(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Undergraduate Catalog / University of Maryland, College Park, 2011-2012"

Uixterg-aduateCafcdog 2013/2012 



A bout the Catalog Page 2 



About theCatalog 

Wd come to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ndergraduate Catal og websi te. T he U ndergraduate 
Catal og provi des i nf ormati on pertai ni ng to undergraduate acaderri c programs, i ncl udi ng course 
descri ptions and program requi rements, and sets forth the university's academic, registration and 
graduation policies and regulations. A listing of University of Maryland policies and procedures is 
avai I abl e at http://www. presi dent, umd.edu/pol i ci es/ Program requi rements contai ned i n the 
U ndergraduate Catal og supersede any i nf ormati on whi ch may be contai ned i n any bul I eti n of any 
school or department. Thi s U ndergraduate Catal og al so contai ns hyperl i nks to other i nf ormati onal 
resources at the University of Maryland. The information contained in these hyperlinks is provided 
as a conveni ence to the reader and i s not part of the U ndergraduate Catal og itself . 

The provi si ons of the U ndergraduate Catal og are not to be regarded as a contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change its policies, 
rules, regulations, requi rements for graduation, course offerings, tuition, fees, other charges, or any 
other contents of thi s catal og at any ti me. 

C hanges are effected from ti me to ti me i n the general policies, and academi c and graduati on 
requi rements. The U ndergraduate Catal og wi 1 1 be updated to ref I ect such changes, as appropri ate, but 
updates may not appear i mmedi atd y. There are establ i shed procedures for maki ng changes that 
protect the i nsti tuti on's i ntegri ty and the i ndi vi dual students i nterest and wd fare. A curri cul um or 
graduati on requi rement, when al tered, i s not normal I y retroacti ve unl ess the change i s to the 
students' advantage and can be accommodated withi n the span of years normal I y requi red for 
graduation. 



Publications 

Undergraduate Catalog The current U ndergraduate Catal og, as wd I as past versi ons, are avai I abl e 
at this site. 

Graduate Catalog The online graduate catalog is at: www.gradschool.umd.edu/catalog. For 
i nf ormati on cal I 301-314-4198. 

Registration Guide The Registration Guide ourJ i nes registration procedures and provides web I i nks 
to i nf ormati on on current regi strati on dates, deadl i nes and fees, as wd I as general i nf ormati on. The 
Regi strati on G ui de i s avai I abl e to al I students free of charge and can be pi eked up at the M i tchd I 
B ui I di ng, Stamp Student U ni on, M cK d di n L i brary and vari ous other di stri buti on poi nt across 
campus. The Schedul e of CI asses i s avai I abl e onl i ne at: 
www.testudo. umd. edu/Schedul eOfC I asses, html . 



A bout the University 



Page 3 



About the University 

Campus Administration and Deans 
College Park Administration 

Wallace L oh President 

Ann G . Wylie Seni or V i ce Presi dent and Provost 

L i nda C lement; V i ce Presi dent for Student Aff ai rs 

RobertM. Specter, Vice Presi dent for Administrative Affairs 

Patrick O' Shea, V i ce Presi dent for Research 

Brodie Remi ngton V i ce Presi dent for U ni versi ty Rd ati ons 

Brian D. Mobs, Vice President and Chief I nformation Officer 



College Park Administrative Deans 

Donna B. Hamilton, Associ ate Provost for Acaderri c Affai rs and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

Patricia A. Steele Dean of Libraries 

Siba Samal, Associ ate Dean, Col I ege of Veteri nary M edi ci ne, M aryl and Campus 

Charles A. Caramel I o Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School 

Academic Calendar 20U-2012 



Fall Semester 2011 

First Day of Classes 

Labor Day 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading Day 

Final Exams 

Corrrrencement - M ai n Ceremony 

Corrrnencement - Col I ege/Department 
Ceremonies 

Winter Term 2012 

Classes Begin 

Dr. Martin Luther King Holiday 

Classes End 

Spring Semester 2012 

First Day of Classes 
Spring Break 
Last Day of Classes 



August 31 (Wednesday) 

September 5 (M onday) 

November 24-27 (Thursday-Sunday) 

December 13 (Tuesday) 

December 14 (Wednesday) 

December 15-21 (Thursday-Wednesday) 

December 21 (Wednesday) 

December 22 (Thursday) 



J anuary 3 (Tuesday) 
January 16 (Monday) 
J anuary 23 (Monday) 



J anuary 25 (Wednesday) 
March 18-25 (Sunday-Sunday) 
May 10 (Thursday) 



A bout the University 



Page 4 



Reading Day 

Final Exams 

Senior Day 

Conrnencerrent - M ai n Ceremony 

Commencement - Col I ege/Department 

Ceremonies 

Summer Term 2012 

Sessions I and I -A Begin 

Session I -A Ends 

Session I -B Begins 

I ndependence Day H ol i day 

Sessions I andl-B End 

Sessions 1 1 and 1 1 -C Begi n 

Session 1 1 -C Ends 

Session 1 1 -D Begins 

Sessions 1 1 and 1 1 -D End 



May 11 (Friday) 

May 12-18 (Saturday- Friday) 

May 19 (Saturday) 

May 20 (Sunday) 

May 21 (Monday) 

May 29 (Tuesday) 
June 15 (Friday) 
June 18 (Monday) 
July 4 (Wednesday) 
July 6 (Friday) 
July 9 (Monday) 
July 27 (Friday) 
July 30 (Monday) 
August 17 (Friday) 



All dates are potentially subject to change 

Future academic calendars can be viewed at www.provost.umd.edu/calendar/ 



Accreditation 

The University of Maryland, College Park is accredited by the M iddleStates Commission on Higher 
Education ( MSCHE ). under the authority of the U.S. Department of Education. I n addition, 
i ndi vidual col leges, schools, and departments are accredited by a number of other groups: 

Accreditors Approved by U.S. Secretary of Education: A meri can Associ ati on for M arri age and 
Farri I y Therapy, Commission on Accreditation for M arri age and Family Therapy Education ; 
American Dietetic Association, Commissi on on Accreditation for Dietetics Education; American 
Psychological Association, Committee on Accreditation ; American Speech- Language- Hearing 
A ssoci ati on, Counci I on A caderri c A ccredi tati on i n A udi ol ogy and Speech- L anguage Pathol ogy ; 
A meri can Veteri nary M edi cal Associ ati on, Counci I on Educati on ; Counci I on Educati on for Publ i c 
Health ; National Association of Schools of Music, Commission on Accreditation, ; National 
Counci I for Accreditation of Teacher Education 

Other Accreditors Landscape Architecture A ccredi tati on Board (LAAB); Institute of Food 
Technologists; National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB); Planning Accreditation Board; 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business; American Library Association (ALA); 
Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE); Council on Rehabilitation Education; Council 
for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); Accreditation Board 
of Engi neeri ng and Technology (ABET); Accredit] ng Counci I on Education on J ournal ism and M ass 
Communications (ACEJMC); National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. 
M aster of A rchitecture program val i dated, not accredited, by the Royal Soci ety of A rchitects. 



AbouttheUniversity Page5 



Evaluated Rather Than Accredited: 

M aryl and Sea G rant Col I ege ( N ati onal Sea G rant Revi ew Panel ) , Water Resources Center ( U ni ted 
States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey). 

For more i nf ormation about Accreditation see http://www. ms07.umd.edu/ 



ts and Application Procedures 



L Requirements and Application Procedures 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 



The University of Maryland is a publicly funded land grant institution and the flagship of the University System of Maryland. The University's 
M i ssi on Statement expresses a comni tment to achi evi ng excel I ence as the state's pri mary center for research and graduate educati on and the 
institution of choice for undergraduate students of exceptional ability and promise Consistent with this m ission, the University counts the 
diversity of its students among its greatest strengths and as an integral component of the educational process and academic excellence. 

The undergraduate admission process, which reflects the University's educational mission, seeks toidentify those applicants, who as individuals 
and as a group, will enrich and benefit from the campus learning environment, and thus benefit the entire student body. The process is structured 
to bui I d enteri ng cl asses of students whose vari ed backgrounds and experi ences provi de substanti al evi dence of the! r potenti al to: 

1. M eet the university's requi rements for acaderri c success. 

2. Enrich the university as a heterogeneous community. 

3. Add new perspectives to the university's curriculum and scholarly pursuits. 

4. Develop personal skills, including leadership, self-confidence, and intellectual engagement. 

5. Contribute to the intellectual, cultural, social and political life of the university, state, and nation. 

As the university must make fine distinctions among large numbers of highly qualified applicants, the ability to assess consistently all information 
presented i n the appl i cati on becomes i ncreasi ngl y i mportant Therefore, the uni versi ty empl oys a ri gorous revi ew process that engages the 
expertise of professional educators in performing individualized and holistic evaluations of each application. Each applicant is assessed on the 
basi s of achi evements and potenti al i n a broad range of acaderri c categori es, vi ewed i n the context of the opportuni ti es and chal I enges the 
applicant faced. 

These categori es i ncl ude: 

1. Strength of educati onal performance, as measured by the nature and ri gor of hi gh school curri cul um and acaderri c achi evements. 

2. Potential for col lege success, as evidenced by performance on nationally normed standardized tests. 

3. Potential to promote beneficial educational outcomes and to makeapositivecontribution to campus and community life. 

4. Persistence and commitment to educational excellence, as evidenced by demonstrated success in facing adversity and overcoming obstacles. 

Application Forms 

The undergraduate application forms may be completed and submitted on-lineviathewebat www.admissions.umd.edu . You may also download 
a PDF of the application from the admissions website. 

Fall Semester Freshman Admission 

The University of Maryland strongly encourages all applicants to apply by our November 1 priority application deadline to assure best 
consideration for admission, merit scholarships, andinvitation to theHonors College or College Park Scholars. Admission to the University of 
M aryland is competitive. We typically receive more than 26,000 applications for a fall freshman class of approximately 4,000. As a result, we are 
unableto offer admission to all students who have the ability to be academically successful at Maryland. A completed application includes an 
application form official high school transcript, SAT I or ACT scores, essays and activity statement, guidance counsel or and teacher 
recommendati on forms and appl i cati on fee 

Applying by the November 1 priority deadline is encouraged. For updated deadline information, please visit: 

www.adrrissions.urrrl.edu/adrrissions/applv/application_deadlines.asp . Becauseof space I irritations, theuniversity is unable to offer admission 
to all qualified applicants. 

Spring Semester Freshman Admission 

Students may be admitted for the spring semester by applying directiy for spring admission or by having their fall application identified for 
spring admission through the application review process (as a result of space I irritations). In addition, applications received after the priority 
deadl i ne date wi 1 1 be consi dered on a rol I i ng, space-avai I abl e basi s. A compl eted appl i cati on i ncl udes an appl i cati on form of f i ci al hi gh school 
transcri pt, SAT I or ACT scores, essays and activities, guidance counselor and teacher recommendation forms and appl ication fee. 

Applying by the priority deadline is encouraged. For updated deadline information, please visit: 
www.adrrissions.umd.edu/adrrissioris/applv/application deadl ines.asp . 

Financial Aid Applications 

The priority deadline for Financial Aid is February 15. Students seeking financial assistance should complete the FAFSA before receiving their 
letter of admission. More information is avail able about Financial Aid in Chapter 2. 

Early Admission Options for High-Achieving High School Students 

Concurrent Enrollment Talented high school seniors have the opportunity to enroll at the University of Maryland for two courses, or seven 
credits, each semester. Successful applicants will have pursued a rigorous high school program and will haveindicated exceptional performance 
and ability achieved overtime. To apply, students must submit: the compl eted application and fee; high school transcript; an essay explaining why 
they are i nterested i n the program a I etter of recommendati on from the hi gh school ; and a I etter of perrri ssi on from the parents or guardi an. 



ts and Application Procedures 



Students must live within commuting distance Tuition is assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply in full. 

Summer Enrollment High school students with a strong high school record may be considered for enrol I ment in courses during the summer 
precedi ng thei r j uni or or seni or year. They must f i I e a regul ar appl i cati on for undergraduate adrri ssi on, i ncl udi ng an of f i ci al hi gh school 
transcript. Tuition is assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply in full. 

Application Deadlines 

Spring: January 2 
Summer: Mayl 
Fall: August 1 

Early Admission: Although the University of Maryland generally requires applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to their first full -time 
registration, the university will admit a limited nurrber of well -qualified students without high school diplomas. Successful applicants will have 
pursued a rigorous high school program and will have indicated exceptional performance and ability achieved over time. Students must be within 
two credits of high school graduation and have the commitment of the high school to award a diploma after successful completion of the freshman 
year at Maryland. To apply, students must submit: the completed application and fee, high school transcript and SAT I or ACT results, an essay 
expl ai ni ng how they wi 1 1 benef i t from the program and a I etter of perrri ssi on from the parents or guardi an and a I etter of support from the hi gh 
school which details the school's agreement to award the high school diploma. Early admission students are eligible for on-campus housing, 
scholarships based on academic achievement, the Honors College, and College Park Scholars. Early application is strongly advised. 

High School Equivalency Examination (GED) 

M ary I and resi dents who are at I east 16 years of age and who have not recei ved a hi gh school di pi oma may be consi dered for adrri ssi on provi ded 
they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency (GED) certificate. I n order to be consi dered for admission, the applicant must 
submit a completed application (including SAT I scores if the applicant has been out of high school for less than three years) and present an above 
average total score as wel I as above average scores on each of the f i ve parts of the test 

Non-Accredited/Non- Approved High School 

Students from non-accredi ted/non-approved hi gh school s who seek adrri ssi on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and shoul d contact the Off i ce of 
Undergraduate Admissions for information. 

Home-Schooled Students 

Home-schooled applicants shoul dmeet the same minimum high school course requirements expected of all applicants. Additional information 
from home-school ed students i s requi red i n the f ol I owi ng areas of the appl i cati on: 

Transcript should provide course descriptions, books used, methods of evaluation, and the grades received, as well as a statement 
providing general informati on about the home-school curriculum If college-level courses have been taken simultaneously an official 
col I ege transcri pt shoul d be i ncl uded wi th the appl i cati on. 

Letters of ReconrrEndation: the University of M aryland requires two recommendations from all freshman applicants. I n the case of 
home-school ed students these recommendati ons shoul d be provi ded by 1) and i ndi vi dual acti ng i n a supervi sory or eval uati ve 
capaci ty wi th regard to the students curri cul urn, and 2) from a teacher i n any setti ng ( home-school program communi ty col I ege 
course, etc.). 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CREDIT 

The University of Maryland encourages applicants to seek AP credit so that academically successful students may move forward in their 
programs at an appropri ate pace. H owever, credi t i s not granted for al I exams offered by the Col I ege B oard. C redi ts are accepted and courses are 
exempted, based on departmental approval , accordi ng to the chart be! ow. Students shoul d arrange to have thei r scores sent di recti y to the 
University of Maryland from the Educational Testing Service; the code is 5814. Students should also inform their advisors at Orientation that they 
anticipate receiving AP credit because this information may affect their placement in subject-matter courses. 

If a student has already received AP credit at another institution, this credit will be reevaluated. The score received must be equivalent to the 
minimum score the University of Maryland accepted at the time the test was taken; otherwise, the credit will not be eligible for transfer. AP credits 
that are accepted are recorded as transfer credi t on U ni versi ty of M aryl and records and f i gure i n the total number of credi ts earned toward 
graduati on. Students may not recei ve A P credi t for an equi val ent course taken at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and or el sewhere I f students earn credi t 
i n a course equi val ent to an A P exam for whi ch they al so earned credi t the A P credi t wi 1 1 be del eted from thei r records. Students shoul d check 
with their advisors for detailed i nformati on on the assignment of A P credit 

PI ease note that the chart represents a general outlineof A P credit I n all cases, creditisavailableonlyfor grades of 3or higher, subjectto 
ongoi ng departrnental reeval uati on. A 1 1 departments reserve the ri ght to reeval uate the content of exams arid to change the assi gnment of credi t 
and course equivalencies. Any new exams offered after February 15 may or may not be evaluated by the appropri ate department Students should 
check wi th thei r advi sor at Ori entati on. 

Certain departments, particularly Mathematics and Physics, have separate criteriaforplacementincourses and the assignment of credit. Students 
should check with those departments for additional information. All entering freshmen will be placed in math courses according to the University 
of M aryl and math pi acement exam. 

2011-2012 University of Maryland Advanced Placement (AP) Exams and Credit Table 









AP Exam Title 

1 


Score 

1 


Related 
Course 


Cr 

1 


Maj 

1 


Core 


Note 



is and Application Procedures 



Art History 


3,4,5 


ARTH 
100 


3 


No 


Yes 


ARTH 100 fills CORE-Arts requirement. 
Contact department for pi acement, 405-1479. 
















Art 






H 


1 


1 


Students interested in establishing creditfor 
specific courses must submit portfolio for 
evaluation; call 405-1442 










Yes 


No 


Drawing 


4,5 


ARTT 
110 


3 














General 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 


















Bidogy 


4 


BSCI 
105 aid 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


BSCI fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sciences; italsofillsCORE-Lab(Life) Science 
requirements. Contact the College of Life 
Sciences for placement, 405-2080. 








LL 
Elective 








5 


BSCI 
105 aid 


8 


Yes 


Yes 








BSCI 
106 


















Chemistry 


4 


CHEM 
131/132 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


1 

CHEM fills a major requirement in all Life 
Sciences; it also fills CORE-Lab (Physical) 
Sci ence requi rement. Contact department f or 
placement, 405-1791. 










5 


CHEM 

131/132 

and 


6 


Yes 


Yes 












CHEM 
271 


N/A 


N/A 




















Computer Science 






H 


1 




Credit will begiven for either the A ortheAB 
exam not both. Credit may be earned for both 
the C++ and JAVA exams. Students receiving an 
acceptabl e score on the J A V A exam ( 5 on A , 4 
or 5 on A B) are exempt from CM SC131. 
Contact department for pi acement, 405-2672. 








No 




JAVA (2004+) A 


5 


LL 
Elective 


4 
_| 


No 














JAVA (2004+) AB 


4,5 


LL 

Elective 


1 
4 


No 


1 
No 


C++(pre-2004)A 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


4 


No 


No 














C++(pre-2004) 
AB 


4 


LL 

Elective 


1 
4 


No 
No 


No 








5 


LL 
Elective 


6 


No 


















Economics 












Economics majors must score4 or 5 to receive 
credit toward the major. Either ECON fillsone 
of twoCORE-Social/ Behavioral Science 
requi rements. Contact department for placement, 
405-3513 














Macroeconomics 


4,5 


ECON 
201 


3 


Yes 
No 


Yes 
Yes 








Microeconomics 


3 


ECON 
105 


3 














4,5 


ECON 
200 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


















Engjish 












Students with score of 4 or 5 on Lang and Comp 
exam satisfy CO RE- Fundamental Studies 
Freshman Writing requirement (*ENGL 101). 
Students with credit for theLanauaaeexam mav 
not receive credit for ENGL 291 or its 
equivalent. ENGL 240fillsCORE-Literature 
requi rement. Contact department for pi acement, 
405-3825. 














Literature & Comp 


3 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 
















4,5 


LL 

Elective 

and 


6 


No 


No 


















ENGL 
240 




Yes 


Yes 










Language & Comp 


3 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


No 



is and Application Procedures 





4,5 


ENGL 
101 


3 


No 


* 


















Env. Science 


4,5 


LL 
Elective 


3 


No 


Yes 


ENSP101 fills CORE-Physical Science 
requirement. 
















French 












Lanauaae Students with score of 4 who wish to 














Language 


4 


FREN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 
















5 


FREN 
204 and 


6 


Yes 


Yes 


continue should enroll in FREN 204; with score 
of 5 must enroll in FREN 250 or higher. 
Literature Students with score of 4 should 
enroll in FREN 250; with score of 5 may enroll 
in 300-level courses. FREN 203, 204 or 211 fills 
CORE-Humanities requirement FREN 250 fills 
CORE-Liter- ature requirement Contact 
department for placement, 405-4034. 














FREN 
211 


No 
Yes 


Yes 








Literature 


4 


FREN 
204 


3 


Yes 
















5 


FREN 
204 and 


6 
1 


Yes 


Yes 






Yes 








FREN 
250 


Yes 
















1 
Geog-apny, Human 


1 
4,5 


GEOG 
202 


3 


Yes 


1 
Yes 


GEOG 202 fills one of two CORE 
Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for pi acement 405-4073. 
















German 


4 


GERM 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 


Students wi th score of 4 who wi sh to conti nue 
must enroll in GERM 204; with score of 5 must 
enroll in GERM 301. Contact department for 
placement, 405-4091. 




7 


No 


5 


GERM 
203 and 


Yes 










GERM 
204 


Yes 


Yes 


















Gov't & Politics 












GVPT 170fillsoneof twoCORE-Social/ 
Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement, 405-4124. 


United States 


3,4,5 


GVPT 
170 


3 


Yes 


Yes 














Comparative 


3,4,5 


GVPT 
280 


3 


1 
Yes 


No 














History 








1 




U.S. History: A score of 4 will be awarded three 














United States 


4 


HIST 
156 or 


3 


Yes 


Yes 












credi ts as chosen by the student ( H 1 ST 156 or 
HIST 157). A score of 5 will be awarded six 
credits (HIST 156 and 157). Either fills 
CORE-History requirement 






HIST 
157 


Yes 


Yes 










5 


HIST 
156 and 


6 


Yes 


Yes 
















HIST 
157 


Yes 


Yes 












European 


4 


HIST 
112 or 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


E uropean H i storv : A score of 4 wi 1 1 be awarded 
















HIST 
113 


Yes 


Yes 


3 credi ts as chosen by the student ( H 1 ST 112 or 
HIST 113). A score of 5 will be awarded 6 
credits(HIST112and HIST 113). HIST 112 
fills CORE-Humanities requirement; HIST 113 
fills CORE-History requirement. 










5 


HIST 

112 

and 


6 


Y S 


Yes 








Yes 








HIST 
113 


Yes 














World 


4,5 


HIST 
219 


3 


1 
Yes 


Yes 


World Historv: fills CORE-Historv requirement 


see department for placement, 405-4272. 



te and Applicabon Procedures 



Italian 


4,5 










Esam not currently offered; under review; 
contact department for placement 405-4031. 
















Latin 










1 


Students with score of 4 or 5 in any AP Latin 
test may not take LATN201 or lower for credit 
Students wi th score of 4 or 5 i n more than one 
AP Latin test may receive additional credit. 
Contact department for pi acement and credit 
adjustment 405-2013. 










^| 




Vergil 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 














Catullus & Cicero 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 






4 


Yes 


Catullus & Horace 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


Yes 














Catullus&Ovid 


4,5 


LATN 
201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


















Mathematics 












*MATH 141 may be completed through 
credit-by-exam MATH 140 fills both 
CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement 
andCORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non-lab 
requi rement. Students who receive credit for 
M ATH 140 or 140 & 141 may not receive credit 
for MATH 220 or 220 & 221. Contact 
department for placement, 405-5053. 










Yes 




CalculusAB 


4,5 


MATH 
140* 


4 


Yes 












Calculus BC 


4,5 


MATH 
140 and 


1 
8 

1 


1 
Yes 


Yes 






MATH 
141 


Yes 


Yes 
















Calculus BC 
with A B Subscore 


4,5 


1 

MATH 
140 


4 


Yes 


1 
Yes 


The Calculus BC w/ AP subscore is treated as if 
the BC exam was the AB exam Students may 
notreceiveAB subscore credit if credit was 
awarded for the BC exam 
















Music 








1 


1 


MUSC 130orl40fillsCORE-Arts 

H i story/Theory requi rement M aj ors shoul d 

contact department for placement 405-5563. 








3 


No 




Listening/Literature 


3,4,5 


MUSC 
130 


Yes 














Theory 


4 

5 


MUSC 
140 
MUSC 
150 


3 


No 
No 


Yes 

No 


















Physics 












PHYS 121 and 122 fulfill CORELab 
( Phvsi cal ) Sci ence reaui rement Phvsi cs C 
exams fulfill major requirements in Life 
Sciences, Engineering, or Physics; they also 
fulfill theCORELab (Physical) Science 
requi rement. A score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C 
exams wi 1 1 be awarded four credits as chosen by 
the student and hi s/her advi sor. 
Students must have credit for A P Calculus BC 
to take the next course i n sequence. Contact 
department for placement, 4055979. 














Physics B 


4,5 


PHYS 
121 and 


8 


No 


Yes 
















PHYS 
122 




No 


Yes 














Physics C 
























Mechanics 


4,5 


PHYS 
141 or 


4 


No 


Yes 
















PHYS 
161 or 


Yes 

Yes 


Yes 










PHYS 
171 


Yes 












Elec./Magnet 


4 


PHYS 
142 or 


1 
4 


No 
Yes 


Yes 






PHYS 
260/1 


Yes 














5 


PHYS 
142 or 


4 


No 
Yes 


Yes 










PHYS 
260/1 or 


Yes 
















PHYS 
272 


Yes 


Yes 





te and Application Procedures 



Psychology 


4,5 


PYSC 
100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


The A P exam counts towards the 35 requi red 
major credits. A student entering with AP credit 
must complete PSYC221 with a grade of B or 
better. PSYC 100 fills one of two 
CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. 
Contact department for pi acement, 405-5866. 
















Spanish 












Lanauaae Students with score of 4 who wish to 














Language 


4 


SPAN 
203 


4 


No 


Yes 




5 


SPAN 
204 and 


6 


No 


Yes 


continue must enroll in SPAN 204, 211 or 207; 
with score of 5 must enroll in 300-1 evel courses. 
Literature Students with score of 4 or 5 must 
enroll in300-level courses. CORE: SPAN 203 or 
204 fills CORE-Humanities requirement SPAN 
221 fills CORE-Literature requirement Contact 
department for placement, 405-6452. 


















SPAN 
207 




1 
Yes 

Yes 


No 










Literature 


4 


SPAN 
221 


3 


Yes 
















5 


SPAN 
207 and 


1 
6 

1 


1 
Yes 


No 






SPAN 
221 


Yes 


Yes 














Statistics 


4,5 


STAT 
100 


3 


* 


Yes 


STAT 100 fills CORE-Fundamental Math 
requirementandCOREMath& Formal 
Reasoni ng non-1 ab requi rement 
* STAT 100 f i 1 1 s program requi rements i n 
certain majors. Consult advisor. 





Please Note LL refers to courses art: the lower (IfJOand 200) level. Students may not receive credit for AP courses and equivalent UMCP 
courses or transfer courses (including IB or CLEP). Credit will bedelebed in such cases. Decisions about applicability of coursesto 
CORE are updated on an ongoing basis Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent information. Native speakers may not earn AP 
credit for French, German or Spanish language exams. 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMS (IB) AND CREDIT TABLE 

2011-2012 

The University of Maryland awards creditto students who sit for I ntemational Baccalaureate exams according to the table below. The University 
retrieves scores from the International BaccalaureateOrganization; students may request that their scores be released to the University at 
www.ibo.org/ibna/graduates/. Interested students should contacttheOfficeofUndergraduateAdnissions for additional information. Note: Credit 
awards and course equivalencies are subject to change 

International Baccalaureate Exams (IB) and Credit Table 





IB Exam 
Title 


Score 


Related 
Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 

1 


Notes 












Anthropology 

Higher 


5,6,7 

1 


See Notes 








Underreview. Students interested in Anthropology should contact an advisor for placement, 405-1423. 
















Art Design 

Higher 


5,6,7 


See Notes 








Underreview. Students interested in Art should contact an advisor for placement, 405-1445. 
















Biology 








1 




















Higher 


5 


LL Elective 


4 


No 


No 
Yes 


BSCI 105 fills a major requi rement in all Life Sciences; also fillsCORE-Lab (Life) Science requi rerrent Contact 
rheCollege of Life Sciences for placement, 405-2080. 




Higher 


6,7 


BSCI 105 & 
LL Elective 


8 


Yes| 
















Chemstry 








1 


1 


















Either 


5 


CHEM 131 & 
CHEM 132 


4 
6 


Yes 


Yes 


CHEM fills a requi rement for all Life Science majors; also fillsCORE-Lab (Physical) Science requirement 
Contact department for pi acement 405-1791. 








Yes 




Either 


6,7 


CHEM 131 & 
CHEM 132 & 


Yes 
















CHEM 271 


Yes 


No 
















Compunng 

Higher 


5,6,7 




3 




No 


Contact department for pi acement 405-2672. 



ts and Applicabon Procedures 



Economics 




1 


1 


1 

















Higher 


5 


ECON 205 


LU 

6 
1 




Yes 


ECON majors must score 6 or 7 to receive credit toward major. ECON fills one of two CORE-Social/Behavioral 
Science requirements. Contact department for placement, 405-3266. 




Higher 


6,7 


ECON 200 & 
ECON 201 


Yes 


Yes 












EnoJishA/B 

Higher 


5,6,7 


ENGL 240 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ENGL 240satisfiesCORE-Literaturerequirement Contact department for placement 405-3825. 














Env. Sbxfes 

Higher 


6,7 


See Notes 


3 






Under review. Students interested in Environmental Science or Pol icy should contact an advisor tor placement 
405-8571. 
















French 












Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue should enroll in FREN 204; with score of 6 or 7 should 










Standard 


5 


FREN 203 


4 


No 


Yes 


enroll in FREN 250 or hi aher level courses. Hiaher Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 mav enrol 1 in300-level 
courses. FREN 203, 204 or 211 fills CORE-Humanities requirement FREN 250fillsCORE-Literature 
requirement. Contact department for placement 405-4034. 












Standard 


6,7 


FREN204& 


6 


Yes 


Yes 












FREN 211 


No 


Yes 






Higher 


5 


FREN 204 & 
FREN 250 


6 


Yes 


Yes 






~9~ 


Yes 




Higher 


6,7 


FREN 2045, 
FREN 250 Si 


Yes 
















FREN 211 


No 


Yes 
















Geography 

Either 


5,6,7 


GEOG 100 


3 


No 


Yes 


GEOG 100 satisfies oneof two CORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact department for placement 
405-4053. 














German 








1 




Students with score of 5 who wish to continue must enroll inGERM 204; with score of 6 or 7 must enroll in 
GERM 301. Contact department for pi acement 405-4091. 














Higher 


5 


GERM 203 


4 

7 


No 


No 




Higher 


6,7 


GERM 203 & 
GERM 204 


No 


No 
















History 

(Higher) 








A score of 5 will be awarded three credits (as chosen by the student-except for West & Southeast A si a). A score 
of 6or7will beawarded six credits. All HI ST courses listed at left fulfill CORE-History requirement except 
HIST112fillsCORE-Humanities/ Other. HIST 120, 122, 123, 2843id 285 also fulfill Diversity requirement 














Africa 


5 


HIST 122 or 
HIST 123 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST 122 & 
HIST 123 


6 


Yes 


Yes 














Americas 


5 


HIST 156 or 
HIST 157 


3 


Yes 


Yes 












6,7 


HIST 156 & 
HIST 157 


6 


Yes 
1 


Yes 














Europe 


5 


HIST 112 or 
HIST 113 


3 


1 

Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST 112 & 
HIST 113 


6 


1 

Yes 


Yes 








E/SE Asia 


5 


HIST 284 or 
HIST 285 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 


HIST 284 & 
HIST 285 


6 


1 

Yes 


Yes 














Islamic World 


5,6,7 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


Yes 














West Asia 


5 


HIST 120 


3 


Yes 


Yes 
















6,7 | 


HIST 120 & 
LL Elective 


6 


Yes 


Yes 
















Itedian 


1 






1 


1 


Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue must enroll in ITAL 204; with score of 6 or 7 mav enroll 










Standard 


5 


ITAL 203 


4 


No 


Yes 


in300-level courses. Higher: Students with score of 5, 6 or 7 must enroll in300-level courses. ITAL 203 or 204 
fills CORE-Humanities requirement ITAL 251fillsCORE-Literaturerequirement Contact department for 
placement 405-4031. 














Standard 


6,7 


ITAL204& 


6 


Yes | 


Yes 
















ITAL 211 


Yes 


No 












Higher 


5 

1 


ITAL 204 & 
ITAL 251 


6 


Yes 


Yes 














Higher 


6,7 


ITAL 204 & 
ITAL 251 & 


9 


Yes 


Yes 



ts and Application Procedures 



1 




ITAL 211 




Yes 


No 


















Integ. Tech, 


1 


See Notes 






1 


N o credi t i s awarded for thi s exam at thi s ti me 
















Latin 

Either 


5,6,7 


LATN 201 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


Contact department for pi acement 405-2013. 
















Mathematics 












Standard: Nocredit. but placement in MATH 220isawarded. Hiahen MATH 141 mav be completed via 














credit- by-exam MATH 140fillsbotfiCORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement and CORE-Math& Formal 
Reasoni ng non-1 ab requi rement Contact department with quesrj ore, 405-5053. 


Standard 


5,6,7 


See Notes 





No 


No 














Higher 


5,6,7 


MATH 140 


7 


Yes 


Yes 
















Music 

Either 


5,6,7 


M USC 130 


3 


No 


Yes 


MUSC 130 fills CORE-Arts requirement M ajors should contact department for pi acement 405-5563. 
















Philosophy 

Higher 


6,7 


PHIL 100 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


PHIL 100 fillsCORE-Humanities requirement 
















Physics 

Higher 


5,6,7 


PHYS121& 
122 


8 


Yes 


Yes 


PHYS220 and 221 fill CORE-Lab (Physical) science requirements. Students continuing Physics study 
should consult department for placement, 405-5979. 


Psychology 

Either 


1 

6,7 


1 

PSYC100 


1 

3 


Yes 


Yes 

1 


ThelB exam counts towards the 35 credits requiredinthe major. If a student enters with IB credit s/he must 
complete PSYC221 with a gradeof B or better. PSYC 100 fillsoneof two CORE-Social/ Behavioral Science 
requirements. Contact department for placement, 405-5866. 
















Spanish 


| 


1 




1 


1 


Standard: Students with score of 5 who wish to continue must enroll in SPAN 204, 211 or 207: withscoreof 6 or 7 














Standard 


5 


SPAN 203 


4 


No 


Yes 














Standard 


6,7 


SPAN 204 & 


6 


NO | 


Yes 


must enroll in300-level courses. Hiaher: Students with score of 5. 6 or 7 must enroll in300-levd courses. SPAN 
203 or 204 fillsCORE-Humanities requirement. SPAN 221 fillsCORE-Literature requirement Students 
continuing Spanish study should consult department for placement, 405-6452. 






SPAN 207 


Yes 


No 














Higher 


5 


SPAN 204 & 


6 


No 


Yes 
















SPAN 221 


Yes 


Yes 


Higher 


6,7 


SPAN 204 & 


9 


No 


Yes 
















SPAN 207 & 


Yes 


No 
















SPAN 221 


Yes 


Yes 
















Swahili 

Either 


6,7 


FOLA 159 


6 


No 


No 


Electivecredit in trie FOLA program Students who wish to continue should contact the FOLA officeinjininez 
Hall. 
















Theatre 

Higher 


5,6,7 


THET 110 


3 


No 


Yes 


THET llOfillsCORE-Arts requirement Majors should contact ctepartrrert for pi acerret, 405-6694. 



PleaseNote LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit for IB courses and for equivalentUMCP courses ortransfer courses (includingAP or 
CLEP). IB credit will be deleted in such cases. Decisions about applicability of courses to CORE are updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent 
information. Native speakers may not earn IB credit for any language exams. 

Students who receive an International Baccalaureate Diploma or Certificate may consider presenting a portfolio to the Freshman Writing Office for review. Sea the Department of English 
web site or call the Freshman Writing Office 405-3771, for further information. 



ADMISSION TO LIMITED ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS (LEP) 



Certain colleges, schools, and departments within the university have taken steps to limit enrollment in order to maintain quality programs. These 
include trie School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, RobertH. Smith School of Business, A. James Clark School of Engineering, Philip 
Merrill Col lege of Journalism Department of Biological Sciencs, Department of Biochemistry, Chenisty and Environmental Sciences 
and Policy-Biodiversity and Conservation, Department of Communication, Department of Criminology, Department of Government and Politics, 
Department of Natural Resource Sciences and LandscapeArchitectureand Department of Psychology. LEP programs are continually reviewed. 
Students should check the LEP website at www.lep.urrid.edu or contact the Coordinator of Limited Enrollment Programs at 301-314-8385 for 
updated i nf ormarj on. 

Freshmen: Admission for new freshmen to Limited Enrollment Programs is competitive. Because space may be limited for a particular major, 
earl y appl i carj on i s encouraged. F reshmen who are di recti y admi tted to an L E P wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew when they compl ete 45 
col I ege credi ts. The revi ew van es from program to program but al ways i ncl udes sarj sf actory performance i n a set of appropri ate courses. Students 
not passi ng the revi ew wi 1 1 be requi red to choose another maj or. See the acadeni c program descri prj on for sped f i c detai I s. 

Freshmen not directly admitted to an LEP may be assigned to Letters and Sciences. Students are not guaranteed admission to an LEP at a later 
date, although they may gain admission by meeting the requirements outlined in the r particular program by the time they compl ete45 or 60 
credits at Maryland. See the foil owing seed on on LEP transfer admission and the LEP program descriptions for further detai Is about this option. 

Transfers Transfer students and on-campus students wi shi ng to change tharmajortoanLEP must meet a set of gateway courses wi th rri ni mum 
grades in order to be admitted to the program Space is limited in each program, and the most qualified applicants will be admitted each semester. 
Additional information for each of the Limited Enrollment Programs may be found in the descriptions of academic majors in chapter 7. 

Transfer students who are not directly adrrissibleto an LEP upon application to the university will be assigned to an alternate program Those 
wi th fewer than 60 credi ts will be assigned to Letters and Sciences, and will be allowed the opportunity to meet the gateway requirements by the 
time they compl ete 45 or 60 credits. Students with more than 60 credits will be admitted to an interim advising program in Letters and Sciences 



ts and Application Procedures 



where they will be advised regarding their qualifications for the LEP and, in some cases, students need to choose another major. 

Second Major: Enrolled students interested in adding an LEP as a second major should see "Degree Requirements" in chapter 4. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

While professional schools do not require, favor, or prefer specific majors, pre-professional advisors can provide guidance concerning trie choice 
of major. Undecided students may enter Letters and Sciences, but must adhere to the University of Maryland policy, that students declarea 
degree-granting major by the time they reach 60 credits. See www.ltsc.umd.edu/ 

Forfurther information on pre-professional programs, see "Other for Credit Programs" in Chapter 7, www.prelaw.umd.edu or 
www.prehealth.umd.edu . 

SPECIAL APPLICANTS 

Golden I dentification Card Program 

The University of Maryland participates in the Golden Identification Card Program The institution will make avail able courses and various 
servi ces to persons who are 60 years of age or ol der, who are I egal resi dents of the State of M ary I and and who are reti red ( not engaged i n gai nf ul 
empl oy ment for more than 20 hours per week) . W hen persons el i gi bl e f or thi s program are adrri tied to the uni versi ty , they regi ster on a 
space-avail able basis for credit courses as regular or special students in any session and receive a Golden I dentification card. Golden ID students 
must meet all course prerequisite and co-requisite requirements. Tuition is waived for these courses; however, a Golden ID administrative fee is 
assessed every semester. Golden ID students may regi ster for a maximum of three courses per term Golden ID students are not eligible for 
Consortium courses. The Golden Identification Card will entitieeligible persons to certain academic services, including the use of the libraries and 
the shurjrj e bus servi ce Such servi ces wi 1 1 be avai I abl e duri ng any sessi on onl y to persons who have regi stored for one or more courses for that 
semester. Golden ID stixlentsal so liave the opportunity to become involved with the Golden ID Student Association, which provides cultural and 
social events, course recommendations, and peer advising. Additional information may be obtained from the Off ice of UndergraduateAdnissions 
at 301-314-8385. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

A ppl i cants who qual i fy for adrri ssi on but do not desi re to work toward a baccal aureate degree may be adrri tted as non-degree-seeki ng students. 

Non-degree-seeking students who have received a baccal aureate degree are advised that no credit earned whileenrolled may be applied at a later 
date to a graduate program These post-baccal aureate students may enrol I i n undergraduate courses for whi ch they possess the necessary 
prerequisites, but may not enrol I in courses restricted to graduate students only. Students who wish to take courses at the graduate level (600 and 
above) must contact the Graduate School for information concerning admission requirements for Advanced Special Student status. 

N on-degree-seeki ng students who do not have a baccal aureate degree must submit transcri pts and meet regul ar adrri ssi on standards. Transcri pts 
arenotrequiredfromstudentswithbaccalaureatedegreesfromaregionally accredited institution. Because of space I irritation, several 
departments requi re perm ssi on be given i n advance to regi ster for cl asses as a non-degree student PI ease contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Adrri ssi ons for further i nforrrerj on. 

Non-degree-seeking students who are taking classes to transfer immediately back to another institution may apply without academic transcripts. 
These appl i cants must i n I i eu of transcri pts, subrri t off i ci al documentarj on from that i nsti turj on granti ng permi ssi on to take course work at the 
University of M aryland for that particular semester. 

Returning Students and Veterans 

Applicants who have not attended school for more than five years, or who have had military experience, should contact both an adrri ssi ons 
counselor and the Returning Students Program 301-314-7693. Veterans should also contact the the University of M aryland Veterans Certification 
Office: 301-314-8239. 

Students returni ng to the University of M aryland after a separation of five calendar years may petition the appropriate dean to have a number of 
grades and credits from courses previously taken at theUniversity of Maryland, College Park, removed from the calculation of their cumulative 
grade poi nt averages and from the credits appl i ed toward graduati on requi rements. See i nf ormati on under "Regi strati on, Acaderri c Requi rements 
and Regulations" in chapter 4 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

The Uni versi ty of M aryland seeks to enrol I i nternational students who demonstrate strong academic performance with records suggesting 
potential for success at Maryland. Admission is competitive and is offered to applicants whose academic credentials indicate marks of "very good" 
to "excellent" Due to space limitations and the competitive nature of undergraduate adrri ssi on at the University of Maryland, an international 
applicant should submit a complete application as early as possible, and always before the deadlines listed in this section. Applications completed 
after a deadl i ne wi 1 1 not be consi dered for that semester, but wi 1 1 be revi ewed for the f ol I owi ng semester. E val uati on of an appl i cant's credenti al s 
will take pi ace only after all application materials are received. 

Applicants currently holding or intending to seek an F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor visa to study in the United States are consi dered 
international applicants and should observe the foil owing instructions. All other non-i mm grant visa holders (including A, E, G, H, I , and L) 
shoul d f ol I ow the F reshman and Transfer i nstructj ons precedi ng and f ol I owi ng the I ntemati onal Student A drri ssi on seed on 

Freshman Admission - 1 nternational 

Y ou are consi dered a freshman appl i cant i f you have compl eted fewer than 12 semester hours of uni versi ty-l evel credi t past secondary school at 
thetimeyou plan to enter the University of Maryland. Successful freshman applicants demonstrate satisfactory completion of diverse 
college-preparatory subjects in secondary school, proficiency in English, and evidence of sufficient funds to cover all expenses. Due to space 
limitations, we are unable to offer adrri ssi on to all students who have the ability to be successful academically at the University of Maryland. 

TheFall (August) deadl i ne for applications to be received is November 1. The Spring (January) general deadline is August! 

A 1 1 of the f ol I owi ng documents must be subrri tted before the freshman f i nal deadl i ne f or an appl i cant to be consi dered for undergraduate 



ts and Application Procedures 



admission: International Student Application for UndergraduateAdnission; nonrefundableapplicationfee(U.S. $55.00); official secondary 
school transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion 
fromanational secondary school examination and external board or agency examination; all official university or col lege transcripts in native 
language with certified literal English translations (if any); proof of English proficiency (Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 
International English Language Testing System (I ELTS)); SAT I orACTofficial results statement of activities; essays; guidance counsel or and 
teacher recommendati on letters; and Certification of Finances, i ncluding supporting documents that demonstrate support of U.S. $44,331 per year. 
Current F-l and J -1 Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their I -94 Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current 1-20 or DS-2019 
form Current other non-immigrant Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their I -94 Arrival/Departure Record and visa stamp. 

Transfer Admission - 1 nternational 

Y ou are considered a transfer applicant if you have completed 12 or more semester hours of university- level credit past secondary school at the 
ti me you pi an to enter the U ni versi ty of M ary I and. Students who have compl eted fewer than 30 transf erabl e credi ts must subrri thigh school 
transcripts and SAT I orACTscores. Successful transfer appli cants demonstrate better than average grades in strong academic courses, 
proficiency in English, and evidence of sufficient funds to cover all expenses. Due to space limitations, weareunableto offer admission to all 
students who have the ability to be academically successful at the University of Maryland. 

TheFall final deadline for applications to be received is March! The Spring (January) final deadline is August! 

A 1 1 of the fol I owi ng documents must be subrri tied before the transfer f i nal deadl i ne f or an appl i cant to be consi dered for undergraduate 
admission: International Student Appli cation for UndergraduateAdnission; nonrefundableapplicationfee(U.S. $55.00); all official university or 
col lege transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations; proof of English proficiency; statement of activities; and 
Certification of Finances, including supporting documents that demonstrate support of U.S. $44,331 per year . Current F-l andj -1 Visa Holders 
must also provide photocopies of their I -94 Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current 1-20 or DS-2019 form Current other 
non-i mm grant V i sa H ol ders must al so provi de photocopi es of thei r I -94 A rri val/Departure Record and vi sa stamp. Students with fewer than 30 
semester hours must also provide official secondary school transcripts in native language with certified literal English translations, SATscores, 
and, where appropriate, official results and certificate of completion froma national secondary school examination. 

English Proficiency 

Non-native English speakers (regardless of citizenship) who seek admission to the University of Maryland must verify their proficiency in 
English by taking and submitting an official score report from one of the following English proficiency exams: TOEFL (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language); or I ELTS (I nternational English Language Test System). Please note that whileTOEFL or I ELTS scores are required to 
satisfy proficiency in English, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions will conduct a full file review considering all application materials 
submitted in the appli cation package to make a determination about the students level of English proficiency. Those whose native language is not 
English, or who have earned a post-secondary degree froma university in an English-speaking country do not need to take or submit scores from 
an English proficiency exam Transfer credit for an English composition coursefroman U.S. institutions does not waive the English proficiency 
exam 

Visa Records 

Applicants Residing Outside of the United States: To enter the United States, international students residing abroad will need a passport from their 
government and a visa from the U.S. Consulate. I n order to obtain a visa for the purposes of studying in theUnited States, the applicant must 
present a Certificateof Eligibility formto the U.S. Consulate. The university will issue this form to admitted students who havesubrritted proof of 
havi ng sufficient funds to cover the cost of a program of study. Admitted students with personal , f arri ly, or other source of private fundi ng wi 1 1 be 
issued the Certificate of Eligibility form (1-20) in order to obtain the F-l Student Visa. Admitted students who are sponsored by agencies, 
foundations, or their home government or are participating in an established exchange program may be issued the Certificate of Eligibility form 
(DS-2019) inordertoobtaintheJ-1 Exchange Visitor Visa. 

Applicants Currently Residing in the United States: Appli cants currently holding F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor status in the United States 
need to submit a photocopy of thei r I -94 Arri val/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current I -20 or DS-2019 form along with proof of havi ng 
suff i ci ent funds to cover the cost of a program of study. A ppl i cants hoi di ng another type of non- i mmi grant status need to subrri t a photocopy of 
their 1-94 Arrival/Departure Record and visa stamp, and must indicate if they intend to seek a change to F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor 
status. Upon admission and submission of the appropriate financial support documentation, the university will issue the appropriateCertificate of 
Eligibility form (1-20 or DS-2019) to thestudent. 

The University of Maryland awards between 4 and 8 semester credits for most A-level exams completed with a grade of C or better. Up to 4 
semester credits may be awarded for certain AS-level exams compl eted with acceptable grades. International Baccalaureate exams, Cambridge 
I nternational exams, Caribbean Advanced Proficiency exams, West African Examination Council exams, Abitur, and other post-secondary exam 
scores may be recognized for credit For further information, contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Adrrissionsviaemail at um-admit@umd.edu or 301-314-8385. 

TRANSFE R ADM I SSI ON 

Admission to the University of Maryland is competitive. Review the Statement of Philosophy of UnderqraduateAdrrissions and Admission 
Review Factors for more i nf ormati on regard ng our adrni ssi on process. When the number of students desi ri ng adrri ssi on exceeds the number that 
can be accommodated at thi s i nsti tuti on, or i n a parti cul ar prof essi onal or sped al i zed program adrri ssi on wi 1 1 be based on the overal I strength of 
the student's academic performance 

In accordance with Maryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer polices, certain appli cants from Maryland public 
institutions are given special consideration and are admitted when space is available. 

TheAdrrissionComrritteeconsiders the student's academic record and grades receivedinall college-level courses. Students are expected to have 
completed English Composition (the equivalent of UM 's ENGL 101) and college level mathematics (the equivalent of UM 's Math 110 or above) 
prior to enrollment 

Students who graduate from high school and subsequently complete a minimum of 12 semester hours or 18 quarter hours during a regular term 
excl udi ng summer school , at a regi onal I y accredi ted col I ege or uni versi ty are consi dered transfer appl i cants. Students who compl ete fewer than 30 
semester or 45 quarter hours are expected to submit high school records and SAT I and/or ACT scores for review. When an appl icant has attended 



ts and Application Procedures 



more than one i nsti tuti on, a cumul ati ve average for al I previ ous col I ege work attempted wi 1 1 be computed. To be consi dered, course work must 
have been completed ata regionally accredited college or university. 

Application Dates 

Semester Date 

Spring Priority - August 1 

Spri ng - N ovember 15 

Fall Priority- March 1 
Fall- Junel 

Transfer from Maryland Public I institutions 

Currently, applicants who have attended Maryland public institutions may be admitted in accordance with the criteria outlined in the previ ous 
paragraph. The university subscribes to the policies set forth in the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) and Board of Regents 
transfer policies. When the number of students desiring admission exceeds the number that can beacccimrnodated in a particular professional or 
specialized program adrrissionwill be based on criteria developed by theuniversitytoselectthebestqualifiedstudents. 

A rti cul ated transfer programs are avai I abl e at each M ary I and communi ty col I ege. A n arti cul ated transfer program i s a I i st of courses that best 
prepare appl i cants for a parti cul ar course of study at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and A ppl i cants who take appropriate courses specified in the 
articulated program and earn acceptable grades are guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit. Articulated transfer programs help students plan 
their new programs after changing career objectives. More information about A RTSYS, the arti cul ati on system isavailableonlineathttp://artweb.u! 
http://artweb.usmd.edu/ A ppl i cants can el i mi nate al I doubt concemi ng transfer of courses by fol I owi ng arti cul ated programs. 

General Transfer I n fo rm a Uon 

Admitted students will receive a preliminary review of transfer credit within two weeks after receiving the letter of admission. An official review 
of transfer credi t occurs thereafter, wi th f i nal deterni nati on of appl i cabi I i ty made by an academi c advi sor/eval uator i n the off i ce of the appropri ate 
dean for the major. Generally, college-level courses completed at regionally-accredited institutions will transfer provided that grades of at I east 
"C" (2.0) are earned and the coui^e is similar in content and scope to work offered at Maryland. The regional accrediting bodies are Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 
Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and Western Association of Schools and 
Colleges. Up to 60 credits from a community or two-year col I ege and 90 credits from a four-year col lege, may be applied toward the degree 
Students are required to complete at least their final 30 credits at Maryland to earn a University of Maryland degree 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public colleges and universities is covered by the Maryland Higher Education Commission 
(MHEC) transfer policies (see complete text later in this seed on). Maryland will accept grades of "D" or better from appropri ate course work 
completed ata regionally-accredited Maryland public institution, including other institutions in the University System of Maryland. 

TheTransfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assistance to students and transfer advisors. TheCenter, a joint effort between the 
Offices of Undergraduate Admissions and the Office of the Registrar, has computerized and consolidated the transfer credit evaluation process. It 
provides incoming students from domestic institutions with information on acceptability of credits and transfer equivalencies, subject to 
adj ustment by advi sors wi thi n the student's i ndi vi dual program Certai n courses (eg., those not appeari ng or not f ul I y el aborated i n the sendi ng 
institution's current catalog) may require additional information such as syllabi, portfolios, etc., before evaluation. 

I nformation on transferability of specific courses to the University of Maryland, College Park may be accessed on the web at 
www.tce.umd.edu/TCE/ . 

Each college-level course will beevaluated individually, with applicability toward major or general education requirements determined by the 
appropri ate academic unit The university does not transfer blocks of courses, such as those completed through the Associate's Degree. See 
"Departments, Majors and Programs" for specific general education and major requirements. 

Creditwill be posted to your Maryland record only from official transcripts sentfromtheinstitution at which the credit was completed. Students 
who have earned credit through Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 
subject area exams must have scores sent directly from the testing board, even if they are already posted on a transcript from another institution. 



SOURCE 


ACCEPT 
CREDITS? 


EQUIVALENT OR 
REQUIRED CREDITS 


GRADES/SCORES WHERE 
APPROPRIATE 


Note Some transfer credit policies are under review. Please call UndercraduateAdmissiansfor current information. 


ACE N on Collegiate Courses 


No 


Advanced Placement Program (CEEB) 


Yes 


EorRJ- 


3 or higher (see chart in Chapter 1) 


CLEP 


Yes 


EorRJ- 


See chart i n Chapter 4 


Community Col lege of the Ai r Force 


Yes 


EorRl 


C (2.0) or higher equivalent grade as 
appropri ate to dept. 


Correspondence courses 


No 






Dantes 


No 






Defense 
1 


Yes 

Language 

Institute 


EorRl 


Scores as appropri ate to department 



ts and Application Procedures 



Departmental exams from other col leges 


Yes EorRJ- C (2.0) or higher 


International Baccalaurate 


Y es E or R 1 5 or hi gher (see chart i n Chapter 1) 


Lifeexperience 


No, unless val i dated through CLEP or University of Maryland, College Park departmental exam 






Military credit 


No 


Nursing school courses: by transfer/by 
challenge exam 


No2 


Other articulation agreements (propriety 
schools, public agencies, etc.) 


No, unless a newly-formed Maryland public institution operating under auspices of M HEC 


PONSI non-collegiate work 


No 


Portf ol i o credi ts from other col 1 eges 


No 



1. Courses must be similar in depth and scope to University of Maryland courses. Applicability is determined by the appropriate dean. 

2. Professional courses aregenerally nottransferable. Coursetaken at a regionally-accredited institution may bereviewed by the appropriate dean. 



Statement on Transfer of CourseCredit 

The University of Maryland welcomes transfer students and has transfer agreements (sometimes referred to as "articulation" agreements) to 
encourage and aid students in their efforts to take appropriate courses prior to transfer. Each course is evaluated individually for students seeking 
to transfer to the University of M aryland. Credit is granted for courses that are applicable to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and 
for which a grade of "C" or above was earned. Courses completed at Maryland public two- or four-year institutions may be transferred with 
grades of " D " or above provi ded that course content i s appropri ate to our acaderri c programs. 

Maximum Number of Transfer Credits Accepted 

The University of Maryland has direct transfer agreements with all Maryland community colleges, as well as other junior and community colleges 
outsi de of the state The uni versi ty will accept for transfer a maxi mum of 60 credi ts from a two-year program and 90 credi ts from a four-year 
program for courses i n whi ch a grade of "C " or above was earned and whi ch are appropri ate to an approved curri cul um at thi s i nsti tuti on. See the 
above paragraph for requi red course grades. 

Maximum Number of Credits Allowed for Non-Traditional Learning 

Students who have acquired college-level learning through work or other non-collegiate activities may wish to translate their experience into 
credits at Maryland by validation through the national CLEP examination (College-Level Examination Program) or credit-by-exani nation 
administered by academic departments. The university will accept a maxi mum of 30 hours of credit through examination. 

Minimum Number of Credits Required Through Classroom Instruction in theMajor Field and for the Degree 

The U ni versity of M aryl and requi res a rri ni mum of 120 semester hours of credit for an undergraduate degree; some programs requi re more. 
Regardless of the total number of transfer credits, students must complete at I east their last 30 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

Statement on Transfer of General Education Requirements 

As directed by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (M HEC) Transfer Policy, transferable courses taken in fulfillment of general 
education requirements at a Maryland public institution will be applied toward University of Maryland's general education requirements. Careful 
planning with an academic advisor will ensure that students take appropriate credit and maximize their credit transfer. The total number of 
general educati on credi ts for a M aryl and publ i c i nsti tuti on transfer or post baccal aureate credi ts wi 1 1 not exceed that requi red of rati ve students. 

Transfer credit Policy- Maryland Higher Education Commission (Title 13B) 

www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/subtitle_chapters/13B_Chapters.htm 

RESIDENCY INFORMATION 



Residency Classification Office, 1130 Mitchell Building 

301-314-9596; Fax: 301-314-7915 
E-mail: resclass@umd.edu 
www.testudo.umd.edu/rco 

Petitions, related documents and questions concerning the Board of Regents Policy on Student Classification for Admission and Tuition Purposes 
should be directed to the Residency Classification Office in the Office of the Registrar. 
Determination of I ivState Status for Admission and Tuition Purposes: See 
www.usmh.usrnd.edu/regents/taylaws/SectionVI 1 1 A/I 1 1 270.html for the complete text of this policy. 

An initial determination of in-state status will be made by the Office of UndergraduateAdrrissions at thetimea students' application for 
admission is considered. The determination made at that time, and any determination made thereafter, shall prevail in each semester until the 
determination is successfully challenged. Students may challenge their classification by submitting a timely petition to the Residency 
Classification Office Determi nations are based on the residency policy and requi rements. The deadline for subrritting a complete petition along 
with all support ng documents, i s the f i rst day of the semester i n whi ch the student wi shes to be cl assi f i ed as i n-state 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in completing the review process. A decision in each case will be made within 
60 days of receipt of a complete petition and all required documentation. During this period of time or any further period of time requi red by the 
university, any fees and charges based on the previous determination must be paid. The student is solely responsible for any I ate charges incurred 
by the resi dency process. I f the determi nati on i s changed, any excess fees and charges wi 1 1 be refunded. 

Students classified as in-state for admission and tuition purposes are responsible for notifying the Residency Classification Office in writing 
within 15 days of any change in their circumstances that might in any way affect their classification at the University of Maryland. 



ts and Application Procedures 



RE ADM I SSI ON AND RE INST ATE ME NT 

Students who are admitted and do not register for thei r first semester or cancel registration prior to beginning their first semester must apply again 
for admission (see Freshman or Transfer Admission). Students who are admitted as "Term Only" also must apply again for admission if they 
wish to register for a subsequent term Students admitted as "Non-Degree" seeking students, who would like to become degree-seeking students, 
must apply again for admission (seeTransfer Admission). 

Students who have matriculated and registered and did not maintain that registration continuously (Fall and Spring semesters) to graduation, must 
appl y for readrri ssi on or rei nstatement to re-enrol I at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and. 

See "Withdrawal and Leave of Absence from the University" in chapter 4 for more detailed information. 

Readrri ssi on 

Students must appl y for readrri ssi on i f they i nterrupt regi strati on for one or more semesters and were not acaderri cally disrri ssed at the 
concl usi on of the I ast semester of attendance 

Reinstatement 

Students who are acaderri cally dismissed from the university must apply for reinstatement All applications for reinstatement are reviewed by a 
Faculty Petition Board. Students may apply for rei nstatement for the semester immediately following dismissal or for any subsequent semester. 
Only the Faculty Petition Board can grant reinstatement. 

Students who are denied reinstatement will be required to comply with specific recommendations made by the Faculty Petition Board in order to 
be consi dered for rei nstatement i n a future semester. 

Reinstatement After Withdrawal 

Students who withdraw from the university must apply for rei nstatement if they i nterrupt enrol Iment for one or more semesters. 
Students shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons for more i nf ormati on about readrri ssi on and rei nstatement. 

Deadlines 

For full consideration, students must observe the foil owing deadlines: 

Readrri ssi on 



Fall Semester 


August 15 


Winter Term 


November 1 


Spring Semester 


J anuary 15 


Summer Sessi on 1 


May 1 


Summer Session II 


Junel 


Reinstatement 





Fall Semester July 1 

Wi nter Term N ovember 1 

Spri ng Semester December 1 

Summer Session I May 1 

Summer Session 1 1 Junel 

All students are encouraged to apply early in order to take advantage of early registration. 

Summer School 

Students who are dismissed or withdraw at the end of the fall semester are not el igible to attend Summer Sessions unless or until they are 
approved for rei nstatement Students di srri ssed at the end of a spri ng semester may attend any Summer Sessi ons pri or to bei ng rei nstated provi ded 
the student regi stered for Summer Sessi on courses pri or to di srri ssal or wi thdrawal . 

Winter Term 

Students dismissed or withdraw at the end of the fall semester may attend Winter Term pri or to being reinstated provided the student registered for 
Winter Term prior to dismissal or withdrawal. Winter Term is offered to students who have attended during the preceding fall semester. Students 
with a break in attendance must be reenrol led to be el igible to attend Winter Term Students readmitted/reinstated for a spring semester may also 
attend Wi nter Term 

Clearances 

Clearancesfromjudicial Programs, the Bursar, Health Center, International Education Services and/or the Graduate School may be requested of 
the applicant. 

Applications 

Applications for readrri ssi on and rei nstatement may be accessed via the web at www.adrrissions.urrxJ.edu/adrrissions/applv/reenrollrnentasp. 

Additional I nformation 

For additional information contact the Office of Undergraduate A drri ssi ons, M itchell Building - Ground Floor, University of Maryland, College 
Park, M D 20742-5251, 301-314-8385 or visit: www.adrrissions.umd.edu . 



ts and Application Procedures 



OFFICE OF EXTENDED STUDI ES (Summer Term Winter Term, Freshmen Connection, Professional Programs) 

0132 Main Administration Building 

301-405-7762 

oes.umd.edu 

Chuck Wilson, Assistant Vice Presidentfor Records, Registration, and Extended Studies 



Summer Term serves more than 13, 000 students that i ncl ude current students, visiting students from other uni versi ti es and col I eges, graduates, 
prof essi oral s, and hi gh school students. Summer Term features more than 1, 700 courses that are offered morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne 
duri ng three- week or si x-week sessi ons. 

Winter Termserves more than 5,000 students that include current students, visiting students from other universities and colleges, graduates and 
professionals. Offered in J anuary between the end of the fall semester and the beginning of the spring semester, Winter Term is a three-week 
sessi on that features more than 450 courses that meet morning, afternoon, evening, and online 

Freshmen Connection offers spring-admitted students the opportunity to begin their University of Maryland education in the fall semester. With 
Freshmen Connecti on, spri ng-adnitted students earn up to 17 U ni versity credits toward the r undergraduate degree and get on track to graduate i n 
four years. 

Pre-Cdlege Programs 

The Young Scholars Program a three-week summer program i nvi tes ri si ng hi gh school sophomores, j uni ors, and seni ors to pursue acadeni c 
interests, discover career opportunities, earn university credits, and explore university life Highly qualified students enroll in a three-credit 
i introductory course f eaturi ng f i el d tri ps and guest speakers. Students parti ci pate i n workshops arid seni nars that further enri ch the r uni versi ty 
experi ence and resi de on campus or commute from home. 

Young Scholars Discovery, a two- week summer program i nvi tes ni ddl e school students to expl ore educati on and career opportuni ti es and I earn 
about university life. Academically promising students enroll in non-credit courses, attend field trips, and engage with experts in innovative 
fields. Students collaborateininteractiveseninars, enjoy evening social activities, and reside on campus or commute from home. 

TheFreshmen First Program prepares incoming first-year students for living and learning at the University of Maryland. The program eases the 
transi ti on to the uni versi ty envi ronment In this three- week summer program students enrol I i n a three-credi t course attend seni nars, workshops, 
and social activities, meet and study with other incoming freshmen, and resi de on campus or commute from home. 

Professional Programs include Professional M asters programs, Graduate Certificate programs, post-baccalaureate opportunities, and customized 
i ni ti ati ves that i ncl ude seni nars, work force trai ni ng, and short courses crafted for i ndustry appl i cati on. All programs are desi gned to meet the 
educational needs of professional audiences and target external constituencies in business, government, and non-profit organizations. These 
programs serve prof essi onal audi ences i n new ways, i mprovi ng access for prof essi oral audi ences through i nnovati ve approaches to teachi ng and 
I eami ng, parti cul arl y through the onl i ne envi ronment 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applicants who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited college or university in the United States (or the equivalent 
of a baccalaureate degree in another country) are eligibleto be considered for admission to theGraduate School attheUniversity of Maryland. 
Graduate School and degree program criteriafor admission are available in the Graduate Catalog, avail able online at 
www.gradschool . umd.edu/catal og. For more i nf ormati on on graduate degree programs, f i nanci al aid for graduate study, deadl i nes, and onl i ne 
application instructions, pi ease visit the Graduate School 's website, www.gradschool .umd.edu. email gradschool@umd.edu, or call theGraduate 
School Information Center at 301-405-0376. Hard-copy correspondence can beaddressedto the Graduate School, 2123 LeeBuilding, University 
of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742-5121 



Cambridge International Examination Program (CI E) 2011-2012 



ExamTrtie 


Grade 


Related 
Courses) 


Cr 


Major 


Core 


Notes 


Accounting 
Accounting Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B,C 


BMGT220& 
BMGT221 

BMGT220 


3 
3 

3 


No 
No 

No 


No 
No 

No 


Account] ng courses are gateway requi rements for enteri ng the 
Robert H. Snith School of Business. 


ArtDesign Sub 


A, B, C 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Contact department for pi acement 405- 1449 


Biology 
Biology Sub 


TBD 
TBD 


BSCI 105 & 
BSCI 106 

BSCI 105 


4 
4 

4 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


BSCI credits fulfill CORE-Life Science Lab requirement. Contact 
department for placement 405-6904 





ts and Application Procedures 



Chemistry 
Chemistry Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


CHEM 131 & 

CHEM 132 & 
CHEM 271 

CHEM 131 & 
CHEM 132 & 


3 
1 
2 

4 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 


CHEM credits fulfill CORE-Physical Science Lab requirement 
Contact department for pi acement 405- 1791 


Divinity 


A, B, C 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


PHIL majors/RELS rri nors should speak to their academic advisors. 


Economics 
Economics Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


ECON 201& 
ECON 200 

ECON 105 


3 
3 

3 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


ECON credits fulfill CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 

requi rement(s) . Contact department for pi acement 405-7845 or 

edinger@econ.umd.edu. 


Geography 


A, B, C 


GEOG 100 


3 




Yes 


GEOG credits fulfill one of twoCORE CORE-Social/Behavioral 
Sci ence requi rements. 


History 


A, B, C 


HIST 219 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


Regardless of the subject material covered, theSH CORE is 
awarded. Contact department for pi acement 405-4265 


Islamic 
Civilization 


A, B, C 


LL elective 


3 




Yes 


Creditfulfills CORE-Humanities and Diversity requirement. 


Literature 
Literature Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


ENGL 205 & 
ENGL 240 

ENGL240 


3 

3 

3 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


ENGL credits fulfill CORE-Humanities Literature requirements. 
Contact department for pi acement 405-3825 


Mathematics 
Pure 

Pure Sub 
Further 


A, B, C 

A, B, C 
A, B, C 


MATH 115 & 
MATH 140 

MATH 113 

STAT 100 & 
STAT 400 


3 
4 

3 

3 
3 


No 
Yes 

No 

No 
Yes 


Yes 

Yes 

No 


MATH 113 and 115 fill CORE-Fundamental Math requirement 
MATH 140 and STAT 100 fill CORE Mathematical Science 
requirement. Contact department for pi acement 
ugadvisor@math.umd.edu 


Mechanicsl/23 


A, B, C 


PHY S 141 


4 


No 


Yes 


PHYS credits fulfill CORE-Physical Sci ence Lab requirement. 
Contact department for pi acement 405-3401 


Music 
Music Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


MUSC140& 
M USC 130 

TBD 


3 
3 

3 


No 
No 

No 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


MUSCcreditsfill CO RE- Humanities Arts requi rement(s). Contact 
department for placement 405-8435 


Nutrition 


A, B, C 


LL elective 


3 


No 


No 


Contact department for pi acement 405-2139 


Physics 


A, B, C 


PHYS121& 
PHY S 122 


4 

4 




Yes 
Yes 


PHYS credits fulfill CORE-Physical Science Lab requirement. 
Contact department for pi acement 405-3401 


Psychology 
Psychology Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


PSYC100& 
LL elective 

PSYC100 


3 
3 

3 


Yes 

No 

Yes 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


PSYC credits fulfill CORE-Social/Behavioral Science 
requi rement(s) . Contact department for pi acement 405-5862 


Spanish 
Spanish Sub 


A, B, C 
A, B, C 


SPAN 301 & 
SPAN 302 

TBD 


3 
3 


Yes 
Yes 

Yes 


No 
No 

TBD 


Students wi shi ng to conti nue study i n Spani sh shoul d contact advi sor 
for placement, 405-6441 



Please Note LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Any test at theAdvanced or Subsidiary level not listed may be 
reviewed for credit at U M CP. Students may not receive credit both for CI E courses and for equivalent U M CP courses or transfer 
courses (including Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate). CIE creditwill bedeleted in such cases. Applicable grades 
for a parti cul ar exam are those i n effect when a student takes the exam Contact your Col I ege Dean i f you have questi ons. 



Certain CI E tests may be developed or revised during the year. Atthe time this catalog was implemented, information on those tests 
was not avail able ChangesarepossibleinUMCPcreditacceptanceforrevisedCIE exams. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 21 

Z Fees* Expenses and Financial Aid 

TUITION AND BILL PAYMENT INFORMATION 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-314-9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
billtalk@umd.edu 
www. umd. edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 

Tui ti on and fees for the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, are I i sted i n the 
next secti on. The uni versi ty requi res that al I deposi ts and fees be pai d by stated 
deadl i nes, or penal ti es must be i imposed. M any potenti al adrni ni strati ve 
di ff i cul ti es can be avoi ded i f students careful I y f ol I ow publ i shed procedures and 
notify the appropri ate off i ce(s) of any changes that mi ght affect the r f i nanci al 
obi i gati on to the uni versi ty. This i ncl udes updati ng your emai I address so 
communi cati on concerni ng your bi 1 1 i ng i s prompt, and notifyi ng the B ursar's 
Off i ce of changes of address so that mai I af f ecti ng the student's f i nanci al 
rel ati onshi p wi th the uni versi ty wi 1 1 not be del ayed or returned. 

Tui ti on and bi 1 1 payment i nf ormati on for Summer Term Wi nter Term F reshmen 
Connection and Professional Programs may be found at www.oes.umd.edu. 

Col I ege Park sponsors a deferred- payment pi an for the Fal I and Spri ng semesters 
onl y . I nf ormati on regardi ng the Terp payment pi an i s avai I abl e by cal I i ng 
301-314-9000 or 1-888-313-2404 or a twww.umd.edu/bursar . 

A 1 1 charges i ncurred duri ng a semester are payabl e i mmedi ate! y. Returni ng 
students wi II not be permi tted to cornpl ete regi strati on unti I al I f i nanci al 
obi i gati ons to the uni versi ty, i ncl udi ng I i brary f i nes, parki ng vi ol ati ons, and 
other penal ty fees and servi ce charges, are pai d i n f ul I . 

Payment for past due bal ances and current semester fees i s due on or before the 
f i rst day of cl asses. Students who regi ster i n advance must pay the r bi 1 1 s i n f ul I 
pri or to the general regi strati on peri od. Students who regi ster after the i ni ti al 
regi strati on peri od are requi red to make f ul I payment by the due date i ndi cated to 
avoi d cancel I ati on of the r enrol I ment and I oss of the r cl assroom seats to other 
students. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Page 22 



A I though the uni versi ty bi 1 1 s students monthl y, i t cannot assume responsi bi I i ty 
for thei r recei pt. Students are remi nded that i t i s thei r responsi bi I i ty to noti f y tine 
University of any change in their email address. If a student bill is not received 
on or before the begi nni ng of each semester, i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to 
obtai n a copy of the bi 1 1 . To check your account bal ance or vi ew your monthl y 
bi 1 1 i ng statement go to www. umd. edu/bursar and choose "Student Account 
I nqui ry" or go to the F i nanci al Servi ce Center, 1135 L ee B ui I di ng. The off i ce i s 
open Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m 

A 1 1 checks or money orders shoul d be made payabl e to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount due Student s name and student s University 
I D number should be written on the front side of the check. U ni versi ty grants 
and schol arshi ps wi 1 1 be posted to the student's account. H owever, the f i rst bi 1 1 
mai I ed pri or to the begi nni ng of each semester may not i ncl ude these credits. 

Students are urged to check thei r resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ce agreements 
for procedures for cancel I ati on of reservati ons and for deadl i nes for recei vi ng 
refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be made after these deadl i nes, even if the 
student deci des not to attend the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Students wi 1 1 i ncur a I ate payment f ee i n the event of f ai I ure to pay a bal ance on 
thei r student account by its due date. A I ate payment fee of $10.00 or 5%, 
whi chever i s hi gher, wi 1 1 be assessed i n addi ti on to the total past due amount. A n 
addi ti onal 1. 5% f i nance charge wi 1 1 be charged monthl y i f the account i s not 
settled. 

Students who f ai I to pay the i ndebtedness duri ng the semester i n whi ch 

del i nquency occurs wi 1 1 be i nel i gi bl e to regi ster for subsequent semesters unti I 

the debt and the penalty fees are cl eared. 

I n the event a student wi th a del i nquent account becomes regi stered for a future 
semester, the account must be settl ed i n f ul I pri or to the onset of the future 
semester, to avoid cancellation of registration. 

The state has establ i shed, under I egi si ati ve mandate, a Central Col I ecti ons U ni t 
(CCU) withi n the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planni ng. The university is 
requi red by state I aw to refer al I del i nquent accounts to the State Col I ecti ons 
U ni t. PI ease note that M aryl and I aw al I ows the Central Col I ecti ons U ni t to 
i ntercept state i ncome tax refunds for i ndi vi dual s wi th del i nquent accounts, and 
that CCU is authorized to notify a National Credit Bureau of the deli nquency at 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 8 ^ 23 

the ti me the account i s referred to i t for col I ecti on. 

All accounts due from students* faculty, staff, non-students, etc., are 
included within these guidelines. 

Central Col I ecti ons U ni t costs i ncurred i n col I ecti ng del i nquent accounts wi 1 1 be 
charged to the student. The mi ni mum col I ecti on fee i s 17% pi us attorney and/or 
court costs. 

N o degrees, di pi omas, certif i cates, or transcri pts of records wi 1 1 be i ssued to 
students who have not made sati sf actory setti ement of the r accounts. 

Notes Additional Information on Student Financial Obligations, Disclosure of 
Information, Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can befound in the "Policy 
Statements" secti on at the begi nni ng of thi s catal og. 

Payment of Fees 

A 1 1 checks, money orders, or postal notes shoul d be made payabl e to " U ni versi ty 
of Maryland". The student's University I D number must be written on the front 
of the check. VI SA, M asterCard, American Express, and Discover credit cards 
and onl i ne check payment are accepted. Onl i ne payments can be made by 
cl i cki ng on the bl ue box at www.umd.edu/bursar. 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-314-9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
billtalk@umd.edu 
www. umd. edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 

*>An Irrportant Fee Notice Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any 
other University publication, the University reserves the right to make changes 
in tuition, fees, and other charges at any time deemed necessary by the 
University and the University System of Maryland Board of Regents. Tuition and 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 24 

fee information is published in the Registration Guide each semester and is also 
available on-line at www. umd.edu/bursar. 

2011-2012 Academic Year-Esti mated* 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time ifthenunrber of credit hours enrolled is 12 
or more) 



Maryland Residents (I n-state) 

Total Academic 
Year Cost 

Tuition $6,966 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech fee) 2 ggg 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits 

B oard (Resident Dining Plan) 3,885 

5,804 
Room (IncludesTdecomfee) 



Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States, and Other Countries 

Total Academic 
Year Costs 

Tuition $24,337 

M andatory F ees (includes Tech fee) 2 ggg 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits 

Board Contract (Resident Dining Plan) 3,885 

Room (includes the Telecom fee) 5, 804 



Tuition and Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered part-time if the number of credit hours enrolled is 11 
or fewer) 



I n-State Tui ti on (per credit hour) $ 290 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P^ 25 

Out-of-State Tui ti on (per credit hour) 1,014 

M andatory Fees (per serrester) 

9-11 credi t hours (per serrester) 845 

8 or fewer credi t hours (per serrester) 389 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
billtalk@umd.edu 
www. umd. edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 



Mandatory Fees 

Student Fees The mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students i s 
based on a number of requested credit hours as fol I ows: Students regi stered for 9 
or more credits: $844.50 per semester; students regi stered for 8 or fewer credits: 
$389.00 per semester. 

Student Activities Fee ( Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I undergraduate students at 
the request of the Student Government A ssoci ati on. 1 1 i s used i n sponsori ng 
various student activities, student publications, and cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students. Thi s fee i s pai d 
i nto a fund that i s used for capi tal i mprovement, expansi on, and constructi on of 
vari ous campus faci I i ti es such as open recreati on areas (tenni s courts, basketbal I 
courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the Stamp Student Union. These 
proj ects are not funded or are funded onl y i n part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students for the support of the 
Department of I ntercol I egi ate A thi eti cs. A 1 1 students are encouraged to 
parti ci pate i n al I of the acti vi ti es of thi s department or to attend the contests i f 
they do not parti ci pate 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 26 



Shuttle Bus Fee ( Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students for the support of the 
shutti e bus transportati on system 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to all 
students and i s used to expand recreati onal f aci I i ti es and Stamp Student U ni on 
services. 

Recreation Services Fee ( Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I students sped f i cal I y to 
support the construed on and operati on of Ri tchi e Col i seum and the Campus 
Recreati on Center, a mul ti - use f aci I i ty that i ncl udes basketbal I and racquetbal I 
courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor jogging track, and multipurpose 
activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee Charged to al I students to support 
the operati on of the C I ari ce Smi th Perf ormi ng A rts Center. 

Telecommunications Fee Assessed to al I students I i vi ng i n university residence 
halls. 

Technology Fee Charged to undergraduate students, to support the 
i mprovement of the computer systems on campus. 

OtherFees 

Undergraduate Application Fee (N on- Refundable): Charged to all new 
applicants. $55 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (N on- Refundable): $400. All newly 
admitted undergraduate students who i ntend to matri cul ate i n the Fal I or Spri ng 
semester must submi t a $400 deposi t whi ch i s credi ted to the r tui ti on charges 
when they enrol I . Shoul d the student deci de not to enrol I for the specif i c 
semester of appl i cati on, the $400 deposi t i s f orf ei ted and cannot be used to offset 
any charges, i ncl udi ng ori entati on charges, the student may i ncur. 

Students admitted for the Fal I semester must submit this deposit by M ay 1 or 
wi thi n 30 days from the r date of admi ssi on, whi chever i s I ater, to reserve the r 
pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. Students admitted for the Spri ng semester must 
submi t thi s deposi t by December 1 or wi thi n 14 days of the r date of admi ssi on, 
whi chever i s I ater, to reserve the r pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. 

Pre-Cd lege Orientation Program Registration Fee $160 Freshmen (two-day 
program), $101 Transfer (one-day program), $60.00 Parent (per person). 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d ^ >S Q^ 27 



Late Registration Fee $20. A 1 1 students are expected to compl ete thei r 
regi strati on on the regul ar regi strati on days. Those who do not compl ete thei r 
regi strati on duri ng the prescri bed days must pay thi s fee. 

Special Feefor students requiring additional preparation in Mathematics 
(MATH 003> 010, 010, 013 and 015) per semester: $280. (Requi red of students 
whose curri cul um cal I s for MATH 110 or 115 and who do not pass tine 
qual ifyi ng exami nati on for these courses.) Thi s Sped al M ath Fee i s i n addi ti on 
to course charge Students enrol I ed i n thi s course and concurrent! y enrol I ed for 
ni ne or more credi t hours wi 1 1 be consi dered as f ul I -ti me students for purposes of 
assessing fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts, Business; and Science 
(UNI V 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees: The university offers a number of courses (M BA, ENTS, 
Chemical and Life Sciences, Animal Sciences) that have special course fees in 
addition to, or i n I ieu of, the standard tuition charges. Students are encouraged to 
contact the department pri or to regi steri ng for the cl ass to determi ne the total 
cost of the course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as 
those charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate 
I evel s. A udi ted credi t hours wi 1 1 be added to hours taken for credi t to determi ne 
f ul I -ti me or part-ti me status for fee assessment purposes. Sped al Students are 
assessed fees i n accordance with the schedul e for the comparabl e undergraduate 
or graduate cl assi f i cati on. 

Special Examination Fea(Credit-by-Exam): $30 per course for all 
undergraduates and f ul I -ti me graduate students; credi t- hour charge for part-ti me 
graduate students. 

Parki ng Registration Fees A 1 1 students enrol I ed for cl asses at the uni versi ty 
and who drive or park a vehi cl e anywhere or anyti me on the campus must 
regi ster to park on campus each academi c year. For addi ti onal i nf ormati on, 
pi ease refer to Department of Transportati on Servi ces. 

Textbooks and Suppl ies Textbooks and cl assroom suppl i es vary wi th the 
course pursued, but averaged $1076 in 2010-2011 (two semesters). 

Service C harges for Dishonored C hecks Payabl e for each check whi ch i s 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 28 

returned unpai d by the drawer bank on i ni ti al presentati on because of i nsuff i ci ent 
funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 

When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the check and pay any 
outstandi ng bal ance i n the account wi thi n 10 days or I ate fees may be assessed 
and the account transferred to the Central Col I ecti on U ni t for I egal f ol I ow-up. 
Addi ti onal ly, a mi ni mum 17% col I ecti on charge i s added to the charges posted 
to the student's account at the ti me the transfer i s made. When a check i s 
returned unpai d due to an error made by the student's bank, the student must 
obtai n a I etter from the branch manager of the bank or a person of equi val ent 
status admi tti ng the error. Thi s I etter must be subrri tted to the Off i ce of the 
B ursar to have the servi ce charge wai ved. 

Overdue L i brary C harges F or i terns from the I i brary 's mai n ci rcul ati ng 
col I ecti ons, charges are .50 cents per day per i tern, and recal I ed i tern f i nes are $2 
per day. I f an i tern i s I ost or muti I ated, the borrower i s charged the esti mated cost 
of the i tern pi us a processi ng fee to cover acqui si ti on and catal ogi ng costs. 
Different f i ne rates may apply to other I i brary col I ecti ons, such as reserve 
collections. 

Maryland Encash Institute Fee Seni- intensive, $3406.00. Intensive, 
$5972.00. Students enrol I ed wi th the M aryl and E ngl i sh I nsti tute pay thi s f ee i n 
support of the I nsti tute. Students enrol I ed i n the semi-i ntensi ve program may 
al so enrol I for regul ar academi c courses and pay the tui ti on and fees associ ated 
wi th those off eri ngs. The program al so offers non-credi t courses i n A meri can 
E ngl i sh Pronunci ati on ( U M E I 006) for $943.00 and F I uency Program or 
Advanced Writing (UMEI 007, 008) for $1253.00. These charges were for Fall 
2010 and are subj ect to change. 

Property Damage C harge Students wi 1 1 be charged for damage to property or 
equi pment. When responsi bi I i ty for the damage can be f i xed, the i ndi vi dual 
student wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or i t; when responsi bi I i ty cannot be f i xed, the cost of 
repai ri ng the damage or repl aci ng equi pment wi 1 1 be prorated among the 
individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P^ 29 

whi che\/er i s greater, pi us an additi onal 1.5% on each subsequent bi 1 1 i ng. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees Students compel I ed to I eave the uni versi ty at 
any ti me duri ng the academi c year shoul d meet wi th the r academi c col I ege 
advi si ng off i ce and secure a form for withdrawal . The compl eted form and 
i denti f i cati on card are to be submi tted to the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce 
whi ch wi 1 1 communi cate resul ts to the Off i ce of the Regi strar. Students wi 1 1 
f orf ei t the r ri ght to a refund i f the wi thdrawal acti on descri bed above i s not 
adhered to. The eff ecti ve date used i n computi ng refunds i s the date the 
wi thdrawal form i s f i I ed i n the academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce. Stop payment 
on a check, f ai I ure to pay the semester bi 1 1 , or fai I ure to attend cl asses does not 
constitute withdrawal . Refund requests should be processed by students with the 
Off i ce of the B ursar, otherwi se any credi t on the student account coul d be 
carri ed over to the next semester. I f a C ancel lation of Regjstration is 
submitted to the Office of the Re^ strar before the official first day of classes 
thestudent is entitled to full credit of semester tuition. 

U ndergraduate students wi thdrawi ng from the uni versi ty wi 1 1 be credi ted for 
tuiti on and fees i n accordance with tine fol I owi ng schedul e: 



Pri or to 1st day of cl asses 


100% 


1st 10 days of classes 


80% 


3rd week 


60% 


4th week 


40% 


5th week 


20% 


After 5th week 


No 
refund 



N ote: F i rst-semester freshmen who recei ve Ti ti e I V ai d and who wi thdraw wi 1 1 
recei ve a refund i n accordance wi th federal regul ati ons. 

Prior to the first day of classes, if f ul l-ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses, thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of the per-credit-hour fee for part-ti me students. However, if students later add a 
course or courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they 
are regi stered to 12 or more, they wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed for the difference between 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 30 

per-credit-hour fees pai d and the general fees for f ul l-ti me undergraduates. 

I f duri ng the fi rst five days of classes f ul I -ti me undergraduates drop a course or 
courses thereby changi ng the total number of credi ts for whi ch they are 
regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s 
of part-ti me charges pi us 20% of the difference between the f ul I -ti me fees and 
appropri ate part-ti me charges. After the f i rst f i ve days of cl asses, there i s no 
refund for changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me status. Students who regi ster as 
part-ti me undergraduate students and apply for a refund for courses dropped 
duri ng the f i rst week of cl asses wi 1 1 be gi ven an 80% refund. N o refund wi 1 1 be 
made for courses dropped thereafter. 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students official I y withdraw from the university or when they are given 
permi ssi on by the appropri ate of f i ci al s of the uni versi ty to move from the 
resi dence hal I s and/or to di sconti nue di ni ng hal I pri vi I eges. I n these cases, the 
room refund wi 1 1 be computed by mul ti pi yi ng the number of peri ods remai ni ng 
by the pro rata weekly rate after adj usti ng for a servi ce charge Refunds to 
students havi ng f ul I board contracts wi 1 1 be cal cul ated i n a si mi I ar manner. N o 
room and/or board refunds wi 1 1 be made after the 14th week of the semester. 
Students are rem nded that reservati ons for room and board must be cancel ed by 
the date publ i shed i n the resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ces agreement(s) . 

I n computi ng refunds to students who have received the benefit of scholarshi ps 
and I oans from uni versi ty funds, the computati on wi 1 1 be made to return the 
maxi mum amount to the schol arshi p and I oan accounts without I oss to the 
university. 

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

0102 Lee Building 

301-31^9000 

301-405-9265 

umfinaid@umd.edu 

www.financialaid.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSF A ) adrri ni sters al I types of federal , 
state, and institutional financial assistance programs, and, in cooperation with 
other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. The pri mary responsi bi I ity for f i nanci ng attendance at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, I i es with students and f ami I i es. Schol arshi ps, grants, 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P^ 31 

I oans, and work-study posi ti ons are awarded on the basi s of academi c ability 
and/or f i nanci al need as determi ned by a federal needs analysi s system 1 1 i s the 
i ntent of OSFA to provi de assi stance to students who mi ght not otherwi se be abl e 
to pursue col I ege studi es due to f i nanci al constrai nts. 

Financial aid funds are limited; therefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students must f ol I ow these steps to recei ve pri ori ty consi derati on for f i nanci al ai d: 

1. Student admi ssi ons appl i cati ons and al I necessary supporti ng documents to 
the Of f i ce of A dmi ssi ons by the appropri ate deadl i nes ( Deadl i nes are 
listed in Chapter 1) 

2. Compl ete a F ree A ppl i cati on for F ederal Student A i d ( F A F SA ) 
after J anuary 1. The F A F SA i s avai I abl e on the OSFA web si te at www.fi i 
www.fi nanci alaid.umd.edu. A new FAFSA is required for each 
academi c year of the student's enrol I ment. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing the 
FAFSA. A financial aid application has no bearing on a student's 
admi ssi on appl i cati on. H owever, students wi 1 1 not recei ve f i nal 
consi derati on for ai d unti I they are admi tted to a degree program 

3. Complete the FAFSA no later than February ^ so that it is 
received by the federal processor by February 15. Applying online 
helps to expedite the process I ncome for the previ ous year may be 
esti mated i ni ti al I y and corrected I ater on the Student A i d Report 



A ppl i cati ons recei ved before F ebruary 15 wi 1 1 be gi ven pri ori ty consi derati on. 
General Regulations Applicable to All Forms of Aid 

Full-Time Status. For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 credit 
hours through the schedul e adj ustment peri od each semester i n order to recei ve 
the f ul I f i nanci al ai d award. PI ease refer to the standards of Sati sf actory 
Academi c Progress when consi deri ng droppi ng be! ow 12 credit hours for any 
given semester. 

C itizenshi p Status. I n order to be el i gi bl e for federal , state, or uni versi ty 
f i nanci al assi stance, students must be U ni ted States ci ti zens or el i gi bl e 
non-citizens. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 32 



Default/Owe Refund: Students cannot be in default on an educational loan, nor 
can they owe any refund on a Pel I Grant or Suppl emental Educati onal 
Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded at any post- secondary institution. 

Decree- Seeking: Students must be worki ng toward a degree or certif i cate. 
Students must be admitted to the university as "degree-seeki ng." 

Satisfactory Process Students must be maki ng satisfactory progress toward a 
degree or certif i cate accord ng to the Standards for Sati sfactory Academi c 
Progress publ i shed i n the Schedul e of CI asses. 

Selective Services To receive federal financial aid, male students must register 
with Selective Service if they are at least 18 years old and born after December 
31, 1959, unl ess they are not requi red by I aw. The federal government wi 1 1 verify 
compl i ance of thi s regi strati on requi rement. Students who have questi ons about 
Sel ecti ve Servi ce regi strati on may contact the Sel ecti ve Servi ce at 847-688-6888 
or www.sss.gov. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non- university source, the university may reduce the 
f i nanci al ai d awarded by the uni versi ty . 1 1 i s the student's responsi bility to noti f y 
the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of al I outsi de awards. 

C hange in Financial Situation: 1 1 i s the students responsi bi I i ty to notify the 
Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of any changes to hi s or her f i nanci al 
ci rcumstances duri ng the year. 

Reappl ication Requi rement N eed- based assi stance i s not automati cal I y 
renewed from year to year. A 1 1 students requesti ng need- based ai d must reappl y 
by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA annually. Such reappl ication must 
i ndi cate conti nued f i nanci al need and mai ntai n Sati sfactory A cademi c Progress 
(SAP). 

Award Policy: Financial aid is normally a combination of grants, loans, and 

student empl oyment. The f i nanci al ai d "package" i s determi ned by the 

avai I abi I i ty of f i nanci al ai d and the f i nanci al ci rcumstances of each student. 1 1 i s 

not necessary to make any sped al appl i cati on for uni versi ty grants. The Off i ce of 

Student F i nanci al A i d wi 1 1 determi ne awards that best f i t the needs and 

qual i f i cati ons of the candi dates. 



Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educati onal costs i s used i n determi ni ng the amount of ai d 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 33 

that a student i s awarded duri ng the academi c year. A typi cal budget for an 
undergraduate at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, Col I ege Park, i s as f ol I ows: 

Depoxlentslijdentli\^ngoncampu^offcBrT|x^ 

(not with parent/rdativ^ 

Tuition and Fees 

I n-State: M aryl and Resi dent $8,416 

Out-of-State: DC, other states, other countries 24,831 

Room 5,714 

Board 3,885 

Books 1,076 

Personal and Transportation expenses 3,024 

Total In-State $22,115 

Total Out-of-State $38,530 



MERIT BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

1135 Lee Bui I ding 
301-31^9000 
301-405-9265 
sf a-schol arshi ps@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 



Scholarships 

Several schol arshi ps are avai I abl e to the hi ghest-achi evi ng students at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. Two types of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e: 
those based solely on academic or creative talent (merit- based), and those based 
on f i nanci al need. The el i gi bi I ity cri teri a for the different schol arshi ps are I i sted 
bel ow. PI ease al so see the I i st of departmental schol arshi ps at the end of thi s 
chapter. Students are encouraged to contact the off i ce or department responsi bl e 
for sel ecti ng the red pi ents for more i nf ormati on on these programs. Current 
i nf ormati on about schol arshi ps i s al so avai I abl e on the Web at www. uga. umd.edu 
www.uqa.umd.edu 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 34 



Banneker/Key Scholarship: The University of M aryland seeks to identify and 
sel ect some of the bri ghtest hi gh school seni ors i n the nati on to conti nue the r 
education as Banneker/Key Scholars. There are two award levels for Banneker 
K ey Schol arshi ps. The f i rst award I evel covers the costs of tui ti on, mandatory 
fees, room and board, and a book al I owance each year for four years. The second 
award I eve! provi des a parti al schol arshi p to go towards tuiti on and a book 
al I owance each year for four years. Schol arshi p red pi ents wi 1 1 al so be admi tted 
to the Honors Col lege and will be afforded many other opportunities as they 
parti ci pate i n i ntel I ectual enri chment programs. For f ul I consi derati on, students 
must subrri t an admi ssi on appl i cati on, appl i cati on fee, off i ci al transcri pt, essay, 
recommendati ons, and off i ci al copi es of SAT or ACT scores to the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons by N ovember 1 for the f ol I owi ng academi c year. 
Sel ected semi f i nal i sts are gi ven a personal i ntervi ew by the B anneker/K ey 
Sel ecti on commi ttee F actors such as a candi date's i nvol vement i n communi ty 
servi ce, tal ents or ski 1 1 s, I eadershi p, and character al I pi ay a part i n the f i nal 
awards. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu 
for more i nf ormati on. 

President s Schdarshi p: T hi s award provi des tal ented prospecti ve freshmen 
with schol arshi p support for four years. Awards rangi ng from $2,000 to $12,000 
per year are offered to i ncomi ng freshmen. Students are sel ected through the 
admissions process with primary consideration given to academic performance 
in high school (high school courses and achievement), standardized test scores 
(SAT or ACT), recommendations, and an essay. For full consideration, students 
must subrri t a compl ete appl i cati on for adrri ssi on by N ovember 1. Contact the 
Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Deans! Scholarship: This award provides talented prospective freshmen with 
schol arshi p support for one to two years. Awards rangi ng from $1,500 for one 
year to $4,500 for two years are offered to i ncomi ng freshmen. To be 
consi dered, students must subrri t a compl ete appl i cati on for adrri ssi on by 
November 1. Contact the Office of U ndergraduate Admissions at _www.uga.umd.ec 
www, uqa. umd. edu f or more i nf ormati on. 

Presidents Transfer Scholarship: This scholarship is a two-year $5,000 per 
year schol arshi p for transfer students. Students do not have to fi 1 1 out a separate 
appl i cati on to be consi dered as they wi 1 1 be eval uated based on the r appl i cati on 
to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and. The schol arshi p wi 1 1 be awarded to the most 
competitive transfer students with the strongest academi c records and col I ege 
grade poi nt averages. Students who are awarded the schol arshi p wi 1 1 recei ve 
noti f i cati on by mai I about two weeks after they recei ve thei r I etter of admi ssi on. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 35 

Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at www.uqaumd.edu for more 
information. 

Regents Scholars Program: The Regents Schol ars Program recogni zes the 
extraordi nary achievement of outstandi ng freshmen students. New awards are 
made each year i n the amount of f ul I i n-state tui ti on, mandatory fees, room, 
board, and a $1000 sti pend. Red pi ents are automati cal I y admi tted to the H onors 
College. A select number of the top high school schol ars in the state will be 
consi dered for thi s most presti gi ous award. A compl ete admi ssi on appl i cati on, 
application fee, official transcript, essay, recommendations, and SAT or ACT 
scores must be submi tted to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons by 
N ovember 1 for consi derati on for the Regents Schol ars Program for the 
f ol I owi ng academi c year. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at_www 
www, uqa umd. edu f or more i nf ormati on. 

National Merit Scholarship/College-Sponsored Merit Award: The National 
M eri t Schol arshi p Corporati on (N M SC) has a vari ety of schol arshi ps that are 
awarded to students based on academic performance. The University of 
M ary I and serves as a sponsori ng i nsti tuti on for prospecti ve freshmen sel ected by 
N M SC to receive the Col I ege-Sponsored M eri t Schol arshi p award. Students 
sel ected for the U M Sponsored M eri t award wi 1 1 recei ve a four-year renewabl e 
schol arshi p rangi ng from $1,000 - $2,000/year. All finalists shoul d f ol I ow 
N M SC 's i nstructi ons for f i rst choi ce noti f i cati ons careful I y and observe 
deadl i nes to remai n el i gi bl e for awards. 

The N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p al so awards Corporate-Sponsored meri t 
schol arshi ps and National Achievement awards. For more i nf ormati on on the 
N ati onal M eri t Schol arshi p program pi ease vi si t: www, nati onal meri t. org . 

Weinberg Regents Scholarship: I n order to conti nue the commitment to 
outstandi ng students, the Board of Regents has desi gnated the Wei nberg Regents 
Schol arshi p to be awarded to a M aryl and community col I ege transfer student. 
To be sel ected for thi s award, the transfer student must have excepti onal 
qual if i cati ons, i ncl udi ng achi evement of a 4.0 grade poi nt average, compl eti on of 
the A ssoci ate of A rts degree at a M aryl and communi ty col I ege, evi dence of 
creati ve and i ntel I ectual acti vi ti es or schol arl y potenti al , and have been admi tted 
to one of the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and i nsti tuti ons. The deadl i ne for 
submi tti ng the candi date's appl i cati on materi al i s J une 15. The wi nner may 
receive the schol arshi p for two years, total i ng no more than four semesters 
i ncl udi ng summer sessi ons. For i nf ormati on, contact the U ni versi ty System of 
Maryland Administration at 301-445-1992. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al Aid Pa 9 e 36 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are avail able to 
outstandi ng students transferri ng from M aryl and community col I eges. The 
awards cover i n-state tui ti on for two years of undergraduate study. To be 
el i gi bl e students must have an overal I grade poi nt average of 3. 5 for al I col I ege 
work attempted, and must have compl eted an Associ ate of A rts degree or the 
enti re f i rst two years of courses for the maj or i n whi ch the student expects to 
enrol I . Students who have previ ousl y attended the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, 
Col I ege Park, are i nel i gi bl e for thi s schol arshi p. Candi date nomi nati on forms are 
avai I abl e i n earl y J anuary from the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons or from 
communi ty col I ege advi sors. The deadl i ne for recei pt of the appl i cati on, off i ci al 
transcri pts, and schol arshi p materi al s i s earl y-M arch. Contact the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons at www.uqa.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Honors Scholarship: H onors students al ready attend ng M aryl and are el i gi bl e 
to apply for one of these $500 awards. To be consi dered, students must be f i rst 
or second year students, have at I east a 3.2 grade poi nt average, be maki ng 
sati sf actory progress toward the compl eti on of requi rements for an H onors 
ci tati on, and di spl ay f i nanci al need. To appl y appl i cants must submi t an essay on 
thei r academi c goal s and pi ans for achi evi ng them PI ease note that Regents, 
Banneker-Key, and Presi dent's Schol arshi p red pi ents are not el i gi bl e for the 
H onors Schol arshi ps. F or more i nf ormati on pi ease contact the H onors Col I ege 
at 301-405-6771. 

University of Maryland Departmental Scholarships: Some Col I eges and 
departments at the uni versi ty offer a vari ety of meri t schol arshi ps. M ost 
departmental schol arshi ps requi re a student to have a mi ni mum grade poi nt 
average of 3.0 and be regi stered for a mi ni mum of 12 credits per semester. For 
i nf ormati on regardi ng departmental schol arshi ps, pi ease contact the appropri ate 
Col I ege or department 

C reative and Performi ng Arts Schol arshi ps: T hese are competi ti ve 
schol arshi ps whi ch are awarded annual I y . Pri mary consi derati on wi 1 1 be gi ven to 
enteri ng freshmen and transfer students from community col I eges that have 
outstandi ng tal ent i n art, dance, musi c, or theater. The schol arshi ps cover i n-state 
tui ti on and mandatory fees and are renewabl e for up to three years based upon an 
acceptabl e I evel of performance as def i ned by the respecti ve departments. 
A udi ti ons and/or portfol i os are requi red. For more i nf ormati on pi ease contact the 
Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es at 310-405-2088. 

Maryland State Scholarships: The Maryland State Scholarship Administration 
(MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards both need- and merit- based scholarships 
to M aryl and resi dents. There are many different programs avai I abl e, i ncl udi ng 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 37 

the G uaranteed A ccess G rant, Educati onal A ssi stance G rant, the Senatori al 
Schol arshi p, the H ouse of Del egates Schol arshi p, and the Di sti ngui shed Schol ar 
Award. Y ou may obtai n more i nformati on about these and other awards by 
calling MSSA at 800-974-1024. All Maryland residents are expected to apply 
for State schol arshi p assi stance I ni ti al appl i cati on for many of the awards i s 
made through the F ree A ppl i cati on for F ederal Student A i d ( F A F SA ) . PI ease 
note that f i I i ng the F A F SA i s suff i ci ent to appl y for most M aryl and State 
Schol arshi ps at U M D, al though some may requi re addi ti onal appl i cati on forms. 
The appl i cati on deadl i ne for most programs i s M arch 1. The FA FSA i s avai I abl e 
on the OSFA web site atvww.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

Scholarships from Other States Several states have reciprocal agreements 
with the State of M aryl and. Students who are resi dents of these states may 
recei ve funds for study i n el i gi bl e post-secondary i nsti tuti ons i n M aryl and. 
I nterested students shoul d contact thei r state schol arshi p agenci es for i nformati on. 

Schdarshi p Searches A broad range of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e from pri vate 
sources. U sual I y, these awards are not as wel I publ i ci zed as state and uni versi ty 
programs. Therefore, students should conduct a schol arshi p search to locate such 
sources. The U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers access to several servi ces to students 
to ai d them i n thei r searches. Access our website at 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu/schol arshi ps to use these servi ces. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

0102 Lee Building 

301-31^9000 

301-405-9265 

umfinaid@umd.edu 

www.financialaid.umd.edu 

G rants 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d admi ni sters several grant programs for 
undergraduates. Awards are made based on fi nanci al need as deterrri ned by the 
FA FSA . Grants do not have to be repai d. Access our web site at.www.fi nanci al ai d. 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu f or more i nformati on. 

Pell Grant This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al Aid Pa 9 e 38 

which aid from other sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are 
seeki ng thei r f i rst bachel or's degree and have excepti onal need may receive a 
Federal Pel I G rant. A 1 1 undergraduates wi 1 1 be consi dered for thi s grant 
regardl ess of when thei r appl i cati ons were received. Students may receive the 
Federal Pel I G rant for I ess than f ul I -ti me attendance, al though the award wi 1 1 be 
pro- rated based on the number of credits attempted. Awards range from $555 to 
$5,550. 



Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) 
Grant 

Through the Col I ege Cost Reducti on and Access Act of 2007, Congress created 
the Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) 
Grant Program that provi des grants of up to $4,000 per year to students who 
i ntend to teach i n a publ i c or private el ementary or secondary school that serves 
students from I ow-i ncome f ami I i es. 

To receive the TEACH Grant students must complete the FAFSA, be a U.S. 
citizen or eligible non-citizen, enrolled as an undergraduate, post- baccalaureate 
or graduate student, enrol I ed i n a coursework necessary to begi n a career i n 
teachi ng or plan to complete such coursework, mai ntai n a cumulative 3.25 GPA 
and sign a TEACH Grant Agreement to Serve Questions regarding the TEACH 
G rant Program can be di rected to the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. 

I nstitutional Grants The university awards grants to f ul l-ti me students who 
demonstrate f i nanci al need and meet OSF A 's pri ori ty appl i cati on deadl i ne of 
February 15. There are three funds from whi ch instituti onal grants are awarded, 
theUM Scholarship, Frederick Douglass Grant and the UM Grant. OSF A selects 
the red pi ents of these awards based on avai I abi I i ty of funds and the 
qual if i cati ons of the appl i cants. The U M Schol arshi p may be awarded to 
undergraduates with demonstrated need and high academic achievement. The 
UM Grant and Frederick Douglas Grant may be awarded to any undergraduate 
with demonstrated need. Award amounts for these programs range from $500 to 
$3,900. 

Self-Help 

F i nanci al ai d al so consi sts of sel f - hel p assi stance such as empl oy ment and 
student loan programs. M ost of these programs are awarded based on need as 
determi ned by the FA FSA . Access our web site at www.financialaid.umd.edu 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 39 

for additional information. 

Federal Work-Study: The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program provides 
students with the opportunity to earn money to meet the r educati onal and 
personal expenses. M oney earned from the FWS program does not have to be 
paid back. To be considered for FWS, students must meet OSFA's priority 
appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. Thi s award i s need- based and may range 
from $800 to $2,000. Pay rates depend on the level of complexity of the work, 
but will be at I east the federal minimum wage Like all university employees, 
FWS empl oyees receive a paycheck every other week for the hours worked. 
M ost FWS j obs are on campus, though opportuni ti es exi st through the 
Community Service Program for FWS students to work off campus at several 
Federal Government A genci es. The number of hours students may work i s 
I i mited to 20 per week whi le school is i n session and 40 per week duri ng 
vacations and summer break. 

Paid I nternships Students with pai d i nternshi ps si gn a contract at the 
begi nni ng of the semester that states the payment amount for the number of 
hours to be worked duri ng that semester. The payment amount i s advanced to the 
students account at the start of each semester. This program differs from Federal 
Work-Study i n that students receive al I "wages" at the start of each semester, as 
opposed to a bi-weekly pay check, and those funds are appl i ed di recti y to the 
students account. Several off i ces and departments on campus, i ncl udi ng Shuttl e 
UM, Residential Facilities, and Dining Services, offer paid internships. Students 
shoul d contact the department or off i ce for whi ch they are i nterested i n worki ng. 



Perkins Loan: The Perki ns I oan i s a I ow-i nterest rate (5%) I oan for 
students with excepti onal f i nanci al need. Thi s i s a I oan borrowed from the 
school , and must be repai d. To be el i gi bl e, students must meet OSF A 's pri ori ty 
appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. The amount of the award wi 1 1 depend upon 
the students need and may range from $200 to $1,000. New borrowers (those 
who f i rst receive a federal Perki ns Loan after J uly 1, 1988) have a grace peri od 
of ni ne months after graduati ng or I eavi ng school before they must begi n 
repayment of the r federal Perki ns L oan(s) . I nterest wi 1 1 begi n accrui ng at the 
ti me of repayment. Thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attendi ng school 
and enrol I ed at I east half ti me i n a degree-seeki ng program 

Direct Stafford Loan: Thi s i s a I ow-i nterest- rate I oan for students who attend at 
I east hal f-ti me A ppl i cati on i s made through the school 's f i nanci al ai d of f i ce vi a 
theFAFSA. Eligibility for thi si oan is based on need, not credit worthiness. This 
I oan i s borrowed by the student and must be repai d. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 40 

There are two types of Direct Stafford Loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. The 
Di rect Stafford subsi di zed I oan i s awarded to students with demonstrated 
f i nanci al need; thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e students are attend ng school and 
enrol I ed at I east half-ti me i n a degree-seeki ng program Students who do not 
demonstrate f i nanci al need, or who do not demonstrate suffi ci ent need to borrow 
a f ul I y Di rect Stafford subsi di zed I oan, may borrow a Di rect Stafford 
unsubsi di zed I oan. The Di rect Stafford unsubsi di zed I oan i s i nterest beari ng. 
Students borrowi ng a Di rect Stafford unsubsi di zed I oan wi 1 1 be requi red to repay 
the pri nci pi e and any i nterest that may accrue duri ng school attendance. A 1 1 
students who want to appl y for ei ther Di rect Stafford I oan must compl ete the 
F A F SA . A s of J ul y 1, 2011, the D i rect Stafford subsi di zed I oan wi 1 1 have a 4. 5% 
f i xed i nterest rate. The Di rect Stafford unsubsi di zed I oan wi 1 1 have a 3.4% f i xed 
i nterest rate Students who graduate or drop bel ow half-ti me status are granted a 
six- month grace peri od before repayment of the Di rect Stafford I oan i s requi red. 

The f ol I owi ng are the maxi mum I oan amounts per academi c year: $5,500 for 
undergraduates with freshman status, $6,500 for undergraduates attai ni ng 
sophomore status, and $7,500 for undergraduate students who attai n j uni or or 
seni or status. I f students do not demonstrate suffi ci ent need to borrow the 
maxi mum Di rect Stafford subsi dized I oan, they may borrow the difference i n a 
Di rect Stafford unsubsi di zed I oan. The maxi mum borrowi ng I i mi t f or most 
undergraduates is $31,000. 

Direct PLUS (Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students) Loan: This is a 
non- need- based I oan, whi ch parents may borrow to hel p defray the cost of thei r 
dependent chi Idren's education. The Di rect PLUS enables parents to borrow the 
f ul I yearly cost of attendance (as determi ned by the school ) mi nus al I other 
f i nanci al ai d. Otherwi se, there i s no yearl y or cumul ati ve borrowi ng I i mi t. A s of 
J ul y 1, 2011, the student i s requi red to compl ete a F ree A ppl i cati on for F ederal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to apply for the Direct PL US loan. Afterthe 
FA FSA i s compl eted, borrowers must submi t the Di rect PL U S I oan appl i cati on 
to the school for cal cul ati on and certif i cati on of the maxi mum I oan amount that 
the parent may borrow per student per year. The Di rect PL U S I oan appl i cati on i s 
I ocated on the OSFA web site at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu and sel ect the 
"Printable Forms" link. 

The Di rect PLUS is granted to borrowers based on credit- worthi ness as 
determi ned by the Department of Educati on whom the borrower sel ects. The 
Di rect PL U S I oan has a 7.9% f i xed i nterest rate. The borrower has the opti on of 
begi nni ng repayment on the Di rect PLUS loan either 60 days after the loan is 
fully disbursed or not unti I six (6) months after the dependent student on whose 
behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrol I ed on at I east a half-ti me basi s. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 41 



COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

0102 Lee Building 

301-314-9000 

301-405-9265 

sfa-schol arshi ps@umd.edu 

www.financialaid.umd.edu 



Some U M col I eges and departments offer meri t- based schol arshi ps. M ost 
departments wi 1 1 only consi der students who enrol I for 12 credits per semester, 
and who have a grade poi nt average of at I east 3.0. Some of these schol arshi ps 
are open to prospecti ve freshman and transfer students. Some of them are onl y 
open to conti nui ng U M students. F or addi ti onal i nf ormarj on regard ng 
departmental schol arshi ps pi ease contact the appropri ate col I ege or department 
or visit www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu/Schol arhi ps/departmental .html . 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

A gri cul tural & Resource E conomi cs 

A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences 

B i ol ogi cal Resources E ngi neeri ng 

L andscape A rchi tecture 

Natural Resource Sci ences 

Natural Resources Management Program 

N utri ti on & F ood Sci ence 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 
Art 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 42 

Art History & Archaeology 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparati ve L i terature 

Dance 

E ngl i sh L anguage and L i terature 

French & Italian Languages and Literatures 

Germanic Studies 

History 

J ewi sh Studi es Program 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es 

Af ro-A meri can Studi es 

Anthropology 

Cri mi nol ogy & Cri mi nal J usti ce 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Pol i ti cs 

Heari ng and Speech Sci ences 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 43 



J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy 
Psychology 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Applied Mathematics 
Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Meteorology 
Physics 
Statistics Program 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counsel ing& Personnel Services 
Curri cul um & I nstructi on 

H uman DeveJ opment ( I nsti tute for C hi I d Study) 
M easurement, Stati sti cs & E val uati on 
Special Education 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 44 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

COLLEGE OF CHEMICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Entomology 

Environmental Sciences 

M ari ne- E stuari ne E nvi ronmental Sci ences 

A. J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A erospace E ngi neeri ng 
Chemical Engineering 
C i vi I and E nvi ronmental E ngi neeri ng 
E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng 
F i re Protecti on E ngi neeri ng 

M ateri al s and N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng 
Mechanical Engineering 
Reliability E ngi neeri ng 

ROBERT H.SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Accounting 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 45 

Deci si on and I nf ormati on Technol ogi es 
Finance 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 
M anagement and Organi zati on 
Marketing 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING aid PRESERVATION 

Architecture 

U rban Studi es and PI anni ng Program 



Interdepartmental Programs 

Chemical Physics Program 

E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy 

Systems E ngi neeri ng 

RETURNING STUDENTS PROGRAM/COUNSELING CENTER 

C harl otte W . N ewcombe F oundati on Schol arshi p 
Gerald G. Portney Memorial Scholarship 
Marilyn K. Brown Memorial Loan 
Gerald G. Portney Emergency Fund 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

A cademi c A chi evement Programs 
A i r Force Aerospace studi es Program 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 46 

ArmyROTC 

Col I ege Park Schol ars Program 

I ndividual Studies Program 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Equity 

Letters and Sciences 

N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce 

Honors College 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Alumni Association 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services Hage4/ 

3. Campus Administration, Resources* and Student Services 

CAM PUS ADM INI STRATI ON 

Office of the President 

1101 M ai n A cirri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5803 
Wal I ace Loh, Presi dent 
www.umd.edu/PRES 

The presi dent is the chief executive officer of the University of Maryland. Six vice presidents, who 
report to the presi dent, manage different divi si ons of the campus administration. TheOfficeof 
D i versi ty and I ncl usi on, the Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs, and the M aryl and F i re and 
Rescue Institute report to the Office of the Presi dent. The University Senate, a representative 
I egi si ati ve body of the uni versi ty, advi ses the presi dent on academi c and other matters. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5252 
301-405-8195 

Seni or V i ce Presi dent and Provost: A nn G . Wyl i e 
provost@umd.edu 
www. provost, umd.edu 

The Senior Vice President and Provost is the chief academic officer of the university with 
responsi bi I ity for gui di ng the academi c devd opment and di recti on of the i nstituti on i n accordance 
with the university's mission; ensuri ng that our programs and faculty are of the highest cal i ber; 
supporti ng the diversity of our students, faculty, and staff as a special strength; and promoti ng 
academic excel lence across the university. The deans of the 12 col leges and schools at the Uni versi ty 
report di recti y to the Provost, as do the deans for U ndergraduate Studi es, the G raduate School , and 
the I i brari es, the C hi ef I nf ormati on Off i cer, and the Executi ve D i rector of the I nsti tute for B i osci ence 
and B i otechnol ogy Research. The Seni or V i ce Presi dent and Provost oversees the devd opment, 
review, and iirplementationof all academic policies and regulations; consults closdy with the 
U ni versi ty Senate and other f acul ty advi sory groups on academi c programs and pol i ci es; and serves 
as liaison with other university divisions in strategic and long-range planning. 



