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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun-news"

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Information For Beach Visitors - Page 3-B 



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VIRGINIA BEACH SUN -NEWS 



"HOME OF AMERICA'S fIRST MAN IN SPACE" 



TWO SECTIONS 
16 PAGES 



VOL. XXXVII. No. 31 



35 



TELEPHONE GA 8-2401 



VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADS PAY 



SINGLE COPY: 5c BY MAIL $3.50 PER YEAH 



Plaque Commemorates Storm Assistance 




Adj. Gen. Paul M. Booth (left) receives a handprinted, framed plaque from Virginia 
Beach Mayor Frank A. Dusch in appreciation for the outstanding work members of the 4th 
Missile 11th Battalion of the Virginia National Guard did during the March 7 storm. The pre- 
sentation was made Monday at a cocktail party and dinner the City of Virginia Beach gave for 
Gen. Booth, his staff and officers of the battalion at the Cavalier Hotel. (Cavalier Hotel Photo) 



Beach Appeal 
Is Widespread 

VIRGINIA BEACH— This city is noted for its appeal to vaca- 
tioners and tourists from throughout the Nation, but probably 
little thought is given to its popularity among its own people. 

Thousand upon thousands of Virginians visit here each year, 
the record will show, and it has been evident this summer that 
Virginia Beach is a favorite 



In the State,' including the head 
man, Governor Albertis S. Har- 
rison, Jr. 

Governor Harrison has spent 
several weekends at his Camp 
Pendleton cottage here and has 
enjoyed many rounds of golf 
over the Princess Anne Country 
Club course. | 

Just recently Governor Har- 
rison, in greeting a group of 
Swedish Air Cadets in his Rich- 
mond office, insisted that the 
group visit Virginia Beach be- 
fore leaving the State. It is un- 
derstood that they did just that 
after Governor Harrison had 
advised him. 

The second man in the Vir- 
ginia State government, Lt. Gov. 
Mills E. Godwin, Jr., of Suffolk, 
is also a frequent visitor to Vir- 
ginia Beach. The Lieutenant 
Governor is here often to ad- 
dress various groups but also 
visits with bis family on week- 
ends. 

Still another outstanding State 
political leader who is here dur- 
ing the summer on weekends is 
Representative Burr P. Harri- 
sonjCongressman Harrison has 

(Continued on Page 4) 




In Auto Accident 

KEMPSVILLE — Robert Vin- 
son, 31, of 3005 Welcome Road 
was killed Monday night in a 
head-on collision on Providence 
Road. 

■v * 

Also injured was Vinson's 
wife, Phyllis, who was reported 
in "poor condition" Tuesday in 
Norfolk General HospitaL 

The driver of the other car 

involved, "Harold Hershberger, 
31, and his wife, Anna, are re- 
ported in good condition at Nor- 
folk General Hospital. Four of 
their seven children, Paul, 9; 
Marvin, 2; Martha, 2; Ray, 3; 
were hospitalized in King's 
Daughter's Hospital and are re- 
ported in fairly good condition. 

Vinson's car, according to 
Princess Anne police, went off 
Providence road and swerved 
back onto the oncoming lane of 
traffic striking the Hershberger 
car. 

The investigating officer was 
Lt. Knowles.' 



Elks Lodge 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
institutional and charter moot- 
ing night for the new Virginia 
Beach Elks Lodge will be hold 
next Thursday night, August 
9, at the AJan B. Shepard 
Convention Center. The moot- 
ing is sot to begin at 7 p.m. 

Those desiring to be charter 
members must bo present at 
the snooting and does in the 
amount of $13.50 should bo 

Lodge Committee, P.O. Box 
241, Virginia Beach. 

Guard Honors 
Lt Gov. Godwin 

VIRGINIA' BEACH — Lt. Gov. 
Mills E. Godwin Jr. received a 
special presentation from- the 
National Guard Bureau today in 
recognition of his support of the 
Virginia National Guard. 

A handsomely framed copy of 
the National Guard creed en- 
titled "I Am The Guard" was 
given Godwin by Col. Charles C. 
Boatwright, special projects of- 
ficer, and Maj. James C. Elliott, 
public affairs officer, who made 
a special trip from Washington 
for the presentation during en- 
campment of Virginia National 
Guardsmen at the state military 
reservation. Godwin came from 
his home in Suffolk for the cere- 
mony, witnessed by Maj. Gen. 
Paul M. Booth, the Virginia ad- 
jutant general, and other guard 
officers. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



City Praised 
By Visitor 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach Cnamber of 
Commerce received a letter 
Wednesday- from recent vaca- 
tioners citing lifeguards, police 
and residents in the rescue of 
their lost child. 

The letter, from Mrs. Sidney 
Suther of Greensboro, N.C., 
stated: 

"Gentlemen: My husband, 
our four children, and I have 
just returned today from a 
short visit to your resort town 
During our brief stay, we found 
ourselves confronted with a 
distressing situation. While on 
the beach,' it soon became ap- 
parent that our five-year-old 
son had wandered off along the 
vast strand of beach alone. 

"Naturally, we became fran- 
tic, and began a search of our 
own, but to no avail. As a last 
resort, we reported our missing 
child to a lifeguard who, in turn, 
relayed a description and infor- 
mation to other lifeguards sta- 
tioned along the entire beach 
area. They also notified your 
police department which was 
very prompt in joining in the 
search, and in what seemed a 
lifetime to us, but actually no 
time at all, our sobbing frighten- 
ed child was returned to lis. 

."We know we are very 
fortunate parents to have had 
our child returned to us, safe 
and well. We feel that pert of 
our good fortune is duo to 
the alertness of your fine life- 
guard staff and police depart- 
ment. , The ©the* .pert^ t we 
thank the good Lord for. 

"Even the people of Virginia 
Beach seemed so genuinely in- 
terested ip helping us locate our 
little boy. , We were over- 
whelmed with all the warmth 
and kindness shown us during 
those three agonizing hours, and 
felt we could not put'off writing 
to you, commending you on the 
fine service accorded us. It is, 
indeed, gratifying to know that 
these services exist. Please con- 
vey our many thanks to all 
those who made it possible for 
us to say we really enjoyed our 
Virginia Beach vacation. 
Very truly yours, 
Mrs. Sidney N. Suther 

GUARDSMEN WILL 
FEAST ON BARBEQUE 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Between 
300 and 400 Virginia National 
Guardsmen are expected to at- 
tend a beach-barbeque Thurs- 
day at 5:30 p.m. at Camp 
Pendleton. 

The City of Virginia Beach is 
sponsoring the party for the en- 
listed men who helped in the 
March 7 storm. 




Next Mhnth 

HATCHETT TO VISIT 
NORWEGIAN CITY 

VIRGINIA BEACH— City Manager RusselJ Hatchett wffl 
resent Virginia Beach at the Sept. 22 unveiling of the Norwegian 
Lady statue in Moss, Norway. 

Hatchett received a telegram late Tuesday inviting him I© 
attend the ceremonies as guest of the city of Moss and the T*sr- 

wegian Travel Association. 
The Sept. 22 ceremonies wi 



(Phillips Photo) 
A Happy City Manager, Headed for Norway. 



Police to Rescue 



'Strange Animal 1 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Policemen answering animal calls can 
expect anything from rescuing a kitten from the top of a tree to 
pulling a Kinkajou out of a porch ceiling 
>. ^Sgk^Ui Simmons and his partner Set J. J. Waterfield an- 
swered a call last weetaTthe borneof fi.'HTTCurtz at 112-58th St. 
Kurtz said a "strange animal" 



was lodged in the ceiling of his 
front porch. 

The policemen's first thought 
were that probably a muskrat 
or a racoon imprisoned itself. 
But the sight df a long slender 
wooly tail drooping from the 
ceiling, immediately eliminated 
both those possibilities. Well, 
maybe it was a monkey ... a 
monkey in Virginia Beach? 

After two long, struggling 
hours, Simmons prodded the 
strange animal out, and Water- 
field captured the indignant 
beast. It was decided that this 
was probably some animal that 
the two men had seen at some 
time at the zoo. It was abviously 
someone's pet because it had a 
red leather collar around its 
neck. But what was it? 

The only thing left to do 
was inquire around the neigh- 
borhood. After asking "Have 
you lost a strange animal" 
and receiving a few puzzled 
stores, Simmons arrived at the 
homo of Mrs. Robert Mac- 
Mannis, 110-58th St., who im- 
mediately replied, "Ooh, 
Naomi, where is she?" 
Simmons gladly took Mrs. 



MacMannis to the Kurtz's porch 
where Naomi had been threaten- 
ing Waterfield with ferocious 
glares and snapping teeth.' Im- 
mdiately, Mrs. MacMannis said, 
"Naomi, stop that!" And Just as 
quickly, Naomi became as tame 
as a kitten and curled up in 
Mrs. MacMannis' arms. 

The dictionary describes a 
kinkajou as: "a nocturnal plant- 
igrade, carnivorous mammal 
living in South America, about 
as large as a cat, having a pre- 
hensile tail, easily tamed." 

Auto Accident Damage 
Is Costly Business 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Virginia 
Beach Police have reported 18 
automobile accidents ranging 
from $50 to $800 damage to 
vehicles, Chief Reeves Johnson 
said yesterday. 

Only one accident involved a 
personal injury. 

Drivers following the cars 
ahead of them are still the major 
cause of accidents. 



Asphalt Roads 
Low Bidder on 
Walk Repairs, 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
bid of $89,841.68 by the Asphalt 
Roads and Materials Co., Inc., 
of Lynnhaven was lowest of five 
bids submitted for the last 
phase of repair work on the 
boardwalk damaged in the 
March 7 storm, an army engi- 
peer' spokesman said Tuesday. 

Boardwalk repairs include de- 
molition of portions of the back 
of the existing concrete board- 
walk, excavation and grading 
required to replace fill, replace- 
ment of wooden piles and con- 
crete deck beams, replacement 
of demolished portions of the 
bulkhead and concrete curtain 
wall, replacement of concrete 
caps on the existing bulkhead, 
replacement of concrete posts 
and aluminum railing, construc- 
tion of new wood railing, and 
extension of stor;n sewers. 

The work, which the govern- 
ment had previously estimated 
ar$lO0,'6OI.B8 fT^EBMuTe% to 
begin about August 10, the 
spokesman said. The company 
will have 90 days to complete 
repairs. 



be held at 5 p.m. in Moss and 
H a.m. here when identical 
statues will be unveiled simul- 
taneously. 

The $-foot bronze statue, * 
gift to tho city of Virginia 
Beach from the citizapt of 
Moss, left Norway Tuesday on 
the Naval Training SWp 
Haakon VII accompanied by 
65 cadets. 

The ship is scheduled to ar- 
rive in Norfolk Sept. 4. 

Plans are now underway fflf 
construction of a "lost seaftaflfc 
shrine" at 25th Street I aj»d 
oceanfront to hold the statue. 
Time will not permit completion 
of the entire shrine, a c% 
spokesman indicated Wednos* 
day,' but work will begin im- 
mediately on preparations for 
the statue. 

The completed shrine will in- 
clude a reflection pool, steps 
leading down from the beard- 
walk into a landscaped area, 
park benches, memorial mark- 
ers and the Norwegian and 
American flags. City Council ap- , 
proved the shrine a few weeks 
ago after it was recommended 
by the City Planning Commis- 
sion. 

The statue will be presented 
to the city to replace a figure- 
head from Ihe Norwegian *■»* 
Dictator winch sank off Virginia 
Beach in 1841. The original 
wooden piece has long since 
deteriorated from the elements. 



In The Sun-News 



T 



BaskinintheSun 
Is New Feature 

Section B, Rage I 

' ' ' . ■ i' 

GORDON BASKIN, Beach resident and school administrator, be- 
comes a guest columnist this week with the first in a series 
dealing with the lighter side of the' news. 

LESLIE RUSSELL, staff writer, has an interesting story on a 
trip to the Beach by a group of girls from West VirjSnii. 

Section B PsJtrc I 

LUCILE CLARK, Sun-News Food Editor, writes oi sandwic 
and the history of the great American snack. Section B, Page I 

JOY HAKIM, Staff writer, tells of two enterprising youngMe 
the Bay Colony area and their way of making spei 
money during the summer months. Section B, Pa| 

RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS, News Editor presents another faed 
weekly column. Section A,' 



First Astronaut and His Family Say Goodbye to Virginia Beach 




America's first astronaut, Cmdr. Alan B. Snepard, ana nis family left Virginia Beach Friday for their new home in Houston, Texas, where the space program isnow headquartered. The famous family spent Thursday night at , 
bird Motor Lodge after their furniture was moved out of their Bay Colony home. They were wished luck on their move by Chamber of Commerce President Albin R. Mailhes. Cmdr. Shepard, who made his historic Hight May 5, 1981, visited 
Mailhes, Mrs. Shepard posed with the girls, and pet dog, and the astronaut gave final driving instructions to his wife before they set out in separate automobiles for Texas. Shepard leaves behind a Convention Center named in his honor. (Philupa 




T 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1 962 
Page 2-A 




MRS. HALCY WEBSTER BROWN, JR. 

Doris Davenport Bride 
bf H. W. Brown, Jr. 



Society Editor 

Phona 6A 8-7993 

James- Woolen 
Vows Are Said 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Virginia 
Beach Methodist Church was 
the setting Saturday at 4 p.m. 
for the marriage of Miss Sandra 
Lane James and George Wilton 
Wooten. The Rev. Dr. Kenneth 
Haddock, pastor of the chnrch, 
performed the ceremony. He 
was assisted by the Rev. John 
Graves of Elon College, Elon 
College, N.C. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Walter 
James Sr. The bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John Mose 
Wooten of Hamlet, N.C. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride had Mrs. Harold 
Walter James. Jr. as her matron 
of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Misses Portia Wooten of Ham- 
let, Dianne Woodring of Falls 
Church, Mary Ann Williams of 
Fentress, Barbara Burnett of 
Danville, Mrs. Joseph Piper of 
Oceana and Miss Kathleen Tig- 
nor. 

Mr. Wooten was best man for 
his son. Groomsmen were Burl 
Clements of Richmond, Wayne 
Mahanes of Madison, Ashley 
Seymour of Hamlet, Demus 
Thompson of Burlington, N.C, 
Charles Rayburn of Norfolk and 
Harold James Jr. 

A reception was held at the 

% bride's home at 123 Bluebird 

Drive. After a wedding trip to 

Miami Beach, the- couple will 

live at Elon College, N.C. 





[: GREENVILLE, N.C. — The 
age of Miss Doris Eliza- 
eth Davenport and Mr. Halcey 
Webster Brown Jr., was solem- 
Saturday at eight p.m. in 
ike Saint James Methodist 
(ftiurch, in Greenville, N.C. 
•t The bride is the daughter of 
and Mrs. Ruland Wilbur 
ivenport of Greenville, and 
groom is the son of Mr. and 
Halcey Webster Brown of 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

The Rev. Malloy Owen of 
Clayton* N.C, former pastor of 
the church, officiated at the 
lble ring ceremony assisted 
the Rev. Carlton Hirschi, 
snt pastor. 

•£The vows were exchanged in 
t* candlelight setting. The 
was decorated with a 
:kground of emerald leaf 
in a variety of heights 
snted by a large basket 
snapdragons and seven- 
iched candelabra with tall 

Sthedral candles. The candela- 
a were entwined with smilax 
d gardenias. Garlands of 
_ lilax and gardenias were uaad 
the altar rail. Pews were 
rked with white satin and 
f. Seven-branched 
>ra with tall cathedral 
candles entwined with smilax 
and gardenias were used in the 
entrance of the sanctuary. 

A program of nuptial musk 
was rendered by the organist, 
Mrs. Robert Mitchell of Colum- 
bia, NiC, cousin of the bride, 
and soloist Mist Berma Jean 
Davenport of Fayetteville, N.C, 
cousin of the bride. Miss Daven- 
port sang "Entreat Me Not to 
Leave Thee' and "I Love You 
Truly." y'The Lord's Prayer" 
was sung as the benediction. 

Given in marriage by her fa* 
ther, the bride wore a formal 
gown of Ivory peau de soie made 
with a scoop neck and, elbow 
length sleeves, appliqued in 
Alenoon lace embroidered with 
pearls. The flat front skirt had 
bell-shaped sides and a bustle 
back with inverted pleats /that 
carried a long Balf bow which 
ended in a cathedral train. 

Her veil was ym imported 
French mantilla of hand clipped 
Chantilly lace especially made to 
compliment the gown. She car- 
ried a cascade bouquet of white 
hybrid orchids tied with white 
bridal aattn 

The bride was attended by bar 
sister, Miss Linda Lee Daven- 
port, as maid of honor, and Mrs. 
John Perktnson of Alexandria, 
sister of the groom, as matron 
of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Mrs. StaerrjH Bryant, Virginia 
Beach; Miai Jean Lee Williams, 
Williimston. N.C; alias Linda 
Gray Vtek, Kinston, N.C; and 
Miss Agoas Vivian Lawler, 
GoWsboro, N.C 
The attendants wore full 

blue 



roses at the waistline. The hat 
was a rose similar to the roses 
on the dress. They wore match- 
ing slippers and carried cascade 
bouquets of hybrid lavender 
orchids tied with matching satin 
ribbon. 

The bridegroom's father was 
best man. Ushers were John 
Perkinson of Alexandria, broth- 
er-in-law of toe groom; Ray 
Smith of Pearisburg, cousin of 
the bride; Robert Ashburner of 
Norfolk, Crajflte Pelouze of Rich- 
mond, and*Trachard Stone and 
Jay Wood df Virginia Beach. 

For her daughter's wedding, 
Mrs. Davenport chose a beige 
sheath lace over satin dress. 
Mrs. Brown, mother of the 
groom, • wore a sheath draped 
dress 'of Siemese pink shaded 
into a deep raspberry print chif- 
fon. Both mothers wore gar- 
denia corsages. 

The bride is a graduate of St. 
Mary's Junior College and re- 
ceived her B. S. Degree in 
Business and Mathematics at 
East Carolina College where she 
was a member of Alpha Delta 
Pi Sororiety and Pi Amega Pi, 
honorary business fraternity. 
She is a member of the Frank 
W. Cox High School faculty of 
Princess Anne County. 

The groom is a graduate of 
Hargrave Military Academy and 
attended Campbell College and 
William and Mary College. He 
is a member of the Revelers 
Club and an associate of Web- 
ster's clothing store at Virginia 
Beach. 

After their wedding trip, the 
couple will reside at 202-87th St 
Virginia Beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. B. 
Orford & their daughter, Becky 

and son, Peter, arrived from 
Sao Paulo, Brazil to be the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
W. Davenport at their home in 
Linkhorn Park. While here they 
will visit Williamsburg, James- 
town and Yorktown and leave 
next week from New York via 
British Overseas Airlines for a 
holiday in England before re- 
turning to their home in Brazil. 




Personal Mention 



Mrs. J. B. Downing and her 
daughter^ Joan r have returned 
to tneir home on Srd* Si, after 
visiting Capt. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Sutler and Major Herbert Blair 
n Washington. 

Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam L. Gil- 
liam Jr., are spending this week 
at the Sea Ranch at Kitty Hawk, 
N.C. 



in* wp t»me at the Sea Horse 
on 78th Street. 



Mr. and Mrs. H. Oliver Brown 
have left to visit their son and 
daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. 
H. 0. Brown, Jr., in Westfield, 
N.J., and also spend some time 
in Canada. 



David Dodson returned 
Wednesday to hU home on H^'W 
Road after spending several 
weeks visiting relatives in Coral 
Gables, Fla 

Comdr. and Mrs. David L. 
Hancock and their two children, 
who have been residing on 
Brandon Road, Bay Colony 
have moved to 149 Pinewood 
Road. 



Lt'Col. and Mrs. i T. Van 
Patten m and their three chil- 
dren, who have been living in 
Princess Ann»$iUs, have left 
for France where CoL Va*« Pat- 
ten has been ordered for duty. 

The Rev. and Mrs. Henry c 
Barton Jr., and their three chil- 
dren of Birmingham, Ala., are 
spending several weeks with 
Mrs. Barton's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Maclin Simmons. 



Garrison-Walsh 
Vows Are Said 



Miss Barbara Anne Barnard, granddaughter of^ Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick H. Hutmann and frequent visitor of Virginia 
Beach, became the bride of Richard Guryn Mattingly, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Mattingly of Washington, DC, recently 
at Andrews Air Base Chapel. The couple will reside in Santa 
Monica, Calif. 



Mrs. Marian 0. Edmonds and 
Miss Mary Ryan of New York 
spent last weekend with Mrs. 
Edmonds' mother Mrs. Julian 
Osborne at her 53rd St. home. 



The Rev. and Mrs. David Wat- 
son have returned to their home 
in Baltimore, Md., after visiting 
Mrs. B. K. Lindemann on Holly 
Road. 



> Capt. and Mrs. John R. Beard- 
all and their three children 
have arrived from McLean, and 
are making their home on W 
54th Street. 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Battle 
of Rocky ML, NjC, are visiting 
Mrs. Battle's parents, Comdr. 
and Mrs. ."ulhn-B. Timberlake 
at their hon.a «j Tith Street. 



Mr. and Mrs John M. Camp 
Jr., and their three children of 
Franklin are occupying their 
home at 4504 Ocean Front. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. Augustus 
Whitehurst and their children, 
Anne and Ridge, have arrived 
from Knoxville, Term., to spend 
a month with Mrs Whitehursts' 
mother, Mrs. Guy Webb at her 
home on 53rd Street. 



Cnaaaemen 

WILLIAMS— BROWNING 



td of ^rnt 



d 




Mrs. Jerry Walsh 

BAY COLONY— Mr. and Mrs. 
H. T. (Pick) Garrison of 4 Crys- 
tal Parkway, Bay Colony, an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Lorraine Emily "Tod- 
dy" Garrison to Jerry Walsh. 

Mr. Walsh is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Kirk Walsh 
of 1310 Baltic Ave., Virginia 
Beach. ,U 

The wedding took place July 
11 in North Carolina. 

Mrs. Hugh S. Meredith will 
leave Friday to spend several 
days as the guest of Lt. Comdr. 
and Mrs. Edward Carver at their 
home in Newport, R.I. Little 
Miss aJne Carver, who has been 
the guest of Miss Leighton 
Meredith, will return to her 
home with Mrs. Meredith. 



Mrs. Mary Williams of Fen- 
tress and Wilford Williams of 
Virginia Beach announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Miss Mary Ann Williams, to Lt. 
Robert Ross Browning. 

Lt. Browning is the son of 
Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Browning 
of Greenville, N.C. 

Miss Williams was graduated 
from De Paul Hospital School of 
Nursing and is currently on the 
nursing staff at De Paul. 

Lt Browning was graduated 
from Duke University where he 
was a member of Lambda Chi 
Alpha fraternity. He is now 
serving in the United States 
Navy. i 

The wedding will take place 
Aug. 25 in Bethel Baptist 
Church. 



SHOUP— STERLING 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Fitzgerald Jr. an- 
nounce the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Frances Eliza- 
beth Shoup, to Larry Edward 
Sterling. 

Mr. Sterling is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George Monroe Ster- 
ling of Hays, Kansas. 

Miss Shoup is a graduate of 
Virginia Beach High School. She 
attended Averett College in 
Danville. 

Mr. Sterling is a graduate of 
Hays High School. He is sta- 
tioned at Ft. Story. 

A wedding has been planned 
for Aug. 26 aUlte Post Chapel. 

McGINLEY— DICKENS 

HEIDELBERG, Germany — A 
military wedding in the chapel 
of Heidelberg Castle is being 
planned by Miss Margaret Wallis 
McGinley and Capt. Waverley 
Joyner Dickens HI. They will be 
married August 11. 

The bride-to-be is the daugh- 
ter of Col. and Mrs. James Mi- 
Mr. and Mrs. William Bristow chael McGinley of Dallas, Texas, 
of Lynchburg are spending sev- She has been stationed with the 



ere, 



area since last October. Her 
fiance, whose parents are Mr. 
and Mrs. Waverley Joyner Dick- 
ens Jr., of Birdneck Point, is 
serving with the U.S. Army in 
Mannheim. 

Miss McGinley graduated 
from Gulf Park Junior College 
of Gulfport, Miss. She is a 
former student of the Univer- 
sity of Texas where she was a 
member of Zeta Tau Alpha. She 
graduated from North Texas 
University and was a member 
of the Dallas Cotillion Club. 

The prospective bridegroom 
graduated from Va. Military In- 
stitute in Lexington. 



eral weeks at The Mariner on 
57th Street 



Mrs. H. Whitehurst Harriman 
left Saturday for Hollywood, 
Calif., where she will spend 
some time with Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Greer at their home in 
Beverly Hills. 



KUUSKRAA— SHUFORD 

CHERRYVILLE, N.C — Mr. 
and Mrs. Mihkel Salumaa an- 
nounce the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Helgi Katherine 
Kuuskraa of Charlotte, to Har- 
ley Ferguson Shuford Jr. of 
Hickory, N.C 

Mr. Shuford is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harley Ferguson Shu- 
ford Qf Hickory. He is a grand- 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Abner 
Stephenson Pope of Norfolk and 
Virginia Beach. 

Miss Kuuskraa is the daughter 
of the late Alexander Kuuskraa. 
She was graduated from Lenoir 
Rhyne College where she was 
May Queen in 1961. Mr. Shuford 
is a graduate of the Episcopal 
High School and the University 
of North Carolina. 



Miss Rita Gamer, of Lynch- 
burg is spending several weeks 
as the guest of her brother-in- 
law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. S. 
R. Meredith at their home on 
Pinewood Road. 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Rose 
and their children, Tanner, 
Keithley and Janet, of Rich- 
mond are spending the month of 
August at the home of Mrs. 
Rose's parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
B. Tayler in Cavalier Park. 



Mr. and Mrs. John B. Norfleet 
will leave Saturday to spend ten 
days in Ashville, N.C 



Mr. and Mrs. Massey Valen- 
tine and Mr. and Mrs. Shelton 
Horsley of Richmond are spend- 



sachusetts Institute of Techno- 
logy where she received a B.S. 
degree in naval architecture and 
marine engineering. 

Mr. Wyatt is a graduate of 
Granby High School in Norfolk. 
He attended Harvard University 
and the Norfolk College of Wil- 
liam and Mary. He is a 1962 
graduate of M.I.T. with a B.S. 
degree in industrial manage- 
ment. 

Miss Brainard and Mr. Wyatt 
have accepted positions with the 
Electric Boat Company, Groton, 
Conn. 

A September wedding is 
planned. 



the convivial atmosphere and 
good food of an Old En; ' 'i pub 

Jtalrigb fafett 

open charcoal grill 

LUNCHEON 12 to 2:30 
DINNERS 6 to 10:00 

(Dinner* 1.75 up) 

BACK ROOM PIANO FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS 
Street Entrance - Lower Lobby 

£ir Palter 

BY THE SEA 

39th St., Virginia Beach, Va. 



United States Special Services 
in the Heidelberg - Mannheim 



BRAINARD — WYATT 
CLINTON, Conn. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Davis Brainard an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Judith Ann 
Brainard, to Joe Earle Wyatt 
Jr. 

Mr. Wyatt is the son of Capt. 
Joe Earle Wyatt, USN, (ret.), 
and Mrs. Wyatt of Bayside, Va. 
Miss Brainard is a graduate of 
Morgan High School in Clinton. 
She attended the University of 
Eastman School of Music at the 
University of Rochester, N.Y. 
She is a 1962 graduate of Mas- 



MCDONALD — NICHOLS 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Lorraine McDonald of West 
Palm Ueaeh, Fla., will become 
the bride of William J. C. 
Nichols of Burlington, Vt., Oct. 
26 at Stuart, Fla. 

Mr. Nichols has been the 
swim pro and pool director for 
the Cape Colony Club since the 
club opened in 1958. He divides 
his time between Virginia 
Beach and Delray Beach, Fla., 
where he has business interests. 

The bride-elect is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Russ 
of Joliet, 111. 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

SHAPE OF BEAUTY — So much that's important dtepends upon 
the Shaping of your hah*. Yet, so few women appreciate the import- 
ance. A lady says "Ops — don't cut a smidgeon!" the moment we bring 
out the shaper or shears. However, just one short flick of that shaper 
may establish the line that makes your hair style best-ever, (Never, 
can we iccall a style that didn't owe its handsomeness to pre-shaping!) 
MAGIC IN OUR WAVES— We have a boundless store of knowledge 
about things a wave should do for you — and a boundless supply of 
professional permanents to make your dream comie true. There's a 
wave to fit your purse, your personality, and your present needs, wait-' 
ing for you, here in our salon. And we're waiting to get to know you! 

STYLISTS 

MRS. ANDERSON MRS. WHITE 

MR. WILLIAMS MRS. TERRY 

Uaulo 



(JSurqeSS ^Mairdtullna ^alc 



onA 



LASKIN ROAD, VIRGINIA BEACH Pho» 
TWO NORFOLK LOCATIONS 



!flh 



100 Louisiana Dr., Wards Corner 
Ph. 583-1819 



2209 Bam 
Ph 



a Blvd. 







Circs 
1720 

SHOPS FOR THE LADIES AND THEIR DAUGHTERS 



W$%%%%% Mwjjjw 



TRANSITION Al COTTONS 

A lovely selection of dark cottons to 
cotton knits in prints, stripes and solids. 

Contintfing our sale of Summer Merchandise 
OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS TIL 9 PJH. 




which featured two satin. 



Va. Beach Souvenir 

For. a memorable souvenir take home Va. Beach's 
latest dance steps. Classes with special condensed 
courses in the latest dances. 

10 hours instruction for only 
$22.50 

For a different exciting vacation*, come in and 
register now. 

Lynn-Paige School of Dance 

1*06AtfctfttcAv«. Virginia Both Phone 42S-W10 



COSMETICS 

• TUSSY 

• REVLON 

• MAX FACTOR 

• LANVIN 

SALE 

all 

su mmer merchand ise 

CELEBRATING OUR 5th ANNIVERSARY 
GA 84424 - HIllTOP 

JAMES PHARMACY Inc. 



SB 



Zj*&k u> / hXw a^oj^u^coI, I 




y[lexanu*er*])eegl 

»a>«r1t» I relvilers linen gentlemen's opparel - Indies', sportswear 
31*1 STREET VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRGINIA 




^^m 



T 



WW 



W^W 



V 






Public Relations Director of 
the Virginia Beach Rescue 
i Squad compiles and keeps up to 
date in written form an accur- 
g* ate and detailed history of the 
v * Squad from ite origin through 
the succeeding periods of elec- 
tion. With the assistance of the 
Officers and the Squad he gets 
out programs educating the 
public as to the work, purposes, 
and activities of the Squad. 

The election of Active Rescue 
Squad officers of the Virginia 
Beach Rescue Squad is held the 
first regular meeting night in 
May. They are installed the first 
meeting in June and serve for 
a period of one year, or the next 
installation of officers. 



Canada or America— Work i§ Same 



■ bob 



! 





Park 

RIGHT ON 
THE OCEAN 

Virginia Beach 

AT 31st STREET 



FREE! 

ADMISSION 



PARK OPENS 

DAILY AT 1 P.M. 

SAT. & SUN. AT NOON 

Bathhouse Opens 8 A.M. 

• FREE • 

PICNIC AREA 

FOR INFORMATION 
Dial GA 8-1199 



DANCING 

NIGHTLY 
IN BALLROOM 

LIVE ORCHESTRAS 



Jam Sessions 

Sat. & Sun. from 11 a.m. 



FREE ACTS 

Daily 2:30 p.m. & 10 p.m. 
ON OUTDOOR STAGE 
TODAY thru SUNDAY 

Fran Kane 

Performs Amazing Feats of 
Juggling, Balancing and 

Holla Bolla 



Starts Monday, Aug. 6 

Art Henry •& Co. 

Captivating Pony. Dog and 
Mo nkey Act. 

NEXT SUNDAY 

AUG. 5 - 2:30 P.M. 

On Outdoor Stage 

Selection of 

Miss Seaside 
Park 1962 

Bathing Beauty 

CONTEST 

Thrilling & Safe 

RIDES 

For Adults and Children 
50-Attractions-50 — 



Miss Saucier learns about city government from Mrs. Oliver 
and receives friendship tokens from Mayor Dusch. (Phillips 
Photos) 

Canadian Miss 
Here to Brush 
Up on English 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss Colette Saucier, a lovely French- 
Canadian from Anjou, Montreal, firmly believes the old saying 
"practice makes' perfect." She came to Virginia Beach to practice 
her six months instruction in the English language. 

By surrounding herself with Americans, she felt she would 
have to learn control of their 
language. 

After a week at the Cavalier 
Hotel, however, Colette found 
she wasn't meeting enough peo- 
ple to converse with. "Most of 
the hotel guests are couples, 
i'm alone." The best way to 
carry on a conversation, she de- 
cided, was to find someone with 
the same interests. 

Being secretary to the 
mayor of Anjou for seven 
years, Colette's natural choice 
was Mrs. Eileen Oliver, secre- 
tary to Virginia Beach Mayor 
Frank A. Dusch. 
She called Eileen Monday, the 
two met at the hotel and Colette 
has been busy ever since. 

She made a tour ot City Hall 
Tuesday where she met city of- 
ficials, department heads, secre- 
taries and anyone else who hap- 
pened to drop by. Eileen pre- 
sented her with the city's Mer- 
cury capsule emblem pin and 
Mayor Dusch gave her a match- 
ing tie clasp and cuff link set 
for Mayor Ernest Crepeault in 
Anjou. 

Colette found that she and 
Eileen did, indeed, have a great 
deal in common. Their work is 
quite similar and their city 
governments set up much the 
same way. 

Mushrooming City 
Anjou, one of 31 municipali- 
ties on the island of Montreal, 
has a mayor and six eldermen. 
Mostly an industrial town, hav- 
ing recently added a $45 mil- 
lion oil refinery, Anjou has 
jumped in growth during the 



f 

Martha Kellogg 
Becomes Bride of 
James Dunbrock 

St. Bridget's Catholic Church 
in Richmond was the setting 
Saturday for the marriage of 
Miss Martha Ann Kellogg and 
James Henry Dunbrock of Vir- 
ginia Beach. Monsignor Francis 
J. Byrne officiated at the 4 p.m. 
ceremdny. 

Miss Kellogg is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Mann 
Kellogg of Richmond and the 
bridegroom's parents are Mr. 
and Mrs. George Carl Dunbrock 
of Ann Arbor, Mich. 

The bride's sister, Mrs. Henry 
Hortensius George IV, of Va. 
Beach, was matron of honor and 
only attendant. Miss Ann Dudley 
George, niece of the bride, was 
flower girl. 

Lyle Harry Dornan, of Elk- 
hart, Ind., cousin of the bride- 
groom, was best man and ushers 
were Henry Hortensius George 
IV, brother-in-law of the bride, 
and James Randolph Story, both 
of Virginia Beach. 

A reception for out-of-town 
guests and family was held at 
the s bride's home on Club Vista 
Lane after which the couple left 
for a wedding trip to Strick- 
lands Lodge in Pocono Moun- 
tains. 

They will reside at 411 Har- 
vard St., Norfolk. 



Parties Honor 

Debutantes 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Misses 
Virginia Hope Baldwin, Helen 
Jane Ferguson Carney, Susan 
Clarke Oast and Molly Williams 
Holt, four of the season's debu- 
tantes, were guests of honor 
Saturday at 11:30 a.m. at a buf- 
fet luncheon and swimming par- 
The party was given by Mrs. 
Herbert Nash Lee, Mrs. Samuel 
Weisiger Pannill Jr. and Mrs. 
William Edwin Snellings Jr. It 
was held at Mrs. Lee's home at 
U0-78th Street. 

Guests included the debu- 
tantes of the season and a few 
additional guests. 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 



Page 3- A 




A vinyl floor to 

meet every taste 

and budget 

FERRELL 

LINOLEUM & TILE CO. 

326 W. 21st St. — MA 5-5305 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



past seven years from 800 popu- 
lation to over 12,0Q0. 

Colette joined the mayor when 
the town was first formed in 
1955 through a Dill passed'by 
the Quebec government. At this 
time she and one other woman 
were the only two employees in 
city hall. Today she has six girls 
working for her. 

But even this added help does 
not permit the 26-year-old Col- 
ette much leisure time. Her du- 
ties as assistant city treasurer 
and secretary to the mayor often 
keep her at the office for 10 
to 12 hours a day. 

The lovely young woman 
misses her family and they miss 
her — she got three telephone 
calls from her mother last week 
— but she is determined to 
spend her planned 15 days here, 
leaving next Wednesday. 

Meanwhile, she hopes to keep 
talking and practice the English 
language. 

WILLIAM P. FINNEGAN, JR. 

OUANTICO (FHTNC)— Sec- 
ond Lieutenant William P. Fin- 
negan, Jr., USMC, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William P. Finnegan 
of 310 Second -St., W., Virginia 
Beach, Va., was graduated on 
June 27, from the 26-week of- 
ficers' basic course at Marine 
Corps Schools, Quantico, Va. 

The course is attended by new- 
ly commissioned Marine Corps 
officers and officers from allied 
countries. 



MISS KELLAM IS 
PARTY HONOREE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Jacqueline Camille Kellam who 
will marry Donavon Ellis Bon- 
ney Saturday at 5:30 p.m., en- 
tertained her bridal attendants 
at a luncheon Wednesday at the 
Princess Anne Country Club. 

Honor guests were Mrs. Frank 
Wallace Kellam, Jr., matron of 
honor; Mrs. Robert John Rob- 
ertson Jr., and Mrs. Fitzhugh 
Lee Dowdy, bridesmaids; and 
Miss Mary Susan Kellam, flower 
girl. Fifteen guests were pres- 
ent. 

Tomorrow, Mrs. Philip Hun- 
ter Bonney will entertain her 
son, Donavon Ellis Bonney and 
Miss Kellam at a buffet dinner 
at the Thunderbird. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Monte M. Miller 
of Charlottesville and Virginia 
Beach announce the birth of 
their first child, a daughter, 
Virginia Corydon, on July 26 at 
Norfolk General Hospital. Mrs. 
Miller is the former Miss Carolyn 
Mansfield Winn, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edgar 
Winn of Norfolk. Mr. Miller is 
the son of Mrs. George F. Miller 
of Winchester and the late Col. 
Miller, U.S.A. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Lawson Miles Jr:, Mr 
and Mrs. William L. Taliaferro 
and Mr. and Mrs. B. Randolph 
Whittle entertained Friday at 
6:30 p.m. at a buffet supper in 
honor of Misses Susan Tyler 
Thomas and Caroline Grandy 
Tyler, two of the season's 
debutantes, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles A. Vail. Mrs. Vail is the 
former Miss Eleanor Howe Tyler 
a recent bride and former debu- 
tante of the season. 

The party was held at the 
Miles' home, 1223 Crystal Lake 
Circle. 

The guests included debu- 
tantes of the season* tHeir es- 
corts and a few additional 
guests. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
CIVIC LEAGUE 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
The Princess Anne Plaza Civic 
League will meet Wednesday at 
8 p.m. in the Plaza School. 

Election of officers for the 
coming year will be held. All 
members are urged to attend. 



Horner Speaks 
To C of C Group 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
monthly luncheon meeting of 
the Chamber's "Contact Club" 
will feature David Horner of 
Maritime Explorations as special 
guest speaker today. 

Horner, president of The 
Virginia State Skin Divers' As- 
sociation, founded Maritime Ex- 
plorations at 19th and Atlantic 
Avenue in 1960. As Virginia's 
first underwater sports and skin 
diving center,, this new facility 
at Virginia Beach has not only 
i attracted much curiosity and in- 
terest, but has attracted sur- 
prising interest and participa- 
tion both with residents of the 
area and vacationists. 

The fifteen years of diving 
experience Horner gleaned in 
the North Atlantic Ocean, the 
Mediterrean. the Caribbean and 
numerous lakes and quarries he 
now utilizes in his charter ex- 
plorations off the Virginia- 
North Carolina Outer Banks. 
' Author of several articles on 
diving and shipwrecks for ad- 
venture magazines, Horner is 
currently writing a book to be 
entitled "Shipwrecks, Swash- 
bucklers and Sunken Gold" 
(True Tales of the Virginia Sea 
Coast). His fascination with the 
world under the sea also result- 
ed in his publishing a chart in- 
dicating the location of sunken 
and buried treasures on the At- 
lantic Coast. Ten years were 
spent on the research for the 
map. 

The "Contact Club" with its 
membership of thirty diversified 
business men and women serves 
as a membership and public re- 
lations arm of the Chamber. 



Mr. and Mrs. George M. San- 
derlin of Virginia Beach, an- 
nounce the birth of their first 
child, a son, Kevin Blair, on 
July 8 at Leigh Memorial Hos- 
pital in Norfolk. Mrs. Sanderlin 
is the former Miss Anita Sue 
Myers of Virginia Beach. • 



Mr. and Mrs. Landon Hilliard 
III of Charlottesville and Vir- 
ginia Beach announce the birth 
of their second child, second 
son, David Shelburne, on July 
26th at the University Hospital 
in Charlottesville.. 



NIXON ELECTBIC 

606 • 17th St., Va. Beach, Va. Phone GA 8-3711 

COMMERCIAL and RESIDENTIAL WIRING 

Wiring for Clothes Dryers and Water Heaters 

AUTHORIZED HOUSEPOWER CONTRACTOR 
LARGE and SMALL APPLIANCE REPAIRS 

ELECTRICAL SUPPIES AND FIXTURES 



CORRECTION 

Ad. - Thursday, July 26th 

James Pharmacy Inc. 

Hilltop 

REMINGTON PORTABLE MIXERS 4.95 

SHOULD HAVE BEEN 9 95 



SAVE 

At Va. Beach's 

LARGEST 

Used Auto Parts 
Yard 




Just Off Va. Beach Blvd. in Oceana 

GA 8-1131 




GA 8-1797 GA 8-9227 

Free Estimates— Pickup & Delivery 

RE-UPHOLSTERING 

J4illtop 
ijpkouterina Co. 



9 



17th St. at City Limits— Va. Beach 
Custom Made Drapes & -Slip Coven 

RE-FINISHING - REPAIRING - REBUILDING 



GOVERNMENT PROPERTY 

FOR SALE 

WATER PIPE LINE 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, AND 
PRINCESS ANNE COUNTY, VIRGINIA f 

SEALED BIDS TO BE OPENED ON 
AUGUST 17, 1962 

The property offered for sale consists of a 12 inch cast-iron water pipe 
line, extending approximatelv 23,985 lineal fefet from Moores Bridge 
Pumping Station. Norfolk. Virginia, to State Route 60 at the U.S. 
Naval Amphibious Base. Little Creek. Princess Anne County, Virginia. 
No land is included -in the sales offering. , 

HOW, WHEN, AND WHERE TO BUY 

AH bids must be submitted on "Invitation, Bid, and Acceptance Form 

No. GS-03-U(R)-17" which describes the property, states the terms 

and conditions of sale and necessary instructions. 

Sealed bids will be received at GSA Business Service Center, Room 

7122, 7th and D Streets, S. W., Washington, 25, D.C., until 1:00 P.M., 

EDT August 17, 1962, at which place and time they will be publicly 

opened and read. 

For Invitation, Bid and Acceptance Form, or for further information, 

cull or write to the office listed below. 

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, REGION 3 

UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL SERVICE 

REAL PROPERTY DIVISION 

7th AND D STREETS, S. W 

WASHINGTON 25, D. C. 

TELEPHONES: WOrth 3-6139 or WOrth 3-6140 



Oceana Shoe Repairing 

Complete Shoe Service 

All material and work guaranteed 
None Better 



We fill Orthopedic Prescriptions 

SALMON Prop. 
512 Courthouse Blvd. — Oceana 

NEXT TO EXQUISITE BARBER SHOP 






Call Your Local Service Center for 

ALL YOUR SERVICE PROBLEMS 





\ W CONDITIONING AND HEATING ~7 

COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL 

Prompt 24-HOUR Service 

ALL WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 
Phone: GA 8-1929 204 - 22nd Street 

Phone: Kl 5-6843 Virginia Beach, Va. 



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Virginia Beach Son-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 



THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-NEWS 

Published every Thursday by The Beach Publishing Corporation 
JIM Padfk Avenue % V.rginia Baaeh, Virginia 



FRIO A. HAYCOX President and Publisher 

ALBIN R. MAILHES Vice President - General Manager 

RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS ~~ - .. News Editor 

; WILLIAM R McKNIGHT — Advortising Manager 

CECIL T. PRESSON _. Production Superintandant 

_ 1 y , J - „ 1 

/ 

Eatcred as an— a* class matter ia the post office ie Virginia Beach, Vs., oader the act of March 3, 187* 



WHhta county — $3.50 per 



Suhscrlstloe rates by mail 



Outside of County — $4.09 per annum 



The City Gives Recognition to 
The Virginia National Guard 



The City of Virginia Beach can, well be 
proud or the fine cooperative relationship 
it enjoys with all branches of the military 
services, but it should be abundantly proud 
of the fine cooperation of the Virginia 
National Guard with this area. 

Ever since the disastrous storm of March 
7 City of Virginia Beach officials were im- 
pressed with the efficiency and the swift 
approach to our problems as evidenced by 
the Virginia National Guard. It was an ex- 
treme emergency and the Virginia National 
Guard met it squarely. 

This week the City demonstrated its ap- 
preciation to the Virginia National Guard 
md its tble leaders. With the Guard assem- 
bled at nearby Camp Pendleton the City 
played host to Major General Paul AA. Booth, 
the Stale's Adjutant General, and his staff 
of officers at a special dinner on Monday 
night. 

4 < 



General Booth became the first honor- 
ary cilizen or the new Virginia Beach wnen 
Mayor Frank A. Dusch presented the mili- 
tary leader with a certificate of appreciation 
from the people of this area. General Booth, 
in modest terms, accepted the citation on 
behalf of the men who made it all possible. 
He accepted little credit for the work ac- 
complished and gave most credit to the 
local residents. 

Then on Wednesday the City entertained 
the enlisted men who served the area dur- 
ing the storm. This event took the form of a 
beach party at the military reservation. 

Recognition of the splendid work of the 
Virginia National Guard was in order and 
City of Virginia Beach and the County of 
Princess Anne officials are to be commend- 
ed for this fine demonstration of public 
relations and civilian-military teamwork. 




Work of The Rescue Squad 
Should Not Be Taken for Granted 



This, the month of August, is known as 
Rescue Squad Month in Virginia Beach and 
Princess Anne County. This is the single 
month out of the twelve that this superb 
volunteer organization asks for financial 
support from the residents of this area to 
cover the needs of the group's operating 
budget. 

The Virginia Beach-Princess Anne Rescue 

. Squad has not one member who receives 
any financial remuneration. All members 
are our friends and neic/hbors, who give of 
tfeeir time and who have been trained to 
meet almost any type of emergency. The 
Rescue Squad does not operate by the clock. 
Its members are subject to call at all times 
ancr at least two members are on active 
cjuty 24 hours of each day. 

\j Organized in 1952 the Virginia Beach- 
frincess Anne Rescue Squad has answered 



a total of 8,951 calls during the past ten 
years. The Squad has driven its ambulances 
a total of 214,897 miles in this period and 
members have contributed a total of 109,- 
846 man hours since the squad was 
organized. 

The Rescue Squad deserves the support 
of every citizen for no one is exempt from 
possible use pf its services. .The assistance 
by the Rescue Squad is free to anyone. 

Remember the Rescue Squad is calling 
you now for financial assistance. You may 
be calling the Rescue Squad tomorrow. 
Whether you contribute or not if you need 
them the Rescue Squad will be there. But, 
send your contribution to the Virginia 
Beach-Princess Anne Rescue Squad, P. O. 
Box 47, Virginia Beach. SEND YOUR CHECK 
TODAY. 



Rev. Macon B. Walton, a native of Richmond and a gradu- 
ate of V.M.I, and the Virginia Theological Seminary, has suc- 
ceeded Rev. Emmanuel Bach as assistant rector of Galilee 
Episcopal Church. Rev. Bach recently returned to his native 
Switzerland. Mr. Walton, 30-year-old bachelor, is residing at the 
home of W. G. Bruce on Lee Road until September when Mr. 
Walton will take an apartment on North Bay Shore Road in 
Bay Colony. 




m m sum: '02 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 



66 Head 

covering 
S8 Pitch 
WTree 
«0 Symbol for 

mm 

10 Pierce with 61 Writing 



1 L_ 
6 Utter 



Answtr To Puzzle No. 716 

a 



» D_0 R £ 
COVER 
H 7 »7 5 



/ 



14 Dwelling 

15 Molten rock 

16 ExcaraUon 

17 Parcel of 
land 

18 Vestigea 
39 Jewel 



•2 

63 To make 

a&aip- 
67 Russia 



i 



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Americaa 



69 To tola 



RDDDim QUO QQDti 
BDOPI CliEEE UDU 
□ DDE EBEBE EE1SH 

iibd Hannra nnmn 

rannn r s hebec 

nn ran 

riiiinc dbbobe 



W Entreaty \ 
74 Period of v 




*3i3 Sl-fi"" ill! 

pIeIeIrI I m| e! eI tT si |«IHe|o 



10 Erfec* ^ 

11 Spinning 
toy 

It The poplar 
13 Beneath 
19 Go back to 



OTToeaei A j>. 

31 To testify V DOWN 
34 Abbot u * • 

36 Harem roost 1 50 per cess 

37 Flab 
39 8»4l 



I 




2 &a.«ln 
t Cast ballot 



■■I,- ii... n 

5 Allow 

6 A leaf of 



7 Fine 



fabric 
• HwU <£ 
9 vassal ^ 

made of 

osiers 



. state 
22 Pronoun 

25 Warm 
weather 
drinks 

26 Emmet 
• Festivals 
30 Drinking 

vessels 
SI Periods 

32 Prepare for 
print 

33 Host 
lacking in 
color 

34 Sandhills 



»l 

spring 
38 Exterior 
60 woody plant 



41 Stitches 
43 Buddhist 

Pillar 
45 Severe 
48 A small 

particle 
50 Moral offense 
53 Disembarked 

55 Recent 

56 Stringed 
instruments 

57 Nimble 
59 Stop 

momentarily 

61 Pratt 

62 Lath 

64 Rabbit 

65 Brink 

66 Of an age 
group 

66 Signifying 
maiden 
name 

70 Man's name 

71 Germ ceU 
76 Correlative 

of either 




Beach Appeal 

(Continued From Page 1) 

The lieutenant governor made 
an address at the dedication of 
the 29th Division Armory in 
Norfolk last May. Maj. Gen. E. 
W. McGowan, chief of the Na- 
tional Guard Bureau, heard the 
address and was so impressed 
with Godwin's reference to the 
guard and its* creed he ordered 
the framed copy prepared for 
him. 

Guard Honors 

(Continued From Pag* 1) 

a summer cottage in North Vir- 
ginia Beach and visits here 
each weekend that he can es- 
cape the Washington scene. 

Not only are the State's top 
political leaders attracted to Vir- 
ginia Beach. This week a young 
lady who served as "Miss Vir- 
ginia" in 1961 is honeymooning 
here. She is the new Mrs. Robert 
Churchill of Roanoke, the former 
Miss Charlotte Thomas. 



SILVER SPRING GIRL 
WINS NDF FELLOWSHIP 

Margaret Moffatt. 2037 Lu- 
zerne Ave., Silver Spring, Md., 
has been awarded a National 
Defense Felowship in Spanish 
to the University of New Mexi- 
co for the academic year 1962- 
63. 

Miss Moffatt, a 1960 graduate 
of Trinity College, Washington, 
has been teaching Spanish at 
Princess Anne High School in 
Virginia Beach, Virginia dur- 
ing the past year. She did post- 
graduate studies at William and 
Mary. 

She is the daughter of Mr. & 
Mrs. Thomas L. Moffatt of Silver 
Spring. 



The telephone rang shortly after 8 a.m. last Friday. Still clad 
in housecoat and pajamas and hooded hair dryer, I was sitting at 
the kitchen table beating the typewriter. 

"Are you about ready to come to work," the bossman asked 
when I picked up the receiver. 

"Just about," I lied. "Why?" 

'The Shepard's are ready to leave," he explained. "I want 
some pictures. They are at the Thunderbird Motel. Come 
quick." I learned later they stayed at the motel Thursday 
night after their furniture had left for Houston, Texas. 

"I'll bring the camera," I told him. You bring the film." 
,Most -newspaper people know that America's publicity-shy 
Astronaut is pretty much a stickler for promptness and it wasn't 
too likely that he would hang around the motel waiting on one 
lone woman reporter with a* less-than-trusty Polaroid camera. I'm 
sure I broke all records and became an outcast in the notoriously 
tardy female race when I dressed and combed my slightly damp 
hair and left the house in 10 minutes. 

I drove up in front of the motel with a few misgivings. 
Would the Astronaut chew me up and spit me out in little pieces, 
I kept wondering? At least the bossman, who knows Shepard 
pretty well, would be there to run interference for me, I kept 
telling myself. 

No one was standing impatiently on the parking lot or in 
the lobby, so I breathed a little easier. "They are in the dining 
room," the desk clerk told me. 

I peeped around the corner. Sure enough, there sat Cmdr. 
Shepard, his lovely wife, Louise, the three girls and Mr. Mailhes, 
Bossman and president of the Chamber of Commerce. 

RELAX, IT'S A-OK 
"It's all right. Come on in," Bossman greeted me. "I've got 
permission for the pictures." (He must have noticed me trying 
to hide the camera behind my purse.) 

After the introductions were made and a few pleasant com- 
ments were exchanged, the group proceeded with their breakfast 
whil I loaded the camera. 

"Hope I'm not giving you indigestion," I threw out at Shepard. 
"Not hardly," he threw back. I kept loading. 

Since I once lived in Texas City, just 40 miles from Houston, 
and Shepard made history in Florida, my native state, I felt com- 
pelled to add a few occasional tid-bits of information to the con- 
versation. But my thoughts were pretty incoherent. By now I was 
wondering if the blasted camera would work. It has been known 
to fail, and the* "photographer" has been known to goof. 



Virginia Beach 
Court Dseket 

JULY ab 

Mathew R Leo, Norfolk: reck- 
less driving, $25. 

Edward L. Johnson, Virginia 
Eesch: speeding, $25. 

WtH'ara Ove-t-m London 
Bridge: no c'ty ID Card.)$ 1 

T ohn Allen Bndshaw. Vir 
ein'R Bsach; reo'rless dr'vinT 
$2S. 

Chrstopher Asdrev O^or^es 
Charbttasville; willful conceal 
ment, $50. 

Mathew R. Le^m, Norfolk: 
sleeping in auto. $10 

J. M Hn u '" Norfolk; ?lee? 
ng in auto, $10. 

Theodore Tjnmas. Jr, Vir 
ginia Beach; drunk in public, 
S10. 

Janes C thambron. Dam 
Neck: drunk in nubl'c. W0 

Raymond W Collins, Norfolk: 
' speedng. $20. 

A 1 1 r. n L Diggs, Newport 
j News; vaerancy, 6 months in 
jail; drunk in public, 60 days. 

John Allen Bradshaw, Vir- 
ginia Beach; unnecessary noise, 
$10. 

Isaac H. Mock, Little Creek; 
speeding, $15. 

William C. Eschenbech, Little 
Creek; speeding, $50 and unnec- 
essary noise, $10. 

James I. Miller, Norfolk; 
speeding, $25. 

William Cliff, Norfolk; speed- 
ing, $20. 

Ronald K. Dotson, Norfolk; 
drunk in public, $10; urinating 
in public, $25. 

James K. Killet, Norfolk; 
reckless driving, $25. 

Carl D. Swiger, Portsmouth; 
improper equipment, $15; reck- 
less driving, $35. 

Louis P. Minacapelli, Ports- 
mouth; reckless driving, $25. 

John E. McCombs, Virginia 
Beach; reckless driving, $25. 

William H. Grill, Bayside; im- 
proper equipment, $10. 



Lotus Queen, Festival, Blooms 




JULY 22 



"What time do you plan to leave," the bossman asked the 
famous family. 

"Right at 9 o'clock," Shepard answered and looked at his 
watch. Bossman looked at it too. "What kind of watch is that?" 
he asked. I caught a glimpse of it as the Astronaut passed it over 
for Mr. Mailhes' inspection. I've never seen so many dials, figures 
and gadgets on one small timepiece. 

"It keeps moon time," Mrs. Shepard commented. What a de- 
lightful person, I thought; I'll bet she doesn't know much more 
about it than I do. ; 

It seems all astronauts wear the same type watch and all are 
set by England's universal time. . 

"Whan you are in outer space you cross a time barrier 
•vent 90 seconds," Cmdr. Shepard explained to me. "Now it 
wouldn't be practical to reset your watch every faw minutes, 
would it?" That made sense. Boy, what I don't know about 
outer space! 

His watch said two minutes after 13 hours (mine said two 
minutes after 9) as they pushed back from the table. Bossman 
and I preceded them outside and I adjusted the camera as 
much as possible. 

Shepard backed his famous Corvette out of a parking space 
onto the lot and Mrs. Shepard fell in behind with her loaded 
down Chevy station wagon. I didn't envy either of them that 
hot trip to Texas. I shook both their hands and wished them 
luck then started shooting away. They must have silently 
wished me luck, too, because two or three of # the pictures 
turned out o.k. 

After a few driving instructions between husband and 
wife, the Shepards headed for Texas and out of the life of 
Vtr#vte vBeafehi He Jeaws behind ,t^ ^^ntU^^e^er^pms^ 
in his horror, she leaves many deVoted friends and the twb leave 
the Bay Colony house "where the Shepards lived when he 
made the first flight into space on May 5, 1961." 

"I'm sorry to see them go," the Chamber of Commerce 
President said. "They brought a lot of recognition to Virginia 
Beach." 

"Yep," the reporter answered. "They were good newspaper 
copy, too." x 



Anthony J. Fantauzzo, Camp 
Elmore; disregarding red light, 
$10. 

Ernest E. Scott, Norfolk; 
drinking in public, $10. 

David A. Hynes, Norfolk; 
drinking in public, $10. 

Thomas J. Matthews, Lynn- 
haven, drunk in public, $10. 

Howard E. Simomin, Norfolk; 
sleeping in auto, $10. 

Charles D. Harris, Dam Neck; 
reckless driving, $25. 

Joe Spence, VAB; gambling, 
$10. * 

Charles R. Williams, Virginia 
Beach; gambling, $10. 

Eddie Nixon, Virginia Beach; 
operating a gambling house, 
$200. 

James Wright, Virginia Beach; 
gambling, $10. 

Al Davis, Virginia Beach; 
gambling, $10. i 

James Edward Joyner, Lynn- 
haven; gambling, $10. 

J<»sse H. Collins, Dam Neck; 
drunk in public, $10. 

Richard P. Carter, Cherry 
Point, N.C.; sleeping in auto, 
$10. 

Jack A. Danek, Norfolk; sleep- 
ing in auto, $10. 

Scatterwood Kearney, Sea- 
tack; resisting arrest, $100 and 
60 days; assault, $100 and 60 
days. 

Kenneth R. Weller, Little 
Creek; assaulting a police offi- 
cer, $50 and disorderly con- 
duct, $50. 

Ronald L- Weaver, Little 
Creek; assaulting a police offi- 
cer, $50 and disorderly con- 
duct, $50. 

Robert G. Nash, Norfolk; dis- 
orderly conduct, $25. 

Melvin Perkins, Norfolk; dis- 
orderly conduct, $200 and 90 
days. 



Wearing the 1962 Lotus Queen crown, placed on he/ 
head last Wednesday at the annual coronation ball, Miss June 
Kay Robinson stops in the middle of her busy Lotus Festival 
schedule to admire the lovely golden blooms that inspired it all. 
The festival ended Wednesday after a week of planned activi- 
ties, most of them centered around the Lotus Gardens near 
Sandbridge. (Boice Photo) 



"Lady" Committee 
Has Three Members 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Mayor Frank Dusch has named Laura. 
Lambe, publicist for the city, to a three-man committee- which 
will handle all phases of the unveiling ceremonies of the nine-foot 
bronze "Lady" on September 22, and a Norwegian - American 
program on September 21st. 

Albin Mailhes, president of The Virginia Beach Chamber of* 
Commerce; William Lillyman.r 



Director pf Sales, Convention 
Center and Mrs. Lambe develop- 
ed the framework of the upcom- 
ing ceremonies during a recent 
visit of Erik Bye of Norway 
Broadcasting. 

Mrs. Lambe, wno will 
handle all publicity on the 
simultaneous unveiling in 
Virginia Beach and Moss, 
Norway has already contacted 
specific network shows and 
magazines indicated in an 
event of this nature. 
Mrs. Lambe stated that other 
news avenues had been contact- 
ed through Peter Prag, Director 
of The Norwegian National 
Travel Office in New York and 
with SAS (Scandanavian Airlines 
System). 

It is felt that with the current 
intercontinental spirit of furth- 
ering unification of old world 
and new, the simultaneous un- 
veiling will be of considerable 



JAMES L. ABBOT 

NORFOLK (FHTNC)— Mid 
shipman third, class James L 
Abbot, son of Capt. and Mrs 
James L. Abott, Jr. of 557 Wnd 
sor Rd., Virginia Beach, Va., 
is participating in a Midship- 
men's summer cruise of five to 
seven weeks aboard the nuclear 
powered attack aircraft carrier 
USS Enterprise. 

The Enterprise, a unit of the 
Atlantic Fleet, operates out of 
Norfolk, Va. It is the Navy's only 
nuclear powered aircraft carrier. 

All Naval Academy and Naval 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(NROTO Midshipmen partici- 
pate in summer cruises aboard 
ship.-, as part of the military train- 
ing administered to the future of- 
ficers. The Midshipmen learn 
first-hand how a ship operates 
and what it is like to live aboard 
one for an extended period of 
tune. 



Rowe Elected 
VPA Prexy 

RICHMOND — Josiah P. 
Rowe, III, co-publisher of the 
Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star 
was elected president of the 
Virginia Press Association at the 
annual convention of daily and 
weekly newspaper' publishers at 
Old Point Comfort, recently. 

He succeeds Lloyd T. Page, 
Jr., publisher of the Buena Vista 
News. Both Rowe and Page are 
second generation Va. news- 
paper publishers. Rowe's elec- 
tion marks the second time in 
V.P.A. history that the son of 
a former president has become 
head of the association. His fa- 
ther, the late Josiah P. Rowe, 
Jr. was president in 1932. The 
late Powell Glass, publisher of 
the Lynchburg News and Ad- 
vance served as president of the 
association in 1944, his father 
Senator Carter Glass having 
headed the group in 1903.- 

Other officers elected were: 
James F. Tindall, publisher of 
the Smyth County News, Ma- 
rion, vice-president for weekly 
newspapers; Lindsay B. Mount, 
executive editor of the Char- 
lottesville Daily Progress, vice- 
president for daily newspapers; 
R. K. T. Larson, executive edi- 
tor for public service of the 
Norfolk Ledger-Star and Vir- 
ginian-Pilot, treasurer; and Ed. 
O. Meyer of Richmond renamed 
secretary-manager. 



intercontinental interest. ■- ' 

Erik Bye will return to Vir- 
ginia Beach about September 
2nd to finalize the two programs 
relative to the Norwegian Lady. 



FUNERALS 

Hans Christian Hansen 
VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral 
services for Hans Christian 
Hansen, 94, husband oiMvs. 
Billie Barnes Hansen and son of 
Hans and Mrs. Ana Kirstina 
Pedersen Hansen, were hehj 
Monday at 1 p.m. at Forest 
Lawn Cemetery. 

Mr. Hansen was a native of 
Copenhagen, Denmark, and had 
lived in the Virginia Beach 
area for the past 40 years. He 
was a retired building contrac- 
tor. 

His wife was his only surviv- 
or. 

Funeral arrangements were 
handled by the Hollomon-Brown 

Funeral Home. 






George Gilliam Says: 



The summer season is 63.2% 
complete wth this issue. We hope 
the remainder of 36.8% (thru 
Labor Day) will show a real 
stretdi finish tor all our hotel 
and motel friends. * 




Atlantic Fuel \ 
Oil Od. 



Call: 
GA 8-5000 

Day or Night 



p 




First Try Pays Off Big 






Leslie Watson Wins Extra 
Hole Watch in P. A. Golf 



VIRGINIA BEACH — White 
the championship finalists mark j 
time until Sunday, August 11, 
for their 36-hple matqh to de- 
cide the 1962 Princess Anne 
Country Club golf .champion- 
ship, most other flight winners 
were determined the past week- 
end. 

Young Leslie Watson, 15-year- 
old Virginia Beach high school 
star, a thrilling 21-hole match 
from Randy Zehmer to capture 
top honors in the first flight. 
Young Watson defeated Zehmer, 
1 up in 21 holes. The ultimate 
winner came through with a 
crucial birdie on the 18th hole 
to send the contest into extra 
holes. 

Watson and Zehmer halved 
the 19th and 20th holes with 
pars and when Zehmer slipped 
to a bogie on the 21st hole Wat- 
son closed the door with an 
orthodox par-four. 

Meanwhile Jordan Ball and 
George Beamon are to meet for 
the title. Both are involved in 
the Eastern Amateur this week 
and will play on Sunday, Aug- 
ust 11. 



In other results W. S. "Buddy" 
Clements defeated Tim Tim- 
mons, 2 and 1, for second flight 
honors^ Wes Snow was too con- 
sistent fOT ft. V. Timms and won 
4 and 3 in the third flight and 
William Vaughan walloped 
Ward Cole, 8 and 7, to win the 
fourth flight title. ♦ 

Gene Evans was the winner 
of the blind bogey event al- 
though he Shared top honors 
with Joe Nelson and Dan Thorn- 
ton. The magic number was 78. 



HIGHLAND LINKS — Bobby 
Trultt, Joe Sevier, Romie.King 
and Ed Waller formed .the win- 
ping team to capture Sunday's 
blitz tourney with best ball of 
53. Three teams tied for second. 

Charles ferry and Marshall 
Cherry shared low gross honors 
with a 73> and Perry won it on 
third extra hole. 

Low net went to Bill Grish- 
man with 77-14-^63. Pete Staf- 
ford was second with 81-17 — 64. 

Three tied for blind bogey 
honors, Joe Sevier, Kelly Davis, 
and Bob Edgerton, 79. 



P. A. Rec. Schedule 



MEN'S UNLIMITED 
Thursday 

Kempsville vs. Courthouse at 
Creeds; 7:00 p.m. 

Pine Grove vs. Knotts Island 
at Creeds; 8:30 p.m. 

Oceana vs. Creeds at Shelton 
Park; 7:30 p.m. 
fcFriday 

Pungo Esso vs. Knotts Island 
at Creeds, 7:00 p.m. 



DUFFER LEAGUE 
Friday 

Teachers vs. M-Boys at Shel- 
ton Park, 7 p.m. 

Woodhaven vs. Kempsville 
Baptist at Shelton Park, 8:30 
p.m. 



WOMEN'S LEAGUE 



f 



Friday 

Aragona vs. Oceana Rec. at 
Kempsville, 7:00 p.m. 

Surf-Riders vs. Courthouse at 
Kempsville No. 1; 8:30 p.m, 
Monday — Aug. 6 
, Bayside Bowl vs. Oceana Rec. 
at Oceana No. 2; 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday 



Pungo Insurance vs. Court- 
house at' Creeds; 7:30 p.m. 

Aragona vs. Surf-Riders at 
Oceana No. 1; 7:30 p.m. 

TEEN GIRLS 
Thursday 

Bayside vs. Aragona I at Oce- 
ana No. 2; 7:00 p.m. 

Burroughs vs. Creeds at Oce- 
ana No. 2; 8:30 p.m. 

Friday-— Aug. 3 

Kempsville vs. 'Chesapeake 
Beach at Oceana No. 2; 7 p.m. 

Aragona Angels vs. Thalia at 
Oceana No. 2; 8:30 p.m. 

Monday — August 6 

Kempsville vs. Aragona I at 
PAHS No. 2; 7:00 p.m. 

Aragona Angels vs. Creeds at 
Creeds; 7:00 p.m. 

Tuesday — Aug. 7 

Bayside vs. Puritans at Oce- 
ana No. 2; 7:00 p.m. 

Burroughs vs. Courthouse at 
Oceana No. 2; 8:30 p.m. 

Wednesday — Aug. 8 

Bayside vs. Courthouse at 
Oceana No. 2; 7:00 p.m. 

Chesapeake Beach vs. Thalia 
at Oceana No. 2; 8:30 p.m. 




Sports Cars 
To Hold Rally 

VIRGINIA BEACH — the 

Tidewater Sports Car Club ni«ht 

allv will begin at Frontier City 

'n Virginia Beach Saturday at 

10 p.m. 

The rally is composed of three 
sections, time-distance, gimmick, 
and regularity run. Participants 
drive over secondary roads at 
specified average speeds with 
the object not to get lost and 
to arrive at the manv check 
points on time. 

The Martha Washington Hotel 
will be the official rally head- 
quarters. Entries are limited to 
60 cars. Group baby sitting will 
be provided for those who regis- 
ter early at the hotel. 

Dash plaques will be award- 
ed for each "leg" of the rally, 
and the first three overall win- 
ners. The grand prize for the 
lowest overall score is a week- 
end for two at the Bel Harbour 
Motel. 

Dave Bauerschmidt will be the 
rally master for Tidewater's 
first all-night rally. 

Miss Kitty Dilday selected 
"Miss All Night Rally" will 
wave off the first rally car from 
Frontier City. 



Virginia Beech ^N-NfcWS 
Thursday, August 2. 1962 
Ny<» 5-A 




Plaza Bowl 
Highlights 



FAMOUS CHINESE & AMERICAN FOOD 



Commonwealth's Attorney Robert L. Simpson tried his hand at martin fishing for the 
first time recently and came home with this 158 pound beauty. Measuring nearly 9 feet, the 
fish was caught about 30 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C., just a little over an hour after the party 
left port. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson joined Mr. and Mrs. Ruben F. Trant and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Kennedy aboard Trant's boat, the "Kitty." Mrs. Trant and Simpson are pictured admiring his 
catch. 



Thursday Nite Foursome 

High game — Bud Womble, 
255; Angela Rush, 218. 

High Series — Bud Womble, 
619, Angela Rush, 534. 

Other top scores — Tommy 
Bunting, 203; Emily Nonni, 199. 

High Team Game — The Idiots 
670. 

High Team Series— 3 N's & 
AR — 1906. 

League Standings 
Won 

The Tubes : 32 

3N'sf & AR 26 

3M's & AB .25 

Cameo Homes 22 

Cannon BaUs ..„ 21% 

Four Duces 21Vi 

Last Four 19% 

The Idiots 18 

Unpredictables 18 

Inbetweens 18 

The Spotters 16 

Bunny Millers 15, , 

Surprises 13% 

The Splits 10 



Pace in Golf 



PORTSMOUTH — Young 
BHly Ketlam, Jr., of Virginia 
Beach showed the way in the 
first round of the Tom Far 
gusson Memorial phase of the 
annual Eastern Amateur 
tournament Tuesday with a 
fine 76, Over the tough Eliza- 
beth Manor Country Club 
course. 

The course was playing 
long and was difficult but 

Young Kellam boomed Ms tee 
shots and chipped and putted 
well in leading the first day 
firing. He had nine of 36 and 
40 with a bogey en the final 
hole. 

Young Kellam is a former 
member of the Virginia Beach 
High School golf team, and 
plays out of the Princess Anne 
Country Club. He is one of 
the rising young stars of this 
area and, is a keen student of 
the game. 

The first day leader was 
scheduled to play the second 
18-hole round on Wednesday. 
According to the schedule he 
teed off Wednesday afternoon 
and completed his round too 
late for this newspaper's dead- 
line. 

The Tom Fergusson event 
is a prelude to the Eastern 
Amateur tournament proper. 
The 12 low scorers in this 
event qualify for the mein 
event which is scheduled to 
open today and run through 
the weekend. 



a - -, 



- 



FREEDOM 



/*Tff 



I 



T 

DRAG 

CREEDS AlkFtFXD 
VA* BEACH, VA. 

DRAG RACING 



3 



ERY SUNDAY 
OPEN 12:30 
RACE TIME 3 P.M. 

BIG CASH PRIZES TO 
Contestants and Spectators 

ADMISSION-$1.00 

Food and Drink Available 

SANCTIONED BY — NATIONAL 
HOT ROD ASSOCIATION 

— MREcnaarft— 

Route 68 to Oceana, torn south on Rt, 
615 to Creed*, then east on Rt. 62 f. 
North Caroline, resident* route thrown 
Blackwater, Pnnro Fett* to 



BOAT 

RENTALS 

by the 

HOUR - DAY - WEEK 

OA 8-6880 

BEACH-BAT 



Virginia Beach 
31st ST. EXTENDED 



Princess Anne Court Docket 



Thursday, — August 2nd 
Judge Kellam 

Robert E. Baker, Outland and 
Gray, p.q., vs. Warneil Thomas 
Owens, et al, etc., Breeden, 
Howard & MacMillan, p.d. 

Alonzo Leo Meeks, Brydges & 
Broyles, p.q., vs. William Webb, 
Jr., p.d. 

Oran Grace, Sr., etc., Brydges 
and Broyles, p.q., vs. William 
Webb, Jr., p.d: 

Oran Grace, Jr., etc., Brydges 
and Broyles, p.q., vs. William 
Webb, Jr., p.d. 



MemBere of 
Diner a Club 



,H i K I run i« 



JlClilL' 



RESERVATIONS 

Parties and Banquets 
"Orders To Take Out" 

CALL UL 5-6701 



Military Highway— Route 13 

Between Lansdale Traffic 
Circle and Va. Beach Blvd. 
Open 10:30 a.m.-IO:30 p.m. 

Enjoy delicious 

food prepared by 

an expert 'Chinese 

chef . . . in the 

calm serenity of 

a Chinese ofmos- 

phere . . . amid 

modem comfort! 



We Serve Luncheon, and Dinners 



**************************** 




Tuesday — August 7th 

Howard. Franklin Heid, Morris 
B. Guttennan, p.q., vs. Jackie 
Blaine Yoder, Taylor, Gustin, 
Harris, Furniss, p.d. 

Edward Boyle, Amato, Baba- 
las, Breit, Cohen, p.q., Ffank L. 



FORMER RESIDENTS' 
KIN ON STAMPS 

NORFOLK — Ten -year -old 
Susan Ashley, daughter and 
granddaughter of former Nor- 
folk residents, was selected as 
the model for the new four-cent 
Girl Scout stamp recently re- 
leased. 

Her mother, Mrs. Guy Ashley, 
is the former Miss Betty Jane 
Jesse who was educated in this 



Pape, Jr., James, Wahab, and 
Spencer, p.d. 

Helen Boyle, Amato, Babalas, 
Breit; Cohen, p.q., vs. Frank L. 
Pape, Jr., James, Wahab and 
Spencer, p.d. 

Sandra Lee Boyle, Amato, 
Babalas, Breit, Cohen, p.q., vs. 
Frank L. Pape, Jr., James, Wa- 
hab & Spencer, p.d. 

Edward Boyle, Amato, Baba- 
las, Breit, Cohen, p.q., vs. Frank 
L. Pape, Jr., James, Wahab and 
Spencer, p.d. 

Gladys B. Rhenback, Drewry 
and Evans, p.q., vs. The Ameri- 
can Insurance Co., Sands, An- 
derson, Marks, Clarke, p.d. 



Wednesday — August 8th 
Judge Kellam 

Shirley Lawhon, Brydges and 
Broyles, p.q., vs. Grayson White- 
hurst, Sr., Williams, Cocke, Wor- 
rell, Kelly, p.d. 

Forrest Theodore Sollmon, 
Amato, Babalas, Breit, Cohen, 
p.q., vs. Catherine Meeks Bazi- 
nett, Taylor, Gustin, Harris, 
Furniss, p.d. 



Larry J. Hillier, Amato, Baba- 
las, Breit, Cohen, p.q., vs. Cath- 
erine Meeks Bazinett, Taylor, 
Gustin, Harris, Furniss, p.d. 

Herbert L. Robinson, Inft., 
etc., Amato, Babalas, Breit, Co- 
hen, p.q., vs. Catherine Meeks 
Bazinett, Taylor, Gustin, Har- 
ris, Furniss, p.d. 

Ruth Robinson, Amato, Baba- 
las, Breit, Cohen, p.q., vs. Cath- 
erine Meeks Bazinett, Taylor 
Gustin, Harris, Furniss, p.d. 

Pearl Midgett, Howell, An- 
ninos, Daugherty, p.q., vs. Char- 
lotte Voliva, Parsons, Stant and 
Parsons, p.q. 

Shirley Bolinaga, Howell, An- 
ninos, Daugherty, p.q., vs. Char- 
lotte Voliva, Parsons, Stant and 
Parsons, p.d. 



Lost 
8 

14 
15 

18tfe 

14Vfe 

20% 

18 

18 

22 

24 

25 

26% 

28 



3M's & AB 3, Cameo Homes 
1; Bill O'Rourke, 506; Joe Riccio, 
496. 

Surprises 3, Inbetweens 1; 
Angela Rush, 534; Harry Hall, 
476. 

Four Duces, 4; Bill Mc- 
Laughlin, 531. 

Last Four, 2%, Cannon Balls, 
1%; Fred Fink, 498, Tommy 
Bradt, 545. 

The Tubes 4, The Splits 0; 
Emily Nonni and Rudy Jugo, 
498; Al Clay, 499. 

3N's & AR 4, Unpredictables, 
0; Mel Neathery, 527; Rose 
Fiore, 444. 

The Idiots, 3, Bunny Millers 1; 
Bud Womble 619; Tommy Bunt- 
ing 546. ^ 

The maximum active member- 
ship of the Virginia Beach RES- 
CUE SQUAD is forty-two (42) 
men. Classifications are: Active, 
Inactive, Associate, Life, Mem- 
bers in Memoriam. 



FOR SALE 

1961 THUNDERBIRD SPORTS CONVERTIBLE 

Ermine White wjth Black Top 
Original Owner — Low Mileage 



MB I 




,493 00 



JAMES POWELL 
Sir Walter Hotel 




\tJj^»»iA**. * *•* SrtttM* 




afisoirjiui 

area and was active in the Nor- 
folk Little Theatre. 

-Susan and her parents,. M% 
afifr.'-MJK.'v Guy -Ashley are rest 
dfcWts^of Westport, Conn. 

Her grandparents, Mr and, 
Mrs Clifford Jesse, are residents 
of Dallas, Texas, but formerly 
lived in. Norfolk, wbejg M/. 
Jesse was plant manager for 
Ford Motor Co. for many years. 



Call BROTHERS 

GA 8-1306 Auto Service 
Va. Beach 

for the new 

Lincon 

HEAVY DUTY MOWERS 
Home & Commercial Use 




GA 8-1797 GA 8-9227 

Free Estimates— Pickup & DeliTery 

Complete 
Automotive Upholstering 



ML 



Uphold 



erina L^o. 



Wj, ^ ^ 1 7th St. at City Limits— Va 

H^ AUTO TOPS 

• Custom Made Seat Covers • Carpets & Floor Matt 



PHONE IN YOUR nrrubmiun 

CONSOLIDATE YOUR PERSONAL BILLS 

2nd Mortgage Loans 

Up to 5 year! to repay. 

Sensible Ratet 

$1,000 TO $20,000 

NO BROKERAGE 

FEE 

i. . iJHIO APPRAISAL FEE 

FREE tW&ULTATION 
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily; Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Fidelity Commercial Co. 

311 -31 5 LAW BUILDING - Granby and Plume St. 

MA7-2S71 

• \m mm ■ s 




6 






ENGINES 

• 3V4 H.P. & 4 H.P. 

4 Cycle— Cast Iron 



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Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 2, 1962 
Page 6-A 



Bayside Church 
Is Re-organized 

BAYSIDE — Rev. and Mrs. 
James V. DeFoe and family will 
leave today for a two weeks va- 
cation at Ridgecrest, the Baptist 
Assembly at Ridgecrest, N.C. 

In the absence of Rev. DeFoe 
Sunday services at Bayside Bap- 
tist Church will be conducted by 
Chaplain Ed Flippen of Fort 
Story and next Sunday by Dr. 
John A. Brown, Executive Sec- 
retary, of the Norfolk Baptist 
Association. 

Wednesday night, the Brother- 
hood of the church will conduct 
the prayer service. 

BAYSIDE PASTOR 
ON VACATION TRIP 

BAYSIDE— Tuesday at 7 p.m. 
there was a "Laymen's Supper" 
at the Social Hall of Bayside 
Christian Church, with 24 mem- 
bers present for the re-organi- 
zation meeting. 

Next month the group will 
elect officers. 

The motto "Every man work- 
ing in his place in his church", 
was adopted at the recent sup- 
per. Following the business 
meeting the group heard a talk 
by an FBI man. 

The dinner was prepared by 
George Brickhouse and served 
by Mrs. D. B. Smith, Jr., Carol 
and Barbara Smith, Linda Ker- 
lee and Barbara Messick. 

