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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland, College Park, 2009-2010"

Underg-aduateCafcyog 2009/2010 



A bout the Catalog Pa 9 e2 

About the Catalog 

OnlineCatalog The contents of the 2009-10 onl i ne Catalog is current as of J une 2009. 

Program requi rements contai ned i n the U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ndergraduate Catal og supersede 
any i nf ormati on whi ch may be contai ned i n any bul I eti n of any school or department. H owever, the 
provi si ons of thi s publ i cati on are not to be regarded as a contract between the student and the U ni versi 1 
University of Maryland. Tine University reserves the right to change its policies, rules, regulations, 
requi rements for graduation, course offeri ngs, tuition, fees, other charges, or any other contents of 
this catalog at any ti me. 

C hanges are effected from ti me to ti me i n the general regul ati ons and i n the acaderri c requi rements. 
There are establ i shed procedures for maki ng changes that protect the i nstituti on's i ntegrity and the 
i ndi vidual students i nterest and welfare. A curricul um or graduation requi rement, when altered, is 
not normal I y retroacti ve unl ess the al terati ons are to the students advantage and can be 
accommodated with the span of years normal I y requi red for graduation. 

Hyperlinks This catalog contains hyperlinks to other informational resources at the University of 
M aryl and. The i information contai ned i n these I i nks is not a part of the official catalog. 

Publications 

Undergraduate Catalog The current U ndergraduate Catal og, as wel I as past versi ons, are avai I abl e 
at this site. 

Graduate Catalog The online graduate catalog is at: www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog. For 
i nf ormati on cal I 301-314-4198. 

Registration Glide: The Registration Guide lists registration dates and procedures, deadl i nes, fees, 
and general i nf ormati on. 1 1 i s avai I abl e pri or to earl y regi strati on for the spri ng and f al I semesters. 
The Regi strati on G ui de i s avai I abl e to al I students free of charge and can be pi eked up at the 
Mitchell Building, Stamp Student Union, Hornbake Library and McKeldin Library. The Scheduleof 
C I asses i s avai I abl e onl i ne at: www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html . 



A bout the University Page3 



About the University 

Campus Acfcrinistration and Deans 
College Park Administration 

C. D. Mote, J r., President 

Nari man Farvardi n Seni or V i ce P resi dent for A caderri c Aff ai rs and P rovost 

L inda C lenient V i ce Presi dent for Student Affai rs 

Mel Bernstein, Vice Presi dent for Research 

J effrey C. Huskamp Vice President and Chief I information Officer 

Am G. Wylie Vice President for Adrri ni strati ve Affai rs 

Br odie Remington Vice Presi dent for University Relations 

College Park Administrative Deans 

Doma B. Hamilton, Associ ate Provost for Acaderri c Affai rs and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

Deader Vikor, I nteri m Dean of L i brari es 

Siba Samal, Associ ate Dean, Col I ege of Veteri nary M edi ci ne, M aryl and Campus 

Charles A. Caramel I o Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School 

Academic Calendar 2009-2010 

FALL TERM 2009 

Classes Start 8G1/09 (M onday) 

Labor Day Hoi iday 9/7/09 (M onday) 

Thanksgiving Holiday 11/26/09 (Thursday) through 11/27/09 (Friday) 

Last Class 12/11/09 (Friday) 

Study Day 12/12-13/09 (Saturday and Sunday) 

Final Exams Start 12/14/09 (M onday) 

Final Exams End 12/19/09 (Saturday) 

M ai n Wi nter Corrrnencement Ceremony 12/19/09 (Saturday eveni ng) 

Col I ege Corrrnencement Ceremoni es 12/20/09 (Sunday) 

WINTER TERM 2010 

Classes Begin 1/4/10 (Monday) 

Martin Luther King Holiday 1/18/10 (Monday) 

Classes End 1/22/10 (Friday) 

SPRING TERM 2010 

Classes Start 1/25/10 (Monday) 

Spring Break 3/15/10 (Monday) through 3/19/10 (Friday) 

Last Class 5/11/10 (Tuesday) 

Study Day 5/12/10 (Wednesday) 



AbouttheUniversity Pa 9 e4 



Final Exams Start 5/13/10 (Thursday) 

Final Exams End 5/19/10 (Wednesday) 

Senior Day 5/20/10 (Thursday) 

M ai n Spri ng Commencement Ceremony 5/20/10 (Thursday eveni ng) 

Col lege Commencement Ceremonies 5/21/10 (Friday) 

SUMMER TERMS 201D 

M emorial Day Hoi iday 5/31/10 (M onday) 
Summer I Begins 6/1/10 (Tuesday) 
I ndependence Day Hoi iday 7/5/10 (M onday) 
Summer I Ends 7/9/10 (Friday) 
Summer 1 1 Begi ns 7/12/10 (M onday) 
Summer 1 1 Ends 8^20/10 (Friday) 

All dates are potentially subject to change. 

F uture academi c cal endars can be vi ewed at www. provost. umd.edu/cal endar/ 



1. RequireiTBTtsandApplicationProcedurs Pageb 

L Reqiirarente and Application Procedires 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 



The University of Maryland is a publicly funded land grant institution and the flagship of the University 
System of Maryland. The University's Mission Statement commits it to achieving excellence as the state's 
pri mary center for research and graduate education and the i institution of choice for undergraduate students of 
exceptional ability and promise. Consistent with this nission, the University counts the diversity of its 
students among its greatest strengths and as an i ntegral component of the educational process and academic 
excellence. 

The undergraduate admissions process, which reflects the University's educational mission, seeks to identify 
those applicants, who as individuals and as a group, will enrich and benefit from the campus learning 
envi ronment, and thus benefit the enti re student body. The process is structured to bui Id enteri ng classes of 
students whose vari ed backgrounds and experi ences provi de substanti al evi dence of thei r potenti al to: 

1. M eet the university's requi rements for academic success. 

2. Enrich the university as a heterogeneous community. 

3. Add new perspectives to the university's curricul um and scholarly pursuits. 

4. Devd op personal skills, including I eadershi p, self-corf i dence, and i ntd I ectual 
engagement. 

5. Contribute to the intellectual, cultural, social and political life of the university, 
state, and nation. 



As the universi ty must make fine distinctions among large numbersof highly qualified applicants, the ability 
to assess consistentiy all information presented in the application becomes increasingly important 
Therefore, the university employs a rigorous review process that engages the expertise of professional 
educators i n performi ng i individual ized and holistic eval uations of each application. Each appl icant is 
assessed on the basis of achievements and potential i n a broad range of academic categories, viewed i n the 
context of the opportuni ti es and chal I enges the appl i cant faced. 
These categori es i ncl ude: 

1. Strength of educational performance, as measured by the nature and rigor of high 
school curri cul um and academi c achi evements. 

2. Potential for col lege success, as evidenced by performance on nationally normed 
standardized tests. 

3. Potential to promote beneficial educational outcomes and to make a positive 
contri bution to campus and community I ife 

4. Persistence, and commitment to educational excellence, as evidenced by 
demonstrated success i n faci ng adversity and overcomi ng obstacles. 



1. RequirQTeTtsandAfplicationProceclureE Paget 



Application Forms 

U ndergraduate appl i cati on forms may be requested and submi tted on- 1 i ne vi a the web at 

www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu . You may also download a PDF of the appl ication from the admissions Web site. 

Application Fee 

A non- ref undabl e $55 appl i cati on f ee i s requi red wi th each appl i cati on. 

Fall Semester Freshman Admission 

The University of Maryland strongly encourages all applicants to apply by our priority application deadline 
to assure best consideration for admission, merit scholarshi ps, and i nvitation to the U niversity Honors 
Program or College Park Scholars. Admission to the University of M aryland is competitive. We 
receive more than 28,000 appl i cati ons for a fall freshman class of over 4,000. As a result, we are unableto 
offer admission to al I students who have the abi I ity to be academical ly successful at M aryland. A completed 
application includes an appl ication form official high school transcript, SAT or ACT scores, essay, guidance 
counsel or recommendati on form and appl i cati on fee. 

Applying by the priority deadline is encouraged. For updated deadline information, please visit: www.adrrissic 
www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu/admi ssi ons/appl v/appl i cati ondeadl i nesasp Because of space limitations, the 
university is unableto offer admission to all qualified applicants. 

Spring Semester Freshman Admission 

Applications received after the priority deadline date will be considered on a rolling, space-available basis. A 
compl eted appl ication incl udes an appl i cati on form of f i ci al hi gh school transcri pt, SAT or A CT scores, 
essay, gui dance counsel or recommendati on form and appl i cati on fee. 

Applying by the priority deadline is encouraged. For updated deadline information, please visit: www.adrrissic 
www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu/admi ssi ons/appl v/appl i cati ondeadl i nesasp 

Financial Aid Applications 

The priority deadline for Financial Aid is February 15. Students seeking financial assistance should complete 
the FA FSA before receiving their letter of admission. More information is avail able about Financial A id in 
Chapter 2. 

Early Admission Options for High-Achieving High School Students 

Concurrent Enrollment: Talented high school seniors have the opportunity to enrol I atthe University of 
M ary I and for two courses, or seven credi ts, each semester. Successful appl i cants wi 1 1 have pursued a 
ri gorous hi gh school program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and abi I i ty achi eved over 
timeToapply, students must submit: the compl eted appl ication and fee; high school transcript; an essay 
expl ai ni ng why they are i nterested i n the program a I etter of recommendati on from the hi gh school ; and a 
letter of permission from the parents or guardian. Students must live withi n commuti ng distance. Tuition is 
assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply infull. 

Summer Enrollment High school students with a strong high school record may be considered for 
enrol I merit i n courses duri ng the summer precedi ng thei r j uni or or seni or year. They must f i I e a regul ar 
appl i cati on for undergraduate admi ssi on, i ncl udi ng an off i ci al hi gh school transcri pt. Tui ti on i s assessed on a 
per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply infull. 

Application Deadlines: 

Spring: January 2 
Summer: M ay 1 
Fall: August 1 



1. RequireiTBTtsandApplicatiaiProcedurGE Page/ 



Early Admission: Although the University of Maryland generally requires applicants to earn a high school 
diploma prior to their first full-time registration, the university will admita limited number of well-qualified 
students without high school diplomas. Successful applicants will have pursued a rigorous high school 
program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and ability achi eved over ti me. Students must be 
withi n two credits of high school graduation and have the commitment of the high school to award a di ploma 
after successful completion of the freshman year at M aryland. To apply, students must submit: the 
compl eted appl i cati on and fee, hi gh school transcri pt and SAT or A CT resul ts, an essay expl ai ni ng how they 
will benefit from the program and a letter of permission from the parents or guardian and a letter of support 
from the high school. Early admission students aredigibleforon-campus housing, scholarships based on 
academic achievement, the University Honors Program and College Park Scholars. Early application is 
advised. 

Higji School Equivalency Examination (GED) 

M aryl and resi dents who are at I east 16 years of age and who have not received a hi gh school di pi oma may 
be considered for admission provided they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency 
(GED) certificate. In order to be considered for admission, trie applicant must present an above average total 
score as wd I as above average scores on each of the five parts of the test. 

Non-Accredited/Non-Approved Hidh School 

Students from non-accredited/non- approved high schools who seek admission to the University of Maryland 
shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons for i nf ormati on. 

Home-Schooled Students 

H ome-school ed appl i cants shoul d meet the same mi ni mum hi gh school course requi rements expected of al I 
applicants. Additional information from home-schooled students is required in the foil owing areas of the 
application: 

Transcript should provide course descriptions, books used, methods of evaluation, and the 
grades reed ved, as wd I as a statement provi di ng general i rformati on about the home- school 
curriculum. If college-levd courses have been taken simultaneously an official college 
transcript should be included with the application. 

Letters of Recomfendation: the University of Maryland requi res two recommendations from 
al I freshman appl i cants. I n the case of home- school ed students these recommendati ons can be 
provided by 1) and individual acting in a supervisory or evaluative capacity with regard to the 
students curriculum and 2) fromateacher in any setting (home-school program community 
col lege course, etc.). 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CREDIT 

TheUniversity of Maryland encourages appl i cants to seek A P credit so that academically successful 
students may move forward i n thd r programs at an appropri ate pace. H owever, credi t i s not granted for al I 
exams offered by the Col lege Board. Credits are accepted and courses are exempted, based on departmental 
approval , accordi ng to the chart bd ow. Students shoul d arrange to have thd r scores sent di rectiy to the 
University of M aryland from the Educational Testi ng Service the code is 5814. Students should also i nform 
thdr advisors at Orientation that they anticipate reed ving AP credit because this information may affect 
thd r pi acement i n subj ect- matter courses. 

If a student has already recdved AP credi tat another institution, this credi twill be reevaluated. The score 
recdved must be equivalent to the minimum score the University of Maryland accepted at the time the test 
was taken; otherwi se, the credi t wi 1 1 not be d i gi bl e f or transfer. A P credi ts that are accepted are recorded as 



1. RequlremEnte and Application Procedures 



Paget 



transfer credit on University of Maryland records and figure in the total number of credits earned toward 
graduation. Students may not receiveAP credit for an equivalent course taken at the University of Maryland 
or elsewhere. If students earn credit in a course equivalent to an A P examfor which they also earned credit 
the A P credit will be deleted from their records. Students should check with their advisors for detailed 
information on the assignment of AP credit. 

PI ease note that the chart represents a general outline of A P credit. I n all cases, credit is available only for 
grades of 3 or hi gher, subj ect to ongoi ng departmental reeval uati on. A 1 1 departments reserve the ri ght to 
reevaluate the content of exams and to change the assignment of credit and course equivalencies. Any new 
exams offered after February 15 may or may not be eval uated by the appropriate department. Students 
should check with their advisor at Orientation. 

Certain departments, particularly Mathematics and Physics, have separate criteria for placement in courses 
and the assi gnment of credi t Students shoul d check wi th those departments for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. A 1 1 
entering freshmen will be placed in math courses according to the University of Maryland math placement 
exam. 

2009- 2010 University of Maryland Advanced Placement (AP) Exams aid Credit Table 



1 

AP ExamTitie 

1 


1 
Score 

1 


Related 
Course 


Cr 


1 
Maj 

1 


1 
Core 

1 


Note 


Art History 


3,4,5 


ARTH 
100 


3 


No 


Yes 


ARTH 100 fills CORE-Arts requirement. 
Contact department for placement 405-1479. 


Art 












Students i nterested i n establ ishi ng credit for 
specific courses must submit portfol io for 
evaluation; call 405-1442 


Drawing 


4,5 


ARTT 
110 


3 


Yes 

1 


No 

1 


General 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Biology 


4 


BSCI 
105 and 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


BSCI fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sciences; italsofillsCORE-Lab(Life) Science 
requirements. Contact the Col lege of Life 
Sciences for placement 405-2080. 




LL 
Elective 


5 


BSCI 
105 aid 


8 


Yes 


Yes 




BSCI 
106 


1 
Chemistry 




4 


CHEM 
131/132 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


CHEM fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sciences; italsofillsCORE-Lab(Physical) 
Sci ence requi rement. Contact department for 
placement 405-1791. 


5 


CHEM 

131/132 

and 


6 


Yes 

1 


Yes 




CHEM 
271 


N/A 


N/A 






{Computer Science 















1. RaquirerraTtearKlApplicaQon Procedures 



Hagey 



1 
JAVA (2004+) A 5 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


Creditwill be given for either the A ortheAB 
exam not both. Credit may be earned for both 
the C++ and JAVA exams. Students receiving an 
acceptabl e score on the J A VA exam (5 on A , 4 
or 5 on A B ) are exempt from C M SC 131. Contact 
department for placement, 405-2672. 


JAVA (2004+) A B 


1 1 

45 

' 1 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


C++(pre-2004) A 


45 

' 1 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 


C++(pre-2004) 
AB 


4 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 




5 


LL 1 
Elective 


6 


No 


No 




Economics 












Economics majors must score 4 or 5 to receive 
credittoward the major. Either ECON fills one 
of twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requi rements. Contact department for pi acement 
405-3513 


Macroeconomics 

1 


4,5 

1 


ECON 
201 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


1 
Microeconomics 


1 
3 


ECON 
105 


3 


No 


Yes 




4,5 


ECON 
200 


3 


1 
Yes 


Yes 




Engjish 












Students with score of 4 or 5 on Lang and Comp 
exam satisfy CORE-Fundamental Studies 
Freshman Writing requi rement(*ENGL 101). 
Students with credit for the Lanauaae exam may 
not receive creditfor ENGL 291 or its 
equivalent. ENGL 240fillsCORE-Literature 
requi rement. Contact department for pi acement, 
405-3825. 


1 
Literature & Comp 


3 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 




4,5 


LL 

Elective 

and 


6 


No 


1 
No 






ENGL 
240 




Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 


Language & Comp 


3 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 




4,5 


ENGL 
101 


3 


No 


* 




Env. Science 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


Yes 


ENSP101 fills CORE-Physical Science 
requirement. 


French 












Lanquaqe Students with score of 4 who wish to 


Language 


4 


FREN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 




5 


FREN 
204 aid 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


continue should enroll in FREN 204; with score 
of 5 must enroll in FREN 250 or higher. 
L i terature Students wi th score of 4 shoul d enrol 1 
in FREN 250; with score of 5 may enroll in 
300-level courses. FREN 203. 204 or 211 fill?; 






FREN 
211 


No 


Yes 



1. RaquirernaitearKJApplicaQon Procedures 



Pageic 



Literature 


4 


FREN 
204 


3 


Yes 

1 


i 

Yes 

1 


CORE-Humanities requirement; FREN 250 fills 
CORE-Literature requirement. Contact 
department for placement, 405-4034. 




5 


FREN 
204 and 


6 


Yes 

1 


Yes 






FREN 
250 


1 

Yes 

1 


Yes 




Geocp-aphy, Human 


4,5 

l 


GEOG 
202 


3 


1 
Yes 


Yes 


GEOG 202 fi 1 Is one of two CORE 
Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement 405-4073. 


German 


4 


GERM 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 


Students with score of 4 who wi sh to conti nue 
must enrol 1 i n GERM 204; with score of 5 must 
enroll in GERM 301. Contact department for 
placement, 405-4091. 


5 


GERM 
203 and 


7 


No 


Yes 




GERM 
204 


Yes 


Yes 


Gov't & Politics 












GVPT 170 fills one of two 
CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement, 405-4124. 


United States 


3,4,5 


GVPT 
170 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 


Comparative 


3,4,5 


GVPT 
280 


3 


Y* 


No 


History 












U.S. History: A score of 4 will be awarded three 


United States 


4 


HIST 
156 or 


3 


Yes 


Yes 






HIST 
157 


Yes| 


Y*| 


credits as chosen by the student (HI ST 156 or 
HIST 157). A scoreof 5 will beawardedsix 
credits (HIST 156and 157). Eitherfills 
CORE- Hi story requirement 




5 


HIST 
156 and 


6 


Y* 


Yes 






HIST 
157 


Yes 


Yes 




i 
European 


4 


HIST 
112 or 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


E uropean H i story: A score of 4 wi 1 1 be awarded 







HIST 
113 


Yes 


Yes 


3 credits as chosen by the student (HIST 112 or 
HIST 113). A scoreof 5 will be awarded 6 
credits(HIST112andHIST113). HIST 112 
fills CORE-Humanities requirement; HIST 113 
fi 1 1 s CORE- H i story requi rement. 




5 


HIST 

112 

and 


6 


Yes 

1 


Yes 






HIST 
113 


Yes 

1 


Yes 




World 


4,5 


HIST 
219 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 

1 


World History: fil Is CORE-History requirement; 


see department for placement, 405-4272. 



1. RaquirernaTtearKlApplicaQon Procedures 



Page 11 



Italian 


4,5 










U nder revi ew; contact department for pi acement. 
405-4031. 


Latin 












Students with score of 4 or 5 i n any A P Lati n test 
may not take LATN 201 or 1 ower for credi t. 
Students with score of 4 or 5 i n more than one 
AP Latin test may receive additional credit. 
Contact department for placement and credit 
adjustment, 405-2013. 


Vergil 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


Y«| 


Y«s| 


Catullus & Cicero 

1 


45 

' 1 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 

1 


1 

Yes 

1 


Catullus& Horace 

1 


4,5 

1 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 

1 


Yes 


1 
Catullus & Ovid 


1 
4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


1 
Yes 


Yes 




Mathematics 












*MATH 141 may be completed through 
credit-by-exam. MATH 140 fills both 
CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement 
andCORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non- lab 
requi rement. Students who receive credit for 
MATH 140 or 140 & 141 may not receive credit 
for MATH 220 or 220 & 221. Contact 
department for placement, 405-5053. 


CalculusAB 


4,5 


MATH 
140* 


4 


Yes 

1 


I 

Yes 

1 


Calculus BC 


4,5 


MATH 
140 and 


8 


1 

Yes 

1 


1 

Yes 

1 






MATH 
141 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 




Calculus BC 
withAB Subscore 


4,5 


MATH 
140 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


The Calcul us BC w/ AP subscore is treated as if 
theBC exam was theAB exam. Students may 
not receiveAB subscore credit if credit was 
awarded for the BC exam. 


Music 












MUSC 130orl40fillsCORE-Arts 

H i story/Theory requi rement. M aj ors shoul d 

contact department for placement, 405-5563. 


Listening/Literature 


3,4,5 


MUSC 
130 


3 


No 


Yes 


Theory 


4 
5 


MUSC 
140 
MUSC 
150 


3 


No 
No 


Yes 
No 




Physics 












PHYS 121 and 122 fulfill CORELab 
( Physi cal ) Sci ence requi rement. Physi cs C 
exams f ulf i 1 1 maj or requi rements i n L if e 
Sciences, Engineering, or Physics; they also 
fulfill the CORE Lab (Physical) Science 


Physics B 


4,5 


PHYS 
121 and 


8 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
122 




No 


Yes 


Physics C 












Mechanics 


4,5 


PHYS 
141 or 


4 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
161 or 


Yes 


Yes 



1. Raquirernaite arc! ApplicaQon Procedures 



Pagel^ 







PHYS 
171 




Yes 


Yes 


requi rement:. a score or 4 or s on trie pnysi cs l 
exams wi 1 1 be awarded four credits as chosen by 
the student and hi s/her advi sor. 
Students must have credit for A P Calculus BC to 
take the next course i n sequence. Contact 
department for placement, 4055979. 


Elec./Magnet 


4 


PHYS 
142 or 


4 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
260/1 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 




5 


PHYS 
142 or 


4 


No 


Yes 






PHYS 
260/1 or 


Yes 

1 


Yes 






PHYS 
272 


1 
Yes 


Yes 




Psychology 


4,5 


PYSC 
100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The A P exam counts towards the 35 requi red 
major credits. If a student enters with AP credit, 
s/he must compl ete PSY C221 with a grade of B 
or better. PSYC 100 fills oneof two CORE - 
Social / Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for placement, 405-5866. 


Spanish 












Lanauaae Students with score of 4 who wish to 


Language 


4 


SPAN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 




5 


SPAN 
204 and 


6 


No 


Yes 


conti nue must enrol 1 i n SPA N 204, 211 or 207; 
with score of 5 must enrol 1 i n 300-levd courses. 
Literature: Students with score of 4 or 5 must 
enroll in 300- level courses. CORE: SPAN 203 
or 204 fi 1 Is CORE-H umanities requi rement; 
SPAN 221 fills CORE-Literature requirement. 
Contact department for placement, 405-6452. 






SPAN 
207 




Yes 

1 


No 

1 


Literature 


4 


SPAN 
221 


3 


Yes 

1 


Yes 




5 


SPAN 
207 and 


6 


1 

Yes 

1 


No 






SPAN 
221 


1 
Yes 


Yes 




Statistics 


4,5 


STAT 
100 


3 


* 


Yes 


STAT 100 fills CORE Fundamental Math 
requirement and CORE Math& Formal 
Reasoning nonlab requirement. 
* STAT 100 f i 1 1 s program requi rements i n 
certain majors. Consult advisor. 





Please Note LL refersto courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for 



1. RequireiTBTtsandApplicatiaiProcedureE 



Page 13 



AP courses and equivalent UMCPcoursesor transfer courses (including IB or CLEP). Credit will be 
deleted in such cases Decisions about applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing 
basis Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent infuimUon. Native speakers may not earn AP 
credit for French, German or Spanish languageexams 



INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMS (IB) AND CREDIT TABLE 

2009-2010 

The University of M aryland awards credit to students who sitfor I nternational Baccalaureate exams 
accordi ng to the tabl e bd ow. I nterested students shoul d contact the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons for 
additional information. Note Credit awards and course equivalencies are subject to change 

International Baccalaureate Exams (IB) and Credit Table 





IB Exam L 

x:«« \Scare 
Title 


Related 
Course 


Cr 


Maj 

1 


Core 


Notes 












Anthropology 1 

Higher | ' ' 


See Notes 








U nder revi ew. Students i nterested i n A nthropol ogy shoul d contact 
an advisor for placement 


Art Design 

Higher 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








Under review. Students interested in Art should contact an advisor 
for placement. 


Bidogy 














Higher 


5 


LL Elective 


4 


No 


No 


BSCI 105 fills a major requirement in all Life Sciences; also fills 
CORE-Lab(Life) Science requirement Contact the Col lege of Life 
Sciences for placement 405-2080 


Higher 


6,7 


BSCI 105 

&LL 

Elective 


8 


Yes 


Yes 
















Chemistry 














1 
Either 


1 
5 


CHEM 131 

&CHEM 

132 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


CHEM fillsrequirementforall Life Science majors; also fills 
CORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement. Contact department for 
placement 405-1791. 














1 
Either 


1 
6,7 


CHEM 131 
&CHEM 
132 & 


6 


Yes 


Yes 














CHEM 271 


Yes 


No 
















Computing 

Higher 


5,6,7 

1 




3 




No 


Contact department for placement 405-2672. 














Economics 




























Higher 


5 


ECON 205 


3 




Yes 


ECON majors must score 6 or 7 to receive credit toward major. 
ECON fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement 405-3513. 














Higher 


6,7 


ECON 200 

&ECON 

201 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


English A/B 

Higher 


5,6,7 


ENGL 240 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ENGL 240 satisfies CORE-Literature requirement. Contact 
departmentfor placement 405-3825. 


Env. Stucfes 

Higher 


67 1 


See Notes 


3 






U nder review. Students i nterested i n E nvi ronmental Science or 
Pol i cy shoul d contact an advi sor for pi acement 
















French 












Standard ■ Students wi th score of5whowishtocontinueshould 














Standard 


5 


FREN 203 


4 


No 


Yes 


enroll inFREN 204; with score of 6 or 7 should enroll inFREN 



1. Requirernente and Application Procedures 



Page 14 



Standard 6,7 


FREN 204 
& 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


250 or hiaher level courses. H iaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 
may enroll in300-level courses. FREN 203, 204 or 211 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement FREN 250fillsCORE-Literature 
requirement. Contact department for placement 405-4034. 






FREN 211 


No 


Yes 












II 1 
Higher 5 


FREN 204 

&FREN 

250 


6 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 












1 

Higher 

1 


6,7 

1 


FREN 204 
&FREN 
250 & 


9 


1 
Yes 

1 


1 
Yes 
















FREN 211 


No 


Yes 














Geography 

Either 


5,6,7 


GEOG 100 


3 


No 


Yes 


GEOG 100 satisfies one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement 405-4053. 
















German 








1 




Students with score of 5 who wi sh to conti nue must enrol 1 i n 
GERM 204; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll inGERM 301. 
Contact department for placement 405-4091. 














Higher 


5 


GERM 203 


4 


No 


No 












1 
Higher 


1 
6,7 


GERM 203 

&GERM 

204 


7 


1 
No 


No 
















History 

(Higher) 












A score of 5 wi 1 1 be awarded three credits (as chosen by the 
student-except for West & South A si a) . A score of 6 or 7 wi 1 1 be 
awarded six credits. All HIST courses listed at leftfulfill 
CORE-History requirement HIST 112 fills CORE-Humanities/ 
Other. HIST 120, 122, 123, 284 and 285 also fulfill Diversity 
requirement. 














Africa 


5 


HIST 122 
or HI ST 123 


3 


Yes 


Yes 














6,7 


HIST122& 
& HI ST 123 


6 


Yes 


Yes 














Americas 


5 


HIST 156 

orHIST 

157 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST156& 
& HI ST 157 


1 
6 


1 
Yes 


1 
Yes 














Europe 


5 


HIST 112 or 

orHIST 

IB 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST 112 & 
& HI ST 113 


6 


Yes 


Yes 












E/SE Asia 


5 


HIST 284 

orHIST 

285 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST284& 
& HI ST 285 


6 


1 
Yes 


| 
Yes 












Islamic World 


5,6,7 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


Yes 














WestAsia 


5 

1 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


Yes 



1. RequirerreTt5andApplicatiaiProcedureE 



Page lb 





6,7 


HIST120& 

&LL 

Elective 


6 


Yes 


1 
Yes 


















Italian 












Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to conti nue must 














Standard 


5 


ITAL 203 


4 


No 


Yes 


Standard 


6,7 


ITAL 204 
& 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


enroll in ITAL 204; with score of 6 or 7 may enroll in300-level 
courses. H iaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 must enrol 1 i n 
300-level courses. ITAL 203or204fillsCORE-Humanities 
requirement; ITAL 251 fills CORE-Literature requirement 
Contact department for placement 405-4031. 
















ITAL 211 


Yes 


No 














Higher 


5 


ITAL 204 

&ITAL 

251 


6 


Yes 


Yes 












Higher 


6,7 


ITAL 204 
&ITAL 
251 & 


9 


Yes 


Yes 
















ITAL 211 


Yes 


No 
















InfaTech. 




See Notes 








No credit i s awarded for thi s exam at this ti me. 
















Latin 

Either 


5,6,7 


LATN 201 


4 


Yes 


Yes | 


Contact department for placement 405-2013. 
















1 
Mathematics 










1 


Standard: No credit but placement in MATH 220 is awarded. Hiqher 


Hiqher MATH 141 may be completed via credit-by-exam. MATH 


Standard 


5,6,7 


See Notes 





No 


No 


140fills bothCORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement and 
CORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non- lab requirement Contact 
department with questions, 405-5053. 














Higher 


1 
5,6,7 


MATH 140 


7 


1 
Yes 


Yes 
















Music 

Either | 


5,6,7 


M USC 130 


3 


No 


Yes 


MUSC 130fillsCORE-Arts requirement Majors should contact 
department for placement 405-5563. 














Philosophy 

Higher 


6,7 


PHIL 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


PHIL lOOfillsCORE-Humanities requirement 














Phyacs 

Higher 


5,6,7 


PHY S 121 
&122 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


P HYS220 and 221 fill CORE-Lab (Physical) science 
requirements. Students continuing Physics study should 
consult department for placement, 405-5979. 














Psychology 

Either 


6,7 


PSYC100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The 1 B exam counts towards the 35 credits required in the major. If 
a student enters with IB credit s/hemustcompletePSYC221witha 
gradeof B or better. PSYC lOOfillsoneof two 
CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement 405-5866. 
















Spanish 












Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to conti nue must 














enrol 1 i n SPA N 204, 211 or 207; with score of 6 or 7 must enrol 1 i n 
300-level courses. Hiaher: Students with score of 5, 6 or 7 must 
enroll in 300-level courses. SPAN 203or204fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement SPAN 221 fills CORE-Literature 
requirement. Students continuing Spanish study should consult 
department for placement 405-6452. 


Standard 


5 


SPAN 203 


4 


No 


Yes 










Standard 


6,7 


SPAN 204 


1 
6 


No 


Yes 














SPAN 207 


Yes 


No 














Higher 


5 


SPAN 204 


6 


No 


Yes 
















SPAN 221 


Yes 


Yes 










Higher 

1 


6,7 

1 


SPAN 204 
& 


9 


No 
1 


Yes 
1 



1. Requi rernsnts and Application Procedures 



Page It: 







SPAN 207 
& 




1 

Yes 

1 


No 








SPAN 221 


Yes 


Yes 


Swehili 

Either 


6,7 


FOLA 159 


6 


No 


No 


ElectivecreditintheFOLA program. Students who wish to 
continue should contact the FOLA officeinJiminezHall. 


Theatre 

Higher 


5,6,7 


THET 110 


3 


No 


Yes 


THET llOfillsCORE-Arts requirement. Majors should contact 
department for placement 405-6694. 





Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for IB courses and for 
equivalent UMCP courses or transfer courses (including APorCLEP). I B credit wi 1 1 be deleted in such cases. Decisions about 
applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent information. 
Native speakers may not earn I B creditfor any language exams. 

Students who receive an I nternational Baccalaureate Di ploma or Certificate may consider presenti ng a portfolio to the Freshman 
Writing Off ice for review. See the Department of E nql ish web site or cal I the Freshman Writing Office, 405-3771, for further 
information. 



ADMISSION TO LIMITED ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS (LEP) 



Certain colleges, schools, and departments within the university have taken steps to I i mi t enrol I merit in order 
to maintain quality programs. These include the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Robert 
H. Smith School of Business, A. James Clark School of Engineering, Department of Government and 
Politics, Philip Merrill Coll ege of J oumal i sm, Department of N atural Resource Sci ences and L andscape 
Architecture, Department of Psychology and Department of Communication. LEP programs are continually 
reviewed. Students should check the LEP Web si te at www. I ep. umd.edu or contact the Limited Enrollment 
Program Admissions Coordinator at 301-314-8385 for updated information. 

Freshmen: A dmissi on for new freshmen to Limited Enrollment Programs is competitive. Because space 
may be limited for a particular major, early application is encouraged. Freshmen who aredirectiy admitted to 
an LEP will be subject to a performance review when they complete45 col I ege credits. The review varies 
from program to program but always i ncl udes satisfactory performance i n a set of appropriate courses. 
Students not passi ng the revi ew wi 1 1 be requi red to choose another maj or. See the acaderri c program 
descri ption for specific details. 

Freshmen not di rectiy admitted to an LEP may be assigned to Letters and Sciences or to a general major 
within the LEP college requested. Students are not guaranteed admission to an LEP at a later date, although 
they may gai n admi ssi on by meeti ng the requi rements outiinedintharrjarticularprcigram by the time they 
complete45 or 60 credits at Maryland. See the foil owing section on LEP transfer admission and the LEP 
program descri pti ons for further detai I s about thi s opti on. 

Transfers Transfer students and on-campus students wishirgtochangetharrrajortDanLEPmustmeeta 
set of gateway courses with mi ni mum grades i n order to be admitted to the program Space is I i mited i n each 
program and the most qual if i ed appl i cants wi 1 1 be adrri tted each semester. A ddi ti onal i nf ormati on for each 
of the Limited Enrollment Programs may be found in the descri pti ons of academic majors in chapter 7. 

Transfer students who are not di rectiy admissible to an LEP upon application to the university will be 
assi gned to an al ternate program. Those wi th fewer than 60 credi ts wi 1 1 be assi gned to L etters and Sci ences, 
and will be allowed the opportunity to meet the gateway requirements by the time they complete45 or 60 
credits. Students with more than 60 credits will be admitted to an interim advising program in Letters and 
Sci ences where they will beadvised regarding their qualifications for the LEP and, in some cases, the need to 
choose another maj or. 



1. RequirQTeTtsandAfplicationProceclureE Pagel/ 



Second Major: Enrolled students interested in adding an LEP as a second major should see "Degree 
Requi rements" i n chapter 4. 

Pre-Profesaonal Programs 

While professional schools do not require, favor, or prefer specific majors, pre- professional advisors can 
provide guidance concerning the choice of major. Undecided students may enter Letters and Sciences, but 
must adhere to the University of Maryland policy, that students declare a degree-granting major by the time 
they reach 60 credits. See www.ltsc.umd.edu/ 

For further information on pre- professional programs, see "Other for Credit Programs" in Chapter 7, 
www.prelaw.umd.edu or www.prehealth.urnd.edu . 



SPECIAL APPLICANTS 

Golden Identification Card Program 

The University of Maryland participates in theGol den I dentificati on Card Program. The institution will 
make avai I abl e courses and vari ous servi ces to persons who are 60 years of age or ol der, who are I egal 
resi dents of the State of M aryl and and who are red red ( not engaged i n gai nf ul empl oyment for more than 20 
hours per week). When persons eligi blefor this program are admitted to the university, they register on a 
space-avai lable basis for credit courses as regular or special students i n any session and receive a Golden 
I dentificati on card. Golden I D students must meet al I course prerequisite and co- requi site requi rements. 
Tuition is waived for these courses; however, a Golden I D admi nistrativefee is assessed every semester. 
Golden I D students may register for a maxi mum of three courses per term Golden I D students are not 
eligible for Consortium courses. The Golden Identification Card will errti tie eligible persons to certain 
academic services, including the use of the libraries and the shuttle bus service. Such servi ces will be 
avai I abl e duri ng any sessi on only to persons who have regi stered for one or more courses for that semester. 
Gol den I D students al so have the opportuni ty to become i nvol ved wi th the Gol den I D Student A ssoci ati on, 
which provides cultural and social events, course recommendations, and peer advising. Additional 
i nf ormati on may be obtai ned from the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at 301- 314-8385. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to work toward a baccalaureate degree may be 
admitted as non-degree-seeking students. 

Non-degree- seeki ng students who have received a baccalaureate degree are advised that no credit earned 
while enrolled may be applied at a later date to a graduate program These post- baccalaureate students may 
enrol I i n undergraduate courses for whi ch they possess the necessary prerequi si tes, but may not enrol I i n 
courses restricted to graduate students only. Students who wish to take courses at the graduate level (600 and 
above) must contact the G raduate School for i nf ormati on concerni ng admi ssi on requi rements for A dvanced 
Special Student status. 

Non-degree- seeki ng students who do not have a baccalaureate degree must submit transcri pts and meet 
regul ar admi ssi on standards. Transcri pts are not requi red from students wi th baccal aureate degrees from a 
regionally accredited institution. Because of space limitation, several departments require permission be 
given i n advance to regi ster for cl asses as a non-degree student. PI ease contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
A drri ssi ons for further i nf ormati on. 

Non-degree-seeking students who are taking classes to transfer immediately back to another institution may 
apply without academic transcri pts. These appl icants must, in lieu of transcri pts, submit official 
documentation from that institution grand ng permission to take course work at the U ni versity of M aryl and 
for that parti cul ar semester. 

Returning Students and Veterans 



1. RequireiTBTtsandApplicatiaiProcedurGE Pagelfc 



Applicants who have not attended school for more than five years, or who have had military experience, 
should contact both an admissions counselor and the Retumi ng Students Program 301-314-7693. Veterans 
should also contactthe the University of Maryland Veterans Certification Office: 301-314-8239. 

Students returning to the University of M aryland after a separation of five calendar years may petition the 
appropriate dean to have a number of grades and credits from courses previously taken at the University of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, removed from the cal cul ati on of thei r cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages and from the 
credits applied toward graduation requirements. See information under "Registration, Academic 
Requirements and Regulations" in chapter 4. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

The University of Maryland seeks to enroll international students who demonstrate strong academic 
performance with records suggesting potential for success at Maryland. Admission is competitive and is 
offered to appli cants wliceeacadeniccredentialsirdii^terrarksof "veiygc)od" to "excellent." Due to space 
limitations and the competitive nature of undergraduate admission at the University of Maryland, an 
international appli cant should submit a complete application as early as possible, and always before the 
deadl i nes I i sted i n thi s seed on. Appli cati ons completed after a deadline will not be considered for that 
semester, but wi 1 1 be revi ewed for the f ol I owi ng semester. E val uati on of an appl i cants credenti al s wi 1 1 take 
place only after al I appl ication materials are received. Decisions are released i n writi ng on a rol I i ng basis. 

Applicants currently holding or intending to seek an F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor visa to study in the 
U ni ted States are consi dered i nternati onal appl i cants and shoul d observe the f ol I owi ng i nstructi ons. A 1 1 
other non-immi grant visa holders (including A, E, G, H, I, andL) should follow the Freshman and Transfer 
instructions preceding and following the I ntemational Student Admission section 

Freshman Admission - 1 ntemational 

You are considered a freshman applicant if you have completed fewer than 12 semester hours of 
university- level credit past secondary school atthe time you plan to enter the University of Maryland. 
Successful freshman applicants demonstrate satisfactory completion of diverse col I ege- preparatory subjects 
i n secondary school , prof i ci ency in English, and evi dence of suffi ci ent funds to cover al I expenses. Due to 
space I irritations, we are unable to offer admission to all students who have the ability to be successful 
academical ly at theUniversity of M aryland. 

The Fal I (A ugust) deadl i ne for appl i cati ons to be received i s December 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) general 
deadline is August! 

All of the foil owi ng documents must be submitted before the freshman final deadline for an appli cant to be 
consi dered for undergraduate adrri ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on; 
nonrefundable appl ication fee (U.S. $55.00); official secondary school transcripts in native language with 
certified literal English translations and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion from 
a national secondary school examination; all official university or col lege transcripts in native language with 
certified literal English translations (if any); proof of English proficiency; SAT or ACT official results; 
statement of activities; an essay; and Certification of Finances, including supporting documents that 
demonstrate support of U.S. $40,191 per year. Current F-l and J -1 Visa Holders must also provide 
photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current 1-20 or DS-2019 form. Current 
other non-immi grant Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure Record and 
visa stamp. 

Transfer Admission - 1 ntemational 

You are considered a transfer applicant if you have completed 12 or more semester hours of university-level 
credit past secondary school at the time you plan to enter the University of Maryland. Students who have 



1. RequirerreitearxJApplicaQonProcedures Pageiy 



completed fewer than 28 transferable credits must submit high school transcri pts. Successful transfer 
appl i cants demonstrate better than average grades i n strong academi c courses, prof i ci ency in English, and 
evidence of sufficient funds to cover al I expenses. Due to space I i mitations, we are unable to offer admission 
to all students who have the ability to be academically successful attheUniversity of Maryland. 

The Fal I f i nal deadl i ne for appl i cati ons to be received i s M arch 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) f i nal deadl i ne i s 
August! 

All of the foil owing documents must be submitted before the transfer final deadline for an applicant to be 
consi dered for undergraduate adrri ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on; 
nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $55.00); all official university or college transcripts in native language 
with certified literal English translations; proof of English proficiency; statement of activities; and 
Certif i cati on of F i nances, i ncl udi ng supporti ng documents that demonstrate support of U .S. $40, 191 per 
year. Current F-l and J -1 Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure 
Record, vi sa stamp, and current I - 20 or DS- 2019 form. C urrent other non- i mmi grant V i sa H ol ders must al so 
provi de photocopies of their 1-94 A rrival/Departure Record and visa stamp. Students with fewer than 28 
semester hours must also provide official secondary school transcripts in native language with certified literal 
English translations, SAT scores, and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion from a 
national secondary school examination. 

English Proficiency 

Non-native English speakers (regardless of citizenship) who seek admission to the University of Maryland 
must verify their proficiency in English by taking and submitting an official score reportfrom one of the 
foil owing English proficiency exams: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language); orlELTS 
(I ntemational English Language Test System). Those whose native languageis not English, who earn an 
SAT critical readi ng score of 480 or higher, or who have earned a post-secondary degree from a university i n 
an E ngl i sh-speaki ng country do not need to take or submi t scores from an E ngl i sh prof i ci ency exam. 
Transfer credit for an English composition course from an U.S. institutions does not waive the English 
proficiency exam. 

Visa Records 

A ppl i cants Residing Outside of the United States: To enter the United States, international students residing 
abroad wi 1 1 need a passport from thei r government and a vi sa from the U .S. Consul ate. I n order to obtai n a 
visa for the purposes of studying in the United States, the applicant must present a Certificateof Eligibility 
formtotheU.S. Consulate. The university will issue this form to admi tted students who have submitted 
proof of having sufficient funds to cover the cost of a program of study- Admitted students with personal, 
family, or other source of private funding will beissued the Certificateof Eligibility form l-20inorderto 
obtai n the F- 1 Student V i sa. A dmi tted students who are sponsored by agenci es, f oundati ons, or thei r home 
government, or are parti ci pati ng i n an establ i shed exchange program may be i ssued the Certif i cate of 
E I i gi bi I i ty form DS- 2019 i n order to obtai n the J - 1 Exchange V i si tor V i sa. 

Applicants Currently Residing in the United States Applicants currently holding F-l Student orj-l 
Exchange Visitor status in the United States need to submit a photocopy of their 1-94 Arrival/Departure 
Record, vi sa stamp, and current I - 20 or DS- 2019 form al ong wi th proof of havi ng suffi ci ent funds to cover 
the cost of a program of study. Applicants holding another type of non- immigrant status need to submit a 
photocopy of thei r I -94 A rrival/Departure Record and vi sa stamp, and must i ndi cate if they i ntend to seek a 
change to F-l Student orj -1 Exchange Visitor status. Upon admission and submission of the appropriate 
financial support documentati on, the university will issue the appropriate Certificate of Eligibility form(l-20 
or DS-2019) to the student. 

General Certificateof Education/The West African Examinations Council (WAEC) Exams 

The University of M aryland awards between 4 and 8 semester credits for most A-level exams completed 
with a grade of C or better. Up to 4 semester credits may be awarded for certain AS- level exams completed 
with acceptabl e grades. For further i rformati on, contact the Off i ce of I nternati onal Educati on Servi ces vi a 
email a tiesacK^deans. umd.edu or 301-314-7740. 



1. RequirernsntearxJApplicaQonPrccedures Page^c 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 

A student who has attended any regional ly accredited institution of higher education fol lowi ng graduation 
from hi gh school and attempted 12 or more credi ts wi 1 1 be consi dered f or admi ssi on as a transfer student. 
Transfer applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary standing at their previous institutions to be 
digiblefor transfer to the University of Maryland. 

When the number of students desi ri ng admi ssi on exceeds the number that can be accommodated at thi s 
institution, or in a particular professional or specialized program admission will be based on the overall 
strength of the students academic performance. 

Reqiirements 

Admission for transfer applicants is primarily based on the number of credits a student has earned and 
academic achievement for all college-level work. In calculating eligibility, the university will use the 
average stated on the transcript by the sending institution. When an applicant has attended more than one 
i nsti tuti on, a cumul ati ve average for al I previ ous col I ege work attempted wi 1 1 be computed. To be consi dered, 
course work must have been completed at a regionally accredited college or university. All students with 
grade poi nt averages bel ow 3.0 wi 1 1 be consi dered on a space-avai I abl e basi s. Students who were not 
admissible as high school seniors must complete at I east 30 semester hours with the grade point average as 
stated above. I n accordance with M aryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer 
policies, applicants from Maryland public institutions are, in some instances, given special consideration, 
and, when qualified and space is available, may be admitted with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or 
higher. 

Application Dates 

Semester Date 

Spri ng N ovember 15 (A ugust 1 wi th any non- U S academi c records) 

Fal I Priority M arch 1 (Students with non-US academic records must apply by this date) 

Fall Junel 



Transfer from Maryland Public I nstitutions 

Currently, applicants who have attended Maryland public institutions may be admitted in accordance with 
the criteria outlined in the previous paragraph. The university subscribes to the policies set forth in the 
Maryland Higher Education Commission (M HEC) and Board of Regents transfer policies. When the number 
of students desi ri ng admi ssi on exceeds the number that can be accorrrnodated i n a parti cul ar prof essi onal or 
special ized program admission wi 1 1 be based on criteria developed by the university to select the best 
qualified students. 

A rti cul ated transfer programs are avai I abl e at each M ary I and communi ty col I ege. A n arti cul abed transfer 
program is a list of courses that best prepare applicants for a particular course of study at the University of 
M aryl and. A ppl i cants who take appropri ate courses specif i ed i n the arti cul ated program and earn acceptabl e 



1. RequiremEnte and Application Procedure 



PageZL 



grades are guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit Articulated transfer programs hd p students plan thei r 
new programs after changi ng career obj ecti ves. M ore i rformati on about A RTSY S, the arti cul ati on system i s 
avai I abl e onl i ne atittp://artweb.usmd.edu/ . A ppl i cants can d i mi nate al I doubt concemi ng transfer of courses 
by f ol I owi ng arti cul ated programs. 

General Transfer I nformation 

Admitted students wi 1 1 reed ve a prd i mi nary review of transfer credit withi n two weeks after recdvi ng the 
I etter of admi ssi on. A n of f i ci al revi ew of transfer credi t occurs thereafter, wi th f i nal determi nati on of 
appl i cabi I i ty made by an academi c advi sor/eval uator i n the of f i ce of the appropri ate dean for the maj or. 
Generally, college-levd courses completed at regionally-accredited institutions will transfer provided that 
grades of at I east "C " (2.0) are earned and the course i s si mi I ar i n content and scope to work offered at 
M aryl and. The regi onal accredi ti ng bodi es are M i ddl e States A ssoci ati on of Col I eges and School s, N ew 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 
Northwest A ssoci ati on of School sand Col I eges, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and Western 
Association of Schools and Col leges. Up to 60 credits from a community or two-year col lege, and 90 credits 
from a four-year col I ege, may be appl i ed toward the degree. Students are requi red to compl ete at I east thd r 
final 30 credits at Maryland to earn a University of Maryland degree. 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public col I eges and universities is covered by the Maryland 
Higher Education Commission (MHEC) transfer policies (see compl ete text later in this section). Maryland 
will accept grades of "D" or betterfrom appropriate course work completed ata regionally-accredited 
Maryland public institution, ircluding other institutions in the University System of Maryland. 

The Transfer C redi t Center provi des arti cul ati on i nf ormati on and assi stance to students and transfer advi sons. 
The Center, ajoint effort between the Off i ces of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons and the Off i ce of the Regi strar, 
has computeri zed and consol i dated the transfer credi t eval uati on process. 1 1 provi des i ncomi ng students from 
domestic i institutions with i nformation on acceptabil ity of credits and transfer equivalencies, subject to 
adjustment by advisors within the students individual program. Certain courses (e.g., those not appearing or 
notfullydaborated in the sending institution's current catalog) may requi re additional information such as 
syllabi, portfolios, etc., before eval uati on. 

I nformation on transferabi I ity of specific courses to the University of M aryl and, Col lege Park may be 
accessed on the web at www.tce.umd.edu/TCE/ . 

Each college-levd course will be evaluated individually, with applicability toward major or general 
education requi rements determi ned by the appropriate academic unit. The university does not transfer blocks 
of courses, such as those completed through the Associate's Degree. See "Departments, M ajors and 
Programs" for specific general education and major requirements. 

Credit will be posted to your Maryland record only from official transcripts sent from the institution at which 
the credi t was compl eted. Students who have earned credi t through A dvanced PI acement (A P) , I nternati onal 
Baccalaureate (IB), orCollege-Levd Examination Program (CLEP) subject area exams must have scores 
sent di rectiy from the testi ng board, even if they are al ready posted on a transcri pt from another i nstituti on. 



SOURCE 


ACCEPT 
CREDITS? 


EQUIVALENT OR 
REQUI RED CREDITS 


GRADES/SCORES WHERE 
APPROPRIATE 


Note Sometransfer credit policies are under review. Pleasecall Undergraduate Aclmsaonsfor 
current information. 


ACE Non Collegiate Courses 


No 


Advanced Placement Program 
(CEEB) 


Yes 


EorR 1 


3 or hi gher (see chart i n 
Chapter 1) 


CLEP 


Yes 


EorR 1 


See chart i n Chapter 4 



1. Raquirernaite arc! ApplicaQon Procedures 



Page 12 



Community College of theAir 
Force 


Yes 


EorRl 

1 


C (2.0) or higher equivalent 
grade as appropri ate to dept. 


Correspondence courses 


No 


Dantes 


No 


Defense 


Yes 

Language 

Institute 


EorRl 

1 


Scores as appropri ate to 
department 


Departmental exams from 
other col leges 


Yes 


EorRl 


C (2.0) or higher 


International Baccalaurate 


Yes 


EorRl 


5 or hi gher (see chart i n 
Chapter 1) 


Life experience 


No, unless validated through CLEP or University of Maryland, College 
Park departmental exam 


Military credit 


No 


Nursing school courses: by L 2 
transfer/by chal 1 enge exam | 


Other arti cul ati on agreements 
(propriety schools, public 
agencies, etc.) 


1 

No, unless a newly-formed Maryland public institution operating under 

auspices of MH EC 


PONSI non-collegiate work 


No 


Portf ol i credi ts from other 
col 1 eges | 


No 



1. Courses must be similar in depth and scope to University of Maryland courses. Applicability is 
determi ned by the appropri ate dean. 

2. Professional courses are general ly not transferable. Course taken at a regional ly-accredited institution 
may be revi ewed by the appropri ate dean. 



St a te men t on Transfer of CourseCrecf t 

The University of M aryland wd comes transfer students and has trarefer agreements (sometimes referred to 
as "articulation" agreements) to encourage and aid students in their efforts to take appropriate courses prior to 
transfer. Each course is evaluated individually for students seeking to transfer to the University of Maryland. 
Credit is granted for courses that are appl icable to a Bachelor of A its or Bachelor of Science degree, and for 
which a grade of "C" or above was earned. Courses completed at M aryland publ ic two- or four-year 
institutions may be transferred with grades of "D" or above provided that course content is appropri ate to our 
academic programs. 

Maximum Number of Transfer Credits Accepted 

The University of Maryland has direct transfer agreements with all M ary I and community col I eges, as well as 
other j unior and community col leges outside of the state. The university wi II accept for transfer a maxi mum 
of 60 credi ts from a two-year program and 90 credi ts from a four-year program for courses i n whi ch a grade 
of "C" or above was earned arid whi chare appropri ate to an approved curriculum at this institution. Seethe 
above paragraph for requi red course grades. 

Maximum Number of C redits Allowed for Non-Traditional Learning 

Students who have acqui red col lege-levd learni ng through work or other non-col legiate activities may wish 



1. RequirQTeTtsandAfplicationProceclureE PageZd 



to translate their experience into credits at Maryland by validation through the national CLEP examination 
(Col lege- Level Examination Program) or credit- by-exarri nation administered by academic departments. The 
university will accept a maximum of 30 hours of credit through examination. 

Minimum Number of Credits Required Through Classroom I nstruction in the Major Field and for the 
Degree 

The University of Maryland requires a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit for an undergraduate 
degree; some programs requi re more. Regardless of the total number of transfer credits, students must 
complete at I east their last 30 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

State men t on Transfer of General Education Requirements 

As directed by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Transfer Policy, transferable courses 
taken in fulfill merit of general education requirements at a Maryland public institution will be applied toward 
University of Maryland's CORE requirements. Careful planning with an academic advisor will ensure that 
students take appropri ate credit and maximize their credit transfer. Thetotal number of general education 
credi ts f or a M ary I and publ ic institution transfer or post baccal aureate credi ts wi 1 1 not exceed that requi red of 
native students. 

Transfer credit Policy - Maryland Higher Education Commission (Title 13B) 

www.dsd.state.md. us/comar/subti ti e_chapters/13B_C haptens, htm 

RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

Residency Classification Office, UBOMitchell Building 

301-314-9596; Fax: 301-314-7915 
E-mail: resclass@umd.edu 
www.testudo. umd.edu/rco 

Peti ti ons, rd ated documents and questi ons concerni ng the B oard of Regents Pol i cy on Student C I assif i cati on 
for Admissi on and Tuition Purposes should be di rected to the Residency Classification Office in the Off ice 
of the Registrar. 

Determination of I n-State Status for Admission and Tuition Purposes: See 
vuvuw.usrnh.usnd.edu/regents/bylavus/SectionVI I l/VI 1 1 270.htni for the complete text of this policy. 

An initial determination of in-state status will be made by the Office of Undergraduate Admissi ons at the 
ti me a students' appl ication for admission is considered. The determi nation made at that ti me, and any 
determi nati on made thereafter, shal I prevai I i n each semester unti I the determi nati on i s successful ly 
challenged. StLdertsmaychallengetharclassifi^o 

Classification Office. Determi nations are based on the residency pol icy and requi rements. The deadl i nefor 
submitting a complete petition along with all supporting documents, is the first day of the semester in which 
the student wi shes to be cl assif i ed as i n- state. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in completing the review process. A 
decision in each case will be made within 60 days of recei pt of a complete petition and all required 
documentation. During this period of time, or ary further period of time required by the university, anyfees 
and charges based on the previous determination must be paid. The student is solely responsible for any late 
charges i incurred by the resi dency process. I f the determi nati on i s changed, any excess fees and charges wi 1 1 
be refunded. 

Students classified as in-state for admission and tuition purposes are responsible for notifying the Residency 
Classification Office in writing within 15 days of any change in their circumstances that might in any way 
affect their classification at the University of Maryland. 



1. RequirerreTt5andApplicationProcedurG£ Page^ 



READMISSION AND REINSTATEMENT 

Students who are admi tied and do not regi ster for the r f i rst semester or cancel regi strati on pri or to begi nni ng 
their first semester must apply again for admission (see Freshman or Transfer Admission). Students who are 
admitted ae "Term Only" also must apply agai n for admission if they wish to register for a subsequent term. 

Students who have matri cul ated and regi stered and di d not mai ntai n that regi strati on conti nuously ( Fal I and 
Spring semesters) to graduation, must apply for readrrissi on or reinstatement to re-enroll atthe University of 
Maryland. 

See "Withdrawal and Leave of Absence from the University" i n chapter 4 for more detailed information. 

Readrrisson 

Students must apply for readrrissi on if they i nterrupt registration for one or more semesters and were not 
academical ly dismissed at the concl usion of the last semester of attendance. 

Reinstatement 

Students who are academical ly dismissed from the university must apply for rei nstatement. All appl ications 
for reinstatement are reviewed by a Faculty Petition Board. Students may apply for reinstatement for the 
semester immediately following dismissal or for any subsequent semester. Only the Faculty Petition Board 
can grant rei nstatement 

Students who are denied reinstatement will be required to comply with specific recommendations made by 
the Faculty Petition Board in order to be considered for rei nstatement in afuture semester. 

Reinstatement After Withdrawal 

Students who withdraw from the university must apply for rei nstatement if they i nterrupt enrol I merit for one 
or more semesters. Students who were academical ly dismissed at the concl usion of the previous completed 
semester al so must apply for rei nstatement (see U ndergraduate Pol i cy on Probati on and Di smi ssal ) . Students 
shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons for more i nf ormati on about readmi ssi on and 
rei nstatement 

Deadlines 

There are no deadl i nes for readmi ssi on. For f ul I consi derati on, students applyi ng for rei nstatement must 
observe the f ol I owi ng deadl i nes: 

Fall Semester J uly 1 

Wi nter Term N ovember 1 

Spri ng Semester December 1 

Summer Session I May 1 

Summer Session II Junel 

A 1 1 students are encouraged to apply early i n order to take advantage of early regi strati on. 

Summer School 

Students who are dismissed at the end of the fall semester are notdigibleto attend Summer Sessions unless 
or until they are approved for reinstatement Students dismissed at the end of a spring semester may attend 
any Summer Sessi ons pri or to bei ng rei nstated. H owever, these students must be approved for rei nstatement 
i n order to attend duri ng the subsequent fal I semester. 

Winter Term 

Students dismissed at the end of the fal I semester may attend Winter Term pri or to being reinstated. Winter 



1. RequirareTtearrJApplicaQonProcedures vsge'Zb 



Term i s offered to students who have attended duri ng the precedi ng f al I semester. Students wi th a break i n 
attendance must be reenrolled to be eligible to attend Winter Term. Students readmitted/reinstated for a 
spring semester may also attend Winter Term 

Clearances 

Clearances fromjudicial Programs, the Bursar, Health Center, International Education Services and/or the 
Graduate School may be requested of the applicant. 

Applications 

Applicati ons for readmi ssi on and rei nstatement may be accessed vi a the web at www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu/adm 
www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu/admi ssi ons/apply/reenrol I merit. asp. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact the Off ice of Undergraduate Admissions, ground floor, 0117 Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5251, 301-314-8385 or visit: www.admissions.um 
www.admi ssi ons. umd.edu 



Graduate School 

Applicants who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited col lege or university 
intheUnited States (or the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree in another country) are eligible to be 
considered for admission to the Graduate School at the University of Maryland. Graduate School and degree 
program cri teri a for admi ssi on are avai I abl e i n the G raduate Catal og, avai I abl e onl i ne at 
www.gradschool .umd.edu/catalog. For more i information on graduate degree programs, fi nancial aid for 
graduate study, deadl i nes, and onl i ne appl ication i nstructi ons, pi ease vi si t the G raduate School 's websi te, www. 
www.gradschool .umd.edu email gradschool@umd.edu, or call the Graduate School Information Center at 
301-405-0376. Hard-copy correspondence can be addressed to the Graduate School, 2123 Lee Bui Idi ng, 
University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742-5121. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 26 

2 Fees* Expenses and Financial Aid 

TUITION AND BILL PAYMENT INFORMATION 

FiricVicicrf Servi ces Ce n te r 

1135 LeeBuilding, 301-31^9000 and 1-888-313-2404 
www.umd.edu/bursar 

Tuition and fees for the University of Maryland, College Park, arelisted inthe 
next secti on. The uni versi ty requi res that al I deposi ts and fees be pai d by stated 
deadl i nes, or penal ti es must be i mposed. M any potenti al admi ni strati ve 
di ff i cul ti es can be avoi ded i f students careful I y f ol I ow publ i shed procedures and 
notify the appropri ate off i ce(s) of any changes that mi ght affect the r f i nanci al 
obi i gati on to the uni versi ty. This i ncl udes updati ng your emai I address so 
communi cati on concerni ng your bi 1 1 i ng i s prompt, and notifyi ng the B ursar's 
Off i ce of changes of address so that mai I aff ecti ng the student's f i nanci al 
rel ati onshi p wi th the uni versi ty wi 1 1 not be del ayed or returned. 

Col I ege Park sponsors a deferred- payment pi an. I nf ormati on regardi ng the Terp 
payment pi an i s avai I abl e by cal I i ng 301-314-9000 or 1-888-313-2404 or at 
www.umd.edu/bursar . 

A 1 1 charges i ncurred duri ng a semester are payabl e i mmedi ate! y . Returni ng 
students wi II not be permi tted to compl ete regi strati on unti I al I f i nanci al 
obi i gati ons to the uni versi ty, i ncl udi ng I i brary f i nes, parki ng vi ol ati ons, and 
other penal ty fees and servi ce charges, are pai d i n f ul I . 

Payment for past due bal ances and current semester fees i s due on or before the 
f i rst day of cl asses. Students who regi ster i n advance must pay thei r bi 1 1 s i n f ul I 
pri or to the general regi strati on peri od. Students who regi ster after the i ni ti al 
regi strati on peri od are requi red to make f ul I payment by the due date i ndi cated to 
avoi d cancel I ati on of thei r enrol I ment and I oss of thei r cl assroom seats to other 
students. 

A I though the uni versi ty bi 1 1 s students monthl y, i t cannot assume responsi bi I i ty 
for thei r recei pt. Students are remi nded that i t i s thei r responsi bi I i ty to noti f y tine 
U ni versi ty of any change i n thei r emai I address. I f a student bi 1 1 i s not recei ved 
on or before the begi nni ng of each semester, i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to 
obtai n a copy of the bi 1 1 ei ther onl i ne at www.umd.edu/bursar and choose 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 27 

"Student Account I nquiry" or go to the Financial Service Center, 1135 Lee 
B ui I di ng. The off i ce i s open M onday through F ri day, 8: 30 a. m. to 4: 30 p. m. 

A 1 1 checks or money orders shoul d be made payabl e to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount due Students name and students University 
I D number should be written on the front side of the check. University grants 
and schol arshi ps wi 1 1 be posted to the student's account. H owever, the f i rst bi 1 1 
mai I ed pri or to the begi nni ng of each semester may not i ncl ude these deducti ons. 

Students are urged to check thei r resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ce agreements 
for procedures for cancel I ati on of reservati ons and for deadl i nes for recei vi ng 
refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be made after these deadl i nes, even if the 
student deci des not to attend the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Students wi 1 1 i ncur a I ate payment f ee i n the event of f ai I ure to pay a bal ance on 
thei r student account by its due date. A I ate payment fee of $10.00 or 5%, 
whi chever i s hi gher, wi 1 1 be assessed i n addi ti on to the total past due amount. A n 
addi ti onal 1. 5% f i nance charge wi 1 1 be charged monthl y i f the account i s not 
settied. 

Students who f ai I to pay the i ndebtedness duri ng the semester i n whi ch 
del i nquency occurs wi 1 1 be i nel i gi bl e to advance regi ster for subsequent 
semesters unti I the debt and the penalty fees are cl eared. 

I n the event a student wi th a del i nquent account becomes regi stered for a future 
semester, the account must be settl ed i n f ul I pri or to the onset of the future 
semester, to avoid cancellation of registration. 

T he state has establ i shed, under I egi si ati ve mandate, a Central Col I ecti ons U ni t 
(CCU) withi n the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planni ng. The university is 
requi red by state I aw to refer al I del i nquent accounts to the State Col I ecti ons 
U ni t. PI ease note that M aryl and I aw al I ows the Central Col I ecti ons U ni t to 
i ntercept state i ncome tax refunds for i ndi vi dual s wi th del i nquent accounts, and 
that CCU i s authori zed to notify a N ati onal Credi t B ureau of the del i nquency at 
the ti me the account i s referred to i t for col I ecti on. 

All accounts due from students, faculty, staff, non-students, etc., are 
included within these guidelines. 

Central Col I ecti ons U ni t costs i ncurred i n col I ecti ng del i nquent accounts wi 1 1 be 
charged to the student. The mi ni mum col I ecti on fee i s 17% pi us attorney and/or 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 28 



court costs. 

N o degrees, di pi omas, certif i cates, or transcri pts of records wi 1 1 be i ssued to 
students who have not made sati sf actory setti ement of thei r accounts. 

Note A ddi ti onal I nf ormati on on Student F i nanci al Obi i gati ons, D i scl osure of 
I nf ormati on, Del i nquent Accounts, and Sped al Fees, can be found i n the " Pol i cy 
Statements" seed on at the begi nni ng of thi s catal og. 

Payment of Fees 

All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be made payable to the 
U ni versity of M aryl and. The student's U ni versity I D number must be written on 
the front of the check. VISA, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover 
credi t cards are accepted. Onl i ne payments can be made by cl i cki ng on the bl ue 
box a twww.umd.edu/bursar. 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 



*/\r> / important Fee Notice Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any 
other University publication, the University reserves the right to make changes 
in tuition, fees, and other charges at any time deemed necessary by the 
University and the University System of Maryland Board of Regents. Tuition and 
fee information is published in the Registration Guide each semester and is also 
available on-line at www.umd.edu/bursar. 

2009-2OL0 Academic Year-EstimatBtf* 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the number of credit hours enrolled is 12 
or more.) 

Maryland Residents (I n-state) 

Total Academic 
Year Cost 

Tuition $6,566 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech fee) -^ ^q-j 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 29 

Board (Resident Dining Plan) 3,826 

Room (I ncludesTelecom fee) 5,549 

Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States; and Other Countries 

Total Academic 
Year Costs 

Tuition $22,503 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech lee) -^ 4g 7 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits 

Board Contract (Resident Dining Plan) 3,826 

Room (includes the Telecom fee) 5, 549 



Tuition and Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered part-time if the number of credit hours enrolled is 11 
or fewer) 



I n- State Tui ti on (per credit hour) $ 273 

Out-of- State Tui ti on (per credit hour) 938 
M andatory Fees (per semester) 

9-11 credi t hours (per semester) 743. 50 

8 or fewer credi t hours (per semester) 338. 94 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

Mandatory Fees 

Student Fees The mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students i s 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 30 

based on a number of requested credit hours as f ol I ows: Students regi stered for 9 
or more credits: $743.50 per semester; students regi stered for 8 or fewer credits: 
$338.94 per semester. 

Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to al I undergraduate students at 
the request of the Student Government Associ ati on. 1 1 i s used i n sponsori ng 
various student activities, student publications, and cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students. Thi s f ee i s pai d 
i nto a fund that i s used for capi tal i mprovement, expansi on, and constructi on of 
vari ous campus faci I i ti es such as open recreati on areas (tenni s courts, basketbal I 
courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the Stamp Student Union. These 
proj ects are not funded or are funded onl y i n part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students for the support of the 
Department of I ntercol I egi ate A thi eti cs. A 1 1 students are encouraged to 
parti ci pate i n al I of the acti vi ti es of thi s department or to attend the contests i f 
they do not parti ci pate. 

Shuttle Bus Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students for the support of the 
shutti e bus transportati on system. 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to all 
students and i s used to expand recreati onal facilities and Stamp Student U ni on 
services. 

Recreation Services Fee ( Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I students sped f i cal I y to 
support the constructi on and operati on of Ri tchi e Col i seum and the Campus 
Recreati on Center, a mul ti - use faci I i ty that i ncl udes basketbal I and racquetbal I 
courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor jogging track, and multipurpose 
activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee Charged to al I students to support 
the operati on of the C I ari ce Smi th Perf ormi ng A rts Center. 

Telecommunications Fee Assessed to al I students I i vi ng i n university residence 
halls. 

Technology Fee Charged to undergraduate students, to support the 
i mprovement of the computer systems on campus. 

OtherFees 

U ndero/aduate Appl ication Fee ( N on- Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I new 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 31 



applicants. $55 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $400. All newly 
admitted undergraduate students who i ntend to matri cul ate i n the Fal I or Spri ng 
semester must submi t a $400 deposi t whi ch i s credi ted to theirtuiti on charges 
when they enrol I . Shoul d the student deci de not to enrol I for the specif i c 
semester of appl i cati on, the $400 deposi t i s f orf ei ted and cannot be used to offset 
any charges, i ncl udi ng ori entati on charges, the student may i ncur. 

Students admitted for the Fal I semester must submit this deposit by M ay 1 or 
wi thi n 30 days from the r date of admi ssi on, whi chever i s I ater, to reserve the r 
pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. Students admitted for the Spri ng semester must 
submi t thi s deposi t by December 1 or wi thi n 14 days of the r date of admi ssi on, 
whi chever i s I ater, to reserve the r pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. 

PreCd lege Orientation Program Registration Fee $145 (two-day program), 
$101 (one-day program), $60.00 (per person). 

Late Registration Fee $20. A 1 1 students are expected to compl ete the r 
regi strati on on the regul ar regi strati on days. Those who do not compl ete the r 
regi strati on duri ng the prescri bed days must pay thi s fee. 

Special Feefbr students requiring additional preparation in Mathematics 
(MATH 003, 030, 010, 013 and 015) per semester: $250. (Requi red of students 
whose curri cul um cal I s for M ATH 110 or 115 and who do not pass the 
qual ifyi ng exami nati on for these courses.) Thi s Sped al M ath Fee i s i n addi ti on 
to course charge. Students enrol I ed i n thi s course and concurrent] y enrol I ed for 
ni ne or more credi t hours wi 1 1 be consi dered as f ul I -ti me students for purposes of 
assessing fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts* Business; and Science 
(UNI V 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 096-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees: The university offers a number of courses (M BA, ENTS, 
Chemical and Life Sciences, Animal Sciences) that have special course fees in 
addition to, or i n I ieu of , the standard tuition charges. Students are encouraged to 
contact the department pri or to regi steri ng for the cl ass to determi ne the total 
cost of the course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as 
those charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 32 

I a/el s. A udi ted credi t hours wi 1 1 be added to hours taken for credi t to determi ne 
f ul I -ti me or part-ti me status for fee assessment purposes. Sped al Students are 
assessed fees i n accordance with the schedul e for the comparabl e undergraduate 
or graduate cl assi f i cati on. 

Special Examination Fee(Credit-by-Exam): $30 per course for all 
undergraduates and f ul I -ti me graduate students; credi t- hour charge for part-ti me 
graduate students. 

Parking Registration Fees All students enrol led for classes at the university 
and who drive or park a vehi cl e anywhere or anyti me on the campus must 
regi ster to park on campus each academi c year. For addi ti onal i nf ormati on, 
pi ease refer to Department of Transportati on Servi ces. 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and cl assroom suppl i es vary wi th the 
course pursued, but averaged $1025 i n 2008 (two semesters). 

Service C harges for Dishonored C hecks: Payabl e for each check whi ch i s 
returned unpai d by the drawer bank on i ni ti al presentati on because of i nsuff i ci ent 
funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 

When a check i s returned unpai d, the student must redeem the check and pay 
any outstandi ng bal ance i n the account withi n 10 days or I ate fees may be 
assessed and the account transferred to the Central Col I ecti on U ni t f or I egal 
f ol I ow-up. Addi ti onal ly, a mi ni mum 17% col I ecti on charge i s added to the 
charges posted to the students account at the ti me the transfer i s made. When a 
check is returned unpaid due to an error made by the students bank, the student 
must obtai n a I etter from the branch manager of the bank or a person of 
equi val ent status admi tti ng the error. Thi s I etter must be submi tted to the Off i ce 
of the B ursar to have the servi ce charge wai ved. 

Overdue L ibrary C harges: For i terns from the I i brary's mai n ci rcul ati ng 
col I ecti ons, charges are .50 cents per day per i tern, and recal I ed i tern f i nes are $2 
per day. I f an item i s I ost or muti I ated, the borrower i s charged the esti mated cost 
of the i tern pi us a processi ng fee to cover acqui si ti on and catal ogi ng costs. 
Different f i ne rates may apply to other I i brary col I ecti ons, such as reserve 
collections. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 33 

Maryland Engjish Institute Fee: Semi -intensive, $3406.00. 1 ntensive, 
$5972.00. Students enrol I ed wi th the M aryl and E ngl i sh I nsti tute pay thi s f ee i n 
support of the I nsti tute. Students enrol I ed i n the semi -i ntensive program may 
al so enrol I for regul ar academi c courses and pay the tui ti on and fees associ ated 
with those offerings. The program also offers non-credit courses in American 
Engl ish Pronunciation (UM El 006) for $943.00 and Fl uency Program or 
Advanced Writing (UM El 007, 008) for $1253.00. These charges were for Fall 
2008 and are subj ect to change. 

Property Damage C barge: Students wi 1 1 be charged for damage to property or 
equi pment. When responsi bi I i ty for the damage can be f i xed, the i ndi vi dual 
student wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or i t; when responsi bi I i ty cannot be f i xed, the cost of 
repai ri ng the damage or repl aci ng equi pment wi 1 1 be prorated among the 
individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, 
whi chever i s greater, pi us an additi onal 1.5% on each subsequent bi 1 1 i ng. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees Students compel I ed to I eave the uni versi ty at 
any ti me duri ng the academi c year shoul d meet wi th the r academi c col I ege 
advi si ng off i ce and secure a form for withdrawal . The compl eted form and 
i dentif i cati on card are to be submi tted to the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce 
whi ch wi 1 1 communi cate results to the Off i ce of the Regi strar. Students wi 1 1 
f orf ei t the r ri ght to a refund i f the wi thdrawal acti on descri bed above i s not 
adhered to. The eff ecti ve date used i n computi ng refunds i s the date the 
wi thdrawal form i s f i I ed i n the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce. Stop payment 
on a check, f ai I ure to pay the semester bi 1 1 , or fai I ure to attend cl asses does not 
constitute withdrawal . Refund requests should be processed by students with the 
Off i ce of the B ursar, otherwi se any credit on the student account coul d be 
carri ed over to the next semester. I f a C anoel lation of Registration is 
submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the official first day of classes 
the student is entitled to full credit of se m ester tuition. 

U ndergraduate students wi thdrawi ng from the uni versi ty wi 1 1 be credi ted for 
tui ti on and fees i n accordance with tine f ol I owi ng schedul e: 

Pri or to 1st day of cl asses 100% 
1st 10 days of cl asses 80% 

3rd week 60% 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 34 

4th week 40% 

5th week 20% 

After 5th week ^° . 

refund 



Note: First- semester freshmen who receiveTitie I V aid and who withdraw will 
recei ve a refund i n accordance wi th federal regul ati ons. 

Prior to the first day of classes, if f ul l-ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses, thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of the per-credit-hour fee for part-ti me students. However, if students later add a 
course or courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they 
are regi stered to 12 or more, they wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or the difference between 
per-credit-hour fees pai d and the general fees for f ul l-ti me undergraduates. 

I f during the first five days of classes f ul I -ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of part-ti me charges pi us 20% of the difference between the f ul I -ti me fees and 
appropri ate part-ti me charges. After the f i rst f i ve days of cl asses, there i s no 
refund for changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me status. Students who regi ster as 
part-ti me undergraduate students and apply for a refund for courses dropped 
duri ng the f i rst week of cl asses wi 1 1 be gi ven an 80% refund. N o refund wi 1 1 be 
made for courses dropped thereafter. 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students off icial ly withdraw from the university or when they are given 
permi ssi on by the appropri ate of f i ci al s of the uni versi ty to move from the 
resi dence hal I s and/or to di sconti nue di ni ng hal I pri vi I eges. I n these cases, the 
room refund wi 1 1 be computed by mul ti pi yi ng the number of peri ods remai ni ng 
by the pro rata weekly rate after adj usti ng for a servi ce charge. Refunds to 
students havi ng f ul I board contracts wi 1 1 be cal cul ated i n a si mi I ar manner. N o 
room and/or board refunds wi 1 1 be made after the 14th week of the semester. 
Students are remi nded that reservati ons for room and board must be cancel ed by 
the date publ i shed i n the resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ces agreements) . 

I n computi ng refunds to students who have received the benefit of scholarshi ps 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 35 

and I oans from uni versi ty funds, the computati on wi 1 1 be made to return the 
maxi mum amount to the schol arshi p and I oan accounts without I oss to the 
university. 

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Student F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000; fax: 301-405-9265 
umfinaid@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, 
state, and institutional financial assistance programs, and, in cooperation with 
other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. The pri mary responsi bi I ity for f i nanci ng attendance at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, I i es with students and f ami I i es. Schol arshi ps, grants, 
I oans, and work- study positi ons are awarded on the basi s of academi c abi I ity 
and/or f i nanci al need as determi ned by a federal needs analysi s system. 1 1 i s the 
i ntent of OSFA to provi de assi stance to students who mi ght not otherwi se be abl e 
to pursue col I ege studi es due to f i nanci al constrai nts. 

Financial aid funds are limited; therefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students must f ol I ow these steps to recei ve pri ori ty consi derati on for f i nanci al ai d: 

1. Submi t admi ssi ons appl i cati ons and al I necessary supporti ng 
documents to the Off i ce of Admi ssi on by the appropri ate deadl i nes. 
(Deadl i nes are I i sted i n chapter 1.) 

2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 

after J anuary 1. The FAFSA is avai I able on the OSFA web site at www.fi nar 
www.fi nanci alaid.umd.edu. A new FAFSA is requi red for each 
academi c year of the students enrol I ment. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing the 
FAFSA. A financial aid application has no bearing on a students 
admi ssi on appl i cati on. H owever, students wi 1 1 not recei ve f i nal 
consi derati on for ai d unti I they are admitted to a degree program. 

3. Mail the FAFSA to the Federal Processor no later than 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 36 

February X so that it is received by the processor by February 
15b Applying online helps to expedite the process, I ncome for the 
previ ous year may be esti mated i ni ti al I y and corrected I ater on the 
Student Aid Report. 

A ppl i cati ons recei ved before F ebruary 15 wi 1 1 be gi ven pri ori ty consi derati on. 
General Regulations Applicableto All Forms of Aid 

Full-Time Status. For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 credit 
hours through the schedul e adj ustment peri od each semester i n order to recei ve 
the f ul I f i nanci al ai d award. PI ease refer to the standards of Sati sf actory 
Academi c Progress when consi deri ng droppi ng be! ow 12 credit hours for any 
given semester. 

C itizenshi p Status. I n order to be el i gi bl e for federal , state, or uni versi ty 
f i nanci al assi stance, students must be U ni ted States ci ti zens or el i gi bl e 
non-citizens. 

Default/Owe Refund: Students cannot be in default on an educational loan, nor 
can they owe any refund on a Pel I Grant or Suppl emental Educati onal 
Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded at any post- secondary institution. 



Students must be worki ng toward a degree or certif i cate. 
Students must be admitted to the university as "degree-seeki ng." 



Students must be maki ng satisfactory progress toward a 
degree or certif i cate accord ng to the Standards for Sati sf actory Academi c 
Progress publ i shed i n the Schedul e of CI asses. 

Selective Service: To receive federal financial aid, male students must register 
with Selective Service if they are at least 18 years old and born after December 
31, 1959, unl ess they are not requi red by I aw. The federal government wi 1 1 verify 
compl i ance of thi s regi strati on requi rement. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non- university source, the university may reduce the 
f i nanci al ai d awarded by the uni versi ty . 1 1 i s the student's responsi bi I i ty to noti f y 
the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of al I outsi de awards. 

Change in Financial Situation: 1 1 is the students responsi bi I i ty to notify the 
Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of any changes to hi s or her f i nanci al 
ci rcumstances duri ng the year. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 37 



Reapplication Requirement N eed- based assi stance i s not automati cal I y 
renewed from year to year. All students requesti ng need- based aid must reapply 
by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA annually. Such reapplication must 
i ndi cate conti nued f i nanci al need and mai ntai n Sati sf actory Academi c Progress 
(SAP). 

Award Policy: Financial aid is normally a combination of grants, loans, and 

student empl oyment. The f i nanci al ai d "package" i s determi ned by the 

avai I abi I i ty of f i nanci al ai d and the f i nanci al ci rcumstances of each student. 1 1 i s 

not necessary to make any sped al appl i cati on for uni versi ty grants. T he Off i ce of 

Student F i nanci al A i d wi 1 1 determi ne awards that best f i t the needs and 

qual if i cati ons of the candi dates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educati onal costs i s used i n determi ni ng the amount of ai d 
that a student i s awarded duri ng the academi c year. A typi cal budget for an 
undergraduate at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, i s as f ol I ows: 

Dependent student livi ng on campus/off campus?* 

(not with parent/relatiw) 

The 2009-2010 budget has not yet been determi ned, use the f ol I owi ng 
2008-2009 budget as a gui del i ne. To determi ne the f i nal budget for the 
2009-2010 academi c year, pi ease contact the F i nanci al Servi ce Center at 
301-31^9000. 

Tuition and Fees 

I n-State M aryl and Resi dent $8,005 

Out-of- State: DC, other states, other countries 23,076 

Room 5,402 

Board 3,707 

Books 1,025 

Personal expenses and commuti ng 3,024 

Total In-State $21,163 

Total Out-of-State $36,234 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 38 



MERIT BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
301-405-9265 
sfa-schol arshi ps@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Scholarships 

Several schol arshi ps are avai I abl e to the hi ghest-achi evi ng students at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. Two types of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e: 
those based solely on academic or creative talent (merit- based), and those based 
on f i nanci al need as wel I as academi c or creati ve tal ent (need- based) . The 
el i gi bi I i ty cri teri a for the di ff erent schol arshi ps vary and are I i sted be! ow. F or 
more i nf ormati on on these programs, students are encouraged to contact the 
off i ce or department responsi bl e f or sel ecti ng the red pi ents. PI ease see the I i st of 
departmental schol arshi ps at the end of thi s chapter. Current i nf ormati on about 
schol arshi ps i s al so avai I abl e on the Web at www.uga.umd.edu . 

Banneker/Key Scholarship: The University of M aryl and seeks to identify and 
sel ect some of the bri ghtest hi gh school seni ors i n the nati on to conti nue thei r 
education as Banneker/Key Scholars. There are two award levels for Banneker 
K ey Schol arshi ps. The f i rst award I evel covers the costs of tui ti on, mandatory 
fees, room and board, and a book al I owance each year for four years. The second 
award I eve! provi des a parti al schol arshi p to go towards tuiti on and a book 
al I owance each year for four years. Schol arshi p red pi ents wi 1 1 al so be admi tted 
to the U ni versi ty H onors Program and wi 1 1 be afforded many other opportuni ti es 
for parti ci pati on i n i ntel I ectual enri chment programs. For f ul I consi derati on, 
students must submi t an admi ssi on appl i cati on, appl i cati on fee, off i ci al 
transcript, essay, recommendations, and official copies of SAT or ACT scores to 
the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons by December 1 for the f ol I owi ng 
academi c year. Sel ecti on i s based upon academi c achi evement pi us 
extracurricular activities, awards and honors, and an essay. Semi finalists are 
given a personal i ntervi ew. Factors such as a candi date's i nvol vement i n 
community servi ce, tal ents or ski 1 1 s, I eadershi p, and character al I pi ay a part i n 
the f i nal awards. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons at 
www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 39 



President s Schdarshi p: T hi s award provi des tal ented undergraduate students 
with tuition support for four years. Awards rangi ng from $2,000 to $12,000 per 
year are offered to i ncomi ng freshmen. Students are sel ected through the 
admi ssi ons process wi th pri mary consi derati on gi ven to academi c performance 
in high school (high school courses and achievement) and standardized test 
scores (SAT or ACT). For ful I consideration, students must submit a complete 
appl i cati on for admi ssi on by December 1. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Deans' Scholarship: This award provides talented undergraduate students with 
tuiti on support for one to two years. Awards rangi ng from $1,500 for one year to 
$4,500 for two years are offered to i ncomi ng freshmen. To be consi dered, 
students must submi t a compl ete appl i cati on for admi ssi on by December 1. 
Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more 
information. 

President sTransfer Scholarship: This scholarship is a two-year $5,000 per 
tuiti on schol arshi p for transfer students. Students do not have to fi 1 1 out a 
separate appl i cati on to be consi dered as they wi 1 1 be eval uated based on thei r 
appl i cati on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. T he schol arshi p wi 1 1 be awarded to 
the most competi ti ve transfer students wi th the strongest academi c records and 
col I ege grade poi nt averages. Students who are awarded the schol arshi p wi 1 1 
receive notif i cati on by mai I about two weeks after they receive thei r I etter of 
admi ssi on. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at 
www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Regents Scholars Program The Regents Schol ars Program recogni zes the 
extraordi nary achievement of outstandi ng freshmen students. New awards are 
made each year i n the amount of ful I i n- state tui ti on, room board, and 
mandatory fees. Red pi ents are automati cal I y admi tted to the U ni versi ty H onors 
Program. A sel ect number of the top hi gh school schol ars i n the state wi 1 1 be 
consi dered for thi s most presti gi ous award. A compl ete admi ssi on appl i cati on, 
application fee, official transcript, essay, recommendations, and SAT or ACT 
scores must be submi tted to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons by 
December 1 for consi derati on for the Regents Schol ars Program for the 
f ol I owi ng academi c year. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons for 
more information. 

National Merit Schdarship/College-Sponsored Merit Award: The National 
M eri t Schol arshi p Corporati on (N M SC) has a vari ety of schol arshi ps that are 
awarded to students based on academic performance. The University of 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 40 

M aryl and serves as a sponsori ng i nsti tuti on for students sel ected by N M SC to 
receive the Col I ege-Sponsored M eri t Schol arshi p award. Students sel ected for 
the U M Sponsored M eri t award wi 1 1 receive a four-year renewabl e schol arshi p 
rangi ng from $1,000 - $2,000/year. All finalists should follow NMSC's 
i nstructi ons for f i rst choi ce noti f i cati ons careful I y and observe deadl i nes to 
remai n el i gi bl e for awards. 

T he N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p al so awards Corporate- Sponsored meri t 
schol arshi ps and N ati onal Achi evement awards. For more i nf ormati on on the 
N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p program pi ease vi si t: www, nati onal meri t. org . 

Weinberg Regents Scholarship: The Board of Regents has designated the 
Wei nberg Regents Schol arshi p to be awarded to a M aryl and communi ty col I ege 
transfer student i n order to conti nue the commitment to outstandi ng students. I n 
order to be sel ected for thi s award, a student must have excepti onal 
qual if i cati ons, i ncl udi ng achi evement of a 4.0 grade poi nt average, compl eti on of 
the A ssoci ate of A rts degree at a M aryl and communi ty col I ege, evi dence of 
creati ve and i ntel I ectual activities or schol arl y potenti al , and have been admi tted 
to one of the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and i nsti tuti ons. T he deadl i ne for 
submi tti ng the candi date's appl i cati on materi al i s J une 15. The wi nner may 
receive the schol arshi p for two years, total i ng no more than four semesters 
i ncl udi ng Summer sessi ons. F or i nf ormati on, contact the U ni versi ty System of 
M aryl and Admi ni strati on at 301-445- 1992. 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are avai I abl e to 
outstandi ng students transferri ng from M aryl and community col I eges. The 
awards cover i n- state tuition and mandatory fees for two years of undergraduate 
study. To be el i gi bl e for consi derati on, students must have an overal I grade poi nt 
average of 3.5 for al I col I ege work attempted, and must have compl eted an 
A ssoci ate of A rts degree or the enti re f i rst two years of courses for the maj or i n 
whi ch the student expects to enrol I . Students who have previ ously attended the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, are i nel i gi bl e for thi s schol arshi p. 
Candi date nomi nati on forms are avai I abl e i n earl y J anuary from the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons or from communi ty col I ege advi sors. The deadl i ne 
for recei pt of the appl i cati on, off i ci al transcri pts, and schol arshi p materi al s i s 
mi d- M arch. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons. 

Honors Scholarship: H onors students al ready attendi ng M aryl and are el i gi bl e 
to apply for one of these $500 awards. To be consi dered, students must be f i rst- 
or second-year students, have at I east a 3.2 grade poi nt average, and be maki ng 
sati sf actory progress toward the compl eti on of requi rements for an H onors 
ci tati on. To appl y appl i cants must submi t an essay on the r academi c goal s and 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 41 

pl ans for achi evi ng them. PI ease note that f i nanci al need taken i nto consi derati on 
when awarding funds. I n addition, Regents, Banneker-Key, and Presidents 
Schol arshi p red pi ents are not el i gi bl e for the H onors Schol arshi ps and. F or 
more i nf ormati on pl ease contact the U ni versi ty H onors Program. 

University of Maryland Departmental Scholarships: Some Col I eges and 
departments at the uni versi ty offer a vari ety of meri t schol arshi ps. M ost 
departmental schol arshi ps requi re a student to have a rri ni mum grade poi nt 
average of 3.0 and be regi stered for a mi ni mum of 12 credits per semester. For 
i nf ormati on regardi ng departmental schol arshi ps, pl ease contact the appropri ate 
Col I ege or department. 

Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships: These are competitive 
schol arshi ps whi ch are awarded annual I y . Pri mary consi derati on wi 1 1 be gi ven to 
enteri ng freshmen and transfer students from community col I eges who have 
outstandi ng tal ent i n art, dance, musi c, or theater. The schol arshi ps cover i n-state 
tuition and mandatory fees and are renewable for up to three additional years 
based upon an acceptabl e I evel of performance as def i ned by the respective 
departments. A udi ti ons and/or portf ol i os are requi red. Contact the Col I ege of 
Arts and Humanities. 

Maryland State Scholarships: The M aryl and State Schol arshi p Admi ni strati on 
(MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards both need- and merit- based scholarships 
to M aryl and resi dents. There are currenti y 16 different programs avai I abl e, 
i ncl udi ng the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educati onal Assi stance Grant, the 
Senatori al Schol arshi p, the H ouse of Del egates Schol arshi p, and the 
Disti ngui shed Schol ar Award. Y ou may obtai n more i nf ormati on about these 
and other awards by cal I i ng M SSA at 800-974- 1024. A 1 1 M aryl and resi dents are 
expected to apply for State Schol arshi p assi stance. I ni ti al appl i cati on for many 
of the awards i s made through the F ree A ppl i cati on for Federal Student A i d 
(FAFSA). Please note that filing the F A FSA is sufficient to apply for most 
M aryl and State Schol arshi ps at U M C P, al though some may requi re addi ti onal 
appl i cati on forms. The appl i cati on deadl i ne for most programs i s M arch 1. The 
FAFSA is avai lable on the OSFA web site atzvww.financialaid.umd.edu . 

Scholarships from Other States Several states have reciprocal agreements 
with the State of M aryl and. Students who are resi dents of these states may 
recei ve funds for study i n el i gi bl e post-secondary i nsti tuti ons i n M aryl and. 
I nterested students shoul d contact thei r state schol arshi p agenci es for i nf ormati on. 

Scholarship Searches: A broad range of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e from pri vate 
sources. U sual I y, these awards are not as wel I publ i ci zed as the state and 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 42 

university programs. Therefore, students should conduct a scholarship search to 
locate such sources. The U ni versity of M aryland offers access to several services 
to students to ai d them in their searches. Access our Web site at 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu to use these servi ces. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
301-405-9265 
umfinaid@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Grants 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d admi ni sters several grant programs for 
undergraduates. Awards are made based on f i nanci al need as determi ned by the 
FAFSA. Grants do not have to be repaid. Access our web si teat.www.fi nanci alaid.i 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 



Fell Grant This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 
which aid from other sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are 
seeki ng the r f i rst bachel or's degree and have excepti onal need may receive a 
Federal Pel I G rant. A 1 1 undergraduates wi 1 1 be consi dered for thi s grant 
regardl ess of when the r appl i cati ons were received. Students may receive the 
Federal Pel I G rant for I ess than f ul I -ti me attendance, al though the award wi 1 1 be 
pro- rated based on the number of credits attempted. Awards range from $775 to 
$5,350. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity G rant (FSEOG): The 

FSEOG i s awarded to f ul I -ti me undergraduates with excepti onal need. Pri ority is 
given to Federal Pell Grant recipients. To be consi dered for FSEOG, students 
must meet OSFA's priority application deadline of February 15. The minimum 
award i s $200. The maxi mum award i s dependent upon government fundi ng. 
The funds are di vi ded among as many deservi ng students as possi bl e. 

Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) and National Science and 
Mathematics Access to Retain to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants Academi c 
Competitiveness Grant, Secti on 401A of the " H i gher Educati on Reconci I i ati on 
Act of 2005" establ i shes a grant program for students who have concentrated i n 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 43 



math/sci ence or a f orei gn I anguage cri ti cal to U .S. Securi ty. 

Grants for f i rst or second year undergraduate students are cal I ed "Academi c 
Competitiveness Grants (ACG) ." Grants for thi rd or fourth year undergraduate 
students are cal I ed " N ati onal Sci ence and M athemati cs Access to Retai n Tal ent 
(SMART) Grants." 

Students who are el i gi bl e for the ACG grants must be a U .S. citi zen, enrol I ed 
f ul I -ti me i n an undergraduate program, must have compl eted a " ri gorous hi gh 
school program 1 ' , f i I e the F ree A ppl i cati on f or F ederal Student A i d ( F A F SA ) and 
el i gi bl e for the federal Pel I grant. The ACG grant amount i s up to $750 for f i rst 
year students and $1300 for second year students over two semesters. 

Students who are el i gi bl e for the SM A RT grants must be a U .S . ci ti zen, enrol I ed 
f ul l-ti me i n an approved undergraduate program must have a 3.0 GPA, f i le the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and el igible for the federal 
Pel I grant. The SM A RT grant amount i s up to $4000 over two semesters. 

Teacher Education Assistance for College and Hicfier Education (TEACH) 
Grant 

Through the Col I ege Cost Reducti on and Access Act of 2007, Congress created 
theTeacher Education Assistance for Col lege and Higher Education (TEACH) 
Grant Program that provides grants of up to $4,000 per year to students who 
i ntend to teach i n a publ i c or private el ementary or secondary school that serves 
students from I ow- i ncome f ami I i es. 

To receive the TEACH Grant students must complete the FAFSA, be a U .S. 
ci ti zen or el i gi bl e non-ci ti zen, enrol I ed as an undergraduate, post- baccal aureate 
or graduate student, enrol I ed i n a coursework necessary to begi n a career i n 
teachi ng or plan to complete such coursework, mai ntai n a cumulative 3.25 GPA 
and sign aTEACH Grant Agreement to Serve. Questions regarding theTEACH 
G rant Program can be di rected to the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. 

I institutional Grants The university awards grants to f ul l-ti me students who 
demonstrate f i nanci al need and meet OSF A 's pri ori ty appl i cati on deadl i ne of 
February 15. There are three funds from whi ch i nsti tuti onal grants are awarded, 
theUM Scholarship, Frederick Douglass Grant and the UM Grant. OSF A selects 
the red pi ents of these awards based on avai I abi I i ty of funds and the 
qual if i cati ons of the appl i cants. The U M Schol arshi p may be awarded to 
undergraduates with demonstrated need and high academic achievement. The 
UM Grant and Frederick Douglas Grant may be awarded to any undergraduate 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 44 

with demonstrated need. Award amounts for these programs range from $500 to 
$3,900. 

Self-Help 

F i nanci al ai d al so consi sts of sel f - hd p assi stance such as empl oy ment and 
student loan programs. M ost of these programs are awarded based on need as 
determi ned by the FA FSA . Access our web site at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 
for additional information. 



Work-Study: The Federal Work- Study (FWS) Program provides 
students with the opportunity to earn money to meet the r educati onal and 
personal expenses. M oney earned from the FWS program does not have to be 
paid back. To be considered for FWS, students must meet OSFA's priority 
appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. Thi s award i s need-based and may range 
from $800 to $2,200. Pay rates depend on the level of complexity of the work, 
but will be at I east the federal mini mum wage. Like all university employees, 
FWS empl oyees receive a paycheck every other week for the hours worked. 
M ost FWS j obs are on campus, though opportuni ti es exi st through the 
Community Service Program for FWS students to work off campus at several 
Federal Government Agencies. The number of hours students may work is 
I i mited to 20 per week whi le school is i n session and 40 per week duri ng 
vacations and summer break. 

Paid I nternships Students with pai d i nternshi ps si gn a contract at the 
begi nni ng of the semester that states the payment amount for the number of 
hours to be worked duri ng that semester. The payment amount i s advanced to the 
students account at the start of each semester. This program differs from Federal 
Work- Study i n that students receive al I "wages" at the start of each semester, as 
opposed to a bi - weekl y pay check, and those funds are appl i ed di recti y to the 
students account. Several off i ces and departments on campus, i ncl udi ng Shuttl e 
UM, Residential Facilities, and Dining Services, offer paid internships. Students 
shoul d contact the department or off i ce for whi ch they are i nterested i n worki ng. 



Perkins Loan: The Perki ns I oan i s a I ow- i nterest rate (5%) I oan for 
students with excepti onal f i nanci al need. Thi s i s a I oan borrowed from the 
school , and must be repai d. To be el i gi bl e, students must meet OSF A 's pri ori ty 
appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. The amount of the award wi 1 1 depend upon 
the students need and may range from $200 to $2,000. New borrowers (those 
who f i rst receive a Federal Perki ns Loan after J uly 1, 1988) have a grace peri od 
of ni ne months after graduati ng or I eavi ng school before they must begi n 
repayment of the r F ederal Perki ns L oan(s) . I nterest wi 1 1 begi n accrui ng at the 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 45 

ti me of repayment. Thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attend ng school 
and enrol I ed at I east half ti me i n a degree- seeki ng program. 



Stafford Loan: Thi s i s a I ow-i nterest-rate I oan for students who attend 
at I east half-ti me. A ppl i cati on i s made through the school 's f i nanci al ai d off i ce 
viatheFAFSA. Eligibility for thi si oan is based on need, not credit worthiness. 
Thi s I oan i s borrowed by the student and must be repai d. 

There are two types of Federal Stafford Loans, subsidized and unsubsidized. The 
subsi di zed Stafford I oan i s awarded to students with demonstrated f i nanci al 
need; thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attend ng school and enrol I ed at 
least half-ti me i n a degree- seeki ng program. Students who do not demonstrate 
f i nanci al need, or who do not demonstrate suffi ci ent need to borrow a f ul ly 
subsidized Stafford loan, may borrow a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. 
The unsubsidized loan is interest bearing. Students borrowing an unsubsidized 
Stafford I oan wi 1 1 be requi red to repay the pri nci pi e and any i nterest that may 
accrue duri ng school attendance. All students who wish to apply for either 
Federal Stafford Loan must complete the FAFSA. As of J uly 1, 2009 the 
subsi di zed I oan i nterest rate wi 1 1 be f i xed at 5. 6%. T he unsubsi di zed I oan 
i nterest wi 1 1 be f i xed at 6.8%. Students who graduate or drop bel ow hal f-ti me 
status are granted a six- month grace peri od before repayment of the Stafford 
loan is required. 

The f ol I owi ng are the maxi mum I oan amounts per academi c year: $5,500 for 
undergraduates with freshman status, $6,500 for undergraduates attai ni ng 
sophomore status, and $7,500 for undergraduate students who attai n j uni or or 
seni or status. I f students do not demonstrate suffi ci ent need to borrow the 
maxi mum subsi dized Federal Stafford Loan, they may borrow the difference i n a 
Federal U nsubsi dized Stafford Loan. The maxi mum borrowi ng I i mit f or most 
undergraduates is $31,000. 

Federal PLUS (Parent Loans For Undero^aduate Students): This is a 
non- need- based I oan, whi ch parents may borrow to hel p defray the cost of the r 
dependent chi Idren's education. The Federal PLUS enables parents to borrow the 
f ul I yearly cost of attendance (as determi ned by the school ) mi nus al I other 
f i nanci al ai d. Otherwi se, there i s no yearl y or cumul ati ve borrowi ng I i mi t. 
B ecause thi s I oan i s not need- based, submi ssi on of the F A F SA i s not requi red to 
appl y . H owever, borrowers must f i rst submi t the PL U S I oan appl i cati on to the 
school for cal cul ati on and certif i cati on of the maxi mum I oan amount that the 
parent may borrow per student per year. The Federal PLUS is granted to 
borrowers based on credit- worthi ness as determi ned by the I ender whom the 
borrower se! ects. The i nterest rate for the Federal PL U S i s f i xed at 8.5%. The 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa9 e 46 

borrower has the opti on of begi nni ng repayment on the PL U S I oan ei ther 60 
days after the I oan i s f ul ly di sbursed or not unti I six (6) months after the 
dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrol I ed on 
at I east a half-ti me basi s. 



COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
301-405-9265 
sf a-schol arshi ps@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 



Some U M col I eges and departments offer meri t- based schol arshi ps. M ost 
departments wi 1 1 only consi der students who enrol I for 12 credits per semester, 
and who have a grade poi nt average of at I east 3.0. Some of these schol arshi ps 
are open to prospecti ve freshman and transfer students. Some of them are onl y 
open to conti nui ng U M students. F or addi ti onal i nf ormati on regardi ng 
departmental schol arshi ps pi ease contact the appropri ate col I ege or department 
or visit www.fi nanci al ai d.umd.edu/Schol arhi ps/departmental .html . 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences 

B i ol ogi cal Resources E ngi neeri ng 

Environmental Sciences 

I nsti tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture 

Natural Resource Sci ences 

Natural Resources M anagement Program 

N utri ti on & F ood Sci ence 

PI ant Sci ence and L andscape A rchi tecture 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 47 

Veterinary Medicine 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History & Archaeology 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparati ve L i terature 

Dance 

E ngl i sh L anguage and L i terature 

F rench & I tal i an L anguages and L i teratures 

Germanic Studies 

History 

J ewish Studies Program 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es 

Anthropology 

Cri mi nol ogy & Cri mi nal J usti ce 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 48 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Pol i ti cs 

Heari ng and Speech Sci ences 

J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy 

Psychology 

Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terrori sm 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Applied Mathematics 
Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Meteorology 
Physics 
Statistics Program 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counsel ing& Personnel Services 

Curri cul um & I nstructi on 

Education Policy, Planning, and Administration 

H uman Devel opment (I nsti tute for Chi I d Study) 

M easurement, Stati sti cs & E val uati on 

Special Education 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 49 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 

PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 

COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

COLLEGE OF CHEMICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Entomology 

Environmental Sciences 

M ari ne- E stuari ne E nvi ronmental Sci ences 

A. JAMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Aerospace E ngi neeri ng 

Chemical Engineering 

C i vi I and E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng 

E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng 

F i re Protecti on E ngi neeri ng 

Hill man E ntrepreneurshi p Program 

M ateri al s and N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng 

Mechanical Engineering 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 50 

Reliability E ngi neeri ng 

ROBERT H.SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Accounting 

Business 

Deci si on and I nf ormati on Technol ogi es 

Finance 

H i nman E ntrepreneurshi p 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 

M anagement and Organization 

M arketi ng 

Quest Program 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING aid PRESERVATION 

Architecture 

U rban Studi es and PI anni ng Program 

School of Public Policy 

Environmental Policy Program 

J ames M acGregor Burns Academy of Leadershi p 

Public Policy 

Publ i c Sector F i nanci al M anagement 

Social Policy 

Interdepartmental Programs 

Chemical Physics Program 

E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy (BSOS) 

Systems E ngi neeri ng 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 51 



RETURNING STUDENTS PROGRAM/COUNSELING CENTER 

IrwinS. K ami n Adult Learner Emergency Fund 
C harl otte W . N ewcombe Schol arshi p 
Geral d G . Portney M emori al Schol arshi p 
Returni ng Students Program 
Women's Forum Schol arshi p 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

Academi c Achi evement Programs 

A i r Force Aerospace studi es Program 

Army ROTC 

Col I ege Park Schol ars Program 

Individual Studies Program 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equity 

Letters and Sciences 

N ati onal Schol arshi ps Offi ce 

University Honors Program 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Alumni Association 



3. Carpus Adrrini strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageb^ 

3. Campus Administration, Resources and Student Services 

CAM PUS ADM INI STRATI ON 
Office of the President 

1101 Main Administration Building 
301-405-5803 

C. Daniel Mote, J r., President 
www.umd.edu/PRES 

The president is trie chief executive officer of tine University of Maryland. Six vice presidents, who 
report to trie president manage differentdivi si ons of trie campus adrrini strati on. TheOfficeof 
H uman Rel ati ons Programs, trie Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs, and trie M aryl and F i re and 
Rescue Institute report to the Office of trie President. The University Senate, a representative 
I egi si ati ve body of trie uni versi ty, advi ses trie presi dent on acaderri c and other matters. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5252 

Nariman Farvardin, Senior Vice Presi dent and Provost 
www. provost, umd.edu 

The Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs and Provost i s the chi ef acaderri c off i cer of the 
uni versi ty wi th responsi bi I i ty f or gui di ng the acaderri c devel opmert and di recti on of the i nsti tuti on 
i n accordance with the university's mission; ensuri ng that our programs and faculty are of the highest 
cal i ber; supporti ng the diversity of our students, faculty, and staff as a special strength; and 
promoti ng academic excel lence across the uni versi ty. The deans of the 13 col leges and school sat the 
U ni versi ty report di recti y to hi m as do the deans for undergraduate studi es, the graduate school , and 
prof essi onal studi es, the dean of the I i brari es and the chi ef i nf ormati on of f i cer. The seni or vi ce 
presi dent and provost oversees the devel opmert, revi ew, and i mpl ementati on of al I acaderri c 
pol i ci es and regul ati ons; consul ts cl osel y wi th the U ni versi ty Senate and other f acul ty advi sory 
groups on acaderri c programs and pol i ci es; and serves as I i ai son wi th other uni versi ty di vi si ons i n 
strategi c and I ong- range pi anni ng. 

AcfcrinistrativeAffairs 

1132 Main Administration Building 

301-405-1105 

AnnG. Wylie, Vice President 

www.admi naffai rs.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for A drri ni strati ve Affai rs i s responsi bl e for the eff ecti ve 
management of the physi cal , f i seal , and staff support resources of the i nsti tuti on. The off i ce al so 
provides campus safety and security, environmental health and safety, materials management, and 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageb3 



other necessary support servi ces. Of parti cul ar i rterest to students are the community awareness and 
security programs offered by the Department of Publ i c Safety, the i nformati on and assi stance 
servi ces provi ded by the B ursar for concerns of students regardi ng uni versi ty bi 1 1 i ngs, and the 
campus 1 efforts rel ated to sustai nabi I ity. 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building 

301-314-8428 

Linda Clement, Vice President 

www.studentaffai rs.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for Student Af f ai rs provi des adrni ni strati ve I eadershi p for 15 
departments whi ch oversee student I if e. The offi ce serves as a general poi nt of contact for students 
and thei r f ami I i es regardi ng housi ng, di ni ng, transportati on, recreati on, wel I ness and non-academi c 
student services. The office mai ntai ns I iaison with the university chaplai ns, the Student Government 
Association (SGA), and the Graduate Student Government (GSG). I n addition, it provides 
adrni ni strati ve support for the Seni or Counci I , Parents and Farri I y Affai rs, and Student Affai rs 
Development. 

Officeof Human Relations Procyams 

1130 Shri ver Laboratory, East Wi ng 
301-405-2838 
www.umd.edu/OHRP 

The Offi ce of H uman Rel ati ons Programs (OH RP) advi ses and assi sts the Presi dent i n the promoti on 
of the university mission as it relates to multicultural ism broadly conceptual i zed (i .e, race 
(inclusi ve of col or and creed) ; ethni ci ty; I anguage nati onal or geographi c ori gi n; soci oeconomi c 
cl ass ( i ncl usi ve of educati onal I evel , empl oyment status, and farri I i al corf i gurati on) ; sex and 
gender; gender identity and expression; sexual orientation; physical, developmental, and 
psychol ogi cal ability; religious, spi ri tual , f ai th- based, or secul ar aff i I i ati on; age and generati on; 
physical appearance, environmental concern; and, on the basis of the exercise of rights secured by 
the First Amendment). More specifically, we facilitate partnership building between various 
constituenci es of students, faculty, and staff on these i ssues as they i mpact school i ng and are 
ori ented toward the real i zati on of an i ncl usi ve and therefore aff i rrri ng envi ronment for every ci ti zen 
of the university community. 

The Offi ce of H uman Rel ati ons Programs (OH RP) i s responsi bl e f or i niti ati ng acti on i n compl i ance 
with institutional, state, and federal directives to provide equal education and employment 
opportunities for university students, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the outcomes of 
acti ons taken i n thi s regard, reporti ng our f i ndi ngs to the Presi dent, the Campus Senate, and to the 
campus community at large. We provide students, faculty, and staff with general i nformati on on 
equity efforts and on the status of equity and compliance matters at the university. Students, faculty, 
or staff havi ng a concern about possi bl e i nequiti es i n educati onal or empl oyment matters, or who 
wi sh to regi ster a compl ai nt, may contact either the Campus Compl i ance Offi cer at 301-405-2839, 
or a member of the Campus' Equity Counci I (see Equity Counci I i n chapter 3). 