Administrative Affairs 

1132 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-1105 

AnnG. Wyl ie, Vice Presi dent 
www.admi naffai rs.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for A drri ni strati ve Affai rs i s responsi bl e for the effecti ve 
management of the physi cal , f i seal , and staff support resources of the i nstituti on. The off i ce al so 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services Hage4fci 



provides campus safety and security, environmental health and safety, materials management, and 
other necessary support servi ces. Of parti cul ar i nterest to students are the community awareness and 
security programs offered by the Department of Publ ic Safety, the i information and assistance 
servi ces provi ded by the B ursar for concerns of students regardi ng uni versi ty bi 1 1 i ngs, and the 
campus 1 efforts rd ated to sustai nabi I ity. 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building 

301-314-8428 

301-314-9606 

Li nda Clement, Vice President 

www.studentaffai rs.umd.edu 

The Offi ce of the V i ce Presi dent for Student Af f ai rs provi des adrri ni strati ve I eadershi p for 15 
departments whi ch oversee student I if e. The offi ce serves as a general poi nt of contact for students 
and thei r f ami I i es regardi ng housi ng, di ni ng, transportati on, recreati on, wd I ness and non-academi c 
student services. The office mai ntai ns liaison with the university chaplai ns, the Student Government 
Association (SGA), and the Graduate Student Government (GSG). In addition, it provides 
adrri ni strati ve support for the Seni or Counci I , Parents and Farri I y Affai rs, and Student Affai rs 
Devdopment and External Rdations. 

Office of Diversity and I ndusion 

1130 Shri ver Laboratory, East Wi ng 

301-405-2838 

www.odi.umd.edu 

The Office of Diversity and I ncl usion (ODI ) has campus-wide responsi bi I ities rdated to diversity 
and equity and the University of Maryland. 

Rd ated to equity and compl i ance, ODI i s responsi bl e f or i niti ati ng acti on and provi di ng servi ce i n 
compliance with institutional, state, and federal directives to provide equal education and 
employment opportunities for university students, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the 
outcomes of acti ons taken i n thi s regard, reporti ng our f i ndi ngs to the Presi dent, the Campus Senate, 
and to the campus community at large. We provide students, faculty, and staff with general 
i nf ormati on ana trai ni ng on equity efforts and on the status of equity and compl i ance matters at the 
university (eg., sexual harassment prevention training). Students, faculty, or staff having a concern 
about possi bl e i nequiti es or who requi re di spute resol uti on servi ces (eg., medi ati on, arbitral: on, etc. ) 
i n educati onal or empl oyment matters, or who wi sh to regi ster a compl ai nt, may contact dther the 
Campus Compl i ance Officer at 301-405-2839, or a member of the Campus 1 Equity Counci I (see 
Equity Counci I i n chapter 3). 

ODI also advises and assists the President and the Provost i n the promotion of the university mission 
as i t rd ates to mul ti cul tural i sm and i ncl usi on, broadl y conceptual i zed ( i . e. , race ( i ncl usi ve of col or 
and creed); ethnicity; language national or geographic origin; socioeconomic class (inclusive of 
educational levd, empl oyment status, and familial configuration); sex and gender; gender identity 
and expression; sexual orientation; physical, devdopmental, and psychological ability; rdigious, 
spiritual, faith- based, or secular affiliation; age and generation; physical appearance, environmental 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services Hage4y 



concern; and, on the basi s of the exerci se of ri ghts secured by the F i rst A irendmert) . M ore 
speci fically, wefacili tate the bui I di ng of cooperati ve partnershi ps across campus among vari ous 
constituencies of students, faculty, and staff on these issues and are oriented toward the real ization of 
an i ncl usi ve, and therefore, aff i rrri ng envi ronmert for every citizen of the university community. 

To meet these equity and diversity goals, ODI sponsors numerous i nitiati ves that promote 
i ntergroup rd ati onshi p bui I di ng, cultural competence, sexual harassment and hate cri mes 
preventi on, mul ti cul tural organi zati onal devd opmert, and processes compl ai nts of di scri rri nati on 
and harassment foil owing procedures set forth in the University's Code on Equity, Diversity, and 
I ncl usi on (the compl ete text of thi s Code may be found i n chapter 10) . 

ODI 's efforts are di rected toward the devd opmert of our students, faculty, and staff becomi ng 
pri nci pi ed I eaders, predi sposed to progressi ve acti on; becomi ng democrat] c ci ti zens as outstandi ng 
inwhatthey do, asin who they are, with respect to thdr commitment to furthering the tenets of 
equity and j usti ce for al I . 

Equity Council 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5793 
Dr. Robert Waters 
rewaters@umd.edu 
www.president.umd.edu/EqCo 
301-405-0805 

The Equity Counci I serves as an advi sory group to the Presi dent and supports the I ongstandi ng and 
continuous goal of the University of Maryland to be a nati onal leader in recruiting and retaining a 
diverse community of faculty, staff and students. The Counci I provides leadershi p i n the articulation 
and devd opmert of aff i rmati ve acti on pol i ci es and procedures for the campus communi ty . A 
particular focus of the Equity Counci I is to review and recommend, as appropriate, search and 
sdection pol icies and procedures for the university and its col leges and departments. The Counci I 
consi sts of equity adrni ni strators from each V i ce Presi dent and Dean's off i ce and the Off i ce of the 
President. The Special Assistant to the President for Equity and Diversity serves as Chair of the 
Council. 

Dr. Robert E. Waters, J r., Chair 

Off i ce of the Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs and Provost 

301-405-5793 

1119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

rewaters@umd.edu 

D r. B rooke Suppl e, D i vi si on of Student Affai rs 

301-314-8437 

2108M Mitchdl Building 

bsupple@umd.edu 

Dr. Coke Farmer, School of Public Health 

301-405-2473 

2351F School of Public Health Bldg. 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebu 



cfarmer@umd.edu 

Ms. Carolyn Trimble, University Human Resources 

301-405-5648 

3100 Chesapeake Building 

ctrimble@umd.edu 

Dr. Doug Oard, Col lege of I nformation Studies 

301-405-7590 

4121G H ornbake L i brary 

oard@umd.edu 

Dr. LeeThornton, Di vision of Academic Affairs 

301-405-6810 

1127 M ai n Adrni ni strati on 

lthornto@umd.edu 

Mr. Paul Brown, Maryland Fire and Rescue I nstitute 

4500 Pai nt Branch Parkway 

301-226-9963 

skypaul@umd.edu 

Ms. LaVern Chapman, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-1951 

4570 Van M unchi ng Hal I 

I chapman@rhsmi th. umd.edu 

Ms. Bobvita Salters, Robert H. Smith School of Business 

301-405-9571 

2570C Van Munching Hall 

bsalters@umd.edu 

M s. Cynthi a Tucker, Off i ce of the Presi dent 

301-405-5795 

1112B ColeStudent Activities Building 

ctucker5@umd.edu 

Ms. Barbara Duncan, Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

301-405-0044 

1122 Symons Hall 

bduncan@umd.edu 

Ms. Ingrid Farrdl, School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation 

301-405-6310 

1200 A rchitecture B ui I di ng 

ifarrdl@umd.edu 

Dr. KimNickerson, Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

301-405-7599 

2141 Tydings Hall 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebl 



knickerson@bsos.umd.edu 

M s. Lynn M ulli neaux, Off i ce of I nf ormati on Technol ogy 

301-405-4405 

1124PatuxentBuilding 

lynnmull@umd.edu 

Mr. GeneFerrick, Col lege of Chemical & Natural Sciences 

301-405-7016 

2300GSymonsHall 

gene@umd.edu 

Mr. Dean Kitchen, Col lege of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences 

301-405-2314 

3421 A.V. Williams Building 

dkitchen@umd.edu 

Ms. Wendy A. J acobs, College of Arts and Humanities 

301-405-2345 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall 

waj acobs@umd.edu 

M s. Katfiy Cavanaugh, Col I ege of A its and H umaniti es 

301-405-2116 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall 

kcav@umd.edu 

Dr. Stephen Koziol, Col I ege of Education 

301-405-3324 

2311 B enj ami n B ui I di ng 

skoziol@umd.edu 

Dr. M argaret M cLaughl i n, Col I ege of Educati on 

301-405-6495 

1308 B enj anri n B ui I di ng 

mjm@umd.edu 

Ms. Jane Williams, University Libraries 

301-405-9124 

7107 McKddin Library 

mjwillia@umd.edu. 

M r. J aires N ewton, Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es 

301-405-6851 

2130K Mitchell Building 

jnewton@umd.edu 

Dr. MarkA. Shayman, A. James Clark School of Engineering 

301-405-8336 

3230JeongH. Kim Engineering Building 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hageb^ 



shayman@umd.edu 

Mr. William L. Powers, School of Public Policy 

301-405-6336 

2101E Van Munching Hall 

wpowers@umd.edu 

Ms. Olive Reid, Philip Merrill Col lege of Journalism 

301-405-2433 

1117 J ournal i sm B ui I di ng 

oreid@umd.edu 

Ms. Cynthia Trombly, University Relations 

301-405-2532 

3144 Ri ggs A I umni Center 

ctrombly@umd.edu 

Ms. AnnTonggarwee, Division of Research 
301-405-0916 
2126 Lee Building 
kctongga@umd.edu 

Mr. Kyi and Howard 

Office of Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment 

301-405-5593 

1100 Mitchell Building 

khoward@umd.edu 



Officeof Undergraduate Studies 

2110 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-9363 

www.ugst.umd.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

Associate Dean for General Education: Douglas Roberts 

Associate Dean: J aires Dietz 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Reid Bryant, Lisa Kidy, J aires Newton, Ann Smith 

Assi starts to the Dean: M ark K uhn, Kathryn Robi nson, Laura SI avi n 

Through its many programs, the Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students 
at the University and the faculty and staff that support the undergraduate mission of the campus. The 
Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and responsi bl e 
for leadershi p and oversight of undergraduate curricular and co-curricular education. 

University Relations 

2119 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-4680 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service HagebJ 



B rod e Rem ngton, V i ce Presi dent 
www.urhome.umd.edu 

The Division of University Relations conducts a variety of programs to share news, buildties, and 
rai se phi I anthropi c support for the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Unitsof thisdivision i ncl ude 
Development, Marketing and Communications, University of Maryland College Park Foundation 
A dm ni strati on, Sped al Events, and A I urmi Rd ati ons. U ni versi ty Rd ati ons i s responsi bl e for 
campus- wi de programs i n al urmi aff ai rs, publ i cati ons, f i I m and vi deo presentati ons, medi a rd ati ons, 
and management of maj or campus events. The Great Expectations campai gn to rai se $1 bi 1 1 i on i n 
pri vate support for uni versi ty pri ori ti es such as schol arshi ps and facilities, is coordi nated by 
University Rd ati ons. 



University Senate 

1100 Marie Mount Hall 
301-405-5805 
www.senate.umd.edu 

The U ni versity Senate, an i ntegral part of the U ni versity's system of shared governance, has 
representation from all segments of the campus community: faculty, staff, undergraduate students, 
and graduate students. Parti ci pati on i n the Senate or any of its 12 Standi ng Committees i s an honor 
and a responsibility. 

The f ul I Senate meets approxi matd y ni ne ti mes a year to consi der matters of concern to the 
i nsti tuti on, i ncl udi ng academi c i ssues, uni versi ty pol i ci es, pi ans of organi zati on, f aci I i ti es, and the 
wdf are of faculty, staff, and students. The Senate advi ses the presi dent, the chancd I or, or the Board 
of Regents as appropriate. To become an undergraduate student senator, students must be dected by 
students i n thd r col I ege or school or the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n central i zed, onl i ne 
d ecti ons. E I ecti ons are hd d every year duri ng the spri ng semester. A 1 1 students are al so encouraged 
to parti ci pate i n Senate Standi ng Committees, such as Student Affai rs and Campus Affai rs. These 
committees draw membershi p from the campus community at I arge and cover every aspect of 
campus I if e and f uncti on. Detai I s about the d ecti on and committee vol unteer processes can be found 
at www.senate.umd.edu. 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Academic Achievement Prog-ams 

2204 Marie Mount Hal I 

301-405-4736 

Executive Director: Dr.JerryL. Lewis 

www.aap.umd.edu 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) primarily provides resources and opportunities for 
I ow- i ncome i ndi vi dual s, f i rst generati on col I ege students, di sabl ed students and tradi ti oral I y 



3. Carrpus Adrri nistrarjon, Resources, and 5tudent Service HageM 

under- represented students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secrj on i n Chapter 6. 

Ackrisaons 

301-314-8385 

um-adrrit@umd.edu 

www.admissions.umd.edu 

The services offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions are designed to meet the individual 
needs of prospective students. The office provides general information about the University of 
Maryland through brochures, letters, WEB site, electronic communication, information sessions, and 
campus tours. Adrri ssi ons staff eval uate both freshman and transfer appl i cants i n order to sd ect 
qual if i ed students. For more i nformati on about undergraduate adrri ssi ons, see chapter 1. 

Computing Services Offioeof Information Technology 

Phone 301-405-7700 

Fax: 301-405-0300 

oit@umd.edu 

www.oit.umd.edu 

The Office of I nformati on Technology (OIT) is part of a University of Maryland students everyday 

academic and social life. OIT plans, develops, supports, and iTBintainscoirputing, networking, and 

tdecommuni cations services for the university community to enhance both day-to-day academic and 

busi ness goal s and to further the uni versi ty 's standard of excel I ence i n educati on and research. 

M any faculty members have i ntegrated technol ogy i nto courses, both i nsi de and outsi de of the 
cl assroom Some professors use cl i ckers to col I ect student feedback duri ng cl ass. Through ELMS 
(the university's Enterprise Learning Management System powered by Blackboard Academic Suite) 
( www.elms.umd.edu ). i nstructors can provi de onl i ne course materi al s, col I ect assi gnments, post 
grades electronical I y, and hold discussion sessions. The university's robust wi rdess network (one of 
the nati on's I argest for a uni versi ty our si ze) gi ves students the abi I i ty to connect to the I nternet from 
al most anywhere on campus. Every student I i vi ng i n a resi dence hal I al so has a dedi cated hi gh-speed 
data jack to use when connecrj ng to the university network from his or her room Computer labs 
across campus feature Wi ndows and M aci ntosh envi ronments and provi de pri nti ng servi ces and 
course- rdated software. TerpConnect ( www.terpconnect. umd.edu ) gives students 1GB of storage 
space to use for backi ng up f i I es, hosti ng Web pages, and more. 

TheMyUM portal ( www.my.umd.edu ) gives students a one-stop gateway to numerous university 
resources, including e-mail, a personal calendar, and custom zableRSS feeds, as wdl as everything 
offered through Testudo (www.testudo.umd.edu ) - the abi I ity to regi ster for cl asses onl i ne, see your 
financial aid status, check your grades, and more. 

The OIT Student Hdp Desk (www.hdpdesk.umd.edu. 301-405-1400) is avail able to answer IT 
questi ons and provi de tech support, and i s accessi bl e i n person, over the td ephone, and vi a I i ve chat. 
The Hdp Desk's IT Service Center onl i ne resource ( www.itsc.umd.edu ) enables you to check and 
subscri be to servi ce al erts, as wd I as to i niti ate and track hd p requests onl i ne 24/7. 

Di scounts on computers, pri nters, software programs, and cd I ul ar devi ces and servi ce are al so 
availableto University of Maryland students. Visit the Academic Computers for Terps (ACT) 



3. CarrpusAdrrinistration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebb 



websi te ( www.act.umd.edu ) or the Terrapi n Technol ogy Store ( www.oit umd.edu/techstore. 
301-314-7000) for more information. 



Educational Talent Search 

3103 Turner Hall 

301-324-7763 

www.etsp.umd.edu 

Educati onal Tal ent Search i ncreases the col I ege parti ci pati on of I ow-i ncome and f i rst-generati on 
col lege students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Education Abroad 

1125 Holzapfd 
301-314-7476 
301-314-9135 

Director: Michael J . Ulrich, Ph.D. 
educati onabroad@umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/studyabroad 
301-314-7473 

Education Abroad provides international, academically- based experiences in support of students' 
personal , prof essi onal and i ntd I ectual devd opment Programs are desi gned to promote i ntercultural 
competence, di sci pi i nary schol arshi p and ford gn I anguage acqui sition. Educati on A broad i nspi res 
and i nf orms students, equi ppi ng them wi th the knowl edge and ski 1 1 s to eff ecti vd y engage with I ocal 
and global communities and become cultural ly perceptive citizens. These outcomes are cultivated 
and sustained by: 

I denti f yi ng and devd opi ng safe, af f ordabl e, acaderri cal I y ri gorous, geographi cal I y di verse, 

cul tural I y chal I engi ng and transf orrri ng study abroad programs across a wi de range of di sci pi i nes 

• Advi si ng students i n the sd ecti on of suitabl e programs 

• Prepari ng students to maxi mi ze I earni ng opportuni ti es whi I e abroad and upon thd r return 

• Adrri ni steri ng hi gh-qual ity study abroad programs i n partnershi p with U M faculty and staff 
and col I eagues f rom other i nsti tuti ons 

• I ntegrati ng study abroad with campus curricul urn, programs and activities 

• I ncreasi ng student parti ci pati on i n study abroad 

• Advocati ng for i nternati onal educati on to enri ch U M 's i nstituti onal i dentity 

Dependent on departmental approval , students may use study abroad to f ulf i 1 1 maj or, ni nor, or 
graduation requi rements, i ncl udi ng CORE and decti ves. I n addition to coordi rati ng programs 
sponsored by academic departments, Education Abroad staff offers advising to all University of 
M aryl and students i nterested i n studyi ng abroad. 

Study Abroad Process 



3. CarrpusAdmnistration, Resources, and 5tudent Services Hagebfc 



Students consi deri ng studyi ng i n another country for a semester, year, summer or wi nter are 
encouraged to vi sit Educati on A broad and revi ew the website approxi matdy one year before they 
pi an to study abroad. 

The off i ce's resource I i brary provi des i nf orrnati on on programs offered by M aryl and as wd I as by 
other universities and other providers. Education Abroad staff i nforms students of the necessary 
steps i n obtai ni ng acaderri c credi t and appl y i ng f i nanci al ai d to thei r program of choi ce. 

Types of Study Abroad Programs 

Programs sponsored by Maryland 's academe departments 

Students may reed ve resi dent credi t at M aryl and for programs sponsored by U M acaderri c 
departments and adrni ni stered by Educati on A broad. These i ncl ude semester programs i n London, 
Nice, Alcal§, Berlin, Bared ona, Rome, Shanghai, Bdjing, and Haifa and short term courses taught 
by M aryl and faculty duri ng the Summer, Spri ng and Wi nter terms. A ppl ication i nf orrnati on i s 
avai I abl e from the Educati on A broad website. 

Programs with institutional or organizational arrangements with Maryland 

M aryl and Exchange Programs: Exchange students are di recti y enrol I ed as f ul I -ti me students at one 
of a number of presti gi ous ford gn uni versi ti es around the worl d wi th whi ch the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and has agreements. I n turn, students from the partner uni versi ti es abroad enrol I at M aryl and 
for a semester or year. Exchanges are often rd ated to acaderri c departments, and requi re extensi ve 
I anguage or acaderri c background and at I east a 3. grade poi nt average. M any offer tuition 
waivers. There are specific exchange programs for students majori ng i n Chemistry, J ournal ism, 
Communi cati on, and M athemarj cs, among other f i d ds of study. 

The Uni versity of M aryl and also has agreements i n pi ace for its students to study abroad through the 
f ol I owi ng i nsti tuti ons or organi zati ons: M acquari e U ni versi ty (A ustral i a) , the U ni versi ty of L d den 
(the Netherlands), StudyA ustral i a/The Education Abroad Network, the Danish I nstitutefor Study 
Abroad (DIS), ACTR Russia, and the U ni versi ty Studies A broad Consortium (U SAC). 

Programs recognized by Maryland but vJthoutanydirect sponsorship or arrangement 

M aryl and students who wi sh to study abroad through other i nstiturj ons must attend a General 
A dvi si ng sessi on, and meet wi th a Study A broad A dvi sor to di scuss the transf erabi lity of credits 
before appl y i ng to the study abroad program Detai I s on the process for appl yi ng and transf erri ng 
credit are avai I able from trie "How to Get Started" section of www, umd.edu/studyabroad . 

Officeof Extended Studies 

0132 M ai n A drri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

301-405-7762 

Chuck Wi I son, Assi start V i ce Presi dent for Records, Regi strati on and Extended Studi es 

oes.umd.edu 

TheOfficeof Extended Studi es administers the Uni verity's Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen 
Connection, and Professional Programs. 

Summer Term serves more than 13,000 students that i ncl ude current students, visiting students 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hageb/ 



from other universities and colleges, graduates, professionals, and high school students. Summer 
Term features more than 1,700 courses that are offered morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne 
duri ng three- week or six- week sessions. 

Winter Term serves more than 5,000 students that i ncl ude current students, visiting students from 
other uni versi ti es and col I eges, graduates and prof essi onal s. Offered i n J anuary between the end of 
the f al I semester and the begi nni ng of the spri ng semester, Wi nter Term i s a three- week sessi on that 
features more than 450 courses that meet morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne. 

Freshmen Connection offers spri ng-adrritted students the opportunity to begi n thei r U ni versi ty of 
Maryland education in the fall semester. With Freshmen Connection, spring-admitted students earn 
up to 17 U ni versi ty credits toward thei r undergraduate degree and get on track to graduate i n four 
years. 

Pre-Cdlege Programs 

The Young Scholars Program, a three-week summer program i nvites ri si ng hi gh school 

sophomores, j uniors, and seniors to pursue academic i interests, discover career opportunities, earn 

uni versi ty credi ts, and expl ore uni versi ty I i f e. H i ghl y qual i f i ed students enrol Una three-credi t 

i introductory course f eaturi ng f i d d tri ps and guest speakers. Students parti ci pate i n workshops and 

semi nars that further enri ch thei r uni versi ty experi ence and resi de on campus or commute from 

home. 

Young Scholars Discovery, a two- week summer program i nvites mi ddl e school students to expl ore 
educati on and career opportuni ti es and I earn about uni versi ty I i f e. A caderri cal I y prorni si ng students 
enrol I i n non-credi t courses, attend f i el d tri ps, and engage wi th experts i n i nnovati ve f i d ds. Students 
col I aborate i n i nteracti ve semi nars, enj oy eveni ng soci al acti vi ti es, and resi de on campus or 
commute from home 

TheFreshmen First Program prepares incoming first-year students for living and learning at the 
University of Maryland. The program eases thetransition to the university environment. Inthis 
three- week summer program students enrol Una three-credit course, attend semi nars, workshops, 
and social activities, meet and study with other i ncorni ng freshmen, and reside on campus or 
commute from home 

Professional Programs i ncl ude Prof essi onal M asters programs, G raduate Certifi cate programs, 
post- baccal aureate opportuni ti es, and customi zed i ni ti ati ves that i ncl ude semi nars, work force 
trai ni ng, and short courses crafted for i industry appl i cati on. All programs are desi gned to meet the 
educational needs of professional audiences and target external constituencies in business, 
government, and non-profit organizations. These programs serve professional audiences in new 
ways, i mprovi ng access for prof essi onal audi ences through i nnovati ve approaches to teachi ng and 
I earni ng, parti cul arl y through the onl i ne envi ronment. 



Honor 

www. uni on. umd.edu/studentorg/ 

Students who excd i n schol arshi p and I eadershi p may be i nvited to j oi n the appropri ate honor 
society. Honor societies at Maryland include 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hageba 



Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemistry) 

*AlphaEpsi I on (Agricultural Engineering) 

*Alpha Epsi Ion Delta (Pre-Med) 

Alpha Epsi Ion Rho (Broadcast J ournalism) 

*Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

*Alpha Lambda Delta (Freshman Scholarship) 

Alpha Phi Sigma (Criminal J ustice) 

A I pha Zeta ( A gri cul ture) 

B eta A I pha Psi (A ccounti ng) 

Beta Gamma Si gma (B usi ness M anagement) 

Black Honors Caucus 

*Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 

Delta N u A I pha (Transportati on) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Pi (Business) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

*Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

*GammaTheta U psi I on (Geography) 

*Golden Key Honor Society (Leadership/Scholarship) 

*Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

* K appa Tau A I pha ournal i sm) 
*LambdaPi Eta (Speech Communication) 

* M ortar B oard N ati onal H onor Soci ety (Schol arshi p) 

* N ati onal Soci ety of Col I egi ate Schol ars 
*OmegaChi Epsilon (Chemistry Engineering) 
*Omega Rho (Business) 

*Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 
*Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship/Leadership) 
*Order of Omega (Fraternity/Sorority Leadership) 
Phi Alpha Epsilon (Health/Human Resources) 
*Phi AlphaTheta (History) 
Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) 
Phi Chi Theta (Business and Economics) 
*Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Scholarship) 

* Phi K appa Phi ( Seni or/G raduate Schol arshi p) 
*Phi Sigma (Biology) 

*Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship/Leadership) 

* Phi Si gma I ota ( F rench/l tal i an) 
*Pi Si gma A I pha (Political Science) 
*Phi SigmaTheta 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 
*Primannum Honor Society 
*Psi Chi (Psychology) 
Si gma A I pha Orni cron ( M i crobi ol ogy) 
Sigma Delta Chi (Journalism) 
*Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 
*SigmaTau Delta (English) 
*TauBetaPi (Engineering) 
Tau Beta Sigma 



3. Carrpus A dm ni strati on, Resources, and Student Service: 



Page by 



* M ember of A ssoci ati on of Col I ege H onor Soci eti es 
I ntercol lecp ate Athletics 

Comcast Center 
301-314-7075 
www. umterps.com 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs i s responsi bl e for di recti ng i ntercol I egi ate athl ed c 
programs for both women and men, and for managi ng the campus 1 athl eti c compl ex. 

Women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams i ncl ude cross country, fidd hockey, soccer and vol I eybal I i n 
the f al I ; basketbal I , competi ti ve cheer, swi mmi ng, i ndoor track/f i d d and gy mnasti cs duri ng the 
wi nter; and I acrosse, softbal I , outdoor track/f i d d and water pol o i n the spri ng. Tenni s and golf 
competi ti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

There are men's teams i n f ootbal I , soccer and cross country i n the f al I ; basketbal I , swi mm ng, 
wresrJ i ng, and i ndoor track/f i d d duri ng the wi nter; and basebal I , I acrosse and outdoor track/f i d d i n 
the spri ng. Tenni s and golf competi ti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

M en's and women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams compete i n the N ati onal Col I egi ate Athl eti c 
Association (NCAA) at the Division I levd and intheAtJantic Coast Conference (ACC). 

Eligibility Requirements 

Student-athletes must meet all NCAA, ACC and University of Maryland requirements for 
digibility. Thechartbdow serves only as a gui dd i ne to d i gibi I ity rules and does not provide 
compl ete detai I . ANN CA A requi rements are avai I abl e vi a www.NCAA.org . 



NCAA Continuing Eligibility and Progress Towards Degree Guidelines 



Year of Initial 
Cdlegjate E nrollnnent 




NCAA Requirements 


Semester of Full-Time 
Enrollment 




Enteri ng 1st semester 
(1st year) 


Must be certified by the NCAA Eligibility 
Center 


Enteri ng 2nd semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 

semester 

*1.29UM GPA 


Enteri ng 3rd semester 
(2nd year) 


* 18 hours earned duri ng previous regular 
acaderri c year and 24 for the year 
*6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 
*1.8 NCAA GPA 


E nteri ng 4th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits previ ous 
semester 

* 1.80 NCAA GPA 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service: 



HagebU 



Fall 2003 -present 


E rteri ng 5th semester 
(3rd year) 


* 40% (*48 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours duri ng previous regular academic 
year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 

* declaration of degree program 


I 
E rteri ng 6th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 


E rteri ng 7th semester 
(4th year) 

1 


* 60% (*72 degree applicable credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


1 

Erteri ng 8th semester 

i 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


Erteri ng 9th semester 
(5th year) 


* 80% (*96 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned in previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 



* Based on 120 credit degree program 



1. Student-athl etes are al I owed 4 seasons of eligibility witlnin 5 cal endar years from the ti me they 
first enrol I full-time in a collegiate institution. When they participate in any competition in their 
sport (i ncl udi ng a scri mmage with outsi de competiti on), whether it i s f or one mi nute or an enti re 
contest, they have used a season of competiti on and one of thei r four years of eligibility. 

2. Student-athl etes must be enrol I ed f ul I -ti me, that i s, carry a rri ni mum of 12 credit hours each 
semester to be d i gi bl e to practi ce or compete wi th thei r team I f a student-athl ete drops bd ow 12 
hours he/she wi 1 1 i mmedi atd y be i nd i gi bl e to practi ce or compete, and hi s/her athl eti cs grant- in-aid 
wi 1 1 be revoked unl ess otherwi se approved by the Department of Athl eti cs. G raduati ng seni ors who 
need I ess than 12 credi t hours to compl ete degree requi rements may reed ve an excepti on to enrol I i n 
less than 12 credit hours by compl eti ng a Less Than 12 form avai lable i n the ASCDU . 

3. Student-athl etes are requi red to meet multi pi e sets of acaderri c standards i n order to mai rtai n 
eligibility for atinletic competiti on. These standards are di ctated by the N CA A and the Athl eti c 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebl 



Counci I . I n additi on, student-athl etes may be requi red to mai ntai n standards di ctated by the col I ege 
of thd r maj or for ei trier adrri ssi on i nto a degree program, or mai ntai ni ng enrol I mart. 

4.Transf er student-athl etes must meet al I N CA A , A CC and U M D requi rements i n order to be 
immediately eligible. PI ease note that in certain cases NCAA and ACC digibi I ity requi rements are 
more stri ngent than U M D adrri ssi ons requi rements. 

5. Ineligible student-athl etes are not permitted to compete or travel . 

6. First semester freshman who do not meet the cumul ati ve G PA requi rements, may seek an appeal 
under certai n ci rcumstances. Transfer student-athl etes are requi red to attai n the appropri ate 
cumulative GPA based upon the number of f ul l-ti me semesters they have been enrol led i n any 
institution. 

7.Disrrissed and later rei nstated student-athletes are i nd igi blefor competition unti I they meet 
desi gnated grade poi nt averages. 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs ( I CA ) al so sponsors a number of awards for 

achi evement i n athl eti cs and/or schol arshi p. For further i nformati on, contact the Acaderri c Support 

and Career Devdopment unit (ASCDU), 301-314-7043. 

Officeof I nternational Services 

2111 Holzapfd Hall 

301-314-7740 

301-314-3280 

I nteri m Di rector: Barbara Varsa 

i nternati onal servi ces@umd.edu 

http://www. i nternati onal . umd.edu/i es/ 

I nternati onal students and f acul ty reed ve a wi de vari ety of servi ces desi gned to hd p them benef i t 
from thdr experience in the United States. The Office of International Services (OIS) works closdy 
with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to process F-l and J -1 visa documents for admitted 
students. 01 S sponsors ori entati on programs, i mmi grati on and empl oyment serri nars and coffee 
hour. I n addition, 01 S advisors counsd i nternational students concerni ng i mm grati on and personal 
issues. 

F-landJ -1 status students. Students with F-l or J -1 status are responsible for foil owing the 
regulations of the U.S. Customs and I mmi grati on Service (USCI S) and the Department of State 
( DOS) pertai ni ng to thd r vi sa status. The regul ati ons affect extensi on of stay, transfers, off-campus 
empl oyment authori zati on, practi cal trai ni ng, and course I oads. The Off i ce of I nternati onal Servi ces 
i s the onl y off i ce on campus authori zed to si gn i mrri grati on documents. 

Maintaining Status 

• Full-time registration: I n order to mai ntai n f ul I -ti me student status for i mm grati on purposes, 
F-l and J -1 undergraduate students are expected to register for and complete a rri ni mum credit 
load of 12 hours per semester. Pre-approval from 01 S is requi red if you are goi ng to complete 
the semester with fewer than 12 credits. 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Page to 



• Documents International students must have a valid passport at all times unless exempt from 
passport requi rements. If your I -20 or DS-2109 wi 1 1 soon expi re you should apply for an 
extensi on at I east 30 days pri or to the program compl eti on date on the document. To travel 
outside the U.S. and re-enter as an F-l or J -1, an advisor in 01 S must sign your 1-20 or 
DS-2109 before you leave. 

• Health I insurance A 1 1 undergraduate students, regardl ess of vi sa status, are requi red by the 
University Health Center to carry adequate health insurance. I n addition, J -1 students must 
present copies of thei r health i nsuranceto 01 S i n order to comply with Department of State 
requirements. 

Letters and Sciences 

1117 Hornbake Library 
301-314-8418 

Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant, Ph. D. 
askltsc@umd.edu 
www.ltsc.umd.edu 
General Advising: 301-314-8418 
Pre- Law Advising: www.prdaw.umd.edu 
Credit-by-Exam 301-314-8418 

Letters and Sci ences i s the acaderri c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i d ds before sd ecti ng 
a maj or, for post-baccal aureate students taki ng additi onal course work, and for non-degree seeki ng 
students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sci ences may al so serve as the acaderri c home 
for students compl eti ng requi rements for entry i nto a L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Maryland Encash Institute (ME I) 

1117 Col e Student A eti vi ti es B ui I di ng 
301-405-8634 
301-314-9462 

Director: Dr. Elizabeth Driver 
md@umd.edu 
www.md.umd.edu 

The M aryland Engl ish I nstitute (M El ) provides Engl ish language i nstruction and assessment at the 
postsecondary I evd for speakers of other I anguages who wi sh to I earn English for acaderri c, 
prof essi onal , or personal reasons. MEI fulfills itsnission by provi di ng 

• courses for matriculated students 

• courses for i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 

• afull-time, multj-levd Intensive English Program 

• short courses for members of the campus and I ocal community 

• custom-designed programs for special groups 

• eval uati on of the E ngl i sh I anguage prof i ci ency of prospecti ve and provi si onal I y adrri tted 
students 

• assessment of oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s of i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service HagebJ 



M El offers rigorous courses of study whi le providi ng a positive and supportive learni ng community 
and promoting irtercultural understanding. 

Two regular i nstructional programs are offered for provisional I y admitted and prospective 
undergraduate students who are non- nati ve speakers of E ngl i sh: a senri - i ntensi ve program for 
provi si onal I y adnri tted students and afull-timei ntensi ve program for prospecti ve students. 

Senri-I ntensive(UMEI 005): This program is open only to students admitted to the University of 
M aryl and. Students who are provi si onal I y adrni tted to the U ni versi ty sati sf actori I y compl ete U M E I 
005 their fi rst semester in order to become ful I y adrni tted, full -time students at the University. 
UM El 005 classes meet five days a week, two hours a day. The program is designed especially to 
perfect the language ski I Is necessary for academic work at the University of Maryland. No credit is 
given toward any university degree 

I ntensive This ful l-ti me Engl ish language program is open to non-native speakers who wish to 
i improve the r E ngl i sh for academi c, prof essi onal or personal reasons. There are three i ntensi ve 
E ngl i sh sessi ons per year: One for f al I semester, one for spri ng, and a seven- week sessi on i n the 
summer. Each consists of approxi matdy 23 hours of i nstruction weekly. The program offers five 
I evd s of i nstructi on, begi nni ng through advanced. 

Sati sf actory compl eti on of the program does not guarantee acceptance at the U ni versi ty . E nrol I mart 
is by M El appl ication and acceptance, and no credit is given toward any university degree. Tuition 
rerni ssi on cannot be appl i ed to M E I courses. 



Officeof Multi-Ethnic Student Education (OMSE) 

1101 Hornbake Library 
301-405-5615 or 405-5616 
www.umd.edu/OM SE 

The Off i ce of M ulti -ethni c Student Educati on at U M D provi des servi ces marketed toward over 
8,200 multi -ethni c students. M any of the students served by OM SE are achi evi ng at hi gh rates of 
personal and prof essi onal excel I ence. N everthd ess, there are others who are experi end ng academi c 
and personal chal I enges as outl i ned i n the Off i ce of I nstituti onal Research PI anni ng and Assessment, 
U M CP data on undergraduate retenti on and graduati on rates. OM SE provi des programs and 
resources that support the academi c, personal and prof essi onal excd I ence of students. The mi ssi on 
of the Office of M ulti -ethnic Student Education is di rectly I i nked to the d i mi nation of the 
achievement gap at the University of Maryland. With that goal in mind, OMSE provi des direct and 
i ndi rect servi ces through programs such as a wal k-i n tutori al program study I ab, computer I ab with 
disability services software, weekly honors program mentoring program Check Ups, Academic 
Excd I ence Soci ety, Col I ege Success Schol ars, Road M ap to Success, annual A meri can I ndi an 
Powwow and a my ri ad of servi ces that recogni ze the mul ti pi e i denti ti es of students. 

OM SE 's servi ces emphasi ze the i mportance of "sea ng" al I students from a gl oral i integrated 
perspective. The OM SE team is dedicated to our motto of high expectations, high standards and 
ongoing excd I ence. The political and historical patterns of the University of Maryland continues to 
frame our unwaveri ng corrrnitment to address the d i mate of i ndifference, racial/diversity 



3. CarrpusAdrrinistration, Resources, and 5tudent Services HageM 



i ncompetence and nri si nf ormed perspecti ves that conti nue to permeate the everyday experi ences of 
mul ti -ethni c students. O M SE encourages al I students to i denti f y empoweri ng strategi es to ensure 
matriculation, retention, graduation, and excel lent academic outcomes. 



Oak Ridge Associated Universities 

M d vi n B erstei n, V i ce Presi dent for Research 
ORAU Councilor, University of Maryland 
www.orau.org 

Si nee 1951, students and f acul ty of U ni versi ty of M aryl and have benef i ted from i ts membershi p i n 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 98 colleges and universities 
and a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE) located i n Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU 
works with its member i nstituti ons to hd p thei r students and faculty gai n access to federal research 
facilities throughout the country; to keep its member i nf ormed about opportuniti es for f d I owshi p, 
scholarshi p, and research appoi rtments; and to organize research al Nances among its members. 

Through the Oak Ridge I nstitutefor Science and Education (ORI SE), the DOE faci I ity that ORAU 
operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as wd I as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of 
opportuniti es for study and research. Students can parti ci pate i n programs coveri ng a wi de vari ety of 
di sci pi i nes i ncl udi ng busi ness, earth sci ences, epi derni ol ogy, engi neeri ng, physi cs, geol ogi cal 
sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. 
A ppoi ntment and program I ength range from one month to four years. M any of these programs are 
especi al I y desi gned to i ncrease the numbers of underrepresented mi nori ty students pursui ng degrees 
i n science-and engi neeri ng-rdated disci pi i nes, and details on locations and benefits can be found i n 
the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, whi ch i s avai I abl e at.www.orau.gov/ori se/& 
www.orau.aov/ori seYeduc. htm or by cal I i ng the contacts bdow. 

ORA U 's Off i ce of Partnershi p Devd opment seeks opportuniti es for partnershi ps and al I i ances 
among ORUA's members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty 
devd opment programs, such as the Ralph E. PoweJ unior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the 
Visiting I ndustrial Scholars Program consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research and 
support programs as wd I as servi ces to chi ef research off i cers. 

For more i nformation about ORAU and its programs, contact: 

MdvinBernstdn 

V i ce Presi dent for Research 

ORAU Councilor for University of Maryland 

MonnieE. Champion 
ORAU Corporate Secretary 
865-576-3306 

Visit the ORAU homepageatwww.orau.org. 
Orientation 

1102 Col e Student A cti vi ti es B ui I di ng 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Page to 



301-314-8217 
Director: Gerry Strumpf 
www.orientation.umd.edu 

The goal of Orientation is to i ntroduce new students to the University of M aryland community. The 
Ori entati on Off i ce offers a wi de range of transiti oral programmi ng and servi ces for students and 
their families as they prepare to attend the University of Maryland. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Pre-Cdlege Pro-ams 

1107 West Education Annex 
301-405-6776 
301-314-9155 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy DeJ esus 
pre-col I ege@umd.edu 
www. precol I ege. umd.edu 
Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 
Upward Bound-Math and Science Program (UB-MS): 301-405-1773 

The University of Maryland Pre-Col I ege Programs in the Office Of Undergraduate Studies is 
comprised of the federally and state funded Upward Bound Programs. These programs generate the 
ski 1 1 s and moti vati on necessary for success i n post-secondary educati on. Pre-Col I ege Programs i s 
part of Federal TRIO Programs, which provides educational opportunity outreach programs designed 
to moti vate and support I ow- i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Office of the Registrar 

First floor Mitchell Building 
301-314-8240 
Registrar: Chuck Wilson 
www.testudo.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the Regi strar provi des servi ces to students and academi c departments rd ated to the 
processes of regi strati on, schedul i ng, withdrawal , and graduati on. The off i ce al so mai ntai ns students' 
academi c records and i ssues transcri pts. Staff members are avai I abl e to students for consultati on. For 
detailed information about registration procedures, student records, and academic regulations, see 
chapter 4. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

2301 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-9356 

301-314-0385 

Director: Spencer Benson 

cte@umd.edu 

www.cte.umd.edu 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebb 



The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , indivi dual and campus- wi de efforts to 
enhance teaching and learning at the University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to 
departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teachi ng assi stants. The Center al so adrni ni sters an 
undergraduate teaching assistants program, a University-wide teaching and learning program for 
graduate teachi ng assistants, various faculty and graduate student learni ng communities, a summer 
i nsrjtute for faculty i interested i n enhanci ng thei r use of technol ogy for student I earni ng, vari ous 
Schol arshi p of Teachi ng and Learni ng programs and support for attendance to regi onal and rati oral 
meeti ngs focused on teachi ng and I earni ng. 

See al so the Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secrj on i n Chapter 6. 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2100D (2nd Floor) McKddin Library 

301-314-6786 

F ranci s D uV i rage, D i rector 

ugresearch@umd.edu 

www.ugresearch.umd.edu 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative of the Office of the Dean 
of U ndergraduate Studi es. Created as a resource for students and faculty, the Center serves as a 
cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and off-campus research opportuniti es for undergraduates. M aj or 
programs of the M CU R i ncl ude M aryl and Student Researchers, whi ch permits faculty to list 
research opportunities open to undergraduates duri ng the academic year, and M aryl and Summer 
Scholars, which provides fundi ng for students to conduct summer research (on campus or elsewhere 
i n the U S or abroad as needed) under the mentorshi p of a M aryl and faculty member. 

For more i nf ormati on, see Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Tutoring 

2204 Marie Mount 

301-405-4745 

www.aap.umd.edu 

The Intensive Educational Development Program (I ED) in the Academic Achievement Program 
(AAP) provides tutoring services for eligible University of Maryland students. The schedule for 
tutori ng, study ski 1 1 s, math support, and English support cl asses i s avai I abl e at 2204 M ari e M ount. 
Academi c support cl asses are offered for many I ower-l evd CORE cl asses, i ncl udi ng math and 
Englishcl asses, as wd I as f or sd ected entry- 1 evd cl asses for numerous maj ors (for exampl e 
Business or Biological Sciences). F or a schedule of classes as wd I asdigibilitystatusforAAP's 
servi ces, pi ease contact the Tutori ng Coordi nator at 301-405-4745. A I so, pi ease check A A P's 
webpage at www.aap.umd.edu for schedules, job opportunities as tutors, and further i nformation 
about the program 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hageb/ 



STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Alumni Association 

Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center 

301-405-4678 

alurmi@umcl.edu 

www.al umni .umd.edu 

800-336-8627 

The University of Maryland Alumni Association is a non-profit, membership organization for 
alumni of the University of Maryland, College Park. By taking traditional and innovative approaches 
to al umni programrri ng, the al umni associ ati on f i 1 1 s many purposes, i ncl udi ng the needs of students. 

The al umni associ ati on supports prof essi onal devd opment programs to prepare students f or I if e i n 
the " real worl d. " Students can appl y to be a part of the al umni associ ati on's student ambassador 
organization, Carapace, which assists the alumni association with planning more than 60 programs 
per year. Students may al so appl y for schol arshi ps through the M ary I and A I umni A ssoci ati on 
Schol arshi p Program N ew graduates recei ve a one-year compl i mentary membershi p i n the al umni 
associ ati on that i ncl udes its f ul I range of benefits. Y ears two and three after graduati on are offered 
at a di scounted rate of $25 per year. The al umni associ ati on al so offers graduates access to the 
Onl i ne A I umni Community-a free onl i ne networki ng tool al I owi ng graduates to connect with 
M aryl and al umni and f ri ends based on shared i interests, common acquai ntances, prof essi ons, 
I ocati ons and more. U pon graduati on, the al umni associ ati on i nvi tes new graduates to appl y to j oi n 
i ts Y oung A I umni Comrri ttee, whi ch provi des acti vi ti es for al umni who have graduated i n the I ast 
10 years. 

I n additi on to student programrri ng, the al umni associ ati on honors al umni who have di sti ngui shed 
themsd ves prof essi onal I y and personal I y through the U ni versi ty of M aryl and A I umni A ssoci ati on 
Hal I of Fame and Annual Awards Gala. It provides special programs and services, such as consumer 
di scounts, that benefit al I al umni . 1 1 promotes conti nui ng educati on through its cultural semi nars and 
i nternati onal travel program M ost of al I , the al umni associ ati on seeks to bui I d the Terrapi n spi ri t by 
supporti ng more than 30 al umni cl ubs and acadenri c chapters throughout the country and the worl d. 

The al umni associ ati on has 29 staff members, i s governed by a board of al umni vol unteers and i s 
supported by countl ess other al umni vol unteers around the country. 

Book Center 

Stamp Student Union, lower level 

301-314-BOOK 

www.shopterp.com 

The University Book Center operated by Barnes & Noble is the offici al bookstore for the University 

of M aryl and. The B ook Center i s the onl y store that carri es textbooks for all of your cl asses. The 

store has a I arge sd ecti on of Used Digtal, and Rental Textbooks that are avai I abl e i n many 

courses. General -i nterest books, I iterature, technical books, and best sd lers can be found on the 

I ower I evd of the store. The Book Center al so carri es a wi de sd ecti on of school suppl i es, and 

i mpri nted sportswear and rd ated items. The Book Center website i s www.shopterp.com 

The Book Center is open: 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Page by 



M onday - Thursday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm 
Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Saturday 11: 00 am - 4: 00 pm 

Sunday 12:00 pm- 4:00 pm 

* Additional hours for special events. 

University Career Center and the Presidents Promise (UCC/TPP) 

3100 Hornbake Li brary, South Wi ng 

301-314-7225 

UCC-studenthd p@umd.edu 

www.CareerCenter.umd.edu; www. Presi dentsPromi se. umd.edu 

Refer to our websiteat www.CareerCenter. umd.edu for current hours of operation and hours of 
career assistance 

Mission 

The University Career Center and The Presidents Promise office supports the University of 
M aryl and's mi ssi on and its acaderri c programs by provi di ng a vari ety of programs and servi ces to 
meet the di verse career devd opmert and empl oyment needs of degree-seeki ng students and al urmi . 
The Center teaches, advi ses arid counsel s students to make deci si ons about career i interests, 
empl oyment and f urtheri ng educati onal pursuits such as prof essi onal or graduate school . 1 1 
col I aborates wi th acaderri c departments, empl overs and al urmi i n the del i very of workshops, 
servi ces and career/i nternshi p f ai rs. 

Ti me and agai n employers state that the competitive candidate wi 1 1 have outside the classroom 
experi ences that compl ement the acaderri c curri cul um Through the Presi dents Promi se, each 
student has the chance to engage i n a sped al experi ence and offers the opportunity for extraordi nary 
personal growth. Some students achieve this growth through hands-on research, study abroad, or 
i nternshi ps i n the publ i c and pri vate sectors. Others take on I eadershi p rol es or f i nd f ul f i 1 1 ment i n 
community servi ce programs. Presi dents Promi se staff i s avai I abl e to hd p students navi gate through 
al I opti ons to sd ect the best opportuniti es. I n additi on, dedi cated faculty and staff are al so avai I abl e 
to hd p students chart a course to enhance thd r acaderri c experi ence. 

Resources Include: 

Career Assistance 

Center staff can hd p students: 

• address educational and career decisions 

• identify useful resources 

• take advantage of i nternshi ps, f ul I -ti me, part-ti me and summer empl oyment opportuniti es 

• sharpen j ob search ski 1 1 s and strategi es 

• pi an for graduate and professional school 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Page by 



• i improve resume and cover I etters 

Resume Express 

Get your resume reviewed or have your cover letter critiqued. Avai lablefor currently enrol led 
students. For specif i c days and ti mes pi ease vi sit our website. 

Intern Express 

Get a qui ck overvi ew of strategi es to hd p you f i nd an i nternshi p i n your i ndustry or get hd p f i guri ng 
out how to apply for one. Avai lablefor currently enrol led students. For specific days and ti mes 
pi ease vi si t our websi te 

Career Courses 

EDCP108J : J ob Search Strategies 

Thi s 1 credit course for students with j uni or or seni or standi ng teaches you strategi es for I andi ng 

i nternshi ps or f ul I -ti me empl oyment and bei ng successful i n your career. 

UNIV099: 1 nternshi p Serri nar 

Thi s credit serri nar for graduate or undergraduate students i s desi gned to connect cl assroom theory 

to your i nternshi p and notates your i nternshi p experi ence. 

Career s4Terps 

For free access to a variety of career tools and opportunities i nd udi ng a comprehensive I i sti ng of 
employment opportunities, we recommend every student register for Careers4Terps on the Center's 
website. Once regi stered, you can parti ci pate i n on-campus i ntervi ews, make your resume vi si bl e to 
employers and learn about upcorni ng events and career news through our weekly e-newsletter. 

Y ou wi 1 1 al so gai n access to exd usi ve web resources i nd udi ng: 

• Focus2 - A n onl i ne system that combi nes sdf -assessment, career expl orati on and 
deci si on-maki ng i nto one program 

• Where Did UM Graduates Go? - Find out where fd low Terps have found success. 

• Career I nsider - Research employers and career i nformation. Download Career I nsider 
"books" on different industries. 

• Goi ng G I obal - A n i nternati onal career and empl oyment resource that gi ves you access to 
country career gui des, work permit i nf ormati on and cultural i ntervi ewi ng advi ce 

• Opti mal Resume - Thi s easy to use web-based tool hd ps you build a better resume and write 
cover I etters by hi ghl i ghrj ng ski 1 1 s and qual if i cati ons sought by empl oyers. 

• Virtual M ock I ntervi ews - Practice i ntervi ewi ng by digital ly recordi ng yoursdf and then 
revi ewi ng it from your onl i ne account. 

Career & Employment Resource Room 

Thi s col I ecti on of resources hd ps students I earn about co-curri cul ar opportuniti es and career 

pi anni ng/j ob search strategi es. M ost of the books i n the Resource Room are avai I abl e for ci rcul ati on 

to U M students for one week. Topi c areas i nd ude 

• sdf -assessment/career exploration 

• i nternshi p resources 

• The Presi dents Promi se opportuniti es 

• job search tools 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age /u 



• i nf ormati on on empl oyers 

• international resources 

• graduate/professional schools 

Terp Career & J ob Search Guide 

Thi s i s a free bookl et for career pi anni ng and conducti ng a j ob search. Contents i ncl ude resume 
writing guides, successful interviewing techniques and job search tips. AvailableattheUniversity 
Career Center Office 

The President s Promise 

The Presi dents Prorri se gi ves undergraduate students an i integrated I earni ng experi ence that goes far 
beyond the cl assroom. Students may f i nd opportuni tiesin programs such as I i vi ng and I earni ng 
programs, research experiences, public and private sector internships, learning communities, 
i nternati onal experi ences, servi ce- 1 earni ng experi ences, and opportuni ti es for I eadershi p. 

University Career Center Events 

Programs connecti ng students with al urmi and empl oyers are hd d throughout the acaderri c year. 
Presentati ons and events i ncl ude 

• i nternshi p strategi es 

• resume and cover I etter writi ng 

• career expos and f ai rs 

• networking opportunities 

• career and empl oy ment panel s 

• empl oyer i nf ormati on and networki ng sessi ons 

• webinars 

For a full listing, gotowww.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

Web Resources 

www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 

Read arti cl es about career pi anni ng, j ob hunrj ng and empl oymert trends; keep up-to-date about new 

programs, servi ces and events; use our Career L i nks to access other j ob and career sites. 

www. Presi dentsProrri se. umd.edu 

N avi gate the opportuni ti es avai I abl e at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and that compl emert student 

acaderri c pursuits and bri ng cl assroom knowl edge to I if e. 

University Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Building 
301-314-7651 
301-314-9206 (fax) 
www.counsel i ng.umd.edu 

The University Counseling Center has returned to its home in theShoemakerBuildng. 

Seeki ng hd p i s a si gn of strength! M any students encounter a vari ety of personal , soci al , career, and 
acaderri c i ssues that cal I for assi stance beyond advi ce provi ded by f ri ends and f arri I y. Fortunatd y, 
the U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center provi des free and conf i denrj al counsd i ng servi ces to al I U ni versi ty 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age '1 



of M aryl and students. To schedul e an appoi ntment cal I 301-314-7651 or stop by the front desk i n 
the mai n I obby of the Shoemaker B ui I di ng. Wal k-i n counsel ing is avai I abl e to students of col or who 
woul d I i ke a consul tati on wi th a counsel or of col or, and G L BTQ students who woul d I i ke a 
consul tati on wi th a gay, I esbi an or a gay al I y counsel or, dai I y from 3: 00 p. m to 4: 00 p. m Students 
who seek hd p i n choosi ng a maj or can wal k- i n for consul tati on wi th a career counsel or on 
Wednesdays from 1: 00 p. m to 3: 00 p. m Our newest wal k- i n servi ce i s for students who are 
veterans. Veterans Wal k-l n Hour occurs on M ondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 3:00 p.m 
to4:00p.m 

Counseling Center Services 

Personal/Social Counseling. Y ou don't have to deal with your probl ems al one. I n a warm and 
supportive envi ronment, you can meet with a counselor to discuss any concern you may have related 
to your personal and soci al wd I -bei ng. A mong the topi cs many students di scuss i n counsd i ng are 
sdf -esteem stress, anxiety, depression, rdationship issues, sex, family problems, and londiness. 
Y ou may see a counsd or for i ndi vi dual counsd i ng, coupl es counsd i ng, or j oi n one of the many 
counsd or-led support groups. Cal I 301-314-7651 or visit our website - 
www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Structur/csl gservi ce. htm 

Career Counseling. A normal part of your devd opment i n col I ege i s i dentifyi ng who you are i n 

rd ati on to a f uture career. Y ou can get hd p wi th thi s process i n i ndi vi dual career counsel i ng at the 
U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center. Y our expl orati on may i ncl ude taki ng career i nterest tests and 
i nterpreti ng the results with a counsd or or taki ng advantage of a computerized career i information 
system Whether you are choosi ng a maj or, establ i shi ng career goal s, or consi deri ng j ob 
opportuniti es, it i s i mportant to understand how your personal ity, val ues, and i interests rd ate to your 
future prof essi onal I if e. Career counsd i ng at the Counsd i ng Center i s a good pi ace to begi n. The 
M ajors Wal k-i n program is avai lable on Wednesdays from 1:00-3:00 p.m Cal I 301-314-7651 or 
visit our website - www.counsd i ng.urrrl.edu/Services/sry_car.htm 

Academic Skills Counseling. Many students would I ike to improve thdr academic skills. If you 
want to enhance your I earni ng strategi es, overcome weak areas, or thi nk di fferenti y about bd ng an 
ef f ecti ve col I ege I earner, schedul e an appoi ntment wi th one of the U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center's 
academic ski I Is specialists in the Learning Assistance Service (LAS). ThecounsdorsinLAScan 
hd p you enhance your writi ng, math, note-taki ng, test-taki ng, ti me management and I earni ng 
strategies. I n addition to worki ng i ndi vidual ly with students, the LAS staff offer a variety of 
one-credit I earni ng strategi es courses, as wd I as academj c ski 1 1 s workshops. Topi cs covered i n L A S 
workshops i ncl ude academj c success strategi es, exam ski 1 1 s, ti me management, and end-of-semester 
survi val strategi es. LA S offers an E ngl i sh Conversati on program for i nternati onal students and a 
di ssertati on support group for doctoral students. To schedul e an appoi ntment phone 301-314-7693 
or sign up online at: https://lasonline.umd.edu. Visit our website- www.counsding.umd.edu/LAS 

Workshops and Group Counseling. You can gain strength to deal with your concerns by getting 
together with other peopl e who share si mi I ar probl ems, i nterests, and goal s. Each semester, the 
U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center offers weekl y support groups addressi ng a vari ety of topi cs, such as 
career exploration, dissertation support, procrastination prevention, and stress management. Recent 
group offerings have included, "Cirdeof Sisters," a support group for black women; "My Body-My 
Sdf: A Woman's Group," which addresses problems of body image and eating; and a Sdf Care and 
Wd I ness group that assi sts peopl e wi th strategi es for stayi ng heal thy, psychol ogi cal I y and 
physical ly. Cal I 301-314-7651 or visit our website - www.counsd i ng.umd.edu/Services/srv_grp.htm 

Disability Services The University Counsd i ng Center's Disabi I ity Support Service provides a range 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age ^ 



of accommodati ons for students with di sabi lities, including i interpreters and transcri bi ng servi ces for 
deaf or hard-of-heari ng students; enlarged pri nt and electronic format of textbooks and written 
materials for individuals with print material disabilities (eg., blind or low vision, learning 
di sabi lities and attend on def i ci t di sorders, or physi cal di sabi lities); extended ti me and pri vate space 
for exams; and assi stance with access to vari ous bui I di ngs and f aci I iti es on campus as wd I as access 
to the campus 1 paratransit servi ce. I f you are a new or returni ng student, contact the Di sabi I ity 
Support Servi ce i n the Counsel i ng Center as soon as possi bl e at 301-314-7682 - (voi ce and TTY ), or 
email usatdissup@umd.edu, or visit our website- www.counsding.umd.edu/DSS. 

Returning Students Program I f you are over 25 and returni ng to school after a break i n your 
formal education, you probably have different needs than the traditional col lege student. The 
Returni ng Students Program i n the U ni versity Counsd i ng Center's Learni ng Assi stance Servi ce 
(LAS) is designed to hd p you with the transition to academic I ife. To make your adj ustment to the 
uni versi ty successful , workshops, counsd i ng, and i nf ormati on are avai I abl e at the Counsd i ng 
Center. Cal I 301-314-7693 or visit our website - www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/LAS 

Testing Services. TheTesti ng, Research and Data Processi ng U nit, i n the U ni versity Counsd i ng 
Center adrri ni sters tests for counsd i ng purposes, such as career i nterest i nventori es, and al so 
administers national standardized tests, such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and Miller 
Analogies. Cal I 301-314-7688 or visit our website - www.counsd i ng.urnd.edu/Stnjctur/str_trdp.htm 

Research Services. G roup and i ndi vi dual consul tati on are avai I abl e for those who need assi stance 
wi th research desi gn, stati sti cs and wri ti ng proj ect proposal s, theses, and di ssertati ons. Cal I 
301-314-7660 or visit our website - www.counsd i ng.umd.edu/Stnjctur/trdpui3chgrp.htm 

Support for Parents of College Students The Parent Warm 1 i ne i s a corf i denti al td ephone and 
emai I servi ce for any parent concerned about hi s or her student's adj ustment at col I ege, i ncl udi ng 
concerns impacting academic, social, and emotional realms, and overall mental health. Parent 
Warm 1 i ne staff can be contacted at 301-314-7651 or parentwarml i ne@umd.edu. 

Parent and C hi Id/Adolescent Counseling and Evaluation. The U ni versity Counsd i ng Center's, 
University Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service (UPCCES) provides 
University-connected families with children (ages 4to 18) with a range of services, including 
individual and group therapies, school consultation, and parent consultation. Intdlectual and 
emoti onal/behavi oral eval uati on i s al so avai I abl e for youth with school and I earni ng concerns. 
Contact U PCCES at 301-314-7673 or parentchi I d@umd.edu, or vi sit our website - 
www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Structur/str_pccs. htm 

University Counseling Center Hours 

Counseling Serwceappointments (all students) 301-314-7651 

M onday-Thursday 8: 30 am to 9: 00 pm 

F ri day 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 

Students of Col or Walk-In Hours no appoi ntment needed 

Monday - Friday 3:00 pmto 4:00 pm 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service: 



Page /J 



Rainbow Walk-In 
Tuesday- Friday 



no appoi ntmert needed 
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm 



Veterans Walk-In 

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 



no appoi ntmert needed 

M 3-4pm W 3-4pm Th 3-4pm 



Majors Walk-in 
Wednesdays 



no appoi ntmert needed 
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm 



L earning Assistance Service 

Mondays 

Tuesday- Friday 



301-314-7693 

8:30 am to 7:00 pm 
8:30 am to 4:30 pm 



Disability Support Services 
Monday- Friday 



301-314-7682 

8:30 am to 4:30 pm 



Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit 
Monday- Friday 

Vari abl e eveni ng hours for testi ng purposes 



301-314-7688 

8:30 am to 4:30 pm 



University Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service 301-314-7673 
Monday- Friday 

Eveni ng hours by appoi ntmert 



8:30 am to 4:30 pm 



Dining Services 

1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I 
Dining Plans: 301-314-8069 
Terrapin Express: 301-314-8068 
Student Employment: 301-314-8058 
umf ood@di ni ng. umd.edu 
www.di ni ng.umd.edu 

The University of M aryland offers one of the ten largest self-operated and self -supported di ni ng 
servi ces programs i n the country. Our goal i s to provi de popul ar and nutriti ous food i n a wd comi ng 
setti ng every day. Two a la carte dining halls are open from 7:30 am unrj I midnight on most 
weekdays and duri ng the day on weekends. A n al I -you-care-to-eat di ni ng hal I serves di nner M onday 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age /4 



through F ri day. Smal I er di ni ng I ocati ons cl ose to acaderri c bui I di ngs and resi dence hal I s have hours 
of operation that meet the needs of those facilities. 

The two a I a carte di ni ng hal I s feature a total of 21 cul i nary stati ons i ncl udi ng a stuff ed-to-order 
burritos stop, hot and cold del is, self -serve and custom-made salad bars, ice cream and bakery 
stati ons, gri 1 1 s and fryers, cl assi c comfort food I i nes, i nternati onal I y-themed I unch and di nner 
venues, I tal i an and A si an serveri es, a vegan stati on, and M ongol i an gri 1 1 s. 

This year we're i ntroduci ng 251 North - a completely remodeled, redesigned and re-i magi ned di ni ng 
hal 1 . 251 N orth wi 1 1 provi de al I -you-care-to-eat di ni ng that we hope wi 1 1 encourage you to 
experi mart wi th new foods and still bring you your f avori te di shes. 251 N orth features f i ve themed 
eateri es set i n a brand new di ni ng room with smal I tabl es, cocktai I tabl es, banquettes, and counter 
seati ng. We anti ci pate that 251 N orth wi 1 1 become a cul i nary and soci al center for the campus, 
provi di ng a del i ci ous di ni ng experi ence and enhanci ng the I if e of the community. 

Restaurants, caf ® and conveni ence shops are scattered across campus. For a compl ete I i st of our 
dining locations, hours, and general informationvisitdining.umd.edu or call 301-314-8069. We are 
where you are - and we wd come students, faculty, staff and vi si tors i nto al I of our I ocati ons across 
campus. 

Resident Dining Plans 

Resi dent di ni ng pi ans contai n three sub-accounts: 251 N orth M eal s, Resi dent Poi nts, and Terp 
Bucks. 

Students I i vi ng on the north side of campus wi 1 1 have one 251 North M eal per week i ncl uded i n thei r 
resi dent di ni ng pi ans. Students I i vi ng on the south si de of campus wi 1 1 have four M eal s per semester 
i ncl uded i n thei r resi dent di ni ng pi ans. The number of Poi nts i s adj usted to provi de equi val ent di ni ng 
for al I resi dent di ni ng pi ans. Each M eal al I ows you one-ti me access to thi s al I -you-care-to-eat 
faci I ity. Once i nsi de, you will find vari ed menus, f ami I i ar di shes, and exoti c new foods created by 
our chefs usi ng healthful cooki ng methods and the freshest i ngredi ents. 

Poi nts are to use i n the a I a carte di ni ng hal I s, and B ucks add the opti on of di ni ng i n most of the 
cafes and conveni ence shops on campus. There are enough Poi nts and B ucks i ncl uded i n the di ni ng 
pi an to purchase approxi mate! y 13 compl ete meal packages (eal I ed V al ue M eal s) every week. Y ou 
use Poi nts to purchase food items in the two main dining halls. Enjoy a light snack, a quick meal to 
go, a f ul I di nner, or bri ng guests for a feast - its al I up to you! Asa bonus, Add e's Restaurant i n the 
Stamp accepts Poi nts for di nner M onday through Thursday. 

Access M eal s, Poi nts, and B ucks usi ng your U M I D card. Y our pi dure i s on the front and you must 
be present every ti me the card i s used, you can check recent transacti ons and bal ances onl i ne 24/7 or 
ask for a reed pt showi ng your bal ance after any transacti on. 

We are corf i dent that you wi 1 1 be i mpressed by the qual i ty and excepti onal sd ecti ons avai I abl e 
throughout the di ni ng I ocati ons across campus. 

The Apartment Dining Plan 

We offer the Apartment Plan to students not living in traditional campus residences. The Apartment 
PI an works very much the same as resi denti al di ni ng pi ans, offeri ng students the abi I ity to purchase 
food on campus without carryi ng cash or a credit card; the security that if the U M ID card i s I ost, the 
account can be frozen and then attached to a repl acement U M I D card; and the conveni ence of 
payi ng through the B ursar's Off i ce duri ng the regul ar bi 1 1 i ng cycl e or by usi ng f i nanci al ai d or 
schol arshi p money. A partment PI an poi nts rol I over from f al I to spri ng semester. For detai I s see our 
web site. 



3. Carrpus Adrrinistration, Resources, and 5tudert Service: ^age ^ 



Terrapin Express 

Terrapi n Express i s a pre-pai d debit account, not a substitute for a di ni ng pi an. 1 1 i s a wonderful way 
to suppl ement a di ni ng pi an and a great al ternati ve for students I i vi ng i n campus apartments or 
off-campus. Terrapi n Express accounts are avai I abl e to al I students, faculty and staff through the 
Terrapi n Express Office at 1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I or onl i ne through Testudo web 
servi ces. Check our web site for a compl ete I i sti ng of parti ci pad ng di ni ng and non-di ni ng I ocati ons. 



Department of Fraternity and Sorority L ife 

1110 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-7172 
www.greek.umd.edu 

Office Hours: Monday- Friday. 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p. m 

The Department of Fraternity and Sorority Life oversees al I recognized social and community 
servi ce- based f raterniti es and sororiti es. Staff withi n the department provi de advi si ng and support 
for the chapter rnembers, thei r I eadershi p, and the I eadershi p of four student governi ng counci I s: the 
I nterfraternity Council (IFC), the Panhd I enic Association (PH A), the Pan-Hellenic Counci I (PHC) 
andtheUnited Greek Council (UGC). The department also manages the 21 university-owned 
fraternity and sorority houses and provides resources for the off-campus fraternity arid sorority 
houses. 

University Health Center (UHC) 

Campus Drive, Building 140 
301-314-8180 
301-405-9755 (fax) 
health@umd.edu 
www.health.umd.edu 

Hours of Operation: 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m6:00 p.m 
Saturday 9:00 am 12: 00 p.m 
Sunday Closed 

The University Health Center (UHC) is located on Campus Drive, across from the Stamp Student 
Union, is a nationally accredited ambulatory health care facility. All registered students living on or 
off-campus are eligible to use the UHC. The UHC is open during the hours listed above, with varied 
hours duri ng semester breaks, hoi i days and summer sessi ons. V i si t the U H C websi te, 
www. heal th. umd.edu, for up-to-date i nf ormati on. Students are seen by appoi ntment for routi ne care 
8 a. m 4: 30 p. m on weekdays. Some appoi ntments can be schedul ed onl i ne at 
www.rTyuhc.umd.edu . A limited number of same day appoi ntments are avai I abl e. M edi cal servi ces 
are I i rrited after 5 p. m and on Saturdays. U rgent Care servi ces are avai I abl e without an appoi ntment 
for the evaluation of urgent medical conditions. TheAfter Hours Nursdine 301-314-9386, afree 
medical advice and information service, isavailabletoall registered students when the UHC is 
cl osed. Students shoul d al ways bri ng thei r i nsurance card to the U H C when seeki ng care. 



3. Carrpus Adrrinistration, Resources, and 5tudert Service: ^age /t] 



Copaymentsand Health I nsurance 

There are charges for al I medi cal servi ces. V i sit copayments wi 1 1 vary depend ng on the type of 
i nsurance and servi ce provi ded. There i s al so a " M i ssed A ppoi ntment ' fee. To avoi d thi s fee, 
appoi ntments must be cancel ed or reschedul ed at I east 24 hours i n advance. Y ou may cancel or 
change an appoi ntment on-l i ne at www.myuhc.umd.edu or by cal I i ng (301) 314-8184. M onday 
massage and acupuncture appoi ntments must be cancel ed 72 hours i n advance of the appoi ntment. 
TheHealth Center is ableto bill some insurance plans for the cost of services. Charges not covered 
by i nsurance are posted to the students B ursar Account or can be pai d at the ti me of vi sit i n the 
UHC. Charges can be paid by cash, check, credit cards, or Terrapin Express at the UHC. The UHC 
Pharmacy parti ci pates with many pharmacy i nsurance plans. 

Services 

Types of servi ces provi ded by the U H C i ncl ude Pri mary Care, U rgert Care, men's and women's 
reproductive health care, pharmacy, acupuncture, massage therapy, HIV testing, sports medicine, 
nutriti on, meditati on, mental health, eati ng di sorder, substance abuse, travel cl i ni c, al I ergy cl i ni c, 
immunizations, health promotion, and the Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Program Dental 
Health Servi ces at the University Health Center are provi ded and billed by the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore School of Dentistry. For information about dental servi ces cal I 301-314-9500. 
The Center for Health and Wd I bei ng (CHWB), a satd I ite of the UHC located i n the Eppley 
Recreation Center, is open 9 am to 7 p. m M onday through Thursday and 12 to 4 p.m Fridays. 
Hours may vary duri ng the summer. The CHWB provides health promotion programs and services. 
1 1 does not provi de medi cal servi ces. 

Students younger than 18 years wi 1 1 need perrri ssi on from a parent or I egal guardi an to be treated, 
except for mental health and sexual health services. For students 18 and older, treatment and visit 
i nformation wi 1 1 only be given to parents with the students consent or through a court ordered 
subpoena. I f the vi sit i s bi 1 1 ed through an i nsurance pol i cy, the i nsurance company may send 
detai led informati on concerning a medi cal visit to the pol icy holder (i.e. parent). 

Mandatory Health I nsurance 

As of Fal I 2009, al I newly admitted undergraduate students, registered for 6 or more credits are 
requi red to have health i nsurance. These students are requi red to complete an on-l i ne waiver card each 
each academic year to provide proof of i nsurance coverage by a designated deadl i ne. The waiver 
card can onl y be found on- 1 i ne at: www.fi rststudent.com . Students have 2 opti ons avai I abl e 

1) Complete a waiver because they al ready have i nsurance (eg. through parent plans, 
family plans, or employer-sponsored plans). 

2) Elect to enroll in the Student Health I nsurance Policy by sdecting to enroll on the 
wai ver card* . When choosi ng thi s opti on your student account wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or the 
premium 

NOTE : Students who do not provi de proof of i nsurance or d ect to enrol I vi a the on-l i ne 
wai ver card wi 1 1 be charged on thd r B ursar A ccount the cost of the annual prerri um and 
wi 1 1 be automarj cal I y enrol I ed i n the student heal th i nsurance provi ded by U ni ted H eal th 
Care This is a non- refundable policy. 



3. Carrpus Adrrinistration, Resources, and 5tudert Service: ^age It 



*Additional information on student insurance and FAQ's can be found on the University Health 
Center's web site www.health.umd.edu 

G raduate Students are exempt from thi s requi rement 

I mmunization Requirements 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and requi res al I students to provi de proof of two i mmuni zati on dates for 
Measles, MumpsandRubdla(M.M.R.) prior to the first day of classes. All international Students 
must also document 2 doses of Measles, M umps and Rubella (M .M .R.) and a Tuberculosis (TB) test 
completed withi n the past six months i n the U nited States. 

The I mmunization Record must be subletted to the University Health C enter at Orientation, 
no later than thefirst day of class Compl eted forms can al so be faxed to 301-314-5234. A copy of 
the form can be downl oaded from the U H C websi te at www.health.umd.edu . 

Students who fai I to submit a completed i mmunization record signed by a medical provider, or 
submit acceptable alternative (eg. school, military records) documentation by the first day of classes 
will be assessed a non-conrpliance penalty fee and will be blocked from further changes in 
registration (add/drop/register for following semester). 

U nder M aryl and I aw, students enrol I ed i n a M aryl and i nstituti on of hi gher educati on and who resi de 
i n campus housi ng are requi red to be vacci nated agai nst meni ngi ti s or si gn a wai ver. V acci rati on 
and waiver i information are on the i mmunization form For more i information visit the Health Center 
website, www. heal th. umd.edu . email health@umd.edu . or call 301-314-8180. 

Emergencies 

If students have a health emergency when the Health Center is closed, they should cal I 911. A I ist of 
local hospital information is availableon the UHC website. The UHC and the University assumes no 
f i nanci al responsi bi I i ty f or care recei ved off campus. 

Housing Resident Life 

1102 Annapolis Hall 
301-314-2100 
reslife@umd.edu 
www. resnet. umd.edu 



The Department of Resi dent L if e i s responsi bl e for management of the resi dence hal I s as wd I as the 
cultural, educational, recreational and social programs and activities for residential students. 

Whi le I i vi ng i n a M aryl and residence hal I is not requi red, ni ne of every ten students i n M aryland's 
freshman cl ass make the choi ce to I i ve on campus. M ore than 90 prof essi oral and graduate staff and 
over 400 undergraduate student empl oyees meet the needs of resi dent students. 

There are rooms for approxi matdy 8,900 undergraduate students i n 37 residence hal Is. Three 
di ff erent sty I es of I i vi ng are avai I abl e to campus resi dents: tradi ti onal hal I s, sui tes, and apartments. 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age /fc > 



Within traditional housing, where most first-year residents live, single, double, tripleand quadruple 
room occupancy exists. Our national ly acclai med I i vi ng-learni ng programs i ncl ude Beyond the 
Classroom CIVICUS, Col lege Park Scholars, Digital Cultures and Creativity, Entrepreneurshipand 
Innovation, FLEXUS:TheDr. M ari lyn B erman Pol I ans 1 Women in Engineering Living & Learning 
Community, Gemstone, Global Communities, HinmanCEOs, Honors Humanities, Integrated Life 
Sciences, J imenez-Porter Writers' House, Language House, University Honors, and the Virtus 
E ngi neeri ng Program A 1 1 of these programs add to the di versi ty of on-campus housi ng opti ons. A 1 1 
rooms have a cabl e and data j ack for each student. O ne td ephone jackis provi ded i n each room 

F i rst-ti me freshmen are guaranteed on-campus housi ng provi ded they return thei r M aryl and PI anner 
i ncl udi ng the Enrol I ment Corf i rmation and Housi ng and Di ni ng Services Agreement along with the 
$400 enrol I ment deposit, by M ay 1. Transfer students who want to I i ve on campus should complete 
the M aryl and Planner as wd I and wi 1 1 be al lotted housi ng on a space avai lable basis. 



Office of Student Conduct 

2118Mitchdl Building 

301-314-8204 

301-314-9533 

Di rector: J ohn Zacker 

studentconduct@umd.edu 

www.studentconduct. umd.edu 

The mi ssi on of the Off i ce of Student Conduct i s to resol ve al I egati ons of mi sconduct under the Code 
of Student Conduct and the Code of Academe I ntegrity i n a manner consi stent wi th the core val ues 
of f ai rness, honesty, and i ntegri ty, whi I e promoti ng the U ni versi ty 's educati onal mi ssi on. E nhanci ng 
tine devd opment of character, civility, citizenship, individual/community responsibility, and ethics is 
essential to this mission. University students play a significant role in considering the behavior of 
thd r peers and are asked to assume positions of responsi bi I ity as members of the university's student 
j udi ci ary. The f ol I owi ng tenets gui de thi s mi ssi on: 

• To regard each student as an individual deserving of individual attention, consideration, and 
respect. 

• To consi der the facts f ul I y and careful I y before resol vi ng any case. 

• To speak candidly and honestly with each student. 

• To hoi d each student to a hi gh standard of behavi or, both to protect the campus community, 
and to promote student ethi cal devd opment. 

• To recognize the real ity of human fal I i bi I ity, as wd I as the stresses associated with col legiate 
I ife, and to demonstrate compassion, understandi ng, and a sense of humor. 

• To contri bute to the educati onal mi ssi on of the U ni versi ty by desi gni ng pol i ci es, conducti ng 
programs, and off eri ng i nstructi on that contri bute to the i ntd I ectual and ethi cal devd opment 
of the enti re student body. 

General Statement of Student Responsi bi I ity. Students are expected to conduct thernsd ves at al I 
times in a manner consistent with the University responsibility of ensuring to all members of the 
campus communi ty the opportuni ty to pursue thd r educati onal obj ecti ves, and of protecti ng the 
safety, wdfare, rights, and property of al I members of the campus community. Specific expectations 
for student conduct are ourJ i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and the Code of Academe 
Integrity. (See www.president.umd.edu/pol icies/) 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services ^age /y 



Discipli nary Procedures. Students accused of vi ol ati ng uni versi ty regul ati ons are accorded 
fundamental due process in disciplinary proceedings. Formal rules of evidence, however, shall not 
be appl i cabl e, nor shal I devi ati ons from prescri bed procedures necessari I y i nval i date a deci si on or 
proceedi ng unl ess si gni f i cart prej udi ce to one of the parti es may resul t. U ni versi ty procedures are 
outi i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academe I ntegrity suppl emented by materi al s 
provi ded by the Offi ce of Student Conduct to assi st students who are faci ng accusati ons of 
misconduct. 



Nyumburu Cultural Center 

Campus Drive 
301-314-7758 
301-314-0383 (fax) 
www.nyumburu.umd.edu 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center has served as a major resource of cultural, historical, and social 
programming at the University of Maryland, College Park for more than thirty-five years. The 
Center works closely with student, faculty, and community organizations. The Nyumburu Cultural 
Center offers a vari ety of soci o-cultural , musi cal , educati onal and arti sti c programs to the campus 
community. The nature of the diverse programrri ng and activities is based on the African 
A meri can, Af ri can, and Cari bbean Di aspora experi ence(s) . Nyumburu i s home of the M aryl and 
Gospel Choir, Shades of Harlem (performing arts ensemble), The Black Explosion Newspaper, Male 
Spokesmodd Competition, M iss Unity Scholarship Pageant, J ukej oint, Gospel Happy Hour, 
Leadership Series, NyumburuJazzClub, Kwanzaa Celebration, Cultural Dinner during Black 
History Month, Literature Corf erence, Homecoming Alumni Tailgate, Annual Talent Showcase, 
Annual Student Awards Banquet, Black M ale I nitiative (BM I ) Program and Sisterhood of Unity 
and Love (SOUL). 

Nyumburu's staff are advisors to many campus student organizations: Black Student Union, African 
Student Association (ASA), The Maryland Gospel Choir, The Black Explosion Newspaper, Sigma 
Gamma Rho sorority I nc., Delta SigmaTheta I nc., Alpha Nu Omega Sorority I nc., and Dimensions 
M odd i ng Group to name a few. 

Nyumburu presents Bl ues, J azz, and Gospd music concerts as wd I as academic courses i n Creative 
Writing (ENGL278C), Blues (AASP298V) andjazz (AASP298U) for three credits each. Maryland 
Gospd Choi r students earn 1-credit (M USC329E), and students who take EDCP108N, Col lege and 
Career Advancement earn 1-credit. 

Duri ng the summer, Nyumburu sponsors a Summer Camp Program for students from the age of five 
to sixteen. Through this dynamic dght week program opportunities for youth to explore academic, 
arti sti c, and athletic i interests i n a rd axed and creati ve envi ronment are provi ded. Camp Shul e was 
establ i shed to provi de the chi I dren of M aryl and f acul ty/staff and I ocal youth wi th a di verse 
educational experience. 

The M ulti purpose Room Conference Rooms, Computer Labs, and the Nyumburu Amphitheatre of 
the Nyumburu Cultural Center are open to the students, faculty and staff of the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and . Room reservati ons are al so avai I abl e at a norni nal cost for departmental and off-campus 
events and programs. Come i n and i interact with us, meet other students and make your i deas and 
wi shes known. Our staff goal i s to make Nyumburu a cultural center that i s, "Y our H ome A way 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebu 



from Home." 

Recreation Services, Campus 

1115 Eppley Recreation Center 
301-405-PLAY (Information) 
301-314-5454 (Rec-Check) 
www.crs.umd.edu 

Campus Recreation Services (CRS) offers a wide variety of recreation programs 
including aquatics, fitness programs, informal recreation, intramural sports, 
non-credit instruction, outdoor recreation, and sport clubs. CRS also has some of 
the most advanced recreati on, sports, and f i tness faci I i ti es i n the nati on. The C RS 
facilities i ncludethe Eppley Recreation Center (ERC), Ritchie Col iseum, 
Reckord A rmory, Col e F i el d H ouse and the wei ght and f i tness areas i n the 
School of Public Health (SPH) building. 

The E ppl ey Recreati on Center offers excepti onal aquati c faci lities. The 
N atatori um ( i ndoor pool ) consi sts of two pool s; a 50 meter 01 ympi c si zed pool 
and a shal I ow, i nstructi onal pool . The Outdoor A quad c Center houses a 25 yard 
by 25 meter recreational pool and a splash pool . The CRS aquatic program also 
offers qual i ty i nstructi on i n I if eguard trai ni ng, pool operati ons, water safety 
i ncl udi ng group and pri vate/serri - pri vate swi m I essons. 

CRS offers a wi de vari ety of f i tness programs i ncl udi ng I ow-i mpact, step, and 
water aerobics, cardio- boxing, and sport conditioning. CRS Informal Recreation 
programs al I ow students to enj oy thei r f avori te acti vi ty at thei r I ei sure, whether i t 
i s usi ng cardi ovascul ar equi pment, I i f ti ng wei ghts, j oggi ng, or pi ay i ng 
racquetbal I , vol I eybal I , basketbal I or wal I ybal I . CRS has wei ght rooms and 
fitness centers I ocated i n the ERC, Ri tchi e Col i seum, and SPH . The fitness 
centers feature stai rcl i mbers, bi kes, rowers, total body condi ti oners, arc trai ners, 
and treadmi 1 1 s. Wei ght rooms have a vari ety of free- wei ghts and wei ght 
machines. 

Students I ooki ng to pi ay team or i ndi vi dual sports or take part i n sped al sporti ng 
events have to opportunity to parti ci pate i n the CRS I ntramural Sports or Sport 
CI ub programs. I n the I ntramural Sports program students can parti ci pate 
year-round i n team sports such as basketbal I , footbal I , and soccer. I ndi vi dual and 
dual sports i ncl ude golf, racquetbal I , and many more. I ntramural sports are 
structured acti vi ti es that are open to al I men and women from the campus 
community. Parti ci pants can sel ect thei r own I eve! of competi ti on and pi ay i n 
either men's, women's, grad/fac/staff or coed leagues. 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebl 



The Sport CI ub program offers students the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n 
competi ti ve sport acti vi ti es, I earn new ski 1 1 s, and enj oy the recreati onal and 
soci al f el I owshi p deri ved from sports i nvol vement. Sport C I ubs are student- 1 ead 
organi zati ons that may be ori ented toward competi ti on, teachi ng, recreati on, or 
any combi nati on of these. There are 43 Sport CI ubs, i ncl udi ng Bal I room Dance, 
Lacrosse, Black Belt, Wushu, and Soccer. 

The Outdoor Recreation Center (ORC) is located i n the northwest corner of the 
E ppl ey Recreati on Center. The ORC offers outdoor adventures and cl i ni cs 
throughout the year. Take a backpacki ng tri p, I earn how to rock cl i mb, or try 
white- water kayaki ng. The Cl i mbi ng Wal I and Chal I enge Course are two features 
of the ORC where students may chal I enge themsel ves both physi cal I y and 
mental ly, i ncreasi ng i nterpersonal ski 1 1 s and self-conf i dence The ORC al so has a 
resource I i brary for pi anni ng your own tri ps and equi pment rental s. 

The Campus B i ke Shop i s a one-of-a-ki nd bi ke shop. A 1 1 servi ces are FREE. I n 
true Dl Y fashion the mechanics on staff wi 1 1 teach you how to fix your bi ke, or 
you can do i t yoursel f wi th our tool s. The B i ke Shop i s conveni enti y I ocated i n 
Col e F i el d H ouse on the north end, I ower I evel - near the tunnel entrance. 

Rdicjous Procyams 

1101 Memorial Chapel 
301-314-9866 (Chapel Reservations) 
www.chapd .umd.edu 

The f ol I owi ng chapl ai ns and thei r servi ces are avai I abl e 

Baptist 

M rs. J essi ca Senasack 2120 M emori al C hapd 

301-405-8443 
jessbcm@umd.edu 

Black Ministries 

Rev. Dr. Ruby Moone 1112 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8445 
Rrmoone2@aol .com 

Christian Science 

B ob Snyder 2118 M emori al C hapd 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service: 



Hage&! 



301-474-0403 
rsnyder@umd.edu 



Church of J esus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) 

Dennis Monson 



7601 M owatt Lane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-7570 

monsondb @l dsces.org 



Orthodox 

Rev. KosmasKaravdlas 



2747 Riva Road 

Annapolis, MD 21401 

410-573-2072 
fatherkosmas@schgochurch.org 



Episcopal/Anglican 

Rev. PeterAntoci 



2116 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8453 

eaterps@umd.edu 



Hindu 

Ms. KiranSankhla 



2112 Memorial Chapel 

240-731-6886 

murari s2002@yahoo. com 



Jewish-Hilld 

Rabbi Ari Israel 



H i 1 1 d J ewi sh Student Center 

7612 M owatt Lane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-6200 

ai srad @maryl andhi 1 1 d .org 



Jewish-Chabad 

Rabbi Eli Backman 



Chabad J ewi sh Student Center 
7403 Hopki ns Ave, Col lege Park 
301-277-2994 
chabad@umd.edu 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service: 



HagebJ 



Lutheran 

Rev. Elizabeth PI atz 
MsGail Douglas, Asst. 



2103 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8448 

lutheran@umd.edu 



Muslim 

Mr. Tarif Shraim 



2118 Memorial Chapel 
240-899-8197 

tshrai m@gmai I .com 



Reman Catholic 

Fr. Rob Walsh 



Cathol i c Student Center 

4141 Guilford Rd., College Park 

301-864-6223 

f rrob@cathol i cterps.org 



United Campus Ministry 

(Presbyterian, Disciples of Christ, United Church of Christ) 
Rev. Holly Ulmer 



2101 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8450 

ulmer@umd.edu 



United Methodist 

Rev. KimCapps 



2102 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8451 

umc@umd.edu 



Transportation Services 



3. CarrpusAdmnistration, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 84 



Regents Drive Garage 
301-314-PARK 
transportati on@umd.edu 
www.transportation.urnd.edu 
301-314-2255 

PI ease consi der wal ki ng, bi ki ng, carshari ng and carpool i ng, and ri di ng Shuttl e- U M as al ternati ves to 
bri ngi ng a si ngl e occupancy vehi cl e to campus. 



ShuttieUM 

The Shuttl e-U M transit system i s a unit withi n the Department of Trans- portati on Servi ces whi ch i s 
predominantly supported by student fees. Shuttle-UM provides commuter, evening, NITE Ride, 
paratransi t, and charter servi ces to U ni versi ty students, f acul ty, and staff whi I e cl asses are i n sessi on. 
Schedul es are avai I abl e at the Stamp Student U ni on I nformati on Desk, the Department of 
Transportation Services Regents Drive Garage office, the residence halls, and on the DOTS Web site 
at www.transportati on. umd.edu . 

Zimride 

Zi mride is a carpool i ng database that is excl usi vdy for the use of University of M aryland Affi Nates. 
PI ease vi si t http://zi mri de umd.edu/ and enter your D i rectory I D and password to post your commute 
and f i nd carpool partners. DOTS also offers preferred parki ng and reduced parki ng rates for 
carpool ers. 

Zipcar 

Even 18 year ol ds can rent the Zi pears that I i ve on the U M D campus. For more i nformati on about 
renti ng Zi pears pi ease vi sit htrp://www.transportation.unrd.edu/sl^re.htrd 

Biking 

The University of Maryland has been designated a Bicycle Friendly Campus by the League of 

A meri can B i cycl i sts. DOTS offers cl i ni cs, di scounted gear and other servi ces through bi keU M D . http:/ 

http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/bi ke html 

Parking 

The Department of Transportati on Servi ces ( DOTS) i s responsi bl e for managi ng and mai ntai ni ng 
more than 19, 000 parki ng spaces on the U ni versi ty of M ary I and campus. A 1 1 students who pi an to 
park a I i censed motor vehi cl e i n one of these spaces must either regi ster for a parki ng permit at the 
DOTS office or park at paid meters. Please note Due to construction projects on campus, the 
number of parking spaces could be dramatically reduced. Campus resident freshmen and resident 
sophomores are digibleto regi ster for a parki ng perrri t. 

Because the University of Maryland has limited parking spaces, parking regulations arestrictiy 
enforced. 1 1 1 egal I y parked vehi cl es, as wd I as those vehi cl es not di spl ayi ng a campus parki ng perrri t 
i n areas requi ri ng permits will beti cketed, and students with outstandi ng parki ng f i nes may be 
barred from regi strati on. 

V i sit the DOTS Web site for compl ete procedures and parki ng regul ati ons, di sabl ed parki ng 
information, visitor parking areas, green transportation options, parking registration rates, motor 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hagebb 



vehi cl e assi stance program i nf ormati on, schedul e of f i nes, and other i nf ormati on. 



Community Service-Learning 

0110 Add e H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L if e 

301-314-7174 

www.thestai7p.umd.edu/lcsl 

Community Service- Learning (CSL) promotes service- 1 earning, as an integral aspect of education 
and fosters university engagement withi n the larger community. The CSL website contai ns 
i nf ormati on and resources such as an i nteracti ve database of 800+ community agencies, handouts, 
and step-by-step guidance for getting involved in service. CSL offers on-site personal assistance, a 
weekly I istserv of service opportunities, and presentations across campus. CSL educational materials 
al so i ncl ude resources about soci al i ssues, I eadershi p, curri cul um devd oprnent, and strategi es for 
f aci I i tati ng ref I ecti on. 

Resources For Students 

Supports students engaged in service through Alternative Break programs, Community I nvolvement 
I nterns, and TERPcorps, a student service programrri ng body. CSL parti ci pates i n campus- wide 
resource fai rs, coordi nates vol unteer recognition events and programs, and offers a consultation and 
presentations to any student group or organization. 

Resources For Faculty 

CSL promotes service- 1 earni ng withi n academic courses across disci pi i nes and withi n the I i vi ng and 
learning communities. To that end we offer faculty workshops, individual consultation, sample 
syl I abi , a I endi ng I i brary, and an on- 1 i ne f acul ty handbook for servi ce- 1 earni ng. Programs for f acul ty 
i ncl ude the servi ce- 1 earni ng undergraduate teachi ng assi start program annual i nstructi onal 
i mprovement grants, and an ongoi ng assessment program 

America Reads* America Counts 

I n col I aborati on with the Pri nee George's County Publ i c School system and U M 's off i ce of f i nanci al 
ai d, A men ca Reads* A meri ca Counts provi des hi gh qual i ty mentori ng i n I ocal school s that 
enri ches I earni ng opportuni ti es for both col I ege and d ementary school students. A pproxi matd y 200 
M aryl and federal work-study, vol unteer, and i ntern students serve as readi ng and math mentors and 
work with f ami I i es on I iteracy i n 18 Pri nee George's County d ementary school s. 

Resources For the Community 

Community agencies recruit students, faculty and staff by attendi ng the annual i nvolvement fai r, 
parti ci pati ng outreach tabl es i n the student uni on, and posti ng i nf ormati on on our i nteracti ve 
database and weekly I istserv. CSL sponsors agency orientation programs and offers individual 
consultation to assist agencies with more targeted recruiti ng. 

Campus Programs 

0110 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-7174 
www.thestamp. umd.edu 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Page at 



The mission of Campus Programs is to support and complement the university's academic mission 
and to enhance the educati onal experi ence of students through exposure and parti ci pati on i n soci al , 
cultural, recreational, leadership, intellectual, and governance activities. 

Student Organization Resource Center. Registers all student organizations atthe university and 
provi des an onl i ne di rectory of more than 500 groups. Organi zati on support servi ces i ncl udes: 
accounti ng assi stance, advi sors 1 workshops, I eadershi p trai ni ng programs for organi zati on I eaders, 
i nvol vement sessi ons offered for cl asses and semester ori entati ons are some of the ways 
i nvol vement is nurtured for organizations and i ndivi duals. I n addition, First Look Fai r and Stampfest 
are I arge-scal e i nvol vement f ai rs hd d at the begi nni ng of each semester to showcase the student 
groups and organizations. 

Organization Advising. M aj or student groups such as the Student Government Associ ati on, 
Graduate Student Government, Peer Leadershi p Counci I , TerpVets, the Homecorri ng Committee, 
and Student Entertai nment Events receive di rect advi si ng from Campus Programs staff. Other 
student groups can al so obtai n hd p by request. Assi stance i n programrri ng, securi ng a faculty 
advi sor, offi cer transi ti ons, and efforts to create a new organi zati on i s avai I abl e. 

Leadership & Community Service-Learning. Offers a wi de range of opportuniti es for students to 
engage i n I eadershi p and community engagement. These i ncl ude credit-beari ng I eadershi p courses i n 
conj uncti on with the Counsd i ng and Personnd Servi ces Department i n the Col I ege of Educati on, 
i ncl udi ng a M i nor i n Leadershi p Studi es. I n additi on, the staff offers a wi de range of trai ni ng 
experiences i n i interpersonal and organizational devdopment rangi ng from half -day serri nars and 
weekend workshops such as the M aryl and Leadershi p Conference and M osai c, to ful I semester 
leadershi p programs such as theTerrapi n Leadershi p I nstitute and Turtle Camp. I mmersion 
programs offer students the opportunity to learn about critical community issues (HIV/AIDS, 
Poverty, Sustai nabi I i ty, and more) and engage i n A I ternati ve B reaks across the country. A men ca 
Reads* A meri ca Counts provi des mentori ng i n readi ng and math to students i n the I ocal community. 
Programs such as Terps for Change and TerpCorps hd p students engage with the I ocal community 
in meaningful ways. 

Off-Campus Student I nvol vement Engaging off-campus students atthe University of Maryland 
through social, educational, and outreach programs. 

Programs and Leisure Learning Opportunities. Staff mentors student volunteers and leaders to 
provi de opti ons for out of cl ass engagement through recreati onal opti ons that i ncl udes: the H off 
Theater, the Art and Learni ng Center (offeri ng non-credit courses), the Stamp Gal lery (featuri ng 
regul ar di spl ays of the vi sual arts) , the TerpZone ( bowl i ng, bi 1 1 i ards, and more) , as wd I as Stamp 
Sped al Events and Programs. A compl ete I i sti ng of weekday and weekend events i s featured i n the 
weekly calendar of theDiamondback. 



Multicultural I nvdvement and Community Advocacy 

1120 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-8600 
rri ca-contact@umd.edu 

The M ulticultural I nvolvement and Community Advocacy Office (M ICA), is a unit within the Adde 
H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L i f e and the D i vi si on of Student Aff ai rs. I n support 



3. CarrpusAdrrinistration, Resources, and 5tudent Service Page 8/ 



of the University's commitment to diversity, multicultural ism and social justice, we advance a 
purposeful campus cl i mate that capi tal i zes on the educati onal benef i ts of di versi ty, through 
student-centered advising, advocacy, programs, research, and practices. We encourage student 
i nvol vement and engagement i n the campus and community. M I CA serves al I students and seeks to 
empower them through education on issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, 
gender expressi on, rd i gi on and thei r i ntersecti ons. A 1 1 of the acti vi ti es, programs, servi ces and 
research of MICA strive towards meetirg tine common outcome of developing "good citizens" and 
committed leaders. 

Off-Campus Housing Services 

1110 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-3645 
301-314-9874 
www.och.umd.edu 

The Off-Campus H ousi ng Servi ces Off i ce provi des i nf ormati on and resources about housi ng and 
off-campus I i vi ng. Resources avai I abl e onl i ne i ncl ude OC H 101 a searchabl e housi ng database 
listing avai I abl e rental properti es i n the area; Roommate F i nder, another web- based database where 
students create a prof i I e and search for others with si mi I ar housi ng needs and i interests; as wd I as an 
extensive array of educational materials. For assistance in locating housing, please visit 
www.och. umcl.edu or contact our offi ce 

AddeH. Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life 

Stamp Student U ni on 
301-314-DESK 
www.thestamp. umd.edu 

TheAddeH. Stamp Student Union- Center for Campus Life is the university's "community 
center." More than 25,000 students, faculty, staff members, and campus guests visit the Stamp daily 
to take advantage of its servi ces, programs, and faci I iti es. Our mi ssi on i s to create and sustai n a 
student-centered envi ronment that promotes academic success and personal devdopment; serves as 
a safe and i nvi ti ng campus center; and i s characteri zed by a strong commj tment to mul ti cul tural i sm, 
excd lence, and a positive work envi ronment. 

The Stamp offers lounge space, a variety of i information services, recreation and I d sure acti vi ties, 
student-sponsored programs, visual arts, retail outlets, and more than 40,000 square feet of 
reservable space. 

I information Services 

• I information Center located on the first floor, 301-314-DESK 

• B ul I eti n boards I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

• D i spl ay showcases I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

Recreation and Leisure 

• TerpZone, including full -service bowling lanes, "Cosmic Bowling," billiard tables, video 
games, and three big-screen TVs, 301-314-BOWL 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Service Hageaa 



Student-Sponsored Programs 

• Student Entertai nment Events (SEE), a student-di rected program board whose committees 
plan games, tournaments, concerts, lectures, outdoor recreation trips, 301-314-8359 

• Graduate Student Government, 301-314-8630 

Art and Learning Center, 301-314-ARTS 

• A rt and Learni ng Center, a vi sual arts work and teachi ng center, offeri ng rri ni -courses and arts 
services 

• Stamp Gallery, located on the first floor 

Food and Retail Outlets 

• Capital One Bank, 301-864-8722 

• University Book Center (basement level), 301-314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Maryland Food Co-op (301-314-8089), Saladworks (301-314-0947), Taco 
Bell (301-314-6569), McDonald's (301-314-1489), Adde's Restaurant (301-314-8022), 
Coffee Bar (301-314-CAFE), Panda Express (301-314-6111), Sbarros (301-314-4105), Sushi 
by Panda (301-314-6111), Chick-Fil-A (301-314-6568), Subway (301-266-7827), Moby Dick 
(301-405-6531) 

• M ai I boxes Etc., a f ul I -servi ce postal and packagi ng faci I ity, 301-314-9982 

• Ticket Office, offering campus performance tickets, 301-314-TKTS 

• Union Shop 301-314-7467, featuring snacks, sodas, newspapers, and magazines 

• Terrapi n Technology Store, offeri ng discounted computers, software, i Pods and i Pads, 
301-314-7000 

Reservable Space 

The Stamp offers meeti ng rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 1,000 peopl e. For reservati ons, 
or catering information, contact the Stamp Reservation Office, 301-314-8488. 

AdeleH. Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus Life Hours 

The Stamp is open M onday through Thursday, 7 am to midnight; Friday, 7 am. to 1:30 am; 
Saturday, 8 am to 1:30 am, and Sunday, 11 am. to midnight. 

See other AdeleH. Stamp Student Union- Center for Campus Life Hours offices and services 
d sewhere i n Chapter 3 

Community Service- Learning Office 

Campus Programs 

M ul ti cul tural I nvol vemert and Communi ty A dvocacy 

Rdigious Programs 



4. Registration, Academe Requi refraits, andRegulatiot 



4 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 

Degree I nformation 
Degree Requirements 

T he requi renrents for graduati on vary accord ng to the character of work i n the di ff erent col I eges, school s, departments and academi c uni ts. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I i ty of 
the colleges, schools, departments and other academic units to establish and publish clearly defined degree requirements. Responsibility for knowing and meeting all 
degree requi renrents for graduati on i n any curri cul um rests wi th the student. Sped f i c degree requi rements are I i sted i n thi s catal og under the col I ege and/or 
department as appropri ate 

E ach student shoul d check wi th the proper academi c authori ti es no I ater than the cl ose of the j uni or year to ascertain his or her standing with respect to advancement 
toward a degree For this purpose, each student should be sure to review their semester grades and unofficial transcript on the MyUM website ( www.rrv.umd.edu ) at 
the cl ose of each semester or request a semester grade report 

L Residency Requirement 

a. All candidates for undergraduate degrees from the University of Maryland, College Park, must take a mini mum of 15 credits in courses 
numbered 300 or above, including at least 12 credits in the major field. 

b. Normally these 30 credits will bethefinal 30 credits counted toward the degree. However, credits from University-approved study 
abroad and i nternshi p programs, and a maxi mum of 6 credits that are not part of such programs, may be i ncl uded i n the f i nal 30 if 
approved i n advance by the dean of the academi cunitfromwhichthe student expects to recei ve the degree. 

Z Enrollment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at the Uni versify of Maryland, College Park, may transfer among curri cul a, colleges, or other academic units except where 
I imitations on enrollments have been approved. By the time they complete 60 credits, students are expected to declare a degree-granting major. Students must be 
enrol I ed i n the maj or program f ram whi ch they pi an to graduate, when regi steri ng f or the f i nal f i fteen hours of the baccal aureate program Thi s requi rement al so 
appl i es to the thi rd year of the combi ned, pre- prof essi oral degree programs. A I so see i nf ormati on on doubl e maj ors and doubl e degrees el sewhere i n thi s chapter. 

3. Credit Requirements 

N o baccal aureate degree wi 1 1 be awarded i n i nstances where fewer than 120 credi t hours have been earned. M any undergraduate curri cul a at the U ni versify of 
Maryland, College Park, requi re more than 120 credits. It the responsibility of each student to familiarize hi rrself or herself with the requi rements of particular 
curri cul a The student i s urged to seek advi ce on these matters from the departments, col I eges, or the Off i ce of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es. To earn 
a baccal aureate from th&lniversity of Maryland, College Park, a mini mum of 30 credits must betaken in residence 

4 Grade Point Average 

A mi ni mum cumul ati ve 2. grade poi nt average i s requi red for graduati on i n al I curri cul a A hi gher average may be requi red by the i ndi vi dual department col I ege, 
school, or program 

5. Completion of I nterrupted Degree 

Students whose regi strati on at the University of Maryland, College Park, has lapsed for more than 10 years shall be requi red to complete a mini mum of 15 credit 
hours at Col I ege Park after thei r return to campus i n order to earn a baccal aureate degree. 

Reconrmendations about courses needed to satisfy the remaining degree requi rements will be made at the department level, with approval of the Dean's Office 
requi red. The reason for requi ri ng these credits i s that many f i el ds change suff i ci entl y i n 10 years to requi re that students take current courses i f they are to be 
awarded a current degree. Excepti ons to the requi rement for a mi ni mum of 15 credi ts earned at Col I ege Park upon return to the campus can be recommended by the 
Deans for approval in theOfficeof the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Student Academic SuccesB-DegreeCompletian Pdicy 

The goal of the Student A cadenri c Success-Degree Compl eti on Pol i cy i s to promote undergraduate student success. The pol i cy establ i shes a structured f ranrework to 
gui de al I students to compl eti on of an undergraduate degree wi thi n a reasonabl e peri od of ti me. A cademi c uni ts provi de 4-year tempi ates that students can use to 
devel op a program of study that will meet the course requi rements for a degree. Students are responsi bl e f or devel opi ng pi ans of study, wi th the assi stance of thei r 
academic advisers. Academic units moni tor student progress and assist students at risk of fallingfjehirxJfjerchrrarksintheirplans. The rxil icy in essence establishes 
a process to provi de a pathway to compl eti on of a degree for each student i ni ti al I y created and then adj usted over ti me as needed to meet each students parti cul ar 
circumstances. The poi icy is described in more detail in the section on Academic Advising. (References to the pol ic y http://www.ugst umd.edu/academi csuccess.html 
and to frequently asked questions: http://www.ugstumd.edu/faas-successpol icv.html )." 

Minors 

Minors afford students the opportunity to pursue a limited but structured concentration in a coherent field of study outside their major. The minor may bea 
truncated version of a maj or or a distinctive intellectual subset of a discipline Minors are not offered in every field of study. Students should inquire with 
departments for current avai I abi I i ty of mi nors or see i ndi vi dual I i srj ngs on thi s si te. 

T he structures of mi nors vary i n detai I , but wi th rare excepti ons, they al I requi re no fewer than 15 and no more than 24 credi ts wi th at I east 9 credi ts i n upper di vi si on 
courses (300 level or above). No more than six credits (ortwo courses) may be applied to satisfy both the requi rements of a mi nor and a maj or program Nocourse 
may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor. All courses taken for a minor must be completed with a mini mum grade of C. 

To ensure appropri ate academi c advi si ng, students who wi sh to pursue a mi nor shoul d i nf omn both the col I ege responsi bl e for thei r maj or and the unit off eri ng the 
mi nor as early as possible, but in no case I ater than one full academic year before the expected date of graduation. When a student has completed all requi rements for 
the mi nor, the unit offering the mi nor shall notify the students college, which verifies that the student has met all requi rements and officially notifies the Registrar's 
Off i ce The compl etionofaminoris posted on the students off i ci al transcri pt onl y when the student compl etes al I requi rements f or the bachel or's degree. 

I n F ebruary 2004, the U ni versi ty Senate voted to phase out academi c ci tati ons and repl ace them wi th mi nors. Students pursui ng an academi c ci tati on shoul d contact 
the respecrj ve department or program for i nf ormati on on thi s conversi on process. 

Second Majors and Second Degrees 

Second majors 

A student who wi shes to compl ete a second maj or concurrent! y wi th hi s or her pri mary maj or of record must obtai n wri tten permi ssi on i n advance from the 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



appropri ate departments or programs and col I eges. A s earl y as possi bl e, but i n no case I ater than one f ul I academi c year before the expected date of graduati on, the 
student must f i I e wi th the department or programs i nvol ved and wi th the appropri ate deans, formal programs showi ng the courses to be offered to meet requi rements 
i n each of the maj ors and support ng areas as wel I as those of the col I ege and general educati on programs. A student who wi shes to add a L i mi ted E nrol I mart 
Program as a second major must do so at the earliest possible opportunity to assure that specific credit and GPA requirements can be met I n order to obtain 
approval , students must compl ete al I of the requi rements sped f i ed f or both the pri mary and secondary maj or. C ourses taken for one maj or may be counted as 
appropri ate as part of the degree requi rements for the general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the doubl e maj or program, the student must 
desi gnate whi ch col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e f or the mai ntenance of records and cerrj f i cati on of general educati on requi rements. F i nal approval of a doubl e maj or 
program must be obtai red from each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second DegreesTaken Simultaneously 

A student who wi shes to recei ve two bachel or's degrees si mul taneousl y must sati sf actori I y compl ete the regul arl y prescri bed requi rements of both degree programs 
and a mini mum of 150 credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to onedegrea must be in course work not 
applied to the requi rements of the other degree program As early as possible, but in no case I ater than one full academic year before the expected date of graduation, 
the student must filewith the department or programs involved, as well as with the appropri ate deans, formal programs showing the courses to be offered to meet the 
maj or, supporti ng area, col I ege, and general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the doubl e degree program, the student must desi gnate which 
col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi fi cati on of general educati on requi rements. F i nal approval of a doubl e degree program must be 
obtai ned from each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second DegreesTaken Sequentially 

A student who has compl eted the requi rements for, and has recei ved one baccal aureate and who wi shes to earn a second degree from the uni versi ty must 
sati sf actori I y compl ete al I of the prescri bed requi rements for the second degree and enough addi ti onal credi ts so that the total , i ncl udi ng al I appl i cabl e credi ts earned 
at the university or elsewhere, is at least 150 credits (180 credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). At least 18 of thecredits applied to one degree must 
be i n course work not appl i ed to the requi rements of the other degree program I n no case wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not 
compl eted a mi ni mum of 30 credi ts i n resi dence at the uni versi ty. 

Post-Baccalaureate Second Degree 

A student who has compl eted a bachel or's degree at another accredi ted or recogni zed col I ege or uni versi ty and wi shes to earn a second degree, must sati sfy al I 
current degree requi rements, including General Education requirements. A course by course evaluation of the students pri or collegiate work will be undertaken to 
determi ne whi ch requi rements have been sati sf i ed by pri or coursework. I n no case, wi 1 1 a second baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not compl eted a 
mini mum of 30 credits in resi dence at the university. 



Combined Bachelor's/Masber'sProcfams 

I n a combi ned bachel or's/master's program, some graduate I evel courses i ni ti al I y taken for undergraduate credi t may al so be appl i ed towards the graduate credi t 
requi rements for a master's degree program at the University of Maryland. A bachel or's/master's program may be developed for an individual student or it may bea 
structured program 

Individual Student Bachelor's/Master's Program A program may be developed by an individual student in consultation with his/her academic advisor. Such a 
program i s avai I abl e onl y to students whose academi c performance i s excepti onal . 1 1 i s to be devel oped accord ng to the i ndi vi dual career i nterests and goal s of the 
student and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng experi ence rather than mere! y the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate and undergraduate credi ts. The program 
requi res the approval of the di rectors of both the undergraduate and the graduate programs i nvol ved and of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es and the 
Dean of t&aduate School . N ormal I y, no more than ni ne credi ts of graduate courses appl i ed to the bachel or's degree may be counted al so f or graduate credi t i n an 
individual student program Courses to be double-counted must be at the 600 1 evel or above and must be passed with at least a 'B' grade Individual study courses, 
i ntemshi ps, or courses gi ven credi t by exami rati on are not el i gi bl e. The credi ts to be doubl e-counted wi 1 1 be desi grated as appl i cabl e to the graduate program after 
the student recei ves the bachel or's degree and matri cul ates i n the G raduate School . T hi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed i f the student wi thdraws from the graduate 
program before compl erj ng the master's degree. 