For the past several Sunday 
nights the Youth and the fa- 
thers of the church have been 
meeting at 6:00 p.m. on the 
Parking Lot for a Softball game. 
Ages from 6 to 66 have been 
participating and enjoying them- 
selves very much. Badminton 
and croquet have been enjoyed 
on the church lawn by the girls 
and ladies of the church. Fol- 
lowing the games, refreshments 
are served. 

FELLOWSHIP MEETING 
SET FOR TONIGHT 

BAYSIDE— The Youth Fellow- 
ship of Bayside Christian 
Church will meet Thursday at 
7 p.m. to continue their work 
on making membership direc- 
tories for the church. 

The names, addresses and 
phone numbers of all the church 
members will be included in the 
directory. The Youth recently 
adopted this project as a service 
to the church. 

Sunday, July 29, the Senior 
High Sunday School Class at 
tended the worship service in 
a body. Each Sunday, a differ 
ent class attends service in a 
group. 




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Rain Only Makes 
For More Fun 
At Bayside Show 



BAYSIDE — The Creekmore 
Stables off Bayside Road was the 
scene of one mighty wet horse- 
show Sunday as youngsters from 
six to 16 years of age competed 
in classes ranging from jumping 
to bareback riding. 

Persistent drizzling rain did 
little to discourage the young 
equestrians, their horses, or the 
many onlookers in the four 
hours of show time. 

The judges, Mrs. Joyce Page, 
Miss Diane Cherry, and Ed 
Powell, judged the. riders on 
horsemanship, handling, and the 
movement of the horse. 

After presentation of the 
colors and some impressive 
routines by the drill team, the 
show began with its first class, 
intermediate jumping. 

Miss Susan Whitehurst 
from Princess Anne Stables 
placed first on "Etiquette" 
with Miss Cathy Posey, sec- 
ond and Miss Sarah Begdan, 
third. Placing in the pair class 



ages 10 end under were 
Cathy Posey and Narveen 
Puma, first; Butch and Mike 
Creekmore, second. 
In the outside course (B), 
Narveen Puma was first; Butch 
Creekmore, second; Joan Skid- 
more, third. In Bareback for 10 
and under, Dale Brassel, first; 
Elida Eaton, second; Debbie 
Pointer, third. Hunter under 
saddle, Betsy Hall, first; Mary 
Cooley, second; Eileen Creek- 
more, third. Intermediate jump- 
ing, Susan Whitehurst, first; 
Sarah Bogdon, third. Bareback 
for ages 13 and over, Linda 
Nye, first; Joan Skidmore, sec- 
ond; Sarah Bogdon, third. Pair 
jumping, Vickie Meeks and Pam 
Creekmore, first; Cathy Posey 
and Narveen Puma, second; 
Joan Skidmore and Vickie 
Green, third. 

Because of the inclement 
conditions the remaining 18 
classes will be presented Aug. 
12 at 2 p.m. at the Creekmore 
Stables. 



Progressive 



Bayside Flower 
Show New Type 



By RITA VtLLINES ' 
BAYSIDE — Summer vaca- 
tioners in the area have been 
invited to make plans to come 
back and attend the "Home 
Placement Flower Show" to be 
held Nov. 3, from 1:30 to 7:00 
p.m. 

Called a "progressive show," 
it will be the first of its kind po 
be held in the- Tidewater area. 
The viewers will go from house 
to house to see it. 

The show will be sponsored 
by the Tidewater District, Vir- 
ginia Federation of Garden 
Clubs and will be conducted on 
a Standard Base. There will be 
five classes of exhibits planned 
for eaoji home on tour. The 
placements of exhibits will con- 
form to the furnishings of the 
hqmes. 

An Education Division for 
the whole show is to be held 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Dewey C. Heath, in Baylake 
Pines and will feature a chry- 
santhemum garden. 

The Junior Division will in- 
clude display of "wood plaques." 

Chairmen 

The general chairman of the 
show is Mrs. Frank Lukanich 
and her co chairman is Mrs. A. 
H. Culpepper. On the advisory 
committee is Mrs. T. E. Ritter, 
District president; Mrs. Heath, 
Mrs. Gustav Schneider, Mrs. J. 
Y. Wright, Mrs. J. H. Chockley, 
Jr.; secretary is Mrs. C. E. Ellis, 
treasurer, Mrs. J. F. Kitchin; 
Junior Division, Mrs. C. E. Mc- 
Gion; scrapbook, Mrs. C. T. 



Gattis. 

Artistic chairman, Mrs. W. B. 
Alley; horticulture, Mrs. G. C. 
Gallamore; judges and clerks, 
Mrs. Dewey Heath; tickets, Mrs. 
Schneider; publicity, Mrs. J. W. 
Phipps, Area Chairmen: Norfolk 
Mrs. 0. L. Wilkinson; co-chair- 
man, Mrs. Roy Nichols; Ports- 
mouth, Mrs., Bonner Martin, co- 
chairman, Mrs. F. C. Tonkin; 
Bayside, Mrs. Edgar La Rose, co- 
chairman, Mrs. James Parrett; 
Virginia Beach, Mrs. W. H. 
Brown, co-chairman, Mrs. E. F 
Trant, Jr. 

Homes in which the flower 
arangements will be on display 
are: Mr. and Mrs. William L. 
Rowe, 407 Patrick St., Wajer 
view, Portsmouth; Mr. and Mrs 
J. Roland McLean", 5409 Edge 
water Drive, Norfolk; Mr. and 
Mrs. August H. Culpepper, 2702 
Wakefield Drive, Thoroughgood, 
Bayside; Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. 
Haycox, Sr., 109 Hill Road, Cava- 
lier Park, Virginia Beach; Mr. 
and Mrs. Kermit S. Land, 137 
Pinewood Rd., Linkhorn Park, 
Virginia Beach. 

Tri-L Sunday School Class Meets 

BAYSIDE— The Tri-L Sunday 
School Class of Bayside Baptist 
Church will meet Tuesday, at 
8 p.m. at the home of Mrs. 
Dorothy Brewer in Bayville Gar- 
dens. 

Mrs. R. L. Simpson is teacher 
of the class. 



OCEANA 
EXTERMINATORS 

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because of PESTS 

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Bold Keys to 
Members 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Members 
of the Cape Henry Club were 
presented with gold keys last 
Thursday and launched the first 
Key Club Night at the Raleigh 
Tavern in the Sir Walter Hotel. 

Highlight of the evening was 
a twist exhibition by Mr. and 
Mrs. Victor Sheffield of the 
Lynn-Paige School of Dance. 

Dinner music provided' by 
Phil Johnson and his ragtime 
piano and dance music by the 
Norman Bennet Quartet en- 
tertained the guests from 8:00 
p.m. til the "wee small hours." 

Among the guests were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Nelms, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sidney S. Kellam, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace Clark, Mr. and Mrs. 
S. Peter Scoppa, James K. 
Wyatt, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. 
Gillespie, Mr. and Mrs. Leon 
Landouer, Mr. and Mrs. T. G. 
Tully of Cincinnati, Ohio, Burks 
Hamner, Mrs. Peggy Ann Gim- 
bert, Mrs. Beulah Wood, Miss 
Barbara Jo Nelson, Mr. Frank 
Christian, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Haycox, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Lambe, Mrs. Floyd E. Kellam, 
Sr., Floyd Kellam, Jr., Miss 
Becky Kellam, Giles G. Dodd, 
Austin Owen, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam P .Kellam, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. H. Lamberton of Miami, Fla., 
and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Leiseg- 
ang of Westfield, Mass. 

BAYSIDE CUBS' IN 
DERBY CONTEST 

BAYSIDE — Cub Scout Pack 
69 recently held its annual Pine- 
wood Derby contest at Bayside 
School. 

Den winners were: Gilbert 
Batemen, David Smith, Bill 
Stokes, Denny Garland, Eddie 
Overland, Thomas Hazlebaker, 
Mike McColgan, Kevin Cox, 
Tracy Holmes and Charles Du- 
pree. 

Pack winners included Gil- 
bert Batemen, Den 1 first place; 
Mike McColgan, Den 7, second 
and Bill Stokes, Den 3, third 
place. 

Judges were Bernard Logan, 
D. G. Peyton, W. A. Dewar, D. T. 
Schmidt, H. E. Creekmore, Glen 
Oberlin, M. D. Ellis and W. A. 
McCroom. 

The pack presented a skit, 
"Wild West Rodeo," recently at 
Aragona Elementary School. 

MRS. SMITH PLANS 
KINDERGARTEN CLASS 

BAYSIDE — Mrs. James W. 
Smith will teach a kindergarten 
for 5 year olds this fall at the 
Old Donation Episcopal Church. 
She wiU be assisted by a part- 
time music teacher. 

Classes will be from 9 a.m. to 
noon Monday through Friday. 

The cost mil be $20 a month, 
plus a $5 registration fee. Stu- 
dents must be 5 by January 1, 
1963. 

In January 1963, the present 
Virginia Beach - Princess Anne 
Rescue Squad will be called Vir- 
ginia Beach Rescue Squad, Inc. 
The objective of this Squad is 
to assist in the saving of life, ad- 
minister FIRST AH) and teach 
methods of safety in Virginia 
Beach. 



It happened 100 MIS ago 

The oldest incorporated tradt association In the country, tht 
United States Brewers Association, was organized in 1862 ... 
the same year that 




IN VIRGINIA General Robert E. Lee defended his capital city of 
Richmond against the invading "bluecoats." Virginians toasted 
their gallant General with foaming steins of beer. 

For then, as now, beef was the traditional beverage 
of moderation. But beer means more than enjoyment 
to our state. The Brewing Industry contributes more 
than 8 million tax dollars to Virginia yearly-money 
that helps support our hospitals, schools, and parks. 

TODAY, in its centennial year, the United States 
Brewers Association still works constantly to assure 
maintenance of high standards of quality and pro- 
priety wherever beer and ale are served. 





Virginia Beach Theatres 

BEACH BAYNE 



25th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 

and SATURDAY 

August %, 3 & 4 

The 

NOTORIOUS 
LANDLADY 

Kim Novak 
Jack Lemmon 

Features: 
2:00—4:30—7:00—9:10 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and TUESDAY 

August 5, 6 & 7 

MR. HOBBS 

TAKES A 

VACATION 

James Stewart 
Maureen O'Hara 

Features: • 
2;00— 4:00— 6:00— 8:00— 10*00 

WED., THURS., FRI. 
and SATURDAY 

August 8, 9, 10 & 11 

HATARI 

John Wayne 

Elsa AAartinelli 

Red Buttons 

Features: , 

1:00—3^40—6:20—9:00 



17th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 
and SATURDAY 
August 2, 3 & 4 

ALL 
FALL DOWN 

Eva Marie Saint 
Warren Beatty 

Features: 
2:00—4:00—6:00—8:00—10:00 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and TUESDAY 

August 5, 6 & 7 

The 

NOTORIOUS 
LANDLADY 

i 

Kim Novak 
Jack Lemmon 

Features: 
2:00— 4:30— 7:00^-9:30 
ADV ANCE D PRICES 

WED., THURS., FRI. 
and SATURDAY . 
August 8, 9, 10 & 11 

MR. HOBBS 

TAKES A 

VACATION 

James Stewart 
Maureen O'Hara 

Features: 
2:00—4:00—6:00—8:00—10:00 



Complete investment services 

Direct line with all major markets 

First and only Investment office in Virginia Beach 



Andehson 8 Strupwickl 

UNDBR.WMTBRS - DISTRIBUTORS 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

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ASSOCSATt MEMBERS 
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Thomas N. P. Johnson, Jr. 

Manager 

Allan Rothenberg 

Registered Representative. 



VIRGINIA BEACH 
3110 PACIFIC AVENUE 

p. o, eox see 

TELEPHONE 428-8680 



Willard R. Ashburn, Jr. 
Asst. Manager 

Frank L. Lawlor 



OFFfCE HOURS: 
Weekdays - 9 - 5 
Saturdays - 9 - 1 2 

Richmond - Charlottesville - Fredericksburg 



Virginia Beach 



Rescue Squad in Action 




PA Little Leaguers Win Title 

LYNNHAVEN — Th«v h«v« don* it again. Th* Princes* 
Anne Little Uagutrs are again in the State Little League 
Tournament that starts today in Lynchburg. 

Princess Anne captured th* District 8 Little League 
ch? n-sinn-SIn Monday with a clean 4 to J victory over Azalea. 
Tha victory vyas tha second district title in a raw for th* Prin- 
ces? Anna Little Le*?uart. 

The champions broke a 1 to 1 deadlock in its final gam* 
with Azalea. It was the sixth inning in th* gam* played at 
Little Cresk and Las Wliiteborn delivered a two-run single to 
bury the Azalaa team. David Tow than followed with a double 
to give the winners a big three-run Inning. 

Mike Tucker was brilliant >n relief coming on in the fifth 
inning when A-alea had load*d th* bases. Tucker got two out 
with force plays and than fanned Bart Yodor to end the throat. 

A largo following is in Lynchburg to root the champiens 
home with the state title William "Bookie" Allen is the man 
aaer and ir also with the team in Lynchburg. , 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 



Page 7-A 



Volunteer Squadsmen Bill Phillips (left) and Randy Randolph lift "victim" into ambu- 
lance. (Boice Photo) 



10 Years Old 



Major Burgess of the Virginia 
State Police, said the use of Red 
Lights on a non - emergency 
Rescue Squad call was within 
the law and that the Ambulance 
should display the Red Lights 
for protection as well as to gain 
r ! ght of way. He also stated thai 
the Squads should use the Red 
Lights when going to the scene 
of a call, regardless of the type 
of call, and when in traffic to 



Also includede in the Rescue 
Squad report is the name of the 
doctor, tie number of the ve 
'tide U3ed; the driver and as 
sistant. The speedometer read- 
n*» at t+e start and finish of the 
call, with the total mileage. 

use tiie siren as needed. Usually 
anytime a patient is in the am- 
bulance the Squad uses the Red 
Lights. 




t 



Rescue Squad Observing 
Birthday This Month 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 

VIRGINIA BEACH — It was 
bitter cold that December day 
in 1951. Near the corner of 
20th Street and Atlantic Avenue 
a large crowd of freezing, 
frightened people stood waiting, 
anxiously looking up and down 
the streets, hoping hejp would 
come soon. In their midst lay a 
critically injured woman, pros- 
trate on the q|ld street, the vic- 
tim of a pdialstrian-automobile 
accident. 

The woman couldn't be moved 
until an ambulance arrived. Yet 
%ie only ambulance in the city, 
operated by the Fire Depart- 
ment, -was broken down, which 
meant the nearest equipment 
was in Norfolk. The crowd 
waited, helpless to ease the suf- 
fering woman. 

Two men watching the drama 
swdre to each other to do every- 
thing in their power to avoid 
such a tragedy ever happening 
again. Those men — David Stor- 
mont III and J. Peter Holland 
III — spearheaded the organiza- 
tion of the Virginia Beach-Prin- 
cess Anne Rescue Squad which 
celebrates its 10th anniversary 
during August with the annual 
fund raising campaign. 



Squad 10 Years Old 

Since its organization in May, 
1952, this . strictly volunteer 
group of men, which started out 
with 26 active members and 
now have 32, have answered 
8,951 calls, traveled 214,897 
miles and donated 109,846 man- 
hours to assist all persons in 
need of help. 

The first operating squad 
was headed by Holland as 
captain; Frederic W. Strun- 
cius, first lieutenant; John 
Brinn II, second It.; A. B. Mid- 
gott, sgt:; Stormont, treasurer; 
John E. Fitzgerald Jr., secre- 



tary; Goodwin S. (Chick) Jor- 
dan, chaplain; and Samuol C. 
Foote Jr., public relations. 

Administrative officers for 
the first squad were Claiborne 
Bryant, president; Reeves John- 
son, vice president; Paul Ackiss, 
legal advisor, Floyd E. Kellam, 
Philip Ansell and Charles 
Forbes, trustees; and Dr. James 
W. Todd, Dr. C. W. DeWalt and 
Dr. Ira L. Hancock, medical ad- 
visors. 

$1 Had Value 

A dollar apparently had more 
value 10 years ago than it does 
today. The squad bought a sec- 
ond hand ambulance from the 
City of Virginia Beach for the 
4oken price of one dollar and 
for the same price purchased an 
old paneled truck from John 
Fitzgerald. Next they converted 
a station wagon into an ambu- 
lance and acquired a boat and 
trailer. This meager beginning 
is a fat cry from the elaborate, 
extensive equipment with which 
the Rescue Squad now' operates. 

The first fund-raising drive 
was in June of 1952 but the 
official annual date was later 
changed to August. An old 
tin building, donated by the 
Standard Oil Co., housed the 
volunteer group until a $32,- 
000 brick structure was built, 
adjoining the Fire Depart- 
ment, in 1957. 

Though well-trained in stand- 
ard and advanced Red Cross 
first aid, members of the squad 
are men from all professions — 
service station owners, lawyers, 
city employees — who donate 
their time to emergency wosk. 
Former Captains 

Following Holland as captain 
were. Stormont, 1953; Claude 
Edwards, 1954; Foote, 1955; Wil- 
liam K. MacDonald, 1956; C. S. 
Kiley, 1957; R. R. McChesney, 
1958-59; E. A. (Ned) Langhorne, 




Mrs. Moore's Bakery 

NEXT TO BE-LO SUPER MARKET 
400 - 30th ST. VIRGINIA BEACH GA 8-5081 




Jiloraae ZJlme Jrd +J4ere! 



Let Us Store Your Winter Garments 

Call GA 8-2801 for Box 
l^icS 3Ut ^t. (cleaners 

Most Reasonable Cleaners at the Beach 
to Cebneal Store, 3 1 st $t. Phone GA 8-2801 



I960; and A. B. Midgett, 1961. 

D. W. Beasley heads the pres- 
ent officers, which also include 
A. M. Randolph, first lieutenant; 
C. B. Russell Jr., 2nd It.; H. W. 
Casey, sgt.; G. S. Taylor, secre- 
tary; C. N. Edwards, treasurer; 
L. B. Woolford, planning and 
training; Marvin R. Hines, pub- 
lic relations; J. Gaskins, chap- 
lain; and Louis Kitchin, statis- 
tician. ' 

Hines, incidentally, is presi- 
dent of the state rescue squad 
organization, the first Virginia 
Beach - Princess Anne County 
man to hold the position and 
the youngest man ever to serve 
in that capacity. 

The Virginia Beach - Princess 
Anne Rescue Squad has come a 
long way in 10 years, and it has 
all been done with public con- 
tributions and volunteer man- 
hours. 



PA Residents 
Attend Meeting 

PRINCESS ANNE — Mrs. 
Fred Volker, Sr., Mrs. Thomas 
Hunter, Sr., and Mrs. Doris 
Simmons attended the Virginia 

Federation of Home Demonstra- 
tion Clubs meeting at V.P.I. 
Tuesday. 

The speaker was Dr. Edgar 
P. Phillips, Executive Director 
of The American Child Guid- 
ance Foundation. His topic was 
"Our Children and Our Future." 

This meeting was part of 
the celebration of the 90th 
Anniversary of V.P.I. Mrs. 
L. J. Crawgey of Wytheville, 
Virginia, president, presided. 

Others attending the Institute 
of Rural Affairs, Wednesday 
and today were Mrs. Ralph 
Frost and Mrs. Elizabeth D. 
Deal, County Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent. 

Though called the Institute of 
Rural Affairs, this meeting is 
for all people of Virginia. 
Topics of interest to men and 
women are discussed. There are 
exhibits and tours of places of 
educational interest. 

Dr. T. Marshall Hahn, Jr., new 
president of V.P.I., spoke on 
"The Land Grant Movement, 
V.P.L and the Old Dominion." 
He outlined the purpose of 
VPI past, present and future, 
its history and plans for its 
share in the development of 
Virginia citizens. * 

Other speakers were Miss 
Eunice Heywood, Federal Exten- 
sion Service and Dr. T. W. 
Thompson, Union Theological 
Seminary, who spoke on "The 
Family in the Community." 

The International Farm Youth 
Exchange program included re- 
ports of various delegates. 
Among them were Judy Sweck- 
er and Rosalie Frazier, Ayse 
Baysal. a student at V.P.I. from 
Turkey, will also be on the pro- 
gram. She will return; to Tur- 
key as an Extension supervisor 
for Home Economies Agents in 
her country. 







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NtrltaV, Vt. 

Mrt. LctntN Al*«t 

lull WtBtck Dritt 

Httoftoa, Vt. 



Mr*. J.kt A. TkMtAl 

lliT-H Irm. Hud 
Ckttltltonlll.. Vt. 

Mkto Kl.it. HtlMftV 
111. I. B.X MS 
Klrhti.ito. Vt. 

Mr*. Vlrti.l. (Ili.rr 
11) A Wlck.r SI. 
Willltnuktri, V^ 

Mrt. H...rJ OUtw 
i;i*«rr*t.r. Vl. 
■I. 1. B.i 111 



r-.tll.r M. Mt.ll.r 
lit. Ntvltowir A.I.. 
VtrtitU Btock. v.. 

Willi.* A. F.rrtot 

Ull K. Olanr M. 

N.rf.lk, Vt. 

rtttia m. stir 

til* Pkm.tr An 
.N.rf.lk, Vt. 

r.rnll D. Y..BIT 

11- Mnrt An. 

' CktrkrttotYlHt. Vt. 



Mill Hrfet H. Btrtnt 
*'.irvir* Drit. 
Prttklia, Vt. 

Mrt. I Jadirr K. II. xk 

Stir lta.1. 

W l.toll, N. C. 

Mr. I.. W. [toll.. 
ji'l Ctltl. Pri*. 
Wiliittuktri, Vt. 

Mrt. L..IM M.riti.|.ltr 

• 3"i Pmnitto. Ilt.4 

Williitoiktri, V.. 



Bricettt VmI 

II Ft* Gr.v* Drirt 

Mttittot, Vi. 

Mr. iJMItor VartkkrU 
71» WtkHM SI. 
rrt.Ua. Vt. 

Mr.. D.» B.,.llr. Ji. 
Iltt < ktrtk SU 
Aktoki., M. C. 

Mr.. H. M. I.l«4tor 

3tl Plmcrrat llriv. 

rwrt.Mi-.tk, Vt. 



»"■ ErnWat Ltwrnct 

Ktau 1. Hot 1U A 

HtBttok. Vl. 

Mrt. PrlMIt W.k.««U 
llll tirwavtr Art. 

', Vt. 



DtltoM R. Blk.r 

lill KAto. Tirrat. 

Hinttto., Vt. 

Mra. D.r.tkr fhavl. 

1MI Ur«to Slrrrl 114. 
Iii».l... v.. 



Mn. 
IB 



Wtokttt tt. E.vtrs 
' 1 SUM 

Vi. 



. Otto C EA.tr* 
R. P. D. J 

V»V 



Mil. J. J. Ctttort 
111 K. WtM 81. 

Aktokta, K. C. 

Mn. P. M. JnklM 
ni Roaitok. Arc. 
i-ttty. K. C. 



trim M. P i.toW I M 

5515 Ik t a m .kl Alto. 

>i«*p.rt Itoata. Vfc 

Mrt. P. 
11 

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Mn. W.N., R. Im, 

lit Mm Lw 

Kr.ptrt Km, Vl. 






SPtCIAl IOW MICE — OLD VWGINIA GHA0E A 



.♦^•^ U.S.D.A. GRADED OVER. 14 lbs. ^*+> 



~+^ GRAPE JELLY 



CS BltANO FtOZEN 






.N *& 



. . . 2 t 3* 
STRAWBERRIES . . 2 39 

THIS VVEHC SAVE ON IWTMAT A.MS0CAN MMEMTO OR SWISS . 

SLICED CHEESE ....'- 29' ] 

CS BRAND FROZEN CONCENTRATED 

ORANGE juke 3 81' 6 ; ~ 85' i 

K.RAFT 



ARMOUR STAR TOP QUALITY 



f IISH CHISAPEAXE IAY 

Flounder Filet . • . i» 69* 

■MDY FOI TIM PAN— «iSN DHStW 

Ww Fish . ... ib 33' 



LUNCHEON M^ATS 0|1R pRIM RyE ^y^ ^ 

M 6 Ol. Sf.OO *'««'t tt%t SALAMI, OUVI lOAf 

4 ^ 1 ~ »-.aar THRIFTY BREAD -a«w- "-24' 



FOI AUTOMATIC WASHIIS 

CASCADE 

50 •'• JL3* 

Pkf. "■ 


GOLDEN COIOIEO 

FLUFFO 
3 & » 


OUZ DOES EVERTTHINO 

DUZ 

IT.:* 


IOW SUOSINO 

DASH 


MIIACU ClIAMSIt 

COMET 
2 'ST II' 


irjWCEJTliU 

CRISCO 
3c. k . 88 


FA1IIC SOrTNK 

DOWNY 
SI 45' 


NOUStHOU aiANtt 

MR. CLEAN 

IS ... i|Qc 


PtiMIUM IN EACH PRC, 

DUZ PREMIUM 

»» ii 


MAKff CUANINO EASY 

SPIC 8 SPAN 


' THE (OAT Of HAUTHM WOMJN 

CAMAY BEAUTY SOAP 

Z Clkt. ** " Clkll *' 


UEP WATfl rPEtH 

\Mfmm 

12 M gCcAT. 


rrscotM inn 

0XYDOL 

* 35 



top op? root oesshis with eichi 



20 at. 

# # # lM( 

SAVE AT COLONIAL ON— «EO MEO 



Whip Topping . . . . -: 1 49 { Vienna Sausage . . • 

CHEFS fflDt TOP OU All IT PURE ■» VALUE AT COLONIAL-MO MM 

Corn Oil Margarine • £ 29* Margarine U 10* 

PRECISION OROUNO— COLONIAL! M» «INTT ON HANO— 5AUT SOINMN 

Hot Cup Coffee ...%& Ice Cream £ 99* 

COLONIAL'S PREMIUM QUALITY JUST CHILI AND SERVE— OOU u 

Monticeito Beer . . 6 £ 89* Pineapple Juice . . 3 '- 25 c 

RAIN Ol lOfMUO NH NNNINO NE" l*»"OVEO^-«IO ECONOMY SIZE 

Purity Salt *»r 10' Ipana Toothpaste . . . 



EOt A MIAL IN A JlfFY— STARfHi 



SAVE ON COLONIAL'S 



Corned Beef -' 49< 3D Bleach s 55 

LARGE GOLDEN RIPE 





FANCY MA. SUMMER RAMOO COOKI** 

APPLES. lb - 

AN FrlcM EfkKtin Bklll. t« . m%t *"«• I. >. *■ Qat*lilY lifkli Imikm 



z 



GOLD BOND stamps 

VOUMM IS 

HOME GARDEN GUIDE 

>MeOt<MAtfEOAt 




GOLD BOND {•<.<></>.< 

IMP tol. Oi.ii. m* it. I . irkl tl 

o». ik. ri». 

ARMOUR STAR FRANKS 

COOO M 001ONUI STORE 
CrtlNC OOW IONS ITAAtPt 



alto. A.R. 4, lt»l 

II1 II M1IIII I 



IOOFREE 

GOLDBONDv : p< 

Wlk IkU C«(M ••< Ik. twck«| tl 
f>. 3 li. OWALtHIT 

CANNED HAM 



COOS M COlONiil STOIt 
OIVIHC COU) ION0 ITAMtt 

V... •*.. A.(. 4. I««| 

is loo c-i 



GOLD BONDstomDs 

•at It W (mm RkKk *m 

INSECT! 



GOLD BOHDstamps 

VBIk **• C i r ltl *M It. RirtlaM. mf 
•t, fj" »i^ W.J 

t ANT ROMR 



Oa. M .r. Cm * «A Fl., 





25FREE 

GOLD BOND.s.'amw 



kilt ttii C.ra 
Ot. 'kf.i 

SAUS 



*,iS Kit Ca.t.. W4 *«. *»^li». •» 
~ '. S-H. t,m~* IkM 

JSAGE UNKS 



Od* M CQlOMtl (TOM 
Civ INC COLD tONO SliMH 



GOLD BOND stamps 

Wiik Ik. C..H —4 Ik. t. K ku. .t 
Oh 14 .«. C.-.l'.i. nn 

HOUSE m GARDEN BOMR 



■ 



GOLD BONDstomps 



Om 14 «. Ca Ikd llaj 

F1CNIC A PATIO ROMS 

ooooiNccioVRAiwcm 

CMtC GOBI RONS STAMM 




fO* A SMOOtHM SOfTH i 

ZEST DEADTY SOAP 



JS14I 



WALDORF 

4X88- 



IN ASSORTED COLOR! 

S0FT-WEYE 



wrvt ««t rr— pmi i 







IIG VAL 



ATI 







GOLD BOMDstomM 

M irk in. C t .n . ol «• *nT mi mt 
Om bN^r I'm 

RANDIODORANT 



PEANUT i«jna....2^w 




EMNP« 

V... trkvAlR, 4, 1*41 
l J JSC^ 




Hge &A 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 



And to Think One Cot Away 



"B'i $"-%," 



II 



*■ v ? eS f / y ,r ^ ima T ? each f »shermen combined their talents recently to bag the sailfish and white marlin«shown above. They 
2S ed ,. < S Z* 0regon Met 0n Capt 0mie TUlet ' s boat " The Sportsman." From left, Sonny, first mate; Of. Spessard W T 

Parker, who landed the 6-foot, 8-inch saUfish; J. R. Alphin, Mickey James and William P. Kellam. Spessard and Keliam I 
each landed a white marlin while James lost a blue marlin after a 45-minute struggle. (Brown Photo) 



King Ske Blues 



tr h^H^J"^ M rg i ni i! 5f* ch m ^ K }}^ <° "eW L - L - »t«*en Jr., «. B. Hodgson Jr., A. M. Hodgson and F. E Weigand 
Jr., hold part of 58 bluefish they caught off black and white bony on board Capt. Steve Quimby's "JIM BO" out of Lone Ciwk 

ASa U ^r V "g]n i rfprto\rot n e^ Ch "*" ^ ^ * "'"^ ' ' C ™™ N " '™ "» "* *£*£*££ 



i 



. . YOUR CHECK 
IS A 
CREDIT 







To your good judgment and an asset 
to your reputation in the community. It 
protects you against untimely losses and serves 
as a receipt for payments promptly made. When 
you ooen your checking account at the BANK OF PRIN- 
CESS ANNE ... you "go into partnership" with a friendly, 
local bank where you will be known, recognized and always 
welcome. 

BANK OF PRINCESS ANNE 

TOO VIRGINIA BEACH BIVD. Member Federal Deposit insurance Corporation 
- through Friday 9 A.M. to 1 PX and Friday afternoon '4 to 7 P.M. 



SUN-NEWS Classified Ads Bring Results 



OF INTEREST TO VETERANS 

The Peace Corps needs re- 
tired military people and reserv- 
ists who have finished active 
military obligations, says the 
Director, R. S. Shriver. 

Peace Corps duty is for a two- 
year period in the country of 
the volunteer's choice. All ap- 
plicants must be American citi- 
zens in excellent physical and 
mental health and at least 18 
years of age. There is no upper 
age limit. 

For many Peace Corps pro- 
jects a college degree is not 
necessary, nor is knowledge of 
a foreign language always neces- 
sary. Retired personnel do not 
relinquish any pension to which 
they may be entitled. All volun- 
teers must undergo an intensive 
training period at a leading col- 
lege or university prior to being 
sent to an overseas assignment. 
Training is divided into two 
phases; one in the U. S. and the 
other in the host country. 

The Peace Corps provides all 
expenses, including transporta- 
tion, training, clothing, food, 
medical care, and incidentals. 
Each person receives a termina- 
tion payment of $75.00 for each 
month of service in the Corps. 
This pay does not conflict with 
the dual compensation law. 






"SUFEIMHGfrr TENDER 

CHUCK 
STEAK 

LB. ,J* JC 

STOCK YOUR FREEZER 

AT TKIS SPECIAL LOW 

PRICE . . . COME SEE . . . 

COME SAVE AT AAP! 

SPOON SIZE 

NABISCO 

SHREDDED WHEAT 



7V*-oi. 
Pkg. 



19 



Large 
Box 



29 



OXYDOL 

DETERGENT 
Large Qg£C 



FAB 

DETERGENT 



Large 
Box 



34 



COMET 

CLEANSER 

214-oz. All 
Cans «j5J_ 



AJAX 

CLEANSER— 2c Off 

2 14-oz. €%m< 
Cans & 4 



SALVO 

RGENT 

43' 



DETERGENT 



24-oz. 
Box 



FLORIENT 

AIR DEODORANT 
C 



5'4-oz.' 
Can 



75 



LIFEBUOY 

REGULAR SOAP 

O Bar, 35° 
3 LITTLE KITTENS 

CAT FOOD 

6 14-oz. 00 C 
Cans OO 



DUPONT 



SPONGE 

10- 



HANDY 
SIZE 



LIPTON'S 

TEA 

X*. 45* 



BLUE BONNET 



MARGARINE 

cms. g|J 



10c COUPON INSIDE PACKAGE 

GOOD ON PURCHASE OF 
CHASE AND SANBORN COFFEE 



^^^^^^^*a^*^a^B^B^B^B^B^B^BjBjBjjB^BjBjBjB^BjBjB|B^B^B^B^B^B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v^v*' ^^^i 

A&Fs "SUPER-RICHT" BLADE-CUt-None Priced Higher _| 

CHUCK ROAS 



ARM ROAST »" « 
CROSSCUT ■• MILtu "*" 
GROUND CHUCK 
STEW BEEF ■•««» 



«49t 
■ S9« 
*S9« 

*fts 



SPECIAL 
THIS 
WEEK 

ALLGOOD SLICED T " "SUPER-RIGHT" ALL MEAT 

BACON '2 — 99e FRANKS 2 ■ 89c 

Braunsoh weiger SC. .•-... »,. 29c SMOKED BEEF JS*"*" 1 **. ** %%» 

HOG HOCKS «•«• ii. 39« FIZZ A '" ■*« ••* "• 590 J"-«-^l .00 



STRAINED 

BEECHNUT 

BABY FOOD 

9 *5r 95 c 

ZEST 

REGULAR SOAP 

£t Bars ^ff 

CAMAY 

BATH SOAP 

£f Bars 1$3 

TIDE 

DETERGENT 
5c Off 



FRfcSH 

CHICKEN PARTS 

LEGS 

• 49c 



BREASTS I . WINGS 



59c 29c 



FRESH 



CRAB MEAT 



CLAW 

Mb. Can 

83c 

W-lb. can 49c 



REGULAR 

Mb. Can 

$101 

'-Mb. can 57c 



BACK FIN 

Mb. Cm 

$179 

W-Ib. can 1.05 



Big Savings on A&P's Fresh Fruits and Vegetables! 

CALIFORNIA-URGE SIZE-PINK MEAT 

CANTALOUPES 3 49 



FRESH TENDER- YOUNG 



GREEN BEANS 2-29< 

CALIFORNIA-RED RIPE * 

STRAWBERRIES 3 '1 

LETTUCE MuMHim imtHt» ioc NECTARINES*'"""" «. 19c 

B ARTLETT PEARS 2 *i J5C RED PLUMS mm -» * 1 9c 

• j 

Come See . . . You'll Really Save At A&P! 

16-OZ. CAN j \j%0 
■J 16-OZ. CANS "f'JJC^ 
£ ISft-OZ. CANS £%jC 

2 Mr 

fg 3U.-OZ. CANS ^%j\§ 
£, LB. JAR OvC 

19c 
25c 

|J LB. CAN 00C 

29c 



PORK'N BEANS 
APPLE SAUCE 
GREEN BEANS 
POTTED MEAT 
GRAPE JELLY 
HOT ROLL MIX 
PAPER TOWELS 
SHORTENING 
GRAPE JAM 



VAN CAMP'S "9c OFF' 



A»P FANCY 



A&P FRENCHED 



ARMOUR'S "2c OFF- 



OLD VIRGINIA PURE 



DUFF'S 



NORTHERN JUMBO 



CRISCO 



14U-0 Z. PKG. 



LARGE ROLL 



ANN PAGE 



1-LB. JAR 




LIQUID DETERGENT 

(JUl "?c OFF" OT. BOT. 

LIQUID CLEANER 

fWAA " 5 c OFF" 'SOZ. BOT. 

10c OFF— CLEANSER 

MR. CLEAN or. bot 

DETERGENT 

UAvlll "'Oc OFF" GT. BOX 

LIQUID DETERGENT 

JUl ""c OFF" KINO SIZE 

PALIViOLIVE— BATH 

SOAP ».«. off 4 

LIQUID CLEANER 

AJAX 



BARS 



"10c OFF" 28-OZ. BOT. 



56c 
34c 
59c 
69c 
82c 
50c 
59c 



A&P'S GRAPEFRUIT 

JUICE 

4^ 46-OZ. CANS ^J+JG 

A&P FANCY 

SPINACH 

^^1 27-OZ. CANS ^}^^C 

DEL MONTE SLICED 

PINEAPPLE 

£g 20-OZ CANS ^^%^C 



ANN PAGE—RED KIDNEY 

BEANS 
29c 



3-LB., SOZ CAN 



Jane Parker's Fine Quality Baked Foods! 



APPLE PIE 
POUNDCAKE 
IS 



JANE PARKER SAVE 10c 



■A. 



CRESCENT 
GOLD OR MARBLE 1 S-OZ. 



SAVE 4c 1-LB LOAF iC 

tVltl. e»TMUl 



39 
39 
25. 



CINNAMON ROLLS .— SS* COOKIES JBMKt, ^LVsto 
WHITE BREAD l^^m DESSERT SHELLS *.*» l 5c 

THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 4th. 



Legal Notices 



MRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEWS 

SERVING VIRCINIA BEACH AND PRINCESS ANNE 



Classified Ads 



:>» 



SECTION B 



No Investment 



VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1962 



Enterprising Youngsters 




Touch football with Burt and David, sons of Lt. Cmdr. and 
Mrs. Burton Lee Doggett Jr. 



By JOY HAKIM 

BAY COLONY — Two young 
executives have initiated their 
own business here this summer. 

Neil MacLennan and Sam 
Clark have formed a baby sit- 
ting service and found it a lu- 
crative enterprise. 

"We've earned more than $40 
in 2.0 days," said Neil with evi- 
dent delight. 

The boys who left nothing to 
chance had business cards made 
announcing their service and 
took them to most of the homes 
in Bay Colony where they live. 

NEED A BABY SITTER? 
Call: Nail MacLennan, Age 15 
135 Lake Shore Drive j 

Dial GA 8-7556 

OR 

Sam Clark, Age 15 

117 Rolf* Lane Dial GA 8-6249 

50 cents per hour 

* Experienced with small 

children 

"We've had lots of calls," 
said Sam, "and we're always 
busy on week-ends. 

"When we've got jobs and 
someone wants a sitter we call 
our friends." 

"Usually there's not too much 
Hfc» aittiog," aaid Ne#. "You just 
read to the children or watch 
TV with them and tuck them 
in when they're supposed to go 
to bed. 

"But I had a two-year-old 
really surprise me. He was in 
bed when I came about five 
o'clock and I started fixing sup- 
per for the older children. The 
next thing I knew a neighbor 
called that the baby was walk- 
ing down the street. He had 
climbed out of bed, walked 
down stairs, opened the front 
door and walked away. I put 
him back in bed, but he kept 
climbing out all evening — I 
got tired long before he did." 



The boys who are both sopho- 
mores at Virginia Beach High 
School' hope to use the.ir savings 
to travel. Neil is planning a, trip 
to Canada and Sammy would 
like to go to Texas. 

They are the sons of Cmdr. 
and Mrs. D. M. MacLennan and 
Capt. and Mrs. Sam Clark. 

How do children react to boy 
sitters? Mrs. Lee Doggett says 
her two sons are thrilled when 
Neil or Sammy sit. One mother 
of a four-year-old told the boys 
that her daughter was very up- 
set when she was told a boy was 
coming to sit, but the next 
morning, like most women, she 
had changed her mind. She 
woke her mother up saying, 
"Mommy. I like bovs!" 




Sam tucks Torry Doolin in 
bed. She is the daughter of 
Cmdr. and Mrs. E. H. Doolin. 



Music Teachers 
Workshop Being 
Conducted Here 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Twenty- 
six music teachers from all over 
Virginia are spending the week 
at Virginia Beach attending the 
"Study-Vacation Workshop for 
Piano Teachers" being conduct- 
ed by Bristow Hardin at the 
Hardin School of Music on 35th 
Street. 

The workshop activities which 
nclude two morning and after- 
noon sessions each day, features 
lectures by Hardin, demonstra- 
tion lessons, group discussion of 
teaching problems, and recitals 
by piano students. 

The first public appearance 
of the Virginia Beach Recorder 
Society, an organization spon- 
sored by the Hardin School and 
directed by Charles Hardin, was 
the highlight of the 'Wednesday 
evening program. Ensemble 
numbers of the seventeenth and 
eighteenth century were played 
on a "family of recorders." 
Solos on the soprano, tenor, and 
alto recorder were played' by 
Clyde Brocket, Cecil Nichols, 
and Charles Hardin. Virginia 
Hardin and Bristow Hardin were 
the accompanists. 

Students participating in the 
programs are Beverly Babcock, 
Nancy Campbell, Mary Dekker, 
Hygd Hardin, Mary Jo Kellam, 
Leighton Meredith, Alex Prid- 
more, and Charyl Soloman. 

Teachers enrolled for J the 
course are Miss Helen Binns. 
Mrs. Betty Reamey, Miss Ruth 
Green, Mrs. Maria Shell, Miss 
Franzeska Wipperman, Mrs. 
Florence Richardson Robertson, 
Miss Dorothy Pettus, Miss Maria 
Whitehead, and Mrs. Clarke 
Tohnson, all of Richmond; Mrs. 
J. M. Holland and Mrs. John 
Riddick, both of Franklin; Mrs. 
W. S. FJliotte of Farmville; 
Miss Charlotte Munson of Alex- 
andria; Miss Fannie Kerr of 
Petersburg; Mii. P. T5." Wing- 
field of Roanoke; Miss Regina 
Katz, Miss Joan Johnson, Don- 
ald Porter, David Can* Glover, 
all of Portsmouth; Mrs. Rosa 
Belle Albright of Chesapeake; 
Vincent Watkins of Poquoson; 
Mr. A. W. Shaw of Gaulej, West 
Virginia; Mrs. Blanche Baum 
Schmoele, of Norfolk. 




By GORDON BASKIN 

I see where a man has just joined the Double-Life Club. 

Fellow's name is Cobb; either William E. or W. Edward, de- 
pending on whether he was in North Carolina or Virginia. 

He was a Republican, but I don't think that was his reason. 

The newspaper referred to him as "dashing", and I can't 
think of a better word. 

I'm always amazed at these clowns who have 
two lives. I'm not talking about the obvious mora' 
issue, but about how they manage the thing. ) 
can't even stand up in my house without five P 
people asking, "Where are you going?" 

Cobb is a real piker compared to some of 
the charter members of the club. He had an air 
Diane to flit back and forth, and a very profitable 
business to finance the situation. The club mem 
bers who knock me out are the ones you read 
about from time to time; like the truck driver in 
the middle west who had two families— one at 
each end of his regular run. I guess a good way O*"*on Baskin 
to describe him would be to call him the Tractor • Trailer Schiio-' 
phrenic. 

This driver had a wife, complete with two children, in each 
of the two towns. He was paying on two television sets, two 
mortgages, two refrigerators, two washing machines, and two 
cars; and all on seventy-eight fifty a week! In addition he was 
putting up with two females and their assorted questions and 
complaints. He was a glutton for punishment. 

So I'll vote for the truck driver Romeo. I hope they didn't 
put him in jail— it'd be a horrible waste of talent. With his ability 
to get that kind of mileage out of seventy-eight fifty a week, Mr. 
Kennedy need never look further for a Budget Director. With 
that experience at deficit financing, he'd have us out of the hole 
by next Wednesday afternoon. 




Miss Seaside Park Contest 
Scheduled Here August 5 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Seaside Park for 1962 will be 
chosen in the first contest of its 
kind to be held at the Virginia 
Beach amusement resort Aug. 5. 

The competition is open to 
girls 18 years of age or older. 
There are no other require- 
ments, except that they present 
themselves* dressed in bathing 
suits, at the outdoor stage be- 
fore 2:30 p.m., when the judging 
will take place. 

The winner will be awarded 
a trophy and a ribbon. Trafton 
Robertson, popular radio and 
television personality, will be 
the master of ceremonies. The 
event is open, not only to Vir- 
ginia Beach girls, but to any 
outof-towners who are interest- 
ed in competing. The show is 
free to the public. 



In Norfolk 




Surplus Sale Is 
Set For August 9 



Neil reads a favorite story to Jon and Ann Dobbs, children 
of Cmdr. and Mrs. W. P. Kiser. * 

Driftwood Oddity at Sea Horse Inn 




Mrs. Virginia Fisher, manager of the Sea Horse Inn, in- 
spects the unusual piece of driftwood that holds a place of 
honor over the 78th Street hotel mantle. Shaped exactly like 
a seahorse, the piece was discovered by a visitor at the inn last 
summer. The driftwood barely escaped the fireplace on one 
occasion but was salvaged in time and is now arranged in an 
outstanding display arrangement. (Phillips Photo) 



NORFOLK— Need an 80-ton 
diesel locomotive to round out 
your model train collection? 
The Department of Defense will 
pffer a couple of these among 
the 300 items of surplus equip- 
ment to be sold at auction on 
August 9. 

The Norfolk Defense Surplus 
Sales Office, an activity of the 
Defense Supply Agency, has 
recently released an illustrated 
catalog describing each item of 
this equipment slated for the 
auction^ block. 

Equipment, ranging from 
jeeps and small power boats to 
the locomotives, is now on dis- 
play at North Carolina and Vir- 
ginia military installations rep- 
resenting all branches of the 
Armed Forces. The one day sale, 
however, will be held in the 
main ballroom of the Golden 
Triangle Motor Hotel in down- 
town Norfolk. 

"Smiling George", Beam and 
"Friendly Fred" Hinkley, gov- 
ernment auctioneers known 
across the country for selling an 
tern a minute, will rap the 
gavel at 10 a.m. EDT and begin 
knocking down the items to 
bidders. 

Auctions are not new to the 
local Defense Surplus Sales Of- 
fice. More than 2500 people at- 
tended a similar event in Nor- 
folk last November. It is ex- 
pected that equipment now of- 
fered will also have wide ap- 
peal to the general public, small 
businessmen, and surplus deal- 
ers. 

This equipment includes a 
dozen boats, one of which is a 



56-foot single screw motor 
launch, equipped with 150 HP, 
1800 RPM, six cylinder Gray 
Marine diesel engine. Among 
the automotive equipment are 
numerous jeeps, trucks, semi 
and full - stake trailers. Many 
forklifts, with pneumatic and 
solid tires, large capacity cranes, 
and warehouse tractors com- 
prise some of the materials 
handling equipment. Heavy duty 
road machinery runs the gamut 
from a cement mixer to a 
% yard, 12^4 ton Bay City crawl- 
er crane. The wide selection of 
machine tools includes vertical 
and horizontal milling machines, 
shapers, lathes, and arc welders. 

While auction participants 
must register and obtain a num- 
bered bid paddle, there is no 
registration fee. For the con- 
venience of the public, advance 
registrations will be accepted at 
the hotel on the day prior to the 
sale. 

Color slides will be used 
throughout the auction to fur- 
ther aid buyers in identifying 
the equipment as it goes to the 
block. As an added service, rep- 
resentatives of local banking 
and commercial transportation 
firms will be available at the 
sale site. 

Complete details of the sale 
and a free copy of the catalog 
may be obtained by writing the 
Defense Surplus Sales Office, 
Depi?NN, Norfolk 11, Virginia. 



Among other free attractions 
at Seaside Park this week will 
be the unusual juggling, balanc- 
ing and rolla bolla act .pre- 
sented by the comely Fran 
Kane, one of the most attrac- 
tive single acts on the summer 
circuit. 

Miss Kane appears daily, at 
2:30 and 10:00 p.m. on the out- 
door stage. She will be here 
through Sunday, Aug. 5. 
- Nighttime features at the re- 
sort include dancing in the ball- 
room, and there are weekend 
jam sessions beginning each Sat. 
and Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Eddie 
Lee and his Corvettes from 
Harrisonburg, and the Electras 
from Rocky Mount, N.C., remain 
great favorites with the dancers 
at Seaside Park, particularly the 
Twist devotees. 

Admission to Seaside Amuse- 
ment Park is free. 



The Senior Officers of the 
Virginia Beach Rescue Squad 
consists of a President, Vice- 
President, Legal Aclviser, three 
Adviser! and 



Bridge-Tunnel 
Moves Ahead 

BAYSIDE — Approximately 
one-third of the tunnel sections 
for the Chesapeake Bay Bridge 
Tunnel will be in place within 
the next few days, a spokesman 
for the project said today. 

Contractors plan to sink the 
12th of 37 giant steel-and -con- 
crete tubes making up two 
m:ie Lng tunnels. The tube will 
be placed by the end of this 
week, weather permitting, the 
spokesman said. * 

Tunnel sections are being laid 
in trenches dredged under ma- 
jor shipping channels at the 
mouth of the bay. This will be 
the sixth tube placed under the 
Baltimore Channel. Six others 
are in position under Thimble 
Shoal Channel. 

The trench-type tunnels are 
similar in design to the Balti- 
more Harbor Tunnel and the 
Hampton Roads Tunnel. They 
will provide a two-lane roadway 
24 feej wide for vehicles using 
the new 17.5-mile crossing be- 
tween the tip of the Delmarva 
Peninsula and «the Virginia 
mainland. 

At the north end of the cross- 
ing this week, construction 
crews started building a 4,000- 
foot long earth ramp to connect 
the shore with the concrete 
trestle spanning Fisherman In- 
let. A hydraulic dredge will 
pump up 158,910 cubic yards of 
bay bottom sand to form the 
ramp. 

Completion of the ramp will 
enable construction crews and 
equipment to drive' to over- 
water work sites now reachable 
only by boat. 

Gordon M. Shoemaker, Jr. 

QUANTJCO (FHTNC)— Sec- 
ond Leu tenant Gordon M. Shoe- 
maker, Jr., USMC, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gordon M. Shoemaker, 
Sr. of 309 38th St, Virginia 
Beach, Va., was graduated on 
June 2, from the 26-week of- 
ficers' basic course at Marine 
Corps Schools Quantico, Va. 

The course is attended by new- 
ly commissioned Marine Corps 
officers and officers from allied 
countries. 

Classroom work includes in- 
struction in personnel administra- 
tion, first aid, map reading, wea- 
pons and leadershp technques. 
Practical application of the class 
room subjects is conducted in the 
field by students and, in addition, 
the practical aspects of communi- 



Honeymooners 



Fame Carries On 
For Miss Virginia 




(Phillips Photo) 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Churchill HI 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Robert Churchills checked into the 
Thunderbird Motor Lodge over the week-end with all the anonym- 
ity honeymoon couples desire, hoping only to relax in the ittn 
and recuperate from the busy days preceding their wedding 
Friday in Roanoke. 

A handsome couple they are: Bob, tall and athletic; Charlotte, 

slim and lovely. They caused 



Medical Adviserl and three I cations and employment of sup- 
Trustees. ' port weapons are applied. 



Virginia Cruise 

Sport fishing, surf and sun 
bathing, skin diving, shopping 
and browsing— these are just a 
few of the activities available to 
a group of Virginians sailing on 
the six and a half day Virginia 
Cruise to Nassau this Sept. 

Sailing from Norfolk aboard 
the luxurious S. S. Brasil on 
September 18, the group will 
spend three days and two 
nights in glamorous Nassau. In 
addition to the aforementioned 
activities, passengers may take 
a Catamaran Cruise around 
some of the Bahama Islands or 
take a shore excursion to the 
interesting places in and around 
Nassau. 

The all first class, air con- 
ditioned S. S. Brasil is the pas- 
senger's hotel throughout the 
cruise and while anchored at 
Nassau. 

A dance orchestra, first-run 
movies and passenger participa- 
tion activities will provide en- 
tertainment abord ship. 

Choice staterooms are still 
available on the cruise spon- 
sored by the Virginia Cruise 
Corp. Reservations may s be made 
by contacting Mrs., Roberta 
Aiken, 611 East • Franklin St., 
Richmond, or your. local author- 
ized travel agent. 



Girls Do Winter Work for Summer Fun 



By LESLIE RUSSELL 
VIRGINIA BEACH — After a 
winter's work of money-making 
projects, twenty-five members 
of the South Charleston Girl's 
Club of West Virginia are spend- 
ing a well-deserved vacation at 
the beach, under the direction 
of the club's sponsor, Mrs. Wil- 
liam W. Edge. 

Throughout the year, the 
club, whose membership con- 
sists of about 280 girls, from 
the ages of 12 to 17, put on 
bake sales, speghetti dinners 
and dances to pay for all the 
expenses of the Virginia 
Beach trip. Each year for the 
past 6 years the club charters 
a bus to carry the members 
"bag and baggage" to the 



Princess Anne Hotel for 

"their week." 

Among their other activities, 
the girls collect and repair ar- 
ticles for the needy, visit nurs- 
ing homes, ana\ each Christmas, 
the club throws a party for the 
needy children of the city. Last 
year, the girls provided 300 
boys and girls with "toys of 
their choice." Mrs. Edge, a 
school teacher, explained, "the 
girls put the toys oh a display 
so each child had his, choice." 
"The club," she said, "is di- 
vided into three groups, seven 
grade 'girls, junior high, and 
senior high. Each group meets 
on a different day of the week, 
but works on the same projects." 
The girls earn the beach trip by 



working on a point system. The 
girls with the most points win 
the trip. 

Mrs. Edge began the club 
some 14 years ago because she 
was interested in recreational 
work. Her husband, William 
Edge, is director of the South 
Charleston recreational center. 
For the past twelve years, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edge and "their girls" 
have been coming to the beach. 

In addition to their many oth- 
er projects, Mrs. Edge proudly 
commented, "each year, a $100 
scholarship is awarded to an out- 
standing senior for her college 
education, a sportsmanship 
award, and an all-around trophy 
is given to outstanding mem- 
bers. 



Well Earned Trip for Girls Club 




This lovely group of girls earned money for their Virginia Beach trip by sponsoring bate 
sales, dances and other functions. (Boice Photo) 



more than a few 
glances from motel guests 
their radiant good looks. 

If the brand-new bride looked 
slightly familiar, it's no wonder. 
Her picture has appeared in 
newspapers all over the countiw, 
she has appeared on television 
many times and has spent \2 
months opening shopping cen- 
ters and what-have-you and mak- 
ing guest appearances through- 
out the state. 

As Charlotte Thomas, Mrs. 
Churchill wore the "Miss Vir- 
ginia" title in 1961. 

She relinquished her well- 
deserved title in June to anoth- 
er young beauty and immediate- 
ly made plans for her long de- 
layed wedding to Bob Churchfll, 
childhood sweetheart and "boy- 
across-the-street." 

When Charlotte won the 
Virginia crown teat year, 
was the one person wad coup 
not wish her luck. Her title 
meant a year's 'delay M their 
wedding plans since the recfcjii- 
ent must remain unmarried dar- 
ing her reign. 

While Charlotte toured the 
state and kept her busy schedule 
of personal appearances, , Wfb 
studied civil engineering at Va. 
Polytechnic 'institute and waited 
("Impatiently," his bride said) 
in the background. 

New, To Work! 

Charlotte, with one year at 
Randolph-Macon. behind her, al- 
so managed to get another year 
at business college while she 
was Miss Virginia. Now she w$l 
use this background to work as 
a secretary at Radford College 
while Bob continues his edua- 
tion at VPI. Oddly enough, It 
was one of the judges that se- 
lected her as Miss Virginia who 
offered her the job. 

The couple originally headed 
for Wrightsville Beach to speitd 
their honeymoon but decided 
the place was too quiet for them 
and moved to Virginia Beach. 

This resort is no stranger to 
them. They both have visited 
here in the past with their pat- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Thom- 
as and Mr. & Mrs. R. C, Chureh- 
ifl Jr. 

And, too, last fall Mrs. Robert 
Churchill HI appeared at the 
Virginia Beach Auto Show — at 
Miss Virginia. 

NAVY WIVES HOLD 
FAREWELL DANCE 

VIRGINIA BEa/h — »#, 
Princess Anne Navy Wives MK 
No. 143 held a "farewell dial 
dance" recently for 
leaving on a Med 
at the Acey Ducey Ch 
Oceana. 

Members and gu« 
sented with a cai 

After the dinner, 
the music of the 
was enjoyed. 

Out of town guests 
Mr. and Mrs. 
of Amherst, 
Miss 
viUe, 





Page 2-B 



3C* 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 

Complete TV Schedule f of Week - Thurs. thru Wed. 



Ct$— WTARTV ( 3) 

Nte-^AWrrno) 

AOC— WVECTV (U) 

today 

MORNING 

fcy tv 




(NKTmw Dr. Raton. 
tis>— uuwg rar A Day 

3:36 ( •)— To Tell Tba Truth 
(*e>— «nr • DangtHss* 
ttsi — *a« bo Ion Trust 

3:58 ( 8>— OMUnan of r 

*:•• ( S)— an* Mam 



liM ( 8>— 1 



Nlffct 



Via* 

70S { 6) Bam* a aumi 
Tim (ISy— R*t Mac 

" CSV— UK «0» ttlae 




_ IB 

> ao? Chute 
•1 Stars 

lul World 




• (IS)— Sen naneUrn Baa* 





*l#p-— Hu 
s-ee ( s>— Wantbar 
8:88 (1S>— CTtft) AW 
5:15 ( 3) — Movie 
5:46 (IS) — The Barry Show 

EVlNtNG 

6:68 (16>— fllitiwv Patrol 

«s6* U8)--I*o*i Newe^ 

6:1ft (1S>— iR New* 

6:88 ( S>— Rnothole Club 

6:86 < 




8 (18>— Sports 

(1S>— Theater "18" 
UaBB (16)— Toaigat 



FRIDAY 

MORNING 



6tS6 (18)— Tarn Show 
TaM (18)— Toear 

(18>— Operation Alphabet 



TtlS < »-m 

7:1ft < 8)— Burn* * Allen 

T.«4S ( J)— Lift Up HUM Rye* 



•m f 



(18)— Comnay Tim 
(18)— Today la Tidewater 
!!•)— Tndsy 
[ 8>_Bob aid Cheuncey 
(18V- TV Hour of Stan 
<1S>— Thi* Wonderful World 

•US <16>— Kurt's Aimsaac 

8iM < 89— «aw] 

•~ }&&?$ Sff *~ 

(18). M orning Xorla 



( 8K- Calendar 

(18) — Say When 
I8«8» < IHIfft Loejr 

(18) — Play Tour Hunch (Otaw) 
11 IM ( S>— Verdict la Tour* 

(18)— The Price I* Bight « Oaten 

(18) — Vennassee Brnie Ford 
11:38 < a>— The Brighter Day 

(I8»— Concentration 

(IS) — Town Tor A Sow 
lliM ( »— Harry Raaoanar New. 

AFTERNOON 

18:66 ( S) — Lore of Life 

(!•> — Tour Plret Impreeelon 
(13) — J*ne Wymaa Show 

lt:38 ( 8) S earch For Tomorrow 
(18) — Truth or Consequences 
(13) — Camouflage 

IStaft ( 3)— The Guiding Light 

IliM (18)— NBC Hew* 
1:88 ( 8) — Set Together 

(18) — DtaHag Far Dollar. 
(13)— Big Mac 

4i88 (18)— Weather 
1:38 ( 3)— Beat of TV 

< 1S>— Dialing For Dollar* 
(IS) — San Frandaco Baa* 

1:66 (18)— New. and Weather I 
1:00 ( S>— Paaaword 

(18)— Jan Murray Show (Cote) 

(13) — Day In Court 
SiSS (18)— NBC New? 
8:38 ( 3)— Roum Party 

(18) — LoretU Toung -Shaw 

(H) Scran Saw. 
S.-66 ( S)— The Mlllionair* 

(18)— Touag Dr. Melon. 

(18V— Queen Fay A Oar 
3:3* ( 3)— To Tell The Truth 

(18) — Our Flra Daughter* 

(13) — Who Do Ton Trust 
1:58 ( 8)— Chaa. CoUingwood New* 
4:88 ( 3) — Secret Storm 

(18)— Make Boom For Daddy 

< IS >-*- American Bandstand 
4:18 ( »)« Secret Storm 

«iS8 ( 8>— Bdre of Night 

(18) — Her.'* Bollywood 
4:58 (IS)— S Stooge, and Popey* 
4:55 (18)— NBC New* 
SiSS ( 8)— New* At Flra 

(18)— Deputy Dawg 
8:66 ( 3>— Barry Weather 
fttS ( 3>— Movie 



, «*' 



buildimTIuppues 



OPt-MlANT 



■ST. 1170 



rFe Can Save You Money 




(16)— Club Ahoy 

8i*» Ua>— Barty Show 

EVENING 

e« (iftV-LowalNew* 
SUS (18)— ABC N*w* 
S:SS ( 3>— Knot-Sole Ctuh 
«l8f < 3)— Sport* Round- 0» 
SiSS ( •>— TV R.«9ot>er 

(if 
( 
s.ae i 

MS>| 

(IS)— Huntlay Brtnaiar Resort 
7.-8S ( S> — The Beat of TMiPeet 
(18) — Man Into Space 
(IS) — Divorce Court 
7:38 ( 8)— Rawhide 

(18) — IntarnaUonal SaowUea* 
SiSS (13)— The Bathaway* 
8:66 ( S)— Route 88 

(18)— The Detective* 
(IS) — The Rlint eton e* 
SiSS (18>— 77 Sunaet Strip 
SiSS ( 3>— Father of the BrM* 

(1S>— What'* Wrong With Men? 
ISiSS t S) — The Twilight Cone 

(18) — All-Star Football Game 
ISsSS (It)— Chat Huntlay Rat 
11188 ( S>— 11th Hour Newt 
(IS) eBa re n O'clock 



11:18 




Si88 ( 



«iSS 

diss ( 

* *ww », 8B#"<saea w s^a*j^**s***»^*w. a*s*^ 

( IS>— Sunday Sho woaa* 

5:«* ( S>— A Why of Thinking 

(IS)— Wide W arid af Sport* 
6s«8 < 8)— AnSteur lour 



S)— To Tta The TruU 

Five Daughter* 
h Do " 



>o Ten Tri 
Oalhsrwoed 



SiSS 



tJ 



(18)— Amarleaa 
diSB < SK- Bdga of Night 

(18)— Here* Ho^woort 




Trail, 
New* 



it 



(IS)— Maw*. Weather 

( 3>— Weather 
11:18 (18>— Weather 
lliSS ( «)— Movie 

( I B ) S p ort* 

(IS)— Shock 
lliSS (IS)— Tonight 
liSS (18)— New* 



SATURDAY 

MORNING 



StSS (IS) — Morntnc Worahip 

n — Today On Tin 
TtSB ( 3>— The Morning Show 



7(8© (18). 



(18) — Bug* Bunny 
(18) — Big Picture 
8:88 (18)— Poop Deck'* Pirate Dan 
(13) — Comedy Time 
apt. Ka 



B:8S ( 3>— Capt. 

( 18) — Shipwreck band 
(18) — Men. 
8:38 (18)— Pip The Piper • 

18:88 ( 8) — The Ahrln Show 

(18)— Shary Lewi* Show (Cote) 
18:38 ( 8)— Mighty Monaa 

(18)— King Leonardo and 

Short Subject. (Cote) 
(IS)— Big Mac 
11:88 ( 3)— Magic Load of Allakaaam 



: 




lllSB ( 3)— Roy 1 

(18)— Make Roon For Daddy 
(IS)— Wild Bill HJjckok 

AFTERNOON 

18:88 ( 8) — Sky King 

(10)— Mr. Wtsard 

(IS) — Bug* Bunny 
12:38 ( 3) — New* 

(18) — TV Hour of Star* 

(18) — White Hunter 
is— ( 3)— HopaJong Caaatdy 

(18)— Viking* 
1:38 ( 8)— Film 

(18) — House Detective 

(13) — Science Fiction Theatre 
1:45 ( 3) — Baseball— L.A. at Baltimore 
848 (10)— Baseball 

(18)— Hovie 
4:88 ( 3) — Baeeball Scoreboard 
4:30 ( 3) — Western Marshall 

(18)— Public Service 

(13) — Tales of Texas Banger* 
5:00 (10)— Movie 

(13)— Teleeports 
5:90 ( 3) — Lone Ranger 
5188 ( 8) — Grand Ole Opry 
• (18) — Peter Sunn 

EVENING 

848 ( 3)— Icabod St Me 

(13) — Playhouse 13 
6:30 ( 3) — Art Link letter A The Kid* 

(10) — All-Star Wrestling 
8:45 ( 8) — News- Weather . 
8:88 ,( 3)— New* 
740 ( 3)— Exclusive 
7:30 t 8)— Perry Mason 

(10)— Tales of Welle Fargo 
848 (13) — Boom For One More 
8:30 ( 3) — The Defender* 



(18)— Tall Kan 
(1 



13) — Leave It To Baaror 
•4S (18)— Movies 

(13)— Lawrence Walk 
848 ( 8) — Hare Gun, Will Travel 
1848 ( 3) — Gunsmoke 

(IS)— Fight of the Weak 
10:45 (18) — Saturday Sport* Final 
11:08 ( 3)— 11th Hour Final 
( 1 0) — News- Weather 
(13)— Lai* New* ■ 
11:05 (13)— Movie 
11US ( 3)— Weather 
11:19 ( 3) — Sports i 

(10)— The Big Movie 
(13) — Theatre 13 
11:20 < 8)— Movie Time 
12:00 (10)— Late. Late Show 
1:30 (18)— New. 
1:48 (18)— Evening Devotion 



I 



I 



•? 



Poy$ in lime saved ••.Poys In dollars you haven't 
spent golnflalsewhere... Pays in helpful home-town 
contacts... Pays in satisfaction that comes of support- 
ina community enterprise. 

i. is nvaeabla at our bank. Come In! 

wy so •* wi**r*i*fiw ess wi arsssiat. WW* fit. 




SUNDAY 

MORNING 

7:30 ( 3)— Hopalong Cassidy 

( 13) — Christopher* 
8:88 (13) — Fisher Family 
8.-85 (18) — Morning Worahip 
848 ( 3)— Bob Poole's Gospel Favorit* 

(10) — Sacred Heart 

(13) — Big Mac 
8:48 (18)— The Christopher* 
i:O0 (10) — Dawn Bible Study 
9:30 ( 3) — This 1* The Life 

(18) — Herald of Truth 

(13) — Comedy Time 
1840 ( 8) — Lamp Unto My Feet 

(IS)— This I* The Answer 
1848 ( 8>— Look Dp and Live 

(18)— Safety In The 'SO'* 

(13) — Sunday Theatre • 
11:80 ( 3) — Camera 3 

(10)— live & Learn 
11:30 ( 3)— Accent 

(18) — Topic 



AFTERNOON 



IZst 



( 3) — Window on Main St. 
(18) — House Detectives 
(13)— Wild Bill Hlekok 
18:38 ( 3) — Washington Conversation 
(10) — Airman's World 
( 13) — Trackdown 
12:56 ( 3)— CBS News 
140 ( 3) — News, Weather. Sports 
(10) — Teleaport Digest 
(13) — Hollywood Showcase 
1:15 ( 3) — Builders Showcase 
:30 ( 3) — Great Voices From Great 
Books. 
1:40 (10) — Dugout Interview 
2:00 (10) — Tidee Baseball 
8:15 ( 3) — Movie 
2:30 (13) — Thrills & Skills 
3:©0 (13) — San Francisco Beat 



••••***.******...•.••• 

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EVENING 

8:88 ( S>— 30th Century 

(18)— Mart Thar 
8«88 ( 3)— Mt»ter Rrj 

(18>— This Is NBC New* 
(IB) — Movie Time 
748 < 3) — Lassie 

(18) Bn llwisJU* 
7t38 ( 8>— Dennis Th* Mm if 
(18)— W.rt Diane? 
(13)— Follow Th* Sun 
848 ( 8)— Bd Bullivma 
848 (18>— Advantaras of Sir Franca* 
Drake 
<l»>— Hollywood 
848 ( 3>— G.B. Theatre 
— (18) — Bon ana* 
848 ( 8)— Who la Thi* Worid 
1848 ( 3)— Candid Camera 
(18) — DuPont Show 
(13)— Lawmen 
18:88 ( 8)— What's My Lin. 
1148 ( 8)— Brie Sevareid 
(18)— Weekend Raw* 
(13)— Late New* 
HilS (18>— Movie 

(13)— Weather 
11:18 ( S) B part a Boport 

(13)— Theatre 13 
11:88 ( 3)— Rxcluatv* 
1:88 <18>— News 

MONDAY 

MORNING 

5:38 (18) — Farm Show 
748 (IB*— Today 

(18)— Operation 
7:18 < S)— VPI Report 
7118 ( 8)— Burns * Allan 
7:38 (18)— Big Mae 
7:48 < 8)— Lift Up Mine | 
748 ( 3>— News 
848 ( 3>— C»»t. 

«18)— Comedy 1 
8:88 (18)— Today In 
S4S (18)— Today 
848 ( 8) — Bob and Channuey 

(18) — TV Hour of Star* 

(13)— Thi* Wonderful World 
8:85 ( 8)— New* 
SiSS ( 8)— A* The World Tuma 

(13)— Morning Mori* 

( 8)— Calendar 

(IS)— Sat Whan 
1848 ( 8)— I Love Luey 

(18)— Play Tour Hunoh (Color) 
1148 ( 3)— Verdict Is Tour* 

(IS) — The Price 1* Right 

(18)— TeauMwsoe Brnie Ford Show 
1148 ( 3)— The Brighter Day 

( 18) — Concentration 

(18) — Tour* For A Song 
11 aSS ( 8>— Harry Baasonar New* 

AFTERNOON 

1848 ( 8)— Love of Life 

(10) — Tour First Impression 
(13) — Jane Wyman Show 
1848 ( 8) — Search For Tomorrow 
(18) — Truth or Consequence* 
( 13) — Camaflouge 
12:45 ( 8)— The Guiding Light 
18:88 (10) — NBC News 
148 ( 3) — Get Together , 

(10)— Dialing For Dollar* 
(13)— Big Mac 
1:85 (10) — Weather 
148 ( 8) — Beat of TV 
148 (10) — Dialing For Dollars » 

(13) — San Francisco Beat 
(10) — News 
840 ( 8)— Paaaword 

(10) — Jan Murray Show 
(13) — Day to Court 
8:88 (10) — New* 
848 ( 3) — House Party 

(10) — Loretta Toung Show 
(13)— Seven Reys 
848 < 3)— The Millionaire 

(10>— Young Dr. Malone 
(lfc) — Queen For A Day 
3:38 ( 3)— To Tell the Truth 
(IS)— Our Five Daughter* 
(13) — Who Do Ton Trust. 
848 ( 3)— Chaa. Collngwood Now* 
448 ( 8)— The Secret Storm 

(10)— Make Boom For Daddy 
(13>— American Bandstand 
4:38 ( 8)— Edge of Night 

(10) — Here's Hollywood 
4:58 (18)— 3 Stooge, and Popeye 
4:55 (18) — NBC New* 
548 ( 3)— New* At Five ' 

(10)— Quick Draw McGraw 
S4S ( 8) — Weat er 
5:18 ( 3) — Dr. Whilehurst Reports 

From Europe 
5:18 ( 3)— Movie 
5:30 (10)— Club Ahoy 
5:48 (13) — Barlv Show 

EVENING 

6:08 (18) — Highway Patrol 
6:88 (18) — Local Newa 
8:18 (13)— ABC New* 
6:88 ( 3) — Knothole Club 
6:88 ( 8) — Snort* Bound-On 
848 ( 8)— TV Reporter 

(10) — Six-Thirty Report 
(13) — Pater Gunn 
6 idS ( 8) — Weatherman 
6:48 ( 8)— Walter Cronklte 

(19) — H'intley-Brinktey Report 
748 ( 8)— The Pioneers 

(16)— King of Diamond* 
(181— «ea Huat 
748 ( 3)— To Tell The Truth 

(10) — Man & The Challenge 
(18) — Cheyenne 
• 48 ( 3)— Pete ft Gladys 
(10)— National Velvet 
•48 ( 3)— Father Know* Beat 
(16) — Price I* Bight 
(13) — Law ft The Plainsman 
•48 ( 8) — Desi-Lucy Comedy Hour 
(10) — 87th Precinct 
(13) — Surf side Six 
1*48 ( 3) — Hennesey - 

(10) — NBC Actuality 
(18) — Ben Casey 
18:88 ( 8)— I've Got A Secret 
1148 ( 8) — llth Hour New. 

(16)— Eleven O'clock Report 
(13)— ABC-News Final 
HilS ( 3)— Weather 
11:13 (13)— Local New*. Weather. Sport* 
11:18 t 8) — Sport* 

(10)— Late Weathw 
11(88 ( 8)— "Dr. Whitehurst BeporU, 
From Europe 
(18)— Sport* 
11:25 < 3)— Movie , 

11:27 (18)— Theatre 18 / 

11:38 (18)— Tonight ' 



• 48 ( 81— Now* At Frr* 
(16)— Yogi 



8l IS ( 8) — Dr. Whitehurst Reports 
Front Europe 

Ahoy 

' BROW 

EVENING 

6:65 (13>— Lo«ml' , N.w^ 
60S (18)— ABO New* 

iiS 

Elit^.Thirty^Seport 




6:88 
648 
748 

m 

7:36 



.4. 1 I 



Tat* ( 8)— Death Valley 

(16>— Grand Jury 

(13)— Everglade* 
7:8« ( 8)— Rescue 8 

(16)— Laramie 

(18) — Bug* Bunny 
8:68 ( 8)— Paaaword ^ 

(18>— Batohelor Father 
848) ( 8)— Dobte 01111* 

(16>— Alfred Hitchcock 

(18) — The New Bread 
648 ( 8) — Comedy Spot 

(16)— Dick Powell Show 
64* ( 5>— The Third Man 

(13) — Tour* For A Song 
1648 A 3)— Talent Scout* 

\ 10)— Cain'* Hundred 

(13)— Alcoa Premier 
UnBS ( M}»^"" 

(IS)— ABC New. 
1145 <13>— Late N*w* 
11:16 ( 8)— Weather 
lltlS (13)— Local New*. Weather. 



6:85 
SiSS 
848 



648 

see 

1648 

1648 
11:66 

1148 

U:SS 

1S4S 
1S4S 



WEDNESDAY 

MORNING 

(IS) — Farm Show 
(10! — Continental Classroom 
(10)— Today Show 
(13>— Operation Alphabet 
( 3)— VPI Beporu 
( 3)'— Burns A Allan Show 
18)— Big Mae 

)— Captain Kangaroo 
(18)— Coosaoar Tint 
(18)— Today in Tidewater 
(16)— Today 

( 8) — Bob and Chauncay 
(18)— TV Hour of Star* 
18)— Thi. Wonderful World 
! »— Bar* 
; 3)— A* Th. Wortd 
.18)— Morning Motto 
( 3)— Special 
(18)— Say When 

(18>— Play Teur^Runah 
( 8)— Verdict I* Tour* 
(16>— The Prtes Is Right fOntw-i 
(18)— Tenneeae. RmteJerd Show 
< S>— Th* Brighter Day 



(Color) 



18:45 

1848 

148 



(IS)— Tour* For A 

( 8) — Barrv B*aaon«r New* 

AFTERNOON 

( 8)— Love of Lift 

(18)— Tour First lmpremion 

(18) — Jane Wyman Show 

( J>— Search For Tomorrow 

(18) — Truth or Couaequenee* 

( IS) — Camaflouge 

( 8)— The Guiding Light 



11 118 ( 8)— Movie 

(16)— Weather 
11:68 ( 8)— Dr. Whitehurst Report* 

From Europe 
11 188 ( 3)— Movie 
11:27 (13)— Theatre IS 
lliBS (16)— Sparta 
114* (16)— Tonight 



V¥F ! CO*rlf WAGON 



TUESDAY 
MORNING 

648 (10)— Farm Show 

848 (16) — Continental Classroom 

7:08 (16) — Today Show 

(18)— Operation Alphabet 
7:18 ( 3) — VPI Report 
7:15 ( 8) — Burn* A Alien Show 
748 (13)— Big Mac 
7 148 ( 3)— Lift Dp Mine Eye* 
7:55 ( 8) — New* 
848 ( 8)— Captain Kangaroo 

(IS)— Comedy Tim* 
•48 (18>— Today In Ttdewater 
■48 (16)— Today 
848 ( 3)— Bob and Chaunesw 
(IS)— TV Hour of Star* 
(13)— Thi* Wonderful World 
SiSS ( Si—Raw* 
•48 ( 81— A* The World 
13)_Momlng Mo via 
1*48 < 3)— Calendar 
10)— Say When 
I)— I Low 



1*48 ( 8)— I 

(18) — Play Tour Hunoh (Cote) 
1148 ( 3)— Verdict. I* Tour* 

(16)— The Price It Bight (Color) 
(13) — Tentywaee Ernie Ford Show 
11:38 ( 3)— The Brighter Say 
(ie>— Concentration 
(18>— Tour* For A Song 
11:88 ( 8)— Harry Kaaeonar New* 

AFTERNOON 

1S48 ( 8)— Lore of Ufa 

(16)— Tour Pint Impression 
(13) — Jane Wymaa Show 

1848 ( S>— Search For Tomorrow 

(16) — Truth or Consequence* ■ 
( 18)— Camaflouge P 

18:45 ( 3) — The Guiding Light 

18:88 (18)— NBC Newa 
1:60 ( 3)— Get Together 

MO)— Dialing For Dollar. 
(IS)— Big Mac 
1:88 (16)— Weather 

(IS)— Mid-D*y Report 
1:38 ( »— Bert of TV 

(16 ) . Di a l ing For Dollar* 



(18)— San Franemce 
148 (16)— New* and Weatnsr 
• 46 ( 3)— Password 

( < l»t^S U Cwhrt B,IOW CC0tort 

( 



• 48 ( • 

(16)— Ycung Dr. Malon* 
(IS)— Quean For A Day 



CBS Show 
To Feature 
Top Artists 

The dance team of Marge 
and Gower Champion, operatic 
mezzo-soprano Rise Stevens and 
accordionist Dick Contino are 
among the American guests who 
will be seen in the one-hour 
rebroadcast of the Peabody 
Award-winning "Invitation to 
Moscow," on "The Ed Sullivan 
Show" Sunday, August 5th 
(8-9 p.m., edt) on the CBS Tele- 
vision Network. 

rt Invitation to M o s c o w," 
originally presented on Sept. 27, 
1959, as a 90-minute program, 
was produced in the Soviet 
Union during the summer of 
1959 with American and Rus : 
sian talent, when Sullivan toured 
that country with a variety show 
at the request of the U.S. State j 
Department, 

In it, Marge and Gower 
Champion perform indigenous 
American dances on the stage 
of the Moscow Palace of Sports; 
Rise Stevens sings "Getting to 
Know You" in Russian and Eng- 
lish to Soviet children in Mos- 
cow's Gorki Park;^ and Dick 
Contino renders an accordion 
solo of "Hucklebuck" at a party 
given for the staff of the Sulli- 
van show by a group of Soviet 
artists. 

Other guests are Conrad 
Buckner, tap dancer; Charles K. 
L. Davis, tenor, singing "He 
Ono" in Hawaiian; the Barry 
Sisters, singing "Otchi Tchorni- 
ya" in Russian and English; 
Eddy Manson, playing a har- 
monica medley of Stephen Fos- 
ter songs; Margaret Tynes, dra- 
matic soprano, singing a medley 
of spirituals in English; Eric 
Brenn and his plate-spinning 
act; and wire artist Hubert 
Castle. 

The Russian talent includes 
the Abrotsov Puppets perform- 
ing a variety show in miniature, 
the Russian Brown Bear doing 
acrobatic tricks at the Moscow 
circus, and the Red Army Dan- 
cers. 

"Invitation to Moscow" was 
honored with the George Foster 
Peabody Award in April, 1960, 
for its "contribution to inter- 
national understanding" and for 
"Sullivan's showmanship and 
acute awareness of the role 
prime time television can play 
in promoting international good 
will." It was the first American 
television program to take its 
own equipment into Moscow and 
the first U.S. variety show to 
perform in the Soviet Union for 
the Russian people. 