The Office of Human Relations Programs (OHRP) sponsors i niti ati ves that promote intergroup 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services PageM 



rel ati onshi p building, sexual harassment and hate cri mes preventi on, mul ti cul tural organi zati onal 
devel opment, and processes compl ai nts of di scri mi rati on f ol I owi ng procedures set forth i n the 
U ni versi ty's H uman Rel ati ons Code (the compl ete text of thi s Code may be found i n chapter 10) . 

The efforts of the OH RP are directed toward the devel opment of our students, faculty, and staff 
becorri ng principled I eaders, predi sposed to progressi ve acti on; becorri ng democrati c ci ti zens as 
outstanding in what they do as in who they are with respect to thei r commitment to furthering the 
tenets of equity and j usti ce for al I . 

Equity Council 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5793 
www.president.umd.edu/EqCo 

The Equity Counci I serves as an advi sory group to the Presi dent and supports the I ongstandi ng and 
continuous goal of the University of Maryland to be a rati onal leader in recruiting and retaining a 
diverse community of faculty, staff and students. The Counci I provides leadershi p i n the articulation 
and devel opment of aff i rmati ve acti on pol i ci es and procedures for the campus communi ty . A 
particular focus of the Equity Counci I is to review and recommend, as appropriate, search and 
selection pol icies and procedures for the university and its col leges and departments. The Counci I 
consi sts of equity adrri ni strators from each V i ce Presi dent and Dean's off i ce and the Off i ce of the 
President. The Special Assistant to the President for Equity Diversity serves as Chai r of the Counci I . 



Dr. Robert E. Waters, J r., Chair 

Off i ce of the Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs and Provost 

301-405-5793 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

rewaters@umd.edu 

Dr. Brooke Supple, Di vision of Student Affairs 

301-314-8437 

2108M Mitchell Building 

bsupple@umd.edu 

Dr. Warren Kelley (I nterim), Division of Student Affairs 

301-314-8436 

2108G Mitchell Building 

wkeHey@umd.edu 

Dr. Viki Annand, School of Public Health 

301-405-2473 

2302 Health and Human Performance Building 

vannand@umai I .umd.edu 

Ms. Carolyn Trimble, University Human Resources 

301-405-5648 

3100 C hesapeake B ui I di ng 

ctrimble@umd.edu 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebb 



D r. D i anne B arl ow, Col I ege of I nf ormati on Studi es 

301-405-2042 

4105 H ornbake L i brary 

dbarlow@unxl.eclu 

Dr. Cordell W. Black, Division of Academic Affairs 

301-405-6810 

1127 M ai n Adrri ni strati on 

cblack@umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Brown, Maryland Fire and Rescue I nstitute 

4500 Pai nt Branch Parkway 

301-226-9963 

skypaul@umd.edu 

Ms. LaVern Chapman, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-1951 

4570 Van M unchi ng Hal I 

I chapman@rhsrrith. umd.edu 

Ms. Vicki Kesler, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-2308 

2570D Van M unchi ng Hal I 

vkesler@umd.edu 

M s. Roberta H . Coates, Offi ce of the Presi dent 

Staff Ombuds Office 

301-405-5795 

1112 ColeStudent Activities Building 

rcoates@umd.edu 

Ms. Barbara Duncan, Col I ege of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

301-405-0044 

1122 Symons Hall 

bduncan@umd.edu 

Ms. Ingrid Farrell, School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation 

301-405-6310 

1200 A rchitecture B ui I di ng 

ifarrell@umd.edu 

Dr. KimNickerson, Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

301-405-7599 

2141 Tydings Hall 

kni ckerson@bsos. umd.edu 

Ms. Lee Ellen Harper, Office of Professional Studies 

301-405-2224 

2103 Reckord Armory 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebfc 



lharper@umd.edu 

Mr. GeneFerrick, Col lege of Chemical & Life Sciences 

301-405-7016 

2300GSymonsHall 

gene@umd.edu 

Ms. Wendy A. Jacobs, College of Arts and Humanities 

301-405-2345 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall 

wajacobs@umd.edu 

Dr. Stephen Koziol, Col lege of Education 

301-405-3324 

2311 Benj arri n B ui I di ng 

skoziol@umd.edu 

Dr. M argaret M cLaughl i n, Col I ege of Educati on 

301-405-6495 

1308 B enj arri n B ui I di ng 

rrim@umd.edu 

Dr. Ronald Lipsman, Col I ege of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

301-405-2313 

3417 A.V. Williams Building 

rlipsman@umd.edu 

Mr. Dean Kitchen, Col I ege of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

301-405-2314 

3421 A.V. Williams Building 

dkitchen@umd.edu 

M s. J ohnni eque L ove, U ni versi ty L i brari es 

301-405-9048 

7233 McKeldin Library 

jlovel@umd.edu. 

M r. J ames N ewton, Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es 

301-405-6851 

2130K Mitchell Building 

jnewton@umd.edu 

Dr. Gary Pertmer, A.J ames Clark School of Engineering 

301-405-3936 

1124 Martin Hal I 

pertmer@umd.edu 

Mr. William L. Powers, School of Public Policy 

301-405-6336 

2101E Van Munching Hall 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageb/ 



wpowers@umd.edu 

Ms. Olive Reid, Philip Merrill Col lege of Journalism 

301-405-2433 

1117 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng 

oreJd@umd.edu 

Ms. Cynthia Trombly, University Relations 

301-405-2532 

3144 R i ggs A I umni Center 

ctrombl y@umd.edu 

Mr. Kyi and Howard 

Office of I nstitutional Research, Planning & Assessment 

301-405-5593 

1100 Mitchell Building 

khoward@umd.edu 

Office of Diversity and Inclusion 

1130 Shri ver Laboratory, East Wi ng 
301-405-2838 
www.odi.umd.edu 

The Office of Diversity & I ncl usion (ODI ) advises and assists tine President i n the promotion of the 
university mission as it relates to multicultural ism broadly conceptual i zed (i .e, race (i ncl usi ve of 
color and creed); ethnicity; language national or geographic origin; socioeconomic class (inclusive 
of educational level, employment status, and familial configuration); sex and gender; gender identity 
and expressi on; sexual ori entati on; physi cal , devel opmental , and psychol ogi cal ability; religi ous, 
spiritual, faith- based, or secular affiliation; age and generation; physical appearance, environmental 
concern; and, on the basi s of the exerci se of ri ghts secured by the F i rst A mendment) . M ore 
sped fically, wefacili tate partnershi p bui I di ng between vari ous consti tuenci es of students, f acul ty, 
and staff on these i ssues as they i mpact school i ng and are ori ented toward the real i zati on of an 
i ncl usi ve and therefore aff i rrri ng envi ronment for every citizen of the university community. 

The Office of Diversity & Inclusion (ODI) is responsible for initiating action in compliance with 
i nsti tuti onal , state, and federal di recti ves to provi de equal educati on and empl oy mart opportuni ti es 
for university students, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the outcomes of actions taken i n 
thi s regard, reporti ng our f i ndi ngs to the Presi dent, the Campus Senate, and to the campus 
community at large. We provide students, faculty, and staff with general i information on equity 
efforts and on the status of equity and compliance matters at the university. Students, faculty, or staff 
havi ng a concern about possi bl e i nequiti es i n educati onal or empl oyment matters, or who wi sh to 
regi ster a compl ai nt, may contact either the Campus Compl i ance Off i cer at 301-405-2839, or a 
member of the Campus' Equity Counci I (see Equity Counci I i n chapter 3). 

Office of Undergraduate Studies 

2130 Mitchell Building 

301-405-9363 

www.ugst.umd.edu 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebfc 



Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

Associate Dean: KatherineMcAdams 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Reid Bryant, Lisa Kiely, J ames Newton 

Assi starts to the Dean: Kathryn Robi nson, Laura SI avi n 

Through its many programs, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students 
at the University and the faculty and staff that support the undergraduate mission of the campus. The 
Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and responsi bl e 
for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar and co-curri cul ar educati on. 

University Relations 

2119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

301-405-4680 

B rodi e Rem ngton, V i ce Presi dent 

www.urhome.umd.edu 

The Division of University Relations conducts a variety of programs to share news, buildties, 
and rai se phi I anthropi c support for the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. U ni ts of thi s di vi si on i ncl ude 
Development, Marketing and Communi cations, University of Maryland College Park Foundation 
Administration, Special Events, and Alumni Relations. University Relations is responsible for 
campus- wi de programs i n fund- rai si ng, al urmi affai rs, publ i cati ons, f i I m and vi deo presentati ons, 
media relations, and management of major campus events. The Great Expectations fund raising 
campai gn to rai se $1 bi 1 1 i on i n pri vate support for uni versi ty pri ori ti es such as schol arshi ps and 
facilities, is coordinated by University Relations. 



University Senate 

1100 Marie Mount Hall 
301-405-5805 
www.senate.umd.edu 

The University Senate, anintegral part of the institution's system of shared governance, has 
representation from all segments of the campus community: faculty, staff, undergraduate students, 
and graduate students. Parti ci pati on i n the Senate or any of its 15 Standi ng Committees i s an honor 
and a responsibility. 

The f ul I Senate meets approxi mate! y ni ne ti mes a year to consi der matters of concern to the 
i nsti tuti on, i ncl udi ng acaderri c i ssues, uni versi ty pol i ci es, pi ans of organi zati on, f aci I i ti es, and the 
welfare of faculty, staff, and students. The Senate advi ses the presi dent, the chancel I or, or the Board 
of Regents as appropri ate. To become a student senator, students must be el ected by students i n thei r 
col I ege or school or the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n central i zed, onl i ne el ecti ons. E I ecti ons 
are he! d every year duri ng the spri ng semester. Students are al so encouraged to parti ci pate i n Senate 
Standi ng Committees, such as Student Affai rs and H uman Re! ati ons. These committees draw 
membershi p from the campus community at I arge and cover every aspect of campus I if e and 
f uncti on. Detai I s about the el ecti on and appoi rtment process are avai I abl e from the U ni versi ty 
Senate Office. 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Page by 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Academic Achievement Programs 

2110 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-4736 

Executive Director: Dr.JerryL. Lewis 

www.aap.umd.edu 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) pri man ly provides resources and opportunities for 
I ow- i ncome i ndi vi dual s, f i rst generati on col I ege students, di sabl ed students and tradi ti onal I y 
under- represented students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 
Acfcrissons 

301-314-8385 
umadrni t@umd. edu 
www.admissions.umd.edu 

The services offered by the Office of U ndergraduate Admissions are designed to meet the i ndi vi dual 
needs of prospective students. The office provides general information about the University of 
M aryl and through brochures, I etters, i nformati on sessi ons, and campus tours. Adrri ssi ons staff 
eval uate the appl i cati ons of both freshman and transfer students i n order to sel ect qual if i ed students. 
U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons al so revi ews al I appl i cati ons for readrri ssi on and rei nstatement. For 
more i nformati on about undergraduate adrri ssi ons, see chapter 1. 

America Reads* America Counts 

0144 Holzapfel Hall 

301-314-READ 

www.arac.umd.edu 

Do you I i ke worki ng with ki ds? A men ca Reads*A meri ca Counts (A RAC), part of Community 
Service- Learning, is a partnership between the University of Maryland and Pri nee George's County 
Publ ic Schools. ARAC strives to provide high qual ity mentori ng i n local schools that enriches 
I earni ng opportuniti es for both col I ege and el ementary school students. Federal Work Study mentor 
positions (starti ng at $10/hour), Vol unteer, I ntern, and Academic Credit opportunities are al I 
avai I abl e M entors are matched with chi I dren i n a Pri nee George's County el ementary school s and 
tutor 3- 10 hours per week for a semester or more. M entors recei ve excel I ent trai ni ng i n tutori ng, 
I eadershi p and community servi ce- 1 earni ng and have the opportunity to connect with other students 
who share thei r i interests. Contact the A RA C offi ce for more i nformati on or to I earn whether you are 
el i gi bl e for federal work-study. A PPLY TODAY at www.arac. umd.edu. 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Sen/ices PagebC 



Computing Services Office of Information Technology 

Phone 301-405-7700 
Fax: 301-405-0300 
oit@umd.edu 
www.oit.umd.edu 

The Office of Information Technology (01 T) is part of a University of Maryland students everyday 
academic and social life. 01 T plans, develops, supports, and maintains computing, networking, and 
tdecommuni cations services for the university community to enhance both day-to-day academic and 
busi ness goal s and to further the uni versi ty's standard of excel I ence i n educati on and research. 

M any faculty members have i integrated technol ogy i nto courses, both i nsi de and outsi de of the 
cl assroom Some professors use cl i ckers to col I ect student feedback duri ng cl ass. Through ELMS 
(the university's Enterprise Learning Management System powered by Blackboard Academic Suite) 
( www.elms.umd.edu ). i nstructors can provi de onl i ne course materi al s, col I ect assi gnments, and post 
grades electronical I y, and hold discussion sessions. The university's robust wi re! ess network (one of 
the nati on's I argest for a uni versi ty our si ze) gi ves students the abi I i ty to connect to the I nternet from 
al most anywhere on campus. Computer I abs across campus feature Wi ndows and M aci ntosh 
envi ronments and provi de pri nti ng servi ces and course- re! ated software. 

The MyUM portal ( www.my.umd.edu ) gives students a one-stop gateway to numerous university 
resources, including e-mail, a personal calendar, and customizable RSS feeds, as well as everything 
offered through Testudo (www.testudo. umd.edu) , whi ch al I ows you to regi ster for cl asses onl i ne, see 
your financial aid status, check your grades, and more. 

The 01 T Student H el p Desk (www, he! pdesk. umd.edu. 301.405. 1400) provi des answers to your I T 
questions and offers technical assistance. Discounts on computers, printers, software programs, and 
eel I ular devices and service are also avai lableto University of M aryland students. Visit the 
Acaderri c Computers for Terps (ACT) Web site ( www.act.umd.edu ) or the Terrapi n Technol ogy 
Store (www.oit umd.edu/techstore. 301.314.7000) for more information. 



Educational Talent Search 

3103 Turner Hall 

301-324-7763 

www.etsp.umd.edu 

E ducati onal Tal ent Search i ncreases the col I ege parti ci pati on of I ow- i ncome and f i rst-generati on 
col lege students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Officeof Extended Studies 

0132 Main Administration Building 
301-405-7762 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebl 



Chuck Wi I son, Assi start V i ce Presi dent for Extended Studi es 
oes.umd.edu 

TheOffice of Extended Studies administers the Uni verity's Summer Terrn, Freshmen First, Young 
Scholars Program Freshmen Connection Program Winter Term and Professional Programs. 

Sumner Term offers over 1,700 undergraduate and graduate courses and non-credit workshops 
that are open to current M aryl and students, visiting students from other col I eges, graduates, 
professionals, high school students, and more. Classes are offered morning, afternoon, evening, and 
onl i ne duri ng two 6- week sessi ons or four 3- week sessi ons. I n the Young Scholars Program 
academi cally qualified high school j uni ors and seni ors pursue academi c i interests, di scover career 
opportuni ti es, and I earn about uni versi ty life. Freshmen First provi des f al I and spri ng newl y 
admitted M aryl and freshmen an opportunity to transit] on i nto whi I e earni ng academi c credit. 

The Freshmen Connection Pro-am is a fal I semester academic program specif ical ly designed for 
students who corf i rm spri ng adrni ssi on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Students who enrol I i n thi s 
extension program earn up to 16 credits toward thei r undergraduate degree. 

Winter Term i s a three- week sessi on i n J anuary offeri ng more than 200 undergraduate and 
graduate courses as wel I as noncredit workshops. Wi nter Term provi des an opportunity for students 
to accel erate thei r progress toward graduati on, f ulf i 1 1 prerequi sites, and meet el i gi bi I ity requi rements 
for certain majors. 

Professional Programs provi des I i f el ong I earni ng opportuni ti es for worki ng prof essi onal s at the U ni v 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and . P rof essi onal master degrees and graduate certi f i cates are offered i n ei ther 
the traditional face-to-face cl assroom envi ronment or through the f I exi bl e onl i ne I earni ng format. 
Prof essi onal Programs al so i ncl ude post-baccal aureate opportuniti es that assi st i n preparati on for 
professional schools, graduate programs, and professional achievement as well as customized 
programs that i ncl ude semi nars, work force trai ni ng, or short courses crafted for i ndustry appl i cati on. 



Student Financial Services Center 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
umfinaid@umd.edu 
www.financialaid.umd.edu 

The Offi ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) adrni ni sters a vari ety of f i nanci al assi stance and student 
empl oyee programs. A ssi stance i s granted pri mari I y on the basi s of the appl i cants f i nanci al need as 
determined by the Free Application for Federal StudentAid (FAFSA). The OSFA staff isavailable 
for i ndi vidual counsel i ng on matters pertai ni ng to f i nanci ng a col lege education. For additional 
information, see section enti tied Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid. 

Honor Societies 

www. uni on. umd.edu/studentorg/ 

Students who excel i n send arshi p and I eadershi p may be i nvited to j oi n the appropri ate honor 



3. Carpus Adrrini strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagefc^ 



society. Honor societies at Maryland include 

Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemistry) 

* A I pha E psi I on (A gri cul tural E ngi neeri ng) 
*Alpha E psi I on Delta (Pre-Med) 

A I pha E psi I on Rho (B roadcast J ournal i sm) 

*Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

*Alpha Lambda Delta (Freshman Scholarship) 

A I pha Phi Si gma (Cri mi nal J usti ce) 

A I pha Zeta (A gri cul ture) 

B eta A I pha Psi (A ccounti ng) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Management) 

Black Honors Caucus 

*Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 

Delta N u A I pha (Transportati on) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Pi (Business) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

*Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

*GammaTheta U psi I on (Geography) 

*Golden Key Honor Society (Leadership/Scholarship) 

* Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

* K appa Tau A I pha (J ournal i sm) 
*LambdaPi Eta (Speech Communication) 

* M ortar B oard N ati onal H onor Soci ety (Send arshi p) 

* N ati onal Soci ety of Col I egi ate Send ars 
*OmegaChi Epsilon (Chemistry Engineering) 
*Omega Rho (Business) 

*Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

*Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Order of Omega (Fraternity/Sorority Leadership) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (HealttYHuman Resources) 

*Phi AlphaTheta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) 

Phi Chi Theta (Business and Economics) 

*Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Scholarship) 

*Phi Kappa Phi (Senior/Graduate Scholarship) 

*Phi Sigma (Biology) 

*Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Phi Sigma lota (French/Italian) 

*Pi Si gma A I pha (Political Science) 

*Phi SigmaTheta 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 

*Pri mannum Honor Society 

*Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Si gma A I pha Orni cron (M i crobi ol ogy) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Journalism) 

*Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

*SigmaTau Delta (English) 

*TauBetaPi (Engineering) 



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Pagebd 



Tau Beta Sigma 

* M ember of A ssoci ati on of Col I ege H onor Soci eti es 

I ntercollecpate Athletics 

Comcast Center 
301-314-7075 
www. umterps.com 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs i s responsi bl e for di recti ng i ntercol I egi ate athl ed c 
programs for both women and men, and for managi ng the campus' athletic compl ex. 

Women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams i ncl ude cross country, f i el d hockey, soccer and vol I eybal I i n 
the f al I ; basketbal I , competi ti ve cheer, swi mmi ng, i ndoor track/f i el d and gyrmasti cs duri ng the 
wi nter; and I acrosse, softbal I , outdoor track/f i el d and water pol o i n the spri ng. Tenni s and golf 
competi ti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

There are men's teams i n f ootbal I , soccer and cross country i n the f al I ; basketbal I , swi mm ng, 
wresti i ng, and i ndoor track/f i el d duri ng the wi nter; and basebal I , I acrosse and outdoor track/f i el d i n 
the spri ng. Tenni s and golf competi ti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

M en's and women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams compete i n the N ati onal Col I egi ate Athl eti c 
A ssoci ati on (NCAA) at the Division I level and in the Ati antic Coast Conference (ACC). 

Eligibility Requirements 

Student-athletes must meet all NCAA, ACC and University of Maryland requirements for 
eligibility. Thechart below serves only as a guideline to eligibility rules and does not provide 
compl ete detai I . ANN CA A requi rements are avai I abl e vi a www.NCAA.org . 



NCAA Conti ruing E liability and Process Towards Decree Guidelines 



Yearoflritial 
Collegjate Enrollment 




NCAA Requirements 


Semester of Full-Time 
Enrollment 




E nteri ng 1st semester 
(1st year) 


Must be certified by the NCAA Eligibility 
Center 


E nteri ng 2nd semester 

1 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 

semester 

*1.29UM GPA 


E nteri ng 3rd semester 
(2nd year) 


* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
acaderri c year and 24 for the year 
*6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 
*1.8 NCAA GPA 


Enteri ng 4th semester 

1 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits previ ous 
semester 

* 1.80 NCAA GPA 



3. Carpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services 



Pagefctf 



Fall 2003 -present 


E nteri ng 5th semester 
(3rd year) 


* 40% (*48 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours duri ng previ ous regul ar acaderri c 
year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 

* declaration of degree program 


E nteri ng 6th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 


E nteri ng 7th semester 
(4th year) 


* 60% (*72 degree applicable credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


i 
Enteri ng 8th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


Enteri ng 9th semester 
(5th year) 


* 80% (*96 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned in previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 



*Based on 120 credit degree program 



1. Student-athl etes are al I owed 4 seasons of eligibility witinin 5 cal endar years from the ti me they 
f i rst enrol I f ul l-ti me i n a col legiate i nstitution. When they parti ci pate i n any competition i n thei r 
sport (i ncl udi ng a scri mrrage with outsi de competiti on), whether it i s f or one rri nute or an enti re 
contest, they have used a season of competiti on and one of thei r four years of eligibility. 

2. Student-athl etes must be enrol I ed f ul I -ti me, that i s, carry a rri ni mum of 12 credit hours each 
semester to be el i gi bl e to practi ce or compete with thei r team I f a student-athl ete drops bel ow 12 
hours he/she will immediately be ineligibl e to practice or compete, and his/her athletics grant-in-aid 
wi 1 1 be revoked unl ess otherwi se approved by the Department of Athl eti cs. G raduati ng seni ors who 
need I ess than 12 credi t hours to compl ete degree requi rements may recei ve an excepti on to enrol I i n 
less than 12 credit hours by compl eti ng a Less Than 12 form avai lable i n the ASCDU . 

3. Student-athl etes are requi red to meet multi pi e sets of acaderri c standards i n order to mai ntai n 
el i gi bi I ity f or athl eti c competiti on. These standards are di dated by the N CAA and the Athl eti c 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebb 



Counci I . I n additi on, student-athl etes may be requi red to mai ntai n standards di ctated by the col I ege 
of the r maj or for either adrri ssi on i nto a degree program, or mai ntai ni ng enrol I ment. 

4Transf er student-athl etes must meet al I N CA A , A CC and U M D requi rements i n order to be 
immediately eligible. PI ease note that in certain cases NCAA and A CC eligibility requi rements are 
more stri ngent than U M D adrri ssi ons requi rements. 

5. 1 nel i gi bl e student-athl etes are not permitted to compete or travel . 

6. First semester freshman who do not meet the cumul ati ve G PA requi rements, may seek an appeal 
under certai n ci rcumstances. Transfer student-athl etes are requi red to attai n the appropri ate 
cumulative GPA based upon the number of f ul I -ti me semesters they have been enrol led i n any 
institution. 

7.Disrrissed and later rei nstated student-athletes are i nel igi blefor competition unti I they meet 
desi gnated grade poi nt averages. 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athletics (I CA) also sponsors a number of awards for 
achievement i n athletics and/or scholarshi p. For further i information, contact the Academic Support 
and Career Development unit (ASCDU), 301-3147043. 

International Education Services 

3116 Mitchell Building 

301-314-7740 

D i rector: V al eri e Wool ston 

E-mail: iesadv@deans. umd.edu 

www. i nternati onal . umd.edu/l E S 

I nternati onal students and f acul ty recei ve a wi de vari ety of servi ces desi gned to nel p them benef i t 
from their experience in the United States. International Education Services (IES) works closely 
wi th the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons, eval uati ng acaderri c records from overseas and 
processi ng appl i cati ons for English prof i ci ency, vi sa, and f i nanci al requi rements. I E S sponsors 
ori entati on programs, i mm grati on and empl oyment serri nars, and the G I oral Communi ti es, 
I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program i n Dorchester H al I . I E S advi sors counsel i nternati onal students concerni ng 
i mm grati on and personal i ssues. 

F-landJ -1 status students Students with F-l or J -1 status are responsible for foil owing the 
regul ati ons of the U .S. Customs and I mmi grati on Servi ce(U SCI S) pertai ni ng to the r vi sa status. The 
regul ati ons affect extensi on of stay, transfers, off-campus empl oyment authori zati on, practi cal 
trai ni ng, and course loads. The Office of I nternati onal Education Services is the only office on 
campus authori zed to si gn i mrri grati on documents. 

Maintaining Status 

• Full-time registration: I n order to mai ntai n f ul I -ti me student status for i mm grati on purposes, 
F-l and J -1 undergraduate students are expected to register for and complete a rri ni mum credit 
load of 12 hours per semester. Pre-approval from I ES is requi red if you are goi ng to complete 
the semester with fewer than 12 credits. 

• Documents I nternati onal students must have a val id passport at al I ti mes unless exempt from 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebfc 



passport requirements. If your 1-20 or DS-2109 will soon expire you should apply for an 
extensi on at I east 30 days pri or to the program compl eti on date on the document. To travel 
out5idetheU.S. and re-enter as an F-l orj -1, an advisor in I ES must sign your 1-20 or 
DS-2109 before you leave. 

• Health I nstrance J -1 students are requi red to carry adequate health i insurance whi le 
attendi ng the uni versi ty . Students must ei ther purchase the heal th i insurance pi an avai I abl e i n 
the H eal tin Center or show proof of coverage that meets Department of State gui del i nes. F - 1 
students are strongly encouraged to purchase university health i insurance. Visit the Health 
Center for assi stance with i nsurance. 

Letters and Sciences 

1117 Hornbake Library 

Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant Ph. D. 
General Advi si ng: 301-314-8418^9 
Pre-Law Advising: www.prelaw.umd.edu 
Credit-by-Exam 301-314-8418 
www.lt5C.umd.edu 

Letters and Sci ences i s the acaderri c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i el ds before sel ecti ng 
a maj or, for post-baccal aureate students taki ng additional course work, arid for non-degree seeki ng 
students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sci ences may al so serve as the acaderri c home 
for students compl eti ng requi rements for entry i nto a L i rrited E nrol I ment Program 

For more i nformati on, see Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Maryland Ergish Institute(MEI) 

1121 Holzaphel Hall 
301-405-8634 
Di rector: M arsha Sprague 
www. i nternati onal . umd.edu/mei 

The Maryland English I institute (M El ) provides English language instruction and assessment at the 
postsecondary I eve! for speakers of other I anguages who wi sh to I earn English for acaderri c, 
prof essi onal , or personal reasons. MEI fulfills its mission by provi di ng 

• courses for matriculated students 

• courses for i nternati onal teachi ng assi starts 

• afull-time, multi-level Intensive English Program 

• short courses for members of the campus and I ocal community 

• custom-designed programs 

• eval uati on of the E ngl i sh I anguage prof i ci ency of prospecti ve and provi si onal I y adrri tted 
students 

• assessment of oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s of i nternati onal teachi ng assi starts 

M E I offers ri gorous courses of study whi I e provi di ng a posi ti ve and supporti ve I earni ng communi ty 
and promoting irtercultural understanding. 

Two regular i instructional programs are offered for provisional I y admitted and prospective 
undergraduate students who are non- rati ve speakers of E ngl i sh: a serri - i interna ve program for 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageb/ 



provi si oral I y adrri tted students and a f ul I -ti me i ntensi ve program for prospecti ve students. 

Senri-I ntensive(UMEI 005): This program is open only to students admitted to the University of 
Maryland. For information on University of Maryland English proficiency requirements, please see 
the I nternati onal Educati on Servi ces web site at http://www. i nternati oral . umd.edu/i es/. Students 
who are provisional I y adrri tted to the Uni versity satisfactorily complete UM El 005 their first 
semester i n order to become fully adrri tted, full -time students at the University. UMEI 005 classes 
meet f i ve days a week, two hours a day. The program i s desi gned especi al I y to perfect the I anguage 
skills necessary for academic work at the Uni versity of Maryland. Enrol I mentis by permission of 
the di rector, and no credit is given toward any U ni versity degree. 

I nbenave: Thisfull-ti me Engl ish language program is open to non-native speakers who wish to 
i improve thei r E ngl i sh for acaderri c, prof essi onal or personal reasons. There are three i ntensi ve 
English sessi ons per year: One for f al I semester, one for spri ng, and a seven-week sessi on i n the 
summer. Each consists of approxi mately 23 hours of i nstruction weekly. The program offers five 
I evel s of i nstructi on, advanced begi nni ng through advanced. 

Sati sf actory compl eti on of the program does not guarantee acceptance at the U ni versi ty . E nrol I ment 
is by permission of the director, and no credit is given toward any University degree. Tuition 
rerri ssi on can not be appl i ed to M E I courses. 



Officeof Multi-Ethnic Student Education (OMSE) 

1101 Hornbake Library 
301-405-5615 or 405-5616 
www.umd.edu/OM SE 

The Office of M ulti -ethnic Student Education at UM D currentiy serves over 8,200 multi -ethnic 
students. M any of the students served by OM SE are achi evi ng at hi gh rates of personal and 
prof essi onal excel I ence. N everthel ess, there are others who are experi end ng acaderri c and personal 
chal I enges as outi i ned i n the Off i ce of I nstituti onal Research PI anni ng and Assessment U M CP data 
on undergraduate retention and graduation rates. OM SE provides programs and resources that 
support the acaderri c, personal and prof essi onal excel I ence of students. The rri ssi on of the Off i ce of 
M ulti -ethnic Student Education is di rectiy I i nked to the el i rri nation of the achievement gap at the 
University of Maryland. With that goal in mind, OMSE provides direct and indirect servi ces 
through programs such as a wal k i n tutorial program study lab, weekly honors program mentori ng 
program Check I n, Academic Honor Society, Col lege Success Scholars, Road M ap to Success, Gold 
Standard, annual American I ndian Powwow and a myriad of servi ces that recognize the racial and 
ethnic nuances of students. 

OM SE 's servi ces emphasi ze the i mportance of " seei ng" al I students from a gl oral i integrated 
perspective. The OM SE team is dedicated to our motto of high expectations, high standards and 
ongoing excellence. The political and historical patterns of the Uni versity of Maryland continues to 
frame our unwaveri ng commitment to addressi ng the cl i mate of i indifference, racial/diversity 
i ncompetence and rri si nf ormed perspecti ves that conti nue to permeate the everyday experi ences of 
mul ti -ethni c students. O M SE encourages al I students to i denti f y empoweri ng strategi es to ensure 
matri cul ati on, retenti on, graduati on, and excel I ent acaderri c outcomes. 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Sen/ices Paget*: 



Melvin Berstein, Vice President for Research 
ORAU Councilor, University of Maryland 
www.orau.org 

Si nee 1951, students and f acul ty of U ni versi ty of M aryl and have benef i ted from i ts membershi p i n 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 98 colleges and universities 
and a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE) located i n Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU 
works with its member i nstituti ons to he! p thei r students and faculty gai n access to federal research 
facilities throughout the country; to keep its member i nformed about opportuniti es for f el I owshi p, 
scholarshi p, arid research appoi ntments; and to organize research al Nances among its members. 

Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that ORAU 
operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as well as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of 
opportuniti es for study and research. Students can parti ci pate i n programs coveri ng a wi de vari ety of 
di sci pi i nes i ncl udi ng busi ness, earth sci ences, epi derri ol ogy, engi neeri ng, physi cs, geol ogi cal 
sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. 
A ppoi ntment and program I ength range from one month to four years. M any of these programs are 
especi al I y desi gned to i ncrease the numbers of underrepresented rri nori ty students pursui ng degrees 
i n science-and engi neeri ng- related disci pi i nes, and details on locations and benefits can be found i n 
the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, whi ch i s avai I abl e atwww.orau.gov/ori se/e 
www.orau.aov/ori se/educ. htm or by cal I i ng the contacts below. 

ORA U 's Off i ce of Partnershi p Devel opment seeks opportuniti es for partnershi ps and al I i ances 
among ORUA's members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty 
development programs, such as the Ralph E. PoweJ unior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the 
Visiting I ndustrial Scholars Program consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research and 
support programs as we! I as servi ces to chi ef research off i cers. 

For more i nformation about ORAU and its programs, contact: 

Melvin Bernstein 

V i ce Presi dent for Research 

ORAU Councilor for University of Maryland 

MonnieE. Champion 
ORAU Corporate Secretary 
865-576-3306 

Visit the ORAU homepageatwww.orau.org. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Field House 
301-314-8217 
Director: Gerry Strumpf 
www.orientation.umd.edu 

The goal of Orientation is to i ntroduce new students to the University of M aryl and community. The 
Ori entati on Off i ce offers a wi de range of transitional programrri ng and servi ces for students and 
their families as they prepare to attend the University of Maryland. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Page by 



Pre-C d lege Programs 

1101 West Education Annex 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy DeJ esus 

www. precol I ege. umd.edu 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound-Matin and Science Program (UB-MS): 301-405-1773 

The University of Maryland Pre-College Programs in Office Of Undergraduate Studies is comprised 
of the federal I y and state funded programs. These programs generate tine ski 1 1 s and moti vati on 
necessary for success i n post-secondary education. Pre-Col lege Programs is part of the Federal TRI O 
Programs, which provides educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and 
provi de support to I ow-i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students. 

For more i nformati on, see Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Office of the Registrar 

First floor Mitchell Building 

301-314-8240 

Registrar: William F. McLean 

www.testudo.umd.edu 

The Offi ce of the Regi strar provi des servi ces to students and acaderri c departments rel ated to the 
processes of regi strati on, schedul i ng, withdrawal , and graduati on. The offi ce al so mai ntai ns students' 
acaderri c records and i ssues transcri pts. Staff members are avai I abl e to students for consultati on. For 
detailed information about registration procedures, student records, and academic regulations, see 
chapter 4. 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2100D (2nd Floor) McKeldin Library 

301-314-6786 

Francis DuVinage 

ugresearch@umd.edu 

www.ugresearch.umd.edu 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative from the Office of the 
Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Created as a resource for faculty and students, the Center serves as a 
cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and off-campus research opportuniti es for undergraduate students. 
Additional I y, faculty members can share different models for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students 
i nto research programs, and ways of i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the curri cul um 

For more i nformati on, see Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 
Center for Teaching Excellence 

0405 Marie Mount Hall 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e ^ 



301-405-9356 

Director: Spencer Benson 

cte@umd.edu 

www.cte.umd.edu 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , indivi dual and campus- wi de efforts to 
enhance teaching and learning at the University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to 
departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teachi ng assi starts. The Center al so adrri ni sters an 
undergraduate teaching assistants program a University-wide teaching and learning program for 
graduate teachi ng assi starts, the L i 1 1 y Teachi ng Fell ows program the I nstructi onal I mprovemert 
Grants program and various Scholarshi p of Teachi ng and Learni ng programs. 

For more i nformati on, see the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Tutoring 

2110 Marie Mount 

301-405-4745 

www.umd.edu/AAP 

The Intensive Educational Development Program (I ED) in the Academic Achievement Programs 
(AAP) provides tutoring services for eligible University of Maryland students. The schedule for 
tutori ng, study ski 1 1 s, math support, and E ngl i sh support cl asses i s avai I abl e at 2110 M ari e M ourt. 
Acaderri c support cl asses are offered for many I ower-l evel CORE cl asses, i ncl udi ng math and 
E ngl i sh cl asses, as wel I as f or sel ected entry- 1 evel cl asses for numerous maj ors (for exampl e 
Business or Biological Sciences). For a schedule of classes as wel I aseligibilitystatusforAAP's 
servi ces, pi ease contact the Tutori ng Coordi nator at 301-405-4745 or yukako@umd.edu. A I so, 
pi ease check AA P's webpage at www. umd.edu/aap for schedul es, j ob opportuniti es as tutors, and 
further i nformati on about the program 



STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Alumni Association 

Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center 

301-405-4678 

www.al urmi .umd.edu 

The University of Maryland Alumni Association is a non-profit membership organization for 
alumni of the University of Maryland, College Park. By taking traditional and innovative approaches 
to al urmi programrri ng, the al urmi associ ati on f i 1 1 s many purposes, i ncl udi ng the needs of students. 

I n conj uncti on with Seni or Counci I and the Offi ce of Student Affai rs, the associ ati on supports 
professional devdopmertprc>gramstopreraresrijdentsforlifeinthe''real world." Prospective and 
current students may appl y for schol arshi ps through the M aryl and A I urmi A ssoci ati on Schol arshi p 
Program N ew graduates recei ve a one-year compl i mentary membershi p i n the al urmi associ ati on 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e ^ 



that i ncl udes its f ul I range of benefits. Y ears two and three after graduati on are offered at a 
di scounted rate of $25 per year. The al urmi associ ati on al so offers graduates access to the 
TerpN ati on N etwork-a free onl i ne soci al and career tool al I owi ng graduates to connect wi th 
M aryl and al urmi and f ri ends based on shared i interests, common acquai ntances, prof essi ons, 
I ocati ons and more. U pon graduati on, the al urmi associ ati on i nvites new graduates to j oi n its Y oung 
A I urmi C I ub, whi ch provi des acti vi ti es for al urmi who have graduated i n the I ast 10 years. 

I n additi on to student programmi ng, the al urmi associ ati on honors al urmi who have di sti ngui shed 
themsel ves prof essi onal I y and personal I y through the U ni versi ty of M aryl and A I urmi A ssoci ati on 
Hall of Fame and Annual Awards Gala. It provides special programs and services, such as consumer 
di scounts, that benefit al I al urmi . 1 1 promotes conti nui ng educati on through its cultural semi nars and 
i nternati onal travel program M ost of al I the al urmi associ ati on seeks to bui I d the Terrapi n Spi rit by 
supporti ng more than 30 al urmi cl ubs and academi c chapters throughout the country arid the worl d. 

The al urmi associ ati on has 31 staff members, i s governed by a board of al urmi vol unteers, and i s 
supported by counti ess other al urmi vol unteers around the country. 

Book Center 

Stamp Student U ni on, I ower I evel 

301-314-BOOK 

www.shopterp.com 

The University Book Center operated by Barnes & Noble is the official bookstore for the University 
of M aryl and. The B ook Center i s onl y store that carri es textbooks for all of your cl asses. A I arge 
sel ecti on of general -i interest books, I iterature, techni cal books, and best sel I ers can be found on the 
I ower I evel of the store. The Book Center al so carri es a wi de sel ecti on of school suppl i es, and 
i mpri nted sportswear and rel ated items. The Book Center website i s www.shopterp.con 

The Book Center is open: 



Monday -Thursday 


9:00 am - 


7:00 p.m 


Friday 


9:00 am - 


6:00 p.m 


Saturday 


10:00 am - 


4:00 p.m. 


Sunday 


12:00 am- 


4:00 p.m 



* Additional hours for special events. 



University Career Center and the Presidents Promise (UCC/TPP) 

3100 H ornbake L i brary, South Wi ng 
301-314-7225 
UCC: hel p@umd.edu 
www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

Refer to our wsb site for current hours of operation and hours of career assistance. 
Mission 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e fl 



The University Career Center and The Presidents Promise office supports the University of 
M aryl and's mi ssi on and its academi c programs by provi di ng a vari ety of programs and servi ces to 
meet the di verse career devel opment and empl oyment needs of degree-seeki ng students and al urmi . 
The Center teaches, advi ses arid counsel s students to make deci si ons about career i interests, 
empl oyment and furthering educational pursuits such as professional or graduate school. It 
col I aborates wi th academi c departments, empl overs and al urmi i n the del i very of workshops, 
servi ces and career/i rternshi p f ai rs. 

Ti me and agai n employers state that the competitive candidate wi 1 1 have outside the classroom 
experi ences that compl ement the academi c curri cul um Through the Presi dents Promi se, each 
student has the chance to engage i n a sped al experi ence and offers the opportunity for extraordi nary 
personal growth. Some students achieve this growth through hands-on research, study abroad, or 
i rternshi ps i n the publ i c and pri vate sectors. Others take on I eadershi p rol es or f i nd f ul f i 1 1 merit i n 
community servi ce programs. Presi dents Promi se staff i s avai I abl e to hel p students navi gate through 
al I opti ons to sel ect the best opportuniti es. I n additi on, dedi cated faculty and staff are al so avai I abl e 
to hel p students chart a course to enhance thei r academi c experi ence. 

Resources 

Career and E mployment Resource Room The Career and E mpl oyment Resource Room i s a 
central pi ace to I earn about our many servi ces and resources on career pi anni ng, i rternshi ps, 
appl yi ng to graduate/ prof essi onal school , and the j ob search. The Resource Room contai ns a 
comprehensi ve col I ecti on of books, computers wi th i rternet connecti ons, and empl oyer i nf ormati on. 
Peer Career E ducators are al so avai I abl e to answer questi ons and assi st i n the use of avai I abl e 
resources. The Resource Room i s open to al I graduate and undergraduate students and al urmi of the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and Col I ege Park and Shady G rove campuses. 

Career Assistance: Thi rty-rri nute Same Day Career assi stance appoi rtments and pre-schedul ed 
I ndi vi dual Career A ssi stance appoi rtments are avai I abl e wi th our staff. D uri ng thi s ti me assi stance i s 
provi ded to students i n i dentifyi ng maj ors suited to thei r i nterests, hel pi ng them to understand the 
worl d of work, and prepari ng them for the j ob search by f ocusi ng on thei r ski 1 1 s and i nterests. We 
al so provi de gui dance i n the graduate school appl i cati on process, and work with al urmi i n begi nni ng 
their career changes. (Phone 301.314.7233) 

Web Resources: The UCC/TPP provides 24 hour access to various resources: 

vwuw.CareerCent3er.Liind.edu: read articles about career pi anni ng, job hunti ng, and 
empl oyment trends; keep up-to-date about new programs, services, and everts; register for 
Careers4Terps; access FOC U S and expl ore graduate school opti ons. A n extensi ve I i st of 
I i nks to other I rternet j ob and career si tes wi 1 1 provi de addi ti onal hel p. 
wwwJntanational.umd.edu/ge: research, identify, connect with arid engage in 
i nternati onal study, i rternshi ps, vol unteeri ng, teachi ng, and work experi ences. 
www.President5Pronriisaumd.edu: navi gate the opportuni ti es avai I abl e at M aryl and that 
compl ement student academi c pursuits and bri ng cl assroom knowl edge to I if e 

CareersCTerps (C4T): For fast and comprehensive access to employment opportunities, al I students 
shoul d regi ster for Careers4Terps, whi ch provi des students free access tojob Listi ngs, O n-Campus 
I ntervi ewi ng and Resume Referral . 1 1 al so gi ves you updated i nf ormati on on career and j ob f ai rs and 
empl oyer i nf ormati on sessi ons. C4T students recei ve sped al e- mai I bul I eti ns on upcorni ng 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e ft 



empl oymert events rel ated to thei r maj or. 

On-Campus I ntervi ewi ng (OC I ): OCI offers students the opportunity to i ntervi ew on campus with 
a vari ety of organi zati ons for full-time, i nternshi p, or part-ti me posi ti ons. To parti ci pate, students 
must regi ster for Careers4Terps. OC I i s al so avai I abl e to recent al urmi . 

J ob L isti ng C urrent j ob I i sti ngs- i ncl udi ng part-ti me, i nternshi p, graduate assi stantshi p, and 
f ul I -ti me posi ti ons are accessi bl e 24 hours vi a C4T. Additional j obs are often posted on the bul I eti n 
boards i nsidethe UCC/TPP suite. Students seeki ng short term part-ti mejobs should consider our 
Quick Bucks e-mail service. 

C redentials Services U ndergraduate/graduate students and al urmi of the U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
Col I ege Park and Shady G rove campuses can establ i sh permanent prof essi onal f i I es to hoi d letters of 
recommendation and background i nf ormati on i n support of appl i cati ons for empl oymert and 
graduate/professional school . There is a smal I fee. 

Resume Referral : Students and al urmi can present thei r qual i fi cati ons to empl overs who are not 
i ntervi ewi ng on campus. By regi steri ng with Careers4Terps you j oi n a pool of candi dates accessi bl e 
to empl overs who are requesti ng appl i cants with specif i c ski 1 1 s or backgrounds to f i 1 1 thei r current 
j ob openi ngs. E mpl overs revi ew resumes and then di recti y contact qual i f i ed candi dates to arrange 
off i ce i ntervi ews or to request addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 

Virtual Mock I nterviews These are self-produced practice i ntervi ews. Through use of an 

i nteracti ve kiosk located i n the UCC/TPP suite, sessions are digital ly recorded and streamed to an 

onl i ne account for your revi ew with a career advi sor. 

Terp Exbernshipc A n externshi p i s a short j ob shadowi ng experi ence that provi des you with the 
opportunity to observe and network with prof essi onal s, i nvesti gate a career f i el d, cl arify career goal s 
and i interests, and f uncti on wi thi n a work envi ronment. A ppl i cati ons are accepted rri d-f al I semester 
for wi nter term experi ences. 

Terp Career & J ob Search Glide Thi s i s a sped al gui de for career pi anni ng, conducti ng a j ob 
search and appl yi ng to graduate school . Contents i ncl ude resume wri ti ng gui des, successful 
i ntervi ewi ng techni ques and j ob search strategi es. 

Terp Network: Thi s i s a Web-based database f eaturi ng contact i nf ormati on for parents, al urmi and 
f ri ends of the U ni versi ty of M aryl and who are i interested i n provi di ng career advi ce and rol e 
model i ng to current M aryl and students. 

Academic Courses The UCC/TPP offers several career development courses: 

E DC P108I - Academic Transition into I nternshi ps A one-credit course desi gned to 
provi de students wi th the f ul I experi ence of searchi ng for searchi ng and successful I y 
obtai ni ng an i nternshi p. Themes may i ncl ude understandi ng the rel ati onshi p of i nternshi p 
experi ences to maj ors and/or career paths, setti ng I earni ng obj ecti ves, maki ng the most of 
an i nternshi p experience, and eval uati ng offers. (Recommended for Freshmen, 
Sophomores, and J uniors.) 

EDCP lOBj - J ob Search Stratecpes Designed for students who are seeki ng to learn 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e /zt 



more about strategi es for I andi ng f ul I ti me empl oyment and succeedi ng at work. Themes 
may i ncl ude correspondence and i ntervi ew preparati on, determi ni ng f it and 
appropri ateness of posi ti ons, setti ng real i sti c expectati ons for sal ari es and duti es, 
appropriate work etiquette, networking, selecting references, on-the-job success, and 
managi ng work cultures and dynamics. (Recommended for J uniors and Seniors.) 

UNIV099 - 1 nbernship Experience: Designed to complement students supervised work 
experi ences. Topi cs may i ncl ude expl ori ng career opti ons, devel opi ng prof essi onal work 
ski 1 1 s, and exarni ni ng the rel ati onshi p between i nternshi p and academi c coursework. Good 
acaderri c standi ng, subrri ssi on of transcri pt, and i nternshi p descri pti on and approval of 
instructor required. 

Career Development Procyams Special events bri ng students and employer representatives 
together for i nf ormati on exchange and empl oyment contact. Stay tuned on the f ol I owi ng sped al 
events through our Web site 

• University Career Center Events & Workshops 

• I nternshi p and Part-Ti mej ob Fai r 

• Fall Career Fair 

• WinterJobsFair 

• Spring Career Fair 

• M aryl and/M etropol itan Educati on Expo 

• Diversity J ob Search Series 

• N ati onal Student E mpl oyment Week 

• And more 

Federal Work Study Students Note: Students el i gi bl e for Federal Work Study/Community Servi ce 
positions should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid: www.umd.edu/FI N/ or 301-314-9000. 

E rep neeri ng Maj ors Note A ddi ti onal support for part-ti me, i nternshi p and cooperati ve educati on 
positi ons i s avai I abl e through the E ngi neeri ng Co-op and Career Servi ces offi ce at 301-405-3863. 

Business Majors Note Additional support for part-time, internship, cooperative educati on, and 
f ul I -ti me posi ti ons i s avai I abl e through the U ndergraduate B usi ness Career Center offi ce at 
301-405-7103. 

University Counseling Center 

Susquehanna Hall (4th Floor) and South Campus Dining Hall (3rd Floor) 
301-314-7651 
301-314-9206 (fax) 
www.counsel i ng.umd.edu 

FromSumrer 2009 to Summer 201Q the UruveratyCounsdirgCerOEristEmporarily relocating 
tothe4& Floor of Susquehanna Hall, and the3Td Floor of the South Campus Dining Hall while 
its usual hornet the Shoemaker Build ng undergoes renovations TheCenber will still provideall 
of its services, butcheckbelowtoseewhereeach unit will be housed 

Seeki ng he! p i s a si gn of strength! M any students encounter a vari ety of personal , soci al , career, and 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e ^ 



acaderri c i ssues that cal I for assi stance beyond advi ce provi ded by f ri ends and f ami I y. Fortunate! y, 
the U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center provi des free and corf i denti al counsel i ng servi ces to al I 
University of Maryland students. To schedulean appointment cal I 301-314-7651 or stop by the 4^ 
Floor of Susquehanna Hal I . Wal k-i n counsel i ng is avai lable to students of color who would I i ke a 
consultation with a counselor of color and GLBTQ students who would I i ke a consultation with a 
gay, lesbian or a gay al ly counselor, dai ly f rom3:00 p.m to 4:00 p.m Students who seek help in 
choosi ng a maj or can wal k-i n for consul tati on with a career counsel or on Wednesdays from 1: 00 
p.mto3:00p.m 

Counseling Center Services 

Personal/Social Coinseling. You don't have to deal with your problems alone. I n a warm and 
supportive envi ronment, you can meet with a professional counselor to discuss any concern you may 
have rel ated to your personal and soci al wel I -bei ng. A mong the topi cs many students di scuss i n 
counseling are self-esteem stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, sex, family problems, and 
I onel i ness. Y ou may see a counsel or for i ndi vi dual counsel i ng, coupl es counsel i ng, or j oi n one of the 
many counsel or-l ed support groups. Susquehanna Hall (4th Floor)- Cal I 301-314-7651. 
www.counsel i ng. umd.edu/Structur/csl gservi ce. htm 

Career Counseling. A normal part of your devel opment i n col I ege i s i dentifyi ng who you are i n 
rel ati on to a future career. Y ou can get hel p wi th thi s process i n i ndi vi dual career counsel i ng at the 
U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center. Y our expl orati on may i ncl ude taki ng career i nterest tests and 
i nterpreti ng the results with a professional counselor or taki ng advantage of a computerized career 
i nf ormati on system Whether you are choosi ng a maj or, establ i shi ng career goal s, or consi deri ng j ob 
opportuniti es, it i s i mportant to understand how your personal ity, val ues, and i interests rel ate to your 
future professional life. Career counseling at theCounseling Center isagood place to begin. The 
M aj ors Wal k-i n program i s avai I abl e on Wednesdays from 1: 00-3: 00 p. m Susquehanna Hall (4th 
Floor). Cal I 301-314-7651. www.counsel i ng. umd.edu/Servi ces/srv_car. htm 

Academic Skills Counseling Many students would I ike to improve their academic ski I Is. If you're 
ti red of struggl i ng because of your own weak areas, schedul e an appoi ntment to see the U ni versi ty 
Counsel i ng Center's education specialists i n the Learni ng Assistance Service (LAS). The counselors 
i n L A S can hel p you enhance such ski 1 1 s as readi ng, wri ti ng, note-taki ng, I earni ng sci ence and math 
materi al , and I earni ng stati sti cs. Workshops cover a range of topi cs, i ncl udi ng study ski 1 1 s, exam 
ski 1 1 s, ti me management, English conversati on, end-of -semester survi val ski 1 1 s, and strategi es for 
compl eti ng your thesi s or di ssertati on. South Carrpus Dining Hall (3rd Floor), cal I 301-314-7693 
or email las-cc@umd.edu. www.counseling.umd.edu/LAS 

Workshops and Group Coinseling. Y ou can gai n strength to deal with your concerns by getti ng 
together with other peopl e who share si rri I ar probl ems, i nterests, and goal s. Each semester, the 
U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center offers weekl y support groups addressi ng a vari ety of topi cs, such as 
career exploration, dissertation support, procrastination prevention, and stress management. Recent 
group offerings have included, "Circle of Sisters," a support group for black women; "MyBody-My 
Self: A Woman's Group," which addresses problems of body i mage and eati ng; and a Self Care and 
Wel I ness group that assi sts peopl e wi th strategi es for stayi ng heal thy, psychol ogi cal I y and 
physically. Susquehanna Hall (4th Floor), call 301-314-7651. 
www.counsel i ng. umd.edu/Servi ces/srv_grp. htm 

Support for Students with Disabilities. The U ni versity Counsel i ng Center's Di sabi I ity Support 
Servi ces, provi des a range of servi ces for students with di sabi I iti es, i ncl udi ng hel p i n I ocati ng 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e /fc 



i nterpreters for deaf or hard-of - heari ng students; readers for vi sual I y- i mpai red students, bl i nd 
students, and students with I earni ng di sabi lities; and assi stance with access to vari ous bui I di ngs and 
facilitieson campus. I f you are a new or returni ng student, contact the Di sabi I ity Support Servi ces 
Off i ce i n the Counsel i ng Center as soon as possi bl e Susquehanna Hall (4th floor). Cal I 
301-314-7682, voice and TTY . www.counsel i ng.umd.edu/DSS/ 

Returning Students Program. I f you are over 25 and returni ng to school after a break i n your 
formal education, you probably have different needs than the traditional col lege student. The 
Returni ng Students P rogram i n the U ni versi ty Counsel i ng Center's L earni ng A ssi stance Servi ce 
(LAS) is designed to hel p you with the transition to academic I ife Workshops, counsel i ng, and 
publ i cati ons are avai I abl e at the Counsel i ng Center to make your adj ustment to the uni versi ty 
successful. South Carrpus Dining Hall &** Floor). Call 301-314-7693. 
www.counseling.umd.edu/LAS 

Testing Services The Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit in the University Counseling 
Center adrri ni sters tests for counsel i ng purposes, such as career i nterest i nventori es, and al so 
administers national standardized tests, such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and Miller 
Analogies. South Canpus Dining Hall (3rd Floor). Call 301-314-7688. 
www.counsel i ng. umd.edu/Structur/str_trdp. htm 

Research Services G roup and i ndi vi dual consul tati on are avai I abl e i f you need assi stance wi th 
research design and statistics and writing project proposals, theses, and dissertations. Susquehanna 
Hall (4th Floor). Call 301-314-7687. www.counsding.umd.edu/Structur/trdpui^hgrp.htm 

Support for Parents of College Students The Parent Warrri i ne i s a conf i denti al tel ephone and 
emai I servi ce for any parent concerned about hi s or her students adj ustment at col I ege, i ncl udi ng 
concerns impacting academic, social, and emotional realms, and overall mental health. Parent 
Warrri i ne staff can be contacted at 301-314-7651 or parentwarrri i neOumd.edu . Susquehanna 
Hall (4th Floor). 

Parent and Child/Adolescent Counseling and Evaluation. The University Counseling Center's, 

University Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service (UPCCES) provides 

U ni versi ty-connected f arri I i es wi th chi I dren (ages 4 to 18) wi th a range of servi ces, i ncl udi ng 

individual and group therapies, school consultation, and parent consultation. Intellectual and 

emoti onal/behavi oral eval uati on i s al so avai I abl e for youth with school and I earni ng concerns. 

Susquehanna Hall (4th Floor). Cal I 301-314-7673 or parentchi I d@umd.edu. 

www.counsel i ng. umd.edu/Structur/str_pccs. htm 

University Counseling Center Hour 

CouriselirigSerwceappointrrents (all students) 301-314-7651 

M onday-Thursday 8: 30 am to 9: 00 pm 

Friday 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 

Students of Col or Walk-I n Hours no appoi ntment needed 

Monday - Friday 3:00 pmto 4:00 pm 



3. Carpus Adrrini strati on, Resources, and Student Services 



Page// 



Rainbow Walk-In 
Tuesday- Friday 

Majors Walk-in 
Wednesdays 



no appoi ntment needed 
3: 00 pm to 4: 00 pm 

no appoi ntment needed 
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm 



L earning Assistance Service 

Mondays 

Tuesday- Friday 



301-314-7693 

8:30 am to 7:00 pm 
8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Disability Support Services 
Monday- Friday 



301-314-7682 

8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit 
Monday- Friday 

Vari abl e eveni ng hours for testi ng purposes 



301-314-7688 

8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



University Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service 
Monday- Friday 

Eveni ng hours by appoi ntment 



301-314-7673 

8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Dining Services 

1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I 
Dining Plans: 301-314-8069 
Terrapin Express: 301-314-8068 
Student Employment: 301-314-8058 
umf ood@di ni ng. umd.edu 
www.di ni ng.umd.edu 

The U ni versity of M aryl and offers one of the ten I argest self-operated and self -supported di ni ng 
servi ces programs i n the country. Our goal i s to provi de popul ar and nutriti ous food i n a wel comi ng 
setti ng every day. We offer a vari ety of di ni ng pi an al ternati ves to maxi rri ze conveni ence and 
f lexi bi I ity and exceed your di ni ng expectations. Di ni ng locations are situated al I over the campus 
cl ose to acaderri c bui I di ngs and resi dence hal I s. Our two mai n di ni ng rooms are open unti I rri dni ght 
on most weekday nights. 

Di ni ng opti ons i ncl ude a I arge sel ecti on of traditional entrees as wel I as more trendy, popul ar food 
choi ces. Di ni ng rooms feature a total of 21 cul i nary stati ons i ncl udi ng a srxiffed-to-order burritos 
stop; hot and col d del i s; self -serve and custom made sal ad bars; i ce cream and bakery stati ons; gri 1 1 s 
and fryers; cl assi c comfort food meal s; i nternati onal I y-themed I unch and di nner venues; I tal i an and 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e /fc 



A si an serveri es; an al I -vegan stati on; and our new M ongol i an gri 1 1 s. 

I n additi on to the di ni ng rooms, there are restaurants, caf ®, and conveni ence shops scattered across 
campus to satisfy U ni versity of Maryland students and the campus community. For a complete list 
of our di ni ng locations, hours, and general i information please visit di ni ng.umd.edu or cal I us at 
301-314-8069. We are where you are - and we wel come students, faculty, staff and vi sitors i nto al I 
of our locations across campus. 

Resident Dining Plans. Y our di ni ng pi an works I i ke a debit account: you use your poi nts whenever 
and as often as you woul d I i ke throughout the semester. Y ou purchase food "la carte - even i n our 
resi dent di ni ng rooms. E nj oy a I i ght snack, a qui ck meal to go, a f ul I di nner, bri ng guests - ifs all up 
to you! 

You access dining points using your UM I D card. Your picture is on the front and you must be 
present every ti me the card i s used. Check poi nt bal ances onl i ne 24/7 or ask for a recei pt showi ng 
your bal ance after any transact] on. 

Every resi dent di ni ng pi an consi sts of two accounts, Resi dent Poi nts and Terp B ucks. Poi nts may be 
used in the South Campus Dining Room and The Diner. If you use all your Poi nts, these locations 
wi 1 1 automati cal I y tap i nto your Terp B ucks. B ucks provi de you wi th f I exi bi I i ty i n spendi ng and are 
accepted at many of the caf® and convenience shops on campus. As a bonus, A dele's Restaurant 
accepts Poi nts for di nner M onday through Thursday. A thi rd account, Terrapi n Express, may al so 
be I oaded onto the U M I D card. Terrapi n Express i s not a di ni ng pi an, its a pre-pai d account 
accepted vi rtual I y everywhere on campus. See di ni ng. umd.edu/terrapi n for detai I s. 

TheApartment Dining Plan. We offer the Apartment Plan to students not I i vi ng i n traditional 
campus resi dences. The A partment PI an works very much the same as resi denti al di ni ng pi ans, 
offeri ng students the abi I ity to purchase food on campus without carryi ng cash or a credit card; the 
security that if the U M ID card i s I ost, the account can be frozen and then attached to a repl acement 
U M I D card; and the conveni ence of payi ng through the B ursar's Off i ce duri ng the regul ar bi 1 1 i ng 
cycl e or by usi ng f i nanci al ai d or schol arshi p money. A partment PI an poi nts rol I over from f al I to 
spri ng semester. For detai I s see our web site. 

We are corf i dent that you wi 1 1 be i impressed by the qual i ty and excepti onal sel ecti ons avai I abl e 
throughout the di ni ng I ocati ons across campus. See you at I unch! 

Terrapin Express 

Terrapi n Express i s a pre-pai d debit account, not a substitute for a di ni ng pi an. 1 1 i s a wonderful way 
to suppl ement a di ni ng pi an and a great al ternati ve for students I i vi ng i n campus arartments or 
off-campus. Terrapi n Express accounts are avai I abl e to al I students, faculty and staff through the 
Terrapi n Express Office at 1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I or onl i ne through Testudo web 
servi ces. Check our web site for a compl ete I i sti ng of parti ci pati ng di ni ng and non-di ni ng I ocati ons. 



Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life 

1110 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-7172 
www.greek.umd.edu 
Office Hours: Monday- Friday. 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p. m 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services ^ a 9 e /y 



Social and community service- based fraternities and sororities, and their leadership, are advised and 
supported by the staff inthe Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life. The office also advises the four 
student governing councils: The I nterfraternity Council (IFC), the Panhel I enic Association (PHA), 
the Pan- Hellenic Council (PHC) and the United Greek Council (UGC). The office also manages 
university-owned fraternity and sorority houses and coordi nates off-campus houses. 

University Hedth Center (UHC) 

Campus D ri ve, B ui I di ng 140 
301-314-8180 
310-314-7845 (fax) 
www.health.umd.edu 

The University Health Center, legated on Campus Drive across from the Stamp Student Union, isa 
national ly accredited ambulatory health carefaci I ity. Every currentiy registered student I i vi ng on- or 
off-campus is eligibleto use the UHC. The UHC is open during the hours listed above with varied 
hours duri ng semester breaks, hoi i days and summer sessi ons. V i si t the U H C Web si te for up-to-date 
i nf ormati on. Students are seen by appoi ntment onl y for routi ne care 9 a. m - 5 p. m on weekdays. 
Some appointments can be scheduled www. heal th.umd.edu through. "myUhc" A limited number of 
same day appoi ntments are avai I abl e. M edi cal servi ces are I i mi ted after 5 p. m and on Saturdays. 
U rgent Care servi ces are avai I abl e wi thout an appoi ntment for the eval uati on of urgent medi cal 
probl ems. The After H ours N urseL i ne (301-314-9386), a free medi cal advi ce and i nf ormati on 
service isavailabletoall registered students when the UHC is closed. 

Fees, Services and Health I nsuance 

There i s a $15 fee for vi sits with most of our provi ders. Fees may vary dependi ng on the type of 
servi ce. There i s al so a " M i ssed A ppoi ntment/Late Cancel I ati on" fee. To avoi d the charge, 
appoi ntments must be cancel ed or reschedul ed at I east 24 hours i n advance. M assage arid 
acupuncture appoi ntments must be cancel ed withi n 72 hours of the appoi ntment. Additional fees are 
charged for servi ces such as: dental health, laboratory, radiology, immunizations, allergy injections, 
casts, physical therapy, medications and suppl ies dispensed through the pharmacy and medical 
units, massage, acupuncture, substance abuse counseling and various medi cal procedures and 
orthopedi c suppl i es. Charges are posted to the students B ursar Account or can be pai d at the ti me of 
visit i n the UHC. Charges paid for at the ti me of visit wi 1 1 not appear on the Bursar Account. 

Servi ces provi ded by the U H C i ncl ude Pri mary Care, U rgent Care, men's and women's reproducti ve 
healthcare, pharmacy, acupuncture, massage therapy, HIV testing, sports medicine, nutrition, 
meditation, mental health, eating disorder, substance abuse, travel clinic, occupational health, health 
promotion, and the Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Program Dental Health Services at the 
U ni versi ty H eal th Center are provi ded and bi 1 1 ed by the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, B al ti more School 
of Dentistry. For dental hours cal I 301-314-9500. The Center for Health and Wei I bei ng (CH WB), a 
satel I ite of the U HC located i n the Eppley Recreation Center, is open 12 to 8 p.m M onday through 
Thursday and 12 to 5 p.m Fridays. Hours may vary duri ng the summer. The CH WB provides health 
promotion programs and services. It does not provide medical services. 

Students younger than 18 wi 1 1 need to subrni t a form gi vi ng perrni ssi on from a parent or I egal 
guardi an to be treated, except for mental health and sexual health servi ces. To obtai n a form cal I 
301-314-8180 or go to the Health Center's Web site. For students 18 and older, treatment and visit 
i nf ormati on cannot be gi ven to parents wi thout the students wri tten consent or through a court 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services PagebC 



ordered subpoena. 

I information regardi ng mental health or sexual health services cannot be released without the 
patients consent. The UHC is in compliance with the Federal Health I insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act. 

I n accordance with the new University of Maryland Mandatory Health I nsirance 
requirement, all newly adnritted freshmen and transfer students regsbered for 6 or more 
aeditearetrandabedtohaveheEJItiinsLi-anceAII newly-admitted students must complete an 
on- 1 i ne form at www.fi rststudent.com to i ndi cate whether they either: 1) have i insurance (i.e. through 
parent pi ans, f ami I y pi ans, or empl oyer-sponsored pi ans) and wi sh to wai ve the requi rement or 

2) wish to purchase the Student Health I insurance Plan (SHI P) sponsored by the University of 
M aryl and. I f the on-l i ne form i s not compl eted by the deadl i ne, students wi 1 1 be charged for the 
Student Health I insurance Plan. M ore i information regardi ng M andatory Health I insurance is avai lable 
on the UHC website. 

The SH I P i s avai I abl e to al I students. 1 1 provi des coverage for acci dents and i 1 1 ness as wel I as travel 
rel ated vacci nes and medi cati ons. Students may si gn up duri ng the open enrol I ment peri ods at the 
beginning of each semester. The University Health Center is considered an out-of- network health 
care provi der. Students with other health i insurance shoul d check with tinei r i insurance company to 
di scuss benef i ts and rei mbursement procedures f or U H C servi ces. M ost H M Os do not cover servi ces 
outsi de tinei r areas, so students i n outiyi ng counties i n M aryl and or i n other states or nations may 
want to consi der enrol I i ng i n the student health i insurance pi an. Students who are not enrol I ed i n 
SH I P are charged a fee for most vi sits and for certai n procedures such as x-rays, I ab tests, al I ergy 
injections, and medications dispensed through the pharmacy and medical units. Fees are waived for 
studentswithSHIP. 

The pharmacy accepts most major pharmacy plans. 

I mmunization Requirements 

Students at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and are requi red to have recei ved some vacci nati ons and others 
are strongly recomnnended. The University of M aryl and requi res all students to provide proof of two 
immunization dates for Measles, M umps and Rubella (M.M.R.) prior to the first day of classes. The 
I rnmuni zati on Record must be subrni tted to the U ni versi ty H eal tin Center on A ugust 1 st for 
i ncorni ng f al I semester and J anuary 1 for i ncorni ng spri ng semester students. Students may bri ng the 
completed form to orientation, or it can be faxed to 301-314-5234. A copy of the form can be 
downloaded fromtheUHCWebsiteatwww.lnealth.urnd.edu/forrns. 

All international students must document Measles, Munpsard Rubd la Immunizations (M.M.R., 2 
doses) and a Tuberculosis (TB) test completed witini n the past six months. Students who fai I to 
subrni t a compl eted heal tin form si gned by a physi ci an or acceptabl e al ternati ve documentati on wi 1 1 
be prohi bi ted from regi steri ng for cl asses after a one-semester grace peri od. U nder M aryl and I aw, 
students enrol I ed i n a M aryl and i nstituti on of hi gher educati on and who resi de i n on campus student 
housi ng are requi red to be vacci rated from tini s I aw. E itiner vacci nati on i nf ormati on or a si gned 
waivermustbeirrludedontheirrrnunizationform For more information, visittheUHC Website, 
e-mail healtin@umd.edu, or call 301-314-8180. 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagetfl 



Housing: Resident Life 

1102 Annapolis Hall 
301-314-2100 
reslife@umd.edu 
www. resnet. umd.edu 



The Department of Resi dent L if e i s responsi bl e for management of the resi dence hal I s as wel I as the 
cultural, educational, recreational and social programs and activities for residential students. 

Whi le I i vi ng i n a M aryland residence hal I is not requi red, ni ne of every ten students i n M aryland's 
freshman cl ass make the choi ce to I i ve on campus. M ore than 80 prof essi onal and graduate staff and 
over 400 undergraduate student empl oyees meet the needs of resi dent students. 

There are rooms for approxi mately 8,250 undergraduate students i n 36 residence hal Is. Three 
di ff erent styl es of I i vi ng are avai I abl e to campus resi dents: tradi ti onal , sui tes and apartments. Wi thi n 
tradi ti onal housi ng, where most f i rst year resi dents I i ve, si ngl e, doubl e, tri pi e and quadrupl e room 
occupancy exists. Our national ly acclai med I i vi ng-learni ng programs i ncl ude Beyond the 
Classroom CIVICUS, Col lege Park Scholars, EcoHouse, HinmanCEOs, Gemstone, Global 
Communities, Jimenez- Porter Writers' House, Language House, Honors Humanities and University 
H onors. A 1 1 of these programs add to the di versi ty of on-campus housi ng opti ons. A 1 1 rooms have a 
cabl e and data j ack for each student. One tel ephone jack is provi ded i n each room 

F i rst ti me freshmen are guaranteed on-campus housi ng provi ded they return thei r M aryl and PI anner 
i ncl udi ng the E nrol I merit Corf i rmati on and H ousi ng and D i ni ng Servi ces A greement along with the 
$400 enrol I ment deposit by M ay 1. Transfer students who want to I i ve on campus should complete 
the M aryland Planner as wel I and wi 1 1 be al lotted housi ng on a space avai lable basis. 



Office of Student Conduct 

2118 Mitchell Building 
301-314-8204 
www.studentconduct. umd.edu 

1 1 i s the mi ssi on of the Off i ce of Student Conduct to resol ve al I egati ons of mi sconduct under the 
Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academe Integrity i n a manner consi stent with the core val ues 
of f ai mess, honesty and i ntegri ty whi I e promoti ng the U ni versi ty's educati onal rri ssi on. E ssenti al to 
thi s mi ssi on is to enhance the development of character, civility, citizenship, individual/community 
responsi bi I i ty, and ethi cs. U ni versi ty students pi ay a si gni f i cant rol e i n consi deri ng the behavi or of 
thei r peers and are asked to assume positions of responsi bi I ity as members of the university's student 
j udi ci ary. The f ol I owi ng tenets gui de thi s rri ssi on: 

• To regard each student as an individual, deserving individual attention, consideration, and 
respect. 

• To consi der the facts f ul I y and careful I y before resol vi ng any case. 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagefc£ 



• To speak candidly and honestiy with each student. 

• To hoi d each student to a hi gh standard of behavi or, both to protect the campus community, 
and to promote student ethi cal devel opment. 

• To recognize the real ity of human fal I i bi I ity, as wel I as the stresses associated with col legiate 
I ife, and to demonstrate compassion, understandi ng, and a sense of humor. 

• To contri bute to the educati oral mi ssi on of the U ni versi ty by desi gni ng pol i ci es, conduct] ng 
programs, and offeri ng i nstructi on that contri bute to the i ntel I ectual and ethi cal devel opment 
of the enti re student body. 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected to conduct themselves at al I 
times in a manner consistent with the University responsibility of ensuring to all members of the 
campus communi ty the opportuni ty to pursue thei r educati oral obj ecti ves, and of protecti ng the 
safety, welfare, rights, and property of al I members of the U ni versi ty. Specific expectations for 
student conduct are outi i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and the Code of Academe I ntegrity. 
See www. president urrd. edu/poiicies/. 

Disci pi i nary Procedures. Students accused of vi ol ati ng U ni versi ty regul ati ons are accorded 
fundamental due process i n di sci pi i nary proceedi ngs. Formal ml es of evi dence, however, shal I not 
be appl i cabl e, nor shal I devi ati ons from prescri bed procedures necessari I y i nval i date a deci si on or 
proceedi ng unl ess si gni f i cant prej udi ce to one of the parti es may resul t. U ni versi ty procedures are 
outi i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academe I ntegrity suppl emented by materi al s 
provi ded by the Offi ce of Student Conduct to assi st students who are f aci ng accusati ons of 
misconduct. 



Nyumburu Cultural Center 

Campus Drive 
301-314-7758 
301-314-0383 (fax) 
www.nyumburu.umd.edu 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center has served as a maj or resource of cultural , hi stori cal , and soci al 
progranrring at the University of Maryland, Col lege Park for more than thirty-five years. The 
Center works closely with student, faculty, and community organizations. The Nyumburu Cultural 
Center offers a vari ety of soci o-cultural , musi cal , educati oral and arti sti c programs to the campus 
community. The nature of the diverse programrri ng and activities is based on the African 
A meri can, Af ri can, and Cari bbean D i aspora experi ence(s) . N yumburu i s home of the M aryl and 
Gospel Choir, Shades of Harlem (performing arts ensemble), The Black Explosion Newspaper, Male 
Spokesmodel Competition, M iss Unity Scholarship Pageant, J ukej oint, Gospel Happy Hour, 
L eadershi p Seri es, N yumburu J azz C I ub, K wanzaa Cel ebrati on, C ul tural D i nner duri ng B I ack 
H i story M onth, L i terature Conference, H omecomi ng A I umni Tai I gate, A nnual Tal ent Showcase, 
Annual Student Awards Banquet, Black M ale I nitiative (BM I ) Program and Sisterhood of Unity 
and Love (SOUL). 

N yumburu's staff are advi sors to many campus student organi zati ons: B I ack Student U ni on, Af ri can 
Student Association (ASA), The Maryland Gospel Choir, The Black Explosion Newspaper, Sigma 
Gamma Rho sorority I nc., Delta SigmaTheta I nc., Alpha Nu Omega Sorority I nc., and Dimensions 
M odel i ng Group to name a few. 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagetts 



Nyumburu presents Bl ues, J azz, and Gospel music concerts as wel I as academic courses i n Creative 
Writing (ENGL278C), Blues (AASP298V) andj azz (AASP298U) for three credits each. Maryland 
Gospel Choi r students earn 1-credit (M USC329E), and students who take EDCP108N, Col lege and 
Career Advancement earn 1-credit. 

Duri ng the summer, Nyumburu sponsors a Summer Camp Program for students from the age of five 
to sixteen. Through this dynamic eight week program opportunities for youth to explore academic, 
artistic, and athletic i interests i n a rel axed and creati ve envi ronment are provi ded. Camp Shul e was 
establ i shed to provi de the chi I dren of M aryl and f acul ty/staff and I ocal youth wi th a di verse 
educational experience. 

The M ulti purpose Room Conference Rooms, Computer Labs, and the Nyumburu Amphitheatre of 
the Nyumburu Cultural Center are open to the students, faculty and staff of the U ni versity of 
M aryl and . Room reservati ons are al so avai I abl e at a norri nal cost for departmental and off-campus 
events and programs. Come i n and i nteract with us, meet other students and make your i deas and 
wishes known. Ourstaff goal is to make Nyumburu a cultural centerthatis, "YourHomeAway 
from Home." 

Recreation Services, Campus 

1115 Eppley Recreation Center 
301-405-PLAY (Information) 
301-314-5454 (Rec-Check) 
www.crs.umd.edu 

Campus Recreati on Servi ces (CRS) offers a wi de vari ety of recreati on programs including aquati cs, 
fitness programs, informal recreation, intramural sports, non-credit instruction, outdoor recreation, 
and sport clubs. 

CRS has some of the most advanced recreati on, sports, and fitness f aci I iti es i n the nati on. The CRS 
faci I ities include the Eppley Recreati on Center (ERC), Ritchie Coliseum Reckord Armory, Cole 
Fiddhouseand the weight and fitness areas in the School of Public Health (SPH) building. 

The E ppl ey Recreati on Center has two i ndoor and two outdoor pool s for I ap swi mm ng and di vi ng. 
The CRS aquati c program al so offers swi mm ng I essons, and I if eguard trai ni ng. 

CRS offers a wi de vari ety of fitness programs throughout the week at E RC and Ritchi e Col i seum 
These i nd ude low-i mpact, step, and water aerobics, cardio-boxi ng, and sport conditioni ng. CRS 
I nf ormal Recreati on programs al I ow students to enj oy thd r f avori te acti vi ty at the r I d sure, whether 
itis using cardi ovascul ar equi pment, I i fti ng wd ghts, j oggi ng, or pi ay i ng racquetbal I , vol I eybal I , 
basketbal I or wal lybal I . CRS has wdght rooms and fitness centers located i n the ERC, Ritchie 
Col i seum and H H P. The fitness centers feature stai rd i mbers, bi kes, rowers, total body conditi oners, 
and treadrri 1 1 s. Wd ght rooms have a vari ety of f ree-wd ghts and wd ght machi nes. The E RC al so 
has racquetbal l/handbal l/wal lybal I and squash courts. 

Students I ooki ng to pi ay team or i ndi vi dual sports or take part i n sped al sporti ng events wi 1 1 want to 
parti ci pate i n the CRS I ntramural Sports program. Students can parti ci pate year-round i n team sports 
such as basketball, football, and soccer. I ndi vi dual and dual sports include golf, racquetbal I, and 
many more I ntramural sports are structured acti vi ti es that are open to al I men and women from the 
campus community. Parti ci pants can sd ect thd r own I evd of competiti on and pi ay i n dther men's, 



3. Carpus Adrrini strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageant 



women's, grad/fac/staff or coed leagues. 

The Outdoor Recreati on Center (ORC) i s I ocated i n the northwest corner of the E ppl ey Recreati on 
Center. The ORC offers outdoor adventures and cl i ni cs throughout the year. Take a backpacki ng 
tri p, I earn how to rock cl i mb, or try white-water kayaki ng. The CI i mbi ng Wal I and Chal I enge Course 
are two features of the ORC where students may chal I enge themsel ves both physi cal I y and mental I y, 
i ncreasi ng i interpersonal ski 1 1 s and self-corf i dence The ORC al so has a resource I i brary for pi anni ng 
your own tri ps, a bi ke repai r shop, and equi pment rental s. 

A Sport Cl ub is a student organization, registered with Campus Recreation Services, formed by 
individuals moti vated by a common i interest and desi re to parti ci pate i n a f avori te sport acti vi ty . 
Cl ubs vary i n focus and programrri ng, si nee student members manage the operati on of the cl ub and 
decide on club activities. A sport club may be competitive recreational, instructional, social, or all 
of these. 

Religous Prog-ams 

1101 Memorial Chapel 
301-314-9866 (Chapel Reservations) 
www.chapel .umd.edu 

The f ol I owi ng chapl ai ns and thei r servi ces are avai I abl e 

Baptist 

M s. J essice Schulte 2120 M emorial Chapel 

301-405-8443 
je5stem@umd.edu 

Black Ministries 

Rev. Dr. Ruby M oone 1112 M emorial Chapel 

301-405-8445 
Rrmoone2@aol .com 

Christian Science 

Bob Snyder 2118 M emorial Chapel 

301-474-0403 
rsnyder@umd.edu 

C hirch of J esus C hrist of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) 

Denni s M onson 7601 M owatt L ane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-7570 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services 



Pageab 



monsondb @l dsces.org 



Orthodox 

Rev. K osmas K aravel I as 



2747 Riva Road 

Annapolis, MD 21401 

301-261-8218 
fatherkosmas@schgochurch.org 



E piscopal/AngJ ican 

Rev. PeterAntoci 



2116 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8453 

eaterps@umd.edu 



Hindu 

Ms. KiranSankhla 



2112 Memorial Chapel 

301-570-6426 

murari s2002@yahoo. com 



Ja/uish-Hillel 

Rabbi Ari Israel 



H i 1 1 el J ewi sh Student Center 

7612 M owatt Lane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-6200 

ai srael @maryl andhi 1 1 el . org 



Je/vish-Chabad 

Rabbi Eli Backman 



Chabad J ewi sh Student Center 
7403 Hopki ns Ave., Col lege Park 
301-277-2994 
chabad@umd.edu 



Lutheran 

Rev. Elizabeth PI atz 
Ms.Gail Douglas, Asst. 



2103 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8448 

lutheran@umd.edu 



3. Carrpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services 



Page at 



Muslim 

Mr. Tarif Shraim 



2118 Memorial Chapel 
240899-8197 
tshrai m@grrai I .com 



Roman Catholic 

Fr. Kylelngels 



Cathol i c Student Center 

4141 Guilford Rd., College Park 

301-864-6223 

f rkyl el @cathol i cterps. org 



United Campus Ministry 

(Presbyterian, Disci pies of Christ, United Church of Christ) 
Rev. Holly III mer 



2101 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8450 

ulmer@umd.edu 



United Methodist 

Rev. KimCapps 



2102 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8451 

umc@umd.edu 



Transportation Services 

Regents Drive Garage 

301-314-PARK 

www.transportation.umd.edu 

Parking 

The Department of Transportati on Servi ces (DOTS) i s responsi bl e for managi ng and mai ntai ni ng 
more than 19, 000 parki ng spaces on the U ni versi ty of M aryl and campus. A 1 1 students who pi an to 
parka licensed motor vehicle in one of these spaces must either register for a parking permit at the 



3. Carpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces ^ a 9 e B/ 



DOTS office or park at paid meters. Please note Due to construction projects on campus, tine 
number of parking spaces could be dramatically reduced. Campus resident freshmen and resident 
sophomores are el i gi bl e to regi ster for a parki ng permit. 

Because the University of Maryland has limited parking spaces, parking regulations arestrictiy 
enforced. 1 1 1 egal I y parked vehi d es, as we! I as those vehi cl es not di spl ayi ng a campus parki ng perrri t 
i n areas requi ri ng permits will beti cketed, and students with outstandi ng parki ng f i nes may be 
barred from regi strati on. 

V i sit the DOTS Web site for compl ete procedures and parki ng regul ati ons, di sabl ed parki ng 
information, visitor parking areas, green transportation options, parking registration rates, motor 
vehi cl e assi stance program i nf ormati on, schedul e of f i nes, and other i nf ormati on. 

Park and Rides (Bowie, Burtonsvilleand Laurel) 

The Department of Transportati on Servi ces i s off eri ng FRE E weekday transportation to faculty, 
staff and corrrruter students intheformof park & rides. This service runs from the park and 
ridelotstotheCollegePark campus. The Laurel Park& Ride lot is located on the northbound 
side of Route 197 (Laurel -Bowie Road) - approxi mately 1/8 ni le north of the i intersection of Route 
197 and Contee Road. The B urtonsvi 1 1 e Park & Ri de I ot i s I ocated about 10 ni I es from campus and 
is between routes 198 and 29. The Bowie Park & Ride lot is located between routes 197 and Northviev 
N orthvi ew D ri veabout 13 ni I es from campus. F i nd more i nf ormati on about these routes onl i ne at 
www.transportation.umd.edu/alt_trans/p&r.html . 

Shuttie-UM 

Shutti e-U M transit system i s a unit withi n the Department of Trans- portati on Servi ces whi ch i s 
predoninantiy supported by student fees. Shuttie-UM provides commuter, evening, NITE Ride, 
paratransi t, and charter servi ces to U ni versi ty students, f acul ty, and staff whi I e cl asses are i n sessi on. 
Schedul es are avai I abl e at the Stamp Student U ni on I nf ormati on Desk, the Department of 
Transportation Services Regents Drive Garage office, the residence halls, and on the DOTS Web site 
at www.transportati on. umd.edu. 



C ommunity Service-L ear ni ng 

0110 A del e H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L if e 

301-314-2273 

www.csl.umd.edu 

Community Service- Learning (CSL) promotes service- 1 earning, as an integral aspect of education 
and fosters university engagement withi n the larger community. The CSL website contai ns 
i nf ormati on and resources such as an i nteracti ve database of 800+ community agencies, handouts, 
and step-by-step guidance for getting involved in service. CSL offers on-site personal assistance, a 
weekly I istserv of service opportunities, and presentations across campus. CSL educational materials 
al so i ncl ude resources about soci al i ssues, I eadershi p, curri cul urn devel opment, and strategi es for 
facilitating reflecti on. 

Resources For Students 



3. Campus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pagebfc 



Supports students engaged in service through Alternative Break programs, Community I nvolvement 
I nterns, and TERPcorps, a student service programmi ng body. CSL parti ci pates i n campus-wide 
resource fai rs, coordi nates vol unteer recognition events and programs, and offers a consultation and 
presentations to any student group or organization. 

ReaxrcesFor Faculty 

CSL promotes service- 1 earni ng withi n academic courses across disci pi i nes and withi n the I i vi ng and 
I earni ng communi ti es. To that end we offer f acul ty workshops, individual consul tati on, sampl e 
syllabi, a lending library, and an on- line faculty handbook for service- 1 earning. Programs for faculty 
i ncl ude the servi ce- 1 earni ng undergraduate teachi ng assi start program annual i nstructi onal 
i mprovement grants, and an ongoi ng assessment program 

America Reads' America Courts 

I n col I aborati on with the Pri nee George's County Publ i c School system and U M 's off i ce of f i nanci al 
ai d, A meri ca Reads* A meri ca Counts provi des hi gh qual i ty mentori ng i n I ocal school s that 
enri ches I earni ng opportuni ti es for both col I ege and el ementary school students. A pproxi matel y 200 
M aryl and federal work-study, vol unteer, and i ntern students serve as readi ng and math mentors and 
work with f ami I i es on I iteracy i n 18 Pri nee George's County el ementary school s. 

Resources For the Community 

Community agencies recruit students, faculty and staff by attendi ng the annual i nvolvement fai r, 
parti ci pati ng outreach tabl es i n the student uni on, and posti ng i nf ormati on on our i nteracti ve 
database and weekly I istserv. CSL sponsors agency orientation programs and offers i ndi vidual 
consultation to assist agencies with more targeted recruiti ng. 

C ampus Procj" ams 

0110 Stamp Student U ni on 
301-314-7174 
www.thestamp. umd.edu 

The mission of Campus Programs is to support and complement the university's academic mission 
and to enhance the educati onal experi ence of students through exposure and parti ci pati on i n soci al , 
cultural, recreational, leadership, intellectual, and governance activities. 

Student Organization. Regi sters al I student organi zati ons at the uni versi ty and provi des an onl i ne 
di rectory of more than 500 groups. Organi zati on support servi ces i ncl udes: accounti ng assi stance, 
advi sors' workshops, I eadershi p trai ni ng programs for organi zati on I eaders, i nvol vement sessi ons 
offered for cl asses and semester ori entati ons are some of the ways i nvol vement i s nurtured for 
organizations and i ndi vidual s. I n addition, First Look Fai r and Stampfest are large-scale i nvolvement 
f ai rs hel d at the begi nni ng of each semester to showcase the student groups and organi zati ons. 

Organization Advising. M aj or student groups such as the Student Government Associ ati on, 
Graduate Student Government, Peer Leadershi p Counci I , TerpVets, the Homecorri ng Committee, 
and Student E ntertai nment Events recei ve di rect advi si ng from Campus Programs staff. Other 
student groups can al so obtai n hel p by request. Assi stance i n programmi ng, securi ng a faculty 
advi sor, off i cer transi ti ons, and efforts to create a new organi zati on i s avai I abl e. 

Leadership Development. Offers a wide range of credit-beari ng leadershi p courses i n conj unction 
with the Counsel i ng and Personnel Servi ces Department i n the Col I ege of Educati on, i ncl udi ng a 
M i nor i n Leadershi p Studi es. The off i ce's web site detai I s these offeri ngs. I n additi on, the staff 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Page ay 



offers a wi de range of trai ni ng experi ences i n i interpersonal and organi zati onal devel opment rangi ng 
from half -day semi nars and weekend workshops such as the M aryl and Leadershi p Conference, to 
f ul I semester I eadershi p programs, Terrapi n Leadershi p I nstitute and Turti e Camp. 

Off-Campus Student I nvdvement. (OCSI ) provi des servi ces to support and enhance the 
educati onal experi ence of A L L students who I i ve off-campus. Thi s i s achi eved through soci al , 
educati onal , i nf ormati onal , and devel opmental programs to hel p students be connected to campus, 
di scover i nvol vement and I eadershi p opportuni ti es, and I earn more about campus I i f e. 

Pro^amsandLeisureLearningOpportunitiesL Staff mentors student volunteers and leaders to 
provi de opti ons for out of cl ass engagement through recreati onal opti ons that i ncl udes: the H off 
Theater, the Art and Learni ng Center (offeri ng non-credit courses), the Stamp Gal lery (featuri ng 
regul ar di spl ays of the vi sual arts) , the TerpZone ( bowl i ng, bi 1 1 i ards, and more) , as wel I as Stamp 
Sped al Events and Programs. A compl ete I i sti ng of weekday and weekend events i s featured i n the 
weekl y cal endar of the Diamondback. 

Multicultural I nvol vement and Community Advocacy 

1120 Stamp Student U ni on 

301-314-8600 

mi ca-contact@umd.edu 

A 1 1 of the acti vi ti es, programs, servi ces and research of the Off i ce of M ul ti cul tural I nvol vement and 
Community Advocacy strive towards meeti ng the common outcome of devel opi ng "good citizens" 
towards thei r graduation, with a particular focus on bei ng cultural I y competent, effective i n diverse 
group envi ronments, and engaged i n a strong ethni c of servi ce to and I eadershi p towards a soci al I y 
j ust mul ti cul tural communi ty . We organi ze our work around aff i rrri ng i denti ti es and nurturi ng thei r 
development (i .e, advocacy for students who are Asian Pacific American, Black, Lati na/o, 
Indigenous/Native American, Multiracial, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Transgender); building 
inclusive communi ties based on our individual and organizational diversity; and creating positive 
soci al change through I eadershi p i n our communi ti es and campus- wi de. 

Off-Campus Housing Services 

1110 Stamp Student Union 

301-314-3645 

www.och.umd.edu 

Off-Campus H ousi ng Servi ces mai ntai ns up-to-date computeri zed I i sti ngs of vari ous rental housi ng 
opti ons (both vacant and to share) . A rea maps, apartment di rectori es, transportati on i nf ormati on and 
resources about I i vi ng off campus are avai I abl e i n the off i ce and on- 1 i ne. 

Adele H. Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life 

3100 Stamp Student U ni on 

301-314-DESK 

www.union.umd.edu 

The Adele H . Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life is the university's "community 
center." More than 25, 000 students, faculty, staff members, and campus guests visit the Stamp daily 



3. Carrpus Adrn ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Pageac 



to take advantage of its servi ces, programs, and f aci lities. Our mi ssi on i s to create and sustai n a 
student-centered envi ronment that promotes academic success and personal development; serves as 
a safe and inviting campus center; and i s characteri zed by a strong comrni tment to mul ti cul tural i sm, 
excel I ence, and a posi ti ve work envi ronment. 

The Stamp offers lounge space, a variety of i information services, recreation and leisure activities, 
student-sponsored programs, visual arts, retail outlets, and more than 40,000 square feet of 
reservable space. 

I nformation Services 

• I nformation Center located on the first floor, 301-314-DESK 

• B ul I eti n boards I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

• Di spl ay showcases I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

Recreation and Lei sire 

• Hoff MovieTheatre, 301-314-HOFF 

• Terp Zone, i ncl udi ng f ul I -servi ce bowl i ng I anes, " L unar Bowl i ng, " bi 1 1 i ard tabl es, vi deo 
games, and three big-screen TVs, 301-314-BOWL 

Student-Sponsored Programs 

• Student Entertai nment Events (SEE), a student-di rected program board whose committees 
plan games, tournaments, concerts, lectures, outdoor recreation trips, 301-314-8359 

• Student Tutorial Academic Referral Center (STAR Center), offering tutor listings and test 
files, 301-314-8359 

• Graduate Student Government 

Art and Learning Center, 301-3L4ARTS 

• A rt and Learni ng Center, a vi sual arts work and teachi ng center, offeri ng rri ni -courses and arts 
services 

• Union Art Gallery, I ocated on the first floor 

Food and Retail Outiets 

• Chevy Chase Bank, 301-864-8722 

• University Book Center (basement level), 301-314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Maryland Food Co-op (301-314-8089), Saladworks (301-314-0947), Taco 
Bell (301-314-6569), McDonald's (301-314-1489), Adders Restaurant (301-314-8022), 
Coffee Bar (301-314-CAFE), Panda Express (301-314-6111), Sbarros (301-314-4105), Steak 
Escape (301-314-9665), Sushi by Pandy (301-314-6111), Chick-Fil-A (301-314-6568), 
Subway (301-266-7827) 

• M ai I boxes Etc., a f ul I -servi ce postal and packagi ng f aci I ity, 301-314-9982 

• Ti cket Off i ce, offeri ng campus performance ti ckets, and a f ul I Ti cket M aster Outi et, 
301-314-TKTS 

• Union Shop 301-314-7467, featuring snacks, sodas, newspapers, and magazines 

Reservable Space 

The Stamp offers meeti ng rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 1, 000 peopl e For reservati ons, 
or catering information, contact the Stamp Reservation Office 301-314-8488. 

Adele H . Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus L ife Hours 

The Stamp is open Monday through Thursday, 7 am to midnight; Friday, 7 am. to 1:30 am; 



3. Carpus Adrri ni strati on, Resources, and Student Services Page 91 



Saturday, 8 am to 1:30 am, and Sunday, 11 am. to midnight. 

See other A dele H. Stamp Student Union- Center for Campus Life Hours offices and services 
el sewhere i n Chapter 3 



Communi ty Servi ce- L earni ng Offi ce 

Campus Programs 

M ul ti cul tural I nvol vement and Communi ty A dvocacy 

Off-Campus Housing Services 

Religious Programs 



4. RegstraDon, AcacfericRectJrerrerts enilRegJaDms 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 

Decree I nformation 

Degree Requi rements 

T he requi rerrents for graduati on vary accord ng to the character of work i n the di ff erent col I eges, school s, clepartments and acaderri c uni ts. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I i ty of 
the colleges, schools, departrrents and other acaderri c units to establish and publish clearly def ined degree requirements. Responsi bi I ity for knowing and meeting all 
degree requi rements for graduati on i n any curri cul um rests wi th the student. Sped f i c degree requi rements are I i sted i n thi s catal og under the col I ege and/or 
department as appropri ate. 

E ach student shoul d check wi th the proper acaderri c authori ti es no I ater than the cl ose of the j uni or year to ascertain his or her starding with respect to advancement 
toward a degree. For this purpose, each student should be sure to review their semester grades and unofficial transcript on the MyUM website ( www.mv.urrd.edu ) at 
the cl ose of each semester or request a semester grade report. 

L Residency requirement- Final 30-Hour Rule 

a. All candidates for University of Maryland, CollegePark, degrees should plan to take their final 30 credits in residence si nee the 
advanced work of thei r maj or study normal I y occurs i n the I ast year of the undergraduate program I ncl uded i n these 30 semester hours 
will be a minimum of 15 semester hours in courses numbered 300 or above, including at I east 12 semester hours requi red in the maj or 
fi el d ( i n curri cul a requi ri ng such concentrati ons) . 

b. A student who at the time of graduati on will have completed 30 credit hours in residence at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, 
may, under unusual ci rcumstances, be perm tted to take a maxi mum of 8 of the fi nal 30 credi ts of record, corrpri si ng no more than two 
courses, at another i nsti tuti on. A student who has compl eted 75 credi t hours i n resi dence at the U ni versi ty, may, under unusual 

ci rcumstances, be perm tted to take a maxi mum of 16 of the fi nal 30 credi ts of record, compri si ng no more than 4 courses, at another 

i nsti tuti on. I n such cases, wri tten perm ssi on must be obtai ned i n advance from the dean and chai r/di rector of the acaderri c uni t from 

whi ch the student expects to graduate A ny course taken at another i nsti tuti on and i ntended to sati sfy a sped f i c maj or requi rement at thfel ni versi ty 

University Maryland must be approved as an equivalent course by the chai r/di rector and the dean. Normally, no morethan two courses 

required by the maj or, including maj or and supporting courses, will be approved. Exceptions beyond the articulated maxi mum credits 

and/or courses will bemadeonly under highly unusual circumstances; requests for an exception must be made through the Dean's office to 

the Off i ce of the Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs. 

c. For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional programs, the final 30hoursof the90-hourprogramattheUniversity of 
Maryland, CollegePark, must betaken in residence. 

Z Credit Requirements 

While several undergraduate curri cul a require morethan 120 credits, no baccalaureate curriculum requi res fewer than 120. No baccalaureate will beawardedin 
instances in which fewer than 120 credit hours have been earned. It is the responsibility of each student to farri I iarize himself or herself with the requi rements of 
sped f i c curri cul a. The student i s urged to seek advi ce on these matters from the departments, col I eges, or the Off i ce of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es. 
To earn a baccalaureate from theJniversity of Maryland, CollegePark, a minimum of 30 credits must be taken in resi dence. 

3. Enrollment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, may transfer among curri cul a, colleges, or other academic units except where 
I irritations on enrollments have been approved. Bythe time they complete 60 credits, students are expected to declare a degree-granting maj or. Students must be 
enrol I ed i n the maj or program from whi ch they pi an to graduate, when regi steri ng for the f i nal 15 hours of the baccal aureate program Thi s requi rement al so appl i es 
to the thi rd year of the combi ned, pre-prof essi onal degree programs. A I so see i nformati on on doubl e maj ors and doubl e degrees el sewhere i n thi s chapter. 

4. Grade Point Average 

A rrini mum cumulative 2.0 grade point average is requi red for graduati on in all curricula. 

5. Completion of I nterrupted Degree 

Students whose regi strati on at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, has lapsed for more than 10 years shall be requi red to complete a rrini mum of 15 credit 
hours at Col I ege Park after thei r return to campus i n order to earn a baccal aureate degree. 

Recorrmendati ons about courses needed to sati sfy the remaining degree requi rements will be made at the department level, with approval of the Dean's Office 
requi red. The reason for requi ri ng these credits i s that many f i el Ss change suffi ci enti y i n 10 years to requi re that students take current courses i f they are to be 
awarded a current degree. Excepti ons to the requi rement for a rri ni rrum of 15 credi ts earned at Cd I ege Park upon return to the campus can be recorrmended by the 
Deans for approval in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affai rs. 

Academic SuceessrDecj-eaCcmplebon Policy, Student 

U ni versi ty of M aryl and pol i cy sti pul ates that f ul I -ti me degree seeki ng students are expected to compl ete thei r undergraduate degree program i n f our years. To meet 
thi s expectati on, students must pi an careful I y i n consul tati on wi th an acaderri c advi sor; compl ete 30 credi ts each year ( whi ch i s usual I y accompl i shed through a 
course I oad ofl4tol6creditsper semester) ; sati sfy general educati on, prerequi si te and other course requi rements wi th acceptabl e grades i n a ti mel y manner; and 
meet the benchmarks. A caderri c uni ts provi de the benchmarks and sampl e tempi ates of rrul ti -semester pi ans I eadi ng to four-year graduati on. Students are requi red 
to map out i ndi vi dual i zed four-year pi ans, consi stent wi th these gui del i nes and benchmarks, and are responsi bl e for updati ng them as ci rcumstances change. 
Students who do not meet benchmarks are requi red to sel ect a more sui tabl e maj or. Students who change maj ors must subrri t a real i sti c graduati on pi an to the 
acaderri c uni t of the new maj or for approval . A ny student who compl etes ten semesters or 130 credi ts wi thout compl eti ng a degree i s subj ect to mandatory advi si ng 
pri or to regi strati on for any subsequent semester. Students wi th excepti onal ci rcumstances or those who are enrol I ed i n sped al programs are requi red to devel op a 
modi f i ed graduati on pi an that i s appropri ate to thei r si tuati ons. I n al I cases, students are responsi bl e for meeti ng progress expectati ons and benchmarks requi red for 
thei r degree programs. 

Every student shoul d contact hi s or her col I ege or department advi sor to obtai n the re! evant materi al s for devel opi ng a four-year graduati on pi an and requi red 
benchmarks. 

For information about this policy visit: www.ugst.urrd.edu/acaderricsuccess.htrri andwww.ugst.urrd.edu/faqs-successpolicy.htrri 

Minors 

Minors afford students the opportunity to pursue a limited but structured concentration in a coherent field of study outside their major. The rri nor may bea 
truncated versi on of a maj or or a distinctive intellectual subset of a discipline. Minors are not offered in every field of study. Students should inquire with 
departrrents for current avail ability of minors or see individual listings on this site. 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJaDcns 



The structures of minors vary in debai I, but, with rare exceptions, they all requi re no fewer than 15 and no more than 24 credits with at I east 9 credits in upper division 
courses (300 level or above). No morethan six credits (ortwo courses) may be applied to satisfy both the requi rerrents of ami nor and a maj or program Nocourse 
may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor. All courses taken for ami nor must be completed with a mini mum grade of C. 

To ensure appropriate academic advising, students who wish to pursue ami nor should inform both the cd lege responsible for their maj or and the unit offering the 
minor as early as possible, but in no case later than one full academic year before the expected date of graduation. When a student has completed all requi rerrents for 
the minor, the unit offering the minor shall notify thestudents college, which verifies that the student has met all requi rerrents and officially notifies the Registrar's 
Off i ce. The compl eti on of a rri nor i s posted on the students off i ci al transcri pt onl y when the student compl etes al I requi rerrents for the bachel or's degree. 

I n F ebruary 2004, the U ni versi ty Senate voted to phase out acaderri c ci tati ons and repl ace them wi th rri nors. Students pursui ng an acaderri c ci tati on shoul d contact 
the respecti ve department or program for i nf ormati on on thi s conversi on process. 

Seoond Maj or sand Second Decrees 

Second majors 

A student who wi shes to compl ete a second maj or concurrenti y wi th hi s or her pri mary maj or of record must obtai n wri tten perm ssi on i n advance from the 
appropri ate departments or programs and cd I eges. A s earl y as possi bl e, but i n no case I ater than one f ul I acaderri c year before the expected date of graduati on, the 
student must f i I e wi th the department or programs i nvol ved and wi th the appropri ate deans, formal programs showi ng the courses to be offered to meet requi rerrents 
in each of the majors and supporting areas as well as those of the col lege and general education programs. A student who wishes to add a Limited Enrollment 
Program as a second major must do so at the earliest possible opportunity to assure that specific credit and GPA requirements can be met. I n order to obtain 
approval , students must compl ete al I of the requi rerrents sped f i ed for both the pri mary and secondary maj or. C ourses taken for one maj or may be counted as 
appropri ate as part of the degree requi rerrents for the general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the cloud e maj or prograrn the student must 
desi gnate whi ch cd I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi f i cati on of general educati on requi rerrents. F i nal approval of a doud e maj or 
program must be obtai red from each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second Degrees Taken Simultaneously 

A student who wi shes to recei ve two bachel or's degrees si mul taneousl y must sati sf actori I y compl ete the regul ari y prescri bed requi rerrents of both degree programs 
and a minimum of 150 credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to onedegree must be in course work not 
applied to the requi rerrents of the other degree program As early as possible, but in no case I ater than one full academic year before the expected date of graduation, 
thestudmtmustfilewiththedepartn^ntorprogramsinvolved, as well as with the appropri ate deans, formal programs snowing the courses to be offered to meet the 
maj or, support ng area, col I ege, and general educati on programs. I f two cd I eges are i nvol ved i n the doud e degree prograrn the student must desi gnate which 
col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi fi cati on of general educati on requi rerrents. F i nal approval of a doud e degree program must be 
obtai red from each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second Degrees Taken Sequentially 

A student who has compl eted the requi rerrents for, and has recei ved one baccal aureate and who wi shes to earn a second degree from the uni versi ty must 
sati sf actori I y compl ete al I of the prescri bed requi rerrents for the second degree and enough addi ti onal credi ts so that the total , i ncl udi ng al I appl i cabl e credi ts earned 
at the university or elsewhere, is at least 150 credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to onedegree must 
be i n course work not appl i ed to the requi rerrents of the other degree program I n no case wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not 
completed a minimum of 30 credits in residence at the university. 

Post-Baccalaureate Second Degree 

A student who has compl eted a bachel or's degree at another accredi ted or recogni zed cd I ege or uni versi ty and wi shes to earn a second degree, must sati sfy al I 
current degree requi rerrents, including General Education requirements. A course by course evaluation of the students pri or collegiate work will be undertaken to 
deterrri ne whi ch requi rerrents have been sati sf i ed by pri or coursework. I n no case, wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not compl eted a 
rri ni mum of 30 credi ts i n resi dence at the uni versi ty. 

Combined Bachelor' s/M aster's Programs 

I n a combi ned bachel or's/master's prograrn some graduate I evel courses i ni ti al I y taken for undergraduate credi t may al so be appl i ed towards the graduate credi t 
requi rerrents for a rrsster's degree program at the University of Maryland. A bachel or's/master's program may be developed for an individual student, oritmaybea 
structured program 

Individual Student Bachelor's/Master's Program A program may be developed by an individual student in consul tati on with his/her academic advisor. Such a 
program is avail able only to students whose academic performance is exceptional. It is to be developed according to the individual career interests and goals of the 
student and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng experi ence rather than mere! y the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate and undergraduate credi ts. The program 
requi res the approval of the di rectors of both the undergraduate and the graduate programs i nvol ved and of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es and the 
Dean of tifia-aduate School . N ormal I y, no more than ni ne credi ts of graduate courses appl i ed to the bachel or's degree may be counted al so for graduate credi t i n an 
individual student program Courses to be double-counted must be at the 600 1 evel or aboveand must be passed with at least a 'B' grade Individual study courses, 
i ntemshi ps, or courses gi ven credi t by exam nati on are not el i gi bl e. The credi ts to be doubl e-counted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appl i cabl e to the graduate program after 
the student recei ves the bachel or's degree and math cul ates i n the G raduate Schod . T hi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed i f the student wi thdraws from the graduate 
program before compl eti ng the master's degree. 

Structured Bachelor' s/Master' s Program: A structured bachel or's/ master's program i s an arti cul ated curri cul um combi ni ng an exi sti ng undergraduate program 
and an exi sti ng master's program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, offered by the same or by di f f erent departments. Such a program i s to be desi gned for students 
whose acaderri c performance i s excepti onal and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng experi ence rather than rrerel y the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate and 
undergraduate credits. A proposal forsuchaprogramshouldbesubrrittedbythecoilege(s) housing the academe programs concerned and requi res the approval of 
the Graduate Counci I , the Graduate Dean, the Senate PCC Committee, and the Provost. 

N ecessary features of a structured bachel or's/master's program i ncl ude the fol I owi ng: 

a. There must be specific requi rerrents for admission to the combi ned program that speak to the excepti onal performanceof the students to be admitted. 
Atarrinimurn students accepted for the program must be clearly adrri ssi de to the graduate program porti on. 

b. The program shoul d be desi gned so as not to undul y del ay the student's recei pt of thei r bachel or's degrees. Taki ng graduate credi ts shoul d not undul y 
I i rri t the breadth of the students experi ence through premature sped al i zati on. 

c. A 1 1 requi rerrents of the bachel or's program and of the master's program must be compl eted to recei ve the two degrees. W here appropri ate, graduate 
courses taken whi I e an undergraduate may substi tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate maj or program 

d. The student may be offered deferred adrri ssi on to the graduate schod at the end of thej uni or year prograrn subj ect to compl eti on of the seni or year 
program in a timely fashion and with a specified I evel of achievement. Formal adrri ssi on to the graduate school will requi re compl eti on of all 

requi rerrents for the bachel or's degree. 



4. Reg strrt on, Academe ReqJremerts, andRegJaticns 



e The credi ts tD be doubl e-counted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appl i cabl e tD the graduate program after the student recei ves the bachel or's degree and 
matri cul ates i n theG raduate School . T hi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed i f the student wi thdraws from the graduate program before compl eti ng the 
master's degree 

A structured bachelor's/master's program may normally include up to nine credits of graduate level courses (600 level and above) that are counted both for the 
bachel or's program and the master's program M ore than ni ne doubl e-counted credi ts may be al I owed i f both of the f ol I owi ng condi ti ons are sati sf i ed. 

a. T he addi ti onal graduate credi ts appl i ed to the undergraduate program do not undul y I i rri t the breadth of the students experi ence through premature 
sped al i zati on. T hi s condi ti on may be sati sf i ed, for exarrpl e, i f the graduate credi ts substi tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate program that 
woul d have been taken i n any case, but at a I ess advanced I evel . 

b. The master's program requires substantially morethan thirty credits. This condition will bedeerrBd to be satisfied if the combined program, with 
doubl e-counti ng, still requi res 150 or more credit hours to compl ete 

Academic Advising 

Academic advising is an integral part of each student's educational experi ence and it takes many forms. Academic advising is a shared responsibility between the 
student and the advisor. For more i nformation visit www.advi si nq.urrd.edu . Together with a student, an academic advisor can: 

Monitor students! progress in their major. 

Provide information on academe requirements needed for graduation: 

• Discuss how a course of study fits a particular academic or career interest. 

• A nswer questi ons concemi ng a sped f i c academi c concern, such as probl ems wi th a parti cul ar cl ass. 

• Assist students in developing an academic and career plan. 

