Animal Husbandry Club; Animal Sciences Graduate Association; College Park 
Environmental Group; Collegiate4-H; Food and Nuti'iti on Club; L andscape A rchitectijre Student 
Associ ati on; M D Student Chapter of Golf Course Superi ntendents Associ ati on of A meri ca; 
Minorities in Agriculture, Natijral Resources, and Related Sciences (M AN RRS); Natijral Resources 
Management Society; Sigma Alpha; Equesti'ianClub; UM Food Technology Club; and Veteri nary 
Science Club. 

Financial AsaStance 

A number of schol arshi ps are aval I abl e for stixlents enrol I ed i n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and 
Natijral Resources. These i ncl ude 

AGNR Alumni Association Scholarship, AGNR General Scholarship, Arthur M. A halt Memorial 
Scholarship, Attorney General's Agricultural and Natijral Resources Scholarship, Profess J ohn 
Axl ey M emori al Schol arshi p, E i I een Barneti: Schol arshi p, Bdtsvi 1 1 e Garden CI ub Schol arshi p, 
Bruce and Donna Berlage Scholarship, Chester F. B I etch Endowment, Bowie-Crofton Garden Club 
Scholarship, Frank D. Brown Memorial Scholarship, J oseph Byrd Foundation Scholarship, J orias 
andj oan Cash Student Award Scholarship, Chapd Valley Landscape Honorary Scholarship, George 
Earl e Cook, Jr. Scholarship, Pati'idaE. Criner& LindaCrinerBedate Scholarship, Ernest T. Cul I en 
M emori al Schol arshi p, J ai me Dannemann Schol arshi p, R . F . Davi s M emori al Schol arshi p, J erry V . 
DeBarthe Memorial Scholarship, William R. DeLauder Scholarship Scholarship, MyloS. Downey 
Memorial Scholarship, Equine Studies Scholarship, ExploreAGNR Schol arshi p, J amesR. Ferguson 
Memorial Scholarship, KennetiiS. Fowler Memorial Endowed Scholarship, Thomas A. Fretz 



I he col leges and bchods P^ell/ 

Agriculture and Natural Resources Scholarship, J ames & Sarah Goddard Memorial Scholarship, 
WilliamD. Godwin Endowed Scholarship, Golf Course Builders of America Association 
Foundati on Schol arshi p, G reen Schol arshi p for E nvi ronmental Protecti on Schol arshi p, M anasses J . 
& Susanna J arboe G rove Schol arshi p, Tom H artsock A ni mal M anagement Schol arshi p, H . Pal mer 
Hopki ns Scholarship established by Charles W. Coalejr. & Ellen KirbyCoale Charles & Judy 
I ager Schol arshi p. Land Grant Schol arshi p, J ames & Gertrude Leamer Schol arshi p, Donald Lei shear 
International Travel Scholarship, L ee M ajeskie Dai ryYoutin Scholarship, Maryland Greenhouse 
G rowers A ssoci ati on Schol arshi p, J ames R . M i 1 1 er Outstandi ng Seni or Schol arshi p, J ohn and 
M arj ori e Moore International Agriculture & Natijral Resources Student Travel Scholarship, J ames 
and Dessie M 0x1 ey Scholarship, Paul R. Poffenberger Memorial Scholarship, J enniferRusso 
Memorial Scholarship, Ross& Pauline Smith Scholarship, J. Herbert Snyder Educational 
Schol arshi p, Soutiiern States Cooperati ve Schol arshi p, H i ram I . Sti ne M emori al Schol arshi p, T . B . 
Symons Memorial Scholarship, TIC Gums Scholarship, Vansville Farmers Club Scholarship, A.V. 
V i erhd I er Schol arshi p. Si egf ri ed Wei sberger, J r. M emori al Schol arshi p, Theo & Georgi anna M i I es 
Wei ss M emori al Schol arshi p, and the Wi 1 1 i am R . Wi nsl ow Schol arshi p. 

The Col lege is pri vi leged to offer additional support i n the form of i nterest-free loans through the 
Catineri ne B ri nkl ey L oan F und whi ch are aval I abl e to stixlents who are resi dents of M aryl and and 
progressi ng i n programs wi thi n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atijral Resources. 

Av^jards 

The Agriculture and Natijral Resources A I umni Chapter provides recognition each year for the 
Outstandi ng Seni or i n the two-year and four-year programs. 

Research Units 

Maryland Ag'idJtiral Experiment Station 

The M aryl and Agricultural Experi ment Station (MAES) supports research conducted pri marl ly by 
120 f acul ty sci enti sts I ocated wi thi n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atijral Resources. F acul ty use 
state-of-the-art f aci I i ti es such as a new Research G reenhouse CompI ex and E nvi ronmental 
Si nxil ator, as wd I as 10 off-campus research I ocati ons, for research i n the sci ence busi ness, pol i cy, 
and practice of agriculture. MAES supports research that benefits consumers and producers al i ke 
for exampi e, our si gnif i cant focus on the envi ronment protects val uabi e natijral resources such as the 
C hesapeake B ay. U ndergraduate stijdents al so benef i t from mentori ng by M A E S-supported f acul ty 
andinsti'uctional use of MAES facilities statewide. 

Cooperative Extension Service 

The M aryl and Cooperative Extension Service (M CES) educates citizens i n the appi ication of 
practi cal , research- based knowl edge to criti cal i ssues i n agri cultural and agri busi ness i ncl udi ng 
aquaculture; natijral resources and the envi ronment; human development, nuti'ition, did:, and health; 
youtii devdopment and 4-H; and fami ly and community leadershi p. The statewide program i ncl udes 
more than 180 faculty and support staff located i n 23 counties, the City of Baiti more, four regional 
centers, and the U ni versi ty of M aryl and's Col I ege Park and E astern Shore campuses. I n addi ti on, 
more than 15, 000 vol unteers and ci ti zens i n M aryl and gi ve generousi y of thd r ti me and energy. 

Center for Food SystenrB Security and Safety 

TheCenter for Food Systems Secirity and Safety (CF S3) provides worl d-d ass research, 

educati on and outi'each on i ssues rd ated to food and water defense safety and protecti on. H oused i n 



I he col leges end bchods P^ellt 

■ ' 

the Department of N utriti on and Food Sci ence, thi s new center wi 1 1 provi de additi onal opportunity 
for students to become involved in issues of significance for Jnomeland security. For information on 
CFS3, please see http://aqresearch.umd.edU/CFS3/i ndex.cfm or cal I 301-405-0773. 

Harry R. Hu^iesCentier for A^o-Ea3logy, Inc. 

The Harry R. Hu^iesCentErfor Ag^o-Ecology; Inc. is a private non-profit 501 (c) 3 
organizationaffiliated with the University of Maryland. The Center brings together diverse interests 
from the agri cultural , forestry, and envi ronmental communiti es for the purpose of retai ni ng 
M aryl and's worki ng I andscapes and the i ndustri es they support whi I e protect] ng and i mprovi ng the 
health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tri butari es. The Center has funded 48 research proj ects for a 
total i nvestment of nearly $6.3 mi 1 1 ion. For further i nformation see http://agroecol .umd.edu/ or cal I 
at: 410-827-6202. 

J oint I n^tute For Food Safety and Nutrition 

TheJ oint InditubeFor Food Safety axl Nutrition (J I FSAN), established between the US FDA 
and the University of Maryland in 1996, is a jointly administered research and education 
program For information on J I FSAN, see http://www.jifsan.unxl.edu/ or call 301-405-8382. 

Northeadiern Re^onal AquacultureCentier 

The Nortiieastern Re^onal AquaciJtij'e Center (NRAC) is one of five Regional Aquaculture 
Centers estabi i shed by the U . S. Congress for the U ni ted States. F unded by the U SDA , and 
represent ng 12 states and the D i stri ct of Col umbi a, N RA C devd ops and sponsors cooperati ve 
regi onal research and extensi on proj ects i n support of the aquaculture i ndiBtry i n the northeastern 
United States. For further information see http://www.nrac.umd.edu/ or cal I 301-405-6085. 

Student E ngagement and Service Units 

Virgnia-JNIaryJand Re^onal CollegeoF Veterinary JNIedidne^ JNIaryiand Campus 

Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources 
1202 G udd sl5/ V eteri nary Center, 301-314-6830 
www.vetnied.vt.edu 

TheVirgini a- Maryland Regional Collegeof Veterinary Medicine is operated by the University of 
M aryl arid and the V i rgi ni a Pol ytechni c I nsti tute and State U ni versi ty . E ach year, 30 M aryl and and 
50 V i rgi ni a resi dents compri se the enteri ng cl ass of a four-year program I eadi ng to a Doctor of 
Veteri nary M edi ci ne (DV M ) . 

Thef i rst three years are given at Vi rgi nia Polytechnic I nstitute and State University i n Blacksburg, 
Virginia. The final year of instruction is given at several locations, including the University of 
M aryl and. Col I ege Park. 

A student desi ri ng admi ssi on to the col I ege must compi ete the pre- veteri nary requi rements and 
appi y for admi ssi on to the prof essi onal curri cul um A dmi ssi on to thi s program i s competi ti ve, and 
open to al I M aryl and resi dents. All M aryl and resi dents' appI i cati ons are processed at the Col I ege of 
Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus, University of Maryland, College Park. 



I he col leges end bchods p^eiiy 

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I nditube oF AppI ied A^icultire CT WD-Year Progrsard 

Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources 
2123 J ull Hall, 301-405-4685 
E-mai I : iaaOumd.edu 
http: //www, i aa. umd. edu/ 
Dr. TomHartsock, Director 

The I nstitute of AppI ied Agriculture (I AA) awards academe certificates i n Agri busi ness 
Management, Equine Business Management, General Ornamental Horticulture, Golf Course 
M anagement. Landscape M anagement, and Turfgrass M anagement. As a two-year program the I AA 
has a separate admi ssi on pol i cy. U pon compi eti on of the program stixlents are wd come to transfer 
to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park; U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ni versi ty Col I ege; and other 
schools. 

For more i nf ormati on about the I A A , i ts admi ssi ons procedures, and requi rennents, contact the 
Instituteof Applied Agriculture 2123J ull Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742-2525. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND PRESERVATION (ARCH) 

1298 A rchitecture B ui I di ng, 301-405-8000 
www.arch.umd.edu 
arcinfo@umd.edu 
Dean: Garth Rockcastie 

Associ ate Dean(s) : J ohn M audi i n-J eroni mo, Qi ng Shen, Lee Wal drep 
Assistant Dean(s): I ngrid Farrdl 

Director: M. Simon 

Professors: R. Bennett, G. Bowden (Prof of Practice), K. DuPuy, R. Etiin (Dist Univ Prof), S. 

Hurtt, P. Noonan (Prof of Practice), T. Schumacher, R. Vann 

Associ ate Professors: M. Bdl, C. Bovill, B. Kdly, A. Gardner, I . Gournay 

Assistant Professors: M. Ambrose, D. Oakley, I. Williams, B. Wortham 

Lectijrers: L. Escobal, M. Mc Inturff 

Professors Emeriti: W. Bechhoefer, G. Francescato, J . Hill, R. Lewis, J . Loss., F. Schlesinger 

Visiting Faculty: R. Eisenbach 

The School of Architectijre, Planni ng, and Preservation offers a four-year undergraduate program 
I eadi ng to the Bachd or of Sci ence degree i n architectijre, and a graduate program I eadi ng to the 
prof essi onal degree of M aster of A rchitectijre. The undergraduate maj or i n architectijre i s desi gned 
to mi ni mi ze the ti me requi red to compI ete the curri cul um I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree. 

Students reed ve ri gorous and comprehensi ve i nsti'ucti on from a f acul ty whose mennbers are acti ve 
i n prof essi onal practi ce or research. M any f acul ty members have di sti ngui shed themsd ves across 
the professional specti'um and represent different approaches to architectijral design. Thd r i ndi vidual 
areas of expertise include architectijral design and theory, history, architectijral archaeology, 
technology, urban design and planning, and historic preservation. Visiting critics, lectijrers, and the 
Kea Di sti ngui shed Professor augment the faculty; togetiier they provi de students with the requi site 
exposure to contennporary realities of architectijral design. 



I he col leges and bchods P^el^c 

TheB.S. degree in architecture will qualify graduates to pursue a career in a number of fields, such 
as construed on, real estate devd opment, publ i c adni ni strati on, or hi stori c preservati on, or to 
conti nue i n graduate work i n prof essi onal f i el ds such as architecture, urban pi anni ng, hi stori c 
preservation, landscape architecture, or law. 

Special Advantages and Fadlities 

The school i s housed i n a modern, ai r-conditi oned bui I di ng provi di ng desi gn workstati ons for each 
stixlent, a 300 seat audi tori um and serni nar and cl assroom f aci I iti es. A wd I -equi pped woodworki ng 
and modd shop, and computer graphics faci I ities are also provided. The Architecture Li brary, one of 
the f i nest i n the nati on, offers conveni ent access to a current ci rcul ati ng col I ecti on of more than 
24,000 vol umes, 6,000 periodicals, and an extensive sd ecti on of reference materials. Rare books 
and speci al acqui siti ons i ncl ude a col I ecti on rd ati ng to i nternati onal expositi ons and the 
11,000-volume National Trust for Historic Preservation Library. TheElizabetii D. Alley Visual 
Resources Col lection i ncl udes a reserve col lection of 500,000 si ides on architectijre, landscape 
architectijre, urban planning, architectijral science, andtechnology as wdl as audio- visual 
equi pment for cl assroom and stixli o use. 

Summer programs include travd to Rome, Paris, Turkey, Great Britain, and other countries. 
Students may earn di rect credit doi ng hands-on restorati on work and by attendi ng I ectijres by 
vi si ti ng archi tects, preservati oni sts, and schol ars. 

Achrisaon Requirements 



A rchitectijre i s a L i mited E nrol I ment Program (L E P) . See the Admi ssi ons secti on i n chapter 1 for 
general LEP admission policies. 

F reshnron Adnrisaon. Students wi th the most competi ti ve records from hi gh school wi 1 1 gai n di rect 
admi ssi on to the School of A rchitectijre, PI anni ng and Preservati on from hi gh school , as al I owed by 
space consi derati ons with the School . Because space may be I i mited before al I i nterested freshmen 
are admitted to the program early appi i cation is sti'ongly encouraged. Freshmen admitted to the 
program will have access to the necessary advi si ng through thd r i ni ti al semesters to hd p them 
determi ne if architectijre i s an appropri ate maj or for thd r i nterests and abi I iti es. 

F reshmen who are admi tted to archi tectijre wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew at the end of 
thd r thi rd semester, typi cal I y 45 credi ts.To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, these stijdents nxst 
demonsti'ate thd r abi I i ty to compi ete the f ol I owl ng pri or to enrol I ment of the stijdi o sequence 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Disti'ibutive Studies CORE requirement 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher i n each course 

• MATH 220, PHYS121axloiieofthecoirseS^*liSbedbelowwithamininximgradeof 2.0 
i n each and an overal I mi ni nxim grade poi nt average of 2. 67 i n al I three 

** Students nruSt take one oF the cx)u'se5belGwtDGonr|3letetheM 
Didributive Studies CORE reqiiremenb 

• BSCI 205 (3) Environmental Sdence(LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mplications of Global Change (PS) 

• PHYS 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 (PL) 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el^l 



Students may be enrol I ed i n A RC H 226 and compi eti ng thei r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous 
with the review process duri ng thd r fourth semester. A mi ni nxim cunxilati ve GPA of 2.00 i n al I 
col I ege I evd coursework i s al so requi red. I n additi on, the revi ew wi 1 1 i ncl ude an assessment of two 
letters of recommendations, transcri pts, an essay, and a portfol io, the nature of which is specif led by 
the School . PI ease contact the School of A rchitecture, PI anni ng, and Preservati on at 301-405-8000 
for portfol i o requi rements and deadi i nes. Y ou may al so vi sit the School website at 
www.arch.umd.edu. 

NotB Students are adrritted to the School during the Fall semester only. 

Transfer Adnrisaon Reqiiremerts New transfer students, as wd I as students al ready enrol led on 
campus who wi sh to change maj ors to architecture, wi 1 1 undergo a transfer admi ssi on process. To 
meet the provi si ons of the process, these students nxst demonstrate thd r abi I i ty to compI ete the 
f ol I owl ng pri or to enrol I ment i n the studi o sequence (J uni or year) : 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Distributive Studies CORE requirement 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher i n each course 

• MATH 220, PHY S 121 and one of the courses** I isted bdow with a mi ni mum grade of 2.0 i n 
each and an overal I mi ni mum grade poi nt average of 2. 67 i n al I three 

** Students must take one of the courses bd ow to compI ete the M athemati cs and the Sci ences 
D i stri buti ve Studi es CO R E requi rement: 

• BSCI 205 (3) Environmental Sdence(LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mplications of Global Change (PS) 

• PHYS 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 (PL) 

Students may be enrol I ed i n A RC H 226 and compI eti ng thd r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous 
wi th the revi ew process duri ng thd r fourth semester. A mi ni mum cumul ati ve G PA of 3. 00 or above 
i n al I col lege levd coursework is also requi red. I n addition, the review wi 1 1 i ncl ude an assessment of 
two I etters of recommendati ons, transcri pts, an essay, and a portfol i o, the nature of whi ch i s 
specif i ed by the School . PI ease contact the School of A rchitecture, PI anni ng, and Preservati on at 
301-405-8000 for portfol i o requi rements and deadI i nes. Y ou may al so vi sit the School website at 
www.arch.umd.edu. Note: j ust because students meet the above requi rements, does not guarantee 
admission i nto this LEP (Limited Enrol I ment Program). 

NotB Students are adnritted to the School during the Fall semester only. 

Appeals Students who are deni ed admi ssi on and who fed that they have extenuati ng ci rcumstances 
may appeal in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admi ssi ons, Mitchdl Building. Students 
denied admission at tfie 45 credit review may appeal di rectiy to tine School of Architecture, Planni ng 
and Preservati on. For further i nf ormati on, contact the Counsd or f or L i mited E nrol I ment Programs at 
301-31^8385. 

Recriitment 

Associate Dean: LeeW. Waldrep, Ph.D. 
1298 A rchitecture B ui I di ng, 301-405-8000 
www.arch.umd.edu 



I he col leges and bchods 



P^e Yll 



The Schools Associate Dean serves as a resource and contact person for prospective stixlents 
i nterested i n the B.S. i n Architecture degree and also serves as a I iaison to the Office of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOptions 

I n the first two years of college, directiy admitted students and those seeking to transfer into the 
School of A rchitecture, PI anni ng and Preservati on shoul d adhere to the f ol I owl ng curri cul um 



General Education (CORE) and Electives 

UNIVIOO The Students in the University 

ENGLlOl Introduction to Writing (CORE) 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I (CORE) 

ARCH 170 I ntroduction to the Built Environment (CORE) 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I (CORE) 

A RC H 225 Hi story of Worl d A rchi tecture I 

ARCH 226 H i story of Worl d A rchi tecture 1 1 

ARCH 242 Drawing I 

OnefrxjmthefdlovJng 

BSCI 205 Environmental Science (LS) 

GEOG 140 Coastal Environments (PS) 

GEOL 120 Environmental Geology (PS) 

GEOL 123+ Causes & I mpli cations of Global Change (PS) 

PHYS 122 Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 (PL) 

Tot^ Credits 



Crafts 

30 

1 

3 

3 

3 

4 

3 

3 

3 



56 



-k3E0L 123 is also offered as M ET0123 and as GEOG123 

I f adnriUed after Gonr|3leti rg 56 credits dudenbs are ecpectsd to Gonrf^ 
reqij remenbs for a total gF 120 credits 



Third Year 

A RCH 227 Hi story of Worl d A rchitecture 1 1 1 

ARCH400 Architecture Studio I* 

ARCH410 Architectural Technology I 

ARCH401 Architecture Studio 1 1 

ARCH411 Architectural Technology 1 1 

ENGL391 Advanced Composition 

ELECT Directed Electives 



3 
6 
4 
6 
4 
3 
3 



I he col leges and bchods 



P^e 123 



CORE 



Core Requirements 



Tot^ 



3 
32 



FoirtfiYea- 

ARCH402 Architecture Studio 1 1 1 

ARCH412 Architectural Technology 1 1 1 

ELECT Directed History of Architecture Elective?^* 

ARCH403 Architecture Studio IV 

ARCH413 Architectural Technology IV 

ELECT Directed Electives 

CORE CORE Requirements 



Tot^ 



6 
4 
3 
6 
4 
6 
3 
32 



Tot^ Credits 



120 



^Courses are to be taken in sequence as indicated fjy Roman numerals in course titles 

^'''Di reded ArchitECtirehistiory courses 



ARCH420 
ARCH422 
ARCH423 
ARCH433 

ARCH434/ 
ARCH435 

ARCH436/ 
ARCH437 

Advising 



H i story of A meri can A rchi tecture 
H i story of G reek A rchi tecture 
H i story of Roman A rchi tecture 
H i story of Renal ssance A rchi tecture 

H i story of M odern A rchi tecture 

H i story of Contemporary A rchi tecture 

H i story of I si ami c A rchi tecture 

H i story of Pre-Col umbi an A rchi tecture 



E nteri ng students are advi sed by the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng; as advi si ng i s mandatory, 
students are expected to medt with an academi c advi sor each semester to di scuss tiiei r academi c pi an 
and course sd ecti on. Students are encouraged to contact the School off i ce ( 301-405-8000) to 
determi ne aval I abl e advi si ng hours and/or make an appoi ntment. 

ApprGMBd Student Societies and ProfiesEionai Organizations 

The School of Architecture, Planni ng, and Preservation sponsors a chapter of the American I nstitute 
of Architecture Students (Al AS), the national association for architecture stijdents. The Al AS 
chapter sponsors a variety of activities including an annual Career Fair, Beaux Arts Ball, field trips, 
and other events throughout the academi c year. 



Finandal AsaStanoe 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois Fegei'^A 

■ ' 

Each year, the School of Architecture, Planni ng and Preservation offers a number of merit-based 
schol arshi ps to qual ifyi ng undergraduate students; some are offered to students parti ci pati ng i n stixly 
abroad programs. I nterested stixlents are encouraged to appi y for these earl y duri ng the spri ng 
sennester. PI ease note that most of these schol arshi ps are reserved for stixlents i n the stixli o 
sequence of the program 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OFSA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state, and i nstituti onal 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the 
awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng stixlents. For more i nformati on, vi sit: 
vwwv.fi nancialaid.iJTid.edu. 

Research Units 

PcvlqpcriEgp\gt'lqt'Uo ct\/l tqy \i 'Tgugctej 'bpf 'Gf wec\iqp 

1112 PreinkeitFieldhouse, College Park, 301-405-6788 

www.smai1growth.umd.edu/ 

Dr. GerrittKnaap 

The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education is a non-partisan center for research and leadership 
ti-aining on SmartGrowth and related land use issues nationally and internationally. Founded in 2000, tine National 
Center for Smart Growtin is a cooperative venture of four University of Maryland schools: Architecture. Planning and 
Preservation. Public Policy. Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Engineering . The mission of the Center is to bring 
tine diverse resources of the University of Maryland and a network of national experts to bear on issues in land 
development resource preservation and urban growtin - the nature of our communities, our landscape and our quality 
of life - tinrough interdisciplinary research, out-each and education, tinereby establishing tine University as the national 
leader in tills field. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2088 
www.arhu.umd.edu 
Dean: James Harris 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es ennbraces a heterogeneous group of di sci pi i nes that stixly 
human experi ence, thought, expressi on and creati vi ty . A 1 1 val ue the devd opment of cri ti cal thi nki ng, 
f I uent expression i n writi ng and speech, sensitivity to etinical and aestiietic issues, and a complex 
understandi ng of hi story and cul ture. Departments and programs i n A rts and H umani ti es pri ze 
vi gorous i ntd I ectijal dd^ate i n a di verse communi ty. Whi I e they have sti'ong i ndi vi dual i denti ti es, 
they are al so i nvol ved i n i nterdi sci pi i nary stixli es. Thus stijdents wi 1 1 f i nd, for exampi e, courses i n 
the Department of E ngl i sh that approach I iteratijre i n its hi stori cal contexts, courses i n the 
Department of History that adoptfeminist perspectives, courses in the Department of Art History 
and A rchaeol ogy that stixly Af ri can pol iti cs, and so on. 

F urther exampi es of the speci al opportijni ti es aval I abl e to stixlents i n thi s ri chl y vari egated col I ege 
i ncl ude an excepti onal vi sual resource center i n A rt H i story and A rchaeol ogy, the E ngl i sh 
Departments computer-based writi ng classroom and an AT&T Foreign Language Classroom 
A ddi ti onal I y, stixlents may add an i nternati onal experi ence to thd r undergraduate educati on by 
partid pati ng in an ARHU -sponsored stixly abroad program in Nice, Alcala, Sevilla, or Genoa or an 
exchange program i n the U nited K i ngdom Si ngapore, or J apan. The educati onal vi stas open to 
stixlents i n Dance, M usic, and Theati'e are enhanced enormously by the Clarice Smith Center for the 



I he col leges end bchods Fegei'^b 

■ ' 

Perf orrni ng A its, whi ch houses those three departments. Students may al so parti ci pate i n one of the 
Collegers five living- 1 earning programs: Honors Humanities, Col I egeParIc Scholars in the Arts, 
Col lege Park Scholars i n Culture of the Americas, J i menez- Porter Writers' House, and Language 
House (see below). 

Achrisaon Requirements 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n one of the creati ve or perform! ng arts are encouraged to seek trai ni ng i n 
the ski 1 1 s associ ated wi th such an area pri or to matri cul ati on. Students appi y i ng for entrance to thse 
programs may be requi red to audi ti on, present si i des, or submit a portfol i o as a part of the admi ssi on 
requirements. 

DpnriMtiXTBrt 

1120L Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2096 

www.arhu.umd.edu/admissions 

A dmi ssi ons Coordi nator: J . Dari us G reene 

The Col lege^s Admissions Coordi nator serves as a resource and contact person for prospective 
students i nterested i n A rts and H umaniti es degrees, and as a I i ai son to tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admissions. 

Under^aduate De^ee Requi rement^De^eeOpdotis 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es offers the degree of Bachd or of A rts i n the f ol I owl ng f i el ds of 
study: 

American Studies: www.amst.umd.edu 

Art: www.art.umd.edu 

Art History and Archeology: www.arthistory-archaeoloay.umd.edu 

Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies: www.ceres.umd.edu 

C hi nese L anguage and L i terature 

www. I anguaaes. umd.edu/A si anE astE uropean/chi nese^ 
Classics: www.classics.umd.edu 
C I assi cal H umani ti es csee classics) 

Communication: www.commumd.edu 

Dance www.dance.umd.edu 

E ngl i sh L anguage and L i terature www, engi i sh. umd.edu 

French Language and Literature www. I anguaaes. umd.edu/F renchi tal i an/undergraduat^i ndex 

Germanic Studies: www. I anguaaes. umd. edu/german 

G reek (see classics) 

History: www, hi story, umd.edu 

I tal i an L anguage and L i terature 

www. I anauaaes. umd.edu/F renchi tal i an/underaraduate^i ndex 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el^fc 



J apanese Language and Literature 

www. I anguages. unxl.eclu/asi aneasteuropean/j apanese 

J ewish Studies: www.jewishstudies.unTl.edu 

Latin (see CI assies) 

Lati n and Greek (see classics) 

Linguistics: www.ling.umd.edu 

|V| usi c: www.music.umd.edu 

Students rmjoring in Music rmy pursue a Bachelor of Music degree 

Piii I osophy: www. phi I osopliy. umd.edu 

Romance Languages: www. I anguages. umd.edu/frenchital i an/romancel ang 

Russian: www. I anguages. umd.edu/asi aneasteuropean/russi an 

Spanish and Portuguese www. I anguages. umd.edu/spani shportuguese 

Theab-e: www.ttieab^e. umd.edu 

Women's Studies: www.womensshxlies.umd.edu 

The Col lege also offers certificate programs i n Women's Studies, East Asian Studies, and Lati n 
American Studies. 

Major Reqijremenbs 

• A 1 1 stixlents nxst compi ete a program of stixly consi sti ng of a maj or (a f i el d of concentrati on) 
and someti mes supporti ng courses as speci f i ed by one of the acadenri c uni ts of the Col I ege. N o 
program of stixly shal I requi re i n excess of 60 sennester hours. 

• A maj or shal I consi st, i n addi ti on to the I ower-di vi si on departmental prerequi si tes, of 24 to 40 
hours, at least 12 of which must be i n courses numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which 
nxst be taken at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park. 

• A maj or program someti mes requi res a secondary f i el d of concentrati on (supporti ng courses) . 
The natijre and number of these courses are deternri ned by the maj or department. 

• No grade I ower than C may be used to f ul f i 1 1 maj or or supporti ng course requi rements. N o 
course for the maj or or support modul e may be taken Pass-Fai I . 

• Students shoul d consult the unit i n whi ch they wi 1 1 maj or for specif i c detai I s; certai n units 
have mandatory advi si ng. 



Graduation Reqiiremenbs 

Thefol lowi ng Col lege requi rements apply only to stixlents earni ng Bachelor of Arts degrees from 
the Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es. These requi rements are i n additi on to or i n f ulf i 1 1 ment of 
campus and departmental requi rements. For i nformati on concerni ng the Bachd or of M usi c i n the 
School of M usic, stixlents should consult a M usic advisor. 

Students who doubl e maj or i n A R H U and another col I ege on campus nxst compI ete the Col I ege 
requi rements i n A R H U of ford gn I anguage to the i ntermedi ate I evd , and 45 hours of upper- 1 evd 
credit. 



I he col leges end bchods Fegei^/ 



A 1 1 A Its and H umani ti es freshmen (excl udi ng students i n Col I ege Park Schol ars, H onors 
Humanities, or University Honors) nx6ttal<eL/M\/ 101, The Student in the Uni\/ersity and 
Introduction to Computer Resources, duri ng thd r f i rst semester on campus. 

Distributicn: To encourage advanced mastery of materi al , a mi ni nxim of 45 of the total of 120 
semester hours nxst be upper- level work (i.e., courses numbered 300-499). A majority of the 45 
credits wi 1 1 be earned i n the f ulf i 1 1 ment of requi rennents for the maj or and CORE . 

Fcrei^ Laiguage: To expand Students' understandi ng of other cultures i n an i ncreasi ngly global 
soci ety, the Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es requi res its maj ors to compi ete the i ntermedi ate I evd of 
a ford gn I anguage. Learni ng a second I anguage produces deep knowl edge of cultural as wd I as 
I i ngui sti c differences whi I e openi ng pathways for common understandi ng. 

All students majoring in ARHU nxBt pass the designated I evd of a ford gn I anguage with a grade of 
2.0or better. PleaseconsultanARHU advisor for a list of the requi red course sequences. 

Students al ready beyond the requi red I evd and wi shi ng to be exennpt from the requi rennent nxist 
document thd r prof i ci ency when they enter A RH U i n one of the f ol I owl ng ways: 

1. H i gh school transcri pt showi ng I evd 4 of a ford gn I anguage; 

2. For students with nativeprofidency, exam administered by American Council ontheTeachingof 
Ford gn Languages passed at the advanced mi d (A M ) I evd . For more i nformati on, pi ease see an 
advi sor i n the A RH U Off i ce of Student Affai rs, or cal I 301-405-2108. 

Advising 

F reshmen and new transfer students have advi sors i n the A rts and H umani ti es Col I ege Off i ce of 
Student Affai rs (301-405-2108) who assi st them i n the sd ecti on of courses. Students nxst see the 
departmental advi sor for the maj or. A 1 1 f i rst-year students (both freshmen and transfers), j uni ors 
who have completed 65-75 credits, and seniors who have completed 90-105 credits, have mandatory 
advi si ng i n both the Col I ege and tine department. For further i nformati on about advi si ng, students 
should cal I the ARHU Office of Student Affairs, 301-405-2108. 

Internships 

Several departments withi n A rts and H umani ti es have wd I -estabi i shed i nternshi p opti ons. For more 
i nformati on on i nternshi ps taken for academi c credit students shoul d contact thd r departmental 
acadennic advisor. Typically, students must be in good acadennic standing and in thdr junior or 
senior year to complete a for-credit i nternshi p. They usual ly complete an appi ication and attach a 
current academi c transcri pt, and the experi ence usual I y I asts for one semester. I n addi ti on to the si te 
experi ence, students wri te an anal ysi s of the experi ence i n conj uncti on wi th a f acul ty member i n 
thd r department. I nternshi ps with I iteracy programs and with the M aryland General Assennbly are 
aval I abl e through the E ngl i sh Department, 301-405-3827. For assi stance i n I ocati ng an i nternshi p 
si te, vi si t the U ni versi ty Career Center at 3100 H ornbake L i brary. South Wi ng or do a search on the 
website www.careercenter.umd.edu 

Certification oF Hi^ School Teachers 

A student who wi shes certif i cati on as a secondary educati on teacher i n a subj ect represented i n thi s 
col lege is encouraged to speak with an advisor i n Education Curricul um and I nstruction (1207 
B enj ami n B I dg. ) to di scuss the di ff erent paths aval I abl e for certi f i cati on. A student may pursue 
secondary teacher certif i cati on as an undergraduate with a doubl e maj or i n a content area and 



I he col leges end bchods P^el^t 

■ ' 

secondary educati on, pursue the f i ve-year i ntegrated master's program whi ch al I ows for the content 
maj or as an undergraduate and compi eti on of certif i cati on and graduate degree requi rements i n a 
fifth year, or apply to the one-year i ntensi ve master's pi us certification program 

Departments and Centers 

Academic Computing Sen/ices 

1111 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2104 
www.ARHU.umd.edu/technoloay 
Assistant Dean: Kathleen R. Cavanaugh 

Academic Computi ng Services (ACS) supports the use of technology by faculty, staff, and students 
i n the Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es. ACS provi des desktop support servi ces for faculty and staff, 
support for the use of technol ogy to support teachi ng and I earni ng, and cl assroom technol ogy 
support servi ces. 

TheArtGdIery 

1202 A rt-Soci ol ogy B ui I di ng, 301-405-2763 
www.artgal lery.urrd.edu 
Director: Scott D. Habes 

TheArt Gallery presents exhibitions, lectures, film series, residencies, and publications focusing on 
contemporary art and vi sual culture. Opportuniti es for nxseum trai ni ng and arts management 
experi ence are aval I abl e to students through i ntern and work-study positi ons. 

TheCenber for Renaissance and Baroque Studies 

0139TaliaferroHall, 301-405-6830 

www.crbs.umd.edu 

Founding Director S. Schoenbaum (1927-96) 

Director: A dele Seeff 

Associate Director: Karen Nelson 

The Center for Renal ssance and Baroque Studi es promotes teachi ng and research i n the Renal ssance 
and Baroque Peri ods i n al I di sci pi i nes of the arts and humaniti es. The Center sponsors a vast array of 
programs, i ncl udi ng annual i nterdi sci pi i nary symposi a, speci al I ectures and performances, 
conferences, summer i nstitutes, a j ournal , and a vol ume seri es of symposi a proceedi ngs publ i shed by 
the University of Delaware Press in conjunction with Associated University Presses. As part of its 
mi ssi on to support undergraduate educati on, the Center coordi nates a seri es of i nterdi sci pi i nary arts 
and humanities courses. Through its outreach programs, the Center provides professional 
devd opment to secondary school arts and humaniti es teachers throughout the state of M aryl and and 
sponsors a Shakespeare summer camp and a Shakespeare monologue contest, both of which target 
middle school students. The planni ng committee for Attendi ng to Early M odern Women-one of the 
Center's standi ng comrrittees-organizes and coordi nates an i nternational symposi um on the 
university's campus every three years. 

David C. Drislcell Center for the Study oF the African Diaspora 

1214 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-405-6835 
email: driskellcenter(a)umd.edu 
www.driskellcenter.unxl.edu 
Executive Director Robert E. Steele 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois p^ei^y 



The David C. Driskd I Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and 
the Af ri can D i aspora at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, cd ebrates the I egacy of Davi d C . 
Driskdl -- Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art, Artist, Art Historian, Collector, and 
Curator -- by preservi ng the ri ch heritage of Af ri can A meri can vi sual art and culture. EstabI i shed i n 
2001, the Center provi des an i ntd I ectual home for arti sts, nxiseum prof essi onal s, art admi ni strators, 
and schol ars of col or, broadeni ng the f i d d of Af ri can di aspori c studi es. The Dri skd I Center i s 
committed to col I ecti ng, documenti ng, and presenti ng Af ri can A meri can art as wd I as repi eni shi ng 
and expandi ng the f i d d. 

ConsortiuTion RaoQ Gender, and Ethnicity (CRGE) 

1208 Cole Student Activities BIdg., 301-405-2931 

www.crge.umd.edu 

Director Ruth E. Zambrana 

Interim Assistant Director Laura A. Logie 

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) is a university- wide, nationally prominent, 
i nterdi sci pi i nary research organi zati on and pedagogi c uni t that col I aborates wi th departments and 
col I eges across U M to promote schol arshi p as wd I as faculty and graduate student devd opment. 
C RG E 's work uni tes schol ars from around campus who exami ne the i ntersecti ons of race, gender, 
d:hni city and other di mensi ons of difference as they shape i dentiti es, behavi or and compi ex soci al 
rd ati ons. CRGE offers programs, research i nterest groups, seed grants, graduate f d I owshi ps and 
colloquia. 

Language l^edia Services 

1204J im®iez Hall, 301-405-4925; Fax: 301-314-9752 

Email: lanaweb(a)umd.edu 

www.languaaes.umd.edu/lms 

J and B rennan-Ti 1 1 mann, Coordi nator of Language I nstructi onal Technol ogy 

J eff M aurer, M uiti medi a Techni ci an 

Language M edi a Servi ces (L M S) i s a support unit withi n the School of Languages, L iteratures and 
Cultures whi ch provi des audi o vi sual equi pment and multi medi a support for faculty, staff and 
students. L M S provi des f i rst ti er support and trai ni ng for f acul ty teachi ng i n the f i ve technol ogy 
enhanced classrooms located i n J i menez Hal I, the mobi le audio lab and tine computer classroom 
Servi ces for faculty i ncl ude equi pment and vi deo/DV D I oan, ford gn I anguage program recordi ng, 
scanni ng of i nstructi onal documents, trai ni ng on equi pment use, tape dupl i cati on and conversi on, 
and di gi ti zati on of audi o materi al s. Servi ces for students i ncl ude audi otape and di gi tal audi o f i I e 
di stri buti on and an i ndependent study space 

FOLA 

1109 J im®iez Hall, 301-405-4046 
www.lanauaaes.umd.edu/fola 
Coordinator NaimeYaramanoglu 

The FOLA (Fordgn Language) Program enables qual if led students with high motivation to acqui re a 
speaki ng knowledge of a number of fordgn languages not offered i n regular campus programs. 
Whi I e i nstructi on i s basi cal I y sd f -di rected, students meet regul arl y wi th a nati ve-speaki ng tutor for 
practi ce sessi ons to rd nf orce what has al ready been covered through the i ndi vi dual use of books and 
audi tapes or C Ds. F i nal exami nati ons are admi ni stered by outsi de exami ners who are speci al i sts i n 



I necoiiegesendbchoois p^eiJC 

■ ' 

thdr fields. 

Living-Learning Pro-ams 

Honors H uTBiiities 

1103 Wicomico Hall, 301-405-6992 
www, honorshumani ti es. urnd. edu 
ennail: honorshumanitiesOunnd.edu 
Di rector: Professor Peter M al I i os 

E nteri ng freshmen parti ci pate by i nvi tati on i n H onors H umani ti es, a two-year I i vi ng/l earni ng 
program H onors H umani ti es i s f or academi cal I y tal ented stixlents who have i ntd I ectial ambi ti ore 
i n the humaniti es and arts or a desi re to devd op thd r educati on on a I i beral arts f oundati on. The 
program is organized around a two-year research or creative project (The Keystone Project) that a 
stixlent desi gns and executes wi th the gui dance of a f acul ty mentor. H onors H umani ti es provi des 
students with sti nxilati ng serni nars, exciti ng academic friendshi ps, a I i vdy home base i n Wicomico 
Hall, and opportunities to take advantage of the i ntd I ectual, cultural, and artistic riches of the 
Washington, D.C. region. Upon successful completion of the program students earn a citation in 
H onors H umani ti es, and thi s ci tati on i s entered upon thd r uni versi ty transcri pts. 

College Park Scholars 

CPS in the Arts: Professor Peter Bdcken, Dr. David Solomon 
CPS in Cultures of the Americas: Professor Sangeeta Ray 
www.scholars.umd.edu 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es co-sponsors cross-di sci pi i nary Col I ege Park Schol ars programs 
in Cultures of the Americas and in Arts. Thesetwo-year programs provide exciting living- 1 earning 
envi ronments i n speci al I y-equi pped resi dence hal I s (Centrevi 1 1 e and B d A i r respecti vd y) . Students 
with sti'ong i nterests i n these areas meet i n weekly col loquia with faculty, and, i n the Arts program 
with student teachers as wd I, to pursue creative and intdlectual endeavors. Fiddtrips, invited 
speakers, hands-on workshops, and the yearl y staged A rts Fai r on M aryl and Day i n Spri ng sti nxil ate 
creati vi ty and the sense of togetinerness whi I e f ormi ng a communi ty of I earners and teachers i n the 
Arts Program Cultures of the Americas focuses on the peoples, cultures and histories of North and 
Soutii A meri ca, al I owl ng stixlents to thi nk comparati vd y . Students engage these topi cs not onl y i n 
the col I oqui a but by al so taki ng a speci al I y desi gned three credi t course the second semester of the 
freshman year. Besides academic readings, invited lectijres, local fiddtrips, presentations, and 
community servi ce, the program sponsors a 4-6 day tri p to a ri ch cultural site i n the A meri cas the 
f i nal semester. Both Scholars programs give stixlents the opportunity to stixly with thd r peers whi le 
bd ng i n cl ose contact with thd r faculty advi sors experi enci ng a smal I col I ege envi ronment. 

J InrKiiez-PortEr WritErsI House 

0111 Dorchester Hall, 301-405-0671 
www.writershouse.umd.edu 
Director J ohnna Schmidt 

TheJ i m®iez-Porter Writers' House (J PWH) is a I i vi ng and learni ng program open to al I majors. The 
program was coned ved and devd oped pri marl I y for upper-di vi si on stixlents, but wi 1 1 consi der 
appi i cati ons from academi cal I y tal ented i ncomi ng freshmen who have a sol i d focus on creati ve 
wri ti ng. L ocated i n Dorchester H al I , the Wri ters' H ouse creates a campus- wi de I i terary center to 
stixly creative writi ng i n its cross-cultural and multi I i ngual di mensions. Parti ci pants I i ve i n a close 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el^l 

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communi ty of students who share an i nterest i n creati ng stori es, poems, pi ays, and i magi nati ve 
non-f i cti on. Students work with vi siti ng writers, publ i sh a I iterary magazi ne, attend speci al readi ngs 
andcolloquia, produce an annual I iterary festival, and receive notation upon successful completion 
of the program C I ass si zes are smal I , and i ncl ude one-on-one f acul ty advi si ng sessi ons. A dmi ssi on 
to the Writers' House is competitive, with only forty to fifty stixlents I i vi ng arid writi ng togetiier 
each year. A ppl i cati ons can be obtai ned by contacti ng the di rector, or by 
vi siti ng www, writershouse. umd.edu . Final deadline for admission every year is March! 

Langiage House 

0107 St. Mary's Hall, 301-405-6996 
www.lanauaaes.umd.edu/lh 
Program Director Dr. Phoenix Liu 
PhoenixLOumd.edu 

The Language House is a campus living- 1 earning program for stixlents wishing to immerse 
themsd ves i n the stixly of a ford gn I anguage and cul ture. A total of 97 stixlents of A rabi c, C hi nese, 
French, German, Hebrew, Italian, J apanese, Persian, Russian, and Spanish share 19 apartments. A 
I i ve-i n native graduate mentor leads each language d uster. The goal of language i mmersion is 
achieved through activities organized by the stixlents and mentors, a language-learni ng computer 
I ab, an audi o- vi sual nxil ti - purpose room and ford gn td evi si on programs reed ved vi a satd I i te. 

College Honors Pro-am 

Most departments in the Col lege of Arts and Humanities offer Departmental Honors Programs 
( D H P) . D H Ps are upper-di vi si on programs wi thi n the i ndi vi dual academi c uni ts. Students enrol I ed i n 
Departmental H onors work i ndependenti y wi th f acul ty members i n subj ects of speci al i nterest, 
devd op and deepen thd r research ski 1 1 s, and, i n the process, earn an even sti'onger degree. Students 
nxst have a cunxilati ve grade poi nt average of at least 3.0 to be admitted. For further i nformation 
about individual Departmental Honors Programs and pol ides, consult with departmental advisors. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa in chapter 4. 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (BSOS) 

2148 Tydi ngs Hall, 301-405-1697 

www. bsos. umd.edu 

bsosque(a)bsos. umd.edu 

Dean: Edward Montgomery 

Associate Dean(s): Robert Schwab 

Assistant Dean(s): K atiierine Pedro Beardsley, Jennifer Dumas, KimNickerson 

The Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a diverse group of disci pi i nes and 
f i d ds of study al I of whi ch emphasi ze a broad I i beral arts educati on as the f oundati on for 
understandi ng the envi ronmental , sod al , and cultural forces that shape our worl d. At the heart of the 
behavi oral and sod al sci ences i s the attempt to understand human bd ngs, both i ndi vi dual I y and i n 
groups. Di sci pi i nes i n the behavi oral and sod al sci ences use approaches that range from the 
sci enti f i c to the phi I osophi cal , from the experi mental to the theoreti cal . I ntegral to al I the di sci pi i nes. 



I he col leges and bchods p^ei^:^ 

however, i s the devd opmert and appi i cati on of probi em sol vi ng ski 1 1 s, whi ch i n combi nati on wi tin 
other academi c ski 1 1 s, enabi e students to thi nk anal yti cal I y and to communi cate cl earl y and 
persuasi vd y. Students i nterested i n human behavi or and i n sol vi ng human and soci al probI ems wi 1 1 
f i nd many exciti ng opportuniti es through the programs and courses offered by the Col I ege of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOptions 

• Each student nxst complete a mi ni mum of 120 hours of credit with at least a 2.0 cunxilati ve 
grade poi nt average. Courses must i ncl ude the credits requi red i n the U ni versity's general 
education requi rements (CORE) and the specific major and support] ng course and grade 
requi rements of the programs i n the academi c departments off eri ng bachd or's degrees. 

• Students i n BSOS nxst complete M ath and Engl ish by 60 credits. 

• Students nxst compi ete 15 upper I evd credits i n the students f i nal 30 credits. 

• All students are urged to speak with an academic advisor i n thd r major and an advisor i n the 
Col lege Advisi ng Office at least two semesters before graduation to review thd r academic 
progress and di scuss f i nal graduati on requi rements. 

Advising 

The BSOS Advisi ng Center coordi nates undergraduate advisi ng and mai ntai rs student records for 
B SOS students. A dvi sors are aval I abl e to provi de i nf ormati on concerni ng U ni versi ty requi rements 
and regul ati ons, transfer credi t eval uati ons, and other general i nf ormati on about the U ni versi ty by 
appoi ntment from 9 a. m to 5 p. m M onday through F ri day. U ndergraduate advi sors for each 
undergraduate maj or are I ocated i n the department off i ces. These advi sors are aval I abl e to assi st 
students i n sd ecti ng courses and educati onal experi ences i n thd r maj or area of study consi stent with 
major requirements and students' educational goals. 

Departments and C enters 

The Col I ege i s composed of the f ol I owl ng departments, each off eri ng a maj or program that I eads to 
the Bachd or of A rts or the Bachd or of Sci ence degree, as appropri ate 

Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es* 

Department of A nthropol ogy 

Department of Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Pol iti cs 

Department of Heari ng and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychology 

Department of Soci ol ogy 

I n additi on, the Col I ege i s a maj or contri butor to the E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program and 
sponsors several of its areas of concentration. 

*The Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es al so offers an undergraduate certif i cate requi ri ng 21 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois Fegei^d 

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semester hours of course work (see U ndergraduate Certif i cate Programs i n Chapter 7) . 

Minors 

Several departments withi n the Col I ege of Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences sponsor mi nors. See 
i ndi vi dual department I i sti ngs for i nf ormati on. A pproved mi nors i ncl ude 

• B I ack Women's Studi es (Departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es and Women's Studi es - 
see Women's Studi es) 

• Geographic I nf ormati on Science (Department of Geography) 

• Hearing and Speech Sciences (Department of Hearing arid Speech Sciences) 

• I nternati onal Devd opment and Conf I i ct M anagement (Department of Government and 
Politics) 

• Neuroscience (Departments of Psychology and Biology) 

• Terrori sm Studi es (Col I ege of Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences - see bd ow) 

Minor in Terrorism Studies 

The Terrori sm Studi es program focuses on expl ori ng the ori gi ns and moti vati ons of terrori sm based 
on theoreti cal understandi ngs of i ndi vi dual and group behavi or. Students al so expl ore the i mpacts of 
the threat of terrori sm on i ndi vi dual s and communi ti es as wd I as sti'ategi es for preventi ng, deterri ng, 
miti gati ng, and respondi ng to terrori st threats. For more i nformati on about the mi nor, pi ease vi sit: 
www.start.umd.edu 

Students are requi red to take the f ol I owl ng three courses: 

• BSOS 33tt Terrorist JNIotivationsand Behaviors (3 credits). This course explores theories 
expl ai ni ng the f ormati on of terrori st groups and the moti vati ons behi nd terrori st behavi or, 
bui I di ng upon theori es from soci al psychol ogy, soci ol ogy, pol i ti cal sci ence, cri mi nol ogy, and 
hi story. Thi s course draws heavi I y from hi stori cal exampi es as wd I as current exampi es of 

i nternati onal and domesti c terrori st groups around the worl d. 

• BSOS 331: Responses to Terrorism (3 credits) . Thi s course exami nes the i mpact of terrori sm 
on groups and i individuals and explores how communities have prepared and ideal I y should 
prepare i n the face of potenti al terrori st threats. Thi s course draws from antiiropol ogy, 

cri mi nol ogy, economi cs, hi story, pol i ti cal sci ence, soci al psychol ogy, and soci ol ogy. 

• BSOS 332: The Practice of Terrorism Studies (5 credits). This serni nar serves as the 
capstone for the mi nor program As part of the course, stixlents compi ete an approved 

i nternshi p or conduct a rd evant, ori gi nal research proj ect. Students al so meet regul arl y wi th an 
i nsti'uctor to I earn and appi y acadenni c and prof essi onal anal yti cal tool s rd evant to the stijdy of 
terrori sm The course i ncl udes vi sits from guest speakers worki ng i n the f i d d of terrori sm 
stixli es, and stixlents parti ci pate i n a terrori sm- preventi on tabi etop exerci se. 

I n additi on to the three new courses, stixlents nxst take one 3-credit course on research metiiods, to 
be drawn from courses i n any di sci pi i ne, i ncl udi ng: Af ri can-A meri can Studi es; A ppl i ed 
M atiiemati cs and Sci entif i c Computati on; B i ol ogi cal Sci ences; Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce; 
Communications; Economics; Civil Engineering; Electi'ical Engineering; Fire Protection 
Engineering; Family Studies; Geography; Government and Politics; History; Health; Latin 
American Studies; Psychology; Sociology; Statistics; and Survey MetiTodol ogy. 

To sati sfy the f i nal requi rement, stixlents nxst enrol I i n one 3-credi t d ecti ve rd ated to terrori sm 
stixli es. START staff compi le a I ist of courses bd ng offered each semester that satisfy the decti ve 
requi rement. Students are al so encouraged to enrol I i n courses from the Washi ngton, DC consorti um 
to sati sfy the d ecti ve requi rement, thereby drawl ng on the uni que, exi sti ng resources present 



I he col leges and bchods h'cQelM 



throughout the Washington, DC metropolitan area. 



Living-Learning Pro-ams 

CIVICUS 

0107 Somerset Hall, 301-405-8759 
D i rector: D r. Sue B ri ggs 

CI VI CDS is a two-year I i vi ng and learni ng program i n the Col lege of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences. This academic citation program is centered on f i vethares of ci vi I society: citizenshi p, 
I eadershi p, communi ty servi ce- 1 earni ng, communi ty bui I di ng i n a di verse soci ety, and schol arshi p. 
About 130 diverse and energetic CI VI CDS Associates take a common core of classes, I i ve togettier 
in Somerset Hal I, and participate in civic, community service, experiential, and other activities and 
projects on and off campus. 

CIVICUS was founded on the assumption that to be engaged members of ci vi I society we have an 
obi i gati on to be aware of the worl d outsi de of the cl assroom and to act upon i ssues tinat affect the 
world i n which we I i ve. Therefore, our courses and activities are i ntricatdy I i nked with each other 
and our communi ties. CIVICUSA ssoci ates enri ch thd r academi c work and expl ore career 
opportunities by vol unteeri ng with non-profit organizations and governmental agencies and 
programs, creati ng thd r own community servi ce proj ects, and i nteracti ng with faculty and 
community leaders. They are among the most involved students at Maryland. CI VI CUS Associates 
complete a Capstone internship at the University or inthe D.C. metropolitan area. 

Sdected students from all majors are invited to partid pate in the CI VI CUS Living and Learning 
Program when they apply to the university as first year students, based on thd r letters of 
recommendation, i nvol vement i n high school and the community, admissions essays, and academic 
transcri pts. CI V I CU S I ooks to i nvite students who wi 1 1 conti nue to strengthen and broaden thd r 
I eadershi p ski 1 1 s wi thi n the campus and I ocal communi ti es. 

For more information, pi ease visit: www.CIVICUS.umd.edu 

College Park Scholars International Studies 

1104CentrevilleHall, 301-405-9304 
Faculty Director: Dr. James Glass 

One of twd ve Col lege Park Scholars I i vi ng-learni ng programs, the I nternational Studies Program 
bri ngs together undergraduate students from a vari ety of di sci pi i nes who share an i nterest i n gl obal 
i ssues, pol i ti cs, and events. E ach enteri ng cl ass of approxi matd y si xty-f i ve students takes courses 
togetlier duri ng the freshman and sophomore years. The maj ority of I nternati onal Studi es Schol ars 
reside i n Centrevi I le Hal I . 

I nternati onal Studi es was one of the ori gi nal four Col I ege Park Schol ars programs I aunched i n 1994, 
sponsored by the Col I ege of Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences (B SOS) and the Department of 
Government and Pol itics (GVPT). The Faculty Di rector and theTeachi ng Assistants al I have thd r 
roots i n the Department of Government and Pol iti cs. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elJi: 

The I rternati onal Studi es Program wd comes students who wi sh to I i ve and I earn together and who 
have an i nterest i n expl ori ng i nternati onal pol iti cal , economi c, and cultural i ssues. Our program 
offers an opportunity to bui Id global understand! ng and global awareness through academic and 
experiential learning. 

For more information, pi ease visit: www.scholars.umd.edu/is^ 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Atlantic Coafit- Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Alliancefor Graduate Education 
andtheProfies5oriate(AC-SBE Alliance) 

Director KimJ . Nickerson 

301-405-7599 

kni ckerson(a)bsos. umd.edu 

www.acsbe.org 

TheAC-SBE Alliance is comprised of the University of Maryland at College Park, the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Howard University, the University of Florida, and the University of 
M i ami . The goal s of tine AC-SB E A 1 1 i ance are to i ncrease the number of U nder- Represented 
Minority (URM) students receiving Ph.D.'s in SBE di sci pi ines and to increase the number of URMs 
enteri ng tiie SB E prof essori ate. The AC-SB E A 1 1 i ance recruits and prepares undergraduates to 
pursue doctoral degrees, assists students in the transition from Bachelor to Ph.D. programs, assists 
graduate students i n completi ng thd r Ph.D.s, and prepares graduate students for success. The 
Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (B SOS) i s the I radi ng body at the UMD campus for this 
parti cul ar al I i ance. B SOS al so col I aborates wi th the U M D G raduate School and the U ni versi ty of 
Maryland Systenis PromiseAl Nance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP). 
Through thse rd ati onshi ps, students can parti ci pate i n graduate trai ni ng semi nars and prof essi onal 
devdopment activities. I n addition, BSOS organizes an annual Summer Research I nitiativefor 
undergraduates i n order to achi eve the goal s set by the AC-SB E A 1 1 i ance. 

College Honors Pro-am 

U ndergraduate honors are offered to graduati ng students i n the departments of Af ri can A meri can 
Studies, Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice. Economics, Geography, Government and 
Pol i ti cs, Psychol ogy, and Soci ol ogy . 

Dean's Academic Scholar. To be named a Dean's A cadenric Scholar is the highest acadenric award 
that a B SOS student can earn i n the Col I ege. Dean's Schol ars are those graduati ng seni ors who have 
compi eted 60 credi ts at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park and have mai ntai ned a mi ni nxim 
cunxil ati ve grade poi nt average of 3. 8. A student who has been found responsi bl e of a vi ol ati on of 
academic integrity is notdigible. 

Dean's List. Any student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic work under the regular 
gradi ng mdthod i n the precedi ng semester, without fai I ure of any course, and with an overal I average 
gradeof atleast3.5, will be placed on the Dean's List. The Distinguished Dean's List consists of 
students who have completed successful I y a mi ni nxim of 12 credit hours i n a semester with a 4.0. 

Honor SocietiesL Students who excd i n thd r academic disci pi i ne may be sdected for membershi p 
i n an honorary soci ety. H onorari es for whi ch students i n B SOS are chosen i ncl ude 

• Alpha Kappa Ddta ~ Sociology 



I he col leges and bchods P^elifc 

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• Alpha Phi Sigma-- Criminal Justice 

• Gamma Theba Upsilon ~ Geography 

• Omicron Delta Epsilon ~ Economics 

• Pi Sigma Alpha- Political Sciences 

• Psi Chi ~ Psychology 

ApprcMBd Student Societies atxJ ProfiesEionai Organizations 

Students who maj or i n the Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences have a wi de range of i nterests. The 
fol lowi ng is a I ist of stixlent organizations i n the disci pi i nes and fields of ttie Behavioral and Social 
Sciences: 

• A ntinropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on 

• Cri mi nal J usti ce Student Associ ati on 

• Economics Association of Maryland 

• Geography Club 

• Maryland Neurosci ences Society 

• National Student Speech- Language and Hearing Assoc.(NSSLHA), MD Chapter 

• Pre-Medical Society 

• Sociology Collective 

• The Society of African American Studies 

For more i nf ormati on about these stixlent organi zati ons or starti ng a new stixlent group, pi ease 
contact the Off i ce of Campus Programs, Add e H . Stamp Student U ni on, 301-314-7174. 

Finandal AsaStanoe 

The Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences offers several scholarships to stixlents in BSOS 
maj ors who have enrol I ed i n the col I ege for one or more semesters. E ach schol arshi p al so has 
additi onal el i gi bi I ity criteri a. The schol arshi ps i ncl ude 

• M urray E . Pol akoff Schol arshi p Award for A caderni c Excel I ence 

• I rv & M i cki Gol dstd n Schol arshi p Award for Commitmient to Servi ce 

• Katineri ne Pedro & Robert S. Beardsley Schol arshi p Award for Outstandi ng Leadershi p 

• J ean & Robert Steel e Schol arshi p Award f or F i rst Generati on Students 

• BSOS FutijreAlumni Scholarship Award for Financial Need (60 or more credits) 

Schol arshi p i nf ormati on and appi i cati ons are made aval I abl e each Fal I semester. Schol arshi p awards 
are granted for the fol lowi ng Fal I semester. For more i nformation, please visit: www.bsos.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OFSA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state, and i nstituti onal 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the 
awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng stixlents. For more i nformati on, vi sit: 
www.finandalaid.umd.edu 

Research Units 

The Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sd ences sponsors several special purpose, college-wide 
research centers. These centers i ncl ude The Center for Substance A buse Research; The N ati onal 
Consorti um for the Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terrori sm and The Publ i c Safety Trai ni ng 
and Technology Assistance Agency. These i nterdisci pi i nary centers often offer i nternshi ps and a 



I he col leges and bchods P^eli/ 

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selected number of undergraduate research assistant opportunities for i nterested students. Tinese 
researcin experi ences offer excel I ent preparati on for future graduate study and/or j ob opportuniti es i n 
the pri vate and publ i c sectors. A ddi ti onal I y, the col I ege offers computi ng servi ces through i ts Off i ce 
of Academi c Computi ng Servi ces. 

Center for SiiDdariGe Abuse Research (CESAR) 

4321 Hartwick Rd. Ste. 501, College Park, M D 20740 

301-405-9770 

www.cesar.umd.edu 

Director Dr. Eric Wish 

Established in 1990, CESAR is a research unit sponsored by the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences. CESAR staff gatiner, analyze, and disseminate timely information on issues of substance 
abuse and monitor al coliol - and drug- use i ndi cators throughout M aryl and. CE SA R ai ds state and 
I ocal governments i n respondi ng to the probi em of substance abuse by provi di ng the above-stated 
i nformati on, as wd I as techni cal assi stance and research. Faculty mernbers from across campus are 
i nvol ved wi th C E SA R- based research, creati ng a center i n whi ch substance abuse i ssues are 
anal yzed from nxil ti di sci pi i nary perspecti ves. Students obtai n advanced techni cal trai ni ng and 
hands-on experi ence through thd r i nvol vement i n ori gi nal surveys and research. 

Maryland Popiiation Research Center (MPRC) 

0124N Cole Student Activities Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-6403 

www.popcenter.umd.edu 

Director: Sandra H off erth 

The M aryl and Popul ati on Research Center (M PRC) i s a nxiiti di sci pi i nary center dedi cated to 
population- related research and housed in the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) at 
the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park. O ur pri mary goal i s to draw togetiner I eadi ng schol ars 
from di verse di sci pi i nes to support, produce, and promote popul ati on- rd ated research. 

The cross-disci pi i nary research i nterests of our faculty al low the M PRC to conti nual ly grow and 
make a uni que contri buti on to the f i d d of popul ati on stijdi es. The M PRC's members i ncl ude faculty 
from the departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es, Agri cultural and Resource Economi cs. 
Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice. Economics, Family Studies, Geography, Human 
Devd opment, the J oi nt Program i n Survey M etinodol ogy, the School of Publ i c Pol i cy, and 
Sociology. 

National ConsortiuTifortheStudyaFTerrorlsmand Responses to Terrorism (START) 

3300 Symons Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742 

301-405-6600 

www.start.umd.edu 

Director Dr. GaryLaFree 

The N ati onal Consorti um for the Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terror (STA RT) i s a U . S. 
Department of Homdand Security Center of Excd lence, tasked by the Department of Homdand 
Security's Sci ence and Technol ogy Di rectorate with usi ng state-of-the-art theori es, metiiods, and 
data from the soci al and behavi oral sci ences to i mprove understandi ng of the ori gi ns, dynami cs, and 
soci al and psychol ogi cal i mpacts of terrori sm STA RT, based at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. 
Col I ege Park, ai ms to provi de ti md y gui dance on how to di srupt terrori st networks, reduce the 



I he col leges and bchods P^eljfc 

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i nci dence of terrori sm and enhance the resi I i ence of U . S. soci ety i n the face of the terrori st threat. 

OfficeoF Academic Computing Services (OACS) 

0221 LeFrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-1670 

www.oacs.umd.edu 

Director: Dan Navarro 

The Col I ege bd i eves strongi y that the study of behavi oral and soci al sci ences shoul d i ncorporate 
both quanti tati ve and computati onal ski 1 1 s. Consequent] y, curri cul a i n most departments requi re 
somecourse work in statistics, quantitative research methods, and information technology. The 
B SOS Off i ce of A caderni c Computi ng Servi ces provi des undergraduate students i n the Col I ege wi th 
both f aci I iti es and staff assi stance to sati sfy a broad range of computer-rd ated needs. OACS operates 
f i ve computer cl assrooms and a speci al i zed graphi cs I ab that offer a wi de vari ety of popul ar 
software, col or and bl ack-and- white pri nti ng, and both text and graphi cs scanni ng. U ndergraduate 
students are al so encouraged to take advantage of OACS's I earni ng resources, i ncl udi ng free 
computer and stati sti cs trai ni ng courses, hd p documentati on, a I i brary of computer-rd ated texts and 
free access to research data. 

Pii3lic Safety, Training and Technology Asadance (PSTTP) 

9001 Edmonston Rd. Ste. 300, Greenbdt MD 20770 

301-489-1700 

www.hiclta.org 

Director: Thomas H. Carr 

EstabI i shed i n 1994, the Publ i c Safety, Trai ni ng and Technol ogy Assi stance Program (PSTT) 
(f ormerl y the Washi ngton/B al ti more H I DTA ) i s co-sponsored by the Col I ege of B ehavi oral and 
Social Sciences and President Bush's Office of National Drug Control Policy. This program is 
funded by Congress to hd p coordi nate and fund the f i ght agai nst drug-rd ated cri me arid to treat 
drug-addi cted cri mi nal offenders. H I DTA efforts i ntegrate preventi on and I aw enforcement at the 
communi ty I evd to reduce the i nvol vement of hi gh- ri sk youth i n drug traff i cki ng careers and 
cri mi nal behavi or. H I DTA al so works wi th pri vate i ndustry and government to form partnershi ps 
geared toward the devd opment of commerci al software for use by I aw enforcement, cri mi nal j usti ce, 
treatment and regul atory agenci es. The Washi ngton/ Baiti more H I DTA empi oys a nxiiti -di sci pi i nary 
approach that i ncorporates I aw enforcement, treatmenl/cri mi nal j usti ce and preventi on through a 
regi onal strategy that i ncl udes al I these di sci pi i nes. Faculty mernbers from across campus are 
involved with HI DTA -based research, and students obtain advanced technical training and hands-on 
experi ence through thd r i nvol vement i n data col I ecti on, ori gi nal surveys, geo- mappi ng and 
research. 



THE ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (BMGT) 

1570 Van M unchi ng Hal 1 , 301-405-2286 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu 
Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 
A ssoci ate Dean(s) : Patri ci a C I evd and 

The Robert H . Smith School of Busi ness is an i nternational ly recognized leader i n management 
educati on and research for the di gital economy. The faculty are schol ars, teachers, and prof essi onal 
leaders with a commitment to superior education in business and management, specializing in 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois p^ei^y 

■ ' 

accounting, finance, information systems, operations management, management and organization, 
marl<eti ng, logistics, transportation and supply chai n management. The Smith School is accredited 
byAACSB International -TheAssociationtoAdvanceCollegiateSchoolsof Business, the prenier 
accrediti ng agency for bachd or's, master's and doctoral degree programs i n busi ness admi ni sti'ati on 
and accounting, www.aacsb.edu . 

A stixlent i n the Smith School of Busi ness, selects a major(s) i n one of thefol lowi ng curricula: (1) 
Accounting; (2) Finance (3) General Business; (4)1 nformati on Systems; (5)lnternational Business; 
(6) Logistics, Transportation, & Supply Chain Management; (7) Marketing; or (8) Operations 
M anagement. U pper-di vi si on B M GT programs are offered at Col I ege Park and at the Universities 
at Shady Grove l n M ontgomery County. F or detai I s on the maj ors offered at Shady G rove vi si t 
http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergracl/shaclygrove.htn1. 

Achrisaon Requirements 



See chapter 1 for general L E P admi ssi ons pol i ci es. 

F reshman Adnrisaon 

Admission to the BM GT degree programs is competitive. A I i mi ted number of freshmen who 
dennonsti'ate outstandi ng talent wi 1 1 be admitted di rectiy to thd r BM GT major of choice (eg. 
Accounting, Finance, etc.). Admission will be on a space aval I able basis. All stixlents are urged to 
appi y earl y. A 1 1 stixlents admi tted di recti y to B M GT as freshmen must demonsti'ate sati sf actory 
progress (2.00 cumulative GPA or better) pi us completion of Gateway courses (BM GT 220, BM GT 
230, ECON 200 or 201, and MATH 220 or 140 with a "C" or better) i n the semester they reach 
45 credi ts (excluding A P and ESL), at which time they will be reviewed in order to continue in the 
BMGT major. 

Students not di rectiy admitted to the Smith School of Busi ness as freshman can be admitted to the 
Division of Letters & Sciences, with some of these stixlents enrol I i ng i n the M arkets and Society 
program These stixlents can apply for admission to Busi ness by the semester i n which 60 credits are 
completed. (See Transfer Admi ssi on below) 

Transfier AdmJsaon for Students from On or Off Campus 

Students who began at UMCP or a Maryland System School in Spring 2004 through Spring 20C5 
iA€re grandfathered under the Spring 2001 adrrission standards, through Spring 2007. At this time 
all students must meet the current admi ^ on standards, detailed below. 

A 1 1 stixlents appI yi ng for admi ssi on to B M GT as transfer stixlents, whetiner i nternal transfers al ready 
enrolled at UMCP or external transfer stixlents entering the university for the first time, will be 
subject to competitive admission for a limited number of spaces in the BMGT program at each 
program location. 

To be consi dered for admi ssi on, appI i cants must compi ete the f ol I owl ng requi rements: 

• M i ni nxim 3. cunxil ati ve G PA ( preferred, may vary based upon the appI i cant pool ) 

• M i ni nxim j uni or standi ng: 60 credi ts earned 

• Completion of 50% of lower-level university CORE requirements (Note ECON 200 and 201 
satisfy lower- level SB CORE requi rements and MATH 220 or 140 satisfies lower- level MS 
CORE requirements) 



I he col leges and bchods P^el-^ 

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• Completion of the foil owing Gateway courses, all with "C" or better: 

BMGT 220 and 221: Accounting 

ECON 220 and 201: M icro and Macro Economics 

ENGL 101 

MATH 220 or 140: Calculus 

BMGT 230 or BMGT 231 or equivalent: Statistics 

• Co-curri cul ar i nvol vement, I eadershi p experi ence and honors and awards wi 1 1 al so be 
consi dered i n the admi ssi on deci si on. Students are sti'ongi y encouraged to submi t wi th thei r 
appi i cati ons a resume and I etter debai I i ng thei r accompi i shments and experi ence. 

Application Deadlines for Transfer Students CompI ete appI i cati ons and al I supporti ng 
documents nxBt be received no later than: 

Fal I Semester: 1st busi ness day of J une (Priority DeadI i ne) 

1st busi ness day of A ugust (F i nal DeadI i ne) 
Spri ng Semester: 1st busi ness day of December (Pri ority DeadI i ne) 

1st busi ness day of J anuary ( F i nal DeadI i ne) 

A/ote 1: For odernal transfer applicants in the Spring, all transcripts and supporting documentation 
nust be recdved by the lOtii txisiness day of] anuary. 

NoteZ PI ease subnritcompldBd applications to tine Attn: LEP Coordinator, Officeof 
Und^graduateAdnrisaons, Mitchell Building, Uni\/ersity of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742-5235. 

Freshmen who begin study in another major at College Park who would have met the direct BMGT 
admi ssi on standards from hi gh school have unti I the I ast day of i nsti'ucti on i n the f i rst semester of 
thei r freshmen year at Col I ege Park to change thei r maj or to B M GT. 

AppealstDtfiis Policy: A ppeal s to thi s pol i cy may be f i I ed with the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admi ssi ons, on the ground f I oor M itchd I B ui I di ng. Such appeal s wi 1 1 requi re documentati on of 
unusual, extenuating, or special circumstances. 

Statenrent oF Policy on Transfer oF C redit froni Comnruiity Colleges 

1 1 i s the practi ce of the Smi th School of B usi ness to consi der for transfer from a regi onal I y accredi ted 
communi ty col I ege onl y the f ol I owl ng courses i n busi ness admi ni sti'ati on: an i ntroductory busi ness 
course, busi ness stati sti cs, i ntroducti on to computi ng (equi val ent to B M GT 201) , or el ementary 
accounti ng. Thus, it is antici pated that students transferri ng from another regional ly accredited 
i nstitution wi 1 1 have devoted the major share of thei r academic effort below the j unior year to the 
compI eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a community 
col I ege may be appI i ed toward a degree from the Smith School of B usi ness. 

Otherlrfititutions 

The Smith School of Busi ness normal ly accepts transfer credits from regional ly accredited four-year 
i nstituti ons. J uni or- and seni or-l evd busi ness courses are accepted from col I eges accredited by the 
AssociationtoAdvanceCollegiateSchoolsof Business (AACSB). J unior- and senior- level business 
courses from other than AACSB-accredited school s are eval uated on a course- by-course basi s to 
determi ne transf erabi I i ty . 

The Smith School of B usi ness requi res that at I east 50 percent of the busi ness and managennent 
credit hours requi red for a busi ness degree be earned at the U ni versity of M aryland. Col lege Park. 



I he col leges and bchods P^el4l 



Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOptions 

The university confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Master of Business 
Administration (M.B. A.), Masterof Science (M.S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Information 
concerni ng admission to tine M.B. A. orM.S. programisavailableatwww.rhsmitli.unid.edu. 

Underg-aduate Prog-am 

The undergraduate program recogni zes tiie need for prof essi onal educati on i n busi ness and 
management based on a f oundati on i n tiie I i beral arts. I n addi ti on, tiie progranis i nternati onal I y 
i ntegrated curri cul um prepares students to be eff ecti ve and responsi bl e managers i n today's 
dynami c busi ness envi ronment. 

A student i n busi ness and management sel ects a maj or i n one of several curri cul a: ( 1) A ccounti ng; 
(2) Information Systems: Specialization Business; (3) Finance (4) General Business; (5) 
International Business; (6) Operations Management; (7) Marketing; (8) Logistics, Transportation, 
and Supply Chai n M anagement. 

SmmrBry oF Badielor oF Science Degee Reqiiremenbs (all cirriciJa) 

At I east 45 hours of tiie 120 semester hours of academi c work requi red for graduati on must be i n 
busi ness and management subj ects. A mi ni mum of 58 hours of tiie requi red 120 hours must be i n 
300- or 400- level courses. I n addition to tiie requi rement of an overal I cumulative grade poi nt 
average of 2.0 (C average) in all university course work. Effective Fall 1989, all busi ness majors 
must earn a 2.0 or better i n al I requi red courses, i ncl udi ng Economics, M atiiematics, and 
Communi cati on. E I ecti ves outsi de tiie curri cul a of tiie School may be taken i n any department of tiie 
university, if tiie stixlent has tiie necessary prerequisites. 



Credits 



BMGT220 
BMGT221 
ECON200 


F reshman-Sophomore School 
Requirements 

Pri nci pi es of Accounti ng 1 
Pri nci pi es of Accout lU ng 1 1 
Pri nci pi es of M i croeconomi cs 


3 
3 
4 


ECON201 


Pri nci pi es of M acroeconomi cs 

One1ix3m 


4 


MATH220 
MATH 140 


Elementary Calculus 1 
Calculus 1 

One1ix3m 


3 

4 


BMGT230 


Busi ness Statistics 


3 


BMGT231 


Statistical Models for Busi ness 

Oneftum 


3 


COM M 100 
COM M 107 
COM M 200 


Foundations of Speech Communication 

Speech Communication 

Criti cal Thi nki ng and Speaki ng 

Tot^ 


3 

3 

3 

23-24 



J inior-Senior School Reqiiremenbs 

B M GT301 I ntroducti on to I nf ormati on Systems 



I he col leges and bchods P^el4^ 

■ ■ 

BMGT340 Business Finance 3 

B |V| GT350 |V| arl<eti ng Pri nci pi es and Organi zati on 3 

B |V| GT364 |V| anagement and Organi zati onal Tineory 3 

B |V| GT367 Career Searcin Strategi es i n B usi ness 1 

BIVIGT380 Business Law 3 

BIVIGT495 Business Policies, OR 3 
BM GT495H Busi ness Pol icies (Honors) 

ECON Economics- see below 3-6 

Tot^ 22-25 



Economics Reqiiremenbs 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are requi red by the Smith School of 

B usi ness. The specif i c requi rements for each maj or are I i sted with the maj ors' specif i c requi rements. 

Major Reqiiremenbs 

I n additi on to the Smith School of B usi ness Bachel or of Sci ence requi rements I i sted above, 
general ly another 18-24 credits are requi red for each major. See i ndi vidual major I isti ngs i n chapter 
7. 

A Typical Pro-am for the F reshman and Sopliomore Years 

Grafts 

Freshman Year 

CORE and/or Electives 9 

ENGLlOl or equivalent 3 

MATH (depending on placement)* 3 

First Semester Total 15 

CORE and/or Electives 9 

COM M 100, 107 or 200 3 

MATH or BM GT230/231* 3 

Secjond Semester Total 15 

SophomoreYear 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

B M GT220 (Prereq Sophomore Stand ng) 3 

ECON200 4 

MATH or BM GT230/231* 3 

Third Semester Total Ifi 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

ECON 201 4 

B M GT221 (Prereq BMGT220) 3 

BM GT230 (Prereq MATH22(J'), OR 3 

BM GT231 (Prereq MATH141), OR 

Elective 



I he col leges and bchods FegelA^d 



FoirthSanesta- Total 16 



*See F reshrmn-Sophormre School requirements for appropriate math and statistics courses 



Advising 

General advi si ng for students adnittecl to the Smith School of B usi ness i s aval I abl e M onday through 
Friday in the Office of Undergraduate Programs, 1570Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286. Itis 
recommended that students vi sit thi s off i ce each semester to ensure that they are i nformed about 
current requi rements and procedures. Transfer students enteri ng the university can be advised duri ng 
spri ng, summer, and f al I transfer ori entati on programs. Contact the Ori entati on Off i ce for further 
information, 301-314-8217. 