(16)— NBC Hew* 

( S)— Get Together 

(10 — Dialing For Dollar* 

(is)— Big Mate 
1:88 (16)— Weather 

(18) — Mad-Day Baport 
1:86 ( S)— Beat of TV 

(16) — Dialing For Dollars 

(IS) — San Franctaco Beat 
148 (IS)— New* ana Weatnsr 
848 ( 8>— Password 

(18) — Jan Murray Show (Color) 

(IS) — Day In Court 
8:85 (16) — NBC News 
848 ( 8) — Bouae Party 

(16) — Loretta Toung Show 

(18) — Seven Maya 
848 < 8)— The Millionaire 

(16) — Toung Dr. Malon* 

(18)— Queen For A Day 
8:38 ( 8) — To Tell The Truth 

(10)=— Our 5 Daughter* 

(13) — Who Do Tou Trust. 
8:56 ( 8) — Chaa. CoUingwood New* 
846 ( 8)— Secret Storm 

(10)— Make Boom For 

(18) — American Bandstand 
4:15 ( 8) — Secret Storm 
4:30 ( 8)— Edge of Night 

(aw) — Here's Hollywood 
4:88 (18)— S Stooge* ft Popeye 
4:88 (10) — NDC News 
S48 C 3)— News At Fire 

(10)— Whirleybirds 
8 1 10 ( 8) — Dr. Whitehurst Report* 

From Europe 
5:15 ( 3) — Movie 
5:36 (10)— Club Ahoy 
6:40 (13) — Early Show 



648 
SiSS 
•US 

StSS 
6:85 
848 



StdS 
StdS 

746 



748 

8106 

846 

8:66 



Patrol 



1648 



1648 
1146 



1148 
11:16 
1148 

11:86 



)1:SS 
11:38 



(10)— High w« 

( 8) A hnn n a c 

( 8)— SPorte Botod-Pp 

( 3)— Weatharm** 

X 8)— Walter CronaJte 

(161— Hnnttef-Brinhtef 

( 3)— The California** 

( 10)— Shotgun Steal 

(13) — Rlpcord 

( 3) — Th* Atvln Snow 

(16)— Wagon Train 

(18)— Howard K. Smith ABO New* 

( 8)— Danger Map 

(18)— Focus on America 

( s) — Checkmate 

(16)— Th* RefaeK 

(18)— Top Cat 

(16)— Kraft Mystery Theatre 

(13)— Hawaiian By* 

( 8)— Dfc* Van Dyke Show 

( 3)— Steel Hour 

(18)— Pluy TdUr Hunch 

(18) — NftnH 

(1B>— ^bavW 



< 8)— llth Bony 

(1S>— Sieves 




_ O'Cteeh 
OB)— ABO-TV Mew* 
(18)— Late Mew* 
( 8)— Weather 
(16)— Late Weather 
(IS) — Local New*- Weather-Sport* 
( 8)— Or. Whitehurst Report* 

From Europe 
(16)— Sporte 
( 8V— Movie 
(18)— Theatre IS 
(10)— Tonight 



LEARN TO SPEAK 

SPANISH 

2 6-WEEK COURSES 

Starts Wednesday, Aug. 8 
Hotel Monticello ' 

Afternoon, 3-5 pan.; 
Evening, 7-9 p.ra. 

Two hour class, ones a week 
$21 Fee Inchides Study Materials 

Two Members From 
One Family $35 

Instructor Ben Crowson has taught 
similar courses at Walter Reed 
Army Hospital and Pentagon Bldg. 
Register day of first class. 



Sen/Ice IS 00B SFRCIALTT 

TV - STEREO - RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 





HIRTZ TV 

SALES arid SERVICE 

LONDON BRIDGE, VA. 

OPEN 9 A.M. . 9 P.M. Phone 340-8888 



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31»t AND HOUY RD. 



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GA 8-4044 



31 
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EsasWOa 



Wakes Make Patterns on Linkhorn Bay 



*1L 




Beach Movies 



Thousands of water ski enthusiasts flocR to Virginia Beach eacn /ear to enjoy their favorite sport on placid Linkhorn 
Bay, the ideal spot for skiing, fishing, sailing and other water sports. «. 

A (illicit to Beach Entertainment, Sports 



DANCING 
PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 
CLUB. Private club, member- 
ship required. 

CAPE COLONY CLUB. Private 
Club, membership required. 

THE MARSHALL'S — Buddy 
"Myer's Orchestra nightly. 7 to 
10 p.m. in pool-patio dining 
area. 

CAVALIER BEACH A CABANA 

CLUB, membership required. 

SEASIDE PARK— Dancing night- 
ly in Ballroom. A new orches- 
tra alternating every night. 
Jam session Saturday and 
Sunday at 2 p.m. Closes Labor 
Day. 

TROPICANA— Atlantic and 16th 



TWIST ! I 
TOP COMBOS! 



NfW 



TROPIGANA 

Every Night 
7:30 to Midnight . 
JAM SESSION 

Sunday 2:00 
Sandwiches— Pizzas 

16th & ATLANTIC 



(upstairs). Dancing. 



Jim 



Ses- 



sion. 



BAHAMA ROOM— Popular Trio 

(every night except Sundays) 

thru Labor Day. 
PEPPERMINT BEACH CLUB — 

Ocean-front and 15th Street. 

Orchestra from New York's 
Peppermint Lounge. Jam ses- 
sions Saturday and Sunday. 



FISHING 

BEACH BAY MARINA— Laskin 
Road at City Limits. Boat 
Rentals. Sports fishing in 
Coast Guard inspected boats. 

POOLE'S— at Lynnhaven Inlet. 
Party boats for ocean fishing, 
also smaller boats for bay 
fishing. Coast Guard inspect- 
ed, radio equipped boats. 

LONG CREEK MARINA— Near 

Lynnhaven Inlet. Sports fish- 
ing in Coast Guard inspected 
boats. 



LIBRARY — Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne County Library 
has a non-resident charge of 
$5 of which $3 will be refund- 
ed. Located at 302-22nd St. 

' Hours— Tues. thru Thursday, 
2 p.m.-O p.m. Friday and Sat- 
urday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



TOWN PLAYGROUND— 25th 

Street opposite High School 

athletic field. 
COURTS AT THE CAVALIER— 

40th and Atlantic — Har-Tru 

Courts. Professional in charge. 

Courts available to guests of 

members. 
PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 

CLUB — New courts; members 

and guests only. 



AMUSEMENT PARKS 
FRONTIER CITY — Birdneck 
Road near 31st St. Ext. (about 
% mile from Atlantic Avenue 
—A full size Western town, 
stage coach, railroad, river- 
boat. 
SEASIDE PARK— Atlantic Ave. 
at 31st Street. Rides, games, 
amusements for children and 
adults. Amusements open 
daily at 9 a.m. Facilities for 
picnics, bathing lockers, danc 
ing. Closes Labor Day. 



TENNIS 
SEVERAL COURTS AT THE 



J 



P 

R 
O 
G 
R 

E 

S 

S 

I 

V 

E 



Sherwood Lounge 

JAZZ 

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 p.m. 
ON THE OCEAN 

2105 ATLANTIC AVE. 



D 

I 
X 

I 

E 
L 
A 
N 
D 



THEATRE 
SANDPIPER PLAYHOUSE — 
19th and Arctic. 

LOCAL MOVIES 

BEACH THEATRE— Atlantic at 
25th Street. 

BAYNE THEATRE — Atlantic 

near-lTtte^-"^-^— ■■ .■«; . - 



NEARBY DRIVE-IN THEATRE 
SHORE DRIVE-IN — Route & 
east of Chesapeake Beach 
About 6 miles from Virginia 
Beach. Enclosed children's 
playground, patio, air condi- 
tioned snack bar. 



At the high school there are 
new tennis courts. 



WATER SKIING 
LASKIN MARINA— City limits 
and 31st St. Expert Ski Tow- 
ing Service, Instruction, Li- 
censed operators. Phone GA 8- 
5444. 



SIGHTSEEING 
BOAT CRUISE— 2-hour cruise. 
Laskin Marina. 31st St. Ext. 
Phone 428-8733. 



GOLF 



CAVALIER YACHT AND COUN- 
TRY CLUB— 18 Hole— Mem- 
bers, guests and visitors with 
Guest Cards are welcomed at 
this course. 

PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 
CLUB— 18-Hole; members & 
guests only. 

HILLTOP DRIVING RANGE A 
CARPET GOLF— 31st Ext. 2 
miles from Atlantic Avenue. 



(The following reviews are 
printed with special permis- 
sion from The Green Sheet, a 
monthly survey of current 
films.) 

THE NOTORIOUS LANDLADY 

Appearing at the Beach 
Theatre today through Saturday 
and at the Bayne Theatre Sun- 
day through Tuesday. 

ESTIMATES AGREE: 

This spoof of British whodun- 
its is a merry romp from its 
tantalizing beginning to the 
rowdy end. American Embassy 
attache' Jack Lemmon rents a 
flat in Kim Novak's London 
home. Scotland Yard suspects 
that American Miss Novak has 
killed her English husband. But 
since no body has been found, 
the yard can do no more than 
keep an eye on the lady's activi- 
ties, and these, with the arrival 
of Mr. Lemmon, become highly 
newsworthy. The resulting pub- 
licity is distressing to the young 
man's protocol - minded chief, 
who demands that his subordin- 
ates keep their off-hours life 
tidy. A brace of corpses, a 
blackmailing neighbor and a 
wild chase involving an Army 
helicopter and a runaway wheel- 
chair provide action a-plenty. 
Jack Lemmon, with his winning, 
controlled comedy style plays 
the smitten attache' who con- 
tinues to love his landlady even 
as he wonders if she really did 
her spouse in, and is planning 
to do the same to her devoted 
tenant. 

Fred Astaire as his boss and 
Lionel Jeffries as a Scotland 
Yard Inspector are other funny 
men, and the American-British 
supporting cast is excellent. 
Kim Novak is properly myster- 
ious and alluring. 

The finale, though it takes a 
long time to arrive, is well 
worth waiting for: a wildly far- 
cial pursuit along the Cornwall 
shore, with a hilarious musical 
boost from the "Pirates of 
Penzance," blared out by a brass 
band on a sanitarium lawn. Be- 
sides his big Gilbert and Sulli- 
van climax, composer George 
Duning makes clever use of 
variations on "A Foggy Day in 
London Town" throughout his 
entertaining score. 



a great success, and once again 
family solidarity is triumphant. 



TOP HAT 

DANCING 

featuring / 

Al Cannon and His 'Tuff Sax 

29th and OCEAN FRONT 



1£2&2£5S£«3 



LETS TWIST, 

Dancing Nightly and Saturday and Sunday Afternoon 

PEPPERMINT 

BEACH CLUB 



NOW FEATURING 

THE DYNAMIC AIRDALES 



RECREATION FACILITIES 

Community playgrounds are 
maintained at the Cook School 
(15th Street and Baltic) and the 
Virginia Beach High School with 
a full supervised course of di- 
rected play, crafts, and recrea- 
tion. 



THE 

Lighthouse 

Steamed 
CRABS 

SOUTH ATLANTIC AVE. 

Next to Steel Pier 



SKEET FIELD 
THE PRINCESS ANNE GUN 
CLUB — Is a skeet club located 
on Little Neck Road, 0.9 of a 
mile from Route 58. Turn 
right off on Little Neck Road 
about one quarter of a mile 
west of the Pine Tree Inn. 
(clearly marked). 
Club is associated and regis- 
tered Wjafe NSSA and is open 
every^Rternoon. The telephone 
nuflrtwr is GY 7-4228. ' 




IZZY DEAN RETURN 
SET FOR AUGUST 11 

The world champion New 
York Yankees take on the hust- 
ling Detroit Tigers Saturday, 
August 11 and again on Sun- 
day, August 12 in "Baseball 
Game of the Week" attractions 
on the CBS Television Network. 

The games wUl be played at 
Yankee Stadium, New York, 
and will start at 1:45 p.m., EDT, 
on both dates. 

Dizzy Dean and Pee Wee 
Reese will be the television re- 
porters. 



United States Marines fought 
with General Jackson in his his- 
toric repulse of British forces 
assaulting New Orleans during 
the Christmas season, 1814. 



u 



»f 



Plus 



GENE and His TEAM BEATS 

15th and ATLANTIC AVE. 



ITALIAN FOOD 



PRIVATE 
DINING ROOM 

Ample Parking 




FINC ITALIAN FOODS 
310 - 31st ST., VA. BEACH 



MR. HOBBS TAKES 
A VACATION 

Scheduled at the Beach 
Theatre Sunday through Tues- 
day; Bayne, Wednesday through 
Saturday. 
ESTIMATES AGREE: 

Looking back, Mr. Hobbs has 
his doubts about his vacation, in 
this domestic comedy that, 
ranges from all-out slapstick to 
wryly humorous truths about 
American family life, He is a 
St. Lous banker, a devoted hus- 
band and father, and a some- 
what detached grand-parent' 

It is- Mrs. Hobbs' idea to gath- 
er the entire clan in a borrowed, 
sight-unseen house on the Cali- 
fornia coast. The outsize house- 
hold consists of Mother and 
Dad, a twelve-year-old TV ad- 
dict son, teenage Kathie, whe 
has "retired from the human 
race" due to new braces on her 
teeth, two married daughters 
with husbands, children and 
problems, and a disgruntled 
Finnish cook. Mr. Hobbs is more 
than a little dubious all this 
family solidarity in any sur- 
rundings. least of all in the 
ramshackle, broken down hor- 
ror that is to house them for a 
month of togetherness. As 
wacky mishaps crowd upon one 
another, his fears prove well 
grounded. A luscious blonde 
beach siren and two unwanted 
guests who turn out to be secret 
drinkers are no help. While a 
little of this humor is rather 
broad, what happens has a very 
funny, identifiable down-to- 
earthiness. 

James Stewart is his most 
likeable self as the harassed Mr. 
Hobbs, Maureen O'Hara is a 
paragon of good nature and 
good intentions as his spouse, 
and the supporting cast is 
equally enjoyable. In spite of 
fights, tears and general ex- 
haustion, by the time everyone 
packs up to go home it is evi- 
dent that the summer has been 



Donut Kitchen 

Fresh Donuts 
Made Daily 

AtL MEALS SERVED 
18th and ATLANTIC 



KATARI 

Opening at the Beach Wednes- 
day. 

ESTIMATES AGREE: 

A framework of story is set 
up around the activities of a 
team of professional hunters 
who furnish East African ani- 
mals to zoos and circuses all 
over the world. With headquar- 
ters on a Tanganyika ranch, 

John Wayne heads up the half 
dozen men in the group — an 
attractive, international lot that 
includes Red Buttons, a Brook- 
lyn ex-taxi driver who is afraid 
of animals. Two refreshingly 
unglamorized girls fit easily into 
the operation, and furnish love 
interest that is more humorous 
than romantic. 

The chase and capture of the 
beasts make for splendid animal 
shots, filled with excitement as 
the chosen quarry in a galloping 
herd is lassoed from a rashly 
pursuing truck, and brought 
home for shipment. There is a 
notable lack of violence in these 
procedures, and the pleasure in 
watching the animals is ac- 
centuated by knowing that they 
are being treated with consid- 
eration. 

. The episodes tend to be 
comic, as when Red Buttons 
makes a big catch by covering 
a tree full of monkeys with a 
rocket-fired net. East Africa and 
its wild life get fascinating pre- 
sentation. But it is three baby 
elephants that steal the show, 
and a chase in which they act 
as bloodhounds is captivating. 

New Bridges 
Show Opens 
September 11 

"The Lloyd Bridges , Show," 
starring Bridges as Adam Shep- 
herd, a roving journalist, will 
make its debut Tuesday, Sept. 
11 (8-8.30 p.m., EDT) on the 
CBS Television Network. 

In the series, Shepherd, 
through his imagination, pro- 
jects himself into the role of 
the protagonist of the particular 
story he is covering. An earring 
found amidst the wreckage of a 
train may suggest to Shepherd 
the story Of a harried commut- 
er. A wrist watch found in a 
dead man's effects may reveal 
to the writer the story of the 
spiritual leader of a Latin 
American doctor's visit to his 
father's native Greece. Once the 
clue is discovered, Bridges, as 
Shepherd, assumes the role of 
the commuter, the revolutionist, 
or the doctor. 

For Bridges, perhaps most 
famous for his portrayal of 
Mike Nelson in the syndicated 
television series, "Sea Hunt," 
the new series is "something 
like having one's own personal 
actors' workshop," as he puts it. 

The series was created by 
Aaron Spelling, who is execu- 
tive producer of the Four Star 
Television Production. Spelling's 
meteoric career in Hollywood 
began when he was a character 
actor. He started writing for 
"Zane Grey Theatre." Later, he 
created and produced "Johnny 
Ringo." 

Everett Chambers is producer 
of "The Lloyd Bridges Show." 

Directors on the new show in- 
clude John Cassavetes — who 
will also make a guest star ap- 
pearance in one episode — Paul 
Henreid and John Peyser. 

The Kaiser Companies, rep- 
resented by Young & Rubicam, 
Inc., are sponsors of "The Lloyd 
Bridges Show." 



Playhouse to 
Begin New Play 
Friday 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Sandpiper Playhouse will open 
its second series of plays Friday 
with the presentation of "Mr. 
Roberts," one of the first plays 
to come out of World War II. 

Adapted from the Thomas 
Heggen novel, the highly suc- 
cessful Broadway play opened 
in 1948 and was later made into 
a movie starring Henry Fonda, 
Jack Lemon and James Cagney. 

In the Sandpiper presentation, 
the Henry Fonda role of Lt. 
Roberts is played by Wade Wil- 
liams, the Jack Lemon part 
(Ensign Culver) by Bob McAllis- 
ter and the James Cagney role 
of the captain by Robert Wain- 
wright. 

So successful has the play be- 
come that it has been translated 
into 62 languages and presented 
in 14 countries. 

'Teen-Talk' on 
W60F Radio 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Bob 
Gheza, program manager for 
WBOF, announced this week 
that the radio station has added 
a special public service program 
for teen-agers. 

"Teen-Talk," a 5-minute show 
heard every ' Sunday at 7:45 
a.m., is moderated by Allen 
Ludden, known to most tele- 
vision viewers for his work on 
"Password" and "College Bowl." 
The public service program is 
sponsored by the United States 
Marine Corps. 

Ludd«n will eovtr practical- 
ly every subject of conversa- 
tion among teen-agars, from 
dating and manners to collage 
in the now series. 
A well-known authority on 
teeft-age topics, Ludden was the 
winner of the- 1962 Horatio Al- 
ger Award. He is also the author 
of four books on teen-age mat- 
ters and has lectured in over 
500 high schools across the 
country. 

His ability to talk with teen- 
agers about common problems 
and goals has made him a recog- 
nized authority in this field. 

VEPCO DECLARES 
QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 

The Board of Directors of the 
Virginia Electric and Power Co. 
recently declared a quarterly 
dividend of 35c per share on the 
common stock payable Septem- 
ber 20, 1962, to stockholders of 
record at the close of business 1 
on August 31, 1962. 

Regular quarterly dividends 
of $1.25 per share on the $5 
dividend preferred; $1.01 per 
share on the $4.20 dividend pre- 
ferred and $1.03 per share on 
the $4.12 dividend preferred, all 
payable September 20, 1962, to 
shareholders of record August 
31, 1962, were declared. 



Vlrgihfa Be** $UI*NfW$ 
Thursday, August 2, \ 942 
Pag* 3S 



SANDPIPER PLA 
SCHEDULE 

Curtaln Hm o $ 'M pm* 
Friday and Saturday— "Mr. 
Roberts, opening the soconel 
series. 

Sunday and) Monday — 
"Critic's Chests* ' 

Tuesday and Wednesday — 
"Brlgedoon" 

The Playhouoe win close to- 
night to prepere for premfersj 
of Mr. Roberts. 

m 



NORMANDIE 
CAFETERIA 



Fast Service 

Wide Variety 

Attractive 

Prices- 



Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 



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SURREY 
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Home Cooked Meals 

Air Conditioned, 

Ample Parking 

15th 4 ATLANTIC AVJC 



O MINIATURE 

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COURSES 



15th 
28th 



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ATLANTIC AVE. 



OCEAN 

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'MR. 



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August 3-4 
AtaJedoo %3M 

"atmes CHOicr 

by ERA LEVIN 

August 5- 6 
ue. 



"BRIGADQON" 

by LERNEaVeed LOEWE 

August 7 - 8 



OCEAN REEF FISHING 

On The Party Boat 'MISSY" 

LEAVES DAILY AT 8:00 A.M. 

(Regardless of number of people aboard) 

LONG CREEK MARINA 

Route 615—'/, MUe Sooth of Shore Drive 

HO 4-9952 

Adults $7.50 Children $3.7$ 

Includes Bait And Handlings 

S nack Bar Aboa rd ■ 



rjflit hik- 




SEAS SEAFOOD 

RESTAURANT 

Snak Bar 

Serving Break! ut 24 HOURS 

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* 



Vlrglrllli Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 2, 1 962 
Pag«4~B 

*_^_ 



VACATIONERS 

Consult Our Dentists 
r? in need of a new sat of 

TEETH 

Repairs 

While You Wait 

9 TO 6 P.M. DAILY 

CLOSED SATURDAY 

Shmdmnt 

DENTISTS 

QrmMfyalTrUiMSl 

No Appointment 
Necessary 



MA 2-4575 • 
PARKING 



Motor Ramp Garage 
H4 W. Main St 



a 



fjotei from Mi 



our 



COUNTY AGENT 

By E. R. "DICK" COCKRELL, JR. 




NOW IS THE TIME TO: 

Kill flies. 
Start plowing. 
Paint the shed. 
Sneak a snooze. 
Sow pansy seeds. 
Eat watermelons. 
Clean the furnace. 
Read Mark 4: 26-34. 
Help Sis wash dishes. 
Refill the cookie jar. 
Repaint the farm sign. 
Check for fire hazards. 
Buy fire extinguishers. 
Admire Auntie's porch swing. 
Fix Auntie's porch swing. 
Plant peonies and poppies. 
Write to your congressman. 
Try out a new fishing reel. 
Dream about the North Pole. 
Pause and admire the sunset. 
Dress poultry for the freezer. 
Plant some more lilies and 

tulips. 
Repair the roof on the loafing 

barn. 
Install a sprinkler system for 



SMITH'S 

Appliance Service 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

ON ALL 

Household Appliances 
DIAL 341-1392 

9527 MAVERICK STREET PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 



the hogs. 
Make sure feedlot cattle are 

getting enough vitamin A. 
Ask Mom if she'd like to dine 

in an air-conditioned 

restaurant. 




Monday— July 23 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
CHAMBER APPROVES 

Some two months ago the 
Virginia Beach . Chamber of 
Commerce organized a new 
Agricultural Committee. W. 
Clark Fleming is chairman of 
the new committee, with 
Howard Jones sitting in the 
Vice-chairman's seat. 

The committee immediately 
started to work. The first ac- 
tion taken came when the 
County Board of Agriculture re- 
quested the Agricultural Com- 
mittee of the Virginia Beach 
Chamber to sponsor the 4-H Jr. 
Steer and 4-H Market Lamb 
Projects. The committee liked 
the idea and decided to request 
authorization from the Cham- 
ber to conduct the projects. 

A committee of Ralph Frost, 
Bobby Midgett, Keister Evans 
and me was erequested to pre- 
pare this request. On Monday I 
appeared before the Executive 
Board on behalf of the commit- 
tee. The Board was very enthus- 
iastic about the two projects 
and authorized the Agricultural 
Committee to plan and conduct 
both projects. 

Clark Fleming made the -fol- 
lowing sub-committee chairman 
appointments at the committee's 
monthly meeting Tuesday at the 
Dune's Hotel. Roy Payne was 
appointed chairman of the pro- 
jects committee. Howard Jones 
was appointed chairman of the 
4-H Junior Steer Project sub- 
committee and J. Curtis Payne, 
chairman of the 4-H Market 
Lamb Projects committee. 

Also appointed was Jeb Ives, 
chairman of monthly program 
committee. 



DHIA HERDBOOK CLINIC 

Bob DeFord, S. W. Smith, Al 
MacKay, Clark Fleming and 
Stanley Yeskolski met with me 
for lunch and DHIA on Monday 
afternoon. With the assistance 
of John Van Luik and Elvin 
Flint, DHIA Supervisors, we 
went over the DHLA/testing pro- 
gram and use of records with a 
fine tooth comb. 

Records are essential in any 
farm operation but especially in 
dairying. DHIA is one of the 

(best record keeping systems a 
dairy farmer can have. Proper 

t records can be used for better 
feeding, selection of replace- 
ments, a means of culling, and 

) many others. *, 

The understanding of how to 



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use these records was a % part 
of the clinic. I reckon that this 
educational work it my respon- 
sibility so if there are others, 
who could not attend this or 
other clinics, please call me. 
HI he glad to help. Also if you 
want to discuss a record system 
for your herd, just call my of- 
fice. I probably won't ho in, but 
I'll get your message and follow 
up. 



Tuesday — 24th 
SWEET POTATO 
SALES MEETING 

Princess Anne Sweet Potato 
Growers should sit up and take 
notice of what's going on around 
us. You know we think that we 
are in pretty good shape with 
our marketing association, but 
we must stay alert to changes 
and opportunities. 

Tuesday was a good day 'for 
Russell Brown, Alton Williams 
and me. We went to Williams- 
burg for a joint meeting of the 
Vegetable Marketing Associa- 
tions in Eastern Virginia. 

Each of th associations spoke 
on its purpose, marketing pro-, 
cedure, problems, and needs. 
Good points were also men- 
tioned. We learned a lot that 
day. If we forget about the im- 
portance of organized marketing 
of a quality product then we are 
lost 

Williams, who now serves as 
President of the Princess Anne 
Marketing Association, is plan- 
ning a membership meeting of 
the association to discuss the 
joint meeting and to make plans 
for the 1962-6«Vmarketing sea- 
son of sweet potatoes. 



Thwrt*i¥-->lyl¥ ?6th 

VflMJUMA IMUW SOU 
CONSWVATrON DISTRICT 

Looking after the affairs of 
the Soil Conservation work of 
Norfolk and Princess Anne 
Counties was the order of the 
morning for me. The Board of 
Supervisors of the Virginia 
Dare District meet bi-monthly 
under the direction of A. E. 
Roach, Chairman of the Board. 



HOMEMAKERS 





Wednesday — 25th 
A TOUGH JOB 

When you eat too much, isn't 
it nice to sit back with that silly 
look on your face, and just go 
Whe-e-e-h. 

But suppose right at that 
moment you had to stand before 
a group of farmers and talk 
Dairy Herd Improvement for 45 
minutes. 

Well, that is what happened 
to me Wednesday night at the 
annual meeting of Yoder 
Dairies, Inc. When I accepted 
Joe Hershberger's invitation to 
talk, I didn't realize that I was 
going to eat so much. It was 
good, gosh it was good. 

I don't know if the dairymen 
learned as much as I talked, 
'cause I talked plenty. Why and 
how to improve our Dairy Man- 
agement through records, and 
the proper use of the records 
was the main topic. I sure en- 
joyed- being with those folks. 
Just hope that they didn't fin- 
ish listening before I finished 
talking. 



AGRICULTURE— . 

ITS IMPORTANCE 

Sometimes we forget that 
the biggest industry in the 
United States is Agriculture. 
Its total investment is more 
than $206 billion, and it em- 
ploys more people than the 
steel, automotive, transporta- 
tion, and public utilities in- 
dustries combined. The Tri- 
Stater. 



JR. ANGUS FIELD DAY 

Just as I finished lunch Thurs- 
day it was time to go to Holland 
for the Junior Angus Field* Day. 
We had lots of folks to go. They 
included Mr. and* Mrs. Ralph 
Moulton and their four Angus 
steer feeders, Margaret, Joe, 
Jerry and Johnny. Also in at- 
tendance were Joey Pecsek, 
David White and Lee Durham. 

The field day for the Juniors 
included an Angus type demon- 
stration, a weight guessing con- 
test, three Judging contests, a 
tatooing demonstration, and a 
fitting and showing contest. 

Princess Anne 4 • H'ers 
brought home three of the four 
awards. Joe Moulton was second 
high scorer in the judging con- 
test and received an Angus 
model bull trophy, Margaret 
Moulton, received a silver bowl 
trophy for winning one of the 
classes, and Joey Pecsek re- 
ceived a silver bowl for having 
traveled the most miles to get 
to the field day. 



Friday — 27th 
SILAGE MEETING 
AND TOUR PLANNED 

John Shoulders, VPI Exten- 
sion Agronomist, rolled in here 
early. Dog gone a fella that goes 
to work before breakfast. 

I told John that we had found 
that we were not making corn 
silage as good as we should. Also 
bragged that we had the highest 
yield of silage per acre in the 
state, but that we needed to im- 
prove the quality of silage by 
better harvesting through prop- 
er timing and etc. 

The etc. is always the most 
important you know. These etc. 
were pretty well spelled out 
last winter when the County Ex- 
tension Dairy Planning Commit- 
tee met to plan our annual pro- 
gram. This committee said that 
we need to do more educational 
work on silage. So that's what 
ole John and I were planning. 

Gonna let you in on a little 
secret. The plans look good, 
real good. 

A very high level sort of 
meeting^for dairymen and beef 
cattlemen will be held at 8 p.m. 
on August 16th, followed by a 
real up-to-date, modern, eye- 
opening tour the next day. Will 
tell you more plans next week. 
See if you don't agree when you 
see the outline. 



Specials are an accepted part 
of food merchandising. Each 
week-end, you'll have a wide 
choice of specialed items you 
can buy. They are, of course, 
designed to get you into a store, 
hoping after you get there you'll 
do your whole week's grocery 
shopping. 

It has been suggested that 
•specials are bargains. If you 
were to shop specials to the 
fullest extent, you could save 
$200 to $300 a year on your 
grocery biU. 

There is a lot of truth in this. 
Some research results show that 
careful shopping, including 
shopping specials, could cut 
many gorcery bills 10 to 15 per- 
cent, ft could do this without 
loss of variety or in the quality 
of items bought. So, shopping 
for specials can be important in 
your food plans. 

However, there is danger in 
pursuing specials too avidly. 
For one thing, not every special 
is a bargain to you. This does 
not mean that specials' do not 
carry unusually attractive price 



of Rural Affairs at VPI. I'm 
tickled that I've, got a real 
"bunch" from Princess Anne 
with me. They include at the 
last round-up; E. H. Harrison, 
John Potter, Jeb Ives, Ralph 
Frost, Alva Malbone, Earl 
Tebault, Guy Bonney, Herman 
Dudley, and Forrest Baum. 

The Institute is the farmers' 
and homemakers' week at the 
Agricultural College. 



Saturday — 28th 

Fish are jumping, corn is 
growing, and I'm sitting in this 
:?/x?:Y office doing paper work. 
Gotta get things ready to be 
away for a week. Yep! Going to 
them thar hills in Blacksburg. 

When you read this, I'll be 
attending the Annual Institute 

MJ 9 



The Weeks Ahead 
Minimum Corn Hillage 
Demonstration Tour 

I don't want you to forget to 
attend the corn tour on Tues- 
day, August 7. Time is 1 p.m. 
First stop is at Norfolk City 
Farm. 



MARKET HOG SHOW 

Let's go to Courtland August 
8 and 9 to the Virginia Market 
Hog Show to learn more about 
producing the kind of hogs 
needed today. 



NURSERY HELP 

Dr. Paul Smeal from VPI 
Horticultural Department here 
August 13 to help me help you. 
Give me a call. 



JR. HEREFORD FIELD DAY 

Will be held Saturday, Aug. 
18, at Rock Hill Farm in Black- 
stone, Virginia. 



EXTENSION CONFERENCE 

The week of August 20, your 
agents will be at VPI attending 
Annual Extension Workers Con- 
ference. Mrs. Pinkham and 
Miss Walsh Will be here to help 
you. 



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tags. Usually they do. It means 
that, unless it fits into your 
family food plans, "it isn't a bar- 
gain for you. Ham at 29c a lb. 
isn't a bargain if you can't eat 
ham A special is designed to 
attract many people, but there 
is no hope that any one special 
will be a bargain to all people. 

Second, you can get so in- 
volved in chasing specials that 
you spend as much getting them 
as you. save. For example, I 
have a friend who spends al- 
most all day Friday doing her 
grocery shopping. She visits 
every store in town, buying 
specials. As a result, she has a 
low food cost. Yet, she is always 
wishing she had more time to 
clean house, to mend childrens* 
clothes, and to work with her 
flowers. Perhaps, she's paying a 
high price in time for the money 
she saves. 

Nor, is this counting the cost 
of the extra gas she use's, the 
wear and tear on her automo- 
bile, the lunch she often buys 
as she does her Friday grocery 
shopping. Not all the saving on 
food is a realized saving. 

Specials can save you money. 
Specials can be a bargain. How- 
ever, you have to consider each 
special on its own merits and 
you have to be the master of 
your own grocery list rather than 
letting specials dictate what you 
buy. 



PROTECT YOUR WOOLENS 

Now is the time to start put- 
ting away your winter woolens. 
But\before you do, moth-proof 
them. You can do it yourself 
with any of several insecticides 
now on the market. \ 

There are a number of chemi- 
cals -that offer good protection 
both against clothes moths and 
carpet beetles You can buy 
these chemicals at most hard- 



ware, drag, and dejD»rtment 
stores, nay come as lipid oil 
solutions' to he applied with a 
sprayer, or in pressuriied spray 
containers of their own 

Simply hang your clean 
clothes and blankets on an out 
doors line and. spray them with 
the chemical solution until the 
surface is moist but not wet 
Allow the garments to dry, then 
store. 

If you apply too much solu- 
tion, it may cause a white de- 
posit after the fabric dries. 
Don't worry about this. After 
storage you usually can brush 
off the excess. K not, dry- 
cleaning will do the trick. 



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The MIXING BOWL . . . 

IT'S 3un TO COOK 



By LUCILE CLARK 

8UN-NEWS FOOD EDITOR 

for the Very latest In food fads and tables . . for 
practical, down-to-earth recipes that please both 
palate and pocketbook, read the "Mixing Bowl" by 
Lucille Clark each Thursday in the Sun-News. 



— 




now... TWO 




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serving the 
Virginia Beach - 
Princess Anne area 



& Mill U KEIPAL 



PRINCESS ANNE -94 15 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH -3201 PACIFIC AVENUE 



Doubtless the Greeks, Rom- 
ans and Babylonians enjoyed a 
wedge of meat between two 
slabs of bread, but it was the 
Earl of Sandwich who made the 
English people sandwich mind- 
ed. He couldnt stop playing 
long enough to eat his meals 
when ready— so he ordered 
meat on bread be brought to 
him and so it was called sand- 
wich from that time on. Actuat 
ly, however, the sandwich was 
the invention of the great Jew- 
ish teacher, Rabbi Hillel, the 
prince who lived between 70 
B.C. and 70 A.D. 

The Jewish people during the 
Passover feast ritual still follow 
Hillel's custom of eating sand- 
wiches made of two pieces of 
matzoh (unleavened bread) con- 
taining mohror (butter herbs) 
and haroseth (clapped nuts and 
apple to resemble the mortor of 
the Egyptians) as a reminder of 
Hebrew suffering before the de- 
liverance from Egypt. 

All this is to prove that sand- 
wiches are as old as bread and 
cheese. Since they intended to 
assuage the pangs of hunger, 
they should not be made paper- 
thin and practically tasteless. 
Sandwiches are not canape's, 
and canape's are not sandwiches 
although the same spreads may 
be used for both. These facts 
came from the Gold Book by 
Louis P. DeGouy. 

There are many garnishes to 
compliment a sandwich. It is 
nice to use them when serving 
sandwiches — eye appeal so often 
makes one think the sandwich 
more appetizing. Like acces- 
sories to. one's dress, they should 
be chosen with taste and a sure 
sense of appropriateness. Here 
are a few garnishes, Sweet or 
sour pickles, Dill pickles, green 
pepper, hard • cooked eggs, 
olives, tomatoes, Radishes, par- 
sley or watercress. 

The Earl of Sandwich had no 
idea there would be a month 
celebrating the sandwich, I'm 
*ure. 

But, there is— August is Na- 
tional Sandwich Month — today 



Use SUN-NEWS Classified Ads 



sandwiches may be spread, 
stuffed— stacked and served hot 
or cold. There are some triple 
deckers — such as the delicious 
Club sandwich. There are open- 
faced sandwiches, an ideal 
booster for Sunday night supper 
or late evening snacks, this 
sandwich is to be eaten with a 
knife and fork. 

The most popular filling for 
the sandwich, whether plain or 
fancy is a slice of meat. With so 
many varieties packaged, you 
can get most any kind you like. 

Salami Smorrebrod begins 
with slices of sandwich bread on 
which are piled curly leaf let- 
tuce slices 1 of tomatoes, cucum- 
ber and salami. You can pile as 
high as you like because it's 
knife and fork food. For decora- 
tion and added tang, top with 
sour cream and crumbles of 
blue cheese. To continue in the 
Scandinavian tradition serve a 
pot of steaming coffee. 



margarine 

1 tablespoon horse-radish 
6 slices of sandwich bread 

2 eggs 

2 tablespoon chopped chives 
Butter or margarine 

12 tomato wedges 

Allow butter to soften at room 
temperature. Blend well with 
horse-radish. Spread each slice 
of bread with some of the but- 
ter mixture. Arrange 3 or 4 
slices of salami on each slice of 
bread. Beat together eggs, milk, 
and chives. Melt butter in a 
small skillet. Add beaten eggs 
and stir gently as they .cook. 
Top each sandwich with some of 
the scrambled eggs and 2 toma- 
to wedges. 




SALAMI SMORREBROD 

Yield: 6 sandwiches. 

2 packages (4 ounces each) 

sliced hard salami 
6 slices sandwich bread 
Lettuce 

12 slices tomato 
24 slices cucumber 
Vz cup dairy sourced cream 
1 tablespoon Worcestershire 

sauce 
6 tablespoons crumbled blue 

cheese 
To assemble sandwich, cover 
a slice of bread with lettuce. 
Cover lettuce with* 2 slices of 
tomato. Arrange 4 cucumber 
slices on top of tomato. Shingle 
3 or 4 slices of salami on top of 
cucumber. Blend together sour 
cream & Worcestershire sauce. 
Spoon some of sauce over sand- 
wich. Sprinkle one tablespoon 
blue cheese over top. Continue 
making remaining sandwiches in 
same manner. 



MICHAEL L. DICKERSON 

NORFOLK (FHTNC)— Mid- 
shipman first class Michael L. 
Dickerson, son of Mrs. Mary L. 
Dickerson of 612 Virginia Ave., 
Oceana, Va., is participating 
in a Midshipmen's summer cruise 
of five tS seven weeks aboard 
the nuclear powered attack air- 
craft carrier USS Enterprise. 

All Naval Academy and Naval 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(NROTC) Midshipmen partici- 
pate in summer cruises aboard 
ships as part of the mlitary train- 
ng administered to the future of- 
ficers. The Midshipmen learn 

*-hand how a ship operates 
and what it is like to live aboard 
one for an extended period of 
time. 



PARTY SANDWICH LOAF 

1 large loaf unsliced 
white bread 

3 fillings (below 

1 pound cream cheese 
Vz cup heavy cream (about) 

Trim crusts from loaf; cut in 
fourths lengthwise. Form party 
loaf with bread slice, then egg 
filling, bread, tongue filling, 
bread, chicken filling, bread. 
Beat cream cheese until smooth. 
Add cream slowly while beating 
until mixture is fluffy and easy 
to spread. Frost loaf with cheese 
mixture. Garnish top with ros- 
ettes of cheese mixture and 
sliced stuffed olives. Makes 8 
to 10 servings. * 

Egg - Celery - Anchovy Filling: 
Combine % cup finely chopped 
hard-cooked eggs (3), Va cup 
minced celery, 1 T. cut chives, 
3 minced anchovies, 2 T. minced 
watercress and l k cup mayon- 
naise. 

Tongue and Pickle Filling: 
Combine % cup finely chopped 
cooked tongue, 2 T. minced 
sweet gherkins, 1 T. capers, 1 T. 
prepared mustard and % cup 
mayonnaise. 

Chicken Filling: Combine 
% cup finely chopped cooked 
chicken, 2 T. chopped toasted 
almonds, Vz cup well-drained 
grated pineapple, 1 T. minced 
pimiento, % cup mayonnaise. 

During August serve sand- 
wiches often. Make your sum- 
mer living easier and cooler. A 
cooked ham, roast beef or tur- 
key in the refrigerator will be a 
big help. 



SALAMI SCRAMBLE 
Yield: 6 sandwiches 
2 packages (4 ounces each) 

sliced hard salami 
Vz stick (Mi cup) butter or 



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•TAOOUYIAMI 



A Scoop for Print 




Horse Panel 




Dr.ss FatHm No. SIJ2. A Scaop lor 

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44-inch. • 

Ne.oWorfc •arforn No. 5S5. Hon* 
Pan.1. This boautiful picture of horje 
and coif it Mnbroidmrtd with simpl. 
tf itches. II' $ an idoai afff. Hot-iron troni- 
for paffom momvrot about 12'/j by 17 
incht-s wifh eomptet. Instructions Ask for 
No, 595. Our Naodlowork Catalog con- 
taining coupon for totocting on* pattern 
fro* it 50 cmtt. 

Sond 35c for each aY*u pctftrn, 25c 
for •och noodloworlr potttrn (add 5e for 
oach pottom for third clou moiling and 
rOc for •aefi patten for first clou mail- 
ing) to AUDREY LANE BUREAU, k» 
1490, Niw fork I, NX 




« K M% 



BY MARY STONE 



Neither ride vulnerable. Matt 



Q1652 
J543 
4Q42 



I 



North 

5 ♦ 

• ♦ 



NORTH 

♦ •* 

♦ All 

VAKQIC 

♦ »» 
EAST 

tAQJTi 

?J543 V»7 

SOUTH 
KSM 
KM 
I 

4AKJ107 

The bidding: 
East South West 
past l 4 pass 

pass 1 NT pass 
pass 4 4» pass 
pass 5 NT pass 
pass pass pats 

Opening lead: 3 of clube. 

East woo the first trick with the 
ace of clubs and returned a small 
club. South took the trick with the 
king and led a small diamond to 
the ace on the board. South led 
the nine of spades and let it ride 
to lose to West's queen. West re- 
turned a small diamond, East 
went up with the jack and South 
won the trick with the king. South 
then drew the last two rounds of 
trumps, played three rounds of 
hearts, Bluffing a club and a dia- 
mond. South next trumped a heart 
in own hand, led last spade from 
hand and gave up a club for 
two trick set. 

COMMENT: West made one 
error in play. After taking the 
queen of spades trick, should have 
returned a heart instead of a 
small diamond. 

This hand woe played by a 
bridge group that hoe been meet- 
ing regularly for 12 years. Al- 
though not professionals, all of 
the player* are above average. 
How would you haw bid and 
played this hand? 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, AugtM 2, 1962 

Page 5-B 




ADMIRAL STORAGE & TRANSFER CORP. 

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AGENT FOR ENGEl BROTHERS, INC. 




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1 




_^L^J ^jfcB ^^^^ 



let's 00 to Church 



jinia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 
'age 6-8 



Calendar of 
Meetings and 

Special Events 



AMERICAN LEGION— 1st & 
3rd Thursdays, 8:00 p.m., Club- 
house, Laskin Road. Phone GA 
W5J8. 

40 k 8 — 1st Monday each 
month, 8 pjn., clubhouse, Las- 
Ida Road. 



LEGION AUXILIARY — 2nd 
Monday each month 8 p.m., club- 
Laskin Road. 



days 
Club 



CTVTTAN— 1st and 3rd Tues- 
7:00 p.m., Bay Harbour 
b. 




MOUNT OLIVE 
BAPTIST CHU RCH 

9:30 am.— Church School 
11:00 a.m. — Mottling Worship 
7:30 p.m.— Evening Worship 



's Gnat 

King's Grant Road at Queeaafeury 
Drive, Lynnhaven, Va. 
Rev. H. E. Rkhards, Jr., 
10:00 tun.— Sunday School 
11:00 a.m.— Moaning Worship 
7:30 p.m.— Evening Service 



DAUGHTERS 
—2nd and 4th 
17th Street 



OF AMERICA 
Tuesday, 308- 



Daughters of American Revo- 
lution — 2nd Saturday. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. • 



DAR, Princess Anne Chapter — 
2nd Saturday, Sept.-May. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. 



EXCHANGE CLUE— 2nd and 
3rd Mondays, 7:00 p.m. Dinner, 
American Legion Club House, 
Laskin Road. 



VIRGINIA BEACH JUNIOR 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — 
2nd Tuesday, 8 p.m., 4th Tues- 
day, 7.-00 p.m. Dinner meeting, 
Black Angus Restaurant. 



SHRINE CLUB — 2nd Friday 
each month 7 PM. at Cavalier 
Yacht Club. 



KIWANIS— Every Wednesday, 
7 pjn. Dinner, Cavalier Yacht 
Club. 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS — 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 8 pjn. 
Star of the Sea Parish Hall, 14th 
and Arctic. 



LIONS CLUB— 2nd and 4th 
Monday at Isle of Capri at 
7:00 P.M. v 



. OCEANA LIONS CLUB — 
Meets at Cavalier Y.C.C. 2nd k 
4(h Tuesday at 7 p.m. 



MASONS — 2nd Wednesday, 
7.30 p.m., Masonic Hall, 20th 
Street and Arctic Avenue. 




MOOSE LODGE 1998— Every 

' Tuesday, 8 pjn., at Lodge 004 

Atlantic Avenue. Phone GA8- 

-.9786. 



ROTARY — Every Thursday, 
7 pjn., Black Angus Restaurant. 

SPORTS — Every Tuesday, 
1:00 pjn., Cape Colony Club. 



VFW POST 7166 — 
4th Thursdays, 8 p.m., 
Street. 



2nd and 
30847th 



VFW AUXILIARY— 2nd and 
4th Mondays, 8 p.m., 308-17th 
Street. ( 



;>nne 

ruasday c 



PRINCESS HNNE RURTTAN 
CLUB — 1st Tuesday each month 
7 P.M. H. H. Bendler, Secretary. 
GA 8-2881. 



BUSINESS k PROFESSION- 
AL WOMAN'S CLUB OF PRIN- 
CESS ANNE COUNTY — Meets 
2nd Monday of each month at 
pine Tree Inn at 7 p.m. Make 
reservations with Mrs. Atkins 
at 341-1291. 

VIRGINIA BEACH TOAST- 
MASTERS CLUB— Meets 2nd & 
4th Wednesday at Black Angus 
Restaurant from 6:30 to 9 p.m 



' The Track Star Who • 

Observed the Sabbath and 

Lived up to God's Command 
Sermonet by Edmund Berkeley, 

"Rector, Galileo Episcopal 
Church, Va. Beech, Va. 

I read a story in an old Coro- 
net .Magazine called "God 
Speed," about a young Scot 
named Eric Liddell studying for 
the ministry in 1924, faced with 
two of the greatest moments in 
his life. In a few months he 
would be ordained a servant of 
the Lord, and also he was faced 
with the opportunity of bring- 
ing glory to England in the 100- 
meter dash at the Olympic 
Games in Paris. 

Quiet unassuming Liddell 
went about his studies at the 
seminary, followed by hard 
hours of work practicing on the 
athletic field with intense ser- 
iousness. 

Ho was a firm believer 
that man existed for God, and 
country, and that service to 
both was his mission in life. 

A few weeks before the games 
began, Liddell was shocked to 
learn that the preliminary jrace 
in his specialty was scheduled 
for a Sunday afternoon. His re- 
ligious principles would not al- 
low him to compete on the 
Sabbath. Nevertheless, he con- 
tinued his daily schedule of 
study and practice, on the 
athletic field, with one major 
change. 

In the past, at the end of the 
day's activities he had been in 
the habit of joining his friends 
in the usual after -hours dis- 
cussions (or bull sessions) 
that ran into half the night. 
Now, however, he left right 
after the evening meal, and re- 
turned to his room much later, 
tired and spent. His friends 
wondered about this, for never 
once did he tell them where he 
went. 

A few weeks later the whole 
world knew what Eric Liddell 
had been doing in those after 
hours. While his friends were 
unhappy for him over the pecu- 
liar trick of fate, as they put it, 
that chance had kept him from 
participating in the special 
event that he liked in the 
Olympic Games. Liddell had, 
started training for a different 
event, one that would take 
place during the week and not 
interfere with his worship of 
God on Sunday, and keeping the 
Sabbath Day Holy. This event 
called for an entirely different 
type of speed and endurance 
and so required special practice. 

Learning of his great effort, 
the sports world was thrilled 
when Eric Liddell took his place 
on the winner's platform, to re- 
ceive the Gold Medal as Olym- 
pic 400-meter champion. The 
record performance that won it 
for him stands among the great 
individual achievements of the 
Olympic Games. 

We today need to observe the 
Sabbath and live by God's Com- 
mands. 



BAPTIST CHURCH 

London Bridge, Virginia 
G. Edward Hughes, Pastor 

9:45 ajn.— Sunday School. 
1 1:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:00 pjn.— Training Union. 

8:00 p.m.Evening Worship. 



LYNNHAVEN COLONY CHAPEL 

Greer Neck Road near Shore Dr. 
Rev. Sent Ne l so n. Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School 
10:45 a.m.— Morning Worship. 

DIAMOND SPRINGS . 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Disciples of Christ 

6700 W. Heden Road 

Near Little Creek Ferry 

9:45 A.M.— Church School 

11:00- A.M.— Worship Service 

6:30 P.M.— Youth Groups 



ST. JOHN'S BAPTIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne Court House 
Rev. Brace B. PerUna, Pastor 
10:00 A.M.— Sunday School. 
1 1:00 A.M.— Morning Worship. 
6:00 P.M.— B.T.U. 
7:00 P.M.— Evening Worship. 



HILLTOP BAPTIST CHAPEL 

sieeting in 
Linkhorn Park School, Laskin Rd. 

Pastor— George T. Stalling* 
9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
1 1:00 sum.— Worship Service. 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Rev. Frank Hughes, Jr. 

245 Rceemont Road 
9:30 A.M. ft 5 P.M. — Worship 

10:30 A.M.— Sunday School 



BA YSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 

1480 Pleasure House Road 
Pastor— lames V. De Foe 

8:30 & 11:00 A.M.— Worship 

Service 
8:00 P.M. — Evening Service 



CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



THALIA LYNN BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

(Meeting hi Princess Anne 
High School) 

9:30 A.M.— Sunday School. 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

35th Street at Holly Road ' 
H. WadeU Waters, Pastor 

Sunday School 9:30 A.M. 

Morning Worship _ 11:00 A.M. 

Training Union 6:15 P.M. 

Evening Service 7:30 P.M. 



^gga^amsogaa^ 




' IS SEQ3BS SJ3EQ® 



Oak Grove 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
Beck Bay, Virginia 
Rev. H. Eugene Arrington, 

9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
8:00 pjn. — Evening Worship. 

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Bayside, Virginia 

GreenweH Road & Lakeview Dr. 

Rev. David Moore, Pastor 

9:45 a.m. — Sunday School 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
7:45 pjn. — Evening Worship 



FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 

419 Gienrock Road, Norfolk 2, Va. 
Rev. Charles T. Hendricks, Pastor 

9:45 sum.— Church School. 
11:00 a-m. — Morning Worship. 
7:30 pjn. — Evening Worship. 

, FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 

6818 Va. Beach Blvd., Norfolk, Va. 
Fred M. Fame, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a jn.— Morning Worship. 
6:30 p.m. — Fellowship Hour. 
7:30 pjn. — Evening Services. 



FREEWILL BAPTIST 

In Princess Anne County on Highway 
615 Vi mfle Past Oceana Air Station 
on right 
T. J. Tingle, Serving as Minister 

Sunday School — 9:45 AM. 

Worship Service 11:45 AM. 

Evening Service — 7:30 P.M. 

GRACE BRETHREN CHURCH 

Great Neck at Hilltop 
A. Harold Arrington, Pastor 
10:00 AM.— Sunday School. 
11:00 AM.— Worship Service 
7:30 P.M. — Evening Service. 



Star of the Sea 
• CATHOLIC CHURCH , 

Nth Street and Arctic Circle 

Nicholas J. Habets, Pastor 

Sunday Masses: Winter, 8:00, 9:30 

and 11:00 a.m. 
Summer, June 15 th thru Labor Day, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m. and 
. 12:15 p.m. 
Holy Days, 7:00, 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 

J p.m. 
essions, 4:00 to 5:00 and 7:00 
to 8:00 p.m. Saturday 
Weekday Mass, 8 a.m. 



ST. GREGORY'S CATHOLIC 
. CHURCH , 
7211 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Rev. Dfnrian Abbatkchio, O.S.B. 

MASSES: 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; High 

Mass, 12:00 noon. 

Confessions are on Saturday, 7:30- 
8:30. 



OCEAN PARK 
(IMMUNITY CHURCH 
Parker N. Young, Pastor 
Du Pont Circle, Bayside, Va. 
9:45 a.m —Bible SchooL 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.— Family Night Service. 



Virginia Beach 
COMMUNITY CHAPEL 

Laskin Road, Linkhorn Bay 
Rev. Richard Woodward, Pastor 

9:45 a.m. — Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship 
11:30 a.m.— Children's Church 

7:30 pjn. — Evening Service. 



BAYSIDE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

(Congregational) 
Shore Drive and GreenweH Road 

Earl L. FarreO, Minister 
9:45 A.M.— Worship Service. 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School. 
11:00 A.M.— Worship Service. 



KALA CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Back Bay, Va. 
Gene HartseU, Minister 

10:00 A.M.— Bible School 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
7:30 P.M.— Evening Worship 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 

621 Va. Beach Blvd., Oceana, Va. 
James W. Medua, Minister 

10:00 a.m.— Bibk Study 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 

15th Street end Baltic Avenue 
Elwood Ken, Pastor 

9:45 a.m Sunday School. 

11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 pjn. — Evangelistic Service. 

FIRST CHURC H OF CHRIST, 
SCIENTIST 

209 - 20th Street 
9:30 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Chuhch Service 
8:00 P.M.— Wednesday Service 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

East Lane — Oceana 

Rev. Samuel D. Befler, Jr., Pastor 

9:45 a.m. — Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.Evangelistic Service. 

CHURCH OF GOD 

620 14th Street 
Bobby H. Sams, Pastor 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
7:30 AM.— Evening Worship 



GALILEE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

40th and Pacific— GA 8-3573 

The Rev. Edmund Berkeley, Rector 

The Rev. Emmanuel C. Bach, 

Assistant Rector 
8:00 a.m.— Holy Communion 
9:15 a.m.— Family Service, Church 

School, Sermon 
11:15 a.m.— Morning Prayer and 
Sermon. 



EMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Kempsville Road, Kempsville 
The Rev. Charles R. McGinley, 
Pastor 
8:00 A.M. — Holy Communion 
10:00 AM. — Morning Prayer and 
. Sermon 



EASTERN SHORE CHAPEL 

Episcopal) 

B. Sidney Sanders, Rector 

8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion 
9:30 a.m. — Family Service and 

Morning Prayer (3srd Sun- 
day Holy Communion.) 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Paryer and 
Sermon (1st Sunday, Holy 
Communion.) 



OLD DONATION 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Rt. 1, Box 63B, Bayside, Va. 
- Rev. Beverley D. Tucker, Jr. 

8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion 
10:00 a.m. — Morning Prayer and 
Sermon. 



TEMPLE EMANUEL 

25th and Baltic, Virginia Beach 
Philip Rabinowitz, Rabbi 
7:30 A.M. — Services Mon.-Fri. 
9:00 A.M. — Services Sat 
8:00 A.M.— Services Sun. 



THE LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Missouri Synod 
Sunday .School— 9:45 AM. 
Being conducted temporarily at 
Happy Days Nursery School, Las- 
kin Rd., adjacent to Linkhorn School. 



Evangelical 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Of the Good Shepherd 

Atlantic and 18th Street 
Rev. John D. Krister, Minister 
8:30 A.M.— Morning Worship 
9:45 A.M.— Church School and 

Adult Bible Classes 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 



-- OUR SAVIOUR'S 

LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Baylake Pines B*wide, Virginia 
Kenneth R. Carbaugh, Pastor 
8:30 A.M.— Worship Service 
9:45 A.M.— Church School 
11:00 A.M.— Worship Service 



PRINCE OF PEACE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(Missouri Synod) 
Rev. J. Elmer Medley, Pastor 

Meeting at Happy Days Nursery 
Laskin Rd., next to Linkhorn Sch. 

Divine Worship - 8:30 A.M. 

Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. 

Confessional Service — ._ 8:15 A.M. 

on Communion Sundays 
Sunday School & Bible Class 9:30 a.m. 
11 a.m Worship Service 



VIRG INIA BEACH 
METHODIST CHURCH 

207- 18th Street 
Dr. W. Kenneth Haddock, Pastor 

8:30 a.m. — Worship Service Summer 

Months 
9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11:00 a.m— Worship Service 



BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH 

Creeds 
Roger C. Snyder, Pastor 

10:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
11:00 A.M.-Church School 



PLAZA METHODIST CHURCH 

Meeting at Plaza School 
Walter A. WUtehurot, Pastor 

9:45 A.M.— Morning Worship 

11:00 A.M.— Church ScbooF 

7:00 P.M.— Youth Fellowship 



BEECH GROVE 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne 
Kogar c sayoer, none 
10:00 AM,— Church School 
11:00 A. M— Morning Worship 

Scott Me moria l 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Great Neck Road, Oceana, Va. 
Rev. Lee H. Rlchcreek, Pastor 
9:45 ajn^— Church School 
11:00 am.— Morning Worship 

7:30 p.m.— Y outh F eUowshy. > 

FRANCS ASBURY 
METHODIST CHURCH, 

Greet Neck Road 
E. I. Taylor, Pa st or 
9:45 a.m.— Church School 
1 1 :0O a.m.— Morning Worship 



HAYGOOD MEMORIAL 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Bayside ft Bay Snore Roads 

Jeans G. Long, Jr., Pastor 

9:45 A.M.— Morning Worship and 

Church School. 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship and 
Church School. 



THALIA METHODIST CHURCH 

Pine Ave. A Va. Beach Blvd. 
Rev. B. J. Garrett, Pastor 

9:00 A.M.— Church School 
10:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 



Community 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Acredafe — Kempsville 
Rev. A. P. Reach, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.— Youth Fellowship. 



LYNNHAVEN 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Little Neck Road 

Rev. Walter A. Whiteharst, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11:15 a.m. — Morning Worship 



K notts Island 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Knotts Island. N.C. 
Janes E. Hodges, Minister 

10:00 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m. — Worship Service. 




9 



Nimm o 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne. Virginia 
* Rev. Frank D. James 

10:15 a.m.— Church School 
11:15 a.m. — Morning Worship 



METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne, Virginia 
Rev. LdRoy Davis, Mlnist 
9:45 a-m. — Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 



BAYLAKE METHODIST CHURCH 

Shore Drive at Treasure Island Dr. 
'-• Bayside 

Janes W. Reynolds, Jr., Minister 
8:30 A 11 A.M.— Worship Service 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 



Charity 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Back Bay, Virginia 
Rev. William A. Moon, Jr. 

10:00 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 



SALEM METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne, Virginia 
Rev. Frank D. James 

10:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
11:00 a.m.— Church School. 
7:30 p.m.— Youth Fellowship 



OCEANA 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

S. Court House Rd., Oceana, Va. 
Paul A. Aldricb, Pastor 

9:45 a.m. — Sunday School 
10:45 a.m. — Morning Worship 



Calvary 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

First Street, Gienrock, Norfolk, Va. 

E. Croweil Cooky, Pastor 
9:45 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
6:30 p.m.— What-Nots Fellowship. 
6:30 p.m. — Pioneer Fellowship. 
6:30 pjn.— Young People's Fellow- 
ship. 



FIRST 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Pacific Avenue at 36th Street 
Henry G. Morgan 
J. Paul Vondacek 
Minister 
Sunday 
8:30 Morning Worship 
9:45 Church School 
11:00 Morning Worship 
7:30 Youth Fellowships 
7:30-8:00— Sunday evening Chanel 
Vesper Service 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

Weatz J. MiDer, Minister 

Meeting in the Plaza 
Elementary School 

Sunday School — 9:45 A.M. 

Church Service 11:00 A.M. 



Christ Presbyterian Church 

1200 Aragona Boulevard 

M. Bund Dudley, Minister 

8:30 A.M.— Worship and Church 

School 
9:45 AM.— Church School 
11:00 A.M.— Worship and Church 
School. 



KING'S GRANT 
, PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
(Now meeting in the King's Grant 
Elementary School) 
Raymond C. Flitton, Pastor 
9:50 AM.— Sunday School. 
11:00 A.M. — Morning Worship. 



LYNNHAVEN 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Lynnhaven Village 
H. L. Boettcher, Clerk of Session 

10:00 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 

6:30 p.m.— Youth Fellowship. 

6:30 pjn.— Pioneer Fellowship. 

7:30 p.m. — Evening Worship. 



Bayside 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Near Robbins Corner 
Rev. J. E. Johnson, Pastor 

9:45 a.m. — Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 



(Quaker) 
FRIENDS MEETING 
. LASKIN RD. 

9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 AM.— Meeting for Morning 
woraorp. 



An old adage, indeed, that "all work and no play 
makes Jack a dull boy." m 

The "kids" on the farm are models of youthful effi- 
ciency. But they go a-fishin' whenever they can. 

The business men, the housewives, the schoolchildren 
— they need their fishin' too ! 

But there is another way in which the old adage is 
true: ALL WORKING and no PRAYING leaves man 
a dull soul!* 

The God who created us never intended us to be able 
to get along without Him. 

Our hands may sow seed, but they cant make it 
grow. Our minds may work out problems, but they cant 
solve the world's chaos. All of our efficiency hasn't 
brought us lasting happiness or firm hope. r 

But when we turn to our Christian faith, and seek 
its power through regular worship in our Churches — - 
then we find the things we need and want most! 



ST. MARK A.M.E. CHURCH 

Oceana, Va. 

Rev. D. P. Fetton, Pastor 

9:30 a.m. — Sunday SchooL 
11:00 a.m.— Worship Service. 




THE CHURCH tOm ALL . . . 

ALL FOR THE CHURCH 

TIm Church U the ti et lt it factor 
cm earth far the buikiiaf af char- 
acter aad food citixaaaUp. it a a 
rto uh aatt at apiritaal relate. Wi*- 
Ml a Uroaf Church, Batcher de- 
■Mcracjr aor cmhiatioa caa tar- 
rive. Tact* an few eouad reatoni 
whr every peneet ih ea ld attend 
arnica* regalarrjr aad rapport *e 
Church. The* are: (I) For hit 
own aaka. (2) Far hU childrea '• 
tale. ($) For the take of hit coca- 
muaitr aad aalioa. (4) Far the 
take af Am Church iaelf . which 
aeedi hit awral aad material* rap- 
port. Pita to fa to church reaja- 
larljr aad read roar BMt daily. 



Ctmyrignt 190S, tdaUr advertising Service, Inc., Straaburg, Va. 



THIS SERIES OF MESSAGES IN THE INTEREST OF THE CHURCH IS SPONSORED 
BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS 



HOLT BUICK, INC. 

THREE GREAT BUICKS 

LaSabra — Invicta — Electro 

21st ft PACIFIC AVE. GA 8-2132 



MURDEN DRUG CO.. 

Prompt, Efficient Prescription Service 
Phone 340-8111 London Bridge, Va. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

Telephone GA 8-9319 
23rd Street Virginia Beach 



ROSE'S 5-10-25c STORES, INC. 

309 31st St. ft 1901 Atlantic Avenue 
Your Shopping Center 



RUSSELL & HOLMES 

Your Newly Enlarged Shoe Store 

"Where Shopping Is a Pleasure" 

1908 Atlantic Avenue Virginia Beach 

GA 8-4301 



PRICE'S INC. 

HILLTOP 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



NIXON ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractors — General Repairs 

House,( Commercial Wiring — Light Fixtures 

CM • 17th Street. Va. Beach—Phone GA 8-3711 



COMET TRAILERS 

Hani your own furniture with Comet Trailers 
Call 543-3534 
1217 South Military Highway 



EMRHAE FORD 

FORD and ITALIAN FIAT 

406 . 17th St. also Bayside on Rt 13Y 

Telephone GA 8-S232 



BE-LO SUPERMARKET 

30th Street ft Arctic As 
Virginia 



R. L. GARRINGER 

a* Wholesale Meats and Provisions 
Distributors Kraft Food Products 
2446 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Telephone MA 7-5398 Norfolk. Va. 



CAVALIER GARAGE ' 

JOHNNY DUDLEY 

Directly Behind Hotel 

Independently Operated 

Hotly Rd. ft Cavalier Dr. 

Dial GA 8-2131 Virginia Beach 



BRINKLEY'S SHELL SERVICE 

"Friendly Service plus Quality Products* 

31st Street and Baltic Avenue 

Telephone GA 8-4232 Virginia Beach 



KELLAM & EATON, INC. 

Building Supplies 

"Headquarters For Your Needs" 

Princess Anne Phone 2661—2672 



CERTIFIED TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

151 EAST LITTLE CREEK RD. 588-5471 

6000 VA. BEACH BLVD. 497-1021 



KELLAM & EATON INSURANCE CO. 

Real Estate — Rentals — Insurance 
3113 Pacific Avenue — Telephone GA 8-9161 



PRINCESS ANNE PLUMBING 
& ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, INC. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

Westlnghouse Appliances 

Phone: Day 2660 ft 2678 — Night 2663 

Princeaa Anna 



OCEANA CURB MARKET 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Groceries and Meats 

Phone GA 8-1691 Oceana, Va. 



VA. BEACH AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

Evinrude Mote-* — Automotive Parts 
Phone GA 8-6556 
*- 826 - 17th Street 



W. A. WOOD OIL CO. 

Commission Agent 

ESSO STANDARD OIL CO. 

Feel OS and Kerosene 

Dial GA 8-3385 



Security 
Changes Allow 
More Earnings 

A person can now earn more 
money and still get some of his 
social security benefit during 
the year. 

This change in the law is of 
special interest to people who 
earn between $1,500 and $1,700 
a year after they become 
eligible for benefits. A person 
who earns more than $1,200 now 
loses benefits at the rate of $1 
in benefits for each $2 earned 
between $1,200 and $1,700. On 
earnings of over $1,700 $1 in 
benefits is withheld foreach $1 
earned. These new withholding 
rates apply to a person's earn- 
ings during 1961. 

Some parts of the social secur- 
ity retirement test were not 
changed by the recent amend- 
ments to the law. A person may 
receive checks for all 12 months 
of the year when he earns 
$1,200 or less during the yjear. 
He can get a benefit payment, 
also, fo^ any month in which he 
is 72 years of age or older, re- 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 8160 
Crow Canyon Road, Haywood, 
California. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Mary M. White, D.C; 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. . 8-2-4t 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princoss Anno, 'on the 23rd day 
of July, 1962. 
Guy Wilburt DeFrehn, Plaintiff 

against 
Prances Isabelle DeFrehn, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
.The object of this suit is to 
give evidecne for the purpose 
of obtaining a final divorce de- 
cree on the 10th day of August, 
1962, at 10:00 A.M., from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion and aband- 
onment. 
And an affidavit having been 



the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the la«t known 
post office address being: 225 
Virginia Avenue, Spray, North 
Carolina. . 

It is ordered that he Mo ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy-^Tosto: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
.Edward T. Caton, m, p.q. 
210-25th Street 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-194t 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within tea (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FJENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-19-4t 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



Virginia Beach Suh-News, Thursday, August 2, 1962 



Page 7-B 



--*. 



gardless of how much he earns 

during the year. A person under H de and ft ! ed , } h _ a * ^u^SSft 



72 can get a full benefit check 
for^ any month in which he 
neither earns wages of more 
than $100 nor renders substan- 
tial services in self-employment. 
For further information about 
whether you could get some 
checks during the year if you 
applied for benefits, visit, call, 
or write the Norfolk social se- 
curity office and ask for "If You 
Work While You Get Society 
Security Payments." This pam- 
phlet is free, of course. 

• LEGAL NOTICES 

NOTICE OF AUCTION 

Notice is hereby given that at 
10:00 a.m. on August 14, 1962, at 
Everett-Jordah Motor Co., 516- 
17th Street, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, we shall sell at public 
auction one 1955 Buick autojno- 
bile, 5B-5038934, with accessor-, 
ies, registered in the name of 



ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 2001 Q 
Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do, what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. i 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-26-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerks Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 19th day 
of Jury, 1962. 
Marvin Roger McMillan, 

against Plaintiff 

Constance Delaney Coveney 
McMillan Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The .object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce from the bonds 
of matrimony from the said de- 
fendant, upon the grounds of 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant ' is" not a resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 821 
Rainey Street, Burlington, N.C. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due N publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Xopy— Tasta: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
Sy: Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Henry L. Lam, p.q. 
Princess Anne, Virginia 7-26-4t 



si 



right to bid. 
EVERETT-JORDAN MOTOR CO. 
Drewry & Evans, Attorneys 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-lt 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 3rd day 
of July, 1962. 
LEON COOLEY, Plaintiff 

against 
DOROTHY WELKINS COOLEY, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a Vinculo Ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 



t/jforge B. Sharp. Terms: cash 
at time of, sale. The under- 
gned ^compWy reserves" tha^trupon tire grounds of deser- 
tion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: Route No. 
1, Springhope, North Carolina. 
It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. * 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. - 
L. Travis Branch, p.q. 
2608 Atlantic Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-12-4t 



NOTICE OF AUCTION 

Notice is hereby given, that at 

10:00 a.m. on August 14, 1962, 

at Everett-Jordan Motor Co., 
. 516-17th Street, Virginia Beach, 
I Virginia, we shall sell at public 

auction one 1958 Edsel automo- 
bile, No. WSRG 704072, with 

accessories, registered in the 
Jname of Clarence E. Sorey. 
\ Terms: cash at time of sale. The 
\ undersigned company reserves 

the right to bid. 

EVERETT-JORDAN MOTOR CO. 
iDrewry & Evans, Attorneys 

Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-lt 

NOTICE OF AUCTION 

Notice is hereby given that at 
10:00 a.m. on August 14, 1962, 
at Everett-Jordan Motor Co. 516- 
17th Street, Virginia Beach, Va., 
we shall sell at public auction 
one 1955 Pontiac automobile, 
W855H 16926, with accessories, 
registered in the name of Saul 
! Cherry. Terms: cash at time of 
sale. The undersigned company 
reserves the right to' bid. 
EVERETT-JORDAN MOTOR CO. 
Drewry & Evans, Attorneys 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-lt 

NOTICE OF AUCTIpN 

Notice is hereby given that at 
10:00 a.m. on August 14, 1962, 
at Everett-Jordan Motor Co., 
51617th Street, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, we shall offer for sale 
at public auction one 1957 Ford 
automobile, No. D7EW-297302, 
with accessories, registered in 
the name of Norma Lee Law- 
rence. Terms: cash at time of 
sale. The undersigned company 
reserves the right to bid. 
EVERETT JORDAN MOTOR CO. 
Drewry & Evans, Attorneys 
Virginia Beach, Va . 8-2-lt 

Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Or- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 26th 
day of July, 1962. 

Joseph E. BlackweU, Plaintiff 
against 

Dorothy Joan BlackweU, * 

tefendant ■ 
RDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
Obtain a divorce A Vinculo Ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 
ant-, upon the grounds of three 
year separation under Section 
20-91 (9) of the Code of Virginia- 
1950. 

And aa affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 11th day 
of July, 1962. 
RAYMOND P. BROWN, Plaintiff 

against 
HALLIE R. BROWN, Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a vinculo Matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 
the grounds- of desertionr-' 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: Route 
1, Windsor, North Carolina. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-194t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 3rd day 
of July, 1962. 
PERRY D. OWENS, Plaintiff 

against 
ISLY HOLLEY OWENS, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this publication 
is to give notice of the taking 
of depositions on the 30th day 
of July, 1962, in the above 
styled suit, the object of which 
is to obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said de- 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
'the CUrk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 19th day 
of July, 1962. 
Thomas Glenn Overby, Plaintiff 

against 
Elizabeth Franks Overby, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain from the defendant a 
divorce A Mensa Et Thoro, to 
be later merged into a divorce 
A Vinculo Matrimonii, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered that 



fendant upon the grounds of 
desertion and abandonment. 

And an affidavit having been she do appear here within ten 
made and filed that the defend- (W) days after due publication 



ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 4439 
Texas Avenue, SE., Washington 
19, D.C. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles,. p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-12-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 11|h 
day of July, 1962. 
Helen Gilbert Kallam, Plaintiff 

against 
James Kallam, Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a Vinculo Matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 



hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest 
in this suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Kellam & Kellam, p.q. 
Board of Trade Building 
Norfolk, Va. 7-26-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Cleric's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 11th 
day of July, 1962. 
ALTON W. MEEKTNS, Plaintiff 

against 
THELMA W. MEEKINS. 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 
ant, upon the grounds of con- 
duct tantamount to wilful deser- 
tion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 



VIRGINIA: The regular meeting 
of the Board of Supervisors of 
Princess Anne County will be 
held In the Circuit Court Room, 
on Monday, August 13, 1962, 
at two o'clock P.M., at which 
time persons will be heard for 
and against the following pro- 
posed changes in zoning, use 
permits, etc.: 

L ■ Application of Clyde T 
Landry for a change of zoning 
from Residence Suburban Dis- 
trict 1 (R-S 1) to Agricultural 
District (A-R) of certain prop- 
erty located on the Southwest 
side of Route 632, beginning at 
a point Vi mile West of Route 
615. Fronting 1102.86 feet on 
Route 632, having a maximum 
depth of 1839 feet. Said prop- 
erty along Route 632 to remain 
zoned R-S 1 for a depth of 225 
feet. Bounded on the East by a 
canal ditch and property of 
Cordelia Walke, on the South by 
the property of A. M. Beale and 
on the West by property of 
Dennis Walke Jr. Containing 
23.6 acres, more or less. Sea- 
board District. 

n. Application of Raymond F. 
Ruett and Ray W. Dezern by 
Thomas C. Broyles, Attorney, 
for a change of zoning from 
Residence Duplex District 2 
(R-D 2) to Limited Commercial 
District 3 (OL 8) of Lots 21-25, 
Block 7, subdivision of Chesa- 
peake Park. Said property lo- 
cated at the Northwest inter- 
section of Ocean View Avenue 
and Seaview Avenue. Fronting 
145.5 feet on Ocean View Ave- 
nue, having a depth of 100 
feet, more or less, on Seaview 
Avenue. Bayside District. 

III. Application of Mary L. 
Carson Pyle by Robert B. Crom- 
well Jr., Attorney, for the dis- 
continuance, closure and aband- 
onment of a certain portion of 
Race Street, subdivision of 
Jacksondale. Said portion to be 
closed bounded by Front Street 
on the North and Second Street 
on the South, Lots 1-7, Block 6 
on the East and Lots 6-14, Block 
5 on the West. Having a 66 foot 
right of way. Lynnhaven Dis- 
trict. 

IV. Application of Harris and 
Otealia Jennings by Henry L. 
Lam, Attorney, for a Use Per- 
mit to operate a playground and 
recreation area on' a parcel of 
land being a part of Tract 3, 
J. M. Keeling Plat. Said tract 
located on the North side of 
Indian River Road, 3280 feet 
West of Mears Corner. Said 
parcel beginning at a point 625 
feet North of Indian River Road, 
having a depth of 102.17 feet on 
the West, a width of 210 feet 
on the North, a depth of 65.71 
feet on the East and a width of 
210 feet on the South. Kemps- 
ville District. 

V. Application of ^Hardy R. 
Phipps and Mrs. Letcher Con- 
way McClenny for a Use Permit 
to operate a riding academy on 
certain property located on the 
West side of Kempsville-Great 
Bridge Road. Containing 15 
acres, more or less; beginning 
at a point 690 feet South of 
Indian River Road and extend- 
ing in depth to the Farrell 
Farm. Kempsville District. 

VI. Application of P. P. Owen 
for a Use Permit to maintain a 
sign on certain property -located 
on the South side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, 870 feet East 
of London Bridge Creek om 
property owned by E. B. Lind- 
sley Jr. Lynnhaven District. 

VII. Application of Donnelly 
Advertising Corp. of Virginia 
for a Use Permit to maintain a 
sign on certain property lo- 
cated on the North side of Vir- 
ginia Beach Boulevard, 50 feet 
East of Oconee Park Road, own- 
ed by E. C. Kellam, M. A. Briggs 
and Mrs. B. F. Dixon. Lynnhav- 
en District. 

VHI. Application of J. U. Ad- 
denbrook's Sons Inc. for a Use 
Permit to maintain a sign on 
the Northeast comer of Route 
647 and Route 58, on property 
owned' by Elias Codd. Bayside 
District. 

IX. Application of Shoreline 
Corporation by Lee A. Gifford 
for the following changes of 
zoning in the proposed subdi- 
vision of Lake Smith Terrace: 

(1) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban District 3 
(R-S 3) to General Commercial 



Paul Revere Road, fronting 822 
feet oh Bayside Road and 133.53 
feat on Paul Revere Road; and 
Parcel C, located at the North 
east intersection of Bayside 
Road and Twain Lane, fronting 
125 feet on Bayside Road and 
252.8 feet on Twain Lane. 

(2) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban District 3 
(R-S 3) to Limited Commercial 
District 2 (C-L 2) of Parcel B 
located at the Southeast inter- 
section of Paul Revere Road and 
Miles Standish Road, fronting 
133.7 feet on Paul Revere Road 
and 770 feet on Miles Standish 
Road. 

(3) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban District 3 
(R-S 3) to Multiple-Family Resi- 
dence District (R-M) of Parcel 
D, located at the Northwest in- 
tersection of Bayside Road and 
Twain Lane. Fronting 125 feet 
on Bayside Road and 242.70 feet 
on Twain Lane. Bayside District. 

X. Application of Fair Mead- 
ows Private School by Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Phillips for a Use Permit 
to operate a private school in 
Lekies Memorial Methodist 
Church, located near Davis 
Corner on the North side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard on 
Lots 13, 14, and 15, plat of Mil- 
burn Manor. Bayside District. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Juanita, S. Grimstead, 
D.C. 8-2-2t 

VIRGINIA: The regular meeting 
of the Board of Supervisors of 
Princess Anne County will be 
held in the. Circuit Court Room 
on Monday, August 13th at two 
o'clock P.M., at which time 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



• FURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 

FOR RENT — One-bedroom 
apartment, living room, kitch- 
en privileges. 516-20th Street, 
GA 8-2458. 7-19-tfn 



• MISC. FOR SALE 



l-bedroom furnished apartment, 
living room, bath, kitchenette 
and large walk -in closet. 
Monthly annual rental, $50 
per month. Call GA 8-4960. 

8-2-2t 



FOR SALE— Used air condition 
units. See Ernest McBride, 
Herriott, Motel, 17th & Ocean 
Front. 7-26-2t 



FOR SALE — Practically new 
window fan, cost $60, sell for 
$22 or best offer. Call GA 8- 
8050. 8-2~-tt 



SITUATION WANTED 



High school girl wants part a* 
fuUrtime baby sitting, 50c per 
hour. Thoroughly experi- 
enced. References. Call GA8- 
8050. 8-2-at 

., 1 — , — . ' — yi 

• HELP WANTED 
Male - Female 



One and two bedroom furnisfied 
apartments. GA 8-9663 or MA 
2-1286. 7-26-tfn 



FOLLY RANCH, 1400-17th St., 
clean, modern rooms, effici- 
encies, 1 & 2 bedroom apart- 
ments. Reasonable weekly, 
monthly, or annual rates. 

11-9-tfn 



Approximately 1200 feet. 16mm ^"LT*' ™*\££j 



Studio Apt. rurmshed. All utili- 
ties including air condition. 
Summer rate, $85.00 week, 
year-round rental, $85 month. 
Call 855-1947 or GA 8-3680. 

7-12-tfn 



• 'APARTMENT FOR RENT 



2-bedroom unfurnished apart- 
ment, year round rental, can 
be seen Wednesday, Saturday, 
and Sunday after 1, other 
days after 5 p.m. 1416 Cypress 
Avenue, Virginia Beach, Va. 

8-2-3t 



ocean pictures, photographed 
Virginia Beach area about 
1932. Includes scene at 17th 
St. and Atlantic Avenue, Old 
Baptist Tabernacle, fish boat 
landing at Rudee Inlet fish- 
ing in Abermarle Sound. A 
number of adult and children 
Beach residents included in 
pictures. Some scenes made of 
sea voyage including stop in 
Havana. By unidentifyable 
couple. For sale as a unit, will 
not cut. May be viewed by in- 
terested party. Write Box "M" 
c/o Virginia Beach Sun-News, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-2t 



and orderlies. Apply Virgin**. 4 



Beach Hospital. 



5-11 



FOR SALE- 
condition, 
GA 8-5520. 



■ Hydroplane, good 

new paint. Call 

8-2-lt 



$3.00 or more per hour can be 
yours. Local Watkins Prod- 
ucts route available. Set your 
own hours* We train. Rash 
name and address for PBU 
SONAL INTERVIEW to 
RURAL MANAGER, P. 0. 
Box Number 5071, Richmond* 
Virginia . 7-26$ 



!' 