• I nform students about possible scholarships or fel I owships and how to apply for them 

• G ui de students through the regi strati on process, i ncl udi ng provi di ng i nf ormati on on vari ous regi strati on bl ocks and what needs to be done to remove them 

Help students plan for future graduate study or career: 

• D i scuss how an academi c maj or can prepare a student for hi s/her career, and what career opti ons are avai I abl e. 

• Refer students to the Career Center whi ch provi des career counsel i ng as wel I as workshops on vari ous careers, on wri ti ng resumes, prepari ng for j ob 
interviews, etc. 

• I nform students about graduate school requi rements and appl i cati on procedures. 

• I nform students about i ntemshi p opportuni ti es and how they can possi bl y recei ve credi t for them 

• Provi de i nf ormati on on study abroad programs that rri ght enri ch a student's acaderri c experi ence as wel I as enhance thei r resume. 

Serve asa campus resource: 

• Refer students to various academic support units that provide tutoring or workshops on study ski lis, time management, stress management, etc. 

• Recommend that students seek counsel i ng for stress, addi cti ons, trauma that may be aff ecti ng thei r acaderri c work. 

• I nform students with physical and I earning disabilities of the support avai I able to them 

• E ncourage students to get i nvd ved on campus vi a sod al , pd i ti cal , acaderri c, ethni c/cul tural , sport and/or recreati onal student organi zati ons and acti vi ti es. 

Some advisors can provide information on all of theabove. Others specialize in a particular topic or area of concern. For example, a college/department may have a 
specific career advisor or study abroad coordinator. Furthermore, some advisors work with specific populations, i.e. returning students, athletes, students with 
physi cal or I eami ng di sabi I i ti es, students of col or, etc. 

W hen requesti ng to meet wi th an advi sor, sped fy what topi cs you wi sh to di scuss to ensure that you are di rected to the appropri ate i ndi vi dual . 



Registering for Classes 

Office of the Registrar 
Mitchell Building 301-314-8240 
www.testudo.urrd.edu 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, it is necessary to process an official registration. Specific registration dates and instructions are printed 
i n the Regi strati on Guide and on the MyUM website, www.rry.urrd.edu. The Registration Guide is issued for thespring and fall. The Schedule of Classes is issued 
for the summer sessions. Winter Term information is printed in the Fall Registration Guide, and on the MyUM website. 

Newly admitted students are invited, and strongly encouraged to attend an orientation session (see chapter 3 for Orientation information). Advising and course 
registration are part of the orientation process. All newly admitted students must meet with an advisor prior to registration. Additionally, newly admitted freshmen 
and transfer students are requi red to provi de proof of i rrmuni zati on for measl es, rube! I a, mumps and tetanus/di phtheri a. A ddi ti onal I y, M aryl and I aw requi res resi dent 
hal I students to ei ther provi de proof of vacci nati on agai nst meni ngococcal di sease or seek an exempti on from thi s requi rement 

Registration Process: C urrenti y enrol I ed students are i nvi ted to earl y regi strati on by appoi ntment. Regi strati on appoi ntments for the f al I semester begi n i n A pri I , 
and appointments for the spri ng semester begin in late October. Regi strati on can be processed on the MyUM (my.umd.edu) web site or in person. Open registration 
follows early registration, and continues up to the first day of classes. D uri ng thi s tirne students may make schedule adjustrrents or process an original registration. 
The schedule adjustment period begins on the first day of classes. All regi strati on transactions, either on-line or in person, arefinal unless a student processes a 
cancel I ati on of regi strati on. 

Schedule Adj ustment and Drop Period 

Schedule Adjustment: The schedule adjustment period is the first 10 days of classes forthefall and spri ng semesters, the first 5 days of classes for Summer 
Sessi ons I and 1 1 , and the f i rst 3 days of cl asses for Wi nter Term and 3-week accel erated Summer courses. Courses may be added, when space i s avai I abl e, duri ng 
the schedule adj ustment period, and will appear on the students permanent record along with other courses previously listed. Courses dropped during this period will 
not appear on the students permanent record. 

Departments may identify courses or sections of courses (with theapproval of theOfficeof the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs), whi charter the first 
f i ve days of the schedul e adj ustment peri od i n Spri ng and F al I semesters, shal I requi re f acul ty or departmental approval for students to add. 

• D uri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od f ul I -ti me undergraduates may drop or add courses, or change seed ons or credi 1 1 evel wi thout f i nanci al penal ty 
provided they remain full -time students (registered for 12 or more credits). Consult the Registration Guide for information and penalties associated with 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJaDcns 



changi ng from f ul I -ti rre to part-ti me. 

• Part-ti rre undergraduates (fewer than 12 credi ts) may al so add, drop and change secti ons, as wel I as change credi 1 1 evel , but they shoul d consul t the deadl i ne 
seed on i n the Regi strati on G ui de to avoi d i ncurri ng add ti onal charges. 

• Grading Method (including pass-fail) may be changed only during the schedule adjustment period. 

• Inthecaseof students who areadvised in the Division of Letters and Sciences when Dean's approval is required, the Dean for Office of Undergraduate 
Studi es shal I assume the responsi bi I i ti es normal I y del egated to the Dean. 

After Schedule Adjustment 

• Courses may not be added without special permission of the department and the dean of the academe unit in which the student is enrol led. 

• All courses for which the student is enrol led shal I remain as a part of the students permanent record. The students status shal I be considered full -time if the 
number of credit hours enrol led at this time is 12 or more. 

• An official class list for each course being offered is issued to the appropriate department by the Office of the Registrar. Electronic rosters are provided to all 
f acul ty wi th emai I accounts. Students are not perm tted to attend a cl ass i f thei r names do not appear on the cl ass I i st. I nstructors must report di screpanci es to 
the Offi ce of the Regi strar. 

Drop Period 

The drop period for undergraduate students will begin at the close of the schedule adjustment period and terrrinate at the end of the tenth week of classes for the fall 
and spri ng semesters, and at a comparableti me for summer sessions and Winter Term Consult the Registration Guideor Summer Schedule of Classes for dates. 

D uri ng thi s peri od a student may drop a maxi mum of four credi ts. H owever, i f the course carri es more than four credi ts, the student may drop the end re course, or i n 
the case of a vari abl e credi t course, reduce the credi 1 1 evel by up to four credi ts. D rops duri ng thi s peri od wi 1 1 be recorded on the students permanent record wi th a 
notation of W and will be considered to represent a single enrollment (one of two possible) in the course. This mark will not be used in the computation of a 
students cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

Credit Hours and Maximum Semester Credits 

N o baccal aureate curri cul um requi res fewer than 120 semester hours. T he semester hour, whi ch i s the uni t of credi t, i s the equi val ent of a subj ect pursued one peri od 
a week for one semester. Two or three hours of laboratory or field work are equi val ent to one lecture or recitation period. 

I n order for undergraduate students to compl ete most curri cul a i n four acaderri c years, thei r semester I cad rrust range from 12 to 19 hours ( 30 to 36 hours each year) 
toward the degree. Bypolicy, undergraduates may not exceed the fd I owi ng maximum credit loads without the prior approval of theirDean: 20 credits in a 15 week 
semester; 8 credits in a 6 week summer terra or 4 credits in an accelerated 3 week term 

Cancellation of Regjstration 

Students who regi ster and I ater deci de not to attend the U ni versi ty must cancel thei r regi strati on wi th the Offi ce of the Regi strar pri or to the off i ci al f i rst day of 
classes. Fail ure to cancel regi strati on will result in a financial obligation to theUniversity of Maryland even though a student does not attend class. TheUniversity 
reserves the ri ght to cancel regi strati on for students who f ai I to meet thei r f i nanci al obligati ons. 

Concurrent Unda-cj-aduateGraduateRegstration 

An undergraduate degree seeking student at the University of Maryland may, with the approval of his or her Dean, of the department and the instructor offering the 
course, and of the Graduate School, regi ster for graduate courses (600 1 evel and above) that will be recorded asfer graduate creditoiiy and that may beapplied 
towards an advanced degree at this university or elsewhere Students eligible for this option normally will have achieved J uni or standing, will haveaGPA of at least 
3.0, and will have successfully completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of 'B' or better. The student must submit a plan of study that shows that taking 
graduate courses will not undul y del ay compl eti on of requi rements for the bachel or's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate credi ts attempted i n any 
semester may not be more than ei ghteen. T he graduate credi ts so earned will not count towards any of the requi rements for trie B accal aureate degree. A maxi mum of 
twel ve credi ts may be taken for graduate credi t by a student whi I e enrd I ed as an undergraduate. 

UndercraduateCrecftfor Graduate La/d Courses 

Subj ect to requi rements deterrri ned by the graduate faculty of the department or program offeri ng the course, undergraduate degree-seeki ng students may regi ster 
for graduate-level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 to 898, with the except] on of 799, for undergraduate creditThestudent must obtainthe prior approval of 
the department and i nstructor offeri ng the course. 

Students eligible for this option normally will have achieved J uni or standing, will haveaGPA of at least 3.0, and will have successfully completed the prerequisite 
courses wi th a grade of 'B ' or better. 

E nrol I ment i n a graduate-l evel course does not i n any way i mply subsequent departmental or graduate school approval for adrri ssi on i nto a graduate program, nor 
may the course be used as credi t for a graduate degree at theJ ni versi ty of M aryl and. 

Withdrawal and Leave of Absence 

Students adrri tted to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and are expected to make regul ar and consi stent progress towards the compl eti on of thei r degree. H owever, the 
University understands that in exceptional circumstances a student may find it necessary to completely withdraw from all classes. The University considers such an 
i nterrupti on to be very seri ous as i t del ays normal progress towards the degree. Students shoul d not wi thdraw for f ri vol ous reasons or to avoi d the consequences of 
i gnori ng thei r acaderri c responsi bi I ities. Any student considering withdrawal i s strongl y encouraged to meet with his or her acaderri ccd lege advisor before leaving 
theUniversity. 

Potential Implications Withdrawing or taking a leave of absence from theUniversity may have seri ousirrplicati ons for international students, students receiving 
f i nanci al ai d or students resi di ng i n on-campus housi ng. Students are advi sed to contact the appropri ate offi ces before f i nal i zi ng wi thdrawal or I eave of absence 
plans 

Student Financial Services Office 1135 LeeBuilding, 301-314-9000 

Department of Resident Life 2100AnnapdisHall, 301-314-2100 

I ntemati onal Educati on Servi ces: 3117 M i tchel I B ui I di ng, 301-314-7740 

Withdrawal : A wi thdrawal i s avai I abl e anyti me between the f i rst and I ast day of cl asses. Students must subrri t wri tten noti ce of wi thdrawal to the Offi ce of the 
Regi strar no I ater than the last day of classes. A students return to the University is contingent upon theconditions outlined \rReturn to the University beicm. 

Leaveof Absence: A leaveof absence is a type of withdrawal and i s avai I abl e for students wishing to take ti me away from the University with the intention of 
returning thefdlcwingsernester.Theleaveofabsencestatusisespecially helpful for recipients of federal financial aid because they are not considered to be 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJarjcns 



wi thdrawn provi ded they do return and corrpl ete the f d I owi ng semester. Students may appl y for a I eave of absence onl y duri ng the I ast 60 days of the semester. A 
students return to the U ni versi ty i s conti ngent upon the condi ti ons outi i ned i nReturn to the University bdiON. 

Return to the University: Normally, a student may withdraw or take a I eave of absence from the University only onceduring matriculation as an undergraduate. 
Students who find it necessary to leave the University are required to petition the Faculty Review Board in order to return. Students who have earned a minimum 2.0 
cumul ati ve G PA , wi th no previ ous wi thdrawal or I eave of absence, are exempt from thi s requi rement. Students who wi thdraw or take a I eave of absence whi I e on 
acaderri c probati on, or those retumi ng from di srri ssal , are al ways requi red to peti ti on the Facul ty Revi ew B card. Students are al so requi red to corrpl ete a 
Reinstatement A dvi si ng Meeting with their academic col I egeadvi si ng office before the petition will beconsidered by the Faculty Review Board. 

Additional Withdrawal/Leave of Absence I nfer maticn:The eff ecti ve date of wi thdrawal or I eave of absence for the purposes of refunds i s the date that the noti ce 
is received by the Off ice of the Registrar. Notation of withdrawal/leaveof absenceandtheeffectivedatewill be posted to the students academic record. Instructors 
and col lege offices will be notified of all withdrawn students.Thedeadlinedateforsubrrittingthewithdrawal for each semester is the I ast day of classes. Students 
should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for reenrdlment information. 

The repeat pd icy will not apply to courses taken during the academic semester from which thestudent is officially withdrawn. 

Military Call-ups It is the intent of the University of Maryland, CdlegePark, to facilitate the withdrawal or change in registration and the reenrdlment of students 
who are called to active military duty duri ng the semester. The student (or a representative) should take a copy of the military orders to the Office of the Registrar 
and process a wi thdrawal or change i n regi strati on papers. Detai I ed i nformati on about thi s process may be obtai ned from the Off i ce of the Regi strar. 
W i thdrawal f or acti ve mi I i tary servi ce wi 1 1 have no effect on any subsequent request to wi thdraw from the U ni versi ty . 

CoursesTaken at Other I nstitutions 

Courses taken at another i nsti tuti on may not be credi ted toward a degree program wi thout pri or approval of the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects to 
eamadegree. Eligible students may enrd I in courses at other Universities via the University System of Maryland's Inter Institutional Registration Program or the 
Consortiumof Universities of the Washington Metropditan Area. 

Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area: 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropditan Area consists of American University, TheCathdic University of America, Corcoran Col I ege of 
Art and Design, GallaudetUniversity, Georgetown University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, Howard University, Marymount 
University, Joint Military IntelligenceCdlege, National Defense Intelligence Col I ege, Southeastern University, Trinity University, University of the District of 
ColumbiaandtheUniversity of Maryland College Park. Students enrol led in these i nsti tuti ons are able to attend certain classes at the other campuses and have the 
credit considered as resident credi tat their home institutions. Comparade courses offered at University of Maryland may not be taken through the Consortium The 
i ntenti on i s to al I ow students to take an occasi onal course to augment a program rather than to devel op an i ndi vi dual program Payment of tui ti on f or courses wi 1 1 be 
made to the students home campus however, sped al fees may be assessed by the host i nstitution. 

Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland students with at least junior standi ngmay participate in the Consortium program according to the 
stipul ati ons listed in the current edition of the Regi strati on Guide. E nrol I msnt i n courses i s avai I abl e onl yon a space-avail ad e basis. Vi si ting students are expected to 
meet prerequi si tes or other cri teri a set by the host i nsti tuti on and corrpl y wi th the host i nsti tuti on's regi strati on procedures and deadl i nes. 

GoldenID students are not el igide to enrol I incourses through theConsortiumwith waiver of fees. University of Maryland students may only enrol I incourses 
offered on the campus of the host i nsti tuti on. Students i nterested i n add ti onal i nformati on about the C onsorti um program shod d revi ew the current edi ti on of the 
RegistrationGuideorcontacttheConsortiumCoordinatoronthefirstfloorof theMitchell Building. 

University System of Maryland I nter-l nstitutional Registration Program 

U ndergraduate students have the opportuni ty to take courses at certai n U ni versi ty System of M aryl and I nsti tuti ons to augment thei r degree program at U ni versi ty of 
Maryland CdlegePark under the I nter-l nstitutional Registration Program Participating institutions include Bowie State University, Coppin State University, 
Frostburg State University, Salisbury State University, Towson University, University of Baltimore, University of Maryland at Baltimore, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore County, University of Maryland College Park andUniversity of Maryland Eastern Shore. University of Maryland College Park students may not enroll in 
courses at the University of Maryland University Cd lege through this program Currently registered, degree seeki rig 1 ni versi ty of Maryland students with at least 
sophomore standi ngmay enrol I i n courses and have that credit considered as resident credi tat thei rhome institution. Enrollment in courses is avai lade onl yon a 
space avai I able basis and vi si ti ng students are expected to meet prerequi si tes or other cri teri a set by the host institution. Payment of tuition for courses will be made 
to the student's home campus however special fees may be assessed by the host institution. Students interested in additional information about the I nter-l nstitutional 
Registration programshould review the current edition of the Registration Guideor contact theConsortiumCoordi nator on thefirst floor of theMitchell Building. 

Student I D Numbers 

University of Maryland assigns all students a unique nine-digit identification number called the U ID Number. This number is used as a student identifier for most 
uni versi ty transacti ons. Students are al so requi red to provi de thei r Soci al Securi ty N umber, whi ch i s used f or a I i mi ted number of purposes that are requi red by I aw 
or business necessity. See www.president.urrd.edu/policies/docs/vi-2600A.pdf for the University of Maryland Policy on the Cd lection, Useand Protection of ID 
N umbers and a listof currently approved uses 

Useof Email for Official Communication 

T he U ni versi ty has adopted emai I as the pri mary means for send ng official communi cati ons to students. A caderri c advi sors, f acul ty, and campus adrri ni strati ve 
off i ces use emai I to convey i nportant i nformati on and ti me-sensi ti ve noti ces. All enrol I ed students are provi ded a U ni versi ty emai I address. Students are responsi bl e 
for keepi ng thei r emai I address up to date or for forward ng emai I to another address. Fai I ure to check emai I , errors i n forwardi ng emai I , and returned emai I due tomaill 
rmilbox fiior user unknown will not excuse a student from rri ssi ng announcements or deadl i nes 

Change of Address 

Students are expected to notify the Office of the Registrar of any change in their local, permanent or e-mai I address. Use the internet to keep address information 
current and accurate. C hange of address forms are avai I ad e at the f ol I owi ng pi aces: 

MyUM website www.my.urrd.edu 

Office of the Bursar, Room 1115 or 1135, LeeBuilding 

Student Servi ces C ounter, f i rst f I oor, M i tchel I B ui I di ng 

I dentification Cards 

The photo ID card is issued at thetirre the student fi rst registers for classes. This card is to be used for the entire durationof enrol I rrent. Additionally, students who 
have food service contracts will usethis photo identification card. ContactDiningServicesdirectJyforfurtherinformation. 

T he photo i denti fi cati on card can be used by students to wi thdraw books from the libraries, for adrri ssi on to most athletic, social, and cultural events, and as a 



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general form of identification on campus. 

T here i s a repl acemant charge of $20 for I ost photo i denti f i cati on cards. Questi ons concemi ng the i denti f i cati on card system shod d be addressed to the Off i ce of the 
Registrar. 

Veterans Benefits 

Students attending the university urriertheVeteransEducationAssistanceAct(TitJe38, U.S. Code) may receive assistance and enrollment certification at the 
Veterans Certification Office, intheOfficeof the Registrar, first floor.Mitchel I Building. ConsulttheRegistrationGuidefor further information. 

Classification of Students 

Official classifi cati ons of undergraduate students are based on earned credits as follows: freshman, 1-29 semester hours; sophomore, 30-59; junior, 60-89; and 
seni or, 90 to at I east 120. 

Academic Records and Regulations 

The Office of the Registrar, located on the first floor of the Mitchell Bui I ding is responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official transcripts. 

Marking System 

T he f ol I owi ng symbol s are used on the students permanent record for al I courses i n whi ch he or she i s enrol I ed after the i ni ti al regi strati on and schedul e adj ustment 
period: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C-H C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, XF, I, P, S, and W. These marks remain as part of the students permanent record and may be changed only by 
the ori gi nal i nstructor on certi f i cati on, approved by the department chai r and the dean, that an actual rri stake was made i n deterrri ni ng or recordi ng the grade. 

• A+, A, A- denotes excel lent mastery of the subject and outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester averages, a mark of A+, A, A- will 
be assi gned a val ue of 4 qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour. 

• B+, B, B- denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship. A mark of B-H B, B- is assi gned a value of 3 quality poi nts per credit hour. 

• C+, C, C- denotes acceptable mastery of the subject. A mark of C+, C, C- is assi gned a value of 2 quality poi nts per credit hour. 

• D+, D, D- denotes borderline understanding of the subject. It denotes marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory progress toward a degree. A 
markof D-H D, D- is assi gned a value of 1 quality point per credit hour. 

• F denotes f ai I ure to understand the subj ect and unsati sf actory performance. A mark of F i s assi gned a val ue of qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour. 

• X F- denotes fai I ure due to acaderri c di shonesty. 

• S i s a department opti on mark that may be used to denote sati sf actory performance by a student i n progressi ng thesi s proj ects, ori entati on courses, practi ce 
teaching, and the I ike In computation of cumulative averages a mark of Swill not be included. 

• W is used to indicate withdrawal from a course in which the student was enrolled at the end of the schedule adj ustment period. For information and 
compl eteness, the mark of W i s pi aced on the students permanent record by the Off i ce of the Regi strar. T he i nstructor wi 1 1 be noti f i ed that the student has 
withdrawn from the course This mark is not used in any computation of quality poi nts or cumulative average total sat the end of the semester. 

• Audit -A student may register to audit a course or courses which have been designated as available under the audit opti on and in which space is avail able. 
The notation All D will be pi aced on the transcript for each course audi ted. A notation to the effect that this symbol does not imply attendance or any other 
effort in the course will be included on the transcript in the explanation of the grading system 

• Pass-Fail - The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to A +, A, A-, B-H B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D-. The student must inform the Office of the 
Regi strar of the sel ecti on of thi s opti on by the end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od. 

Additional Record Natations 

I n add ti on to the above marks, there are provi si ons for other record or transcri pt notati ons that may be used based on uni versi ty poi i cy and individual ci rcumstances. 

Dupl icate axrss U sed to i ndi cate two courses wi th the same course content. The second course i s counted i n the cumul ati ve total s earned; both courses are counted 
i n the cumul ati ve attempted credi t and i n the cal cul ati on of grade poi nt average. 

Excluded Credit (Exd Crd)_; Excluded credit is noted when Academic Clemency has been granted. 

I ncompletes The mark of I is an exceptional mark that is an i nstructor option. It is given only to a student whose work i n a course has been qualitatively 

sati sf actory, when, because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unad e to compl ete some smal I porti on of the work of 

the course. I n no case wi 1 1 the mark I be recorded for a student who has not compl eted the maj or porti on of the work of the course. 

1. Thi s I ncompl ete Contract form must be subrri tted to the dean of the col I ege offeri ng the course within six weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncompl ete C ontract i sn't compl eted wi thi n the si x week peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compl eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangements for the compl eti on of the 
work. Thework must becorrpleted by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as def i ned by the contract i s not compl eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty member or the f acul ty members dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course 
requi rements. 

5. 1 1 is the responsi bi I ity of the instructor or department chair concerned to submit the grade pron^y urjoncornpletionof theconditionsof thelncompleteContract. 

6.Thel cannot be removed through re-registration for the course or through credit by examination. An I mark is not used in the computation of quality points 
or cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages. 

Non-applicable (Non-Appl): Inall cases of transfer from one col I ege to another at the University of Maryland, College Park, thedean of the receiving cdlege, 
wi th the approval of the student, shal I i ndi cate which courses, i f any, i n the student's previ ous acaderri c program are not appl i cabl e to hi s or her new program and 
shall notify the Office of the Regi strar of the adj ustments that are to be made in deterrri ning the students progress toward a degree. Deletions may occur both in 
credits attempted and correspondingly in credits earned. This evaluation shall be made upon the students initial entry into a new program not thereafter. If astudent 
transfers from one program to another, his or her record evaluation shal I be made by the dean in the same way as if he or she were transferring col leges. If the 
student subsequent! y transfers to a thi rd col I ege, the dean of the thi rd cd I ege shal I make a similar initial adj ustment; courses marked nonappl i cabl e by the second 



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dean may become appl i cabl e i n the thi rd program 
Pass-Fail Policy 

Pass-Fail Policy: The foil owing Pass-Fail policy was approved by the Board of Regents for implementation beginning with the Spring 1989 semester: 

1. To register for a course under the pass-fail option, an undergraduate must have completed 30 or more credit hours of college credit with a G PA of at least 2.0. At 
least 15 of these credit hours must have been completed at theUniversity of Maryland, College Park with a University of Maryland GPA of at least 2.0. 

2. Courses for which this option applies must beelectives in thestudents program Thecourses may not becollege, major, field of concentration, or general 
education program requi rements. 

3. Only one course per semester may be registered for under the pass-fail option. 

4. No morethan 12 semester hours of credit may betaken under the pass-fail option during a student's college career. 

5. Students may not choose thi s opti on when re-regi steri ng f or a course. 

6. When regi steri ng under the pass-fai I opti on, a course that i s passed wi 1 1 count as hours i n the students record but wi 1 1 not be computed i n the grade poi nt average. 
A course that i s f ai I ed wi 1 1 appear on the student's record and wi 1 1 be computed both i n the overal I average and the semester average. 

7. Students registering for a course under the pass-fai I opti on are requi red to complete all regular course requi rements. Their work will be evaluated by the 
instructor by the normal procedure for letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. ThegradesA+, A, A-, B-H B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D- will 
automati cal I y be converted by the Off i ce of the Regi strar to the grade P on the students permanent record. The grade F wi 1 1 remai n as given. The choi ce of gradi ng 
opti on may be changed onl y duri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od for courses i n whi ch the student i s current) y regi stered. 

Incompletes 

The mark of 'I ' is an exceptional mark that is an instructor opti on. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unad e to compl ete some smal I porti on of the work of the course. I n no 
casewill themarkl be recorded for a student who has not completed the major porti on of the work of the course 

1 . Thi s I ncompl ete Contract form must be subrri tted to the dean of the col I ege offeri ng the course wi thin six weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncompl ete C ontract i sn't compl eted wi thi n the si x week peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compl eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangements for the compl eti on of the 
work.Theworkmustbecorrpletedbythetimestipulatedinthecontract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as def i ned by the contract i s not compl eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty member or the f acul ty members dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay . 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course 
requi rements. 

5. 1 1 is the responsi bi I ity of the instructor or department chair concerned to submit the grade prornptiy upon completion of theconditions of the I ncornpleteContract. 

6. The 'I ' cannot be removed through re-registration for the course or through credit by examination. An 'I ' mark is not used in the computation of quality points or 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages. 

Grade Point Average, Computation of 

GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points accumulated in courses for which a gradeof A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, orF has 
been assi gned by the total number of credits attempted in those courses. Courses for which a mark of P, S, I, NGRorW has been assi gned are not included in 
computing theGPA. Each letter grade hasanurrerical value A+, A, A- =4; B+, B, B- =3; C+, C, C- =2; D+, D, D- =1; F =0. Multi plying this value by the 
number of credi ts for a parti cul ar course gi ves the number of qual i ty poi nts earned for that course. 

See Repeat Pd i cy to deterrri ne the effect of repeated courses i n the cal cul ati on of G PA . 
Repeat Policy 

Thefollowing Campus Repeat Policy applies to ALL courses that may not be repeated for additional credit. 

1. The following students are requi red to follow the new repeatpolicy: 

a. All new freshmen who began at University of Maryland , College Park Fall 1990 and after. 

b. Transfer students from schools other than Maryland community colleges who began at University of Maryland, College Park, Fall 1990 and after. 
T hi s i ncl udes transfer students from another U ni versi ty of M aryl and i nsti tuti on . 

2. There is a lirrit to the number of times a student may repeat a course. Students may haveone repeat of any course in which they earned an A+, A, A-, B+, B, 
B-, C+, C, C-, D-H D, D-, F, P, S, W, NGR or Audit; they cannot be regi stered (after the schedule adj ustment period) for any given course more than twice. A 
students cleans off i ce may grant an excepti on al I owi ng an addi ti onal course repeat. I n thi s case, students must present a pi an for successful I y compl eti ng the course. 
A 1 1 attempts'// be counted toward the total lirrit for repeatabl e credi ts. 

Note: Students may rot choose the Pass-Fail option when re-registering for a course or re-registsr for a course in which a grade of I has been noted. 

3. Students may repeat no more than 18 credi ts. A ddi ti onal I y, i f a student wi thdraws from all courses duri ng a semester, those courses are not i ncl uded i n thi s 
lirrit. 

4. The grade point average will i ncl ude al I attempts at a given coursethat result in a gradeof A+, A, A-, B-H B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, orF. However, to help 
freshmen and transfer students adjust to the University of Maryland, College Park, the fd I owing two excepti ons allow for the currul ati ve GPA to be calculated so 
that onl y the hi gher grade i s i ncl uded: 

a. W hen the repeated course was taken wi thi n the students first semester at University of Maryland, College Park, or 



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b. W hen the repeated course was taken wi thi n the students f i rst 24 credi t hours attempted ( i ncl udi ng transfer credi ts) or wi thi n the semester duri ng 
whi ch the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted. 

5. A ny grade earned i n pri or attempts of a repeated course will appear on the student's transcri pt, regard ess of whether the grade i s dropped from or i ncl uded i n, the 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

6. Repeat by transfer: I f a student repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or duri ng the semester i n whi ch the student reached 24 credi ts attempted 
(including transfer credits) and the transfer grade is higher, then the original grade in the course will be excluded from the G PA calculation. 

a. If the course was taken after the semester in which thestudent reached 24 credits attempted, the original grade remains in the G PA calculation. 

Repeat Policy Prior to Fall 1990c 

T he f ol I owi ng students f d I ow theprew'ous_repeat pd i cy: 

• Students who began at University of Maryland, College Park, beforetheFall 1990 semester (including students who enter University of Maryland, Cdlege 
Park for summer 1990) . 

• Transfer students who began at a M aryl and comrruni ty col I ege before Fal 1 1990. 

• UMBC College of Engineering students who began before 1990. 

T he hi ghest grade recei ved i n the repeated course i s used to cal cul ate the G PA . A student may repeat any course; however no student may be regi stered for a course 
more than three ti mes. 

If a student repeats a course in which heor she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, orS, the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned 
toward thedegree. Onlythe highest mark will be used in computation of the students cumulative average Under unusual circumstances, the students dean may 
grant an exception to thi spd icy. 

Academic Clemency Policy 

Undergraduate students returning to the University of Maryland, College Park in pursuit of their initial baccalaureate degree, after a separation of five calendar years 
may peti ti on the appropri ate dean to have a number of previ ousl y earned grades and credi ts removed from the cal cul ati on of thei r cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 
U p to 16 credits and corresponding grades from courses previously completed at theUniversity of Maryland, Cdlege Park, will be removed from cal cul ati on of the 
grade point average and will not be counted toward graduation requirements. The petition for clemency must be fi led in thefirst semester of return to the institution. 
A pproval i s nei ther automati c or guaranteed. 

Honors (Dean's L ist) 

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) will be awarded to those students who complete, within any given semester (excluding winter and summer terms), 12 or 
more credits (excluding courses with grades of P and S) with a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher. This recognition will be noted on the students academic record. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal, Under gj-aduate Policy on 

Consistentwith the University of Maryland Student Academic Success- DegreeCompletion Policy, it is the intent of the University that its students make 
sati sf actory progress toward thei r degree obj ecti ves, and achi eve academi c success. I f a student has sped al ci rcumstances that make i t i mpossi d e to compl ete a 
normal course I oad, the student must meet wi th an advi sor to di scuss the ci rcumstances, the student's pi ans for conti nued progress toward a degree, and the 
i mpl i cati ons for conti nued enrol I ment. 

Thefol I owi ng gui del i nes for retenti on of students refer separately to semester (Fal I and Spri ng) and Wi nter or Summer terms: 

a. Academic retention is based solely on grade point average (GPA). A mini mum of 120 successfully completed course credits is required for graduation in any 
degree curri cul um I ndi vi dual col I eges, school s, and departments may establ i sh hi gher requi rements for graduati on. Students must consul t the appropri ate col I ege, 
school , or department for sped f i c i nf ormati on. 

b. Satisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Students whose semester GPA fal Is below 2.0 are encouraged to 
meet wi th thei r advi sors regard ng the devel opment of a pi an that will appropri atel y respond to the students academi c difficulties and I ead to academi c i mprovement. 
Individual colleges, schools and departments may establish separate requi rements for mandatory advi sing. Students must consult the appropri ate col I ege, school, or 
department for sped fi c i nf ormati on. 

c. Unsatisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. Students will be placed on Academic Probation foil owing any 
semester in which a 2.0 cumulativeGPA is not achieved. Normally, students will be Academically Dismissed if they are unable to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 
or hi gher at the end of thei r probati onary semester. 

Academic Probation: 

Students will be placed on academic probati on if their cumulative GPA fal Is below 2.0 Normally, student is expected to attaina2.0 cumulativeGPA attheendof 
any probationary semester. Students who fail to achievea 2.0 cumulativeGPA at the end of thei r probati onary semester may be academically dismissed, depending 
on their credit level asdetailedbelcw. 

1. Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be dismissed from the University in the event their cumulative GPA remains below 2. Oat the end of their 
probati onary semester. Students who are on probati on and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in 
the subsequent semester. 

2. Students who are on academic probation and have earned fewer than 60 credits will be permitted to continue on academic probation if a mini mum semester GPA 
of 2.0 is achieved i n each semester of probation. 

a. Full -time students must complete 9 or more credits in each semester of probation. A completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which a 
student recei ves a grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, orS. 

b. Students who meet thi s requi rement wi 1 1 be perm tted to conti nue on probati on unti I the cl ose of the semester ( exel udi ng wi nter and summer terms) 
in which they attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

c. However, students who are on probati on will bedisrrissedif they have not achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the semester in which 
they comd ete 60 credits. 

d. Students who are on probati on and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal inthe 
subsequent semester. 

3. The Off i ce of the Regi strar wi 1 1 noti fy students when they are pi aced on academi c probati on. Such noti ces wi 1 1 i ncl ude a requi rement that the students consul t an 
academi c advi sor i n thei r col I eges earl y i n the probati onary semester and i n no event I ater than the begi nni ng of the early regi strati on period for the next semester. 



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T he Officeof the Registrar will noti fy the col I eges cf students who are placed on academic probation and will note the academe probationary status on the students 
academic record. 

a. T he acaderri c advi sors will assi st students i n devel opi ng appropri ate pi ans for achi evi ng sati sf actory academi c performance. 

b. Students who are pi aced on probati on wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or regi ster wi thout the approval of an academi c advi sor i n thei r 
college. 

Acaderric Dismissal: 

1. Students who have earned 60 or more credits will be di srri ssed i f their cumulative G PA remains belcw 2.0 for two consecutive semesters (excluding winter and 
summer terms). Students who attain a cumulativeG PA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal. 

2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits will be dismissed foil owing any probationary semester in which they fail to attain a mini mum 2.0 semester GPA 
and complete the requisite credits detailed under Academic Probation. Students who attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not 
be subject to dismissal. 

3. Students who have been academically dismissed and who are reinstated will be academically dismissed again if a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is not achieved 
by the end of the first semester after reinstatement. Reinstated students will not be all owed to add or drop courses, or to regi ster during any semester without the 
approval of an acaderric advi sor in thei red lege, unless a cumulative GPA of at I east 2.0 is achieved. 

4. The Office of the Registrar will noti fy the appropri ate University offices when students are academically dismissed and will note the dismissal onthestudents 
acaderric record. 

5. TheOfficeof UndergraduateAdrrissionswill notify students in writing when they are dismissed. The notices will include a statement that regi strati on for the 
next semester (exel udi ng wi nter or summer terms) wi 1 1 be cancel ed. 

6. N ormal I y, a student di srri ssed for acaderri c reasons must wai t out one semester (f al I or spri ng) before rei nstatement. Excepti ons wi 1 1 be deterrri ned by the 
Faculty Petition Board. 

Application for Academic Reinstatement 

1 . Students who have been di srri ssed may appl y to the F acul ty Peti ti on B oard for rei nstatement on the grounds of rri ti gati ng ci rcumstances, such as ( i ) 
demonstrated progress toward a degree by successful compl eti on of 24 degree-appl i cabl e credi ts i n the precedi ng year, ( i i ) conti nui ng i mprovement i n the 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average, and ( i i i ) progress i n general educati on and maj or requi remsnts. 

2. The application for reinstatement must include a written statement explaining the circumstances leading to dismissal and a proposed plan to remedy those 
circumstances. Students are encouraged to consult with their acaderri c advi sors prior to subrritti ng their appl i cations to the Faculty Petition Board. 

3. A ppl i cati ons for rei nstatement can be obtai ned from the Reanrol I ment Off i ce i n the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dm ssi ons, whi ch i s responsi bl e f or adrri ni steri ng 
the rei nstatement process in coordination with the Faculty Petition Board. 

Faculty Petition Board: 

1. The Reenrollment Office is responsible for submitting the rei nstatement applications for review and decision by the Faculty Petition Board, which is comprised of 
tenured faculty appointed by the SeniorVice President for Acaderric Affairs and Provost. The Board i s the sde arbiter of rei nstatement applications. 

2. The Faculty Petition Board has the discretion to establish theterms for reinstatement, incl udi ng the requi rements for achi evi ng acaderri c improvement and 
devel opi ng an acaderri c pi an for success. 

3. The Reanrol I ment Office will forward the Boards decision to students at their permanent addresses. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students: 

T he uni versi ty reserves the ri ght to request at any ti me the wi thdrawal of a student who cannot or does not mai ntai n the requi red standard of schol arshi p, or whose 
conti nuance i n the uni versi ty woul d be detri mental to hi s or her heal th, or the heal th of others, or whose conduct i s not sati sf actory to the authori ti es of the 
university. Additional information about the dismissal of deli nquent students may be found in the Code of Student Conduct. 

Attendance and Assessment/Exami nations 

Attendance 

1. Theuniversityexpectseachstudenttotakefull responsi bi I ity for hi sor her acaderric work and acaderric progress. The student, to progress sati sf actorily, must 
meet al I of the requi rements of each course for whi ch he or she i s regi stered. Students are expected to attend cl asses regul ari y, for consi stent attendance offers the 
most eff ecti ve opportuni ty open to al I students to gai n command of the concepts and materi al s of thei r courses of study. Except as provi ded be! ow, absences will not 
be used i n the computati on of grades, and the recordi ng of student absences will not be requi red of the f acul ty. 

2. Itisthepolicyof the uni versi ty to excuse the absences of students that result from thefol lowing causes: illnessof thestudent, or illness of a dependent as 

def i ned by B oard of Regents ppl i cy on f ami I y and medi cal I eave; rei i gi ous observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the student from bei ng present 
during the class period); participation in university activities at the request of university authori ties; and compel ling circumstance beyond the students control. 
Students cl ai rri ng excused absence must appl y i n wri ti ng and f umi sh documentary support for thei r asserti on that absence resul ted from one of these causes. 

3. In some courses, attendance and i n-cl ass parti ci pati on are ongoi ng requi rements and an i ntegral part of the work of the course I n other courses, occasi onal 
in-class assessments may occur, sometimes without advance notice It is the responsibility of thei nstructor to inform each class at the beginning of the semester of 
the nature of i n-cl ass parti ci pati on expected and the effect of absences on the eval uati on of the students work i n the course. 

4. Absences in courses where in-class participation is a significant part of the work of the course shall be handled by the instructor in the course in accordance with 
thegeneral policy of hi sor her acaderric unit. 

5. Permanent changes i n the schedul i ng or I ocati on of cl asses must be approved by the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, non-departrrental i zed 
school or col lege, as appropri ate. 

Assessment 

1. The university provides students with excused absences the opportunity to reschedule significant assessments, except in cases where the nature of the 
assessment precluded the possibility of rescheduling, OR to perform a substitute assignment without penalty. An instructor is not under obligation to offer a 
substitute assignment or to givea student a make-up assessment uni ess the failure to perform was due to an excused absence, that is, due to illness (of thestudent or 
a dependent) , rei i gi ous observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the student from bei ng present duri ng the cl ass peri od) , parti ci pati on i n uni versi ty 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJaDcns 



acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty authori ti es, or compel I i ng ci rcumstances beyond the students control . Students cl ai rri ng excused absence rrust appl y i n wri ti ng 
and f umi sh docurrentary support for thei r asserti on that absence resul ted from one of these causes. 

The makeup assessment or substitute assignment must be at a time and place mutually agreeable to the instructor and student, cover only the material for which the 
student was originally responsible, and be at a comparable level of difficulty with the original assessment. In the event that a group of students requires the same 
makeup assessment or substitute assignment, onetimsand place may be scheduled. The makeup assessment or substitute assignment must not interfere with the 
studentsregulariyscheduledclassesorin-classfinal examination. 

Students who have a concern regardi ng rel i gi ous observances shod d see thei r i nstructors at the start of the semester. A I though the uni versi ty attempts to 
accommodate the religious beliefs of all of its members, itfunctiorBwithinasecularerivironrrentandislirritedintlTeexterittowhichitcanintermptitsnormal 
operations. The president shall determine when it is appropriate for the campus community to restrict rescheduling exam nations or other significant assessments on 
the dates of rel i gi ous observance. 

At this time, exam nations or other si gnifi cant assessments may not be scheduled on RoshHoshanah, YomKippur, Good Friday, or the first two days of Passover. 

I n cases of di spute, the student may appeal to the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or col I ege of f eri ng the course wi thi n 
one week from the date of the refusal to schedul e a makeup assessment. I n those i nstances where the i nstructor i s the chai r, di rector or dean, the appeal shal I be 
made to the next hi gher adrri ni strati ve off i cer, whose deci si on shal I be f i nal . 

2. The student must notify his or her instructor of the reason for absence as soon as possible Where the reason for absence from a scheduled assessment is known 
well in advance (for example, in cases of religi ous observance or parti ci pad on in uni versi ty acti vi ties at the request of university authori ties), the student must inform 
the instructor by the end of the schedule adjustment period. Prior notification is especially important in connection with final examinations, si nee failure to 
reschedule a final exam nation before conclusion of the final examination period may result in loss of credits during the semester. Where the reason is not known 
well in advance (for example, in cases of illness or compel ling circumstances beyond thestudents control), the student must inform the instructor as soon as the 
reason develops, or as soon as possible after its development. 

3. Ordinarily, assessments are given during class hours in accordance with the regularly scheduled (or officially arranged) time and pi ace of each course. No less 
than seven cal endar days noti ce shal I be gi ven for assessments schedul ed at other ti mes and pi aces. 1 1 shal I be the i nstructors responsi bi I i ty to ensure that the change 
in schedul edoes not interfere with any students regularly scheduled classes or in-class final examinations. It is the responsibility of the student to be informed 
concemi ng the dates of announced qui zzes, tests, and exam nati ons. Performance assessments may take a vari ety of forms and need not be cl assroom- based wri tten 
examinations. 

4. A f i nal exam nati on shal I be gi ven i n every undergraduate course Excepti ons may be made wi th the wri tten approval of the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the 
department, non-departmental i zed school or cd I ege, as appropri ate H owever, a students f i nal course grade shal I be based on a combi nati on assessments that i s at 

I east the equivalent of a comprehensive final examination. Nofinal examination or equivalent may be given or due during the last week of classes. All in-class final 
examinations must be ha don the date and at the time listed in the official final examination schedule. Out-of-cl ass final exam nati on or equivalent assessments 
shall be due on the date and at a time listed in the official final examination schedule. 

5. Thechair, the director or the dean of the department, non-departmentalized school or college, as appropri ate, is responsi We for the adequate administration of 
assessments i n courses under his or her jurisdiction. 

6. No in-class assessment shal I exceed the allotted time for a regularly scheduled class period. In the case of in-class final examinations, the time allotted shal I not 
exceed the schedul ed f i nal exam nati on peri od. 

7. Each student shal I be given the instructi ons and performance requirements for all assessments intended to require morethanonehalf class periodinaform 
transl atabl e to hard copy, uni ess the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or col I ege, as appropri ate, has authori zed another 
procedure The instructi ons and requi rements of the assessment shall be archived in an appropriate medium in a suitable place. 

8. The following rules shal I govern all in-class exam nati ons, unless the instructor for a specific course stipulates alternate rules for that course. A breach of any of 
the rules shall constitute disruption of class, a disciplinary offense (Code of Student Conduct, section 9.m), or may serve as the basis of an allegation of academic 
dishonesty. 

a. Students arri vi ng I ate for an exam nati on may not unreasonabl y di srupt the exam nati on room 

b. Students must leave all unauthorized materials (eg., books, notes, calculators) with the proctor before being seated. 

c. W here seati ng arrangements are establ i shed by proctors, student must conform to these arrangements. 

d. Students may not return to an exam nati on room after I eavi ng, uni ess perm ssi on to do so has been granted by the proctor pri or to the students 
departure 

e Students must cease conversation pri or to the passing out of exam nati on papers and mai ntain si I ence during the end re exam nati on period. 

f. Students must pi ace exam nati on papers face down on the wri ting desk until the exam nati on is officially begun by the proctor. 

g. Students must keep exam nati on papers flat on the wri ting desk at all times. 

h. Students at an examination must be prepared to show current Uni versi ty identification. 

9. Eachfaculty member is to retain, foronefull semester after a course is ended, the students final assessments inthe appropriate medium If a faculty member 
goes on I eave for a semester or I onger, or I eaves the uni versi ty, the f i nal assessments and grade records for the course must be I eft wi th the chai r, the di rector or the 
dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or cd I ege, as appropri ate 

Classroom Climate; Statement en 

TheUniversity of Maryland values the diversity of its student body and is committed to providing a classroom atmosphere that encourages the equitable participation 
of al I students. Patterns of i nteracti on i n the cl assroom between the f acul ty member and students and among the students themsel ves may i nadvertentl y communi cate 
preconceptions about student abilities based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation. These patterns are due in part to 
the differences the students themsel ves bring to the classroom C lassroom instructors should be particularly sensitive to being equitable inthe opportunities they 
provide students to answer questions in class, to contribute their own ideas, and to participate fully in projects in and outside of the classroom 

Of equal i mportance to equi ty i n the cl assroom i s the need to attend to potenti al deval uati on of students that can occur by reference to demeani ng stereotypes of any 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJaDcns 



group and/or overl ooki ng the contri buti ons of a parti cul ar group to the topi c under di scussi on. J oki ng at the expense of any group creates an i nhospi tabl e 

envi ronrrent and i s i nappropri ate M oreover, i n provi di ng eval uati ons of students, i t i s essenti al that i nstructors avoi d di storti ng these eval uati ons wi th preconcei ved 

expectati ons about the i ntel I ectual capaci ti es of any group. 

It is the responsibility of individual faculty members to review their classroom behaviors, and those of any teaching assistants they supervise, to ensure that students 
are treated equi tabl y and not di scouraged or deval ued based on thei r di ff erences. Resources for sel f-eval uati on and trai ni ng for f acul ty members on cl assroom 
cl i mate and i nteracti on patterns are avai I abl e from the Off i ce of H uman Rel ati ons. 

Transfer Crecf t 

For current University of Maryland, College Park students 

The Office of the Registrar posts all transfer credit that would be acceptable to any of the degree programs at the University of Maryland, CollegePark.Thedeanof 
the col I ege i n whi ch the student i s enrol I ed determi nes whi ch transfer credi ts are appl i cabl e to the students degree program I n general , credi t from acaderri c courses 
taken at instituti ons of hi gher educati on accredi ted by a regi onal accredi ti ng asscci ati on wi 1 1 transfer, provi ded that the course i s compl eted wi th at I east a grade of C 
(2.0) and the course is similar in content and level to work offered atCollege Park. Thetitieof courses accepted for transfer credit will be noted on the students 
record; however, the grade will not. Grades from transferred courses are not included in the University of Maryland, College Park, grade point average calculation. 
See chapter 1 for additional information. 

Coursestaken at other institutions vuhileattendingthe University of Maryland, College Park 

L Coursestaken at another institution may not be credited toward a degree without approval in advance by the dean of the college from which the student expects 
a degree. The same rul e appl i es to regi strati on i n the summer program of another i nstituti on. Perm'ss/on to £rro///n^notfTer/ns&'tu6'on forms are available in the 
office of the students dean. This form must be submitted and approved by thecdlegefor any course which will eventually be added to the university transcript. 

Z Coursestaken at other University of Maryland I institutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of Maryland, College Park in Fall 1989 or later, all course work taken at any University System of 
Maryland instituti on will be posted as transfer credit. For all students who attended Maryland prior to Fall 1989, courses taken at another University of Maryland 
Board of Regents institution (UMBC, UMAB, UMES, UMUC) priortoFall 1989 will beincluded in thecumulativeGPA. Coursestaken at any other institution 
may not be credited toward a degree without advance approval . See #L above for information. 

3. USM Concurrent I nter-l institutional Registration Program 

University undergraduate students participating in the Concurrent I nter-l nstituti onal Registration Program should obtain permission from their dean. Course work 
counts as resident credit. Students participating in this program must be enrolled full ti me in a degree programat University of Maryland, College Park, for the 
semester i n whi ch these courses are taken. 

4. Corisortiumof Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 

Courses taken through the Consorti um are consi dered to be resi dent credit. See above under Consorti um and the Regi strati on Gui de for i nformati on. 

Transfer Credit Center 

TheTransfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assistance to students and transfer advisors More information is available in the section on Transfer 
Admission in chapter 1 and on the internet at www.tce.urrd.edu. 

Proficiency Examination Programs (Credt-by-Exam, CLEP) 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers new, continuing, and retumi ng students several opportunities to earn col I ege credit by derrDnstrating achievement 
in a subject field through examination. College Park recognizes three proficiency examination programs for credit: Advanced Placement (AP), Departmental 
Proficiency Examination Program (Credit-by-Exarrination), and College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). Undergraduate students may earn a total of up to 
one-half of the credits required for their degree through examination. Usually, this is no morethan 60 credits. Students are responsible for consul ting with the 
appropri ate dean or advi sor about the appl i cabi I i ty of any credi ts earned by exam nati on to a sped f i c degree program Students shod d al so seek assi stance i n 
determining whi cHUniversity of Maryland, College Park courses duplicate credits earned for an examination. Students will not receive credit for both passing an 
examination and completing an equivalent course 

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit For complete information about the applicability of AP exams and the assignment of credit, pi ease see chapter 1. 

Depart m e n t a l Proficiency Examination (Credit-by-Exarrination) 

Col I ege Park Departmental Proficiency Exarri nati ons, customarily referred to as credi t-by-exarri nation, are comparable to comprehensive final examinations in a 
course. A I though the mathemati cs and f orei gn-l anguage departments recei ve the most appl i cati ons for credi t by exarri nati on, many departments will provi de 
exarri nati ons for certain of their courses. Initial inquiry as to whether an examination in a specific course is available is best rrBcle at the acaderri eclepartment which 
offers the course i n questi on. 

I f an exarri nati on for a course i s avai I abl e, the department will provi de i nformati on regard ng ti me and pi ace, type of exarri nati on, and materi al whi ch rri ght be 
helpful in preparing for the exarri nati on. An undergraduate who passes a departmental proficiency examination is given credit and quality points toward graduation 
i n the amount regularly all owed i n the course, provi ded such credi ts do not dupl i cate credi t obtai ried by some other means. After maki ng arrangements wi th the 
department, apply through the Division of Letters and Sciences, 1117 Hombake Li brary, 301-405-2793. 

Policies governing emit by examination: 

1. Theapplicartrrustbeformally admitted to theUniversity of Maryland, College Park. Posting of credit earned, however, will be delayed until thestudentis 
registered. 

2. Departmental Proficiency Exarri nati ons may not be taken for courses in whi chtliestuderit has rerrBined registered at the University of Maryland, CollegePark, 
beyond the Schedul e A dj ustment Peri od even wi th a transcri pt notati on of W . 

3. Departmental Proficiency Exarri nati ons may not be used to change grades, including Incompletes and Withdrawals. 

4. Application for credit-by-exarrination is equivalent to registration for thecourse; however, the foil owing conditions apply: 

a. A student may cancel the application at any time prior to completion of the exarri nati on with no entry on his/her permanent record. (Equivalent to the schedule 
adjustment period.) 

b. The instructor makes the results of the exarri nati on avai I able to the student prior to formal subrrissionof thegrade. Beforefinal submission of the grade, the 
student may elect not to have this grade recorded. Inthiscase, a mark of W isrecorded. (Equivalentto the drop period.) 

c. N o exarri nati on may be attempted more than twice 

d. The instructor must certify on the report of the exarri nati on submitted to the Office of the Regisbar that copies of theexarri nation questions (or identifying 
i nformati on i n the case of standard zed exarri nati ons) , and the students answers have been f i I ed wi th the chai r of the department off eri ng the course. 

5. If accepted by the student (see 4b above), lettergradeseamedrhroughcredit-by-examnationareerteredonrhestudentstranscript, and are used in computing 



i, Academic RecfJrernErts, andRegJaDcns 



his/her cumulative grade point average. A student may elect to takeacredit-by-exarrination Pass-Fail only if the credit fulfil Is an elective in the students degree 
programNocollege, major, field of concentration, or general education program requirement may betaken under the pass-fail option. PI ease refer to the 
Pass-Fail policy under the Records section in this chapter. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) recognizes college-level competence achieved outside the cd lege classroom Two types of CLEP tests are 
avai I abl e General Exam nati ons, which cover the content of a broad f i el d of study; and Subj ect Exarri rati ons, whi ch cover the sped f i c content of a col I ege course 
Credit can beeamed and will be recognized bCollege Park for somsCLEP General or Subj ect Examinations, provided satisfactory scores are attained. Credits 
earned under C L E P are not consi dered resi dence credi t, but are treated as transfer credi t. C L E P exams are adrri ni stered at C L E P testi ng centers throughout the 
country. The University of Maryland, College Park isaCLEPTest Center (TestCenter Code 5814). Toobtainan application or additional information, contactthe 
CLEP Administrator in theCounseling Center, Room0106A Shoemaker Hall, (301-314-7688), orwritetoCLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, NJ , 08541-6600. Students 
who want to earn credit through CLEP must request their official score reports to be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admission, Mitchell Building, University of 
Maryland, CollegePark, MD 20742-5235. (The University of Maryland, CdlegePark, ScoreRecipientCodeis5814.) 

Policies governing CLEP are as fbl lows 

1. A stuclent must matriculate at the university before CLEP credits are officially posted. The posting will not be done until a student has established a record. 

2. Each institution of the University Systemof Maryland establishes standards for acceptanceof CLEP exemptions and credits. Students must check with the 
institution to which they will transfer to I earn if they will lose, maintain, or gain credit. 

3. CdlegePark will award credit for a CLEP exarri nati on 

a. provi ded the exarri nati on was bei ng accepted for credi t here on the date the stuclent took the exarri nati on, and 

b. provi ded that the exarri nati on was not taken duri ng a students f i nal 30 credi ts. The f i nal 30 hours of credi t are to be taken i n resi dence, unl ess pri or approval has 
been granted by the students dean. 

4. Creditwill notbegivenfor lxflicaii|3letiiigacoir9eaixl|3assiiiganexaniiiiartioiicova'iiigsiil3Staiitiallytiiesaii«iiBterial. 

5. F urthermore, credi twill not be awarded f or C L E P exarri nati ons i f the student has previ ousl y comd eted more advanced courses i n the same f i el d. 

6. CLEP examinations posted on transcripts from other institutions will be accepted if the exarri nati on has been approved by CdlegePark and the scores reported 
areequal to or higherthan those required by this institution. If the transcript from the pri or institution does not carry the scores, itwill be the responsibility of the 
student to request Educational Testing Service to forward a copy of the official report to the Office of Admissions. University awards credits for CLEP Examinations 
only as indicated on the chart provi ded in this chapter (if an exarri nati on is not listed, it is not accepted for credit at this institution). 

I f you have questi ons about the appl i cabi I i ty of sped f i c credi t to your program, consul t the I i st provi ded in this catal og or contact your Dean's Off i ce. 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 





ExamTitle 


Score 

1 


Related 
Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 

1 


Notes 




General Exams 




Natural Science 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


















Humanities 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


















Social Science & 
History 


50 

1 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 






Subj ect Exams 




Biology 

Gen. Biology 


49 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receive CLEP credit in Biology and wish to take additional BIOL credit 
should enroll in BIOL 105. 
















Cherristry 

Gen. Cherristry 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receive CLEP credit in Cherristry and wish to take additional CHEM credit 
should enroll in CHEM 131 AND 132. 










Economics 

Prin. Maco. 


57 


ECON 201 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ECON credits fulfill oneof twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
deparbrert for placement, 301-405-3513. 












Prin. Micro. 


54 


ECON 200 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















Financial Acctg 


65 


BMGT220 


3 


Yes 


No 


Students who recei ve C L E P credi t i n A ccounti ng and wi sh to take add ti oral account] ng 
credit should enrdl inBMGT 221. 
















Government 

American Govt. 


52 


GVFT 170 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


GVPT 170 fulfillsone of twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Students 
shoul d contact the department for gateway appl i cabi 1 i ty, 301-405-4136. 


















67 


MATH 140 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


MATH 140 or 220 fulfills CORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non-lab requirement; also 
fulfills CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement. 

♦FulfillsCORE-Fundamenta 1 Studies Math requirement. 


MdUienuucs 

Calculus/Elem 
Functions 












58 


Math 220 


3 


No 


Yes 










50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


* 














Sociology 

Intro. Sociology 


50 

1 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Sod ol ogy maj ors who recei ve credi t for thi s exam wi 1 1 be exempt from SOCY 100. Other 
students who wish to fulfill aCORE requirement are encouraged to enrdl inSOCY 105. 



i, Academe Recfjremerts, arvdRegJaDcns 



Please Note: 

• LL refers to courses at the I ower(100 and 200) I evel . Any test not listed will not be accepted for credit at UMCP. Students may not receive credit both for 
CLEP courses and for equivalentUMCP courses or transfer courses (including Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate). CLEP credit will be 
deleted in such cases. Applicable scores for a particular exam are those in effect when a student takes the exam Contact your College Dean if you have 
questions 

• Certain CLEP tests may be revised during 2008-09. At the time this catalog was printed, information on the new versions of those tests was not avail able 
Changes are possible in UMCP credit acceptance for revised CLEP exams. Contact theTesting Office for up-to-date information, 301-314-7688. 

• Computer-based CLEP testing was implemented during 2003 for selected tests at selected test venues. Scoring procedures may change. The scores above 
apply to computer based testing. Departments will evaluateany new tests and scoring procedures as they become avail able. Some exams may be considered 
for credit on a case-by-case basis until review is complete. Contact an advisor or theTransfer Credit Center (tccinfo@. urrd.edu) for further information. 
Students who have matriculated at UMCP are encouraged to speak to their advisor about departmental or Advanced Placement exams in addition to CLEP. 
All math cul ated students must have perrri ssi on of the; red lege advisor to take CLEP tests. Students interested in taking MATH CLEP are encouraged to 
speak to the math advisor on campus, 301-405-4362. 

Graduation, Applications, Commencement Honors 

Graduation Applications 

Each candidatefor a degree or certificate must file a formal application with theOfficeof the Registrar. Thedeadlinefor application is theend of theschedule 
adj ustmsnt peri od for the semester i n whi ch the student pi ans to graduate, or at the end of the f i rst week of the second summer sessi on for A ugust degrees. 

I n al I cases, graduati on appl i cati ons must be f i I ed at the begi nni ng of the students f i nal semester before recei vi ng a degree. The graduati on appl i cati ons are 
availableontheintemetatwww.my.umd.eduorattrieRegistrar'sOffice, lstfloorMitchell Building. 

Commencement Honors 

Summacumlaude, magna cum I aude and cum I aude are the highest commencement honors that the University bestows for sustained excellence in scholarship. They 
are awarded to the top 10% of al I students graduati ng i n each col I ege over the course of a year. Surrma cum I aude i s awarded to students wi th a G PA equal to the 
hi ghest two percent of al I cd I ege graduates over the past three terms, magna cum I aude to the next hi ghest three percent, and cum I aude to the f ol I owi ng f i ve 
percent. To be eligible for this recognition, at I east 60 semester hours must be earned at the university or at a program in which credit earned is counted as University 
of Maryland, Cd lege Park, resident credit (contact theOfficeof the Registrar to determine program eligibility). No more than 6 credits taken pass/fail or 
satisfactory/fail shall count toward the 60-hour minimum Nostudentwithagrade-pointaverageof less than 3.3 will be considered for a corrmencement honor. 
B ecause grades for a term general I y are off i ci al I y recorded after the term's graduati on day, computati on of the students G PA wi 1 1 not i ncl ude grades for courses 
taken during the students final semester at the university. However, the hours taken during that semester will apply toward the 60-hour requirement. 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

Organized in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the ddest and most widely respected academic honorary society in the United States. I nvitation to membership is based on 
outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of the liberal arts and sciences. Student members are chosen entirely on the basis of academic excellence; neither 
exbacum cul ar I eadershipror service to the corrrrijnity isconsidered. Election is held twice a year, onceinthefall and once i n the spri ng semester. 

The process for election to Phi Beta Kappa invdves a review in November for those who graduated the previous August or those who will graduate in December, 
and a review inMarchforthosegraduatinginMay. A number of qualifying juniors are also considered duri ng the same semester. The review is conducted by a 
sel ect corrrri ttee of f acul ty members represent] ng the humani ti es, soci al sci ences, and natural sci ences. T he corrrri ttee revi ews transcri pts of al I j uni ors and seni ors 
with qual ifyi ng grade poi nt averages. Whether a student qual ifi es for membershi p i n Phi Beta Kappa depends on the quality, depth, and breadth of the students 
record in liberal education courses. The final decision for election rests with the resident faculty members of Phi Beta Kappa. There is no application procedure for 
electiontoPhi BetaKappa(see#4belowforpossibleexception). 

Requirements for consideration of membership in Phi Beta Kappa at the University of Maryland.CollegePark, campus chapter include 

1. Grade Point Average: For seni ors a grade point average of at I east 3. 5 overall as well asinall liberal arts and sciences courses taken. Forjuniors the minimum 
grade poi nt average i s 3. 75, and possi bl y hi gher dependi ng on the number of candi dates i n a parti cul ar year. 

2. Residence: At least 60 credit hours must betaken at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

3. Liberal Courses For seniors, at I east 90 credit hours in courses in the liberal arts and sci ences (where liberal courses are to be distinguished from professional 
or technical courses), at least 45 of which must be taken at the University of Maryland, CdlegePark. Forjuniors, at I east 75 total credit hours must be completed, 
at I east 60 of whi chare in courses in the liberal arts and sciences; of these, at I east 45 must be taken at the University of Maryland, CdlegePark. Students would 
ordinarily be majors in one of the programs in the liberal arts and sci ences. Hcwever, students with the requisite number of liberal credit hours can be admitted if 
they have completed at least 5 courses (15 credit hours or more) for seniors or three courses (9 credit hours or more) forjuniors in a single liberal arts and sciences 
department/program at U M C P. 

4. Required courses: One semester of mathematics, whichmustbefulfilledbycdlege-level credi t hours ( including A P credit), and two col I ege semesters of a 

f orei gn I anguage at the el ementary I evel , or above. T he I anguage requi rement may al so be sati sf i ed by compl eti on of four years of one I anguage other than E ngl i sh 
at the high school level or above, or the equivalent. Students with such a foreign I anguage background who wish to beconsidered for admission to Phi BetaKappa 
should notify the Phi BetaKappa office in writing and provide the appropriate documentation (such asahigh school transcript) prior to the month of consideration. 
C redi t i s not al I owed based on SAT scores. 

5. Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi B eta Kappa rrust contain at I east three liberal arts and sci ences courses (9 credit hours or more) ineachofthe 
three f ol I owi ng areas: a) arts and humani ti es, b) behavi oral and soci al sci ences, c) natural sci ences and mathemati cs ( i ncl udi ng a I aboratory sci ence course; thi s 
requi rement cannot befulfi I led by A P credit). All the courses in at I east two of the three requi red areas must be completed at UMCP and in the remaining area no 
more than one AP course can be used to fulfil I the requi rement. In general, Phi Beta Kappa will accept theCORE classification of courses but courses which CORE 
desi gnates as havi ng more than one cl assi f i cati on may not sati sfy any Phi B eta K appa di stri buti on requi rement. Students wi th more chal I engi ng courses and 
moderate! y hi gh grade pd nt averages are preferred by the corrrri ttee to those wi th hi gher grade poi nt averages but a narrow range of courses. 

Minimal qualifications in more than one area may preclude election to Phi BetaKappa. Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi Beta 
Kappa. Thejudgment of the resident faculty rrembers of Phi Beta Kappa on the quality, depth, and breadth of the students record is the deciding factor in every 
case Any questions about criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (including equivalency exam nations in foreign languages) should be directed to the Phi Beta 
KappaOffice, Dr. Denis Sullivan, 301-405-8986. 

Academic I integrity 

The University of Maryland is an academe community. Its fundamental purpose is the pursuit of knowledge. Likeall other communities, the University can function 
properly only if its members adhere tod early establi shed goal sand values. Essential to the fundamental purposeof the University is the commitment to the 
principles of truth and academic honesty. Accordingly, the Codeof Academe Integrity is desi gned to ensure that the principle of academic honesty is upheld. While 
all members of the University sharethis responsibility, the CocfeoMcaQfemc/ntegrity is desi gned so that special responsibility for upholding the principle of 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJarjcns 



academi c honesty I i es wi th the students. 

The University's Codeof Academe Integrity \s a nationally recognized honor code, administered by a Student Honor Council. Any of the foil owing acts, when 
corrrritted by a student, shall constitute academic dishonesty: 

C head ng: / ntentionally using or atterrpting to use unauthorized rraterials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise. 

Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or in/ertion of any information or citation in an academic exercise. 

Facilitating academic dishonesty: I ntentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of the Code of Academe Integrity. 

Plagiarism I ntentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic exerc/se. 

If it is deterrri ned that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred, agradeof XF is considered the normal sancti on for undergraduate students. The grade of XF is 
noted on the academi c transcri pt as f ai I ure due to academi c di shonesty . L esser or more severe sancti ons may be i mposed when there are ci rcumBtances to warrant 
such consideration. Suspension or expulsion from the University may be imposed even for a first offense. 

Students shoul d consult the Code of Academic Integrity, at www.presi dent, urrd.edu/pol i ci es/i i i lOOa.htrrl for further i nformati on regard ng procedures for reporti ng 
and resol vi ng al I egati ons of academi c di shonesty. 



Honor Pledge 

I n 2002, the U ni versi ty adopted an honor pi edge i n whi ch students are asked to wri te out and si gn the pi edge on maj or assi gnments and exams, as desi gnated by the 
instructor. The Honor Pledge is designed to encourage instructors and students to reflect upon the University's core institutional value of academic integrity. 
Professors who invite students to sign the Honor PleSgesignify that there is an ethical component to teachi ng and learning. Student who write by hand and sign the 
PI edge affi rm a sense of pri de i n the i ntegrity of thei r work. The PI edge states: 

"/ pledge on my honor that I have rot given or received ary wauthori zed assi sterce on ths assi grnwty examination." 

For rmreh ifu i nHtio n regard rytheCodeofAcadsnic Integrity, theHorw Pledge^ 
IheOfHceofSluckntConduct 

The primary purposefor thei mposition of discipline in the university setting is to protect the campus community. Consistent with that purpose, reasonable efforts are 
also made to foster the personal and social development of those students who are held accountable for violations of university regulations. Compared to disciplinary 
systems at many uni versi ti es, U ni versi ty of M aryl and students are gi ven unusual authori ty and responsi bi I i ty for management of the campus process. M embershi p 
on the student j udi ci ary i s an extraordi nary educati onal experi ence, and opportuni ty to be of servi ce to the communi ty, and a personal honor. 

Cases that may resul t i n suspensi on or expul si on are heard by conduct boards, compri sed end rel y of students. I n such cases, students are accorded substanti al 
procedural protect] ons, i ncl udi ng an opportuni ty for a heari ng and an appeal . L ess sen ous cases are resol ved in discipli nary conferences conducted by U ni versi ty 
staff members. A cts of vi d ence ( i ncl udi ng any sexual assaul t) , i nti rri dati on, di srupti on, or ri oti ng; substanti al theft or vandal i srn fraud or forgery; use or 
distribution of ill egal drugs; and artfode of Student Conducts d ati on mod vated by consi derati ons of sex, race, ethni c ori gi n, sexual ori entati on or rel i gi on are forms 
of rri sconduct that most frequent) y resul t i n di srri ssal from the U ni versi ty. Students accused of vi d ati ng U ni versi ty discipli nary regul ati ons are encouraged to 
di scuss the al I egati ons wi th thei r parents or guardi are, I egal counsel , and wi th appropri ate U ni versi ty staff members. 

Prohibited Conduct 

A compl ete I i st of conduct consi dered prohi bi ted as wel I procedures for resol vi ng al I egati ons of rri sconduct may be found i n the Code of Student Conduct at 
www. presi dent. urrd. edu/pd i ci es or through the Off i ce of Student Conduct websi te at www. studentconduct.urrd.edu 
T he f ol I owi ng i s general noti ce of what consti tutes prohi bi ted conduct and i s subj ect to di sci pi i nary acti on: 

• Use, possession or storage of any weapon 

• Causi ng physi cal harm or apprehensi on of harm 

• Initiating or causing to be initiated a false report, warning or threat of fire, explosion or other emergency 

• A cri rri nal offense comrri tted off-campus 

• Violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction 

• M i susi ng or damagi ng f i re safety equi pment 

• Distribution or possession for purposes of distribution of any illegal drug 

• F umi shi ng fal se i nformati on to the U ni versi ty 

• M aki ng, possessi ng, or usi ng any forged, al tered, or f al si f i ed i nstrument of i denti f i cati on 

• I nterf eri rig wi th the freedom of expressi on of others 

• Theft of property or of services; possessi on of std en property 

• Destroyi ng or damagi ng the property of others 

• Engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct 

• Failure to comply with the directions of University officials 

• Use or possessi on of any illegal drug 

• Use or possessi on of fireworks on University premises 

• Violation of published University regulations or pdicies including the residence hall contract, alcohol policy, parking regulations, rioting, hazing policy, and 
sexual assault. 

Note: Effective A pri I 2005, students who viol ate the foil owing section will be dismissed from the University: 

Rioting, assault theft vandalism fire-setting, or other serious misconduct related to a University-sponsored event occurringon- or off-campus, that 
results in harmto persons or property or otherwise poses a threat to the stability of the campus or campus community may result in disciplinary action 
regardless of the existence, status, or outcome of any cri rri nal charges in a court of I aw related to mi sconduct associated with a University-sponsored 
event 

For more i nformati on regardi ng student conduct issues, contact the Office of Student Conduct at 301-314-8204 or vi sit www.studentconduct.urrd.edu 

Summary of Policies and Regul ati ons Pertaining to Students 

Descriptions of these pdicies are for general information only. PI ease refer to specific texts for official language M edifications may be made or other pdicies may 
be added throughout the year. PI ease contact the Off i ce of Student Conduct for add ti onal i nformation. 



i, Academe RecfJremErts, andRegJaDcns 



In addition to the policies reprinted or identified elsewhere (eg., Vne Code of Student Conduct erd Code of Academe Integrity), students enrol led at College Park are 
expected to be aware of, and to abi de by, the pd i ci es surrmari zed bel cw. I nformati on about where the corrpl ete texts may be consul ted fd I ows each summary. Thi s 
i nformati on was compi I ed and provi ded by the Off i ce of Student Conduct. 

Alcoholic Beverage Policy and Procedures forbid unauthorized possession, use, or distribution of alcoholic beverages on university property. Certain exceptions 
arespecified. (I nformati on subject to change pending legislation. Originally approved by theBoard of Regents, September 26, 1969. Legal drinking age in the State 
oM aryl and i s 21 years. Repri nted i n Student H andbook. ) 

PdicyonAir^ifyingEquiprrentrestrictsthehoursand locations of useof certain forms of sourri amplifying equipment, provides a procedure for the 

authori zati on of otherwi se restri cted uses of sound ampl i fyi ng equi prrent, and I ocates responsi bility for corrpl ai nts wi th those usi ng the equi prrent. (A dopted by the 

U ni versi ty Senate, J une 2, 1970. Repri nted i n the Student H andbook. ) 

CampusActivities Policies regulate reservation of university facilities, advertising, co-sponsorship, cared I ati on and postponement, and various other matters 
relati ng to programs of student organizations. (Published in the Event M anagemant Handbook. For more i nformati on, contact the Campus Reservations Office.) 

Computer Use Policy defines standards for reasonableand acceptable useof University computer resources, including electronic mail. 

Policy on Demonstrations establishes guidelines for demonstrations and picketing. Stipulates that the university will take steps necessary both to protect the right of 
i ndi vi dual s or groups to demonstrate and to protect the freedom of speech, asserrbl y, and movement of any individual or group. (A dopted by the U ni versi ty Senate, 
J une 2, 1970. Reprinted in the Student Handbook.) 

Examination Rulesset general standards for student conduct during exam nations. They are applicable to all examinations given at the Col lege Park campus unless 
contrary instructions are provi ded by the faculty member adrri nistering the exam nation. (Printed on most university exam nation books. See also chapter 4.) 

Policy on Hazing and Statement on Hazing prohibits hazing, which is defined as intentionally or recklessly subjecting any person to the risk of bodily harm, or 
severe emoti onal di stress, or causi ng or encouragi ng any person to comrri t an act that woul d be a vi ol ati on of I aw or uni versi ty regul ati ons, for the purpose of 
initiating, promoti ng, f osteri ng, or conf i rrri ng any form of aff i I i ati on wi th a student group or organi zati on, as defi ned by theCocfe of Student Conduct. T he express or 
implied consent of the victim will not be a defense For more information, contact the Office of Student Conduct. 

Carnpus Parking Regulationscover registration, permits, fees, violations, enforcement, fines, towing and impounding, reviews, carped programs, special events 
parking, emergency parking, and a number of other areas. Notady, the regul ati ons provide that "the responsi bility of finding an authorized parking space rests with 
thedriver." Students who have 55 or fewer credits and live in the "GrahamCracker Complex" cannot register for a parking permit. (Current regulations in effect 
sincejuly, 1997. An informational guide is distributed to all who register for parking. For more information, contact the Department of Transportation Services.) 

Policy Pertaining to Public Displays defi nes standards for perm ssi de displays, objects or structures not designed to be continuously carried or held by a 
demonstrator or pi cketer so as si mul taneousl y to protect freedom of expressi on and prevent unreasonad e threats to the heal th, safety, securi ty, or mi ssi on of the 
campus. (Approved by the President, March 29, 1989. For more information, contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.) 

Residence Hall Rules define prohibited conduct in and around campus residence and dining halls, buildings, and at Department of Resident Life and/or Department 
of Dining Services-sponsored activities, i n addition to that which falls under the Residence Halls/Dining Services Agreement, Code of Student Conduct, and federal, 
stateand local lawsThe rules also specify standard sanctions for rule viol ati ons, and provide for an adjudication process. (Reprinted in Comrunity Living, the 
Residence Hal I sand Dining Services Handbook. For more information, contact the Department of Resident Life) 

Sexual Assault Policy offers advice and guidance for complainants, including assistance in filing criminal complaints. Defi nes and sets penalties for sexual assault. 
Specifies that [s]exual assault is a serious off ense and the standard sanction for any sexual assault, including acquaintance rape, isexpulsion. 

Student Organization Registration Guidelines define student organizations, responsibilities of officers, and registration, and establish types of registration, a 
regi strati on process, certai n pri vi I eges of regi stered student organi zati ons i n good standi ng, sancti ons which may resul t from regi strati on revi ew, and gui del i nes for 
consti tuti ons. ( F or more i nformati on, or for a copy of the gui del i nes, contact the Off i ce of C ampus Programs. ) 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 107 

5b General Education Requirements (CORE) 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sdemes Studies Prop-am 

General Education Program and Requirements 

Off i ce of the Associ ate Provost for Academi c Affai rs and Dean for 

U ndergraduate Studi es 

2130 Mitchell Building, 301-405-9363 

Di rector CORE PI anni ng and I mpl ementati on: Laura SI avi n 

www. ugst. umd.edu/core 

In our world of rapid economic, social, and technological change, students need 
a strong and broadly based education. General education helps students achieve 
the intellectual integration and awareness they need to meet challenges in their 
personal, social, political, and professional lives. General education courses 
introduce the great ideas and controversies in human thought and experience. A 
solid general education provides a strong foundation for the life-long learning 
that makes career-change goals attainable. The breadth, perspective, and rigor 
provided by the CORE curriculum helps Maryland graduates become ' ' educated 
people" 

Donna B. Hamilton 

Associ ate Provost and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

BROAD OUTCOME GOALS FOR THE CORE CURRICULUM 
[Approved October 6, 2005 by the University Senate CORE Committee] 

After compl eti on of CORE Program requi rements students shoul d be abl e to: 

1. demonstrate understand ng of maj or f i ndi ngs and i deas i n a vari ety 
of di sci pi i nes beyond the maj or; 

2. demonstrate understand ng of methods, ski 1 1 s, tool s and systems 
used i n a vari ety of di sci pi i nes, and hi stori cal , theoreti cal , sci entif i c, 
technol ogi cal , phi I osophi cal , and ethi cal bases i n a vari ety of 
disciplines; 

3. use appropriate technologies to conduct research on and 
communi cate about topi cs and questi ons and to access, eval uate and 
manage i nf ormati on to prepare and present the r work effectively to 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 108 



meet academic, personal, and professional needs; 

4. demonstrate critical analysis of arguments and eval uation of an 
argument's major assertions, its background assumptions, the 

evi dence used to support i ts asserti ons, and i ts expl anatory utility; 

5. understand and arti cul ate the i mportance and i nf I uence of 
diversity withi n and among cultures and societies; 

6. understand and apply mathematical concepts and models; and 

7. communicate effectively, through written and oral communication 
and through other forms as appropri ate. 

N ote: To vi ew L earni ng Outcome Goal s for each of the CORE categori es, pi ease 
vi si t: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/L earni ngOutcome. htm 

To obtai n a CORE Academic Planner and Record Keeper, visit your col lege 
advi si ng off i ce, or the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es (2130 M i tchel I B ui I di ng) . 

WhoCompktesCORE? 

To earn a baccal aureate degree, al I students at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, 
Col I ege Park compl ete both a maj or course of study and a campus- wi de general 
education program. Students who enter the University M ay 1990 and after 
complete CORE requirements. 

Exceptions Students who enter the U ni versi ty with ni ne or more credits earned 
before M ay 1990 from the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, or any other 
col I ege may compl ete thei r general educati on requi rements under the U ni versi ty 
Studies Program (USP), subject to certain limitations. (See"USP" and "Statute of 
Limitations" sections below.) Advanced Placement (AP) and other 
exami nati on- based credi ts do not count i n these determi nati ons. 



University Studies Procj-am (USP) 

For detai I ed i nf ormati on about U SP requi rements, see undergraduate catal ogs 
dated 1992 or earl i er, or contact the CORE program at 2130 M i tchel I B ui I di ng, 
301-405-9359. 1 nf ormati on on USP is also at: 

www.ugst.umd.edu/core/morei nfo/usp.html .NOTE: Students who graduate 
under U SP requi rements A ugust 1994 and thereafter must f ulf i 1 1 the Advanced 
Studi es requi rements descri bed i n the Fal I 1994 and subsequent catal ogs. (See 
CORE Advanced Studies section.) 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 109 

Statute of L imitations for Previous General Education Programs (GEP, 
GUR, USP) 

U ndergraduate students who return to the university after August 1987 no I onger 
have the opti on of compl eti ng general educati on requi rements under the ol der 
General Education Program (GEP) or the General University Requirements 
(GUR). Thereafter, f ol I owi ng any substantive change i n general educati on 
requi rements (I i ke the change i n Fal I 1990 from USP to CORE), undergraduate 
students returni ng or transf erri ng to Col I ege Park after a separati on of five 
conti nuous years must f ol I ow the requi rements i n effect at the ti me of re-entry. 
A n excepti on may be granted to those students who at the ti me of separati on had 
compl eted 60 percent of the general educati on requi rements then i n effect. 

Maryland Public Community Cd lege Students 

For the purpose of determi ni ng whi ch general educati on program i s requi red 
(CORE or USP), students transferring to the University of Maryland from 
M aryl and publ i c communi ty col I eges shal I be treated as i f thei r regi strati on dates 
were concurrent with enrol I ment at thi s university. 



CORE Program Components 

L FUNDAM E NTAL STUDI E S bui I d competence and conf i dence i n basi c 
wri ti ng and mathemati cs. M astery of these basi cs enhances success both duri ng 
and after col I ege. Students begi n f ul f i 1 1 i ng F undamental Studi es requi rements i n 
thei r f i rst year at the U ni versi ty . www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/F undaSt. html 

Z Dl STRI BUTI VE STUDI ES focus on breadth, i ncl udi ng courses i n the 
f ol I owi ng categori es: L i terature; T he H i story or T heory of the A rts; H umani ti es; 
Physical Sciences; Life Sciences; Mathematics and Formal Reasoning; Social or 
Political History; Behavioral and Social Sciences; and Interdisciplinary and 
E mergi ng I ssues. Students general I y pursue D i stri buti ve Studi es i n the f i rst two 
years of thei r course work. www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/D i strSt. html 

3. ADVANC E D STUDI E S al I ow students to enhance thei r degree and 
strengthen thei r cri ti cal thi nki ng and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s by taki ng two upper- 1 evel 
courses outsi de thei r maj or after 60 credits. Students may substitute an approved 
CORE Capstone course i n thei r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for one of 
these two courses. www.ugst.urrd.edu/core/elements/AclvanSt.htrnl 

4 HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY gives students the opportunity to 
exami ne thei r i deas and val ues i n the I i ght of vari ous cul tural , i ntel I ectual , and 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 110 

social contexts. Diversity courses i ncrease knowledge of what constitutes 
difference and i ncrease students' abi I ity to I earn from and appreci ate peopl e, 
cultures, i deas, and art forms that are often different from those they know best. 
Students may compl ete the Cultural Diversity requi rement at any ti me before 
graduati on. www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/D i versi ty . html 

CORE Prog-am Outline 

(Requirements Outline www.ugsLumd.edu/cor^core req.html) 

I IMPORTANT NOTES about Fundamental and Distributive Studies 



• M U ST be sel ected from the approved CORE course I i sts to count toward 
CORE requirements. Atwww.ugst.umd.edu/core, click on What are the 
CORE Courses? for I i nks to the current I i sts of approved courses i n each 
CORE category. 

• M A Y al so be used to sati sf y col I ege, maj or, and/or supporti ng area 
requi rements if the courses also appear on CORE Fundamental or 
Distri buti ve Studi es I i sts. 

• CORE courses MAY NOT betaken on a Pass-Fail basis. 



I. CORE Fundamental 

Three Courses (9 credits) Requi red 

1 One course in I ntroduction to Writing (Must be attempted within the first 
30 credits; must be passed withi n thefi rst GO credits.) See: 
www.english.umd.edu/index. 

Approved CORE I ntroduction to Writing Courses: Select 
appropri ate course based on requi rements I i sted. 

ENGL 101 1 ntroduction to Writing 

ENGL 101A I ntroduction to Writing (M ust betaken if student has 

TSWE [SAT verbal subtest] score below 33) 

ENGL 101H I ntroduction to Writing (Honors Students) 

ENGL 101X I ntroducti on to Wri ti ng (Students for whom E ngl i sh i s 

a second language may register for ENGL 101X instead of ENGL 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 111 



101.) 

Note Based on scores from either the TOEFL or MEIP, students 
may be required to complete a program of English language 
instruction for non-native speakers through the M El before being 
allowed to register for ENGL 101X. 

Exemptions from I ntroduction to Writing requirement 

• A P E ngl i sh L anguage and Composi ti on test score of 4 or 5, OR 

• SAT verbal score 670 or above for scores achieved between 
May 1995 and February 2005. (In April 1995, the Educational 
Testi ng Servi ce re-centered the scores on the SAT . Students 
whose test scores are from before A pri I 1995 must have 
recei ved a score of 600 or above to be exempt from F reshman 
Writi ng. Thi s re-centeri ng does not ref I ect a rai si ng of the 
requi rement for exempti on, but a change i n the scori ng system 
used by ETS. 

• I n M arch 2005, ETS began the use of a new SAT test for 

wri ti ng. I nf ormati on about exempti on i n connecti on wi th SAT 
tests taken after M arch 2005 wi 1 1 be avai I abl e at 
www.english.umd.edu/index. 

Z One course in Mathematics (Must be attempted within the first BOcredits; 
must be passed within the first GO credits.) See 
www.ug5tumd.edu/oore/oourses/F undamental/F undaSt-math.html 



Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics Courses: 

MATH 110 Elementary Mathematical Models; OR 

M ATH 112 Col I ege A I gebra wi th A ppl i cati ons and Tri gonometry; 

OR 

MATH 113CollegeAlgebrawithApplications; OR 

MATH 115 Pre-cal cuius; OR 

Any 100-or 200-level MATH or STAT course except MATH 199, 
210, 211, 212,213, 214, and 274. 

Exemptions from Mathematics requirement 

• SAT M ath score of 600 or above; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above i n Cal cul us AB or BC; OR 

• A P score of 4 or above i n Stati sti cs; OR 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 112 

• CLEP Calcul us Exam score of 50 or higher. 

Note If you are placed in the Developmental Math Program by the 
Mathematics Placement Exam, you may be offered the opportunity to 
combine your Developmental course with the appropriate 
subsequent course of MATH 110, 111, 113, or 115 and thus finish 
both in one semester. For further information, pleaseseethe 
Developmental Math Program web site 
www.math. urrd.edu/undergraduate/courses/fsmshtrh 



3. One course in Professional Writing (taken after GO credits). See 
vww7.ugstumd.edU/core/course5/F undamental/F unda-St-professional .html 



Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses Select the 
appropri ate course based on requi rements or i interests I i steel 

ENGL 390 Science Writing 

ENGL 391 A dvancecl Composi ti on 

ENGL 392 Legal Writing 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 

ENGL 395 Writing for Health Professions 

ENGL 398 Topi cs i n Prof essi onal Wri ti ng 

Suffixed versi ons of the above course numbers al so f ulf i 1 1 the CORE 
Prof essi onal Writi ng requi rement. 



Exemption from Professional Writing Requirement: 

• Grade of "A" in ENGL 101 (NOT ENGL 101A or ENGL 
101X ), except for students maj ori ng i n E ngi neeri ng. A 1 1 
E ngi neeri ng maj ors must take ENGL 393. 

Note No exemption from the Professional Writing requi rement will 
be granted for achievement on SAT verbal exam Professional 
Writing courses cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies 
requirements. 

II. CORE Distributive Studies 

N i ne Courses (28 credi ts) Requi red 

See the most current I i sti ngs of approved CORE courses at 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 113 

www. ugst. umd.edu/core, or the onl i ne Schedul e of CI asses at 
www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

1 H umanities and the Arts-three courses requi red: 

• One course from L i terature (HL) list: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/H L .html , and 

• One course from The Hi story or Theory of the Arts (HA) list: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Distri butive/H istoryCo.html and 

• One more course from L i terature ( H L ) , OR T he H i story or T heory of the 
Arts (HA), OR Humanities (HO) lists. HO List: 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/H umani ti esCo. html 

Note There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the 
Humanities (HO) list. 

Z The Sciences and Mathematics- three courses required: 

• U p to two courses from Physi cal Sci ences (PL/PS) I i sts 

PL List: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/Physi cal LabCo.html 

PS List: 
www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/Physi cal Courses, html 
and 

• U p to two courses from L if e Sci ences (L L/L S) I i sts 

LL List: 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/L i f eL abCo. htm 

L S L i st: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/L i f eCo. html 

and 

• U p to one course from M athemati cs and Formal Reasoni ng (M S) I i st 

MS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/M athCo.html 

Notes At least one science course MUST include or be accompanied 
by a lab taken in the same semester (LL or PL lists only). More than 
one lab course may be taken. Courses must be taken from at least 
two of the three lists. There is no specific CORE requirement for a 
course from the Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) list. At 
least two life and/or physical science courses must be taken (PL, PS, 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 114 

LL, and LS lists). The third Sciences and M 'athematics course may be 
another science selection or may be chosen from the Mathematics 
and Formal Reasoning (MS) course lists. 

3. Social Sciences and History-three courses required: 

• One course from Soci al or Pol i ti cal H i story (SH) list 

SH List: www.ugst.umd. edu/core/courses/Distributive/Social Co. html and 

• Two courses from Behavioral and Social Sciences (SB) list 

SB L i st: www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/B ehavCo. html 

4 Interdisciplinary and Emercpng Issues (CORE CODE: IE) 

OPTIONAL CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES CATEGORY 
EFFECTIVE BEGINNING FALL 2005 

The IE category features courses that provide an interdisciplinary 
exam nation of issues (theory questions, methods) across CORE 
areas, or present a significant portion of content that does not fit into 
any of the specific CORE areas but deals with contemporary issues, 
emerging disciplines, or other categories of knowledge, skills, and 
values that lie outside these areas. 

Students may take one I E course i n pi ace of one of the f ol I owi ng: 

• The thi rd course i n the H umani ti es and the A rts category (one H L and one 
HA must be taken) OR 

• The thi rd course i n the Sci ences and M athemati cs category (two sci ence 
courses chosen from PL , PS, L L , or L S I i sts i ncl udi ng at I east one course 
from the L L or PL I i sts must be taken) OR 

• One SB course i n the Social Sciences category (one SH and one SB must 
betaken) 

See the CORE websi te at www. ugst. umd.edu/core for detai I s on 
how to use the I E opti on. 

IMPORTANT NOTES ON THE IE OPTION 

• I E i s an opti onal CORE di stri buti ve studi es category; Students may f ulf i 1 1 
CORE requi rements without taki ng an I E course. 

• Only one I E course may be counted toward f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Di stri buti ve 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 115 



Studi es requi rements. 
• Whether a student takes an I E course or not, total CORE Distri buti ve 
Studi es course and credit requi rements remai n the same: at I east 9 courses 
and 28 credits. 

I E L i st: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/l E . html 

III. CORE Advanced Studies 

Two Courses (6 credits) Requi red 

Students may choose thei r two Advanced Studi es courses from a wi de range of 
upper- 1 evel off eri ngs outsi de thei r maj ors. Good choi ces i ncl ude courses that 
mesh wi th or expand educati onal goal s or other i nterests, i ncrease knowl edge, 
and strengthen cri ti cal thi nki ng and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s. 



CORE Advanced Studies Requirement Two upper-level (300- or 400-level) 
courses outside the major taken after 60 credits. Students may substitute a CORE 
approved seni or capstone course i n thei r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for 
one of the two requi red Advanced Studi es courses. Enrol I ment i n CORE 
Capstone courses wi 1 1 be subj ect to departmental gui del i nes. The other course 
must be outsi de the maj or. Students compl eti ng doubl e maj ors or doubl e degrees 
wi 1 1 have f ulf i 1 1 ed the campus Advanced Studi es requi rement, unl ess thei r 
pri mary maj or or col I ege has addi ti onal requi rements. The students academi c 
col I ege determi nes whether or not a course i s "outsi de the maj or" for the purpose 
of f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Advanced Studies. 

The following may NOT be used to fulfill Advanced Studies requirements: 

• Professional Writi ng courses (courses that meet the Fundamental Studies 
upper- 1 evel wri ti ng requi rement) ; 

• courses used to meet Distri buti ve Studies requi rements; 

• i nternshi ps, practi ca, or other experi enti al I earni ng types of courses; 

• courses taken on a pass/f ai I basi s. 

One i ndependent studi es course (mi ni mum of three credi ts, outsi de the 
maj or) may be used toward Advanced Studi es requi rements as I ong as i t i s 
consi stent wi th the ml es above and the f acul ty member supervi si ng the 
i ndependent study agrees that i t i s appropri ate for Advanced Studi es. 

Notes CORE Capstone courses must be taken within the major. A senior thesis 
(minimum of 3 credits) or successful completion and defense of an honors thesis 
in either the General Honors or a Departmental Honors Program (minimum of 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 116 



3 credits) courts as CORE Capstone credit 

CORE Capstone List 

www. ugst. urrd.edLi/cor^courses/Aclvancecl/CapstoneCo. html 

IV. CORE Human Cultural Diversity 

One Course (3 credits) Requi red 

See the COR E D i versi ty Listat www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/D i versi ty . html 
or the onl i ne Schedul e of C I asses at 
www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on: (a) the history, status, treatment, 
or accompl ishment of women or mi nority groups and subcultures; (b) 
non-Western culture, or (c) concepts and implications of diversity. 

Note A number of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy CORE 
Distributive Studies, Advanced Studies, or a college, major, and/or supporting 
area requirement 

Study Abroad and Satisfying Core Requirements 

Students may use study abroad to earn credit toward U ni versi ty of M aryland 
CORE Distributive and/or Advanced Studies requirements. All students 
considering study abroad must meet with a Study Abroad Advisor and complete 
the Permi ssi on to Study A broad form (avai I abl e at the Study A broad Off i ce) . 
T he Study A broad Off i ce determi nes i f the course work wi 1 1 be compl eted 
through an accredi ted academi c program and be el i gi bl e for transfer credi t. U pon 
approval , the number of credits wi 1 1 be determi ned for each course. How the 
courses wi 1 1 apply to a students graduati on requi rements wi 1 1 be determi ned by 
the students advi si ng col I ege COR E D i stri buti ve Studi es equi val end es ( i f 
appl i cabl e) must be shown cl earl y on the Study A broad form wi th approval s 
from the U M academi c departments whi ch offer si mi I ar courses. CORE 
Advanced Studies criteria also apply to Study Abroad courses students wish to 
count toward CORE Advanced Studies. Some college/departmental guidelines 
and restrictions may apply. 

Parti ci pati on i n a study abroad program with the successful compl eti on and 
transfer of at least 9 credits abroad automatical ly waives a students CORE 
H uman C ul tural D i versi ty requi rement. 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 117 



Approved Courses for theCORE Program 



Visit the CORE Web site at www.ugst.umd.edLi/core for program 
descriptions for the requirements in each CORE Category, course lists and 
further details. 

Notes about the lists: 

1. At the Web si te I i sted above, cl i ck on What are theCORE Courses? for I i nks 
to the current I i sts of approved courses i n each CORE category. N ote that 
courses are added and del eted over ti me. A sel ecti on of the approved courses i s 
offered each semester. 

2. Some courses are approved for CORE for one semester only to offer students 
sped al opportuni ti es. The one-ti me approval I i st changes each semester. Go to 
www. uqst. umd.edu/core/ and cl i ck on WhataretheCORE Courses?, then cl i ck 
on One-TimeOnly Courses. 

3. Course numbers and ti ties change from time to time. SeetheCORE Web site 
I i sted above for updates. 

4. 1 n a parti cul ar semester, courses may be cross- 1 i sted or shared by more than 
one department and may appear under more than one course number. I f 
cross-listed or shared courses are approved for CORE, this information will be 
avai I abl e i n the onl i ne I i sti ngs. F requent i nstances i ncl ude courses wi th pref i xes 
AASP,AAST,AMST,CMLT,JWST, LGBT, andWMST. 

5. For i information about Honors (HON R) courses that are approved for CORE, 
pi ease refer to the onl i ne resources noted above. Other resources i ncl ude the 
current "The University Honors Program I information and Course Description 
Bookl et" and the U ni versity Honors Program website: www.honors.umd.edu 

6. For information about CORE Fundamental Studies courses, pi ease see the 
F undamental Studi es secti on above. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools PagellE 



6. The Colleges and Schools 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES (AGNR) 

0107 Symons Hall, 301-405-7761 
www.agnr.umd.edu 
eweiss@umd.edu 
Dean: Cheng- i Wei 

Associate Dean(s): LeonH. Slaughter 
A ssi start Dean(s) : Ray Stri ckl i n 

TheCollege of Agriculture and Natural Resources offers a variety of academic programs that apply science, management design, 
and engineering to improve the world in which we live and work. Feeding the world's population, developing scientifically-based 
land use practices and policies, understanding animal and plant biology, improving nutrition and its effects on human health, 
conservi ng and restori ng ecosystems, and profitably managi ng farms and agri busi nesses i n harmony with the envi ronment are al I 
vital concerns of the Col lege. I integrating the useand protection of natural resources in the production of food and nursery crops is a 
chal I enge f aci ng students. 

I n addition to course work, undergraduates have opportunities to work closely with faculty i n state-of-the-art f aci I ities 
i ncl udi ng those for ani mal sci ences, di eteti cs, envi ronmental sci ence and technol ogy, pi ant sci ences, and veteri nary medi ci ne. T he 
College also serves as the academic home of the Maryland Campus of the Virginia- Maryland Regional College of Veterinary 
Medicine. Nearby resources such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's BeltsvilleAgricultural National Research Center, the 
National I institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Admi nistration, the Smithsonian I institution and the National Zoo, M aryland's 
Departments of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center enhance teaching, research, 
internship, and career opportunities for students. Field study courses offered in Brazil, Belize, Egypt, England, and Costa Rica, and 
study-abroad programs such as those i n R ussi a and A ngers, F ranee expose students to other cul tures and envi ronments. L earni ng 
opportunities are also strengthened through student involvement i n such co-curricular activities as the College Honors Program 
career programs, leadershi p workshops, and student cl ubs. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Educational opportunities in the Col lege of Agri culture and Natural Resources are enhanced by the proximity of several research 
units of the federal government. Teachi ng and research activities i n the College are conducted with the cooperation of scientists 
and professional people in government positions. Of particular interest are the National Agricultural Research Center at Beltsville, 
the National Agricultural Library, the National Arboretum and the Food and Drug Admi nistration. 

Instruction in the basic biological and social sciences, and I andscape design is conducted in modem, 

technological ly-equipped classrooms and laboratories. The appl ication of basic pri nci pies to practical situations is demonstrated for 
the student in numerous ways. Inaddition toon-campus facilities, the col lege operates several education and research facilities 
throughout Maryland. Horticultural and agronomic crops, turf, beef, horses, dairy cattie, and poultry are maintained under practical 
and research conditions and may be used by our students. These centers, as well as other selected locations on and off campus 
also serve as I ivi ng laboratories for envi ronmental studies. 

Admission Requirements 

It is recommended that students entering the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources have completed a high school 
preparatory course that includes: English, 4 units; mathematics, 3 units; biological and physical sciences, 3 units; and history or 
social sciences, 2 units. The Landscape Architecture maj or is a limited enroll merit program (LEP). See chapter 1 for general 
I imited-enrol I merit program admission policies. 

Undergraduate Degree Reqiirements/DegreeOptions 

Departments i n theCol lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources offer the fol lowi ng programs of study: 

Agricultural and Resource Economics Business Management; Agricultural Science Environmental and Resource 
Policy; Food Production; International Agriculture and Political Process. 

Animal Sciences: Animal Care and Management; Equine Studies; Laboratory Ani mal Care Science/Preprofessional; 
and Ani mal Biotechnology 

Combined Agriculture/Veterinary Medicine 



6. TheCollegssandSchools PagellS 



Environmental Sdenceand Policy: Environment& Agriculture, Environmental Economics, Environmental 
Restoration, Soil, Water, & Land Resources, and Wildlife Resources & Conservation. 

Environmental Scienceand Technology: Concentrations in Ecological Technology Design, Environmental Health, 
Soil and Watershed Science, or Natural Resources Management 

Plant Sciences: Horticulture and Crop Production, Landscape Management, Plant Sciences, Turf and Golf Course 
Management, and Urban Forestry 

General Agricultural Sciences 

L andscape Architecture 

Natural Resources Management: Environmental Education/Park Management; Land and Water Resource 
M anagement; and PI ant and Wi I dl if e Resource M anagement 

Nutrition and Food Sdence Dietetics; Food Science and Nutritional Science 

Students graduating from the College must complete at least 120 credits with a grade point average of 2.0 in all courses applicable 
toward the degree. Requi rements of the maj or and support ng areas are I i sted under individual program headi ngs i n the 
Departments, M ajors and Programs section of this site. 

Advising 

Each student in the Col lege is assigned a faculty advi sor to assist in sdecting courses, accessing academic enrichment opportunities, 
and making strategic career decisions. Advisors normally work with a limited number of students and are ableto give individual 
guidance Both freshmen enteri ng with a defi nite choice of curriculum and transfer students are assigned to departmental advisors 
for counsel and pi anni ng of al I academi c programs as soon as possi bl e. Students have access to addi ti onal advi si ng through thei r 
home departments undergraduate program off i ce and through the col I ege's student servi ces off i ce A G N R Peer M enters, 
academi cal I y tal ented and uni versi ty-engaged uppercl assmen, provi de an addi ti onal advi si ng resources for students i n the col I ege. 

Specifics of advisor assignment are available in the undergraduate office of each department. 
Departments and Centers 

Undergraduate credit instruction is offered by the Departments of A nimal and Avian Sciences (ANSC), Agricultural and Resource 
Economics (AREC), Environmental Science and Technology (ENST), Nutrition and Food Science (NFSC), and Plant Science and 
L andscape A rchitecture(PSLA). An additional major, Environmental Scienceand Pol icy (ENSP) is based and administered within 
the Col I ege of Agriculture and Natural Resources; it offers specializations advised within this col lege as wd I thecollegesof 
Behavioral and Social Sciences, Chemical and Life Sciences, and Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Additional 
courses are provided through the 2-year certificate program i n the I nstitute of Appl ied Agriculture. 

Minors 

Academic M inors provide students an opportunity to expand or complement thar major by taking additional courses (15-24 credits) 
i n a coherent f i d d of study. Students i nterested i n a mi nor shoul d contact the undergraduate program off i ce of the department 
offeri ng the minor. Currentiy the fol lowing are approved minors (with the offeringderjartment in parentheses) in the college: 

Agribusiness Economics (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Environmental Economics and Policy (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Landscape Management (Plant Science and Landscape Architecture) 

Soil Sdence(Environmental Science and Technology) 

Living-Learning Programs 

EcoHouse, a Living-Learning program for undergraduates interested in learning about and promoting innovative, 
ecologically-sound lifestyles. I nformati on is avail able through the Environmental Science and Pol icy Program and through 
Department of Resident Life (www.resnetumd.edu or email to resl ife@umd.edu) . 

The col I ege also sponsors, through its Environmental Scienceand Policy Program the Environment, Technology and Economy 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel2C 



curricul um i n College Park Scholars. Admission to Col lege Park Scholars is a selective and by-i nvitation. (For further i information, 
see Undergraduate Studies, College Park Scholars Program in the Colleges and Schools section of this site). 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Thelnstitute of Applied Agriculture offers 60-credit certificate programs designed primarily for professional development Majors 
offered include Agribusiness Management, Golf Course Management Equine Business Management Landscape Management, 
Ornamental Horticulture, and Turfgrass Management Some two-year program students continue on in regular four-year programs 
in the col lege and several of the college's majors allow li mited use of I nstitute courses in their programs. 

Pre-Veterinary M eel cine 

Four-year degree students contemplati ng early admission to veteri nary schools may choose the Combi ned Agriculture-Veteri nary 
Medicine program. Inthis option, students complete basic science courses and University CORE in three years. They apply to 
veterinary schools in the Fall semester of the junior year, and, if they are granted early admission to an accredited school of 
veterinary medicine, the B.S. degree is awarded after completion of the first year of vet school. Details of the curriculum are 
found intheAnimal Sciences major elsewhere in this catalog. 

College Honors Program 

Students may apply for admission to theCol lege Honors program after completing 60 credits with a mi nimum 3.2 GPA i n a 
program withi n the Col lege. Honors students work with a faculty mentor and must take at least 12 credits of honors courses 
including a senior thesis. I nterested students should contact their faculty advisor. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student participation in professional societies, clubs, and interest groups is extensive in the col lege, and students find opportunity 
for varied expression and growth i n thefol lowi ng organizations: 

AGNR Peer Mentors; AG NR Student Ambassadors; AG NR Student Council; Alpha Zeta; Alpha Gamma Rho; Animal Husbandry 
Club; Animal Sciences Graduate Association; College Park Environmental Group; Collegiate4-H; Food and Nutrition Club; 
L andscape A rchitecture Student Association; MD Student Chapter of Golf Course Superintendents Association of America; 
Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Sciences (MANRRS); Natural Resources Management Society; Sigma 
Alpha; Equestrian Club; UM Food Technology Club; and Veteri nary Science Club. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of scholarships are availablefor students enrol led in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. These include 

AGNR Alumni Association Scholarship, AGNR General Scholarship, Arthur M.Ahalt Memorial Scholarship, Attorney General's 
Agricultural and Natural Resources Scholarship, Profess J ohnAxley Memorial Scholarship, Eileen Barnett Scholarship, Beltsville 
Garden Club Scholarship, Bruce and Donna Berlage Scholarship, Chester F. B I etch Endowment, Bowie-Crofton Garden Club 
Scholarship, Frank D. Brown Memorial Scholarship, J oseph Byrd Foundation Scholarship, J onas and J oan Cash Student Award 
Scholarship, Chapel Valley Landscape Honorary Scholarship, George Earle Cook, Jr. Scholarship, Patricia E.Criner& Linda 
C ri ner B edate Schol arshi p, E rnest T . C ul I en M emori al Schol arshi p, J ai me Dannemann Schol arshi p, R . F . Davi s M emori al 
Scholarship, J erryV. DeBarthe Memorial Scholarship, William R. DeLauder Scholarship Scholarship, MyloS. Downey Memorial 
Scholarship, Equine Studies Scholarship, Explore AGNR Scholarship, James R. Ferguson Memorial Scholarship, Kenneths. 
Fowler Memorial Endowed Scholarship, Thomas A. Fretz Agriculture and Natural Resources Scholarship, J ames& Sarah Goddard 
Memorial Scholarship, William D. Godwin Endowed Scholarship, Golf Course Builders of America Association Foundation 
Scholarship, Green Scholarship for Environmental Protection Scholarship, Manasse3j.& Susanna J arboe Grove Scholarship, Tom 
Hartsock Animal Management Scholarship, H. Pal mer Hopkins Schol arshi p established byCharlesW. Coalejr. & Ellen Kirby 
Coale, Charles & Judy lager Scholarship, Land Grant Scholarship, J ames& Gertrude Learner Scholarship, Donald Leishear 
I nternational Travel Scholarship, Lee Majeskie Dairy Youth Scholarship, Mary I and Greenhouse Growers Association Scholarship, 
JamesR. Mi Her Outstanding Senior Scholarship, John and Marjorie Moore I nternational Agriculture& Natural Resources Student 
Travel Scholarship, J ames and Dessie Moxley Scholarship, Paul R. Poffenberger Memorial Scholarship, J ennifer Russo Memorial 
Scholarship, Ross& Pauline Smith Scholarship, J. Herbert Snyder Educational Scholarship, Southern States Cooperative 
Scholarship, Hiram I. Stine Memorial Scholarship, T.B. Symons Memorial Scholarship, TIC Gums Scholarship, Vansville Farmers 
Club Scholarship, A. V. Vierhel I er Scholarship, Siegfried Weisberger, J r. Memorial Scholarship, Theo & Georgianna M iles Weiss 
Memorial Scholarship, and the William R.Winslow Scholarship. 

TheCollege is privileged to offer additional support in the form of interest-free loans through theCatherineBrinkley Loan Fund 
which are avail able to students who are residents of Maryland and progressing in programs within the Col lege of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources. 

Awards 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel21 



The Agriculture and Natural Resources Alumni Chapter provides recognition each year for the Outstanding Senior in the two-year 
and four-year programs. 

Research Units 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) supports research conducted primarily by 120faculty scientists located 
withintheCollegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources. Faculty use state-of-the-art facilities such as a new Research Greenhouse 
Complex and Environmental Simulator, as well as 10 off-campus research locations, for research in the science, business, policy, 
and practi ce of agri cul ture MAES supports research that benef i ts consumers and producers al i ke; for exampl e, our si gnif i cant focus 
on the envi ronment protects val uabl e natural resources such as the C hesapeake B ay . U ndergraduate students al so benef i t from 
mentoring by MA ES-supported faculty and instructional use of MAES facilities statewide 

University of Maryland Extension 

The University of Mary I and Extension educates citizens in the application of practical, research-based knowledge to critical issues 
in agri cultural and agri business includingaquaculture; natural resources and the envi ronment; human development nutrition, diet, 
and health; youth development and 4-H; and family and community leadership. The statewide program includes more than 180 
faculty and support staff located in 23 counties, theCity of Baltimore, four regional centers, and the University of Maryland's 
College Park and Eastern Shore campuses. I n addition, more than 15,000 volunteers and citizens in Maryland give generously of 
thei r ti me and energy. 

Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (CFS3) 

T he C enter for Food Safety and Security Systems (C F S3) provi des worl d-cl ass research, educati on and outreach on i ssues 
related to food and water defense, safety and protection. Housed in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, this new center 
wi 1 1 provide additional opportunity for students to become i nvolved i n issues of significance for homeland security. For 
i information on CFS3, pleaseseeagresearch.umd.edu/CFS3/index.cfmorcall 301-405-0773. 

Harry R. HughesCenterfor Agro-Ecology, Inc. 

The Harry R. HudhesCenterfor Agro-Ecology, Inc. is a private, non-prof it 501 (c) 3 organization affiliated with the University 
of Maryland. TheCenter brings together diverse iiferestsfromtheagricultural, forestry, and environmental communities for the 
purpose of retaining Maryland's working I andscapes and the industries they support while protecting and improving the health of 
theChesapeake Bay and its tri buraries. For further i information see agroecol .umd.edu/or cal I at 410-827-6202. 

J oint Institute For Food Safety and Nutrition 

TheJ oint Institute For Food Safety and Nutrition (J I FSAN), established between the US FDA and the University of Maryland 
in 1996, is a jointly administered research and education program. For information on J I FSAN, seewww.jifsan.umd.edu/ or call 
301-405-8382. 

Northeastern Regional Aquaoiture Center 

The Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center (NRAC) is one of five Regional A quacul ture Centers established bytheU. S. 
Congress for theUnited States. Funded bytheUSDA, and representing 12 states and the District of Columbia, NRAC develops and 
sponsors cooperative regional research and extension projects in support of the aquaculture industry in the northeastern United 
States. Forfurtherirformationseewww.nrac.umd.edu/orcall 301-405-6085. 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Mecfdne> Maryland Campus 

Collegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources 
1202 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, 301-314-6830 
www.vetmed.vt edu 

The Virginia- Maryland Regional Collegeof Veterinary Medicine is operated by theUniversity of Mary I and and the Virginia 
Polytechnic I nstituteand State University. Each year, 30 Maryland and 50 Virginia residents comprise the entering class of a 
four-year program I eadi ng to a Doctor of V eteri nary M edi ci ne ( DV M ) . 