Specialized Acadenric Programs 

The Smith School offers innovative special programsthrough its Undergraduate Fellows Program 
The Fd I ows program offers a seri es of speci al academi c programs,or tracks whi ch wi 1 1 create smal I 



ihecoiiegesenabchods Fegei^ 

■ ' 

communi ti es of schol ars wi thi n the I arger Srni th School communi ty . E ach speci al i zed F el I ows 
program combi nes opportuniti es for acti on I earn! ng and profess! onal de/el opment with ri gorous 
i n-depth academi c coursework focused on cutti ng edge i ssues aff ecti ng 21st century busi ness. 

Co-curricular acti vities are a key component of the Fd lows program Field tri ps and i nternshi ps, 
i nternati onal study tri ps and exchanges, speaker seri es, di nners, retreats and competiti ons wi 1 1 foster 
I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and contri bute to your personal and prof essi onal growth. A I umni i nvol vement i s an 
i mportant aspect of Fd I ows programmi ng, with Smith al umni and corporate partners contri buti ng 
thdr time, talents and experience through sponsorship and participation in events and activities. For 
more i nformati on on each of the Smith Fd I ows Programs pi ease see the f ol I owl ng i nformati on and 
correspond! ng I i nks. For i nformati on on al I our Fd I ows Programs vi sit http://unel:. rhsmith.umd.edu 
and cl i ck on the Fd I ows Program tab. 

Freshman FeUovus The Freshman Fd lows track provides enriched opportunities for al I of our 
newly admitted Smith freshmen students from the moment they step on campus for the new 
Freshman Fd lows Orientation, fol lowed by "Busi ness Week" a yearly tradition to kick off the 
acadennic year with a series of social and professional events and activities. Freshman Fd lows 
Program consi sts of four (4) requi red courses, whi ch are compi eted over a students f i rst four 
semesters, plus a portfolio of co-curricular activities. For more information, please visit 
www.rhsmith.unid.edu/underaracl/freshmanfd lows, htni . 

International FellotAis A special group of Freshman Fdlows, Smith I nternational Fdlows are 
students who decl are dual degrees i n busi ness and ford gn I anguage. For more i nformati on on 
I nternati onal F d I ows, i ncl udi ng i nformati on on your ford gn I anguage advi sor, pi ease cl i ck www. rhsm 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/underaracl/i nternati onal fd I ows. htm l 

AcGOiiiting Teaching Scholars TheAccounting& InformationAssuranceDepartinent(AIA) 
offers thi s speci al program opportunity for undergraduate accounti ng students to serve as di scussi on 
I eaders and teachi ng assi stants for the begi nni ng accounti ng courses, B M GT 220 & 221. Accounti ng 
teachi ng scholars earn a $3,000 yearly sti pend (depend! ng on hours worked) whi le review! ng 
mater! al ! n preparati on for the C PA exam and practi ci ng organ! zati onal and dd i very ski 1 1 s. A 
one-cred! t mentor! ng course i s offered to prepare students for thd r rol es as teachi ng assi stants. F or 
more ! nformati on, pi ease vi si t www.rhsmith.umd.edu/underaracl/AIATeachi ngScholars.htnnl . 

Business Process Fel lows Pro-am The objective of the Busi ness Process Fdlows program is to 
devd op excd I ence i n operati ons management. Students wi 1 1 1 earn and practi ce busi ness process 
methodol ogi es and software tool s used by I eadi ng edge compani es and agenci es to desi gn and 
manage compI ex enterpri ses. The program wi 1 1 approach organi zati ons as i nterdependent systems, 
wi th ennphasi s on stati sti cal thi nki ng and opti mi zati on of the enterpri se. A practi cum offered i n 
conj uncti on wi th BMGT 485 Project Managermnt course can I ead to i nternshi ps wi th partner 
compani es. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergracl/busi nessprocessfd lowshtni . 

Desigi and I mo^yation in Marketing Fellovus The Desi gn i n M arketi ng Fd I ows Program bri dges 
the gap between marketi ng research and theory and the real i zati on of wd I -desi gned appi i cati ons. 
The program curricul um and co-curricular acti vities are designed to produce busi ness leaders who 
can make strategi cal I y sound and creati ve desi gn deci si ons. Fd I ows program students wi 1 1 master the 
creati ve probi em-sol vi ng and i nnovati ve-thi nki ng ski 1 1 s and experi ences al ong wi th marketi ng 
strategy and desi gn techni ques needed to be competi ti ve i n today's j ob market ( i ncl udi ng desi gn and 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el4b 

■ ' 

brand management). This program is intendedly interdisciplinary, with nxitual benefitto be gained 
by col I aborati on between marked ng students and desi gn students i n devd opi ng creati ve busi ness 
sol uti ons. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
www.smitli.umd.edu/underarad/clesianandi nnovationmarketi nof el lows. html 

E mergng C FOs Thi s program i s desi gned for students i nterested i n corporate f i nance and 
i nvestment banki ng. 1 1 i s desi gned to go more i n depth i nto corporate f i nance aspects of f i nance, and 
provi de students with enhanced I eadershi p and communi cati on ski 1 1 s. I n additi on to traditi onal 
courses taken by al I f i nance maj ors, students i n thi s program wi 1 1 attended a dedi cated seed on of 
Financial Managenwt BMGT 440F . Thi s seed on woul d bri ng i n corporate guest speakers and a 
case competition. For more i nformati on, please visit www.rhsmith.unxl.edu/undergracl/ernergi ngcfos.1 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/underaracl/emerai nacfos.html . 

E ntrepreneLTship FellotAS . The E ntrepreneurshi p Fd I ows Program bri ngs together tal ented Smith 
School students to create an entrepreneuri al cheni stry that wi 1 1 sti nxil ate the creati on and growth of 
new hi gh- potenti al enterpri ses. The pri mary goal of the E ntrepreneurshi p Fd I ows program i s to have 
each student parti ci pate i n I aunchi ng a prof itabi e busi ness venture whi I e sti 1 1 in school . Students wi 1 1 
pitch the Di ngman Center for E ntrepreneurshi p for i nvestment dol I ars and wi 1 1 demonstrate an 
acti onabi e pi an with a proposed return on i nvestment. Students wi 1 1 al so be encouraged to parti ci pate 
in University- hosted business plan competitions. The Di ngman Center for E ntrepreneurshi p will 
provi de mentori ng, access to capital , i ncubati on f aci I iti es and other support for E ntrepreneurshi p 
Fdlows. For more information on the Di ngman Center, pleasevisitwww.rhsmith.unxl.edu/dingman 
www.rhsmith.unxl.edu/di ngman . For nx)re i nformati on on the E ntrepreneurshi p Fd I ows Program 
vi si t www, rhsmith. unxl.edu/undergrad/entrepreneurshi pfd I ows. html . 

Financial Services Fellovus Thi s program i s desi gned for students i nterested i n the f i nanci al 
servi ces i ndustry, i ncl udi ng traditi onal banki ng (I oan off i cer, personal banki ng off i cer) and the 
f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry (f i nanci al pi anners, personal i nvestment managers) . The emphasi s i s on 
f i nanci al servi ces such as traditi onal banki ng, f i nanci al pi anners and personal i nvestment managers. 
Potential partners may include commercial banks, savings and loans, credit unions, insurance 
compani es, and f i nanci al pi anni ng f i rms. I n additi on to traditi onal courses taken by al I f i nance 
maj ors, students i n thi s program wi 1 1 attend a dedi cated seed on of BMGT 445F Comrwcial Banl< 
l^anagement For nx)re information, pleasevisit.www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergrad/financialservicesfe 
www.rhsmith.unxl.edu/underaracl/fi nanci al servi cesfd I ows. html . 

Global OpportLnities Global Opportunities is a sdectiveand reciprocal academic programfor 
I anguage and busi ness stixlents i nterested i n the worl d of i nternati onal busi ness, who want to gai n 
ski 1 1 s outsi de thd r maj ors and enhance thd r opportuni ti es i n the gl obal busi ness arena. L anguage 
maj ors compl ete 15 credits i n busi ness, whi I e busi ness maj ors compi ete 15 credits i n a si ngl e ford gn 
I anguage, 9 credits of whi ch must be at the 300-400 1 evd . Regi sti'ati on i s expedited for stixlents i n 
the program who al so parti ci pate i n stixly abroad tri ps, i nternati onal cl ubs and co-curri cul ar 
acti viti es. For i nformati on on the ford gn I anguage offeri ngs, pi ease vi si t www. I anauaaes.unxl.edu/ . 
For nx)re information on Global Opportunities, pleasevisitwww.rhsmith.unxl.edu/undergracl/globalop 
www.rhsmith.unxl.edu/undergracl/globalopportunitiesfdlows.htiinl . 

Leadership Fellovus Begins Fall 2009. Leadership Fdlows is an innovative and high quality 
academi c program ai med at sd ecti ng and devd opi ng I eadershi p tal ent for busi ness. The program i s 
based upon ttie phi I osophy that qual ity I eadershi p devd opment conies from a combi nati on of three 
core dements: (1) sound leadership theories operating as guiding principles, (2) quality leadership 



I necoiiegesendbchoois p^ei-^ 

■ ' 

experiences and practices, and (3) quality feedback based on scientific assessment tools. Students 
shoul d have concrete organi zati onal and I eadershi p experi ences by acti vd y parti cipatinginactivities 
in school, community, or business- related organizations, ideally taking on leadership positions by 
thd r second year i n tine program Students wi 1 1 parti ci pate i n a 360-assessment witii mentori ng and 
feedback from faculty and student mentors, and devd op a Leadershi p Devd opment PI an as part of 
an acti on-l earni ng practi cum For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
wwwjhsmitli.uiTid.edu/uriderarad/leadershi pfd lowshtni . 

LenriTB Senbet I nvesbnent Find Fellovus Thi s program i s a year-l org, advanced f i nance 
program aval I abl e to undergraduate f i nance maj ors i n tind r seni or year. Twd ve students are sd ected 
i n the spring of thdr junior year to participate on the fund, two as portfolio managers and ten as 
equity analysts. The program provides the students with ttie opportunity to apply what they have 
I earned i n F i nance cl asses to actual i nvestment deci si ons, through researchi ng real compani es and 
managi ng a portfol i o of real money, and through revi ewi ng the results of the deci si ons they make. 
Attheendof the year- long comnnitiTient, the Fund mennbers will present thdr performance to Fund 
donors. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit www.rhsmith.umd.edu/senbetfuncl/ . 

LTSCM Fellovus The Logistics, Transportation, & Supply Chain Management (LTSCM) Fdlows 
Leadershi p Program offers students a uni que opportunity for I earni ng and community bui I di ng both 
withi n the Smith School and with external LTSCM professionals. As part of a top-ranked program 
students wi 1 1 have the opportuni ty to take core LTSC M cl asses together, parti ci pate as I eaders i n the 
LTSCM Soci ety, vi sit regi onal LTSCM f aci I iti es and operati ons, si gn up for a cl ass that expl ores 
international and/or North American LTSCM processes, and network at local and annual meetings 
of leading professional LTSCM organizations. By combiningdassroom I earning with opportunities 
i n the prof essi onal community, LTSCM J uni or- Seni or Fd I ows wi 1 1 have a uni que opportunity to 
bui I d knowl edge of the LTSCM prof essi on and create a f oundati on for a networked career. For 
more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t www, rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/LTSC M f d I ows. htnl . 

Music Management Fellovus The objective of the M usic M anagennent Fd lows program is to 
devd op students' i nterests and capabi I i ti es i n the sped al i zed management f uncti ons i nvol ved i n the 
busi ness of nxsi c management, i ncl udi ng musi c marketi ng and promoti ons, producti on and 
di stri buti on, broadcasti ng, performance and producti on I ogi sti cs i n event and tour management, and 
fundi ng and management of venues and i nstituti ons. Students wi 1 1 i nteract with and I earn from 
experts in the fidd by partidpating in the design and production of recorded music, live events and 
programs, and through special i zed cl i nics and i nternshi ps focused on different genres and 
performance envi ronments: M usi c & E ntertai nment; Performi ng A rts. For more i nformati on, pi ease 
visit www, rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/musi cmanagementf d I ows. htni . 

Quantitative F I nance FellotAis The Quantitative Finance Fdlows Program (formerly Financial 
M arkets Fd I ows program) i s for students i nterested i n i nvestments, and i n parti cul ar i n I earni ng 
more about the software and hardware used i n the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry. I n additi on to 
traditi onal courses taken by al I f i nance maj ors, students i n thi s program wi 1 1 enrol Una non-credit 
section of Reuters 3000XTRA, pi us BM GT 343F-a dedicated section of I nvestments. This section 
woul d have a f i nanci al markets I ab requi rement extra sessi ons taught i n the I ab i n whi ch students 
woul d be taught to use Reuters, B I oomberg and other f i nanci al markets I abs hardware and software. 
Students woul d al so be d i gi bl e to parti ci pate i n wi nter-term study abroad tri ps with B M GT H onors, 
where focused on f i nanci al markets. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergracl/quantitativefi nancefd lowshtml . 

Quantitative Marketing Fellov\i5 Quantitative marketing is an approach to marketing that rdies 



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on computer based model s and stati sti cal , econometri c and data mi ni ng methods to understand and 
analyze why, which, when and how mxh products and services are being bought by consumers and 
f i rms. The ai m i s to make better forecasts, to I earn about new marketi ng opportuniti es, to enabi e 
managers to ask "what if" questions, and to make better decisions on prici ng, segmentation, 
adverti si ng and promoti ons, di stri buti on, positi oni ng, customer rd ati onshi p managennent, and 
product and servi ce desi gn, among others. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/unclerarad/quantitativemarketi nofel lowshtni . 

QUEST (Quality EnhatxenentSystEmsandTeBiTE): A collaborative partnership with the A. 
J ames CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng and the Col I ege of Computer, M athennati cal and Physi cal 
Sci ences, the Q U E ST program i s an i nnovati ve three-year qual i ty managennent program wi th a 
dynami c I earni ng envi ronment. G rounded i n team- based courses I ed by an i nterdi sci pi i nary f acul ty, 
the program offers students the opportunity to study i ntegrati on of qual ity i n the workpl ace whi I e 
applying the knowledge and ski 1 1 -set they have gained from their major in the field of engineering, 
busi ness or computer sci ence. QU E ST graduates enter the work force excel I i ng i n teanrwork, 
customer val ue management process and product desi gn, probi enn-sol vi ng, proj ect managennent and 
customer sati sfacti on. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit www.rhsmith.umd.edu/quest/ . 

Ressarch Fellovus Research Fd I ows i s a one-year program offeri ng students pal d opportuniti es to 
work with one of our outstandi ng Smith Faculty members on thd r research. Research fd lows 
compl ete up to a total of 250 hours/semester, whi ch can be al I ocated as 18 hours/week for 14 weeks 
or some otiner set hours, to be estabi i shed by the faculty proj ect supervi sor. Compensati on i s 
$5,000/year or $2,500/semester, dependi ng upon hours worked. Research Fd I ows wi 1 1 present thd r 
work at the annual Research Day each spri ng. M i ni mum one-year commitment, may be renewed. 
For more information, pi ease visit www, rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/researchf d I ows. htni . 

Snrith Technology FeUovus ST Fd I ows perform a vari ety of duti es, whi ch may i ncl ude servi ng as 
teachi ng assi stants wi th technol ogy- i ntensi ve cl asses, or as research assi stants, executi ng targeted 
technol ogy devd opment proj ects f or use i n i nstructi on or research, assi sti ng faculty and othes with 
targeted projects involving software such as Oracle or .NET. Some proj ect assignments will require 
experi ence usi ng specif i c software pi atforms and wi 1 1 provi de techni cal support for courses, assi st 
faculty with tutori al s and demonstrati ons, and assi st stixlent teams i n proj ects. Students worki ng on 
proj ects whi ch requi re speci f i c technol ogy ski 1 1 s wi 1 1 be d i gi bl e to attend vendor hands-on trai ni ng 
sessi ons. Proj ects wi 1 1 general I y be def i ned as one semester i n durati on but coul d extend over the 
acadenic year. Compensation for work on projects is $10/hour, with projects rangi ng from 200-400 
hours, which can be spread over a semester or a year. Projects may be renewable for additional 
semesters. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t www, rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/sti . html . 

Sports Management FellotAis The Sport M anagement Fd I ows program focuses on the worl dwi de 
enterpri se of sport and the promi nence of organi zed sports at every I evd i n col I egi ate and 
prof essi onal sports envi ronments, together with the si gnif i cance of auxi I i ary i ndustri es i n sports 
appard and equi pment, td evi si on contracts and other anci 1 1 ary products and servi ces. The 
curri cul um i ncl udes an i nternshi p bui 1 1 i nto the BMGT 485 Project Management course whi ch wi 1 1 
provi de students an opportunity to focus on the parti cul ar i ssues i n the sports i ndustry, and prepare 
them for vari ous rol es i n sport management i n both the col I egi ate and prof essi onal sport 
envi ronments and private sector enterprises. For more i nformati on, please visit 
www, rhsmi th. umd. edu/underarad/sportmanaaementf d I ows. htni . 

STARS: The mi ssi on of the STA RS program i s to encourage and attract f i rst generati on and under 
represented students to the study of busi ness, to prepare them for col I ege, and to encourage them to 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el-^ 

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makethe U ni versi ty of Maryland the r#L choice. Once adrritted, the program provides a supportive 
networl< for academi c success I eadi ng to graduati on, and then wd conies them bacl< as al umni 
contri butors to the Smith Community. The chal I enge i s to i dentify and support outstandi ng stixients 
i nterested i n stixiyi ng busi ness, and to worl< togetiner with thd r school s and with vari ous access 
programs to prepare for admi ssi on to col I ege. To achi eve thi s goal , Smi th School undergraduates 
have devd oped a corps of peer- mentors who provi de mentori ng and academi c support to hi gh 
school stijdents, as wd I as to stijdents al ready admi tted to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and who seek 
admi ssi on to the Smith School . Student mentors parti ci pate i n vi sits to hi gh school s and work with 
sponsored col lege access programs. They visit high-school stixients at off-campus sites and host 
these stixients duri ng campus vi sits and educati onal programs such as the annual 
High-School-to-Col I ege Workshops and FinanceFidd Day. A one-credit course in I ntergroup 
Communi cati on i s bd ng consi dered as a vehi cl e for bui I di ng mentori ng ski 1 1 s and coordi nati ng 
vol unteer activities. For more i nformation, please visit 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/underarad/starsnew.htiii . 

College Honors Pro-am 

The Snrith School Honors program which is part of the Smith School 's Fd lows Program offers 
stixients with superi or academi c achi evements speci al opportijniti es and resources, i ncl udi ng the 
opportunity to parti ci pate i n cutti ng-edge research on busi ness i ssues, and to graduate with honors. 
Students i n the honors program take thd r upper-l evd B M GT core courses i n smal I , serni nar-styl e 
honors secti ons, whi ch al I ow i n-depth expl orati on of busi ness topi cs i n marketi ng, f i nance, 
management and organization, busi ness law, and pol icy and sti'ategy. The Smith School Honors 
Program provi des both a non-thesi s and a thesi s opti on, i n whi ch students work on an ori gi nal 
research proj ect under the supervi si on of a Smi th School f acul ty member. A dmi ssi on to the Smi th 
School H onors P rogram i s competi ti ve. Students are sd ected on the basi s of the f ol I owl ng 
requirements: 

• M i ni mum 3. 5 cumul ati ve grade poi nt average 

• M i ni mum 45 credit hours earned 

• Compl eti on of al I B M GT pre-requi site courses by the end of Spri ng sennester: 

Pri nci pi es of Accounti ng I and 1 1 : B M GT 220 and 221 

B usi ness Stati sti cs: B M GT 230 (or 231) 

Calculus: MATH 220 or 140 

Principles of M icro- and Macro- Economics: ECON 200 and 201 

The appi i cati on to the B M GT H onors program i ncl udes a personal essay and two I ett:ers of 
recommendation from faculty. TheBMGT Honors application can be downloaded from the Smith 
School website http://une[:. rhsmith.umd.edu . 

Admission to the Smith School Honors Program takes pi ace once a year in the Spring semester. 
M ore debai I s are aval I abl e at www.rhsmith.umd.edu/underarad/busi nesshonors.htiii . 

ApproMBd Student Societies and ProfiesEional Organizations 



Student Profiesaonal Organizations 

Students may choose to associ ate thennsd ves wi th one or more prof essi onal organi zati ons. V i si t 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/susa for more detai I s and a compl ete I i st of organi zati ons. 



inecoii^esembcnoois H^eMS 



Av^jards 

Scholarships 

For debai I s on avai I abl e schol arshi ps, pi ease vi si t www.unel:.rhsnnitli.unncl.eclu. 



COLLEGE OF CHEMICAL & LIFE SCIENCES (CLFS) 

1302 Symons Hall, 301-405-2080 
www.chennlife.umd.eclu 
Dean: Norma Al lewd I 

Associate Dean(s): Robert I nfantinoj r., Arthur Popper 
Assi stant Dean(s) : L i sa B radi ey-K I emko, J od I e Presson 

U ndergraduate Research and I nternshi p Programs - Di rector K ateri na (Kaci ) Thompson 

Life Sciences College Park Scholars - Director Lee Hdmen 

U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons Counsd i ng and Recruitment - Coordi nator: Eden M . Garosi 

Health Professions Advising Office- Director Wendy Loughlin 

Undergraduate Biological Sciences Program at the Universities at Shady Grove- Director Tom 

Stanton 

The undergraduate degree programs i n the Col I ege of Chenni cal and L if e Sci ences are 

Chemistry 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

E nvi ronmental Sci ences & Pol i cy 

The degree programs i n the Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences prepare students for entry i nto 
the work force, matriculation in graduate school, and matriculation in professional schools. The 
Cherni stry and B i ochemi stry degree programs are housed i n the Department of Cherni stry and 
B i ocheni stry. The B i ol ogi cal Sci ences degree program i s j oi nti y offered by the departments of 
Biology, Cdl Biology arid Molecular Genetics, and Entomology. Biological Sciences students may 
study broadly in General Biology, or special izethdr upper I evd course work in Cdl Biology and 
Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, M icrobiology, or Physiology and Neurobiology. A double major 
program wi th the Col I ege of E ducati on provi des certi f i cati on to teach H i gh School C herni stry or 
Biology. The Col lege grants degrees i n the Biodiversity and Conservation special izati on i n the 
E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy maj or. 

Opportuiitiesfor Research 

Opportuniti es are avai I abl e across the Col I ege and off-campus for undergraduates to parti ci pate i n 
basic and appi led research projects, and research experience is encouraged for al I undergraduate 
students. Off campus opportunities include National I nstitutes of Health, Food and Drug 
Administration, National Institute of Standards and Technology, The Smithsonian, the National Zoo, 
pri vate bi otechnol ogy f i rms, and many others. The Col I ege h^ speci al off eri ngs i n al I of the 
campus-wide acadenic programs such as Gemstones, Honors, Col lege Park Scholars, and Freshman 
Learning Communities. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbC 



Achrisaon Requirements 

Students appi yi ng f or adrni ssi on shoul d consul t the U ni versi ty A dmi ssi ons seed on i n C hapter 1 for 
general i nf ormati on about adni ssi ons requi rements and recommended courses. Students who pi an to 
enter an undergraduate program i n the Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences shoul d i ncl ude the 
f ol I owl ng subj ects i n thei r hi gh school program at I east two units i n the bi ol ogi cal sci ences and 
physical sciences (chemistry, physics); and four units of mathematics algebra, geometry, 
pre-cal cul us and cal cul us. M ath and sci ence coursework at the honors/A P/l B I evd i s strongi y 
encouraged. 

For further i nformati on about admi ssi ons to the Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences, contact 
Eden M .Garosi, Coordinator, Undergraduate A dmi ssi ons Counseling and Recruitment, 
301-314-8375; egarosi(a)umd.edu and cherni if e-inquiries(a)umd.edu. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rement^Deg'eeOptions 

See entri es under i ndi vi dual degree programs i n C herni stry and B i ocherni stry, B i ol ogi cal Sci ences, 
and Environmental Sciences. 

Advising 

Students i n the Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences have substanti al advi si ng support throughout 
thei r academi c career. Each semester each student i s assi gned an advi sor and i s requi red to meet 
with that advi sor before regi steri ng for the next semester cl asses. Advi sors i ncl ude the prof essi onal 
advi si rg staff housed i n the Col I ege off i ce ard faculty niernbers i n the vari ous acaderni c advi sors. 
Students have access to a range of advi si ng experti se to gui de them through thei r academi c and 
prof essi onal careers. Questi ons about advi si ng shoul d be di rected to the Student Servi ces Off i ce, 
1300 Symons H al 1 , 301-405-5820. Students i nterested i n the health prof essi ons can f i nd additi onal 
advising from the Health Professions Advising Office 0129 Chemistry BIdg, 301-405-7805, 
http://www.prehealth.unxl.edu/ . 

Departments and C enters 

The Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences i s home to four academi c departments. The C henristry 
Department offers the undergraduate degrees i n Cherni stry and i n B i ocherni stry. The undergraduate 
B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Degree i s a j oi nt off eri ng by the three B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Departments. These 
aretheBidog/ Department the Cell Bidog/andMoleciJar Genetics Department and the 
E ntomolog/ Department. 

I^linors 

The Col I ege of Chenri cal and L if e Sci ences does not offer nri nors. 
Living-Learning Pro-ams 

College Park Scholars L ife Sciences 

Director Dr. Lee Hell man 

Assistant Director Ms. BeckyZonies 1119 Cumberland Hal I, 301-405-0528 

The Col I ege of Cherni cal and L if e Sci ences sponsors the Col I ege Park Schol ars L if e Sci ences 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbl 

program for erteri ng freshman who are adrritted by i nvitati on duri ng the admi ssi ons process. 
Students meet weekl y i n col I oqui a wi tin f acul ty where they I earn more about the di verse areas of 
study i n the I if e sci ences. Schol ars are al so cl ustered i n course seed ons whi ch f ulf i 1 1 maj or and 
general education requirements. I nternational travel -study course opportunities led by College 
f acul ty are aval I abl e as a part of the program Students create a communi ty of I i vi ng and I earni ng i n 
a speci al I y-equi pped resi dence hal I . 

Specialized Acadenfic Pro-ams 

J oint Biomedical Researcii Prog'am with the University oF Maryland School oF Medicine 

Students may appi y f or the j oi nt B i omedi cal Sci ence Research P rogram between the Department of 
Medical and Research Technology (DMRT), University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the 
Col I ege of C herni cal and L i f e Sci ences. Students who have successful I y compi eted 60 credi ts of 
prerequi si te courses at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park may be consi dered for the 
program Beginning i n the j uni or year within the UM School of Medicine, students will develop 
ski I Is i n a variety of biotechnology methodologies as wd I as become fami I iar with the operation of 
anal yti cal i nstruments used i n cl i ni cal I aboratori es, bi omedi cal sci ence, and bi osaf ety and qual i ty 
assurance issues. I nterested students should cal I the DRMT Admissions Office at 410-706-7664. 

College Honors Pro-am 

Students in the College of Chemical and Life Sciences participate in Gemstones, the University 
Honors program and College Park Scholars, and research-intensive departmental honors programs. 

Departmental Honors 

Students may apply to parti ci pate i n research- based departmental honors programs i n the each of the 
departments of tine Col I ege. Based on the students performance i n research and defense of a 
written thesi s, the department may recommend candi dates for the appropri ate degree with 
Departmental Honors or Departmental High Honors. Successful completion of departmental honors 
wi 1 1 be recogni zed on a students academi c transcri pt and di pi oma. Parti ci pad on i n the U ni versi ty 
Honors program is not requi red for entry i nto a departmental honors program See departmental 
I i sti ngs or consult with an academi c advi sor i n the Col I ege for more i nformati on. 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, AND PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES (CMPS) 

3400 A. V. Williams, 301-405-2677 

www.cmps.umd.edu 

cmpsque(a)umd.edu (for CM PS advising questions) 

Dean: Stephen Hal peri n 

Associate Dean(s): Ronald L. Lipsman (Senior Assoc. Dean), David C. Lay 

Nationally recognized for our education, research, faculty and students, the Col I ege of Computer, 
Mathematical and Physical Sciences is a critical educational and scientific resource benefiting the 
region and the nation. The Col lege offers every student a high-qual ity, i nnovati ve, and 
cross-di sci pi i nary educati onal experi ence. StrongI y comrni tted to maki ng studi es i n the sci ences 
aval I abl e to al I , the Col I ege acti vd y encourages and supports the recrui tment and retenti on of 
women and mi noriti es. 

Our students have the opportunity of worki ng cl osely with f i rst-cl ass faculty i n state-of-the-art I abs. 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois p^eib:^ 

■ ' 

both on and off campus, on some of the most exciti ng probi ems of modern sci ence and mathemati cs. 
We have devd oped courses to ref I ect the evol vi ng nature of I T subj ects and the rapi dl y changi ng 
worl d of sci ence and mathennati cs. As a new approach to undergraduate educati on, nxiiti pi e tracks 
are offered withi n maj ors, i ncl udi ng tracks for future teachers and tracks with an ennphasi s on 
computation. 

Students parti ci pate i n Departmental Honors programs. Corporate Scholars, the Gemstone program 
Quest, and Col I ege Park Schol ars. They appi y thd r I ab and cl assroom ski 1 1 s through i nternshi ps at 
area compani es. Excel I ent advi si ng and career servi ces are i n pi ace to hd p our undergraduates 
transition to graduate programs, publ ic service, or private sector commerce. Our highly-ski I led 
graduates pursue careers i n a great many f i el ds and prof essi ons. 

Achrisaon Requirements 

A 1 1 students who meet the admi ssi ons standards descri bed i n Chapter 1 of thi s catal og are i nvited to 
consi der a maj or or a mi nor i n one of the Bachd or of Sci ence degree programs of the Col I ege. 
A ppl i cati ons of prospecti ve freshmen and transfer students are eval uated by the Off i ce of 
Undergraduate Admissions (www.uga.umd.edu). All current University of Maryland students in 
good academi c standi ng are wd come to contact the CM PS Dean's Off i ce at 301-405-2677 or 
cmpsque(a)deans. umd.edu. 

Recriitment 

3400 A . V . Wi 1 1 i ams 301-405-2677 
vwAW■cnr^3&^J^rri■edu^^J^c^eryaduBte^prospecti^^_g^^ 

Asst. Director for Recruitment: Andrew] anosko (aj anoskoOumd. edu ) 

The Col I ege^s Assi stant Di rector for Recruitment serves as a resource and contact person for 
prospecti ve students i nterested i n bachd or degrees and al so serves as a I i ai son to the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Under^aduate De^ee Requirement^De^eeOptions 

Graduation Reqiiremenbs 

1. A mi ni mum of 120 semester hours with at least a C average is requi red of al I 
Bachd or of Sci ence degrees from the Col I ege. 

2. Forty-three credit hours that satisfy the general education CORE program 
requi rements of the U ni versi ty . I n some i nstances, courses taken to sati sf y these 
requi rements may al so be used to sati sfy maj or requi rennents. 

3. M ajor and supporti ng coursework as specified under each department or program 

4. Thef i nal 30 semester hours nxst be completed at Col lege Park. Occasional ly, the 
Dean may wai ve thi s requi rement for up to 16 of the 30 credi ts ci ted. Such a wai ver i s 
considered only if the student al ready has 75 credits i n residence. 

5. Students must be enrol led in the program in which they plan to graduate by the time 
they regi ster f or the I ast 15 hours. 



I he col leges and bchods h'cQel^d 

■ ■ 

Advising 

The Undergraduate Education Office, 3400A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2677, centrally 
coordi nates advi si ng and the processi ng and updati ng of stixlent records. I nqui ri es concerni ng 
university regulations, transfer credit Dean's Exceptions and other general information should be 
addressed to thi s off i ce. Speci f i c departmental i nf ormati on i n rd ati onshi p to maj ors i s best obtai ned 
di recti y from academi c departments. E ach department i n the Col I ege requi res semester advi si ng for 
regi sti'ati on and f utijre course pi anni ng. Advi sors i n departments are aval I abl e on wal k-i n and 
appoi ntinent basi s. Students are al so encouraged to contact the off i ce by e-mai I at 
cmpsque(a)umd.edu. Assistance is also aval I able by phone at 301-405-2677. 

Departments and Centers 

The f ol I owl ng departments, programs and research units are the pri nci pal components of the 
College 

Department of Asti'onomy 

Deparbnent of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Geology 

Department of M atinemati cs 

Department of Physics 

Applied M atinemati cs and Statistics, and Scientific Computation Program 

Physical Sciences Program 

Statistics Program 

Center for B i ol nf ormati cs and Computati onal B i ol ogy 

Center for N anophysi cs and A dvanced M ateri al s 

Center for Sci enti f i c Computati on and M atinemati cal M odd i ng 

Earth System Sci ence I nterdi sci pi i nary Center 

I nstitute for Advanced Computer Studies 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology 

I nstitute for Research i n E I edroni cs and A ppl i ed Physi cs (j oi nt with the Col I ege of 

Engineering) 

J oi nt Quantum I nstitute 

M aryl and B i ophysi cs Program 

M ateri al s Research Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng Center 

N orbert Wi ener Center for H armoni c A nal ysi s and A ppl i cati ons 

De^^ee Pro-ams 

Thefol lowi ng Bachdor of Science (B .S.) degree programs are offered to undergraduates by the 
departments and programs of the Col I ege Asti'onomy, Computer E ngi neeri ng. Computer Sci ence. 
Geology, Matinernatics, Physics, and Physical Sciences. In addition. Geology sponsors one of the 
areas of concentrati on i n the E nvi ronnnental Sci ence and Pol i cy program 

i^linors 

The Col I ege off ers M i nors i n the f ol I owl ng areas: 

Asti'onomy 
Computer Science 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elM 

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Surficial Geology 
Earth Material Properties 
Earth History 
Geophysics 
Hydrology 
Meteorology 
Atmospheri c C herni stry 
Atmospheric Sciences 
Mathematics 
Actuarial Mathematics 
Statistics 
Physics 

M i nors i n the Col I ege offer students i n al I di sci pi i nes the opportunity to pursue a structured program 
of study in afield outsidethdr major. Each student who successfully completes a mi nor will have 
the accompi i shment noted on thd r transcri pt. Consult departmental advi sors and websites for further 
i nf ormati on. www. cmps. umd. edu/undergraduat^programs. htm 

Living-Learning Pro-ams 

College Park Scholars 

www.scholars.umd.edu 

CPS in Science, Discovery & the Universe 

Co- Directors: Alan Peel and Stephen White 
CPS in Earth, Life& Ti me Director Thomas R. Holtz,Jr. 

The Col I ege co-sponsors two Col I ege Park Scholars programs. Science, Discovery^ the Universe 
and Earth, Life & Ti me. These I i vi ng/learni ng programs focus around the academic disci pi i nes of the 
faculty, space sciences (in particular planetary science) and the historical natural sciences (in 
parti cul ar pal eontol ogy and evol uti onary bi ol ogy) , respecti vd y . I n these two-year programs for 
i ncomi ng freshmen, slLidents are brought together around common i ntd I ectual i nterests. The 
program seeks to i nspi re students to devd op thd r i nterests and i ntd I ectual capaci ty by bui I di ng a 
community where everyone has shared i nterests i n scholarly pursuits. The Scholars program al lows 
students to experi ence a smal I col I ege envi ronment, i n cl ose contact with faculty who are worki ng at 
the forefront of thd r f i d ds of experti se. 

Specialized Acadenric Pro-ams 

C M PS Corporate Scholars Pro^-am 

3400 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-1082 
www.cmps.umd.edu/csp/i ndex.htm 
Contact: L awrence L i ff at lliff(a)umd.edu 

The Corporate Schol ars Program i s a combi ned i nternshi p and schol arshi p program that provi des 
highly talented CM PS students with work experience rdated to thd r f idds of study. The program is 
a uni que endeavor by the Col I ege to expand and i mprove our students' educati on and to bui I d better 
rd ati onshi ps wi th I ocal corporati ons. 

CMPS Under^-aduabe Research Experiences 

www.cmps. umd. edu/undergraduat^research. htm 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elbb 

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I rternshi ps are val uabi e. Research i s f asci nati ng. Students can experi ence sci entif i c di scovery f i rst 
hand. Knowledge learned in class is used and applied. Students learn the sci entitle metiiod in a real 
experi mental setti ng, and they see how new sci entif i c knowl edge i s created. Be a part of the sci ence 
di scovery i n C M PS, whi ch pi aces the col I ege among the top 15 publ i c and pri vate uni versi ti es 
nati onwi de. A research experi ence provi des a f i rst- hand route i nto prof essi onal probi em-sol vi ng and 
may lead to publ ication. This gives stixlents personal contact with faculty, postdoctoral fd lows and 
graduate stixlents, and a real pi ctijre of graduate school . E mpl oyers and graduate school s I ook for 
research experi ence i n appi i cants. 

College Honors Pro-am 

U ndergraduate honors are offered to stixlents i n the Physi cal Sci ences Program and the departments 
of Asti'onomy, Computer Science, Geology, Matiiematics and Physics. Specific information is 
provi ded under the i ndi vi dual program descri pti ons. 

Dean'sList. A list of all stixlents who have passed at least 12 hours of academic work in the 
precedi ng semester with an overal I average grade of at I east 3.5. 

AsBxiabe Dean's Commendation. A I ist of al I stixlents who have passed at least 12 hours of 
acadenic work i n the precedi ng semester with an overal I average grade between 3.0 and 3.5. 

Financial AsaStanGe 

Scholarships 

www.cmps.umd.edu/undergraduate^scholarshi ps.htin 

For currentiy enrol led stixlents, the Col lege accepts merit and need-based award and scholarshi p 
appI i cati ons on the Col I ege Schol arshi p A ppl i cati on Form Students shoul d compi ete one form onl y 
and submit either decti'onical ly or via surface mai I . AppI icants wi 1 1 be considered for al I merit and 
need- based schol arshi ps admi ni stered by the Col I ege for whi ch they are d i gi bl e. E I i gi bl e stixlents 
wi 1 1 al so be contacted by emai I with i nformati on on speci al programs. For best consi derati on. 
Col I ege schol arshi p appI i cati ons for each academi c year shoul d be submitted by M ay 10 for the 
school year begi nni ng the f ol I owl ng Septennber. 

Departmental schol arshi ps may have different deadi i nes. For additi onal i nformati on vi sit the 
col I ege web site. 

Av^jards 

J . R. Dorfman Prizefor Underg'aduabe Research 

www.cmps. umd. edu/undergraduat^dorf man_pri ze. htin 

Anaward presented at the Spring Academic Festival for the best research project conducted on or 
off campus by a current Col I ege undergraduate maj or. 

The CM PS website I i sts other awards and schol arshi ps that are aval I abl e to CM PS maj ors: 
www.cmps. umd.edu/undergraduate^schol arshi ps.htin 



Research Units 



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Center for Bid nfbi-maticsand Computational Biology 

3115 Biomolecular Sciences BIdg, 301-405-5936 
www.cbcb.uiTd.edu 

Professor and Di rector Steven Salzberg The U ni versity of M aryland Center for Bioi nformatics and 
Computati onal B i ol ogy i s a nxil ti di sci pi i nary center dedi cated to research on questi ons ari si ng from 
the genome revol uti on. CBCB bri ngs together sci end sts and engi neers from many f i el ds, i ncl udi ng 
computer science, molecular biology, genomics, mathematics, statistics, physics, and biochemistiy, 
al I of whom share a common i nterest i n gai ni ng a better understandi ng of how I ife works. Students 
i nterested i n Ph.D. stixlies i n CBCB have a number of choices. Students with a background i n 
computer sci ence, matiiemati cs, physi cs, or engi neeri ng shoul d consi der appi yi ng to ttie Ph. D . 
programs i n Computer Sci ence or i n B i oengi neeri ng. Students whose pri nci pal trai ni ng i s i n the 
bi ol ogi cal sci ences mi ght prefer to appI y to one of several departmental or i nter-department 
programs I i sted at cbcb. umd.edu. programs 



Center for Nanophysicsand Adxoxfid Materials 

Physi cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-7321 

www.cnam.umd.edu 

Professor and Di rector Steven A nl age 

The Center for Nanophysics and Advanced M aterials (CNAM ) bri ngs togetiner about thi rty-f i ve 
faculty from physi cs and aff i I i ated departments to work on cutti ng-edge research probi ems rd ated to 
condensed matter physi cs. The faculty conduct both experi mental and theoreti cal research i n f i el ds 
such as solid state physics, sti^ongly correlated dedron systems, superconductivity, surface sci ence 
magneti c materi al s, and seni conductors. Thi s research i s i mportant for commerci al and 
defense- rd ated applications, such as communications, digital and analog dedronics, sensors, and 
computers. CNAM provi des a uni que i nterdi sci pi i nary educati on that gi ves stixlents a di versi ty of 
ski I Is as wd I as a broad perspective of how scientific knowledge i mpacts technological 
devd opment. The experi mental and theoreti cal research programs at CN A M are carri ed out by 
approxi matd y 40 graduate stixlents under the supervi si on of the C N A M f acul ty. A si gni f i cant 
number of undergraduate stixlents al so parti ci pate i n research proj ects, many of them reed vi ng a 
high honors citation upon graduation. 



Center for Scientific Computation and Matiiematical Modeling 

4149 Computer Science I nsti-ucti onal Center, 301-405-0648 

www.cscammumd.edu 

Professor and Di rector Eitan Tadmor 

The abi I ity to compute at tremendous speeds with gigantic data sets is enabi i ng advances i n nearly 
B/ery di sci pi i ne. Sci entif i c computati on pi ays a I eadi ng rol e i n the stixJy of protd n f ol di ng, cl i mate 
B/ol uti on, weatiier predi cti on, star f ormati on, pi asma turbul ence, quark-gl uon i nteracti ons and 
hi gh-temperatijre superconducti vi ty. A t the Center for Sci enti f i c Computati on and M atinemati cal 
M odd i ng, graduate stixlents and faculty are worki ng togetiner to devd op and to understand 
fundamental computational techniques, algorithms and analytical tools, and to apply this 
understandi ng to outstandi ng sci entif i c probI ems i n a vari ety of f i d ds. U ndergraduate research 
opportijniti es exi st for stixlents who are i nterested i n I earni ng how to use computers to understand 
how the worl d works. 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elb/ 

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Earth SySbem ScieriGe I nberdisciplinary Center 

2207 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-5599 

www.e5sic.uiTd.edu 

Professor and Director: Antonio J . Busalacchi 

E SSI C i s a j oi nt center between the Departments of Atmospineri c and Oceani c Sci ences, Geol ogy, 
and Geograpiny together with the Earth Sciences Di rectorate at the NASA Goddard Space Fl ight 
Center. The goal of the Center i s to enhance our understandi ng of how the 
atmosphere-ocean- 1 and- bi osphere components of the Earth i nteract as a coupl ed system Thi s i s 
accompi i shed vi a studi es of the i nteracti on between the physi cal cl i mate system (e.g., El N i no) and 
biogeochemical cycles (e.g., greenhouse gases, changes i n land use and cover). The major research 
thrusts of the Center are studies of CI i mate Variabi I ity and Change, Atmospheric Composition and 
Processes, and the Global Carbon Cycle (i ncl udi ng Terrestrial and M ari ne Ecosystems/Land 
Use^Cover Change). The manner i n which this research is accompi ished is via analyses of i n situ and 
remotely sensed observations together with component and coupled ocean-atmosphere- 1 and models. 
Together thi s provi des a f oundati on for understandi ng and f orecasti ng changes i n the gl obal 
envi ronment and assessi ng regi onal i mpl i cati ons. Data assi mi I ati on and regi onal downscal i ng 
provi de the means by whi ch the observati ons and model s are I i nked to study the i nteracti ons 
between the physi cal cl i mate system and bi ogeochemi cal cycl es from gl obal to regi onal seal es. 
Courses and research guidance by Center faculty are provided through the Departments of 
Geography, Geology and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, or under the auspices of Col lege 
i nterdisci pi i nary I isti ngs. 

I nditubefor Advanced Computer Studies 

2119 A. V. Williams Building, 301-405-6722 

www, umi acs. umd.edu 

Professor and Director: V.S. Subrahmanian 

The faculty at the I nstitute for Advanced Computer Studi es conduct fundamental research at the 
i nterface between computer sci ence and other sci entif i c di sci pi i nes supported by a state-of-the-art 
computi ng i nf rastructure. These i nterdi sci pi i nary research programs offer opportuniti es for thesi s 
research and classroom i nstruction, with a planned new focus on human-computer i nteracti on, 
bioi nformatics and computational biology. The I nstitute is i nternational ly known i n computer vision 
and graphi cs, paral I el and di stri buted computi ng, i nf ormati on vi sual i zati on and educati onal 
technol ogi es, natural I anguage processi ng and computati onal I i ngui sti cs, software engi neeri ng, and 
nxil ti medi a and i nternet computi ng. Courses and tinesi s research gui dance by I nsti tute f acul ty are 
provi ded under the auspi ces of the I abs, centers, and the academi c departments aff i I i ated with the 
Institute. 

Inditubefor Physical Science and Technology 

4211 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-4877 

www.ipst.Limd.edu 

Professor and Director: Rajarshi Roy 

The faculty mennbers of the I nstitute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy are engaged i n the study 
of pure and appi i ed sci ence probi ems that are at the boundari es between those areas served by the 
acadenri c departments. A reas of ennphasi s i ncl ude appI i ed mathemati cs and sci end f i c computati on, 
statistical physics and chaotic dynamics, biophysical and chemical physics, materials sci ence and 
nanotechnology, atomic, molecular, optical and plasma physics, and space and upper-atmospheric 
physi cs. These i nterdi sci pi i nary probI ems afford chal I engi ng opportuniti es for thesi s research and 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elbt 

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cl assroom i nstructi on. Courses and thesi s research gui dance by I nsti tute f acul ty are provi ded ei ther 
through the graduate program i n cherni cal physi cs, tine sci entif i c computati on and mathemati cal 
model i ng program or under the auspi ces of other departments. 

Inditubefor Research in Electronics and Applied Physics 

Energy Research Facility, 301-405-4951 

www.ireap.umd.edu 

Professor and Director Dan Lathrop 

The Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (I REAP) isjointiy administered by the 
College and the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering. The faculty members in I REAP study 
di verse sci end f i c probi ems that are on the boundari es between physi cs and engi neeri ng, and teach 
rd evant courses i n the Col I ege and E ngi neeri ng Departments. I R E A P conducts experi mental and 
theoreti cal research i n noni i near dynami cs (chaos), hi gh-temperature pi asma physi cs, pi asma 
spectroscopy, rd ati vi sti c mi crowave d ectroni cs, hi gh- bri ghtness charged parti cl e beams, 
f ree-d ectron I asers, I aser- pi asma i nteracti ons, i on beam mi crof abri cati on techni ques, and mi crowave 
si nteri ng of advanced materi al s. I R E A P i s recogni zed i nternati onal I y as a I eadi ng uni versi ty 
research center i n these areas of research. We acti vd y encourage undergraduate parti ci pad on i n our 
research program through i ndependent study, speci al proj ects, and i nternshi ps urider faculty 
supervision. 

J oint Quantun I nstitube 

0368 Physi cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-6129 

jqi.umd.edu 

Professor and Di rector: Chri s Lobb 

A new technol ogi cal revol uti on i s begi nni ng because the strange and uni que properti es of quantum 
physi cs are rd evant for i nformati on sci ence and technol ogy. Our abi I ity to expl oit quantum 
phenomena is sti 1 1 at a pri miti ve stage, analogous to the use of a si ngle transistor. A chal lengi ng 
goal i s to I earn how to seal e up from si mpl e few-component systems to si zes necessary for 
appi ications. Such a "quantum computer" has the potential abi I ity to handle problenns that would 
take the age of the uni verse to sol ve on the best conventi onal computers ~ probI ems such as 
decrypti on and desi gni ng mol ecul es for pharmaceuti cal appI i cati ons. The J oi nt Quantum I nsti tute 
(J Ql ) has gathered two dozen I eadi ng sci end sts from the N ati onal I nstitute of Standards and 
Technol ogy and the U ni versi ty of M aryl and to create the i nternati onal center for excd I ence i n the 
study of quantum mechani cs. U ndergraduates are acti vd y i nvol ved i n research at the J Ql , and new 
students are encouraged to parti ci pate. 

Maryland Biophysics Pro^-am 

I nstitute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy, 301-405-4780 
maryl andbi ophysi cs. umd.edu 
Professor and Director: D. Thirumalai 

One of the great chal I enges i n the current century i s to use to ri gorous methods i n physi cs and 
cherni stry to tackl e cutti ng edge probI ems i n bi ol ogy. F rom transcri pti on of geneti c i nformati on to 
how vari ous components of a cd I f uncti on are amenabi e to i nvesti gati on by experi mental and 
computational methods. The faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fd lows in the Biophysics 
program are usi ng a vari ety of techni ques to study a wi se range of probI ems of great i nterest i n 
bi ol ogy. Several I aboratori es mi ght recrui t enterpri si ng undergraduate students to parti ci pate i n 
these exciti ng areas of research. 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois p^eiby 

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Materials RessarchScieriGeand Engneering Center 

2120 Physi cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-8349 

www.nTsec.umcl.eclu 

Professor and Director Ellen D. Williams 

Part of a national network of NSF-f unded M aterials Research Centers, faculty activities i n M RSEC's 
mandate i ncl ude materi al s research, i ndusti'i al col I aborati ons and educati onal outi'each. Faculty 
research focuses on pol ari zati on dynami cs i n f errod edri c thi n f i I ms, surface nanosti'urtures-f rom 
f I uctijations to driven systems and metal oxides with high spi n polarization. M RSEC actively 
encourages undergraduate parti ci pati on i n thd r research program through parti ci pati on i n 
i ndependent stixly, speci al proj ects and i nternshi ps under faculty supervi si on and pays speci al 
attenti on to encouragi ng women and mi noriti es to enter sci ence. 

Norbert Waner Center for Harmonic Analysisand Applications 

2211 M atiiemati cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-5058 

www.norbertwiener.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: J ohnj . Benedetto 

H armoni c anal ysi s provi des fundamental matinemati cal theory as wd I as i mportant tool s for sci ence 
and engi neeri ng i n a ti me of great di scovery, and it addresses probi ems of maj or i nterest for the 21st 
centijry . O perati ng at the i ntotace between academi a, government, and i ndustiy, the N orbert 
Wiener Center(NWC) seeks to serve as a catalyst for the advancennent of harmonic analysis and its 
appi i cati ons. At the N WC, graduate stixlents and faculty are worki ng togetiier to devd op harmoni c 
anal ysi s i n the context of vi tal i ndusti'i al technol ogi es, and to enhance these technol ogi es wi th 
fundamental and appI i cabi e matinemati cal results. Research areas i ncl ude wavd et theory, radar and 
sonar waveform design, compressed sensing, quantum computing, and medical and hyperspecti'al 
i magi ng. U ndergraduates parti ci pate i n the N WC research program through i ndependent stixly, 
i nternshi ps under faculty supervi si on, and the N WC's Dani d Sweet U ndergraduate Research 
Fd I owshi ps. Women and mi noriti es are encouraged to parti ci pate. 



Student E ngagement atxJ Service Units 

C M PS I nternshi p and C areer Sen/ices 

3400 A . V . Wi 1 1 i ams B ui I di ng, 301-405-2677 
vwAA/.cmpsLiiTrd.edu/careEr^ ndachtm 

The CM PS Col I ege assi sts stixlents with i nternshi ps and f ul I -ti me empi oyment searches, corporate 
i nformati on and recruiti ng sessi ons, and workshops for i ntervi ews and resumcOVvriti ng. I f you are 
majoring in asti-onomy, computer science, geology, matinennatics, physical sciences, or physics, 
check out the bi weekl y CM PS Career Connection eNewsletter . T hi s I i sts announcements of 
i nternshi ps al ong wi th i nteresti ng part-ti me and f ul I -ti me j obs. I nternshi ps are an i nval uabi e tool for 
career expl orati on, al I owl ng you to bui I d rd evant resum® and make prof essi onal connecti ons whi I e 
sti 1 1 i n school . The CM PS 497 1 nternshi p Serni nar provi des an academi c component for the 
i nternshi p experi ence. I n addi ti on, the C M PS Corporate Scholars Program offers stixlents a 
comprehensi ve summer work experi ence i n thd r f i d ds of stixly, wi th a prof essi onal mentor and a 
$2,000 scholarship. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbC 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

1204 Benj ami n B ui I di ng, 301-405-2344 
www.eclucation.umd.eclLVstLiclenti nfo 
Dean: Donna L. Wiseman 

Tine Col I ege of Educati on i s a prof essi onal col I ege committed to advanci ng the sci ence and art of 
teachi ng/l eami ng, i ncl udi ng the practi ces and processes whi ch occur from i nf ancy through 
adulthood i n both school and non-school setti ngs. The Col I ege^s mi ssi on i s to provi de preparati on for 
current and future teachers, counselors, administrators, educational specialists, and other related 
educati onal personnel , and to create and di sserni nate the knowl edge needed by prof essi onal s and 
policy makers in education and related fields. 

Thecollege programs prepare educators, counselors, psychologists, administrators, researchers, and 
educati onal speci al i sts. G raduates work wi th i ndi vi dual s from i nf ancy through adul thood i n school s, 
community agencies, col leges and universities. Educational programs are accredited/approved bytiie 
f ol I owl ng: N ati onal Counci I for A ccredi tati on of Teacher E ducati on, M aryl and State Department of 
Education, American Psychological Association, Council on Accreditation of Counseling and 
Related Educational Professions, and Council on Rehabilitation Education. Accreditation provides 
for reel procal certification with most other states that recognize national accreditation. 

The M aryl and State Department of Education (M SDE) issues certificates to teach i n the publ ic 
school s of the state. I n additi on to graduati on from an approved program M SDE requi res 
sati sfactory scores on the state I i censure exams (Praxi si and 1 1 ) for certif i cati on. At the ti me of 
graduati on, the Col I ege i nf orms M SD E of the graduate^s el i gi bi I i ty f or certi f i cati on. U nder 
M aryl and I aw, cri mi nal background checks may be requi red and consi dered by the State 
Department of Educati on i n the awardi ng of teachi ng certif i cati on, and by empi oyers before grand ng 
empi oyment i n the teachi ng f i el d. Certi fi cati on may be deni ed or revoked for i ndi vi dual s who have 
been convi cted of cri mes of vi ol ence and/or chi I d abuse. A ddi ti onal I y, some M aryl and counti es 
requi re a cri mi nal background check pri or to pi acement i n an i nternshi p 

Special Advantages and Fadlities 

Students i n the Col I ege of Educati on have the opportunity to work with an exempi ary faculty. 
A mong our ranks are nati onal I y known f acul ty researchers who have made si gni f i cant contri buti ons 
to advanci ng theory and i mprovi ng prof essi onal practi ce. I n additi on, the Col I ege^s strategi c I ocati on 
provi des students with research opportuniti es that are unparal I el ed. Students can student teach and 
conduct research i n school districts with highly diverse populations. The region also provides access 
to several research libraries, government agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and educational 
associations. 

The Col I ege of Educati on offers many speci al resources and f aci I iti es to students, faculty, and the 
community, i ncl udi ng the f ol I owl ng centers: 

• TheCeilBfoiMaUiatB U csEckKation provides a mathematics laboratory for undergraduate 
and graduate students. Occasi onal I y there are tutori ng servi ces for chi I dren and adol escents. 
These servi ces are offered i n conj uncti on with speci al graduate and undergraduate courses i n 
el ementary and secondary school mathemati cs. Center faculty are engaged i n research i n 
mathemati cs educati on, serve as consultants to school systems and i nstructi onal publ i shers. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbl 

and provi de i n-servi ce teacher educati on i n additi on to graduate degree programs. 

• The Center ferVburigCfif/cHan is part of the I nstitutefor Child Study/Department of Human 
DB/d opment i n the Col I ege of E ducati on. 1 1 offers a creati ve I earni ng experi ence for chi I dren 
three four, and five years old whose parents are affiliated with the University. The Center 
engages i n chi I d study, curri cul um devd opment, and teacher trai ni ng. I ts research and 
observati on f aci I iti es are aval I abl e to parents, faculty, and other persons concerned with the 
care and educati on of young chi I dren. 

• TheMarylandlnstili^forMinorilyAchieiAEmsrtandUrljan Edjcation i s bui It on a formal 
partnershi p with the M aryl and State Department of Educati on and serves M aryl and school 
districts, especial ly Pri nee George^s County and Baiti more City, which are majority mi nority 
di stri cts wi th seri ous performance chal I enges. 1 1 provi des outreach servi ces to hd p school s 

i denti f y, i mpl ement and eval uate strategi es to i mprove student achi evement. D rawi ng on a 
structure that taps i nto the extensi ve i ntd I ectual capi tal of the Col I ege of E ducati on, the 
i nstitute focuses university faculty research and outreach to teachers, students, and 
admi ni strators who are on the front I i nes batd i ng one of the bi ggest probi ems i n urban school s 
today-the mi nority achi evement gap. 

Achrisaon Requirements 

Adnrisaon to Teacher Education Profesaonal CoirseWork 

A ppl i cants to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and who have decl ared an i nterest i n educati on are admi tted to 
adepartmentintheCollege. All maj ors nxBt meet the sdective admission requirements for full 
admi ssi on i nto the Col I ege of Educati on i n order to enrol I i n course work i n tine prof essi onal teacher 
education degree program. 

For full admi ssi on into a teacher educati on maj or, a student must (1) complete the English and math 
lower-levd fundamental studies (six credits) with a grade of C or better; (2) earn 45 semester hours 
with an overal I cunxilati ve grade poi nt average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale (3) submit a personal 
goal statement that i ndi cates an appropri ate commitment to prof essi onal educati on; (4) have pri or 
experi ences i n the educati on f i d d; (5) submit three I etters of recommendati on/reference (6) submit 
a si gned copy of the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards 
Acknowledgment Form and (7) have passi ng scores on the Praxis I . 

Admission appi ication forms are aval lable i n Room 1204 of the Benjami n Bui Idi ng. Only those who 
are admitted are abl e to enrol I i n the prof essi onal educati on sequence. A n overal I grade poi nt 
average of 2.5 nxst be mai ntai ned after admission to Teacher Education to conti nue i n the 
professional education programs. A Teacher Education Appeals Board reviews appeals from 
students who do not meet the admi ssi ons, advancement, or retenti on criteri a. Consult the Student 
Services Office (Room 1204 Benjamin BIdg.) for policies and procedures regarding appeals. 

Criteria for admission to the Teacher Education program apply to any teacher preparation program 
offered by the University of M aryl and. Thus, students desi ri ng a major i n nxBic or physical 
educati on shoul d appI y to the Col I ege of E ducati on for admi ssi on to the prof essi onal program i n 
Teacher Educati on. Stiidents who are not enrol I ed i n the Col I ege of Educati on but who, through an 
estabi i shed cooperati ve program wi th another col I ege are prepari ng to teach, nxst meet al I 
admi ssi on, schol asti c and curri cul ar requi rements of the Col I ege of Educati on. The prof essi onal 
educati on courses are restri cted to degree-seeki ng maj ors who have met Col I ege of Educati on 
requi rements for admi ssi on and retenti on. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elb^ 

Gabeuuay Reqijremenbsfor Early Childhood and Elementary Education Pro-ams 

The Early Childhood and Elementary Education programs are Limited Enrollment Programs, which 
admit stiJdents on a space-aval I abl e basi s. I n additi on to the requi rements for admi ssi on to teacher 
educati on that are I i sted above, earl y chi I dhood and el ementary educati on maj ors nxst meet the 
f ol I owl ng gateway requi rements: 

1. Completion of a four-credit CORE laboratory physical science, a four-credit CORE 
laboratory biological science. Elements of Numbers and Operations (MATH 212), and 
Elements of Geomeby and Measurement (MATH 213) with a mininximcunxilative 
G PA i n these four courses of 2. 7 

2.Completi on of Introduction to Teaching (EDCI 280) or Exploring Teaching in Early 
Childhood (EDHD220) with a grade of B or better 

3. Passi ng scores on the Praxi s I : Academi c Ski 1 1 s Assessments (Students wi 1 1 be 
requi red to meet the i ndi vi dual cut-off scores for each of the three Praxi s I assessments. 
A composite score wi 1 1 not be accepted for admi ssi on.) 

Students admitted to the University as freshmen may bedirectiy admitted to the Early Childhood or 
E I ementary Educati on programs through the end of the schedul e adj ustinent peri od, second 
semester, freshman year. 1 1 i s anti ci pated that no more than 50% of the aval I abl e pi aces i n each 
program wi 1 1 come from these groups. I n the event that the number of qual if i ed appi i cants exceeds 
the aval I abl e program si ots, the stixlents wi th the most competi ti ve records from hi gh school wi 1 1 
gai n di rect admi ssi on to the Col I ege of Educati on. Students who are admitted to campus, but not 
di rectiy admitted to Education, wi 1 1 be advised i n the Division of Letters and Sciences. 

At the time of admission, each stixlentdi rectiy admitted into the Col I ege of Educati on will enter into 
a contract that states the requi rements for mai ntai ni ng enrol I ment, i ncl udi ng theti me or credit level 
by whi ch the gateway requi rements must be compi eted. 

A 1 1 other prospecti ve earl y chi I dhood and el ementary educati on maj ors nnay appI y for admi ssi on 
duri ng the Spri ng of the year i n whi ch they compI ete 60 credits i ncl udi ng the coursework and 
gateway admission criteria I i sted above. Students with advanced credit (60 or more hours) may 
apply for admission when they meet the gateway requi rements. AppI ications wi 1 1 be reviewed i n the 
Spri ng, and stixlents who have completed the gateway requi rements wi 1 1 be admitted competitively 
based on G PA , on a space-aval I abl e basi s. The mi ni nxim admi ssi on G PA for i nternal and external 
transfers will be 3. Of or El ementary Educati on and 2. 75 for Early Chi I dhood. Students with the 
requi red gateway courses and I ower grade poi nt averages wi 1 1 be consi dered as space i s aval I abl e 

Students may be granted admi ssi on to the earl y chi I dhood or el ementary educati on I i mi ted 
enrol I ment programs only once. Therefore, once a stixlent has been admitted to the I i mi ted 
enrol I ment program i f the stixlent i s I ater di smi ssed for f ai I ure to compI ete the gateway 
requi rements i n a ti mel y manner, the stijdent may not reappi y to the program 

Detai I ed i nformati on regardi ng admi ssi on to the Teacher Educati on program i ncl udi ng the gateway 
requi rements for Early Chi Idhood or Elementary Education, is aval lable i n the Student Services 
Office Room 1204 Benjamin (301-405-2344). 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rement^Deg'eeOptions 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbci 

The College of Education confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science 
( B . S. ) depend! ng on the amount of I i beral arts stixly i ncl uded i n a parti cul ar degree program 
M i ni nxim requi rements for graduati on are 120 semester hours. Specif! c departmental program 
requi rements for more than the mi ni mum nxst be f ulf i 1 1 ed. 

I n addition to the university's general education requi rements (CORE) and the specific requi rements 
for each curri cul um the Col I ege requi res that al I maj ors compi ete a Foundati ons of Educati on 
course (eg., EDPS 301) and, depending upon the teacher education major, six to twelve semester 
hours of readi ng course requi rements. A grade of C or better i s requi red i n al I pre- prof essi onal and 
prof essi onal course work requi red for the maj or. A n overal I grade poi nt average of 2. 5 nxist be 
mai ntai ned after admi ssi on to Teacher Educati on. A grade of S i s requi red i n tine stixlent teachi ng 
porti on of the yearl ong i nternshi p. A 1 1 teacher candi dates are requi red to obtai n sati sf actory 
B/al uati ons on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards and attai n 
qual ifyi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I and Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Detai I ed 
i nf ormati on about the Praxi s assessments i s aval I abl e i n the Student Servi ces Off i ce. Room 1204 
Benjamin. 

Excepti ons to curri cul ar requi rements and rul es of the Col I ege of Educati on nxst be recommended 
by the stixlents advi sor and department chai rperson and approved by the Dean. 

Yearlong I nternshi p (Student Teaching) 

The yearl ong i nternshi p, whi ch i s the cul mi nati ng experi ence i n the teacher preparati on program 
takes place in a collaborating school (i.e., partner school, PDS-- Professional Development School). 
The yearl ong i nternshi p consi sts of one semester of metinods and one semester of stixlent teachi ng. 
Each teacher candi date^s i nternshi p wi 1 1 vary accord! ng to the uni que attri butes of the! r teacher 
educati on program All! nternshi ps wi 1 1 prov! de teache" candi dates with the opportunity to i ntegrate 
theory and practice through a comprehensive reality-based experience. The yearlong internship is 
arranged through the Col I ege of Educati on i n col I aborati on with the school site coordi nators (i.e., 
PDS Coordi nators) and the desi gnated school s i n the partnershi p. 

The yearl ong i nternshi p i s a f ul I -ti me commitment. I nterference with thi s responsi bi I ity because of 
empi oyment or course work i s sti'ongi y di scouraged. Teacher candi dates assi gned to school s for thi s 
i nternshi p are responsi bl e f or thd r own transportati on and I i vi ng arrangements and shoul d be 
prepared to travel to whi chever school has been assi gned. Student teachi ng requi res a speci al fee. 
PI ease refer to the Registi'ati on Guide under Financial Information: Fees. During the yearl ong 
i nternshi p, stixlents shoul d be prepared to adhere to the academi c schedul e^cal endar for the school 
system i n whi ch they are pi aced. 

I n order to reed ve a yearl ong i nternshi p pi acement, al I teacher candi dates nxst make appi i cati on the 
semester pri or to the begi nni ng of the methods porti on of the i nternshi p year. Prospecti ve stixlent 
teachers nxst have been admitted to Teacher Education and have completed al I prerequisites. Prior 
to assi gnment, al I stixlents i n teacher preparati on programs nxst have ( 1) mai ntai ned an overal I 
grade poi nt average of at I east 2.5 with a mi ni nxim grade of " C" i n every course requi red for the 
major; (2) satisfactorily completed all other required course work in their program (3) received a 
f avorabi e recommendati on from thd r department; (4) attai ned qual ifyi ng scores for the State of 
M aryl and on the Praxi s I and Praxi s 1 1 assessments; (5) appI i ed f or a year-l ong i nternshi p pi acennent 
through the Col lege of Education duri ng the semester prior to the i nternshi p year; (6) reed ved 
f avorabi e rati ngs from pri or supervi sed experi ences i n school setti ngs; (7) reed ved f avorabi e 
B/al uati ors on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards; and (8) 
submitted a cri mi nal history disclosure statement. I n addition, state law gives the local school to 
whi ch the stixlent teacher i s assi gned the di screti on to requi re a cri mi nal background check pri or to 



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pi acemert. E arl y C hi I dhood E ducati on students nxst have a certi f i cate i ndi cati ng freedom from 
tuberculosis and proof of immunization. 

Note A 1 1 regi sti'ati ons i n the stixlent teachi ng porti on of the yearl ong i nternshi p, regardi ess of 
whetiner a stiJdent withdraws or takes a I eave of absence, wi 1 1 be counted as an attempt under the 
campus repeat pol i cy. Onl y two regi sti'ati ons wi 1 1 be al I owed. After two regi sti'ati ons, further 
attempts at stixlent teachi ng must be approved by the department and the school system 
prof essi onal s i nvol ved i n the teacher candi date^s i nternshi p experi ence. Thi s pol i cy appi i es onl y to 
stixlents i n the Col I ege of E ducati on duri ng the stixlent teachi ng porti on of the yearl ong i nternshi p. 

CollegeaF Education Foindational CompEtencie^echnical Standatxis 

A 1 1 candi dates i n the U M prof essi onal preparati on programs are expected to demonsti'ate that they 
are prepared to work with chi I dren and youtin i n educati onal setti ngs. Thi s preparati on results from 
the cornbi nati on of successful compi eti on of uni versi ty coursework and f i el d/i nternshi p experi ences 
and the demonsti'ati on of i mportant human characteri sti cs and di spositi ons that al I educators shoul d 
possess. These characteristics and dispositions, the Col I ege of Education Foundational 
Competencies/Technical Standards, are grouped into four categories: Communication/lnterpersonal 
Skills, Emotional and Physical Abilities, Cognitive Dispositions, and Personal and Professional 
Requirements. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards serve several important functions, including, but 
not I i mi ted to: (a) provi di ng i nf ormati on to those consi deri ng pre K - 12 and communi ty prof essi onal 
careers that wi 1 1 hd p such stixlents i n thd r career deci si on-maki ng; (b) advi si ng appI i cants of 
non-academi c cri teri a consi dered i n admi ssi ons deci si ons made by the U ni versi ty's pre K - 12 and 
community professional preparation programs; (c) servi ng as the basis for feedback provided to 
stixlents i n these programs regardi ng thd r progress toward mastery of al I program obj ecti ves; and (d) 
servi ng as the basi s f or the f i nal assessment of attai nment of graduati on requi rements and 
recommendati on for certi fi cati on. 

Candi dates i n the undergraduate teacher preparati on programs wi 1 1 be requi red to submit a Col I ege 
of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards Acknowledgement Form as part of 
the Col I ege^s sd ecti ve admi ssi ons revi ew i n the sophomore or j uni or year. Sd f -assessments of 
candi dates and faculty eval uati ons of stijdents on the Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal 
Standards al so wi 1 1 occur duri ng each f i d d/i nternshi p experi ence. Students wi 1 1 be monitored and 
given feedback throughout the program Atspecified points, stixlents will be notified of 
i nadequaci es that may prevent them from progressi ng through thd r program Documentati on and 
consensus regardi ng the stixlents f uncti oni ng wi 1 1 be sought before any acti on i s taken. Candi dates 
who experi ence def i ci enci es i n any areas wi 1 1 be encouraged to seek appropri ate prof essi onal hd p 
from uni versi ty or other sources. I f the probi em seems to be beyond remedi ati on, conti nuati on i n 
professional programs, graduation, or recommendati on for certification may be denied. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical standards may be met with, or without, accommodations. 
The University complies with the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the 
A meri cans with Di sabi I iti es Act of 1990. Therefore, the Col I ege of Educati on wi 1 1 endeavor to make 
reasonabi e accommodati ons wi th respect to i ts techni cal standards for an appI i cant wi th a di sabi I i ty 
who i s otherwi se qual if i ed. For detai I ed i nformati on on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal 
Competencies/Technical Standards, seewww.education.umd.edu/stijdentinfo/teachercert.htiiil 

Advising 



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The Student Servi ces Off i ce provi des academi c advi si ng for educati on students regard! ng adni ssi on, 
ori entati on, regi strati on, graduati on, and certif i cati on. At other ti mes, stixlents who have been 
admi tted to the Col I ege of E ducati on reed ve academi c advi si ng through thd r departments. Students 
are requi red to compi ete an academi c audit i n the Off i ce of Student Servi ces upon admi ssi on to the 
prof essi onal teacher educati on degree program U ndergraduates are expected to compI ete thd r 
degree program i n a ti md y manner and to adhere to program benchmarl<s. I nf ormati on about 
program beTchmarl<s and four-year pi ans i s aval I abl e on the Student Servi ces website at 
http://www.education.umd.edu/stijdenti nfo/currenl/ugmajor-currented.htiil . 

Departments and Centers 

The Col I ege i s organi zed i nto se/en departments, three of whi ch offer undergraduate maj ors i n 
teacher educati on: the Department of Curri cul um and I nsti'ucti on, whi ch offers d ementary and 
secondary education programs; the Department of Human Devdopment and I nstitutefor Child 
Study, whi ch offers an earl y chi I dhood program and the Department of Speci al E ducati on. I n 
additi on, the Col I ege i ncl udes a number of centers that offer speci al resources and f aci I iti es to 
stixlents, faculty, and the community: 

Center for Accd erati ng Student Learni ng 

Center for C hi I dren, Rd ati onshi ps and C ul ture 

Center for Educati on Pol i cy and Leadershi p 

Center for M atiiemati cs Educati on 

Center for the Study of Assessment Val i dity and E val uati on 

Center for Y oung Chi I dren 

Connections Beyond Sight and Sound 

I nstitute for the Study of Excepti onal Chi I dren and Y outii 

International Center for Transcultural Education 

K-16 Partnershi p and Devdopment Center 

Maryland Assessment Research Center for Education Success (MARCES) 

M aryl and I nstitute for M i nority Achi e/ement and U rban Educati on 

Maryland Literacy Research Center 

Sci ence Teachi ng Center 

M i d-Ati anti c Center for M atinemati cs Teachi ng & Learni ng 

National Center on Education, Disability, and J uvenilej ustice 

National Reading Research Center 

Minors 

The Col lege of Education offers five mi nors: 

1. The M i nor i n Secondary Education i ncl udes 15-18 credits and provides opportunities for 
undergraduate subj ect area maj ors to enrol Una sequence of educati on courses that hd ps them to 
determi ne if teachi ng i s a vi abl e career opti on for them For more i nformati on about the secondary 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbfc 

educati on mi nor, contact the Department of C urri cul um and I nstructi on, 1207 B enj ami n B ui I di ng . 

2. The M i nor i n Speci al Educati on provi des opportuniti es for undergraduate stixlents to enrol Una 
sequence of educati on courses to determi ne if worl<i ng with stixlents with di sabi I iti es i s a vi abl e 
career opti on. For stixlents i nterested i n pursi ng thi s career opti on, a one-year M.Ed, program 

I eadi ng to certif i cati on as a speci al educator, i s al so aval I abl e. For more i nformati on about the 
18-credit special education minor, see www.education.umd.edu/EDSP/news/^minorSpEd.pctf 

3. The M i nor i n Second Language Education (TESOL) provides opportunities for undergraduate 
subj ect area maj ors to compi ete a sequence of courses that hd ps them prepare for careers as teachers 
of English as a second language in US schools and/or prepare them for roles as teachers of English 
as a ford gn I anguage i n i nternati onal setti ngs. 1 1 i ncl udes coursework from the Department of 
Curri cul um and I nsti'ucti on and the Department of H uman Devd opment. For more i nformati on 
abouttheTESOL minor, contacttheDepartmentof Curriculumand Insti'uction, 1207 Benjamin 
Building. 

4. The M i nor i n H uman De/d opment provi des a ri gorous f oundati on i n human devd opment for 
stixlents who wi sh to support thd r maj or f i d d of study with knowl edge of human growtin and 
devd opment across nxiiti pi e domai ns and devd opmental stages, as wd I as knowl edge rd ated to 
pri nci pi es of teachi ng and I earni ng and/or who desi re acti ve parti ci pati on i n human devd opment 
research under the supervi si on of H uman Devd opment faculty i n I aboratory setti ngs. Contact the 
Human De/d opment undergraduate minor advisor. Dr. Megan Hurley, at mhurleyl(a)umd.edu or 
301-405-7233 for more i nformati on or to arrange an advi si ng appoi ntinent. 

5. The E DCP M i nor i n Leadershi p Studi es promotes col I ege stixlent I eadershi p devd opment by 
educati ng undergraduate stixlents for and about I eadershi p i n a compI ex worl d. The goal of the 
mi nor i s to prepare stijdents to serve eff ecti vd y i n formal and i nf ormal I eadershi p rol es i n campus, 

I ocal , nati onal , and gl obal contexts. Faculty and stixlents i n the mi nor are dedi cated to advanci ng the 
f i d d of I eadershi p stixli es by bui I di ng upon and cri ti cal I y eval uati ng exi sti ng theoreti cal , 
research- based, and practical knowledge. For more information, see Betin Niehaus (0110 Stamp 
Student U ni on, eni ehaus(a)um edu) . 



Living-Learning Pro-ams 

College Park Scholars Adx^xates for Children 

Col I ege Park Schol ars i s an i nnovati ve two-year I i vi ng/l earni ng program for academi cal I y tal ented 
stixlents. Admission is by invitation. Students attend weekly, faculty- led colloquia, which engage 
stixlents in discussion arid debate with promi nent experts in thefidd. 

The Col lege Park Scholars Advocates for Chi Idren Program i nvol ves stixlents i n advocacy efforts 
targeti ng a broad range of soci al , educati onal , pol i cy and j usti ce i ssues aff ecti ng di verse chi I dren, 
fami I ies and communities. The Advocates program is sti'uctijred so that stixlents become i nformed i n 
areas of personal i nterest that rd ate to chi I dren, fami I i es and communiti es. They then I earn to 
transi ate thd r knowl edge i nto advocacy for soci al j usti ce and change. A dvocacy i nvol vement 
i ncl udes pol i ti cal I obbyi ng, grassroots organi zi ng and servi ce acti vi ti es i n school s and communi ti es. 