• FOR RENT 



SCHOOL TEACHERS 

Houses and apartments for 
winter season. Available lM 
bor Day. Call The BroWn 
Agency, office, 428-3244; 
home, GA 8-5693. 




parsons will be hoard for and 

against the following: 

AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 15 

OF THE COUNTY OF 

PRINCESS ANNE, VIRGINIA 

At a regular meeting of the 
Board of Supervisors of Prin- 
cess Anne County, Virginia held 
on Monday, in the Courtroom 
of the Circuit Court of Princess 
Anne County, the following 
amendment to Chapter 15, Sec- 
tion 33 was adopted: * 

BE IT ORDAINED by the 
Board of Supervisors of Princess 
Anne County, Virginia, that 
Chapter 15, of the Code of the 
County of Princess Anne, Vir- 
ginia, 1958 as amended, be 
amended by adding the follow- 
ing new sub-section, to-wit: (33) 
to read as follows: 

SECTION 33: BATHING, 
SWIMMING, ETC. — RESTRIC- 
TIONS: 

It shall be unlawful for any 
person for the purpose of bath- 
ing or swimming to use or cause 
to be used the waters of the 
Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the 
beach or shoreline of said Ocean 
in Princess Anne County, Vir- 
ginia in that area of water 
bounded on the West by said 
beach or shoreline and -bound- 
ed on the North by the southern 
side of the Williams Steel Fish- 
ing Pier and bounded on the 
South by the Northern Jetty of 
Rudee Inlet and on the East by 
aMine drawn between the east- 
ern most extremity, of the said 
fishing pier and the eastern 
most extremity of the Jetty. 

Any person violating the pro- 
vision of this said Section shall 
be punished in accordance to 
Section 1-6 of the Code of the 
County of Princess Anne. 



UNFURNISHED, two bedrooms, 
screened porch, $117.50 per 
month, includes heat and 
water. 112-83rd St., available 
late August CaH 428^695. 

7-124t 



• COn AGES FOR RENT 



•DIAMOND RING 
Ladies one caret Solitaite, beau- 
tiful cut and color. Need 
cash. $550. Phone 587-2584. 

8-2-lt 

Beautiful Gladioli in assorted 
colors, $1 per dozen. Other 
flowers and fruits in season. 
Wholesale and retail. J. G- 
Cromwell Flowers, 100 Or- 
chard and Granby Street, 
phone MA 7-7019,' Norfolk. 

7-28-3t 




FOR RENT — Small furnished 
cottage. Service couple. Near 
Oceana Base. $55 month. Call 
340-8329! . 8-2-tfn 



• FEMALE HELP WANTED 



NURSES — Graduate, practical 
and nurses aids. Apply Super- 
intendent, Va. Beach Hospital, 
25th and Arctic Ave. 8-17-tfn 



Like new, Mahogany buffet, 
will sacrifice. Call or write 
Va. Beach^un-News, P. O. 
Box 657, GA 8-2401. 11-30-tfn 



Furnished and unfur 
hemes and apartments. One 
to four bedrooms. Winter 
yearly. Anchor Realty. 
GA 8-7421. 

• W ANTED TO RENT \;; 

WANTED — Cottage Virginia- 
Beach. Ocean front or 
side, 3 or more 
Responsible tenants. Au 
15 through Labor Day or 
week in August and. 
week in September. Write 
ing full description, Iocs 
and rent to Box Number * 
c/o Virginia Beach Sun-Ne 
Virginia Reach, Va. 



Sale on new appliances, TV and 
Stereo at Hirtz Bazaar, Oce- 
ana. Open 9-9. Also used fur- 
niture, appliances and parts. 
We buy-sell-swap anything at 
Hirtz Bazaar. GA 8-7088. 

7-20-tfn 




Maury Riganto Auction 



HOUSE FOR RENT 



3-bedroom brick house, yearly 
rental, Atlantic Avenue. Also, 
3-room apartments. GA 8-5596. 

8-2-lt 



FOR RENT — Bungalow, Vir- 
• ginia Beach Blvd. at Lynn- 
haven; 2 bedrooms, automatic 
laundry. Call 341-3974 or 340- 
8300. 8-2-tfn 



BE IT RESOLVED by the 
Board of Supervisors of Prin- 
cess Anne County that in order 
that the public be advised of 
the foregoing ordinance prohib- 
iting swimming and bathing in 
the area as described in said 
ordinance, the Chief of Police 
is authorized and instructed to 
erect appropriate warning signs 
at such places in the said area 
in question as he may deem 
proper. 
A Copy— Testo: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Juanita S. Grimstead, 
DX. 8-2-2t 

• ROOM FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — Unfurnished 2- 
bedroom home, fireplace, den, 
playroom, large screened 
porch, spacious yard. Reason- 
able yearly rental. Phone 
GA 8-2517 after 5. 8-2-tfn 



Lynnhaven. Boating at back 
door, 3-bedroom unfurnished 
ranch, 2 baths, fireplace, 
built-in kitchen, baseboard 
heat, attached garage, huge 
wooded lot, $175 monthly. 
Phone 341-3948. 8-2-lt 



• STORE FOR RENT 



r 



FOR RENT — Office" df'store 
space on ocean side of Atlan- 
tic Avenue. Rent very reason- 
able. P.O. Box 827, Virginia 
Beach. 6-7-tfn 



• HOUSE FOR SALE 



By owner, 3-bedroom house, at- 
tached garage, 5704 Meer Rd., 
North Virginia Beach. Shown 
by appointment. Phone 428- 
3671 or 428-1211. 5-24-tfn 



HOUSEHOLD GOODS 



Antique Eastern Shore Empire 
sideboard. Dial JU 3-1374, 
Norfolk. 7-26-3t 



BUSINESS SERVICES 



Crane, bulldozer and truck rent- 
al service. Top soil, sand and 
clay fill. Douglas S. Mason 
Crane Service Company, Box 
63, London Bridge, Virginia. 
Phone 340-8558. 7-5-tfn 



Alterations and restyling. Pro- 
fessional. Aileen Lyon, phone 
GA 8-7119^ 7-124t 

PRESCRIPTIONS WANTED: to 
fill. Free delivery. Call Barr's 
Rexall Pharmacy. GA 8-1211. 

6-15-tfn 



Ironrite ironer, excellent condi- 
tion, $75. GA 8-2201. 8-2-2t 



.*• 



Repairs 

Commercial 

ad 

Household 

Refrigeration 

Laundromats 

Dealers for Westlngboaat 

Appliance* 

Commercial FRIGEDAIRB fl 
Products 

W. C. JOHNSON 

322. 17th Street 

Virginia Beuca 

Phone GA 8-4871 



AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 



■■ 



FOR SALE — Oak desk with 
• glass top with typewriter en- 
closure; swivel chair and two 
straight chairs, $40. Call GA 
8-11 71. 7-26-2t 

Antiques. Butler's desk and 
large double doored cabinet 
with butterfly shelf. Also, 
small pine corner cupboard. 
Phone GA 8-1001, nights. 

7-26-2t 



®' 



EmRhae Motors, 

Ford, thunderbir 
Italian Fiats 

»6-17lh St.— GA W232— Va. 
Bayside, Va. HO 44541 







OPTICIANS 






Ask Your Eye Physkian About 

TRAYLOR'S 



Rooms for rent, $12 week. Sheif 
wood Hotel, 2105 Atlantic. , 

8-2-2t 



One or two rooms with private 
bath. 31047th Street, GA8- 
1049. 8-2-lt 



• FURNISHED HOUSE 
FOR RENT 



BUSINESS SERVICE— Business 
services. Hoover Vacuum 
Cleaner. Sales and Service. 
Prompt efficient repairs. Pick 
up and delivery. Phone GA 8- 
4222. Fuel, Feed & Building 
Supplies, Inc., GA 8-1968. 

4-17-tfn 



FOR SALE — 40-inch Westing- 
house electric stove, good 
condition, reasonable. Also, 
Duro - Therm oil heater, 
good condition, cheap. 510 
Rudee Blvd., phone GA 8-3601. 

8-2-lt 



• INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 



Draperies, custom made, lined 
or unlined, conventional or 
draw. Measuring and hanging 
no extra charge. Call GA8- 
2976. 7-19-4t 



HARDIN SCHOOL 
Of Music 

Bristow Hardin, Director 

313 -35th Street 
Virginia Beach 



Virginia Beach's only 
GUILD OPTICIAN 

1803 Atlantic Ave., Virginia 



(SB 



RESTAURANTS 



Charlie's Seafood Restaurant 






District 2 (C-G 2) of Parcel A, 



* P O. Boaj Seated at the Southweet inter- 
981, Edgartown, Bassachusetts. section of Bayside Road and 



FOR RENT—One bedroom fur- 
nished modern cottage, living 
room and kitchen combined, 
shower bath, excellent loca- 
tion. Call GA 8-5090. 7-12-tfn 



• FOR SALE OR RENT 



TV rentals at Hirtz TV, London 
Bridge, open 9-9. Phone 340- 
8888. Also reconditioned TV's 
for sale. Beatala to pwtrobp 
terms. '7-20-tfn 



POSTED SIGNS 

FOR SALE 

20c Each 

or 

$2.00 doz. 

THE SUN-NEWS 

8108 Pacific Ave. 



WILLIAM KILLGROVE 
Instruction in 

Piano, Organ, Accordian 
JU 7-0466 - GA 8-3202 



*»• 



STEAKS — CHICKEN 

ALASKA KINO CRAB 

Private Dining Room far Partiaa 

810 Atlantic Ave., West 
Near Lynnhaven Inlet 



PEST CC 



ALDRIDGE & CHAMBERS, Int. 



Exterminators 



Phone 340-8262 



REAL ESTATE 
EXAM SCHOOL 

STATE LICENSE 

PREPARATORY COURSE 

ENROLL NOW TAUGHT 

By GRADUATE ATTORNEY 

OWa—2 Weals 7;M to M5 

MON. — WED. — FRL 

COMPLETE COURSE $35 

Norfolk - Portsmouth 

real estate school 
law bldg. phone 
147 n<S&«lV 




• PLUMBING & HEATING 

ADAMS 
PLUMBING 

•Strriag VfcgMa Btack rfaca 1*41 

Plumbing aaa 1 Ideating 

Repair servfe* and suppllfpv 

warfft air duct heatir 
Chrysler Air Conditioning 

Bl DGKT TBRM8 AS 
Wfi SERVICE WHAT WE 

416*171* U, 

Virginia Booth 




■WW 



T 




r?- 







AND WE'RE AT YOUR SERVICE 24 HOURS A DAY 

RESCUE §QUAR MEN ARE 



- AROUND THE CLOCK! 



VOLUNT 




RS 



This Is How Your 

RESCUE SQUAD 

has served you! 



Our perennial dividend is declared in SERVICE 
TO THE PUBLIC, payable on demand. Divi- 
dends paid to date as follows: 



— answered for the year, a total of 8,95 l/since organizing in 1952. 

33,518 MILES 

— driven in service for a year, making a total of 214,897 since 
organizing. 

13,145 MAN HOURS 

— volunteered during the past year, making a total of 109,846 
organizing. 



What the 



RESCUE SQUAD 



Means to YOU 

and VIRGINIA BEACH 



<n 



It means that any hour of the day and night, day-in and day-out,, 
there is trained help standing by in case you have an accident, are 
suddenly ill, need emergency transportation, or any number of 
completely unexpected situations arise in which you may need help. 
The Rescue Squad is dispatched by the Virginia Beach Police 
Department . . . Just call GA 8-9223 and they're on their way to 
your assistance. Race, color or creed knows no barrier when the 
call /'Rescue Squad" . comes over the speaker. And their services 
cost you nothing! 

Send Your Contribution in TODAY! 



P. O. ROA 47, VIRGINIA REACH 

OB CALL 

GA 8-9223 



Proposed 1962-1963 

BUDGET 

Mobile Equipment — Gas - Oil - Repairs $ 2,500.00 

Utilities ; 1,000,00 

Operating Expenses, General 5,500.00 

Building Maintenance and Improvements 1,700.00 

Insurance 2,500.00 

First Aid Supplies 500.00 

CAPITAL OUTLAYS 

Small Equipment Replacements 1,300.00 

Replacement of Vehicles 4,000.00 

Principal and Interest on Building Fund Note .... 3,000.00 

TOTAL 



• « • • 



• t • 



$22,000.00 



WE NEED 

YOUR HELP 

TOU MAT NEED OURS 

REMEMBER! The Virginia Beach-Princess Anne Rescue 
Squad is on duty 24 hows a day — to offer assistance to those 
in distress at NO CHARGE for their services! 



■ 



i 



rfj 



ft 



^ ^ *w m w i p we 



■»**^"PMP"W^^P-^P"«P"^P^^"W^»*"^'^»^P" 



T 



■^^^■^"^^i^Bi 



Information For Beach Visitors - Page 3-B 





VlRGtNi; STATF LIBRHIT 
i RICHMOND, VA. 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN - NEWS 



"HOME OF AMERICA'S FIRST MAN IN SPACE" 



3 Sections 
36 Pages 



VOl. XXXVII. No. 32 



35 



TELEPHONE GA 8-2401 



VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADS PAY 



SINGLE COPY: 5c BY AAAIL $3.50 PER YEAR. 



Pass Resolution 



Ruritans Oppose 
Plan For Park 
Along Shoreline 

BACK BAK— The Princess Anne Ruritan Club Tuesday night 
went on record in opposition to any federal-state plan to convert 
any oceanfront property in Princess Anne County into a national 
seashore park. 

The Ruritans unanimously adopted a motion in the form of 
a resolution advanced by V. Al 



fred Etheridge that no part of 
the oceanfront property located 
in Princess Anne County be, in- 
cluded in a proposal by the Na- 
tional Park Service to establish 
a national seashore park along 
the North Carolina - Virginia 
coast. - 

Action by the Princess Anne 
Ruritans closely followed the 
thinking of the .Currituck Coun- 
ty Board of Commissioners, who 
also resolved to oppose such a 
national seashore park. 

The Currituck Board resolved 
that "the Currituck Outer Banks 
area from the Virginia line 
southward to the Dare County 
line not be acquired by the Na- 
tional Park Service or any oth- 
er national or state agency for 
public use, but that said area be 
left open for private develop- 
ment." 

SEE EDITORIAL— PAGE 4-A 



Oh July 18, the National Park 
Service said it Would invite Vir- 



ginia to participate in the plan 
by including the 14-mile strip of 
Princess Anne County ocean- 
front from Sandbridge to the 
North Carolina line. 

It is understood no formal 
proposal has been made to Vir- 
ginia officials'. The expression of 
the Princess Anne Ruritan club 
is the first such comment from 
the Virginia side. 

The plan to preserve the Out- 
er Banks in their present semi- 
wild state was introduced July 
14 by United States Interior 
Secretary Stewart Udall and 
Governor Terry Sanford during 
a meeting at Nags Head. 

The Princess Anne Ruritans 
and the Currituck County Board 
of Commissioners favor private 
development of the area in 
question: 

The area proposed for a na- 
tional park which would include 
part of Princess Anne County 
would cover an area of 190 
miles. 



Sept 15th 



College Football 
Coming to Beach 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Frederick College and Newberry College 
will meet here on Saturday, September 15, in a football contest 
that will mark the first college grid game for Virginia Beach. 

Announcement of the college football game was made jointly 
by the Virginia Beach Sports Club and the Virginia Beach Junior 
Chamber of Commerce on 



Wednesday. 

Final arrangements were 
made this week with the two 
schools and the game is being 
played for the benefit of the six 
and eight man football program 
here and an annual scholarship 
fund award being planned by the 
Sports Club. 

Both schools are expected to 
field strong teams this fall. 
Newberry College is located in 
South Carolina and is a member 
of the strong Carolina's Confer- 
ence. Newberry annually fields 
one of the south's outstanding 
small college teams. 

Coach Bill MacDonald of 



Frederick entered the football 
wars last year and established 
themselves as a power among 
small colleges. Frederick made 
an enviable record in its first 
year and indications are that the 
team will be even stronger this 
season. 

The game is scheduled to be 
played in the Virginia Beach 
Memorial Stadium and tickets 
at two dollars are expected to 
go on sale next Monday. 

Preparations for the promo- 
tion of the game are under the 
co - chairmenship of Fletcher 
Bryant of the Jaycees and John 
Tucker of the Sports Club. 



In The Sun-News 



SHOPLIFTING TRICKS 
REVEALED IN ARTICLE 

Section A, Page I 



RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS, news editor of the Sun-News, gives out 

with tips of the shoplifting trade and the problems they 

"create. 

JOY HAKIM, Sun-News Staffer, writes of the Atlantic and Pacific 
coasts coming together among girl scouts in Vermont. 

Section B, Page 1 

LESLIE RUSSELL, a member of the Sun-News staff, gives an 
account of a young beach music student who has been study- 
ing in St. Louis. Section B, Page 1. 

VIRGINIA'S LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL CHAMPS are to be 

found in picture form on the Sports Page. Section A Page 5 

SOCIETY items of interest in this issue. Section A Pages 2 & 3 



Seal Ideas 



PRINCESS ANNE — Entries 
in the competition to select an 
official seal for the new City of 
Virginia Beach have been slow, 
a county spokesman said this 
week. 

However, the Planning Com- 
mission office has received 
numerous inquiries and entries 
are expected to pick up as the 
Oct. 31 deadline nears. 

Winner .of the competition 
will recerVs $100 and his en- 
try will be adopted as the of- 
ficial seal for the City of Vir- 
ginia Beech when the merger 
becomes effective January 1. 

Submitted drawings may be 
in black and white and in pencil 
or ink. Mason Gamage, chair- 
man of the awards committee, 
said. <* 

Anyone in the Tidewater area, 
except contest officials, is 
eligible to enter. 

Judges for the contest will be 
named by the awards commit- 
tee. They will select the best 
designs and submit them to the 
governing bodies of Princess 
Anne and Virginia Beach for the 
final decision. * 



Men-Of-War 
Here Disappear 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Five 
children were stung by Portu- 
gese men-of-war while swimming 
at North Virginia Beach. 

Man-of-war stings cause pain- 
ful red welts, followed by blist- 
ers and peeling skin when the 
pain subsides. Men-of-war are 
warm-water animeis , anther 
rarely found in this area except 
in extreme warm weather. 

Treated at Virginia Beach 
Hospital by Drs. William D. Sel- 
lings and James Wickstom were: 

Billy Jacob, 13, son of Dr. and 
Mrs. W. Lindsay Jacob of Pitts- 
burg, Pa., vacationing at the Sea 
Horse Hotel on 78th Street. He 
had "burns" on both arms and 
legs. 

John Cooley Jr., 12, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooley Sr. of 
213 76th St. John was stung 
severely on one hand. 

An 11-year-old girl was treated 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Grand Prise for Antique Show 




Albert Crawford of Crawford House presents high boy re- 
production to Mrs. James Davis (in Colonial costume) and Mrs. 
Joseph DeCreny for show's grand prize. 

Thirty Antique Dealers 
Enter Fourth Annual 
Show and Sale Here 



VIRGINIA BEACH,— More 
than 30 antique dealers will fill 
the Alan B. Shepard Convention 
Center with vast arrays of ex- 
hibits for the Fourth Annual 
Antiques Show and Sale, Aug. 
16-19. 

This rapidly growing event, 

sponsored by the Woman's Club 
of Princess Anne County, was 
extended to four days this year 
because of the tremendous at- 



tendance during last year's two- 
day show. 

The dealers will represent 
an area extending from Con- 
necticut to Ohio. Every avail- 
able space, including the cen- 
ter's meeting rooms, have 
been filled, e show spokesman 
said, end there is still a wait- 
ing list of dealers. 

Among the items on display 
will be furniture, glassware, 



King-Size Pile 

Driver Starts 
Work Next Month 

BAYSIDE, VA. — A new 
behemoth-size pile driving barge 
is being fitted out to replace the 
storm-sunk "Big D" in building 
the Chesapeake Bay Bridge- 
Tunnel, a contracting official 
said today. 

The new driver will start work 
next month, according to J. R. 
Liles, project manager on the 
trestle portion of the $200,000,- 
000 bay crossing. 

It will be a twin to the origin- 
al "Big Driver," a specially de- 
signed $1,500,000 machine 
equipped with 100-foot long 
steel legs on which it jacked 
itself above the waves while it 
hammered 30 to 80-ton concrete 
piles into the bay floor. , 

The "Big D" capsized five 
miles from shore during the dis- 
asterous Ash Wednesday storm 
that smashed the Atlantic Coast 
last March. Salvage crews have 
recovered most of the mechanic- 
al equipment from the sunken 
hull, and efforts are still under- 
way to raise the hull. 

The recovered equipment is 
being reconditioned and used in 
fitting out the new barge. 

Basically, the driver is a 70x 
150 : foot Delong barge which 

(Continued on Page 8) 

SPECIAL GIFT TO 
WESLEYAN COLLEGE 

PRINCESS ANNE — The 
Virginia Wesleyan Methodist 
College received* $10,000 check 
for its building fund from Ames 
& Brownley, Inc., department 
store through the D. Baker 
Ames Foundation. 

The new college which will 
enroll its first class in Sept. 
1964 will be built east of Lans- 
dale traffic circle straddling the 
Norfolk-Princess Anne County 
line. 

Thomas P. Monahan, presi- 
dent of Ames and Brownley, 
said the donation was decided 
on a month ago. D. Baker Ames, 
who died in 1956, was a founder 
of the store and a member of 
Epworth Methodist Church. 



Shoplifting Is Increasing Problem to Owners 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 
VIRGINIA BEACH — An at- 
tractive young woman, accom- 
panied by her small child, 
wandered through the grocery 
store aisles, thoughtfully pick- 
ing up items here and there 
and placing them in a basket. 
Her shopping procedure 
seemed normal enough. 

Yet this woman was a shop- 
lifter. She occasionally shifted 
an item from the basket into 
her pocketbook. A simple 
move, requiring less than a spit 
second, but one that brought 
the woman shame and disgrace 
and a police record that will 
stay with her for the rest of 
her life. 

She wes but one of 42 
ceses the Virginia Beech 
Police Dept. has handled 
since the first of the year; 
persons arrested either for 
unlawful concealment or 
pettit larceny (shoplifting). 
All are misdemeanors. Most 
first offenders pay a stiff 
fine end ere put on proba- 
tion with a warning that a 
second offense means a jail 
term. 

There seems to be no divi- 
sion of social class or age, color 
or sex. There are as many ar- 
rests made in the higher in- 
come areas as in the less ex- 
pensive sections, as many men 
as women and as many whites 
as Negroes. The ages range 
from juveniles to persons in 
their 70's. There is no pattern 
Nor is there any distinction 
among the items taken. It may 
come bracket, pick up a 50-cent 
item when she has a basketful 
of groceries to check out? Why 



should a school teacher walk 
out of a store with a package 
of Epsom salts in her pocket- 
book? Why should a college 
professor try to shoplift a pack- 
age of meat? 

The police don't know. They 
be a tube of toothpaste or it 
may be a Smithfield ham. 

Why should a woman from, 
say, Bay. Colony or Birdneck 
Point, who's husband is cer- 
tainly in the above average ln- 
have asked these questions 
time and time again. The 
answer they usually get is "I 
don't know. I just had an im- 
pulse to pick it up." 

Weil-Known Citizens 
"Most of these people are 
not considered habitual 
thieves," Police Chief Reeves 
Johnson said. "Nor do they 
heed to steal. They should 
realize that once they have 
picked up an item, any item, 
they are put in the same cate- 
gory with any other type thief 
and face the same punishment. 
They give in to an impulse and 
forget the consequences." 

Some do not operate on im- 
pulse. They plan ahead. One 
worn a n concealed skirts, 
blouses sweaters and a child's 
winter coat on hooks under 
Her dress. Another dropped the 
lifted items into blousy panta- 
loons secured to her legs. The 
majority, however, slip items 
into their handbags, pockets, 
shirts or coats. 

The number arrested does 
not include those the store 
managers may have detected 
but didn't bring charges 
against. The managers are 




Basket to Bag: One Shoplifting Method 



Stockholders 
Approve Merger 
Of Two Banks 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Stockholders of the Bank of Virginia 
Beach voted overwhelmingly Wednesday afternoon at a special 
meeting approving the bank's proposed merger with the Bank of 
Princess Anne. 

Action of the stockholders of the Bank of Virginia Beach 

followed by one day similar ac 



Elks Meeting 
Set Tonight 




LEE A. DONALDSON 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The in- 
stitutional ,and charter meeting 
of the new Virginia Beach Elks 
Lodge is scheduled for tonight 
in the Alan B. Shepard Conven- 
tion Center. The meeting is to 
start at 7 o'clock. 

Lee A. Donaldson of Etna, 
Pa., Grand Exalted Ruler of the 
Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks will be the principal 



A total of 198 members had 
signed up for the charter 
night meeting and initiation 
into the Virginia Beech Elks 
Lodge by mid-afternoon on 
Wednesday. A spokesman for 
the new lodge expressed the 
prediction that more than 200 
would become charter mem- 
bers of the lodge at tonight's 
meeting. 



speaker at the meeting. Donald 
son is expected to arrive by air 
this afternoon accompanied by 
his wife. 

A plane side press conference 
is scheduled on Donaldson's ar- 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Negligence 
Number One 
Accident Cause 



tion taken by the stockholders 
of the Bank of Princess Anne. 
Tuesday more than 90 per 
cent of the outstanding stock of 
the Bank of Princess Anne voted 
for the merger of the fledging 
banking institution with the 
Bank of Virginia Beach. 



aware of who is stealing. 
They can usually tell exactly 
which items. When the situa- 
tion gets too bed, they will 
have the people apprehend- 
ed. 

Shoplifting has always been 
a problem, Chief Johnson 
pointed out, but during the 
past few months it has reached 
the point where stores have 
had to hire off-duty plain 
clothes detectives to hejRr cor- 



rect the situation. 

"It's our duty to prosecute 
and arrest," Johnson said, "but 
we feel it is also our duty to 
try and prevent people from 
committing these crimes by 
making them more aware of 
the consequences. 

"I will say that 9* per cent 
of the cases never repeat. But 
they must live with the record 
against their name for the rest 
of their lives." 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Negli- 
gence is still causing motorists 
expense and the Virginia Beach 
Police Department a lot of head- 
aches. Ten accidents caused by 
negligence occurred this week 
with damage ranging from $25 
to $650. 

Accidents included last Thurs- 
day: Pacific and Atlantic Ave- 
nue, improper change of lanes, 
damage, $150; 16th near Arctic, 
pulling into traffic from illegal 
parking place, $600; Friday, 17th 
near Arctic, passing too close, 
reckless driving, leaving the 
scene of the accident, $40; 19th 
and Parks Ave., backing into 
parking place, $25; 17th and 
Pacific Ave., improper passing 
at intersection, $250; 25th and 
Atlantic, left turn into through 
traffic, $450; Pacific and 31st, 
improper backing, leaving the 
scene of accident, $50. Saturday: 
Atlantic and 31st, following too 
close, $100; Sunday, 17th and 
Cypress, crossing solid line 
causing head-on collision, reck- 
less driving, $600. Monday, 17th 
near Cypress, following too 
close, $100. 



The Bank of Princess 
opened its doors on March 6, 
1961 and the Bank of Virginia 
Beach was founded in June of 
1945. 

A recent statement of the 
Bank of Virginia Beach showed 
assets of more than $12,000,000 
while the latest statement of the 
Bank of Princess Anne revealed 
assets in excess of $3,0O0,00O ; 
Together the new bank, if 
granted approval by banking 
agencies and the -State Com- 
mission, will have assets of ap- 
proximately $15,000,01^ 

No effective date for the mer- 
ger of the two banks has bees 
determined since approval of 
various agencies must be ob- 
tained. It is expected, though, 
that the merger might become 
effective next January 1. 

Sidney S. Kellam, Virginia 
Beach business and hotel exe- 
cutive, serves as chairman of 
the board of both banks at the 
present time. Edward H. Church 
is president of the Bank of Vir- 
ginia Beach and W. Albert Hes* 
has served as president of the 
Bank of Princess Anne since its 
founding. 

When asked his reaction to 
the action of the stockholders. 
Kellam said: "We are gratified 
with the overwhelming approval 
given and we look forward to a 
tremendous growth of the beast 
in the future." 

Sign-Up Tine 
For Cover Crops 

PRINCESS ANNE — Russett 
Dudley, chairman of the Prin- 
cess Anne ASC Committee, 
would like to remind farmers 
that the first 2 weeks of August 
are designated as the sign up 
period for fall cover-crops, Urns 
and pasture. 

Any farmer is eligible to ap- 
ply for government cost-shares 
on conservation practices, Mr. 
Dudley said. He especially urged 
farmers with diverted land vat - 
der the 1962 Feed Grain Pro- 
gram to put a cover crop on the 
land this fall. "It will," he said, 
"not only protect the land from 
the ravages of heaving and 
thawing through the winter, but 
will hold available plant nu- 
trients that otherwise would 
leach out through the soil, and 
will add much-needed organic 
matter." 

Cover crops of rye, oats, bar* 
ley, rygrass and crimson clover 
may be planted with Agricultur- 
al Conservation , Program cost- 
shares. Also, Urns may be ap- 
plied to existing pasture, or t© 
cropland in connection with 
legumes such as crimson clover, 

Mr. Dudley said that fanners 

might apply for these practtote 

when they go by the ASC office 
for final wheat and core pay- 
ments. 



VW$ni» Bead* SUNDEWS 
Thursday, August 9, 1962 
2-A 



Society Editor 

Phona GA 1-7993 

Fay Greenland 
Becomes Bride of 
B. P. Campbell, Jr, 

WASHINGTON, DC. — The 
Episcopal Church of the Ascen- 
sion and St. Agnes was the set- 
ting Saturday at 4 p.m. for the 
marriage of Miss Fay Sharon 
Greenland and Brewster Phillips 
Cancel] Jr. The Re*. Frederic 
Howard Meisel performed the 
cerfiawny with a Nuptial Mass. 
He waSassisted by the Rev. Jean 
A. Vathe of Richmond, Va., re- 
tired* J^ctor of Johns Memorial 
Episeoifel Church in Farmville, 

The bride, is the daughter of 
the: late Thomas Herbert Green- 
land; and the late Mrs. Bernice 
ChUrch Bober. She is the niece 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Clyde 
Gimbert of Va. Beach, Va. The 
bridegroom is the son of Dr. & 
Mrs. Brewster Phillips Campbell 
of Tucson, Arizona. 

Given in marriage by her 
unc,le Mr. Gimbert, the bride 
had as matron of honor, Mrs. 
Joseph A. Baicker of Princeton, 
N.J., formerly of Norfolk, Va. 
Miss Abby Anne Campbell of 
Berkeley, Calif., sister of the 
bridegroom, was maid of honor. 

i j 

Arnold L. Boss! of Cape Cod, 
Mass., was best man. Grooms- 
men were Lt. Kenneth Church 
Gimbert of Norfolk, Gerald K. 
Peterson, Martin R. Whittaker 
and Dwight L. Seely, all of 
Berkeley, Calif. 

A reception was held at the 
Officers' Club in Bethesda, Md. 
After a wedding trip through 
the southwestern United States 
and Mexico, the couple will live 
in Itteson. 

Miss Margaret Irvin Jordan 
entertained last Wednesday at 
a luncheon in honor of Miss 
Linda Koch, who has recently 
returned from Europe. The 
luncheon was given at Miss Jor- 
dan's home in Bay Colony and 
the guests numbered 7. 



Kellam- 




Evening Hats 
After Dark 

By IN6A BORG 

Fashion Consultant 

Evening hats — the brash 
beauty of night and the beauti- 
ful summertime allure for the 
after dark hours. 

Picture, for instance, a great 
whoosn of a fawn-like silk ma- 
line wig hat, studded with a 
jeweled circlet. 

For the oriental-type beau- 
ty cosmetic principals include 
the round, wide eyes, bold arid 
unabashed, playing to the hilt 
the nighttime art of artifice. 
For this effect, paint the up- 
per lid in a palest beige, omit 
customary strokes at the outer 
corners. To the milk blonde 
beauty, cosmetic dazzlement for 
the white-against-tan look, use 
coral lipstick and turquoise- 
shaded eyes, with just a touch 
of powder on the cheeks and 
nose to give that velvety look. 



Engagement Announced* 



Mrs. Donavon Ellis Bonney 



(Aufenger Photo) 



Miss Jacqueline Kellam 
Bride of Don E. Bonney 



PRINCESS ANNE — Miss 
Jacqueline Camille Kellam be- 
came the bride of Donavon Ellis 
Bonney Saturday at 5:30 p.m. in 
the garden of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wal- 
lace Kellam of Princess Anne. 

The bridegroom is the son of 
Mrs. Philip Hunter Bonney of 
Creeds and the late Mr. Bonney. 

Miss Kellam was given in 
marriage by her father. Dr. 
Joseph S. Johnstoi, district 
superintendent of the Method- 
ist Church, officiated. 

Bride's Gown 
For her wedding, the bride 
chose a full • length heavy 
Duchess satin gown, richly em- 




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fall colors and styling in sportswear, 
street and dressy dresses. 



OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS TIL 9 TM. 



broidered with flowers around 
the scooped neck and in panels 
down the front and back. The 
loosely pleated skirt fell from 
a fitted empire waistline and 
ended in a shallow train. Her 
waist-length veil of illusion was 
attached to a flat bow bandeau, 
she wore short white gloves and 
carried a nosegay of delicate 
summer flowers. 

Mrs. Frank W. Kellam Jr., 
sister-in-law of the bride, at- 
tended as matron of honor and 
Miss Mary Susan Kellam, the 
bride's niece, was flower girl. . 

Bridesmaids were Mrs. Robert 
Jean Robertson Jr., cousin of 
the bride, and Mrs. Fitzhugh 
Lee Dowdy. 

William Edward Stamper of 
Creeds served his brother-in-law 
as best man and Master William 
Edward Stamper Jr., nephew of 
the bridegroom, was ringbearer. 

Groomsmen included two of 
the bride's brothers, Frank Wal- 
lace Kellam Jr. and David Early 
Kellam. 

A reception was held in the 
garden immediately following 
the wedding. 

After a wedding trip through 
the southern states, the couple 
will reside in Princess Anne. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ashcraft 
of Atlanta, Ga., will arrive Fri- 
day to spend ten days at the 
Princess Anne County Club. 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewman 
and their three children of 
Louisville, Ky , are spending 
several days at the Sea Horse 
on 78th St. 



SALE 



The proprietors of Alexander-Bcegle wish to announce 
that a general sale is now in progress at their establish- 
ment located at 31st Street. Substantial reductions are 
being offered on men's and ladies' bermudas in addition 
to all suits and sport coats. Savings can also be found 
on men's sport shirts, summer slacks, and other items. 

AU our short sleeve dress shirts by, Gant of New Haven 
are also being offered on this sale so do plan to stop in. 



All of this is good to know, 
girls, but with a pretty face you 
need a lovely shaped body to 
go along with it. So remember 
the do's and don'ts of dieting— 
if you have to. 

1. Eat your food slowly. Make 
everything last longer and not 
only will your digestion be bet- 
ter, but you will feel that you 
have eaten more than you really 
did. 

Rest — •Then Eat 

2. Don't eat when you are 
tired. You may even want to 
take a short nap before dinner. 
If you are relaxed you will eat 
more slowly and digest your 
food more thoroughly. 

3. If you must have that in- 
between-meals snack, keep fruit 
and rabbit food, (celery, carrots, 
lettuce, radishes) handy and 
nibble on these. Their calories 
content is very low. 

4. If you feel the before din- 
ner drink is necessary, switch 
from cocktails to highballs. 
Avoid mixed drinks at all costs 
or your dieting will be greatly 
endangered. 

5. Don't force yourself to eat 
when you are not hungry. Take 
advantage of every opportunity 
to curtail those calories. 

6. Don't keep too much food 
in the house. If extra food is* 
available, you may not be able 
to resist the temptation to dig 
into it. Plan your menus a few 
days ahead of time and when 
you go to the market, buy only 
those things on the list, not a 
wide variety of delectable items 
that- attract your eye. 

7. Don'* eat heartily before 
going to bed. If you must heve 
e midnight snack, try a cup of 
hot skimmed milk. This will 
give you nourishment during 
the night and may even help 
you sleep better. 

8. Prepare your main dishes 
in a "gourmet" manner. Using 
only low-calorie ingredients, 
learn to get the most out of the 
least in your cooking. If you 
enjoy what you eat, you will for- 
get that you have given up 
some of your old favorite 
dishes. 

9. If you are on a diet, don't 
get more than 8 hours sleep at 
the time because you cannot 
burn up the calories when you 
are inactive. People on a diet 
must be up and on the go. 

Please realize that these tips 
are for persons heavily over- 
weight. The rest of you relax 
. . . until next week. 




Jerry McClanan 
Becomes Bride of 
Lt bavis R Harris 



VIRGINIA BEACH — the 
marriage of Miss Jerry Ann Mc- 
Clanan and Lt. (i.g) Davis 
Franklin Harris, USN, took 
place Saturday at 3:30 p.m. in 



Twine-Gormly 
Vows Are Said 

NORFOLKr-TbJ marriage of 
Miss Rebecca Marie Twine and 
Antho 



I 



MISS LESLIE JEANNE ACKISS 



ACKISS — LAMBERT 

BACK BAY — Mr. Alton 
Johnston Ackiss of Back Bay 
announces the engagement of 
his daughter, Miss Leslie Jeanne, 
to Lt. Clark Spencer Lambert, 
USMC, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Carlton Joyner Lambert of Lon- 
don Bridge. Miss Ackiss' late 
mother was the former Eliza- 
beth Blactwell. 

Miss Ackiss attended Peace 
Junior College in Raleigh, N.C., 
and graduated from Richmond 
Professional Institute. 

Lt. Lambert is a graduate of 
the College of William & Mary 
in Norfolk where he was a mem- 
ber of the Imps social fraternity. 
He is now stationed at Camp 
Lejeune, N.C. 

A fall wedding is planned. 



DAVIDSON — O'NEAL 

BAYSIDE— Mr. & Mrs. James 
A. Davidson announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, 
Miss Betty Jean Davidson, to 
Clyde Allen O'Neal Jr. 

Mr. O'Neal is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clyde Allen O'Neal of 
Lynnhaven. 

Miss Davidson is a graduate 
of Princess Anne High School. 

Mr. O'Neal, graduated from 
Norview High School. He is em- 
ployed as an engineering inspec- 
tor with the City of Norfolk. 

The wedding will take place 
October 20. 



their daughter, Miss Elizabeth 
Ann Farley, to Phillip Edward 

McAdams. 

Mr. McAdams is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Edward 
McAdams of Virginia Beach. 

Miss Farley is a graduate of 
Virginia Beach High School. She 
is now employed by Herbert S. 
Reid, Jr., an attorney at law. 

Mr. McAdams is also a gradu- 
ate of Virginia Beach High 
School. He is employed by Stand- 
ard Office Supply Inc. 

The wedding will take place 
October 20. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Wick 
and their two daughters, who 
have been , visiting Mrs. Wick's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. 
Norfleet on 88th St., will return. 
this weekend to their home in 
Houston, Texas. 



fa- < 



Given in rrarriage by her 
ther, the bride had Miss Nora 
Jean Fouke as her maid of hon- 
or and only attendant. 

Joseph Richard Gormly of 
Vs. Beach was best man for his I 
brother. Groomsmen were Mon- ' 
treville Bowen Walker HI of Va 
Beach, and Ray Shelton Twine 
Jr., brother of the bride. 

A recr . n was held at thp ; I 
bride's! ire ^263 Sewells Point \ 
Road, After a wedding trip oyer \ 
Skyline Drive, the couple will v< 
live in Norfolk. 



Robert Anthony Gprmly took 
pftO Saturday at 2:30 p.m. at 
Norview Baptist Church. The 
Rev. William R, Smith performed ! 
the ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 

vr as "MethJisT ScS f- ^s^&s^j^ 

The Rev. Dr. Kenneth Haddock, I Mr G f<*> " to «** , of **' £? d 
pastor of the church, performed I *«• J » me ' L Gorml y of Vif " J | 
&e ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Edward 
McClanan. The bridegroom is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Eugene Harris of Watertown, 
Mass. * 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father. She had as 
her matron of honor,, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Moscoffian. Bridesmaids 
were Miss Arline Boyette of 
Norfolk, Miss Nancy Connell, 
Mrs. John Fletcher Bryant Jr. 
and Mrs. John J. Ahrin Jr. 

Gordon McClay of Franklin, 
Mass., was best man. Grooms- 
men were Lt. (j.g.) Thomas E. 
LeJeune, Lt. (j.g.) James Reddy, 
Lt. (j-g) David K. Maskell, Lt. 
(j.g.) Charles C. Silva, Lt. (j.g.) 
Richard Deibert and Lt. (j.g.) 
Gene Taylor, all stationed at the 



Oceana Naval Air Station. 

A reception was given at the 
Commissioned Officers' Club, 
Oceana Naval Air Station. After 
a wedding trip to Nova Scotia, 
the couple will live at 509-24th 
St., Virginia Beach. 



•a , a»'.'A»/.»v»;;a»' , ;:*''A»'j. 



Mrs. D. Conrad Little is 
spending several days in. New 
York City, visiting her daugh- 
ter, Miss Eliza Little. 



Salexahu-ertlJeegle 

wewtm $ rtteiWi ftwtt fMtfcmcM'i tpenel -le#tt' se*m««or 
m STIftT VIRGIN** BtACH. VIRGINIA 




Miss Bettie Kate Pace Cadieux 
entertained last Wednesday at 
a shower in honor of Miss Anne 
Stell whose marriage to Morgan 
Mann will take place on August 
25th. The party was given at 
Miss Cadieux's home on 21st St., 
and the guests numbered 20. 



Adm. and Mrs. M. B. Wev of 
Norfolk are spending several 
days at the Princess Anne Coun- 
try Club. 



CARLSON — NELSON 

LYNNHAVEN — Mr. & Mrs. 
Joel Frederick Carlson an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Joel Cary Carl- 
son, to Noel Nelson. 

Mr. Nelson is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. R. L. Nelson of Fort 
Worth, Texas. 

Miss Carlson is a graduate of 
Maury High School and attend- 
ed Wayne University in Detroit, 
Mich. She is employed as a 
secretary at Lost Valley Ranch 
in Colorado. 

Mr. Nelson is a graduate of 
Texas Christian University and 
did graduate work at North 
Texas State College. He is as- 
sociated with the Navigators, an 
interdenominational Christian 
service organization. He is in 
Lyallpur, West Pakistan, work- 
ing with the United Presbyter- 
ian Mission. 

An early spring wedding is 
planned. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Saunders 
and their two children of New- 
port News are spending several 
weeks at the home of Mrs. 
Saunders mother, Mrs. Braden 
Vandeventer on Bay Shore Dr. 



ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE 
SAVINGS TO 50% 

Suits & Sport Coats - 2Q% 

Dress & Sport Shirts . 20% 

Men's Trousers 20% 

Men's Bermuda Shorts .20% 

Men's Knit Shirts T 3#% 

Men's Shoes . .20% 

Men's Hats ... ; 

Ladies Madras Suits .20% 

Ladies Dresses & Skirts .20% 

Ladies Bermudas .. ..20% 

H. Webster Brown, Sr. H. Webster Brown, Jr., 

PAtlFIC AVENUE AT THIRTY -FIRST STREET 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 



FARLEY — McADAMS . 
VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. Sterling Marshall Farley 
announce the engagement of 



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VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Capitola Marguerite Barco be- 
came the bride of Dean Burgess 
on Saturday at 4 p.m. in Sty of 
the Sea Catholic Church. The 
Rev. Nicholas J. Habets, pastor 
of the church, performed the 
church, performed the cere- 
mony. 

The bride is a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Franklin 
Barco. The bridegroom is a son 
of .Mrs. Charles 0. Burgess of 
Norfolk and the late Mr. Bur- 
gess. 

Mr. Barco gave his daughter 
in marriage. She had as her 
maid of honor her sister, Miss 
Camilla Prince Barco. Brides- 
maids were Mrs. Leslie E. Jones 
Jr., sister of the bridegroom, 
and Miss Elizabeth Hayes, both 
of Norfolk. 

Charles O. feurgess of Norfolk 
was best man for* his brother. 
Groomsmen were J. Thomas 
Russell of Dahlgren; Lawrence 
F. Barco, the bride's brother;, 
Robert T. Nixon, Leslie E. Jones] 
Jr., Robert B. Lindemann and 
C. J. Lindemann. 

A reception was given at 172 
Pinewood Road, the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Wood, 
the bride's uncle and aunt. After 
a wedding trip to New York 
City, the couple will live in the 
Suburban Park Apartments, 
Norfolk. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Cockrell 
of Richmond are spending sev- 
eral days at the Princess Anne 
Country Club. 



^Jhe flew 

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SIR WALTER HOTEL 

39TH AND OCEAN FRONT 

STREET ENTRANCE 

DINING HOURS - 6:00 to 10:00 P.M. 
ZJkii VUeeh'd Special 



Beef Steak en Brochette 

Cubes of Beef Steak 
broiled to your desire with 

mushroom caps 

green peppers and onions. 

Saffron Rice 

Mixed Green Sajad Beverage 



$295 



Honky Tonic Piano Player In RALEIGH TAVERN 6:30-9:30 PM. 



Stewart-Creeqi 
Rites held 

PRINCESS ANNE — Commu- 
nity Methodist Church was the 
setting Sunday at 4 p.m. for the 
marriage of Miss Sally Ann 
Stewart and Joseph Haywood 
Greene Jr. The Rev. John L. 
Kibler Jr., pastor of the church, 
performed the ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis S. Stewart. 
The bridegroom is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Haywood 
Greene of Norfolk. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride had Miss Helen 
Coley of Norfolk as her maid of 
honor. Mrs. Jack Price of Nor- 
folk was bridesmaid. 

Henry Geisz of Petersburg 
was best man for Mr. Greene. 
Groomsmen were Edward 
Brooks and Charles Medlin, both 
of Norfolk. 

A reception was held at the 
church social hall. After a wed- 
ding trip to Richmond, the 
couple will live in the Lafayette 
Shores Apartments, 3443 Nor- 
way St., Norfolk. 

Cay Sprurll Weds 
John W. Spence 

LONDON BRIDGE— The mar- 
riage of Miss Barbara Gay 
Spruill and John William Spence 
took place Saturday, July 28 at 
2 p.m. at London Bridge Baptist 
Church. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. G. E. 
Hughes. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan C. Spruill 
of Lynnhaven. The bridegroom 
is the son of Mr. & Mrs. Charles 
B. Spence. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride had as her maid 
of honor and only attendant her 
stepsister, Miss Sandra Anne 
Lynn of Lynnhaven. 

Bailey Spence was best man 
for his brother. Groomsmen 
were Robert Gutherie of Vir- 
ginia Beach and Columbus Cart- 
wright of Oceana. 

A reception was held at the 
church social hall. After a wed- 
ding trip through the mountains 
of Virginia, the couple will live 
at 518 Brown Street, Martins- 
ville.' 

Bay Harbour 
Club Activities 

VIRGEflA BEACH — The 
month of August will be an ac- 
tive one for Bay Harbour Club 
members. 

A cookout will be herd 
Wednesday, August 15th on the 
terrace. 

August 21, the little folks 
will have their day at the pool 
with lunch and swimming. 

"Persian Night" at Bel Har- 
bour will take place, August 24 
featuring the chef's psecial, 
shish-ka-bobs and beef-ka-bobs. 

A "coketail" party is sched- 
uled for the younger set (12 or 
over) by the pool from 5:30 to 
9:30 p.m. stag or drag. 

The Labor Day Weekend Par- 
ty features dancing to the 
music of versatile musicians and 
dinner August 31. 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 9, 1962 



Page 3*A 



Lynnhaven Girl Wins Area- Wide Crown 




«ru» * ^ andra 0hver of Lynnhaven receives the crown that officially names her Queen MarVaGold. Suzanne Ballard of Willis 
Wharf places the crown on her head while Sandra Richardson of Williamsburg (left) and Pat Hobbs of Suffolk, members of 
the royal court, look on. Sandy will represent the -sweet potat o industry of Maryland and Virginia during the 1962-63 marketing 
season. August 24 marks the beginning of the promotional pr ogram and during her reignf Sandy will make personal aDDea 
ances at various events and on television. 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. and Mrs. Walton G. 
Saunders will leave today to 
spend six weeks traveling in 
Europe. \^, 



Adm. Jerould Wright (ret.), 
Mrs. Wright and their daughter 
and son, Miss Marian Wright & 
Bill Wright, are spending the 
month of August at their cottage 
on 53rd St. 



Lt. and Mrs. Fielding Lewis 
Tyler and their young daughter, 
have arrived from Augusta, Ga., 
to spend ten days visiting' Lt. 
Tyler's parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Gordon Tyler in Cavalier Park. 



Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Phillips 
Jr.., and their young, daughter, 
who have been in Charlottes- 
ville, will arrive next week to 
make their home here. They 
will reside on Cavalier Drive. 



Engaged 




Miss Latti Gordon, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Gordon; 
Jr., of Richmond spent last 
weekend as the guest of Mrs. 
William P. Dickson Sr., on 34th 
St. 



Mr. and Mrs. Warden Emory 
of Richmond are spending this 
week with Mr.- Emory's brother- 
in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. 
P. H. Allen on Pinewood Road. 



Miss Betty Lou Burton has re- 
turned to her home in Bay 
Colony after being in St. Louis, 
Mo., where she studied piano 
and music theory under Dr. Leo 
Sirota. Miss Burton will enter 
Hollins College in the fall. 




Mrs. D. Cameron Lacy Jr., 
and her two children of Rich- 
mond, are spending this week 
visiting Mrs. Lacy's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. K. C. Robinson in Bay 
Colony. Mr. Lacy will join his 
family this weekend. 



JUNE LINDSAY STIVERS 

STIVERS — RHODES 

VIRGINIA, BEACH — Mr. and 
Mrs. James E. Stivers of 2416 
Arctic Avenue, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
June Lindsay Stivers, to Eugene 
Charles Rhodes. 

Mr. Rhodes is the son of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. George Rhodes 
of Union, N.J. , 

Miss Stivers graduated from 
Virginia Beach High School in 
June and is a member of the 
Va. Beach Methodist Church 
choir. 

Mr. Rhodes, a 1956 graduate 
of Union High School, attended 
the College of William & Mary 
in Norfolk, and served three 
years in the Navy. He is pres- 
ently a customer service engi- 
neer for International Business 
Machines in Charlottesville. 

Wedding plans will be an- 
nounced later. ^ 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Bret- , 
scher of Alexandria announce 
the birth of their first child, a 
daughter, Susan Reese, on July 
28 in Alexandria. Mrs. Bretscher 
is the former Miss Ann DeVore, 
Smith, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George,B. Smith of Lynn- 
haven. Mr. Bretscher is the son 
of Mrs. Jerome V. Detmer of 
Greenwich, Conn; 



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Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Lam- 
bert announce the birth of a 
daughter, Laura Anne, on July 
24 at Leigh Memorial Hospital. 
Mrs. Lambert is the former Miss 
Betty Swain, daughter of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Swain of 
Creswell, N.C. Mr. Lambert is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. D. 
Lambert of Bayside. 

Births at Beach Hospital 

July 20, 1962— Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles L. Coleman, 507 High 
Point Ave.; Va. Beach; girl. 

July 25— Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
L. Sharpe, 4045 E. Dectur Drive, 
Oceana, Va.; girl. 

July 25— Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
E. Welch, 1000-17th St., Virginia 
Beach; boy. , 

July 24— Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam E. Heafner Jr., 5 Paris St., 
Virginia Beach; boy. 

July 29— Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Bizzell, Rt. 1, Box 193; Princess 
Anne, Va.; boy. 

July 29— Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert V. Dors, 803 Delaware Ave., 



Communism Is 
WAVY-TV Topic 

The first of thirteen television 
programs about World Cow- 
muni sm premiered last Sunday 
on WAVY-TV, Channel 10 at 
12 to 12:30 p.m. 

"Crisis," »e timely news aeries 
features oyer thirty experts in- 
cluding several from behind th 
Iron Curtain* Among them wll 
be President Kennedy, who warf 
recorded for the series shortly 
before his election, Margaret 
Chase Smith, U.S. Senator, Gar* 
los Romulo and Charles Malik, 
two ex-presidents of the Genera 
Assembly, Henry Cabot Lodge, 
former U.S. Ambassador, Get 
eral Bella J 
in-Chief of 
forces during' the 
ist revolt; Alexai 
daughter of the at 
and Peace," and '? 

Crisis, faces the [ 
the conflict between 
world and communism 
perts of diverse religious be 
liefs who were chosen frdm 
numy fields and who exprej* 
perspectives on the relative raM- 
its of the factors involved. 




Virginia Beach, Va.; girt. 

July 30— Mr. and Mrs. Mi- 
chael Eniily, 2708 Baltic Ave., 
Virginia Beach; Va.; girl. 

July 30— Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
C. Jenkins, 518-31st Street, Vir- 
ginia Beach; boy. - 



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NEXT TO EXQUISITE BABIES SHOP 






Page 4-A 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 9, 1 962 



Wl VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-NEWS 

i 

Published tvtry Thursday by The Beach Publishing Corporation 
1108 Pacific Avenut ' Virginia Beach, Virginia 



FRED A. HAYCOX 
ALBIN R. MAILHES 

amy am phillips 

WILLIAM k, JkKNIOHT 
CECIL T. PRESSON 



President and Publisher 

Vice-President - General Manager 

News Editor 

• Advertising Manager 

«„ Production Superintendent 



-a-s-p 



- 




SI 111 SIDE T»2 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 



Eaten* irn seeded das matter ia the post office in Virginia Beech, Vs., under the act of March 3. 187* 




Subscription rates by nail 



Outside of County — M.W per annum 



Princess Anne Ruritans Speak 
Out on National Seashore Park 



The Princess Anne Ruritan Club spoke 
cfjfyt their meeting Tuesday night in unan- 
imous opposition to any plan that would 
ificlude any oceanfront property located 
ir) Princess Anne County to become a part 
crfF a national seashore park to be operated 
fc*y the National Park Service. 

* We laud the action of the Princess Anne 
Ruritan Club in this matter. They have ex- 
pressed what we believe is the feeling of 
the vast majority of residents of this area. 
Their stand also seems to be the view of 
the resdients and representatives of the 
North Carolina outer banks Region. 

The CurritucfVCounty Board of Commis- 
sioners took a similar stand in the matter 
of a federal-state plan to convert a vast 



area of shoreline into a national seashore 
park. In the Currituck resolution it was 
stated that the area in question should bs 
left open for private development. 

We believe the key to opposition to the 
establishment of this vast area into a na- 
tional seashore park should rest on the 
point that its future should be left to pri- 
vate development. However, if this were 
not enough reason to oppose the plan there 
is always the matter of the government 
owning more land. We believe that in- 
stead of acquiring more land the govern- 
ment should be releasing much of the land 
area it now controls. 

The Princess Anne Ruritan Club is to be 
congratulated for the position it has taken 
in this matter. We agree With this stand. 



Sometimes it seems as if fate decides two paople should me,et 
and, by golly, they meet desipte unusual circumstances. 

At least that was the way it seemed to Jean Stiffler of North 

Alanton. 

FATEFUL DAY 

She and her husband, Bob, and two children, Doug and 
Diane were at the Cape Colony Club pool a few Sundays ago wrtn 
Roger Rae, a friend from New York. Roger spotted a couple at 
a near by table he.once knew in New York" when Aney all worked 
for the Better Homes and Gardens magazine. 

Roger introduced Betty and Mike Bay, now of Arlington, to 
Jean and Bob. The conversation soon worked its way around to 
Iowa, since Roger and Joan both hail from there. 

What part of Iowa did you live in?" Betty asked Jean. 

'CenterviUe," she answered. "A little town I know you've 
never heard of." 

"Oh, but I have," Betty said. "I have relatives there. Do you 
know anyone named Winters?" 

Indeed she did. Jean's mother's maiden name was Winters. 
The two gals, who had always lived half a continent apart, are 
second cousins. But it took a weekend at Virginia Beach and a 
mutual friend from New York to bring them together. 



Four Generations at Family Reunion 



Hall to The Champions of Virginia 

League Baseball 



1 The Princess Anne Little League All-Stars Hagerstown, Maryland in the interstate 

are the champions of all little league base- tournament. If they win in Maryland, and 

ball in Virginia. The local youngsters won every member of the team is confident 

this distinction by winning the state iittle they will, the next playoff will be in Nor- 

Ipague tournament last weekend in Lynch- folk in the Southern Regionals on August 

burg. 16-18. 

Loucfon County fellvictim to the champs William Allen is the manager of the 
in the final game and the Princess Anne championship team and according to the 
team looked more like the New York manager every member of the club is a 
Yankees. They used their home run power, true champion in every sense of the w,ord. 
to vanquish their foe with young Bobby We know the parents of these young- 
Lewis delivering a two-run homer with two . sfers are proud and the entire area shares 
out in the seventh inning. It gave Princess fn this pride. We congratulate the Virginia 
Anne the game a/id the title by a 5 to 3 Little League champs and hope they go all 
«bore. / the way to win the Little League World 

The State champs are presently in Series. 

— , . , — — — . 1, — - . 

Yes— It's Taxpayers' Money! 

... 

Writing in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, sciousjy or not, they assume that govern- 
c >lumnisL Howard Preston makes one of ment has some other and magical means 
t le best suggestions that has come along in of obtaining funds. 



It's ironic that people from small towns invariably run into 
someone they know, or once knew, when they get away from their 
old stomping grounds. 

A similar incident happened to B. J., fliy better half, and my- 
self Saturday night while we were enjoying the music of Jack 
Golly and his orchestra at the Cavalier Beach Club. 

One of the musicians looked so familiar it was driving us 
crazy trying to place him. During an intermission we cornered 
him and asked his name. 

The minute he told us, we both realized who our mystery man 
was. 

He leads the high school band in Plant City, F la., our home 

town, and is spending his summer as a member of Jack Golly's 

( band, which originates in Tampa, only 21 miles from Plant City. 

All three of us got a big laugh out of it. Our musician ac- 
quaintance had been trying to place us, too. . . 

"Boy, it really is a small world," he commented. "I was in 
New York recently and came face to face with a man from Plant 
City. These Florida people get around!" 



BASKIN' IN THE SUN 



By GORDON BASKIN 



cjqite a while. 

> He simply suggests that, when we write 
c|r talk about government spending, we 
ujf 3be phrase "taxpayers' money" rather 
than "federal funds." 

» It^ls unfortunate, but true, that there is 
at need to emphasize this distinction. Num- 
bers' of people, seemingly, don't relate 
government money to the money Ufat is 
taken from them through taxation. <&>n- 




Government doesn't earn money, and 
it doesn't create wealth. It isn't supposed 
to. Government can spend only what it first 
seizes from the people— and this includes 
the as-yet-unborn taxpayers who will be 
paying the bills of the past for ages to 
come. * * 

So— don't just think of federal funds. 
Think of taxpayers' money— your money. 



t Be Re-won 

leadership we are making plans for 1970 
and 1980, and are looking as far ahead 
as the year 2000." 

Then Mr. Fleger touched on the biggest 
issue of all, in these words: ". . . freedom 
isn't a stable thing. It must be won and 
re-won. All of us in this nation have to 
watch it, care for it, work for it, even fight 
In an address at the award dinner, Presi : for it. And even when achieved, freedom 
dent Fleger of the Edison Electric Institute can be lost easily." 

said this; "The electrical industry was Mr. Fleger knows whereof he speaks- 
founded in the atmosphere of freedom. It for he is a representative of a great in- 
fe the product of individual invention and dustry which is and long has been under 
Initiative. ... * constant attack by those who would de- 

"As a result of this kind of development, . stroy it as a private enterprise, socialize it, 
Our country jhas the most advanced electric and establish a monolithic government 
power systejm in the world. We have more monopoly. That system is nothing to brag 
•lectric power capacity than the next five about in Russia. 



Freedom 

Junior Achievement, Inc.'s top hone 
tfie Gold Achievement Award, has 
£iven to the electrical industry in recogni- 
tion of its continued and widespread sup- 
fort of the program. The purpose of that 
program is to give young people a practi- 
cal,' applied knowledge, of how the Amer- 
ican free enterprise system works. 




countries combined—and three times the 
power capacity of the Soviet Union. 

"To maintain and advance our electrical 



Yes— the fundamental lesson we all must 
learn is that freedom must not only be won 
—but re-won. 



Nation Is You 

Senator Byrd of Virginia, who is prob- They can act most effectively and expedir- 

ably the Senate's foremost expert on fiscal iously by action to balance the domestic 

Affairs, has contributed an article to Tax budget." 
teview in which he underlines some basic 



If unpalatable truths. 

The nation's fiscal position, he observes, 
jcharattetiized as it is "by debt, deficits, and 
jihreatenjng {nation," cfoes not inspire 
fonftetence either at home or abroad. The 
Continuing loss of our gold, he goes on, 
Imperils our security "tike an atomic 
bomb/' Finally^Jaa says that we, must go 
jb the root causes of this crisis before it is 
IK} WrfflWilinat those In *rjthority most 
"act to restore confidence in the dollar. 



Senator Byrd is not an alarmist. He just 
knows a fact when he sees one, and speaks 
accordingly. In the long run, a nation 
which habitually outspends its income 
winds up in the same fix as a family or a 
business which outspends its income — 
broke and bankrupt. And remember, 
bankruptcy for the nation means bank- 
ruptcy for every citizen— the wiping out 
of savings, investments, insurance— every- 
thing. 



Called up a man Monday 
morning to come fix a leaky 1 
pipe connection. He said he'd 
come, but not until Tuesday. 
Said he spent 
every Monday I 
repairing t h i 
damage done 
by the do - it 
yourselfers. 

I'm not sur 
prised at all 
Everyone 
know is 'bus" 
making o 
building some- 
thing. Everyone Gordon Baskin 
but me. Never again. I'm cured. 
I was cured by a little doll 
house I bought for my small 
daughter. I saved five dollars 
by buying the model that had 
to be assembled. "A child can 
assemble it," said the clerk. 
Maybe so. Not this adult. 

I should have known to stop 
as soon as I read the first sen- 
tence in the directions. "While 
holding parts 'C & 'D' together 
as shown in diagram 'F', place 
tab 'A' in slot 'B' as indicated 
in diagram 'LL' below." An 
idiot would have realized that 
only a man with three hands 
was capable of such contortions. 
Did I return the doll house to 
that smug clerk? I did not. 

When I finished that job 
the doll house looked like a 
Los Alamos split-level that had 
been at ground zero during 
one of the rsren! atomic tests. 
I had reduced my small 
daughtaft^o tears, taught my 
sons some interesting, new 
words, had three stitches in 
my thumb, had a tetanus shot, 
and my wife wasn't speaking 
to me. I figure that the five 
dollars I saved cost me a 
minimum of fiteen dollars in 
medical expense alone. 
Now I buy the assembled 
model of everything. I'll even 
pay double to get it. 

If you!d like to conduct a 
simple experiment on how far 
this do-it-yourself craze has 
gone, leaf through one of the 
magazines devoted to the Home; 
its care and feeding Examine 
the number of articles which 
tell wives how they can get 
their husbands to make some- 
thing out of something else. 
They have titles like, "How To 
Make A Coffee Table." this gem 
will explain, with pictures, how 
Mr. and Mrs, Fixit made a 
stunning conversation piece out 
of an old beer keg and two 
hundred yards of dental floss. 
Unfortunately the article does 
not describe th6 resulting di- 



vorce, and certainly doesn't tell 
who got custody of the coffee 
table. 

If the magazines stopped 
here, I think I could bear up 
under the strain; but they don't. 
Later is a seventy page romance 
about a young couple (they'd 
have to be young) who bought a 
condemned stable and converted 
it to a magnificent six-bedroom 
house. They naturally saved 
seventeen thousand dollars by 
doing the work themselves. 
'Since I am gullible and love 
fairy tales, I'd believe this if it 
weren't for the pictures that ac- 
company the story. The "be- 
fore" pictures look as if they 
were taken by a man with palsy 
and a forty-year old box camera. 
The "after" pictures are in 
technicolor,^ cinemascope and 
stereophonic sound, and were 
shot by a professional with three 
assistants and eight hundred 
pounds of ^equipment. 

What A Change! 

These ^'before" pictures have 
the wife lurking somewhtre in 
the background, and believe me 
the background is where she be- 
longs. She is usually dressed in 
a feed-bag shift and G. I. shoes, 
and has the kind of hair-do 
found in a National Geographic 
article on the Zulus. Ah! — but 
wait! If you will just run your 
eyes over the same dame in the 
"after" pictures. Please note the 
simple little black dress (Lord 
and Taylor's— $165.00), the im- 
ported shoes, and the slick new 
coiffure. She appears to have 
visited a plastic surgeon and is 
certainly forty pounds lighter. 
I suppose you could forgive the 
loss in weight, as carrying those 
bricks and plastering those 
walls will certainly take it out 
of you. 

They rfever show Jhe hus- 
bands in these pictures. Know 
why? He's somewhere in a rest 
home with nurses around the 
clock. 

So — next time any of you 
men are forced to the wall by 
your wife, next time she gets 
that gleam In her eye, next 
time she wants to rip out a 
wall, tile a bath, add a room, 
or even paint the woodwork; 
Stop! Rise from your chair 
and walk quickly to the tele- 
phone and call I man who can 
handle the job. Don't let your 
pride stand in the way of your 
health. 

You say you don't know a 
man? Come now — dp what the 
ads say — Look in the Yellow 
Pages. 




Mr.' and Mrs. Phillip M. Lyons of London Bridge hosted a family reunion Sunday 
attended by 43 relative's. Amom? the group w^re four generations: (left to right) Mrs. Virginia 
Parrish. and Mrs. Florence French of St. Petersburg, Fla., Mrs. Pal Kiddwell and her two-year- 
old daughter, Pamela, of Orlando, Fla. Mrs. French has 8 children, 20 grandchildren and 3 
great-grandchildren. Three of Mrs. French's children, Mrs. Lyons, Wirt B. French Jr. and Mrs. 
Robert Hall, are local residents, tfhoto by. Paul K. White) 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 

Editor, Virginia Beach Sun-News 
Dear Sir: 

We at Ferrum Junior Col- 
lege usually pause for awhile 
during the summer months to 
take stock of the past academic 
year and to plan for the coming 
one. 

In summing up the things ac- 
complished here at Ferrum, we 
are struck- by the fact- that most 
of it is done by persons who 
are indirectly associated with 
the college, like yourself. 

You have helped Ferrum im- 
mensely with the excellent news 
■coverage which,, the Virginia 
Beach Sun-News - ha? provided. 
Truly, Ferrum could not have 
become the fine junior college 
it is today if you had not 
helped spread the word. 

Thank you so much for all 
you have done and are continu- 
ing to do for Ferrum. It meaps 
a great deal to us to know how 
vitally interested you are in 
Christian higher education. If 
there is any way that we at 
Ferrum can help jiou, please let 
us know. . 
Sincerely, 
Jam^s P. Turner, 
Director of Information 
Services. 



FUNERALS 

DALLAS G. EDWARDS 

' VIRGINIA BEACH — Dallas 
Garfield Edwards, 78, of Bur- 
lington after a long illness. 

A native of Edward, N.C., he 
lived in Burlington three years. 
Before that he lived in Princess 
Anne County 15 years. 

Until his retirement in 1954, 
he was a building contractor. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Louise Johnson Edwards; 
three sons* Irving Edwards of 
Portsmouth, Lisle Edwards of 
Louisville and' Samuel F. Ed- 
wards of Louisville and Samuel 
F. Edwards of Lynnhaven; a 
daughter, Mrs. Richard Munson 
of Baton Rouge, La.; four broth- 
ers, Jesse M. Edward^ of Scot- 
land Neck, N.C., Alexander Ed- 
wards of Rbanoke Rapids, N.C., 
W. H. Edwards of Portsmouth 
and M. Edwards of Washington, 
N.C.; three sisters, Mrs. R. B. 
Brantley of Aurora, N.C.; Mrs. 
Emma Brantley of Graham, 
N.C., and Mrs. Mary Tuten of 
Washington, N.C.; three grand- 
children and a stepgranddaugh- 
ter. 

The body was sent to Maestas 
Funeral Home, Virgihia Beach. 
Funeral services were conducted 
at Eastern Shore Chapel Ceme- 
tery Thursday at 3 p.m. by the 
Rev. T. K. Howard of Faith 
Temple Free Will Baptist 
Church.' 



ACROSS 

1 Skill 
4 City of 
Indiana 
10 Dear teeth 

14 Cry of cow 

15 Peaceful 

16 Unclosed 

17 Lukewarm 

19 Movable 
opening In 
fence 

20 Novel by 
Zola 

21 Vast ages 
23 Stiffens 
25 Error 

28 To cut, 
after snick 

29 Preposition 

30 In a » 
vertical 
line (naut.) 

32 Serpents 
36 Pulpy fruit 
38 Male 
forebears 

40 In a row 

41 Render vocal 
music 

43 At no time 

45 A serous 
fluid (pi.) 

46 Heating 
vessels 

48 Satan 

50 Malay 
gibbon 

51 Motive 
53 Pry 

55 Earth 
goddess 

56 Garden 
tool (pi.) 



58 Entertained 

lavishly 
60 Discharging 

64 Nerve 
network 

65 Japanese 
aborigine 

66 A storeroom 
68 Abyssian 

ruler's 
title 

71 Hot 
weather 
drinks 

72 Lodged 
' 74 Guldo's 

high note 

75 At this 
place 

76 Primitive 
weapon (pi.) 

77 To soak 

DOWN 

1 Danish 
territorial 
division 

2 Fish eggs 
' 3 Drinks 

heavily 

4 Abducts 

5 Correlative 
of either 

6 Small cask 

7 Tierra 
del Fuego 

~ Indians 

8 Gloves 

9 Body of 
water (pi.) 

10 Hides 

11 Brilliant 
colored 
ocean fish 



H 





V 


E 


L 




B 


L 


A 


B 


A 


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D 


E 


L 


* 


V 


A 


I 





T 




I 


ft 


A 


fc 


f 


i 



ann a aaa lilu aa 
laaaa oaunrjui 



aaana uinusi ana 



TnTTI 



aa aan noa aaaa 


R 


1 


N 


E 







n 


L 


'u 1 


T 


rpr*" 


D 


F 


P 


L 


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A 


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GfO 


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12 Man's 
nickname 

13 Nahoor ' 
sheep (pi.) 

18 Greek 

letter 
22 Quantity of 

yarn 

24 Rockfish 

25 Rodent 
catching cat 

26 Bid 

27 Having 
hearing 
organ - 

31 Ax hammer 
for breaking 
stone 

33 Canal, 
North Se, 
to Baltic 

34 To anger 

35 Scorched 
37 Girl's name 
39 Cut apart 
42 A gasworks 
44 Stream 



47 Product of 
'combustion 
49 Myths . 

52 Makes noise 
like horse 

54 Estimate 
57 Pry about in 

meddlesome 

manner 

59 Fine and 
Ught as a 
line 

60 Tunisian 
measure 

61 Pelt 

62 Extraordinary 
person 

53 Adhesive 
compound 

67 Third King 
of Judah 

69 Tree yielding 
caucho 

70 Occupied 
a seat 

73 Teutonic 
deity 




Mrs. Marie Dittmann Endres 

VIRGINIA BEACH — A pri- 
vate funeral service was held 
this week for Mrs. Marie Ditt- 
mann Endres, 88, of Richardson 
Road, Bayside, at the Maestas 
Funeral Home. 

A native of Germany, she was 
a resident of the Bayside area 
for the past 7 years. She was 
the wife of the late Otto L~ 
Endres. v -f^ 

Surviving, are a daughter, Mrs. 
Earl E. Clarridge of Bayside; 
and two grandchildren. Father 
Earl C. Clarridge of New Castle, 
Del. and Sheldon V." Endres of 
Rome,. N.Y. 



Vernon Henry Morrisette 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral 
services were held for Vernon 
Henry Morrisette, 67, last Thurs> 
day at the Maestas 3 Funeral 
Home by the Rev. N. W. Waters. 

Mr. Morrisette, .who died at ) ?, 
his home on 31st Street last ^ 
Tuesday, was a native arid, life- 
long resident of RrinceSS Anne 
County, and the son of the '18te 
William H. and Mrs. Fannie 
Barnes Morrisette. 

Surviving are his wile, Mrs. 
Pauline Widgeon Morrisette; 
two sons, Langley C. Morrisette 
and William H. Morrisette; one 
daughter, Miss Mildred V. 
Morrisette; and four grandchil- 
dren, all of Virginia Beach. 

Burial was in Rosewood Me- 
morial Park, Bayside. Pallbear- 
ers were: Robert W. Rumley, 
Harry Ferguson, Arthur J. Bar- 
co, John H. O'Dell, W. J. Smith- 
wick, Jr., and George S. Brown. 



The Captain of the Virginia 
Beach Rescue Squad presides at 
all meetings and has direct 
supervision of the Squad. He 
has the power to act on all non- 
emergency calls, is Chairman of 
the Executive and Program 
Committees. He is a member of 
the Finance Committee, ap« 
points the statician. He also ap- 
pointes the auditing committee 
consisting of three members. 
This committee reports on the 
first regular business meeting in 
June.' 




George Gilliam Says: 



August is a month of Promise 
. . . Promise of fine finish of a 
succ&sful vacation season, and 
promise of a Glorious Autumn. 




HEATING OILS 



Atlantic Fuel 
OH Go. 

Call: 

GA 8-5000 

Day or Night 



' 




''* LittTe League Baseball 



SUPERB GOLF 
WINS EASTERN 



By M. T. "Cakes" Holland 

(NOTE: "Cak*>»," member 
of the Virginia Beach fire de- 
partment, set a new course 
record at Highland Links this 
year with a 64, six strokes off 
the previous record, played in 
the Eastern Amateur.) 

Prior to the opening of the 
Eastern Amateur golf tourna- 
ment, held at the Elizabeth 
Manor course/ in Portsmouth, 
the concensus of opinion was 
that the same or even higher 
score would be needed to win. 

Winner Charlie Smith from 
Gastonia, N.C., former Southern, 
North-South champion, playing 
* knocked this theory to bits with 
in his first Eastern Amateur, 
rounds of 67-68-71-69 for a rec- 
ord of 275, five strokes under 
par for 72 holes. After touring 
the tough 35-35 par 70 Elizabeth 
Manor course, Charlie said this 
was the best four rounds he's 
ever played in competitive golf. 

Talking with George Skin- 
ner, general chairman of the 
tournament, he said the course 
would play long and hard, and 
that the pins would be in 
tough position*, according to 
the weather. George predicted 
a 282-283 to win, and beca'ui 
Deane Beamon had played tt 
course several times and was 
well acquainted with it, he 
t would be the man to beat. 
George picked the long, hard 
hitting, Aero-Pines, Earl Fen- 
nell as the local dark horse. 

In the last tournament, the 
Walter Beckett Memorial win- 
ner Fennell hit his shots real 
well, but had trouble, and bad 
breaks. Skinner further _ stated, 
even though the field is star 
studded with top amateurs, the 
conditions should bring the 
scores up. This prediction yrould 
have been correct, except for 
the spectacular golf of Charlie 
Smith. Last year's tournament 
was won by Deane Beamon with 
a record 28 1 for 72 holes. This 
year Deane posted a 282, good 
for second place. 

Ronnie Garringer from Hamp- 
ton predicted a record 280 or 
281 to carry off the honors . . . 
Bobby Lojr, 1961 State Cham- 
pion came up with 281-282 for 
}he win . . . Wright Garrett, a 
real threat- in any tournament, 
had the best nine hole score for 
the four rounds. Wright birdied 
four holes, including two of the 
toughest holes on the out-going 
nine. Wright could do no better 
than fourth place with a total 
287.. 

Several Virginians survived 
the cut of 152 after 36 holes. 
These included Ronnie Yer- 
ringer, Vinny Giles, '62 State 
Amateur Champ, Bob Rawi- 
ing, Bobby Loy, Jordan Ball, 
Jim Moore, Clarence 'Ace' 
Parker (who played the first 
two rounds with Charlie 
Smith), Billy Cowardin, Mike 



Wynn, Davis Adams, and 
Wright Garrett. 

In practice rounds: Aero-Pines 
Bud Penacle eagled the tough 
18th with a booming drive and 
holed out with a three wood. 
This I believe is. the first time 
this feat was accomplished . . . 
Jerry Smith, playing the course 
for the first time placed his tee 
shot in good position on the 
18th another god shot, a little to 
the left, and about 40 yards 
short, said with an amazed look, 
"This is a par 4?" ... Did any- 
one hear the laughter when one 
of the contestants so pre- 
occupied with his practiced 
round score walked into the 
ladies locker room? WOW . . . 
In practice, Wright Garrett was 
three under par through the 13, 
then proceeded to boom his tee 
sht on the 14th out of bounds, 
finishing with a 73. 

A real fine tournament. The 
course was in tip-top shape. 
Congratulations to all concerned 
and the best of luck for bigger 
and better tournaments. 



-Bird Bowling 




Virginia Beach sUftk#rVS 
Thursday, Au S«f|fr j|f 2 

Any RESCUE 
bcr„ naving £ served in a fait 
and satisfactory rnmner 
dvfr a period if ten jjbrs, 
^utbrhiticSlly b% OTfe%d a 
Membership. Toe service period 
of ten years shall be measured! 
in total accumulative, timp 




m 



tfh 



BOAT 
RENTALS 

by the 
HOUR - DAY - WEEK 



6A 8-6880 



BEACH-BAY 

MARINA 

Virginia Beach 
31st ST. EXTENDED 



tf —■#*»««»« 4. IH I jl.11 **l^ i j pj/f iw. 



These are the Princess Anne Little League All-Stars. These youngsters defeated Upper Loudon County, 5 to 3, last Sunday in the finals of the State 
Little League tounuunefit held in Lynchburg. The team now enters the Interstate Little League tournament at Hagerstown, Maryland. The Princess Anne 
All-Stars left here Wednesday morning for the Maryland city. If the team wins at Hagerstown they will play in the Southern Regional Playoffs in Norfolk, 
August lfclli. Reading ffom left to right, bottom row— David Tew (Alternates— Howard V. Richardson, HI, Michael Shinn), William B. Allen Jr., Leslie G. White- 
horne Gilbert W. Sterling, William H. Simmons, Leslie G. Shaw, Jr. Top row— Coach Robert L. Lewis, Raymond W. Strickland, Robert L. Lewis, Jr., Michael 
N Tucker, Raymond K. Wilson, ^Robert W. Woolridge, Robert L. German, Billy H. Sawyer, Jeffr ey E. Bratton, and Manager Wil liam B. Allen 

"This is How I Did It" 




The 1962-63 bowling season 
will soon be under way. Sept. 
4th is the official starting date 
for the first league schedule. 

There will be Bantam Leagues 
for the boys and girls, age 9 to 
12. Junior Leagues for boys and 
girls 1 3to 15. Senior Leagues 
for those 16 to 18. Daytime 
ladies leagues as well as night. 

The Wednesday night Town 
and County League plans \j& 
start bowling on September 5th. 
The Night Owl Ladies League 
plans to start Thursday,^ Sept. 
6th. Have need of a few bowlers 
in both of these leagues. The 
Princess Anne Suburban men's 
league plans to go 14 teams and 
needs a few bowlers, will start 
Thursday,. Sept. 6th. Monday 
Night Pioneer Mixed will hold 
its meeting Monday, Sept. 10th, 
and plans to start bowling this 
night. We will have some be- 
ginners leagues and more infor- 
mation about all the leagues in 
next week's edition. 

For information, call GA8- 
5897. ' 

In 1952 a group of 18 men 
volunteered their services in 
the formation of a group grave- 
ly needed at Virginia Beach, a 
group that would cover emer- 
gencies beyond the protection 
of the fire and police depart- 
ment. This Rescue Squad was 
not an original idea for many 
communities of comparable size 
and character have such a serv- 
ice and esteem its protection 
with immeasurable pride. Since 
1952, the Virginia Beach Rescue 
Squad has done some real grow- 
ing and is now a smoothly op- 
erating unit. 




Plaza Bowl 
Highlights 



CALL US AND SAVE 




The Largest Stock of Used • 
AUTO PARTS IN v"A. BEACH 

Tidewater Salvage Inc. 

Just Off Va. Beach Blvd. in Oceana 



Happy Bobby Lewis, center, is showing his dad, Robert L. Lewis, left, and Manager Wil- 
liam B. Allen how he gripped the bat that meant a two-run homer and victory for the Princess 
Anne Little League All-Stars last week in Lynchburg. The win meant the State Little League 
championship for the local youngsters. - 



Thursday Nite Foursome 

High game — Tommy Neathery 
205; Norma Bunting 190. 

High Set— Ruby Jugo and Joe 
Riccio 531, Norma Bunting 449. 

Other top scores — Harry Hall 
526, Tommy Neathery 513, Jer- 
ry Fiore 510. 

High Team Game — Bunny 
Millers, 688. 