Tlnefirst three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic I nstituteand State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. The final year of 
instruction is given at several locations, including the University of Maryland, Col lege Park. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel22 



A student desiringadmissi on to the col lege must complete the pre-veterinary requirements and apply for admission to the 
prof essi onal curri cul um. A dmi ssi on to thi s program i s competi ti ve, and open to all M ary I and resi dents. All M aryl and resi dents' 
applications are processed at the Col lege of Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus, University of Maryland, College Park. 

I institute of Applied AcriaJtire (Two-Year Procram) 

Collegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources 
Glori Hyman, Acting Director 
2123 J ull Hall, 301-405-4685 
E-mail: iaa@umd.edu 
www.iaa.umd.edu/ 

The Institute of Applied Agriculture (I AA) awards academic certifi elites inAgribusinessMaiTagerrert, Equine Business 
Management, General Ornamental Horticulture, Golf Course Management Landscape Management, and Turf grass Management 
Asa two-year program the I A A has a separate admi ssi on pol i cy . U pon compl eti on of the program, students are we! come to 
transfer to the University of Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland University College and other schools. 

For more information about the I AA, its admissions procedures, and requirements, contact the I nstitute of Applied Agriculture, 
2123J ull Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742-2525. 



School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation 

1298 A rchitecture B ui I di ng, 301-405-8000 

www.arch.umd.edu 

arci nfo@umd.edu for general i nformation and requests 

archadvise@umd.edu for undergraduate advisi ng questions 

www.lep.umd.edu for information on applying to the Limited Enrollment Program as a freshman or internal transfer student and to 

see the gateway requi rements f or A rchi tecture 

www.transferadvisi ng.umd.edu for transfer advisi ng questions 

Dean: Garth Rockcastie 

Associate Dean(s): J ohn Maudlin-J eronimo, Qing Shen 

Assistant Dean(s): Ingrid Farrell 

Architecture Program 

Director: Madlen Simon 

Assistant Director: Courtney Miller Bel lairs 

Professors: M.Bell, R. Etiin(DistUniv Prof), S. Hurtt, G. Rockcastie, T. Schumacher, R.Vann 

Associate Professors: C. Bovill, R. Eisenbach, A. Gardner, I. Goumay, B. Kelly, M. Simon 

Assistant Professors: M.Ambrose, H. Koliji, L.D. QuirosPacheco, I.Williams, B.D. Wortham-Galvin 

Professors of the Practice: G. Bowden, C. Frisone, P. Noonan 

Senior Lecturers: C. Miller Bellairs 

Lecturers: M . al Khalil, L. Escobal, C. Lostritto, A. Pressman, M . Ramirez, R. Schneck 

Professors Emeriti: W. Bechhoefer, R. Bennett, K. DuPuy, G. FrancescatoJ . Hill, R. LewisJ . Loss., F. Schlesinger 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a four-year undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree i n architecture. The School offers graduate programs leadi ng to the professional degrees of M aster of A rchitecture, 
M aster of H istoric Preservation, M aster of Community Planni ng, and M aster of Real Estate Development. I n addition, joi nt 
professional degrees and certificates areoffered. The School offers a post- prof essi onal Master of Science in Architecture degree 
and a Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design. Students graduating with the undergraduate major in architecture typically 
requi re two years to compl ete the curri cul um I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree i n archi tecture. 

Students receive rigorous and comprehensive instruction from a faculty whose members are active i n professional practice or 
research. M any faculty members have disti nguished themselves across the professional spectrum and represent different approaches 
to architectural design. Their individual areas of expertise include architectural design and theory, history, architectural 
archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, and historic preservation. Visiting critics, lecturers, and the Kea Distinguished 
Professor augment the faculty; together they provide students with the requi site exposure to contemporary realities of architectural 
design. 

The B.S. degree in architecture will qualify graduates to pursuea career in a number of fields, such as construction, real estate 
development public administration, or historic preservation, or to continue in graduate work in professional fields such as 
architecture, urban planni ng, historic preservation, landscape architecture, or law. The program offers design studios and electives 
i n drawi ng and vi sual representati on I eadi ng some of our students to pursue advanced degrees i n graphi c desi gn, i nteri or desi gn, 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel23 



fashion design, exhi bition design and other creative fields. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

The school is housed i n a modern bui Idi ng providi ng design workstations for each student a 300 seat auditori um, and semi nar and 
classroom facilities. TheGreat Space, an atrium at the center of the School, is the location for collaborate projects, design reviews, 
critiques, and a variety of events that that bring the architecture program together. Facilities include a well-equipped woodworking 
and model shop, computer labs, digital output and digital fabrication. TheArchitecture Library, one of the finest in the nation, 
offers convenient access to a current ci rculati ng col lection of more than 24,000 vol umes, 6,000 periodicals, and an extensive 
selection of reference materials. Rare books and special acquisitions include a col lection relating to international expositions and 
the 11,000-volume National Trustfor Historic Preservation Library. The Elizabeth D. Alley Visual Resources Collection includes a 
reserve collection of 500,000 slides on architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, architectural science, and technology as 
well as audio- visual equipment for classroom and studio use. 

Summer programs include travel to Rome, Paris, Turkey, Great Britain, and other countries. Students may earn direct credit doing 
hands-on restoration work and by attending lectures by visiting architects, preservationists, and scholars. 

Admission Requirements 

www.lep.umd.edu for information on applying to the Limited Enrollment Program 
www.transferadvisi ng.umd.edu for transfer advisi ng questions 

Architecture is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See www.lep.umd.edu for information on Limited Enrollment Programs and 
a I ink to Architecture. All students must meet the requirements for admission to theLEP by applying for a Review at 
approxi mately 45 credits. 

Freshman Admission. Students with the most competitive records from high school gain direct admission to the Undergraduate 
Architecture Program through the University Admissions Office. Early application is strongly recommended due to limited space 
i n the program. A dmi tted freshmen have access to the necessary advi si ng through thei r initial semesters to determi ne if archi tecture 
i s an appropri ate maj or f or thei r i nterests and abi I i ti es. 

Freshmen who are admitted to architecture must apply for a review of their progress at the end of their third semester, typically 45 
credi ts. To meet the provi si ore of the revi ew, these students must derronstrate their ability to complete the foil owing: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirements 

• Distributive Studies CORE requirements 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher in each course (students are advised to repeat courses if they do 
not receive the required grade) 

• MATH 220, PHYS 121 andcneafthecaurses?* listed below with a mini mum grade of 2.0 in each and an overall 

mi ni mum grade poi nt average of 2.67 i n al I three (students are advised to repeat courses if they do not receive the requi red 
grade) 

** Students must take one of the axrses below to cxxnpletetheMadiaTiaticsancI the Sdaxes Distributive StuciesCORE 
requirement: 

• BSCI 205 (3) Environmental Science (LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I rrplications of Global Change (PS) 

• PHYS 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics II (PL) 

Students may be enrol led in ARCH 226 andcompleti ng their distributive studies contemporaneous with the review process during 
their fourth semester. A minimumcumulativeGPA of 2.00 in all collegelevel coursework is also required. In addition, the review 
will include an assessment of two letters of recommendations, transcripts, an essay, and a portfolio, the nature of which is specified 
by the School. Please contact the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at 301-405-8000 for a Review Process 
Application, debailedportfoliorequiremenrsarddeadlinesorvisitwww.arch.umd.edu. 

Note: Students are adrritted to the School during the Fall semester only. 

Transfer Admission Requirements. New transfer students, as wel I as students al ready enrol led on campus who wish to change 
majors to architecture, may also apply for the Review Process. Admission to transfer students is very competitive due to limited 
space and vari es f rom year to year. To meet the provi si ore of the process, transfer appl i cants must demonstrate their ability to 
compl ete the f ol I owi ng: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Distributive Studies CORE requirement 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher in each course (students are advised to repeat courses if they do 
not receive the required grade) 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 124 



• MATH 220, PHYS 121 and one of the courses** listed below with a mini mum grade of 2.0 in each and an overall minimum 
grade poi nt average of 2.67 i n al I three (students are advised to repeat courses if they do not receive the requi red grade) 

** Students must take one of the courses below to complete the M athematics and the Sciences Distri butive Studies CORE 
requirement 

• BSCI 205 (3) Environmental Science (LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mplications of Global Change (PS) 

• PHYS 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics II (PL) 

Students may be enrol led in ARCH 226 and completing their distri butive studies contemporaneous with the review process during 
their fourth semester. A minimumcumulativeGPA of 3. 00 or above in all collegelevel coursework is also required. Inaddition, 
the review will include an assessment of two letters of recommendations, transcripts, an essay, and a portfolio, the nature of which 
is specified by the School. Please contact the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at 301-405-8000 for a Review 
Process Application, detailed portfolio requirements and deadlines, orvisitwww.arch.umd.edu. Note: Many outstanding transfer 
candidates apply to the Review Process for admission. Completion of the above requirements does not guarantee admission i nto 
the Limited Enrollment Program. 

Note: Students are adrritted to toe School during the Fall semester only. 

Appeals, Students who are denied admission as a freshman and feel that they have extenuati ng ci rcumstances may appeal i n 
writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell Building. Students denied admission at the 45 credit review may 
appeal in writing directiy to the Director of Architecture, School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Forfurther 
information, contact the Counsel or for Li mi ted Enrol I merit Programs at 301-314-8385. 

Recruitment 

arcinf o(5) umd.edu for general i nf ormati on and requests re! ated to the undergraduate and graduate programs archadviseOumd.edu 
for undergraduate advi si ng questi ons 

www.lep.umd.edu for information on applying to the Limited Enrollment Program as a freshman or internal transfer student 
www.transf eradvi si ng. umd.edu for transf er advi si ng questi ons 

All pre-col lege students and families are strongly encouraged to attend a Visit Maryland Day col lege session offered at various 
times during each Fall semester- seewww.umd.edu. A detailed presentation of the Program isfollowed byatour of the building 
duri ng each of these more formal sessi ons. I nf ormal tours of the School are offered duri ng term ti me on M onday, Wednesday and 
Friday at 1pm. Visitors have an opportunity to meet with an Undergraduate Advisor at 1:30 on each tour day. Consult www.arch.urr 
www.arch.umd.edu for information on tours and summer tour hours (hours may vary). Open Houses for students admitted to the 
A rchitecture Program take pi ace duri ng the Spri ng Semester. 

Transfer students who have not yet applied/accepted a placeat UMCP should contact the Pre-transfer Advising Unit at 
www.transf eradvi si ng. umd.edu for advi ce on proceedi ng toward a maj or and a smooth transi ti on. If done i n advance, thi s wi 1 1 he! p 
to maximize the number of courses that will transfer and apply as an architecture pre-requi sites (se ewww.lep.umd.edu . Seethe 
B.S. in Architecture curriculum and additional information at www.arch.umd.edu and specifically at 
htto://arch.urrd.edu/architBctore/academics/clegree_programs/BS_ARCH .pdf . Transfer students may review theTransfer Credit 
Center's website for information on courses that will transfer to UMCP www.tceumd.edu 

Students within the University who wish to apply to the A rchitecture Program are invited to meet with an Undergraduate Advisor 
during term time for advice on pre- requi sites and the Review Process for admission as a transfer student 

For additional questions about recruitment contact Courtney M iller Bellairs, Assistant Director, Architecture Program. 
cmi I lerbO umd.edu 

U nda graduate Degree Requi remente/Degree Options 

I n the first two years of college, directiy admitted students and those seeking to transfer into the School of Architecture, Planning 
and Preservation should adhere to the fol lowi ng curricul um: 

Credits 

CORE/ELECT General Education (CORE) and Electives 30 

UNIV100 The Students in the University 1 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing (CORE) 3 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I (CORE) 3 

ARCH170 IntroductiontotheBuiltEnvironment(CORE) 3 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 125 



PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I (CORE) 

ARCH225 History of World Architecture I 

ARCH226 History of World Architecture 1 1 

ARCH 242 Drawing I 

One from thefoHovJncf 
B SC 1 205 E nvi ronmental Sci ence ( L S) 

GEOG140 Coastal Environments (PS) 

GEOL120 Environmental Geology (PS) 

GEOL123+ Causes and Implications of Global Change (PS) 
PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physicsll (PL) 

Total Crecits 

-+GEOL 123 is also offered as M ET0123 and as GEOG123 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



56 



BasicCORE requirements are fulfilled in the first 2 years, while Advanced CORE requirements are satisfied after students have 
completed 60 credits. 

If admitted after completing 56crecftesbxJenteareexpectedtocompletethefdlovM of 120 

credits: 



Third Year 

ARCH227 History of World Architecturelll 
ARCH400 Architecture Studio I* 
ARCH410 Architectural Technology I 
ARCH401 Architecture Studio 1 1 
ARCH411 Architectural Technology 1 1 
ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
ELECT Directed Elective 
CORE Core Requi rements 



Total 



Forth Year 

ARCH402 Architecture Studio III 

ARCH412 Architectural Technology 1 1 1 

ELECT Directed History of Architecture Elective** 

ARCH403 Architecture Studio IV 

ARCH413 Architectural Technology IV 

ELECT Directed Elective 

CORE CORE Requirements 

Total 
Total Credits 



C recite 

3 
6 
4 
6 
4 
3 
3 
3 
32 

6 
4 
3 
6 
4 
6 
3 

32 
120 



*Courses are to be faten in sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in course titles 
** Directed Architecture hi story courses 

ARCH420 History of American Architecture 
ARCH422 History of Greek Architecture 
ARCH423 History of Roman Architecture 
ARCH 433 H i story of Renai ssance A rchi tecture 
ARCH434 History of Modern A rchi tecture 
ARCH435 History of Contemporary Architecture 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel26 



Advising 

Eiteri rig students are advised by the Office of Undergraduate Advising located in the School's Main Office. Advising ismandatory 
for al I undergraduate archi tecture maj ors each semester. Students must meet wi th an academi c advi sor to di scuss thei r academi c 
plan and course selection. Students can make an appointment for advising by contacting the School office (301-405-8000) or by 
si gni ng up for an appoi rrtment at the M ai n Off i ce front desk. Students shoul d contact the advi si ng off i ce vi a the front desk or archad 
archadvi se@umd.edu if an appoi rrtment needs to be changed or a question answered. Some wal k-i n appoi ntmerrts may be 
available. Student may use the archadvi se@umd.edu email at any time. Students should always include their full name, UID and 
contact i nf ormati on i n any emai I correspondence. T he advi si ng off i ce wi 1 1 be cl osed duri ng certai n cri ti cal weeks duri ng the 
semester when advisors need to focus on their own academic deadlines. The Main Office front desk will have information on these 
closures. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The A rchitecture Student Assembly represents the student body. Assembly members are elected from undergraduate and graduate 
classes. Representatives attend Faculty Meetings, serve on committees, and organize the A rchitecture Program Retrospective at the 
end of each semester. 

The School of A rchitecture, Planni ng, and Preservation sponsors a chapter of the A merican I nstitute of A rchitecture Students 
(AIAS), the national association for architecture students. TheAIAS chapter sponsors a variety of activities including an annual 
Career Fair, Beaux Arts Ball, field trips, conferences, workshops other events throughout the academic year. 

The Emerging Green Builders is the student organization dedicated to promoting sustainability. Members organize exhibits, a 
public lecture, a series of lunchtimetalks, and other activities. 

Financial Assistance 

M any f i nanci al awards are offered to freshman upon admi ssi on. A ny questi ons about f i nanci al ai d for freshman admi ts shoul d be 
di rected to the offi ce of A dmissionsand the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Each year, the School of A rchitecture, Planni ng and Preservation offers a number of merit-based scholarshi ps to qual ifyi ng 
undergraduate students. M any are offered to students parti ci pad ng i n study abroad programs. I rrterested students are encouraged to 
apply for these in early Spring. I information is avai lable at www.arch.umd.edu . Please note that most of these scholarships are 
reserved for students i n the studi o sequence of the program. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal, state, and institutional financial assistance programs 
and, in cooperation with other University off ices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For more 
information, visit vwuw.finandalaid.umd.edu . FreshrrenardsophorToresarestronglyencouragedtDvisittheOFSA earlyin 
thei r tenure at the U niversity of M aryland to determi ne any scholarshi ps they may be eligible for in the foil owing years. 

Research Units 

National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education 

1112 PreinkertFieldhouse, CollegePark, 301-405-6788 
www.smartgrowth. umd.edu/ 
Dr. GerrittKnaap 

The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education is a non-partisan center for research and leadership training on 
SmartGrowth and related land use issues nationally and internationally. Founded in 2000, the National Centerfor SmartGrowth is 
a cooperative venture of four U niversity of M aryland schools: Architecture. Planning and Preservation. Public Policy. Agriculture 
and Natural Resources, and Engineering . The mission of the Center is to bring thediverse resources of the University of Maryland 
and a network of nati onal experts to bear on i ssues i n I and devel opment, resource preservati on and urban growth - the nature of 
our communi ti es, our I andscape and our qual i ty of I if e - through i rrterdi scipli nary research, outreach and educati on, thereby 
establishing the University as the nati onal leader in this field. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2088 
www.arhu.umd.edu 
Dean: J ames Harris 

The Col lege of A its and H umanities embraces a heterogeneous group of disci plinestriatstudyhurran experience, thought 
expression and creativity. All value the development of critical thinking, fluent expression in writing and speech, sensitivity to 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 127 



ethical and aesthetic issues, and a complex understanding of history and culture. Departments and programs in Arts and Humanities 
prize vigorous intellectual debate in a diverse community. Whilethey have strong individual identities, they are also involved in 
interdisciplinary studies. Thus students will find, for example, courses in the Department of English that approach literature in its 
historical contexts, courses in the Department of Hi story tiiat adopt feminist perspectives, courses in the Department of A it Hi story 
and A rchaeology that study African pol itics, and so on. 

Further examples of the special opportunities available to students in this richly variegated col lege include an exceptional visual 
resource center i n A it H i story and A rchaeol ogy, the E ngl i sh Departments computer- based wri ti ng cl assroom, and an AT&T 
Foreign Language Classroom. Additionally, students may add an international experience to their undergraduate education by 
participating in an A RHU -sponsored study abroad program in Nice, Alcala, Sevilla, or Genoa or an exchange program in the 
United Kingdom Singapore, or Japan. The educational vistas open to students in Dance, Music, and Theatre are enhanced 
enormously by theClarice Smith Centerfor the Performing Arts, which houses those three departments. Students may also 
participate in one of the College's five living- 1 earning programs: Honors Humanities, College Park Scholars in theArts, College 
Park Scholars in Culture of the Americas, J imenez-Porter Writers' House, and Language House (see below). 

Admission Requirements 

Students wishing to major in one of the creative or performing arts are encouraged to seek training in the ski I Is associated with 
such an area pri or to matri cul ati on. Students appl yi ng for entrance to these programs may be requi red to audi ti on, present si i des, or 
submit a portfol i o as a part of the admi ssi on requi rements. 

Recriitment 

1120L Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2096 
www.arhu. umd.edu/admi ssi ons 
Admissions Coordinator: J. Darius Greene 

TheCol lege's Admissions Coordi nator serves as a resource and contact peison for prospective students interested in Arts and 
Humanities degrees, and as a liaison to the Off ice of Undergraduate Admi ssi ons. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rerrents/DegreeOptions 

The Col lege of Arts and Humanities offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts in thefol lowing fields of study: 

American Studies: www.amst.umd.edu 

A rabi c Studi es: www.arabic.umd.edu 

Art: www.artumd.edu 

Art History and Archeology: www.arthistory-archaeoloay.umd.edu 

Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies: www.ceres.umd.edu 

Chinese Language and Literature: 

www.chi nese.umd.edu 
CI assies and Classical Humanities: www.classics.umd.edu 
Classical Humanities (seeciassics) 
Communication: www.comm.umd.edu 
Dance : www.dance.umd.edu 

English Language and Literature www.english.umd.edu 
French Language and Literature www.french.umd.edu 
Germanic Studies: www.qerman.umd.edu 

Greek (see Classics) 

History: www.historv.umd.edu 

Italian Language and Literature 

www.italian.umd.edu 

J apanese Language and Literature: 

www.j apanese. umd.edu 

J ewish Studies: www.iewishstudies.umd.edu 

Latin (see Classics) 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel26 



L ati n and G reek (see classes) 

Linguistics: www.ling.unxl.edu 

M usic: www.music.umd.edu 

Students majoring in Music may pursue a Bachelor of Music degree 

Persian Studies: www.persian.umd.edu 

Phi losophy: www.philosophy.umd.edu 

Romance Languages: www, romance! anquaqes. umd.edu 

Russian: www.russian.umd.edu 

Spanish and Portuguese www.spanish.umd or www.portuguese.umd.edu 

Theatre: www.theatre.umd.edu 

Women's Studies: www.womensstudies.umd.edu 

TheCol lege also offers certificate programs in Women's Studies, East Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. 

Major Requirements 

• All students must complete a program of study consisting of a major (afield of concentration) and sometimes supporting 
courses as specified by one of the academic units of the Col lege. No program of study shall require in excess of 60semester 
hours. 

• A major shall consist, in addition to the lower-division departmental prerequisites, of 24 to 40 hours, at least 12 of which 
must be i n courses numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must betaken at the University of M aryland, Col lege Park. 

• A major program someti mes requi res a secondary field of concentration (support ng courses) . The nature and number of 
these courses are determi ned by the major department 

• No grade lower than C may be used to fulfil I rraj or or supporting course requirements. No course for the major or support 
module may betaken Pass-Fail . 

• Students should consult the unit in which they will major for specific details; certain units have mandatory advising. 

Graduation Requirements 

Thefol lowi ng Col lege requi rements apply only to students earni ng Bachelor of A rts degrees from the Col lege of A rts and 
Humanities. These requirements are in addition to or infulfillmentof campus and departmental requirements. For information 
concerni ng the Bachelor of M usic i n the School of M usic, students should consult a M usic advisor. 

Students who double major in ARHU and another college on campus must complete the College requi rements in ARHU of foreign 
language to the intermediate level, and 45 hours of upper- level credit 

All Arts and Humanities freshmen (excluding students in College Park Scholars, Honors Humanities, or University Honors) must 
take UNI V 101, The Student in the University and Introduction to Computer Resources, duri ng thei rfirst semester on campus. 

Distribution: To encourage advanced mastery of material, a mini mum of 45 of the total of 120 semester hours must be upper- level 
work (i.e., courses numbered 300-499). A majority of the 45 credits will be earned in the fulfillment of requi rements for the major 
and CORE. 

Foreign Language: To expand students' understandi ng of other cul tures i n an i ncreasi ngl y gl obal sod ety, the Col I ege of A rts and 
Humanities requires its majors to complete the intermediate level of a foreign language. Learning a second language produces 
deep knowledge of cultural as well as linguistic differences while opening pathways for common understanding. 

All students majoring in ARHU must pass the designated level of a foreign language with a grade of 2.0 or better. Please consult 
an A RH U advisor for a I ist of the requi red course sequences. 

Students al ready beyond the requi red I evel and wi shi ng to be exempt from the requi rement must document thei r prof i ci ency when 
they enter ARHU in one of the foil owing ways: 

1. High school transcri pt showi ng I evel 4 of a f orei gn I anguage; 

2. For students with native proficiency, exam administered by American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages passed at 
theadvancedmid(AM) level. For more information, pi ease see an advisor in the ARHU Office of Student Affairs, or call 
301-405-2108. 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel2S 



Advising 

Freshmen and new transfer students have advisors intheArtsand Humanities College Office of Student Affairs (301-405-2108) 
who assist them in the selection of courses. Students must see tre departmental advisor for the major. All first-year students (both 
freshmen and transfers), j uniors who have completed 65-75 credits, and seniors who have completed 90-105 credits, have 
mandatory advising in both the Col lege and the department. For further information about advising, students should call theARHU 
Off i ce of Student Aff ai rs, 301-405-2108. 

Internships 

Several departments within Arts and Humanities have well -established internship options. For more information on internships 
taken for academi c credi t students shoul d contact thei r departmental academi c advi sor. Typi cal I y, students must be i n good 
academic standing and in their junior or senior year to complete a for-credit internship. They usually complete an application and 
attach a current academic transcript, and the experience usually lasts for one semester. In addition to the site experience, students 
write an analysis of the experience in conjunction with a faculty member in their department. Internships with literacy programs 
and with the Maryland General Assembly are avail able through the English Department, 301-405-3827. For assistance in locating 
an i nternshi p site, visit the U niversity Career Center at 3100 Hornbake L i brary, South Wi ng or do a search on the website 
www.careercenrer.umd.edu 

Certification of High School Teachers 

A student who wi shes certif i cati on as a secondary educati on teacher i n a subj ect represented i n thi s col I ege i s encouraged to speak 
with an advisor in Education Curriculum and Instruction (1207 Benjamin Bldg.) to discuss the different paths availablefor 
certification. A student may pursue secondary teacher certification as an undergraduate with a double major i n a content area and 
secondary educati on, pursue the five-year i nregrated master's program whi ch al I ows for the content maj or as an undergraduate and 
completion of certification and graduate degree requi rements i n a fifth year, or apply to the one-year i ntensive master's pi us 
certification program. 

Deportmaitsand Centers 

Academic Computing Services 

1111 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2104 
www.ARHU.umd.edu/technoloqy 
Assistant Dean: Kathleen R. Cavanaugh 

Academic Computing Services (ACS) supports the use of technology by faculty, staff, and students in theCollegeof Arts and 
Humanities. ACS provides desktop support services for faculty and staff, supportfor the use of technology to support teaching and 
learning, and classroom technology support services. 

The Art Gallery 

1202 Art-Sociology Building, 301-405-2763 

www.artaallery.urrid.edu 

Director: Scott D. Habes 

The A it Gallery presents exhibitions, lectures, film series, residencies, and publications focusing on contemporary art and visual 
culture. Opportunities for museum training and arts management experience are avail able to students through intern and 
work-study positions. 

TheCenter for Renaissanceand Baroque Studies 

0139 Taliaferro Hall, 301-405-6830 

www.crbs.umd.edu 

Founding Director: S. Schoenbaum (1927-96) 

Director: AdeleSeeff 

Associate Director: Karen Nelson 

TheCenter for Renaissanceand Baroque Studies promotes teaching and research in the Renaissance and Baroque Periods in all 
disciplines of the arts and humanities. The Center sponsors a vast array of programs, including annual interdisciplinary symposia, 
sped al I ectures and performances, conferences, summer i nsti tures, and a vol ume seri es of symposi a proceedi ngs publ i shed by the 
University of Delaware Press i n conj unction with Associated U niversity Presses. The Attending to Early Modern Women symposia 
series, recognized national ly and i nternational ly as themajor scholarly event i n the field of early modern women's studies, is 
hosted by the Center triennial ly. TheCenter publ i shes Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal, the only peer-reviewed 
j oumal devoted to the i nterdi sci pi i nary and gl obal study of women and gender from 1400- 1700. 

TheCenter offers a variety of programs for off -campus constituencies of teachers and their students. Serving as Director of 
Outreach for the Col lege of A its and H umanities, the Center Di rector supervises a range of community outreach programs 



6. TheCollegssandSchools PageBC 



including the University of Maryland/Northwood High School Collaboration and the Seminars for Teachers professional 
development program for area educators. Other Center outreach programs are designed to provide access to recent research in 
Renaissance Studies, and i ncl ude the Shakespeare M onologue Festival and Shakespeare Camp, both of which target middle school 
students. The Crossing Borders/Breaking Boundaries summer institute brings school teachers to campus for an interdisciplinary 
exploration of arts-integration practices. 

David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the African Diaspora 

1214 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-405-6835 
email: driskdlcenter(5) umd.edu 
www.driskellcenter.umd.edu 
Executive Director: Robert E. Steele 

TheDavid C. Driskell Center for the Study of theVisual Arts and Culture of African Americans and theAfrican Diaspora at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, celebrates the legacy of David C. Driskell - Distinguished University Professor Emeritus 
of Art, Artist, A it Historian, Collector, and Curator- by preserving the rich heritage of African American visual art and culture. 
Established in2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, museum professionals, art administrators, and scholars of 
color, broadening the field of African diasporic studies. The Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and 
presenting African American art as well as replenishing and expanding the field. 

Consortium en Race, Gender, and Ethnidty (CRGE) 

1208 Cole Student Activities Bldg., 301-405-2931 
www.crge.umd.edu 
Director: Ruth E. Zambrana 
Assistant Director: LauraA. Logie 

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) isa University-wide initiative promoting 1) intersectional theory, 
pedagogy and research, 2) mentoring and training of faculty and graduate students of color, and 3) thoughtful and dynamic 
interdisciplinary collaboration. CRGE's work explores the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and other dimensions of 
inequality as they shape the construction and representation of identities, behavior and complex social relations. Over the past ten 
years, CRGE has become a national leader in issues of diversity and inclusion and has worked diligently to lead the way in 
i nnovati ve i ntersecti onal i nterdi sci pi i nary research vi a col I oqui um, research i nterest groups, seed grant fundi ng of j uni or f acul ty, 
and collaborative partnerships. Ourwork has become crucial tothefulfillmentof theUM mission of achieving excellence in areas 
of scholarship, pedagogy and community service. 

Language Media Services 

1204J im®iez Hall, 301-405-4925; Fax: 301-314-9752 

Email: lanqwebOumd.edu 

www.lanquages.umd.edu/lnis 

J anel B rennan-T i 1 1 mann, Coordi nator of L anguage I nstructi onal Technol ogy 

Jeff Maurer, Multimedia Technician 

Language Media Services (L MS) is a support unit within the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures which provides audio 
visual equipment and multimedia support for faculty, staff and students. LMS provides first tier support and training for faculty 
teaching in the five technology enhanced classrooms located in Jimenez Hall, the mobile audio lab and the computer classroom. 
Servi ces for f acul ty i ncl ude equi pment and vi deo/DV D I oan, f orei gn I anguage program recordi ng, scanni ng of i nstructi onal 
documents, training on equipment use, tape duplication and conversion, and digitization of audio materials. Servi ces for students 
include audiotape and digital audio file distribution and an independent study space. 

FOLA 

1109J im®iez Hall, 301-405-4046 
www. I anguages. umd.edu/fol a 
Coordinator: NaimeYaramanoglu 

The FOLA (Foreign Language) Program enables qual if ied students with high motivation to acqui rea speaki ng knowledge of a 
number of foreign languages not offered in regular campus programs. While instruction is basically self-directed, students meet 
regul arl y wi th a nati ve-speaki ng tutor for practi ce sessi ons to rei nf orce what has al ready been covered through the i ndi vi dual use of 
books and audio tapes or CDs. Final examinations are administered by outside examiners who are specialists in their fields. 



Living-Learning Programs 

Honors Humanities 

1103 Wicomico Hall, 301-405-6992 
www.honorshumanities.umd.edu 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 131 



email: honorshumanitiesOunxI.edu 
Director: Professor Peter Mallios 

Entering freshmen participate by invitation in Honors Humanities, a two-year living/learning program. Honors Humanities is the 
University of Maryland's premier undergraduate program for academically talented students who have intellectual ambitions in the 
humanities and arts or a desire to develop their education on a liberal arts foundation. The program is organized around a special 
humanities curriculum and a final independent research or creative project (The Keystone Project) that a student designs and 
executes with the guidance of a faculty mentor. Honors Humanities provides students with stimulating seminars, exciting academic 
friendships, a lively home base in Wicomico Hall, and opportunities to take advantage of the intellectual, cultural, and artistic riches 
of the Washington, D.C. region. Upon successful completion of the program, students earn a citation in Honors Humanities, and 
this prestigious citation is entered upon their university transcripts. 

C d lege Park Scholars 

CPS in the Arts: Professor Harold Burgess 

CPS in Cultures of theAmericas: Professor Sangeeta Ray 

www.schol ars. umd.edu 

TheCollegeof Arts and Humanities co-sponsors cross-disciplinary College Park Scholars programs in Cultures of theAmericas 
and in Arts. These two-year programs provide exciting living-learning environments in specially-equipped residence halls 
(CentrevilleandBel Air respectively). Students with strong i nterests i n these areas meet in weekly col I oqui a with faculty, and, in 
the Arts program, with student teachers as well, to pursue creative and intellectual endeavors. Field trips, invited speakers, hands-on 
workshops, and the yearly staged Arts Fair on Maryland Day in Spring stimulate creativity and the sense of togetherness while 
forming a community of learners and teachers in the Arts Program. Cultures of the Americas focuses on the peoples, cultures and 
histories of North and SouthAmerica, all owing students to think comparatively. Students engage these topics not only inthe 
colloquia but by also taking a specially designed three credit course the second semester of the freshman year. Besides academic 
readings, invited lectures, local field trips, presentations, and community service, the program sponsors a 4-6 day trip to a rich 
cultural site in the Americas the final semester. Both Scholars programs give students the opportunity to study with theirpeers 
while being i n cl ose contact withtheirfacultyadvi sors experiencing a small col lege environment 

J im®iez-Partar Writers' House 

0111 Dorchester Hall, 301-405-0671 
www.writershouse.umd.edu 
Director: J ohnna Schmidt 

TheJim®iez-Porter Writers' House(JPWH) is a living and learning program open to all majors. The program was conceived and 
developed primarilyfor upper-division students, but will consider applications from academically talented incoming freshmen who 
have a sol id focus on creative writi ng. Located in Dorchester Hal I, the Writers' House creates a campus-wide I iterary center to study 
creative writing in its cross-cultural and multilingual dimensions. Participants live in a close community of students who share an 
interest in creating stories, poems, plays, and imaginative non-fiction. Students work with visiting writers, publish a literary 
magazine, attend special readings and colloquia, produce an annual literary festival, and receive notation upon successful 
completion of the program. CI ass sizes are small, and include one-on-one faculty advising sessions. Admission to the Writers' 
House is competitive, with only forty to fifty students I i vi ng and writi ng together each year. A ppl ications can be obtai ned by 
contacting the director, or by visiting www.writershouse.umd.edu . Final deadline for admission every year is M arch 1. 

Language House 

0107 St. Mary's Hall, 301-405-6996 
www.lanauaaes.umd.edu/lh 
Program Director: Dr. Phoenix Liu 
PhoenixL (5) umd.edu 

The Language House I mmersi on Program was the fi rst I ivi ng- 1 earning program on rarrpus for students wishing to immerse 
themselves in the study of a foreign language and culture. A total of 100 students live in one of ten clusters (Arabic, Chinese, 
French, German, Hebrew, I tali an, Japanese, Persian, Russian or Spanish), which are housed in 19 apartments in St. Mary's Hall. 
Students must commit to speaking their target language as they prepare meals, study and socialize together, do household chores, 
etc. Faculty liaisons work with students in each of the language clusters, and a student mentor, a native speaker of the language, 
assists students i n the i mmersion environment. The goal of language immersion is achieved through activities organized by the 
mentors, a language- 1 earni ng computer lab, an audio-visual multi-purpose room, and foreign television programs received via 
satellite. 

College Honors Program 

M ost departments in the College of Arts and Humanities offer Departmental Honors Programs (DHP). DHPs are upper-division 
programs withi n the i ndividual academic units. Students enrol led i n Departmental Honors work i ndependentiy with faculty 
members i n subj ects of sped al i nterest devel op and deepen thei r research ski 1 1 s, and, i n the process, earn an even stronger degree. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools PageB2 



Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 to be admitted. For further information about individual 
Departmental Honors Programs and policies, consult with departmental advisors. 



Phi Beta Kappa 

Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa in chapter 4. 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (BSOS) 

2148 Tydi ngs H al 1 , 301-405- 1697 
www.bsos.umd.edu 
advi si ngcenter@bsos. umd.edu 
Assistant Dean(s) : Katheri ne Pedro Beardsley, J ennifer Dumas, A nn Hoi mes, K i m N ickerson 

The Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a diverse group of disci pi ines and fields of study all of which 
emphasize a broad liberal arts education as the foundati on for understandi ng the environmental, social, and cultural forces that 
shape our world. At the heart of the behavioral and social sciences is the attempt to understand human beings, both individually and 
ingroups. Disci pi ines in the behavioral and social sciences use approaches that rangefrom the scientific to the philosophical, from 
the experimental to the theoretical. Integral to all the disci pi ines, however, is the development and application of problem solving 
skills, which in combination with other academic skills, enable students to think analytically and to communicate clearly and 
persuasively. Students interested in human behavior and insolving human and social problems will find many exciting 
opportunities through the programs and courses offered by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Undergraduate Decree Reqiirements/DegreeOptions 

• Each student must complete a mini mum of 120 hours of credit with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. Courses 
must i ncl ude the credits requi red i n the U ni versity's general education requi rements (CORE) and the specific major and 
support ng course and grade requi rements of the programs i n the academi c departments off eri ng bachel or's degrees. 

• Students in BSOS must complete Math and English by 60 credits. 

• Students must complete 15 upper level credits in the students final 30 credits. 

• All students are urged to speak with an academic advisor in their major and an advisor in the College Advising Office at least 
two semesters before graduati on to revi ew thei r academi c progress and di scuss f i nal graduati on requi rements. 

Advising 

The BSOS Advising Center coordinates undergraduate advi sing and maintains student records for BSOS students. Advisors are 
avai I abl e to provi de i nf ormati on concerni ng U ni versi ty requi rements and regul ati ore, transfer credi t eval uati ore, and other general 
i nf ormati on about the U ni versi ty by appoi ntment from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m M onday through F ri day. U ndergraduate advi sors for each 
undergraduate major are located i n the department offices. These advi sore are avail able to assist students insdectiing courses and 
educational experiences in thei rmajor area of study consistent with rrajor requirements and students' educational goals. 

Departments and Centers 

TheCol lege is composed of the following departments, each offering a maj or program that leads to the Bachel or of Arts or the 
Bachelor of Science degree, as appropriate 

Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es* 

Department of A nthropol ogy 

Department of Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Pol itics 

Department of Heari ng and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychology 

Department of Sociology 

I n addition, the College is a major contributor to the Environmental Science and Policy Program and sponsors several of its areas 
of concentration. 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 133 



*T he Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es al so offers an undergraduate certifi cate requi ri ng 21 semester hours of course work 
(see Undergraduate Certificate Programs in Chapter 7). 

Minors 

Several departments wi thi n the Col I ege of B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences sponsor mi nors. See individual department listings for 
i information. A pproved mi nors i ncl ude 

• B I ack Women's Studi es ( Departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es and Women's Studi es - see Women's Studi es) 

• Geographic I nformation Science (Department of Geography) 

• Hearing and Speech Sciences (Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences) 

• International Development and Conflict Management (Department of Government and Politics) 

• Neuroscience (Departments of Psychology and Biology) 

• Terrorism Studies (College of Behavioral and Social Sciences - see below) 

Minor in Terrorism Studies 

TheTerrorism Studies program focuses on exploring the origins and motivations of terrorism based on theoretical understandings 
of individual and group behavior. Students also explore the impacts of the threat of terrorism on individuals and communities as 
well as strategies for preventing, deterring, mitigating, and responding to terrorist threats. For more information about the minor, 
pleasevisit www.start.umd.edu 

Students are requi red to take the f ol I owi ng three courses: 

• BSOS 330: Terrorist Motivations and Behaviors (3 credits) . Thi s course expl ores theori es expl ai ni ng the f ormati on of 
terrorist groups and the motivations behind terrorist behavior, building upon theories from social psychology, sociology, 
political science, criminology, and history. This course draws heavily from historical examples as well as current examples of 
i nternational and domestic terrorist groups around the world. 

• BSOS 33L Responses to Terrorism (3 credits). This course exami nes the i mpact of terrorism on groups and i individuals 
and explores how communities have prepared and ideally should prepare in the face of potential terrorist threats. This course 
draws from anthropology, criminology, economics, history, political science, social psychology, and sociology. 

• BSOS 332: The Practice of Terrorism Studies (5 credits) . Thi s semi nar serves as the capstone for the mi nor program. As 
part of the course, students complete an approved i ntemshi p or conduct a relevant origi nal research project. Students also 
meet regularly with an instructor to learn and apply academic and professional analytical tools relevant to the study of 
terrorism. The course includes visits from guest speakers working in the field of terrorism studies, and students participate in 
a terrorism- prevention tabletop exercise. 

I n addition to the three new courses, students must take one 3-credit course on research methods, to be drawn from courses i n any 
discipline, including: African-American Studies; Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation; Biological Sciences; 
Criminology and Criminal Justice; Communications; Economics; Civil Engineering; Electrical Engineering; Fire Protection 
Engineering; Family Studies; Geography; Government and Politics; History; Health; Latin A meri can Studies; Psychology; 
Sociology; Statistics; and Survey Methodology. 

To satisfy the final requirement students must enrol I in one 3-credit elective related to terrorism studies. START staff compile a 
I ist of courses being offered each semester that satisfy the elective requi rement Students are also encouraged to enrol I incourses 
from the Washington, DC consortium to satisfy the elective requirement, thereby drawing on the unique, existing resources present 
throughout the Washington, DC metropolitan area. 



Living-Learning Programs 

CIVICUS 

0107 Somerset Hall, 301-405-8759 
Director: Dr. SueBriggs 

CIVICUS is a two-year living and I earning program in the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences. This academic citation 
program is centered on five themes of civil society: citizenship, leadership, community service- 1 earning, community building in a 
diverse society, and scholarship. A bout B0 di verse and energetic CIV I CUS Associates take a common core of classes, live 
together in Somerset Hal I, and participate in civic, community service, experiential, and other activities and projects on and off 
campus. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools PageB4 



CI V I CUS was founded on the assumption that to be engaged members of civil society we have an obligation to be aware of the 
worl d outside of thecl assroomand to act upon issues that affect the world in which we live. Therefore, our courses and activities 
are i ntri cately I i nked wi th each other and our communi ti es. C I V I C U S A ssoci afces enri ch thei r academic work and explore career 
opportunities by vol unteeri ng with non-profit organizations and governmental agencies and programs, creati ng thei r own 
community service projects, and interacti ng with faculty and community leaders. They are among the most i nvolved students at 
Maryland. CI VI CUS Associates completea Capstone internship at the University or in the D.C. metropolitan area. 

Selected students from all majors are invited to participate in the CI VI CUS Living and Learning Program when they apply to the 
university as first year students, based on thei r letters of recommendation, involvement in high school and the community, 
admissions essays, and academic transcripts. CI VI CUS looks to invite students who will continue to strengthen and broaden their 
I eadershi p ski 1 1 s wi thi n the campus and I ocal communi ti es. 

For more information, please visit: www.CIVICUS.umd.edu 

College Park Scholars, International Stucfes 

1104 Centra/i I le Hal 1 , 301-405-9304 
Faculty Director: Dr. James Glass 

One of twelve Col lege Park Scholars I ivi ng-learni ng programs, the I nternational Studies Program bri ngs together undergraduate 
students from a variety of disciplines who share an interest in global issues, politics, and events. Each entering class of 
approxi mately sixty-five students takes courses together duri ng thef reshman and sophomore years. The majority of I nternational 
Studies Scholars reside in Centrevi I le Hall . 

International Studies was one of the original four Col lege Park Scholars programs launched in 1994, sponsored by the Col lege of B eh 
Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) and the Department of Government and Politics (GVPT). The Faculty Director and the 
Teaching Assistants all have theirroots in the Department of Government and Politics. 

The I nternational Studies Program welcomes students who wish to I ive and learn together and who have an i nterest i n explori ng 
international political, economic, and cultural issues. Our program offers an opportunity to build global understanding and global 
awareness through academic and experiential learning. 

For more information, please visit: www.scholars.umd.edu/is/ 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Atlantic Coast -Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Alliancefor Graduate Education and the Professoriate 
(AC-SBE Alliance) 

Director: KimJ . Nickerson 
301-405-7599 
knickerson@bsos.umd.edu 
www.acsbe.org 

TheAC-SBE Alliance is comprised of the University of Maryland at Col lege Park, the University of North Carolina atChapel 
Hill, Howard University, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami. The goals of the AC-SBE Alliance are to increase 
the number of Under- Represented Minority (URM) students receiving Ph.D.'s in SB E di sci pi inesand to increase the number of 
U RMs entering the SB E professoriate. The AC-SBE Alliance recruits and prepares undergraduates to pursue doctoral degrees, 
assi sts students in the transition from Bachelor to Ph.D. programs, assi sts graduate students in completing thei rPh.D.s, and prepares 
graduate students for success. The Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) i s the leading body attheUMD campus for 
this particular alliance. BSOS also col I aborates with the UMD Graduate School and the University of Maryland System's Promise 
Alliancefor Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP). Through these relationships, students can participate in graduate 
training seminars and professional development activities. Inaddition, BSOS organizes an annual Summer Research I nitiativefor 
undergraduates in order to achieve the goals set by theAC-SBE Alliance. 

College Honors Program 

U ndergraduate honors are offered to graduati ng students i n the departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es, A nthropol ogy, 
Criminology and Criminal J ustice, Economics, Geography, Government and Politics, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Dean's Academic Scholar. To be named a Dean's Academic Scholar is the highest academic award that a BSOS student can earn 
intheCollege. Dean's Schol ars are those graduati ngseni ors who have completed 60 credits at the University of Maryland, College 
Park and have mai ntai ned a mi ni mum cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of 3.8. A student who has been found responsi bl e of a 
violation of academic integrity is not eligible. 

Dean's List Any student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic work under the regular grading method in the preceding 
semester, without failure of any course, and with an overall average grade of at least 3.5, will be placed on the Dean's List. The 
Distinguished Dean's List consists of students who have completed successfully a mini mum of 12 credit hours in a semester with a 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 135 



4.0. 

Honor Societies, Students who excel in their academic discipline may be selected for membership in an honorary society. 
H onorari es for whi ch students i n B SOS are chosen i ncl ude: 

• Alpha Kappa Delta- Sociology 

• Alpha Phi Sigma- Criminal Justice 

• Gamma Theta Upsilon - Geography 

• Omicron Delta Epsilon - Economics 

• Pi Sigma Alpha- Political Sciences 

• Psi Chi - Psychology 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students who major in the Behavioral and Social Sciences have a wide range of i nterests. Thefol lowi ng is a I ist of student 
organizations i n the disci pi i nes and fields of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: 

• A nthropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on 

• Criminal J ustice Student Association 

• E conomi cs A ssoci ati on of M aryl and 

• Geography Club 

• Maryland Neurosciences Society 

• National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Assoc.(NSSLHA), MD Chapter 

• Pre-Medical Society 

• Sociology Collective 

• The Society of African American Studies 

For more information about these student organizations or starting a new student group, pi ease contact the Office of Campus 
Programs, Adele H. Stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174. 

Financial Assistance 

The col lege offers several scholarships to its students (see below). Each scholarship has eligibility criteria. Scholarship information 
and appl i cati ons are made avai I abl e each f al I semester. Schol arshi p awards are granted for the f ol I owi ng f al I semester. T he col I ege 
offers the fol I owi ng schol arshi p awards: 

• M urray E. Polakoff Scholarship Award for Academic Excellence 

• lrv& Micki Goldstein Scholarship Award for Commitment to Service 

• Katherine Pedro & Roberts. Beardsley Scholarship A ward for Outstanding Leadership 
•J ean & Robert Steele Scholarship A ward for First Generation Students 

• BSOS Future Alumni Scholarship A ward for Financial Need (60 or more credits) 

For more information, please visit: www.bsos.umd.edu 

Scholarships are sometimes given at the department level. Check with your departmental advisor or your director of undergraduate 
programs for more i nf ormati on regardi ng schol arshi p opportuni ti es that may be avai I abl e to you. 

The National Scholarship Office at the University of MaiylarxIprovidesirforrrBtiononriationallycorTpetitivesclxilaishipsatthe 
undergraduate (and graduate) level. For more information, pleasevisit www.scholarships.umd.edu 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal, state, and institutional financial assistance programs 
and, in cooperation with other University off ices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For more 
information, visit www.fi nancialaid.unxl.edu 

Research Units 

TheCollegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences sponsors several special purpose, college-wide research centers. Thesecenters 
i ncl ude: The Center for Substance A buse Research; The National Consorti um for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to 
Terrorism; and The Public Safety TrainirgardTechrxilcgyAssistarceAgerxy. TlTeseinterdisciplinaiycentascftH^ 
i nternshi ps and a selected number of undergraduate research assistant opportunities for i nterested students. These research 
experi ences offer excel I ent preparati on for future graduate study and/or j ob opportuni ti es i n the private and publ i c sectors. 
A ddi ti onal I y, the col I ege off ers computi ng servi ces through i ts Offi ce of A cademi c Computing Services. 

C enter for Substance Abuse Research (C E SAR) 

4321 Hartwick Rd. Ste. 501, College Park, M D 20740 



6.TheCollege>andSchools PageB6 



301-405-9770 
www.cesar.umd.edu 
Director: Dr. Eric Wish 

Established in 1990, CESAR is a research unit sponsored by the Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences. CESAR staff gather, 
analyze, and dissemi nate ti mely i information on issues of substance abuse and monitor alcohol- and drug-use i ndicators throughout 
M aryl and . C E SA R ai ds state and I ocal governments i n respondi ng to the probl em of substance abuse by provi di ng the above-stated 
information, as well as technical assistance and research. Faculty members from across campus are involved with CESAR- based 
research, creati ng a center i n which substance abuse issues are analyzed from multidisci pi i nary perspectives. Students obtai n 
advanced techni cal trai ni ng and hands-on experi ence through thei r i nvol vement in original surveys and research. 

Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC) 

0124N ColeStudent Activities Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-6403 

www.popcenter.umd.edu 

Director: Dr. Sandra Hofferth 

The M aryland Population Research Center (M PRC) is a multi disciplinary center dedicated to population- related research and 
housed in the Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) at the University of Maryland, College Park. Our primary goal is 
to draw together I eadi ng schol ars from diverse di sci pi i nes to support, produce, arid promote popul ati on- rel ated research. 

The cross-disciplinary research interests of our faculty allow the M PRC to continually grow and make a unique contribution to the 
field of population studies. The M PRC's members i nc I ude faculty from the departments of African A merican Studies, Agricultural 
and Resource Economics, Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice, Economics, Family Studies, Geography, Human 
Development, thej oint Program in Survey Methodology, the School of Public Policy, and Sociology. 

National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) 

3300 Symons Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742 

301-405-6600 

www.start.umd.edu 

Director: Dr. Gary LaFree 

TheNational Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terror (START) isaU.S. Department of Homeland 
Security Center of Excellence, tasked by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate with using 
state-of-the-art theori es, methods, and data from the soci al and behavi oral sci ences to i mprove understandi ng of the ori gi ns, 
dynamics, and social and psychological impacts of terrorism. START, based atthe University of Maryland, College Park, aims to 
provide timely guidance on how to disrupt terrorist networks, reduce the incidence of terrorism and enhance the resilience of U.S. 
society in the face of the terrorist threat. 

Office of Academic Computing Services (OACS) 

0221 LeFrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-1670 

www.oacs.umd.edu 

Director: Dan Navarro 

TheCollege believes stronglythatthe study of behavioral and social sci ences should incorporate both quantitative and 
computational skills. Consequently, curricula in most departments require some course work in statistics, quantitative research 
methods, and information technology. The BSOS Office of Academic Computing Services provides undergraduate students in the 
College with both facilities and staff assistance to satisfy a broad range of computer-related needs. OACS operates five computer 
classrooms and a special ized graphics lab that offer a wide variety of popular software, color and black-and-white pri nti ng, and 
both text and graphics scanni ng. U ndergraduate students are also encouraged to take advantage of OACS's learni ng resources, 
i ncl udi ng f ree computer and stati sti cs trai ni ng courses, hel p documentarj on, a I i brary of computer- rel ated texts and free access to 
research data. 

Public Safely, Training and Tedmdogy Assistance (PSTTP) 

9001 Edmonston Rd. Ste. 300, Greenbelt M D 20770 

301-489-1700 

www.hidta.org 

Di rector: Thomas H . Carr 

Established in 1994, the Public Safety, Training and Technology Assistance Program (PSTT) (formerly the Washington/Baltimore 
HIDTA) is co-sponsored by theCol lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Office of National Drug Control Policy. This 
program i s funded by Congress to hel p coordi nate and fund the fi ght agai nst drug- rel ated cri me arxl to treat drug-addicted criminal 
offenders. HIDTA efforts integrate preventi on and I aw enforcement at the community level to reduce the involvement of high-risk 
youth i n drug traff i cki ng careers and cri mi nal behavi or. H I DTA al so works wi th pri vate i ndustry and government to form 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 137 



partnershi ps geared toward the devel opmert of commerci al software for use by I aw enforcement cri mi nal j usti ce, treatment and 
regulatory agencies. The Washi ngton/ Balti more H I DTA employs a multi-disci pi i nary approach that i ncorporates law enforcement 
treatment/cri mi nal j usti ce and preventi on through a regi onal strategy that i ncl udes al I these di sci pi i nes. F acul ty members from 
across campus are i nvolved with H I DTA-based research, and students obtai n advanced technical trai ni ng and hands-on experience 
through thei r i nvol vement i n data col lection, origi nal surveys, geo-mappi ng and research. 



THE ROBERT H.SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS(BMGT) 

1570 Van M unchi ng Hal 1 , 301-405-2286 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu 
Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 
Associate Dean(s): Patricia Cleveland 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business is an internationally recognized I eader in management education and research for the 
digital economy. The faculty are scholars, teachers, and professional leaclerswithacorTTnitmenttosuperioreducationinbusiness 
and rTBnagement specializing in accounting, finance, information systems, operations management management and organization, 
marketing, and supply chain management The Smith School isaccredited byAACSB International -The Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business, the premier accrediting agency for bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree programs in business 
admi ni strati on and accounti ng, www.aacsb.edu . 

A student in the Smith School of Business, selects a major(s) in one of the foil owing curricula: (1) Accounting; (2) Finance; (3) 
General Business; (4)1 nformati on Systems; (5)1 nternati onal Business; (6) Logistics, Transportation, & Supply Chain Management 
(7) Marketing; or(8) Operations Management Upper-division BMGT programs are offered at Col lege Park and at the 
Universities at Shady Grove i n M ontgomery County. F or detai I s on the maj ors offered at Shady G rove vi si t 
www. rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove html . 

Admission Requirements 

See "Admission Requirements and Application Procedures" chapter for general LEP admissions policies. 

Freshman Admi sa en 

Admission to the B M GT degree programs is competitive. A I i mited number of freshmen who demonstrate outstandi ng talent wi 1 1 
be admitted directiy to their BMGT major of choice (eg. Accounting, Finance, etc.). Admission will be on a space available basis. 
All students are urged to apply early. All students admitted directiy to BMGT as freshrrenrriust demonstrate satisfactory progress 
(2.00 cumulativeGPA or better) plus corrpletion of Gateway courses (BMGT 220, BMGT 230, ECON 200 or 201, and MATH 
220 or 140 with a "C" or better) i nthe semester they reach 45 credits (excluding A P and ESL), at which time they will be 
reviewed i n order to conti nue i n the B M GT major. 

Students not directiy admitted to the Smith School of Business as freshman can be admitted to the Division of Letters & Sciences, 
with some of these students enrol I i ng i n the M arkets and Society program. These students can apply for admission to B usi ness by 
the semester in which 60 credits are completed. (SeeTransfer Admission below) 

Transfer Admission for Students from On or Off Campus 

Students who began at UMCP or a Maryland SystemSchool in Spring 2004 through Spring 2005 were grandfathered under the 
Spring 2001 adrhssion standards, through Spring 2007. At this time all students mist meet the current admission standards, 
detailed below. 

A 1 1 students applyi ng for admission to B M GT as transfer students, whether i nternal transfers al ready enrol led at U M CP or external 
transfer students entering the university for the first time, will be subject to competitive admission for a limited number of spaces in 
the B M GT program at each program I ocati on. 

To be consi dered for admi ssi on, appl i cants must compl ete the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

• Minimum 3.0 cumulativeGPA (preferred, may vary based upon the applicant pool) 

• Minimumjunior standing: 60 credits earned 

• Completion of 50% of lower-level university CORE requirements (Note: ECON 200 and 201 satisfy lower-level SB CORE 
requi rements and MATH 220 or 140 satisfies lower-level M S CORE requi rements) 

• Completion of thefol lowing Gateway courses, all with "C" or better: 

BMGT 220 and 221: Accounting 

ECON 200 and 201: M icro and M aero Economics 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PageBE 



ENGL 101 

MATH 220 or 140: Calculus 

BMGT 230*or BMGT 231# 

* The fol I owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT230: BIOM301, ECON321, 
EDMS451, GEOG305, PSYC200, and SOCY201. 

#The f ol I owi ng courses are approved substitutes for B M GT 231: E N E E 324, E N M E 392, or 
STAT400 

• Co-curricular involvement leadership experience and honors and awards will also be considered in the admission decision. 
Students are strongly encouraged to submit with thei r appl ications a resume and letter detai ling their accompl ishments and 
experience. 

Application Deadlines for Transfer Students: Complete appl ications and all supporting documents must be received no later 
than: 

Fal I Semester: 1st busi ness day of J une (Priority Deadl i ne) 

1st business day of August (Final Deadline) 
Spring Semester: 1st business day of December (Priority Deadline) 

5th busi ness day of J anuary (Final Deadl i ne) 

Notel: For external transfer applicants in the Spring, all transcripts and support] ng documentati on mist be received by thelOth 
business day of J anuary. 

Nots2: PI ease subrrit completed appl ications to the Attn: LEP Coordinator, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235. 

F reshmen who begi n study i n another maj or at Col I ege Park who woul d have met the di rect B M GT admi ssi on standards from hi gh 
school have until the last day of instruction inthe first semester of theirfreshmen year at College Park to change theirmajorto 
BMGT. 

Appealstothis Pdicy: Appeals to this policy may be filed with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, on the ground floor 
Mitchell Building. Such appeal swill require documentation of unusual, extenuating, or special circumstances. 

State m ent of Policy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

1 1 is the practice of the Smith School of B usi ness to consider for transfer from a regional ly accredited community col lege only the 
fol I owi ng courses i n busi ness admi ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, i ntroducti on to computi ng 
(equivalent to BM GT 201), or elementary accounti ng. Thus, it is antici pated that students transferring from another regionally 
accredited institution will have devoted the maj or share of thei r academic effort below the junior year to the completion of basic 
requirements in the liberal arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a community col lege may be applied toward a degreefrom the 
Smith School of Business. 

Other Institutions 

The Smith School of Business normally accepts transfer credits from regionally accredited four-year institutions. J uni or- and 
senior-level busi ness courses are accepted from col leges accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB). J unior- and senior- level business courses from other than AACSB-accredited schools are evaluated on a 
course- by-course basi s to determi ne transf erabi I i ty . 

The Smith School of Busi ness requires that at least 50 percent of the busi riessarxlrrenagemerit credit hours required for a busi ness 
degree be earned at the U ni versity of M aryland, Col lege Park. 

Underg-aduate Decree Requrements/De^eeOptions 

he university confers the fol I owing degrees: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Master of Busi ness Admi ni strati on (M.B. A.), Master of 
Science (M .S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). I nformation concerning admission to the M .BA. or M .S. program is available at 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

Undergraduate Program 

T he undergraduate program recogni zes the need for prof essi onal educati on i n busi ness and management based on a f oundati on i n 
the I i beral arts. I n addi ti on, the program's i nternati onal I y i ntegrated curri cul um prepares students to be eff ecti ve and responsi bl e 
managers i n today's dynami c busi ness envi ronment 

A student in business and management selects a major in one of several curricula: (1) Accounting; (2) I nformation Systems: 
Specialization Business; (3) Finance (4) General Business; (5) International Business; (6) Operations Management; (7) Marketing; 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PageBS 



(8) Supply Chain Management. 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work requi red for graduation must be i n busi ness and management 
subjects. A minimum of 58 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be in 300- or 400- level courses. In addition to the requirement of 
an overall cumulati ve grade point average of 2.0 (C average) inall university course work. EffectiveFall 1989, all business majors 
must earn a 2.0 or better in all requi red courses, including Economics, Mathematics, and Communication. E I ectives outside the 
curricula of the School may be taken in any department of the university, if the student has the necessary prerequisites. 

Credits 





Frcshman-Sophcmcre School 






Requirements 




BMGT220 


Pri nci pies of Accounti ng 1 


3 


BMGT221 


Pri nci pies of Accounti ng 1 1 


3 


ECON200 


Pri nci pies of M icroeconomics 


4 


ECON201 


Pri nci pies of M acroeconomics 

One from 


4 


MATH 220 


Elementary Calculus 1 


3 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 

One from 


4 


BMGT230 


Busi ness Statistics 


3 


BMGT231 


Statistical Models for Busi ness 

One from 


3 


COM M 100 


Foundations of Speech Communication 


3 


COM M 107 


Speech Communication 


3 


COM M 200 


Critical Thinking and Speaking 


3 




Total 


23-24 




J unicr-Senicr School Requirements 




BMGT301 


1 ntroduction to 1 nformation Systems 


3 


BMGT340 


Business Finance 


3 


BMGT350 


Marketing Principles and Organization 


3 


BMGT364 


Management and Organizational Theory 


3 


BMGT367 


Career Search Strategies in Business 


1 


BMGT380 


Business Law 


3 


BMGT495 


Business Policies, OR 


3 


BMGT495H Busi ness Policies (Honors) 




ECON 


Economics - see below 


3-6 




Total 


22-25 



Economics Requirements 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are requi red by the Smith School of Busi ness. The specific requi rements for 
each major are listed with the majors' specific requirements. 

Major Requirements 

I n addition to the Smith School of Business Bachelor of Science requirements listed above, generally another 18-24 credits are 
requi red for each major. Seeindividual major listings in chapter 7. 

A Typical Prog-am for the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Credits 

Freshman Year 

CORE and/or Electives 9 

ENGL101 or equivalent 3 

MATH (depending on placement)* 3 

First Semester Total 15 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel* 



CORE and/or Electives 9 

COM M 100, 107 or 200 3 

MATH or BM GT230/231* 3 

Second Semester Total 15 

ScphomoreYear 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

B M GT220 (Prereq Sophomore Standing) 3 

ECON200 4 

MATH or BM GT230/231* 3 

Third Semester Total 16 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

ECON201 4 

B M GT221 (Prereq BMGT220) 3 

BMGT230or 231 or Elective 3 

Forth Semester Total 16 



*See Freshman-Sophomore School requirements for appropriate math and statistics courses. 



Advising 

General advising for students admitted to the Smith School of Business is avail able Monday through Friday in the Office of 
Undergraduate Programs, 1570 Van Munching Hal I, 301-405-2286. It is recommended that students visitthis office each semester 
to ensure that they are i nformed about current requi rements and procedures. Transfer students enteri ng the university can be 
advised during spring, summer, and fall transfer orientation programs. Contactthe Orientation Office for further information, 
301-314-8217. 

Specialized Academic Programs 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel41 



The Smith School offers i nnovati ve special programs through its U ndergraduate Fel lows Program. The Fel lows program offers a 
series of special academic programs,or tracks which will create small communities of scholars within the larger Smith School 
community. Each specialized Fellows program combines opportunities for action learning and professional development with 
rigorous in-depth academic coursework focused on cutting edge issues affecting 21st century business. 

Co-curricular activities are a key component of the Fellows program. Field trips and internships, international study trips and 
exchanges, speaker seri es, di nners, retreats and competi ti ore wi 1 1 foster I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and contri bute to your personal and 
professional growth. Alumni involvement is an important aspect of Fellows programming, with Smith alumni and corporate 
partners contri buti ng thei r ti me, tal ents and experi ence through sponsorshi p and parti ci pati on i n events and acti viti es. For more 
information on each of the Smith Fellows Programs pi ease see the foil owing information and corresponding links. For information 
on all our Fellows Programs visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Freshman Fdlouus The Freshman Fel lows track provides enriched opportunities for al I of our newly admitted Smith freshmen 
students from the moment they step on campus for the new Freshman Fellows Orientation, followed by "BusinessWeek" ayearly 
tradition to kick off the academic year with a series of social and professional events and activities. Freshman Fellows Program 
consi sts of four (4) requi red courses, whi ch are compl eted over a students f i rst four semesters, pi us a portf ol i o of co-curri cul ar 
activities. For more information, please visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

International Fdlouus A special group of Freshman Fellows, Smith I nternational Fel lows are students who declare dual degrees 
in business and foreign language. For more information on I nternational Fellows, including information on your foreign language 
advisor, visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Accelerated Finance Fdlouus: The Accelerated Fi nance Fel lows program is designed for freshmen with advanced standing who 
are sure they want to pursue a f i nance career. These students are i nterested i n accel erati ng thei r f i nance coursework, and i n taki ng 
additional finance courses- beyond what the major requi res. These students have the potential to become "star" finance majors, 
courted by top finance recruiters. Theemphasis of this program is on preparing studentsfor a high profilecareerinfinance. For 
more information, pleasevisit rttp://uriet.rhsmith.urTd.eduarxlclickontheFellowsProgramtab 

Accounting Teaching Scholars TheAccounting& I nformati on A ssurance Department (A I A) offers this special program 
opportunity for undergraduate accounti ng students to serve as discussion leaders and teachi ng assistants for the begi nni ng 
accounti ng courses, B M GT 220 & 221. Accounti ng teachi ng scholars earn a yearly sti pend (dependi ng on hours worked) whi le 
reviewing material in preparation for the C PA exam and practicing organizational and delivery skills. A one-credit mentoring 
course is offered to prepare students for their roles as teaching assistants. For more information, pleasevisit 
http://unetrhsmith.unid.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Business Process Fdlouus Program: The objective of the Business Process Fellows program is to develop excel I ence in 
operati ore management. Students wi 1 1 1 earn and practi ce busi ness process methodol ogi es and software tool s used by I eadi ng edge 
companies and agencies to design and manage complex enterprises. For more information, pleasevisit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu 
and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Design and Innovation in Marketing Fdlouus The Design in Marketing Fellows Program bridges the gap between marketing 
research and theory and the real i zati on of wel I -desi gned appl i cati ons. T he program curri cul um and co-curri cul ar acti viti es are 
designed to produce business leaders who can make strategically sound and creative design decisions. This program is intendedly 
interdisciplinary, with mutual benefit to be gained by collaboration between marketing students and design students in developing 
creative busi ness sol utions. visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Emerging CFOs This program is desi gned for students interested in corporate finance and investment banking. It is designed to 
go more i n depth i nto corporate finance aspects of f i nance, and provide students with enhanced I eadershi p and communication 
skills. For more information, please visit hitrp://unetilTsrTiith.umd.eduarid click on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Entrepreneurship Fdlouus . The E ntrepreneurshi p Fel lows Program bri ngs together talented Smith School students to create an 
entrepreneurial chemistry that will stimulate the creation and growth of new high-potential enterprises. The primary goal of the 
Entrepreneurship Fel lows program is to have each student participate in launching a profitable busi ness venture while sti 1 1 in school. 
This program is offered solely at the Smith School at Shady Grove campus (http://www.rhsmith.urrd.edu/urxlergracl/shadygrove/). 
For more information on the Entrepreneurship Fellows Program, visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows 
Program tab. 

Financial Services Fdlouus This program is designed for students interested in the financial services industry, including traditional 
banking (loan officer, personal banking officer) and the financial services industry (financial planners, personal investment 
managers). For more information, pleasevisit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Global Opportunities Global Opportunities is a selective and reciprocal academic program for language and busi ness students 
interested in the world of international business, who want to gain skills outside their majors and enhance their opportunities in the 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel42 



gl obal busi ness arena. L anguage maj ors compl ebe 15 credi ts i n busi ness, whi I e busi ness maj ors compl ebe 15 credi ts i n a si ngl e 
foreign language, 9 credits of which must be at the 300-400 level. Forinformationontheforeignlanguageofferings, pleasevisit 
www.languages.umd.edu/. For more information on Global Opportunities, pleasevisit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu arid click on 
the Fel lows Program tab. 

Leadership Fellows: BeginsFall 2009. Leadership Fellows is an innovativeand high quality academic program aimed at 
selecting and developing leadership talent for busi ness. Students will parti ci pate in a 360-assessment with mentoring and feedback 
from faculty and student mentors, and develop a Leadership Development Plan as part of an action-learning practicum. For more 
i information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Lemma Senbet Investment Find Fellows: This program is a year-long, advanced finance program availableto undergraduate 
finance maj ors in their senior year. Twelve students are selected in the spring of their junior year to participate on the fund, two as 
portfol io managers and ten as equity analysts. The program provides the students with the opportunity to apply what they have 
I earned i n F i nance cl asses to actual i nvestment deci si ons, through researchi ng real compani es and managi ng a portfol i o of real 
money, and through reviewing the results of the decisions they make. At the end of the year-long commitment the Fund members 
will present their performance to Fund donors. For more information, pleasevisit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and click on the 
Fellows Program tab. 

LTSCM Fellows: The Logistics, Transportation, & Supply Chain Management (LTSCM) Fel lows Leadership Program offers 
students a unique opportunity for learning and community building both within theSmith School and with external LTSCM 
professionals. By combining classroom learning with opportunities in the professional community, LTSCM Fellows will havea 
unique opportunity to bui Id knowledge of the LTSCM profession and create a foundation for a networked career. For more 
i information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Music Management Fellows The objective of the M usic M anagement Fellows program is to develop students' interests and 
capabilities in the special izedrrenagementf unctions involved in the business of music management including music marketing 
and promotions, production and distribution, broadcasting, performance and production logistics in event and tour management 
and funding and management of venues and institutions. Students will interact with and I earn from experts in the field by 
participating in the design and production of recorded music, live events and programs, and through specialized clinics and 
i nternshi ps focused on different genres and performance envi ronments: M usi c & E ntertai nment Perf ormi ng A rts. For more 
i information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Quantitative Finance Fellows: TheQuantitative Finance Fellows Program (formerly Financial Markets Fellows program) isfor 
students i nterested i n i investments, and i n particular i n learni ng more about the software and hardware used i n thef i nancial services 
industry. For more information, pleasevisit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Quantitative Marketing Fellows: Quantitative marketi ng is an approach to marked ng that relies on computer based models and 
statistical, econometric and data mining methods to understand and analyze why, which, when and how much products and services 
are being bought by consumers and firms. For more information, pleasevisit http://unet.rhsmith. umd.edu and click on the Fellows 
Program tab. 

QUEST (Quality Enhancement Systems and Teems): A collaborative partnership with the A. James Clark School of 
Engineering and the Col lege of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, theQUEST program is an innovative three-year 
quality management program with a dynamic learning environment Grounded inteam-based courses led by an interdisciplinary 
faculty, the program offers students the opportunity to study i integration of qual ity i n the workplace while applyi ng the knowledge 
and ski 1 1 -set they have gai ned from thei r maj or i n the f i el d of engi neeri ng, busi ness or computer sci ence. For more i nformati on, 
pleasevisit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

Research Fellows: Research Fellows is a one-year program offering students paid opportunities to work with one of our 
outstandi ng Smith Faculty members on their research. Research fel lows complete up to a total of 250 hours/semester, which can be 
allcicatedasl8lnoui^weekforl4weel<sorsomeothersethours, to be established by the faculty project supervisor. Compensation 
is $5,000/year or $2,500/semester, depending upon hours worked. Research Fel lows will present their work at the annual Research 
Day each spring. Mini mum one-year commitment may be renewed. For more information, pleasevisit 
http://unet rhsmith.umd.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Smith Technology Fellows ST Fellows perform a variety of duties, which may include serving as teaching assistants with 
technology-intensive classes, or as research assistants, executing targeted technology development projects for use in instruction or 
research, assisting faculty and others with targeted projects involving software such as Oracle or .NET. Some project assignments 
will require experience using specific software platforms and will provide technical support for courses, assist faculty with tutorials 
and demonstrations, and assist student teams in projects. Students working on projects which require specific technology skills will 
be eligible to attend vendor hands-on training sessions. Projects will generally be defined as one semester in duration but could 
extend over the academic year. Compensation for work on projects is $10/hour, with projects ranging from 200-400 hours, which 
can be spread over a semester or a year. Projects may be renewablefor additional semesters. For more information, pleasevisit 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel43 



http://unetrhsmith.uird.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Sports Management Fellows: The Sport M anagement Fel lows program focuses on the worldwide enterprise of sport and the 
promi nence of organi zed sports at every I eve! i n col I egi ate and prof essi oral sports envi ronments, together wi th the si gnif i cance of 
auxiliary industries in sports apparel and equipment, television contracts and other ancillary products and services. For more 
information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fel lows Program tab. 

STARS: The mission of the STARS program is to encourage and attract first generation and under represented students to the 
study of business, to prepare them for college, and to encourage them to make theUniversity of Maryland their #L choice. Once 
admitted, the program provides a supportive network for academic success leadi ng to graduation, arid then welcomes them back as 
al umni contri tutors to the Smith Community. The chal lenge is to identify and support outstandi ng students i nterested i n studyi ng 
busi ness, and to work together with their schools and with various access programs to prepare for admission to college. To achieve 
this goal, Smith School undergraduates have developed a corps of peer- mentore who provide mentoring and academic support to 
high school students, as well as to students already admitted to the University of Maryland who seek admission to the Smith 
School . Student mentors participate i n visits to high schools and work with sponsored col lege access programs. They visit 
high-school students at off-campus sites and host these students during campus visits and educational programs such as the annual 
High- School-to-CollegeWorkshops and FinanceField Day. A one-credit course in I ntergroup Communication is being considered 
as a vehicle for building mentoring ski I Is and coordinating volunteer activities. For more information, please visit 
http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and cl ick on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Technology and Business Trarefbrmation Fellows Program: TheTechnology& BusinessTransformationfellowsprogram 
aims to identify and train students who are passionate about leveraging the latest technologies for business as well as social 
transformation. This highly selective Fel lows program will provide students the opportunity to interact with the faculty in small 
classes as well as col I aborate with them on state-of-the art industry and research projects. For more information, please visit 
http://unet.rhsmith.udm.eduand click on the Fel lows Program tab. 

Other Special Programs outside of the Smith School's Fellows Program: Inaddition, Smith School students can incorporate 
other exceptional multidisciplinary learning opportunities as part of their degree programs. Programs like College Park Scholars (inch 
(including Business. Society, and the Economy) : Gemstone: and The Hinman Campus Entrepreneurship Opportunities (CEOs) 
programs j oi n busi ness undergraduates with those from other disciplines. Several of the programs menti oned above were formed 
through parrnershi ps wi th other col I eges or departments on campus. 

College Honors Program 

The Smith School Honors Fellows program, which is part of the Smith School's Fellows Program, offers students with superior 
academic achievements special opportunities and resources, i ncludi ng the opportunity to partici pate in cutting-edge research on 
busi ness i ssues, and to graduate wi th honors. Students i n the honors program take thei r upper- 1 eve! B M GT core courses i n smal I , 
semi nar-styl e honors secti ore, whi ch al I ow i n-depth expl orati on of busi ness topi cs i n marked ng, f i nance, management and 
organization, busi ness law, and policy and strategy. The Smith School Honors Program provides both a non-thesis and a thesis 
option, in which students work on an original research project under the supervision of a Smith School faculty member. 
Admission to the Smith School Honors Program is competitive. Students are selected on the basis of the foil owing requirements: 

• M inimum3.5 cumulative grade point average 

• M i ni mum 45 credit hours earned 

• Completion of all BMGT pre-requisitecoursesbytheend of Spring semester: 

Principles of Accounting I and II: BMGT 220 and 221 

Business Statistics: BMGT 230 (or 231) 

Calculus: MATH 220 or 140 

Principles of Micro- and Macro- Economics: ECON 200 and 201 

The application to the BMGT Honors program includes a personal essay and two letters of recommendation from faculty. The 
BMGT Honors application can be downloaded from the Smith School website: hrjp://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu . 

Admission to the Smith School Honors Fellows Program takes pi ace once a year in the Spring semester. For more information, 
pi ease visit http://unet rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fel lows Program tab. 



Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel« 



Student Professional Organizations 

Students may choose to associate themselves with one or more professional organizations offered under the umbrella organization, 
Smith Undergraduate Student Association (SUSA). For more details, visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the SUSA tab. 

Awards 

Scholarships 

For detail son avail able scholarships, pi ease click on the scholarship tab at http://unet rhsmith.umd.edu . 



COLLEGE OF CHEMICAL & LIFE SCIENCES (CLFS) 

1302 Symons Hall, 301-405-2080 
www.cheml ife.umd.edu 
Dean: Norma A Newel I 

Associate Dean(s): Robert I nfantinoj r., Arthur Popper 
Assistant Dean(s): Lisa Bradley-Klemko, J oelle Presson 

U ndergraduate Research and I nternshi p Programs - Di rector: Kateri na (Kaci ) Thompson 

Life Sciences College Park Scholars - Director Lee Helmen 

Undergraduate Admissions Counseling and Recruitment- Coordinator: Eden M . Garosi 

Health Professions Advising Office- Director: Wendy Loughlin 

Undergraduate Biological Sciences Program atthe Universities at Shady Grove- Director: Tom Stanton 

The undergraduate degree programs intheCollege of Chemical and Life Sciences are 

Chemistry 
Biochemistry 
Biological Sciences 
Environmental Sciences & Policy 

The degree programs in the Col lege of Chemical and Life Sciences prepare students for entry into the work force, matriculation in 
graduate school, and matriculation in professional schools. The Chemistry and Biochemistry degree programs are housed in the 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The Biological Sciences degree program is jointiy offered by the departments of 
Biology, Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, and Entomology. Biological Sciences students may study broadly in General 
Biology, or specialize their upper level course work in Cell Biology and Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, Microbiology, or 
Physiology and Neurobiology. A double major program with the Col lege of Education provides certification to teach High School 
Chemistry or Biology. TheCol lege grants degrees in the Biodiversity aixl Conservation specialization in the Environmental 
Science and Policy major. 

Opportunities for Research 

Opportunities are avail able across the Col lege and off-campus for undergraduates to participate in basic and applied research 
projects, and research experience is encouraged for al I undergraduate students. Off campus opportunities i ncl ude National I nstitutes 
of Health, Food and Drug Administration, National Institute of Standards and Technology, The Smithsonian, the National Zoo, 
private biotechnology firms, and many others. TheCollege has special offerings in all of the campus- wide academic programs such 
asGemstones, Honors, Col lege Park Scholars, and Freshman Learning Communities. 



Admission Requirements 

Students applying for admission should consult the University Admissions section in Chapter 1 for general information about 
admi ssi ons requi rements and recommended courses. Students who pi an to enter an undergraduate program i n the Col I ege of 
Chemical and Life Sciences should include the foil owing subjects in their high school program: at least two units in the biological 
sciences and physical sciences (chemistry, physics); and four units of mathematics- algebra, geometry, pre-calculusand calculus. 
Math and science coursework at the honors/A P/IB level is strongly encouraged. 

For further information about admissions to theCollege of Chemical and Life Sciences, contact Eden M. Garosi, Coordinator, 
Undergraduate Admi ssi ons Counseling and Recruitment, 301-314-8375; egarosi@umd.edu and chemlife-inquiries@umd.edu. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel45 



Undergraduate Degree Reqiirements/DegreeOptions 

See entries under individual degree programs in Chemistry and Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, and Environmental Sciences. 

Advising 

Students inthe College of Chemical and Life Sciences have substantial advising support throughout their academic career. Each 
semester each student is assigned an advisor and is required to meet with that advisor before registering for the next semester 
classes. Advisors include the professional advising staff housed in the College office and faculty members in the various academic 
advi sors. Students have access to a range of advi si ng experti se to gui de them through thei r academi c and prof essi onal careers. 
Questi ore about advi si ng shoul d be di rected to the Student Servi ces Off i ce, BOO Symons Hal 1 , 301-405-5820. Students i nterested 
i n the health professions can find additional advi si ng from the Health Professions Advisi ng Office, 0129 Chemistry Bldg, 
301-405-7805, www.prehealth.umd.edu. 

Departments and Centers 

TheCol lege of Chemical and Life Sciences is home to four academic departments. The Chemistry Department offers the 
undergraduate degrees in Chemistry and in Biochemistry. The undergraduate Biological Sciences Degree is a joint offering by the 
three Biological Sciences Departments. ThesearetheBidogy Department; theCdl Bidogy and MdeaJar Genetics 
Department; and the Entemdogy Department. 

Minors 

TheCollege of Chemical and Life Sciences does not offer minors. 
Living-Learning Programs 

C d lege Park Send ars Life Sciences 

Director: Dr. Lee Hell man 

Assistant Director: Ms. Becky Zonies 1119 Cumberland Hall, 301-405-0528 

TheCol lege of Chemical and Life Sciences sponsors the College Park Scholars Life Sciences program for entering freshman who 
are admitted by invitation during the admissions process. Students meet weekly in colloquia with faculty where they learn more 
about the diverse areas of study in the life sciences. Scholars are also clustered in course sections which fulfil I major and general 
education requirements. I nternational travel-study course opportunities led by Col lege faculty are avail able as a part of the 
program. Students create a community of living and learning in a specially-equipped residence hall. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

J dnt Biomedical Research Program with the University of Maryland Schcd of Medicine 

Students may apply forthejoint Biomedical Science Research Program between the Department of Medical and Research 
Technology (DM RT), University of Maryland School of Medicine, and theCol lege of Chemical and Life Sciences. Students who 
have successful ly completed 60 credits of prerequisite courses at the U ni versity of M aryland, Col lege Park may be considered for 
the program. Begi nning in the junior year within the UM School of Medicine, students will develop ski lis in a variety of 
biotechnology methodologies as well as become familiar with theoperation of analytical instruments used in clinical laboratories, 
biomedical science, and biosafety and quality assurance issues. I nterested students should call the DRMT Admissions Office at 
410-706-7664. 

College Honors Program 

Students in the Col lege of Chemical and Life Sciences participate in Gemstones, the University Honors program and College Park 
Scholars, and research- intensive departmental honors programs. 

Departmental Honors 

Students may apply to partici pate i n research- based departmental honors programs i n the each of the departments of the Col lege. 
Based on the students performance in research and defense of a written thesis, the department may recommend candidates for the 
appropriate degree with Departmental Honors or Departmental High Honors. Successful completion of departmental honors will be 
recognized on a students academic transcript and diploma. Participation in the University Honors program is not required for entry 
into a departmental honors program. See departmental listings or consultwith an academic advisor in theCollegefor more 
information. 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES (CMPS) 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel46 



3400 A .V . Wi 1 1 iams, 301-405-2677 
www.cmps.uincl.edu 

cmpsque@umd.edu (for CM PS advising questions) 
Dean: Stephen Hal peri n 
Associate Dean(s): Ronald L. Lipsman(Sr. Assoc. Dean), J ames M . Purtilo 

Nationally recognized for our education, research, faculty ard students, theCollegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences is a critical educational and scientific resource benefiting the region and the nation. The Col lege offers every student a 
high-quality, innovative, and cross-disciplinary educational experience. Strongly committed to making studies in the sciences 
avail able to all, theCollege actively encourages and supports the recruitment and retention of women and minorities. 

Our students have the opportunity of worki ng closely with fi rst-class faculty in state-of-the-art labs, both on and off campus, on 
some of the most exciting problems of modern science and mathematics. We have developed courses to reflect the evolving nature 
of I T subj ects and the rapi dl y changi ng worl d of sci ence and mathemati cs. A s a new approach to undergraduate educati on, 
multiple tracks are offered within majors, including tracks for future teachers and tracks with an emphasis on computation. 

Students participate in Departmental Honors programs, Corporate Scholars, theGemstone program, Quest, and College Park 
Scholars. They apply thei r I ab and cl assroom ski 1 1 s through i nternshi ps at area compani es. Excel I ent advi si ng and career servi ces 
are i n pi ace to hel p our undergraduates transi ti on to graduate programs, publ i c servi ce, or pri vate sector commerce. O ur 
highly-skilled graduates pursue careers in a great many fields and professions. 

Admission Requirements 

All students who meet the admissions standards described in Chapter 1 of this catalog are invited to consider a major or a minor in 
one of the Bachelor of Science degree programs of theCollege. Applications of prospective freshmen and transfer students are 
evaluated by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions (www.uga.umd.edu). All current University of Maryland students in good 
academi c standi ng are wel come to contact the CM PS Dean's Off i ce at 301-405-2677 or cmpsque@deans. umd.edu. 

Recruitment 

3400 A .V . Wi 1 1 i ams 301-405-2677 
www.arii^iiTKl.eckv'iixla-giackiat^iDiasjDeclivestiKlaTts.lTbTi 

Assistant Director for Recruitment Kim Ozga (ozgaOumd.edu) 

The Col lege's Assistant Di rector for Recruitment serves as a resource and contact person for prospective students i nterested i n 
bachelor degrees and also serves as a I iaison to the Off ice of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/DegreeOptions 

Graduation Requirements 

LA minimum of 120 semester hours with at leastaC average is required of all Bachelor of Science degrees from the 
College. 

2. Forty-three credit hours that satisfy the general educationCORE program requirements of the University. Insome 
i instances, courses taken to satisfy these requi rements may also be used to satisfy major requi rements. 

3. Major and supporting coursework as specified under each department or program. 

4. Thef i nal 30 semester hours must be completed at Col lege Park. Occasional ly, the Dean may waive this requi rement 
for up to 16 of the 30 credits cited. Such a waiver is considered only if the student al ready has 75 credits i n residence. 

5. Students must be enrol led in the program in which they plan to graduate by the time they register for the last 15 
hours. 

Advising 

The Undergraduate Education Office, 3400A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2677, centrally coordinates advising and the 
processing and updating of student records. I nquiries concerning university regulations, transfer credit Dean's Exceptions and other 
general information should be addressed to this office. Specific departmental i nf ormati on i n relationship to majors is best obtained 
di rectiy from academic departments. Each department i n the College requi res semester advisi ng for registration and future course 
planning. Advisors in departments are avail able on walk-in and appointment basis. Students are also encouraged to contact the 
office by e-mai I at cmpsque@umd.edu. Assistance is also available by phone at 301-405-2677. 

Departments and Centers 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel47 



Thefol lowi ng departments, programs and research units are the pri nci pal components of the Col lege: 

Department of Astronomy 

Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Geology 

Department of Mathematics 

Department of P hysi cs 

Applied Mathematics and Statistics, and Scientific Computation Program 

Physical Sciences Program 

Statistics Program 

Centerfor Biol nformatics and Computational Biology 

Center for Nanophysics and Advanced M atsrials 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling 

Earth System Science I interdisciplinary Center 

I nstitute for Advanced Computer Studies 

I nstitute for Physi cal Sci ences and Technol ogy 

I nstitute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (joi nt with theCol lege of Engineering) 

J oi nt Quantum I nstitute 

M aryland Biophysics Program 

Materials Research Science and Engineering Center 

Norbert Wiener Centerfor Harmonic Analysis and Applications 

Degree Programs 

Thefol lowi ng Bachelor of Science (B .S.) degree programs are offered to undergraduates by the departments and programs of the 
College: Astronomy, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and Physical Sciences. In 
addition, Geology sponsors one of the areas of concentration in the Environmental Science and Policy program. 

Minors 

The Col lege offers Minors in the foil owing areas: 

Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Surficial Geology 
Earth Material Properties 
Earth History 
Geophysics 
Hydrology 
Meteorology 
Atmospheric Chemistry 
Atmospheric Sciences 
Mathematics 
Actuarial Mathematics 
Statistics 
Physics 

Minors in the Col lege offer students in all di sci rJines trie opportunity to pursue a structured program of study in afield outside their 
major. Each studentwho successfully completes a mi nor will have the accomplishment noted on their transcript. Consult 
departmental advisors and websites for further information, www.crrps.urrd.edu/urxiergraduate/programs.htm 

Living-Learning Programs 

College Park Scholars 

www.schol ars. umd.edu 

Science, Discovery & the Universe Co-Directors: Alan Peel and Stephen White 

Science & Global Change Director: Thomas R. Holtzjr. 

The Col lege co-sponsors two Col lege Park Scholars programs, Science, Discovery& the Universe and Science & Global Change. 
These living/learning programs focus around the academic disciplines of the faculty, physical sciences (in particular Astronomy) 
and global change sci ences (in particular Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Geology), respectively. In these two-year 
programs for i ncomi ng freshmen, students are brought together around common i ntel I ectual i nterests. T he program seeks to i nspi re 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 146 



students to da/el op their interests and intellectual capacity by building a community where everyone has shared interests in 
scholarly pursuits. The Scholars program allows students to experience a small col lege environment in close contact with faculty 
who are worki ng at the forefront of thei r f i el ds of experti se. 

Specialized Academe Programs 

C M PS C operate Scholars Program 

3400 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-1082 
www.cmps.umd.edu/csp/i ndex.htm 
Contact: Lawrence L iff, lliff@umd.edu 

TheCorporate Scholars Program is a combined internship and scholarship program that provides highly talented CM PS students 
with comprehensive work experience related to their fields of study. The program is a unique endeavor by the College to expand 
our students' education, improve their professional development and enhance our relationships with local businesses. 

C M PS Undergraduate Research Experiences 

www.cmps.umd.edu/undergraduate/research.htrn 

An important part of the content of CM PS majors is delivered outside the classroom, with the greatest emphasis being on 
leveraging our strength: research. Our students experience scientific discovery first hand, as knowledge learned in class is integrated 
and applied. Each major provides access to a variety of research internships that will provide opportunities to collaborate with with 
other students, f acul ty, postdoctoral f el I ows and graduate students. E mpl overs and graduate school s I ook for research experi ence i n 
applicants. Beapartof the science discovery in CM PS, which pi aces the col lege among the top public and private universities 
worldwide. 

College Honors Program 

U ndergraduate honors are offered to students i n the Physical Sciences Program and the departments of Astronomy, Computer 
Science, Geology, Mathematics and Physics. Specific information is provided under the individual program descriptions. 

Dean's List A list of all students who have passed at I east 12 hours of academic work in the preceding semester with an overall 
average grade of at least 3.5. 

Associate Dean's Commendation. A list of all students who have passed at least 12 hours of academic work in the preceding 
semester with an overal I average grade between 3.0 and 3.5. 

Financial Assistance 

Scholarships 

www.cmps.umd.edu/underqraduate/scholarshi ps.htm 

Forcurrentiy enrolled students, the Col lege accepts meritand need-based award and scholarship applications on the Col lege 
Scholarship Application Form. Students should complete one form only and submit either electronically or via surface mail. 
Applicants will be considered for all meritand need-based scholarships administered by theCollege for which they are eligible. 
Eligible students will also be contacted by errai I with information on special programs. For best consideration, Col lege scholarship 
appl i cations for each academic year should be submitted by M ay 10 for the school year begi nni ng thefol lowi ng September. 

Departmental scholarships may have different deadlines. For additional information visit the col lege web site. 

Awards 

J . R. Dorfman Prize for Undergraduate Research 
www.cmps.urrd.edu/urxlergraduate/dorfrrBn_prize.htm 

An award presented at the Spring Academic Festival for the best research project conducted on or off campus by a current Col lege 
undergraduate major. 

TheCM PS website lists other awards and scholarships that are avail able to CM PS majors: 
www.cmps.umd.edu/undergraduate/scholarshi ps.hrm 

Research Units 

Center for Biol nfbrmatics and Computational Biology 

3115 Biomolecular Sciences Bldg, 301-405-5936 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel4S 



cbcb.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: Steven Salzberg 

The University of Maryland Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology is a multidiscipli nary center dedicated to 
research on questi ons ari si ng from the genome revol uti on. C B C B bri ngs tDgether sci end sts and engi neers from many f i el ds, 
including computer science, molecular biology, genomics, mathematics, statistics, physics, and biochemistry, all of whom share a 
corrrrrininterestingainirigabetterurxlerstandingof how life works. Students interested in Ph.D. studies in CBCB haveanumber 
of choices. While we do not have a Ph.D. program specifically in Bioinformatics, ourfaculty supervise Ph.D. researchin 
bioinformatics through a number of different graduate programs. Links to these programs can be found at 
http://cbcb.umd.edu/programs, and potential students are encouraged to apply to the Ph.D. program that best matches thei r 
interests. 

Students with a background in computer science, mathematics, physics, or other mathematically oriented fields should consider 
applying to the Ph.D. program in Computer Science or inBioengineering. The Bioengineering program has been in place at the 
University of Maryland for several years, and i n 2006 Bioengineering was I aunched as a new Department, which is slated to grow 
substantially over the nextfive years. Students whose principal training is in the biological sciences might prefer to apply to the 
Biological Sciences program which has a new track in Bioinformatics. CBCB Faculty belong to each of these programs, allowing 
students with an interest in Bioinformatics to pursue a Ph.D. in the program that bests fits their previous training. 

Center for Nancphysics and Advanced Materials 

Physics Building, 301-405-7321 

www.cnam.umd.edu 

P rof essor and D i rector: Steven A nl age 

TheCenterfor Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM ) brings together about thirty-five faculty from physics and affiliated 
departments to work on cutti ng-edge research problems related to condensed matter physics. The faculty conduct both 
experimental and theoretical research in fields such as sol id state physics, strongly correlated electron systems, superconductivity, 
surface science, magnetic materials, and semiconductors. This research is important for commercial and defense- related 
appl i cati ons, such as communi cati ons, digital and anal eg el ectroni cs, sensors, and computers. CNAM provi des a uni que 
interdisciplinary education that gives students a diversity of skills as well as a broad perspective of how scientific knowledge 
impacts technological development. The experimental and theoretical research programs at CNAM are carried out by 
approximately 40 graduate students under the supervision of the CNAM faculty. A significant number of undergraduate students 
also participate in research projects, many of them receiving a high honors citation upon graduation. 

Center for Sdentific Computation and Mathematical Modding 

4149 Computer Science I nstructional Center, 301-405-0648 

www.cscamm. umd.edu 

Distinguished University Professor and Director: EitanTadmor 

The ability to compute at tremendous speeds with gigantic data sets is enabling advances in nearly every discipline. Scientific 
computation has emerged as one of the fundamental tools of scientific i investigation. It is concerned with the construction, analysis 
and implementation of novel computational algorithms which revolutionized the scientific methodology through its interplay with 
experiments and theory. These algorithms enable us, for example, to convert small scale interactions i nto accurate predictions of 
large scale phenomena. It is here that mathematics, modeling and experiments interact through scientific computation. 

At the Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling, graduate students and faculty are working together to 
develop and to understand fundamental computational techniques, algorithms and analytical tools, and to apply this understandi ng 
to outstandi ng sci entif i c probl ems i n a vari ety of f i el ds. N ew appl i cati ons rangi ng from transport i n f I ui ds and pi asma, 
nano-structures and image processing to weather prediction, computational tomography and numerical relativity requirescientific 
computation as a key partner. 

Undergraduate research opportunities exist for students who are interested in learning how this cross-disciplinary partnership works. 

Earth System Sdence I nterdsdpNnary Center 

5825 University Research Court, 301-405-5599 

www.essic.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: AntonioJ . Busalacchi 

ESSIC is a joint center between the Departments of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Geology, and Geography together with the 
Earth Sciences Directorate at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the Center is to enhance our understanding of 
how theatrrDsphere-ocearvlard-bicspherecorrponents of the Earth interact as a coupled system. This is accomplished via studies 
of the interaction between the physical climate system (eg., El Nino) and biogeochemical cycles (eg., greenhouse gases, changes 
in land use and cover). The major research thrusts of the Center are studies of ClimateVariability and Change, Atmospheric 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel5C 



Composition and Processes, andtheGlobal Carbon Cycle (including Terrestrial and Marine Ecosystems/Land Use/Cover Change). 
The manner in which this research is accomplished is via analyses of in situ and remotely sensed observations together with 
component and coupl ed ocean-atmosphere- 1 and model s. Together thi s provi des a f oundati on for understandi ng and forecast] ng 
changes i n the gl obal envi ronment and assessi ng regi onal i mpl i cati ons. Data assi mi I ati on and regi oral downscal i ng provi de the 
means by which the observations and models are linked to study the interactions between the physical climate system and 
bi ogeochemi cal cycl es from gl obal to regi onal seal es. Courses and research gui dance by Center f acul ty are provi ded through the 
Departments of Geography, Geology and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, or under the auspices of College interdisciplinary 
listings. 

I institute for Advanced Computer Studies 

2119 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-6722 

www.umiacs.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: V.S. Subrahmanian 

The faculty at the I nstitute for Advanced Computer Studies conduct fundamental research at the interface between computer 
scienceand other scientific disciplines supported by a state-of-the-art computing infrastructure. These interdisciplinary research 
programs offer opportunities for thesis research and classroom instruction, with a planned new focus on computational social 
sciences, bioinformatics and computational biology, and knowledge discovery and machine learning. The I nstitute is 
internationally known in computer vision and graphics, parallel and distributed computing, information visualization and 
educational technologies, natural language processing and computational linguistics, software engineering, and multimedia and 
internet computing. Courses and thesis research guidance by I nstitute faculty are provided under the auspices of the labs, centers, 
and the academi c departments aff i I i ated wi th the I nsti tote. 

I nstitute for Physical Science and Technology 

4211 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 301-405-4814 

www.ipstumd.edu 

Professor and Director: Rajarshi Roy 

Professor and Associate Director: Michael Coplan 

Thefaculty members of the I nstitute for Physical Science and Technology are engaged i n the study of pure and applied science 
probl ems that are at the boundaries between those areas served by the acaatemicidepartmerts. Areas of errphasi si rr I ude applied 
mathematics and scientific computation, statistical physics and chaotic dynamics, biophysics and chemical physics, materials 
science and nanotechnology, atomic, molecular, optical and plasma physics, and space and upper-atmospheric physics. These 
i nterdi scipli nary probl ems afford chal I engi ng opportuni ti es for thesi s research and cl assroom i nstructi on. Courses and thesi s 
research guidance by I nstitute faculty are provided either through the graduate programs i n Biophysics, Chemical Physics, the 
Applied Mathematics, Applied Statistics and Scientific (AMSC) program or under the auspices of other departments. 

I nstitute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics 

Energy Research Facility, 301-405-4951 

www.ireap.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: Dan Lathrop 

The I nstitute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (I REAP) is jointly administered by the Col lege and the A. James 
Clark School of Engineering. The faculty members in I REAP study diverse sciertific probl errs that are on the boundaries between 
physics and engineering, and teach relevant courses in the College and Engineering Departments. I REAP conducts experimental 
and theoretical research in nonlinear dynamics (chaos), high-temperature plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, relativistic 
microwave electronics, high- brightness charged particle beams, free-electron lasers, laser- plasma interactions, ion beam 
mi crof abri cati on techni ques, and mi crowave si nteri ng of advanced materi al s. I R E A P i s recogni zed i ntemati oral I y as a I eadi ng 
university research center i n these areas of research. We actively encourage undergraduate parti ci pation i n our research program 
through i ndependent study, special projects, and i nternshi ps under faculty supervision. The I nstitute offers undergraduate 
fellowships and summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU-TREND). I information can be found at the I nstitute web 
sitewww.ireap.umd.edu. 

Joint Quantum Institute 

2207 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405- BOO 

www.jqi.umd.edu 

P rof essor and D i rector: Steve Rol ston 

A new technol ogi cal revol uti on i s begi nni ng because the strange and uni que properti es of quantum physi cs are rel evant for 
i information science and technology. Our ability to exploit quantum phenomena is sti II at a pri mitive stage, analogous to the use of 
a si ngl e transi stor. A chal I engi ng goal i s to I earn how to seal e up from si mpl e few-component systems to si zes necessary for 
applications. Such a "quantum computer" has the potential abi I ity to handle probl ems that would take the age of the uni verse to 
sol ve on the best conventi oral computers - probl ems such as decry pti on and desi gni ng mol ecul es for pharmaceuti cal appl i cati ons. 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 151 



Thejoint Quantum Institute (J Ql) has gathered two dozen leading scientists from the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology and theUniversity of Maryland to create the international center for excellence in the study of quantum mechanics. 
Undergraduates are actively involved in research at theJQI, and new students are encouraged to participate. 

Maryland Biophysics Program 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology, 301-405-9307 

marylandbiophysics.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: D.Thirumalai 

One of the great chal I enges i n the current century i s to use to ri gorous methods i n physics and chemistry to tackle cutting edge 
probl ems in biol ogy . F rom transcri pti on of geneti c i nf ormati on to how vari ous components of a eel I f uncti on are amenabl e to 
i nvesti gati on by experi mental and computati onal methods. T he f acul ty, graduate students, and postdoctoral f el I ows i n the 
B i ophysi cs program are usi ng a vari ety of techni ques to study a wi se range of probl ems of great i nterest i n bi ol ogy. Several 
laboratories might recruit enterprisi ng undergraduate students to parti ci pate i n these exciti ng areas of research. 

Materials Research Science and EngineeringCenter 

2120 Physics Building, 301-405-8349 

www.mrsec.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: Ellen D.Williams 

Part of a national network of NSF-funded Materials Research Centers, faculty activities in M RSEC's mandate include materials 
research, industrial collaborations and educational outreach. Faculty research focuses on making new materialsfor the next 
generati ore of i nf ormati on technol ogi es, usi ng the tool s of N anoSci ence. M ateri al s of sped al i nterest are carbon- based materi al s 
for use i n nanoelectronics and photovoltaics, and metal-oxide materials with the property of coupl ing magnetic and electrical 
responses. M RSE C encourages undergraduate parti ci pati on i n the research through parti ci pati on i n i independent study, sped al 
projects and i nternshi ps with faculty supervision, and pays special attention to encouragi ng women and minorities to enter science. 

NorbertWeiner Center for Harmonic Analysis and Applications 

2211 Mathematics Building, 301-405-5058 

www.norbertwiener.umd.edu 

Professor and Director: J ohnj . Benedetto 

Harmonic analysis provides fundamental mathematical theory as well as important tool sf or science and engineering in a timeof 
great discovery, and itaddresses problems of major interest for the 21st century. Operating at the interface between academi a, 
government and industry, the Norbert Wiener Center(NWC) seeks to serve as a catalyst for the advancement of harmonic analysis 
and its applications. At the NWC, graduate students and faculty are working together to develop harmonic analysis in the context of 
vital industrial technologies, ardtoenliarcetriesetechrxilogieswithfurdarriental and applicable mathematical results. Research 
areas include wavelet theory, radar and sonar waveform design, compressed sensing, quantum computing, and medical and 
hyperspectral i magi ng. U ndergraduates parti ci pate i n the NWC research program through i ndependent study, i nternshi ps under 
faculty supervision, and the NWC's Daniel Sweet Undergraduate Research Fellowships. Women and minorities are encouraged to 
participate. 



Student Engagement and Service Units 



C M PS I nternshi p and Career Opportunities 

3400 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2677 
www.cmps.umd.edu/careers/index.htm 

TheCol lege assists students with internships and full-time employment opportunities, recruiting sessions, and workshops for 
interviews and resum(EWriting. If you are majoring inastronomy, computer science, geology, mathematics, physical sciences, or 
physics, check out the foil owing webpage: www.crTps.umd.edu/careers/index.htm. This site lists announcements of internships 
al ong wi th i nteresti ng part-ti me and f ul I -ti me j obs. I nternshi ps are an i nval uabl e tool for career expl orati on, al I owi ng you to bui I d 
rel evant r®um® and make prof essi onal connecti ons whilestill in school . T he C M PS 497 1 nternshi p Semi nar provi des an 
academi ccomponent for the internship experi ence. In addition, the CM PS Corporate Scholars Program offers students a 
comprehensive summer work experience in their fields of study, with a professional mentor and a $2,000 scholarship. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

1204 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2344 
www.education.umd.edu/studentinfo 
Dean: Donna L. Wiseman 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel52 



The Collegeof Education is a professional col I egecommi tied to advancing the science and art of teaching/learning, including the 
practices and processes which occur from infancy through adulthood in both school and non-school settings. The College's mission 
i s to provi de preparati on for current and future teachers, counsel ors, admi ni strators, educati onal sped al i sts, and other re! ated 
educational personnel, and to create and disseminate the knowledge needed by professionals and policy makers in education and 
related fields. 

The col lege programs prepare educators, counselors, psychologists, administrators, researchers, and educational specialists. 
Graduates work with individuals from infancy through adulthood in schools, community agencies, colleges and universities. 
Educational programs are accredited/approved by the following: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
Maryland State Department of Education, American Psychological Association, Council on Accreditation of Counseling and 
Related Educational Professions, and Council on Rehabilitation Education. Accreditation provides for reciprocal certification with 
most other states that recognize national accreditation. 

The M aryland State Department of Education (M SDE) issues certificates to teach i n the public schools of the state. I n addition to 
graduation from an approved program M SDE requi res satisfactory scores on the State I icensure exams (Praxis I and 1 1 ) for 
certification. At the time of graduation, theCollegeinformsMSDE of the graduate's el igibi I ity for certification. Under Maryland 
I aw, cri mi nal background checks may be requi red and consi dered by the State Department of E ducati on i n the awardi ng 
of teaching certification, and by employers before granting employment in the teaching field. Certification may be denied or 
revoked for i ndi vi dual s who have been convi cted of cri mes of vi ol ence and/or cri mes against children. Additionally, someM aryland 
Marylandcounties requi re a criminal background check prior to placement in an internship 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Students i n the Col lege of Education have the opportunity to work with an exemplary faculty. A mong our ranks are national ly 
known faculty researchers who have made si gnif i cant contri buti ons to advanci ng theory and i mprovi ng prof essi onal practi ce I n 
addition, the College's strategic location provides students with research opportunities that are unparalleled. Students can student 
teach and conduct research i n school districts with highly diverse populations. The region also provides access to several research 
libraries, government agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and educational associations. 

TheCollegeof Education offers many special resources and facilities to students, faculty, and the community, including the 
foil owing centers: 

• TheCenter for Mathematics Education provides a mathematics laboratory for undergraduate and graduate students. 
Occasi onal ly there are turjori ng servi ces for chi I dren and adol escents. These servi ces are offered i n conj uncti on with sped al 
graduate and undergraduate courses in elementary and secondary school mathematics. Centerfaculty are engaged in research 
in mathematics education, serve as consultants to school systems and instructional publishers, and provide in-service teacher 
education i n addition to graduate degree programs. 

• T he Center for Young Children i s part of the I nsti tube for C hi I d Study/D epartrrertof HurrenDevdopmentintheCollegeof 
Education. 1 1 offers a creative learni ng experience for chi Idren three, four, and five years old whose parents are aff i I iated 
with the U niversity. The Center engages i n chi Id study, curricul um development, and teacher preparation. I ts research and 
observation facilities are avail able to parents, faculty, and other persons concerned with the care and education of 

young children. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to Teacher Education Professional Course Work 

Applicants to the University of Maryland who have declared an interest in education are admitted to a department in the Col lege. 
All maj ors must meet the selective admi ssi on requirements for full admission into theCollegeof Education inorderto enroll in 
course work i n the professional teacher education degree program. 

For full admission into a teacher education major, a student must (1) complete the English and math lower-level fundamental studies 
(six credits) withagradeof C or better; (2) earn 45 semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average of at I east 2.5 
ona4.0scale; (3) submit a personal goal statement that indicates an appropriate commitmentto professional education; (4) have 
prior experiences in the educati on field; (5) submit three letters of recommendati on/reference; (6) receive satisfactory ratings on the 
Collegeof Educati on Technical Standards/Foundatioral Competencies (or submit a signed copy of theCollegeof Education 
Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards Acknowledgment Form if formal evaluations have not yet occurred); (7) have 
passi ng scores on the Praxis I . 

Admission application forms are available in Room 1204 of the Benjamin Building. Only those who are admitted are able to enroll 
in the professional education sequence. An overall grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained after admi ssi on to Teacher 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel52 



E ducati on to conti nue i n the prof essi onal educati on programs. A Teacher E ducati on A ppeal s B oard revi ews appeal s from students 
who do not meet the admissions, advancement or retention criteria. Consult the Student Services Office (Room 1204 Benjamin 
Bldg.) for policies and procedures regarding appeals. 

C ri teri a f or admi ssi on to the Teacher E ducati on program appl y to any teacher preparati on program offered by the U ni versi ty of 
M aryland. Thus, students desiri ng a major i n music or physical education should apply to the Col lege of Education for admission to 
the professional program in Teacher Education. Students who are not enrol led in the Col lege of Education but who, through an 
established cooperative program with another college are preparing to teach, must meet all admission, scholastic and curricular 
requirements of the Col lege of Education. The professional education courses are restricted to students who are enrolled in an 
approved teacher preparation program and degree-seeking majors who have met Col lege of Education requirements for admi ssi on 
and retention. 

Gateway Requirements for EarlyCNIdhood and Elementary Education Programs 

In order to meet the Maryland State Department of Education's (MSDE's) institutional performance criteria lor the 
Redesign (i. e. strong math and science background for early cNldhood and elementary education teacher candidates), 
students in these programs need to fulfill additional performance criteria. In addition to therequirements for admission 
to teacher education that are listed above, early childhood and elementary education majors mist satisfy the following 
gateway requirements 

1. Completion of a four-credit CORE laboratory physical science, a four-credit CORE laboratory biological science, 
Elements of Numbers and Operations (MATH 212), and Elements of Geometry and Measurement (MATH 213) with a 
mini mum grade ofC in each class and a 2.7 cumulative GPA across all four courses 

2.Completion of Introduction toTeaching (EDCI 280) or Exploring Teaching in Early Childhood (EDHD220) witha 
grade ofB or better 

3. Passing scores on thePraxisI: Academic Ski I Is Assessments (Students will berequired to meettheindividual cut-off 
scores for each of the three Praxis I assessments A composite score will not be accepted for admission.) 