For more i nformati on on the Col lege Park Scholars: Advocates for Chi Idren Program visit 1125 
Cumberland Hall or phone 301-314-2777. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elb/ 



Specialized Academic Pro-ams 

Secxmdary Education Pro-am Options 

The Col I ege of Educati on has nxiiti pi e pathways for students who are i nterested i n teachi ng at the 
secondary level. 

The Dual Major option, whi ch i s desi gned for i nconi ng freshmen or sophonDres, I eads to the 
Bachd or's degree with a maj or i n an academi c content area pi us a second maj or i n secondary 
educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to have an academi c content maj or whi ch sati sf i es the 
requi rements of the academi c department and meets the standards for teacher certif i cati on. 
Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compi ete both maj ors i n four years 
with careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

The Minor in Secxmdary Education provides opportunities for undergraduate subject area majors 
to enrol Una sequence of education courses that hd ps them to deterni ne if teachi ng is a viable 
career option for them The 15-18 credit mi nor may betaken prior to admission i nto a teacher 
preparati on program I f an undergraduate student pursui ng or compI eti ng the mi nor desi res to enter 
an educati on track, the candi date nxst appi y for tine dual maj or program to obtai n certi fi cati on as a 
secondary educati on cl assroom teacher through compI eti on of a M aryl and State Department of 
Educati on approved program opti on. Some of the courses students take to compI ete the M i nor i n 
Secondary E ducati on may al so be appI i cabi e i n certi fi cati on opti ons at the graduate I evd offered 
through the Department of Curricul um and I nstruction. These students should consult with an 
advi sor i n the Department of Curri cul um and I nstructi on to i dentify the most appropri ate opti on 
I eadi ng to teacher certif i cati on and to re/i ew the specif i c admi ssi on requi rements associ ated with 
these programs. 

The Certificate Prog'am requi res compI eti on of an academi c maj or, i ncl udi ng coursework specif i c 
to meet certif i cati on standards i n the certif i cate area, and a bachd or's degree i n an approved 
academi c content area, pi us the compI eti on of a certif i cate program i n secondary educati on to meet 
requi rements i n U M 's approved program for M SDE certif i cati on. Sd ected coursework from the 
M i nor i n Secondary Educati on may be taken pri or to admi ssi on to the Certif i cate Program opti on. 

The Five-Year I nte^ated Master' svuitii Certification Prog'am, which is i ntended for content 
majors enteri ng the j unior or senior year, is for talented students with a mi ni nxim GPA of 3.0 who 
seek to combi ne undergraduate studi es i n the content area and prof essi onal educati on as a 
f oundati on for a focused prof essi onal year at the graduate I evd I eadi ng to secondary- 1 e/d 
certif i cati on i n the subj ect f i d d and the M aster's of Educati on degree. As undergraduates, admitted 
students compI ete thd r baccal aureate degrees with a maj or i n the rd evant content area and a 
mi ni nxim of 12 credits i n prof essi onal educati on studi es rd ated to teacher certif i cati on requi rements. 
I n thd r fifth year, they enrol I i n a f ul I -year i nternshi p and compI ete graduate- 1 B/d prof essi onal 
studi es that make them d i gi bl e for teacher certi f i cati on and the master's of educati on degree. 

Detai I ed i nf ormati on about these secondary educati on program opti ons i s aval I abl e at the Col I ege of 
Education Website www.education.unxl.edu/studentinfo. 



College Hotxrs Pro-am 

U ndergraduate teacher educati on maj ors meeti ng certai n schol asti c requi rements may parti ci pate i n 
theCollegeof Education Honors Program The objective of this program isto examine thefidd of 



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educati on at I evd s of depth and breadth that go beyond that provi ded by any one teacher preparati on 
sequence. The program consi sts of there components: group, cross-di sci pi i nary, and i ndi vi dual 
study. The Honors Program represents an excel lent spri ngboard for students with aspi rations to go 
on to graduate school . For further i nformation contact Dr. Christy Corbi n, 1117H Benjami n 
Building, 301-405-7793. 

CollegeaF Education Title 1 1 

I nditutional Data on Teacher Preparation 

The Col I ege of Educati on pass rates f or the Titi e 1 1 reporti ng peri od for the 2006-2007 acadenri c 
year i ndi cated that we exceeded the statewi de pass rate i n al I categori es. When the data were 
summari zed, the Col I ege had a 100% pass rate; the statewi de average was 97%. ( I nsti tuti onal pass 
rates: Basic Skills- 100%; Professional Knowledge- 100%; Academic Content Areas- 100%; 
Speci al Popul ati ons - 100%) . Data tabi es reporti ng si ngl e-assessment i nsti tuti onal pass rates, 
aggregate i nsti tuti onal pass rates, and summary pass rates are aval I abl e through the Col I ege website, w 
www.educati on/umd.edu I nf ormati on on the number of stixlents enrol I ed and the stixlent teachi ng 
experiences is highlighted below: 

• Total number of stixlents enrol I ed duri ng 2006-2007: 1253 

• Total number of stixlents i n programs of supervi sed stixlent teachi ng duri ng academi c year 
2006-2007: 354 

• Total number of supervi si ng faculty for the teacher preparati on program duri ng 2006-2007: 58 

• The stixlent teacher/faculty rati o. &1 dudents per faculty member 

• The average number of hours per week requi red of stixlent parti ci pati on was 40 hours The 
total number of weeks of supervi sed stijdent teachi ng requi red i s 16 waels The total number 
of hours is 640 hours 

• The teacher preparati on program i s currenti y approved by the state. 

• The teacher preparati on program i s not currenti y desi gnated as " I ow-performi ng" by the state 
as def i ned by secti on 208(a) of the H E A of 1998. 

• The teacher preparation program is not currenti y designated as "at risk of bd ng designated as 
'I ow perform! ng' by the state" as def i ned by secti on 208(a) of the H E A of 1998. 

ApprcMBd Student Societies and ProfiesEional Organizations 

The Col I ege sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa; the Teacher Education Association of Maryland 
Students (TEAM S), a stat^national education association; the Student Assembly, a stixlent 
governance organization; and Kappa Delta Pi, an honor society in education. TheMary McLeod 
B etiiune Soci ety i s a pre- prof essi onal organi zati on concerned wi th mi nori ty i ssues and educati on. A 
chapter of the Counci I for Excepti onal Chi I dren i s open to undergraduate and graduate stixlents i n 
Special Education. 

The PI an of Organi zati on for the Col I ege of Educati on cal I s for undergraduate stixlent representati on 
on both the Col I ege of Educati on Assembly and Col I ege Senate. These organizations assume a 
critical role in policy development for the Col lege of Education. TheAssenbly meets at least once 
a year duri ng the f al I sennester for i ts annual meeti ng. Senate meeti ngs typi cal I y occur once a month 
duri ng the f al I and spri ng sennesters. Si x f ul I -ti me undergraduate stixlents are el ected at I arge as 
voting mennbers of the Assennbly. At least one representative from each of the departments with 
undergraduates serves on the Assembly. Of the six Assembly members, one is elected to serve as a 
del egate to the Col I ege of E ducati on Senate. Students i nterested i n reed vi ng further i nf ormati on 
about the Col I ege A ssembi y or Senate shoul d contact the Off i ce of Student Servi ces. Room 1204 
Benjannin. 



I necoiiegesendbchoois p^eiby 

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I n several departments there are i nf ormal organi zati ons of students. Students shoul d contact the 
i ndi vi dual departments or, i n the case of Col I ege- wi de groups, the Student Servi ces off! ce, for 
add! ti onal i nf ormati on regard! ng these organi zati ons. 

Financial AsaStanGe 

The Off! ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state and i nstituti onal 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the 
awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. For i nformati on, vi sit: www.fi nanci alaid.umd.edu . 

Inaddition, contributions from the Col I ege of Education Alumni and Friends have made it possible 
to award a number of $1,000 schol arshi ps to deservi ng undergraduate and graduate students each 
acadeni c year. These awards are based on the f ol I owl ng criteri a: 

• academic performance 

• financial need 

• I eadershi p and contri buti ons to the fi el d of educati on or 
commitment to potenti al I eadershi p i n the f i el d of educati on 

• encouragement of a diverse and multicultural community 

Schol arshi p appi i cati ons may be obtai ned i n the Off i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . 
A ppl i cati ons al so are aval I abl e on-l i ne 
http://www.education.umd.edu/studenti nfo/schol arshi ps/i ndex.html . 

For more i nformati on about the Col I ege of Educati on Schol arshi ps, i ncl udi ng deadi i nes and 
appI i cati on materi al s, contact the Off i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . 

Av^iards 

The Meritiorious New Teacher Candidate (M ivrrc ) desi gnati on i s awarded to those candi dates 
who meet ri gorous criteri a that demonstrate strong verbal ski 1 1 s, a hi gh I e/el of mastery of thd r 
subj ect matter, and excel I ence i n thd r prof essi onal program The M NTC i s an opti onal desi gnati on 
to be noted on the i nitial I icense of highly qual if led teachers. Si mi lar to the M erit Scholar 
desi gnati on or D i sti ngui shed D i pi oma for hi gh school students, the M NTC i s one of pri de and 
accompi i shment as a dedi cated teacher candi date who has excel I ed at every phase of preparati on and 
demonstrated a deep commitment to hi gh expectati ons for al I chi I dren. 

Five jurisdictions-- District of Columbia, Maryland, Delaware, N ew Jersey and Virginia ~ 
parti ci pate i n the M NTC program and new teachers who achi eve the M eri tori ous N ew Teacher 
Candi date desi gnati on are el i gi bl e to teach i n any of these f i ve areas wi thi n the M i d-Ati and c regi on 
without havi ng to meet any additi onal state requi rements. 

M ore detai I ed i nformati on about the M NTC criteri a and the M NTC pre-Candi date appI i cati on 
processes i s aval I abl e at www.aacte.org/mntc. 

Student E ngagement and Service Units 

Student Services Office ( 1204 B enj ami n B ui I di ng, 
301-405-2344; www.educati on. umd.edu/studenti nfo ) 

The Student Servi ces Off i ce provi des academi c advi si ng for educati on maj ors regardi ng admi ssi on, 
ori entati on, regi strati on, graduati on, and certif i cati on. I nformati on about the Praxi s assessments and 
the Col I ege of E ducati on Schol arshi ps al so i s aval I abl e i n Student Servi ces. 



I he col leges end bchods P^el/C 



Education^ Technology Services (0234 B enj ami n B ui I di ng, 301-405-3611) 

E ducati oral Technol ogy Servi ces hd ps the Col I ege advance the eff ecti ve use of technol ogy i n 
support of student I earn! ng. The Center provi des a range of technol ogy and medi a resources and 
servi ces to faculty and students. The Center al so offers prof essi oral devd opment courses, 
technol ogy pi anni ng, consult] ng assi stance, and other outreach servi ces to educators and pol i cy 
makers throughout the state and region. A number of research, development, and demonstration 
acti viti es i n educati oral technol ogy al so are conducted through the Center's grants and contracts with 
federal, state and private funding sources. 

Ca^er Center (3100 Hornbake Li brary; 301-314-7225) www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

A 1 1 seni ors graduati ng i n the Col I ege of E ducati on are encouraged to compi ete a credenti al s f i I e wi th 
the Career Center. C redenti al s consi st of student teachi ng eval uati ons and recommendati ons from 
academi c and prof essi oral sources. A n i niti al regi strati on f ee i s requi red and erabi es the Career 
Center to send a students credenti al s to i nterested educati oral empi oyers, as i ndi cated by the 
student. Students al so may f i I e credenti al s i f compI eti ng teacher certi f i cati on requi rements or 
advanced degrees and if i nterested i n teachi ng, admi ni strati ve or research positions i n education. 

Other servi ces aval I abl e through TE RP (The E mpl oyment Regi strati on Program) i ncl ude j ob I i sti ngs 
i n pri vate and publ i c school s and i nsti tuti ons of hi gher I earni ng, on-campus i ntervi ews wi th i n-state 
and out-of-state school systenns, and resume referral to ennpl oyers i nterested i n hi ri ng educati on 
maj ors. I nf ormati on and appi i cati ons from school systems throughout the country, j ob search 
publ i cati ons, and vari ous empI oyment di rectori es are aval I abl e i n the Career Center. 



CdlegeoF Education Title 1 1 -institutional Data on Teadier Preparation 

The Col I ege of Educati on pass rates f or the Titi e 1 1 reporti ng peri od for the 2006-2007 academi c 
year i ndi cated that we exceeded the statewi de pass rate i n al I categori es. When the data were 
summari zed, the Col I ege had a lOCP/o pass rate; the statewi de average was 97%. ( I nsti tuti oral pass 
rates: BasicSkills- lOCP/o, Professioral Knowledge- lOCP/o, Academic Content Areas- 100%; 
Speci al Popul ati ons - 100%) . Data tabi es reporti ng si ngl e-assessment i nsti tuti oral pass rates, 
aggregate i nsti tuti oral pass rates, and summary pass rates are aval I abl e through the Col I ege website, w 
www.educati on/umd.edu I nf ormati on on the number of students enrol I ed and the student teachi ng 
experiences is highlighted below: 

• Total number of students enrol I ed duri ng 2006-2007: 1253 

• Total number of students i n programs of supervi sed student teachi ng duri ng academi c year 
2006-2007: 354 

• Total number of supervi si ng faculty for the teacher preparati on program duri ng 2006-2007: 58 

• The student teacher/faculty rati o. &1 dudenbs per faculty member 

• The average number of hours per week requi red of student parti ci pad on was 40 hours The 
total number of weeks of supervi sed student teachi ng requi red i s 16 waels The total number 
of hours is 640 hours 

• The teacher preparati on program i s currenti y approved by the state. 

• The teacher preparati on program i s not currenti y desi gnated as " I ow-performi ng" by the state 
as def i ned by seed on 208(a) of the H E A of 1998. 

• The teacher preparation program is not currenti y designated as "at risk of bd ng designated as 
'I ow perform! ng' by the state^' as def i ned by seed on 208(a) of the H E A of 1998. 



I he col leges and bchods P^el/l 



A.J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

3110 J eong H . K i m E ngi neeri ng B ui I di ng, 301-405-8335 

www.eng.umd.edu 

Dean: Herbert Rabin 

Associate Dean(s): Gary A. Pertmer 

Tine mission of theClarIc Scinool of E rigi neeri ng at the University of IMaryland is to provide quality 
engi neeri ng educati on, to conduct strong researcin programs, to foster a cl ose partnersini p with 
i ndustry and government, and to provi de rd ated servi ce to the campus community and the 
communi ty at I arge. A maj or focus of the School 's acti vi ti es i s to provi de a qual i ty engi neeri ng 
educati on wi th suff i ci ent scope to i ncl ude the basi c and speci al i zed engi neeri ng trai ni ng necessary to 
the current and emergi ng needs of soci ety. The School has rd ated responsi bi I ity to contri bute to the 
advancement of knowl edge by conducti ng research at the cutti ng edge of sci ence and technol ogy. 
Si nee sci ence and technol ogy are rapi dl y advanci ng, the School al so has a prof essi onal 
responsi bi I ity to provi de conti nui ng educati on programs so the practi ci ng engi neer can remai n 
effective. The School faculty and admi nisti'ation also sees as part of its mission, an obi igation to 
serve the needs of the campus community and the community at I arge i n the spi rit of col I egi al 
cooperation. 

E ngi neers al so occupy an i ntermedi ary positi on between sci enti sts and the publ i c because, i n 
additi on to understandi ng sci entif i c pri nci pi es, they are concerned with the ti mi ng, economi cs, and 
values that define the use and application of those principles. Withthis in mind the School fostersa 
cl ose partnershi p with i ndustiy and government, and al so reaches out to both the campus community 
at large with its services. 

Achrisaon Requirements 

Di rect AdmisEions Reqii remenbs 

1. Admi ssi on to the Cl ark School of E ngi neeri ng i s I i mited. A ppl i cants are revi ewed and wi 1 1 be 
admitted di recti y on a competitive basis. Evaluation is based on high school grades, standardized 
test scores, acti vi ti es, I eadershi p and demonsti-ati ons of potenti al to succeed. A n appi i cant may appi y 
to any of the maj ors offered withi n the School . A n appi i cant al so has the opti on of enteri ng as an 

U ndeci ded E ngi neeri ng maj or and wi 1 1 typi cal I y choose a degree program i n the f i rst year. 

2. National MeritardNational A chievernent Final i sts and Serri finalists, Maryland Distinguished 
Schol ar F i nal i sts, and B anneker/K ey Schol ars are admi tted di recti y to the School . 

Academic BencimrBris 

The Cl ark School of E ngi neeri ng has expectati ons and pol i ci es that are desi gned to promote the 
success of its stixlents and to ensure ti mdy progress to the degree. A stixlent, i n consul tati on with 
School and Departmental advi sors, i s requi red to devd op an i ndi vi dual pi an f or ti md y compi eti on 
of hi s/her degree program The pi an wi 1 1 be revi ewed by the stixlent and hi s/her advi sor on a regul ar 
basis and revised, if necessary, as individual circumstances change. Under normal circumstances, a 
stixlent i s expected to compI ete hi s/^her degree requi rements i n no more than four years. 

45-Credit BencJUTBrlG 



I he col leges end bchods Fegei/'Z 

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D i recti yadrritted freshmen will be subject to an academic reviewattheendof the semester in 
whi ch they attai n 45 U ni versi ty of M aryl and credi ts. I n order to successful I y compi ete the revi ew, 
students must have an overal I G PA of at I east 2. and have compI eted E N E S 100, F undamental 
Studi es E ngl i sh, one Di stri buted Studi es Course from tine H umaniti es or Soci al Sci ences, and the 
following sequence of Gateway requirements: MATH 141, PHYS 161, and CHEM 113 or CHEM 
135 with a grade of 2.0 or better. 

Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at the University of 
M aryl and or at any other uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. 
A course i n whi ch a grade of W (withdrawn) i s earned i s counted as an attempt. Students who f ai I to 
meet these requi rements by tine semester in which they attain 45 University of Maryland credits may 
be di smi ssed from the CI ark School and may not reappi y . 

60- and 90-C redit Benchmarks 

Each academi c program has specif i c benchmark requi rements at tine 60 and 90 credit I evel . Refer to 
www, eng. umd.edu/advi si ng/advi si ng_4-year- pi ans. htni for program benchmarks. 

Transfier Adnrisaon 

Di rect AdnrisEions Reqii rements 

Internal and External Transfer students will be di recti y admitted to the CI ark School if theymeetthe 
Gateway requi rements, MATH141, PHYS 161, CHEM 113 or CHEM 135 with a grade of 2.0 or 
better, have compI eted F undamental Studi es E ngl i sh, have compI eted at I east one H umani ti es or 
Soci al Studi es course, and have a mi ni nxim cumul ati ve G PA of 3. i n al I col I ege- 1 evel coursework, 
and who have not previously been admitted to tine Clark School of Engi neeri ng. Only one repeat of a 
single course to the set of Gateway courses, eitiner at the University of Maryland or at any otiner 
uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a grade 
of W (witixirawn) is earned is counted as an attennpt. Students should wait unti I al I gateway 
requi rements are compI ete before appi yi ng for admi ssi on to tine School . 

I nternal and External Transfer students who do not meet tine Di rect Admi ssi ons Requi rements, but 
have compI eted the Gateway requi rements, may appI y and be consi dered for admi ssi on on a 
competitive basis. 

Appeal Process 

A 1 1 stixlents may appeal the admi ssi on deci si on. Students di recti y admi tted as freshmen who are 
di smi ssed because of f ai I ure to meet gateways or to be i n good academi c standi ng at 45 credits, may 
appeal i n writi ng di recti y to the Associate Dean for Education i n the Clark School .All other students 
who are deni ed admi ssi on may appeal through the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons of tine 
University. 

Special Note 

Students witii a previous B. A. orB.S. degree will be admitted to the Clark School of Engineering 
witii a mi ni nxim GPA of 3.0 i n al I col lege-levd coursework and a completion of MATH 140, 
MATH141, CHEM 113 or CHEM 135, and PHYS 161 with a grade of 2.0 or higher in each. 

En^neeringTransfier Prog'ams 

M ost of tine community col I eges i n M aryl and provi de one- or two-year programs whi ch have been 
coordi nated to prepare stixlents to enter the sophomore or j uni or year i n engi neeri ng at tine 
University of Maryland. These curricula are identified as Engineering Trarefer Programs in the 
catal ogs of tine sponsori ng i nstituti ons. The vari ous associ ate degree programs i n technol ogy do not 



I he col leges and bchods Fegel/d 

■ ■ 

provi de the preparati on and transferabi I ity i nto the degree curri cul a as the desi gnated transfer 
programs. A maxi nxim of one- half of the degree credits (approxi matdy 60 semester hours) may be 
transferred from a two-year community col I ege program 

There may be some courses whi ch are not offered by the school s parti ci pad ng i n the engi neeri ng 
transfer program Students shoul d i nvesti gate the f easi bi I ity of compi eti ng these courses i n summer 
school at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and before starti ng thd r j uni or course work i n the f al I semester. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOpdons 

Structure of E ngi neeri ng Curri cul a: Courses i n the normal curri cul um or program and prescri bed 
credit hours I eadi ng to the degree of Bachd or of Sci ence (with curri cul um desi gnati on) are outi i ned 
i n the sections descri bi ng each department i n the Clark School of Engi neeri ng. No student may 
modify the prescri bed number of hours without speci al permi ssi on from the Dean of the School . The 
courses i n each curri cul um may be cl assif i ed i n the f ol I owl ng categori es: 

1. Courses i n the CORE L i beral A rts and Sci ence Studi es Program. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences, mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Rd ated techni cal courses, engi neeri ng sci ences and other courses approved for one curri cul um 
but offered by another department. 

4. Courses i n the maj or department. A student shoul d obtai n written approval for any substituti on of 
courses from the department chai r and the Dean of the School . The courses i n each engi neeri ng 
curri cul um as classified bdow, form a sequential and devdopmental pattern i n subject matter. I n 
thi s respect, curri cul a i n engi neeri ng may differ from curri cul a i n other col I eges. Some regul ati ons 
whi ch are general I y appi i cabi e to al I students may need cl ari f i cati on for purposes of orderl y 

admi ni strati on among engi neeri ng students (see the Academi c Regul ati ons i n chapter 4) . M oreover, 
the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng estabi i shes pol i ci es whi ch suppi ement uni versi ty regul ati ons. 

School RegJations 

1. The responsi bi I ity for proper regi strati on and for sati sfyi ng stated prerequi sites for any course 
nxst rest with the student as does the responsi bi I ity for proper achi evement i n courses i n whi ch the 
student i s enrol I ed. Each student shoul d be f ami I i ar with the provi si ons of thi s catal og, i ncl udi ng the 
Academic Regulations. 

2. Requi red courses i n mathemati cs, physi cs, and cherni stry have hi ghest pri ori ty. 1 1 i s strongi y 
recommended that every engi neeri ng student regi ster for mathemati cs and cherni stry or mathemati cs 
and physi cs each semester unti I the student hasfullysatisfied requi rements of the C I ark School of 
Engi neeri ng i n these subjects. 

3. To be d i gi bl e for a bachd ors degree in the Clark School of Engineering, a student nxst have 
an overal I average of at least a 2.0 and a grade of C (2.0) or better i n al I engi neeri ng courses 
(courses wi th an E N pref i x) . Responsi bi I i ty for knowi ng and meeti ng al I graduati on requi rements i n 
any curri cul um rests with the student. 

4. I n additi on to the requi rement for a C (2.0) or better i n al I EN courses, al I students who begi n 
college-levd work, dther at the University of Maryland or any other institution in the Spring 2005 
semester or later, nxst reed ve a grade of C (2.0) or higher i n al I technical courses (eg. mathematics, 
physics, etc) used to satisfy major requirements. 



I he col leges and bchods P^el/4 

■ ■ 

5. A course taken at U M i n whi ch a grade has been earned may not be repeated vi a transfer from 
another institution. 

6. A 1 1 students are requi red to compi ete a number of general educati on courses and nxst f ol I ow tine 
universitys requirements regarding completion of tine general education (CORE) Program Consult 
tine A caderni c Regul ati ons secti on of tini s catal og for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. E ngi neeri ng students 
who began college-le/el work (dtiner at tine University of Maryland or at otiner institutions) during 
tine Fal I 1989 semester or I ater are requi red to compI ete a j uni or- 1 evd techni cal writi ng course 
regardi ess of tiiei r performance i n freshman E ngl i sh cl asses. Thi s represents a School pol i cy, not a 
U ni versi ty- wi de pol i cy . 

7. A 1 1 degree programs i n tine CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng requi re a mi ni nxim of 120 credits pi us 
satisfaction of all department, School, and University general education (CORE) program 

requi rements. Students shoul d be aware tinat for al I currenti y exi sti ng engi neeri ng programs tine total 
number of credits necessary for tine degree exceeds 120 by some number tinat depends on tine 
specific major. 

Curricula for tine various engi neeri ng departments are given i n tills catalog to i 1 1 usti'ate how tine 
programs can be completed i n four years. These curricula are rigorous and relatively difficult. 
Surveys have shown tinat only about one-tini rd to one- half of tine students actual I y receive an 
engi neeri ng degree i n four years. The nnaj ority of students (whetiner at M aryl and or at otiner 
engi neeri ng school s nati onwi de) compI ete tine engi neeri ng program i n f our and one- hal f to f i ve 
years. 1 1 i s quite f easi bl e for a student to sti'etch out any curri cul um tini s nnay be necessary or 
desi rabi e for a vari ety of reasons. H owever, students shoul d seek competent advi si ng i n order to 
ensure tinat courses are taken i n tine proper sequence 

A 1 1 students are urged to compI ete a seni or audi t usi ng Degree N avi gator and re/i ew wi tin tind r 
departmental advi sor at I east two semesters pri or to graduati on. The purpose of tine seni or audit i s to 
di scuss academi c progress and conf i rm tinat graduati on requi rements are be ng compI eted. 

Departments and De^^ees 

The CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng offers tine degree of Bachd or of Sci ence i n tine f ol I owl ng f i d ds of 
study: Aerospace Engineering, Bioengi neeri ng. Biological Resources Engineering (currently bdng 
phased out- no new admits). Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, 
E I edri cal E ngi neeri ng, F i re P rotecti on E ngi neeri ng, M ateri al s Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng, M echani cal 
Engineering, B.S. Engineering (Applied Sdence Option). All of tine above programs, with tine 
exception of Bioengi neeri ng and B.S. Engineering (Applied SdenceOption) are accredited by tine 
E ngi neeri ng Accreditati on Comrni ssi on of tine Accreditati on Board for E ngi neeri ng and Technol ogy 
(ABET). According to ABET policy, tine new (as of J uly 2006) Bioengi neeri ng Program will apply 
for accreditati on after graduati on of its f i rst student, whi ch i s anti ci pated i n 2009. 

F reshman-Sophomore Years 

The f reshnnan and sophomore years i n engi neeri ng are desi gned to I ay a sti'ong f oundati on i n 
nnatinemati cs, physi cal sci ences, and tine engi neeri ng sci ences upon whi ch tine student wi 1 1 1 ater 
devd op a prof essi onal program duri ng tine upper di vi si on (j uni or and seni or) years. D uri ng tine fi rst 
two years, students are i ntroduced to tine concepts of engi neeri ng desi gn and work i n 
multi di sci pi i nary teams. The School course requi rements for tine f reshnnan and sophomore years are 
si mi I ar for al I students, regardi ess of tind r i ntended academi c program tinus aff ordi ng tine student 
nnaxi mum f I exi bi I i ty i n choosi ng a sped f i c engi neeri ng sped al i zati on. 



I he col leges and bchods Fegel/b 



E n^ neeri ng Sciences 

E ngi neeri ng Sci ence courses represent a common core of basi c materi al offered to students of 
several different departments. A 1 1 freshman and sophomore students of engi neeri ng are requi red to 
tal<eENES 100. Other ENES courses, 102, 220, and 221, are specified by the different departments 
or tal<en by the student as deed ves. The responsi bi I ity for teachi ng the engi neeri ng science courses 
i s di vi ded among the engi neeri ng departments. I n addi ti on to the core courses noted above, several 
courses of general i nterest to engi neeri ng or non-engi neeri ng students have been gi ven ENES 
desi gnati ons. See the L i st of A pproved Courses i n chapter 8 for further descri pti ons of these courses. 

F reshnron C ir riciJ un 

See i ndi vi dual department requi rements i n chapter 7. E nteri ng freshman math pi acement i s 
determi ned sol el y by performance on the U ni versi ty math pi acement exam and not on the M ath SAT 
score. Placement i n MATH 115 or lower wi 1 1 delay by a semester el igi bi I ity to take certai n 
engineering courses. 

SophomoreYear 

N 1 ater than the sophomore year, a student shoul d sd ect an academi c degree program (A erospace 
Bioengi neeri ng. Biological Resources, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Fire Protection, 
M echani cal , or M ateri al s Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng) and thi s department assumes the responsi bi I i ty 
for the students academi c gui dance, counsel i ng, and program pi anni ng from that poi nt unti I the 
compi eti on of the degree requi rements of that program as wd I as the School . For the specif i c 
requi rements, see the curri cul um I i sti ng i n each engi neeri ng department. 

Advising 

Advi si ng i s mandatory for al I students i n the CI ark School . Advi si ng for freshmen and undeci ded 
engi neeri ng students i s provi ded by the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Advi si ng and Academi c Support, 
I ocated i n Room 1124 G I enn L . M arti n H al 1 , 301-405-3855, and i s aval I abl e by appoi ntment 
M onday through F ri day from 8: 30 a. m to 4: 30 p. m Wal k- i n advi si ng i s al so aval I abl e at speci f i c 
ti mes duri ng tine week. A ppoi ntments for other hours can be made by speci al request. Students with a 
decl ared engi neeri ng maj or shoul d seek advi si ng from thd r academi c department. Refer to the 
individual program for additional information. 

JNIinors 

Minor in Engneering Leadership Development: 16 credits. Preparing engineering students for 

I if e-l ong I eadershi p rol es i n educati on, i ndusby, and government i s the goal of the mi nor i n 

engi neeri ng I eadershi p devd opment. The mi nor wi 1 1 compI ement the techni cal ski 1 1 s and knowl edge 

students acqui re duri ng thd r academi c careers to better prepare them for I eadershi p and 

col I aborati ve rol es i n thd r prof essi onal futures. Students may earn the mi nor and a notati on on thd r 

off i ci al transcri pt by compI eti ng coursework whi ch focuses on communi cati on, gl obal awareness, 

proj ect management, understandi ng onesd f and worki ng eff ecti vd y wi th others. Contact the mi nor 

advisor, Rachd Rose (rrose4@umd.edu), orvisitthewd^at 

www. ursp. umd. edu/l ^ershi p- mi nor/mi nor- 1 eadershi p. html for more i nf ormati on. 

I nternational Eng neeri n^ 15 to 21 credits. I n addition to a strong engi neeri ng background, there 
i s a need for engi neers with cross-cultural experi ence and ford gn I anguage abi I iti es. Students may 
earn the mi nor by compI eti ng a course i n I nternati onal B usi ness Cultures for E ngi neeri ng and 



I he col leges end bchods P^el/fc 

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Technology and additional courses in language, culture studies, or internationally related studies, 
pi us an engi neeri ng experi ence abroad. Contact the mi nor advi sor, J ane F i nes (jf i nes(a)unxl.edu), or 
vi sit the web at www. ursp. umd.edu/i nternati onal/i ndex. htnl for more i nformati on. Students who 
f ul f i 1 1 mi nor requi rements wi 1 1 reed ve a notati on on thd r off i ci al transcri pt. 

Nanoscienoe and Technology: 15 credi ts. E xpl osi ve growth i n the f i el d of nanometer seal e sci ence 
and technol ogy (N S&T) has I ed i n the past few years to many technol ogi cal advances i n devi ces and 
materi al s structured at the nanometer seal e. The I nterdi sci pi i nary M i nor Program of Study i n 
N anosci ence and Technol ogy i s i ntended to prepare parti ci pad ng students for a career i n thi s rapi dl y 
devd opi ng f i d d. Thi s program draws upon the consi derabi e experti se i n nanosci ence at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, i n departments di stri buted among three school s, E ngi neeri ng. Computer, 
M athemati cs and Physi cal Sci ences and Cherni stry and L if e Sci ences. Students take courses i n 
Fabrication/Synthesis and Characterization, which emphasize the experi mental side of NS&T, as 
wd I as F undamental Sci ence and Speci al i zati on E I ecti ves, whi ch teach the underl yi ng pri nci pi es 
and di recti ons, and i ncl ude underl yi ng theory and the motivations for NS&T. Visit the web site 
www.nanocenter.umd.edu/education/nano_mi nor/nano_mi nor.php for more i nformati on. 

Minor in Nuclear Eng neeri n^ 15 credits. The need for engineers with knowledge of nuclear 
engi neeri ng topi cs wi 1 1 grow si gni f i canti y i n the comi ng years, wi th new nuci ear pi ants bd ng 
pi anned, exi sti ng pi ants conti nui ng operati on, and i ncreasi ng i ndusti'i al and medi cal uses of radi ati on 
sources. The mi nor i n N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng provi des an engi neeri ng stixlent with an understandi ng 
of nucI ear engi neeri ng and its appi i cati on to many different f i d ds, such as power generati on, reactor 
operati on, and i ndusti'i al uses. Students i n the mi nor wi 1 1 1 earn the fundamental s of nucI ear reactor 
engi neeri ng, radi ati on i nteracti ons and measurement, power pi ant desi gn concepts, and reactor safety 
and ri sk assessment. The mi nor i s open to any stixlent i n the CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng. Contact 
Dr. G .A . Pertmer (pertmer(a)umd.edu) for further i nformati on. Students who f ulf i 1 1 mi nor 
requi rennents wi 1 1 reed ve a notati on on thd r off i ci al transcri pt. 

Project Managemenb 15 credits. A basic understandi ng of project management is becomi ng 
i ncreasi ngi y i mportant for engi neers. Such knowl edge enabi es them to contri bute i mmedi atd y to 
ennpl oyers, and to advance thd r careers. I n additi on to a sti'ong engi neeri ng background, there i s 
si gnif i cant need for engi neers to understand the fundamental s of managi ng proj ects i n order to 
eff ecti vd y parti ci pate as members of proj ect teams. Students who successful I y compi ete mi nor 
requi rements wi 1 1 reed ve a notation on ttid r offidal transcri pt. Contact J ohn Cable, Project 
Management M inor Advisor (jcable(a)umd.edu) or visitthe web site 
www, pm umd.edu/underarad_proaram6/underarad_mi nor_courses/i ndex. hbii for more 
information. 

Living-Learning Pro-ams 

WomeninEn9neeringLiving& Learning Conmruiity 

Director Paige Smith 

Women i n E ngi neeri ng Program 

1134G Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 

The Women in Engi neeri ng Li ving& Learning Community (WIE LLC) is open to any first year 
engi neeri ng stixlent (male or female) with an i nterest i n promoti ng gender diversity i n thef idd of 
engi neeri ng. Students who compI ete the f i rst year of the program are i nvi ted to parti ci pate i n a 
second year. The program seeks to promote community among f i rst and second year engi neeri ng 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois Fegei// 

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students comrni tted to gender di versi ty i n the f i el d and to provi de encouragement and support for 
academi c and prof essi onal success by: ( 1) i ntroduci ng students to women mentors and rol e model s; 
(2) offering professional and personal development opportunities; (3) helping students make 
connect] ons with peers i n engi neeri ng and (4) rd nforci ng i mportant techni cal ski 1 1 s needed to 
succeed i n engi neeri ng. The components of this I i vi ng and learni ng program i ncl ude a one credit 
serni nar course, course cl usteri ng, resi denti al housi ng on a common f I oor and resources provi ded i n 
the residence hall. 

Spedalized Acadenfic Programs 

Dual De^^ee Program 

The Dual Degree Program is a cooperative arrangement between the Clark School of Engi neeri ng 
and sd ected col I eges whi ch al I ows students to earn undergraduate degrees from both i nstituti ons i n 
approximatdy five years. A student in the Dual Degree Program will attend his/^hercollegefor 
approxi matd y three academi c years ( mi ni nxim 90 semester hours) and the C I ark School of 
E ngi neeri ng at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and for approxi matd y two acadeni c years ( mi ni mum hours 
requi red determi ned i ndi vi dual I y approxi matd y 60 semester hours) . 

Dual degree candi dates may parti ci pate i n any of the baccal aureate programs i n the CI ark School of 
E ngi neeri ng on a space aval I abl e basi s. 

At the present ti me the parti ci pad ng i nstituti ons i n M aryl and and the Di stri ct of Col umbi a are 
A meri can U ni versi ty, B owl e State U ni versi ty. Col umbi a U ni on Col I ege, Coppi n State Col I ege, 
F rostburg State U ni versi ty, M organ State U ni versi ty. Col I ege of N otre Dame of M aryl and, St. 
Mary's Collegeof Maryland, Salisbury University, Towson University, McDanid College, Trinity 
Col I ege, and Washi ngton Col I ege. A I so parti ci pad ng i n the program are K entucky State U ni versi ty. 
King Col I ege in Tennessee, Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania, and Xavier University in 
Louisiana. 

E n^ neeri ng Abroad 

Preparati on for practi ci ng engi neeri ng i n the gl obal marketpl ace i s i ncreasi ngi y i mportant for new 
engi neers and al so for engi neers to advance i n thd r career. The CI ark School offers opportuniti es for 
students to study abroad i n I ocati ons around the worl d duri ng thd r col I ege career. Students may 
d ect to study abroad for one or two semesters or parti ci pate i n a short-term summer or wi nter term 
program I nternshi ps and research experi ences abroad are al so aval I abl e. Some study/i nternshi p 
abroad programs requi re f I uency i n tiie nati ve I anguage, whi I e other programs offer opportuni ti es i n 
E ngi i sh. Faculty advi sors and the study abroad advi sor wi 1 1 hd p students sd ect an appropri ate 
program and course work. 

For further i nformation on the Clark School 's i nternational programs, students should contact J ane 
Fi nes (jf i nesOunxI.edu ) or visit the web site at www.ursp.ena. umd.edu/i nternational/i ndex.html . 



College Honors Pro-am 

Students in theA. James Clark School of Engineering participateintheUniversity Honors Program 
College Park Scholars, the Clark School Honors Program and departmental honors programs (see 
the i ndi vi dual department seed on for detai I s) . 

Clark School En^neering Honors Prog'am 



I hecollegesendbchools P^el/t 



TheClark School offers an Engineering Honors Program that provides eligible students the 
opportuni ty to pursue an enri ched program of studi es that wi 1 1 broaden thd r perspecti ves and 
i ncrease the deiDth of thd r knowl edge. E ngi neeri ng students meeti ng al I of the f ol I owl ng criteri a are 
eligible to apply: 

1. Upper fourth of engineering juniors and seniors 

2. J uni or standi ng or 60 appi i cabi e credits 

3. Completionof atleastonesennesteratUMCP 

The requi rements for compi eti ng the program are as f ol I ows: 

1. A Honors Research Project which often can be used as a technical elective a written 
report, and an oral presentati on to a faculty panel of tine E H P. 

2. Successful completionof botin Engineering Honors Seminars (EN ES 480 and EN ES 
481, one credit hour each). 

3. M ai ntenance of a GPA to remai n i n the upper till rd of tine class. 
For more i nf ormati on see www.eng.umd.edu/current/ current_honors.ltn1 

College Park Scholars- ScienoQ Technology, and Society 

Director: Dr. Bebsy Mendelsohn 

Co-sponsored by the Clark School of Engineering, tine Science, Technology, and Society (STS) 
prgoram i s one of the 12 1 i vi ng/l earni ng programs offered by tine Col I ege Park Schol ars Program 
Thi s two year program for academi cal I y tal ented freshmen and sophomores i s open to al I maj ors 
who are i nterested i n exami ni ng the i mportance of soci al processes that shape sci entif i c research and 
technol ogi cal devd opment, and conversd y, the ways that sci ence and technol ogy shape soci ety. 
The STS program sponsors social activities that bui Id community and complennent classroom work. 

ApprcMBd Student Societies and ProfiesEional Organizations 

ProfiesEJonal Societies 

Each of the engi neeri ng departments sponsors a stixlent chapter or stijdent secti on of a nati onal 
engi neeri ng society. The student chapters sponsor a variety of activities i ncl udi ng technical 
meeti ngs, soci al gatiieri ngs, and School or U ni versi ty servi ce proj ects. A 1 1 stixlents are sti'ongi y 
encouraged to j oi n one or more of these chapters. These organi zati ons are A meri can H d i copter 
Soci ety, A meri can I nsti tute of A eronauti cs and A sti'onauti cs, A meri can I nsti tute of C herni cal 
E ngi neers, A meri can N ucl ear Soci ety, A meri can Soci ety of A gri cul tural E ngi neers, A meri can 
Soci ety of Civil Engineers, A meri can Soci ety of Mechanical Engineers, Black Engineers Society, 
Institute of Electi'ical and E I edronics Engi neers. Minerals, Metals and Materials Sod ety. Society of 
Asian Engi neers. Society of Automotive Engi neers. Society of Fi re Protection Engi neers. Society of 
H i spani c E ngi neers, and Soci ety of Women E ngi neers. 

Honor Societies 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois p^ei/y 

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The CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng and each of the engi neeri ng departments sponsor honors soci eti es. 
Nomi nations or i nvitations for membershi p are usual ly extended to j unior and senior students based 
on schol arshi p, servi ce and/or other sd ecti ve cri teri a. Some of the honors organ! zati ons are branches 
of national societies; others are local groups: Tau Beba Pi (College Honorary); Alpha Epsilon 
(Agricultural Engineering); Alpha Nu Sigma (Nuclear Engineering); Chi Epsilon(Civil 
Engineering); Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering); Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering); 
Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering); and Sigma 
Gamma Tau (Aerospace E ngi neeri ng) . 

Financial AsaStanGe 

The CI ark School offers schol arshi ps to tal ented undergraduate engi neeri ng students. Thi s i s a 
competi ti ve schol arshi p program wi th schol arshi ps awarded for meri t. F i nanci al need and a vari ety 
of other factors may al so be consi dered. N ew freshmen are automati cal I y consi dered for most C I ark 
School schol arshi ps. C urrent and new transfer students nxst compi ete ttie onl i ne schol arshi p 
appi i cati on by M ay 31st for best consi derati on. Contact J ane F i nes (ifines(a)umd.edu) or vi si t the 
websi te www, ursp. umd.edu/schol arshi ps/i ndex. hbii for more i nformation. 

The Benjamin T. Rome Scholarship is a f ul l-ride schol arshi p awarded to a new freshman student 
each year. The Rome Schol arshi p covers al I expenses (tuition and fees, room and board) pi us a book 
al I owance and a sti pend. The award i s renewabi e for three additi onal years provi ded the reel pi ent 
mai ntai ns good academi c standi ng and makes progress toward an engi neeri ng degree. 



Research Units 
Under^aduabeRessarch Pro^'ams 

U ndergraduate research programs al I ow qual if i ed undergraduate students to work with research 
I aboratory di rectors i n departments, thus gi vi ng students a chance for a uni que experi ence i n 
research and engi neeri ng desi gn. Proj ects i n engi neeri ng al I ow undergraduate students to do 
i ndependent study under the gui dance of f acul ty members i n an area of mutual i nterest. For more 
i nf ormati on contact the department or the Dean's off i ce. 

Student E ngagement and Service Units 

OfficeoF Under^-aduabeAdvising and Academic Sifiport 

1124Glenn L.Martin Hall, 301-405-3855 

Director: J ennaDol an 

www.ena.umd.edu/aclvisina . engrhelpOdeans. umd.edu 

The Office of U ndergraduate A dvi sing and A cadennic Support Office provides a broad variety of 
servi ces to assi st students duri ng thd r col I egi ate careers. I ndi vi dual advi si ng may focus on a number 
of student rel ated i ssues i ncl udi ng: schedul e pi anni ng, course sd ecti on, uni versi ty pol i cy 
interpretations, career choices, social and personal adjustinentsand academic concerns. The office 
al so provi des ori entati on to new students, cl ears students for graduati on, and i s i nsti'umental i n 
hd pi ng students process admi nisti'ative forms. The staff works closdy with other campus offices to 
i dentify resources that address the vari ous needs of our students. 

E n^ neeri ng Co-op and Career Sen/ices 

1131 Glenn L.Martin Hall, 301-405-3863 
Director: Hddi Sauber 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elbC 

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co-opOena.umd.edu . www.coop.ena.umcl.edu 

Whether its to wi re robots i n a car pi ant, monitor a waste water management proj ect, or refornxil ate 
cough syrup for a pharmaceuti cal company, the E ngi neeri ng Co-op and Career Servi ces Off i ce 
assi sts sbxients i n f i ndi ng cooperati ve educati on (co-op) and i nternshi p posi ti ons i n pri vate i ndustry 
and the government. Students may worl< f ul I -ti me or part-ti me duri ng the f al I , spri ng and/or summer 
semesters. Co-op and i nternshi p posi ti ons compi ement cl assroom I earni ng and provi de students the 
opportunity to gai n prof essi onal I evd experi ence, bui I d mentori ng rd ati onshi ps, i ntegrate theory 
and practi ce, conf i rm career choi ces, and hd p f i nance thd r educati on. 

Thef i rst step i n the appi ication process is to attend an orientation session that focuses on 
i nternshi p/co-op search strategi es. After writi ng a resume and havi ng it criti qued by our off i ce, 
students are gi ven permi ssi on to upl oad thd r resume i nto our datab^ eL i nl< of engi neeri ng j obs 
and on-campus i ntervi ews. To assi st students i n thd r search we offer a wi de vari ety of worl<shops on 
topi cs such as eff ecti ve resumes, i ntervi ew strategi es, prof essi onal i sm career f ai r preparati on, sal ary 
negoti ati on, and advanced j ob search techni ques. Our website I i sts the current schedul e of 
workshops. I n additi on, students have the opportunity to meet empi oyers by parti ci pad ng i n our 
career f ai rs, empI oyer i nf ormati on sessi ons, and speci al j ob search presentati ons conducted by 
engi neeri ng recrui ters. V i si t our websi te for more i nf ormati on: www.coop.ena.umd.edu . 

Under^aduateRecriitment and Special Pro^-ams 

1124Glenn L.Martin Hall, 301-405-3857 
Director:] aneF, Fines 
www.ursp.umd.edu 

The Office of Undergraduate Recruitment and Special Programs is responsible for activities to 
recruit and retai n students i n the A . J ames CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng. Servi ces i ncl ude 
undergraduate recruitment, international programs, leadership programs, meeting with prospective 
students, provi di ng K - 12 outreach acti vi ti es, admi ni steri ng the C I ark School 's schol arshi p program 
advi si ng students studyi ng abroad, advi si ng students compI eti ng the mi nor i n I nternati onal 
E ngi neeri ng or E ngi neeri ng Leadershi p Devd opmen, and coordi nati ng I nventi s: Academy of 
E ngi neeri ng L eadershi p. 

TheCenber for Minorities in ScieriGeand En^neering 

1134GlennL. Martin Hall, 301-405-3878 
Director Rosemary L. Parker 

The Center i s dedi cated to i ncreasi ng the enrol I ment and graduati on rates of Af ri can A meri can, 
H i spani c, and N ati ve A meri can students maj ori ng i n engi neeri ng. The Center provi des a compI ete 
package of servi ces desi gned to assi st students from pre-col I ege through compI eti on of the 
undergraduate degree. Servi ces i ncl ude acadeni c advi si ng, tutori al assi stance, schol arshi p 
i nformation, the BRI DGE Program outreach programs, job i nformation and support of student 
organizations. 

Women in En^neering Pro^'am 

1134GlennL. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 
Director Paige E.Smith 

The Women i n E ngi neeri ng Program (WI E Program) i s dedi cated to i ncreasi ng the enrol I ment, 
retenti on, and graduati on rates of f emal es i n the School , as wd I as i dentifyi ng and addressi ng thi s 
group's unique needs. The Program provides a comprehensive set of i nitiati ves designed to 



I hecollegesendbchools P^elBl 

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encourage and assi st women students to become successful prof essi onal engi neers. 

Servi ces offered i ncl ude research f el I owshi ps, prof essi onal mentor! ng program i nf ormati on I i stserv, 
website, I i vi ng and learni ng community, f i rst year mentori ng program workshops on careers, 
outreach programs, speakers, student advisory board, and support of women engi neeri ng 
organizations. 

E n^ neeri ng I nformation Technologes (E I T) 

0123 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-0174 
Executive Director J ames F. Zahniser, 301-405-3885 
www.it.umd.edu 

K eepi ng pace wi th tine I atest devd opments i n the area of i nf ormati on technol ogi es worl dwi de, the 
CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng provi des a state of-the-art computi ng envi ronment that wi 1 1 be tine 
standard for engi neers i n the years ahead. Faculty and students have access to computer workstati ons 
with a wi de range of engi neeri ng software and multi -medi a enabi ed cl assrooms with the I atest 
presentati on capabi I i ti es. I n addi ti on, E I T provi des access and support on the I atest tool s and 
servi ces for onl i ne col I aborati on, presentati on technol ogi es, and di stance I earni ng. 

Distance Education Technology and Sen/ices 

2104 Martin Hall, 301-405-4910; Fax: 301-314-9639 
www.det5.umd.edu 

D i stance E ducati on Technol ogy and Servi ces, D ETS, provi des di stance educati on technol ogy and 
support service to the A. J ames CI ark School of Engineering and the UMCP campus. Weserveover 
500 students per year by provi di ng graduate and undergraduate courses i n engi neeri ng and other 
rel ated f i el ds. I n addi ti on, we al so provi de techni cal , servi ces to the campus such as vi deo 
conferenci ng, vi deo capturi ng, satd I ite servi ces and more. For further i nformati on, pi ease reference 
theDETSwebsiteatwww.dets.umd.edu. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (SPH) 

3310 SPH Building, 301-405-2438 

www.sph.umd.edu 

Dean: Roberts. Gold 

A ssoci ate Dean(s) : D ushanka K I ei nman 

Assistant Dean(s): Viki Annard, Mary Kivlighan 

The School of Publ ic Health provides preparation leadi ng to the Bachelor of Science degree i n the 
following professional areas: Physical Education (K-12), Community Health and Family Science. 
The Col I ege al so offers curri cul a i n K i nesi ol ogi cal Sci ences. I n additi on, each department offers a 
wide variety of courses for all university students. These courses may be used to fulfill the general 
educati on requi rements and as el ecti ves. 

Programs combi ni ng service and i nstruction are provided by the Chi Idrens Health and 
Developmental Clinic (see KNES 389E) and the Adult Health and Developmental Program (see 
SPHL287). 

Special Advantages atxJ Facilities 



I he col leges and bchods p^eia^ 



The Friedgen Farni ly Student Lounge, located i n the SPH Bui Idi ng is avai lablefor use by al I student 
i n the col lege between 7 am. and 10 p. m Access is through the student ID card. Seethe Director 
of Faci I ities i n 3310 SPH BIdg if you do not have access. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirement^Deg'eeOpdons 

The School of Public Health offers the baccalaureateinthe following fields of study: Physical 
Education, Kinesiological Sciences, Community Health and Family Science. The degree of Bachelor 
of Sci ence i s conferred upon stixlents who have met the conditi ons of thd r curri cul a as herd n 
prescri bed by the School of Publ ic Health. 

Each candi date for a degree nxst f i I e a formal appi i cati on with the Records Off i ce accordi ng to the 
schedul ed deadi i nes f or the anti ci pated semester of graduati on. 

Advising 

Atthetimeof mati'iculation and first registi'ati on, each stixlent is assigned to a member of the 
Col I ege faculty who acts as the stixlents academi c advi sor. These assi gnments are made by the 
i ndi vi dual departments and depend upon the stixlents chosen maj or. A 1 1 atiil etes and stijdents on 
probati on or di smi ssal have mandatory advi si ng and are seen by advi sors i n the Student Servi ce 
Center. 301- 405-2357. 

Departments and C enters 

The School i s composed of the f ol I owl ng departments, each off eri ng maj or programs that I ead to a 
Bachd or of Sci ence degree 

Department of Fami I y Sci ence 

Department of K i nesi ol ogy* 

Department of Public and Community Health 

*Offers degrees i n K i nesi ol ogi cal Sci ences and Physi cal Educati on. 

Coilege IHonors Prog'am 

Phi Alpha Epsilon. Honorary Society of the School of Publ ic Health. The purpose of this 
organi zati on i s to recogni ze academi c achi evement and to promote prof essi onal growtin by 
sponsori ng acti vi ti es i n the f i el ds of physi cal educati on, ki nesi ol ogy, fami I y sci ences, communi ty 
health, and related areas. 

Students qual ify for membershi p when they attai n j uni or standi ng i n physi cal educati on, ki nesi ol ogy, 
fami I y sciences, or community health, and have a mi ni nxim overal I average of 3.5 and a mi ni nxim 
of 24 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. For additional information, pleasecontact 
the Student Service Center, 301-405-2357. 

Research Units 

Center on Agng 

2367 SPH Building, 301-405-2469 
Chair and Professor Dr. Laura B. Wilson 
www.sph.umd.edu/health-services 



I he col leges and bchods p^eiaii 

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The Center on Agi ng, as part of the Department of Health Services Adni ni strati on (a graduate 
program) , sti mul ates and supports agi ng- rd ated acti vi ti es wi thi n exi sti ng departments, col I eges, and 
schools throughout all of the various institutions of the University System of Maryland. TheCenter 
coordi nates the Graduate Gerontology Certificate (master's and doctoral levels), the university's 
f i rst approved graduate certif i cate program The Center assi sts undergraduate and graduate students 
i nterested i n the f i el d of gerontol ogy and hd ps them to devi se educati onal programs to meet the r 
goals. It is a research center working in health and aging policy, lifdong learning and civic 
engagement, disability and aging, behavioral and social aspects of aging, and health serviceddivery 
systems. 1 1 al so conducts community educati on programs, assi sts faculty i n pursui ng research 
acti viti es i n the f i d d of agi ng, conducts conferences on adulthood and agi ng-rd ated topi cs, provi des 
on- and off-campus techni cal assi stance to practiti oners who serve ol der adults and sponsors the 
University of Maryland Osher Lifdong Learning I nstitute. Legacy Leadership I nstitutes, the 
University of Maryland Retirees Association, and Retired and Senior Volunteer Programs 
International (RSVPI). 

Student E ngagement atxJ Service Units 

StudEnt SETvicsCEntET 

1304 School of Public Health Building, 301-405-2753 
www.sph.umd.edu/studentservices 

The Student Servi ce Center provi des advi si ng on admi ssi ons, ori entati on, academi c pol i cy, 4-year 
pi anni ng, career i nf ormati on, and requi red advi si ng for students on academi c probati on or di smi ssal 
and all col lege athletes. All other advising is provided in the col lege departments. TheCenter is 
open from 8: 00 am - 4: 30 pm week days for use by students for studyi ng and group meeti ngs. 
There are twd ve computers aval I abl e for student use. 

GymkanaTroifie 

1120 SPH Building, 301-405-2566 
www.gymkana.umd.edu 
Director Scott Wdsh 

For over 60 years, the University of Maryland Gymkana Troupe has been influencing young people 
to I i ve healthy I ifestyles. Founded at the University of M aryland Col lege Park campus i n 1946, tine 
troupe has travded throughout M aryland and ndghbori ng states promoti ng drug-free I i vi ng. Each of 
its 60-1- members pledgesthemsdvesto be drug-free. Through thdr role-niodding and unique 
gymnasti c performances, they have i nf I uenced hundreds of thousands of peopi e to j oi n them i n 
living a drug-free life. The troupe which is open to all University of Maryland students of all 
abi I i ti es, i s consi dered a one-of -a- ki nd organi zati on and i s bd i eved to be the onl y col I egi ate 
exhi bi ti onal gymnasti c troupe acti vd y touri ng the U ni ted States. A s an outreach program of the 
School of Publ ic Health, the Gymkana Troupe uses peer role modds who share tind r experiences 
and thd r message of healthy I i vi ng with others. Students i nfl uenci ng students to avoid drugs is the 
heart of Gymkana's program 

THE PHILIP IMERRILL COLLEGE OFJOURIMALISM GOUR) 

1117 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng, 301-405-2399 
www.journalismumd.edu 
Dean: Lee Thornton (Interim) 
Associate Dean(s): D. Hdder, O. Rdd 



inecollegesandbchods P^elt^ 

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Assistant Dean(s): S. Crane, M. Payne-Gassaway, F. Quine, L. Ringer 

Professors: M. Beasley, D. Broder, R. CleginornJ . Franlclin (Philip IMerrill Cinair), H.Joinnson 

(KnigJTtCiiair), E. Roberts, L. Stdner, C. Stepp, L. Tinornton (RicJiard Eaton Cinair) 

Associate Professors: I . Chinoy, C. Hanson, D. Heider (Assoc Prof & Assoc Dean), K. IMcAdams 

(Assoc Prof & Assoc Dean UG Studies), S. IMoeller, J . Newliagen, E. Zanot 

Lecturers: A. Barbieri, A. Bonner, C. Clayton, S. Crane (Lecturer & A sst Dean), A. Flynn, P. Fuchs, 

C. Harvey, D. Huffman, S. Katcef, C. Rogers, K. Swift 

Professors Emeriti: J . Blumler, P. Geraci (Assoc Prof Emeritus), D. Gomery, R. Hiebert, L. Martin 

Visiting Faculty: R. Lorente, D. Nelson (Director of Carnegie Seminar), L. Pitts (Merrill Visiting 

Professor), G. Solomon (Povich Professor) 

TheMajor 

The Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm prepares students for careers i n newspapers, magazi nes, TV 
news, newsl etters and onl i nej ournal i sm outi ets. The undergraduate j ournal i sm program cul mi nates 
inaB.A. degree in journal ism 

The col lege is f ul ly accredited by tine Accrediti ng Counci I on Education i n J ournal ism and M ass 
Communications. 

Students I earn i n col I ege programs such as Capi tal N ews Servi ce, a dai I y wi re servi ce i n Washi ngton 
andAnnapoliSk UMTV, a cable station operated by tine col I ege and tine American J ournal ism 
Rb/I ew, the nati on's I eadi ng medi a magazi ne. 

Students maj ori ng i n j ournal i sm take approxi matd y one-tini rd (42 credi ts) of tinei r total coursework 
i n tine Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm J ournal i sm courses are desi gned to provi de students witii 
a worki ng knowl edge of ttie tool s and concepts tiiey wi 1 1 need to perform as top-f I i ght prof essi onal 
communicators. 

The remai ni ng two-tiii rds (80 credits) of undergraduate coursework consi sts of a vari ety of otiier 
subjects such as history, economics, government, sociology and psychology. This exposure 
acquai nts students witin fundamental probi ems and i ssues tiney wi 1 1 encounter i n tinei r careers. Witini n 
tinese credits, journal ism students must choose a "Concentration" (a core of advanced work i n a 
substanti ve f i el d) to estabi i sh competency i n a speci al i zed area of knowl edge tiney wi 1 1 be abl e to use 
as professionals. 

Program Obj ectives 

About theCdlege 

The Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm i s wi del y consi dered one of tine best j ournal i sm programs 
i n tine nati on, bl endi ng a mi x of pri ze- wi nni ng j ournal i sts, communi cati on schol ars and nati onal I y 
recogni zed prof essi onal programs. The school 's mi ssi on i s si mpl e to produce tine best possi bl e 
j ournal i sts for I eadi ng newspapers, nnagazi nes, TV , radi o and onl i ne news outi ets. Recent graduates 
areeditors, reporters and producers at The New York Times, Washi ngton Post, CBS, LosAngdes 
Ti nnes, CNN, Annerica Onl i ne and many of tine nation's otiner top news organizations. 

Students learnfromafacultytinat includes Pulitzer Prizewinners David S. Broder, HaynesJ ohnson 
and J on FrankI i n, fornner CBS White House correspondent LeeThornton and fornner Phi ladd phia 
I nqui rer Executive Editor Gene Roberts. 



I he col leges and bchods P^eia 



Located I ess than 10 mi I es from the news capital of Washi ngton, students parti ci pate i n i nternshi ps 
duri ng the academi c year at The Washi ngton Post, The (Baiti more) Sun, CN N , and a wi de array of 
Washi ngton news bureaus. I n the summer, stixlents i ntern at top news organizations around the 
country. Broadcast news stixlents produce and anchor a 30- mi nute nightiy news show that reaches 
more than 400, 000 househol ds i n suburban Washi ngton on the Col I ege-operated U M TV stati on, and 
onl i ne stixlents work on M aryland Newsl i ne, a pol itical and publ ic pol icy Web- based news 
magazi ne. Advanced broadcast, onl i ne, and pri nt stixlents enrol I i n Capital News Service, an 
i ntensi ve f ul I -ti me reporti ng program i n Washi ngton and A nnapol i s. Students al so parti ci pate i n 
some of the school 's many prof essi onal programs, i ncl udi ng the montinl y magazi ne A meri can 
J ournal i sm Revi ew and the Casey J ournal i sm Center on Chi I dren and Fami I i es. 

CollegeMission Statement 

The Col I ege seeks to be the nati on's preerni nent prof essi onal school i n its f i el d, a model for others i n 
i ts i ntegrati on of schol arl y work and prof essi onal practi ce. A s we enter a new century, i t aspi res to 
I ead i n the uses and stixly of new technol ogi es to i mprove understandi ng and performance i n our 
f i el ds. I ts mi ssi on i s to educate uni versi ty stixlents at the undergraduate, master's and doctoral I evd 
wi thi n a I i beral arts context, prepari ng them for careers i n j ournal i sm and schol arl y work and 
teachi ng i n these f i el ds; to el evate the standards of prof essi onal practi ce; and to advance the qual i ty 
of publ i c I i f e through knowl edge of publ i c i ssues, i ncl udi ng those rd ated to the rol e i n a democrati c 
society. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

1. Demonsti'ate the abi I ity to research, write, report and edit rd evant news stori es acceptabi e by a 
professional newsoutiet. 

2. U nderstand the hi story of j ournal i sm be fami I i ar wi th coverage of di verse groups i n soci ety 
and learn the role of journal ists i n society. 

3. U nderstand the etini cal gui dd i nes and practi ces that govern the prof essi on and the I egal 
i mpl i cati ons and consi derati ons that i nf orm the prof essi on. 

4. Demonsti-ate the abi I i ty to appi y tool s, concepts and technol ogy appropri ate for the 
presentati on of i mages and i nf ormati on i n the prof essi on. 

5. Conduct research and eval uate i nf ormati on by metinods appropri ate to the profession. 

6. Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts. 

Special Advantages and Fadlities 

The M erri 1 1 Col I ege i s home to many uni que programs and opportijniti es aval I abi e to undergraduate 
stixlents: 

UMTV: B roadcast j ournal i sm stixlents stixly and I earn at U M TV , the col I ege-owned cabi e TV 
station that houses state-of-the-art equi pment, i ncl udi ng DVCPro, Avid and EN PS systems used i n 
the f i d d today. Students begi n thd r broadcast educati on from thd r f i rst semester at the Col I ege, 
vol unteeri ng as crew members for programs produced under the gui dance of renowned broadcast 
faculty mernbers. 

Capital NaAS Service the col lege^s Capital News Service operates two pri nt bureaus, one 
i nAnnapol is and one i n Washi ngton, D.C, a dai ly tdevision newscast, and an onl i ne news 
magazi ne. CN S provi des stixlents with real -I if e reporti ng experi ences coveri ng a beat, devd opi ng 
sources, generati ng story i deas and writi ng on deadi i ne under the supervi si on of a faculty editor. 



I he col leges and bchods P^elbfc 



Real-World Experience Students take thd r educati on out of the cl assroom and i nto the real worl d. 
U si ng i nternshi ps, student medi a and i n-cl ass reporti ng, our students don't j ust I earn why, but how. 
Thecollege is located just outside Washington, D.C., the nation's capital, and the country's eighth 
largest media market. 

Top-Nobch FaciJty: The M erri 1 1 Col I ege i s home to i nternati onal I y renowned j ournal i sts and medi a 
scholars, i ncl udi ng seven Pul itzer Prize wi nners. Courses are also taught by worki ng journal i sts who 
serve as adj unct professors. 

AcGesstDCenbersoFJOLrnalism Study: TheMerrill Col I ege is home to nine centers for journal ism 
study and prof essi onal devd opment. U ndergraduates have opportuniti es to i nteract with these 
programs. I nternshi ps are aval I abl e f or students at two of these centers. Students can wri te and 
research topi cs i mpacti ng the f i el d at A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew, one of two nati onal publ i cati ons 
that cover the j ournal i sm i ndustry. Students can al so i ntern at the Casey J ournal i sm Center on 
Children and Families. 

Technology for the" Real World" : Students use the same technologies used by professional 
journal i sts and media special ists. From the latest i n non-1 i near editi ng systems, to updated 
technol ogi es for di gital art and pagi nati on, every undergraduate wi 1 1 have access to the hardware and 
software used by prof essi onal s i n td evi si on and radi o producti on, vi sual j ournal i sm onl i ne news 
and media communication. 

Achrisaon Requirements 

J ournal ism is a Limited Enrol I ment Program (LEP). See the Admissions seed on in chapter If or 
general LEP admission policies. 

Freshman AdmJSEJon and the45-C redit Re/ieuv 

First-time entering freshmen will gain admission to the Philip Merrill Col I ege of J ournal ismdi recti y 
from hi gh school on an aval I abl e basi s. E arl y appi i cati on i s encouraged. F reshmen admi tted to the 
program will have access to the necessary advi si ng through the r i ni ti al semesters to hd p them 
determi ne if J ournal i sm i s an appropri ate area for thd r i nterests and abi I iti es. Academi c and career 
advi si ng i s provi ded to j ournal i sm students throughout thd r academi c career by qual i f i ed academi c 
counsd ors and the Col I ege^s faculty. 

F reshmen who are admi tted di recti y to J ournal i sm wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew by the 
ti me they have compi eted 45 credits. To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, these students must 
complete (1) The two, first-year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at 
least ni ne credits of Distri buti ve Studies coursework, sdected i n consultation with an advisor; (3) 
ENGL 101 and J OUR 201 with grades of C or higher (J OUR 100 is a pre or co-requisiteof J OUR 
201); and (4) a mi ni mum cunxilati ve GPA of 2.0. Students must prove grammar ski I Is competency 
through attainment of a mininximof a 2.0 inj OUR 181 prior to enrolling inj OUR 201. Students 
who do not meet these requirements will not be allowed to continue in tine LEP and will be required 
to sd ect another maj or. I n additi on freshmen are expected to compI etej OU R 200 by the end of thd r 
first year. 

Transfier Adnrisaon 

These requi rements apply to new transfer students to the U ni versity as wd I as on-campus students. 

N ote N more ttian 12 transfer credi ts of communi cati ons courses from an accredi ted j ournal i sm 
program may be approved by the Col I ege to be appI i ed toward the degree. Transfer students who 



I he col leges and bchods P^elB/ 

wi sh to reed ve credi t f or J O U R 201 based on work done i n a non-accredi ted j ournal i sm program 
nxst pass a prof i ci ency exam 

I n order to be admitted to J ournal i sm transfer students wi 1 1 be requi red to meet the f ol I owi ng set of 
gateway requirements: (l)Tlietwo, first-year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and 
mathematics; (2) at least ni ne credits of Disti'i buti ve Studies coursework, selected i n consultation 
with an advisor; (3) completion of ENGL 101 andj OUR 201 with grades of C or higher. Enrollment 
inj OUR 201 requires proof of grammar skills cornpetency through the attainment of at least a 2.0 in 
JOUR 181; and (4) attainmentof a2.8GPA for all college-level work attempted. 

The Test of Standard Written Engl ish (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic 
year. Students who fai led to pass the TSWE (with a mi ni mum score of 52 on thd r second attempt) 
pri or to the end of the 2005-06 academi c year are not el i gi bl e to take J OU R 181 to demonsti'ate 
grammar ski 1 1 s competency. 

Appeals 

Students who are unsuccessful i n gai ni ng admi ssi on to J ournal i sm at the freshman or transfer I evd , 
and bd i eve they have extenuati ng or speci al ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal i n 
writing to theOfficeofUndergraduateAdmissions.Thestixlentwill be notified in writing of the 
appeal decision. 

Students admitted to J ournal i sm as freshmen that do not pass the 45-credit revi ew but bd i eve they 
have speci al ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal di recti y to the Col I ege. 

For further i nf ormati on, contact The Col I ege^s Student Servi ces of f i ce at 301-405-2399. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

* Effective for students matriculating Fall 2008 or later. (Student matriculating before Fall 2008 
should contact an advisor about requirements). 

Students are requi red to earn a mi ni nxim of 122 credi ts. D ue to the I i beral -arts focus of j ournal i sm 
accredi ted j ournal i sm programs requi re maj ors to compi ete successful I y approxi matd y two-thi rds of 
thd r coursework i n areas other than j ournal i sm and communi cati on. The Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of 
J ournal i sm at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and adheres to thi s nati onwi de pol i cy . In practi cal terms, thi s 
means that of the 122 mi ni nxim credits requi red for graduati on, a j ournal i sm stiJdent nxst take 42 
credits i n j ournal i sm (numbered 100 or above) . Of the remai ni ng 80 credits, a mi ni nxim of 65 nxst 
be earned i n I i beral -arts desi gnated courses. 

The Philip Merrill Col I ege of J ournal ism stipulates that 56 of the total credits nxst betaken in 
upper-levd courses (courses numbered 300-499). 

Requi red courses for al I j ournal i sm maj ors regardi ess of whetiner j ournal i sm i s a stixlents pri mary or 
secondary major 

I.J oirnalism reqiiremenbsoubsidetheCollege 

Students nxst compI ete the f ol I owi ng I i beral arts coursework compI ementi ng the U ni versi ty's 
general education requirements. Forthe University's general education (CORE) requirements, 
consult the CORE program i n the current U ndergraduate Catal og. 

• A bsti'act thi nki ng ski 1 1 s requi rement (ni ne credits) 

1. One three-credit stati sti cs course from the f ol I owi ng I i st: 
BIOM 301, BMGT 230, CCJ S 200, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 305, GVPT 227, 



I he col leges and bchods P^eltfc 

PSYC 200, SOCY 201, or a more advanced statistics course. 
2. A mi ni mum of si x credi ts througln one or a combi nati on of the f ol I owi ng opti ons. Siioul d 
a stijdentcinoose to combine the options, at I east one language course nxst be at the 
intermediate level: 

• Language up to two courses with at I east one course at the i ntermedi ate I evd and 
no more than one course at the i ntroductory I evd .(High school equi val ency does 
not sati sf y thi s requi rement. ) 

• M atiYStati sti cs/Computer Sci ence up to two courses 

• Any mathematics (MATH) course numbered 111 or higher. 

• Any computer science (CM SC) course. 

• Public Speaking: one course from COM M 100, 107, 200, or 230. 

• H i story: one course from H I ST 156 or 157. 

• Behavioral or Social Science one course from A NTH 260; PSYC 100 or 221; SOCY 100 or 
105. 

• Economics: one course from ECON 200 or 201. 

• Government and Pol iti cs: one course from GV PT 100 or 170. 

• Supporti ng Area: Four upper-level (numbered 300 or higher) courses for a mi ni nxim of 12 
credits i n a supporti ng f i el d (cannot be i n Communi cati on) . 

I I . J oirnalism GOirse reqiiremenbs 

•JOUR 100-Professional Orientation (one credit) 

•J OUR 200-Hi story. Roles and Structures (three credits) 

• J OU R 201-News Writi ng and Reporti ng (three credits) 
•J OUR 202/262-News Editing (three credits) 

• J OU R 203 - M uiti medi a Reporti ng (three credits) 
•J OUR 300-Ethics (three credits) 

• One of News Writi ng and Reporti ng 1 1 (three credits): 

•JOUR320-Printor 
•JOUR360-Broadcast 

• *Aclvanced Skills: Any twoj OUR classes numbered 321-389 (six credits) 
•J OUR 350-Graphics orj OUR 352-OnlineJ ournalism (three credits) 
•JOUR 399-Supervi sed I nternshi p (one credit) 

•J OUR 400-Law of Mass Communication (three credits) 

• One of the f ol I owi ng (three credits) : 

• Advanced Ski 1 1 s - J OU R 321-389 

• J ournal i sm and Soci ety Course -JOUR 410-469 

• Research: Any J OUR course numbered 470-479 (three credits) 

• J ournal i sm Capstone Experi ence (three credits) 

• J ournal i sm Capstone Col I oqui um (one credit) 

* Students pursui ng a broadcast track are requi red to compi ete J OU R 361 as one of the 
twoJ OUR classes numbered 321-389. 

III. Specific J oirnalism Reqiiremenbs 

• Completion of J OUR 201: Students nxst completej OUR 201 with a "C" or higher. Consult 
the U ndergraduate Catal og or on-l i ne Schedul e f or a I i st of prerequi sites and resti'i cti ons for 
journal ism courses. 

• "C" Requirement: Students must earn a "C" or better inj OUR 201 andj OUR 202/262 prior to 
taki ng any courses for whi ch they serve as a prerequi site. 



I he col leges and bchods p^eiay 



Placement in Coirses 

E nrol I ment i n J OU R 201 requi res proof of grammar ski 1 1 s competency through the attai nment of at 
leasta2.0inJOUR181. 

The Test of Standard Written Engl ish (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic 
year. Students who fai led to pass the TSWE (with a mi ni mum score of 52 on thd r second attempt) 
pri or to the end of the 2005-06 academi c year are not el i gi bl e to take J OU R 181 to demonstrate 
grammar ski 1 1 s competency. 

Advising 

The Off i ce of Student Servi ces, 1117 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng, 301-405-2399, provi des academi c 
advi si ng to maj ors on an appoi ntment basi s. Send e-mai I i nqui ri es to j ourug(a)deans. umd.edu. 

Living-Learning Pro-ams 

College Park Scholars Media, Self & Society 

CPS in Media, Self and Society Director Dr. Kalyani Chadha; Associate Director: Ken J oseph 

Co-sponsored by the Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm the M edi a. Self and Soci ety Program i s 
one of the I i vi ng/l earni ng programs offered by the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program Thi s two-year 
program for i ncomi ng freshman i s desi gned to gi ve students the opportuni ty to undertake a cri ti cal 
exami nati on of medi a organi zati ons, i nsti tuti ons and practi ces as wd I as gai n practi cal experi ence 
through i nvol vement i n a media-related activity of thd r choice. For more i nformation seethe 
Col I ege Park Schol ars Program seed on i n thi s catal og. 

Honors Pro-am 

A I though no departmental honors program current] y exi sts wi thi n the Col I ege, academi cal I y 
outstandi ng students are recognized through Kappa Tau Al pha, the J ournal ism academic honor 
society. 

Student Societies and Profiesaonal Organizations 

The col lege sponsors student chapters of the Society for Professional J ournal ists, the National 
Association of Black J ournal ists, and the Radio andTdevision News Directors Association. These 
organi zati ons provi de students wi th opportuni ti es to practi ce ski 1 1 s, estabi i sh soci al rd ati onshi ps 
with other students both on and off campus, and meet and work with professionals i n thef idd. 

For i nf ormati on on the organi zati ons I i sted, contact the Student Servi ces Off i ce, 1117 J ournal i sm 
Building, 301-405-2399. 

Finandal AsaStanoe 

The Col I ege i s committed to enrol I i ng the most qual if i ed students, regardi ess of abi I ity to pay. 
Toward tinat end, the Col I ege through donor-sponsored awards gi ves more than $105, 000 annual I y 
i n schol arshi ps to undergraduates. A ddi ti onal I y, the U ni versi ty awards schol arshi ps and f i nanci al ai d 
i ncl udi ng I ow-i nterest I oans, grants and work-study opportuni ti es. 

Soirees for I nconring Students 

AIM ncomi ng freshman are automati cal I y consi dered for schol arshi ps granted by the Col I ege. 



I he col leges and bchods p^eiyc 



Gridiron Sc/To/arsfi/jOS - Funded by the Gridi ran Foundation of Washi ngton, the $6,000 annual 
award i s a four-year renewabi e schol arshi p gi ven to an i ncomi ng j ournal i sm freshman. Sd ecti on i s 
based on meri t and a comrni tment to pri nt j ournal i sm 

WilliamRandolpli l-iearstSclTolarsliips - Awards of $2,000 for one year only to outstandi ng 
M aryl and hi gh school stijdents admitted to the Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm 

7/Te Freedom ForumJ ournal ism Scliolarsliips - Awards of $1, 250 to an i ncomi ng freshman and 
$1,250 to an outstandi ng undergraduate (pri nt, broadcast or onl i ne) with f i nancial need. 

BaltimoreSun Diversity in j ournal ismScliolarsliip - A non- renewable $2,500 award estabi ished by 
theTi mes M i rror Foundation to an i ncomi ng freshman with high academic achievement i n high 
school and wide-rangi ng cultural and economic background, who resides i n the Baiti more Sun's 
circulation area. 