High Team Set — Cameo 
Homes, 1855. 

Special Notes of Interest — 
Anna Windemiller had a tripli- 
cate of three 109's. 

League Standings 
Won 

The Tubes 36 

3 N's & a R 30 

3 M's & a B .. 27 

Cameo Homes „. 25 

Unpredictables 24 

Last Four ..._; .__... 22Ms 

Cannon Ball'* - 22% 

Inbetweens .: 22 

Four Duces 21% 

The Idiots . 18 

Bunny Millers 17 

The Spotters 16 

Surprises .— 14& 

The Splits ,..l0 



Lost 

8 
14 
17 
19 
20 
21% 
21% 
22 
22% 
22 
27 
28 
29% 
30 



2; Bill O'Rourke, 488, Winde 
Windemiller 453. 

Cameo Homes. 3, Cannon 
Ball's 1; Joe Riccio 531, Tommy 
Bradt, 498. 

Inbetweens 4, The Splits 0; 
Harry Hall, 526, Bob Reeves, 
437. 

Unpredictables 4, The Idiots, 
0; Jerry Fiore 510, Sam Roberts 
489. 

The Tubes 4, Four Duces 0; 
Rudy Jugo- 531, Dee McLaugh- 
lin 425. 

3 N's & a R 4; Tommy Neath- 
ery 513. 



Call 



BROTHERS 



GA 8-1306 Auto Service 
Va. Beach 

for the new 

Lincon 

HEAVY DUTY MOWERS 
Home & Commercial Use 




ENGINES 
• 3V4 H.P. & 4 H.P. 
4 Cycle— Cast Iron 



The Summery: 

Last Four d, surprises 1; E. T. 
Miller & Fred Fink 473, Mel 
Rush, 461. 

3 M's St a B 2, Bunny Millers, 



Freedom "7" 



DRAG RACFS 




Plymouths Top 
Drag Race Field 

1962 Plymouths made a clean 
sweep of the high priced Super 
Super Stock Class in the NHRA 
sanctioned races at Freedom 
"7" Dragway in Virginia Beach. 

Lynn Baker, of Portsmouth, 
won $100 first money with an 
elapsed time of 11:46 and a 
speed of 102.15 miles per hour. 
Bubba Newnam, of Virginia 
Beach, ran second and W. J. 
Baker, of Hampton ran third. 
Second and third money in this 
event pays $50 and $25 respect- 
ively. 

Qharlie Gary, of Newport 
News, in a B Class Gas car won 
the $2500 Street Eliminator 
first prize and Richard Cutchin, 
of Dover, Delaware, in an A 
Class S|ock won the Stock 
Eliminator. The ■ best elapsed 
ttme of the da/ in Super Super 
Stock was turned in By Lynn 
Baker, as he won the first prize. 
However, he was tied by Pee- 
Wee Wallace, of Richmond, in 
bis 1962 Plymouth who also 
turned in an e t of 11:46. The 
Baker car also turned in the 
top speed of the day in SS,S 



with 102.15 mph. 

The most exciting event of 
the day was in C Class Stock 
Automatic. For the past couple 
of weeks, a tremendous rivalry 
has been building up between 
Ray Hauser of 940 Defoe Street 
in Norfolk, driving a 1952 Olds- 
mobile in C Class Stock Automa- 
tic, and Ann Butler, of 1915 
Atlantic Avenue, in Portsmouth, 
driving her father, Russell Cald- 
well's 1959 Plymouth. A pro- 
test was lodged last week by 
Hauser which necessitated Cald- 
well tearing the '59 Plymouth 
all the way down so the stroke 
and bore of the engine could be 
checked. The car was found to 
be legal, however, and Hauser 
did defeat the car last week. 
When it came time for Ann and 
Hauser to run in their class to- 
day, they, both made two trips 
down the track which ended in 
a dead heat and finally on the 
third try, Hauser just barely 
nosed out this high flying girl. 
This rivalry will be resumed on 
the 19th at Freedom "7" Drag- 
way for the • big Mid-season 
Championships. 

Freedom "7" will not operate 
on the 12th of August, but wil! 
present the biggest race meet 
of the season with the Mid- 
season Championship oh Sun : 
day, August 19th. $800 in bonds 
Will be given in the SS/S Class, 
and there will be cash awards in 
every event for this particular 
affair. 129 cars showed up for 
racing Sunday and 122 qualified. 
It is expected that in the neigh- 
borhood of 300 racing vehicles 
will be on hand for the big 
event ou tfie 19th. 




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Free Estimates— Pickup & Delivery 

Complete 
Automotive Upholstering 

Jvitltop 

vlpnol&lennQ (So. 

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17th St. at City LinOto-Va Beach 

AUTO TOPS 

• Custom Made Seat Covers • Carpets & Floor Mats 



FOR SALE 

1961 THUNDERBIRD SPORTS CONVERTIBLE 

Ermine White with Black Top 
Original Owner — Low Mileage 

$3,495°° 



f t * l m m .: *» 



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Sir Walter Hotel 



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MALBON 

Va. Beach Blvd. 



WILLYS 

p 

GA 8-4961 





SERVICE 

CO. 



While you wait AUTO GLASS for all make cars 
Curved • Flat • AH Sixes 

• USED JEEPS 
4-Wheel Drive « Trucks - Station Wagons 

RAQIATORS 
Cleaned — Repaired — 




ALL TYPES OF INSURANCE 

for Action . . . Results 

GA 8-9161 



KELLAM 




INSURANCE CO. 



REALTORS 



3113 PACIFIC AVENUE 

B. W. WROtON 
GA 8-5273 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

ROBT. 6. HARDAWAY 
GA 8-7175 




I 
I 
I 



X^iin'Mi Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 9, 1962 
Page 6-A 

RABBI PINCUS NOW 
AT TEMPLE EMANUEL 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Rabbi 
Phihp Pincus, formerly of 
Houston, Texas, assumed duties 
Aof, 1 aa Rabbi of Temple 
Emanuel, it has been announced 
by Dr. Bernard B. Batleman, 
president of the congregation. 

Rabbi Pincus recently retired 
from the United States Air 
Force with the rank of Lt. Col. 
in the Chaplain Corps. In his 
more than twenty years of serv- 
ice; he served in many areas of 
the world including Europe, 
Newfoundland, Greenland, Ja- 
pan and Korea. He served with 
distinction during World War n 
and in Korea and later was the 
recipient of a number of honors, 
among them being the American 
Defense Medal, American 
Theatre Ribbon, World War H 
Victory Medal, German Occupa- 
tion Medal, Army Commenda- 
tion Medal, Air Force Commen- 
dation Medal, Humane Action 
Medal/Berlin Airlift Clasp. 

He entered military service as 
Chaplain in May, 1942. In 1946 
he was selected as regular U.S. 
Air Force Chaplain. He served 
in Panama, Germany, Alaska, 
Korea, Japan and in many State- 
side bases. Rabbi Pincus had 
short tours in Greenland, Ice- 
land, Bermuda and the Azores. 
His last assignment was Deputy 
Command Chaplain, Headquar- 
ters, Military Air Transport 
Service. 

Rabbi Pincus was selected 
at Air Force Chaplain of the 
year for 1959 to receive the 
"Four Chaplains Award" of 
the Alexander D. Good a 
Udfe, B'nai B'rith for that 
year, and he served as Special 
Consultant on Jewish matters 
to the Department of Defense 
Chaplain Board. He was se- 
lected as the Jewish represen- 




RABBI PHILIP PINCUS 

tative at the Interment of the 
Unknown Soldiers of World 
War II and Korea at Arlington 
National Cemetery on May 
30, 1958. Rabbi Pincus re- 
ceived the Seminary Distin- 
guished Service Medal in 
June, 1961. 

The new spiritual leader of 
Temple Emanuel received his 
B. A. degree from the College 
of the City of New York in 1931 
and was ordained in 1935 at the 
Jewish Theological Seminary in 
New York. He is a member of 
the rabbinical assembly— a body 
composed of Conservative 
Rabbis 

Rabbi Pincus will, in addition 
to his Rabbinical duties, assume 
supervision of the Hebrew and 
Sunday schools and cultural pro- 
grams associated with the tem- 
ple. 



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ELECTRICAL SUPPIES AND FIXTURES 



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PREPARATION IS KEY 
TO THICK JUICES 



HOMfMA&RS' ITEMS 

Thick tomato juice— or thin? 
If your family likes thick meaty 
tomato juice, you can easily 
satisfy their preference. 

The key to thick juice, either 
made at home or at a commer- 
cial cannery, is the order in 
which the steps of preparation 
are carried out If you boil large 
chunks of tomatoes for several 
minutes before straining, the 
juict, will be thick. If you strain 
before heating, the juice will be 
thin. 

For thick juice, be sure the 
tomatoes are in chunks or slices 
when they are heated. Once 
strained, the juice can be either 
canned or frozen. The pre- 
liminary steps of sorting, trim- 
ming, and washing are the same 
as usual for any tomato juice. 
Slice or quarter the tomatoes 
into a large kettle, bring them 
to a boil, and keep them at a 
boiling temperature with stir- 
ring for three to five minutes, 
depending on the size of the 
chopped tomatoes. With larger 
chunks, boil the maximum time. 
After boiling, the chunks will 
soften and the pulp can be 
strained through a colander. 

Some people prefer to remove 
the core before boiling, claiming 
that this improves the flavor of 
the juice. Add salt to taste, or 
omit it if you prefer. Then bring 
back the juice to boiling before 
canning, and fill the hot con- 
tainers to within 3/8-inch of the 
top. Process jars or cans by the 
usual procedure. • 

To freeze, cool the strained 
juice as quickly as possible and 
allow plenty of headspace when 
filling the containers. If you use 
glass jars, fill them only % full. 
Otherwise, you may have freez- 
ing breakage. 
TRADING STAMPS 

It has been said that few 
things in the food industry ever 
captured attention and devotion 
as quickly and as completely as 
trading stamps. We go into a 
grocery store, we buy some 
items, we pay for them, we get 
back some change and some 
little pieces of paper. And 
heaven help the checker of the 
store that forgets to give us 
those pieces of paper! Store 
managers tell me that we'll for- 
get the groceries, we'll forget 
the change, but we never, never 
forget the stamps. 




YOU HAVE TO TRY IT 
TO BELIEVE ITI 

Ab; Gillette 

Sup**. 
BLUE BLADE 



By now, trading stamps are 
.fairly familiar to all of us. Yet, 
like every other major expendi- 
ture, it is well occasionally to 
review their purposes, influ-. 
ence, and costs. 

Generally speaking, stores 
give stamps to attract new cus- 
tomers or keep old customers. 
Some stores start a stamp plan 
to get a sales advantage over 
customers. Others may feel that 
they are forced into stamps to 
remain competitive. So, stamps 
are simply part of the over-all 
promotional or advertising pro- 
gram of the store. 

Few, if any, grocery stores 
are non-profit organizations, at 
least not by choice. Those 
stamps cost the store money; 
from 2Vi-3 cents per sales dol- 
lar. This is 2Vi-3 cents of cost 
that they have to get back in 
one form or another before they 
have a profit 

Who pays this 2*4-3 cent cost? 
At one extreme, the retailer 
might do so, if added volume 
does not help cover it and if he 
cannot raise prices to compen- 
sate'. At the other extreme^his 
customers may do so, if added 
volume does not cover it and if 
the retailer can raise prices 
that much. 

The evidence seems to point 
to the fact that in many situa- 
tions both retailer and customer 
pay for the stamps. Added 
volume, lower other promotion- 
al and advertising costs, and 
lower net profits mean the gro- 
cer pays part of the cost. 
Slightly higher shelf prices 
mean that consumers pay for 
part. 

Are stamps for you? Only 
you can answer that. There are, 
however, two points you may 
want to consider. Stamps are 
not free. You pay something for 
them. If you like a store and 
definitely plan to shop there 
and if it gives stamps, it's only 
good business to save these 
stamps. You're paying for them. 

Analysis of stamp catalogues 
to decide whether you need the 
merchandise listed, analysis of 
costs of that merchandise with 
stamps compared with retail 
store or discount store prices, 
and the time and effort spent, 
saving, pasting and redeeming 
stamps are things to think about 
as you evaluate trading stamps. 





10 for 69< 
FITS ALL tILLETTE RAZORS 



QUESTION: When I buy froz- 
en meat and bring it home, it 
is slightly thawed. Can I re- 
freeze it? 

ANSWER: Frozen meat can 
be safely refrozen if it has not 
been thawed completely. How- 
ever, the meat may be less ten- 
der and juicy. 



When mixing beaten eggs 
with hot mixtures, pour these 
mixtures slowly into the eggs, 
stirring constantly. This avoids 
curdling and cooking the eggs. 



«3 



SEMfe 

TOP 



BOMpt 



<§ 




RNAOCJNG 



HOME! FEDERAL SAVINGS 

OUR NEWEST OFFICE: 6024 VA. BEACH BLVD. 
AT THOMAS CORNER 

Home Office: 112 West York Street 

OTHER OFFICES 
700 Beat* St r e e t Norfolk Hunttngtoa at 
SS11 High Btv-Fortsaaoeth Hewpert Hewe 

1« N. Mala 8treet-«»ifoIk 12 g. King 



By RBV. ELMER MEDLEY 
Prince of Peace Luthern Church 

From a study of the Words of 
Holy Scripture' we know that 
God has given His Law to be 
used by us in a three-fold man- 
ner; a curb, to check coarse 
outbursts of sin; a mirror, to 
show us our lives as He sees 
them; and a rule, to show us 
what in what a God-pleasing life 
exists. Before you continue 
reading this meditation, go -to 
your Bible, and there read the 
20th chapter of Exodus, where 
God reveals the Ten Command- 
ments to Moses. Notice the 
setting, the gravity of the scene. 
Notice also the all inclusiveness 
of the Commandments. Read 
Matthew 5:17-7:29, to see what 
Christ says concerning the. Law. 

Having read the 'account of 
the giving of the Law, and also 
Christ's sermon, which is based 
on that Law, I'm sure you can 
keep your own "score-card" on 
your life. You don't need a 
special invitation to see that you 
just don't match up as you 
should. This is using the Law as 
a mirror. You are looking into 
the truth of God's Word, and 
comparing yourself with its de- 
mands. 

Because we are human, there 
are two dangers that we face as 
we thus use the Law of God as 
a mirror. The first, is that we 
read the Law, and pass over it 
almost without thought, telling. 
ourselves smugly that Christ 
died to release us from the Law; 
that the Law has no power over 
us. To be sure, Christ has died 
to free us from the curse of the 
Law; it has no power over us. 
BUT, it is also true that when 
we come to Christ to receive this 
forgiveness and freedom, we 
must come with repentance — 
we must come in humility. It is 
necessary, then, that we do not 
pass over the Law as a brief 
prelude, but that we actually 
consider it carefully, that we 
apply it in all its severity, to 
ourselves. It is only when we 
see just how much the Law ap- 
plies to us personally, and when 
we see just how sin-filled our 
lives are, that The. Holy Ghost 
can really apply the Gospel to 
our hearts, with its soothing, 
saving effect. 

There is another danger in 
the Law, one just opposite of the 
aforementioned. It is possible 
that you, as a sincere Christian, 
read the Law very carefully, 
and consider it in relation to 
your life, and this is well. The 
danger comes when it is time 
for you to go to the Gospel. It 
is unquestionably true that you, 
or anyone else who reads the 
Law in a right spirit should 
feel condemned — guilty. But it 
is just as true that when The 
Gospel comes, that you should 
feel free — saved. It is a very 
great danger, and in fact a temp- 
tation of Satan, that you cannot 
escape the Law. One might say, 
"For the first time in my life, I 
really see the Law. I never rea- 
lized how guilty I am. Surely, 
God cannot forgive me." This is 
just as futile as impenitence. 
The Law has its place. Accord- 
ing to Luther (commenting on 
Galatians), the Law is to show 
us the henousness of sin, of my 
sin, but it is also to prepare the 
penitent heart for the sweet 
comfort of the Gospel. 

As you prepare to worship 
God, as you are prepared by the 
Holy Spirit to meet Him day by 
day, consider God's Holy Law, 
but consider it in its place. Be 
assured that it does tell you of 
your wretchedness before God. 
But also be assured that it is at 
this point that the Words "un- 
utterable",, the "sweetness most 
ineffible", the marvelous grace 
of God, in Jesus Christ, comes 
to your rescue. For above all, 
and finally, you ARE God's own 
redeemed child in Christ. You 
are the object of the loVe of 
your gracious Heavenly Father. 



C rSwYourBi5P 

CHRIST'S SECOND 

ADVENT IS NEARI 

-ACTS 1:11 

For free Bible 
study helps, serfd 
name and address to: 

THE CHRISTADELPHIANS 

P. O. BOX 842 
RICHMOND 24, VIRGINIA 



LORD'S 
WORK 




i etnincM for all . . . 

ALL rod THE CHURCH 
TU Quire* fa ** f natt* factor 

•a aarSt far At mat *f «•>«'- 

arttr tad fowl tilutaoMp, It U • 
Mo n t i] » m »f ipirUiMl valval. Wi(h- 
aaa t atraaf Umtcii. atiflrar dc- 
aacracy tor ariaxalioa cat) aw- 
viva. TImm an law aavad i 
way amy acrtan iBaaM 



Chore*. Thay am (t) Far h» 
*w» take . (2) Far kit children'! 
aakf. (3) Far ft* take of Kb caa- 
■aaitjr aad Bttiea. (4) Far •» 
rah* of ft* Chart* ihtlf, which 
aatdi kit awrtl aad notorial Hip- 
part. PUa la a* to church reau- 
l.rlr tad rttd raw Bibk dairy. 




Sunday 

Kaworafc 
M1-S0 



Monday 

Nthtmaa 
t;lS-43 



The dignity of willing labor is one of the prin- 
ciples which Christianity has established among us. 
It is a natural by-product of a faith whose founder 
was the Carpenter of Nazareth, whose first adherents 
were fishermen of Galilee. 

Those who are eager to serve God and their fel- 
low men find rich opportunities in the life of the 
Church. There are tasks for a man's hands, for his 
voice, for his pen, for his mind. There are needs that 
our offerings cannot supply . . . challenges that call, 
for the talents and time of earnest men and women.* 

That friendly church which inspires us on Sunday 
is busy with the Lord's work all week. That man in 
the next pew is finding new happiness 'in willihg 
Christian service. Are you? 

Copyright 196 1, Keiiter Advertiting Service, Inc., Struburg, Va. 



Tuttdty 

IKinrt 

•:l-T 



Wednwday 
IKingi 
«:10-I8 



Thurtdty 
Ptalmi 
80:10-17 



Friday 
Paafau 
137:14 



Saturday 
I Corinthian! 



THIS SERIES OF MESSAGES IN THE INTEREST OF THE CHURCH IS SPONSORED 
BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS 



HOLT BUICK, INC. 

THREE GREAT BUICKS 

Iialaara — Iavicta — Electra 

21st ft PACIFIC ATE. GA 8-2132 



MURDEN DRUG C O. 

Prompt, Efficient Prescription Service 
Phone 340-8111 London Bridge, Va, 



{3rd Street 



SEASIDE MARKET 

Telephone GA 8-9319 

Virginia 



ROSE'S 5-10-25c STORES, INC. 

399 31st Si ft 1991 Atlantic Av 
Your Shopping Center 



RUSSELL ft HOLMES 

Your Newly Enlarged Shoe Store 

"Where Shopping Is a Pleasure" 

1998 Atlantic Avenue Virginia Beach 

GA 8-4301 



PRICE'S INC. 

HILLTOP 

VIRGINIA BEACH 



NIXON ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractors — General Repairs 

Housed Commercial Wiring— Light Fixtures 

ten . 17th Street, Va. Beach— Phone GA 8-3711 



COMET TRAILERS 

Hani your own furniture with Comet Trailers 
Can 343-3534 

1217 South Military Highway 



EMRHAE FORD 

FORD aad ITALIAN FIAT 
• 17th St. alee Bayside on Rt 13Y 
Telephone GA 94232 



BE-LO SUPERMARKET 

39th Street 9 Arctic A* 
VlrgiBia 



R. L. GARRINGER 

Wholesale Meats sad Provisions 

Distributors Kraft Food Products 

2446 Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Telephone MA 7-5398 Norfolk, Va, 



CAVALIER GARAGE 

IOHNNY DUDLEY 

Directly Behind Hotel 

Independently Operated 

Holly Rd. ft Cavalier Dr. 

Dial GA 8-2131 Virginia Beach 



BRINKLEY'S SHELL SERVICE 

"Friendly Service phis Quality Products! 

31st Street and Baltic Avenue 

Telephone GA 8-4232 Virginia Bfach 



KELLAM ft EATON, INC. 

Building Supplies 

"Headquarters For Your Needs" 

Princess Anne Phone 2661—2672 



CERTIFIED TV ft APPLIANCE CO. 

151 EAST LITTLE CREEK RD. 588-5471 

6909 VA. BEACH BLVD. 497-1021 



KELLAM & EATON INSURANCE CO. 

Real Estate — Rentals — Insurance 
3113 Pacific Avenue — Telephone GA 8-91.1 



PRINCESS ANNE PLUMBING 
ft ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, INC. 

Pfumblng and Heating Contractors 
Westlngbouse Appliance! 
Phone: Day 2960 ft 2678 — Night 2993 
Princes* Anna \ 



OCEANA CURB MARKET 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Groceries and Meats 

Phone GA 8-1691 Oceana, Va. 



R 



VA. BEACH AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

Evtarede Mote— .— Automotive Parts 
Pbone GA 8-6556 
829 • 17th Street 



W. A. WOOD OIL CO. 



ESSO STANDARD OIL CO. 
FnalOll and Ki 
Dial GA 8-3385 



Sun-News Classified Ads Bring Results 



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NO MONEY DOWN x 

PRICE'S 

HILLTOP, VA. BEACH 

SHOP TILL 9 P.M. 



Inspection, Then Camp 




■ Scoutmaster Herb Ortt conducts a "shake down" inspection of bqys from Boy Scout 
Troop 3*78 Of Virginia Beach Methodist Church before they took off last Wednesday on a 23-day 
trip to Camp Philmont in Cimmaron, New Mexico. They are (left to right) Johnny Ortt, Stan 
Phillips, Terry Whesdos and Lou Hubbard Jr. The boys are backed up by proud fathers Stan- 
ley Phillips? Paul Whesdos, and Lou Hubbard. Also making the trip but not present when the 
picture was taken were Calvin Jones and- Charles Saunders. (Boice Photo) 



New President 



No Slimmer Meetings 
But Clubwomen Are 



Busy 



By VIROIE HUDSON 
BAYSID&— "Our Club never 
stops working in the summer. 
We merely dispense with official 
club meetings." These were the 
sentiments of Mrs. Thomas B. 
Petty, newly elected President 
of the Woman's Club of Chesa- 
peake Beach. 

She explained that the Club 
members participated regularly 
throughout the summer in the 
Bloodmobile program at the 
Little Creek Amphibious Base. 
They have also staged their 
Summer Festival annually in 
August for eleven years. How- 
ever, the 1962 Festival was 
necessarily cancelled, due to 
the selling of the Chesapeake 
Beach Community, scene of the 
annual event,, to the incoming 
Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. 
Dispensing with the Festival 
created spare time which the 
ladies in the Club were not ac- 
customed to. 

Mrs. Petty decided that her 
flfemberit should not be "bur- 
dened" with all this laisura & 
so arranged for them to sharp- 
en their club wits on ■ course 
in Parliamentary Procedure. 
Mrs. 0. T. Edmondson, a Past 
President of the Chesapeake 
Club, and now a Business 
Teacher in Princess Anne High 
School, agreed to instruct the 
classes. 

August vacations were nearly 
the undoing of Mrs. Petty's best 
laid plans, but still determined, 
she, with Mrs. Edmondson, 
worked out a "Brush Up" 
course which could be done in 
two evenings, with three hours 
instruction each evening. An 
invitation to participate in the 
study went out to the Bayside 
Junior Woman's Club, and tele- 
phone committees from the two 
clubs went to work. 

Surprisingly enough, for hot 
weather, fourteen ladies eagerly 
signed up for the classes. The 
first evening of study was held 
in the home of*Mrs. Edmondson, 
Tuesday evening, July 31. The 
second was in the home of Mrs., 
Louise Rieder at Chesapeake 
Beach. Mrs. Edmondson reports 
that "the interest and enthus- 
iasm were so great, and the re- 
freshments so delightful, that I 
consider the shortened study 



very successful. We are most 
happy with the attendance of 14, 
as 15 is usually the limit on a 
class of this kind." Mrs. Petty, 
high In her praise for the Club 
ladies who participated, says 
that such classes will be re- 
sumed in the Fall in order that 
members Vacationing may also 
benefit. 

In addition to teaching Bus! 
ness and Shorthand at the high 
school, Mrs. Edmondson also acts 
as sponsor to the School's "Fu- 
ture Business Leaders of Ameri- 
ca" Club. This group, under her 
direction, took second place this 
past school year in the William 
and Mary Regional District for 
their ability in Parliamentary 
discussion. 

The instructor closed the fin- 
al class for the Woman's Club 
with this admonition, "Parlia- 
mentary Procedure is designed 
to save time, to keep order, 
thus to accomplish the purpose 
of the organization's meetings. 
Use it wisely and keep in mind 
that it merely represents, basic- 
ally, good order and good man- 
ners." 

i 

"PRAYER GROUP" MEETS 

BAYSIDE— Mrs. D. B. Smith 
Sr., of Sylvan Beach is enter- 
taining August 10 at a beach 
party at her home for her 
"Prayer Group" from Park 
Place Methodist Chufcli. 



JUNIOR HIGH GROUP 
VISITS NAVY SHIP 

BAYSIDE— The Junior High 

M.Y.F. of Bay lake Methodist 

Church enjoyed a trip aboard 

the U.S.S. Greenwich Bay, last 
week. i 

While on board they saw their 
materials for "Operation Hands 
clasp" being loaded for distri 
bution overseas. 



MISS JUDY NICHOLS IS 
GUEST OF Mr. A MRS. SMITH 

BAYSIDE— Miss Judy Nichols 
of Suffolk, Va., was guest of her 
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. 
D. B. Smith, Jr., on Hollis Road, 
last week while her brother Tal- 
madge Nichols was a patient in 
Norfolk General Hospital. Miss 
Carol Smith accompanied them 
home this week and is visiting 
in Suffolk. 

U. VA. GRADUATE 
GEORGE G. PHILLIPS, JR. 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Mr. and 
Mrs. George G. Phillips of Vir- 
ginia Beach will spend this week- 
end at the Farmington Country 
Club at Charlottesville and at- 
tend the graduation of their son, 
George G. Phillips, Jr., from the 
University of Virginia. 

Also attending will be S. S. 
Royster Jr., of Virginia Beach 
and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. 
Rowland II of Little Rock, Ark. 

DELEGATE 

BAYSIDE— Gene Gibilaro of 
Lake Bradford Drive is a dele- 
gate to the M.Y.F. Senior High 
Assembly at Blackstone, Va 7 
this week. 



Pier Model Arrives in Norfolk 



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Manager 
Allan Rothenberg 

Registered Representative 



VIRGINIA BEACH 
31 10 PACIFIC AVENUE 

♦. o. box see 

TELEPHONE 480-8000 



Willard R. Ashburn, Jr. 
Asst. Manager 

Frank L. Lawlor 



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Saturdays — 9-12 

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LADIES DAY OUT 
PROGRAM STARTS 

BAYSIDE — "Uttle Ladies 
Day Out" program got under 
way at the Baylake Methodist 
Church Wednesday, and will 
continue through August. 

It is for "Little Ladles" ages 
8 through 18 years of age. The 
program offers instructions in 
bowling, beginners swimming, 
advanced swimming, horseback 
riding, charm, bridge, dancing, 
badminton, handicrafts, charcoal 
and soap sculpture, art, modern 
dance, and modeling. 

The teenage, 14-18, course is 
$6.00 and tftere is additional 
fees for some of the sports of- 
fered. It *is necessary to. have a 
Junior Y.M.C.A. membership 
card for 75c in order to take 
part in the program. 



BAYSIDE UONS 
HEAR KLINGMEYER 

BAYSIDE— The Bayside Lions 
Club met Wednesday, at Shore 
Drive Inn with the president, 
C. B. Ostrander, presiding. 

Ernest Posey, program chair- 
man for the evening, introduced 
W. A. Klingmeyer, a member of 
the Ward's Corner Lions Club. 
Klingmeyer was one of a large 
group of Virginia Lions who re- 
cently returned from the lions 
International Convention in 
Nice, France. He showed the 
club a large number of color 
slides which he took while at- 
tending the convention and also 
during the European tour which 
took the party to points of in- 
terest in France, Great Britain, 
Switzerland. 

'Klingmeyer said that Ernest 
Posey rendered a great service 
to the group of traveling Lions 
by acting as French interpreter 
on the tour. 



BAYSIDE CHURCH 
BOARD MEETING 

Monday night at 7 p.m. the 
Official Board of the Bayside 
Christian church met with the 
chairman Dewey Simmons, pre- 
siding. 

Tuesday at 10:30 p.m. Circle 
No. 1 met at the home of Mrs. 
W. C. Griffin, Lee Avenue. Mrs. 
Evelyn Caldwell is the Circle 
leader. 

Tuesday night the Cancer 
Dressing Class met at the 
church at 7:30 p.m. Mrs. Hazel 
Taylor, Friendly Service 
Chairman, it in charge of this 
class. 

The Annual Pilgrim Fellow- 
ship Assembly of the Southern 
Convention will be held at Camp 
Moonelon, Eton College, N,C. 
Saturday and Sunday. Delegates 
from the Bayside church, will at- 
tend. Each church is entitled to 
two delegates. 

Wednesday night at 6 p.m. the 
Senior High Fellowship will 
visit the Convalescent Home at 
Ocean Park after which they 
will assemble at the church to 
continue working on their pro- 
ject, "phurch year books". 

MOOSE DINNER 

The Virginia Beach Moose 
Lodge No. 1998 will sponsor a 
fried chicken dinner on August 
12 at 904 Atlantic avenue, it has 
been announced. 

Dinner will be served from 
12 noon, until 5 p.m. All pro- 
ceeds from the dinner will be 
contributed to aid Lukenua 
stricken American children. 



Virginia Beach SuivNews, Thursday, Augusf 9, 19dt 

* Page 7-M 



Adm. David H. Clark (ret.), left, Executive Director of the 
Virginia State Ports Authority, points out details of the new 
Lamberts Point General Cargo Terminal to J. Hoge Tyler, III, 
president of Seaboard Citizens National Bank. The model is 
now on display in the-lobby of Seaboard Bank on Main Street. 
The pier is being built by the Virginia State Ports Authority 
and will cost thirteen and one-half million dollars upon com- 
pletion. The display arrived in Norfolk from the Washington 
National Airport and is on display in the Seaboard lobby for a 
limited time. (Haycox Photoramic) 



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Itaia Beach SUN-NSW3 
sr«tay, August 9, 1962 

w« e-A 




(Continued From Pag* 1) 

*in«» font, dolls, linens, jewel- 

f tad brksa-brac. According to 

I Aow'i policy, all antiques 

fepU>»d must be authentic, no 

»p»dnctions. 

The foyer will feature "Ac- 

Mrtttea of the Past" with dem- 

natrations on leather craft and 

lace making. 

Candle Maker* Return 
The candle makers from Wil- 
lltmsburg, with their exotic 
candles and secret formula, will 
Cfturn this year. The candle 
demand last year far exceeded 
tte supply. A linen expert will 
be on hand and the Chesapeake 
and Potomac Telephone Co. will 
display an antique country 
store. 

Hostesses in Colonial costumes 
will greet visitors and the Hos- 
pitality Corner will offer ham 
biscuits, sandwiches, homemade 
cake and hand-turned-freezer 
peach ice cream. 

Door prizes will be given and 
an authentic reproduction high 
boy from Crawford House will 
be the grand prize. It is now on 
display at the Bank of Virginia 
Beach. 

Mrs. Joseph DeCreny is gen- 
eral chairman. A 



Elks Meeting 

(Continued Prom Pago 1) 

rival. The Donaldsons will be 
met by a small group of Virginia 
Beach dignitaries headed by 
Mayor Frank A. Dusch. A recep- 
tion is planned at the Cavalier 
Hotel this afternoon. 

Donaldson was elected head 
Of the 1,300,000 member frater- 
nity at its national convention 
in Chicago on July 9. He had 
previously served as grand sec- 
retary for eight years. 

The new Virginia Beach lodge 
Will be the 24th Elks Lodge to 
be established in Virginia. It 
was through the work of Her- 
bert L. Willard, past exalted 
ruler of Portsmouth Lodge 82 
that the Virginia Beach lodge 
was formulated. 

Approximately 200 members 
are expected, to be initiated to- 
night by Exalted Ruler John T. 
Curran and officers of the Ports- 
mouth Lodge. ' 

MISS SPRY OFF 
M EUROPEAN TOUR 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Anne L. Spry of Scotia, N.Y., 
franddaughter of Mrs. H. S. 
Spry of Great Neck Road, and 
niece of Mrs. Virgil H. Land of 
Princess Anne, is sailing to 
Europe, Aug. 21 on the liner 
S. S. Atlantic. 

, Miss Spry, daughter of Lcdr. 
and Mrs. Norman L. Spry, grad- 
uated from Chamberlayne Col- 
lege in Boston, Mass. and re- 
ceived an associate in science 
degree. She plans to continue 
her studies at the University of 
Naples in Italy. 7 

Miss Spry and her mother wul 
visit the ports of Casabltfnca, 
AMgeaers, Gilbraltar, Palma be- 
fore joining Lcdr. Spry in Naples 

The Sprys will live in Naples 
for two years where Lcdr. Spry 
has been assigned duty. 



Notes Tell Story 



Rescue Squad Finds 
It Is Appreciated 

VIRGINIA BEACH— As contributions to the Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne Rescue Squad started to roll in this week during 
the 1962 fund-raising drive, heart-warming stories have unfolded 
on the notes accompanying the donations. 

Perhaps the most touching has been the one from a widow, 
written on the anniversary of 



her husband's death. She said 
"In Aug. 1960 you folks came 
to my assistance. My husband 
was dying of a heart attack, and 
I will always be so grateful for 
your kindness. You had been to 
our aid once before and taken 
him to the hospital. 

"The last chock ho over 
wrote was one to the Rescue 
Squad. Today, instead of mak- 
ing the trip to his grave and 
buying flowers, I am tending 
you this small gift. I thank you 
for your help and kindness." 
Other notes have said: 
"We commend each member 
of the Rescue Squad for their 
unselfish service to this com- 
munity. We appreciate your 
help in the past. God bless you 
in your work . . ." 

"I can't think of any organiza- 
tion that does more good than 
yours. I only wish I could do 
more, but each summer I look 
forward to this priviledge . . ." 
"I enclose a check with my' 
everlasting gratitude to the 
two fine Christian gentlemen 
who helped me when I fell in 
my home. ... I shall never 
forget them . . ." 
• "Just a line to once again 
thank you for your kind atten- 
tion last Saturday. I am sure 
you are aware of the contribu- 
tion that you and the other Res- 
cue Squad volunteers make to 
the public. I only wish I could 
find words to express my own 
gratitude . . ." 

"Always I will appreciate 
your answer to my call . . . and 
the driver's kindness. Only wish 
I could do more . . ." 

And so the notes have been. 
Some are brief ("Keep up the 
good work!"), some grateful 
("With God's Blessing") and all 
filled with appreciation for the 
volunteer services rendered by 
the Rescue Squad. 



Funerals 

MARIA TUCKER GRIFFIN 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral 
services for Mrs. Maria Tucker 
Griffin, 817 were held Wednes- 
day at 5 p.m. at Galilee Episcopal 
Church by the Rev. Beverly 
Tucker White of St. Andrew's 
Episcopal Church, Norfolk, and 
the Rev. Edmund Berkley of 
Galilee Episcopal Church. Bur- 
ial was today in a Bedford, Mass. 
cemetery. 

Her parents were the Right 
Rev. and Mrs. Beverly D. Tuck- 
er. Her husband was Malcolm 
Griffin. She was bom in War- 
saw, Va. 

Surviving are two sisters, 
Mrs. G. Winthrop Lee of Con- 
cord, Mass., and Miss Lila W. 
Tucker of Virginia Beach; and 
four brothers, the Right Rev. 
Beverly D. Tucker of Cleveland, 
Lawrence F. Tucker of Virginia 
Beach, Ellis N. Tucker of Sewa- 
nee, Tenn., and the Rev. F. 
Bland Tucker of Savannah. 



Cats in News 
For Firemen 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Even 
Virginia Beach has it's "Cat on 
a Hot Tin Roof." ... or at least 
the Virginia Beach Fire Depart- 
ment thought so. 

Fireman R. H. Gray and his 
crew answered "a cat's call for 
help" recently at 24th Street. 

Gray and his crew came to a 
cat's rescue again when some- 
one called reporting a cat lodged 
in a drainpipe at 18th and Pa- 
cific. Well, the cat turned out 
only to be a tiny kitten . . . but 
a mighty gratefurone. 

Other calls answered from 
July 23 through August 5th 
were: 

July 24—7:51 a.m., oven; 207- 
43rd St. 

July 27—1:19 p.m., bottle gas 
tank; 18th St. bet. Arctic and 
Baltic. 

July 27—3:31 p.m., grass; 
19th & Med. 

July 27 — 4:55 p.m., miscel- 
laneous; 31st & Holly Road. 

July 28 — 8:01 a.m., automo- 
bile; 17th & Med. Ave. 

July 28 — 9:01 a.m., miscel- 
laneous; 35th & Atlantic Ave. 

July 30" — 9:05 p.m., motorcy- 
cle; 17th & Pacific Ave. 

July 31 — 1:03 p.m., power 
failure - alarm system; Everett 
School. 

July 31 — 1:19 p.m., power 
failure - alarm system; Cooke 
School. 

August 1 — 10:31 p.m., auto- 
mobile; 28th & Atl. Ave. 

August 2 — 5:10 p.m., oven; 
204-26% th St. 

Men-of-War 

(Continued, on Page 8) 

at home and brought to the hos- 
pital later as a precautionary 
measure. 

Charles Sewell, 12, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hampton H. Sewell Jr. 
of 72nd Street. He received 
stings on his left hand while 
floating on a rubber raft. 

Bob Adams, 8, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. E. R. Adams of Richmond, 
also staying at the Sea Horse, 
was stung on both legs. 

JANET'S OPEN NEW 
BEACH FACILITY 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Janet's 
Typewriter Service has opened 
its third store at 206-22nd St. 

This service, the first in this 
area, offers complete service and 
all makes of typewriters, adding 
machines, and calculators by ex- 
pert mechanics. 

Janet's also carries small 
desks, typewriter tables, type- 
writer ribbons and other office 
supplies. 



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Advice For Long 
Life-Observe 
Traffic Signs 

VIRGINIA BEACH — "Traffic 
signs are signs of life. Kno# 
them and obey them." 

Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Reeves E. Johnson gave that ad- 
vice to motorists today as he 
urged them to support the Signs 
of life program of the Virginia 
Beach Police and the Governors 
Highway Safety Committee. 

This program is designed to 
promote better knowledge of 
traffic signs and signals and to 
encourage strict obedience to 
them. 

"Traffic sign locations are de- 
termined bv careful engineering 
studies," Chief Johnson said. 
"Whenever you see one there's 
a sound reason for its presence, 
and it's to your advantage to 
obey it." 

Chief Johnson emphasized 
that traffic signs, signals, and 
pavement markings for both 
motorists and pedestrians 
should be given the same 
obedience accorded a traffic 
officer. 

He advised motorists to learn 
the Signs of Life by shape so 
that they may be recognized on 
sight. Listing the number of 
basic sign shapes to six, Chief 
Johnson described them as fol- 
lows: 

1. EIGHT -SIDED, red and 
white. This sign means STOP— 
one message, one requirement 
— never anything else. 

2. DIAMOND, yellow. This 
sign indicates danger ahead, 
carries such messages as Slow, 
School, Narrow Bridge, Men 
Working, or ' the directional 
symbols describing curves, in- 
tersections, side roads, etc. It 
means slow down, stay alert. 

3. RECTANGULAR, white. 
Tells of speed limits, marks no 
passing zones, gives other regu- 
latory information such as park- 
ing rules. Obey its message. ' 

4. TRIANGULAR, yellow. This 
sign is the yield. It tells the 
motorist to defer to the driver 
on the intersecting street. How- 
ever, he need not come to a full 
stop except when necessary to 
avoid traffic on the intersecting 
street. 

5. ROUND, yellow sign warns 
of a highway-railroad intersec- 
tion 300 to 500 feet ahead. This 
sign calls for reduced speed and 
extra caution, so the driver can 
make sure no train is coming 
before he drives across the 
trscKs 

6. RAILROAD CROSSBUCK 
marks the intersection of high- 
way and railway. Cross only 
when the way is clear. 

Pile Driver 

(Continued From' Page 1) 

mounts a 100-ton revolving 
crane with an 185-foot boom. 
Steel spuds, six feet in diameter 
and 100 feet long, at each cor- 
ner are equipped with air jacks 
to lift the barge out of the wa-, 
ter. Pontoons cover the spud 
tips to keep them from sinking 
into the bottom under the driv- 
er's 1,650-ton weight. 

In the absence of the Big D, 
a smaller floating pile driver has 
been driving piles across the 
shallow expanse of Fisherman 
Inlet, working south from Wise 
Point at the tip of Virginia's 
Eastern Shore. 



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Legal Notices 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEWS 

SERVING VIRCINIA BEACH AND PRINCESS ANNE 



Classified Ads 



SECTION B 



/* 



VIRGINIA &EACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1962 



SANDPIPER SCORES 
WITH "MR. ROBERTS" 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The blue and gold Sandpiper Playhouse 
tent practically rocked' on its foundations Friday and Saturday 
as "Mr Roberts" launched the second series of plays. 

s The "hilarious and robuit play about Navy life during World 
War n may be familiar to many 



through its long Broadway run 
and movie, but the Playhouse 
presentation is fresh and enter- 
taining, showing none of the 
wear that might be expected. 
Wade Williams, who doubles 
fs star and director, is excel- 
lent •• Lt. (j.g.) Roberts, 
executive officer of the Navy 
Cargo Ship AK601 operating 
en the fringes of combat ac- 
tion in the last days of the 
war. His interpretation of the 
lone; • suffering Roberts who 
wants desperately to got into 
the fight before its all over 
Is so sympathetic and believ- 
able that he commands the 
respect of his audience every 
step of the way. 
Just as fine, in the role of 
the tyrannical captain, is Bob 
Wainwright who delivers his 
villainous lines with vehemence 
and effectiveness. 

George Snediker is convincing 
as the doctor who sympathizes 
with Roberts and La Verne Wat- 
son's brief appearance as a 
southern-drawling Shore Patrol 
officers is one of the comic high- 
lights of the play. 

TV's "Bozo" 
Bob McAllister carries the 
role of Ensign Pulver, the 
bungling young officer who has 



good intentions but too little 
gumption, with all the needed 
enthusiasm. He brings the house 
down when he bounces on stage 
coated with soap suds from an 
ill-fated prank. 

The leads have an excellent 
back-up crew of players who 
throw out bits of humorous 
quips and zany risque dialogue 
with aU the timing necessary to 
makfe them spontaneous and de- 
lightful. 

Rounding out the cast are Ed 
Frede, Ted Biddison; Foy Shaw, 
Doug Pugh, Jim Moore, Skip 
Osborne, Bess Melvin, Paul 
Gregory and Roy Pratt. Seamen 
are played by Jim Fischer, Bill 
Sunnergren and Ray Nichols. 

The sets, designed by- Neal 
Thomas and provided by the 
Little Creek Naval Amphibious 
Base, are perfect and convert 
the tent into a seafaring cargo 
ship with just the proper touch. 
"Mr. Roberts," written by 
Thomas Heggan and Joshua 
Logan, is a wonderful play 
and will probably be the blue- 
ribbon winner of the Play- 
house's 1962 season. 
If will alternate through Aug- 
ust with "Brigadoon" and "Cri- 
tic's Choice." 

— Ruby Jean Phillips 



Among Girl Scouts 



Atlantic-Pacific Sands Swapped in Vermont 



New Manager 



BOW CREEK CLUB 
NAMES SCHOENBRUN 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
Donald G. Schoenbrun of New 
Orleans, La., has been appointed 
manager of the new Bow Creek 
Golf and Country Club, located 
at Princess Anne Plaza. 

A graduate of the University 
of Vermont, majoring in Club 
and Restaurant Administration, 
Schoenbrun has an outstanding 
background in Club and food 
management. He grew up in the 
Country Club- business, being 
the nephew of the well-known 
Jacobs family, of the Lake Tarle- 
ton Club, in the White Moun- 
tains, and spent all of his spare 
time learning the business from 
the ground up. 

A commissioned officer in the 
U. S. Air Force, he served as 
manager of the Commissioned 
Officers' Club at the Charleston 
Air Force Base. While there, he 
supervised club activities, in- 
cluding banquets, receptions, 
food and beverage operation, 
clerical staff and the scheduling 
of entertainment. 

Schoenbrun, in November 
1956, inspected all dining facili- 
ties used by personnel from the 
Charleston Air Force Base at 
the U.S. bases in Europe, Eng- 
land and the Azores. 



White Released 
From Hospital 

LYNNHAVEN — Herbert N. 
White, 77, of the 3400 block of 
Holly Road, was released Satur- 
day from the Virginia Beach 
Hospital after being thrown 
from his car in a left-turn acci- 
dent Friday on Virginia Beach 
Blvd. 

White was treated for several 
broken ribs and cuts and bruises 
on the face and back, a hospital 
spokesman said. 

Albert J. Resolute, 22, of 
Portsmouth, driver of the sec- 
ond car, was also X-rayed for a 
' knee injury at the hospital and 
released. 
^ Trooper Walter Branch of the 
State Police said White, who 
had been driving "west on the 
boulevard, was making a left 
urn onto Old Rosemont Road. 
Resolute's auto was eastbound. 

White was thrown out of his 
car onto the highway, by the 
impact, and the car went up the 
eastbound lane and into the 
ditch, Branch said. 



Upon receiving an honor- 
able discharge from the serv- 
ice in. February,' 1957, Schoen- 
brun served as resident food 
and beverege cost comptroller 
of the Columbia Club, a pri- 
vate men's club of 1,200 mem- 
bers in Indianapolis, Indiana; 
the Pontchertrain Hotel, New 
Orleans; general manager of 
the Prince Conti Hotel of New 
Orleans, end manager of the 
Suburban Country Club of 
Portsmouth. 

He presently resides with his 
wife, Shirley, and their three 
children, two daughters and a 
son, in Portsmouth, but plans to 
move to this area in the near 
future. 



Volunteer Fire 
Units to Remain 
After Jan. 1st 



PRINCESS ANNE— A county 
official announced last Thurs- 
day that the 12 fire departments 
in Princess Anne County will 
remain as volunteer units after 
the merger next January 1. 

The present volunteer depart- 
ments are: Lynnhaven, Chesa- 
peake Beach, Ocean Park, Davis 
Corner, Kempsville, Thalia, Lon- 
don Bridge, Oceana, Seatack, 
Courthouse, Creeds and Black- 
water. 

The present Virginia Beach 
Fire Department has 17 paid 
firemen and 35 volunteers. 

Princess Anne fire depart- 
ments are now alerted by the 
dispatcher at police headquar- 
ters. These operations may be 
separated after the January 1 
merger, and a unit set up under 
which fire equipment would be 
dispatched by a fireman dis- 
patcher. 

CAPE HENRY' KEY 
CLUB PLANS LUAU 

VIRGINIA BEACH — A luau 
will be presented by The Cape 
Henry Key Club this Thursdays 
night on the Shuffleboard Court. 

The buffet, which features 
barbecued pig and pineapples, 
will begin at 7 p.m. Cocktail 
hour will be from 6 to 7 p.m. 

Members and hotel guests are 
invited. Dress is casual. 



By JOY HAKIM 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Sand 
from Virginia Beach was 
swapped for sand from the 
Pacific Ocean at the girl scout 
round-up held recently at But- 
ton Bay, Vermont. 

Gail Gerry and Ann Hood 
represented Virginia Beach at 
the encampment held on the 
sho'res of Lake Champlain. 
There were 8,500 girl scouts 
there and another 1,500 scout 
leaders' and personnel. 

"Swapping" was one of the 
favorite pastimes of the girls, 
according to Gail and Ann 
who took many souvenirs of 
Tidewater with them and 
brought back a collection of 
mementoes from ell over this 
country and even a few for- 
eign lands. 

Their loot includes: California 
redwood, coal from the Adiron- 
dacks, cotton seed from Missis- 
sippi, a miniature Amish bon- 
net from Pennsylvania, a pin 
cushion tomato from New Jer- 
sey, Vermont maple syrup and 
many samples of girl scout 
handicrafts and ingenuity. 
Send A Navy Info 
They took sand, a booklet of 
Navy talk, shell-decorated book- 
marks and pine-needle baskets 
as their swaps from Virginia. 

But swapping was only part 

of the fun for twtgirls who took 

their own tent-bed rolls and 

cooking equipment. 

"It was absolutely wonder- 




Gail (left) 

ful," said Ann, "meeting girls 
from all over who have different 
ideas and backgrounds." 

The scouts kept busy with dis- 
cussion groups, crafts, lectures, 
song fests, swimming, demon- 
strations and just walking 
around the huge camp. 

Each group of scouts put on 
a demonstration that had been 
prepared in advance. The Tide- 
water girls roasted peanuts and 
passed out peanut recipes. They 
wore burlap Aprons decorated 
with an appliqued peanut plant. 

Scouts from Texas put on 
bullwhip and lasso demonstra- 
tions, Georgia girls marched in 



and Ann 
V (Hakim Photo) 

confederate uniforms and a 
Kansas group sang old folk 
songs. 

A huge arena erected near 
the bay held the 10,000 parti- 
cipants on four different oc- 
casions — one was the birthday 
party to celebrate the 50th an- 
niversary of girl scouting. 

Visitors thronged the encamp- 
ment and sometimes, "we felt 
like animals in the zoo," said 
Gail. "There were more visitors 
than scouts before the two 
weeks were up." 

Gail and Ann are both Marin- 
er Scouts. They hold the rank 
of "midshipmite." 



Ann, the daughter of Capt. 
and Mrs. A. H. Hood, will en- 
ter her senior year at Virginia 
Beach High this fall. 

Gail, also a senior, will go to 
school in San Diego, Calif., 
where her parents, Capt. and 
Mrs. D. J. Gerry, have recently 
moved. 

The girls applied for the 
round-up last year and found 
out in January that they had 
been accepted. They trained for 
the encampment with discus- 
sions and practice camping-out 
sessions. Sixteen girls were in- 
cluded in the Tidewater contin- 
gent. 

"We both want to go to the 
next round-up as girl scout 
leaders," said Ann. "And so do 
everyone of the other 8,500 par- 
ticipants," chimed in Gail. 
Scouting Ambitions 

"Someday we'd each like to 
have our own scout troop," they 
said. "And I may go into pro- 
fessional scouting," said Ann. 

"In case you wonder where 
the name Button Bay comes 
from," said Gail, "here are some 
buttons." , 

She held out pieces of hard- 
ened clay pierced with holes. 
They are thrown up by nature 
on the beaches of the bay and 
many look just like buttons. 

"These buttons are my favor- 
ite souvenirs," said Gail (she had 
already pointed out a dozen oth- 
er favorites), "and they weren't 
even swaps." 



Lions Speaker 




Pros and Cons Heard 
At Rezoning Hearing 



Arch Coleman, former 
member of the Office of 
Strategic Services, will be 
guest speaker at a meeting of 
the Virginia Beach Lions Club 
Friday at 7 p.m. at the Isle of 
Capri Restaurant. This will be 
his second appearance before 
the group. 

P. A. PLAZA NOW 
TWO YEARS OLD 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
Princess Anne Plaza, the coun- 
ty's 1,100 family community, 
will celebrate its second anni- 
versary this week. It was de- 
veloped by John Aragona. 

In two years, this community 
has added a shopping center 
consisting of 19 stores, the Bow 
Creek Golf and Country Club, 
a bowling alley, three churches, 
and Plaza Elementary School. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Resi- 
dents of single-family dwellings 
and owners of duplex property 
in the area spoke at length last 
Thursday at the City Planning 
Commission hearing on a pro- 
posal to upgrade the residential 
area between 20th and 28th Sts. 

The re-zoning proposed by the 
commission would upgrade the 
residential community from two- 
family and multi-family dis- 
tricts to a one-family classifica- 
tion. Excepted was the area east 
of Mediterranean Ave. between 
24th and 25th streets, which 
would be multi-family. 

A petition opposing the 
change with 52 names was pre- 
sented by Mrs. Mary Ray of the 
400 block of 22nd Street, C. G. 
Hearne, who owns rental prop- 
erty in the area, also objected 
to the proposed rezoning. 

After speaking in favor of 
the re-zoning, Roy Jackson of 
the 400 block of 23 rd Street 
received a burst of applause 
when he sat down. Jackson, 
who lives Jn a single-family 
dwelling there, said, "I have a 
right to live in peace. I don't 
like to listen to the music of 
the garbage cans end I live in 
an area where the more pros- 
perous ones have moved out 
and left their problems to me. 
I have one-family residences." 

The commission also heard 



the application of Southwestern 
Development Co. for a use per- 
mit to errect a 12-story, 300-unit 
motor hotel on 40th Street be- 
tween Atlantic and Pacific ave- 
nues. There was no opposition. 
Everett A. Fairlamb Jr., pre- 
sented the application on behalf 
of the motor hotel. The proposed 
motel, tentatively named "The 
Shores" will feature a 1,200 seat 
convention hall, drive-in regis- 
tration desks, shopping arcade, 
enclosed foot bridge over At- 
lantic Avenue to the beach and 
a banquet hall. 

If the plan is approved, con- 
struction will begin at the end 
of this summer, and open in the 
spring of 1964. 

SEATACK DRIVE STARTS 

SEATACK — The Seatack 
Building Committee have begun 
a third drive to raise money for 
the Seatack Community Center. 
The genter block drive will con- 
tinue through this month. 

All churches, clubs, and or- 
ganizations are asked to donate. 
Checks and money orders are 
to , be mailed to the Program 
Committee Chairman, Rev. D. P. 
Felton, 624 Airport Rd., Oceana, 
Virginia. 



Service Years Merit Life Membership 




These six Life Members of the Virginia Beach-Princess Anne Rescue Squad represent 
over 00 years of volunteer service to those in need of help. They are (left to right) C. N. Ed- 
wards^Dssie Wade, Charles McChesney, Dave Stormont III, Hugh Kitchin and A. B. Midgett. 
IWftescue Squad opened its annual fund raising drive last week. All members of the squad 
aj% volunteer workers and the organization operates entirely on private contributions. (Boice 
Photo) ) 



'Critics' Choice' 
Players Lauded 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
performances in "Critic's 
Choice", last of the Sandpiper 
Playhouse's second series of 
plays, is the only thing that gets 
the three-act comedy off the 
ground and makes it a worth- 
while entertainment piece. 

' The play itself, written by Ira 
Levin, is only fair. But a fine, 
capable cast does wonders with 
the material and molds it into a 
pleasant diversion. 

The responsibility of this ac- 
complishment rests on the 
shoulders of Jon Dawson, the 
director, and the six performers. 

ChiChi Lively, as Angela Bal- 
lantine, a novice playwright, and 
Clayton Edwards, as Parker Bal- 
lantine, her drama critic hus- 
band who must review his wife's 
play even though he knows it's 
a stinkeroo, are both delightful. 

Miss Lively is radiant and 
lovely, truly a talented actress. 
Edwards carries his lengthy 
role off without a hitch, al- 
though he dees not make the 
most convincing drunk, which 
ho attempts to do in the third 
act. However this does not 
blight his fine performance. 

LaVerne Watson's interpreta- 
tion of a finger-snapping, slight- 
ly weird director just couldn't 
be better. This fine young actor 
has really Iproved himself this 
season with a bit part in "Mr. 
Roberts," which he has develop- 
ed into one of the funniest spots 
in the play, and with his fine 
performance in this role., 

Peggy Boykin, as Ivy London, 
Ballantine's ex-wife, is a pleas- 
ure to watch, she is vivacious 
and sparkling and brings the 
play to life when she's onstage. 

Balalntine's mother-in-law is 
a worldy, witty woman and 
Louise Hall's performance of the 
role a believably clever one. 
Young Actor 

And finally there is Stephen 
B. Groh, as Ballantine's pre- 
cocious son, who pits his youth- 
ful talents against those of the 
more experienced actors and 
has no trouble holding his own. 
His role is lengthy but he never 
falters or misses a cue. 

"Critic's Choice" will alter- 
nate through July with "Mr. 
Roberts" and "Brigadoon." 

If your taste is light, light 

comedy and excellent acting, by 

all means see "Critic's Choice." 

— Ruby Jean Phillips 

The First Lieutenant of the 
Virginia Beach Rescue Squad 
assumes the duties of the Cap- 
tain in his absence. He is Chair- 
man of the Membership Com- 
mittee and is in charge of the 
Duty Roster. 



Oldster Recalls 
Development Of 
Knotts Island 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Knotts Island, the piece of land sitting 
on the North Carolina-Virginia line, may not be a thriving me'tro- 
polis today but it certainly has cgme a long way since Mrs. Mary 
E. White was a little girl. w/* 

Mrs. White is nearing her 98th birthday arid a lot can happen 
to a place, as well as to people, 



in that length of time 

There were not too many 
families on the island in those 
by-gone days but there were 
enough youngsters to warrant a 
one-room school building. Jesse 
White, Mrs. White's uncle (her 
mother's maiden name was 
White), was the regular teacher 
but during the summers a man 
from Richmond spent his vaca- 
tion on the island and taught 
special classes. 

There wasn't too much for 
the active young people to do 
except maybe fish and climb 
trees ("I got caught in one once 
and couldn't get down," Mrs. 
White remembers). Fortunately, 
Mrs. White had three brothers 
and two half-sisters to play with. 
One half-sister, Annie, still lives 
on the island. 

The road connecting Knotts 
Island with Princess Anne 
County was nothing more than 
a cattle path built up with cut 
pine trees. This didn't make 
traveling very easy. When a 
road was actually put in and 
«tigns designating it as Marsh 
Road were installed, Mrs. 
White joined most of the 
youngsters on the island in 
making a trip to the road to 
it. 



The pioneer couple had nine 
children, two of which died in 
infancy. Six are still living: 
Roland White, Mrs. ft. T. Creek- 
more and Mrs. W. W. Hinnant, 
Virginia Beach; Mrs. Angie 
Bryant, Portsmouth; Harvey E. 
White, Norfolk; and Gilmer 
White, Jacksonville, Fla. 



Beach Music 
StudentHome 
From Studits 



"We were especially carried 
away by the road marker," she 
said. "We had never seen one. 
We thought Knotts Island was 
getting pretty citified." 

Today most men use hunting 
and fishing as a hobby or a di- 
version from their work. To the 
pioneers of Knotts Island, hunt- 
ing and fishing were their way 
of life. They sold fish, ducks and, 
other game to a store owner in 
Back Bay — in later years this 
was one of Mrs. White's sons — - 
who sent them on to Norfolk 
and points farther north. They 
also farmed. 

It Rained Crabs 

Mrs. White, who has been 
confined to the Virginia Beach 
Hospital since she broke her hip 
two years ago, doesn't remem- 
ber any violent storms but well 
remembers the day it rained 
crabs. 

"It was a very hard rain," 
she said, "and when we looked 
outside there were crabs, all 
sizes, running all over the yard." 

A large hunk of Knotts Island 
belonged to Mrs. White's grand- 
father, James Spratt, which was 
eventually passed on to her fa- 
ther, Jackson Spratt, who 
made a living off the land and 
once opened a store on isolated 
Morn's Island for hunters. It was 
the only building on the island. 

Mrs. White met her husband, 
N. B. White, known to nearly 
everyone as "Polion," when he 
visited the island. They were 
married wheit. she was still a 
few months shy of 17. For many 
years they lived' in Back Bay 
until Mr. White opened a hotel 
in Norfolk for Princess Anne 
visitors. 

"Everybody in Princess Anne 
stayed at our hotel at one time 
or another," Mrs. White said. 
"My husband used to sit around 
the lobby with them and tell 
stories about the county's earlier 
days." 

A trip to Norfolk in those 

days was a major undertaking. 

One plank road connected 

Princast Anne and Norfolk 

and horse and wagon was the 

only transportation. It was 

rough traveling. 
Mrs. White loved the "bright 
lights" of Norfolk and never 
longed for the simple life of 
Knotts Island. One of the most 
exciting things that happened 
in the big city, she said, was the 
"Charleston Earthquake;" about 
1880, when tremors knocked 
dishes off the shelves and peo- 
ple ran through the streets 
shouting the "end of the world 
has come." 




BETTY 



BURTON 




By LESLIE RUSSELL 

BAY COLdNV — " Ambitio* 
and high hopes are i 
the- beauty oT'yoith: 
tain^y is true in the Case of 1 
Betty Lou Burton, 17-yeejH 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. Burton of Bay Colony. 

The pretty blond Miss who 
has studied the piano for 11 
years under Mrs, F. M. Bun tin 
has just recently returned froth 
a six-week course of piano aott 
music theory at the Saint Low 
Institute of Music. Betty \Lom 
studied under Dr. Leo Sirota, 
who is an artist, teacher, -and 
internationally known pianist 
, A graduate of Country 
School for Girls, Betty 
plans to enter Hollins 
this fall where she will 
in her obvious talent, music. 

Among her hopes for the 
future, Betty Lou is verf. 
much inter es te d in be coming ) 
a concert pianist, although, 
she says, "I would litis t* 
teach." 

At the institute, Betty Lou 
and about 150 other youttj 
musicians sat in on de: 
tion piano lessons for 
who had never taken 
Betty Lou says "that was 
first time I had ever thought 
teaching. I could see how 
warding it would be." 

' During her six week 
Betty Lou took classes m theorj 
ear training, transposition, and 
harmony- 
Outstanding Teacher 
Among her teachers was one 
of the foremost musicians of # 
day, Dr. Leo Sirota. Sirota, fol- 
lowing his debut with the) Vk 
na Symphony Orchestra, 
the capitals of Europe of 
Manchuria, China aaad 
After coming to Americ 
1947, Dr. Sirota made his 
at Carnegie HaU. He 
appointed artist 
of St Louis Institute 





Any SQUAD 
served in a faithful 
tory manner for a 
years or more, 
a. Life Met 
of the active 
Squad provided 
em more 
ing votes, 



Page 2-B 



Virginia Beach Son-News, Thursday, August q, 1962 

■ I H 1 1 1! ■ » « . ■ 



Complete TV Schedule for Week - Thur*. thin Wed. 

JMs— WTAH-TV t 3) 




c m *mui sb»» 

I ( tr—Burns * Ailea 

IS 5 

I t Tooag ft* TMtwoter 




Wort* 



•itS < »>— Ai 

(18>— -Jtomlnr Movie 




Lot* Luc* 
~» Jar Your H 
i**t ( s>— Verdict I* lour* _ 

(MS— Ike Price la B*rh» «Oe*»t 
(18> — Ttnnntlnn Ernie Ford 




♦ 



I 8>— Love ef Ll» 
]M«^-.ToaT First lmpretaton 
Tl»> — Jane Wymaa Show 
IBS < B) ■Sea r ch For Tomorrow 

(It*— -Truth or Ci i m wiwi 

(18>— Camoufl*** 



SiSt ( S) — To Tell The Tratk 
(1*)— Oar 6 Detvhtero 
i. i*i — Who Do you 

S;W < 8) — Ctaiinm of Charm 

«.tt ( 8) — Secret Stone 

tiBS ( 8) — EUre of rllgtt 
(IM-BtVi Holhjrweod 

1:SB (IS) — 8 Stoofee I 

1:8* (It) — NBC Newe 

»i00 ( 8>— WeelLer 

• ••) — ttu Ueberry 

MM ( S>— Weather 

6;1« ( 3>— Or. Whitehuret Report* 

From Eur©** 
SiSt <lt>— Club Ahoy 
tilt ( J>— Movie 
5:tt (IS) — The Bony Shew 
«:M (it) — Hlrhway Patrol 
• :«o il8>r—UK'»l #>ewe 
«:1S ti|j— ABC New* 
f.Bt ( S>— Eeo thole Club 
%:** \ 8> — Sports tWuna-Ui 
«:M I S>— TV Boporu 
(It)— But Thirty 
(IS) — Peter Guna 
.«• Si — Weeilieraiar 
*!*B ( 8) P omias Bdwaiu. 
it) — Huuliev Brui«le> 



\ 



U- 
SB:4B 1 3)— The Guidinf Light 
MiM (It*— NBC Newe R 
>*• ( S) — Get Together 

<lt>— Ota" 

(18>— BU 




THURSDAY EVENING 

i.-tt ( 3) — Shannon 

(It) — Miami Undercover 
(13) — Beachcomber 
7:8t ( 8) — The Flyin* Doctor 
(It) — The Outlaws 
(18>— Oxsie 6 Harriet 
8:00 ( 3) — Frontier Circua 

(13) — Donna Reed Show 
S:St (It) — Dr. Kildalre 

(18>— The Real McCoys 
• KM ( 3>— Brenner 

(IS) — My Three Sone 
BiSS ( S) — Sane Grey Theatre 
Ut)— The Lively Ones 
(IS)— The Law * Mr. Jones 
Mitt ( 3) — CBS Reports 

(It) — Siur Atodf With Mite* 
'IS) — The Untouchables 
ll:tt ( 3) — News 

(It)— Eleven O'clock Beport 
(IS) — ABC New* 
ll:lt, ( 3) — Weather 

(13)— News, Weather. Sports 
( It) — Weather 
11:15 ( 3) — Sports Final 

■13) — 3iK>ru 
ll:*t ( 8) — Dr. Whliehurst Reports 
From Europe 
(ttr— Sperts 
(IS) — Theater "IS" 
11:86 ( S>— Movie 
Usee) (it) — Tomrtt | 



FRIDAY EVENING 

7!tt < .B^The Beet of The Pott 

* ' %e^^"" >i eBweBBf Mawta* - "fptoi ■ ^ ' 

<13>— Divorce Court 
7iBB ( 8>— Rawhide 

(It (—International Showtime 
Sitt (13)— The Halhawsys 
8:3t ( 3) — Route 96 

(It)— The Detectives 
(IS) — The Funutouee 

(lt>— The Blamonr Trap 
lt:t* < *>— The TwtUtkt Mm 

(13>— Tarret: The Corruptore 
lt:St (It)— Chet Huntley Report* 
. i tew t 81 — 111* Roar News 

(lt>— Barren OVAoet Report 

(IS) - ■ M ewa. Weather 
n:it ( 8) — Wea t her 
llilt ( S)— Sports 

(It)— Weather 
ll:tt ( 3) — Dr. Whitehurst Reports 
From Europe 

(It) — Sports 

(13) S h o ck ' 
11:88 ( 3>— Movie 
ll:8t ( It)— Toairtt 
1MB (It)— Mews 



SATURDAY 

MORNING 



8:68 (lt»— Moron* worehtt 
Titt (It)— Today On The Farni 
7iSt ( 3>— T*eMernln» Show 

(It) — Bun Bnnny 

(13) — Bi«- Picture * 
8MB (10) — Poop Dock's Pirate Don 



(13)— Comedy Thae 
•itt ( 3)— Capl. Ksiureroo 

( It)— Shipwreck Island 

(18)— Mone 
9:36 (it)— Pip The Piper 
lBiSt ( 3) — The Ahrin Show 

(It)— Shary Lewis Show (Color) 



Itdt ( B>- stkrhtr 

(It)— sthsT Leonardo tad 

Short B Ba Boe H (Color) 

11 itt < SV- Marietend of AUakaaaa 

nam 



B 



(IBK- Make Room For Daddy 
(IS)— Wild BUI Hkkok 

AFTERNOON 

ISitt ( S>— Bky Kraf 
<lf>—-Mz. Wiaord 




lBtBB 

"" ur of Stare 
Hunter 
l*t ( S) — Hopafowr Csjssidy 

(18)— VlXinw 
l:3t ( S>— Film 

(IB) — House Detective 



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WE ARE GLAD TO APPROVE 
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(11) — Science Fiction Theatre 
1:4ft < m~ Detroit at NT. 
IM (lt>— Raiefcall— Orioles at Red Sox 

(18>— Mtrrte 
4:80 ( S)— Baseball Scoreboard 
4:SO ( S> — Western Marshall 

(IB)— Public Service 

(IS) — Tales of Texas Rancors 
6:tt (It) — Movie 

(IS) — Tetesports 
S:BB ( 8) — Lone Ranrer 
S:St ( ft) flo ao d Ole Opry 

(IB ) P e ter Gunn 



EVENING 



64* ( 3)— fcabod A Me 

(18>— rtswbeuee IS 

B«BB V 



a tk* 



BidS ( S>— News Weather 
tcBB ( » ■ gew i 
TtBB ( t) faulasive 
laBB ( S I— P Wey Mm 

(It)' Tabu of Wells Faryo 
SiBB (IS)— Room for Owe More 
S:8t ( 8)— The Defwaders 

(IS)— Leavs It To Beaver 
t.tt (I t) M o v ies 

(1S>— Lawrsoos Wftt . 

t:8t ( 3)— Have Sun. WO) Travel 

(IS) — Invitation to Parte 
lt:4« (18) — Saturday Sports Final 
ll:tt (S)— 11th Hour Ftnal 
' ( It)— News- Weather 

(IB) Low llewa 
ll:BB (IS)— Movie 
11:1* ( 8)— Weather 
U:1S ( 3) — Sports 

(lt>— The Biy Movie 

(18>— Theatre IS 
ll:BB ( 3) — Movie Time 
ISttS (it)— Late. Late Show 



list (it)— News 



(It)— Bvenins- Dovotioa 





SUNDAY 
MORNING 

7:3t ( 3) — Hopalon* Cassidy 

(IS) — Christophere 
8: 00 (18)— Fisher Family 
8:88 (IB) — Hominy Worship 
8:8B ( 3) — Bob Poole's Gospel Favorite 

(IB)— Sacred Heart 

(13) — Bhr Mac 
8:4ft (It)— The Christophers 
I'lOO (IB) — Dawn Bible Study 
8:38 ( 3V— This Is The Tit* . 

(It)— Herald of Truth 

(13) — Comedy Time 
lt:00 < 3)— Lamp Unto My Feet 

(It)— This It ThO Answer 
ItiSB ( 3)— Look Up and Live 

(1B>— Safety In The We 

(19V— Sunday Theatre 
11:00 ( 3) — Camera 3 

(10)— Live A Learn 
11:30 ( 3 >— Accent 

(It)— Topic 

AFTERNOON 

18:00 ( 3)— Window on Main St. 

(It) — House Detectives 

(IS) — Wild Bill Hlckok 
18:30 ( 8) — Waehtncton Conversation 

(10)— Airman's World 

( 18)— Track do wn 
18:58 ( 8)— CBS News 
1:00 ( 8) — News. Weather. Sports 

(10) — Telesport Difeet , 

(13) — Hollywood Showcase 
1:1ft ( 3) — Builders Showcase 
1:80 ( 3) — Spotlight on Sports 

(10) — Sports Direst 
1:4ft ( 3)— Baseball— Detroit at N.T. 

(10) — Sports Reel 
2:00 (10) — Baseball — Bait, at Boston 
8:1ft ( 3) — Movie 
8:80 (13)— Thrills A Skills 
3:00 (13) — San Francisco Beat 
440 (13) — Issues A Answers 
8:80 (13)— Editor's Choice 
4:80 ( 3) — Baseball Scoreboard 
4:30 ( 3) — Adventure Theatre 

(10) — Sunday Showcase 

(13) — Bowliny 
5:00 ( 3)— A Way of Thinkinf 

(IS) — Wide, World of Sporte 
5:30 ( 8) — Amateur Hour 

(10) — Patterns In Music 

EVENING 

6:00 (3) — 20th Century 

(It)— Meat The Preee 
«:SO ( 3)— Mtjter Ed 

(It)— This Is NBC Newe 
(13)— Movie Time 
7:00 < 3>— Lassie 

( 10)— Bullwinkle 
7:80 ( 8)— Dannie The Menace 
(It)— Wait Disney 
(13) — Follow The Sun 
8:00 ( 8)— Ed Sullivan 
8:80 (It) — Adventures of Sir Francis 
Drake 
(18) — Hollywood Special 
0:00 ( 3) — G.E. Theatre 

( 10) — Bonanza 
0:80 ( 8) — Who In This World 
10:00 ( 8) — Candid Camera 
(10)— DuPont Show 
( 13) — Lawmen 
10:30 ( SV— What's My Lisa 
11:00 ( 3)— Eric Sevareid 
^ (10)— Weekend Newe 
^N 18V— Late New* 
11:10 (10) — Movie 

( 13) — Weather * 

11:1 ft ( 3) — Sporte Report 

(18)— Theatre IS 
11:80 < 3)— Exclusive 
lite (It) — News 



TUESDAY EVENING 

Tttt ( S)— Death Teliey Dan 

(1« 

(181 
7iSt ( 8>— Rescue 8 

( it) — Laramis 




t:8t ( 8)— The Third Mat 

(18)— Tours For A Sony 




Newe 

idaBsT fstsssfssBBBft 




Worth*, end 



Whitehur»t Report* 
arVom Buropo 
"tela ' 

It 




PRACTICAL NURSIN8 
BUILDING TO OPEN 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 

7.-00 ( 8)— The Calif ornlane 

(IB) — Sbots-un Blade 

US) . ealpooru 
ItSw ( Bj— «Re Ahrin Show 

If ) — Wa go n Train 

(IB)— Howard K. Smith ABO New. 
8:O0 ( 8)—*inf*r Man 

J I P foom on America 
8)— Checkmate 
10>— Th* Rebel 
(13>— Top C«t 
Bit* (IB)— Kraft Jfyatery Theatre 

0:80 ( BV— WckVan Dyke Show 
10:00 ( 8)— Circle Theatre 

(IB)— Play Tour Hunch 

(18)— Naked City 
lt:St (lt>— David BrlnkJey's Journal 
llitt ( 8)— llth Hoar Nti 

(IB)— Eleven CClook 

(IS)— ABC-TV New* 
tl*BB (It) ttl* Newt 
11 Ut < 8)— Weather 
ll:lft (It)— Late WBatber . , 

(IS)— Local News-Weather-Sporta 
11:80 ( 8)— Dr. Whliehurst Reports 
From Europe 

(10)— Sport* 
11 IBS ( 8) — Movie 

(la)— Theatre IB 
11:80 (10)— Toniyht 



nK HepQCl 

so Final 



NOItFOUC—Aootoer ftirrt In 
ViTf4nia! Sinith-Rogers Memoir- 
itl Hall it the first building in 
Virginia to be constructed sole- 
ly for practical Nurse education. 
Other programs throughout the 
State have converted existing 
buidings for their Schools but 
this is the first building which 
has been constructed exclusive- 
ly for a Practical NOrsing Pro- 
gram. 

Dedication of the $850,000 
Smith-Rogers Memorial Hall, a 
unit of Leigh Memorial Hospi- 
tal, marked a new era in de- 
velopment of Practical Nursing 
Education. The building to 
named in memory of the late 
Oscar t. Smith and Crawford S. 
Rogers, both former presidents 
of the Board of Directors of 
Leigh Memorial Hospital who 
gave generously and tirelessly 
of their time and talents in the 
development of The Practical 
Nursing Program at Leigh Me- 
morial Hospital, 

Since its organization in 1946, 
the school has grown in popular- 
ity and has gained an excellent 
reputation. The School is proud 




MONDAY EVENING 

7:00 ( 8) — The Pio n eer* *^_~ 
(10) — Kiny of Diamonds 
(IS)— Sea Hunt 
7:30 ( 3)— To Tell The Truth 
» (10)— Man A The Challenye 
(18)— Cheyenne 
8:0O ( 3)— Pete «t Gladys 
(10) — National Velvet 
8:80 ( 8) — Father Know* Beet 
(10>— Price It Riyht 
(13)— Law A The Plainsman 
9:00 ( 8) — Deal -Lucy Comedy Hour 
(10)— 87th Precinct 
(13) — Surfside Six 
10:00 ( 8)— Hennesey «. 

(10)— NBC Actuality 
(13) — Ben Casey 
10:30 ( 8)— I've Got A Secret 
11:00 ( 8) — list Hour Newe 

(10)— Eleven OCIoek Report 
(13)— ABC-News Final 
11 tit ( 3) — Weather 
11:18 (18) — Local Newt. Weather, Sport* 
UtlB < 8) — Bport* 

(It)— Late Weather 
ll:8t ( 3)— Dr. Whitehuret Report* 
From Europe 
(It)— Sporte 
11:88 ( 3)— Movie 
11:87 (18) — Theatre 18 
11:30 (10)— Toniyht 



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Telstar Is 
Historic First 

The CBS Television Network 
interrupted its regular program- 
ing schedule July 11 for a sec- 
ond successive day's coverage of 
historic milestones in instant 
transatlantic television — the 
first live television broadcasts 
from Europe to the United 
States by way of the Telstar 
communications satellite. 

A French-originated broad- 
cast, the first transatlantic tele- 
vision program to be beamed 
from Europe, took place at 
7:35 p.m., EDT, and was includ- 
ed in a CBS News Special Re- 
port (7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT). The 
French program was carried 
simultaneously by all three 
major U.S. networks. 

The CBS Television Network 
alone interrupted its regular 

programing later in the evening 
(10:22-10:28 p.m., EDT) to carry 
live, the British-originated trans- 
atlantic broadcast beamed to the 
Telstar from the British Post 
Office's transmitter at Goon- 
hilly Down, Cornwall. The pro- 
gram interrupted was "The 
United States Steel Hour," full- 
hour mystery drama. The Brit- 
ish program originated live in 
the Goonhilly Down transmit- 
ter's control room, and was 
actually the first all-live trans- 
atlantic television broadcast 
from Europe. 

The CBS Television Network, 
therefore, wat the only network 
to carry both transatlantic 
broadcasts at the moment they 
were transmitted from Europe. 

The seven-minute French pro- 
gram, broadcast to the U.S. v}a 
Telstar from the French satellite 
transmitting station at Pleum- 
eur-Bodou, Brittany, consisted 
of an introduction by the 
French Communications Minis- 
Jei, Jacmies Marette; a rendi- 
tion of "La Chahwnette" by 
finger Yves M08tand; songs by 
a rretch guitarist md by Psrif- 
&n chanteuse Michele Arnaud; 
a brief comedy routine by* 9 
French comedian, and scenes of 
the Paris television studio where 
the French program was video- 
taped for transmittal by satellite. 

The British program consisted 
of congratulatory remarks by 
Charles Booth, chief engineer 
of the British General Post Of- 
fice, directed to the American 
communications engineers re- 
sponsible for the creation and 
success of the Telstar satellite. 

CBS News Correspondents 
Harry Reasoner and Charles 
CpUingwood were ti» reporters 
fn New York for the CBS Newt 
Special Reports 

The first joint exchange of 
1 iv e transatlantic television 
broadcasts via the Telstar be- 
tween European broadcasters 
and the three major U.S. tele- 
vision networks is scheduled to 
take place on Monday, July 23. 



sponsorship of vocational edu 
cation. It was the first school of 
Practical Nursing in the United 
States to receive National Ac- 
creditation by the National As- 
sociation for Practical Nurse 
Education and Service. It was 
the first school of Practical 
Nurse Education in the State of 
Virginia. 

Practical Nursing is a true 
child of the jet age. The develop- 
ment of Practical Nursing 
Schools has soared in the last 
15 years. During this period, the 
term "Shortage of Nurses," be- 
came a familar one throughout 
tijt) nation. World War II had 
demonitrated many truths. 
None w|| more self evident 
than the -critical shortage of 
personnel trained to give skilled 
nursing care. With this realiza- 
tion came the increased con- 
sciousness of the role of the 
practical nurse or vocational 
nurse. Before the war most 
practical nurses confined their 
services to home nursing; how- 
ever, with the shortage of pro- 
fessional nurses, many hospitals 
found that a combination of pro- 
fessional and practical nursing 
service was extremely satisfac- 
tory. The number of Practical 
Nursing Programs in the United 
States has grown from 46 in 
1945 to 661 in 1961. Thus, in 
the past 17 years, 615 schools 
of practical nursing have been 
established. 

The Leigh Memorial School 
of Practical Nursing was or- 
ganized in January 1946 in co- 
operation with the Vocational 
Department of the Norfolk City 
Schools. 

' The Licensed Practical Nurse, 
or L.P.N. is an essential mem- 
ber of tiie health team, who is 
capable of giving nursing care 
under the direction of a li- 
censed physician, or a registered 
nurse. After completing a twelve 
(12) month course in an ap- 
proved School of Practical 
Nursing, such as this one, the 
individual is eligible to take the 
Virginia State Board of Examin- 
ation,xa.nd upon passing this is 
privileged to use the title "Li- 
censed Practical Nurse" or 
"L.P.N." 