Structured Bachelor' s/M aster' s Program: A structured bachel or's/ master's program i s an artj cul ated curri cul um combi ni ng an exi sti ng undergraduate program 
and an exi sti ng master's program at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, offered by the same or by di f f erent departments. Such a program i s to be desi gned for students 
whose academi c performance i s excepti oral and shoul d be an i ntegrated I eami ng experi ence rather than merel y the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate and 
undergraduate credits. A proposal for suchaprogram should be submitted by thecoilege(s) housing the academic programs concerned and requi res the approval of 
the Graduate Counci I , the Graduate Dean, the Senate PCC Committee, and the Provost 

N ecessary features of a structured bachel or's/master's program i ncl ude the f ol I owi ng: 

a There must be specific requi rements for admission to the combi ned program that speak to the excepti onal performance of the students to be admitted. 
At a mi ni mum, students accepted for the program must be cl earl y admi ssi bl e to the graduate program porti on. 

b. The program shoul d be desi gned so as not to undul y del ay the student's recei pt of thei r bachel or's degrees. Taki ng graduate credi ts shoul d not undul y 
I i mi t the breadth of the students experi ence through premature sped al i zati on. 

c. A 1 1 requi rements of the bachel or's program and of the master's program must be compl eted to recei ve the two degrees. W here appropri ate, graduate 
courses taken whi I e an undergraduate may substj tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate maj or program 

d. The student may be offered deferred admi ssi on to the graduate school at the end of thej uni or year program, subj ect to compl eti on of the seni or year 
programinati melyfashion and withaspecified level of achievement Formal admi ssi on to the graduate school will requi re compl eti on of all 

requi rements for the bachel or's degree. 

e The credi ts to be doubl e-counted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appl i cabl e to the graduate program after the student receives the bachel or's degree and 
matriculates in theGraduateSchool. This designation will becanceled if the student withdraws from the graduate program before completing the 
master's degree 

A structured bachel or's/master's program may normally i ncl ude up to nine credits of graduate I evel courses (600 level and above) that are counted both for the 
bachel or's program and the master'ss program M ore than ni ne doubl e-counted credi ts may be al I owed i f both of the f ol I owi ng condi ti ons are sati sfi ed. 

a T he addi ti onal graduate credi ts appl i ed to the undergraduate program do not undul y I i ni t the breadth of the students experi ence through premature 
sped al i zati on. T hi s condi ti on may be sati sfi ed, for exampl e, i f the graduate credi ts substj tute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate program that 
woul d have been taken i n any case, but at a I ess advanced I evel . 

b. The master's program requi res substantially more than thirty credits. This condition will be deemed to be satisfied if the combi ned prograrn with 
doubl e-counrj ng, still requi res 150 or more credit hours to compl ete 



4. Registration, Academe Reouirements, and Regulations Page91 

1 ■ 

Academic Advising 
Academic Advising 

Role of Advising 

Academic advising is an integral part of each student's educational experience and it takes many forms. Academicadvisorsprovidestudentswithinformationon 
academi c requi rements needed for degree compl eti on, hel p students pi an for future graduate study or a career, and serve as a research person. A cademi c advi si ng i s 
a shared responsi bi I i ty between the student and the advi sor. 

• Provide information on academic requirements needed for graduation. Advisors assist students in developing an academic and career plan, monitor 
students in the major, and discuss how a courseof study fits a particular academic or career interest Advisers answer questions concerning a specific 
academi c concern, such as probl ems wi th a parti cul ar cl ass, and gui de students through the regi strati on process, i ncl udi ng provi di ng i nf omnati on on vari ous 
regi strati on bl ocks and what needs to be done to remove them 

• Help students plan for future graduate study or career. Advisers discuss how an academic major can prepare a student for his/her career, and what career 
opti ons are avai I abl e Advi sers refer students to the Career Center whi ch provi des career counsel i ng and workshops on i ssues such as wri ti ng resumes and 
prepari ng f or j ob i ntervi ews. T hey al so i nf omn students about i ntemshi p opportuni ti es and how credi t can be earned, and provi de i nf omnati on on study abroad 
programs that mightenricha students academi c experi ence as we! I as enhance thei r resume A dvi sers i nf omn students about graduate school opportuni ti es 
and appl i cati on procedures. _ 

. Serve as a campus resource A dvi sers assist students in obtaining support from other offices of the University. This includes informing students about 
possi bl e schol arshi ps or f el I owshi ps, and ref erri ng students to academi c support uni ts that provi de tutori ng or workshops on study ski 1 1 s, ti me management, 
and stress management. They may recommend that students seek counsel i ng for stress, add cti ons, or trauma that may be aff ecti ng thei r academi c work. 
A dvi sers inform students with physical and I earning disabilities of the support avai I able to them They also encourage students to enrich their experiences by 
becorri ng i nvol ved on campus vi a soci al , political, academi c, ethni c/cul tural , sport and/or recreati onal student organi zati ons and acti vi ti es. 

Some advi sors are abl e to provi de i nf ormati on on al I of the above Others sped al i ze i n a parti cul ar topi c or area of concern. For exampl e a col I ege/department may 
have a sped f i c career advi sor or study abroad coordi nator. Students i n upper I eve! courses are often advi sed by f acul ty members who can assi st wi th graduate 
school and career i ssues. F urthermore, some advi sors work wi th sped f i c popul ati ons, such as returni ng students, athl etes, students wi th physi cal or I earni ng 
di sabi I i ti es, and students of col or. 

If you are not sure whereto seek advising, contact your academic college When requesting to meet with an advisor, specify what topics you wish to discuss to 
ensure that you are di rected to the appropri ate i ndi vi dual . A dvi si ng at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and i s normal I y a combi nati on of prof essi onal advi sors, I ocated i n 
many of the col lege office, and faculty advisors. Please check your individual col lege to find out whom you need to see for academic advi sing. For more 
information, visit www.advisingumd.edu . 

Academic Advising and Degree Completion 

A 1 1 new students are requi red to attend Ori entati on where they wi 1 1 regi ster for cl asses. D uri ng thei r first semester, students devel op a four year pi an based on 
templates provided for each major (see www.4vearplans.umd.edu) . Each plan includes specific benchmark courses to be completed within a specific period of time 
F our year pi ans must be approved by an advi sor i n order to regi ster for subsequent semesters. 

Students are requi red to compl ete the benchmark courses i n thei r maj or i n order to progress to graduati on (see Student Academi c Success-Degree Compl eti on 
Pol icy). Outli ned i n each four year pi an, benchmark courses gui de students i n a step by step process to degree compl eti on and demonstrate sati sf actory progress i n 
the maj or. A cademi c uni ts conduct regul ar revi ews of students' progress, and those students who are i n danger of f al I i ng behi nd benchmarks will be requi red to 
work with an advi sor to devel op a pi an to get back on track. Students who do not make progress may be requi red to sel ect a new maj or i n whi ch they can be 
successful. 

M any students change thei r maj ors over the course of thei r academi c career. When doi ng so, students must f i rst compl ete and have approved a new four year pi an. 
A ny student who compl etes ten semesters or 130 credi ts wi thout compl eti ng a degree i s subj ect to mandatory advi si ng pri or to regi strati on for any subsequent 
semester. Students wi th excepti onal ci rcumstances or those who are enrol led in sped al programs are requi red to devel op a modi fi ed graduati on pi an that i s 
appropri ate to thei r si tuati ons. I n al I cases, students are responsi bl e f or meeti ng progress expectati ons arid benchmarks requi red for thei r degree programs. 

It is recommended that al I students seek advi si ng assistance prior to course registration. Students should also consult with an advisor as circumstances change and 
four year pi ans need to be updated. M any col I eges have mandatory advi si ng for pri or to regi steri ng for a new semester. 

Students pi aced on probati on are requi red to consul t an academi c advi sor i n thei r col I ege pri or to the begi nni ng of a new semester but no I ater than the end of the 
schedul e adj ustment peri od. Students will not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or to regi ster duri ng any probati on semester wi thout the approval of an academi c 
advi sor i n the! r col I ege. 

Student Academic Success-Degree Completion Policy 

T he goal of the Student A cademi c Success- Degree C ompl eti on Pol i cy i s to promote undergraduate student success. T he pol i cy establ i shes a structured framework 
and cri teri a to gui de al I students to compl eti on of an undergraduate degree wi thi n a reasonabl e peri od of ti me. 

Ful I — ti me degree seeking students normally are expected to compl ete the undergraduate program in four years. Within this timeframe, all students are expected to 
demonstrate conti nui ng progress i n thei r maj ors by compl eti ng prerequi si te or requi red courses wi th the appropri ate grades, and by compl eti ng other requi rements 
consistent with graduation progress or benchmarks established by their academic units (see 2, below). It is ultimately the responsibility of the student to meet these 
requi rements. To he! p students meet these requi rements the U ni versi ty wi 1 1 f aci I i tate student progress to degree by provi di ng enhanced student advi si ng through the 
fol I owi ng measures: 

1. Academic units will create 4-year graduati on templates that will specify the degree requi rements for each major and provide semester-by-semester course schedule 
model s that achi eve graduati onwithin four years. Students will prepare i ndi vi dual i zed pi ans for compl eti ng thei r degrees i n accordance wi th the academi c uni ts' 
4-year graduati on pi ans. Students are al so encouraged to peri odi cal I y update the! r pi ans wi th the assi stance of thei r academi c advi sors. 

2. A cademi c uni ts wi 1 1 establ i sh graduati on progress benchmarks for each academi c maj or. These will sped fy the credi t and course cri teri a that will i ndi cate 

sati sf actory progress to degree. A cademi c uni ts wi 1 1 establ i sh schedul es for regul ar peri odi c revi ews of student progress, and students who are i n danger of f al I i ng 
behi nd the program benchmarks will be requi red to consul t wi th an advi sor pri or to regi strati on. 

3. Students who do not achi eve the progress expectati ons or benchmarks wi 1 1 be perrri tted to conti nue inthemajoronlyuponthe approval of the dean of thei r 
college If it becomes necessary for students to change majors, they will begiven assistance in identifying and enrol ling in a suitable alternative major. 

4. When students change maj ors, they will be requi red to present an academic pi an to the new major unit that demonstrates their ability to complete their degree in a 
timely manner. 

W hi I e some students will have val i d reasons to take addi ti onal ti me to degree, any student who compl etes 10 semesters or 130 credi ts (see footnote 1 for credi ts not 
counted towards these I i mi ts) wi thout compl eti ng a degree will requi re mandatory advi si ng i n hi s/her col I ege pri or to regi strati on for subsequent semesters. Students 
wi th excepti onal ci rcumstances, students whose programs i ncl ude mi nors, doubl e maj ors/degrees, enri chment acti vi ti es or who need to pursue a degree part ti me wi 1 1 
have on record approved pi ans wi th approved program benchmarks. Program benchmarks wi 1 1 be devel oped by the student i n consul tati on wi th and approved by an 
advisor. 

Footnote 1 Degree credits include University of Maryland credits and all applicable transfer credits from other postsecondary institutions. The equivalent semesters 
applicable to the enrol I merit limit for transfer credits will be determined by dividing all transfer credits applicable to the degree by 15. However, Advanced Placement 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, andRegulatior 



(A P) and I ntemati onal B accal aureate ( I B ) credi ts, and credi ts earned for col I ege courses taken whi I e i n hi gh school and pri or to matri cul ati on at a postsecondary 
institution, will notcounttowardthissemesterorcreditlimitation. Such courses may, however, count toward degrees. Summer Sessi on and Winterterm will not be 
i ncl uded i n the semester count C redi ts earned duri ng Summer Sessi ons or W i nterterms will be i ncl uded i n the credi t count 

10.27.04 



Registering for Classes 

Officeof the Registrar 

Mitchell Building 301-314-8240 
www.testudo.umd.edu 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, it is necessary to process an official registration. Specific registration dates and instructions are printed 
i n the Registration Guide and on the MyUM website, www.my.umd.edu. 

Newly admitted students are invited, and strongly encouraged, to attend an orientation session (see chapter 3 for Orientation information). Advising and course 
registration are part of the orientation process. All newly admitted students must meet with an advisor priorto registration. Likewise, newly admitted freshmen and 
transfer students are requi red to provi de proof of i rrmuni zati on for measl es, rubel I a, mumps and tetanus/di phtheri a. A ddi ti onal I y ,M aryl and I aw requi res resi dent hal I 
students to ei ther provi de proof of vacci nati on agai nst meni ngococcal di sease or seek an exempti on from thi s requi rement 

Registration Process C urrenrj y enrol I ed undergraduate students are i nvi ted to earl y regi strati on by appoi ntment Students can regi ster at or anyti me after thei r 
assigned registration appointment date and time Registration appointments for the Fall semester begin in April, and appointments for the Spring semester begin in 
late October. Regi strati on can be processed on the MyUM web site (my.urrd.edu) or in person. Open registration follows early registration, and conrj nues up to the 
first day of classes. During this time, students may process an original regi strati on or make schedule adjustments. The scheduleadj ustment period begins on the first 
day of cl asses. All regi strati on transacti ons, ei ther on- 1 i ne or i n person, are f i nal unl ess a student processes a cancel I ati on of regi strati on. 

Regi strati on information for Summer Term, Winter Term, Freshmen Connection, and Professional Programsmaybefoundatwww.oes.umd.edu. 

Schedule Adj ustment and Drop Period 

Schedule Adjustment: The schedule adj ustment period is the first 10 days of classes for the fall and spri ng semesters, thefirst 5 days of classes for Summer 
Sessions I and II, and the first 3 days of classes for Winter Term and 3-week Summer Term sessi ons. Courses may be added, when space is avail able, during the 
schedul e adj ustment peri od, and will appear on the students permanent record al ong wi th other courses previ ousl y I i sted. Courses dropped duri ng thi s peri od wi 1 1 not 
appear on the student's permanent record. 

Compl ete i nf ormati on on schedul e adj ustment and drop peri od for Summer Term, Wi nter Term, F reshmen Connecti on, and Prof essi onal Programs may be found at 
www.oes.umd.edu. 

Departments may identify courses or sections of courses (with the approval of theOfficeof the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs), which after the first 
f i ve days of the schedul e adj ustment peri od i n Spri ng and F al I semesters, shal I requi re f acul ty or departmental approval for students to add. 

• D uri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od f ul I -ti me undergraduates may drop or add courses, or change secti ons or credi 1 1 evel wi thout f i nanci al penal ty 

provi ded they remai n f ul I -ti me students ( regi stered for 12 or more credi ts) . See w ww.testudo. umd.edu/soc/drops. html for i nf ormati on and penal ti es associ ated 
wi th changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me. 

• Part-ti me undergraduates (fewer than 12 credi ts) may al so add, drop and change secti ons, as wel I as change credi 1 1 evel , but they shoul d consul t the deadl i ne 
section at www.testudo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.html to avoid incurring additional charges. 

• Grading Method (including pass-fail) may be changed only during the schedule adj ustment period. 

• In the case of students who are advised in the Division of Letters and Sciences when Dean's approval is required, the Dean for Office of Undergraduate 
Studies shal I assume the responsibilities normally delegated to the Dean. 

After Schedule Adj ustment 

• Courses may not be added without special permission of the department and the dean of the academic unit in which the student is enrolled. 

• A 1 1 courses for whi ch the student i s enrol I ed shal I remai n as a part of the students permanent record. The students status shal I be consi dered f ul I -ti me if the 
number of credi t hours enrolledatthistimeisl2ormore. 

• Anofficialclasslistforeachcoursebeing offered i s i ssued to the appropri ate department by the Off i ce of the Regi strar. E I ectroni c rosters are provi ded to al I 
f acul ty wi th emai I accounts. Students are not pemni tted to attend a cl ass i f thei r names do not appear on the cl ass I i st. I nstructors must report di screpanci es to 
the Off i ce of the Regi strar. 

Drop Period 

T he drop peri od for undergraduate students will begi n at the cl ose of the schedul e adj ustment peri od and term rate at the end of the tenth week of cl asses for the f al I 
and spri ng semesters. Consult the deadline section at www.testudo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.html for dates. 

D uri ng thi s peri od a student may drop a maxi mum of four credi ts. H owever, i f the course carri es more than four credi ts, the student may drop the enti re course; or i n 
the case of a vari abl e credi t course, reduce the credi 1 1 evel by up to f our credi ts. D rops duri ng thi s peri od wi 1 1 be recorded on the students permanent record wi th a 
notati on of W and wi 1 1 be consi dered to represent a si ngl e enrol I ment (one of two possi bl e) i n the course. Thi s mark wi II not be used i n the computati on of a 
students cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

Credit Hours and Maximum Semester Credits 

N o baccal aureate curri cul um requi res fewer than 120 semester hours. T he semester hour, whi ch i s the uni t of credi t i s the equi val ent of a subj ect pursued one peri od 
a week for one semester. Two or three hours of I aboratory or fi el d work are equi val ent to one I ecture or red tati on peri od. 

I n order for undergraduate students to compl ete most curri cul a i n four acaderri c years, thei r semester I oad must range from 12 to 19 hours ( 30 to 36 hours each year) 
toward the degree. By policy, undergraduates may not exceed the foil owing maxi mum credit loads without the pri or approval of theirDean: 

15 week semester: 20 credits in a 15 week semester (16 credits priorto thefirst day of classes) 

6 Week Summer Term 8 credits 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulator 



3 Week Term (Summer or Winter): 4 credits 

Cancellation of Registration 

Students who regi ster and I ater deci de not to attend the U ni versi ty must cancel thei r regi strati on wi th the Off i ce of the Regi strar pri or to the off i ci al f i rst day of 
classes. Failure to cancel registration will result in a financial obligation to theUni versi ty of Maryland even though a student does not attend class. The University 
reserves the ri ght to cancel regi strati on for students who f ai I to meet thei r f i nanci al obi i gati ons 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate Registration 

An undergraduate degree seeking student at the University of Maryland may, with the approval of his or her Dean, of the department and the instructor offering the 
course, and of the Graduate School, regi ster for graduate courses (600 level and above) that will be recorded asfor graduate creditonly and that may be applied 
towards an advanced degree at thi s uni versi ty or el sewhere Students el i gi bl e f or thi s opti on normal I y wi 1 1 have acini eved J uni or standi ng, wi 1 1 have a G PA of at I east 
3.0, and will have successfully completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of 'B' or better. The student must submit a plan of study that shows that taking 
graduate courses will not undul y del ay compl eti on of requi rements f or the bachel or's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate credi ts attempted i n any 
semester may not be more than ei ghteen. T he graduate credi ts so earned will not count towards any of the requi rements for the B accal aureate degree. A maxi mum of 
twel ve credi ts may be taken for graduate credi t by a student whi I e enrol I ed as an undergraduate 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subj ect to requi rements determi ned by the graduate faculty of the department or program of f eri ng the course, undergraduate degree- seeki ng students may regi ster 
for graduate- level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 to 898, with the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit The student must obtain the prior approval of 
the department and i nstructor off eri ng the course. 

Students eligible for this opti on normally will have achieved J uni or standing, will haveaGPA of atleast3.0, and will have successfully completed the prerequisite 
courses wi th a grade of 'B ' or better. 

E nrol I ment i n a graduate- 1 evel course does not i n any way i mpl y subsequent departmental or graduate school approval f or admi ssi on i nto a graduate program, nor 
may the course be used as credi t for a graduate degree at theU ni versi ty of M ary I and. 

Withdrawal and Leave of Absence 

Students admi tted to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and are expected to make regul ar and consi stent progress towards the compl eti on of thei r degree. H owever, the 
U ni versi ty understands that i n excepti oral ci rcumstances a student may f i nd i t necessary to compl etel y wi thdraw f rom al I cl asses. The U ni versi ty consi ders such an 
i nterrupti on to be very seri ous as i t del ays normal progress towards the degree. Students shoul d not wi thdraw for f ri vol ous reasons or to avoi d trie consequences of 
i gnori ng thei r academi c responsi bilities. Any student consi deri ng wi thdrawal i s strongl y encouraged to meet wi th hi s or her academi c col I ege advi sor before I eavi ng 
the University. 

Potential Implications Withdrawing ortaking a leave of absence from theUniversity may have seri ous implications for international students, students receiving 
f i nanci al ai d or students resi di ng i n on-campus housi ng. Students are advi sed to contact the appropri ate of f i ces before f i nal i zi ng wi thdrawal or I eave of absence 
plans 

Student Financial Services Office: 1135 LeeBuilding, 301-314-9000 

Depa-tmentof ResidentLife: 2100AnnapolisHall, 301-314-2100 

International Education Services: 3117 Mitchell Building, 301-314-7740 

Withdrawal : A wi thdrawal i s avai I abl e anyti me between the fi rst and I ast day of cl asses. Students must submi t wri tten noti ce of wi thdrawal to the Off i ce of the 
Regi strar no I ater than the last day of classes. A students return to the University is contingent upon theconditionsoutlinedi (Return to theUniversity below. 

Leaveof Absence: A leaveof absence is a type of withdrawal and i s avai I abl e for students wishing to take time away from the University with the intention of 
returning the foil owing semester. The I eave of absence status is especially helpful for recipients of federal financial aid because they are not considered to be 
wi thdrawn provi ded they do return and compl ete the f ol I owi ng semester. Students may appl y for a I eave of absence onlyduringthelast60 days of the semester. A 
students return to the University is contingent upon the conditions outlined i nReturn to theUniversity below. 

Return to the University: Normally, a student may withdraw ortakea leaveof absence from the University only once during matriculation as an undergraduate. 
Students who find it necessary to I eave the University are requi red to petition the Faculty Review Board in order to return. Students who have earned a mini mum 2.0 
cumulativeGPA, with no previous withdrawal or leaveof absence, are exempt from this requirement. Students who withdraw ortakea leaveof absence whi I eon 
academi c probatj on, or those retumi ng from di srri ssal , are al ways requi red to petj ti on the Facul ty Revi ew B oard. Students are al so requi red to compl ete a 
Reinstatement Advi sing Meeting with their academic col I ege advi si ng office before the petition will be considered by the Faculty Review Board. 

Additional Withdrawal/L eave of Absence I nf orrrati on:Tho eff ecti ve date of wi thdrawal or I eave of absence for the purposes of refunds i s the date that the noti ce 
i s recei ved by the Off i ce of the Regi strar. N otati on of wi thdrawal/l eave of absence and the eff ecti ve date wi 1 1 be posted to the students academi c record. I nstructors 
and col I ege offices will be notified of all withdrawn students. The deadline date for submitting the withdrawal for each semester is the I ast day of classes. Students 
shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons for reenrol I ment i nf ormati on. 

The repeat policy will not apply to courses taken during the academic semester from which the student is officially withdrawn. 

Military Call-ups: It is the intent of theUniversity of Maryland, College Park, to facilitate the withdrawal or change in regi strati on and the reenrol I ment of students 
who are called to active military duty during the semester. The student (or a representative) should take a copy of the military orders to the Office of the Regi strar 
and process a wi thdrawal or change i n regi strati on papers. Detailed i nf ormati on about thi s process may be obtai ned from the Off i ce of the Regi strar. 
Withdrawal for active mi I itary service wi 1 1 have no effect on any subsequent request to withdraw from the U ni versi ty. 

Courses Taken at Other I institutions 

Courses taken at another i nsti tuti on may not be credi ted toward a degree program wi thout pri or approval of the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects to 
earn a degree. Eligible students may enroll in courses at other uni versi ties via the University System of Maryland's Inter- Institutional Registration Program or the 
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 

Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area consists of American University, The Catholic University of America, Corcoran College of 
Art and Design, GallaudetUniversity, Georgetown University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, Howard University, Marymount 
University, National Defense Intelligence Col I ege, National Defense University, Trinity University, University of the District of Col umbi a and the University of 
Maryland College Park. Students enrolled in degree-seeking programs at these institutions are able to attend certain classes at the other campuses and have the credit 
consi dered as resi dent credi t at thei r home i nsti tuti ons. T he i ntenti on i s to al I ow students to take an occasi onal course to augment a program rather than to devel op an 



4. Registration, Academe Requi rernerits, andRegulatiot 



individual program Payment of tui ti on for courses wi 1 1 be made to the students home campus however, sped al fees may be assessed by the host i nsti tuti on. 
Comparable courses offered atUniversity of Maryland may not be taken through the Consortium 

C urrentl y regi stered, degree seeki ng U ni versi ty of M ary I and students wi th at I east j uni or standi ng may parti ci pate i n the Consorti um program accordi ng to the 
stipulations listed in the current edition of the Registration Guide. Enrollment in courses is avail able only on a space-avail able basis. Visiting students are expected to 
meet prerequi si tes or other cri teri a set by the host i nsti tuti on and compl y wi th the host i nsti tuti on's regi strati on procedures and deadl i nes. 

Golden ID students are not eligible to enrol I in courses through the Consortium with waiver of fees. University of Maryland students may only enroll in courses 
offered on the campus of the host i nsrj turj on. Students i nterested i n add ti onal i nf omnati on about the C onsortj um program shoul d revi ew the current edi ti on of the 
Regi strati on Gui de or contact the Consorti um Coordi nator on the f i rst f I oor of theM i tchel I B ui I di ng. 

University System of Maryland I nter-l nstitutional Registration Prog-am 

Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland College Park students havethe opportunity to take courses at certain University System of Maryland 
I nsrj tuti ons to augment thei r degree program at U ni versi ty of M aryl and under the I nter- 1 nsti turj onal Regi strati on Program T he provi si ons for such are contai red i n 
theBoardof Regents Policy on Student Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration (BOR III 2.40;lll 2.41) found at http://www.usmd.edu/recients/ . Participating 
institutions include Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Frostburg State Uni versify, Salisbury University, Towson University, University of Baltimore, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, University of Maryland Col lege Park and University of Maryland Eastern Shore. 
University of Maryland College Park students may not enrol I in courses at the University of Maryland University Col lege through this program Currently 
regi stered, degree seeki dtgii versi ty of M aryl and students wi th at I east sophomore standi ng may enrol I in courses for credi t and have that credi t consi dered as resi dent 
credit at their home institution. E nrol I ment i n courses i s avai I abl e only on a space avail able basis and vi si ting students are expected to meet prerequi si tes or other 
criteriasetbythehostinstiturjon. Payment of tuition for courses will be made to the student's home campus however special fees may be assessed by the host 
i nsrj tuti on. Students i nterested i n addi ti onal i nf omnati on about the I nter- 1 nsrj tuti onal Regi strati on program shoul d revi ew the current edi ti on of the Regi strati on 
Guideor contact the Consortium Coordi nator on the first floor of theM itchell Building. 

I nter- 1 nsrj turj onal Regi strati on is only applicable for the Fall and Spring semesters. 
Student I D Numbers 

University of Maryland assigns all students a unique nine-digit identification number called the U ID Number. This number is used as a student identifier for most 
uni versi ty transacti ons. Students are al so requi red to provi de thei r Soci al Securi ty N umber, whi ch i s used for a I i mi ted number of purposes that are requi red by I aw 
or business necessity. Seewww.presidentumd.edu/policies/docs/vi-2600A.pdffortheUniversityof Maryland Pol icy on the Col lection, Use and Protection of ID 
N umbers and a I i st of currently approved uses 

Use of Email for Official Communication 

T he U ni versi ty has adopted emai I as the pri mary means for send ng official communi cati ons to students. A cadenri c advi sors, f acul ty , and campus admi ni strati ve 
offices use email to convey important information and time-sensitive notices. All enrol led students are provided a University email address. Students are responsible 
for keepi ng thei r emai I address up to date or for forward ng emai I to another address. Fai I ure to check emai I , errors i n f orwardi ng emai I , and returned emai I due to rraill 
mailbox ftior user unknown will not excuse a student f ram mi ssi ng announcements or deadl i nes 

Change of Address 

Students are expected to notify theOfficeof the Registrar of any change in their local, permanent or e-mail address. Use the internet to keep address information 
current and accurate. C hange of address forms are avai I abl e at the f ol I owi ng pi aces: 

MyUM website: www.my.umd.edu 

Off i ce of the B ursar, Room 1115 or 1135, L ee B ui I di ng 

Student Servi ces C ounter, f i rst f I oor, M i tchel I Building 

PI ease be advi sed that changi ng your permanent address coul d affect your resi dency status for tui ti on and bi 1 1 i ng purposes. For further i nf omnati on about these 
potential implications, pleasecontarttheResidercyClassificationOfficeatresclass@umd.edu. 

I dentin" cation Cards 

The photo ID card is issued at the time the student first registers for classes. This card is to be used for the enti re duration of enrol I ment. Additionally, students who 
have food servi ce contracts will use thi s photo i denti fi cati on card to access these servi ces. Contact D i ni ng Servi ces di recti y f or further i nf omnati on. 

T he photo I D card can be used by students for admi ssi on to most athl eti c, soci al , and cul tural events, to wi thdraw books from the I i brari es, and as a general form of 
identification on campus. 

U ni versi ty of M aryl and photo I D cards wi 1 1 be repl aced free of charge onl y when the most recent acti ve I D card i s turned i nto the Off i ce of the Regi strar at the ti me 
of reissueAND: 

l)thelD bar code is no longer visible or readable; or 

2) the I D card has become worn and no I onger f uncti ons properl y . 

The replacement of an ID card will carry a charge of $20 if the student indicates that their card is lost stolen, or the card has intentional damage (i.e. holes punched 
inthecard, cards intentionally snapped in two, etc.). The Registrar's Off ice is available weekdays from 8:30am to 4:30pm in the First Floor Lobby of the Mitchell 
B ui I di ng f or requesti ng repl acement cards. 

Veterans Benefits 

Students attending the university under the Veterans Education Assistance Art (Title 38, U.S. Code) may receive assistance and enrollment certification at the 
Veterans Certification Office, in the Office of the Regi strar, 1113M itchell Building. Consult the online Schedule of Classes 
at http://www.testudo.umd.edu/soc/vets.hbnl for more i nf omnati on. 

Classification of Students 

Official classifi cati ons of undergraduate students are based on earned credits as follows: freshman, 1-29 semester hours; sophomore, 30-59; junior, 60-89; and 
senior, 90 to at I east 120. 

Academic Records and Regulations 

TheOfficeof the Regi strar, located on the first floor of the Mi tchel I Bui I ding is responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official transcripts. 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulator 



Marking System 

T he f ol I owi ng symbol s are used on the student's permanent record for all courses i n whi ch he or she i s enrol I ed after the i ni ti al regi strati on and schedul e adj ustment 
period: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, XF, I, P, S, andW. These marks remain as part of the students permanent record and may be changed only by 
the ori gi nal i nstructor on certi f i cati on, approved by the department chai r and the dean, that an actual mi stake was made i n detemni ni ng or recordi ng the grade. 

• A+, A, A- denotes excel lent mastery of the subject and outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester averages, a mark of A+, A, A- will 
be assi gned a val ue of 4 qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour. 

• B+, B, B- denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship. A mark of B+, B, B- is assi gned a value of 3 quality poi nts per credit hour. 

• C+, C, C- denotes acceptable mastery of the subject A mark of C+, C, C- is assi gned a value of 2 quality poi nts per credit hour. 

• D+, D, D- denotes borderline understanding of the subject It denotes marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory progress toward a degree. A 
mark of D+, D, D- is assi gned a value of 1 quality point per credit hour. 

• F denotes f ai I ure to understand the subj ect and unsati sf actory performance. A mark of F i s assi gned a val ue of qual i ty poi nts per credi t hour. 

• X F- denotes f ai I ure due to academi c di shonesty . 

• S i s a department opti on mark that may be used to denote sati sf actory performance by a student i n progressi ng thesi s proj ects, ori entati on courses, practi ce 
teachi ng, and the I i ke In computati on of cumul ati ve averages a mark of S wi 1 1 not be i ncl uded. 

• Wis used to i ndi cate wi thdrawal from a course i n whi ch the student was enrol I ed at the end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od. For i nf ormati on and 
compl eteness, the mark of W i s pi aced on the students permanent record by the Off i ce of the Regi strar. T he i nstructor wi 1 1 be noti f i ed that the student has 
withdrawn from the course This mark is not used in any computation of quality points or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester. 

• Audit- A student may register to audit a course or courses which have been designated as available under the audit option and in which space is avail able. 
ThenotationAUD will be pi aced on the transcript for each course audi ted. A notation to the effect that this symbol ctaes not imply attendance or any other 
effort i n the course will be i ncl uded on the transcri pt i n the expl anati on of the gradi ng system 

• Pass-Fail - The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to A +, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D-. The student must inform theOfficeof the 
Regi strar of the sel ecti on of thi s opti on by the end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od. 

Add tional Record Notations 

I n add ti on to the above marks, there are provi si ons f or other record or transcri pt notati ons that may be used based on uni versi ty poi i cy and i ndi vi dual ci rcumstances. 

Dupl icate course U sed to i ndi cate two courses wi th the same course content The second course i s counted i n the cumul ati ve total s earned; both courses are counted 
i n the cumul ati ve attempted credi t and i n the cal cul ati on of grade poi nt average. 

Excluded Credit (Exd Crd)_: Excluded credit is noted when Academic Clemency has been granted. 

I ncompl etes The mark of I is an exceptional mark that is an instructor opti on. I tisgiven only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively 

sati sf actory , when, because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unabl e to compl ete some smal I porti on of the work of 

the course. I n no case wi 1 1 the mark I be recorded for a student who has not compl eted the maj or porti on of the work of the course 

1. Thi s I ncompl ete Contract form must be submi tted to the dean of the col I ege off eri ng the coursewithinsix weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncompl ete C ontract i sn't compl eted wi thi n the si x week peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compl etj ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangements for the compl etj on of the 
work. The work must be compl eted by the time stipulated in the contract usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as defi red by the contract i s not compl eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty member or the f acul ty members dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course 
requi rements. 

5. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I i ty of the i nstructor or department chai r concerned to submi t the grade promptl y upon compl etj on of the condi ti ons of the I ncompl ete Contract 

6. The I cannot be removed through re- regi strati on for the course or through credi t by exami nati on. A n I mark i s not used i n the computati on of qual i ty poi nts 
or cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages. 

Non-applicable (Non-Appl): In all cases of transfer from one col I ege to another at the University of Maryland, College Park, the dean of the receiving college, 
wi th the approval of the student shal I i ndi cate which courses, i f any, i n the student's previ ous academi c program are not appl i cabl e to hi s or her new program, and 
shal I notify the Off i ce of the Regi strar of the adj ustments that are to be made i n detemni ni ng the students progress toward a degree. Del etj ons may occur both i n 
credits attempted and correspond ngly incredits earned. This evaluation shall be made upon the students initial entry into a new program, not thereafter. If astudent 
transfers from one program to another, hi s or her record eval uati on shal I be made by the dean i n the same way as i f he or she were transf erri ng col I eges. I f the 
student subsequent! y transfers to a thi rd col I ege, the dean of the thi rd col I ege shal I make a similar initial adj ustment courses marked nonappl i cabl e by the second 
dean may become appl i cabl e i n the thi rd program 

Pass-Fail Policy 

Pass-Fail Policy: The following Pass-Fail policy was approved by the Board of Regents for implementation beginning with the Spring 1989 semester: 

1. To register for a course under the pass- fail option, an undergraduate must have compl eted 30 or more credit hours of col I ege credit with a G PA of at least 2.0. At 
least 15 of these credit hours must have been compl eted at theUni versi ty of Maryland, College Park with a University of Maryland GPA of atleast2.0. 

2. Courses for whi ch thi s opti on appl i es must be el ecti ves i n the students program The courses may not be col I ege, maj or, f i el d of concentrati on, or general 
education program requi rements. 

3. Only one course per semester may be registered for under the pass-fail option. 

4. N o more than 12 semester hours of credi t may be taken under the pass-f ai I opti on duri ng a student's col I ege career. 

5. Students may not choose this option when re- registering for a course. 

6. When regi steri ng under the pass-f ai I opti on, a course that i s passed wi 1 1 count as hours i n the students record but wi 1 1 not be computed i n the grade poi nt average. 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



A course that i s f ai I ed wi 1 1 appear on the student's record and wi 1 1 be computed both i n the overal I average and the semester average. 

7. Students registering for a course under the pass- fail option are required to complete all regular course requirements. Their work will be evaluated by the 
instructor by the normal procedure for letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. ThegradesA+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or D- will 
automati cal I y be converted by the Off i ce of the Regi strar to the grade P on the students permanent record. The grade F wi 1 1 remai n as given. The choi ce of gradi ng 
opti on may be changed onl y duri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od for courses i n whi ch the student i s current! y regi stered. 

Incompletes 

The mark of V is an exceptional mark that is an instructor option. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unabl e to compl ete some smal I porti on of the work of the course I n no 
case wi 1 1 the mark I be recorded for a student who has not compl eted the maj or porti on of the work of the course 

1. This Incomplete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of the col lege offering the course within six weeks after the grade submission deadline (if a grade 
hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f any I ncompl ete C ontract i sn't compl eted wi thi n the si x week peri od, the i nstructor will convert the I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compl etj ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; i t i s the students responsi bi I i ty to request arrangements for the compl etj on of the 
work. The work must be compl eted by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event no later than one year. If the 
remai ni ng work for the course as defi red by the contract i s not compl eted on schedul e, the i nstructor will convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean ( i n negoti ati on wi th the f acul ty member or the f acul ty members dean) upon the wri tten 
request of the student i f ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student will make appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course 
requi rements. 

5. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I i ty of the i nstructor or department chai r concerned to submi t the grade promptl y upon compl etj on of the condi ti ons of the I ncompl ete Contract 

6. The 'I 'cannot be removed through re- regi strati on for thecourseor through credit by examination. An T mark is not used in the computation of quality points or 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt averages. 

Computation of Grade Point Average 

GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points accumulated in courses for which a grade of A +, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, orF has 
been assigned by the total number of credits attempted in those courses. Courses for which a mark of P, S, I, NGRorW has been assi gned are not included in 
computing theGPA. Each letter grade has a numerical value: A+, A, A- =4; B+, B, B- =3; C+, C, C- =2; D+, D, D- =1; F =0. Multj plying this value by the 
number of credi ts f or a parti cul ar course gi ves the number of qual i ty poi nts earned for that course. 

See Repeat Pol i cy to detemni ne the effect of repeated courses i n the cal cul ati on of G PA . 
Repeat Policy 

Thefollowing Campus Repeat Policy applies toALL courses that may not be repeated for additional credit 

1. The f ol I owi ng students are requi red to f ol I ow the new repeat poi i cy: 

a All new freshmen who began at University of Maryland , College Park Fall 1990 and after. 

b. TransferstucentsfromschoolsotherthanMaryland community col leges who began at University of Maryland, CollegePark, Fall 1990 and after. 
This includes transfer students from another University of Maryland institution. 

2. There is a limit to the number of times a student may repeat a course. Students may have one repeat of any course in which they earned an A +, A, A-, B+, B, 
B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, P, S, W, NGR or Audit they cannot be regi stered (after the schedule adj ustment period) for any given course more than twice. A 
students cleans off i ce may grant an excepti on al I owi ng an addi ti onal course repeat I n thi s case, students must present a pi an for successful I y compl etj ng the course. 
All attemptBw'// be counted toward the total I i mi t for repeatable credits. 

Nats Students may not choose the Pass-Fail option when re-registering for a course or re-register for a course in which a grade of I has been noted. 

3. Students may repeat no more than 18 credi ts. A ddi ti onal I y , i f a student wi thdraws from all courses duri ng a semester, those courses are not i ncl uded i n thi s 
limit 

4. The grade point average will include all attempts at a given coursethat result in a gradeof A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, orF. However, to help 
freshmen and transfer students adjust to the University of Maryland, CollegePark, the foil owing two excepti ons allow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so 
that only the hi gher grade i s i ncl uded: 

a W hen the repeated course was taken within the students first semester at University of Maryland, CollegePark, or 

b. W hen the repeated course was taken wi thi n the students first 24 credi t hours attempted ( i ncl udi ng transfer credi ts) or wi thi n the semester duri ng 
whi ch the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted. Advanced Placement Exam credits do not count toward the 24 credit count. 

5. A ny grade earned i n pri or attempts of a repeated course wi 1 1 appear on the student's transcri pt, regard ess of whether the grade i s dropped f rom, or i ncl uded i n, the 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

6. Repeat by transfer: I f a student repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or duri ng the semester i n whi ch the student reached 24 credi ts attempted 
(including transfer credits) and the transfer grade is hi gher, then the original grade in the course will be excluded from the GPA calculation. 

a. If the course was taken after the semester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted, theoriginal grade remains in the GPA calculation. 

Repeat Policy Prior to Fall 199a 

T he fol I owi ng students fol I ow the previous repeat poi i cy: 

• Students who began at University of Maryland, CollegePark, before the Fall 1990 semester (including students who enter University of Maryland, College 
Park for summer 1990). 

• Transfer students who began at a M aryland community college before Fal I 1990. 

• UMBC College of Engineering students who began before 1990. 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



T he hi ghest grade recei ved i n the repeated course i s used to cal cul ate the G PA . A student may repeat any course; however no student may be regi stered for a course 
more than three ti mes. 

If a student repeats a course in which he or she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, orS, the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned 
toward thedegree. Only the highest mark will be used in computation of the students cumulative average Under unusual circumstances, the students dean may 
grant an excepti on to thi s pol i cy . 

Academic Clemency Policy 

U ndergraduate students returni ng to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Coll ege Park in pursuitof their initial baccal aureate degree, after a separati on of f i ve cal endar years 
may peti ti on the appropri ate dean to have a number of previ ousl y earned grades and credi ts removed from the cal cul ati on of thei r cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 
U p to 16 credi ts and correspondi ng grades from courses previ ousl y corrpl eted at theU ni versi ty of M ary I and, C ol I ege Park, wi 1 1 be removed from cal cul ati on of the 
grade point average and will not be counted toward graduation requirements. The petition for clemency must be filed in the first semester of return to the institution. 
A pproval i s nei ther automati cor guaranteed. 

Honors (Dean's List) 

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) will be awarded to those students who complete, within any given semester (excluding winter and summer terms), 12 or 
more credits (excluding courses with grades of P and S) with a serrester GPA of 3.5 or higher. This recognition will Denoted on the students academic record. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal, Undergraduate Policy on 

Consistent with the University of Maryland Student Academic Success- DegreeCompletion Policy, it is the intent of the University that its students make 
sati sf actory progress toward thei r degree obj ecti ves, and achi eve academi c success. I f a student has sped al ci rcumstances that make i t i mpossi bl e to compl ete a 
normal course I oad, the student must meat wi th an advi sor to di scuss the ci rcumstances, the student's pi ans for conti nued progress toward a degree, and the 
i mpl i cati ons f or conti nued enrol I ment 

Thefol I owi ng gui del i nes for retenti on of students refer separately to semester (Fal I and Spri ng) and Wi nter or Summer terms: 

a. Academic retention is based solely on grade point average (GPA). A mini mum of 120 successfully completed course credits is required for graduation in any 
degree curri cul um I ndi vi dual col I eges, school s, and departments may establ i sh hi gher requi rements for graduati on. Students must consul t the appropri ate col I ege, 
school , or department for sped f i c i nf ormati on. 

b. Satisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Students whose semester GPA fal Is below 2.0 are encouraged to 
meet wi th thei r advi sors regard ng the devel opment of a pi an that will appropri atel y respond to the students academi c difficulties and I ead to academi c i mprovement 
Individual colleges, school s and departments may establish separate requi rements for mandatory advising. Students must consult the appropri ate col I ege, school, or 
department for sped f i c i nf ormati on. 

c. Unsatisfactory Performance is defined as the achievement of a cumulative GPA of I ess than 2.0. Students will be placed on Academic Probation following any 
semester in which a 2.0 cumulativeGPA is not achieved. Normally, students will be Academically Dismissed if they are unable to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 
or hi gher at the end of thei r probati onary semester. 

Academic Probation: 

Students will be placed on academic probati on if their cumulative GPA fal Is below 2.0. Normally, student is expected to attain a 2.0 cumulativeGPA attheendof 
any probationary semester. Students who fail to achi evea 2.0 cumulativeGPA at the end of their probationary semester may be academically dismissed, depending 
on their credit level as detailed below. 

1. Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be dismissed from the University in the event their cumulative GPA remains below 2. Oat the end of their 
probationary semester. Students who are on probati on and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in 
the subsequent semester. 

2. Students who are on academic probation and have earned fewer than 60 credits will be permitted to continue on academic probation if a minimum semester GPA 
of 2.0 i s achi eved i n each semester of probati on. 

a Full -time students must compl ete 9 or more credits in each semester of probation. A completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which a 
student recei ves a grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, orS. 

b. Students who meet thi s requi rement wi 1 1 be permi tted to conti nue on probati on unti I the cl ose of the semester ( excl udi ng wi nter and summer terms) 
in which they attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

c. However, students who are on probati on will be dismissed if they have not achi eved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the semester in which 
they compl ete 60 credits. 

d. Students who are on probati on and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal inthe 
subsequent semester. 

3. The Off i ce of the Regi strar wi 1 1 noti fy students when they are pi aced on academi c probati on. Such noti ces wi 1 1 i ncl ude a requi rement that the students consul t an 
academi c advi sor i n thei r col I eges earl y i n the probati onary semester and i n no event I ater than thebeginnirgof the eariy regi strati on rjeriod for the next semester. 
The Office of the Regi strar will notify the col I eges of students who are pi aced on academic probation and will note the academic probationary status on the students 
academic record. 

a T he academi c advi sors will assi st students i n devel opi ng appropri ate pi ans for achi evi ng sati sf actory academi c performance 

b. Students who are pi aced on probati on wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or regi ster wi thout the approval of an academi c advi sor i n thei r 
college. 

Academic Dismissal: 

1. Students who have earned 60 or more credits will be dismissed if their cumulative GPA remai ns below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters (excluding winter and 
summer terms). Students who attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal. 

2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits will be dismissed foil owing any probationary semester in which they fail to attain a minimum 2.0 semester GPA 
and complete the requi site credits detailed under Academic Probation. Students who attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in the preceding winter or summer term will not 
be subject to dismissal. 

3. Students who have been academically dismissed and who are reinstated will be academically dismissed again if a cumulativeGPA of at least 2.0 is not achieved 



4. Registration, Academe Requi remerits, andRegulatiot 



by the end of the first semester after reinstatement Reinstated students will not be all owed to add or drop courses, or to register during any semester without the 
approval of an academic advisor in their col lege, unlessacumulativeGPA of at I east 2.0 is achieved. 

4. The Office of the Registrar will notify the appropriate University offices when students are academically dismissed and will note the dismissal on the students 
academic record. 

5. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions will notify students in writing when they are dismissed. The notices will include a statement that registration for the 
next semester (exel udi ng wi nter or summer terms) wi 1 1 be cancel ed. 

6. N ormal I y, a student di smi ssed for academi c reasons must wai t out one semester (f al I or spri ng) before rei nstatement Excepti ons wi 1 1 be determi ned by the 
Faculty Petition Board. 

Application for Academic Rei nstatement 

1. Students who have been di smi ssed may appl y to the F acul ty Peti ti on B oard for rei nstatement on the grounds of mi ti gati ng ci rcumstances, such as ( i ) 
demonstrated progress toward a degree by successful compl eti on of 24 degree-appl i cabl e credi ts i n the precedi ng year, (ii) continuing i mproverrent i n the 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average, and ( i i i ) progress i n general educati on and maj or requi rements. 

2. The application for reinstatement must include a written statement explaining the circumstances leading to dismissal and a proposed plan to remedy those 
ci rcumstances. Students are encouraged to consul t wi th thei r academi c advi sors pri or to submi tti ng thei r appl i cati ons to the F acul ty Peti ti on B oard. 

3. Applications for rei nstatement can beobtained from the Reenrollment Office in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, which is responsible for administering 
the reinstatement process in coordination with the Faculty Petition Board. 

Faculty Petition Board: 

1. The Reenrollment Office is responsible for submitting the rei nstatement applications for review and decision by the Faculty Petition Board, which is comprised of 
tenured f acul ty appoi nted by the Seni or V i ce Presi dent for A cademi c Aff ai rs and Provost. T he B oard i s the sol e arbi ter of rei nstatement appl i cati ons. 

2. The Faculty Petition Board has tine discretion to establish the terms for reinstatement including the requi rements for achieving academic improvement and 
devel opi ng an academi c pi an for success. 

3. The Reenrol I rrent Office will forward the Boards decision to students at their permanent addresses. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students: 

T he uni versi ty reserves the ri ght to request at any ti me the wi thdrawal of a student who cannot or does not mai ntai n the requi red standard of schol arshi p, or whose 
conti nuance i n the uni versi ty woul d be detri mental to hi s or her heal th, or the heal th of others, or whose conduct i s not sati sf actory to the authori ti es of the 
university. Additional information about the dismissal of delinquent students may be found in the Code of Student Conduct 

Attendance and A ssessmen t^ xaml nations 

Attendance 

1. The university expects each student to take full responsibility for his or her academic work and academic progress. The student to progress satisfactorily, must 
meet al I of the requi rements of each course forwhichheor she i s regi stered. Students are expected to attend cl asses regul arl y , f or consi stent attendance offers 
the most eff ecti ve opportunity open to al I students to gai n command of the concepts and materi al s of thei r courses of study. Except as provi ded bel ow, 
absences will not be used i n the computati on of grades, and the recordi ng of student absences will not be requi red of the f acul ty . 

2. Itisthe policy of the university to excuse the absences of students that result from the foil owing causes: illness of the student or illness of a dependent as 
def i ned by B oard of Regents pol i cy on f ami I y and medi cal I eave; rei i gi ous observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the student from bei ng 
present duri ng the cl ass peri od) ; parti ci pad on i n uni versi ty acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty authori ti es; and compel I i ng ci rcumstance beyond the students 
control . Students cl ai mi ng excused absence must appl y i n wri ti ng and f umi sh documentary support for thei r asserti on that absence resul ted from one of these 
causes. 

3. 1 n some courses, attendance and i n-cl ass parti ci pad on are ongoi ng requi rements and an i ntegral part of the work of the course. I n other courses, occasi onal 
in-class assessments may occur, sometimes without advance notice It is the responsibility of the instructor to inform each class at the beginning of the 
semester of the nature of i n-cl ass parti ci pati on expected and the effect of absences on the eval rati on of the student's work i n the course 

4. A bsences i n courses where i n-cl ass parti ci pati on i s a si gni f i cant part of the work of the course shal I be handl ed by the i nstructor i n the course i n accordance 
with the general policy of his or her academic unit 

5. Permanent changes i n the schedul i ng or I ocati on of cl asses must be approved by the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department non-departmental i zed 
school or col lege, as appropriate. 

Medically Necessitated Absences from Class 

• The University shall excused ass absences that result from a students illness, provi ded the student complies with the procedures below. Procedures vary 
dependi ng on the I ength and frequency of the absence and whether the absence occurs duringaMajor Schedul ed G radi ng Event 

• Major Scheduled Grading Events and Prolonged Absences Instructors shal I identify in writing all Maj or Scheduled Grading Events pertaining to each course 
at the beginning of the semester. Students who miss a Maj or Scheduled Grading Event due to illness or who havea prolonged absenceduetoillness( multiple 
consecuti ve absences due to the same i 1 1 ness) shal I be requi red to provi de hi s or her i nstructor wi th wri tten documentati on of the i 1 1 ness from the U ni versi ty H eal th 
Center or from his or her own health care provider. The University Health Center or health care provider shal I verify dates of treatment and indicate the dates the 
student was urabl e to meet academi c responsi bi I i ti es. 

• Excused Absences from Class Except during a Major Scheduled Grading Event students may be excused from a single lecture, recitation or laboratory session 
one time per course per semester for a medically necessitated reason. The student should make a reasonable attempt to inform the instructor of his/her illness prior 
to the class, and present his or her instructor with a self-signed note attesting to thedateof his or her illness. This note must include an acknowledgement: (a) that 
the i nf ormati on provi ded i s true and correct and ( b) that the student understands that provi di ng f al se i nf ormati on to U ni versi ty off i ci al s i s a vi ol ati on of Part 9( h) 
of the Code of Student Conduct 

« Written Absence Policies. Students who have more than one non-consecutive medically necessitated absence should comply with the requi rements of the wri tten 
absence pol i cy appl i cabl e to each cl ass. I nstructors shal I adopt a wri tten pol i cy addressi ng non-consecuti ve student absences for medi cal I y necessi tated reasons at 
the begi nni ng of each semester. I nstructors shoul d sped f y the nature of i nf ormati on and the documentati on they requi re from students. 

< Resolution of Problems. A student who wishes to contest a decision by the instructor should consult with the instructor's Department Chair and the Dean's Office 
of the C ol I ege as necessary. 
http://www.presideriryumd.edu/ixilicies/docsA/-100G.pdf 

Assessment 

1. The uni versi ty provi des students wi th excused absences the opportuni ty to reschedul e si gni f i cant assessments, except i n cases where the nature of the 
assessment precluded the possibility of rescheduling, OR to perform a substitute assignment without penalty. An instructor is not under obligation to offer a 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



substi tute assi gnment or to gi ve a student a make- up assessment unl ess the f ai I ure to perform was due to an excused absence, that i s, due to i 1 1 ness (of the student or 
a dependent) , rel i gi ous observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the student f rom bei ng present duri ng the cl ass peri od) , parti ci pad on i n uni versi ty 
acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty authori ti es, or compel I i ng ci rcumstances beyond the students control . Students cl ai mi ng excused absence must appl y i n wri ti ng 
and fumi sh documentary support for thei r asserti on that absence resul ted from one of these causes. 

T he make- up assessment or substi tute assi gnment must be at a ti me and pi ace mutual I y agreeabl e to the i nstructor and student cover onl y the materi al f or whi ch the 
student was ori gi nal I y responsi bl e, and be at a comparabl e I evel of di ff i cul ty wi th the ori gi nal assessment I n the event that a group of students requi res the same 
make- up assessment or subsrj tute assi gnment one ti me and pi ace may be schedul ed. The make- up assessment or subsrj tute assi gnment must not i nterf ere wi th the 
students regularly scheduled classes or in- class final examination. 

Students who have a concern regardi ng rel i gi ous observances shoul d see thei r i nstructors at the start of the semester. A I though the uni versi ty attempts to 
accommodate the religious beliefs of all of its members, it functions within a secular environment and is limited in the extent to which it can interrupt its normal 
operati ons. The presi dent shal I determi ne when i t i s appropri ate for the campus communi ty to restri ct reschedul i ng exami rati ons or other si gni f i cant assessments on 
the dates of rel i gi ous observance. 

At this time, exami nations or other significant assessments may not be scheduled on Rosh Hoshanah, YomKippur, Good Friday, or the first two days of Passover. 

In cases of dispute, the student may appeal tothechair, the director or the dean of the department, non-departmentalized school or col lege offering the course within 
one week from the date of the refusal to schedul e a make- up assessment I n those i nstances where the i nstructor i s the chai r, di rector or dean, the appeal shal I be 
madetothenext higher administrativeofficer, whose decision shal I befinal. 

2. The student must notify his or her instructor of the reason for absence as soon as possible Where the reason for absence from a scheduled assessment is known 
well in advance (for example, in cases of religious observance or participation in university activities at the request of university authorities), the student must inform 
the instructor by the end of the schedule adjustment period. Prior notification is especially important in connection with final examinations, si nee fail ure to 
reschedul e a f i nal exami rati on before concl usi on of the f i nal exami nati on peri od may resul t i n I oss of credi ts duri ng the semester. Where the reason i s not known 
wel I i n advance (for exampl e, i n cases of i 1 1 ness or compel I i ng ci rcumstances beyond the students control ), the student must i nf orm the i nstructor as soon as the 
reason devel ops, or as soon as possi bl e after i ts devel opment. 

3. Ordinarily, assessments are given during class hours in accordance with the regularly scheduled (or officially arranged) time and pi ace of each course. No less 
than seven cal endar days noti ce shal I be gi ven for assessments schedul ed at other ti mes and pi aces. 1 1 shal I be the i nstructors responsi bi I i ty to ensure that the change 
in schedule does not interfere with any students regularly scheduled classes or in-class final examinations. It is the responsibility of the student to be informed 
concemi ng the dates of announced qui zzes, tests, and exami nati ons. Performance assessments may take a vari ety of forms and need not be cl assroom- based wri tten 
examinations. 

4. A f i nal exami nati on shal I be gi ven i n every undergraduate course Excepti ons may be made wi th the wri tten approval of the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the 
department non-departmental i zed school or college, as appropriate However, a students final course grade shal I be based on a combination assessments that is at 

I east the equivalent of a comprehensive final examination. No final examination or equivalent may be given or due during the last week of classes. All in-class final 
exami nati ons must be held on the date and at the time listed in the official final examination schedule. Out-of-cl ass final exami nati on or equivalent assessments 
shall be due on the date and at a time listed in the official final examination schedule. 

5. A student may seek to rescheduled nal exami nati ons so that he or she has no more than three (3) examinations on any given day. It is the responsibility of the 
student to i ni ti ate the reschedul i ng or be responsi bl e for taki ng the exami nati on as ori gi nal I y schedul ed. When reschedul i ng i s desi red, the student shoul dfirst 
contact his or her class instructors). A student who encounters difficulty rescheduling examinations with his or her instructors is advised to contact his or her 
respecti ve Dean's Off i ce. F acul ty are expected to accommodate students wi th I egi ti mate reschedul i ng requests. 

6. Thechair, the director or the dean of the department non-departmentalized school or col lege, as appropri ate, is responsible for the adequate administration of 
assessments i n courses under hisorherjurisdiction. 

7. No in-cl ass assessment shal I exceed the allotted time for a regularly scheduled class period. In the case of in-class final examinations, the time allotted shall not 
exceed the schedul ed f i nal exami nati on peri od. 

8. Each student shal I be given the instructi ons and performance requirements for all assessments intended to require more than one- half class period in a form 
translatable to hard copy, unl ess the chair, the director or the dean of the department non-departmental i zed school or col lege, as appropri ate, has authorized another 
procedure The i nstructi ons and requi rements of the assessment shal I be archi ved i n an appropri ate medi um i n a sui tabl e pi ace 

9. The foil owing rules shal I govern all in-cl ass exami nati ons, unless the instructor for a specific course stipulates alternate rules for that course. A breach of any of 
the rules shall constitute disruption of class, a disciplinary offense (Code of Student Conduct section 9.m), or may serve as the basis of an allegation of academic 
dishonesty. 

a Students arri vi ng I ate f or an exami nati on may not unreasonabl y di srupt the exami nati on room 

b. Students must leave all unauthorized materials (e.g., books, notes, calculators) with the proctor before being seated. 

c. W here seati ng arrangements are establ i shed by proctors, student must conform to these arrangements. 

d. Students may not return to an exami nati on room after I eavi ng, unl ess permi ssi on to do so has been granted by the proctor pri or to the students 
departure 

e Students must cease conversati on pri or to the passi ng out of exami nati on papers and mai ntai n si I ence duri ng the enti re exami nati on peri od. 

f . Students must pi ace exami nati on papers face down on the wri ti ng desk unti I the exami nati on i s off i ci al I y begun by the proctor. 

g. Students must keep exami nati on papers f I at on the wri ti ng desk at al I ti mes. 

h. Students at an examination must be prepared to show current University identification. 

10. E ach f acul ty member i s to retai n, f or one full semester after a course i s ended, the students f i nal assessments i n the appropri ate medi um I f a f acul ty member 
goes on I eave for a semester or I onger, or I eaves the uni versi ty , the f i nal assessments and grade records for the course must be I eft wi th the chai r, the di rector or the 
dean of the department non-departmentalized school or college, as appropriate 

Statement on Classroom Climate 

T he U ni versi ty of M aryl and val ues the di versi ty of i ts student body and i s cormni tted to provi di ng a cl assroom atmosphere that encourages the equi tabl e parti ci pati on 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



of al I students. Patterns of i nteracti on i n the cl assroom between the f acul ty member and students and among the students themsel ves may i nadvertentl y communi cate 
preconceptions about student abilities based on age, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation. These patterns are due in part to 
the di ff erences the students themsel ves bri ng to the cl assroom C I assroom i nstructors shoul d be parti cul arl y sensi ti ve to bei ng equi tabl e i n the opportuni ti es they 
provi de students to answer questi ons i n cl ass, to contri bute thei r own i deas, and to parti ci pate f ul I y i n proj ects i n and outsi de of the cl assroom 

Of equal i importance to equi ty i n the cl assroom i s the need to attend to potenti al deval uati on of students that can occur by reference to demeani ng stereotypes of any 
group and/or overl ooki ng the contri buti ons of a parti cul ar group to the topi c under di scussi on. J oki ng at the expense of any group creates an i nhospi tabl e 
envi ronment and i s i nappropri ate M oreover, i n provi di ng eval uati ons of students, i t i s essenti al that i nstructors avoi d di storti ng these eval uati ons wi th preconcei ved 
expectati ons about the i ntel I ectual capaci ti es of any group. 

1 1 i s the responsi bi I i ty of i ndi vi dual f acul ty members to revi ew thei r cl assroom behavi ors, and those of any teachi ng assi starts they supervi se, to ensure that students 
are treated equi tabl y and not di scouraged or deval ued based on thei r di ff erences. Resources f or sel f -eval uati on and trai ni ng for f acul ty members on cl assroom 
cl i mate and i nteracti on patterns are avai I abl e f rom the Off i ce of H uman Rel ati ons. 

Transfer Credit 

For current University of Maryland, College Park students 

TheOfficeof the Registrar posts all transfer credit that would be acceptable to any of the degree programs at the University of Maryland, CollegePark.Thedeanof 
the col I ege i n whi ch the student i s enrol I ed detemni nes whi ch transfer credi ts are appl i cabl e to the students degree program I n general , credi t from academi c courses 
taken at i nstj tuti ons of hi gher educati on accredi ted by a regi onal accredi ti ng associ ati on wi 1 1 transfer, provi ded that the course i s compl eted wi th at I east a grade of C 
(2.0) and the course i s si mi I ar i n content and I evel to work offered atCol I ege Park. The ti tl e of courses accepted for transfer credit wi 1 1 be noted on the students 
record; however, the grade will not Grades from transferred courses are not included in the University of Maryland, College Park, grade point average calculation. 
See chapter 1 for additional information. 

Courses taken at other instituti ons whileattendingtheUniversity of Maryl and, College Park 

L Courses taken at another institution may not be credi ted toward a degree wi thout approval i n advance by the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects 
a degree. The same rule applies to registration in the summer program of another instituti on. Permission to Enroll in Another Institution forms are avai I able in the 
off i ce of the students dean. T hi s form must be submi tted and approved by the col I ege for any course whi ch wi 1 1 eventual I y be added to the uni versi ty transcri pt 

Z Courses taken at other University of Maryland I nstitutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of Maryland, College Park in Fall 1989 or later, all course work taken at any University System of 
Maryland instituti on will be posted as transfer credit For all students who attended Maryl and prior to Fall 1989, courses taken at another University of Maryland 
Board of Regents institution (UMBC, UMAB, UMES, UMUC) priortoFall 1989 will beincluded in thecumulativeGPA. Courses taken at any other institution 
may not be credi ted toward a degree wi thout advance approval . See #L above for i nf ormati on. 

3. USM Concurrent I nter-l institutional Registration Program 

U ni versi ty undergraduate students parti ci pad ng i n the Concurrent I nter- 1 nstj tuti onal Regi strati on Program shoul d obtai n permi ssi on f rom thei r dean. Course work 
counts as resident credit Students participating in this program must be enrol led full time in a degree program at University of Maryland, Col I ege Park, for the 
semester i n whi ch these courses are taken. 

4 Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 

Courses taken through the Consortium are considered to be resident credit Seewww.testudo.umd.edu/soc/consortiumhtml for more information. 

Transfer Credit Cerrter 

TheTransfer Credit Center provides articulation information and assi stance to students and transfer advisors More information is available in the section on Transfer 
Admission in chapter 1 and on the internet at www.tce.umd.edu. 

Proficiency Examination Programs (Creclit-by-Exam, CLEP) 

The University of Maryland, Col I ege Park offers new, continuing, and retumi ng students several opportuni ties to earn col I ege credit by demonstrating achievement 
in a subject field through examination. College Park recognizes three proficiency examination programs for credit: Advanced Placement (AP), Departmental 
Proficiency Examination Program (Credit-by-Exami nation), and College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). Undergraduate students may earn a total of up to 
one- hal f of the credi ts requi red f or thei r degree through exami nati on. U sual ly, this is no more than 60 credi ts. Students are responsi bl e f or consul ti ng wi th the 
appropri ate dean or advi sor about the appl i cabi I i ty of any credi ts earned by exami nati on to a sped f i c degree program Students shoul d al so seek assi stance i n 
determining which University of Maryland, College Park courses duplicate credits earned for an exami nati orStudents will not receive credit for both passing an 
examination and completing an equivalent course 

Advanced Placement (AP) C red t For compl ete i nf ormati on about the appl i cabi I i ty of A P exams and the assi gnrrent of credi t pi ease see chapter 1. 

Depart m e n tal Proficiency Examination (Cretft-by-Examination) 

Col I ege Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, customarily referred to as credit-by-exarri nation, are comparable to comprehensive final examinations in a 
course. A I though the mathemati cs and f orei gn- 1 anguage departments recei ve the most appl i cati ons for credi t by exami nati on, many departments will provi de 
exami nati ons for certain of their courses. Initial inquiry as to whether an examinati on in a specific course is available is best made at the academi cclepartmert which 
offers the course i n questi on. 

I f an exami nati on for a course i s avai I abl e, the department will provi de i nf ormati on regard ng ti me and pi ace, type of exami nati on, and materi al whi ch mi ght be 
hel pf ul in prepari ng for the exami nati on. A n undergraduate who passes a departmental prof i ci ency exami nati on i s gi ven credi t and qual i ty poi nts toward graduati on 
i n the amount regul arl y al I owed i n the course, provi ded such credi ts do not dupl i cate credi t obtai ried by some other means. After maki ng arrangements wi th the 
department apply through the Division of Letters and Sciences, 1117 Hombake Li brary, 301-405-2793. 

PdidesgcMsrning craft by examination: 

1. The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of Maryland, College Park. Posting of credi teamed, however, will be delayed until the student is 
registered. 

2. Departmental Prof i ci ency Exami nati ons may not be taken for courses i n whi ch the student has remai ned regi stered at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, 
beyond the Schedul e A dj ustment Peri od even wi th a transcri pt notati on of W. 

3. Departmental Proficiency Exami nati ons may not be used to change grades, including Incompletes and Withdrawals. 

4. A ppl i cati on for credi t- by- exami nati on i s equi val ent to regi strati on for the course; however, the f ol I owi ng condi ti ons appl y : 

a. A student may cancel the application at any time prior to completion of the exami nati on with no entry on hi s/her permanent record. (Equivalent to the schedule 
adjustment period.) 

b. Theinstructor makes the results of the exami nati on avai I able to the student prior to formal submission of the grade Beforefinal submission of the grade, the 
student may elect not to have this grade recorded. In this case, a mark of W is recorded. (Equi val ent to the drop period.) 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulatior 



c. No exami nati on may be attempted more than twi ce 

d. The instructor must certify on the report of the exami nation submitted to the Office of the Registrar that copies of the exami nation questions (or identifying 
i nf ormarj on i n the case of standard zed exami rati ons) , and the students answers have been f i I ed wi th the chai r of the department off eri ng the course 

5. If accepted by the student (see 4b above), letter gradeseamedthroiighcredit-by-exanninationareerteredonthestudentstranscript, and are used in computing 
his/her cumulative grade point average. A student may elect to takea credit-by-examination Pass-Fail only if thecredit fulfills an elective in the student's degree 
programNo college major, field of concentration, or general education program requirement may betaken under the pass-fail option. Please refer to the 
Pass- Fai I policy under the Records secti on i n thi s chapter. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) recognizes college-level competence achieved outside the col lege classroom Two types of CLEP tests are 
avai I abl e: General Exami nati ons, whi ch cover the content of a broad f i el d of study; and Subj ect Exami rati ons, whi ch cover the sped f i c content of a col I ege course 
Credit can beearned and will be recognized by Col lege Park for some CLEP General or Subj ect Exami nati ons, provided satisfactory scores are attained. Credits 
earned under C L E P are not consi dered resi dence credi t but are treated as transfer credi t. C L E P exams are admi ni stered at C L E P testi ng centers throughout the 
country. The U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park i s a CL E P Test Center (Test Center Code 5814) . To obtai n an appl i cati on or add rj oral i nf ormarj on, contact the 
CLEP Administrator in the Counseling Center, Room0106A Shoemaker Hall, (301-314-7688), or write to CLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, NJ , 08541-6600. Students 
who want to earn creditthroughCLEP must request thei r off i ci al score reports to be sent to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi on, M i tchel I B ui I d ng, U ni versi ty 
of Maryland, CollegePark, MD 20742-5235. (The University of Maryland, CollegePark, ScoreRecipientCodeis5814.) 

Policies governing CLEP are as follows: 

1. A studmtnmst matriculate at the university before CLEP credits are officially posted. Theposting will not be done until a student has established a record. 

2. Each i nstj tutj on of the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and establ i shes standards for acceptance of C L E P exemprj ons and credi ts. Students must check wi th the 
institution to which they will transferto learn if they will lose, maintain, or gain credit 

3. Col I ege Park will award credit for a CLEP exami nati on 

a. provi ded the exami rati on was bei ng accepted for credi t here on the date the student took the exami nati on, and 

b. provi ded that the exami nati on was not taken duri ng a students f i nal 30 credi ts. The f i nal 30 hours of credi t are to be taken i n resi dence, unl ess pri or approval has 
been granted by the student's dean. 

4 Creditwill notbegjvenfor botticornrjIetingacoursearKJpassinganexaninationccveringsubslantiallythesamematerial. 

5. Furtherrrnre, creditwill not be awarded for CLEP exami nati ons if the student has previously completed more advanced courses in the samefield. 

6. CLEP exami rati ons posted on transcri pts f rom other i nstj tutj ons wi 1 1 be accepted i f the exami nati on has been approved by C ol I ege Park and the scores reported 
areequal to or higherthan those required by this institution. If the transcript from the pri or institution does not carry the scores, it will be the responsibility of the 
student to request E ducarj oral Testi ng Servi ce to forward a copy of the off i ci al report to the Off i ce of A dmi ssi ons. U ni versi ty awards credi ts for C L E P Exami nati ons 
only as indicated on the chart provi ded in this chapter (if an exami nation is not listed, it is not accepted for credit at this institution). 

I f you have questi ons about the appl i cabi I i ty of sped f i c credi t to your prograrn consul t the I i st provi ded i n thi s catal og or contact your Dean's Off i ce 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 





Exam Title 


Score 


Related 
Course 


Cr 


Maj 


Core 


Notes 




General Exams 




Natural Science 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 












Humanities 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 














Social Sdence& 
History 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 






Subj ect Exams 




Biology 

Gen. Biology 


49 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receive CLEP credit in Biology and wish to take additional BIOL credit 
should enroll in BIOL 105. 








Chemistry 

Gen. Chemistry 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Students who receive CLEP credit in Chemistry and wish to take additional CHEM credit 
should enroll in CHEM 131 AND 132. 
















Economics 

Pri n. M aco. 


57 


ECON 201 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


ECON credits fulfill oneof twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Contact 
department for placement, 301-405-3513. 












Prin. Micro. 


54 


ECON 200 


3 


Yes 


Yes 










Financial Acctg 


65 


BMGT220 


3 


Yes 


No 


Students who recei ve C L E P credi t i n A ccounrj ng and wi sh to take add rj oral accounrj ng 
credit should enroll inBMGT221. 














Government 

American Govt. 


52 


GVPT 170 


3 


Yes 


Yes 


GVPT 170 fulfil Is one of twoCORE-Social/Behavioral Science requirements. Students 
should contact the department for gateway applicability, 301-405-4136. 
















Mathematics 

Calculus/Elem 
Functions 

1 


67 


MATH 140 


4 


Yes 


Yes 


MATH 140 or 220 fulfills CORE-Math& Formal Reasoning non- lab requirement; also 
fulfills CORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement 

*FulfillsCORE-Fundamental Studies Math requirement 








58 


Math 220 


3 


No 


Yes 








50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


* 



4. Registration, A cadenic Requirements, andRegulatiot 



Sociology 

Intro. Sociology 


50 


LL Elective 


3 


No 


No 


Soci ol ogy maj ors who recei ve credi t f or thi s exam wi 1 1 be exempt from SOCY 100. Other 
students who wish to fulfill aCORE requirement are encouraged to enroll inSOCY 105. 





Please Note 

• LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Any test not listed will notbeacceptedforcreditatUMCP. Students may not receive credit both for 
CLEP courses and for equivalentUMCP courses or transfer courses (including Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate). CLEP credit will be 
deleted in such cases. Applicable scores for a particular exam are those in effect when a student takes the exam Contact your College Dean if you have 
questions 

• Certain CLEP tests may be revised during 2010-11. At the time this catalog was printed, information on the new versions of those tests was not avail able 
Changes are possible in UMCP credit acceptance for revised CLEP exams. Contact the Testing Office for up-to-date information, 301-314-7688. 

• Computer-based CLEP testing was implemented during 2003 for selected tests at selected test venues. Scoring procedures may change The scores above 
apply to computer based testing. Departments will evaluateany new tests and scoring procedures as they become avail able Some exams may be considered 
for credi ton a case- by- case basis until review is complete Contact an advisor or theTransfer Credit Center (tccinfo@.umd.edu) for further information. 
Students who have matri cul ated at U M C P are encouraged to speak to thei r advi sor about departmental or A dvanced PI acerrent exams i n add ti on to C L E P. 
All matri cul ated students must have perrrissi on of their col lege advi sor to take CLEP tests. Students interested in taking MATH CLEP are encouraged to 
speak to the math advisor on campus, 301-405-4362. 

Graduation, Applications Commencement Honors 

Graduation Applications 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application with theOffice of the Registrar. The deadline for application is the end of the schedule 
adj ustment peri od for the semester i n whi ch the student pi ans to graduate, or at the end of the f i rst week of the second summer sessi on f or A ugust degrees. 

I n al I cases, graduati on appl i cati ons must be f i I ed at the begi nni ng of the students f i nal semester before recei vi ng a degree. The graduati on appl i cati ons are 
available on the internet at www.my.umd.edu or at the Registrar's Office, IstflooiMitchell Building. 

Commencement Honors 

Summa cum I aude, magna cum I aude and cum I aude are the hi ghest commencement honors that the U ni versi ty bestows for sustai ned excel I ence i n schol arshi p. They 
are awarded to the top 10% of al I students graduati ng i n each col I ege over the course of a year. Summa cum I aude i s awarded to students wi th a G PA equal to the 
hi ghest two percent of al I col I ege graduates over the past three terms, magna cum I aude to the next hi ghest three percent and cum I aude to the f ol I owi ng f i ve 
percent Tobeeligibleforthis recogni ti on, at I east 60 semester hours must be earned at the uni versi ty or at a program i n whi ch credi t earned i s counted as U ni versi ty 
of Maryland, College Park, resident credit (contact the Office of the Registrar to determine program eligibility). No more than 6 credits taken pass/fail or 
satisfactory/fail shall count toward the 60-hour mini mum No student with a grade- point average of less than 3.3 will be considered for a commencement honor. 
B ecause grades for a term general I y are off i ci al I y recorded after the term's graduati on day, computati on of the students G PA wi 1 1 not i ncl ude grades for courses 
taken duri ng the students f i nal semester at the university. However, the hours taken duri ng that semester wi 1 1 apply toward the 60- hour requi rement 

E lection to Phi Beta Kappa 

www, uast umd.edu/pbk. html 

Organized in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely respected academic honorary society intheUnited States. 

I nvitation to membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of the liberal arts and sciences. Student members 

are chosen entirely on the basis of academic excellence; neither extracurricular leadership nor service to the community is 

consi dered. E I ecti on i s hel d twi ce a year, once i n the f al I and once i n the spri ng semester. 

T he process for el ecti on to P hi B eta K appa i nvol ves a revi ew i n N ovember for those who graduated the previ ous A ugust or those 
who wi 1 1 graduate i n December, and a revi ew i n M arch for those graduati ng i n M ay. F or j uni ors the revi ew occurs i n M arch. T he 
review is conducted by a select committee of faculty members representing the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. 
The committee reviews transcripts of all students with qualifying grade point averages. Whether a student qualifies for membership 
in Phi Beta Kappa depends on the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record in liberal courses. The final decision for 
election rests with the faculty committee and faculty Phi Beta Kappa members. 

Requirements for consideration of membership in Phi Beta Kappa at the University of Maryland, College Park campus chapter 
include: 

L Grade Point Average For seniors a grade point average of at least 3.75 overall as well as in all liberal arts and sciences courses 
taken. Forjuniors the minimum grade point average is at I east 3.85. National PBK rules, however, requirethatnomorethan20 
percent of the students el ected i n any one year can be j uni ors, so the actual mi ni mum grade poi nt average for j uni or admi ssi on may 
be higher than 3.85. 
Z Residence At least 60 credit hours must betaken at the University of Maryland, Col lege Park. 

3. Liberal Courses For seniors, at I east 90 credit hours in courses in the liberal arts and sciences (where "liberal" courses are to be 
distinguished from professional or technical courses), at least 45 of which must be taken at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. F or j uni ors, at I east 75 total credi t hours must be compl eted, at I east 60 of whi ch are i n courses i n the I i beral arts and sci ences; 
of these, at least 45 must betaken at the University of Maryland, College Park. Students would ordinarily be majors in one of the 
programs in the liberal arts and sciences. However, students with the requisite number of liberal credit hours can be admitted if they 
have compl eted at I east 5 courses ( 15 credi t hours or more) for seni ors and f or j uni ors i n a si ngl e I i beral arts and sci ences 
department/program at U M C P. 

4. Required courses One semester of mathematics, which must be fulfilled by college-level credit hours (including AP credit, but 
not exemption by SAT), and two col lege semesters of the same foreign I anguage at the elementary level, or at I east one semester 
above that I evel . T he I anguage requi rement may al so be sati sf i ed by compl eti on of four years of the same I anguage other than 

E ngl ish at the hi gh-school level or above, or the equi val ent. Students with such a foreign I anguage background who wi sh to be 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, andRegulatior 



considered for admission to Phi Beta Kappa should notify the Phi Beta Kappa office (2110 Marie Mount Hal I) inwritingand 
provi de the appropri ate documentati on ( an of f i ci al hi gh school transcri pt) pri or to the month of consi derati on. J uni ors provi di ng I ate 
documentati on ( after M arch 1) wi 1 1 be consi dered onl y as seni ors. 

5. Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi Beta Kappa must contain at I east nine liberal arts credit hours in each of the 
three foil owing areas: (a) arts and humanities, (b) behavioral and social sciences, (c) natural sciences and mathematics (including a 
laboratory science course). The laboratory science course cannot be fulfil led by AP credit All the courses in at least two of the 
three required areas must be completed at the University of Maryland, College Park, and in the remaining area no more than one 
AP course can be used to fulfil I the requirement. Ingeneral, Phi BetaKappawill accept theCORE classification of courses. In 
satisfying the distribution requirement however, a maximum of one course that satisfies multipleCORE categories, allotted to the 
category that hel ps the student the most can be used. A P H i story courses wi 1 1 be consi dered as sati sf yi ng onl y the arts and 
humanities requi rement 

Students wi th more chal I engi ng courses and moderatel y hi gh grade poi nt averages are preferred by the comrri ttee to those wi th 
hi gher grade poi nt averages but a narrow range of courses. M i ni mal qual if i cati ons i n more than one area may precl ude el ecfj on to 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

Recommended Criteria I nclude: 

1 Regular grades (rather than pass/fail) in mathematics, foreign language courses, and distribution areas. 
2 - Some traditional social sciences and humanities courses that requi re written essays and papers. (Note that internships may be 
counted as professional courses and not as I i beral courses). 

Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi Beta Kappa. The judgment of the resident faculty members of 
Phi Beta Kappa on the quality, depth, and breadth of the students record is the deciding factor in every case Any questions about 
criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (including equivalency examinations in foreign languages) should be directed to the Phi Beta 
Kappa Office, Dr. Denis Sullivan, and 301-405-8986. 



Academic I ntegrity 

T he U ni versi ty of M aryl and i s an acadenri c communi ty. I ts fundamental purpose i s the pursui t of knowl edge. L i ke al I other communi ti es, the U ni versi ty can f uncti on 
property only if its members adhere to clearly established goal sand values. Essential to the fundamental purposeof the University is the commitment to the 
pri nci pi es of truth and acadenri c honesty. A ccordi ngl y, the Code of Academe I ntegrity i s desi gned to ensure that the pri nci pi e of academi c honesty i s uphel d. W hi I e 
al I members of the U ni versi ty share thi s responsi bi I i ty , the Code of Academe I ntegrity i s desi gned so that sped al responsi bi I i ty for uphol di ng the pri nci pi e of 
academi c honesty I i es wi th the students 

T he U ni versi ty 's Code of Academe I ntegrity i s a nati oral I y recogni zed honor code, admi ni stered by a Student H onor Counci I . A ny of the f ol I owi ng acts, when 
committed by a student shall constitute academic dishonesty: 

C heati ng: / ntentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academe exercise 

Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academe exercise. 

Facilitating academic dishonesty: I ntentionally or knowingly hel ping or attempting to help another to violate any provision oftheCode of Academe Integrity. 

Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academe exercise 

I f i t i s deterrri red that an act of academi c di shonesty has occurred, a grade of X F i s consi dered the normal sancti on for undergraduate students. T he grade of X F i s 
noted on the academi c transcri pt as f ai I ure due to academi c di shonesty. L esser or more severe sancti ons may be i mposed when there are ci rcumstances to warrant 
such consi derati on. Suspensi on or expul si on from the U ni versi ty may be i mposed even f or a f i rst offense 

Students shoul d consult the Code of Academe Integrity, at www.presi dent umd.edu/pol i ci es/i i i 100a.html for further i nf orrrati on regard ng procedures for reporti ng 
and resolving allegations of academic dishonesty. 



Honor Pledge 

I n 2002, the U ni versi ty adopted an honor pi edge i n whi ch students are asked to wri te out and si gn the pi edge on maj or assi gnments and exams, as desi gnated by the 
i nstructor. T he H onor PI edge i s desi gned to encourage i nstructors and students to ref I ect upon the U ni versi ty 's core i nsti tuti onal val ue of academi c i ntegri ty. 
Professors who invite students to sign the Honor Pledge signify that there is an ethical component to teaching and learning. Students who write by hand and sign the 
PI edge affi mn a sense of pri de i n the i ntegrity of thei r work. The PI edge states: 

"/ pledge on ny honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this assignment/ exam nation." 

For rmmh ifu t ntiU on recprcfngtheCodecfAcackrric I ntBcjity, theHonor Pledge ortheStuckntHonorCouncil pleoserefer to vw\A/v.shcunxLecki or contact 
theOfficeofStudentConduct 

Student Conduct 

The primary purpose for thei imposition of discipline in the university setting is to protect the campus community. Consistent with that purpose, reasonable efforts are 
al so made to foster the personal and sod al devel opment of those students who are hel d accountabl e f or vi ol ati ons of uni versi ty regul ati ons. Compared to di sci pi i nary 
systems at many uni versi ti es, U ni versi ty of M aryl and students are gi ven unusual authori ty and responsi bi I i ty f or management of the campus process. M embershi p 
on the student j udi ci ary i s an extraordi nary educati onal experi ence, and opportuni ty to be of servi ce to the communi ty , and a personal honor. 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, andRegulatior 



Cases that may resul t i n suspensi onorexpulsionare heard by conduct beards, compri sed enti rel y of students. I n such cases, students are accorded substanti al 
procedural protecti ons, i ncl udi ng an opportuni ty f or a heari ng and an appeal . L ess seri ous cases are resol ved in discipli nary conferences conducted by U ni versi ty 
staff members. Acts of violence (including any sexual assault), intimidation, disruption, or rioting; substantial theft or vandal ism; fraud or forgery; use or 
distribution of illegal drugs; and srt£odeofStudentConductV\dstion motivated by considerations of sex, race, ethnic origin, sexual orientation or religion arefomns 
of misconduct that most frequently result in dismissal from the University. Students accused of violating University disciplinary regulations are encouraged to 
di scuss the al I egati ons wi th thei r parents or guardi ans, I egal counsel , and wi th appropri ate U ni versi ty staff members. 

Prohibited Conduct 

A compl ete I i st of conduct consi dered prohi bi ted as wel I procedures for resol vi ng al I egati ons of mi sconduct may be found i n the Code of Student Conduct at 
www. presi dent umd. edu/pol i ci es or through the Off i ce of Student Conduct websi te at www.studentconductumd.edu 
T he f ol I owi ng i s general noti ce of what consrj tutes prohi bi ted conduct and i s subj ect to di sci pi i nary acti on: 

• Use, possession or storage of any weapon 

• Causi ng physi cal harm or apprehensi on of harm 

• Initiating or causi ng to be i ni ti ated a f al se report, wami ng or threat of f i re, expl osi on or other emergency 

• A criminal offense committed off-campus 

• V i ol ati ng the terms of any di sci pi i nary sancti on 

• M i susi ng or damagi ng f i re safety equi pment 

• Distribution or possession for purposes of distribution of any illegal drug 

• Furnishing false information to the University 

• Making, possessing, or using any forged, altered, or falsified instrument of identification 

• I nterf eri ng wi th the freedom of expressi on of others 

• Theft of property or of servi ces; possessi on of stol en property 

• Destroyi ng or damagi ng the property of others 

• Engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct 

• Failure to comply with the directions of university officials 

• Use or possession of any illegal drug 

• Use or possession of fireworks on university premises 

• V i ol ati on of publ i shed uni versi ty regul ati ons or pol i ci es i ncl udi ng the resi dence hal I contract al cohol pol i cy, parki ng regul ati ons, ri oti ng, hazi ng pol i cy , and 
sexual assault. 

Note: Effective April 2006, students who viol ate the foil owing section will bedismissedfromtheUniversity: 

Rioting, assault theft, vandalism fire-setting, or other serious rri sconduct related to a University-sponsored event occurring on- or off-carrpus, that 
results in harm to persons or property or otherwise poses a threat to the stability of the campus or campus community may result in disciplinary action 
regardless of the existence, status, or outcome of any criminal charges in a court of law related to misconduct associated with a university-sponsored 
event. 

For more i nformation regardi ng student conduct issues, contact the Office of Student Conduct at 301-314-8204 or vi sit www.studentconduct.umd.edu 

Summary of Policies and Regulations Pertaining to Students 

Descriptions of these policies are for general information only. PI ease refer to specific texts for official language M edifications may be made or other policies may 
be added throughout the year. PI ease contact the Office of Student Conductfor additional information. 

Inaddition to the policies reprinted oridentifiedelsewhere(e.g., the Codeof Student Conduct and Codeof Academic Integrity), students enrol led at Col lege Park are 
expected to be aware of, and to abi de by, the pol i ci es summari zed bel ow. I nf ormati on about where the compl ete texts may be consul ted f ol I ows each summary. Thi s 
i nf ormati on was compi I ed and provi ded by the Off i ce of Student Conduct 

Alcoholic Beverage Policy and Procedures forbid unauthorized possession, use, or distribution of alcoholic beverages on university property. Certain exceptions 
are specified. (I nformation subj ect to change pending legislation. Originally approved by theBoard of Regents, September 26, 1969. Legal drinking age in the State 
otA aryland is 21 years. Repri nted i n Student Handbook.) 

PdicyonArr^ifyingEquipmentrestrictsthehoursand locations of useof certain forms of sound amplifying equipment provides a procedure for the 

authori zati on of otherwi se restri cted uses of sound ampl i f y i ng equi pment and I ocates responsi bi I i ty for compl ai nts wi th those usi ng the equi pment (A dopted by the 

U ni versi ty Senate, J une 2, 1970. Repri nted i n the Student H andbook. ) 

Campus Activities Policies regul ate reservation of university facilities, advertising, co-sponsorship, cancellation and postponement, and various other matters 
rel ati ng to programs of student organizations. (Published in the Event M anagement Handbook. For more i nformation, contact the Campus Reservations Office.) 

Computer Use Policy defi nes standards for reasonabl e and acceptabl e use of U ni versi ty computer resources, i ncl udi ng el ectroni c mai I . 

Policy on Demonstrations establ i shes gui del i nes for demonstrati ons and pi cketj ng. Sti pul ates that the uni versi ty will take steps necessary both to protect the ri ght of 
individuals or groups to demonstrate and to protect the freedom of speech, assembly, and movement of any individual or group. (Adopted by the University Senate, 
J une 2, 1970. Repri nted i n the Student H andbook. ) 

Examination Rules set general standards for student conduct duri ng exami nati ons. They are appl i cabl e to al I exami nati ons gi ven at the Col I ege Park campus uni ess 
contrary i nstructi ons are provi ded by the f acul ty member admi ni steri ng the exami nati on. ( Pri nted on most uni versi ty exami nati on books. See al so chapter 4. ) 

Policy on Hazing and Statement on Hazing prohi bits hazing, which is defined as intentionally or recklessly subjecting any person to the risk of bodily harm, or 
severe emoti onal di stress, or causi ng or encouragi ng any person to commi t an act that wouldbeaviolationoflaworuni versi ty regul ati ons, for the purpose of 
i ni ti ati ng, promoti ng, f osteri ng, or conf i mni ng any form of aff i I i ati on wi th a student group or organi zati on, as defi ned by theCocte of Student Conduct. T he express or 
implied consent of the victim will not be a defense For more information, contact the Office of Student Conduct 

Campus Parki ng Regulationscover registration, permits, fees, violations, enforcement fines, towing and impounding, reviews, carpool programs, special events 
parki ng, emergency parki ng, and a number of other areas. N otabl y, the regul ati ons provi de that "the responsi bi I i ty of f i ndi ng an authori zed parki ng space rests wi th 
thedriver." Students who have 55 or fewer credits and live in the "Graham Cracker Complex" cannot register for a parking permit (Current regulations in effect 
sincejuly, 1997. An informational guide is distributed to all who register for parking. For more information, contact the Department of Transportation Services.) 

Policy Pertaining to Public Displays defi nes standards for pemnissi ble displays, objects or structures not designed to be continuously carried or held by a 
demonstrator or pi cketer so as si mul taneousl y to protect freedom of expressi on and prevent unreasonabl e threats to the heal th, safety, securi ty , or mi ssi on of the 
campus. (Approved by the Presi dent March 29, 1989. For more information, contact the Officeof theVicePresidentforStudentAffairs.) 

Residence Hall Rules define prohibited conduct in and around campus resi dence and dining halls, buildings, and at Department of Resident Life- and/or Department 
of Dining Services-sponsored activities, i n addition to that which falls under the Residence Halls/Dining Services Agresrrert, Code of Student Conduct, and federal, 



4. Registration, Academic Requirements, andRegulatior 



state and local laws. The rules also specify standard sanctions for rule violations, and provide for an adjudication process. (Reprinted \nComrunity Living, the 
Residence Halls and Di ni ng Services Handbook. For more information, contact the Department of Resident Life) 

Sexual Assault Policy offers advice and guidance for complainants, including assistance in filing criminal complaints. Defines and sets penalties for sexual assault 
Specifies that [s]exual assault is a serious off ense and the standard sanction for any sexual assault, including acquaintance rape, isexpulsion. 

Student Organization Registration Guidelines define student organizations, responsibilities of officers, and registration, and establish types of registration, a 
regi strati on process, certai n privil eges of regi stered student organi zati ons i n good standi ng, sancti ons which may resul t f rom regi strati on revi ew, and gui del i nes for 
consrj turj ons. ( F or more i nf ormati on, or for a copy of the gui del i nes, contact the Off i ce of C ampus Programs. ) 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 106 

S General Education Requirements (CORE) 

CORE/General Education 

General Education Program and Requirements 

Off i ce of the Associ ate Provost for Academi c Affai rs and Dean for 

U ndergraduate Studi es 

2110 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-405-9361 

Contact: Laura SI avi n, Assi stant to the Dean 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core 

In our world of rapid econorric, social, and technological change, students need 
a strong and broadly based education. General education helps students achieve 
the intellectual integration and awareness they need to meet challenges in their 
personal, social, political, and professional lives. General education courses 
introduce the great ideas and controversies in human thought and experience A 
solid general education provides a strong foundation for the life-long learning 
that makes career-change goals attainable The breadth, perspective, and rigor 
provided by the CORE curriculum helps Maryland graduates become "educated 
people." 

Donna B. Hamilton 

Associ ate Provost and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

The University of Maryland College Park, will be implementing a new 
General Education program beg nning in the Fall of 2022. This program will 
replaceCORE. Students enrolled atthe University prior to Fall 2012 will still 
be under theCORE program For mom information on the new/General 
Education pro-am the program requirements, andhowtodetEminewhether 
a student (inducing transfer students) will be under CORE or the new 
program, please see http//genedumiedu/ or contact Doucjas Roberts, 
Associate Dean for General Education (roberts@umdedu). 

BROAD OUTCOME GOALS FOR THE CORE CURRICULUM 
[Approved October 6, 2005 by the University Senate CORE Committee] 

After compl eti on of CORE Program requi rements students shoul d be abl e to: 
1. demonstrate understand ng of maj or f i ndi ngs and i deas i n a vari ety 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 107 



of di sci pi i nes beyond the maj or; 

2. demonstrate understand ng of methods, ski 1 1 s, tool s and systems 
used i n a vari ety of di sci pi i nes, and hi stori cal , theoreti cal , sci enti f i c, 
technol ogi cal , phi I osophi cal , and ethi cal bases i n a vari ety of 
disciplines; 

3. use appropri ate technol ogi es to conduct research on and 
communi cate about topi cs and questi ons and to access, eval uate and 
manage i nformati on to prepare and present the r work effectively to 
meet academic, personal, and professional needs; 

4. demonstrate critical analysis of arguments and eval uation of an 
argument's major assertions, its background assumptions, the 

evi dence used to support i ts asserti ons, and i ts expl anatory utility; 

5. understand and arti cul ate the i mportance and i nf I uence of 
diversity withi n and among cultures and societies; 

6. understand and apply mathematical concepts and models; and 

7. communi cate effectively, through written and oral communication 
and through other forms as appropri ate 

N ote: To vi ew L earni ng Outcome Goal s for each of the CORE categori es, pi ease 
vi sit: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/Learni ngOutcomahtm 

To obtai n a CORE Academic Planner and Record Keeper, visit your col lege 
advising office, or the Office of Undergraduate Studies (2130 Mitchell Building). 

WhoCompletesCORE? 

To earn a baccal aureate degree, al I students at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, 
Col I ege Park compl ete both a maj or course of study and a campus- wi de general 
education program Students who enter the University May 1990 and after 
compl ete CORE requi rements. 

Exceptions: Students who enter the U ni versi ty with ni ne or more credits earned 
before M ay 1990 from the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, or any other 
col I ege may compl ete thei r general educati on requi rements under the U ni versi ty 
Studies Program (USP), subject to certain limitations. (See"USP" and "Statute of 
Limitati ons' ' secti ons bel ow. ) A dvanced PI acement (A P) and other 
exami nati on- based credi ts do not count i n these determi nati ons. 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 108 

University Studies Program (USP) 

For detai I ed i nf ormati on about U SP requi rements, see undergraduate catal ogs 
dated 1992 or earl i er, or contact the CORE program at 2110 M ari e M ount Hall, 
301-405-9361. 1 nf ormati on on USP is also at: 

www.ugst.umd.edu/core/moreinfo/usp.html. NOTE: Students who graduate 
under USP requi rements A ugust 1994 and thereafter must f ul fi 1 1 the A dvanced 
Studi es requi rements descri bed i n the Fal I 1994 and subsequent catal ogs. (See 
CORE Advanced Studies section.) 

Statute of Limitations for Previous General Education Programs (GEP, 
GUR, USP) 

U ndergraduate students who return to the uni versi ty after A ugust 1987 no I onger 
have the opti on of compl eti ng general educati on requi rements under the ol der 
General Education Program (GEP) or the General University Requirements 
(GUR). Thereafter, following any substantive change in general education 
requi rements (I i ke the change i n Fal I 1990 from USP to CORE), undergraduate 
students returni ng or transf erri ng to Col I ege Park after a separati on of five 
conti nuous years must f ol I ow the requi rements i n effect at the ti me of re-entry. 
A n excepti on may be granted to those students who at the ti me of separati on had 
compl eted 60 percent of the general educati on requi rements then i n effect. 

Maryland Public Community Cd lege Students 

For the purpose of determi ni ng whi ch general educati on program i s requi red 
(CORE or USP), students transferring to the University of Maryland from 
M aryl and publ i c communi ty col I eges shal I be treated as i f thei r regi strati on dates 
were concurrent with enrol I ment at thi s university. 



CORE Prog-am Components 

1 FUNDAM E NTAL STUDI E S bui I d competence and conf i dence i n basi c 
wri ti ng and mathemati cs. M astery of these basi cs enhances success both duri ng 
and after col I ege Students begi n f ul f i 1 1 i ng F undamental Studi es requi rements i n 
thei r f i rst year at the U ni versi ty . 
www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/F undaSt. html 

2 Dl STRI BUTI VE STUDI ES focus on breadth, i ncl udi ng courses i n the 
f ol I owi ng categori es: L i terature; The H i story or Theory of the A rts; H umani ti es; 
Physical Sciences; Life Sciences; Mathematics and Formal Reasoning; Social or 
Pol itical Hi story; B ehavi oral and Sod al Sci ences; and I nterdi sci pi i nary and 
E mergi ng I ssues. Students general I y pursue Di stri buti ve Studi es i n the f i rst two 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 109 



years of the r course work. www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/D i strSt. html 

3. ADVANC E D STUDI E S al I ow students to enhance thei r degree and 
strengthen thei r cri ti cal thi nki ng and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s by taki ng two upper- 1 evel 
courses outsi de thei r maj or after 60 credits. Students may substitute an approved 
CORE Capstone course i n thei r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for one of 
these two courses, www. ugst. umd.edu/core/el ements/A dvanSt. html 

4 HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY gives students the opportunity to 
exami ne thei r i deas and val ues i n the I i ght of vari ous cul tural , i ntel I ectual , and 
social contexts. Diversity courses i ncrease knowledge of what constitutes 
di f f erence and i ncrease students' abi I i ty to I earn from and appreci ate peopl e, 
cultures, i deas, and art forms that are often different from those they know best. 
Students may compl ete the Cultural Diversity requi rement at any ti me before 
graduati on. www. ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/D i versi ty . html 



CORE Prog-am Outline 

(Requirements Outline; www.ugsLumd.edu/core/core req. html) 

I IMPORTANT NOTES about Fundamental and Distributive Studies 
courses 

• M U ST be sel ected from the approved CORE course I i sts to count toward 
CORE requirements. Atwww.ugst.umd.edu/core, click on What are the 
CORE Courses? for I i nks to the current I i sts of approved courses i n each 
CORE category. 

• M A Y al so be used to sati sfy col I ege, maj or, and/or supporti ng area 
requi rements if the courses also appear on CORE Fundamental or 
Di stri buti ve Studi es I i sts. 

• CORE courses MAY NOT betaken on a Pass-Fail basis. 

I . CORE Fundamental Studies 

Three Courses (9 credits) Requi red 

L One course in Academic Writing (Must be attempted within the first 30 
credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits) See 
http://www.eng1 ish.urnd.edu/academics/academicwriti ng 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 110 



Approved CORE Academic Writing Courses Select appropriate 
course based on requi rements I i sted. 

ENGL 101 Academic Writing 

ENGL 101A Academic Writing (M ust betaken if student has 

TSWE [SAT verbal subtest] score below 33) 

ENGL 101H Academic Writing (Honors Students) 

ENGL 101X A cademi c Wri ti ng (Students for whom E ngl i sh i s a 

second language may register for ENGL 101X instead of ENGL 

101.) 

Note Based on scores from either the TOEFL or MEIP, students 
may be required to complete a program of English language 
instruction for non-native speakers through the M El before being 
allowed to register for ENGL 101X. 

Exemptions from Academic Writing requirement 

• A P E ngl i sh L anguage and Composi ti on test score of 4 or 5, OR 

• SAT verbal score 670 or above for scores achi eved between 
May 1995 and February 2005. (In April 1995, the Educational 
Testi ng Servi ce re-centered the scores on the SAT. Students 
whose test scores are from before A pri I 1995 must have 
recei ved a score of 600 or above to be exempt from A cademi c 
Wri ti ng. Thi s re-centeri ng does not ref I ect a rai si ng of the 
requi rement for exempti on, but a change i n the scori ng system 
used by ETS. 

• I n M arch 2005, ETS began the use of a new SAT test for 

wri ti ng. I nf ormati on about exempti on i n connecti on wi th SAT 

tests taken after M arch 2005 wi 1 1 be avai I abl e at 

www.engl i sh. umd.edu/fw-program-general/f wp-exempti ons/. 

• Begi nni ng i n Fal I 2012, students under the new General 

E ducati on program wi 1 1 not be exempted from the A cademi c 
Writing requirement based on SAT scores. 

2 One course in Mathematics (Must be attempted within the first 30 
credits; must be passed within the first 60 credits) See 
www.ug5tuirri.edu/ccr e/course^ 

Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics Courses: 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 111 

MATH 110 Elementary Mathematical Models; OR 
MATH 112 Col I ege A I gebra wi th A ppl i cati ons and Tri gonometry; 
OR 

MATH 113 Col I ege A I gebra with Applications; OR 
MATH 115 Pre-cal cuius; OR 

Any 100-or 200-level MATH or STAT course except MATH 199, 
210, 211, 212,213, 214, and 274. 

Exemptions from Mathematics requirement: 

• SAT M ath score of 600 or above; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above in Calculus AB orBC; OR 

• A P score of 4 or above i n Stati sti cs; OR 

• CL E P Cal cul us Exam score of 50 or hi gher. 

• Begi nni ng i n Fal I 2012, students under the new General 
Educati on program wi 1 1 not be exempted from the 

M athemati cs requi rement based on SAT scores. 

Note If you are placed in the Developmental Math Program by the 
Mathematics Placement Exam you may be offered the opportunity 
to combine your Developmental course with the appropriate 
subsequent course of MATH 110, 111, 113, or 115 and thus finish 
both in one semester. For further information, please seethe 
Developmental Math Program web site 
www.rmth.umd.edu/undbrgraduate/courses/fsmhM 

3. One course in Professional Writing (taken after 60 credits). See 
www.uggLumd.edU/core/courses/F undamental/F unda-St-professional .html 

Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses: Select the 
appropri ate course based on requi rements or i nterests I i sted 

ENGL 390 Science Writing 

ENGL 391 A dvanced Composi ti on 

ENGL 392 Legal Writing 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 

ENGL 395 Writi ng for Health Professions 

ENGL 398 Topi cs i n Prof essi onal Wri ti ng 

Suffixed versi ons of the above course numbers al so f ulf i 1 1 the CORE 
Prof essi onal Wri ti ng requi rement. 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 112 



Exemption from Professional Writing Requirement 

• Grade of "A" in ENGL 101 (NOT ENGL 101A or ENGL 
101X ), except for students maj ori ng i n E ngi neeri ng. A 1 1 
E ngi neeri ng maj ors must take ENGL 393. 

• Begi nni ng i n Fal I 2012, students under the new General 
Educati on program wi 1 1 not be exempted from the Prof essi onal 
Writing requirement based on a grade of "A" in ENGL 101. 

Note No exemption from the Professional Writing requirement will 
be granted for achievement on SAT verbal exam Professional 
Writing courses cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies 
requirements. 

1 1 . CORE Distributive Studies 

N i ne Courses ( 28 credi ts) Requi red 

See the most current I i sti ngs of approved CORE courses at 
www. ugst. umd.edu/core, or the onl i ne Schedul e of CI asses at 
www. testudo. umd. edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

L H umanities and the Arts-three courses requi red: 

• One course from L i terature (HL) list: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/H L .html , and 

• One course from The H i story or Theory of the A rts ( H A ) I i st: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Distri buti ve/H istoryCo.html and 

• One more course from L i terature ( H L ) , OR The H i story or Theory of the 
Arts (HA), OR Humanities (HO) lists. HO List: 

www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/H umani ti esCo. html 

Note: There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the 
Humanities (HO) list 

2 The Sciences and Mathematics- three courses requi red: 

• U p to two courses from Physi cal Sci ences (PL/PS) I i sts 

PL List: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Distri buti ve/Physi cal LabCo.html 
PS List: 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 113 

www. ugst. unTi.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/Physi cal Courses, html 

• U p to two courses from L if e Sci ences (LL/LS) lists 

LL List: 

www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/L ifeLabCo.htm 

LS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/L ifeCo.html 

• U p to one course from M athemati cs and Formal Reasoni ng (M S) I i st 

MS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/M athCo.html 

Notes: At least one science course MUST include or be accompanied 
by a lab taken in the same semester (LL or PL lists only). More than 
one lab course may be taken. Courses must be taken from at least 
two of the three lists. There is no specific CORE requirement for a 
course from the Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) list At 
least two life and/or physical science courses must be taken (PL, PS, 
LL, and LS lists). The third Sci ences and Mathematics course may 
be another science selection or may be chosen from the Mathematics 
and Formal Reasoning (MS) course lists. 

3. Social Sciences and Hi story-three courses required: 

• One course from Sod al or Pol i ti cal H i story (SH ) I i st 

SH List: www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/Soci alCo.html and 

• Two courses from Behavi oral and Sod al Sci ences (SB ) I i st 

SB List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/B ehavCo.html 

4 Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues (CORE CODE: IE) 

OPTIONAL CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES CATEGORY 
EFFECTIVE BEGINNING FALL 2005 

The IE category features courses that provide an interdisciplinary 
examination of issues (theory, questions, methods) across CORE 
areas, or present a significant portion of content that does not fit 
into any of the specific CORE areas but deals with contemporary 
issues, emerging disciplines, or other categories of knowledge, skills, 
and values that lie outside these areas. 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 114 

Students may take only one I E course i n pi ace of only one of the 

following: 

• The thi rd course i n the H umani ti es and the A rts category (one H L and one 
HA must betaken) OR 

• The thi rd course i n the Sci ences and M athemati cs category (two sci ence 
courses chosen from PL , PS, L L , or L S I i sts i ncl udi ng at I east one course 
from the LL or PL lists must betaken) OR 

One SB course i n the Soci al Sci ences category (one SH and one SB must 
betaken) 



• 



Seethe CORE website at www.ugst.umd.edu/corefor details on 
how to use the I E opti on. 

IMPORTANT NOTES ON THE IE OPTION 

• I E is an optional CORE distri buti ve studies category; Students may fulfi 1 1 
CORE requi rements without taki ng an I E course 

• Only one I E course may be counted toward fulfi 1 1 i ng CORE Di stri buti ve 
Studi es requi rements. 

• Whether a student takes an I E course or not, total CORE Distri buti ve 
Studi es course and credi t requi rements remai n the same: at I east 9 courses 
and 28 credits. 

I E L i st: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/l E . html 

III. CORE Advanced Studies 

Two Courses (6 credits) Requi red 

Students may choose thei r two Advanced Studi es courses from a wi de range of 
upper-l evel off eri ngs outsi de thei r maj ors. Good choi ces i ncl ude courses that 
mesh wi th or expand educati onal goal s or other i nterests, i ncrease knowl edge, 
and strengthen cri ti cal thi nki ng and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s. 

CORE Advanced Studies Requirement Two upper- 1 evel (300- or 400- 1 evel) 
courses outside the major taken after 60 credits. Students may substitute a CORE 
approved seni or capstone course i n thei r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for 
one of the two requi red Advanced Studi es courses. Enrol I ment i n CORE 
Capstone courses wi 1 1 be subj ect to departmental gui del i nes. The other course 
must be outsi de the maj or. Students compl eti ng doubl e maj ors or doubl e degrees 
wi 1 1 have f ul f i 1 1 ed the campus A dvanced Studi es requi rement, unl ess thei r 
pri mary maj or or col I ege has addi ti onal requi rements. The student's academi c 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 115 

col I ege determi nes whether or not a course i s "outsi de the maj or" for the purpose 
of f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Advanced Studi es. 

The following may NOT be used to fulfil I Advanced Studies requirements 

• Professional Writi ng courses (courses that meet the Fundamental Studies 
upper- 1 eve! writing requirement); 

• courses used to meet Di stri buti ve Studi es requi rements; 

• i nternshi ps, practi ca, or other experi enti al I earni ng types of courses; 

• courses taken on a pass/f ai I basi s. 

One i ndependent studi es course ( mi ni mum of three credi ts, outsi de the maj or) 
may be used toward A dvanced Studi es requi rements as I ong as i t i s consi stent 
wi th the rul es above and the f acul ty member supervi si ng the i ndependent study 
agrees that i t i s appropri ate for A dvanced Studi es. 

Notes: CORE Capstone courses trust be taken within the major. A senior thesis 
(mini mum of 3 credits) or successful completion and defense of an honors thesis 
in either the Honors College or a Departmental Honors Program (mini mum of 3 
credits) counts as CORE Capstone credit. 

CORE Capstone List 

www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/A dvanced/CapstoneCo. html 

IV. CORE Human Cultural Diversity 

One Course (3 credits) Requi red 

See the CORE Diversity Listat www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Diversity.html 

or the onl i ne Schedul e of C I asses at 

www. testudo. umd. edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on: (a) the history, status, treatment, 
or accompl ishment of women or mi nority groups and subcultures; (b) 
non-Western culture, or (c) concepts and implications of diversity. 

Note: A number of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy CORE 
Distributive Studies, Advanced Studies, or a college, major, and/or supporting 
area requirement 

Study Abroad and Satisfying Core Requirements 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 116 

Students may use study abroad to earn credit toward U ni versity of M aryland 
CORE Distributive and/or Advanced Studies requirements. All students 
consi deri ng study abroad must meet with a Study A broad Advi sor and compl ete 
the Perrri ssi on to Study A broad form (avai I abl e at the Study A broad Off i ce) . 
The Study A broad Off i ce deterrri nes i f the course work wi 1 1 be compl eted 
through an accredi ted academi c program and be el i gi bl e for transfer credi t. U pon 
approval , the number of credits wi 1 1 be deterrri ned for each course. How the 
courses wi 1 1 apply to a student's graduati on requi rements wi 1 1 be deterrri ned by 
the student's advi si ng col I ege CORE Di stri buti ve Studi es equi val end es (if 
appl i cabl e) must be shown cl earl y on the Study A broad form wi th approval s 
from the U M academi c departments whi ch offer si mi I ar courses. CORE 
A dvanced Studi es cri teri a al so appl y to Study A broad courses students wi sh to 
count toward CORE A dvanced Studi es. Some col I ege/departmental gui del i nes 
and restrictions may apply. 

Parti ci pati on i n a study abroad program with the successful compl eti on and 
transfer of at least 9 credits abroad automatical ly waives a student's CORE 
H uman C ul tural D i versi ty requi rement. 



Approved Courses for theCORE Program 



Visit the CORE WebsitBatwww.ugst.umd.edu/corefor program 
descriptions for the requi rements in each CORE Category, course lists and 
further details. 

Notes about the lists 

1. At the Web si te I i sted above, cl i ck on WhatamtheCORE Courses? for I i nks 
to the current I i sts of approved courses i n each CORE category. N ote that 
courses are added and del eted over ti me. A sel ecti on of the approved courses i s 
offered each semester. 

2. Some courses are approved for CORE for one semester only to offer students 
sped al opportuni ti es. The one-ti me approval I i st changes each semester. Go to 
www, uqst. umd. edu/core/ and cl i ck on WhatamtheCORE Courses?, then cl i ck 
on One-TimeOnly Courses. 

3. Course numbers and ti ti es change from ti me to ti me. See the CORE Web si te 
I i sted above for updates. 



5. General Education Requirements (CORE) Page 117 



4. 1 n a parti cul ar semester, courses may be cross- 1 i sted or shared by more than 
one department and may appear under more than one course number. I f 
cross-l i sted or shared courses are approved for CORE, this i nformati on wi 1 1 be 
avai I abl e i n the onl i reschedule of CI asses at Testudo, 
www. testudo. umd. edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html . F requent i instances i ncl ude 
courses with prefixes AASP, AAST, AM ST, CMLTJ WST, LGBT, and WMST. 

5. For i nformati on about Honors (HONR) courses that are approved for CORE, 

pi ease refer to the onl i ne resources noted above and the H onors Col I ege websi te: w 
www, honors, umd.edu 

6. For information about CORE Fundamental Studies courses, pi ease see the 
F undamental Studi es secti on above 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagell8 

6. TheCdlegesand Schools 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND PRESERVATION (ARCH) 

1298 A rchi tecture B ui I di ng, 301-405-8000 
www.arch.unxl.eclu 
arci nfo@umd.edu 
Dean: David Conrath 

Associate Dean(s): Marie Howland, GerritKnaap 
Assistant Dean(s): Ingrid Farrell 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a four-year pre- professional undergraduate program 
I eadi ng to the B ache! or of Sci ence degree i n archi tecture. The School al so offers graduate programs I eadi ng to the 
prof essi onal degrees of M aster of A rchi tecture, M aster of H i stori c Preservati on, M aster of Communi ty PI anni ng, and 
M aster of Real Estate Devel opment, as wel I as j oi nt prof essi onal degrees and certi f i cates. The School offers a 
post- professional Master of Sci ence in Architecture degree and a Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design. 
Students graduati ng wi th the undergraduate maj or i n archi tecture ty pi cal I y requi re two years to compl ete the curri cul um 
I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree i n architecture. PI ease see the graduate catal og for more i nf ormati on on graduate 
programs at the School of A rchi tecture. 

The School is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA). 

Students recei ve ri gorous and comprehensi ve i nstructi on from a f acul ty whose members are acti ve i n prof essi onal 
practi ce or research. M any f acul ty members have di sti ngui shed themsel ves across the prof essi onal spectrum and 
represent different approaches to architectural design. Their individual areas of expertise include architectural design 
and theory, history, architectural archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, and historic preservation. 
Visiting critics, I ecturers, and the K ea D i sti ngui shed Professor augment the f acul ty ; together they provi de students wi th 
the requi si te exposure to contemporary realities of archi tectural desi gn. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Accrecftations 

N A A B - 1 n the U ni ted States, most state regi strati on boards requi re a degree from an accredi ted prof essi onal degree 
program as a prerequisite for licensure The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole 
agency authori zed to accredit U .S. prof essi onal degree programs i n architecture, recogni zes three types of degrees: the 
Bachelor of Architecture, the M aster of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 
6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, dependi ng on the extent of its conformance with established educational 
standards. 

Doctor of Architecture and M aster of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre- professional undergraduate 
degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional 
education. However, the pre- prof essi onal degree is not by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. 