SoirGesfor Cirrent Students 

Every year, stixlents benefit from the generosity of our donors with myri ad schol arshi ps, rangi ng 
from $500 to $5, 000 i n one-ti me and renewabi e i nstal I ments, awarded by the col I ege. Students are 
sd ected on a basi s of need, merit donors' i ntent or a combi nati on of these factors. Bd ow i s a 
sd ecti on of schol arshi ps stixlents may appi y for: 

The J oseph R. SI evin Award 

The K . Chri stopher H ouston Schol arshi p 

The Paul Berg Diamondback Scholarship 

E ntravi si on Communi cati ons B roadcast J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Washi ngton Press CI ub Foundati on Schol arshi p 

J ohn Story C leghorn and Nona Reese Cleghorn Schol arshi ps 

The Reese Cleghorn Excd lence i n J ournal ism Schol arshi p 

J ay J ackson Schol arshi p 

The F rank Qui ne and M ary E 1 1 en Doran-Qui ne J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

M aryl and- Dd aware- DC Press Association Scholarships 

The Richard W. Worthi ngton J ournal ism Schol arshi p 

Gertrude Poe Schol arshi ps 

The StanI ey E . Rubenstd n M emori al J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Steven C . Aff ens B roadcast J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

The Ral ph Crosby J ournal ism Excd lence Schol arshi p 

The Fred I., EdnaO. and Fred J . Archibald Scholarship 

J udith Paterson and Leon Danid Scholarship 

TheJ oe Aaron J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

The Phyl I is and Frank Kopen Broadcast] ournal ism Schol arshi p 

The M arj ori e Ferguson-Benj ami n H ol man Schol arshi ps 

The H i ebert J ournal i sm I nternati onal Travd Award 

The Gene Roberts Award 

For more i nformation, and d igi bi I ity requi rements, visit http://www.j ournal ismumd.edu/fi nancial/ 

Other SourGes 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state and i nstituti onal 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the 
awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng stixlents. For i nformati on, vi sit: 
http://www.financialaid.unxl.edu 



I he col leges and bchods P^el9l 

■ ■ 

Av^jardsatxJ Recx3^ition 

Maryland-DelaMiare-DidrictaFColifTtNa Press Association Top NekAS-Editorial Student 

- Awarded annual I y to an outstandi ng pri nt j ournal i sm student at the M ay conmencement. A 
separate award i s al so gi ven to the top B roadcast student. 

J iJieGalvan Outstanding Campus Member Avuard - The Society of Professional J ournal ists 
chapter selects one graduate i n journal ism who is outstandi ng i n his or her class on the basis of 
character, servi ce to the communi ty, schol arshi p, prof i ci ency i n practi cal j ournal i sm and si gni f i cant 
contributions to thdrSPJ chapter. 

KappaTau Alpha Top Scliolar Avuard - Awarded at each commencement to thejournalism 
stixlent earni ng the hi ghest academi c achi evement for al I undergraduate stixly. 

Kappa Tau Alpha National Honor Society- The top ten percent of the journal ism graduating 
cl ass i s i nducted i nto thi s nati onal organi zati on each commencement. 

Fieldv^iork Opportunities 

internships 

Supervi sed i nternshi ps are essenti al . Penny B ender F uchs i s the D i rector of the J ournal i sm 
I nternshi p Program 3116 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng, 301-405-2796. 

Profiesaonal Experience Opportmities 

Capital NaAS Service 

TheAnnapol is and Washi ngton bureaus of the Capital News Service are staffed by stixlents and 
supervi sed by col I ege i nsti'uctors. Students cover state and I egi si ati ve news for cl i ent papers around 
the regi on. B roadcast stijdents have the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n Capi tal N ews Servi ce i n the 
A nnapol i s bureau, devd opi ng stori es and packages f or U M TV . Students are requi red to report 
breaki ng news under deadi i ne, write prof i I es, and cover state agenci es. Thi s i s a f ul I -ti me, 
semester- 1 ong program on site at one of two bureau I ocati ons. Students i nterested i n web j ournal i sm 
can report, write and edit for Maryland Newsline an online magazine. This bureau is located in the 
col I ege^s onl i ne f aci I i ty. Capi tal N ews Servi ce i s coordi nated by A ssi stant Dean Steve C rane J ournal i s 
J ournal i sm B ui I di ng, 301-405-8806. 

UMTV 

For stixlents i nterested i n broadcast news, opportijniti es to gai n experi ence with cabi e news 
programs are presented withi n the curri cul um and by vol unteeri ng at the campus td evi si on stati on, 
UMTV. 

Student-Rifi Campus Media Outiets 

Students can gai n broadcast news and sports reporti ng experi ence through the campus radi o stati on, 
WM UC. There are numerous stixlent-run publ ications on campus. These i ncl ude. The 
Diamondback, an i ndependent dai ly newspaper that appears i n pri nt and onl i ne. The 
Di anx)ndback i s one of the most-r^ campus dai I i es i n the nati on. A mong the many campus 
publ i cati ons there are I iterary magazi nes and newspapers of i nterest to speci al popul ati ons. These 
include the Ed ipse, BlackExplosion, ThePublicAsian, Mitzpeh and Unwind! magazine. 



I he col leges and bchods vegel'-fZ 



COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES (C LIS) 

4105 Hornbake Building, 301-405-2033 

www.clis.umd.eclu 

Dean: J ennifer J . Preece 

Wini I e the Col I ege does not current] y have an undergraduate maj or, i t offers courses at the 
undergraduate level, which may be found under Library Science (LBSC). These courses are 
suggested for students wi shi ng to devd op ski 1 1 s i n I ocati ng, anal yzi ng, and eval uati ng i nf ormati on 
and those seeki ng to I earn more about career opportuniti es i n the i nf ormati on f i el d. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY (PUAF) 

2101 Van M unchi ng Hal 1 , 301-405-6330 

www.puaf.umd.edu 

Dean: Steve Fetter 

Whi I e the School does not current] y have an undergraduate maj or, i t offers courses at the 
undergraduate I evd , whi ch may be found under Publ i c Affai rs (PUAF). These courses are 
suggested for students wi shi ng to devd op knowl edge and experi ence i n publ i c pol i cy and 
I eadershi p. For additi onal i nformati on on possi bl e undergraduate opportuniti es see 
http://www. publ i cpol i cy. umd.edu/prospecti v^undergrad. htrri . 



OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

2130 M itchd I B ui I di ng, 301-405-9363 

www.ugst.umd.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

Associate Dean: KattierineMcAdams 

Associ ate Dean: Scott Wol pert 

Assistant Dean: Lisa Kidy, James Newton 

A ssi stants to the Dean: K athryn Robi nson, L aura SI avi n 

Through its many programs, tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students 
at the University and the faculty and staff that support tine undergraduate mission of the campus. The 
Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and responsi bl e 
for I eadershi p and oversight of undergraduate curricular and co-curricular education. The 
responsi bi I iti es of U ndergraduate Studi es i ncl ude 

• L i vi ng- 1 earni ng programs 

• Academic enrichment programs 

• I nterdi sci pi i nary and i ndi vi dual studi es programs 



I he col leges and bchods h'cQel'^3 

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• Academic advisi ng pol icy and assessment 

• CORE/General Education 

• Academi c pi anni ng and pol i cy 

• E nrol I ment management 

• University learning outcomes assessment 

Pri mary I i sti ngs for programs that report to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es appear i n thi s 
secti on (except where noted) . 

Acadenfic Achie/ement Pro-ams 

2110MarieMountHall, 301-405-4736 

www.aap.umd.edu 

Executive Di rector: Dr. J erry Lewis 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) primarily provides academic support, advising and 
counsel i ng and graduate school preparati on for upper cl ass tradi ti onal I y under- represented and 
I ow- i ncome and f i rst generati on col I ege stixlents. A caderni c support, ski 1 1 enhancement, academi c 
advi si ng and counsel i ng, and tutori ng are provi ded for I ow i ncome and f i rst generati on stixlents and 
for stixlents with disabi I ities. Academic Achievement Programs i ncl udethe I ntensi ve Educational 
Development (I ED), and Educational Opportunity Center (EOC), the Ronald E. McNair 
Post- Baccalaureate Achievement Program the Summer Transitional Program and Student Support 
Services (SSS). EOC, McNairandSSS, are part of the Federal TRIO programs and are funded by 
the U .S. Department of Education to promote access, to provide support services, to motivate and to 
prepare stixlents from di sadvantaged backgrounds for retenti on i n and graduati on from 
undergraduate school and to prepare for doctoral programs. 

Educational Opportmity Center (EOC) 

M r. A ndre N otti ngham A ssoci ate D i rector 
301-429-5933 

EOC is supported by a U .S. Department of Education grant designed to assist persons 19 and older 
I ow- i ncome and f i rst-generati on i n pursui ng post-secondary educati onal opportijni ti es. U M - E OC 
serves pri marl ly I nner-Bdtway communities i n Pri nee George's County and provides assistance i n 
the appi i cati on processes for admi ssi on to and f i nanci al ai d for post secondary educati on. Specif i c 
guidance is given in selecting the "right' college completing the FA FSFA, and promoting 
postsecondary educati on for target popul ati on. E OC al so works wi th hi gh school seni ors i n some 
Pri nee George's County H i gh School s. 

SuTmer Transitional Prog'am (STP) 

The Summer Transiti onal Program (STP) assi sts stixlents i n both thd r academi c and personal 
adjustinent to the University. It includes a very intensive "academic boot camp" with skills 
enhancement i nsti'ucti on i n smal I group/cl asses i n matin, E ngl i sh, and col I ege stixly sti'ategi es, 
coupled with enrollment in a selected three-credit university CORE course with tutoring to facilitate 
stixlents' academi c adj ustinent. I n additi on, stixlents enrol Una one-credit ori entati on course and 
parti ci pate i n weekl y i ndi vi dual and/or group counsel i ng sessi ons. The si x-week STP i s requi red of 
al I stixlents admi tted to the U ni versi ty through SSS/I E D . 

I ntensive Educational De^opment (I E D) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene Associate Director, AAP and I ED 



inecoii^esanabcnoois H^eiai 

301-405-4751 

I E D as i ni ti ated i n 1968 by the U ni versi ty and provi des an array of i ntensi ve comprehensi ve 
academi c and tutori al servi ces to f i rst-year and second-year students who parti ci pate i n the Summer 
Transit] onal Program (STP), f i rst- and second-year el i gi bl e transfer students, and other el i gi bl e 
students i n the general student body who seek academi c support. The I E D program begi ns with the 
STP; prospective students who are admitted to the University through the I ED programs are required 
to attend the six- week transitional program which is designed to develop, expand and i mprove 
Engl ish, math, and study ski I Is and to assist with some of the social and psychological chal lenges 
some students face i n the transi ti on from hi gh school to the uni versi ty . Students who successful I y 
complete the STP are admitted to the University with all services provided by the program aval I able 
throughout thd r undergraduate career at the U ni versi ty. 

Student Sifiport Services (SSS) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director 
301-405-4750 

SSS is a U .S. Department of Education grant supported program geared toward low-i ncome and 
f i rst-generati on col I ege students. 1 1 works i n conj uncti on with the I E D Program f ocusi ng nxich of its 
support to f i rst and second year students. H owever, SSS desi gned and i ntended to provi de academi c 
and career advi si ng, tutori ng, stress management, study ski 1 1 and test taki ng support to any el i gi bl e 
low-i ncome and f i rst generation undergraduate student throughout thd r ti me at the university. The 
SSS program al so provi des f i nanci al ai d workshops and assi stance, i ndi vi dual and group counsel i ng, 
and I eadershi p de/el opment workshops. I n I i mi ted cases, SSS provi des suppi emental grant ai d to 
el i gi bl e parti ci pants i n the program 

Ronald E. McNair Post-BaocalaireBte Achievement Prog'am 

Dr. Wal I ace Southerl and 1 1 1 , Associ ate Di rector 
301-405-4749 

The M cNai r program is funded and designed pri nci pal ly to prepare low-i ncome, f i rst-generati on 
col I ege j uni ors and seni ors and/or students from tradi ti onal I y underrepresented i n graduate school to 
attend graduate school , especi al I y, to pursue to a doctoral degree. The M cN ai r program offers a 
si X- week summer research experi ence that affords students the opportuni ty to work i nti matd y wi th 
faculty mentors on specif i c research proj ects, ref i ne ski 1 1 s i n written and oral communi cati ons, 
computer appi i cati ons, stati sti cs and research methodol ogy. Parti ci pants are requi red compi ete a 
research abstract/paper whi ch i s publ i shed each year, seni ors are gi ven the opportuni ty to parti ci pate 
i n a mock di ssertati on defense, and they are f i nanci al I y supported i n presenti ng thd r research at 
vari ous conferences. The program al so offers assi stance with the compI eti on of graduate school , 
prepari ng a compd I i ng personal statement, admi ssi ons and f i nanci al ai d appI i cati ons and preparati on 
for graduate school admi ssi ons tests 

Asian Annerican Studies Pro-am (AAST) 

1120 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aast.umd.edu 

aast(a)unxl.edu 

Director: Larry Haji me Shi nagawa, Ph.D. 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with the opportunity to study 



inecollegesandbchods P^el9b 

■ ■ 

critical I y the experiences of Asian Americans. TJirougin an i nterdisci pi i nary approach, students 
exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and 
connected to the broader themes for di versi ty, ethni ci ty, race, gender and mi grati on i n the A meri cas. 
A A ST offers a 21 credit- hour undergraduate certificate for students as wd I as a 15 credit- hour 
mi nor. For both the Certif i cate and the M i nor, courses may be cross-l i sted i n other departments and 
some may sati sfy CORE requi rements. 



Certificabe Reqijremenbs 

A. AASr Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. I ntroducti on to A si an A meri can Studi es (A A ST200) 

2. A si an A meri can H i story and Soci ety (A A ST201) 

B. Elective Courses (12 credits): Students may earn the 12 required elective credits by 
successful I y compi eti ng any of a number of speci al topi cs courses A A ST offers each 
semester. E I ecti ve requi rements may al so be sati sf i ed through successful compI eti on of 
courses offered through other departments or programs. Students nxst obtai n approval 
from the A A ST program di rector for courses outsi de of A A ST off eri ngs. 

C. AAST Senior Capstone (3 credits): Students participate in a faculty-guided research 
proj ect (A A ST388) or an experi end al I earni ng proj ect such as an i nternshi p wi th an 

A si an A meri can or A si an Paci f i c A meri can organi zati on (A A ST378) . 

D. All courses toward the Certificate nxst be completed with mi ni nxim grade of "C." 
Students i nterested i n earni ng the certif i cate shoul d f i rst schedul e an advi si ng 
appointment at the A A ST office. Students in good standing may then off id ally enrol I in 
tine certif i cate program Whi I e students may begi n taki ng courses before they enrol I i n 
the certif i cate program they shoul d schedul e an advi si ng appoi ntment as soon as 
possible 

Minor Requremenbs 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. I ntroducti on to A si an A meri can Studi es (A A ST 200) 

2. A si an A meri can H i story and Soci ety (A A ST 201) 

B. Upper-levd Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two requi red foundational courses, 
students will also sdecttvw additional upper-levd (300/400) courses, one of which 
woul d be at the 400 1 e/d , from the f ol I owl ng I i st of regul ar and speci al topi cs courses: 
AAST 384, AAST 388, AAST398A, AAST 398D, AAST 398L, AAST 398P/HI ST 
319P, AAST 420/WM ST 420, AAST 424/SOCY 424, AAST 498A/EDCP 498A, AAST 
498B, AAST 498C/HI ST 419J , AAST 498D, AAST 498E, AAST 498F, AAST 498G, 
AAST 4981/EDCP 418A, AAST 498J , AAST 498K, AAST 498L, AAST 498M/AMST 
418N, AAST 498N and AAST 498P. 

C . The f i nal requi rement for the M i nor i s the successful compI eti on of A A ST 378 
(Experiential Learni ng - 3 credits), a semester-long i nternshi p at an organization that 



I he col leges and bchods H^eiyfc 

■ ■ 

centers i ts efforts on A si an A meri can i ssues. Such organi zati ons may i ncl ude 
governmental units, non-profit agencies, and on-campus organizations. 



Air Force ReserveOffiGer Training Corps (AFROTC) Pro-am 

2126 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-314-3242 

www.afrotc.umd.edu 

Director Colonel Robert E. Pecoraro 



TheAir Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) provides students tlie opportunity to earn 
a comrni ssi on as a second I i eutenant i n tine U nited States A i r Force whi I e compi eti ng tiiei r 
undergraduate or graduate degree. 1 1 i s hi ghl y recommended tinat students seeki ng a comrni ssi on 
contact tine A F ROTC department for f ul I program detai I s before regi steri ng for cl asses. 

Prog'am reqiiremenbs 

A F ROTC i s desi gned to be a 4-year experi ence, but tine schedul e can be compressed ( mi ni nxim of 2 
years) f or qual i f i ed candi dates. A 1 1 owances wi 1 1 vary dependi ng on i ndi vi dual s' abi I i ti es to pass 
mi ni nxim cadet standards. A f ul I four-year program i s composed of tine 2-year General M i I itary 
Course (CMC) and tine 2-year Professional Officer Course (POC). CMC students receive an 
i ntroducti on to tine A i r Force and vari ous career f i el ds, and have a chance to compete for 
scholarshi ps. Non-scholarshi p GM C students i ncur no mi I itary service obi igation and may elect to 
di sconti nue tine program at any ti me. Students wi shi ng to attend tine POC nxst pass al I cadet 
standards by tinei r I ast semester i n tine G M C, and compete for acceptance to attend a summer f i el d 
trai ni ng course. After compi eti ng f i el d trai ni ng, students enteri ng tine POC are contracted to serve a 
mi ni nxim of 4 years acti ve-duty servi ce i n tine A i r Force. The POC concentrates on tine 
development of leadership skills and tine study of United States defense policy. Additionally, as 
contracted cadets al I POC students receive a montlily al lowance of $450- $500. 

Scholarships and I noentives 

AFROTC scholarshi p programs provide 2-year to 4-year awards on a competitive basis. Those 
members of A F ROTC who pass basi c cadet standards are el i gi bl e for schol arshi ps i n any degree 
program based on a competi ti ve sd ecti on process hd d every spri ng. Schol arshi p reel pi ents reed ve 
money for tuition, a book al lowance (currentiy $900/year), and a monttily al lowance from $300 to 
$500, dependi ng on I evd i n A F ROTC . Speci al degree-speci f i c schol arshi ps are al so aval I abl e to 
tinose i n sd ect techni cal and non-techni cal f i d ds, dependi ng on A i r Force needs (check witin 
A F ROTC department for current I i st) . Some of tiiese opti ons al I ow enteri ng j uni ors to go di recti y 
i rto tine POC and f i ni sh tine end re A F ROTC program i n 2 years; students consi deri ng tlni s opti on 
shoul d make appi i cati on tine semester pri or to start. 

Arm/ Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 

1150 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-314-9238 

www.anTyrotc.umd.edu 

Di rector L i eutenart Col ond Denni s M cFadden 

The A rmy Reserve Off i cer Trai ni ng Corps offers students tine opportunity to earn a commi ssi on as a 



I he col leges and bchods P^el9/ 

■ ■ 

Second Liojterart in the United States Army (Active Reserve or National Guard) while 
compi eti ng thd r undergraduate degree. 

FoLT-Year Prog'am 

The four-year program is composed of the Basic Leadershi p Course and the Advance Leadershi p 
Course. The f i rst two years (Basi c Course) consi sts of a general i ntroducti on to mi I itary customs and 
courtesy, soldier ski I Is, communication ski I Is, personal development, and introductory leadership 
ski 1 1 s. Students enrol I ed i n the basi c course i ncur no obi i gati on and may di sconti nue the program at 
any ti me. I n the f i nal two years (Advanced Course), students concentrate on devd opi ng I eadershi p 
ski 1 1 s i n organi zati ons. Students nxst have permi ssi on of the D i rector of A rmy ROTC to enrol I i n 
the advanced course. The Advanced Course requi res five weeks of f idd trai ni ng at Fort Lewis, 
Washi ngton the summer after thd r j uni or year. 

Two-Year Prog'am 

The two-year program i s aval I abl e to students with two years and a summer remai ni ng i n thd r 
university studies. The academic requi rements for this program are identical to the Advanced Course 
i n the four-year program and students are d i gi bl e to reed ve the same benef i ts. D uri ng the summer 
preceding the junior year, students nxst attend five weeks of f idd training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. 
Students shoul d start the appi i cati on process for thi s opti on no I ater than J anuary of thd r sophomore 
year. 

Scholarships and I noentives 

Armiy ROTC Scholarships are aval I able for four, three or two years on a competitive basis. The 
scholarships are based soldy on merit not financial need. Those sdected recdve tuition and 
mandatory fees, a book al lowance and a non-taxable monthly al lowance rangi ng from $350- $500 
based on academic year. 

CirriciJLiTi 

Basic LeadersliipCoirse 

FreshmanYean ARMYlOl (fall) ARMY102 (Spring) 
SophomoreYean ARMY201 (Fall) ARMY202 (Spring) 

Advanced LeadersliipCoLrse 

J uniorYean ARMY301 (Fall) ARMY302 (Spring) 
SeniorYean ARMY401 (Fall) ARMY302 (Spring) 

A 1 1 A rmy ROTC courses are open to any uni versi ty student for credi t whether or not he or she i s 
enrol I ed as a cadet i n the A rmy ROTC program 

Beyond the C lasEroom 

1104 South Campus Commons, Bui Idi ng 1, 301-314-6621 

www.BeyoncrrheClassroomumd.edu 

btdnfo(a)umd.edu 

Di rector J ames V . Ri ker 

Beyond the Classroom (BTC) is an i nterdisci pi i nary I i vi ng-learni ng program dedicated to equi ppi ng 
students with the educati onal and prof essi onal I eadershi p ski 1 1 s to understand and to contri bute 



I he col leges and bchods p^eiyfc 

constructively to civic engagement and social change i n a global context. Students address 
si gni f i cant ci vi c and soci al i ssues tiirough i nternshi p, communi ty servi ce, and ci vi c I earni ng 
experiences with nonprofit nongovernmental and civil society organizations in tine greater 
Washington, D.C. meb'opolitan area. Through its integrated academic, experiential, and sen/ice 
components tinat offer stixlents real -worl d opportuniti es, BTC enabi es stixlents to devd op and to 
real izetiidr potential for civic leadership at the local, national and global levels. BTC isa 
two-semester program open to al I sophomores, j uni ors, and seni ors. 

Center for Teadiing ExceHence 

0405 MarieMountHall, 301-405-9356 

www.cte.umd.edu 

I nteri m Di rector: Davi d E ubanks 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , i ndi vi dual and campus- wi de efforts to 
enhance teaching and learning at tine University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to 
departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants. The Center provides 
workshops, teachi ng assi stant devd opment, e/al uati on and support sti'ategi es for i mprovi ng teachi ng 
and I earni ng, i ndi vi dual consul tati ons for f acul ty and graduate stixlents, research on current teachi ng 
practi ces, and i mpl ementati on of i nnovati ve teachi ng and I earni ng sti'ategi es. 

The Center also administers tine Undergraduate Teaching Assistants program a University- wide 
teachi ng and I earni ng program for graduate teachi ng assi stants, tine L i 1 1 y Teachi ng Fd I ows program 
tine I nsti'uctional I mprovement Grants program and various Scholarshi p of Teachi ng and L earni ng 
programs. 

Educational Talent Search College Gatei/\ay Pro-ams 

3103 Turner Hall, 301-314-7763 

www.et5p.umd.edu 

Di rector J ames Newton 

Educational Talent Search 

Educational Talent Search, a discretionary early intervention grant funded by tine U.S. Department of 
E ducati on, i ncreases tine col I ege parti ci pati on of I ow- i ncome and f i rst-generati on col I ege stixlents by 
creati ng an academi c pi pd i ne from mi ddl e school to hi gh school to baccal aureate stixly. A utinori zed 
by tine H i gher Educati on Act of 1965, Tal ent Search i dentif i es needy stijdents and hd ps tinem take 
advantage of tine Educational Opportunity Grant Program now known to as tine Pd I Grant. Based at 
and sponsored by tine U ni versi ty si nee 1985, Tal ent Search i denti f i es youtin of exti'eme f i nanci al or 
cultural need witii an "exceptional potential" for postsecondary education and encourages tinem to 
compi ete secondary school and undertake further educati on. 1 1 al so publ i ci zes tine aval I abi I i ty of 
stixlent f i nanci al ai d and encourages secondary school or col I ege dropouts to reenter educati onal 
programs. Tal ent Search suppi ements otiner pre-col I ege counsd i ng and academi c enri chment 
servi ces. Program- based Tal ent Search Advi sors work tinrough sd ected M aryl and school s, 
provi di ng stixlents from 6ti> 12tii grades witii a vari ety of servi ces and i nformati on. The Tal ent 
Search Program al so refers f ami I i es to tine U pward Bound Program and U pward Bound 
M atiYScience I nitiati ve Programfor academic devd opment arid comprehensive counsd i ng 
services. 

College Park Scholars Pro-am (C PSP) 



inecoiiegesendbchods p^eiyy 

■ ' 

1125 Cumberland Hall, 301-314-2777 
www.scholars.umd.eclu 
Executive Director: Greig Stewart 

Col I ege Park Schol ars i s a cl ass of 12, i nterdi sci pi i nary, two-year I i vi ng/l earn! ng programs i n whi ch 
acadenri cal I y and creati vd y tal ented freshmen and sophomores expl ore i nterests that enhance, or 
complennent, their academic major. Students in each program attend weekly, faculty- led colloquia 
that encourage acti ve di scussi on and debate. Other courses i n the curri cul um sati sfy general 
educati on (CO R E ) requi rements. I n the second semester of thd r sophomore year, stixlents choose 
from i ndependent research, service- 1 earni ng projects, or i nternshi ps ~ both on and off campus ~ for 
the r Schol ars-practi cum experi ence. 

The Programs' focus on community offers many advantages. Program faculty mai ntai n off i ces i n 
Cambri dge Community resi dence hal I s whi ch f aci I itates meeti ng with stixlents. Several program 
faculty I ffld stixly-abroad experi ences between the f al I and spri ng sennesters, or duri ng the summer. 
L i vi ng togetiner i n the resi dence hal I s hd ps stixlents form study groups for common courses. 
Schol ars al so enj oy meeti ng guest speakers and havi ng the opportunity to conti nue conversati ons 
outsi de the cl assroom Program di rectors encourage students to pursue I eadershi p opportijniti es i n 
co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es, desi gn and i mpl ement communi ty servi ce and soci al events, parti ci pate i n 
tutoring, recrui tment acti vi ti es . or serve on the Student A dvi sory B oard . 

Upon successful completion of the program stixlents earn an academic Citation (requi rements vary 
by program ) . I n thd r j uni or year, stixlents are encouraged to bui I d on thd r Schol ars experi ences by 
appiyi ng to departmental honors programs and other I earni ng community opportunities. 

A dmi ssi on to Col I ege Park Schol ars i s sd ecti ve and by i nvi tati on. U pon i nvi tati on to Schol ars, 
stixlents i ndi cate thd r preference from the f ol I owl ng programs: 

A dvocates for C hi I dren 

Arts 

Business, Society, and the Economy 

Cultures of the A meri cas 

Earth, Life, and Time 

Environmental Studies 

International Studies 

LifeSd ences 

Media, Sdf, and Society 

Public Leadership 

Sdence, Discovery, and the Uni verse 

Science, Technology, and Society 

CORE Liberal Arts and SderiGesStucfes Pro-am 

2130 M itchd I B ui I di ng, 301-405-9359 

www. ugst. umd.edu/core 

Director CORE Planning & Implementation: Laura Slavin 

To earn a baccal aureate at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and al I stijdents compi ete both a mej or course of 
stixJy and a campus-wide general education program For more i nformation, see Chapter 5, General 
Education Requirements. 



I he col leges and bchods P^e^uc 



Federal SemeSber Pro-am 

0117 Hornbake Library, 301-314-0023 
www.f ederal semester, umd.eclu 
Coordinator: Leain Howell 

TheFederal Semestier is a twelve credit program coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate 
Studi es i n conj uncti on with several col I eges and the Career Center. The program i s desi gned to 
bri ng students from al I di sci pi i nes together to I earn, di scuss and expl ore i ssues of federal pol i cy and 
i s aval I abl e to students by appi i cati on. R i si ng j uni ors and seni ors wi th strong academi c backgrounds 
and an i nterest i n the federal government are encouraged to appI y. The Federal Semester consi sts of 
three pri mary components: 

1. The Federal Semester Seminar: UNI V328 (3 credits) is a seminar course focused on federal 
pol i cy. Each year the course wi 1 1 have a themati c focus (e.g. health pol i cy, educati on pol i cy, etc) . 
This seminar benefits from the diversity of students who participate in the Federal Semester 
Program I n the smal I serni nar setti ng students wi II bri ng knowl edge from thd r di sci pi i nary focus to 
di scussi on of Federal Pol i cy. 

2. The Internship: UNIV349 (3 credits) Federal Semester Experiential Leaning course coupled with 
an internship with a federal agency or related organization. (With permission, students may 
substitute an i nternshi p withi n thd r major area that has si mi lar focus.) 

3. Supporti ng course work: Two regul ar U M courses approved by the program that compi ement the 
Federal Semester mission (6 credits). 

I n addition, students wi 1 1 parti ci pate i n Federal Semester Program activities i ncl udi ng tri ps to Capitol 
Hill, serni nars with i nvited speakers, workshops on f i ndi ng and maki ng the most of your i nternshi p, 
and an end-of -the-year event. Students wi 1 1 be recogni zed at graduati on for thd r parti ci pad on i n tiie 
Federal Semester. 

To apply students nxst have completed 45 credits with a grade poi nt average of 3.0 or higher and 
nxst submi t a compI eted appI i cati on aval I abl e on the websi te at 
www.f ederal semester, umd.edu/appl i cati on. 

Global Communities 

1122 Holzapfd Hall, 301-314-7100 
www.globalcommunities.umd.edu 
D i rector: M oni ca E mery 

Global Communities provides undergraduate international and U.S. students with a living- 1 earning 
envi ronment that enhances thd r knowl edge of the worl d, its cultures and peopi e, al ong with 
compI ementi ng thd r academi c studi es. D i versi ty knows no borders, and an i ncreasi ngl y compI ex 
gl obal soci ety makes i t i mperati ve for students from al I di sci pi i nes to I earn i ntercul tural ski 1 1 s i n 
order to work and I i ve i n the 21st century. The program seeks to: create an awareness of cultural 
differences; devd op the communi cati on ski 1 1 s, whi ch f aci I itate i ntercul tural exchanges; understand 
vari ed cul tural val ues and the expressi on of those val ues i n di verse soci eti es; and expl ore one^s own 
cul tural I y constructed i denti ty . Dorchester H al I , where roommates often come from di ff erent 
cul tures, offers a uni que i nternati onal envi ronment where G I obal Communi ti es students have an 



I he col leges and bchods P^e^^ui 

■ ■ 

opportuni ty to appi y i mmedi atd y what they I earn i n the cl assroom to actual i ntercul tural i nteracti on 
i n thei r resi denti al experi ence. 

Indvidual Studies Pro-am 

Olio Hornbake Library, 301-314-8418 

www.ivsp.umd.edu 

J oan Burton, Acting Assistant to Dean 

The I ndi vidual Studies Program (I VSP) is a degree-granti ng academic program under tine di recti on 
of tine Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es. The program al I ows stixlents to create new i nterdi sci pi i nary 
curri cul a I eadi ng to tine B achd or of A rts or B achd or of Sci ence degree. Students draw pri marl I y 
from tine U ni versi ty of M aryl and 's course off eri ngs to form an academi c concentrati on not 
otinerwi se aval I abl e to tinem at tine i nstituti on. A written prospectijs tinat def i nes tine stixlents maj or 
and outi i nes tine curri cul um i s requi red to appI y to tine program 

Students must seek tine gui dance and approval of a faculty mentor pri or to havi ng tinei r prospectiJs 
reviewed by tine I ndi vidual Studies Faculty Review Board. If approved, tine courses agreed upon by 
tine Faculty Revi ew Board become tine basi s for tine stixlents maj or requi rements. These I i sted 
requirements from numerous academic departments, along witii tine CORE general education 
requi rements, are anal ogous i n most ways to tine academi c requi rements gi ven to stixlents who sd ect 
from tine U ni versi tys ti'adi ti onal maj ors. H owever, each stixlent i s requi red to desi gn a uni que 
program of stixly and defend it i n order to be a part of I VSP. 

I ndi vi dual Studi es stijdents nxist compi ete a seni or proj ect and are encouraged to use i nternshi ps or 
i ndependent stixli es wi tin f acul ty to suppi ement tinei r work i n tine cl assroom Whi I e I V SP programs 
are never vocati onal i n natijre, drawl ng from real - 1 i f e experi ence as a suppI ement to tine academi c 
curri cul um i s general I y encouraged. These proj ects often serve as a way for tine stixlents to devd op 
academi c connecti ons among tine nxil ti pi e di sci pi i nes i nvol ved i n tine r programs. 

Whi I e I V SP gi ves stixlents tine opportuni ty to create a uni que academi c program focused on a 
specif i c area of stixly, usi ng courses from nxiiti pi e academi c departments, it does not substitute for 
or replicate tine educational goals of existing University programs, including tine Li mi ted Enrollment 
Programs (LEPs). I VSP programs may not i ncl ude substantial numbers of courses f rom LEP 
departments. 

Devd opi ng a successful I V SP prospectijs takes ti me and usual I y i nvol ves several meeti ngs to revi ew 
and edi t tine draft prospectijs. I nterested stixlents shoul d contact tine I V SP Coordi nator and begi n tine 
appI i cati on process earl y i n tind r academi c career. Worki ng cl osd y wi tin tine Coordi nator and tind r 
prospective faculty mentor, stixlents should pi an to complete and submit tind r I VSP prospectijs, 
pref erabi y duri ng tind r sophomore year, or i n tind r j uni or year, before reachi ng 90 credi ts. 

TotjeacMtbBdinlDlhelndvickjal StudesPm^BmlhestudentmEt 

1. Have a clearly defi ned academic goal tinat cannot be reasonably satisfied i n an existi ng 
curriculumattineUniversity of Maryland, College Park. 

2. H ave at I east 30 earned col I ege credi ts wi tin at I east 12 credi ts compI eted at Col I ege Park. 

3. Have a mi ni nnum of a 2.5 GPA i n each of tind r previous two semesters of col lege, and at least a 
2.0 GPA overall. 

4. CompI ete at I east 30 addi ti onal credi ts begi nni ng tine term f ol I owl ng admi ssi on to I V SP . 



I he col leges and bchods P^e^^u^ 



5. I denti f y an appropri ate f acul ty mentor, pref erabi y tenured or tenure track, wi th si gni f i cant 
undergraduate educati on experi ence rd ated to the fi el d of study. 

6. CompI ete a detai I ed pi an of study ( prospectus) whi ch i s approved by thd r f acul ty mentor and 
then approved by the I ndi vidual Studies Faculty Review Board. This proposal wi 1 1 i ncl ude 

a. A cl ear statement of the central academi c purpose for thd r maj or. 

b. Specific course requi rements i ncl udi ng at least 27 credits of upper-division major 
coursework (300 & 400 level) beyond the I VSP courses: I VSP 31, I VSP 318, and I VSR 
420. 

c. The I i St of courses nxst i ncl ude at I east one writi ng-craft course, i n additi on to the 
CORE Fundamental Studies Introduction to Writing, and Professional Writing 

requi rements, sd ected from an approved I i st that i s aval I abl e from the I ndi vi dual 
Studies staff. 

d. A semester-by-semester pi an for the compI eti on of thd r undergraduate degree withi n 
a reasonabi e peri od of ti me. 

7. CompI ete the I VSP Departmental Notification Form in order to notify academic units from 
whi ch they wi 1 1 take three or more 300-400 1 evd courses. 

Follov\ingacMssia% studenfsnvSb 

1. Earn a grade of C or better i n al I courses requi red i n thd r I VSP program of study i ncl udi ng I VSP 
420, and a satisfactory grade i n I VSP 317. 

2. CompI ete mandatory advi si ng sessi ons wi th thd r f acul ty mentor and the I V SP staff every 
semester, i ncl udi ng a revi ew of thd r semester- by-semester academi c pi an for compI eti on of thd r 
I VSP program 

3. I f not al ready compI eted, work towards i mmedi ate compI eti on of the fundamental studi es 
requi rements for E ngl i sh compositi on and mathemati cs. 

For more information, pi ease visit the I VSP websiteatwww.ivsp.umd.edu or contact Leah Howdl, 
I VSP Coordinator at 1117 Hornbake Library, 301-314-8418. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual andTransgender StudesCLGBT) 

2212 MarieMountHall, 301-405-5428 

www.lgbts.umd.edu 

Di rector: Dr. M ari I ee L i ndemann 

The Program i n Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an i nterdisci pi i nary 
undergraduate certi f i cate desi gned to exami ne the I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and representati ons 
of L G BT persons, those who are today descri bed as havi ng a mi nori ty sexual ori entati on or who are 
gender transgressi ve. Students study LGBT fami I ies and communities, cultures and subcultures; 
hi stori es, i nsti tuti ons, I anguages and I i teratures; economi c and pol i ti cal I i ves; and the compI ex 
rd ati ons of sexual mi nori ti es to the cul ture and experi ence of the gender conformant and 
(hetero)sexual majority. LGBT Studies is an interdisciplinary and nxiltidisciplinaryfidd, and 
promotes the application of new theories and methodologies (eg., queer, feminist, critical race, and 
nxiiti cultural theori es) to estabi i shed di sci pi i nes, and it advances the generati on of new knowl edge 



I he col leges and bchods Fegezud 

■ ■ 

withi n traditi oral f i d ds of schol arshi p. Through study of sexual mi noriti es, students gai n an 
understand! ng of and respect for other differences i n human I Ives such as age abi I ity, class, 
d:hnicity, gender, race, and religion. With their faculty advisors, certificate candidates design a 
program that compi ements thd r maj or f i el d of study. 

Certificabe Reqijremenbs 

21 credits 15 credits are in required courses, wliile 6 credits are earned in bAJO dective courses 
A . Requi red core curri cul um for the Certi f i cate i n L G BT Studi es ( 15 credi ts) 

1. LGBT200- 1 ntroductionto Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower-level course focused on literature art, or culture by or about LGBT people 
either ENGL 265 or CM LT 291; 

3. One of the foil owing upper-di vision courses focused on the persoral, social, political, 
and historical aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, PHI L 407, or WMST 494; 

4. One of the foil owing upper-di vision courses focused on literature art, or culture by or 
about LGBT people ENGL 359,459, 465; or LGBT 327 



5. One of the foil owing: 

a. LGBT488 

Semirar in LGBT Studies 

b. LGBT386 

Supervised I nternship - LGBT Community Organizations 

B. Elective courses for the Certificate in LGBT Studies (6 credits) 

Students choose 6 hours of elective credits i n consultation with thei r advisor i n LGBT Studies. At 
least 3 hours of elective credits nxst be from upper-division courses (i.e., those numbered 300 or 
above) . Students are encouraged to choose el ecti ves to compI ement tinei r knowl edge of L G BT 
peopi e and i ssues by expl ori ng di sci pi i nes that contrast with the maj or fi el d of study. Students may 
sd ect el ecti ve courses from the I i st of core courses above or from a I i st of approved courses 
mai ntai ned by the program The I i st i s updated regul arl y and aval I abl e at 
http://www.lgbts.unxl.edu/certif i cate. html . A student may also petition to have any other course 
f ul f i 1 1 thi s requi rement by provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the 
course work, usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, consi sts of L G BT materi al . 

• A ppropri ate substituti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es 2 through 4 above may be made with 
approval from the Director of LGBT Studies. 



inecoii^esanabcnoois H^e/^tw 

• N course earned with a grade bdow "C" (2.0) will court toward the certificate in LGBT 
Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi nxim of ni ne credits (or three courses) to sati sfy the requi rements of 
both thd r maj or and the certif i cate i n LG BT Studi es. 

• No more than nine of the required credits may betaken at an institution other than the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

• Students nxst decl are the certif i cate i n LGBT Studies to the Di rector of LGBT Studies one 
year pri or to thd r i ntended graduati on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 

Minor Reqijremenbs 

15 credits 12 credits are in required courses, wiiile 3 credits are earned in one upper-le\/el dectiye 
course. 

A . Requi red core curri cul um f or the M i nor i n L G BT Studi es ( 12 credi ts) 

1. LGBT 200~lntroductionto Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower-lB/d course focused on literatijre art, or culture by or about LGBT people 
dther ENGL 265 or CM LT 291; 

3. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on the personal, social, political, 
and historical aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, PHI L 407, or WMST 494; 

4. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on literatijre art, or culture by or 
about LGBT people ENGL 359, 459, 465; or LGBT 327. 

B. Elective course for the Mi nor in LGBT Studies (3 credits) 

A n upper-di vi si on d ecti ve wi 1 1 compi ement the requi red courses. Thi s d ecti ve may be a course 
from categori es 3 and 4 above that has not been used to f ulf i 1 1 requi rements; or it may be one of the 
capstone courses i n LGBT Studies (LGBT 386 or LGBT 488), or a course chosen from the I ist of 
approved decti ves for the LGBT Studies program The I ist of approved decti ves is aval lable at 
http://www.lgbts.unxl.edu/certif i cate. Itrri . A stijdent may also petition to have any coursef ulf i 1 1 
thi s requi rement by provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the course 
work, usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, consi sts of L G BT materi al . 

• A ppropri ate substituti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es 2 through 4 above may be made with 
approval from the Director of LGBT Studies. 

• No course earned with a grade bdow "C" (2.0) will count toward the minor in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi nxim of six credits (or two courses) to satisfy the requi rements of 
both thd r maj or and the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es. H owever, courses taken to compI ete the 
mi nor i n LGBT Studies may not be used to satisfy the requi rements of another mi nor. 

• No more than six of the requi red credits (or two courses) may betaken at an i nstitution other 
than the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Col I ege Park. H owever, at I east si x upper di vi si on credi ts 
applied to the minor nxst betaken at this university. 

• Students nxst decl are the mi nor i n LGBT Studies to the Di rector of LGBT Studies one year 
pri or to thd r i ntended graduati on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 



Letters atxJ SdenGes 



I necoiiegesendbchoois p^e^Ub 

■ ' 

1117 Hornbake Library, Assistant DearYDi rector: Deborah Rdd Bryant, Ph. D. 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 or 8419 

Pre-Law Advising: prelaw(a)umd.edu 

Credit-by-Exam 301-314-9423 

Letters and Sci ences i s the academi c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i el ds before sd ecti ng 
a maj or, for post-baccal aureate students taki ng additi onal course work, arid for non-degree seeki ng 
students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sci ences may al so serve as the academi c horre 
for students compi eti ng requi rements for entry i nto a L i mited E nrol I ment Program Letters and 
Sci ences advi sors hd p students to sd ect and schedul e courses, pi an academi c programs, and I earn 
about campus- wi de resources. L etters and Sci ences col I aborates cl osd y wi th col I ege advi si ng 
offices, academic departments, and programs across campus and provides a coordi nated advi si ng 
network that features: 

Choosing a Major 

L etters and Sci ences students reed ve i nf ormati on about and referral to a wi de range of acadenri c 
programs and servi ces i ncl udi ng speci al i zed workshop sessi ons. L etters and Sci ences staff speci al i ze 
i n assi sti ng students devd op strategi es and pi ans for enteri ng L i mi ted E nrol I ment P rograms. 

Markets and Society 

M arkets and Soci ety i s a program for enteri ng freshmen i nterested i n expl ori ng the worl d of 

busi ness. The M arkets and Soci ety Program hd ps students to I earn about the f i d d of busi ness, ref i ne 

thd r career goal s, and i nteract with other students who share thd r i nterests. 

Learning Comnruiities 

Learni ng Community programs i n Letters and Sci ences focus on f i rst-year students. They combi ne a 
one-credi tsenninar called I ntroducti on to the University with one or more general education (CORE) 
courses. The serri nars f aci I itate maj or and career expl orati on. 

I nberim Advising Prog'am 

Newly admitted transfer students with rrorethan 60 credits, who were unsuccessful i n gai ni ng 
admi ssi on to a L i mi ted E nrol I ment P rogram reed ve advi si ng and assi stance from a L etters and 
Sci ences prof essi onal staff member duri ng thd r f i rst two semesters on campus. For thi s group of 
students, the U ni versi ty wai ves the requi rement that al I students nxBt decl are a maj or by 60 credi ts. 

Pre-Law Advising 

L etters and Sci ences offers speci al i zed advi si ng for students i nterested i n I aw. F or further 

i nformati on, see the seed on on Pre-Law Advi si ng i n thi s catal og and vi sit www, prd aw. umd.edu 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2nd Floor Mc Kddin Library, 301-314-6786 

www.ugresearch.urrd.edu 

Director LisaKidy 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative from the Off ice of the 
Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Created as a resource for faculty and students, the Center serves as a 
cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and off-campus research opportuniti es for undergraduate students. 
Additional I y, faculty members can share different modds for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students 
i nto research programs, and ways of i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the curri cul um 



I he col leges and bchods P^e^^Ufc 

A mong the programs at the M C U R are the M aryl and Student Researchers program ( M SR ) and the 
Senior Summer Scholars (SSS). M SR provides an opportunity for students to worl< with faculty 
mentors on ongoi ng research projects. Experienced students, who are risi ng seniors, are encouraged 
to appi y for fundi ng through the Seni or Summer Schol ars program for summer study wi th a f acul ty 
member. Students new to research as wd I as students with pre/i ous research experi ence parti ci pate 
in this program 

Nation^ Schol»-ship Office 

0104 Reckord Armory, 301-314-1289 
www.scholarships.unid.edu 
Director Francis DUVinage, Ph.D. 

The National Scholarships Office (N SO) is committed to helping eligible University of Maryland 
students identify, apply for, and wi n national schol arshi ps and fd lowshi ps. The process of prepari ng 
an appI i cati on for a schol arshi p or f d I owshi p requi res careful thought and preparati on through each 
stage of the process. Resources aval I abl e through the N SO i ncl ude i nf ormati on and gui dance on the 
many nati onal schol arshi ps and f d I owshi ps. 

The N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce assi sts i n the preparati on of nati onal schol arshi p appI i cati ons, 
i ncl udi ng gui dance on writi ng a personal staternent, sd ecti ng faculty members to write I etters of 
recommaxlati on, and by provi di ng mock i ntervi ews to hd p students prepare for i ndi vi dual 
i ntervi ews that are often a part of frie appI i cati on process. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Fidd House, 301-314-8217 
www.orientation.umd.edu 
Director Gerry Strumpf 

The goal of Orientation is to introduce new students to the University of Maryland community 
U ni versity of M aryl and community. The Ori entati on Off i ce offers a wi de range of transiti onal 
programmi ng and servi ces for students and thd r f ami I i es as they prepare to attend the U ni versi ty of 
Maryland. 

Neuv Student Orientation 

Hdd prior to the semester a student enrolls at the University of Maryland, new student orientation 
for f i rst-ti me freshman normal I y covers two days; ori entati on for new transfer students covers one 
day. During New Student Orientation, individuals meet with representati ves from thd r academic 
col I ege for advi si ng and course schedul i ng. U ndergraduate Ori entati on Advi sors, i ntroduce students 
to academic and student I if eat the University of Maryland, including student campus services and 
resources, and opportunities for i nvol vement on campus. 

Parent Orientation 

Parents of new University of M aryl and students are strongly encouraged to attend a one-day 
program speci f i cal I y desi gned to i ntroduce them to the academi c, soci al , and cul tural opportuni ti es 
of the university and to better preparethemfor the issues that are I ikdy to affect thdr son or 
daughter throughout thd r matri culationattheUni versi ty . 

TerpTrips 

Terp Tri ps focus on the conti nui ng transiti on of parents. Offered to parents on the second day of 
freshman ori entati on, these one-day programs combi ne a tri p to an area attracti on with connecti ons 



I hecoiiegesendbchoois Fege'^o/ 

■ ' 

to other parents and a campus faculty or staff host. 

I nb'oduction Id the University Seminars 

The Ori entati on Off i ce coordi nates new student semi nar courses, U N I V 100 and 101. These courses 
i ntroduce students to the worl d of hi gher educati on and, more speci f i cal I y, to the U ni versi ty of 
|V| aryl and. Course topi cs i ncl ude career/maj or expl orati on, successful studyi ng and test-taki ng 
strategies, diversity, and involvement within the university. 

University IHonors Pro-am 

AnneArundd Hall, 301-405-6771 

www.honors.unxl.edu 

honors(a)umd.edu 

Director Dr. Barbara L. Thorne 

The University Honors Program offers special educational opportunities and resources to students 
wi th excepti onal acadenri c tal ents. H onors students combi ne H onors course work wi th studi es i n 
thd r maj ors and el ecti ve courses to deepen thd r total educati onal experi ence. They broaden thd r 
intellectual horizons by selecting Honors (HONR) seminars and Honors versions of some regular 
courses. Honors serni nars offer smal I class size (capped at 20 students) and academic experiences 
characterized by active parti ci pad on, i ntensi ve writi ng, and outstandi ng faculty who encourage 
critical thinking and innovation. Most Honors seminars fulfill CORE (general education) 
requirements. 

Students in the University Honors Program may earn an Honors Citation by taking five Honors 
courses pi us a one-credi t col I oqui um and by mai ntai ni ng an overal I 3. 2 G PA . A nne A rundd H al I , 
the Honors Li vi ng/Learni ng Center, houses 100 Honors students, the Portz Li brary, seni nar rooms, 
faculty office, and lounges. Honors students also I i ve and study together i n Queen Anne's, Denton, 
Wi comi CO, and E 1 1 i cott H al I s; many uppercl assmen enj oy apartment-styl e housi ng i n South Campus 
Commons. 

Acceptance of f i rst-year students i nto the University Honors Program is by i nvitation based on the 
standard appi i cati on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and ( by December 1st for best consi derati on for 
H onors and meri t schol arshi ps) . Students wi th two semesters of f ul I -ti me col I ege work (excl udi ng 
A P credi ts) compi eted at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and or another i nsti tuti on may appI y f or admi ssi on 
to Honors. Honors Humanities, www.honorshumanities.umd.edu and Gemstone, 
www.aemstone.umd.edu are more speci al i zed programs wi thi n U ni versi ty H onors; they are 
descri bed under thd r own headi ngs i n thi s catal og. 

I n addition to the University Honors Program about 40 departments or colleges offer advanced, 
di sci pi i ne- based H onors programs that provi de enri ched opportuni ti es, typi cal I y i nvol vi ng work 
with faculty mentors on i ndependent research projects. M ost departmental and col lege Honors 
programs begi n i n the j uni or year; pi ease contact them di recti y for the admi ssi on requi rements. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Departments Majors^ and Pro-ams 

ACCOUISTTING (BMGT) 

TheRobat H. Smith Schod of Business 

1570 Vai M unching Hall, 301-405-2286 

www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad 

Chair: M.Loeb 

Professors: L. Gordon, O. Kim, M . Loeb, S. Loeb 

Associate Professors: S. Cheng (Assoc Prof) 

Lecturers: P. Basu (Tyser Teaching Fellow), G. Bulmash (Tyser Teaching Fellow), C. Linsley (Tyser Teaching Fellow), J . McKinney (Tyser 

Teaching Fellow), B. Michelson, G. Pfeiffer 

Adjunct Professors: E. Cantor (Lecturer), M. Lavine( Lecturer), S. Rose (Lecturer), C. Stevens (Lecturer), N. Webb (Lecturer) 

Visiting Faculty: M. Finch (Tyser Teaching Fellow) 

TheMajcr 

A ccounti ng, i n a I i mi ted sense, i s the anal ysi s, cl assi f i cati on, and recordi ng of f i nanci al events and the report] ng of the resul ts of such events for an 
organi zati on. I n a broader sense, account] ng consi sts of al I f i nanci al systems for pi anni ng, control I i ng, and apprai si ng performance of an 
organi zati on. A ccounti ng i ncl udes among i ts many facets: f i nanci al pi anni ng, budgeti ng, accounti ng systems, f i nanci al management control s, 
financial analysis of performance^ financial reporting, intemal and external auditing, and taxation. The accounting curriculum provides an 
educational foundation for careers i n publ ic accounti ng, management; whether i n private busi ness organizations, govemment or nonprofit 
agencies, or consulting. Two tracks are provided: The PublicAccounting Track leading to theCPA (Certified Public Accounting) and the 
Management Accounting/Consulting Track, flfeaas note Currently, only the Public Accounting track is aval I able. 

AcknisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

SeeRobertH. Smith School of Busi ness entry in chapter 6 for admission requirements. 
Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 



All Acxxxinting Majors: crafts 

BMGTBIO Intermediate Accounting I 3 

BMGT311 IntermediateAccountingll 3 

BIVIGT321 Managerial Accounting 3 

BMGT326 Accounting Systems 3 

A ccounti ng M aj ors must compi ete an addi ti onal 12 
credi ts from one of the f ol I owi ng tracks. 



Publ i c Acxxxinti ng T rack: 

BMGT323 Taxation of I ndivi duds* 

BMGT411 Ethicsand Professionalism in Accounting* 

BMGT422 AuditingTheory& Practice* 

One of the following: 

BMGT410 Govemment Accounting 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and E states 

BMGT423 Fraud Examination 

BMGT424 Advanced Accounting 

BMGT427 AdvancedAuditingTheory& Practice 

B M GT428 Speci al Topi cs i n A ccounti ng 

M anagemait Acxxxinti ng'C cnsulti ng T rack: 

BMGT426 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Three of the ibiloming: 
-,.. „-r-,„,- Survey of B usi ness I nf ormati on Systems and 

D I»Hj I SJD -I- u 1 

Technology 

BMGT323 Taxation of I ndivi dud sf* 

B M GT332 Operati ons Research for M anagement Deci si ons 

BMGT385 Operati ons Management 

BMGT402 DatdDase Systems 

B M GT403 Systems A nal ysi s and Desi gn 

BMGT410 Govemment Accounting 

BMGT411 Ethicsand Professionalism in Accounting* 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and E states 

BMGT423 Fraud Examination 

BMGT424 Advanced Accounting 

B M GT428 Speci al Topi cs i n A ccounti ng 

BMGT430 Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT434 Introduction to Optimization 



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3 
9 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



BMGT440 Advanced Financial Management 
BIVIGT446 international Finance 

Upper Le/d Eanarrics Requirement 3 

One offiye following courses 
E CON 305 I ntermedi ate |V| acroeconomi c Theory and Pol i cy 
E CON 306 I ntermedi ate iviicroeconomic Theory 
E CON 330 M oney and B aiki ng 
E CON 340 Intemational Economics 

Total CrecitsfcrAcocxinting 27 

andEconcmics 

* Requred for CPA in Maryland 

I n addition to the major requirements listed above; please consult Chapter 6 or www.rhsmith.umd.edu for a listing of additional Smith School 
degree requirements that apply to all Smith School majors. 

The basic educational requirementsof the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy to sit for the CPA scamination area baccalaureate or 
hi gher degree wi th a maj or i n A ccounti ng or wi th a non-accounti ng degree suppi emented by course work the B oard determi nes to be substanti al I y 
the equi vd ent of an A ccounti ng maj or. Students pi anni ng to take the C PA exami nati on for certi f i cati on and I i censi ng outsi de M aryl and shoul d 
determi ne the educati onal requi rements for that state and arrange thei r program accord ngl y. 

SinoeJ ine3Q 1999, all appHcarrtsvuhodesiretotaketheCPAaGarriinaAionin Maryland hawebeai required to hawecanpldBcl 150 
sanester hoursof oollegeworlcaswEll asotherspedfied requirements. 

AercEpace E ng neeri ng (E NAE ) 

A.JamesClarkSdiod of Engneering 

3181 Glenn L. Martin Hdl, 301-405-2376 

www.aero.umd.edu 

Chair: D. Pines (Professor Si Chair) 

Professors: R. Cdi, I. Chopra, A. Flatau, W. FoumeyJ. Hubbard, S. Lee J. Leishman, M. La/vis, N. Wereley 

Associate Professors: D. Akin, J . Baeder, C. Cadou, R. Sanner, B. Shapiro, A. Winkelmann, K. Yu 

A ssistant Professors: J . Humb^ D. Paley, R. Sedwick 

Lecturers: B. Barbee I. Cohen,J. Didion, L. Healy, K. Lewy, B. Roberts, N. Roop, D. VanWie 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: A. Marshall 

Adjunct Professors: R.Tolson 

Professors Emeriti: J. Anderson, E.Jones 

Visiting Faculty: M . Bowden (Visit Asst Prof), R. Koricegi (Visit Prof), F. Schmitz (Visit Prof), M . Tishchenko (Visit Prof) 

TheMajcr 

A erospace engi neeri ng i s concemed wi th the processes, both anal yti cal and creati ve, that are i nvol ved i n the desi gn, manufacture and operati on of 
aerospace vehi d es wi thi n and beyond pi anetary atmospheres. These vehi d es range from he! i copters and other verti cal takeoff ai rcraft at the 
I ow-speed end of the f I i ght spectrum, to spacecraft travel i ng at thousands of mi I es per hour duri ng I aunch, orbi t; transpl anetary f I i ght, or reentry, 
at the hi gh-speed end. I n between there are general avi ati on and commerci al transport ai rcraft f I yi ng at speeds wel I be! ow and cl ose to the speed of 
sound, and supersoni c transports, f i ghters, and mi ssi I es whi ch crui se supersoni cal I y. A I though each speed regi me and each vehi cl e poses i ts speci al 
probi ems, al I aerospace vehi cl es can be addressed by a common set of techni cal sped al ti es or di sci pi i nes. 

The subdi sci pi i nes of A erospace E ngi neeri ng are aerodynami cs, f I i ght dynami cs, propul si on, structures, and ' ' desi gn" . A eodynami cs addresses 
the f I ow of ai r and the associ ated forces, moments, pressures, and temperature changes. F I i ght-dynami cs addresses the moti on of the vehi cl es 
i ncl udi ng the traj ectori es, the rotati onal dynami cs, the sensors, and the control I aws requi red for successful accompi i shment of the mi ssi ons. 
P ropul si on addresses the engi nes whi ch have been da/i sed to convert chemi cal (and occasi onal I y othe forms) enegy i nto useful work, to produce 
the thrust needed to prope! aerospace vehicles. Structures addresses material properties, stresses, strains, deflection, and vibration along with 
manuf acturi ng processes as requi red to produce the very I i ght wei ght and rugged el ements needed i n aerospace vehi cl es. A eospace ' ' desi gn' ' 
addresses the process of synthesi zi ng vehi cl es and systems to meet def i ned mi ssi ons and more geneal needs. Thi s i s a process that draws on 
information from theothe subdi sci pi i nes while embodying its own unique el ements. The Aeospace Engineering program is designed to provide a 
f i rm f oundati on i n the vari ous subdi sci pi i nes. 

Courses of feed by thi s department may be found unde the f ol I owi ng acronym: E N A E 
Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

1. P repare future aeospace engi neers who wi 1 1 be successful i n thei r careers, i ncl udi ng i ndustry, govemment servi ce and academi a, 
in the State of Maryland and beyond. 

2. Prepare students to sol verel a/ant problems in a) aeodynamics,b) structures, c) dynamics and control s,d) propulsion, ande) 
systems and desi gn, wi th a f ocus i n ei the the aeonauti cal or space areas. 

3. E nabi e students to re! ate the! r fundamental physi cs, math and engi neeri ng studi es to the many practi cal aspects of aeospace 
engineeing research, development; and practice. 

4. P repare future aeospace engi neers who are abl e to i ntegrate thei r know! edge of engi neei ng sub-di sci pi i nes to produce useful 
product designs. 

5. Promote innovative educational activities to challenge students and improve the I earning experience including design 
presentati ons, hands-on I aboratory expel ences, novel use of I ntemet i nf ormati on techno! ogy, and i ndependent research proj ects. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



6. Seek conti nual I y to i mprove course off eri ngs and curri cul a, whi I e attract] ng the best students possi bl e and i mprovi ng the nati onal 
stature of the program. 

7. Prepare future aerospace engineers who understand the context in which their profession is practiced, and who are able to adapt to 
future deve! opments i n both technol ogy and the empi oyment marl<et. 



Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

1. Students wi 1 1 deve! op cri ti cal reasoni ng and thi nl<i ng sl<i 1 1 s. 

2. Students wi 1 1 deve! op wri tten and oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s. 

3. Students wi 1 1 deve! op sci ence and quanti tati ve reasoni ng ski 1 1 s. 

4. Students will develop information literacy skills. 

5. Students will deve! op technol ogy fluency. 

Academic Prog'amsand Departmental Facilities 

The Aerospace E ngi neeri ng Department has a number of f aci I i ti es to support educati on and research across a range of speci al areas. The 
department has suteonic wind tunnels with test sections ranging from a few inches up to 7.75 feet by 11.00 feet as well as a supersonic tunnel with 
a 6 inch by 6 inch test section. There are a number of structural test machines with capabilities up to 220,000 pounds for static loads and 50,000 
pounds for dynamic loads. The department also has experimental facilities to test hell copter rotors in hover, in forward flight; andinvacuumto 
i sol ate i nerti al I oads from aerodynami c I oads. There i s an anechoi c chamber for the i nvesti gati on of noi se generated by hel i copters, and an 
autoci ave and other f aci I i ti es f or manuf acturi ng and i nspecti ng composi te structures. The neutral buoyancy f aci I i ty, whi ch i nvesti gates 
the assembly of spacestructures in a simulated zero gravity environment; is supported by robots and associated controllers. There are also many 
computers and workstati ons that provi de I ocal computi ng capabi I i ty and extensi ve network access to campus mai nf rames, supercomputi ng centers, 
and al I the resources of the I nternet. 

Acknisacn totiie Maj cr 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other Engineering Departments. Please consult Chapter 6. 
Reqiirementsfor tiieMajcr 



Freshman Year 

ENESIOO Introduction to Engineering Design 
E N A E 100 The A erospace E ngi neeri ng P rof essi on 
CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engineers 
|V|ATH140/141Calculusl,ll 
PHYS161 General Physics I 
ENES102 Statics 
ENAE202 Aerospace Computing 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total Crecfts 



SqshomoreYear 

M echani cs of M ateri al s 

I ntroduction to Aerospace Systems 

Calculus II I 

The A erospace E ngi neeri ng P rof essi on 1 1 
ENME2320R Thermodynami cs 
ENIVIE320 

Differential Equations 

L i near A I gebra for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers, 

OR 

I ntroducti on to L i near A I gebra 
PHYS26Q^261 General Physics 1 1 
PHYS27Q^271 General Physics I II 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total Crecits 



ENES220 
ENAE283 
MATH 241 
ENAE200 



MATH 246 
MATH 461 
MATH 240 



ENAE311 
ENAE301 

ENAE362 

ENAE324 
ENAE432 
ENAE380 
ENGL 393 



J unior Year 

Aerodynamics I 

Dynamics of Aerospace Systems 
Aerospace I nstrumentati on and 
Experimentation 
Aerospace Structures 
Control of Aerospace Systems 
F I i ght Software Systems 
Technical Writing 



Grafts 


Grafts 


First 


Saxnd 


San 


San 


3 




1 




3 




4 


4 




3 




3 




3 


3 


3 


14 


16 


Grafts 


Grafts 


First 


Saxnd 


San 


San 


3 




3 




4 






1 




3 




3 




3-4 


4 






4 


3 


3 


17 


16 


Grafts 


Grafts 


First 


Saxnd 


San 


San 


3 




3 




3 






4 




3 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 


3 


3 


ENAE414 


Aeronautical Trade 
Aerodynamics II 




3 


ENAE404 


Space System Track 
Space F 1 i ght Dynami cs 
Total Credits 


15 


3 

16 






Crafts 


Crafts 






First 


Saiond 


ENAE464 
ENAE423 
ENAE398* 
ENAE400s?t 
ELECTIVE + 
CORE 


Senior Yea- 
Aerospace Engineering Lab 
Vibration & Aeroelasticity 
Honors Research Project; OR 
= one400 level ENAE course 
Techni cal E 1 ecti ve; see note be! ow 
CORE Program Requirements 


Sem 

3 

3 


San 

3 
3 

3 
3 


ENAE403 
ENAE455 
ENAE481 
ENAE482 


Aeronautical Track 
A i rcraf t F 1 i ght Dynami cs 
AircraftPropulsion& Power 
Pri nci pi es of A i rcraft Desi gn 
Aeronautical Systems Designs 


3 
3 
3 


3 


ENAE441 
ENAE457 
ENAE483 
ENAE484 


Space System Track: 

Space Navigati on & Guidance 

Space Propulsion & Power 

Pri nci pi es of Space Systems Desi gn 

Space SyslM ns Desi gn 

Tot^ Crecfts 


3 
3 
3 

15 


3 
15 



* Only one of ENAE 398, 488 or 499 may be used for ttiese dectives. 

'^One 300/400 1 evd course in Engnea-ing, Mathematics, or Physical Sciences 
that has been approved for this purpose by the Undergraduate Prog-am 
Director. 

Minimum De^eeRequiremaitsThefulfillment of all Department; School, and University requirements. A mini mum of 124 credits are 
requi red for an Aerospace E ngi neeri ng degree. 

Students must select a track. All courses in either the Aeronautical orAstronautical track must be completed. Students in either track who wish to 
gai n a broader educati on across the aeronauti cal or space appi i cati on areas can take courses requi red i n the other track as el ecti ves. 

Academi c BaKhmarl<s: Students pursui ng the maj or shoul d ra/i ew the academi c benchmarks estabi i shed f or thi s program. See: 

www.4vearpl ans. umd.edu . Students wi 1 1 be peri odi cal I y revi ewed to i nsure they are meeti ng benchmarks and progressi ng to the degree. Students 

who f al I behi nd program benchmarks are subj ect to speci al advi si ng requi rements and other i nterventi ons. 

AercEpace Electives 



The Department offers a range of electives. The fol lowing courses have recently been offered as electives for the undergraduate degree 



ENAE398H Honors Research 

ENAE415 Helicopter Theory 

ENAE416 Viscous Flow & Aerodynamic Heating 

ENAE424 Design SiManufactureof Computer Prototypes 

ENAE425 Mechanics of Composite Structures 

FNAF42fi Computer-Aided Structural Analysis and 

Design 

ENAE471 Aircraft Flight Testing 

ENAE488B Intro to Computational Structural Dynamics 

ENAE488IVI High Speed Aerodynamics 

ENAE488P Product Design 

ENAE488R Hybrid Rocket Design 

ENAE488\/\/ Designof Remotely Piloted Vehicles 

ENAE499 ElectiveResearch rRepeaiaWetDScred'/tg' 



Other ReqiiremaitsfortheMajor 

See C hapter 6 for mi ni mum grade requi rements i n key prerequi si te courses for engi neeri ng students. Students shoul d f ol I ow the sequence of 
courses as outi i ned i n the aerospace engi neeri ng degree requi rements and four-year pi an. 

Advising 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



A dvi si ng i s mandatory. E ach student i s assi gned to a f acul ty member who must be consul ted and whose permi ssi on i s requi red for course 
registration each semester. Thelist of advisor assignments is avail able in the departments main office. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

Students can be employed and perform research in any of the departments research labs, centers, or facilities. Participation in an on or off campus 
i nternshi p, co-op, or other experi enti al I eami ng opportuni ty i s strongi y encouraged. See the aerospace engi neeri ng undergraduate studi es staff for 
i nf ormati on on perf ormi ng research i n a department I ab arid contact the E ngi neeri ng Co-op and Career Servi ces off i ce for assi stance i n 
obtaining off campus positions or experiences. 

HcncrsProg'am 

The Aerospace Engineering Honors Program at the University of Maryland provides a rigorous and comprehensive education for a career in 
technical leadership and scientific or engineering research. Honors course work encompasses the requi red curriculum for all University of 
M aryl and Aerospace E ngi neeri ng students at an advanced I e/el . 

At the end of their first academic year, each aerospace student isa/aluated and students are invited to join the program based on their University of 
Maryland cumulative grade point average and progress toward their degree in Aerospace Engineering. Honors sections of EN AE 283, ENAE 311, 
and ENAE 423 are offered as part of this program, in addition to an honors research project, ENAE 398H/498H, which culminates in a scholarly 
paper and presentati on at a prof essi onal conference. Students who compi ete the honors curri cul um graduate wi tfi A erospace H onors at the ti me of 
graduation. 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

The Deparbnent is home to student chapters of the American I nstituteof Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Helicopter Society - 

I nternati onal , and the Si gma Gamma Tau aerospace engi neeri ng honors soci ety. Aerospace E ngi neeri ng students are al so frequent parti ci pants i n 

student activiti es of the Soci ety for Advancement of M ateri al s and Process E ngi neeri ng. 

Scholarships and Finandai Asastanoe 

The Deparbnent offers academic scholarships and recipients are chosen based on merit. All admitted and current students in the department are 
automatically considered for these awards. Noseparateapplicationisrequired. The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types 
of federal , state and i nsti tuti onal f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of 
scholarships to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Awards and Reoo^tion 

The Department offers the following awards: Academic Achia/ement Award for the senior with the highest overall academic average at 
graduati on; R . M . R i ve! I o Schol arshi p A ward and the Stephen G uthri e M emori al A ward for hi ghest overal I academi c average through the j uni or 
year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding Achievement Award for scholarship and service to the student chapter and the deparbnent; American 
Helicopter Society Outstanding Achia/ement Award for service to the student chapter and the deparbnent; American I nsbtuteof Aeronaubcs and 
A stronaub cs Outstandi ng A chi evement A ward for schol arshi p and servi ce to the student chapter and the department; J ohn A nderson Schol arshi p i n 
Aerospace Engineering for the best paper and poster presentabon based on research performed at the University of M aryl and. 

African American Studies (AASP) 

Cdlegeof Bdiavioral and Sodal Sdaxies 

2169 Lefrak Hdl, 301-405-1158 

www. bsos. umd. edu/aasp/ 

Chair: S. Harley 

Associate Professors: D. Gaskin, F. Wilson 

Assistant Professors: M. Chateauvert, G. Dinwiddle, O.Johnson, S. Madhavan,J . Richardson 

Lecturers: J . England, I . Kargbo, J . Semper 

TheJVlajor 

The African American Studies Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with two highly-regarded options: a Cultiral and Sodal Analysis 
Ccncentraticn with emphasis on culture and history; or the Public Pdicy CcnoentratiGn with an emphasis on problem-solving, analytical 
deci si on-maki ng, and pracb cal appi i cati ons of pol i cy anal ysi s and management ski 1 1 s. I n addi b on, students who e! ect maj ors i n other departments 
can eam a Caiificateln African Ama'ican StucfesL I n September 2004, we introduced a minor in Blade Women's Studes which is a 
collaborabve program with tJie University's Department of Women's Studies. 

Courses offered in this deparbnent may be found under the acronym AASP. 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The field of African American Studies has been an explicitiy interdisciplinary one from its earl lest formulation atthetum of the twentieth century 
byW. E. B. DuBois, CarterG. Woodson, and other scholars. Si nee the 1960s, ithasdevelopedasacoherentfieldof study with well-developed 
rriethods, theories, andpedagogy. We belia/e that the African American Studies Department at the University of Maryland, Col lege Park has a 
di sb neb ve intellectual and programmatic focus that continues in this tradition and extends it through situating the study of peoples of African 
descent at the i ntersecti on of cul tural and hi stori cal studi es and the soci al sci ences. 

AASD's current program continues the tradition of employing a social scientific approach to the study of the African American experience that 
i nvol ves a concomi tant understand ng of Af ri can A meri cans' publ i c pol i cy needs. The program ref I ects the strengths and di sci pi i nary speci al ti es 
of our own faculty in history, political science, public policy, economics, community development, and research methodology and analysis. 

Prog'am Learning Outcomes 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



A primary goal of the program is to da/e! op strong critical thinking, research and writing ski I Is, through our curriculum, suchthatAASD majors 
I eam the i nterdi sci pi i nary methods used i n exami ni ng the soci o-economi c, hi stori cal , and pol i ti cal experi ences and contri buti ons of peopi e of 
Af ri can descent Students shoul d acqui re the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Content ability to identify, describe, and relate central themes, methods, andscholarlydevelopmentof the field of African 
American Studies. 

2. Critical Thinking: students develop a clear understanding of the richness and complexity of the i nterdi sci pi i nary scholarship in 
African American Studies. 

3. Students can design and da/el op the foundations of their own research/thesis projects, specifically, a thesis statement abstract, and 
annotated bibliography. 

AchnisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n A f ri can A meri can Studi es must make an advi si ng appoi ntment for an ori entati on to the maj or. Students must 
complete an application and attend a BSOS academic plan workshop. 

Please call theAASD office at 301-405- 1158 to make an advi sing appoi ntment. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

Students must earn a grade of C ( 2. 0) or better i n each course that i s to be counted toward compi eti on of degree requi rements. A 1 1 rel ated or 
supporti ng courses i n other depailments must be approved by an A A SP f acul ty advi son 

Foundaticn courses required for all majors: crafts 

AASPIOO Introduction to African A meri can Studies 3 

AASPlOl Public Policy and the Black Community {Forrvsc\yAASP300) 3 

AASP200 African Civilization 3 

AASP202 Black Culture in the United States 3 

AASP297 Research Methods in African A meri can Studies {F<xrvs[\yMSP2seR) 3 

CORE Liberal Arts aid Sciences 43 

Cultural and Sodal Analysis Concentration Reqii rements: 

-inr^nrf. Upper-Division Electives in African American Studies IS 

Seminars 

Or^ from 3-6 

AASP397 SeniorThesis 
AASP386/396 Experiential teaming /Independent Study Non-Thesis Option 

One from 3 

AASP400 Di rected Readi ngs i n African American Studies 
AASP402 Classic Readings in African American Studies 

Tot^ Crecfts 82-85 

Public Policy Concentration Reqii rements: 
Analytic Component 

AASP 301 Applied PolicyAnalysis and theBlack Community CForArB-/yAASP42^; 3 

AASP 303 Computer A ppli cations in African A meri can Studi es ^For(m-;yA4SP42SP; 3 

AASP 305 Theoretical, Mettxxlologi cal, and Pol icy Research Issues in African -. 

American Studies (FornBriyAASP40i) 
E CON 200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 

E CON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

One additional analytical ski lis course outside of AASP, with AASP ., 

approval 

One from 3 

STATIOO Elementary Statistics aid Probability 
SOCY 201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

Equivalent Statistics Course (SophonvreYear) 

Policy Electives in African American Studeg" 9 

Final Option 3-6 

One from 
AASP397 SeniorThesis 
AASP386/396 Experiential teaming/ Independent Study Non-Thesis 

Tot^ Crecfts 93-96 



Depgftmsfl^Mqor^ endProg-arrs 



*Upper-divisionAASP elecdvesin the policy area (AASP nuniiers499A-Z) or, with approval, elective courses oiAside of AASP 

Certificate 

TheCertificatein African Ama-ican Stud es off ersunda'graduatsstudaits an excdimt opportunity to de^do 

American issues while pursuing a major in another field. Certificatsstudentsleamaboutthesocial, economic, political and cultural history of the 
African American people through a concentration of courses they plan with the AASD Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate 
al so may be used to sati sfy core requi rements and e! ecti ves. 

Eaming a Certificatein African American Stud es gives stixients a competitive advantage i n thejob rnarket by add ng greater focus to their 
undergraduate experi ence. 

PI ease see catalog section on "Certificate Programs" for more information and requi rements fora Certificatein African Ama'ican Studes, 
Advising 

The African American Studies Department has mandatory advising for all AASD majors. 

U ndergraduates i n good academi c standi ng may enrol I i n the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department or obtai n more i nf ormati on about aval I abl e 
options and services by contacti ng the Undergraduate Academic Advisor, African American Studies Department, 2169 Lefrak Hall , University of 
Maylaid, College Pari<, MD 20742, 301-405-1158. 

Internships 

AASP 386 -Experiential Learning in African American Studes was da/eloped to enable majors and certificate students to formally link their 
academi c studi es to experi ences as undergraduate teachi ng assi stants and i ntems, and to do so i n a structured I earni ng context 

The i nternshi p requi res students to work d osel y wi th thei r si te supervi sors. Students are requi red to f ul f i 1 1 the j ob responsi bi I i ti es and work the 
number of hours per week that is outlined in their learning proposals. Site supervisors define specific job responsibilities and assignments, monitor 
thei r trai ni ng, and eval uabe thei r performance at the end of the semester by compi eti ng an eval uati on form arid submi tti ng a I etter of 
recommendati on to be i ncl uded i n thei r portf ol i os. 

I ntems must parti ci pate i n a weekl y semi nar, and compI ebe the assi gned proj ects ai med at bri ngi ng together academi c research, ref I ecti ve work, 
and professional development. 

HcncrsProg'am 

Academically talented undergraduates may enroll in the University Honors Program with a specialization in African American Studies. The 
Honors Program includes seminars and lectures presented by distinguished University of Maryland, College Park, faculty and guests. A reduced 
rati o of students to f acul ty ensures more i ndi vi dual i zed study. 