In keeping with the campus undergraduate admi ssi ore policy, the College of Education will admitas many freshmen as possible as 
"pre-service" education majors. Internal and external transfers who have completed fewer than 60 credits and who have not yet met 
the standards required for enrol I merit in the professional degree programs also will beadmitted as "pre-service" education majors. 
For directly admitted freshmen, the above admission requirements will serve as the criteria for the 45-credit review, which occurs 
at theend of the semester in which the freshmen complete 45 credits. Forinternal and external transfers, these criteria make up the 
"gateway." Students who pass the 45-credit review or the gateway will beadmitted into the professional degree programs. 
Transfer students with sixty or more credits will be granted permission to enrol I as a pre-service major in education, provided they 
have maintained at I east a 2.5 GPA and successfully completed the lower- level fundamental studies witha mini mum grade of C or 
better. These students will be given one semester to meet the requirements for admi ssi on to teacher education. 

I n accordance with M SDE pol icy, students i n the professional teacher preparation programs must complete a 100-day i nternship 
over two consecutive semesters in an approved partner school/Professional Development School (PDS). Because there are a 
limited number of available PDS sites, the Col lege may beforced to impose seat restrictions if the number of teacher candidates 
for a given area exceeds the number of avail able placements. In these situations, the College will utilize a holistic review of the 
applicants in the candidate pool, and select the top candidates to fill thoseseats. WhileGPA will bean important consideration, the 
totality of the admi ssi on portfolio will be used to determine the candidates who will be given top consideration for the available 
seats. 

Detailed information regarding admission to the Teacher Education program, including the gateway requirements for Early 
Childhood or Elementary Education, is avail able in the Student Services Office, Room 1204 Benjamin (301-405-2344). 

Undercpcduate Decree Reqiirement^DecreeOptions 

TheCollegeof Education confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) depending on the amount 
of I i beral arts study i ncl uded i n a parti cul ar degree program. M i ni mum requi rements for graduati on are 120 semester hours. 
Specific departmental program requi rements for more than the mi ni mum must befulfi I led. 

I n addition to the university's general education requirements (CORE) and the specific requi rements for each curriculum the 
Col lege requi res that all majors complete a Foundations of Education course (eg., EDPS301) and, depending upon the teacher 
education major, six to twelve semester hours of reading course requi rements. A grade of C or better is requi red in all 
pre-professional and professional course work requi red for the major. An overall grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained 
after admi ssi on to Teacher Educati on. A grade of S is requi red in the student teaching portion of the yearlong internship. All 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Page 154 



teacher candidates are required to obtain satisfactory evaluations on the Col lege of Education Foundational 
Competencies/Technical Standards and attainqualifyi ng scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxis I andPraxisll assessments. 
Detailed information about the Praxis assessments is available in the Student Services Office, Room 1204 Benjamin. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the Col lege of Education must be recommended by the students advisor and 
department chai rperson and approved by the Dean. 

Yearlong Internship (Student Teaching) 

The yearlong internship, which is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program takes place in a collaborating 
school (i.e., partner school, PDS- Professional Development School). The yearlong internship consists of one semester of methods 
and one semester of student teaching. Each teacher candidate's internship will vary according to the unique attributes of their 
teacher educati on program. AIM nternshi ps wi 1 1 provi de teacher candi dates wi th the opportuni ty to i ntegrate theory and practi ce 
through a comprehensive, reality-based experience. The yearlong internship is arranged through the Col lege of Education in 
collaboration with the school site coordinators (i.e., PDS Coordinators) and the designated schools in the partnership. 

The yearlong internship is a full-tirre commitment. I nterference with this responsibility because of employment or course work is 
strongly discouraged. Teacher candidates assigned to schools for this i nternshi p are responsi blefor thei r own transportation and 
I ivi ng arrangements and should be prepared to travel to whichever school has been assigned. Student teaching requires a special fee. 
PI ease refer to the Registration Guide under Financial Information: Fees. During the yearlong internship, students should be 
prepared to adhere to the academic schedule/calendar for the school system in which they are placed. 

I n order to receive a yearlong i nternshi p placement, al I teacher candidates must make appl ication the semester prior to the begi nni ng 
of the methods portion of the internship year. Prospective student teachers must have been admitted to Teacher Education and have 
completed all prerequisites. Prior to assignment all students in teacher preparation programs must have: (1) maintained an overall 
grade point average of at least 2.5 withaminimum grade of "C" in every course required for the major; (2) satisfactorily completed 
all other required course work in their program (3) received a favorable recommendati on from thei r department (4) attained 
qualifying scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxisl andPraxisll assessments; (5) applied forayear-long internship 
placement through the Col lege of Education during the semester prior to the internship year; (6) received favorable ratings from 
prior supervised experiences in school settings; (7) received favorableevaluations on the College of Education Foundational 
Competencies/Technical Standards; and (8) submitted a criminal history disclosure statement. Inaddition, state law gives the local 
school to which the student teacher is assigned the discretion to require a criminal background check prior to placement Early 
Childhood Education students must have a certificate indicati ng freedomfrom tuberculosis and proof of immunization. 

Notes All registrations in the student teaching portion of the yearlong internship, regardless of whether a student withdraws or 
takesaleaveof absence, will be counted as an attempt under the campus repeat policy. Only two registrations will beallowed. 
After two registrations, further attempts at student teachi ng must be approved by the department and the school system 
professionals involved in the teacher candi date's internship experience. This pol icy applies only to students in theCol lege of Educatic 
E ducati on duri ng the student teachi ng porti on of the yearl ong i nternshi p. 

CdlegeoF Education Foundational Competendes/Technical Standards 

A 1 1 candidates i n the U M professional preparation programs are expected to demonstrate that they are prepared to work with 
children and youth in educational settings. This preparation results from the combination of successful completion of university 
coursework and f i el d/i nternshi p experi ences and the demonstrati on of i mportant human characteri sti cs and di sposi ti ore that al I 
educators should possess. These characteristics and dispositions, the College of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical 
Standards, are grouped into four categories: Communicati orVI nterpersonal Skills, Emotional and Physical Abilities, Cognitive 
Dispositions, and Personal and Professional Requirements. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards serve several important functions, including, but not limited to: (a) providing 
i information to those considering pre K- 12 and community professional careers that will help such students in their career 
decision- making; (b) advising applicants of non-academic criteria considered in admissions decisions made by the University's pre 
K-12 and community professional preparation programs; (c) servi ng as the basis for feedback provided to students i n these 
programs regarding their progress toward mastery of all program objectives; and(d) serving as the basis for the final assessment of 
attai nment of graduati on requi rements and recommendati on for certifi cati on. 

Candidates in the undergraduate teacher preparation programs will be requi red to achieve satisfactory ratings on the Col lege of 
Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards (or, if evaluations are not yet available, submit a Col lege of Education 
Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards Acknowledgement Form) as part of the Col I ege's selective admissions review i n 
the sophomore or j unior year. Self-assessments of candidates and faculty eval uations of students on the Foundational 
Competencies/Technical Standards also will occur during each fi el d/i nternshi p experience. Students will be monitored and given 
feedback throughout the program. At specified points, students will be notified of inadequacies that may prevent them from 
progressi ng through thei r program. Documentati on and consensus regardi ng the students fundi oni ng wi 1 1 be sought before any 
acti on i s taken. Candi dates who experi ence def i ci end es i n any areas wi 1 1 be encouraged to seek appropri ate prof essi onal hel p from 
university or other sources. If the problem seems to be beyond remediation, admission and/or continuation in the professional 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel55 



programs, graduation, or recommendation for certification may be denied. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical standards may be met with, or without, accommodations. The U niversity compl ies with the 
requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Therefore, the Col lege of 
Education will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations with respectto its technical standards for an applicant with a 
disability who is otherwise qualified. For detailed information on theCollegeof Education Foundational Competencies/Technical 
Standards, see www.educati on. umd.edu/studenti nfo/teachercert html 



Advising 

The Student Services Office provides academic advisi ng for education students regardi ng admission, orientation, registration, 
graduation, and certification. At other times, students who have been admitted to the College of Education receive academic 
advi sing through their departments. Advising is mandatory in theCollegeof Education: Students must be advised prior to 
regi strati on each semester. Students shoul d consul t an advi sor i n the academi c department for further i nf ormati on about the 
mandatory advisi ng requi rement 

Students are requi red to complete an academic audit i n the Office of Student Services upon admission to the professional teacher 
educati on degree program. U ndergraduates are expected to compl ete thei r degree program i n a ti mel y manner and to adhere to 
program benchmarks. I nf ormati on about program benchmarks and four-year pi are i s avai I abl e on the Student Servi ces websi te at 
http://www.education.umd.edu/studenti nf o/currenr/ugrrBjor-currented.html . 

Departments and Centers 

TheCol lege is organized i nto seven departments, three of which offer undergraduate majors i n teacher education: the Department 
of C urri cul um and I nstructi on, whi ch offers el ementary and secondary educati on programs; the Department of H uman 
Development and Institute for Chi Id Study, which offers an early childhood program and the Department of Special Education. In 
addition, the Col lege i ncl udes a number of centers that offer special resources and faci I ities to students, faculty, and the 
community: 

Center for Accel erati ng Student Leami ng 

Center for Children, Relationships and Culture 

Center for Education Policy and Leadership 

Center for I ntegrated LatentVariable Research (CI LVR) 

Center of Literacy, Language, and Culture 

Center for Mathematics Education 

Center for Young Children 

Connections Beyond Sight and Sound 

I nstitutefor the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth 

International Center for Transcultural Education 

K-16 Partnership and Development Center 

Maryland Assessment Research Centerfor Education Success (MARCES) 

Maryland I nstitutefor Minority Achievement and Urban Education 

Maryland Literacy Research Center 

Pri nci pled Assessment Design for I nqui ry i n Science (PA Dl ) 

Science Teaching Center 

Mid-Atiantic Centerfor Mathematics Teaching & Learning 

National Center on Education, Disability, andj uvenilej ustice 

Minors 

TheCollegeof Education offers five minors: 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel56 



1. The M i nor i n Secondary Education i ncl udes 15 credits and provides opportunities for undergraduate subject area majors to 
enroll in a sequenceof education courses that helps them to determine if teaching is a viable career option for them. For more 
informati on about the secondary education mi nor, contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, 1207 Benjamin Building. 

2. The Minor in Special Education provides opportunities for uixlergraduate students to enroll in a sequence of education courses 
to determine if working with students with disabilities is a viable career option. For students interested in pursing this career 
option, a one-year M.Ed, program leading to certification as a special educator, is also avail able. For more information about the 
18-credit special education minor, see: www.education.umd.edu/EDSP/news/mi norSpEd.pdf 

3. The M i nor in Second Language Education (TESOL) provides opportunities for undergraduate subject area majors to complete a 
sequence of courses that helps them prepare for careers as teachers of English as a second language i n US schools and/or prepare 
therm f or rol es as teachers of English as a foreign I anguage in international settings. It i ncl udes coursework from the Department of 
Curriculum and I instruction and the Department of Human Development For more information about theTESOL minor, contact 
the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, 1207Benjamin Building. 

4. T he M i nor i n H uman Devel opment provi des a ri gorous f oundati on i n human devel opment for students who wi sh to support 
thei r maj or f i el d of study wi th knowl edge of human growth and devel opment across mul ti pi e domai ns and devel opmental stages, as 
wel I as knowledge related to pri nci pies of teachi ng and learni ng and/or who desi re active partici pation i n human development 
research under the supervision of Human Devel opment faculty in laboratory settings. Contact the Human Development 
undergraduate mi nor advisor, Dr. M egan H urley, at mhurleyl@umd.edu or 301-405-7233 for more i nformation or to arrange an 
advi si ng appoi rrtment 

5. TheEDCP Minor in Leadership Studies promotes college sbxlertleadershipdevdoprrentbyeducatingurdergraduatestuderte 
forandaJbout leadership in a complex world. The goal of the minor is to prepare students to serve effectively informal and informal 
leadership roles in campus, local, national, and global contexts. Faculty and students in the mi nor are dedicated to advancing the 
field of leadership studies by building upon and critically evaluating existing theoretical, research- based, and practical knowledge. 
For more information, see Beth Niehaus (0110 Stamp Student Union, eniehaus@um.edu). 

Living-Learning Programs 

College Park Scholars Advocates for Children 

College Park Scholars is an innovative two-year living/learning program for academically talented students. Admission is by 
invitation. Students attend weekly, faculty-led colloquia, which engage students in discussion and debate with prominent experts in 
thefield. 

The Col lege Park Scholars Advocates for Children Program involves students in advocacy efforts targeting a broad range of social, 
educational, policy and justice issues affecting diverse children, families and communities. The Advocates program is structured so 
that students become informed in areas of personal interest that relate to children, families and communities. They then learn to 
transl ate thei r knowl edge i nto advocacy f or soci al j usti ce and change. A dvocacy i nvol vement i ncl udes political I obbyi ng, grassroots 
organizi ng and service activities i n schools and communities. 

For more information on the Col lege Park Scholars: Advocates for Children Program visit 1120 Cumberland Hall or phone 
301-314-5909. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Secondary Education Program Options 

TheCollege of Education has mul ti pie pathways for students who are interested in teachi ng at the secondary level. 

The Dual Major option, whi ch i s desi gnedf or incoming freshmen or sophomores, leads to the Bachelor's degree with a major in 
an academi c content area pi us a second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to have an academi c 
content maj or whi ch sati sfi es the requi rements of the academi c department and meets the standards for teacher certif i cati on. 
Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compl ete both majors i n four years with careful advi sement and 
scheduling. 

The Minor in Secondary Education provides opportunities for undergraduate subject area majors to enroll i n a sequence of 
education courses that helps them to determine if teaching is a viable career option for them. The 15-18 credit minor may betaken 
pri or to admi ssi on i nto a teacher preparati on program. I f an undergraduate student pursui ng or compl eti ng the mi nor desi res to enter 
an education track, the candidate must apply for the dual major program to obtai n certification as a secondary education classroom 
teacher through completion of a M aryland State Department of Education approved program option. Some of the courses students 
take to compl ete the M i nor in Secondary Education may also be applicable in certification options at the graduate level offered 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel57 



through the Department of Curricul um and I nstruction. These students should consult with an advisor i n the Department of 
Curriculum and I nstructi on to identify the most appropriate option leading to teacher certification and to review the specific 
admission requirements associated with these programs. 

The Certificate Prog-am requires completion of an academic major, including coursework specific to meet certification standards 
i n the certifi cate area, and a bachel or's degree i n an approved academi c content area, pi us the compl eti on of a certifi cate program i n 
secondary educati on to meet requi rements i n U M 's approved program f or M SD E certifi cati on. Sel ected coursework from the M i nor 
i n Secondary Education may betaken prior to admission to the Certificate Program option. 

TheFive-Year Integrated Master's with Certification Program, which is intended for content majors entering thejunior or 
senior year, is for talented students with a mini mum GPA of 3.0 who seek to combine undergraduate studies in the content area and 
professional educati on as a foundation for a focused professional year at the graduate level leading to secondary- level certification 
in the subject field and the Master's of Education degree. As undergraduates, admitted students complete their baccalaureate 
degrees with a major in the relevant content area and a mini mum of 12 credits in professional education studies related to teacher 
certifi cati on requi rements. I n thei r fifth year, they enrol I i n a f ul I -year i nremshi p and compl ete graduate- 1 evel prof essi oral studi es 
that make them eligible for teacher certification and the master's of education degree. 

F or detai I ed i nf ormati on about these secondary educati on program opti ons, contact the Department of C urri cul um and I nstructi on, 
1207 Benjamin Building. 



College Honors Program 

Undergraduate teacher education majors meeting certain scholastic requirements may participate in the College of Education 
Honors Program The objective of this program is to examine the field of education at levels of depth and breadth that go beyond 
that provided by any one teacher preparation sequence. The program consists of there components: group, cross-disci pi i nary, and 
i individual study. The Honors Program represents an excel lent spri ngboard for students with aspi rations to go on to graduate school . 
For further information contact Dr. Christy Corbin, 1117H Benjamin Building, 301-405-7793. 

College of Education Title 1 1 

I institutional Data on Teacher Preparation 

TheCollege of Education passratesfortheTitiell reporting period for the 2007-2008 academic year indicated that we exceeded 
the statewide pass rate in all categories. When the data were summarized, treCollegehadalC)0%passrate; the statewide average 
was 97%. (Institutional pass rates: Basic Skills- 100%; Professional Knowledge- 100%; Academic Content Areas- 100%; 
Special Populations- 100%). Data tables reporting si ngle-assessment institutional pass rates, aggregate institutional pass rates, and 
summary pass rates are available through the Col lege website, www.educati on/umd.edu . Information on the number of students 
enrolled and the student teaching experiences is highlighted below: 

• Total number of students enrol led duri ng 2007-2008: 1115 

• Total number of students i n programs of supervised student teachi ng duri ng academic year 2007-2008: 307 

• Total number of supervising faculty for trie teacher preparation program during 2007-2008: 58 

• T he student teacher/f acul ty rati o. 5.3 students per faculty member 

• The average number of hours per week requi red of student participation was 40 hours. Thetotal number of weeks of 
supervised student teaching required is 16 weeks. Thetotal number of hours is 640 hours. 

• T he teacher preparati on program i s currenti y approved by the state. 

• The teacher preparation program is notcurrentiy designated as "low- performing" by the state as defined by section 208(a) of 
theHEAof 1998. 

• The teacher preparation program is notcurrentiy designated as "at risk of being designated as 'low performing' by the state" 
as defined by section 208(a) of the HEA of 1998. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Col lege sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa; theTeacher Education Association of Maryland Students (TEAMS), a 
state/national education association; the Student Assembly, a student governance organization; and Kappa Delta Pi, an honor 
society in education. The Mary McLeod Bethune Society is a pre- professional organization concerned with minority issues and 
education. A chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children is opm to urxiergiaduatearidgraduatestuderirs in Special Education. 

The Plan of Organization for the Col lege of Education cal Is for undergraduate student representation on both the Col lege of Educatior 
Education Assembly and College Senate. These organizations assume a critical role in policy development for the College of Educate 
Education. TheAssembly meets at I east once a year during the fall semester for its annual meeting. Senate meetings typically 
occur once a month duri ng the f al I and spri ng semesters. Si x f ul I -ti me undergraduate students are el ected at I arge as voti ng 
members of the Assembly. At least one representative from each of the departments with undergraduates serves on the Assembly. 
Of the six Assembly members, one is deded to serve as a ddegate to th£ol lege of Education Senate. Students interested in 
receiving further information about theCol lege Assembly or Senate should contact the Office of Student Services, Room 1204 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 156 



Benjamin. 

I n several departments there are i nf orrral organi zati ons of students. Students shoul d contact the i ndi vi dual departments or, i n the 
case of Col lege-wide groups, the Student Services office, for additional i information regarding these organizations. 

Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs 
and, in cooperation with other university off ices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information 
(including details regarding the new TEACH grants), visit www.financialaid.umd.edu . 

I n addition, contributions from the Col lege of Education Alumni and Friends have made it possible to award a number of $1,000 
schol arshi ps to deservi ng undergraduate and graduate students each academi c year. These awards are based on the f ol I owi ng 
criteria: 

• academic performance 

• financial need 

• leadershi p and contributions to the field of education or 
commitment to potential leadership inthefield of education 

• encouragement of a diverse and multicultural community 

Schol arshi p appl i cati ons may be obtai ned i n the Offi ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n). A replications also are avail able 
on- 1 i ne: http://www.education.umd.edu/studenti nfo/schol arshi ps/i ndex.html . 

For more information about the College of Education Scholarships, including deadlines and application materials, contact the 
Off i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . 

Awards 

M aryland Teachers of Premise Program 

Each year, the Col lege identifies five to seven of its most promising gifted pre-service educators, who are seniors and who plan to 
teach in the state of Maryland. These students become part of a select group of outstanding pre-service and veteran teachers 
participating in a mentor- prot(^®program and educational Institute. Aspartof the program, each student is paired with an 
award-winning veteran teacher mentor (Teacher of the Year, Mil ken National Educator, Blue Ribbon School Master Teacher, etc.), 
who provides guidance and support during the transiti on period into teaching. For more information about this program contact 
Dr. KathyAngeletti, Assistant Dean (kangel@umd.edu). 

Student E nepgement and Service Units 

Student Services Office 

1204 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2344 
www.education.umd.edu/studentinfo 

The Student Services Office provides academic advisi ng for education majors regardi ng admission, orientation, registration, 
graduation, and certification. I nformation about the Praxis assessments and the Col lege of Education Scholarships also is 
avai lablein Student Servi ces. 

Educational Technology Services 

0234 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3611 

Educational Technology Services helps the Col lege advance the effective use of technology in support of student learning. The 
Center provides a range of technology and media resources and services to faculty and students. The Center also offers professional 
development courses, technology planni ng, consulting assistance, and other outreach services to educators and pol icy makers 
throughout the state and region. A number of research, development; and demonstration activities in educational technology also 
are conducted through the Center's grants and contracts with federal , state, and private fundi ng sources. 

Career Center 

3100 Hornbake Library; 301-314-7225 
wwwCareerCenter.umd.edu 

All seniors graduating in the Col lege of Education are encouraged to completeacredentialsfilewith the Career Center. 
C redenti al s consi st of student teachi ng eval uati ons and recommendati ons from academi c and prof essi onal sources. An initial 
registration fee is requi red and enables the Career Center to send a students credentials to i nterested educational employers, as 
indicated by the student. Students also may file credentials if completing teacher certification requirements or advanced degrees 
and if interested in teaching, administrative or research positions in education. 

Other services availablethroughTERP (The Employment Registration Program) include job listings in private and public schools 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel5S 



and institutions of higher learning, on-campus interviews with in-state and out-of-state school systems, and resume referral to 
empl oyers i nterested i n hi ri ng educati on maj ors. I nf ormati on and appl i cati ons from school systems throughout the country, j ob 
search publications, and various employment directories are available in the Career Center. 

Col lege of Education Title 1 1 - Institutional Data on Teacher Preparation 

The Col lege of Education pass rates for theTitie 1 1 reporti ng period for the 2007-2008 academic year i ndicated that we exceeded 
the statewide pass rate in all categories. When the data were summarized, theCollegehadalOO%passrate; the statewide average 
was 97%. (Institutional pass rates: Basic Skills- 100%; Professional Knowledge- 100%; Academic Content Areas- 100%; 
Special Populations- 100%). Date tables reporting single-assessment institutional pass rates, aggregate institutional pass rates, and 
summary pass rates are available through the Col lege website, www.education/umd.edu . Information on the number of students 
enrolled and the student teaching experiences is highlighted below: 

• Total number of students enrol led duri ng 2007-2008: 1335 

• Total number of students i n programs of supervised student teachi ng duri ng academic year 2007-2008: 307 

• Total number of supervising faculty for the teacher preparation program during 2007-2008: 58 

• The student teacher/faculty ratio. 5.3 students per faculty member 

• The average number of hours per week required of student parti cipati on was 40 hours. Thetotal number of weeks of 
supervised student teaching required is 16 weeks, Thetotal number of hours is 640 hours. 

• T he teacher preparati on program i s current] y approved by the state. 

• The teacher preparation program is not currently designated as "low- performing" by the state as defined by section 208(a) of 
theHEAof 1998. 

• The teacher preparation program is not currently designated as "at risk of being designated as 'low performing' by the state" 
as defined by section 208(a) of the HEA of 1998. 



A.J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

3110Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-8335 
www.eng.umd.edu 
Dean: Darryll Pines 
Associate Dean(s): Gary A. Pertmer 

T he mission of the CI ark School of Engineering at the University of Mary I and is to provide quality engineering educati on, to 
conduct strong research programs, to foster a close parrnershi p with i industry and government and to provide related service to the 
campus community and the community at large. A major focus of the School s activities is to provide a qual ity engi neeri ng 
education with sufficient scope to include the basic and specialized engineering trainirgnecessaiy to the current and emerging 
needs of society. The School has related responsibility to contribute to the advancement of knowledge by conducting research at 
the cutti ng edge of sci ence and technol ogy . Si nee sci ence and technol ogy are rapi dl y advanci ng, the School al so has a prof essi oral 
responsi bi I ity to provide conti nui ng education programs so the practici ng engi neer can remai n effective. The School faculty and 
admi nistration also sees as part of its mission, an obi igation to serve the needs of the campus community and the community at 
I arge i n the spi ri t of col I egi al cooperati on. 

Engineers also occupy an intermediary position between scientists and the public because, in addition to understanding scientific 
princi pies, they are concerned with the timing, economics, and values that define the use and application of those principles. With 
this i n mi nd trie School fosters a close parrnershi p with i ndustry and government, and also reaches out to both the campus 
community at large with its services. 

Admission Requirements 

Direct Admissions Requirements 

1. Admission to the Clark School of Engi neeri ng is limited. Applicants are reviewed and will be admitted direct! yon a competitive 
basis. Eval uation is based on high school grades, standardized test scores, activities, leadershi p and demonstrations of potential to 
succeed. A n appl icant may apply to any of the majors offered withi n the School . A n applicant also has the option of entering as an 
Undecided Engineering major and will typically choose a degree program in the first year. 

2. National Merit and National Achievement Finalists and Semifinal ists, Maryland Distinguished Scholar Finalists, and 
Banneker/Key Scholars are admitted di rectiy to the School . 

Academic Benchmarks 

TheClark School of Engineering has expectations and policies that are designed to promote the success of its students and to 
ensure ti mel y progress to the degree. A student, i n consul tati on wi th School and Departmental advi sors, i s requi red to devel op an 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel6C 



individual plan for timely completion of higher degree program. Theplanwill be reviewed by the student and his/her advisor on a 
regular basis and revised, if necessary, as individual circumstances change. Under normal circumstances, a student is expected to 
compl ere hi s/her degree requi rements i n no more than four years. 

45-CrerJt Benchmarks 

Directly admitted freshmen will be subject to an academic review at tine end of the semester in which they attain 45 University of 
M aryland credits. I n order to successful ly complete the review, students must have an overal I GPA of at least 2.0 and have 
completed ENES 100, Fundamental Studies English, one Distributed Studies Course from theHumanities or Social Sciences, and 
the foil owing sequence of Gateway requirements: MATH 141, PHYS 161, andCHEM lBorCHEM 135 with a grade of 2.0 or 
better. 

Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at the University of Maryland or at any other university or 
col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a grade of W ( wi thdrawn) i s earned i s counted as 
an attempt. Students who fail to meet these requi rements by the semester in which they attain 45 University of Maryland credits 
may be di smi ssed from the C I ark School and may not reappl y. 

GO- and 90-C redit Benchmarks 

Each academi c program has specif i c benchmark requi rements at the 60 and 90 credit I evel . Refer to www.eng. umd.edu/advi si ng/advi 
www.enq. umd.edu/advisi nq/advi si nq_4-vear-pl ans. html for program benchmarks. 

Transfer Admission 

Direct Admissions Requirements 

Internal and External Transfer students will bedirectiy admitted to the Clark School if they meet the Gateway requirements, 
MATH141, PHYS 161, CHEM113 or CH EM 135 with a grade of 2.0or better, have completed Fundamental Studies English, have 
completed at I east one Humanities or Social Studies course, and have a mini mum cumulative GPA of 3.0 inall collegelevel 
coursework, and who have not previously been admitted to theClark School of Engineering. Only one repeat of a single course to 
the set of Gateway courses, either at the U ni versity of M aryland or at any other university or col lege, wi 1 1 be considered to meet 
the review requi rements. A course i n which a grade of W (withdrawn) is earned is counted as an attempt Students should wait 
until all gateway requi rements are complete before applying for admission to the School. 

Internal and External Transfer students who do not meet tfe Direct Admissions Requi rements, but have completed the Gateway 
requi rements, may apply and be considered for admission on a competitive basis. 

Appeal Process 

All students may appeal the admission decision. Students directiy admitted as freshmen who are dismissed because of failure to 
meet gateways or to be in good academic standing at 45 credits, may appeal in writing directiy to the Associate Dean for Education 
in theClark School. All other students who are denied admission may appeal through tine Office of Undergraduate Admissions of 
the University. 

Special Note 

StudentswithapreviousBA.orB.S. degree will be admitted to theClark School of Engineering with a mini mum GPA of 3.0 in all 
collegelevel coursework and a completion of MATH140, M ATH141, CHEM IB or CHEM 135, and PHYS 161 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher in each. 

Engineering Transfer Programs 

M ost of the communi ty col I eges i n M aryl and provi de one or two-year programs whi ch have been coordi nated to prepare students 
to enter the sophomore or junior year in engineering at the University of Maryland. These curricula are identified as Engineering 
Transfer Programs in the catalogs of the sponsoring institutions. The various associate degree programs in technology do not 
provi de the preparati on and transf erabi I i ty i nto the degree curri cul a as the desi gnated transfer programs. A maxi mum of one half of 
the degree credits (approxi mately 60 semester hours) may be transferred from a two-year community col lege program. 

T here may be some courses whi ch are not offered by the school s parti ci pad ng i n the engi neeri ng transfer program. Students shoul d 
i nvestigatethe feasibility of completing these courses in summer school at theUni versity of Maryland before starting their junior 
course work i n the f al I semester. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/DegreeOptions 

Structure of Engineering Curricula: Courses in the normal curriculum or program and prescribed credit hours leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science (with curriculum designation) areourJined i n the sections describing each department in the CI ark School of 
Engineering. No student may modify the prescribed number of hours without special permission from the Dean of the School. The 
courses i n each curri cul um may be cl assif i ed i n the f ol I owi ng categori es: 

1. Courses in the CORE Liberal Arts and Science Studies Program. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel61 



2. Courses in the physical sciences, mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Rel ated techni cal courses, engi neeri ng sci ences and other courses approved for one curri cul um but offered by another 
department. 

4. Courses inthe major department. A studentshould obtain written approval for any substitution of courses from the department 
chai r and the Dean of the School . The courses i n each engi neeri ng curricul um as classified below, form a sequential and 
developmental pattern in subject matter. In this respect curricula in engineering may differ from curricula in other colleges. Some 
regul ati ore whi ch are general ly appl i cabl e to al I students may need cl arif i cati on for purposes of orderl y admi ni strati on among 
engineering students (see the Academic Regulations in chapter 4). Moreover, the CI ark School of Engineering establishes policies 
which supplement university regulations. 

School Regulations 

1. The responsibility for proper registration and for satisfying stated prerequisites for any course must rest with the student as does 
the responsibility for proper achievement in courses in which the student is enrolled. Each studentshould be familiar with the 
provi si ore of thi s catal og, i ncl udi ng the A cademi c Regul ati ore. 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics, and chemistry have highest priority. It is strongly recommended that every 
engineering student registerfor mathematics and chemistry or mathematics and physics each semester until the student has fully 
satisfied requirements of the Clark School of Engineering in these subjects. 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the CI ark School of Engi neering, a student must have an overall averageof atleasta2.0 
and a grade of C (2.0) or better in all engineering courses (courses with an EN prefix). Responsibility for knowing and meeting all 
graduation requirements in any curriculum rests with the student. 

4. In addition to the requirement for a C (2.0) or better in all EN courses, all students who begin col lege- level work, either at the 
University of Maryland or any other institution in the Spring 2005 semester orlater, must receive a grade of C (2.0) orhigherinall 
technical courses (e.g. mathematics, physics, err) used to satisfy major requirements. 

5. A course taken at UM in which a grade has been earned may not be repeated via transfer from another institution. 

6. All students are required to complete a number of general education courses and must follow the university's requirements 
regarding completion of the general education (CORE) Program. Consult the Academic Regulations section of this catalog for 
additional information. Engineering students who began col lege- level work (either at the University of Maryland or at other 
institutions) during theFall 1989 semester or later are required to complete a junior- level technical writing course regardless of 
their performance in freshman English classes. This represents a School policy, not a University-wide policy. 

7. All degree programs in the Clark School of Engi neering require a mini mum of 120 credits pi us satisfaction of all department, 
School, and University general education (CORE) program requirements. Students should be aware that for all currentiy existing 
engi neeri ng programs the total number of credits necessary for the degree exceeds 120 by some number that depends on the 
specific major. 

C urri cul a for the vari ous engi neeri ng departments are gi ven i n thi s catal og to i 1 1 ustrate how the programs can be compl eted i n four 
years. These curricula are rigorous and relatively difficult. Surveys have shown that only about one-third to one-half of the students 
actually receive an engineering degree in four years. The majority of students (whether at Maryland or at other engi neering schools 
nationwide) complete the engi neering program in four and one- half to five years. Itisquitefeasibleforastudenttostretehoutany 
curri cul um thi s may be necessary or desi rabl e for a vari ety of reasons. H owever, students shoul d seek competent advi si ng i n order 
to ensure that courses are taken i n the proper sequence. 

All students are urged to complete a senior audit using Degree Navigator and review with their departmental advisor at I east two 
semesters prior to graduation. The purposeof the senior audit is to discuss academic progress and confirm that graduation 
requi rements are bei ng completed. 

Departments and Degrees 

The CI ark School of Engi neering offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in thefol lowing fields of study: Aerospace Engi neering, 
Bioengi neering, Biological Resources Engineering (currentiy being phased out- no new admits), Chemical Engineering, Civil 
Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Fire Protection Engineering, Materials Science and Engi neering, 
Mechanical Engineering, B.S. Engineering (Applied ScienceOption). All of the above programs, with the exception of 
B ioengi neering and B.S. Engineering (Applied ScienceOption) are accredited by the Engi neering Accreditation Commission of 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). According to ABET policy, the new (as of J uly 2006) 
Bioengi neering Program will apply for accreditation after graduation of its first student which isanticipated in 2009. 

Freshman-Sophomore Years 

T he freshman and sophomore years i n engi neeri ng are desi gned to I ay a strong f oundati on i n mathemati cs, physi cal sci ences, and 
the engi neering sci ences upon which the student will later develop a professional program during the upper division (junior and 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 162 



seni or) years. D uri ng the f i rst two years, students are i ntroduced to the concepts of engi neeri ng desi gn and work i n 
multidiscipli nary teams. The School course requirements for the freshman arid sophomore years are similar for all students, 
regardless of their intended academic program, thus affording the student maximum flexibility in choosing a specific engineering 
specialization. 

Engineering Sciences 

E ngi neeri ng Sci ence courses represent a common core of basi c materi al offered to students of several different departments. A 1 1 
freshman and sophomore students of engi neeri ng are required to take EN ES 100. Other ENES courses, 102, 220, and 221, are 
specif ied by the different departments or taken by the sU^rient as el ectives.Tlie responsibility for teaching the ergi neeri ng sci ere 
courses is divided among the engi neeri ng departments. I n addition to the core courses noted above, several courses of general 
interest to engineering or non-engineering students have been given ENES designations. Seethe List of Approved Courses in 
chapter 8 for further descri ptions of these courses. 

Freshman Curriculum 

Seeindividual department requirements in the Departments andMajors section of this site. Entering freshman math placement is 
determined solely by performance on the University math placement exam and not on the Math SAT score. Placement in MATH 
115 or lower will delay by a semester el igibi I ity to take certain engineering courses. 

ScphomoreYear 

N o I ater than the sophomore year, a student shoul d sel ect an academi c degree program (A erospace, B i oengi neeri ng, B i ol ogi cal 
Resources, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Fire Protection, Mechanical, or Materials Science and Engineering) and this 
department assumes the responsi bi I i ty f or the students academi c gui dance, counsel i ng, and program pi anni ng from that poi nt unti I 
the completion of the degree requirements of that program as well as the School. For the specific requirements, see the curriculum 
I isti ng i n each engi neeri ng department 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for all students in the Clark School. Advising for freshmen and undecided engineering students is provided 
by the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A cademi c Support, I ocated i n Room 1131 G I enn L . M arti n H al 1 , 301-405-3855, and 
is available by appointment Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Walk- in advising is also available at specific times 
duri ng the week. A ppoi ntments for other hours can be made by sped al request Students wi th a deel ared engi neeri ng maj or shoul d 
seek advi sing from their academic department. Refer to the individual program for additional information. 

Minors 

Minor in Engineering Leadership Development 16credits. Preparing engineering students for life-long leadership roles in 
education, industry, and government is the goal of the mi nor in engineering leadership development. The mi nor will complement 
the techni cal ski 1 1 s and knowl edge students acqui re duri ng thei r academi c careers to better prepare them for I eadershi p and 
collaborative roles in their professional futures. Students may earn the mi nor and a notation on their official transcript by 
completi ng coursework which focuses on communication, global awareness, project management, undersrandi ng oneself and 
working effectively with others. Contact the mi nor advisor, Jane Fines (jfines@umd.edu), or visit the web at 
www.ursp.urrd.edu/leadership-minor/minor-leadership.html for more information. 

International Engineering: 15 to 21 credits. I n addition to a strong engi neeri ng background, there is a need for engineers with 
cross-cul tural experi ence and f orei gn I anguage abi I i ti es. Students may earn the mi nor by compl eti ng a course i n I ntemati oral 
Business Cultures for Engineering and Technology and additional courses in language, culture studies, or internationally related 
studies, plus an engineering experience abroad. Contact the mi nor advisor, Caine Francis (cfranci4@umd.edu), or visit the web at 
www.uisp.urrd.edu/inrernational/iridex.html for more information. Students who fulfill mi nor requirements will receive a notation 
on their official transcript. 

Nanosdenceand Technology: 15 credits. Expl osi ve growth i n the field of nanometer scale sci ence and technology (NS&T) has 
led in the pastfew years to many technological advances i n devices and materials structured at the nanometer scale. The 
I nterdisciplinary M inor Program of Study in Nanoscience and Technology is intended to prepare participating students for a career 
i n thi s rapi dl y devel opi ng fi el d. Thi s program draws upon the consi derabl e expert se i n nanosci ence at the U niversityof 
Maryland, in departments distributed among three schools, Engineering, Computer, Mathematics and Physical Sciences and 
Chemistry and Life Sciences. Students take courses in FabricatiorVSynthesisand Characterization, which emphasize the 
experimental sideof NS&T, as well as Fundamental Science and Specialization Electives, which teach the underlying principles 
and directions, and include underlying theory and the motivations for NS&T. Visit the website 
www.nariocenrer.umd.edu/educatiori/nario_mi nor/nano_mi nor.php for more i information. 

Minor in Nudear Engineering: 15credits. Theneedforengirieerswithkncwledgeof nuclearengineeringtopics will grow 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 163 



signifi cantiy in the coming years, with new nuclear plants being planned, existing pi ants continuing operation, and increasing 
industrial and medical uses of radiation sources. Theminor in Nuclear Engineering provides an engineering student with an 
understandi ng of nucl ear engi neeri ng and i ts appl i cati on to many different f i el ds, such as power generati on, reactor operati on, and 
industrial uses. Students in the mi nor will I earn the fundamentals of nucl ear reactor engineering, radiation interactions and 
measurement power plant design concepts, and reactor safety and risk assessment The mi nor is open to any student i n the Clark 
School of Engineering. Contact Dr. G.A. Pertmer (pertmer@umd.edu) for further information. Students who fulfil I minor 
requi rements wi 1 1 receive a notation on thei r official transcri pt. 

Project Management: 15credits.A basi c understandi ng of project management is becoming increasingly important for engineers. 
Such knowledge enables them to contri bute i mmediately to employers, and to advance thei r careers. I n addition to a strong 
engi neeri ng background, there i s si gnif i cant need for engi neers to understand the fundamental s of managi ng proj ects i n order to 
effectively participate as members of project teams. Students who successful ly complete mi nor requi rements will receive a notation 
on their official transcript. Contact J ohn Cable, Project Management Mi nor Advisor (jcable@umd.edu) or visit the web site 
www.pm.umd.edu/underqrad_proqrams/underqrad_mi norcourses/i ndex.html for more i nformation. 

Living-Learning Programs 

FLEXUS: TheDr. Marilyn Berman Pdlans Women in Engineering Living & Learning Community 

Director: Paige Smith 

Women in Engineering Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 

The Women in Engineering Living & Learning Community (WIE LLC) i s open to any first year engineering student (male or 
female) with an interest in promoting gender diversity in the field of engineering. Students who complete thefirst year of the 
program are i nvited to parti ci pate i n a second year. The program seeks to promote community among f i rst and second year 
engi neeri ng students committed to gender diversity i n the field and to provide encouragement and supportfor academic and 
professional success by: (1) i ntroduci ng students to women mentorsand role models; (2) offering professional and personal 
development opportunities; (3) hel ping students make connections with peers inengi neeri ng and (4) reinforcing important technical 
ski I Is needed to succeed in engineering. The components of this living and learning program include a one credit seminar course, 
course cl usteri ng, resi denti al housi ng on a common f I oor i n E 1 1 i cott H al I and resources provi ded i n the resi dence hal I . 

College Park Scholars- Science, Technology, and Society 

Director: Dr. Betsy Mendelsohn 

Co-sponsored by the CI ark School of Engineering, the Science, Technology, and Society (STS) prgoramisoneof the 12 
I ivi ng/learni ng programs offered by theCol lege Park Scholars Program. This two year programfor academically talented 
freshmen and sophomores i s open to al I maj ors who are i nterested i n exami ni ng the i importance of soci al processes that shape 
scientific research and technological development and conversely, the ways that science and technology shape society. The STS 
program sponsors social activities that build community and complement classroom work. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Dual Degree Program 

TheDual Degree Program is a cooperative arrangement between the Clark School of Engineering and selected col leges which 
al lows students to earn undergraduate degrees from both i nstitutions i n approxi mately five years. A student i n the Dual Degree 
Program wi II attend his/her col lege for approxi mately three academic years (mi ni mum 90 semester hours) and the Clark School of 
E ngi neeri ng at the U ni versity of M aryl and for approxi mately two academi c years (approxi mately 60 semester hours, hours 
requi red determi ned i ndi vidual ly ) . 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the baccalaureate programs in the CI ark School of Engineering on a space 
avail able basis. 

At the present time the participating institutions in Maryland and the District of Columbia are American University, Bowie State 
University, Columbia Union College, Coppin StateCollege, Frostburg State University, Morgan State University, College of Notre 
Dame of Maryland, St. Mary's College of Maryland, Salisbury University, Towson University, McDaniel College, Trinity College, 
and Washi ngton Col lege. A Iso partici pati ng i n the program are Kentucky State U niversity, K i ng Col lege i n Tennessee, 
Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania, and Xavier University in Louisiana 

E ngi neeri ng Abroad 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 164 



Preparation for practicing engineering in the global marketplace is increasingly important for new engineers and also for engineers 
to advance in their career. The Clark School offers opportunities for students to study abroad in locations around the world during 
their col lege career. Students may elect to study abroad for one or two serriestErsorrjartcirjateinaslxirt-taTrisumrrierorwirter 
term program. I nternshi ps and research experiences abroad are also avai I able. Some study/i nfcernshi p abroad programs requi re 
fluency in the native language, while other programs offer opportunities in English. Faculty advisors and the study abroad advisor 
will help students sel ect an appropri ate program and course work. 

For further i information on the Clark School's i nternational programs, students should contact Cai ne Francis (cfranci4@umd.edu) 
orvisittriewebsitea twww.urep.em.urrd.edu/internatioral/irdex.htrrJ 

College Honors Program 

Students in the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering participate in the University Honors Program College Park Scholars, the 
Clark School Honors Program, and departmental honors programs (seethe individual department section for details). 

Clark School Engineering Honors Program 

TheClark School offers an Engineering Honors Program that provides eligible students the opportunity to pursue an enriched 
program of studies that will broaden their perspectives and increase the depth of thei rknowl edge. Engineering students meeting all 
of the following criteria are eligibleto apply: 

1. Upper fourth of engineering juniors and seniors 

2. Junior standing or 60 applicable credits 

3. Completion of at least onesemester at UMCP 

T he requi rements for compl eti ng the program are as f ol I ows: 

1. A Honors Research Project which often can be used as a technical elective, a written report, and an oral presentation 
to a faculty panel of theEHP. 

2. Successful completion of both E ngi neeri ng Honors Semi nars(ENES 480 and ENES 481, onecredit hour each). 

3. Maintenance of aGPA to remain in the upper third of thecl ass. 
For more information see www.enq.umd.edu/currenty current_honors.html 



Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Professional Societies 

Each of the engineering departments sponsors a student chapter or student section of a national engineering society. The student 
chapters sponsor a variety of activities including technical meetings, social gatherings, and School or University service projects. 
A 1 1 students are strongl y encouraged to j oi n one or more of these chapters. T hese organi zati ons are A meri can H el i copter Soci ety, 
American I nsti tote of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Nuclear Society, 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers, A meri can Soci ety of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
Black Engineers Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, Society of 
Asian Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, Society of Fire Protection Engineers, Society of Hispanic Engineers, and 
Society of Women Engineers. 

Honor Societies 

TheClark School of E ngi neeringand each of the engineering departments sponsor honors societies. Nominations or invitations for 
membership are usual ly extended to junior and senior students based on scholarship, service and/or other selective criteria. Some of 
the honors organizations are branches of national societies; others are local groups: Tau Beta Pi (College Honorary); Alpha 
Epsi I on (Agricultural Engineering); Alpha Nu Sigma (Nuclear Engineering); Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering); Eta Kappa Nu 
(Electrical Engineering); Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering); Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire 
Protection Engineering); and Si gira Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering). 

Financial Assistance 

TheClark School offers scholarships to talented undergraduate engineering students. This is a competitive scholarship program 
with scholarshi ps awarded for merit Fi nancial need and a variety of other factors may also be considered. New freshmen are 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 165 



automati cal I y consi dered for most C I ark School schol arshi ps. C urrent and new transfer students must compl ete the onl i ne 
scholarship application by May 31st for best consi deration. ContactJ ane Fines (ifinesOumd.edu) or visitthe website www.ursp.umd. 
www.urep.uird.edu/scholarehips/irdex.htrnl for more i nf ormati on. 

The Benjamin T. Rome Scholarship is a f ul l-ride schol arshi p awarded to a new freshman student each year. The Rome 
Scholarship covers all expenses (tuition and fees, room and board) pi us a book allowance and a stipend. The award is renewable 
for three addi ti oral years provi ded the red pi ent mai ntai ns good academi c standi ng and makes progress toward an engi neeri ng 
degree. 

Research Units 

Undergraduate Research Programs 

U ndergraduate research programs al low qual if ied undergraduate students to work with research laboratory di rectors i n departments, 
thus giving students a chance for a unique experience in research and engineering design. Projects in engineering allow 
undergraduate students to do independent study urdertheguidarreof faculty membere in an area cf mutual interest For more 
i nf ormati on contact the department or the Dean's office. 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Office cf Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-9973 
Di rector: J enna Dolan 
www.ena.umd.edu/advisina 

T he Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A cademi c Support Off i ce provi des a broad vari ety of servi ces to assi st students duri ng 
thei r col legiate careers. I ndividual advisi ng may focus on a number of student related issues i ncl udi ng: schedule planni ng, course 
selection, university policy interpretations, career choices, social and personal adjustments, as well as identification and support for 
students with specific academic concerns. The office also provides orientation to new students, clears students for graduation, and 
is instrumental in helping students process administrative forms. The staff works closely with other campus offices to identify 
resources that address the vari ous needs of our students. 

Engineering Co-op and Career Services 

1131 Glenn L .M arti n Hal I, 301-405-3863 
Director: Heidi Sauber 
co-opOenq.umd.edu. www.coop.enq.umd.edu 

Whether its to wi re robots i n a car plant monitor a waste water management project or reformulate cough syrup for a 
pharmaceutical company, the Engineering Co-op and Career Services Office assists students in finding cooperative education 
(co-op) and internship positions in private industry and the government. Students may work full -time or part-time during the fall, 
spri ng and/or summer semesters. Co-op and internshi p positions complement classroom learni ng and provide students the 
opportunity to gain professional level experience, build mentoring relationships, integrate theory and practice, confirm career 
choices, and help finance their education. 

T he f i ret step i n the appl i cati on process i s to attend an ori entati on sessi on that focuses on internship/co-op search strategies.After 
writi ng a resume and havi ng it critiqued by our office, students are given permission to upload thei r resume i nto our database eLi nk 
of engi neeri ng j obs and on-campus i ntervi ews. To assi st students i n thei r search we offer a wi de vari ety of workshops on topi cs 
such as effective resumes, interview strategies, professionalism, career fair preparation, salary negotiation, and advanced job search 
techniques. Our websitelists the current scheduleof workshops. Inaddition, students have the opportunity to meet employers by 
parti ci pati ng i n our career f ai re, empl oyer i nformati on sessi ons, and sped al j ob search presentati ons conducted by engi neeri ng 
recruiters. Visitour website for more information: www.coop.ena.umd.edu . 

Undergraduate Recruitment and Special Programs 

1131 Glenn L .M arti n Hal I, 301-405-3857 
Director) ane F, Fines 
www.urep.umd.edu 

The Office of Undergraduate Recruitment and Special Programs is responsible for activities to recruit and retain students intheA. 
James Clark School of Engineering. Services include undergraduate recruitment international programs, leadership programs, 
meeting with prospective students, providing K-12 outreach activities, administering the CI ark School's scholarship program 
advi sing students studying abroad, advising students compl eting the mi nor in International Engineering or Engineering Leadership 
Development and coordinating I nventis: Academy of Engineering Leadership. 

TheCenter for Minorities in Science and Engineering 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 166 



1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3878 
Director: Rosemary L. Parker 

TheCenter is dedicated to increasing the enrollment and graduation rates of African American, Hispanic, and Native American 
students majoring in engineering. TheCenter provides a complete package of services designed to assist students from pre-college 
through compl eti on of the undergraduate degree. Servi ces i ncl ude academi c advi si ng, tutori al assi stance, send arshi p i nformati on, 
the BRI DGE Program outreach programs, job information and support of student organizations. 

Women in Engineering Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 
Director: Paige E.Smith 

TheWomen in Engineering Program (Wl E Program) is dedicated to increasing the enrol I merit, retention, and graduation rates of 
females i n the School , as wel I as identifyi ng and addressi ng this group's unique needs. The Program provides a comprehensive set 
of initiatives designed to encourage and assist women students to become successful professional engineers. 

Services offered include research fellowships, professional mentoring program, information I istserv, website, living and learning 
community, first year peer mentoring program, workshops on careers, outreach programs, speakers, student advisory board, and 
support of women engi neeri ng organizations. 

Engineering Information Technologies (EIT) 

0123Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-0174 
Executive Director: J ames F. Zahniser, 301-405-3885 
www.itumd.edu 

Keeping pace with the latest developments in the area of information technologies worldwide, the CI ark School of Engineering 
provides a state of-the-art computi ng envi ronment that wi 1 1 be the standard for engi neers i n the years ahead. Faculty and students 
have access to computer workstations with a wide range of engi neeri ng software and multi-media enabled classrooms with the 
latest presentation capabilities. Inaddition, EIT provides accessary support on the latest tool sand servi ces for online 
collaboration, presentation technologies, and distance I earning. 

Distance Education Technology and Servi oss 

2104 Martin Hall, 301-405-4910; Fax: 301-314-9639 
www.dets.umd.edu 

Distance Education Technology and Services, DETS, provides distance education technology and support service to the A . J ames 
C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng and the U M C P campus. We serve over 500 students per year by provi di ng graduate and 
undergraduate courses in engineering and other related fields. Inaddition, we also provide technical, servi ces to the campus such as 
video conferencing, video capturing, satellite servi ces and more. For further information, please reference the DETS web site at 
www.ders.umd.edu. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (SPHL) 

3310 SPH Building, 301-405-2438 
www.sph.umd.edu 
Dean: Roberts. Gold 
A ssoci ate Dean(s) : D ushanka K I ei nrran 
Assistant Dean(s): Viki Annard, Mary Kivlighan 

The School of Public Health provides preparation leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the following professional areas: 
Physical Education (K-12), Community Health and Family Science. The Col lege also offers curricula in Kinesiological Sciences. 
I n addition, each department offers a wide variety of courses for all university students. These courses may be used tofulfill the 
general education requi rements and as electives. 

Programs combining service and instruction are provided by the Children's Health and Developmental Clinic (seeKNES 389E) 
and the Adult Health and Developmental Program (see HLSA 287). 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

TheFriedgen Family Student Lounge, located in the SPH Building is availablefor use by all student in the col lege between 7 a.m. 
and 10 p.m. Access is through the student ID card. See the Director of Facilities in 3310 SPH Bldg if you do not have access. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel67 



Undergraduate Degree Reqiirements/DegreeOptions 

The School of Public Health offers the baccalaureate in the foil owing fields of study: Physical Education, Kinesiologies Sciences, 
Community Health and Family Science. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who have met the conditions 
of their curricula as herein prescribed by the School of Public Health. 

Each candidate for a degree must file a formal application with the Records Office according to the scheduled deadlines for the 
anti ci pated semester of graduati on. 

Advising 

Atthetimeof matriculation and first registration, each student is assigned to a member of the Col lege faculty who acts as the 
students academic advisor. These assignments are made by theindividual departments and depend upon the students chosen major. 
A 1 1 athl etes and students on probati on or di smi ssal have mandatory advi si ng and are seen by advi sors i n the Student Servi ce Center. 
301-405-2357. 

Departments and Centers 

TheSchool iscomposedof several departments and an institute. The fol I owi ng departments offer maj or programs that lead to a 
Bachelor of Science degree: 

Department of Family Science 

Department of Kinesiology* 

Department of Public and Community Health 

*Offers degrees in Kinesiological Sciences and Physical Education. 

College Honors Program 

Phi Alpha Epalcn. Honorary Society of the School of Public Health. The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic 
achievement and to promote professional growth by sponsoring activities in the fields of physical education, kinesiology, family 
sciences, community health, and related areas. 

Students qual if y for membershi p when they attai n j uni or standi ng i n physi cal educati on, ki nesi ol ogy, f ami I y sci ences, or 
community health, and have a mi ni mum overal I average of 3.5 and a mi ni mum of 24 credits at the U ni versity of M aryland, Col lege 
Park. For additional information, pi ease contact the Student Service Center, 301-405-2357. 

Research Units 

Center on Acpng 

2367 SPH Building, 301-405-2469 
Chair and Professor: Dr. Laura B. Wilson 
www.sph.umd.edu/hlsa/AGI NG/ 

The Center on Aging, as part of the Department of Health Services Administration (a graduate program), stimulates and supports 
aging-related activities within existi ng departments, colleges, and schools throughout all of the various institutions of the 
University System of Maryland. The Center coordi nates the Graduate Gerontology Certificate (master's and doctoral levels), the 
university's first approved graduate certificate program. The Center assists undergraduate and graduate students i nterested i n the 
field of gerontology and helps them to devise educational programs to meet their goals. It is a research center working in health and 
aging policy, lifelong learning and civic engagement, disability and aging, behavioral and social aspects of aging, and health 
service deli very systems. It also conducts community education programs, assists faculty in pursuing research activities in thefi eld 
of aging, conducts conferences on adulthood and aging-related topics, provides on- and off-campus technical assistance to 
practitioners who serve older adults and sponsors the University of Maryland Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Legacy 
Leadership I institutes, the University of Maryland Retirees Association, and Retired and Senior Volunteer Programs I nternational 
(RSVPI). 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Student Servi ceC enter 

1304 School of Public Health Building, 301-405-2753 
www.sph.urTd.edu/studentservices 

The Student Service Center provides advising on admissions, orientation, academic policy, 4-year planning, career information, and 
requi red advi sing for students on academic probati on or dismissal and all col lege athl etes. All other advi sing is provided in the 
col lege departments. The Center is open from 8:00 am -4:30 pm week days for use by students for studying and group meetings. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel6E 



T here are twel ve computers avai I abl e for student use. 

Gymkana Troupe 

1120 SPH Building, 301-405-2566 

www.gymkana.umd.edu 

D i rector: Scott Wei sh 

For over 60 years, the University of Maryland GymkanaTroupe has been influencing young peopleto live healthy lifestyles. 
Founded at the University of Maryland College Park campus in 1946, the troupe has traveled throughout Maryland and 
neighbori ng states promoti ng drug-free I ivi ng. Each of its 60+ members pledges themselves to be drug-free. Through thei r 
role- modeling and unique gymnastic performances, they have influenced hundreds of thousands of peopleto join them in living a 
drug-free life. The troupe, which is open to all University of Mary I and students of all abilities, is considered a one-of-a-kind 
organization and is believed to be the only collegiate exhibition^ gymnastic troupe actively touring the United States. As an 
outreach program of the School of Publ ic Health, the Gymkana Troupe uses peer role models who share thei r experiences and thei r 
message of healthy living with others. Students influencing students to avoid drugs is the heart of Gymkana's program. 

THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM OUR) 

1117 Journal ism Building, 301-405-2399 
www.journal ism.umd.edu 
Dean: K. Klose 
Associate Dean(s): O. Reid 
Assistant Dean(s): S. Crane, M. Payne-Gassaway, F. Quine, L. Ringer 

Professors: D. BroderJ. Franklin (Philip Merrill Chair), H.Johnson (Knight Chair), K. Klose(Dean), E. Roberts, L. Steiner, C. 

Stepp, L. Thornton (Richard Eaton Chair) 

Associate Professors: I. Chinoy, C. Hanson, K. McAdams (Assoc Prof & Assoc Dean UG Studies), S. ModlerJ. Newhagen, E. 

Zanot 

Assistant Professors: R.Yaros 

Lecturers: S. Banisky, A. Bonner, K. Chadha(Dir. Media, Self & Society, CP Scholars), C. Clayton, S. Crane (Lecturer & A sst 

Dean), A. Flynn, P. Fuchs, C. Harvey, D. Huffman (Bait. Sun Distingui shed Lecturer), S. Karref, R. Lorente, C. Rogers, G. 

Solomon (Prof Of Practice) 

Professors Emeriti: M. BeasleyJ . Blumler, P. Geraci (Assoc Prof Emeritus), D. Gomery, R. Hiebert, L. Martin 

Visiting Faculty: K. B I acki stone (Povich Professor), D. Nelson (Director of Carnegie Seminar), L. Pitts (Merrill Visiting 

Professor), L. Walker (Visit Prof) 

The Major 

ThePhilip Merrill Col lege of Journal ism prepares students for careers in newspapers, magazines, TV news, newsletters and online 
journal ismoutiets. The undergraduate journalism program culminates in a B.A. degree in journal ism. 

Thecollegeisfully accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education injournalism and Mass Communications. 

Students I earn in col lege programs such as Capital Newsservice, a daily wire service in Washington and Annapolis, UMTV, a 
cable station operated by the college, and the American Journal ism Review, the nation's leading media magazine. 

Students majoring in journal ism take approximately one-third (42 credits) of their total coursework in the Philip Merrill Col lege of 
J ournal i sm. J ournal i sm courses are desi gned to provi de students wi th a worki ng knowl edge of the tool s and concepts they will need 
to perform as top-flight professional communicators. 

The remaini ng two-thi rds (80 credits) of undergraduate coursework consists of a variety of other subjects such as history, 
economics, government sociology and psychology. This exposure acquaints students with fundamental problems and issues they 
wi 1 1 encounter i n thei r careers. Withi n these credits, journal ism students must choose a "Concentration" (a core of advanced work i n 
a substantive field) to establish competency in a specialized area of knowl edge they will be able to use as professionals. 

Procjram Obj ectives 

About theCdlege 

ThePhilip Merrill Collegeof Journalism is widely considered one of the best journal ism programs in the nation, blending a mix of 
pri ze-wi nni ng j ournal i sts, communi cati on schol ars and nati onal I y recogni zed prof essi onal programs. T he school 's mi ssi on i s 
si mpl e to produce the best possi bl e j ournal i sts f or I eadi ng newspapers, magazi nes, TV , radi o and onl i ne news outi ets. Recent 
graduates are editors, reporters and producers atThe New York Times, Washington Post, CBS, LosAngelesTimes, CNN, America 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel6S 



Online and many of the nation's other top news organizations. 



Students I earn from a faculty that includes Pulitzer Prizewinners David S. Broder, Haynesjohnsonandjon Franklin, former CBS 
White House correspondent LeeThornton and former Phi ladelphia I nquirer Executive Editor Gene Roberts. 

Located less than 10 mi les f rom the news capital of Washi ngton, students partici pate i n i nternshi ps duri ng the academic year at 
The Washington Post, The (Baltimore) Sun, CNN, and a wide array of Washington news bureaus. Inthe summer, students intern at 
top news organizations around the country. B roadcast news students produce and anchor a 30- mi nute nightiy news show that 
reaches more than 400,000 households in suburban Washington on the College-operated UMTV station, and online students work 
on Maryland Newsline, a political and public policy Web- based news magazine. Advanced broadcast; online, and print students 
enroll in Capital Newsservice, an intensive full -time reporting program in Washington and Annapolis. Students also partici pate in 
some of the school 's many prof essi onal programs, i ncl udi ng the morrthl y magazi ne A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew and the Casey 
Journal ism Center on Children and Families. 

Cd lege Mission Statement 

The Col lege seeks to be the nation's preeminent professional school in its field, a model for others in its integration of scholarly 
work and professional practice. As we enter a new century, it aspires to lead i n the uses and study of new technologies to improve 
understand ng and performance i n our f i el ds. I ts mi ssi on i s to educate uni versi ty students at the undergraduate, master's and 
doctoral level within a liberal arts context, preparing them for careers in journal ism and scholarly work and teaching in these fields; 
to elevate the standards of professional practice; and to advance the quality of public life through knowledge of public issues, 
i ncl udi ng those related to the role i n a democratic society. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Demonstrate the ability to research, write, report and edit relevant news stories acceptable by a professional newsoutiet 

2. Understand the history of journalism befami liar with coverage of diverse groups in society and learn the role of journalists 
in society. 

3. U nderstand the ethi cal gui del i nes and practi ces that govern the prof essi on and the I egal implicati ore and consi derati ons that 
i nform the profession. 

4. Demonstrate the abi I i ty to appl y tool s, concepts and technol ogy appropri ate for the presentati on of i mages and i nf ormati on i n 
the profession. 

5. Conduct research and eval uate i nformation by methods appropriate to the profession. 

6. Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

The M erri 1 1 Col lege is home to many unique programs and opportunities avai lable to undergraduate students: 

UMTV: B roadcast jouiralismstuderts study aixl I earn at UMTV, the college-owned cable TV station that houses state-of-the-art 
equipment including DVCPro, Avid and ENPS systems used in the field today. Students begin their broadcast education from their 
f i rst semester at the Col lege, vol unteeri ng as crew members for programs produced under the gui dance of renowned broadcast 
faculty members. 

Capital Newsservice: the college's Capital News Service operates two print bureaus, one in Annapolis and one in Washington, 
D.C, a daily television newscast; and an online news magazine. CNS provides students with real-life reporting experiences covering 
a beat, developing sources, generating story ideas and writing on deadline under the supervision of a faculty editor. 

Real-World Experience! Students take their education out of the classroom and into the real world. Using internships, student 
media and in-class reporting, our students don't just I earn why, but how. The col lege is located just outside Washington, DC, the 
nation's capital, and the country's eighth largest media market. 

Top-Notoh FaaJty: The Merrill Col lege is home to internationally renowned journalists and media scholars, including six Pulitzer 
Prize wi nners. Courses are also taught by worki ng journal ists who serve as adjunct professors. 

Access to Centers of J oirnalism Study: The Merrill Col I egeishome to nine centers for journal ism study and professional 
development Undergraduates have opportunities to interact with these programs. I nternshi ps are avai I able for students at two of 
these centers. Students can wri te and research topi cs i mpacti ng the f i el d at A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew, one of two nati onal 
publications that cover the journal ism industry. Students can also intern at the Casey Journalism Center on Children and Families. 

Technology for the "Real World" : Students use the same technologies used by professional journal ists and media special ists. 
F rom the I atest innon- 1 i near editing systems, to updated technologies for digital art and pagination, every undergraduate will have 
access to the hardware and software used by prof essi onal s i n tel evi si on and radi o producti on, vi sual j ournal i sm onl i ne news and 
medi a communi cati on. 

Admission Requirements 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel7C 



Journalism is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See the Admissions seed on in chapter If or general LEP admission policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45-C reef t Review 

First-time entering freshmen will gain admission to the Philip Merrill Col lege of Journal ism directly from high school on an 
avail able basis. Early application is encouraged. Freshmen admitted to the program will have access to the necessary advising 
through their initial semesters to help them determine if J ournal ism is an appropriate area for thei r interests and abilities. Academic 
and career advising is provided to journalism students throughout their academic career by qualified academic counselors and the 
College's faculty. 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to J ournal ism will be subject to a performance review by the ti me they have completed 45 
credi ts. To meet the provi si ore of the revi ew, these students must compl ete ( 1) T he two, f i rst-year F undamental Studi es courses: 
ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at I east nine credits of Distributi ve Studi es coursework, selected in consultation with an advisor; 

(3) ENGL 101 andj OUR 201 with grades of C or higher (J OUR 100 is a preorco- requisite of J OUR 201); and (4) a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 Students must prove grammar skills competency through attainment of a mini mum of a 2.0 inj OUR 181 
prior to enrolling inj OUR 201. Students who do rot meet these requirements will not be allowed to continue in the LEP and will 
be required to select another major. I n addition freshmen are expected to compl ete J OUR 200 by the end of their first year. 

Transfer Admission 

These requi rements apply to new transfer students to the U niversity as wel I as on-campus students. 

Note No more than 12 transfer credits of communications courses from an accredited journal ism program may be approved by the 
Col lege to be applied toward the degree. Transfer students who wish to receive credit for J OUR 201 based on work done in a 
non-accredited journal ism program must pass a proficiency exam. 

In order to be admitted to J ournal ism, transfer students will be requi red to meet the foil owing set of gateway requirements: (1) The 
two, first-year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL lOlaixIrTBtriematics; (2) at least nine credits of Distributive Studies 
coursework, selected in consultation with an advisor; (3) completion of ENGL 101 and J OUR 201 with grades of C or higher. 
Enrollment inj OUR 201 requi res proof of grammar ski lis competency through the attainment of at least a 2.0 inj OUR 181; and 

(4) attainment of a2.8GPA for all college-level work attempted. 

TheTestof Standard Written English (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic year. Students who failed to pass 
theTSWE (with a mi nimum score of 52 on their second attempt) prior to theend of the 2005-06 academic year are not eligible to 
takej OU R 181 to demonstrate grammar ski I Is competency. 

Appeals 

Students who are unsuccessful i n gai ni ng admi ssi on to J ournal i sm at the freshman or transfer I evel , and bel i eve they have 
extenuati ng or sped al ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal i n wri ti ng to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ore. 
The student will be notified in writing of the appeal decision. 

Students admitted tojournalism as freshmen that do not pass the 45-credit review but believe they have special circumstances that 
should be considered, may appeal directly to the Col lege. 

For further i information, contactThe Col lege's Student Services office at 301-405-2399. 
Requi rements for the Major 

* Effective for students matriculating Fall 2008 or later. (Student matriculating before Fall 2008 should contact an advisor about 
requirements). 

Students are requi red to earn a mi ni mum of 122 credi ts. D ue to the I i beral -arts focus of j ournal i sm, accredited j ournal i sm programs 
requi re maj ors to compl ete successful I y approxi matel y two-thi rds of thei r coursework i n areas other than j ournal i sm and 
communication. The Philip Merrill Col lege of J ournal ism at the University of Maryland adheres to this nationwide policy. In 
practical terms, this means that of the 122 mi nimum credits requi red for graduation, a journal ism student must take 42 credits in 
journalism (numbered 100 or above). Of the remaining 80 credits, a mi nimum of 65 must be earned in liberal -arts designated 
courses. 

ThePhilip Merrill Collegeof J ournal ism stipulates that 56 of the total credits must betaken in upper-level courses (courses 
numbered 300-499). 

Requi red courses for al I j ournal i sm maj ors regardl ess of whether j ournal i sm i s a students pri mary or secondary maj or: 

I .J arnalism reqii rements outside the College 

Students must compl ete the foil owing liberal arts coursework complementing the University's general education requirements. For 
the University's general education (CORE) requirements, consult the CORE program in the current Undergraduate Catalog. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel71 



• A bstract thi nki ng ski 1 1 s requi rement ( ni ne credi ts) 

1. One three-credit statistics course from the following list: 

BIOM 301, BMGT 230, CCJ S 200, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 305, GVPT 227, PSYC 200, SOCY 201, ora more 
advanced statistics course. 

2. A mini mum of six credits through one or a combination of the following options. Should a student choose to combine 
the options, at I east one I anguage course must be at the intermediate level: 

• Language up to two courses with at I east one couise at the intermediate level and no more than one course at the 
introductory level. (High school equivalency does not satisfy this requi rement.) 

• M attyStati sties/Computer Science: up to two courses 

• Any mathematics (MATH) course numbered 111 or higher. 

• A ny computer sci ence (C M SC ) course. 

• Public Speaking: one course from COM M 100, 107, 200, or 230 

• H i story: one course from H I ST 156 or 157. 

• Behavioral or Social Science one course from A NTH 260; PSYC 100 or 221; SOCY 100 or 105. 

• Economics: one course from ECON 200 or 201. 

• Government and Politics: one course from GVPT 100 or 170 

• Supporting Area: Four upper-level (numbered 300 or higher) courses for a mini mum of 12 credits in a supporting field 
(cannot be i n Communi cati on) . 

I I . J arnalism corse requirements: 

•JOUR 100-Professional Orientation (one credit) 
•J OUR 200-History, Roles and Structures (three credits) 
•J OUR 201-News Writing and Reporting (three credits) 
•J OUR 202/262-News Editing (three credits) 
•JOUR 203- Multimedia Reporting (three credits) 
•J OUR 300-Ethics (three credits) 

• One of News Writing and Reporting II (three credits): 

•JOUR320-Printor 
•JOUR360-Broadcast 

• *Advanced Skills: Any two J OUR classes numbered 321-389 (six credits) 
•J OUR 350-Graphics orj OUR 352-OnlineJ oumalism (three credits) 
•JOUR 399-Supervised Internship (one credit) 
•JOUR400-Lawof Mass Communi cati on (three credits) 

• One of the following (three credits): 

• Advanced Ski I Is - J OU R 321-389 

•J ournalismand Society Course- J OUR 410-469 

• Research: Any J OUR course numbered 470-479 (three credits) 
•J ournal ism Capstone Experience (three credits) 

•J ournal ism Capstone Col loqui um (one credit) 

* Students pursuing a broadcast track are required to completej OUR 361 as one of the two J OUR classes numbered 
321-389. 

III. Specific J ournalism Requirements 

• Completion of JOUR 201: Students must complete J OUR 201 with a "C" or higher. Consultthe Undergraduate Catalog or 
on- line Schedule for a list of prerequi sites and restrictions for journal ism courses. 

• "C" Requirement Students must earn a "C" or betterinJOUR 201 andJOUR 202/262 prior to taking any courses for which 
they serve as a prerequisite. 

Placement in Courses 

Enrollment inj OUR 201 requi res proof of grammar ski lis competency through the attainment of at least a 2.0 in J OUR 181. 

TheTestof Standard Written English (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic year. Students who failed to pass 
theTSWE (with a mi nimum score of 52 on their second attempt) prior to theend of the 2005-06 academic year are not eligible to 
takej OU R 181 to demonstrate grammar ski I Is competency. 

Advising 

The Office of Student Services, 1117 J ournal ism Building, 301-405-2399, provides academic advi sing to maj ors on an appointment 
basis. Send e-mail inquiriestojourug@deans.umd.edu. 



Living-Learning Programs 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel72 



College Park Scholars Mecfa, Self & Society 

CPS in Media, Self and Society Director: Dr. Kalyani Chadha 

Co-sponsored by the Phi lip Merrill Collegeof Journalism, the Media, Self and Society Program is one of the living/learning 
programs offered by the Col lege Park Scholars Program. This two-year program for i ncomi ng freshman is designed to give students 
the opportunity to undertake a critical examination of media organizations, institutions and practices as well as gain practical 
experience through involvement in a media-related activity of their choice. For more information see the Col lege Park Scholars 
Program section i n this catalog. 

Honors Program 

Although no departmental honors program currentiy exists within the College, academically outstanding students are recognized 
through K appa Tau A I pha, the J ournal i sm academi c honor soci ety. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The col lege sponsor student chapters of the Soci ety for Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists, and 
the Radio and Television News Di rectors Association. These organizations provide students with opportunities to practice ski lis, 
establish social relationshi ps with other students both on and off campus, arid meet and work with professionals i n the field. 

For information on the organizations listed, contact the Student Services Office, 1117 J ournal ism Building, 301-405-2399. 

Financial Assistance 

TheCollege is committed to enrolling the most qualified students, regardless of ability to pay. Toward that end, the Col lege 
through donor-sponsored awards gives more than $105,000 annually in scholarships to undergraduates. Additionally, the 
University awards scholarships and financial aid including low-interest loans, grants and work-study opportunities. 

Sources for Incoming Students 

AIM ncomi ng freshman are automati cal I y consi dered for schol arshi ps granted by the Col I ege. 

TheFreedomForumJ ournal ism Scholarships - Awards of $1,250 to an i ncomi ng freshman and $1,250 to an outstandi ng 
undergraduate (print broadcast or online) with financial need. 

Gridiron Foundation J ournal ism Scholarships- Funded by the Gridiron Foundation of Washington, the $6,000 annual award is a 
four-year renewable scholarship given to an incoming journal ism freshman. Selection is based on merit and a commitmentto print 
journalism. 

William Randolph Hear st Scholarships- Awards of $2,000for one year only to outstanding Maryland high school students 
admitted to the Phi lip Merrill Col I ege of Journalism. 

BaltirroreSun Diversity inj ournal ism Scholarship- A non-renewable $2,500 award established by theTimes Mirror Foundation 
to an incoming freshman with high academic achievement in high school and wide-ranging cultural and economic background, who 
resides i n the Balti more Sun's ci rculation area. 

Sources for C ur rent Students 

Every year, students benef itf rom the generosity of our donors with myriad scholarshi ps, rangi ng from $500 to $5,000 i n one-ti me 
and renewable i nstal I merits, awarded by the col lege. Students are selected on a basis of need, merit donors' i ntent or a 
combination of these factors. Below is a selection of scholarships students may apply for: 

TheJosephR. Slevin Award 

The Paul Berg Diamondback Scholarship 

Entravision Communications Broadcastj ournal ism Scholarship 

Washington Press Club Foundation Scholarships 

J ohn Story C leghorn and Nona Reese C leghorn Scholarships 

T he Reese C I eghorn Excel I ence i n J ournal i sm Schol arshi ps 

J ay J ackson Scholarship 

TheFrank Qui ne and Mary Ellen Doran-Quine J ournal ism Scholarship 

Maryland- Del aware- DC Press Association Scholarships 

T he R i chard W . Worthi ngton J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Gertrude Poe Scholarshi ps 

T he Stanl ey E . R ubenstei n M emori al J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Steven C . Affens B roadcast J ournal ism Scholarshi p 

The Ralph Crosby J ournal ism Excel lence Scholarshi p 

The Fred I., EdnaO. and Fred J. Archibald Scholarship 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel73 



The Phyllis and Frank Kopen Broadcastjournalism Scholarship 
The Marjorie Ferguson-Benjamin Hoi man Scholarship 
TlTeHiebertJoumalismlntemational Travel Award 
T he G ene Roberts A ward 

For more information, and eligibility requirements, visitwww.journalism.umd.edu/financial/ 

Other Soirees 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs 
and, in cooperation with other university off ices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, 
visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Awards and Recognition 

Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Press Association Top Net/vs-Ecf tarial Student - Awarded annual ly to an 
outstandi ng print journal ism student at the M ay commencement A separate award is also given to the top Broadcast student. 

J ulieGalvan Outstanding Campus Member Award - The Society of Professional J ournal ists chapter selects one graduate i n 
journalism who is outstanding in his or her class on the basis of character, service to the community, scholarship, proficiency in 
practical journalism and significant contributions to their SPJ chapter. 

Kappa Tau Alpha Top Scholar Award - Awarded at each corrrnencement to thejoumalism student earning the highest academic 
achievement for all undergraduate study. 

Kappa Tau Alpha National Honor Society- The top ten percent of the journalism graduating class is inducted into this national 
organization each commencement. 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

Internships 

Supervised internships are essential. Penny Bender Fuchs is the Director of the J ournal ism I nternship Program 3116 J ournalism 
Building, 301-405-2796. 

Professional Experience Opportunities 

Capital Newsservice 

TheAnnapolis and Washington bureaus of the Capital News Service are staffed by students and supervised by college instructors. 
Students cover state and I egi si ati ve news for cl i ent papers around the regi on. B roadcast students have the opportuni ty to parti ci pate 
in Capital News Service in theAnnapol is bureau, developing stories and packages for UMTV. Students are required to report 
breaking news under deadline, write profiles, and cover state agencies. This is a full-time, semester-long program on site at one of 
two bureau I ocarj ore. Students i nterested i n web j ournal i sm can report, wri te and edi t f or M ary I and N ewsl i ne, an onl i ne magazi ne. 
This bureau is located in the college's online facility. Capital News Service is coordinated by Assistant Dean Steve Crane, 
Journalism Building, 301-405-8806. 

UMTV 

For students interested in broadcast news, opportunities to gain experience with cable news programs are presented within the 
curri cul um and by vol unteeri ng at the campus tel evi si on stati on, U M TV . 

Student-Run Campus Media Outlets 

Students can gai n broadcast news and sports reporti ng experi ence through the campus radi o stati on, WM UC . There are numerous 
student-run publications on campus. These include, The Diamondback, an independent daily newspaper that appears in print 
and online. The Diamondback is one of the most-read campus dailies in the nation. Among the many campus publications there are 
literary magazines and newspapers of interest to special populations. These include the Ed ipse, Black Explosion, The PublicAsian, 
Mitzpeh and Unwind! magazine. 



COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES (CLIS) 

4105 Hornbake Building, 301-405-2033 

www.clis.umd.edu 

Dean: J ennifer J . Preece 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel74 



Whi lethe Col lege does not currentiy have an undergraduate major, it offers courses at the undergraduate level, which may be 
found under Library Science (LBSC). These courses are suggested for students wishi ng to develop skills in locating, analyzing, 
and evaluating irformati on and those seeki ng to learn more about career opportunities in the information field. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY (PUAF) 

2101 Van M unchi ng Hal 1 , 301-405-6330 
www.puaf.umd.edu 
Dean: Steve Fetter 

W hi I e the School does not currenti y have an undergraduate maj or, i t offers courses at the undergraduate I evel , whi ch may be found 
under Public Affairs (PUAF). These courses are suggested for students wishing to devel op knowledge and experience in public 
pol icy and leadershi p. For additional i nformation on possi ble undergraduate opportunities see 
www.publicpolicy.urrd.edu/prcspective/urxlergrad.html. 

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

2130 M itEhd I B ui I di ng, 301-405-9363 
www.ugstumd.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 
Associate Dean: KatherineMcAdams 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Reid Bryant L i sa K i el y, James Newton 
Assistants to the Dean: Kathryn Robinson, LauraSlavin 

T hrough i ts many programs, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students at the U ni versi ty and the 
faculty and staff that support the undergraduate mission of the campus. The Office of U ndergraduate Studies is the pri mary 
di vi si on at theU ni versi ty of M aryl and responsi bl e for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar and co-curri cul ar 
education. The responsibilities of Undergraduate Studies include: 

• Living-learning programs 

• Academic enrichment programs 

• I nterdisciplinary and individual studies programs 

• A cademi c advi si ng pol i cy and assessment 

• CORE/General Education 

• Academic planning and policy 

• E nrol I merit management 

• University learning outcomes assessment 

P ri mary listings for programs that report to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es appear in this secti on (except where noted) . 

Academic Achievement Programs 

2110 Marie Mount Hall, 301-405-4736 

www.aap.umd.edu 

Executive Director: Dr. Jerry L. Lewis 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) pri marily serves traditionally urder-representBdard I ow-irromearxl first-generation 
col I ege students. A cademi c support, skill enhancement academi c advi si ng and counsel i ng, and tutori ng are provi ded for these 
populations and for students with disabilities. Academic Achievement Programs include the I ntensive Educational Development 
(I ED), Educational Opportunity Center (EOC), the Ronald E. McNair Post- Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair), the 
SummerTransitional Program, and Student Support Services (SSS). EOC, McNair, and SSS, are part of the Federal TRIO 
programs and are funded by the U.S. Department of Education to promote access, provide support services, motivate, and prepare 
students from disadvantaged backgrounds for retention in and graduation from undergraduate programs and to prepare for doctoral 
programs. 

Educational Opportunity Carter (EOC) 

Ms. Lisa Peyton-Caire, Associate Director 
301-429-5933 

EOC is supported by a U .S. Department of Education grant designed to assist persons 19 and older, low-i ncome, and 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel75 



first-generation in pursuing post-secondary educational opportunities. UM-EOC serves primarily I nner-Beltway communities inPrinc 
Pri nee Georges County and provides assistance i n the appl ication processes for admission to and f i nancial aid for post-secondary 
educati on. Specif i c gui dance i s gi ven i n sel ecti ng col I eges, compl eti ng the F A F SA , and promoti ng post-secondary educati on for 
target populations. EOC also works with high school seniorsinsome Pri nee George's County High Schools. 

Simmer Transitional Program (STP) 

TheSummerTransitional Program(STP) assists students in both their academic and personal adjustmentto the University. It 
i ncl udes very intensive ski lis enhancement in math, English, and col lege study strategies, coupled with enrol Iment in a selected 
three-credit university CORE course with tutoring to facilitate students' academic adjustment. Inaddition, students enrol I ina 
one-credit orientation course and partici pate i n weekly i ndi vidual and/or group counsel i ng sessions. The six-week STP is requi red 
of all students admitted to the University through SSS/I ED. 

Intensive Educational Development (I ED) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director, AAP and I ED 
301-405-4751 

I E D provi des an array of i ntensi ve academi c and tutori al servi ces to f i rst-year and second-year students who parti ci pate i n the 
SummerTransitional Program (STP), eligiblefirst- and second-year transfer students, and other eligible students who seek 
academic support. The I ED program begi ns with the STP; prospective students who are admitted to the U ni versity through the I E D 
program are requi red to attend this six-week transitional program. Successful completion of the STP is requi red for admission to 
the U niversity. Admitted students conti nue to receive program services throughout thei r undergraduate career at the U ni versity. 

Student Support Services (SSS) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director 
301-405-4750 

SSS isa U.S. Department of Education grant supported program geared toward I ow-incomeand first-generation col lege students. It 
works in conjunction with the I ED Program focusing much of its support to first- and second- year students. SSS provides 
academi c and career advi si ng, tutori ng, stress management and study-ski 1 1 and test-taki ng support to el i gi bl e I ow- i ncome and 
first-generation undergraduate students throughout their time at the University. The SSS program also provi des financial aid 
workshops and assi stance, i ndi vi dual and group counsel i ng, and I eadershi p devel opment workshops. I n I i mi ted cases, SSS 
provi des suppl emental grant ai d to el i gi bl e parti ci pants i n the program. 

Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program 

Dr. Wallace Southerland III, Associate Director 
301-405-4749 

T he M cN ai r program i s funded and desi gned pri nci pal I y to prepare I ow- i ncome, f i rst-generati on col I ege j uni ors and seni ors and/or 
students from traditionally underrepresented groups to attend graduate school, especially, to pursue doctoral degrees. The McNair 
program offers a six- week summer research experience that affords students the opportunity to work i nti mately with faculty 
mentors on specific research projects, refine ski I Is in written and oral communication, computer applications, statistics and 
research methodology. Partici pants are requi red to complete a research abstract/paper for publ ication. Seniors are given the 
opportunity to participate in a mock dissertation defense, they receive financial support toward presenting their research at 
conferences. Theprogramalsooffersassistancewithpreparationof acompelling personal statement, admission and financial aid 
applications, preparation for graduate school admissions tests, and successful completion of graduate degrees. 

Asian American Studies Program (AAST) 

1120 Cole Student Activities Building, 301.405.0996 

www.aast.umd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

Director: Larry Haji me Shi nagawa, Ph.D. 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with the opportunity to study critically the experiences of Asian 
A meri cans. T hrough an i nterdi sci pi i nary approach, students exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es and cul tures of A si an A meri cans 
as both distinctive from and connected to the broader themes for diversity, ethnicity, race, gender and migration in the Americas. 
AAST offers a 15 credit-hour minor. For the M inor, courses may be cross- listed in other departments and some may satisfy CORE 
and Diversity requirements. 

Minor Requirements: 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. lrrtroductiontDAsianAmericanStudies(AAST 200/AMST298C) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST 201/HIST219M) 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel76 



B. Upper-la/el Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two required foundational courses, students will also select two additional 
upper-level (300/400) courses, one of which would be at the 400 level, from the foil owing list of regular and special topics courses: 
AAST 384, AAST338, AAST398A, AAST398B, AAST398C, AAST 398D, AAST398G, AAST 398L, AAST 398P, AAST 
420/WM ST 420, AAST 424/SOCY 424, AAST 498A, AAST 498B, AAST 498C, AAST 498D, AAST 498E, AAST 498F, AAST 
498G, AAST 4981 , AAST 498J , AAST 498K, AAST 498L, AAST 498M , AAST 498N, AAST 498P and AAST498T. 

C. Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of AAST 378 (Experiential Learning- 3credits), a 
semester-long i ntemshi p at an organization that centers its efforts on Asian American issues. Such organizations may i ncl ude 
governmental units, non-profit agencies, and on-campus organizations. 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Program 

2126 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-314-3242 

www.afrotc.umd.edu 

Director: Colonel Robert E. Pecoraro 

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) provides students the opportunity to earn a commission as a second 
I ieutenant i n the U nited States A i r Force whi le completi ng thei r undergraduate or graduate degree. 1 1 is highly recommended that 
students seeki ng a commi ssi on contact the A F ROTC department for f ul I program detai I s before regi steri ng f or cl asses. 

Prog-am requirements 

AFROTC is designed to be a 4-year experience, but the schedule can be compressed (mini mum of 2 years) for qualified 
candi dates. A 1 1 owances wi 1 1 vary dependi ng on i ndi vi dual s' abi I i ti es to pass mi ni mum cadet standards. A f ul I four-year program i s 
composed of the 2-year General Military Course (GMC) and the 2-year Professional Officer Course (POC).GMC students receive 
an introduction to theAirForce and various career fields, and have a chance to compete for scholarships. Non-scholarship GMC 
students incur no military service obligation and may elect to discontinue the program at any time. Students wishing to attend the 
POC must pass all cadet standards by thei r last semester in the G M C, and compete for acceptance to attend a summer field training 
course. After completi ng field trai ni ng, students enteri ng the POC are contracted to serve a mi ni mum of 4 years active-duty service 
in theAirForce. The POC concentrates on the development of leadership ski I Is and the study of United States defense policy. 
Additionally, as contracted cadets all POC students receive a monthly allowance of $450- $500. 

Scholarships and Incentives 

A F ROTC schol arshi p programs provi de 2-year to 4-year awards on a competitive basi s. Those members of A F ROTC who pass 
basi c cadet standards are el i gi bl e f or schol arshi ps i n any degree program based on a competi ti ve sel ecti on process hel d every 
spring. Scholarship recipients receive money for tuition, abookallowance(currentJy$900/year), and a monthly allowancefrom 
$300 to $500, dependi ng on I evel i n A F ROTC . Sped al degree-specif i c schol arshi ps are al so avai I abl e to those i n sel ect techni cal 
and non-technical fields, depending onAir Force needs (check with AFROTC department for current list). Some of these options 
al low entering juniors to go directiy into the POC and finish the entire AFROTC program in 2 years; students considering this 
option should make appl i cation the semester prior to start. 

Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 

1150 Cole Student Activities Building, 301-314-9239 

www.amryrotc.umd.edu 

armyroto@umd.edu 

Director: Lieutenant Colonel RanelleManaois 

The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps offers students the opportunity to earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the 
United States Army (Active, Reserve, or National Guard) while completing their undergraduate degree. 

Four-Year Program 

Thefour-year program is composed of the Basic Leadershi p Course and the Advance Leadershi p Course. Thef irst two years 
(Basic Course) consists of a general introduction to military customs and courtesy, soldier ski I Is, communication ski I Is, personal 
development and introductory leadership ski I Is. Students enrol led in the basic course incur no obligation and may discontinue the 
program at any time. In thefinal two years (Advanced Course), students concentrate on developing leadership ski I Is in 
organizations. Students must have permission of the Director of Army ROTC to enroll in the advanced course. The Advanced 
Course requi res fi ve weeks of fi el d trai ni ng aC ort L ewi s, Washi ngton the summer after thei r j uni or year. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel77 



Two-Year Program 

The two-year program is avail able to students with two years and a summer remaining in their university studies. The academic 
requirements for this program are identical to the Advanced Course in the four-year program and students are eligible to receive 
the same benefits. During the summer preceding the junior year, students must attend five weeks of field training at FortKnox, 
Kentucky. Studertsstould start the appli cation process for thisopti on ro^ 

Scholarships and Incentives 

Army ROTC Scholarships are avail able for four, three or two years on a competitive basis. The scholarships are based solely on 
merit, notfinancial need. Those selected receive tuition and mandatory fees, a book allowance, and a non-taxable monthly 
al I owance rangi ng from $350- $500 based on academic year. 

Curriculum 

Basic Leadership Corse 

F reshman Y ear: A RM Y 101 (fal I ) A RM Y 102 (Spri ng) 
Sophomore Year: ARMY201 (Fall) ARMY202 (Spring) 

Advanced Leadership Course 

J uniorYear: ARMY301 (Fall) ARMY302 (Spring) 
SeniorYear: ARMY401 (Fall) ARMY402 (Spring) 

All Army ROTC courses are open to any university studentfor credit whether or not he or she is enrolled as a cadet in the Army 
ROTC program. 

Beyond the C laasroom 

1104 South Campus Commons, Building 1, 301-314-6621 

www.BeyonaTheClassroom.umd.edu 

btcinfo@umd.edu 

Di rector: J ames V . Ri ker 

Beyond the Classroom (BTC) is an interdisciplinary living- 1 earning program dedicated to equipping students with the educational 
and professional leadershi p ski lis to understand and to contri bute constructively to civic engagement and social change i n a global 
context. Students address significant civic and social issues through i nternshi p, community service, and civic learni ng experiences 
with nonprofit nongovernmental and civil society organizations in the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Through its 
i ntegrated academic, experiential, and service components that offer students real-world opportunities, BTC enables students to 
develop and to realize their potential for civic leadership at the local, national and global levels. BTC is a two-semester program 
open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

0405 Marie Mount Hall, 301-405-9356 

www.cte.umd.edu 

cte@umd.edu 

Director: Spencer Benson 

The Center for Teaching Excel I ence supports departmental, individual and campus-wide efforts to enhance teaching and learning 
at the University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants. 
TheCenter provides workshops, teaching assistant development, evaluation and support strategies for improving teaching and 
learning, individual consultations forfaculty and graduate students, research on current teaching practices, and implementation of 
i nnovati ve teachi ng and I earni ng strategi es. 

T he C enter al so adrri ni sters an undergraduate teachi ng assi stants prograrn a U ni versi ty-wi de teachi ng and I eami ng program for graduate teachi ng assi starts, the 
Lilly Teaching Fellows prograrn the I nstructional I rrproverrent Grants prograrn and various Scholarship of Teaching and Learning programs 

Educational Talent Search 

3103Turner Hall, 301-314-7763 

www.etsp.umd.edu 

D i rector: A ndre N otti ngham 

Educational Talent Search 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel7E 



Educational Talent Search (ETSP) is a federal TRI O program grant- funded by the U .S. Department of Education and sponsored by 
the U ni versi ty of M aryl and si nee 1985. We provi de free pre-col I ege assi stance to di sadvantaged students enrol I ed at 10 target hi gh 
schools in Pri nee George's County Publ ic Schools. The goal of the program is to i ncrease the number of students that graduate 
from high school and continue on to enrol I at an institution of higher education. Educational Talent Search counselors assist 
individuals by providing early awareness counseling and assi stance in academics, financial aid, career explorations, tutorial 
services, exposure to col I ege campuses, peer mentoring, student/parent workshops, SAT/ACT prep, and assistance with college 
appl ications. I n addition, we assist students who have dropped out by encouragi ng them to re-enter school . 

College Park Scholars Program (C PSP) 

1125 Currte-land Hall, 301-314-2777 
www.schol ars. umd.edu 
Executive Director: Greig Stewart 

College Park Scholars is a class of interdisciplinary, two-year living/learning programs in which academically and creatively 
tal ented freshmen and sophomores expl ore i nterests that enhance, or compl ernent thei r academi c maj or. Students i n each program 
attend weekl y, f acul ty- 1 ed col I oqui a that encourage acti ve di scussi on and debate. Other courses i n the curri cul um sati sf y general 
education (CORE) requirements. I n the second semester of their sophomore year, students choose from independent research, 
servi ce- 1 eami ng proj ects, or i nternshi ps - both on and off campus - for thei r Schol ars -practi cum experi ence. 

The Programs' focus on community offers many advantages. Program faculty maintain offices in Cambridge Community residence 
hal I s whi ch f aci I i tares meeti ng wi th students. Several program f acul ty I ead study-abroad experi ences between the wi nterterm or 
duri ng the summer. L i vi ng together i n the resi dence hal I s hel ps students form study groups for common courses. Schol ars al so 
engage with guest speakers and have the opportunity to conti nue conversations outside the classroom. Program di rectors encourage 
students to pursue I eadershi p opportunities i n co-curricular activities, design and implement community service and social events, 
participate in tutoring, recruitment activities, or serve on the Student Advisory Board . 

Upon successful completion of the program students earn an academic Citation (requirements vary by program) . In their junior 
year, students are encouraged to bui I d on thei r Schol ars experi ences by applyi ng to departmental honors programs and other 
learning community opportunities. 

Admission to College Park Scholars is selective and by invitation. Upon invitation to Scholars, students indicate their preference 
from the f ol I owi ng programs: 

A dvocates for C hi I dren 

Arts 

B usi ness, Society, and the Economy 

C ultures of the A meri cas 

Earth, Life, and Time 

Environment, Technology and Economy 

I nternational Studies 

Life Sciences 

Media, Self, and Society 

Public Leadership 

Science and Global Change 

Science, Discovery, and the Universe 

Science, Technology, and Society 

CORE L iberal Arts and Sciences Studies Program 

2130 Mitchell Building, 301-405-9363 

www.ugstumd.edu/core 

DirectorCORE Planning^ Implementation: Laura Slavin 

To earn a baccalaureate at the University of Maryland all students compl ere both a maj or course of study and a campus- wide 
general education program. For more information, seeChapter 5, General Education Requirements. 

Federal Semester Program 

0110 Hornbake Library, 301-314-0023 
www.federalsemester.umd.edu 
Di rector: Dr. J can Burton 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel7S 



TheFecleral Semester isaselective, year-long program coordinated by the Office of Undergraduate Studies in conjunct] on with 
several col leges/programs and the Career Center. The program is designed to bring students from all disciplines together to learn, 
discuss and explore issues of federal policy and is availableto students by application. Rising juniors and seniors with strong 
academic backgrounds and an interest in federal policy areencouraged to apply. TheFederal Semester Program consists of three 
pri mary components: 

1. The Federal Semester Seminar: UNIV348 (3 credits, fall semester). A choice of several seminar courses focused on federal 
policy. Each seminarcourse has a separate thematic focus (for example, federal health policy, homeland security policy). The 
semi nar courses benef it from the diversity of students who participate in the Federal Semester Program. Inthesmall seminar 
setting students bring knowledge from their disciplinary focus to discussion of Federal Policy. 

2. The I nternship: UNIV349 (3 credits, spring semester). The Federal Semester Experiential Leaning course includes an internship 
wi th a federal agency or re! ated organi zati on. ( W i th permi ssi on, students may compl ete the i nternshi p under the course number for 
i nternshi ps i n the students major.) 

3. Supporting course work: TworegularUM courses approved by the program that compl ement the Federal Semester mission(6 
credits). (With permission, students may apply courses completed prior to the Federal Semester year.) 

In addition, students will participate in Federal Semester Program activities including visits to Capitol Hill and federal agencies, 
conversations with leaders in public policy, workshops on finding and making the most of your internship, and an end-of-the-year 
event 

To apply students must have completed 45 credits with a grade poi nt average of 3.0 or higher and must submit a completed 
application. For detailsand application: www.federalsemester.umd.edu. 

Global Communities 

1122 Holzapfel Hall, 301-314-7100 
www.i international .umd.edu/gc 
Di rector: Kevi n M cCI ure 

Through Global Communities, students become: 1) aware of global issues and diversity through cultural programming and 
academic experiences in their residence hall and in the Washington, DC area; 2) empowered with knowledge and ski I Is that allow 
them to communicate with peoplef rom a variety of backgrounds and to thrive as citizens of the world; and 3) active as agents of 
change in their immediate places of influence and beyond. Domestic and exchange students in the program live in Dorchester Hall. 
creati ng an i nternati onal resi denti al experi ence. Students take a one-credi t col I oqui um course each semester and one support ng 
area course each year. They have opportunities to take partinaintercultural events, such as visiting an embassy, attendinga 
lecture by a renowned scholar, or taking part in a sustainability camping trip. After the completion of the curriculum and the 
successful submission of a portfolio of global skills, students are awarded a Global Competencies notation on their transcripts. 

I ndividual Studies Program 

0110 Hornbake Library, 301-314-0023 

www.ivsp.umd.edu 

Di rector: Dr. J oan Burton 

The I ndividual Studies Program (IVSP) is a degree-granting academic program under the direction of the Office of Undergraduate 
Studies. The program allows students to create new interdisciplinary curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Sci ence degree. Students draw pri mari ly from the U ni versity of M aryl and's course off eri ngs to form an academi c concentration not 
otherwise avail able to them at the institution. A written prospectus that defines the students maj or and outlines the curriculum is 
requi red to apply to the program. I ndividual ly created student majors have recentJy i ncl uded such titles as Peace and J ustice 
Studies, A si an American Pol icy and Advocacy, Global Health, International Studies, Urban Studies and Planning, Interactive 
Media Studies, and Studies of the Mind and Brain. 

Students must seek the guidance and approval of afaculty mentor prior to havi ng thei r prospectus reviewed by the I ndividual 
Studies Faculty Review Board. If approved, the courses agreed upon by the Faculty Review Board become the basis for the 
students major requirements. These listed requi rements from numerous academic departments, along with the CORE general 
educati on requi rements, are anal ogous i n most ways to the academi c requi rements gi ven to students who sel ect from the 
University's traditional majors. However, each student is required to design a unique program of study and defend it in order to be 
apartoflVSP. 

I ndividual Studies students must complete a senior capstone project and are encouraged to engage i n i nternshi ps, research projects, 
independent studies with faculty, as well as study abroad to supplement their work in the classroom. WhilelVSP programs are 
never vocational i n nature, drawing from real-l ife experience as a supplement to the academic curricul um is general ly encouraged. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel8C 



These projects oftsn serve as a way for the students to develop academic connections among the multiple disciplines involved in 
their programs. 

While I VSP gives students the opportunity to create a uniqueacademicprogramfocused on a specific area of study, using courses 
from multiple academic departments, it does not substitute for or replicate the educational goals of existing University programs, 
including the Limited Enrollment Programs (LEPs). IVSP programs may not include substantial numbers of courses from LEP 
departments. 

Developing a successful IVSP prospectus takes time and usually involves several meetings to review and edit the draft prospectus. 
I nterested students should contact the I VSP staff and begin the application process early in their academic career. Working closely 
with the I VSP staff and their prospective faculty mentor, students should plan to complete and submit their IVSP prospectus, 
preferably during their sophomore year, or in their junior year, before reaching 90 credits. 



To be admitted into thelndwdual Studies Programthesbudait must 

1. Have a clearly defined academic goal that cannot be reasonably satisfied in an existing curriculum at the University of Maryland 
M arylard, Col lege Park. 

2. Have at least 30 earned college credits with at least 12 credits completed at Col lege Park. 

3. Have a mini mum of a2.5GPA ineachof their previous two semesters of college, and at least a 2.0 GPA overall. 

4. Complete at least 30 additional creditsbeginningthetermfollowingadmissiontolVSP. 

5. Identify an appropriate faculty mentor, preferably tenured or tenure track, with significant undergraduate education experience 
related to the field of study. 

6. Complete a detai led plan of study (prospectus) which is approved by their faculty mentor and then approved by the I ndividual 
Studies Faculty Review Board. This proposal will include: 

a. A clear statement of the central academic purpose for their major. 

b. Specific course requirements including at least 27 credits of upper-division major coursework (300 & 400 level) 
beyond the IVSP courses (IVSP 317, IVSP 318, and IVSP 420). 

c. The list of courses must include at least one writing craft course (in addition to the CORE Fundamental Studies 
Introduction to Writing and the Professional Writing requirements) selected from an approved list that is available 
from the I ndividual Studies staff. 

d. A semester- by-semester plan for the completion of thei r undergraduate degree withi n a reasonable period of time. 

7. Complete the IVSP Departmental Notification Form in order to notify academic units from which they will take three or more 
300-400 level courses. 

Following admission, students imsb 

1. Earn a grade of C or better in all courses required in their IVSP program of study including I VSP 420 as well as a satisfactory 
grade in IVSP 317. 

2. Complete mandatory advising sessions with their faculty mentor and the IVSP staff every semester, including a review of their 
semester- by-semester academi c pi an for compl eti on of thei r I V SP program. 

3. If not already completed, work towards immediate completion of the fundamental studies requirements for English composition 
and mathematics. 

For details and further information, visit the IVSP websiteatwww.ivsp.umd.edu. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

2212 Marie Mount Hall, 301-405-5428 

www.lgbts.umd.edu 

lgbts@umd.edu 

Director: Dr. MarileeLindemann 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel81 



The Program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an interdisci pi i nary undergraduate certificate and a 
mi nor designed to examine the lives, experiences, identities and representations of LGBT persons, those who are today described 
as having a minority sexual orientation or who are gender transgressive. Students study LGBT families and communities, cultures 
and subcultures; histories, institutions, languages and literatures; economic and political lives; and the complex relations of sexual 
mi norities to the culture and experience of the gender conformant and (hetero) sexual majority. LGBT Studiesisan 
interdisciplinary and multi disciplinary field, and promotes the application of new theories and methodologies (eg., queer, feminist, 
critical race, and multicultural theories) to established disciplines, and it advances the generation of new knowledge within 
tradi ti onal f i el ds of schol arshi p. T hrough study of sexual mi nori ti es, students gai n an understandi ng of and respect for other 
differences in human lives such as age, ability, class, ethnicity, gender, race, and religion. With theirfaculty advisors, certificate 
candi dates desi gn a program that compl ements thei r maj or f i el d of study. 

C ertificate Reqii rements 

21 credits: 15 credits are in required courses, while 6 credits are earned in two elective courses. 
A. Required core curriculumfor the Certificate in LGBT Studies (15 credits) 

1. LGBT200- 1 ntroduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower- level course focused on literature, art or culture by or about LGBT people, eitherENGL 265orCMLT 
291; 

3. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on the personal, social, political, and historical aspects of 
LGBT people LGBT 350, PHI L 407, or WM ST 494; 

4. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people ENGL 
359,459, 465; or LGBT 327 



5. One of the foil owing: 

a. LGBT488 

Semi nar i n LGBT Studies 

b. LGBT386 

Supervised I ntemshi p - LGBT Community Organizations 

B. ElectivecoursesfortheCertificateinLGBT Studies (6 credits) 

Students choose six hours of elective credits in consultation with their advisor in LGBT Studies. At least three hours of elective 
credits must be from upper-division courses (i .e, those numbered 300 or above). Students are encouraged to choose el ectives to 
complement their knowledge of LGBT people and issues by exploring disci pi ines that contrast with the major field of study. 
Students may select elective courses from the list of core courses above or from a list of approved courses maintained by the 
program. The list is updated regularly and avai lable at www.lgbts.umd.edu/mi nor.html . A student may also petition to have any 
other coursefulf ill this requirement by providing evidence, usually the syllabus, that a substantial amount of the course work, 
usually including a term paper, consists of LGBT material. 

• A ppropriate substitutions for courses I isted i n categories 2 through 4 above may be made with approval from the Di rector of 
LGBT Studies. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C" (2.0) will count toward the certificate in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maximum of nine credits (or three courses) to satisfy the requirements of both their maj or and the 
certificate in LGBT Studies. 

• No more than nine of the required credits may betaken at an institution other than the University of Maryland, Col lege Park. 

• Students must declare the certificate in LGBT Studies to the Director of LGBT Studies one year prior to their intended 
graduation to assure appropriate advising and record-keeping. 

Minor Retirements 

15credits: 12 credits arein required courses, while3 credits areearned in one upper-level elective course 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel82 



A . Requi red cone curri cul um f or the M i nor i n LG BT Studi es ( 12 credits) 

1. LGBT 200— I rrtroduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, andTransgender Studies 

2. One lower-level course focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people, either ENGL 265 or CM LT 
291; 

3. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on the personal, social, political, and historical aspects of 
LGBT people LGBT 350, PHI L 407, or WM ST 494; 

4. One of the foil owing upper-division courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people ENGL 
359, 459, 465; or LG BT 327. 

B. Elective course for the Mi nor in LGBT Studies (3 credits) 

An upper-division elective will complement the required courses. This elective may be a course from categories 3 and 4 above that 
has not been used to fulfil I requirements; or it may be one of the capstone courses in LGBT Studies (LGBT 386 or LGBT 488), or a 
course chosen from the list of approved electivesfor the LGBT Studies program. The list of approved electives is available at 
www.lgbrs.umd.edu/minor.htrril. A student may also petitiontohaveanycoursefulfill this requirement by providing evidence, 
usually the syllabus, that a substantial amount of the course work, usually including a term paper, consists of LGBT material. 

• A ppropriate substitutions for courses I isted i n categories two through four above may be made with approval from the 
Director of LGBT Studies. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C" (2.0) will counttoward the minor in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi mum of six credits (or two courses) to satisfy the requi rements of both the' r major and the mi nor i n 
LGBT Studies. However, courses taken to complete the mi nor in LGBT Studi es may not be used to satisfy the requi rements 
of another mi nor. 

• No more than six of the required credits (or two courses) may betaken at an institution other than the University of 
Maryland, College Park. However, at least six upper-division credits applied to the minor must betaken at this university. 

• Students must declare the minor in LGBT Studies to the Director of LGBT Studies one year prior to their intended 
graduation to assure appropriate advising and record-keeping. 

Letters and Sciences 

1117 Hornbake Library, Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant, Ph. D. 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 or 8419 

Pre-Law Advising: prelaw@umd.edu 

Credit-by-Exam: 301-314-8418 

Letters and Sciences is the academic home for students exploring a variety of fields before selecting a major, for post-baccalaureate 
students taki ng additional course work, and for non-degree seeki ng students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sciences 
may also serve as the academic home for students completing requi rements for entry into a Limited Enrollment Program. Letters 
and Sciences advisors he! p students to select and schedule courses, plan academic programs, and learn about campus- wide 
resources. Letters and Sciences col laborates closely with col lege advisi ng offices, academic departments, and programs across 
campus and provides a coordi nated advisi ng network that features: 

Choosing a Major 

Letters and Sciences students receive information about and referral to a wide range of academic programs and services including 
specialized workshop sessions. Letters and Sciences staff specialize in assisting students develop strategies and pi are for entering 
L i mi ted E nrol I merit Programs. 

Markets and Sodety 

M arkets and Soci ety i s a program for enteri ng freshmen i nterested i n expl ori ng the worl d of busi ness. T he M arkers and Soci ety 
Program helps students to learn about the field of business, refine their career goals, and interact with other students who share 
their interests. 

Learning Comrmnities 

Learni ng Community programs i n Letters and Sciences focus on f i rst-year students. They combi ne a onecredit semi nar cal led 
I rrtroduction to the University with one or more general education (CORE) courses. The seminars facilitate major and career 
exploration. 

Interim Advising Program 



6. TheCollegesandSchools Page 183 



Newly admitted transfer students with more than 60 credits, who were unsuccessful i n gai ni ng admission to a Li mi ted E nrol I ment 
Program, receive advising and assistance from a Letters and Sciences professional staff member during their first two semesters on 
campus. F or thi s group of students, the U ni versi ty wai ves the requi rement that al I students must decl are a maj or by 60 credi ts. 

Pre-Law Advising 

Letters and Sciences offers specialized advi sing for students interested in law. For further information, see the section on Pre-Law 
Advising in this catalog and visit www.prelaw.umd.edu 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2100D (2nd Floor) McKeldin Library, 301-314-6786 

www.ugresearch.umd.edu 

ugresearch@umd.edu 

Director: Francis DuVinage 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) isaninitiativefromtheOfficeof the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. 
Created as a resource for students and faculty, the Center serves as a cleari nghousefor both on-campus and off -campus research 
opportunities for undergraduate students. Additional ly, the Center serves as a forum where faculty members can share different 
models for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students i nto research programs, and ways of i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the 
curriculum. 

Among the programs at the MCUR are the Maryland Student Researchers program (M SR) and the Senior Summer Scholars (SSS). 
M SR provides an opportunity for students to work with faculty mentors on ongoi ng research projects. Experienced students, who 
are rising seni ors, are encouraged to appl y for fundi ng through the Seni or Summer Schol ars program for summer study wi th a 
faculty member. Students new to research as well as students with previous research experience participate in this program. 

National Scholarship Office 

2403 Marie Mount Hall, 301-314-1289 

www.scholarships.umd.edu 

scholarships@umd.edu 

Director: Francis DuVinage, Ph.D. 

The National Scholarships Office at the University of Maryland, College Park aims to provide undergraduates with the 
best possible information, guidance and support as they learn about and apply for national scholarships. 

National scholarships are competitive, prestigious awards that provide opportunities and supportfora wide range of 
enriching experiences, including study abroad, graduate study (and sometimes undergraduate study also), federal 
employment teaching, research, and public service. National scholarships are looking for students (with or without 
financial need) who are developing strong interests and goals - academic and extracurricular - and who want to take 
advantage of every constructive opportunity that will help them reach their objectives. J ustas each national scholarship 
offers a different kind of opportunity each is also looking for a different range of strengths and interests in its applicants. 
If you develop a strong academic record, are thoughtful about your choices and devote yourself to activities you care 
about, you may well find one or more scholarships opportunities of interest to you. 