The University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning& Preservation offers thefollowingNAAB-accredited 
degree programs: 

• M .Arch (pre- professional degree +60 graduate credits) 

• M. A rch(non- pre- prof essi onal degree + 109 credits) 

Next accreditation visit for both programs: 2011 

Facilities 

The school i s housed i n a modern bui I di ng provi di ng desi gn workstati ons for each student, a 300 seat audi tori um and 
seminar and classroom facilities. The Great Space, an atrium at the center of the School, is the location for collaborate 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagell9 



proj acts, desi gn revi ews, cri ti ques, and a van ety of events that that bri ng the archi tecture program together. Facilities 
include a well -equipped woodworking and model shop, computer labs, digital output and digital fabrication. The 
A rchi tecture L i brary , one of the f i nest i n the nati on, offers conveni ent access to a current ci rcul ati ng col I ecti on of more 
than 24,000 vol umes, 6,000 peri odi cal s, and an extensi ve sel ecti on of reference materi al s. Rare books and sped al 
acquisitions include a col I ecti on relating to international expositions and the 11, 000- volume National Trust for Historic 
Preservation Li brary. The Elizabeth D. Alley Visual Resources Col I ecti on includes a reserve col I ecti on of 500,000 
si ides on archi tecture, landscape archi tecture, urban planning, architectural science, and technology as well as 
audi o-vi sual equi pment for cl assroom and studi o use 

Upper level summer programs include travel to Rome, Paris, Turkey, Great Britain, and other countries. Students may 
earn di rect credi t doi ng hands-on restorati on work and by attendi ng I ectures by vi si ti ng archi tects, preservati oni sts, and 
schol ars. U ndergraduate Seni ors and graduate students may al so parti ci pate i n a Study A broad Semester at the School 's 
facility at Kiplin Hall, in northern England. 

Admission Requirements 

www.lep.umd.edu for i nformation on applying to the Li rrited Enrol I ment Program i n the Fal I semester only 

www.transf eradvi si ng. umd.edu for transfer advi si ng questi ons 

Architecture is a Li mited Enrol I ment Program (LEP). See www. I ep.umd.edu for i nformati on on Li ni ted Enrol I ment 
Programs and a I i nk to A rchi tecture A 1 1 students must meet the requi rements for admi ssi on to the L E P by appl yi ng for 
a Revi ew at approxi mately 45 credits. 

F reshman Admission. Students wi th the most competi ti ve records from hi gh school gai n di rect admi ssi on to the 
U ndergraduate A rchi tecture Program through the U ni versi ty A drni ssi ons Of f i ce. E arl y appl i cati on i s strongl y 
recommended due to I i mited space i n the program. Admitted freshmen have access to the necessary advi si ng through 
their initial semesters to determine if architecture is an appropriate major for their interests and abilities. 

Once a student has earned 45 credi ts, he/she must have successful I y compl eted a sped f i c set of courses 
called "gateway" requi rementsNote Only one' gateway' or performance review course may be repeated 
to earn the required grade and that course may only be repeated once F reshmen who are admi tted to 
archi tecture must appl y for a 45 credi 1 1 i mi ted enrol I ment revi ew on F ebruary 1st duri ng the r forth semester. 
To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, these students must demonstrate the r abi I i ty to compl ete the f ol I owi ng 
"gateway" requirements: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirements 

• Distributive StudiesCORE requirements 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 wi th a grade of 3. or hi gher i n each course 

• MATH 220, PHYS 121 and one of the courses** listed below withamini mum grade of 2.0ineach and an 
overal I mi ni mum grade poi nt average of 2.67 i n al I three. Thi s gui del i ne typi cal I y al I ows for one grade of C ' 
across these three courses. 

** Students must take one of the courses below to compl ete the Mathematics and the Sciences Distributive Studies 
CORE requirement: 

• ENSP101(3) Environmental Science (LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mpli cati ons of Global Change (PS) 

• PHYS 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics II (PL) 

Students may be enrol I ed i n A RCH 226 and compl eti ng the r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous with the 45 credit 
I i ni ted enrol I ment review during the rfourth semester. A minimumcumulativeGPA of 2.00 in all collegelevel 
coursework i s al so requi red. I n addi ti on, the revi ew wi 1 1 incl ude an assessment of two I etters of recommendati ons, 
transcripts, an essay, and a portfolio, the nature of which is specified by the A rchi tecture Program. PI ease contact the 
Undergraduate Architecture Advisors at archadvise@umd.edu for a 45 Credit Limited Enrollment Review Application 
normally available in October prior to the February submission. The application, detailed portfolio requirements and 
deadl i nes are also avai I abl e onl i ne at www.arch.umd.edu. See the STU DENTS tab for i nformati on on Student Affai rs. 

Note Freshmen students are admitted to the School duri ng the Fal I semester only. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel2C 



Transfer Admission Requirements Transfer students who wi sh to study A rchitecture must f i rst gai n 
admission to the University and then apply to the LEP at the earl i est opportunity fol lowi ng completion of the 
"gateway" requirements. Transfer students, and students enrol led on campus who wish to join the LEP, 
apply for the same 45 credit I irrited enrollment review outlined above Admission to transfer students is very 
competi ti ve and vari es from year to year due to I i mi ted space. To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, transfer 
students must demonstrate thei r ability to compl ete the fol I owi ng "gateway" requi rements: 

• Fundamental Studies CORE requirement 

• Distributive StudiesCORE requirement 

• A RC H 170, 225, 226, and 242 wi th a grade of 3.0 or hi gher i n each course 

• MATH 220, PHYS 121 and one of the courses** listed below withamini mum grade of 2.0ineach and an 
overal I mi ni mum grade poi nt average of 2.67 i n al I three. Thi s gui del i ne typi cal I y al I ows for one grade of 'C ' 
across these three courses. 

** Students must take one of the courses below to compl ete the Mathematics and the Sciences Distributive Studies 
CORE requirement: 

• ENSP101(3) Environmental Science (LS) 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments (PS) 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology (PS) 

• GEOL 123/METO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mpli cations of Global Change (PS) 

• PHY S 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 (PL) 

Students may be enrol I ed i n A RCH 226 and compl eti ng thei r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous with the 45 credit 
I i ni ted enrol I ment revi ew. A mi ni mum cumul ati ve G PA of 3.00 or above i n al I col I ege I eve! coursework i s requi red. 
I n addi ti on, the revi ew wi 1 1 i ncl ude an assessment of two I etters of recommendati ons, transcri pts, an essay, and a 
portfolio, the nature of which isspecified by the A rchitecture Program. Please contact the Undergraduate A rchitecture 
Advisors at archadvise@umd.edu for a 45 Credit Li mi ted Enrol I ment Review A ppl i cation normally avai lable i n 
October pri or to the F ebruary subrri ssi on. The appl i cati on, detai I ed portf ol i o requi rements and deadl i nes are al so 
availableonlineatwww.arch.umd.edu. See the STUDENTS tab for information on Student Affairs. 

N ote M any outstandi ng transfer candi dates appl y i n F ebruary each year. Compl eti on of the above requi rements does 
not guarantee admi ssi on i nto the L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program 

Appeals Students who are deni ed adrri ssi on as a freshman and feel that they have extenuati ng ci rcumstances may 
appeal i n wri ti ng to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, Mitchell B ui I di ng. Students deni ed admi ssi on at the 45 
Credit Limited Enrol I ment Review may appeal in wri ting directly to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of 
Architecture, Planning and Preservation. For further information, contact the Counsel or for Limited Enrollment 
Programs at 301-314-8385. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/Degree Options 

I n the f i rst two years of col I ege, di recti y admi tted students and those seeki ng to transfer i nto the School of A rchi tecture, 
PI anni ng and Preservation shoul d adhere to the fol I owi ng curri cul um: 

Credits 

CORE/ELECT General Education (CORE) and Electives 30 

UNIV1O0 The Students in the University 1 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing (CORE) 3 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I (CORE) 3 

ARCH 170 Introduction to the Bui It Environment (CORE) 3 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I (CORE) 4 

ARCH225 Hi story of World A rchi tecture I 3 

ARCH226 Hi story of World A rchi tecture 1 1 3 

A RCH 242 Drawing I 3 

One from the following: 3 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel21 



ENSP101 Environmental Science (LS) 

GEOG140 Coastal Environments (PS) 

GEOL 120 Envi ronmental Geol ogy (PS) 

GEOL123+ Causes and Implications of Global Change(PS) 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physics II (PL) 

Total Credits 56 

-+GEOL 123 is also offered as A OSC 123 and as GEOG123 

Basic CORE requirements are fulfilled in the first 2 years, while Advanced CORE requirements are satisfied after 
students have completed 60 credits. 

If admitted after completing 56 credits; students are expected to cornpletethefdlowingrequirenienteforatotal 
of 120 credits: 

Third Year Credits 

ARCH227 History of World A rchitecturelll 3 

ARCH400 Architecture Studio I* 6 

ARCH410 Architectural Technology I 4 

ARCH401 Architecture Studio 1 1 6 

ARCH411 Architectural Technology II 4 

ENGL391 Advanced Composition 3 

ELECT Directed Electives 3 

CORE Core Requirements 3 

Total 32 
Fourth Year 

ARCH402 ArchitectureStudiolll 6 

ARCH412 Architectural Technology III 4 

ELECT Directed Hi story of Architecture Elective** 3 

ARCH403 Architecture Studio IV 6 

ARCH413 Architectural Technology IV 4 

ELECT Directed Electives 6 

CORE CORE Requirements 3 

Total 32 

Total Credits 120 

♦Courses are to betaken in sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in course titles. 
**Di rected A rchitecture hi story courses; 

ARCH 420 H i story of A meri can A rchi tecture 

A RC H 422 Hi story of G reek A rchi tecture 

A RC H 423 H i story of Roman A rchi tecture 

A RC H 433 H i story of Renai ssance A rchi tecture 

A RC H 434 Hi story of M odem A rchi tecture 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel22 



ARCH 435 H i story of C ortemporary A rchi tecture 

Advising 

E nteri ng students are advi sed by the U ndergraduate A dvi sors I ocated i n the School 's M ai n Off i ce. A dvi si ng i s 
mandatory for al I undergraduate archi tecture maj ors each semester. Students must meet wi th an academi c advi sor to 
di scuss the r academi c pi an and course sel ecti on. Students can make an appoi ntment for advi si ng onl i ne by vi siti ng 
www.arch.umd.edu and clicking on the STUDENTS tab and Advising. Students may also contact the advi sing office 
viaarchadvise@umd.edu. Walk- in appointments may be avail able Students may usethearchadvise@umd.edu email 
at any ti me. Students shoul d al ways i ncl ude the r f ul I name, U I D and contact i nf ormati on i n any emai I 
correspondence. The advi si ng off i ce may be cl osed duri ng certai n criti cal weeks duri ng the semester when advi sors 
need to focus on the r own academi c deadl i nes. The M ai n Of f i ce front desk wi 1 1 have i nf ormati on on these cl osures. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Architecture Student Assembly represents the student body. Assembly members are elected from undergraduate 
and graduate cl asses. Representati ves attend Faculty M eeti ngs, serve on committees, and organi ze the A rchi tecture 
Program Retrospecti ve at the end of each semester. 

The School of A rchi tecture, PI anni ng, and Preservati on sponsors a chapter of the A meri can I nsti tute of A rchi tecture 
Students (Al AS), the national association for architecture students. The Al AS chapter sponsors a variety of activities 
including an annual Career Fair, Beaux Arts Ball, fieldtrips, conferences, workshops, and other events throughout the 
academic year. 

The E mergi ng G reen B ui I ders i s the student organi zati on dedi cated to promoti ng sustai nabi lity. M embers organi ze 
exhi bits, a publ i c I ecture, a seri es of I unchti me tal ks, and other activities. 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and chapter of N OM A S i s aff i I i ated wi th the nati onal prof essi onal organi zati on N OM A . 
N O M A S i s a group of students from a vari ety of backgrounds pursui ng archi tecture degrees at the undergraduate and 
graduate I evel s, i nterested i n contri buti ng to the U M D School of A rchi tecture, PI anni ng and Preservati on by bui I di ng a 
sense of communi ty based on shared experi ences uni que to our di verse student body. 

Financial Assistance 

M any f i nanci al awards are offered to freshman upon adrri ssi on. A ny questi ons about f i nanci al ai d for freshman adrri ts 
shoul d be di rected to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drni ssi ons and the Of f i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. 

Each year, the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation offers a number of merit-based scholarships to 
qual i f yi ng undergraduate students. M any are offered to students parti ci pad ng i n study abroad programs. I nterested 
students are encouraged to appl y for these i n earl y Spri ng. I nf ormati on i s avai I abl e at www.arch.umd.edu. PI ease note 
that most of these schol arshi ps are reserved for students i n the studi o sequence of the program. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal , state, and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. F reshmen and sophomores are strongl y encouraged to vi si t the OF SA earl y i n the r tenure at the U ni versi ty 
of M aryl and to determi ne any schol arshi ps they may be el i gi bl e f or i n the f ol I owi ng years. 

For more information, visit: vwuw.fi nancialaid.umd.edu. 

Research Units 

National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education 

1112 PreinkertFieldhouse, Col lege Park,301-405-6788 
www.smartgrowth. umd. edu 
Dr. GerritKnaap 

The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education is a non-partisan center for research and leadership 
training on Smart Growth and related land use issues nationally and internationally. Founded in 2000, the National 
C enter for Smart G rowth i s a cooperati ve venture of four U ni versi ty of M aryl and school s: A rchi tecture, PI anni ng and 
Preservati on; Publ i c Pol i cy; A gri cul ture and N atural Resources; and E ngi neeri ng. The rri ssi on of the Center i s to bri ng 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel23 



the di verse resources of the U ni versi ty of M aryl and and a network of nati onal experts to bear on i ssues i n I and 
devel opment, resource preservati on and urban growth - the nature of our communi ti es, our I andscape and our qual i ty 
of I i f e -- through i nterdi sci pi i nary research, outreach and educati on, thereby establ i shi ng the U ni versi ty as the nati onal 
leader in this field. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES (AG NR) 

0108 Symons Hal 1 , 301-405-2078 

agnr.umd.edu 

eweJss@umd.edu 

Dean: Cheng-i Wei 

Associate Dean(s): Leon H. Slaughter, Nick Place, Adel Shi rmohammadi 

Assi stant Dean(s) : Ray Stri ckl i n 

The Col I ege of A gri culture and N atural Resources offers a vari ety of academi c programs that appl y sci ence, 
management desi gn, and engi neeri ng to i mprove the worl d i n whi ch we I i ve and work. F eedi ng the worl d's popul ati on, 
devel opi ng sci enti f i cal I y- based I and use practi ces and pol i ci es, understandi ng ani mal and pi ant bi ol ogy, i mprovi ng 
nutrition and its effects on human health, conservi ng and restoring ecosystems, and profitably managi ng farms and 
agri busi nesses i n harmony wi th the envi ronment are all vital concerns of the C ol I ege. I ntegrati ng the use and protecti on 
of natural resources i n the product] on of food and nursery crops i s a chal I enge faci ng students. 

I n addi ti on to course work, undergraduates have opportuni ti es to work cl osel y wi th f acul ty i n state-of-the-art faci I i ti es 
including those for ani mal sciences, dietetics, environmental sci ence and technology, landscape architecture, plant 
sci ences, and veteri nary medi ci ne The Col I ege al so serves as the academi c home of the M aryl and Campus of the 
Virginia- Mary I and Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. Nearby resources such as the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Beltsvi lie Agricultural National Research Center, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug 
Administration, the Smithsonian I institution and the National Zoo, M aryland's Departments of Agriculture and Natural 
Resources, and the Patuxent Wi I dl ife Research Center enhance teachi ng, research, i nternshi p, and career opportuni ti es 
for students. Field study courses offered in Azerbaijan, Brazil, Belize, Costa Rica, Italy, Peru, Russia, andTaiwan, and 
a study- abroad program i n A ngers, France expose students to other cultures and envi ronments. Learni ng opportuni ti es 
are al so strengthened through student i nvol vement i n such co-curri cul ar acti viti es as the Col I ege H onors Program 
AGNR Undergraduate Research Program career programs, leadership workshops, and student clubs. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Educati onal opportuni ti es i n the Col I ege of A gri culture and N atural Resources are enhanced by the proxi mity of several 
research units of the federal government. Teachi ng and research acti viti es i n the Col I ege are conducted with the 
cooperati on of sci enti sts and prof essi onal peopl e i n government posi ti ons. Of parti cul ar i nterest are the N ati onal 
Agricultural Research Center at Beltsvi lie, the Nati onal Agricultural Library, the Nati onal Arboretum andtheFood 
and D rug A drri ni strati on. 

I nstructi on i n the basi c bi ol ogi cal and soci al sci ences, and I andscape desi gn i s conducted i n modem, 

technol ogi cal I y-equi pped cl assrooms and I aboratori es. The appl i cati on of basi c pri nci pi es to practi cal si tuati ons i s 

demonstrated for the student i n numerous ways. I n addi ti on to on-campus faci I iti es, the col I ege operates 

several educati on and research facilities throughout Maryland. Horticultural and agronomic crops, turf, beef, horses, 

dai ry cattl e, and poul try are mai ntai ned under practi cal and research condi ti ons and may be used by our students. 

These centers, as wel I as other sel ected I ocati ons on and off campus al so serve as I i vi ng I aboratori es for envi ronmental 

studies. 

Admission Requirements 

I I is recommended that students enteri ng the Col I ege of A gri culture and N atural Resources have compl eted a hi gh 
school preparatory course that includes: English, 4 units; mathematics, 3 units; biological and physical sciences, 3 units; 
and hi story or social sciences, 2 units. The Landscape Architecture major isalirrited enrollment program(LEP). See 
chapter 1 for general I i mi ted-enrol I ment program admi ssi on pol i ci es. 



Urtderg-aduateDe^eeRequirements/De^eeOpticris 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel24 



Departments in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources offer the foil owing programs of study: 

Agricultural and Resource Economics: Business Management; Agricultural Science; 
Environmental and Resource Pol icy; Food Production; International Agriculture; and Political 
Process. 

Animal Sciences: Animal Care and M anagement; Equine Studies; Laboratory Animal Care; 
Sci ence/Preprof essi onal ; and A ni mal B i otechnol ogy 

Combined Agriculture/Veterinary Medicine 

Environmental Science and Policy: Environments; Agriculture, Environmental Economics, 
Environmental Restoration, Soil, Water, & Land Resources, and Wildlife Resources & 
Conservation. 

Environmental Science and Technology: Concentrations in Ecological Technology Design, 
Environmental Health, Soil and Watershed Science, or Natural Resources M anagement. 

Plant Sciences: H orti cul ture and C rop Productj on, L andscape M anagement PI ant Sci ences, 
Turf and Golf Course M anagement, and Urban Forestry 

General Agricultural Sciences 

L andscape Architecture 

Natural Resources Management: Environmental Education/Park Management; Land and 
Water Resource M anagement; and PI ant and Wi I dl ife Resource M anagement 

Nutrition and Food Science: Dietetics; Food Science; and Nutritional Science 

Students graduati ng from the Col I ege must compl ete at I east 120 credits with a grade poi nt average of 2.0 
i n al I courses appl i cabl e toward the degree Requi rements of the maj or and supporti ng areas are I i sted under 
i ndi vi dual program headi ngs i n the Departments, M aj ors and Programs secfj on of thi s si te. 



Advising 

Each student in the Col I ege is assigned a faculty advisor to assist in selecting courses, accessing academic enrichment 
opportuni ti es, and maki ng strategi c career deci si ons. A dvi sors normal I y work wi th a I i rri ted number of students and are 
abl e to gi ve i ndi vi dual gui dance. B oth freshmen enteri ng wi th a def i ni te choi ce of curri cul um and transfer students are 
assi gned to departmental advi sors for counsel and pi anni ng of al I acaderri c programs as soon as possi bl e Students 
have access to additi onal advi si ng through thei r home departments undergraduate program off i ce and through the 
col I ege's student servi ces off i ce A G N R Peer M entors, acaderri cal I y tal ented and uni versi ty- engaged uppercl assmen, 
provi de an additi onal advi si ng resource for students i n the col I ege 

Sped f i cs of advi sor assi gnment are avai I abl e i n the undergraduate off i ce of each department. 
Departments and Centers 

Undergraduate credit instruction is offered by the Departments of Animal and Avian Sciences (ANSC), Agricultural 
and Resource Economics (A REC), Environmental Science andTechnology(ENST), Nutrition and Food Science 
(NFSC), and PI ant Science and Landscape Architecture (PSLA). Additionally, the Environmental Science and Policy 
( E N SP) maj or i s based and admi ni stered wi thi n the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources; i t offers 
sped al i zati ons advi sed wi thi n thi s col I ege as wel I the col I eges of B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences, C hemi cal , 
Mathematical and Natural Sciences. Also, the A gri cultural Science and Technology maj or within PSLA of fers students 
the opportuni ty to doubl e maj or i n A gri cul ture E ducati on. A ddi ti onal courses are provi ded through the 2-year 
certi f i cate program i n the I nsrj tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture. 

Minors 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel25 



Academi c M i nors provi de students an opportunity to expand or compl ement the r maj or by taki ng additi onal courses 
( 15-24 credits) i n a coherent f i el d of study. Students i nterested i n a mi nor shoul d contact the undergraduate program 
of f i ce of the department off eri ng the mi nor. C urrentl y the f ol I owi ng are approved rri nors ( wi th the off eri ng department 
i n parentheses) i n the col I ege 

Agribusiness Economics (Agri cultural and Resource Econorri cs) 

Environmental Economics and Policy (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development (Agri cultural and Resource Econorri cs) 

Landscape Management(Plant Science and Landscape Architecture) 

Soil Science (Environmental Science and Technology) 

Living- Learning Programs 

The col I ege sponsors, through its Envi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program the Envi ronment, Technol ogy and 
Economy curriculum in College Park Scholars. Admission to Col lege Park Scholars is selective and by invitation only. 
For further i nformati on, see U ndergraduate Studi es, Col I ege Park Schol ars Program i n the Col I eges and Schools 
section of this site. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

The I nstitute of Applied Agriculture offers 60-credit certificate programs designed primarily for professional 
devel opment. M aj ors offered i ncl ude A gri busi ness M anagement, E qui ne B usi ness M anagement, G ol f C ourse 
Management Golf Course Construction Management, Landscape Management, Ornamental Horticulture, Sports Turf 
M anagement and Turfgrass M anagement. Some two-year program students conti nue on i n regul ar four- year programs 
i n the col I ege and several of the col I ege's maj ors al I ow I i mi ted use of I nsti tute courses i n the r programs. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

The Col I ege of A gri culture and N atural Resources i s the most popul ar choi ce for students who wi sh to pursue 
veteri nary medi ci ne. Two excel I ent maj ors not to be rri ssed are housed i n the Department of A ni mal and A vi an 
Sciences. The A gri cultural and Veterinary Medicine major off ers a student an accelerated academic path with all 
recommended courses for veteri nary school and the opportuni ty to appl y at the end of the j uni or year. The 
Sci ences/Pre-Professi onal maj or offers a student a four year academi c path with al I recommended courses for 
veteri nary school and the opportuni ty to appl y upon recei pt of the bachel or of sci ence ( B . S . ) degree. 

College Honors Program 

Students may appl y for admi ssi on to the Col I ege H onors program after compl eti ng 60 credi ts wi th a rri ni mum 3.2 
GPA in a program within the Coll ege Honors students work with afaculty mentor and must take at I east 12 credits of 
honors courses i ncl udi ng a seni or thesi s. I nterested students shoul d contact the r f acul ty advi sor. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student parti ci pad on i n prof essi onal soci eti es, cl ubs, and i nterest groups i s extensi ve i n the col I ege, and students f i nd 
opportunity for vari ed expressi on and growth i n the f ol I owi ng organi zati ons: 

AGNR PeerMentors; AGNR Student Ambassadors; AGNR Student Council; Alpha Zeta; Alpha Gamma R ho; Animal 
and Avian Sciences Graduate Student Association; Block and Bridle; Collegiate4-H; Food and Nutrition Club; 
Landscape Architecture Student Association; Natural Resources Management Society; SigmaAlpha; UM Equestrian 
Club; UM Food Sci ence Club; UM Student Chapter of Golf Course Superintendents Association of America; and 
V eteri nary Sci ence C I ub. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of scholarships are avail able for students enrol led in the Col I ege of A gri culture and Natural Resources. 
These i ncl ude 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel2C 



AGNR Alumni Association Scholarship; AGNR General Scholarship; A rthurM. A halt Memorial Scholarship; 
Attorney General's Agricultural and Natural Resources Scholarship; Professor J ohnAxley Memorial Scholarship; 
Eileen Barnett Scholarship; Beltsvi lie Garden Club Scholarship; B ruce and Donna Berl age Scholarship; Chester F. 
Bletch Endowment; Bowie-Crofton Garden Club Scholarship; FrankD. BrownMemorial Scholarship; J osephByrd 
F oundati on Schol arshi p; J onas and J oan C ash Student A ward Schol arshi p; C hapel V al I ey L andscape H onorary 
Scholarship; George Earle Cook, Jr. Scholarship; ErnestT. Cull en Memorial Schol arshi p; J ai me Dannemann 
Scholarship; R.F. DavisMemorial Schol arshi p; J erryV. DeBarthe Memorial Scholarship; WilliamR. DeLauder 
Scholarship; FrankJ. DudaTurfgrass Scholarship; MyloS. Downey Memorial Scholarship; Equine Studies 
Scholarship; ExploreAGNR Scholarship; J amesR. Ferguson Memorial Scholarship; Kenneths. Fowler Memorial 
Endowed Scholarship; ThomasA. Fretz Agriculture and Natural Resources Schol arshi p; James & Sarah Goddard 
Memorial Scholarship; WilliamD. Godwin Endowed Scholarship; Golf Course Builders of America Association 
Foundation Scholarship; ManassesJ. & SusannaJarboeGroveScholarship;TomHartsockAnimal Management 
Scholarship; H. Palmer Hopkins Scholarship established by Charles W. Coale, J r. & Ellen Kirby Coale; Charles & J udy 
I ager Schol arshi p; Land Grant Schol arshi p; J ames & Gertrude Learner Schol arshi p; Donal d Lei shear I nternati onal 
Travel Scholarship; LeeMajeskie Dairy Youth Scholarship; Mary I and Greenhouse Growers Association Scholarship; 
James R. & PatriciaM. Miller Outstanding Senior Scholarship; John and Marjorie Moore International Agriculture& 
Natural Resources Student Travel Schol arshi p; J ames and DessieMoxley Scholarship; Paul R. Poffenberger Memorial 
Schol arshi p; J enniferRusso Memorial Scholarship; Ross& Pauline Smith Scholarship; J. Herbert Snyder Educational 
Schol arshi p; Southern States Cooperati ve Schol arshi p; H i ram I . Sti ne M emori al Schol arshi p; T. B . Symons M emori al 
Scholarship; TIC Gums Scholarship; Vansvi lie Farmers Club Scholarship; A.V. V ierhel I er Scholarship; Siegfried 
Weisbergerjr. Memorial Schol arshi p;Theo& Georgianna Miles Weiss Memorial Scholarship; and the WilliamR. 
Wi nsl ow Schol arshi p. 

The Col lege is privileged to offer additional support in the form of interest-free loans through the Catherine Brinkley 
L oan F und whi ch are avai I abl e to students who are resi dents of M aryl and and progressi ng i n programs wi thi n the 
Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources. 

Awards 

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Alumni Chapter provides recognition each year for the Outstanding Senior in 
the two-year and four-year programs. 

Research Units 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station 

The M aryl and A gri cultural Experi ment Stati on (M A ES) supports research conducted pri mari I y by 120 faculty 
scientists located within the Col lege of A gri culture and Natural Resources. Faculty use state-of-the-art facilities such as 
a new Research G reenhouse C ompl ex and E nvi ronmental Si mul ator, as wel I as 10 off- campus research I ocati ons, for 
research i n the sci ence, busi ness, pol i cy, and practi ce of agri culture. MAES supports research that benefits consumers 
and producers al i ke; for exampl e, our si gnif i cant focus on the envi ronment protects val uabl e natural resources such as 
the C hesapeake B ay . U ndergraduate students al so benef i t from mentori ng by M A E S-supported f acul ty and i nstructi onal 
use of M A E S f aci I i ti es statewi de 

University of Maryland Extension 

The University of Maryland Extension educates citizens in the application of practical, research- based knowledge to 
critical issues in agricultural and agribusiness including aquaculture; natural resources and the envi ronment; human 
development, nutrition, diet, and health; youth development and 4-H; and family and community leadership. The 
statewi de program i ncl udes more than 180 faculty and support staff I ocated i n 23 counti es, the City of Balti more, four 
regi onal centers, and the U ni versi ty of M aryl and's C ol I ege Park and E astern Shore campuses. I n addi ti on, more than 
15, 000 vol unteers and ci ti zens i n M aryl and gi ve generousl y of thei r ti me and energy. 

Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (CFS3) 

The Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (CFS3) provides world-class research, education and outreach on 
issues related to food and water defense, safety and protection. Housed i n the Department of Nutrition and Food 
Sci ence, thi s new center wi 1 1 provi de addi ti onal opportuni ty for students to become i nvol ved i n i ssues of si gni f i cance 
for homeland security. For information on CFS3, pi ease see agresearch.umd.edu/CFS3/index.cfmor call 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel27 



301-405-0773. 

Harry R. Hughes Center for Agro-Ecology, I nc. 

The Harry R. Hughes Center for Agro-Ecology, I nc. is a private, non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization affi Mated with the 
U ni versity of M aryl and. The Center bri ngs together diverse i nterests from the agri cultural , forestry, and envi ronmental 
corrmuniti es for the purpose of retai ni ng M aryl and's worki ng I andscapes and the i ndustri es they support whi I e 
protect] ng and i mprovi ng the heal th of the C hesapeake B ay and i ts tri butari es. F or further i nf ormati on see 
agroecol .umd.edu/or cal I at 410-827-6202. 

J oint I nstitute For Food Safety and Nutrition 

TheJ oint I nstitute For Food Safety and Nutrition (J IFSAN), established between theUS FDA and the University of 
M aryl and i n 1996, i s a j oi nrj y admi ni stered research and educati on program F or i nf ormati on on J I F SA N , see 
www.j ifsan.umd.edu/ or cal I 301-405-8382. 

Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center 

The Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center (NRAC) is one of five Regional Aquaculture Centers established 
bytheU. S. Congress for the United States. Funded by the USDA, and representing 12 states and the District of 
C ol umbi a N RA C devel ops and sponsors cooperati ve regi onal research and extensi on proj ects i n support of the 
aquacul ture i ndustry i n the northeastern U ni ted States. F or further i nf ormati on see www. nrac. umd. edu/ or cal I 
301-405-6085. 

Studmt Engagement and Service Units 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus 

C ol I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources 

Valerie Ragan, Director, Centerfor Public and Corporate Veterinary Medicine 
1202 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, 301-314-6820 

Email: vragan@umd.edu 

www.vetmed.umd.edu 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medici ne is operated by the University of Maryland and the 
V i rgi ni a Pol ytechni c I nsti tute and State U ni versi ty . E ach year, 30 M aryl and and 50 V i rgi ni a resi dents compri se the 
entering class of a four-year program leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM ). 

The first three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic I nstitute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. The final 
year of i nstructi on i s gi ven at several I ocati ons, i ncl udi ng the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

A student desi ri ng admi ssi on to the col I ege must compl ete the pre- veteri nary requi rements and appl y for admi ssi on to 
the prof essi onal curri cul um. A drri ssi on to thi s program i s competi ti ve, and open to al I M aryl and resi dents. A 1 1 
M aryl and resi dents' appl i cati ons are processed at the C ol I ege of V eteri nary M edi ci ne, M ary I and C ampus, U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

I nstitute of Appl ied Agriculture (Two-Year Program) 

Col I ege of A gri cul ture and Natural Resources 

Glori Hyman, Acting Director 

2123 J ul I H al 1 , 301-405-4685 

E-mail: iaa@umd.edu 

www.iaa.umd.edu 

The I nstitute of Appl ied Agriculture (I AA) awards academic certificates in Agri business Management Equine 
Business Management, Golf Course M anagement Golf Course Construct] on Management, Landscape Management, 
Ornamental Horticulture, Sports Turf Management, and Turf grass M anagement. As a two-year program, the I AA hasa 
separate admi ssi on pol i cy. U pon compl eti on of the program students are wel come to transfer to the U ni versity of 
M aryl and, C ol I ege Park; U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ni versi ty C ol I ege; and other school s. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel28 



For more information about the I AA, its admissions procedures, and requirements, contact the Institute of Applied 
Agriculture, 2123J ull Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742-2525. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2088 
www. arhu. umd. edu 
Dean: Bonnie Thornton Dill 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es embraces a heterogeneous group of di sci pi i nes that study human experi ence, 
thought expressi on and creati vi ty . A 1 1 val ue the devel opment of cri ti cal thi nki ng, f I uent expressi on i n wri ti ng and 
speech, sensitivity to ethical and aesthetic issues, and a complex understanding of history and culture. Departments and 
programs in Arts and Humanities prize vigorous intellectual debate in a diverse community. While they have strong 
i ndi vi dual i denti ti es, they are al so i nvol ved i n i nterdi sci pi i nary studi es. Thus students wi 1 1 f i nd, for exampl e, courses i n 
the Department of E ngl i sh that approach I i terature i n i ts hi stori cal contexts, courses i n the Department of H i story that 
adopt f emi ni st perspecti ves, courses i n the D epartment of A rt H i story and A rchaeol ogy that study A fri can pol i ti cs, and 
soon. 

F urther exampl es of the sped al opportuni ti es avai I abl e to students in this richly vari egated col I ege i ncl ude an 
exceptional visual resource center in Art History and Archaeology, theEnglish Department's computer-based writing 
classroom, and an AT&T Foreign Language Classroom Additionally, students may add an international experi ence to 
the r undergraduate educati on by parti cipatinginanARHU -sponsored study abroad program i n N i ce, A I cal a, Sevi 1 1 a, 
or Genoa or an exchange program in the United Kingdom, Singapore, orjapan. The educational vistas open to students 
i n Dance, M usi c, and Theatre are enhanced enormousl y by the CI ari ce Srni th Center for the Perf ormi ng A rts, whi ch 
houses those three departments. Students may al so parti ci pate i n one of the Col I ege's f i ve I i vi ng-l earni ng programs: 
Honors Humanities, Col I ege Park Scholars in the A rts, Digital Cultures and Creativity, Jimenez-Porter Writers' House, 
and L anguage H ouse (see be! ow) . 

Admission Requirements 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n one of the creati ve or perf ormi ng arts are encouraged to seek trai ni ng i n the ski 1 1 s 

associ ated wi th such an area pri or to matri cul ati on. Students appl yi ng for entrance to these programs may be requi red to 

audi ti on, present si i des, or submi t a portf ol i o as a part of the adrni ssi on requi rements. 

Recruitment 

1120L Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2096 

www. arhu. umd. edu 

Admissions Coordinator: J. Darius Greene 

The Col I ege's A drni ssi ons Coordi nator serves as a resource and contact person for prospecti ve students i nterested i n 
A rts and H umani ti es degrees, and as a I i ai son to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es off ers the degree of Bachel or of A rts i n the f ol I owi ng f i el ds of study: 

American Studies: www.amst.umd.edu 

Arabic Studies: www.arabic.umd.edu 

Art www.art.umd.edu 

Art History and Archeology: www.arthistory-archaeology.umd.edu 

Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies: www.ceres.umd.edu 

C hi nese L anguage and L i terature www. chi nese. umd. edu 

Classics: www.classics.umd.edu 

C I assi cal H umani ti es (see classics) 

Communication: www.corrm.umd.edu 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel29 



Dance www.clance.unxl.edu 

English Language and Literature: www.english.unxl.edu 

French Language and Literature www.french.umd.edu 

Germanic Studies: www.german.umd.edu 

Greek (see CI assies) 

History: www.history.umd.edu 

Italian Language and Literature: www.italian.unxl.edu 

J apanese Language and Literature www.japaneseumd.edu 

J ewish Studies: www.jewishstudies.umd.edu 

Latin (see CI assies) 

Lati n and Greek (see Classics) 

Linguistics: www.ling.umd.edu 

M usi c: www. musi c. umd.edu (Students majoring in Music may pursue a Bachelor of Music degree) 

Persian Studies: www.persian.umd.edu 

Philosophy: www.philosophy.umd.edu 

Romance Languages: www.romancelanguages.unxl.edu 

Russian: www.russian.umd.edu 

Spanish and Portuguese www.spanish.umd.edu or www.portuguese.umd.edu 

Theatre www.theatre.umd.edu 

Women's Studies: www.womensstudies.umd.edu 

The Col lege also offers certificate programs in Women's Studies, East A si an Studies, and Latin American Studies. 

Major Requirements 

• A 1 1 students must compl ete a program of study consi srj ng of a maj or (a f i el d of concentrati on) and someti mes 
supporti ng courses as sped f i ed by one of the academi c uni ts of the Col I ege N o program of study shal I requi re i n 
excess of 60 semester hours. 

• A major shall consist, inaddition to the lower-division departmental prerequisites, of 24 to 40 hours, atleastl2 
of which must be in courses numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must betaken at the University of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

• A maj or program someti mes requi res a secondary f i el d of concentrati on (supporti ng courses) . The nature and 
number of these courses are deterrri ned by the maj or department. 

• No grade I ower than C may be used to f ul f i 1 1 maj or or supporti ng course requi rements. N o course for the maj or or 
support modul e may be taken Pass-Fai I . 

• Students shoul d consul t the uni t i n whi ch they wi 1 1 maj or for sped f i c detai I s; certai n uni ts have mandatory 
advising. 

Graduation Requirements 

The f ol I owi ng Col I ege requi rements appl y onl y to students earni ng B achel or of A rts degrees f rom the Col I ege of A rts 
and H umaniti es. These requi rements are i n additi on to or i n f ulf i 1 1 ment of campus and departmental requi rements. For 
i nf ormati on concern ng the B achel or of M usi c i n the School of M usi c, students shoul d consul t a M usi c advi sor. 

Students who doubl e maj or i n A R H U and another col I ege on campus must compl ete the A R H U G I obal E ngagement 
requirement and 45 hours of upper- level credit. 

All A rts and Humani ties freshmen (excluding students in Col I ege Park Scholars, Digital Cultures and Creativity, 
Honors Humanities, or University Honors) must take UNIV 101, The Student in the University and I ntroducb on to 
Computer Resources, duri ng thei rfirst semester on campus. 

Distribution: To encourage advanced mastery of materi al , a mi ni mum of 45 of the total of 120 semester hours must be 
upper- 1 evel work (i.e., courses numbered 300-499). A maj ority of the 45 credits wi 1 1 be earned i n the f ulf i 1 1 ment of 
requi rements for the maj or and CORE . 

The Global Engagement Requirement 

To expand A R H U students' understand ng of other cul tures and I anguage i n an i ncreasi ngl y gl obal soci ety , the col I ege 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel3C 



has expanded and renamed its current "Foreign Language Requirement' to the "Global Engagement Requirement." 
L earni ng a second I anguage produces deep knowl edge of cul tural as wel I as I i ngui sti c di ff erences whi I e openi ng 
pathways for common understandi ng. The new requi rement wi 1 1 retai n the current requi rement i n f orei gn I anguage 
study as an opti on whi I e addi ng two addi ti onal opti ons. 

Option 1 Study of a Foreign Language 

Requirement Students will take foreign I anguage coursework to the designated level atUMD. PI ease consult an 
A R H U advi sor f or a I i st of the approved course sequences. 

Option Z Cultural Immersion through Study Abroad 

Requirement Students wi 1 1 parti ci pate i n a semester I ong Study A broad experi ence i n a country where English is not 
the pri mary I anguage. 

The study abroad experi ence must i ncl ude: 

1. At I east the f i rst year/el ementary I evel I anguage of the host country before or duri ng the experi ence (or equi val ent 
as determi ned by the A RH U f orei gn I anguage pi acement pol i cy; 

2. A ref I ecti on component that wi 1 1 chal I enge students to asses thei r pre-departure, i n country and post study abroad 
experi ence (0-3cr); 

3. Parti ci pad on i n one of the f ol I owi ng pre-approved engagement experi ences: 

• lnternship(l-6cr) 

• Servi ce L earni ng (0 cr) 

• A living situation involving daily interaction with host nationals (eg., a pre-approved home stay with 
a host nati onal f ami I y) (0 cr) 

• Other - an engagement experi ence approved i n advance of departure 

Students must devel op a I earni ng contract wi th an A R H U advi sor i n advance of study i ng abroad i n order for the 
experi ence to count for the G I obal E ngagement Requi rement Past study abroad experi ences will not be consi dered 
retroactively. 

Option 3: 1 ndiwdually-deagned Engagement Experience 

Requirement Students may al so create an i ndi vi dual I y-desi gned experi ence that achi eves the I earni ng outcomes of the 
gl obal engagement requi rement. 

Thi s opti on must i ncl ude 

1. At I east the f i rst year/el ementary I evel I anguage of the host country before or duri ng the experi ence (or equi val ent 
as determi ned by the A RH U f orei gn I anguage pi acement pol i cy) 

2. A pre-approved short- or I ong- term study abroad program that has been deemed appropri ate for i ncl usi on i n this 
opti on by A RH U in conj uncti on with the Educati on A broad Off i ce. 

3. Students must devel op a learning contract with an A RHU advisor and petition to have the experi ence approved in 
advance. 

Students proposi ng study abroad i n an E ngl i sh-speaki ng country must choose to study a I anguage that has si gni f i cance 
to the hi stori cal or current cul ture of the host country. Students wi 1 1 need to research and di scuss the i ntersecti on of the 
chosen I anguage and cul ture i n thei r peti ti on. 

Important notes 

1. Students al ready beyond the requi red I anguage needed to f ulf i 1 1 the G I obal Engagement Requi rement must 
document thei r I anguage prof i ci ency by taki ng a pi acement exam or equi val ent as determi ned by the A R H U 
f orei gn I anguage pi acement pol i cy. 

2. Students taki ng a f orei gn I anguage cl ass at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and on or after 9/15/2011 wi 1 1 need to take a 
f orei gn I anguage pi acement test. PI ease see an A RH U advi sor for detai I s. 

3. Students seeki ng exempti on from the G I obal E ngagement Requi rement must take the f orei gn I anguage pi acement 
test in an on-campus proctored environment PI ease see an A RHU advi sor for the proctored exam schedule. 

For more information, pi ease see an advi sor in the A RHU Office of Student Affairs, or call 301-405-2108. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel31 



Advising 

F reshmen and new transfer students have advi sors i n the A its and H umani ties Coll ege Of f i ce of Student Aff ai rs 
(301-405-2108) who assi st them i n the sel ecti on of courses. Students must see the departmental advi sor for the maj or. 
A 1 1 f i rst-year students ( both freshmen and transfers) , students who have compl eted 45- 55 credi ts, and seni ors who have 
compl eted 90- 100 credits, have mandatory advi si ng i n both the Col I ege and the department. For further i nf ormati on 
about advi sing, students should call theARHU Office of Student Affairs, 301-405-2108. 

Internships 

Several departments wi thi n A rts and H umani ti es have wel I - establ i shed i nternshi p opti ons. F or more i nf ormati on on 
i nternshi ps taken for academi c credi t, students shoul d contact the r departmental academi c advi sor. Typi cal I y, students 
must be i n good academi c standi ng and i n thei r j uni or or seni or year to compl ete a f or-credi t i nternshi p. They usual I y 
compl ete an appl i cati on and attach a current academi c transcri pt and the experi ence usual I y I asts for one semester. I n 
addi ti on to the si te experi ence, students wri te an anal ysi s of the experi ence i n conj uncti on wi th a f acul ty member i n 
thei r department. I nternshi ps wi th I i teracy programs andwiththeMarylandG eneral A ssembl y are avai I abl e through 
the English Department 301-405-3827. For assistance in locating an internship site, visitthe University Career Center 
at 3100 Hornbake Li brary, South Wi ng or do a search on the website www.careercenter.umd.edu 

Certification of High School Teachers 

A student who wi shes certi f i cati on as a secondary educati on teacher i n a subj ect represented i n thi s col I ege i s 
encouraged to speak with an advisor in Education Curriculum and I instruction (1207 Benjamin Bldg.) to discuss the 
di ff erent paths avai I abl e for certi fi cati on. A student may pursue secondary teacher certi f i cati on as an undergraduate 
wi th a doubl e maj or i n a content area and secondary educati on, pursue the f i ve-year i ntegrated master's program whi ch 
al I ows for the content maj or as an undergraduate and compl eti on of certi f i cati on and graduate degree requi rements i n a 
f i f th year, or appl y to the one-year i ntensi ve master's pi us certi f i cati on program. 

Departments and Centers 

Academic Computing Services 

1111 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2104 

www. arhu. umd. edu/tech 

Assistant Dean: Kathleen R. Cavanaugh 

Academi c Computi ng Servi ces (ACS) supports the use of technol ogy by faculty, staff, and students i n the Col I ege of 
A rts and H umani ti es. A C S provi des desktop support servi ces for f acul ty and staff, support for the use of technol ogy to 
support teachi ng and I eami ng, and cl assroom technol ogy support servi ces. 

The Art Gallery 

1202 A rt-Soci ol ogy B ui I di ng 

301-405-2763 

www. artgal I ery . umd. edu 

umdtheartgal lery.bl ogspot com 

Di rector: J ohn Shi pman 

The A rt G al I ery presents exhi bi ti ons, I ectures, f i I m seri es, resi denci es, and publ i cati ons f ocusi ng on contemporary art 
and vi sual cul ture. Opportuni ti es for museum trai ni ng and arts management experi ence are avai I abl e to students 
through i ntern and work- study positi ons. 

David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African 
Diaspora 

1214 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-6835 
email: driskel lcenter@umd.edu 
www.driskellcenter.umd.edu 
Executive Director: Robert E. Steele 

TheDavidC. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel32 



Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park, celebrates the legacy of David C. Driskell - Distinguished 
University Professor Emeritus of Art, Artist, Art Historian, Collector, and Curator- by preserving the rich heritage of 
African American visual art and culture. Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, 
museum prof essi onal s, art adrri ni strators, and schol ars of col or, broadeni ng the f i el d of Afri can di aspori c studi es. The 
Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting Afri can American art as well as replenishing 
and expandi ng the f i el d. 

Consortium on Race* Gender, and Ethnicity (C RGE ) 

1208 ColeStudent Activities Bldg., 301-405-2931 
www.crge.umd.edu 
Director: Ruth E. Zambrana 
Assistant Director: Laura A. Logie 

The Consorti um on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) is a University- wide initiative promoting 1) intersectional 
theory, pedagogy and research, 2) mentori ng and trai ni ng of faculty and graduate students of col or, and 3) thoughtful 
and dynami c i nterdi scipli nary col I aborati on. C RG E 's work expl ores the i ntersecti ons of race, gender, ethni ci ty and 
other di mensi ons of i nequal i ty as they shape the construct] on and representati on of i denti ti es, behavi or and compl ex 
social relations. CRGE has become a national leader in issues of diversity and inclusion and has worked diligently to 
I ead the way i n i nnovati ve i ntersecti onal i nterdi scipli nary research vi a col I oqui um research i nterest groups, seed grant 
funding of junior faculty, and collaborative partnerships. Our work has become crucial tothefulfillmentof theUM 
mi ssi on of achi evi ng excel I ence i n areas of schol arshi p, pedagogy and communi ty servi ce 

Language Media Services 

1204J im®iez Hall, 301-405-4925; Fax: 301-314-9752 

Email: langweb@umd.edu 

www. I anguages. umd. edu/l ms 

Janel Brennan-Tillmann, Instructional Designer 

J eff M aurer, Coordi nator 

Language Media Servi ces(L MS) is a support unit within the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures which 
provi des audi o vi sual equi pment and mul ti medi a support f or SL L C f acul ty, staff and students. L M S provi des f i rst ti er 
support and trai ni ng for f acul ty teachi ng i n the ni ne technol ogy enhanced cl assrooms I ocated i n J i menez H al I and the 
SLLC Language Technol ogy Classroom. Servi ces f or SLLC faculty include equi pment and video/DVD loan, foreign 
I anguage program recordi ng, scanni ng of i nstructi onal materi al s, trai ni ng on equi pment use, tape dupl i cati on and 
conversi on, and di gi ti zati on of audi o and vi deo materi al s. Servi ces for students i ncl ude suppl ementary cl assroom 
audi otape and di gi tal audi of i I e di stri buti on and an i ndependent study space. Servi ces for non-SL L C f acul ty i ncl ude 
technol ogy cart and SLLC Technol ogy C I assroom reservati ons for a fee. 

FOLA 

1109 J i m®iez H al 1 , 301-405-4046 
www. I anguages. umd. edu/f ol a 
C oordi nator: N ai me Y aramanogl u 

The FOLA (Forei gn Language) Program enabl es qual if i ed students with hi gh moti vati on to acqui re a speaki ng 
knowl edge of a number of forei gn I anguages not offered i n regul ar campus programs. Whi I e i nstructi on i s basi cal I y 
sel f- di rected, students meet regul arl y wi th a nati ve-speaki ng tutor for practi ce sessi ons to rei nf orce what has al ready 
been covered through the i ndi vi dual use of books and audi o tapes or C Ds. F i nal exarri nati ons are admi ni stered by 
outsi de exarri ners who are sped al i sts i n the r f i el ds. 

Living-Learning Programs 

Honors Humanities 

1103 Wi com co H al 1 , 301-405-6992 
www. honorshumani ti es. umd. edu 
emai I : honorshumani ti es@umd.edu 
Di rector: Professor Val ®i e K . Orl ando 

E nteri ng freshmen parti ci pate by i nvi tati on i n H onors H umani ti es, a two-year I i vi ng/l eami ng program H onors 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel33 



H umani ti es i s the U ni versi ty of M ary I and's prerri er undergraduate program for academi cal I y tal ented students who 
have diverse intellectual ambitions in the humanities and arts or a desire to develop their education on a liberal arts 
f oundati on. The program i s organi zed around a sped al humaniti es curri cul um and a f i nal i ndependent research or 
creati ve proj ect (The K eystone Proj ect) that a student desi gns and executes wi th the gui dance of a f acul ty mentor. 
Honors Humanities provides students with stimulating seminars, exciting academic friendships, a lively home base in 
W i comi co H al I , and opportuni ti es to take advantage of the i ntel I ectual , cul tural , and artistic ri ches of thWashi ngton, 
D.C. region. Upon successful completion of the program, students earn a citation in Honors Humanities, and this 
presti gi ous ci tati on i s entered upon thei r uni versi ty transcri pts. 

College Park Scholars 

CPS i n the A rts: Professor H arol d B urgess 
www.scholars.umd.edu 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es and U ndergraduate Studi es co-sponsor a cross-di sci pi i nary Col I ege Park Schol ars 
program i n the A rts. Thi s two-year program offers the benef i ts of a smal I col I ege experi ence by provi di ng an exci ti ng 
li ving-l earni ng envi ronment where students across academi c di sci pi i nes I i ve, work, and study wi th thei r peers and 
devel op cl ose ti es wi th f acul ty advi sors. Students parti ci pate i n weekl y col I oqui a and numerous events i ncl udi ng an 
annual student- produced A rts Festival, creative workshops, original performances and special engagements with 
professional artists. 

A rts Schol ars are offered a wi de vari ety of opportuni ti es to see, di scuss and parti ci pate i n vi sual and pert ormi ng arts 
events, expl ore theoreti cal facets of the arts, and appl y thei r tal ents to f ami I i ar as we! I as new forms of creati ve 
expressi on. The A rts Schol ars program seeks to encourage students wi th di verse academi c i nterests to thi nk cri ti cal I y 
about the arts and engage i n active I eadershi p and advocacy for the arts throughout thei r academi c careers and beyond. 

J imdhez-Porter Writers' House 

0111 Dorchester Hall, 301-405-0671 
www. wri tershouse umd. edu 
Director: J ohnna Schmidt 

The J im®iez- Porter Writers' House(JPWH) is a living and learning program open to all majors. The program was 
concei ved and devel oped pri mari I y for upper-di vi si on students, but wi 1 1 consi der appl i cati ons from academi cal I y 
tal ented i ncomi ng freshmen who have a sol i d focus on creati ve wri ti ng. L ocated i n Dorchester H al I , the Writers' H ouse 
creates a campus-wide literary center to study creative writing especially in its cross-cultural and multilingual 
di mensi ons. Parti ci pants I i ve i n a cl ose communi ty of students who share an i nterest i n creati ng stori es, poems, pi ays, 
and i magi nati ve non-f i cti on. Students work wi th vi si ti ng wri ters, publ i sh a I i terary magazi ne, attend sped al readi ngs 
and col I oqui a, produce an annual I i terary f esti val , and recei ve notati on upon successful compl eti on of the program. 
C I ass si zes are smal I , and i ncl ude one-on-one f acul ty advi si ng sessi ons. A dmi ssi on to the Wri ters' H ouse i s 
competi ti ve, wi th onl y f i fty to si xty students I i vi ng and wri ti ng together each year. A ppl i cati ons can be obtai ned by 
contacting the director, orbyvisitingwww.writershouse.umd.edu. Final deadline for admission every year is March 1. 

Digital Cultures and Creativity 

www. honors, umd. edu/D i gi tal C ul tures. php 
Di rector: Professor M atthew K i rschenbaum 
F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease contact: 
dcc-honors@umd.edu 
Phone 301.405.2866 
Twitter: @umd_dcc 

Entering freshmen participate by invitation in Digital Cultures and Creativity (DCC), a two-year living/learning 
program that i s part of the uni versi ty's H onors Col I ege. Desi gned for the 21st century student who was bom i nto the 
worl d of wi ndows and the web, DCC provi des an i nnovati ve curri cul um and I earni ng communi ty that combi nes art, 
imagination, and global citizenship with new media and new technologies. Depending on individual interest, DCC 
students pursue acti vi ti es as vari ed as di gi tal musi c and vi deo producti on, di gi tal art, computer game desi gn, creati ve 
el ectroni c wri ti ng, vi rtual worl ds, and devel opi ng onl i ne communi ti es. Parti ci pad ng f acul ty range from A rts and 
H umani ties to Computer Sci ence to the Information School. DCC students are housed in Queen Anne's Hal I, one of the 
most attracti ve and col I egi ate resi dence hal I s on campus, central I y I ocated al ongsi de M cK el di n L i brary and renovated 
to contemporary standards- i ncl udi ng ai r condi ti oni ng. A 1 1 i ances wi th campus programs such as the M obi I i ty I ni ti ati ve 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel34 



( usi ng mobi I e da/ices I ikei Phones to enhance education and I earning) and the Maryland Institute for Technology in 
the H umaniti es keep students on the cutti ng edge, whi I e also exposi ng them to a network of speakers and events taki ng 
advantage of our proxi mi ty to I ocal i nsti tuti ons rangi ng from the Srri thsoni an to B ethesda Sof tworks. U pon successful 
completion of the 16-credit program students earn a citation i n Digital Cultures and Creativity which is entered i n the r 
uni versi ty transcri pts. 

Language House 

0107 St. M ary's H al 1 , 301-405-6996 
www. I anguages. umd. edu/l h 
Program Director: Dr. Phoenix Liu 
PhoenixL@umd.edu 

T he L anguage H ouse I mmersi on P rogram was thefirst living-l earni ng program on campus for students wi shi ng to 
i mmerse themsel ves i n the study of a f orei gn I anguage and cul ture. A total of 101 students I i ve i n one of ten cl usters 
(Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, J apanese, Persian, Russian or Spanish), which are housed in 19 
apartments i n St. M ary's H al I . Students must comrri t to speaki ng thei r target I anguage as they prepare meal s, study and 
socialize together, do household chores, etc. Faculty I iai sons work with students in each of the I anguage clusters, anda 
student M entor, a nati ve speaker of the I anguage, assi sts students i n the i mmersi on envi ronment. The goal of I anguage 
i mmersi on i s achi eved through acti vi ti es organi zed by the M entors, a I anguage- 1 earni ng computer I ab, an audi o- vi sual 
mul ti - purpose room and f orei gn tel evi si on programs recei ved vi a satel I i te. 

College Honors Program 

M ost departments in the Col lege of A its and Humani ties offer Departmental Honors Programs (DHP). DHPsare 
upper-division programs within the individual academic units. Students enrol led in Departmental Honors work 
i ndependenti y wi th f acul ty members i n subj ects of sped al i nterest, devel op and deepen thei r research ski 1 1 s, and, i n the 
process, earn an even stronger degree. Students must have a cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of at I east 3. to be 
admitted. For further information about individual Departmental Honors Programs and policies, consult with 
departmental advisors. 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES(BSOS) 

2148Tydings Hall, 301-405-1697 

www. bsos. umd. edu 

bsosadvi si ng@umd.edu 

Dean: J ohn Townshend 

Associate Dean(s): Katherine Pedro Beardsley, Wayne M cl ntosh 

Assistant Dean(s): Ann Holmes, Lucy Miller, KimNickerson 

The Col I ege of B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences i s compri sed of a di verse group of di sci pi i nes and f i el ds of study al I of 
whi ch emphasi ze a broad I i beral arts educati on as the f oundati on for understandi ng the envi ronmental , soci al , and 
cultural forces that shape our worl d. At the heart of the behavi oral and soci al sci ences i s the attempt to understand 
human bei ngs, both i ndi vi dual I y and i n groups. D i sci pi i nes i n the behavi oral and soci al sci ences use approaches that 
range from the sci enti f i c to the phi I osophi cal , from the experi mental to the theoreti cal . I ntegral to al I the di sci pi i nes, 
however, i s the devel opment and appl i cati on of probl em sol vi ng ski 1 1 s, whi ch i n combi nati on wi th other academi c 
ski 1 1 s, enabl e students to thi nk anal yti cal I y and to corrmuni cate cl earl y and persuasi vel y . Students i nterested i n human 
behavi or and i n sol vi ng human and soci al probl ems wi 1 1 f i nd many exci ti ng opportuni ti es through the programs and 
courses off ered by the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

• Each student must complete a rri ni mum of 120 hours of credit with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. 
Courses must i ncl ude the credits requi red i n the U ni versity's general educati on requi rements (CORE) and the 
sped f i c maj or and supporti ng course and grade requi rements of the programs i n the academi c departments 
off eri ng bachel or's degrees. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel35 



• Students i n B SOS must compl ete M ath and E ngl i sh by 60 credi ts. 

• Students must compl ete 15 upper I evel credi ts i n the students f i nal 30 credi ts. 

• All students are urged to speak with an academic advisor in their major and an advisor in the Col lege Advising 
Off i ce at I east two semesters before graduati on to revi ew thei r acaderri c progress and di scuss f i nal graduati on 
requi rements. 

Advising 

The BSOS Advi si ng Center, I ocated i n 2148 Tydi ngs H al I , coordi nates undergraduate advi si ng and mai ntai ns student 
records for behavi oral and soci al sci ence students. A dvi sors are avai I abl e to provi de i nf ormati on concemi ng U ni versi ty 
requi rements and regul ati ons, transfer credi t eval uati ons, and other general i nf ormati on about the U ni versi ty by 
appoi ntment from 9: 00 a. m to 5: 00 p. m M onday through F ri day. U ndergraduate advi sors for each undergraduate 
maj or are I ocated i n the department of f i ces. These advi sors are avai I abl e to assi st students i n sel ecti ng courses and 
educati onal experi ences i n thei r maj or area of study consi stent wi th maj or requi rements and students' educati oral goal s. 
For additional information pi ease visit www.bsos.umd.edu or cal I 301-405-1697. 

U ndergraduate Degree Requi remerrt^Degree Options 

• Each student must complete arrini mum of 120 hours of credit with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. 
Courses must i ncl ude the credits requi red i n the U ni versity's general educati on requi rements (CORE) and the 
sped f i c maj or and support ng course and grade requi rements of the programs i n the academi c departments 

off eri ng bachel or's degrees. 

• U pon enteri ng B SOS as freshman, transfer or by maj or change students must compl ete and subrni t a graduati on 
pi an to the col I ege advi si ng off i ce for revi ew and approval . 

• Students i n B SOS must compl ete M ath and E ngl i sh by 60 credi ts. 

• Students must compl ete 15 upper I evel credi ts i n the students f i nal 30 credi ts. 

• All students are required to compl ete an academic audit with an academic advisor in their major and an advisor in 
the Col I ege A dvi sing Office when they reach between 75-89 credits, approximately two semesters before 
graduati on to revi ew thei r academi c progress and di scuss f i nal graduati on requi rements. 



Departments and Centers 

The col I ege is composed of the foil owing departments, each offering a maj or program that leads to the Bachel or of Arts 
or the B achel or of Sci ence degree, as appropri ate 

Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es* 

Department of A nthropol ogy 

Department of Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Politics 

Department of Heari ng and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychol ogy 

Department of Soci ol ogy 

I n addi ti on, the col I ege i s a maj or contri butor to the E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Policy Program and sponsors several 
of its areas of concentration. 

*The Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es al so offers an undergraduate certifi cate requi ri ng 21 semester hours of 
course work. 

Minors 

Several departments within the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sci ences sponsor minors. Seeindividual department 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel3C 



or center websi tes for more i nf ormati on. A pproved rri nors i ncl ude 

• Black Women's Studies (Departments of African American Studies and Women's Studies) 

• Geographic I nf ormati on Science (Department of Geography) 

• Global Studies (two tracks): International Development and Conflict Management or Global Terrorism 

• H eari ng and Speech Sci ences (Department of H eari ng and Speech Sci ences) 

• I nternati onal Devel opment and Corf I i ct M anagement (Department of Government and Pol itics) 

• N eurosci ence (Departments of Psychol ogy and B i ol ogy) 

• Survey M ethodol ogy (J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy) 

• G I obal Terrori sm ( N ati onal Consorti um for the Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terrori sm) 



Living-Learning Programs 

CI VICUS Living and Learning Program 

0107 Somerset H al 1 , 301-405-8759 
Director: Dr. SueBriggs 

CIVICUSisatwo-yearlivingandlearningprogramintheCollegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences. Thisacademic 
ci tab on program i s centered on f i ve themes of civil society: citi zenshi p, I eadershi p, communi ty servi ce- 1 earni ng, 
community bui I di ng i n a di verse soci ety, and schol arshi p. 

About 130 diverse and energetic CI VICUS Associates take a common core of classes, live together in Somerset Hall, 
and parti ci pate i n ci vi c, communi ty servi ce, experi enti al , and other activities and proj ects on and off campus. 

CI VICUS was founded on the belief that to be engaged members of civil society we have an obligation to be aware of 
the worl d outsi de of the cl assroom and to act upon i ssues that affect the worl d i n whi ch we I i ve. 

Our courses and activities are i ntricately I i nked with each other and our communities. CI VI CUS Associates enrich thei r 
academi c work and expl ore career opportuni ti es by vol unteeri ng wi th non- prof i t organi zati ons and governmental 
agenci es and programs, creati ng thei r own communi ty servi ce proj ects, and i nteracti ng wi th f acul ty and communi ty 
I eaders. They are among the most i nvol ved students at M aryl and. CI V I CU S Associ ates compl ete a Capstone i nternshi p 
on campus or i n the DC metropol itan area as second semester sophomores. 

Selected students from all majors are invited to participate in the CI VI CUS Living and Learning Program when they 
appl y to the uni versi ty as f i rst year students, based on thei r I etters of recommendati on, i nvol vement i n hi gh school and 
the communi ty, admi ssi ons essays, and academi c transcri pts. 

CI VI CUS looks to invite students who will continue to strengthen and broaden their leadership ski I Is within the 
University and local communities. 

For more information, please visit: www.CIVICUS.umd.edu. 

College Park Scholars, International Studies 

1104 Centrevi 1 1 e H al 1 , 301-405-9304 
Faculty Director: Dr. James Glass 

One of twel ve Col I ege Park Schol ars living-l earni ng programs, the I nternati onal Studi es Program bri ngs together 
undergraduate students from a vari ety of di sci pi i nes who share an i nterest i n gl obal i ssues, pol i ti cs, and events. E ach 
enteri ng cl ass of approxi matel y si xty-f i ve students takes courses together duri ng the freshman and sophomore years. 
The maj ority of I nternati onal Studi es Schol ars resi de i n Centrevi 1 1 e H al I . 

I nternati onal Studi es was one of the ori gi nal four Col I ege Park Schol ars programs I aunched i n 1994, sponsored by the 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) and the Department of Government and Pol itics (GVPT). The 
Faculty Di rector and theTeachi ng Assistants al I have thei r roots i n the Department of Government and Pol itics. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel37 



The I ntemati onal Studi es Program wel comes students who wi sh to I i ve and I earn together and who have an i nterest i n 
expl ori ng i ntemati onal political, economi c, and cul tural i ssues. O ur program offers an opportuni ty to bui I d gl obal 
understand ng and gl obal awareness through academi c and experi enti al I earni ng. 

For more information, please visit: www.scholars.umd.edu/is/ 

Global Communities 

0119 Dorchester Hall, 301-314-7100 
Di rector: Dr. V i rgi ni a H auf I er 
gl obal communiti es@umd.edu 

G I obal Corrmuni ties isa two-year I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program that i s part of the uni versi ty's G I obal Studi es Program and 
issponsored by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS). Students participate in a combination of 
courses, extracurri cul ar opportuni ti es, and resi denti al I i vi ng organi zed around the theme of gl obal i zati on, i ts chal I enges 
and opportuni ti es. The program enri ches thei r understandi ng of the causes and consequences of the worl d's 
i nterconnectedness, and provi des academi c and i ntercul tural ski 1 1 s to hel p them address the i ssues i t rai ses. 

G I obal C ommuni ti es provi des a f oundati on for a vari ety of academi c maj ors and an entry poi nt to the G I obal Studi es 
M i nors. Students take two three-credi t courses on a theme rel ated to gl obal i zati on i n thei rfirst year. These 
i nterdi sci pi i nary courses are desi gned and taught by I eadi ng schol ars i n the soci al sci ences, and expl ore si gnif i cant 
i ssues through I abs, si mul ati ons, case studi es, and research. The second year of the program requi res experi enti al 
I earni ng through either a short-term study abroad opportunity, servi ce- 1 earni ng course, or i ntemshi p. There is a f i nal 
one- credi t capstone course i n the second year. U pon compl eti on of the 10- credi t program students recei ve a notati on on 
thei r transcri pt 

The program recogni zes that si gni f i cant I earni ng occurs outsi de the cl assroom. Courses are compl emented by regul ar 
field tripsto museums, i ntemati onal organi zati ons, embassi es, and other si tes that take advantage of our I ocati on i n the 
greater Washi ngton, DC area. A vari ety of events and acti vi ti es on campus bri ng the i ssues to I i f e. Students from al I 
comers of the worl d I i ve together i n the resi dence hal I , f osteri ng i ntercul tural communi cati on ski 1 1 s and bui I di ng a 
di verse and supporti ve community. 

G I obal Corrmuni ti es i s a sel ecti ve i nvi tati on-onl y program for enteri ng freshmen. 1 1 ai ms to enrol I a cl ass of 75 
students each year. The program seeks academical I y strong students who express i nterest i n i ntemati onal affai rs, have 
i ntemati onal or i ntercul tural experi ence, or si mpl y are open to the ki nd of experi ence we offer. 

F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t: www.gl obal communiti es.umd.edu 
Specialized Academic Programs 

Atlantic Coast - Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Alliance for GraduateEducationandthe 
Professoriate (AC -SBE Alliance) 

Director: KimJ . Nickerson 
301-405-7599 
knickerson(cD bsos.umd.edu 
www.acsbe.org 

The AC-SBE Alliance is comprised of the University of Maryland at College Park, the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, Howard University, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami. Thegoals of the AC-SBE 
Alliance are to increase the number of Underrepresented Minority (URM) students receiving Ph.D.s in SBE disciplines 
and to i ncrease the number of U RM s enteri ng the SB E prof essori ate TheAC-SBEAIIi ance recrui ts and prepares 
undergraduates to pursue doctoral degrees, assi sts students i n the transi ti on from B ache! or to Ph. D . programs, assi sts 
graduate students i n compl eti ng thei r Ph. D .s, and prepares graduate students for success. The Col I ege of B ehavi oral 
and Social Sciences (BSOS) i s the I eadi ng body attheUMDcampusf or this particular alii ance. BSOS also 
col I aborates withtheUMCPG raduate School and the U ni versi ty of M ary I and System's Promi se A 1 1 i ance for G raduate 
Education and the Professoriate (PROMISE AGEP). Through these relationships, students can participate in graduate 
training seminars and professional development activities. Inaddition, BSOS organizes an annual Summer Research 
I nitiativefor undergraduates in order to achieve the goals set by the AC-SBE Alliance 

College Honors Program 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel38 



U ndergraduate honors are offered to graduati ng students i n the departments of Afri can A meri can Studi es, 
Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice, Economics, Geography, Government and Politics, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

Dean's Academic Scholar. To be named a Dean's Academic Scholar is the highest academic award that a BSOS 
student can earn i n the Col I ege Dean's Schol ars are those graduati ng seni ors who have compl eted 60 credits at the U ni ve 
Universityof Maryland, Col I ege Park and have maintained a mini mum cumulative grade point average of 3.8. A 
student who has been found responsi bl e of a vi ol ati on of academi c i ntegri ty i s not el i gi bl e. 

Dean's L ist A ny student who has passed at I east 12 hours of academi c work under the regul ar gradi ng method i n the 
precedi ng semester, without fai I ure of any course, and with an overal I average grade of at I east 3.5, wi 1 1 be pi aced on 
the Dean's List. The Disti nguished Dean's List consists of students who have completed successful ly a mi nimum of 12 
credit hours i n a semester with a 4.0. 

Honor Societies. Students who excel i n the r academi c di sci pi i ne may be sel ected for membershi p i n an honorary 
soci ety . H onorari es for whi ch students i n B SOS are chosen i ncl ude: 

• Alpha Kappa Delta- Sociology 

• Alpha Phi Sigma-- Criminal Justice 

• Gamma Theta U psi I on - Geography 

• Orri cron Delta Epsi I on - Economi cs 

• Pi SigmaAlpha- Political Sciences 

• Psi Chi - Psychology 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students who major in the Behavioral and Social Sciences have a wide range of interests. The following is a I ist of 
student organi zati ons i n the di sci pi i nes and f i el ds of the B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences: 

• A nthropol ogy Student Associ ati on 

• Cri mi nal J usti ce Student Associ ati on 

• Economi cs Associ ati on of M aryl and 

• Geography Club 

• M aryl and N eurosci ence Soci ety 

• National Student Speech- Language and Hearing Assoc.(NSSLHA), MD Chapter 

• Pre-Medical Society 

• Soci ol ogy Col I ecti ve 

• The Society of African American Studies 

F or more i nf ormati on about these student organi zati ons or starti ng a new student group, pi ease contact the Off i ce of 
Campus Programs, A dele H. Stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174. 

Financial Assistance 

The col I ege offers several scholarships to its students (see below). Each scholarship has eligibility criteria. Scholarship 
i nf ormati on and appl i cati ons are made avai I abl e each f al I semester. Schol arshi p awards are granted for the f ol I owi ng 
f al I semester. The col I ege offers the f ol I owi ng schol arshi p awards: 

• M urray E . Pol akoff Schol arshi p A ward for A cademi c Excel I ence 

• lrv& Micki Goldstein Scholarship A ward for ComrritmenttD Service 

• Katherine Pedro & Roberts. BeardsleyScholarshipAwardforOutstandingLeadership 

• J ean & Robert Steel e Schol arshi p Award for Fi rst Generati on Students 

• Future Alumni Scholarship A ward for Financial Need (60 or more credits) 

F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t: www.bsos.umd.edu 

Schol arshi ps are someti mes gi ven at the department I eve! . C heck wi th your departmental advi sor or your di rector of 
undergraduate programs for more i nf ormati on regardi ng schol arshi p opportuniti es that may be avai I abl e to you. 

The N ati onal Schol arshi p Off i ce at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and provi des i nf ormati on on nati onal I y competi ti ve 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel39 



schol arshi ps at the undergraduate ( and graduate) I evel . F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t: www.schol arshi ps.umd.edu 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal , state, and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For more information, visit: www.fi nanci al ai d, umd, edu 

Research Units 

The Collegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences sponsors several special purpose, coll ege-wide research centers. These 
centers i ncl ude The Center for Substance A buse Research; The N ati onal Consorti um for the Study of Terrori sm and 
Responses to Terrorism and The Public Safety Training and Technology Assistance Agency. These interdisciplinary 
centers often offer i ntemshi ps and a sel ected number of undergraduate research assi stant opportuni ti es for i nterested 
students. These research experi ences offer excel I ent preparati on for future graduate study and/or j ob opportuni ti es i n 
the pri vate and publ i c sectors. A ddi ti onal I y, the col I ege offers computi ng servi ces through i ts Of f i ce of A cademi c 
Computi ng Servi ces. 

Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) 

4321 Hartwick Rd. Ste. 501, College Park, M D 20740 
301-405-9770 
www.cesar. umd.edu 
Director: Dr. Eric Wish 

Established in 1990, CESAR is a research unit sponsored by the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences. CESAR 
staff gather, anal yze, and di ssemi rate ti mel y i nf ormati on on i ssues of substance abuse and moni tor al cohol - and 
drug- use i ndi cators throughoutM aryl and. CESA R ai ds state and I ocal governments i n respondi ng to the probl em of 
substance abuse by providing the above-stated information, as well as technical assistance and research. Faculty 
members from across campus are i nvol ved wi th C E SA R- based research, creati ng a center i n whi ch substance abuse 
i ssues are analyzed from multi disciplinary perspectives. Students obtain advanced technical training and hands-on 
experi ence through the; r i nvol vement i n ori gi nal surveys and research. 

Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC) 

0124N Cole Student Activities Bui I ding, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-6403 

www.popcenter.umd.edu 

Director: Dr. Sandra H off erth 

The M aryl and Population Research Center (M PRC) is a multi disciplinary center dedicated to population- related 
research and housed in the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (B SOS) at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. Our pri mary goal i s to draw together I eadi ng schol ars from di verse di sci pi i nes to support, produce, and promote 
popul ati on- re! ated research. 

The cross-di sci pi i nary research i nterests of our f acul ty al I ow the M PRC to conti nual I y grow and make a uni que 
contri bution to the field of population studies. The M PRC's members i ncl ude faculty from the departments of African 
American Studies, Agricultural and Resource Economics, Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice, 
Economi cs, Fami ly Studi es, Geography, H uman Devel opment, thej oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy, the School 
of Public Policy, and Sociology. 

National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) 

3300 Symons H al I , U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, M D 20742 
301-405-6600 
www.start. umd. edu 
Director: Dr. Gary LaFree 

TheNational Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terror (START) isaU.S. Department of 
H omel and Securi ty Center of Excel I ence, tasked by the Department of H omel and Securi ty's Sci ence and Technol ogy 
Di rectorate with usi ng state-of-the-art theori es, methods, and data from the soci al and behavi oral sci ences to i mprove 
understand ng of the ori gi ns, dynarri cs, and soci al and psychol ogi cal i impacts of terrori sm STA RT, based at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, ai ms to provi de ti mel y gui dance on how to di srupt terrori st networks, reduce the 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel4C 



i nci dence of terrori sm, and enhance the resi I i ence of U .S. soci ety i n the face of the terrori st threat. 

Office of Academic Computing Services (OACS) 

0221 LeFrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 
301-405-1670 
www.oacs. umd. edu 
Director: Dan Navarro 

The Col I ege bel i eves strongl y that the study of behavi oral and soci al sci ences shoul d i ncorporate both quanti tati ve and 
computati onal ski 1 1 s. C onsequentl y, curri cul a i n most departments requi re some course work i n stati sti cs, quanti tati ve 
research methods, and i nf ormati on technol ogy. The BSOS Off i ce of A caderni c Computi ng Servi ces provi des 
undergraduate students in the Col I ege with both facilities and staff assistance to satisfy a broad range of 
computer- rel ated needs. OA CS operates f i ve computer cl assrooms and a sped al i zed graphi cs I ab that offer a wi de 
vari ety of popul ar software, col or and bl ack-and-whi te pri nti ng, and both text and graphi cs scanni ng. U ndergraduate 
students are al so encouraged to take advantage of OA CS's I earni ng resources, i ncl udi ng free computer and stati sti cs 
trai ni ng courses, hel p documentati on, a I i brary of computer- rel ated texts and free access to research data. 

Public Safety, Training and Technol ogy Asa stance (PSTTP) 

9001 Edmonston Rd. Ste. 300, Greenbelt, M D 20770 

301-489-1700 

www.hidta.org 

Di rector: Thomas H . Carr 

Establ ished i n 1994, the Publ i c Safety, Trai ni ng and Technol ogy Assi stance Program (PSTT) (formerl y the 
Washington/Baltimore HI DTA) is co- sponsored by theCollege of Behavioral and Social Sci ences and the Office of 
N ati onal D rug Control Pol i cy. Thi s program i s funded by Congress to hel p coordi nate and fund the f i ght agai nst 
drug- rel ated cri me and to treat drug-addi cted cri rri nal offenders. H I DTA efforts i ntegrate preventi on and I aw 
enforcement at the corrmuni ty I evel to reduce the i nvol vement of hi gh- ri sk youth i n drug traffi cki ng careers and 
cri rri nal behavi or. H I DTA al so works wi th pri vate i ndustry and government to form partnershi ps geared toward the 
development of commerci al software for use by I aw enforcement, cri rri nal j ustice, treatment and regul atory agenci es. 
The Washi ngton/ Balti more H I DTA empl oys a mul ti -di sci pi i nary approach that i ncorporates I aw enforcement 
treatment/cri mi nal j usti ce and preventi on through a regi onal strategy that i ncl udes al I these di sci pi i nes. Faculty 
members from across campus are i nvol ved wi th H I DTA - based research, and students obtai n advanced techni cal 
trai ni ng and hands-on experi ence through thei r i nvol vement i n data col I ecti on, ori gi nal surveys, geo-mappi ng and 
research. 



THE ROBERT H.SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS(BMGT) 

1570 Van M unchi ng H al 1 , 301-405-2286 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu 
undergradi nfo@rhsmith.umd.edu 
Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 
Associate Dean(s): Patricia Cleveland 
Assistant Dean(s): Brian Horick 

The Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness seeks to provi de the knowl edge and thought I eadershi p that transform students 
i nto agents of both economi c prosperi ty and transf ormati ve soci al change. The Srri th School i s accredi ted by A A CSB 
I nternational - The Associ ation to Advance Col I egi ate Schools of Busi ness, the premi er accredi ti ng agency for 
bachel or's, master's and doctoral degree programs i n busi ness admi ni strati on and accounti ng. www.aacsb.edu . 

A student i n the Srri th School of B usi ness, sel ects a maj or(s) i n one of the f ol I owi ng curri cul a: ( 1) A ccounti ng; (2) 
Finance; (3) General Business; (4)1 nformati on Systems; (5)1 nternational Business; (6) Supply Chain Management; (7) 
M arketi ng; or (8) Operati ons M anagement. U pper-di vi si on B M GT programs are offered at Col I ege Park and at they ni ve 
U ni versi ti es at Shadv G rove n M ontgomery C ounty . F or detai I s on the maj ors offered at Shady G rove vi si t 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove.htrri . 



Admission Requirements 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PageMl 



See "Admission Requirements and Application Procedures" chapter for general LEP admissions policies. 

Freshman Admission 

Direct admission to the Smith School is offered on space-avail able basis to first-time applicants who present the most 
competi ti ve academi c records. A 1 1 students admi tted di recti y to B M GT as freshmen must demonstrate sati sf actory 
progress. 

• A 1 1 students admi tted as freshmen must demonstrate sati sf actory progress (2. G PA or better) pi us compl eti on of 
Gateway courses (BM GT 220, BM GT 230, ECON 200 or 201, and MATH 220 or 140 - each with a mini mum 
grade of "C", 2.000 equivalent, or better) by the semester they reach 45 credits (excluding A P and ESL), at 
which time they will be revi ewed i n order to continue in the BMGT major. (Note Only one repeat of one single 
course to the set of Gateway courses will beaccepted to remain in BMGT. Appeals will be considered.) 

• Students must be i n the process of compl eti ng B M GT 221 and ECON 200 or 201 i n the semester i n whi ch they 
reach 60 credits. Students shoul d have compl eted 50% of CORE by the ti me they have reached 60 credits. 

Transfer Admission for Students from On or Off Campus 

A 1 1 students appl yi ng for admi ssi on to B M GT as transfer students, whether i nternal transfers al ready enrol I ed at U M C P 
or external transfer students enteri ng the uni versi ty f or the f i rst ti me, wi 1 1 be subj ect to competi ti ve admi ssi on for a 
I i mi ted number of spaces i n the BM GT program at each program location. I nternal and external transfer students may 
appl y to compete for admi ssi on to the Smi th School of B usi ness after they have earned 45 credi ts, and i f accepted, wi 1 1 
be provi si onal I y admi tted for the semester f ol I owi ng the compl eti on of thei r 60th credi t. A dmi ssi on wi 1 1 be f i nal i zed 
once al I requi rements are corf i rmed at the end of the f ol I owi ng semester. B el ow are the current admi ssi on standards. 

• M i ni mum 3.0 cumul ati ve GPA (preferred, may vary based upon the appl i cant pool ) 

• M i ni mum j uni or standi ng: 60 credits earned 

• Completion of thefollowing Gateway courses, all with "C" (2.000 equivalent) or better: 

BMGT 220 and 221: Accounting 

ECON 200 and 201: M icro and M aero Economics 

ENGL 101 Academic Writing 

MATH 220 or 140: Calculus 

B M GT 230*or B M GT 231# B usi ness Stati sti cs 

* The f ol I owi ng courses are approved substi tutes for B M GT230: B I OM 301, 
ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG305, PSYC200, andSOCY201. 

#The foil owing courses are approved substi tutes for BMGT 231: ENEE324, 
ENME392, orSTAT400 

• Co-curri cul ar i nvol vement, I eadershi p experi ence and honors and awards wi 1 1 al so be consi dered i n the admi ssi on 
deci si on. Students are strongl y encouraged to subrri t wi th thei r appl i cati ons a resume and I etter detai I i ng thei r 
accompl ishments and experi ence. 

• Students may be i n the process of compl eti ng B M GT221 and ECON 200 or 201 i n the semester i n whi ch they 
appl y for admi ssi on but must have successful I y compl eted al I gateway courses by the end of the current 
semester. Students shoul d have compl eted 50% of CORE by the ti me they have reached 60 credits. 

Application Deadlines for Transfer Students: Compl ete appl i cati ons and al I support] ng documents must be received 
no later than: 

Fal I Semester: M arch 1st 
J une 15th 
Spri ng Semester: N ovember 1st 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel42 



Please submit conrplehsd applications to the Attn: LEP Coordinator, Office of Undergr actuate Adrrissions, Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235. 

Freshmen who begin study in another major at College Park who would have met the direct BMGT admission 
standards from hi gh school have unti I the I ast day of i nstructi on i n the f i rst semester of the r freshmen year at Col I ege 
Park to change the r maj or to BM GT. 

Appeals to this Pol icy: Appealstothispolicymay befi led with the Off ice of Undergraduate Admissions, on the 
ground floor Mitchell B ui I di ng. Such appeal s wi 1 1 requi re documentati on of unusual , extenuati ng, or sped al 
circumstances. 

Statemen t of Policy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

1 1 i s the practi ce of the Srri th School of B usi ness to consi der for transfer from a regi onal I y accredi ted communi ty 
col I ege onl y the f ol I owi ng courses i n busi ness adrri ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, 
introduction to computing (equivalent to BMGT 201), or elementary accounting. Thus, it is anticipated that students 
transf erri ng from another regi onal I y accredi ted i nsti tuti on wi 1 1 have devoted the maj or share of thei r academi c effort 
bel ow the j uni or year to the compl eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a 
communi ty col I ege may be appl i ed toward a degree from the Smi th School of B usi ness. 

Other I nsti tuti ons 

The Smi th School of B usi ness normal I y accepts transfer credi ts from regi onal I y accredi ted four-year i nsti tuti ons. 
J uni or- and seni or- 1 evel busi ness courses are accepted from col I eges accredi ted by the A ssoci ati on to A dvance 
Collegiate Schoolsof Busi ness (AACSB). Junior- and senior- level busi ness courses from other than 
AACSB-accredited schools are eval uated on a course- by- course basis to determi ne transf erabi I ity. 

The Smi th School of B usi ness requi res that at I east 50 percent of the busi ness and management credi t hours requi red 
for a busi ness degree be earned at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rartent^Degree Options 

The university confers the foil owing degrees: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), 
M aster of Science (M .S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). I nformation concerning admission to the M .B.A. or M .S. 
program is availableatwww.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

U ndergraduate Program 

The undergraduate program recogni zes the need for prof essi onal educati on i n busi ness and management based on a 
f oundati on i n the I i beral arts. I n addi ti on, the program's i nternati onal I y i ntegrated curri cul um prepares students to be 
eff ecti ve and responsi bl e managers i n today's dynarri c busi ness envi ronment. 

A student i n busi ness and management sel ects a maj or i n one of several curri cul a: ( 1) A ccounti ng; (2) I nf ormati on 
Systems: Specialization Business; (3) Finance; (4) General Business; (5) International Business; (6) Operations 
Management (7) Marketing; (8) Supply Chain Management 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academi c work requi red for graduati on must be i n busi ness and 
management subj ects. A ni ni mum of 57 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be i n 300- or 400-1 evel courses. I n 
addition to the requirement of an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C average) in all university course 
work. A 1 1 busi ness maj ors must earn a 2.0 or better i n al I requi red courses, i ncl udi ng Econorri cs, M athemati cs, and 
C orrrnuni cati on. E I ecti ves outsi de the curri cul a of the School may be taken i n any department of the uni versi ty, i f the 
student has the necessary prerequisites. 

Credits 
Freshman-Sophomore School Requirements 

BMGT110 IntrototheBusinessValueChain 3 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BMGT221 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel43 



ECON 201 Pri nci pi es of M acroeconorri cs 4 

Onefrom 

MATH 220 Elementary Calculus I 3 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

Onefrom 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 3 

BMGT231 Statistical Models for Business 3 

Onefrom 

COM M 100 Foundati ons of Speech Communi cati on 3 

COM M 107 Speech Communication 3 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking 3 

Total 26-27 

J unior- Senior School Requirements 

BMGT301 Introduction to Information Systems 3 

BMGT340 Business Finance 3 

BMGT350 Marketing Pri nci pies and Organization 3 

B M GT364 M anagement and Organi zati onal Theory 3 

BMGT367 Career Search Strategies in Business 1 

BMGT380 Business Law 3 

BMGT391 Leadership in Action 1 

BMGT495 Business Policies 3 

BMGT499 Advanced Topics in Business 1 

ECON Economics- see below 3-6 

Total 24-27 

E conomics Requi rements 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are requi red by the Smith School of Business. The specific 
requi rements for each maj or are I i sted wi th the maj ors' sped f i c requi rements. 

Major Requirements 

In addition to the Smith School of Business Bachelor of Science requi rements listed above, generally another 18-24 
credi ts are requi red for each maj or. See i ndi vi dual maj or I i sti ngs i n chapter 7. 

A Typical Program for the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Credits 
Freshman Year 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

ENGL 101 or equivalent 3 

MATH (depending on placement}* 3 

BMGT110 3 

First Semester Total 15 

CORE and/or Electives 6 

ECON200 4 

COM M 100, 107 or 200 3 

M ATH or B M GT230/231* 3 

Second Semester Total 16 

SophomoreYear 

CORE and/or Electives 9 

BM GT220 (Prereq Sophorrore Standing) 3 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel« 



ECON201 4 

M ATH or B M GT230/231* 3 

Third Semester Total 16 

CORE and/or Elective 10 

B M GT221 (Pra-eq BMGT220) 3 

BMGT230 or 231 or Elective 3 

Fourth Semester Total 16 



*See Freshman-Sophomore School requirements for appropriate math and statistics courses. 



Advising 

G eneral advi si ng for students admi tted to the Smi th School of B usi ness i s avai I abl e M onday through F ri day i n the 
Office of Undergraduate Programs, 1570 Van Munching Hal I, 301-405-2286. It is recommended that students visit this 
of f i ce each semester to ensure that they are i nf ormed about current requi rements and procedures. Transfer students 
enteri ng the uni versi ty can be advi sed duri ng spri ng, summer, and fal I transfer ori entati on programs. Contact the 
Ori entati on Of f i ce for further i nf ormati on, 301-314-8217, or vi si t http://www.ori entati on. umd.edu. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

The Smith School offers innovative special programs through its Undergraduate Fellows Program. TheFellows 
program offers a seri es of sped al academi c programs, or tracks whi ch wi 1 1 create smal I communi ti es of schol ars wi thi n 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel45 



the I arger Smi th School communi ty . E ach speci al i zed F el I ows program combi nes opportuni ti es f or acti on I earni ng and 
professional development with rigorous in-depth academic coursework focused on cutting edge issues affecting 21st 
century business. 

Co-curricular activities areakey component of theFellows program Field trips and internships, international study 
tri ps and exchanges, speaker seri es, di nners, retreats and competi ti ons wi 1 1 foster I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and contri bute to 
your personal and prof essi onal growth. A I urmi i nvol vement i s an i mportant aspect of F el I ows programmi ng, with 
Sni th al urmi and corporate partners contri buti ng thei r ti me, tal ents and experi ence through sponsorshi p and 
participation in events and activities. For more information on each of the Smith Fellows Programs pi ease see the 
fol I owi ng i nf ormati on and correspond ng I i nks. For i nformati on on all our Fell ows Programs vi sit 
http://unet rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Freshman Fellows The Freshman Fellows track provides enriched opportuni ties for all of our newly admitted Smith 
freshmen students from the moment they step on campus for the new F reshman F el I ows Ori entati on. For more 
i nformati on, pi ease vi sit http://unet. rhsmi th. umd.edu and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Accelerated Finance Fellows The Accelerated Finance Fellows program is designed for freshmen with advanced 
standi ng who are sure they want to pursue a f i nance career. These students are i nterested i n accel erati ng thei r f i nance 
coursework, and i n taki ng additi onal f i nance courses- beyond what the maj or requi res. These students have the 
potential to become "star" finance majors, courted by top finance recruiters. The emphasis of this program is on 
prepari ng students for a hi gh prof i I e career i n f i nance. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu 
and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Accounting Teaching Scholars TheAccounting& lnformationAssuranceDepartment(AIA)offersthisspecial 
program opportuni ty for undergraduate accounti ng students to serve as di scussi on I eaders and teachi ng assi stants for 
the begi nni ng accounti ng courses, B M GT 220 & 221. A ccounti ng teachi ng schol ars earn a yearl y sti pend (depend ng 
on hours worked) whi I e revi ewi ng materi al i n preparati on for the C PA exam, and practi ci ng organi zati onal and 
del i very ski 1 1 s. A one-credi t mentori ng course i s offered to prepare students for thei r rol es as teachi ng assi stants. For 
more i nformati on, pi ease vi si ttttp://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Business Process Fel lows Program: The obj ecti ve of the B usi ness Process F el I ows program i s to devel op excel I ence 
i n operati ons management. Students wi 1 1 1 earn and practi ce busi ness process methodol ogi es and software tool s used by 
I eadi ng edge compani es and agenci es to desi gn and manage compl ex enterpri ses. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t 
http://unetrhsmitn.umd.edu and click on theFellows Program tab 

Design and I nnovation in Marketing Fellows: The Desi gn i n M arketi ng Fel I ows Program bri dges the gap between 
marked ng research and theory and the real i zati on of we! I -desi gned appl i cati ons. The program curri cul um and 
co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es are desi gned to produce busi ness I eaders who can make strategi cal I y sound and creati ve desi gn 
deci si ons. Thi s program i s i ntendedl y i nterdi sci pi i nary, wi th mutual benef i t to be gai ned by col I aborati on between 
marked ng students and design students i n devel opi ng creative busi ness sol utions. visit http://unet. rhsmi th.umd.edu and 
cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

E merging C FOs: Thi s program i s desi gned for students i nterested i n corporate f i nance and i nvestment banki ng. 1 1 i s 
desi gned to go more i n depth i nto corporate f i nance aspects of f i nance, and provi de students with enhanced I eadershi p 
and communi cati on ski 1 1 s. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows 
Program tab. 

E ntrepreneurship Fellows . The Entrepreneurs!! p Fel I ows Program bri ngs together tal ented Smith School students to 
create an entrepreneurial chemistry that will stimulate the creati on and growth of new high- potential enterprises. The 
pri mary goal of the E ntrepreneurshi p F el I ows program i s to have each student parti ci pate i n I aunchi ng a prof i tabl e 
busi ness venture whi le sti 1 1 in school . This program is offered solely at the Smith School at Shady Grove campus 
( http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/) . F or more i nformati on on the E ntrepreneurshi p F el I ows 
Program, visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on theFellows Programtab. 

Financial Services Fellows Thi s program i s desi gned for students i nterested i n the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry, 
i ncl udi ng tradi ti onal banki ng ( I oan off i cer, personal banki ng of f i cer) and the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry (f i nanci al 
planners, personal investment managers). For more information, pi ease visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd. edu and click on 
the Fel I ows Program tab. 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel* 



Lemma Smbet Investment Fund Fellows This program is a year-long, advanced finance program avail able to 
undergraduate f i nance maj ors i n the r seni or year. Twel ve students are sel ected i n the spri ng of the r j uni or year to 
parti ci pate on the fund, two as portf ol i o managers and ten as equity anal ysts. The program provi des the students wi th 
the opportuni ty to appl y what they have I earned i n F i nance cl asses to actual i nvestment deci si ons, through researchi ng 
real compani es and managi ng a portf ol i o of real money, and through revi ewi ng the resul ts of the deci si ons they make. 
At the end of the year-long commitment, the Fund members wi 1 1 present the r performance to Fund donors. For more 
i nf ormati on, pi ease vi sit http://unet.rhsmith. umd.edu and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Private Equity and Venture Capital Clinic: The Private Equity and Venture Capital Clinic (PEVCC) isaprogram 
that provi des sel ected students wi th the opportuni ty to serve as A nal ysts at an actual Pri vate E qui ty F und wi th over 
$50M under management, under the supervi si on of Prof essi onal F und managers. For more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi sit 
http://unet rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

SCM Fellows: The Supply Chain Management (SCM ) Fellows Leadership Program offers students a unique 
opportunity for I earning and community bui I ding both within theSrrith School and with external SCM professionals. 
B y combi ni ng cl assroom I earni ng wi th opportuni ti es i n the prof essi onal communi ty, SC M F el I ows wi 1 1 have a uni que 
opportunity to bui I d knowl edge of the SCM prof essi on and create a foundati on for a networked career. For more 
i nformati on, pi ease vi sit http://unet. rhsmi th. umd.edu and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Social I nnovation Fellows: The Soci al I nnovati on Fel I ows program wi 1 1 i mmerse students i n the process of seeki ng 
i nnovati ve sol uti ons for soci al transf ormati on through busi ness pri nci pi es and hands- on engagements wi th nonprof i t 
and for- prof i t organi zati ons. W hereas many peopl e i n the past sought to change soci ety through acti vi sm, today 
i ndi vi dual s are creati ng better al temati ves entrepreneuri al ventures that address soci al and envi ronmental i ssues. The 
program features an opti onal i ntemshi p and co-curri cul ar programrri ng ai med at devel opi ng ski 1 1 s i n the areas of soci al 
enterpri se, rri crof i nance, marked ng and new medi a. Students I eave the program with a deep understandi ng of how to 
appl y the r busi ness ski 1 1 s toward addressi ng i ssues of soci al and envi ronmental i mportance i n I arge and smal I 
organi zati ons al i ke F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program 
tab. 

Music Management Fellows The objective of the M usic M anagement Fel lows program is to develop students' 
i nterests and capabi I i ti es i n the sped al i zed management f uncti ons i nvol ved i n the busi ness of musi c management 
including music marketing and promotions, production and distribution, broadcasting, performance and production 
I ogi sti cs i n event and tour management, and fundi ng and management of venues and i nsti tuti ons. Students wi 1 1 i nteract 
wi th and I earn from experts i n the f i el d by parti ci pad ng i n the desi gn and producti on of recorded musi c, I i ve events and 
programs, and through sped al i zed cl i ni cs and i ntemshi ps focused on different genres and performance envi ronments: 
M usi c & E ntertai nment; Perf ormi ng A rts. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsrri th. umd. edu and cl i ck on 
the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Quantitative Finance Fellows: The Quantitative Finance Fel I ows Program (formerly Financial Markets Fel I ows 
program) i s for students i nterested i n i nvestments, and i n parti cul ar i n I earni ng more about the software and hardware 
used i n the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry . F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si thttp://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the 
F el I ows Program tab. 

QUEST (Quality Enhancement Systems and Teams): A collaborative partnership with the A. James Clark School of 
Engi neeri ng and the Col I ege of Computer, M athemati cal and Physi cal Sci ences, the QU EST program is an i nnovati ve 
three-year qual i ty management program wi th a dynarri c I earni ng envi ronment. G rounded i n team- based courses I ed by 
an i nterdi sci pi i nary f acul ty, the program offers students the opportuni ty to study i ntegrati on of qual i ty i n the workpl ace 
whi I e appl yi ng the knowl edge and ski 1 1 -set they have gai ned from the r maj or i n the f i el d of engi neeri ng, busi ness or 
computer science For more information, pi ease visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

Smith Technology Fel lows ST Fel I ows perform a vari ety of duti es, whi ch may i ncl ude servi ng as teachi ng assi stants 
wi th technol ogy- i ntensi ve cl asses, or as research assi stants, executi ng targeted technol ogy devel opment proj ects for use 
in instruction or research, assi sting faculty and others with targeted projects involving software such as Oracle or 
. N ET . Some proj ect assi gnments wi 1 1 requi re experi ence usi ng sped f i c software pi atf orms and will provi de techni cal 
support for courses, assi st f acul ty wi th tutori al s and demonstrati ons, and assi st student teams i n proj ects. Students 
worki ng on proj ects whi ch requi re sped f i c technol ogy ski 1 1 s wi 1 1 be el i gi bl e to attend vendor hands- on trai ni ng 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel47 



sessi ons. Proj ects wi 1 1 general I y be def i ned as one semester i n durati on but coul d extend over the academi c year. 
Compensati on for work on proj ects i s $10/hour, wi th proj ects rangi ng from 200-400 hours, whi ch can be spread over a 
semester or a year. Proj ects may be renewable for additional semesters. For more information, pleasevisitittpV/unetrhsn 
http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and click ontheFellows Program tab. 

Sport Management F el lows The Sport M anagement F el I ows program focuses on the worl dwi de enterpri se of sport 
and the promi nence of organi zed sports at every I evel i n col I egi ate and prof essi onal sports envi ronments, together wi th 
the si gni f i cance of auxi I i ary i ndustri es i n sports apparel and equi pment, tel evi si on contracts and other anci 1 1 ary 
products and servi ces. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi sit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program 
tab. 



STARS The mi ssi on of the STA RS program i s to encourage and attract f i rst generati on and under represented 
students to the study of busi ness, to prepare them for col I ege, and to encourage them to make the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and the r #L choi ce Once admi tted, the program provi des a supporti ve network for academi c success I eadi ng to 
graduati on, and then wel comes them back as al urmi contri butors to the Smi th Communi ty. The chal I enge i s to i denti f y 
and support outstandi ng students i nterested i n studyi ng busi ness, and to work together wi th the r school s and wi th 
vari ous access programs to prepare for admi ssi on to col I ege. To achi eve thi s goal 5mi th School undergraduates have 
devel oped a corps of peer- mentors who provi de mentori ng and academi c support to hi gh school students, as wel I as to 
students al ready admi tted to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and who seek admi ssi on to the Smi th School . Student mentors 
parti ci pate i n vi si ts to hi gh school s and work wi th sponsored col I ege access programs. They vi si t hi gh- school students 
at off-campus sites and host these students duri ng campus visits and educational programs such as the annual 
H i gh-School -to-Col I ege Workshops and F i nance F i el d Day. A one-credi t course i n I ntergroup Communi cati on i s bei ng 
consi dered as a vehi cl e f or bui I di ng mentori ng ski 1 1 s and coordi nati ng vol unteer activities. F or more i nformati on, 
pi ease vi sit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and cl i ck on the Fel I ows Program tab. 

Technology and Bus ness Transformation Fellows Program: The Technol ogy & B usi ness Transformati on fel I ows 
program ai ms to i denti f y and trai n students who are passi onate about I everagi ng the I atest technol ogi es for busi ness as 
well as social transformation. This highly selective Fellows program will provide students the opportunity to interact 
with the faculty in small classes as well as col I aborate with them on state-of-the art industry and research proj ects. For 
more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. udm eduand cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Other Special Programs outside of the Smith School's Fellows Program: In addition, Smith School students can 
i ncorporate other excepti onal multi disci pi i nary I eami ng opportuniti es as part of the r degree programs. Programs I i ke Col I 
Col I eae Park Schol ars ( i ncl udi ng Business. Society, and the Economy ) ; Gemstone : and The H i nman Campus 
Entrepreneurship Opportunities (CEOs) programs j oi n busi ness undergraduates wi th those from other di sci pi i nes. 
Several of the programs menti oned above were formed through partnershi ps with other col I eges or departments on 
campus. 

College Honors Program 

The Smith School Honors Fellows program, which is part of the Smith School's Fel I ows Program offers students with 
superi or academi c achi evements sped al opportuni ti es and resources, i ncl udi ng the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n 
cutti ng- edge research on busi ness i ssues, and to graduate wi th honors. Students i n the honors program take the r 
upper-l evel B M GT core courses i n smal I , semi nar-styl e honors seed ons, whi ch al I ow i n-depth expl orati on of busi ness 
topi cs i n marked ng, f i nance, management and organi zati on, busi ness I aw, and pol i cy and strategy. The Smi th School 
H onors Program provi des both a non-thesi s and a thesi s opti on, i n whi ch students work on an ori gi nal research proj ect 
under the supervi si on of aSmi th School f acul ty member. A dmi ssi on to the Smi th School H onors Program i s 
competi ti ve Students are sel ected on the basi s of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

• Mini mum 3.5 cumul ati ve grade poi nt average 

• Mini mum 45 credit hours earned 

• Completion of all BMGT pre- requi site courses by the end of Spring semester: 

Pri nci pi es of A ccounti ng I and 1 1 : B M GT 220 and 221 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel4E 



Business Statistics: BMGT230(or231) 

Calculus: MATH 220 or 140 

Pri nci pi es of M i cro- and M aero- Economi cs: ECON 200 and 201 

The appl i cati on to the B M GT H onors program i ncl udes a personal essay and two I etters of recorrmendati on from 
faculty. The BMGT Honors application can be downloaded from the Smith School website 
http://unetrhsmith, umd.edu . 

Admission to the Smith School Honors Fellows Program takes place once a year in the Spring semester. For more 
i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student Professional Organizations 

Students may choose to associ ate themsel ves wi th one or more prof essi onal organi zati ons offered under the umbrel I a 
organization, Smith Undergraduate Student Association (SUSA). For more details, visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu 
and cl i ck on the Peopl e tab to access SU SA cl ubs. 

Awards 

Scholarships 

For detail son avail able scholarships, pi ease click on the scholarships tab at http://unet. rhsmi th.umd.edu . 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, AND NATURAL SCIENCES (CMNS) 

2300 Symons Hall, 301-405-4906 
www.cmns.umd.edu 
Dean: J ayanth R. Banavar 
Associate Dean(s): Robert I nf anti no, Paul Smith 
Assistant Dean(s): LisaBradley-KlemkoJoellePresson 

N ati onal I y and i nternati onal I y recogni zed for our educati onal programs, research excel I ence, 
disti nguished faculty and students, the Col I eqe of Computer, M athemati cal , and N atural Sci ences 
(CMNS) i s a critical educati onal and sci entif i c resource benefit' ng the regi on and the nati on. The 
Col I ege offers every student a hi gh-qual i ty, i nnovati ve, and cross-di sci pi i nary educati onal 
experi ence. Strongl y comrri tted to maki ng studi es i n the sci ences avai I abl e to al I , the Col I ege 
actively encourages and supports the recruitment and retention of women and rri nori ties 
underrepresented i n our di sci pi i nes. 

Our students have the opportunity to work closely with faculty members in state-of-the-art 
laboratories, both on- and off-campus, on some of the most exciti ng problems of modern science and 
mathemati cs. We have devd oped courses to ref I ect the evol vi ng and i ncreasi ngl y i nterdi sci pi i nary 
nature of the sci ences, mathemati cs, and advances i n i nf ormati on technol ogy . Asa new approach to 
undergraduate educati on, multi pi e tracks are offered withi n maj ors, i ncl udi ng tracks for future 
teachers, and tracks with an emphasis on computation. 

Our students parti ci pate i n the U ni versi ty H onors Col I eqe , Col I eqe Park Schol ars , the Quest 

and Hinman CEOs programs, the Corporate Scholars program departmental honors programs, and 

many other co-curri cul ar opportuni ti es. Students pursue research proj ects i n f acul ty I aboratori es, or 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel49 



i n the rich cl uster of federal and private research i institutions i n proxi rrity to our campus; they apply 

their lab and cl assroom ski 1 1 s through i nternshi ps at area compani es, non-governmental 

organi zati ons, and i n cl i ni cal setti ngs. Excel I ent advi si ng and career servi ces are i n pi ace to gui de our 

students through thei r academi c program and faci I itate transiti on to graduate programs and 

prof essi onal school s, pri vate-sector empl oyment, and publ i c servi ce careers. Our hi ghl y-ski 1 1 ed 

graduates pursue careers i n a great many f i d ds and prof essi ons. 

Admission Requirements 

F reshmen and transfer students i interested i n appl yi ng for admi ssi on shoul d consul t wi th the general uni versi ty 
admissions information provided in Chapter 1 of this catalog. Admission to someCMNS majors is limited - please 
consul t the i nf ormati on i n C hapter 1 or the f ol I owi ng I i nk for i nf ormati on about L i rri ted E nrol I ment Programs . 
F reshmen consi deri ng a maj or i n a C M N S di sci pi i ne shoul d pursue a hi gh school program of studi es that i ncl udes four 
years of mathemati cs - pref erabl y i ncl udi ng al gebra, geometry, pre-cal cul us, and cal cul us. Students i nterested i n 
pursui ng maj ors i n the I i f e sci ences and physi cal sci ences shoul d take two to three courses i n the bi ol ogi cal and physi cal 
sci ences wi th I aboratory . Students i nterested i n C omputer Sci ence are encouraged to take hi gh school computer sci ence 
coursework, i ncl udi ng A P C omputer Sci ence i f i t i s avai I abl e M ath and sci ence courses work at the honors/A P/l B 
level is strongly encouraged. F or more i nf ormati on about admi ssi ons to the Col lege, pi ease contact Ms. EdenM. 
G arosi , C oordi nator of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons and Recrui tment; egarosi (cDumd.edu : 301- 314- 8375. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

PI ease see individual department/maj or entries in Chapter 7 for specific information about specific undergraduate 
maj or requi rements. 

Advising 

Every student in the Col lege is assigned an academic advisor, who may be a faculty member or a professional staff 
member of the Col I ege or academi c department A dvi sors work wi th students to devel op thei r programs and to ensure 
that they are maki ng requi red progress toward the degree. Educati onal and career goal s, academi c progress, and 
pre- regi strati on course pi anni ng are among the topi cs di scussed duri ng advi si ng sessi ons. A dvi sors can al so hel p 
students connect to val uabl e opportuniti es and resources on- and off-campus. 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory for most C M N S students, and al I are encouraged to take advantage of thi s servi ce Sped f i c 
i nf ormati on about advi si ng appears on the col I ege website at www.cmns.umd.edu/undergraduate/index.htm . 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng careers i n the health prof essi ons can f i nd additional advi si ng support from the 
Reed-Y orke Health Professions Advi si na Office . 1210 H .1 Patterson Hall, 301-405-7805. 

De pa rt me nts and Centers 

The f ol I owi ng academi c departments del i ver undergraduate courses and degree programs i n C M N S: 

Department of Atmospheri c and Oceani c Sci ence 

Department of Astronomy 

Department of B i ol ogy 

Department of Cel I Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Department of Chemi stry and B i ochemi stry 

Department of Computer Sci ence 

Department of Entomology 

Department of Geol ogy 

Department of M athemati cs 

Department of Physics 

Undergraduates in CM NS also participate in research and co-curri cul ar activities of the research programs, institutes, 
and centers of the college listed in the Research Units section below. 

Majors 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel5C 



Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Environmental Science and Policy - Biodiversity and Conservation 

Geology 

Mathematics 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Minors 

The Col I ege offers rri nors i n the f ol I owi ng areas: Actuari al M athemati cs, Astronomy, Atmospheri c 
Chemistry, Atmospheric Sciences, Computer Science, Earth History, Earth Material Properties, 
Geophysics, Hydrology, Mathematics, Meteorology, Physics, Planetary Sciences, Statistics, andsurficial 
Geology. 

Living-Learning Programs 

The Col I ege sponsors several I i vi ng I earni ng programs whi ch offer sped al academi c and co-curri cul ar opportuni ti es to 
participants. 

The new I ntegrated Life Sciences Program (I LS) i n the U ni versi ty H onors Col I ege was created to offer students 
enhanced cross-di sci pi i nary trai ni ng i n the I if e sci ences through an i nnovati ve curri cul um and research and i nternshi p 
opportunities. The I LS program is directed by Dr. Todd Cooke 

The Col I ege sponsors three programs i n the Col I ege Park Schol ars (CPS) living-l earni ng program whi ch draw upon the 
breadth of the academic disci pli nes and faculty expertise i n CM NS. Each of these two-year programs brings students 
together around a common di sci pi i nary focus through courses, serri nars, and experi enti al I earni ng opportuni ti es. The 
programs i nspi re students to devel op thei r i nterests and i ntel I ectual capaci ty by bui I di ng a communi ty i n whi ch 
everyone has shared i nterests i n schol ari y pursui ts, i n cl ose contact wi th f acul ty who are worki ng at the forefront of 
thei r f i el ds of experti se. 

CPS- Life Sciences 

Director: Dr. ReidCompton 

Assistant Director: Ms. Becky ZoniesKenemuth 

CPS - Science. Discovery & the Universe 
Co-Directors: Dr. Alan C. Peel and Dr. Neal A. Miller 

Sci ence & G I obal C hanae 

Di rector: Dr. Thomas R. Holtz, J r. 

Associ ate Di rector: Dr. J ohn M erck, J r. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

A n i mportant part of the content of CM N S maj ors i s del i vered outsi de the cl assroom, with the greatest emphasi s bei ng 
on leveraging our strength: research. Our students experience scientific discovery first hand, as conceptual learning in 
cl ass i s i ntegrated and appl i ed. E ach maj or provi des access to a vari ety of research experi ences that wi 1 1 provi de 
opportuni ties to collaborate with faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students. Our 
geographi c I ocati on al so offers many uni que opportuni ti es for students to gai n research and i nternshi p experi ence i n 
federal laboratories and agencies, private companies, and non-governmental organizations. Employers and graduate 
school s I ook for research experi ence i n appl i cants. B e a part of the sci ence di scovery i n C M N S, whi ch pi aces the 
col I ege among the top publ i c and pri vate uni versi ti es wori dwi de. M ore i nf ormati on about research opportuni ti es are 
provided on th eCol I ege website , and on departmental webpages. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel51 



College Honors Pro-am 

I n addi ti on to our I i vi ng I earni ng programs descri bed above, C M N S departments offer research- i ntensi ve departmental 
honors programs to whi ch students may appl y . B ased on a student's performance i n a mul ti -semester mentored 
research proj ect and defense of a wri tten thesi s, the department may recommend that candi dates recei ve the r 
bachelor's degree with Departmental Honors or Departmental High Honors. Successful completion of departmental 
honors i s recogni zed on a student's di pi oma and transcri pt. Parti ci pati on i n the U ni versi ty H onors C ol I ege i s not a 
prerequi si te for parti ci pati on i n departmental honors programs. See i ndi vi dual C M N S department websi tes for more 
information. 



Financial Assistance 

The Col I ege Schol arshi ps page provides a list of scholarships and awards administered at the Col I ege level for 
currentl y enrol I ed students and i nf ormati on about the appl i cati on process. Students compl ete an el ectroni c appl i cati on 
to be considered for all merit and need- based scholarships administered by theCollegefor which they are eligible The 
annual appl i cati on deadl i ne for schol arshi p appl i cati ons for returni ng students i s i n M ay . 

See departmental websi tes for more i nf ormati on about undergraduate schol arshi ps based i n the departments of C M N S . 

The CM N S Corporate Scholars Program provi des qual if i ed students with a summer i nternshi p and a $2,000 
schol arshi p i n the name of the r host company. Thi s program i s open to al I students who have a maj or I i sted i n the 
col I ege, and who are mai ntai ni ng at I east a 3.0 GPA . 

Awards 

See the Col I ege websi te for a compl ete I i sti ng of undergraduate schol arshi ps and awards . 
Research Units 

I n addi ti on to our academi c departments, many undergraduate students pursue mentored research proj ects i n the 
C ol I ege's research centers and i nsti tutes. C ontact i nf ormati on for the centers and i nsti tutes are provi ded bel ow. 
I nf ormati on about the scope of research i n the uni t, as wel I as aff i I i ated f acul ty, i s provi ded on the websi te of each 
center or institute. 