BA/MPP Prcg-am 

I n this innovative joint program, candidates eam a bachelor's degree in African American Studies and a master's degree in public policy after 
approximate!yfiveyears.TheBA/MPP is designed to integrate the study of the hi story, culture, and life of African Americans with technical 
ski 1 1 s, trai ni ng, and techni ques of contemporary pol i cy anal ysi s. The program al so features a summer component that i ncl udes a I ecture seri es, 
research opportunities, and special seminars. 

Students who are interested in the BA/M PP program can contact the African American Studies Department at 301-405-1158 for application 
details. 

Opticnsfor Study vuith AASP 

For students who major in other departments, the African American Studies Program offers three options for study: 

1. Students may obtain a certificate in African American Studies by completing 21 credit hours of course work. For more information on the 
Af ri can A meri can Studi es Certi f i cabe, see the secti on on campus- wi de programs I ater i n thi s chapter. 

2. Students may designate African A meri can Studies as a double major, completing the major requi rements for both AASP and another program. 

3. AASP can be a supporti ng area of student for maj ors such as Computer Sci ence^ B usi ness, or E ngi neeri ng. 

4. Students may obtai n a mi nor i n B I ack Women's Studi es by compI eti ng 15 credi t hours of coursework. 

Student Societies and Protessicnai Organizations 

AASD majors havetheopportunity of being well pr^red for leadership positions in campus organizations. AASD maj ors have historically 
held notable positions at the University of Maryland in suchorganizationsastheNAACP, AlphaNu Omega Sorority, Incorporated and The Black 
Student Union. 

The Society of African American Studies is the student- run organization associated with and supported by the department The Society provides 
community service in local schools, hosts on-campus programs and events, and annually has supported a local family through its 
"Adopt-a-Family" program. 

TheSociety sponsors a "Saturday Freedom School" program each year which brings middle school children from a local Prince George's County 
P ubi i c School to campus for sa/en consecuti ve Saturdays. The program provi des mentori ng and academi c support that seeks to foster the 
devel opment of posi ti ve B I ack i denti ti es i n the student parti ci pants, whi I e strengtheni ng thei r academi c performance. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



J ohn B . and I da SI aughter Schd arshi p. 

African Ama'ican StudiesCertificate 

Cdlegeof Bdiavicral and Sodal Sdaxies 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www. bsos. umd. edu/aasp/ 

The African American Studies Certificate program offers the opportunity to develop a specialization in African American studies while pursuing a 
major in another field. Certificate students leam about the social, economic, political, and cultural history of African American peoplethrough a 
concentration of courses (21 credit hours). Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy CORE requirements and electives. 
U ndergraduates i n good standi ng may apply for the program by contacti ng the academi c advi sor of the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department i n 
2169 LeFrak Hall. Students pursuing the certificate must meet the University's general education (CORE) and department requirements. See also 
the African American Studies department listing earlier in chapter 7. 

Ag'idJtiral SdenceandTechndcgy^GST) 

Cdlegeof Apiculture and Natural Resources 

2102 PI ait Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-4355 

www.psla.umd.edu 

khunt@umd.edu 

Chair: W. Kenworthy( Professor and Acting Chair) 

Director: D. Glenn (Assoc Prof) 

TheMajcr 

A gri cul tural Sci ences and Technol ogy i s a sci ence based curri cul um that al I ows students to obtai n technol ogi cal ski 1 1 s i n a broad area of 
agricultural studies. Agricultural Sci ences and Technol ogy students are required to take courses in Agricultural Economics, Animal Sciences, 
Environmental Sci ence and Technol ogy. Plant Science and Pest Management The high number of restricted and non-resb'icted electives in tills 
curri cul um al I ows students the f I exi bi I i ty to da/el op an academi c program compati bl e wi th thei r personal i nterests. Students maj ori ng i n thi s 
curri cul um are strongl y advi sed to choose two pri mary areas of concenti^ on. F or exampi e, students may want to deve! op experti se i n both 
Animal Scienceand Crop Science. 

I n addi ti on to of f eri ng thi s curri cul um, the Department of P I ant Sci ence and L andscape A rchi tecture al so offers two other undergraduate degrees: 
the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (B LA). These programs are described elsewhere in the catalog under 
" P I ant Sci ences' ' and ' ' L andscape A rchi tecture. ' ' 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronyms: PLSC and LARC. 
Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

• Students wi 1 1 da/el op techni cal and knowl edge based ski 1 1 s i n the requi red areas of study. 

• Students wi 1 1 use techni cal and basi c I earned knowl edge to col I aborate, sol ve probi ems and then arti cul ate conci usi ons. 

• Students shal I devel op eff ecti ve communi cati on ski 1 1 s and demonstrate the abi I i ty to present i deas wi th cl ari ty to an appropri ate audi ence 

• Students wi 1 1 connect and bui I d rel ati onshi ps wi th extemal groups i n the appropri ate f i el ds of study. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theJVlajcr 







Crafts 


ANSClOl 


Principles of Animal Science 


3 


ANSC 


ANSC** 


3 


ANSC220 


L i vestock M anagement 


3 


ANSC340 


H eal th M anagement of A ni mal Popul ati ons, OR 


3-4 


PLSC420 


Principles of Plant Pattiology 




AREC250 


Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 


3 


AREC 


AREC** 


3 


BSCI 105 


Principles of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI 106 


Principlesof Biologyll, OR 




PLSC201 


P 1 ant Structure and F uncti on 


4 


BSCI 


B SCI ** 1 nsect Pest Type Course 


3 


CHEIVI104 


Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemisby 


4 


CHEIV|13yi32 


General Chemisby 1 and Lab 


4 


ENBEIOO 


B asi c B i ol ogi cal Resources E ngi neeri ng Technol ogy 


3 


ENST200 


F undamer ital s of Sol 1 Sci ence 


4 


ENST 


ENST** 


3 


MATH 113 


MATH IB or higher 


3 


PLSC389 


Internship 


3 


PLSC398 


Seminar 


1 


PLSC 101 


1 ntroductory Crop Science 


4 


PLSC453 


Weed Science 


3 


PLSC 


PLSC** 


3 




PLSC, ANSC, or LARC** 


3 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Accounting, Education, Computer, or Policy 3 

CORE CORE and General Agricultural Progran Requirements 99 100 

ELECT Electives 20-21 

**Stuclents rwy select any course(s) having required tours in (he area indicated. 

Advising 

The Department has mandatory f acul ty advi si ng for each of i ts maj or and mi nor programs. Students are requi red to meet wi th thei r faculty advi sor 
at I east twice a year. See the Director, Dr. D.S. Glenn (301-405-1331), or the Program Management Specialist in Undergraduate Studies in 2102 
Plant Sciences Building (301-405-4355) for additional information. 

internships 

I nternshi ps wi th sci enti sts are aval I abl e at nearby federal and state agenci es. N umerous i nternshi ps al so exi st and can be readi I y arranged for 
students i nterested i n private sector empi oyment 

Student Societies and Prcfessicnal Organizations 

The department sponsors student teams that parti ci pate i n regi onal and nati onal contests. These teams prepare i n the f ol I owi ng areas: turf, weeds 
and crops, and landscape contracting. 

AGST majors are encouraged to join the Agricultural ScienceClub. This club is open to all UMCP students who have an interest in agriculture and 
related areas. TheAG Science Club is affiliated with the national student organization of the Agronomy, Crop Science and Soil Science Society of 
America. The fundi on of the club is to bring together students of I ike interests to participate in College; academic and social activities. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several schol arshi ps and awards are aval I abl e to PL SC students. Contact the Associ ate Dean's off i ce at 301-405-2078 for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 
The Department also maintains a listing of scholarships. Contact Kathy Hunt in 2102 Plant Sciences, 301-405-4355. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in 
cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, vi si t 
www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu. 

Ag'idJtiral and ResoirceEconomicsCAREC) 

Cdlegeof Apiculture and Natural Resources 

2200 Symons Hdl, 301-405-1291 

www.arec.umd.edu 

bburdi ck@arec. umd.edu 

Chair: K. McConnell (Acting Chair) 

Director: H. Leathers (Assoc Prof) 

Professors: R. Chambers, B. Gardner, D. Hueth, R.Just; E. Lichtenberg, R. Lopez, W. Musser, M. Nerlove, L. Olson 

Associate Professors: A. Alberini, J . Hanson, J . Horowitz, H. Leathers, D. Lipton, L. Lynch, D. Parker 

Assistant Professors: B. Kirwan, A. Lange; K. Leonard, C. McAusland 

I nstructors: D. J ohnson (Farm M anagement Specialist) 

Affiliate Professors: M . Cropper 

Adj unct Professors: J . Chavas, J .Oui ggi n, J . L i st 

Adjunct Associ ate Professors: K. McNew 

Professors Emeriti: F. Bender, N. Bockstae!, E. Brown, J. Cain, J. Curtis, P. Foster, I. Hardie,J. Moore, G. Stevens, I. Strand, D.Tuthill 

TheMajor 

Agricultural andResourceEconomics majors completeaset of prerequisite courses, a core of classes offered by the Agricultural andResource 
E conomi cs Department, and one or more f i el ds compri sed of se! ected courses from outsi de the department The core i ncl udes courses i n economi c 
reasoning, agribusiness management, environmental and resource policy, agricultural policy, economic development; and analytical methods. The 
program permi ts students f I exi bi I i ty i n choosi ng f i el ds to f i t the! r career i nterests. M aj ors must compi ete one and are strongi y encouraged to 
compi ete two f i el ds. The curri cul um bal ances breadth and depth, and I ets students devel op academi c ski 1 1 s i n two or more areas. The program 
provides a good foundation for careers in economics, resource or environmental policy, agribusiness, and international agriculture. Students are 
also able to minor in Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

DoubleMajors 

The department features a doubl e maj or wi th Spani sh for students i nterested i n careers i n mul ti nati onal agri busi ness f i rms or i nternati onal 
agencies. It features a double major with Government and Politics for students interested in law school. Both can be completed within 120 credits. 
Other double majors are possible in consultation with an advisor. 

ReqiiremaitBfor theMajor 

Crafts 
Pra'eqii si te C curses 

ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON201 Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

E CON 306 I ntermedi ate Microeconomic Theory 3 

ECON321 Economic Statistics, OR 3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



B M GT230B usi ness Stati sti cs 
M ATH 220 E I ementary Cal cul us I , OR 3 

|V|ATH140Calculusl 
STATIOO Elementary Statistics aid Probability, OR 3 

MATH 111 I ntroduction to Probabil ity 

Major CcreCourses 

Seven of these courses must be successfully corrplebed. 

AREC404 Applied PriceAndysis 3 

AREC405 Economics of Production 3 

AREC425 Economics of the Food Sector 3 

AREC427 Economics of Commodity Marketing Systems 3 

AREC433 Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 3 

AREC445 Agricultural Da/elopment in the Third World 3 

AREC453 Economicsof Natural Resource Use 3 

AREC455 Economicsof Land Use 3 

AREC484 I ntroduction to Econometrics in Agriculture 3 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

Computer-Based Analysis in Agricultural and Resource ., 

Economics 
A D ci-Anr\r- 9ny o**i^ 3 credit 400 level AREC course may be substituted with 

permission of advisor 

Fidds 

A 1 1 maj ors must compi ete one of the f ol I owi ng f i el ds. Two are 
strongly encouraged. 

BisnessManagemEnt 

BMGT220 Principlesof Accounting I 3 

BMGT221 Principlesof Accounting II 3 

BMGT340 Business Finance 3 

BMGT350 Ma-keting Principles 3 

B M GT364 M anagement and Organi zati on 3 

BMGT380 Business Law I 3 

Other 300 levei BMGT coirses may be substituted, 

B M GTSOOs'^"' perrrission ofacMsor. (TheAREC d^jamvEnt cannot 
auUrorizeSbLKlenlslDtakBBMCr axMisesthctareresbidEdlD 
business nsjors.) 

T(M Credits 18 

A^aJtoTal Science 

Six (or more) courses in agricultural science, indudng: 
EN BE 110 I ntroduction to Biological Resources Engineering 1 

ENBE200 Fundamentals of Agricultural Mechanics 3 

PLSCIOO I ntroduction to Horticulture, OR 4 

PLSClOl I ntroduction to Crop Science 

EN ST 105 Soil and Environmental Quality 3 

ANSClOl Principlesof Animal Science 3 

Other courses in agrioJtural sdence dx)sen in 
APR! sri consultationvnth an ach/isor. Siib^tutionsto the above . 

listed courses maybemade with the perrrission of 

advisor. 

T(M Credits 18 

Food Production 

Sx courses from the foil owing list 

PHYS117 I ntroduction to Physics, OR 4 

PHYS121Fundamentals of Physics 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology 4 

BSCI223 I ntroduction to Microbiology 4 

NFSCIOO Elements of Nutrition 3 

NFSC112 Food Science and Technology 3 

NFSC430 Food Microbiology 3 

NFSC431 Food Qud ity Control 4 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Other courses related to food sdence can be substituted 
with perrrission ofacMsor. 

Totd Credits 18 

EnviravriEnlal and Resotave Policy 

Sx courses from the foil owing list 

E CON 481 Environmental Economics 3 

ANTH450 Theory and Practiceof Environmental Anthropology 3 

H I ST405 E nvi ronmental H i story 3 

GEOG372 RemotsSensing 3 

GEOG373 Geographic I nfomiati on Systems 3 

GV PT273 I ntroducti on to E nvi ronmental Pol i ti cs 3 

GVPT306 Global Ecopditics 3 
Ottier courses related to erMrormental policies or 
sciences can be substituted with perrrission ofad\/isor. 

Totd Credits 18 

/ ntemaUcnal A^aitum 

Sx courses from the following list 
E CON 305 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

E CON 315 Economic Da/el opment of Underda/el oped Areas 3 

E CON 340 Intemational Economics 3 

GEOG422 Population Geogr^hy 3 

GVPT200 I ntemationd Politick Relations 3 

GVPT350 I ntemationd Relations in the Third World 3 

ENST440 Crops, Soils and Civilization 3 

PLSC303 I ntemationd Crop Production 3 

Ottier courses related to intsernational econorrics 

busness politics or ag-i culture can be sih^tutsedrnth 

perrrission ofad\^sor. 

Totd Credits 18 

PdiHtal PmoesB 

A ny six courses ingovemment and poll tics, chosen ,„ 

wi th permi ssi on of the advi son 

Totd Credits 18 

Ach^ncedDe^TeePreparaHon 

Sx (or more) courses from the following list 

ECON407 Advanced Macroeconomics 3 

ECON414 GameTheory 3 

ECON415 Strategic Behavior and Incentives 3 

ECON422 OuantitativeMethods in Economics I 3 

ECON423 OuantitativeMethods in Economics II 3 

ECON425 Mathematical Economics 3 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 4 

M ATH240 I ntrodudion to Linear Algebra 4 

MATH241Calculuslll 4 

Otiier courses in matinematics, statistics, or 

econom^ics may be subs&'futed with perrrisson of 

advisor. 

Totd Credits 18 

SbxtentDea^TedFidd 

This field requires a written proposal listing at I east six 

courses total i ng at I east 18 credits. The proposal must 

be submitted to the Undergraduate Committee of the 

AREC department Committee approval must be 18 

obtai ned 30 or more credit hours before graduati on. A 

student designed field may be used to study a foreign 

I anguage as part of the A R E C curri cul um. 

Totd Credits 18 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Other ReqiiremaitsfortheMajcr 

A 1 1 courses must be passed wi th a grade of C or better to count towards prerequi si te courses, maj or core courses, or f i el d requi rements. " C or 
better" means any grade for which the University awards 2 or more quality points in calculating GPA. 

Reqiiremaits for the Minor 

Three minors exist inAREC, Agribusiness Economics, Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Da/elopment; and Environmental 
E conomi cs and Pol i cy. Requi rements are I i sted bel ow: 

Crafts 

A^ibusiness Ecxncmics 

AREC250 Elementsof Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

AREC404 Applied PriceAndysis 3 

AREC405 Economics of Production 3 

AREC425 Economics of Food Sector 3 

AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 3 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the 

courses listed with perrrisson oftheUndergrackjateAcMsor. 

Total CraJts 15 

Resourceand A^icultural Policy in Economic 
Deudopmait 

AREC250 Elementsof Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

AREC365 World Hunger, Population and Food Supplies 3 

AREC433 Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AD f CMS Agricultural Da/elopment, Population Growth, and the ., 

Environment 
AREC453 Naturd Resources and Public Policy 3 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the course 
listed with perrrisson oftheUndergraduateAd/isor. 

Total Crecfts 15 

Environmaital Economics and Policy 

AREC240 Introduction to Economics and the Environment 3 

AREC332 Introduction to Natural Resource Pol icy 3 

Computer-basedAnalysis in Agricultural and Resource -, 

Economics 
ARFr44S Agricultural Da/elopment, Population Growth, and the ., 

Environment 
AREC455 Economicsof Laid Use 3 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the course 

listed with perrrisson of Undergraduate Ad\/isor. 

Total Crecfts 15 

Advising 

B ecause the program i s f I exi bl e, advi si ng i s mandatory. A ppoi nbnents may be made i n Room 2200 Symons H al 1 , 301-405- 1291. 

Awards and ReGo^tion 

Schol arshi ps honori ng A rthur and Paul i ne Sei denspi nner and Ray M urray are aval I abl e Contact a f acul ty advi sor for more i nf ormati on, 
301-405-1291. 

Ama'ican Studes (AM ST) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

1102 Hdzapfel Hdl, 301-405-1354 

www.amstumd.edu 

Chair: N. Struna 

Professors: J . Caughey, R. Kelly 

Associate Professors: M. Lounsbury,J . Paoletti, S. Parks, L. Shinagawa, M. Sies 

Assistant Professors: C. Hanhardt(AsstProf),J . McCune(AsstProf), P. Williams-Forson 

Lecturers: M . Brody, C. LaRoche (Lecturer), G. Metcalf 

Affiliate Professors: J . Auerbach, M. Beasley, R. Bennett, I . Berlin (Dist Univ Prof), A. Bolles, C. Caramdlo, J . Chernda, B. Dill, W. Fdk, B. 

Finkelstein, B. Finn, G. Gerstie,J . Gilbert (Dist Univ Prof), D. Gomery, L. Landry, S. Leonard, M. Leone, R. Levine^ S. Miche! (Prof, Affiliate 

Prof), B. Pearson, C. Peterson, S. Promey, G. Ritzer (Dist Univ Prof), E. Schdnick, P. Secrist B. Shneiderman, M . Smith, M . Washington 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



AffiliatsAssociats Professors: S. Barkin, M. Bdl, E. Barkley Brown, E. Chambers, K. Chuh, S. Garfinkd, I . Goumay, M . Graber, D. Grimstsd, S. 
Harley, E. Hughes, K. King,J . Klumpp, S. Logan, A. Moss, R. Muncy, H. Nathans, S. Pa-ry-Giles, T. Pa-ry-Giles, S. Ray, L. Rowlaid, P. 
Shacke!, D. Sicilia, S. Simpson,] . Sullivan, F. Wilson 
AffiliatsAssistant Professors: R. Bauer, L. DeRose^ A. Nieves, Z. Nunes 
Professors Emeriti: L. Mintz 
Visiting Faculty:]. Dussdier 

TheMajcr 

A meri can Studi es i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary f i el d of cul ture studi es that encompasses topi cs and research methods i n I i terature and I anguage; hi story 
and art hi story, medi a studi es, and the soci al sci ences, such as anthropol ogy and soci ol ogy. The A meri can Studi es B .A . program at M aryl and i s the 
ol dest i n &a stence ( 1945) and the department i s ranked i n the top f i ve A meri can Studi es programs nati onal I y . 

A meri can Studi es seeks especi al I y to understand the be! i ef s and val ues i n and through whi ch A meri cans make sense of themsel ves and thei r 
worl ds. The program combi nes exposure to methods of cri ti cal anal ysi s currenti y practi ced i n A meri can Studi es, a concentrati on i n a compani on 
di sci pi i ne or f i e! d, and opportuni ti es to i ntegrate knowl edge and ski 1 1 s at the advanced I evel , through research, i ntemshi ps and creati ve proj ects. 
American Studies is a writing-intensive^ research-oriented major. Every student is required to da/dop a research proposal and complete a senior 
proj ect or honors thesi s. 

A meri can studi es prepares students for graduate and prof essi onal school and careers i n mass medi a, busi ness, soci al j usti ce, teachi ng, publ i c 
history and govemment Courses offered by this department may be found under the acronym AM ST. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

The A meri can Studi es maj or requi res a mi ni mum of 42 credi ts, i ncl udi ng 24 i n A meri can Studi es, 6 credi ts of I ower I a/el A meri cani st courses 
taken outside the department, and 12- 24 credits in a focus area or mi nor taken outsidethe American Studies department. At least 27 of the credits 
for the maj or must be in 300 or 400 1 a/el courses, with at I east twelve of these credits at the 400 1 evel. A grade of Cor better is requi red in each 
of the courses making up the major (includes those taken outside the department; such as the Americanist courses and those taken for the minor or 
focus area). 

Foundaticn Courses (15 crecits) 

Course requi rements i n thi s area are i ntended to provi de a f oundati on i n A meri can Studi es and the study of A meri can cul ture and soci ety i n other 
disciplines. Courses taken for CORE may be doublecounted towards the maj or. 

Crecits 

A M ST201 I ntroducti on of A meri can Studi es 3 

AM'^34n Introduction to History, Theories and Methods in American ., 

Studies 

OnBS-crecMtcoLrsefrom 3 

AMST203 Popular Culture in America 

AMST204 FilmandAmericanCultureStudies 

AMST205 Material Aspects of American Life 

AMST207 Contemporary American Cultures 

AMST212 Diversity in American Culture 

AM ST260 American Culture in the I nformation Age 

FOUNDATION Foundation courses outside the AM ST department 6 

Any fwD lower-level coirses selected from an approved list 
List is avdiabie through the department 

Advanced Requi remEnts (15 crecits) 

Course requi rements i n thi s area are i ntended to offer students the opportuni ty to expl ore sel ected topi cs i n A meri can Studi es i n greater depth and 
to appi y what they have I earned i n thei r f oundati on courses. A 1 1 of these courses must be at the 300 or 400 1 eve! . A meri can Studi es advanced 
requi rements may be sati sf i ed i n one of two ways: 

Option A: 

. Four 400-1 a/el A M ST courses, not i ncl udi ng A M ST 450 ( 12 credi ts) 
. AMST 450 Seminar in AMST or AMST 388 Honor Thesis (3 credits) 

Option B: 

. Three 400-leve! AMST courses not including AMST 450 (9 credits) 

• AMST 386-1 ntemshi p, 398-1 ndependent Study or 388-Honors Thesis Research (3credit5) 

• AMST 450 Seminar in AMST or AMST 388 Honors Thesis Research (3 credits) 

Focus Area Requiremaiits(12-24Crecft5) 

The focus area requi rements rei nf orce the essenti al i nterdi sci pi i nary nature of our f i e! d, off eri ng students a range of opti ons to connect the! r 
A meri can Studi es coursework wi th a re! ated di sci pi i ne or f i e! d. All focus area courses must be taken outsi de the A meri can Studi es Department. 

Minor or Certificate opti on (15-24 crecits^ atleast9at the 300 or 400 leud) 

Successful completion of a minor or certificate from an approved list (avail able through the department). University approved minors range from 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



15 to 24 credi ts; cali f i cats programs requi re 2 1-24 credi ts. The department or program admi ni steri ng the mi nor determi nes speci f i c requi rements, 
and i n some cases, student el i gi bi I i ty. 

FooiisAreaOpticn (12a-ecit5^ all attheaOOcr 400leuel) 

Successful compi eti on (C or better) of four upper I a/el courses outs! de the department that enabi e the student to construct a coherent focus area 
compi ementary to A meri can Stud! es. A focus area may be I n a si ngl e department or sel ected from two or more departments (exampi es avai I abl e 
through the d^Jartment) . Students shoul d not pursue a focus i n a department or program that offers a sui tabi e mi nor or certi f i cate. A n A meri can 
Studi es advi sor must approve course se! ecti on wi thi n the focus area i n advance as part of mandatory advi si ng each semester. 



HcncrsProg'am 

The American Studies Honors Program offers outstanding students an opportunity to add distinction to their academic records by undertaking an 
i ndependent research proj ect i n an area of parti cul ar i nterest. 

The program i s i ntended to al I ow students prepari ng for graduate study or a prof essi onal career to appi y and further da/el op thei r research, 
anal yti c, and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s i n an i ndependent proj ect of thei r own desi gn, i n consul tati on wi th a f acul ty mentor. Students are encouraged to make 
use of the rich resources of the Washington-Baltimore area, including major research institutions such as the Smithsonian I nstitutions, the Library 
of Congress, and the National Archives. 

Students fulfill the honors program requirements through a combination of honors-designated coursework (6 credit hours) and an honors thesis (6 
credit hours). Thesecoursesandcrecftsfall Miffvn both the American Stucfesmajcr requiremenitsandtheUniversity'sl20-a'ecft 
unda'^aduatede^ee requirement Students vuho undertake American Stud esHGncrsareeccusedfrcmthesenior seminar, AMST 450l 

Eligbility: Students must haveat I east a 3.0 GPA at the time of entry into the program, and must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. 
To graduate wi th H onors i n A meri can Studi es, students must have a 3. cumul ati ve G P A and at I east a 3. 2 G P A i n thei r maj or coursework. 

ApplicatJcn: Students who wish to pursue Honors work should submit a letter of intent to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The letter should 
i denti f y the core f acul ty member who has agreed to approve course work and supervi se the research and wri ti ng of the honors thesi s. 

Requiranerrts: The Honors Program gives students a substantial amount of flexibility in fulfilling the two basic requirements: 6 credit hours of 
honors-designated coursework; and 6 credit hours of AMST 388, Honors Thesis and Research. 

To f ul f i 1 1 the coursework requi rements ( 6 credi t hours) , students may: 

• Take an upper level Honors section course in a department or departments consonant with the students major focus areas. 

• Take an upper I evel U ni versi ty H onors course. 

• Negotiate an Honors Option Contract with the instructor of an upper division course in American Studies or in a department or departments 
consonant with the students major focus areas. 

• Take a graduate course i n a department or departments consonant wi th the students maj or focus areas. 

All coursework not taken in an Honors section, in a university Honors course, or in a graduate course should have an Honors Option Contract 
compi eted, i n order to ensure that the students transcri pt ref I ects that the work carri es H onors credi t. 

To f ul f i 1 1 the thesi s requi rements, students wi 1 1 : 

• Register for 6 credit hours of AMST 388, HonorsThesis and Research. Customarilythisisspread across thestudents senior year, with3 
credit hours taken each term. 

• P resent the thesi s to a commi ttee composed of the f acul ty mentor and another department f acul ty member. A t the sati sf actory conci usi on of 
the thesi s presentati on, the commi ttse wi 1 1 noti fy the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es that the thesi s has been read, eval uated and 
approved. The Director of Undergraduate Studies will then notify the University Honors Program Director of the successful completion of 
tiie i ndi vi dual H onors degree program. 

ANIMAL SCIENCES(ANSC) 

Cdlegeof Apiculture and Natural Resources 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373 

www. ansc. umd. edu 

ansc@umd.edu 

Chair: T. Porter 

Professors: R. Erdman, R. Kohn, I. Mather, M.Ottinger, R. Peters, T. Porter, M. Vamer, I. Vijay 

Associate Professors: C. Angel, J. Doerr, I. Este/ez, T. Hartsock, C. Keefer, W. Stricklin, L.Woods, N.Zimmermann 

Assistant Professors: B. Bequette, A. Burk, I. Hamza, F. Siewerdt,J. Song, L.Taneyhill (AsstProf), M. Updike(AsstProf) 

Lecturers: C. Hakenkamp (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: S. Schoenian 

Professors Emeriti: L. Douglass (Prof Emeritus),]. Heath, J. MajeskieJ.Soares,J. Vandersall, D.Westhoff, W.Williams 

TheMajcr 

The Department of A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences provi des a chal I engi ng program for academi cal I y tal ented students i nterested i n the appI i cati on of 
bi ol ogy and technol ogy to the care management and study of domesti c and aquati c ani mal s. I n addi ti on to emphasi zi ng the tradi ti onal farm speci es 
of dai ry and beef catd e, sheep, swi ne and poul try, our program i ncl udes opti ons i n equi ne studi es, I aboratory ani mal management, and sci ences 
whi ch prepare students for veteri nary or graduate school . A ni mal sci ences maj ors expl ore a wi de range of subj ects - from fundamental bi ol ogy to 
ani mal nutri ti on, physi ol ogy and geneti cs - whi I e i ntegrati ng sci ence and economi cs i nto ani mal management 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Our departmait offers B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. One-third of our animal sciences seniors enter veterinary school, while others go on to 
graduate school . Our graduates al so pursue a vari ety of careers such as research techni ci ans, sal es or market] ng representati ves, or ani mal 
producers. 

Acadanic Pro^amsand Departmaital Facilities 

Our up-to-dabefacilities in the Animal Sciences Center, which opened in 1991, include new classrooms, an inviting lecture hall and a large social 
area for students. The newl y constructed teachi ng I abs, ani mal rooms and a surgery sui te are I ocated adj acent to the teachi ng farm where horses, 
sheep, beef and dai ry catd e are mai ntai ned. 

Reqiiremaitsfor tiieJVlajcr 

A ni mal Sci ences prepares students for veteri nary school , graduate school and careers i n research, sal es and market] ng, bi otechnol ogy, aquacul ture; 
and ani mal product] on. The curri cul a appi y the pri nci pi es of bi ol ogy and technol ogy to the care, management; and study of dai ry and beef catd e, 
horses, fish, sheep, swine^ and poultry. Students complete the Ani mal Sciences core courses and choose a specialization area: Animal 
Biotechnology, Animal Care and Management; Equine Studies, Laboratory Ani mal Management, and Sciences^Professional Option to prepare for 
admission to graduate, veterinary, pharmacy, nursing or medical school. 



ANIMAL SCI ENCES CORE 

All unda-g-aduates majoring in Animal Sdences must drafts 
compile the following course requirements: 

ANSClOl Principlesof Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC211 Animd Anatomy 3 

ANSC212 Animd Physiology 3 

ANSC214 Animal Physiology Laboratory 1 

ANSC314 ComparativeAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC327 MolecularandOuantitativeAnimal Genetics 3 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 4 

BSCI223 Generd Microbiology 4 

CHEM 131/132 Generd Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 



MATH 220 
MATH 140 



One from 

E I ementary Cal cul us I 

Calculus I 



3 

4 



One from 
AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 

ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK 

All students must complete 30-40 credts in one of the 
following six options 



3 
4 



1. ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT (OlOHA) 
RecfMredCourses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimd Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM 104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the following courses 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 
ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 
ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animd Welfa-e 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animd Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



Plus tai'S 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 HealthManagementof Animal Populations 

ANSC220 Livestock M aiagement 

ANSC232 Horse Management 

ANSC240 Dairy Catd e Management 

A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 



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ANSC305 Companion Animal Care 3 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Managemait 3 

2. EQUINE STUDIES (OlOK) Requined Courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Maiagement 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

A NSC 330 Equine Science 3 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimd Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus fate 9 credits from the ibi lowing courses 

ANSC340 HealthManagementof Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animd Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animd Welfa-e 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animd Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



3. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT 

(ai04D) 

RecfMrsdCoLTSES 

ANSC340 HealthManagementof Animal Populations 3 

ANSC413 Lab Animal Management 3 

ANSC437 Animd Biotechnology 2 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

ANSC453 Animd Welfa-e 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animd Behavior 3 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the ibI lowing courses: 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 
ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

Plus take 3 credits from the following courses: 

ANSC220 Livestock Maiagement 3 

A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 3 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 3 



ANSC315 

BSCI 106 

BCHM463 

BSCI 230 

CH EM 231/232 

CH EM 241/242 

CHEM271 

PHYS121 

PHYS122 



ANSC340 
ANSC420 
ANSC435 
ANSC437 



4 &5. SCIENCES& COMBINED AG AND VET 
SCI (01O4E axll299D) ReqLnivdCowses 

AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

Principles of Biology 1 1 4 

Biochemistry of Physiology or 3 

Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

Organic Chemistry I I/Laboratory 4 

General Chemistry and Energetics 2 

Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 4 

Plus take 9 credits from the following courses: 

HealthManagementof Animal Populations 3 

Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

Experimental Embryology 3 

Animal Biotechnology 2 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



ANSC443 
ANSC444 
ANSC446 
ANSC447 
ANSC452 
ANSC453 
ANSC455 
ANSC497 



ANSC220 
ANSC232 
ANSC240 
ANSC255 
ANSC262 
ANSC413 



Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

Avian Physiology 3 

Animal Welfare 3 

Applied Animal Behavior 3 

Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

Plus take 3 credits from the ibi lowing courses: 

L i vestock M anagement 3 

H orse M anagement 3 

Dai ryCattJe Management 2 

I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 3 

Commercial Poultry Management 3 

Laboratory Animal Management 3 

For additional information concerning v^eri nary school applications, 
please contact tlTeK. Feldman, VMRCVM, 87CB Greennead Dr., 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3711, 
301-314-6820, kleldmBn@unrl.edu 



a ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (01O!F) RofJred 
Courses 

ANSC437 Animd Biotechnology 2 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM 231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM 241/242 Organic Chemistry I I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 Generd Chemistry aid Energetics 2 



Plus (ate 3 credits from the fbl lowing courses: 
ANSC220 Livestock M aiagement 
A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 
ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 



Plus talis 9 credits from the following courses: 

ANSC340 HealthManagementof Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animd Welfa-e 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animd Behavior 3 



Plus talis 3 credits from the following courses: 
ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

BSCI380 ComparativeBioinformatics 

BSCI413 Recombinant DNA 



3 
4 
3 



Other ReqiiremaitsfortheMajcr 

A ni mal sci ences maj ors sel ect one of si x opti ons as an area of speci al i zati on: 

Sdenoq'PrafesEiGnal - Prepares students for admission to veterinary or medical school sand^or graduate school. Graduate school study can open 
the door to an exciting research career in specialty areas of animal or biological sciences such as genetics, nutrition, physiology or ceil biology. 
The curriculum emphasizes advanced courses in the biological and physical sci ences and includes all the preveteri nary and pre medicine 
requirements. 

C ombi ned Ag & Vet Sd - A combi ned degree program i s avai I abl e to students who gai n admi ssi on to veteri nary school pri or to compi eti ng thei r 
bachelor'sdegree.CollegeofAgricultureand Natural Resources students who have completed at I east ninety hours, including all collegeand 
uni versi ty requi rements, are awarded a bache! or of sci ence degree upon successful compI eti on of at I east thi rty semester hours i n an accredi ted 
col I ege of veteri nary medi ci ne. E ari y pi anni ng wi th your advi sor i s encouraged i f you choose thi s opti on. 

E quine Stucies - Offers hands-on I eami ng opportuni ti es i n the area of equi ne sci ence and management. The Department of A ni mal and A vi an 
Sci ences at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers undergraduate students the opportuni ty to emphasi ze on horses whi I e pursui ng a B achel or of Sci ence 
degree i n A ni mal Sci ence. Students may take equi ne courses that expl ore a wi de range of topi cs i ncl udi ng anatomy and physi ol ogy, nub'i ti on, 
reproduction, exercise, law, insurance facilities, health and disease, pasture management, and more. Our courses are designed to provide valuable 
hands-on I eami ng experi ences to better prepare students to be future I eaders i n the horse i ndustry as we! I as other i ndustri es. I n addi ti on, A N SC 
students may take one or more equi ne courses wi thi n the I nsti tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture 

Animal Biotechnology -The Animal Biotechnology opti on is a relatively new addition to our program. It combines the basic requi red animal 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



sci aice courses wi th a focus on bi ol ogy and technol ogy . This opti on has a heavy emphasi s on sci ence courses, to prepare students for a 
prof essi onal career. Some of the career opti ons wi th thi s tracl< i ncl ude: an i ndustry career i n ani mal bi otechnol ogy; a graduate degree i n 
biotechnology (either |V|S and/or PHD); or a professional degree and career (Veterinary or Human Medici ne^ Nursing, Pharmacy.) 

Ani mal C are & M anaganait - 1 s desi gned for students whose career pi ans i ncl ude ani mal management; product] on and the marketi ng of ani mal 
products. The curri cul um provi des basi c courses i n geneti cs, nutri ti on, physi ol ogy and reproducti on whi I e al I owi ng students to focus on the 
management of one parti cul ar I i vestock speci es. Y ou wi 1 1 be encouraged to suppi ement academi c work wi th practi cal experi ence by compi eti ng an 
i nternshi p. Dai ry sci ence students, for exampi e, i ntern at I ocal farms where they parti ci pate i n deci si ons about breedi ng, f eedi ng, heal th practi ces, 
milk production and other aspects of herd management This option will prepare you for ownership or management positions with dairy, livestock 
or poul try producti on enterpri ses; posi ti ons wi th marketi ng and processi ng organi zati ons; breed associ ati ons; and posi ti ons i n agri busi ness f i el ds 
such as sales of feed, pharmaceutical products and agricultural equipment Graduates also work with state and federal agencies. 

L abcratory Ani mal M anagement - P repares students for careers i n the operati on and management of I aboratory ani mal f aci I i ti es connected wi th 
thebiotechnology industry. Course work in nutrition, reproduction and environmental management is combined with practi cal I earning to provide 
future managers wi th tool s they wi 1 1 need. Asa graduate, you may pursue careers wi th state or federal agenci es; wi th pri vate i ndustry i n the 
management and operati on of I aboratory ani mal producti on; and wi th i nstructi onal or i nvesti gati onal f aci I i ti es. 

Advising 

A ni mal sci ences maj ors are assi gned a f acul ty acM sor to assi st wi th program and course se!ection,aswellastohelp students take advantage of the 
many non-classroom opportunities in theW^ington, D.C. area. Faculty members have speci aides in all areas of animal sciences, as well as 
veteri nary medi ci ne, and bri ng practi cal appi i cati ons to the d assroom, creati ng a ri ch I earni ng experi ence for students. 

Face to face advising is mandatory. Each student will be assi gned to a faculty advisor to assist in planning hi sor her academic program. For 
information or appointment 1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

Because it is part of a land grant university, the Department of Animal and Avian Sciences also has responsibility for research and technology 
transfer to the ani mal i ndustry throughout M aryl and. Duri ng undergraduate study, students are encouraged to conduct i ndependent research i n 
faculty laboratories on campus or at the nearby U. S. Departnentof AgricultureBeltsvilleAgricultural Research Center. 

I nternshi ps 

Students are encouraged to gai n practi cal ani mal management experi ence by pursui ng i ntemshi ps. Students have compI eted i ntemshi ps i n 
locations ranging from the area around the University, to catdefarms in theM idwest, agri busi ness firms in Califomi a, and a zoo in Frankfurt, 
Germany. Many animal sci ences students use the summer to gain additional applied experi ence in ani mal sciences, veterinary medi cine or 
agribusiness. 

HcncrsProg'am 

Students admitted to theAGNR Honors Program areeligibleto take3 - 6 credits of Honors Thesis Research within the ANSC Department 
( A N SC 388) . U ndergraduate honors thesi s research i s conducted under the di recti on of an A G N R f acul ty member i n parti al f ul f i 1 1 merit of the 
requirements of the College of AGNR Honors Program. The thesis will be defended before a faculty committee 

Student Societies and Prcfessicnai Organizations 

The clubs and organi zati ons affiliated with the Ani mal Sci ence department allow ample opportunities for leadership, development, hands-on 
animal experience, and fun! 
Alpha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Gamma Rho is a social /professional fraternity that has been a training ground for leaders in the agri culture and life sci ences community 
si nee it was established at College Park in 1928. AGR has a rich tradition of alumni contacts with over 50,000 brothers nationwide, including over 
700 brothers in the Washington area alone. AGR men are leaders in various clubs within the col lege and thefratemity is an active member of both 
the Inter-fraternity Council (IFC) and theAgStudent Council. Alpha Gamma Rho stresses scholarship, leadership and fellowship, anditiswdl 
respected among G reek organi zati ons because of thei r no pi edgi ng, substance free, schol ars envi ronment I n addi ti on, the chapter house on 
P ri nceton Avenue offers ttie opportuni ty to I i ve wi th brothers who are taki ng the same cl asses and share many of the same i nterests whi ch makes 
i t much easi ertofindanicheon such a I arge campus. 

Alpha Zeta 

A I pha Zeta i s an agri cul tural prof essi onal honor soci ety whose membershi p i s se! ected from undergraduate and graduate students excel I i ng i n 
scholarship, leadership, character, and service. Organizational events include coordinating the Partners in Education program with the USDA 
Agriculture Research Service Beltsville Area, fund raising activities, community service projects, awards and recognition programs, and an annual 
studenUfaculty/alumni banquet A popular annual event is coordinating a Field Day for young children at the nearby National Agricultural 
Research V i si tor Center at B el tsvi 1 1 e. 

Animal HusbanckyClub 

TheAnimal Husbandry Club at the University of Maryland, College Park, provides opportunities for students to gainanimal handling experience 
and bui I d i nterpersonal rel ati onshi p ski 1 1 s, whi I e gi ven the encouragement to excel I A cti vi ti es and experi ences speci f i cal I y desi gned for students of 
di versi f i ed i nterests i n ani mal agri cul ture are provi ded, i ncl udi ng experi ences wi th many di f f erent domesti c speci es. M embershi p i s open to al I 
undergraduatestudents interested in getting hands-on experienceworking with dairy, beef, sheep or swine and I earning more about general animal 
sciences. Activities include the Ag Day Dairy and Livestock Shows, Harvest Stomp/Fall Festival, fitting of animals for the annual Wye Angus 
Sale, and other activities working with dairy animals. One can gain further leadership skills by holding an office. Each Spring, elections are held 
for President, VicePresident; Secretary, Treasurer, and Historian. 

CGlle^abe4^H 

Many colleges and universities haveCollegiate4-H clubs. Collegiate4-H is an organization that provides its members with a sense of identity on 
campus, enri ches thei r I i ves through group prqj ects and recreati on, and da/el ops conf i dence and I eadershi p ski 1 1 s. C I ubs provi de servi ce and 
support to thei r I ocal and state 4-H programs, such as servi ng as j udges and conducti ng trai ni ng workshops. They are al so a servi ce and soci al 
group for campus students. Col I egi ate 4-H i s open to al I col I ege students who wi sh to support youth and the 4-H program. 1 1 i s not necessary to 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



have pri or 4- H experi ence onl y to have an i nterest i n the 4- H i deal s and i n servi ng your communi ty . www.colleqiat84h.orci/ 

Si gra Alpha 

SigmaAlpha is a national professional agricultural sorority. Theobjectiveofthesororityistopromoteitsmembersinall facets of agriculture and 
to strengthen the f ri endshi ps among them. M embers stri ve f or achi evement i n schol arshi p, I eadershi p, servi ce, and to further the devel opment of 
women pursuing careers in agriculture. SigmaAlpha works to promote agriculture and women's role, on our campus, in our community and 
throughout the state. Activities include attending regional and national conferences /conventions; participating in college a/ents (Fall Bash, ANSC 
orientation, Cook-Offs); service activities including teaching agriculture to local elementary students and judging contests for the Maryl and F FA; 
professional Guest speakers, and participating in Maryland Day/Ag Day. Membership rush is held on a semester basis. To be eligible potential 
members must have 2. 25 C umul ati ve G P A , A gri cul ture maj or or si ncere i nterest i n agri cul ture, be a member of one other group, enrol I ed i n IS 
credits, or working 10 hours a week. Visitthe web site www.studentorq. umd.edu/siqma 

University of Maryland Equestrian Club 

The University of Maryland Equestrian Club (UM EC) provides on-campus horseback riding lessons and equine leaming opportunities for campus 
students and f acul ty at begi nner through advanced I eve! s. The A N SC department provi des the bam, equi pment, ri di ng arenas and horses whi I e the 
students provi de care for ttie horses. There i s a ri di ng f ee of $200 per semester for one ri di ng I esson a week for the enti re semester. L arge 
deductions are easily eamed for help with feeding, cleaning stalls or teaching. Club members not riding are strongly encouraged to participate in 
other d ub acti vi ti es, such as educati onal and fun semi nars, f i e! d tri ps and monthi y meeti ngs. I n the past; U M E C members have attended the 
Columbia Grand Prix and the Washington I ntemational Horse Show and taken field trips to the DuPont Veterinary Medical Center in Leesburg, 
Va. and Days End Horse Rescue Farm in Maryland. Members have also participated in clinics on tack fitting and identifying lameness in horses. 
Club members, under the leadership of tJie Executive Board and Directors, make most UM EC club decisions. We offer a great opportunity to all 
students and we're al ways open to suggesti ons. We al so try to have somethi ng for a/eryone i ncl udi ng basi c E ngl i sh equi tati on, Westem equi tati on, 
dressage bareback and trai I ri di ng, horse and farm management; veteri nary care, teachi ng ski 1 1 s and much more The U M E C i s I ocated at the 
campus horse bam, and our office is in the Shack, right next to the paddocks. There is very limited space in the riding lessons, so email us right 
away to reserve yourself a spot in the most educati onal equine club provided by the University of Maryland. Visit the web site 
www.studentorq.umd.edu/umec/ 

University of Maryland Equestrian Team 

TheEquestrian Team isacompetitive club, meaning they travel to different schools in the zone and compete in I HSA shows. Students, faculty, 
staff, and alumni association members of all la/els are invited. The team offers English, Western, and jumping, so team members can pick what 
typeof riding to specialize in or compete in all three! The team does not hoi dtryouts so anyone can join the team. UMET is located about 25 
minutesoff campus at Clay Hill Stablesin Springdale Maryland. The cost per semester for team membership is $550. This fee covers two one 
hour group lessons a week taught by trainer TrishaPrettyman, unlimited practice rides (hacks), show fees, show practices, andatonof fun! 

Veterinary SdenceClub 

The pri mary obj ecti ves of the V eteri nary Sci ence C I ub are to: promote a deeper understandi ng of the numerous opportuni ti es i n veteri nary 
medi ci ne exchange i nf ormati on on veteri nary and ani mal experi ences, and keep students updated on the I atest veteri nary school i nf ormati on. 

What does the Veterinary SdenceClub do? A variety of guest speakers are invited to club meetings to talk about their specialties or field of 
i nterest A sampi e of topi c i ncl ude wi I dl i f e rehabi I i tati on, I aboratory ani mal medi ci ne, exoti c pet care and veteri nary ethi cs. 

Eachyear, faculty from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine speak to club members about veteri nary medical school. 
M ock i ntervi ews are hel d i n J anuary to prepare our d ub members for the admi ssi ons process. 

C I ub sponsored tri ps offer our members the opportuni ty to tour vari ous veteri nary medi cal fad I i ti es, tal k to veteri nary students and f acul ty, and to 
visit local zoos and animal care facilities. 

Annually, the club participates in the A PV MA National Symposium which is held at different veteri nary schools each year. This is an eccellent 
opportuni ty to vi si t a vet school , pi us hear over 30 speakers on numerous topi cs and parti ci pate i n a vari ety of wet and dry I ab. 

There are also opportunities to volunteer with the Pri nee George's County Animal Shelter in partnership with PetSmart; to help find homes for 
abandoned ani rnal s. F or more i nf ormati on vi si t the web si te www.careercenter. umd. edu/V etSci C I ub 

Scholarships and Financial Asastance 

American Society of Animal Sciences Scholastic Recognition and Department of Animal Sciences Scholastic Achievement Awards are presented 
each year attheCollegeofAgricultureandNatural Resources StudentAwards Convocation. The ANSC program admi nisterssa/eral scholarships, 
including: C.W. England, Dairy Technology Society, the Kinghorne Fund Fellowship, theC.S. Shaffner Award, the Lillian Hildebrandt Rummel 
Scholarship, and the Owen P. Thomas Devel opment Schol arshi p. For eligibility criteria, visit the A NSC Office, 1415A Animal Sciences Center. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in 
cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, vi si t 
www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu. 

AnthrqMlcgy (AISTTH) 

Cdlegeof Bdiavioral and Sodal Sdaxies 

1111 Woods Hall, 301-405-1423 

www. bsos. umd. edu/anth 

Chair: P. Shackel 

Professors: J. Chemela (also LASC), F.Jackson, M. Leone, T. Whitehead 

Associate Professors: J . Frddenberg, M . Paolisso 

Assistant Professors: S. Brighton, W. Stuart 

Lecturers: M. Butier, A. Chisholm,J. Finch, D. Gadsby,T. Leslie, M. London, A. Meredith, M. Plyler, M.Solano 

Affiliate Professors: A. Bolles (WMST), S. Bushrui,J . Ca-lson, J . Caughey (AMST), T. Cederstrom, J . Hanna, R. Ha-rison (CMLT, LASC), S. 

Kim(WMST),J. Kunen, D. Linebaugh(HISP), A. Nieves(HISP), C. Puentes-Mari<ides, C. Robertson (MUSC) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Adjunct Professors: S. Abbott-Jamieson(NOAA), C. Grain, S. Fiske, A. Froment L. Kaljee^ B. LittJe (National Park Service), F. |V|clV|anamon 
(National Park Service), S. Potter (National Park Service), N.Tashima(LTG Associates) 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: G.Thakur 
Professors Emeriti: JVj. Agar, N. Gonzalez (Emerita) 

TheMajcr 

A nthropol ogy, the study of cul ture, seeks to understand humans as a whol e - as soci al bei ngs who are capabi e of symbol i c communi cati on through 
whi ch they produce a ri ch cul tural record. A nthropol ogi sts try to expl ai n di f f erences among cul tures - di f f erences i n physi cal characteri sti cs as we! I 
as i n customary behavi or. A nthropol ogi sts study how cul ture has changed through ti me as 9ie human genus has spread over the earth. 
A nthropol ogy i s the sci ence of the bi ol ogi cal a/ol uti on of human speci es, and the di sci pi i ned schol arshi p of the cul tural deve! opment of human 
beings' knowledge and customary behavior. 

A nthropol ogy at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers ri gorous trai ni ng for many career opti ons. A strong background i n anthropol ogy i s a def i ni te 
asset i n prepari ng for a vari ety of academi c and prof essi onal f i el ds, rangi ng from the I aw and busi ness, to comparati ve I i terature, phi I osophy and 
the fine arts. Whetiier one goes on to a Master's or a Ph.D., the anthropol ogy B. A. prepares one for a wide range of non-academic employment; 
such as city and public health planning, deve! opment consulting, program a/aluation, and public archaeology. 

Pro-am Learning Outccmes 

H avi ng compi eted the degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng know! edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students shall have an integrated knowledge, awareness and understanding of a culturally and biologically diverse world. 

2. Students shall demonstrate an understanding of cul ture and society. 

3. Students shal I demonstrate the abi I i ty to understand compI ex research probi ems, and arti cul ate appropri ate methods and theory. 

Academic Pro^amsand Departmental Facilities 

The A nthropol ogy department offers begi nni ng and advanced course work i n the three pri nci pal subdi vi si ons of the di sci pi i ne: cul tural 
anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. Within each area, the department offers some degree of specialization and provides a 
vari ety of opportuni ti es f or research and i ndependent study. L aboratory courses are offered i n bi ol ogi cal anthropol ogy and archaeol ogy. F i el d 
school s are offered i n archaeol ogy. The i nterrel ati onshi p of al I branches of anthropol ogy i s emphasi zed. 

TheAnthropology department has a total of five laboratories, located in Woods Hall, which aredivided into teaching labs and research labs. The 
deparbnents three archaeol ogy I abs, contai ni ng materi al s col I ected from f i e! d school s and research prqj ects of the p^ several years, serve both 
teachi ng and research purposes. The other two I aboratori es are a teachi ng I aboratory i n bi ol ogi cal anthropol ogy and the L aboratory for A ppl i ed 
Ethnography and Community Action Research. Cultural Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), a research and program da/elopment arm of the 
deparbnent i s I ocated i n Woods H al I . The Center f or H eri tage Research Studi es, I ocated i n the Department of A nthropol ogy, focuses on research 
devoted to understanding the cultural characteristics of heritage and its uses. 

The undergraduate curriculumistied to the departments |V|asterinAppliedAnthropology(M.A.A.) program; accordingly, preparation for 
non-academi c empi oyment upon graduati on i s a pri mary educati onal goal of the departrnents undergraduate course work and i nternshi p and 
research components. Thedepartment has also recently implemented a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program. Students at the graduate I a/el are 
asked to focus i n one of three areas of f acul ty experti se H eal th, H eri tage^ and E nvi ronment 

Reqiirementsfor tiieMajcr 

M aj ors are requi red to take five courses i n the core course sequence (three i ntroductory courses and two advanced method and theory courses), for 
atotal of 16 credit hours.They must also take 15 credit hoursinanthropologyelectives and 18 supporting credit hours in courses that are primarily 
outsi de the maj or. A nthropol ogy maj ors must al so acqui re a second I anguage or compI ete a quanti tati ve methods course 

Requi red C curses C reiJts 

I ntroductory ccurses 

A NTH 220 I ntroducti on to B i ol ogi cal A nthropol ogy 4 

A NTH 240 I ntroducti on to A rchaeol ogy 3 

ANTH260 I ntroduction to Soci o-cul tural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 



Advanced Method and Theory courses: 

At least bvo of the following (one must be in moor's area of 
primaryfocus-i.e, culbs-al aithropology, archaeology, 
biological antJrropology) 
A NTH 320 M etixxl and Theory i n B i ol ogi cal A nthropol ogy, A N D/OR 3 

ANTH340 MetixxlandTheory in Archaeology, AND/OR 3 

ANTH360 Metixxl and Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 3 

Anthropology E ledives: 

Fiftem credtsof anthropoiogy eiectives, 9 atthe300 le\/el or 

above 
ANTH Anthropology el ectives 6 

A NTH 300/400 U pper I a/el A rthropol ogy courses 9 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Supporting Course Work: 

Eighteen credit hours of supporting dectives; at least 10 

credit hours must beoutsideof the departmait (with your ,„ 

academic advisor's approval), 8 hours may be anthropology 

course work. 

QuantitativeMethodsor Ford^ Language Requiranenb 

QUANT One quantitative methods course from approved listkeptby 

the U ndergraduabe D i rector 

. .|^p Proficiency may be demonstrated in one of the foil owing 

ways: 

• Successful completion of high-school level 4 in one 
language, OR 

• Successful completion of ttieintermEdatB level in 
college language coLTses, OR 

• Successful completion of a placement scani nation at 
the abo\/e levels in one of the campus language 
departments offering such examinations 

Advising 

The primary advisor for students in the Anthropology major is the Undergraduate Advisor. The advisor is available to students during 
appoi ntmaits, wal k-i n hours, and by phone and emai I . The advi sor i s rsponsi bl e for hel pi ng studaits pi an thei r successful compi ed on of the 
A nthropol ogy maj or. Studaits will work wi th the advi sor for an ori aitati on to the department; status on degree progress, admi ni strati ve approval 
for speci al course enrol I ment academi c audi ts, and graduati on d earance I n addi ti on, students shoul d consi der the U ndergraduabe A dvi sor a 
resource for general academi c and career advi ce duri ng thei r ti me at M aryl and. 

The office of Undergraduate Advisor is supervised and supported by the Di rector of Undergraduate Studies (a faculty member) i n the Department 
of A nthropol ogy. I n addi ti on, al I f acul ty members i n the department serve as f acul ty advi sors to students. Students are expected to sel ect and 
request a f acul ty member who works wi thi n thei r area of focus to be thei r f acul ty advi sor ( i . e A rchaeol ogy, B i ol ogi cal A nthropol ogy or C ul tural 
Anthropology). For more information, or to contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or Undergraduate A dvi sor, pleasecall 301-405-1423 or 
go to www.teos.umd.edu^anth. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

There are sa/eral undergraduate research experi ences avai I abl e for students: 

1. Archaeology laboratories 

2. Biological anthropology lab 

3. Chesapeake heritage program 

4. Immigrant Life Course 

5. Cultural Systems Analysis Group 

6. Center for Heritage Resource Studies 

For more information, pi ease see our website: www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 
Fiddworic Oppcrtirities 

The Department of Anthropology encourages students to explore its field school and study abroad opportunities: 

1. Summer archaeology field school 

2. Ethnographic field school injamaica (study abroad program) 

3. Ethnographic field school in the Brazilian Amazon (study abroad program) 

4. Ethnographic field school in Argentina (study abroad program) 

5. Wi nter term f i el d study i n I tal y (study abroad program) 

Formoreinfomiation, see our website: www.bsos.umd.edu/anth. 

IntErnships 

All undergraduate students are encouraged to do an intemshi p. Therearemany non-profitandgovemmentagenciesintheBaltimoreWashington 
area that are wi 1 1 i ng to support A nthropol ogy i nterns. F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease contact the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es or the 
U ndergraduate A dvi sor. 

Co-cp Prog'ams 

The Department has a coopa^ti ve agreement with the National Park Service. When avai lable, students have opportunities to work on various 
archeology and museum projects in the National Capital Region. Formoreinfomiation, pi ease contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or 
the U ndergraduate A dvi sor. 

HcncrsProg'am 

The Anthropology department also offers an Honors Program that provides the student an opportunity to pursue i n-depth study of his or her 

i nterests. A cceptance i s conti ngent upon a 3. 5 G P A i n arithropol ogy courses and a 3. overal I average. M embers of thi s program are encouraged to 

take as many departmental honors courses (either as HON R oras"H" sections of A NTH courses) as possibleTheHonors Citation isawarded 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



upon compi ed on and re/i ew of a thesi s ( usual I y based upon at I east one term of research under the di recti on of an A nthropol ogy f acul ty member) 
to be done within the field of anthropology. For additional information, students should contactthe Director of Departmental Honors Program, Dr. 
William Stuart, 301-405-1435; E-mail: wstuart@anth.umd.edu 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

A nthropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on ( A SA ) : A n anthropol ogy student associ ati on that meets regul arl y to pi an student events and to hel p coordi nate 
various student and faculty activities. Meeting times are posted outside 0100 Woods Hall. 

The department and the ASA jointly sponsor a public lecture series. 

Applied Mathematics and Scientific Ccmputaticn Prog'am (AMSC) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3103 Mathematics Building, 301-405-0924 

www.amsc.umd.edu 

amsc@amsc.umd.edu 

Director: J ames A. Yorker Distinguished University Professor 

Professors: More than 100 members from 19 units. 

Academic Prog'amsand Departmental Facilities 

The Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation Program of fers a graduate program in which students combine studies in mathematics and 
application areas. The Program also offers an undergraduate Certificate in Computational Science. AMSC courses carry credit in mathematics, 
wi th the excepti on of A M SC 462. A n undergraduate program emphasi zi ng appi i ed mathemati cs i s aval I abl e to maj ors i n mathemati cs. 
Appropriate courses carry the MATH and STAT prefixes, as well astheAMSC prefix. 

Certificate 

The Certi f i cate i n Computati onal Sci ence i ntroduces students to basi c computati onal methods for better understandi ng and sol vi ng probi ems i n the 
physi cal sci ences. N umeri cal techni ques and computer archi tecture wi 1 1 be taught wi th the goal of appI yi ng these to si tuati ons i n the physi cal 
sciences. Computational methods will be applied to problems that are not analytically tractable; for comparison, physical problemstiiatare 
amenableto analysis will also be examined. The goal of the program is to enhance student understanding of numerical methods that will beof use 
i n graduate school , academic research, and i ndustry. 

C ertificate Reqii rements 

1. CoreRequirements- the following courses are required: 

Three courses in Programming Languages, Numerical Methods, and Computer Architecture: 

CM SC 106 cr CM SC Bl I ntrodudion to Progranmi ng 

A MSC460 Computational Methods 

A M SC462 1 ntro to Comp Organi zati on and Tool s f or Sci enti f i c Computi ng 

A course i n whi ch advanced computati on i s appI i ed to sci enti f i c probI ems: 

PHY S474 Computational Physics cr 
ASTR415 Computational Astrophysics 

A science base: 

PHYS273 1 ntroductory Physics: Waves or 

PHY S270 General Physics: Electrodynamics, Light; Relativity & Modem Physics and PHY S271 General Physics: Electrodynamics, 

Light; Relativity & Modem Physics Lab 

Note! Anyof CMSC106orCMSC131, CM SC 114 or CM SC 132, CMSC214orCMSC212, ENEE114, PHYS165, may be substituted for 
CM SC 106 or CM SCBl. AM SC466 may be substituted for AM SC460. CM SC311 and CM SC351 may be substituted for AM SC462. 

2 Electives 

E I ecti ve courses must be chosen from the I i st bel ow such that the enti re sequence of courses for the Certi fi cate meets the fol I owi ng two condi ti ons: 
(a) at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300-400 la/el; (b) at I east 12 credit hours must be outside the maj or. Inthecaseof multiplemajors, at 
I east 12 credi t hours must be outsi de al I the other maj or requi rements. 

ASTR 120 1 ntroductory Astrophysics-Solar System (3) 

ASTR 121 1 ntroductory Astrophysics 1 1 -Stars and Beyond (4) 

ASTR 320Theoreticd Astrophysics (3) 

ASTR415 Computational Astrophysics 

CMSC 114 or CM SC 132 Computer Sci ence I (4) 

CM SC 214 or CM SC212 Computer Sci ence 1 1 (4) 

CMSC 250 Discrete Structures (4) 

GEOL 341 Structural Geology (4) 

M ATH 240 1 ntroducti on to L i near A I gebra (4) 

MATH 241 Cd cuius II I (4) 

MATH 246 Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers (3) 

MATH 431 Geometry for Computer Gr^hics (3) 

MATH 452 1 ntrodudion to Dynamics and Chaos (3) 

MATH 462 Partial Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers (3) 

MATH 464 Transform Methods to Scientists and Engineers(3) 

PHYS 171 1 ntroductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity (3) 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



PHYS 272 1 ntroductDry Physics: Fields (3) 
PHYS 273 1 ntroductDry Physics: Waves (3) 
PHYS 374 1 rtermedi ate Theoretical M ethods (4) 
PHYS 401 Quaitum Physics I (4) 

cr PHYS 420 Principles of Modern Physics (3) 
PHYS 402 Quaitum Physics 1 1 (4) 
PHYS 404 1 ntroduction to Statistical Thermodynamics (3) 
PHYS 410 Classical |V|echaiics(4) 
PHYS 411 1 ntermediate Electricity aid M agnetism (4) 
PHYS 474 Computation^ Physics 

Undcrg'aduate Research Experiences 

A n honors program provi des opportuni ti es for outstandi ng students to engage i n research on a computati onal prqj ect wi th a f acul ty member. 
Students wi 1 1 be accepted i nto thi s program after thei r sophomore year b^ed on thei r academi c performance. 

To obtain more information, contacttheApplied Math and Scientific Computing Program, 3103 Mathematics Building, UMCP, Telephone: 
301-405-0924, www.amsc.umd.edu . 

ARCHITECTURE (ARCH) 

School of Architecture Planning and Presa'vation 

1298 Architecture Bui I ding, 301-405-8000 

www.arch.umd.edu 

arcinfo@umd.edu 

Director: M . Simon (Assoc Prof, Assoc Prof & Dir) 

Professors: M. Bell (Affil Assoc Prof, Prof), R. Bennett(Prof, Affiliate Prof), G. Bowden (Prof Of Practice), R. Etiin(DistUnivProf), S. Hurtt 

(Prof), P. Noonan (Prof Of Practice), K. Du Puy (Prof), G. Rockcastle (Prof, Prof And Dean), T. Schumacher (Prof), R. Vann (Prof) 

Associate Professors: R. Eisenbach(VisitAssoc Prof), A. Gardner (Assoc Prof), I. Goumay (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof), B. Kelly (Assoc Prof 

& Dir, Assoc Prof) 

Assistait Professors: M . Ambrose (Asst Prof), D. Oakley (Asst Prof), I . Willians (Asst Prof), B. Wortham (Asst Prof) 

Professors Emeriti: W. Bechhoefer (Prof Emeritus), D. Fogle(Prof Emeritus), G. Francescabo (Prof Emeritus), J . Hill (Prof Emeritus), R. Lewis 

(Prof Emeritus),]. Loss (Prof Emeritus), B. Schlesinger (Prof Emeritus) 

TheMajcr 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a four-year undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
archi tecture, and a graduate program I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree of M aster of A rchi tecture. F or i nf ormati on see the School of A rchi tecture. 
Planning, and Preservation entry in Chapter 6. 

Art(ARTT) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

1211-E Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-7790 

www.artumd.edu 

artdept@umd.edu 

Chair: J. Ruppert 

Professors: T. Lapinski, F. Sham 

Associate Professors: P. Craig, M. Humphrey, P. Kehoe^ R. Klank, R. Lozner,J. McCarty, W. Richardson, J. Thorpe 

Assistant Professors: D. Gavin, B. Morse,J . Pinder,J . Strom 

Lecturers: E. Bisese, E. Conover, J . Cudlin, L. Drogoul, A. Georgievska-Shine^ K. Holder, S.J ones, R. Lewis, N. Ratnapala, F. Rehak, B. Scott B. 

Tyroler,G.Vafai, R.Weil 

Professors Emeriti: C. Demonte( Distinguished Scholar-Teacher), D. Driskell (Distinguished University Professor) 

TheMajcr 

The Department of A rt i s a pi ace where students transform i deas and concepts i nto obj ects and vi sual experi ences. 1 1 i s an envi ronment ri ch i n art 
theory, cri ti ci sm, and awareness of di verse worl d cul ture Students are taught to arti cul ate and ref i ne creati ve thought and appi y knowl edge and 
skill to the making of images, objects, and experi mental works. Courses are meaningful to students with the highest degree of involvement in the 
program and those who take el ecti ves. Students maj ori ng i n A rt take a focused program of courses f ol ded i nto a general I i beral arts educati on 
offered by the university. 

The di verse f acul ty of arti ste i n the department stri ve to foster a sense of communi ty through the common experi ence of the creati ve process, 
sharingtheir prof essi onal experi ence f reel y wi th students. 

The areas of concentration withinthe major are design, drawing, painting, printmaking, digital imaging, andsculpture. Areas of study include 
papermaki ng, photography, and art theory. I ntemshi ps and i ndependent studi es are al so aval I abl e. 

Reqiirementsfcr theMajor 

Undergraduate students are offered a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Art . The requirements consist of a curriculum of 36 credits of art studio and art 
theory courses, and 12 addi ti onal credi ts of art hi story and art theory courses as a support ng area for a total of 48 maj or requi red credi ts. N o course 
wi th a grade I ess than C may be used to sati sf y maj or or supporti ng area requi rements. 

Foundation C ourses 15 C red ts 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



ARTTIOO 
ARTT 110 
ARTT150 
ARTT 200 
ARTT 210 



Two Dimensional Art Fundamaitals 
Elemaits of Drawing I 
I ntroducti on to A rt Theory 
Three D i mensi onal A rt F undamental s 
Elements of Drawing 1 1 



I ntermeciateCourses 

Painting 
Sculpture 
Printmaking 
Design 



9Crecits 



one courss fromeach three or four 
areas of concentration 

ARTT 320 

ARTT 330, 331, 332, 333, 334 

ARTT 340, 341, 342, 344 

ARTT 350, 351, 
352 



Advanced Courses 

ARTT 418 
ARTT Theory 
ARTT elective 
ARTT elective 

*cour3e offering varies 



12Crecit5 



Advanced Drawing 
One 300/400 A RTT theory* 
One 300/400 ARTT elective 
One 400 level ARTT elective 



Sif^portingArea 

ARTH 200 
ARTH 201 

ARTH/ArtTheory 



12Crecit5 



Art of theWestem World to 1300 

Art of theWestem World after 1300 

Two 300^400 la/el ARTH/ArtTheory 
electives 



48Tat^ CraJts 



Advising 

The name of the advi sor for each d ass i s avai I abl e i n the department of f i ce. E ach second-semester sophomore and f i rst-semester seni or i s requi red 
to see his or her advisor within the department Additionally, each student is strongly encouraged to see his or her advisor in the department each 
semester. 

IntErnships 

Students have worked i n a vari ety of i nternshi p setd ngs. These have i ncl uded assi sti ng prof essi onal s compi ete publ i c commi ssi ons, commerci al or 
cooperati ve gal I ery and exhi bi ti on duti es, and worki ng i n prof essi onal arti sts' workshops i n the B al ti more and Washi ngton, D .C . metropol i tan areas. 
Additional information is available in the Department of Art office. 

HcncrsProg'am 

The H onors Program i s avai I abl e to art studi o maj ors for the purpose of creati ng opportuni ti es for i n-depth study and enri chment i n areas of 
special and creative interest To qualify, students must be art maj ors with junior or seni or status, amajorG.P.A of 3.2, and an overall G.P.A. of 
3.0. The program requi res a total of 12 credits in Honors course work. One course (3 credits) must be taken at the 300- level, and three courses (3 
credits each) atthe400-level.Thereisathesiscomponentinoneof the400-level courses. PI ease consult the Honors Advi sor for additional 
information. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of A rt admi ni sters ei ght Creati ve and Performi ng A rts Schol arshi ps (CA PA s) that are avai I abl e to freshman and enteri ng transfer 
students for the Fall semesters. This is a merit-based scholarship ttiat is awarded on a oneyear basis, andmay be renewed. Additional information 
i s avai I abl e i n the rnai n off i ce of the departrnent. The J ames P . Wharton P ri ze i s awarded to the outstandi ng A rt rnaj or parti ci pati ng i n the 
December or May graduation exhibition. The Van Crews Scholarship is designated for outstanding Art majors concentrating in design. It is 
awarded for one year and is renewable. The David C. Driskell Award for the Outstanding Graduating Graduate Student is awarded at the end of 
the academic year. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Student Art Exhibitions 

The West Gallay (1309 ArtySocidogy Building) is an exhibition space devoted primarily to showing the art work of students. It is managed 
by undergraduate art maj ors, assi sted by a f acul ty advi sor. 

LectireProg'am 

The Department of A rt has a I ecture program i n whi ch arti sts and cri ti cs are brought to the campus to expl ore i deas i n contemporary art A strong 
component of this program is da/oted to diversity. 



ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (ARTH) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

1211-B Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-1479 

www. arthi story, umd. edu 

Chair: W. Pressly 

Professors: J . Hargrove, F. Kelly, J . Kuo, S. Mansbach, M . Venit, A. Wheelock 

Associate Professors: A. Colantuono, M. Gill 

Assistant Professors: R. Ater, S. Hill, E. MarloweJ . Shannon, Y. Suzuki, A. Volk 

Professors Emeriti: D. Denny (Prof Emeritus), M. Spiro(AssocProf Emerita), J. Withers (Assoc Prof Emerita) 

TheMajcr 

The faculty and students of the Department of Art History and Archaeology form a dynamic nucleus within a major research university. The 
program, leadi ng to the B.A. degree in Art Hi story, providesadiverseselectionof courses in the art and archaeology of Africa, Asia, Europe and 
the Americas. The goal of thedepartmentisto develop thestudents critical understanding of visual culture in both art historical and archaeological 
contexts. 

The department has strong coverage inWestem art from the classical period up to the present. Inaddition, by taking advantage of the unusual 
di versi ty of f acul ty i nterests, students can study i n areas not tradi ti onal I y offered i n departments of art hi story and archaeol ogy, such as the art and 
archaeology of Africa, art of diaspora cultures, art and archaeology of tiie Americas, and Asian art Grounding in art historical and archaeological 
theory and method i s provi ded i n a number of courses. Studi es i n archaeol ogy may be pursued i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty departments. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym: A RTH . 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The Department of Art Hi story and Archaeology's B.A. program provides majors critical knowledge of visual culture in both art historical and 
archaeol ogi cal contexts. The program promotes vi sual I i teracy i n the hi story of art of gl obal cul tures from prehi stori c ti mes to the present; 
cul ti vates strong research, wri tten, and cri ti cal thi nki ng ski 1 1 s; and da/el ops students' abi I i ty to synthesi ze cul tural , hi stori cal , pol i ti cal , and soci al 
information as it bears upon the visual arts. 

Pro-am Learning Outccmes 

Students are expected to fully engage with the curriculum and the opportunities presented for learning and research. Having completed B.A. in Art 
H i story, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability to demonstrate knowl edge of a large set of artistic monuments, objects, and performances in the history of art and in specific periods 
and^or cultures and pi ace the visual arts in cul tural, historical, political, and/or social contexts. 

2. An abi lity to communicate effectively about art i n writi ng, appiyi ng complex forms of analysis i n essay-length papers using clear and concise 
prose 

3. A n abi I i ty to empi oy the appropri ate technol ogi es f or conducti ng research i n the hi story of art; i ncl udi ng pri nt sources and/or el ectroni c 
information. 

4. A n abi I i ty to recogni ze and understand fundamental art hi stori cal methods encompassed by but not I i mi ted to connoi sseurshi p, styl i sti c 
chronology, visual and technical analysis, in addition to specialized methods of interpretation and criticism and other contextual approaches. 

Academic Pro^amsand Deparbnental Facilities 

The I ocati on of the uni versi ty between Washi ngton and B al ti more gi ves students the opportuni ty to use some of the f i nest museum and archi val 
col I ecti ons i n the worl d for thei r course work and i ndependent research. The department encourages students to hoi d i ntemshi ps at a number of 
these institutions. Curator/professors, exhibitions in TheArt Gallery at the University of Maryland, interactive technol ogles, and the extensive use 
of study col I ecti ons bri ng regi onal and di stant museums i nto the cl assroom. 

The departmentisinthe forefront of exploring digital imaging technol ogles for art hi stori cal and archaeological teaching, research, and 
publication. 

Reqiirementsfor theMajcr 

Requi rements f or the maj or i n A rt H i story are as f ol I ows: 

Crafts 
Onefrom: 3 

A RTT 100 T wo D i mensi onal A rt F undamental s 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



ARTTllO Elements of Drawing I 

ARTH required axirses 

ARTH2XX three ARTH courses at the 200 level 9 

A RTH 30Q^400sa/en A RTH courses at the 300-400 1 evel 21 

SuppcrtingArea: 12 

A support] ng area of four courses i n coherently 
related subject matter outside the department of Art 
H i story and A rchaed ogy at the 300-400 1 a/el 

No credit toward the rrBJor can be recsved for ARTH 100 or 355. 

No course with a grade lomer than C may be used to satisfy major or supporting area requrerrBnts. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors. 

internships 

Qual i f i ed maj ors shoul d consul t wi th a departmental advi sor for i nternshi p opporbuni ti es. 

HcncrsProg'am 

Qual if i ed maj ors may parti ci pate i n the departments honors program, whi ch requi res the compi eti on of A RTH 488 or A RTH 489, A RTH 496 
(Methods of Art Hi story) andARTH 499 (Honors Thesis). Consult a departmental advi sor for details. 

Awards and ReGc^iiticn 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers three undergraduate awards each year: thej .K . Reed Fe! lowshi p Award to an upper-leve! 
major and the George Levi tine and Frank DiFederico Book Awards to seniors nearing graduation. 

Asi an and E ast E irqiean L anguages and C litires (AE E L ) 

For information consult the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures entry elsewhere in this chapter. 

Asian Ama'ican Studes Certificate 

Offioeaf Unda-^aduabeStucf es 

1120 Cde Student Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

Director: Larry Haji me Shi nagawa, Ph.D. 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with theopportunity to study critically the experiences of Asian Americans. 
Through an i nterdi sci pi i nary approach, students exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and 
connected to the broader themes for diversity, ethnicity, race^ gender and migration in the Americas. AAST offers a 21 credit- hour undergraduate 
certificate for students as well as a 15 credit-hour minor. For both the Certificate and the M inor, courses may be cross- listed in other departments 
and some may satisfy CORE requirements. 

C ertificate Reqii rements: 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. lntroductiontoAsianAmericanStudies(AAST200) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST201) 

B. Elective Courses (12 credits): Students may eam the 12 required elective credits by successfully completing any of a number of 
speci al topi cs courses A A ST offers each semester. E I ecti ve requi rements may al so be sati sf i ed through succe^f ul compI eti on of 
courses offered through other departments or programs. Students must obtain approval from the AAST program director for courses 
outsi de of AAST offeri ngs. 

C. AAST Senior Capstone (3 credits): Students participate in a faculty-guided research project (AAST388) or an experiential 
learning project such as an intemship with an Asian American or Asian Pacific American organization (AAST378). 

D. All coursestowardtheCertificatemustbecomplebedwithminimumgradeof "C." Students interestedineaming the certificate 
shoul d f i rst schedul e an advi si ng appoi ntment at the A A ST off i ce Students i n good standi ng may then of f i ci al I y enrol I i n the 
certificate program. Whi I e students rnay begin taking courses before they enrol I in the certificate program, they should schedule an 
advi si ng appoi ntment as soon as possi bl e. 

Minor Requi remaits 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



1. I ntroducti on to A si an A meri can Studi es ( A A ST 200) 

2. Asian Ama'ican History and Society (AAST 201) 

B. Upper-la/d Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two required foundational courses, students will also select two additional 
upper- 1 evel ( 300/400) courses, one of whi ch woul d be at the 400 1 a/el , from the f ol I owi ng I i st of regul ar and speci al topi cs courses: 
AAST 384, AAST 388, AAST398A, AAST 398D, AAST 398L, AAST 398P/HI ST 319P, AAST 420/WM ST 
420, AAST 424/SOCY 424, AAST 498A/EDCP 498A, AAST 498B, AAST 498C/HI ST 419) , AAST 498D, 
AAST 498E, AAST 498F, AAST 498G, AAST 4981/EDCP 418A, AAST 498) , AAST 498K, AAST 498L, 
AAST 498M/AM ST 418N, AAST 498N aid AAST 498P . 