A young girl of seventeen (17) 
or a mature woman of fifty (50) 
have equal opportunities in the 
vocation of Practical Nursing. 

The School of Practicaf Nurs- 
ing at Leigh is proud to be an 
-important factor in continuing 
to provide well trained Practical 
Nurses to care for the sick 
whenever they choose to go. 

The vocation of practical 
nursing is an exceptionally 
gratifying one. In learning to 
render a service to others, the 



' quired. 



New! Gil 

Jill 

ible 
Razor 

You turn dial 
from 1 to t 
for th« ax- 
act totting 
th«tm*teh- 
os your 
•kin and 
beard 




practical nurse frequently finds 
new and rewarding areas of 
personal "satisfaction. These re- 
warding experiences are avail- 
able to a large number of both 
men and women. The age range 
of 17 to 50 years encompasses J 
a broad part of our population. 
High School graduation is not 
essential, provided the applicant 






4 * 




*.MY « 



jut* vulnerable. South 



▼ won 

till 

♦ QMS 



repuiauon. ine gcnooi 1 prouu {he re ^ ntrance tests 

of many firsts, twas the first E ^ nce q{ ^ heaJth ^ 
program in the MMtim mQral characte matuFit y ( and 
which the entire course was ^^ desire to mTse is re . 
given m a hospital under the miippri 



hith 
deal* 



fill 

•> 10741 
*> Ml 
41-431 

WEST BAST 

mZ — I f i 

♦ AKQIS4S 

•> KJI75 

SOUTH 
•/AKQJ74 
SAKQ6S 

Thebiddint: 

South West North East 

% y ? ♦ pass pass 

«•/ C^lB pass past 

past 
Opening lead: Act of diamond*. 

Wert^oHhat first trick with 
ace of diamonds. Treat again led 
diamonds and South trumped in 
own hand. South then led four 
rounds of hearts, three rounds of 
spades and hand was made. 

COMMENT: This was a pat 
hand. South was correct in bidding 
b small slam since there was only 
one losing trick in that hand if 
the spades break. However, South 
definitely should have redoubled. 

Thit hand wat played by a 
bridge group that hat been meet- 
ing regularly for 1$ years. Al- 
though not projettionah, all of 
the players are above average. 
How would you have bid and 
played this hand? 



3 



ervice 



18 OUR SPECIALTY 




TV - STEREO - RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 

H1RTZ 

SALES and SERVICE 

LONDON BRIDGE, VA. 

OPEN ^vA.M. - 9 P.M. Phone 340-8888 




-T ■ ' ■ ' ' 



— 



Shopping for a new washer? 

Now MAYTAG 

DEPENDABILITY 

at Low, Low Prices 




Han'M Proof of Mmytag OtjpendabilHy 

Recently a Maytag Highlander was picked at 
random from the assembly line, and put into 
operation in the Maytag Ptoduct Testing Labora- 
tory. The test was made under typical "home 
use 1 ' conditions. This Maytag Highlander Auto- 
matic Washer worked day in and day out for 
10,145 hours (15,218 loads) equal (0 SO years' 
normal horn us*? Service cost averaged only 12.00 
a year! Proving again that you buy the most 
dependable washer made . . . when it's a Maytag. 



■ Tempanmiri selector protect 
cfcrthiaV top Joodtng 

■ Water lev*] control for tco> 
stiff, twin away droMnf 

Buy MAYTAG and Get The Most 
Important Feature of AM . . . DEPENDABILITY! 



■ Selective cycle control honi** 
all fabrics 

■ Gyrafoom action b thorough, 
lint removal positive 



No Money Down with Trade 
$5.00 a Month up to 12 Months 



Murden's Appliances 



31$t AND HOLLY RD. 



GA 8-4044 



/s 



■ • [ t . 



=a 



L 



TWIST I ! 
TOPCOMBOSf 

NEW 

TROPICANA 

Every Night 

7:30 to Midnight 

JAM SESSION 

Sunday 2:00 
Sandwiches—Pizzas 

16th & ATLANTIC 



MINIATURE 

GOLF 

18hole 
COURSES 

15th & PACIFIC AVE. 
28th & ATLANTIC AVE. 

* 

OCEAN 

CARPET GOLF COURSES 




The bay and lanes behind the Virginia Beach oceanfrpnt rew ard the angler with a wide diversity of fresn ana salt water fish. 

A Guide to Beach Entertainment, Sports 




DANCING 

PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 
CLUB. Private club, member- 
ship required. 

CAPE COLONY CLUB. Private 
Club, membership required. 

THE MARSHALL'S — Buddy 
Myer's Orchestra nightly. 7 to 
10 p.m. in pool-patio dining 
area. 

CAVALIER BEACH & CABANA 
CLUB, membership required. 

SEASIDE PARK— Dancing night- 
ly in Ballroom. A new orches- 
tra alternating every night. 
Jam session Saturday and 
Sunday at 2 p.m. Closes Labor 

Day- , . 

TROPICANA— Atlantic and 16th 

(upstairs). Dancing. Jam Ses- 
sion. 
BAHAMA ROOM— Popular Trio 



(every night except Sundays) 
thru Labor Day. 

PEPPERMINT BEACH CLUB — 

Ocean-front and 15th Street. 

Orchestra from New York's 
Peppermint Lounge. Jam ses- 
sions Saturday and Sunday. 



RIGHT ON 
THE OCEAN 

Virginia Beach 

AT 3 1st STREET 




s*.»»^ 

FREE ACTS 

MWIMORSTMI 

GLORIA PEEBLES AC©. 

c *Ptlvattag Monkey ft 
Dog Act 

Starts Monday, Aug. 13 
The SKATING REOALS 

Thrilling and Safe 

RIDES 

mumnurn 



jftf P UYHOUSI 

19th & Arctic-GA 8-7844 

"MR. ROBERTS" 
by 

Geo. Heggen and Joshua Logan 

August 9 - 10-15 

Admission $3.00 

"CRITIC'S CHOICE" 

by IRA LEVIN 

August 11-12 

Admission 2.50 

"BRIGADOON" 

by LERNER and LOEWE 

August 13 - 14 

Admission $350 



FISHING 

BEACH BAY MARINA— Laskin 

Road at City Limits. Boat 

Rentals. Sports fishing in 

Coast Guard inspected boats. 

POOLE'S— at Lynnhaven Inlet. 
Party boats for ocean fishing, 
also smaller boats for bay 
fishing. Coast Guard inspect- 
ed, radio equipped boats. 

LONG CREEK MARINA— Near 
Lynnhaven Inlet. Sports fish- 
ing in Coast Guard inspected 
boats. 



AMUSEMENT PARKS 
FRONTIER CITY — Birdneck 
Road near 31st St. Ext. (about 
% mile from Atlantic Avenue 
—A full size Western town, 
stage coach, railroad, river- 
boat. 
SEASIDE PARK— Atlantic Ave 
at 31st Street. Rides, games, 
amusements for children and 
adults. Amusements open 
daily at 9 a.m. Facilities for 
picnics, bathing lockers, danc- 
ing. Closes Labor Day. , 



WATER SKIING 
LASKIN MARINA— City limits 
and 31st St. Expert Ski Tow- 
,ing Service, Instruction, Li- 
censed operators. Phone GA 8- 
5444. 



SIGHTSEEING 
BOAT CRUISE— 2-hour cruise. 
Laskin Marina, 31st St. Ext. 
Phone 428-8733. 



THEATRE 
SANDPIPER PLAYHOUSE — 
19th and Arctic. 

LOCAL MOVIES 
BEACH THEATRE— Atlantic at 

25th Street. 
BAYNE THEATRE — Atlantic 
near 17th. 



GOLF 



LIBRARY — Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne County Library 
has a non-resident charge of 
$5 of which $3 will be refund- 
ed. Located at 302-22nd St. 
Hours— Tues. thru Thursday, 
2 p.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Sat- 
urday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



NEARBY DRIVE-IN THEATRES 
SHORE DRIVE-IN — Route 60, 
east of Chesapeake Beach. 
About 6 miles from Virginia 
Beach. Enclosed children's 
playground, patio, air condi- 
tioned snack bar. 



CAVALIER YACHT AND COUN- 
TRY CLUB— 18 Hole— Mem- 
bers, guests and visitors with 
Guest Cards are welcomed at 
this course. 

PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 
CLUB — 18-Hole; members & 
guests only. 

HIGHLAND LINKS COUNTRY 
CLUB--Rosemont Rd., 9 holes; 
public course. 



Snooky Lanson 
At Beach Club 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Snooky 
Lanson, 7-year veteran of tele- 
vision's "Your Hit Parade," will 
be featured with Dean Hudson 
and his orchestra at the Cavalier 
Beach and Cabana Club Friday 
through Sunday. Hudson will 
remain through Thursday. 

Lanson, whose record of "By 
the Light of the Silvery Moon" 
with Ray Noble sold over a mil- 
lion and a half copies, has ap- 
peared on such television pro- 
grams as the Jack Paar, Giselle 
MacKenzie, Milton Berle and 
Kate Smith Shows, This is Show 
Business and The Name's the 
Same. 

This will be Dean Hudson's 
20th engagement at Virginia 
Beach, appearing the first 
time in the old Peacock Ball- 
room at Seaside Park, back 
during the 30's. 
Early members of his band 
that appeared Virginia Beach 
were Les and Larry Elgart, Vic 
Damone, The Cherry Sisters, 
Danny Davis, Buddy Morrow, 
Frances Colwell, The Debs, 
Sunny Burke and many others 
who later became big names. 
Also Band Managers 
In addition to being one of 
the top band leaders, Hudson 
also manages and books such 
bands as Claude Thornhill, The 
Three Suns, The Tommy Dorsey 
Orchestra with Sam Donahue, 
Warren Covington, Woody Her- 
man, Tony Pastor, Shep Fields 
and The Four Freshmen. He is 
headquartered in Atlanta with 
the Arnold Agency. 

This past year Hudson made 
his debut as a sportscaster with 
Tom Harmon at the Masters on 
CBS. He has already been asked 
back for the 1963 Masters. 



SANDPIPER PLAYHOUSE 
SCHEDULE 

Tonight ft Friday — "Mr. 

Roberts." 

Saturday and Sunday — 
"Critic's Chetea." 



Monday ft Tuesday— "Brig- 
adoon." 

Wadnosday ft Thursday — 
"Mr. Roberts." 

(Reviews of Mr. Roberts A 
Critic's Choice, appear this 
week on page 1-B.) 



Virginia Beech SUN-NfWS 
Thursday, August % 1$$2 
Pag* 3-8 



NORMANDIE 
CAFETERIA 

Anract.ve Djnn#f 

Prices 

2118 ATLANTIC AVI. 



■SSI 



TENNIS 

SEVERAL COURTS AT THE 
TOWN pLAYGROUND-^25th 

Street opposite High School 

athletic field. 
COURTS AT THE CAVALIER— 

40th and Atlantic -j Har-Tru 

Courts. Professional in charge. 

Courts available to guests of 

members. 
PRINCESS ANNE COUNTRY 

CLUB— New courts; members 

and guests only. 



Virginia Beach Theatres 

BEACH BAYN 



'AftracnaM-"" *#•* i I 



25th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 
and SATURDAY 

August 9, 10 & 11 

HATARI 

John Wayne 

Elsa Martinelli 

Red Buttons 

Features: 
1 ;00— 3 :40— 6:20— 9:00 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 
and TUESDAY 

August 12, 13 & 14 

BOYS' 
NIGHT OUT 

Kim Novak 
James Garner 
Tony Randall 

Features: 
2:00-— 4:00— 6:00— 8:00— 1 0:00 

WED., THURS., FRI. 
and SATURDAY 

August 15, 16, 17 & 18 

MUSIC MAN 

Robert Preston 
Shirley Jones 

Features: 
2:00—4:30—7:00—9:30 

Children 50c all day 

Adults 9Sc Mstnce 

$1.25 



17th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 

and SATURDAY 

August 9, 10 & 11 

MR. HOBBS 

TAKES A 

VACATION 

James Stewart 
Maureen O'Hara 

Features: 
2:00— 4:00— 6:00— «:00— 10:00 

ADVANCED PRICES 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and TUESDAY 
August 12, 13 & 14 

HATARI 

John Wayne 

Elsa Martinelli 

Red Buttons 

Features: 
1 :00— 3:40— 6:20— 9:00 
ADVANCED PRICES 

WED., THURS., FRI. 

and SATURDAY 

August 15, 16, 17 & 18 

BOYS' 
NIGHT OUT 

Kim Novak 
James<?arner 
To^y Randall 

Fesstures: 

2:00— 4:00— 6:00— S:00— 1 0:00 

ADVANCED PRICES 



RECREATION FACILITIES 

Community playgrounds are 
maintained at the Cook School 
(15th Street and Baltic) and the 
Virginia Beach High School with 
a full supervised course of di- 
rected play, crafts, and recrea- 
tion. 

At the high school there are 
new tennis courts. 



SKEET FIELD m 

THE PRINCESS ANNE GUN 
CLUB— Is a skeet club located 
on Little Neck Road, 0.9 of a 
mile from Route 58. Turn 
right off on Little Neck Road 
about one quarter of a mile 
west of thfe Pine Tree Inn. 
(cleaily marked). 
Club is associated aiid regis- 
tered with NSSA and is open 
every afternoon. The telephone 
number is GY 7-4228. 

'Music Man' Kids 



Coming Beach 
Movie Review 

(This review of "Boys Night 
Out," scheduled at the Beech 
Theatre Sunday through Tues- 
day and the Bayne Theatre 
Wednesday through Saturday, 
appears with special permis- 
sion from The Green Sheet, 
a monthly survey of current 
films, 

BOYS' NIGHT OUT 

Released by MGM-Embassy 
Pictures. Producers: Marty 
Ransohoff and Joe Levine. Di- 
rector: Michael Gordon. Source: 
Screenplay by Ira Wallach, 
based . on a story by Marvin 
Worth. Photography: Arthur E. 
Arling. Musfc: Frank deVol. 
CinemaScope. Metrocolor. Lead- 
ing Players: Kim Novak, James 
Garner. 104 minutes. 

ESTIMATES AGREE: 

Three husbands & a bachelor 
neighbor, communters all, have 
been spending one night a week 
in town away from family re- 
sponsibilities, and they are find- 
ing it a bore. For a change of 
pace they decide to rent a 
swank New York hideaway, com- 
plete with a gorgeous blonde. 
An odd set of circumstances pro- 
vides their dream apartment 
and Kim Novak as well. Actually 
she is a sociology student, writ- 
ing a thesis on adolescent sex 
fantasies in the suburban male, 
and equipped with a hidden tape 
recorder, she uses the unsus- 
pecting "boys" as guinea pigs. 
With some skill and elementary 
psychology, the virtuous Kim 
holds off the eager-beaver hus- 
bands (Tony Randall, Howard 
Duff and Howard Morris) and 
falls in love with bachelor James 
Garner. Suspicious wives, the 
bachelor's nosy mother and pri- 
vate eye Fred Clark furnish 
complications, but all is settled 
as the would-be strayers return 
gladly to the hearth. Settings, 
both in town and suburbs, have 
an up-to-the-minute style. A 
cast of well known comedians 
handles the knowing situations 
and dialogue easily, and does 
the material more than justice. 




Susan Luckey and Timmy 
Everett play top featured 
roles in the spellbinding 
Warner Bros. Technicolor 
presentation of Meredith Wil- 
son's 'The Music Man," open- 
ing Wednesday at the Beach 
Theatre. Robert Preston, re- 
creating the title role that 
won him unanimous acclaim 
in the original Broadway pro- 
duction, and Shirley Jones 
star as the fast talking sales- 
man and the town librarian. 
Buddy Hackett, Hermione 
Gingold, Paul Ford and The 
Buffalo Bills are co-starred in 
the film. 



Animal Act 
At Seaside 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Gloria 
Peebles and Company, a trained 
animal act which is a miniature 
circus in itself, will be the free 
attraction this week on the out- 
door stage at Seaside Park, Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

The performance, which fea- 
tures dogs and monkeys, may be 
seen every day at 2:30 and 10:00 
p.m. from Monday through Sun- 
day. 

Attendance at Seaside Park, 
which has been mounting stead- 
ily through July, has achieved 
its highest daily average as the 
season begins its last month." 
While the amusement park is a 
local enterprise, its popularity is 
by no means confined to the 
Tidewater area. Operators of 
hotels, motels and beach room- 
ing houses report that most of 
their guests become frequent 
patrons of its many attractions 
during their vacation periods. 

Ocean bathing on its well- 
patrolled beach is of course a 
major attraction; dancing in the 
ballroom nightly and all day 
Saturday and Sunday, starting 
at 11:00 a.m., is another. The 
Electras and Eddie Lee's Cor- 
vettes play for the twist-oriented 
crowds on weekends. The Com- 
manders, The Rebels, The Rock- 
ing Ramblers and Rocking Aces 
play Monday through Friday. 

Admission to Seaside Park is 
always free. 



SURREY 
CAFETERIA 

Home Cooked Meals 
Air Conditioned 
Ample Parking 

15th & ATLANTIC AVE. 



Donut Kitchen 

Fresh Donuts 
Made Daily 

ALL MEALS SERVED 
18th and ATLANTIC 



ITALIAN FOOD 




PRIVATE 
DINING ROOM 

Ample Parking 



FINE ITALIAN FOODS 
310 - 31st ST., VA. BEACH 



TOP HAT 

DANCING 

featuring 

Al Cannon and His "Tuff Sax 

29th and OCEAN FRONT 



LETS TWIST 

Dancing Nightly and Saturday and Sunday Afternoon 

PEPPERMINT 
BEACH CLUB 

- * 

NOW FEATURING 

THE DYNAMIC AIRDALES' 

Plus 

"GENE and His TEAM BEATS" 

15th and ATLANTIC AVE. 



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OCEAN REEF FISHING 

On The Parly Boat "MISSY" 

LEAVES DAILY AT 8:00 A.M 

(Regardless of number of people aboard) 

LONG GREEK MARINA 

Route 615— «A Mile South of Shore Drive 

**& HO 4-9952 °%£ 

Includes Bait, etc. 



M2BM 





-Snack Bar Aboard- 



THE 

Lighthouse 

Steamed 
CRABS 

SOUTH ATLANTIC AVE. 

Next to Steel Pier 



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RESTAURANT 

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Serving Breakfast 24 

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re Drive at Lynnhaven Bridge 




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Virginia B*ach Swn-N#w$, Ttwrsday, August 9, 1962 
Pag* 4-8 



COUNTY AGENT 

•y I. 1, *W€ir COCKtILU JR. 




ansa 



$.OW THINKER 

'"ThaaVI bim talking to 
Hie fellow for more than five 
jnimrte* wfion he called me a 
tool," 

"Wlset caused the delay?" 

County Wide Dairy and Baaf 
CafH* SBaf Ma atk ig A Tour 
Harniod for Aug, 16 and 17 

Joe cheapest £eed we can 
produce in Princess Anne Coun- 
ty is corn silage. We can pro- 
duce more tons per acre- than 
anywhere in Virginia. We can 
also produce corn silage cheap- 
er per ton than anywhere in 
Virginia. 

'But, DHIA records show that 
we are not feeding as much 
silage to our dairy cows as 
dairymen in other counties in 
Virginia. Doesn't it look like 
that we ought to be taking a 
greater advantage of those 
things which we cad do well to 
make up for some of the more 
difficult problems which we 
cdnnot solve so quickly? 

?We also found, last winter at 
oir Dairy Short Course, which 
was sponsored by the Agricul- 
tural Committee of the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce, that our 
qnality was not what it should 
he,. Therefore, the Extension 
Forage Committee recommend- 
ed that educational work be 



VACATIONERS 

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If hi need of a new set of 

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While You Wait 

9 TO 6 P.M. DAILY 

CLOSED SATURDAY 




DENTISTS 

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Phone 
MA 2-4575 

FREE PARKIN? 

Motor Ramp Garage 
114 W. Main St 



W 



conducted this fall during silage 
harvesting season to up-grade 
the quality of our silage and to 
increase the amount of silage 
stored which would result in a 
greater amount of silage being 
fed the individual dairy cows. 

At the request of these com- 
mitteemen, I invited John 
Shoulders, Extension Agrono- 
mist in charge of forage work at 
VPI, to come down and help me 
in planning this educational 
program. 

We have planned for a corn 
silage meeting for the night of 
August 16, at 8 p.m., at Princess 
Anne Courthouse, Va. The pro- 
gram is planned so that ade- 
quate and complete discussion 
can be had on two phases of 
silage. The first part of the pro- 
gram will be the value of and 
economics of silage in a forage 
program. Mr. Kenneth Loope, 
Agricultural Economist at VPI, 
(will handle this discussion; and 
secondly, Mr. Dan Kite, Agricul- 
tural Engineer at VPI, will dis- 
cuss through a series of slides 
systems ni making storing and 
feeding silage. Needless to say, 
there is much more information 
in these topics than inferred by 
their title. I believe that this 
meeting will be one which is 
modern, up-to-date, and really 
eye-opening. All dairymen and 
beef cattlemen are urged to be 
present. 

The tour the following day 
will be on four farm locations. 
At these various stops we will 
discuss the right stage of matur- 
ity for proper harvesting, and 
the wrong stage. We will show 
different types of silos, and how 
feed back is obtained. We will 
also show different methods of 
feeding, along with the proper 
use of all kinds of equipment, 
including the harvester itself. 

There are always purposes 
and goals behind educational 
programs such as this, and so 
I would like for you to know 
what we are really trying to do. 
There is a great need to improve 
the quality of our silage. Also, 
a great need for the increase in 
quantity of silage fed, not only 
on dairy cattle, but a tremen- 
dous increase is necessary in 
beef cattle. Of major inmport- 
ance, also, is the various kinds 
of automatic feeding systems 
which today are not only eco- 
nomical, but are absolutely 
essential. Come join us as we 
try to outline means by which 
you can reach these goals on 
your own individual farm. 



PASTURE KNR 
DEEP IN JANUARY 

We are now in the middle of 
summer. Winter will be here 
soon. Summer is the time to 
prepare for winter. Winter 
brings problems for both dairy- 
men and beef cattlemen. Let's 
discuss some of these problems 
and also ways of combating 
them. All livestock men in Prin- 
cess Anne need a heavy sod 
pasture during the "muddy" 
months. Dairymen need a dry 
pasture for milking cows, dry 
cows, and heifers. Beef cattle- 
men need the same things, but 
also they like to have some ex- 
tra feed, too. 

We have always recommend- 
ed very highly a practice of 
fertilizing a field or fields of 
fescue around the first of Aug- 
ust with 50 to 60 lbs. of pure 
nitrogen. This will give you 
exactly what you need. 

After fertilizing your field 
with nitrogen, take your live- 
stock off immediately, and do 
not put them back until after 
all other pasture, corn stalks, 
cover crops and so forth are 
gone. This should be around 
Janary 1, which is about the 
start of the mud season. At this 
time, the fescue has grown up 
and fallen down and will be a 
mass of forage. 

This is also about -the time 
that beef calves start dropping. 
This fescue field is excellent for 
calving. It will be solid, dry, and 
the cow will be getting addition- 
al exercise, thus causing less 
calving trouble. Not only is this 
good for calving season, but it 
will also provide extra months 
of pasture feeding. 

Dairy cattle, dry cows, and 
heifers reap the same benefits. 
However, one of your greatest 
needs of the dairy farm is a 
good place where the cows will 
get out of the mud. Many cattle- 
men have done this the last 2 or 
3 years and they tell me that 
the results far excel the cost. 
Why don't you try it? 



cordially invited to attend. 

BAYVILLE COWS PRODUCE 
HISH RECORDS 

Two registered Guernsey 
com in the herd of Bayville 
Farms, Inc., Princess Anne 
County, have recently com- 
piaterf top official DIflR Preduc- 
tion Records according to the 
American Guernsey Cattle Club. 
These cows were milked twice 
daily. The testing was super- 
vised by Elvin flint, supervisor 
of the Southampton • Princess 
Anne Dairy Herd Improvement 
Association. Bayville Royal 
Althea, a six-year-old, produced 
a 13,550 lbs. of milk and 700 
pounds of fat in 208 days. Bay- 
ville Jolly Damsel, a senior 3- 
year-old, produced 12,710 lbs. 
of milk, and 618 lbs. of fat in 
305 days. 



do !> to be sure that you have 
strong and sufficient holding 
pens, cuttmf chutes, holding 
chute, pi so on. It's very 
dangerous to handle cattle with- 
out proper equipment I don't 
believe we can do too weU with 
a saddle horse and rope in Prin- 



ACP SION-UP UNDERWAY 

Norman Beal, ASCS Office 
Manager, tells me that farmers 
are signing up. at this time for 
various conservation practices 
which they want to conduct dur- 
ing the winter months. These 
practices include: Winter cover 
crops, permanent vegetative 
cover, additional rotation cover, 
liming of farm land, and im- 
provement of permanent cover 
and forest improvement. Any- 
one interested in these conser- 
vation programs should contact 
Mr. Beal, in his office. 



NURSERY TOUR 

Nurserymen of Princess Anne 
County will be interested in 
knowing that August 11 is the 
day for the Virginia Nursery- 
men Summer Tour. It will start 
at 8:30 a.m., at the Coleman 
Nursery, 1234 Western Branch 
Blvd., Portsmouth, Va. 

The tour will include a visit 
to Greenbriar Farms, Winn 
Nursery, Norfolk Botannical 
Gardens, Le-Mac Nurseries at 
Hampton, MacDonald Nurseries 
and Garden Center in Hampton, 
and the Coleman Nursery and 
Garden Center in Portsmouth. 

I would certainly like to urge 
all of our Princess Anne and 
Virginia Beach nurserymen to 
be in attendance at this summer 
tour, as I believe it to be one of 
the more educational events 
you will have an opportunity of 
attending this year. 



TIME TO GET READY 

A couple of weeks ago, I was 
jotting down for you the Peo- 
ple in the county who we had 
visited to look at their 1962 
calf crop. Today, I just happen- 
ed to think about the fact that 
it won't be too long before 
these calves will be going to 
market. 

There are lots of things to do 
to get ready, and I always think 
that the first thing you should 



After yen have your equip- 
ment ready, I think first you 
need to be sure that your calves 
are coming along the wa> they 
should. This means that you 
have dehorned and castrated all 
of those tele calves. Then, I 
think you want to get your cows 
ready. This involves testing, for 
T.B. and Bangs. Be sure that 
you get this job done during 
the leisurely summer months. 
Now is a good time to get that 
done. Contact your Veterinarian 
at once and be sure that you 
have these things taken care of 
before the fall of the year. 

While I am talking about 
equipment, I guess I should 
mentioned to you some folks 
that have real good equipment 
for handling cattle, because you 
might like to go take a look at 
somebody else's pens to get 
some ideas of who you should 
construct yours. 

Mr. M. R. Adams has a very 
nice one. Howard Salmons has 
one constructed by a plan which 
I drew several years ago, and 
R. P. Midgett, at his Stumpy 
Lake Farm, has a very ideal set 
of holding pens. I would like to 
encourage any of you to take a 
look at these pens and holding 
chutes and see if you don't like 
them. They can be built very in- 
expensively. 



a 



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MeW 



v ,\ \ v 




/ ' 1\\ 



A SHORT REMINDER 

Now is the time to buy fall 
seed. Don't forget — buy only 
those seeds which are recom- 
mended by this area. Stop by 
this office to be sure of your 
varieties. 



PACKAGE 

wrapped te yew 
specifications 

Your mortage loan In- 
cludes principal, inter- 
est, taxes and insur- 
ance v . . all reduced to one payment, just like rent. 
Credit life Insurance if desired. 

If you are 'looking around" for better nvtno. quar- 
ters, look in on us when it comes to the financing. 
You'll be glad that you did. 



VIRGINIA BEACH FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 



210 -25th Street 



Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Phone GA 8-9331 



B*# 



— I' 








YOUR DEALER'S GOT AUGUST BUYS 



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SELECTION OF 

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JUNIOR HEREFORD 
FIELD DAY 

The Virginia Hereford Assoc- 
iation will hold its annual meet- 
ing and field day at Rockhill 
Farm, Blackstone, Virginia, on 
August 18, 1962. This is the first 
time this field day has been held 
in south-side Virginia. 

The program will include type 
demonstration, judging contest, 
fitting and showing demonstra- 
tion, feed demonstration, and a 
cutting horse demonstration. 
Rock Hill Farm and the Black- 
stone Chamber of Commerce of 
jointly sponsoring this event. 

All interested Junior and 
adult herefdrd breeders are 




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worke-pcomas for a Chevrolet price. 
(You know how low that ia.) 

JET-SMOOTH CHEVROLET 



Here's about the best thing that's 
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since budgets— the lively low-cost 
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(Body by Fisher, what else?), a 6 
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plus things like bolt-on front-end 
components for rock-bottom upkeep, 
Eleven-mode! selection includes the 
Nova 2-Door Sedan (second from top), 

CHEVY n NOVA 



The Corvalr Moms is kind of like two 
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667 SfVtNfllNfH ItREET VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 



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VIRGINIA BEACH -3201 PACIFIC AVENUE 



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Virginia toech Sun-Ntws ( Thursday, Augvftf, 1 

Page 




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The MIXING BOWL . . . 

IT'S Jun TO COOK 



By LUCILE CLARK 

8UN-NKW8 FOOD EDITOR 

Far the very latest In foo<l facta and fables ... for 
practical, down-to-earth recipes that plea&e botb 
palate and pocketbook, read the "Mixing Bowl" by 
Lucille Clark each Thursday in the Sun-News 



mmmm 



Are you planning an outdoor 
party? What better time to try 
a delicious barbecue quarter 
turkey on your outdoor grill! 
And, what better, more elegant 
recipe to, use than the easy 
Honey Orange Glace Barbecue. 

After swimming, baseball, or 
fishing trip when they catch no 
fish), an out-door party would 
be a perfect finale for the day. 

Prepare the grill, be sure all 
the fuel is burning and let it 
burn down to a good~1»i#N»f 
coals. 

I have been advised that the 
quartered turkey is available. 

So this is an ideal way to pur- 
chase the turkey fof your Bar- 
becue. Remove the quarter tur- 
key from its protective wrap- 
ping, put it on the grill 6-8 
inches above alow burning coals, 
Baste frequently with the Honey^ 
orange glaze made of simple 
mixture of % cup honey, hk cup 
orange juice and % cup brown 
sugar. You can make the glaze a 
day ahead* of time. It will keep 
perfectly in the refrigerator. 
After about 15 minutes of cook- 
ing, your turkey will be nicely 
browned on one side. Turn it 
and then brown it on the other 
side for another 15 minutes and 
rotate every 15 minutes there- 



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after for a total of about 45 
minutes cooking time. If you 
really adore that summer-smoke 
flavor, place sheet of foil over 
the turkey loosely while it is 
cooking. If necessary cook long- 
er; be sure it is well done. 

America has been going Bar- 
becue-balmy for sometime, and 
more so every year. Weather 
permitting families cook more 
and more out of doors. 

Turkey is fast becoming a 
savory favorite of the grill gour- 
met. Time was when turkey was 
only a winter-time meal because 
of tremendous size and required 
hours of hot oven work. Now, 
though it is a year-round de- 
light, especially scrumptious and 
easy to fix. 

The reason for this difference 
is a simple matter of division, 
turkey is available now divided 
into quarters and each individ- 
ually wrapped. If you can not 
locate this in your super-market 
(some areas still do not have it), 
buy a small turkey and have the 
meat-man quarter it for you. 

Here are some suggestions for 
things to serve at the Barbecue 
fresh corn on the cob, baked 
beans (can be baked in the oven 
while barbecue is busy out of 
doors), sliced tomatoes or may- 
be Caraway Cole Slaw. 



ends of cones with whipped 
cream forced through pastry 
tube. Store unused cones in 
tightly-covered metal container 
to prevent softening. Makes 10 
cones. 

The Marine Corps is a separ- 
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Navy's partner within the Naval 
Establishment. 



PRINCESS ANNE 

Garden Equipment Co. 

OCEANA, VA. • PHONE GA 8-4051 



CARAWAY COLE SLAW 

6 servings. 

Vi medium head cabbage, 
shredded (4 cups) 

Vi cup dairy sour cream 

2 tablespoons sugar 

2 tablespoons vinegar 

% teaspoon salt 
Dash pepper 

% teaspoons caraway seed 

Shred chilled cabbage thor- 
oughly. Combine remaining in- 
gredients and pour over cab- 
bage. Mix lightly and serve im- 
mediately or refrigerate until 
ready to serve. 



Refreshments for your out- 
door meal should be good but 
easy. Iced or hot coffee; iced 
tea or milk all go well with most 
any dessert. How about some 
Peanut Butter Brownies? 



PEANUT BUTTER BROWNIES 

% cup sifted flour 

V< teaspoon salt 

V4 cup crunchy-style peanut 

butter 
% cup butter 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

1 cyp firmly packed brown 
sugar 

2 eggs, unbeaten 

1 cup chopped peanuts 
Mix and sift flour and salt. 
Cream peanut butter, butter and 
vanilla. Add sugar gradually, 
creaming until well-blended. 
Add eggs 1 at a time, beating 
well after each addition. Blend 
in flour. Stir in peanuts. Spoon 
into greased 8-inch square cake 
pan. Spread evenly. Bake at 
330° 30 to 35 minutes or until 
center is firm. Cool in pan 5 
minutes. Cut into squares. Re- 
move from pan. Cool on cake 



rack. 
Danish cream cones are good 

to serve too and if you like to 

try new recipes, maybe you 

would like this one- 
Use Your Strawberry Jam 

What's popular in Denmark 
promises to be equally popular 
here. Each delicious cone is a 
rolled strip of baked pastry, 
filled with strawberry jam at 
one end and whipped cream at 
the other. For this occasion, you 
can bring out the strawberry 
jam you preserved from the re- 
cent spring crop. You'll be hard 
pressed to find a more luscious 
way to use it. 

A few words of caution are 
in order when you make Dan- 
ish Cream Cones. The cones 
must he rolled immediately aft- 
er baking lest the pastry become 
too brittle to handle. That's why 
it's best to bake only two or 
three at a time. Unless you plan 
to use them immediately, keep 
the cones in an air-tight con* 
tainer. Naturally, you put the 
jam and whipped cream filling^ 
in at the very last minute so the 
cones are fresh and crisp when 
you serve them. 



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WHY? 

Buy a Ran » bl er anywhere else when you eat save up to 
$200.00 on a factory fresh 1962 Rambler. AU Models and 
color. 

For Instance- 1W2 Rambler Classic 4-door station wofon 

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Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 9, J 962 
Page 6-B ««— » mn^ ^tmstmmd 

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GIVE NOW TO YOUR 
RESCUE SQUADHI 

The yearly drive is underway, 
if you haven't sent in your con- 
tribution; DO IT NOW! 
Tuesday — July 24th 

12:01 am. — Emergency serv- 
ice given to victim in shock. Ad- 
mitted to Va. Beach Hospital.— 
Kitchin-Conneil. 

6:90 a.m.— Navy dependent at 
Lynnhaven, started hemmorag- 
ing about 2 a.m. Admitted to Va. 
Beach Hospital. When unable to 
stop bleeding, transported doctor 
and patient to Norfolk General 
Hospital, doctor administering 
plasma enroute. — Connell k H. 
Kitchin. 

10:00 a.m.— Side of beef hit 
victim in back in a Va. Beach 
super market. Used board 
stretchers to transport to hosp. 
—Phillips-Police. 

11:40 a.m.— Transport victim 
to home. — Phillips. 

5:00 p.HL— Victim fell from 
ladder, injured ankle and suf- 
fered lacerations on arms and 
legs. Taken to Va. Beach Hosp. 
— Phillips-Beasley. 

5:45 p.m. — Transportation of 
heart patient from doctor's of- 
fice to De Paul Hospital. — 
Phillips-Stallings. 

6:55 p.m. — Ladder victim 
taken to Norfolk General Hos- 
pjtal— Gillifcnd. 

8:30 p.m. — Call to local hotel 
— tourists had gotten too much 
sun. — Gilliland-McClanan. 



Beach Hospital to Norfolk Gen- 
eral Hospital.— Taylor-Randolph. 

11:15 a.m. — O.B. case given 
transportation to De Paul Hos- 
pital. — Beasley. 

2:30 p.m.— Emergency service 
given victim who had migrain 
headaches and couldn't walk. 
Taken to Va. Beach Hosp. — 
Taylor. 



aaaa 



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^rflaatP 



4-H Activities 
and Events 

By KRISTER EVANS, JR, 
Assistant County Agent 



a 



— n 



Friday — July 27th 

5:30 p.m. — Navy dependent 
given emergency service for a 
possible broken shoulder, tak- 
en to Va. Beach Hosp.— J. B. 
McChesney-McCaw. 



Saturday — July 28th 

10:45 am. — Heart patient 
given transportation from Nor- 
folk Gen. Hospital to home in 
North Alanton.— Casey. 

4:00 p.m. — Victim suffered 
cut on head from broken bottle, 
treated for shock by Russell. 

7:23 p.m. — Tourist passed 
out iii hotel lobby. Advised to 
get some fresh air. — Edwards- 
Connell. 



4-H FORMER MEMBER 
JOINS 4-H STAFF 

Robert W. Blanton, a native 
of Amelia County, has joined 
the State 4-H Club Staff as 
Assistant State 4-H Club Agent. 
He holds a B.S. degree in Agri- 
cultural education from VPI and 
has done grad- 
uate work at 
the University 
of Arkansas k 
Wisconsin. At 
the present 
time he is look- 
ing toward a 
master's degree 
in Agriculture 
Economics at 
VPI. Prior to 
doing graduate 
work, Mr. Blanton was Assistant 
County Agent in Pittsylvania 
County. He has also been an in- 
structor in vocational agricul- 
ture. .1 ■ , . 




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' Wednesday— July 25th 

10:15 a.m. — Transportation to 
convalescence home — Beasley. 

4:20 p.m. — Heart attack vic- 
tim, DO A. — mouth to mouth, 
oxygen resusitator, external 
heart massage administered un- 
til doctor arrived. — Beasley- 
Phillips. 

8:10 p.m. — Transportation to 
convalescent home. — Beasley 
Langhorne. 

9:00 p.m. — Transportation to 
De Paul Hosptal. — Langhorne- 
Beasley. 



Thursday — July th 
10:00 a.m. — Person with 
broken leg taken home to North 
Virginia Beach from Va. Beach 
Hospital.— Taylor-Randolph. 

10:30 am.— Victim with bad 
back transported from Virginia 






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Sunday — July 29th 

1:00 a.m. — Applied compress 
bandage to victim with lacera- 
tion on head in motel. Taken to 
Virginia* Beach Hospital for 
treatment. — Connell-Edwards. 

2:40 a.m.— Victim with cut on 
forehead, taken to Va. Beach 
Hospital to have wound closed. 
—Connell-Edwards. 

4:35 am. — Fisherman got 
stung by Skate; given emer- 
gency service, taken to Virginia 
Beach Hospital for check and re- 
turned to home. — Connell. 

5:20 p.m.— Coast Guardsmen 
given emergency service for 
cut on hand and taken to Va. 
Beach Hospital.— Hall-Morse. 

5:50 p.m. — Navy dependent 
given transportation to Ports- 
mouth Naval Hospital.— Connell 

Monday — July 30th 

9:30 a.m. — Auto accident 
oh Laskin Road. Victim in mild 
shock; taken to Va. Beach Hos- 
pital.— Langhorne. 

11:50 am.— Victim unable to 
sit up and ride in car, because 
of recent operation. Ambulance 
service from London Bridge to 
De Paul Hospital.— Russell. 

3:40 p.m. — Transportation 
from Norfolk General Hospital 
to Va. Beach Hospital.— Lang- 
horne. 

5:40 p.m.— Victim in Atlantic 
Park given emergency service 
for possible broken thigh, lacer- 
ations on back of head, and 
possible fractured skull. Taken 
to Virginia Beach Hospital. — 
Langhorne-Hogan. 

6:10 p.m. — Victim with pos- 
sible concussion and broken 
leg, transported from Virginia 
Beach Hospital.^-Timms. 



National 4-H Club Congress 

Of all the events on the 4-H 
calendar, the one which draws 
the greatest attention across the 
nation is the National 4-H Club 
Congress each autumn in Chica- 
go. In fact, it is often called 
"the show window of 4-H," be- 
cause it brings together a group 
of outstanding 4-H members 
who exemplify the valuable re- 
sults of 4-H Club work. 

Jointly sponsored by the Ex- 



tension Service and the Na- 
tional Committee, the Congress 
is made possible by the coopera- 
tion of 55 donor organizations 

who provide national and reg- 
ional 4-H awards, including 
travel funds for delegates' all- 
expense trips to Chicago. In ad- 
dition, they arrange meal events 
and entertainment which are 
part of a memorable week. 

Always an inspiring occasion, 
the 'Congress took on an added 
importance in November, 1961, 
because it was the 40th anniver- 
sary of this great youth event. 
In attendance were more than 
1,350 4-H delegates from the 50 
states and Puerto Rico, plus 
hundreds of interested adults; 
some 200 Extension workers 
who hold leaders' sessions due- 
ing the Congress; 275 press and 
radio-TV representatives; and 
nearly 200 donor representa- 
tives. This last-named group in- 
cluded board chairmen, presi- 
dents, vice-presidents, and other 
key business officials, all of 
whom were proud to honor the 
4-H delegates who had worked 
Tiard to earn their right to at- 
tend the Congress. These men 
and women enjoy their contacts 
with 4-H young people, who in 
turn are always impressed to 
meet corporate executives with 
such a keen interest in their 
accomplishments. 



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eruieemen 

In The News 

MONROE KELLY 

Midshipman Monroe Kelly, 
son of Captain and Mrs. Monroe 
Kelly, USN, of 229 Pocahontas 
dr., Virginia Beach, Va., and 
Midshipman Thomas K. Kimmel 
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
K. Kimmel of 9402 Ocean front, 
Virginia Beach, Va., have joined 
the class of 1966 at the U. S. 
Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md„ 
and are undergoing summer 
"plebe training" at the academy 
in preparation for joining the 
brigade of midshipmen in the 
fall. 

The two months of military 
indoctrination during the sum- 
mer is designed to teach the new 
plebes the ways of Navy and 
Naval Academy life. They are 
taught to march and to wear the 
Navy uniform correctly. They 
also learn Navy terminology and 
begin some academic work. 

Midshipmen undergo an ex- 
tensive training program during 
their four years at the Academy, 
including three summer training 
cruises. The curriculum consists 
of 160 semester hours, and 
every midshipman must partici- 
pate in one of the many sports 
offered. 

Upon graduation, midshipmen 
receive a bachelor of science de- 
gree and are commissioned in 
the Navy or second lieutenant in 
the Marine Corps, Army or Air 
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i 



. • LEGAL NOTICES 



I 



VIRGINIA: Tha regular mating 
of tha Board of Supm-visors of 
Priiww Anno County will bo 
hold in the Circuit Court Room 
on Monday, August 13th at two 
o'etoek ?M., at which timo 
poroont will bo hoord for and 
•9*in*t tho following! 
AMENDMENT TOlCHAPTER 15 

OF THE COUMW©* 
PRINCESS ANNE, VIRGINIA 
At a regular meeting of the 
Board of Supervisors of Prin- 
cess Anne County, Virginia held 
on Monday, in the* Courtroom 
of the Circuit Court of Princess 
Anne County, the following 
amendment to Chapter 15, Sec- 
tion 33 was adopted: 

BE IT ORDAINED by the 
Board of Supervisors of Princess 
Anne County, Virginia, that 
Chapter 15, of the Code of the 
County of Princess Anne, Vir- 
ginia, 1958 as amended, be 
amended by adding the follow- 
ing new sub-section, to-wit: <83) 
to read as follows: 

SECTION 33: BATHING, 
SWIMMING, ETC. — RESTRIC- 
TIONS: 

It shall be unlawful for any 
person for the purpose of bath- 
ing or swimming to use or cause 
to-be used the waters of the 
Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the 
beach or shoreline of said Ocean 
ini Princess Anne County, Vir- 
ginia in that area of water 
bounded on the West by said 
beach or shoreline and bound- 
ed on the North by the southern 
side of the Williams Steel Fish- 
ing Pier and bounded on the. 
South by the Northern Jetty of 
Rudee Inlet and on the East by 
a line drawn between the east- 
ern most extremity of the said 
fishing pier and the, eastern 
most extremity of the Jetty. 

Any person violating the pro- 
vision of this said Section shall 
be punished in accordance to 
Section 1-6 of the Code of the 
County of Princess Anne. 



NOTICES 

OU. 

TRUSTErS SALE 
PURSUANT to the terms of a 
certain Deed of Trust dated 
August 16, 1956, recorded lh 
the Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of Princess Anne County, 
Virginia, is Deed Book 466, at 
page 323, default having been 
made in the payment of the debt 
therein secured and being re- 
quired by the beneficiary so to 
do, the undersigned trustee will 
sen at public auction on the 
Courthouse steps, *Pri4cess Anne, 
Virginia, on August 2|, 1962, at 
12,00 noon, the real estate de- 
scribed as follows: 

All that certain lot, piece or 
parcel of land, together with the 
buildings and improvements 
thereon, situate, lying and being 
in the County of Princess Anfte, 
(and known, numbered and desig- 
nated as Lot 12, Block H, as 
shown on the plat entitled "Map 
of Section 3, Bay Colony," which 
said plat is duiy recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of Princess Anne County, 
Virginia, in Map Book 36, at 
page 54. 

Balance of a prior Deed of 
Trust will be announced at the 
time of sale. Terms: $500.00 
deposit, cash settlement within 
10 days. 

HARRY M. HERMAN, Trustee 
By Edward T. Caton, HJ, 
Attorney 8-9-lt 



NOTICES 



IWoftteCodeofVlfghsia. 



And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that ttie defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
pott office address being: 8169 
Crow Canyon Road, Haywood, 
California. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and" do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 



• LKAL NOTICES 



A Copy— Tartar 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Mary M. White, D.C. 

Ijydges & Broyjes, p.g.. 

3115 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach,. Va. 8-2-4t 



BE IT RESOLVED by the 
Board of Supervisors of Prin- 
cess Anne County that in order 
that the public be advised of 
the foregoing ordinance prohib- 
iting swimming and bathing in 
the area as described in said 
ordinance, the Chief of Police 
is authorized and instructed to 
erect appropriate warning signs 
at such places in the said area 
in question as he may deem 
proper. 

A Copy— Teste: 

JOHNfV. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Juanita S. Grimstead, 
D.C. 8-2-2t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on tho 23rd day 
of July, 1962. 
Guy Wilburt DeFrehn, Plaintiff 

against 
Frances Isabelle DeFrehn, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit Is to 
give evidecne for the purpose 
of obtaining a final divorce de- 
cree on the 10th day of August, 
1962, at 10:00 A.M., from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion and aband- 
onment. 

And an affidavit haying been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the, last known post 
office address being: 2501 Q 
Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Margaret M. Hood, D.C, 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-26-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
tho Clork's Office of tho Cir- 
cuit Court of tho County of 
Princota Anno, on tho llth 
day of 'July, 1W2. 
Helen Gilbert Kallam, Plaintiff 

against ? 

James Kallam, Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a Vinculo Matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 225 
Virginia Avenue, Spray, North 
Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within, ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. WJiite, D.C. 
Edward T. Caton, m, p.q. 
210-25th Street 
Virginia Beach, Va, 7-19-4t 



Common woafth of Virginia, In 
tho Clork's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court Of tho County of 
Princess Anno, on tho llth day 
of July, 19*2- 
RAYMOND 1 P. BROWN, Plaintiff 

against 
HALLIEH. BROWN, Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a vinculo Matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is % a ^on-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: Route 
1, Windsor, North Carolina. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear berg within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy— -Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 7-19-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
tho Clork's Office of tho Cir- 
cuit Court of tho County of 
Princess Anno, on tho 19th day 
of July, 1962, 
Marvin Roger McMillan, 

against Plaintiff 

Constance Delaney Coveney 
McMillan Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce from the bonds 
of matrimony from the said de- 
fendant, upon the grounds of 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident 6f the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 821 
Rainey Street, Burlington, N.C. 
It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Margaret M. Ifood, DC. 
Henry L. Lam, p.q. 
Princess Anne, Virginia 7-264t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
tho Clork's Office of tho Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anno, on the 19th day 
of July, 1962. 
Thomas Glenn Overby,. Plaintiff 

against * 

Elizabeth Franks Overby, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit Is to 
obtain from the defendant a) Bridge 
divorce A Mensa Et Thoro, to 
be later merged into a divorce 
A Vinculo Matrimonii, nipon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered that 
she do appear here within ten 
(10) days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest 
in this suit. 
A Copy— Teste: * 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Kellam & Kellam, p.q. 
Board of Trade Building 
Norfolk, Va. 7-26-4t 



Route 632, having*! maximum 
depth of 1839 feet. Said prop- 
erty along Route 632 to remain 
iened R-5 1 for a depth of 225 
feet. Bounded on the East by a 
canal ditch and property of 
CordeUa Waike, on the South by 
the property of A. M. Beale and 
on the West by property of 
Dennis Walke Jr. Containing 
2S.8 acres, more ar leBsr Set- 
board District. 

IL Application of Raymond F. 
Ruett and Ray W. Deaern by 
Thomas C. Broyles, Attorney, 
for a change of zoning from 
Residence Duplex District 2 
(R-D 2) to Limited Commercial 
District 3 (C-L 3) of Lots 21-25, 
Block 7, subdivision of Chesa- 
peake Park. Said property lo- 
cated at the Northwest inter- 
section of* Ocean View Avenue 
and Seayiew Avenue. Fronting 
145.5 feet on Ocean View Ave- 
nue, having a depth of 100 
feet, more br less, on Sea view 
Avenue. Bayside District. 

HI. Application of Mary L. 
Carsop Pyle by Robert B. Crom- 
well Jr., Attorney, for the dis- 
continuance, closure and aband- 
onment of a certain portion of 
Race Street, subdivision of 
Jacksondale. Said portion to he 
closed bounded by Front Street 
on the North and Second Street 
on the South, Lots 1-7, Block 6 
on the East and Lots 8-14, Block 
5 on the Welt. Having a 66 foot 
right of way. Lynnhaven Dis- 
trict. 

IV. Application of Harris and 
Otealia Jennings by Henry L 
Lam, Attorney, for a Use Per- 
mit to operate a playground and 
recreation area on a parcel of 
land being a part of Tract S, 
J. M. Keeling Plat. Said tract 
located on the North aide of 
Indian River Road, 3280 feet 
West of Mears Corner. Said 
parcel beginning at a point 625 
feet North of Indian River Road, 
having a depth of 102.17 feet on 
the West, a w|dth of 210 feet 
on the North, a depth of 65.71 
feet on the East and a width of 
,210 feet on the South. Kemps- 
ville District « 

V. Application of Hardy R. 
Phipps and Mrs. Letcher Con- 
way McClenny for a Use Permit 
to operate a riding academy on 
certain property located on the 
West side of Kempsville-Great 

Road. Containing 15 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



Church, located near Davis 
Comer on the North side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard on 
Loti IS, 14, and 15, plat of Mil- 
burn Manor. Bayside District. 
A Copy— Tosto: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Juanita S. Grimstead, 
D.C. 8-2-2t 



• Business Opportunities 



At waterfront at Virginia Beach, 
Hotel furnished, Restaurant 
soda fountain, corporation, 
ABC license. For sale, owner 
ill. For appointment call: 
MA 2-1988 from 9 a.m. to 
12 a.m. or 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

8-9-6t 



HELP WANTED 
Female 



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name and address for PER- 
SONAL INTERVIEW to 
RURAL MANAGER, P. O. 
Box Number 5071, Richmond, 

7-2*3t 



Virginia Beach $un-News, Thursday, August 9, rf 62 



Page 7-B 



CLASSIFIED 




• COn AGES FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — Small furnished 
cottage. Service couple. Near 
Oceana Base. $55 month. Call 
340-8329. 8-2-tfn 



f MALE HELP WANTED 

RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

Position open, must have car, 
be over 21. Call 428-5255. 

8-9-lt 



• BABY SITTERS 



High school senior wants baby- 
sitting day or night. Experi- 
enced. Barbara Fulton, GA8- 
3716. 8-9-lt 



• HOUSEHOLD GOODS 



Antique Eastern Shore Empire 
sideboard. Dial JU 3-1874, 
Norfolk. 7-26-St 



Ironrite ironer, excellent condi- 
tfon; $75. GA 8-2201. 8-2-2t 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

I nave found that you are still 
looking. Call 428-5257. 8-9-lt 



• FEMALE HELP WANTED 



RELIABLE MAN OR WOMAN. 
To take over Watkins Route 
in city of Virginia Beach. 
Good for $75 and up weekly. 
t N© investment. Set your own 
hours. Permanent opportu- 
nity. Full or part time. Write 
Watkins Products, Jnc, D-64, 
Winona, Minn. 8-9-2t 



RISERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

We may have the answer for 
you. Call 428-5255. 8-9-lt 



FURNISHED APTS. 

FOR RENT 



TEACHERS 

1 and 2-bedroom apartments, 
September through June, $75- 
$85 month. Call Four Gables, 
428-5127. 8-9-tfn 



1 -bedroom furnished apartment 
living room, bath, kitchenette 
and large walk -in closet. 
Monthly annual rental, $50 
per month. Call GA 84960. 

8-2-2t 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

We are hiring today. Call 
428-5257.' fl^-lt 



acres, more or less; beginning 

at a point 690 feet South of 0ne and two bedroom furnished 

Indian River Road and'extendf- apartments. GA 8-9663 or MA 



Clubs, organizations and individ- 
uals sell America's finest as- 
sortment of Christmas and AH 
Occasion card*,, gifts, candy, 
novelties, personalized cards. 
Easy money, $50 to $100 or 
more selling 21 for $1. Profits 
up to 60c per box. Dial EX 7- 
7251, write or apply for 
samples on approval. Shirley 
Greeting Cards, 206 County 
street, Dept VB, Portsmouth, 
Virginia. 8-9-lt 



Drug and fountain help, per- 
manent work, apply in person. 
Barr's Pharmacy, 17th and 
Atlantic Avenue. 8-9-tfn 



TELEPHONE CONTACT 
LADIES. We now have open- 
ings for two ladies, ages 21 
65 to do telephone contact 
work from our local office at 
303-30th Street. Must have 
pleasing voice, willingness to 
work, four hours per day and 
a guaranteed hourly wage. 
Hours can be arranged to suit 
your free time. Five-day week. 
CaU 428-5255 from 9 a.m. to 
12. Ask for Mr. Hornstone. 

8-9-lt 



NURSES — Graduate, practical 
and nurses aids. Apply Super- 
intendent Va. Beach Hospital, 
25th and Arctic Ave. 8-17-tfn 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
tho Clerk's Office of the 4 Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Arino, on the 11th 
day of July, 1962. 
ALTON W. MEEKINS, Plaintiff 

against 
THELMA W. MEEKINS, 

Defendant 
ORDER OP PUBLICATION 
The, object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 



ing in depth to the Farrell 
Farm. Kempsville District. 

VI. Application of P, P. Owen 
for a Use Permit to maintain a 
sign on certain property located 
on the South side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, 870 feet East 
of London Bridge Creek on 
property owned by E. B. Lind- 
sley Jr. Lynnhaven District. 

VH. Application of Donnelly 
Advertising Corp. of Virginia 
for a Use Permit to maintain a 
sign on certain ,. property lo- 
cated on the North. side of Vir- 
ginia Beach Boulevard, 50 feet 
East of Oconee Park Road, own- 
ed by E. C. Kellam, M.'AVlrlggs 
and Mrs. B. F. Djjfitt. fcySBbay- 
en District. 

VIJI. Application of J. U. Ad- 
denbrook's Sons Inc. for a Use 
Permit to maintain a sign on 
the Northeast comer of Route 
647 and Route 58, on prdperty 
owned by Elias Codd. Bayside 
District. 

DC. Application of Shoreline 
Corporation by Lee A. Gifford 
for the following changes of 



2-1286. 



7-26-tfn 



FOLLY RANCH, 1400-17th St., 
clean, modern rooms, effici- 
encies, 1 & 2 bedroom apart- 
ments. Reasonable weekly, 
monthly, or annual rates. 

11-9-tfn 



• APARTMENT FOR RENT 



3-room, 2nd floor apartment 
private entrance, all utilities, 
yearly rental. 3400 Arctic 
Avenue. 8-9-lt 



One^bedroom apartment, 416- 
22nd 1 Street yearly. CaU GA 
8-2724. 8-9-lt 



Modern 3-bedroom unfurnished 
apartment near school, l\k 
blocks from Ocean, yearly 
reptal, available August 10. 
Phone GA 8-2576. 8-9-tfn 



anf upon the grounds of con . 

duct tantamount to wilful deser- *?****& in the proposed subdi- 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSION- 
ER OP ACCOUNTS, CIRCUIT 
COURT, COUNTY OF PRIN- 
CESS ANNE, VIRGINIA. 

August 7, 1962. 
To the Creditors of 
Devillo.O. Todd, Deceased: 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64-161, Code of 
Virginia, that the undersigned 
Commissioner of Accounts, hav- 
ing for settlement the account 
of the National Bank of Com- 
the^Estate of DeVillo O. Todd, 
Deceased, and having been re- 
quested by the said Executor so 
to do, has appointed the 4th 
day of September, 1962. at 
three o'clock p.m., at 210-25th 
Street Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
as the time and place of receiv- 
ing proof of debts or. demands 
against the said decedent or his 
estate. 

A. R. WALTON. 
Asst. Commissioner of Acounts 



NOTICE 

An Application for a moving 
permit will be heard ; by City 
Council, Monday, August 20, 
1962. 

Description of building: 1 
story frame. 

Location from: 124 feet xl50 
feet in square No. 13. 

Subdivision map 2, City of 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

Location to: lots No. 12, 13 14, 
and 15, Block No. 117. 
W. Clyde Simpson Jr. 
Box 247, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-9-2t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
tho Clork's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of tho County of 
PrinceM Anno, oh the 26th 
day of July, 1962. 
Joseph E. BlackwelL Plaintiff 

against 
Dorothy Joan BlackwelL 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo Ma- 



IrimeM from the said defend- 
ant, apw^ne grounWof three 



8-9-2tl year separation under Section 



tion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made* and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: P. O. Box 
981, Edgartown, Bassachusetts. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit 

A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p<i. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va- 7-19-4t 



VIRGINIA: Tho rogular mooting 
of the Board of Supervisors of 
Princess Anne County will bo 
hold in tho Circuit Court Room, 
on Monday, August 13, 1962, 
at two o'clock P.M, at whjeh 
timo persons will bo hoard for 
and against tho following pro- 
posed changes in toning, use 
permits, etc.: 

I. Application of Clyde T. 
Landry for a change of zoning 
from Residence Suburban" Di> 
trict 1 (R-S 1) to Agricultural 
District (A-R) of certain prop- 
erty located on the Southwest 
side of R&b'K 6§gfteMg it 
a point Vt mile West of Route 
615. Fronting 1102.86 feet on 



vision of Lake Smith Terrace: 

(1) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban District 3 
(R-S 3) to General Commercial 
District 2 (C-G 2) of Parcel A, 
located at the Southwest inter- 
section of Bayside Road and 
Paul Revere Road, fronting 822 
feet on Bayside Road and 133.53 
feet on Paul Revere Road; and 
Parcel C, located at the North- 
east intersection of Bayside 
Road and Twain Lane, fronting 
125 feet on Bayside Road and 
252.8 feet on Twain Lane. 

(2) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban pistrict 3 
(R-S 8) to Limited Commercial 
District % (C-L 2) of Parcel B 
located at the Southeast inter- 
section of Paul Revere Road and 
Miles Standish Road, fronting 
183.7 feet on Paul Revere Road 
and 77p feet on Miles Standish 
Road. 

(3) Change of zoning from 
Residence Suburban Pistrict 3 
(R-S 3) to MuKdple-FamUy Resi- 
dence District (R-M) of Parcel 
D, located at the Northwest in- 
tersection of Bayside Road and 
Twain Lane, fronting 123 ftiet 
on Bayside Road and 242.70 feet 
on Twain Lane Bayside District 

X. Application of Fair jjead- 
ows Private School by Mrs. Vir- 

e» lap* n i m tWM 

to operate a private school in 
Lekiet, Memorial Methodist 



2-bedroom unfurnished apart- 
ment year round rental, can 
be seen Wednesday, Saturday, 
and Sunday after 1, other 
d§ys after 5 p.m. 1416 Cypress 
Avenue, Virginia Beach, Va. 

8-2-St 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

If you are the right man, I have 
a good proposition for you. 
Phone 428-5256. 8-9-lt 



SITUATION WANTED 



LADIES, DONT BELIEVE IT! 
The woman's place is not in 
the home unless family cir- 
cumstances demand it. Why 
waste your life if you are not 
accomplishing anything? Mrs. 
Moore and Mrs. Smith are 
among many successful wom- 
en in our sales organization. 
We will thoroughly train you 
in our methods if you want 
real security in being self- 
sufficient. Call Mr. Horn- 
stone, 428-5256. 8-9-lt 



Real bargains in newly uphol- 
stered furniture. Chairs, sofas, 
loveseats and antiques. Hill- 
top Upholstering Company, 
17th Street Extended, Vir- 
ginia Beach, phone 428-1797. 

8-9-tfn 

Castro convertible chair, otto- 
man, both convert to single 
beds, like new, $150. Stauffer 
reducing machine, $50. GA8- 
6571 after 5 p.m. 8-9-lt 



3-room traitor for rent located 
in Davisville Trailer Paak, 
Call GA 8-2562. 8-Mt 

SCHOOL TEACHERS 

Houses and apartments for the 
winter season. Available La- 
bor Day. Call The Brown 
Agency, office, 428-3244; 
home, GA 8-5693. 8-2-5t 



Furnished and uniurnishedr 
homes and apartments. One; 
to four bedrooms. Winter or 
yearly. Anchor Realty. CW* 
GA 8-7421. 9*tfR 



Reed bottom chairs, dining 
room chairs, chests, desk, 
washstand and other house- 
hold items. Call GA 8-5193. 

8-9-tfn 



• MISC. FOR SALE 



Approximately 1200 foot, 16mm 
ocean pictures, photographed 
Virginia Beach area about 
1932. Includes scene at 17th 
St. and Atlantic Avenue, Old 
Baptist Tabernacle, fish boat 
landing at Rudee Inlet fish- 
ing in Abermarle Sound. A 
number of adult and children 
Beach residents included in 
pictures. Some scenes made of 
sea voyage including stop in 
Havana. By unidentifyable 
couple. For sale as a unit will 
not cut. May be viewed by in- 
terested party. Write Box "M" 

' c/o Virginia Beach Sun-News, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-2t 



Boys and girls bicycle, good 
condition, new tires, $15 each. 
Phone GA 8-6713. 8-9-tfn 



German Shepherd AKC puppies, 
superior breeding, show dog 
stock, have shots. Kimball up- 
right piano, good condition. 
Child's school desk. Call GA 
8-8182. ■ ^-9-lt 



ANTIQUE mahogany card table, 
only $10. Call GA 8-1941. 

8-9-lt 



• HOUSE FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — - Bungalow, Vir- 
ginia Beach Blvd. at Lynn- 
haven; 2 bedrooms, furnished, 
automatic laundry. Call 341- 
3974 or 340-8300. 8-2-tfn 



Pedigree Bird Dog Pointer and 
German Shepherd puppies, 
$10 and $15. . 1108 Laskin 
Road. Mrs. H. G. Brooks. 

8-9-21 



TVE GOT IT. You can have it,^ 
tc<v because I love to train'; 
men to make big money. 
Think big-% you? Let's beg 

Coo, T U An , * 



? 



big together. See L. Horn- 
stone, 303-30th Street. 8-9-lt 

f HOUSE FOR SALE 



Great Neck Estates. 4-bedroom 
ranch, 2Vt baths, den, %< 
acre wooded tot 160 feet; 
frontage on fresh water lake- 
air-conditioned, one year okM 
by owner. 428-8781. t>8-l!g 



By owner, 3-bedroom house, atl 
tached garage, 5704 Meer Rd,| 
North Virginia Beach, 
by appointment. Phone 
3671 or 428-1211. 5-2 

RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

I think I have the deal you have, 
been looking for. Call 4284 
5255. 8-9-11 




• WANTED TO BUY 



Ocean side or ocean front 
between 80th Street and 
Street Give details in 
only to: Mrs. Ada G. Mi 
No. 7 Bridgeway Road.'Ric 
mond, Virginia. 8-9-11 





Overhead garage door. Call 341- 
3105. 8-9-lt 



If you can talk, you can make 
money with us. Call 428-5257. 

8-9-lt 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

If not satisfied with present po- 
sition, call 428-5257. 8-9-lt 



• BUSINESS SERVICES 



Crane, bulldozer and truck rent- 
al service. Top soil, sand and 
clay fill. Douglas S. Mason 
Crane Service Company, Box 
63, London Bridge, Virginia. 
Phone 340-8558. 7-5-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

It will only cost you a dime to 
find out if this is it. Call 
428-5255. 8-9-lt 



High school girl wants part or 
full-time baby sitting, 50c per 
hour. Thoroughly experi- 
enced. References. Call GA8- 
8050. 8-2-2t 



PRESCRIPTIONS WANTED: to 
fill. Free delivery. Call Barr's 
Rexall Pharmacy. GA 8-1211. 

6-15-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

Make me show you how you can 
make more money. Phone 428- 
5255. 

~~STOK FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — Office-trr store 
space on ocean side of Atlan- 
tic Avenue. Rent very reason- 
able. P.O. Box 827, Virginia 
Beach. 6-7-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

I hear you are still looking for 
"A rtght preposition. Call 

20-5256. 8-9-lt 



• FOR SALE Oft RENT 

i ii i fi l l i I ..:---'-'■ i r - - - ! ■ "- ' 

TV rentajs aj Hirtz TV, London 
Bridge, open 9-9. Phone 340- 
•888. Also reconditioned TVs 
for sale. Rentals to purchase 

7-20tfn 



Are you 
5256. 



ookmg? 



mm. 



8-9-lt 



BUSINESS SERVICE— Business 
services. Hoover Vacuum 
Cleaner. Sales and Service. 
Prompt efficient repairs. Pick 
up and delivery. Phone GA8- 
4222. Fuel, Feed It Building 
Supplies, Inc., GA 8-1968. 

4-17-tfn 



Draperies, custom made, lined 
or unlined, conventional or 
draw. Measuring and hanging 
no extra charge. Call GA8- 
2976. 7-19-4t 



POSTED SIGNS 

FQB S4kE 
20c Each 

rW 

$2.00 doz. 

THE SUN-NEWS 

« 

3108 Pacific Ave. 



Beautiful Gladioli in assorted 
colors, $1 per dosen. Other 
flowers and fruits in season. 
Wholesale and retail. J. G. 
Cromwell Flowers, 100 Or- 
chard and Granby Street, 
phone MA 7-7019, Norfolk. 

7-2*3t 



Like new, Mahogany buffet, 
will sacrifice. Call or write 
Va. Beach Sua-News, P. O. 
Box 657, GA 8-2401. 11-30-tfn 



Sale on new appliances, TV and 
Stereo at Hirtz Bazaar, Oce- 
ana. Open 9-9. Also used fur- 
niture, appliances and parts. 
We buy-sell-swap anything at 
Hirtz Bazaar. GA 8-7088. 

7-20-tfn 



Repairs 

Commercial 



Household 
Refrigeration 



Pcelara for 



Commercial FRIGIDAlBa 



W. C. 




AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 




r:i 



Ford, Tfiund«tilrcJs, 
Itatian Fiats 

U-Vm St-GA M232— Va. 
Va. BO 44S41 



OPTICIANS 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

A telephone call could stop your 
search. CaU 428-5255. 8i9-lt 



• INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 



HARDIN SCHOOL 
Of Musk 



Hardin, Director 

313 - 35th Street 
Virginia Beach 



WMmm 



' ; 



WILLIAM KILLGROVE 
Instructor) lp 

Piano, Organ, Accordian 

JU 7-0460 - GA 8-3|p 

jy—— 'i 



=*= 



ESTATE 
EXAM SCHOOL 

STATE LTdSa 
PREPARATORY OKJR8E 
ROfJL NOW TAUOH1 
JATE A 

COMPLETE COURSE 
NoHMf.Nri 
REAL ESTATE 




**9 




Ask Your Eye Physician About 

TRAYLOR'S 

Virginia Beach's Only 
GUILD OPTICIAN 

1803 Atlantic At 

a 




RESTAURANTS 



Charlie's Seafood Restaurant 

5TEAKS - CHICKEN 
ALASKA KING CRAB 
[Room tar 



Pi i* ate Diniaa 

810 Atlantic Ave., 
Near Lynnhaven Inlet 




ALDRIOGE & CHAMBERS, Inc. 
Exterminators 
Phone 



PL 



& HEATING 



PUJMaM^G CORP. 



Plumbing and Heating 
Repair service and syppffes 

warm sir fhjet heettof 
Chrysler Ail Condittenfng 

■COOET TEBMS AA 

416.17th St, - 0A§43 
Virginia fteetit 









t 



¥ 





e in millions of 



- 



■:> 



YOUR SPEU CA$H _ 
FREE GOLD BOND STAM 



.▼.Of 



";. 



A- 



4/oe^ 






rfifF STftAffiS 7 



*ra. Mary Raoatr Gard 
111 WilUw DrT^ 
N*»».rt N.wa, va. 

, L.W. Padia 
M»* Caadamad Dr. 

Nrwport Xtwm, Va. 



Mr«. Ciwrc* Carter 
«»S Hirer Raad 
Kichm„»d. Va. 

Mr*. S. S. Hiptkind 

7712 Haapshir. lid. 

Kich-.nd. Va. 

A. P. Bath* 
^Carral H.ttl 
V-, 



Mm. John W. Bait 

UN S. Hollr Art. 

Highland S.rjnn, Va. 

Mra. 8m BtlU Parkttt 
3»lf Draok Rd. 
Rirhmond. Va. 

Fdw.rd L. Claka 

3»U mate Laaa 

Kirhaoad. Va. 

("ar.lya Cra»a 

4M Oak Av». 

Wajttaabara, Va. 

Mrs. Cktryl Bat by 

1MJ Randolph St. 
WilUaanaar* Va. 

Mr. Caarba E. Jaaaj 

R- R. 3, Bax 4:>t 
WiUUMikarir. Va. 

Mra. Aubrey Pattmaa 
liar Cilm At.. 
«. Va. 



Mr. J. H. Tnompton 
Kllrrwn, Va. 

Mr*. W. R. Sktkoa 
1U1 Laiaar Aw. 
a*tt«naarg, Va. 

Mr*. Mildred Hau*fl 

11M W. Oma View Ave, 

.Narfalk. Va. 

Mra. It. V. Joynei 

I«: Cray den Rd. 

Marfatk, Va. 



Mrs. Glaria M. Hirtmin 

UN W. Ueeaa View Ave. 

N.rf.lk, Va. 



Mn, Haward Davi. 

itU NorrelU Are. 

K.rf.Lk, Va. 

Mrs. Barbara Meaaley 
„ 2} KBi*y Rd. 
Mtwfaat N.wa, Va. 



Mra. d M. Fin* 
sis Uatei A**. 

Norfolk. Va. , 



Uaa I.evina 

1 Sarrey SI. 

I'oruniouia. Va. 

KUie Harrb 

IBM « hapel 81. 

N.rf.lk, Vs. 



Steak** V. Saaka 
ISW Bounds Ave. 
1'orUrauuth. Va. 



Mra. Maa Reaaaaa 

4*01 Kenova St. 
.Narfatt, Va. 



Mra. VT. K. GHrk.ll 
iSS W. lath St. 

Norfulk, Va. 



Williaai P. Iwif t 

41U» Wilaaa Dr. 

Narfatt. Va. 



Mra. Umt* \\>»t 
2139 Tarlelon Dr. 
< harloitnuille, Va. 



Ida OXraaaki 

Water View Rd. 

Y.rat.wn, Va. 



RliufcaUl Edward, 
bktattater. Va. 



Wianla White 
Raate 2. Bax 21* 
Williaaiahtut. Va. 



Mr. Lath.r Dart* 

Ml. S 
Wararabora, Va. 

Mra. 1. B. Vkk 
Kt. fc Box Ml 
Patenter* Va. 

Dorotky /. Martin 

i\ M.naaaent Ard. 

Patenter* x*. 



Cal.aial Rtiamt fta Kflhl to Hara ■ Q.alin.a* 
Carat. Wiiritelaa to Aaata Only. Caatari anai Sal, Avfl. 4 



"V 




C*6»i*AQi 



ApAii||n 



* The Spell CASH 
Game ended last week 
but your Spell CASH ^ 
cards are still valuable. 
This week you can get Up to 
100 FREE GOLD BOND Stamps 
simply by redeeming 
your Spell CASH Cards at 
any Colonial check-out counter. 
Each card is worth 
10 Gold Bond Stamps. 
Limit 10 cards per 
family, please. 






**♦ (ted 



a.. "•• ■»»•> ""•»«. I.. 



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*'(* 



AJATURJINOCR armour star 



MB 




■•irstcot 

SlIGHTl* MICH en 



jjftTUK- TENftCR AfajQUR STAR 




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* SANiORN 



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It 



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DRY BLEACH 

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SAVE ON LIQUID 

TREND 

IH. WT 



1c SALE — lur 3 CAKES OIT 4H, CAKI FOR 1c 

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FLitCY WHITE 

BLEACH 
£21' 




Ik, 



VEAL SH0U1DER MS! 

VEAL CUTLHS . . . . u, 99* VEAL LOIN CHOPS . . . u, 89« 
VEAL RIB CHOPS . . . u, 69« VEAL SHOULDER CHOPS * 59* 
BREAST O r VEAL ...... -u> 23* 



MLlii,f^MM 



Mcts Effatiiva Thun., FH., Sal., A«g. ♦, 10, II 
Quantily lighli Ratarvad 



PUSH CHESAPEAKE BAT 

DRESSED BUnERFiSH \ . ... lb. 29c 

IN THE SHELL— ASSORTED SIZES 

FKSHCLAMS . «| z . 4 9e 

FRESH CRABMEAT 
Clow lb. 89c Rag. lb. 99c 




25 EXTRA FREE STAMPS 

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CHEF'S PRIDE SALADS 

NO COUPON HOUIKP 



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CAROLINA MAID CANNED BISCUITS . 

MILD CHEDDAR CHEESE 

SANDWICH BREAD 

OUR PRIDE WHEAT BREAD 

STAR-KIST TUNA FISH 



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„ KINO SIZE THRIFTY 
10 Extra Stomp* with Each Leaf 9 



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OFF . 



1 Can Fr.#— Marl 3 
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SARA LEE ALL BUTTER 
FRESH 

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49* 
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vetUMi 14 
HOME GARDEN GUIDE 

GOOD IN COLONIAL STORE 
GIVING GOLD RONO STAMPS 

VaU aftar Aug. It, 




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Attend the Antique Show this Week 



AUG16I962 





VIRGIRU STATF LIBRARY 
RICHMOND. WA. 




NIA BEACH SUN -NEWS 



"HOME OF AMERICA'S FIRST MAN IN SPACE" 



2 SECTIONS 
16 PAGES 



V©L. XXXVII. No. 33 



m 



On Way Here 

Norwe 



TfeLEPHONE GA 8-2401 VfcGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 16 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADS PAY 



& 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
"Norwegian Lady," the 9-foot 
statue donated to the City of 
Virginia Beach by the citizens 
of Moss, Norway, is on her way. 

She was hosted aboard the 
Royal Norwegian Navy Ship 
Haakon VII July 31 at the town 
of Horten, Norway, just south 
of Oslo. 

The ship is a training vessel 
for cadets fr6m the Naval 
Academy and men from the 
Petty Officer's Training (School. 
The captain is Kommandor, Kap- 
tein Knut E. Larsen. 
Due Sept. 4 

The training cruise will first 
take the ship to the Shetland 
Islands and later to Bermuda 
and -is due to arrive in Norfolk 
about .Sept. 4 



ginia Beach at the unveiling of 
an identical statue there. 

Accompanying Hatchett on 
the trip will be a news corres- 
pondent from WTAR-TV, AM- 
FM, according to Robert Lambe, 
WTAR President. He Ifcll give 
full coverage to the Norwegian 
unveiling ceremonies and other 
activities being planned for 
Hatchett by the City of Moss, 
Norwegian Broadcasting and the 
Norwegian Travel Association. 



Antique Show 
Opening Today 

VIRGINIA BEACH —The 
Colonial look of the Fourth An- 



Brief welcoming ceremonies I nual Anti( l ue S Show and Sale 

11 1_ _ 1 I J J f __ -^ AM. m a IXrill \\f\ K *» rt Yt n *"t kwlAfli. 4 n J n . , 



will be held during the unload- 
ing of the statue when the 



will be broken briefly today 
with- a bit of the "Old West" 



Haakon VH berths in Norfolk. ! wheh the Frontier City stage 
Unveiling ceren^nie. are c^oach will escort Judge < Davis 

scheduled Sept. 22 at the l? eed &nd Y ir g |n »a Beach Mayor 

25th Street and Ocean Front 

park toon to be prepared as 

the lite for the statue. 
City Manager W. Russell 
Hatchett will leave New York 
Sept. 18 via Scandinavian Air- 
lines for Moss to represent "Vir- 




I Against 
Park Plan for 
County Areas 

PRINCESS ANNE— A resolu- 
tion to acquire any Princess 
Anne County shoreline by the 
National Park Service was 
vetoed by the* Boajd of Super- 
visors Monday. 

The resolution was passed 
unanimously by the five present 
supervisors. Pungo supervisor 
Kenneth Whitehurst offered the 
resolution and Lynnhaven super- 
visor James Darden seconded it. 

The resolution states: "Where- 
as proposal ha* been made that 
the National Parks Service ac- 
quire additional seashore areas 
on the Atlantic coastline from 
Sand&ridge south 1 to the North 
Carolina line for the purpose of 
constructing a National Park 
and, whereas, it is the desire of 
the Princess Anne Board of 
Supervisors to reserve this area 
for private development now, 
therefore, be it resolved by the 
Board of Supervisors of Prin- 
cess Anne County that the 
beach "area from Sand bridge 
south to the North Carolina 
line, be not acquired by the Na- 
tional Parks Service or any oth- 
er-national or state agency for 
public use, but the said area be 
left ooen for private develop- 
ment." 

No action was taken on a re- 
quest by Jack Meredith of 
Rudee Inlet to extend a swim- 
ming ban from an area iust 
south of the Williams Steel 
Fishing Pier to Rudee Inlet it- 
self. The swimming ban ordin- 
ance was passed on second read- 
ing and will go into effect in 
30 days. 

In other business, Mrs. Cal- 
vin Chapman told the super- 
visors that she opoosed the oo- 
eration of "Buster's Place" near 
her Chesapeake Beach home. 
Mrs. Chapman objected to the 
noise and asked that the estab- 
lishment be closed. 

The operatpr of the establish- 
ment located at Seaview and 
Ocean Avenues, Raymond Reutt, 
said he came to the area more 
than 10 years ago and spent 
more, than $2,000 constructing 
a road. 

Reutt said, "It's a shame you 
men allow a few people to gang 
up on 



Elks Meeting 
August 28th 

VIRGINIA BEACH— There 
wiH be a meetfhg of the new 
Virginia Beech Elks Ledge 
226| on Thursday night, Aug. 
28, In the Alan B. Sheperd 
Convention A Center, It . Bat 
beerk^nnoonced. 

The meeting will begin at 
8 pm. and cloee ne later than 
9.15 p.m., according to Rob* 
ert L. Simpson, exalted ruler. 
A fellowship hour will follow 
the meeting. 

Candidates unable to attend 
the charter night meeting will 
be initiated at the next meet- 
ing a« well as other appli- 
cants, who neve been ap- 
proved for membership. 

Applications may be ob- 
tained from members of the 
lodge or Roland Cuddy, sec- 
retary, at P.O. Box 241, Vir- 
ginia Beech, Va. 

Special Movie 
Scheduled for 
Deaf Children 

NORFOLK — The Cinerama 
production of "Search for Para- 
dise" will^'be shown Sunday at 
5:30 p.m.*at the Rosna Theatre 
Qn 628 West 35th Street for the 
benefit of the P're-school Class 
for Dea£ Children. This pro- 
gram is sponsored by the Tide- 
water Association for Hearing 
Impaired Children, 

The Pres chool Class, the only 
school of. iW ' BnTlji ' Virginia, 
began in September I960 with 9 
children and one teacher/ , 
Last year, five of the ten 
children enrolled were from 
Navy families. Enrojlmeat for 
Sept. 1962 at this time indicates 
4 out of 9 will be Navy chil- 
dren. 