Center for Bioinf ormati cs and Computational Biology 
3115 B i omol ecul ar Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-5936 
Acting Director: Mihai Pop 

C enter f or N anophvsi cs and A dvanced M ateri al s 
0368 Physics Building, 301-405-8285 
Professor and Director: Michael S. Fuhrer 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling 
4149 Computer Science I instructional Center, 301-405-0648 
D i sti ngui shed U ni versi ty Professor and D i rector: E i tan Tadmor 

Earth System Sci ence I nterdi sci pi i nary Center 
5825 University Research Court, 301-405-5599 
Professor and Director: Antonio J . Busalacchi 

I nsti tute for A dvanced Computer Studi es 
2119 A . V . Wi 1 1 i ams B ui I di ng, 301-405-6722 
Professor and Director: Amitabh Varshney 

I nsti tute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy 

4211 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-4814 

Professor and Director: Raj arshi Roy 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel52 



Professor and Associate Director: Michael Copl an 

I nsti lute for Research i n E I ectroni cs and A ppl i ed Phvsi cs 
Energy Research Facility, 301-405-4951 
Professor and Director: Daniel Lathrop 

J oi nt Quantum I nstitute 

2207 C omputer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405- 1300 

Professor and D i rector: Steve Rol ston 

M arvl and B i ophvsi cs Program 

I nstitute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy, 301-405-9307 

Distinguished University Professor and Director: DevarajanThirumalai 

M arvl and Pathogen Research I nstitute 

3102 Bioscience Research Building, 301-405-2156 

Professor and Director: David Mosser 

M aterials Research Science and Engi neeri ng Center 
2120 Physics Building, 301-405-8349 
Professor and Director: J anice E. Reutt-Robey 

Norbert Wiener Center for Harmonic Analysis and Applications 
2211 M athemati cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-5058 
Professor and Director: J ohnj . Benedetto 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

The Col I ege provi des two servi ce centers that coordi nate ori entati on and advi si ng servi ces, revi ew clean's excepti ons to 
pol i cy requests, and f i el d i nqui ri es about academi c regul ati ons, transfer credi t revi ew, study abroad, and other 
undergraduate program matters. Each department is also served by an undergraduate program office which coordi nates 
departmental academic advising 

AV Wi I NamsCMNS Student Servi ces Office 

3400AV Williams Building 

301-405-2677 

cmpsque®umd,edu 

For col I ege- level inquiries and serving majors and minors in: Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Astronomy, 

Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and Physical Sciences 

Svmons H al I CM N S Student Servi ces Off i ce 

1300 Syrrons Hall 

301-405-2080 

For col I ege- level inquiries and serving majors: Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Environmental 

Sci ences and Pol i cy- B i odi versi ty and C onservati on 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng careers i n the heal th prof essi ons can f i nd addi ti onal advi si ng support from 
the Reed-Y orke H eal th Prof essi ons A dvi si ng Off i ce . 1210 H.J Patterson Hall, 301-405-7805. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

1204 Benj arri n B ui I di ng, 301-405-2344 
www.educati on.umd.edu/studenti nf o 
Dean: Donna L. Wiseman 
Associate Dean(s): MargaretJ . McLaughlin 
Assistant Dean(s): Kathleen A. Angel etti 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel53 



The Col I ege of Educati on is a prof essi onal col I ege committed to prepari ng accompl i shed begi nni ng and advanced-l evel 
prof essi onal s who can advance the I eami ng and devel opment of the r students and who are ready to become I eaders i n 
the r f i el ds. The Col I ege seeks to fosterthe I earni ng and devel opment of PK-16 students through our educator 
preparation programs, leadership, research, advocacy, and partnerships. Educational inequities exist on multiple levels; 
therefore, we ai m to prepare educators wi th the ski 1 1 s and commi tments necessary to ensure equi ty for al I students i n 
the publ i c school s and cl assrooms they wi 1 1 1 ead. 

The col I ege programs prepare educators, counselors, psychologists, administrators, researchers, and educati onal 
sped al i sts. G raduates work wi th i ndi vi dual s from i nf ancy through adul thood i n school s, communi ty agenci es, col I eges 
and universities. Educational programs are accredited/approved by the foil owing: National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), American Psychological Association, 
Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Professions, and Council on Rehabilitation 
E ducati on. A ccredi tati on provi des red procal certi f i cati on wi th most other states that recogni ze nati onal accredi tati on. 

M SDE issues certificates to teach in the public schools of the state. I n addition to graduation from an approved 
program, MSDE requires satisfactory scores on the state Praxis licensure exams for certification. Atthetimeof 
graduation, the Col lege informs MSDE of the graduates' eligibility for certification. Under Maryland I aw, criminal 
background checks may be requi red and consi dered by M SDE i n the awardi ng of teachi ng certi fi cati on, and by 
empl oyers before granti ng empl oyment i n the teachi ng f i el d. C erti f i cati on may be deni ed or revoked for i ndi vi dual s 
who have been convi cted of cri mes of vi ol ence and/or cri mes agai nstchil dren. Additi onal I y, some M aryl and counti es 
requi re a cri mi nal background check pri or to pi acement i n an i nternshi p. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Students in the Col I ege of Education have the opportunity to work with an exemplary faculty. Among our ranks are 
nati onal I y known f acul ty researchers who have made si gni f i cant contri buti ons to advanci ng theory and i mprovi ng 
prof essi onal practi ce I n addi ti on, the C ol I ege's strategi c I ocati on provi des students wi th research opportuni ti es that are 
unparal I el ed. Teacher candi dates can compl ete the r teachi ng i nternshi p and conduct research i n school di stri cts wi th 
hi ghl y di verse popul ati ons. The regi on al so provi des access to several research I i brari es, government agenci es, 
not-for-profit organizations, and educational associations. 

The Col I ege of Educati on offers many sped al resources and f aci I iti es to students, faculty, and the community, 
i ncl udi ng the f ol I owi ng centers: 

• The Center for Mathematics Education provi des a mathemati cs I aboratory for undergraduate and graduate 
students. Occasi onal I y there are tutori ng servi ces for chi I dren and add escents. These servi ces are offered i n 
conj uncti on wi th sped al graduate and undergraduate courses i n el ementary and secondary school mathemati cs. 
Center f acul ty are engaged i n research i n mathemati cs educati on, serve as consul tants to school systems and 

i nstructi onal publ i shers, and provi de i n-servi ce teacher educati on i n addi ti on to graduate degree programs. 

• The Center for Young Children i s part of the I nsti tute for Chi I d Study/H uman Devel opment in the Col I ege of 
Educati on. 1 1 offers a creati ve I earni ng experi ence for chi I dren three, four, and f i ve years ol d whose parents are 
aff i I i ated with the U ni versity. The Center engages i n chi I d study, curri cul um devel opment and teacher 
preparati on. Its research and observati on f aci I i ti es are avai I abl e to parents, f acul ty, and other persons concerned 
with the care and educati on of young chi I dren. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to Teacher Education Professional Course Work 

A ppl i cants to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and who have ded ared an i nterest i n educati on are admi tted to a department i n the 
College. All maj ors must meet the selective admi ssi on requirements for full admission into the Col I ege of Educati on in 
order to enrol I i n the prof essi onal sequence of the teacher educati on degree programs. 

The admi ssi on process i ncl udes three steps: 

1. PreAdrrission Review: C andi dates must ( 1) compl ete the E ngl i sh and math I ower- 1 evel fundamental studi es 
(six credits) withagradeof C or better; (2) earn 45 semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel54 



average of at I east 2. 75 on a 4. seal e; (3) compl ete gateway and/or sped al i zati on or maj or requi rements for the 
program area with a minimum 2.70 GPA, and earn at least a B in any Education course identified by the program 
as a sped f i c gateway prerequi si te; (4) subrri t a personal goal statement that i ndi cates an appropri ate commi tment 
to prof essi onal educati on; (5) have pri or experi ences i n the educati on f i el d; (6) submi t three I etters of 
recommendati on/reference; ( 7) recei ve sati sf actory rati ngs on the C ol I ege of E ducati on Techni cal 
Standards/Foundati onal Competencies (or submit a signed copy of the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal 
Competencies/Technical Standards Self Assessment if formal evaluations have not yet occurred); (8) submit 
cri mi nal hi story di scl osure statement; and, (9) have passi ng scores on the Praxi s I . 

2. Program Faculty review the appl i cati ons of the candi dates who meet the above cri teri a and rate them on si x 
components: (1) overall GPA, (2) GPA in gateway/specialization/major, (3) rating for pri or experience, (4) rating 
of recommendations, (5) rating of application essay, and (6) review of Foundational Competencies 

eval uati on/sel f - report. 

3. Thefaculty sets a minimum cut score for eligibility based upon several factors (eg., instructional resource 
capacity of the prograrrVdepartment Professional Development School [PDS] placement capacity in the 

certi f i cati on area, avai lability of high qual i ty mentors i n the certi fi cati on area, work force need i n the state, etc. ) . 
Candi dates meeti ng at I east mi ni mum cut scores are schedul ed for i ntervi ews. Program faculty re- ranks 
candi dates based on aggregate scores from the compl ete prof i I e - i .e. , the si x factors i n step 2 pi us the i ntervi ew. 
The hi ghest ranki ng i ndi vi dual s usi ng the aggregate score are offered admi ssi on. [The total number adrni tted i s 
based on target enrol I ment gui del i nes. ] 

A dmi ssi on appl i cati on forms are avai I abl e i n Room 1204 of the B enj ami n B ui I di ng. Onl y those who are adrni tted are 
abl e to enrol I i n the prof essi onal educati on sequence. A n overal I grade poi nt average of 2. 75 must be mai ntai ned after 
adrni ssi on to Teacher E ducati on to conti nue i n the prof essi onal educati on programs. The program f acul ty i s abl e to 
recommend sel ected other candi dates for D i screti onary A dmi ssi on based on any of a vari ety of sped al consi derati ons. 
Consul t the Student Servi ces Off i ce (Room 1204 Benj ami n B I dg. ) for pol i ci es and procedures regardi ng Di screti onary 
Admission. 

C ri teri a for adrni ssi on to the Teacher E ducati on program appl y to any teacher preparati on program offered by the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Thus, undergraduates desi ri ng a maj or i n musi c or physi cal educati on shoul d appl y to the 
C ol I ege of E ducati on for admi ssi on to the prof essi onal program i n Teacher E ducati on. I ndi vi dual s who are not enrol I ed 
i n the Col I ege of Educati on but who, through an establ ished cooperative program with another col I ege are prepari ng to 
teach, must meet al I admi ssi on, schol asti c and curri cul ar requi rements of the Col I ege of Educati on. The courses i n the 
prof essi onal educati on sequence are restri cted to teacher candi dates who are enrol I ed i n an approved teacher 
preparati on program and degree-seeki ng maj ors who have met Col I ege of Educati on requi rements for adrni ssi on and 
retention. 

Gateway Requirements for Early Childhood and Elementary Education Programs 

In order to meet the M aryl and State Department of Education's (MSDE's) institutional performance 
criteria for the Redesign (i.e. strong math and science background for early childhood and elementary 
education teacher candidates), prospective majors in these programs need to fulfill additional performance 
criteria. In addition to the requi rements for admission to teacher education that are listed above early 
childhood and elementary education majors must satisfy the following gateway requirements: 

1. Completion of a four-credit CORE laboratory physical science a four-credit CORE laboratory biological 
science Elements of Numbers and Operations (MATH 212), and Elements of Geometry and Measurement 
(MATH 213) with a minimumgrade ofC in each class and a 2.7 cumulative GPA across all four courses. 

2.Completion of Looking Inside Schools and Classrooms (EDCI 280) or Exploring Teaching in Early 
Childhood (EDHD220) with a grade ofB or better 

3. Passing scores on the Praxis I : Academic Skills Assessments (Applicants will be required to meet the 
individual cut-off scores for each of the three Praxis I assessments. A composite score will not be accepted 
for admission.) 

I n keepi ng wi th the campus undergraduate adrni ssi ons pol i cy, the C ol I ege of E ducati on wi 1 1 admi t as many freshmen as 
possi bl e as " pre-servi ce" educati on maj ors. I nternal and external transfers who have compl eted fewer than 60 credits 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel55 



and who have not yet met the standards requi red for enrol I ment i n the prof essi onal degree programs al so wi 1 1 be 
adrri tted as ' ' pre-servi ce' ' educati on maj ors. F or di recti y adrri tted freshmen, the above adrri ssi on requi rements wi 1 1 
serve as the cri teri a for the sophomore (earl y chi I dhood, el ementary, and sped al educati on) or j uni or (secondary 
educati on) I evel revi ew. F or i nternal and external transfers, these cri teri a make up the " gateway. ' ' Teacher candi dates 
who pass the sophomore/j uni or I evel revi ew or the gateway wi 1 1 be adrri tted i nto the prof essi onal degree programs. 
Transfers wi th si xty or more credi ts will be granted permi ssi on to enrol I as a pre-servi ce maj or i n educati on, provi ded 
they have mai ntai ned at I east a 2. 75 G PA and successful I y compl eted the I ower- 1 evel fundamental studi es wi th a 
mi ni mum grade of C or better. These i ndi vi dual s wi 1 1 be gi ven one semester to meet the requi rements for adrri ssi on to 
teacher educati on. 

Detai I ed i nformati on regard ng adrri ssi on to the Teacher Educati on program i ncl udi ng the gateway requi rements for 
Earl y Chi I dhood or El ementary Educati on, i s avai I abl e i n the Student Servi ces Off i ce, Room 1204 Benj arri n 
(301-405-2344). 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/Degree Options 

The Col lege of Educati on confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) depending on 
the amount of I i beral arts study i ncl uded i n a parti cul ar degree program M i ni mum requi rements for graduati on are 120 
semester hours. Specif i c departmental program requi rements for more than the rri ni mum must be f ulf i 1 1 ed. 

I n addition to the university's general educati on requi rements (CORE) and the specif i c requi rements for each 
curriculum the Col lege requi res that all maj ors complete a Foundations of Educati on course (eg., EDPS 301) and, 
depend ng upon the teacher educati on maj or, si x to twel ve semester hours of readi ng course requi rements. A grade of C 
or better i s requi red i n al I pre- prof essi onal and prof essi onal course work requi red for the maj or. A n overal I grade poi nt 
average of 2.75 must be mai ntai ned after adrri ssi on to Teacher Educati on. A grade of S is requi red i n the teachi ng 
internship. All teacher candi dates are requi red to obtain satisfactory evaluations on the Collegeof Education 
F oundati onal C ompetenci es/Techni cal Standards and attai n qual i f yi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I 
and Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Detai I ed i nformati on about the Praxi s assessments i s avai I abl e i n the Student Servi ces 
Office, Room 1204 Benjamin. 

Excepti ons to curri cul ar requi rements and rul es of the Col I ege of Educati on must be recommended by the teacher 
candidate's advisor and department chai rperson and approved by the Dean. 

Yearlong I nternship 

The yearl ong i nternshi p, whi ch i s the cul mi nati ng experi ence i n the teacher preparati on program takes pi ace i n a 
collaborating school (i.e., partner school, PDS-- Professional Development School). Each teacher candidate's 
i nternshi p wi 1 1 vary accord ng to the uni que attri butes of the r teacher educati on program. AIM nternshi ps wi 1 1 provi de 
teacher candi dates wi th the opportuni ty to i ntegrate theory and practi ce through a comprehensi ve, real i ty- based 
experi ence. The yearl ong i nternshi p i s arranged through trie Col I ege of Educati on i n col I aborati on wi th the school si te 
coordi nators, PDS Coordi nators, and the desi gnated school s i n the partnershi p. 

The yearlong internshi pis a full-time commitment. Interference with this responsibility because of employment or 
course work i s strongl y di scouraged. Teacher candi dates assi gned to school s for thi s i nternshi p are responsi bl e for thei r 
own transportati on and I i vi ng arrangements and shoul d be prepared to travel to whi chever school has been assi gned. 
The f i nal semester of the yearl ong i nternshi p requi res a sped al fee. PI ease refer to the Regi strati on G ui de under 
F i nanci al I nformati on: F ees. D uri ng the teachi ng i nternshi p, teacher candi dates shoul d be prepared to adhere to the 
academi c schedul e/cal endar for the school system i n whi ch they are pi aced. 

I n order to recei ve a yearl ong i nternshi p pi acement, al I teacher candi dates must make appl i cati on the semester pri or to 
the i nternshi p year. Prospective i nterns must have been admitted to Teacher Educati on and have compl eted al I 
prerequisites. Prior to assignment all candidates in teacher preparation programs must have (1) maintained a 
rri ni mum overal I grade poi nt average of at I east 2. 75 wi th a rri ni mum grade of " C" i n every course requi red for the 
maj or; (2) sati sfactori I y compl eted al I other requi red course work i n thei r program (3) recei ved a f avorabl e 
recommendati on from thei r department (4) attai ned qual i f yi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I and 
Praxisll assessments; (5) appl ied for a year- 1 ong internship pi acement through the Col I ege of Educati on during the 
semester pri or to the i nternshi p year; ( 6) recei ved f avorabl e rati ngs from pri or supervi sed experi ences i n school 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel5C 



settings; (7) reed ved favorable evaluations on the Col I ege of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical 
Standards; and (8) submi tted a cri ni nal hi story di scl osure statement. I n addi ti on, state I aw gi ves the I ocal school to 
whi ch the i ntem i s assi gned the di screti on to requi re a cri mi nal background check pri or to pi acement E arl y C hi I dhood 
E ducati on maj ors must have a certi f i cate i ndi cati ng freedom from tubercul osi s and proof of i mmuni zati on. 

Note All regi strati ons i n the teachi ng i ntemshi p, regardl ess of whether an i ntern wi thdraws or takes a I eave of 
absence, wi 1 1 be counted as an attempt under the campus repeat policy. Onl y two regi strati ons wi 1 1 be al I owed. After 
two regi strati ons, further attempts at the teachi ng i ntemshi p must be approved by the department and the school system 
prof essi onal s i nvol ved i n the teacher candi date's i ntemshi p experi ence. 

Col lege of Education Foundational Ccrnpefcencies/Technical Standards 

A 1 1 candi dates i n the U M prof essi onal preparati on programs are expected to demonstrate that they are prepared to work 
wi th chi I dren and youth i n educati onal setti ngs. Thi s preparati on results from the combi nati on of successful compl eti on 
of uni versi ty coursework and f i el d/i ntemshi p experi ences and the demonstrati on of i mportant human characteri sti cs 
and di sposi ti ons that al I educators shoul d possess. These characteri sti cs and di sposi ti ons, the Col I ege of Educati on 
Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards, are grouped into seven categories: English Language Competence, 
I nterpersonal Competence, Work and Task M anagement, A nal yti c/Reasoni ng Competenci es, Prof essi onal Conduct 
Physical Abilities, and Professional Dispositions. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards serve several important functions, including, but not limited to: (a) 

provi di ng i nf ormati on to those consi deri ng pre K - 12 and communi ty prof essi onal careers that wi 1 1 he! p such 

i ndi vi dual s i n the r career deci si on- maki ng; ( b) advi si ng appl i cants of non-acaderri c cri teri a consi dered i n adrri ssi ons 

deci si ons made by the U ni versi ty's pre K - 12 and communi ty prof essi onal preparati on programs; (c) servi ng as the basi s 

for feedback provi ded to candi dates i n these programs regardi ng the r progress toward mastery of al I program 

obj ecti ves; and (d) servi ng as the basi s for the f i nal assessment of attai nment of graduati on requi rements and 

recommendati on for certi f i cati on. 

Candi dates i n the undergraduate teacher preparati on programs wi 1 1 be requi red to achi eve sati sfactory rati ngs on the 
College of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards (or, if evaluations are not yet avail able, submit a 
C ol I ege of E ducati on F oundati onal C ompetenci es/Techni cal Standards A cknowl edgment F orm) as part of the C ol I ege's 
sel ecti ve admi ssi ons revi ew i n the sophomore or j uni or year. Sel f- assessments of candi dates and f acul ty eval uati ons on 
the Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards al so wi 1 1 occur duri ng each f i el d/i ntemshi p experi ence. Teacher 
candi dates will be moni tared and gi ven feedback throughout the program. A t sped f i ed poi nts, they will be noti f i ed of 
i nadequaci es that may prevent them from progressi ng through the r program. Documentati on and consensus regardi ng 
the teacher candi date's f uncti oni ng wi 1 1 be sought before any acti on i s taken. Candi dates who experi ence def i ci end es i n 
any areas wi 1 1 be encouraged to seek appropri ate prof essi onal hel p from uni versi ty or other sources. I f the probl em 
seems to be beyond remedi ati on, adrri ssi on and/or conti nuati on i n the prof essi onal programs, graduati on, or 
recommendati on for certi f i cati on may be deni ed. 

Foundational Competenci es/Techni cal standards may be met with, or without, accommodations. TheUniversity 
compl i es wi th the requi rements of Secti on 504 of the Rehabi I i tati on A ct and the A meri cans with Disabilities Act of 
1990. Therefore, the Col I ege of Education will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations with respect to these 
standards for an appl icant with a disabi lity who is otherwise qual if ied. For detailed i nformation on the College of 
Educati on- Foundati onal Competencies/Technical Standards, seewww.education.urnd.edu/studentinfo/teachercert.htrnl. 

L iveText Portfolio Requirement: 

The Col I ege recently i nstituted a new I earni ng dectroni c portfol i o and accredited on management system for its teacher 
preparati on programs. A n acti ve subscri pti on to L i veText i s a requi rement for the courses that compri se the 
prof essi onal educati on curri cul um. Teacher candi dates wi 1 1 be expected to submi t a number of the r course and 
portfol i o assi gnments through L i veText. 

The Li veText account, which can be purchased at the University Book Center, is a one-time purchase that is 
comparabl e i n pri ce to the cost of a textbook. These accounts wi 1 1 I ast f or a f ul I year after graduati on so that educati on 
maj ors can use the r d ectroni c L i veText portfol i os i n the j ob seeki ng process. For more i nf ormati on about L i veText 
contact Dr. Kathy Angdetti, Assistant Dean (kangd@umd.edu). 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel57 



Advising 

The Student Servi ces Off i ce provi des acaderri c advi si ng for educati on maj ors regardi ng admi ssi on, ori entati on, 

regi strati on, graduati on, and certifi cati on. At other ti mes, teacher candi dates who have been admitted to the Col I ege of 

E ducati on recei ve academi c advi si ng through thei r program advi sors. A dvi si ng i s mandatory i n the C ol I ege of 

E ducati on: E ducati on maj ors must be advi sed pri or to regi strati on each semester. Teacher candi dates shoul d consul t 

an advi sor i n thei r academi c program for further i nformati on about the mandatory advi si ng requi rement. 

Teacher candi dates are requi red to compl ete an academi c audi t i n the Off i ce of Student Servi ces upon admi ssi on to the 
prof essi onal teacher educati on degree program U ndergraduates are expected to compl ete thei r degree program i n a 
ti mel y manner and to adhere to program benchmarks. I nformati on about program benchmarks and four-year pi ans i s 
avai I abl e on the Student Servi ces website at 
http://www. educati on. umd. edu/studenti nf o/current/ugmaj or- currented. htm 1 . 

Departments and Centers 

The Col I ege i ncl udes a number of centers that offer sped al resources and f aci I i ti es to students, faculty, and the 
community, i ncl udi ng the f ol I owi ng: 

C enter for C hi I dren, Rel ati onshi ps and C ul ture 
Center for Education Pol i cy and Leadershi p 

Center for Integrated Latent Variable Research (CI LVR) 

Center for Literacy, Language, and Culture 
Center for M athemati cs Educati on 
Center for Y oung Chi I dren 

I nsti tute for the Study of Excepti onal C hi I dren and Y outh 

International Center for Transcultural Education 

M aryland Assessment Research Center for Education Success (M ARCES) 

M aryl and E ngl i sh I nsti tute 

M ary I and I nsti tute forMinorityAchi evement and U rban E ducati on 

Sci ence Teachi ng Center 

Researchers from the Col I ege of Educati on also will be studying the neural basis of language, emotion and thought in 
the new campus Brain Imaging Center. The centerpiece of this center will be a new functional magnetic resonance 
i magi ng or f M Rl scanner. Thi s new center wi 1 1 al I ow uni que research to be conducted, i ncl udi ng exarri ni ng brai n 
activity aschil dren I earn to read and understand word meani ngs, and di scoveri ng brai n areas i n chi I dren that are 
acti vated duri ng soci al acceptance or rej ecti on. 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel5£ 



Minors 

The Col I ege of Educati on offers f i ve mi nors: 

1. The M i nor i n Secondary Educati on i ncl udes 15 credi ts and provi des opportuni ti es for undergraduate subj ect area 
maj ors to enrol Una sequence of educati on courses that hel ps them to determi ne i f teachi ng i s a vi abl e career opti on for 
them. For more i nformati on about the secondary educati on mi nor, contact the Curri cul um and I nstructi on program 
advisor, 1207 Benjamin Building. 

2. The M inor in Second Language Education (TESOL) provides opportuni ties for undergraduate subj ect area maj ors to 
compl ete a sequence of courses that hel ps them prepare for careers as teachers of E ngl i sh as a second I anguage i n U S 
school s and/or prepare them for rol es as teachers of E ngl i sh as a f orei gn I anguage i n i nternati onal setti ngs. 1 1 i ncl udes 
coursework from Curri cul um and I nstructi on and from H uman Devel opment. For more i nformati on about theTESOL 
mi nor, contact the Curri cul um and I nstructi on program advi sor, 1207 Benj ami n B ui I di ng. 

3. The Mi nor in Special Educati on provi des opportuni ties for undergraduates to enrol I in a sequenceof education 
courses to determi ne i f worki ng wi th students wi th di sabi I i ti es i s a vi abl e career opti on. F or i ndi vi dual s who are 
interested in pursuing this career opti on, a one-year M.Ed, program, leading to certification as a special educator, is 
al so avai I abl e. F or more i nformati on about the 18-credi t sped al educati on rri nor, see 
www.education.umd.edu/EDSP/news/minorSpEd.pdf. 

4. The M i nor i n H uman Devel opment provi des a ri gorous f oundati on i n human devel opment for undergraduates who 
wi sh to support thei r maj or f i el d of study wi th knowl edge of human growth and devel opment across mul ti pi e domai ns 
and devel opmental stages, as wel I as knowl edge re! ated to pri nci pi es of teachi ng and I earni ng and/or who desi re acti ve 
parti ci pad on i n human devel opment research under the supervi si on of H uman Devel opment f acul ty in I aboratory 
settings. Contact the Human Development undergraduate rri nor advisor, Ms. Eileen Kramer, at ekramer@umd.edu or 
301-405-8432 for more i nformati on or to arrange an advi si ng appoi ntment 

5. The E DC P M i nor i n L eadershi p Studi es promotes col I ege student I eadershi p devel opment by educati ng 
undergraduate students/or and about I eadershi p i n a compl ex worl d. The goal of the mi nor i s to prepare students to 
serve effectively in formal and informal leadership roles in campus, local, national, and global contexts. Faculty and 
students i n the mi nor are dedi cated to advanci ng the f i el d of I eadershi p studi es by bui I di ng upon and cri ti cal I y 

eval uati ng exi sti ng theoreti cal , research- based, and practi cal knowl edge F or the I i st of approved courses and 
additional details regarding the EDCP Mi nor in Leadership Studies, please visit 
www. educati on. umd. edu/edcp/l eadershi p. 

Specialized Academic Programs 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel59 



Secondary Education Pro-am Options The Col lege of Education has multi pie pathways for individuals who are 
i nterested i n teachi ng at the secondary I eve! : 

The Dual Major option, which is designed for incoming freshmen or sophomores, leads to the Bachelor's degree with 
a maj or i n an academi c content area pi us a second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to 
have an academi c content maj or whi ch sati sf i es the requi rements of the academi c department and meets the standards 
for teacher certi f i cati on. Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compl ete both maj ors i n four 
years with careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

The Certificate Program requi res compl eti on of an academi c maj or, i ncl udi ng coursework specif i c to meet 
certi fi cati on standards i n the certi fi cate area, and a bachel or's degree i n an approved academi c content area, pi us the 
compl eti on of a certifi cate program i n secondary educati on to meet requi rements i n U M 's approved program for M SDE 
certi f i cati on. Sel ected coursework from the M i nor i n Secondary E ducati on may be taken pri or to admi ssi on to the 
Certifi cate Program option. (TheCertificateProgramiscurrentlyunder review. For additional information, contact 
the Curriculum and I nstruction program advisor, 1207 Benjamin.) 

The Five-Year I ntegrated Master's with Certification Program, whi ch i s i ntended for content maj ors enteri ng the 
j uni or or seni or year, i s f or tal ented undergraduates wi th a mi ni mum G PA of 3. who seek to combi ne undergraduate 
studi es i n the content area and prof essi onal educati on as a f oundati on for a focused prof essi onal year at the graduate 
I evel I eadi ng to secondary- 1 eve! certi f i cati on i n the subj ect f i el d and the M aster's of E ducati on degree C andi dates who 
are admitted to the program compl ete thei r baccal aureate degrees with a maj or i n the rel evant content area and a 
mi ni mum of 12 credi ts i n prof essi onal educati on studi es rel ated to teacher certi f i cati on requi rements. I n thei rfifth year, 
they enroll in afull-year internship and complete graduate- 1 evel professional studies that make them eligible for 
teacher certifi cati on and the master's of educati on degree. 

F or detai I ed i nf ormati on about these secondary educati on program opti ons, contact the C urri cul um and I nstructi on 
program advi sor, 1207 B enj arri n B ui I di ng . 

College Honors Program 

U ndergraduate teacher educati on maj ors meed ng certai n schol asti c requi rements may parti ci pate i n the Col I ege of 
E ducati on H onors Program The obj ecti ve of thi s program i s to exarri ne the f i el d of educati on at I evel s of depth and 
breadth that go beyond that provi ded by any one teacher preparati on sequence The program consi sts of three 
components: group, cross-di sci pi i nary, and i ndi vi dual study. The H onors Program represents an excel I ent spri ngboard 
for teacher candi dates wi th aspi rati ons to go on to graduate school . F or further i nf ormati on contact D r. C hri sty C orbi n, 
1117H Benjarrin Building, 301-405-7793. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Col I ege sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa; the Teacher Educati on Associ ati on of M aryl and Students 
(TEAMS), a state/national education association; the College of Education Student Assembly, a student governance 
organi zati on; and K appa Del ta Pi , an honor soci ety i n educati on. The M ary M cL eod B ethune Soci ety i s a 
pre- professional organization concerned with minority issues and education. Student Educators of Young Children 
( SE Y C ) i s a student organi zati on sponsored by the M aryl and A ssoci ati on for the E ducati on of Y oung C hi I dren 
(MDAEYC), an affiliate of the National Associ ati on f or the Educati on of Young Chi I dren (N A EYC). A chapter of the 
Counci I for Excepti onal Chi I dren i s open to teacher candi dates i n Sped al Educati on. 

The PI an of Organi zati on for the Col I ege of Educati on cal I s for undergraduate student representati on on both the Col I ege 
Col I egeof Educati on Assembl y and Col I ege Senate. These organi zati ons assume a criti cal rol e i n pol i cy devel opment 
for the Col I ege of Education. The Assembly meets at I east once a year during the fall semester for its annual meeting. 
Senate meeti ngs typi cal I y occur once a month duri ng the f al I and spri ng semesters. N i ne f ul I -ti me undergraduates are 
elected as voting members of the Col I ege Assembly. At least two representatives from each of the departments with 
undergraduate maj ors serve on the Assembl y. The chai r of the U ndergraduate Student Assembl y also serves as a 
voting member of theCollege of Education Assembly. Of the ten Assembly members, one is elected to serve as a 
delegate to the Col I ege of Education Senate. For further information about the Col I ege Assembly or Senate, contact 
the Off i ce of Student Servi ces, Room 1204 Benj ami n. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagelffi 



I n several departments there are i nformal organi zati ons of students. Students shoul d contact the i ndi vi dual 
departments or, inthecaseof Col I ege-wide groups, the Student Services office, for additional information regarding 
these organi zati ons. 

Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For i nformati on (i ncl udi ng details regardi ng TEACH grants), visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu . 

I n addi ti on, contri buti ons from the C ol I ege of E ducati on A I umni and F ri ends have made i t possi bl e to award a number 
of $1,000 schol arshi ps to deservi ng teacher educati on candi dates each academi c year. These awards are based on the 
foil owing criteria: 

• academic performance 

• financial need 

• I eadershi p and contri buti ons to the fi el d of educati on or 
commi tment to potenti al I eadershi p i n the f i el d of educati on 

• encouragement of a diverse and multicultural community 

Schol arshi p appl i cati ons may be obtai ned i n the Of f i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . A ppl i cati ons al so are 
avai lableon-li ne: http://www. educati on.umd.edu/studenti nf o/schol arshi ps/i ndex.htm 1 . 

For more information about the Col I ege of Education Scholarships including deadlines and application materials, 
contact the Of f i ce of Student Services(1204Benjamin). 

Awards 

M aryland Teachers of Promise Program 

E ach year, the C ol I ege i denti f i es f i ve to seven of i ts most promi si ng gi fted pre-servi ce educators, who are seni ors and 
who pi an to teach i n the state of M aryl and. These i ndi vi dual s become part of a sel ect group of outstandi ng pre-servi ce 
and veteran teachers participating in a mentor-prot(ig®program and educational Institute. As part of the program each 
teacher candi date i s pai red wi th an award- wi nni ng veteran teacher mentor (Teacher of the Y ear, M i I ken N ati onal 
Educator, Blue Ribbon School Master Teacher, etc.), who provides guidance and support during the transition period 
into teaching. For more information about this program contact Dr. KathyAngeletti, Assistant Dean 
(kangel(a)umd.edu). 

Student E ngagement and Service Units 

Student Services Office 

1204 B enj arri n B ui I di ng, 301-405-2344 
www.educati on. umd.edu/studenti nf o 

The Student Servi ces Off i ce provi des academi c advi si ng for educati on maj ors regardi ng admi ssi on, ori entati on, 
regi strati on, graduati on, and certifi cati on. I nformati on about the Praxi s assessments and the Col I ege of Educati on 
Schol arshi ps al so i s avai I abl e i n Student Servi ces. 

Educational Technology Services 

0234 B enj ani n B ui I di ng, 301-405-3611 

E ducati onal Technol ogy Servi ces hel ps the Col I ege advance the eff ecti ve use of technol ogy i n support of student 
I eami ng. The Center provi des a range of technology and medi a resources and services to faculty and students. The 
C enter al so offers prof essi onal devel opment courses, technol ogy pi anni ng, consul ti ng assi stance, and other outreach 
servi ces to educators and pol i cy makers throughout the state and regi on. A number of research, devel opment, and 
demonstrati on acti viti es i n educati onal technol ogy al so are conducted through the Center's grants and contracts with 
federal, state, and private funding sources. 

Career Center 

3100 Hornbake Library; 301-314-7225 
www.CareerCenter.umd.edu 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel61 



The E mpl oyment Regi strati on Program (TE RP) i ncl ude job listi ngs i n pri vate and publ i c school s and i nsti tuti ons of 
hi gher I earni ng, on-campus i ntervi ews wi th i n-state and out-of-state school systems, and resume referral to empl oyers 
i nterested i n hi ri ng educati on maj ors. I nf ormati on and appl i cati ons from school systems throughout the country, j ob 
search publications, and various empl oyment directories also are available in the Career Center. 

A.J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

3110J eong H.Kim Engi neeri ng Bui Idi ng, 301-405-8335 
www.eng.umd.edu 
Dean: Darryll Pines 
Associate Dean(s): WilliamFourney 

The mission of the Clark School of Engi neeri ng at the University of Maryland is to provide quality engineering 
educati on, to conduct strong research programs, to foster a cl ose partnershi p wi th i ndustry and government, and to 
provi de rel ated servi ce to the campus corrmuni ty and the communi ty at I arge. A maj or focus of the School 's acti vi ti es 
i s to provi de a qual i ty engi neeri ng educati on wi th suffi ci ent scope to i ncl ude the basi c and sped al i zed engi neeri ng 
trai ni ng necessary to the current and emergi ng needs of soci ety. The School has a rel ated responsi bility to contri bute to 
the advancement of knowl edge by conducti ng research at the cutti ng edge of sci ence and technol ogy. Si nee sci ence and 
technol ogy are rapi dl y advanci ng, the School al so has a prof essi onal responsi bi I i ty to provi de conti nui ng educati on 
programs so the practi ci ng engi neer can remai n eff ecti ve i n the f i el d. The School f acul ty and admi ni strati on al so sees as 
part of its mission an obligation to serve the needs of the campus community and the community at large in the spirit of 
collegial cooperation. 

E ngi neers al so occupy an i ntermedi ary posi ti on between sci enti sts and the publ i c because, i n addi ti on to understand ng 
sci enti f i c pri nci pi es, they are concerned wi th the ti rri ng, economi cs, and val ues that def i ne the use and appl i cati on of 
those pri nci pi es. With this i n rri nd, the School fosters a cl ose partnershi p with i ndustry and government, and also 
reaches out to both the campus communi ty at I arge wi th i ts servi ces. 

Admission Requirements 
Direct Admissions Requirements 

1. Admission to the Clark School of Engineering is limited. Applicants are reviewed and will be admitted directly on a 
competitive basis. Evaluation is based on high school grades, standard zed test scores, activities, leadershipand 
demonstrati ons of potenti al to succeed. A n appl i cant may appl y to any of the maj ors offered wi thi n the School . A n 
appl i cant al so has the opti on of enteri ng as an U ndeci ded E ngi neeri ng maj or and will typi cal I y choose a degree 
program i n the f i rst year. 

2. National Merit and National A chi evement F i nali sts and Serri finalists, Mary I and Distinguished Scholar Finalists, and 
B anneker/K ey Schol ars are admi tted di recti y to the School A caderri c B enchmarks 

Four Year Plan 

The C I ark School of Engi neeri ng has expectati ons and policies that are desi gned to promote the success of its students 
and to ensure ti mel y progress to the degree. A student, i n consul tati on wi th School and departmental advi sors, i s 
requi red to devel op an i ndi vi dual pi an f or ti mel y compl eti on of hi s/her degree program. The pi an wi 1 1 be revi ewed by 
the student and hi s/her advi sor on a regul ar basi s and revi sed, i f necessary, as i ndi vi dual ci rcumstances change. U nder 
normal ci rcumstances, a student i s expected to compl ete hi s/her degree requi rements i n no more than four years. 

Benchmarks 

Directly admitted freshmen will be subject to an academic review at the end of the semester in which they attain 45 
U ni versi ty of M ary I and credi ts. I n order to successful I y compl ete the revi ew, students must have an overal I G PA of at 
least 2.0 and have completed ENES 100, Fundamental Studies English, one Distributed Studies Course from the 
Humanities or Social Sciences, and the foil owing sequence of Gateway requirements: MATH 141, PHYS 161, and 
CHEM 113 or CH EM 135 with a grade of 2.0 or better. 

Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at the University of M aryland or at any other 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel62 



uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a grade of W ( wi thdrawn) 
i s earned i s counted as an attempt. Students who f ai I to meet these requi rements by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 45 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and credi ts may be di smi ssed from the C I ark School and may not reappl y . D i smi ssed students may 
appeal i n writi ng di rectly to the Associate Dean of Retention, Graduation and Career Services i n the Clark School . 

The second benchmark revi ew occurs two semesters after the 45 credi t revi ew, and the thi rd benchmark revi ew occurs 
two semesters after the second revi ew. Transfer students admitted to the CI ark School wi 1 1 be subj ect to onl y the second 
and thi rd benchmark revi ews. 

E ach academi c program has sped f i c benchmark requi rements. Refer to 
www.eng. umd.edu/advi si ng/advi si ng_4-year- pi ans. html for program benchmarks. 

Transfer Admission 

Direct Admissions Requirements 

I ntemal and external transfer students will be di recti y admi tted to the C I ark School i f they meet the G ateway 
requi rements, M ATH 141, PHY S 161, CH EM 113 or CH EM 135 with a grade of 2.0 or better, have compl eted 
F undamental Studi es E ngl i sh, have compl eted at I east one H umani ti es or Soci al Studi es course, and have a mi ni mum 
cumulativeGPA of 3.0 in all college-level coursework, and who have not previously been admitted to the CI ark 
School of Engineering. Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either atthe University of 
M aryl and or at any other uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a 
grade of W ( wi thdrawn) i s earned i s counted as an attempt. Students shoul d wait until all gateway requi rements are 
compl ete before appl yi ng for admi ssi on to the School . 

Appeal Process 

All students denied admission to the CI ark School may appeal thedecisioninwritingdirectlytotheAssociateDeanof 
Retention, Graduation and Career Services in the CI ark School. External transfer students who are denied admission to 
the U ni versi ty may appeal to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons of the U ni versi ty . 

Special Note 

Students with a previous B. A. orB.S. degree will be admitted to the Clark School of Engineering with a mini mum 
GPA of 3.0 i n al I college-level coursework and a completion of MATH 140, MATH141, CHEM113orCHEM135, and 
PHYS 161 with a grade of 2.0 or higher in each. Post-baccalaureate students must meet all transfer admi ssi on 
requirements. 

There may be some courses whi ch are not offered by the school s parti ci pati ng i n the E ngi neeri ng Transfer program. 
Students shoul d i nvesti gate the f easi bi I i ty of compl eti ng these courses i n summer school at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
before starti ng the r j uni or course work i n the f al I semester. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi remerrts'Degree Options 

Structure of E ngi neeri ng C urri cul a: Courses i n the normal curri cul um or program and prescri bed credi t hours I eadi ng to 
the degree of B ache! or of Sci ence ( wi th curri cul um desi gnati on) are outl i ned i n the seed ons descri bi ng each department 
i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng. N o student may modi f y the prescri bed number of hours wi thout sped al perm ssi on 
from the Dean of the School . The courses i n each curriculum may be classified in the foil owing categories: 

1. Courses i n the CORE L i beral A rts and Sci ence Studi es Program. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences, mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Rd ated techni cal courses, engi neeri ng sci ences and other courses approved for one curri cul um but offered by 
another department. 

4. Courses in the major department A student should obtain written approval for any substitution of courses from the 
department chai r and the Dean of the School . The courses i n each engi neeri ng curri cul um as cl assif i ed bd ow, form a 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel63 



sequent] al and devel opmental pattern i n subj ect matter. I n this respect curri cul a i n engi neeri ng may differ from 
curri cul a i n other col I eges. Some regul ati ons whi ch are general I y appl i cabl e to al I students may need cl ari f i cati on for 
purposes of orderl y admi ni strati on among engi neeri ng students (see the A caderri c Regul ati ons i n chapter 4) . M oreover, 
the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng establ i shes pol i ci es whi ch suppl ement uni versi ty regul ati ons. 

School Regulations 

1. The responsi bi I i ty for proper regi strati on and for sati sfyi ng stated prerequi si tes for any course must rest wi th the 
student as does the responsi bi I i ty for proper achi evement i n courses i n whi ch the student i s enrol I ed. E ach student 
shoul d be f ami I i ar wi th the provi si ons of thi s catal og, i ncl udi ng the A caderri c Regul ati ons. 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics, and chemistry have highest priority. It is strongly recommended that 
every engi neeri ng student regi ster for mathemarj cs and chemi stry or mathemarj cs and physi cs each semester unti I the 
student has f ul I y sati sf i ed requi rements of the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng i n these subj ects. 

3. To be el i gi bl e f or a bachel or's degree i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng, a student must have an overal I average of 
at least a 2.0 and a grade of C (2.0) orbetterinall engineering and CM SC courses used to satisfy major requi rements. 
Responsi bi I ity for knowi ng and meed ng al I graduati on requi rements i n any curri cul um rests with the student 

4. In addition to the requirement for a C (2.0) orbetterinall engi neeri ng and CM SC courses, all students who begin 
college-level work, either at the University of M aryland or any other institution in the Spring 2005 semester or later, 
must receive a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all technical courses (eg. mathematics, physics, etc) used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

5. A course taken at U M i n whi ch a grade has been earned may not be repeated vi a transfer from another i nsrj tuti on. 

6. Students in the CI ark School of Engineering must have a rri ni mum 2. Uni versi ty of Maryland G PA to enroll in 
courses at another i nsrj tuti on. 

7. A 1 1 students are requi red to compl ete a number of general educafj on courses and must f ol I ow the uni versi ty's 
requi rements regarding completion of the general education (CORE) Program. Consult the Academic Regulations 
secti on of thi s catal og for addi fj onal i nf ormati on. E ngi neeri ng students who began col I ege- 1 evel work ( ei ther at the 
University of Maryland or at other institutions) during the Fall 1989 semester or later are requi red to compl ete a junior- 
level technical writing course regardless of their performance in freshman English classes. This represents a School 
pol i cy, not a U ni versi ty- wi de pol i cy . 

8. A 1 1 degree programs i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng requi re a rri ni mum of 120 credi ts pi us sati sf acti on of al I 
department School, and University general education (CORE) program requi rements. Students should be aware that 
for al I current! y exi sti ng engi neeri ng programs the total number of credits necessary for the degree exceeds 120 by 
some number that depends on the sped f i c maj or. 

C urri cul a for the vari ous engi neeri ng departments are gi ven i n thi s catal og to i 1 1 ustrate how the programs can be 
compl eted i n four years. These curri cul a are ri gorous and rel ati vel y di ff i cul t. Surveys have shown that onl y about 
one- thi rd to one- half of the students actual I y receive an engi neeri ng degree i n four years. The maj ority of students 
(whether at M aryl and or at other engi neeri ng school s nati onwi de) compl ete the engi neeri ng program i n four and 
one- hal f to f i ve years. It is quite f easi bl e for a student to stretch out any curri cul um thi s may be necessary or desi rabl e 
for a vari ety of reasons. H owever, students shoul d seek competent advi si ng i n order to ensure that courses are taken i n 
the proper sequence. 

All students are urged to complete a senior audit using Degree Navigator and review with their departmental advisor at 
I east two semesters pri or to graduati on. The purpose of the seni or audit is to discuss acaderri c progress and corf i rm 
that graduati on requi rements are bei ng compl eted. 

Depart m e n ts and Degrees 

The CI ark School of Engi neeri ng offers the degree of Bachel or of Sci ence i n the fol I owi ng f i el ds of study: Aerospace 
Engineering, Bioengi neeri ng, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, 
F i re Protect on E ngi neeri ng, M ateri al s Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng, M echani cal E ngi neeri ng. A 1 1 of the above programs 
are accredi ted by the E ngi neeri ng A ccredi tati on Comrri ssi on of the A ccredi tati on B oard for E ngi neeri ng and 
Technology (ABET). 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PagelM 



Freshman-Sophomore Years 

The freshman and sophomore years i n engi neeri ng are desi gned to I ay a strong f oundati on i n mathemati cs, physi cal 
sci ences, and the engi neeri ng sci ences upon whi ch the student wi 1 1 I ater devel op a prof essi onal program duri ng the 
upper di vi si on (j uni or and seni or) years. D uri ng the f i rst two years, students are i ntroduced to the concepts of 
engi neeri ng desi gn and work i n mul ti di sci pi i nary teams. The School course requi rements for the freshman and 
sophomore years are si mi I ar for al I students, regardl ess of the r i ntended acaderri c program, thus aff ordi ng the student 
maxi mum flexibility in choosi ng a specif i c engi neeri ng sped al ization. 

E ng neeri ng Sciences 

Engi neeri ng Sci ence courses represent a common core of basi c materi al offered to students of several different 
departments. A 1 1 freshman and sophomore students of engi neeri ng are requi red to take E N E S 100. Other E N E S 
courses, 102, 220, and 221, are sped f i ed by the di ff erent departments or taken by the student as el ecti ves. The 
responsi bi I i ty for teachi ng the engi neeri ng sci ence courses i s di vi ded among the engi neeri ng departments. I n addi ti on 
to the core courses noted above, several courses of general i nterest to engi neeri ng or non-engi neeri ng students have 
been gi ven E N E S desi gnati ons. See the L i st of A pproved C ourses i n chapter 8 for further descri pti ons of these courses. 

Freshman Curriculum 

Seeindividual department requi rements in the Departments and Majors section of this site Entering freshman math 
pi acement i s determi ned sol el y by performance on the U ni versi ty math pi acement exam and not on the M ath SAT 
score Placement in MATH 115 or lower will eld ay by a semester eligibility to take certain engineering courses. 

SophomoreYear 

N o I ater than the sophomore year, a student shoul d sel ect an acaderri c degree program (A erospace, B i oengi neeri ng, 
Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Fire Protection, Mechanical, or Materials Sci ence and Engineering) and this 
department assumes the responsi bi I i ty f or the students acaderri c gui dance, counsel i ng, and program pi anni ng from that 
poi nt unti I the compl eti on of the degree requi rements of that program as wel I as the School . F or the sped f i c 
requi rements, see the curri cul um I i sti ng i n each engi neeri ng department. 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory for al I students i n the C I ark School . A dvi si ng for freshmen and undeci ded engi neeri ng students 
i s provi ded by the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A caderri c Support, I ocated i n Room 1131 G I enn L . M arti n 
H al 1 , 301-405-9973, and i s avai I abl e by appoi ntment M onday through F ri day from 8: 30 a. m to 4: 30 p. m Wal k- i n 
advi si ng i s al so avai I abl e at specif i c ti mes duri ng the week. A ppoi ntments for other hours can be made by sped al 
request. Students with a ded ared engi neeri ng maj or shoul d seek advi si ng from the r acaderri c department. Refer to the 
individual program for additional information. 

Minors 

Minor in Engineering Leadership Development 16 credits. Preparing engineering students for life- long leadership 
rol es i n educati on, i ndustry, and government i s the goal of the mi nor i n engi neeri ng I eadershi p devel opment. The rri nor 
wi 1 1 compl ement the techni cal ski 1 1 s and knowl edge students acqui re duri ng thei r acaderri c careers to better prepare 
them for I eadershi p and col I aborati ve rol es i n thei r prof essi onal futures. Students may earn the mi nor and a notati on on 
thei r off i ci al transcri pt by compl eti ng coursework whi ch focuses on communi cati on, gl obal awareness, proj ect 
management understandi ng oneself and worki ng effectively with others. Contact the rri nor advisor, J ane Fi nes 
(jf i nes@umd.edu), or vi sit the web atvww.ursp.umd.edu/l eadershi p/i ndex.htrri for more i nformati on. 

International Engineering: 15 to 21 credits. I n addition to astrong engineering background, there is a need for 
engi neers wi th cross- cul tural experi ence and f orei gn I anguage abi I i ti es. Students may earn the mi nor by compl eti ng a 
course i n I ntemati onal B usi ness C ul tures for E ngi neeri ng and Technol ogy and addi ti onal courses i n I anguage, cul ture 
studi es, or i ntemati onal I y rel ated studi es, pi us an engi neeri ng experi ence abroad. Contact the mi nor advi sor, Cai ne 
F ranci s (cf ranci 4@umd. edu) , or vi si t the web at www. ursp. umd. edu/i ntemati onal /i ndex. html for more i nformati on. 
Students who f ul f i 1 1 ni nor requi rements wi 1 1 recei ve a notati on on thei r off i ci al transcri pt. 

Nanoscienceand Technology: 15 credits. Explosive growth in the field of nanometer scale sci ence and technol ogy 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel65 



( N S&T) has I ed i n the past few years to many technol ogi cal advances i n devi ces and materi al s structured at the 
nanometer seal e The I nterdi sci pi i nary M i nor Program of Study i n N anosci ence and Technol ogy i s i ntended to prepare 
parti ci pad ng students for a career i n thi s rapi dl y devel opi ng f i el d. Thi s program draws upon the consi derabl e experti se 
i n nanosci ence at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, i n departments di stri buted among three school s, E ngi neeri ng, Computer, 
M athemati cs and Physi cal Sci ences and C hemi stry and L i f e Sci ences. Students take courses i n F abri cati on/Synthesi s 
and Characterization, which emphasize the experimental side of NS&T, as well asFundamental Science and 
Speci alization Electi ves, whi ch teach the underl yi ng pri nci pi es and di recti ons, and i ncl ude underl yi ng theory and the 
motivations for NS&T. Visit the web sit a/vww,nanocenter,utrd,edu/educatioiynano_mi nor/nano_mi nor.php for more 
information. 



Nuclear E ngi neeri ng: 15 credits. The need for engi neers with knowl edge of nucl ear engi neeri ng topi cs wi 1 1 grow 
si gni f i cantl y i n the comi ng years, wi th new nucl ear pi ants bei ng pi anned, exi sti ng pi ants conti nui ng operati on, and 
i ncreasi ng i ndustri al and medi cal uses of radi ati on sources. The mi nor i n N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng provi des an engi neeri ng 
student wi th an understandi ng of nucl ear engi neeri ng and i ts appl i cati on to many di ff erent fields, such as power 
generati on, reactor operati on, and i ndustri al uses. Students i n the mi nor wi 1 1 1 earn the fundamental s of nucl ear reactor 
engi neeri ng, radi ati on i nteracrj ons and measurement power pi ant desi gn concepts, and reactor safety and ri sk 
assessment. The mi nor is open to any student in the CI ark School of Engineering. Contact Dr. G.A. Pertmer 
( pertmer@umd.edu) for further i nf ormati on. Students who f ul f i 1 1 rri nor requi rements wi 1 1 recei ve a notati on on thei r 
official transcript. 

Project Mana g e m e n t 15 credits. A basi c understanding of project management is becoming increasingly important 
for engi neers. Such knowl edge enabl es them to contri bute i mmedi atel y to empl oyers, and to advance thei r careers. I n 
add ti on to a strong engi neeri ng background, there i s si gni f i cant need for engi neers to understand the fundamental s of 
managi ng proj ects i n order to ef f ecti vel y parti ci pate as members of proj ect teams. Students who successful I y compl ete 
mi nor requi rements wi 1 1 recei ve a notati on on thei r off i ci al transcri pt Contact Qi ngbi n Cui , Proj ect M anagement M i nor 
Advisor (cui@umd.edu) orvisittheweb 
sit ewww.pm.urrxi.edu/underarad_proarams/underarad_mi nor_courses/i ndex.html . 

Living-Learning Programs 

Flexus The Dr. Marilyn Berman Pdlans Women in Engineering Living & Learning Community 

Women in Engineering Program 
1131 Glenn L.Martin Hall 
301-405-3931 
Director: Paige Smith 

The Women in Engi neeri ngLiving& Learning Community (WIE LLC) is open to any first-year female engineering 
student wi th an i nterest i n promoti ng gender di versi ty i n the f i el d of engi neeri ng. Students who compl ete the f i rst year 
of the program are i nvited to parti ci pate i n a second year. The program seeks to promote community among f i rst and 
second year engi neeri ng students committed to gender diversity i n the f i el d and to provi de encouragement and support 
for academi c and prof essi onal success by: 

1. i ntroduci ng students to women mentors and rol e model s; 

2. offering professional and personal development opportunities; 

3. helpi ng students make connecti ons wi th peers i n engi neeri ng and 

4. rei nf orci ng i mportant techni cal ski 1 1 s needed to succeed i n engi neeri ng. 

The components of this living and learning community include a one credit seminar course, course clustering, 
resi denti al housi ng on a common f I oor i n Easton H al I and resources provi ded i n the resi dence hal I . Parti ci pants wi 1 1 
also have the opportunity to work closely with Virtus: a Living and Learning Community for Success in Engineering 

Virtus A Living and Learning Community for Success in Engineering 

Successful E ngi neeri ng Educati on and Devel opment Support Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

301-405-3936 

Coordi nator: Tamara Fuller 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel66 



V i rtus provi des f i rst-year mal e engi neeri ng students access to an engi neeri ng based I i vi ng and I earni ng envi ronment. 
The pri mary goal of V i rtus i s to promote community among f i rst and second year engi neeri ng students and to provi de 
support for academi c and prof essi onal success. L i vi ng i n Easton H al I , parti ci pants wi 1 1 be i ntroduced to a di verse range 
of mentors and role models and offered professional and personal development opportunities. I n addition to a common 
resi dence f I oor, the components of this livi ng and I earni ng communi ty i ncl ude a one credi t seni nar, course cl usteri ng, 
and resources provi ded i n the resi dence hal I . Parti ci pants al so have the opportuni ty to make connecti ons wi th peers i n 
engi neeri ng and work closely with Flexus: the Dr. M ari lyn Berman Pol lans' Women i n Engi neeri ng Livi ng and 
L earni ng C omrnuni ty . V i rtus i s funded through the N ati onal Sci ence Foundati on's Sci ence, Technol ogy, E ngi neeri ng, 
and M athematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP, Award#0969232). 

College Park Scholars- Science* Technology, and Society 

Director: Dr. Betsy Mendelsohn 

Co-sponsored by the CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng, the Sci ence, Technol ogy, and Sod ety (STS) program i s one of the 
11 1 i vi ng/l earni ng programs offered by the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program. Thi s two year program for academi cal I y 
tal ented freshmen and sophomores wel comes al I maj ors. Students exami ne the ways that soci al processes shape 
sci enti f i c research and technol ogi cal devel opment, and converse! y, the ways that sci ence and technol ogy shape soci ety. 
The STS program provi des activities that build community, cultivate leadership, prepare students to seek internships, 
and hel p students to thri ve i n col I ege 

College Honors Program 

Students in the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering may participate in the University's Honors College, College Park 
Schol ars, Gemstone, the CI ark School H onors Program, and/or departmental honors programs (see the i ndi vi dual 
department secti on for detai I s) . 

CI ark School Engi neeri ng H onors Program 

The CI ark School offers an Engi neeri ng Honors Program that provides el i gi bl e students the opportunity to pursue an 
enri ched program of studi es that will broaden the r perspecti ves and i ncrease the depth of the r knowl edge. E ngi neeri ng 
students meed ng al I of the foil owing criteria are eligible to apply: 

1. Upper fourth of engineering juniors and seni ors; 

2. J uni or standi ng or 60 appl i cabl e credi ts; 

3. Completionof at I east one semester at UMCP. 



The requi rements for compl eti ng the program are as f ol I ows: 

1. A n H onors Research Proj ect whi ch often can be used as a techni cal el ecti ve, a wri tten report, and an oral 
presentati on to a f acul ty panel of the E H P; 

2. Successful completion of both Engineering Honors Seminars (ENES 480 and ENES 481, one credit hour each); 

3. M ai ntenance of a G PA to remai n i n the upper thi rd of the cl ass. 

For more i nformation see http://www.eng.umd.edu/current/honors-program 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Professional Societies 

E ach of the engi neeri ng departments sponsors student chapters or student secti ons of a nati onal engi neeri ng soci ety. 
The student chapters sponsor a vari ety of acti viti es i ncl udi ng techni cal meeti ngs, soci al gatheri ngs, and School or 
U ni versi ty servi ce proj ects. A 1 1 students are strongl y encouraged to j oi n one or more of these chapters. 

These organizations are American Helicopter Soci ety- Intl.: American I nstitute of Aeronautics and Astronautics: 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel67 



American Ceramic Society; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; American Nuclear Society; American Society 
of Civil Engineers; American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineering; American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers; ASM International; Black Engineers Society; Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers; Materials Engineering Society; Materials Research Society; Minerals, Metal sand Materials Society; 
Soci ety of A si an E ngi neers; Soci ety of A utomoti ve E ngi neers; Soci ety of F i re Protect] on E ngi neers; Soci ety of 
H i spani c E ngi neers; Soci ety of M anuf acturi ng E ngi neers; and Soci ety of Women E ngi neers. 

Honor Societies 

The CI ark School of E ngi neeri ng and each of the engi neeri ng departments sponsor honors soci eti es. N omi nati ons or 
i nvi tati ons for membershi p are usual I y extended to j uni or and seni or students based on schol arshi p, servi ce, and/or 
other sel ecti ve cri teri a. Some of the honors organi zati ons are branches of nati onal soci eti es; others are I ocal groups: 
TauBetaPi (College Honorary); Alpha Nu Sigma (Nuclear Engineering); Alpha Sigma Nu (Materials Science 
Engineering); Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering); Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical and Computer Engineering); Omega Chi 
Epsi I on (Chemical Engineering); Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering); 
and Si gma G amma Tau (A erospace E ngi neeri ng) . 

Financial Assistance 

The CI ark School offers schol arshi ps to tal ented undergraduate engi neeri ng students. Thi s i s a competiti ve schol arshi p 
program wi th schol arshi ps awarded for meri t. F i nanci al need and a vari ety of other factors may al so be consi dered. 
N ew freshmen are automarj cal I y consi dered for most C I ark School schol arshi ps. C urrent and new transfer students 
must complete the online scholarship application by May 31st for best consi deration. ContactJaneFines( 
jfi nesCcDumd.edu ) or vi si t the websi te www. ursp umd, edu/schol arshi ps/i ndex. html for more i nf orrnati on. 

T he Benj arrin T . Rome Schol arshi p i s a f ul I - ri de schol arshi p awarded to a new f reshman student each year. The 
Rome Schol arshi p covers al I expenses (tuiti on and fees, room and board) pi us a book al I owance and a sti pend. The 
award i s renewabl e for up to three addi ti onal years provi ded the red pi ent mai ntai ns good academi c standi ng and 
makes progress toward an engi neeri ng degree 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal , state, and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For more information, visit: www.fi nanci al ai d. umd. edu . 

Research Units 

Undergraduate Research Programs 

U ndergraduate research programs al I ow qual if i ed undergraduate students to work with research I aboratory di rectors i n 
departments, thus gi vi ng students a chance for a uni que experi ence i n research and engi neeri ng desi gn. Proj ects i n 
engi neeri ng al I ow undergraduate students to do i ndependent study under the gui dance of faculty members i n an area of 
mutual i nterest. For more i nf orrnati on, contact the department 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-9973 
Di rector: J enna Dolan 
www.eng.umd.edu/advisinq 

The Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A caderri c Support Of f i ce provi des a broad vari ety of servi ces to assi st 
students duri ng thei r col I egi ate careers. I ndi vi dual advi si ng may focus on a number of student rel ated i ssues i ncl udi ng: 
schedule planning, course sel ecti on, university policy interpretations, career choices, social and personal adjustments, 
as wel I as i denti f i cati on and support for students wi th sped f i c academi c concerns. The of f i ce al so provi des ori entati on 
to new students, cl ears students for graduati on, and i s i instrumental i n hel pi ng students process admi ni strati ve forms. 
The staff works cl osel y wi th other campus off i ces to i dentif y resources that address the vari ous needs of our students. 

E ngi neeri ng Co-op and Career Services 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3863 
Director: Heidi Sauber 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel68 



CareerEnqrOumd.edu . www.coop.eng, umd.edu 

Whether it's to wi re robots i n a car pi ant, monitor a waste water management proj ect or ref ormul ate cough syrup for a 
pharmaceuti cal company, the E ngi neeri ng Co-op and C areer Servi ces Of f i ce assi sts students i n f i ndi ng cooperati ve 
educati on (co- op) and i nternshi p posi ti ons i n pri vate i ndustry and the government. Students may work f ul I -ti me or 
part-ti me duri ng the f al I , spri ng and/or summer semesters. Co-op and i nternshi p posi ti ons compl ement cl assroom 
I eami ng and provi de students the opportuni ty to gai n prof essi onal I evel experi ence, bui I d mentori ng rel ati onshi ps, 
i ntegrate theory and practi ce, corf i rm career choi ces, and hel p f i nance the r educati on. 

The f i rst step i n the appl i cati on process i s to attend an ori entati on sessi on that focuses on i nternshi p/co-op search 
strategi es. After writi ng a resume and havi ng it criti qued by our off i ce, students are given permissi on to upl oad the r 
resume i nto our database of engi neeri ng j obs and on-campus i ntervi ews. To assi st students i n thei r search we offer a 
wi de vari ety of workshops on topi cs such as ef f ecrj ve resumes, i ntervi ew strategi es, prof essi onal i sm, career fai r 
preparati on, sal ary negoti ati on, and advanced j ob search techni ques. O ur websi te I i sts the current schedul e of 
workshops. I n additi on, students have the opportunity to meet empl oyers by parti ci pati ng i n our career fai rs, empl oyer 
i nf ormati on sessi ons, and sped al j ob search presentati ons conducted by engi neeri ng recrui ters. V i si t our websi te for 
more i nf ormati o nwww. coop, enq, umd. edu . 

Undergraduate Recruitment and Special Programs 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3857 
Director: J aneF. Fines 
www.ursp.umd.edu 

The Office of Undergraduate Recruitment and Special Programs is responsible for activities to recruit and retain 
students i n the A . J ames C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng. Servi ces i ncl ude undergraduate recrui tment, i ntemati onal 
programs, leadership programs, meeting with prospective students, providing K-12 outreach activities, administering 
the CI ark School 's schol arshi p program, advi si ng students studyi ng abroad, advi si ng students compl eti ng the mi nor i n 
I ntemati onal E ngi neeri ng or E ngi neeri ng L eadershi p Devel opment 



TheCenter for Minorities in Science and Engineering 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3878 
Director: Rosemary L. Parker 

The Center is dedicated to increasing the enrollment and graduation rates of African American, Hispanic, and Native 
American students majoring in engineering. TheCenter provides a complete package of servi ces designed to assist 
students from pre-col I ege through compl eti on of the undergraduate degree. Servi ces i ncl ude academi c advi si ng, tutori al 
assistance, scholarshipinformation.theBRIDGE Program outreach programs, job informati on and support of student 
organizations. 

Women in Engineering Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 
Director: Paige E.Smith 

The Women i n E ngi neeri ng Program ( WI E Program) i s dedi cated to i ncreasi ng the enrol I ment, retenti on, and 
graduati on rates of f emal es i n the School , as wel I as i denti f yi ng and addressi ng thi s group's uni que needs. The 
Program provi des a comprehensi ve set of i ni ti ati ves desi gned to encourage and assi st women students to become 
successful professional engineers. 

Servi ces offered i ncl ude research f el I owshi ps, prof essi onal mentori ng program, i nf ormati on I i stserv, websi te, I i vi ng 
and I eami ng community, f i rst year peer mentori ng program workshops on careers, outreach programs, speakers, 
student advi sory board, and support of women engi neeri ng organi zati ons. 

E ngi neeri ng I nformation Technologies (E IT) 

0123 G I enn L . M arti n H al 1 , 301-405-0174 
Executive Director: J ames F. Zahniser, 301-405-3885 
www.itumd.edu 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel69 



Keeping pace with tine latest devdopments in tine area of information technologies worldwide tine CI ark 
School of E ngi neeri ng provi des a state of-the-art computi ng envi ronment that wi 1 1 be tine standard for 
engi neers i n tine years ahead. Faculty and students have access to computer workstati ore with a wi de range of 
engi neeri ng software and technol ogy enabl ed cl assrooms wi tin the I atest presentati on capabi I i ti es. I n addi ti on, 
E I T provi des access and support on the I atest tool s and servi ces for onl i ne col I aborati on, presentati on 
technol ogi es, and i nf rastructure servi ces. 

Distance Education Technology and Services 

2104 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-4910; Fax: 301-314-9639 

Assistant Director: M arty Ronni ng, 301-405-4899 
www.it.umd.edu 

Di stance Educati on Technol ogy and Servi ces, DETS, provi des di stance educati on technol ogy and support 
service to the A. James Clark School of Engineering and the UMCP campus. We serve over 1000 students 
per year by provi di ng graduate and undergraduate courses i n engi neeri ng and other rd ated f i d ds. I n addi ti on, 
we al so provi de techni cal , servi ces to the campus such as vi deo conf erenci ng, vi deo capturi ng, satd I ite 
servi ces and more 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (SPHL) 

2242 SPH Building, 301-405-2438 

www.sph.umd.edu 

Dean: Roberts. Gold 

Associate Dean(s): DushankaKleinman, Sandra Crouse Qui nn 

Assistant Dean(s): Coke Farmer, Mary Kivlighan 

The School of Publ i c Health provi des preparati on I eadi ng to the Bachel or of Sci ence degree i n the fol I owi ng 
prof essi onal areas: K i nesi ol ogy, C ommuni ty H eal th and F ami I y Sci ence I n addi ti on, each department offers a wi de 
vari ety of courses for al I uni versi ty students. These courses may be used to f ul f i 1 1 the general educati on requi rements 
andaselectives. 

Programs combining service and instruction are provided by the Children's Health and Developmental Clinic (see 
KNES 389E) and theAdult Health and Developmental Program (see HLSA 287). 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

The Friedgen Family Student Lounge, located in the SPH Building is availablefor use by all students in the col lege 
between 7 am. and 10 p.m. Access is through the student ID card. See the Director of Facilities in 3310 SPH Bldgif 
you do not have access. The Student Servi ce Center, 2242C SPH , has study areas and computers avai I abl e to SPH 
students from 8: 00 am - 4: 30 pm dai I y . Occasi onal I y, avai I abi I i ty and access are I i mi ted due to cl asses and student 
programs. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rement^Degree Options 

The School of Public Health offers the baccalaureate in the fol lowing fields of study: Physical Education, Kinesiology, 
Community Health and Family Science The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who have met 
the condi ti ons of thei r curri cul a as herei n prescri bed by the School of Publ i c H eal th. 

TheSchool of PublicHealthalsooffersabaccalaureatedegreeinPublicHealthScience. Thisisa science-based 
program for 3rd and 4th year students. The program i s offered excl usi vel y at the Shady G rove campus. For more 
i rformati on pi ease refer to www.sph. umd.edu/phs/. 

Each candi date for a degree must f i I e a formal appl i cati on wi th the Records Off i ce accordi ng to the schedul ed 
deadl i nes for the anti ci pated semester of graduati on. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel7C 



Advising 

At the time of matriculation and first registration, each student wi 1 1 meet with the departmental Undergraduate Director 
who wi 1 1 act as the students advi sor. Additi onal I y, athl etes and al I students on probati on or di smi ssal have mandatory 
advi si ng and are seen by advi sors i n the Student Servi ce Center. 301- 405-2357. 

Departments and Centers 

The School is composed of several departments and an i nstitute The fol I owi ng departments offer maj or programs that 
I ead to a Bachel or of Sci ence degree 

Department of Behavioral and Community Health 
Department of Fami ly Sci ence 
Department of K i nesi ol ogy 

Living-Learning Programs 

Global Public Health Scholars Living and Learning Community 

The School of Public Health offers a Global Public Health Scholars program within the Col lege Park Scholars Living 
and L earni ng Communi ti es; For more i nf ormati on pi ease refer to www.schol ars. umd. edu. 

College Honors Program 

Phi Alpha Epsi Ion. Honorary Society of the School of Public Health. The purpose of this organization is to recognize 
academi c achi evement and to promote prof essi onal growth by sponsori ng acti vi ti es i n the f i el ds of physi cal educati on, 
kinesiology, family sciences, community health, and related areas. 

Students qual i f y for membershi p when they attai n j uni or standi ng i n ki nesi ol ogy, fami I y sci ences, or communi ty 
health, and have a minimum overall average of 3.5 and a minimum of 24 credits at the University of M aryland, College 
Park. For additional information, pi ease contact the Student Service Center, 301-405-2357. 

Awards 

Awards within the School of Public Health include the Jerry P. Wrenn Scholarships, the Noel Myricks Endowed 
Schol arshi p, the N ed G ayl i n E ndowed Schol arshi p, the J eanette Spi er B eavers M emori al Schol arshi p the A ndrew 
B i 1 1 i ngsl ey E ndowed Schol arshi p, the Davi d H yde Schol arshi p, the Dori s Sands Schol arshi p, the Qui nn Schol arshi p, the 
AliceMorgan Love Scholarships, NASPE Maj or of the Year A ward, EDA7AAPHERD Outstanding Future 
Prof essi onal s Awards, the Dean's Seni or Schol ars Awards and the F ral ey Award. 

Research Units 

Center on Aging 

Chair and Professor: Dr. Laura B. Wilson 
www.sph. umd. edu/hl sa/A G I N G/ 

The Center on A gi ng, as part of the Department of H eal th Servi ces A drri ni strati on (a graduate program), sti mul ates 
and supports agi ng- re! ated acti vi ti es wi thi n exi sti ng departments, col I eges, and school s throughout al I of the vari ous 
institutions of the University System of Maryland. The Center coordinates the Graduate Gerontol ogy Certificate 
( master's and doctoral I eve! s) , the uni versi ty's f i rst approved graduate certi fi cate program. T he C enter assi sts 
undergraduate and graduate students i nterested i n the f i el d of gerontol ogy and he! ps them to devi se educati onal 
programs to meet the! r goal s. 1 1 i s a research center worki ng i n heal th and aging policy, lifel ong I earni ng and ci vi c 
engagement, di sabi I i ty and agi ng, behavi oral and soci al aspects of agi ng, and heal th servi ce del i very systems. 1 1 al so 
conducts communi ty educati on programs, assi sts f acul ty i n pursui ng research acti vi ti es i n the f i el d of agi ng, conducts 
conferences on adulthood and aging- related topics, provides on- and off-campus technical assi stance to practitioners 
who serve ol der adul ts and sponsors the U ni versi ty of M ary I and Osher LifelongLearninglnsti tute, L egacy L eadershi p 
Institutes, the University of Maryland Retirees Association, and Retired and Seni or Volunteer Programs International 
(RSVPI). 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel71 



Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health L iteracy 

The Herschel S. Horowitz Centerfor Health Literacy has been established to address the major public health problem 
of poor health literacy and its effect on health outcomes. This is the nation's first academic based health literacy center 
and i s devoted to i mprovi ng heal th through the I i f espan wi th emphasi s on cl osi ng the heal th di spari ti es gap. Research 
i s needed to establ i sh the nature of the casual rel ati onshi ps between and among the vari ous factors i ncl udi ng culture and 
soci ety , educati on systems, heal th systems and heal th outcomes and costs to devel op ef f ecti ve i nterventi ons and heal th 
policy. The Center was established with a generous gift from Alice Horowitz and her family. 

Maryland Center for Health Equity 

The M aryland Centerfor Health Equity is designed to address issues connected with health disparities. The emphasis is 
on creati ng eff ecti ve change from tiie I evel of the i ndi vi dual to i ssues at the macro pol i cy I evel . 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Student Service Center 

1304 School of Public Health Building, 301-405-2753 
www.sph.umd.edu/student5ervice5 

The Student Servi ce Center provi des advi si ng on admi ssi ons, ori entati on, acaderri c pol i cy, 4-year pi anni ng, career 
i nf ormati on, and requi red advi si ng for students on acaderri c probati on or di srri ssal and al I col I ege athl etes. A 1 1 other 
advi si ng is provided i n the col lege departments. The Center is open from 8:00 am - 4:30 pm week days for use by 
students for studyi ng and group meeti ngs. There are twel ve computers avai I abl e for student use 

Gymkana Troupe 

1120 SPH Building, 301-405-2566 

www.gymkana.umd.edu 

Di rector: Scott Wei sh 

For over 60 years, the U ni versity of M aryl and Gymkana Troupe has been i nf I uenci ng young peopl e to I i ve healthy 
I i f esty I es. F ounded at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and C ol I ege Park campus i n 1946, the troupe has travel ed throughout 
M aryl and and nei ghbori ng states promoti ng drug-free I i vi ng. E ach of i ts 60+ members pi edges themsel ves to be 
drug-free. Through the r rol e- model i ng and uni que gymnasti c performances, they have i nf I uenced hundreds of 
thousands of peopl e to j oi n them i n I i vi ng a drug-free I i fe The troupe, whi ch i s open to al I U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
students of all abilities, is considered a one-of-a-kind organization and is believed to be the only collegiateexhibitional 
gymnasti c troupe acti vel y touri ng the U ni ted States. A s an outreach program of the School of Publ i c H eal th, the 
Gymkana Troupe uses peer rol e models who share the r experi ences and the r message of healthy I i vi ng with others. 
Students i nf I uenci ng students to avoi d drugs is the heart of Gymkana's program 

THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF J OURNALISM (J OUR) 

1100 K ni ght H al 1 , 301-405-2399 
www. merri 1 1 . umd. edu 
Dean: Kevin Klose 

Associate Dean(s): KatherineMcAdams, OliveReid 
Assistant Dean(s): ErrilyHartz, Anne Martens 

Professors: M. Feldstein (Richard Eaton Chair), H.Johnson (Knight Chair), K. Klose(Dean), S. Moeller, C. Rogers 

(Prof Of Practice), G. Solomon (Prof Of Practice), L. Steiner, C. Stepp 

Associate Professors: I. Chinoy, C. Hanson, K. McAdams (Assoc Prof & Assoc Dean), J . Newhagen, E. Zanot 

Assistant Professors: R. Yaros 

Lecturers: K. Chadha (Dir. Media, Self & Society, CP Scholars), C. Clayton, A. Flynn, P. Fuchs, C. Harvey, D. 

Huffman (Bait. Sun Distinguished Lecturer), S. Katcef, R. Lorente 

Professors Emeriti: M. BeasleyJ. BlumlerJ. Franklin, P. Geraci (Assoc Prof Emeritus), D. Gomery, R. Hiebert, L. 

Martin, E. Roberts 

Visiting Faculty: S. Banisky (Visiting Prof), K. Blackistone(Povich Professor), D. Nelson (Visting Prof), L. Walker 

(Visiting Prof) 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel72 



The Major 

The Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm prepares students for careers i n newspapers, magazi nes, TV news, newsl etters 
and onl i ne j ournal i sm outl ets. The undergraduate j ournal i sm program cul mi nates i n a B . A . degree i n j ournal i sm. 

The col lege is fully accredited by the Accrediting Council on Educati on injoumalism and Mass Communications. 

Students I earn i n col I ege programs such as Capi tal N ews Servi ce, a dai I y wi re servi ce i n Washi ngton and A nnapol i s, 
UMTV, a cable station operated by the col lege, and the American J ournal ism Review, the nation's leading media 
magazine. 

Students maj ori ng i n j ournal i sm take approxi mate! y one-thi rd (41 credi ts) of the r total coursework i n the Phi I i p M erri 1 1 
C ol I ege of J ournal i sm. J ournal i sm courses are desi gned to provi de students wi th a worki ng knowl edge of the tool s and 
concepts they wi 1 1 need to perform as top-f I i ght prof essi onal communi cators. 

The remai ni ng two-thi rds (81 credi ts) of undergraduate coursework consi sts of a vari ety of other subj ects such as 
history, economics, government, sociology and psychology. This exposure acquaints students with fundamental 
problems and issues they will encounter in their careers. Within these credits, journalism students must choosea 
"Concentration" (a core of advanced work in a substantive field) to establish competency in a specialized area of 
knowl edge they wi 1 1 be abl e to use as prof essi onal s. 

Program Obj actives 

About theCdlege 

The Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm i s wi del y consi dered one of the best j ournal i sm programs i n the nati on, 
bl endi ng a ni x of pri ze- wi nni ng j ournal i sts, communi cati on schol ars and nati onal I y recogni zed prof essi onal programs. 
The school's mission is simple to produce the best possiblej ournal i sts for leading newspapers, magazines, TV, radio 
and onl i ne news outl ets. Recent graduates are edi tors, reporters and producers at The N ew Y ork Ti mas, Washi ngton 
Post, CBS, Los Angeles Times, CNN, America Online and many of the nation's other top news organizations. 

L ocated I ess than 10 mi I es from the news capi tal of Washi ngton, students parti ci pate i n i ntemshi ps duri ng the academi c 
year at The Washi ngton Post, The (Baltimore) Sun, CNN, and a wide array of Washi ngton news bureaus. Inthe 
summer, students i ntem at top news organi zati ons around the country. B roadcast news students produce and anchor a 
30- mi nute ni ghtl y news show that reaches more than 400,000 househol ds i n suburban Washi ngton on the 
College-operated UMTV station, and online students work on Maryland Newsline, apolitical and public policy 
Web-based news magazine. Advanced broadcast online, and print students enroll in Capital News Service, an intensive 
f ul I -ti me reporti ng program i n Washi ngton and A nnapol i s. Students al so parti ci pate i n some of the school 's many 
prof essi onal programs, i ncl udi ng the monthl y magazi ne A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew and the J ournal i sm Center on 
Children & Families. 

College Mission State m e n t 

The Col I ege seeks to be the nati on's preemi nent prof essi onal school i n i ts f i el d, a model for others i n i ts i ntegrati on of 
schol arl y work and prof essi onal practi ce. A s we enter a new century, i t aspi res to I ead i n the uses and study of new 
technol ogi es to i mprove understandi ng and performance i n our f i el ds. I ts mi ssi on i s to educate uni versi ty students at the 
undergraduate, master's and doctoral I eve! within ali beral arts context, prepari ng them for careers i n j ournal i sm, and 
schol arl y work and teachi ng i n these f i el ds; to el evate the standards of prof essi onal practi ce and to advance the qual i ty 
of publ i c I if e through knowl edge of publ i c i ssues, i ncl udi ng those rel ated to the rol e i n a democrati c soci ety. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Demonstrate the abi I ity to research, write, report and edit re! evant news stori es acceptabl e by a professi onal news 
outlet 

2. U nderstand the hi story of j ournal i sm, be f ami I i ar wi th coverage of di verse groups i n soci ety and I earn the rol e of 
journalists in soci ety. 

3. U nderstand the ethi cal gui del i nes and practi ces that govern the professi on and the I egal i mpl i cati ons and 
consi derati ons that i nf orm the professi on. 

4. Demonstrate the abi I i ty to appl y tool s, concepts and technol ogy appropri ate for the presentati on of i mages and 
i nf ormati on i n the professi on. 

5. Conduct research and eval uate i nf ormati on by methods appropri ate to the professi on. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel73 

6. Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts. 
Special Advantages and Facilities 

The M erri 1 1 Col I ege i s home to many uni que programs and opportuni ti es avai I abl e to undergraduate students: 

UMTV: B roadcast j oumal ism students study and I earn at U MTV, the college-owned cable TV station that houses 
state-of-the-art equi pment, including DVCPro, Avid and ENPS systems used in the field today. Students begin their 
broadcast education from the rfirst semester at the Col I ege, vol unteeri ng as crew members for programs produced 
under the gui dance of renowned broadcast faculty members. 

C apital Nevus Service the col I ege's C api tal N ews Servi ce operates two pri nt bureaus, one i n A nnapol i s and one i n Wash 
Washington D.C, a daily television newscast and an onl i ne news magazi ne. CNS provides students with real -life 
reporti ng experi ences coveri ng a beat, devel opi ng sources, generati ng story i deas and wri ti ng on deadl i ne under the 
supervision of a faculty editor. 

Real- World E xperience Students take thei r educati on out of the cl assroom and i nto the real worl d. U si ng 
internships, student media and in- class reporting, our students don't just I earn why, but how. The col I ege is located just 
outsi deWashi ngton, D . C . , the nati on's capi tal , and the country's ei ghth I argest medi a market. 

Top-Notch Faculty: The Merrill College is home to internationally renowned journalists and medi a scholars. Courses 
are al so taught by worki ng j ournal i sts who serve as adj unct professors. 

Access to Centers of J ournal ism Study: The M erri 1 1 Col lege is home to ni ne centers for journal ism study and 
prof essi onal devel opment. U ndergraduates have opportuni ti es to i nteract wi th these programs. I nternshi ps are avai I abl e 
for students at two of these centers. Students can wri te and research topi cs i mpacti ng the f i el d at A meri can J ournal i sm 
Review, one of two nati onal publications that cover the journal ism industry. Students can also intern at theCasey 
J ournal ism Center on Children and Families. 

Technology for the " Real World" : Students use the same technol ogi es used by prof essi onal j oumal i sts and medi a 
sped al i sts. F rom the I atest i n non- 1 i near edi ti ng systems, to updated technol ogi es for di gi tal art and pagi nati on, every 
undergraduate wi 1 1 have access to the hardware and software used by prof essi onal s i n tel evi si on and radi o producti on, 
vi sual j ournal i sm, onl i ne news and medi a corrmuni cati on. 

Admission Requirements 

J ournal ism is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). See the Admissions section in chapter 1 for general LEP admission 
policies. 

F reshrran Admission and the 45-C redit Review 

First-tj me entering freshmen will gain admission to the Philip Merrill Col I ege of J ournal ism directly from high school 
on an avai I abl e basi s. E arl y appl i cati on i s encouraged. F reshmen admi tted to the program wi 1 1 have access to the 
necessary advi si ng through thei r i ni ti al semesters to hel p them determi ne i f J oumal i sm i s an appropri ate area for thei r 
i nterests and abilities. A caderni c and career advi si ng i s provi ded to j oumal i sm students throughout thei r academi c 
career by qualified academic counselors and the Col I ege's faculty. 

F reshmen who are admi tted di recti y to J ournal i sm wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew by the ti me they have 
completed 45 credits. To meet the provisions of the review, these students must complete (1) The two, first-year 
Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; ( 2) at I east nine credits of Distributi ve Studies coursework, 
selected in consultation with an advisor; (3) ENGL 101 andj OUR 201 with grades of C or higher (J OUR 181 is a 
pre-requisiteforJOUR201); and (4) aminimumcumulativeGPA of 2.0. Students must prove grammar ski I Is 
competency through attai nment of a mi ni mum of a 2.0 i n J OU R 181 pri or to enrol I i ng i n J OU R 201. Students who do 
not meet these requirements will not be all owed to continue in the LEP and will be required to select another major. In 
addi ti on freshmen are expected to compl ete J OU R 200 by the end of thei r f i rst year. 

Transfer Admission 

These requi rements appl y to new transfer students to the U ni versi ty as wel I as on-campus students. 

N ote N o more than 12 transfer credi ts of corrmuni cati ons courses from an accredi ted j oumal i sm program may be 
approved by the Col I ege to be appl i ed toward the degree. Transfer students who wi sh to recei ve credit for J OU R 201 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Page 174 



based on work done in a non-accredited journalism program must pass a proficiency exam 

I n order to be admitted to J ournal i sm transfer students wi 1 1 be requi red to meet the f ol I owi ng set of gateway 
requirements: (1) The two, first- year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at least nine 
credits of Distri buti ve Studies coursework, selected i n consultation with an advisor; (3) completion of ENGL 101 and 
JOUR 201 with grades of C or higher. Enrollment inj OUR 201 requi res proof of grammar ski I Is competency through 
the attainment of atleasta2.0inJOUR 181; and(4) attainment of a 2.8 G PA for all college-level work attempted. 

The Test of Standard Written English (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic year. Students who 
f ai I ed to pass the TSWE (wi th a rri ni mum score of 52 on thei r second attempt) pri or to the end of the 2005-06 
academi c year are not el i gi bl e to take J OU R 181 to demonstrate grammar ski 1 1 s competency. 

Appeals 

Students who are unsuccessful i n gai ni ng adrri ssi on to J ournal i sm at the freshman or transfer I eve! , and bel i eve they 
have extenuati ng or sped al ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal i n wri ti ng to the Of f i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. The student wi 1 1 be noti f i ed i n wri ti ng of the appeal deci si on. 

Students adrri tted to J ournal i sm as freshmen that do not pass the 45-credi t revi ew but bel i eve they have sped al 
ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal di recti y to the Col I ege. 

F or further i nf ormati on, contact The Col I ege's Student Servi ces off i ce at 301-405-2399. 
Requi rements for the Maj or 

Effective for students matriculating Fall 2011 or later. (Student matriculating before Fall 2011 should contact an 
advisor about requi rements). 

Students are requi red to earn a rri ni mum of 122 credi ts. A ccredi ted j ournal i sm programs requi re maj ors to 
compl ete successful I y approxi mately two-thi rds of thei r coursework i n areas other than j ournal ism and communi cati on. 
The Phi lip Merrill Col lege of Journalism at the University of Maryland adheres to this nationwide policy. In practical 
terms, thi s means that of the 122 mi ni mum credi ts requi red for graduati on, a j ournal i sm student must take 41 credi ts i n 
journalism (numbered 100 or above). Of the remaining 81 credits, a mini mum of 65 must be earned in liberal -arts 
designated courses. 

The Philip Merrill College of J ournal ism stipulates that 56 of the total credits must betaken in upper- level courses 
(courses numbered 300-499). 

Requi red courses for al I j ournal i sm maj ors regardl ess of whether j ournal i sm i s a student's pri mary or secondary 
major: 

I.J ournal ism requirements outside the Col I ege 

Students must compl ete the f ol I owi ng I i beral arts coursework compl ementi ng the U ni versi ty's general educati on 
requirements. For the University's general education (CORE) requirements, consult the CORE program in the current 
U ndergraduate Catal og. 

• A bstract thi nki ng ski 1 1 s requi rement ( ni ne credi ts) 

1. One three-credit statistics course from the foil owing list: 

BIOM 301, BMGT 230, CCJ S 200, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 306, GVPT 227, PSYC 200, SOCY 
201, or a more advanced statistics course. 

2. A rri ni mum of si x credi ts through one or a combi nati on of the f ol I owi ng opti ons. Shoul d a student choose 
to combi ne the opti ons, at I east one I anguage course must be at the i ntermedi ate I eve! : 

• L anguage up to two courses wi th at I east one course at the i ntermedi ate I evel and no more than one 
course at the i ntroductory I evel . (H i gh school equi val ency does not sati sfy thi s requi rement. ) 

• M ath/Stati sti cs/Computer Sci ence: up to two courses 

• Any mathematics (MATH) course numbered 111 or higher. 

• Any computer science (CM SC) course. 

• Public Speaking: one course from COM M 100, 107, 200, or 230 

• H i story: one course from H I ST 156 or 157. 

• Behavioral or Social Science: one course from A NTH 260; PSYC 100 or 221; SOCY 100 or 105. 

• Economics: one course from ECON 200 or 201. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel75 



• Government and Pol iti cs: one course from GV PT 100 or 170. 

• Supporting Area: Four upper-level (numbered 300 or higher) courses for a rri ni mum of 12creditsina 
supporting field (cannot be in Communication). 

I I . J ournalism course requirements 

• JOUR 200: H i story, Rol es and Structures (three credits) 

• JOUR 201: News Writi ng and Reporti ng (three credits) 

• JOUR 203: M ulti medi a Reporti ng (three credits) 

• JOUR 300: Ethi cs (three credits) 

• JOUR 352: OnlineJ ournalism (three credits) 

• J OUR 399: Supervised I nternship (one credit) 

• J OUR 400: Law of M ass Communication (three credits) 

• JOUR470-479: Media Research (three credits) 

• J ournal ism Capstone Experi ence (three credits) 

• J ournal ism Capstone Col I oqui um: Busi ness of J ournal ism (one credit) 

SPECIALIZATIONS (15 credits) 

MULTI-PLATFORM: 

J OUR202: News Editing (three credits) 

JOUR320: News Writing and Reporting II (three credits) 

J OU R321-389 E I ecti ve (three credi ts) 

J OUR321-389/J OUR 410-469 Elective (three credits) 

J OUR321-389/J OUR 410-469 Elective (three credits) 

BROADCAST: 

J OUR262: Broadcast Field and Studio Production (three credits) 

JOUR360: Broadcast News Writing and Reporting I (three credits) 

JOUR361: Broadcast News Writing and Reporting 1 1 (three credits) 

J OUR321-389/J OUR 410-469 Elective (three credits) 

J OUR321-389/J OUR 410-469 Elective (three credits) 

III. Specific J ournalism Requirements 

• Completion of J OUR 201: Students must completej OUR 201 with a "C-" or higher. Consult the Undergraduate 
Catal og or onl i ne Schedul e f or a I i st of prerequi si tes and restri cti ons for j ournal i sm courses. 

• "C" Requirement: Students must earn a "C-" or better inj OUR 201 and J OUR 202/262 prior to taking any 
courses for whi ch they serve as a prerequi si te. 

Placement in Courses 

E nrol I ment i n J OU R 201 requi res proof of grammar ski 1 1 s competency through the attai nment of at I east a 2.0 i n J OU R 
181. 

The Test of Standard Written English (TSWE) was phased out at the end of the 2005-06 academic year. Students who 
f ai I ed to pass the TSWE (wi th a rri ni mum score of 52 on the r second attempt) pri or to the end of the 2005-06 
academi c year are not el i gi bl e to take J OU R 181 to demonstrate grammar ski 1 1 s competency. 

Advising 

The Office of Student Services, 1100 Knight Hal I, 301-405-2399, provides academic advising to majors on an 
appointment basis. Send e-mail inquiries to jourug@deans.umd.edu. 

Living-Learning Programs 

College Park Scholars Media, Self & Society 

CPS in Media, Self and Society Director: Dr. Kalyani Chadha 

Co-sponsored by the Philip Merrill Col lege of J ournalism the Media, Self and Society Program is one of the 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel7C 



I i vi ng/l earni ng programs offered by the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program Thi s two-year program for i ncorni ng freshman 
i s desi gned to gi ve students the opportuni ty to undertake a criti cal exarri nati on of medi a organi zati ons, i nsti tuti ons and 
practi ces as wel I as gai n practi cal experi ence through i nvol vement i n a medi a- rel ated acti vi ty of thei r choi ce. F or more 
information see the Col I ege Park Scholars Program section in this catalog. 

Honors Prog-am 

A I though no departmental honors program currentl y exi sts wi thi n the Col I ege, academi cal I y outstandi ng students are 
recogni zed through K appa Tau A I pha, the J ournal i sm academi c honor soci ety. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The col I ege sponsors student chapters of the Soci ety for Prof essi onal J ournal i sts, the N ati onal Associ ati on of B I ack 
J ournal ists, and the Radio and Television News Directors Association. These organi zati ons provide students with 
opportuni ti es to practi ce ski 1 1 s, establ i sh soci al rel ati onshi ps with other students both on and off campus, and meet and 
work wi th prof essi onal s i n the f i el d. 

F or i nf ormati on on the organi zati ons I i sted, contact the Student Servi ces Off i ce, 1100 K ni ght H al 1 , 301-405-2399. 

Financial Assistance 

The Col I ege i s comrri tted to enrol I i ng the most qual if i ed students, regardl ess of abi I i ty to pay. Toward that end, the 
C ol I ege through donor-sponsored awards gi ves approxi matel y $100, 000 annual I y i n schol arshi ps to undergraduates. 
A ddi ti onal I y, the U ni versi ty awards schol arshi ps and f i nanci al ai d i ncl udi ng I ow- i nterest I oans, grants and work-study 
opportunities. 

Sources for I nooning Students 

AIM ncorni ng freshman are automati cal I y consi dered for schol arshi ps granted by the Col I ege. 

Willi am Randolph Hearst Scholarships - Establ i shed i n honor of Wi 1 1 i am Randol ph H earsf s 82nd bi rthday, these are 
among the col I ege's f i rst schol arshi ps. A I i mi ted number of non- renewabl e awards are granted to outstandi ng 
Maryland high school students admitted to the Philip Merrill Col lege of Journalism. 

Baltimore Sun Diversity inj ournal ism Scholarship - Establ i shed by the Ti mes M i rror F oundati on, thi s non-renewabl e 
award is granted to an i ncorni ng freshman with hi gh academi c achi evement i n hi gh school and wi de-rangi ng cultural 
and economi c background, who resi des i n the B al ti more Sun's ci rcul ati on area. 

Sources for Current Students 

Students are sel ected on a basi s of need, meri t donors' i ntent or a combi nati on of these factors. B el ow i s a sel ecti on of 
schol arshi ps students may appl y for: 

Steven C . Aff ens B roadcast J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

The Fred I ., Edna O. and FredJ . Archibald Scholarship 

The Paul Berg Diamondback Schol arshi p 

J ohn Story C leghorn and Nona Reese C leghorn Scholarships 

The Reese CI eghorn Excel I ence i n J ournal ism Schol arshi ps 

The Ral ph Crosby J ournal i sm Excel I ence Award 

Entravision Communications BroadcastJ ournal ism Scholarship 

The Marjorie Ferguson- Benjamin Hoi man Scholarship 

K. Christopher Houston '85 Scholarship 

J ay J ackson Schol arshi p 

The Phyllis and Frank Kopen BroadcastJ ournal ism Scholarship 

Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association Scholarships 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel77 



The Frank Qui ne and M ary El I en Doran-Qui ne J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

The Stanl ey E . Rubenstei n M emori al J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

TheJ oseph R. SI evi n Award 

The Washington Exanriner J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

The Ri chard W . Worthi ngton J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Sources for Current Students Traveling Abroad 

TheHiebertJournalismlnternational Travel Award 

The Gene Roberts Award 

F or more i nf ormati on, and el i gi bi I i ty requi rements, vi si t http://www,merri I .umd.edu/underqraduate/scholashi ps 

Other Sources 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For information, visit www.fi nancialaid.umd.edu 

The National Scholarships Office is committed to helping students of the University of M aryland identify, apply for, 
and wi n nati onal schol arshi ps and f el I owshi ps i n thei r pursui t of hi gher educati on. We al so hel p students f i nd research 
opportuniti es i n thei r f i el ds of study. 

Awards and Recognition 

Maryland-Delavuare-District of Columbia Press Association Top News-Editorial Student- Awarded annually to 
an outstandi ng pri nt j ournal i sm student at the M ay commencement A separate award i s al so gi ven to the top broadcast 
student. 

J ulieGalvan Outstanding Campus Member Award - The Soci ety of Professional J ournal ists chapter sel ects one 
graduate i n j ournal i sm who i s outstandi ng i n hi s or her cl ass on the basi s of character, servi ce to the communi ty, 
schol arshi p, prof i ci ency i n practi cal j ournal i sm and si gni f i cant contri but ons to thei r SPJ chapter. 

Kappa Tau Alpha Top Scholar Award - Awarded at each commencement to the j ournal i sm student eami ng the 
hi ghest academi c achi evement for al I undergraduate study. 

Kappa Tau Alpha National Honor Society - The top ten percent of the j ournal i sm graduati ng cl ass i s i nducted i nto 
this national organization each commencement 

Fiddwork Opportunities 
Internships 

Supervised internships are essential. ChrisHarvey is the Director of the J ournal ism Internship Program 1100A Knight 
Hall, 301-405-2796. 

Professional Experience Opportunities 

Capital Newsservice 

The A nnapol i s and Washi ngton bureaus of the Capital N ews Servi ce are staffed by students and supervi sed by col I ege 
i nstructors. Students cover state and legislative news for cl i ent papers around the regi on. B roadcast students have the 
opportuni ty to parti ci pate in Capital N ews Servi ce i n theA nnapol i s bureau, devel opi ng stori es and packages for U M TV . 
Students are requi red to report breaki ng news under deadl i ne, write prof i I es, and cover state agenci es. This is a 
f ul I -ti me, semester- 1 ong program, on si te at one of two bureau I ocati ons. Students i nterested i n web j ournal i sm can 
report, write and edit for Maryland Newsline, an online magazine. This bureau is located in the college's online facility. 

UMTV 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel78 



F or students i nterested i n broadcast news, opportuni ti es to gai n experi ence wi th cabl e news programs are presented 
wi thi n the curri cul um and by vol unteeri ng at the campus tel evi si on stati on, U M TV . 

Student-Run Campus Media Outlets 

Students can gai n broadcast news and sports reporti ng experi ence through the campus radi o stati on, WM U C . There are 
numerous student-run publ i cati ons on campus. These i ncl ude, The Di amondback, an i ndependent dai ly newspaper that 
appears in print and online. The Diamondback is one of the most-read campus dailies in the nation. Among the many 
campus publ i cati ons there are I i terary magazi nes and newspapers of i nterest to sped al popul ati ons. These i ncl ude the 
Eel i pse, Bl ack Expl osi on, The Publ i cAsi an, M itzpeh and U nwi nd! magazi ne 



COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES (CLIS) 

4105 H ornbake B ui I di ng, 301-405-2033 
www. i school .umd.edu 
Dean: J ennifer J . Preece 

W hi I e the Col I ege does not currentl y have an undergraduate maj or, it offers courses at the undergraduate I eve! , whi ch 
may befound under Library Science (LB SC). These courses are suggested for students wishing to develop ski I Is in 
I ocati ng, anal yzi ng, and eval uati ng i nf ormati on and those seeki ng to I earn more about career opportuni ti es i n the 
information field. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY (PUAF) 

2101 Van M unchi ng H al 1 , 301-405-6330 
www. puaf . umd. edu 
Dean: DonKettl 



W hi I e the School does not currentl y have an undergraduate maj or, i t offers courses at the undergraduate I eve! , whi ch 
may befound under Public Affairs (PUAF). These courses are suggested for students wishing to develop knowledge 
and experi ence i n publ i c pol i cy and I eadershi p. F or addi ti onal i nf ormati on on possi bl e undergraduate opportuni ti es see 
www. publ i cpol i cy. umd. edu/current/undergraduate 

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

2110 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-9363 

www. ugst umd. edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

Associate Dean for General Education: Douglas Roberts 

Associate Dean: J ames Dietz 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Re! d Bryant, L i sa K i el y, J ames Newton, Ann Smith 

Assistants to the Dean: Mark Kuhn, Kathryn Robinson, Laura SI avin 

Through its many programs, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students at the U ni versity 
and the f acul ty and staff that support the undergraduate mi ssi on of the campus. The Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s 
the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and responsi bl e for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar 
and co-curri cul ar educati on. The responsi bi I i ti es of U ndergraduate Studi es i ncl ude 

• Living- 1 earning programs 

• Acaderri c enri chment programs 

• I nterdi sci pi i nary and i ndi vi dual studi es programs 

• Acaderri c advisi ng pol i cy and assessment 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel79 



• CORE/General Education 

• A caderri c pi anni ng and pol i cy 

• E nrol I ment management 

• U ni versity I eami ng outcomes assessment 

L i sti ngs for programs that report to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es: 

A cademi c A chi evement Programs 

Achieving College Excellence (ACE) 

A si an A meri can Studi es Program (A A ST) 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) 

Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTO 

Beyond the CI assroom 

Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence 

Educati onal Tal ent Search 

College Park Scholars Program (CPSP) 

CORE/General Education 

Federal Semester Program 

First Year Book 

G I obal Studi es M i nor Program I ndi vi dual Studi es Program 

Lesbian. Gay. Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

Letters and Sci ences 

M aryland Center for Undergraduate Research (M CUR) 

N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce 

Orientation 

Pre-Col lege Programs 

P re-T ransf er A dvi si ng 



Academic Achievement Prcgrams 

2204 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-405-4736 

www.aap.umd.edu 

Dr. J erry L. Lewis, Executive Director 

The A cademi c A chi evement Programs (A A P) pri mari I y serves tradi ti onal I y under- represented and I ow- i ncome and 
f i rst-generati on col I ege students. A cademi c support, ski 1 1 enhancement academi c advi si ng and counsel i ng, and 
tutori ng are provi ded for these popul ati ons and for students wi th di sabi I i ti es. A cademi c A chi evement Programs 
include the Intensive Educati onal Development (I ED), Educational Opportunity Center (EOC), the Ronald E. McNair 
Post- Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair), the Summer Transitional Program, and Student Support Services 
(SSS). EOC, M cNai r, and SSS, are part of the Federal TRI O programs and are funded by the U .S. Department of 
Educati on to promote access, provi de support servi ces, moti vate, and prepare students from di sadvantaged 
backgrounds for retenti on i n and graduati on from undergraduate programs and to prepare for doctoral programs. 

Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) 

Ms. LisaPeyton-Caire, Associate Director 
301-429-5933 

EOC is supported by a U.S. Department of Education grant designed to assist persons 19 and older, low-income, and 
f i rst-generati on i n pursui ng post-secondary educati onal opportuniti es. U M -EOC serves pri mari I y I nner-Beltway 
corrmuniti es i n Pri nee George's County and provi des assi stance i n the appl i cati on processes for admissi on to and 
financial aid for post-secondary education. Specific guidance is given in selecting col leges, completing the F A FSA, and 
promoti ng post-secondary educati on for target popul ati ons. EOC also works with hi gh school seni ors i n some Pri nee 
George's County High Schools. 

Summer Transitional Program (STP) 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PagelSC 



The Summer Transitional Program (STP) assists students in both their academic and personal adjustment to the 
U ni versi ty . 1 1 i ncl udes very i ntensi ve ski 1 1 s enhancement i n math, E ngl i sh, and col I ege study strategi es, coupl ed wi th 
enrollment in a selected three-credit university CORE course with tutoring to facilitate students' academic adjustment. 
I n addition, students enroll in a one-credit orientation course and participate in weekly individual and/or group 
counsel i ng sessi ons. The six-week STP is requi red of al I students admitted to the U ni versity through SSS/I ED. 

Intensive Educational Development (I ED) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director, AAP and I ED 
301-405-4739 

I E D provi des an array of i ntensi ve academi c and tutori al servi ces to f i rst-year and second- year students who parti ci pate 
in the Summer Transitional Program(STP), eligiblefirst- and second-year transfer students, and other eligible students 
who seek academi c support. The I ED program begi ns with the STP; prospective students who are admitted to the 
U ni versi ty through the I E D program are requi red to attend thi s si x- week transi ti onal program. Successful compl eti on of 
the STP i s requi red for admi ssi on to the U ni versi ty . A dmi tted students conti nue to recei ve program servi ces throughout 
the r undergraduate career at the U ni versi ty. 

Student Support Services (SSS) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director 
301-405-4739 

SSS i s a U .S. Department of Educati on grant supported program geared toward I ow-i ncome and f i rst-generati on 

col I ege students. 1 1 works i n conj uncti on wi th the I E D Program f ocusi ng much of i ts support to f i rst- and second- year 

students. SSS provi des academi c and career advisi ng, tutori ng, stress management, and study- ski 1 1 and test-taki ng 

support to el i gi bl e I ow-i ncome and f i rst-generati on undergraduate students throughout the r ti me at the U ni versi ty. 

The SSS program al so provi des f i nanci al aid workshops and assi stance, i ndi vi dual and group counsel i ng, and 

I eadershi p devel opment workshops. I n I i mi ted cases, SSS provi des suppl emental grant ai d to el i gi bl e parti ci pants i n 

the program. 

Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Prog-am 

Dr. Terri D. Wright, Associate Director 
301-405-4749 

The M cN ai r program i s funded and desi gned principally to prepare I ow- i ncome, f i rst-generati on col I ege j uni ors and 
seni ors and/or students from tradi ti onal I y underrepresented groups to attend graduate school , especi al I y, to pursue 
doctoral degrees. The M cN ai r program offers a si x-week summer research experi ence that affords students the 
opportuni ty to work i nti matel y wi th f acul ty mentors on sped f i c research proj ects, ref i ne ski 1 1 s i n wri tten and oral 
corrmuni cati on, computer appl i cati ons, stati sti cs and research methodol ogy . Parti ci pants are requi red to compl ete a 
research abstract/paper for publ i cati on. Seni ors are gi ven the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n a mock di ssertati on defense, 
they recei ve f i nanci al support toward presenti ng the r research at conferences. The program al so offers assi stance wi th 
preparati on of a compel I i ng personal statement, admi ssi on and f i nanci al ai d appl i cati ons, preparati on for graduate 
school admissions tests, and successful compl eti on of graduate degrees. 

Achieving College Excellence 

011OC Hornbake Library, 301-314-9962 
http://aceum. umd.edu/ 
ace@umd.edu 

Leah Howell 

Achieving Col I ege Excel I ence (ACE) is a learning community designed to build support for academic success in math 
and i ncl udes mentorshi p, sped al opportuni ti es, ski 1 1 devel opment, and cl ose contact wi th i mportant f acul ty and staff 
members. 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Program 

2126 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-3242 
www.afrotc.umd.edu 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel81 



Director: Colonel Robert E. Pecoraro 

The A i r F orce Reserve Off i cer Trai ni ng Corps (A F ROTC ) provi des students the opportuni ty to earn a comrri ssi on as a 
second I i eutenant i n the U ni ted States A i r F orce whi I e compl eti ng the r undergraduate or graduate degree. 1 1 i s hi ghl y 
recommended that students seeki ng a comrri ssi on contact the A F ROTC department for f ul I program detai I s before 
regi steri ng for cl asses. 

Procp"am requirements 

A F ROTC i s desi gned to be a 4-year experi ence, but the schedul e can be compressed (mi ni mum of 3 years) for 
qual if i ed candi dates. A f ul I four- year program is composed of the two-year General M i I itary Course (GM C) and the 
two-year Prof essi onal Off i cer C ourse ( POC ) . G M C students recei ve an i ntroducti on to the A i r F orce and vari ous career 
f i el ds, and may have a chance to compete for schol arshi ps. N on-schol arshi p G M C students i ncur no rri I i tary servi ce 
obi i gati on and may el ect to di sconti nue the program at any ti me. Students wi shi ng to conti nue i n the POC must pass 
al I cadet standards by the r I ast semester i n the G M C , successful I y compete for acceptance i nto summer f i el d trai ni ng 
course, and compl ete f i el d trai ni ng. POC students concentrate on the devel opment of I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and the study of U 
U ni ted States defense pol i cy . A ddi ti onal I y, al I POC students recei ve a monthl y al I owance of $450- $500. 

Scholarships and Incentives 

If the Air Force is offering scholarships, members of A F ROTC inall degree programs are eligible to compete for 
schol arshi ps based on a competi ti ve sel ecti on process. Schol arshi p red pi ents recei ve money for tui ti on up to $18,000 
per year, a book allowance (currently $900/year), and a monthly all owance from $300 to $500, depending on the 
student's A F ROTC year. 



Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 

1150 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-9939 
www. armyrotc. umd. edu 
armyrotc@umd. edu 

D i rector: L i eutenant C ol onel Sam C ook 

The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps offers students the opportunity to develop 
leadership skills plus earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army 
(Active, Reserve, or National Guard) while completing their undergraduate degree. 

Four-Year Program 

The four-year program is composed of the Basic Leadership Course and the Advance 
Leadership Course. The first two years (Basic Course) consists of a general introduction to 
military customs and courtesy, soldier skills, communication skills, personal development, 
and introductory leadership skills. Students enrolled in the basic course incur no 
obligation and may discontinue the program at any time. In the final two years 
(Advanced Course), students concentrate on developing leadership skills in organizations. 
Students must have permission of the Director of Army ROTC to enroll in the advanced 
course. The Advanced Course requires five weeks of field training at Fort Lewis, 
Washington the summer after their junior year. 

Two-Year Program 

The two-year program is available to students with two years remaining in their university 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools PagelS2 



studies. The academic requirements for this program are identical to the Advanced Course 
in the four-year program, and students are eligible to receive the same benefits. 
Prerequisites for the Advance Course must be fulfilled prior to enrollment. The following 
options exist to help students fulfill Basic Course requirements before enrolling in the 
Advance Course: 

1. Leadership Training Course (LTC): Students may attend a five week adventure 
challenge course at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Students should start the application process for 
this option no later than J anuary of their sophomore year. 

2. Veterans: Students with prior military service. 

3. Basic Training: Constructive credit will be awarded for students who have completed 
Basic Training prior to starting their junior year. 

4. Reserve Duty: Students serving in the Reserves or National Guard Training prior to 
entering their junior year or starting a graduate program. 

5. J ROTC: Students who completed 3-4 years of J ROTC in High School. 

6. Service Academy or Senior ROTC: Two year attendance at a service academy or 
successful completion of two years in a sister service Senior ROTC training can qualify for 
constructive credit. 

Scholarships and Incentives 

Army ROTC Scholarships are available for four, three or two years on a competitive basis. 
The scholarships are based solely on merit, not financial need. Scholarship awardees may 
apply benefits to either Room and Board or Tuition and Mandatory Fees. An additional 
book allowance ($1,200 a year) and a non-taxable monthly stipend ranging from 
$300-$500 based on academic year is extended to students. 

Army ROTC students/cadets may compete for summer training opportunities to include 
Airborne, Air Assault, Sapper School, Combat Diver Qualification, or Northern Warfare 
Training during the summer and winter breaks. Additionally, students/cadets may compete 
for summer abroad opportunities. Previous Army ROTC cadets have completed summer 
abroad in Brazil, Greece, India, Morocco, Panama, Slovakia, and Estonia (to name a few). 

Curriculum 

Basic Leadership Course 

Freshman Year: ARMY101 (fall) ARMY102 (Spring) 
Sophomore Year: ARMY201 (Fall) ARMY202 (Spring) 

Advanced Leadership Course 

J uniorYear: ARMY301 (Fall) ARMY302 (Spring) 
Senior Year: ARMY401 (Fall) ARMY402 (Spring) 

The Freshman and Sophomore level classes are open to any student for credit: ARMY 
101, 102, 201, 202 (and 103/104 - physical fitness), whether or not he or she is enrolled as 
a cadet in the Army ROTC program. The J unior and Senior levels are restricted to "Cadet 1 
status only (ARMY 301,302, 401 and 402). Contact Army ROTC for further information. 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel83 



Asian American Stucles Prog- am (AAST) 

1145 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

Director: Larry Haji me Shi nagawa, Ph.D. 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with the opportunity to study critically the 
experi ences of A si an A meri cans. Through an i nterdi sci pi i nary approach, students exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es 
and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and connected to the broader themes for di versi ty, ethni ci ty , 
race, gender and migration in the Americas. AAST offers a 15 credit- hour minor. For the M inor, courses may be 
cross- listed in other departments and some may satisfy CORE and Diversity requirements. 

Minor Requirements 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. I ntroduction to Asian American Studies (AAST200/AMST298C) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST201/HIST219M ) 

B . U pper- 1 evel C ourses ( 6 credi ts): In addi ti on to the two requi red f oundati onal courses, students wi 1 1 al so sel ect two 
additional upper-level (300/400) courses, one of which would be at the 400 1 evel. The foil owing list of regular and 
special topics courses include AAST398A, AAST398B, AAST398D, AAST398L, AAST398M, AAST398P, 
AAST420/WMST420, AAST424/SOCY424, AAST498A, AAST498C, AAST498D, AAST498E, AAST498I, 
AAST498J , AAST498L, AAST498M , AAST498N, AAST498P, AAST498V, and AAST498W. 

C. Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of AAST378 (Experiential Learning- 3 credits), a 
semester- 1 ong i nternshi p at an organi zati on that centers i ts efforts on A si an A meri can i ssues. Such organi zati ons may 

i ncl ude governmental uni ts, non- prof i t agenci es, and on-campus organi zati ons. A I ternatel y, students may opt for 
AAST388 (I ndependent Research - 3 credits), a semester-long research project that also centers around Asian American 
issues. 