C.Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of AAST 378 (Experiential Leaming- 3 credits), a semester-long 
i ntemshi p at an organi zati on that centers i ts efforts on A si an A meri can i ssues. Such organi zati ons may i ncl ude govemmental uni ts, 
non-profit agencies, and on-campus organizations. 

Astrcnomy ^STR) 

College of Computer, MathEmatical and Physical Sdenoes 

1204 Compute and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-3001 

www.astro.umd.edu 

astr-grad@deans.umd.edu 

Chair: S. Vogel 

Director: J. Trasco 

Professors: M. A'Hearn, D. Hamilton,] . Harrington, A. Harris, L. Mundy, E. Ostiiker, K. Papadopoulos, W. Rose, S. Veilleux 

Associate Professors: S. McGaugh, M. Miller, C. Reynolds, D. Richardson 

Assistant Professors: A. Bolatto, M. Ricotti 

Instructors: G. Deming 

Lecturers: M. Hayes-Gehrke, N. Miller, P. Romani 

Adjunct Professors: N. Gehrels, S. Holt; R. Mushotzky, N. White 

Professors Emeriti: R.Bell, J. Earl, W. Erickson, M. Leventhal, D. Wentzel 

Visiting Faculty: D. Neufeld 

TheMajcr 

The Astronomy Department offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science in Astronomy as well as a series of courses of general interest to 
non-majors. Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation in Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics. The degree program is 
desi gned to prepare students for posi ti ons i n government and i ndustry I aboratori es or for graduate work i n A stronomy or rel ated f i el ds. A degree 
in Astronomy has also proven valuable as preparation for non-astronomical careers. 

Academic Pro^amsand Departmaital Facilities 

The Department of Astronomy is a partner in the Combined Array for Research in M illimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARM A) which operates a 
mi Hi meter wavelength radio array located near Bishop, California. The array is the largest and most sensitive array in the world. The Department 
is a partner withKitt Peak National Observatory i n the bull ding of a large format near infrared camera for the Mayal I 4- meter optical telescope. 
Opportunities are aval I able for undergraduates to become involved in research with both facilities. The Department also operates a small 
observatory on campus. Therearefourfixedtelescopesranginginaperturefrom20' to7". Therearealso six portables" telescopes. Mostofthe 
telescopes now have CCD cameras and several are computer controlled. Thisfacilityisusedextensivelyforundergraduatedasses. An 
Observatory Open H ouse Program for the publ i c i s al so run. Detai I s are aval I abl e from the Astronomy Department off i ce 

Reqiirementsfor tiieMajcr 

ASTR120 

ASTR121 

ASTR310 
ASTR320 
ASTR4^- 

PHYS171* 

PHYS174 
PHYS272* 
PHYS273* 
PHYS275 

PHYS276 

PHYS374 
PHYS401 
PHYS404 
MATH 140 
MATH 141 
MATH 240 
MATH 241 



Required Cotrses 


Crecft5 


1 ntroductory Astrophysi cs: Sol ar System 


3 


1 ntroductory Astrophysi cs 1 1 : Stars and 


4 


Beyond 


Observational Astronomy 


3 


Theoretical Astrophysics 


3 


400 la/el astronomy courses 


6 


1 ntroductory Physi cs: M echani cs and 


3 


Relativity 


Physics Laboratory 1 ntroducti on 


1 


1 ntroductory Physi cs: Fi el ds 


3 


1 ntroductory Physics: Waves 


3 


Experimental Physics 1: Mechanics and Heat 


2 


Experimental Physics 1 1 : Electricity and 


■) 


Magnetism 




IntermediateTheoretical Methods 


4 


Ouantum Physics 1 


4 


1 ntroducti on to Stati sti cal Thermodynami cs 


3 


Calculus 1 


4 


Calculus II 


4 


1 ntroducti on to L i near A 1 gebra 


4 


Calculus III 


4 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



MATH94fi Differential Equations for Scientists and ., 

Engineers 
*WiththeperrrissionoftheacMsor, PHYS161, 262, 263 can be substituted for this sequence. 

The program requi res that a grade of C or better be obtai ned i n al I courses requi red for the maj or. Students pi anni ng to doubl e maj or (or to seek a 
double degree) in Physics and Astronomy should note that this combination does not automatically satisfy CORE Advanced Studies. They should 
di scuss the i ssue wi th thei r academi c advi sors to assure that thei r program meets al I degree requi rements. 

Detai I ed i nf ormati on on typi cal programs and al ternati ves to the standard program can be found i n the pamphi et end ti ed, Department 
Recfuirennents for a Bachelor of Sdence Degree inAstronony which is availablefrom the Astronomy Department office 

Reqiiremaits for the Minor 

A M inor in Astronomy may be earned by completing the following with grades of C or better. An appointment must be made to register for the 
mi nor before f i nal 30 credi ts are taken. P I ease 

contact Department for compi ete ml es and procedures. 

Crafts 

ASTRIOO Introduction to Astronomy, OR 3 

ASTRlOlGeneral Astronomy, OR 4 

any other Introductory sequence in 

Astronomy 

ASTR 220 Collisions in Space 3 

Three from 

ASTR300 Sta3 aid Stellar Systems 3 

ASTR330 Solar System Astronomy 3 

ASTR340 Origin of the Universe 3 

ASTR380 LifeintheUniverse-Astrobiology 3 

ASTR498 Specid Problems in Astronomy 3 

CRSxx Or a course approved by the department 3 

Honors Prc^am 

The Honors Program offers students of scceptional ability and interest in Astronomy opportunities for part-time research participation which may 
devel op i nto f ul I -ti me summer prqj ects. H onors students work wi th a f acul ty advi sor on a research proj ect for whi ch academi c credi t may be 
earned. Certai n graduate courses are open for credi t toward the bache! or's degree. (Students are accepted i nto the H onors Program by the 
Departments Honors Committee on the basis of grade poi nt average or recommendation of faculty.) Honors candidates submit a written proposal 
on their research proj ect and enrol I in ASTR 399, complete a research project; write a thesis and do an oral presentation before a committee 
Satisfactory grades lead to graduation With Honors (or High Honors) in Astronomy. 

For Add tional Information 

F urther i nf ormati on about advi si ng and the H onors Program can be obtai ned by cal I i ng the Department of A stronomy off i ce at 301-405-3001. 
Students who have been away more than two years may f i nd that due to curri cul um changes the courses they have taken may no I onger be 
adequate preparati on for the courses requi red to compI ete the maj or. Students i n thi s si tuati on must meet wi th the D epartmental A dvi sor to make 
appropriate plans. 

AtmoEpha'ic and Oceanic Sdence (ATMOS) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sdences 

3417 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 301-405-5391 

www. atmos. umd. edu 

Chair: J. Carton 

Professors: A. Busalacchi,J . Carton, R. Dickerson, R. Hudson, E. Kalnay, Z. Li, R. M urtugudde, S. Nigam, R. Pinker, R. Salawitch, D. Zhang 

Associate Professors: N. Zeng 

Assistant Professors: D. Kirk-Davidoff 

Adjunct Professors: B. Doddridge M. King, K. Pickering 

Professors Emeriti: F. Baer, R. Ellingson, A. Vernekar 

Reqii rements for the Minor 

Three M i nor tracks are aval I abl e 
M inor in M eteorology 
M i nor i n Atmospheri c Sci ences 
M inor in Atmospheric Chemistry 

The M i nor i n M eteorol ogy i s the most sui tabi e preparati on for graduate students i n Atmospheri c and Oceani c Sci ence For more detai I s vi si t 
atmos.umd.edu/MINOR or contact the Undergraduate A dvi sor, R. Hudson: (hudson@atmos.umd.edu). 

Minor in Mebeordogy 

This Mi nor will provide the students with a general background in Meteorology as offered by the lower la/el courses, and a broader background 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



on a wide range of sub-fields in JVIebeorology and on current issues in Climate Research, as provided by the two required courses. This |V| inor is 
ai med at students who wi sh to be i nf ormed about thi s f i e! d, who do not have an a pri ori i nterest to pursue graduate worl< i n thi s f i e! d, but who 
mi ght pursue careers where bacl<ground i n |V| eteorol ogy i s i mportant; such as envi ronmental pol i cy, govemment; and i ndustry. Thi s |V| i nor i s not 
open to students who major in Physical Sciences with a concentration in meteorology, or who major in Physics with the Meteorology Physics area 
of concentration. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two el ecti ves from: 

. M ETO 123 Global Change) 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any other 400 level courses offered below as dectives 

Two required courses: 

. M ETO 400 The Atmosphere 

• M ETO 401 Global Environment 

Oneadditional elective from: 

• Any 400 la/el courses offered in the Department of M eteorol ogy on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent e! ecti ves that will be 
offered by Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, or members of theEarth System Sci ence I nterdisci pi i nary Center (ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geology and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 (Globd ClimateChaige: Past and Present) 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiaid Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446 Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 
. GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor in AtmoEpheric Sdenoes 

Thi s mi nor wi 1 1 provi de a general background i n meteorol ogy as offered by the I ower I evel courses, and a sol i d background i n Atmospheri c 
Physics (M ETO 431) and Atmospheric Dynamics (M ETO 432), as offered b two required courses. It is aimed at students that might consider 
graduate work i n M eteorol ogy, or prepare them for the very f avorabi e j ob market i n theWashi ngton area, where a background i n M eteorol ogy can 
be an important asset Studmts attempting this mi nor will need as strong background in Mathematics, Physics and Chmiistry at the I evel of 
MATH 240 or 461, PHYS 270 and PHYS 271; CHEM 103, which are prerequisites for the required courses. Student interested in taking this 
M i nor program shoul d contact the undergraduate advi sor i n the Department of meteorol ogy for advi sement. Thi s mi nor i s not open to students 
who maj or i n P hysi cal Sci ences wi th a concentrati on i n meteorol ogy, or who maj or i n P hysi cs wi thi n the M eteorol ogy P hysi cs area of 
concentration. 

This Minor will require 15 credits. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two el ecti ves from: 

• METO 123 Global Change 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 
. M ETO 400 The Atmosphere 

The f ol I owi ng two courses are requi red: 

• M ETO 431 M eteorol ogy for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers I 

• M ETO 432 Meteorology for Scientists and Engineers 1 1 

One elective from: 

• Other 400 1 a/el coursesofferedintheDepartmentof Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent electives that will be 
offered by Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, or members of theEarth System Sci ence I nterdisci pi i nary Center (ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geology and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 Global Climate Change Past aid Present 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiaid Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446 Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 
. GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor inAtmoEphericCliaTiistry 

ThisMinorwill provide the students with a general background in Meteorology as offered by the lower la/el required courses, and a background 
on i ssues i n A trrlospheri c C hemi stry. Thi s M i nor track i s i ntended for students who mi ght pursue careers where background i n Atmospheri c 
Chemistry is needed, such asAir Pollution, Atmospheric Chemistry, and envi ronmental issues. It is aimed at students that mi ght consider 
graduate work i n A tmospheri c C hemi stry, or prepare them for a vay f avorabi e j ob market i n the Washi ngton area, where a background i n 
|v| eteorol ogy can be an i mportant asset. Students attempti ng thi s mi nor wi 1 1 need a strong background i n mathemati cs, P hysi cs and C hemi stry at 
thela/elof MATH 240 or 461, PHYS 270 aid PHYS 271, CHEM 481 (preferred) or CHEM 103, which a-e prerequisites for the requi red 
courses. Students i nterested i n taki ng thi s M i nor program shoul d contact the U ndergraduate Advi sor i n the Department of M eteorol ogy. Thi s 
M inor is not open to students who major in Physical Sciences with a concentration in M eteorol ogy, or who major in Physics within the 
M eteorol ogy Physics area of concentration. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two el ecti ves from: 

.METO 123 Global Change 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any METO 400 level courseoffered below as elective 

The f ol I owi ng two courses are requi red: 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



• M ETO 431 M ebeorol ogy for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers I 

• METO 434 Air Pollution 

One elective from: 

• CHEM 474 (Environmental Chemistry) 

• GEOL 471 (Geochemicd Methods of Analysis) 

• Other 400 1 a/el coursesofferedintheDepatnentof Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent electives that will be 
offered by Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, or members of theEarth System Sci ence I nterdi sci pi i nary Center (ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geography and Geol ogy such as: 

GEOG 446 (Applied Climatology) 

GEOG 447 (Advanced Biogeography) 

GEOG 472 (Remote Sensing) 

GEOL 437 (Global Climate Change Past aid Present) 

GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiand Hydrology) 



FISCHELL DEPARTMEISTT OF BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) 

A.J amesClark School of Engneering 

2330 J eong H . K i m E ngi neeri ng B ui I di ng, 301- 405-7426 

www. bi oe umd. edu/ 

bioe-undergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: W. Bentiey (Prof, Char) 

Director: P. Kofinas (Prof, Graduate Program Director), A. Shirmohammadi (Prof, Undergraduate Program Director) 

Professors: A . J ohnson, Y . Tao 

Associate Professors: K. Herold, H. Montas, Y. Yu (Assoc Prof; joint with UMD School of Pharmacy) 

AssistantProfessors:J. Aranda-Espinoza, Y. Chen, J. Fisher, A. Hsieh,J. Seog (joint with EN MS), S. Shah 

Adjunct Professors: T. Barbari, B. Griffith, G. Payne 

Adjunct Associate Professors: J. Culver, H. Ghandehari, V. Vakharia, C.Yu 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. Shekhar, Z. Wu 

TheMajcr 

Bioengi neeri ng is a combination of biological engineering (engineering based upon the sci ence of biology) and biomedical engineering 
(engineering applied to human health care). It is the application of a systematic, quantitative, and integrative ways to think about and solve 
important problems of biological origin. The engineeringpriciples of this field are rooted in the physical, chemical, and mathematical sciences and 
used to study bi ol ogi cal systems at al 1 1 evel s of seal e. 1 1 advances fundamental concepts, creates knowl edge from tfie mol ecul ar to the organ and 
the systems I a/el s, and da/el ops i nnovati ve bi ol ogi cs, materi al s, mathemati cal mode! s, processes, i mpl ants, da/i ces, and i nf ormati cs approaches for 
the betterment of humanki nd. 

B i oengi neers speci al i ze i n those products made from, used wi th, or appi i ed to bi ol ogi cal organi sms. I n addi ti on to engi neeri ng sci ence and 
design, they study biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, genetics, physiology, bioinf ormati cs, biorheology, bioimaging, and biosystems. The 
symbiosis between engineering and biology gives bioengi neers unique capabilities in our modem world. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym: BIOE 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The Undergraduate Program in Bi oengi neeri ng is founded in biology, driven by human health issues, and is forward-thinking. Our objective is to 
marry the principles and applications embedded in engineering with the sciences of biology. Maryland bioengi neers gain a broad-based education 
i n whi ch engi neeri ng approaches are brought to bear on understandi ng and i mprovi ng I i vi ng systems and thei r envi ronment . 

We aspi re to be among the very best; provi di ng excepti onal educati onal and practi cal experi ences for our students. We wi 1 1 educate students to 
excel i n the f i el d of bi oengi neeri ng and carry out research and deve! opment of bi o-based systems that wi 1 1 i mprove heal th care throughout the 
worid. 

Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

• Demonstrate knowl edge of fundamental pri nci pi es i n engi neeri ng and bi ol ogy 

• Demonstrate commi tment to the bi ol ogi cal engi neeri ng/bi omedi cal engi neeri ng sector 

• E xperi ence a mul ti cul tural , col I egi ate worki ng envi ronment 

• Gain experience in design and group projects 

• Develop an ability to write and present their projects effectively 

Academic Pro^amsand Departmental Facilities 

The Fischell Department of Bi oengi neeri ng has established relationships with biomedical research centers, such as the University of Maryland 
Biotechnology Institute the National Institutesof Health, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USDA-ARS, USEPA, and other educational 
i nsti tuti ons such as the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy. Our undergraduate students will 
I eam from regul atory experts through col I aborati ve research wi th F D A sci enti sts and engi neers I ocated onl y 5 mi I es from campus. They wi 1 1 al so 
have the opportunity to work on bio-based research in sa/eral USDA-ARS Laboratories located only 2 miles north of campus. I n addition,They 
wi 1 1 have the opportuni ty to perform i nternshi ps at the U M B , work i n i ts I abs, and gai n exposure to d i ni cal practi ce Our growl ng i nterdi sci pi i nary 
f acul ty i s dedi cated to i ntegrati ng bi oengi neeri ng wi th these programs. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



B i oengi neeri ng I aboratori es i ncl ude 

• Ce! I B i ophysi cs L aboratory 

• Biomaberials Laboratory 

• Orthopaedic M echanobiology Laboratory 

• Human Performance Laboratory 

• F uncti onal M acromol ecul ar L aboratory 

• N euromuscul ar B i oengi neeri ng Laboratory 

• Bioimaging and JVIachine Vision Laboratory 

• JVIode! Andysis Laboratory 

• Bioenvironmental Laboratory 

AcknisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

All Bi oengi neeri ng majors must meet admission, progress, and retention standards of the A. James CI ark School of Engineering. 

Advising 

A 1 1 B i oengi neeri ng maj ors must parti ci pate i n an advi si ng sessi on pri or to regi steri ng each semester. Students are assi gned to a f acul ty advi sor no 
I ater than ttiei r second semester i n the maj or. A ny questi ons about the program may be di rected to the B i oengi neeri ng Department Of f i ce, 2330 
J eong H.Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-6769. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

A 1 1 students i n our maj or have the opportunity to parti ci pate i n research i n stateof-theart I abs on campus or at surround ng government or 
industrial locations, either through projects withinthe Department or through theEngineering Co-op and Career Services office. Special programs 
and services inci ude theASPI RE Program, in which students collaborate with faculty and staff on real -world engineering projects; theMaryland 
Center for Undergraduate Research, which assists students in finding on- and off-campus research opportunities; and the NSF-sponsored Research 
Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, in which students work with full -time faculty, visiting scientists, and others on relevant research. 
Our REU site is the only one of its kind in the nation dedicated to molecular and cellular engineering. 

IntErnships 

B i oengi neeri ng students may get the opportunity to intem in our faculty Laboratories as well assa/eral Federal agencies such as NIH inthearea. 
The Col I ege of E ngi neeri ng Coop Of f i ce provi des excel I ent i nf ormati on for i ntemshi p opportuni ti es. 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

B i oengi neeri ng students rnay join to the student chapter of BMES (Biomedical Engineering Society) ortothestudentchapterof ASABE 
(American Society of Agricultural andBiological Engineers) or both. They also mayjointo other collegeor campus based student organization if 
they so desire 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The University and theA. J ames Clark School of Engineering offer a range of financial support to talented undergraduate students enrolled at the 
School. Offeringsindude theA. James ClarkEndowedScholarshipfund and theBenjaminT. Rome Scholarship. Our program is competitive 
wi th awards made on the basi s of meri t; f i nanci al need, and other factors. F or more i nf ormati on on a vari ety of schol arshi ps, pi ease vi si t 
www.ursp.umd.edu. 

Inaddition, the Off ice of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, 
i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the award ng df schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t 
www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu. 

We also have several departmental annual awards and scholarships that student may apply and be selected based on their scholastic achievements, 
servi ce to the department and the prof essi on. These award are open to j uni ors and seni ors i n the program. I nf ormati on on these annual awards and 
schol arshi p may be obtai ned from the f acul ty advi sors i n the department 



Bidogcal Sciences Prog-am (BSC I ) 

Cdlegeof Chanical and Life Sdaxies 

1322 Symons Hdl, 301-405-6892 

www.chemlife.umcl.edu 

Dr.JodlePresson, Assistant Dean Academic Undergraduate Programs; Dr. MarciaShoffner, Assistant Director Biological Sciences Program 

TheMajor 

TheBiological SciencesmajorisjointiyofferedbytheDepartmentsof Biology, Cell Biology& Molecular Genetics, and Entomology. All 
B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors compi ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the B asi c P rogram. I n addi ti on, 
students must compI ete an A dvanced P rogram wi thi n one of the f d I owi ng speci al i zati on areas: 

• Ceil Biology & Genetics (CEBG) 

• Ecology & Evolution (ECEV) 

• General Biology (GENB) 

• Microbiology (M I CB) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 





Basic Prog-am in Bidogcal Sdmoes 


BSCI 105 


Principles of Biology 1 


BSCI 106 


Principles of Biology II 


BSCI 207 


Principles of Biology 1 1 1 


BSCI 222 


Pri nci pi es of Geneb cs 




Suppcrta ng oxirses 


MATH 220 


E 1 ementary Cal cul us 1 , OR 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


MATH 221 


Elementary Calculus 1 1 , OR 


MATH 141 


Calculus II 



• Physiology & Neurobiology (PHNB) 
. Individudized Studies (BIVS) 

A compi ets list of special izati on area requirements can be found on our website^ www.chemlife.umd.edu. Note that the Individualized Studies 
specialization (BIVS) requires permission of the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Academic Programs, and involves an approved proposal to do 
coursework in theCollegeand in other disciplines. Further questions about Biological Sciences can be directed to the Undergraduate Academic 
Program Office at 301-405-6892. 

Bidogcal SdaxiesattheUniversity of (Maryland at Shady Grove 

TheBiological Sciences Program attheUniversity of Maryland offersadegreeprogramatUniversitiesatShady Grove. TheBiological Sciences 
Program at Shady Grove offers theAdvanced Program courses normally taken in thejunior and senior years. More information is aval I able at; 

http://www. I i f e. umd.edu/bi ol ogi cal sci ences^Shadygrove. html 
Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

Crecfts 
CORE CORE Prog-am Requirements 30 

15 

4 
4 
3 
4 

30-32 

3 
4 
3 
4 

CHEM 131/132* Fundamentds of Generd Chemistry /Lab 4 

CHEM 231/232 Organic Chemistry I / Lab 4 

CHEM 241/242 Organic Chemistry 1 1 / L^ 4 

CHEM271/272*Gen Chem & Energetics/ Gen Bioandytical Lab 4 

PHYS121 FundamentdsofPhysicsLOR 4 

PHYS141 Principles of Physics 4 

PHYS122 FundamentdsofPhysicslLOR 4 

PHYS142 Principles of Physics 4 

*Newcheiristrycour5esreplaceCHEM lOSandCHEM 113 

Advanced Prog-am in Spedalization Area 27 

See websi te f or detai I s of speci al i zati on A rea 
requirements. 

ELECT Electives 15-18 

A grade of C or better is required for BSCI 105, 106 and 222 (the diversity course), all courses in theAdvanced Program, and all supporting 
courses (math, chemistry, and physics). Majors in Biological Sciences cannot use any Chemical and Life Sciences course to fulfil I CORE 
Advanced Studies requirements, including courses in CHEM or BCHM . 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each preregistration period for all Biological Sciences majors. All freshmen and new transfer students will be 
assigned an advisor from theCollegeof Chemical and Life Sciences Student Services advising staff. Students will be assigned to a departmental 
faculty advisor once a basic sequence of courses has been successfully completed. The departmental faculty advisors are coordinated by the 
f ol I owi ng persons for the i ndi cabed speci al i zati on areas. These coordi nati ng advi si ng off i ces can be contacted for maki ng appoi ntments wi th an 
advi sor or for any other i nf ormati on regard ng that speci al i zati on area. 

Straiey 1225 H.J. Patterson 301-405-2766 CEBG,GENB,MICB 

Compton 2227Biology-Psychology 301-405-6904 ECEV, PHNB 

Kent 3142 Plant Sciences 301-405-3911 GEN B 

Presson B22SymonsHall 301-405-6892 BIVS, Education Double major 



HcncrsProg'am 

Outstandi ng students are encouraged to apply to departmental Honors Programs. Through the Honors Programs students wi II become actively 
i nvol ved i n the ongoi ng sci enti f i c research at the uni versi ty . I nf omiati on dbout these honors programs may be obtai ned from the U ndergraduate 
Academic Prograns Office, 1322 Symons Hall, 301-405-6892. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Bidogy(BIOL) 

Cdlegeof Chanical and Life Sdax£5 

2227 Biology-Psychology Building, 301-405-6904 

www.biol.umd.edu 

bioundergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: R. Payne (Prof) 

Professors: G. Borgia, C.Carr, A. Cohen, M. Colombini, D.Gill, D. I nouye, W. J effery, T. Kocher, J. O'Connor, D. Poeppel, A. Popper, M. 

Red<a, S. Via, G. Wilkinson 

Associate Professors: I. Ades, M. Cummings,J . Dietz, M. Dudash, W. Fagan, C. Fenster, I. Forseth, W. Higgins, E. Quinlan, K. Shaw, S. 

Sukharev, S. Tishkoff 

Assistant Professors: R. Araneda, A. Bely, K. Carleton, C. Castillo-Davis, E. Haag, P. Kanold, H. Lee,J . Simon, D. Soares 

Instructors: P. Koines,] . Opoku-Edusei 

Lecturers: R. Compton (Senior Lect), R. I nfantino (Senior Lect), J. Jensen (Senior Lect), P. Lanford, B. Parent 

Professors Emeriti: G. Anastos, E. Clark, J. Corliss, A. Haley, R. Highton, S. Pierce 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences P rogram e! sewhere i n thi s chapter, or contact the Department of B i ol ogy U ndergraduate Of f i ce. 

Advising 

Advising in the Biological Sciences program is mandatory. Students are assigned an advisor based on their area of specialization. The Department 
of Biol ogy faculty coordinate and advise students who specialize in Physiology and Neurobiology (PHNB), and Ecology and Evolution (ECEV). 
Contact ttie Depatnent of B i ol ogy U ndergraduate Of f i ce, 405-6904, for i nf ormati on about advi si ng or to schedul e an appoi ntment For advi si ng 
in other Biological Sciences Specialization areas, see the Biol ogi cal Sciences Program listing in this catalog. 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The Department of Biology Honors Program offers highly motivated and academical ly qual if led students the opportunity to work closely with a 
f acul ty mentor on an ori gi nal , i ndependmt research proj ect. Students are requi red to parti ci pate i n the program for at I east three semesters and need 
not have been admitted University Honors program in order to participate Contact the undergraduate off ice for more information. 

Business^ Gena'd 

For information, seeLogistics, Businessand Public Policy elsewhereinthischapter. 

CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (CEBG) 

Cdlegeof Chanical and Life Sdaxies 

1109 Microbiology Building, 301-405-5435 

www.cbmg.umd.edu 

Chains. Wolniak (Prof) 

Director: D. Straney (Assoc. Prof) 

Professors: T. Cooke, S. Hutcheson, D. Mosser, A. Simon, D. Stein, H. Sze 

Associate Professors: S. Benson, C. Chang,J . DeStefano, C. Delwiche,J . Dinman, N. El-Sayed, Z. Liu, K. Mclver, S. Mount; W. Song, R. Stewart 

Assistant Professors: V. Briken, K. Frauwir&i, B. Fredericksen, L. Gao,J . Kwak, V. Lee 

I nstructors: A. Smith 

Lecturers: E. Moctezuma, B. Ouimby, P. Shields 

Affiliate Prof essors: M . Colombini (Biol), W.J effery (Bid), I . Mather (ANGR), S. Salzberg (CBCB) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Ades (Biol), D. Perez (AGNR), L. Pick(Ent) 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: I. Hamza(AGNR), M. Pop (CBCB) 

Adjunct Professors: P. Hobart(USAMRIID), A. McB ride (Adjunct Prof), B. Moss(NIH), D. Nuss(UMBI)), V. Vakharia(UMBI), O.White 

(TIGR), R.Wickner(NIH) 

Adj unctAssociate Prof essors: E. Baehrecke(UMass Med), J . Culver (UMBI), E. Freed (NCI), K. Green (NIH), L. Wu (UMBI) 

Professors Emeriti: G. Bean, R. Doetsch, E. Gantt(DistUnivProf), F. Hetrick, S.Joseph, G. Patterson, M. Pel czar, J . Ra/ed, B. Roberson, R. 

Weiner, R.Yuan 

TheMajcr 

The department participates in the teaching and advising of students in the Biological Sciences Program, specifically in the Specialization Areas of 
Cell Biology& Genetics (CEBG), Microbiology (MICB), and General Biology (GENB). Our courses are taught in four basic areas that represent 
faculty research interests and expertise including: 

• Ceil and Developmental Biology 

• Genetics and Genomics 

• M i crobi ol ogy, M i crobi al Pathogenesi s and I mmunol ogy 

• Plant Biology 

Requiranents for the Sped alizati on Areas 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences P rogram catal og entry for more i nf ormati on on the degree requi rements. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences P rogram catal og entry for more i nf ormati on on the degree requi rements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. The Department in coordination with the Student Affairs Off ice of the College of Chemical and Life Sciences administers 
the advising of students in the Biol ogi cal Sci ences specialization areas of Microbiology, Cell Biology and Genetics, and General Biology. 
Advising assignments can befound by contacting theCell Biology and Molecular Genetics Undergraduate Program Off ice, 1225H.J. Patterson 
Hall (301-405-2766) or see the site: www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergrad/advising.com. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

Students rnay participate in Department hosted research experiences in faculty laboratories or laboratories at off campus locations. Please contact 
the Cel I B i ol ogy and M ol ecul ar Geneti cs U ndergraduate Of f i ce ( 301 405-2766) for more i nf ormati on or see the si te: 
www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergrad/research.html 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The Departmental Honors Program involves a long term (three semester) independent research project undertaken with a faculty advisor. Please 
contact the Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics UndergraduateOfficefor more information or see the site: 
www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergrad/research.html 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

A 1 1 students i nterested i n mi crobi ol ogy are encouraged to j oi n the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Student C hapter of the A meri can Soci ety for 

M i crobi ol ogy. Si gma A I pha Omi cron i s the honors chapter of thi s group. The groups meet regul arly on campus. I nf ormati on i s aval I abl e through 

the Undergraduate Program Office 

Awards and Reoo^tion 

The P . A rne H ansen A ward i s awarded annual I y to a Departmental H onors student who has demonstrated outstandi ng achi evement through the 
research experience The Sigma Alpha Omi cron Award is giving to outstanding seniors who have excel led in the areas of M icrobiology, or in Cell 
Biology and Genetics. The A ppleman- Norton Award is given to the senior who has excelled in the area of Plant Biology. 

Central Eiropean, Rusaan and Eiraaan Studies (CERE) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2115 Fraicis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-4295 

www.ceres.umd.edu 

Director: M. David-Fox 

Professors: R. Brecht,J. Herf,J. Lampe S. Mansbach, P. Murrell,J. Robinson, M. Rozenblit V.Tismaneanu 

Associate Professors: K. Gor, D. Hitchcock, M. Isaacs (Visit Assoc Prof),J . Kaminski, M. Lekic, C. Martin, C. Schuler 

Assistant Professors: E.Adler (Visit Asst Prof), K. David-Fox, E. Papazian 

AcknisEicn tDthe JVlaj or 

Admission is open to all interested students but should be approved in a meeting with the Director. 
Reqii rements for the JVlaj or 

RequirementsfortheCERESmajorindudetheCollegeof Arts and Humanities's mandated completion of 45 upper-level credits. The College's 
foreign- language requirement will beautomaticallyfulfilledintheprocessof fulfill ing the CERES requirement of taking either Russian, German, 
or a Central/East European language (including Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian, Bulgarian, and Romanian) .The language 
requirement may also be fulfil led by a Eurasian language (i .e., a language from a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). Those interested in 
fulfilling the CERES language requirement through a Central/East European or Eurasian language should consult the director upon entering the 
program. 

Students who e! ect the R ussi an I anguage track must compi ete a mi ni mum of 24 credi t hours i n R ussi an I anguage and I i terature sel ected from 
among the fol I owi ng courses (or thei r equi val ents) : 

Crofts 

RUSSlOl Intensive Elementary Russian I 6 

RUSS102 Intensive Elementary Russian 1 1 6 

RUSS201 Intermediate Russia! I 5 

RUSS202 IntemiediateRussiaill 5 

RUSS301 Advanced Russian I 3 

RUSS302 Advanced Russian II 3 

RUSS303 Russian Conversation: Functional Skills 3 

RUSS321 Survey of Russian Literature I 3 

RUSS322 Survey of Russian Literature 1 1 3 

RUSS401 Advanced Russian Composition 3 

RUSS402 Pradicum in Written Russian 3 

RUSS403 Russian Conversation: Advanced Skills 3 

RUISS404 Practicum in Spoken Russian 3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Students interested in specializing primarily on Central/Eastern Europe may opt for the German language track, and must complete a minimum of 
24 credit hours in the Department of Germanic Studies from among the foil owing courses (or their equivalents): 

Crafts 

GERM 103 Intensive Elementary German 4 

GERM203 Intensive Intermediate German 4 

GERM301 Conversation and Composition I 3 

GERM 302 Conversation and Composition 1 1 3 

• Also accepted will be 16 credit hours of Russian or German and the equivalent of 8 credit hours of a Central/East European language 

• Fulfilling the language requirement through a Eurasian language will be decided on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the director. 

• I n addition to language courses, students must complete 24 hours of CERES approved courses at the 300-leve! or above. These 24 hours 
must betaken in at leastfour different departments (with thie School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures counting as a single 
department) , and may i ncl ude I anguagel i terature courses beyond thie requi red 24 hours. Of the 24 hours, at I east 9 hours must be i n courses 
with substaitial or specific focus on Central/East Europe (for example, ARTH 350 or 488C, GVPT359, 409, HIST 329, 340, 443 and other 
spedal courses offered in theCERESarea vnththeapprovd ofthedrector) and at I east 9 hours must be in those CERES courses with 
substantial or specific Russian^Eurasiai focus (for exmpe, GEOG 325, GVPT445, 451, 459A, 481, HIST 344, 424, 425, 442, SOCY474, 
THET499, and other special courses offered in theCERESarea with the approval ofthedrector). 

For a full listingof this year's CERES courses, seethewebsitewww.ceres.umd.edu, and click on "requirements." 

The various cooperating departments also offer special (i.e non- permanent) seminars and courses in the Russian, EastEuropean, andEurasian 
f i el ds. H I ST 237- R ussi an C i vi I i zati on, i s recommended as a general i ntroducti on to thie program but does not count toward thie f ul f i 1 1 ment of the 
program's requi rements. 

Advising 

Course sel ecti on and progress toward programmati c requi rements are to be di scussed i ndi vi dual I y through meeti ngs withtheCERESdi rector. 
Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

I nternshi ps and i n-country experi ence shoul d be di scussed i ndi vi dual I y wi th the D i rector. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (UNDERGRADUATE) 
Certificate Pro-am InFarmaticn and Reqiirements 
African American StudiesCertificate 

Cdlegeof Bdiavioral and Social Sdaxies 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www. bsos. umd. edu/aasp 

The African American Studies Certificate program offers the opportunity to develop a specialization in African American studies while pursuing a 
major in another field. Certificate students leam about the social, economic, political, and cultural history of African American peoplethrough a 
concentration of courses (21 credit hours). Courses taken toward thie certificate also may be used to satisfy CORE requirements and electives. 
U ndergraduates i n good standi ng may apply for the program by contacti ng thie academi c advi sor of the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department i n 
2169 LeFrak Hall. Students pursuing thie certificate must meet the University's general education (CORE) and department requirements. See also 
thie African American Studies department listing eariier in chapter 7. 

Asian American Stud es Prog'am 

Officeof Unda-g-aduabeStucf es 

1120 Cde Student Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with theopportunity to study critically the experiences of Asian Americans. 
Through an i nterdi sci pi i nary approach, students exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es, and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and 
connected to the broader themes of di versi ty, ethni ci ty, race, gender, and mi grati on i n thie A meri cas A A ST offers an undergraduate certi f i cate for 
students who wi sh to da/el op a speci al i zati on i n A si an A meri can studi es al ongsi de thei r degree pursui ts. 

F or more i nf ormati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n C hapter 6. 
Ccmputaticnal Science 

Cdlegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sdenoes 

3103 Mathematics Building, 301-405-0924 
www.amsc.umd.edu 

For program requirements see Certificate in Computational Sci ence i n thie section on Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation earlier in 
Chapter 7. 

East Asian Stucfes Certificate 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2101B Fraicis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-4309 

The Undergraduate Call ficate in East Asian Studies is a 24-credit course of instruction designed to provide specialized knowledge of the cultures, 
hi stori es, and contemporary concerns of the peopi es of Chi na J apan, and K orea. 1 1 wi 1 1 compi ement and enri ch a students rnaj or. The curri cul um 
focuses on I anguage i nstructi on, ci vi I i zati on courses, and e! ecti ves i n several departments and programs of the uni versi ty . 1 1 i s desi gned speci f i cal I y 
for students who wi sh to expand thei r knowl edge of E ast A si a and demonstrate to prospecti ve empi oyers, the publ i c, and graduate and prof essi onal 
schools a special competenceandsetof skills in East A si an affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, with a grade of C or better in each course, and recommendation by the Coordinator of the Certificate 
Program, a certificate will beawarded. A notationof the award of the certificate will be included on the students transcript The student must have 
a bache! or's degree awarded by M aryl and ( must be Col I ege Park campus) previ ous to or si mul taneousi y with an award of the certi f i cate. 

Certificate Rsqiarararts 

CORE Corses: Thestudentis required to take 

1. HIST 284 East Asiai Civilization I 

2. HIST 285 East Asiai Civilization II 

3. Six semester hours of introduction to one of the following East Asian languages (Chinese, J apanese, or Korean): 

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I 

JAPN 101 Elementary] apanese I 

KORA 101 Elementay Korean I 

KORA 102 Elementay Korean 1 1 

KORA 211 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean I 

KORA 212 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean 1 1 



Students wi th I anguage competence equi val ent to these I anguage courses are exempted from the I anguage requi rement; such students are requi red 
to compI ete an addi ti onal si x hours of el ecti ves i n E ast A si an courses to f ul f i 1 1 the 24-credi t requi rement for the certi f i cate. 

E I ecti ves: Students must compI ete at I east 12 hours of el ecti ves sel ected from four regul ar approved courses on E ast A si a i n such di sci pi i nes as: 
(1) anthropology, (2) art history, (3) ethnomusicology, (4) govemmentand politics, (5) history, (6) language, linguistics, and literature, (7) plant 
science and landscape architecture, and(8) women's studies. Nine of the 12 hours of electives must be upper division(300-400la/el courses). A 
maxi mum of three credi t hours of speci al topi cs courses on E ast A si a wi 1 1 be al I owed wi th the approval of the certi f i cate coordi nator. N o more 
than ni ne credi ts from any one department or from the students maj or may be appi i ed toward the certi f i cate I n addi ti on, no more than ni ne credi ts 
of the courses appI i ed toward the certi f i cate may be transferred from other i nsti tuti ons. Students are asked to work wi th the coordi nator i n ensuri ng 
that the e! ecti ves mai ntai n an i ntercol I egi ate and i nterdi sci pi i nary focus (at I east three di sci pi i nes are recommended) . I nterested students shoul d 
contact the Coordi nator of the Certificate Program, Dr. MarleneMayo, Department of History, Francis Scott Key Hal lmmavoOumd.edu (website 
at www.ceas.umd.edu ). 

IntErnaticnal Ag'iaJtireand Natural Resources 

Cdlegeof Apiculture and Natural Resources 

0108 Symons Hdl, 301-405-2078 
www. agnr. umd. edu 
sabrown@ umd. edu 

The Certificate in I ntemational Agriculture and Natural Resources is designed to enrich a students major with a global perspective. The required 
courses focus on: I anguage instruction; international aspects of the environment, agricultural production, development and sustainabi I ity, nutrition, 
and busi ness; an experi ence abroad; and a capstone course regardi ng the students travel abroad. A ny student i n good academi c standi ng may 
parti ci pate i n the certi f i cate program. 

Requi ranents for Caiificate 

The certificate requi res at least 21 credits that may include courses taken toward other degree and CORE requirements. Upon successful 
completion of the courses, withagradeof C orbetterineachcourseandarecommendationof theAssociateDeanof the Col I ege of Agriculture 
andNatural Resources, a certificate will beawarded. A notationof the award of the certificate will be included on the students transcript Inorder 
to receive the certificate, students must have completed all requirements for a bachelor's degree. 

Foreigi Language 

6-8 credits in a foreign language 

I nternational Courses 

At least 9 credits from the following list of courses, at least 3 of these courses must be in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for 
students not majoring in a program outside of the College of Agricultureand Natural Resources: 

PLSC 303 1 ntemational Crop Production 

ENST 440 Crops, Soils, and Civilization 

AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies 

AREC 433 Food and Agricultural Policy 

B M GT 392 1 ntroducti on to I ntemati onal B usi ness M anagement 

BMGT 390 Competing on Ouality in a Global Economy 

BSCI 365 1 ntemational Pesticide Problems and Solutions 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



GbOU 434 Agriculture and Rural Development 

NFSC 425 International Nutrition 

AREC 445 Agricultural Da/elopment; Population Growth, and the Environment 

ECON 440 International Economics 

GVPT 306 Global Ecopolitics 

GEOG 422 Population Geogr^hy 

Travel Study or Travd Abroad 

Three to four credits of travel study or study abroad. Prerequisite: to have completed the foreign language course work. Prerequisite or 
co-requisite: six credits from the I ntemational Courses List. In order to qualify for the certificate travel study and study abroad experiences 
require prior approval of Associate Dean of theCollegeofAgricultureandNatural Resources. For approval, travel ecperience must demonstrate 
significant learning opportunities in areas related to agriculture and natural resources and cultural immersion. 

Travel Study Sarinar 

IcreditTravel Study Seminar. Prerequisite completion of the travel study requirement 

Thi s course wi 1 1 requi re student presentati on of thei r travel scperi ence i ncl udi ng a paper, a poster presentati on, as wel I as an oral presentati on and 
discussion. 

Ladn American Stud es Certificate 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

0128B Hdzapfel Hdl, (301)405-6459 

www.lasc.urnd.edu 

lasc@umd.edu 

The multidisciplinary certificate programinLatinAmerican Studies isopen to University of Maryland, College Park undergraduates in any major 
who are interested in intemational studies and LatinAmericaTheundergraduateCertificateinLatinAmerican Studies will beawardedto 
students who have compi eted 2 1 credi ts wi th a grade of C or better i n the f ol I owi ng areas. 

Requi ranerrts for Caiificate 

A. Corecurriculumfor all oa-tificatestudaiits (12 crafts) 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 234 Issues in Latin America! Studies I 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 235 Issues in Latin America! Studies 1 1 

HIST 250 or HI ST 251 Latin America! History I or 1 1 

LASC/SPAN/PORT/ANTH 458 Senior capstone course in Latin American Studies 

B.Adcftional courses in Latin Ama'icanStucfes (9 crecfts) 

N i ne credits are additional courses that must be chosen from an approved I ist and from at least two different departments. At least six credits must 
be at the 300- or 400- 1 a/el . See L ati n A meri can Studi es advi sor f or detai I s. 

C. Foragi Language Caripdaxy 

All certificate students must demonstrate theircompetenceineither Spanish or Portuguese. Competency may be proven with a grade of C or better 
inanintermediate-leve! course (PORT 204, SPAN 203) or higher. Native speakers of Spanish or Portuguese or students with extensive ecperience 
i n these I anguages shoul d consul twiththeLatinA meri can Studi es advi sor. I nterested students shoul d contact D r. E yda M eredi z, 2225 J i menez 
Hall atemerediz@umd.edu or the LASC Center at 301-405-6459. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bissoiai andTransgmder St]ucfes(LGBT) 

2212 MarieMountHall, 301-405-5428 
www.lgbt5.umd.edu 

Theprogram in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual andTransgender Studies (LGBT) offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate certificate and a mi nor 
desi gned to exami ne the I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and representati ons of L G BT persons, those who are today descri bed as havi ng a mi nori ty 
sexual ori entati on or who are gender transgressi ve 

F or more i nf ormati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n C hapter 6. 

SdencQ Technology and Society Certificate 

1125 Cumberland Hdl, 301-405-0527 
www.schol ars.umd.edu/sts/certif i cate 

Di rector Betsy M endelsohn, bmendel @umd.edu 

The undergraduate U ni versi ty Certi f i cate program i n Sci ence, Technol ogy, and Soci ety (STS) enabi es students to I earn about the dynami c, 
interactive and creative relationships among science technology, and society. Moststudents can fulfill the21creditsof theprogram within the 
CORE and elective requi rements of their major. I n addition to coursework, the STS program requi res students to attend monthly, STS-related 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



events on campus. E ach student works d ose! y wi th a f acul ty mentor when wri ti ng the capstone term paper i n the seni or E N E S 440 course 

Courses re! a/ant to the STS program are drawn from many departments; thi s demonstrates the currency of sci ence and technol ogy studi es across 
di sci pi i nes i n sci ence technol ogy, the human! ti es and soci al sci ences. STS i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary f i el d that has been taught for more than 30 years 
at universities in the United States and Europe, notably in those with strong engineering and public policy programs. I n recent years, STS 
U ni versi ty Certi f i cate students have chosen to wri te thei r capstone term papers about ti me! y topi cs, i ncl udi ng ttie i nteracti ons among sci ence, 
technology and society related to nanotechnology, fuel cells, physics research funding, and environmental policy. 

Courses 

The STS program requires 9 credits of Basic Courses and 12 credits of Elective Courses; many of these can be fulfilled by CORE courses. 
Students must obtai n pri or approval of the di rector before counti ng courses toward thei r i ndi vi dual STS course of study. F or gui dance, see the 
websi te f or a I i st of approved courses, and note that students may ask the di rector to approve a course not I i sted on the websi te. 

Baac Coirses (9 onscf ^: 

• A sci ence or technol ogy course ( such as a M arquee Course i n Sci ence and Technol ogy) 

• A n i ntroductory hi story of sci ence or hi story of technol ogy course ( such as H I ST 175) 

• The STS capstone course (E NES 440) for seniors 

E/ectfveCoursES (12 crscf^: 

Inaddition, students choose from among a large number of courses approved by the director, many of which are CORE courses. Typically, these 
courses have an i nterdi sci pi i nary ori entati on tfet demonstrates i nter- rel ati onshi ps between sci ence and soci ety or technol ogy and soci ety. Two of 
theelectivesmustbeupper-la/d (300 or 400 1 eve!) courses; please note that these courses may also serve to satisfy theCORE Advanced Studies 
requirement 

J oining the Pro-am and Prog'am Requiranaits 

Students i nterested i n STS shoul d contact the di rector to obtai n advi ce and approval pri or to enrol I i ng i n courses that f ul f i 1 1 the program. Students 
record thei r progress wi th the STS program off i ce as they compi ete requi rements, parti ci pate i n a semi -annual advi si ng meeti ng, and wri te a bri ef 
eval uati on upon compI eti ng the program. Students must eam a mi ni mum grade of C i n each course they wi sh to credi t toward the STS U ni versi ty 
Certificate A students individual courseof study may not exceed these maximums: 9 credits of courses applied to the students major; 3credits 
of Special or Selected Topics courses; 9 credits of courses taken outside UMCP; and 6 credits of courses with the ARE C, ECON andGVPT 
prefixes. Onceall requi rements are met and the director affirms that the student has completed the program, the Registrar includes a notation of 
this University Certificate in STS on the students transcript 

Upper Divisicn Certificatein Secxndary Educadcn 

Cdlegeof Educaticn 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-6877 
www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

See Department of Curriculum and I nstruction earlier in Chapter 7. 
Wcmai' s Studies C ertifi cate 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2101 Woods Hall, 301-405-6877 
www.womensstudies.umd.edu 
womensstudi es@ umd. edu 

See Women's Studi es Department for f acul ty roster. 

The Women's Studi es Certi fi cate Program consi sts of an i ntegrated, i nterdi sci pi i nary curri cul um on women that i s desi gned to suppi ement a 
students maj or. A ny student i n good standi ng may enrol I i n the certi f i cate program by decl ari ng her/hi s i ntenti on to the Women's Studi es 
Undergraduate Advisor. For additional information contact the Women's Studies office, 301-405-6827. 

Requi ranents far Caiificate 

ToqualifyforacertificateinWomen's Studies, astudentwill be requi red to eam 21 credits in Women's Studies courses, nine of which must be at 
the 300/400 1 eve! . N o more than three credi t hours of speci al topi cs courses may be counted toward the certi f i cate N o more than ni ne credi ts 
which are applied toward a major may be included in the certificate program. No more than nine credit hours may betaken at institutions other 
than the University of Maryland. Each student must obtain a grade of C or better in each course that is to be counted toward the certificate. Of the 
2 1 credi ts, courses must be di stri buted as f ol I ows: 
1. Requiranaits far theCertificate 

FandaHon Courses (9 crecSthour^ 
WIVIST200 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society, OR 

WIVIST250 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art& Culture 

WIVIST400 Theories of Feminism 

WIVIST488 Senior Semina- 

Z DistributiveCourses 

>\n9a / : J^tsandLhocture (3 credthoLr^ 
WIVIST241 Women Writers of French Expression inTranslation (X -listed as FREN241) 

WM ST250 I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art, and Culture 

WIVIST255 I ntroduction to Literature by Women (X-listed as ENGL255) 

WIVIST275 Worid Literature by Women (X-listed as CM LT 275) 

WMST281 Women in Germai Literatureand Society (X-listed as GERM 281) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



WIVIST348 
WIVIST408 
WIVIST444 
WIVIST448 
WIVIST458 
WIVIST466 
WIVIST468 
WIVIST481 
WIVIST496 
FREN482 



Literay Works by Women (x-listsd as ENGL348) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women before 1800 (X-listed as ENGL 408) 

Feminist Criticd Theory (X-listed as ENGL 444) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women of Color* (X-listed as ENGL448) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women after 1800 (X-listed as ENGL458) 

FeministPerspectiveon Women in Art (X-listed asARTH466) 

Feminist Cultural Studies 

Femmes Fatal es and the Representation of Violence in Literature(X -listed as FREN481) 

African -American Women Filmmakersf* (X-listed asTHET 496) 

Gender and Ethnicity in Modem French Literature 



WIVIST210 

WIVIST211 

WIVIST212 

WIVIST320 

WIVIST453 

WIVIST454 

WIVIST455 

WIVIST456 

WIVIST457 

AASP498W 

AIVIST418J 

HIST309 



Area 1 1 : Hi^borical Per^xctivBS (3 erect thour^ 

Women in America to 1880(X-listed as HIST 210) 

Women in America Since 1880 (X-listed as HIST 211) 

Women in Westem Europe, 1750-present (X-listed as HIST212) 

Women in Classical Antiquity (X-listed as CLAS 320) 

Victorian Women in England, France, and the United States (X-listed as HI ST 493) 

Women in AfricS* (X-listed as HIST 494) 

Women in Medievd Culture aid Society (X-listed as HIST495) 

Women i n the M i ddl e E ast* 

Chaiging Perceptions of Gender in the US: 1880-1935 (X-listed as HIST 433) 

Black Women in United States History* 

Women and Family in American Life 

Proseminar in Historical Writing: Women's History 



WIVIST200 

WIVIST313 

WIVIST324 

WIVIST325 

WIVIST326 

WIVIST336 

WIVIST360 

WIVIST410 

WIVIST420 

WIVIST425 

WIVIST430 

WIVIST436 

WIVIST452 

WIVIST471 

WIVIST493 

WIVIST494 

AASP498F 

CCJ S498 

SOCY498W 



Anealll: Social and Natural Sciences (3 credthour^ 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society 

Women aid Science (X-listed as BSCI 3B) 

Communi cati on and Gender (x-l i sted as COM M 324) 

Sociology of Gender (X-listed as SOCY 325) 

Biology of Reproduction (X-listed as BSCI 342) 

Psychology of Women (X-listed as PSYC 366) 

Carl bbean Women* 

Women in the African Diasporef*" 

A si an- A meri can Womenr* 

Gender Roles and Social Institutions 

Gender Issues in Fanilies (X-listed as FMST 430) 

Legal Status of Women (X-listed as GVPT 436) 

Women aid the M edia (X-listed asj OUR 452) 

Women's Hedth (X-listed as HLTH 471) 

J ewi sh Women i n I ntemati onal Perspecti ve* 

Lesbian Communities and Difference* 

Special Topics in Black Culture Women and Wori<* 

Special Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice: Women and Crime 

Special Topics in Sociology: Women in the M ilitary 



*Fulfi lis Women's Studies Multi-Cultural Requirement 

3. Courses in Cultiral Diva'sity (6 crecf t hours) 

Students wi 1 1 se! ect one course f or a mi ni mum of 3 credi t hours. A pproved courses are noted wi th an asteri sk i n secti on 2, 
above. Courses i n thi s category may overl ap with other requi rements. 

4. Ranaining Courses 

The remaining courses may be chosen from any of the three distributive areas or from among any of the WM ST courses 
i ncl udi ng WM ST 298 or 498: Speci al Topi cs and WM ST 499: 1 ndependent Study. 

Advising 

Toobtain more information, contact the Undergraduate Advisor, 301-405-6827, or write to the Women's Studies 
Depatnent; 2101 Woods Hdl, UniversityofMarylaid, College Park, MD 20742 
Course Code: WM ST 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (CHEM,BCHM) 

Cdlegeof Chemical and Life Sdaxss 

0107H Chemistry Building, 301-405-1788 

www.chem.umd.edu 

Student I nfomiation: 2102 Chem BIdg; 301-405-1791 

Chair: |V|. Doyle (Professor) 

Professors: M.Alexander, N. Allewell, H. Ammon, D. Beckett N. Blough,J. Davis, P. DeShong, B. Eichhom, D. Falvey, C. Fenselau,J. Fourkas, 

S. Greer, G. Lorimer, A. Mignerey,J . Ondov, J . Reutt-Robey, S. Rokita, L. Sita, D. Thirumalai, J . Tossell, W. Walters,] . Weeks, M . Zachariah 

Associate Professors: D. Fushman, L. Isaacs, C.Jarzynski, D.Jul in, J. Kahn, C. Lee, A. Mullin, V. Munoz, R.Walker 

Assistant Professors: T.Cropp, B. Gerratana, D. Kosov, N. LaRondeLeBlanc, S. Lee^ H. Sintim, V.Tugarinov, A. Vedernikov 

Instructors: S. Ebrahimian 

Lecturers: M. Brooks, B. Dixon, L. Friedman,]. Klassen, M. McDermott-Jones, M. MontagueSmith, D. Steffek 

Affiliate Professors: M. Anisimov,J. Dinman, S. Sukhara/, E.Williams 

Adjunct Professors: F. Khachik, E. Mazzola 

Professors Emeriti: J. Bellama, A. Boyd, H. DeVoe^ D. Freeman, S. Grim, J. Hansen, K. Henery-Logan, C. Holmlund,J. Huheey, R.Jaquith, B. 

Jarvis, F. Kasler, R. Khanna,G. Miller,]. Moore, R. Munn,T.O'Haver, J. Stewart 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

Nobs The lower-le/el courses offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry changed starting in the Fall 2005 semester. The 
I ower- 1 eve! requi rements for chemi stry and bi ochemi stry maj ors are rd^l ected i n the requi rements I i sted bel ow. F or detai I s, contact the 
U ndergraduate Of f i ce or vi si t the undergraduate secti on of the Departments websi te 

C hiemistry 1^ aj crs 

All requi red chemi stry and biochemistry courses must be passed with a mini mum grade of C. Requi red supporting courses, including BSCI 105, 
must be passed with a 2.0 grade point average. 



Required Corses 

CHEM 14€i/147Principles of Generd Chemistry / Lab 
CHEM 237 Principles of Orgaiic Chemistry I 
CHEM 247 Principles of Orgaiic Chemistry 1 1 

General Chemistry and Energetics(Majors) / 

Lab 

Professional I ssues i n Chemistry and 

Biochemistry 
CHEM425 Instruments Methods of Analysis 
CHEM481/483Physical Chemistry I /L^ 
ENGLlOl Introduction to Writing 
UNIVIOO The Student in the University 



CHEM 395 



Crecfts 

4 
4 
4 



4 
5 
3 
1 



Support] ng C curses 

BSCI 105 Principles of Biology I 

PHYS14]/142 Principles of Physics 
MATH 140 Calculus I 
MATH 141 Calculus II 



4 
8 
4 
4 



NOTE: All ir^'ors and potential majors are encouraged to take 
MATH241-Calculus III (4) prior tD beginning Physical Cherhstry, 

DqDalmenital Requi remaits 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 24 

mustindude: 
CHEM401 I norgaiic Chemistry 3 

CHEM482/484Physical Chemistry 1 1 / Lab 5 

ELECT UL ^proved upper level CHEM/BCHM courses 6 

I n order to meet requi rements for a degree approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS), students must complete a specific set of courses i n 
add ti on to thi s curri cul um. I nf ormati on about ACS certi f i cati on can be obtai ned i n the undergraduate of f i ce. 

Bicdienistry (Majors 

All required chemistry, biochemistry, and upper- level biological sci ences courses must be passed with a mini mum grade of C. Requi red supporting 
courses, including BSCI 105, must be passed with a 2.0 grade point average. 



Crafts 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Required Corses 

CHEM 14€i/147Principles of Genarei Chemistry / Lab 4 

CHEIVI237 Principles of Orgaiic Chemistry I 4 

CHEIVI247 Principles of Orgaiic Chemistry II 4 

„|,piy._-,j-,_-,-,General Chemistry and Energetics- Majors/ ^ 

Lab 

rHFM^qs Professional Issues in Chemistry and , 

Biochemistry 

CHEIVI425 Instruments Methods of Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483Physical Chemistry I / L^ 5 

ENGLlOl Introduction to Writing 3 

UNIVIOO The Student in the University 1 

Support] ng C curses 

BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 4 

PHYS14]/142 Principles of Physics 8 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

MATH 141 Calculus II 4 

NOTE: All nrajors and potBntial majors are encouraged to (ate 
MATH241-Calculus III (4) prior to beginning Physcal Cherhstry, 





Lower level courses 


16 






Supporti ng courses 
Upper level courses 
must include: 


20 
25 




BCHM461 
BCHM462 
BCHM464 
BCHM465 
BCHM485 


Biochemistry 1 

Biochemistry II 

B i ochemi stry L abot dl ory 

Biochemistry III 

Physical Biochemistry 

approved biological science courses 




3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 



* Speci f i c i nf omiati on about course requi rements can be obtai ned i n the undergraduate off i ce 

* A student who enrolls in the chemistry or biochemistry program at any time foil owing the first semester of study typically will enter the 
non-majorsintroductorysequence(CHEM Bl/132, 231/232, 241/242 and 271/272; CHEM 132, 232, 242 aid 272 a-eco- requi site laboratory 
courses) which fulfi lis ttie lower-level departmental requirements. Transfer students who wish to pursue chemistry or biochemistry majors will 
have thei r pra/i ous chemi stry course work careful I y a/al uated for pi acement i n the appropri ate courses. Starti ng i n 2007, transfer students wi th 
four or more semesters of general and organi c chemi stry credi t must take, at a mi ni mum, theCHEM 2721 aboratory course to compi ete the 

i ntroductory sequence. 

Advising 

There i s mandatory acM si ng f or al I C hemi cal and L i f e Sci ence maj ors each semester. A dvi si ng appoi ntments can be made by contacti ng the 
undergraduate off icei 2 102 Chemi stry Bui I ding, 301-405-1791 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

Students with a GPA of 3.0 or better who have completed two semesters of CHEM 399 (I ntroduction to Chemical Research) have an opportunity 
to sign up for CHEM 398 (Honors Research) in their senior year and be considered for departmental honors. After successful completion of a 
seni or honors thesi s and semi nar, graduati on wi th honors or wi th hi gh honors i n chemi stry or bi ochemi stry can be attai ned 

Student Societies and ProFesacnai Organizations 

A I pha C hi Si gma C hemi stry F raterni ty i s a prof essi onal f ratemi ty whi ch recrui ts men and women students from chemi stry, bi ochemi stry, and 
related science majors during each fall and spring semester. The fraternity holds weekly meetings and provides tutoring for students in lower-leve! 
chemi stry courses. The office is in Room 2106A Chemi stry Bui I ding. Dr. Lyielsaacs (3341 Chemistry Building, 301-405-1884)) is the faculty 
advisor. 

The student affiliate program of theAmerican Chemical Soci^(SA-ACS) is designed to introduce students in chemi stry, biochemistry and 
related fields to a variety of professional activities. Student affiliates will gain ski I Is and make contacts aimed at launching a successful careerin 
science Activities include networking and meeting with professionals, attending national meetings, and participating in public outreach programs. 
Affiliates also receive subscriptions to Chemical & Engineering News, the undergraduate career magazine, inChenistry, as well as gaining 
on-l ine access to announcements regarding job and intern opportunities. The student affiliate office is located in Room 2112A of the Chemi stry 
Building. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Two schol arshi ps are aval I abl e for maj ors: the I si dore and A nni e A dl er Schol arshi p of $500 to an outstandi ng rnaj or wi th f i nanci al need and the 
L ei dy F oundati on Schol arshi ps of $600 to two outstandi ng j uni or maj ors. N o appi i cati on i s necessary, as al I maj ors are automati cal I y revi ewed by 
the Awards Committee. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING (ENCH) 

A.J amesClark School of Engneering 

21B Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 301-405-1935 

www.chbeumd.edu 

Chai r: F . J oseph Schork 

Professors: M . Anisimov, R. Calabrese K. Choi, S. Greer, F. Schori< (Prof & Char), W. Weigaid 

Associate Professors: R. Adomaitis, S. Ehrman, S. Raghavan, N. Wang, E. Zafiriou 

Assistant Professors: P. Dimitrakopoulos,J. Klauda(AsstProf), G. Sri ram (Asst: Prof), C. Wang(Asst:Prof) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: M . Al-Sheikhly (Affil Assoc Prof, Prof) 

Adjunct Professors: M. Klapa,J. Quackenbush, M. Ranade (Adjunct Prof), A.Yang 

Professors Emeriti: J. Gentry (Prof Emeritus), T. McAvoy, T. Regan, J. Sengers, T. Smith (Prof Emeritus) 

TheMajcr 

Students in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Maryland learn to use a combination of mathematical, 
physi cal , chemi cal , and bi ol ogi cal sci ence concepts wi thi n a ri gorous engi neeri ng desi gn framework, graduati ng wi th a uni que set of ski 1 1 s hi ghl y 
val ued by a wi de range of empi oyers i n i ndustry, academi a, and the govemment The wi de breadth of thi s prof essi on and the Departments uni que 
strengths i n nanotechnol ogy and bi otechnol ogy prepare our students for outstandi ng careers. 

B ecause of the wi de range of ul ti mate appi i cati ons, the chemi cal engi neer f i nds i nteresti ng and di verse career opportuni ti es i n such vari ed f i el ds as 
chemical (inorganic and organic), food processing and manufacturing, metallurgical, polymer, energy conversion, environmental engineering, 
petrol eum ( ref i ni ng, producti on, or petrochemi cal ) , and pharmaceuti cal i ndustri es. A ddi ti onal opportuni ti es are presented by the research and 
devel opment acti vi ti es of many publ i c and pri vate research i nsti tutes and al I government agenci es. Our graduates have taken j obs wi th compani es 
likeDuPont; ExxonMobil, Proctor & Gamble, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Defense. 

On top of all theoptions and opportunities, chemical and biomolecular engineers have traditionally ranked at or near the top of starting salaries 
among al I of the engi neeri ng prof essi ons I 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym: ENCH 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

• P rovi de students wi th a sol i d f oundati on i n chemi cal engi neeri ng sci ence fundamental s as we! I as a broad background i n sci ence and 
mathemati cs to equi p them to enter prof essi onal and chemi cal engi neeri ng practi ce and to enter graduate study at I eadi ng uni versi ti es. 

• P repare students to excel i n tradi ti onal chemi cal engi neeri ng careers and di verse careers i n areas such as bi otechnol ogy, nanotechnol ogy, 
medi ci ne, I aw or busi ness. 

• P roduce graduates who are equi pped wi th quanti tati ve probi em sol vi ng, teamwork, communi cati on ski 1 1 s, and a strong ethi cal f oundati on 
that wi 1 1 serve them throughout tiiei r careers. 

Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

Students are expected to fully engage with the curriculum and the opportunities presented for learning and research. Having 
completed the degree program, students should have acquired the following knowledge and skills: 

• A n abi I i ty to appI y knowl edge of chemi cal engi neeri ng fundamental s to i denti f y and sol ve chemi cal engi neeri ng probI ems. 

• A n abi I i ty to appI y mathemati cs rel evant to engi neeri ng and the physi cal and chemi cal sci ences to i denti f y and sol ve techni cal probI ems. 

• A broad knowl edge necessary to understand the i mpact of engi neeri ng sol uti ons i n a gl obal and soci etal context 

• A n abi I i ty to perform step-by-step desi gn of engi neered systems and chemi cal processes. 

• An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 

• An awareness of safety and envi ronmental i ssues as an i ntegral part of the chemi cal engi neeri ng prof essi on. 

• Skills necessary for employment in a variety of positions in industry or govemment or for continued study in graduate or professional 
schools. 

• An understand ng of current technol ogi cal i ssues rel ated to chemi cal engi neeri ng. 

AchnisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

All Chemical Engineering majors must meet admission, progress, and retention standards of the CI ark School of Engineering. 

Students who wish to study at the CI ark School apply for admission to the University of M aryland; there is no separate application for 
engineering. When filling out the university application, you may choose chemi cal and biomolecular engineering as your intended major. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

The curri cul um i s composed of: 

• The required CORE (general education) requirements of Col lege Park. 

• The requi red E ngi neeri ng core of 37 credits of E N CH courses whi ch i ncl ude 

ENCH215 Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 

ENCH250 Computer Methods in Chemical Engineering 3 

ENCH 300 Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

E N CH 333 Chemi cal E ngi neeri ng Semi nar 1 

ENCH400 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 

ENCH422 Transport Processes I 3 

ENCH424 Transport Processes II I 3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



ENCH426 Transport Processes II I 

E N C H 437 C hem! cal E ngi neeri ng L aboratory 

ENCH440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics 

ENCH442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis 

ENCH444 Process Engineering Economics & Design I 

ENCH446 Process Engineering Economics & Design 1 1 



• M athematics - four semesters 

• Physics - three semester 

• Chemistry ( I ecture'l aboratory): one freshmen Chemistry, two Organic Chemistry, two Physical Chemistry 



Minimum De^eeC reef ts 128 credits and fulfillment of all Departmental, College, and University requirements with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 

Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate courses for their particular course of study. 

Technical ElectivsGiiddines 

Twelvecreditsof ENCH technical dectives are required. It is recommended that they be taken during the senior year. 
The senior ENCH technical dectives are400-level chemical engineering courses, including ENCH4&X, and a limited number of approved 
400- 1 eve! techni cal courses from outsi de chemi cal engi neeri ng. Students shoul d se! ect e! ecti ves wi th the he! p of an academi c advi son N omial I y at 
I east three of the four technical electives should be EN CH4xx; the fourth elective may be chosen from ENCH or from an approved list of 
non-ENCH technical courses. Business or non- techni cal courses are normally not approved. 

One of the electives must have significant mattiematical content and one of the electives must have significant biological content Selection of the 
el ecti ves wi th si gni f i cant mattiemati cal or bi ol ogi cal content i s subj ect to the above constrai nt that at I east three of the four el ecti ves are normal I y 
ENCH courses. 

Upon tiie approval of the academic advisor and written permission of the Department a limited number of substitutions may be permitted. 
Substitutes, including ENCH468 Research (1-3 credits), must fit into an overall plan of study emphasis and ensure that the pi an fulfills the 
accredi tati on desi gn requi rements. Students may el ect to speci al i ze i n a speci f i c area such as B i ol ogi cal E ngi neeri ng or N anotechnol ogy and 
M acromol ecul ar Sci ence; or they may sampi e a vari ety of el ecti ve courses. U pon graduati on, those who speci al i ze i n a parti cul ar techni cal area 
wi 1 1 recei ve a I etber i n recogni ti on of the! r accompi i shment from the C hai r and the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es of the C hemi cal E ngi neeri ng 
Department A list of technical el ecti ves are posted at www.chbeumd.edu/undergrad. 

Other ReqiiremaitsfortheMajcr 

SanipleUnder^aduatePro^an\ Charical and Biomdecular Engnes'ing 



Freshman Year 








Coirse 


Tide 




Fall Spring 
CredtsCredts 


ENES 100 


1 nti-oducti on to E ngi neeri ng Desi gn 




3 


- 


ENES 102 


Statics 




- 


3 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 




4 


- 


MATH 141 


Cd cul us II 




- 


4 


CHEM 135 


Chemistry for Engineers, Lecture 




3 


- 


CHEM 136 


Chemistry for Engineers, Lab 




1 


- 


ENGL 101 


1 nti-oducti on to Writi ng 




3 


- 


PHYS 161 


General Physics 1 




- 


3 


CORE Program Requi rements 




- 


6 


Total 






14 


16 


SophomoreYear 


Fdl Spring 
CretJts Credts 



MATH 
241 
MATH 246 
PHYS 260 
PHYS 261 
PHYS 270 
PHYS 271 
CHEM 23 
CHEM 241 
ENCH 215 

ENCH 250 



Calculus I II 

Differential Equations 
General Physics 1 1 
General Physics 1 1 lab 
General Physics I II 
General Physics I II lab 
Organic Chemistry I 
Organi c Chemi stry 1 1 
Chemical Engineering Analysis 
Computer M ethods i n Chemi cal 
Engineering 



4 
3 



3 
1 

4 
3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



FNTH T)n Chemical Process Thermodynamics 

(Thermo I ) 
CORE Program Requirements 
Tot^ 



3 
18 



17 



J unior Year 



ENJVIA IntroductiontolviatHialsandTheir 
300 Applications (formerly ENES 230) 

CHEM 482 Physicd Chemistry II 
CHEM 483 Physicd Chemistry Laboratory I 
PMrw /inn Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

ENCH 333 Semina- 

ENCH 422 Transport Processes I 

ENCH 424 Transport Processes 1 1 

ENCH 426 Transport Processes II I 

ENCH 440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics 

ENCH 442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

CORE Program Requirements 

Totd 

Senior Year 



Fall Spring 
C reef tsC reef ts 



Chemical Engineering Lab 

Process E ngi neeri ng Economi cs & Desi gn I 

Process E ngi neeri ng Economi cs & Desi gn 1 1 



2 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


3 


17 


16 


Fall Spring 
CrecftsCrecfts 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


6 


6 


3 


6 


15 


15 



ENCH 

437 

ENCH 

444 

ENCH 

446 

ENCH Technical Electives 

CORE Program Requirements 

Totd 

Advising 

A 1 1 students choosi ng C hemi cal E ngi neeri ng as thei r pri mary f i el d must see an undergraduate advi sor each semester. A ppoi ntinents for advi si ng 
can be made at 2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Bui I ding, 301-405-1935. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

A unique aspect of the Departments undergraduate program is its high la/el of student participation in cutdng-edge research. Approximately half 
of our students graduate wi th si gni f i cant I ab experi ence and most f i nd i t to be one of the hi gh poi nts of thei r undergraduate educati on. 

Co-cp Prog'ams 

TheChemical Engineering program works within the CI ark School of Engineering Cooperative Engineering Education Program. Forinformation 
on this program consult the CI ark School of Engineering entry of this catalog or call 301-405-3863. 

HcncrsProg'am 

TheA. James Clark School of E ngi neeri ng hosts a chapter of the Omega Chi Epsi I on National Honor Society for chemical engineering, as well as 
a chapter of the engi neeri ng honor soci ety Tau B eta Pi . 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organization, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Omega Chi Episilonis 
the honorary Chemical Engineering Society 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

F i nanci al ai d based upon need i s aval I abl e through the Of f i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. A number of schol arshi ps are aval I abl e through the A . 
J ames Clark School of Engineering. The department offers opportunities for research and other part-time employment 

Avuardsand Reoo^tion 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding serviceto the Department College and University. These awards include the 
DavidArthurBermanMemorial Award, the Russell B arch Memorial Award, andsa/eral American Institute of Chemical Engineers (Al CHE) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



awards. A I C hE awards are gi ven to the j uni or wi th the hi ghest cumul ati ve G P A as wel I as to the outstandi ng j uni or and outstandi ng seni or i n 
Chemical Engineering. 



CMnese(CHIN) 

For information consult the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures elsewhere in chapter 7. 
Civil and Envircnmaitai Engnea'ing(ENCE) 

A.J amesClark School of Engneering 

1173 Engineering Classroom Building, 301-405-7768 

www.cee.umd.edu 

Chair: A. Haghani 

Professors: M . Aggour, A. Amde, B. Ayyub, G. Baecher, G. Chang, A. Davis, D. Goodings, O. Hao, R. McCuen, P. Schonfdd, M . Skibniewski, 

A. Torrents 

Associate Professors: M. Austin, A. Aydiiek, K. Bmbaker, P. Chang, S. Gabriel, D. Goulias, D. Lovell, E. Miller-Hooks, G. Moglen, C. Schwartz, 

E . Seagren, Y . Zhang 

Assistant Professors: C. Cirillo 

Affiliate Professors: J . Gaisler, B. Golden, E. Kalnay, M . Ruth 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: K. Clifton 

Professors Emeriti: P. Albrecht; F. Birkner, J . Colville, B. Donaldson, R. Ragan, D. Schdling, Y. Stemberg, D. Vannoy, M . Witczak 

TheMajcr 

Civil/Environmental engineering is a peopleserving profession, concerned with the planning, design, construction and operation of large complex 
systems such as bui I di ngs and bri dges, water purl f i cati on and di stri buti on systems, hi ghways, rapi d transi t and rai I systems, ports and harbors, 
ai rports, tunnel s and underground constructi on, dams, power generati ng systems and structural components of ai rcraft and shi ps. The prof essi on 
also includes urban and city planning, prevention and treatment of water and land pollution, and disposal of hazardous wastes and chemicals. The 
desi gn and constructi on of these systems are onl y part of the many chal I enges and opportuni ti es f or ci vi I and envi ronmental engi neers today. 
Recent advances in computers, communications and data management provide new resources that are widely used by professional civil and 
envi ronmental engi neers i n provi di ng safe, economi cal and fundi onal f aci I i ti es to serve our soci ety . 

Courses of fered by thi s department may be found under the acronym E N CE . 
Prog'am Obj ecti ves 

The mission of the Department is threefold: 

1. P rovi de a hi gh qual i ty, chal I engi ng educati on that encompasses breadth and depth; and prepare graduates to be prof i ci ent i n both 
analysis and synthesis facets of civi I engi neeri ng design; 

2. M ai ntai n a strong research program that i s recogni zed for excel I ence i n maj or areas of ci vi I and envi ronmental engi neeri ng; 

3. P rovi de servi ce to the U ni versi ty, the ci vi I engi neeri ng prof essi on, and the communi ty at I arge 

The Department provi des an educati onal program of basi c and speci al i zed engi neeri ng knowl edge necessary for its graduates to be prof i ci ent i n 
recognized specialties of civil engineering. This preparation provides graduates with the tools needed for successful practice in the period 
following graduation. I n addition to general and technical education, the educati onal program stresses professional and ethical responsibilities, an 
awareness of soci etal i ssues, and the need for I i f el ong I eami ng. 

The Department contri butes to the advancement of knowl edge through research on i mportant engi neeri ng probi ems. The research resul ts are 
communicated through recognized channels of knowl edge dissemination. 

The Department serves the needs of the community by emphasi zi ng gl obal and soci etal i ssues. The Department addresses these i ssues through 
U ni versi ty and prof essi onal channel s and contri butes to thei r sol uti ons. 

The Department, bui I di ng upon the above mi ssi on, estabi i shed three program educati onal obj ecti ves: 

1. P repare our graduates for competent prof essi onal practi ce wi thi n ci vi I engi neeri ng rel ated i ndustri es of M aryl and and the 
mi d-Ati antic region. 

2. Create a cadre of graduates with the breadth of interests and skills to take on challenging new areas of engineering practice. 
3. 1 nsti 1 1 i n our graduates a recogni ti on of the i mportance of conti nui ng prof essi onal devel opment. 

Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

The Department has established twenty program outcomes, which include ABET's (a) through (k) criteria, plus four additional American Society 
of Civil Engineers (ASCE) outcomes. The outcomes are listed below, together with Department-specific interpretations, following ASCE. 

1. A n abi I i ty to appi y knowl edge of mathemati cs. A techni cal core of knowl edge and breadth of coverage i n mathemati cs, sci ence and 
civil engineering, i ncluding the fundamentals of sa/eral recognized major CE areas: mathematics through differential equations, 
probability and statistics. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



2. An ability to apply knowledge of basic science. Masteryof courseworkin: calculus-based physics, biology*, chemistry, ecology*, 
and geol ogy/geomorphol ogy. 

3. An ability to apply knowledge of engineering principles. Mastery of coursework in: engineering economics, mechanics, material 
properties, systems, and geo-spatial representation. 

4. A n abi I i ty to use computers to sol ve engi neeri ng probi ems. M asbery of coursework i n i nf ormati on tschnol ogy. 