The National Scholarships Office strives to make learning about and applying for national scholarships an enlightening 
experience. In addition to providing information about national scholarships through our website, through group 
presentations and through individual advising, we also provide individualized guidance and support at every stage of 
the application process. We invite you to visit our website and to make an appointment with us to learn more about 
national scholarships that may help you attain your goals. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Field House, 301-314-8217 
www.orientation.umd.edu 
Director: Gerry Strumpf 

The goal of Orientation is to introduce new students to the University of Maryland community University of Maryland community. 
The Orientation Office offers a wide range of transitional programming and services for students and their families as they prepare 
to attend theUniversity of M aryland. 

New Student Orientation 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel84 



Held prior to trie semester a studert enrol I sat trie University of Maryland, new student orientation for first-time freshmen normally 
covers two days; orientation for new transfer students covers one day. During New Student Orientation, individuals meet with 
representatives from their academic col lege for advising and course scheduling. Undergraduate Orientation Advisors, introduce 
students to academic and student life at theUniversity of Maryland, including student campus services and resources, and 
opportunities for i nvol vement on campus. 

Parent Orientation 

Parents of new U ni versi ty of M ary I and students are strongl y encouraged to attend a one-day program specif i cal I y desi gned to 
introduce them to the academic, social, and cultural opportunities of the university and to better prepare them for the issues that are 
I i kely to affect thei r son or daughter throughout thei r matriculation at the U ni versi ty. 

Terp Trips 

Terp T ri ps focus on the conti nui ng transi ti on of parents. Offered to parents on the second day of freshman ori entati on, these 
one-day programs combi ne a tri p to an area attraction with connections to other parents and a campus faculty or staff host. 

Introduction to the University Soninars 

The Ori entati on Office coordi nates new student seminar courses, UNIVlOOand 101. These courses introduce students to the world 
of higher education and, more specifically, to the University of Maryland. Course topics include career/major exploration, 
successful studying and test-taking strategies, diversity, and involvement within the university. 

Pre-C d lege Programs 

1107 West Education Annex, www.precollege.umd.edu 
pre-col I ege@umd.edu 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy DeJ esus 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound-Math and Science Program (UB-MS): 301-405-1773 

The University of Maryland Pre-College Programs in Undergraduate Studies is comprised of three federally and state supported 
programs: 

Two Upward Bound Programs (UB) and 

Upward Bound-Math and Science Program (UB-M S). 

T hese programs generate the ski 1 1 s and mod vati on necessary for success i n post-secondary educati on. T hey i mmerse hi gh school 
participants in rigorous academic instruction, tutoring, counseling, and innovative educational experiences throughout the school 
year and during the six-week summer residential program. Pre-College Programs are part of the Federal TRIO Programs that 
provide educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

TheUB Programs are open to low-income and/or first-generation college bound high school students in grades 9 through 12, who 
demonstrate an academi c need and want to pursue a four-year postsecondary educati on. E I i gi bl e students must attend target hi gh 
schools in Prince George's and Montgomery Counties. High school principals, teachers, and counsel ors recommend students to the 
program. 

Eligibility for the Upward Bound Programs requi res that students attend Montgomery Blair, Wheaton, Central, High Point, or 
Bladensburg High Schools. 

The UB-MS is open to students in grades 10 through 12, who demonstrate an academic need and want to pursue post-secondary 
education programs infields related to mathematics and science. UB-M S recruits high school students from Potomac and Fairmont 
Heights High Schools in Prince George's County, MD; WatkinsMill High School in Montgomery County, MD , 
Edmonston-Westside High School inBaltimore, MDandBell High School in Washington, DC. 

University Honors Program 

Anne Arundel Hall, 301-405-6771 

www.honors.umd.edu 

honors@umd.edu 

Director: Dr. William Dorland 

The U niversity Honors Program offers special educational opportunities and resources to students with exceptional academic 
tal ents. Honors students combi ne H onors course work with studies i n thei r maj ors and el ecti ve courses to deepen thei r total 
educational experience. They broaden their intellectual horizons by selecting Honors (HONR) seminars and Honors versions of 
some regul ar courses. H onors semi nars offer smal I cl ass si ze (capped at 20 students) and academi c experi ences characteri zed by 
active participation, intensive writing, and outstanding faculty who encourage critical thinking and innovation. Most Honors 



6. TheCollegssandSchools Pagel85 



seminars fulfil I CORE (general education) requirements. 

Students in the University Honors Program may earn an Honors Citation by taking five Honors courses plus a one-credit 
colloquium and by maintaining an overall 3.2 G PA. Anne Arundel Hall, the Honors Living/Learning Center, houses 100 Honors 
students, the Portz Library, seminar rooms, faculty office, and lounges. Honors students also I iveand study together in Queen 
Anne's, Denton, Wicomico, and Ellicott Halls; many upperclassmen enjoy apartment-style housing in South Campus Commons. 

Acceptance of first-year students into the University Honors Program is by invitation based on the standard application to the 
University of Maryland (by November 1st for best consideration for Honors and merit scholarships). Students with two semesters 
of full -time col lege work (excluding AP credits) completed at the University of Maryland or another institution may apply for 
admission to Honors. Honors Humanities , www.honorshurranities.umd.edu and Gemstone, www.qemstone.umd.edu are more 
specialized programs within University Honors; they are described under theirown headings in this catalog. 

I n addition to the U ni versity Honors Program, about 40 departments or col leges offer advanced, disci pi i ne-based Honors programs 
that provide enriched opportunities, typically i nvolvi ng work with faculty mentors on i independent research projects. M est 
departmental and col I ege H onors programs begi n i n the j uni or year; pi ease contact them di recti y f or the admi ssi on requi remenrs. 



Pre-Transfer Advising 

0104 Reckord A rmory 
301.405.9449 or 9448 
www.transf eradvi si ng. umd.edu 
Assistant Dean: LisaKiely 

The Pre-Transfer Advi si ng Program promotes academic success and excel lence through assessi ng the readi ness of students to 
transfer to UM and estimating their time to degree completion. Pre-Transfer Advisors provide advising for students interested in 
transferring from community col leges as well four year schools. Advisors also work closely with staff at the Maryland community 
colleges. 

First Year Book Program 

Officeaf theDeanfor Undercp~aduateStucies 

2130 Mitchell Building 
www.firstyearbook.umd.edu 
Director: LisaKiely 

Each year si nee 1993, the Uni versity has selected a book for all first year students. The goal of the First Year Book Program 
(FY B) is to provide a shared i ntel lectual experience for al I new students along with the opportunity to discuss the book from a 
variety of disciplines. Courses, departmental lectures, living/learning programs and student groups all sponsor events that 
complement a major address by the author and/or other important visitors to campus. 

The Universities at Shady G rove (USG) 

9636 Gudelsky Drive Rockville M D 20850 
301-738-6000 
www.shadygrove.umd.edu 

USG Executive Director and Associate Vice Chancel I or for Academic Affairs, USM: 
Dr. Stewart L. Edelstein 

The U niversities at Shady Grove (USG) is a regional higher education center created under the auspices of the University System 
of Maryland. Since its inception in 2000, USG Iras teen transformed from a I ocati on f or rjart-ti 

vibrant center offering classes during daytime, evenings, and weekends in both full -time and part-time formats. USG currentiy 
serves more than 3,400 graduate and undergraduate students, wi th more than 1, 000 undergraduates enrol I ed i n dayti me programs. 
Nine University System of Maryland (USM) degree-granting institutions collaborate to offer theirtop degree programs, as well as 
certificate and continuing education programs, at one convenient location inMontgomery County. 

U SG provi des al I the presti ge and benef i ts of a M ary I and educati on duri ng a students f i nal two years of undergraduate study. 
M ost credi t earned atM ary I and communi ty col I eges wi 1 1 transfer, and students can choose from a vari ety of maj ors, wi th cl asses 
offered at times that meet their schedules. AttheUniversitiesatShadyGrovecampus, students work side-by-side with professors 
from nationally ranked academic programs. Students can also participate in a growing number of social and academic activities 
and get involved in community service or student leadership. 

The University of Maryland, College Park is one of the powerful partners that make up USG. Students can earn a University of Mary 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel86 



Maryland, Col lege Park degree at USG and celebrate Terrapin traditions no matter which campus they call home. The University 
of M aryland, College Park offers seven undergraduate degrees withi n four different academic departments at Shady Grove. 

Etiological Sciences Pro-am (BSC I ) 

1322 Symons Hall, 301-405-6892 

www.cheml ife.umd.edu 

Dr. J oelle Presson, Assistant Dean, Academic Undergraduate Programs 

Dr. Tom Stanton, Director, Biological Sciences Shady Grove 

Dr. Nancy Trauth-Noben, Assistant Director, Biological Sciences Shady Grove 

The Major 

Biological Sciences at the University of Maryland at ShadyGrove 

cheml if e. umd.edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove 

TheBiological Sciences Program atthe University of Maryland offers a degree program in General Biology (GENB) at 
Universities at Shady Grove. The Biological Sciences Program at Shady Grove offers the Advanced Program courses normally 
taken i n the j uni or and seni or years. 

A 1 1 B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors compl ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the B asi c 
Program. For students matriculating atthe Universities at Shady Grove most of these introductory and supporting courses are taken 
at a community col lege or at another four-year i institution. Dependi ng on space avai lable, students who matriculated at Col lege 
Park may transfer to the Shady G rove Program i n thei r j uni or year, where they may completetheAdvanced Program in General 
Biology. 

Requirements for the Biol ogi cal Sciences Major in General Biology (GENB) at Shady Grove 
Courses equivalent to these to be taken at an institution that offers iower level course work 

I. CORE Procram Requirements- 30 C reel ts 

I I . Basic Program in Bidocpcal Sciences 



BSC 1105 


Principles of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II 


4 


BSC 1223 


General Microbiology 


3 


BSC 1222 


Pri nci pies of Genetics 


4 


MATH 130 or 


Calculusfor Life Sciences 1 cr 


3 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


4 


MATH 131 or 


Calculusfor Life Sciencesll or 




MATH141 


Calculus II 


4 


CH EM 131/132 


General Chemistry 1 w/Lab 


4 


CH EM 231/232 


General Chemistry 1 1 w/Lab 


4 


CH EM 241/242 


Organic Chemistry II w/Lab 


4 



CHEM271/272* General Chemistry II w/Lab 



* CHEM272Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab is not offered at most institutions. Students accepted into the UMCP ShadyGrove 
Biological Sciences may substitute a General Chemistry 1 1 Lab for this course 

1 1 1 .Corses taken at Universities at Shady Grove 



PHYS121 


Fundamentals of Physics 1 


4 


PHYS122 


Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 


4 


GENB 


Advanced Program in General Biology 


27 minimum 


ELECT 


Electives 


20-25 




Total credits recxi red to graduate 


120 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel87 



Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each pre- registration period for all Biological Sciences majors. Advising for students interested in or 
enrolled inthe Shady Grove Program is availablefrom the Director or Assistant Director. Call 301-738-6207 for an advising 
appointment 

The Robert H . Smith School of Business, Shady Grove 

www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 

Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 

Associate Dean(s): Patricia Cleveland 

Di rector of Programs at Shady Grove: Luke Glasgow 

College Park Location: 1570 Van M unching Hall, 301-405-2286 

Shady Grove Location: Building III, Room 5147, 301-738-6079 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business is an internationally recognized I eader in management education and research for the 
digital economy. The faculty are scholars, teachers, and professional leaclerewitinacorrniitrrienttDsuperioreducationinbusiriess 
and management, specializing in accounting, finance, information systems, operations management management and organization, 
marketing, logistics, transportation and supply chain management The Smith School is accredited by AACSB I nternational - The 
Association to AdvanceCollegiate Schools of Business, the premier accrediting agency for bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree 
programs i n busi ness admi nistration and accounti ng, www.aacsb.edu. 

The Smith School of Busi ness offers students the opportunity to complete the junior-seni or curriculum in four majors at the Shady 
Grove campus including (1) Accounting; (2) General Busi ness- Entrepreneurship Fellows Program (3) I nternational Business; and 
(4) M arketing. For details on the majors offered at Shady Grove visit www.rhsrrith.urrd.edu/urxlergra<d/shaclygrovehtml . 

Admission Requirements 

A 1 1 students applyi ng for admission to the Robert H . Smith School of B usi ness as transfer students, whether i nternal transfers 
already enrolled at UMCP or external transfer students entering the university for the firstti me, will be subject to competitive 
admission for a limited number of spaces inthe Smith School at either theCollege Park or ShadyGrove location. For complete 
details on admissions to the Smith School @ Shady Grove visitwww.rhsmith.urrd.edu/urxlergrad/shadygrove/admissions.aspx. 

Statement of Pdicy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

1 1 is the practice of the Smith School of B usi ness to consider for transfer from a regional ly accredited community col lege only the 
f ol I owi ng courses i n busi ness admi ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, i ntroducti on to computi ng 
(equivalent to BM GT 201), or elementary accounti ng. Thus, it is antici pated that students transferring from another regionally 
accredited institution to Shady Grove will have devoted the maj or share of thei r academic effort below the junior year to the 
compl eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a communi ty col I ege may be appl i ed toward 
a degree from the Smith School of B usi ness. 

Other Institutions 

The Smith School of Business normally accepts transfer credits from regionally accredited four-year institutions. J uni or- and 
senior-level busi ness courses are accepted from col leges accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB). J unior- and senior- level business courses from other than AACSB-accredited schools are evaluated on a 
course- by-course basi s to determi ne transf erabi I i ty . 

The Smith School of Busi ness requi res that at least 50 percent of the busi riessarxIrrBnagement credit hours requi red for a busi ness 
degree be earned at the University of Maryland, College Par 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/DegreeOptions 

Upon completion of all degree requi rements, students at the Smith School @Shady Grove will earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 
degree from the Robert H. Smith School of Busi ness at the University of Mary I and Col I ege Park. In addition, the Smith School of 
Busi ness awards Master of Busi ness Admi nistration (M.B.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). 
I information concerni ng admission to the M .B A . or M .S. program is available at www.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work requi red for graduation must be i n busi ness and management 
subjects. A minimum of 58 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be in 300- or 400- level courses. In addition to the requirement of 
an overall cumulati ve grade point average of 2.0 (C average) inall university course work. EffectiveFall 1989, all business majors 
must earn a 2.0 or better in all requi red courses, including Economics, Mathematics, and Communication. 

Freshman-Sophomore School Requirements 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel8E 



B M GT220 Pri nci pies of Account] ng I (3 credits) 
BMGT221 Pri nci pies of Accounting II (3 credits) 
ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) 
ECON201 Pri nci pies of Macroeconomics (3 credits) 

Onefram 3/4 credits 

M ATH220 Elementary Calculus I 

MATH140 Calculus I 

Onefram 3 credits 
BMGT2301 Business Statistics 
BMGT2312 Statistical Models for Business 

Onefram 3 credits 

COM M 100 Foundations of Speech Communication 

COM M 107 Speech Communication 

COM M 200 Critical Thinking and Speaking 

Toted: 23-24 

1 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT230: BIOM301, ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG305, PSYC200, and 
SOCY201. 

2 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT231: ENEE324, ENME392, orSTAT40O 

J unior-Senicr School Requirements 

B M GT301 1 ntroducti on to I nf ormati on Systems (3 credits) 

BMGT340 Business Finance (3 credits) 

B M GT350 M arketi ng Pri nci pies and Organization (3 credits) 

B M GT364 M anagement and Organizational Theory (3 credits) 

B M GT367 Career Search Strategi es i n B usi ness ( 1 credit) 

BMGT380 Business Law (3credits) 

BMGT495 Business Policies (3 credits) 

Total: 19 

Economics Requirements 3-6 credits 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are requi red by the Smith School of B usi ness. V isit 
wwwjhsmith.unxl.edu/uridergrad/shaclygrove/ the specific requi rements for each major offered at Shady Grove. 

Major Requirements 

I n addition to the Smith School of B usi ness Bachelor of Science requi rements I isted above, general ly another 18-24 credits are 
requi red for each major. See www.rhsmitin.urrd.edu/urxlergracl/shaciygrove/ the specific requi rements for each major offered at the 
Smith School @Shady Grove. 

Additional Information 

For more i nformation on the Smith School of B usi ness undergraduate program at Shady G rove visit 
www. rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 

B A. in Communication at Shady G rove 

9630Gudelsky Drive CamilleKendall Academic Center, Suite5123 

Rockville, MD 20850 

301-738-6002 

www.shactygroveuird.edu/programs/uixle^^ 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Coordi nator: Carol i ne Harper (Program Coordi nator) 

Coordinator: J ulieGowin (Outreach Coordi nator) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. GainesJ . Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L. Aldoory, D. Cai, D. Hample, T. Parry-Giles, M . Tonn, M . Turner 

Assi start Professors: S. Khamis, M. Liu, K. Maddux, N. Ofulue, T. Reimer 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel8S 



Lecturers: R. Coleman (Lecturer), S. Simon (Lecturer), B. Swartz (Lecturer), J . Tenney (Lecturer), 

R.Toth (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: J. Fahnestock (ENGL), A. Kruglanski (PSYC), D. Rosenfelt(WMST) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: M. Gelfand(PSYC), S. McDaniel (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J. Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

The Majorat Shady Groue 

T he department offers an exci ti ng curri cul um that prepares students for academi c and prof essi onal careers i n busi ness, government, 
health, education, social and human services, and related fields. Courses offered by the department include persuasion and social 
influence, rhetoric and the analysis of messages, political communication, organizational communication, public relations 
strategies, negotiation and conflict management, and intercultural communication. All students in the program at Shady Grove are 
requi red to complete mandatory advisi ng each semester. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the degree program in Communication, students should beableto demonstrate the foil owing knowledge and 
skills: 

1. An ability to distinguish among a variety of theoretical approaches in the comrriuni cation discipline and use them appropriately 
and effectively i n academic work. 

2. An ability to conduct research and write research reports employing social scientific and/or humanistic approaches in the 
communi cati on di sci pi i ne. 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively in a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

TheCenterfor Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to foster 
democratic communication by a diverse people. See www.comm.center.umd.edu. 

TheCenterfor Risk Communication Research (CRCR) advances dialogue and understanding about communi cation's role in 
controlling and preventing risk; about how publics perceive risk communication; and about the political, economic and social 
contexts for risk communication. Scholars associated with the CRCR examine health, food safety, security, and environmental 
risks. Seewww.comm.riskcenter.umd.edu. 

The departments Media Center at Col lege Park is designed to provide one-on-one tutoring and instructional support to further 
students' oral communication ski lis and confidence. The Media Center is equipped with cameras and recording equipment to tape 
speeches and presentati ore for practi ce and cri ti que. Students may al so uti I i ze resources avai I abl e at Shady G rove through the 
Off i ce of I nf ormati on Technol ogy. 

AdrrissontotheMajor 

Communication is a Limited Enrollment Program in which applicants should have an overall GPA of 2.7 of better, and a grade of 
"C" or better in each of the three courses specifically required by the major (COM M 250, COMM 107, Statistics, or their 
equivalents). Applicants should also attain junior standing (56 or more transferable col lege credits) by the time of enrollment For 
more information on admission and lower-level coursework requirements, please visit the Communication websiteortheTransfer 
Credit Center website at www.tee.umd.edu. Requi rements for the major are as fol lows: 

a. Complete 50% of the CORE requirements, including Fundamental Studies requi rements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Completeoneof thefollowing courses with a gradeof "C" or better: BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY201, 
or equivalent. 

c. Complete COMM 107, COMM 200, COMM230,orequivalentwithagradeof "C" orbetter 

d. Complete COMM 250 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better and 

e. A cumulative GPA of 2.7 or better 

Students may repeat only one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated only once i n thei r attempt to meet the requi rements. 

Transfer Students 

I nternal and external transfer students who meet the Gateway requi rements specified above and have a cumulative G PA of 2.7 i n 
all college-level coursework may apply to the program up until andincluding the semester in which they reach 60 credits. (Students 
are encouraged to apply at any ti me prior to reachi ng 60 credits as long as the requi rements have been completed.) 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel9C 

For those students who meet the Gateway requirements and who apply after the semester in which they reach 60 credits, admission 
i s competi ti ve and on a space-avai I abl e basi s. 

Newly admitted transfer students who have more than 60 credits have only thei rfirst semester at the U ni versity of M aryland to 
compl ete the G ateway requi rements. 

Appeals 

All students may appeal admission decisions. Those students denied admission may appeal to the university's Office of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Requi rements for theMaj or 

The course of study for a Communication major must satisfy all of the following requirements: 

Credits 

COMM107 Oral Communication: Principlesand Practices, OR 3 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 3 

COM M 230 Argumentation and Debate 3 

COM M 250 Introduction to Communication Inquiry 3 

COM M 400 Research Methods in Communication 3 

COM M 401 I nterpreti ng Strategic Discourse 3 

Communication Stud esTrack 
COMM402 Communication Theory and Process 3 

One from 3 

COM M 420 Theories of Group Discussion 
COM M424 Communication in Complex Organizations 
COMM425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 
COM M 426 Conflict Management 
COM M 435 Theories of I nterpersonal Communication 
COMM470 Listening 
COM M 475 Persuasion 
COMM477 Discourse Analysis 
COM M 482 I ntercultural Communi cati ons 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 191 



One from 



COMM330 Argumentation and Public Policy 



COM M 360 The Rhetoric of Black America 



COMM450 Ancientand Medieval Rhetorical Theory 



COMM451 Renaissance & Modern Rhetoric Theory 



COM M453 The Power of Discourse in American Life 



COM M 455 Speechwriti ng 



COMM460 Public Life in American Communities, 1634-1900 



COM M 461 Voices of Publ ic Leadershi p i n the Twentieth Century 



COMM469 The Discourse of Social Movements 



COMM471 Public Communication Campaigns 



COM M 476 Language, Communication, and Action 



COMM 



COMM Elective 



COMM 300/400 Upper La/el COMM Electives 
One Statistical Analysis from 



12 
3-4 



PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 



SOCY 201 I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 



BMGT230 Business Stati sties 



FnM _.,... I ntroduction to Educational Statistics or an equivalent 

course- see advisor 



One Structural Analysis ofL anguage from 



LING200 Introductory Linguistics 



HESP120 I ntroduction to Linguistics 



a MTUDon Cultureand Discourseoran equivalent course- see 

AN I MJoU , . 

advisor 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel92 



Comruni cations Studies Courses related to 
COURSES Communication Studies in one department other than 
COMM 



Notes 

• B ecause the departments curri cul um changes over ti me, the departments U ndergraduate D i rector may approve other 
appropri ate Communi cati on courses to meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses required for the Communication major, buttaken outside COMM, may be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 

Advising 

A dvisi ng is avail able throughout the year in the Cami lie Kendall Academic Center, Suite 5123. Students should check Testudo 
for thei r regi strati on date and for any mandatory advi si ng bl ocks. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experiences include assisting on faculty research projects, participating in special team research projects, and working 
with the departments Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk Communication Research. 

Fiddwcrk Opportunities 

To further enhance I earni ng and career trai ni ng, the department i ncorporates sped al hands-on cl asses such as H eal th 
Communication Campaigns, Visual Communication, Web Design, and PR Event Planning. The department also strongly promotes 
internship and service I earning opportunities with local and state businesses and institutions, and encourages students' participation 
i n a student- run cl ubs. 

Internships 

The departments internship program helps communication majors gain professional experience, build a professional portfolio, and 
take the f i rst steps toward a career. T he department structures i ts i nternshi p program around a course, COMM 386: Experiential 
Learning, offered each school term. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Social ardacademicactivitiesareavailableto students by participating in the foil owing student organizations: the Undergraduate 
Communication Association, the Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society, and the M aryland chapter of the Public Relations Student Society 
of America. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department offers two scholarshi ps: the Levi ck Crisis Communication Scholarship and the Chai m and M i riam Bentzlovitch 
Scholarship to students who exhibit academic excellence. Each year the department distributes a call for applications through 
e-mail. 

Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

9630 Gudelsky Drive, Room 5105 

301-738-6307 

www.shadygrove. umd.edu/programs/undergraduate/cri mi nol ogy-and-cri mi nal -j usti ce/umcp/cri mi nol ogy-and-cri mi nal -j usti ce.cf m 

Chair: S. Simpson 

Shady Grove Program Di rector: S. Gerstenbl ith 

Lecturers: C. Roberts White, F. Kolodner, N. Romeiser, S. Eastman, L. Reynolds, M.Thomas,R. Shusko, M.Janney 

The Major 

Criminology and criminal j usti ce encompasses the study of both the causes of, and responses to crime. It involves studying 
individual, group, and mass behavior, as well as the institutions, professions, and laws that exist to detect control, and ameliorate 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 193 



the effects of crime. As a discipline, cri mi nologyand criminal justice is situated at the nexus of other social science disciplines 
such as soci ol ogy, psychol ogy, and government i n addi ti on to publ ic policy and I egal studi es. 

The University of Maryland, Col lege Park offers its Bachelor of Arts in Cri mi nology& Criminal Justice at the Universities at 
Shady Grove. Students transfer i nto this Program after completi ng thei r freshman and sophomore years elsewhere, typical ly at a 
j uni or col I ege T hrough thi s Program students compl ete thei r j uni or- and seni or-year coursework at U SG wi th the opti on to attend 
full- or part-time.Upon completion of this Program, students are awarded a University of Maryland, College Park B. A. degree. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Having completed the CCJ S degree program students should have acquired the following knowledge and skills: 

1. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate basi c knowl edge of maj or cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce content areas. 

2. Students will demonstrate a basic kncwl edge of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the social sciences. 

3. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

The major in Criminology & Criminal J usti ce comprises 30 hours of coursework in criminology and criminal justice. Eighteen (18) 
hours of supporti ng sequence selected from a list of social and behavioral science courses are required (list is available intheCCJS 
advi si ng office and on the department website). No grade lower than a C- may be used toward the major. An average grade of C is 
required in the supporting sequence. Nine(9) hours of the supporti ng sequence must be at the 300/400 level. Inaddition, 
MATH 111 or higher (M ATH220, MATH 140 or STAT100, but not MATH 113 or MATH 115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved 
course i n social statistics) must be completed with a grade of C or better. A grade of C or better is requi red i n MATH 111 as a 
prerequisite to CCJ S20O 



CCJ S100 
CCJ S105 
CCJ S230 
CCJ S300 
CCJS340 
CCJ S350 
CCJ SELECT 

CCJ S451 
CCJ S452 
CCJ S454 



SUPPORT 
SUPPORT UL 

MATH 111 
MATH 220 
MATH 140 
STAT100 

CCJ S200 
ECON321 
PSYC200 
SOCY201 



Major Requirements 

I ntroducti on to C ri mi nal J usti ce 

Criminology 

Criminal Law in Action 

Cri mi nological and Cri mi nal J ustice Research M ethods 

Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 

J uveni I e Del i nquency 

CCJ S Elective (3 courses) 

One from 

Cri me and Delinquency Prevention 

Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents 

Contemporary Criminological Theory 

Supporting Sequence 

Lower or U pper I evel courses from approved list (3 courses) 

U pper I evel courses from approved list (3 courses) 

One from 

I ntroducti on to Probabi I ity 

E I ementary Cal cul us I 

Calculus I 

Elementary Statistics and Probability 

One from 

Statistics for Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Economic Statistics 

Stati sti cal M ethods i n Psychol ogy 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 



C recite 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 



Total C recite 30 

9 
9 
3-4 



3-4 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel94 



BMGT230 Business Statistics 

Total crafts- Major and Sippcrting 54 
Electivesfor CCJ S Majors (most courses are 3 credits) 

CCJS234 Law of Criminal Investigation 

CCJ S310 Cri mi nal I investigations 

CCJS320 I ntroducti on to Criminalistics 

CCJ S330 Contemporary Cri mi nological I ssues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary Legal Policy Issues 

CCJ S332 MajorTransitions: From Undergraduate to Professional 

CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJ S357 I ndustrial and Retai I Security Admi nistration 

CCJS359 Field Training in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJ S370 Race, Cri me and Cri mi nal J ustice 

CCJS386 Experiential Learning 

CCJS388H I ndependentReadi ng Course in Criminology and Cri mi nal J ustice- Honors 

CCJS389H I ndependent Research in Cri mi nology and Cri mi nal Justice- Honors 

CCJ S398 Law E nforcement and F i el d Trai ni ng 

CCJ S399 I ndependent Study in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

CCJ S400 C ri mi nal Courts 

CCJ S432 Law of Correcti ore 

CCJS444 AclvarcedLawErforcementAdministration 

CCJ S451 C ri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 

CCJS452 Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents 

CCJ S453 White Col lar and Organized Cri me 

CCJ S454 Contemporary Cri mi nological Theory 

CCJ S455 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice I 

CCJ S456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice 1 1 

CCJ S457 ComparativeCriminology and Criminal J ustice 

CCJ S461 Psychology of Cri mi nal Behavior 

CCJS462 Special Problems in Security Administration 

CCJ S498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Other RequrementsfortheMajor 

TheCCJS Department enforces all prerequisites and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are closed. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at least once each semester. Advising is availableon a walk-in basis between 
10amard3pmMorxlaythroughThuradayorbyappoirtmentintrieCamille Kendall Academic Center (Building III), room 5103. 
Students must compl ete al I course prerequi sites and obtai n department permi ssi on from CCJ S A dvi si ng to enrol I i n most CCJ S 
classes. Call 301-738-6031 or 301-738-6307 or email sgerstenblith@crim.umd.edu . 

Internships 

Retirements for Internship Placements 

The internship must bea learning experience involving work in a criminal justice or criminological setting. Interns are expected to 
gain valuable information which will add to their overall understanding of the field of cri mi nology and cri mi nal justice. Internship 
positions must center around gaining new material over the course of the semester and are expected to involve some degree of 
ongoi ng trai ni ng/l earni ng for the i ntern. I nternshi p pi acements are subj ect to the approval of the I nternshi p D i rector. 



6.TheCollege>andSchools Pagel95 



I nternship Eligibility 

I nterns must meet the following criteri a: 

• I nterns must be CCJ S majors 

• I nterns must have compl eted a mi ni mum of 56 credits at the ti me of appl i cati on 

• I items must have a cumulative GPA of at I east 2.5 at the time of application 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credit over the course of the semester 

• A maximum of 6 internship credits per semester and a total of 12 internship credits overal I will be permitted 

• I nternshi p credi t wi 1 1 not be approved for current or previ ousl y hel d j obs 

I nterns must register themselves for the internship prior to the end of trie semester's schedule adjustment period. Obtaining 
Departmental approval for the i nternshi p does N GT regi ster the student for the cl ass. A ddi ti onal i nf ormati on about i nternshi ps can 
be picked up from the CCJ S advising office in Building III, room5103. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

There are two Student Societies avail able for membership for CCJ S majors: the Criminal J ustice Student Association (CRIMSA) 
and Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society (APS). 

TheCriminal J ustice Student Association (CRI MSA) is dedicated to supplementing our members' academic experience by 
providing extracurricular opportunities to further explore critical issues involving criminology and criminal justice. Through a 
regular program of speakers, agency demonstrations, and community service projects, the CRI M SA provides students with 
val uabl e i nf ormati on for maki ng deci si ons about career choi ces, further graduate I evel study, and I aw school . C R I M SA provi des 
students wi th opportuni ti es for academi c and sod al i nteracti on, and access to cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce researchers, 
teachers, and practitioners representing a variety of government; academic and commercial corporate and non-profit 
organizations. All UniversitiesatShadyGrovestudents, regardlessof home institution or major, are el igiblefor CRI MSA 
membership. CRIMSA meetings and programs are held at least monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. CRIMSA members 
pay a one-ti me membershi p fee of $30. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) is a National Criminal J ustice Honor Society founded 1942 and membershi pis open to CCJ S majors who 
have compl eted at I east 40 total credi ts wi th at I east 12 credi ts i n CCJ S courses. U ndergraduate A ppl i cants must have an overal I 
GPA of at least a 3.2 and a major GPA of at least 3.4. Graduate student applicants must have a 3.4 overal I G PA. Applicants must 
fill out an application, submit an official or unofficial transcript, and a check (personal check isfine) made out to Alpha Phi Sigma 
for $55. The local chapter's name is Omega lota. Completed applications, check, and transcripts should be submitted to Dr. 
Gerstenblith in Building III, room 5105. Applications are processed throughout the academic year. Youwill be notified when you 
have been officially accepted. Applications are avail able from Dr. Gerstenblith. 

Awards and Recognition 

Each semester the department selects the outstanding graduating senior for the Peter J. Lejins award. 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



7. Department^ Majors* and Pro-ams 

ACCOUNTING (BMGT) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business 

1570Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286 

www. rhsrri th. umd.edu/undergrad 

Chair: M.Loeb 

Professors: L. Gordon, O. Kirn M. Loeb, S. Loeb 

Associate Professors: S. Cheng (Assoc Prof), R. Hann (Assoc Prof) 

Assistant Professors: S. Brown (A sst Prof), L. Zhou (Visit Asst Prof) 

Lecturers: P. BasufTyser Teaching Fellcw), G. B ul mash (Tyser Teaching Fellow), C. Linsley (Tyser Teaching Fellcw), J . McKinney (Tyser Teaching Fellow), G. 

Pfeiffer 

Adjunct Professors: E. Cantor (Lecturer), E. Folsom (Lecturer), R. Hall (Lecturer), K. Hardy (Lecturer), M. Lavine (Lecturer), P. McNamee (Lecturer), P. McPhun 

(Lecturer), L. Mostow (Lecturer), S. Rose (Lecturer), V. Ryrrer( Lecturer), D. Sites (Lecturer), C. Stevens (Lecturer), N.Webb (Lecturer) 

Visiting Faculty: M. Finch (Tyser Teaching Fellow) 

TheMajcr 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and recording of financial events and the reporti ng of the results of such events for an organization. In 
a broader sense, accounti ng consi sts of al I f i nanci al systems f or pi anni ng, control I i ng, and apprai si ng performance of an organi zati on. A ccounti ng i ncl udes among i ts 
many facets: f i nanci al pi anni ng, budged ng, accounti ng systems, f i nanci al management control s, f i nanci al anal ysi s of performance, f i nanci al reporti ng, i ntemal and 
external audi ti ng, and taxati on. The accounti ngcurriculum provi des an educati onal f oundati on for careers i n publ i c accounti ng, management, whether i n pri vate 
business organizations, government or nonprofit agencies, or consulting. Two tracks are provided: The Public Accounting Track leading to theCPA (Certified 
Public Accounting) and the Management Accounti ng/ConsultingTrackP/easenote Currentiy, only the Public Accounting track is available. 

Acta ssi en to the Major 

See Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in chapter 6 for admission requirements. 
Requirements for theMajor 



All Accounting Majors: 

BMGT310 I nterrredi ate Accounting I 
BMGT311 InterrrediateAccountingll 
BMGT321 Managerial Accounting 
BMGT326 Accounting Systems 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Accounting Majors must complete an additional 12 
credi ts from one of the f ol I owi ng tracks. 



Public Accounti ng Track: 

BMGT323 Taxation of Individuals* 

B M GT411 Ethi cs and Prof essi onal i sm i n A ccounti ng* 

BMGT422 Auditing Theory & Practice* 



3 
3 
3 



One of the following: 

BMGT410 Government Accounting 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and Estates 

B M GT423 F raud Exarri nati on 

BMGT424 Advanced Accounting 

BMGT427 Advanced A uditingTheory& Practice 

BMGT428 Special TopicsinAccounting 



Management Accounti ng/ConsultingTrack: 

BMGT426 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Three ofihe following: 

_..__„_ Survey of Business Information Systems and 

Technology 

BMGT323 Taxation of Individuals* 

B M GT332 Operati ons Research for M anagement Deci si ons 

B M GT3S5 Operati ons M anagement 

BMGT402 Database Systems 

BMGT403 SystemsAnalysisand Design 

BMGT410 Government Accounting 

B M GT411 Ethi cs and Prof essi onal i sm i n A ccounti ng* 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and Estates 

B M GT423 F raud Exarri nati on 

BMGT424 Advanced Accounting 

BMGT428 Special TopicsinAccounting 

BMGT430 Linear Statistica 1 Models in Business 

BMGT434 Introduction to Optimization 

B M GT440 A dvanced F i nanci al M anagement 

BMGT446 International Finance 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Progrems 



Upper Level Economics Requirement 3 

One of the following courses 
ECON305 I ntermedi ate Macroeconorric Theory and Pol icy 
ECON306 I ntermedi ate Microeconorric Theory 
ECON330 Money and Banking 
ECON340 International Economics 

Total C leclrts for Account] ng 27 

and Economics 

* Required for CPA in Maryland 

I n add ti on to the rrBJ or requi rerrents listed above, d ease consult Chapter 6 or www.rhsrrith.urrd.edu for a listing of additional Smith School degree requi remsnts 
that appl y to al I Srri to School maj ors. 

T he basi c educati onal requi rerrents of the M aryl and State B oard of Publ i c A ccountancy to si t for the C PA exarri rati on are a baccal aureate or hi gher degree wi th a 
maj or i n A ccounti ng or wi th a non-accounti ng degree suppl emanted by course work the B oard deterrri nes to be substanti al I y the equi val ent of an A ccounti ng maj or. 
Students pi anni ng to take the C PA exam rati on for certi f i cati on and I i censi ng outsi deM aryl and shod d deterrri ne the educati oral requi rerrents for that state and 
arrange thei r program accordi ngl y. 

SinceJ une30, 199% all applicants who desire to take theCPA examination in Maryland have been required to have completed 150 semester hours of 
college work as well as other specified requirements. 

Aerospace E ng neer i ng (E N AE ) 

A. J ames C lark School of E ngineering 

3181 Glenn L. Matin Hall, 301-405-2376 

www.aero.urrd.edu 

Chair: I . Chopra (Professor & I nterimChair) 

Professors: R. Celi, A. Flatau, W. Foumey.J. Hubbard, S. Lee, J. Leishman, M. Lewis, D. Pines (Dean), N.Wereley 

Associate Professors: D. Akin, J . Baeder, C. Cadou, R. Sanner, B. Shapiro, A. Winkelmann, K. Yu 

Assistant Professors: J . Humbert, D. Paley, R. Sedwick 

Lecturers: B.BarbeeJ. Didion, L. Healy.J. Hrastar, D. Israel, K. LewyJ. Mitchell, E. Morel I i,V. Nagaraj, D. Pal umbo, B. Roberts, N. Roop, D.VanWie 

AffiliateAssociateProfessors: A. Marshall 

Professors Emeriti: J .Anderson, E.Jones 

Visiting Faculty: M. Bcwden(VisitAsstProf), F. Schrritz (Visit Prof), M.Tishchenko (Visit Prof) 

TheMajor 

A erospace engi neeri ng i s concerned wi th the processes, both anal yti cal and creati ve, that are i nvd ved i n the desi gn, manufacture and operati on of aerospace 
vehi cl es wi thi n and beyond pi anetary atmospheres. T hese vehi cl es range from he! i copters and other verti cal takeoff ai rcraft at the I ow-spead end of toe f I i ght 
spectrurn to spacecraft traveling at thousands of rri I es per hour during launch, orbit, transpl anetary flight, or re-entry, at the high-speed end. In between there are 
general avi ati on and commerci al transport ai rcraft f I yi ng at speeds wel I bel cw and cl ose to the speed of sound, and supersoni c transports, f i ghters, and rri ssi I es 
whi ch crui se supersoni cal I y. A I though each speed regi me and each vehi cl e poses i ts sped al prod ems, al I aerospace vehi cl es can be addressed by a common set of 
techni cal sped al ti es or di sci pi i nes. 

Thesubdisciplinesof A erospace Engineering are: aerodynamics, flight dynamics, propulsion, structures, and "design". Aerodynamics addresses the flow of air and 
the associ ated forces, moments, pressures, and temperature changes. F I i ght-dynarri cs addresses the moti on of the vehi cl es i ncl udi ng the traj ectori es, the rotati oral 
dynarri cs, the sensors, and the control I aws requi red for successful accompl i shrrent of the rri ssi ons. Propul si on addresses the engi nes whi ch have been devi sed to 
convert chemical (and occasionally other forms) energy into useful work, to produce the thrust needed to propel aerospace vehicles. Structures addresses material 
properti es, stresses, strai ns, def I ecti on, and vi brati on al ong wi th manuf acturi ng processes as requi red to produce the very I i ght wei ght and rugged el ements needed i n 
aerospace vehicles. A erospace "design" addresses the process of synthesizing vehicles and systems to meet defined rri ssi ons and more general needs. This is a 
process that draws on informati on from the other subdi sci pi i nes while embodying its own uni que el ements. TheAerospace Engineering program is designed to 
provi de a f i rm f oundati on i n the vari ous subdi sci pi i nes. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the fol I owi ng acronym E N A E 

Program Obj actives 

1. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who wi 1 1 be successful i n thei r careers, i ncl udi ng i ndustry, government servi ce, and acaderri a, i n the State of 
Maryland and beyond. 

2. Prepare students to solve relevant problems in a) aerodynamics, b) structures, c) dynarri cs and control s,d) propulsion, ande) systems and design, 
wi th a focus i n ei ther the aeronauti cal or space areas. 

3. E nabl e students to rel ate thei r fundamental physi cs, math and engi neeri ng studi es to the many practi cal aspects of aerospace engi neeri ng research, 
development, and practice. 

4. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who are ad e to i ntegrate thei r knowl edge of engi neeri ng sub-di sci pi i nes to produce useful product desi gns. 

5. Promote i nnovati ve educati oral acti vi ti es to chal I enge students and i mprove the I eami ng expert ence, i ncl udi ng desi gn presentati ons, hands-on 
I aboratory expert ences, novel use of I ntemet i nf ormati on technol ogy, and i ndependent research prqj ects. 

6. Seek conti nual I y to i mprove course off eri ngs and curri cul a, whi I e attracti ng the best students possi bl e and i mprovi ng the rati onal stature of the 
program 

7. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who understand the context i n whi ch thei r prof essi on i s practi ced, and who are abl e to adapt to future 
devel opments i n both technol ogy and the empl oyment market. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

1 . Students will devel op cri ti cal reasoni ng and thi nki ng ski 1 1 s. 

2. Students will develop written and oral communication skills. 

3. Students will devel op sci ence and quanti tati ve reasoni ng ski 1 1 s. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



4. Students will develop information literacy ski I Is. 

5. Students will develop technology fluency. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Aerospace Engi neeri ng Departrrent has a number of faci I iti es to support education and research across a range of special areas. The department has subsonic 
wind tunnels with test sections ranging from a few inches up to 7.75 feet by 11.00 feet as well as a supersonic tunnel with a 6 inch by 6 inch test section. There are a 
number of structural test machines with capabilities up to 220,000 pounds for static loads and 50,000 pounds for dynamic loads. The department also has 
experimental facilities to test helicopter rotors in hover, in forward flight, and in vacuum to i sol ate inertial loads from aerodynamic I cads. There is an anechoic 
chamber for the i nvesti gati on of noi se generated by he! i copters, and an autocl ave and other f aci I i ti es f or manuf acturi ng and i nspecti ng composi te structures. T he 
neutral buoyancy faci lity, which i nvesti gates the assembl y of space structures i n a si mul ated zero gravi ty envi ronment, i s supported by robots and associ ated 
control I ers. T here are al so many computers and workstati ons that provi de I ocal computi ng capabi I i ty and extensi ve network access to campus mai nf rames, 
supercompurj ng centers, and al I the resources of the I ntemet. 

Admission to theMaj or 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other Engineering Departments. For admission information pi ease see A. James CI ark School of Engineering under 
The Col leges and School section of this site. 

Requirements for theMaj or 







Credits 


Crafts 






First 


Second 




Freshman Year 


San 


San 


ENES100 


Introduction to Engineering Design (**canbetaken 
first or second semester) 


3** 




ENAE100 


TheAerospaceEngi neeri ng Profession 


1 




CHEM135 


General Chemistry for Engineers 


3 




MATH140/141Cd cuius 1,11 


4 


4 


PHYS161 


General Physics 1 




3 


ENES102 


Stab cs (**can be taken first or second semester) 




3** 


ENAE202 


A erospace C omputi ng 




3 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 


3 


3 




Total Credits 


14 


16 






Credits 


Crafts 






First 


Second 




Sophomore Year 


San 


San 


ENES220 


M echani cs of M ateri al s 


3 




ENAE283 


1 ntroducti on to A erospace Systems 


3 




MATH 241 


Calculus 1 1 1 


4 




ENAE200 


TheAerospaceEngi neeri ng Profession II 




1 


ENME232or 


Thermodynamics 




3 


ENME320 








MATH 246 


Differential Equations 




3 


MATH 461 


Li near Algebra for Scientists and Engineers or 




3-4 


MATH 240 


1 ntroducti on to Linear Algebra 






PHYS260/261 General Physics II 


4 




PHYS270/271 General Physicslll 




4 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 


3 


3 




Total Credits 


17 


16 






Crafts 


Crafts 






First 


Second 




J unior Year 


San 


San 


ENAE311 


Aerodynamics 1 


3 




ENAE301 


Dynarri cs of A erospace Systems 


3 




ENAE362 


A erospace 1 nstrumentati on and Experi rrentarj on 


3 




ENAE324 


A erospace Structures 




4 


ENAE432 


Control of A erospace Systems 




3 


ENAE380 


F 1 i ght Software Systems 


3 




ENGL393 


Technical Writing 




3 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 
Aeronautical Track 


3 


3 


ENAE414 


Aerodynamics II 




3 



Space System Track 
ENAE404 Space Flight Dynamics 
Total Credits 



Senior Year 

ENAE464 A erospace Engineering Lab 
ENAE423 Vibration & A eroelasti city 





3 


15 


16 


Crafts 


Crafts 


First 


Second 


San 


San 


3 






3 



7. Departments Mejcrs, endProcrcms 



ENAE398* Honors Research Project, or 3 
ENAE 400s* one400 level ENAE course 

ELECTIVE+ Technical Elective; see note below 3 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Aeronautical Track 
ENAE403 Aircraft Flight Dynamics 3 

ENAE455 Aircraft Propulsion & Power 3 

ENAE481 Principles of Aircraft Design 3 

ENAE482 Aeronautical Systems Designs 3 

Space System Track 

ENAE441 Space Navigation & Guidance 3 

E N A E457 Space Propul si on & Power 3 

ENAE483 Principles of Space Systems Design 3 
ENAE484 Space Systems Design 3 

Total Credits 15 15 

* Only one of ENAE 398, 488 or 499 may be used for these dectives. 

+One 300/400 levd course in Engineering, Mathematics, or Physical Sciences that has 
been approved for this purpose by the Undergraduate Program Director. 

MinirrumDecpeeReqiirernentsThefulfillrrentof all Department, School, and University requirements. A mini mum of 124 credits are required for an 
Aerospace Engi neeri ng degree. 

Students must select a track. All courses in either the Aeronautical orAstronautical track must be completed. Students in either track who wish to gain a broader 
educati on across the aeronauti cal or space appl i cati on areas can take courses requi red i n the other track as el ecti ves. 

Academic Benchmarks: Students pursui ng the maj or shoul d revi ew the acaderri c benchmarks establ i shed f or thi s program See www.4vearpl ans urrd.edu . 
Students wi 1 1 be peri odi cal I y revi ewed to i nsure they are meeti ng benchmarks and progressi ng to the degree Students who f al I behi nd program benchmarks are 
subj ect to sped al advi si ng requi rements and other i nterventi ons. 

Aerospace Elective 

T he D epartrrent of f ers a range of el ecti ves. T he f d I owi ng courses have recenti y been off ered as el ecti ves f or the undergraduate degree 

ENAE398H Honors Research 

ENAE415 HelicopterTheory 3 

ENAE416 V i scous F I ow& Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE424 Design & Manufacture of Computer Prototypes 

ENAE425 Mechanicsof Composite Structures 3 

ENAE426 Computer-Aided Structural Analysisand Design 3 

ENAE471 AircraftFlightTesting 3 

E N A E488B I ntro to Computati onal Structural Dynarri cs 3 

ENAE488M High Speed Aerodynamics 3 

ENAE488P Product Design 3 

ENAE488R Hybrid Rocket Design 3 

ENAE488W Design of Remotely Piloted Vehicles 3 

ENAE499 E I ecti ve Research (Repeatable to 6 credits; 3 

Otha- Requi renerrts for theMajcr 

See C hapter 6 f or rri ni mum grade requi rements i n key prerequi si te courses for engi neeri ng students. Students shoul d f ol I ow the sequence of courses as outl i ned i n 
the aerospace engi neeri ng degree requi rements and four-year pi an. 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory. E ach student i s assi gned to a f acul ty member who must be consul ted and whose perm ssi on i s requi red for course regi strati on each semester. 
T he I i st of advi sor assi gnments i s avai I abl e i n the departments mai n off i ce. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students can be empl oyed and perform research i n any of the departments research I abs, centers, or f aci I i ti es. Parti ci pati on i n an on or off campus i nternshi p, 
co-op, or other experi enti al I eami ng opportuni ty i s strongl y encouraged. See the aerospace engi neeri ng undergraduate studi es staff for i nf ormati on on perform ng 
research i n a department lab and contact the Engi neeri ng Co-op and Career Services office for assistance in obtaining off campus positions or experiences. 

Honors Program 

T he A erospace E ngi neeri ng H onors Program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and provi des a ri gorous and comprehensi ve educati on for a career i n techni cal I eadershi p 
and sci enti f i c or engi neeri ng research. H onors course work encompasses the requi red curri cul um f or al I U ni versi ty of M aryl and A erospace E ngi neeri ng students at 
an advanced level. 

At the end of their first academic year, each aerospace student is evaluated and students are invited to join the program based on their University of Maryland 
cumulative grade point average and progress toward their degree in Aerospace Engineering. Honors sections of ENAE 283, ENAE 311, and ENAE 423areoffered 
as part of thisprogram, in addition to an honors research project, ENAE 398H, which culminates in a scholarly paper and presentation at a professional conference. 
Students who compl ete the honors curri cul um graduate wi th A erospace H onors at the ti me of comrrencement. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



The Department is horns to student chapters of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, A rreri can Helicopter Society- International, and the Sigma 
Gamma Tau aerospace engi neeri ng honors soci ety. A erospace E ngi neeri ng students are al so frequent parti ci pants in student activities of the Society for 
Advancement of Material sand Process Engineering. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department offers academic scholarships and recipients are chosen based on merit. All admitted and current students in the department are automatically 
consi dered for these awards. N o separate appl i cati on i s requi red. The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) adrri ni sters al I types of federal , state and i nsti tuti onal 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf ormati on, 
visit: www.financialaid.urrd.edu. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department offers thefollowing awards: AcaderricAchievementAward for thesenior with the highest overall academic average at graduation; R.M. Rivello 
Scholarship Award and the Stephen Guthrie Memorial Award for highest overall academic average through thej uni or year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding 
A chi evement A ward f or schol arshi p and servi ce to the student chapter and the department; A meri can Helicopter Soci ety Outstanding Achievement Award for 
service to the student chapter and the department; Ameri can I nstituteof Aeronautics and Astronautics Outstanding Achievement Award for scholarship and service 
to the student chapter and the department; J ohn A nderson Schol arshi p i n A erospace E ngi neeri ng for the best paper and poster presentati on based on research 
performed at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. 

African American Studies (AASP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 Lefrak Hall, 301-405-1158 

www.bsos.urrd.edu/aasp/ 

Chair: S. Hariey 

Associate Professors: D. Gaskin 

Assistant Professors: M . Chateauvert, G. Dinwiddie, O. J ohnson, S. Madhavan, J . Richardson 

Lecturers: J . England, I . Kargbo, J . Semper 

TheMajcr 

TheAfri can American Studies Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with two highly-regarded options: a Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration with 
emphasison culture and history; or the Public Pdicy Concentration with an errphasison problem-solving, analytical decision- making, and practical applications 
of policy analysis and management ski I Is. In addition, students who elect majors in other departments can earn aCertificate in African American Studies. In 
September 2004, we i introduced a rri nor i n Black Women' s Studies whi ch i s a col I aborati ve program wi th the U ni versi ty's Department of Women's Studies. 

Courses offered in this department may be found under the acronym AASP. 

Program Obj actives 

Thefield of African American Studies has been an explicitiy interdisci pi i nary one from its eariiestformjlationatthetumof the twentieth century by W. E. B. Du 
Bois, Carter G. Woodson, and other scholars. Si nee the 1960s, i t has devel oped as a coherent field of study with well -developed methods, theories, and pedagogy. 
We believethattheAfrican American Studies Department at the University of Maryland, College Park has a distinctive intellectual and programmatic focus that 
continues in this tradition and extends it through situating the study of peoples of African descent at the intersection of cultural and historical studies and the social 
sciences. 

AASD's current program continues the tradition of employing a social scientific approach to thestudy of theAfrican American experiencethat involves a 
concomitant understanding of African Americans' public policy needs. The program reflects the strengths and disciplinary specialties of our own faculty in history, 
political sci ence, publ i c pol i cy, economi cs, communi ty devel opment, and research methodol ogy and anal ysi s. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

A primary goal of the program is to devel op strong critical thinking, research and writing skills, through our curricul urn suchthatAASD majorsleamthe 
i nterdi sci pi i nary methods used i n exarri ni ng the soci o-econorri c, hi stori cal , and pd i ti cal expert ences and contri buti ons of peopl e of Af ri can descent. Students 
shod d acqui re the f d I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Content: ability to identify, describe, and relate central themes, methods, and schd art y devel opment of the field of African A meri can Studies. 

2. Critical Thinking: students devel op a clear understanding of the richness and complexity of the interdisci pi inary schd arship in African American 
Studies. 

3. Students can desi gn and devel op the f oundati ons of thei r own research/thesi s proj ects, sped f i cal I y, a thesi s statement, abstract, and annotated 
bibliography. 

Admission to the Major 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n Af ri can A meri can Stud es must make an advi si ng appoi ntment for an ori entati on to the maj or. Students must corrpl ete an appl i cati on 
and attend a BSOS academic plan workshop. 

Please call theAASD office at 301-405-1158 to make an advi sing appoi ntment. 

Requirements for theMajor 

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course that is to be counted toward completion of degree requirements. All related or supporting courses in 
other departments must be approved by an A A SP f acul ty advi sor. 

Foundation courses required for all majors: Crafts 

AASP100 Introduction to African A meri can Studies 3 

AASP101 PublicPdicyandtheBlackCommunity (ForirerlyAASP300) 3 

AASP200 African Civilization 3 

AASP202 BlackCultureintheUnitedStates 3 

AASP297 Research Methods in African A meri can Studi es (ForrrerlyAASP299R) 3 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 

Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration Requirements 

vyvmti Upper-Division Electives in African American Studies 18 

Seminars 

One from 3-6 

AASP397 SeniorThesis 

AASP386/396 Experiential Learning/ Independent Study Non-Thesis Option 
AASP395 Fundamentals of Quantitative Research 4 

One from 3 

AASP400 Directed Readings in African American Studies 
AASP402 Classic Readings in African American Studies 

Total Credits 86-89 

Public Policy Concentration Requireme n ts 
Analytic Component 

AASP 301 AppliedPolicyAnalysisandtrieBlackConTnunitycForArEr/yA4SP42^; 3 

AASP 303 Computer A ppli cations in African A meri can Studi es (ForrrerlyAASP428P) 3 

Theoretical, Methodological, and Policy Research Issues in African A rreri can 

Studies (ForrrerlyAASP401) 
ECON 200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

Oneadditional analytical ski I Is course outside of AASP, with AASP approval 3 

One from 3 

STAT100 Elementary Statisticsand Probability 
SOCY 201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

Equi val ent Stati sti cs Course (Sophomore Year) 

AASP* Policy Electives in African American Studies* 6 

Final Option 3-6 

One from 
AASP397 SeniorThesis 
AASP386/396 Experiential Learning/ Independent Study Non-Thesis 

Total Credits 90-93 

*Upper-divi9onAASP electivesintiyepollcy area (AASP nurrbers499A-Z) or, with approval, elective coursesoutside of AASP 

Certificate 

T he Certificate i n African American Studies offers undergraduate students an excel I ent opportuni ty to develop a specialization in African A meri can issues while 
pursuing a major in another field. Certificate students I earn about the social, economic, political and cultural history of theAfrican American peoplethrough a 
concentration of courses they plan with theAASD Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy core requirements and 
electives. 

Eami ng a Certificate in African American Studies gi ves students a competiti ve advantage i n thej ob market by adding greater focus to their undergraduate 
experience 

PI ease see catal og secti on on "Certif i cate Programs" for more i nformati on and requi rements for a Certificate in African American Studies 

Advising 

TheAfrican American Studies Department has mandatory advising for all AASD majors. 

Undergraduates in good academic standing may enrol I in theAfrican American Studies Department or obtain more information about avail able options and services 
by contacting the Undergraduate Academic Advisor, African A rr^ri can Studies Department, 2169LefrakHall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, 
301-405-1158. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es maj ors and certi f i cate students are wel come to appl y for undergraduate research assi start i ntemshi ps as part of the AASP386, 
Experiential Learning, course The student must be i n good standi ng and have at I east 56 cumul ated credit hours to apply. 

Additionally, AASP majors with an overall G.PA. of 3.0 or above may enrol I, with department permission, i n the AASP397, Senior Thesis, course working with 
one or rroreCORE AASD faculty members. The student must have successfully completed AASP297, Research Methods in African American Studies. 

F or rrore information and details, pleasecall theAASD Academic Advisor at 301-405-1158. 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

Please seethe i nformati on on AASD I nternship opportunities. 

Internships 

AASP 386 -Experiential Learning in African American Studies was developed to enable majors and certificate students to formally link their academic studies to 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



experi ences as undergraduate teachi ng assi starts and i ntems, and to do so i n a structured I eami ng context. 

T he i ntemshi p requires students to work closely with their site supervisors. Students are required to fulfil I thejob responsi bilities and work the number of hours pa- 
week that is outlined in their I earning proposals. Site supervisors define specific job responsi bilities and assignments, monitor their training, and evaluate their 
perf ormance at the end of the semester by corrpl eti ng an eval uati on f orm and subrri tti ng a I etter of recomrendati on to be included in their portfolios. 

I ntems must parti ci pate i n a weekl y serri nar, and compl ete the assi gned prqj ects ai med at bri ngi ng together acaderri c research, ref I ecti ve work, and prof essi onal 
development. 

Honors Progr am 

Academically talented undergraduates may enrol I in the University Honors Program with a specialization in African American Studies. The Honors Program 
includes seminars and lectures presented by distinguished University of Maryland, College Park, faculty and guests. A reduced rati oof students to faculty ensures 
more i ndivi dual i zed study. 

BA/MPP Program 

Inthisinnovativejointprograrn candi dates earn a bachelor's degree in African A meri can Studies and a master's degree in public policy after approximately five 
years. The BA/M PP is designed to integrate the study of the hi story, culture; and I ifeof African Americans with technical skills, training, and techniques of 
contemporary policy arBlysisTheprogramalsofeaturesasunrrErcorrponentthatincludesalecture series, research opportunities, and special serri nars. 

Students who are i nterested i n the BA/M PP program can contact the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department at 301-405-1158 for appl i cati on detai I s. 

Options for Study with AASP 

F or students who maj or i n other departments, the A f ri can A msri can Studi es P rogram off ers three options for study: 

1. Students may obtai n a certif i cate in African A msri can Studies by corrpl eti ng 21 credit hours of course work. For more information on theAfrican American 
Studies Certificate, see the section on campus-wi deprograms later in this chapter. 

2. Students may designateAfri can American Studies as a double major, corrpl eti ng the major requirements for both AASP and another program 

3. AASP can be a supporting area of student for majors such as Computer Science; Business, or Engineering. 

4. Students may obtai narrinorinBlack Women's Studi es by corrpl eti ng 15 credi t hours of coursework. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

AASD majors have the opportunity of being well prepared for leadership positions in campus organizations. AASD majors have historically held notable positions at 
the University of Maryland in such organizations as the NAACP, Alpha Nu Omega Sorority, Incorporated andThe Black Student Union. 

The Society of African American Studies is the student-run organization associated with and supported by the department. The Society provides community service 
inlocal schools, hosts on-canpus programs and events, and annually has supported a local famlythroughits'Adopt-a-Farrily" program 

The Society sponsors a "Saturday Freedom School" program each year which brings middle school children from a local Prince George's County Public School to 
campus for seven consecuti ve Saturdays The program provi des mentori ng and acaderri c support that seeks to foster the devel opment of posi ti ve B I ack i denti ti es i n 
the student parti ci pants, whi I e strengtheni ng thei r acaderri c performance. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

J ohn B . and I da SI aughter Schol arshi p. 

Awards and Recognition 

Graduating seniors with an overall G.PA. of a3.2 who haveeameda3.5G.P.A.withinthe major are recognized with departmental honors. 
Graduating seniors with an overall G.PA. of a3.5 who haveeameda3.7G.P.A.withinthe major are recognized with departmental high honors. 



African American Studies Certificate 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www.bsos.urrd.edu/aasp/ 

T he Af ri can A meri can Studi es Certi f i cate program off ers the opportuni ty to devel op a sped al i zati on i n Af ri can A meri can studies while pursuing a maj or in another 
field. Certificate students learn about thesocial, economic, political, and cultural history of African American people through a concentration of courses (21 credit 
hours). Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy CORE requirementsandelectives. Undergraduates in good standing may apply for the 
program by contacting the academic advisor of the African American Studi es Department in 2169 LeFrak Hal I. Students pursuing the certificate must meet the 
University's general education (CORE) and departrrent requirements. Also see theAfrican American Studi es department I isti ng on this site. 

Agricultural Science and Technology (AGST) 

Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2102 Plant Sciences Building, 301-405-4355 

www.psla.urrd.edu 

khunt@urrd.edu 

Chair: W. Kenworthy (Professor and Acting Chair) 

Director: D. Glenn (Assoc Prof) 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejors, end Progrems 



TheMajor 

Agricultural Sciences and Technology is a science based curriculum that al lews students to obtain technological skills in a broad area of agricultural studies. 
Agricultural Sciences andTechndogy students are required to take courses in Agricultural Economics, Animal Sciences, Environmental Science and Technology, 
PI ant Sci ence and Pest M anagement. The hi gh number of restri cted and non-restri cted el ecti ves in this curri cul um al I cws students the f I exi bi I i ty to devel op an 
acaderri c program compati bl e wi th thei r personal i nterests. Students maj ori ng i n thi s curri cul um are strongl y advi sed to choose two pri mary areas of 
concentration. For exarrpl e, studentsmay want to devel op expertise in both Animal Scienceand Crop Science. 

In addition to offering this curri cul urn the Department of Plant Sci ence and Landscape Architecture also offers two other undergraduate degrees: the Bachelor of 
Science (B.S.) and the B achel or of Landscape Architecture (B LA). These programs are described elsewhere in thecatalog under "Plant Sciences" and "Landscape 
Architecture." 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronyms: PLSC and LARC. 

Pro-am L ear ni ng Outcomes 

• Students wi 1 1 devel op techni cal and kncwl edge-based ski 1 1 s i n the requi red areas of study. 

• Students wi 1 1 use techni cal and basi c I earned kncwl edge to col I aborate, sd ve prod ems and then arti cul ate concl usi ons. 

• Students shal I devel op effect] ve communi cati on ski 1 1 s and demonstrate the abi I i ty to present i dees wi th cl ari ty to an appropri ate audi ence. 

• Studentswill connectand build relationships with external groups in the appropri ate fields of study. 

Requi rements for theMajor 







Credits 


ANSC101 


Principles of Animal Science 


3 


ANSC 


ANSC** 


3 


ANSC220 


Livestock M anagement 


3 


ANSC340 


Health Management of Animal Populations, OR 


3-4 


PLSC420 


Pri nci pi es of PI ant Pathol ogy 




AREC250 


Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 


3 


AREC 


AREC** 


3 


BSCI105 


Pri nci pies of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II, OR 




PLSC 201 


PI ant Structure and F uncti on 


4 


BSCI 


BSCI**I nsect Pest Type Course 


3 


CHEM104 


Fundamental s of Organi c and B i ocherri stry 


4 


CHEM131/132 


General Chemistry 1 and Lab 


4 


ENST200 


Fundamental s of Sd 1 Sci ence 


4 


ENST 


ENST** 


3 


MATH 113 


MATH113orhigher 


3 


PLSC389 


Intemship 


3 


PLSC398 


Seminar 


1 


PLSC101 


1 ntroductory Crop Science 


4 


PLSC453 


Weed Science 


3 


PLSC 


PLSC** 


3 




PLSC, ANSC, or LARC** 


3 




Accounting, Education, Computer, or Policy 


3 


CORE 


CORE and General Agricultural Program Requi rements 


99 100 


ELECT 


Electi ves 


20-21 



**Students may select any courses) having required hours in the area indicated. 

Advising 

The Department has mandatory faculty advising for each of its major and minor programs. Students are requi red to meet with their faculty advisor at I east twice a 
year. See the Director, Dr. D.S. Glenn (301-405-1331), or the Program Management Special i st i n Undergraduate Studies in 2102 PI ant Sciences Bui I ding 
(301-405-4355) for additional information. 

Internships 

I ntemshi ps wi th sci enti sts are avai I ad e at nearby federal and state agenci es. N umarous i ntemshi ps al so exi st and can be readi I y arranged for students i nterested i n 
pri vate sector errpl oymant. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

T he department sponsors student teams that participate in regional and national contests. These teams prepare in the foil owing areas: turf, weeds and crops, and 
I andscape contract] ng. 

AGST majors are encouraged tojdn the Agricultural Science Club. This club is open to all UMCP students who have an interest in agriculture and related areas. 
TheAG Science Club is affiliated with the national student organization of the Agronomy, Crop Scienceand Soil Sci ence Society of America. The function of the 
club is to bring together students of like interests to participate in College, academic and social activities. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 



Several schdarshipsandawardsareavailabletoPLSC students. ContacttheAssociateDean'sofficeat 301-405- 2078 for additional information. The Department 
al so mai ntai ns a I i sti ng of schol arshi ps. Contact K athy H unt i n 2102 PI ant Sci ences, 301-405-4355. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, parti cipates in the awarding of schd arshi ps to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.urrd.edu. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Ag-iaJtural and ResouroeEoonomJcs(AREC) 

Collegeof AgricuKureand Natural Resources 

2200 Syrrons H al 1 , 301-405-1291 

www.arec.urrd.edu 

bburdi ck@arec.urrd. edu 

Chair: L. Olson 

Professors: R.Chambers, B.Gardner, D. Hueth, R.Just, E. Lichtenberg, R. Lopez, K. McConnell.W. Musser, M. Nerlove 

Associate Professors: A. Alberini, J . Hanson, J . Horowitz, H. Leathers, H. Leathers, D. Lipton, L. Lynch, D. Parker 

A ssistant Prof essors: B. Kirwan, A. Lange, K. Leonard, C. McAusi and 

Instructors: D.Johnson (Farm Management Specialist) 

Affiliate Professors: M. Cropper 

Adjunct Professors: J . Chavas, J .Quiggin, J . List 

Adjunct Associate Professors: K. McNew 

Professors Emeriti: F. Bender, N. Bockstael, E. Brcwn.J . Cain.J . Curtis, P. Foster, I. HardieJ . Moore, G. Stevens, I. Strand, D.Tuthill 

TheMajcr 

Agricultural and Resource Economics majors complete a set of prerequisite courses, a core of classes offered by the Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Department, and one or more f i el ds compri sed of sel ected courses from outsi de the department. The core i ncl udes courses i n economi c reasoni ng, agri busi ness 
management, environmental and resource policy, agricultural policy, economic development, and analytical methods. The program permits students flexibility in 
choosi ng f i el ds to f i t thei r career i nterests. M aj ors must compl ete one and are strongl y encouraged to compl ete two f i el ds. The curri cul um bal ances breadth and 
depth, and I ets students devel op acaderri c ski 1 1 s i n two or more areas. The program provi des a good foundati on for careers i n economi cs, resource or envi ronmental 
policy, agribusiness, and international agriculture. Students are also able to mi nor in Agri cultural and Resource Economics. 

Denize Majors 

T he department features a doubl e maj or wi th Spani sh for students i nterested i n careers i n mul ti nati onal agri busi ness f i rms or i nternati onal agenci es. 1 1 features a 
double major with Government and Politics for students interested in law school. Both can be completed within 120 credits. Other double maj ors are possible in 
consul tati on wi th an advi sor. 

Requirements for theMajor 

Crafts 

Prerequisite Courses 

ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON201 Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

ECON306 I ntermedi ate Microeconorric Theory 3 

ECON321 Economic Statistics, OR 3 

B M GT 230B usi ness Stati sti cs 
MATH220 Elementary Calculus I, OR 3 

MATH140 Calculus I 

STAT100 Elementary Stati sties and Probability, OR 3 

MATH111 Introduction to Probability 

Major Core Courses 

Seven of these courses rrust be successfully corrpletBd. 

AREC404 Applied Price Analysis 3 

AREC405 Economics of Production 3 

AREC425 Economics of the Food Sector 3 

AREC427 Economcsof Commodity Marketing Systems 3 

AREC433 Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 3 

AREC445 Agricultural Development in theThird World 3 

AREC453 Economcsof Natural Resource Use 3 

AREC455 Economcsof Land Use 3 

AREC484 Introduction to Econometrics in Agri culture 3 

AREC305 Farm Management 3 

AREC382 Computer-BasedAnalysisinAgricultural and Resource 3 

Economics 
AREC400s ar| y other 3 credit 400 level AREC course may be substituted with 

permission of advisor 

Fields 

All maj ors must compl ete one of the f ol I owi ng f i el ds. Two are strongl y 
encouraged. 

Business Management 

BMGT220 Principlesof Accounting I 3 

BMGT221 Principlesof Accounting II 3 

BMGT340 BusinessFinance 3 

BMGT350 Marketing Principles 3 

BMGT364 Management and Organization 3 

BMGT380 BusinessLawl 3 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Other 300 level BMGT courses may be substituted, with 
RMrTVT ^ permission of advisor. (TheAREC ckparbvait cannot aUthorizs 
: ^ studaTtstatakeBMGTcoursesthatamrestridEdtabusiness 



majors.) 



Total Credits 



18 



Agricultural Science 

Six(orrrvre) courses in agricultural science, including: 

ENBE110 Introduction to Biological Resources Engineering 1 

ENBE200 Fundamentals of Agricultural Mechanics 3 

PLSC100 Introduction to Horticulture, OR 4 

PL SC 101 I ntroducti on to C rap Sci ence 

ENST105 Soil and Environmental Quality 3 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Science 3 

Other courses in agricultural science, chosen in consultation 
AGRI SCI with an advisor. Substitutions to the above listed courses rray 4 

be made with the permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 18 



Food Production 

Six courses from the following list 
PHYS117 I ntroducti on to Physics, OR 

PHY S121F undarental s of Physi cs 
BSCI105 Principlesof Biology 
BSCI223 I ntroducti on to Microbiology 
NFSC100 Elements of Nutrition 
NFSC112 FoodScienceandTechndogy 
NFSC430 Food Microbiology 
N FSC431 Food Qual ity Control 

Other courses related to food science can be substituted 

with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



Environmsrdal and Resource Policy 

Six courses from the following list 

ECON481 Environmental Econorrics 

ANTH450 Theory and Practiceof Environmental Anthropology 

H I ST405 E nvi ranmental H i story 

G E OG 372 Remote Sensi ng 

GEOG373 Geographic Information Systems 

GVPT273 Introduction to Environmental Politics 

GVPT306 Global Ecopditics 

Other courses related to environmental policies or sciences 
can be substituted with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



International Agriculture 

Six courses from the following list 
ECON305 Intermediate Macroeconomics 
ECON315 Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 
ECON340 International Economics 
GEOG422 Population Geography 
GVPT200 International Politick Relations 
GV PT350 I ntemati oral Re! ati ore i n theThi rd Wori d 
ENST440 Crops, Soil sand Civil izati on 
PLSC303 International Crop Production 

Other courses related to international economics, business, 

politics, or agriculture can be substituted with permission of 

advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



GVPT 



Political Process 

Any six courses in government and politics, chosen with 
perrri ssi on of the advi sor. 



18 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Total Credits 



18 



Advanced Degree Preparation 

Six (or rrvre) courses from the following list 

ECON407 Advanced Macroeconomics 

ECON414 GamsTheory 

ECON415 Strategic Behavior and Incentives 

ECON422 QuartitativeMethodsinEconorricsl 

ECON423 QuartitativeMethodsinEconorricsll 

ECON425 Mathematical Economics 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 

MATH240 Introduction to Li near Algebra 

MATH 241 Calculuslll 

Other courses in mathematics, statistics, or econometrics 
may be substituted with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



Student Designed Field 

This field requires a written proposal listing at I east six 
courses totaling atleast 18 creditsThe proposal must be 
subrri tted to the U ndergraduate C omrri ttee of the A REC 
department. Comrri ttee approval must be obtai ned 30 or 18 

more credi t hours before graduati on. A student desi gned f i el d 
may be used to study a f orei gn I anguage as part of the 
AREC curriculum 

Total Credits 18 



Other Requirements for theMajor 

All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better to count towards prerequisite courses, major core courses, or field requirements. "C or better" means any 
grade for which the University awards 2 or more quality points in calculating GPA. 

Requirements for the Mi nor 

Three minors exist in AREC, Agribusiness Economics, Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development, and Environmental Economics and Policy. 
Requi rerrents are I i sted bel ow: 



Crafts 



Agribusiness Economics 

AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
AREC404 Applied PriceAnalysis 
AREC405 Economics of Production 
AREC425 Econorricsof Food Sector 
AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 

Another AREC course can be substituted for ore of the courses 
listed with permission of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Total Credits 



15 



AREC250 
AREC365 
AREC433 

AREC445 

AREC453 



Resourceand Agricultural Policy in Economic Development 

E I ements of A gri cul rural and Resource E conorri cs 

World Hunger, Population and Food Supplies 

Food and A gri cul rural Policy 

Agricultural Development, Population Growth, and the 

Environment 

Natural Resources and Public Policy 

Another AREC course can be substituted for ore of the course 
listed with permission of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Total Credits 



15 



AREC240 
AREC332 
AREC382 

AREC445 

AREC455 



Environmental Econorricsand Policy 

I nrjoducrj on to E conorri cs and the E nvi ronment 

Introduction to Natural Resource Pol icy 

Computer-based Analysis in Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Development, Population Growth, and the 

Environment 

Econorricsof Land Use 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the course 
listed with perrrission of Undergraduate Advisor. 

Total Credits 15 

Advising 

Because the program is flexible, advising is mandatory. Appointments may rje made i n Room 2200 Symons Hal I, 301-405-1291. 

Awards and Recognition 

Schol arshi ps honori ng A rthur and Paul i ne Sei denspi nner and Ray M urray are avai I abl e. Contact a faculty advi sor for rrore i nformati on, 301-405-1291. 

American Studies (AM ST) 

Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

1102 Holzapfel Hall, 301-405-1354 

www.amst.umd.edu 

Chair: N. Struna 

Professors: J . Caughey, R. Kelly 

Associate Professors: M. LounsburyJ . Padetti, S. Parks, L. Shinagawa, M. Sies 

Assistant Professors: C. HanhardtJ . McCune, P. Williams-Forson 

Lecturers: M . Brady, C. LaRoche, J . McCants, G. Metcalf 

Affi I iate Professors: J . Auerbach, M. Beasley, I. Berlin (DistUniv Prof), A. Bolles, S. Brower, C. Caramello, E. Chambers, J . Chernela, W. Cohen, B. Dill, J . 

Donawerth, W. Falk, B. Finkelstein, G. Gerstie, J . Gilbert (DistUniv Prof), R. Harrison, M. Howland, L. Kauffman, F.Kelly.J. K I urrpp, L. Landry, M. Leone, R. 

La/ine, S. Logan, S. Michel, C. Moses, B. Pearson, C. Peterson, G. Ritzer (DistUniv Prof), D. Rosenfelt, P. Shacke!, B. Shneiderman, M. Smith, R. Walters, O. 

Wang (Assoc Prof), M . Washington, D. Wyatt, R. Zambrana 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Barkin, R. Bauer, M. Bell, E. Barkley Brown, K. Chuh, C. EadesJ . Freidenberg, D. Freund, M. Geores, S. Giovacchini, I. 

Goumay, M . Graber, D. Grimsted, S. Hariey, S. Kim K. King, M. Kirschenbaum M. Lindemann, D. Linebaugh, L. Marro, K. McAdams, A. Moss, R. Muncy, H. 

Nathans, Z. Nunes, S. Parry-Giles,T. Pa-ry-Giles, S. Ray, L. Rowland, D. Sicilia, S. Simpson, J . Sullivan, R. Walters (Prof), O. Wang, M.Zilfi 

AffiliateAssistant Professors R. Ater, V. MacDonald, L. Marro, L. Mar, J. Richardson, M. Rowley 

Adjunct Professors: B. Finn 

Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Hughes 

Professors Emeriti: L. Mintz 

TheMajcr 

A men can Studi es pravi des students wi th a f I exi bl e and coherent program of study that focuses on the cul tures of everyday I i f e and construed ons of i denti ty and 
di ff erence i n A men cans' I i ves, past and present. T he B . A . degree prepares students for graduate work and careers i n f i el ds such as I aw, government and soci al 
policy, media, non-profitand social justice organizations, cultural institutions, education, and business. There are opportunities for internships, research, and 
departmental honors. Facul ty advi sors assi st each student to pi an a curri cul um tai I ored to hi s/her i nterests and goal s. Courses offered by the Department of 
A men can Studi es may be found under the acronym A M ST . 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

Students are expected to engage ful I y wi th the curri cul urn facul ty, and other students. U pon corrpl eti on of the degree programs, students will have derrDnstrated an 
understand ng of mul ti pi e di mensi ons of di versi ty and the abi I i ty to answer research questi ons by usi ng appropri ate A men can Studi es methodd ogi es. Students who 
complete an extracurricular, semester-long experience (eg., internship, service I earning, study abroad, independent study) will have demonstrated the ability to 
analyze culture, cultural processes, and cultural differences. For a compl ete I i sting of program outcomes, contact the department. 

Requirements for theMajor 

TheAmerican Studies major requires a mini mum of 42 credits, including 24 in American Studies, 6 credits of lower level Americanist courses taken outside the 
department, and 12-24 credi ts i n a focus area or rri nor taken outsi de the A meri can Studi es department. At I east 27 of the credi ts for the maj or must be i n 300 or 400 
level courses, with at I east twelve of these credits at the 400 level. A gradeof C or better is required in each of the courses making up the maj or (includes those 
taken outsi de the department, such as the A meri cani st courses and those taken for the rri nor or focus area) . 

Foundation Courses (15 credits) 

Course requi rements i n thi s area are i ntended to provi de a foundati on i n A meri can Studi es and the study of A meri can culture and society in other disciplines. 
Courses taken for CORE may be doubl e-counted towards the maj or. 

Crafts 

AMST201 Introduction of A meri can Studies 3 

AMST340 I ntroduction to History, Theories and Methods in American Studies 3 
One3<redtcoutsBfrom 3 

AMST203 PopularCultureinArrerica 
AMST204 Film and American Culture Studies 
AMST205 Material Aspectsof American Life 
AMST207 Contemporary American Cultures 
AMST212 Diversity in American Culture 
AMST260 A meri can Culture in the I nformati on Age 

FOUNDATION Foundation courses outside the AM ST department 6 

Any two lower-level courses selected froman approved list List is 
available through the departrrent 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Advanced Requirements (15 credits) 

Course requi rerrents in this area are i ntended to offer students the opportuni ty to expl ore sel ected topi cs i n A mari can Studi es i n greater depth and to appl y what they 
have I earned in their foundation courses. All of these courses must be at the 300 or 400 level. A mari can Studies advanced requi rerrents may be satisfied in one of 
two ways: 

Option A: 

. Four400-leve! AMST courses, not including AM ST 450 (12 credits) 

• AMST 450 Seminar in AM ST orAMST 388 HonorThesis (3 credits) 

Option B: 

. Three 400-leve! AMST courses not including AMST 450 (9 credits) 

• AMST 386-1 ntemship, 398-1 ndependent Study or 388-Honors Thesis Research (3 credits) 

• AMST 450 Seminar in AMST or AMST 388 HonorsThesis Research (3 credits) 

Focus Area Requirements (12-24 Credits) 

T he focus area requi rerrents rei nf orce the essenti al i nterdi scipli nary nature of our f i el d, off eri ng students a range of opti ons to connect thei r A mari can Studi es 
coursework with a related discipline or field. All focus area courses must betaken outside the A mari can Studies Departrrent. 

Minor or Certificateoption ( 15- 24ci edits, at least 9atthe300or 400 level) 

Successful completion of a minor or certificate from an approved list (avail able through the departrrent). University approved minors rangefrom 15 to 24 credits; 
certificate programs requi re 21-24 credits. Thedeparbrentorprogramadrrinisteringtiierrinordetermriesspecificrequirernants, and in soma cases, student 
eligibility. 

Focus Area Option (12 credits, all at the 300 or 400 level) 

Successful compl eti on (C or better) of four upper I eve! courses outsi de the departrrent that enabl e the student to construct a coherent focus area compl emantary to 
A mari can Studi es. A focus area may be i n a si ngl e departrrent or sel ected from two or more departments (exampl es avai I abl e through the departrrent) . Students 
shod d not pursue a focus i n a department or program that offers a sui tabl e mi nor or certi f i cate. A n A mari can Studi es advi sor must approve course sel ecti on wi thi n 
the focus area i n advance, as part of mandatory advi si ng each semester. 



Advising 

Departmantal faculty advi sing is mandatory for all majors. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students will compl ete a research prqj ect for the seni or semi nar, A M ST 450, and they are encouraged to gai n add ti onal research expert ence wi th i ndi vi dual f acul ty 
members and advanced graduate students and i n one of the Departments Worki ng Groups. Sea the Departrrent webpage for more i nformati on about research: 
www.amst.umd.edu. 

Internships 

J uni ors and seni ors may take up to 6 hours i n i ntemshi ps that extend an i ndi vi dual 's curri cul ar program Students must consul t wi th a f acul ty advi sor about a 
prospective internship and compl ete and sign an internship contract. All internships will have academic components. 

Honors Program 

T he A mari can Studi es H onors Program offers outstandi ng students an opportuni ty to add di sti ncti on to thei r acaderri c records by undertaki ng an i ndependent 
research prqj ect i n an area of parti cul ar i nterestThe program i s i ntended to al I ow students prepari ng for graduate study or a professi onal career to appl y and further 
develop their research, analytic, and writing ski I Is in an independent project of their own design, inconsultationwithafaculty mentor. Students are encouraged to 
make use of the rich resources of the Washington-Baltimore area, including major research institutions such as the Smithsonian Institutions, the Library of 
Congress, and the National Archives 

Students fulfil I the honors program requi rerrents through a combination of honors-designated coursework (6 credit hours) and an honors thesis (6 credit hours). These* 
These courses and credits fallw'Wn both the American Studies major requirements and the University s 120-credit undergraduate electee requirement 
Students who undertake American Studies Honors are excused fromthe senior seminar, AMST 450. 

Eligibility: Students must haveat least a 3.0 GPA atthetimaof entry into the program, and must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. To graduate with 
Honors in American Studies, students must havea 3.0 cumulative GPA and at I east a 3. 2 GPA in their major coursework. 

Application: Students who wish to pursue Honors work should submit a letter of intent to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The letter should identify the core 
f acul ty member who has agreed to approve course work and supervi se the research and wri ti ng of the honors thesi s. 

Require m e n ts The Honors Program gives students a substantial amount of flexibility in fulfill ingthetwo basic requirements: 6 credit hours of honors-designated 
coursework; and 6 credit hours of AMST 388, HonorsThesis and Research. 

To fulfill the coursework requi rerrents (6 credit hours), students may: 

• Take an upper I eve! H onors secti on course i n a departrrent or departments consonant wi th the student's maj or focus areas. 

• Take an upper I eve! U ni versity H onors course. 

• Negotiate an Honors Option Contract with the instructor of an upper division course in American Studies or in a ctepartrrent or departrrents consonant with 
the students maj or focus areas. 

• Take a graduate course i n a departrrent or departments consonant wi th the student's maj or focus areas. 

All coursework not taken in an Honors secti on, in a university Honors course, or in a graduate course should have an Honors Opti on Contract completed, inorderto 
ensure that the students transcri pt ref I ects that the work cam es H onors credi t. 

To f ul f i 1 1 the thesi s requi rerrents, students wi 1 1 : 

• Register for 6 credit hours of AMST 388, Honors Thesi sand Research. Customarily this is spread across the students senior year, with 3 credit hours taken 
each term 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



• Present the thesis to a committee composed of the faculty mentor and another department faculty member. At the satisfactory conclusion of the thesis 
presentation, the committee will notify the Director of Undergraduate Studies that the thesis has been read, evaluated and approved. The Director of 
Undergraduate Studies will then notify theUniversity Honors Program Director of thesuccessful completion of the individual Honors degree program 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department awards the David Ellis Scholarship annually. For informati on and requirements contact the Department office. 

Awards and Recognition 

T he Department recogni zes outstandi ng schd ari y accompl i shments by undergraduates at graduati on. M onetary pri zes are awarded for both the hi ghest 
undergraduate G PA and the best H onors thesi s. 

ANIMAL SCIENCES (ANSC) 

Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373 

www.ansc.urrd.edu 

ansc@urrd.edu 

Chair: T. Porter 

Professors: R. Erdrran, R. Kohn, I. Mather, M. Ottinger, R. Peters, T. Porter, M. Vamer, I. Vijay 

Associate Professors: C. Angel, J . Doerr, I. Estevez.T. Hartsock, C. Keefer, W. Stricklin, L. Woods, N.Zimmermann 

Assistant Professors: B. Bequette, A. Burk, I. Hamza, F. SiewerdtJ . Song, L.Taneyhill, M. Updike 

Lecturers: C. Hakenkamp 

Affiliate Professors: S. Schoenian 

Professors Emeriti: L. Douglass (Prof Emeritus), J . Heath, J . Majeskie, J . Scares, J .Vandersa 1 !, D.Westhoff, W. Williams 

TheMajcr 

The Departrrent of Animal andAvi an Sciences provides a challenging program for academically talented students interested in the application of biology and 
technol ogy to the care, management and study of dorresti c and aquati c ani mal s. I n addi ti on to emphasi zi ng the tradi ti onal farm sped es of dai ry and beef catti e, 
sheep, swi ne and poul try, our program i ncl udes opti ons i n equi ne studi es, I aboratory ani mal management, and sci ences whi ch prepare students for veteri nary or 
graduate school. Animal sci ences majors explore a wide range of subjects -from fundamental bid ogy to ani mal nutrition, physiology and genetics -while 
i ntegrati ng sci ence and economi cs i nto ani mal management. 

Our departrrent offers B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. One-third of our animal sci ences seniors enter veteri nary schod, whi I e others go on to graduate schod. Our 
graduates al so pursue a vari ety of careers such as research techni ci ans, sal es or marked ng representati ves, or ani mal producers. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Fadlities 

Our up-to-date facilities intheAni mal Sciences Center, which opened in 1991, include new classrooms, an inviting lecture hall and a large social area for students. 
T he newl y constructed teachi ng I abs, ani mal rooms and a surgery sui te are I ocated adj acent to the teachi ng farm where horses, sheep, beef and dai ry cattl e are 
maintained. 

Requirements for theMajor 

A ni mal Sci ences prepares students for veteri nary school , graduate school and careers i n research, sal es and marked ng, bi otechnd ogy, aquacul ture, and ani mal 
production. The curricula apply the principles of biology and technd ogy to the care, management, and study of dairy and beef cattie, horses, fish, sheep, swine, and 
poultry. Students complete the Ani mal Sci ences core courses and choose a specialization area: Animal Biotechnology, Animal Care and Management, Equine 
Studies, Laboratory Ani mal Management, and Sciences/Professional Opti on to prepare for admission to graduate, veterinary, pharmacy, nursing or medical schooPleas 
Please notttiere i s a $50 per course fee for A ni mal Sci ence L aboratory courses. 

ANIMAL SCI ENCES CORE 

All undergraduates majoring in Animal Sciences must r _^ 

corrpletethetbHowing course requirements: CreMS 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC103 Principlesof Animal Sciences Laboratory 1 

ANSC211 Animal Anatomy 3 

ANSC212 Animal Physiology 3 

ANSC214 Animal Physiology Laboratory 1 

ANSC314 ComparativeAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC327 MdecularandQuantitativeAnimal Genetics 3 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biol ogy I 4 

BSCI223 General Microbiology 4 

CHEM131/132 General Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

One from 
MATH220 ElerrentaryCalculusI 3 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

One from 
AREC250 Elementsof Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 4 

ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK 

All students mustcomplete 30-40 credits in one of the 
following six options. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



1. ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT (0104A) 
Required Courses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Fam Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the following courses 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health Managementof Animal Populations 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 

ANSC232 Horse Management 

ANSC240 Dairy Cattle Management 

A N SC 255 I ntroducrj on to A quacul ture 

ANSC262 Comrra-ci a 1 Poultry Management 

ANSC305 Companion Animal Care 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 



2. EQUINE STUDIES (COOK) Required Courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC330 EquineScience 3 

ANSC315 Applied Animal Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Fam Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus fake 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health Managementof Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



3. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (CMMD) 
Required Courses 

ANSC340 Health Managementof Animal Populations 3 

ANSC413 LabAnimal Management 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction Laboratory 1 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 



7. Depatmerts M^o^ srdPvogrstrs 



Plus take 6 credits from the following courses 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



Plus take 3 credits from the following courses: 
ANSC220 Livestock Management 

A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 

ANSC262 Conrra-cid Poultry Management 



4. & 5, SCIENCES & COMBINED AG AND VET SCI 
(C0O4E andl299D) Required Courses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnima 1 Nutrition 3 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology 1 1 4 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology or 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry I I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 General Chemistry and Energetics 2 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 4 

Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health M anagement of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction Laboratory 1 
A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnima 1 Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

Plus talis 3 credits from the following courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC240 Dairy Cattle Management 2 

A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 3 

ANSC262 Comrrerci a 1 Poultry Management 3 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 3 

For additional information concerning veterinary school 
applications please contact the K. Feldrran, VMRCVM, 8705 
Oreenrread Dr., University of Maryland, CollegePark, MD 
20742-3711, 301-3146820, kfeldrrBn@urrd.edu. 

6. ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (01CMF) Required 
Courses 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry I I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 General Chemistry and Energetics 2 



Plus take 3 credits from the following courses 
ANSC220 Livestock Management 

A N SC 255 I ntroducti on to A quacul ture 

ANSC262 Comrrerci a 1 Poultry Management 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 



7. Depatmerts M^o^ srdPvogrstrs 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health M anagerrent of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC446 Physiologyof Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiologyof Mammali an Reproduction Laboratory 1 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Anima 1 Behavior 3 

Plus take 3 credits from the following courses 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

BSCI380 Comparative Bioinformatics 4 

BSCI413 Recombinant DNA 3 

Other Requirements far theMajar 

Animal sciences majors select one of six options as an area of specialization: 

Sdence/Profesaonal - Prepares students for admission to veterinary or medical school sand/or graduate school. Graduate school study can open the door to an 
exciting research career in specialty areas of animal or biological sciences such as genetics, nutrition, physiology or eel I biology. Thecurriculumemphasizes 
advanced courses i n the bi d ogi cal and physi cal sci ences and i ncl udes al I the pre-veteri nary and pre-rredi ci ne requi remsnts. 

Combined Ag & Vet Soi - A combi ned degree program i s avai I abl e to students who gai n adrri ssi on to veteri nary school pri or to compl eti ng thei r bachel or's degree. 
Collegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources students who have completed at I east ninety hours, including all cdlegeand university requirements, areawardeda 
bachel or of science degree upon successful completion of at I east thirty semester hours in an accredited col lege of veteri nary medicine. Early planning with your 
advi sor i s encouraged i f you choose thi s opti on. 

Equine Studies- Offers hands-on learning opportunities in thearea of equine sci erce and management. The Department of Animal and Avian Sciences at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers undergraduate students the opportuni ty to emphasi ze on horses whi I e pursui ng a B achel or of Sci ence degree i n A ni mal Sci ence. 
Students may take equi ne courses that expl ore a wi de range of topi cs i ncl udi ng anatomy and physi d ogy, nutri ti on, reproducti on, exerci se, I aw, i nsurance, facilities, 
heal th and di sease, pasture management, and more. Our courses are desi gned to provi de val uabl e hands-on I eami ng experi ences to better prepare students to be future 
leaders in the horse industry as well as other industries. In addition, A NSC students may take one or more equine courses within the Institute of Applied Agriculture. 

Animal Biotechnology -TheAni mal Biotechnology option is a relatively new addition to our program It combines the basic requi red animal sci ence courses with a 
focus on bi ol ogy and technol ogy. This opti on has a heavy emphasi s on sci ence courses, to prepare students for a prof essi onal career. Some of the career opti ons wi th 
thi s track i ncl ude an i ndustry career i n ani mal bi otechnd ogy; a graduate degree i n bi otechnol ogy ( ei ther M S and/or PH D ) ; or a prof essi onal degree and career 
(V eteri nary or H uman M edi ci ne, N ursi ng, Pharmacy. ) 

Animal Care & Management - 1 s desi gned for students whose career pi ans i ncl ude ani mal management, product] on and the marketi ng of ani mal products. The 
curri cul um provi des basi c courses i n geneti cs, nutri ti on, physi ol ogy and reproducti on whi I e al I owi ng students to focus on the management of one parti cul ar 
livestock species. You will be encouraged to supplement academic work with practical experi ence by completing an internship. Dairy sci ence students, for example, 
intern at local farms where they participate in decisions about breeding, feeding, health practices, milk production and other aspects of herd management. This 
option will prepare you for ownership or management positions with dairy, livestock or poultry product] on enterprises; positions with marketing and processing 
organi zati ons; breed associ ati ons; and posi ti ons i n agri busi ness f i el ds such as sal es of feed, pharmaceuti cal products and agri cul tural equi prrent. G raduates al so 
work wi th state and federal agenci es. 

Laboratory Animal Management - Prepares students for careers in the operation and management of laboratory ani mal facilities connected with the biotechnology 
industry. Coursework in nutrition, reproduction and environmental management is combined with practical I earning to provide future managers with tools they will 
need. Asagraduate, you may pursuecareers with state or federal agencies; wi th pri vateindustry in the management and operation of laboratory ani mal production; 
and wi th i nstructi onal or i nvesti gati onal f aci I i ti es. 

Advising 

A ni mal sci ences maj ors are assi gned a f acul ty advi sor to assi st wi th program and course sel ecti on, as wel I as to hel p students take advantage of the many 
non-classroom opportuni tiesinthe Washington, D.C. area. Faculty rrerrbers have special ties in all areas of animal sciences, as well as veteri nary medicine, and 
bring practical appl i cations to the cl assroom, creating a rich I earning experi ence for students. 

Face to face advi sing is mandatory. Each student will be assi gned to a faculty advi sor to assist in planning hi sor her academic program For information or 
appointment: 1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Because it is part of a land grant university, the Department of Animal and Avian Sciences also has responsibility for research and technology transfer to theani mal 
i ndustry throughout M aryl and. D uri ng undergraduate study, students are encouraged to conduct i ndependent research i n facul ty I aboratori es on campus or at the 
nearby U. S. Department of Agriculture Bel tsvi lie Agricultural Research Center. 

Internships 

Students are encouraged to gai n practi cal ani mal management experi ence by pursui ng i ntemshi ps. Students have compl eted i ntemshi ps in I ocati ons rangi ng from the 
area around the University, to cattie farms in the Midwest, agri busi ness firms in California, and a zoo in Frankfurt, Germany. Many animal sci ences students use the 
summer to gai n addi ti onal appl i ed experi ence i n ani mal sci ences, veteri nary rredi ci ne or agri busi ness. 

Honors Program 

Students admitted to the AGNR Honors Program areeligibletotake3-6credits of HonorsThesis Research within theANSC Department (ANSC388). Undergraduate 
U ndergraduate honors thesis research is conducted under the direction of an AGNR facul ty member in partial fulfill ment of the requirements of theCollegeof 
A G N R H onors P rogram T he thesi s wi 1 1 be def ended bef ore a f acul ty corrrri ttee. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

T he cl ubs and organi zati ons affi I i ated wi th the A ni mal Sci ence department al I ow ampl e opportuni ti es f or I eadershi p, devel oprrent, hands-on ani mal experi ence, and 

fun! 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Gamma Rho is a social/professional fratemi ty that has been a training ground for I eadersinthe agri cul tureand life sci ences community si nee it was 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Progrems 



established atCd lege Park in 1928. AGR has a rich tradition of alumni contacts with over 50,000 brothers nationwide, including over 700 brothers in the 
Washington area alone. AGR man are I eaders i n vari ous clubs within the col lege and the fraternity is an active rrember of both the Inter-fraternity Council (IFC) 
and theAgStudent Council. Alpha Gamma Rho stresses scholarship, leadership and f el I cwship, anditiswell respected among Greek organizations because of their 
no pi edgi ng, substance free, schd ars envi ronment. I n addi ti on, the chapter house onPri nceton Avenue offers the opportuni ty to I i ve wi th brothers who are taki ng the 
same cl asses and share many of the same i nterests which makes i t much easi er to f i nd a ni che on such a I arge campus. 

Alpha Zeta 

A I pha Zeta i s an agri cul tural prof essi onal honor sod ety whose mambershi p i s sel ected from undergraduate and graduate students excel I i ng i n schd arshi p, 
leadership, character, and service. Organizational events include coordinating the Partners in Education program with the USDA Agriculture Research Service, 
B el tsvi 1 1 e A rea, f und rai si ng acti vi ti es, communi ty servi ce proj ects, awards and recogni ti on programs, and an annual student/f acul ty/al urmi banquet. A popul ar 
annual event is coordinating a Field Day for young children at the nearbyNational Agricultural Research Visitor Center at Bel tsvi lie. 

Animal Husbandry Club 

TheAnimal Husbandry Club at the University of Maryland, College Park, provides opportuni ties for students to gain animal handling experience and build 
interpersonal relationship skills, whilegiven the encouragement to excel ! Activities and experiences specifically designed for students of diversified interests in 
ani mal agri cul ture are provi ded, i ncl udi ng experi ences wi th many di ff erent domesti c sped es. M embershi p i s open to al I undergraduate students i nterested i n getti ng 
hands-on experience working with dairy, beef, sheep or swi ne, and I earning more about general animal sciences. Activities include theAg Day Dairy and Livestock 
Shows, Harvest Stomp/Fall Festival, fitting of animals for the annual Wye Angus Sale, and other activities working with dairy animals. One can gain further 
I eadershi p ski 1 1 s by hoi di ng an off i ce. Each Spri ng, el ecti ons are he) d for Presi dent, V i ce-Presi dent, Secretary, Treasurer, and H i stori an. 

Collegiate 4-H 

Many colleges and universities have Collegiate 4-H clubs. Cdlegiate4-H is an organization that provides its members with a sense of identity on campus, enriches 
their lives through group projects and recreation, and develops confidence and leadership ski I Is. Clubs provide service and support to their local andstate4-H 
programs, such as serving as judges and conducting training workshops. They are also a service and social group for campus students. Collegiate4-H isopentoall 
col lege students who wish to support youth and the 4-H program It is not necessary to have prior 4-H experience, only to have an interest in the 4-H idealsandin 
servi ng your communi t vwww.colleaiate4h.org/ 

Sigma Alpha 

SigmaAlpha is a national professional agricultural sorority. Theobjectiveof thesorority i s to promote itsmsmbers in all facets of agri cul ture and to strengthen the 
f ri endshi ps among them. M embers stri ve f or achi evement i n schd arshi p, I eadershi p, servi ce, and to further the devel opment of women pursui ng careers i n 
agriculture SigmaAlpha works to promote agriculture, and women's role, on our campus, i n our community and throughout the state. Acti vi ties include attending 
regional and national conferences /conventions; participating in col lege events (Fall Bash, ANSC orientation, Cook-Offs); service activities including teaching 
agri cul ture to local elementary students and judging contests for the Maryl and FFA; professional Guest speakers, and participating in Maryland Day/Ag Day. 
Membership rush is held on a semester basis. To be eligible, potential members must have 2.25 CumulativeGPA, Agriculture major or sincere interest in 
agriculture, be a member of one other group, enrdled in 18 credits, orworkinalOhoursaweek.Visitthewebsit avww.studentDrg.urrd.edu/siama 

University of Maryland Equestrian Club 

The University of Maryland Equestrian Club (UM EC) provi deson-campus horseback riding lessons and equine I earning opportuni ties for campus students and 
faculty at beginner through advanced levels. TheANSC department provides the barn, equipment, riding arenas and horses while the students provide care for the 
horses. There is a riding fee of $200 per semester for one riding lesson a week for the end re semester. Large deductions are easi I yearned for help with feeding, 
cleaning stalls or teaching. C I ub members not riding are strongly encouraged to participate in other club activities, such as educational and fun seminars, field trips 
and monthly meetings. Inthepast, UMEC rnambershaveattendedtheCdumbiaGrandPrixandtheWashingtoninternational Horse Show and taken field trips to 
theDuPont Veterinary Medical Center in Leesburg, Va. and Days End Horse Rescue Farm in Maryland. Members have also participated in clinics on tack fitting and 
identifying lameness in horses. Club members, under the leadership of the Executive Board and Directors, make most UMEC club decisions. Weofferagreat 
opportunity to all students and we're always open to suggestions. We also try to have something for everyone including basic English equitation, Western equitation, 
dressage, bareback and trail ri di ng, horse and farm management, veteri nary care, teachi ng ski 1 1 s and much more. T he U M E C i s I ocated at the campus horse bam, and 
our office is in the Shack, ri ght next to the paddocks. There is very limited space in the riding lessons, so email us right away to reserve yourself a spot in the most 
educational equine club provi ded by the University of Maryland. Visit the web site www.studmtora.umd.edu/urrec/ 

University of Maryland Equestrian Team 

T he E questri an Team i s a competi ti ve cl ub, meani ng they travel to di ff erent school s i n the zone and compete i n I H SA shows. Students, f acul ty, staff, and al urmi 
association members of all levels are invited.Theteam offers English, Western, and jumping, so team members can pick what typeof riding to specialize in or 
compete i n al I three! The team does not hoi d tryouts so anyone can j oi n the team U M ET i s I ocated about 25 rri nutes off campus at C I ay H i 1 1 Stabl es i rSpri ngdal e, 
Maryland. The cost per semester for team rrerrbershi pis $550. This fee covers two one hour group lessons a week taught by trainer TrishaPrettyman, unlimited 
practi ce ri des ( hacks) , show fees, show practi ces, and a ton of fun ! 

Veterinary Science C lub 

T he pri mary obj ecti ves of the V eteri nary Sci ence C I ub are to: promote a deeper understand ng of the numerous opportuni ti es i n veteri nary medi ci ne, exchange 
i nformati on on veteri nary and ani mal experi ences, and keep students updated on the I atest veteri nary school i nf ormati on. 

What does the Veteri nary Sci ence Club do? A variety of guest speakers are invited to club meeti ngs to talk about their special ties or field of interest. A sampleof 
topi c i ncl ude wi I dl i f e rehad I i tati on, I aboratory ani mal medi ci ne, exoti c pet care and veteri nary ethi cs. 

Each year, faculty fromtheVirginia-Maryland Regional Cd lege of Veteri nary Medi cine speak to club members about veteri nary medical school. Mock interviews 
are hel d i n J anuary to prepare our cl ub members for the adrri ssi ons process. 

C I ub sponsored tri ps offer our members the opportuni ty to tour vari ous veteri nary medi cal f aci I i ti es, tal k to veteri nary students and f acul ty, and to vi si 1 1 ocal zoos 
and ani mal care f aci I i ti es. 

Annually, theclubparticipatesintheAPVMA National Symposium which is held at different veteri nary schools each year. This is an excellent opportunity to visit 
a vet school , pi us hear over 30 speakers on numerous topi cs and parti ci pate i n a vari ety of wet and dry I ab. 

Therearealso opportunities to volunteer with the Pri nceGeorge's County Animal Shelter in partnership with PetSmart, to help find homes for abandoned animals. 
For more information visit the web site www.careercenter.umd.edu/VetSciClub 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

American Society of Animal Sci ences Scholastic Recognition and Department of Animal Sciences Scholastic Achievement Awards are presented each year at the 
Collegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources StudentAwardsConvocation.TheANSC program administers several scholarships, including: C.W. England, Dairy 
Technology Society, the Kinghome Fund Fellowship, theC.S. Shaffner Award, theLillianHildebrandtRummel Scholarship, arid theOwen P. Thomas 
Development Scholarship. For el igid I ity criteria, visittheANSC Office, 1415A Animal Sciences Center. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, i n cooperation with other 
university offices, parti cipates in the awarding of schd arshi ps to deserving students. For information, visit: www.firancialaid.umd.edu. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Anthropology (AINTTH) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1111 Woods Hall, 301-405-1423 

www.bsos.urrd.edu/anth 

Chair: P. Shacke 1 

Professors: J . Chemela (also LASC), F. J ackson, M . Leone, T. Whitehead 

Associate Professors: J . Freidenberg, M. Paolisso 

Assistant Professors: S. Brighton, W. Stuart 

Lecturers: M. Butier.J . Finch, D.Gadsby.T. Leslie, M.London, M. Plyler 

Affiliate Professors: A. Bdles(WMST),J . Carlson, J . Caughey (AMST),J . Grayzel (GVPT),J . Hanna, R. Harison(CMLT, LASC), S. Kim(WMST), D. Linebaugh 

(HISP), L. Frederik MeerfTHET), C. Robertson (MUSC) 

Adjunct Professors: S. Abbott-Jam eson(NOA A), T. Cederstrorn C. C rain (LTG Associates), S. Fiske(NOAA), A. Fromant, A. Garland, S. Huertin-Roberts, E. 

KrebsJ. Kunen(USAID), B. Little (National Park Service), F. McManarron( National Park Service), M. Mieri (Smithsonian), S. Potter (National Park Service), C. 

Puentes-Markides, D. Russell (USAID),J . Schneider, R. Sobel (Smithsonian), N.Tashima (LTG Associates), R. Winthrap(BLM) 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: G.Thakur 

Professors Emeriti: M. Agar, S. Bushrui, N. Gonzalez (Errerita) 

TheMajor 

A nthropol ogy, the study of cul ture, seeks to understand humans asawhde-associal bei ngs who are capabl e of symbol i c communi cati on through which they 
producea rich cultural record. Anthropologists try to explain differences among cultures -differences in physical characteristics as well as in customary behavior. 
A nthropol ogi sts study how cul ture has changed through ti me as the human genus has spread over the earth. A nthropol ogy i s the sci ence of the bi d ogi cal evd uti on 
of human sped es, and the di sci pi i red send arshi p of the cul tural devel oprrent of human bei ngs 1 knowl edge and customary behavi or. 

A nthropol ogy at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers ri gorous trai ni ng for many career opti ons. A strong background i n anthropol ogy i s a def i ni te asset i n prepari ng 
for a variety of academic and professional fields, ranging from the I aw and business, to comparative literature, philosophy and the fine arts. Whether one goes on to 
a Master's or a Ph.D., theanthropdogy BA. prepares one for a wide range of non-academic employment, such as city and public health planning, development 
consul ti ng, program eval uati on, and public archaeol ogy. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1 . Students shal I have an i ntegrated knowl edge, awareness and understandi ng of a cul tural I y and bi ol ogi cal I y di verse wori d. 

2. Students shal I demonstrate an understandi ng of cul ture and soci ety. 

3. Students shal I demonstrate the abi I i ty to understand compl ex research prod ems, and arti cul ate appropri ate methods and theory. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

T he A nthropol ogy department offers begi nni ng and advanced course work i n the three pri nci pal subdi vi si ons of the di sci pi i ne cul tural anthropol ogy, archaeol ogy, 
and d d ogi cal anthropd ogy. W i thi n each area, the departrrent offers some degree of sped al i zati on and provi des a vari ety of opportuni ti es for research and 
independent study. Laboratory courses are offered in bid ogi cal anthropd ogy and archaeol ogy. Fieldschoolsareofferedinarchaeology.Theinterrelationshipof all 
branches of anthropd ogy i s emphasized. 

The A nthropol ogy departrrent has a total of five laboratories, located in Woods Hal I, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs. The departrrents three 
archaeol ogy I abs, contai ni ng materi al s cd I ected from f i el d schod s and research proj ects of the past several years, serve both teachi ng and research purposes. The 
other two laboratories are a teaching laboratory in bid ogi cal anthropd ogy and the Laboratory for Applied Ethnography and Community Action Research.Cultural 
Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), a research and program devel oprrent arm of the departrrent is located in Woods Hall. TheCenterfor Heritage Research Studies, 
I ocated i n the Departrrent of A nthropol ogy, focuses on research devoted to understandi ng the cul tural characteri sti cs of heri tage and i ts uses. 

T he undergraduate curri cul um i s ti ed to the departrrents M aster i n A ppl i ed A nthropol ogy ( M . A A . ) program; accordi ngl y, preparati on for non-acaderri c 
empl cyrrent upon graduati on i s a pri mary educati onal goal of the departrrents undergraduate course work and i ntemshi p and research components. T he departrrent 
hasalsorecentiy irrplerrented a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program Students at the graduate level are asked to focus in one of three areas of faculty expertise: 
Health, Heritage, and Environment. 