Beyond theC lassroom 

1104 South Campus Commons, Building 1, 301-314-6621 

www.BeyondTheClassroom.umd.edu 

btcinfo@umd.edu 

Di rector: J ames V . Ri ker 

B eyond the C I assroom ( BTC ) i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program that prepares students to be acti ve and 
responsi bl e ci ti zens and I eaders i n a compl ex, mul ti - cul tural , and gl obal soci ety . Students devel op the educati onal and 
prof essi onal I eadershi p ski 1 1 s to understand and to contri bute construct] vel y to ci vi c engagement and soci al change i n a 
gl obal context. Students address si gni f i cant ci vi c and soci al i ssues through exci ti ng i nternshi p, communi ty servi ce, and 
ci vi c I earni ng experi ences wi th nonprof i t, nongovernmental and ci vi I soci ety organi zati ons i n the greater Washi ngton, 
D.C. metropolitan area. Through its integrated academic, experiential, and service components that offer students 
real - worl d I earni ng opportuni ti es outsi de the cl assroom, BTC enabl es students from al I di sci pi i nes and maj ors to 
devel op and to real i ze thei r potenti al for ci vi c I eadershi p at the I ocal , nati onal and gl obal I evel s. BTC i s a 
three-semester program open to al I sophomores, j uni ors, and seni ors. 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies Procj-am 

2110 M ari e M ount H a! 1 , 301-405-9361 

www. ugst umd. edu/core 

Laura SI avin: Assistant to the Dean 

To earn a baccal aureate at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and al I students compl ete both a maj or course of study and a 



6.TheCollegesandSchools PagelM 

campus-wide general education program. For more information, see Chapter 5, General Education Requirements. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

2301 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-405-9356 

www.cteumd.edu 

cte@umd.edu 

Director: Spencer Benson 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , i ndi vi dual and campus- wi de efforts to enhance teachi ng 
and I eami ng at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. The Center offers assi stance to departments, f acul ty, graduate and 
undergraduate teachi ng assi starts. The Center provi des workshops, teachi ng assi start devel opment eval uati on and 
support strategi es for i mprovi ng teachi ng and I eami ng, i ndi vi dual consul tati ons for faculty and graduate students, 
research on current teaching practices, and implementation of innovative teaching and learning strategies. TheCenter 
for Teachi ng Excel I ence i s a unit withi mj nderaraduate studi es . 

College Park Scholars Program (C PSP) 

1125 Cumberland Hall, 301-314-2777 

www.schol ars. umd.edu 

Executive Director: Dr. Greig Stewart 

C ol I ege Park Schol ars i s a nati onal I y accl ai mad I i vi ng and I earni ng program that offers outstandi ng students the best 
elements of a small residential college paired with the exciting opportunities available at a large public research 
uni versi ty. E ach of i ts 11, two-year programs for freshmen and sophomores provi des a cl ose- kni t communi ty and a 
chal I engi ng acaderri c experi ence. Students attend weekl y, f acul ty- 1 ed col I oqui a that encourage acti ve di scussi on and 
debate. Other courses in the curriculum satisfy general education (CORE) requirements. I n the second semester of the r 
sophomore year, students choose from i ndependent research, servi ce-l eami ng proj ects, or i ntemshi ps - both on and off 
campus ~ to sati sf y thei r Schol arspracti cum requi rement 

The Programs' focus on community offers many advantages. Program faculty mai ntai n off i ces i n Cambri dge 
Communi ty resi dence hal I s whi ch f aci I i tates meeti ng wi th students. Several program f acul ty I ead study-abroad 
experi ences duri ng the wi nter term or summer semester. L i vi ng together i n the resi dence hal I s hel ps students form 
study groups for common courses. Schol ars al so engage wi th guest speakers and have the opportuni ty to conti nue 
conversati ons outsi de the cl assroom Program di rectors encourage students to pursue I eadershi p opportuni ties in 
co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es, desi gn and i mpl ement communi ty servi ce and soci al events, parti ci pate i n mentori ng programs, 
recrui tment acti vi ti es . or serve on the Student A dvi sorv B oard . 

U pon successful compl eti on of the program, students earn an academi c C i tati on ( requi rements vary bv program) . I n 
thei r j uni or year, students are encouraged to bui I d on thei r Schol ars experi ences by parti ci pati ng i n departmental honors 
programs and other research and i ntemshi p opportuni ti es. 

Admission to College Park Scholars is selective and by invitation. Upon invitation to Scholars, students indicate their 
preference from the f ol I owi ng programs: 

Arts 

B usi ness, Soci ety, and the Economy 

Environment Technology and Economy 

Global Public Health 

International Studies 

Life Sciences 

Media, Self, and Society 

Public Leadership 

Science and Global Change 

Science, Discovery, and the Uni verse 

Science, Technology, and Society 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel85 



Educational Talent Search 

3103 Turner Hall, 301-314-7763 

www. etsp. umd.edu 

Di rector: A ndre N otti ngham 

Educational Talent Search 

Educational Talent Search (ETSP) isafederal TRIO program grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education and 
sponsored by the U ni versi ty of M aryl and si nee 1985. We provi de free pre-col I ege assi stance to di sadvantaged students 
enrol I ed at 10 target hi gh school sin Pri nee G eorge's County Public School s. The goal of the program i s to i ncrease the 
number of students that graduate from hi gh school and conti nue on to enrol I at an i nsti tuti on of hi gher educati on. 
E ducati oral Tal ent Search counsel ors assi st i ndi vi dual s by provi di ng earl y awareness counsel i ng, career expl orati ons, 
tutorial services, exposure to col I ege campuses, peer mentoring, student/parent workshops, SAT/ACT prep, and 
assi stance wi th f i nanci al ai d and col I ege appl i cati ons. I n additi on, we assi st students who have dropped out by 
encouragi ng them to re-enter school . 

Federal Semester Program 

3103 Susquehanna Hall, 301-314-0261 
www.f ederal semester, umd. edu 
federal semester(g>umd. edu 

Di rector: Dr. J oan Burton 

The Federal Semester Procp-am isahighly selecti ve, yeari ong program coordi nated by the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate 
Studi es i n conj uncti on wi th other col I eges, programs and campus initiati ves. The program bri ngs students from al I 
di sci pi i nes together to I earn, di scuss and expl ore i ssues of federal pol i cy, and gal vani zes them toward publ i c servi ce 
careers. Ri si ng j uni ors and seni ors wi th strong academi c backgrounds and an i nterest i n federal pol i cy are encouraged to 
apply. The Federal Semester Program consists of three pri mary components: 

1. The F ederal Semester Semi nan U N I V 348 (3 credi ts, f al I semester) . A choi ce of several semi nar courses, each 
focused on a specif i c theme withi n federal pol i cy (eg. health pol i cy, homel and security or energy and 
environmental policy). Theseminarsbenefitfromthediversity of students who participate in the program. The 
smal I setti ng al I ows students to bri ng knowl edge from their discipli nary focus i nto the di scussi on. Taught by an 
i ndustry expert, the semi nars exarri ne the pol i cy- maki ng process and di scuss sal i ent i ssues wi thi n each theme 
G uest speakers offer real - worl d perspecti ves on how governments and other actors i mpl ement pol i cy . 

2. The I nternshi p: U N I V349 (3-6 credits, spri ng semester). The Federal Semester experi enti al I earni ng course offers 
credi t for an i nternshi p wi th a federal agency or rel ated organi zati on. I n cl ass, students work on prof essi onal 
devel opment and ref I ect on thei r i nternshi p experi ences through j ournal assi gnments. (With permissi on, students 
may compl ete the i nternshi p under the course number for i nternshi ps i n the student's maj or) . 

3. Supporti ng course work: Two regul ar U M courses, approved by the program, that compl ement the F ederal 
Semester mission (6 credits). With permission, students may apply courses completed prior to the Federal 
Semester year. 

I n addi ti on, students parti ci pate i n F ederal Semester Program acti vi ti es i ncl udi ng vi si ts to Capi tol Hill and federal 
agenci es, conversati ons wi th I eaders i n publ i c pol i cy, prof essi onal devel opment workshops and an end-of-the-year 
reception. 

Students i n the program must have compl eted 60 credits by the end of the semester i n whi ch they apply and have a 
grade point average of 3.0 or hi gher. Fordetailsandapplicationpleaseseewww.federalsernsster.umd.edu. 

First Year Book Program 

Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

2110 Marie Mount Hal I 
www.fi rstyearbook. umd. edu 
Director: LisaKiely 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel86 



E ach year si nee 1993, the U ni versi ty has sel ected a book for all first year students. The goal of the F i rst Y ear B ook 
Program (FYB) is to provide a shared intellectual experience for all new students along with the opportunity to discuss 
the book from a vari ety of di sci pi i nes. Courses, departmental I ectures, I i vi ng/l eami ng programs and student groups al I 
sponsor events that compl ement a maj or address by the author and/or other i mportant vi si tors to campus. 

Global Corrmunities 

0119 Dorchester Hall, 301-314-7100 
www.gl obal communiti es.umd.edu 
gl obal communi ti es@umd.edu 

Di rector: Dr. V i rgi ni a H auf I er 

Global Corrmunities is a two-year I ivi ng- 1 earning program that is part of the university's Global Studies Program and 
issponsored by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS). Students participate in a combination of 
courses, extracurri cul ar opportuni ti es, and resi denti al I i vi ng organi zed around the theme of gl obal i zati on, i ts chal I enges 
and opportuni ti es. The program enri ches thei r understandi ng of the causes and consequences of the worl d's 
i nterconnectedness, and provi des academi c and i ntercul tural ski 1 1 s to hel p them address the i ssues i t rai ses. 

Global C ommuni ties provi des a foundation for a vari ety of academic maj ors and an entry point to the Global Studies 
M i nors. Students take two three-credi t courses on a theme rel ated to gl obal i zati on i n thei r f i rst year. These 
i nterdi sci pi i nary courses are desi gned and taught by I eadi ng schol ars i n the soci al sci ences, and expl ore si gnif i cant 
i ssues through I abs, si mul ati ons, case studi es, and research. The second year of the program requi res experi enti al 
I eami ng through either a short-term study abroad opportunity, servi ce-leami ng course, or i ntemshi p. There is a f i nal 
one- credi t capstone course i n the second year. U pon compl eti on of the 10- credi t program students recei ve a notati on on 
thei r transcri pt 

The program recogni zes that si gni f i cant I eami ng occurs outsi de the cl assroom. Courses are compl emented by regul ar 
field tripsto museums, i ntemati onal organi zati ons, embassi es, and other si tes that take advantage of our I ocati on i n the 
greater Washi ngton, DC area. A vari ety of events and acti vi ti es on campus bri ng the i ssues to I i f e. Students from al I 
corners of the worl d I i ve together i n the resi dence hal I , f osteri ng i ntercul tural communi cati on ski 1 1 s and bui I di ng a 
di verse and supporti ve community. 

Global Communities is a selective invitation-only program for entering freshmen. It aims to enrol I a class of 75 
students each year. The program seeks academical I y strong students who express i nterest i n i ntemati onal affai rs, have 
i ntemati onal or i ntercul tural experi ence, or si mpl y are open to the ki nd of experi ence we offer. 

F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t: www.gl obal communiti es.umd.edu 

Honors College 

Anne Arundel Hall, 301-405-6771 

www.honors.umd.edu 

honors@umd.edu 

Di rector: Professor Wi 1 1 i am Dorl and 

The Honors College i s home to M aryl and's hi ghl y accl ai med programs and courses for students wi th excepti onal 
academi c tal ents. H onors creates a very sped al communi ty of f acul ty and i ntel I ectual I y gi fted undergraduates. Smal I 
cl asses and outstandi ng teachers encourage di scussi on and foster i nnovati ve thi nki ng across academi c di sci pi i nes. 
H onors students have exel usi ve access to H onors I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program courses, H onors semi nars, and H onors 
versions of courses offered by the academi c departments on campus. 

Students in the Honors College may earn an Honors Col lege Citation on the transcript by completing coursework and 
requi rements i n an H onors L i vi ng- L eami ng Program and by maintaining an overall 3.2 GPA. Honors Living- Learning 
Programs i ncl ude Digital Cultures and Creativity , Entrepreneurship and I nnovati on, Gemstone , Honors Humanities , 
I ntegrated L i f e Sci ences, and University Honors . A cceptance of f i rst-year students i nto the H onors Col I ege i s 
competi ti ve and by i nvi tati on based on the standard appl i cati on to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and ( by N ovember 1st for 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel87 



best consi derati on for H onors Col I ege and meri t schol arshi ps) . 

I n addi ti on to j oi ni ng an H onors Col I ege L i vi ng- L earni ng Program, H onors students may appl y to one of 40 
Departmental Honors Programs offered by the acaderri c departments and col I eges on campus i n order to take f ul I 
advantage of advanced, discipline- based H onors coursework and research opportuni ti es i n thei r maj or area of study. 
M ost departmental honors programs begi n i n the sophomore or j uni or year. Students i n a Departmental H onors 
Program may earn departmental honors on the transcri pt and di pi oma. 

I ncf vidual Studies Program 

3103 Susquehanna Hall, 301-314-0023 

www.ivsp.umd.edu 

Di rector: Dr. J oan Burton 

Thelndividual Studies Program (I VSP) is a degree-granting academic program under the direction of the Office of 
U ndergraduate Studi es. The program al I ows students to create new i nterdi sci pi i nary curri cul a I eadi ng to the B achel or of 
A rts or B achel or of Sci ence degree. Students draw pri mari I y from the U ni versi ty of M ary I and's course off eri ngs to 
form an acaderri c concentrati on not otherwi se avai I abl e to them attheinstitution.Awri tten prospectus that defi nes the 
student's maj or and outl i nes the curri cul um i s requi red to appl y to the program. I ndi vi dual I y created student maj ors 
have recentl y i ncl uded such ti tl es as Peace and J usti ce Studi es, A si an A meri can Pol i cy and A dvocacy , G I obal H eal th, 
I nternational Studies, Urban Studies and Planning, Digital Narratives, and Public Health Policy. 

Students must seek the gui dance and approval of a Faculty M entor pri or to havi ng thei r prospectus revi ewed by the 
I ndi vidual Studies Faculty Review Board. If approved, the courses agreed upon by the Faculty Review Board become 
the basi s for the students maj or requi rements. These I i sted requi rements from numerous acaderri c departments, al ong 
with the CORE general education requi rements, are analogous i n most ways to the academic requi rements given to 
students who sel ect from the U ni versi ty's tradi ti onal maj ors. H owever, each student i s requi red to desi gn a uni que 
program of study and defend i t i n order to be a part of I V SP. 

I ndi vi dual Studi es students must compl ete a seni or capstone proj ect and are encouraged to engage i n i nternshi ps, 
research proj ects, i ndependent studi es, and study abroad to suppl ement thei r work i n the cl assroom. Whi I e I V SP 
programs are never vocati onal i n nature, drawi ng from real - 1 i f e experi ence as a suppl ement to the acaderri c curri cul um 
i s general I y encouraged. These proj ects often serve as a way for the students to devel op acaderri c connect] ons among 
the multi pi e disci pi i nes i nvol ved i n thei r programs. 

W hi I e I V SP gi ves students the opportuni ty to create a uni que acaderri c program focused on a sped f i c area of study, 
usi ng courses from mul ti pi e acaderri c departments, i t does not subsrj tute for or repl i cate the educati onal goal s of 
existing University programs, including the Li mi ted Enrollment Programs (LEPs). IVSP programs may not include 
substanrj al numbers of courses from L E P departments. 

Devel opi ng a successful IVSP prospectus takes ti me and usual I y i nvol ves several meeti ngs to revi ew and edi t the draft 
prospectus. I nterested students shoul d contact the I V SP staff and begi n the appl i cati on process earl y i n thei r acaderri c 
career. Worki ng cl osel y wi th the I V SP staff and thei r prospecrj ve F acul ty M entor, students shoul d pi an to compl ete 
and subrni t thei r I V SP prospectus, pref erabl y duri ng thei r sophomore year, or i n thei r j uni or year, before reachi ng 90 
credits. 



TobeackrittBdirtiDthelndvickidl StudesPrograin the student met 

1. Have a clearly defined academic goal that cannot be reasonabl y sati sf i ed in an existing curri cul um at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. 

2. Have at least 30 earned col I ege credits with at least 12 credits completed at College Park. 

3. Have a mini mum of a2.5GPA ineachof their previous two semesters of col I ege and at I east a 2.0 G PA overall. 

4. Compl ete at least 30 additional credits beginning the term foil owing admission to IVSP. 

5. Identify an appropriatefaculty mentor, preferably tenured or tenure track, with significantundergraduateeducationexperiencerelatedtD the 
field of study. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagelffi 



6. Compl ete a detail ed plan of study (prospectus) that is approved by their Faculty Mentor and then approved by the I ndividual Studies Faculty 
Review Board. This proposal will include: 

a. A cl ear statement of the central acadeni c purpose f or thei r maj or. 

b. Specific course requirements including at least 27 credits of upper-division major coursework (300 and 400 level) beyond the 
IVSP courses (IVSP 317, IVSP318, andlVSP420). 

c. The list of courses must include at least one Writing Craft course (in addition to theCORE Fundamental Studies Academic 
Writing and the Professional Writing requirements) sdectedfromanapprovedlistthatisavailablefromthelndividual Studies staff. 

d. A semester-by-semester pi an for the compl eti on of thei r undergraduate degree wi thi n a reasonabl e peri od of ti me. 

7. Complete the IVSP Departmental Notification Form in order to notify academic units from which they will take three or more 300- to 
400-1 evel courses. 

Following achission, students must 

1. Earn a grade of C or better in all courses required in their IVSP program of study, including IVSP 420 as well as a satisfactory grade in IVSP 
317. 

2. Complete mandatory advising sessions with their Faculty M entor and the IVSP staff every semester, including a review of their 
semester-by-semester academic plan for completion of their IVSP program 

3. I f not al ready compl eted, work towards i mmedi ate compl eti on of the F undamental Studi es requi rements. 

For detai Is and further information, visit the I VSP website at www.ivsp.umd.edu. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

2417 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-5428 
www. I gbts. umd. edu 
Igbt5@umd.edu 

Director: Dr. MarileeLindemann 

The Program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate 
certi f i cate and a mi nor desi gned to exarni ne the I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and representati ons of L G BT persons, 
those who are today descri bed as havi ng a mi nori ty sexual ori entati on or who are gender transgressi ve. Students study 
LGBT families and communities, cultures and subcultures; histories, institutions, languages and literatures; economic 
and pol i ti cal I i ves; and the compl ex rel ati ons of sexual mi nori ti es to the cul ture and experi ence of the gender 
conformant and ( hetero) sexual maj ori ty . L G BT Studi es i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary and multidiscipli nary f i el d, and 
promotes the application of new theories and methodologies (eg., queer, feminist, critical race, and multicultural 
theori es) to establ i shed di sci pi i nes, and i t advances the generati on of new knowl edge wi thi n tradi ti onal f i el ds of 
schol arshi p. Through study of sexual mi nori ti es, students gai n an understandi ng of and respect for other di f f erences i n 
human I i ves such as age, abi I i ty, cl ass, ethni ci ty, gender, race, and rel i gi on. Wi th thei r f acul ty advi sors, certi f i cate 
candi dates desi gn a program that compl ements thei r maj or f i el d of study. 

Certificate Requirements 

21 credits: 15 credits are in required courses, while 6 credits are earned in two elective courses. 
A. Required core curriculum for the Certificate in LGBT Studies (15 credits) 

1. LGBT200- Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower-level course focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people, either LGBT 265 
(X-listed as ENGL 265) or CM LT 291; 

3. One of the f ol I owi ng upper-di vi si on courses focused on the personal , soci al , pol i ti cal , and hi stori cal 
aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, PHIL 407, or LGBT 494 (X-listed as WM ST 494); 

4 One of the foil owing upper-di vision courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT 
people: LGBT 359 (X-listed as ENGL 359), LGBT 459 (X-listed as ENGL 459), LGBT 465 (X-listed as 
ENGL 465); or LGBT 327 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel89 



5. One of the foil owing: 

a LGBT488 

Serri nar i n LGBT Studi es 

b. LGBT386 

Supervised I nternshi p - LGBT Community Organizations 

B. Elective courses for the Certificate in LGBT Studies (6 credits) 

Students choose six hours of elective credits in consultation with their advisor in LGBT Studies. At I east three hours of 
elective credits must be from upper-division courses (i .e, those numbered 300 or above). Students are encouraged to 
choose el ecti ves to compl ement the r knowl edge of L G BT peopl e and i ssues by expl ori ng di sci pi i nes that contrast wi th 
the maj or f i el d of study. Students may sel ect el ecti ve courses from the I i st of core courses above or from a I i st of 
approved courses mai ntai ned by the program. The I i st i s updated regul arl y and avai I abl e at 
www. I gbts. umd. edu/mi nor. html . A student may al so peti ti on to have any other course f ul f i 1 1 thi s requi rement by 
provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the course work, usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, 
consi sts of L G BT materi al . 

• A ppropri ate subsfj tuti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es 2 through 4 above may be made wi th approval from the 
Director of LGBT Studies. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C" (2.0) will count toward the certificate in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi mum of ni ne credi ts (or three courses) to sati sf y the requi rements of both thei r maj or and 
the certificate i n LGBT Studies. 

• No more than ni ne of the requi red credi ts may be taken at an i nsfj tuti on other than the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, 
Col lege Park. 

• Students must decl are the certi f i cate i n L G BT Studi es to the D i rector of L G BT Studi es one year pri or to thei r 
i ntended graduarj on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 

Minor Requirements 

15 credits: 12 credits are in required courses, while 3 credits are earned in one upper-level elective course. 

A . Requi red core curri cul um for the M i nor i n L G BT Studi es ( 12 credi ts) 

1. LGBT 200--I ntroducti on to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower-level course focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people, eitherLGBT 265 
(X-listedasENGL 265) orCMLT 291; 

3. One of the f ol I owi ng upper-di vi si on courses focused on the personal , soci al, political, and hi stori cal 
aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, PHIL 407, or LGBT 494 (X-listed as WMST 494); 

4 One of thefollowing upper-division courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT 
people: LGBT 359 (X-listed as ENGL 359), LGBT 459 (X-listed as ENGL 459), LGBT 465 (X-listed 
as 465); or LGBT 327. 

B. Elective course for the Mi nor in LGBT Studies (3 credits) 

A n upper-di vi si on el ecti ve wi 1 1 compl ement the requi red courses. Thi s el ecti ve may be a course from categori es 3 and 4 
above that has not been used to f ul f i 1 1 requi rements; or i t may be one of the capstone courses i n L G BT Studi es ( L G BT 
386 or LGBT 488), or a course chosen from the list of approved el ecti ves for the LGBT Studies program Thelistof 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel9C 



approved el ecti ves i s avai I abl e at www. I gbts. umd. edu/rri nor. html . A student may al so peti ti on to have any course 
fulfi 1 1 this requi rement by provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the course work, 
usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, consi sts of L G BT materi al . 

• A ppropri ate substi tuti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es two through four above may be made wi th approval 
from the Di rector of LGBT Studi es. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C" (2.0) will count toward the mi nor in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi mum of si x credi ts (or two courses) to sati sf y the requi rements of both the r maj or and 
the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es. H owever, courses taken to compl ete the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es may not be used to 
sati sf y the requi rements of another mi nor. 

• No more than six of the required credits (or two courses) may betaken at an institution other than the University 
of M ary I and, C ol I ege Park. H owever, at I east si x upper-di vi si on credi ts appl i ed to the mi nor must be taken at thi s 
university. 

• Students must decl are the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es to the D i rector of L G BT Studi es one year pri or to the r 
i ntended graduati on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 



Letters and Sciences 

1117 Hornbake Library, 301-314-8418 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

askltsc@umd.edu 

Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant Ph. D. 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 or 8419 

Pre- Law Advising: prelaw@umd.edu 

Credit-by-Exam: 301-314-8418 

L etters and Sci ences i s the acaderri c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i el ds before sel ecti ng a maj or, for 
post-baccal aureate students taki ng additi onal course work, and for non-degree seeki ng students taki ng undergraduate 
courses. L etters and Sci ences may al so serve as the acaderri c home for students compl eb ng requi rements for entry i nto 
a L i rri ted E nrol I ment Program. L etters and Sci ences advi sors hel p students to sel ect and schedul e courses, pi an 
acaderri c programs, and I earn about campus- wi de resources. L etters and Sci ences col I aborates cl osel y wi th col I ege 
advi si ng off i ces, acaderri c departments, and programs across campus and provi des a coordi nated advi si ng network that 
features: 

Choosing a Major 

L etters and Sci ences students recei ve i nf ormati on about and referral to a wi de range of acaderri c programs and servi ces 
i ncl udi ng sped al i zed workshop sessi ons. L etters and Sci ences staff sped al i ze i n assi sti ng students to devel op strategi es 
and plans for entering Limited Enrollment Programs. 

Markets and Society 

M arkets and Soci ety i s a program for enteri ng freshmen i nterested i n expl ori ng the worl d of busi ness. The M arkets and 
Soci ety Program hel ps students to I earn about the f i el d of busi ness, ref i ne the r career goal s, and i nteract wi th other 
students who share the r i nterests. 

I nterim Advising Program 

N ewl y admi tted transfer students wi th more than 60 credi ts, who were unsuccessful i n gai ni ng adrri ssi on to a L i mi ted 
E nrol I ment Program, recei ve advi si ng and assi stance from a L etters and Sci ences prof essi onal staff member duri ng 
the rfirst two semesters on campus. F or thi s group of students, the U ni versi ty wai ves the requi rement that al I students 
must decl are a maj or by 60 credits. 

Pre-Law Advising 

L etters and Sci ences offers sped al i zed advi si ng for students i nterested i n I aw. F or further i nf ormati on, see the secti on 
on Pre-Law Advising in this catalog and visit www.prelaw.umd.edu 



Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools PagelH 



2100D (2nd Floor) McK el din Library, 301-314-6786 
www. ugresearch. umd. edu 
ugresearch@umd. edu 

D i rector: F ranci s D uV i nage 

The M aryl and Center for U ndergraduate Research (M CU R) is an i niti ati ve ofthe Off i ce of the Dean of U ndergraduate 
Studi es. Created as a resource for students and faculty, the Center serves as a cl eari nghouse for both on- campus and 
off-campus research opportuni ti es for undergraduates. A ddi ti onal I y, the Center serves as a forum where f acul ty 
members can share different models for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students i nto research programs, and ways of 
i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the curri cul um 

M aj or programs of the M C U R i ncl ude M aryl and Student Researchers, whi ch perrri ts f acul ty to I i st research 
opportuni ti es open to undergraduates duri ng the acaderri c year, and M aryl and Summer Schol ars, whi ch provi des 
fundi ng for students to conduct summer research (on campus or el sewhere i n the U S or abroad as needed) under the 
mentorshi p of M aryl and f acul ty members. Students new to research as wel I as students wi th previ ous research 
experi ence parti ci pate i n these programs. 

National Scholarship Office 

2403 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-314- 1289 
www.schol arshi ps. umd. edu 
schol arshi ps@umd.edu 

Director: Francis DuVi nage, Ph.D. 

The National Scholarships Office at the University of Maryland, College Park aims to provide undergraduates 
with the best possible information, guidance and support as they learn about and apply for national 
scholarships. 

National scholarships are competitive, prestigious awards that provide opportunities and support for a wide 
range of enriching experiences, including study abroad, graduate study (and sometimes undergraduate 
study also), federal employment, teaching, research, and public service. National scholarships are looking 
for students (with or without financial need) who are developing strong interests and goals - academic and 
extracurricular - and who want to take advantage of every constructive opportunity that will help them reach 
their objectives. J ustas each national scholarship offers a different kind of opportunity, each is also looking 
for a different range of strengths and interests in its applicants. If you develop a strong academic record, are 
thoughtful about your choices and devote yourself to activities you care about, you may well find one or 
more scholarship opportunities of interest to you. 

The National Scholarships Office strives to make learning about and applying for national scholarships an 
enlightening experience. In addition to providing information about national scholarships through our 
website, through group presentations and through individual advising, we also provide individualized 
guidance and support at every stage ofthe application process. We invite you to visit our website and to 
make an appointment with us to learn more about national scholarships that may help you attain your goals. 



Orientation 

1102 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-8217 

www.orientation.umd.edu 

Director: Gerry Strumpf 

The goal of Ori entati on i s to i ntroduce new students to the U ni versity of M aryl and community. The Ori entati on Off i ce 
offers a wi de range of transiti onal programmi ng and servi ces for students and the r f ami I i es as they prepare to attend 
theU ni versi ty of M ary I and . 

New Student Orientation 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel92 



Held prior to the semester a student enrolls at the University of M aryland, new student orientation for first-time 
freshmen normal I y covers two days; ori entati on for new transfer students covers one day. Duri ng N ew Student 
Ori entati on, i ndi vi dual s meet wi th representati ves from the r academi c col I ege for advi si ng and course schedul i ng. 
Undergraduate Ori entati on Advisors introduce students to academic and student life at the University of Maryland, 
i ncl udi ng student campus servi ces and resources, and opportuni ti es f or i nvol vement on campus. 

Parent Orientation 

Parents of new U ni versi ty of M aryl and students are strongl y encouraged to attend a one-day program sped f i cal I y 
desi gned to i ntroduce them to the academi c, soci al , and cul tural opportuni ti es of the uni versi ty and to better prepare 
them for the i ssues that are I i kel y to affect the r son or daughter throughout the r math cul ati on at the U ni versi ty. 

Terp Trips 

Terp Tri ps focus on the conti nui ng transit] on of parents. Offered to parents on the second day of freshman ori entati on, 
these one-day programs combi ne a tri p to an area attracti on with connecti ons to other parents and a campus faculty or 
staff host. 

I ntroduction to the University Seminars 

The Ori entati on Off i ce coordi nates new student semi nar courses, U N I V 100 and 101. These courses i ntroduce students 
to the worl d of hi gher educati on and, more sped f i cal I y, to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. C ourse topi cs i ncl ude 
career/maj or expl orati on, successful studyi ng and test-taki ng strategi es, di versi ty, and i nvol vement wi thi n the 
university. 

Pre-Cdlege Pro-ams 

1107 West Educati on A nnex, 301-405-6776 
www. precol I ege. umd. edu 
pre-col I ege@umd.edu 

Executive Director: Georgette Hardy Dejesus 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound-M ath and Science Program (UB-M S): 301-405-1773 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and Pre-Col I ege Programs i n U ndergraduate Studi es i s compri sed of three federal I y and state 
supported programs: 

Two Upward Bound Programs (UB) and 

Upward Bound-M ath and Science Program (UB-M S). 

These programs generate the ski 1 1 s and moti vati on necessary for success i n post- secondary educati on. They i immerse 
hi gh school parti ci pants i n ri gorous academi c i nstructi on, tutori ng, counsel i ng, and i nnovati ve educati onal experi ences 
throughout the school year and duri ng the si x-week summer resi denti al program. Pre-Col I ege Programs are part of the 
Federal TRI O Programs that provi de educati onal opportunity outreach programs desi gned to motivate and support 
students from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

The U B Programs are open to I ow-i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students i n grades 9 
through 12, who demonstrate an academi c need and want to pursue a four- year postsecondary educati on. E I i gi bl e 
students must attend target hi gh school s i n Pri nee G eorge's and M ontgomery C ounti es. H i gh school pri nci pal s, 
teachers, and counsel ors recommend students to the program. 

El i gi bi I ity for the U pward Bound Programs requi re that students attend M ontgomery B I ai r, N orthwood or Wheaton 
High Schools in Montgomery County. Bladensburg, Central, High Point, or Northwestern High Schools in Pri nee 
George's County. 

The U B-M S is open to students i n grades 10 through 12, who demonstrate an academi c need and want to pursue 
post-secondary educati on programs i n f i el ds rel ated to mathemati cs and sci ence. U B-M S recruits hi gh school students 
from Potomac and Fairmont Heights High Schools in Pri nee George's County, MD; WatkinsMill High School in 
Montgomery County, MD , Edmonston-WestsideHigh School in Baltimore, MD and Bell High School in Washington, 
DC. " 

Pre-Transfer Advising 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel93 



0110 Hornbake, 301.405.9449 or 9448 
www.transf eradvi si ng. umd. edu/ 
transf eradvi si ng@ umd. edu 

Assistant Dean: LisaKiely 

The Pre-Transf er A dvi si ng Program promotes academi c success and excel I ence through assessi ng the readi ness of 
students to transfer to U M and esti mati ng the r ti me to degree compl eti on. Pre-Transf er A dvi sors provi de advi si ng for 
students i nterested i n transf erri ng from communi ty col I eges as wel I as four-year school s. A dvi sors al so work cl osel y 
wi th staff at the M aryl and communi ty col I eges. 

THE UNIVERSITIES AT SHADY GROVE 

9636Gudelsky Drive Rockvi lie MD 20850 

301-738-6000 

www.shadygrove. umd. edu 

USG Executive Director and Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, USM: 

Dr. Stewart L. Edel stein 

The Universities at Shady Grove (USG) is a regional higher education center created under the auspices of the 
University System of Maryland. Since its inception in 2000, USG has been transformed from a location for part-time 
eveni ng i nstructi on i nto a vi brant center off eri ng cl asses duri ng dayti me, eveni ngs, and weekends i n both f ul I -ti me and 
part-ti me formats. U SG currentl y serves more than 4,000 graduate and undergraduate students, with more than 1,400 
undergraduates enrol I ed i n dayti me programs. N i ne U ni versi ty System of M aryl and (USM) degree-granti ng i nsti tuti ons 
col I aborate to offer thei r top degree programs, as wel I as certifi cate and conti nui ng educati on programs, at one 
convenient location in Montgomery County. 

USG provi des al I the presti ge and benef i ts of a M aryl and educati on duri ng a student's f i nal two years of undergraduate 
study. M ost credi t earned at M aryl and communi ty col I eges wi 1 1 transfer, and students can choose from a vari ety of 
maj ors, wi th cl asses offered at ti mes that meet thei r schedul es. At the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove campus, students 
work si de- by-si de wi th professors from nati onal I y ranked academi c programs. USG provi des students wi th access to 
the f i nest programs of M aryl and's top publ i c uni versi ti es i n an atmosphere that features smal I cl asses, customi zed 
student servi ces and state-of-the-art faci I ities for teachi ng and I earni ng. Students can also take advantage of a 
growi ng number of soci al events, communi ty servi ce acti vi ti es and student I eadershi p opportuni ti es. 

The University of Maryland, College Park is one of the powerful partners that make up USG. Students can earn a 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park degree at U SG and eel ebrate Terrapi n tradi ti ons no matter whi ch campus they 
call home. The University of Maryland, Col lege Park offers eight undergraduate degrees wi thin fivedifferent 
academi c departments at Shady Grove. 

Biological Sciences Program (BSC I) 

The Uni versi ties at Shady Grove, Building 2, rooom4082, 301-738-6007 

chembi o. umd. edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove 

Dr. J oelle Presson, Assistant Dean, Academic Undergraduate Programs 

Dr. Tom Stanton, Director, Biological Sciences Shady Grove 

Dr. Nancy Trauth-Noben, Assistant Director, Biological Sciences Shady Grove 

The Major 

B i ol ogi cal Sci ences at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and at Shady G rove 

cheml i f e. umd. edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 194 



The Biological Sciences Program at the University of M aryland offers a degree program in General Biology (GENB) 
at U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove. The B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program at Shady G rove offers the A dvanced Program 
courses normal I y taken i n the j uni or and seni or years. 

All B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors compl ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the 
B asi c Program F or students matri cul ati ng at the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove most of these i ntroductory and supporti ng 
courses are taken at a community col I ege or at another four-year institution. Dependi ng on space avai I abl e, students 
who matriculated at College Park may transfer to the Shady Grove Program in their junior year, where they may 
compl ete the Advanced Program i n General Bi ol ogy. 

Requirements for the Biol ogi cal Sci ences Maj or in General Biology (GENB) at Shady Grove 
Courses equivalent to these to be taken at an institution that offers lower level course work 



i. tuKt frogfc 


mi rcequi remans - ju c reaits www. ug 


SLun 


1 1 . Basic Program in Biological Sciences 




BSCI 105 


Principles of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI 106 


Principles of Biology II 


4 


BSCI 223 


General Microbiology 


3 


BSCI 222 


Pri nci pi es of Geneti cs 


4 


MATH 130 or 


Cal cul us for Life Sci ences 1 or 


3 


MATH 140 


Cal cul us 1 


4 


MATH 131 or 


Cal cul us for L i f e Sci ences 1 1 or 




MATH 141 


Cal cul us II 


4 


CH EM 131/132 


General Chemistry 1 w/Lab 


4 


CH EM 231/232 


General Chemistry II w/Lab 


4 


CH EM 241/242 


Organic Chemistry II w/Lab 


4 


CH EM 271/272* 


General Chemistry II w/Lab 


4 



* CHEM272Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab is not offered at most institutions. Students accepted i nto the UMCP Shady 
Grove Biol ogi cal Sciences may substitute a General Chemistry II Lab for this course 



1 1 1 .Courses taken at Universities at Shady Grove 

PH Y S121 F undamental s of Physi cs I 

PHY S122 F undamental s of Physi cs 1 1 

GENB Advanced Program in General Biology 

ELECT Electives 

Total credits required to graduate 
Advising 



4 

4 

27 mini mum 

20-25 

120 



A dvi si ng i s mandatory duri ng each pre- regi strati on peri od f or al I B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors. A dvi si ng for students 
interested in or enrol led in the Shady Grove Program is avai lablefrom the Director or Assistant Director. Call 
301-738-6007 for an advi si ng appoi ntment. 

TheRobert H. Smith School of Business, Shady Grove 

www. rhsrni th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel95 



Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 

Associate Dean(s): Patricia Cleveland 

Di rector of Programs at Shady Grove Luke Glasgow 

College Park Location: 1570 Van M inching Hall, 301-405-2286 

Shady Grove Location: Building 1 1 1 , Room5147, 301-738-6079 

The Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness i s an i nternati onal I y recogni zed I eader i n management educati on and research 
forthedigital economy. The faculty are scholars, teachers, and professional leaders with a commitment to superior 
educati on i n busi ness and management, sped al i zi ng i n accounti ng, f i nance, i nf ormati on systems, operati ons 
management management and organi zati on, marked ng, logisti cs, transportati on and suppl y chai n management TheSmitr 
SrritrSchool is accredited by A A CSB International -TheAssociation to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the 
prerri er accredi ti ng agency for bachel or's, master's and doctoral degree programs i n busi ness admi ni strati on and 
accounting, http://www.aacsb.edu. 

The Smi th School of B usi ness offers students the opportuni ty to compl ete the j uni or-seni or curri cul um i n four maj ors at 
the Shady Grove campus including (1) Accounting; (2) General B usi ness- Entrepreneurship Fellows Program 
(curri cul um under revi ew); (3) I nternati onal Busi ness; and (4) M arketi ng. For details on the maj ors offered at Shady 
G rove vi si t http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove 

Admission Requirements 

A 1 1 students appl yi ng for adrri ssi on to the Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness as transfer students, whether i ntemal 
transfers already enrol led at UMCP or external transfer students entering the university for the first time, will be 
subject to competitive admi ssi on for a limited number of spaces in the Smith School at either the Col lege Park or 
Shady G rove I ocati on. F or compl ete detai I s on adrri ssi on to the Smi th School @ Shady G rove vi si t 
http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/admi ssi ons. aspx. 

Statement of Policy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

1 1 i s the practi ce of the Srri th School of B usi ness to consi der for transfer from a regi onal I y accredi ted communi ty 
col I ege onl y the f ol I owi ng courses i n busi ness adrri ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, 
i ntroducti on to computi ng (equi val ent to B M GT 201), or el ementary accounti ng. Thus, i t i s anti ci pated that students 
transf erri ng from another regi onal I y accredi ted i nsti tuti on to Shady G rove wi 1 1 have devoted the maj or share of thei r 
academi c effort be! ow the j uni or year to the compl eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester 
hours from a community col I ege may be appl i ed toward a degree from the Smith School of Busi ness. 

Other I nsti tuti ons 

The Srri th School of B usi ness normal I y accepts transfer credi ts from regi onal I y accredi ted four-year i nsti tuti ons. 
J uni or- and seni or- 1 evel busi ness courses are accepted from col I eges accredi ted by the A ssoci ati on to A dvance 
Collegiate Schoolsof Busi ness (AACSB). Junior- and senior- levd busi ness courses from other than 
AACSB-accredited schools are eval uated on a course- by- course basis to determi ne transf erabi I ity. 

The Smi th School of B usi ness requi res that at I east 50 percent of the busi ness and management credi t hours requi red 
for a busi ness degree be earned at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

U ndergraduate Degree Requi rements/Degree Options 

U pon compl eti on of al I degree requi rements, students at the Smi th School at Shady G rove wi 1 1 earn a B achel or of 
Science(B.S.) degree from the Robert H. Smith School of Busi ness at the University of Maryland College Park. In 
addition, the Smith School of Business awards M aster of Business Administration (M .B.A.), M aster of Science (M .S.), 
and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). I nf ormati on concerning admi ssi on to the M.B. A. orM.S. program is avail able at 
www. rhsrri th. umd. edu. 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academi c work requi red for graduati on must be i n busi ness and 
management subj ects. A ni ni mum of 57 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be i n 300- or 400-1 evel courses. Fifty 
percent of the requi red BM GT credit hours must be compl eted at the Smith School of Busi ness (Col I ege Park or Shady 
G rove campus) . I n addi ti on to the requi rement of an overal I cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of 2. (C average) i n al I 
university course work, effective Fall 1989, all busi ness maj ors must earn a 2.0 or better in all requi red courses, 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Pagel9€ 



including Economics, Mathematics, and Communication. 

Freshman-Sophomore School Requirements 

BM GT110 1 ntroduction to the Busi ness Val ue Chai n (3 credits) 
i*B M GT220 Pri nci pi es of A ccounti ng I (3 credi ts) 
BMGT221 Principlesof Accounting II (3 credits) 
ECON200 Principles of M icroeconomics (3/4 credits) 
ECON201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3/4 credits) 

One from 31 A credits 

MATH 220 Elementary Calculus I 

MATH 140 Calculus I 

Onefrom 3 credits 

B M GT2301 B usi ness Stati sti cs 

B M GT2312 Stati sti cal M odel s for B usi ness 

Onefrom 3 credits 

COM M 100 Foundations of Speech Communication 

COM M 107 Speech Communi cati on 

COM M 200 Critical Thinking and Speaking 

Total: 24-27 

1 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT230: BIOM301, ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG305, 
PSYC2O0,andSOCY201. 

2 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT231: ENEE324, ENME392, orSTAT400. 

J unior-Senior School Requirements 

BM GT301 1 ntroduction to I nformation Systems (3 credits) 

B M GT340 B usi ness F i nance ( 3 credi ts) 

BMGT350 Marketing Principles and Organization (3 credits) 

B M GT364 M anagement and Organi zati onal Theory (3 credits) 

B M GT367 Career Search Strategi es i n B usi ness ( 1 credi t) 

BMGT380 Busi ness Law (3 credits) 

BMGT391 Leadership in Action (1 credit) 

B M GT495 B usi ness Pol i ci es (3 credi ts) 

B M GT499 A dvanced Topi cs i n B usi ness ( 1 credi t) 

Total: 21 

Economics Requirements 3-6 credits 

3- 6 credi ts of approved upper- 1 evel economi cs courses are requi red by the Smi th School of B usi ness. V i si t 
http://www.rhsrnith.urnd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ to vi ew the specif i c requi rements for each major offered at the 
Smith School at Shady Grove 

Major Requirements 

I n addition to the Smith School of Busi ness Bachelor of Science requi rements listed above, general I y another 18-24 
credits are required for each major. See http://www.it6rnith.umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ to view the specific 
requi rements for each maj or offered at the Smith School at Shady Grove 

Additional Information 

For more i nformation on the Smith School of Busi ness undergraduate program at Shady Grove visit 
www. rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 

B A. in Communication at Shady Grove 



6.TheCollegEsandSchools Pagel97 



Carri lie Kendall Academic Center (Universities at Shady Grove), 9636 Gudel sky Drive 

Rockville, MD 20750 

301-738-6208 

www.shadygrove umd. edu/prograrns/undergraduate/communi cati on/umcp/communi cati on.cf m 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Coordinator: Lindsi Baltz (Program Coordinator) 

Coordi nator: J ul i e Gowi n (Outreach Coordi nator) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J . Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, T. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L. Aldoory, D. H ample 

Assistant Professors: S. Khamis, B. Liu, M. Liu, K. Maddux, N. Ofulue, 

Lecturers: R. Coleman (Lecturer), W. Lawson (Lecturer), S. Simon (Lecturer), J . Tenney (Lecturer), R. Toth (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: J . Fahnestock (ENGL), A. Kruglanski (PSYC), D. Rosenfelt(WMST) 

Affiliate Associate Professors: M. Gelfand(PSYC), S. McDaniel (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J . Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

The Major at Shady Grove 

The department offers an exci ti ng curri cul um that prepares students for acaderri c and prof essi onal careers i n busi ness, 
government, health, educati on, soci al and human servi ces, and rel ated f i el ds. Courses offered by the department 
i ncl ude persuasi on and soci al i nf I uence, rhetori c and the anal ysi s of messages, communi cati on and new medi a, di gi tal 
communication, organizational communication, public relations strategies, and intercultural communication. All 
students i n the program at Shady G rove are requi red to compl ete mandatory advi si ng each semester. 

Prog/am Learning Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program i n Communi cati on, students shoul d be abl e to demonstrate the f ol I owi ng 
knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability todisti ngui sh among a vari ety of theoreti cal approaches i n the communi cati on di sci pi i ne and use them 
appropri atel y and eff ecti vel y i n acaderri c work. 

2. A n abi I i ty to conduct research and wri te research reports empl oyi ng soci al sci enti f i c and/or humani sti c approaches i n 
the communi cati on di sci pi i ne 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively i n a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Center for Political Communi cati on and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to 
foster democratic communication by a diverse people. Seewww.corrm.center.umd.edu. 

The Center f or Ri sk Communi cati on Research (CRCR) advances di al ogue and understand ng about communi cati on's 
rol e i n control I i ng and prevent] ng ri sk; about how publ i cs percei ve ri sk communi cati on; and about the pol i ti cal , 
econorri c and soci al contexts for ri sk communi cati on. Schol ars associ ated wi th the C RC R exami ne heal th, food safety, 
security, and environmental risks. Seewww.commriskcenter.umd.edu. 

The department's M edi a Center at Col I ege Park i s desi gned to provi de one-on-one tutori ng and i nstructi onal support to 
further students' oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s and corf i dence The M edi a Center i s equi pped with cameras and record ng 
equi pment to tape speeches and presentati ons for practi ce and criti que Students may also utilize resources avai I abl e at 
Shady G rove through the Off i ce of I nf ormati on Technol ogy. 

Admission to the Major 

Communication isaLimited Enrollment Program in which applicants should have an overall GPA of 2.7 of better, and 
a grade of "C" or betterineach of the three courses specifically requi red by the major (COM M 250, COMM 107, 
Stati sti cs, or the r equi val ents) . A ppl i cants shoul d al so attai n j uni or standi ng ( 56 or more transf erabl e col I ege credi ts) 
by the ti me of enrol I ment. F or more i nf ormati on on admi ssi on and I ower- 1 evel coursework requi rements, pi ease vi si t 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 19£ 



the Communi cati on web site or theTransfer Credit Center website at www.tce.umcl.edu. Requi rements for the maj or are 
as follows: 

a. Compl ete 50% of the CORE requi rements, i ncl udi ng F undamental Studi es requi rements i n M athemati cs and 
English. 

b Compl ete one of the foil owing courses with a grade of "C" or better: BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, 
SOCY 201, STAT100 or equivalent. 

c. Compl ete COM M 107, COM M 200, COMM230, or equivalentwithagradeof "C" or better 

d. CompleteCOMM250orequivalentwithagradeof "C" or better and 

e. A cumul ati ve G PA of 2. 7 or better 

Students may repeat onl y one of the G ateway courses and that may be repeated onl y once in their attempt to meet the 
requirements. 

Transfer Students 

I nternal and external transfer students who meet the Gateway requi rements specif i ed above and have a cumul ati ve 
GPA of 2.7 in all college-level coursework may apply to the program 

Appeals 

A 1 1 students may appeal admi ssi on deci si ons. Those students deni ed admi ssi on may appeal to the uni versi ty 's Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Requirements for the Major 

The course of study for a Communi cati on maj or must sati sf y al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

Credits 



COM M 107 Oral Communi cati on: Pri nci pi es and Practi ces, OR 



COM M 200 Critical Thi nki ng and Speaki ng, OR 



COM M 230 A rgumentati on and Debate 



COM M 250 I ntroducti on to Communi cati on I nqui ry 



COM M 400 Research Methods in Communication 



COM M 401 I nterpreti ng Strategi c Di scourse 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Communication StudiesTrack 



COM M 402 Communi cati on Theory and Process 



One from 



3 
3 



COM M 420 Theori es of G roup Di scussi on 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 199 



COM M424 Communi cation in Complex Organizations 



COM M 425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 



COM M 426 Conflict Management 



COM M 435 Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 



COM M 470 Listening 



COM M 475 Persuasion 



COMM477 Discourse Analysis 



COM M 482 I ntercultural Communi cati ons 



One from 



COM M 330 A rgumentati on and Publ i c Pol i cy 



COMM360 The Rhetoric of Black America 



COM M 450 A nci ent and M edi eval Rhetori cal Theory 



COM M 451 Renai ssance & M odern Rhetori c Theory 



COM M 453 The Power of Di scourse i n A meri can L if e 



COM M 455 Speechwriti ng 



COMM460 Public Lifein American Communities, 1634-1900 



COMM461 Voices of Public Leadership in the Twentieth Century 



COM M 469 The Di scourse of Sod al M overrents 



COM M 471 Public Communication Campaigns 



COM M476 Language, Communication, and Action 



COMM 



COMM Elective 



COMM300/400 Upper Level COMM Electives 



12 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page20C 



One Statistical Analysis from 
STAT 100 E I ementary Stati sti cs and Probabi I i ty 



3-4 



PSYC200 



Stati sti cal M ethods i n Psychol ogy 



SOCY201 



I introductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 



BMGT230 Business Stati sties 



E D M S451 ' ntroc ' uct ' on t0 E ducati onal Stati sti cs or an equi val ent 

course- see advisor 



One Structural Analysis of Language from 



LING200 



I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 



HESP120 Introduction to Linguistics 



A N TH 380 C ul ture and D i scourse or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 



Corrrruni cations Studies: Courses related to 
COU RSES Communi cati on Studi es i n one department other than 
COMM 



Notes 

• Because the department's curri cul um changes over ti me, the department's U ndergraduate Di rector may approve 
other appropri ate Communi cati on courses to meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses requi red for the Communi cati on maj or, but taken outsi de COM M , may be used to sati sfy CORE 
requi rements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 

Advising 

Advising is avail able throughout the year in the Camille Kendall Academic Center, Suite 5119. Students should check 
Testudo for the r regi strati on date and for any mandatory advi si ng bl ocks. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experi ences i ncl ude assi sti ng on faculty research proj ects, parti ci pad ng i n sped al team research proj ects, and 
working with the department's Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk 
Communication Research. 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Page201 



Fieldvucrk Opportunities 

To further enhance I earni ng and career trai ni ng, the department i ncorporates sped al hands-on cl asses such as H ealth 
Communication Campaigns, Visual Communication, Web Design, and PR Event Planning. The department also 
strongl y promotes i nternshi p and servi ce I earni ng opportuni ties with I ocal and state busi nesses and i nsti tuti ons, and 
encourages students' parti ci pati on i n a student- run cl ubs. 

I nternshi ps 

The department's i nternshi p program hel ps communi cati on maj ors gai n prof essi onal experi ence, bui I d a prof essi onal 
portfol i o, and take the f i rst steps toward a career. The department structures i ts i nternshi p program around a course, 
COM M 386: Experiential Learning, offered each school term. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Soci al and academi c acti vi ti es are avai I abl e to students by parti ci pati ng i n the f ol I owi ng student organi zati ons: the 
Undergraduate Communi cati on Association, theLambdaPi Eta Honor Society, and the Maryland chapter of the Public 
Relati ons Student Soci ety of A meri ca 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department offers the Chai m and M i ri am Bentzlovitch Schol arshi p to students who exhi bit academi c excel I ence 
Each year the department di stri butes a cal I for appl i cati ons through e-mai I . 

Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

5103 Carri lie Kendall Academic Center, 301-738-6031 
http://www.shadygrove. umd. edu/academi cs/undergraduate/cri mi nol ogy 
ccj susg@cri m umd. edu 

Stephanie Gerstenblith, Ph.D. 

9630 Gudelsky Drive, Room 5103 

www.shadygrove. umd. edu/academi cs/undergraduate/cri rri nol ogy 

Chair: S. Simpson 

Shady Grove Program Director: S. Gerstenblith 

Lecturers: C. Roberts White, N. Romeiser, S. Eastman, R. Shusko, M . J anney 

The Major 

C ri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce encompasses the study of both the causes of, and responses to cri me 1 1 i nvol ves 
studyi ng i ndi vi dual , group, and mass behavi or, as wel I as the i nsti tuti ons, prof essi ons, and I aws that exi st to detect, 
control, and ameliorate the effects of crime. As a discipline, criminology and criminal justice is situated at the nexus of 
other soci al sci ence di sci pi i nes such as soci ol ogy, psychol ogy, and government, i n addi ti on to publ i c pol i cy and I egal 
studies. 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers its Bachelor of Arts in Criminology & Criminal J ustice at the 
U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove. Students transfer i nto thi s Program after compl eti ng thei r freshman and sophomore years 
el sewhere, typi cal I y at a j uni or col I ege Through thi s Program, students compl ete thei r j uni or- and seni or- year 
coursework at U SG wi th the opti on to attend f ul I - or part-ti me. U pon compl eti on of thi s Program students are awarded 
a U ni versity of M aryl and, Col I ege Park B .A . degree 

Program Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the CCJ S degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate basi c knowl edge of maj or cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce content areas. 

2. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate a basi c knowl edge of descri pti ve and i nf erenti al stati sti cs appropri ate to the soci al 
sciences. 

3. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods. 

Requirements for the Major 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 202 



The major in Criminology & Criminal J ustice comprises 30 hours of coursework in criminology and criminal justice 
E i ghteen ( 18) hours of supporti ng sequence sel ected from a I i st of soci al and behavi oral sci ence courses are requi red 
(list is available in the CCJ S advising office and on the department website). No grade lower than a C- may be used 
toward the maj or. A n average grade of C i s requi red i n the supporti ng sequence. N i ne (9) hours of the supporti ng 
sequence must be at the 300/400 level. Inaddition, MATH 111 or higher (MATH 220, MATH140orSTAT100, but not 
MATH 113 or M ATH115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved course in social statistics) must be completed with a grade of 
'C or better. A grade of C or better is required in MATH 111 as a prerequisite to CCJ S200. 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 



Major Requirements 

CCJS100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CCJ S105 Cri mi nol ogy 

CCJS230 Criminal Law in Action 

CCJ S300 Cri mi nol ogi cal and Cri mi nal J usti ce Research M ethods 

CCJ S340 Concepts of L aw E nf orcement A dmi ni strati on 

CCJ S350 J uveni I e Del i nquency 

CCJ S ELECT CCJ S Electives (3 courses) 

One from 

CCJ S451 Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 

CCJ S452 Treatment of Cri mi nal s and Del i nquents 

CCJ S454 Contemporary Cri mi nol ogi cal Theory 

Total Credits 30 

Supporting Sequence 
SU PPORT Lower or U pper I evel courses from approved list (3 courses) 9 

SU PPORT U L U pper I evel courses from approved I i st (3 courses) 9 

One from 3-4 

M ATH 111 I ntroducti on to Probabi I i ty 
MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 
MATH 140 Calculus I 
STAT 100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

One from 3-4 

CCJ S200 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

ECON321 Economic Statistics 
PSY C200 Stab sti cal M ethods i n Psychol ogy 
SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 
BMGT230 Business Statistics 

Total credits- Major and Supporting 54 

Electives for CCJ S Maj ars(most courses are3 credits) 
CCJ S234 Law of Cri rri nal I nvesti gati on 

CCJ S310 Cri mi nal I nvesti gati ons 

CCJS320 I ntroducti on to Criminalistics 

CCJ S330 Contemporary Cri mi nol ogi cal I ssues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary L egal Pol i cy I ssues 

CCJ S332 M aj or Transi ti ons: F rom U ndergraduate to Prof essi onal 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Page203 



CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJ S357 I ndustri al and Retai I Securi ty A dmi ni strati on 

CCJ S359 FieldTraining in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJ S370 Race, Cri me and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJ S386 Experi enti al L earni ng 

CCJ S388H I ndependent Readi ng Course in Crinrinol ogy and C ri rri nal J usti ce - H onors 

CCJ S389H Independent Research in Criminology and Criminal J ustice- Honors 

CCJ S398 L aw E nf orcement and F i el d Trai ni ng 

CCJ S399 I ndependent Study i n Cri rri nology and Cri rri nal J ustice 

CCJ S400 Cri mi nal Courts 

CCJ S432 Law of Corrections 

CCJ S444 A dvanced L aw E nf orcement A drri ni strati on 

CCJ S451 Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 

CCJ S452 Treatment of Cri mi nal s and Del i nquents 

CCJS453 WhiteCollar and Organized Crime 

CCJ S454 Contemporary Cri mi nol ogi cal Theory 

CCJ S455 Dynami cs of PI anned Change i n Cri mi nal J usti ce I 

CCJ S456 Dynami cs of PI anned Change i n Cri mi nal J usti ce 1 1 

CCJ S457 Compararj ve Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJ S461 Psychol ogy of Cri mi nal Behavi or 

CCJS462 Special Problems in Security Administration 

CCJ S498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Other Requirements for the Major 

The CCJ S Department enforces al I prerequi si tes and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are cl osed. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at least once each semester. Advising is available by appointment 
i n the Carri lie Kendall Academic Center (Bui I ding III), room5103. Students must complete all course prerequisites 
and obtai n department permission from CCJS Advising to enrol I in mostCCJS classes. Call 301-738-6031 or email 
ccjsusg@crimumd.edu. 

Internships 

Requirements for I nternship Placements 

The i ntemshi p must be a I earni ng experi ence i nvol vi ng work i n a cri mi nal j usti ce or cri mi nol ogi cal setrj ng. I nterns are 
expected to gai n val uabl e i nf ormafj on whi ch wi 1 1 add to thei r overal I understand ng of the f i el d of cri rri nol ogy and 
cri rri nal j usti ce. I ntemshi p posi fj ons must center around gai ni ng new materi al over the course of the semester and are 
expected to i nvol ve some degree of ongoi ng trai ni ng/l earni ng for the i ntern. I ntemshi p pi acements are subj ect to the 
approval of the I ntemshi p Di rector. 

I nternship Eligibility 

I nterns must meet the f ol I owi ng criteri a: 

• I nterns must be CCJ S majors 

• I nterns must have completed a rri ni mum of 56 credits at the fj me of appl ication 

• InternsmusthaveacumulativeGPA of at I east 2.5 at the time of application 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credit over the course of the semester 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Page2M 



• A maxi mum of 6 i nternshi p credits per semester and a total of 12 i nternshi p credits overal I wi 1 1 be permitted 

• I nternshi p credit wi II not be approved for current or previ ousl y heldj obs 

I ntems must regi ster themsel ves for the i nternshi p pri or to the end of the semester's schedul e adj ustment peri od. 
Obtai ni ng Departmental approval for the i nternshi p does N OT regi ster the student for the cl ass. A ddi ti onal 
i nf ormati on about i nternshi ps can be pi eked up from the C CJ S advi si ng of f i ce i n B ui I di ng 1 1 1 , room 5103. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

There are two Student Soci eti es avai I abl e for membershi p f or CCJ S maj ors: the Cri mi nal J usti ce Student Associ ati on 
(CRI M SA) and Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society (APS). 

The Criminal Justice Student Association (CRI MSA) is dedicated to supplementing our members' academic experience 
by provi di ng extracurri cul ar opportuni ti es to further expl ore cri ti cal i ssues i nvol vi ng cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce. 
Through a regular program of speakers, agency demonstrations, and community service projects, the CRI M SA 
provi des students wi th val uabl e i nf ormati on for maki ng deci si ons about career choi ces, further graduate I evel study, 
and I aw school . C Rl M SA provi des students wi th opportuni ti es for acaderri c and soci al i nteracti on, and access to 
cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce researchers, teachers, and practiti oners represent] ng a vari ety of government, 
acaderri c and commerci al corporate and non- prof i t organi zati ons. All U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove students, 
regardless of home institution or maj or, are eligible for CRI MSA membership. CRIMSA meeti ngs and programs are 
held at I east monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. CRIMSA members pay a one-time membership fee of $35. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) is a National Criminal J ustice Honor Society founded 1942 and membership is open to CCJ S 
majors who have completed at least 40 total credits with at least 12 credits in CCJ S courses. Undergraduate Applicants 
must have an overal I GPA of at I east a 3.2 and a maj or GPA of at I east 3.4. Graduate student appl i cants must have a 
3. 4 overal I G PA . A ppl i cants must f i 1 1 out an appl i cati on, subrri t an off i ci al or unoff i ci al transcri pt, and a check 
(personal checkisfine) made out to Alpha Phi Sigma for $55. The local chapter's name is Omega lota. Completed 
appl i cati ons, check, and transcri pts shoul d be subrri tted to D r. G erstenbl i th i n B ui I di ng 1 1 1 , room 5105. A ppl i cati ons 
are processed throughout the acaderri c year. Y ou wi 1 1 be noti f i ed when you have been off i ci al I y accepted. 
A ppl i cati ons are avai I abl e from D r. G erstenbl i th. 

Awards and Recognition 

E ach year the department sel ects the outstandi ng graduati ng seni or for the Peter J . Lejins award. 

Public Health Science, Shady Grove 

301 738-6162 
jtodd@umd.edu 

Dr. J ennifer Todd School of Public Health 

U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove 

9630 Gudelsky Drive, Bldg 1 1 1 Room 5127 

www.sph. umd. edu/phs/ 

301-738-6162 

Dr. J ennifer Todd, Program Di rector 
Dr. Coke Farmer, Assistant Dean 

The Major 

The Publ i c H eal th Sci ence degree i s a sci ence- based program whi ch prepares students to work i n the fi el d of public 
heal th. Students graduate wi th a B achel or of Sci ence degree i n Publ i c H eal th Sci ence whi ch prepares students for 
entry- 1 evel posi ti ons i n a vari ety of publ i c heal th prof essi ons and setti ngs, i ncl udi ng at the I ocal , state, federal , and 
international level in aspects of disease prevention, health promotion, environmental protection, emergency 
preparedness, and wel I ness, as wel I as a host of other publ i c health rel ated areas. 

All Publ i c H eal th Sci ence maj ors must compl ete some basi c core sci ence and supporti ng cl asses pri or to matri cul ati ng 
at the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove program Requi rements for the Publ i c H eal th Sci ence maj or at Shady G rove i ncl ude: 

I. Completion of University CORE Requirements 



6. The Col leges and Schools 



Page 205 



1 1 . Completion of Program Prerequisites 



HLTH 130 
HLTH 230 
BSCI 105 
CHEM 131/132 
BSCI 201 
BSCI 202 
BSCI 223 
STAT 200 or 
MATH 220 
A NTH 260 



Intro to Public Community Health 3 

I ntro to H ealth Behavi or 3 

Principles of Biology 4 

General Chemistry with Lab 4 

H uman A natomy & Physi ol ogy I 4 

H uman A natomy & Physi ol ogy 1 1 4 

Microbiology 4 

Statisticsor 3 

Calculus 3 

I ntro to Sod o A nthropol ogy 3 



III. The Public Health Science Program 
Public Health Foundations 

SPHL401 History of Public Health 3 

M I EH 300 I ntro to Envi ronmental H ealth 3 

HLSA 302 I ntro to Health Policy and Services 3 

EPIB301 Epidemiol ogy for Public Health Practice 3 

EPIB300 Biostati sties for Public Health Practice 3 



Public Health SdenceCore 



SPHL 
498X 

KNES360 

SPHL 400 

SPHL 402 

SPHL 405 

SPHL 409 



Essentials of Public Health Biology 3 

Physiology of Physical Activity 3 

I ntro to Global Health 3 

Public Health Emergency Preparedness 3 

Public Health Internship 3 

Social, Political & Ethical Issues in Public -, 
Health 



Public Health Science Electives 

SPHL 410 Public Health Program PI anning& Evaluation 3 

SPHL 498X Food, Policy, & Public Health 3 

HLTH 377 Human Sexuality 3 

HLTH 434 I ntro to Public Health Informatics 3 

H LTH 472 H eal th and M edi cal Term nol ogy 3 

SPH L 498X I ntro to G I obal H eal th Corrmini cati on 3 



6.TheCollegesandSchools Page20€ 



Advising 

Advising is mandatory for each student. PI ease contact the Program Director, Dr. Todd at (301) 738-6162, or]todd@umd 
jtodd(cD umd.edu 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



7. Departments, Majors* and Pro-ams 

ACCOUNTING (BMGT) 

TheRobert H.Smith School of Business 

1570 Van M unchi ng Hal 1 , 301-405-2286 

www. rhsmi th. umd.edu/undergrad 

Chair: M.Loeb 

Professors: L. Gordon, O. Kim, M. Loeb, S. Loeb 

Associate Professors: S. Cheng, R. Hann, M . Kimbrough 

Assistant Professors: S. Brown, C. Levi ne, J . Staihar, undefined 

Lecturers: P. Basu (Tyser Teaching Fellow), G. B ul mash (Distingui shed Tyser Teaching Fellow), M. Finch (Tyser Teaching Fellow), A.Jacobs, R. KovarikJ. 

Lager, C. Linsley (Tyser Teaching Fellow), J . McKinney (Tyser Teaching Fellow), G. Pfeiffer, A. Ramirez 

Adjunct Professors: E. Cantor, E. Folsom R. Hall, K. Hardy, M. Lavine, P. McNamee, P. McPhun, L. Mostow, S. Rose, D. Sites, C. Stevens, N. Webb 

Visiting Faculty: L. Zhou 

The Major 

A ccounti ng, i n a I i mi ted sense, i s the anal ysi s, cl assi f i cati on, and record ng of f i nanci al events and the reporti ng of the resul ts of such events for an organi zati on. I n 
a broader sense, accounti ng consi sts of al I f i nanci al systems f or pi anni ng, control I i ng, and apprai si ng performance of an organi zati on. A ccounti ng i ncl udes among i ts 
many facets: f i nanci al pi anni ng, budged ng, accounti ng systems, f i nanci al management control s, f i nanci al anal ysi s of performance, f i nanci al reporti ng, i ntemal and 
external auditing, and taxation. The accounting curriculum provides an educational foundation for careers in public accounting and management, whether in private 
business organizations, government or nonprofit agencies, or consulting. Two tracks are provided: The PublicAccounting Track leading to the C PA (Certified 
Public Accounting) and the Management Accounti ng/ConsultingTractftfease/jcte Currently, only the Public Accounting track isavailable. 

Admission to the M aj or 

See Robert H. Smith School of Business entry in chapter 6 for admission requirements. 
Requirements for theMaj or 



All Accounting Majors 

BMGT310 Intermediate Accounting I 
BMGT311 Intermediate Accounting II 
BMGT321 Managerial Accounting 
B M GT326 A ccounti ng Systems 



Credits 
3 

3 
3 
3 



A ccounti ng M aj ors must compl ete an addi ti onal 12 
credi ts from one of the f ol I owi ng tracks. 

Public Accounting Track: 

B M GT323 Taxatj on of I ndi vi dual s* 

B M GT411 Ethi cs and Prof essi onal i sm i n A ccounti ng* 

BMGT422 Auditing Theory & Practice* 



3 
3 
3 



One of the following: 

BMGT410 Government Accounting 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and Estates 

B M GT423 F raud Exami nati on 

B M GT424 A dvanced A ccounti ng 

BMGT427 Advanced Auditing Theory & Practice 

BMGT428 Special Topics in Accounting 



Management Accounti no/Consul ting Trade 

BMGT426 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Three of the following: 

_ M (~i-:jqc Survey of B usi ness I nf omnati on Systems and 

Technology 

B M GT323 Taxati on of I ndi vi dual s* 

B M GT332 Operati ons Research for M anagement Deci si ons 

B M GT385 Operati ons M anagement 

BMGT402 Database Systems 

BM GT403 Systems Analysis and Design 

BMGT410 Government Accounting 

B M GT411 Ethi cs and Prof essi onal i sm i n A ccounti ng* 

B M GT417 Taxati on of Corporati ons, Partnershi ps and Estates 

B M GT423 F raud Exami rati on 

B M GT424 A dvanced A ccounti ng 

BMGT428 Special Topics in Accounting 

BMGT430 Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT434 Introduction to Optimization 

B M GT440 A dvanced F i nanci al M anagement 

BMGT446 International Finance 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 208 



Upper Level Economics Requirement 3 

One of the following courses: 
ECON305 I ntemnedi ate Macroeconomic Theory and Pol icy 
ECON306 I ntemnedi ate Microeconomic Theory 
ECON330 Money and Banking 
ECON340 International Economics 

Total C redits for Accounti ng 27 

and Economics 

* Required for CPA in Maryland 

In addition to the major requirements listed above, please consult Chapter 6 or www.rhsmith.umd.edu for a listing of additional Smith School degree requi rerrents 
that apply to all Smith School majors. 

T he basi c educati oral requi rements of the M aryl and State B oard of Publ i c A ccountancy to si t for the C PA exarri rati on are a baccal aureate or hi gher degree wi th a 
maj or i n A ccounti ng or wi th a non-accounti ng degree suppl emented by course work the B oard determi nes to be substanti al I y the equi val ent of an A ccounti ng maj or. 
Students pi anni ng to take the C PA exami rati on for certifi cati on and I i censi ng outsi deM aryl and shoul d determi ne the educati oral requi rements for that state and 
arrange thei r program accordi ngly. 

SinceJ une30, 1999, all applicants who desi re to take the C PA examination in Maryland have been required to have completed 150 semester hours of 
college work as well as other specified requirements. 

Advising 

General advising for students admitted to the Smith School of Business is avail able Monday through Friday in the Office of Undergraduate Programs, 1570Van 
M unchi ng H al 1 , 301- 405-2286. 1 1 i s recommended that students vi si t thi s off i ce each semester to ensure that they are i nf omned about current requi rements and 
procedures. Transfer students enteri ng the uni versi ty can be advi sed duri ng spri ng, summer, and f al I transfer ori entati on programs. Contact the Ori entati on Off i ce for 
further information, 301-314-8217. 

AercepaceEngi neeri ng(ENAE) 

A. J amesClark School of Engineering 

3181 Glenn L. Matin Hall, 301-405-2376 

www.aero.umd.edu 

Chair: M. Lewis(WillisYoungProfessor& Chair) 

Professors: R. Celi, I. Chopra (Prof), A. Flatau, W. FoumeyJ. Hubbard, S. Lee, J. Leishman, M. Lewis, D. Pines (Dean), N. Wereley 

Associate Professors: D. Akin, J . Baeder, C. Cadou, P. Martin (Assoc Prof), R. Sanner, R. Sedwick, A. Winkelmann, K. Yu 

Assistant Professors: J . Humbert, A.J ones (Asst Prof), D. Paley 

Lecturers: B.BarbeeJ. Didion, D. Haas (Lecturer), L. Heal y, J. Hrastar, D. Israel, K. LewyJ. Mitchell, E. Morelli, V. Nagaraj, D. Palumbo, B.Roberts, D. VanWie 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: A. Marshall, A. Trouve(Assoc Prof) 

Professors Emeriti : J . Anderson, E. J ones 

Visiting Faculty: M. Bowden (Visit Asst Prof), F. Schmitz (Visit Prof), M.Tishchenko (Visit Prof) 

The Maj or 

A erospace engi neeri ng i s concerned wi th the processes, both anal yti cal and creati ve, that are i nvol ved i n the desi gn, manufacture and operati on of aerospace 
vehi cl es wi thi n and beyond pi anetary atmospheres. T hese vehi cl es range from he! i copters and other verti cal takeoff ai rcraft at the I ow- speed end of the fl i ght 
spectrum, to spacecraft traveling at thousands of miles per hour during launch, orbit trans- pi anetary flight or re-entry, at the high-speed end. In between there are 
general avi ati on and commerci al transport ai rcraft f I y i ng at speeds wel I pel ow and cl ose to the speed of sound, and supersoni c transports, f i ghters, and mi ssi I es 
whi ch crui se supersoni cal I y. A I though each speed regi me and each vehi cl e poses i ts sped al probl ems, al I aerospace vehi cl es can be addressed by a cormnon set of 
techni cal sped al ti es or di sci pi i nes. 

The sub-disciplines of Aerospace Engineering are: aerodynamics, flight dynamics, propulsion, structures, and "design". Aerodynamics addresses the flow of air and 
the associ ated forces, moments, pressures, and temperature changes. F I i ght-dynami cs addresses the moti on of the vehi cl es i ncl udi ng the traj ectori es, the rotati oral 
dynami cs, the sensors, and the control I aws requi reel for successful accompl i shment of the mi ssi ons. Propul si on addresses the engi nes whi ch have been devi sed to 
convert chemical (and occasionally other forms) energy into useful work, to produce the thrust needed to propel aerospace vehicles. Structures addresses material 
properti es, stresses, strai ns, def I ecti on, and vi brati on al ong wi th manuf acturi ng processes as requi red to produce the very I i ght wei ght and rugged el ements needed i n 
aerospace vehicles. Aerospace "design" addresses the process of synthesizing vehicles and systems to meet defined missions and more general needs. This is a 
process that draws on information from the other sub-disciplines while embodying its own uni que el ements. The Aerospace Engi neeri ng program is designed to 
provi de a f i rm f oundati on i n the vari ous sub-di sci pi i nes. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym E NA E 

Program Obj ecti ves 

1. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who wi 1 1 be successful i n thei r careers, i ncl udi ng i ndustry , government servi ce, and academi a, i n the State of 
Maryland and beyond. 

2. Prepare students to solve relevant probl ems in a) aerodynamics, b) structures, c) dynamics and control s,d) propulsion, ande) systems and design, 
wi th a focus i n ei ther the aeronauti cal or space areas. 

3. E nabl e students to rel ate thei r fundamental physi cs, math and engi neeri ng studi es to the many practi cal aspects of aerospace engi neeri ng research, 
development, and practice 

4. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who are abl e to i ntegrate thei r knowl edge of engi neeri ng sub-di sci pi i nes to produce useful product desi gns. 

5. Promote innovative educati oral activities to challenge students and improve the I earning experience, including design presentations, hands-on 
I aboratory experi ences, novel use of I ntemet i nf omnati on technol ogy, and i ndependent research proj ects. 

6. Seek conti nual I y to i improve course off eri ngs and curri cul a, whi I e attracti ng the best students possi bl e and i mprovi ng the rati onal stature of the 
program 

7. Prepare future aerospace engi neers who understand the context i n whi ch thei r prof essi on i s practi ced, and who are abl e to adapt to future 
devel opments i n both technol ogy and the empl oyment market 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Prog-am Learning Outcomes 

1. Students wi 1 1 devel op cri ti cal reasoni ng and thi nki ng ski 1 1 s. 

2. Students will develop written and oral communication skills. 

3. Students will devel op science and quantitative reasoning ski I Is. 

4. Students will devel op i nf ormati on I i teracy ski 1 1 s. 

5. Students will devel op technology fluency. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Aerospace Engi neeri ng Department has a number of facilities to support education and research across a range of special areas. The department has subsonic 
wind tunnels with test sections ranging from a few inches up to 7.75 feet by 11.00 feet as well as a supersonic tunnel with a 6 inch by 6 inch test section. There are a 
number of structural test machi nes wi th capabi I i ti es up to 220, 000 pounds for stati c I oads and 50,000 pounds for dy nami c I oads. T he department al so has 
experi mental f aci I i ti es to test hel i copter rotors i n hover, i n forward f I i ght, and i n vacuum to i sol ate i nerti al I oads from aerody nami c I oads. T here i s an anechoi c 
chamber for the i nvesti gati on of noi se generated by hel i copters, and an autocl ave and other f aci I i ti es for manuf acturi ng and i nspecti ng composi te structures. T he 
neutral buoyancy facility, which i nvesti gates the assembl y of space structures i n a si mul ated zero gravi ty envi ronrrent, i s supported by robots and associ ated 
control I ers. T here are al so many computers and workstati ons that provi de I ocal computi ng capabi I i ty and extensi ve network access to campus mai nf rames, 
supercomputi ng centers, and al I the resources of the I ntemet 

Admission to the Major 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other Engineering Departments. For admission information pi ease see A. James Clark School of Engineering under 
The Colleges and School section of this site. 

Requirements for the Major 







Credits 


Credits 






First 


Second 




Freshman Year 


San 


Sem 


ENES100 


Introduction to Engineering Design (**canbetaken 
first or second serrestEr) 


3** 




ENAE100 


TheAerospaceEngi neeri ng Profession 


1 




CHEM135 


General Chemistry for Engineers 


3 




MATH140/141Cd cuius 1,11 


4 


4 


PHYS161 


General Physics 1 




3 


ENES102 


Stat] cs (** can be taken first or second semester) 




3** 


ENAE202 


A erospace C omputi ng 




3 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 


3 


3 




Total Credits 


14 


16 






Credits 


Credits 






First 


Second 




Sophomore Year 


Sem 


Sem 


ENES220 


M echani cs of M ateri al s 


3 




ENAE283 


1 ntroducti on to A erospace Systems 


3 




MATH241 


CeJcuIusIII 


4 




ENAE200 


TheAerospaceEngi neeri ng Profession 11 




1 


ENME232or 


Thermodynamics 




3 


ENME320 








MATH246 


Differential Equations 




3 


MATH461 


L i near A 1 gebra f or Sci enti sts and E ngi neers or 




3-4 


MATH 240 


1 ntroducti on to L i near A 1 gebra 






PHYS260/261 General Physics II 


4 




PHYS270/271 General Physics III 




4 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 


3 


3 




Total Credits 


17 


16 






Credits 


Credits 






First 


Second 




J unior Year 


Sem 


Sem 


ENAE311 


Aerodynamics 1 


3 




ENAE301 


Dynami cs of A erospace Systems 


3 




ENAE362 


A erospace 1 nstrumentati on and Experi mentati on 


3 




ENAE324 


A erospace Structures 




4 


ENAE432 


Control of Aerospace Systems 




3 


ENAE380 


F 1 i ght Software Systems 


3 




ENGL393 


Technical Writing 




3 


CORE 


CORE Program Requirements 
Aeronautical Track 


3 


3 


ENAE414 


Aerodynamics II 




3 



Space System Track 
ENAE404 Space Flight Dynamics 
Total Credits 



15 
Credits 



3 

16 

Credits 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Senior Year 

ENAE464 Aerospace Engineering Lab 
ENAE423 Vibration & A eroelasrj city 
ENAE398* Honors Research Project, or 
ENAE 400s* one400 level ENAE course 
ELECTIVE+ Technical Elective; see note below 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Aeronautical Track 
ENAE403 Aircraft Flight Dynamics 
ENAE455 Aircraft Propulsion & Power 
ENAE481 Principles of Aircraft Design 
ENAE482 Aeronautical Systems Designs 

Space System Track 
ENAE441 Space Navigations Guidance 
ENAE457 SpacePropulsion& Power 
ENAE483 Principles of Space Systems Design 
E NA E484 Space Systems Desi gn 

Total Credits 



First 


Second 


San 


Son 


3 






3 




3 




3 


3 


3 



3 
3 
3 

15 



3 
15 



* Only one of ENAE 398, 483 or 499 may be used for these electives. 

+ One 300/400 level course in Engineering, Mathematics, or Physical Sciences that has 
been approved for ttis purpose by the Undergraduate Program Director. 

MirirrumDeyee Requirements The fulfillment of all Department, School, and University requirements. A minimum of 124 credits are required for an 
Aerospace Engi neeri ng degree. 

Students must select a track. All courses in either the Aeronautical orAstronautical track must be completed. Students in either track who wish to gain a broader 
educarj on across the aeronaurj cal or space appl i cati on areas can take courses requi red i n the other track as el ecrj ves. 

Academic Benchmarks Students pursui ng the maj or shoul d revi ew the academi c benchmarks establ i shed f or thi s program See: www.4vearpl ans umd.edu . 
Students wi 1 1 be peri odi cal I y revi ewed to i nsure they are meerj ng benchmarks and progressi ng to the degree Students who f al I behi nd program benchmarks are 
subj ect to sped al advi si ng requi rements and other i nterventi ons. 

Aerospace E lecti ves 

The Department offers a range of electives, Thefollowi ng courses have recently been offered as electives for the undergraduate degree: 



ENAE398H Honors Research 

ENAE415 HelicopterTheory 3 

ENAE416 V i scous F I ow& Aerodynamic Heating 3 

E N A E424 Desi gn & M anuf acture of Computer Prototypes 

ENAE425 Mechanics of Composite Structures 3 

ENAE426 Computer-Aided Structural Analysisand Design 3 

ENAE471 Aircraft Flight Testing 3 

ENAE488B Intro to Computational Structural Dynamics 3 

ENAE488M High Speed Aerodynamics 3 

ENAE488P Product Design 3 

E NA E488R Hybri d Rocket Desi gn 3 

ENAE488W Design of Remotely Piloted Vehicles 3 

ENAE499 Elective Research (RepeataUeto6credlt$ 3 



Other Requirements for theMaj or 

See C hapter 6 f or rri ni mum grade requi rements i n key prerequi si te courses for engi neeri ng students. Students shoul d f ol I ow the sequence of courses as outl i ned i n 
the aerospace engi neeri ng degree requi rements and four- year pi an. 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory. E ach student i s assi gned to a f acul ty member who must be consul ted and whose permi ssi on i s requi red for course regi strati on each semester. 
T he I i st of advi sor assi gnments i s avai I abl e i n the departments mai n off i ce. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students can be empl oyed and perform research i n any of the departments research I abs, centers, or f aci I i ti es. Parti ci pati on i n an on or off campus i nternshi p, 
co-op, or other experiential learning opportunity is strongly encouraged. See the aerospace engineering undergraduate studies staff for information on performing 
research i n a department lab and contact the Engi neeri ng Co-op and Career Services office for assistance in obtaining off campus positions or experiences. 

Honors Program 

T he A erospace E ngi neeri ng H onors Program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and provi des a ri gorous and comprehensi ve educarj on for a career i n techni cal I eadershi p 
and sci enti f i c or engi neeri ng research. H onors course work encompasses the requi red curri cul um f or al I U ni versi ty of M ary I and A erospace E ngi neeri ng students at 
an advanced level. 



At the end of their first academic year, each aerospace student is evaluated and students are invited to join the program based on their University of Maryland 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



cumulative grade point average and progress toward their degree in Aerospace Engineering. Honors sections of ENAE 283, ENAE 311, and ENAE 423 (designated 
by an 'H ' f ol I owi ng the course number) are offered as part of thi s program, i n add ti on to an honors research prqj ect, E N A E 398H , whi ch cul mi nates i n a schol arl y 
paper and presentati on at a prof essi oral conference. Students who compl etethehonorscurriculum graduate wi th A erospace H onors at the ti me of commencement 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Department is home to student chapters of the A men can I nstitute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Helicopter Society - International, and the Sigma 
Gamma Tau aerospace engi neeri ng honors soci ety . A erospace E ngi neeri ng students are al so frequent parti ci pants i n student acti vi ti es of the Soci ety f or 
Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department offers academic scholarships and recipients are chosen based on merit All admitted and current students in the department are automatically 
consi dered for these awards. N o separate appl i cati on i s requi red. The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OSFA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state and i nsti tuti oral 
f i nanci al assi stance programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. Fori nf ormati on, 
visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department offers thefollowing awards: Academic Achievement A ward for the senior with the highest overall academic average at graduation; R.M. Rivello 
Scholarship A ward and the Stephen Guthrie Memorial A ward for highest overall academic average through thej uni or year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding 
A chi evement A ward for schol arshi p and servi ce to the student chapter and the department; A men can H el i copter Soci ety Outstandi ng A chi evement A ward for 
servi ce to the student chapter and the department A meri can I nsti tute of A eronauti cs and A stronauti cs Outstandi ng A chi evement A ward for schol arshi p and servi ce 
to the student chapter and the department J ohn A nderson Schol arshi p i n A erospace E ngi neeri ng for the best paper and poster presentati on based on research 
pert ormed at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and. 

African American Studies (AASP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 Lefrak Hall, 301-405-1158 

www.bsos.umd.edu/aasp/ 

Chair: W. Falk, Acting Chair 

Associate Professors: S. Hariey 

Assistant Professors: M . Chateauvert, G. Dinwiddie, O. J ohnson, S. Madhavan, J . Richardson 

Lecturers: J . England, I . Kargbo, J . Semper 

The Major 

TheAfri can American Studies Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with two highly- regarded options: a Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration with 
emphasis on culture and history; or the Public Policy Concentration with an emphasison problem-solving, analytical decision- making, and practical applications 
of policy analysis and management ski I Is. In addition, students who elect majors in other departments can earn aCertificatein African American Studies. In 
September 2004, we i ntroduced a mi nor i n Black Women' s Studies whi ch i s a col I aborati ve program wi th the U ni versi ty 's Department of Women's Studi es. 

Courses offered i n thi s department may be found under the acronym AASP. 

Program Obj actives 

TheAfri can American Studies Department (AASD) fosters an intellectual environment in which majors learn to critically examine, analyze, interpret and discuss the 
experiences, culture, traditions, and dynamics of peopleoftheAfrican Diaspora A primary goal of the program is to develop strong critical thinking, research and 
writing ski I Is, through our curriculum, such that AASD maj ors I earn the i nterdiscirJi nary methods used in examining the socio-economic, historical, and political 
experiences and contri tuitions of peopleof African descent Our curricul um is organized and structured to introduce AASD majors to African American Studies and 
to ensure that they recei ve appropri ate ground ng i n the maj or themes of the f i el d and can pi ace these themes i n the hi stori cal context of the Af ri can D i aspora such 
that they are better prepared to address the social scientific issues of race, racism, and inequality. The program provides preparation in fundamental research 
methodol ogy so that A A SD maj ors are abl e to expl ore research questi ons wi th suffi ci ent ri gor. 

Rel evance of goal s to the mi ssi on statements and/or strategi c pi ans of the U ni versi ty , C ol I ege, or Program as appl i cabl e: 

T he U ni versi ty of M aryl and's stated goal s for undergraduates i ncl ude the abi I i ty to I earn and devel op cri ti cal reasoni ng and research ski 1 1 s; wri tten and oral 
communications ski I Is; science and quantitative reasoning, and technological fluency. AASD majors are well prepared upon graduation in these areas through the 
departments curriculum and extensive one-on-one mentoring by the AASD faculty. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

A primary goal of the program is to devel op strong critical thinking, research and writing skills, through our curricul urn, suchthatAASD majors learn the 
i nterdi sci pi i nary methods used i n exami ni rig the soci o-economi c, hi stori cal , and pol i ti cal experi ences and contri buti ons of peopl e of Af ri can descent Students 
shoul d acqui re the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

Goal 1: Competency in critical analysis: AASD students can demonstrate critical reading and analytical skills, including understanding an arguments 
maj or asserti ons and assumpti ons and how to eval uate i ts supporti ng evi dence 

Goal 2: Competency in written communications: AASD majors will demonstrate research ski I Is, integrate their own ideas with those of others and 
appl y the conventi ons of attri buti on and ci tati on correct! y. 

Goal 3: Technological competency and critical analysis: AASD majors will demonstrate an understanding of the differences among appropri ate and 
i nappropri ate methods for drawing conclusions through the use of formal analytical, or computational techniques to address real -world problems. 

Goal 4: Critical /Analytical Reasoning: AASD majors will be able to distinguish between premises and conclusions, or between data and i nferences 
from data. 

Goal 5: Competency in oral communications: AASD majors will demonstrate an understanding of the connection between writing and thinking and use 
writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking and communicating in an academic setting. They will use effective presentati on techniques including 
presentation graphics 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Admission totheMaj or 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n Af ri can A meri can Stud es must make an advi si ng appoi ntment for an ori entati on to the maj or. Students must compl ete an appl i cati on 
and attend a BSOS academic plan workshop. 

Please call theAASD office at 301-405-1158 to make an advising appointment. 

Requirements for the Major 

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better i n each course that i s to be counted toward compl eti on of degree requi rements. All rel ated or support ng courses i n 
other departments must be approved by an A A SP f acul ty advi sor. 



Foundation courses required for all maj ors 

AASP100 I ntroduction to African American Studies 

AASP101 Public Policy and the Black Community (ForrrerlyAASP300) 

AASP200 African Civilization 

AASP202 BlackCultureintheUnitedStates 

AASP297 Research Methods in African A meri can Studies (ForrrerlyAASP299R) 



CORE 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Crafts 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

43 



Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration Requirements: 

ELECT 



300/400 



AASP397 



Upper- Division Electives in African American Studies 

Seminars 

One from 
Senior Thesis 



AASP386/396 Experiential Learning /Independent Study Non-Thesis Option 
AASP395 Fundamentals of Quantitative Research 

One from 
AASP400 Directed Readings in African American Studies 
AASP402 Classic Readings in African American Studies 

Total Cretfts 



18 
3-6 



4 
3 



86-89 



Public Policy Concentration Requirements: 



AASP 301 
AASP 303 

AASP 305 

ECON 200 
ECON 201 



STAT100 
SOCY 201 



Analytic Component 

A ppl i ed Pol i cy A nal ysi s and the B I ack Communi ty (ForrrerlyAASP428l ) 

Computer A ppl i cati ons i n Af ri can A meri can Studi es (ForrrerlyAASP428P) 

Theoreti cal , M ethodol ogi cal , and Pol i cy Research I ssues i n Af ri can A meri can 

Studies (ForrrerlyAASP401) 

Pri nci pi es of M i croeconomi cs 

Pri nci pi es of M acroeconomi cs 

One additional analytical ski I Is course outside of AASP, with AASP approval 

One from 

E I ementary Stati sti cs and Probabi I i ty 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 

Equi val ent Stati sti cs Course (Sophorrvre Year) 



AASP* Policy Electives in African American Studies* 

Final Option 

One from 
AASP397 SeniorThesis 
AASP386/396 Experiential Learning/ Independent Study Non-Thesis 



6 
3-6 



Total Credits 90-93 

*Upper-division AASP decbvesinthe policy area (AASP numbers 499A-Z) or, with approval, elective courses outside of AASP 



Certificate 

T he C ertificate i n African American Studies off ers undergraduate students an excel I ent opportunity to develop a specialization in African A meri can issues while 
pursuing a major in another field. Certificate students learn about the social, economic, political and cultural history of theAfrican American peoplethrough a 
concentration of courses they plan with theAASD Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy core requirements and 
electives. 

Eami ng a Certificate in African American Studies gi ves students a competi ti ve advantage i n the j ob market by add ng greater focus to the r undergraduate 
experience 

Please see catalog section on "Certificate Programs" for more infomnati on and requi rements for a Certificatein African American Studies, 

Advising 

TheAfrican American Studies Department has mandatory advising for all AASD majors. 

U ndergraduates i n good academi c standi ng may enrol I i n the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department or obtai n more i nf ormati on about avai I abl e opti ons and servi ces 
by contacting the Undergraduate Academic Advisor, African American Studies Department, 2169 Lefrak Hall, University of Maryland, Col lege Park, MD 20742, 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



301-405-1158. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es maj ors and certi f i cate students are wel come to appl y f or undergraduate research assi start i nternshi ps as part of the AASP386, 
Experiential Learning, course T he student must be i n good standi ng and have at I east 56 cumulative credit hours to apply. 

Additionally, AASD maj ors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 or above may enroll, with department permission, i n the AASP397, Senior Thesis, course working with 
one or more CORE AASD faculty members. The student must have successfully completed AASP297, Research Methods in African American Studies. 

For more information and details, pleasecall theAASD Academic Advisor at 301-405- 1158. 

Fieldwork Opportunities 

Experiential Learning in African American Studies is an academic seminar for maj ors and certificate students who are working at internship or service sites related 
to Af ri can A meri can Studi es. Through course work and cl ass di scussi ons, students are chal I enged to i ntegrate thei r experi enti al experi ences with the 
i nterdi scipli nary study of past and present Af ri can A meri can communi ti es. To successful I y earn credi t for experi enti al I eami ng students must f ul f i 1 1 the requi rements 
at the internship or service site, participate in a bi-weekly seminar, and complete the assi gned projects aimed at bringing together academic research, reflective work, 
and professional development. 

The internship or service portion of the course requi res students to work closely with their site supervisors. Students are requi red to fulfill thejob responsibilities and 
work the number of hours per week that i s outl i ned i n thei r I eami ng proposal s. Si te supervi sors def i ne sped f i c j ob responsi bi I i ti es and assi gnments, moni tor thei r 
trai ni ng, and eval uate thei r performance at the end of the semester by compl eti ng an eval uati on f orm and submi tti ng a I etter of recommendati on to be i ncl uded i n 
their portfolios. 

Students are al so requi red to parti ci pate i n a bi - weekl y semi nar and compl ete assi gnments that exami ne the rel ati onshi p between cl assroom, work, and servi ce 
experi ences. The semi nar wi 1 1 gi ve students the opportuni ty to di scuss the; r i nternshi ps and how thei r experi ences enhance or are enhanced by thei r understandi ng of 
African A meri can studies. During the semi nar, students will share information about assi gnments and give each other feedback Students will eval uate their 
i nternshi p si tes and the rol es the si tes pi ay i n bl ack communi ti es and i n promoti ng soci al change. 

Internships 

AASP 386 -Experiential Learning in African American Studies was developed to enable majors and certificate students to formally I ink their academic studies to 
experi ences as undergraduate teachi ng assi starts and i ntems, and to do so i n a structured I eami ng context 

T he i nternshi p requi res students to work cl osel y wi th thei r si te supervi sors. Students are requi red to f ul f i 1 1 the j ob responsi bi I i ti es and work the number of hours per 
week that is outlined in their learning proposals. Site supervi sors define specific job responsibilities and assignments, monitor their training, and eval uate their 
performance at the end of the semester by compl eti ng an eval uati on form and submi tti ng a I etter of recormnendati on to be i ncl uded i n thei r portf ol i os. 

I ntems must parti ci pate i n a weekl y semi nar, and compl ete the assi gned proj ects ai med at bri ngi ng together academi c research, ref I ecti ve work, and prof essi onal 
development 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

AASD majors have the opportunity of being well prepared for leadership positions in campus organizations. AASD maj ors have historically held notable positions at 
the University of Maryland in such organizations as the NAACP, Alpha Nu Omega Sorority, Incorporated and The Black Student Union. 

TheSocietyofAfri can A meri can Studi es i s the student- run organi zati on associ ated wi th and supported by the department T he Soci ety provi des communi ty servi ce 
inlocal schools, hosts on-campus programs and events, and annually has supported a local family through its "Adopt-a-Family" program 

TheSocietysponsorsa "Saturday Freedom School" program each year which brings middle school children from a local Prince George's County Public School to 
campus for seven consecuti ve Saturdays The program provi des mentori ng and academi c support that seeks to foster the devel opment of posi ti ve B I ack i denti ti es i n 
the student parti ci pants, whi I e strengthen ng thei r academi c performance 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, pleasevisitwww.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Awards and Recognition 

Graduati ng seniors with an overal I G. PA. of a 3.2 who have earned a 3.5 G.P.A. within the major are recognized with departmental honors. 
Graduating seniors with an overall G.PA. of a 3.5 who have earned a 3.7 G.P.A. within the maj or are recognized with departmental high honors. 



Agricultural Science and Technology (AGST) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2102 Plant Sciences Building, 301-405-4355 

www.pslaumd.edu 

khunt@umd.edu 

Chair: W. Kenworthy (Professor and Chair) 

Director: D. Glenn (Assoc Prof) 

The Maj or 

AgriculturalSci ences and Technol ogy i s a sci ence based curri cul um that al I ows students to obtai n technol ogi cal ski 1 1 s i n a broad area of agri cul tural studi es. 
Agricultural Sciences andTechnology students are required to take courses in Agri cul tural Economics, Animal Sciences, Environmental Sci ence and Technol ogy, 
PI ant Sci ence and Pest Management The high number of restri cted and non- restricted el ecti ves in this curriculum all ows students the flexibility to devel op an 
academi c program compati bl e wi th thei r personal i nterests. Students maj ori ng i n thi s curri cul um are strongl y advi sed to choose two pri mary areas of 
concentration. For exampl e, students may want to devel op expertise in both Animal Scienceand Crop Science 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



I n add ti on to off eri ng thi s curri cul una the Department of PI ant Sci ence and L andscape A rchi tecture offers two other undergraduate degrees: the B achel or of 
Science (B.S.) in Plant Sciences and the Bachelor of Landscape A rchi tecture (B LA), These programs are described elsewhere in thecatalog under "Plant Sciences" 
and "Landscape A rchi tecture." 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronyms: PLSC and LARC. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

• Students will develop technical and knowledge-based ski 1 1 s i n the required areas of study. 

• Students wi 1 1 use techni cal and basi c I earned knowl edge to col I aborate, sol ve probl ems and then arti cul ate concl usi ons. 

• Students shal I da/el op ef f ecti ve communi cation skills and demonstrate the abi I i ty to present i deas wi th cl an ty to an appropri ate audi ence 

• Students will connect and bui Id relarj onshi ps wi th external groups i n the appropri ate f i el ds of study. 

Requirements for the Major 







Credits 


ANSC101 


Principles of Animal Science 


3 


ANSC 


ANSC** 


3 


ANSC220 


Livestock M anagement 


3 


ANSC340 


Health Management of Animal Populations, OR 


3-4 


PLSC420 


Pri nci pi es of PI ant Pathol ogy 




AREC250 


Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 


3 


AREC 


AREC** 


3 


BSCI105 


Pri nci pies of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II, OR 




PLSC201 


PI ant Structure and F uncti on 


4 


BSCI 


BSCI**lnsect Pest Type Course 


3 


CHEM104 


Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 


4 


CHEM 131/132 


General Chemistry 1 and Lab 


4 


ENST200 


Fundamental s of Soi 1 Sci ence 


4 


ENST 


ENST** 


3 


MATH 113 


MATH 113 or higher 


3 


PLSC389 


Internship 


3 


PLSC398 


Seminar 


1 


PLSC101 


1 ntroductory Crop Science 


4 


PLSC453 


Weed Science 


3 


PLSC 


PLSC** 


3 




PLSC, ANSC, or LARC** 


3 




Accounting, Education, Computer, or Policy 


3 


CORE 


CORE and General Agricultural Program Requirements 


99 100 


ELECT 


Electi ves 


20-21 



**Students may select any coursefs) having required hours in the area indicated. 

Advising 

The Department has mandatory faculty advising for each of its major and minor programs. Students are required to meet with their faculty advisor at I east twice a 
year. Seethe Director, Dr. D.S. Glenn (301-405-1331), or the Program Management Specialist in Undergraduate Studies in 2102 PI ant Sciences Building 
(301-405-4355) for additional information. 

Internships 

I nternshi ps wi th sci enti sts are avai I abl e at nearby federal and state agenci es. N umerous i ntemshi ps al so exi st and can be readi I y arranged for students i nterested i n 
pri vate sector enrpl oy ment 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

T he department sponsors student teams that participate in regional and national contests. These teams prepare in the foil owing areas: turf, weeds and crops, and 
I andscape contract] ng. 

AGST majors are encouraged to join the Agricultural Science Club. This club is open to all UMCP students who have an interest in agriculture and related areas. 
TheAG Science Club is affiliated with the national student organization of the Agronomy, Crop Sci ence and Soil Sci ence Society of America. The fundi on of the 
cl ub i s to bri ng together students of I ike interests to participate in Col lege, academic and social activities. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several scholarships and awards are avai I able to PLSC students. Contact the Associate Dean's office at 301-405- 2078 for additional information. The Department 
al so mai ntai ns a I i sti ng of schol arshi ps. Contact Kathy H unt i n 2102 PI ant Sci ences, 301-405-4355. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) adrrinistersall types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.fi nanci alaid. umd.edu. 



Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) 

Cdlegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2200 Symons Hall, 301-405-1291 

www.arec.umd.edu 

undergraduateprogrann@arec.unnd. edu 

Chair: L. Olson 

Professors: R. Chambers, R.Just E. Lichtenberg, R. Lopez, L. Lynch, K. McConnell, W. Musser, M. Nerlove 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Associate Professors: A. AlberiniJ. Hanson, H. Leathers, K. Leonard, D. Lipton, D. Parker, R. Williams 

Assistant Professors: V. Hoffmann, C. Towe 

Instructors: D. Johnson (Farm Management Specialist) 

Affiliate Professors: P. Cramton, M. Cropper 

Adjunct Professors: J . Chavas, J . Hoddinott, J . List, J . Quiggin 

Adjunct Associate Professors: K. McNew 

Professors Emeriti: F. Bender, N. Bockstael, E. Brown, J. Cain, J. Curtis, P. Foster, I. Hardie, D. H ueth, J. Moore, G. Stevens, I. Strand, D. Tuthill 

The Major 

Agricultural and Resource Economics majors complete a set of prerequisite courses, a core of classes offered by the Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Department and one or more f i el ds compri sed of sel ected courses from outsi de the department The core i ncl udes courses i n economi c reasoni ng, agri busi ness 
management environmental and resource policy, agricultural policy, economic development, and analytical methods. The program permits students flexibility in 
choosi ng f i el ds to f i t thei r career i nterests. M aj ors must compl ete one and are strongl y encouraged to compl ete two f i el ds. The curri cul um bal ances breadth and 
depth, and I ets students devel op academi c ski 1 1 s i n two or more areas. The program provi des a good f oundati on for careers i n economi cs, resource or envi ronmental 
policy, agribusiness, and international agriculture. Students are also able to mi nor in Agri cultural and Resource Economics. 

DouHeMajcrs 

T he department features a doubl e maj or wi th Spani sh for students i nterested i n careers i n mul ti nati onal agri busi ness f i rms or i nternati onal agenci es. 1 1 features a 
double major with Government and Politics for students interested in law school. Both can be completed within 120 credits. Other double maj ors are possible in 
consultation with an advisor. 

Prop-am Learning Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program, students shod d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

• An understandi ng of economi c terms and concepts. 

• A n abi I i ty to draw i nf erences from data. 

• A knowledge of relevant laws, institutions, and policies. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

C recite 
Prerequisite C curses 

ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics 4 

ECON201 Principles of Macroeconomics 4 

ECON306 I ntemnedi ate Microeconomic Theory 3 

ECON321 Economic Statistics, OR 3 

B M GT230B usi ness Stati sti cs 
MATH220 Elementary Calculus I, OR 3 

MATH140 Calculus I 

STAT100 Elementary Statistjcsand Probability, OR 3 

MATH 111 Introduction to Probability 

Major CoreCourses 

Seven of these courses rrust be successfully completed. 

AREC404 Applied PriceAnalysis 3 

AREC405 Economics of Production 3 

AREC425 Economics of the Food Sector 3 

AREC427 Economicsof Commodity Marketing Systems 3 

AREC433 Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 3 

AREC445 Agricultural Development in theThird World 3 

AREC453 Economicsof Natural Resource Use 3 

AREC455 Economicsof Land Use 3 

AREC484 Introduction to Econometrics in Agri culture 3 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

.___-,„2 Computer-Based Analysis in Agricultural and Resource , 

Economics 
AREC400s an Y other 3 credit 400 level AREC coursemay be substituted with 

permission of advisor 

Fields 

All maj ors must compl ete one of the following fields. Two are strongly 
encouraged. 

Business Management 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BMGT221 Principles of Accounting II 3 

BMGT340 Business Finance 3 

BMGT350 Marketing Principles 3 

BMGT364 Management and Organization 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



BMGT380 Business Law I 



BM 



Other 300 level BMGT courses my be substituted, with 

GT300s P ertr ' ss i ono f ao ^ sor - (TheAREC departmzTtcannotauthoriie 
sludentstDtaheBMGTcoursesthatarereslriclEdtDbusiness 
rrBJors.) 



Total Credits 18 

Acri cultural Science 

Six (or rmre) courses in agricultural science, including: 

ENBE110 Introduction to Biological Resources Engineering 1 

ENBE200 Fundamentals of Agricultural Mechanics 3 

PLSC100 Introduction to Horticulture, OR 4 

PL SC 101 I ntroducti on to C rop Sci ence 

ENST105 Soil and Environmental Quality 3 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Science 3 

Other courses in agricultural science, chosen in consultation 
AGRI SCI with an advisor. Substitutions to the above listed courses may 4 

be made with the permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 18 



Food Production 

Six courses from the following list 
PHY S117 I ntroducti on to Physi cs, OR 

PHY S121Fundamentals of Physics 
BSCI105 Principlesof Biology 
B SC 1 223 I ntroducti on to M i crobi ol ogy 
NFSC100 Elements of Nutrition 
NFSC112 FoodScienceandTechnology 
NFSC430 Food M icrobiology 
NFSC431 Food Quality Control 

Other courses related to food science can be substituted 

with permssion of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



Environmental and Resource Policy 

Six courses from the following list 

ECON481 Environmental Economics 

ANTH450 Theory and Practiceof Environmental Anthropology 

HIST405 Environmental History 

G E OG 372 Remote Sensi ng 

GEOG373 Geographic Information Systems 

GV PT273 I ntroducti on to E nvi ronmental Pol i ti cs 

GVPT306 Global Ecopolitics 

Other courses related to environmental policies or sciences 
can besubstituted with permssion of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



ECON305 
ECON315 
ECON340 
GEOG422 
GVPT200 
GVPT350 
ENST440 
PLSC303 



I ntEmational Agriculture 

Six courses from the following list 

Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

E conomi c D evel opment of U nderdevel oped A reas 3 

International Economics 3 

Population Geography 3 

International Political Relations 3 

International Relations in theThird World 3 

Crops, Soil sand Civil izati on 3 

I ntemati oral C rop Producti on 3 

Other courses related to international econorrics, business, 
politics, or agriculture can be substituted with permssion of 
advisor. 

Total Credits 18 



Political Process 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



GVPT 



Any six courses in government and politics, chosen with 
pemni ssi on of the advi sor. 

Total Credits 



18 
18 



Adi/ancedDecreePreperaBon 

Six (or more) courses from the following list: 

ECON407 Advanced Macroeconomics 

ECON414 GameTheory 

ECON415 Strategic Behavior and Incentives 

ECON422 Quantitative Methods in Economics I 

ECON423 Quantitative Methods in Economics II 

ECON425 Mathematical Economics 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 

MATH240 Introduction to Li near Algebra 

MATH241 Calculus III 

Other courses in mathematics, statistics, or econometrics 
may be substituted with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



Student Desicfiecl Fidel 

This field requires a written proposal listing at least six 
courses total i ng at I east 18 credits. The proposal must be 
submitted to the Undergraduate Committee of theAREC 
department Commi ttee approval must be obtai ned 30 or 18 

more credi t hours before graduati on. A student desi gned f i el d 
may be used to study a f orei gn I anguage as part of the 
AREC curriculum 

Total Credits 18 



Other Requirements for theMajor 

A 1 1 courses must be passed wi th a grade of C or better to count towards prerequi si te courses, maj or core courses, or f i el d requi rements. 
grade f or whi ch the U ni versi ty awards 2 or more qual i ty poi nts i n cal cul ati ng G PA . 



'C or better" means any 



Requi rements for theMinor 

Three minors exist in AREC, Agribusiness Economics, Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development and Environmental Economics and Policy. 
Requi rements are I i sted bel ow: 



Credits 



A cj-i business Economics 

AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
AREC404 Applied PriceAnalysis 
AREC405 Economics of Production 
AREC425 Economics of Food Sector 
AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options 

Another AREC coursecan be substituted for one of the courses 
listed with perm ssi on of the UndergraduateAdvisor. 

Total Credits 



15 



AREC250 
AREC365 
AREC433 

AREC445 

AREC453 



Resource and Acpi cultural Policy in Economic Development 

E I ements of A gri cul tural and Resource E conomi cs 

World Hunger, Population and Food Supplies 

Food and A gri cul tural Policy 

Agricultural Development, Population Growth, and the 

Environment 

Natural Resources and Public Policy 

Another AREC coursecan be substituted for one of the course 
listed with permission of the UndergraduateAdvisor. 

Total Credits 



15 



Environmental Economics and Policy 

AREC240 Introduction to Economics and the Environment 3 

AREC332 Introduction to Natural Resource Pol icy 3 

AREC382 Computer-basedAnalysisinAgricultural and Resource Economics 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 218 



AREC445 Agricultural Devdopment, Population Growth, and the ^ 

Environnrent 
AREC455 Economicsof Land Use 3 

Another AREC coursecan be substituted for one of the course 

listed with perrrission ofUndergraduateAdvisor. 

Total C recite 15 

Advising 

B ecause the program i s f I exi bl e, advi si ng i s mandatory every semester. A ppoi ntments may be made i n Room 2200 Sy nuns H al 1 , 301-405- 1291. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

AREC offers scholarships to AREC undergrads. These awards are based on merit and are in addition to any funding received from the campus or from the col lege 
Currently, scholarshipawardsareavailabletothefull-timeAREC majors with the highest G PA s. They are determined on a semester basis and depend on the 
avai I abi I i ty of funds. Schol arshi p awardees are requi red to conduct themsel ves i n accordance wi th the rul es and regul ati ons of the U ni versi ty. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

Awards and Recognition 

Schol arshi ps honori ng A rthur and Paul i ne Sei denspi nner and Ray M urray are avai I abl e Contact a faculty advi sor for more i nf omnati on, 301-405- 1291. 

American Studies (AM ST) 

College of Arte and Humanities 

1102 Holzapfe! Hall, 301-405-1354 

www.amst.urrd.edu 

Chair: N. Struna 

Professors: J . Caughey, R. Kelly 

Associate Professors: M. LounsburyJ. Paoletti, S. Parks, L. Shinagawa, M. Sies, P. Williams-Forson 

Assistant Professors: J . Farman, C. Hanhardt J . M cCune 

Lecturers: M. Brady, C. LaRoche, G. Metcalf 

Aff i I iate Professors: J. Auerbach, I. Berlin (DistUniv Prof), A. Bolles, S. Brower, C. Caramello, E. Chambers, W. Cohen, B. Dill, J. Donawerth, W. Falk, B. 

FinkelsteinJ. Greene, R. Harrison, M. HowlandJ. Klumpp, M. Leone, R. Levine, S. Michel, C. Moses, B. Pearson, C. Peterson, S. Ray, B. Richardson, G. Ritzer 

(DistUniv Prof), D. Rosenfelt, P. Shackel, B. Shneidemnan, S. Simpson, M. Smith, M.Washington, D. Wyatt, R. Zambrana, M.Zilfi 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: R. Ater, S. Barkin, R. Bauer, M. Bell, E. Barkley Brown, C. EadesJ. Freidenberg, D. Freund, M. Geores, S. Giovacchini, I. Goumay, 

M. Graber, S. Harley, S. Kim K. King, M. Kirschenbaum, M. Lindermann, D. Linebaugh, L. Mar, K. McAdams, A. Moss, R. Muncy, Z. Nunes, A. Rodriguez, L. 

Rowland, D. SiciliaJ. Sullivan, O. Wang 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: F. Carpenter, M. Chateauvert, V. MacDonald, R. OntiverosJ. Richardson, M. Rowley 

Adjunct Professors: B. Finn 

Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Hughes 

The Major 

A meri can Studi es provi des students wi th a f I exi bl e, coherent program of study that focuses on the cul tures of everyday I i f e and the cul tural construed on of i denti ty 
and difference in Americans' lives, past and present TheB. A. degree prepares students for graduate work or careers in fields such as law, government and social 
policy, media, non-profitand social justice organizations, cultural institutions, education, and business. There are opportunities for internships, research, and 
departmental honors. Faculty advisors assist each studentto plan an individualized course of study tailored to hi sor her interests and goals. Courses offered by the 
Department of A meri can Studi es may be found under the acronym A M ST. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to engage fullywiththecurriculurnfaculty, and other students. U pon compl eti on of the degree program, students will have demonstrated an 
understand ng of mul ti pi e di mensi ons of di versi ty and possess the abi I i ty to answer research questi ons by usi ng appropri ate A meri can Studi es methodol ogi es. 
Students who complete an extracurricular, semester-long experience (eg., internship, service I earning, study abroad, independent study) will have demonstrated the 
abi I i ty to anal yze cul ture, cul tural processes, and cul tural di f f erences F or a compl ete I i sti ng of program outcomes, contact the department 

Requirements for the Major 

T he A meri can Studi es maj or requi res a mi ni mum of 42 credi ts, i ncl udi ng 24 i n A meri can Studi es, 6 credi ts of I ower I evel A meri cani st courses taken outsi de the 
department and 12-24 credi ts i n a focus area or mi nor taken outsi de the A meri can Studi es department. At I east 27 of the credi ts for the maj or must be i n 300 or 400 
level courses, with at I east twelve of these credits at the 400 1 evel. A gradeof C or better is requi red in each of the courses making up the maj or (includes those 
taken outsi de the department such as the A meri cani st courses and those taken for the mi nor or focus area) . 