5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. Theability to assess situations in order to identify engineering 
probI ems, f ormul abe al ternati ves, and recommend f easi bl e sol uti ons. 

6. A n abi I i ty to desi gn and conduct experi ments. I n at I east one of the maj or recogni zed C E areas, shoul d be abl e to desi gn and 
conduct f i e! d and I aboratory studi es, gather data, create numerical and otiier model s, and then analyze and i nterpret the results (eg., 
traffic, geotechnical, and water quality investigations). 



7. An ability to analyzeandinterpret data. (See*). 



8. A n abi I i ty to desi gn a component, system or process to meet desi red needs. C ri ti cal desi gn methodol ogy and process el ements 
include problem definition, scope anal^is, risk assessment, creativity, synthesizing alternatives, iteration, codes, safety, security and 
constructabi I i ty, sustai nabi I i ty, and mul ti pi e obj ecti ves and vari ous perspecti ves. Ottier i mportant desi gn or desi gn procurement 

e! ements are bi ddi ng versus qual i f i cati ons- based sel ecti on; esti mati ng engi neeri ng costs; i nteracti on between pi anni ng, desi gn and 
constructi on; owner-engi neer re! ati onshi ps; and I i f ecycl e assessment U nderstandi ng I argescal e systems i s i mportant; i ncl udi ng the 
need to i ntegrate i nf ormati on, organi zati ons, peopi e, processes, and technol ogy. Desi gn experi ences shoul d be i ntegrated throughout 
the prof essi onal component of the curri cul um. 

9. A n abi I i ty to use the techni ques, ski 1 1 s, and tool s of modem engi neeri ng. Thi s i ncl udes the rol e and use of appropri ate i nf omiati on 
technology, contemporary analysis and design methods, and applicabledsign codes and standards as practical problem-solving tools 
to compi ement knowl edge of fundamental concepts. A I so i ncl uded i s the abi I i ty to se! ect the appropri ate tool s for sol vi ng di f f erent 
types and levels of problems. 

10. A n abi I i ty to wri te eff ecti vel y . E ff ecti ve communi cati on i ncl udes I i steni ng, observi ng, readi ng, speaki ng, and wri ti ng and requi res 
understand ng of the fundamental s of i nteracti ng eff ecti vel y wi th techni cal and non- techni cal or I ay i ndi vi dual s and audi ences i n a 
vari ety of setti ngs. Our graduates need to be versati I e wi th mathemati cs, graphi cs, the wori dwi de web and other communi cati on tool s. 

11. An ability to speak effectively. See #L0. 

12. An ability to fundi on effectively as part: of a team. Beableto: lead a design or other team as well as participate as a member of a 
team; demonstrate an understanding of team formation and a/olution, personality profiles, team dynamics, collaboration among 

di verse di sci pi i nes, probI em sol vi ng, and ti me management; and be abl e to foster and i ntegrate di versi ty of perspecti ves, knowl edge 
and experience. 

13. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Demonstrate an understanding of and a commitment to practice 
according to the seven Fundamental Canons of Ethics and the associated Guidelines to Practice Under the Fundamental Canons of 
Ethics. 

14. A knowl edge of contemporary i ssues i n engi neeri ng. Shoul d appreci ate the rel ati onshi p of engi neeri ng to cri ti cal contemporary 

i ssues such as mul ti cul tural gl obal i zati on of engi neeri ng practi ce; rai si ng the qual i ty of I i f e around the gl obe; the growl ng di versi ty of 
soci ety; and the techni cal , envi ronmental , soci etal , pol i ti cal , I egal , aestheti c, economi c, and f i nanci al i mpl i cati ons of engi neeri ng 
projects. 

15. A n understandi ng of the i mpact of engi neeri ng sol uti ons i n a gl obal and soci etal context N eed to appreci ate, from hi stori cal and 
contemporary perspecti ves, cul ture human and organi zati onal behavi or, aestheti cs and ecol ogy and thei r i mpacts on soci ety . I ncl udes 
history and heritage of the CE profession. 

16. A n awareness of the need to conti nual I y upgrade ones techni cal knowl edge base and ski 1 1 s. L i f el ong I earni ng mechani sms 

aval I able for personal and professional development include additional formal education, continuing education, professional practice 
experi ence, acti ve i nvol vement i n prof essi onal soci eti es, communi ty servi ce, coachi ng, mentori ng, and other I eami ng and growth 
activities. Personal and professional da/el opment can include da/el oping understanding of and competencein goal setting, personal 
time management communication, delegation, personality types, networking, leadership, the socio- pol ideal process, and defecting 
change. Professional development can, in addition to the preceding, include career management increasing discipline knowl edge, 
understandi ng busi ness fundamental s, contri buti ng to the prof essi on, consi deri ng sel f -empi oyment achi a/i ng I i censure and speci al ty 
certification, and additional graduate studies. 

17. An ability to apply knowl edge in a speci all zed area related to civil engineering. For a professional civil engineer, specialized 
technical coursewori< (or the equivalent) is necessary. Examples of specialized technical areas include envi ronmental engineering, 
structural engineering, construction engineering and management public works management transportation engineering and water 
resources management Civil engineering specializations in non-traditional, boundary, or emerging fields such as ecological 

engi neeri ng and nanotechnol ogy are encouraged. 

18. A n understandi ng of the el ements of proj ect management constructi on, and asset management E ff orts of the prof essi onal ci vi I 
engi neer often I ead, i n the context of proj ects, to constructi on of structures, f aci I i ti es and systems that, i n turn, must be operated and 
maintained. Proj ect management essentials include proj ect manager responsibilities, defining and meeting client requirements, risk 
assessment and management stakehol der i denti f i cati on and i nvol vement contract negoti ati on, proj ect work pi ans, scope and 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



de! i va'abi es, budget and schedul e preparati on and moni tori ng, i nteradi on among engi neeri ng and other di sci pi i nes, qual i ty assurance 
and qual i ty control , and di spute resol uti on processes. I mportant construct] on el ements are owner-engi neer-contractor re! ati onshi ps; 
project delivery systems (eg., design-bid-build, design-build); estimating construct] on costs; bidding by contractors; labor andlabor 
management i ssues; and constructi on processes, methods, systems, equi pment, pi anni ng, schedul i ng, safety, cost anal ysi s and cost 
control . A sset management seeks ef f ecti ve and ef f i ci ent I orig-term ownershi p of capi tal f aci I i ti es vi a systemati c acqui si ti on, operati on, 
maintenance, preservation, replacement, and disposition. Goals include optimizing I ifecyde performance minimizing lifecydecosts, 
and achie/ing maximum stakeholder bmefit. Tools and techniques include design innovations, new construction technologies, 
materials improvements, geo-mapping, database management, value assessment; performance models, web-based communication, and 
cost accounting. Including asset management recognizes that civil engineers, during their careers, arelikely to be involved with some 
aspect of capi tal f aci I i ti es management 

19. A n understandi ng of busi ness and publ i c pol i cy and admi ni strati on fundamental s. The prof essi onal ci vi I engi neer typi cal I y 
f uncti ons wi thi n both the publ i c and pri vate sectors that requi res at I east an understandi ng of busi ness, publ i c pd i cy, and publ i c 
admi ni strati on fundamental s. I mportant busi ness fundamental s topi cs as typi cal I y appi i ed i n the pri vate, govemment and non-prof i t 
sectors include legal forms of ownership, organizational structure and design, income statements, balance sheets, decision 
(engineering) economics, finance marketing and sales, bill able time overhead, and profit Essential public policy and administration 
fundamental s i ncl ude the pol i ti cal process, publ i c pol i cy, I aws and regul ati ons, fundi ng mechani sms, publ i c educati on and 
involvement govemment-busi ness interaction, and the public service responsibility of professionals. 

20. An understanding of the role of the leader and leadership principles and attitudes. Leading, in the pri vate and public arena - which 
differs from and complements managing- requires broad motivation, direction, and communication knowledgeand skills. Attitudes 
generally accepted as being conducive to leadership include commitinent confidence curiosity, entrepreneurship, high expectations, 
honesty, integrity, judgment persistence positiveness, and sensitivity. Desirable behaviors of leaders, which can be taught and 
learned, includeeaming trust, trusting others, formulating and articulating vision, communication, rational thinking, openness, 
consistency, commitment to organizational values, and discretion with sensitiveinfomiation. 

* I ncreased exposure to or emphasis on biological systems, ecology, sustainability, nanotechnology, and information technology is expected to 
occur i n the 21st century. 

AcknisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

See the entrance requirements for the A. J ames Clari< School of Engineering in Chapter 6 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

TheDepartmentoffersaprogramof studyleading to anABET-accredited Bachelor of ScienceinCivil Engineering (BSCE) degree. Each student 
specializes in one of three tracks: Infrastructure Engineering (Structural andGeotechnical), Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, or 
Transportation Systems and Project M anagernent A total of 122 credit hours ( 123 for the E nvi ronmental and Water Resources Tracl<) are requi red 
f or a B SC E degree wi th emphasi s i n basi c sci ence ( mattiemati cs, chemi stry, and physi cs) , engi neeri ng sci ence ( mechani cs of materi al s, stati cs, and 
dynamics), basic civil and environmental engineering courses; required courses in the selected track; technical electives; and a senior capstone 
design course The curriculum provides a sensible blend of required courses and electives, permitting students to pursue their interests without the 
ri sk of overspeci al i zati on. 



Freshman Year (All Civil & EnuiranrrEntsI En^neerin^ 

MATH 140 Calculus I 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 

CH E M 135 General Chemi stry for E ngi neers 

ENESIOO Introduction to Engineering Design 

ENES102 Statics 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 

PHYS161 Generd Physics 

ENCEIOO Introduction to Civil & Environmental Engineering 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 
Tot^ 



Crecfts 
First Sem 

4 

3 
3 

3 

1 

14 



Crafts 

SaDcnd 
San 



3 

3 

6 
16 



SqiicmareYear (All Civil & EnvinonmEnlal En^neeringl 

MATH241 Calculuslll 

M ATH 246 D i f f erenti al E quati ons for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers 
PHYS26Q^261Generd Physics 1 1 wittiLab 
ENES220 Mechanics of Materials 
ENCE200 Engineering Information Processing I 
ENCE201 Engineering Information Processing 1 1 
ENCE215 Applied Engineering Science 
ENCE305 Fundamentals of Engineering Fluids 
CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tot^ 



Crafts 
First San 

4 

4 
3 
3 



17 



Crafts 

SaDcnd 
San 



3 
6 
15 



Depgftmsfl^Mqor^ endProg-arrs 



Crecfts Crecits 



J unicrYear 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technics Writing 
ENES221 Dynanics 

ENCE300 Fundamaitals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-|V|eb-icsaidGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE340 FundamentalsofGeotechnical Engineering 
E N C E 353 I ntroducti on to Structural A nal ysi s 
ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 
ENCE Electivesf* 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tot^ 

Transportation Systems & Engneering MaiagemmtTrack 
ENGL393 Technics Writing 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-MetricsaidGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE370 I ntroducti on to Transportation Engineering & Planning 
ENCE472 Transportation Engineering 
ENCE Electivesf* 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tot^ 

Environments & Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technics Writing 
BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-MetricsandGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
E N CE 310 I ntroducti on to E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng 
ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 
ENCE431 Hydrologic Engineering 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tdbsl 



First Sem 



SaDcnd 
San 



15 



3 
15 



3 
3 
16 



3 
15 



3 

3 

3 

3 
15 

3 
3 



15 



SaiiorYear 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 
ENCE444 Laboratory Characterization of Geomaterials 
ENCE453 Computer-Aided Structural Analysis 
ENCE454 Design of Concrete Structures 
ENCE441 Foundation Design 
ENCE466 Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tot^ 

Transportation Systems & E ng neeri ngMaiagement Track 
ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 
ENCE422 ProjectCostAccounting& Economics 
ENCE423 Project Plaining, Scheduling & Control 
ENCE470 Highway Engineering 
ENCE466 Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 

Tot^ 

Environments and Water Resources Eng neeri ng Track 
ENCE411 Envi ronmental E ngi neeri ng Sci ence 



Crecfts Crecits 
Secxxvl 



First Sem 



Sem 



3 
3 
15 



3 
3 

6 
3 
15 



3 
6 
3 
15 

3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
15 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



ENCE422 Projed:CostAccounting& Economics 3 

ENCE412 Environmental Engineering Unit Operations 3 

ENCE432 Ground Water Hydrology 3 

ENCE466+ Designof Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives* 6 3 

CORE CORE Progran Requirements 3 3 

Tdbsl 15 15 



Minimum Degree Requirements: 122 credits (123 for the Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Track) andthefulfillmentof all 
departmental, school, andUniversityrequirementswithacumulativegradepointaverageof at least 2.0. Additional semester credits will be 
i nvol ved to tiie extent that courses carryi ng more than three credits are selected. 

4ENCE 466, Design of Civil Engineering Systems, may only betaken in the semester in which the student graduates. 

*ENCE electives aretobeselecbedasfallaiAE: 

Two electives: one from each of the two tracks i n whi ch the student i s not speci al i zi ng; each must be a 300 or 400 1 e/el cl ass chosen from among 
approved courses from that track. 

The remaining electives: Any 300 or 400 1 a/el ENCE class not required for the students chosen track; other senior level mathematics, science^ 
and engi neeri ng courses, with the approval of the Department 

Advising 

Students majoring in civil and environmental engineering are advised by Department faculty and staff, who assist in course selection and 

schedul i ng unti I the semester i n whi ch the student compi etes the basi c requi rements common to al I tracks. At that poi nt, students wi 1 1 be di rected to 

the faculty member who serves as specialty advisor for their track. For advising, contact the Department off ice^ 301-405-7768. 

Underg'aduate Research Experiences 

Department faculty frequently have research opportuniti es for undergraduate students. Students are encouraged to contact faculty members whose 
research specialties are of i nterest. 

Fiddworic Oppcrtirities 

Several excel I ent co-op opportuni ti es are avai I abl e f or C i vi I and E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng students. See the A . J ames C I ark School of 

E ngi neeri ng entry i n chapter 6 of thi s catal og for a f ul I descri pti on of the E ngi neeri ng co-op program, or contact M s. H ei di Sauber, 301-405-3863. 

HcncrsProg'am 

SeeA. J ames Clark School of Engineering Honors Program. 
Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

• American Society of Civil Engineers 

• Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honor Society (by invitation) 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Ci vi I and E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng awards a number of academi c schol arshi ps. These awards are designated pri mari ly for 
j uni or and seni or students. A department commi ttee a/al uates appi i cati ons each year. See theSchool of E ngi neeri ng web si te f or i nf omiati on and 
appi i cati on i nstructi ons. 

Awards and ReGo^tion 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers the foil owing awards: l)TheCivil Engineering Outstanding Senior Award; 2)TheASCE Outstanding 
Senior Award; 3)TheWoodward-ClydeConsultantsAward; 4)TheBechte! Award; 5)TheChi Epsilon Outstanding Seni or A ward; 6)TheBen 
Dyer Award; 7)TheASCE Maryland Section A ward; 8)TheRobertL. Morris A ward for Environmental Leadership; and 9) The Department 
Chairman's Award. 

C lassies (C LAS) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2407 Ma-ieMountHdl, 301-405-2013 

www.classics.umd.edu 

hle^@umd.edu (Chair) orshr@umd.edu (UG advisor) 

Chair: H. Lee 

Professors: L. Doherty,J . Hallett (Distinguished Scholar-Teacher) 

Associate Professors: S. Ruti edge (Undergraduate Advisor), G. Staley, E. Stehle 

Lecturers: M . Pittas-Herschbach, K. Tuite 

A djunct A ssoci ate Professors: J . Scholten 

TheMajor 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Courses offered by this department may be found under the fol I owingacronym(s): CLAS, LATN, GREK. 

Classics is the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture in all its aspects. Greek and Roman culture are the foundations of wesbem culture- its 
I i terature^ i deas, art pol i ti cs, and concept] ons of the i ndi vi dual . G reek myth i s sti 1 1 a shared fund of i mages and narrati ves that ©(presses human 
experi ence L ati n i s the maj or source of E ngl i sh vocabul ary, and G reek provi des techni cal I anguage i n many f i e! ds. C I assi cs expl ores al I of these 
aspects through over f i fbeen hundred years of hi story. 1 1 he! ps us understand the re! ati onshi p of western cul ture to other cul tural systems and pi ace 
ourse! ves better i n the worl d. 

Classics is an intellectually rich and versatile liberal arts major which teaches "core skills", including effective communication, critical thinking, 
and an appreci ati on of di versi ty . B ecause i t i s so i nterdi sci pi i nary and hoi i sti c, a student of cl assi cs gebs a three-di mensi onal vi ew of cul tural 
hi story and the I i terary works ttiat are sti 1 1 maj or forces i n the contemporary scene. Studyi ng Atheni an democracy and the Roman Republ i c 
sharpens understandi ng of comped ng phi I osophi cal and pol i ti cal i deas. Studyi ng L ati n not onl y devel ops E ngl i sh vocabul ary but makes E ngl i sh 
grammar comprehensi bl e. B oth I anguages provi de excel I ent anal yti c trai ni ng; f or i nstance; cl assi cs students score among the top few i n the 
analytic section of the GRE exams. 

Classics is a pre professional maj or for I aw school or for graduate school in any aspect of the ancient world. Classics majors have also continued 
on to I i brary school . L ati n teachers are i n demand; numerous students have found rewardi ng j obs teachi ng secondary school , wi th conti nued 
i nvol vement i n the cl assi cs communi ty . Others have gone i nto busi ness, worked i n educati onal tel evi si on, and gotten j obs i n the wri ti ng or edi ti ng 
fields, in archival work, in special education, or in social services. 

Prog'am Obj ecti ves 

The program aims to help students to understand and appreci ate the Greek and Latin languages and literatures, and their rela/anceto the modern 
world. 

Academic Prog'amsand Departmental Facilities 

The Classics Department offers three Study Abroad courses. 

CLAS 171 ClaBEJcal Myths in Paris (1 credit). ProfessorDoherty. Ten days at the end of May. This oneweek tour of "classical Paris" (taught on 
location after two days of background lectures in Maryland) will focus on the Roman past of the city, the rich collections of Greek and Roman art 
i n the L ouvre, and the i nf I uence of cl assi cal styl es on the art and archi tecture of F ranee. M ythol ogy wi 1 1 provi de a focus for our compari sons of art 
from different periods. I n addition to the Louvre and the M us® d'Orsay, visits will indudewalkingtoursof the Latin Quarter-with its ancient 
Roman baths and media/al art i n the M us® Cluny-and of the Champs Elysds from the Place de la Concorde to the Arc deTriomphe. 

CLAS 30eG Classics in Contacb Gresoe T Pie Living Legacy (3 credits). Professor Pittas-Herschbach. Three weeks in J une. This course is 
taught on location in Greece. Students will be based in Athens and will also visit Mycenae, Delphi, Epidaurus, the temple of Aphaia in Aigina, 
CapeSounion, andEleusis. Readings and discussions will explore key issues and themes (cultural, artistic, political and philosophical) associated 
with Athens during the latter half of the fifth century B.C. 

CLAS 3061 Italy: AndentGreekandRomanCultureinConba(t(3credits). Professors RutiedgeandScholten. Three weeks injanuary. This 
three-week exploration and study of ancient Greek and Roman Culture takes students to the Bay of Naples area, including ancient Pompeii and 
H ercul aneum, and to Rome The course may al so i ncl udes vi si ts to F I orence and Ravenna. 

For the most recent information on the Study Abroad courses, students should consult the websi te www. i ntemati onal .umd.edu/studvabroad . 

I n additi on to our own study abroad programs, students may take advantage of other opportuni ti es to study abroad: for exampi e, i n Rome, at the 
Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies, or in Athens, at the Col lege Year in Athens. Students studying Modern Greek may also spend a 
semester at the A meri can Col lege of Thessalonki or the University of Indianapolis in Athens. 

Acknisacn tDtiie Maj cr 

Admission to the major simply requires a meeting with the undergraduate advisor. No prior knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. 
Reqiirementsfor tiieMajcr 

RequirementsfortheClassicsmajorindudetheCollegeof Arts and Humanities requirement of 45 upper-leve! credits completed. 
The Col lege foreign I anguage requirement will be automatically fulfil led in the process of taking language courses in the maj or. 

Crafts 
OptionA: Latin 

LATN Courses at ttie 200/300 1 eve! 18 

LATN Courses at ttie 400 1 a/el or hi gher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9- 12 

Anytevei CLAS, GREK, or related fields 
such as HIST andARTH 

Option B: Greek 

GREK Courses at ttie 200/300 level 18 

GREK Courses at ttie 400 1 a/el or hi gher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9- 12 

Any level CLAS, LATN, or related fields 
such as HIST andARTH 

Option C: Latin and Gred< 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



LATN 


Latin courses 


18 


GREK 


Greek courses* 

OR 


12 


GREK 


Greek courses 


18 


LATN 


Latin courses* 

AND 


12 




Supportang Courses 


9 




Forexarrplei CLAS170, HIST 110, aid a 
300- or 400-I&/EI course in Greek or Roman 
histary 





*Students witti no previous training in the scond language may 
court introductory le^ courses as part of the 12-tyour requirement 



Option D: Clasacs in Translation (Clasacal 
Humanities) 

CLAS Classics courses 18 

LATN Latin courses, OR 12 

GREK Greek courses 

Supporti ng C our ses 12-14 

Normally upper level courses in Art Hi story. 
Archaeology, Architecture Government 
History, Linguistics, or Philosophy 

NOTES: 



• Students are encouraged to substitute 300- and 
400-la/el courses in LATN and GREK for 
some of the 18 requi red credits i n CLAS. 

• 100 and 200-level courses in GREK may be 
i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
students 12 language credits are taken in Latin, 
and 100 and 200-1 eve! courses in LATN may 
be i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
students 12 language credits are taken in 
GREK. 

• Students are encouraged to take as much 

I anguage as possi bl e, but shoul d take I anguage 
courses sequentially; i.e., 101, 102, 201. Once 
credit has been received in a higher- level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a 
lower-la/el course may not betaken for credit 
The student shoul d begi n the sequence at the 
appropriate level. 



Reqiiremaits for the Minor 

Classical Mytiidogy 

This minor will introduce students to classical mythology, its uses within ancient Greek and Roman culture, and its subsequent influence on art and 
I iterature The mi nor requi res 15 credits. 

Requi red courses: 

CLAS 170 Greek aid Roman Mythology (3) 

CLAS 470ApproachestoGreek Myth (3) 

I n addition, the student must choose three courses from the following list two of which must be at the 300 or 400 la/el: 

CLAS270GreekLiteratureinTraislation (3) 

CLAS 271 Roman LiteratureinTranslation (3) 

CLAS 320Women in Classic^ Antiquity (3) 

CLAS 330 AncientGreek Religion: Gods, Myliis, Temples (3) 

CLAS 331 Ancient Roman Religion: Fromjupiter to Jesus (3) 

CLAS370Classical MythsinAmerica (3) 

CLAS 374Greek Tragedy inTranslation (3) 

CLAS 419TheClassicd Tradition (3) 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Students interested in pursui ng this mi nor should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor i n the Department of Classics. 

Latin 

This mi nor introduces students to the Latin language and enables them to read, inLatin, importantworksof Latin literature For students with no 

pri or experi ence of L ati n, the mi nor requi res 2 1 credi ts, consi sti ng of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

Latin 101 Elementary Latin I (4) 

Latin 102 Elementary Latin II (4) 

Latin 201 Intermediate Latin (4) 

Latin 3xxA reading course in PI autus, Petronius, Ovid or Horaceand Catullus (3) 

Latin 4xx A reading coursein a major Latin author (3) 

Students who enter with advanced standing in Latin can complete the mi nor by taking a total of five courses in Latin at the 200 level and beyond. 
Students interested in pursui ng this mi nor should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor i n the Department of Classics. 

Gred< 

This minor introduces students to ancient Greek and enables tJiem to read, in Greek, important works of Greek literature. This minor requires 21 

credits, consi sti ng of the fol I owi ng courses: 

Greek 101 Elementary AncientGreek I (4) 

Greek 102 Elementary AncientGreek II (4) 

Greek 201 1 ntermedi ate Ancient Greek (4) 

Greek 301ScenesfromAthenian Life (3) 

Greek 4xx Either Greek Philosophers, Greek Tragedy, or Homer (3) 

A Classics course atthe 300 or 400la/el suchasCLAS 374 (Greek Tragedy) orCLAS 330 (Greek Religion) (3) 

Students interested in pursui ng this mi nor should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor i n the Department of Classics. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majorsa/ery semester. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in 
cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, vi si t 
www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu . 

The Classics Department annually awards the Avery Prize to a Latin student of special merit; and the Steyer Undergraduate Scholarship to an 
outstanding classics concentrator.Tohonor the memory of SylviaGerber, who taught Latin for many years in the Washington, DC public schools, 
her son L oui s has recenti y provi ded the department wi th fundi ng to support the trai ni ng of L ati n teachers and L ati n pedagogi cal studi es, i ncl udi ng 
an undergraduate award for an aspi ri ng Lati n teacher. 

Avvardsand ReGc^iiticn 

Outstanding students areinvitedtojoin Eta Sigma Phi, the national undergraduateHonor Society inClassics. The department also annually awards 
the Avery Prize and the Steyer and Gerber Schol arshi ps (see above). 

CcmmincatiGn (COMM) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2130 Skinner Building, 301-405-6519 

www. comm. umd.edu 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J . Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L. Aldoory, D.Cai, D. HampleT. Parry-Giles, M.Tonn, M.Tumer 

Assistant Professors: S. Bowen, S. Khamis, M . Liu, K. Maddux, T. Reimer 

Lecturers: R. Coleman (Lecturer), D. Cronin (Lecturer), S. Drake(Lecturer), J . Gowin (Coordinator), C. Harper (Coordinator), S. Simon 

(Lecturer), B. Swartz (Lecturer), J . Tenney (Lecturer), R. Toth (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: J . F^nestock (ENGL), M . Gurevitch (J OUR), A. Kmglanski (PSYC), D. Rosenfelt (WMST) 

AffiliateAssociateProfessors:IV|.Gelfand(PSYC), S. McDaiiel (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J. Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

TheMajcr 

Communication takes as its subject matter the history, processes, and effects of human communication through speech and its extensions. The 
departmental curri cul um i s desi gned to provi de a I i beral educati on i n the arts and sci ences of human communi cati on as we! I as preparati on for 
career opportuni ti es i n busi ness, government; educati on, I aw, and rel ated f i e! ds. Students pursue academi c programs that emphasi ze many 
disciplinary areas, including intercultural communication, political communication, public relations, negotiation and conflict management 
cognition and persuasion, rhetorical theory, risk communication, history of rhetoric, and criticism of public discourse. Departmental advising is 
mandatory for new majors, second semester sophomores, and seniors. 

Pro-am Learning Outcomes 

U pon compi eti on of the degree program i n Communi cati on, students shoul d be abl e to demonstrate the fol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



l.AnabilitytDdisti ngui sh among a vari ety of theoreti cal approaches i n the communi cati on di sci pi i ne and use them appropri atel y and effect] vel y i n 
academic work. 

2. A n abi I i ty to conduct research and wri te research reports empi oyi ng soci al sci end f i c and/or humani sti c approaches i n the communi cati on 
discipline. 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively in a speech. 

Academic Prog'amsand Departmental Facilities 

The Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to foster democratic 
communication by a diverse people. Seewww.comm.center.umd.edu. 

The Center for Risk Communication Research (CRCR) advances dialogue and understanding about communication's role in controlling and 
preventi ng ri sk; about how publ i cs percei ve ri sk communi cati on; and about the pol i ti cal , economi c and soci al contexts for ri sk communi cati on. 
Scholars associated with theCRCR examine health, food safety, security, and environmental risks. Seewww.comm.riskcenter.umd.edu. 

The departments M edi a Center i s desi gned to provi de oneon-one tutori ng and i nstructi onal support to further students' oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s 
and conf i dence. The M edi a Center i s equi pped wi th cameras and record ng equi pment to tape speeches and presentati ons for practi ce and cri ti que 

Acknisacn totiie Maj or 
F i r st-ti me F reshman 

A 1 1 f i rst-ti me freshmen who desi gnate communi cati on as a maj or pri or to the end of the f i nal exam peri od of thei r f i rst semester wi 1 1 be admi tted 
di recti y to the program. They must si gn a M emorandum of U nderstandi ng that states that they understand that by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 
45 University of Maryland credits (excluding AP), they must meet the foil owing Gateway requirements. 

a. Complete 50% of the CORE requirements, including Fundamental Studies requirements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Completeoneof thefollowing courses withagradeofC or better: BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY201, or equivalent. 

c. Complete COM M 107, COM M 200, or COM M 230 with a grade of C or better 

d. Complete COM M 250 with a grade of Cor better and 

e. A GPA of 2.0 or better 

Students may repeat only one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated only once i n thei r attempt to meet the requi rements. Students who 
fail to meet ttie Gateway requirements by the semester in which they attain 45 credits will be dismissed from the program and cannot reapply. 

Transfier Students 

I nternal and extemal transfer students who meet the Gateway requirements specified above and have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 in all collegelevel 
coursework may appi y to the program up unti I and i ncl udi ng the semester i n whi ch they reach 60 credi ts. (Students are encouraged to appi y at any 
time prior to reaching 60 credits as long as the requirements have been completed.) 

F or those students who meet the G ateway requi rements and who appi y after the semester i n whi ch they reach 60 credi ts, admi ssi on i s competi ti ve 
and on a spaceavai I abl e basi s. 

N ewl y admi tted transfer students who have more than 60 credi ts have onl y thei r f i rst semester at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and to compi ete the 
Gateway requi rements. 

Appeals 

All students may appeal admission decisions. Students directly admitted as freshmen, who are dismissed because of failure to meet Gateway 
requirements or be in good academic standing at 45 credits, may appeal directly to the Undergraduate Director in the Department of 
Communication. All rther students who are denied admission rnay appeal to the university's Office of Undergraduate Admi ssi ons. 

Reqii rements for tiieMajcr 

The course of study for a Communi cati on maj or must sati sfy al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

Crofts 

COM M 107 Oral Communication: Principles and Practices, OR 3 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 3 

COM M 230 Argumentation and Debate 3 

COM M 250 I ntroducti on to Communi cati on I nqui ry 3 

COM M 400 Research Methods in Communication 3 

COMM401 Interpreting Strategic Discourse 3 

CompI eti on of one of the f ol I owi ng tracks: 

Sodal I nfluenoeTrack 

COM M 402 Communi cati on Theory and Process 3 

F/ve from 15 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



COM M 420 
COM M 424 
COM M 425 
COM M 426 
COM M 435 
COM M 470 
COM M 475 
COM M 477 
COM M 482 
COMM 
COMM UL 

PSYC200 
SOCY201 
BMGT230 
EDMS451 



LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



Theories of Group Discussion 

Communication in Complex Organizations 

N egoti ati on and Conf I i ct M anagement 

Conf I i ct M anagement 

Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 

Listening 

Persuasion 

Discourse Analysis 

I ntercultural Communications 

COMM Elective 

Upper Le/el COMM Elective 

One StBS^cal Analysis from 3-4 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs f or Soci ol ogy 

Business Statistics 

I ntroducti on to E ducati onal Stati sti cs 

(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

OneStructural AnalysisofLanguagefrom 3 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 

I ntroducti on to L i ngui sti cs 

Culture and Discourse 

(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

Social Influence 9 

courses rel ated to Soci al I nf I uence i n one department other than COMM 

Communicaticn Stucf esTrack 

Communi cati on Theory and Process 3 

One from 3 

Theories of Group Discussion 
Communication in Complex Organizations 
N egoti ati on and Conf I i ct M anagement 
Conf I i ct M anagement 
Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 
Listening 
Persuasion 
Discourse Analysis 
I ntercultural Communications 

One from 3 

Argumentation and Public Policy 
The Rhetoric of Black America 
Ancient and Medieval Rhetorical Theory 
Renaissance & Modern Rhetoric Theory 
The Power of Discourse in American Life 
Speechwriting 

Public Life in American Communities, 1634-1900 
Voices of Public Leadership in the Twentieth Century 
The Discourse of Social Movements 
Public Communication Campaigns 
Language, Communication, and Action 
COMM Elective 

COMM300/400UpperLa/elCOMM Electives 12 

OneStatistical Analysisfrom 3-4 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 
I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 
Business Stati sties 

I ntroducti on to E ducati onal Stati sti cs 
(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

OneStructural AnalysisofLanguagefrom 3 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 
I ntroducti on to L i ngui sti cs 
Culture and Discourse 
or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

ConrrunicationsStudies 9 

courses rel ated to Communi cati on Studi es i n one department other than 
COMM 



COMM 402 

COMM 420 
COMM 424 
COMM 425 
COMM 426 
COMM 435 
COMM 470 
COMM 475 
COMM 477 
COMM 482 

COMM 330 
COMM 360 
COMM 450 
COMM 451 
COMM 453 
COMM 455 
COMM 460 
COMM 461 
COMM 469 
COMM 471 
COMM 476 
COMM 



PSYC200 
SOCY201 
BMGT230 
EDMS451 



LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



COMM 231 
COMM 232 



Public RdaticnsTrack 

The reqjirements below are effective for incorring Fall 2008 freshmen 
and transfers ackritted to Comrurication. 
News Writing and Reporting for Public Relations 
News Editing for Public Relations 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



COMMBSO Public Relations Theory 3 

COMMBSl Public Relations Techniques 3 

COIV||V|352 SpecializedWriting in Public Relations 3 

COIV||V|386 Experientid Lea-ning* 3-6 

* only 3 credits apply turmjor 

COIV||V|483 Senior Semina- in Public Relations 3 

COIV||V|300/400UpperLa/el COM M Elective 6 

One Statistical Analysis from 

PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 3 

SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 4 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 3 

EDMS451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 3 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 
r'r-.i iDcccvv Courses related to Publ I c Relations In One department Other than COM M „ 

orj OUR 

Rhetoric and Political CultureTrack 

COMM450 Ancientand Medieval Rhetorical Theory 3 

Five from 

COM M 330 Argumentation and Public Policy 3 

COM M 360 TheRhetoric of Black America 3 

COM M 451 Renaissance & M odern Rhetoric Theory 3 

COMM453 ThePowerofDiscoursein American Life 3 

COM M 455 Speechwriting 3 

COMM460 Public Lifein America! Communities, 1634-1900 3 

COMM461 Voices of Public Leadership in the Twentieth Century 3 

COMM469 TheDiscourseof Social Movements 3 

COMM471 Public Communication Campaigns 3 

COM M 476 Language, Communication, and Action 3 

COMM COMM Elective 3 

COMM300/400UpperLa/el COM M Elective 3 

One Critical Analysis of Discourse from 

A M ST432 L i terature and A meri can Soci ety 3 

CMLT488 Genres 3 

ENGL453 Literay Theory 3 

J WST263 Hebrew Bible: Poetry and Prophecy 3 

PHIL233 Philosophy in Literature 3 

OneStructural AnalysisofLanguagefrom 

LING200 Introductory Linguistics 3 

HESP120 Introduction to Linguistics 3 

A NTH 380 Cultxre and Discourse 3 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

courses related to Rhetoric and Political Culture in one department other „ 

than COMM 
Nobes 

• B ecause the departments curri cul um changes over ti me, the departments U ndergraduate D i rector may approve other appropri ate 
Communi cati on courses to meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses required for the Communication major, but taken outside COMM, may be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 



Reqii rements for the Minor 

Rhetori c is the theory of persuasive communi cati on, both written and spoken. The mi nor i n rhetori c has been desi gned for students who want to 
know the principles and ski I Is of practical persuasion inits varied contexts. The program will be of value for all stiudents wishing to improve their 
writing and speaking ski I Is and especially useful for those students who pi an careers in business, management; law, govemment; and education. 
The mi nor i n rhetori c i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary program offered through the cooperati on of the Department of E ngl i sh and the Department of 
Communication. 

Fifteen sanester hours of ccxrsa/uoric are requi red: 

A. Six semester hours from the course list in Rhetorical Theory and Analysis of Discourse 

B. Six semester hours from the course list in Writing and Speaking Skills 

C. Three semester hours in electivesfrom either section of the Rhetoric Course List 

D. At least nine of the fifteen semester hours must at the 300- 1 eve! or higher (including at least six hours at the University of Maryland, College 
Pa-k) 

E. No more than six of the fifteen semester hours may betaken at an institution other than the University of Maryland, College Park 

F . N o more than si x of the f i fteen semester hours may count toward the students maj or, supporti ng courses, and col I ege requi rements 

G . N o course from the students maj or department may count toward the mi nor 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



H . N o course used to sati sf y a F undamental Studi es requi rement may count toward the mi nor 
I . N o course used to sati sfy the requi rements of another mi nor may count toward the rhetori c mi nor. 
J . N o course grade bel ow frie grade of "C" may count toward the mi nor 

En^ng tfie Miner 

Students wi shi ng to pursue the mi nor shoul d revi ew the requi rements above, make tentati ve se! ecti ons of courses bel ow to sati sfy these 

requi rements, and meet wi th one of the advi sers bel ow. The earl i est possi bl e meeti ng to draft a I i st of courses i s recommended. Students must then 

off i ci al I y decl are the mi nor i n rhetori c. 

CiMieiitcoiffiseUSbforihemnor in Rhetoric can be fcxaxl at 

www, comm. umd. edu/rhetori cmi nor, html 

l^inorAchisors: 

J ames F. Klumpp Shirley Logan 

Department of Communi cati on Department of E ngl i sh 

2122 Skinner Building 4139 Susquehanna Hall 

jklumppCo) umd.edu si oaan(a) umd.edu 

301-405-6520 301-405-9659 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s avai I abl e throughout the year i n 2 lOlD Ski nner B ui I di ng. Students shoul d check Testudo for thei r regi strati on date and for any 
mandatory advising blocks. Advising questions can be sent to commadvising@umd.edu or you may call 301-405-0862 or 301-405-0863. 

Undcrg'aduate Research Experiences 

Research experiences include assisting on faculty research projects, participating in special team research projects, and working with the 
departments Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk Communication Research. 

Fieldvwarl< Oppcrtirities 

The department offers service I earning opportunities training local school students in critical thinking and speaking, mediation and conflict 
resolution, and leadership. 

IntErnships 

The departments i nternshi p program hel ps communi cati on maj ors gai n prof essi onal experi ence bui I d a prof essi onal portf ol i o, and take the f i rst 
steps toward a career. The department structures its intemship program around a course, COMM386: Experiential Learning, offered each school 
term. 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The Honors Program provides students with an opportunity for intensive study of Communication. The program provides participants with 
opportuniti es to deepen thei r understandi ng of the di sci pi i ne through graduate-l a/d coursework and to enri ch this understand ng through d osely 
supervi sed research and i nvol vement i n the i ntel I ectual I i f e of the department. 

Students i nterested i n the H onors P rogram appi y for the program, ordi nari I y duri ng the second semester of the sophomore year or the f i rst semester 
of the j uni or year. A ppl i cati on i s f i I ed wi th the U ndergraduate D i rector. Students shoul d have the f ol I owl ng qual i f i cati ons: 

• An overal I GPA of 3.3 or above. 

• CompI eti on of ni ne semester hours i n Communi cati on i ncl udi ng COM M 250. 

• GPA of 3.5 or above in Communication. 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

Social and academic activities are avai I able to students by participating in the foil owing student organizations: the Undergraduate Communi cati on 
Association, the Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society, and the Maryland chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America. 

Scholarships and Financiai Assistance 

The department offers two schol arshi ps: thej une Dowl er B uteau Schol arshi p and the L a/i ck Cri si s Communi cati on Schol arshi p to students who 
exhi bi t academi c excel I ence E ach year the department di stri butes a cal I f or appI i cati ons through e mai I . 

C omparati ve L iteratire Pro-am (C M LT) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

3119 Susquehaina Hdl, 301-405-0115 

Chair: K. Cartwright 

Director: O.Wang 

Professors: A. Balin (English), M. Collins (English), R. Harrison (Spanish & Portuguese), C. Peterson (English), B. Richardson (English) 

Associate Professors: R. Bauer (English), K. Chuh (English), Z. Nunes (English), S. Ray (English), O.Wang (English) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Assistant Professors: E. Bearden (English), S. J el en (English& Jewish Studies), R.Ontiveros (English), G. Passannante(English), V. 
V al i avi tcharska ( E ngl i sh) 
I nstructors: E . Robi nson 
Lecturers: G. Metcalf 

TheMajcr 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym: CM LT 

Computer EngneeringCENCP) 

A.J amesClark School of Engneering 

2429 A.V. Willians Building, 301-405-3685 

www.ece.umd.edu 

eceaclvis@cleans.umd.edu 

Chain P. O'Shea (Professor) 

Professors: E. Abed, A. Agrawala, T. Antonsen, J . Baras, D. Barbe, A. Barg, S. Bhattacharyya, G. B I ankenship (Associate Chair, Extemal 

Relations), R. Chel lappa (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), N. DeClaris, M. Dagenais, C. Davis (Distinguished Scholar Teacher, A. Ephremides, 

C. Espy-Wilson, N. Farva-din, V. Gligor, J . Goldhar, N. Goldsman, R. Gomez, V. GraiatsteiaJ . Hendler, P. Ho, A. Iliadis, J . JaJ a, J . Kim (Prof 

Of Practice), P. Krishnaprasad, W. Lawson (Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies), K. Liu (Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, Distinguished 

Scholar Teacher), A. Makowski, S. Marcus (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), I. Mayergoyz (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), J. Melngailis, H. 

Milchberg (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), K. Nakajima, P. Narayan, R. Newcomb, Y. Oruc, E. Ott (Distinguished University Professor), M. 

Peckerar, H. Rabin, S. Shamma, M . Shayman, A. Tits, T. Venkatesan (Res Prof), U. Vishkin, C. Yang 

Associate Professors: R. Barua, P. Dowd (Res Assoc Prof), M. Franklin, R. Ghodssi,J. Hollingsworth,T. Horiuchi, B.Jacob, R. La, A. 

Pafamarcou, G. Qu, C. Silio, S.Tretter, S. Ulukus, M. Wu, D. Yeung 

Assistant Professors: P. Abshire, S. Bhattacharjee^ M. Hicks,J . Katz, N. Martins,T. Murphy, P. Petrov, K. Rosfjord,J . Simon, A. Srivastava, E. 

\Neks 

Lecturers: W. Hawkins 

Affiliate Professors: S. Aniage, L. Davis, H. Fraik, M. Fu, D. O'Leary, G. Rubloff, F. Wellstood 

AffiliateAssociateProfessors:J . Bernstein, R. Duraiswami, R. Phaneuf, E. Smela 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: M. Cukier 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. Shekhar 

Professors Emeriti: L. Davisson, F. Emad, R. Harger, C. Lee, W. Levine, P. Ligomenides, H. Lin,J. Orloff,J. Pugsley, M. Reiser, M. Rhee, C. 

Striff I er, L.Taylor, K.Zaki 

TheMajcr 

The computer engi neeri ng maj or combi nes the strengths of both the Department of E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng and the Department of 
Computer Sci ence to prepare students for careers i n ttie computer i ndusiry. The program encompasses the study of hardware, software, and 
systems questions that arise in the design, da/elopment; and application of computers and embedded systems. Specifically, computer engineering 
students will have a knowledge of hardware systems (electrical networks, electronics, andVLSI); a knowledge of software systems (algorithms, 
data structures, and operati ng systems) ; and a knowl edge of how these two domai ns i nteract ( di gi tal I ogi c, si gnal and system theory, computer 
architectural and performance analysis). Computer Engineering students will I eam about everything that goes into digital and computing systems, 
from solidstate physics to CMOS VLSI design, to computer architecture to programming, and from operating systems to compiler and language 
theory. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym: ENEE andCMSC. 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The educati onal obj ecti ves are broadi y stated goal s agreed upon by a consensus of the f acul ty pertai ni ng to accompi i shments or I eve! of 
achi a/ement desi red of our students 3- 5 years after graduati on. These f al I under the f ol I owi ng four headi ngs: 

1. Techni cal K nowl edge: G raduate engi neers trai ned i n the fundamental s of computer engi neeri ng and rel evant speci al ti es so they are 
prepared to succeed i n graduate school or be productive engi neers i n government or i ndustry. 

2. Laboratory, Design, andResearch: Graduate engi neers who can design and perform experimental projects to solve diverse 
problems, with special emphasis on exploiting diverse techni cal knowledge and ski I Is so they can engage in design work or research. 

3. P reparati on for F urther Study: G raduate engi neers who have the educati onal f oundati ons and ski 1 1 s necessary to engage i n I i f el ong 
learning in every sphere of their life. 

4. P rof essi onal i sm: G raduate engi neers who have the prof essi onal ski 1 1 s they need to succeed i n thei r chosen prof essi on and are 
prepared to f ul f i 1 1 thei r prof essi onal responsi bi I i ti es as engi neers, whi ch i ncl ude thei r ethi cal obi i gati ons to soci ety, empi oyers, 
empi oyees, and f e! I ow engi neers. 

Pro-am Learning Outccmes 

Educational Opportunities 

The program offers many educati onal opportunities. Mostof these are designed to impart knowl edge and ski lis required of all our students so that 
by the ti me of graduati on they are prepared to achi a/e the E ducati onal Obj ecti ves. Other opportuni ti es are opti onal and offered for i nterested and 
qualified students. The educational opportunities are: 

1. Broad Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply rel evant mathematical, scientific, and basic engineering knowledge. 

2. Disciplinary Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply core computer engineering techni cal knowledge 

3. Specialization: Understanding of and ability to apply the skills and concepts within one or more of the specializations within 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



computer aigi neeri ng. 

4. L aboratory : U nda^tandi ng of and abi I i ty to empi oy standard expen mental techni ques to generate and anal yze data as wel I as use 
stateof-theart software and i nstiumentati on to solve computer engi neeri ng probi ems. 

5. Design: Theoretical understanding of and ability to engage in the creative deign process through the integration and application of 
di verse techni cal knowl edge and expati se to meet customer needs and address soci al i ssues. 

6. Research: Ability to formulate and answer empirical and theoretical questions through participation in undergraduate research 
proj ects for i nterestad and qual i f i ed students. 

7. Leadership: Awareness of the need for engineering leaders both within the profession and the larger community, as well assome 
preparati on to assume those I eadershi p rol es. 

8. Communication Skills: Ability to communicate effectively both through oral presentations and the written word. 

9. Interpersonal Skills: Abilitytointeractprofessionally with others in the workplace^ to engage effectively in team work, and to 
function productively on multi disciplinary group projects. 

10. Engineering Ethics: Understanding of the engineer's responsibilities to employers, society, and their fellow engineers as we! I as an 
ability to recognize potential and actual ethical problems, anal yze critically those situations, and formulate sound etiii cal decisions. 

11. Engineering & Society: Understanding of the symbiotic relationship between engineering and society - specifically, how 

engi neeri ng artifacts are shaped by and i ncorporate human val ues as wel I as the ways i n whi ch engi neeri ng sol uti ons i mpact soci ety - 
and the I arger soci al obi i gati ons thi s entai I s for engi neers. 

12. Lifelong Learning: Skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning and an understanding of the need to continual I yecploit those 
ski 1 1 s i n ref i ni ng and updati ng one's knowl edge base. 

AchnisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

A dmissi on requirements are the same as those of other departments in theSchool of Engineering. SeeAdmission Requirements for A. James Clark 
School of Engineering in Chapter 6. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

As in all engineering degrees, thestudent starts out with a core curriculum in mattiematics and basic science. Subsequent years of study involve 
courses covering a balanced mixture of hardware, software hardwaresoftware tradeoffs, and basic modeling techniques used to represent the 
computing process. Courses covering algorithms, data structures, digital systems, computer organization and architecture, software and hardware 
desi gn and testi ng, operati ng systems, and programmi ng I anguages wi 1 1 be i ncl uded. E I ecti ve courses must i ncl ude el ecb'i cal engi neeri ng and 
computer science courses and techni cal courses outside the departments. SbjdajtsmeteamaffTadeof'C' or tidier in sHen^neerin^ 
nttliaitt i c^ andsdencecaa^sesaswEll asiheprereqiasilBsforihesecoia^ses, A sample program is shown below. 

Credts Crecfts 

Freshman Year First Sem Seocnd San 

CORE** CORE General Education 3 3 

CHEM135 General Chemisby for Engineers 3 

PHYS161 General Physics 3 

|V|ATH140/141Calculusl/Cdculusll 4 4 

CM SC 132* Obj ect Ori ented Programmi ng 1 1 4 

ENESIOO Intro, to Engineering Design 3 

Tot^ Credts 13 14 



SqshomoreYear 



MATH 246 


Differential Equations 




3 


CMSC212 


Computer Sci ence 1 1 


4 




CMSC250 


Discrete Structure 


4 




CMSC351 


Algorithms 




3 


PHYS26(y261 General Physics II witiiLdD 


4 




ENEE200** 


Social & Ettiical Dimensions of ECE 
Technology 




3 


ENEE241 


Numerical Techniques in Engineering 




3 


ENEE204 


Basic CircuitTheory 




3 


ENEE206 


Digital Circuits 




2 


ENEE244 


Digital Logic Design 


3 






Total Credts 


15 


17 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



J unicr Year 



CORE** 


CORE Gaieral Education 


3 


3 


CMSCBBO 


Organization of Prog. Languages 


3 




CIVISC412 


Operah ng Systems 




4 


ENEE303 


Analog and Digital Electronics 


3 




ENEE307 


Electronics Circuits Design Lab 


2 




ENEE322 


Signal and System Theory 


3 




ENEE324 


Engineering Probability 




3 


ENEE350 


Computer Organi zati on 


3 




ENEE446 


Computer Design 




3 




Tot^ Crecfts 


17 


13 



CORE** 
ELECTIVE 
ENGL 393 



Senior Year 

CORE General Education 

Computer E ngi neeri ng Techni cal 
Electives 

Technical Writing 

Total Crecits 



3 


3 


12 


10 




3 


15 


16 



* students may need to take CM SC 131, Obj ect Ori ented Programmi ng I , 
or the computer science exemption exam before taki ng CM SC 132. 
** Note: This sample schedule assumes at least one of the CORE 
DistributiveStudies classes also satisfies theCORE Cultural Diversity 
requirement and ENEE200isusedasaCORE IE to satisfy one of the 
distributivestudies requirements. SeetheGENERAL EDUCATION 
REOUI REM ENTS (CORE) for details about CORE program 
requirements. 



Technical Elective Requirements 

Effective Spring 2001, all BSCP graduates must distribute their 24 
credi ts of techni cal el ecti ves among the f ol I owi ng course categori es: 

Crecfts 

M athemati cs and B asi c Sci ence 
Electives 

Computer Sci ence Theory and 
Applications 

Electrical Engineering Theory and 
Applications 

Advanced Laboratory 

Capstone Design 

Engineering (not Electrical or 
Computer) 



Category A 
Category B 

Category C 

Category D 
Category E 

Category F 



mini mum of 6 
mini mum of 3 

mini mum of 3 

mini mum of 2 
mini mum of 3 



Please read carefUly, andnnakeanalBoflhefolloming^xdal cases and other ilErrE 

1. Two credits of EN EE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and Computer Engineering, may be used to satisfy the Advanced 
Laboratory requirement subject to approval bythefacultysupervisorandtheAssociateChair. The maximum number of EN EE 499 
credi ts that may be appi i ed towards E E techni cal el ecti ve requi rements i s f i ve. 

2. Additional CapstoneDesigncoursescanbeusedassubstitutesfortherequired Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications 
course, and^or the requi red Advanced Laboratory course, provided one of the foil owing is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B, 408C, or 
408F. 

3. Completion of ENEE 408A andENEE 459A satisfies both theCapstoneDesignandAdvancedLaboratory requirements. 

4. I f you have any questi ons on how these requi rements affect your current sel ecti on of techni cal el ecti ves, pi ease contact an advi sor. 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Advising 

All faculty in Electrical and Compuber Engineering fundi on as undergraduate mentors, and a/ery student is assigned a mentor in their first 
semester on campus. Additional advising is done by the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies, the Director and Associate Director of 
Undergraduate Studies, and other professional staff members.f acuity in Computer Engineering function as undergraduate advisors. Departmental 
approval is required for registration in all upper-di vision courses in the major. The departments Undergraduate Office (2429 A.V.Williams 
Building, 301-405-3685) is the contact point for undergraduate advising questions. 

Unda'g'aduate Research Expa'iences 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is affi Mated withmorethan 40 special! zed laboratories, 
supporti ng acti viti es i ncl udi ng: speech and i mage processi ng, hi gh performance systems, mobi I e computi ng and 
multimedia, communication networks, robotics, control systems, neural systems, systems integral] on, VLSI design and 
testi ng, experi mental software engi neeri ng, seni conductor materi al s and de/i ces, photoni cs, f i ber opti cs, i on beam 
litfiography, real -time systems, human- computer interaction, and virtual reality. Undergraduatestuderts are encouraged 
to engage i n research at some poi nt duri ng thei r educati on. A cti ve parti ci pati on i n research not onl y al I ows students to 
apply what they ha^e I earned in class, it also gives them greater insight into a specific area within ECE and an 
appreci ati on for the subd di es and di ff i cul ti es associ ated wi th the producti on of knowl edge and fundamental new 
appi i cati ons Research experi ence al so prepares students for the demands of graduate school and the work force 

The E CE department al so offers outstandi ng summer research i ntemshi p programs. The M aryl and E ngi neeri ng Research I ntemshi p Team program 
offers research opportuni ti es for top undergraduates across the country who are i nterested i n usi ng el ectri cal engi neeri ng ski 1 1 s and tool s to address 
important biosystems applications. TheTraining and Research Experiences in Nonlinear Dynamics program offers research opportuni ties for 
students interested in nonlinear dynamics. The studentsparticipatsincuttingedge, team- based research, technical and educational seminars, and 
f i el d tri ps to I ocal i ndustry . Students can earn academi c credi t for thei r parti ci pati on i n these summer programs. 

Additional information on participating in undergraduate research can be found at www.ece.umd.edu/Academic/Under/advisinci/ENEE499.html . 

Co-q3 Prog'ams 

Participation in the Cooperative Education Program or in an I ntemshi p with private industry or a govemment agency is encouraged. SeeA. J ames 
Clark School of Engineering Co-op and Career Services entry for details. 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng H onors Program i s i ntended to provi de a more chal I engi ng and rewardi ng undergraduate experi ence for 
students pursi ng the baccal aureate i n E I ectri cal or Computer E ngi neeri ng. The program requi res students to compi ete honors versi ons of four 
j uni or I eve! el ectri cal engi neeri ng courses and an honors prqj ect duri ng ffie seni or year. Students compI eti ng al I program requi rements wi th a B 
average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) andacumulativeGPA of 3.0forall undergraduate work will havetheir participation noted on tiieirB.S. diploma, 
students are i nvi ted to j oi n the E C E honors program upon admi ssi on to the uni versi ty, wi th an addi ti onal opportuni ty to j oi n after the sophomore 
year. 

Student Societies and Prcfesaonai Organizations 

TheECE Department has anactiveStudentChapterof the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Information and instructions 
for joining can be found at http://iee&ece.umd.edu. Equallvactiveisthechapterof Eta Kappa Nu. the nationwide Electrical Engineering honorary 
society. Informationoneliqibilitycan be obtained at http://hknumd.edu.ora TheECE Undergraduate Student Council is an autonomous body that 
hosts undergraduate events, provi des feedback to the Department and oversees the undergraduate study I ounge. 

Additionally, there is a program for Women in Electrical and Computer Engineering (WECE) and a group called the Leaders in ECE, who serve as 
our ambassadors, give insight to new and prospective students, and participate in departmental a/ents such as our "International Day" when we 
ce! ebrate the cul tural di versi ty of the students and f acul ty i n our department 

Scholarships and Financiai Assistance 

Several corporate schol arshi ps are admi ni stered through the Department A 1 1 students must compI ete the Col I ege of E ngi neeri ng's onl i ne 

schol arshi p appI i cati on by M ay 1 each year to be consi dered f or al I Col I ege of E ngi neeri ng and E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng Departmental 

schol arshi ps for the f ol I owi ng academi c year. F or i nf ormati on vi si t www. ursp. urnd. edu/schol arshi ps'i ndec. html . 

J obOppcrtiriitieB 

Computer E ngi neers have wi de rangi ng empi oyment opportuni ti es i n both i ndustry and govemment. Some of the speci f i c j obs that students of 
computer engi neeri ng mi ght acqui re are computer desi gner, appI i cati on speci al i st, embedded system desi gner, i nterf aci ng and tel ecommuni cati on 
designer, data logging and control, industrial systems cteign, hardware design, biomedical da/ice design, real -time software design and 
development, instrumentation analysis and control, computer-integrated manufacturing. 

Avuardsand ReGo^tion 

The Department of E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng offers the f ol I owi ng awards: 1. Outstandi ng academi c peri'ormance award presented to a 
junior for academic excel I ence. 2. Service A ward to the graduating seni or who has show a committment to service to fellow students. 3. Chair's 
Award for outstandi ng academi c performance to a graduati ng seni or. 

Computer Sdence(CMSC) 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1119 A.V. Willians Building, 301-405-2672 

www.cs.umd.edu 

ugrad@cs.umd.edu 

Chair: L. Davis 

Professors: A. AgrawalaJ . Aloimonos, W. Cleaveland, L. Defloriani, B. Dorr, H. Elman, W. Gasarch, J . Hollingsworth, S. Khuller, D. JVIount D. 

Nau, D. O'Leary, D. Perlis, A. Porter, W. Pugh, J . Reggia, N. Roussopoulos, S. Salzberg, H. Samet A. Shanl<ar, B. Shneiderman, A. Srinivasan, 

G. Stewart V. Subrahmanian, A. Varshney 

Associate l^rofessors: W. Arbaugh, B. Bederson, S. Bhattacharjee, R. Duraiswami, D.Jacobs, P. Keleher, C. Krusl<al, A. |V|emon,J. Purtilo, A. 

Sussman, C. Tseng 

Assistant Professors: A. DeshpandeJ. Foster, L.Getoor, F. Guimbretiere 1^1. Hicl<s,J. Katz, C. Kingsford, |V|. Pop, V. Sazawal, N. Spring 

Instructors: E. Golub,J . Plane 

Lecturers: F. Emad, L. Herman, M. Hugue^ N. Padua-Perez 

Professors Emeriti: V. Basili, Y. Chu, L. Kand, R. Miller,] . Minker, M. Zelkowitz 

TheMajcr 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: theirtheory, design, development and application. Principal areas within 
computer science include artificial intelligence, computer systems, database systems, human factors, numerical analysis, programming languages, 
software engineering, and theory of computing. A computer scientistisconcemed with problem solving. Problems range from abstract 
determinations of what problems can be solved with computers and the complexity of thealgorithms that solve them to practical matters (design 
of computer systems whi ch are easy for peopi e to use) . Computer sci end sts bui I d computati onal model s of systems i ncl udi ng physi cal phenomena 
(weather forecasting), human behavior (expert systems, robotics), and computer systems themselves (performance evaluation). Such rrlodel soften 
requi re extensi ve numeri c of symbol i c computati on. 

Combined B.S./M.S. Pro-am in Computer Sdaxie 

The Department of Computer Sci ence offers a combi ned B .S./M .S. degree program for students with excepti onal abi I ity and i nterest i n computer 
sci ence Students enrol I ed i n the Combi ned Degree Program may count up to 9 credi ts of graduate coursework taken for the! r undergraduate 
degree toward the M .S. degree as well. Those interested in the program should apply shortly before beginning their junior year. For more 
i nf ormati on, contact the Computer Sci ence D epartment U ndergraduate E ducati on Off i ce. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

The course of study for a Computer Sci ence maj or must i ncl ude al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

1. A grade of C or better i n each of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

a. CMSC 131 or a score of 5 on A version of thej AVA Advanced Placement exam or a score of 4 or 5 on theAB version 
of the J AVA Advanced Placement exam or an acceptable score on the appropriate Department exemption exami nation, 
which is to betaken at the time of entry into the program. 

b. C M SC 132 or acceptabi e score on the appropri ate D epartment exempti on exami nati on, whi ch i s to be taken at the ti me 
of entry i nto the program. 

c. CMSC 212 or acceptablescoreontheappropriate Department exemption examination, which is to be taken at the time 
of entry i nto the program. 

d. C M SC 250 or acceptabi e score on the appropri ate D epartment exempti on exami nati on, whi ch i s to be taken at the ti me 
of entry i nto the program. 

eAtleast 27 credit hours at the 300-400 levels. These mustindudeCMSC 311, CMSC 330, CMSC 351, andatleastl5 
credi t hours from the f ol I owi ng C M SC courses wi th no more than two courses from a si ngl e category: 

Computer Systems: Up to two of 411, 412, 414, 417 

I nf ormati on Processi ng: 420, one of 421 or 424 or 426 or 427 

Software E ngi neeri ng/P rogrammi ng L anguages: U p to two of 430, 433, 434, 435 

Algorithms and Computati on Theory: 451, one of 452 or 456 

Numerical Analysis?*: One of 460 or 466. 

*Woter Courses in Numerical Andysis require MATH 240 and 241 as addtional prereqji sites. Sudents 
withoutdther of these prereqji stes must choose thdr 15 credt hours from the remaining coisses in the other 
four areas 

2. MATH 140 and 141. A STAT course which has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequisite, and one 
other MATH, STAT, or AMSC course which has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course as a prerequisite A grade of C 
or better must be earned in each of the courses. No course that is cross-listed as CMSC may be counted in this requirement 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



3. A minimum of 12 additional credit hours of 300-400 level courses in one discipline outside of computer science with an average 
grade of C or better. No course that is cross-listed as CMSC may be counted in this requirement. Note The following general 
gui del i nes shoul d be observed when sel ecti ng courses f or thi s upper I evel support] ng sequence 

a. Courses must have all the same four- letter acronym 

b. Each course should be a minimum of 3 credits. 

c. Only 1 special topics or i ndependent study course (such as courses numbered 498 or 499) may be used. 

Any variations must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Director. No course used to fulfill another requirement (other than CORE 
Advanced Studi es) can be counted i n thi s requi rement. 



ReqiiremaitB for the Minor 

The purpose of the mi nor i n Computer Sci ence i s not onl y to gi ve students a strong f oundati on i n, and understandi ng of, al gori thmi c reasoni ng, 
probi em sol vi ng methods i nvol vi ng computers and computati on, and a sol i d base to hel p students adapt to future changes i n technol ogy, but to 
compi ement and enhance any students maj or program of study. The computer sci ence mi nor may be earned by students not maj ori ng i n computer 
sci ence and computer engi neeri ng. A grade of C or better must be earned i n al I courses requi red for the mi nor. See 

http://underarad.cs.umd.edu/current-students/dearee-reauirements-for-minor/ for detai I ed I nf ormati on. The award of a M I nor wi 1 1 be noted on the Students 
transcri pt at the ti me of graduati on. 

Advising 

Computer sci ence maj ors may obtai n advi si ng at room 1119 A .V . Wi 1 1 i ams B ui I di ng. I nterested students shoul d cal I 301-405-2672 to recei ve 
further information about the program. Additional information can be found at http://unclerqrad.cs.umd.edu . Students who have been away more 
than two years may f i nd that due to curri cul um changes, the courses they have taken may no I onger be adequate preparati on for the courses 
required to complete the major. Students in this situation must meet with the Department Advisor to make appropriate plans. 

HcncrsPrcg'am 

A departmental honors program provides an opportunity for outstanding undergraduates to takegraduate-leve! courses or to begin scholarly 
research i n i ndependent study wi th a f acul ty member. Students are accepted i nto the program after thei r sophomore year based on thei r academi c 
performance Additionally, tiie department has a chapter of Upsilon Pi Epsilon which isan intemational honor society to recognize ©(cell ence in 
computer sci ence educati on. 

Scholarships and Finandai Assistance 

Students may find employment as tutors, as undergraduate teaching assistants, or as members of the departments laboratory staff. Professors may 
al so have funds to hi re undergraduates to assi st i n research. M any students al so parti ci pate i n i ntemshi p or cooperati ve educati on programs, 
worki ng i n the computer i ndustry for a semester duri ng thei r j uni or or seni or years. 

CdnsdingSc Pa-somd Sa-vices(EDCP) 

Cdlegeof Educaticn 

3214 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2858 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCP 

Chair: D. Kivlighan, Professor & Chair 

Professors: G. Gottfredson, M . Hoffman, S. Komives, C. Lee R. Lent; S. Rosenfield, H. Teglasi-Golubcow 

AssociateProfessors: V. Boyd, E. Fabian, C. Hoi comb- Mccoy, K. I nkel as, S.Jones, M. Lucas, W. Strein 

Assistant Professors: K. MacDonald-Wilson, P. Phillips, S. Ouaye 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: L. Clement,]. Hutchinson, B.Jacoby 

Affi Nate Assistant Professors: J. Adams-Gaston, T. Flannery, L. Gast, D. Grandner, M. Guenzler-Sta/ens,J. Kandell, L. Kiely, S. 

Kirkland-Gordon, G. Metzelaa-s, P. Mielke,] . Osteen, J .G. Stewart, B. Wa-ner,J . Zacker 

Professors Emeriti: J. Birk, D. Hershenson, G. Marx, M. McEwen, P. Powers, D. Pumroy, N. Scholossberg, W. Sedlacek 

TheMajor 

The Department of Counsel i ng and Personnel Servi ces offers programs of preparati on at the master's degree, advanced graduate speci al i st; and 
doctoral degree I a/el s for counsel ors i n el ementary and secondary school s, rehabi I i tati on agenci es, busi ness and i ndustry, and col I ege and 
uni versi ty counsel i ng centers. A ddi ti onal graduate programs of preparati on are provi ded for col I ege student personnel admi ni strators and school 
psychol ogi sts. The department al so offers a j oi nt doctoral program with the Department of Psychol ogy i n counsel i ng psychol ogy. 

W hi I e the department does not have an undergraduate maj or, i t does offer a number of courses whi ch are open to undergraduates and are suggested 
for students considering graduate work in counseling or other human service fields. Specific courses in peer counseling, leadership, and diversity 
are provided. 

Reqiiremaits for the Minor 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Requiranentsfor theMinor in Leadership Stud es 

The E DC P M i nor i n L eada^i p Stud es promotes col I ege student I eadershi p devel opment by educati ng undergraduate students for and about 

leadership in a complex world. Thegoal of the minor is to prepare students to serve effectively in fomial andinformal leadership roles in campus, 

I ocal , nati onal , and gl obal contexts. F acul ty and students i n the mi nor are dedi cated to advanci ng the f i e! d of I eadershi p studi es by bui I di ng upon 

and critically evaluating existing theoretical, research-based, and practical knowledge. Core courses in the mi nor are sequenced to meet 

i ncreasi ngl y compi ex sets of I eami ng outcomes across cogni ti ve, personal deve! opment; and group/organi zati onal domai ns. Students i n the mi nor 

are exposed to di verse theori es and perspecti ves on I eadei^i p and are encouraged to appi y anal yti cal ski 1 1 s to devel op thei r own worki ng 

phi I osophy of I eadershi p that wi 1 1 serve them i n organi zati onal and career contexts. C i vi c engagement and mul ti cul tural competence are vi ewed as 

necessary requi rements for I eadershi p. 

Eligbility 

The first 20 qualified applicants will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis each semester. In order to apply for the mi nor in Leadership 
Studies, students must have 

1. CompI eted at I east 30 credi t hours pri or to appI i cati on to the program. 

2. B e i n good academi c standi ng. 

3. Completed EDCP 217 with a C or better. 

4. Been admitted into the Mi nor pri or to the completion of the final 9 credits of Mi nor coursework and no later than one full academicyear 
before the expected date of graduati on. 

The EDCP M inor in Leadership Studies consists of IScrecftlxxirs No more than six credits can also be applied to a students major, and no 
more than six credits may betaken at an institution other than the University of Maryland College Park. No course with an earned grade below C 
may count towards the mi nor. 

Required Courses 

• EDCP 217 - 1 ntroduction to Leadership 

• EDCP 315 - Leadership in Groups and Organizations 

• EDCP 318 -Applied Contextual Leadership 

OR 

• EDCP 418 - Leadership and Identity 

• EDCP 417 - Advanced Leadership Seminar 

Elect] veCourses: 

Students must choose two 3-credi t courses, one at the 200 1 a/el and one at the 300 or 400 1 evel , from an approved I i st of el ecti ves. See B eth 
Niehaus (0110 Stamp Student Union, eniehaus@um.edu) for the list of approved courses and additional details regarding the EDCP Minorin 
Leadership Studies. 

Criminology & Criminal J u5tice(CCJ S) 

Cdlegeof Bdiavicral and Sodal Sdaxies 

2220 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-4699 

www.ccjs.umd.edu 

Chair: S. Simpson 

Director: L. Brooks (Undergraduate Director, UMCP), S. Gerstenblitfi (Shady Grove) 

Professors: D. Gottfredson (Graduate Director), G. LaFree J . Laub, D. Mackenzie R. Paternoster, A. Piquero, P. Reuter, C. Wellford 

Associate Professors: L. Dugan, E. Wish 

Assistant Professors: B.Johnson, D. Kirk,J. McGloin, H. Petras 

Lecturers: T. Bonnar, P. Canter, G. Cosper, A. Gaston, R. Hamill, J . Horner, A. Lehman, S. Malm, T. Mauriello, D. Salem, B. Smith, C. Roberts 

White, A. Zumbrun 

TheMajor 

The mission of the Department of Criminal J ustice& Criminology is to provide a supportive academic and professional environment for faculty 
and students. The Department promotes stucfy and teachi ng concemi ng cri me and del i nquency and thei r preventi on and control . The U ni versi ty of 
Maryland's Department of Criminology and Criminal J usticeis a national and intemational leader in research and criminal justice educati on, and its 
Graduate Program i s ranked number one i n the f i el d. Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the fol lowi ng acronym: CCJ S. 

Pro-am Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compI eted the CCJ S degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the fol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate basi c knowl edge of maj or cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce content areas. 

2. Students will demonstrate a basic knowl edge of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the social sciences. 

3. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajor 

The major in Criminology & Criminal J usti ce comprises 30 hours of coursework in criminology and criminal justice Eighteen (18) hours of 
supporting sequence selected from a list of social and behavioral sci ence courses are requi red (list is available in the CCJ S advising office and on 
the department websi te) . N o grade I ower than a C- may be used toward the maj or. A n average grade of C i s requi red i n the supporti ng sequence 
Nine(9) hours of ttie supporting sequence must beat ttie 300/400 1 evel. Inaddition, MATH 111 or higher (MATH 220, MATH 140 or STAT 100, 
but not MATH 113 or M ATH 115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved course i n social stati sties) must be compI eted with a grade of 'C or better. A 
grade of 'C or better is required in MATH 111 as a prerequisite to CCJ S200. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Major Requirements 

I ntroduction to Criminal J ustice 
Criminology 
Criminal Law in Action 

Criminological and Criminal J ustice Research Methods 
Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 
J uveni I e De! i nquency 
CCJ S ELECT CCJ S Electives (3 courses) 
Oneirom 

Crime and Delinquency Prevention 
Treatment of Cri mi nal s and Del i nquents 
Contemporary Criminological Theory 

Total credts 



CCJ SlOO 
CCJ S105 
CCJ S230 
CCJS300 
CCJS340 
CCJ S350 



CCJ S451 
CCJ S452 
CCJ S454 



Crecfts 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 



30 



9 
9 



Supporting Sequence 

SUPPORT Lower or Upper I a/el courses from approved list (3 courses) 
SUPPORT Ml Upperle/el courses from approved list 

(3 courses) 

One from 3-4 

MATH 111 I ntroduction to Probability 
M ATH 220 E I ementary Cal cul us I 
MATH 140 Calculus I 
STATIOO Elementary Statistics aid Probability 

One from 3-4 

CCJ S200 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal J ustice 
ECON321 Economic Statistics 
PSYC200 Statistical M ethods in Psychology 
SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 
BMGT230 Business Statistics 

Total crecfts- Major and Supporting 54 



Electives for CCJ S Majors (most courses are 3 credits): 

CCJ S234 Law of Criminal I nvestigation 

CCJS310 Criminal Investigations 

CCJS320 I ntroduction to Criminalistics 

CCJS330 ContemporaryCriminological Issues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary L egal Pol i cy I ssues 

CCJ S332 M aj or Transitions: From Undergraduate to Professional 

CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJ S357 I ndustrial and Retail Security Administration 

CCJ S359 FiddTraining in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJ S370 Race Cri me and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJS386 Experiential Leaming 

cc\ S3RRH ' "dependent Reading Course in Criminology and Criminal 

■' J ustice- Honors 

cc\ S3R9H ' "dependent Research in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

■' - Honors 

CCJ S398 Law Enforcement and FiddTraining 

CCJ S399 I ndependent Study i n Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJ S400 Cri mi nal Courts 

CCJ S432 L aw of Correcti ons 

CCJS444 Advanced Law Enforcement Administration 

CCJS451 Crimeand Delinquency Prevention 

CCJS452 Treatmentof CriminalsandDelinquents 

CCJS453 WhiteColla- and Organized Crime 

CCJS454 ContemporaryCriminological Theory 

CCJ S455 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice I 

CCJ S456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice 1 1 

CCJ S457 ComparativeCriminology and Criminal J ustice 

CCJS461 Psychologyof Criminal Behavior 

CCJ S462 Special Problems in Security Administration 

CCJ S498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



Other ReqiiremaitsfcrtheMajcr 

The CCJ S Department enforces al I prerequi si tes and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are cl osed. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at I east once each semester. Advising is aval I able on a walk- in basis between 10amand4 
pm weekdays i n 2201 L eF rak H al I . Students must compi ete al I course prerequi si tes and obtai n department permi ssi on from CCJSAdvisingto 
enrol I i n most CCJ S cl asses. Cal I 301-405-4729 or emai I advisi nqOcri m.umd.edu . 

internships 

Requi ranaits for I nternship PlaoarTaits 

The i ntemshi p must be a I eami ng experi ence i nvol vi ng work i n a cri mi nal j usti ce or cri mi nol ogi cal setti ng. I nterns are expected to gai n val uabi e 
i nf ormati on whi ch wi 1 1 add to thei r overal I understandi ng of the f i e! d of cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce I nternshi p posi ti ons must center around 
gai ni ng new materi al over the course of the semester and are expected to i nvol ve some degree of ongoi ng trai ni ng/l eami ng f or the i ntern. 
I nternshi p pi acements are subj ect to the approval of the I ntemshi p Di rector. 

I nternship Eligbility 

I nterns must meet the f ol I owi ng cri teri a: 

• I nterns must be CCJ S majors 

• Interns must have completed a minimum of 56 credits at the time of application 

• Interns must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 at the time of application 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credi t over the course of the semester 

• A maximum of 6 internship credits per semester and a total of 12 internship credits overall will be permitted 

• I nternshi p credi t wi 1 1 not be approved for current or pra/i ousi y hel d j obs 

Interns must register themselves for theintemshipprior to the end of the semester's scheduleadjustment period. Obtaining Departmental approval 
for thei ntemshi p does NOT register the student for the class. Additional information about internships can be pi eked up from the CCJ S advising 
office in 2201 LeFrak Hall or on lineatwww.ccjs.umd.edu/Undergrad/index.asp 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The Honors Program is a four-semester (12 required credit hours) sequence which a student begins in the fall semester of his or her junior year. 
The classes are in seminar format and are writing intensive During thefall semester of their senior year, students will complete a thesis'research 
proposal. Thispaperwill be 25-40 pages in length and must be orally defended. During the senior year, students must complete a graduate course; 
whi ch can be taken duri ng the F al I or Spri ng semester. H onors students may count thei r honors courses toward sati sf acti on of thei r maj or 
curriculum requirements. 

Student Societies and Prcfessicnal Organizaticns 

There are two Student Societies availablefor membership for CCJ S majors: the Cri mi nal J ustice Student Association (CJ SA) and Alpha Phi 
Sigma Honor Society (APS). 

The Cri mi nal J usti ce Student A ssoci ati on (CJ SA ) i s dedi cated to suppi ementi ng our members' academi c experi ence by provi di ng extracurri cul ar 
opportunities to further explore critical issues involving cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal justice. Through a regular program of speakers, agency 
demonstrati ons, communi ty servi ce prqj ects and an annual career f ai r, the CJ SA provi des students wi th val uabI e i nf ormati on for maki ng deci si ons 
about career choi ces, further graduate I a/el study, and I aw school . The CJ SA provi des students wi th opportuni ti es f or academi c and soci al 
i nteracti on, and access to cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce researchers, teachers, and practi ti oners represent] ng a vari ety of government; academi c 
and commerci al corporate and non- prof i t organi zati ons. A 1 1 graduate and undergraduate students, regardi ess of maj or, are el i gi bl e for 
membership in the CJSA. CJSA meetings and programs are held at I east monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. CJSA does not assess 
membershi p dues or fees. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) is a National Cri mi nal J ustice Honor Soci ety founded 1942 and membership is open to CCJ S majors who have completed 
at I east 40 total credits with at least 12 credits in CCJ S courses. Undergraduate Applicants must have an overal I GPA of at I east a 3. 2 and a maj or 
GPA of atleast3.4. Graduate student applicants must have a 3.4 overal I GPA. Applicants must fill out an application, submit an official or 
unofficial transcript, and a check (personal check isfine) made out to Alpha Phi Sigma for $55. The local chapter's name is Omega lota. Putthe 
compI eted appi i cati on, check, and transcri pt i n D r. B rooks' mai I box i nsi de 2220 L ^rak H al I . A ppl i cati ons are processed throughout the academi c 
year. You will be notified when you have been officially accepted. Applications are aval I able from the CCJ S Advising Office in 2103 Lefrak 
Hall. 