The Tidewater Association for 
Hearing Impaired Children ap- 
pealed last, May to the state 
through the Governor's Advis- 
ory Council on the needs of 
t is^ sponsored^ by the Worn- [handicapped children to resolve 

the apparent conflict of law be- 
tween the Virginia Code and 
Virginia School Law which now 
prevent school funds from be- 
ing used to support classes for 
preschool handicapped children. 
All services except those of the 
teachers are presently by dona- 
tion and contribution. 

It is important for the chil- 
dren now enrolled, their par- 
ents, and for- the community, 
that this school remain open. 

The following ''Navy Wives* 
clubs are helping with ticket 
sales: 

Officers' Wives Clubs: 

5th Naval District (including 
Communications Station)— Mrs. 



"Ladf is U.S. Bound 



SINGLE COPY: 5c BY MAIL $3.50 PER YEAR. 



Frank A. Dusch to the show's 
noon opening at the Alan B. 
Shepard Convention Center. 

The coach will pick the t 
dignitaries up at 22nd Street 
and back to the Center whe 
Mayor Dusch will welcome 
guests and Judge Reed wflfof- 
ficially open the show. 

—Hostesses in Colonial cos- 
tumes will meet both *men at the 
door and will treat them to 
lunch at the show's Hospitality 
Corner, which offers ham buv 
cuits, sandwiches, homemade 
cake and old-fashioned freezer 
ice cream. 

The show, which will display 
assorted antiques from over 30 
dealers, will run through Sun- 
day. It will be open today thru 
Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. 
and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. 




Board Hears 
Zoning Pleas 

PRINCESS ANNE — Nine ap- 
plications for zoning changes 
and use permits including one 
for a borrow pit 1,300 feet 
north of the intersection of 
Bayshore Road and Aragona 
'Blvd. were heard at a public 
hearing by the Princess Anne 
County Planning Commission 
Monday night. 

Gordon Oliver, applicant of 
the borrow pit permit, told the 
commissioners, "I am not going 
into this thing in a haphazard 
manner. The borrow pit will be 
a planned, and landscaped 
lake." 

Oliver added, he felt that the 
plan would not endanger his 
own children. The lake wUl 
qome within 300 yards of his 
residence. 

An ordinance, drawn by Peter 
Holland II, requiring utility com- 
panies to mark the width, depth 
and course of right-of-ways they 
purchase on lots was also heard 
by the commission. 

The commission will study the 
applications and send them with 
their recommendations to the 
Board of Supervisors for the 
Sept. 10 meeting. 



Tax Changes 
For New City 
Are Proposed 



an's Club 
County. 



of Princess Anne 



Statue Hoisted as Sailors Cheer. 



Chamber Secretary Off 
To Canadian Travel Show 



VETERANS OFFICER 
CANCELS VISIT TQ BEACH 

The regularly scheduled serv- 
ice visit for Thursday, August 
23, 1962 by Tom Moore, veter- 
ans' service officer, is cancelled 
due to business reasons beyond 
his control and authorized by 
the Director. 

Moore regularly visits the 
Alan B. Shepard Convention 
Center on the second and fourth 
/Thursdays monthly. Any 
veteran needing services can 
contact him by telephone at 
MA 2-9671. 



(Continued on Page 4) 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Through 
special promotional arrange- 
ments, Virginia Beach will be 
featured again this year at The 
Toronto Globe and Mail's Vaca- 
tion Bureau, Aug. 27-31. 

Julia Nelms, secretary of the 
Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce, will personally ap- 
pear as a guest travel consultant 
Aug. 27 and 28th, during the 
bureau's Virginia Beach Week. 
Mrs. Nelms will dispense infor- 
mation and distribute the re- 
sort's promotional material in- 
cluding strip maps, folders, salt 
water taffy and souvenir sand 
bags. Color slides of the resort 
will be shown throughout the 
featured week , while the 
bureau's windows and interior 
will display photos and shell 
decorations. 

The Toronto Globe and Mail 
will publicize Virginia Beach 
Week with radio and news- 
paper announcements, accord- 
ing to Laura Lambe, publicist 
for the retort. Mrs. Lambe in- 
iatieted this annual promo- 
tion in 1959 to attract special 
attention to Virginia Beach 
during the Canadian Exposi- 
tion. \ 
To merchandise the occasion 



Officers of New Virginia Beach Elks Lodge 





i These are the officers of the new Virginia Beach Lodge 2288 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks that was instituted la st week at a charter night meeting of the new 
lodge. From left, B. M. Stanton, trustee; R. F. Trant, Jr., trustee; Ted Wool, esteemed lectur- 
ing knight; Sidney S. Kellam, trustee; C. R. Bryant, treasurer; Joseph Raibert, tiler; Robert 
L. Simpson, exalted ruler; Robert Lambe, tras tee; Roland Cuddy, secretary; Albin R. Mailhes 
chaplain; C. H. Nelms, esteemed leading knight^-B. D. Clayton, organist; Jack Haden, inner 
guard; and Lawrence Hamrick, esteemed loyal knight. (Boice Photo) 



further, Mrs. Lambe* said that 
many of the resort's accomma- 
dations will run advertisements 
in the Toronto Globe & Mail, 
August 25th, on a special Vir- 
ginia Beach page carrying the 
announcement of the featured 
week, a listing of all accommo- 
dations at Virginia Beach and a 
news story on fall attractions. 
Virginia Representative 

Mrs. Nelms will attend The 
Canadian National Exposition in 
Toronto August 17th through 
September 3rd as one of the 
representatives in The Virginia 
Travel Council Booth. She and 
other volunteers will man the 
booth on shifts during this an- 
nual show which attracts over 
two million people. Exhibitors 
represent travel interests from 
all over the world, but Virginia 
is one of only four of our states 
to be invited to participate in 
this mammoth annual Exposi- 
tion. 

The Canadian Exposition is 
the final and largest travel show 
on The Virginia Travel Council's 
schedule for 1962. The Cham- 
ber of Commerce has financed 
representation at three of the 
major shows this year: Mrs. 
Nelms attending the Cincinnati 
and Toronto shows; Mrs. Mabel 
Strohkorb attending the Pitts- 
burg show. 

Albin R. Mailhes, president of 
the Chamber, stated that this 
particular-function of the Cham- 
ber has been most effective in 
developing and furthering our 
travel markets. Particularly 
does our fall vacation business 
reflect tthe resort's participa- 
tion in the Canadian Exoosition, 

Mailhes went on to say that 
the Chamber has aoproved a 
two-dav side trip to Montreal so 
that Mrs. Nelms could contact 
travel agents and tour com- 
panies there to stimulate inter- 
Virginia Beach. 

>N TO MEET HERE SEPT. 
.GINIA BEACH— Approxi- 
y 2,000 members of the 
lean Legion and their 
guests are expected to attend 
the Forty-fourth annual conven- 
tion of the Virginia Department 
of the American Legion to be 
held here September 6-9. 

The host post will be Princess 
Anne Post 113. William P. Kel- 
lam and S. Pete "Scoppa of the 
local post are serving as general 
co-chairmen for the state meet- 
ing. 



Auto Accidents 
Fill Docket 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach Police investi- 
gated 12 automobile accidents 
this past week including two 
that injured three . .parsons. 

Aug. 9— Private drive, auto 
struck building, driving under 
influence, $300 damage. 

Aug. 9— 25th at Atlantic, auto 
struck city cleaner cart, $75. 

Aug. 9— 31st at Arctic Ave., 
improper change of lane, $500. 
'Aug. 9— 31st at Holly oad— 
Rfailure to yield right of way 
while making left turn, $800. 

Aug. 10— 28th at Pacific Ave. 
—improper backing, $50. 

Aug. 10 — 35th at Atlantic 
Ave.— improper backing. 

Aug. 10 — Atlantic Ave. at 
8th St., 12-year-old child ran in- 
to car, failure to use pedestrian 
walk. 

Aug. 10— Pacific Ave. at 20th 
Street, two persons injured, 
failure to yield right of way; 
$500 damage. 

Aug. 11 — Atlantic Ave. at 
22nd St., pedestrian struck, no 
injury. 

Aug. 11— Arctic at 24th St.— 
getting out of lane of traffic, 
$500. 

Aug. 12 — Pacific at 22nd, 
opening left door of car in traf- 
fic, $50. 

Aug. 12— 31st at Arctic Ave. 
—failure to yield right of way, 
$1,000. 



PRINCESS ANNE — W. Rus- 
sell Hatchett, acting city man- 
ager of the new city of Virginia 
Beach, gave suggestions for tax 
changes in a report to an execu- 
tive session Monday of the Mer- 
ger Committee, the present Va. 
Beach City Council, and the 
Princess Anne Board of Super- 
visors. . 

The following suggestions 
were approved tentatively until 



ABSALOM AGAIN 
HEADS DINES DRIVE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Richard 
R. Absalom will again head the 
annual March of Dimes drive 
for Virginia Beach and Princess 
Anne County, 
it has been an- 
nounced. 
• Absalom was 
named to the 
post by Mrs. 
Wallace T. 
Clark, chapter 
chairman for 
the Nation- 
al Foundation. 
"Mr. Absalom 
Absalom did an out- 
standing job last year for us and 
we are delighted that he has 
again accepted this responsibil- 
ity*' Mrs. Clark sfld. 

The annual drive is conducted 
in January each year. Absalom 
has announced that committee 
chairmen for the 1963 drive 
will be named at a later date. 




SCOUTS EARN SWIM 
BADGES AT CAMP 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Four 
Va. Beach Boy Scouts, members 
of Troop No. 61> earned swim- 
ming badges at Camp Pepisco 
in Surry County after swimming 
one mile in the James River. 

The boys are Star Scout BiJIy 
Wood, Tenderfoot Will Bagbey, 
First Class Scout Francis Bag- 
bey and Eagle Scout Paul 
deWitt. 

Fifteen scouts from the Tide- 
water area entered the compe- 
tition but only 10 qualified 
after swimming a distance of 
one-fourth mile. Eight boys 
actually finished the swinv The 
river current was so rough that 
the swimmers covered the first 
half mile in 15 minutes and the 
return trip took 50 minutes. 

The boys alternated strokes at 
specific times in order to win 
the badges. 



Bare Feet, Summer Togs 




Summer is here, which accounts for the bare feet, and 
winter is not far away, if the winter outfits these young models 
are wearing are any indication. They are (left to right) Barbara 
Wineberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wineberg of Wash- 
ington, D.C., and Edith, Luanne and Holly Camp, daughters of 
Mr. and Mrs, William M. Camp Jr. of Franklin and Va. 



formal action can take place 
after the two political subdivi- 
sion actually merge Jan. 1, 1968. 

• A ten per cent tax on 
electrical and telephone bills for 
present Princess Anne County 
residents. Virginia Beach al- 
ready has such a tax. 

• Disposal of the present 
personal property taxes en 
household goods and 
effects in both present 
visions. 

• All real estate taxes in the 
new city to be paid on a semi- 
annual basis, in Jane and De- 
cember. Virginia Beach now cot 
lects its real estate on a quar- 
terly basis, and Princess Anne 
on an annual basis. 

• No increase in real estate 
taxes recommended for 1963. 

Hatchett estimated the per- 
sonal property tax to total 
about $150,000 yearly in Prin- 
cess Anne County and about 
$53,000 in Virginia Beach. 

In another estimation, Hatch- 
ett said the present Virginia 
Beach utility tax returns $00,- 
000 yearly, and It-extended to 
Princess Anne, should, bring in 
an additional $400,000. 

The present business license, 
Hatchett said, bring in about 
$140,000 yearly in Va. Beach. A 
similar tax in Princess Anne 
should, return ea estimated 
$300,000. 

Hatchett also recommended a 
$5 per y«*r automobile license 
tax how in effect in Princess 
Anne be applied to the new city. 
Virginia Beach presently has a 
$6 tax. He recom mended that 
present Virginia Beach car own- 
ers be allowed to use their 1063 
tags until they expire in April, 
with a pro rata charge for the 
balance of the year. ': 

Hatchett was authorises" by 
the Merger Committee to bid en 
a 12-inch cast iron water pipe- 
line which the General Services 
Admistration in Washington 
will offer for sale this 
The line runs from the 
Bridge Pumping Station in H<m 
folk to the U. S. Naval Am- 
phibious Base, little Creek. 
Norfolk is not expected to bid 
on the line. 

Police Officers 
Meet Here 

VIRGINIA BEACH — A «t» 
training session for police odp 
cers who graduated from tm 
National-FBI Academy in Wash- 
ington was held Tuesday *ad 
Wednesday at the Dunes Hotel. 

Over 100 graduates including 
four men from this area attend- 
ed the session. Attending grad- 
uates from this area were Vir- 
ginia Beach Police Ch#f 
Reeves Johnson, who wis chair- 
man of the program committee, 
Ivan D. Mapp, commissioner of 
revenue; Capt. R. K. Halstead 
of toe Virginia Beach Police De- 
partment and Sgt. George Bryan 
of the Princess Anne pohee de- 
partment i| 

Guest speakers of the Thus* 
day evening banquet will be 
Judge Robert S. Wahab of the 
Princess Anne Circuit Court, 
Jeptha S. Rodgers, consultant of 
field service division of the In- 
ternational Association of Chiefs 
of Police; Alfred WhltehursJ, 
Commonwealth Attorney of Nor- 
folk; Donald W. Shriver, exec*. 
tive chairman of Chamber if 
Commerce of Norfolk; SM 
Oman, of the division of . 
relations of Norfolk; Glen 
flett. of the National 
Death Bureau of Richmond 
Atlanta; Eari Brown, 
FBI agent in Richmond; 
D. Penis, special FBI 
Norfolk. 




Virginia teach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 16, 1962 
2-A 



Military Wedding 



Society Editoi 

Phorte OA 8-7993 

Miss McGinley 
Becomes Bride of 
Capt W, Dickens 

HEIDELBERG, Germany — 
Heidelberg Castle Chapel was 
the setting Saturday at 2 p.m 
for? the waging of Miss Marga- 
ret Wallis McGinley and Capt. 
Waverley Joyner Dickens, HI 
The , ceremony was performed 
by Chaplain Robert D. Crick. 

the bride is the daughter of 
Mr, and Mrs, James Michael 
McGinley of Dallas, Tex. Capt. 
Dickens is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs.* Ifoverly Joyner Dickens 
Jr. dt Virginia Beach, Va. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by Lt. Col. Louis S. Mehl, had 
her cousin, Mrs. Jerry R. Jacob 
of Port Washington, L.I., N.Y., 
as her matron of honor. Brides- 
maid was Miss Sara Carter of 
Jajckson, Miss. 

4 Lt. Nova Jones, Seattle, 
'Wish., served Capt Dickens as 
bejt man. The bridegroom's 
fellow officers and former Vir- 
ginia Military Institute class- 
mates were groomsmen and 
held the arch of sabres. 

A reception was held at 
Patrick Henry Officers Club. 
After a wedding trip to Switzer- 
land and Italy, the couple will 
live in Weinheim, Germany. 

GIRLS AUXILIARY 

BAYSDDE— The Girls Auxili- 
ary of the Bayside Baptist 
Church met Wednesday at 7:00 
p.m. at the chjurch. 

Special guest and. speaker for 
the meeting was Mrs. Julia Hub- 
bard, missionary to the Indians 
in Oklahoma. 

YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 

BAYSIDE— The Youth Fellow- 
ship of the Bayside Baptist 
Church will meet Sunday at 
7 p.m. at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. B. Miller on Country 
Club Circle in Thoroughgood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Bowlick Memphis, Tenn., are spending 
are the recerational leaders for several weeks at The Marshalls 
this group. I on 66th Street. 




-f. * * ,* * 



Miss Jerry Ann McClanan of 1319 Mediterranean Ave., Wame I 
Frankhn Harris of Watertown, Mass., Aug. 4 at the Virginia Beach Methodist Church with Dr 
p S? a " idd ?J r pe . rf ?™m8 the ceremony. Mrs. Harris is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russeli 
W tertdV Virginia Beach. Mr. Harris is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Harris of 



BIRTHS 

Lt. and Mrs. John Edward 
Hamilton of Virginia Beach an- 
nounce the birth of their first 
child, a daughter, Elisabeth 
Faye, on Aug. 3 at Va. Beach 
General Hospital Mrs. Hamilton 
is the former Miss Nancy Weav- 
er, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph E. Weaver of Durham, 
N.C. Lt. Hamilton is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamil- 
ton of Upper Darby, Pa. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Crump, 
their sons-in-law and daughters, 
Mr. and Mrs. Franke Pidgeon 
with their three children and 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven McLaugh- 
lin with their three sons, all of 
Memphis, 



U/l 



aaaemen 

PRUETT — GATTIS 
. CULPEPER, Va. — Mr. and 
Mrs. George Raymond Pruett of 
Culpeper and Washington, D.C., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Miss Jennifer 
Edith Pruett, to Lt. Franklin 
Benton Gatis, USAF. 

Lt. Gattis is the son of the 
late George H^wland Gattis of 
Durham, N.C.^and Mrs. Esther 
Gattis Brown of Virginia Beach. 
Miss Pruett is a junior at 
Radford College. 

Lt. Gatis is a June graduate 
of Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
He is attending school at Che- 
nute Air Fore Base. 

No date has been set for the 
wedding. 



td of Jfnh 



dt 



ere 



Treese, Jr., USN. 

Mr. Treese is the son of Mr.' 
and Mrs. Thomas'' Matthew 
Treese of Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Miss Twine is a graduate of 
Virginia Beach High School and 
is attending Old Dominion Col- 
lege. She is employed by Coates 
Motor Co., Inc. 

Mr. Treese is a graduate of 
the University of Pittsburg. He 
is affiliated with Sigma Chi 
fraternity. He is serving aboard 
the USS Enterprise. 

The wedding will take place 
Oct. 20 at David Adams Memor- 
ial Chapel, Naval Station, Nor- 
folk. • 



Judy Haffis Weds 

. * ■>* 

D. S, Stephenson 

LONDON BRIDGE -.Eastern 
Shore Chapel was Hhe setting 
for the military wedding of Miss 
TUdy Belle Harris and Lt. (jig.) 
Dante Shapiro Stephenson on 
Saturday it S p.m. The ceremony 
was performed by the Rev. B. 
| Sidney Sanders, rector of the 
church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Col. Jack Roger Harris, USA, 
and Mrs. Harris of Savannah, Ga 
The bridegroom is the son of 
Mrs. Eva Sigrid of Oak Park 
m., and the late George Her- 
man Shapiro. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, had her sister, 
Miss Jacquelyn Harris of Savan- 
nah, as her maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Misses Vir 
ginia Ann Coleman of Peters 
burg and Beverly Ann Kersey of 
Richmond. 

Clifford Timothy Boudreaux 
of Denver, Colo., served as best 
man. Groomsmen were James 
Goodman of Winnetka, Hi., and 
Terry Moshier of Omaha, Neb. 
Swordsmen were Lt. Thomas 
Browne, Lt. (j.g.) David Grave- 
son, Lt. (j.g.) Richard Kerr, Lt 
(jg.l Herbert Lewis, all of Vir- 
ginia Beach; Lt. (j.g.) John 
Neemesof Norfolk, and Lt. (j.g.) 
Paul Kauffman of Greensburg, 
Pa. 



Recipe 0aok Chairmen 




A reception was held at the 
Officers Club, U. S. Naval Am- 
phibious Base, Little Creek. 
After a wedding trip to Seattle's 
World's Fair and San Francisco, 
the couple will live at 211-64th 
St., Virginia Beach. 

PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. and Mrs*. John- Eure and 
their three sons of Suffolk are 
spending the month of August 
at the Holland pottage on 
Raleigh Drive. 



Mrs. Dyer (left) and Mrs. Honeycutt 

CHURCH COOK BOOK 
ON SALE HERE TODAY 



iA 



Mr. and Mrs. Lee Kitchin, who 
have been living in Charlottes- 
ville, are now making their 
home at 208-69th St. Mrs. Kitch- 
in is the former Miss Virginia* 
Lord MacKethan of Norfolk. 



ZJaflor iSurae&s J+airdtftinf Center 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

PERMANENT PROGRESS: Beauty chemists have given some of 
tnea- most m a gn i ficent efforts to maturing faaar . , . and now we 
can offer you permanent waves personalized for the demands that 
come with caJenaW-ctttnges. These professional waves gentry persuade 
your haftr, wan special, gentle chemicals. We aid me persuasion wHh 
x £ rt, ygg* J aM . in ^wrapping-no pull, no break. There's a magni- 
ficent difference m the results ... and months of pleasure ahead for 
you! Vis* us soon at our convenient tocatfon! 

R*|*y I FRTQ 

MR8 ' AND ^SP ! !L«.. 1 .J flLH0WA,U> MRS. WHITE 

MIL WILLIAMS MRS. TERRY 

ZJaflor /Juraedi J+airdtylinp Salons 

LAJJON ROAD, VIRGINIA BEACH , Phone GA 8-3191 
TWO NORFOLK LOCATIONS 
)r ? Wards Corner ggog Hampton Blvd. 

Ph. S25-055S 




MORGAN — BISSETT 
LYNNHAVEN— Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Wilson Russ announce 
the engagement of her daughter, 
Miss Pattie Sue Morgan, to John 
Edward Bissett. 

Mr. Bissett is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hubert J. Bissett. 
. A graduate of Princess Anne 
High School, Mr. Bissett is 
serving with the U.S. Air Force 
in Texas. 

No date has been set for the 
wedding. 



TWINE — TREESE 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy W. Twine announce 
the engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Virginia Florence 
Twine to Ens. Thomas Matthew 



•STEPHENSON— MILLS 

PORTSMOUTH— Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Allen Carter announce 
the engagement of her daughter 
Miss Helen Baird Stephenson, to 
Raymond Jefferson Mills, Jr. 

Mr. Mills is the son of Mr. & 
Mrs. Raymond J. Mills of Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

Miss Stephenson is a graduate 
of Madison College. She is a 
member of the faculty of Pem- 
broke Elementary School *4n 
Princess Anne County. 

Mr. Mills is employed by the 
Atlantic Fuel Oil Co. at Virginia 
Beach. 

The wedding will take place 
October 13. 



Mr. and Mrs. James G. Baker 
of Madisonville, Ky., are spend- 
ing several weeks at The Sea 
Horse Inn on 78th St. Mrs, 
Baker is the former Mies Ann 
Priest of Norfolk. 



F. Fletcher Garlock of 105 
Crystal Lake Drive, Virginia 
Beach is spending a Vacation at 
The Homestead located in the 
Virginia Alleghanies. 



+Jke flew 

RALEIGH TAVERN 

SIR WALTER HOTEL 



39TH AND OCEAN FRONT 



DINING 



STttfT ENTRANCE 



- 6H» hi 10:00 P.M. 



Wa 



% 





en Brochette 

mmmm_mmmmmmmmmmm 



Cubes of Beef Steak 

' trolled to your desire with 

mushroom caps 

green poppers and ©ruons. 

Saffron Rice 

Mixed Green Salad Beverage 

2.95 
FUtlT MJ0NON (4 oz.) 



STYRON-, NEWMAN 

LONDON BRIDGE— Mr. and 
Mrs. James L. Styron announce 
the engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Barbara Faye Styron 
to Norman Lee Newman. 

Mr. Newman is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George A. Newman. 

Miss Styron is a graduate of 
Princess Anne High School. She 
is employed by the Tides Motor 
Hotel and Lodge at Virginia 
Beach. 

Mr. Newman is a graduate of 
Princess Anne High School. 

The wedding will take place 
Oct. 7 at London Bridge Baptist 
Church. 



Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Jordan left 
Wednesday to spend a week at 
High Hampton Inn at Cashiers, 
N.C. In their absence, their 
home is being occupied by Mrs. 
Jordan's uncle and aunt, Mr. & 
Mrs. William Talbott of Staun- 
ton. 



Mrs. C. Stribling Snodgrass 
Jr., and her five children wilh 
leave next week for Nice, 
France. They will spend six 
months and be joined there by 
Comdr. Snodgrass. 



Mrs. Charles L. Sale of Wil- 
liamston, N.C, spent several 
days last week as the guest of 
Mrs. Ann Darden Hunter in Bay 
Colony. Mrs. Sale is a former 
resident of Virginia Beach. 



Miss Margaret Baillio, has ar- 
rived from Georgetown Univ. 
to spend several weeks visiting 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert H. Baillio on 53rd Street. 
Miss Baillio will resume her 
studies aft Georgetown in the 
fall. 



VIRGINIA BEACH -r An idea 
conceived across, the- bridge 
table by Carol Honeyeutt and 
Ola Dyer nearfy a year; ago will 
crystalize ., into reahty today 
when the Woman's Society of 
Christian Service of' Virginia 
Beach Methodist Church puts its 
180-page recipe book on sale. 

Since that (fateful bridge 
game, between the Vernon 
Honeycutts and Dick, Dyer, Carol 
and Ola have gone through 
months of. hard work, frustra- 
tions, headaches and tears but 
never once has, their enthusi- 
asm waned. Both agree the end 
result has been well worth the 
effort. -,'.,' r . 

Easier Chef Hats 

They actuary launched the 
book idea Easter Sunday when 
both donned their best dresses 
for church services hut wore 
chef hats and aprons in lieu of 
the usual accessories. This feat 
did the trick-^it created inter- 
ested in the recipe book. 

■tV- maintain this Interest, 
Carol and. Ola, who were natur- 
ally made co-chairmen of the 
project, Kept various recepticals 
in the church to collect recipes, 
using everything from gaily dec- 
orated boxes to soup pots.- 

As the recipes poured in, the 
committee selected, edited anA 
prepared them for publishing. 
ending up With nearly 400 out- 
standing contributions. 

Entitled "Prom Kitchens by 
the See," the neet black and 
white spiral-bound book fea- 
tures recipes solicited from 
Mrs. John F. Kennedy (gateau 
Sainf-Monoree), Mrs. Lyndon 
B. Johnson (Pedernales River 
chili), Mrs. AlbertU Harrison 
(squash souffle) and Mrs. Alan 
B. Shepard (banana bread). 
Local restaurants also con- 
sented to turn loose a few of 
their more popular dishes. 
These include how to prepare, 
cook and slice a Smithfield ham 
from the Princess Anne Country 
Club, old fashioned apple dump- 
lings from the Normandie Cafe- 
teria, cheese cake from the Cape 
Colony Club, breast of duckling 
a la Jacques from the Cavalier 
and stuffed filet 'of Virginia 
flounder from the Thnnderbird: 
The book, priced at $2.25, 



goes' on sale today at the, con- 
tributing eating places and the 
church. Members of the working 
committee were Mrs. 'James 
Kontopanos, Mrs. Worth Petty, 
Mrs. Fred A. Haycox, Jr., Mrs, 
Howard Winston, Mrs. Robert 

Coulthard end many others who 
gave their time to the book. 

Special mention should also 
be made of the delightful art 
work by Billie Jean Winston. 
Her sketch of the Cape Henry 
Lighthouse eet among speci- 
mens of the see decorates the 
front cover end nearly every 
page has one ef her sketches 
illustrating the various re- 
cipes. 

For a sample of what the 
book contains, here are a few of 
the recipes and their contribu- 
tors: 

Asparagus Salad Mold 

1 pkg. lemon (or lime) jello 
1 med. size can of asparagus 
tips - — 
Sharp cheese 
Stuffed olives , .-, 

Make jello as directed on box. 
Put in refrigerator until it starts 
to thicken a little. In a 10-inch 
cake pan, or 9-inch pie plate, 
place a layer of asparagus tips, 
a layer of grated cheese, a 
layer of stuffed olives. Continue 
layers in the same order if you 
wish. Then pour jello over all 
(gently). Put in refrigerator un- 
til congealed. Serve on . lettuce 
with a dab of mayonnaise. It 
has an unusual flavor, and will 
keep for several days. 

— Artie Lawson 



Student Honored 
ByDAR 

NORFOLK — Three prospec- 
tive college students were hon- 
ored by the Sarah Constant 
Chapter DAR at a dinner meet- 
ing Friday at the W. G, Swarte 
Tea Room. 

Miss Annice Bailey, a junior 
member of the Sarah Constant 
Chapter, will be a senior at 
Longwood College. A former 
student of Emory and Henry 
College, Mss Margaret Hope 
McCohnell w.Jl pursue her med- 
ical secretarial courses at Kees 
College. Miss Mary Carlton Cur- 
ling will be a freshmanUt Long- 
wood College. 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Wells, presi- 
dent, introduced the guests, in- 
cluding Rev. R. Allen Brown, 
and Mr. Allen R. Thompson 
from the S"»s of the American 
Revoluti- The principal topic 
for the . . en • % was the promot- 
ing Sarah Memorial Park at 
Ocean View. 

Mrs. Wells announced that 
the chapter will participate in 
the Naturalization Court to be 
held September 5. 

It was also announced that 
William J. Story Jr. will be the 
speaker at the Chapter's Con- 
stitution Week celebration, 
which will be a dinner meeting 
held at the Navy YMCA in Nor- 
folk Sept. ' 21. Story, former 
superintendent of schools for 
South Norfolk and former mem- 
ber of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, is now superintendent of 
Rock Hill Academy in Char- 
lottesville, Va. and is presently 
spending the summer at Sand- 
bridge. / 

Invitations will be extended to 
area DAR's and friends from 
other civic and patriotic groups. 

HOUSE GUESTS 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Barr and 
their son, Richard, of.Malverne, 
Long Island .will arrive this 
week to be the house guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Davenport 
at their home in Linkhorn Park. 

Mr. Barr is associated with the 
Moore-McCormack Lines, Inc., 
of New York City. 

While here they will visit 
Williamsburg, Jamestown and 
Ydrktown and also attend the 
I'Lost.Colony" .pageant at NagJs-i/i 
Head, N,C, * 



] 



3l> 



iff 



I 



II 

ii 



:l» 



6 servings, of course everyone 
will want 2 or more. 

—Claude G. Washington 



i 



Crab Burgers 

1 cup crabmeat 
v 1 cup finely cut celery 
1 teaspoon prepared mustard 
Va tsp. salt 
Dash pepper 
3 tbsp. mayonnaise 
.6 slices American cheese „ 
6 hamburger buns, sliced 



Mix all except cheese togeth- 
er and spread on bottom half 
of buns. Place cheese slices on 
top half. Broil both halves 3 
inches under broiler until 
cheese starts to bubble. Put to- 
gether and serve at once. Makes 




Chicken Oyster Gumbo 

1 hen 
% to % cup flour 

4 stalks celery # 

•2 to 3 med. size onions 

1 med. size sweet pepper 

4 tbsp. fat (bacon) 
Few springs parsley 

I clove garlic 

1 pint oysters 

Brown chicken in bacon 
grease until brown. Do not flour 
chicken. When you have 
browned chicken take up and 
put aside until you make a nice 
brown sauce wit* % or % cup 
flour. Fry parsley, celery, onion 
and garlic in sauce until tender, 
but not browned. Now put 
chicken in with sauce and>cover 
with boiling water. Add salt and 
pepper toj taste and let cook un- 
til chicken is tender, add 1 pint 
of oysters and let cook until 
they are done. Then, last, just 
before serving, add 1 tbsp. file'. , 
After file' is added, let gumbo 
come to a good boil. Serve im- 
mediately on rice. 

—Melba Clark 



Circa 
1720 



%m%m l >5E£r 



Tank Kmo Pbyw In RALilGH TAVERN 6:304:30 P.M. 



^B 



SHOPS FOR THE LADIES AND THEIR DAUGHTERS 



Informal modeling daily 11 a.m. till 4 
p m, showing a complete wardrobe for 
Back-to-School and College. 



OPEN MONDA* AND FRIDAY EVENINGS TIL • PJH. 



SJUHk^i 



Brydges & Broyles 

Attorneys at Law 

announce the removal of tbe4f office 

1 to 

The Professional Building 

19P0 Laskin Road 

Virginia* Beach, Virginia 

; Richard G. Brydges ifiomas C. Broyles 

Associates 
James R. McKenry p^ G Mur p hy 



August 20, 1962 



GArden 8-6021 



I* 



■•*> 



i 




^■■^■"^"^F^^ 



* Red Cross Life Saving 
Course Into Second Ph 



X 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
American Red Cross-sponsored 
life saving course at Princess 
Anne Country Club ended last 
week with 18 "graduates" and 
a second course is now under- 
way at the Olympia Health Club 
pool with 40 persons enrolled. 

The junior course is open to 
youngsters between the ages of 
12 and 15 and the senior group 
is for persons over 16. Several 
mothers have joined the courses. 



Navy Wives 
Bowling League 

OCEANA— The Oceana Offi- 
cer's Navy Wives' Bowling 
League will have a meeting and 
complimentary coffee Wednes- 
day at 10:30 a.m. at the Thun- 
derbird Lanes. All interested 
wives are invited to come. 

Fall bowling will begin Sept. 
10. 

For further information call 
Mrs. La Verne Hamft, president, 
at 340-8171 or Mrs. Marie Lind- 
sey, secretary at GA 8-7720. 

The United States Marine 
Band first appeared in public on 
March 2f, 17M, at an entertain- 
ment in Philadelphia's Tun 
Tavern, birthplace of the Ma- 
rine Cqrps. 



Meeting two nights a week, 
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., the 
course offers 17 hours for 
seniors and 15 hours for juniors 
in the 4-week period. It is given 
free of charge. 

Designed to cut down the' 
number of summer drownings 
experienced at seashore resorts, 
the Red Cross course teaches 
all phases of water safety and 
life saving. 

Most of the youngsters taTce 
the course so that they can ap- 
ply for life guard jobs during 
the summer months. But an in- 
quiry on "why did you decide to 
take the course" brought an 
assortment of replies. 

These included: "because my 
father, is gonna make me," ,f I 
live near a lake," "I am in and* 
around water and it will help 
us," "I know how to swim, but 
what is. swimming without any- 
thing to do with it!" 

"These life saving courses are 
essentitl to this area because of 
the vast bodies of water that 
surround us," Mrs. David 
Batchelder, Red Cross worker 
who has promoted the water 
safety program here, said. "We 
are so grateful to the Princess 
Anne Country Club and the 
Olympia Health Club for offer- 
ing us their pools for the 
classes." 

Further information on the 
courses may be obtained from 4 
the local American Red Cross 
headquarters on 19th Street. 



fireman's Hold demonstrated 




.Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Woody Venable shows 
Bill Mayo how to carry a drowning victim ashore when he is 
still conscious .but too exhausted to swim. (Phillips Photo) 



Zraiklon CSa 



rner 



1 




Mrs. Moore's Bakery 

NEXT TO BE-LO SUPER MARKET 
400 • 30th ST. VIRGINIA BEACH OA 8-5081 



ass 



SALES 



RENTALS 



REPAIRS 



TYPEWRITER SPECIALISTS 

> Now at 

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206 - 22nd STREET 




CELEBRATING OUR 1 1th ANNIVERSARY 
428-42*1 

• New and Used Machines for Sale 
# Pick up and Delivery Service 

• Adding Machines - Cash Registers 

Two other locations in 
NORFOLK and PORTSMOUTH 




By INGA BORG 
Fashion Consultant ' 
VIRGINIA BEACH — After 
perfectly beautiful days like 
this, it is refreshing to look at 
the frosted coolness of a crisp 
white costume in embossed cot- 
ton—a scoop necked dress with 
its skirt bubbling from a lower- 
ed waistline Which is touched at 
the waist's edge with an encir- 
cling silver Jcy-blue ribbon. A 
stunning picture-hat trimmed 
with the same lucious looking 
material completes the outfit. 
The one single-diamond earring 
demands with 
, this ensemble i 
majesty-like re 
spect. 

This remind, 
us that our fig 
ure has to be ir 
good shape. 1 
promised las* 
week to give 
you, in each of 
my reports, a 
useful tip on **** Bor * 
how to stay slim and trim and 
even give you different exer- 
cises so you can choose which 
are best for you. \ 

Limber up first. To 'awaken 
lazy muscle*, start exarcis* 
sassions this way: 1. stand 
with hands on top of chair; 
band forward from hips — 
back up until arms are straight 
out; 2. lower haad, draw hips 
back. Faal the pull through 
arms, spina, and backs of 
lags— Do this four times daily , 
to start with, than increase 
ana every day until you reach 
twelve times daily. I am sura 
that was easy for you. 
Now for dieters, how would 
you like to lose five pounds in 
one week without actually go- 
ing on a diet? No special menus. 
No special foods. No hunger 
pangs. 

If it sounds remarkable — 
credit a realistic New York doc- 
tor with this fine new system. 
He found that when he gave his 
patients diets, they were far 
more apt to lose the diets than 
the weight. The rigid menu ap- 
proach looked good on paper, 
but it just wasn't practical for 
people to follow. So, the doctor 
went at the- problem the other 
way around. It's what you don't 
eat that won't fatten you. So — 
let's eat what and when you 



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Direct line with all major markets 

Firk and only Investment office in Virginia Beach 



Anderson 8 StrupVick 



UNOBKWRITBRS - DI5TMBUTOR.J 




Thomas N. P. Johnson, Jr. 

-Manager 
Allan Rothenberg 

Registered Representative 



VIRGINIA BEACH 
31 lO PACIFIC AVENUE 

P. O. BOX aae 
TELEPHONE 



Willard R. Ashburn, Jr: 

Asst, Manager 

Frank L Lawlor 



want — except for a list of 22 
foods, without these it would be 
impossible to gain weight. Op- 
erating in reverse, you strike 
those foods from your menus, 
eat reasonable quantities of any- 
thing else — and you lose pound- 
age. The first step in following 
this negative approach to a 
possible weight loss is to clip 
the following list of prohibited 
foods, keep it with you at all 
times, in your wallet or purse 
and at mealtimes and make sure 
none of the items on the list 
find their way on to your plate. 
Forbidden Foods 

Bread, butter, candv, cereals, 
chocolate, crackers, cream, cus- 
tard, cake, gravy, ice cream, 
jellies, jams, noodles nuts, oil, 
pastry, potatoes, nudding, rice, 
soups (thick), spaghetti, sugar. 

This diet means that for 
breakfast vou have fruit, eees, 
bacon, coffee with milk. And it 
would certainly seem that you 
were "dieting" pretty hi eh off 
the hoe by eating the foods that 
are off the list. Be sure that 
your daily menus include fresh 
fruit, a choice of either meat, 
fish or egg, and three vege- 
tables. This free wheeling plan 
allows plenty of latitude to the 
lone dieter in a well-fed family. 
(The butter on the list. applies, 
only to table butter.) 

Since the hundreds of foods 
left to choose from are relative- 1 
Jy low in calories, you can fill 
up on them. And most satisfac- 
tory of all — you are allowed one 
highball a day. 

Next webk^ril give you more 
fashion tips at the resort area. 
After all, years ago, it was the 
fashion to be nicely "rounded" 
and I am sure at the time men 
had found that women were as 
attractive as they find them in 
today's fashion. "What hap- 
pened — I w6nder?" 

I just cannot resist telling you 
my own experience. Last De- 
cember I was in Germany visit- 
ing my 75-year-old Aunt whom 
I had not seep for 15 years. She 
looked at me very seriously and 
said, "Inga, is that what Ameri- 
can marriage has done to you?"' 
My sister who is "nicely round 
proportioned" replied, in the 
same serious manner, "No dear 
aunt that's American Fashion." 

The Marine Corps' major 
units include three divisions, 
three air wings and the nucleus 
of a fourth division — the 1st 
Marine Brigade currently sta- 
tioned in Hawaii. 



Personal Mention 



Dr. and Mrs. Slaughter Fitz- 
Hugh of Charlottesville are 
visiting Mrs. Fitz-Hugh's mother, 
Mrs. .George M. Meredith at her 
home on 53rd Street. 



Lt. Qomdr. and Mrs. Robert 
Thomson and their three sons, 
who have been living in New- 
port, R.I., have arrived at the 
beach to make their home and 
are residing on Brandon Rd., 
Bay. Colony. Mrs. Thomson is 
the former Miss Letitia Greene, 
daughter of Mrs. Winifred Nix- 
on Greene of Virginia Beach. 



Mr. and Mrs. Leigh S. Bissell 
and, their daughter, Torrie 
Leigh of Atlanta, Ga., are spend- 
ing two weeks visiting Mr. Bis- 
sell's mother, Mrs. L. M. Bissell 
at her home on Windsor Road. 



Bobby Thompson, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John H. Thompson III 
of Orlando, Fla., has returned 
to his home after spending three 
weeks with his grandmother, 
Mrs. R. L. Hudgins on 25th St. 
His cousin, Miss Pat Finley, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. D. 
Finley Jr., returned with him 
for a visit with her uncle and 
aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Thompson. 



OFFfCE HOURS: 
Weekdays -» 9 - 5 
Saturdays —9-12 

Richmond - CharlottesY'dle - Fredericksburg - Virginia Beach 




A vinyl floor to 

meet every tastt 

and budget 

FERRELL 

LINOLEUM & TILE CO. 

3M W. 21st St. — MA S-53S5 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



Mr. and Mrs. George R. Guy 
of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., spent 
last weekend at the Princess 
Anne Country Club. Mr. and 
Mrs. Guy are former residents 
of the beaclu^^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gilmor 
Jr. and two daughters, who have 
been living at 586 Bay Colony 
Drive, while Mr. Gilmore was 
serving as a Lieutenant in the 
Navy, have returned to their 
home in New York City. 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry I. Warren 
III and their three daughters re- 
turned Monday to their home in 
Ruxton, Md., after spending 
several weeks with Mrs. War- 
ren's mother, Mrs. L. H-. Wind- 
holz at 4510 Ocean Front. 




Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August T6, lfof 

Page 3A 



OCEANA 
EXTERMINATORS 

If you are distressed 

because of PESTS 

to relieve the strain 

CALL 

M. 0. PAYNE 



a 



♦ 



428-1281 

Free Estimates 



BOX 381 



OCEANA, VA. 



— ^ 



Call Your Local Service Center for 

ALL YOUR SERVICE PROBLE 





ON THE ROCKS ... The young 
lady is modeling a chic new 
black swimsuit with a novelty 
rhinestone trim along the 
squared back. 



\ AIR CONDtTlONINQ AND HEATING / 

TP — C3T 

COMMERCIAL ■ INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL 

Prompt 24-HOUR Service 

ALL WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 
Phone: GA 8-1929 204 - 22nd Street 

Phone: Kl 5-6843 Virginia Beach, V». 



Howard Jenkins III of Rich- 
mond is spending this week 
visiting Tommie Rueger and his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Rueger III at their home on 
Cavalier Drive. 



Comdr. and Mrs. R. P. Coog- 
an and their three children, who 
have been living on Chumley 
Rd., Bay Colony, left Sunday to 
make their home in Newport, 
R.I., where Comdr. Coogan will 
have duty. 



Mrs. Emerson Fawlkes and 
her daughter of Arlington, wjll 
arrive Monday to spend a week 
as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
H, Warfield Leeke at their home 
on Ave. E. 



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INTERIORS 

384 -31st STREET, VIR6WIA BEACH 
CONTEMPORARY SCANDINAVIA* 

-THI MOST IXCItINO rU*NHU*t IN THE WORIO 



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INTERIOR DECORATING 






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Certified ALFALFA 



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I. Lime to ph 7.0, take a soil test, fertilize liberally. 
2* Innoculan;, prepare a good seed-bed, seed carefully. 
3. Protect your stand from weeds and insects. ? 

4« Cut at the right stage. Minimize your field and storage losses. 
5. Plant the best seed . . . Southern States Certified Seed. It's winter-hardy, 

high in germination and purity, adapted, true to variety, pre-tested and 

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P4»4A 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 16, 1962 



THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-NEWS 

Nwy Thursday by The Beach Publishing Corporation 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 



SIM Pacific Avenue 



WtfD A. HAYCOX 

ALMN *. MAILHeS ___ 
«U§Y JEAN PHILLIPS _ 

william r. Mcknight 

CECIL T. 



PresWent and Publisher 
Vice-President • General Manager 

Newt Editor 

Advertising Manager 

Production Superintendent 



Eatered m 



asattar la the post office hi Virginia Beach, Va.. under the act of Match 3, 1«7# 



WtNeeawfr—lwaaer 



rates by mail 



EDITORIALLY SPEAKING 



Outside of Coaaty— S4.ta per annum 



Record Number of Elks Speaks 
Well for New beach Lodge ^ 






Last week the Virginia Beach Lodge 
268 of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of €lks was founded and according 
to State officials of this very fine fraternity 
the number of candidates initiated here at 
tht^charter night meeting set a record. 
5 here were 241 residents of the Virginia 
Beach area officially brought into the Elks 
Lodge here. 

j ' i 

The local Elks Lodge fias made a fine 
^beginning and we predict that it will, in 



time, become one of the outstanding Elks 
Lodge in the United States. 

Along with the initiation of the record 
number an excellent slate of officers were 
installed. Under the leadership evident 
among these officers the Virginia Beach 
Lodge will take its place in this community 
among many fine groups. 

We congratulate those who had a 
hand in the formation of Virginia Beach 
Lodge 2268 of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 



The Danger We Must Watch 



The securities industry's service to the 
jkiblic can best b«4mproved by tightening 
self-regulatory procedures throughout the 
Industry. 

* That is one of the things that President 
Keith Funston of the New York Stock Ex- 
change told this year's graduating class of 
Trinity College. In his words, "Improve- 
ment depends, to a large extent, on the 
Willingness to initiate change — not merely 
Jor the sake of doing something new — 
but because there is a clear, constructive 
need whkfi must be satisfied on a reason- 
able basis." 

A great many changes of this nature 
have been made. For instance, the Ex- 
change's own regulations cover a wide 
range of activities— mechanics of operation, 
disclosure of corporate information, the 
rights of investors, selection and training 
of member firm personnel and so on. By 



and large, these regulations are stronger 
than those imposed by the government. 
And many Exchange member firms, Mr. 
Funston said, "have established operating 
rules of their own which are more stringent 
than those prescribed by either the govern- 
ment or the Exchange." 

Then Mr. Funston made the all-important 
point — a point which goes far Beyond the 
concerns of a securities exchange or any 
other specific enterprise. Nothing that a 
large segment of the public today either 
favors increased government control over 
the private sector of the economy or has 
no opinion at all on the subject, he ob- 
served that historically "where private 
initiative has lagged — where the people 
have been unwilling or unable to assert 
their fundamental control of the govern- 
mental process — freedom has diminished." 
This, above all, is the danger we must 
always remember and watch. 




• IWWMOftM 




Lee A. Donaldson, second from right, Grand Exalted Ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is shown 
being greeted on his afrival here last week by Burks Hamner vice-president and general manager of the Cavalier Hotel Be- 
tween Hamner and Donaldson is Robert L. Simpson, who was installed exalted ruler of the new Virginia Beach Lodge of the 
Elks. At right is He rbert A. Wfflard, past exalted ruler of Portsmouth Lodge 82 jnd chairman of the new lodge committee 



Man with An Idea 



*s 




Or. Maynard A. Peck, Professor of Eco- 
"Sies and Business at Sterling College, is 
in with an idea. It involves a cooper- 
» effort on the part of businessmen 
[teachers to foster a greater understand- 
tof the American economic system, 
fere's the way it would work: Dr. Peck 
>«gld supplement the regular academic 
course of his students by calling in business 
tegjers to lecture on the practical applica- 
gs of the theories these students have 
learning in the classroom. 




In his opinion, "college students want 
to know more about the practice, as well 
as the theory, of economics as it, functions 
on the American busiiness scene." Theory 
is all very well and necessary, but it is 
vitally important that it be illustrated with 
examples and principles of action, to show 
what our system has done and is doing. 
Of top importance, Dr. Peck thinks the 
result would be to arm young people with 
facts to combat the fallacies of alien "isms." 






si immih: '62 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 



f 



Special 



^ 




president. 



Mink Stole Drawing 




If ever there was an unbelievable story to tell, Mary Payne 
Cole of Linkhorn Park has it. What happened to her reaches far 
beyond thfe "it's-a-small-world" level and borders more on the 
fantastic. 

Her story began last year when she and husband Ward were 
attending the tennis matches at v The Cavalier hotel. After standing 
for "what seemed like hours," they spotted a couple of empty chairs 
and made a dash for them. As they watched the matches, Mary 
Payne scuffed up the dirt with her shoe and happened, to uncover 
a glittering object. She picked it up. It wa> a jeweled pin. ' 

"It's probably just rhinestones," Ward said in a typical husband 
fashion. 

"I don't think so," Mary Payne argued. "I think it's diamonds 
and is probably very valuable." 

She held the pin and waited for someone to claim it. No one 
did. At the end of the matches she turned it over to the hotel's 
tennis pro with instructions that if it wasn't claimed, she wanted 
to know so she could advertise its, whereabouts. 
, She called the pro the next day and found that the pin had 
been claimed by a woman from out of town. 

* * * 

This week-end Mary Payne and Ward were again attending 
the annual tennis competition, only this time it was held at the 
Princess Anne Country Club. Their attention was caught by a 
woman searching frantically for something. ' 

"I've tost my pin. I've lost my pin," the woman, kept saying. 
Mary Payne said she would help her search. "I'm pretty good 
at finding things. I found a piece of jewelry last year at the 
Cavalier." 

Same Woman, Same Pin 
"That's odd," the woman said.- "I lost a pin, this same pin, 
last year at the hotel." 

"Was it a gold and platinum filigree bar with about eight big 
diamonds and some smaller diamonds in it?" 

"That's it," the woman cried. "I always wondered who found 
it." . 

Right in the middle of this enlfghtening conversation! Mary 
Payne looked down at her feet and there lay the pin, apparently 
uncovered by their shuffling feet. 

The woman couldn't believe it. Nor could Mary Payne. Nor 
will a lot of people but it sure as tootin' happened. 

And fo make it even more ironic, when Mary Payne and 
Ward were introduced to the woman's husband, the conversa- 
tion got around to families and the man had not only known 
Mary Payne's father, the late Joe Jett, hut had been roommates 
with her uncle, Morris Jett, many years ago at the I Diversify of 
Virginia. 

Yes sir. :h?t's the most fantastic story I've heard in a long 
time. When a person finds the same pin, belonging to the same 
woman, at the same event, on nearly the same day, a year later at ! 
another place . . . well, it's almost uncanny. 

But Mary Payne has a pretty cood philosophy about it all 

Next Time, It's Mine! 
"If I find that pin at the tennis matches next year I'm eoinc 
to keep 'it," she laughed. "By then I'll believe I'm destined to have 



(Continued From Page 1) 

Hilton K. Davis, President. 

SUBLANT) — Mrs. Richard 
Page, President 

OlnfCLANT— Mrs. Robert H. 
Hare, President. 

Armed Forces Staff College- 
Mrs. James W. Guest, President; 

HS-7 (Helicopter Squadron 7) 
—Mrs. G. W. Gogswell, Pres. 

i 

ENLISTED WIVES' CLUBS: 

Aainsworth McCauley Club 
No. 91— Mrs. Peggy Murrin, 
President. 

Tidewater NWC No. 190 — 
Mrs. Norma Katerheinrich, 
President. 

Beverly J. Ellis NWS — Mrs. 
Anna M,. Steele, President. 

John F. Kennedy NWC No. 
221— Mrs. Edna Reiger, Presi- 
dent. 

Princess Anne NWC No. 143 
—Mrs. Edith Goodson, Presi- 
dent. 

Dam Neck Club. No. 207 — 
Mrs. Cardell Anderson, Vice- 



OTHER GROUPS: 

Navy League, Women's Coun- 
cil—Mrs. Oscar Smith, Presi- 
dent. 

Princess Anne Junior Wom- 
an's ,Club— Mrs. V. K. Almond. 

Norfolk Hairdressers Assn. — 
Mrs. Polly Thornton, President. 

Aragona Lions Club— Mr. Sid- 
ney Wilhelm, President. 

Little Creek Lions Club— Mr. 
George Oberlies, President.* 

Kiwanis Clubs — Princess 
Anne-Norfolk County, Mr. A. C. 
Lipfora\ President; Downtown 
Kiwanis— Dr. Paul Landis, Pres- 
ident. 

VFW LADIES AUXILIARY 
TO SPONSOR FAMILY PICNIC 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The Vir- 
ginia Beach Ladies Auxiliary of 
VFW Post No. 7166 will spon- 
sor a family covered dish picnic 
at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Post 
House on 13th and Cartwright. 
The Auxiliary will provide soft 
drinks. 



• ACROSS 

1 Exclamation 
of surprise 

3 River of 
S. America 

8 Sloth 
10 Spanish 
artist 

13 Stream 

14 Animal's 
foot (pi.) 

16 Confederate 
general 

17 Dropsy 

18 Entire 

19 Resounds 
21 Estimates 

23 Fish: eggs 

24 Quit 

26 Instruction 
29 Agreed to 

33 In music: 
high 

34 Asterisks 

36 Compass 
point ; , 

37 Letter of 
alphabet 

38 Holds in 
regard 

41 Indonesian 
of Mindanao 

42 Cote for 
fashioning 
metal obj ects 

43 Article of 
faith 

44 Japanese 
coin 



45 Of the bank 

of a river 
49 Hinders 

51 Prevari- 
cators 

52 East Indian 
timber tree 

53 Dislikes 
intensely 

55 Animal 

58 The gums 

59 Angry 

63 Cooking 
vessel 

64 First name 
of Persian 
poet 

65 Exterior ' 

66 Seethe 

68 Plural 
ending 

69 Requires 

70 A direction 

DOWN 

1 Bone 

2 Aid 

3 Gifts 

4 Cover 

5 Farewell 

6 Egyptian 
god of 
setting sun 

7 Macaws 

8 Shoemaker's 
. tool (pi.) 

9 Exists 

11 Female ruff 

12 Rips 



Answtr To Puzzle No. 718 



oncoic PDunirmrn 
■im i u nnDrjtdr:nr 

fcJLi DQGEJO UUJQailu 

bdq rwEnn nnncn 
BDCJH crjQrjQ ohqej 
hbodb rannnn nan 
□hdfiec nnnran m 
taenn orinnnnn 



□aonjiEiiJuiD nnnnn 



" pi 
h|e|r|e) 



K d e m 



14 Thin metal 
disk 

15 .Beverage 
20 Unfastened 
22 An enzyme 

24 Heels over 

25 City of 
Germany 

26 A leper 

27 Fragrant 
oleoresln 

28 Precipitous 

30 Tantalize 

31 Compound 
ether 

32 College 
officials 

35 Oil of roses 

39 Busybodies 

40 Purloin 
46 Part of 

church 



47 Kind of 
grass 

48 Mortal 
punished 
by Zeus 

50 Snares 

53 Sings 
softly 

54 Wing 

56 Bright 
saying 

57 The 
sweet sop . 

60 Regret 

61 Goddess of 
infatuation 

62 Spread for 
drying 

64 Faroe 
Islands' 
windstorm 

67 Pronoun 



County of 
tha 14th day 



1 I Ho. 



^Plaintiff 



ourt 
Princaaa Anna, 
6f Aufuii 1 
BarWW Men 

against 
Robert E. Prta, Deri 

0*DlR C*TuSLlCAtrON 

Th« obieet of this wit is tb 
obtain * divorce a vinculo ma* 
trimonii from the said defend, 
ant, upon the grounds of con- 
duct tantamount -to desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resideht of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
•nst office address being: Box 
18, Oldtown, Kentucky. 

It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
■*nd do what may be riecel&ary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A Cony— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, IJ.C. 
Drewry and Evans, p.q. 
3007 Pacific Avenue ' 

Virginia Beach, Va. 8-16-41 



PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a public 
hearing on Thursday, September 
8, 1992, at 8.00 p.m. in the 
Council Chamber, 19th St. and 
Arctic Avenue. 

The following business will be 
heard: 

Application from James Kitch- 
en for Use Permit to add twenty 
three (23) renting rooms, din- 
ing room, kitchen, basement to 
Lots 2 and 3, block 66, 27th St. 
and Ocean. 

Application from Samuel Zit- 
train for Subdivision of Plot 115 
& 116, at 203 Avenue Q The 
Hollies, as4ot 62%'x80' instead 
of one lot 125x80. 

The recommendations by the 
Planning Commission on the 
above request will be heard by 
the city council of Virginia 
Beach on September 17, 1862 at 
2:30 P.M. in the council cham- 
ber. 

CHARLES S. KILEY, Sec'y. 
8-16-lt 

• 




George Gilliam Says: 



Now is a good time to think 
about Healing Oil. If you haven't 
been satlsffcM with your previous 
arrangements, why not give us a 
call and let us keep you warm this 
winter? 



'^iiwWiife*ttiaw: - 

mmm 



HEATING OILS 



Atlantic Fuel 
Oil Co. 

Call: 

OA 8-50O0 

Day or Night 



Ensign William J. Belli Jr. was the lucky winner in the mink stole drawing being con- 

Mre by the Rev. Wentz J. Miller (left) of Bow Creek Presbyterian Church, C A Peter- 

*£? SSS* $ale8 counselor f r Larasan Realty Corp. and E. W. Mouhot, president of Lafay- 

rJmg Corp., builders of Hidden Valley Homes. Persons buying a Hidden Valley Home 

in Prineeg Anne Plaza during June were eligible for the drawing. 



Virginia Beach Court Docket 



AUGUST 3 

Ueyfi AJvah Widgion, Prin- 
cess Anne; indecent exposure, 
ISO. 

Com, Jr., Norfolk; dis- 
red light, fit. 

Lee Heini, London 
tarn, $5, 
__r, Norfolk; reek- 

^H Wilson. Norfolk; 

g. Richmond, 





reckless driving, $25. 

Herman William, Charleston, 
S.C.; vagrancy, six months in 
jail. 

Domies Scott Jr., Virginia 
Beach; worthless check, $50 and 
30 days in jail. 

Majorie Vaughn, Va Beach; 
operating without a driver's li- 
cense, $15. 

He Arthur Bdmondson Va. 
Beach: cursing and abuse. $25 
and assault, $75. 



Quintal Heckert Herndon, 
Va.; reckless driving, $25. 

Frederick Kuncken, Little 
Creek; failure to obey police of- 
ficer, $25. 

James T. Barnes, Va. Beach; 
disorderly conduct, $25. 

William Chandler, Ft. *Story; 
drunk In public, $10. "* 

Lee T. Graham, Dam Neck; 
drunk in public, $10; drinking in 
public, $10. 

William L. Kosturko, Dam 
Neck; drunk in public, $10; dis- 
orderly conduct. $25. 

Robert Douglas Niehol, New 



Yokk, N.Y.; disregarding red 
light, $15. 

Larry M. Conn, Va. Beach; 
disorderly conduct, $75. 

Carleton L. McBride, Virginia 
Beach; disorderly conduct, $75. 

Ronald P. Willard, Oceana, 
disorderly conduct, $10. 

Anthony Milavich, New York, 
N.Y.; reckless driving, $25. 
' Stanley H. Fisher, Norfolk; 
drunk in public, $10. 

Albert Weaver, Norfolk; dis- 
regarding red light, $15. 

Bobby Lee Rucker. Richmond; 
improper equipment, $25. 

John Joseph Flynn, Little 
Creek; resisting arrest, $J0; 
drunk in public, $10. 

Hazel Williams, Va. Beach; 
drunk in public, $10. 



AUGUST 5 

William F. McConigle, Mid- 
dleton, Ohio; speeding, $15. 

George Newman Allarnan, 
Hampton; disorderly conduct, 
$15. 

Domle Scott, Jr., Virginia 
Beach; .worthless* check, $50 and 
30 days. 

I. S. Spence, Virginia Beach; 
drank in public. 

Rifle Companies and Infantry 
Battalions constltiHe over.50% 
of the total number of ground 
units in the Organized Marine 
Corps Reserve. Others include, 
motor transport, supply, artil- 
lery, communications and /nis- 
sue units. 1 





*f 




I . ' g 



m 



■■■■ 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 




Lynnhaven Pony League Champs 



Pllza BoWl 
Highlights 




Hlgli game— Fred Fink, 215, 
renda Miller, 200. 

"V-fcUl O'Rourke 579; 

it, 481. 
top scores — Tommy 
572; ftudy Jugo, 560. 
High Team Game— Unpredict- 
ibles, 713. 

High Team Set — Unpredict- 
ables 1984. 

Special notes df interest — 
Cecile Chisholm paced & rolled 
ft 217 game. 

League Standings 
Won 

rie Ttitef _. 87 
N's k a ft __ 33 

Ms s> aB _30% 

ameti Homes 29 

hpradictables 28 

st Folir r ...25% 

bet#eens ... 25 

annon Ball's 22% 

our Duces 22Vfc 

The Mots 18% 

Surprises _.18% 

Bunn* Millers 18 

The Spotters 16 

The Splits _^.10 



Lost 

11 

15 

17% 

19 

20 

22% 

23 

25% 

25% 

25% 

29% 

30 

32 

34 



3 N's & aR 3, The Tubes 1; 

Somrisy Neathery 572, Tony Di- 
itonto 577. 

The Summary: 

Cameo Homes4; Joe Ricco 
807. «• 

Surprises 4, The Splits 0; Mel 
Rush 484, Al Gay 494. 

3 M's & a B 3%, The Idiots, 
%; Bill O'Rourke 579, Bernice 
Roberts 437. 

Inbetweens 3, Four Duces 1; 
Jean Bryant 481, Bob Fortune, 
424. 

l Last Four 3, Bunny Millers L; 
fred Fkk k&* Tomay Bunfc 
fag 446. 

Unpredietables 4, Cannon 
Balls 0; Jerry Fiore 511, Tommy 
Bradt 506. 



Frederick to 

Id 
Grid Lineup 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Frede- 
rick College Coacli Bill McDon- 
ald is excited about the pros- 
pects of his football club that 
will meet Newbury College 
here on Saturday, Sept. 15.' 

Coach McDonald says his 
squad will be dominated by 
sophomores and freshmen, but 
that they will be to their second 
year of college ball. 

Coach McDonald Is looking 
forward to the return of 18 vet- 
erans, including a highly-touted 
transfer, Bobby Gray, from 
Chowan College. 

Newberry will he out to avenge 
the defeat the new Frederick 
team handed them last year on 
their home field. Newberry 
went on to a 50-50 season after 
that initial loss and is peren- 
nially a strong contender in the 
Carolinas Conference. 

The game is scheduled to be 
played under the lights in the 
Virginia Beach Memorial Stad- 
ium on September 15 and tick- 
ets went on sale Monday. 

The contest is being jointly 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Sports Club and Virginia Beach 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
Members of these organizations 
are serving as committees to the 
sale of advance tickets. 

Any RESCUE SQUAD mem- 
ber, having served to a faithful 
and satisfactory manner for 
over a period of ten years, shall 
automatically be offered a Life 
Membership. The service period 
of ten years shall be measured 
in total accumulative time. 




The London Bridge Merchants took the Lynnhaven Pony League championship this 
year by winning 12 games and losing only three. The Winning group includes (standing, left to 
right) Steve Cockrell, Robert Fender, Robert Morris, Sam Rhodes, Robert Lundy, Wayne 
Cousins, Mark SHean and Manager Gatewood Brock; kneeling (left to right) Tommy George, 
Buddy Matthews, Lenny Troutman, Doug Fondren, Joe Scripture and Blair Shaw; sitting, bat 
boys Roger Lundy and Bruce Shaw. (Boice Photo) 



Little League Hi-Lites 




GA 8-1797 6A 8-9227 

Free Ertinutes— Pickup & Delivery 

Complete 
Automotive Upholstering 

J4iutop 
Lfvnouterinq (So, 



9 



WL ^ W 17th St. at City Limits— Vi Beach 

^^ AUTO TOPS 

• Custom Made Seat Covers • Carpets & Floor Mats 



mssmm 




By JOHN ELDER 

PROCESS ANNE-The Prin- 
cess Anne Little League won 
their State Championship by 
collecting 7 victories around 
Virginia. They were beat out in 
the divisional competition on a 
np-hit, no-run game in Hagers- 
town, Md. The team that was 
victorious there was from Dela- 
ware, and needed to play only 
four., games to get there. After 
logging two wins in Maryland, 
they clinched the Regional Title. 
In a welcome home ceremony 
at the Princess 
Anne Plaza 
Shopping Cen- 
ter Monday 
night, there 
were two espe- 
cially appropri- 
a t e presenta- 
tions made. 
Bobby Lewis 
was presented 
the Outstand- 
ing Player 
Award, in recognition of his 
performance as a pitcher and a 
hitter. 

Allan Gets Another Award 
Also on the receiving end of 
a trophy was , manager Bookie 
Allen. Bookie 
has been with 
the PA League 
since* the begin- 
ning, and has 
been an inspir- 
ation, to many 
of the kids in 
the league. For 
his outstand- 
i n g untiring 
service to the Allen 

youth of the 

area, Gus Riganto, of the J.Cs, 
presented a large trophy. 

As we talked with Bookie, 
after the presentation, we ex- 
pected some reflections on the 
past. This feeling was quickly 
dispelled with "It was fun.'* The 



Bobby Lewis 




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CHILDREN FREE 

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next comment he made was 
with regard to next year. "The 
big jot' at hand, how that I am 
graduating to PONY League, is 
to get a field on which to play." 
I guess this pretty much char- 
acterizes Bookie Allen. By the 
way, if you know of a field that 
could be used for baseball next 
year, and is in the Lynnhaven 
area, give Bookie a call, at 341- 
2921. 



Here is a thumbnail sketch of 
the Princess Anne Little League 
All-Stars, Virginia's State cham- 
pions. 

BILLY ALLEN— 12 years, old 
attends King's Grant School, 
lives in the Lynnhaven area. 
Billy was the speed merchant of 
the Stars, getting" four of his 
five hits on bunts. Playing in the 
outfield, Billy turned in error- 
less performance, while batting 
.454. 

JEFF BRATTEN— 12-year-old 
right-handed pitcher and in- 
fielder, lives in the Thalia area. 
Jeff went 9 for 21 at the plate, 
for an impressive .391 mark. 
On the mound he turned in two 



DAVID TEW— 12 years old, 
from Chesopeian. David played 
the hot corner for the Stars, and 
turned in an impressive .312 
average at the plate. 

MIKE TUCKER— 12-year-old 
outfielder - pitcher from Pine- 
wood Gardens. Mike is especial* 
ly remembered for an outstand- 
ing play in the Lyhchburg game, 
when he had to turn his back 
on the plate and chase down a 
long fly ball. He nailed it, over 
his shoulder, saving at least a 
double. 

LES WHITEHORN^-11 years 
old, from Eastern Park, Les's 
assignment was the outfield, 
which he fulfilled flawlessly. He 
went five for ten at the plate, 
for .500, coming up with key 
hits as needed. During the last 
game, Les was hit by a pretty 
serious attack of appendicitis, 
and almost landed in a Hagers- 
town hospital., 

KENNY WILSON— A 12-year- 
old from Pinewood Gardens, 
Ken was pitching and catching. 
Kenny, who pitched well during 
the year, was the hard-luck 
hurler in the All-Star series. He 
made out better behind the 
plate, than in front of it. 

BUBBA WOOLDRIDGE — A 
12-year-old from Thalia. As an 



winning games, beating Cape outfielder and catcher, Bubba 



Charles 8-0, and Lynchburg 2-0 
in nine innings. 



BOBBY GRAHAM — 12-Jear- 
old infielder from Thalia. B6bby 
played a real'good shortstop for 
the stars. Made some outstand- 
ing fielding plays, with a couple 
good throws to first. Bobby at- 
tends Thalia School. He also 
stood ready to pitch if needed. 

BOBBY LEWIS^Another 12- 
year-old, who played infield, 
pitched, and caught. Bobby lives 
in the Kempsville area. He 
showed himself to be the clutch 
hitter of the team by belting 
out four circuit clouts, at least 
two of them proving the decid- 
ing tally of the games. Bobby 
also turned in three wins from 
the hill. For his performance he 
was awarded the "Outstanding 
Player Trophy,' in ceremonies at 
Princess Anne Plaza last Mon- 
day night. 

BILLY SAWYER — Age 12, 
from Chesopeian Colony, at- 
tends King's Grant School. As 
an outfielder, Billy sees much 
action, but turned in one hit for 
two trips as a hitter. 

LES SHAW — 12 years old; 
catcher; home and school in 
Thalia. Les belted out a homer 
in the Upper Louden game. Be- 
hind the plate, he did a real 
steady job. With the pitchers 
winning, you can be sure that 
the catcher is just as responsible 
as his battery mate. 

BILLY SIMMONS — Another 
12-year-old from Thalia. Billy 
went seven for nineteen at the 
plate, for a .368 average. Play- 
ing in the outfield he turned in 
errorless ball. 

WAYNE STERLING— An 11- 
year-bld from Wolfsnare. Wayne 
was the hard-luck hitter of the 
series. Wayne is one of the left 
handed hitters, and as such was 
brought in twice, after the count 
had gone to two strikes to pick 
up a right hander. Despite this, 
he still got a couple of hits. 

RAY STRICKLAND — A 12- 
year-old, from London Bridge. 
Ray alternated between the 
mound, and first base. As a pitch- 
er, he started one game that was 
later won, and himself, defeated 
Upper Louden. At first, he was 
dependable. 



was the defensive plug. His field- 
ing was errorless, and depend- 
able. 



JOHN D. ELLIOTT 

Army 2nd Lt. John D. Elliott, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John D. 
Elliott, Route 2, Princess Anne, 
Va., recently participated with 
other personnel from the 8th 
Division's 504th Infantry in Op- 
eration Jutland Jump, a five-day 
airborne maneuver in Denmark. 

The exercise, the first large- 
scale airborne drop ever con- 
ducted by U. S. Forces on Dan- 
ish soil, was designated to give 
U. S. paratroopers the experi- 
ence of jumping into unfamiliar 
territory and of organizing and 
preparing for combat behind 
simulated enemy lines. Jutland 
Jump provided Danish soldiers 
with the opportunity to engage 
in anti-airborne tactics when 
they provided mock opposition 
for' the 504th's "attacking" 
force. 

Lt. Elliott, a platoon leader in 
the infantry's Company E which 
is regularly located in Mainz, 
Germany, entered the Army in 
1958 and arrived overseas in 
May 1961. 

The 23-year-old officer is a 
1956 graduate of Princess Anne 
High School and attended the 
College of William and Mary in 
Williamsburg. \ 

His wife, Edeltraud, is with 
him in Germany. 



BOAT 
RENTALS 

by the 

HOUR - DAY - WEEK 

GA 8-6880 

BEACH-BAY 

MARINA 

Vir§ inia Beech 
31st ST. EXTENDED 



Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 1 6, 1 962 
Page 5-A 

Princess Anne 
Court Docket 

Today— August loth 
Judge Wahab 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Josebh Cdlumbus HUrdle, rmir- 
der. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Charles G. Jordan, malicious 
wounding. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Jessie Hines, malicious wound- 
ing (2). 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Derwood H. fearkley, burglary- 
County of Princess Anne, vs. 
Clarence P. Williams, D.U.I. 

County of Princess Anne vs. 
William Bronza Spivey, reckless 
driving. 

, County of Princess Anne vs. 
William H. Morrisette, D.U.I, re- 
sulting in an accident. 

County of Princess Anne vs. 
Dennis Walke* D.U.I. 

County of princess Anne vs. 
Arnold Franklin Turpin, D.U.I. 

County of Princess Anne vs. 
Gilbert Allen Tarte, driving 
registration card, resist arrest, 
D.U.I. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Gilbert Allen Tarte, assault po- 
lice officers. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Betty Lee Bush, D.UJ. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Jimmie Lee Powell, speeding. 

Commonwealth of Virginia vs. 
Arnold Franklin Turpin, driving 
without operator's license. 



Monday— August 20th 
Judge Wihab 

William 1L, Holz, vs. Sacks, 
& Kendall, p.q., vs. Coates 
Motor Co., et al, Kellam & Kel- 
lam & Rixey and Rixey, p.d. 

Richard W. Neal, Brydges & 
Broyles, p.q., vs. Donald C. 
Macormac, A. R. Walton, p.d. 

Jeanhette Elmore, Brydges & 
Broyles, p.q., vs. Aubrey 
Holmes, et als,« Rixey & Rixey, 
p.d. 



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Tuesday — August 21st 
Judge Wahab 

Bernette Sanderlin, Kellam & 
Kellam, J>.q., vs. Malcolme E. 
Wooldnoge, Parsons, Stant and 
Parsons, p.d. 

Frank Leonard Abney, Pil- 
cher & Winters, p.q., vs. Cleo L 
Latimer, et al, p.d. 

Betty H. Munford, Brydges & 
Broyles, p.q., vs. Allstate Insur- 
ance Co., White, Ryan and 
Reynolds, p.d. 



Wednesday — August 22nd 
Judge Wahab 

Millie Deese Moser, L. Char- 
les Burlage, p.q., va, Alice La- 
mont, Taylor, Gustin, Harris, 
Fumiss, p.d. 

Sharon R. Sirine, Joseph Teck, 
p.q., vs. Raymond F, Ankum, 
Rixey k Rixey, p.d. 

Orval Neal Caddy, Kellam & 
Kellam, p.q., vs. Mrs. , Mildred 
Taylor, Gordon E. Campbell, p.d. 

PVT. VERNON E. VOLIVA 

FORT KNOX, KY. — Army 
Pvt. Vernon E. Volhn, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alva E. Voliva, 
Route 1, Bayside, Va., recently 
completed the eight-week cleri- 
cal course at The Armor Center, 
Fort Knox, Ky. 

Voliva entered the Army in 
February 1962 and completed 
basic training at Fort Gordon, 
Ga. 

The 19-year-old 'soldier at- 
tended Princess Anne High 
School and was employed by the 
Portsmouth Salvage Company, 
Norfolk, before entering the 
Army. 



Call 



BROTHERS 



GA 8-1306 Auto Service 
Va. Beach 

for the new 

Lincon 

HcVWY DUtY MOWERS 
Home & Commercial Use 




* fNGrNES 
• 3% H.P. & 4 H^. 
4 Cycle— Cast Iron 



FOR SALE 

1961 THUNDERBIRD SPORTS CONVERTIBLE 

Ermine White with Black Top 
Original Owner — Low Mileage 

*3,495°° 

JAMES POWELL 
Sir Walter Hotel 







SALES 



WILLYS 



SERVICE 



MALBON JeeP MOTOR CO. 

Va. Beech Blvd. 6 A 8-4961 Seatack Rd v 

While you wait AUTO GLASS for all make cars 
Curved • Flat • All Sizes 

• USED JEEPS 
4-Wheel Drive - Trucks - Station Wagons 

RADIATORS 
Cleaned - Repaired — Recored 



% 




IF IT'S 
FISHING 
TACKLE 

* 

WE HA 

FUEL-F 








let's 00 to Church Sunday 




Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 16, 1962 
Page 6-A 



Calendar of 
Meetings and 

Special Events 



American legion— ist & 

3rs) Thursdays, 8:00 p.m., Club- 
house, Laskin Road. Phone GA 
8-0548. 



40 



& 8 — 1st Monday each 
month, 8 p.m., clubhouse, Las- 
Road. 



"T 



LEGION AUXILIARY — 2nd 
Monday each month 8 p.m., club- 
house, Laskin Road. 



CTVTTAN— 1st and 3rd Tues- 
days 7:00 p.m., Bay Harbour 
Club. 



DAUGHTERS OF AMERICA 
—2nd and 4th Tuesday, 308- 
17th Street 



Daughters of American Revo- 
lution — 2nd Saturday. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. 



DAR, Princess Anne Chapter — 
2nd Saturday, Sept-May. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. 



EXCHANGE CLUE— tod and 
3rd Mondays, 7.-00 p.m. Dinner, 
American Legion Club House, 
Laskin Road. 



VIRGINIA BEACH JUNIOR 
CHAMBER O&COMMERCE — 
2nd Tuesday, 8 pjn., 4th Tues- 
day, 7:00 pan. Dinner meeting, 
Black Angus Restaurant. 



SHRINE CLUB — 2nd Friday 
each month 7 P.M. at Cavalier 
Yacht Club. 



KIWANIS— Every Wednesday, 
7 p.m. Dinner, Cavalier Yacht 
Club. 



OF COLUMBUS — 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 8 p.m 
Star of the Sea Parish Hall, 14th 
and, Arctic. 



LIONS CLUB— 2nd and 4th 
Monday at Isle of Capri at 
7:00 PJI. 



OCEANA LIONS CLUB — 
Meets at Cavalier Y.C.C. 2nd & 
4th Tuesday at 7 p.m. 



MASONS — 2nd Wednesday, 
7:30 p.m., Masonic Hall, 20th 
Street and Arctic Avenue. 



MOOSE LODGE 1998— Every 
Tuesday, 8 p.m„ at Lodge 904 
Atlantic Avenue. Phone GA8- 



CHRIST'S SECOND 

ADVENT IS NEAR! 

-ACTS 1:11 

' For free Bftfe 
i study helps, send 

to: 



THE CHRISTADELPHIANS 

P. O. BOX S42 
RICHMOND 24, VIRGINIA 



Coleman Tells 
Of OSS Days 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach Lions Club 
turned out in mass Monday to 
hear Arch Coleman make his 
second speech before the club 
on his experience in the OSS. 

One of the first 15 men se- 
lected for the Secret Service, 
Coleman directed an espionage 
school for two years on an old 
16-bedroom estate in Maryland, 
just outside Washington, D.C. 
He trained over 300 men in 
Judo, pistols, ciphering and how 
to handle foreign police during 
that time. 

Always working under an as- 
sumed name, he directed the op- 
erations in Istanbul Turkey for 
two years and set up an organi- 
zation of 75 persons, most of 
whom were German profession- 
al men who had passports in 
and out of their native country. 

Coleman related an incident 
that will "probably never be 
recorded in history" about a 
young American Naval Lieuten- 
ant who was sent by President 
Roosevelt with a peace treaty to 
Germany, outlining fantastic 
terms, such as giving Germany 
control of Central Europe. 

The American turned the 
treaty over to an Ambassador 
that was later tried and acquitted 
at Nuremburg, one of only two 
men to be freed. The Ambassa- 
dor spoke highly of America 
and told the young officer how 
anxious he was to end the war, 
even if it meant overthrowing 
Hitler. He later mentioned in 
his memoirs about bis visit with 
the American. Nothing was ever 
heard from the treaty and the 
popular opinion was that it was 
merely a decoy, Coleman said. 



ROTARY — Every Thursday, 
7 p.m., Black Angus Restaurant 



SPORTS — Every Tuesday, 
1:00 p.m., Cape Colony Club. 



VFW POST NO. 7166— Meets 
2nd and 4th Thursday of each 
month, 8 p.m., 13th and Cart- 
wright. 



VFW AUXILIARY— 2nd and 
4th Monday, 8 p.m., 13th St. and 
Cartwright. 



PRINCESS ANNE RURITAN 
CLUB — 1st Tuesday each month 
7 PM. H. H. Bendler, Secretary. 
GA 8-2881. 



BAPT IST CH URCH 

London Bridge, Virginia 
G. Edward Hashes, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:00 p.m.— "Training Union. 

8.-00 p.m.EveoJng Worship. 

ST. JOHN19 BAPTIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne Court House 
Rev. Brace B. Perkins, Pastor 
10:00 A.M.— Sunday School. 
11:00 AM — Morning Worship. 
6:00 P.M.— B.T.U. 
7:00 P.M.— Evening Worship, 



HILLTOP BAPT IST CHAPEL 

Unkhorn Park School, Laskin Rd. 

Pastor Csprgs T. StaOiags 
9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
1 1 :00 a jn .—Worship Service, 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Rev. Frank Hughes, Jr. 

245 Rosetnont Road 

9:30 A.M. A 5 P.M. — Worship 

Services. 
10:30 A.M.— Sunday School . 



BAYSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 

1480 Pleasure House Road 
Pastor-Blames V. Da Foe 

8:30 A 11.-00 A.M.— Worship 

Service 
8:00 P.M.— Evening Service 



Oak Grove 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
B ack Bay , Virginia 
Rev. H. Engene Arringtoa. 
9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
8:00 pjn.— Evening Worship. 

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Bayside, Virginia 

GreenweH Road A Lakeview Dr. 

Rev. David Moore, Pastor 

9:45 a.m Sunday School 

11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
7:45 pjn. — Evening Worship 



FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 

419 Gfenrock Road, Norfolk 2, Va. 
Rev. Charles T. Hrairicks. Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 am.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 pjn.— Evening Worship. 



FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 

6818 Va. Beach Blvd., Norfolk, Va. 
Fred M. Farias, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 

6:30 pjn. — Fellowship Hour, 

7:30 pjn.— 'Evening 



l T 



FREEWILL BAPTIST - 

In Princess Anne County on Highway 
615 Vi mile Past Oceana Air Station 
on right. 
T. J. Tingle, Serving as Minister 

Sunday School ~_ 9:45 A.M. 

Worship Service 11:45 AM. 

Evening Service 7:30 P.M. 



GRACE BRETHREN CHURCH 
Great Neck at Hilltop 
A. Harold Arringtoa, Pastor . 

10:00 A. M.— Sunday School. 
11:00 A.M.— Worship Service 
7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. 