Foundation Courses (15 credits) 

Course requi rements i n thi s area are i ntended to provi de a foundati on i n A meri can Studi es and the study of A meri can cul ture and society in other disciplines. 
Courses taken for CORE may be double-counted towards the maj or. 

Crafts 

A M ST201 I ntroductj on of A meri can Studi es 3 

AMST340 Introduction to History, Theories and Methods in American Studies 3 
One 3-credt course from 3 

AMST203 Popular Culture in America 
AMST204 Film and American Cul ture Studies 
AMST205 Material Aspects of A meri can Life 
AMST207 Contemporary American Cultures 
AMST212 Diversity in American Culture 
AMST260 A meri can Cul ture in the Information Age 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



FOUNDATION FoundationcoursesoutsidetheAMST department 6 

Any two lower-level courses selected from an approved list. L ist is 
available through the department 

Advanced Requirements (15 credits) 

Course requi rements in this area are i ntended to offer students the opportuni ty to expl ore sel ected topi cs i n A meri can Studi es i n greater depth and to appl y what they 
have I earned i n thei r f oundati on courses. A 1 1 of these courses must be at the 300 or 400 1 evel . A meri can Studi es advanced requi rements may be sati sf i ed i n one of 
two ways: 

Option A: 

. Four400-level AMST courses, not including AM ST 450 (12 credits) 

• AMST 450 Semi narinAMST orAMST 388 Honor Thesis (3 credits) 

Option B: 

. Three 400-level AMST courses not including AMST 450 (9 credits) 

• AMST 386-1 ntemship, 398-1 ndependent Study or 388-Honors Thesis Research (3 credits) 

• AMST 450 Seminar in AMST orAMST 388 Honors Thesis Research (3 credits) 

F ecus Area Requi rements (12-24 Credits) 

T he focus area requi rements rei nf orce the essenti al i nterdi scipli nary nature ofourfield, offering students a range of opti ons to connect thei r A meri can Studi es 
coursework with a related discipline or field. All focus area courses must betaken outside the American Studies Department. 

Minor or Certificate option (15-24 credits, at least 9 at the 300 or 400levd) 

Successful compl etionofaminoror certi f i cate from an approved I i st (avai I abl e through the department) . U ni versi ty approved mi nors range f rom 15 to 24 credi ts; 
certificate programs requi re 21-24 credits. The derjartrnmt or program admnistering the ni nor determ^ and in some cases, student 

eligibility. 

Focus Area Option (12 credits, all at the 300 or 400 level) 

Successful compl eti on (C or better) of four upper I evel courses outsi de the department that enabl e the student to construct a coherent focus area compl ementary to 
A meri can Studi es. A focus area may be i n a si ngl e department or sel ected from two or more departments (exampl es avai I abl e through the department) . Students 
shoul d not pursue a focus i n a department or program that offers a sui tabl e mi nor or certi f i cate. A n A meri can Studi es advi sor must approve course sel ecti on wi thi n 
the focus area i n advance, as part of mandatory advi si ng each semester. 



Requirements for theMinor 
Minor in U.S Latina/o Studies 

Col I ege of A its and H umani ti es 
1208 Cole, 301-405-2931 
www. umd.edu/wmst 

The minor, which requi res a total of 15 credits, is intended for students who wish to develop a specialization in U.S. Latina/o Studies alongside their degree pursuits. 
It is optimal for students engaged i n work with U.S. Latina/o communities in a variety of professions and academic fields including history, literature, education, 
urban studies and planning, health care, social services, business, government public policy, among others. 

Requirements (15 credits) 

A. Two Lower- Level Foundation Courses (6 credits) -All students are requi red to take the two foundational courses: 

USLT 201/U.S. Latinafo Studies I : An Historical Overview to 1960s 

USLT 202/US. Latin^o Studies II: A Contemporary Overview, 1960s- Present. 

B. One Upper-Level Course (3 credits) 

All students are requi red to take the upper- 1 evel course: USLT 488/Seni or Seminar in U.S. 
Latina/o Studies 

C. Two Upper Level ElectiveCourses (6 credits) 

In addition to the three requi red foundational courses, students will select two elective courses in consultation withtheUSLT advisor: 

Onefromeachof two of the foil owing categories: Humanities, Social Sciences, Languages, and Education. 

For these el ecti ves, students can choose USLT 498/Special Topics in U.S. Latina/o Studies and from a I ist of pre-approved courses offered through other 
departments or programs. Elective courses will expl ore the historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological dimensions of U.S. Latina/o experiences. These 
courses will beapproved by the faculty advisory committee. Additional courses that include comparative U.S. Latino content suchasinLASC orGVPT, would be 
eligible for inclusion in the mi nor with the approval of the USLT advisor. 

To make an appoi ntment to expl ore or deel are a rri nor, go to www.arhu. umd.edu/undergraduate/academi cs/mi nors 

Advising 

Departmental faculty advi sing is mandatory for all majors every semester. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students wi 1 1 compl ete a research prqj ect f or the seni or semi nar, A M ST 450, and they are encouraged to gai n add ti onal research expert ence with indivi dual f acul ty 
members and advanced graduate students or i n one of the Department's Worki ng Groups. See the Department web si te for more i nf omnati on about research: 
www.amst.urrd.edu. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Internships 

J uni ors and seniorswitha2.5GPAor better may appl y 3 credi ts of i nternshi p ( A M ST 386) to the 42 credi ts requi red f or the maj or. Students must consul t wi th a 
f acul ty advi sor about a prospecti ve i nternshi p pri or to regi strati on and compl ete and si gn an i nternshi p contract Alii nternshi ps must have an approved academi c 
component For further information, contact Professor Jo Paoletti (jpaol@umd.edu). 

Honors Prop-am 

T he A meri can Studi es H onors Program offers outstandi ng students an opportuni ty to add di sti ncti on to thei r academi c records by undertaki ng an i ndependent 
research proj ect i n an area of parti cul ar i nterestThe program i s i ntended to al I ow students prepari ng for graduate study or a prof essi oral career to appl y and further 
develop their research, analytic, and writing ski I Is in an independent project of their own design, in consultation with a faculty mentor. Students are encouraged to 
make use of the ri ch resources of the Washi ngton- B al ti more area, i ncl udi ng maj or research i nsti tuti ons such as the Smi thsoni an I nsti tuti on, the L i brary of Congress, 
and the National Archives. 

Studentsfulfill the honors program requirements through a combination of honors-designated coursework (6 credit hours) and an honors thesis (6 credit hours). Thesei 
These courses and credits failwt/i/n both theAmerican Studies maj or requi rementsand the University's 120-creditunderg'aduatedeyee requi rement. 
Students who undertake American Studies Honors are excused from the senior seminar, AM ST 450. 

Eligibility: Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA atthetimeof entry into the program, and must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. To graduate with 
Honors in American Studies, students must havea 3.0 cumulativeGPA and at least a 3.2 GPA in their maj or coursework. 

Application: Students who wish to pursue Honors work should submit a letter of intent to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The letter should identify the core 
f acul ty member who has agreed to approve course work and supervi se the research and wri ti ng of the honors thesi s. 

Requirements: The Honors Program gives students a substantial amount of flexibility in fulfill ingthetwo basic requirements: 6 credit hours of honors-designated 
coursework; and 6 credit hours of AM ST 388, HonorsThesis and Research. 

To fulfill the coursework requirements (6 credit hours), students may: 

.TakeAMST418H 

• Take an upper I evel H onors- seed on course i n a department consonant with the students maj or focus areas. 

• Take an upper I evel U ni versi ty H onors course. 

• Negotiate an Honors Option Contract with the instructor of an upper division course in American Studies or i n a department consonant with the students 
maj or focus areas. 

• Take a graduate course i n A meri can Studi es or i n a department consonant wi th the students maj or focus areas. 

All coursework not taken in an Honors section, in a University Honors course, orinagraduatecourse should have an Honors Option Contract completed, inorderto 
ensure that the students transcri pt ref I ects that the work cam es H onors credi t 

To f ul f i 1 1 the thesi s requi rements, students wi 1 1 : 

• Register for 6 credit hours of AM ST 388, Honors Thesi sand Research. Customarily this is spread across the students senior year, with 3 credit hours taken 
each term 

• Present the thesi s to a commi ttee composed of the f acul ty mentor and another department f acul ty member. A t the sati sf actory concl usi on of the thesi s 
presentati on, the commi ttee will noti f y the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es that the thesi s has bean read, eval uated and approved. The D i rector of 
U ndergraduate Studi es wi 1 1 then noti f y the H onors C ol I ege of the successful compl eti on of the i ndi vi dual H onors degree program 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department awards the Davi d E 1 1 i s Schol arshi p annual ly. For i nf ormati on and requi rements, contact the Department of f i ce (301-405- 1354) . 

Awards and Recognition 

T he Department recogni zes outstandi ng accompl i shments by undergraduates at i ts commencement ceremony. M onetary pri zes are awarded to the graduate wi th the 
hi ghest cumul ati ve G PA , to the author of the best H onors thesi s, and to a graduate who has provi ded excepti oral servi ce to the campus or the communi ty . 

ANIMAL SCIENCES (ANSC) 

College of Apiculture and Natural Resources 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373 

www.ansc.umd.edu 

ansc@umd.edu 

Chair: T. Porter 

Professors: R. Erdman, R. Kohn, I. Mather, M. Ottinger, R. Peters, T. Porter, M. Vamer, I. Vijay 

Associate Professors: C. Angel, J. Doerr, I. Estevez, T. Hartsock, C. Keefer, W. Stricklin, L. Woods, N.Zirrmermann 

Assistant Professors: B. Bequette, A. Burk, I . Hamza, F. Siewerdt, J . Song, L. Taneyhill, M . Updike 

Lecturers: C. Hakenkamp 

Affiliate Professors: S. Schoeni an 

Professors Emeriti: L. Douglass (Prof Emeritus), J . Heath, J . Majeskie, J . Soares, J . Vandersall, D. Westhoff, W. Williams 

The Maj or 

The Department of Animal and A vi an Sciences provides a chal I enging program for academical I y talented students interested in the appl icationof biology and 
technol ogy to the care, management and study of domesti c and aquati c ani mal s. I n addi ti on to emphasi zi ng the tradi ti onal farm sped es of dai ry and beef cattl e, 
sheep, swi ne and poul try, our program i ncl udes opti ons i n equi ne studi es, I aboratory ani mal management, and sci ences whi ch prepare students for veteri nary or 
graduate school. Animal sci ences maj ors explore a wide range of subj ects -from fundamental biology to ani mal nutrition, physiology and genetics- while 
i ntegrati ng sci ence and economi cs i nto ani mal management 

Our department offers B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. One-third of our ani mal sci ences seniors enter veteri nary school, while others go on to graduate school. Our 
graduates al so pursue a vari ety of careers such as research techni ci ans, sal es or marked ng representati ves, or ani mal producers. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Our up-to-date facilities in the Animal Sciences Center, which opened in 1991, include new classrooms, an inviting lecture hall and a large social area for students. 
T he newl y constructed teachi ng I abs, ani mal rooms and a surgery sui te are I ocated adj acent to the teachi ng farm where horses, sheep, beef and dai ry cattl e are 
maintained. 

Requirements for theMaj or 

A ni mal Sci ences prepares students for veteri nary school , graduate school and careers i n research, sal es and marketi ng, bi otechnol ogy , aquacul ture, and ani mal 
production. The curricula apply the principles of biology and technology to the care, management and study of dairy and beef cattle, horses, fish, sheep, swine, and 
poultry. Students complete the Ani mal Sci ences core courses and choose a specialization area: Animal Biotechnology, Animal Care and Management, Equine 
Studies, Laboratory Ani mal Management and Sciences/Professional Option to prepare for admission to graduate, veterinary, pharmacy, nursing or medical schooPleas 
Please ndbtinere i s a $50 per course fee for A ni mal Sci ence L aboratory courses. 



ANIMAL SCI ENCES CORE 

All undergraduates majoring in Animal Sciences mist _ ^ te 

complete the following course requirements: 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC103 Principlesof Animal Sciences Laboratory 1 

ANSC211 Animal Anatomy 3 

ANSC212 Animal Physiology 3 

ANSC214 Animal Physiology Laboratory 1 

ANSC314 ComparatJveAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC327 MolecularandQuantJtatJveAnimal Genetics 3 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 4 

BSCI223 General Microbiology 4 

CHEM 131/132 General Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 



MATH220 
MATH 140 



One from 

Elementary Calculus I 
Calculus I 



One from 
AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

ECON200 Principles of Micro-Economics 



ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK 

All students must complete 30-40 credits in oneofthe 
following six options. 



1. ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT (01O4A) 
Required Courses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

A N SC446 Physi ol ogy of M arrmal i an Reproducti on 3 

A N SC447 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on L aboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the following courses: 

A N SC420 Critical Thi nki ng i n A ni mal Sci ences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Ani mal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnimal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses: 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 

A N SC220 Li vestock M anagement 

ANSC232 Horse Management 

ANSC240 Dairy Cattle Management 

ANSC255 Introduction to Aquacul ture 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 

ANSC305 Companion Ani mal Care 

ANSC413 Laboratory Ani mal Management 



2. EQUINE STUDIES (COOK) Required Courses 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC330 Equine Science 3 

ANSC315 Applied Animal Nutrition 3 

A N SC446 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on 3 

A N SC447 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on L aboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

A N SC420 Critical Thi nki ng i n A ni mal Sci ences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



3. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (CO&D) 
Required Courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC413 LabAnimal Management 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

A N SC446 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on 3 

A N SC447 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on L aboratory 1 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the following courses: 

A N SC420 Critical Thi nki ng i n A ni mal Sci ences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 



Plus take3 credits fromthe foil owing courses 
A N SC220 Li vestock M anagement 

ANSC255 Introduction to A quaculture 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 



4. & 5. SCI ENCES & COMBINED AG AND VET SCI 
(01O4E andl299D) Required Courses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology or 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry ll/Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 General Chemistry and Energetics 2 

PHY S121 F undamental s of Physi cs I 4 

PHY S122 F undamental s of Physi cs 1 1 4 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



A N SC446 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on 3 

A N SC447 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on L aboratory 1 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

Plus take3 credits fromthefollowing courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC240 Dairy Cattle Management 2 

ANSC255 Introduction to A quaculture 3 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 3 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 3 

For additional information concerning veterinary school 
applications, pleasecontacttiieK. Fddrran, VMRCVM, 8705 
Greenrread Dr., University of Maryland, CollegePark, MD 
20742-3711, 301-314-6820, kfddrran@urrd.edu. 

6. ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (OKMF) Required 
Corses 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombinant DNA Laboratory 3 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry ll/Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 General Chemistry and Energetics 2 



Plus take3 credits ffomthe foil owing courses 
A N SC220 Li vestock M anagement 

ANSC255 Introduction to A quaculture 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 



Plus take 9 credits from the following courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

A N SC420 Critical Thi nki ng i n A ni mal Sci ences 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

A N SC446 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on 3 

A N SC447 Physi ol ogy of M ammal i an Reproducti on L aboratory 1 

A N SC450 A ni mal B reedi ng PI ans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 Applied Animal Behavior 3 



Plus take3 credits ffomthe foil owing courses 
ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

BSCI380 Comparative BioinfomnarJcs 

BSCI 413 Recombi nant DNA 



Other Requirements for theMaj or 

Animal sciences majors select one of six options as an area of specialization: 

Sci ence/Professi oral - Prepares students for admission to veterinary or medical school sand/or graduate school. Graduate school study can open the door to an 
exciting research career in specialty areas of animal or biological sci ences such as genetics, nutrition, physiology or eel I biology. Thecurriculum emphasizes 
advanced courses i n the bi ol ogi cal and physi cal sci ences and i ncl udes al I the pre- veteri nary and pre- medi ci ne requi rements. 

C ombi ned Ag & Vet Sci - A combi ned degree program i s avai I abl e to students who gai n admi ssi on to veteri nary school pri or to compl erj ng thei r bachel or's degree. 
Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources students who have completed at I east ninety hours, including all college and university requirements, areawardeda 
bachel or of science degree upon successful completion of at I east thirty semester hours in an accredited collegeof veterinary medicine. Early planning with your 
advisor is encouraged if you choose this option. 

Equine Studies- Offers hands-on learning opportunities in the area of equine science and management The Department of Animal and Avian Sciences at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers undergraduate students the opportuni ty to emphasi ze on horses whi I e pursui ng a B achel or of Sci ence degree i n A ni mal Sci ence. 
Students may take equi ne courses that expl ore a wi de range of topi cs i ncl udi ng anatomy and physi ol ogy, nutri rj on, reproducti on, exerci se, I aw, i nsurance, facilities, 
heal th and di sease, pasture management, and more. Our courses are desi gned to provi de val uabl e hands-on I eami ng experi ences to better prepare students to be future 
leaders in the horse industry as well as other industries. In addition, A NSC students may take one or more equine courses within the Institute of Applied Agriculture. 

Animal Biotechnology- TheAni mal Biotechnology option is a relatively new addition to our program It combines the basic requi red animal sci ence courses with a 
focus on bi ol ogy and technol ogy. Thi s opti on has a heavy emphasi s on sci ence courses, to prepare students for a prof essi onal career. Some of the career opti ons with 
thi s track i ncl ude an i ndustry career i n ani mal bi otechnol ogy; a graduate degree i n bi otechnol ogy ( ei ther M S and/or PH D ) ; or a prof essi onal degree and career 
(Veterinary or Human Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy.) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 224 



Animal Care& Management- Is designed for students whose career plans include animal management, production and the marketing of animal products. The 
curri cul um provi des basi c courses i n geneti cs, nutri ti on, physi ol ogy and reproducti on whi I e al I owi ng students to focus on the management of one parti cul ar 
livestock species. You will be encouraged to supplement academic work with practical experience by completing an internship. Dairy science students, for example, 
intern at local farms where they participate in decisions about breeding, feeding, health practices, milk production and other aspects of herd management This 
opti on wi 1 1 prepare you for ownershi p or management posi ti ons wi th dai ry , I i vestock or poul try producti on enterpri ses; posi ti ons wi th marketi ng and processi ng 
organi zati ons; breed associ ati ons; and posi ti ons i n agri busi ness f i el ds such as sal es of feed, phamnaceuti cal products and agri cul tural equi pment. G raduates al so 
work with state and federal agencies. 

Laboratory Animal Management- Prepares students for careers in the operation and management of I aboratory animal facilities connected with the biotechnology 
industry. Course work in nutrition, reproduction and environmental management is combined with practical I earning to provide future managers with tools they will 
need. Asa graduate, you may pursue careers wi th state or federal agenci es; wi th pri vate i ndustry i n the management and operati on of I aboratory ani mal producti on; 
and wi th i nstructi onal or i nvesti gati onal f aci I i ti es. 

Advising 

A ni mal sci ences maj ors are assi gned a f acul ty advi sor to assi st wi th program and course sel ecti on, as wel I as to hel p students take advantage of the many 
non-classroom opportunities in the Washington, D.C. area Faculty members have special ties in all areas of animal sciences, as well as veterinary medicine, and 
bri ng practi cal appl i cati ons to the cl assroom, creati ng a ri ch I eami ng experi ence for students. 

Face to face advi sing is mandatory. Each student will be assi gned to a faculty advi sor to assist in planning hi sor her academic program For information or 
appoi ntment: 1415A A ni mal Sci ences Center, 301-405- 1373. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Because it is part of a land grant university, the Department of Animal and Avian Sciences also has responsibility for research and technology transfer to the ani mal 
i ndustry throughout M aryl and. D uri ng undergraduate study, students are encouraged to conduct i ndependent research i n f acul ty I aboratori es on campus or at the 
nearby U. S. Department of Agriculture Bel tsvi lie Agricultural Research Center. 

Internships 

Students are encouraged to gai n practi cal ani mal management experi ence by pursui ng i ntemshi ps. Students have compl eted i ntemshi ps in I ocati ons rangi ng f rom the 
area around the University, to cattle farms in the Midwest, agri busi ness firms in California, and a zoo in Frankfurt, Germany. Many animal sci ences students use the 
summer to gai n addi ti onal appl i ed experi ence i n ani mal sci ences, veteri nary medi ci ne or agri busi ness. 

Honors Program 

Students admitted to the AGNR Honors Program are eligible to take3 - 6 credits of Honors Thesis Research within theANSC Department (ANSC388). Undergraduate 
U ndergraduate honors thesis research is conducted under the direction of an AGNR faculty member in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the College of 
AGNR Honors Program The thesiswill be defended before a f acul ty committee. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Theclubs and organi zati ons affiliated with the Animal Sci ence department allow ample opportunities for leadership, development hands-on animal experience, and 
fun! 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Gamma Rho is a social/professional fraternity that has been a training ground for leaders in the agri culture and life sciences community si nee it was 
established atCol lege Park in 1928. AGR has a rich tradition of alumni contacts with over 50,000 brothers nationwide, including over 700 brothers in the 
Washington area alone. AGR men are leaders in various clubs within the col lege and the fraternity is an active member of both the I nter-fraternity Council (IFC) 
and theAg Student Council. Alpha Gamma Rho stresses scholarship, leadership and fellowship, and it is well respected among Greek organizations because of their 
no pi edgi ng, substance free, schol ars envi ronment I n addi ti on, the chapter house onPri nceton Avenue offers the opportuni ty to I i ve wi th brothers who are taki ng the 
same cl asses and share many of the same i nterests which makes i t much easi er to f i nd a ni che on such a I arge campus. 

Alpha Zeta 

A I pha Zeta i s an agri cul tural prof essi onal honor soci ety whose membershi p i s sel ected from undergraduate and graduate students excel I i ng i n schol arshi p, 
leadership, character, and service Organizational events include coordinating the Partners in Education program with the USDA Agriculture Research Service, 
Bel tsvi lie Area, fund raising activities, community service projects, awards and recognition programs, and an annual studentyfaculty/alumni banquet. A popular 
annual event is coordinating a Field Day for young children at the nearbyN ati onal Agricultural Research Visitor Center at Bel tsvi lie. 

Animal Husbandry Club 

TheAnimal Husbandry Club at the University of Maryland, College Park, provi des opportuni ties for students to gain ani mal handling experi ence and build 
i nterpersonal rel ati onshi pskills, whilegi ven the encouragement to excel ! A cti vi ti es and experi ences sped f i cal I y desi gned for students of di versi f i ed i nterests i n 
ani mal agri cul ture are provi ded, i ncl udi ng experi ences wi th many di ff erent domesti c sped es. M embershi p i s open to al I undergraduate students i nterested i n getti ng 
hands-on experi ence working with dairy, beef, sheep or swi ne, and I earning more about general animal sciences. Activities include theAg Day Dairy and Livestock 
Shows, Harvest Stomp/Fall Festival, fitting of animals for the annual WyeAngusSale, and other activities working with dairy animals. Onecangainfurther 
leadership skills by holding an office. Each Spring, el ecti ons are held for President, Vice-President Secretary, Treasurer, and Historian. 

Collegiate 4~H 

Many colleges and universities have Collegiate 4-H clubs. Collegiate4-H is an organization that provides its members with a sense of identity on campus, enriches 
thei r I i ves through group proj ects and recreati on, and devel ops conf i dence and I eadershi pskills. Clubs provi de servi ce and support to their I ocal and state 4- H 
programs, such as servi ng as j udges and conducti ng trai ni ng workshops. They are al so a servi ce and soci al group for campus students. Col I egi ate 4- H i s open to al I 
col I ege students who wi sh to support youth and the 4- H program 1 1 i s not necessary to have pri or 4- H experi ence, onl y to have an i nterest i n the 4- H i deal s and i n 
servi ng your conrmjnit vtfww.colleqiate4h.org/ 

Sigma Alpha 

SigmaAlpha is a national professional agricultural sorority. Theobjectiveof the sorority is to promote its members in all facets of agri cul ture and to strengthen the 
f ri endshi ps among them M embers stri ve f or achi evement i n schol arshi p, I eadershi p, servi ce, and to further the devel opment of women pursui ng careers i n 
agri cul ture Si gma A I pha works to promote agri cul ture, and women's rol e, on our campus, i n our corrmuni ty and throughout the state. Activities ind ude attendi ng 
regional and national conferences /conventions; participating in col I ege events (Fall Bash, ANSC orientation, Cook-Offs); service activities including teaching 
agri cul ture to local elementary students and judging contests for the Maryland FFA; professional Guest speakers, and participating in Maryland Day/Ag Day. 
Membership rush is held on a semester basis. To be eligible, potential members must have 2.25 CumulativeGPA, Agri cul ture maj or or sincere interest in 
agri cul ture, be a member of one other group, enrol I ed i n 18 credi ts, or worki ng 10 hours aweek.Visitthewebsi t ewww.studentorq.urind.edu/siqma 

University of Maryland Equestrian Club 

The University of Maryland Equestrian Club (UM EC) provi des on-campus horseback riding lessons and equine I earning opportuni ties for campus students and 
f acul ty at begi nner through advanced I evel s. The A N SC department provi des the barn, equi pment ri di ng arenas and horses whi I e the students provi de care for the 
horses. There is a riding fee of $200 per semester for one riding lesson a week for the end re semester. Large deductions are easi I yearned for help with feeding, 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 225 



cl eani ng stal I s or teachi ng. C I ub members not ri di ng are strongl y encouraged to parti ci pate i n other cl ub acti vi ti es, such as educati oral and fun semi nars, f i el d tri ps 
and monthly meetings. Inthepast, UMEC members have attended the Col umbi a Grand Prix and the Washington International Horse Show and taken field trips to 
theDuPont Veterinary Medical Center in Leesburg, Va. and Days End Horse Rescue Farm in Maryland. Members have also participated in clinics on tack fitting and 
identifying lameness in horses. Club members, under the leadership of the Executive Board and Directors, make most UMEC club decisions. Weofferagreat 
opportuni fy to al I students and we're al ways open to suggesti ons. We al so try to have somethi ng f or everyone i ncl udi ng basi c E ngl i sh equi tati on, Western equi tati on, 
dressage, bareback and trai I ri di ng, horse and farm management veteri nary care, teachi ng ski 1 1 s and much mora T he U M E C i s I ocated at the campus horse bam, and 
our office is in the Shack, right next to the paddocks. There is very limited space in the riding lessons, so e-mail us right away to reserve yourself a spot in the most 
educational equine club provided by the University of Maryland. Visit the web site: www.studentorci.umd.edu/um3c/ 

University of Maryland E questrian Team 

T he E questri an Team i s a competi ti ve cl ub, meani ng they travel to di ff erent school s i n the zone and compete i n I H SA shows. Students, f acul ty , staff, and al umni 
association members of all levels are invited. The team offers English, Western, and jumping, so team members can pick what typeof riding to specialize in or 
compete i n al I three! The team does not hoi d tryouts so anyone can j oi n the team U M ET i s I ocated about 25 mi nutes off campus atClay Hill Stabl es i rSpri ngdal e, 
Maryland. The cost per semester for team membershi pis $550. This fee covers two one hour group lessons a week taught by trai nerTrishaPrettyman, unlimited 
practice rides (hacks), show fees, show practices, and a ton of fun! 

Veterinary Science Club 

T he pri mary obj ecti ves of the V eteri nary Sci ence C I ub are to: promote a deeper understand ng of the numerous opportuni ti es i n veteri nary medi ci ne, exchange 
i nf omnati on on veteri nary and ani mal experi ences, and keep students updated on the I atest veteri nary school i nf omnati on. 

What does the Veteri nary Sci ence Club do? A variety of guest speakers are invited to club meetings to talk about their special ties or field of interest A sarrpleof 
topi c i ncl ude wi I dl i f e rehabi I i tati on, I aboratory ani mal medi ci ne, exoti c pet care and veteri nary ethi cs. 

E ach year, f acul ty f ram the V i rgi ni a- M ary I and Regi onal C ol I ege of V eteri nary M edi ci ne speak to cl ub members about veteri nary medi cal school . M ock i ntervi ews 
are hel d i n J anuary to prepare our cl ub members f or the admi ssi ons process. 

C I ub sponsored tri ps offer our members the opportuni ty to tour vari ous veteri nary medi cal facilities, talkto veteri nary students and f acul ty, and to vi si 1 1 ocal zoos 
and ani mal care f aci I i ti es. 

Annually, the club participates in the A PV MA National Symposium which is held at different veterinary schools each year. This is an excellent opportunity to visit 
a vet school , pi us hear over 30 speakers on numerous topi cs and parti ci pate i n a vari ety of wet and dry I ab. 

There are also opportunities to volunteer with the Pri nceGeorge's County Animal Shelter in partnership with PetSmart, to hel p find homesf or abandoned animals. 
For more information visit the web site: www.careercenter.urrid.eduA/ etSci Cl ub 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

A meri can Soci ety of A ni mal Sci ences Schol asti c Recogni ti on and Department of A ni mal Sci ences Schol asti c A chi evement A wards are presented each year at the 
Collegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources Student Awards Convocation. TheANSC program administers several scholarships, including: C.W. England, Dairy 
Technology Society, the Kinghome Fund Fellowship, theC.S. Shaffner Award, theLillianHildebrandtRummel Scholarship, and the Owen P. Thomas 
Development Scholarship. For eligibility criteria, visittheANSC Office, 1415A Animal Sciences Center. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Anthropology (ANTH) 

Collegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1111 Woods Hall, 301-405-1423 

www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 

Chair: P. Shackel 

Professors: J . Chemela (also LASC), M. Leone, T. Whitehead 

Associate Professors: J. Freidenberg, M. Paolisso 

Assistant Professors: S. Brighton, W. Stuart 

Lecturers: D. Gadsby, A. Garland, T. Leslie, M. London, M. Plyler, G. Thakur 

Affiliate Professors: A. Bolles(WMST),J. Caughey (AMST)J. Grayzel (GVPT)J. Hanna, R. Harrison (CMLT, LASC), S. Kim(WMST), D. Linebaugh(HISP), L. 

FrederikMeer(THET), C. Robertson (MUSC) 

Adjunct Professors: S. Abbott-Jamieson (NOAA), M. ButJer, T. Cederstrom, C. Crain (LTG Associates), S. Fiske(NOAA), A. Froment, S. Huertin- Roberts, J. Kunen 

(USAID), B. Little (National Park Service), F. McManamon (National Park Service), M. Mieri (Smithsonian), C. Puentes-Markides, D. Russell (USAID)J. 

Schablitsky (Adjunct Prof), J . Schneider, R. Sobel (Smithsonian), N. Tashima (LTG Associates), R. Winthrop (BLM ) 

Professors Emeriti: M. Agar, S. Bushrui, N. Gonzalez (Emerita), F.Jackson 

The Major 

A nthropol ogy , the study of cul ture, seeks to understand humans as a whol e - as soci al bei ngs who are capabl e of symbol i c communi cationthroughwhich they 
produce arichcultural record. A nthropol ogiststrytoexplaindi ff erences among cul tures - di ff erences i n physi cal characteri sti cs as wel I as i n customary behavi or. 
A nthropol ogi sts study how cul ture has changed through ti me as the human genus has spread over the earth. A nthropol ogy i s the sci ence of the bi ol ogi cal evol uti on 
of human sped es, and the di sci pi i red schol arshi p of the cul tural devel oprrent of human bei ngs 1 knowl edge and customary behavi or. 

A nthropol ogy at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and offers ri gorous trai ni ng for many career opti ons. A strong background i n anthropol ogy i s a def i ni te asset i n prepari ng 
for a variety of academic and professional fields, ranging from the I aw and business, to comparative literature, philosophy and the fine arts. Whether one goes on to 
a M aster's or a Ph. D . , the anthropol ogy B .A . prepares one for a wi de range of non- academi c empl oyment such as ci ty and public heal th pi anni ng, devel opment 
consulting, program evaluation, and public archaeology. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students shal I have an i ntegrated knowl edge, awareness and understandi ng of a cul tural I y and bi ol ogi cal I y di verse wori d. 

2. Students shall demonstrate an understanding of cul ture and society. 

3. Students shal I demonstrate the abi I i ty to understand compl ex research probl ems, and arti cul ate appropri ate methods and theory. 

Academic Programs and Depart m ental Facilities 

T he A nthropol ogy department offers begi nni ng and advanced course work i n the three pri nci pal subdi vi si ons of the di sci pi i ne: cul tural anthropol ogy, archaeol ogy, 
and bi ol ogi cal anthropol ogy. W i thi n each area, the department offers some degree of sped al i zati on and provi des a vari ety of opportuni ti es f or research and 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



independent study. Laboratory courses are offered in biological anthropology and archaeology. Field schools are offered in archaeology. The interrelationship of all 
branches of anthropology is emphasized. 

T he A nthropol ogy clepartment has a total of f i ve I aboratori es, I ocated i n Woods H al I , whi ch are di vi ded i nto teachi ng I abs and research I abs. T he departments three 
archaeol ogy I abs, contai ni ng materi al s col I ected from f i el d school s and research proj ects of the past several years, serve both teachi ng and research purposes. The 
other two laboratories are a teaching laboratory in biological anthropology and the Laboratory for Applied Ethnography and Community Action Research.Cultural 
Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), a research and program development arm of the department is located in Woods Hall. The Center for Heritage Research Studies, 
I ocated i n the Department of A nthropol ogy, focuses on research devoted to understand ng the cul tural character sti cs of heri tage and i ts uses. 

The undergraduate curriculum is tied to the departments M aster inApplied Anthropology (M. A A.) program; accordingly, preparation for non-academic 
empl oy merit upongraduationisapri mary educati onal goal of the departments undergraduate course work and i nternshi p and research components. T he department 
has also recently implemented a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program Students at the graduate level are asked to focus in one of three areas of faculty expertise: 
Health, Heritage, and Environment 

Requirements for the Major 

Students seeki ng an undergraduate degree are requi red to compj ete at I east 31 credi ts of anthropol ogy coursework i n add ti on to the supporti ng coursework 
sequence. Every course bei ng used to sati sf y anthropol ogy maj or requi rements must be compl eted wi th a grade of 2. or hi gher. 

Required Courses 

I . Foundation Courses Credits 

A NT H 220 I ntroducti on to B i ol ogi cal A nthropol ogy 4 

ANTH240 I ntroducti on to Archaeol ogy 3 

ANTH260 IntroductiontoSocio-cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 

II. Method and Theory courses (2 courses) 6 

ANTH320* Method andTheory in Biological Anthropology 

ANTH340* Method andTheory in Archaeology 

ANTH360* Method andTheory in Sociocul tural Anthropology 

* Two of the upper level method and theory courses (ANTH320, 340, 
360) are required. Students rrust complete the method and theory 
course associated with their chosen focus area - sociocul tural 
anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology. Students may 
not take a method and theory course unless they have completed the 
associated foundation course If a student compl etesal I threeofthe 
method and theory courses, one course can be used as an 
anthropology elective 



III. Anthropology E I ecti ves 

Minimum of 12 credits. 6 of the 12 credits rrust be taken at the 

300-400 level. 
ANTHxx Anthropology el ectives 
ANTH300/400Upper level Anthropology courses 



ANTH386 
ANTH496 
ANTH498 
ANTH458B 

ANTH493 

ANTH498C 
ANTH498N 
ANTH498W 

ANTH498Z 

ANTH499 



IV. Applied Field Methods 

Minimum of 3 credits sdected from the following. Other courses can 

be used with approval ofUG Director. Courses used to fulfill the 

Applied Field Methods requirement may not be used to fulfill any 

other anthropol ogy requirement 

Experiential Learning Internship (3-6 credits) 

Field Methods in Archaeology (6 credits) 

Advanced Field Training in Ethnography (1-6) 

Applied Urban Ethnography (3 credits) 

A nthropol ogi cal F i el dwork and Experi ence i n A rgenti na ( 3 

credits) 

Advanced FieldTraining in Ethnography: Brazil (6credits) 

Ethnol ogy of the I rrmi grant L if e (4 credi ts) 

J amaica: Connections, Celebration and Identity (6 credits) 

Jamaica: Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (6 

credits) 

Fieldwork in Biological Anthropology (3-8 credits) 



3 or more 



SKILLSxx 



V. Skills Requirement 

Quantitative course (chosen fromlistbdow and required for all 
students entering the major Fall 2008 and after) 
BIOM301, MATH111, STAT100, ECON201, ECON321, 
EDMS451, GEOG306, MATH112 or higher (excluding 
MATH 113), PSYC200, SOCY200 



3 or more 



ELECT 



VI . Supporting Course Work: 

Minimumofl8 credits of supporting dectives; at least 10 credit 
hours must be outside of the department (with your academic 
advisor's approval) . 8 hours may be anthropology course work but 
then cannot 'double count as Anthropol ogy dectives. 



18 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Advising 

T he primary advisor for students in the Anthropology maj or is the Undergraduate Advisor. The advisor is avail able to students during appointments, walk-in hours, 
and by phone and emai I . T he advi sor i s responsi bl e for hel pi ng students pi an thei r successful compl eti on of the A nthropol ogy maj or. Students will work wi th the 
advi sor for an ori entati on to the departrrent status on degree progress, admi ni strati ve approval for sped al course enrol I ment, academi c audi ts, and graduati on 
clearance. Inaddition, students should consider the Undergraduate Advi sor a resource for general academi c and career advice during thei rti meat Maryland. 

The off i ce of the U ndergraduate Advi sor is supervised and supported by the Di rector of U ndergraduate Studi es (a faculty member) i n the Department of 
Anthropology. Inaddition, all faculty members in the departrrent serve as faculty advisors to students. Students are expected to select and request a faculty 
member who works withi n their area of focus to be their faculty advisor (i .e. Archaeology, Biological Anthropology or Cultural Anthropology). For more 
information, or to contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or Undergraduate Advi sor, pleasecall 301-405-1423orgotowww.bsos.umd.edu/anth. 

U ndergraduate Research Experiences 

T here are several undergraduate research experi ences avai I abl e for students: 

1. Archaeology laboratories 

2. Biological anthropology lab 

3. Chesapeake heritage program 

4. Immigrant Life Course 

5. Cultural Systems Analysis Group 

6. Center for Heritage Resource Studies 

For more information, pi ease see our website www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 
Fieldwork Opportunities 

The Department of Anthropology encourages students to explore its field school and study abroad opportunities: 

1. Summer archaeology field school 

2. Ethnographic field school in J amaica (study abroad program) 

3. Ethnographi c f i el d school i n the B razi I i an A mazon (study abroad program) 

4. Ethnographic field school in Argentina (study abroad program) 

5. Winter term field study in Italy (study abroad program) 

For more information, see our website: www.bsosumd.edu/anth. 

Internships 

A 1 1 undergraduate students are encouraged to do an i ntemshi p. There are many non- prof i t and government agenci es i n the B al ti more-Washi ngton area that are 
wi 1 1 i ng to support A nthropol ogy i ntems. F or more i nf omnati on, pi ease contact the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es or the U ndergraduate A dvi sor. 

Co-op Programs 

TheDepartrnentlnasacooperativeagreementwiththeNational Park Service. When available, students have opportunities to work on various archeology and 
museum projects in the National Capital Region. For more information, pi ease contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Undergraduate A dvi sor. 

Honors Program 

T he A nthropol ogy department al so offers an H onors Program that provi des the student an opportuni ty to pursue i n-depth study of hi s or her i nterests. A cceptance i s 
contingent upon a 3.5 GPA in anthropology courses and a 3.0 overall average The Honors Citation is awarded upon completion and review of a thesis (usually 
based upon at least one term of research under the direction of an Anthropology faculty member) to be done within the field of anthropology. For additional 
information, students should contact the Director of Departmental Honors Program, Dr. William Stuart, 301-405-1435; E-mail: wstuart@anth.umd.edu 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

A nthropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on (A SA ) : A n anthropol ogy student associ ati on that meets regul arl y to pi an student events and to hel p coordi nate vari ous student 
and facultyactivities.For meeti ng ti mes contact the U ndergraduate A dvi sor. 

The department and the ASA jointly sponsor a public lecture series. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Arabic Studies (ARAB) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3121J im®iez Hall, 301-405-7492 
www.languages.umd.edu/AsianEastEuropean/arabic/ 
f I agshi p-arabi c@umd.edu 

The Maj or 

This 42-credit major provides students with a solid background in linguistic, literary, and cultural aspects of the study of Arabic, inclusiveof the cultures of North 
Africa, Egypt, theArabic-speaking countries of Asia, and the peoples of the diaspora. 

TheB.A.inArabic Studi es prepares students for a range of prof essi oral opportuni ti es, i ncl udi ng careers i n government educati on, busi ness, and i ntemati onal 
development and communication. Students work toward competence in speaking, reading, writing, and listening; they will study thecultureof Arabic-speaking 
peoples in their diverse perspectives, practices, and products; they will become conversant with the contemporary political and daily life of Arabic-speaking peoples, 
wi th cul tural compari son i rrpl i ci t throughout thei r f our years. 1 1 i s expected that many undergraduates will choose to cbubl e maj or or do a doubl e degree i n A rabi c 
and another subj ect, i ncl udi ng arts and humani ti es maj ors, busi ness, computer sci ence, and j oumal i sm 

Requirements for the Major 

A 1 1 students pi anni ng to pursue the maj or i n A rabi c Studi es shoul d contact the undergraduate advi sor, who wi 1 1 be responsi bl e f or pi acement oversi ght and record 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



keepi ng. A grade of C (2.0) or better i s requi red i n al I courses. 

Prerequisites (IS credits) 

Students must take the prerequi si te courses or sati sf y these requi rements by pi acement* 
ARAB104 ElementaryModernStandardArabicl-ll (6credits) 
ARAB105 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic lll-IV (6credits) 
ARAB106 Elementary Egyptian Colloquial Arabic I 
ARAB107 Elementary Egyptian Colloquial Arabic II 



*Modem Standard Arabic is the formal variety of Arabic used throughout the Arab world, particularly for reading and writing. Egyptian Colloquial Arabic is oneof 
the major spoken varieties in the Middle East Oncecredits have been received for a higher- level language focus course, alower-level course in the same strand 
(written or spoken) may not betaken for credit. (ARAB204 may not betaken after ARAB205, for example. ARAB107 may not betaken after ARAB206, etc.) 

COURSES REQUI RED FOR THE MAJOR 

All courses are 3 credits unless noted otherwise. 



Coresequence 24 credits 

ARAB204 Intermediate Modem Standard A rabid 

ARAB205 Intermediate Modem Standard Arabic 1 1 

ARAB304 Advanced M odem Standard Arabic I 

ARAB305 Advanced M odem Standard Arabic 1 1 

ARAB206 Intermediate Egyptian Colloquial Arabic III 

ARAB207 Intermediate Egyptian Colloquial Arabic IV 



(6 credits) 
(6 credits) 



prereq 204 
prereq 205 
prereq 304 
prereq 107 
prereq 206 



Electives a minimum of IS credits 

A. Required Upper- level electives in Arabic (a minimum of 9 credits) 

ARAB311 TheArab World Today pre-coreq304 

ARAB312 Islamic Culture pre-coreq304 

ARAB321 Arabic Media pre-coreq304 

ARAB322 Commercial Arabic pre-coreq304 

ARAB401 Readings in Arabic Literature prereq305 

ARAB402 Arabic Translation prereq 305 

ARAB411 US-Arab Relations prereq 305 

ARAB412 Modem Arabic Literature: A ^^305 

Survey 

ARAB499 Special Topics in Arabic Studies 

• Other A RA B courses may be i ncl uded on wri tten approval of U G advi sor. 

• All prerequisites imply "or equivalent knowledge." In cases where a student has equivalent knowledge, required language-focus credits are replaced in 
consultation with, and with the written approval of, the UG advisor. 

B. Optional Electives in English: a maximum of 9 credits (no prereqs) 

ARAB 251 Arabic Cinema 
ARAB 252 Arabic Literature in Translation 
ARAB 351 Arab Cultureand Civilization 
ARAB 499 Special Topics in Arabic Studies 

Courses in M iddle Eastern Studies taught in English in other departments can be substituted with the approval of the Undergraduate advi sor. 

Study Abroad 

Students maj ori ng i n A rabi c Studi es are encouraged to spend a summer or a semester abroad. C redi ts earned toward the maj or duri ng study abroad must be 
approved by the department pri or to departure A maxi mum of 15 non- U M credi ts may be appl i ed to the maj or. 



Art(ARTT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211-E ArtySociology Building, 301-405-7790 

www.artumd.edu 

artdept@umd.edu 

Chair: J. Ruppert 

Professors: T. Lapinski - Drawing/Watercolor, W. Richardson- Painting/Drawing, F. Sham- Sculpture 

Associate Professors: B. Morse- Digital Media, D. Gavin- Drawing/Multi-media, J. Thorpe- Graphic Design, R. Lozner- Graphic Design, R. Klank- Painting/Art 

Theory, P. Craig- Painting/Drawing, P. Kehoe- Painting/Drawing, M. Humphrey- Printmaking/Drawing 

Assistant Professors: J. Pinder- Drawing/Art Theory, A. Buck-Coleman- Graphic Design, J. Strom- Printmaking 

Lecturers: A. Georgia/ska- Shine- Art Theory, R. Weil -Art Theory, N. Ratnapala- Digital Media, T. Horjus- Drawing, L. Berns- Foundation/A it Theory, J. Stone 

- Foundation/Sculpture, E. Conover- Painting/Drawing, S. Devore- Photography, S.Jones- Sculpture 

Professors Emeriti: C. Demonte(Distinguished Scholar-Teacher), D. Driskell (Distinguished University Professor) 



TheMajcr 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



The Department of Artisaplace where students transform ideas and concepts into objects and visual experiences. It is an environment rich in art theory, criticism, 
and awareness of di verse worl d cul ture. Students are taught to arti cul ate and ref i ne creati ve thought and appl y knowl edge and ski 1 1 to the maki ng of i mages, obj ects, 
and experi mental works. Courses are meani ngf ul to students wi th the hi ghest degree of i nvol vement i n the program and those who take el ecti ves. Students maj ori ng 
i n A rt take a focused program of courses f ol ded i nto a general I i beral arts educati on offered by the uni versi ty . 

T he di verse f acul ty of arti sts i n the department stri ve to foster a sense of communi ty through the common experi ence of the creati ve process, shari ng thei r 
professional experi ence freely with students 

T he areas of concentrati on wi thi n the maj or are desi gn, drawi ng, pai nti ng, pri ntmaki ng, digital i magi ng, and scul pture A reas of study i ncl ude papemnaki ng, 
photography, and art theory. I ntemshi ps and i ndependent studi es are al so avai I abl e 

Prog-am Obj actives 

Pleasegoto Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Academic Procp-amsand Departmental Fadlities 

Pleasegoto Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Admission to the M aj or 

Pleasegoto Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Placement in Courses 

W i th appropri ate A P credi t, students may recei ve credi t f or A RTT 100 or A RTT 110. Students can recei ve pi acement i n more advanced courses wi th portf ol i o 
revi ew. Contact Department advi sors for more i nf ormati on. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

U ndergraduate students are off ered a Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) in Art. The requirements consist of a curriculum of 36 credits of art studio and art theory courses, and 
12 addi ti onal credi ts of art hi story and art theory courses as a supporti ng area for a total of 48 maj or requi red credi ts. N o course wi th a grade I ess than C may be used 
to sati sfy maj or or supporti ng area requi rements. 



Foundation Courses 

ARTT100 
ARTT 110 
ARTT150 
ARTT 200 
ARTT 210 



15 C recite 



Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 

E I ements of D rawi ng I 

I ntroducti on to A rt Theory 

T hree D i mensi onal A rt F undamental s 

E I ements of D rawi ng 1 1 



I ntermediateCourses 



9 Credits 



Painting 
Sculpture 
Pri ntmaki ng 
Design 



one course from three of the following 
four areas 

ARTT 320 

ARTT 330, 331, 332, 333, 334 

ARTT 340, 341, 342, 344 

ARTT 350, 351, 352 



Advanced Courses 

ARTT 418 
ARTT Theory 
ARTT elective 
ARTT elective 
* course offering varies 



12 Credits 



Advanced Drawing 
One 300/400 A RTT theory* 
One 300/400 A RTT elective 
One 400 1 a/el A RTT el ecti ve 



Supporting Area 

ARTH 200 

ARTH 201 
ARTH/ArtTheory 



12 Credits 



A rt of the Western Worl d to 1300 

A rt of the Western Worl d after 
1300 

Two 300/400 1 a/el ARTH/ArtTheory 
el ecti ves 



48Total Credits 



Other Requirements for the Maj or 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Please go to Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Advising 

T he name of the advisor for each class is avail able in the department office. Each second-serrester sophomore and first-semester senior is required to see his or her 
advi sor wi thi n the department Additi onal I y, each student i s strongl y encouraged to see hi s or her advi sor i n the department each semester. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Pleasegoto Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Fieldwork Opportunities 

Please go to Department of Art Website for more information: www.artumd.edu 

Internships 

Students have worked i n a vari ety of i ntemshi p setti ngs. These have i ncl uded assi sti ng prof essi onal s compl ete publ i c corrmi ssi ons, commerci al or cooperati ve 
gallery and exhibition duties, and working in professional artists' workshops in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. metropolitan areas. TheGraphic Design 
concentration maintains a vari ety of internship connections with the professional design community. Additional information is avail able in the Department of Art 
office. 

Honors Program 

T he H onors Program i s avai I abl e to art studi o maj ors f or the purpose of creati ng opportuni ti es f or i n-depth study and enri chment i n areas of sped al and creati ve 
interest To qualify, students must be art maj ors with junior or senior status, a major G. PA of 3.2, and an overall G.PA. of 3.0. The program requires a total of 12 
credits in Honors course work. One course (3 credits) may be taken at the 300 or 400- level, and threecourses (3 credits each) at the400-level. There is a thesis 
component i n one of the 400- 1 evel courses. PI ease consul t the H onors D i rector for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Art administers eight Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships (CAPAs) that are avai I able to continuing students, and entering freshman and 
transfer students. This is a merit-based scholarship that is awarded on a one-year basis, and may be renewed. Additional information is available in the main office of 
the department TheVan Crews Scholarship is designated for outstanding Art majors concentrati ng i n design. It is awarded for one year and is renewable. 



ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (ARTH) 

Cdlegeof Arts and Humanities 

1211-B ArtySociology Building, 301-405-1479 

www.arthistory.umd.edu 

Chair: M.Venit 

Professors: J . Hargrove, J . Kuo, S. Mansbach, W. Pressly, M . Venit A. Wheel ock 

Associate Professors: R. Ater, A. Colantuono, M . Gill 

Assistant Professors: S. Hill, A. M cEwen, J . Shannon, Y . Suzuki, A. Volk 

Affiliate Professors: R. Spear 

Professors Emeriti: D. Denny (Prof Emeritus), M. Spi ro (Assoc Prof Emerita), J. Withers (Assoc Prof Emerita) 

The Maj or 

The faculty and students of the Department of Art History and Archaeology form a dynamic nucleus within a major research university. The program, leadi ng to the 
B.A. degree in Art History, provides a diverse selection of courses in the art and archaeology of Africa, Asia, Europe, and theAmericas. The goal of the department 
is to develop the students critical understanding of visual culture in both art historical and archaeological contexts. 

Thedepartment has strong coverage in Western art from the classical period up to the present Inaddition, by taking advantage of the unusual diversity of faculty 
i nterests, students can study i n areas not tradi ti onal I y offered i n departments of art hi story and archaeol ogy , such as the art of Af ri ca, art of the A f ri can di aspora, art of 
L ati n A meri ca, and C hi nese and J apanese art Studi es i n archaeol ogy may be pursued i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty departments. 

Courses offered by thi s department may be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym A RTH . 

Program Obj ecti ves 

The Department of Art History and Archaeol ogy'sB. A. program provides maj ors critical knowledge of visual culture in both art historical and archaeological 
contexts. The program pronntes visual literacy i n the hi story of art of global cultures from prehistoric times to the present cultivates strong research, written, and 
critical thi nki ng ski 1 1 s; and devel ops students' ability to sy nthesi ze cul tural , hi stori cal, political, and soci al i nf ormati on as i t bears upon the vi sual arts. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to f ul I y engage withthecurriculumandthe opportuni ti es presented for I eami ng and research. H avi ng compl eted the B .A . i n A rt H i story , 
students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability to demonstrate knowl edge of a large set of artistic monuments, objects, and performances in the hi story of art and in specific periods and/or cultures 
and pi ace the visual arts in cultural, historical, political, and/or social contexts. 

2. An ability to communicate effectively about art in writing, applying complex forms of analysis in essay- length papers using clear and concise prose. 

3. A n abi I i ty to empl oy the appropri ate technol ogi es for conducti ng research i n the hi story of art, i ncl udi ng pri nt sources and/or el ectroni c i nf ormati on. 

4. A n abi I i ty to recogni ze and understand fundamental art hi stori cal methods encompassed by but not I i mi ted to connoi sseurshi p, sty I i sti c chronol ogy, vi sual and 
techni cal anal ysi s, i n addi ti on to sped al i zed methods of i nterpretati on and cri ti ci sm and other contextual approaches. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Fadlities 

T he I ocati on of the uni versi ty between Washi ngton and B al ti more gi ves students the opportuni ty to use some of the f i nest museum and archi val col I ecti ons i n the 
worl d f or thei r course work and i ndependent research. The department encourages students to hoi d i ntemshi ps at a number of these i nsti tuti ons C urator/prof essors, 
exhibitions in TheArt Gallery at the University of Maryland, interactive technologies, and the extensive use of study col I ecti ons bring regional and distant museums 
into the classroom 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



The department is in the forefront of exploring digital imaging technologies for art historical and archaeological teaching, research, and publication. The Michelle 
Smith Col laboratory for Visual Culture, located in the department on the fourth floor of the A nVSociology Building, iscentral in creating a nurturing environment for 
academic quality and creative I earning. This new space permits ample workspace for meetings, workshops, forums, and the execution of large-scale technical 
projects. 

Requirements for the Major 

Requi renrents for the maj or i n A it H i story are as fol I ows: 

C recite 
Onefrom: 3 

A RTT 100 T wo D i mensi onal A it F undamental s 
ARTT110 Elementsof Drawing I 

ARTH required courses 

ARTH2xx threeARTHcoursesatthe200level 9 

ARTH300/400seven ARTH courses at the 300-400 1 e/el 21 

Supporting Area: 12 

A supporti ng area of four courses i n coherently re! ated 
subject matter outside the department of Art History and 
A rchaeol ogy at the 300-400 1 e/el 

Wo credit toward the major can be received for ARTH 100 or 355. 

No course with a grade lower than C may be used to satisfy major or supporting area requirements. 

Other Requirements for the Maj or 

I n the Department of ArtHistory and A rchaeol ogy, 300-level and400-level courses are differentiated. 300-level courses focus on peri odor topical surveys and 
400- 1 evel courses hi ghl i ght content or theme- based materi al . M aj ors shoul d compl ete the 200- 1 evel surveys before they enrol I in 300- or 400- 1 evel courses. Students 
are strongl y encouraged to take supporti ng area courses that compl ement the art hi story maj or. N o course wi th a grade I ower than C may be used to sati sf y maj or or 
supporti ng area requi rements. 

Requirements for theMinor 

TheminorinArtHi story i ntroduces students to a range of art- hi stori cal peri ods, probl ems, and methodol ogi es and i s i ntended at once to broaden and deepen the 
students knowl edge of arts and humani ti es. A total of 18 credi ts i s requi red. 

1. Nine credits of 200- 1 evel surveys in the hi story of art are required. Choose any three (3) broad surveys from among the fol I owing 3-credit courses: 

. ARTH 200: Art of the Western World to 1300 
. ARTH 201: Art of the Western World after 1300 

• ARTH 250: Art and Archaeology of Ancient America 

• ARTH 275: Art and Archaeology of Africa 
.ARTH 290: Arts of Asia 

2. In addition, nine (9) credits of upper- 1 evel art hi story courses are requi red. Choose any three (3) upper- division (300- or400-level) 3-credit courses in Art History 
(ARTH prefix). 

A total of si x (6) credi ts may be transferred i nto the mi nor from other i nsti tuti ons or programs. T hese transferred credi ts i ncl ude those from study-abroad programs. 
Study-abroad credi t requi res the pri or approval of the Di rector of U ndergraduate Studi es. 

All courses presented for the mi nor must be passed with a grade of C or better. 

To make an appoi ntrrent to expl ore or decl are a rri nor, 

go to http://www.aitiu.urrd.edu/undergi^Liate/academics/minors 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors. 

Internships 

Students may receive academic credit for internships via ARTH 386. This course may count as one of the seven 300/400-level ARTH courses requi red for 
completion of theARTH major. Prerequisites: permission of department and 60 semester hours completed. All students are requi red to compl ete an ARTH 
I nternshi p Contract, avai I abl e f rom the undergraduate advi sor. Qual i f i ed maj ors shoul d consul t wi th the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es f or i nternshi p 
opportunities. 

Honors Program 

If you havecompleted at least 12 credits in Art History and Archaeology courses and if you have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher (in all course work, notjustARTH 
courses) you are qualified to work toward departmental honors at graduation. Such honors will be noted on your official transcript Consult the Director of 
Undergraduate Studies for details. Among your seven 300/400- 1 evel ARTH courses requi red for the maj or, you must take at least onecolloquium (either ARTH 488 
or 489) and you al so must take M ethods of A it H i story (A RTH 496) . I n add ti on to the regul ar requi rements for the maj or, you must research and wri te an H onors 
Thesis(ARTH 499), normally in the year when you will graduate Before registering for this course you must identify and gain the support of a faculty supervi sor. 
The faculty supervisor must be a regular member of theARTH department faculty. Adjunct faculty members do not supervise honors theses. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology has an active Undergraduate A it History Association. I nterested students should contact the Director of 
U ndergraduate Studi es for more i nf ormati on. 

Awards and Recognition 

T he Department of A it H i story and A rchaeol ogy off ers four undergraduate awards each year: theJudithK.ReedSchol arshi p to an A RT H maj or of j uni or standi ng 
andtheJudithK. Reed CommencementAward, the George Levitine and Frank DiFederico Book Awardsto ARTH graduating seniors. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Asian American Studies Certificate 

Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studies 

1145 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

I ntheAsian American Studies Program (AAST) students undertake a critical study of the experiences of Asian Americans. Through an interdisciplinary approach, 
students exami ne the hi stori es, communi ti es, and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncrj ve from and connected to the broader themes f or di versi ty , ethni city, 
race, gender and mi grati on i n the A meri cas. A A ST offers a 15 credi t- hour mi nor. For the M i nor, courses may be cross- 1 i sted i n other departments and some may 
satisfyCORE and Diversity requirements. PI ease see Chapter 6 for details. 

Please note that the 21-credit Certificate program was suspended starting Fall 2009. 

Minor Requirements 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. lntroductJontoAsianArrEricanStudies(AAST 200/AMST 398C) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST 201/HIST 219G) 

B. Upper-level Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two required foundational courses, students will also select two additional upper-level (300/400) 
courses, one of which would be at the 400 level, from the foil owing list of regular and special topics courses: AAST 384, AAST 388, AAST 398A, 
AAST 398B, AAST 398C, AAST 398D, AAST 398G, AAST 398L, AAST 398P, AAST 420/WMST 420, AAST 424/SOCY 424, AAST 498A, AAST 
498B, AAST 498C, AAST 498D, AAST 498E, AAST 498F, AAST 498G, AAST 4981, AAST 498) , AAST 498K, AAST 498L, AAST 498M, AAST 
498N, AAST 498P and AAST 498T. 

C.Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of AAST 378 (Experiential Learning- 3 credits), a semester- long internship at an 
organization that centers its efforts on A si an A meri can issues. Such organizations may include governmental units, non-profit agencies, and on-campus 
organizations. 

Certificate Requirements (NOTE : the Certificate Program was suspended starting Fall 2009). 

A. AAST CoreCourses (6 credits): 

1. I ntroducrj on to A si an A meri can Studi es (A A ST200) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST201) 

B. ElecrJveCourses (12 credits): Students may earn the 12 required elective credits by successfully completing any of anumber of special topics 
courses A A ST offers each semester. E I ecti ve requi rements may al so be sati sf i ed through successful compl etj on of courses offered through other 
departments or programs. Students must obtai n approval from the AAST program di rector for courses outsi de of AAST offeri ngs 

C. AAST Senior Capstone (3 credits): Students participated afaculty-guided research project (AAST388) or an experiential I earning project such as 
an internship with an Asian American or Asian Pacific American organization (AAST378). 

D. All courses toward the Certificate must be completed with mini mum grade of "C." Students interested in earning the certificate should first schedule an 
advising appointment at the AAST office Students in good standing may then officially enroll in the certificate program Whilestudents may begin taking courses 
before they enrol I i n the certi f i cate program, they shoul d schedul e an advi si ng appoi ntment as soon as possi bl e 

Astronomy (ASTR) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1205 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 301-405-3001 

www.astro.umd.edu 

astr-grad@deans.umd.edu 

Chair: S. Vogel 

Director: E. McKenzie (Res Assoc) 

Professors: L. D. Deming, D. Hamilton, A. Harris, S. McGaugh, M. C. Miller, L. Mundy, R. Mushotzky, E. Ostriker, K. Papadopoulos, C. Reynolds, S. Veilleux 

Associate Professors: D. Richardson 

Assistant Professors: A. Bolatto, M . Ricotti 

Instructors: G. Deming 

Lecturers: M . Hayes-Gehrke, R. Oiling (ResAssoc), A. Peel, P. Romani 

Adjunct Professors: J. Centrella, E. Dwek, N.Gehrels, M. Murrma, N.White 

Professors Emeriti: M.A'Heam, R. Bell, J. Earl, W. EricksonJ. Harrington, M. Leventhal, D.Wentzel 

Visiting Faculty: D. Neufeld 

The Major 

The Astronomy Department offers courses I eadi ng to a Bachelor of Science i n Astronomy as wel I as a series of courses of general i nterest to non-majors. 
Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation in Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics. The degree program is designed to prepare students for 
posi ti ons i n government and i ndustry I aboratori es or f or graduate work i n A stronorry or rel ated f i el ds 

Academic Programs and Departmental Fadlities 

The Department of Astronomy is a partner in the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-WaveAstronomy (CARMA) which operates a millimeter wavelength 
radio array located near Bishop, California. The array is the largest and most sensitive array of its type in the world. As of early 2011, the Department is also 
pursuing a new partnership in a major optical telescope. The Department is involved with major space missions, such as NASA's EPOXI mission which visited 
Comet Hartley 2 i n 2010. Additionally, the Department operates a small observatory on campus which has four fixed telescopes rangi ng i n aperture from 20' to 7" 
and six portabl e 8" tel escopes. Thi s f aci I i ty i s used for undergraduate maj ors' cl asses and for smal I -seal e research proj ects, as wel I as for an Open House Program for 
the public. Finally, the Department maintains and upgrades a Beowulf cluster for computation- intensive science proj ects. Opportunities are availablefor 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



undergraduates to become involved in research with all of these facilities. 
Requirements for the Major 

ASTR120 

ASTR121 

ASTR310 

ASTR320 

ASTR4-- 

PHYS171* 

PHYS174 

PHYS272* 

PHYS273* 

PHYS275 

PHYS276 

PHYS374 

PHYS401 

PHYS404 

MATH 140 

MATH 141 

MATH240 

MATH241 

MATH246 

*With the permission of theadvisor, PHYS161, 262, 263 can be substituted for this sequence. 

T he program requi res that a grade of C or better be obtai ned i n al I courses requi red for the maj or. 



Required Courses 


Credits 


1 ntroductory A strophysi cs: Sol ar System 


3 


1 ntroductory Astrophysics 1 1 : Stars and Beyond 


4 


Observational Astronomy 


3 


Theoretical Astrophysics 


3 


400 level astronomy courses 


6 


Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Relativity 


3 


Physics Laboratory 1 ntroduction 


1 


Introductory Physics: Fields 


3 


Introductory Physics: Waves 


3 


Experimental Physicsl: Mechanics and Heat 


2 


Experimental Physicsll: Electricity and 


2 


Magnetism 




IntermediateTheoretical Methods 


4 


Quantum Physicsl 


4 


1 ntroducti on to Stati sti cal Themnodynami cs 


3 


Calculus 1 


4 


Cal cuius II 


4 


1 ntroducti on to L i near A 1 gebra 


4 


CeJcuIusIII 


4 


Differential Equationsfor Scientists and Engineers 


3 



Detai I ed i nf omnati on on typi cal programs and al temati ves to the standard program can be found i n the pamphl et enti tl ed, Department Requirements for a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Astronomy which is avail able from the Astronomy Department office. 

Requirements for theMinor 

A M i nor i n A stronomy may be earned by compl eti ng the f ol I owi ng wi th grades of C or better. A n appoi ntment must be made to regi ster for the mi nor before f i nal 
30 credits are taken. Please 

contact Department for compl ete rul es and procedures. 

C recite 

ASTR100 I ntroducti on to Astronomy, OR 3 

ASTRlOlGeneral Astronomy, OR 4 

ASTRl-any other I ntroductory sequence i n Astronomy 

ASTR220 Collisions in Space 3 

Three from 

ASTR300 Stars and Stellar Systems 3 

ASTR330 Solar System A stronomy 3 

ASTR340 Origin of the Universe 3 

ASTR380 Life in the Uni verse - Astrobiology 3 

ASTR498 Special Problems in Astronomy 3 

CRSxx Or a course approved by the department 3 

Internships 

M any undergraduate students do astronomy research i ntemshi ps at the N ASA/Goddard Space F I i ght Center. M ore i nf omnati on i s avai I abl e on the department 
website under U nderqraduate Research '. 

Honors Program 

T he H onors Program offers students of excepti onal abi I ity and i nterest i n A stronomy opportuni ti es f or research parti ci pad on. H onors students work wi th a f acul ty 
advi sor on a research proj ect for whi ch academi c credit i s earned. Certai n graduate courses are open for credi t toward the bachel or's degree (Students are accepted 
i nto the H onors Program by the Department's H onors C ommi ttee on the basi s of grade poi nt average or recommendati onoffaculty.)Honors candi dates enrol I in 
ASTR 399, compl ete a research proj ect, writeathesisanddoanoral presentation before a committee. Satisfactory grades lead to graduation With Honors (or High 
Honors) in Astronomy. 

For Additional I nformation 

Further information about advising and the Honors Program can be obtai ned by calling the Departmentof Astronomy office at 301-405-3001. Students who have 
been away more than two years may f i nd that due to curri cul um changes the courses they have taken may no I onger be adequate preparati on for the courses requi red 
to compl ete the maj or. Students i n thi s si tuati on must meet wi th the D epartmental A dvi sor to make appropri ate pi ans. 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sdence(ATMOS) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3417 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 301-405-5391 
www.atmos.umd.edu 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 234 



Chair: J. Carton 

Professors: A. Busalacchi, J . Carton, R. Dickerson, R. Hudson, E. Kalnay, Z. Li, X. Liang, R. Murtugudde; S. Nigam, R. Pinker, R. Salawitch, D. Zhang 

Associate Professors: N. Zeng 

Assistant Professors: K. Ide(AsstProf) 

Adjunct Professors: C. Brown, R. Col well (Dist Univ Prof Emerita, Affiliate Prof), H. VanDenDool, B.Doddridge, R, Higgins, M. King,V. Kousky, K. Pickering, 

L. Uccellini, A. Vemekar 

Professors Emeriti: F. Baer, R. Ellingson 

Requirements for theMinor 

T hree M i nor tracks are avai I abl e: 
M i nor i n M eteorol ogy 
M i nor i n Atmospheri c Sci ences 
M i nor i n Atmospheri c Chemi stry 

TheMinor in Meteorology is the most suitable preparation for graduate students in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science For more details visit: atmos.umd.edu/MINOR 
or contact the Undergraduate Advisor, R. Hudson: (hudson@atmos.umd.edu). 

Minor in Meteorology 

T hi s M i nor wi 1 1 provi de the students wi th a general background i n M eteorol ogy as offered by the I ower I evel courses, and a broader background on a wi de range of 
sub-f i el ds i n M eteorol ogy and on current i ssues i n C I i mate Research, as provi ded by the two requi red courses. Thi s M i nor i s ai med at students who wi sh to be 
i nf omned about thi s f i el d, who do not have an a pri ori i nterest to pursue graduate work i n thi s f i el d, but who mi ght pursue careers where background i n M eteorol ogy 
i s i mportant such as envi ronmental pol i cy, government and i ndustry . T hi s M i nor i s not open to students who maj or i n Physi cal Sci ences wi th a concentrati on i n 
meteorol ogy, or who maj or i n Physi cs wi th the M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two elective from: 

. METO 123 Global Change) 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any other 400 level courses offered below as elective 

Two required course: 

. METO 400 The Atmosphere 

• M ETO 401 Global Envi ronment 

One additional elective from 

• Any 400 level course offered i n the Department of M eteorol ogy on a regular basis or from a I ist of non- permanent elective that wi II be offered by Research 
Scientists, regular faculty from M eteorol ogy, or members of theEarth System Science I nterdi sci pi i nary Center (ESSIC) 

• Course offered by the Department of Geology and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 (Global Climate Change: Past and Present) 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetland Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 

• GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor in Atmospheric Sciences 

T hi s mi nor wi 1 1 provi de a general background i n meteorol ogy as offered by the I ower I evel course, and a sol i d background i n A trrospheri c Physi cs ( M ETO 431) 
and Atmospheric Dynamics (METO 432), as offered by two requi red course. It is aimed at students that might consider graduate work in Meteorology, or prepare 
them for the very f avorabl e j ob market i n theWashi ngton area, where a background i n M eteorol ogy can be an i mportant asset Students attempti ng thi s mi nor wi 1 1 
need as strong background in Mathematics, Physi cs and Chemi stry at the I evel of MATH 240 or 461, PHY S 270 and PHY S 271; CHEM 103, which are 
prerequi si te for the requi red course. Student i nterested i n taki ng thi s M i nor program shoul d contact the undergraduate advi sor i n the Department of meteorol ogy 
for advisement Thi srri nor is not open to students who maj or in Physi cal Science with a concentrati on in meteorol ogy, or who maj or in Physics within the 
M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

This minor will require 15 credits. All course preented for the mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

T he students must choose two el ecti ve from: 

. METO 123 Global Change 

• M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 
. METO 400 The Atmosphere 

The following two course are requi red: 

• M ETO 431 Meteorology for Scientists and Engi neers I 

• METO 432 M eteorol ogy f or Sci enti sts and E ngi neers 1 1 

One elective from: 

• Other 400 level course offered in the Department of Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent elective that will be offered by 
Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorol ogy, or members of theEarth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) 

• Course offered by the Department of Geology and Geography, such as: 

. GEOL 437 Global CI innate Change: Past and Present 
. GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetland Hydrology) 
. GEOG 446Applied Climatology 

• GEOG 447 Advanced Biogeography 

• GEOG 472 Remote sensing 

Minor in Atmospheric Chemistry 

T hi s mi nor wi 1 1 provi de the students wi th a general background i n M eteorol ogy as offered by the I ower I evel requi red course, and a background on i ssue i n 
Atmospheric Chemistry. This Mi nor track is intended for students who might pursue careers where background in Atmospheric Chemistry is needed, such as Air 
Pol lution, Atmospheric Chemistry, and envi ronmental issue. 1 1 is ai med at students that might consider graduate work i n Atmospheric Chemistry, or prepare them 
for a very f avorabl e j ob market i n theWashi ngton area, where a background i n M eteorol ogy can be an i mportant asset Students attempti ng thi s mi nor wi 1 1 need a 
strong background in mathematics, Physics and Chemistry at the I evel of MATH 240 or 461, PHYS 270 and PHYS 271, CHEM 481 (preferred) or CHEM 103, 
whi ch are prerequi si te for the requi red course. Students i nterested i n taki ng thi s mi nor program shoul d contact the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 235 



M eteorol ogy . T hi s mi nor i s not open to students who maj or i n Physi cal Sci ences wi th a concentrati on i n M eteorol ogy, or who maj or i n Physi cs wi thi n the 
M eteorol ogy Physi cs area of concentrati on. 

A total of 15 credits is required. All courses presented for the Mi nor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

The students must choose two elective from: 

.METO 123 Global Change 

. M ETO 200 Weather and CI i mate 

• Any METO 400 level courseoffered below as elective 

The following two courses are required: 

• M ETO 431 Meteorology for Scientists and Engi neers I 

• MET0 434AirPollution 

One elective from: 

• CHEM 474 (Environmental Chemistry) 

. GEOL 471 (Geochemical Methods of Analysis) 

• Other 400 level courses offered in the Department of Meteorology on a regular basis or from a list of non-permanent electives that will be offered by 
Research Scientists, regular faculty from Meteorology, or members of theEarth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) 

• Courses offered by the Department of Geography and Geol ogy such as: 

GEOG 446 (Applied Climatology) 

GEOG 447 (Advanced Biogeography) 

GEOG 472 (Remote Sensing) 

GEOL 437 (Global Climate Change: Past and Present) 

GEOL 452 (Watershed and Wetiand Hydrology) 



FISCHELL DEPARTMENT OF BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) 

A.James Clark School of Encj neeri ng 

2330JeongH. Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-7426 

www.bioe.umd.edu/ 

bioe-undergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: W. Bentley (Prof, Chair) 

DirectonJ. Fisher (Assoc Prof, Assoc Chair, Undergraduate Program Director), P. Kofi nas (Prof, Assoc Chair, Graduate Program Director) 

Professors: P. Bryan (Prof), G. Payne, Y. Tao 

Associate Professors: E. Eisenstein (Assoc Prof), K. Herold, H. Montas, B. Shapiro, Y. Yu (joint with UMD School of Pharmacy) 

Assistant Professors: J . Aranda-Espinoza, Y . Chen, A. Hsieh, S. Matysiak (Asst Prof), S. Muro, J . Seog (joint with UMCP ENMS), S. Shah, I. White 

Professors E meri ti : A . J ohnson 

The Maj or 

Bioengineering is a field rooted in physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and life sci ences. E ach of these areas is applied in a systematic, quantitative, and 
i ntegrati ve way to approach probl ems i mportant i n biol ogy, bi osystems, medi cal research, and cl i ni cal practi ce. B i oengi neeri ng advances fundamental concepts, 
creates knowl edge from the mol ecul ar to organ to system I evel s, and devel ops i nnovati ve processes for the preventi on, di agnosi s, and treatment of di sease. I n short, 
bi oengi neeri ng seeks to i mprove the heal th and I i f e of humanki nd on many I evel & 

Bi oengi neers specialize in those products and processes madefrom, used with, or applied to biological organisms. In addition to engineering science and design, 
bioengi neers study cell biology, physiology, bioinfomnatics, bioimaging, and biomechanics. The synthesis of engineering and biology gives bi oengi neers unique 
capabi I i ti es i n our modem worl d. 

Prqy am Obj actives 

Our curri cul um emphasi zes the pri nci pi es of bi ol ogy, physi ol ogy, engi neeri ng, and desi gn. In addi ti on to the techni cal aspects, the curri cul um al so i ncorporates 
ethi cs, economi cs, and patent concepts. A 1 1 of these areas of study create a ri ch educati onal experi ence, one that prepares our graduates for success i n the 
professional world. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Demonstrate knowl edge of fundamental pri nci pi es i n engi neeri ng and bi ol ogy 

2. Denxinstratecorrmtmenttothebiological engi neeri ng/biomedi cal engineering sector 

3. Experi ence a mul ti cul tural , col I egi ate worki ng envi ronment 

4. Gai n experi ence i n desi gn and group proj ects 

5. Develop an ability to write and present their projects effectively 

Admission to the M aj or 

Students who wi sh to study at the A . J ames C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng appl y f or admi ssi on to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and; there i s no separate appl i cati on f or 
engineering. When filling out the university application, you may choose bioengineering as your intended major. You may also apply as an undecided engineering 
major. 

All Bioengineering majors must meet admi ssi on, progress, and retention standards of the A. J ames CI ark School of Engineering. 

Please note: If you are applying to Bioengineering as a transfer student (whether you are an internal Clark School transfer, external UMD transfer, or transferring 
from an outside institution), then you must completeBlOE 120 with a 3.0 before you will be admitted into the department If you wish to enrol I, please send an 
e-mail withyourUIDtoMichelleFrenchatrrfrench@umd.edu. You will be will be notified by e-mail when permission has been granted. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Requirements for theMaj or 

F ol I owi ng i s the I i st of the course requi rements for the B i oengi neeri ng U ndergraduate Program on semester basi s. Each stLident f ol I owi ng the course tempi ate 
should beableto graduate in 4 years. Each student will meet with his/her Faculty Advisor every semester to plan the schedule of courses for the subsequent 
semester. Someof the students in the bioengi neeri ng program may elect to pursue professional degrees such as Medical, Dental, Law, etc., thus they may need 
certai n courses that those prof essi onal school s requi re and they shoul d be aware of i t and di scuss i t wi th thei r Facul ty A dvi sor. Some of these courses may easi I y be 
taken as "Biological ScienceElectives" to avoid extra load. Students interested in health professions may also view the requi rements atwww.preheal th.urrd.edu . 





FRESHMEN YEAR 


1st 
Serrester 


2nd 
Serrester 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


4 




MATH 141 


Calculus II 




4 


CHEM135 
CHEM136 

ENES100 


General Chemistry for 
Engineers 
General Chemfor 
Engineers Lab 
Introduction to 
Engineering Design (**can 
be taken 1st or 2nd semester) 


3 

1 

3 




ENES102 


Mechanics 1 (** can be taken 
1st or 2nd semester) 




3 


ENGL101 


1 ntroducti on to W ri ti ng 




3 


PHYS161 


General Physics 




3 


BIOE120 


B i ol ogy f or E ngi neers 


3 




BIOE121 


Biology for Engi neers Lab 


1 






COREI 




3 




Total 


15 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 






MATH246 


Differential Equations for 
Sci and Engr 




3 


CHEM231 


Organic Chemistry 


3 




CHEM232 


Organic Chemistry Lab 


1 




BSCI330 
ENES220 


Cell Biology and 
Physiology 
Mechanics II 


4 
3 




PHYS260 


General Physics 


3 




PHYS261 


General Physics Lab 


1 




BIOE241 


B i ocomputati on M ethods 




3 


ENME232 TU 

or ENME320 Tnermod y narT1cs 




3 


BioSci 


Electivel* 




3 




CORE II 




3 




Total 


15 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 






MATH241 


Calculus III 


4 




BIOE332 


Transport Processes Desi gn 




3 


BIOE340 


Physi ol ogi cal Systems and 
Lab 


4 




BIOE420 


Bioimaging 




3 


BIOE453 


Biomaterials 




3 


BIOE454 


BiomaterialsLab 




1 


BIOE455 


Basic Electronic Design 


3 




BIOE331 


Biofluids 


3 




BioSci 


Electivell* 




3 




CORE III 


3 





7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 





CORE IV 




3 




Total 


17 


16 




SENIOR YEAR 






ENGL393 


Technical Writing 


3 




BIOE404 


Biomechanics 




3 


BIOE456 


B ^instrumentation 


3 




BIOE471 


B i ol ogi cal Systems Control 


3 




BIOE485 


Capstone 1 


3 




BIOE486 


Capstone 1 1 




3 


BioSci 


Electi velll* 




3 


EngSci 


Electivel** 


3 




EngSci 


Electi veil** 




3 




COREV 


3 






CORE VI 




3 




Total 


18 


15 




Total Credits for Degree 


127 



*PI ease visit www.bioe.unxJ.edu/urdergrad/ug-bio-electives.htrinl for a sample list of acceptable Biological Science el ectives. Other courses may be acceptable 
pendi ng advi sor approval . One of these courses have to be at 300 or above I evel , one has to be at 200 or above I evel , and the thi rd one can be at any I evel . 
**Please visit www.bioeumd.edu/undergrad/ug-scitech-electives.html for a sample list of acceptable Engineering electi ves. Other courses may be acceptable 
pendi ng advi sor approval . One of these courses must be at the 300 or above I evel and the other course can be at any I evel approved by the advi sor. 

Advising 

Every student majoring in bi oengi neeri ng is assigned a faculty advisor. You will receive an email from the department with your advi sor assignment at the 
beginning of your first semester in the department All students are to meet with their advi sor each semester before they will be able to register for the next 
semester's courses. 1 1 i s hoped that the advi sor wi 1 1 al so serve as a mentor and conf i dante. PI ease f eel free to contact hi m/her wi th any questi ons and concerns you 
may have throughout your academi c career. A ny addi ti onal questi ons about the program may be di rected to the B i oengi neeri ng Department Off i ce, 2330 J eong H . 
Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-7426. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A 1 1 students i n our maj or have the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n research i n state-of-the-art I abs on campus or at surroundi ng government or i ndustri al I ocati ons, ei ther 
through projects within the Department or through the Engineering Co-op and Career Services office. Special programs arid services include theASPI RE Program, 
i n whi ch students col I aborate wi th f acul ty and staff on real - worl d engi neeri ng proj ects; the M aryl and Center f or U ndergraduate Research, whi ch assi sts students i n 
finding on and off campus research opportunities; and the NSF-sponsored Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, in which students work with 
full -time faculty, visiting scientists, and others on relevant research. Our REU site is the only one of its kind in the nation dedicated to molecular and cellular 
engineering. 

Honors Program 

We are pi eased to announce the creati on of the Fi schel I Department of B i oengi neeri ng U ndergraduate Honors Program The goal s of thi s program are to encourage 
the parti ci pad on of excepti onal undergraduate students i n cutti ng-edge bi oengi neeri ng research duri ng the; r j uni or and seni or years. The honors program has been 
desi gned to compl ement team- based desi gn proj ects and coursework that are part of the undergraduate curri cul um G ui del i nes i ncl ude the f ol I owi ng: 

Students shoul d appl y f or admi ssi on to the H onors Program i n the spri ng of thei r sophomore year. 

Students must have compl eted at I east 60 credi ts by the end of thei r sophomore year. 

Students shoul d sel ect a f acul ty mentor engaged i n bi oengi neeri ng research. 

Withinputfromthis mentor, students shoul d propose an i ndependent research proj ect to be compl eted duri ng thei r j uni or and seni or years. 

Students will submi t a progress report detai I i ng thei r research progress i n the spri ng of thei r j uni or year. 

Students wi 1 1 submi t a wri tten thesi s and present thei r research i n the spri ng of thei r seni or year. 

F acul ty mentors must cormni t to gui de the student through hi s/her research proj ect and provi de appropri atefacilities to compl ete the proposed proj ect 

F acul ty mentors must submi t a bri ef statement i ndi cati ng suff i ci ent research progress i n the spri ng of the student's j uni or year. 

Students are wel come to parti ci pate i n other honors programs, but research compl eted for the departmental honors program may not be used to sati sfy the 
requi rements of another honors program 

H onors wi 1 1 be conferred at graduati on upon compl eti on of the enti re two-year program 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

T he U ni versi ty and the A . J ames C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng offer a range of f i nanci al support to tal ented undergraduate students enrol I ed at the School . Off eri ngs 
i ncl ude the A . J ames C I ark E ndowed Schol arshi p f und and the B enj arri n T . Rome Schol arshi p. O ur program i s competi ti ve, wi th awards made on the basi s of meri t, 
financial need, and other factors. For rmre information on a variety of scholarships, pleasevisitwww.ursp.umd.edu. 

In addition, the Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assi stance programs and, in cooperation with 
other university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, please visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 238 



We al so have several departmental annual awards and schol arshi ps that students may appl y and be sel ectecl based on thei r schol asti c achi evements, servi ce to the 
department and the prof essi on. These award are open to j uni ors and seni ors i n the program I nf ormati on on these annual awards and schol arshi p may be obtai ned 
from the facul ty advi sors i n the department 

Awards and Recognition 

A SA B E Student H onor: academi c achi evement servi ce to the department student branch parti ci pad on, and other extracurri cul ar acti vi ti es ( 1 student) 

Washi ngton D C- M ary I and Secti on of A SA B E Schol arshi p: academi c achi evement and contri buti on to the department and student branch ( 3 students) 

Fischell Dept of BioeOutstanding Junior Award presented by Chair: outstanding academic achi evement and contributions to the dept (2 students) 

Fischell Dept of BioeOutstanding Senior Award presented by faculty: academic achievement and contributions to the profession and department (2 students) 

Seymour & FayeWolfeScholarship: Bioengineering student (1 student). 

Outstandi ng Research Award: contri buti on to research i ncl udi ng hours spent i n I ab, co-authorshi p of papers, si gni f i cant breakthroughs i n area of research. A bi I i ty to 
mai ntai n hi gh G PA whi I e perf ormi ng research wi 1 1 al so be consi dered. 

Outstanding Volunteer Award: hours spent performing and the nature of volunteeringactivitiesconsidered. M ai ntai ning high G PA also considered. 

Outstanding Citizen Award: overall contri buti on to department university, profession, andsociety considered. GPA will be taken into account as well. 

Biological Sciences Program (BSC I) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences 

1322 Symons Hall, 301-405-6892 

http://chembi o. unxl.edu/undergraduateprograms 

Dr.JoellePresson, Assistant Dean Academic Undergraduate Programs; Dr. MarciaShofner, Assistant Director Biological Sciences Program 

The Major 

The Biological Sciences major is jointly offered by the Departments of Biology, Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics, and Entomology in the Col lege of Computer, 
M athemati cal , and N atural Sci ences. All Biological Sci ences maj ors compl ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the B asi c 
Program In addition, students must complete an Advanced Program within one of the following specialization areas: 

• Cell Biology & Genetics (CEBG) 

• Ecology & Evolution (ECEV) 

• General Biology (GENB) 

• Microbiology (MICB) 

• Physiology & Neurobiology (PHNB) 
. Individualized Studies (BIVS) 

A complete list of specialization area requirements can be found on our website, chembio.umd.edu/undergraduateprograms. Note that the Individualized Studies 
specialization (BIVS) requires permission of the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Academic Programs, and involves an approved proposal to do coursework in the 
Col I ege and i n other di sci pi i nes. Further questi ons about B i ol ogi cal Sci ences can be di rected to the U ndergraduate Academi c Program Off i ce at 301-405-6892. 

Bidocj cal Sci ences at theUniversity of Maryland at Shady Grove 

TheBiological Sciences Program at the University of Maryland offers a degree program at Universities at Shady Grove TheBiological Sciences Program at Shady 
Grove offers theAdvanced Program courses normally taken inthej uni or and seni or years. More information is avail able at: 
chembi o. umd. edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Students shoul d have mastered the cri ti cal knowl edge at each I evel i n the curri cul um that i s necessary to move on to the next I evel i n the curri cul um 

2. Students should demonstrate an ability to use and apply quantitative methods, especially: interpretation of graphical or tabular data; expression of physical, 
chemi cal , or bi ol ogi cal process i n mathemati cal form; sol vi ng equati ons to determi ne the val ue of physi cal , chemi cal , or bi ol ogi cal vari abl es. 

3. Students at the lower I evel should demonstrate an ability to carry out key experimental techniques used in the chemi cal and life sci ences disciplines. 

4. Students at the I ower I evel shoul d have a basi c understand ng of how to express questi ons as a hypothesi s, how to desi gn a test of a hy pothesi s, and how to gather 
and anal yze si mpl e data. 

5. Students at the upper I evel shoul d be abl e to i ntegrate and appl y a rel evant body of basi c knowl edge to the eval uati on of exi sti ng sci enti f i c studi es and to desi gn 
studi es to test sped f i c hypotheses that i ncl udes desi gn el errents typi cal I y found i n a sped f i c f i el d of the chemi cal and I i f e sci ences. 

6. Students should effectively communicate in writing the processes of science and the results of scientific inquiry. 



T he B i ol ogi cal Sci ences majorisaLimitedE nrol I ment Program PI ease see the adrri ssi on requi rements and procedures at: 
chembi o. umd. edu/undergraduateprograms/advi si ng/howtobecomeacl f smaj or. 



Admission to the Maj or 

TheBiological Sciences majc 
chembi o. umd. edu/undergradi 

Requirements for the Maj or 

C recite 
CORE CORE Proyam Requirements 30 

15 

4 
4 
3 
4 

30-32 





Basic Program in Biological Sdences 


BSCI105 


Principles of Biology 1 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II 


BSCI207 


Principles of Biology III 


BSCI222 


Principles of Genetics 




Supporting courses 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



MATH 130 or 

MATH 140 
MATH 131 or 

MATH 141 
CHEM 131/132 
CHEM231/232 
CHEM241/242 
CHEM271/272 
PHYS121or 

PHYS141 
PHYS122or 

PHYS142 



ELECT 



Calculus I 

Calculus II 

Fundamentals of General Chemistry /Lab 

Organic Chemistry I / Lab 

Organic Chemistry II / Lab 

GenChem& Energetics/Gen Bioanalytical Lab 

F undamental s of Physi cs I , or 

Principles of Physics 

F undamental s of Physi cs 1 1 , or 

Principles of Physics 

Advanced Program in Special ization Area 

See websi te for detai I s of sped al i zati on A rea 
requirements. 

Elective 



3 

4 
3 

4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

Z7 



15-18 



A grade of C or better i s requi red for B SC I 105, 106, 207, 222, al I courses i n the advanced program, and al I support ng courses ( math, chemi stry , and physi cs) . 
Majors in Biological Sci ences cannot use any B SCI, CHEM orBCHM course to fulfill CORE Advanced Studies requirements, including courses in CHEM or 
BCHM. 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory duri ng each pre- regi strati on peri od f or al I B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors. A 1 1 freshmen and new transfer students will be assi gned an advi sor 
from the Col lege of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sci ences Student Services advi sing staff. Students will be assi gned to a departmental faculty advi sor once 
a basi c sequence of courses has been successful I y compl eted. The departmental f acul ty advi sors are coordi nated by the f ol I owi ng persons for the i ndi cated 
sped al i zati on areas. T hese coordi nati ng advi si ng off i ces can be contacted for maki ng appoi ntments wi th an advi sor or for any other i nf ormarj on regard ng that 
specialization area. 

Straney 1225 H.J. Patterson 301-405-2766 CEBG,GENB,MICB 

Jensen 2227 Biology- Psychology 301-405-6904 ECEV, PHNB 

Kent 3142 PI ant Sci ences 301-405-3911 GENB 

Presson 1322SyrrnnsHall 301-405-6892 BIVS, Education Double major 

Honors Program 

Outstandi ng students are encouraged to apply to departmental Honors Programs. Through the Honors Programs students wi 1 1 become actively i nvol ved i n the 
ongoing scientific research at the university. I nformarjon about these honors programs may be obtained from the UndergraduateAcademic Programs Office, 1322 
Symons Hall, 301-405-6892. 

Bidogy(BIOL) 

College of Chemical and Life Sciences 

2227 Biology-Psychology Building, 301-405-6904 

www.biol.umd.edu 

bi oundergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: G.Wilkinson (Prof) 

Professors: G. Borgia, C. Carr, A. Cohen, M. ColombiniJ. Dietz, W. Fagan, C. Fenster, D. Inouye, W.Jeffery, T. Kocher, R. Payne, A. Popper, M. Reaka, S. 

Sukharev, S. Via 

Associate Professors: I.Ades.A. Bely, K.Carleton, M.Cummings, M. Dudash, I . Forseth, E. Haag, W. Higgins, K. Lips, C. Machado, E. QuinlanJ. Simon 

Assistant Professors: R. Araneda, D. Butts, C. Castillo- Davis, P. Kanold, D. Soares 

I nstructors: J . Opoku-Edusei 

Lecturers: R. Compton (Senior Led), R. lnfanrJno(SeniorLect),J.Jensen(SeniorLect), B. Parent, A. Villamagna 

Professors Emeriti: G. Anastos, E. Clark, J. Corliss, D.Gill, A. Haley, R. Highton, S. Pierce 



Requirements for the Major 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program el sewhere in this chapter, or contact the Department of B i ol ogy U ndergraduate Off i ce. 

Advising 

Students are assi gned an advisor based on their area of specialization. The Department of Biology faculty coordinate and advise students who specialize in 
Physiology and Neurobiology (PHNB), and Ecology and Evolution (ECEV). Contact the Department of Biology Undergraduate Office, 405-6904, for information 
about advi si ng or to schedul e an appoi ntment For advi si ng i n other B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Sped al i zati on areas, see the B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program I i sti ng i n thi s 
catalog. 

Honors Program 

The Department of Biology Honors Program offers highly nmrj vated and academically qual ified students the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor on 
an ori gi nal , i ndependent research proj ect Students are requi red to parti ci pate i n the program for at I east three semesters and need not have been admi tted to the 
Honors Col I ege i n order to parti ci pata Contact the undergraduate off i ce for more i nf ormarj on. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 240 



Business, General 

For information, seeManagement& Organization elsewherein Chapter 7. 

CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (CEBG) 

College of C hemical and L ife Sciences 

1109 M icrobiology Building, 301-405-5435 

www. cbmg. umd.edu 

Chai r: N . A ndrews (Prof) 

Director: D. Straney (Assoc. Prof) 

Professors: N.AIIewefl, N. Andrews (Chair), C. Chang, T. Cooke, C. DelwicheJ. Dinrman, S. Hannenhalli (Assoc Prof), S. Hutcheson, R. Mariuzza(IBBR), D. 

MosserJ. Moult(IBBR), D. Nuss(IBBR), A. Simon, D. Stein, H. Sze 

Associate Professors: S. Benson, V. Briken, J . DeStefano, N. El-Sayed, S. Hannenhalli (CBCB), J . Kwak, Z. Liu, K. Mclver, S. Mount, W. Song, R. Stewart, L. Wu 

(IBBR) 

Assistant Professors: K. Cao, K. Frauwirth, B. Fredericksen, V. Lee, S. Walsh (IBBR) 

Instructors: A. Smith 

Lecturers: E. Moctezuma, B. Quimby, P. Shields 

Affiliate Professors: M. Colombini (Biol), W.J effery (Biol), I. Mather (ANGR), S. Salzberg (CBCB) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Ades(Biol), I. Hamza (AGNR), D. Perez (AGNR), L. Pick(Ent) 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: M. Pop(CBCB) 

Adj unct Professors: J. Culver (IBBR), P. Hobart(USAMRIID), A. McB ride (Adjunct Prof), B. Moss (NIH), V. Vakharia (UMBI), O. White (TIGR), R. Wickner 

(NIH) 

Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Freed (NCI), K. Green (NIH) 

Professors Emeriti: G. Bean, T. Cook (Prof Emeritus), R. Doetsch, E. Gantt(DistUnivProf), F. Hetrick, S.Joseph, G. Patterson, M. PelczarJ. Reveal, B. Roberson, 

R. Weiner, R. Yuan 

The Major 

The department participates in the teaching and advising of students in the Biological Sciences Program, specifically in the Specialization Areas of Cell Biology & 
Genetics (CEBG), Microbiology (MICB), and General Biology (GENB). Our courses are taught in four basic areas that represent faculty research interests and 
expertise including: 

• Cell and Developmental Biology 

* Genetics and Genomics 

* Microbiology, Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology 

• Plant Biology 

Requirements for the Specialization Areas 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program catal og entry for more i nf omnati on on the degree requi rements. 

Admission to the M aj or 

TheBSCI major is a limited enroll nrent program Please refer to the limited enrollment programs pageat http://www.lep.urrd.edu/ for further information. 

Requirements for theMaj or 

See B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program catal og entry for more i nf omnati on on the degree requi rements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for certain students (freshmen, change in major, GPA of 2.5 or below). The Department in coordination with the Student Affairs Office of the 
Collegeof Chemical and Life Sci ences administers the advising of students in the Biol ogi cal Sciences specialization areas of Microbiology, Cell Biology and 
Geneti cs, and General B i ol ogy. Advi si ng assi gnments can be found by contacti ng the Cel I B i ol ogy and M ol ecul ar Geneti cs U ndergraduate Program Off i ce, 1212 
H.J. Patterson Hall (301-405-2766) or see the site: www.cbrrg.unrl.edLi/urdergrad/advising.com 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students may parti ci pate i n Department hosted research experi ences i n faculty I aboratori es or I aboratori es at off campus I ocati ons. PI ease contact the Cel I B i ol ogy 
and M ol ecul ar Geneti cs U ndergraduate Off i ce (301-405-2766) for more i nf omnati on or see the site: http://www.cbma. umd.edu/underaraduate/researchopportuni ties 

Honors Program 

The Departmental Honors Program involves a long term (three semester) independent research project undertaken with a faculty advisor. PI ease contact the Cel I 
B i ol ogy and M ol ecul ar Geneti cs U ndergraduate Off i ce for more i nf ormati on or see the si te: http://www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergraduate/researchopportuni ti es 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

All students interested in microbiology are encouraged to join the University of Maryland Student Chapter of the American Society for Microbiol ogy. Sigma Alpha 
Omi cron i s the honors chapter of thi s group. The groups meet regul arly on campus. I nf ormati on i s avai I abl e through the U ndergraduate Program Off i ce. 

Awards and Recognition 

T he department recogni zes graduati ng seni ors wi th awards funded by generous donors. T hese are I i sted at 

htt p: // vwwv. cbmg. urnd. edu/schol arshi psavvards . 



Central European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERE) 
College of Arts and Humanities 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 241 



2106J imenez Ha 1 1, 301-405-4244 

www.ceres.umd.edu 

cmartin@unnd.edu 

Director: C. Martin 

Professors: R. Brecht, M. David-Fox, J. HerfJ. Lampe, S. Mansbach, P. Mun"eil,J. Robinson, V.Tismaneanu 

Associate Professors: K.Gor, D.Hitchcock, M. Isaacs (Visit Assoc Prof), J. Kaminski, M. Lekic, C. Martin, C. Schuler 

Assistant Professors: E.Adler (Visit Asst Prof), K. David-Fox, E. Papazian 

The Major 

TheCERES program fosters in-depth knowledge of the region stretching from Prague in the West to Vladivostok in the East This includes three main areas: Central 
and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia (the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union). Our majors prepare for careers and graduate programs in which 
an in-depth knowledge of Russia, Central Europe, and Eurasia can be applied with great benefit, such as journal ism, government service; diplomacy, business, a 
variety of professional schools, and MA. and Ph.D. programs in the humanities and social sciences. Our majors take courses in a rangeof different departments, 
gaining a firm grounding in the languages, literatures, history, politics, and economics of their area of study. They havetheflexibility to do coursework in other 
fields related to the area as well . Students learn to examine our area of study with the tools of many scholarly fields.Coursesthat count toward this major may be 
found under the foil owing acronyms: ARTH, ECON, GEOG, GERM, GVPT, HIST, PHIL, RUSS, SOCY, THET. 

Prog-am Learning Outcomes 

Having completed the multi-disciplinary degree program, students are expected to attain the foil owing I earning outcomes: 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to 
communicate effectively in writing in either Russian, German, or a Central/East European language (including Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian, 
Bulgarian, and Romanian); or in a Eurasian language (i.e, a language from a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). 2. Students will demonstrate the ability to 
conduct research usi ng pri mary and secondary sources i ncl udi ng archival , pri nt and non-pri nt, and web- based texts. 3. Students wi 1 1 denmnstrate understand ng of 
and sensitivity to cultural diversity by studying a variety of cultures and societies within theCERE region. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

Admission to the M aj or 

A dmi ssi on i s open to al I i nterested students but shoul d be approved i n a meeti ng wi th the D i rector. 
Placement in Courses 

Placement in language courses is determined by the advisor for a given language. 
Requirements for the Major 

Requirements for the CERES major include the Col lege of Arts and Humanities's mandated completion of 45 upper-level credits. The College's foreign-language 
requirement will beautomatically fulfilled in the process of fulfill ing the CERES requirement of taking either Russian, German, or a Central/East European 
I anguage ( i ncl udi ng Czech, Pol i sh, H ungari an, Serbi an and C roati an, B ul gari an, and Romani an) T he I anguage requi rement may al so be f ul f i 1 1 ed by a E urasi an 
language (i.e., a languagefrom a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). Those interested in fulfilling theCERES I anguage requi rement through a Central/East 
E uropean or E urasi an I anguage shoul d consul t the di rector upon enteri ng the program 

Students who el ect the Russi an I anguage track must compl ete a mi ni mum of 24 credi t hours i n Russi an I anguage and I iterature selected from among the foil owing 
courses ( or thei r equi val ents) : 

Crafts 

RUSS101 Intensive Elementary Russian I 6 

RUSS102 Intensive Elementary Russian II 6 

RU SS201 I ntemnedi ate Russi an I 5 

RU SS202 I ntemnedi ate Russi an 1 1 5 

RUSS301 Advanced Russian I 3 

RUSS302 Advanced Russian II 3 

RUSS303 Russian Conversation: Functional Skills 3 

RUSS321 Survey of Russian Literature I 3 

RUSS322 Survey of Russian Literature 1 1 3 

RUSS401 Advanced Russian Composition 3 

RUSS402 Practicum in Written Russian 3 

RUSS403 Russian Conversation: Advanced Skills 3 

RUISS404 Practicum in Spoken Russian 3 

Students interested in specializing primarily on Central/Eastern Europe may opt for the German I anguage track, and must compl ete a mini mum of 24 credit hours in 
the Department of Gemnani c Studi es from among the f ol I owi ng courses (or thei r equi val ents) : 

Credits 
GERM 103 Intensive Elementary German 4 

GERM203 Intensive Intermediate German 4 

GERM301 Conversation and Composition I 3 

GERM302 Conversation and Composition II 3 

• Also accepted will be 16 credit hours of Russian or German and the equivalent of 8 credit hours of a Central/East European language. 

• Fulfilling the language requirement through a Eurasian language will be decided on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the director. 

• In addition to I anguage courses, students must compl ete 24 hours of CERES approved courses at the 300- level or above. These 24 hours must betaken in at 
least four differert clepartments (with the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures counting as a single department), and may include 

I anguage- 1 i terature courses beyond the requi red 24 hours. Of the 24 hours, at I east 9 hours must be i n courses wi th substanti al or sped f i c focus on 
Central /East E uroflfcr exarrpe, ARTH 350 or 488C, GVPT 359, 409, HIST 319, 340, 443 and other special courses offered in the CERES area with the 
approval of the director) and at least 9 hours must be i n thoseCERES courses with substantial or specific Russian/Eurasian focus (for exarrple, GEOG 325, 
GVPT 445, 451, 459A, 481, HIST 344, 424, 425, 442, SOCY 474, THET 499, and other special courses offered in theCERES area with theapproval of the 
director). 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 242 



Forafull listing of this year's CERES courses, seethewebsitewww.ceres.umd.edu, and click on "requirements." 

The vari ous cooperating departments also offer special (i.e non- permanent) seminars and courses in the Russian, East European, and Eurasian fields. HIST 
237- Russi an C i vi I i zati on, i s recommended as a general i ntroducti on to the program but does not count toward the f ul f i 1 1 mant of the program's requi rements. 

Advising 

Course selection and progress toward programmatic requi rements are to be discussed individually through meetings with the CERES director. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students are encouraged to pursue research, i ntemshi p and study abroad experi ences. Such opportuni ti es shoul d be di scussed individuallywiththeDi rector. 

Internships 

Students are encouraged to seek off-campus internships that may be available in the greater DC-Baltimore area. Earning academic credit for such experi ences should 
be di scussed i ndi vi dual I y wi th the D i rector. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (UNDERGRADUATE) 

Certificate Prog-am I nformation and Requi rements 

African American Studies Certificate! 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www.bsos.umd.edu/aasp 
vskeeter@aasp. umd. edu 

T he C ertif icate i n African American Studies offers undergraduate students an excel I ent opportuni ty to devel op a sped al i zati on i n Af ri can-A meri can i ssues while 
pursuing a major in another field. Certificate students learn about the social, economic, political and cultural history of theAfrican-American peoplethrough a 
concentration of courses they plan with theAASD Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy core requirements and 
electives. 

Eami ng a Certificate in African American Studies gi ves students a competi ti ve advantage i n the j ob market by add ng greater focus to the r undergraduate 
experience 

Requirements for theCertificate 

. 9 hours of AASP core courses: AASP 100, AASP 101, and AASP 200 or AASP 202. 

• 9 hours of upper division electives in AASP (300 level or above); courses in other departments must be pre-approved. 
. 3 credit semi nar: AASP 400 or AASP 402. 

• Students must earn a "C" or above i n each course appl i ed toward the certif i cate. 

• No more than 9 credit hours applied towards a major may be counted for the certificate. 

• No more than 9 credit hours may betaken at institutions other than UMCP. 

For more information, or to apply, please cal I the African American Studies Department at 405-1158. TheAASD office is located in 2169 LeFrak Hall. 
Asian American Studies Program 

Offi oe of U ndergr aduate Studies 

1145 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

See Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es/A si an A meri can Studi es Program i n C hapter 6. 
Computational Science 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences 

3103 M athematj cs B ui I di ng, 301-405-0924 
www.amsc.umd.edu 

For program requirements see Certificate in Computational Science in tine section on Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation. 
East Asian Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2111 Taliaferro HeII, 301-405-4319 
http://www.ceas umd.edu/Certifi cate/i ndex. html 
jzgao@umd.edu 

The Undergraduate Certificate in East Asian Studies is a 24-credit course of instruction designed to provide specialized knowledge of the cultures, histories, and 
contemporary concerns of the peopl es of C hi na, J apan, and K orea . 1 1 wi 1 1 compl ement and enri ch a students maj or. T he curri cul um focuses on I anguage i nstructi on, 
civilization courses, and electives in several departments and programs of the university. It is designed specifically for students who wish to expand their knowledge 
ofEast Asia and demonstrate to prospective employers, the public, and graduate and professional schools a special competence and set of ski lis in East Asian affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, withagradeof C or better in each course, and recommendation by the Coordinator of theCertificate Program, a 
certificate will be awarded. A notation of the award of the certificate will be included on the student's transcript. The student must have a bachelor's degree awarded 
by Maryland (must be Col lege Park campus) previous to or simultaneously with an award of the certificate 

Certificate Requirerrents 

CORE Courses: The student i s requi red to take: 

1. HIST 284 East Asian Civilization I 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 243 



2. HIST 285 East Asian Civilization II 

3. Six semester hours of introduction to one of the foil owing East Asian languages (Chinese, J apanese, or Korean): 

CHIN 101 Elementa-y Chinese I 

JAPN lOlElementaryJapanesel 

KORA 101 Elementary Korean I 

KORA 102 Elementary Korean II 

KORA 211 1 ntroductory Readi ng for Speakers of Korean I 

KORA 212 1 ntroductory Readi ng for Speakers of Korean 1 1 



Students with I anguage competence equi val ent to these I anguage courses are exempted from the I anguage requi rement; such students are requi red to compl ete an 
additional six hours of electives in East Asian courses to fulfill the 24-credit requi rement for the certificate 

Electives: Students must compl ete at least 12 hours of electives selected from four regular approved courses on East Asia in such disciplines as: 

1. art history 

2. ethnomusicology 

3. government and politics 

4. history 

5. language, linguistics, and literature, 

6. pi ant science and landscape architecture, and 

7. women's studies. 

Nineof the 12 hours of electives must be upper division (300-400level courses). A maximum of three credit hours of special topics courses on East Asia will be 
al I owed wi th the approval of the certi f i cate coordi nator. N o more than ni ne credi ts f rom any one department or from the student's maj or may be appl i ed toward the 
certi f i cate I n addi ti on, no more than ni ne credi ts of the courses appl i ed toward the certi f i cate may be transferred from other i nsti tuti ons. Students are asked to work 
wi th the coordi nator i n ensuri ng that the el ecti ves mai ntai n an i ntercol I egi ate and i nterdi scipli nary focus (at I east three di sci pi i nes are recommended) . I nterested 
students should contact the Coordinator of the Certificate Program, Dr.JamesZ. Gao, Department of History, 2111 Taliaferro H atbao@umd.edu (website at 
www.ceas.umd.edu ). 

I international Apiculture and Natural Resources 

Cdlegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources 

0108 Symons Hall, 301-405-2078 
www. agnr. umd. edu 
sabrown@umd.edu 

The Certificate in International Agricultureand Natural Resources is designed to enrich a student's major with a global perspective. The required courses focus on: 
I anguage instruction; international aspects of the environment agricultural production, development and sustainabi I ity, nutrition, and business; an experience 
abroad; and a capstone course regardi ng the students travel abroad. A ny student i n good academi c standi ng may parti ci pate i n the certi f i cate program 

Requirements for Certificate 

The certificate requi res at I east 21 credits that may include courses taken toward other degree and CORE requirements. Upon successful completion of the courses, 
withagradeof C or better in each course and a recormnendati on of theAssociate Dean of theCollege of Agriculture and Natural Resources, a certificate will be 
awarded. A notati on of the award of the certi f i cate will be i ncl uded on the students transcri pt I n order to recei ve the certi f i cate, students must have compl eted al I 
requi rements for a bachelor's degree 

Foreign Language 

6-8 credits in a foreign language 

I international Courses 

At I east 9 credits from the foil owing list of courses, at least 3 of these courses must be in theCollege of Agriculture and Natural Resources for students not majoring 
in a program outside of theCollege of Agricultureand Natural Resources: 

PLSC 303 1 international Crop Production 

ENST 440 Crops, Soils, and Civilization 

AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies 

AREC 433 Food and Agricultural Policy 

B M GT 392 1 ntroducti on to I ntemati oral B usi ness M anagement 

BMGT 390 Competing on Quality in a Global Economy 

BSCI 365 International Pesticide Problems and Solutions 

GEOG 434 Agriculture and Rural Development 

NFSC 425 International Nutrition 

AREC 445 Agricultural Development Population Growth, and the Environment 

ECON 440 International Economics 

GVPT 306 Global Ecopolitics 

GEOG 422 Population Geography 

Travel Study or Travel Abroad 

Three to four credits of travel study or study abroad. Prerequisite: to have compl eted the foreign I anguage course work. Prerequisite or co-requisite: six credits from 
the International CoursesList In order to qualify for the certificate, travel study and study abroad experiences requi re prior approval of Associate Dean of the College 
Coll egeof A gri cul ture and N atural Resources. For approval , travel experi ence must demonstrate si gni f i cant I eami ng opportuni ti es i n areas rel ated to agri cul ture and 
natural resources and cultural immersion. 

Travel Study Seminar 

1 creditTravel Study Seminar. Prerequisite: completion of the travel study requirement. 

T hi s course wi 1 1 requi re student presentati on of thei r travel experi ence i ncl udi ng a paper, a poster presentati on,aswellasanoral presentati on and di scussi on. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 244 



Latin American Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3107Ta'iaferro Ha 1 !, 301-405-8961 

www.lasc.umd.edu 

lasc@umd.edu 

T he i nterdi scipli nary certi f i cate program i n L arj n A men can Studi es i s open to U ni versi ty of M ary I and, C ol I ege Park undergraduates i n any maj or who are i nterested 
in global studies and Latin America The undergraduate Certificate in Latin American Studies will be awarded to students who have completed 21 credits with a 
grade of C or better in the foil owing areas. 

Requirements for Certificate 

A. Core curriculum for all certificate students (12 credits) 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 234 Issues in Latin American Studies I 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 235 Issues in Latin American Studies II 

HIST 250 or HIST 251 LatJnAmerican History I orll 

LASC/SPAN/PORT/ANTH 458 Senior capstone course in Latin American Studies 

B. Additional courses in Latin American Studies (9 credits) 

N i ne credi ts are add ti onal courses that must be chosen from an approved I i st and from at I east two di f f erent departments. At I east si x credi ts must be at the 300- or 
400-level. See Latin A men can Studies advisor for details. 

C. Foreign Language Competency 

All certificate students must demonstrate their competence in either Spanish or Portuguese. Competency may be proven with a grade of C or better in an 
intermediate- level course (PORT 204, SPAN 203) or higher. Native speakers of Spanish or Portuguese or students with extensive experience in these languages 
shoul d consul t wi th the L ati n A meri can Studi es advi sor. 

I nterested students should contact our advisor, Dr. I vette Rodriguez-Santana at rivette@umd.edu, 301-405-8961, or LASC at lasc@umd.edu or 301-405-6459. Please 
visit our web page at www.lasc.umd.edu 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

2417 M arie M ount Ha 1 1 , 301-405-5428 
www. I gbts. umd.edu 
lgbts@umd.edu 

The program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an interdisciplinary undergraduatecertificate and a minor designed to examine the 
I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and representati ons of L G BT persons, those who are today descri bed as havi ng a mi nori ty sexual ori entati on or who are gender 
transgressive 

For more information, see the Office of Undergraduate Studies in Chapter 6. 

Science* Technology and Sodety Certificate 

1125 Cumberland Hall, 301-405-0527 
www. schol ars. umd. edu/sts/certi f i cate 

Director Betsy Mendelsohn, bmendel@urrd.edu 

Program website is http://www.sts.umd.edu 

The undergraduate University Certificate program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) enables students to lean about the dynamic, interactive and creative 
rel ati onshi ps among sci ence, technol ogy, and soci ety . In addi ti on to coursework, the STS program requi res students to attend STS- rel ated monthl y events on 
campus; STS events are I i steel on the program websi te. I n addi ti on, students are i nvi ted to parti ci pate i n f i el d tri ps to research I abs and i n servi ce acrj vi ti es rel ated to 
STS; these activities bui Id community among students, staff and faculty. Each student works cl osely with a faculty mentor when writi ng the capstone term paper i n 
the senior ENES 440 course. The STS University Certificate is especially helpful to students who wish to impose a unifying theme on their elective courses. 

Courses rel evant to the STS program are drawn from many clepartments; thi s demonstrates the currency of sci ence and technol ogy studi es across di sci pi i nes i n the 
sciences, engineering, the humanities, and social sciences. STS is an interdisciplinary field that has been taught for more than 30 years at universities in the United 
States and E urope, notabl y i n those wi th strong engi neeri ng and publ i c pol i cy programs. I n recent years, STS U ni versi ty Certi fi cate students have chosen to wri te 
thei r capstone term papers about ti mel y topi cs, i ncl udi ng the i nteracrj ons among sci ence, technol ogy and soci ety rel ated to ranotechnol ogy, fuel eel I s, physi cs 
research fundi ng, and environmental policy. 