Avvardsand ReGc^iiticn 

E ach semester the department sel ects the outstandi ng graduati ng seni or for the Peter J . L q i ns award. 

CirriculunandinstructiGn- Elaiienlary Education (EDCi) 

Cdlegeof Educaticn 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: L.VdIi (Interim) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. Hammer, W. Holliday, D. lmig(Prof Of Practice), M.Johnson, S. Koziol (Interim Assoc. Dean), J. 

McGlnnis, R. Oxford, O. Saracho, D. Sullivan, B. VanSledright, T. Weible( Assoc Dean), D. Wisemai (Deai) 

Associate Professors: P.Campbell, M. Chambliss, D. Chazan, A. Graeber(Emerita), V. MacDonald,J. McCaleb,J. 0'Flahavan,W. Slater 

Assistant Professors: T. Brown, L. Clari<,J. Coffey, A. Edwards, S. Hughes, M. Kushner, M. Martin-Beltran, C. Monts-Sano, M. Peercy, M. 

Stieff, J. Turner 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

TheMajcr 

The Department of Curri cul um and I nstructi on offers an undergraduate curri cul a i n el ementary educati on that I eads to the B achel or of Sci ence. 
Graduates of the Elementary Education program are prepared to teach grades 1 through 6. 

G raduates of the E I ementary E ducati on program meet the requi rements for certi f i cati on i n M aryl and and add ti onal states that are af f i I i ated wi th 
the I nterstate Reel procity Agreement through the M aryl and State Department of Education. 

Pro-am Learning Outccmes 

1. C ontent K nawl edgs E I ementary E ducati on teacher candi dates have i n-depth knowl edge of the subj ect matter that they teach as descri bed i n 
professional (Association for Childhood Education I ntemati onal, ACEI), state(MSDE), and institutional standards. 

ZPedagogcal and PrafiesEional KnovuledgQ Skills^ and Dispoaticns El ementary Educati on teacher candi dates can effectively pi an 
classroom- based instruction or activities for their roles as teachers. Candidates' knowl edge^ skills, and dispositions are applied effectively in 
practice. 

3. ProfesEJcnal Dispcaticns: El ementary Educati on teacher candi dates are able to work with students, families, and communities in ways that 
reflect the dispositions expected of professional educators as delineated in professional (ACEI), state (MSDE), and institutional standards. 

AchnisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

Admission to the Teacher Education Professional Program is competitive. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in the Col lege of 
Education entry. 

Reqii rements for theMajcr 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre professional courses and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may 
enrol I in courses i denti f i ed as part of the prof essi onal sequence, they must compi ete the sel ecti ve admi ssi on requi rements and be f ul I y admi tted to 
the College of Education's Teacher Education Program. An overall grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher 
Education. All teacher candidates are requi red to obtain satisfactory a/aluations on the Col lege of Education Foundational 
CompetenciesTTechnical Standards and to attain qualifying scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxis I andPraxisll assessments. PraxisI is 
requi red for admi ssi on, and P raxi s 1 1 i s requi red for student teachi ng and graduati on. Student teachi ng i s a yearl ong i nternshi p, whi ch takes pi ace i n 
a Col I aborati ng School . 

Crafts 

TheGateway Requiranatefof entrance intD the E I anaiitary 
Teadia' Education pro-am indude 

BIOSCI Biological sci enc^lab 4 

PHY SCI Physical scienc^lab 4 

MATH212 Elements of Numbers and Operations 3 

MATH213 Elements of Geometry and Measurement 3 

EDCI280 Introduction to Teaching* 3 

*ninimimgracle, B 

NOTE: The 14-16 credits of rnath and science mist be coirpletBdmitti a GPA of 2.7. 

Courses vuhidi doublecomt vuith CORE 

CoLTses which may satisfy the university s general education 
requirements (CORE) arid which are required in the Elementary 
Education program of stud es follow: 

HIST156 Socid and Political History 3 

BIOSCI Biological Sci ence'Lab 4 

PHY SCI Physical Science'Lab Gateway Requirements 4 

SOC SCI Social Science 3 

Recommended social sci ence coLrse options: 

GEOGIOO IntroductiontoGeogr^hy 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



GV PT 170 A meri can Gova'nmait 
SOCY 100 I ntroducti on to Psychol ogy 
PSYCIOO I ntroducti on to Sociology 



Other PreProfiesaGnal Requirements 

EDCI301 Teaching Art in the Elementary School, OR 

ARTTIOO Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals, OR 

ARTTllO Elements of Drawing 
E DCI 443 L iterature for Chi I dren aid Y outh 
MATH214 Elements of Probability and Statistics 
M U E D 155 F undamental s for the C I assroom Teacher 
SOCY 230 Soci d ogi cal Soci al Psychol ogy, OR 

PSYC221 Socid Psychology 
EDIVIS410 Classroom Assessment 
EDPS301 Foundations of Education, OR 

EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society, OR 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

EDHD411 Child Growth aid Development 

EDHD425 Language Development and Reading Acquisition 

A rea C rs A rea of E mphasi s chosen from the f ol I owi ng areas: 

Communication, Foreign Language, Literature^ Mathematics, 
Science^ and Social Studies?** 

**TheEDCI Advising Office lias (Mai led inibrmation regarding each area of 
errphasis. All pre-professional course work rrust be corrpletBd with a Cor better. 



3 
3 

18 



ProfesEJonal Education Courses 

EDCI397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools 

E DCI 385 Computers for Teachers 

EDCI461 Maberidsfor Creating Skilled aid Motivated Readers (K-6) 



Year L ong IntErrdiip 

EDCI322 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Social Studies 3 

EDCI342 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Language Arts 3 

EDCI352 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Mathematics 3 

EDCI362 CurriculumandlnstructioninElementaryEd.: Reading 3 

EDCI372 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Science 3 

EDCI488 Classroom Management 1 

EDCI481 Student Teaching: El ementay 12 

EDCI464 Reading Instruction and Diagnosis across Content Areas 3 



NOTES: 



>AII preprofessional and professional courses must be 

completed with a grade of C or better. 
• All courses must be compi eted before the year-l ong 

i ntemshi p unl ess an excepti on has been approved by the 

EDCI Advising Office. 
>A passing scoreon Praxis 1 1 is required before enrollment in 

student teaching. 



Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory for al I students. Students recei ve advi si ng through i ndi vi dual appoi ntments or wal k-i n hours duri ng the earl y regi strati on 
period. Information regarding advising schedules is aval I able each semester. Walk-in advising hours are also posted each semester. Check in the 
department off i ce^ 1207 B enj ami n B ui I di ng. 

IntErnships 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Theyeariong irta'nship, which is the culminating expa'iencein theteacha" preparation program, tal<es place in a collaborating school (i.e, partner 
school, PDS -- Professional Development School). 

Scholarships and Financial Asastance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in 
cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pabes i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, vi si t 
www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu. 

Cirri culiiTi and Instructi en- Secjondary Education (EDCI) 

Cdlegeof Educaticn 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: L.VdIi (Interim) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. Hammer, W. Holliday, D. lmig(Prof Of Practice), M.Johnson, S. Koziol (Interim Assoc. Dean), J. 

McGinnis, R. Oxford, O. Saracho, D. Sullivan, B. VanSledright, T. Weible(Assoc Deai), D. Wiseman (Dean) 

Associate Professors: P. Campbell, M. Chambliss, D. Chazan, A. Graeber (Emerita),J . McCaleb,J . O'Flahavan, W. Slater 

Assistant Professors: T. Brown, I . Clark, J . Coffey, A. Edwards, S. Hughes, M . Kushner, M . Marti n-Be!tran, C. MonteSano, M . Peercy, M . Stieff, 

J . Turner 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

TheMajcr 

The Department of Curri cul um and I nstructi on offers undergraduate curri cul a i n secondary educati on that I eads to the B achel or of Sci ence or 
B achel or of A rts degree and prepares teachers i n vari ous subj ect areas for teachi ng i n mi ddl e school s and secondary school s, grades 7- 12. 

The Department has mul ti pi e pathways for students who are i nterested i n teachi ng at the secondary I a/el : 

The Dual Major option, which is designed for incoming freshmen or sophomores, leads to the Bachelor's degree with a major in an academic 
content area pi us a second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to have an academi c content rnaj or whi ch sati sf i es the 
requi rements of the academi c department and meets the standards for teacher certi f i cati on. Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of 
courses can compi ete both maj ors i n four years wi th careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

The Department of Curriculum and I nstruction also offers a fiveyear integrated master's with certification program. See 
www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/infc/tcerthtm 

G raduates of the Secondary E ducati on programs meet the requi rements for certi f i cati on i n M aryl and and add ti onal states that are af f i I i ated wi th 
the I nterstate Reel procity Agreement through the M aryl and State Department of Education. 

Prog'am Learning Outcomes 

1. Ccntiait KnouvledgB Teacher candi dates have in-depth knowledge of the subj ect matter that they teach as described in professional, state, and 
institutional standards. They demonstrate their knowledge through inquiry, critical analysis, and synthesis of the subj ect. 

2 Pedagogcal and ProfieEEional Knavutedg^ Skills^ and Dispoaticns Teacher candidates can effectively plan classroom-based instruction or 
activities for their roles as teachers. Candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions are applied effectively in practice. 

3. ProfesEJonal Dispoaticns Teacher candidates areableto work with students, families, and communities in ways that reflect the dispositions 
expected of professional educators as delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards. 

Academic Prog'amsand Departmental Facilities 

I n addition to the double major program, the department offers a FiveYear I ntegrated M aster's with Certification Program (I M CP). This program, 
which is intended for content majors entering thejunior or senior year, is for talented students with a minimum GPA of 3.0 who seek to combine 
undergraduate studi es i n the content area and prof essi onal educati on as a f oundati on for a focused prof essi onal year at the graduate I eve! I eadi ng to 
secondary- 1 evel certi f i cati on i n the subj ect f i el d and the M aster's of E ducati on degree. A s undergraduates, students appi y to the I M C P program. I f 
admi tted, students compI ete thei r baccal aureate degrees wi th a maj or i n the rel evant content area and a mi ni mum of 12 credi ts i n prof essi onal 
educati on studi es rel ated to teacher certi fi cati on requi rements. I n thei r f i fth year, they are admi tted to the graduate program and enrol I i n a f ul I -year 
internship. The students will also complete graduate I eve! professional studi estiiatrnake them eligible for initial teacher certification and the 
master's of education degree 

Information about this secondary education program option isavailableatwww.education.umd.edu/EDCI/info/tcert.htm 

Acknisaon totiie Maj or 

Admission to the Teacher Education Professional Program is competitive. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in the Col lege of 
Education entry in Chapter 6. 

Reqii rements for tiieMaj or 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre professional courses and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may 
enrol I in prof essi onal educati on course requi rements tiiey must be f ul I y admi tted to the Col I ege of E ducati on's Teacher E ducati on P rogram. A n 
overal I grade poi nt average of 2.5 must be mai ntai ned after admi ssi on to Teacher E ducati on. A 1 1 teacher candi dates are requi red to obtai n 
satisfactory evaluations on the Collegeof Education Foundational Competencie5n"echnical Standards and to attain qualifying scores for the State 
of Maryland on the Praxis I (Matti 177, Writing 173, Reading 177) and Praxis 1 1 assessments. Praxis! is requi red for admission, and Praxis 1 1 is 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



requi red for student teachi ng and graduati on. Student teachi ng i s a yearl ong i ntemshi p, whi ch takes pi ace i n a Col I aborati ng School ( i . e , partner 
school, PDS - Professional Da/el opment School). 

The Department offers a vari ety of secondary educati on programs I eadi ng to the B achel or of Sci ence and B ache! or of A rts degrees. Students who 
complete a secondary education program at UM meet the Maryland State Department of Education requirements for the Professional Eligibility 
Certificate Consult ttie Department of Curriculum and Instruction for updated information. 

Fordgi-LanguageRequiraTient; Bachelor of ArtsDe^ee 

L anguage prof i ci ency may be demonstrated i n one of several ways: 

(a) Successful completion of level 4 in one language. Students must provide a high school transcriptto verify exemption. 

( b) Successful compi eti on of an i ntermedi ate-l a/e! col I ege f orei gn I anguage course desi gnated by the department 

( c) Students who have nati ve prof i ci ency i n a I anguage other than E ngl i sh may certi f y thei r nati ve prof i ci ency by taki ng an exam admi ni stered 
by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. For more information, pi ease see an advisor in the Arts and Humanities Office 
of StudentAffars, orcdl 301-405-2108. 

Students who have nati ve prof i ci ency i n a I anguage other than E ngl i sh shoul d see thei r content area advi sor. 

Art EducatJcn (preK-12) 

The A rt E ducati on curri cul um i s desi gned to prepare students to teach art i n e! ementary through secondary school s. 1 1 provi des prospecti ve art 
teachers wi th a knowl edge base about the theori es and best practi ces re! a/ant to ef f ecti ve pedagogy, as wel I as current educati on and art educati on 
goal s and standards. Students admi tted to A rt E ducati on compI ete the B achel or of A rts and are requi red to have an academi c content maj or. 

For more information on the sequence of pre professional and professional courses, consultthe College of Education, Department of Curriculum 
and I nsbxiction's advising office 



CrecftB 



PreProfiesEicnal/Siipject Area Courses 
AfctB CarseSequendngisiMxb-rB/ieuii 

ARTT150 IrrtroductiontoArtTheory 

ARTTIOO Two Dimensional Design Fundamentals 

ARTTllO Elements of Drawing! 

ARTH200 ArtoftheWestemWoridtolBOO 

ARTH201 ArtoftheWestemWorid after 1300 

ARTT200 ThreeDimensional Art Fundamentals 

ARTT210 Elements of Drawing 1 1 

ARTT320 Elements of Painting 

ARTT418 Drawing 

ARTT428 Painting 

EDCI407 PfacticuminArtEducation:ThreeDimensional (Spring 
only) 

One from 

A RTT340 E I ements of Pri ntinaki ng: I ntagi i o 

A RTT341 E I ements of Pri ntinaki ng: Woodcut and Re! i ef 

A RTT342 E I ements of Pri ntinaki ng: Col I agraphy 

ARTT343 Elements of Printinaking: Screen Printing 

A RTT344 E I ements of Pri ntinaki ng: L i thography 

PreProfiesEJonal/Education Courses 

EDHD4B Adolescent Development 

FnHn42fi Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content 
Areas! 

E DC! 463 Read! ng i n the Secondary School 

One from 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education 

EDPS201 Educati on in Contemporary American Society 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI405 ArtEducation Methods I fspr/ngon/y; 
E DC! 373 Practi cum i n Ceramics (Spring only) 
EDSP470 I rrtroduction to Special Education 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



EDCI403 

EDCI400* 

EDCI423* 

EDCI406 

EDCI401 

EDCI402 

EDCI474 
EDCI488 



Teachi ng A rt C ri ti ci sm and A estheti cs (Fall only) 3 

Field Experience in Art Education (Faiioniy), and 1 

A rt E ducati on |V| ethods II (Fall only) 3 

Technology and Two-Dimensional Art(Faii only) 3 

Student Teachi ng i n E I ementary School : A rt 6 

Student Teachi ng i n Secondary School s: A rt 6 

I ncl usi on, D i versi ty and P rof essi onal i sm i n Secondary _ 
Education 

Sel ected Topi cs i n Teacher E ducati on ( Student , 
Teachi ng Semi nar, A rt) 

*EDCI400 and EDCI423 tal^n concurreriby 



En^ish Education (Grades 7-12) 

Students who complete the English Education curriculum receive the Bachelor of Arts degree and meet the MSDE requirements for the 
Professional Eligibility Certificate. Students admitted to English Education are required to have an academic content major and must complete the 
f ol I owl ng program requi rements. P I ease check with the ENGL department regardi ng speci f i c coursework. 

Crafts 

PreProfesEJcnal/Subj act Area Courses 



FRGN 
LANG 


Foreign Language f;nter(rec//atenBsfer)'ofamxfem or c/assrca/ 
language is required.) 


8 


ENGL280 


1 ntrodudi on to E ngl i sh L anguage 


3 


ENGL301 


Critical M ethods i n the Study of Literature 


3 


ENGL399 


Senior Semi nar 


3 




One from 


3 


COM M 107 


Oral Communication: Principles and Practices 




coiviivn?s 


1 ntroduction to 1 nterpersonal Communication 




COM M 220 


Small Group Discussion 






One from 


3 


COM M 230 


Argumentation and Debate 




COM M 330 


Argumentation and Public Policy 




COM M 383 


Urban Communication 




COM M 402 


Communication Theory and Process 






One from 


3 


ENGL 101* 


1 ntroduction to Writing 




ENGL101H=* 


' Honors Composition 
One from 


3 


ENGL201 


Westem Worid Literature^ Homer to the Renaissance 




ENGL202 


Westem Worid Literature^ Renaissanceto the Present 






One from 


3 


ENGL304 


The M ajor Wori<s of Shakespeare 




ENGL403 


Shakespeare: The Early Wori<s 




ENGL404 


Shakespeare: The Later Works 






One from 


3 


ENGL384 


Concepts of Grammar 




ENGL383 


The Uses of Language 




ENGL385 


English Semantics 




ENGL482 


History of the English Language 




ENGL483 


American English 




ENGL484 


Advanced English Grammar 




ENGL486 


1 ntroduction to Old English 




ENGL489 


Special Topics in English Language 





DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



One Irom 3 

ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
ENGL393 English Technics Writing 
ENGL493 Advanced Expository Writing 

One^om 
ENGL487 Foundations of Rhetoric 3 

COIV||V|360 The Rhetoric of Blacl< America 
COJVI M 401 I nterpreti ng Strategic Discourse 
COIV||V|453 ThePowerof Discourse in American Life 

Bri^shandAirmcanLitErEtures 15 

one upper- 1 evel course i n each of f i ve out of the 
f ol I owi ng si X areas to be tal<en duri ng the sophomore 
and j uni or years; one of these f i ve courses must be i n 
A meri can L i terature ( 15 credi ts total ) 

1. Medieval Literature 

2. Renai ssance L iterature other than Shakespeare 

3. Restoration or 18th Century Literature 

4. 9th Century British Literature 

5. American Literature before 1900 

6. 20th Century British or American Literature 
Elective: 

ENGL ENGL Elective Women or Minority course 3 

*lfexeirptfromENGLiai, majors are required tn tats ENGL391 IntBrrredi^B 
Writing or ENOL394 Introduction to Creative Writing. 



EDHD4B 
EDHD426 
EDCI463 

EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 



PreProfesEJonal/Education Courses 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content 
Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 

One from 

Foundations of Education 

E ducati on i n Contemporary A meri can Soci ety 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 



EDCI466 
EDCI467 

EDCI416 

EDCI417* 

EDCI447* 

EDCI440** 

EDCI441** 

EDCI474 



ProfiessiGnal Education Courses 

L i terature for A dol escents (Spring only) 

Teachi ng Writi ng (Fall only, senior Year) 

Curriculum and I nstruction in Secondary Education: 
English, Speech, Theater (Fall oniyj unior Year) 

EDCI 417 Bases for English Language I nstruction (Fall 
only Senior Year) 

EDCI 447 Field Experiencein English Teaching 

EDCI 440 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary 
Education: English 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: English 

I ndusion. Diversity and Professionalism in Secondary 
Education 

*EDCI41 7 and EDCI 447 taken concurrently 
**EDCI440and EDCI441 taksn concurrently 



3 
1 
1 
12 
2 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



For more information on the sequence of pre professional and professional courses, consultthe College of Education, Department of Curriculum 
and Instruction (Room 1207, Benjamin). 

Ford^ Language Education (Grades 7-12) 

The F orei gn L anguage ( F L ) E ducati on curri cul um i s desi gned for prospecti ve f orei gn I anguage teachers i n grades 7- 12 who have been admi tted to 
the EDCI Teacher Education Program. Currently, admission is open to qualified students seeking teacher certification in Spanish, French, Russian, 
I tal i an, and German. Other I anguages mi ght be added I ater for teacher certi f i cati on. Students enrol I ed i n f orei gn I anguage educati on are requi red to 
have an academic content major. Consult with an advisor in the Department of Curriculum and I nstruction for further information. 

A mi ni mum of six hours of i ntermedi ats-l a/el I anguage course work i n the students maj or I anguage must precede the requi red 300-400 1 a/el 
courses. The I atter are compri sed of a mi ni mum of 30 hours of prescri bed course work that i ncl uds the areas of readi ng strategi es, grammar and 
composition, conversation, literature civilization and culture and linguistics. Students must also take a minimum of nine hours (three courses) of 
electives i n a related area. The second area of concentration must be approved by a FL advisor. 

In addition to all coursework, students must earn anIntermediateHighscoreontheACTFL oral proficiency exam in their corresponding foreign 
language 

The foil owing requirements must be met with the FL Education program: 

Crafts 
Pre-ProfiessiGnal/Subject Area Courses 

I ntermedi ate ( 200 1 evel ) courses 6 

Readi ng Strategi es 3 

Grammar and Composition (300-400 la/els) 6 

Survey of Literature (300-400 levels) 6 

Conversati on ( 300-400 1 eve! s) 3 

Literature (400-above levels) 6 

Culture and Civilization 6 

Applied Linguistics, OR 3 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 

Electives in Supporting Area/FL-Related „ 

Courses ( mi ni mum of three courses) 

*Applied Linguisticsin thePrinrBryFL Area if available: 
a&iermse LINO200 nay satisfy Oils requirement; check 
witti your advisor. 

Inalmostall instances. Primary FL Area courses must have been completed 
pri or to the Student Teachi ng semester. A ny substi tuti ons for the above must 
be preapproved by a FL Education Advisor. 



Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
LING20O* 

ELECTIVES 



NatB Thepre-professiond cou-sesva-y by subject area. ConsUtthe 
acadenic dep^tment for the sped fie course requirements for each laiguage 
&-ea. 

Crafts 

3 

3 



EDHD4B 
EDHD426 
EDCI 463 

EDPS301 
EDPS201 

EDPS210 



EDCI 410 
EDCI 433 
EDCI 438 
EDCI488 
EDCI 431 



Pre-ProfiesEional/EducatiGn Courses 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading 
in Content Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 

One^om 

Foundations of Education 

Education i n Contemporary American Society 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on 
Education 

ProfesEJonal Education Courses 

Curri cul um and I nstruction i n Secondary 
Education: Foreign Language (Fall only) 

I ntroduction to Foreign Language M ethods 

(Fall only) 

Field Experience in Second Language 
Education CFa//on/y; 

Student Teachi ng Semi nar i n Secondary 
Education: Foreign Language 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: 
Foreign Language 



3 
3 



3 
3 
1 
1 
12 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Fnri474 Inclusion, Diversity, and Professionalism in 

Secondary Education 



MathanaticsEducatiGn (Grades 7-12) 



Students who wish to be certified to teach mathematics at the secondary la/el and who havenotyet been accepted into the Col lege of Education 
must complete the requirements for the Matiiematics Major -Secondary Education Track. P I ease check with the matiiematics department for 
specific niath courses to betaken. 



Crafts 
Pre-ProfesEiGnal/EducatiGn Courses 

EDHD4B Adolescent Da/elopment 3 

FRHnd^fi Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content -. 
Areas I 

E DCI 463 Readi ng i n the Secondary School 3 

One from 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education 

EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

ProfesEJcnal Education Coir ses 

EDCI457 Teachi ng and Learning Middle School Mathematics ^F a// ^ 

only,] unior Year) 

Fnri4SS l^6*^'ods of Teaching Mathematics in Secondary ^ 

Schools (Fa// only, Senior Year) 

Fnn ^RR Field Experience in Secondary Mathematics Education (Fall oniv, senior Year) 
c ui„i 3DD ^i-^i ^1^ ^^^ Year) ^ 

Fnri4sn Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: , 

Mathematics 

Fnn4f!8 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (Student ,_ 

Teaching: Mathematics) 

Fnri474 '"^'u^°"' Diversity, and Professionalism in Secondary _ 

Education 

Sdenoe Education (Grades 7-12) 

P I ease check wi th the sci ence department regardi ng speci f i c course work. 

Students may eam credenti al s i n bi ol ogy, chemi stry, geol ogy, physi cs or agri cul ture A 1 1 students admi tted to the secondary program i n sci ence 
educati on must compi ete a maj or i n thei r area of speci al i zati on. Students shoul d consul t the respecti ve departments for requi rements. F or more 
information, pleaseseewww.education.umd.edu/science 

Credts 

Pre-Profiessional Education Courses 

FnHn496 Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content ., 

Areas I 

EDHD4B Adolescent Da/elopment 3 

E DCI 463 Readi ng i n the Secondary School 3 

One from 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education 

EDPS201 Educati on in Contemporary American Society 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

ProfesEJcnal Education Coir ses 

All areas of sd ence education will be required to complebe 
the following profess onal education courses: 

EDCI411 Knowledge, Reasoning, and Leaming in Sci ence (Fa// on/y) 3 

EDCI375 Field Experience in Sci ence Educati on 1 

EDCI470 P ractices of Teaching Sci ence (Fa// on/y. Sen/or year; 3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



EDCI471 Studait Teaching in Secondary School s: Sciaice 12 

FDri474 Inclusion, Diversity, and Professionalism in Secondary ^ 

Education 

Fnri4S8 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (Student Teaching , ., 

Seminar: Science) 



Sodd Stucfe5Education(Grade57-12) 

Students i n the Soci al Studi es E ducati on program may sel ect an area of concentrati on i n hi story, geography, or government and pol i ti cs. E ach 
concentrati on f ol I ows the general requi rements of thei r respecti ve maj ors i n addi ti on to the pre prof essi onal /subj ect area supporti ng course work 
requi red for certi f i cati on. Students rnay el ect to compi ete the program for certi f i cati on i n Soci al Studi es by choosi ng one of three opti ons for 
compi eti ng the program. 

Option I: Hisbory 

This option requires completion of the foreign language requirement and is primarily for those students earning their initial degree. Requires 68 
semester hours of which 39 credit hours must be in history. 

WoterThe hi story maj or requi res compi eti on of U N I V 101 and a f orei gn I anguage requi rement through the i ntermedi ate I a/el . See A R H U advi si ng 
for details. 



Pre-Profiessicnal/Subj ect Area Courses 
I ntrodu^cryCowses 

HIST156 HistoryoftheUnitedStatesto 1865 (CORE: SH) 
HIST157 History of the United States since 1865 (CORE: SH) 
HISTlOO/200 Non-US, pr\or to 1500 (seacMaDr for approved courses) 
H I ST208 H i stori cal Research and M ethods Semi nar 
HIST408 Proseminar in Historical Writing 



Crafts 



HisbryElecSvBS 24 

Out of a totd 24 credts : 
HIST *18 credits must be at the junior/senior level 

* 15 credi ts must be i n a concentrati on 

* one course must be non-Westem 

/n addtion to the reqj'i red credt hours in hisbory, the 
social studes education frogran requires 29 credt hours 
of coif se worl< in geography and the social sciences as 
outlined below: 

GEOGIOO IntroductiontoGeogr^hy 

GEOG201 Geogr^hyof Environmental Systems (CORE: PL) 3 

GE0G211 Geographyof Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

SOCY/ANTH one Sociology or Anthropology course 3 

ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 4 

ECON ECON Elective 3 

Onefi-om 

GVPTIOO Principlesof Govemmentand Politics (CORE: SB), or 3 

GVPT260 State and Local Government; or 

GVPT280 Comparative Politics and Governments 

GVPT170 American Government (CORE: SB) 3 

HISTlOO/200 HIST (non-Western 100/200 la/el) 3 

ELECTIVE History/Social Science Elective -300-400 level 6 

Ethnic^ OnecourseinEthnicMinorityStudies(U.S. orientation); ., 

Minority can be one of the above courses in social sciences or hi story 



Pre-Profiessional/Education Courses 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education, or 
EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society, or 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Pa^pectives on Education 

EDHD4B AddescaitDa/elopment 3 

cr^Lir^/i-v- Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in theContBit ., 

EDHD426 ^;^| 3 

E DCI 463 Readi ng i n the Secondary School 3 



EDCI426 
E DCI 427* 

E DCI 428* 
E DCI 421 
E DCI 474 

EDCI488 



PrafesEJcnal EducaticnCoirseB 

M ateri al s & Resources i n Soci al Studi es (Fall oniyj mior Year) 

Curriculum and I nstnjction in Secondary Education - Social 
Studies (Fall only, Senior Year) 

Field Experiencein Secondary Social Studies Teaching (Fall 
only) 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies 

Inclusion, Diversity, and Professionalism in Secondary 
Education 

Se! ected TopicsinTeacherE ducati on ( Student Teachi ng 
Seminar: Social Studies) 

*EDCI 427 and EDCI 428 a^e taken concurrently 



3 
3 

1 

12 
2 



Option 1 1 : Geog'aphy 

This option is primarily for those students earning their initial degree and requires sixty credit hours of Preprofessional/Subject Area course 
work. Thirty-five credit hours must be in geography. Nine credit hours of 300 level Gateway courses must betaken in physical geography, 
human geography, and geographic techniques. Theremaining 18 credit hours must include a quantitative methods course and 15 credit hours of 
upper level systematic geography courses. 



PreProfiesEiGnal/Siipject Area Courses 
RrifTHfyCoursBsr 

GEOG201 Geogr^hy of Environmental Systems (CORE: PL) 
GE0G211 Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 
GEOG202 Introduction to Human Geography 
GEOG212 Introduction to Human Geography Laboratory 

Gata/VB/Courses: 

G E OG 3xx one 300 1 a/el physi cal geography course 
G E OG 3xx one 300 1 a/el human geography course 
G E OG 3xx one 300 1 a/el techni que course 
GEOG3xx/4xx Upper Level Geography Electives 

rpor^nfi Introduction to Ouantitative Methods for the Geographic 
Environmental Sciences 



CraJts 



3 

1 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 

15 



/ n a±S1ion to the nequined crecSthcxirs in geo^Tsphy, the social 
sbJcleseduca/Jonpro^^amrnqLaresZaiBcltixxa^cfcoirsewcrlc 
in Nstoryandihesodal sdencesasoUOinedbelaM 

SOCY/ANTH one Sociology or Anthropology course 3 

ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 4 

ECON ECON Elective 3 

GVPTIOO Principlesof GovernmentaidPolitics(CORE: SB), or 3 

GVPT260 Stateand Local Govemment, or 

GVPT280 Comparative Politics and Governments 

GVPT170 American Government (CORE: SB) 3 

HIST156 HistoryoftheUnitedStatestol865, or 3 

HIST157 History of the United States since 1865 

HISTlOO/200 HIST (non-Westem 100^200 la/el) (3) 3 

ELECT History/Socid Science Elective 300-400 la/el 6 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Ethnicy 
Minority 



One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); 
can be one of the above courses i n soci al sci ences or 
history. 



EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 

EDHD4B 

EDHD426 
E DC! 463 



PreProfiesEicnal/Educaticn Courses 

Foundations of Education, or 

Education in Contemporary American Society, or 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition&Motivation in Reading: Reading in the Content 
Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 



EDCI426 
EDCI427* 

EDCI428* 

EDCI421 

EDCI474 

EDCI488 



ProfessJcnal Education Courses 

M aterials & Resources in Social Studies (Fall oniyj unior Year) 

C urri cul um and I nstructi on i n Secondary E ducati on - 
Social Studies (Fall only, Senior Year) 



F i el d Experi ence i n Secondary Soci al Studi es Teachi ng (Fall only)-, 
(Fall oriy) 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies 

I nclusion. Diversity, and Professionalism in Secondary 
Education 

Sel ected Topi cs i n Teacher E ducati on ( Student Teachi ng 
Seminar: Social Studies) 

*EDCI 427 and EDCI428 are t^sn concurrently 



12 
2 



Option III: Gouernmait and Politics 

TlieGowa'nment and Politics pro-am is unda* reuie/v. Please chedcvath tiTeGouernmaTt Deparhnait regard ng spedfic course work. 

This option is primarily for those students earning their initial degree Requires a minimum of 65 credit hours of preprofessional/subject area 
course work. Thirty-six hours must be in GVPT. At least eighteen of the thirty-six credit hours must be upper-level courses. 

All GVPT rnajors must also complete an approved ski lis option (a foreign language or three quantitative courses from a select list -see GVPT 
advising office.) 

I n addition, the GVPT program is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See GVPT advisor for specific admission requirements. 

Crecfts 
PreProfesEional/Siipject Area Courses 

I ntroductory Courses: 

GVPTIOO Principlesof GovernmentaidPolitics(CORE:SB) 3 

GVPT170 American Government (CORE: SB) 3 

GVPT241 TheStudyof Political Philosophy: Ancientaid Modem 3 

ELECTIVES GVPT Electives 9 

GV PT3xx/4xx GV PT U pper L eve! Courses 18 

Sodd Science Quaititative Courses or Foreigi Language 
(seeGVPT ad/isor) 

I n addi ti on to the requi red credi t hours i n G V PT, the soci al studi es 
education program requires 26 credit hours of course work in 
hi story and the social sci ences as outlined below. 

HIST156or Historyof the United States to 1865, or 3 

HIST157 History of the United States since 1865 

HISTlOO/200 Non-Westem History l(Xy200 la/el 3 

SOCY/ANTH Sociology or Anthropology course 3 

ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 4 

ECON ECON Elective 3 

GEOG3xx/4xx Upper Level GEOG, or 3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



HIST3xx/4xx Upper La/d HIST 

GEOG201 Geogr^hyofEnvironmaital Systems (CORE: PL) 3 

GE0G211 Geographyof Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

GEOGIOO Introduction to Geography (CORE: SB) 3 

One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); 



Ethnicy 
Minority 



can be one of the above courses i n soci al sci ences or 
history 



EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 

EDHD4B 

EDHD426 
EDCI463 



PreProfiesEicnal/Educaticn Courses 

Foundations of Education, or 

Education in Contemporary American Society, or 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in the 
Content Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 



EDCI426 
EDCI427* 

EDCI428* 

EDCI421 

EDCI474 

EDCI488 



ProfessJcnal Educaticn Courses 

M aterials & Resources in Social Studies (Fall oniyj unior Year) 

C urri cul um and I nstructi on i n Secondary E ducati on - 
Social Studies (Fall only, Senior Year) 



F i el d Experi ence i n Secondary Soci al Studi es Teachi ng (Fall only), 
(Fall only) ^ 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies 

I nclusion. Diversity, and Professionalism in Secondary 
Education 

Sel ected Topi cs i n Teacher E ducati on ( Student Teachi ng 
Seminar: Social Studies) 

*EDCI 427 and EDO 428 are taken cmcurrentty 



12 
2 



Reqiiremaits for the Minor 

Requi ranents for theMinor Seoondary Education 

The M i nor i n Secondary E ducati on provi des opportuni ti es for undergraduate subj ect area maj ors to enrol I i n a sequence of educati on courses that 
helps them to determine if teaching is a viable career option for them. The 15-18 credit minor may betaken prior to admission into a teacher 
preparati on program. I f an undergraduate student pursui ng or compi eti ng the mi nor desi res to enter an educati on track, the candi date must appi y 
for the dual maj or program to obtei n certi f i cati on as a secondary educati on cl assroom teacher through compI eti on of a M aryl and State D epartment 
of E ducati on approved program opti on. Some of the courses students take to compI ete the M i nor i n Secondary E ducati on may al so be appI i cabi e 
in certification options at the graduate I a/el offered through the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. These students should consult with an 
advisor in the Department of Curriculum and I nstructi on to identify the most appropriate opti on leading to teacher certification and to ra/iew the 
specific admission requirements associated with these programs. 

Requi ranents for the M i nor i n T E SOL 

The mi nor i n Second L anguage E ducati on provi des opportuni ti es f or undergraduate subj ect area maj ors to compI ete a sequence of courses that 
hel ps them prepare for careers as teachers oif E ngl i sh as a second I anguage i n U S school s and^or prepare them for rol es as teachers of E ngl i sh as a 
f orei gn I anguage i n i nternati onal setti ngs. 1 1 i ncl udes coursework from the Department of C urri cul um and I nstructi on and the D epartment of 
H uman Devel opment. The curri cul um provi des a f oundati on i n second I anguage I eami ng and pedagogy, adol escent I earni ng, cross-cultural i ssues 
and understandi ng, and curri cul ar and pedagogi cal i ssues whi ch support readi ng and wri ti ng i n a second I anguage context Sa/eral of the courses 
i ncl ude f i e! d components that provi de candi dates wi th di rect experi ence i n worki ng wi th second I anguage I eamers. The mi nor i ncorporates 
coursewori< required forTESOL certification from the M aryl and State Department of Education. 

Certificate 

Seoondary Education Uppa* Division Certificate 

The Certificate Program requires completion of an academic major, including coursework specific to meet certification standards in the certificate 
area, and a bachel or's degree i n an approved academi c content area, pi us the compI eti on of a certi f i cate program i n secondary educati on to meet 
requirements in UMCP's approved program for MSDE certification. Se! ected coursewori< from the Mi nor in Secondary Educati on may be taken 
pri or to admi ssi on to the Certi f i cate P rogram opti on. 



Detailed information about this program option is available at the College of Education website^ www.education.umd.edu/EDCI/infc/tcerthtm 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory for al I students. Students recei ve advi si ng through i ndi vi dual appoi ntments or wal l<-i n hours duri ng the earl y regi strati on 
period. Information regarding advising schedules is aval I able each semester. Walk-in advising hours are also posted each semester. Check in the 
department off i ce^ 1207 B enj ami n B ui I di ng. 

IntErnships 

Theyeariong internship, which is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program, takes place in a collaborating school (i.e, partner 
school, PDS -- Professional Development School). 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

TheOfficeof Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in 
cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, vi si t 
www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Dance (DANC) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

1920 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, 301-405-3180 

www.dance.umd.edu 

Chair: D. MacLean Wagner (Acting Chair) 

Professors: M . Rosen, A. Warren, A. Wiltz 

Associate Professors: K. Bradley, N. Yati<in 

I nstructors: A . M ayes 

Lecturers: S. Druker, P. J ackson 

Professors Emeriti: D. Madden, L. Warren 

TheMajcr 

The undergraduate curriculum, which leads toward a B.A. degree in Dance, is designed to facilitate the acquisition of new movement ski I Is, 
enhance creativity, and da/el op schol ariy insights in the field. Comprehensive studio and theory courses provide a foundation for a range of careers 
i n dance. Students may choose to study a parti cul ar aspect of dance i n depth, such as perf ormance^ choreography, or producti on; or they may 
choose to merge thei r i nterest i n dance wi th an i nterest i n another f i el d of study. G raduates of the program pursue graduate work i n dance as wel I 
as careers as professional dancers and choreographers, university and secondary school teachers, dance managers, and dancecritics. They also 
work i n the f i el ds of dance medi ci ne and therapy. 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distinguished teachers, choreographers, and performers, each one a specialist in his or her own 
field.Visitingartists throughout the year make addi ti onal contri buti ons to the program. There are performance and choreographi c opportuni ti es f or 
al I dance students, rangi ng from i nformal workshops to f ul ly mounted concerts brth on and off campus. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

Students must compi ete 57 semester hours of dance credi ts. Of theses 18 hours of modern techni que at the Dance 248 1 a/el and above^ and four 
hours of bal I et techni que at the Dance 228 1 a/el and above are requi red. The remai ni ng 35 credi ts must be di stri buted as f ol I ows: 

Crafts 

DANC 102 Rhythmic Training 2 

DANC 109 Improvisation 2 

DANC200 Introduction to Daice 3 

DANC210 Daice Producti on 3 

DANC208 Choreography I 3 

DANC308 Choreography 1 1 3 

DANC388 Choreography I II 3 

DANC305 Principles of Teaching 3 

DANC370 Kinesiology for Dancers 4 

DANC466 Laban Movement Analysis 3 

DANC483 DaiceHistoryll 3 

DANC485 Seminar in Dance 3 



A grade of C or hi gher must be attai ned i n al I dance courses. 

N ew, reenteri ng, and transfer students are expected to contact the department f ol I owl ng admi ssi on to the uni versi ty for i nstructi ons regardi ng 
advi si ng and regi strati on procedures. A I though entrance audi ti ons are not requi red, some pra/i ous dance experi ence i s hi ghl y desi rabi e. 

Departmental advising is mandatory each semester. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory each semester. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



DECISION, OPE RATIONS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES(BMGT) 

TheRobat H. Smith Schod of Business 

1570 Vai M unching Hall, 301-405-2286 

www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad 

Chair: H. Lucas 

Professors: R. Agarwal, G. Anandalingam, A. Assad(Prof), M. Ball, M. Fu, B. Golden, H. Lucas, L. Raschid, D. Riley 

Associate Professors: F.Alt, J. Bailey (Res Assoc Prof), Z. Chen, C. Ddlarocas, W.Jank, S. Raghavan, G. Shmudi, G. Souza, K. Stewart 

Assistant Professors: W. Elmaghraby, G. Gao, A. Gopal, S. Gosain, M. Goyal, I. Karaesmen-Aydin, M. Kumar, A. Mishra, S. Mithas, S. 

Viswanathan, X. Wang 

Lecturers: B. Corwin, S. Leie^ K. Ruhi (Tyser Teaching Fellow), J . Suarez (Tyser Teaching Fellow), P. Weiss (Tyser Teaching Fellow) 

Professors Emeriti: L. Bodin, S. Gass 

Visiting Faculty: H. I brahim(DistinguishedTyser Teaching Fellow), K. Prasad, E. Studer-Ellis(DistinguishedTyser Teaching Fellow) 

TheMajcr 

The Department of Deci si on, Operati ons, and I nf ormati on Technol ogi es offers two maj ors: I nf ormati on Systems - Speci al i zati on: B usi ness, and 
Operations M anagement. 

I nformation Systems- Specialization: Business 

The B usi ness A rea of Concentrati on i n the I nf ormati on Systems (IS) program prepares students to be effective pi anners, users and managers of 
i nf ormati on technol ogi es and systems i n the current envi ronment of the technol ogy-enabi ed busi ness f i rm. The I S maj or focuses on the system 
desi gn and i mpl ementati on ski 1 1 s i ncl udi ng database and web desi gn, anal yti cal ski 1 1 s f or both strategi c pi anni ng of I T and performance e/al uati on, 
and ttie manageri al pi us organi zati onal knowl edge requi red to manage i nf ormati on systems and appi i cati ons based on busi ness and customer 
requi rements. The maj or's core emphasi zes the concepts of systems anal ysi s and desi gn, and the strategi c use of i nf ormati on systems. I n addi ti on 
to a broad groundi ng i n the key fundi onal areas of marketi ng, operati ons, accounti ng, and f i nances thi s maj or devel ops i n-depth knowl edge of 
i nf ormati on systems desi gn and i mpl ementati on, eval uati on and pi anni ng of i nf ormati on technol ogy i nvestments, and managi ng dynami c 
technology projects. 

OperatJcns Managemait 

Operati ons M anagement i nvol ves the desi gn and management of an organi zati on's systems and processes f ocusi ng on the creati on and del i very of 
products and services. This includes such functions as capacity planning, inventory management, logistics managernent, production planning and 
control, resource allocation and total quality. Career opportunities exist in consulting, manufacturing, retailing, service organi zati ons and 
government 

AcknisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

SeeRobertH. Smith School of Busi ness entry in chapter 6 for admission requi rements. 

Reqii rements for theMajcr 

I nfarmatjcn Systems- Spedalizaticn: Business 

Major Requi remaits crafts 

BMGT302 Business Computer Application Programming 3 

BIVIGT402 Database Systems 3 

BIVIGT403 Systems Analysis and Design 3 

BIVIGT407 I nformation Systems Projects 3 

TwoccursesfrcmHst'A' or onecarsefrom'A andane ^ 

carsefixmlist'B': 

ListA 

BMGT405 Busi ness Telecommunications 

B M GT406 E I ectroni c Commerce A ppl i cati on Devel opment 

R M CT^OR ^^ ®*^ ^°P' cs i n Deci si on & I nf o. Tech. 

(repeatable if content differ^ 
B M GT326 Accounti ng Systems 
RMCTdVfi Applied Computer Models in Supply Chain 

Management 
BMGT484 Electronic Ma^keting 

ListB 
B M GT332 Operati ons Research for M anagement Deci si ons 
B M GT385 Operati ons M anagement 
BMGT430 Linea-Statisticd Models in Business 
B M GT434 I ntrodudi on to Opti mi zati on 
B M GT485 Prqj ect M anagement 
B M GT486 Total Oual i ty M aiagement 

Total crecfts requi red 18 

Upper Lei/d Economics Requi ranaits 

aneaf the foUoming corses 3 

E CON 305 I ntermedi ate M acroeconomi c Theory and Pol i cy 
E CON 306 I ntermedi ate Microeconomic Theory 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



E CON 330 M oney aid B anki ng 
E CON 340 Irta'national Economics 

Tot^ ECON 3 

Operations Managemait 

Students pursui ng the Operati ons M anagement maj or must: compi ete M ATH 220 or M ATH 140 and B M GT 230 or 231 pri or to j uni or standi ng; 
and those i nterested i n graduate woric i n thi s f i el d are strongi y advi sed to compI ete |V| ATH 141, |V| ATH 240 and 241 as wel I . 

Tlie course requi rements for the j uni or-seni or curri cul um concentrati on i n Operati ons |V| anagement are as f ol I ows: 

Crafts 

Major Reqii rements 

B |V| GT332 Operati ons Research for |V| anagement Deci si ons 3 
BIVIGT385 Operations |V| anagement 3 

BIVIGT485 Project |V| anagement 3 

One of the following courses (checkprerequisitss): 3 

BIVIGT430 LinearStatisticalJVIodels in Business 
BIVIGT434 Introduction to Optimization 
BMGT435 Business Process Simulation 

Tvx> of the ibilowing courses (check prerequisites): 6 

BIVIGT430 Li near Statistical Models in Business 
BMGT434 Introduction to Optimization 
BMGT435 Business Process Simulation 

I ntroduction to Logistics and Supply Chain 

Management 
BMGT403 Systems Analysis and Design 
B M GT486 Total Oud ity M aiagement* 
BMGT487 Six Sigma Innovation* 

BMGT490H The Total Ouality Practicum (Open only topuEsr 
student^ 
Totd BMGT 18 

Upper Le/el ECON ReqiiremEnts 

Onecf the falloifing corses: 3 

ECON 305 I ntermedi ate M acroeconomi c Theory & Pol i cy 
ECON 306 I ntermedi ate Microeconomic Theory 
E CON 330 M oney and B anki ng 
ECON 340 Intemational Economics 

Tot^ ECON 3 

*students fate either BMGr486 or BMGT4S7: not bath 

I n addition to the major requirements I isted above^ please consult Chapter 6 or www.rhsmith.umd.edu for a I isting of additional Smith School 
degree requirements that apply to all Smith School majors. 

Dietetics 

For more i nformation, consult N utrition and Food Science i n Chapter 7. 

East Asian Studes Certificate 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2101B Fraicis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-4309 

The Undergraduate Certificate in East Asian Studies is a 24-credit course of instruction designed to provide specialized knowledge of the cultures, 
hi stori es, and contemporary concerns of the peopi es of Chi na J apan, and K orea. 1 1 wi 1 1 compI ement and enri ch a students rnaj or. The curri cul um 
focuses on I anguage i nstructi on, ci vi I i zati on courses, and e! ecti ves i n several departments and programs of the uni versi ty . 1 1 i s desi gned speci f i cal I y 
for students who wi sh to expand thei r knowl edge of E ast A si a and demonstrate to prospecti ve empi oyers, the publ i c, and graduate and prof essi onal 
schools a special competenceandsetof skills in East A si an affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, with a grade of C or better in each course, and recommendation by the Coordinator of the Certificate 
Program, a certificate will beawarded. A notationof the award of the certificate will be included on the students transcript The student must have 
a bache! or's degree awarded by M aryl and ( must be Col I ege Park campus) previ ous to or si mul taneousi y with an award of the certi f i cate. 

Certificate RecfMremaHs 

CORE CoirsesiThestudentis required to take 

1. HIST 284 East Asiai Civilization I 

2. HIST 285 East Asiai Civilization II 

3. Six semester hours of introduction to one of the following East Asian languages (Chinese, J apanese, or Korean): 



DgiatrrHt^ M aj cr5 end Prog-ams 



CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I 

JAPN lOlElementaryJapanesel 

KORA 101 Elementay Korean I 

KORA 102 Elementay Korean 1 1 

KORA 211 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean I 

KORA 212 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean 1 1 

Students wi th I anguage competence equi val ent to these I anguage courses are exempted from the I anguage requi rement; such students are requi red 
to compi ete an addi ti onal si x hours of el ecti ves i n E ast A si an courses to f ul f i 1 1 the 24-credi t requi rement for the certi f i cate. 

E I ecti ves: Students must compI ete at I east 12 hours of el ecti ves sel ected from four regul ar approved courses on E ast A si a i n such di sci pi i nes as: 
(1) anthropology, (2) art history, (3) ethnomusicology, (4) govemmentand politics, (5) history, (6) language, linguistics, and literature, (7) plant 
science and landscape architecture, and(8) women's studies. Nine of the 12 hours of electives must be upper division(3C)0-400la/el courses). A 
maxi mum of three credi t hours of speci al topi cs courses on E ast A si a wi 1 1 be al I owed wi th the approval of the certi f i cate coordi nator. N o more 
than ni ne credi ts from any one department or from the students maj or may be appi i ed toward the certi f i cate I n addi ti on, no more than ni ne credi ts 
of the courses appI i ed toward the certi f i cate may be transferred from other i nsti tuti ons. Students are asked to work wi th the coordi nator i n ensuri ng 
that the e! ecti ves mai ntai n an i ntercol I egi ate and i nterdi sci pi i nary focus (at I east three di sci pi i nes are recommended) . I nterested students shoul d 
contact theCoordi nator of theCertificate Program, Dr. MarleneMayo, Department of History, Francis Scott Key Hal lmmavo(a)umd.edu (website 
at www.ceas.umd.edu). 



EconGiTiics(ECON) 

Cdlegeof Bdiavioral and Sodal Sdaxies 

3105TydingsHdl, 301-405-3505 

www. bsos. umd. edu/econ 

Chair: P. Murrell 

Director: C. Clement (Director of Undergraduate Studies) 

Professors: L. Ausubel, P. Cramton, M. Cropper, A. Drazen, M. Duggan,J. Haltiwanger,J. Ham, C. Hulten, E. Mendoza, E. Montgomery, P. 

M urrell, W. Oates, I . Prucha, C. Reinhat J . Rust; T. Schelling (Dist Univ Prof), R. Schw^, M . Straszheim, C. Vegh (Director of Undergraduate 

Honors), D. Vincent; J . Wdlis 

A ssoci ate Professors: J. Chao, P. Coughlin,J. Hdlerstein, Z.Jin, N. Limao,J.Shea 

Assistant Professors: S. Aruoba, S. Chugh, P. D'Erasmo, R. Guiterras, M. Keamey, A. Korinek,J. LaFortune, C. McKelvey, E. Ozbay, E. Filiz 

Ozbay, S.Lee, R. Scares, R. Vlaicu 

Lecturers: D. Baka-dzhieva, A. Gaidhi, R. Haas, B. Lowrey, D. Meade, J . Neri, S. Ver Ploeg, J . S^Ddhaus, K. Short,] . Taig, H. Terrell, L. 

Tiehen,J. Werling 

Professors Emeriti: J. Adams, C. Almon, R. Bennett, B. Bergmann, R. Betancourt; F. Brechling, C.Harris, C. Clague,J. Cumberland, R. Dardis,J. 

Dorsey, H. Kelqian, M. McGuire P. Meyer, D. O'Connell, M. Polakoff, P. Wonnacott 

TheMajor 

E conomi sts study a wi de range of phenomena usi ng anal yti cal methods whi ch descri be how peopi e and col I ecti ons of peopi e behave and i nteract. 
M any economi ste def i ne thei r prof essi on as the anal ysi s of deci si ons made i n the context of scarci ty. E conomi cs can al so be descri bed as the 
study of the producti on, pri ci ng, and di stri buti on of goods and servi ces wi thi n soci eti es. E conomi ste study such probi ems as i nf I ati on, 
unemployment; poverty, environmental quality, financial markets, and intemational trade Economistealsoapply their methods of analysis to such 
di verse areas as cri me, heal th care, di scri mi nati on, and the probI ems of devel opi ng countri es. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym: E CON . A s a I arge diverse department; courses are offered i n al I 
of the maj or f i el ds of economi c study. M any courses anal yze the rol e of the government and publ i c pol i ci es i mpacti ng economi c outcomes, whi I e 
others focus on deve! opi ng advanced appI i cati ons of economi c theori es and methodol ogi es. 

The program i s desi gned to serve both maj ors and non-maj ors. The department offers a vari ety of 300-1 a/el courses on parti cul ar economi c i ssues 
whi ch can be taken after two semesters of pri nci pi es. The program for maj ors i s desi gned to serve those who wi 1 1 seek empi oyment i mmedi atel y 
after col I ege as wel I as those who wi 1 1 pursue graduate study. E conomi cs maj ors have a wi de vari ety of career opti ons, i ncl udi ng posi ti ons i n state 
and local govemment, federal and international agencies, business, finance and banking, joumalism, teaching, politics and law. Many economics 
maj ors pursue graduate work i n economi cs or anrther soci al sci ence, I aw, busi ness or publ i c pol i cy . 

Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

Students are scpected to f ul I y uti I i ze the opportuni ti es presented for I eami ng and research. H avi ng compI eted the degree program, studente shoul d 
have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Understandingof the key terminology used within the discipline 

2. A bi I i ty to use the fundamental methods and tool s of the di sci pi i ne to mode! economi c behavi or and to descri be and anal yze 
rel ati onshi ps between economi c vari abl es. 

3. A bi I i ty to i nterpret and appI y descri pti ve and i nf erenti al stati sti cs. 

4. A bi I i ty to anal yze the effect of government pol i ci es on the economy usi ng both conceptual and quanti tati ve tool s. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

I n addition to the university's general education (CORE) requi remente, studente who declare Economics as a major during the Spring 2007 
semester or thereafter must earn a minimum of 38 credite via a combination of foundation and elective courses in Economics and Math as listed 
bel ow. E conomi cs maj ors must al so compI ete a mi ni mum of 15 credi te i n support ng courses. A 1 1 courses must be passed wi th a grade of C or 
better to count towards the f oundati on, el ecti ve, and support ng requi remente. A course used to f ul f i 1 1 one requi rement for the maj or may not 
count towards any other maj or requi rement Studente shoul d see a departmental advi sor for gui dance on choosi ng between vari ous opti ons. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



especi al I y i f f uture pi ans i ncl ude graduate trai ni ng i n economi cs. Students who decl ared E conomi cs before Spri ng 2007, can choose to f ol I ow 
these new requi rements OR the previ ous requi rements. See a departmental advi sor for detai I s. 



FcundatJcn Courses 

ECON200 
ECON201 
IVIATH220 

MATH 140 
ECON300* 
ECON321 

STAT400 
ECON326 
ECON325 



Crecfts 

Principles of Micro- Economics 4 

P ri nci pi es of M aero- E conomi cs 4 

Elementary Calculus I or 3 

CdculusI 4 

Methods& Tools for Economic Analysis 3 

E conomi c Stati sti cs or 3 

Applied Probability and Statistics 3 

I ntermedi ate M acroeconomi c Theory & Pol i cy 3 

I ntermedi ate M i croeconomi c Theory 3 



E oonorri cs E I ecti ves C ourses 



Oneirorrt* 
ECON310 

EC0N311 

ECON312 

ECON314 

ECON315 

ECON416 

One front* 
ECON402 

ECON422 

ECON424 

ECON425 

Three from 

EC0N4XX 

* With perrrission from the departrrent a rr^or rrey substitutB a math course (fJIATH 240 or fJIATH 241) for ECON 300. 

** The Econorrics curriculummay be updated over time, given college and carrpus approval. Students will be notified as ether appropriate courses are approved that fulfill the 
requi rermnts for the major. 

Support! ng C oirses: 

Support- UL Upperla/e! courses- see NOTES below 

NOTES 



European Economic History 

American Economic History Before the Civil War 

American Economic History After the Civil War 

E conomi c H i story, Da/el opment and Pol i cy 

E conomi c Da/el opment of U nderda/el oped A reas 

Theory of Economic Da/elopment 

Economic Models and Forecasting 
Econometrics I 

Computer Methods in Economics 
Mathematical Economics 

Any 400 1 eve! Economics courses 



15 



• Excludes] unior English writing class, intemshifs, experiential leaming, and 'non-traditjonal' courses. 

• A ddi ti onal mathemati cs courses beyond the requi red mathemati cs course (MATH 220 or 140) may be counted as f ul f i 1 1 i ng the A ddi ti onal 
Support Course Requi rement 

• A ddi ti onal economi cs courses may be i ncl uded among the 15 hours of support] ng courses. 

• All supporting courses must be approved by an Economics Department Advisor. 

• All courses meeting the Additional Supporting Course requirement must be completed with a grade of C or better and may not betaken 
pass-fail, except ECON 386 which can only betaken pass-fail. 



Other ReqiiremaitsfortheMajcr 
Study Sequenoes and Plans of Study 

E conomi cs i s an anal yti cal di sci pi i ne, bui I di ng on a core of pri nci pi es, model i ng methodol ogi es, and stati sti cal techni ques. Students must begi n 
withafoundationinmathematics and economic principles (ECON 200 and ECON 201). A more advanced, analytic treatment is presented in 
intermediate theory courses (ECON 325 and ECON 326), which provide necessary background for in-depth stucfy of any specific issues, such as 
those covered i n the upper I eve! courses. E mpi ri cal research and the use of computers are becomi ng i ncreasi ngl y i mportant i n economi cs. A 1 1 
students are we! I advi sed to i ncl ude as many stati sti cs, econometri cs, and quanti tati ve methods courses i n thei r curri cul um as possi bl e. 

Students interested in economics as preparation for a career in business, law, or policy-making and analysis, should visitthe departments website 
for suggest] ons on speci f i c upper-l eve! courses to sati sf y the e! ecti ve requi rements for the maj or. 

Those students pi anni ng to pursue graduate study i n economi cs must begi n to prepare themsel ves anal yti cal I y for graduate work by f ocusi ng on 
theory, statistics, and rnathematics in their undergraduate curriculum. These stixients should consider the full econometrics sequence of ECON 422 
and 423. M astery of the cal cul us and I i near al gebra i s essenti al for entrance i nto graduate school s, and therefore students must take M ATH 140, 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



MATH 141, MATH 240, MATH 241 and MATH 246. Students should also plai on td<ing MATH 410 aid 411. 

Benchmarks Students decl ari ng E conomi cs as thei r maj or must meet sati sf actory progress benchmarks for the maj or. These benchmarks are not 
appi i cabi e to al I freshmen decl ari ng E conomi cs as thei r maj or; these students shoul d meet wi th an advi sor to set appropri ate expectati ons and an 
academic pi an for their Economics course work. Otherwise, E conomi cs majors must complete (with a grade of "C" or higher) ECON200, 
ECON201, MATH 220 or 140, aid ECON 300 within 2 semesters of entering the major. TheCdlegedso requires the completion of four CORE 
Distributive Studies courses (which can indudeECON 200, ECON201, and Calculus), as we! I as the English Fundamental Studies requirement. 

In addition to the benchmark courses included above, students must complete ECON 326 and ECON 321 (with a grade of "C" or higher) within 
three semesters of enteri ng the maj or. 

Advising 

Departmental academic advisors work with current and prospective majors on a walk-i n basis. M ajors are encouraged to see an advisor at least 
once an academi c year to veri f y progress i n thei r program requi rements. F urther i nf ormati on on courses, i ntemshi ps, the department honors 
program, careers, and graduate schools may be obtai ned from the advisors. 

L ocati on: 3127 Tydi ngs H al I 

Phone contacts: 301-405-3513; 301-405-7845; 301-405-3503 

Hcncrs Pro-am 

The Economics Honors Program provides economics majors with the opportunity for advanced study in a seminar format; with faculty supervision 
of seminar papers and an honors thesis. The Honors Program is designed for students intending to attend graduate school or those seeking an 
i n-depth study of economi c theory and i ts appI i cati on to economi c probi ems. 

The H onors Program i s a 12-hour sequence, cul mi nati ng i n the compi eti on of a seni or thesi s. Students must compi ete E CON 422 pri or to thei r 
seni or year. Students must al so compi ete E CON 396 ( H onors Workshop - f al I term) and ECON 397 ( H onors Thesi s - spri ng term) i n thei r seni or 
year. To compi ete the program, any one of the f ol I owi ng four courses can be taken concurrent! y or pri or to the honors workshop and thesi s: 
ECON 407, 414, 423, 425. 

To be eligible for admission, a student must have completed 15 hours of economics with a GPA of 3.25. Interested students should meet with the 
D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es at the earl i est possi bl e date to ra/i ew thei r curri cul um pi ans and to appI y f or admi ssi on to the program. 

Student Societies and Prcfesacnai Organizations 

Omicron Delta Epsilon is the economics honorary society. PI ease see the Undergraduate Economics Advisors in 3127 Tydi ngs for membership 
information. 

The E conomi cs A ssoci ati on of M aryl and i s an undergraduate club that meets regul ari y to di scuss graduate study i n economi cs and other f i el ds, 
empi oyment opportuni ti es, and recent economi c trends. P I ease see the U ndergraduate E conomi cs A dvi sors i n 3127 Tydi ngs for more i nf ormati on. 

Awards and Reoo^tion 

The Dudley and Louisa Dillard Prize is awarded to the outstanding Economics junior and senior with a broad liberal arts program. 

The Sujon Guha Prize is awarded to the best Honors Thesis i n Economics. 

The M arti n M oskowi tz A wards provi des schol arshi ps to students based on academi c excel I ence, f i nanci al need, and a demonstrated commi tment 
to and phi I osophy of publ i c servi ce. 

The M oskowi tz Family Scholarship is awarded to an academically successful economics major with demonstrated financial need. 

The M ark Sul I Ivan Schol arshi p i s awarded to an economi cs maj or who came from the eastem part of the state and has hi gh academi c performance 

The Honorable I damaeGarrott Memorial Scholarship supports academically talented majors who demonstrate financial need. 

Education Pdicy Studes (E DPS) 

Cdlegeof Educaticn 

2110 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3570 

www.education.umd.edu/EDPS 

Chair: F. Hultgren (Interim) 

Professors: B. Finkdstein, B. Malen, S. Sdden 

Associate Professors: R. Croninger, D. Herschbach,J . Rice 

Professors Emeriti: L. Berman,J. Splaine 

TheMajor 

W hi I e the department does not have an undergraduate maj or, i t does offer a number of courses whi ch are open to undergraduates and are suggested 
for students i nterested i n studyi ng the rol e of educati on i n soci ety or consi deri ng graduate work i n educati on pol i cy studi es. Parti cul ar courses of 
interest include Foundations of Education, Educati on in Contemporary American Soci ety, and Historical and Philosophical Perspectives in 
Education. 

Electrical Engneering(ENEE) 

A.J amesClark School of Engneering 

2429 A.V. Willians Building, 301-405-3685 
www.ece.umd.edu 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



eceaclvis@cleans.umd.edu 

Chair: P. O'Shea (Professor) 

Professors: E. Abed, T. Antonsen, J . Baras, D. Barbe A. Barg, S. Bhattacharyya, G. B I anl<enship (Associate Chair External Relations, R. 

Chel lappa (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), N. DeClaris, M. Dagenais, C. Davis (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Ephremides, C. 

Espy-Wilson, N. Farvardin, V. Gligor,J . Gddhar, N. Goldsmai, R. Gomez, V. Graiatstein, P. Ho, A. Iliadis, J .J aja, J . Kim (Prof Of Practice), P. 

Krishnaprasad, W. Lawson (Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies), K.Liu (Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, Distinguished Scholar Teacher), 

A. Makowski, S. Marcus (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), I. Mayergoyz( Distinguished Scholar Teacher), J. Melngailis, H. Milchberg 

(Distinguished Scholar Teacher), K. Nakajima, P. Narayan, R. Newcomb, Y. Oruc, E. Ott (Distinguished University Professor), M. Peckerar, H. 

Rabin, S. Shamma, M . Shayman, A. Tits, T. Venkatesan (Res Prof), U. Vishkin, C. Yang 

Associate Professors: R. Barua, P. Dowd (Res Assoc Prof), M . Franklin, R. Ghodssi, T. Horiuchi, B. J acob, R. La, A. Papamarcou, G. Qu, C. 

Silio, S.Tretter, S. Ulukus, M. Wu, D. Yeung 

Assistant Professors: P. Abshire, N. Martins, T. Murphy, P. Petrov, K. Rosfjord,J.Simon, A. Srivastava, E. Waks 

Lecturers: W. Hawkins 

Affiliate Professors: A. Agrawala, S. Aniage L. Davis, H. Frank, M. Fu, D. O'Leary, G. Rubloff, F. Wellstood 

AffiliateAssociate Professors:] . Bernstein, S. BhattacharjeeJ . Hollingsworth, R. Phaneuf, E. Smela 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: R. Duraiswami, M. Hicks,J . Katz, R. Shekhar 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. Cukier 

Professors Emeriti: L. Davisson, F. Emad, R. Harger, C. Lee, W. Levine, P. Ligomenides, H. Lin,J. Orloff,J. Pugsley, M. Reiser, M. Rhee, C. 

Striff I er, L.Taylor, K.Zaki 

TheMajcr 

The Electrical Engineering (EE) major is intended to give students a solid foundation in the science and engineering disciplines, to teach them how 
to conti nue to I earn i n an ever-changi ng technol ogi cal worl d, and to prepare them to f uncti on as responsi bl e ci ti zens and ethi cal , prof essi onal 
engi neers i n today's gl obal soci ety. I n addi ti on to techni cal i nstructi on, both depth and breadth are requi red i n the humani ti es and soci al sci ences to 
understand the economi c, ecol ogi c, and human factors i nvol ved i n reachi ng the best sol uti ons to today's probi ems.The basi c f oundati on i n 
mathemati cal , physi cal , and engi neeri ng sci ences i s estabi i shed i n the f i rst two years of the curri cul um. A core of requi red E E courses i n the thi rd 
year i s f ol I owed by a f I exi bl e structure of e! ecti ves that al I ows for ei ther breadth or speci al i zati on. A requi red capstone desi gn course where every 
student i ntegrates knowl edge from previ ous d asses i s the cul mi nati on of each students educati onal experi ence A ppropri ate choi ces of e! ecti ves 
can prepare an E E maj or for advanced studi es i n graduate school , a career as a practi ci ng engi neer, or for a career i n some other di sci pi i ne such as 
medi ci ne I aw, or busi ness, where an E E degree can be hi ghl y benef i ci al . A reas stressed i n the maj or i ncl ude si gnal processi ng and communi cati on 
systems, computer systems, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, microelectronics, and power systems. Within these areas are courses in 
such topics as medical devices, neural networks, solid state and nano-electronics, integrated circuits, lasers, wireless communication networks, 
computer and embedded system design, power electronics and system design, digital signal processing, digital control systems, and computer 
securi ty. Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym: E N E E . 



Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The educati onal obj ecti ves are broadi y stated goal s agreed upon by a consensus of the f acul ty pertai ni ng to accompi i shments or I eve! of 
achi a/ement desi red of our students 3- 5 years after graduati on. These f al I under the f ol I owi ng four headi ngs: 

1. Techni cal K nowl edge G raduate engi neers trai ned i n the fundamental s of el ectri cal engi neeri ng and rel evant speci al ti es so they are prepared to 
succeed i n graduate school and^or be producti ve engi neers i n govemment or i ndustry . 

2. Laboratory, Design, and Research: Graduate engi neers who can design and perform experi mental projects to solve diverse problems, with 
speci al emphasi s on expl oi ti ng di verse techni cal knowl edge and ski 1 1 s so they can engage i n desi gn work or research. 

3. P reparati on for F urther Study: G raduate engi neers who have the educati onal f oundati ons and ski 1 1 s necessary to engage i n I i f el ong I eami ng i n 
every sphere of thei r I if e 

4. P rof essi onal i sm: G raduate engi neers who have the prof essi onal ski 1 1 s they need to succeed i n thei r chosen prof essi on and are prepared to f ul f i 1 1 
thei r prof essi onal responsi bi I i ti es as engi neers, whi ch i ncl ude thei r ethi cal obi i gati ons to soci ety, empi oyers, empi oyees, and f el I ow engi neers. 

Prog'am Learning Outccmes 

Educational Opportunities 

The program offers many educati onal opportunities. Mostof these are designed to impart knowl edge and ski lis required of all our students so that 
by the ti me of graduati on they are prepared to achi a/e the E ducati onal Obj ecti ves. Other opportuni ti es are opti onal and offered for i nterested and 
qualified students. The educational opportunities are: 

1. Broad Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply rele/ant mathematical, scientific, and basic engineering knowledge. 

2. Disciplinary Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply core electrical engineering techni cal knowledge 

3. Specialization: Understanding of and ability to apply the skills and concepts within one or more of the speci all zati ons within electrical 
engineering. 

4. L aboratory : U nderstandi ng of and abi I i ty to empi oy standard experi mental techni ques to generate and anal yze data as wel I as use 
state-of-theart software and i nstrumentati on to sol ve el ectri cal engi neeri ng probI ems. 

5. Desi gn: Theoreti cal understandi ng of and abi I i ty to engage i n the creati ve desi gn process through the i ntegrati on and appi i cati on of diverse 
technical knowl edge and expertise to meet customer needs and address social issues. 

6. Research: Ability to formulateand answer empirical and theoretical questions through participation in undergraduate research projects for 
interested and qualified students. 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



7. Leadership: Awareness of the need for engineering leadersboth within the profession and the larger community, as well as some preparation to 
assume those I eadershi p rol es. 

8. Communication Skills: Ability to communicate effectively both through oral presentations and the written word. 

9. I nterpersonal Skills: Ability to interact professionally with others in the workplace^ to engage effectively in teamwori<, and to function 
producti vel y on mul ti di sci pi i nary group proj ects. 

10. Engineering Ethics: U nderstanding of the engineer's responsi bill ties to employers, society, and their fellow engineers as well as an ability to 
recognize potential and actual ethical problems, analyze critically those situations, and formulate sound ethical decisions. 

11. Engineering & Society: Understanding of the symbiotic relationship between engineering and society specifically, how engineering artifacts 
are shaped by and i ncorporabe human val ues as wel I as the ways i n whi ch engi neeri ng sol uti ons i mpact soci ety and the I arger soci al obi i gati ons thi s 
entai I s for engi neers. 

12. Lifelong Learning: Skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning and an understanding of the need to continually exploit those ski lis in 
ref i ni ng and updati ng onels knowl edge base 

AcknisEJcn tDthe Maj cr 

A dmissi on requirements are the same as those of other departments in theSchool of Engineering. SeeAdmission Requirements for A. James Clark 
School of Engineering in Chapter 6. 

Reqiiremaitsfor theMajcr 

Requi rements for the E I ectri cal E ngi neeri ng maj or i ncl ude thorough preparati on i n mathemati cs, physi cs, chemi stry, and engi neeri ng sci ence 
Elective courses must include both Electrical Engineering courses and technical courses outside the department. Students must earn a grade of 'C 
or hi gher i n al I engi neeri ng, mathemati cs, and sci ence courses, as wel I as the prerequi si tes for these courses. A sampi e program i s shown bel ow. 



Freshman Year 

CHEM 135 General Chemistry for Engineers 
PHYS161 General Physics 
MATH 140/141Calculus I / Cdculus 1 1 
ENESIOO Intro. To Engineering Design 

I ntro. To Programmi ng Concepts for 

Engineering 

I ntermediabe Programmi ng Concepts for 

Engineers 



Credfs Crecits 
Second 



First San 

3 

4 
3 



Sem 

3 
4 



ENEE140* 



ENEE150 



CORE** 


CORE General Education 


3 


3 




ToW 


15 


13 






Crafts 


Crafts 




SophomoreYear 


First San 


Seocnd 
San 


MATH 241 


Calculus III 


4 




MATH 246 


Differenbal Equations 




3 


PHYS26(y261 General Physics II aid Lab 


4 




PHYS27(y271 General Physics III andL^ 




4 


ENEE241 


Numerical Techniques in Engineering 


3 




ENEE244 


Digital Logic Design 


3 




ENEE204 


Basic CircuitTheory 




3 


ENEE206 


Digital Circuits Lab 




2 


ENEE200** 


Social & Ethical Dimensions of ECE 
Technology 




3 


CORE** 


CORE General Education 


3 






Tot^ 


17 


15 






Crafts 


Crafts 




Junior Yea- 


First San 


Soixid 
San 


MATH4XX*** Advanced ElectiveMath 




3 


ENEE303 


Analog and Digital Electronics 


3 




ENEE307 


Elecljonics Circuits Design Lab 


2 




ENEE3B 


1 ntro. to Da/ice Physics 


3 




ENEE322 


Signal and System Theory 


3 




ENEE324 


E ngi neeri ng P robabi 1 i ty 




3 


ENEE350 


Computer Organi zali on 




3 


ENEE380 


E 1 ectromagneti c Theory 


3 




ENEE381 


Electromagnetic Wave Program 




3 


CORE** 


CORE General Education 




3 



DepgftiTKrt^ Majors EndProg-arrs 



Tot^ 14 15 



Credts Credts 
Senior Year First sem 



Second 
Sem 



ELECTIVE EE Electives 7 6 

ELECTIVE Free Technical Electives**** 3 6 

ENGL393 Technical Writing 3 

CORE** CORE General Education 3 3 

Tot^ Ifi 15 

*Stiudent5 must complete EN EE 140 or pass the exemption exam or A PCS exam before taking EN EE 150. 

** Note Schedule assumes one CORE class satisfies the CORE Cultural Diversity requi rement and E NEE 200isusedasa CORE IE tosatisfy 
one of the di stii buti ve studi es requi rements. 

***Must come from list of approved Math courses within free technical elective list 

**** Must come from list of courses approved for free technical dectiveswithatleasttwoelectiveEE courses taken from the same specialty area. 

Technical Elective Requi rements 

EffBctJveFell 200B, all erteringBSEE ^tudentsmEb 

1. D i stri bute thei r 13 credi ts of E E techni cal el ecti ves among the f ol I owi ng course categori es: 

Category A. Advanced Theory and Applications: mini mum of 3 credits 
Category B. Advanced Laboratory: minimum of 2 credits 
Category C . Capstone Desi gn: mi ni mum of 3 credi ts 

Note ENEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and ComputerEngineeririg.may be used to satisfy either theCategoryA or the Category B 
requi rement subject to approval by the faculty supervisor and the Associate Chair; it cannot be used as a Category C course. Themaximum 
number of ENEE 499 credits that may be applied towards EE technical elective requi rements is five 

2. Di stri bute their 9 credits of free techni cal electives as follows: 

a. They may beany upper-la/el course (300 level or higher) from the math, engineering, and basic science disciplines whose courses 
start wi th the f ol I owi ng pref i xes and who do not appear on the I i st of unaccept^l e courses aval I abl e from the U ndergraduate Studi es 
Office AMSC, BCHM, BIOE, BSCI, CHEM, CMSC, ENAE, ENCE, ENCH, ENEE, ENES, ENFP, ENMA, ENME, ENNU, ENRE, 
MATH, PHYS, and STAT. The most up-to-date list of approved and unacceptable courses will always be aval I able from the 

U ndergraduate Studi es Off i ce and on the E C E websi te. 

b. They may beany upper-level course (300 level orhigher) whose prefix is not given in the list above, assuming that the student (i) 
compi etes the appi i cati on to al I ow the course to count as a f ree el ecti ve, ( i i ) demonstrates how thi s course compi ements the student's 
prof essi onal goal s and ( i i i ) recei ves the si gned approval of the A ssoci ate C hai r for U ndergraduate E ducati on. I f more than one course 
is taken via this option, all of thosecourses must have a closely-related theme. 

3. H ave two courses from the same ENEE speci al ty area. A I i st of courses grouped accord ng to speci al ty area i s aval I abl e from the 
U ndergraduate Studi es Off i ce and on the E C E websi te. 

I f you have any questi ons about how these requi rements affect your current sel ecti on of seni or E E el ecti ves, pi ease contact an advi son 

TedvKcal dlecSvss for ^tudsntsackrittod Spring 2001 - Spring200B: 

The 13 credits of EE technical electives among the following course categories: 

Crafts 

~. . . . .-ru J A 1- _*; minimumof 

CategoryA AdvancedTheoryandApplicabons ., 

~. n A J. _ji u -1- minimumof 

Category B Advanced Laboratory ^ 

„_, „ ^ ,j„ r^ ■ minimumof 

Category C Capstone Design