Requirements for theMajor 

Students seeki ng an undergraduate degree are requi red to compl ete at I east 31 credi ts of anthropol ogy course work i n addi ti on to the support ng coursework 
sequence. Every course being used to satisfy anthropology major requirements must be compl eted with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

Required Courses 

I . Foundation Courses C redits 

ANTH220 Introduction to Biol ogi cal Anthropology 4 

ANTH240 IntroductiontoArchaedogy 3 

ANTH260 I ntroducti on to Soci o-cul tural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 

II. Method and Theory courses (2 courses) 6 

ANTH320* Method andTheory in Bidogical Anthropology 

ANTH340* Method andTheory in Archaeology 

ANTH360* Method andTheory in Soci ocultural Anthropology 

*Two of the upper level method and theory courses (ANTH320, 340, 
360) are required. Students mist complete the method and theory 
course associated with their chosen locus area - sociocultural 
anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology. Students may 
not take a method and theory course unless they have completed the 
associated foundation course. I fa student completes all three of the 
method and theory courses, one course can be used as an 
anthropology elective. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



III. Anthropology E lecti ves 

Minirrumofl2 credits. 6 of the 12 credits mist be taken at the 

300-400 level. 
ANTHxx Anthropology decti ves 6 

ANTH300/400Upper level Anthropology courses 6 

IV. Applied Field Methods 

Minimum of 3 credits selected from the following. Other courses can 

be used with approval ofUG Director. Courses used to fulfill the 3 or more 

Applied Field Methods requirement may not be used to fulfill any 

other anthropology requirement. 
ANTH386 Experiential Learning Internship (3-6 credits) 
ANTH496 Field Methods in Archaeology (6 credits) 
ANTH498 Advanced Field Training in Ethnography (1-6) 
ANTH468B Applied Urban Ethnography (3 credits) 
ANTH493 Anthropological Fi el dwork and Experience in Argentina (3 

credits) 
ANTH498C Advanced Field Training in Ethnography: Brazil (6credits) 
ANTH498N Ethnology of thelrrm'grantLife(4 credits) 
ANTH498W J amaica: Connections, Celebration and I dentity (6 credits) 
ANTH498Z J arnaicaAdolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (6 

credits) 
ANTH499 Fieldwork in Biological Anthropology (3-8 credits) 

V. Skills Requirement 

Quantitative course (chosen fromlist below and required for all ^ rrnre 

students entering the major F all 2008 and alter) 
BIOM301, MATH111, STAT100, ECON201, ECON321, 
SKI LLSxx EDMS451, GEOG306, MATH112 or Higher (excluding 
MATH113), PSYC200, SOCY200 

VI . Supporting Course Work: 18 

Minirrumofl8 creditsofsupportingelectives; at least 10 credit 
p, pj— p hours rrust be outside of 'the deparbrent (with your academe 

advisor's approval). 8 hours may be anthropology course work, but 
then cannot 'double count as Anthropology electives 

Advising 

T he pri mary advisor for students in the A nthropol ogy maj or is the Undergraduate Advisor. The advisor is avail able to students during appointments, walk-in hours, 
and by phone and emai I . T he advi sor i s responsi bl e f or hel pi ng students pi an thei r successful compl eti on of the A nthropol ogy maj or. Students will work wi th the 
advi sor for an ori entati on to the department, status on degree progress, adrri ni strati ve approval for sped al course enrol I ment, acaderri c audi ts, and graduati on 
clearance. Inaddition, students should consider the Undergraduate Advi sor a resource for general academic and career advice during their time at Maryland. 

The office of Undergraduate Advi sor is supervised and supported by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (a faculty member) in the Department of 
A nthropol ogy. I n addi ti on, al I f acul ty members i n the department serve as f acul ty advi sors to students. Students are expected to sel ect and request a f acul ty 
member who works within their area of focus to betheir faculty advisor (i.e. Archaeology, Biological A nthropol ogy or Cultural Anthropology). For more 
information, or to contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or Undergraduate Advi sor, pleasecall 301-405-1423orgotDwww.bsos.urfd.edu/anth. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

T here are several undergraduate research experi ences avai I abl e f or students: 

1 . A rchaed ogy I aboratori es 

2. Biological anthropology lab 

3. Chesapeake heritage program 

4. Immigrant Life Course 

5. Cultural Systems Analysis Group 

6. Center for Heritage Resource Studies 

For more information, pi ease see our website www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 
Fiddwork Opportunities 

The Deparbrent of Anthropology encourages students to explore its field school and study abroad opportunities: 

1 . Summer archaed ogy f i el d school 

2. Ethnographic field school in J amaica (study abroad program) 

3. Ethnographi c f i el d school i n the B razi I i an A mazon (study abroad program) 

4. Ethnographic field school in Argentina (study abroad program) 

5. Winter term field study in Italy (study abroad program) 

For more information, see our website www.bsosunxl.edu/anth. 

Internships 

All undergraduate students are encouraged to do an i ntemshi p. There are many non-profit and government agencies i n the Balti more-Washi ngton area that are 
wi 1 1 i ng to support A nthropol ogy i ntems. F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease contact the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es or the U ndergraduate A dvi sor. 

Co-op Prog-ams 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



TheDepartrrenthasacooperativeagreerrentwiththeNational Park Service. When available, students have opportunities to work on various archeology and 
museum projects in the National Capital Region. For more information, pi ease contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Honors Progr am 

T he A nthropol ogy department al so offers an H onors Program that provi des the student an opportuni ty to pursue i n-depth study of hi s or her i nterests. A cceptance i s 
contingent upon a 3.5 GPA in anthropology courses and a 3.0 overall average The Honors Citation is awarded upon completion and review of a thesis (usually 
based upon at least one term of research under the direction of an Anthropology faculty member) to be done within the field of anthropology. For additional 
information, students should contact the Director of Departmental Honors Program, Dr. William Stuart, 301-405-1435; E-mail: wstuart@anth.urrd.edu 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

A nthropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on (A SA ) : A n anthropol ogy student associ ati on that meets regul ari y to pi an student events and to he! p coordi nate vari ous student 
and faculty activities. For meeting times contact the Undergraduate Advisor. 

T he department and the A SA j oi nti y sponsor a publ i c I ecture seri es. 

Applied Mathematics and Sdentific Computation Program (AMSC) 

Collegeof Computer, Mat h ematical and Physical Sciences 

3103 M athemati cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-0924 

www.amsc.urrd.edu 

amsc@amsc.urrd.edu 

Director: Dr. KonstantinaTrivisa 

Professors: More than 100 members from 19 units. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

T he A ppl i ed M athemati cs and Sci enti f i c C omputati on Program offers a graduate program i n whi ch students combi ne studi es i n mathemati cs and appl i cati on areas. 
The Program also offers an undergraduateCertificate in Computational Science. AMSC courses carry credit in mathematics, with the exception of AMSC 462. An 
undergraduate program emphasizing applied rnathen^ cs i s avail able to rnajors in mathematics. Appropriate courses carry the MATH and STAT prefixes, as well as 
theAMSC prefix. 

Certificate 

TheCertificatein Computational Science introduces students to basic computational methods for better understanding and solving problems in the physical sciences. 
Numerical techniques and computer architecture will be taught with the goal of applying these to situations in the physical sciences. Computational methods will be 
applied to problems that are not analytically tractable; for comparison, physical problems that are amenable to analysis will also be examined. The goal of the 
program i s to enhance student understand ng of numeri cal methods that wi 1 1 be of use i n graduate school , acaderri c research, and i ndustry. 

Certificate Requirements 

L Core Requirements - the fol I owi ng courses are requi red: 

T hree courses inPrograrrrring Languages, Numerical Methods, and Computer Architecture 

CMSClOSor CMSC131 Introduction to Programming 

AMSC460 Computational Methods 

AMSC462 1 ntro to Comp Organization andToolsfor Scientific Computing 

A course in which advanced computation is applied to scientific problems: 

PHY S474 Computati onal Physi cs or 
ASTR415 Computational Astrophysics 

A science base 

PHY S273 1 ntroductory Physi cs: Waves or 

PHY S270 Genera 1 Physics: Electrodynamics, Light, Relativity & Modem Physics and PHYS271 General Physics: Electrodynamics, Light, Relativity 

& Modem Physics Lab 

Notes Any of CMSClOSor CMSC131, CMSC114or CMSC132, CMSC214or CMSC212, ENEE114, PHYS165, may be substituted forCMSC106orCMSC131. 
AMSC466 may be substituted for AMSC460. CMSC311 and CMSC351 may be substituted for AM SC462. 

Z Elective; 

Elective courses must be chosen from the list below such that the enti re sequence of courses for theCertificate meets the following two conditions: (a) at least 12 
credit hours must be at the 300-400 level; (b) at I east 12 credit hours must be outside the major. In the case of multiple majors, at least 12 credit hours must be 
outsi de al I the other maj or requi rements. 

A STR 120 1 ntroductory A strophysi cs-Sol ar System ( 3) 

ASTR 121 1 ntroductory Astrophysics 1 1 -Stars and Beyond (4) 

ASTR 320Theoretical Astrophysics (3) 

ASTR415 Computational Astrophysics 

CM SC 114 or CM SC132 Computer Science I (4) 

CM SC 214 or CM SC212 Computer Science 1 1 (4) 

CM SC 250 Di screte Structures (4) 

GEOL 341 Structural Geology (4) 

MATH 240 Introduction to Li near Algebra (4) 

MATH 241 Calculus III (4) 

MATH 246 Differential EquationsforScientistsandEngineers(3) 

MATH 431 Geometry for Computer Graphics (3) 

MATH 452 1 ntroduction to Dynamics and Chaos (3) 

MATH 462 Partial Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers(3) 

MATH 464TransformMethodstoScientistsandEngineers(3) 

PHYS 171 1 ntroductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity (3) 

PHYS 272 1 ntroductory Physics: Fields (3) 

PHYS 273 1 ntroductory Physics: Waves (3) 

PHYS 374lntermediateTheoretical Methcds(4) 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Progrems 



PHYS 401 Quantum Physics I (4) 

or PHYS 420 Principles of Modem Physics (3) 
PHYS 402 Quantum Physics 1 1 (4) 
PHYS 404 1 ntroduction to Statistical Thermodynamics (3) 
PHYS 410 Classical Mechanics(4) 
PHYS 411 1 nterrredi ate Electricity and Magnetism (4) 
PHY S 474 Computati onal Physi cs 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A n honors program provi des opportuni ti es f or oubstandi ng students to engage i n research on a computati onal prqj ect wi th a f acul ty member. Students wi 1 1 be 
accepted i nto thi s program after thei r sophomore year based on thei r acaderri c performance. 

To obtain more information, contact the Applied Math and Scientific Computing Program, 3103 Mathematics Bui I ding, UMCP, Telephone 
301-405-0924. www.amsc.urrd.edu . 

Arabic Studies (ARAB) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

3121 J imOiez Ha 1 !, 301-405-7492 
www.languages.umd.edu/AsianEastiEuropean/arabic/ 
f I agshi p-arabi c@umd.edu 

TheMajcr 

T hi s 42-credi t maj or provi des students wi th a sol i d background i n I i ngui sti c, I i terary, and cul tural aspects of the study of A rabi c, i ncl usi ve of the cul tures of N orth 
Africa, Egypt, the Arabic-speaking countries of Asia, and the peoples of the diaspora. 

TheBA. in Arabic Studies prepares students for a range of professional opportunities, including careers in government, education, business, and international 
development and communication. Students work toward competence in speaking, reading, writing, and listening; they will study the culture of Arabic-speaking 
peoples in their diverse perspectives, practices, and products; they will become conversant with the contemporary political and daily life of Arabic-speaking peoples, 
wi th cul tural compari son i rnpl i ci t throughout thei r four years. 1 1 i s expected that many undergraduates will choose to doubl e maj or or do a doubl e degree i n A rabi c 
and another subj ect, i ncl udi ng arts and humani ti es maj ors, busi ness, computer sci ence, and j oumal i sm 

Requirements for theMajor 

A 1 1 students pi anni ng to pursue the maj or i n A rabi c Studi es shoul d contact the undergraduate advi sor, who wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for pi acement, oversi ght, and record 
keepi ng. A grade of C (2.0) or better i s requi red i n al I courses. 

Prerequisites (18 credits) 

Students must take the prerequi si te courses or sati sfy these requi rements by pi acement:* 
ARAB104 Elementary Modem Standard A rabid -I I (6credits) 
ARAB105 ElementaryModemStandardArabiclll-IV (6credits) 
ARAB106 Elementary Egyptian Cdloquial Arabic I 
ARAB107 Elementary Egyptian Cdloquial Arabic 1 1 

*Modem Standard Arabic istheformal variety of Arabic used throughout the Arab world, particularly for reading and writing. Egyptian Cdloquial Arabic is oneof 
the maj or spoken varieties in the Middle East. Oncecredits have been received for a higher-level language focus course, alower-level course in the same strand 
(written or spoken) may not betaken for credit. (ARAB204 may not betaken after ARAB205, for example. ARAB107 may not betaken after ARAB206, etc.) 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE MAJ OR 

All courses are 3 credits unless noted otherwise. 

Coresequence: 24 credits 

ARAB 204 I nta-rredi ate Modem Standard A rabid (6 credits) 

ARAB 205 Intermediate Modem Standard Arabic 1 1 (6 credits) prereq204 

ARAB304 Advanced Modem Standard Arabic I prereq205 

ARAB305 Advanced Modem Standard Arabic 1 1 prereq304 

ARAB206 IntermediateEgyptianColloquial A rabi c 1 1 1 prereql07 

ARAB207 IntermediateEgyptianColloquial ArabicIV prereq206 

Electives a rrinimumof 18 credits 

A. Required Upper-level el ectives in Arabic (a mini mum of 9 credits) 

ARAB311 TheArabWoridToday pre-coreq304 

ARAB312 Islamic Culture pre-coreq304 

ARAB321 Arabic Media pre-coreq304 

ARAB 322 Commercial Arabic pre-coreq304 

ARAB401 Readings in Arabic Literature prereq305 

ARAB402 Arabic Translation prereq305 

ARAB411 US-Arab Relations prereq305 

ARAB412 Modern Arabic Literature A prereq305 

Survey 



7. Departments Mejcrs, axIPrccrcrns 



ARAB499 Special Topics in Arabic Studies 

• OtherARAB courses may be included on written approval of UG advisor. 

• All prerequisites imply "or equivalent knowledge." In cases where a student has equivalent knowledge, required language-focus credits are replaced in 
consultation with, and with the written approval of, the UG advisor. 

B. Optional Electives in English: amaximumof 9 credits (no prereqs) 

ARAB 251 Arabic Cinema 
ARAB 252 Arabic Literature in Translation 
ARAB 351 Arab Culture and Civilization 
ARAB 499 Special Topics in Arabic Studies 

Courses in M iddle Eastern Studies taught in English in other departments can be substituted with the approval of the Undergraduate advisor. 

Study Abroad 

Students majoring in Arabic Studies are encouraged to spend a summer or a semester abroad. Credits earned toward the major duri ng study abroad must be 
approved by the department pri or to departure A maxi mum of 15 non-U M credi ts may be appl i ed to the maj or. 



School of Architecture Planning; and Presa-vation 

1298ArchitectureBuilding, 301-405-8000 
www.arch.urrrl.edu 

arci nfo@urrd.edu for general i nformati on and requests 

archadvi se@urrd. edu for undergraduate advi si ng questi ons 

www.lep.urrd.edu for information on applying to the Limited Enrollment Program as a freshman or internal transfer student and to see the gateway requirements for 

Architecture 

www.transf eradvi si ng. urrd.edu for transfer advi si ng questi ons 

Dean: Garth Rockcastie 

Associate Dean(s): J ohn Maudlin-J eronimo, Qing Shen 

Assistant Dean(s): IngridFarrell 

Architecture Program 

Director: Madlen Simon 
Assistant Director: Courtney Miller Bellairs 

Professors: M. Bell, R. Etiin(DistUniv Prof), S. Hurtt, G. Rockcastie, T. Schumacher, R.Vann 
Associate Professors: C. Bovill, R. Eisenbach, A. Gardner, I. Goumay, B. Kelly, M. Simon 
Assistant Professors: M.Ambrose, H. Koliji, L.D. Qui ros Pacheco, I. Williams, B.D. Wortham-Galvin 
Professors of the Practice G. Bowden, C. Frisone, P. Noonan 
Senior Lecturers: C. Miller Bellairs 

Lecturers: M . al Khalil, L. Escobal, C. Lostritto, A. Pressman, M . Rarrirez, R. Schneck 
Professors Emeriti: W. Bechhoefer, R. Bennett, K. DuPuy, G. Francescato.J . Hill, R. LewisJ . Loss., F. Schlesinger 

T he School of A rchi tecture, PI anni ng, and Preservati on offers a four-year undergraduate program I eadi ng to the B achel or of Sci ence degree i n archi tecture The 
School offers graduate programs leading to the professional degrees of Master of Architecture, Master of Historic Preservation, Master of Community Planning, and 
Master of Real Estate Development. In addition, joint professional degrees and certificates areoffered. The School offers a post-professional Master of Sci ence in 
ArchitecturedegreeandaPh.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design. Students graduating with the undergraduate maj or in archi tecture typically require two 
years to compl ete the curri cul um I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree i n archi tecture. 

For information see the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation entry in Chapter 6. 

Art(ARTT) 

Collegeaf Arts and Humanities 

1211-E Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-7790 

www.art.urrd.edu 

artdept@urrd.edu 

Chair: J . Ruppert 

Professors: T. Lapinski, F. Sham 

Associate Professors: P. Craig, D. Gavin, M. Humphrey, P. Kehoe, R. Klank, R. Lozner.J. McCarty, B. Morse, W. Richardson, J .Thorpe 

Assistant Professors: A. Buck-Coleman(AsstProf),J . Pinder.J . Strom 

Lecturers: L. B ems (Lecturer), E. Bisese, M. Boone (Lecturer), K. Capps (Lecturer), E. Conover, A. Georgievska-Shine, K. Holder, S.Jones, N. Ratnapala, F. Rehak, 

B. Tyroler, G. Vafai, R. Well 

Professors Emeriti: C. Demonte(Distinguished Scholar-Teacher), D. Driskell (Distinguished University Professor) 

TheMajcr 

The Departrnent of Art is a place where students transform ideas and conceptsinto objects and visual experiences. It is an environment rich in art theory, criticism, 
and awareness of di verse wori d cul ture. Students are taught to arti cul ate and ref i ne creati ve thought and appl y knowl edge and ski 1 1 to the maki ng of i mages, obj ects, 
and experimental works. Courses are meaningful to students with the highest degree of involvement in the program and thosewho take electives. Students majoring 
i n A rt take a focused program of courses f d ded i nto a general I i beral arts educati on offered by the uni versi ty. 

T he di verse f acul ty of arti srs i n the department stri ve to foster a sense of comrruni ty through the common experi ence of the creati ve process, shari ng thei r 
prof essi onal experi ence f reel y wi th students 

T he areas of concentrati on wi thi n the maj or are desi gn, drawi ng, pai nti ng, pri ntmaki ng, digital i magi ng, and scul pture A reas of study i ncl ude papermaki ng, 
photography, and art theory. I ntemshi ps and i ndependent stud es are al so avai I abl e. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Requirements for the Maj or 

U ndergraduate students are off ered a Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) in Art. The requirements consist of a curriculum of 36 credits of art studio and art theory courses, and 
12 additional credits of art hi story and art theory courses as a supporting area for a total of 48 major required credits. No course with a grade I ess than C may be used 
to sati sfy maj or or supporti ng area requi remants. 



Foundation Courses 

ARTT100 
ARTT 110 
ARTT150 
ARTT 200 
ARTT 210 



15 Credits 



Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 

E I emsnts of D rawi ng I 

I ntroduction to ArtTheory 

T hree D i mensi onal A rt F undamantal s 

E I emsnts of D rawi ng 1 1 



I nterrrediate 0011*395 

Painting 
Sculpture 
Printmaking 
Design 



9 Credits 



one course fromthree of the following 
four areas 

ARTT 320 

ARTT 330, 331, 332, 333, 334 

ARTT 340, 341, 342, 344 

ARTT 350, 351, 352 



Advanced Courses 

ARTT 418 
ARTT Theory 
ARTT elective 
ARTT elective 
*course offering varies 



12 Credits 



Advanced Drawing 
One 300/400 A RTT theory* 
One 300/400 ARTT elective 
One 400 1 evel A RTT el ecti ve 



Supporting Area 

ARTH 200 

ARTH 201 
ARTH/ArtTheory 



12 Credits 



A rt of the Western Wori d to 1300 

Art of the Western World after 
1300 

Two 300/400 level ARTH/ArtTheory 
electives 



48 Total Credits 



Advising 

T he name of the advisor for each class is avail able in the department off ice. Each second-serrester sophomore and first-semester senior is requi red to see his or her 
advi sor within the department. Additionally, each student is strongly encouraged to see his or her advisor in the department each semester. 

Internships 

Students have worked i n a vari ety of i ntemshi p setti ngs. These have i ncl uded assi sti ng prof essi onal s compl ete publ i c conrri ssi ons, corrrnerci al or cooperati ve 
gallery and exhibit] on duties, and working in professional artists' workshops in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. metropolitan areas. Additional information is 
avai lable in the Department of Art office. 

Honors Program 

T he H onors Program i s avai I abl e to art studi o maj ors for the purpose of creati ng opportuni ti es for i n-depth study and enri chmant i n areas of sped al and creati ve 
interest. To qualify, students must be art maj ors with junior or senior status, amajorG.PA of 3.2, and an overall G.PA. of 3.0. The program requi res a total of 12 
credits in Honors course work. Onecourse (3 credits) may be taken at the 300 or 400-1 evel, and three courses (3 credits each) at the 400-1 evel. There is a thesis 
component in one of the 400-1 evel courses. PI ease consult the Honors Director for additional information. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Art administers eight Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships (CAPAs) that are avai I able to continuing students, and entering freshman and 
transfer students. This is a merit-based scholarship that is awarded on a one-year basis, and may be renewed. Additional information is available in the main office of 
the department. TheJamesP. Wharton Prize is awarded to the outstanding Art maj or participating in the December or May graduation exhibition. TheVan Crews 
Scholarship is designated for outstanding Art maj ors concentrating in design. It is awarded for one year and is renewable The David C. Driskell Award for the 
Outstandi ng Graduati ng G raduate Student i s awarded at the end of the acaderri c year. 

Student Art Exhibitions 

The West Gallery (1309 Art/Sociology Building) is an exhibition space devoted primarily to showing the art work of students. It is managed by undergraduate art 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



maj ors, assi sted by a f acul ty advi sor. 

Lecture Prog-am 

The Department of Art has a lecture program in which artists and critics are brought to the campus to explore ideas in contemporary art. A strong component of this 
program i s devoted to di versi ty. 



ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (ARTH) 

CoHegeof Arts and Humanities 

1211-B Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-1479 

www.arthistory.urrd.edu 

Chair: W. Pressly 

Professors: J. Hargrove, F. Kelly, J. Kuo, S. Mansbach, M. Venit, A. Wheelock 

Associate Professors: A. Colantuono, M . Gill 

Assistant Professors: R. Ater, S. Hill, E. Marlowe, J. Shannon, Y. Suzuki, A. Vol k 

Professors Emeriti: D. Denny (Prof Emeritus), M. Spiro (Assoc Prof Errerita), J . Withers (Assoc Prof Errerita) 

TheMajcr 

The faculty and students of the Department of Art History and Archaeology form a dynamic nucleus within a major research university. The program, leadi ng to the 
B.A. degree in Art History, provides a diverse select] on of courses in the art and archaeology of Africa, Asia, Europe, and theArrericas. The goal of the department 
i s to devel op the students critical understandi ng of vi sual cul ture i n both art hi stori cal and archaeol ogi cal contexts. 

The department has strong coverage in Western art from the classical period up to the present. Inaddition, by taking advantage of the unusual diversity of faculty 
interests, students can study in areas not traditional I y offered in departments of art hi story and archaeology, such as the art and archaeology of Africa, art of diaspora 
cul tures, art and archaeol ogy of the A rreri cas, and A si an art. G roundi ng i n art hi stori cal and archaeol ogi cal theory and method i s provi ded i n a number of courses. 
Studies in archaeology may be pursued in cooperation with other University departments. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the fol I owi ng acronym A RTH . 

Program Obj actives 

The Department of ArtHistoryandArchaeology'sBA. program provides maj ors critical knowledge of visual cul ture in both art hi stori cal and archaeological 
contexts. The program promotes visual literacy in the hi story of art of global cul tures from prehistoric times to the present; cultivates strong research, written, and 
critical thinking ski I Is; and devel ops students' ability to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. 

Prog-am L ear ni ng Outcomes 

Students are expected to f ul I y engage withthecurriculum and the opportuni ti es presented for I eami ng and research. H avi ng compl eted B A . i n A rt H i story, students 
shod d have acqui red the fd I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability to demonstrate knowledge of a large set of artistic monuments, objects, and performances in the hi story of art and in specific periods and/or cul tures 
and pi ace the visual arts in cultural, historical, political, and/or social contexts. 

2. An ability to communicate effectively about art in writing, applyi ng complex forms of analysis in essay-length papers using clear and concise prose. 

3. A n abi I i ty to empl oy the appropri ate technol ogi es for conducti ng research i n the hi story of art, i ncl udi ng pri nt sources and/or el ectroni c i nformati on. 

4. A n abi I i ty to recogni ze and understand fundamental art hi stori cal methods encompassed by but not I i rri ted to connoi sseurshi p, styl i sti c chrond ogy, vi sual and 
techni cal anal ysi s, i n addi ti on to sped al i zed methods of i nterpretati on and cri ti ci sm and other contextual approaches. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The location of the university between Washington and Baltimore gives students the opportunity to use some of the finest museum and archival cd lections in the 
wori d for thei r course work and i ndependent research. The department encourages students to hd d i ntemshi ps at a number of these i nsti tuti ons C urator/prof essors, 
exhi bitionsinTheArt Gallery at theUniversity of Maryland, interactive technologies, and the extensive use of study cd lections bring regional and distant museums 
into the classroom 

T he department i s i n the forefront of expl oring digital i magi ng technol ogi es for art hi stori cal and archaed ogi cal teachi ng, research, and publ i cati on. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

Requi rements f or the maj or i n A rt H i story are as f ol I ows: 

Crafts 
One from: 3 

ARTT100 Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 
ARTT110 Elements of Drawing I 

ARTH required courses 

ARTH2xx threeARTH courses at the 200 level 9 

ARTH300/400sevenARTHcoursesatthe300-400la/el 21 

Supporting Area: 12 

A supporti ng area of four courses i n coherently re! ated 
subj ect matter outsi de the department of A rt H i story and 
A rchaeol ogy at the 300-400 1 eve! 



7. Depatmerts M^o^ srdPvogrstrs 



No credit toward the major can be received for ARTH 100 or 355. 

No course with a grade lower than C may be used to satisfy major or supporting area requirements. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors. 

Internships 

Qualified majors should consult with a departmental advisor for internship opportunities. 

Honors Program 

Qualified majors may participate in the department's honors prograrn which requires the completion of ARTH 488 or ARTH 489, ARTH 496 (Methods of Art 
History) andARTH 499(HonorsThesis). Consult a departmental advisor for details. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers three undergraduate awards each year: thej .K. Reed Fellowship Award to an upper-level major and the 
George Levitineand Frank DiFederico Book Awards to seniors nearing graduation. 

Asian American Studies Certificate 

Office of U ndergraduate Studies 

1120 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301.405.0995 

www.aast.urrd.edu 

aast@urrd.edu 

Director: Larry Hajirre Shi nagawa, Ph.D. 

TheAsian American Studies Program (AAST) prcwidesstudmts with theopportunity to study critically theexperiences of Asian Americans. Through an 
i nterdi scipli nary approach, students exam ne the hi stori es, communi ti es, and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and connected to the broader 
themes for diversity, ethnicity, race, gender and migration in theAmericas. AAST offers a 15 credit-hour minor, and a 21 credit-hour certificate for students. For the 
Minor, courses may be cross-listed in other departments and some may satisfy CORE and Diversity requirements. The Certificate program will be discontinued 
starting Fall 2009. 

Minor Require m e n ts 

A. AAST CoreCourses (6 credits): 

1. lntroductiontoAsianArrericanStudies(AAST200/AMST398C) 

2. AsianAmericanHistoryandSociety(AAST 201/HIST 219G) 

B. Upper-level Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two required foundational courses, students will also select two additional upper-level (300/400) 
courses, one of which would be at the 400 level, from the foil owing list of regular and special topics courses: AAST 384, AAST 388, AAST 398A, 
AAST 398B, AAST 398C, AAST 39SD, AAST 398G, AAST 398L, AAST 398P, AAST 420/WMST 420, AAST 424/SOCY 424, AAST 498ft, AAST 
498B, AAST 498C, AAST 498D, AAST 498E, AAST 49SF, AAST 498G, AAST 4981, AAST 49SJ , AAST 498K, AAST 49SL, AAST 498M, AAST 
498N, AAST 498P and AAST 498T. 

C.Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of AAST 378 (Experiential Learning- 3credits), a semester-long internship at an 
organi zati on that centers i ts efforts on A si an A meri can i ssues. Such organi zati ore may i ncl ude governmental uni ts, non- prof i t agenci es, and on-campus 
organizations. 

Certificate Requirements (NOTE: the Certificate Program will bediscontinued starting Fall 2009). 

A. AAST CoreCourses (6 credits): 

1. lntroductiontoAsianAmericanStudies(AAST200) 

2. A si an A meri can Hi story and Society (AAST201) 

B. ElectiveCourses (12 credits): Students rnay earn the 12 requireddectivecredits by successfully completing any of anumber of special topics 
courses A A ST offers each semester. E I ecti ve requi rements may al so be sati sf i ed through successful corrpl eti on of courses offered through other 
departments or programs. Students must obtai n approval from the A A ST program di rector for courses outsi de of A A ST off eri ngs. 

C. AAST Senior Capstone (3 credits): Students parti cipateinafaculty-guided research project (AAST388) or an experiential I earning project such as 
an internship with an Asian American or Asian Pacific American organization (AAST378). 

D. All coursestowardtheCertificatemustbecorrpletedwithrrinimumgradeof "C." Students interested in earning the certificate should first 
schedule an advising appointment at the A A ST office. Students in good standing may then officially enrol I in the certificate program While students 
may begi n taki ng courses before they enrol I i n the certi f i cate prograrn they shoul d schedul e an advi si ng appoi ntment as soon as possi bl e. 

Astronomy (ASTR) 

Collegeof Computer, Mat h e ma tical and Physical Sciences 

1204 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-3001 

www.astro.urrd.edu 

astr-grad@deans.urrd.edu 

Chair: S. Vogel 

Director: J .Trasco 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Professors: M. A'Heam, D. Harrilton, J . Harrington, A. Harris, L. Mundy, E. Ostriker, K. Papadopoulos, W. Rose, S. Veilleux 

Associate Professors: S. McGaugh, M. Miller, C. Reynolds, D. Richardson 

Assistant Professors: A. Bolatto, M . Ricotti 

Instructors: G. Derring 

Lecturers: M. Hayes-Gehrke, N. Miller, P. Romani 

Adjunct Professors: N. Gehrels, S. Holt, R. Mushotzky, N.White 

Professors Emsriti: R. Bell, J . Earl, W. Erickson, M. Leventhal, D.Wentzel 

Visiting Faculty: D. Neufeld 

TheMajor 

TheAstronomy Departrrent offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science in Astronomy as well as a series of courses of general interest to non-majors. 
Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation in Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics. The degree program is designed to prepare students for 
posi ti ons i n government and i ndustry I aboratori es or for graduate work i n A stronomy or rel ated f i el ds A degree i n A stronomy has al so proven val uabl e as 
preparati on for non-astronorri cal careers. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Departrrent of Astronorny is a partner in the Combined Array for Research in Millimster-WaveAstronomy (CARMA) which operates a millimeter wavelength 
radio array located near Bishop, California. Thearray is the largest and most sensitive array of its type in the world. The Department is a partner with Kite Peak 
National Observatory in the building of a large format near infrared camera for the Mayal I 4-meter optical telescope. Opportunities are avail able for undergraduates 
to become involved in research with both facilities. TheDepartrrentalsooperatesasrnall observatory on campus. Therearefourfixedtelescopesrangingin 
aperture from 20" to 7". There are also six portable 8" telescopes. This facility is used extensively for undergraduate classes. An Observatory Open House Program 
forthepublicisalsorun. DetailsareavailablefromtheAstronomy Department office 

Requirements for the Major 

ASTR120 

ASTR121 

ASTR310 

ASTR320 

ASTR4-- 

PHYS171* 

PHYS174 

PHYS272* 

PHYS273* 

PHYS275 

PHYS276 

PHYS374 

PHYS401 

PHYS404 

MATH 140 

MATH 141 

MATH 240 

MATH 241 

MATH 246 

*With the perrrission of the advisor, PHYS161, 262, 263 can be substituted for tfis sequence. 

The program requi res that a grade of C or better be obtai ned i n al I courses requi red for the maj or. Students pi anni ng to doubl e maj [or (or to seek a doubl e degree) i n 
Physics and Astronomy should note that this combinati on does not automatically satisfy CORE Advanced Studies. They should discuss the issue with their academic 
advi sors to assure that thei r program meets al I degree requi rements. 

Detai I ed i nf ormati on on typi cal programs and al temati ves to the standard program can be found i n the pamphl et enti ti ed, Departrrent Requirements for a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Astronony whi chi s avai I abl e from the A stronomy Department off i ce 

Requi rements for the Mi nor 

A Mi nor in Astronomy may be earned by completing thefol lowing with grades of C or better. A n appointment must be made to register for the minor before final 
30 credits aretaken. Please 

contact Department for compl ete rul es and procedures. 

Crafts 

ASTR100 I ntroducti on to Astronomy, OR 3 

ASTRlOlGenera 1 Astronomy, OR 4 

ASTRl-any other Introductory sequence in Astronomy 

ASTR220 Collisions in Space 3 

Three from 

ASTR300 Stars and Stella- Systems 3 

ASTR330 Solar System A stronomy 3 

ASTR340 Origin of the Universe 3 

ASTR380 Life in the Uni verse -Astrobiology 3 

ASTR498 Special Problems in Astronomy 3 

CRSxx Or a course approved by the department 3 



Reqiired Coirses 


Crafts 


Introductory Astrophysics: Solar System 


3 


1 ntroductory A strophysi cs 1 1 : Stars and B eyond 


4 


Observational Astronomy 


3 


Theoretical Astrophysics 


3 


400 level astronomy courses 


6 


Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity 


3 


Physi cs L aboratory 1 ntroducti on 


1 


Introductory Physics: Fields 


3 


1 ntroductory Physics: Waves 


3 


Experimental Physics 1: Mechanics and Heat 


2 


Experimental Physicsll: Electricity and 


2 


Magnetism 




IntermediateTheoretical Methods 


4 


Quantum Physi csl 


4 


1 ntroducti on to Stati sti cal Thermodynami cs 


3 


Calculus 1 


4 


Calculus II 


4 


1 ntroducti on to L i near A 1 gebra 


4 


Calculus 1 1 1 


4 


Differential Equationsfor Scientists and Engineers 


3 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Honors Progr am 

T he H onors Program of f ers students of except] oral ability and i nterest i n A stronomy opportuni ti es for part-ti rre research parti ci pati on whi ch may devel op i nto 
full-tirresurrmar projects. Honors students work with a faculty advisor on a research project for which academic credit may be earned. Certain graduate courses are 
open for credit toward the bachel or's degree. (Students are accepted i nto the H onors Program by the Departments H onors Committee on the basi s of grade poi nt 
average or recomrrendati on of faculty.) Honors candidates submit a written proposal on their research project and enroll inASTR 399, complete a research project, 
write a thesis and do an oral presentation before a committee. Satisfactory grades lead to graduation With Honors (or High Honors) inAstronomy. 

For Ackltional Information 

Further informati on about advising and the Honors Program can be obtained by calling the Departrrent of Astronomy office at 301-405-3001. Students who have 
been away more than two years may f i nd that due to curri cul um changes the courses they have taken may no I onger be adequate preparati on for the courses requi red 
to compl ete the maj or. Students i n thi s si tuati on must meet wi th the D epartrrental A dvisor to make appropriate plans. 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science (ATM OS) 

Collegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3417 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-5391 

www.atrrDS.umd.edu 

Chair: J . Carton 

Professors: A. Busalacchi, J . Carton, R. Dickerson, R. Hudson, E. Kalnay, Z. Li, R. Murtugudde, S. Nigam, R. Pinker, R. Salawitch, D. Zhang 

A ssoci ate Professors: N . Zeng 

Assistant Professors: K. Ide(AsstProf), D. Kirk-Davidoff 

Adjunct Professors: B. Doddridge, M. King, K. Pickering 

Professors Emsriti: F. Baer, C. Brown (Adjunct Prof), R. Colwell (DistUnivProf Emsrita, Affiliate Prof), H.VanDenDod (Adjunct Prof), R. Ellingson, R. Higgins 

(Adjunct Prof), V. Kousky (Adjunct Prof), L. Uccellini (Adjunct Prof), A. Vemekar 

Requi rements for the Mi nor 

T hree M i nor tracks are avai I abl e 
M i nor i n M eteord ogy 
M i nor i n Atmospheri c Sci ences 
M i nor i n Atmospheri c Cherri stry 

The Minor in Meteorology is the most suitable preparati on for graduate students in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. For more details visit: atmos.umd.edu/MINOR 
or contact the Undergraduate A dvisor, R. Hudson: (hudson@atmos.umd.edu). 

Minor in Meteorology 

T hi s M i nor wi 1 1 provi de the students wi th a general background i n M eteorol ogy as offered by the I ower I evel courses, and a broader background on a wi de range of 
sub-fields in Meteorology and on current issues in Climate Research, as provided by the two requi red courses. This Mi nor is aimed at students who wish to be 
i nformed about thi s f i el d, who do not have an a pri ori i nterest to pursue graduate work i n thi s f i el d, but who rri ght pursue careers where background i n M eteorol ogy 
isimportant, such as envi ronmental policy, government, andindustry. This Mi nor is not open to students who major in Physical Sci ences with a concentration in 
msteord ogy, or who maj or i n Physi cs wi th ihe M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two electives from 

. METO 123 Global Change) 

• M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any other 400 level courses offered below as electives 

Two requi red courses: 

. METO 400TheAtmosphere 
. METO 401 Global Environment 

Oneadditional electivefrom 

• Any 400 level courses offered in the Departrrent of Meteorology on a regular basis or froma list of non- permanent electives that will beoffered by Research 
Scientists, regular faculty from M eteorol ogy, or members of the=arth System Science I nterdiscipli nary Center (ESSI C) 

• Courses offered by the Departrrent of Geol ogy and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 (Global Climate Changs Past and Present) 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiand Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 

• GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor in Atmospheric Sciences 

This minor will provide a general background in meteorology as offered by the I ower I evel courses, and a sol id background in Atmospheric Physics (METO 431) 
and Atmospheric Dynamics (METO 432), as offered b two requi red courses. It is aimed at students that might consider graduate work in Meteorology, or prepare 
them for the very favorabl e j ob market i n theWashi ngton area, where a background i n M eteorol ogy can be an i rrportant asset. Students attempti ng thi s rri nor wi 1 1 
need as strong background in Mathematics, Physi cs and C hem sby at the I evel of MATH 240 or 461, PHY S 270 and PHY S 271; CHEM 103, which are 
prerequi si tes for the requi red courses. Student i nterested in taking this Mi nor program shoul d contact the undergraduate advi sor i n the Departrrent of meteord ogy 
for advisement. This rri nor is not open to students who maj or in Physical Sci ences with a concentrati on in meteorology, or who maj or in Physics within the 
M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

This Mi nor will require 15 credits All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two electives from 

. METO 123 Global Change 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

. METO 400TheAtmosphere 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Thefollcwing two courses are required: 

• M ETO 431 M eteorol ogy for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers I 

• M ETO 432 M eteorol ogy for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers 1 1 

One elective from 

• Other 400 level courses offered in the Department of Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent electives that will beofferedby 
Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, or members of theEarth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geol ogy and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 Global Climate Change Past and Present 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wed and Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 

• GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor in Atmospheric C herristry 

ThisMinorwill provide the students with a general background in Meteorology as offered by the lower I eve! required courses, and a background on issues in 
Atmospheric Chemistry. This Mi nor track is intended for students who might pursue careers where background in Atmospheric Chemistry is needed, such as Air 
Pollution, Atmospheric Chemistry, and envi ronmental issues. It is aimed at students that might consider graduate work in Atmospheric Chemistry, orpreparethem 
for a very favorabl e j ob market i n theWashi ngton area, where a background i n M eteorol ogy can be an i mportant asset. Students attempt] ng thi s mi nor wi 1 1 need a 
strong background in mathematics, Physics and Chemistry at the level of MATH 240 or 461, PHYS 270 and PHYS 271, CHEM 481 (preferred) orCHEM 103, 
whi ch are prerequi si tes for the requi red courses. Students i nterested in taking this Mi nor program shoul d contact the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of 
Meteorology. This Mi nor is not open to students who major in Physical Sciences with a concentration in Meteorology, or who major in Physics within the 
M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two electives from 

.METO 123 Global Change 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any METO 400 level courseoffered below as elective 

Thefollcwing two courses are requi red: 

• M ETO 431 M eteorol ogy for Sci enti sts and E ngi neers I 

• MET0 434AirPollution 

One elective from 

• CHEM 474 (Envi ronmental Chemistry) 

• GEOL 471 (Geocherrical Methods of Analysis) 

• Other 400 1 eve! courses offered in the Department of Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent electives that will beofferedby 
Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, ormembersof theEarth System Science Interdisciplinary Center(ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geography and Geol ogy such as: 

GEOG 446 (Applied Climatology) 

GEOG 447 (Advanced Biogeography) 

GEOG 472 (Remote Sensing) 

GEOL 437 (Global CM mate Change Past and Present) 

GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiand Hydrology) 



FISCHELL DEPARTMENT OF BIOE NGI NEE RING (BIOE) 

A. J ames C lark School of E ngineering 

2330JeongH. Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-7426 

www.bioe.urrd.edu/ 

bi oe-undergrad@urrd.edu 

Chair: W. Bentley (Prof, Chair) 

Director: P. Kofinas(Prof, Graduate Program Director), A. Shirmohammadi (Prof, Undergraduate Program Director) 

Professors: A . J ohnson, Y . Tao 

Associate Professors: I. Balaras (Assoc Prof), J . Fisher, K. Herdd, H. Montas,Y. Yu (Assoc Prof; joint with UMD School of Pharmacy) 

Assistant Professors: J . Aranda-Espinaza, Y . Chen, A. Hsieh, S. Muro (Asst Prof), J . Seog (joint with ENMS), S. Shah, I . White (Asst Prof) 

Lecturers: G. Rahmoel I er (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: C. Fenselau Cotter (Prof, Affiliate Prof), D. DeVoe(Affil Assoc Prof, Prof) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Raghavan (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof) 

Adjunct Professors: T. Barbari, B. Griffith, G. Payne, J . Vossoughi (Adjunct Asst Prof, Adjunct Prof) 

Adjunct Associate Professors: L. Abts (Res Assoc Prof, Aff Res Assoc Prof), J . Culver, H. Ghandehari, V. Vakharia, C.Yu 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. Shekhar, Z. Wu 

TheMajcr 

Bioengineering is a combination of biological engineering (engineering based upon the science of biology) and biomedical engineering (engineering applied to 
human health care). It is the application of a systematic, quantitative; and i integrative ways to think about and sdveirrportant problems of biological origin. The 
engi neeringprinci pies of this field are rooted in the physical, chemical, and mathematical sciences and used to study biological systemsatall levelsof scale. It 
advances fundamental concepts, creates kncwl edge from the rrd ecul ar to the organ and the systems I evel s, and devel ops i nnovati ve bi ol ogi cs, materi al s, 
mathematical models, processes, implants, devices, and i nformatics approaches for the betterment of humankind. 

B ioengi neers specialize in those products made frorn used with, or applied to biological organisms. In addition to engineering science and design, they study 
biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, genetics, physiology, bioi nformatics, biorheology, bid magi ng, and biosystems. The symbiosis between engineering and 
bi ol ogy gi ves bi oengi neers uni que capabi I i ti es i n our modem wori d. 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Prcgcms 



Courses offered by thi s department rray be found under the fol I owi ng acronym B I OE 

Pro-am Obj ecti ves 

The Undergraduate Program in Bioengineering isfounded in biology, driven by human health issues, and is forward-thinking. Our objective is to marry the principles 
and applications embedded in engineering with the sciences of biology. Maryland bioengineersgain a broad-based education in which engineering approaches are 
brought to bear on understandi ng and i mprovi ng I i vi ng systems and thei r envi ronmant. . 

We aspi re to be among the very best, provi di ng excepti onal educati onal and practi cal experi ences for our students. We wi 1 1 educate students to excel i n the f i el d of 
bi oengi neeri ng and carry out research and devil opment of bi o-based systems that wi 1 1 i mprove heal th care throughout the worl d. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

• Demonstrate knowl edge of f undamsntal pri nci pi es i n engi neeri ng and bi ol ogy 

• Demonstrate corrrri tment to the bi ol ogi cal engi neeri ng/bi omedi cal engi neeri ng sector 

• Experiencea multicultural, collegiate working environment 

• Gai n experi ence i n desi gn and group proj ects 

• Develop an ability to write and present their projects effectively 

Academic Programs and Departmental Fadlities 

TheFischell Departmsnt of Bioengineering has established relationships with biomedical research centers, such as the University of Maryland Biotechnology 
Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USDA-ARS, USEPA, and other educati onal institutions such as the University 
of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy. Our undergraduate students will I earn from regulatory experts through collaborative 
research with FDA scientists and engineers located only 5 miles from campus. They will also have the opportunity to work on bio-based research in several 
USDA-ARS Laboratories located only 2 miles north of campus. lnaddition,Theywill have the opportunity to perform internships at the UMB, work in its labs, and 
gain exposure to clinical practice. Our growing interdisciplinary faculty is dedicated to integrating bioengineering with these programs. 

B i oengi neeri ng I aboratori es i ncl ude 

• Cell Biophysics Laboratory 

• Ti ssue E ngi neeri ng and B i omateri al s E ngi neeri ng L aboratory 

• Orthopaedic Mechanobiology Laboratory 

• H uman Performance L aboratory 

• Functional Macromolecular Laboratory 

• N euromuscul ar B i oengi neeri ng L aboratory 

• B i oi magi ng and Machine Vision Laboratory 

• Model Analysis Laboratory 

• Bi ©environmental Laboratory 

• The Balaras Group 

• Biorrdecularand Metabolic Engineering Laboratory 

• Biophotonic I maging Laboratory 

• TheHerdd Laboratory 

• M ol ecul ar M echani cs L aboratory 

• The Muro Group 

• Photonic Biosensors Laboratory 

• Soi I and Water Engi neeri ng Laboratory 

• Water Quality Laboratory 

Admission to the Major 

All Bioengineering majors must meet admission, progress, and retention standards of the A. James CI ark School of Engineering. 

Requirements for theMajor 

Fd I owi ng is the I i st of the course requirements for the Bioengi neeri ng Undergraduate Program on semester basis. Each student fol I owing the course tempi ate 
should beableto graduate in 4 years. Each student will meet with his/her Faculty Advisor every semester to plan the scheduleof courses for thesubsequent 
semester. Some of the students in the bioengineering program may elect to pursue professional degrees such as Medical, Dental, Law, etc., thus they may need 
certain courses that those professional schools require and they should be aware of it and discuss it with their Faculty Advisor. Some of these courses may easily be 
taken as "Biological Science El ecti ves" to avoid extra load. Students interested in health professionsrravalsoviewtliereauirerrHit5 atevww.prehealth.unTd.edu . 





FRESHMEN YEAR 


1st 
Semester 


2nd 
Semester 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


4 




MATH 141 


Calculus II 




4 


CHEM135 


General Chemistry for 
Engineers 


3 




CHEM136 


General Chemfor 
Engineers Lab 
Introduction to 


1 




ENES100 


Engineering Design (**can 
be taken 1st or 2nd semester) 


3 




ENES102 


Stati cs (**can be taken 1st or 
2nd semester) 




3 


ENGL101 


1 ntroducti on to W ri ti ng 




3 


PHYS161 


General Physics 




3 


BIOE120 


B i ol ogy f or E ngi neers 


3 




BI0E121 


B i ol ogy f or E ngi neers L ab 


1 






COREI 




3 




Total 


15 


16 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 





SOPHOMORE YEAR 






MATH 246 


Differential Equations for 
Sci and Engr 




3 


CHEM231 


Organic Chemistry 


3 




CHEM232 


Organic Chemistry Lab 


1 




BSCI330 


Cell Biology and 
Physiology 


4 




ENES220 


Mechanics of Materials 


3 




PHYS260 


General Physics 


3 




PHYS261 


General Physics Lab 


1 




BIOE241 


Biocomputation Methods 




3 


ENME232 _ 

or ENME320 Tnamx ty namcs 




3 


BioSci 


Electi vel* 




3 




CORE II 




3 




Toted 


15 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 






MATH 241 


Calculus III 


4 




BIOE332 


Transport Processes Desi gn 




3 


BIOE340 


Physi ol ogi cal Systems and 
Lab 


4 




BIOE420 


Bioimaging 




3 


BIOE453 


Biomaterials 




3 


BIOE454 


BiomaterialsLab 




1 


BIOE455 


Basic Electronic Design 


3 




ENME331 




3 




orENCE305 nulub 




BioSci 


Electi veil* 




3 




CORE III 


3 






CORE IV 




3 




Tofcd 


17 


16 




SENIOR YEAR 






ENGL393 


Technical Writing 


3 




BIOE404 


Biomechanics 




3 


BIOE456 


B i oi nstrumantati on 


3 




BIOE471 


Biological Systems Control 


3 




BIOE485 


Capstone 1 


3 




BIOE486 


Capstone 1 1 




3 


BioSci 


Electi velll* 




3 


EngSci 


Electi vel** 


3 




EngSci 


Electi veil** 




3 




COREV 


3 






CORE VI 




3 




Toted 


IS 


15 




Total Credits for Degree 


127 





*Please visitwww.bioe.urrd.edu/undergrad/ug-bio-electives.htrrl for a sample list of acceptable Biological Science el ectives. Other courses may be acceptable 
pending advisor approval. One of these courses have to beat 300 or above level, one has to beat 200 or above level, and the third one can be at any level. 
**Please visit www.bioeurrd.edu/undergrad/ug-scitech-electives.html f or a sample list of acceptable Engineering electi ves. Other courses may be acceptable 
pendi ng advi sor approval . One of these courses must be at the 300 or above I evel and the other course can be at any I evel approved by the advi sor. 

Advising 

All B i oengi neeri ng maj ors must parti ci pate in an advi sing session prior to registering each semester. Students are assigned to a faculty advisor during their first 
semester in the major. Any questions about the program may be directed to the Bioengineering Department Office, 2330JeongH. Kim Engineering 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Building, 301-405-7426. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A 1 1 students i n our n-aj or have the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n research i n state-of-the-art I abs on campus or at surroundi ng government or i ndustri al I ocati ons, ei ther 
through projects within the Departrrent or through the Engineering Co-op and Career Services office. Special programsaridservicesincludetheASPIRE Program 
i n whi ch students col I aborate wi th f acul ty and staff on real -worl d engi neeri ng proj ects; the M aryl and Center for U ndergraduate Research, whi ch assi sts students i n 
fi rxding on and off carrpus research opportuni ties; and theNSF-sponsored Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program in which students work with 
full -time faculty, visiting scientists, and others on relevant research. Our REU site is the only one of its kind in the nation dedicated to molecular and cellular 
engineering. 

Internships 

Bioengi neeri ng students may get the opportunity to intern in our faculty Laboratories as well asseveral Federal agencies such as NIH inthearea. TheCdlegeof 
E ngi neeri ng Coop Off i ce provi des excel I ent i nformati on for i ntemshi p opportuni ti es. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Bioengi neeri ng students may join the student chapter of BMES (Biomedical Engineering Society) or to the student chapter of ASA BE (American Society of 
Agricultural and Biological Engineers) or both. Theyalsornayjoinothercdlegeorcarrpusbasedstudentorganizationif theysodesire. Both of these student 
chapters conduct their acti vi ties under an umbrel I a organizati on cal I edSoBE (Society of Biological Engineers). 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The University and the A. James CI ark School of Engineering offer a range of financial support to talented undergraduate students enrolled at the School. Offerings 
includetheA. J amesClark Endowed Scholarship fund and theBenjarrinT. Rome Scholarship. Our program is competitive; with awards made on the basis of merit, 
financial need, and other factors. For more information on a variety of scholarships, pleasevisitwww.ursp.umd.edu. 

In addition, the Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assi stance programs and, in cooperation with 
other university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, please visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

We al so have several departmental annual awards and send arshi ps that students may appl y and be sel ected based on thei r schd asti c achi evements, servi ce to the 
departrrent and the professi on. These award are open to j uni ors and seni ors i n the program I nformati on on these annual awards and schd arshi p may be obtai ned 
from the f acul ty advi sors i n the departrrent. 



Biological Sdences Program (BSC I) 

College of Chemical and Life Sdences 

1322 Syrrons H al 1 , 301-405-6892 

www.cherrlife.urrd.edu 

Dr.JoellePresson, Assistant Dean Academic Undergraduate Programs; Dr. M arci a Shoffner, Assi start Director Biological Sciences Program 

TheMajor 

TheBidogical Sciences major isjdntly offered by the Departments of Biology, Cell Bidogy& Molecular Genetics, andEntorrdogy. All Bidogical Sciences 
maj ors corrpl ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the B asi c Program I n add ti on, students rrust compl ete an A dvanced 
Program wi thi n one of the fol I owi ng sped al i zati on areas: 

• Cell Biology & Genetics (CEBG) 

• Ecdogy& Evolution (ECEV) 

• General Bidogy(GENB) 

• Microbiology (MICB) 

• Physidogy& Neurobiology (PHNB) 
. I ndividuaiized Studies (BIVS) 

A corrpl ete list of specialization area requirements can be found on our website, www.cherrlifeurrd.edu. Notethat the Individualized Studies specialization (BIVS) 
requires permission of the Assi start Dean of Undergraduate Academic Programs, and involves an approved proposal to do coursework in the Col lege and in other 
disciplines. Further questions about Bidogical Sciencescan be directed to tine Undergraduate Academic Program Office at 301-405-6892. 

Biological Sdences at the University of Maryland at Shady Grove 

TheBidogical SciencesProgramattheUniversity of M aryl arxJ offers a degree program at Universities at Shady Grove. TheBidogical Sciences Program at Shady 
Grove offers the A dvanced Program courses normally taken inthej uni or and seni or years. More information is avail able at: 
www.life.urrd.edu/biological_sciences/Shadygrovehtml 

Requirements for the Maj or 

Crafts 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 30 

Basic Program in Biological Sdences 15 

BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 4 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology 1 1 4 

BSCI207 Principlesof Biology III 3 

BSCI222 Principlesof Genetics 4 

Supporting courses 30-32 

MATH 130 or Calculus I 3 

MATH 140 4 

MATH 131 or Calculus 1 1 3 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



MATH 141 4 

CHEM131/132* FundarentelsofGenerd Chemistry /Lab 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I /Lab 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry II /Lab 4 

CHEM271/272* GenChem& Energetics/ Gen Bioandytica 1 Lab 4 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I, or 4 

PHYS141 Pri nci pi esof Physics 4 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physics 1 1, or 4 

PHYS142 Pri nci pi esof Physics 4 
*Wew cherristry courses replace CHEM ICBand CHEM 113 

Advanced Program in Specialization Area 27 

See websi te f or detai I s of sped al i zati on A rea 
requirements. 

ELECT Elective; 15-18 

A grade of C or better i s requi red f or B SC I 105, 106 and 222 (the di versi ty course) , al I courses i n the A dvanced Prograrn and al I support] ng courses ( math, 
chemistry, and physics). Majorsin Biological Sciences cannot use any Chemical and Life Sciences course to fulfil I CORE Advanced Studies requirements, 
including courses in CHEM orBCHM. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each pre-regi strati on period for all Biological Sciences majors. All freshmen and new transfer students will beassigned an advisor 
fromtheCollegeof Chemical and Life Sciences Student Services advising staff. Students will be assigned to a departmental faculty advisor once a basic sequence 
of courses has been successful I y compl eted. The departmental f acul ty advi sors are coordi nated by the f ol I owi ng persons f or the i ndi cated sped al i zati on areas. T hese 
coordi nati ng advi si ng off i ces can be contacted for maki ng appoi ntments wi th an advi sor or for any other i nf ormati on regard ng that sped al i zati on area. 

Straney 1225 H J . Patterson 301-405-2766 CEBG.GENB.MICB 

Compton 2227 Biology-Psychology 301-405-6904 ECEV, PHNB 

Kent 3142 PI ant Sciences 301-405-3911 GENB 

Presson 1322 Syrrons Ha 1 1 301-405-6892 Bl VS, Education Double major 

Honors Program 

Outstandi ng students are encouraged to apply to departmental Honors Programs. Through the H onors Programs students wi 1 1 become actively i nvd ved i n the 
ongoing scientific research at the university. I nformation about these honors pn^rarTBrrBybeobtainedfromtheUrxJergraduateAcademic Programs Office, 1322 
Syrrons H al 1 , 301-405-6892. 

Bidogy(BIOL) 

College of Chemical and Life Sdences 

2227 B i d ogy-Psychol ogy B ui I di ng, 301-405-6904 

www.bid.urrd.edu 

bi oundergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: R. Payne (Prof) 

Professors: G. Borgia, C. Cam, A. Cohen, M. Colombini, D. Gill, D. Inouye, W.Jeff ery.T. Kocher.J . O'Connor, D. Poeppel, A. Popper, M. Reaka, S. Via, G. 

Wilkinson 

Associate Professors: I. Ades, M. Cunnings, J . Dietz, M. Dudash, W. Fagan, C. Fenster, I. Forseth, W. Higgins, E. Quinlan, K. Shaw, S. Sukharev, S.Tishkoff 

Assistant Professors: R. Araneda, A. Bely, K. Carieton, C. Castillo-Davis, E. Haag, P. Kanold, H. Lee, J . Simon, D. Soares 

Instructors: P. KoinesJ . Opoku-Edusei 

Lecturers: R. Compton (Senior Led:), R. lnfantino(SeniorLect),J .Jensen (Senior Lect), P. Lanford, B. Parent 

Professors Emeriti: G. Anastos, E. Clark, J . Corliss, A. Haley, R. Highton, S. Pierce 

Requirements for theMajor 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program el sewhere in this chapter, or contact the Department of B i d ogy U ndergraduate Off i ce. 

Advising 

Advi sing in the Biol ogi cal Sci ences program is mandatory. Students are assigned an advisor based on their area of specialization. The Department of Bidogy faculty 
coordinate and advise students who specialize in Physiology and Neurobidogy (PHNB), and Ecology and Evolution (ECEV). Contact the Department of Biology 
U ndergraduate Off i ce, 405-6904, for i nformati on about advi si ng or to schedul e an appoi ntrrent. For advi si ng i n other B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Sped al i zati on areas, see 
the Bid ogi cal Sci ences Program listing in this catalog. 

Honors Program 

The Department of Biology Honors Program offers highly motivated and academically qual ified students the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor on 
an ori gi nal , i ndependent research proj ect. Students are requi red to parti ci pate i n the program for at I east three semesters and need not have been adrri tted U ni versi ty 
H onors program i n order to parti ci pate Contact the undergraduate off i ce for more i nformati on. 

Business, General 

For information, seeLogistics, Business and Public Pd icy el sewhere in Chapter 7. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (CEBG) 

College of Chemical and Life Sciences 

1109 M i crobi ol ogy B ui I di ng, 301-405-5435 

www.cbmg.urrd.edu 

Chair: S. Wolniak(Prof) 

Director: D. Straney (Assoc. Prof) 

Professors: T. Cooke, S. Hutcheson, D. Mosser, A. Simon, D. Stein, H. Sze 

Associate Professors: S. Benson, C. Chang, J . DeStefano, C. Delwiche, J . Dinman, N. El-Sayed, Z. Liu, K. Mclver, S. Mount, W. Song, R. Stewart 

Assistant Professors: V. Briken, K. Frauwirth, B. Fredericksen, L. Gao, J. Kwak.V. Lee 

Instructors: A. Smith 

Lecturers: E. Moctezuma, B. Quimby, P. Shields 

Affiliate Professors: M. Colombini (Biol), W.Jeffery (Biol), I. Mather (ANGR), S. Salzberg (CBCB) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Ades(Biol), D. Perez (AGNR), L. Pick (Ent) 

AffiliateAssistant Professors I. Hamza(AGNR), M. Pop(CBCB) 

Adj unct Professors: P. Hobart(USAMRIID), A. McBride (Adjunct Prof), B. Moss (NIH), D. Nuss(UMBI )),V.Vakharia (UMBI), O.White (TIGR), R. Wickner 

(NIH) 

Adj unct Associate Prof essors: E. Baehrecke(UMass Med), J . Culver (UMBI), E. Freed (NCI), K. Green (NIH), L. Wu (UMBI) 

Professors Emeriti: G. Bean, R. Doetsch, E. Gantt(DistUnivProf), F. Hetrick, S.Joseph, G. Patterson, M. Pelczar.J . Reveal, B. Roberson, R. Weiner, R.Yuan 

TheMajor 

T he department participates in the teaching and advising of students in the Biological Sciences Program, specifically intheSpecializationAreas of Cell Biology & 
Genetics (CEBG), Microbiology (Ml CB), and General Biology (GENB). Our courses are taught in four basic areas that represent faculty research interests and 
expertise including: 

• Cell and Developmental Biology 

• Genetics and Genomics 

• Microbiology, Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology 

• PI ant Biol ogy 

Requirements for the Specialization Areas 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program catal og entry for more i nformati on on the degree requi rements. 

Requirements for theMajor 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program catal og entry for more i nformati on on the degree requi rements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. The Department in coordination with the Student Affairs Office of the Cdlegeof Chemical and Life Sci ences administers the advising of 
students in the Biol ogi cal Sci ences specialization areas of Microbiology, Cell Biology and Genetics, and General Biology. Advising assignments can be found by 
contacting the Cell Biol ogy and Molecular Genetics Undergraduate Program Office, 1225H.J. Patterson Hall (301-405-2766) or seethesite 
www.cbmg.urrd.edu/undergrad/advi si ng.com 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students may participate in Department hosted research experiences in faculty laboratories or laboratories at off campus locations. PI ease contact the Cell Biology 
and Molecular Genetics Undergraduate Office (301 405- 2766) for more information or see the site www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergrad/research.html 

Honors Prcgram 

The Departmental Honors Programinvolvesalongterm(threesemBster) independent research project undertaken with a faculty advisor. PI ease contact the Cell 
Bid ogy and Molecular Genetics Undergraduate Office for more information or see the site www.cbmg.urrd.edu/undergrad/research.html 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

All students interested in rricrobiol ogy areencouraged to jdnthe University of Maryland Student Chapter of the A meri can Society for Mi crobi d ogy. Sigma Alpha 
Orri cron i s the honors chapter of thi s group. The groups meet regul ariy on campus. I nformati on i s avai I abl e through the U ndergraduate Program Off i ce. 

Awards and Recognition 

T he P . A me H ansen Award i s awarded annual I y to a Departmental H onors student who has demonstrated outstandi ng achi evement through the research expert ence. 
The Sigma Alpha Orri cron Award is giving to outstandi ng seniors who haveexcelled in theareas of Microbiology, or in Cell Biology and Genetics. The 
A ppl erran-N orton A ward i s gi ven to the seni or who has excel I ed i n the area of PI ant B i d ogy. 

Central European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERE) 

Cdlegeof Artsancl Humanities 

2121 Ta 1 i aferro Ha 1 !, 301-405-4289 

www.ceres.umd.edu 

Director: M. Rozenblit 

Professors: R. Brecht, M. David-Fox,J . Herf, J . Lampe, S. Mansbach, P. Murrell, J . Robinson, V.Tismaneanu 

Associate Professors: K.Gor, D.Hitchcock, M. I saacs (Visit Assoc Prof), J . Karrinski, M. Lekic, C. Martin, C. Schuler 

Assistant Professors: E.Adler (Visit Asst Prof), K. David-Fox, E. Papazian 

Admission to theMajor 

Admission is open to all interested students but should beapproved in a meeting with the Director. 
Requi rements for theMajor 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Requirements for the CERES major include the Col lege of Arts and Humanities's mandated completion of 45 upper-level credits. The College's foreign-language 
requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the process of fulfill ing the CERES requi rement of taki ng either Russian, German, or a Central/East European 
I anguage ( i ncl udi ng Czech, Pol i sh, H ungari an, Serbi an and C roati an, B ul gari an, and Romani an) X he I anguage requi rement may al so be f ul f i 1 1 ed by a E urasi an 
language (i.e., a I anguage from a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). Those interested in fulfilling theCERES I anguage requirement through a Central/East 
E uropean or E urasi an I anguage shoul d consul t the di rector upon enteri ng the program 

Students who elect the Russian I anguage track must complete a mini mum of 24 credit hours in Russian language and literature selected from among the foil owing 
courses ( or thei r equi val ents) : 

Crafts 

RUSS101 Intensive Elementary Russianl 6 

RUSS102 Intensive Elementary Russianll 6 

RUSS201 Intermediate Russian I 5 

RUSS202 Intermediate Russian 1 1 5 

RUSS301 Advanced Russian I 3 

RUSS302 Advanced Russian 1 1 3 

RUSS303 Russian Conversation: Functional Skills 3 

RUSS321 Survey of Russian Literature I 3 

RUSS322 Survey of Russian Literature 1 1 3 

RUSS401 Advanced Russian Composition 3 

RUSS402 Practicumin Written Russian 3 

RUSS403 Russian Conversation: Advanced Skills 3 

RUISS404 Practicumin Spoken Russian 3 

Students interested in specializing primarily on Central/Eastern Europe may opt for the German I anguage track, and must complete a mini mum of 24 credit hours in 
the Department of Germanic Studies from among the following courses (or their equivalents): 

Crafts 
GERM 103 Intensive Elementary German 4 

GERM203 Intensive I ntermedi ate German 4 

GERM301 Conversation and Composition I 3 

GERM302 Conversation and Composition 1 1 3 

• Also accepted will be 16 credit hours of Russian or German and the equivalent of 8 credit hours of a Central/East European language. 

• Fulfil ling the language requirement through a Eurasian language will bedecided on a case-by-case basis in consultation with thedi rector. 

• I n addition to I anguage courses, students must complete 24 hours of CERES approved courses at the 300- level or above. These 24 hours must betaken in at 
I east four di ff erent departments ( wi th the School of L anguages, L i teratures and C ul tures counti ng as a si ngl e department) , and may i ncl ude 
language-literaturecourses beyond the requi red 24 hours. Of the 24 hours, at I east 9 hours must be in courses with substantial or specific focus on 
Cer^lEd&Euratfbr exarrpe, ARTH 350 or 488C, GVPT359, 409, HIST 319, 340, 443 and other special courses offered intheCERES area with the 
approval of the director) and at least 9 hours must be i n thoseCERES courses with substantial or specific Russian/Eurasian focus (for exarrple, GEOC 325, 
GVPT445, 451, 459A, 431, HIST344, 424, 425, 442, SOCY474, THET 499, and other special courses offered in the CERES area with the approval of the 
director). 

Forafull listing of this year's CERES courses, seethewebsitewww.cere3.urrd.edu, and click on "requirements." 

T he various cooperating departrrents also offer special (i.e non-permanent) seminars and courses in the Russian, East European, and Eurasian fields. HIST 
237-Russian Civilization, is recommended as a general i ntroduction to the program but does not count toward thefulfi 1 1 ment of the prograrrls requi rements. 

Advising 

Course selection and progress toward programmatic requi rements are to be discussed individually through meetings with theCERES director. 
Undergraduate Research Experiences 

I ntemshi ps and i n-country experi ence shoul d be di scussed i ndi vi dual I y wi th the D i rector. 

CERTI FICATE PROGRAMS (UNDERGRADUATE) 
Certificate Program Information and Requirements 
African American Studies Certificate 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www.bsos.urrd.edu/aasp 

T he Af ri can A meri can Studi es Certi f i cate program offers the opportuni ty to devel op a sped al i zati on i n Af ri can American studies while pursuing a major in another 
field. Certificate students learn about thesocial, economic, political, and cultural history of African American people through a concentration of courses (21 credit 
hours). Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy CORE requi rements and el ectives. Undergraduates in good standing may apply for the 
program by contact] ng the academic advisor of the African A meri can Studi es Department in 2169 LeFrak Hal I. Students pursuing the certificate must meet the 
University's general education (CORE) and department requi rements. Also see theAfricanAmeri can Studi es department I isti ng on this site. 

Asian American Studies Program 

Office of U ndergraduate Studies 

1120 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301.405.0996 

www.aast.urrd.edu 

aast@urrd.edu 

TheAsian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with the opportunity to study critically the experiences of Asian Americans. Through an 
i nterdi scipli nary approach, students exarri ne the hi stori es, communi ti es, and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and connected to the broader 
themes for diversity, ethnicity, race, gender and migration in the Americas. AAST offers a 15 credit-hour minor. 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, endProgrcms 



F or more i nf ormati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n C hapter 6. 
Computational Science 

Collegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3103 M athemati cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-0924 
www.am3c.urrd.edu 

For program requirements see Certificate in Computational Science in thesection on Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation. 
East Asian Studies Certificate 

Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

2101B Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-4309 

The Undergraduate Certificate in East Asian Studies is a 24-credit course of instruction designed to provide specialized knowledge of the cultures, histories, and 
contemporary concerns of the peoples ofChina, Japan, and Korea. Itwill complement and enrich a students maj or. The curriculum focuses on language instruct] on, 
civilization courses, and el ectives in several departments and programs of the university. It is designed specifically for students who wish to expand their knowledge 
of East A si a and demonstrate to prospective employers, the public, and graduate and professional schools a special competence and set of ski lis in East Asian affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, withagradeof C or better in each course, and recommendation by the Coordinator of theCertificatePrograrn a 
certificatewill be awarded. A notation of the award of the certificate will be included on the student's transcript.T he student must have a bachelor's degree awarded 
by Maryland (must beCd lege Park campus) previous to or simultaneously with an award of the certificate 

Certificate Requirements 

CORE Courses: The student i s requi red to take 

1. HIST 284 East Asian Civilization I 

2. HIST 285 EastAsian Civilization 1 1 

3. Six semester hours of introduction to one of the following East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, or Korean): 

CHIN 101 Elerrentay Chinese I 

JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese I 

KORA 101 Elerrentay Korean I 

KORA 102 Elerrentay Korean 1 1 

KORA 211 Introductory Reading for Speakers of Korean I 

K ORA 212 1 ntroductoiy Readi ng for Speakers of K orean 1 1 



Students with I anguage competence equi val ent to these I anguage courses are exempted from the I anguage requi rerrent; such students are requi red to compl ete an 
additional six hours of el ectives in East Asian courses to fulfill the 24-credit requi rerrent for the certificate 

Electives: Students must compl ete at I east 12 hours of el ectives selected fromfour regular approved courses on EastAsia in such disciplines as: (1) anthropology, 
(2) art history, (3) ethnomusicdogy, (4) government and politics, (5) history, (6) language, linguistics, and literature, (7) pi ant science and landscape architecture, 
and (8) women's studies. Nineof the li ! hours of electives must be upper division (300-400 level courses). A maximumof three credit hours of special topics 
courses on East Asia will be allowed with the approval of the certificate coordinator. N orrore than nine credits from any one department or from the students 
maj or may be appl i ed toward the certi f i cate. I n addi ti on, no more than ni ne credi ts of the courses appl i ed toward the certi f i cate may be transferred from other 
institutions. Students are asked to work with the coordinator in ensuring that the el ectives maintain an intercollegiate and interdisciplinary focus (at I east three 
disci pi ines are recomrended). Interested students should contact the Coordinator of theCertificatePrograrn Dr. LindsayYotsukura.JapanesePrograrn School of 
L anguages, L i teratures, and C ul tures, 2106F J i rrenez IHaBiurrd.edu ( websi te at www.ceas. urrd.edu) . 

I international Agricultureand Natural Resources 

Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

0108 Syrrons H al 1 , 301-405-2078 

www.agnr.urrd.edu 

sabrcwn@urrd.edu 

TheCertificatein I ntemarjonal Agricultureand Natural Resources is designed to enrich a student's major with a global perspective. The required courses focus on: 
I anguage instruction; international aspects of the environment, agricultural production, development and sustainabi I ity, nutrition, and business; an experience 
abroad; and a capstone course regardi ng the students travel abroad. A ny student i n good acaderri c standi ng may parti ci pate i n the certi f i cate program 

Requirements for Certificate 

The certificate requi res at I east 21 credits that mayinclude courses taken toward other degree and CORE requirements Upon successful completion of the courses, 
withagradeof C or better in each course arxJ a recorrrrendarj on of theAssociate Dean of theCdlege of Agriculture and Natural Resources, a certificate will be 
awarded. A notation of the award of the certificate will be included on the students transcript. In order to receive the certificate, students must have completed all 
requi rements f or a bachel ors degree 

Foreign Language 

6-8 credi ts i n a f orei gn I anguage 

I nternational Courses 

At I east 9 credits from the foil owing list of courses, at least 3 of thesecourses must be in theCollege of Agriculture and Natural Resources for students not majoring 
i n a program outsi de of the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources: 

PLSC 303 1 ntemarjonal Crop Production 

ENST 440 Crops, Soils, aid Civilization 

AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies 

AREC 433 Food aid Agricultural Pdicy 

B M GT 392 1 ntroducrj on to I ntemarj onal B usi ness M anagerrent 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



BM(jI J90 Competing on Quality maCilobal bconomy 

BSCI 365 International Pesticide Problems and Solutions 

GEOG 434 Agriculture and Rural Development 

NFSC 425 International Nutrition 

AREC 445 Agricultural Development, Population Growth, and the Environment 

ECON 440 International Economics 

GVPT 306 Global Ecopolitics 

GEOG 422 Population Geography 

Travel Study or Travel Abroad 

Three to four credits of travel study or study abroad. Prerequisite to have completed the foreign language course work. Prerequisite or co-requisite six credits from 
the International CoursesList. In order to qualify for the certificate, travel study and study abroad experiences require prior approval of Associate Dean of the College 
Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources. For approval, travel experience must demonstrate significant I earning opportunities in areas related to agriculture and 
natural resources and cultural immersion. 

Travel Study Seminar 

1 credit Travel Study Seminar. Prerequisite completion of the travel study requirement. 

T hi s course will requi re student presentati on of thei r travel expert ence i ncl udi ng a paper, a poster presentati on, as wel I as an oral presented on and di scussi on. 
Latin American Stucies Certificate 

Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

0128B Holzapfe! Hall, (301)405-6459 

www.lasc.umd.edu 

lasc@urrd.edu 

The multi di sci pi i nary certificate program in Latin American Studies is open to University of Maryland, College Park undergraduates in any major who are interested 
in international studies andLatin America The undergraduateCertificate in Latin American Studies will be awarded to students who have completed 21 credits with 
a grade of C or better in the following areas. 

Requirements for Certificate 

A. Corecurriculumfor all certificate students (12 credits) 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II 

HIST 250orHIST 251 Latin American Hi story I or 1 1 

LASC/SPAN/PORT/ANTH 458 Senior capstone course in Latin American Studies 

B. Additional courses in Latin American Studies (9 credits) 

Nine credits are additional courses that must be chosen from an approved list and from at I east two different departments. At least six credits must be at the 300- or 
400-1 evel. See Latin American Studies advisor for details. 

C. Foreign Language Competency 

All certificate students must demonstrate their competence in either Spanish or Portuguese. Competency may be proven with a grade of C orbetterinan 
intermediate I evel course(PORT 204, SPAN 203) or higher. Native speakers of Srjanish or Portugueseor students with extensiveexperienceintheselanguages 
should consult with the Latin American Studies advisor. I nterested students should contact the LA SC Center at lasc@umd.edu or 301-405-6459 and/or our advisor, 
Dr. EydaMerediz, 2225Jimenez Hall duringlierofficehourspostedinourwebpageatwww.lasc.umd.edu 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual andTransgender Studies (LGBT) 

2212 M an e M ount Hall, 301-405-5428 
www. I gbts. urrd.edu 
lgbts@urrd.edu 

The program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual andTransgender Studies(LGBT) offers an interdi sci pi i nary undergraduate certificate and ami nor designed to examine the 
I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and represented ons of L G BT persons, those who are today descri bed as havi ng a rri nori ty sexual ori entati on or who are gender 
transgressive 

For more information, see the Office of Undergraduate Studies in Chapter 6. 
Upper Division Certificatein Secondary Education 

Collegeof Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-6877 
www.education.urrd.edu/EDCI 

See Department of Curriculum and I instruction. 
Women' s Studies C ertificate 

Collegeof Artsand Humanities 

2101 Woods H al 1 , 301-405-6877 
www. womensstudi es. urrd.edu 
womensstudi es@urrd.edu 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



See Women's Stud es Departrrent for faculty roster. 

TheWorren's Studies Certificate Programconsists of an integrated, i nterdi sci pi i nary curriculum on woman that is designed to supplement a student's major. Any 
student in good standing may enrol I in the certificate program by declaring her/his intention to the Woman's Studies Undergraduate Advisor. For additional 
i nformati on contact the Woman's Studi es off i ce, 301-405-6827. 

Requirements for Certificate 

To qualify for a certificate in Woman's Studies, a student will be required to earn 21 credits in Woman's Studies courses, nine of which must be at the 300/400 
I evel . N o more than three credi t hours of sped al topi cs courses may be counted toward the certi f i cats N o more than ni ne credi ts whi ch are appl i ed toward a maj or 
may be included in the certificate program No more than nine credit hours may betaken at instituti ons other than thHniversity of Maryland. Each student must 
obtai n a grade of C or better i n each course that i s to be counted toward the certi f i cate. Of the 21 credi ts, courses rrust be di stri buted as f ol I ows: 
1. Requirements for theCertificate 

Foundation Courses (9 credit hours) 

I ntroduction to Woman's Studies: Woman and Society, OR 

I ntroduction to Woman's Studies: Woman, Art & Culture 

Theori es of Fern ni sm 

Senior Seminar 



WMST200 
WMST250 
WMST400 
WMST488 
Z Distributive Corses 



WMST241 
WMST250 
WMST255 
WMST275 
WMST281 
WMST348 
WMST408 
WMST444 
WMST448 
WMST458 
WMST466 
WMST468 
WMST481 
WMST496 
FREN482 



Area I: Arts and Literature (3 credit hours) 

Woman Writers of French Expression inTranslation (X-listedasFREN241) 

I ntroduction to Woman's Studies: Woman, Art, and Culture 

I ntroduction to Literature by Woman (X-l isted as ENGL255) 

WoridLiteraturebyWoman(X-listedasCMLT 275) 

Woman in German Literature and Society (X-listed asGERM 281) 

Literary Works by Woman (x-listed as ENGL348) 

Special Topics in Literatureby Woman before 1800 (X-listed as ENGL 408) 

Feminist Critical Theory (X-listed as ENGL 444) 

Special Topics in Literature by Woman of Cdor* (X-listed as ENGL448) 

Special Topics in Literatureby Woman after 1800 (X-listed as ENGL458) 

Feminist Perspective on Woman in Art (X-listed as ARTH466) 

Feminist Cultural Studies 

F emmas F atal es and the Representati on of V i ol ence i n L i terature(X - 1 i sted as F R E N 481 ) 

African -American Woman Filmmakers* (X-listed asTHET 496) 

Gender and Ethnicity in Modem French Literature 



WMST210 

WMST211 

WMST212 

WMST320 

WMST453 

WMST454 

WMST455 

WMST456 

WMST457 

AASP498W 

AMST418J 

HIST309 



Area II: Historical Perspectives (3 credit hours) 

Women i n A mari ca to 1880(X -I i sted as H I ST 210) 

Women in America Si nee 1880 (X-listed asHIST 211) 

Women in Western Europe, 1750-present (X-listed as HIST212) 

Women in Classical Antiquity (X-listed asCLAS 320) 

Victorian Women in England, France, and theUnited States (X-listed asHIST493) 

Women in Africa* (X-listed as HIST 494) 

Women in Medieva 1 Culture and Society (X-listed as HIST495) 

Women in the Middle East* 

Changing Perceptions of Gender in theUS: 1880-1935 (X-listed as HIST 433) 

Black Women in United States History* 

Women and F ami I y i n A man can L i f e 

Proserrinar in Historical Writing: Women's History 



WMST200 
WMST313 
WMST324 
WMST325 
WMST326 
WMST336 
WMST360 
WMST410 
WMST420 
WMST425 
WMST430 
WMST436 
WMST452 
WMST471 
WMST493 
WMST494 



Area III: Social and Natural Sciences (3 credit hours) 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Woman and Society 

Women and Sci ence (X-l isted as BSCI 313) 

Communication and Gender (x-l isted as COM M 324) 

Sociology of Gender (X-listed as SOCY 325) 

Biology of Reproduction (X-listed as BSCI 342) 

Psychology of Women (X-listed as PSYC 366) 

Cari bbean Women* 

Women intheAfrican Diaspora* 

Asian-American Women* 

Gender Rol es and Soci al I nsti tuti ons 

Gender Issues in Families (X-listed as FMST 430) 

Lega 1 Status of Women (X-listed as GVPT 436) 

Women and theMedia (X-listed asj OUR 452) 

Women's Health (X-listed as HLTH 471) 

J ewish Women in I ntemational Perspective* 

Lesbian Communities and Difference* 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



AASP498F Special Topics in Black Culture Woman and Work* 

CCJS498 Special Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice Women and Crime 

SOCY498W Special Topics in Sociology: Women in the Military 



*Fulfi lis Women's Studies Multi -Cultural Requirement 

3. Courses in Cultural Diversity (6 credit hours) 

Students wi 1 1 sel ect one course f or a mi ni mum of 3 credi t hours A pproved courses are noted wi th an asteri sk i n secti on 2, above 

Courses in this category may overi ap wi th other requi rements 

4 Remaining Courses 

T he remai ni ng courses may be chosen from any of the three di stri buti ve areas or from among any of the WM ST courses i ncluding 

WMST 298 or 498: Special Topics and WMST 499: 1 ndependent Study. 

Advising 

Toobtain more information, contact the Undergraduate Advisor, 301-405-6827, or write to theWomen's Studies Department, 2101 
WoodsHall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 
Course Code WMST 



CHEMICAL AND Bl OMOLECULAR ENGI NEERI NG (ENCH) 

A. J allies C lark School of E ngineering 

2113 Cherried and Nuclear Engineering Bui I ding, 301-405-1935 

www.chbe.umd.edu 

Chair: F.J oseph Schork 

Professors: M.Anisimov, R. Calabrese, K.Choi, F. Schork (Prof & Chair), W. Wei gand 

Associate Professors: R. Adomaitis, P. Dirritrakopoulos, S. Ehrrran, S. Raghavan, N. Wang, E. Zafiriou 

Assistant Professors: J. Klauda (Asst Prof), G. Sriram(Asst Prof), C.Wang (Asst Prof) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: M . Al-Sheikhly (Affil Assoc Prof, Prof) 

Adjunct Professors: M. Klapa.J . Quackenbush, M. Ranade (Adjunct Prof), A.Yang 

Professors Emeriti: J . Gentry (Prof Emeritus), S. Greer (Affiliate Prof, Prof Errerita),T. McAvoy.T. Regan, J . Sengers, T. Srrith (Prof Emeritus) 

Visiting Faculty: H. Hwang (VisitAssoc Prof), H. Kim (Visit Prof) 

TheMajor 

Students in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Maryland learn to use a combination of mathematical, physical, 
cherri cal , and bi ol ogi cal sci ence concepts wi thi n a ri gorous engi neeri ng desi gn framework, graduati ng wi th a uni que set of ski 1 1 s hi ghl y val ued by a wi de range of 
ernpl oyers i n i ndustry, acaderri a, and the government. T he wi de breadth of thi s prof essi on and the Departments uni que strengths i n nanotechnd ogy and 
bi otechnol ogy prepare our students for outstandi ng careers. 

B ecause of the wi de range of ulti mate appl i cati ons, the cherri cal engi neer f i nds i nteresti ng and di verse career opportuni ties in such vari ed f i el ds as cherri cal 
( i norgani c and organi c) , food processi ng and manuf acturi ng, metal I urgi cal , pol ymer, energy conversi on, envi ronmental engi neeri ng, petrol eum ( ref i ni ng, 
product] on, or petrocherri cal ) , and pharmaceuti cal i ndustri es. Additi onal opportuni ti es are presented by the research and devel opmant acti vi ti es of many pud i c and 
private research institutes and all government agencies. Our graduates havetaken jobs with companies like DuPont, ExxonModl, Proctor & Gamde, the Food and 
Drug Administration, and the Department of Defense 

On top of all the options and opportunities, chemical and bi omol ecul ar engi neers have traditional I y ranked at or near the top of starting salaries among all of the 
engi neeri ng prof essi ons! 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym ENCH 

Program Obj ecti ves 

• Provi de students wi th a sd i d f oundati on i n cherri cal engi neeri ng sci ence fundamental s as wel I as a broad background i n sci ence and mathemati cs to equi p 
them to enter prof essi onal and cherri cal engi neeri ng practi ce and to enter graduate study at I eadi ng uni versi ti es. 

• Prepare students to excel i n tradi ti onal cherri cal engi neeri ng careers and di verse careers i n areas such as d otechnol ogy, nanotechnd ogy, medi ci ne, I aw or 
business. 

• Produce graduates who are equi pped wi th quanti tati ve prod em sd vi ng, teamwork, comrruni cati on ski 1 1 s, and a strong ethi cal f oundati on that will serve them 
throughout thei r careers. 

Prcgram L ear ni ng Outcomes 

Students are expected to fully engage with the curriculum and the opportunities presented for learning and research. Having completed the degree 
program, students should have acquired the following knowledge and skills: 

• A n ad I i ty to appl y knowl edge of cherri cal engi neeri ng fundamental s to i denti fy and sd ve cherri cal engi neeri ng prod ems. 

• A n ad I i ty to appl y mathemati cs rel evant to engi neeri ng and the physi cal and cherri cal sci ences to i denti fy and sol ve techni cal prod ems. 

• A broad knowl edge necessary to understand the i rrpact of engi neeri ng sd uti ons i n a gl obal and soci etal context. 

• An ability to perform step-by-step design of engineered systems and chemical processes. 

• An ad I ity to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 

• An awareness of safety and envi ronmental i ssues as an i ntegral part of the cherri cal engi neeri ng professi on. 

• Skills necessary for errd oymant i n a vari ety of posi ti ons i n i ndustry or government or for conti nued study i n graduate or professi onal schod s. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



• An understand ng of current technd ogi cal i ssues rel ated to cherni cal engi neeri ng. 
Admission to theMajor 

All Chemical E ngi neeri ng majors must meet adrrissi on, progress, and retention standards of the CI ark School of Engineering. 

Students who wish to study at the CI ark School apply for adrrissi on to the University of Maryland; there is no separate application for engineering. When filling out 
the uni versi ty appl i cati on, you may choose cherri cal and bi omol ecul ar engi neeri ng as your i ntended maj or. 

Requirements for theMajor 

Thecurriculumis composed of: 

• The required CORE (general education) requirements of Col lege Park. 

• The required Engineering core of 37 credits of ENCH courses which include 

ENCH215 Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 

ENCH250 ComputerMethodsinCherrical Engineering 3 

ENCH300 Chemical PrccessTherrrodynarrics 3 

ENCH333 Chemical Engineering Seminar 1 

ENCH400 Chemical Engi neeri ngThefmodynarrics 3 

ENCH422 Transport Processes I 3 

ENCH424 Transport Processeslll 3 

ENCH426 Transport Processeslll 3 

ENCH437 Chemical Engineering Laboratory 3 

ENCH440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 

ENCH442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis 3 

ENCH444 Process Engineering Econorrics& Design I 3 

ENCH446 Process Engineering Econorrics& Designll 3 

• M athemati cs - four semesters 

• Physi cs - three semester 

• Chemistry (lecture/laboratory): one freshmen Chemistry, two Organic Chemistry, two Physical Chemistry 

MinirrumDegreeCredits: 128 credits and fulfillment of all Departmental, College, andUniversity requirements with a cumulative grade point averageof 2.0 

Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate courses for their particular course of study. 

Technical ElectivesGuiddines 

Twelve credits of ENCH technical electives are required. 1 1 is recommended that they be taken during the senior year. 

TheseniorENCH technical electives are400-level chemical engineering courses, including EN CH468x, andalirrited number of approved 400-level technical 
courses from outside cherri cal engineering. Students shoul d sel ect electives with the helper an academic advisor. Normally at I east three of the four technical 
electivesshouldbeENCH4xx; the fourth elective may be chosen from ENCH or from an approved I ist of non-ENCH technical courses. Business or non-technical 
courses are normal ly not approved. 

Oneof theelectives must have significant mathematical content, and one of the electives must have significant bid ogi cal content. Selection of the electives with 
si gni f i cant mathemati cal or bi d ogi cal content i s subj ect to the above constrai nt that at I east three of the f our el ecti ves are normal I y E N C H courses. 

Upon the approval of the academic advisor and written permission of the Department, a limited number of substitutions may be permitted. Substitutes, including 
ENCH468 Research (1-3 credits), must fit into an overall plan of study emphasis and ensurethat the plan fulfills the accreditation design requirements. Students 
may el ect to specialize in a sped fie area such as Biol ogi cal E ngi neeri ng or Nanotechndogy and Macromol ecul ar Science; or they may sample a variety of elective 
courses. Upon graduation, those who specialize in a particular technical area will receive a letter in recognition of their accomplishment from the Chair and the 
Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Cherri cal Engineering Department. A I ist of technical el ecti ves are posted at: www.chbe.urrd.edu/undergrad. 

Other Requirements for theMajor 

SairpleUrelergraduate Program Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 

Freshman Year 

Course Title Fa " S" 

Credits Credits 

ENES100 Introduction to Engineering Design ^ 

(**can be taken first or second semester) 

ENES102 Statics (**cante(aten first or second semester) - 3** 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 - 4 

CHEM 135 Chemistry for Engineers, Lecture 3 

CHEM 136 CherristryforEngineers, Lab 1 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 3 

PHYS161 General Physics I - 3 

CORE Program Requirements - 6 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Total 



14 



16 



Sophomore Year 



Cal cul us 1 1 1 



Fall 
Credits 



MATH 
241 

MATH 246 Differential Equations 

PHYS260 General Physics 1 1 3 

PHY S 261 General Physicsll lab 1 

PHY S 270 General Physi cs 1 1 1 

PHY S 271 General Physi cs 1 1 1 I ab 

CHEM 23 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 241 OrganicCherristryll 

ENCH 215 Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 

ENCH 250 ComputerMethodsinChemical Engineering 

ENCH 300 Chemcal ProcessTherrnDdynarricsfTherrrD 

CORE Program Requi rements 3 

Total 18 



Spring 
Credits 



3 
3 

17 



Fall Spring 
C redits C reditu 



J uiior Year 

ENMA Introduction to Material sand Their Applications 
300 (formerly EN ES 230) 

CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry 1 1 

CHEM 483 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 

ENCH 400 Chemical EngirieeringTherrrDdynarricsfrhermoll) 

ENCH 333 Seminar 

ENCH 422 Transport Processes I 

ENCH 424 Transport Processes 1 1 

ENCH 426 Transport Processes 1 1 1 

ENCH 440 Cherried Engineering Kinetics 

ENCH 442 Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

CORE Program Requi rements 

Total 

Senior Year 



ENCH 437 Chemical Engineering Lab 

ENCH 444 Process Engineering Econorrics& Design I 

ENCH 446 Process Engineering Economics & Design 1 1 

ENCH Technica 1 Electives 

CORE Program Requi rements 

Total 

Advising 

All students choosing Chemical Engineering as their primary field must see an undergraduate advisor each semester. Appointments for advising can be made at 
2113Cherrica l and Nuclear Engineering Building, 301-405-1935. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A unique aspect of the Departments undergraduate program is its high level of student participation in cutting-edge research. Approximately half of our students 
graduate with significant lab experience and most find it to be one of the high points of their undergraduate education. 

Co-op Prog-ams 

TheCherrical Engineering program works within the CI ark School of Engineering Cooperative Engineering Education Program For information on this program 
consult the CI ark School of Engineeri ng entry of this catalog or cal I 301-405-3863. 

Honors Program 

TheA. James Clark School of Engineering hosts a chapter of the Omega Chi Epsi I on National Honor Society for chemical engineering, as well as a chapter of the 
engi neering honor society Tau Beta Pi . 



- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


3 


17 


16 


Fall Spring 
Credits Credits 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


6 


6 


3 


6 


15 


15 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organization, the A men can Institute of Chemical Engineers. Omega Chi E pi si I on is the honorary 
C hem cal E ngi neeri ng Sod ety 

Scholarships and Finandal Assistance 

Financial aid based upon need is avail able through the Office of Student Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are avail able through theA. J aires Clark School 
of Engineering. ThedepartrrBntoffersopportunitiesforresearchardotherpart-tin^enployment. 

Awards and Recognition 

Annual awards aregiven to recognize scholarship and outstanding service to the Department, CdlegeandUniversity. Theseawardsincludethe David Arthur 
Berman Memorial Award, the Russell B arch Memorial Award, ard several American Institute of Chemical Engineers (A I CHE) awards. AlChE awards are given 
to thejuniorwith the highest cumulativeGPA as well as to the outstandi ng junior and outstandi ng senior in Chemical Engineering. 



CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (CHEM,BCHM) 

College of Chemical and Life Sciences 

0107H Chemistry Building, 301-405-1788 

www.chemumd.edu 

Student Information: 2102ChemBldg; 301-405-1791 

Chair: M. Doyle (Professor) 

Professors: M. Alexander, N. Allewell, H. Arm-on, D. Beckett, N. Blough.J . Davis, P. DeShong, B. Eichhorn, D. Falvey, C. Fenselau, J . Fourkas, S. Greer, G. 

Lorirrer, A. Mignerey, J . Ondov, J . Reutt-Robey, S. Rokita, L. Sita, D.Thirumalai, J .Tossell, W. Waiters, J . Weeks, M. Zachari ah 

Associate Professors: D. Fushman, L. Isaacs, C.Jarzynski, D.J ulin, J . Kahn, C. Lee, A. Mullin, V. Munoz, R. Walker 

Assistant Professors: T. Cropp, B. Gerratana, D. Kosov, N. LaRonde-LeBlanc, S. Lee, H. Sintirn V. Tugarinov, A. Vedemikov 

Instructors: S. Ebrahirrian 

Lecturers: M. Brooks, B. Dixon, L. Friedman.J . Klassen, M. McDerrrott-Jones, M. Montague-Smith, D. Steffek 

Affiliate Professors: M. Anisirrov.J . Dinman, S. Sukharev, E.Williams 

Adjunct Professors: F. Khachik, E. Mazzola 

Professors Emeriti: J . Bel lama, A. Boyd, H. DeVoe, D. Freeman, S. GrirnJ . Hansen, K. Henery-Logan, C. HolrriundJ . Huheey, R.Jaquith, B.Jarvis, F. Kasler, R. 

Khanna, G. Miller, J . Moore R. Munn.T. O'Haver.J . Stewart 

Requirements for theMajor 

Note: The lower-level courses offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry changed starting in the Fall 2005 semester. The lower-level requirements 
for cherri stry and bi ocherri stry maj ors are ref I ected i n the requi rements I i sted bel ow . F or detai I s, contact the U ndergraduate Off i ce or vi si t the undergraduate 
section of the Departments website 

Chemistry Majors 

All requi red cherri stry and biocherri stry courses must be passed with a mini mum grade of C. Requi red supporting courses, including BSCI 105, must be passed 
with a 2.0 grade pd nt average 

Crafts 
Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principlesof General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principlesof Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principlesof Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHEM276/277 General Cherri stry and Energetics) Maj ors) /Lab 5 

CHEM395 Professional Issues in Cherri stry and Biocherri stry 1 

CHEM425 Instrumental Methodsof Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483 Physical Chemistry I /Lab 5 

ENGL101 IntroductiontoWriting 3 

UNIV100 The Student in the University 1 

Supporting Courses 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 4 

PHYS141/142 Principlesof Physics 8 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 4 

NOTE: All majors and potential majors are encouraged to take 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior to beginning Physical Chenistry. 

Departmental Requirements 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 24 

trust include: 
CHEM401 Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM482/484 Physical Chemistry 1 1 /Lab 5 

ELECT UL approved upper level CHEM/BCHM courses 6 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



I n order to meet requi rements for a degree approved by the A meri can Chemical Society (ACS), students must complete a specific set of courses in addition to this 
curriculum I nformation about ACS certification can beobtained in the undergraduate office. 

Biochemistry Majors 

All required chemistry, biochemistry, and upper-level biological sci ences courses must be passed with a mini mum grade of C. Required supporting courses, 
includingBSCI 105, must be passed with a 2.0 grade point average. 

Crafts 
Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principlesof General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principlesof Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principlesof Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHEM276/277 General Chemistry and Energetics- Majors/ Lab 5 

CHEM395 Professional Issues in Chemistry and Biochemistry 1 

CHEM425 Instrumental Methodsof Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483 Physical Chemistry I /Lab ' 5 

ENGL101 IntroductiontoWriting 3 

UNIV100 The Student in the University 1 



Supporting Courses 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 

PHY S141/142 Pri nci pi es of Physi cs 
MATH 140 Calculus I 
MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 



NOTE: All majors and potential majors are encouraged to fate 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior to beginning Physical Chem'stry. 



Departmental Requirements 

Lower level courses 

Supporting courses 

Upper level courses 

mist include: 
BCHM461 Biochemistry I 
BCHM462 Biochemistry 1 1 
BCHM464 Biochemistry Laboratory 
BCHM465 Biochemistry III 
BCHM4S5 Physical Biochemistry 

approved biological science courses 



16 
20 
25 



* Specific i nformation about course requirements can be obtained in the undergraduate office. 

* A student who enrol Is in the chemistry or biochemistry program at any tirrefd I owingthefirst semester of study typically will enter the non- majors introductory 
sequence(CHEM 131/132, 231/232, 241/242 and 271/272; CHEM 132, 232, 242 and 272 areco-requisitelaboratory courses) which fulfil Is the lower- level 
departmental requi remsnts. Transfer students who wi sh to pursue cherri stry or bi ocherri stry maj ors wi 1 1 have thei r previ ous cherri stry course work careful I y 

eval uated for pi acement i n the appropri ate courses. Starti ng i n 2007, transfer students wi th f our or more semesters of general and organi c cherri stry credi t must take; 
at a rri ni mum, the C H E M 272 1 aboratory course to compl ete the i ntroductory sequence. 



Advising 

There is mandatory advising for all Chemical and Life Sci encemaj ors each semester. A dvi sing appointments can be made by contacting the undergraduate office, 
2102Cherristry Building, 301-405-1791 

Honors Program 

Students with a G PA of 3.0 or better who have completed two semesters of CHEM 399 (Introduction to Chemical Research) have an opportunity to sign up for 
CHEM 398 (Honors Research) in their senior year and be considered for departmental honors. After successful completion of a senior honors thesis and seminar, 
graduation with honors or with high honors in chemistry or biochemistry can be attained 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Alpha Chi Sigma Cherri stry Fraternity is a professional fraternity which recruits men and women students from chemistry, biochemistry, and related science 

maj ors duri ng each fal I and spri ng semester. The f ratemi ty hd ds weekly rreeti ngs and provi des tutori ng for students i n I ower-l evel cherri stry courses. The off i ce i s 

i n Room 2106ACherri stry Bui I ding. Dr. Lyle Isaacs (3341 Cherri stry Bui I ding, 301-405-1884)) is the faculty advisor. 

Thestudent affiliate programof the American Chemical Society (SA -ACS) is designed to introduce students in cherri stry, biochemistry and related fields to a 
variety of professional activities. Student affiliates will gain ski I Is and make contacts aimed at launching a successful career i n sci ence. A ctivi ties include 
networki ng and meeting with professionals, attending national meetings, and participating in public outreach programs. Affiliates also receive subscriptions to 
Chemical & Engineering News, the undergraduate career magazi ne/'nC/iem'stry, as well as gaining on-line access to announcements regarding job and intern 
opportunities. Thestudent affiliate office is located in Room 2112A of theC hem stry Building. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Two schol arshi ps are avai I abl e for maj ors: the I si dore and A nni e A dl er Schd arshi p of $500 to an outstandi ng maj or wi th f i nanci al need and the L ei dy Foundati on 
Scholarships of $600 to two outstanding junior maj ors. No application is necessary, as all maj ors are automatically reviewed by theAwards Committee. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Chinese(CHIN) 

Collegeof Arts and Humanities 

2106J im®iez Hall, 301- 405-4239 
www.chinese.umd.edu 

TheMajor 

The Chinese major provides the training and cultural background needed for entering East Asia-related careers i n such fields as higher education, the arts, business, 
government, i ntemati onal rel ati ons, agri cul ture, or the medi a. Students may al so consi der a doubl e maj or i n C hi nese and another di sci pi i ne, such as busi ness, 
government and politics, economics, or j ournal i sm C hi nese students have the option of applying to live in St. Mary's Hall (Language House) and participating in a 
study abroad program 

Requi rements for theMajor 

As of Fall, 2007, the Chi nese major requires 39 credits 18 of language, 3 of CHIN207, and 18 of non-language electives, as descri bed below.No grade lower 
than C (2.0) may be used toward the major. 

I. Language require m ents 18 credits of Chi nese language at 200-level or above. Student placing into the program at higher levels should reach at I east the level of 
CHI N302 or CHI N306 but may substitute non-language courses on China-related subjects for someof these 18 credits. (Thefinal decision on what substitute 
courses may be used for the maj or rests wi th the C hi nese Program and the C hi nese A dvi sor. ) L anguage courses accepted for the maj or i ncl ude 

• CHI N201/202 Intermediate Spoken Chi nese I and Intermediate Written Chi nese I (must be taken together and passed together) 

• CHI N203/204 1 ntermedi ate Spoken Chi nese 1 1 and I ntermedi ate Written Chi nese 1 1 (must betaken together and passed together) 
. CHI N301 Advanced Chinesel 

. CHIN302 Advanced Chi nesel I 
. CHIN305 Lifein China through TV Plays I 
.CHIN306Lifein China through TV Plays II 
. CHI N401 Readings in Modem Chinesel 
. CHI N402 Readings in Modem Chinesel I 

• CHIN418A Special TopicsinConterrporaryChineseFiction and Film Sex and the City: Literary and Filmic Representations of Women (taught in Chi nese) 

• CHI N418B Special Topics in Contemporary Chi nese Fiction and Film The Representation of Youth (taught in Chinese) 

• CHIN 441 Traditional Chi nese Fiction (taught in Chi nese) 
. CHI N442 Modem Chi neseFicti on (taught in Chi nese) 

II. Linguistic Resources for Students of Chinese! 3 credits 

CHI N207 (3 credits). This course is intended primarily for students at second year level. Thegoal is to guide students into becoming more independent and effective 
I earners of the I anguage. 

If the student is already at the third year level or above, a 3-credit substitute can be arranged with the approval of theadvisor. See "NorH anguage Requi rements", 
bel ow, f or a I i st of some acceptabl e courses 

III. Literature: 3 credits of Chi nese literature at 300 level or above. Courses accepted include 

• C H I N 314 C hi nese F i cti on and D rama i n T ransl ati on 

• CHI N315 Modem Chi nese Literature inTransI ati on 
. CHIN316Traditional ChineseValues 

• CHIN418A Special TopicsinConterrporaryChineseFiction and Film Sex and the City: Literary and Filmic Representations of Women 

• CHIN418B 3 Special Topics in Contemporary Chinese Fiction and Film The Representation of Youth 
. CHI N442 Modem Chi neseFicti on 

IV. Linguistics. 3 credits of Chi nese linguistics at 300 level or above Courses accepted include 

• CHIN421 Sounds and Transcripti ons of Mandarin Chinese 

• C H I N 422 A dvanced C hi nese G rammar 
.CHIN423ChineseHistorical Phonology 

. CHI N424 Linguistics of the Chi nese Writing System 

• CHI N 428 Selected Topics in Chi nese Linguistics 
. EALL300TheLanguagesof EastAsia 

V. History/Civilization. 6 credits of Chi nese hi story/civilization offered by other departments. Courses accepted include, but are not limited to: 

• EALL310AsianCultureandtheSinosphere 

• HIST284 East Asian Civilization I 
. HIST 285 East Asian Civilization 1 1 

• HIST480HistoryofTraditional China 
.HIST481A History of Modem China 

"Special Topics" and "Colloquium" courses (those with variable numbers, ending in 8 or 9 and followed by a letter) may be acceptable but only depending on the 
actual title and content of the course at the time it is offered. Thefinal say on whether such courses areacceptable for a particular students maj or is in the hands of 
the C hi nese Program and the C hi nese A dvi sor. 

Electives. 6 credits of electives at 300 level or above, subject to the advisor's approval. In addition to all the specific courses listed "Non-languageRequirerrents", 
above, I anguage courses and i ndependent study may al so be used toward thi s requi rerrent. 

Civil and Environmental Engnea'ing(ENCE) 

A. J ames C lark School of E ngineering 

1173 Engineering Classroom Bui I ding, 301-405-7768 

www.cee.urrd.edu 

Chair: A. Haghani 

Professors: M. Aggour, A. Arrde, B. Ayyub, G. Baecher, G. Chang, A. Davis, D. Goodings, O. Hao, R. McCuen, P. Schonfeld, M. Skibniewski, A. Torrents 

Associate Professors: M.Austin, A. Aydi I ek, K. Brubaker, P. Chang, S. Gabriel, D. Goulias, D. Lovell, E. Miller-Hooks, C. Schwartz, E. Seagren.Y. Zhang 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Assistant Professors: C. Cirillo, Q. Cui, L. Zhang (A sst Prof) 

Affiliate Professors: J . Gansler, B. Golden, E. Kalnay, M . Ruth 

AffiliateAssistant Professors K. Clifton 

Professors Emsriti: P. Albrecht, F. Birkner.J . Cdville, B. Donaldson, R. Ragan, D. Schel ling, Y. Sternberg, D.Vannoy, M. Witczak 

Program Obj actives 

The mission of the Departrrent isthreefold: 

1. Providea high quality, challenging education that encompasses breadth and depth; and prepare graduates to be proficient in both analysis and 
synthesi s facets of ci vi I engi neeri ng desi gn; 

2. M ai ntai n a strong research program that i s recogni zed for excel I ence i n maj or areas of ci vi I and envi ronmantal engi neeri ng; 

3. Provide service to the University, the civil engineering profession, and the community at large. 

T he Departrrent provi des an educati onal program of basi c and sped al i zed engi neeri ng knowl edge necessary for i ts graduates to be prof i ci ent i n recogni zed 
special ties of civil engineering. This preparation provides graduates with the toolsneeded for successful practice in the period foil owing graduation. Inadditionto 
general and technical education, the educati onal program stresses professional and ethical responsibilities, an awareness of societal issues, and the need for life-long 
learning. 

T he Departrrent contri butes to the advancement of knowl edge through research on i mportant engi neeri ng probl ems. The research resul ts are communi cated through 
recognized channels of knowl edge dissemination. 

The Departrrent serves the needs of the community by emphasizing global and societal issues The Departrrent addresses these issues through University and 
prof essi onal channel s and contri butes to thei r sol uti ons. 

The Departrrent, building upon the above mission, established three program educati onal objectives: 

1. Prepare our graduates for competent professional practice within civil engi neeri ng rel ated industries of Maryland and the mi d-Ati antic region. 

2. C reate a cadre of graduates wi th the breadth of i nterests and ski 1 1 s to take on chal I engi ng new areas of engi neeri ng practi ce. 
3. 1 nsti 1 1 i n our graduates a recogni ti on of the i mportance of conti nui ng prof essi onal devel oprrent. 

Pro-am L ear ni ng Outcomes 

The Departrrent has established twenty program outcomes, which includeABET's (a) through (k) criteria, pi us four additional American Society of Civil Engineers 
(ASCE) outcomes The outcomes are listed below, together with Department-specific interpretations, following ASCE. 

1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics. A technical coreof knowl edge and breadth of coverage in mathematics, science, and civil 

engi neeri ng, i ncl udi ng the fundamental s of several recogni zed maj or C E areas: mathemati cs through di fferenti al equati ons, probabi I i ty and stati sti cs. 

2. An ability to apply knowl edge of basic science M astery of coursework i n: calculus-based physics, biology*, chemistry, ecology*, and 
geol ogy/geomorphol ogy. 

3. A n abi I i ty to appl y knowl edge of engi neeri ng pri nci pi es. M astery of coursework i n: engi neeri ng economi cs, mechani cs, materi al properti es, systems, 
andgeo-spatial representation. 

4. A n abi I i ty to use computers to sd ve engi neeri ng probl ems. M astery of coursework i n i nf ormati on technd ogy. 

5. An ability to identify, formulate, and sol ve engi neeri ng probl ems. T he abi I ity to assess si tuati ons in order to identify engi neeri ng probl ems, formulate 
al temati ves, and recommend f easi d e sd uti ons. 

6. An abi I ity to design and conduct experiments. I n at I east one of the maj or recogni zed CE areas, should be able to design and conduct field and 
laboratory studies, gather data, create numerical and other models, and then analyze and interpret the results (e.g., traffic, geotechnical, and water 
qual i ty i nvesti gati ons) . 