Courses: 

The STS program requi res 9 credits of CORE and 12 credits of U pper Level courses. Students must obtai n pri or approval of the di rector before counti ng courses 
toward their individual STS course of study. For guidance, see the websitefor a list of approved courses, and note that students may ask the director to approve a 
course not I i sted on the websi te. 

CORE Courses (9 creel te): 

•An overview history of sci ence or history of technology course (such as HIST175 or HIST204) 

•The STS sophomore capstone course, CPSP227 

• A third CORE course that relates sci ence to society or technology to society 

Upper Levd (300- and400-l&*i) Corses (12 credis): 

T hese courses have an i nterdi sci pi i nary ori entati on that demonstrates i nter- rel ati onshi ps between sci ence and soci ety or between technol ogy and soci ety. Students 
choose three courses and the fourth course is EN ES440, the STS University Certificate capstone. 

J oi ring the Program and Program Requirements: 

Students i nterested i n STS shoul d contact the di rector to obtai n advi ce and approval pri or to enrol I i ng i n courses that f ul f i 1 1 the program Students record thei r 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



progress wi th the STS program off i ce as they compl ete requi rements, parti ci pate i n a semi -annual advi si ng meeti ng, and wri te a bri ef eval uati on upon compl erj ng 
theprogram Students must earn a mini mum grade of C in each course they wish to credit toward the STS University Certificate. A students individual courseof 
study may not exceed these maximums: 9 credits of courses applied to the student's major; 3 credits of Special or Selected Topics courses; 9 credits of courses taken 
outsideUMCP; and6creditsof courses with theAREC, ECON andGVPT prefixes. Once all requi rements are met and the director affirms that the student has 
compl eted the program, the Regi strar i ncl udes a notati on of thi s U ni versi ty C erti f i cate on the students transcri pt 

Upper Division Certificate in Secondary Education 

College of Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 
www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

The Certificate Program in Secondary Education is currently under review. Please see an advisor in EDCI for more information on this pathway and other pathways 
to certification. 



Women's Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2101 Woods Hall, 301-405-6877 
www.womensstudies.umd.edu 
womensstudi es@umd.edu 

See Women's Studi es Department for faculty roster. 

T he Women's Studi es C erti f i cate Program consi sts of an i ntegrated, i nterdi sci pi i nary curri cul um on women that i s desi gned to suppl ement a student's maj or. A ny 
student i n good standi ng may enrol I i n the certi f i cate program by decl ari ng her/hi s i ntenti on to the Women's Studi es U ndergraduate A dvi sor. For add ti oral 
i nf ormati on contact the Women's Studi es off i ce, 301-405-6827. 

Requi rements for Certificate 

To qualify for a certificate in Women's Studies, a student will be required to earn 21 credits in Women's Studies courses, nine of which must be at the 300/400 
I evel . N o rrore than three credi t hours of sped al topi cs courses may be counted toward the certi fi cate N o more than ni ne credi ts whi ch are appl i ed toward a maj or 
may be included in the certificate program No morethanninecredit hours may be taken at institutions other than thy ni versi ty of Maryland. Each student must 
obtai n a grade of C or better i n each course that i s to be counted toward the certi f i cate. Of the 21 credi ts, courses must bedistri buted as f ol I ows: 
L Requi rements for the Certificate 

FounckHon Courses (9 credt hours) 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society, OR 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art & Culture 

Theories of Feminism 

Senior Seminar 



WMST200 
WMST250 
WMST400 
WMST488 
Z DistributiveCourses 



WMST241 
WMST250 
WMST255 
WMST275 
WMST281 
WMST348 
WMST408 
WMST444 
WMST448 
WMST458 
WMST466 
WMST468 
WMST481 
WMST496 
FREN482 



Area I: Artsand Literature (3 credt hours) 

Women Writers of French Expression in Translation (X-listed as FREN241) 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art, and Culture 

I ntroduction to Literature by Women (X-l isted as ENGL255) 

World Literature by Women (X-listed asCMLT 275) 

Women in German Literature and Society (X-listed asGERM 281) 

Literary Works by Women (x-listed as ENGL348) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women before 1800 (X-listed as ENGL 408) 

Feminist Critical Theory (X-listed as ENGL 444) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women of Color* (X-listed as ENGL448) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women after 1800 (X-listed as ENGL458) 

Femini st Perspective on Women in Art (X-listed as ARTH466) 

Feminist Cultural Studies 

Femmes Fatal es and the Representation of Violence in Literature(X-l isted as FREN481) 

African -American Women Filmmakers* (X-listed asTHET 496) 

Gender and Ethnicity in Modem French Literature 



WMST210 
WMST211 
WMST212 
WMST320 
WMST453 
WMST454 
WMST455 
WMST456 
WMST457 



Area II: Historical Perspectives (3 credit hours) 

Women in America to 1880(X-listedasHIST 210) 

Women in America Si nee 1880 (X-listed as HIST 211) 

Women in Western Europe, 1750-present (X-listed as HIST212) 

Women in Classical Antiquity (X-listed as CLAS 320) 

Victorian Women in England, France, and the United States (X-l isted as HI ST 493) 

Women in Africa* (X-listed as HIST 494) 

Women in Medieval Culture and Society (X-listed as HIST495) 

Women i n the M i ddl e E ast* 

Changing Perceptions of Gender in theUS: 1880-1935 (X-listed as HIST 433) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



AASP498W 

AMST418J 

HIST309 



Black Women in United States History* 
Women and Family in American Life 
Proseminar in Historical Writing: Women's History 



WMST200 

WMST313 

WMST324 

WMST325 

WMST326 

WMST336 

WMST360 

WMST410 

WMST420 

WMST425 

WMST430 

WMST436 

WMST452 

WMST471 

WMST493 

WMST494 

AASP498F 

CCJS498 

SOCY498W 



Area III: Social andNahwal Sciences (3 crerft hours) 

I ntroduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society 

Women and Science (X -listed as BSCI 313) 

Communication and Gender (x-l isted as COM M 324) 

Sociology of Gender (X-listed as SOCY 325) 

Biology of Reproduction (X-listed as BSCI 342) 

Psychology of Women (X-listed as PSYC 366) 

Cari bbean Women* 

Women intheAfrican Diaspora* 

Asian-American Women* 

Gender Rol es and Soci al I nsti tuti ons 

Gender Issues in Families (X-listed as FMST 430) 

Lega 1 Status of Women (X-listed as GVPT 436) 

Women and theMedia (X-listed asj OUR 452) 

Women's Health (X-listed as HLTH 471) 

J ewi sh Women i n I ntemati onal Perspecti ve* 

Lesbian Communities and Difference* 

Special Topics in Black Culture: Women and Work* 

Special Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice: Women and Crime 

Sped al Topi cs i n Soci ol ogy : Women i n the M i I i tary 



*Fulfi lis Women's Studies Multi-Cultural Requirement 

3. Courses in Cultural Diversity (6 credit hours) 

Students wi 1 1 sel ect one course f or a mi ni mum of 3 credi t hours A pproved courses are noted wi th an asteri sk i n secti on 2, above 

Courses in this category may overl ap wi th other requi rements. 

4 Remaining Courses 

T he remai ni ng courses may be chosen from any of the three di stri buti ve areas or from among any of the WM ST courses i ncl udi ng 

WMST 298or498: Special Topicsand WMST 499: 1 ndependent Study. 

Advising 

To obtain more information, contact the Undergraduate Advisor, 301-405-6827, or write to the Women's Studies Department 2101 
Woods Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 
Course Code: WMST 



CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING (CHBE) 

A. J ames Clark School of Engineering 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Bui I ding, 301-405-1935 

www.chbe.urrd.edu 

Chair: S. Ehrman 

Professors: R. Adomaitis, M . Anisimov, R. Calabrese, K. Choi, E. Wachsman, W. Weigand 

Associate Professors: P. Dimitrakopoulos, S. Raghavan, N. Wang 

Assistant Professors: J . Klauda (Asst Prof), G. Sriram (Asst Prof), C. Wang (Asst Prof) 

Affiliate Professors: M. Al-Shakhly (Affil Prof, Prof), W. Bentiey (Prof, Affiliate Prof), D. DeVoe(Prof, Affiliate Prof), G.Jackson (Prof, Affiliate Prof), P. Kofinas 

(Prof , Aff i I iate Prof ), M . Zachari ah (Prof , Aff i I iate Prof ) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: J. Fisher (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof), S. Lee (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof) 

Affi I i ate Assistant Professors: J . Seog (Asst Prof, Aff Asst Prof) 

Adjunct Professors: M . Klapa, J . Quackenbush, M . Ranade (Adjunct Prof), A. Yang 

Professors Emeriti: J. Gentry (Prof Emeritus), S. Greer (Affiliate Prof, Prof Emerita),T. McAvoy, T. Regan, J. Sengers, T. Smith (Prof Emeritus) 

The Major 

Students in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Maryland learn to use a combination of mathematical, physical, 
chemi cal , and bi ol ogi cal sci ence concepts wi thi n a ri gorous engi neeri ng desi gn framework, graduati ng wi th a uni que set of ski 1 1 s hi ghl y val ued by a wi de range of 
empl overs i n i ndustfy , academi a, and the government T he wi de breadth of thi s prof essi on and the Departments uni que strengths i n nanotechnol ogy and 
bi otechnol ogy prepare our students for outstandi ng careers. 



B ecause of the wi de range of ulti mate appl i cati ons, the chemi cal engi neer finds i nteresti ng and di verse career opportuni ties in such vari ed f i el ds as chemi cal 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 247 



(inorganic and organic), food processing and manufacturing, metallurgical, polymer, energy conversion, environmental engineering, petroleum (refining, 
producti on, or petrochemi cal ) , and phamnaceuti cal i ndustri es. A ddi ti onal opportuni ti es are presented by the research and devel opment acti vi ti es of many public and 
private research institutes and all government agencies. Our graduates have taken jobs with companies like DuPont, ExxonMobil, Proctor & Gamble, the Food and 
Drug Administration, and the Department of Defense 

On top of all the options and opportunities, chemical and bionnlecular engineers have traditionally ranked at or near the top of starti ng salaries among all of the 
engi neeri ng prof essi ons! 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronyms: ENCH & CHBE 

Program Obj ecti ves 

• Provi de graduates wi th a sol i d f oundati on i n chemi cal engi neeri ng sci ence fundamental s as wel I as a broad background i n sci ence and mathemati cs to equi p 
them to enter prof essi onal and chemi cal engi neeri ng practi ce and to enter graduate study at I eadi ng uni versi ti es. 

• Prepare graduates to excel i n tradi ti onal chemi cal engi neeri ng careers and di verse careers i n areas such as bi otechnol ogy , nanotechnol ogy, medi ci ne, I aw or 
business. 

• Produce graduates who are equi pped wi th sol i d quanti tati ve probl em sol vi ng, teamwork, communi cati on ski 1 1 s, adaptabi I i ty to new technol ogi es and a strong 
ethi cal f oundati on that wi 1 1 serve them throughout the r careers. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to f ul I y engage withthecurriculum and the opportuni ti es presented for I eami ng and research. H avi ng compl eted the degree program, students 
shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

• A n abi I i ty to appl y knowl edge of chemi cal engi neeri ng fundamental s to i denti f y and sol ve chemi cal engi neeri ng probl ems. 

• An ability to identify and solve probl ems in specialized areas related to chemical engineering. 

• A n abi I i ty to appl y mathemati cs rel evant to engi neeri ng and the physi cal and chemi cal sci ences to i denti f y and sol ve techni cal probl ems. 

• A broad knowl edge necessary to understand trie i rrpact of engi neeri ng sol uti ons i n a gl obal and soci etal context 

• A n abi I i ty to i denti fy engi neeri ng probl ems and propose appropri ate sol uti ons. 

• An ability to perform step-by-step design of engineered systems and chemical processes. 

• An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 

• The knowl edge of computers and i nf omnati on technol ogy necessary to fundi on eff ecti vel y as chemi cal engi neers 

• An awareness of safety and envi ronmental i ssues as an i ntegral part of the chemi cal engi neeri ng prof essi on. 

• An ability to successfully participate in teams. 

• A n abi I i ty to communi cate eff ecti vel y through oral presentati ons and wri tten reports. 

• An understandi ng of prof essi onal and ethi cal responsi bi I i ti es 

• Skills necessary for empl oy ment i n a vari ety of posi ti ons i n i ndustry or government or f or conti nued study i n graduate or prof essi onal school s. 

• An understandi ng of current technol ogi cal i ssues rel ated to chemi cal engi neeri ng. 

• A n abi I ity to engage i n structured research. 

• An appreci ati on for excel I ence and di versi ty . 

• A n abi I i ty and the rmti vati on to engage in life-long I eami ng, and the abi I i ty to conduct research usi ng resources beyond the undergraduate curri cul um 

Requirements for the Major 

IMPORTANT: This seed on contains requirements for incoming freshman or transfer students entering the B.S. program in Chenri cal and Bionnlecular 
Engineering Fall 2010 and later. For students entering the program before Fall 201 0see requi rements here. 

T he undergraduate program i s desi gned to be compl eted i n f our years. 1 1 i s i important to f ol I ow the sampl e program as cl osel y as possi bl e, as nearl y al I C H B E cl asses 
are offered onl y once a year. A 1 1 C hemi cal and B i omol ecul ar E ngi neeri ng students must parti ci pate i n an advi si ng sessi on pri or to regi steri ng each semester. 
Students areassi gned a faculty advisor at the start of their first semester in the major. Questions about the undergraduate program may be sent to Kathy Lopresti at 
lopresti@umd.edu. 

Coures appearing in bold are offered by the Department of Chemical and Bi omol ecul ar Engineering. 

Freshmen Year: Fall semester 

Course Crafts 

ENES100 Introduction to Engineering Design 3 

MATH 140 Ca 1 cul us I 4 

CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engineers 3 
CHEM136 General Chemistry for Engineers Laboratory 1 

CORE 3 

Total Credits 14 

Freshmen Year: Spring semester 

Course Crafts 

ENGL101 Introduction to Wri ting 3 

MATH 141 Ca 1 cul us 1 1 4 

PHYS161 General Physics: Mechanics and Particle ^ 

Dynamics 

BIOE120 Biol ogy for Engi neers 3 

CHBE101 Introduction to Chemistry & Biomdecular 3 
Engineering 

Total Credits 16 

Sophomore Year: Fall se m ester 
Course Credits 

MATH241 Calculus II I 4 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



PHYS260 


General Physics II 


3 


PHYS261 


General Physics II Laboratory 


1 


CHEM231 


Organic Chemistry 1 


3 


CHEM232 


Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 


1 


CHBE301 


Chemical and Biomdecular Engineering 
Thermodynamics 1 


3 


CORE 




3 


Total Credits 




18 



Sophomore Year: Spring semester 
Course Creoffe 



„. TLn . c Differential Equations for Scientists and 
MATH246 Engineers 



PHY S270 Genera 1 Physi cs 1 1 1 3 

PHYS271 Genera 1 Physics I II Laboratory 1 

CHEM241 Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHEM242 Oraganic Chemistry 1 1 Laboratory 1 

CHBE250 Computer Methods in Chemical Engineering 3 



r unr TO Chemical and Biomdecular Engineering 
crusts Thermodynamics 1 1 



Total 
Credits 



17 



J unior Year: Fall Semester 
Course Credt 

CHBE410 Statistics and Experimental Design 3 

CHBE422 Chemical and Biomdecular Transport ^ 

Phenomenal 

CHBE440 Chemical Kinetics & Reactor Design 3 

CHEM272 General Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory 2 

ENGL393 Technica 1 Writing 3 

CORE 3 

Total Credits 17 

J unior Year: Spring Semester 
Course Croft 

BCHM461or Biochemistry I or 3 

BCHM453 Biochemistry of Physiology 

ENMA300or Intro to Material sand Their Applications or 
ENMA425or IntroductiontoBiomaterialsor 3 

BIOE453 Biomaterials 

CHBE424 Chemical and Biomdecular Transport ^ 

Phenomenall 

CHBE426 Chemical and Biomdecular Separation ^ 

Processes 

CHBE333 Communication Skills for Engineers 1 

CORE 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 249 



Total Credits 16 



Senior Year: 


Fall Semester 




Corse 




Craft 


CHBE437 


Chemical & Biomdecular 
Engineering Lab 


3 


CHBE442 


Chemical & Biomdecular Systems Analysis 


3 


CHBE444 


Process Engineering Economi cs and Design 1 


3 


TECH ELECT Technical Elective* 


3 


CORE 




3 


Total Credits 




15 


Senior Year: 


Spring Semester 




Corse 




Crafts 


CHBE446 


Process E ngineering Economics & Design 1 1 


3 


TECH ELECT Technical Elective* 


3 


TECH ELECT Technical Elective* 


3 


CORE 




3 


CORE 




3 


Total Credits 




15 



Technical Elective list of approved courses www.chbeurrd.edu/urdergrad/fall201Velectives-fl0forward.htrril 

Degree Credits: 128 credits and fulfillment of all departmental, college, and university requirements with a cumulative grade point averageof 2.0 

Other Requirements for theMaj cr 

IMPORTANT: Changes have been made to our undergraduate Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering curriculum that will take effect in Fall 2010. These changes 
only apply to new, incoming freshmen or transfer students entering our program in Fall 2010 and LATER. If you entered our program in Spring 2010 or EARLIER, 
you will not be affected. 

Program requi rements for students enteri ng before Fall 2010 (Spring 2010 or EARL I E R) can be found at 
www.chbe.unrd.edii/undergrad/prefall2010/requirements-prefall2010.html 

Advising 

A 1 1 students choosi ng C hemi cal and B i oitdI ecul ar E ngi neeri ng as thei r pri mary f i el d must see thei r assi gned undergraduate advi sor each semester. PI ease contact 
Kathy Lopresti at 301-405-5888 or lopresti@umd.edu for your assigned advisor i nformation. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A unique aspect of the Departments undergraduate program is its high level of students participation in cutting- edge research. Approximately half of our students 
graduate with significant lab experience and most find it to be one of the high points of their undergraduate education. 

Honors Program 

TheA. James Clark School of Engineering hosts a chapter of the Omega Chi Epsi I on National Honor Society for chemical engineering, as well as a chapter of the 
engineering honor society, Tau Beta Pi. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organization, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Omega Chi E pi si I on is the honorary 
C hemi cal E ngi neeri ng Sod ety 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

F i nanci al ai d based upon need i s avai I abl e through the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. A number of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e through the A . J aires C I ark School 
of E ngi neeri ng. The department offers opportuni ti es f or research and other part-ti me empl oyment 

Awards and Recognition 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding service to the Department Col lege and University. These awards include the David Arthur 
Bemnan Memorial Award, the Russell Barch Memorial Award, arid several American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AICHE) awards. AICHE awards are given 
to thejunior with the highest cumulativeGPA as well as to the outstanding junior and outstanding senior in Chemical Engineering. 



CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (CHEM, BCHM) 

College of Chemical and Life Sciences 

0107H Cherristry Building, 301-405-1788 

www.chemumd.edu 

Student I nformation: 2102ChemBldg; 301-405-1791 

Chair: M. Doyle (Professor) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Professors: M.Alexander, H. Ammon, D. Beckett, N. BloughJ. Davis, P. DeShong, B. Eichhorn, D. Falvey, C. FenselauJ. Fourkas, D. Fushman, O. Herzberg 

(Prof), L. Isaacs, C.J arzynski, G. Lorimer.A. Mignerey.A. MullinJ. OndovJ. Orban (Prof), J . Reutt-Robey, S. Rokita, R. Salawitch (Prof), L. Sita, D.Thirumalai, 

W. Walters, J . Weeks, M . Zachariah 

AssociateProfessors:T. Dayie (Assoc Prof), D.JulinJ. Kahn, C. Lee, S. Lee, G. Papoian (Assoc Prof ), A. Vedemikov 

Assistant Professors: J. Edwards (Asst Prof), N. LaRonde-LeBlanc, S. Li (Asst Prof), Z. Nie(AsstProf), P. Paukstelis (Asst Prof), H. Si ntim, V.Tugarinov, Y.Wang 

(Asst Prof) 

Lecturers: B . Dixon, L . Friedman, M . M cDemnott-J ones, M . M ontague- Smith, D. Steffek, B. Walters (Lecturer), J . Watson (Lecturer), N . White (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: M. AnisimovJ. Dinman, S. Sukharev, E.Williams 

Adjunct Prof essors: J . Capala (Adjunct Prof), P. Dagdigian (Adjunct Prof), B. Gerratana (Assoc Prof), F. Khachik, L. Locascio (Adjunct Prof), E. Mazzola, L. Morss 

(Adjunct Prof) 

Professors Emeriti: J . Bellama, A. Boyd, H. DeVoe, D. Freeman, S. Greer (Prof Emerita), S. Grim, J . Hansen, G. Helz (Aff Res Prof), J. Huheey, B. Jarvis, G. Miller, 

T. O'Haver, J . Tossell (Prof Emeritus) 

Requirements for theMaj or 

Note The lower-level courses offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry changed starting in the Fall 2005 semester. The lower-level requirements 
for chemistry and biochemistry majors are reflected in the requirements listed below. For details, contact the Undergraduate Office or visit the undergraduate 
section of the Departments website 

Chemistry Majors 

All requi red cherri stry and bi ochemi stry courses must be passed wi th a mi ni mum grade of C . Requi red support ng courses, i ncl udi ng B SC I 105, must be passed 
with a 2.0 grade poi nt average 

Crafts 
Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principlesof General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principlesof Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principlesof Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHEM276/277 General Chemistry and Energetics( Majors) / Lab 5 

CHEM395 Professional Issues in Chemistry and Biochemistry 1 

CHEM425 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483 Physical Chemstry I / Lab 5 

ENGL101 IntroductJontoWritJng 3 

UNIV100 The Student in the University 1 

Supporting Courses 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 4 

PHYS141/142 Principlesof Physics 8 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 4 

NOTE: All rrBJors and potential majors are encouraged to fate 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior to beginning Physical Cherhstry. 

Depa rtmenta l Requirements 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 24 

rrust include 
CHEM401 Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM482/4S4 Physical Chemstry II /Lab 5 

ELECT UL approved upper level CHEM/BCHM courses 6 

I n order to meet requi rements for a degree approved by the A meri can C hemi cal Soci ety (A C S) , students must compl ete a sped f i c set of courses i n addi ti on to thi s 
curri cul um I nf omnatj on about ACS certi f i cati on can be obtai ned i n the undergraduate off i ce. 

Biochemistry Majors 

All requi red cherri stry, bi ochemi stry, and upper- 1 evel bi ol ogi cal sci ences courses must be passed wi th a mi ni mum grade of C . Requi red support ng courses, 
including BSCI 105, must be passed with a 2.0 grade point average. 

C recite 
Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principlesof General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principlesof Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principlesof Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHEM276/277 General Chemistry and Energetics- Majors/ Lab 5 
CHEM395 Professional Issues in Chemistry and Biochemistry 1 
CHEM425 Instrumental Methodsof Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483 Physical Chemstry I / Lab 5 

ENGL101 IntroductJontoWritJng 3 

UNIV100 The Student in the University 1 

Supporting Courses 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 4 

PHYS141/142 Principles of Physics 8 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

MATH 141 Calculus 1 1 4 

NOTE: All rrBJors and potential majors are encouraged to fate 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior to beginning Physical Charistry. 

Depa rtme n ta l Requirements 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 25 

rrust include 
BCHM461 Biochemistry I 3 

BCHM462 Biochemistry II 3 

BCHM464 Biochemistry Laboratory 3 

BCHM465 Biochemistry III 3 

BCHM485 Physical Biochemistry 3 

approved bi ol ogi cal sci ence courses 6 

* Sped f i c i nf ormati on about course requi rements can be obtai ned i n the undergraduate off i ce. 

* A student who enrol Is in the chemistry or biochemistry program at any ti mef oil owing the first semesterof study typically will enter the non- majors introductory 
sequence (CHEM 131/132, 231/232, 241/242 and 271/272; CHEM 132, 232, 242 and 272 are co- requi site laboratory courses) which fulfil Is the lower-level 
departmental requi rements. Transfer students who wi sh to pursue chemi stry or bi ochemi stry maj ors wi 1 1 have thei r previ ous cherri stry course work careful I y 

eval uated for pi acement i n the appropri ate courses. Starti ng i n 2007, transfer students wi th four or more semesters of general and organi c chemi stry credi t must take, 
at a mi ni mum, the C H E M 272 1 aboratory course to compl ete the i ntroductory sequence 

Advising 

There i s mandatory advi si ng f or al I C hemi cal and L i f e Sci ence maj ors each semester. A dvi si ng appoi ntments can be made by contacti ng the undergraduate off i ce, 
2102Chemstry Building, 301-405-1791 

Honors Program 

Students with a G PA of 3.0or better who havecompleted two semesters of CHEM 399 (Introduction to Chemi cal Research) have an opportunity to sign up for 
CHEM 398 (Honors Research) in their senior year and be considered for departmental honors. After successful completion of a senior honors thesis and seminar, 
graduati on wi th honors or wi th hi gh honors i n chemi stry or bi ochemi stry can be attai ned 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity is a professional fraternity which recruits men and women students from chemistry, biochemistry, and related science 
majors during each fall and spring semester. The fraternity holds weekly meetings and provides tutoring for students in lower-level chemistry courses. The office is 
in Room 2106AC hemi stry Bui I ding. Dr. Lylelsaacs(3341Chemistry Building, 301-405-1884)) is the faculty advisor. 

The student affiliate program of the American Chemical Society (SA -ACS) is designed to introduce students in chemi stry, biochemistry and related fields to a 
vari ety of prof essi onal actj vi ti es. Student aff i I i ates will gain skills and make contacts ai med at I aunchi ng a successful career i n sci ence. Activities incl ude 
networki ng and meeti ng wi th prof essi onal s, attendi ng nati onal meeti ngs, and parti ci pad ng i n publ i c outreach programs. Aff i I i ates al so recei ve subscri pti ons to 
C hemi cal & E ngi neeri ng N ews, the undergraduate career magazi ne/n Charistry, as wel I as gai ni ng on- 1 i ne access to announcements regardi ng j ob and i ntem 
opportunities. The student affiliate office is located in Room 2112A of theC hemi stry Building. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Two scholarships are avail able for maj ors: the I si dore and A nnie A dler Scholarship of $500 to an outstanding maj or with financial need and the Leidy Foundation 
Schol arshi ps of $600 to two outstandi ng j uni or maj ors. N o appl i cati on i s necessary, as al I maj ors are automati cal I y revi ewed by the A wards C ommi ttee. 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENCE) 

A.James Clark School of Encjneering 

1173 E ngi neeri ng CI assroom B ui I di ng, 301-405- 7768 

www.cee.umd.edu 

Chair: A. Haghani 

Professors: M . Aggour, A. Amde, B. Ayyub, G. Baecher, G. Chang, A. Davis, O. Hao, R. McCuen, P. Schonfeld, C. Schwartz, M . Skibniewski, A. Torrents 

Associate Professors: M.Austin, A. Aydi I ek, K. Brubaker, P. Chang, S. Gabriel, D.Goulias, D. Lovell, E. Miller-Hooks, Y. Zhang 

Assistant Professors: C. Cirillo, Q. Cui, K. Wigginton(AsstProf), L.Zhang 

Affiliate Professors: J . Gansler, B. Golden, E. Kalnay, M . Ruth 

Professors Emeriti: P. Albrecht, F. BirknerJ. Colville, B. Donaldson, R. Ragan, D. Schel ling, Y. Sternberg, D.Vannoy, M. Witczak 

The Maj or 
The Major 

TheB.S. degree requi res A total of 122 credit hours (123 for the Environmental and Water Resources track) with emphasis in basic science (mathematics, 
chemi stry, and physi cs) , engi neeri ng sci ence ( mechani cs of materi al s, stati cs, and dynami cs) , and basi c ci vi I and envi ronmental engi neeri ng core courses 
(computati ons, materi al s, f I ui d mechani cs, probabi I i ty & stati sti cs, and Geographi c I nf ormati on Systems) . By thej uni or year, each student chooses one of three 
tracks: Infrastructure Engineering, Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, or Transportation Systems and Project Management Each track specifies 
junior- and seni or- 1 evel requi rements. A 1 1 three tracks i ncl ude techni cal el ecti ves that may be sel ected from a combi nati on of the si x C i vi I E ngi neeri ng sped al ti es 
and other approved courses (The six specialty areas are Environmental, Geotechnical, Project Management Structural, Transportation, and Water Resources). The 
curri cul um provi des a sensi bl e bl end of requi red courses and el ecti ves, pemni tti ng students to pursue thei r i nterests wi thout the ri sk of overspeci al i zati on. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Prog-am Obj actives 

The mission of the Department is threefold: 

1. Providea high quality, challenging education that encompasses breadth and depth; and prepare graduates to be proficient in both analysis and 
synthesi s facets of ci vi I engi neari ng desi gn; 

2. M ai ntai n a strong research program that i s recogni zed for excel I ence i n maj or areas of ci vi I and envi ronmental engi neeri ng; 

3. Provide service to the University, thecivil engi neari ng profession, and thecommunity at large 

T he Department provi des an educati onal program of basi c and sped al i zed engi neeri ng knowl edge necessary f or i ts graduates to be prof i ci ent i n recogni zed 
specialties of civil engineering. This preparation provides graduates with the tools needed for successful practice in the period foil owing graduation. In addition to 
general and techni cal educati on, the educati onal program stresses prof essi onal and ethi cal responsi bi I i ti es, an awareness of soci etal i ssues, and the need f or I i f e- 1 ong 
learning. 

Tine Department contributes to the advancement of knowl edge through research on important engineering problems. The research results are communicated through 
recognized channels of knowl edge dissemination. 

The Department serves the needs of the community by emphasizi ng global and soci etal issues. The Department addresses these i ssues through U ni versity and 
prof essi onal channel s and contri butes to thei r sol uti ons. 

The Department, building upon the above mission, established three program educati onal objectives: 

1. Prepare our graduates for competent professional practice within civil engineering related industries of Maryland and the mid-Atlantic region. 

2. C reate a cadre of graduates wi th the breadth of i nterests and ski 1 1 s to take on chal I engi ng new areas of engi neeri ng practi ce 
3. 1 nsti 1 1 i n our graduates a recogni ti on of the i mportance of conti nui ng prof essi onal devel opment 

Program Learning Objectives 

The faculty of the Department of Civil Engineering has established the following Program Educational Objectives: 

• To understand, appl y and devel op fundamental knowl edge i n sci ence, technol ogy, engi neeri ng and mathemati cs. 

• To attai n advanced qualification in both specialization and breadth. 

• To understand and apply business sensitive criteria in meeting professional responsibilities. 

• To incorporate soci etal I y sensitive criteria into professional decisions. 

• To devel op forward- thi nki ng atti tudes that enhance communi cati on and exempl ary practi ce. 

Deci si ons are to be based on assessments of the qual i ty of our graduates and al umni , feedback from empl oyers of our graduates, and sel f assessment 
of the f acul ty and program i n meeti ng our obj ecti ves and I eami ng outcomes goal s. 

Procy-am Learning Outcomes 



Admission to the Maj or 

See the entrance requirements for the A. James CI ark School of Engineering in theColleges and Schools section of this site 

Requirements for the Maj or 

The Department offers a program of study leading to an ABET-accredited Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) degree Each student specializes in one 
of three tracks: Infrastructure Engineering (Structural andGeotechnical), Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, or Transportation Systems and Project 
Management A total of 122 credit hours (123 for the Envi ronmental and Water Resources Track) are required for a BSCE degree with emphasis in basic science 
( mathemati cs, chemi stry, and physi cs) , engi neeri ng sci ence ( mechani cs of materi al s, stati cs, and dynami cs) , basi c ci vi I and envi ronmental engi neeri ng courses; 
requi red courses i n the sel ected track; techni cal el ecti ves; and a seni or capstone desi gn course The curri cui um provi des a sensi bl e bl end of requi red courses and 
el ecti ves, permi tti ng students to pursue thei r i nterests wi thout the ri sk of overspeci al i zati on. 

Credits Credits 

Freshman Year (All Civil & Environmental Encjneering) First Sem ^^T 

MATH140 CeJcuIusI 4 

MATH141 CeJcuIusII 4 

CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engineers 3 

ENES100 Introduction to Engineering Design (**can betaken firstor second semster) **3 

ENES102 S&iCSC^canbetakm first or second sernester) **3 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 3 

PHYS161 Genera 1 Physics 3 

ENCE100 I ntroducti on to Civi I & Environmental Engineering 1 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 6 

Total 14 16 

Credits Credits 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Sophomore Year (All Civil & ErMiv nm ental Engneering) 

MATH241 CeJcuIusIII 

MATH246 Differential Equationsfor Scientists and Engineers 
PHY S260/261 General Physics II with Lab 
E N ES220 M echani cs of M ateri al s 
ENCE200 Civil Engineering Computation 
ENCE201 Engineering Information Processing 
ENCE215 Engineering for Sustainabi I ity 
ENCE305 Fundamentals of Engineering Fluids 
CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



First Sen 

4 

4 
3 
3 



3 
17 



Second 
Sem 



3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



J unior Year 

/ nfrastructure Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
ENES221 Dynamics 

ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE340 Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering 
ENCE353 Introduction to Structural Analysis 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 

Transportation Systems & Engineering Management Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE370 lntroductJontoTransportationEngineering& Planning 
ENCE472 Transportation Engineering 
ENCE Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 

Environmental & Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
BIOE120 Biology for Engineers 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE302 Probability and Statistics for Civil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE310 Introduction to Environmental Engineering 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE431 Hydrologic Engineering 
ENCE Breadth Electives* 

CORE CORE Program Requirements 

Total 



Credits Credits 
Second 



First Sem 



3 
3 
3 

15 



3 
3 

3 
3 

3 

15 



3 
3 
3 

3 

15 



Sem 

3 
3 



3 
3 
15 



3 
3 
3 
15 

3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
15 



ENCE320 

ENCE444 

ENCE454 

ENCE441 

ENCE466 

ENCE 

CORE 



Senior Year 

/ nfrastructure Engineering Track 

E ngi neeri ng Proj ect M anagement 

Experimental Methods in Geotechnical & 

Structural Engineering 

Design of Concrete Structures 

Foundation Design 

Design of Civil Engineering Systems 

Electives* 

CORE Requirements/Advanced Studies 

Total 



Credits Credits 
Second 



First Sem 



3 
3 

3 
3 
15 



Sem 



3 
6 
3 
15 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Transportation Systems & Engineering Management Track 

ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 3 

ENCE422 Project Cost Accounting & Economics 3 

ENCE423 ProjectPlanning, Scheduling & Control 3 

ENCE470 Highway Engineering 3 

ENCE466 Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives* 6 3 

CORE CORE Requirements/Advanced Studies 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Track 

ENCE411 Environmental Engineering Science 3 

ENCE422 Project Cost Accounting & Economics 3 

ENCE412 Environmental Engineering Unit Operations 3 

ENCE432 Ground Water Hydrology 3 

ENCE466+ Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE Electives* 6 3 

CORE CORE Requirements 3 3 

Total 15 15 

M i ni mum Degree Requi rements: 122 credi ts and the f ul f i 1 1 ment of al I departmental , school , and uni versi ty requi rements wi th a cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of at 
least 2.0. Additional semester credits will be involved to the extent that courses carrying more than three credits are selected. 

4ENCE 466, Design of Civil Engineering Systems, may only be taken in the semester in which the student graduates. E 
*ENCE ELECTIVES 

For all tracts 

- 3XX, 4XX or6XX. AtleasttwomustbeENCE courses 

- No more than one ENCE 489 

- No more than 3 total ENCE with the same first two numbers 

Breadth Electives 

Geotechnical/StructureTrack will include two electives from 

ENCE370,402,422, 423,470,472 - OR-- 
ENCE310,411,412, 431,432 



Transportati on/Project M anagement Track wi II i ncludetwo electives from 

ENCE340, 353, 441, 444, 454 - OR - 
ENCE 310, 411, 412, 431, 432 

E nvi ronmental /Water Resources Track wi 1 1 i ncl ude two el ecti ves from 

ENCE 340, 353, 441, 444, 454 - OR - 
ENCE 320, 370, 402, 423, 470, 472 

Advising 

Advising 

All Civil and Environmental Engireering majors are advised by department faculty and staff members, who assist in course selection and scheduling. Students may 
consult the Department office to obtain their advisors' names and contact information (1173 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-7768) 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Department faculty frequently have research opportunities for undergraduate students. Students are encouraged to contact faculty members whose research 
sped al rj es are of i nterest 

Fiddvucrk Opportunities 

Several excellent co-op opportunities are availablefor Civil and Environmental Engineering students. See the A. James CI ark School of Engineeri ng entry in chapter 
6 of this catalog for a full description of the Engineering co-op program, orcontactMs. Heidi Sauber, 301-405-3863. 

Honors Program 

See the A . J ames C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng H onors Program 
Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

• American Society of Civil Engineers 

• Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honor Society (by invitation) 

• Engi neers Without Borders 

• ITS Student Chapter 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering awards a number of academic scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for junior and senior 
students. A department commi ttee eval uates appl i cati ons each year. See theSchool of E ngi neeri ng web si te f or i nf ormati on and appl i cati on i nstructi ons. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers the foil owing awards: l)TheCivil Engineering Outstanding Senior Award; 2) TheASCE Outstanding Senior Award; 3) 
TheWoodward-Clyde Consultants Award; 4) TheBechtel Award; 5) TheChi Epsilon Outstanding Senior Award; 6) TheBen Dyer Award; 7) TheASCE Maryland 
SectionAward; 8)TheRobertL. Morris A ward for Environmental Leadership; and 9) Tine Department Chairman's A ward. 

Classics (CLAS) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1210MarieMountHall, 301-405-2013 

www.classics.umd.edu 

hlee6@umd.edu (Chair) orshr@umd.edu (UG advisor) 

Chair: H. Lee 

Professors: L. DohertyJ. Hallett (Distinguished Scholar-Teacher), E. Stehle 

Associate Professors: S. Rutledge(UndergraduateAdvisor), G. Staley 

Lecturers: M . Pittas-Herschbach, J . Woods 

Affiliate Professors: J . B urton 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: J . Scholten 

The Major 

Courses offered by this department may befound under the foil owing acronym(s): CLAS, LATN, GREK. 

Classics isthe study of ancientGreek and Roman culturein all its aspects. Greek and Roman culture are the foundations of western culture- its literature, ideas, art, 
politics, and concepti ons of the i ndi vi dual . G reek myth i s sti 1 1 a shared fund of i mages and narrati ves that expresses human expert ence. L ati n i s the maj or source of 
E ngl i sh vocabul ary, and G reek provi des techni cal I anguage i n many f i el ds. C I assi cs expl ores al I of these aspects through over f i fteen hundred years of hi story. 1 1 
hel ps us understand the rel ati onshi p of western cul ture to other cul tural systems and pi ace oursel ves better i n the wort d. 

CI assies is an intellectually rich and versatile liberal arts maj or which teaches "core ski I Is", including effective communication, critical thinking, and an appreciation 
of diversity. Because it is so interdisciplinary and holistic, a student of classics gets a three-dimensional view of cultural history and the literary works that are sti 1 1 
maj or forces i n the contemporary scene Studyi ng Atheni an democracy and the Roman Republ i c sharpens understandi ng of competi ng phi I osophi cal and pol i ti cal 
i deas. Studyi ng L ati n not onl y devel ops E ngl i sh vocabul ary but makes E ngl i sh grammar comprehensi bl e B oth I anguages provi de excel I ent anal yti c trai ni ng; f or 
instance, classics students score among the top few in the analytic section of theGRE exams. 

Classics is a pre- professional maj or for I aw school or for graduate school inany aspect of the and ent world. CI assies majors have also gone on to library school. 
L ati n teachers are i n demand; numerous students have found reward ng j obs teachi ng secondary school , wi th conti nued i nvol vement i n the cl assi cs communi ty . 
Others have gone i nto busi ness, worked i n educati oral tel evi si on, and gotten j obs i n the wri ti ng or edi ti ng f i el ds, i n archi val work, i n sped al educati on, or i n soci al 
services. 

Program Obj actives 

T he program ai ms to he! p students to understand and appreci ate the G reek and L ati n I anguages and I i teratures, and thei r rel evance to the modern wort d. 
Program Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students must demonstrate the ability to interpret the cul tural context of primary sources through a variety of methodological approaches. 

2. Majors, including Classical Humanities majors, are expected to demonstrate some I eve! of I anguage proficiency. 

• Latin majors must beableto read and translate Latin at the advanced level. 

• Latin and Greek majors must beableto read and translate either Latin or Greek at the advanced level and the other I anguage at the intermediate I eve! . 

• Classical Humanities majors must be abl e to read and translate ei ther Latin or Greek at the intermediate level. 

Adni ssion to the M aj or 

Admission to the maj or simply requires a meeting with the undergraduate advisor. No prior knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. 

Placement in Courses 

Students with score of 4 or 5 in any AP Latin test may not take LATN 201 or lower for credit Students with score of 4 or 5 in more than one A P Latin test may 
receive additional credit For further i nformati on, contact the department's undergraduate advisor. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

Requirements for the CI assies maj or include the Col lege of A rts and Humani ties requirement of 45 upper- level credits completed. 
The College's Global Engagement Requirement will be automatically fulfilled in the process of taking I anguage courses in the major. 

C recite 
Option A: Latin 

LATN Courses at the 200/300 1 eve! 18 

LATN Courses at the 400 1 eve! or higher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9- 12 

Any level CLAS, GREK, or related fields such as 
HIST and ARTH 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Option B: Greek 

GREK Courses at the 200/300 1 evel 18 

GREK Courses at the 400 level or higher 12 

Supporti ng courses 9-12 

Any level CLA5, LATN, or related fields such as 
HIST and ARTH 





Option C: Latin and Greek 


LATN 


Latin courses 


GREK 


Greek courses* 




OR 


GREK 


Greek courses 


LATN 


Latin courses* 



18 

12 



18 
12 
AND 
Supporting Courses 9 

For example, CLAS 170, HIST 110, and a 300- 
or 400-1 evel course in Greek or Roman history 



* Students with no prejious training in the second language may 
count introductory level courses as part of the 12-hour 
requirement 



Option D: Classics in Translation (Classical 
Humanities) 

CLAS Classics courses 18 

LATN Latin courses, OR 12 
GREK Greek courses 

Supporting Courses 12-14 

Normally upper level courses in Art History, 
Archaeology, Architecture, Government, 
History, Linguistics, or Philosophy 

NOTES: 



• Students are encouraged to substitute 300- and 
400-level courses in LATN and GREK for some of 
the 18 requi red credits i n CLAS. 

. 100 and 200-level courses in GREK maybe 
i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
student's 12 language credits are taken in Latin, and 
100 and 200-level courses i n LATN may be 
i ncl uded among the supporti ng credi ts i f the 
student's 12 language credits are taken in GREK, 

• Students are encouraged to take as much I anguage 
as possi bl e, but shoul d take I anguage courses 
sequentially; i.e., 101, 102, 201. Oncecredithas 
been received in a higher- 1 evel language 
acquisition or grammar course, a lower- 1 evel 
course may not betaken for credit The student 
shoul d begi n the sequence at the appropri ate I evel . 



Requirements for theMinor 

Classical Mythology 

Thisminorwill introduce students to classical mythology, its uses within ancient Greek and Roman culture, and its subsequent influence on art and literature. The 
mi nor requi res 15 credits. 

Requi red courses: 

CLAS 170 Greek and Roman Mythology (3) 

CLAS 470 Approaches to Greek Myth (3) 

I n add ti on, the student must choose three courses from the f ol I owi ng I i st, two of whi ch must be at the 300 or 400 1 evel : 
CLAS270GreekLiteratureinTranslation (3) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



CLAS 271 Roman Literature in Translation (3) 

CL AS 320 Women in Classical Antiquity (3) 

CLAS 330AncientGreekReligion: Gods, Myitis, Temples (3) 

CLAS 331Ancient Roman Religion: From Jupiter to Jesus (3) 

CLAS 370 Classical Myths in America (3) 

CLAS 374 Greek Tragedy inTranslation (3) 

CLAS 419TheClassical Tradition (3) 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng thi s mi nor shoul d consul t wi th the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of Classics. 

Latin 

This minor introduces students to the Latin language and enables them to read, in Latin, important works of Latin literature For students with no prior experience of 

L ati n, the mi nor requi res 21 credi ts, consi sti ng of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

Latin 101 Elementary Latin I (4) 

Latin 102 Elementary Latin II (4) 

Latin 201 Intermediate Latin (4) 

Latin3xxA reading course in PI autus, Petronius, OvidorHoraceandCatullus(3) 

Latin4xxA reading course in a major Latin author (3) 

Students who enter wi th advanced standi ng i n L ati n can compl ete the mi nor by taki ng a total of f i ve courses i n L ati n at the 200 1 evel and beyond. Students i nterested 
in pursuing this minor should consult with the Undergraduate A dvi sor in the Department of Classics 

Greek 

This minor introduces students to ancient Greek and enables them to read, in Greek, important works of Greek literature This minor requires 21 credits, consisting 

of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

GreeklOlElerrentaryAncientGreekl (4) 

Greek 102 El ementary Ancient Greek 1 1 (4) 

Greek 201 Intermediate Ancient Greek (4) 

Greek 301 Scenes from Athenian Life (3) 

G reek 4xx Either Greek Philosophers, Greek Tragedy, or Homer (3) 

A Classics course at the 300 or 400lei/e! such as CLAS 374 (Greek Tragedy) or CLAS 330 (Greek Religion) (3) 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng thi s mi nor shoul d consul t wi th the U ndergraduate A dvi sor i n the Department of Classics. 

Advising 

Departmental advi si ng i s mandatory for al I maj ors every semester. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Eta Sigma Phi is the national undergraduate Honor Society in CI assies founded in 1914 at the University of Chicago. The University of Maryland's chapter, Zeta Nu, 
was established in 1994. Students are invited to join in thespring semester. To qualify, a student must be registered in a 300- or 400- level Greek or Latin course, 
must have at I east a B+ average in all language courses, and an overall GPA of B or better. 

Students can also join the American Philological Association, which is the national classics professional organization, and the Classical Association of theAtlantic 
States, which is our regional classical organization. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
uni versi ty off i ces, parti ci pates i n the award ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. F or i nf omnati on, vi si t: www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

TheClassics Department annually awards the A very Prize to a Latin student of special merit, and the Steyer Undergraduate Scholarship to an outstanding classics 
concentrator. To honor the memory of Sylvia Gerber, who taught Latin for many years in the Washington, DC public schools, her son Louis has recently provided 
the department wi th fundi ng to support the trai ni ng of L ati n teachers and L ati n pedagogi cal studi es, i ncl udi ng an undergraduate award for an aspi ri ng L ati n teacher. 

Awards and Recognition 

Outstandi ng students are invited to join Eta Sigma Phi , the national undergraduate Honor Society i n Classics (see Student Societies and Professional Organizations 
above). 

The department also annually awards theAvery Prize for excellence i n Latin, and the Steyer and Gerber Scholarships (see Schol arshi ps and Fi nanci al Assistance 
above). 

Communication (COMM) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2130 Skinner Bui I ding, 301-405-6519 

www. comm umd. edu 

commadvi si ng@umd.edu 

Chair: E. Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J. Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, T. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L.AIdoory, D. Hample 

Assistant Professors: S. Khamis, B. Liu, M. Liu, K. Maddux, X. Nan, N. Ofulue 

Lecturers: R. Coleman, J . Gowin (Coordinator), W. Lawson (Lecturer), S. Simon, J . Tenney, R. Toth 

Affiliate Professors: J . Fahnestock (ENGL), A. Kruglanski (PSYC), Y. Peri (Prof & Dir), D. Rosenfelt (WMST) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: M. Gelfand (PSYC), S. McDaniel (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J. Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

The Major 

Communi cati on takes as its subj ect matter the hi story, processes, and effects of human corrmuni cati on through speech and i ts extensi ons. The departmental 
curri cul um i s desi gned to provi de a I i beral educati on i n the arts and sci ences of human communi cati on as wel I as preparati on for career opportuni ti es i n busi ness, 
government educati on, I aw, and rel ated f i el ds. Students pursue academi c programs that emphasi ze many di sci pi i nary areas, i ncl udi ng i ntercul tural communi cati on, 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 258 



political communication, public relations, negotiation and conflict management cognition and persuasion, rhetorical theory, risk communication, history of rhetoric, 
and cri ti ci sm of publ i c di scourse. Departmental advi si ng i s mandatory for new maj ors, second semester sophomores, and seni ors. 

Prog-am Learning Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program i n C orrmuni cati on, students shoul d be abl e to demonstrate the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability to distinguish among a variety of theoretical approaches in the communication discipline and use them appropriately and effectively in academic and 
professional work. 

2. A n abi I i ty to conduct research and wri te research reports empl oyi ng soci al sci enti f i c and/or humani sti c approaches i n the communi cati on di sci pi i ne 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively in a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to foster democratic communication by a diverse 
people. Seewww.corrm.center.umd.edu. 

The Center for Risk Communication Research (CRCR) advances dialogue and understanding about communication's role in controlling and preventing risk; about 
how publics perceive risk communi cati on; and about the political, economic and social contextsfor risk communication. Scholars associated with the CRCR 
examine health, food safety, security, and environmental risks. Seewww.commriskcenter.umd.edu. 

The departments M edi a Center i s desi gned to provi de one-on-one tutori ng and i nstructi onal support to further students' oral communi cat on ski 1 1 s and conf i dence 
T he M edi a Center i s equi pped wi th cameras and recordi ng equi pment to tape speeches and presentati ons f or practi ce and cri ti que 

Admission totheMaj or 
First-time Freshman 

All fi rst-time freshmen who desi grate communi cat on as a maj or prior to the end of the final exam period of their first semester will be admitted directly to the 
program They must si gn a M emorandum of U nderstandi ng that states that they understand that by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 45 U ni versi ty ofM ary I and credi ts 
(excluding AP), they must meet the foil owing Gateway requirements. 

a. Complete 50% of theCORE requirements, including Fundamental Studies requirements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Completeoneof thefollowing courses with a gradeofC or better: BMGT230, CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY201, STAT100, or equivalent 

c. Compl ete COM M 107, COM M 200, or COM M 230 with a gradeofC or better 

d. CompleteCOMM250withagradeof Cor better and 

e A GPA of 2.0 or better 

Students may repeat only one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated only once in their attempt to meet the requi rements. Students who fai I to meet the 
Gateway requi rements by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 45 credi ts wi 1 1 be di smi ssed from the program and cannot reappl y. 

Transfer Students 

Internal and external transfer students who meet the Gateway requi rements specified above must also have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 in all college-level coursework 
to apply to the program 

Appeals 

A 1 1 students may appeal admi ssi on deci si ons. Students di recti y admi tted as freshmen, who are di srri ssed because of fai I ure to meet Gateway requi rements or to be i n 
good academic standing at 45 credits, may appeal directiytotheUnclergraduateDirectorinthe Department of Communication. All other students who are denied 
admi ssi on may appeal to the uni versi ty 's Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 



Requirements for the Major 

T he course of study f or a C orrmuni cati on maj or must sati sf y al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 



Credits 



COM M 107 Oral Communi cati on: Pri nci pi es and Practi ces, OR 3 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 3 

COM M 230 Argumentation and Debate 3 

COM M 250 Introduction to Communi cati on Inquiry 3 

COM M 400 Research Methods in Communication 3 

COMM401 Interpreting Strategic Discourse 3 

Completion of one of thefollowing tracks: 

Social I nfluenceTradc 

COM M 402 Communi cati on Theory and Process 3 

Five from 15 

COMM420 Theories of Group Discussion 
COM M 424 Communication in Complex Organizations 
COM M 425 Negotiation and Conf Net Management 
COMM426 Conflict Management 
COMM435 Theoriesof Interpersonal Communication 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



COM M 470 
COM M 475 
COM M 477 
COM M 482 
COMM 
COMM UL 

PSYC200 

SOCY201 

BMGT230 

EDMS451 

STAT100 



LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



Listening 

Persuasion 

Discourse Analysis 

Intercultural Communications 

COMM Elective 

Upper Level COMM Elective 

One Statistical Analysis from 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 

Business Statistics 

I ntroducti on to Educati onal Stati sti cs 

Elementary Statistics and Probability 

(or an equi val ent course - see advi sor) 

OneStructural Analysisof Language from 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 

I ntroducti on to L i ngui sti cs 

C ul ture and D i scourse 

(or an equi val ent course - see advi sor) 



3 
3 

3-4 



COURSESXX Courses related to Social Influence in one department other than COMM 



COMM 402 

COMM 420 
COMM 424 
COMM 425 
COMM 426 
COMM 435 
COMM 470 
COMM 475 
COMM 477 
COMM 482 

COMM 330 
COMM 360 
COMM 450 
COMM 451 
COMM 453 
COMM 455 
COMM 460 
COMM 461 
COMM 469 
COMM 471 
COMM 476 
COMM 
COMM 300/400 

PSYC200 

SOCY201 

BMGT230 

EDMS451 

STAT100 



LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



Communication StudiesTrack 

Cormnuni cati on Theory and Process 

One from 

Theories of Group Discussion 

Communication in Complex Organizations 

N egoti ati on and Conf I i ct M anagement 

C onf I i ct M anagement 

T heori es of I nterpersonal C ormnuni cati on 

Listening 

Persuasion 

Discourse Analysis 

Intercultural Communications 

One from 

A rgumentati on and Publ i c Pol i cy 

TheRhetoricof Black America 

And ent and Medieval Rhetorical Theory 

Renaissance & Modem Rhetoric Theory 

T he Power of D i scourse i n A meri can L i fe 

Speechwriting 

Public LifeinAmerican Communities, 1634-1900 

Voices of Public Leadership in theTwentieth Century 

T he D i scourse of Soci al M overrents 

Publ i c Corrmuni cati on Campai gns 

Language, Communication, and Action 

COMM Elective 

Upper Level COMM Electjves 

One Statistical Analysis from 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 

Business Stati sties 

I ntroducti on to Educati onal Stati sti cs 

Elementary Statistics and Probability 

(or an equi val ent course - see advi sor) 
OneStructural Analysisof Language from 
I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 
I ntroducti on to L i ngui sti cs 
C ul ture and D i scourse 
or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 



3 

12 
3-4 



COU RSESXX Courses related to Communication Studies i n one department other than COM M 



Public RdationsTrack 

The requirements below are effective for incorring Fall 2008 freshmen and 

transfers adm'tted to Comrunication. 
COMM231 NewsWritingandReportingforPublicRelations 3 

COMM232 News Editing for Public Relations 3 

COMM 350 Public Relations Theory 3 

COMM 351 Public Relations Techniques 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



COMM352 Specialized Writing in Public Relations 
COM M 386 Experi enti al L eami ng* 

* only 3 credits apply to major 
COM M 483 Senior Seminar in Public Relations 
COM M 300/400 Upper Level COMM Electives 

One Statistical Analysis from 
PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 

SOCY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 
EDMS451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 

STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

(or an equi val ent course - see advi sor) 
COURSESXX Coursffir ^*^toPublicRelationsinonedepartmentotherthanCOMM or 

J OUR 



3 
3-6 

3 

6 

3-4 



Rhetoric and Political CultureTrack 

COM M 450 A nci ent and M edi eval Rhetori cal Theory 3 

Five from 15 

COMM 330 Argumentation and Public Pol icy 
COMM360 TheRhetoricof BlackArrerica 
COMM451 Renaissance& Modem Rhetoric Theory 
COMM453 The Power of Discourse in American Life 
COMM 455 Speechwritjng 

COMM460 PublicLifeinAmericanCommunities, 1634-1900 
COMM 461 Voices of Public Leadership in theTwentieth Century 
COMM469 The Discourse of Social Movements 
COMM 471 Public Communication Campaigns 
COMM476 Language, Communication, and Action 

COMM COMM Elective 3 

COMM300/400 UpperLeve! COMM Elective 3 

One Critical Analysis of Discourse from 3 

AMST432 Literature and American Society 

CMLT488 Genres 

ENGL453 Literary Theory 

J WST263 Hebrew Bible: Poetry and Prophecy 

PHIL233 Philosophy in Literature 

OneStructural AnalysisofLanguagefrom 3 

LING200 Introductory Linguistics 

H E SP 120 I ntroductj on to L i ngui sti cs 

ANTH380 Culture and Discourse 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

i-ni idcccvv Courses related to Rhetoric and Political Culture in one department other than n 

LUUKbbbXX C0MM 9 



Notes 

• B ecause the department's curri cul um changes over ti me, the departrrents U ndergraduate D i rector may approve other appropri ate Communi cati on courses to 
meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses required for the Communi cati on major, but taken outside COMM, may be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 

Requirements for theMinor 

Rhetoric is the theory of persuasive communi cati on, both written and spoken. The mi nor in rhetoric has been designed for students who want to know the principles 
and ski I Is of practical persuasion in its varied contexts. The program will be of value for all students wishing to improve their writing and speaking ski I Is and 
especially useful for those students who pi an careers in business, management, law, government and education. The mi nor in rhetoric is an interdisciplinary program 
offered through the cooperation of the Department of English and the Department of Communication. 

To make an appoi ntrrent to expl ore or decl are a rri nor, go to www.arhu. umd.edu/undergraduate/academi cs/mi nors. 

F ifteen semester hours of coursework are requi red: 

A. Six semester hours from the course list in Rhetorical Theory and Analysis of Discourse 

B. Six semester hours from the course list in Writing and Speaking Ski I Is 

C. Three semester hours in electives from either section of the Rhetoric Course List 

D. At least nine of the fifteen semester hours must at the 300-level or higher (including at least six hours at the University of Maryland, College Park) 

E. No more than six of thef ifteen semester hours may be taken at an institution other than the University of Maryland, College Park 

F . N o more than si x of the f i fteen semester hours may count toward the students maj or, supporti ng courses, and col I ege requi rements 

G . N o course from the students maj or department may count toward the mi nor 

H . N o course used to sati sfy a F undamental Studi es requi rement may count toward the mi nor 
I . N o course used to sati sfy the requi rements of another mi nor may count toward the rhetori c mi nor. 
J. No coursegrade below the grade of "C" may count toward the mi nor 



Entering the Minor 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 261 



Students wi shi ng to pursue the mi nor shoul d revi ew the requi rements above, make tentati ve sel ecti ons of courses bel ow to sati sfy these requi rements, and meet wi th 
oneof the advisers below. Theearliest possible meeting to draft a list of courses is recommended. Students must then officially declare the mi nor in rhetoric. 



Cumentcouraelistsfiartheninor in Rhetoric can befouidat 

www, comm umd. edu/rhetori cmi nor, html 

Mi nor Advisors 



JamesF. Klumpp Shirley Logan 

Department of Communication Department of English 

2122 Skinner Building 3114 Tawes Hall 

iklumDP@umd.edu sloaan@umd.edu 

301-405-6520 301-405-9659 



Advising 

Advi si ng i s avai I abl e throughout the year i n 2101D Ski nner B ui I di ng. Students shoul d check Testudo for thei r regi strati on date and for any mandatory advi si ng 
blocks. Advising questions can be sent to commadvising@umd.edu or you may call 301-405-0862 or 301-405-0863. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experi ences i ncl ude assi sti ng on f acul ty research proj ects, parti ci pad ng i n sped al team research proj ects, and worki ng wi th the departments C enter for 
Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk Communication Research. 

Internships 

T he departments i ntemshi p program hel ps communi cati on maj ors gai n prof essi onal experi ence, bui I d a prof essi oral portf ol i o, and take the f i rst steps toward a 
career. The department structures its internship program around a course, COM M 386: Experient/a/ Learning, offered each school term 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides students with an opportunity for intensive study of Communication. The program provides participants with opportunities to deepen 
their understanding of the discipline through supervised research with faculty, graduate- level coursework, and involvement in the intellectual life of the department 

Students i nterested i n the H onors Program appl y for the program, ordi nari I y duri ng the second semester of the sophomore year or the fi rst semester of the j uni or 
year. The appl i cati on i s f i I ed wi th the U ndergraduate D i rector. Students shoul d have the f ol I owi ng qual i f i cati ons: 

• An overall GPA of 3.3 or above 

• Completion of nine semester hours in Communication including COMM 250. 

• GPA of 3. 5 or above in Communi cati on. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Sod al and academi c acti vi ti es are avai I abl e to students by parti ci pad ng i n the f ol I owi ng student organi zati ons: the U ndergraduate Communi cati on A ssoci ati on, the 
Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society, and the Maryland chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

T he department offers the J une Dowl er B uteau Schol arshi p to a freshman student who exhi bi ts academi c excel I ence 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2116 Tawes Hal 1 , 301-405-3839 

www. cml t umd. edu 

Chair: K. Cartwright 

Director: Z. Nunes 

Professors: M. Collins (English), R. Harrison (Spanish & Portuguese), C. Peterson (English), S. Ray (Prof), B. Richardson (English) 

A ssoci ate Professors: R. Bauer (English), K. Chuh (English), S.J elen (Assoc Prof), Z. Nunes (English), O.Wang (English) 

Assistant Professors: E. Bearden (English), K. Macharia(AsstProf), R. Ontiveros (English), G. Passannante(English), V. Valiavitcharska( English) 

Instructors: E. Robinson 

Professors Emeriti: A. Berlin (Prof Emerita) 

The Major 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the acronym CM LT. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Computer Engineering (ENCP) 

A.James Clark School of Engineering 

2429 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-3685 
www.eceumd.edu 
eceadvi se@umd. edu 
Chair: P. O'Shea (Professor) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Professors: E. Abed,T. AntonsenJ. Baras, D. Barbe, A. Barg, S. Bhattacharyya, G. B I ankenship (Associate Chair, External Relations), R. Chel lappa (Distinguished 

Scholar Teacher), N. DeClaris, M. Dagenais, C. Davis (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Ephremides, C. Espy-Wilson, R. Ghodssi, V. GligorJ. Goldhar, N. 

Goldsman, R. Gomez, V. Granatstein, P. Ho, A. Iliadis, J .J a) a, J . Kim (Prof Of Practice), P. Krishnaprasad, W. Lawson (Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies), 

W. Levine(Res Prof), K. Liu (Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Makowski, S. Marcus (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), I. 

Mayergoyz (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), J. Melngailis, H. Milchberg (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), K. Nakajima, P. Narayan, R. Newcomb, Y. Oruc, E. Ott 

(Distinguished University Professor), M. Peckerar, H. Rabin, S. Sharmna, M. Shayman, A. Tits, T. Venkatesan (Res Prof), U. Vishkin, M.Vorontsov( Res Prof) 

Associate Professors: P. Abshire, R. Barua, P. Dowd (Res Assoc Prof), M. Franklin, T. Horiuchi, B.Jacob, R. La,T. Murphy, A. Papamarcou, G. Qu, C. SilioJ. 

Simon, A. Srivastava, S. Ulukus, M . Wu, D. Yeung 

Assistant Professors: N. Martins, E. Waks 

Lecturers: W. Hawkins 

Affiliate Professors: A. Agrawala, J. Aloimonos, S. Anlage, L. Davis, M. Fu, M. Harper, A. Harris, J. Hollingsworth, D, O'Leary, G. Rubloff, F. Wellstood 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Appelbaum, S. Bhattacharjee, M. Cukier, R. Duraiswami, R. Kishek, R. Phaneuf, E. Smela 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: Y. Chen, M. Hicks, P. Keleher, R. Shekhar 

Professors Emeriti: L. Davisson, F. Emad, R. Harger, C. Lee, P. LigomenidesJ. OrioffJ. Pugsley, M. Reiser, M. Rhee, C. Striffler, L.Taylor, S.Tretter, K.Zaki 

The Major 

Tine computer engineering major combines the strengths of both the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science 
to prepare students for careers i n the computer i ndustry. The program encompasses the study of hardware, software, and systems questi ons that ari se i n the desi gn, 
development and application of computers and embedded systems. Specifically, computer engineering students will havea knowledge of hardware systems 
(electrical networks, electronics, and VLSI); a knowledge of software systems (algorithms, data structures, and operating systems); and a knowledge of how these 
two domains interact (digital logic, signal and system theory, computer architectural and performance analysis). Computer Engineering students will learn about 
everythi ng that goes i nto di gi tal and computi ng systems, from sol i d state physi cstoCMOSVLSI desi gn, to computer archi tecture to programmi ng, and from 
operating systems to compiler and language theory. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym: ENEE andCMSC. 

Program Obj actives 

B roadl y stated, the Educati onal O bj ecti ves of the undergraduate program i n computer engi neeri ng pertai n to the accompl i shments and performance of our students 
3- 5 years after graduati on. These obj ecti ves were determi ned i n consul tati on wi th the vari ous consti tuenci es of the computer engi neeri ng program and agreed upon 
and approved by a consensus of the faculty. 

L Technical Knowledge 

To graduate engi neers trai ned i n the fundamental s of computer engi neeri ng and rel evant sped al ti es so they are prepared to succeed i n graduate school and/or be 
productive engi neers i n government or i ndustry. 

Z Laboratory, Design, and Research 

To graduate engi neers who can design and perform experimental projects to solve diverse problems, with special emphasis on exploiting diverse technical 
knowl edge and ski 1 1 s so they can engage i n desi gn work or research. 

3. Preparation for Further Study 

To graduate engi neers who have the educati onal foundations and skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning in every sphere of their life 

4 Professionalism 

To graduate engi neers wi th the necessary prof essi onal ski 1 1 s to succeed intheir chosen prof essi on and the preparati on to f ul f i 1 1 thei r prof essi onal responsi bi I i ti es as 
engi neers whi chi ncl ude thei r ethi cal obi i gati ons to soci ety, empl oyers, empl oyees, and f el I ow engi neers. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

A comprehensive set of Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) has been derived from the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs). These SLOs comprise the 
knowl edge and ski 1 1 s al I Computer Engi neeri ng students are expected to possess by the ti me they graduate so the PEOs can be accompl i shed. The SL Os are: 

L Broad Foundation 

Ability to apply relevant mathematical, scientific, and basic engineering knowledge 

2. Disciplinary Foundation 

A bi I i ty to appl y core el ectri cal engi neeri ng techni cal knowl edge 

3. Laboratory 

Ability to employ standard experimental techniques to generate and analyze data as well as use stateof-theart software and instrumentation to solve el ectri cal 
engi neeri ng probl ems. 

4 Design 

A bi I i ty to engage i n the creati ve desi gn process through the i ntegrati on and appl i cati on of di verse techni cal knowl edge and experti se to meet customer needs and 
address social issues. 

5. Communication Skills 

A bi I i ty to cormnuni cate ef f ecti vel y both through oral presentati ons and the wri tten word. 

& Interpersonal Skills 

A bi I i ty to i nteract prof essi onal I y wi th others i n the workpl ace, to engage eff ecti vel y i n teamwork, and to f uncti on producti velyonmultidiscipli nary group proj ects. 

7. Engineering Ethics 

A bi I i ty to expl ai n an engi neer's responsi bi I i ti es to empl oyers, soci ety , and thei r f el I ow engi neers as wel I as an abi I i ty to recogni ze potenti al and actual ethi cal 
probl ems, anal yze critically those si tuati ons, and f ormul ate sound ethi cal deci si ons. 

8. Engineering Society 

A bi I i ty to expl ai n the sy mbi oti c rel ati onshi p between engi neeri ng and soci ety sped f i cal I y , how engi neeri ng arti facts are shaped by and i ncorporate human val ues as 
well as the ways in which engineering solutions impact society and the larger social obligations this entails for engineers 

9. Life-long Learning 

Skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning and an understanding of the need to continually exploit those ski I Is in refining and updating one's knowledgebase. 

Educational Opportunities 

I n add ti on to the Student L eami ng Outcomes which appl y to al I C P students, there exi st vari ous other educati onal opportuni ti es whi ch qual i f i ed and moti vated 
students may choose to take advantage of . The most i mportant of these i ncl ude: 

la Research 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



A bi I i ty to f omnul ate and answer empi ri cal and theoreti cal questi ons through parti ci parj on i n undergraduate research proj ects for i nterested and qualified students. 

1L Leadership 

A wareness of the need for engi neeri ng I eaders both wi thi n the prof essi on and the I arger communi ty , as wel I as sorre preparati on to assume those I eadershi p rol es. 

12. Entrepreneurship 

K nowl edge of the technol ogy entrepreneurshi p process and busi ness ski 1 1 s to be abl e to work eff ecti vel y as empi oyers of I eaders of technol ogy startup ventures, 
industrial firms, or government 

Admission to the M aj or 

Admission requirements for theComputer Engi neering major aredetermi ned by theA J ames Clark School of Engineering. See Chapter 6 for the CI ark School 
admi ssi on requi rements. F or detai I s on the U ni versi ty's requi rements and general admi ssi on procedures, pi ease see C hapter 1. 

Requirements for the Major 

A s i n al I engi neeri ng degrees, the student starts out wi th a core curri cul um i n mathemati cs and basi c sci ence Subsequent years of study i nvol ve courses coveri ng a 
balanced mixture of hardware, software, hardware-software trade-offs, and basic modeling techniques used to represent the computing process. Courses covering 
al gori thms, data structures, digital systems, computer organi zati on and archi tecture, software and hardware desi gn and testi ng, operati ng systems, and programmi ng 
I anguages wi 1 1 be i ncl uded. E I ecti ve courses must i ncl ude el ectri cal engi neeri ng and computer sci ence courses and techni cal courses outsi de the departments. Students i 
Students must earn a (fade of 'C or hicfrer in all encjneering, nulliaiulics, andsciencecoursesaswell astheprerequisitEsforlhesecoursesA sampleprogram 
is shown below. 



Freshman Year 

CORE** CORE General Education 

CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engineers 
PHYS161 General Physics 

MATH 140/141 Cal cul us I /Cal cul us 1 1 
CMSC132* Object Oriented Programming 1 1 
ENES100 Intro, to Engineering Design 

Total Credits 



Credits 


Credits 


First Sem Second Son 


3 


3 


3 






3 


4 


4 




4 


3 




13 


14 



Sophomore Year ++ 



CORE** 

MATH246 

CMSC216 

CMSC250 

CMSC330 

PHYS26Q/261 

ENEE222 

ENEE200** 

ENEE205 
ENEE245 



CORE General Education 3 

Differential Equations 3 

I ntroducti on to Computer Systems 4 

Discrete Structure 4 

Organization of Programming Languages 3 

General Physics 1 1 with Lab 4 

Elementsof Discrete Signal Analysis 4 

Social & Ethical Dimensions of ECE 3 

Technology 

Electric Circuits 4 

Fund. Digital Circuits & Systems Lab 2 

Total Credits 17 17 





J unior Year 






CORE** 


CORE General Education 


3 




CMSC351 


Algorithms 




3 


CMSC412 


Operating Systems 




4 


ENEE303 


Analog and Digital Electronics 


3 




ENEE307 


Electronics Circuits Design Lab 


2 




ENEE322 


Signal and System Theory 


3 




ENEE324 


Engi neeri ng Probabi 1 ity 




3 


ENEE350 


Computer Organization 


3 




ENEE446 


Computer Design 




3 




Total Credits 


14 


13 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 264 



Senior Year 



CORE** 


CORE General Education 


3 


3 


ELECTIVE 


Computer Engineering Technical Electives 


12 


10 


ENGL393 


Technical Writing 




3 




Total Credits 


15 


16 



++ Effective with the Fall 2010 freshmen admit class, students will be required to 
f ol I ow the new curri cul um above. Students enrol I ed pri or to Fal I 2010 or students 
enrolled in parallel programs at other 2 and 4 year institutions should follow the 
ol d requi rements. H owever, records will be revi ewed when necessary on an 
i ndi vi dual basi s duri ng the phase i n/out peri od, and adj ustments made i n degree 
requi rements, 

* Students may need to take CM SC 131, Object Oriented Programming I, orthe 
computer science exemption exam before taking CM SC 132. 
** Note: This sample schedule assumes at I east one of the CORE Distributive 
Studies classes also satisfies the CORE Cultural Diversity requirement and 
ENEE200isusedasaCORE IE to satisfy one of the distributive studies 
requirements. See the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (CORE) for 
detai I s about CORE program requi rements. 



Technical Elective Requi rements 

Effective Spring 2010, all BSCP graduates must distribute their 22 credits of 
techni cal el ecti ves among the f ol I owi ng course categori es: 

Credits 

CategoryA Mathematics and Basic Science El ecti ves mini mum of 6 

CategoryB Computer ScienceTheory and Applications minimumof3 

Category C Electrical Engineering Theory and rT inirrx J mof3 

Applications 

Category D Advanced Laboratory minimumof2 

Category E Capstone Design minimumof3 

Category F General Technical Electives minimumof3 

P/ease read carefully, andmakea ncteoflhefollcwing special cases and ether items 

1. General Technical Electives. They may beany upper- level course (300 level or higher) from the math, engineering, and basic science disciplines 
whose courses start with the following prefixes and who do not appear on the list of unacceptable courses avail able from the Undergraduate Studies 
Office: AMSC, BCHM, BIOE, BSCI, CHEM, CMSC, ENAE, ENCE, ENCH, ENEE, ENES, ENFP, ENMA, ENME, ENNU, ENRE, MATH, PHYS, 
and STAT. Students may use upper level course (300 level or higher) whose prefix is not given in the list above, assuming they received approval to 
use such courses and the f ol I owi ng condi ti ons are met: ( i ) a students sel ects two or more such courses whi ch are cl osel y re! ated by a theme and ( i i ) the 
student demonstrates how these courses compl ement thei r prof essi onal goal s. The most up-to-date list of approved and unacceptabl e courses wi 1 1 
always be availablefrom the Undergraduate Studies Office and on the ECE website 

2. Two credits of ENEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and Computer Engineering, may be used to satisfy the A dvanced Laboratory requirement 
subject to approval by the faculty supervisor and the Associate Chair. The maximum number of ENEE499 credits that may be applied towards EE 
technical elective requirements if five 

3. Additional CapstoneDesign courses can be used as substitutes for the requi red Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications course, and/or the 
requi red Advanced Laboratory course, provided one of the foil owing is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B or408C. 

4. 1 f you have any questi ons on how these requi rements affect your current sel ecti on of techni cal el ecti ves, pi ease contact an advi sor. 

Advising 

All ECE faculty members provide mentoring for undergraduate students and every student is assi gned a mmtor during their firtsernester in the nraj or. Additional 
advisi ng is provided by the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Education and the professional advising staff of ECE Undergraduate Studies Office 
Departmental pemni ssi on i s requi red i n order to regi ster for and al I courses i n the maj or. The Department's U ndergraduate Studi es Off i ce (2429 A .V . Wi 1 1 i arms 
B ui I di ng, 301- 405- 3685) i s the pri mary poi nt of contact for undergraduates wi th advi si ng questi ons, and detai I ed curri cul um requi rements, regi strati on i nf omnati on, 
and advi si ng and mentori ng procedures can be on the ECE Undergraduate Advi sing website 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is affiliated with more than 40 specialized laboratories, supporting activities including: speech and image 
processing, high performance systems, mobile computing and multimedia, communication networks, robotics, control systems, neural systems, systems integration, 
VLSI desi gn and testi ng, experi mental software engi neeri ng, semi conductor materi al s and devi ces, photoni cs, f i ber opti cs, i on beam I i thography , real -ti me systems, 
human- computer i nteracti on, and vi rtual real i ty . U ndergraduate students are encouraged to engage i n research at some poi nt duri ng thei r educati on. A cti ve 
participation in research not only allows students to apply what they have learned in class, it also gives them greater insight into a specific area within ECE and an 
appreci ati on f or the subti eti es and difficulties associ ated wi th the producti on of knowl edge and fundamental new appl i cati ons. Research experi ence al so prepares 
students for the demands of graduate school and the work force I nf ornnati on on parti ci pad ng i n undergraduate research can be found atwww .ece umd.edu/A cademi c/U 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 265 



www.gaurrrl.edu/Academc/Under/advisina/ENEE499.ritrril . 

The ECE department also offers unique summer research internship programs. The Maryland Engineering Research Internship Team program offers research 
opportuni ti es f or top undergraduates from across the country i nterested i n usi ng computer engi neari ng ski 1 1 s and tool s to address i important bi osystems appl i cati ons. 
T he T rai ni ng and Research Experi ences i n N onl i near Dy nami cs program offers research opportuni ti es f or students i nterested i n nonl i near dy nami cs. The students 
parti ci pate i n cutti ng edge, team- based research, techni cal and educati oral semi nars, and field tripsin I ocal i ndustry. 

Internships 

I nf omnati on on i ntemshi ps can be found at www.coop.eng.umd.edu . 
Co-op Programs 

Partici pation in a Cooperative Educati on Program or internship with private industry or a government agency is strongly encouraged. See the A. James CI ark School 
of Engineering catalog entry for details 

Honors Program 

T he E I ectri cal and C omputer E ngi neari ng H onors Program i s i ntended to provi de a more chal I engi ng and rewardi ng undergraduate experi ence for students pursui ng 
the baccal aureate i n E I ectri cal or Computer E ngi neeri ng. The program requi res students to compl ete honors versi ons of four j uni or I eve! el ectri cal engi neari ng 
courses and a research project during the senior year. Students completing all program requirements with a 'B' average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) andacumulativeGPA 
of 3.0 for al I undergraduate work wi 1 1 have thei r parti ci pad on noted on thei r B . S. di pi oma. Students wi th the necessary academi c qual i f i cati ons are i nvi ted to enrol I 
ty pi cal I y after the compl eti on of thei r sophomore year. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The ECE Department has an active student chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Information and instruct] ons for joining can be 
found on thei r website (eeaece.umd.edu ). Equally active is the Gamma Xi chapter of Eta Kappa Nu honor society which is dedicated to recognizing excellence in 
electrical and computer engineering. I nformati on on eligibility can be obtained by visiting thei r website t/vww.hkn.orci/admin/chapter.asp?ch=113 ). The ECE 
Undergraduate Student Council (USC) represents the entire ECE undergraduate student body. TheECE-USC hosts undergraduate social events, provides feedback to 
the Department and overseas the ECE undergraduate student lounge FormoredetailsvisittheECE-USC website ( www.ece.umd.edu/eceusc/ ). Additional Iv. there 
is also a program for Women in Electrical and Computer Engineering (WECE) and a group called the Leaders in ECE, who serve as our ambassadors, give insight 
to new and prospective students, and partici pate in departmental events such as our "International Day" when we celebrate the cultural diversity of the students and 
f acul ty i n our department. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several schol arshi ps are admi ni stered through the department and many others through the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng. To be 
considered for these awards, students must submit an appl ication by M ay 1st of each year for thefol lowi ng academic year. For 
more i nformati on visit: www.ur3p.urnd.edu/sch0larships/inclex.htrnl . 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers the following awards: 1. Outstanding academic performance award presented to a junior for 
academi c excel I ence; 2. Servi ce A ward to the graduati ng seni or who has show a commi tment of servi ce to f el I ow students; and 3. C hai rs A ward for outstandi ng 
academic performance to a graduating senior. 

J ob Opportunities 

Computer engi nears were pri mari I y responsi bl e f or the recent revol uti ons i n the musi c, tel ecommuni cati ons and medi cal devi ce i ndustri es. T hey remai n at the 
forefront of cutrj ng edge devel opments and i nnovati ons i n nanotechnol ogy , roboti cs, and other technol ogi es. E I ectri cal engi neers al so have wi de rangi ng empl oyment 
opportuni ties in other fields including electronics, microelectronics, communications and signal processing, power systems, electrophysics, computer architecture, 
circuits, and control systems. Specificjobs include developing fiber optic technology, lasers for biomedical applications, software for robots, electronic weapons 
systems, advanced wi rel ess networks, and neuron- 1 i ke sensors for vari ous appl i cati ons. 

Computer Sdence(CMSC) 

Collegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1119 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2672 

www.cs.umd.edu 

ugrad@cs. umd.edu 

Chair: L. Davis 

Professors: A. AgrawalaJ. Aloimonos, B. Bederson, S. Bhattacharjee, W. Cleaveland, L. Defloriani (on leave), B. Dorr, H. Elman (Assoc Chair), W. GasarchJ. 

H ol I ingsworth (Assoc Chair), D.Jacobs, S. Khuller, D. Mount D. Nau, D. O'Leary, D. Perlis, A. Porter, W. PughJ. Reggia, N. Roussopoulos, S. Salzberg, H. 

Samet A. Shankar, B. Shneidemnan, A. Srinivasan, V. Subrahmanian, A. Varshney 

Associate Professors: W.Arbaugh, A. Deshpande, R. DuraiswamiJ. Foster, L. Getoor, M. Hicks, J. Katz, P. Keleher, C. Kruskal.A. Memon, M. Pop, J. Purtilo, N. 

Spring, A. Sussman, C.Tseng 

Assistant Professors: H. Corrida Bravo, H. Daume, M. Hajiaghayi, C. Kingsford 

Lecturers: F. Emad, E. Golub, L. Herman, M. Hugue, N. Padua- Perez, J . Plane (Senior Lecturer) 

Professors Emeriti: V. Basili, Y. Chu, L. Kanal, R. Mi Her, J. M inker, G. Stewart (Distinguished University Professor Emeritus), M. Zelkowitz 

The Major 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: their appl ication, design, development and theory. Principal areas within computer science 
include artificial intelligence, computer systems, database systems, human factors, numerical analysis, programming languages, software engineering, and theories 
of computing. A computer scientist is concerned with problem solving. Problems range from abstract questions of what problems can be solved with computers to 
practi cal matters such desi gn of computer systems whi ch are easy for peopl e to use Computer sci end sts build computarj onal model s of systems i ncl udi ng physi cal 
phenomena (weather forecasting), human behavior (expert systems, robotics), and computer systems themselves (performance evaluation). Such models often 
requi re extensi ve numeri cor symbol i c computarj on. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 266 



Placement in Courses 

M uch of the knowl edge at the earl y stage of the degree program i s cumul ati ve. To ensure that transfer and students start wi th the appropri ate courses, the 
department offers exempti on exams for CMSC 131, 132, 216, and 250. Students who have had CS courses prior to starting at Maryland should contact the 
undergraduate office (ugrad@cs.umd.edu) airiniiTijmaftvw weeks before the first day of class of their first term at Maryland to schedule and take exempti on 
exams. 

Requirements for theMaj or 

T he course of study f or a C omputer Sci ence maj or must i ncl ude al I of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

1. A grade of C or better i n each of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

a. CMSC 131 or a score of 5 on A versionoftheJAVA Advanced Placement exam or a scoreof 4 or 5 on the AB version of theJAVA 

A dvanced PI acement exam or an acceptabl e score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exami nation,whichistobe taken at the ti me 
of entry i nto the program 

b. CMSC 132 or acceptable score on the appropri ate Department exemption examination, which is to betaken at the time of entry into the 
program 

c. CMSC 216 or acceptable score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exami nation, which is to be taken at the time of entry into the 
program 

d. CMSC 250 or acceptable score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exami nation, which is to be taken at the time of entry into the 
program 

e At least 27 credit hours at the 300-400 1 ei/els. These must include CMSC 330, CMSC 351, and at least 15 credit hours from the 
f ol I owi ng C M SC courses wi th no more than two courses from a si ngl e category: 

Computer Systems: U p to two of 411, 412, 414, 417 

I nf ormatj on Processi ng: 420, one of 421 or 422 or 423 or 424 or 426 or 427 

Software Engineering/Programming Languages: Uptotwoof 430, 433,434,435,436 

Algorithms and Computation Theory: 451, oneof 452 or 456 

Numerical Analysis*: Oneof 460 or 456. 

*A/oter Courses in Numerical Analysis requireMATH 240 and 241 as additional prerequisites. Students without either of 
these prerequisites mist choose their 15 credit hours from the remaining courses in the other four areas. 

2. MATH 140 and 141. A STAT course which has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequisite, and one other MATH, 
STAT, orAMSC course which has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequisite A grade of C or better must be earned in 
each of the courses. No course that is cross- listed as CMSC may be counted in this requirement 

3. A minimum of 12 additional credithoursof 300-400level courses in one disci pi ine outside of computer sci ence with an average grade of C or 
better. No course that is cross- listed as CMSC may be counted in this requi rementNote The foil owing general guidelines should be observed when 
sel ecti ng courses f or thi s upper I evel support ng sequence 

a. Courses must have al I the same four- 1 etter acronym 

b. Each course should beaminimum of 3credits. 

c. Only 1 special topics or i ndependent study course (such as courses numbered 498 or 499) may be used. 

Any variations must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Director. No course used to fulfill another requirement (other than CORE Advanced Studies) can 
be counted i n thi s requi rement 



Requirements for theMinor 

T he purpose of the mi nor i n C omputer Sci ence i s not onl y to gi ve students a strong f oundati on i n, and understandi ng of, al gori thrri c reasoni ng, probl em sol vi ng 
methods i nvol vi ng computers and computati on, and a sol i d base to hel p students adapt to future changes i n technol ogy , but to compl ement and enhance any 
students maj or program of study. The computer sci ence mi nor may be earned by students not maj ori ng i n computer sci ence and computer engi neeri ng. A grade of C 
or better must be earned i n al I courses requi red for the mi nor. Seavww.unclergrad.cs.urrd.edu/current-students/degree-requi rements-for-mi nor/ for detai led 
i nf omnati on. The award of a M i nor wi 1 1 be noted on the students transcri pt at the ti me of graduati on. 

Advising 

All advisirgforCSstLdertsisdoneintheComputerScienceDepartmert All CS majors must attend an advising session each semester prior to registering for 
classes. Advising appointments may be scheduled at 
https://webapps.cs. umd.edu/ugrad/advi si nq/l oqi n. php 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



T here are mul ti pi e endowed schol arshi ps avai I abl e to students maj ori ng i n computer sci ence A ddi ti oral detai I s can be found at 
http://undergrad.cs.umd.edu/contaciyscholarsriip-opportunities 

I n add ti on, students may f i nd empl oyment as tutors, as undergraduate teachi ng assi starts, or as members of the department's I aboratory staff. Professors may al so 
have funds to hi re undergraduates to assi st i n research. M any students al so parti ci pate i n i ntemshi p experi ences, worki ng i n the computer i ndustry duri ng the summer 
after thei r sophomore and/or j uni or years. 

Counseling & Personnel Services (E DC P) 

College of Education 

3214 Benjamin Building, 301-405-2858 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCP 

Chair: D. Kivlighan, Professor & Chair 

Professors: E. Fabian, G. Gottfredson, M. Hoffman, S. Korrives, C. Lee, R. Lent, S. Rosenfield, H. Teglasi-Golubcow 

Associate Professors: M. Lucas, W. Strein 

Assistant Professors: J. Bryan, P. Gold, K. MacDonald-Wilson, M. Miller, P. Phillips, S. Quaye 

Affiliate Professors: J . H utchi nson 

Professors Emeriti: M. McEwen, W. Sedlacek 

The Maj or 

Counsel i ng and Personnel Servi ces offers programs of preparati on at the master's degree, advanced graduate sped al i st, and doctoral degree I evel s for counsel ors i n 
el ementary and secondary school s, rehabi I i tati on agenci es, busi ness and i ndustry, and col I ege and uni versi ty counsel i ng centers. A ddi ti onal graduate programs of 
preparati on are provi ded for col I ege student personnel admi ni strators and school psychol ogi sts. Counsel i ng and Personnel Servi ces al so offers a j oi nt doctoral 
program wi th the Department of Psychol ogy i n counsel i ng psychol ogy. 

W hi I e the uni t does not have an undergraduate maj or, i t does offer a number of courses whi ch are open to undergraduates and are suggested for students consi deri ng 
graduate work i n counsel i ng or other human servi ce f i el ds. Sped f i c courses i n peer counsel i ng, I eadershi p, and di versi ty are provi ded. 

Requirements for theMinor 

RequiremerrtsfortheMinor in Leadership Studies 

TheEDCP M inor in Leadership Studies promotes col I ege student leadership development by educating undergraduate students for and about leadership in a 
complex world. The goal of the mi nor is to prepare students to serve effectively informal andinformal I eadershi proles in campus, local, national, and global 
contexts. Faculty and students in the mi nor are dedicated to advancing the field of leadership studies by building upon and critically evaluating existing theoretical, 
research- based, and practi cal knowl edge. Core courses i n the mi nor are sequenced to meet i ncreasi ngl y compl ex sets of I eami ng outcomes across cogni ti ve, 
personal devel opment, and group/organi zati onal domai ns. Students i n the mi nor are exposed to di verse theori es and perspecti ves on I eadershi p and are encouraged 
to apply analytical skills to devel op their own working philosophy of leadership that will serve them in organizational and career contexts. Civic engagement and 
mul ti cul tural competence are vi ewed as necessary requi rements for I eadershi p. 

Eligibility 

The first 20 qualified applicants will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis each semester. In order to apply for the mi nor in Leadership Studies, students 
must have: 

1. Completed at least 30 credit hours prior to appl ication to the program 

2. B e i n good academi c standi ng. 

3. Completed EDCP 217 with a C or better. 

4. B een admi tted i nto the M i nor pri or to the compl eti on of the f i nal 9 credi ts of M i nor coursework and no I ater than one full academi c year before the expected 
date of graduation. 

The EDCP Minor in Leadership Studies consists of IS credit hours. No more than six credits can also be applied to a student's maj or, and no more than six credits 
may betaken at an institution other than the University of Maryland College Park. No course with an earned grade below C may count towards the mi nor. 

Required Courses 

• EDCP 217- Introduction to Leadership 

• EDCP 315 - Leadership in Groups and Organizations 

• EDCP 318 -Applied Contextual Leadership 

OR 

• EDCP 418- Leadership and Identity 

• EDCP 417- Advanced Leadership Seminar 

Elective Courses 

Students must choose two 3-credi t courses, one at the 200 1 evel and one at the 300 or 400 1 evel , from an approved I i st of el ecti ves. For the I i st of approved courses 
and additional detai Is regarding the EDCP Mi nor in Leadership Studies, please vi sttww.education.umd.edu/edcp/leadershi p. 

Criminology & Criminal J usb'ce(CCJ S) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2220 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-4699 

www.ccjs.umd.edu 

Chair: S. Simpson 

D i rector: L . B rooks ( U ndergraduate D i rector) 

Professors: D. Gottfredson, G. LaFree, J . Laub, R. Paternoster, P. Reuter, L. Sherman, T. Thomberry, C. Wellford 

Associate Professors: L. Dugan (Graduate Director), B.Johnson, J. McGloin, E. Wish 

Assistant Professors: T. Loughran, D. Mairmn, K. Nakamura _ 

Lecturers: T. Bonnar, M. Fleming, S. Flower, J. F oust, A. Gaston, R. HamillJ. Homer, A. Lehman, S. Malm,T. Mauriello, D. Salem, B.Smith, C. Roberts White, 

A. Zumbrun 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 268 



The Major 

The mission of the Department of Criminal J ustice& Criminology is to provide a supportive academic and professional environment for faculty and students. The 
Department promotes study and teachi ng concemi ng cri me and del i nquency and thei r preventi on and control . The U ni versi ty of M aryl and's Department of 
Criminology and Criminal J ustice is a national and international leader in research and criminal justice education, and its Graduate Program is ranked number one in 
the field. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym CCJ S. Both UMCP and Shady Grove offer the CCJ S Bachelor of Arts 
degree 

Program Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the CCJ S degree program, students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate basi c knowl edge of maj or cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce content areas. 

2. Students will demonstrate a basic knowl edge of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the social sciences. 

3. Students wi 1 1 demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods 

Admission to the M aj or 
Admission to the Maj or 

In accordance with University policy, the Department of Criminology and Criminal J ustice at UMCP has been designated a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). 
All first-ti me freshmen admits who request Criminology and Criminal J ustice will be directly admitted into the maj or. Other first-ti me freshman that wish to declare 
Criminology and Cri mi nal J ustice as a maj or prior to the last day of classes of the first semester in residence will be all owed to do so. The LEP does not apply to the 
CCJ S Shady Grove program 

In order to remain a Criminology and Criminal J ustice maj or, newly admitted freshman will be required to compl ete the foil owi ng gateway/entrance requirements 
on or before the end of the semester i n whi ch they attempt 45 U ni versi ty of M aryl and credi ts: 

a Completion of the University's Fundamental English Requirement (ENGL 101) 
b Completion of CCJ S100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 

c. Completion of CCJ S105 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 

d. Conpletion of MATH 111 or MATH220 or MATH140 or STAT100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 
e A minimum cumulativeG PA of 2.00 

A 1 1 other students, i ncl udi ng both i ntemal and external transfer students, wi 1 1 not be admi tted to the program unti I they have met the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

a Completion of the University's Fundamental English Requirement (ENGL 101) 
b Completion of CCJ S100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 

c. Completion of CCJ S105 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 

d. Completion of MATH111 or MATH220 or MATH140 or STAT1O0 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher 
e A minimum cumulativeG PA based on all previous col lege- level coursework of 2.50 or higher 

Policies for Limited Enrollment Programs 

• Onl y one gateway or entrance requi rement course may be repeated to earn the requi red grade, and that course may be repeated onl y once 

• A gradeof W (Withdrawn) in a course is counted as an attempt 

• Students may appl y onl y once to a L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program Students who have been di smi ssed from the maj or may not reappl y . 

• Students must maintain a cumulativeG PA of 2.00. Failuretodoso will result in dismissal from the maj or. 

Any student denied admission or dismi ssed from the maj or may appeal. Dismissed students appeal directly to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Cri mi nol ogy 
and Criminal Justice. Internal transfer students appeal to the Office of the Dean for Behavioral and Social Sciences. External transfer students appeal totheOffice 
of Admissions. 

Requirements for the Major 

The maj or in Criminology & Criminal J ustice comprises 30 hours of coursework in criminology and criminal justice. Eighteen (18) hours of supporting sequence 
selected from a list of social and behavioral sci ence courses are requi red (list is available in the CCJ S advising office and on the department website). No grade 
I ower than a C- may be used toward the maj or. A n average grade of C i s requi red i n the supporti ng sequence. N i ne (9) hours of the support ng sequence must be at 
the 300/400 level. Inaddition, MATH 111 or higher (MATH220, MATH140orSTAT100, butnotMATH113orMATH115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved course 
in social statistics) must be compl eted with a gradeof 'C or better. A gradeof 'C or better is required in MATH 111 as a prerequisite to CCJ S200. 

Major Requirements Credits 

CCJS100 Introduction to Cri mi nal Justice 3 

CCJS105 Criminology 3 

CCJS230 Criminal Law in Action 3 

CCJS300 Criminological and Cri mi nal J ustice Research Methods 3 

CCJS340 Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 3 

CCJS350 Juvenile Deli nquency 3 

CCJ SELECT CCJ SEIectives (3 courses) 9 

One from 3 
CCJ S451 Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 
CCJS452 Treatment of Cri mi nal sand Delinquents 
CCJ S454 Contemporary Criminological Theory 

Total credits 30 

Supporting Sequence 

SUPPORT Lower or Upper I eve! courses from approved list (3 courses) 9 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



SUPPORT UL UPP 9 " ' e *' courses from approved list 

(3 courses) 

One from 
MATH111 I introduction to Probability 
MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 
MATH 140 Calculus I 
STAT100 ElementaryStatistJcsandProbability 

One from 
CCJ S200 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

ECON321 Economic Statistics 
PSYC200 Statistical Methods in Psychology 

SOCY 201 I ntroductory Stati sti cs f or Soci ol ogy 
BMGT230 Business Statistics 

Total credits- Major and Supporting 



9 

3-4 



3-4 



54 



Elective for CCJ S Majors(most courses are 3 credits): 

CCJS234 Law of Criminal Investigation 

CCJS310 Criminal Investigations 

CCJS320 Introduction to Criminalistics 

CCJS330 Contemporary Criminological Issues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary Legal Pol i cy I ssues 

CCJS332 Major Transitions: From Undergraduate to Professional 

CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJS357 Industrial and Retail Security Administration 

CCJS359 Field Training in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJS370 Race, C rime and Criminal Justice 

CCJS386 Experiential Learning 

CCIS388H Independent Reading Course in Criminology and Criminal 

Justice- Honors 

CCIS389H Independent Research in Criminology and Criminal J ustice- 

Honors 

CCJS398 Law EnforcementandFieldTraining 

CCJ S399 Independent Study in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

CCJS400 Criminal Courts 

CCJ S432 Law of Correcti ons 

CCJ S444 Advanced Law Enforcement Administration 

CCJ S451 Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 

CCJS452 Treatment of Criminal sand Delinquents 

CCJS453 WhiteCollarand Organized Crime 

CCJ S454 Contemporary Criminological Theory 

CCJS455 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice I 

CCJS456 Dynamics of Planned Change in Criminal J ustice 1 1 

CCJS457 Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice 

CCJS461 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 

CCJS462 Special Problems in Security Administration 

CCJ S498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 



Other Requirements for theMajor 

The CCJ S Department enforces al I prerequi sites and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are closed. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at I east once each semester. Advising is avail able on a walk- in basis between 10 am and 4 pm weekdays i n 
2201 LeFrak Hall. Students must complete all course prerequi si tes and obtain department permission from CCJS Advising to enrol I in most CCJ S classes. Call 
301-405-4729 or emai ladvi si nqPcri mumd.edu . 

Internships 

Requirements for I nternship Place m e n ts 

T he internship must be a I earning experience involving work in a criminal justiceor cri rrinological setting. Interns are expected to gain valuable information which 
will add to thei r overal I understand ng of the f i el d of cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce I ntemshi p posi ti ons must center around gai ni ng new materi al over the course 
of the semester and are expected to i nvol ve some degree of ongoi ng trai ni ng/l eami ng f or the i ntem. I ntemshi p pi acements are subj ect to the approval of the 
Internship Director. 

I nternship Eligibility 

I ntems must meet the f ol I owi ng cri teri a: 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



• Interns must be CCJS majors 

• Interns must have completed a mini mum of 56 credits at the time of application 

• Interns must have a cumulativeG PA of at least 2.5 at the time of application 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credit over the course of the semester 

• A maximum of 6 internship credits per semester and a total of 12 internship credits overall will be permitted 

• I nternshi p credi t wi 1 1 not be approved for current or previ ousl y hel d j obs 

I nterns must register themselves for the internship prior to the end of the semester's schedule adjustment period. Obtaining Departmental approval for the internship 
does NOT register the student for the class. Additional information about internships can be pi eked up from the CCJS advising office in 2201 LeFrak Hall or on line 
at www.cqs.umd.edu/Undergrad/index.asp 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program is a four-semester (12 required credit hours) sequence, which a student begins in the fall semester of his or her junior year. The classes are in 
seminar format and are writing intensive Duringthefall semester of their senior year, students will complete a thesis/research proposal. Thispaperwill be25-40 
pagesinlength and must beorally defended. During the senior year, students must complete a graduate course, which can be taken during the Fall or Spring 
semester. H onors students may count thei r honors courses toward sati sf acti on of thei rmajorcurriculum requi rements. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

There are two Student Societies availablefor membership for CCJS majors: the Criminal Justice Student Association (CJSA) and Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society 
(APS). 

TheCriminal J ustice Student Association (CJ SA) is dedicated to supplementing our members' academic experience by providing extracurricular opportunities to 
further expl ore cri ti cal i ssues i nvol vi ng cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce. T hrough a regul ar program of speakers, agency demonstrati ons, communi ty servi ce 
proj ects and an annual career f ai r, the CJ SA provi des students wi th val uabl e i nf omnati on for maki ng deci si ons about career choi ces, further graduate I evel study, 
and I aw school . The CJ SA provi des students wi th opportuni ti es for academi c and sod al i nteracti on, and access to cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce researchers, 
teachers, and practi ti oners representi ng a vari ety of government academi c and cormnerci al corporate and non- prof i t organi zati ons. A 1 1 graduate and undergraduate 
students, regardless of major, are eligible for membership in theCJSA. CJSA meetings and programs are held at I east monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. 
CJ SA does not assess membershi p dues or fees. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) isa National Criminal JusticeHonor Society founded 1942 and membership is open to CCJS majors who have completed at I east 40 total 
credits with at I east 12 credits in CCJS courses Undergraduate Applicants must have an overall GPA of at I east a 3. 2 and a major G PA of at least 3.4. Graduate 
student applicants must have a 3.4 overall GPA. Applicants must fill out an application, submit an official or unofficial transcript and a check (personal check is 
fine) made out to Alpha Phi Sigma for $55. The local chapter's name is Omega lota Put the completed application, check, and transcript in Dr. Brooks' mailbox 
i nside 2220 Lefrak Hal I. A ppli cations are processed throughout the academic year. You will be notified when you have been officially accepted. Applications are 
avail able from the CCJS Advising Office in 2103 Lefrak Hall. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Awards and Recognition 

Each semester the department selects the outstanding graduating senior for the Peter J . Lejins award. 

Curriculum and I nstruction - Elementary Education (E DC I ) 

Collecjeof Education 

2311 Benjamin Building, 301-405-3324 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: F. Hultgren (Prof & interimChair) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. lmig(Prof Of Practice), S. Koziol (Assoc. Dean), J. McGinnis, O. Saracho, D. Sullivan, L.Valli, B. VanSledright D. 

Wiseman (Dean) 

Associate Professors: P.Campbell, D. ChazanJ. McCaleb, J. O'Flahavan, W. Slater, J. Turner 

Assistant Professors: A. Brantlinger, L. CI ark, J. Coffey, A. Edwards, C. Greenhow, S. Hughes, M. Hyler, V. MacDonald, M. Martin-Beltran, C. MonteSano, M. 

Peercy 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

Professors Emeriti: M. Chambliss, A. Graeber, W. Holliday, M.Johnson 

The Major 

Curriculumandl nstructi on offers an undergraduate curri cul um i n el ementary educati on that I eads to the B achel or of Sci ence Courses offered i n thi s program may 
be found under the f ol I owi ng acronym E DC I . G raduates of the E I ementary Educati on program are prepared to teach grades 1 through 6, and meet the requi rements 
for certification in Maryland and additional states that are affiliated with the Interstate Reciprocity Agreement through the Maryland State Department of Education 
(MSDE). 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. El ementary Educati on teacher candi dates have i n-depth knowl edge of the subj ect matter that they teach as descri bed i n prof essi onal (A ssoci ati on f or C hi I dhood 
Education International, AC El), state(MSDE), and institutional standards. 

2. Elementary Education teacher candidates can effectively plan classroom- based instruction or activities for their roles as teachers. Candidates' knowledge, skills, 
and dispositions are applied effectively in practice 

3. Elementary Education teacher candidates practice evidence based deci si on- making through the use of assessment as well asthecritical interpretation of research 
and inquiry in order to improve educati onal practice They accurately assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



student I earni ng, and have a posi ti ve effect on I earni ng f or al I students. 

4. Elementary Education teacher candidates demonstrate understand ng of learners and theirsocial and cultural contexts with a global perspective and intentional 
sensi ti vi ty to other cul tures. They are abl e to work wi th students, f ami I i es, and communi ti es i n ways that ref I ect the di sposi ti ons expected of prof essi onal educators as 
delineated in professional (ACEI), state(MSDE), and institutional standards. 

5. El ementary Educati on teacher candi dates competenti y i ntegrate technol ogy i n i nstructi on to support student I earni ng and devel op data-dri ven sol uti ons for 
instructional andschool improvement They demonstrateproficiency in each of the seven Mary/and Teechar Technol ogy Standards. 



Admission totheMaj or 

Admission to the Teacher Education Professional Program is competitive. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in theCollegeof Education entry. 

Placement in Courses 

TheElementary Education program includes both pre- professional and professional education course work. Before undergraduates may enroll in courses identified 
as part of the prof essi onal sequence, they must compl ete the sel ecti ve admi ssi ons requi rements and be f ul ly adrri tted to the Col I ege of Educati on's Teacher 
Education program Admission procedures and criteria are explained in theCollegeof Education entry. To beeligibleto enroll in professional sequence courses 
during the Fall semester, prospective majors must submit a completed application form by May 1st of the preceding Spri ng semester. Teacher candidates will not be 
permitted to enroll in professional sequence courses -- including the yearlong internship-- pri or to completi on of the selective admi ssi ons requi rements and full 
admi ssi on to the Col I ege of Educati on. 

Requirements for theMaj or 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre- prof essi onal courses and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before undergraduates may enroll in 
courses identified as part of the professional sequence, they must compl ete the selective admi ssi on requirements and be fully admitted to theCollegeof Education's 
Teacher Education Program An overal I grade point average of 2.75 must be mai ntai red after admission to Teacher Education. All teacher candidates are requi red to 
obtai n sati sfactory eval uati ons on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards and to attai n qual ifyi ng scores for the State of M aryl and 
on the Praxi s I arid Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Praxi s I is requi red for adrri ssi on, and Praxi s 1 1 is requi red for the teachi ng i ntemshi p and graduati on. The cul mi rati ng 
experi ence i s the yeari ong i ntemshi p, whi ch takes pi ace i n a Prof essi onal Devel opment School . 



TheGdbBway Require i mlhfoi entranceintotheElementary Teacher 
Education program include 

BIOSCI Biological science/lab 

PHY SCI Physical science/lab 

MATH212 Elements of Numbers and Operations 

MATH213 Elements of Geometry and Measurement 

EDCI280 Looking Inside School sand Classrooms* 

*rrinirrum grade, B 

NOTE: The 14-16 credits of math and science rrust be completed with a rhnirrum 
grade ofC in each course and an overall GPA of 2. 7. 



Credits 



Courses which double count with CORE 

Courses which may satisfy the university s general education requirements 
(CORE) and which are required in the Elementary Education program of 
studies follow: 

HIST156 Hi story of the United States to 1865 

BIO SCI Biological Science/Lab Gateway Requirement 

PHY SCI Physical Science/Lab Gateway Requirement 

SOC SCI Social Science 

Recommended social science course options: 

GEOG100 Introduction to Geography 

GVPT170 American Government 

PSY C 100 I ntroductj on to Psychol ogy 

SOCY100 Introduction to Sociology 



Other Pre-Professional Requirements 

EDCI301 Teaching Art in the El ementary School, OR 
ARTT100 Two Dimensional Design Fundamentals, OR 
ARTT110 Elements of Drawing 
EDCI443 LiteratureforChildrenandYouth 
MATH214 E I ements of Probability and Statistics 
MUED155 FundamentalsfortheClassroomTeacher 
SOCY 230 Soci ol ogi cal Soci al Psychol ogy, OR 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



PSYC221 Social Psychology 
EDMS410 ClassroomAssessment 3 

EDPS301 Foundations of Education, OR 3 

EDPS201 Education in Contemporary American Society, OR 

EDPS210 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

EDHD411 Child Growth and Development 3 

EDHD425 LanguageDevelopmentandReadingAcquisition 3 

A rea C rs A rea of E mphasi s chosen f rom the f ol I owi ng areas: 18 

Communication, Foreign Language, Literature, Mathematics, Science, and 
Social Studies** 

**The EDCI Advising Office has detailed information regarding each area of 
errphasis. All pre-professional course work rrust be completed with a Cor better. 

Professional Education Courses 

EDCI397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools 3 

EDCI461 MaterialsandlnstructJonforCreatingSkilledandMotivatedReaders, Parti 3 



Year L org I nternship 

EDCI322 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Social Studies 

EDCI342 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: LanguageArts 

EDCI352 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Mathematics 

EDCI362 Curriculumand Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Reading 

EDCI372 Curriculumand Instruction in Elementary Ed.: Science 

EDCI488 Classroom Management 

EDCI481 Student Teaching: Elementary 

EDCI464 Assessment for Reading 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
12 
3 



NOTES: 



• All pre-professional and professional courses must be completed 
with a grade of C or better. 

• A 1 1 courses must be compl eted before the year- 1 ong i ntemshi p 
unless an exception has been approved by the EDCI Advisi ng Office 

• A passing scoreon Praxis II is required before enrollment in the 
teaching internship. 



Other Requirements for theMajor 

A n overal I grade poi nt average of 2. 75 must be mai ntai ned after adrri ssi on to Teacher E ducati on. A 1 1 teacher candi dates are requi red to obtai n sati sf actory 
eval uati ons on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards and to attai n qual ifyi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I 
and Praxi s 1 1 assessments. Praxi s I is requi red for admi ssi on, and Praxi s 1 1 i s requi red for the teachi ng i ntemshi p and graduati on. The cul mi rati ng experi ence of the 
program is the year! ong internship, which takes place in a Professional Development School (PDS)/collaborating partner school. 

Advising 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory f or al I el ementary educati on maj ors. F or more i nf omnati on or to schedul e an advi si ng appoi ntment, contact the Off i ce of Student Servi ces 
(301-405-2344). 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

EDCI 280 (LcoMng I nadeScrxx)ls and CI assrooir$ typically is taken during the sophomore year. Thiscourse, which ispartof the gateway requirements for 

admi ssi on to the E I ementary Educati on Teacher E ducati on Program, provi des an expl orati on of teachi ng i n the publ i c school s. T hi s course i ncl udes a three hour per 

week field component 



Internships 

During the senior year of the program, teacher candi dates compl etea year! ong internship in a network of professional development school settings (PDS Networks). 
T hese si tes ref I ect the I i ngui sti c, ethni c and economi c di versi ty that i s character! sti c of the G reater B al ti more- Washi ngton D . C . regi on. F or addi ti onal i nf omnati on 
about the year! ong i ntemshi p, see the Col I ege of Educati on entry. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal , state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other 
university offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships to deservi ng students. For information, visit: www.firancialaid.umd.edu. 

TheCollegeof Education also offers a number of scholarships. For more information, see http://www.education.umd.edu/studentinfo/scholarshi ps/i ndex.html. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Curriculum and Instruction- Secondary Education (EDCI) 

College of Education 

2311 Benjarrin Building, 301-405-3324 

www.education.umd.edu/EDCI 

Chair: F. Hultgren (Prof & Interim Chair) 

Professors: P. Afflerbach, M. Dreher, D. lmig(Prof Of Practice), S. Koziol (Assoc. Dean), J. McGinnis, O. Saracho, D. Sullivan, L.Valli, B. VanSledright, D. 

Wiseman (Dean) 

Associate Professors: P.Campbell, D. ChazanJ. McCaleb, J. O'Flahavan, W. Slater, J. Turner 

Assistant Professors: A. Brantlinger, L. Clark, J. Coffey, A. Edwards, C. Greenhow, S. Hughes, M. Hyler.V. MacDonald, M. Martin-Beltran, C. Monte-Sano, M. 

Pearcy 

Affiliate Professors: E. Redish 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. Benson, R. Lavine 

Professors Emeriti: M. Chambliss, A. Graeber, W. Holliday, M.Johnson 

The Major 

C urri cul um and I nstructi on offers undergraduate curri cul a i n secondary educati on that I ead to the B ache! or of Sci ence or B achel or of A rts degree and prepares 
teachers i n vari ous subj ect areas for teachi ng i n mi ddl e school s and secondary school s, grades 7- 12. 

Multiple pathways are avai I abl e for i ndi vi dual s who are i nterested i n teachi ng at the secondary I evel : 

T he D ual M aj or opti on, whi ch i s desi gned for i ncomi ng freshmen or sophomores, I eads to the B achel or's degree withamajorinan academi c content area pi us a 
second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to have an academi c content maj or whi ch sati sf i es the requi rements of the academi c 
department and meats the standards for teacher certi f i cati on. Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compl ete both maj ors i n four years wi th 
careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

Curriculum and Instruction also offers a five-year integrated master's with certification program Seewww.education.umd.edu/EDCI/info/tcerthtm. 

G raduates of the Secondary Educati on programs meet the requi rements for certi f i cati on i n M ary I and and addi ti onal states that are affi I i ated wi th the I nterstate 
Red proci ty A greament through the M aryl and State Department of E ducati on. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Secondary Education teacher candidates have in-depth knowledgeof the subj ect matter that they teach as described in professional (eg., National Council of 
Teachers of English - NCTE, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics- NCTM, etc.); state (MSDE); and, institutional standards. 

2. Secondary Education teacher candi dates can effectively plan classroom- based instruction or activities for their roles as teachers Candidates' knowledge, skills, 
and di sposi ti ons are appl i ed eff ecti vel y i n practi ce. 

3. Secondary Education teacher candi dates practice evidence- based decision- making through theuseof assessment as well asthecritical interpretation of research 
and inquiry in order to improve educati onal practice. They accurately assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor 
student I earni ng, and have a posi ti ve effect on I earni ng f or al I students. 

4. Secondary Educati on teacher candi dates demonstrate understanding of I earners and their social and cultural contexts with a global perspective and intentional 
sensi ti vi ty to other cul tures. They are abl e to work wi th students, f ami I i es, and communi ti es i n ways that ref I ect the di sposi ti ons expected of prof essi onal educators as 
delineated in professional (eg., NCTE, NCTM, etc.); state (MSDE); and, institutional standards. 

5. Secondary Educati on teacher candi dates competentl y i ntegrate technol ogy i n i nstructi on to support student I earni ng and devel op data- dri ven sol uti ons for 
instructional andschool improvement They demonstrate proficiency in each of the seven Maryland Teacher Technol ogy Standards. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

I n addition to the double major program, Curriculum and I nstructi on offers a Five-Year I ntegrated M aster's with Certification Program (I M CP). This program is 
i ntended for tal ented undergraduates with a mi ni mum GPA of 3.0 who seek to combi ne undergraduate studies i n the content area and prof essi onal educati on as a 
f oundati on for a focused prof essi onal year at the graduate I evel I eadi ng to secondary- 1 evel certi f i cati on i n the subj ect fi el d and the M a