7. An abi I ity to analyze and interpret data. (See*). 

8. An abi I ity to design a component, system or process to meet desi red needs. Critical desi gnmethodol ogy and process el ements include prod em 
definition, scope, analysis, risk assessment, creativity, synthesizing alternatives, iteration, codes, safety, security and constructad I ity, sustainability, and 
multiple objecti ves and various perspectives. Other important design or design procurement el ements are bidding versus qualifications-based selection; 
esti mati ng engi neeri ng costs; i nteracti on between pi anni ng, desi gn and construct] on; owner-engi neer rel ati onshi ps; and I i f e-cycl e assessment. 
Understanding large-scale systems is important, including the need to integrate information, organizations, people, processes, and technd ogy. Design 
experi ences shod d be i ntegrated throughout the prof essi onal component of the curri cul um 

9. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and tods of modem engineering. This includes the role and use of appropriate information technology, 
contemporary anal ysi s and desi gn methods, and appl i cabl e desi gn codes and standards as practi cal prod em-sol vi ng tod s to comd errent knowl edge of 
fundamental concepts. A I so i ncl uded i s the abi I i ty to sel ect the appropri ate tool s for sol vi ng di ff erent types and I evil s of probl ems. 

10. A n ad I i ty to wri te effect] vel y. Effect] ve communi cati on i ncl udes I i steni ng, observi ng, readi ng, speaki ng, and wri ti ng and requi res understand ng of 
the fundamentals of interacting effectively with technical and non-technical orlay individual sand audi ences in a variety of settings. Our graduates 
need to be versati I e wi th mathemati cs, graphi cs, the wori dwi de web and other communi cati on tool s. 

11. An ad I ity to speak effectively. See#L0. 

12. An abi I ity to function effectively as part of ateam Beableto: lead a design or other team as well as participate as a member of a team; 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



demonstrate an understand ng of team format] on and evol uti on, personal i ty prof i I es, team dynarri cs, col I aborati on among di verse di sci pi i nes, probl em 
sd vi ng, and ti rre managemant; and be abl e to foster and i ntegrate di versi ty of perspecti ves, knowl edge and experi ence. 

13. A n understand! ng of prof essi onal and ethi cal responsi bi I i ty . D erronstrate an understand! ng of and a comrri tment to practi ce accordi ng to the seven 
Fundamental Canons of Ethics and the associated Guidelines to Practice Under the Fundamental Canons of Ethics. 

14. A knowledge of contemporary issues in engineering. Should appreciate the relationship of engineering to critical contemporary issues such as 
multicultural globalization of engineering practice; raising the quality of life around the globe; the growing diversity of society; and the technical, 
environmental, societal, political, legal, aesthetic, economic, and financial implications of engineering projects. 

15. A n understandi ng of the i mpact of engi neeri ng sol uti ons in a gl obal and soci etal context. N eed to appreci ate, from hi stori cal and contemporary 
perspecti ves, cul ture, human arid organi zati onal behavi or, aestheti cs and ecol ogy and thei r i mpacts on soci ety . I ncl udes hi story and heri tage of the C E 
profession. 

16. An awareness of the need to continually upgrade ones technical knowl edge base and ski I Is. Life-long learning mechanisms availablefor personal 
and professional development include additional formal education, continuing education, professional practice experi ence, active involvement in 
professional societies, community service, coaching, mentoring, and other learning and growth activities. Personal and professional development can 
i ncl ude devel opi ng understandi ng of and competence i n goal setti ng, personal ti rre managemant, communi cati on, del egati on, personal i ty types, 
networking, leadership, the socio-political process, and effecting change Professional devel oprrent can, i n add ti on to the preceding, i ncl ude career 
management, i ncreasi ng di sci pi i ne kncwl edge, understand ng busi ness fundamental s, contri buti ng to the prof essi on, consi deri ng sel f-empl oyment, 
achi evi ng I i censure and sped al ty certi f i cati on, and addi ti onal graduate studi es. 

17. An ability to apply knowledge in a specialized area related to civil engineering. For a professional civil engineer, specialized technical coursework 
(ortheequivalent) isnecessary. Examples of specialized technical areas include environmental engineering, structural engineering, construction 

engi neeri ng and management, pud i c works management, transportati on engi neeri ng and water resources managemant. C i vi I engi neeri ng 
sped al i zati ons i n non-tradi ti onal , boundary, or emargi ng f i el ds such as ecd ogi cal engi neeri ng and nanotechnol ogy are encouraged. 

18. A n understandi ng of the el emants of proj ect managemant, construct] on, and asset managemant. Efforts of the prof essi onal ci vi I engi neer often I ead, 
i n the context of proj ects, to construed on of structures, facilities and systems that, i n turn, must be operated and mai ntai ned. Proj ect managemant 
essenti al s i ncl ude proj ect manager responsi bi I i ti es, def i ni ng and maeti ng cl i ent requi remants, ri sk assessment and managemant, stakehol der 

i denti fi cati on and i nvol vemant, contract negoti ati on, proj ect work pi ans, scope and del i verabl es, budget and schedul e preparati on and moni tori ng, 
i nteracti on among engi neeri ng and other di sci pi i nes, quality assurance and quality control , and di spute resd uti on processes. I mportant construct] on 
el emants are owner-engineer-contractor relationships; proj ect deli very systems (eg., design-bid-build, design-build); estimating construct] on costs; 
bidding by contractors; labor and labor managemant issues; and construction processes, methods, systems, equipment, planning, scheduling, safety, cost 
anal ysi s and cost control . A sset managemant seeks eff ecti ve and efficient I ong-term ownershi p of capi tal f aci I i ti es vi a systemati c acqui si ti on, 
operation, maintenance, preservation, replacement, and disposition. Goal si ncl ude optimizing life-cycle performance, minimizing life-cycle costs, and 
achi evi ng maxi mum stakehol der benef i t. Tod s and techni ques i ncl ude desi gn i nnovati ons, new construct] on technd ogi es, materi al s i rrprovemants, 
geo-mappi ng, database managemant, val ue assessment, performance model s, web-based communi cati on, and cost accounti ng. I ncl ud ng asset 
management recogni zes that ci vi I engi neers, duri ng thei r careers, are I i kel y to be i nvol ved wi th soma aspect of capi tal f aci I i ti es managemant. 

19. A n understandi ng of busi ness and publ i c pd i cy and adrri ni strati on fundamental s. The prof essi onal ci vi I engi neer typi cal I y f uncti ons wi thi n both the 
public and pri vate sectors that requi res at I east an understandi ng of busi ness, pud i c pol i cy, and publ i c adrri ni strati on fundamental s. I mportant busi ness 
fundamentals topics as typically applied in the private, government and non-profit sectors include legal forms of ownershi p, organizational structure 
and design, income statements, balance sheets, decision (engineering) economics, finance, marketing and sales, bill able time, overhead, and profit. 
Essential public pol icy and administration fundamental si ncl ude the political process, pudiepdicy, laws and regulations, funding mechanisms, public 
educati on and i nvol vemant, govemmant-busi ness i nteracti on, and the publ i c servi ce responsi bi I i ty of prof essi onal s. 

20. An understanding of the role of the leader and leadership principles and attitudes. Leading, in the pri vate and public arena -which differs from and 
complements managing - requires broad motivation, direction, and communication knowl edge and skills. Attitudes generally accepted as being 
conducive to I eadershi pi ncl ude comrri tmant, confidence, curiosity, entrepreneurs!! p, high expectations, honesty, integrity, judgment, persistence, 
positiveness, and sensitivity. Desirable behaviors of leaders, which can be taught and I earned, include earning trust, trusting others, formulating and 
articulating vision, communication, rational thinking, openness, consistency, comrri tmant to organizational values, and discretion with sensitive 
information. 

* I ncreased exposure to or emphasi s on bi ol ogi cal systems, ecol ogy, sustai nabi I i ty, nanotechnd ogy, and i nf ormati on technol ogy i s expected to occur i n the 21st 
century. 

AckrisaontotheMajor 

See the entrance requi remants for the A. Jamas CI ark School of Engineering in theColleges and Schools section of this site. 

Requi rements for theMajor 

The Departrrent offers a program of study leading to anABET-accredited Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) degree Each student specializes in one 
of three tracks: Infrastructure Engineering (Structural andGeotechnical), Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, or Transportati on Systems and Project 
Managemant. A total of 122 credit hours (123 for the Environmental and Water Resources Track) are requi red for a BSCE degree with emphasis in basic science 
(mathematics, chemistry, and physics), engineering science (mechanics of materials, statics, and dynamics), basic civil and environmental engineering courses; 
requi red courses i n the sel ected track; techni cal el ecti ves; and a seni or capstone desi gn course The curri cul um provi des a sensi bl e bl end of requi red courses and 
electives, perrritti ng students to pursue their i nterests without the risk of overspecialization. 

Crofts Crofts 

Freshman Year (All Civil & Environmental Engineering) First San ^^T 

MATH140 Calculus I 4 

MATH141 Calculus 1 1 4 

CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engi neers 3 

ENES100 lnti^uctiontoEngineeringDesignft*canfaet3ten/7rstor5Ba3ndsan3ster; **3 

ENES102 Statics (**can fee tefcsn first or second serrester) **3 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 3 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



PHYS161 General Physics 

ENCE1CD Introduction to Civil & Environmental Engineering 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



1 
14 



6 
16 



Sophomore Year (All Civil & Environmental Engineering) 

MATH241 Calculuslll 

MATH246 Differential Equationsfor Scientists and Engineers 
PHY S26(y261 General Physics 1 1 with Lab 
ENES220 Mechanics of Materials 
ENCE200 Engineering Information Processing I 
ENCE201 Engineering Information Processing 1 1 
ENCE215 Applied Engineering Science 
ENCE305 Fundamentals of Engineering Fluids 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



Crofts Crafts 

Second 



First San 

4 

4 
3 
3 



17 



San 

3 



3 
6 
15 



J unior Year 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
ENES221 Dynamics 

ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-MetricsandGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE340 Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering 
ENCE353 I ntroduction to Structural Analysis 
ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 

Transportation Systems & Engineering ManagenwtTrack 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-MetricsandGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE370 I ntroduction to Transportation Engineering & Planning 
ENCE472 Transportation Engineering 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 

En/ironmertal & Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE301 Geo-MetricsandGISinCivil Engineering 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE310 I ntroduction to Environmental Engineering 
ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 
ENCE431 Hydrologic Engineering 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



Crafts Crafts 
Second 



First San 



3 
3 
15 



3 
15 



3 
3 
16 



San 

3 



3 
15 



3 

3 

3 

3 
15 

3 
3 



15 



Senior Year 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 



Crafts Crafts 

Second 



First San 



San 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



ENCE444 Laboratory Characterization of Georraterials 

ENCE453 Computer-Aided Structural Analysis 

ENCE454 Design of Concrete Structures 

ENCE441 Foundation Design 

ENCE466 Designof Civil Engineering Systems 

ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 
Total 

Transportation Systems & Engineering ManagerrertTrack 
ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 
ENCE422 Project Cost Accounting & Economics 
ENCE423 Project Planning, Scheduling & Control 
ENCE470 Highway Engineering 
ENCE466 Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENCE411 Environmental Engineering Science 
ENCE422 Project Cost Accounting & Economics 
ENCE412 Environmental Engineering Unit Operations 
ENCE432 Ground Water Hydrology 
ENCE466+ Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
15 



3 
3 

6 
3 
15 



6 
3 
15 



3 
6 
3 
15 

3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
15 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
15 



Mini mum Degree Requirements: 122 credits (123 for the Environmental andWaterResourcesEngineeringTrack) andthefulfillmentof all departmental, school, 
and University requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. Additional semester credits will be involved to the extent that courses carrying 
morethan threecredits areselected. 

4ENCE 466, Designof Civil Engineering Systems, may only be taken in the semester in which the student graduates. 

*ENCE decti vesare tote selected as follows 

Two electives: onefrom each of the two tracks in which the student is not specializing; each must be a 300 or 400 level class chosen from among approved courses 
from that track. 

The remaining electives: A ny 300 or 400 1 evel E N C E cl ass not requi red f or the students chosen track; other seni or I evel mathemati cs, sci ence, and engi neeri ng 
courses, with the approval of the Department. 

Advising 

Students majoring in civil and environmental engineering are advised by Department faculty and staff, who assist in course selection and scheduling until the 
semester in which the student completes the basic requirements common to all tracks. At that point, students will be directed to the staff/ faculty member who serves 
as specialty advisor for their track. For advising, contact the Department office, 301-405-7768. 



Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Department f acul ty f requenti y have research opportuni ti es for undergraduate students. Students are encouraged to contact f acul ty members whose research 
sped al ti es are of i nterest. 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

Several excel lent co-op opportuni ties are avail able for Civil and Environmental Engineering students. See the A. James CI ark School of Engineering entry in chapter 
6 of thi s catal og for a f ul I descri pti on of the E ngi neeri ng co-op program, or contact M s. H ei di Sauber, 301-405-3863. 

Honors Program 

SeeA. James Clark School of Engineering Honors Program 
Student Sodeties and Professional Organizations 

• American Society of Civil Engineers 

• Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honor Society (by invitation) 

Scholarships and Finandal Assistance 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering awards a number of academic scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for junior and senior 
students. A department comrri ttee eval uates appl i cati ons each year. See theSchool of E ngi neeri ng web si te for i nf ormati on and appl ication i nstructi ons. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers the foil owing awards: l)TheCivil Engineering Outstanding Senior Award; 2) TheASCE Outstanding Senior Award; 3) 
The Woodward-ClydeConsultants Award; 4)TheBechtel Award; 5)TheChi Epsilon Outstanding Seni or Award; 6) The Ben Dyer Award; 7) TheASCE Maryland 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Progrems 



SectionAward; 8) The Robert L. Morris Award for Environmental Leadership; and 9) The Department Chairman's Award. 
Classics (CL AS) 

Collegeof Artsand Humanities 

2407 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-2013 

www.classics.urrri.edu 

hlee6@urrd.edu (Chair) orshr@urrd.edu (UG advisor) 

Chair: H. Lee 

Professors: L. Doherty.J . Hallett (Distinguished Scholar-Teacher) 

Associate Professors: S. Rutledge(UndergraduateAdvisor), G. Staley, E. Stehle 

Lecturers: M. Pittas-Herschbach, K.Tuite 

Affiliate Professors: J . B urton 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: J . Scholten 

TheMajor 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym(s): CLAS, LATN, GREK. 

Classics is the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture in all its aspects. Greek and Roman culture are the foundations of western culture- its literature, ideas, art, 
politics, and conceptions of the individual. Greek myth is still a shared fund of images and narratives that expresses human experience. Latin is the major source of 
E ngl i sh vocabul ary, and G reek provi des techni cal I anguage i n many f i el ds. C I assi cs expl ores al I of these aspects through over f i fteen hundred years of hi story. 1 1 
helps us understand the relationship of western culture to other cultural systems and pi ace ourselves better in the world. 

CI assies is an intellectually rich and versatile liberal arts major which teaches "core ski I Is", including effective communication, critical thinking, and an appreciation 
of diversity. Because it is so interdisciplinary and holistic, a student of classics gets a three-dimensional view of cultural hi story and the literary works that are still 
maj or forces i n the contemporary scene Studyi ng Atheni an democracy and the Roman Republ i c sharpens understandi ng of competi ng phi I osophi cal and political 
i deas. Studyi ng L ati n not onl y devel ops E ngl i sh vocabul ary but makes E ngl i sh grammar comprehensi bl e. B oth I anguages provi de excel I ent anal yti c trai ni ng; f or 
instance, classics students score among the top few in the analytic section of theGRE exams. 

Classics isapre-professional maj or for I aw school or for graduate school in any aspect of the and ent world. CI assies majors have also continued on to library 
school . L ati n teachers are i n demand; numerous students have found rewardi ng j obs teachi ng secondary school , wi th conti nued i nvd vement i n the cl assi cs 
comrruni ty . Others have gone i nto busi ness, worked i n educati onal tel evi si on, and gotten j obs i n the wri ti ng or edi ti ng f i el ds, i n archi val work, i n sped al educati on, 
or in social services. 

Proc^am Obj ecti ves 

T he program ai ms to he! p students to understand and appreci ate the G reek and L ati n I anguages and I i teratures, and the r re! evance to the modern wori d. 
Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and skills: 

1 . Students must demonstrate the abi I i ty to i nterpret the cul tural context of pri mary sources through a vari ety of methodol ogi cal approaches. 

2. Majors, including Classical Humanities majors, are expected to demonstrate some level of I anguage proficiency. 

• Latin majors must beableto read and translate Latin at the advanced level. 

• Latin and Greek majors must beableto read and translate either Latin or Greek at the advanced level and the other I anguage at the intermediate level . 

• Classical Humanities majors must be abl e to read and transl ate ei ther Latin or Greek at the intermedi ate level. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

TheClasacs Department ofTersthree Study Abroad courses and a Semester of Study in Roma For the most recent information on the courses and the 
semester study, students shouldconsultthe websi t ewww.i ntemati onal . urrd.edu/studvabroad . 

CLAS 171 Classical Mythsin Paris (1 credit). Professor Doherty. Ten days at the end of May. Thisone-week tour of "classical Paris" (taught on location after two 
days of background I ectures i n M aryl and) wi 1 1 focus on the Roman past of the ci ty, the ri ch cd I ecti ons of G reek and Roman art i n the L ouvre, and the i nf I uence of 
cl assi cal styl es on the art and archi tecture of F ranee. M ythol ogy will provi de a focus for our compari sons of art from di ff erent peri ods. I n addi ti on to the L ouvre and 
the Mus@d'Orsay, visits will include walking tours of the Latin Quarter-with its ancient Roman baths and medieval art i n the M us® Cluny-and of the Champs 
E lys@s f rom the PI ace de I a Concorde to the A re deTri omphe. 

CLAS30BG Classics in Context: Greece: The Living Legacy (3 credits). Professor Pittas-Herschbach. Three weeks in June This course is taught on location in 
Greece Students will be based in Athens and will also visit Mycenae, Delphi, Epidaurus, thetempleof AphaiainAigina, CapeSounion, andEleusis. Readings and 
discussions will expl ore key issues and themes (cultural, artistic, political and philosophical) associated with Athens during the latter half of the fifth century B.C. 

CLAS 30H Italy: Ancient Greek and Reman Culture in Context (3 credits). Professors Ruti edge and Send ten. Three weeks i n J anuary. This three-week 

expl oration and study of and ent Greek and Roman Culture takes students to the Bay of Naples area, including and ent Pompeii and Herculaneum, and to Roma The 

course may al so i ncl ude vi si ts to F I orence and Ravenna. 

SEMESTER STUDY IN ROME. University of Maryland undergraduates can study in Rome, taking courses in Latin, Greek, Classics, History, and Art History 
and A rchaed ogy at the American University in Rome(AUR), the oldest independent, four-year, degree-granting American institution of higher learning in the 
Eternal City. TheAUR is located on the top of thejaniculumhill, acrcestheTiberRiverfromthesiteof the and ent city. 

I n addi ti on to our own study abroad programs, students may take advantage of other opportuni ti es to study abroad: for exampl e, i n Rome, at the I ntercd I egi ate Center 
for Classical Studies, or in Athens, at the Col lege Year in Athens. Students studying Modem Greek may also spend a semester at the American Collegeof 
T hessal onki or the U ni versi ty of I ndi anapol i s i n A thens. 

Admission to the Maj or 

A dm ssi on to the maj or si mply requires a meeting with the undergraduate advisor. No pri or knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. 

Placement in Courses 

Students with score of 4 or 5 in any AP Latin test may not take LATN 201 or lower for credit. Students with score of 4or5inmorethanoneAP Latin test may 
receive additional credit. For further i nformati on, contact the department's undergraduate advisor. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Requi remerrts for theMajor 

Requirements for the CI assies major include the College of Arts and Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. 
TheCollegeforeignlanguagerequiremsntwill be automatical ly fulfi 1 1 edinthe process of taking language courses in the major. 

Crafts 
Option A: Latin 

LATN Courses at the 200/300 1 a/el 18 

LATN Courses at the 400 level or higher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9-12 

Any level CLAS, GREK, or related fields such as 
HISTandARTH 

Option B: Greek 

GREK Courses at the 200/300 1 a/el 18 

GREK Courses at the 400 level or higher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9-12 

Any level CLAS, LATN, or related fields such as 
HISTandARTH 

and Greek 

18 
12 

18 
12 





Option C : Latin and Greek 


LATN 


Latin courses 


GREK 


Greek courses* 




OR 


GREK 


Greek courses 


LATN 


Latin courses* 



AND 
Supporting Courses 

For example, CLAS 170, HIST 110, and a 300- 
or 400- level course in Greek or Rorran H story 



*Students with no previous training in the second language may 
count introductory level courses as part of the 12-hour 
requirement 



Option D: Classics in Translation (Classical 
Humanities) 

CLAS CI assies courses 18 

LATN Latin courses, OR 12 

GREK Greek courses 

Supporting Courses 12-14 

Norrrally upper level courses in Art Hi story, 
Archaeology, ArcHtecture, Government 
History, Linguistics, or PHIosophy 

NOTES: 



• Students are encouraged to substitute 300- and 
400-level courses in LATN and GREK forsomsof 
the 18 requi red credits i n CLAS. 

« 100 and 200-level courses i n GREK may be 
i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
student's 12 language credits are taken in Latin, and 
100 and 200-level courses i n LATN may be 
i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
student's 12 language credits are taken in GREK. 

« Students are encouraged to take as much I anguage 
as possi bl e, but shoul d take I anguage courses 
sequentially; i.e., 101, 102, 201. Oncecredithas 
been received in a higher-level language 
acqui si ti on or grammar course, a I ower-l eve! 
course may not be taken for credit. The student 
shoul d begi n the sequence at the appropri ate I evel . 



7. Departments Mejcrs, end Procrems 



Requirements far theMinor 

Classical Mythology 

Thisrrinorwill introduce students to classical mythology, its uses within ancient Greek and Roman culture, and its subsequent influence on art and literature. The 
rri nor requi res 15 credi ts. 

Requi red courses 

CLAS 170 Greek and Roman Mythology (3) 

CLAS470Approachesto Greek Myth (3) 

I n addition, the student rrust choose three courses from the foil owing list, two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level : 

CLAS 270 Greek Literature in Translation (3) 

CLAS 271 Roman Literature in Translation (3) 

CLAS 320 Women in Classical Antiquity (3) 

CLAS 330AncientGreekReligion: Gods, Myths, Temples (3) 

CLAS 331 Ancient Roman Religion: From Jupiter to Jesus (3) 

CLAS 370 Classical Myths in America (3) 

CLAS 374 Greek Tragedy inTranslati on (3) 

CLAS 419TheClassical Tradition (3) 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng thi s rri nor shoul d consul t wi th the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of Classics. 

Latin 

This minor introduces students to the Latin language and enables themto read, inLatin, important works of Latin literature. For students with no prior experienceof 

L ati n, the rri nor requi res 21 credi ts, consi sti ng of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

Latin 101 Elementary Latin I (4) 

Latin 102 Elementary Latin 1 1 (4) 

Latin 201 1 ntermadiate Latin (4) 

Latin3xxA reading course in PI autus, Petroni us, Ovid or Horace and Catullus (3) 

Latin4xxA reading course in a major Latin author (3) 

Students who enter wi th advanced standi ng i n L ati n can compl ete the rri nor by taki ng a total of f i ve courses i n L ati n at the 200 1 evel and beyond. Students i nterested 
in pursuing this rri nor should consult with the Undergraduate A dvi sor in the Department of Classics. 

Greek 

This rri nor introduces students to ancientGreek and enables themto read, inGreek, important works of Greek literature This rri nor requires 21 credits, consisting 

of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

Greek 101 Elementary Ancient Greek I (4) 

Greekl02ElementaryAncientGreekll (4) 

Greek 201 Intermediate Ancient Greek (4) 

Greek 301 ScenesfromAthenian Life (3) 

Greek 4xx Either Greek Philosophers, Greek Tragedy, or Homer (3) 

A Classics courseat the 300 or 400 level such asCLAS 374 (Greek Tragedy) or CLAS 330 (Greek Religion) (3) 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng thi s rri nor shoul d consul t wi th the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of C lassies. 

Advising 

Departmental advi si ng i s mandatory for al I maj ors every semester. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Eta Sigma Phi is the national undergraduate Honor Society in CI assies founded in 1914 at the University of Chicago. The University of Maryland's chapter, ZetaNu, 
was established in 1994. Students are invited to join in thespring semester. To qualify, a student must beregistered in a 300- or 400- level Greek or Latin course, 
musthaveaB+averageinall language courses, and an overall GPA of B. 

Students can also join the American Philological Association, which is the national classics professional organization, and the Classical Association of theAtlantic 
States, which is our regional classical organization. 

Scholarships and Finandal Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) adrrinistersall types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.urrd.edu . 

The CI assies Department annually awards the Avery Prizeto a Latin student of special merit, and the Steyer Undergraduate Scholarship to an outstanding classics 
concentrator. To honor the memory of Sylvia Gerber, who taught Latin for many years in the Washington, DC public schools, her son Louis has recently provided 
the department wi th fundi ng to support the trai ni ng of L ati n teachers and L ati n pedagogi cal studi es, i ncl udi ng an undergraduate award for an aspi ri ng L ati n teacher. 

Awards and Recognition 

Outstandi ng students are invited to join Eta Sigma Phi , the national undergraduate Honor Society i n Classics (see Student Societies and Professional Organizations 
above). 

The department also annually awards theAvery Prize for excellence in Latin, and the Steyer and Gerber Scholarships (see Scholarships and Financial Assistance 
above). 

Communication (COMM) 
Collegeaf Arts and Humanities 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



2130 Ski nner B ui I di ng, 301-405-6519 

www.commurrd.edu 

comrradvi si ng@urrd.edu 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J . Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L. Aldoory, D. Cai, D. Hample,T. Parry-Giles, M.Tonn, M. Turner 

Assistant Professors: S. Kharris, M. Liu, K. Maddux, X. Nan, N. Ofulue,T. Reirrer 

Lecturers: R. Coleman (Lecturer), J . Gowin (Coordinator), C. Harper (Coordinator), S. Simon (Lecturer), B. Swartz (Lecturer), J .Tenney (Lecturer), R.Toth 

(Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: J. Fahnestock (ENGL), A. Kruglanski (PSYC), D. Rosenfelt(WMST) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: M . Gelfand (PSYC), S. McDaniel (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J . Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

TheMajor 

Communication takes as its subject matter the hi story, processes, and effects of human communi cation through speech and its extensions. The departmental 
curri cul um i s desi gned to provi de a I i beral educati on i n the arts and sci ences of human communi cati on as wel I as preparati on for career opportuni ti es i n busi ness, 
government, educati on, I aw, and rel ated f i el ds. Students pursue acaderri c programs that emphasi ze many di sci pi i nary areas, i ncl udi ng i ntercul tural communi cati on, 
political communication, public relations, negotiation and confl id rnanagernent, cognition and persuasion, rhetorical theory, risk communi cati on, hi story of rhetoric, 
and cri ti ci sm of publ i c di scourse. Departrrental advi si ng i s mandatory for new maj ors, second semester sophomores, and seni ors. 

Prog-am L ear ni ng Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program i n C ommuni cati on, students shod d be abl e to demonstrate the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability to distinguish among a variety of theoretical approaches i n the communi cati on disci pi ineand use them appropriate! yard effectively in academic work. 

2. A n abi I i ty to conduct research and wri te research reports empl oyi ng soci al sci enti f i c and/or humani sti c approaches i n the communi cati on di sci pi i ne. 

3. A n abi I i ty to argue cl eari y and eff ecti vel y i n a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

TheCenterfor Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to foster democratic communication by a diverse 
people. Seewww.commcenter.umd.edu. 

TheCenterfor Risk Communication Research (CRCR) advances dialogue and understanding about communi cation's role in controlling and preventing risk; about 
how publics perceive risk communi cati on; and about the political, economic and social contexts for risk communi cati on. Scholars associated with the CRCR 
examine health, food safety, security, and environmental risks. Seewww.commriskcenter.umd.edu. 

T he departments M edi a Center i s desi gned to provi de one-on-one tutori ng and i nstructi onal support to further students' oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s and conf i dence. 
T he M edi a Center i s equi pped wi th cameras and recordi ng equi pment to tape speeches and presentati ons for practice and critique. 

Admission to the Maj or 

First-time Freshman 

All first-tiri^freshrrenwlTodesigriatecoriTnunicationasarnajorpriortotrieendof thefinal exam period of their first semester will be admitted directly to the 
program They must si gn a M emorandum of U nderstandi ng that states that they understand that by the semester i n which they attain 45 UniversityofMaryl and credits 
(excluding AP), they must meet the foil owing Gateway requirements. 

a. Complete 50% of the CORE requirements, including Fundamental Studies requirements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Completeoneof thefdlowing courses with a grade of C or better: BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY 201, or equivalent. 

c. Compl ete COM M 107, COM M 200, or COM M 230 with a grade of C or better 

d. CompleteCOMM250withagradeof C or better and 

e. A GPA of 2.0 or better 

Students may repeat only one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated only once i n the; r attempt to meet the requi rements. Students who fai I to meet the 
Gateway requi rements by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 45 credi ts wi 1 1 be di smi ssed from the program and cannot reappl y. 

Transfer Students 

Internal and external transfer students who meetthe Gateway requirements specified above and have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 in all college-level coursework may 
appl y to the program up unti I and i ncl udi ng the semester i n whi ch they reach 60 credi ts. ( Students are encouraged to appl y at any ti me pri or to reachi ng 60 credi ts as 
I ong as the requi rements have been compl eted. ) 

For those students who meet the Gateway requirements and who apply after the semester in which they reach 60 credits, admission is competitive and on a 
space-avai I abl e basi s. 

Newly admitted transfer students who have more than 60 credits have only their first semester at the University of Maryland to compl ete the Gateway requirements. 

Appeals 

A 1 1 students may appeal adrri ssi on deci si ons. Students di recti y adrri tted as freshmen, who are di smi ssed because of fai I ure to meet Gateway requi rements or be i n 
good academic standing at 45 credits, may appeal directiytotheUnc^raduateDirectorinthe Department of Communication. All other students who are denied 
adrri ssi on may appeal to the uni versi ty's Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dm ssi ons. 

Requi rements for theMajor 

T he course of study for a Communi cati on maj or must satisfy all of the following requi rements: 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Credits 



COM M 107 Oral Corrmuni cati on: Pri nci pi es and Practi ces, OR 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 

COM M 230 Argumentation and Debate 

COM M 250 I ntroducti on to Communi cati on I nqui ry 

COM M 400 Research M etheds i n Corrmuni cati on 

COMM401 Interpreting Strategic Discourse 

Compl eti on of one of the fol I owi ng tracks: 

Social InfluenceTrack 

COM M 402 Corrmuni cati on Theory and Process 

F/ve from 
COMM420 TheoriesofGroupDiscussion 
COMM424 Communication in Complex Organizations 
COM M 425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 
COM M 426 Conflict Management 
COM M 435 Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 
COM M 470 Listening 
COM M 475 Persuasion 
COM M 477 Discourse Analysis 
COM M 482 I ntercul tura 1 Communi cati ons 
COMM COMM Elective 

COMM UL Upper Level COMM Elective 

One Statistical Analysis from 
PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 

SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 
EDMS451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 

(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

One Structural Analysis of Language from 
LING200 Introductory Linguistics 

HESP120 I ntroducti on to Linguistics 

ANTH380 Cultureand Discourse 

(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

Social Influence 

courses rel ated to Soci al I nf I uence i n one department other than COMM 

Cormunication StudiesTrack 

COMM 402 Communi cati on Theory and Process 

One from 
COMM420 TheoriesofGroupDiscussion 
COMM424 Communication in Complex Organizations 
COMM 425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 
COMM 426 Conflict Management 
COMM 435 Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 
COMM 470 Listening 
COMM 475 Persuasion 
COMM 477 Discourse Analysis 
COM M 482 I ntercul tura 1 Corrmuni cati ons 

One from 
COMM330 Argumentation and Public Policy 
COMM350 TheRhetoric of Black America 
COM M 450 Ancient and M edieval Rhetorical Theory 
COM M 451 Rena ssance & M odem Rhetori c Theory 
COMM453 ThePowerof Discourse in American Life 
COMM 455 Speeenwriting 

COMM460 Public Lifein American Communities, 1634-1900 
COMM461 Voices of Public Leadership in theTwentieth Century 
COMM469 TheDiscourseof Social Movements 
COMM471 Public Communication Campaigns 
COM M 476 Language, Communication, and Action 
COMM COMM Elective 

COMM 300/400 Upper Level COMM Electives 

One Statistical Analysis from 
PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 

SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 
E D M S451 I ntroducti on to E ducati onal Stati sti cs 



3 
15 



3-4 



12 
3-4 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

One Structural Analysis of Language from 
LING200 Introductory Linguistics 

HESP120 Introduction to Linguistics 

ANTH380 Cultureand Discourse 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

Comrunications Studies 

courses related to Communication Studies in one department other than COM M 



Public RdationsTrack 

The requirements below are effective for i nooning Fall 2003 freshmen and 

transfers admitted to Comruiication 

News Writing and Reporting for Public Relations 

N ews E di ti ng f or Publ i c Rel ati ons 

Public Relati ons Theory 

Publ i c Rel ati ons Techni ques 

Specialized Writing in Public Relations 

Experiential L earning* 

* only 3 credits apply to major 

Senior Seminar in Public Relations 
COM M 300/400 Upper Level COMM Electives 

One Statistical Analysis from 

Stati sti cal M ethods i n Psychol ogy 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci d ogy 

Business Stati sties 

I ntroducti ontoEducational Stati sti cs 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 
COURSESXX CoursesrelatedtoPublicRelationsinonedepartrrentotherthanCOMM or 



COMM 231 
COMM 232 
COMM 350 
COMM 351 
COMM 352 
COMM 386 

COMM 483 



PSYC200 
SOCY201 
BMGT230 
EDMS451 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3-6 

3 
6 

3 
4 
3 
3 



Rhetoric and Political CultureTradk 

Ancient and M edieval Rhetorical Theory 3 
F/'ve from 

Argumentation and Public Policy 3 

TheRhetoric of Black America 3 

Renai ssance & M odem Rhetori c Theory 3 

ThePowerof Discourse in American Life 3 

Speeenwriting 3 

Public Lifein American Communities, 1634-1900 3 

Voicesof Public Leadership in the Twentieth Century 3 

TheDiscourseof Social Movements 3 

Public Communication Campaigns 3 

Language, Communication, and Action 3 

COMM Elective 3 

COMM 300/400 Upper Level COMM Elective 3 
One Critical Analysis of Discourse from 

L i terature and A meri can Soci ety 3 

Genres 3 

Literary Theory 3 

H ebrew B i bl e Poetry and Prophecy 3 

Philosophy in Literature 3 
One Structural Analysis of Language from 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 3 

I ntroducti on to Linguistics 3 

Culture and Discourse 3 
or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

courses related to Rhetoric and Political Culture in one department other than q 
COMM 



COMM 450 

COMM 330 
COMM 360 
COMM 451 
COMM 453 
COMM 455 
COMM 460 
COMM 461 
COMM 469 
COMM 471 
COMM 476 
COMM 



AMST432 
CMLT488 
ENGL453 
JWST263 
PHIL 233 

LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



Notes 



• B ecause the department's curri cul um changes over ti me, the departments U ndergraduate D i rector may approve other appropri ate Communi cati on courses to 
meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses required for the Communi cati on major, but taken outside COMM, may be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 



Requi rements for theMinor 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, end Prcgcms 



Rhetoric is thetheory of persuasivecorrmuni cation, both written and spoken. The minor in rhetoric has been designed for students who want to know the principles 
and ski I Is of practical persuasion in its varied contexts. The program will be of value for all students wishing to improve their writing and speaking skills and 
especially useful for those students who pi an careers in business, management, law, government, and education. The minor in rhetoric is an interdisciplinary program 
offered through the cooperati on of the Department of Engl ish arid the Department of Communication. 

Fifteen semester hoirsof coursework are required: 

A. Six semester hours from thecourse list in Rhetorical Theory and Analysis of Discourse 

B. Six semester hours from the course list in Writing [and Speaking Ski I Is 

C . Three semester hours i n el ectives from either secti on of the Rhetori c Course L i st 

D. At least nine of the fifteen semester hours must at the 300-1 evel or higher (including at least six hours at the University of Maryland, College Park) 

E. No more than six of the fifteen semester hours may betaken at an institution other Sian the University of Maryland, College Park 

F . N o more than si x of the f i fteen semester hours may count toward the students maj or, supporti ng courses, and col I ege requi rements 

G . N o course from the students maj or department may count toward the mi nor 

H . N o course used to sati sfy a F undamental Studi es requi rement may count toward the mi nor 
I . N o course used to sati sfy the requi rements of another mi nor may count toward the rhetori c rri nor. 
J. N o course grade below the grade of "C" may count toward the rri nor 

Entering the Minor. 

Students wi shi ng to pursue the rri nor shoul d revi ew the requi rements above, make tentati ve sel ecti ons of courses bel ow to sati sfy these requi rements, and meet wi th 
oneof theadvisers below. The earl i est possible meeting to draft a list of courses is recommended. Students must then officially declarethe rri nor in rhetoric. 

Cun^entcourselisteforlheninorinRhebriccanbeibiwidah 

www.conTnurrd.edu/rhetoricrrinor.htrri 

Minor Aduisorx 

JamesF. Klumpp Shirley Logan 

Department of Communication Department of English 

2122 Ski nner B ui I di ng 4139 Susquehanna H al I 

iklurrpptaiurrd.edu slociarKaiurrd.edu 

301-405-6520 301-405-9659 



Advising 

Advi si ng i s avai I abl e throughout the year i n 2101D Ski nner B ui I di ng. Students shoul d check Testudo for thei r regi strati on date and for any mandatory advi si ng 
blocks. Advising questions can besentto commadvising@urrd.edu or you may call 301-405-0862 or 301-405-0863. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experi ences i ncl ude assi sti ng on f acul ty research prqj ects, parti ci pati ng i n sped al team research prqj ects, and worki ng wi th the departments C enter for 
Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk Communication Research. 

Internships 

T he departments i ntemshi p program hel ps communi cati on maj ors gai n prof essi onal experi ence, bui I d a prof essi onal portf d i o, and take the f i rst steps toward a 
career. The department structures its internship program around a course, COM M 386: Experierf/a/ Learning, offered each school term 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides students with an opportunity for intensive study of Communication. The program provides participants with opportunities to deepen 
thei r understandi ng of the di sci pi i ne through graduate-l evel coursework and to enri ch thi s understandi ng through cl osel y supervi sed research and i nvol vement i n the 
intellectual life of the department. 

Students i nterested i n the H onors Program appl y for the prograrn ordi nari I y duri ng the second semester of the sophomore year or the fi rst semester of the j uni or 
year. A ppl i cati on i s f i I ed wi th the U ndergraduate D i rector. Students shoul d have the f ol I owi ng qual i f i cati ons: 

• An overall GPA of 3.3 or above. 

• Completion of ninesemester hours in Communication including COM M 250. 

• GPA of 3.5 or above in Communication. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Soci al and acaderri c acti vi ti es are avai I abl e to students by parti ci pati ng i n the f ol I owi ng student organi zati ons: the U ndergraduate Communi cati on A ssoci ati on, the 
L ambda Pi Eta H onor Soci ety, and the M aryl and chapter of the Publ i c Rel ati ons Student Soci ety of A meri ca. 

Scholarships and Finandal Assistance 

T he department offers the J une Dowl er B uteau Schd arshi p to a freshman student who exhi bi ts acaderri c excel I ence 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

2116TawesHall, 301-405-3839 

www.crrit.urrd.edu 

Chair: K. Cartwright 

Director: Z. Nunes 

Professors: A. Berlin (English), M. Collins (English), R. Harrison (Spanish & Portuguese), C. Peterson (English), B. Richardson (English) 

A ssoci ate Professors: R. Bauer (English), K. Chuh (English), Z. Nunes (English), S. Ray (English), O.Wang (English) 

Assistant Professors: E. Bearden (English), S. J elen (English & Jewish Studies), R. Ontiveros (English), G. Passannante(English), V. Valiavitcharska( Engl ish) 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Instructors: E. Robinson 
Lecturers: G. Metcalf 



TheMajor 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronymCMLT in Chapter 7. 

Computer Engineering (ENCP) 

A. J allies C lark School of E ngi neering 

2429A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-3685 

www.ece.urrd.edu 

eceadvi se@urrd. edu 

Chair: P. O'Shea (Professor) 

Professors: E. Abed, A. Agrawala.T. Antonsen.J . Baras, D. Barbe, A. Barg, S. Bhattacharyya, G. B I ankenship (Associate Chair, External Relations), R. Chellappa 

(Distinguished Scholar Teacher), N. De Claris, M. Dagenais, C. Davis (Distinguished Scholar Teacher, A. Ephrerrides, C. Espy-Wilson, N. Farvardin, R. Ghodssi, V. 

Gligor.J.Gddhar, N.Goldsman, R. Gomez, V. Granatstein.J . Hendler, P. Ho, J. Hollingsworth, A. IliadisJ . J a) a, J . Kim (Prof Of Practice), P. Krishnaprasad, W. 

Lawson (Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies), K. Liu (Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Makowski, S. Marcus 

(Distinguished Scholar Teacher), I. Mayergoyz (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), J . Melngailis, H. Milchberg (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), K. Nakajima, P. 

Narayan, R. Newcomb, Y. Oruc, E. Ott (Distinguished University Professor), M. Peckerar, H. Rabin, S. Sharrma, M. Shayman, A. Tits, T. Venkatesan (Res Prof), U. 

Vishkin, C.Yang 

Associate Professors: P. Abshire, R. Barua, S. Bhattacharjee, P. Dowd (ResAssoc Prof), M. Franklin.T. Horiuchi, B.Jacob, R. La,T. Murphy, A. Papamarcou, G. 

Qu, C. SilioJ . Simon, A. Srivastava, S. Ulukus, M. Wu, D.Yeung 

Assistant Professors: M. Hicks, J . Katz, N. Martins, P. Petrov, K. Rosfjord, E. Waks 

Lecturers: W. Hawkins 

Affiliate Professors: S. Anlage, L. Davis, H. Frank, M. Fu, D. O'Leary, G. Rubloff, F. Wellstood 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: J . Bernstein, R. Duraiswarri, R. Phaneuf, E. Smela 

AffiliateAssistant Professors M.Cukier 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. Shekhar 

Professors Emeriti: L. Davisson, F. Emad, R. Harger, C. Lee, W. Levine, P. Ligomenides, H. Lin, J . Orioff.J . Pugsley, M. Reiser, M. Rhee, C. Striffler, L.Taylor, S. 

Tretter, K.Zaki 

TheMajor 

T he corqouterengirieeringrraj or combines the strengths of both the Departrrent of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science 
to prepare students for careers i n the computer i ndustry. The program encompasses the study of hardware, software, and systems questi ons that ari se i n the desi gn, 
development, and application of computers and embedded systems. Specifically, computer engineering students will havea knowledge of hardware systems 
(electrical networks, electronics, and VLSI); a knowledge of software systems (algorithms, data structures, and operating systems); and a knowledge of how these 
two domains interact (digital logic, signal and system theory, computer architectural and performance analysis). Computer Engineering students will learn about 
everythi ng that goes i nto di gi tal and computi ng systems, from sd i d state physi cstoCMOSVLSI desi gn, to computer archi tecture to prograrrrri ng, and from 
operating systems to compiler and language theory. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym ENEE andCMSC. 

Program Obj ecti ves 

T he educati onal obj ecti ves are broadl y stated goal s agreed upon by a consensus of the f acul ty pertai ni ng to accompl i shments or I evel of achi evement desi red of our 
students3-5yearsaftergraduation.Thesefall underlie foil owing four headings: 

1. Technical Knowledge G raduate engineers trained in the fundamentals of computer engi neering and relevant special ties so they are prepared to 
succeed i n graduate school or be productive engi neers i n government or i ndustry. 

2. Laboratory, Design, and Research: Graduate engi neers who can design and perform experimental projects to solve diverse problems, with special 
emphasis on exploiting diverse technical knowledge and ski I Is so they can engage in design work or research. 

3. Preparati on for F urther Study: G raduate engi neers who have the educati onal f oundati ons and ski 1 1 s necessary to engage i n I i f el ong I eami ng i n every 
sphere of their life. 

4. Prof essi onal i sm G raduate engi neers who have the prof essi onal ski 1 1 s they need to succeed i n thei r chosen prof essi on and are prepared to f ul f i 1 1 thei r 
prof essi onal responsi bilities as engi neers, whi ch i ncl ude thei r ethi cal obi i gati ons to soci ety, empl oyers, empl oyees, and f el I ow engi neers. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

Educational Opportunities 

T he program offers many educati onal opportuni ti es. M ost of these are desi gned to i rrpart knowl edge and ski 1 1 s requi red of al I our students so that by the ti me of 
graduation they are prepared to achi eve the Educati onal Objectives. Other opportuni ties are optional and offered for interested and qualified students. The educati onal 
opportunities are 

1. Broad Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply relevant mathematical, scientific, and basic engineering knowledge. 

2. Disciplinary Foundation: Understanding of and ability to apply core computer engi neering technical knowledge 

3. Sped al i zati on: U nderstandi ng of and ability to appl y the ski 1 1 s and concepts wi thi n one or more of the sped alizati ons wi thi n computer engi neeri ng. 

4. L aboratory : U nderstandi ng of and abi I i ty to empl oy standard expert mental techni ques to generate and anal yze data as wel I as use state-of-the-art 
software and i nstrumentati on to sd ve computer engi neeri ng probl ems. 

5. Design: Theoretical understanding of and ability to engage in the creative design process through the integration and application of diverse 
techni cal knowl edge and experti se to meet customer needs and address soci al i ssues. 

6. Research: A bi I i ty to formul ate and answer empi ri cal and theoreti cal questi ons through parti ci pad on i n undergraduate research proj ects for i nterested 
and qual i fi ed students. 

7. Leadership: Awareness of the need for engineering leaders both within the profession and the larger community, as well as some preparati on to 
assume those I eadershi p rol es. 

8. Corrmuni cation Skills: Ability to communicate effectively both through oral presentations and the written word. 

9. I interpersonal Ski 1 1 s: A bi I i ty to i nteract prof essi onal I y wi th others i n the workpl ace, to engage eff ecti vel y i n teamwork, and to f uncti on producti vel y 
on mul ti di sci pi i nary group proj ects. 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



10. Engineering Ethics: Understanding of the engineer's responsibi I i ties to employers, society, and their fellow engineers as well as an ability to 
recogni ze potenti al and actual ethi cal probl ems, anal yze cri ti cal I y those si tuati ons, and f ormul ate sound ethi cal deci si ons. 

11. Engineering & Society: Understanding of the symbi otic relationship between engineering and society- specifically, now engineering artifacts are 
shaped by and incorporate human values as well as the ways in which engineering solutions impact society- and the larger social obligations this 
entai I s for engi neers. 

12. Life-long Learning: Skills necessary to engage in life-long learning and an understand ng of the need to continually exploit thoseskil Is in refining 
and updati ng one's knowl edge base. 

AckrisaontotheMajor 

A drri ssi on requirements are the same as those of other departments in the School of Engineering. See Admission Requirements for A. James CI ark School of 
E ngi neeri ng i n Cd I eges and School s seed on of thi s si te. 

Requi rements for theMajor 

A s i n al I engi neeri ng degrees, the student starts out wi th a core curri cul um i n mathemati cs and basi c sci ence. Subsequent years of study i nvol ve courses coveri ng a 
balanced mixture of hardware, software, hardware-software trade-offs, and basi c modeling techniques used to represent the computing process. Courses covering 
al gori thms, data structures, digital systems, computer organi zati on and archi tecture, software and hardware desi gn and testi ng, operati ng systems, and programrri ng 
I anguages will be i ncl uded. E I ecti ve courses must i ncl ude el ectri cal engi neeri ng and computer sci ence courses and techni cal courses outsi de the departments. Students i 
Students must earn a grade of' C or higher in all engineering, Hiafliana ffcs, andsciencecoursesaswell as ^prerequisites for these coursesA sampleprogram 
is shown below. 



Freshman Year 

CORE** CORE Genera 1 Education 

CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engi neers 
PHYS161 General Physics 

MATH 140/141 Cal cul us I /Cal cul us 1 1 
CMSC132* Object Oriented Programming 1 1 
ENES100 Intro, to Engineering Design 

Total Credits 



Crafts 


Credits 


First Sem Second Sam 


3 


3 


3 






3 


4 


4 




4 


3 




13 


14 



Sophomore Year ++ 



MATH 246 


Differential Equations 






3 


CMSC212 


Computer Sci ence 1 1 




4 




CMSC250 


Discrete Structure 




4 




CMSC351 


Algorithms 






3 


PHYS260/261 


General Physics II with Lab 




4 




ENEE222 


Elements of Discrete Signal Analysis 




4 


ENEE200** 


Social & Ethical Dimensions 
Technology 


ofECE 




3 


ENEE205 


Electric Circuits 






4 


ENEE244 


Digital Logic Design 
Total Credits 




3 
15 


17 



J uiior Year 



CORE** 


CORE General Education 


3 


CMSC330 


Organization of Prog. Languages 


3 


CMSC412 


Operati ng Systems 




ENEE303 


Analog and Digital Electronics 


3 


ENEE307 


Electronics Circuits Design Lab 


2 


ENEE322 


Signal and SystemTheory 


3 


ENEE324 


Engi neeri ng Probata 1 ity 




ENEE350 


Computer Organization 


3 


ENEE446 


Computer Design 
Total Credits 


17 



3 
13 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



Senior Year 



CORE** CORE Genera 1 Education 

ELECTIVE Computer Engineering Technical Electives 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
Total Credits 



3 


3 


12 


10 




3 


15 


16 



++ Effective with the Fall 2009 freshman admit class, students will be required 
to follow the new curriculum above. Students enrolled prior to Fall 2009 or 
students enrolled in parallel programs at other 2 and 4 year institutions should 
f ol I ow the ol d requi rements. H owever, records wi 1 1 be revi ewed when 
necessary on an i ndi vi dual basi s duri ng the phase i n/out peri od, and adj ustments 
made i n degree requi rements. 

* Students may need to take CM SC 131, Object Oriented Programming I, orthe 
computer science exemption exam before taking CMSC 132. 
** Note This sample schedule assumes at I east one of the CORE Distributive 
Studies classes also satisfies the CORE Cultural Diversity requirement and 
ENEE200isusedasaCORE IE to satisfy one of the distributive studies 
requi rements. SeetheGENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (CORE) 
for detai I s about CORE program requi rements. 



Technical Elective Requirements 

Effective Spring 2001, all BSCP graduates must distribute their 24 credits of 
techni cal el ecti ves among the f ol I owi ng course categori es: 

Credits 

Mathematics and Basic Science El ecti ves rrinimumof6 

Computer ScienceTheory and 
Applications 

Electrical Engineering Theory and 
Applications 

Advanced Laboratory 

Capstone Design 

Engineering (not Electrical or Computer) 



Category A 
Category B 

Category C 

Category D 
Category E 
Category F 



mini mum of 3 

mini mum of 3 

mini mum of 2 
mini mum of 3 
3 



Pl*2&&& read carcftJIy, andirBk&anoteoflhefollcAAJngspecisI cases and otfierfflBmsr 

1. Two credits of E NEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and Corrputer Engineering, may be used to satisfy the Advanced Laboratory requi rement 
subject to approval by thefaculty supervisor and the Associate Chair. The maximum number of ENEE 499 credits that may be applied towards EE 
techni cal el ecti ve requi rements i s fi ve 

2. Additional CapstoneDesigncoursescanbeusedassubstitutesfortherequired Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications course, and/orthe 
requi red Advanced Laboratory course, provi ded one of the fd I owing is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B, 408C, or408F. 

3. Completion of ENEE 408A and ENEE 459A satisfiesboth the Capstone Design and Advanced Laboratory requirements. 

4. I f you have any questi ons on how these requi rements affect your current sel ecti on of techni cal el ecti ves, pi ease contact an advi sor. 

Advising 

All faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineeringfuncti on as undergraduate mentors, and every student is assigned a mentor in their first semester in the major. 
Additi onal advi si ng i s done by the A ssoci ate C hai r for U ndergraduate Studi es, the D i rector and A ssoci ate D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es, and other prof essi onal 
staff members. Departmental approval is requi red for registration in all upper-division coursesinthemajor.ThedepartrnentsUndergraduateOffice(2429^.V. 
Williams Building, 301-405-3685) is the contact pdnt for undergraduate advi sing questi ons. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 



The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is affiliated with more than 40 specialized laboratories, supporting 
activities including: speech and image processing, high performance systems, mobile computing and multimedia, communication 
networks, robotics, control systems, neural systems, systems integration, VLSI design and testing, experimental software 
engi neeri ng, semi conductor materials and devices, photonics, fiber optics, ion beam lithography, real -time systems, human- 
computer i nteracti on, and vi rtual real i ty. U ndergraduate students are encouraged to engage i n research at some poi nt duri ng thei r 
education. Active participation in research not only allows students to apply what they have learned in class, it also gives them 
greater insight into a specific area within ECE and an appreciation for the subtleties and difficulties associated with the production 
of knowl edge and fundamental new appl i cati ons. Research experi ence al so prepares students for the demands of graduate school 



7. Depsrtmerts Mejcrs, endProcrcms 



and the work force. 

T he E C E department al so offers outstandi ng summer research i ntemshi p programs. T he M aryl and E ngi neeri ng Research I ntemshi p Team program offers research 
opportuni ti es for top undergraduates across the country who are i interested i n usi ng el ectri cal engi neeri ng ski 1 1 s and tod s to address i mportant bi osystems 
appl i cati ons. TheTrai ni ng and Research Experi ences i n N onl i near Dynarri cs program offers research opportuni ti es for students i nterested i n nonl i near dynarri cs. 
The students parti ci pate in cutting edge, team- based research, technical and educational seminars, and field trips to local industry. Students can earn academic credit 
for thei r parti ci pati on i n these summsr programs. 

Additional information on participating in undergraduate research can be found at www.ece.umd.edu/Academc/Under/aclvisinci/ENEE499.htrnl . 

Co-op Proof ams 

Participation in the Cooperative Education Programor in an I ntemship with private industry or a govemmant agency is encouraged. SeeA. James Clark School of 
E ngi neeri ng Co-op and C areer Servi ces entry for detai I s. 

Honors Proof am 

T he E I ectri cal and C omputer E ngi neeri ng H onors Program i s i ntended to provi de a more chal I engi ng and rewardi ng undergraduate experi ence for students pursui ng 
the baccalaureate in Electrical orConputerEngineerirg.Theprogramrequiresstudentstocompletehonorsversionsof four junior level electrical engineering 
courses and an honors project during the senior year. Students completing all program requirements with a 'B' average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) andacumulativeGPA of 
3.0forall undergraduate work will have their participation noted on theirB.S. diploma. Students areinvitedtojointheECE honors program upon admission to the 
uni versi ty, wi th an add ti onal opportuni ty to j oi n after the sophomore year. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

TheECE Department has an active Student Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Information and instruct] ons for joining can be 
found at http://ieee.ece.urrd.edu. Equal ly active is thechapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the nationwide El ectri cal Engineering honorary society. Information on eligibility 
can be obtai ned at http://hknurrd.edu.org. The ECE U ndergraduate Student Counci I is an autonomous body that represents the i nterests of undergraduate students, 
creates a constructive social environment, provi des feedback to the Department and oversees the undergraduate study lounge. Additional information can be found 
at http://www.ece.urrd.edU/eceusc/i ndex.htrrl . 

Additionally, there is a programfor Women in Electrical and Computer Engineering (WECE) and a group called the Leaders in ECE, who serve as our ambassadors, 
gi veinsi ght to new and prospective students, andpartici pate in departmental events such as our "International Day" when we celebrate the cultural diversity of the 
students and f acul ty i n our department. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several corporate scholarships are administered through the Department. All students must complete the College of Engineering's online scholarship application by 
May leach year to be considered for all Collegeof Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering Departmental scholarships for the foil owing academic 
year. For information visit www. ursp.urrd.edu/scholarships/index.html. 

J ob Opportunities 

Computer E ngi neers have wi de rangi ng errpl oyment opportuni ti es i n both i ndustry and government. Some of the sped f i c j obs that students of computer engi neeri ng 
rri ght acqui re are computer desi gner, appl i cati on sped al i st, embedded system desi gner, i nterf aci ng and tel ecommuni cati on desi gner, data I oggi ng and control , 
i ndustri al systems desi gn, hardware desi gn, bi omedi cal devi ce desi gn, real -ti me software desi gn and devel opment, i nstrumentati on anal ysi s and control , 
computer-integrated manufacturing. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers thefollowing awards: 1. Outstanding academic performance award presented to a junior for 
academic excel I ence. 2. ServiceAward to the graduati ng senior who lias show a com tlrnent to service to fellow students. 3. Chair'sAward for outstanding academe 
performance to a graduati ng seni or. 

Computer Sdence(CMSC) 

Collegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1119A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2672 

www.cs.urrd.edu 

ugrad@cs. urrd.edu 

Chair: L. Davis 

Professors: A. Agrawala, J . Aloimonos, S. Bhattacharjee, W. Cleaveland, L. Defloriani, B. Dorr, H. Elman (Assoc Chair), W. Gasarch, J . Hollingsworth (Assoc 

Chair), D.Jacobs, S. Khuller, D. Mount, D. Nau, D. O'Leary, D. Periis, A. Porter, W. Pugh.J . Reggia, N. Roussopoulos, S. Salzberg, H. Samet, A. Shankar, B. 

Shneiderman, A. Srinivasan, V. Subrahmanian, A. Varshney 

Associate Professors: W. Arbaugh, B. Bederson, R. Duraiswarri.J . Foster, L. Getoor, M. Hicks, J . Katz, P. Keleher, C. Kruskal, A. MemonJ . Purtilo, A. Sussman, 

C.Tseng 

Assistant Professors: A. Deshpande, C. Kingsford, M . Pop, V. Sazawal, N. Spring 

Lecturers: F. Erred, E. Golub, L. Herman, M. Hugue, N. Padua-Perez, J . Plane(Senior Lecturer) 

Professors Emeriti: V. Basili, Y. Chu, L. Kanal, R. Mi Her, J . M inker, G. Stewart (Distinguished University Professor Emeritus), M. Zelkowitz 

TheMajcr 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: their application, design, devel opment and theory. Principal areas within computer science 
include artificial intelligence, computer systems, database systems, human factors, numerical analysis, programming languages, software engineering, and theory of 
computing. A computer scientist is concerned with problem solving. Problems range from abstract questions of what problems can be solved with computers to 
practi cal matters such desi gn of computer systems whi ch are easy for peopl e to use. Computer sci enti sts bui I d computati onal model s of systems i ncl udi ng physi cal 
phenomena (weather f orecasti ng) , human behavi or ( expert systems, roboti cs) , and computer systems themsel ves ( performance eval uati on) . Such model s often 
requi re extensi ve numeri c or symbol i c computati on. 

Combined B.S./M.S. Program in Computer Science 

The Department of Computer ScienceoffersacombinedB.S./M.S. degree program for students with exceptional ability and interest in computer sci ence Students 
enrol I ed i n the Combi ned Degree Program may count up to 9 credits of graduate coursework taken for thei r undergraduate degree toward the M .S. degree as we! I . 
T hose i nterested i n the program should appl yshortiy before beginning their junior year. For more information, contact theComputer Science Department 
U ndergraduate E ducati on Off i ce. 



7. Departments Mejcrs, endPrcgcms 



Requirements for theMajor 

T he course cf study for a C orrputer Sd ence maj or must i ncl ude al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rerrents: 

1. A grade of C or better in each of the foil owing courses: 

a. CMSC 131 or a score of 5 on A version of theJAVA Advanced Placerrent exam or a scoreof 4or5ontheAB version of theJAVA 
Advanced Placerrent exam or an acceptable score on the appropriate Departrrent exempti on examination, which is to betaken at the time 
of entry i nto the program 

b. CMSC 132 or acceptable score on the appropriate Departrrent exempti on exam nati on, which is to be takenatthetirreof entry into the 
program 

c. CMSC 212 or acceptable score on the appropriate Department exempti on exam nati on, which i s to betaken at the tirre of entry into the 
program 

d. CMSC 250 or acceptable score on the appropriate Departrrent exempti on exam nati on, which is to be taken atthetirreof entry into the 
program 

e. Atleast27credithoursatthe300-400la/els.ThesemustincludeCMSC 311, CMSC 330, CMSC 351, and at I east 15 credit hours 
from the f ol I owi ng C M SC courses wi th no more than two courses from a si ngl e category: 

Computer Systems: U p to two of 411, 412, 414, 417 

I nf ormati on Processi ng: 420, one of 421 or 424 or 426 or 427 

Software Engineering/Programming Languages: Uptotwoof 430, 433,434,435 

Algorithms and ComputationTheory: 451, one of 452 or 456 

Numerical Analysis*: One of 460 or 466. 

*Afote Courses in Nurrerical Analysis require MATH 240 and 241 as additional prerequisites. Students without either of 
these prerequi sites mist choose their 15 credit hours from the remaining courses in the other four areas. 

2. MATH 140 and 141. A STAT course which has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequisite, and one other MATH, 
STAT, orAMSC course which has MATH 141 (or a moreadvanced mathematics courseas a prerequisite. A grade of C or better must be earned in 
each of the courses. No coursethat is cross-listed as CMSC may be counted in this requirement. 

3. A mnimumof 12 additional credit hours of 300-400 level courses in one disci pi ine outside of computer science with an average grade of C or 
better. Nocoursethatiscross-listedasCMSC may be counted in this requi rerrentNote: The foil owing general guidelines should be observed when 
sel ecti ng courses f or thi s upper I eve! supporti ng sequence 

a. Courses must have al I the same four- letter acronym 

b. Each courseshould be a mnimumof 3credits. 

c. Only 1 special topics or i ndependent study course (such as courses numbered 498 or 499) may be used. 

Any variations must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Director. No course used to fulfil I another requirement (otherthan CORE Advanced Studies) can 
be counted i n thi s requi rement. 



Requirements for theMinor 

T he purpose of the mi nor i n C omputer Sci ence i s not onl y to gi ve students a strong f oundati on i n, and understandi ng of, al gori thrri c reasoni ng, probl em sol vi ng 
methods i nvol vi ng computers and computati on, and a sd i d base to he! p students adapt to future changes i n technol ogy, but to compl ement and enhance any 
students maj or program of study. The computer sci ence rri nor may be earned by students not maj ori ng i n computer sci ence and computer engi neeri ng. A grade of C 
or better must be earned i n al I courses requi red for the rri nor. Se ^ittp://underarad.cs.umd.edu/current-students/deqree-requirements-for-minor/ for detai I ed i nformati on. 
Theawardof a Minor will be noted on the students transcript at the time of graduation. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

T here are mul ti pi e endowed schol arshi ps avai I abl e to students maj ori ng i n computer sci ence. A ddi ti oral detai I s can be found at 
http://undergrad.cs.umd.edu/contact/schdarship-opportunities 

I n add ti on, students may f i nd empl oyment as tutors, as undergraduate teachi ng assi starts, or as members of the department's I aboratory staff. Professors may al so 
have funds to hi re undergraduates to assi st i n research. M any students al so parti ci pate i n i ntemshi p or cooperati ve educati on programs, worki ng i n the computer 
i ndustry for a semester duri ng the! r j uni or or seni or years 

Counseling & Personnel Services (E DC P) 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



College of Education 

3214 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2858 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCP 

Chair: D. Kivlighan, Professor & Chair 

Professors: G. Gottfredson, M. Hoffman, S. Korrives, C. Lee, R. Lent, S. Rosenfield, H.Teglasi-Golubcow 

A ssoci ate Professors: V. Boyd, E. Fabian, C. Holcorrb-Mccoy, K. Inkelas, S.Jones, M. Lucas, W. Strein 

Assistant Professors: J . Bryan, P. Gold (Asst Prof), P. Gold, K. MacDonaJd-Wilson, P. Phillips, S. Quaye 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: J . Hutchinson 

Professors Emeriti: M. McEwen 

TheMajor 

The Departrrent of Counseling and Personnel Services offers programs of preparation at the master's degree, advanced graduate specialist, and doctoral degree 
I evel s for counsel ors i n el ementary and secondary school s, rehabi I i tati on agenci es, busi ness and i ndustry, and cd I ege and uni versi ty counsel i ng centers. Additi onal 
graduate programs of preparati on are provi ded for col I ege student personnel adrri ni strators and school psychol ogi sts. The departrrent al so offers a j d nt doctoral 
program wi th the Departrrent of Psychol ogy i n counsel i ng psychol ogy. 

W hi I e the departrrent does not have an undergraduate maj or, i t does offer a number of courses whi ch are open to undergraduates and are suggested for students 
consi deri ng graduate work i n counsel i ng or drier human servi ce f i el ds. Sped f i c courses i n peer counsel i ng, I eadershi p, and di versi ty are provi ded. 

Requi rements for theMinor 

Requirements for the Minor in Leadership Studies 

TheEDCP Mi nor in Leadership Stud es promotes cd I ege student I eadershi p development by educating undergraduate students/brand afoutleadership in a 
complex world. The goal of the mi nor is to prepare students to serve effectively informal andinformal I eadershi proles in campus, local, national, and global 
contexts. Faculty and students in the minor are dedicated to advancing the field of leadership studies by building upon and critically evaluating existing theoretical, 
research-based, and practical knowledge. Core courses intherri nor are sequenced to meet increasinglycompl ex sets of I earning outcomes across cognitive, 
personal devel oprrent, and group/organi zati onal domai ns. Students i n the rri nor are exposed to di verse theori es and perspecti ves on I eadershi p and are encouraged 
to apply analytical skills to devel op their own working philosophy of leadership that will serve them in organizational and career contexts. Civic engagement and 
mul ti cul tural competence are vi ewed as necessary requi rements for I eadershi p. 

Eligibility 

Thefirst 20 qualified applicants will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis each semester. In order to apply for the rri nor in Leadership Studies, students 
must have 

1. Completed at least 30 credit hours prior to appl i cation to the program 

2. Bein good academic standing. 

3. Completed EDCP 217 with a C or better. 

4. Been admitted into the Mi nor prior to the completion of the final 9 credits of Mi nor coursework and no later than one full academic year before the expected 
date of graduation. 

TheEDCP Mi nor in Leadership Studies consi sts of 18 credit hours. No more than six credits can also be applied to a students maj or, and no more than six credits 
may betaken at an institution other than the University of Maryland College Park. No course with an earned grade below C may count towards the rri nor. 

Required Courses 

• EDCP 217 - 1 ntroduction to Leadership 

• EDCP 315- Leadership in Groups and Organizations 

• EDCP 318- Appl iedContextua 1 Leadership 

OR 

. EDCP 418 - Leadership and I identity 

• EDCP 417 -Advanced Leadership Seminar 

Elective Courses 

Students must choose two 3-credit courses, one at the 200 1 evel and one at the 300 or 400 1 evel, from an approved list of el ecti ves. See BethNiehaus (0110 Stamp 
Student Union, eniehaus@umedu) for the list of approved courses and additional details regarding the EDCP M inor in Leadership Studies. 

Criminology & Criminal J ustice(CCJ S) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2220 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-4699 

www.ccjs.umd.edu 

Chair: S. Simpson 

Director: L. Brooks (Undergraduate Director) 

Professors: D. Gottfredson, G. LaFreeJ . Laub, D. Mackenzie, R. Paternoster, A. Piquero(GraduateDirector), P. Reuter, C. Wellford 

A ssoci ate Professors: L. Dugan, E. Wish 

Assistant Professors: B.Johnson, D. Kirk.J. McGldn, H. Petras 

Lecturers: T.Bonnar, A.Gaston, R. Harrill.J. Homer, A. Lehman, S. Malm T. Mauriello, D. Salem B. Smith, C. Roberts White, A. Zumbrun 

TheMajor 

The mission of the Departrrent of Criminal J ustice& C ri rri nol ogy is to provide a supportive academic and professional environment for faculty and students. The 
Departrrent promotes study and teachi ng concern ng cri me and del i nquency and thei r preventi on and control. The University of Maryland's Departrrent of 
Crirrindogy and Criminal J ustice is a national and international leader in research and criminal justice education, and its Graduate Program is ranked number one in 
the field. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym CCJ S. Both UMCP and Shady Grove offer iheCCJ S Bachelor of Arts 
degree. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the CCJ S degree program students shoul d have acqui red the fol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



1 . Students will demonstrate basi c knowl edge of nBJ or cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce content areas. 

2. Students will demonstrate a basic knowl edge of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the social sciences. 

3. Students will demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods. 

AckrissJen to the Major 
Admission to the Maj or 

In accordance with University policy, the Department of Criminology and Cri mi nal Justice has been designated a Limited Enroll rrent Program (LEP). All first-time 
freshman admits who request Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal Justice will be di recti y admitted into the maj or. Other first-time freshman that wish to declare Cri mi nol ogy 
and Criminal J usti ce as a maj or prior to the last day of classes of the first semester in residence will be all owed to do so. 

Students who arrived at UMD or a Maryland public institution prior to Fall 2009will not be subject to LEP requirements until Fall 2011. Studentswho enrolled in a 
Maryland public institution Fall 2009 or later, or were previously enrolled in a Maryl and privateornon- Maryland public institution will be requi red to meet the 
terms of the LEP. All students regard ess of matriculation date or pi ace will be subject to LEP requirements in Fall 2011. 

I n order to remai n a C ri rri nol ogy and C ri rri nal J usti ce maj or, newl y adrri tted freshman will be requi red to corrpl ete the f d I owi ng gateway/entrance requi rements 
on or before the end of the semester in which they attempt 45 University of Maryland credits: 

a. Completion of the University's Fundamental English Requirement (ENGL 101) 

b. Completion of CCJSlOOwithagradeof C (2.0) or higher 

c. Corrpletionof CCJS105withagradeof C (2.0) or higher 

d Corrpletionof MATH 111 or MATH220orMATH140orSTAT100withagradeof C (2.0) orhigher 
e A rrinimumcumulativeGPA of 2.00 

A 1 1 other students, i ncl udi ng both i ntemal and external transfer students, will not be adrri tted to the program unti I they have met the fd I owi ng requi rements: 

a. Completion of the University's Fundamental English Requirement (ENGL 101) 

b. Corrpletionof CCJSlOOwithagradeof C (2.0) or higher 

c. Completion of CCJS105withagradeof C (2.0) or higher 

d Corrpletionof MATH111 orMATH220 or MATH140 or STAT 100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 
e A rrinimumcumulativeGPA based on all previous col lege level coursework of 2.50 or higher 

Policies for Limited Enrollment Programs 

• Onl y one gateway or entrance requi rement course may be repeated to earn the requi red grade, and that course may be repeated onl y once 

• A gradeofW (Withdrawn) in a course is counted as an attempt. 

• Students may appl y onl y once toaLirritedEnrdl ment Program Students who have been di srri ssed from the maj or may not reappl y . 

• Students must maintainacumulativeGPA of 2.00. Failuretodosowill result in dismissal from the major. 

Any student denied adrri ssi on or dismissed from the maj or may appeal. Dismissed students appeal directiy to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Cri rri nol ogy 
and Criminal Justice. Internal transfer students appeal to the Office of the Dean for Behavioral and Social Sciences. External transfer students appeal totheOffice 
of Admissions. 

Requi rements for the Maj or 

The maj or in Cri rri nd ogy & Criminal J usti ce comprises 30 hours of coursework in cri rri nol ogy and criminal justice. Eighteen (18) hours of supporting sequence 
selected froma list of social and behavioral science courses are requi red (list is available in the CCJS advising office and on the department website). Nograde 
I ower than a C- may be used toward the maj or. A n average grade of C i s requi red i n the supporti ng sequence. N i ne (9) hours of the supporti ng sequence must be at 
the 300/400 level. I n addition, MATH 111 or higher (MATH 220, MATH140 or STAT100, but not MATH113 or MATH115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved course 
in social statistics) must be completed with a grade of 'C or better. A grade of 'C or better is required in MATH 111 as a prerequisite to CCJ S200. 



Major Requirements 



Crafts 



CCJ S100 


1 ntroduction to Criminal J ustice 


3 


CCJ S105 


Cri rri nol ogy 


3 


CCJ S230 


Crirrinal LawinAction 


3 


CCJS300 


Crirrinological and Cri rri nal J ustice Research Methods 


3 


CCJS340 


Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 


3 


CCJ S350 


J uveni 1 e Del i nquency 


3 


CCJ SELECT 


CCJ S Electives (3 courses) 


9 




One from 


3 


CCJ S451 


Cri me and Delinquency Prevention 




CCJ S452 


Treatment of Cri rri nal s and Del i nquents 




CCJ S454 


Contemporary Crirrinological Theory 






Total credits 


30 




Supporting Sequence 




SUPPORT 


L ower or U pper 1 evel courses from approved list (3 courses) 


9 


SUPPORT UL 


U pper 1 evel courses from approved 1 i st 
(3 courses) 


9 




One from 


3-4 


MATH 111 


1 ntroduction to Probability 




MATH 220 


Elementary Calcul us 1 




MATH 140 


Calculus 1 




STAT100 


E 1 ementary Stati sti cs and Probabi 1 i ty 





7. Depertnets Mqcrs andPra^ems 



One from 3-4 

CCJS200 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal Justice 

ECON321 Economic Statistics 

PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 

SOCY201 I ntroductory Statistics for Sociology 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 

Total credits - Major and Supporting 54 

Elective; for CCJ S Majors(rrcst courses are 3 credits): 

CCJ S234 Law of Criminal I nvestigation 

CCJS310 Criminal Investigations 

CCJS320 Introduction to Criminalistics 

CCJS330 Contemporary Criminological Issues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary Legal Pol i cy I ssues 

CCJS332 Major Transitions: From Undergraduate to Professional 

CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJS357 Industrial andRetail Security A dm ni strati on 

CCJS359 FieldTraining in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJS370 Race, C rime and Criminal Justice 

CCJS386 Experiential Learning 

CCI S388H ' nc ' e P er| d ent: Reading Course in Criminology and Criminal 

Justice- Honors 

CCI S389H ' nc ' e P er| d ent: Research in Criminology and Criminal J ustice- 

Honors 

CCJS398 Law Enforcement and FieldTraining 

CCJS399 I ndependent Study in Criminology and Criminal Justice 

CCJ S400 Cri mi nal Courts 

CCJ S432 Law of Correcti ons 

CCJS444 Advanced Law Enforcement Administration 

CCJS451 Crimeand Delinquency Prevention 

CCJS452 Treatment of Cri mi nal sand Delinquents 

CCJS453 WhiteCollarand Organized Crime 

CCJ S454 Contemporary Criminological Theory 

CCJ S455 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J usticel 

CCJ S456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J usticel I 

CCJS457 Comparative Criminology and Cri mi nal Justice 

CCJS461 Psychdogyof Criminal Behavior 

CCJS462 Special Problems in Security Administration 

CCJS498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Cri mi nal Justice 



Other Requirements for theMajor 

The CCJ S Department enforces al I prerequi sites and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are closed. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at I east once each semester. Advising is availableon a walk-in basis between 10 amand 4 pm weekdays in 
2201 LeFrak Hall. Students must complete all course prerequi si tes and obtain department perm ssi on from CCJS Advising to enrol I in mast CCJ S classes. Call 
301-405-4729 or emai ladvi si nqQcri m umd. edu . 

Internships 

Requirements for I nternship Placements 

T he internship 'must bea I earning experience involving work in a criminal justice or cri minological setting. Interns are expected to gain valuable information which 
will add to thei r overal I understand ng of the f i el d of cri rri nd ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce I ntemshi p posi ti ons must center around gai ni ng new materi al over the course 
of the semester and are expected to i nvol ve some degree of ongoi ng trai ni ng/l eami ng for the i ntem. I nternshi p pi acements are subj ect to the approval of the 
I nternship Director. 

I nternship Eligibility 

I ntems must meet the f ol I owi ng cri teri a: 

• I nterns must beCCJ S majors 

• I nterns must have completed a mini mum of 56 credits at the time of application 

• InternsmusthaveacumulativeGPA of atleast 2.5 atthetimeof application 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credit over the course of the semester 

• A maximum of 6 internship credits per semester and a total of 12 internship credits overal I will be permitted 



7. Depsrtmerts Majors, end Prepare 



• I nternshi p credi t wi 1 1 not be approved for current or previ ousl y hddj obs 

I ntems must register themselves for the internship prior to the end of the semester's schedule adjustment period. Obtaining Departmental approval for the internship 
does NOT register the student for the class. Additional i nformati on about i nternshi ps can be pi eked up from the CCJS advising off ice in 2201 LeFrakHall or on line 
atwww.ccjs.urrd.edu/Undergrad/index.asp 

Honors Progr am 

The Honors Program is a four-semester (12 required credit hours) sequence, which a student begins in the fall semester of his or her junior year. The classes are in 
seminar format and are writing intensive. Duringthefall semesterof their senior year, students will complete a thesis/research proposal. Thispaperwill be25-40 
pages in length and must be orally defended. During the senior year, students must complete a graduate course, which can betaken during the Fall or Spring 
semester. H onors students may count thei r honors courses toward sati sf acti on of thei rmajorcurriculum requi rements. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

There are two Student Societies avail able for membershi p for CCJ S majors: the Criminal J ustice Student Association (CJ SA) and Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society 
(APS). 

TheCrirrinal J ustice Student Association (CJ SA) is dedicated to supplementing our members' academic experience by providing extracurricular opportunities to 
further expl ore critical i ssues i nvol vi ng cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce. T hrough a regul ar program of speakers, agency demonstrati ons, communi ty servi ce 
proj ects and an annual career fai r, the CJ SA provi Ses students wi th val uabl e i nformati on for maki ng deci si ons about career choi ces, further graduate I evel study, 
and I aw school . The CJ SA provi des students wi th opportuni ti es for acaderri c and sod al i nteracti on, and access to cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce researchers, 
teachers, and practitioners representing a variety of government, academic and commercial corporateand non-profit organizations. All graduate and undergraduate 
students, regardless of major, are eligible for membership in theCJSA. CJSA meeti ngs and programs are held at I east monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. 
CJ SA does not assess membershi p dues or fees. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) isa National Criminal J ustice Honor Society founded 1942 and membershi pis open to CCJS majors who have completed at I east 40 total 
credits with at least 12 credits in CCJS courses Undergraduate Applicants must have an overall GPA of at I east a 3. 2 and a major G PA of at least 3.4. Graduate 
student applicants must have a 3.4 overall GPA. Applicants must fill out an application, submit an official or unofficial transcript, and a check (personal check is 
fine) made out to Alpha Phi Sigma for $55. The local chapter's name is Omega lota. Put the completed application, check, and transcript in Dr. Brooks' mailbox 
i nsi de 2220 L ef rak H al I . A ppl i cati ons are processed throughout the acaderri c year. Y ou wi 1 1 be noti f i ed when you have been of f i ci al I y accepted. A ppl i cati ons are 
avail able from the CCJ S Advising Office in 2103 Lefrak Hall. 

Awards and Recognition 

Each semester the department selects the outstanding graduating senior for the PeterJ . Lejins award. 

Curriculum and I instruction - Elementary Education (EDCI ) 

College of Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 

www.education.urrd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: L.Valli (Interim) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. Hammer, W. Holliday, D. lrrig(Prof Of Practice), M.Johnson, S. Kozid (Assoc. Dean), J. McGinnis, R. Oxford, O. 

Saracho, D. Sullivan, B. VanSledright, T. Wei ble( Assoc Dean), D. Wiseman (Dean) 

Associate Professors: P. Campbell, M. Chan-bliss, D. Chazan, A. Graeber (Emerita), V. MacDonald, J . McCaleb, J . O'Flahavan, W. Slater, J . Turner 

Assistant Professors: A. Brantlinger.T. Brown, L. Clark, J . Coffey, A. Edwards, S. Hughes, M. Hyler, M. Martin-Beltran, C. Monte-Sano, C. North, M. Peercy, M. 

Stieff 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

TheMajor 

The Department of Curriculum and I nstructi on offers an undergraduate curricula in el ernentary education that leads to the Bachelor of Science. Graduates of the 
E I ernentary Educati on program are prepared to teach grades 1 through 6. 

Graduates of the El ernentary Education program meet the requirements f or certification in Maryland and additional states that are affiliated with the Interstate 
Reciprocity Agreement through the M aryland State Department of Education. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

L Content Knowledge: E I ernentary Educati on teacher candi dates have i n-depth knowl edge of the subj ect matter that they teach as descri bed i n professi onal 
(Association for Childhood Education International, ACEI), state(MSDE), and institutional standards. 

Z Pedagogical and Professional Knowledge, Skills; and Dispositions: Elementary Education teacher candidates can effectively plan classroom-based instruction 
or activities for their roles as teachers. Candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions are applied effectively in practice. 

3. Professional Dispositions: El ernentary Educati on teacher candi dates are able to work with students, families, and communi ties in ways that reflect the 
dispositions expected of professional educators as delineated in professi onal (ACEI), state (MSDE), and institutional standards. 

Admission to the Major 

Admission to theTeacher Education Professional Program is competitive. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in the Cd lege of Education entry. 

Requi rements for theMajor 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre-professional courses and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may enrd I incourses 
identified as part of the professi onal sequence, they must complete the selective admission requi rements and be fully admitted to theCollegeof Education'sTeacher 
E ducati on Program A n overal I grade poi nt average of 2. 5 must be mai ntai ned after adrri ssi on to Teacher E ducati on. A 1 1 teacher candi dates are requi red to obtai n 
sati sfactory eval uati ons on the Cd I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards and to attai n qual i fyi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the 
Praxi s I and Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Praxi s I is requi red for adrri ssi on, and Praxi s 1 1 i s requi red for student teachi ng and graduati on. Student teachi ng i s a yeari ong 
i nternshi p, whi ch takes pi ace i n a C d I aborati ng School . 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



TheGabeway Requirements for entrance into the Elementary Teacher 
Education program include: 

BIOSCI Biological science ab 

PHY SCI Physical science/lab 

MATH212 Elerrents of Nunters and Operations 

MATH213 E I errents of GeorrBby and Measurement 

EDCI280 Introduction to Teaching* 

*rrinirrumgrade, B 

NOTE: The 14-16 credits of math and science mist be conpleted with a ninirrum 
grade ofC in each course and an overall CPA of 2. 7. 



Crafts 



Courses which double count with CORE 

Courses wNch rray satisfy the university's general education requirerrents 
(CORE) and which are required in the Elerrentary Education programof 
studies follow: 

HIST156 Hi story of the United States to 1865 

BIO SCI Biological Science/Lab 

PHY SCI Physical Science/Lab Gateway Requirerrents 

SOC SCI Social Science 

Recomrended social science course options. 

GEOG100 Introduction to Geography 

GV PT170 A rreri can Government 

SOCY 100 I ntroducti on to Psychol ogy 

PSYC100 I ntroducti on to Sociology 



Other Pre-Professional Requirements 

EDCI301 Teaching Art in the E I emantarySchod, OR 3 

ARTT100 Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals, OR 

ARTT110 Elerrents of Drawing 
EDCI443 Literaturefor Children and Youth 3 

MATH214 Elerrents of Probability and Statistics 3 

MUED155 FundamentalsfortheClassroomTeacher 3 

SOCY 230 Sociological Social Psychology, OR 3 

PSYC221 Social Psychology 
EDMS410 Classroom Assessment 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education, OR 3 

EDPS201 Education in Contemporary A rreri can Society, OR 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

EDHD411 Child Growth and Development 3 

EDHD425 LanguageDevelopmentandReadingAcquisition 3 

AreaCrs Area of Emphasis chosen from the foil owing areas: 18 

Communication, Foreign Language, Literature, Mathematics, Science, and 
Social Studies** 

**The EDCI Advising Office has detailed inforrration regarding each area of 
emphasis All pre-profesaonal course work mist be completed with a C or better. 



Professional Education Courses: 

EDCI 397 Princi pies and M ethods of Teachi ng i n Elerrentary Schools 

EDCI385 Computers for Teachers 

EDCI461 Materialsfor Creating Skilled and Motivated Readers (K-6) 



Year Long IntsrnsHp 
EDCI 322 Curriculumand Instruction in Elerrentary Ed.: Social Studies 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



EDCI342 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: LanguageArts 3 

EDCI352 Cumculumarri Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Mathematics 3 

EDCI362 Cumculumarri Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Reading 3 

EDCI372 Cumculumarri Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Science 3 

EDCI488 Classroom Management 1 

EDCI481 StudentTeaching: Elementary 12 

EDCI464 ReadinglnstructionandDiagnosisacrcesContentAreas 3 

NOTES: 

• A 1 1 pre-professi onal and professi onal courses must be compl eted 
with a grade of C or better. 

• A 1 1 courses must be compl eted before the year-l ong i ntemshi p 
unless an exception has been approved by the EDCI Advisi ng Office 

• A passing score on Praxis 1 1 is required before enrollment in student 
teaching. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for all students. Students receive advising through individual appointments or walk-in hours during the early registration period. Information 
regarding advising schedules is availableeach semester. Walk-in advising hours are also posted each semester. Check in (fie department office, 1207 Benjamin 
Building. 

Internships 

The yearlong internship, whichistlie culminating experience in the teacher preparati on prograrn takes place in a collaborating school (i.e., partner school, PDS-- 
Professi onal Devel opment School ) . 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, i n cooperation with other 
university offices, parti cipates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.urrd.edu. 

TheCollegeof Education also offers a number of scholarships. For more information, seelittp://www.education.urrri.edu/studeritinfo/scholarships/index.html. 
Curriculum and I instruction - Secondary Education (EDCI ) 

College of Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 

www.education.urrd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: L.Valli (Interim) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. Hammer, W. Holliday, D. lrrig(Prof Of Practice), M.Johnson, S. Kozid (Assoc. Dean), J. McGinnis, R. Oxford, O. 

Saracho, D. Sullivan, B. VanSledright, T. Wei ble (Assoc Dean), D. Wiseman (Dean) 

Associate Professors: P. Campbell, M. Chan-bliss, D. Chazan, A. Graeber (Emerita), J . McCaleb.J . O'Flahavan, W. Slater.J .Tumer 

Assistant Professors: A. Brantlinger.T. Brown, I. Clark, J . Coffey, A. Edwards, S. Hughes, M. Hyler, M. Marti n-Beltran, C. Monte-Sano, C. North, M. Peercy, M. 

Stieff 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

TheMajcr 

T he Department of C urn cul um and I nstructi on of fers undergraduate curri cul a i n secondary educati on thatleadstotheBachelorof Science or Bachelor of Arts 
degree and prepares teachers i n vari ous subj ect areas for teachi ng i n rri ddl e schod s and secondary school s, grades 7-12. 

The Department has multi pi e pathways for students who are i interested i n teachi ng at the secondary I evel: 

T he D ual M aj or opti on, whi ch i s desi gned for i ncorri ng freshmen or sophomores, I eads to the B achel ors degree wi th a maj or i n an acaderri c content area pi us a 
second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to have an acaderri c content maj or whi ch sati sf i es the requi rements of the acaderri c 
department and meets the standards for teacher certi f i cati on. Carrii dates who fol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compl ete both maj ors i n four years wi th 
careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

The Department of Curriculum and I nstructi on also offers a five-year i integrated master's with certification program See 
www.education.urrd.edu/EDCI/info/tcert.htm 

G raduates of the Secondary Educati on programs meet the requi rements for certi f i cati on i n M aryl and and addi ti onal states that are aff i I i ated wi th the I nterstate 
Reciprocity Agreement through the M aryl and State Department of Education. 

Program L ear ni ng Outcomes 

L Content Knowledge: Teacher candi dates have i n-depth knowl edge of the subj ect matter that they teach as descri bed i n professi onal , state, and i nsti tuti onal 
standards. They demonstrate thei r knowl edge through i nqui ry, cri ti cal anal ysi s, and synthesi s of the subj ect. 

Z Pedagogical and Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions: Teacher candi dates can effectively plan classroom-based instruction or activities for their 
roles as teachers. Candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions are applied effectively in practice 

3. Professional Dispositions: Teacher candi dates are able to work with students, families, and communi ties in ways that reflect the dispositions expected of 
professional educators as delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



I n add ti on to the double maj or prograrn the department offers a Five-Y ear Integrated Master's with Certification Program (I MCP). Thisprograrn is intended for 
tal ented students wi th a rri ni mum GPA of 3.0 who seek to combi ne undergraduate studi es i n the content area and professi onal educati on as a foundati on for a 
focused professional year at the graduate level leading to secondary-level certification in the subject field and the Master's of Educati on degree. As undergraduates, 
students are double majors in both secondary education and their content area. While double majors, students complete a mini mum of 12 credits in professional 
educati on studi es rel ated to teacher certi f i cati on requi rements. I n thei r j uni or or seni or year they appj y to the graduate program I f they are adrri tted to the graduate 
program they enroll in a full-year internship. The students will also complete graduate-level professional studies that make them eligible for initial teacher 
certi fi cati on and the master's of educati on degree 

I nformati on about thi s secondary educati on program opti on i s avai I abl e at www.educati on. urrd.edu/EDCI /i nfo/tcert.htm 

AckrisaontotheMajor 

Admission to theTeacher Education Professional Program is competitive. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in the College of Education entry in 
Chapter 6. 

Requi rements for theMajor 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre-professional courses and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may enroll in 
professional education course requirements they must befully admitted to theCollegeof Educati on'sTeacher Education Program An overall grade point average of 
2.5 must be maintained after admission toTeacher Education. All teacher candidates are requi red to obtain satisfactory evaluations on theCollegeof Education 
Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards and to attain qualifying scores for the State of Maryland on the Praxis I (Math 177, Writing 173, Reading 177) and 
Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Praxi s I i s requi red for adrri ssi on, and Praxi s 1 1 is requi red for student teachi ng and graduati on. Student teachi ng i s a yearl ong i ntemshi p, 
which takes place in a Collaborating School (i.e, partner school, PDS - Professional Development School). 

The Department offers a variety of secondary education programs leadi ng to the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees Students who complete a 
secondary educati on program at UM meet the Maryland State Department of Education requirements for the Professional Eligibility Certificate. Consult the 
Department of Curri cul um and I nstructi on for updated i nformati on. 

Foreign-Language Requirement; Bachelor of Aits Degree 

L anguage prof i ci ency may be demonstrated i n one of several ways: 

(a) Successful compl eti on of I evel 4 i n one I anguage. Students must provi de a hi gh school transcri pt to veri fy exempti on. 

(b) Successful completion of an intermediate-level college foreign I anguage course designated by the department. 

(c) Students who have native proficiency in a I anguage other than English may certify their native proficiency by taking an exam administered by theAmerican 
Council on theTeaching of Foreign Languages. For more information, pi ease see an advisor in the Arts and Humanities Office of Student Affairs, or call 
301-405-2108. 

Students who have nati ve prof i ci ency i n a I anguage other than E ngl i sh shoul d see thei r content area advi sor. 

Art Education (pre K-12) 

TheArt Education curriculum is designed to prepare students to teach art in elementary through secondary schools. It provides prospective art teachers with a 
knowl edge base about the theori es and best practi ces rel evant to eff ecti ve pedagogy, as wel I as current educati on and art educati on goal s and standards. Students 
admitted to Art Education completethe Bachelor of Arts and are required to havean academic content major. 

For more information on the sequence of pre-professional and professional courses, consult the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and I nstructi on's 
advi sing office. 



Pre-Profesaonal/Subject Area Courses 

Water CaurseSequencing is under reAem 

ARTT150 Introduction to Art Theory 

ARTT100 Two Dimensional Design Fundamentals 

ARTT110 Elementsof Drawing I 

ARTH200 Art cftheWestem World to 1300 

ARTH201 Art of the Western World after 1300 

ARTT200 Three-Dimensional Art Fundamentals 

ARTT210 Elementsof Drawing II 

ARTT320 Elementsof Painting 

ARTT418 Drawing 

ARTT428 Panting 

EDCI407 PracticuminArtEducation:ThreeDimensional (Springonly) 

One from 
ARTT340 Elementsof Printmaking: Intaglio 
ARTT341 Elementsof Printmaking: Woodcut and Relief 
ARTT342 Elementsof Printmaking: Cdlagraphy 
ARTT343 Elementsof Printmaking: Screen Printing 
ARTT344 Elementsof Printmaking: Lithography 

Pre-Professional/Education Courses 



Credits 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



EDHD413 
EDHD426 
EDCI463 

EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 

EDCI405 

EDSP470 

EDCI403 

EDCI400* 

EDCI423* 

EDCI406 

EDCI401 

EDCI402 

EDCI474 
EDCI4S8 



Add escent Devel oprrent 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content 
Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 

One from 

F oundati ons of E ducati on 

Educati on i n Contemporary A mari can Soci ety 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Professional Education Courses 

Art Education Methods I (Spring only) 

Introduction to Special Education 

TeachingArtCriticism and A estheti cs (Fall only) 

F i el d Experi ence i n A rt Educati on (Fall only), and 

Art Education M ethods 1 1 (Fall only) 

Technology andTwo-Dirrensional Art (Fall only) 

Student Teachi ng i n Elementary School : Art 

Student Teachi ng i n Secondary Schools: Art 

Inclusion, Diversity and Professional ism in Secondary 
Education 

Selected Topics in Teacher Education (StudentTeaching 
Seminar, Art) 

*EDCI4O0 and EDCI423 taken concurrently 



English Education (Grades 7-12) 

Students who complete the English Education curriculum receive the Bachelor of Arts degree and meet the MSDE requirements for the Professional Eligibility 
Certi f i cate. Students adrri tted to E ngl i sh E ducati on are requi red to have an acaderri c content maj or and must compl ete the f ol I owi ng program requi rements. PI ease 
check wi th the E N G L department regardi ng sped f i c coursework. 

Crafts 



Pre-Profesaonal/Subject Area Courses 

Foreign Larguage (intermediate mastery of a modern or classical 
language is required.) 

I introduction to English Language 

Critical Methods in the Study of Literature 

Senior Seminar 

One from 

Oral Communication: Principles and Practices 
I ntroduction to I nterpersonal Communication 
Small Group Discussion 

One from 
Argumentation and Debate 
Argumentation and Public Policy 
U rban Communi cati on 
Communication Theory and Process 

One from 

I ntroducti on to Wri ti ng 
ENGL101H* Honors Composition 

One from 
Western World Literature, Homer to the Renaissance 
Western World Literature, Renaissance to the Present 

One from 
ENGL304 The Maj or Works of Shakespea-e 



FRGN 
LANG 

ENGL280 

ENGL301 

ENGL399 

COM M 107 
COM M 125 
COM M 220 

COM M 230 
COM M 330 
COM M 383 
COM M 402 

ENGL101* 



ENGL201 
ENGL202 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



ENGL403 Shakespeare The Early Works 
ENGL404 Shakespeare The Later Works 

One from 3 

ENGL384 Concepts of Grammar 
ENGL383 The Uses of Language 
ENGL3S5 English Semantics 
ENGL482 History of the English Language 
ENGL483 American English 
ENGL484 Advanced English Grammar 
ENGL486 Introduction to Old English 
ENGL489 Special Topics in English Language 

One from 3 

ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
ENGL393 English Technical Writing 
ENGL493 Advanced Expository Writing 

One from 
ENGL487 Foundations of Rhetoric 3 

COMM360 TheRhetoric of Black America 
COMM401 Interpreting Strategic Discourse 
COMM453 The Power of Discourse in American Life 

British and American Literature 15 

one upper-level course in each of five out of the foil owing six 
areas to be taken duri ng the sophomore and j uni or years; one 
of these five courses must be in American Literature (15 
credits total) 

1. Medieval Literature 

2. RenaissanceLiterature other than Shakespeare 

3. Restoration or 18th Century Literature 
4. 19th Century British Literature 

5. A rreri can L i terature before 1900 

6. 20th Century British or American Literature 
Elective: 

ENGL ENGL Elective Women or Minority course 3 

*lfexerrpt fromENGLlCH, nrajorsare required to take ENGL391 Intermediate 
Writing or ENGL394 Introduction to Creative Writing. 



EDHD413 
EDHD426 
EDCI463 

EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 



Pre-Prafesaonal/Eclucation Courses 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content 
Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 

One from 

Foundations of Education 

Education in Contemporary American Society 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 



EDCI466 
EDCI467 

EDCI416 
EDCI417* 



Professional Education Courses 

L i terature for A dol escents (Spring only) 

Teachi ng Wri ti ng (Fall only, Senior Year) 

Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: English, 
Speech, Theater (Fall only] unior Year) 

EDCI 417 Bases for Engl ish Language I nstnxti on (Fall only, 
Senior Year) 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



EDCI 447* 
EDCI 440** 
EDCI441** 
EDCI474 



EDCI447 Field Experiencein English Teaching 

E DC 1 440 Student Teachi ng Serri nar i n Secondary 
Education: English 

Student Teachi ng i n Secondary Schod s: E ngl i sh 

Inclusion, Diversity and Professional ism in Secondary 
Education 

*EDCI41 7 and EDCI 447 taken concurrently 
**EDCI 440 and EDCI 441 taken concurrently 



1 
1 

12 
2 



For more information on the sequence of pre-professional and professional courses, consult the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and I nstructi on 
(Room 1207, Benjamin). 

Foreign Language Education (Grades 7-12) 

The Foreign Language (FL) Education curriculum is designed for prospective foreign language teachers in grades 7-12 who have been admitted to the EDCI Teacher 
Education Program Currently, admission is open to qualified students seeking teacher certification in Spanish, French, Russian, Italian, Chinese and German. Other 
I anguages rri grit be added I ater for teacher certi f i cati on. Students enrol I ed i n f orei gn I anguage educati on are requi red to have an acaderri c content maj or. C onsul t 
with an advi sor i n the Department of Curri cul um and I nstructi on for further i nformati on. 

A rri ni mum of si x hours of i ntermedi ate-l evel I anguage course work i n the student's maj or I anguage rrust precede the requi red 300-400 1 evel courses. The I after are 
compri sedofarrinimumof30 hours of prescri bed course work that i ncl udes the areas of readi ng strategi es, grammar and composi ti on, conversati on, I i terature, 
civilization and culture, and linguistics. Students must also take a mini mum of nine hours (three courses) of electivesin a related area. The second area of 
concentration must be approved by a FL advisor. 

In addition to all coursework, students must earn anlnterrrediateHighscoreontheACTFL oral proficiency exam in their corresponding foreign I anguage. Students 
inRussian, Italian, andChinesemustalsoeamanlnterrrediateHighscoreontheACTFL written proficiency test. 

The foil owing requirements must be met with the FL Education program 



Crofts 
Pre-Profesaonal/Subject Area Courses 

I ntermedi ate (200 1 evel) courses 6 

Readi ng Strategi es 3 

Grammar and Composition (300-400 levels) 6 

Survey of Literature (300-400 levels) 6 

Conversation (300-400 levels) 3 

Literature(400-abovelevels) 6 

Culture and Civilization 6 

Applied Linguistics, OR 3 

I introductory L i ngui sti cs 

ElectivesinSupportingArea/FL-RelatedCourses „ 

( rri ni mum of three courses) 

* Applied Linguistics in the Primary FL Area if available; 
otherwise LI NG200 may satisfy this requirement; check 
with your advisor. 

Inalmostall instances, Primary FL Area courses must have been completed prior to 
the Student Teachi ng semester. A ny substi tuti ons for the above must be 
pre-approved by a FL EducationAdvisor. 



Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
Primary FL Area 
LING200* 

ELECTIVES 



Nairn The pre-professional courses vary by subject area. Consult the academe 
department for the specific course requi rerrents for each language area. 



EDHD413 
EDHD426 
EDCI 463 

EDPS301 
EDPS201 

EDPS210 



EDCI 410 



Pre-Professional/Education Courses 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in 
Content Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 

One from 

Foundations of Education 

Education in Contemporary American Society 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on 
Education 

Professional Education Courses 

C urri cul um and I nstructi on i n Secondary 
Education: Foreign LanguagefFa// only) 



Crofts 

3 

3 

3 
3 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



EDCI433 Introduction to Foreign Language Methods (Fall only) 3 

EDCI438 FiddExperienceinSecondLanguageEducation 1 

(Fall only) 

EDCI488 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 1 

Foreign Language 

EDCI431 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Foreign , 2 

Language 

EDCI474 Inclusion, Diversity, and Professional ism in -, 

Secondary Education 



Mathematics Education (Grades 7-12) 

Students who wish to be certified to teach mathematics at the secondary level and who have not yet been accepted into the Col lege of Education must complete the 
requiremants for the Mathematics Major- Secondary Education Track. Please check with tire rnathernatics department for specific math courses to be taken. 

Crafts 
Pre-Professional/Education Courses 

EDHD413 Adolescent Development 3 

EDHD426 Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content 3 

Areas I 

EDCI 463 Readi ng i n the Secondary School 3 

One from 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education 

EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI457 Teachi ng and Learning Middle School Mathematics (Fallonly, 3 
junior Year) 

EDCI455 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools ("Fa// 3 
only, Senior Year) 

EDCI355 Field Experiencein Secondary Mathematics Education CFa// n 

only, Senior Year) 

EDCI450 Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: , 

Mathematics 

EDCI488 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (Student Teaching: , 2 

Mathematics) 

EDCI474 Inclusion, Diversity, and Professional ism in Secondary 2 

Education 

Science Education (Grades 7-12) 

PI ease check wi th the sci ence department regard ng sped fi c course work. 

Students may earn credenti al s i n bi ol ogy, cherri stry, geol ogy, physi cs or agri cul ture A 1 1 students adrri tted to the secondary program i n sci ence educati on must 
complete a major in their area of specialization. StuderitsshouldccrisulttherespectiveclepartrreTtsforrequirernents. For more information, pi ease see 
www.education.urrd.edu/science 

C recite 

Pre-Professional Education Courses 

EDHD426 Cognition & Motivation in Reading: Reading in Content Areas I 3 

EDHD413 Adolescent Development 3 

EDCI 463 Readi ng i n the Secondary School 3 

One from 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education 
EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society 
EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Professional Education Courses 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



All areas of science education will be required to complete the 
following professional education courses 

EDCI411 Knowledge, Reasoning, and Learning in Science (Fall only) 3 

EDCI375 Field Experience in Science Education 1 

EDCI470 Practices of Teaching Science (Fa// on/y, Senior Year) 3 

EDCI471 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Science 12 

EDCI474 Inclusion, Diversity, and Professional ism in Secondary Education 2 

EDCI488 Selected Topics in Teacher Education (Student Teaching , 3 

Seminar: Science) 

Social Studies Education (Grades 7-12) 

TheSocial Studi es Education pr og ram is under review. Contact an advisor in 1207 Benjamin Build ng for updated program information. 

Students i n the Soci al Studi es E ducati on program may sel ect an area of concentrati on i n hi story, geography, or government and pol i ti cs. E ach concentrati on f d I ows 
the general requi rements of the; r respecti ve maj ors i n addi ti on to the pre-prof essi onal /subj ect area support ng course work requi red for certi f i cati on. Students may 
el ect to compl ete the program for certi f i cati on i n Soci al Studi es by choosi ng one of three opti ons for compl eti ng the program 

Option I : History 

T hi s opti on requi res compl eti on of the f orei gn I anguage requi rerrent and i s pri mari I y for those students eami ng thei r i ni ti al degree. Requi res 68 semester hours of 
whi ch 39 credi t hours must be i n hi story. 

A/oierT he history maj or requi res compl eti on of UNI V 101 and a foreign I anguage requi rerrent through the interrredi ate level. SeeARHU advising for details. 

Crafts 
Pre-Profesaonal/Subject Area Courses 
introductory Courses 

HIST156 Historyof the United States to 1865 (CORE: SH) 3 

HIST157 HistoryoftheUnitedStatessincel865 (CORE: SH) 3 

HIST100/200 Non-US, prior to 1500 (seeacMsor for approved courses) 3 

HIST208 Historical Research and Methods Seminar 3 

HIST408 Proserrinar in Historic^ Writing 3 

History Elective* 24 

Out of a total 24 credits : 
HIST *18creditsmjstbeatthejunior/seniorlevel 

* 15 credi ts must be i n a concentrati on 

* one course must be non-Western 

In addition to the required credit hours in history, thesocial 
studies education program requi res 29 credit hours of course 
work in geography and the social sciences as outlined below 

GEOG100 Introduction to Geography 

GEOG201 Geography of Environmental Systems (CORE: PL) 3 

GEOG211 Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

SOCY/ANTH one Sociology or Anthropology course 3 

ECON200 Principles of Micro-Economics 4 

ECON ECON Elective 3 

One from 

GVPT100 Principlesof GovemrrentandPolitics(CORE: SB), or 3 

GVPT260 State and Local Government, or 

GVPT280 ComparativePoliticsandGovemrrents 

GVPT170 American Government (CORE: SB) 3 

HIST100/200 HIST (non-Western 100/200 la/el) 3 

ELECTIVE History/Social Science Elective- 300-400 level 6 

Ethnic/ One course in Ethnic Minority Studies (U.S. orientation); canbe 

Minority oneof the above courses in social sciences or hi story 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 

EDHD413 

EDHD426 
EDCI463 



Pre-Profesaonal/Education Courses 

Foundations of Education, or 

Educati on i n Contemporary A rreri can Sod ety, or 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Add escent Devel oprrent 

Cognition& Motivation in Reading: Reading in the Content 
Areas I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 



EDCI426 

EDCI427* 

EDCI428* 

EDCI421 

EDCI474 

EDCI4S8 



Professional Education Courses 

M ateri al s & Resources i n Sod al Studi es (Fall only, J unior Year) 

Curriculum and I nstruction in Secondary Education - Social 
Studies (Fall only, Senior Year) 

F i el d Experi ence i n Secondary Soci al Studi es Teachi ng (Fall only) 

Student Teachi ng i n Secondary Schools: Social Studies 

Inclusion, Diversity, and Professional ism in Secondary Education 

Selected Topics in Teacher Education (StudentTeaching 
Seminar: Social Studies) 

*EDCI 427 ardEDCI 428 aretaken concurrently 



3 

3 

1 

12 
2 



Option 1 1 : Geography 

This option is primarily for those students earning their initial degreeand requires sixty credit hours of Pre-professional/Subject Area course work. Thirty-fivecredit 
hours rrust be i n geography. Nine credit hours of 300 level Gateway courses must betaken in physical geography, human geography, and geographic techniques. 
T he remai ni ng 18 credi t hours must i ncl ude a quanti tati ve methods course and 15 credi t hours of upper I evel systemati c geography courses. 



Pre-Prafesaonal/Subject Area Courses 
PrimmyCourses 

GEOG201 Geography of Environrrenta 1 Systems(CORE: PL) 
GEOG211 Geography of Envi ronmental Systems Laboratory 
GEOG202 I ntroducti on to H uman Geography 
GEOG212 Introduction to Human Geography Laboratory 

Gateway Courses 

GEOG3xx one 300 level physical geography course 
GEOG3xx one 300 1 evel human geography course 
GEOG3xx one 300 1 evel technique course 
GEOG3xx/4xx Upper Level Geography Electives 



Credits 



3 
1 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 
15 



GEOG306 



I ntroducti on to Quantitative Methods for the Geographic 
Environmental Sciences 



In actition to therequiredcredithoursin geography, thesocial studies 
education p o g i a i n reqiMres2Scredthoursofcoursewa1cinNstoryand 
Hie soda/ sciences as outlined below. 



SOCY /A NTH one Soci d ogy or A nthropol ogy course 

ECON200 Principles of Micro-Economics 

ECON ECON Elective 

GVPT100 Princidesof Government and Pditics (CORE: SB), or 

GVPT260 State and Local Government, or 

GVPT280 ComparativePoliticsandGovemrrents 

GVPT170 American Govanmant (CORE: SB) 

HIST156 Hi story of the United States to 1865, or 

HIST157 Hi story of the United States si nee 1865 

HIST100/200 HIST (non-Westem 100/200 level) (3) 



7. Depsrtmeris Majors, end Prepare 



ELECT History/Socia 1 Science Elective 300-400 1 a/el 

Ethnic/ Onecoursein Ethnic Minority Studies(U.S. orientation); can be 

Minority one of the above courses in social sciences or hi story. 



EDPS301 
EDPS201 
EDPS210 

EDHD413 

EDHD426 
EDCI463 



Pre-Professional/Education C curses 

Foundations of Education, or 

Education in Contemporary A rreri can Society, or 

Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

Adolescent Development 

Cognition&Motivation in Reading: Reading in the Content Areas 
I 

Readi ng i n the Secondary School 



EDCI426 

EDCI427* 

EDCI428* 

EDCI421 

EDCI474 

EDCI488 



Professional Education Courses 

Materials& Resources in Social Studies (Fall onlyjunior Year) 

Curriculum and I nstruction in Secondary Education - Social 
Studi es (Fall only, Senior Year) 

F i el d Experi ence i n Secondary Sod al Studi es Teachi ng (Fall only) 

StudentTeaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies 

Inclusion, Diversity, and Professional ism in Secondary Education 

Selected Topics in Teacher Education (StudentTeaching 
Seminar: Social Studies) 

*EDCI 427 and EDCI428 are taken concurrently 



3 

3 

1 

12 
2 



Option III: Government and Politics 

The Government and Politics program is under review. Please check with the Government Department regarding specific course work. This option is 
primarily for those students earning their initial degree. Requires a minimum of 65 credit hours of preprofessional/subject area course work. Thirty-si x hours must be 
in GVPT. At least eighteen of the thirty-six credit hours must be upper-level courses. 

All GVPT majors must also completean approved ski lis option (a foreign language or three quantitative courses froma select list- seeGVPT advising office.) 

In addition, theGVPT program is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). SeeGVPT advisor for specific admission requirements. 

Credits 
Pre-Profesaonal/Subject Area Courses 

I ntroductory Courses: 

GVPT100 Principlesof Government and Politics (CORE: SB) 3 

GVPT170 American Government (CORE: SB) 3 

GVPT241 TheStudyof Political Philosophy: Ancient and Modem 3 

ELECTIVES GVPT Electives 9 

GVPT3xx/4xx GVPT Upper Level Courses 18 

Social Science Quantitative Courses or Foreign Language (see 
GVPT advisor) 

Inaddition to the required credit hour