BUSINESS k PROFESSION- 
AL WOMAN'S CLUB OF PRIN- 
CESS ANNE COUNTY — Meets 
2nd Monday of each month at 
Pine Tree Inn at 7 pjn. Make 
reservations with Mrs. Atkins 
at 341-1291. 



VIRGINIA BEACH TOAST- 
MASTERS CLUB— Meets 2nd & 
4th Wednesday at Black Angus 
Restaurant from 8:30 to 9 p.m. 

Cmr Of VIRGINIA BEACH 



THALIA LYNN BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

9:30 AM, 
11:00 A.M, 



Star of the Sea 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

14th Street and Arctic. Circle 

Nicholas 1. Habets, Pastor 
Sunday Masses: Winter, 8:00, 9:30 

and 11:00 a.m. 
Summer, Awe 15th thru Labor Day, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m. and 

12:15 p.m. 
Hory Days, 7:00, 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 

p.m. , 

Confessions, 4:00 to 5:00 and 

to 8:00 p.m. Saturday 
Weekday Mass, 8 a.m. 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 

15th Street end Baltic Avenue 
Elwood Kara, Pastor 
9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 pjn.— Evangelistic Service, 

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, 
SCIENTIST 

209 • 20th Street 
9:30 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Chuhch Service 
8.-00 P.M.— Wednesd ay Service 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 

East Lane — Oceana 

Rev. Samuel D. Befler, Jr„ Paste* 

9:46 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m, — Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.Evangelisric Service. 

CHURCH OF GOD 

620 14th Stmt 
Bobby H. Sams, Pastor 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 
11. -00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
7:30 A.M.— Evening Worship 

GALILEE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

40th and Pacific— GA 8-3573 

The Rev. Edmand Berkeley, Rector 

Rev. Macon B. Walton 

Assistant Rector 
8.00 a.m. — Holy Communion 
10:00 a.m. — Morning Sermon and 
prayer except first Sun- 
day in month because 
of Holy Communion. 



EMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Kemps ville Road, KempsviHe 
The Rev. Charles R. McGialey, 



8:00 A.M.— Holy Communion 
10:00 A.M.— Morning Prayer and 

Sermon 



EASTERN SHORE CHAPEL 

(Episcopal) 
B. Sidney Sanders, Rector 
8:00 am. — Holy Communion 
9:30 a.m. — Family Service and 

Morning Prayer (3rd Sun- 
day Holy Communion.) 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Paryer and 
Sermon (1st Sunday, Holy 
Communion.) 



OLD DONATION 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Rt.*J, Box 63B, Bayside, Va. 
Rev. Beverley D. Tucker, Jr. 

8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion 
10:00 a.m. — Morning Prayer and 
Sermon. 



1 TEMPLE EMANUEL 

25th and Baltic, Virginia Beach 
Philip Rabinowitz, Rabbi - 
7:30 A.M.— Services Mon.-Frl 
9:00 A.M.— Services Sat 
8:00 A.M.— Services Sun. 



THE LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Missouri Synod 
Sunday School— 9:45 A.M. 
Being conducted temporarily at 
Happy Days Nursery School, Las- 
kin Rd., adjacent to Linkhorn School. 



nni>rn 

Gnat Neck Road 
E. f. Taylor, Pastor 

9-.4C ajn.— Church School 
11:00 



8?«hmYaaalfta** 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Virginia Beach Boulevard, Lynnhaven 



8:45 am. and 11 a.m. — sendees, 
9:45 a.m.— Church School 
6:30 pjn,— Youth FeBowshsp 



HAYGOOD MEMORIAL 
METHODIST CHURCH 

A Bay Short Roads 
1mm G. Long, Jr., P asto r 
9:45 A.M.— Morning Worship 

V*uUfvu jyTavOt ■ 

11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship and 
Church School. 

Scott Memorial 
METHODIST CHURCH 
Great Neck Road, Oceana, Va. 
Rev. Lee H. Richer***, Pastor 
9:45 ajn.— Church School 
11:00 ajn.— Morning Worship 
7:30 p.m.— Y outh F eUowshep. 

THALIA METHODIST CHURCH 

Pine Ave. A Va. Be a ch Blv d. 
Rev, B. J. Garrett, Pastor 
9:00 A.M.— Church School 
10:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 

Cnwna—ity 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Acredaie — Kempsville 
Rev. A. P. Roach. Pastor 
9:45 ajn.— Church School. 
11.00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 pjn.— Y oothFe ltowsfatp. 

LYNNHAVEN 

METHODIST CHURCH 

little Neck Road 

Rev. Walter A. WhllihaiiL Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11:15 a.m.— Morning Worship 



METHODIST CHURCH 

Knotts Island. N.C. 
James E. Hodges, Minister 
10:00 ajn.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m.— Worship Service, 



BAYLAKE METHODIST CHURCH 

Shore Drive at Treasure Island Dr. 

Bayside 

Janes W. Reynolds, Jr „ Minister 

8:30 A 11 A.M.— Worship Service 

9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 




7:00 



ST. GREGORY'S CATHOLIC 
CHURCH 

7271 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Rev. Danuaa Abb.tktJ.io, OAB. 
MASSES: 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; High 
Mass, 12:00 noon. 
Confessions are on Saturday, 7:30- 
8:30. 



Emmanuel 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

10100 Virginia Beach Boulevard 

(Temporary Worship Center) 

Kenneth A. Price, Pastor 

9:15 a.m.— Church School 

10:30 a.m.— Worship Service 

(Nursery for pre-school children 

during worship) 



LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Of the Good Shepherd 

Atlantic and 18th Street 
Rev. John D. Kelstor, Minister 
8:30 A.M. — Morning Worship 
9:45 A.M.— Church School' and 

Adult Bibb Classes 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 



■Q.J, „„1 



YOU HAVE TO TRY IT 
TOBBJEVEITI 





HUE HIDE 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
35th Street at Holly Road 
H. WaasB Waters, Pastor 

Sunday School 9:30 A.M. 

Morning Worship _- 11:00 A.M. 

Training Union _ J: 15 PJ4. 

Evening Service 7:30 P.1I. 



MOUNT OUVE 



Colette 



ft far 

Wt ALL tULETTI RAZORS 



Rev. T. M. Wi 

9:30 
11:00 
7:30 pja.- 



10:00 

11:00 

7:30 



's Grant Read at 
Drive, L] 
H. E. 



OCEAN PARK 
COMMUNITY CHURCH 

Parker N. Yooag, Pastor 
Du Pont Circle, Bayside, Va. 

9:45 a.m.— Bible School. 
11. -00 ajn.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.— Family Night Service, 



Vhgaeia ft 
COMMUNITY CHAPEL 

Road, Linkhorn Bay 



Va. 



^ ssa^sjsajanaaB # 



v^ 



IXPAMIKK * 




9:45 sjn.— Sunday School. 
11.-00 a jo.— Morning Worship 
11:30 ajn.— Children's Church 

7:30 p.m. — Evening Service. 

BAYSIDE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

(Ceaaregatioaal) 
Shore Drive and Greenwell Road 

Earl L. FarreO, MJasster 
9:45 A.M.— Worship Service. 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School. 
11:00 A.M.— Worship Service, 

KALA CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Va. 



OUR SAVIOUR'S 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Baylake Pines, Bayside, Virginia 
Kenneth R. Carbangh, Pas 
8:30 A.M.— Worship Service 
' 9:45 A.M.— Church School 
11:00 A.M.— Worship Service 



P RINCE OF PEACE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(Missouri Synod) 
Rev. J. Elmer Medley, Pastor 
Meeting at Happy Days Nursery 
Laskin Rd., next to Linkhorn Sch. 

Divine Worship — 8:30 A.M. 

Holy Communion 1st A 3rd Sun. 

Coolessional Service 8:15 A.M. 

on Communion Sundays 
Sunday School A Bible Class 9:30 am. 
11 a.m.— Worship Service 



10:00 A.M. 

11:00 AM. 

7:30 P.M. 



Worship 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 
521 Va Beach Blvd., Oceana, Va. 
Jasaas W. 
IMS 

11-00 



VIRG INIA BEACH 
METHODIST CHURCH 

207- 18th Street 
Dr. W. Kenneth Haddock, Pastor 

8:30 a.m. — Worship Service Summer 

Months { 

9:45 ajn. — Church School \ 
11:00 ajn.— Worship Service/ 

BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH 

Creeds 

Koger c soyear, pastor 

10:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
11:00 A.M.— Church School 



' Charity 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Back Bay, Virginia 
Rev. WiDiam A. Moon, Jr. 
10:00 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. , 

SALEM METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne, Virginia 
Rev. Frank D. James 

10:00 am.— Morning Worship. 
11:00 a.m.— Church School. 
7:30 pjn.— Youth Fellowship 

OCEANA 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 

S. Court House Rd., Oceana, Va. 

Paul A. AHrich, Pastor 
9:45 ajn.— Sunday School 
10:45 am. — Morning Worship 

Calvary 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

First Street, Oleorock, Norfolk, Va. 
E. CroweB Cooley, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. ) 
6:30 p.m.— What-NoU Fellowship. 
6:30 p.m.— Pioneer Fellowship. 
6:30 pjn.— Young People's Fellow- 
ship. 

FIRST 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Pacific Avenue at 36th Street 

Henry G. Morgan 

J. Paul Vondacek 

Minister 



mu 



■ OmJuMahCuip 



\ 






8:30 Morning Worship 
9:45 Church School 
11:00 Morning Worship 
7:30 Youth Fellowships 
7:30-8:00— Sunday evening Chapel 
Vesper Service 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

Wentz J. Miller, Minister 

Meeting in the Plaza • 
Elementary School 

Sunday School — 9:45 A.M. 

Church Service 11:00 A.M. 



Christ Presbyterian Church 

1200 Aragona Boulevard 

M. Bland Dudley, Minister 

8:30 A.M.— Worship and Church 

School 
9:45 A.M.-Churoh School 
11:00 A.M.— Worship and Church 
School. 



LYNNHAVEN 

Great Neck Road 



9:45 
10:45 



__ rmr - ■ «- * 

mg worsrap 
ntoaWOiahip 



CHAPEL 
Shore Dr. 



,YI\(,S1B0M>S 



Worship. 



DIAMOND SPRINGS 
CHURCH 



Discspies of Christ 

6700 W. Hadeo Road 

Near Little Creek Ferry 



9:45 A.M.— Church School 

11:00 AM.— Worship Service 

6:30 PAL— Youth Oroups 



PLAZA METHODIST CHURCH 

Meeting at Plaza School 
Walter A. Whiteharst, Pastor 
9:45 A.M.— Morning Worship 
11:00 A.M.— Church School 
7:00 P.M.— Youth Fellowship 

Nimmo 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne, Virginia 
Rev. Frank D. James 

10:15 a.m.— Church School 
11:15 ajn.— Morning Worship 



KING'S GRANT 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

(Now meeting in the King's Grant 
Elementary School) 
Raymond C. Flitton, Pastor 
9:50 A.M.— Sunday "School. 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship. 



METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne, Virginia 
Rev. LeRoy Davis, Minister 
9:45 ajn.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 



BEECH GROVE 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Princess Anne 
Roger C Snyder, Pastor 

10:00 A.M.— Church School , 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 



LYNNHAVEN 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Lynnhaven ViHage 
H. L. Boettcaer, Clerk of 

10:00 ajn.— Church School. 
1 1:00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 

6:80 p.m.— Youth Fellowship. 

6:30 pjn.— Pioneer Fellowship. 

7:30 p.m.— Evening Worship. 



Bayside 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

_ Near Robbins Comer 
Rev. J. E Johanna, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 

(Qaa ker) 

FRIENDS MEETING 
LASKIN RD. 

9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Meeting far Morning 

Tf ,, .111, ' 

worsrap. 

ST. MARK A.M.E. CHURCH 

Oceana, Vs. 
Rev. D. P. Fettoa, 
9:30 ajn. — Sunday School. 
11:00 ajn.— Worship Service. 






1 7 



I saw a miracle today. I visited a family 
with a tiny baby, and as I looked at him 
and held his chubby hand in mine, I felt 
the thrill that comes to me each time I 
gaze upon a new life. 

In my work as a minister, I call upon 
many families. I see many babies. Yet 
that thrill is always there. For of all 
God's great gifts, this is the greatest. 
Nowhere, I think, does His power stand 
more truly revealed to us than when 
we see a small being, created in His 
image. 

As I held this baby today, I knew a 
special gladness because his parents 
are members of my church and stand 
ready to bring up their son in the full, 
rich light of religious training. Would 
that all blessed babes were so for- 
tunate! It is God who gives us our 
children — but it is we who must 
teach them the meaning of His love. 
His truth, and His eternal under- 
standing, i 



•*• Cfcurcii • A. 
M, 4 /or A. l "• . »*••«* /<ck» 

T ,v *- iw ' T '""''«<». cm 

"''T per*, ifc„,u *••••» 

' f ^CWcfc iw'^.f »'*•«»* 

ftS & uS* v * 

Fr}4^ V --^Um, B IS* 

^•■'Co'(MM M , *L 1*SJ 

*" l.i. 



I 



* Copyright 1SS8, Kekter Adv. Service, Struburf, Va. 



THIS SERIES OF MESSAGES IN THE INTEREST OF THE CHURCH IS SPONSORED 
BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS 



HOLT BUICK, INC. 

' THREE GREAT BUICKS 
LaSabra — Invicta — Electta 
21st A PACIFIC AVE. GA 8-2132 



MURDEN DRUG CO. 

Prompt, Effiden* Prescription Service 
Phone 3404111 London Bridge, Va. 



R. L. GARRINGER 

Wholesale Meats and Provisions 
Distributors Kraft Food Prodocts 
- 2446 Virginia Beach Boatevard 
Telephone MA 7-5391 Norfolk, Vs. 



CAVALIER GARAGE 

JOHNNY DUDLEY 

Directly Behind Hotel 

Independently Operated 

Holly Rd. & Cavalier Dr. 

Dial GA 8-2131 Virginia 



83rd Street 



K 



SEASIDE MARKET , 

Telephone GA 8-9319 

Virginia 






ROSE'S 5-1 0-25c STORES, INC. 

3*9 31st St & 19*1 Atlantic Avenue 
Your Shopping Center 



RUSSELL & HOLMES 

Your Newly Enlarged Shoe Stare 

"Where Shopping Is a Pleasure" 

1908 Atlantic Avenue Virginia Beach 

GA 8-4301 



PRICE'S INC. 

HILLTOP 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



NIXON ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractors — Geaersl Repairs 

House.( Commercial Wiring— Light Fixtures 

tea > 17th Street. Va. Beach— Phone GA 8-3711 



COMET TRAILERS 

Haul your own furniture with Comet Trailers 
Call 543-3534 
1217 Sooth Military Highway 



EMRHAE FORD 

FORD and ITALIAN FIAT 
> 17th St. also Bayside oa Rt 13Y 
T e leph one GA 84232 



BE-LO SUPERMARKET 

30th Street A Arctic Avenue 

Virginia 



BRINKLEY'S SHELL SERVICE - 

"Friendly Service pins Quality Products" 

31st Street and Baltic Avenue 

Telephone GA 84232 Virginia Beach 



KELLAM & EATON, INC. 

Building Supplies 

"Headquarters For Your Needs" 

Princess Anne Phone 2661—2072 



CERTIFIED TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

151 EAST LITTLE CREEK RD. 588-5471 

6000 VA. BEACH BLVD. 497-1021 



KELLAM & EATON INSURANCE CO. 

Real Estate — Rentals — Insurance 
3113 Pacific Avenue — Telephone GA 84101 



PRINCESS ANNE PLUMBING 
& ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, INC. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

vVcstinghouse Appliances 

Phone: Day 2660 & 2678 — Night 2663 

Princes* Ana* 



OCEANA CURB MARKET 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Groceries and Meats 

Phone GA 8-1691 Oceana, Va. 



VA. BEACH AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

Evmrude Mote— — Automotive Parts 
Phone GA 84556 
820 - 17th 



w 



A. WOOD OIL CO. 

Commission Agent 

ESSO STANDARD OIL CO. 

Fuel Oil and Kerosene 

Dial GA 8-3385 



WeMAM? FELLOWSHIP 

BAYSIDR— Wednetday at 8 
I .at. the General meeting ©f tne 
tyomaa'f FeUowihip will be held 
it the B«jrSrtte CHrtotifca Church. 

The installation of new offi- 
cers will be H*ld at that ttoie 
and all women of the church are 
Invited to attend, . 




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BAYSIDE— "Utile Ladies Day 
Out" got off with a "bang" last 
Wednesday with registration of 
oter 100. this progjtira is spon- 
sored by the YWCA and is 
geared for "little ladies" bt» 
tween the ages 8 to 14 and U 
to 18 and ihey are in legiori! 

On Friday mornings there is 
bowling at Bayside Bowl with 
Mrs. Johnson, from the Bowl, 
Instructing. 

There is "art" on Wednesdays 
with Mrs. Elizabeth D'Auria 
teaching the class. 

Sewing Classes are being held 
at Singer's, Ward's Corner on 
Wednesdays for 14 to 18 years 
age group. 

Horseback Riding Lessons are 
given at the Ride Awhile Stable, 
Bayside on Monday and Tues- 
day mornings. 

Swimming lessons are being 
given at the private pool of Mr. 
and Mrs. D. S. Murray, in 
Thoroughgood with Mrs. Flo 
Beagle and Miss Mary Helen 
Thomas instructing. 

Dramatics are being taught by 
Mrs. Joseph Deal; Charm, by 
Mrs. "Victor B. Moden; modern 
dance, Miss Emily Sue Nelson; 
badminton, Mrs. Ingrid Hinson; 
baton. Miss Barbara Glemming; 
and bridge, Mrs. Norman Ar- 
lington. . . 

According to^Mrs. R. L. Hite, 
co-ordinator of the program 'be- 
ing held each week at Baylake 
Methodist Church in Baylake 
Pines, the youngsters are asking 
"when are you going to have it, 
next year?" 






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After belay 

BAYSIDE -- The Creekmore 
Stables was the scehe of some 
ihiihty fine horsemanship Sun- 
day at the second pari or a 
horseshow that began two weeks 
ago but was postponed because 
Of bad weather. 

In the first event, musical 
chairs, Elida Eaton placed first; 
Peggy Bascdmb, second; Kenny 
Posey, third. 

Stbdifit elastM are |udgad 
on the student'* form, horse- 
manship management. Hunter 
divisions ere judged on the 
horse s performances. 

In the bareback jumping 
course, Eileen Creekmore, first; 
Phyllis Midgett, second; Betsey 
Hall, third. Bareback Jumping, 
Pam Meekins, Barbara David- 
son, secdnd; Linda Ny'es, third. 

Bareback Canter for ten and 
under, Susan Whitehurst, first; 
Peggy Baacomb, second; Lynn 
Colenda, third. 

Advanced bareback Jumping, 
Sally Wright, Aral; Pam Meek- 
ins,, second. 

Hunter over fence, Eileen 
Creekmore; Betsy Hall, second; 
Merit Tooey. . 

-Bareback trotting, Sherry 
Walker, first,* Martha Smith, 
second; Kathy Leveridge, third. 

Elementary jumping, Pam 
Cox, first; Timmy Posey, second; 
Donna Morgan, third. 
, Musical hats, Barbara David- 
son, first; Judy Hoffman, sec- 
ond; Butchie Creekmore, third. 

Pair jumping, Eileen Creek- 
moore and Susan Whitehurst, 
first; Betsy Hall and Merit 
Tooey, second; Linda Nye and 
Jane Hughes, third. 

Bareback Cantering, Norveen 
Puma, first; Pam Creekmore, 
second; Vickie Greene, third. 

Advanced jumping, Linda 
Nye, first; Pam Creekmore, sec- 
ond; Joan Skidmore, third. 

Elementary jumping, Kenny 
Posey, first; Susan Brown, sec- 
ond; Martha Smith, third. 

Pair jumping, Barbara David- 
son, and Sally Wright, first; 
Joan Skidmore & Vickie Greene, 
second; Vickie Meeks and Pam 
Meekins, third. 

Musical chairs, Norveen 
Puma, first; Sherry Parker, sec- 
ond; Pam Creekmore. 

BIBLE SCHOOL 

BAYSIDE— The Bayside Bap- 
tist Church will hold its third 
Vacation Bible School this sum- 
mer for the children of MOA 
Trailer court, just off Highway 
13, across from Be-Lo Food 
Market. 

The Bible School is scheduled 
for Aug. 20-24 and will begin 
each morning at 9 a.m. and con- 
tinue to noon. On Monday, open- 
ing day, there will be a walking 
parade through the trailer 
.court. The sessions of the school 
will be out of doors in the park 
area. Part of the recreation will 
be swimming in the freshwater 
lake adjoining the Trailer Court. 

The following will teach the 
Bible School: Mrs. Hyram 
Greer, Mrs, Robert Fodrey, Mrs. 
Jo'Thomas, Mrs. Jack Bookout, 
Mrs. Ed Lassiter and Rev. James 
V. DeFoe, pastor. 

BAYSIDE CHRISTIAN ' 
CHURCH NEWS 

BAYSIDE— Sunday at 7 p.m. 
the Board of Deacons of the 
Bayside Christian Church met 
at the church for theii* regular 
business meeting. The president 
of the board, Eugene Caldwell, 
presided. 



Mr. and Mrs. George Bobbins 
of Hermitage Road, Thprough- 
good are vacationing in Maine, 
their former home. 



Mr. and Mrs. Tom DeBusk of 
2724 Two Woods Road have had 
as their house guests, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Wesson and children, 
Julia and Grey, of Gladstone, Va. 

Comdr. and Mr*. Roy M. Sud- 
duth have recently moved to 
2732 Two Woods Road, Thor- 
oughgood, from Jacksonville, 
Fla. Comdr. Sudduth is attached 
to U.S.S. Saratoga now based at 
Portsmouth Navy Yard. 



ust 16, for surgery. 



The C. F. Pratt family of 
Meredith. .Road, Like Shores, 
after vacationing in Tennessee, 
have returned to' their home 



Rev. J. W. Reynolds Sr. and 
Mrs. Reynolds of Fairfax, Va. 
are visiting their son and daugh- 
ter in law, Rev .J. W. Reynolds 
Jr. family on Indian HiU Road, 
Baylake Pines. 



Mrs. W. H. Garner of Two 
Woods Road, Thoroughgood, 
held a "coffee" Tuesday morn- 
ing, August 14, at 10:30 a.m. at 
her home for the new arrivals 
on her street. 



Mrs. H. B. Robertson, Jr., of 
Lake Shores, enters Portsmouth 
Naval Hospital Thursday, Aug- 



David Ward of rnoroughgood 
is attending the Senior Method- 
ist Youth Fellowship assembly 
at Blackstone, Va., this week. He 
represents the Baylake Method- 
ist Church. 



The Mary McAden Circle of 
the Baylake Methodist Church 
will meet Thursday night, Aug. 
16, at 8:00 p.m. at the home of 
Mrs. Alfred Olson, James Drive. 



Bayside Baptist 
Hears Dr. Brawn 

BAYSIDE — Dr. John A. 
Brown, executive secretary for 
the 50 Baptist Churches of Nor- 
folk Baptist Association, filled 
the pulpit of the Bayside Baptist 
Church Sunday, while the pas- 
tor Rev. James V. DeFoe and 
family are on vacation at Ridge- 
crest, N.C. 

This week, August 12-18 is 
"Focus Week" for the "Sun- 
beams," boys and girls of the 
missionary organization. The 
young people sat in a body at 
the Sunday Worship Service. 

"Christmas In August," an 
annual Sunbeam affair, will be 
celebrated with a party Aug. 23 
at 10 A.M. Gifts for Indian 
young people will be brought to 
the party by the members. t 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August Te, lf62 

7-rS 



The Ruth Reynolds Circle of 
the Baylake Methodist Church 



will meet tonight at 8 o'clock at 
the home of Mrs. P. B. Young, 
III, 517 Lakeview Drive. 




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Tuesday night the Board of 
Christian Education met at the 
Bayside Christian Church. 

MISS BARBARA MESSICK 
ATTENDS FELLOWSHIP 

BAYSIDE— Saturday and Sun- 
day, Miss Barbara Messick of 
the Bayside Christian Church 
attended the Senior High Fel- 
lowship Assembly at Camp 
Moonelon, Elon College, N.C. 
She represented the Bayside 
Church. 

NEW MEMBERS RECEIVED 
IN FELLOWSHIP AT BAYLAKE 
PINES METHODIST CHURCH 

BAYSIDE— According to Rev. 
J. W. Reynolds, Jr., pastor of 
Baylake Pines Methodist Church, 
the following new members 
joined with the congregation 
Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. N. H. 
Scawthorn and Mr. and Mrs, G. 
F. Heuser. 



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By LESLIE RUSSELL 

THALIA— "HoW fine it is to 
be on good terms with Ameri- 
cans and to contribute to the 
world peace even a little!" 

This was the statement that 
Yasuto Kaiiiva of Japan closed 
with in a letter of introduction 
addressed to members of Prin- 
cess Anne School's Foreign Ex- 
change Student Committee. 

This fall, Yasuto will enroll 
at a senior at Princess Anna 
High School. He will live in 
the homo of Lt. Comdr. and 
Mrs. George C. Benoit in 
Thalia. 

Yasuto is able to come to 
America through the American 
Field Service. The purpose of 
this private, non-profit, educa- 
tional organization is to further 
the L understanding and good- 
will among the peoples of .the 
world. This purpose is carried 
out by bringing teen-age stu- 
dents from countries such as 
Argentina, Boliva, Cambodia, 
Deqmark, Ethiopia, France, Ger- 
many, Indonsia. Japan, Sweden, 
and many others, to study in 
American high schools and pre- 
paratory schools and to live in 
American families and commun- 
ities for a year. At the same 
time, the AFS sends U.S. teen- 
agers abroad for either a 'sum- 
mer or school term of exeperi- 
ence. 

No Simple Task 

There is a lot of work that 
goes into sponsoring an ex- 
change student. There must be 
an interest in the school in ac- 
cepting the student; forming a 
j local Chapter to watch over the 
student and AGs matters dur- 
ing the school year; raising $650 
participating contribution to 
AFS; and most important of all, 
choosing a family that has "a 
heart large enough to share a 
portion with another child from 
another land for a year — and 
probably forever." 

Under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. E. J. Gerloff of 180 Cedar 
Lane, and her committee, these 
things have been done and now 
a year in America awaits Yasuto 
Kaijiya. 

YasUto was born in China at 
the end of World War II. His 
parents left China and migrated 
to Japan. Yasuto grew up as 
other boys and as ha summed 
it up . . . "it seems to have been 
a very pleasant and happy one." 

At the ago of 11, Yasuto 
decided to take an examina- 
tion that would allow him to 
enter LaSalle Junior High 
where ho would- bo taught 
English for the first time. 
Yasuto was one of a hundred 
boys thaf was accepted. 



Yasuto's interests include: 
playing baseball, basketball, 
ping-pong; listening to music 
with^friends and judo. Yasuto 
also plays the Harmonica. 

His father is a successful 
businessman "who keeps a 
wholesale-store named "Fuiiya 
Ltd.," dealing with cosmetics, 
soap, shirts, etc." 

Yasuto's future plans after 
graduation include attending the 
University of Tokyo to major in 
economics. 

It is easy, to see why Mrs. 
Gerloff and 'her committee: 
Mrs. Gilbert Keene, president of 
Cape Henry Woman's Club; Mr. 
Edward G. Carson, president of 
North Thalia Civic League; Mr. 
E. E. Cox, Princess Anne's 
school advisor: Mrs. U. A. Sall- 
wasser, Mrs. Wm. H. Black, and 
of course, the Benoit family, 
who are giving so much, are so 
excited about receiving this boy 
who is so anxious to learn 
American history, "to slide on 
the water", (water ski), and "to 
see and learn the way of living 
and thinking of Americans." 

MEYER DAVIS BOND 
OPENS AT CAVALIER 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Cavalier Beach Club will pre- 
sent the Meyer Davis Orchestra 
under direction of Cv Del man 
Friday through Aug. 23. 

From the inaugural ball of 
Presidents 'Harding, Hoover, 
Coolidge, Roosevelt, and Eisen- 
hower to the social functions of 
Baltimore, Washington, New 
York, and Philadelphia, this or- 
chestra has won such popular- 
ity and demand that it is not 
unusual for engagements to be 
made ten or more years in ad- 
vance. Dates through 1975 have 
been reserved by socialites and 
dignitaries here and abroad. 

Meyer Davis' Music was ac- 
corded the distinction of provid- 
ing the first and only orches- 
tra imported to Europe for a 
debutante party under the 
leadership of Maestro Davis, 
himself, who was unanimously 
chosen by both the American 
and French Committees to play 
for the internationally famous 
Versailles Debutante Ball, held 
at the Royal Palace in Versailles, 
France on July 11, 1958. 

As Victor Recording artists, 
the Meyer Davis records are 
distributed throughout the 
world. 



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3 LBS 


25* 


NECTARINES 1 ««■ 39c 


CABBAGE "•»" mm 


» 5c 


RED PLUMS i™ ■•« 2 «*- J9c 

1 ' , fi . 


ONIONS — w 


£ til. MILK j|90 



DUKE'S LOW PRICED! 



DEL MONTE "FOOD FIESTA" 

CATSUP ,,ni oMM,n Z ' , ** 1 , '"' 39c p||||(j|'i»""Lf.o.»rtr»uiT2"-»»c»«55c 

BEANS """ umk 2 " •"■ cm 49c CORN • oiocn 2 '■'••• ■** "•* 35c 
PEAS """ """ 2 '*• , ""' "** 39c Dnl IK " N " frii - o "* M8 ' ( J 4,w - *— o5c 

49c 
29c 
49c 

10c 

69c 
19c 



MAYONNAISE 
KOSHER DILLS 
CHOPPED HAM 
APPLE JELLY 
PEANUT BUTTER 
MUST ARD RELISH 



CAROLINA BEAUTY 



SWIFT'S "Be OFF" 



WHITE HOUSE 



OT. JAM 



QT. JAR 



12-OZ. CAN 



S-OZ. JAR 



ANN PAGE KRUNCHY 24-6Z, JAR 



FRENCH'S SWEET 9-OZ. JAR 



JANE PARKER BAKED FOODS! 
GOLD, CINNAMON or SUGARED 

DONUTS « — 25c 



RAISIN 



PIE 



SPECIAL PRICEDI 1-LB.r 

rl APPLE 



PIE 



special friceoi i-lb. 



o-oz, fj WW 

soz 40C 



CAMPBELL'S SOUP 

ALL MEAT BASE VARIETIES 

6' i $1 W 
I0M-OZ. CANS 

Lesser Quantities Sold at Regular Price 



•pauauea 
JIFFY 

i 



JELL Y or LEMON ROLL S 59c 
CHEESE CRESCENT ■«•« •«. 35c 
VIENNA BREAD, Plain .n«<i9c 
WHITE BREAD t 2 •»-«• i— Sic 



CAKE MIXES 
10c 



ALl 
VARIETIES 8-OZ. PKG 



BIO 

VALUEI 



FROZEN FOOD VALUES! 

PENDLETON BRAND 



PEAS 
10c 



10-OZ. FKO, 

ICK or CHEFS KMCE 

s-ei. fM. IOO 



FROST MIXES m "»»» ?»-«■ >«. 1 Qc 

ARMOURs BANNER BRAND 

SAUSAGE 

10H-OZ. CANS iXdU 



NUTLEY 



OLEO 

A R'ic 

*W 1-LB. SOLIDS B^BlJ|# 

4 t». erat nttM 590 



THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 12. 



C 



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'-^^^"^^^i^^^i^^^mimvmmmmmmmmmim 



Legal Notices 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEWS 



SEKVINC VIRGINIA BtACH AND PRINCESS ANNE 



Classified Ads 



SECTION B 



VrRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1962 



Beach Visitor 



Mrs. Bernard MacFadden Speaks 
Out On Beauty, Youth, Diets 




Mrs. Bernard MacFadden 



By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 

VIRGINIA BEACH— "The average woman is too concerned 
about a few pounds. Being thin is not normal. A woman was made 
to be voluptous and is far more attractive when she is." $- 

This encouraging statement for weight-conscious women was 
made by a person who should 
know, Mrs. Bernard MacFadden, 
widow of the famous physical 
culturist and health food faddist. 

Visiting here last week with 
her daughter, Mrs. Carol Turn- 
bridge, the energetic and ani- 
mated Mrs. MacFadden stop- 
* r ped briefly during speaking 
sessions at the Association for 
Research and Enlightenment 
for an interview. 

Wearing a silk orange and 
white print ruffled suit dress, 
she discussed her recently pub- 
lished book, "Barefoot In Eden," 
which is being considered for a 
movie, her health spa now un- 
der construction at Goshan, 
N.Y., her appearance on the 
new Jack Paar television show 
this fall (she visited his former 
show 21 times) and the philso- 
phy that has kept her vivacious 
and youthful even though she 
boasts of being 57. 

3 Tips For Youth 
"In my American and Euro- 
pean lecture tours on 'Long 
Lasting Youth, Beauty and 
Peace of Mind,' I outline a re- 
juvenation method for. women 
that will take 15 years off their 
age," she said. "This method 
can be boiled down into three 
point*; create a desire, have 
faith in yourself 'and plan and 
work toward a goaL" 

These lectuVes and the book 
are, part of Mrs. jdacFadden's 
plana to carry on her late hus- 
bandVwork. A mutual Interest 
hi physical culture and spiritual 
well-being led to their introduc- 
tion in Texas and developed a 
happy 9-year marriage until 
MacFadden's death in 1954. She 
was the last of his four wives. 

The best way to Jose weight, 
Mrs* MacFadden believes, is 
by fasting ('The Bible says to 
fast") two days a week on 
fruits and juices. 

"Those two days will give the 
body a chance to rest," she ex- 
plained. "We push our bodies 
too much and force it with ex- 
cessive food. Three meals a day 
are not necessary; one heavy 
meal and two lesser ones are 
sufficient." 

For her own routine, Mrs. 
MacFadden has the juice of half 
a lemon in a warm cup of water 
for breakfast and a tablespoon 
of honey as a, pick-me-up at 
mid-morning. Honey, she said, 
is a "God-send" for the body 
and produces' quick energy 
without stimulation. 

Names "Killers" 

"The killers are over indulg- 
ence of the stimulants, alcohol, 
tobacco, colas and condiments," 
she said. "These can be taken 
in moderation but most people 
do. not use them moderately." 



CHILDREN'S DRIVE 
CHAIRMEN NAMED 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Mrs. R. 
Lawson Miles and Mrs! M. Ward 
Cole will serve as Co-chairmen 
of this year's fund raising cam- 
paign in Virginia Beach and 
Princess Anne County for the 
Children's Home Society of Vir- 
ginia, it was announced recently. 

W. A. Roper, president of the 
society, said "We are very for- 
tunate to have these ladies head 
the campaign." 

"The Society faces a constant- 
ly growing need for funds to 
take care of homeless babies and 
find suitable homes for them," 
Roper added. 

'These babies must look to 
the people of Virginia Beach & 
Princess Anne County and the 
other citizens of Virginia for 
help. We hope everyone will re- 
spond generously this year." 




BASKXN' IN THE SUN 



By GORDON BASKIN 




Gordon Baskin 



An ordained minister in the 
Universal Spiritual Church, a 
non-sectarian group that "helps 
all people to a higher self by 
realizing their own forces," Mrs. 
MacFadden was delighted to see 
the operation of the A.R.E. dur- 
ing her speaking sessions. 

"The Association will grow 
and grow," she predicted, "and 
in time will become known the 
world over. People are seeking 
the truth of Bfe for only through 
knowledge can we cope with the 
situations that are building up 
in the world today. 

Mrs. MacFadden has counsel- 
ing studios for her beauty and 
youth program at 21 W. 58th St. 
in New York City. 

TEXTBOOKS ON SALE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Text 
books for this coming year will 
be on sale at Virginia Beach 
High School beginning August 
20 from 9 a.m. to noon and from 
1 to 3 p.m. Monday through Fri- 
day. 

Registration of new students 
will he from 9 to 1130 a.m. 
through Friday. 



L am certain that Miss Amy Vanderbilt bows to no 
human when it comes to deciding What spoon is used on 
which melon. Surely she, the arbiter of the social graces, 
even speaks in less than a, scream to Miss Emily Post; 
although I'm sure they aren't constant din- 
ner companions. By the way — I'd certainly 
like to watch them at the same dinner 
table. I wouldn't want to eat anything — 
I wouldn't dare. I'd just want to see how 
fhey^made out 4 with the spoons and dealt 
with the firmer bqwls. 

Anyway, I'm a little peeved it Miss 
Vanderbilt. I think she's carried this 
etiquette business • little toe far. I'm 
referring to the headline on her column 
last week. It ran, "Young Wines Go With Corned Beef 
Hash" Well, nowl 

I admit I am never at my best when I am at a dinner 
where each plate is flanked by dozens of spoons, forks, 
knives, chisels, and other assorted hardware. The whole 
business makes me nervous. There are several rules of 
thumb to follow, of course. One states that you start from 
the outside and use the tools in order moving toward the 
plate. Another says to watch the fiostess and follow her 
lead. This last rule is fine if you have eyes like Roger Maris. 
You never get mudh to eat, since you are too busy watching 
the hostess, but you at least have the proper fork in hand 
when the untouched plate is whisked out from under your 
Starving nose. 

Parf ait on Knife? 
I've never had any luck with the outside to inside 
gambit, as I usually wind up with a butter knife with 
which to eat the parfait. It can be done, of course, but the 
stuff drools down your shirt front, people stare, servants 
raise eyebrows, and all that sort of thing. Very bad for 
the morale. Messy, too. 

Until Miss Vanderbift's column appeared I'd never 
worried about the matter too much, as my invitations to 
seated dinners has fallen off to almost zero. When I a/n 
invited to dinner it is usually in someone's back yard, and 
on most occasions you bring your own hamburger. Now 
that she has expressed herself about the necessity of wines 
with corned beef hash, it makes me feel like Linus without 
his blanket. Any day now she'll begin to pass on informa- 
tion about how to handle hot dogs and such fare. Of 
course, in my circle, practically anything she suggests will 
be an improvement, but I'm getting a little old to remem- 
ber a set of involved rules. 

I've been a little leery of this wine business any- 
way. You've seen how it goes; fellow takes a mouthful, 
rclls it over his tongue, qazes soulfully at the ceilinq, 
and then drops a remark like, "Ah yes! Beaujolais, 1959; 
from the vineyard of my old friend Pierre. The rather 
bitter aftertaste leads me to believe these grapes are 
from his south slooe!" Nuts. I'll never behove It in a 
thousand years. Oh it sounds very grand — but if the 
exact truth were known the so-called wine exports 
couldn't tell the difference between Pabst 62 and warm 
drinking wafer. 

Whenever I find myself in the company of one of 
these "experts," I take a firm grip on my wallet and watch 
and get the heck out of there. A man who can lie like that 
is capable of anything. 

So I better give up corned beef hash. Pitty. I like the 
stuff. I just haven't the wine glasses to handle it properly. 
Miss Vanderbilt suggests seven wines that are suitable. 
With seven glasses in front of me, I'd be dazzled. Anyway 
—I like corned beef hash for breakfast, and after a qlass 
each of seven different wines, I would be in no condition 
to shave. The only decent and respectable /thing to do 
would be to go back to bed. 



Local Lawyers 
In Move to 
New Building 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The law 
firm of Brydges & Broyles will 
move its offices Saturday to the 
newly constructed Professional 
Building at 1900 Laskin Road. 

The offices were formerly lo- 
cated at 3116 Pacific Avenue. 
Two new attorneys, James 
R. MeKenry and Bruce 6. 
Murphy, have recently be- 
come associated with the law 
firm. 

MeKenry, a native of Lynch- 
^psilon social 
*! i g m a Alpha 
urg, graduated 
rom University 
f -Va. in 1958 
■/here he was a 
member of the 
raternity and 
he Eli Banana 
tibbon Society, 
before graduat- 
ing from the 
MeKenry University's law 
school this February he was a 
member of the Phi Alpha Delta 
legal fraternity and participated 
in Moot Court. 

He was admitted to The Vir- 
ginia Bar in February and is a 
member of the Virginia State 
Bar Association. Mcenry resides 
with his wife, Monica, at 6203 
Atlantic Avenue. 

A native of Virginia Beach, 
Murphy attended the University 
of Virginia and 
Sorbonhe Uni 
versity in Paris 
France, a n c 
graduated froir 
the T. Q. Wil 
liams School o< 
Law of the Un 
iversity of Rich 
morid in Febru 
ary. He was c 
member of the 
St. Elms Hall Murphy 
Social fraternity at the Ujiiver- 
sitrfof Virginia. * 

While in Richmond he was a 
member of Phi Delta Theta 
legal fraternity, was a student 
librarian, served on the Student 
Council and was secretary of the 
Student Bar Association. He, 
too, was admitted to the Vir- 
ginia Bar in February and is a 
member of the Virginia State 
Bar Association. 

Murphy presently resides with 
his wife, Lou Ann, and young 
daughter, Laura, on Rolfe Lane 
in Bay Colony. 




Boosts Confederacy 




Sohool Teacher 



ALANTON COUPLE 
ENJOYING GUEST 
FROM LYON, FRANCE 



_ . A i»..n-N>w» Staff Phoioj 

Owen and Civil War Momentos 



At 'Dome" 



Confederate Display 
Feature of Antique 
Show Here This Week 



LONDON BRIDGE — Paul 



Plea Goes Out 
To Blood Donors 

VIRGINIA BEACH — A plea 
for blood donors has been sent 
by Mrs. Lcds M. Nelson, chair- 
man of the Blood Program of 
the Princess Anne County Chap- 
ter of the American- Red Cross 
to all churches in "the Princess 
Anne County & Virginia Beach. 
Mrs. Nelson cited an alarming 
rate in her letter stating that 
the residents of this area had 
given only 30% of their assigned 
quota based on blood used. 

"The need for blood is urgent 
and ever present," she said. "It 
is needed to save the lives of 
accident victims, to supply doc- 
tors striving to save lives 
through surgery, and for the 
diseases that require frequent 
blood transfusions." 

All of these needs are de- 
pendant upon the Tidewater 
Regional Blood Program of the 
American Red Cross in this area 
to supply whole blood and blood 
derivatives. 

Because of the demand of 
blood and the present lack, it 
has been necessary to call in 
other areas to help, Mrs. Nel- 
son said. 

The next bloodmobile visit 
will be Monday at the Alan B. 
Shops rd Convention Dome at s 
19th and Pacific Avenue et 
Virginia Beach from noon to 
6 p.m. 

RECENT GUESTS 
VIRGINIA BEACH — Recent 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn 
Dill of High Point Ave., were 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Poots and 
three children of Haddenfield, 
N J., Also visiting the Dill home 
were Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Odum of San Juan, Puerto 
Rico. 



Owen may not believe that the 
South will rise again, but he's 
sure going to revive it a bit at|hong 
the Fourth Antiques Show and 
Sale this week-end at the Alan 
B. Shepard Convention Center. 
Owen, owner of Aladdin's 
Lamp Antique Shop at London 
Bridge, will have one of the 
largest displays at the show and 
will devote it almost exclusively 
to authentic Confederate items 
from the Civil War period^ 

He has enough armament — 
guns, swords, bayonets, powder 
flasks and even bullets — to 
start his own army but also has 
an assortment of books, money 
and household items dating 
back to the days of the Old 
South. 

Also Co-Publisher 

The Civil War holds a special 
interest for this wood-worker- 
turned-antique-dealer, perhaps 
because he is a native of his- 
torical Winchester. He doesn't 
consider himself an avid Civil 
War buff but his interest in\the 
period prompted him to co- 
publish a book, "Old Jube," 
claimed as the only complete 



biography of Confederate Gen- 



eral Jubal A. Early, with the 
book's author, Millard K. Bus- 



This book will be displayed 
for sale at the show along with 
others dealing with history and 
genealogy. Of particular interest 



By JOY HAKIM 

ALANTON— When you play 
Monopoly in French, Broadway 
becomes the Champs Elysee and 
Park Place is the Rue de la Paix. 

That's just one of the things 
Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Agelasto Jr. 
have learned this summer. 

They have a young French 
schoolteacher living with them 
arid while she is discovering 
America they're finding out 
about France. 

Enjoys Visitors 

"Having a foreigner stay 
with you is a wonderful experi- 
ence," said Mrs. Agelasto, she 
thinks more people should try 
it. (In the past the Agelastos 
have had English students visit 
them.) 

Twenty-three - year-old Made- 
leine Gannin arrived . here in 
mid-July from Lyon, France, 
and has been busy ever since 
with rounds of visiting, parties, 
luncheons and sightseeing — all 
under the aegies of the Agelas- 
tos. 

She has been to Williamsburg 
and Yorktown, to the Boardwalk 
Art Show and the Tidewater 
Arts Festival, to summer ses- 
sions at Princess Anne High 
School and Country Day School. 
She has bowled and watershed 
and has visited a model home in 
a new housing development. 
Her English is limited, but 



Riganto Honored 
By P.A. Jaycees 

PRINCESS ANNE — Gus 



to local people is the "History Riganto ^was selected Princess 
and Biography of Norfolk Coun- 
ty" by William H. Stewart, cov- 



Births at Beach Hospital 

Aug. 2— Mr. and Mrs, Marvin 
Willard Murphy, 421-20th St., 
Va. Beach; girl. 

Aug. 2 — Mr. and Mrs. Loren 
E. Duval, Rt. 2, Box 50, London 
Bridge, Va,; girl. 

Aug. 2 — Mr. and Mrs. James 
A. Carroll Jr., Box 10A, Munden, 
Va.; girl. 

Aug. 3 — Mr. and Mrs. John 
Edward Hamilton, 210-83rd St., 
Virginia Beach; girl. * 

Aug. 4 — Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd 

C. Johnson, 6601 Waterworks 
Road, Norfolk, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 5 — Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. 
Burgess, 605 Catalina Ave., 
Lynnhaven, Va»; girl. 

Aug. 6 — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
W. Sitek, 522 Delaware Ave., Va. 
Beach; boy. 

Aug. 7— Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
A. Holcomb, 209-17th Street, Va, 
Beach, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 8^-Mr. and Mrs. Jerry 

D. Rutz, 419 Garwood Ave., Bay- 
side, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 8— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
D. Harrison Sr., Box 548, Oce- 
ana, Va.; boy. 

FAMILY VISITING 
VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Gleason of Balti- 
more and their four children are 
visiting Mrs. Gleason's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Dill, at their 
home on High Point Avenue. 



ering the period from 1637 to 
1900. It gives brief biographies 
of such well-known names as 
Fentress, Ackiss, Etheridge and 
many other Princess Anne 
County stalwarts. 

An antique dealer since 
1950, Owen came, to this area 
a year ago because of the in- 
tense and fast-growing popula- 
tion, feeling that it offered a 
good market. 

"Actually, I would rather be 
out buying and selling antiques 
or working in my workshop 
than confined to the shop,"" he 
said, "but as long as I keep col- 
lecting, I've got to keep selling." 
Owen, who presently resides 
at the Association for Research 
and Enlightenment on 67th St., 
was "forced" into the antiques 
business, he said, by friends 
wanting to buy his collections. 
He's been "hooked" ever since. 



Jaycee of the Month 
Princess Anne group 



Anne 

The 
sponsored. Charlie McDowell and 
Tommy Nelson, winners of the 
local tournament, who repre- 
sented Virginia in the National 
Tournament. 

Riganto is associated with 
Freddy's Restaurant at Princess 
Anne Plaza. 

For the month of July, the 
Jaycees selected Paul Stalx- 
nor, the Seep Box Derby 
chairman, and Bobby Steven- 
son, for his work on the blood 
drive. 

Al Teich Jr., past president of 
the Norfolk Jaycees and how in- 
ternational commissions coordin- 
ator, spoke on his portfolio at 
the Aug. 6' meeting. 

Members of the Eastern 
Shore Chapter putlined their 
orintation program for the Prin- 
cess Anne group at the' .same 
meeting. 1 



she has been amazed at the 
number of area people who 
speak French and want to 
practice their language on her. 

How has Miss Gannin reacted 
to all she has seen? 

The .was intriqued by Wil- 
liamsburg. "We have a village 
of the Middle Ages near Lyon," 
she said, "but people don't live 
there as at Williamsburg." 

Lend of "Free" 

Most foreigners associate 
America with materialism, but 
Madeleine was surprised that so 
many things are free here. She 
was thinking of the plays and 
exhibitions at . the Tidewater 
Arts Festival, of the Boardwalk 
Art Show and of much of Wil- 
liamsburg and Yorktown. 

"In France you pay to go to 
the museum or outdoor thea- 
ter," she said. 

She found a model home at 
Princess Anno Plaza delight- 
ful, "We have no construction 
of this 
ell th< 

washer, . dr * ere only for 
the rich In once. 
Bowling is also only for th» 
wealthy in France she com- 
mented. Madeleine got a spare 
and a strike to end her first 
frame here. 

Blonde, attractive Madeleine) 
Gannin is a graduate of the 
University of Lyon. She teaches 
fourth grade in a public school . 
in that city. 

"There are 35 students in my 
class," she said, "and that is 
considered a very small class." 
She was amazed at the small 
summer school classes at Prin- 
cess Anne High, School. "High 
school classes hi France ofted 
have a hundred or more stu- 
dents." 

Impressed by School 
She was impressed by the 
amount and quality of the scien- 
tific equipment in the class- 
rooms, in France only the teach- 
er has a microscope and other 
materials. 

There are parent teacher as- 
sociations in the French schools 
but the teacher-pupil relation- 
ship is much more formal. Stu- 
dents would never wear short* 
to school as they were doing the 
day Madeleine visited Princess 
Anne High School 

In Madeleine's class many of 
the youngsters are French Al- 
gerians recently moved to 
France. 

How has Madeleine reacted to 
the American's she has met? 

"Everyone is so hospitably 
and so calm," she said, and H 
you've ever met e volatile 
southern Frenchmen you can 
appreciate the contrast." 
As a final token of her ap- 
proval of this country she a<j 




i, Ma Kim rnotoi 
Mrs. Agelasto, Madeleine and Peter Agelasto. 



Page 2-6 



■ 



■ 
i 




Virginia Beech Sun-News, Thursday, August 16, 1962 



c*s— wTAfcTv ( a 
, W— wAvy-Tv no) 

MONDAY thru FRIDAY 
MORNINO 



TV Schedule for Week - Thurs. thru 




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AFTERNOON 

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(1*) — Tour first InpressioD 
(IS) — Jim Wynun Show 
( S) — Search For Tomorrow 
(ISr— Truth 



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(1SJ— Camouflage 

( »>— The OuidSn*- Li»hl 

(16) — NBC New* Report 

< S>— Get Torether 

(16) — Disllat for Dollars 

(1S>— -Bit Km 

{ fr-Mtt TV 

{ll—MaUnr ror 

(IS) — San 

1 11 — N e w t 

( 8)— f —wort 



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(It) — NBC Newt 
( »>— Boom Party 
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(131 — Sera Ken 
( 3>- 
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< 3>— To Tell The Trath 
(!•)— Oar • Dautfctara 

is, — w h „ in, nu Twt 
( 8) — dnilrare of Charm 
( t>— Secret Storm 
«!•»— aj.k, tVxua Par Daddy 
< IS) — American Bandstand 
1 3) — EJre of NWht 

(It^W Nawa^bart 



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( S>— Weather 

( S) — Dr, Whitehurst Reports 

Prom Europe 
(lt>— Club Ahoy 
( 8)— Movie 
(IS) — Die Sariy Show 
(H»— Highway rwtral 
(IS)— Local Newa 
(13) — ABC News 
• 3) — Knothole Crab 
« » ) ■ Sp ort* Round-Da 

8) — TT Reporter 
(It)— Six Thirty fta pon 
(13) — Pusr Gubo 
< Si — Weatharmar 
( S>— Doui-Ue Bdwarda 
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( 1*— Huatlsar-1 



eses 



THURSDAY EVENING 

1:66 i 8) — Shannon 

(it) — Miami Coderoorer 

(18) — Beachcomber 
I8*w ( 3>-JThe Fly% Doctor 

(It)— The OulSrVt 

(13)— O.ii* & Harriet 
8:66 < 8) — Frontier Circus 

< 13) — Donna Beed Show 
Ss*e (lt>— Dr. Kildaire 

.*. iit^rSJeT ' 
(13)— My Three Son* 

9sm 5.J?— IP* 0r »» *■*»**• 

(It)— The Lively Ones 
(13) — The Law A Mr. Jom* 
lt.ee ( 3) — Americana "A Portrait in 
Veree" 



C ME 

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For Fast Personalized Service 

when 
BUYING - SELLING - RENTING 

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Virginia Beach Blvd. »f Lynnhaven 
MULTIPLE LISTING REALTOR 



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(lt>— Eleren O'clock 

(13)— ABC Newi 
11 il* ( 8)— Weather 

(1*>— Newa, Weather. Sport* 

(!•) — Wsathwr 
HilS { " 



11:1 






liJtIW ^ 

( 3>— ttr. Whitehorat 

afrvBw •wttf^DPtt 

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FRIDAY EVENING 



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The Peat 



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11:16 

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3)— Boat* 

(lt>— The Detect! re. 
(13)— The Pllntatoeea 
(1S>— 77 Sanaat Strip 
( 3>— Father of the Bride 

(IS)— Pure* Special 

t 8)— Tbt Twillrtt Zom . 

(IS)— Tartat: The Coernptora 

(IS)— Chat Huntley Beporta 

(18>— Newt. Waathar 
( »— waathar 

( 3>— Sport* 

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( S> — Dr. Whltehnrat Beporta 

Prom Europe 
(it)— Sport* 
(13)— Shock 
( 3)— Marie 
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SATURDAY 
MORNING 




-Wild Bill Hickok 

AFTERNOON 



18:66 ( 3)— Sky Bint 

(1S>— Mr. Wlsard 

(13) — But* Bunny 
1*:3S < 8)— Newa 

(IS) — TV* Hour of Stan 

(IS) — White Hunter 
lit* ( 3)— Hopalont Cawidy 

(13)— Tlkint* 
IdS ( 3>— Film 

(IS)— Honee Detective 

<18>— Science Fiction Theatre 
1:*6 ( 3) — Cleveland at Baltimore 
*:SS (IS)— Public Service 

(IS)— Morte * ' i 

t:SS (It)— Baseball— San Francisco at 

Mttwanke 
3:3S (13) — Championship Bowlinr 
4:8S ( S) — Baseball Scoreboard 
4iStt ( 8)— Western Marshall 

(IS) — Tales of Texas Bangers 
9.-SS (IS)— Movie 

(13>— Teleaport* 
SlSS ( S>— Lone Banter 
6:3S ( 3)— Grand Ole Opry 

(13)— Peter Sunn 

EVENING 

6.-SS ( 8)— Icabod & Me 

(1S>— PUrhOOse IS 
ttSS ( 3)— Art Unkletter & Ths Kid* 

X IS)— All-Star Wrestlint 
•'** < S>— New*.W*ather 

?:«S ( S)— Newt 
ISS f 8) — Exclusive 
T»SS ( K— Parry Mason 

(IS)— Tale* of Walla Pargw 
t:St (13) — Boom Per One Mora 
mm ( 3)— The Defenders 
(IS)— Tall Mas 
(13)— Leave It To Beaver 
ttSS (IS)— Movies 

(13) — Lawrence Welk 
•tBS ( Si — Hare Onn, Will Travel 



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Back in 1913, fewer people had cars*. .far 




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ItiSS ( S)— Ounsmoks 

dsv— tomaMon to 

lt:46 (1S>— Saturday 
ItiSS ( S)— 11th Bour 




SUNDAY 




Parartta 



Xm-mmw* 

(13)— Comedy 91 

ItiSS < 8>— Look Op ai 

(IS)— Safety Th The wirt 
(rt>— Sunday ThaStre 

UMW ( S)— Camera S 

(1S>— Uv* * tears 

(1S>— Topic 



tftft- 



II 



AFTERNOON 



II:tS 






1»:3S 



11:86 
liSS 



1:18 

l:3S 

l:tfl 

l.-SS 

8.18 
1:38 
Sitt 
4.-SS 

S:SS 
«:*S 
4:3S 



6.-SS 
8:36 

tiSS 
6:3S 

I -Ot 
7:8t 



8:30 



»:St 

tiSS 

10:SS 



ItiSS 
11:0S 



II:1S 

UllS 

11:28 
l.-SS 



( S>— Window 
(IS)— Crisis 
(IS)— Wild BUI Hickok 
( 3) — Waahimrton Conversation 
(IS)— Inaitht 
(18>— Trsckdown 
< 3)— CBS Haws 
( »}— Newa, Weather. Sport* 
(IS)— Teleaport Dlreat . 
US) — Hollywood Showcase 
( 8) — Builders Showcase 
( 3) — Adventure Theatre 
(IS) — Sport* Direst 
(1S>— Sport* Beet 
( 3) — Builder* Showcase 
(IS)— Tidewater Tide* va Greenville 
( S>— Movie 
(1S>— Thrill* A Skill* 
(1S>— San Francisco Beat 
(IS) — laauea A Answer* 
(IS)— Editor'* Choice 
( S>— Baseball Scoreboard 
( 3) — Great Voice* from Great 
Book* , 

{}&%%&*""*". - 
( 3)— A Way of Thinkint 
(IS)— Wis* World of oporto 
( SI— Amateur Hour ' ' 
(IS)— Patterns In Music 

EVENING 

( S) — 20th Century 

(10)— Meet The Press 

( 8)— Mister id 

(10)— Thu I* NBC New* 

(18)— Mori* Tim* 

( S>— Lassie •* 

(IS)— Bullwtnkle 

( S>*-D*nnU The 

(IS)— Walt Dtaney 

(134— -Follow The Sun 

( 3)— Ed Sullivan 

(IS) — Adventure* of Sir Fraocto 

Drake 
(13)— Hollywood Special 
( 8>— «JB. The*MrtV 
(IS) — Bonanza 
( 3) — Who In This World 
( S) — Candid Camera 
(10) — DuPont Show 
(13) — Lawmen 
( S>— What's My Una 
( S)— Erie Sevaratd 
<1S>— Weekend Newt 
(13)— Late News 
(It)— Movie 
(13)— Weather 
( S) — Sport* Report 
(13)— Theatre IS 
( 3)— Exclusive 
(1S>— New. 




WEDNESDAY EVENING 



S.-SS 




AJJC New. 



Mystery Th eat r e 
jwaiiao Bra 
Sr— Dick Tan Dyke Show 
Bour 
Tour Hunch 




(IS)— Lata Weather 
(ljj— Lo<*J New».Waather-Sport* 
11:88 ( S>— Or. Whlt*hur*t ~ 

USr_Ewrto 8aK>Pt 
UiSS ( 3)— Movie 

(1»)— Theatre IS 
lists U6>— Tooitht 



11 US 
11:13 
I lilt 



MONDAY EVENING 

7:66 ( 3)— The Pioneers 
(16>— Kint of Dlatr 
(IS)— Sea Hunt 
7:38 ( 3) — To Tell The Truth 

(IS) — Man A The Challenge 
(1S>— -Cheyenne 
8:66 ( 8)— Pete A Gladys 
(18) — National Velvet 
8:86 ( 3) — Father Know* Beat 
(16) — Price Is Blrht 
(13) — Law A The Plainsman 
tiSS ( 3>— Desi-Luey Comedy Bour 
(10)— 87th Precinct 
(13)— Surf side Six 

10:86 ( 3)— Henneeey 

(16)— NBC Actuality 
(13)— Ben Casey 

10:30 ( 3) — Money Talks 

11166 ( 8)— nth Hour Raw* 

(16)— Eleven O'Clock B*»«»*/~~A 
(13)— ABO- New* Final / } 
( 3)— Weather ' / 

(IS) — Local News. Weather. Sport* 
I 3>— £port t i 

(16)— Late Weathw \ 

11:88 ( 3)— Dr. Whitehurst Report* ' 
Prom Europe 
(16) — Sport* 

11:8S ( 3)— Morte 

11:87 (13)— Theatre 13 

11:38 (It)— Tonight 

TUESDAY EVENING 

7:tt ( 3) — Deith Valley Day* 

(1S>— Orahd Jury 

(13) — Evert lade* 
7:88 ( 3) — Rescue 8 

(IS) — Laramie 

(13) — Burs Bunny 
8:88 ( 8)— (Password 

(13)— Batchelor Father 
8:36 ( 3)— Dobie Oilli* 

(16)— Alfred Hitchcock 

(IS) — The New Breed 
8:08 ( 3>— Comedy Spot 

(10) — Dick Powell Show 
6:36 ( 3) — Money Talks 

(IS) — Your* For A Sons; 
16:88 ( 3) — Talent Scoula 

(lO)^-Cain'a Hundred 

(13)— Alcoa Premier 

(16) — Eleren O'Clock teport 
(13>— ABC NewiT^ ^^ 
»*5 (13)— l*to Bewa- 
il 1I6 ( 8>— Weather 
litis (13)— Local New*. Waathar, 

Sport. 
11:16 ( 3) — Movie 




=fl 




4-H Activities 
and Events 

By KIISTER IVANS, JR. 

Assistant County Agsnt 



\ 



Dr.11 Porfsm No. 32o^8reary Cnorsi. 
One 0/ tht Noton't pr*Hittf tt/lmt ho* 
ftt new tnaflow n+cklin» pnd b full skirt 
laid In unpfttmd pfeaft. No. 33*51 com.j 
to tint 10, n, 14. 16, 18. Site 14 to**« 
3% yordi or 15-(nca fabric 

Ns.d/swork PoMsrn No. 733. Iota 
Motift. One dot*n colorful rmi in o 
vortofy of liz.i moy b* ambroioVsd on 
tewoh, eproiw, ptoca mof 1 ond all ttnwu. 
Hot-iron trantftr potlsro No. 7&S contain* 
compfafs totfrueftoni. 

Our N*.d/.wor* Cofofof containing 
coupon lot finding *M potrsrs trot It 
30 c*nfi. 

Sand 35i for *oxh Arm poffsrn, Ui 
lot soch aaedlswort poWsra ladd 5# for 
aocn poftora for fhlrd e(ott mailing and 
!0< tar oocn poftorn tor fhri etoti wail- 
ing) 19 AUOlfY UNC IUUA0, lot 1490, 
Now Tort I, N.r. 



1 



VIRGINIA'S YOUTH 
FACE THE FUTURE 

Tike a look ai the future job 
outlook. "By 1970 you will be one 
of 87 million workers employed, 
by 1975 you'll be one of 94 mil- 
lion. You will find good oppor- 
tunities close to home, for al- 
most 3 million of the full-time 
employed persons in 1975 will 
be Virginians. 

During the next 10 years you 
will be one of 26 million young 
men and women under 25 years 
of age entering the working 
world. Competition for the more 
desirable jobs—the jobs you 
wil want — will be keen. 

Training Will Bs Nssdtd 
. Training will be needed for 
future employment. The failure 
to finish high school will great- 
ly limit your opportunities for 
employment. Many business 
firms will not hire those without 
the minimum of a high school 
diploma. A college degree is a 
requirement for many jobs. 

In the 1960's over 7.5 million 
young people will drop out of 
school before graduation, and 
about one-third will drop out be- 
fore completing the 8th grade. 
Your first step tpward a good 
job is to finish high school. 
Unemployment R Schooling 
During the 1959 recession 
period, a survey of unemploy- 
ment by the amount of educa- 
tion of the workers showed 8% 
of the non-high school graduates 
searching for a job, About 4% 
of the workers with a high 
school diploma were looking 
for work, whHe only about 2% 
of the workers with -some col- 
lege training were unemployed. 
Young men and women who 
drop out of school seldom feel 
secure on the job: They are the, 
first to be dropped from the 
payroll and the last to be em- 
ployed. 

You can make plans now for 
your job and employment secur- 
ity by finishing high school. 
Eiycstjori, Pays Off in Cash 
Education pays off in cash. A 
high school graduate will, on 
the average, receive $76,000 
more lifetime income than those 
who drop out before finishing. 
That is $19,000 more income 
for each of the 4 years spent 
in high school. It also pays ad- 
ditional dividends to continue 
your education beyond high 
school. A college degree will, on 
the average, add an additional 
$177,000 to your lifetime in- 
come, or over $44,000 for each 
of the 4 years spent in college. 
More Women Will Be Employed 
It doesn't make as much dif- 
ference as it used to whether 
you check Vmale" or "female" 
On your application blank. More 
and more young women are be- 
ing hired to fill important career 
positions. By 1970, one, out of 




VACATIONERS 

Consult Oor Dentists 

if in need of a new set of 

TEETH 

Repairs 

While You Wait 

9 TO 6 P.M. DAILY 

CLOSED SATURDAY 

SUmUni " 



SEMfc 

fop 



BOMf* 



A 




DENTISTS 

No Appointment 



Phone 
MA 2-4575 

FREE PARKING 

Motor Ramp Garage 
114 W. Main St 

^^mwmmm^mmmmwmwm 




FfNAHONG 



HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS 



QUI NEWEST QfFICE; 6034 VA. BEACH BLVD. 
AT THOMAS CORNER 

Hosst Officr. 112 West York Street 
OFFtcjf 




Sell 

lesff.ijkta 



« twjvert ft owe 
U S. KUf ftt -Rimytoo 



every 3 workers in Awerica will 
be a woman; and odds now art 
2 to 1 that a young girl will 
spend part of her life as an em- 
ployee. 
Future Opportunities Greater 

There's lots of room at the 
top for those who prepare! By 
1970 our growing economy will 
need about 40% more profes- 
sionally trained people than at 
present. By 1965, we'll need 
45,000 more doctors, 605,000 
more teachers, 80,000 more 
natural scientists, and 100,000 
more engineers — to mention 
just a few. Well also need more 
people trained in business, more 
clerical, secretarial and sales 
workers, more service workers. 
The need for skilled craftsmen 
in manual occupations will also 
increase. 

Unskilled laborers will have 
a hard time finding a job. There- 
fore, if you want a job you 
should get training in some 
specialized field of work. 

The need for professionally 
trained agricultural workers will 
increase. Each year 15,000 new 
jobs in 500 different occupations 
related to agriculture become 
available, while at present our 
colleges are graduating only 
7,000 agricultural students each 
year. 







East 



Bath tide* vulnerable. South deaU, 

NORTH 
e>KJ»t 

$II7S3 

WEST m EAST 

♦it ii if,-* 

est fur 

♦ 10865 ♦JI741 

SOUTH 
a>A4l 
♦ A J It 3 

tstlfi 

♦AQ 

The Bidding: 

Sooth West North 

INT P"« 7 NT 

psss pa si 

Opening lead; S of spade*. 

South won the first trick with 
the ace in own hand. South then 
cashed five heart tricks, ending 
in the dummy. South played the 
king and queen of diamonds from 
the board, led a low club to the 
ace in her hand, played the ace 
and jack of diamonds, then a low 
club to the king on the board. The 
king of spades was the 18th trick. 

COMMENT: This was a pat 
hand and took no skill to play. The 
thing to notice is the bidding by 
Norm. North merely considered 
the points, decided South had to 
. have four aces to open with 2 NT 
and immediately bid grand slam. 



Service is oto spscutrr 

TV - STEREO - RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 



T-V 






*ii 



'SALES and SERVICE 

LONDON BRIDGE, VA. 

OPEN 9 A.M. - 9 P.M. Phone 340-8888 



I t 

1 



■aaaBSBSsaas** 



Shopping for a new washer? 

now MAYTAG 

DEPENDABILITY 

at Low, Low Prices 





//•re)'« Proof of Mmylag DopundabllHy 

Recently a Maytag Highlander was picked at 
random from the assembly fine, and put into 
operation in the Maytag Product Testing Labora- 
tory. The test was mads under typical "home 
use 1 ' conditions. This Maytag Highlander Auto- 
matic Washer worked day in and day out for 
10,146 hours (15,218 loads) equal la SO watt' 
mrmlhomuts! Service cost averaged only $2.00 
a year! Proving again that you buy the meet 
dependable washer made , . . whan it's a Maytag. 



I Solectivs cycle control hondte ■ Tsmparorurt selector protects 

oH fabrics deifies, top loading 

■ Gyrofoom action Is thorough, ■ Wotsr level control for ta» 

. tot removal positive omy, swirkway draining 

Buy MAYTAG and Get The Most 
Important Featura of A» . . . DEPENDABILITY! 



No Money Down with Trade 
$5.00 a Month up to 12 Months 



Murden's Appliances 



31st AND HOLLY RD 



B« S*^WtJ^ 



» 



4 



TWIST ! ! 
TOP COMBOS! 



NEW 



TROPIGANA 

Every Night 
7:30 to Midnight 
JAM SESSION > 

Sunday 2:00 
Sandwiches-Pizzas ' 

16th & ATLANTIC 







MINIATURE 



GOLF 

18 hole 
COURSES 

15th & PACIFIC AVE. 
28th 4 ATLANTIC AVE. 

OCEAN 

CARPET GOLF COURSES 



County's Breeder of Fine Horses 



■ ■ ■ ■ 



i $m 



/ 





Ernie Bowden poses with widely acclaimed 6-year-old stallion, "Dee feee." (Paul K. White 
Photo) 



ifa P UYHOUSg 

19th & Arctie-GA 8-7844 

"MR. ROBERTS" 
by 

Geo. Heggen and Joshua Logan 

August 16-21-22 ' 

Admiasioe $3.00 

"CRITICS -CHOICE" 

by IRA LEVIN 

August 17-, 18 

Admission 2.59 

"BRIGADOON" 

by LERNER and LOEWE 

August 19-20 

Admission $3.50 



County Boasts Raro 
Horse Breeding Farm 



PRINCESS ANNE — Culver 
Farm in Princess Anne County 
houses 20 of the 75 Appaloosa 
horses in Virginia and the own- 
er, Ernie Bowden, is one of only 
10 breeders in the state. 

A native of the county, Bow- 
den has lived in Currituck, N.C. 
since 1951 and returned here 
less than a year ago to open his 
horse and cattle ranch. 

He started breeding quarter 
horses about 12 years ago but 



terest in them has increased in 
the past few years. 

Bowden, the only Appaloosa 
brooder in the county, is pres- 
ident of the Central Atlantic 
Appaloosa Association Inc., 
*n organization consisting of 
brooders from Virginia, Wost 
Virginia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Delaware and 
Maryland. 

The Appaloosa, noted for 
their distinctive markings and 



switched to the Appaloosa three | p a r a d e appearance, became 



Beach Shines 
After Nightfall 



VIRGINIA BEACH — When 
the sun goes down and the 
moon comes Up, Virginia Beach 
begins to shine! • ^*~ > 

A resort can't be a resort 
without nightlife and this vaca- 
tionland qualifies by providing 
an array of top notch entertain- 
ment throughout the summer 
season. 

Step across the oceans to the 
land of famous beer by enter- 



years ago because the spotted, 
speedy horses are scarce and in- 



RIGHTON ■ 

THE OCEAN ■ 

Virginia Beach J 

AT 3 1st STREET - 




Ssssa 

W «*6AiT| 9 9 N 



Virginia Beach Theatres 

BEACH BAYNE 



FREE ACTS 

The SKATING REGALS 
Starts Monday, Ang. 20 

THE SCALZOS 
"nous Mag ician Act 

ThriWng ond Soto 

RIDES 

MKftMLTS/ 



25th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 

and SATURDAY 

August 16, 17 & 18 

The 

MUSIC MAN 

Robert Preston 
Shirley Jones 

Features: 
2:00— 4:30— 7:00— 9:30 

Children 50c all day 

Adults 90c Matinee 

1.25 Evening 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and TUESDAY 
August 19, 20 & 21 

LISA 

Stephen Boyd 
Dolores Hart 

Features: 
*2:00— 4:00— 6:00— 8:00— 10.-O0 

WED,, THURS., FRI. 

and SATURDAY 

August 22, 23, 24 & 25 

THE MIRACLE 
WORKER 

- 

Anne. Bancroft 
Patty Duke 
Victor Jory 



2:00— 4:00—6:00— ft 00— 1 0:00 «, 



17th & Atlantic 

' TODAY, FRIDAY 
and SATURDAY 

August 16, 17 & 18 

BOYS' 
NIGHT OUT 

Kim Novak 
James Garner 
Tony Randall 

Features: 
2:00— 4:00— 6:00— 8:00—10:00 

ONE WEEK - Beginning 
SUN., August 19 

The 

MUSIC MAN 

Robert Preston 
Shirley Jones 

Features: 
2:00—4:30—7:00—9:30 

Children 50c aD day 

Adults 90c Matinee 
1.25 Evening 



nearly extinct about 1938 when 
there were qaUy 600 of the breed 
in this coiWry. With careful, 
selective breeding the 'number 
has now increased to over 10,000 
registered horses with the great- 
est concentration in Oregon, 
Washington and Idaho. 

"Dee Zee," one of Bowden's 
Appaloosa stallions, was sired 
by two of the original 600 
horses; The 6-year-old stallion 
has been shown throughout the 
midwest and was recently rec- 
ognized as one of the top stal- 
lions in the country. 

Horse History 
Horses of the Appaloosa's 
rare, spotted color scheme ap- 
peared in 14th century Persian 
art and in Chinese art dating 
back to 500 BX. They are be- 
lieved to have beei* imported 
from the Near East or Spain 
with shipments of goods to Mex- 
ico about 1600 where the horses 
eventually made their way to 
the United States. 

The plains Indians placed the 
horses in the Nez Perce Tribe 
about 1730 and during the ex- 
ploration of the west this tribe 
seemed to be the only ones with 
any number of Appaloosas. 

During the 1730»s and 1830*s, 
the Nez Perce bred their un- 
usually marked horses and de- 
veloped a distinct type. This 
tribe inhabitated the , area of 
what is now the northeast cor- 
ner of Oregon, southeast cor- 
ner of Washington, bordering 
on Idaho where most of the 
Appaloosas are still found. 

The Nez Perce were fond of 
racing. They raced their un- 
usual horses from distances of 



Helen Keller 
Story on Screen 

(This review of The Mir- 
acle Worker," which opens at 
the Beach Theatre Wednes- 
day, appears with special per- 
mission from The Green 
Sheet, a monthly survey of 
current films.) 
ESTIMATES AGREE: 

The early encounters of the 
child Helen Keller with her first 
teacher, Annie Sullivan, have 
the drama of miraculous tri- 
umph over insurmountable ob- 
stacles. Imprisioned in her dark- 
ness and silence, the blind, deaf, 
mute Helen is more like a little 
wild animal than a human being, 
raging against everyone in her 
frustrated hunger for some- 
thing she doesn't yet know. 

Her teacher's first task is to 
get her under bodily control, so 
that she may then try to reach 
her mind. The formidable diffi- 
culties in the way are intensified 
by family pity and indulgence, 
by the gentle, misguided moth- 
er's protective love, the dom- 
ineering father's hot-tempered 
impatience. 

The battle of wills between 
teacher and pupil finds vent in 
fierce physical struggles that 
are a shattering experience for 
the viewer. After crisis has suc- 
ceeded crisis, each with its own 
sharp impact, a breathless audi- 
ence shares the teacher's dawn- 
ing love and sense of accom- 
plishment at the wonderful 
awakening awareness of the 
child. * 

Patsy Duke is amazingly be- 
lievable as the youthful Helen, 
fighting to make contact with a 
world she can only sense 
around her. Anne Bancroft gives 
great warmth and strength to 
the role of the young Irish 
teacher who, in the shadow of 
her own harsh childhood and 
weakened sight, has the com- 
passion and toughness to guide 
the little girl into new life. 



a few hundred yards to as long 
as twelve miles. 

Palouse county, a large area 
of fertile land drained by the 
Palouse River, became the 
breeding place of the colorful 
horses. A Palouse became slur- 
red to form Apalouse and 
Apalousie and later Appaloosa. 

The rich land of the Palouse 
Was soon plowed and with the 
plow came the demand for draft 
Stock. Pasture lands were fenced 
and grazed by domestic stock. 
The Appaloosa dwindled in num- 
bers to the point of extinction. 
Some were scattered throughout 
the west, a few were kept by 
stockmen. The descendants of 
these horses make up the pres- 
ent number of Appaloosas. 

Once used for war, racing and 
buffalo hunting, the Appaloosa 
is now the stock horse or pleas- 
ure and parade mount of pres- 
ent day riders. 



ing the Rathskellar Lounge, 
authentically patterned from 
the popular German entertain- 
ment spots. Recording star 
Jeannie Thomas is featured 
nightly. 

Remember the era of the 
big bends? Virginia Beech is 
one of the few cities that 
keeps the trend alive by 
bringing some of the greatest 
bands in the country to the 
Cavalier Beach and Cabana 
Club. Ray McKinley, Tony 
Pastor, Carmen Cavallero and 
Claude Thornhill are just a 
few of the famous personali- 
ties featured on the club's 
ocean terrace bandstand this 
season. 

But if the fox trot, cha-cha 
and waltz are too tame and you 
desire a dance with a little more 
zinc, then try the Peppermint 
Beach Club where the twist is 
the rage. This isn't strictly for 
the kids. Nor is it strictly for 
the vacationers. Any night a 
passer-by might well see a group 
of local residents trying their 
hand at the frantic dance. 

Jazz, Rock A Roll 

The younger set have a ball 
at the gaily decorated Tropicana 
where popular rock - and - roll 
groups are featured on the band- 
stand nightly. 

For jazz enthusiasts there 
are well-known trios featured at 
Minnie's Keyboard Lounge, the 
Cape Henry Club, Bay Harbour 
Club and the Cape Colony Gub. 

If a nice quiet movie is more 
your idea of an evening's en- 
tertainment, the Beach and 
Bayne Theatres and Virginia 
Beach Drive-In Theatre schedule 
a long line of top ranking films 
throughout the summer season. 

But if live acting is more to 
your liking, then don't miss 
the outstanding plays pre- 
sented nightly by the Sand- 
piper Playhouse in tho blue 
and gold theatre-in-the-round 
tent en 19th St. For the rest 
of this month "Brigadoon," 
"You Can't Take It With You" 
and "Under the Yum Yum 
Tree" alternate during the 
week. Starting in August, 
"Brigadoon" will alternate 
with "Mr Roberts" and "Cri- 
tic's Choice." 

"Special entertainment is 
Scheduled at the Alan B. Shep- 
ard Convention Center not only 
during the summer season but 
year-round. The schedule may 
include rock-and-roll groups, 
famous personalities, a full- 
scale antique show or profes- 
sional wrestling. 



NORMANDIE 
CAFETERIA 

At ' ract,ve Dinner 
Prices 

2118 ATLANTIC AVE. 



THE 



ouse 



Lighth 

Steamed 
CRABS 

SOUTH ATLANTIC AVE. 

Next to Steel Pier 



Donut Kitchen 

Fresh Donuts 
Made Daily 

ALL MEALS SERVED 
18th and ATLANTIC 



Cool Mr Boon 
To Park Trade 

VIRGINIA BEACH — This 
summer, ride operators of Sea- 
side Amusement Park at Vir- 
ginia Beach report the season's 
biggest business because of the 
cooler weather. 

The Skee-Ball alleys, a refine- 
ment of bowhng, have been in- 
creased, but even so, the alleys 
are all in use most of the time. 

This week, the Rebels and the 
Rocking Ramblers are playing at 
the popular ballroom. Eddie Lee 
and the Corvettes from Har- 
risonburg, and the Electras of 
Rocky Mount, N.C, will play 
Saturday and Sunday afternoons 
at the jam sessions and the 
twist contest finals are Sunday 




Virginia Beach 
Thursday, August 

*SiL 

night. 

The Skating Regsls, tho free 
act attraction this week, wlU 
perform twice a day at SrlO* and 
10:00 p.m. on the park's new 
outdoor stage. 



-9RK* 



SURREY 
CAFETERIA 

Home Cooked Meals 
Air Conditioned 
Ample Parking 

15th 4 ATLANTIC AVI.. 







Specializing in 

Superb Seafoods 

Hot and Cold Luncheon Selections 
Dinner Menu Features Gourmet Sea- 
food, Crab Imperial Flounder Stuff- 
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dine, Seafood Platters, etc. 

Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner served m Beautiful 
Nauncal Atmosphere with Panoramic Bay View 



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AND 
MARINA 



LASKIN ROAD — VIRGINIA BEACH 



LETS TWIST 

Dancing Nightly and Saturday and Sunday Afternoon 

PEPPERMINT 



BEACH C 




NOW FEATURING 

THE DYNAMIC AIRDALES" 

Plus 

"GENE and His TEAM BEATS' 

15th and ATLANTIC AVE. 



OCEAN REEF FISHING 

On The Party Boat "MISSY" 

LEAVES DAILY AT 8:00 A. M. 

(Regardless of number of people aboard) 

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Route 615— y 2 Mile South of Shore Drive 

%$ HO 4-9952 *8T 



Includes Bait, etc. 




Snack Bar Aboard- 




TOP HAT 

DANCING 

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featuring 

Al Cannon and His "Tuff Sax" 

29th and OCEAN FRONT 




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RESTAURANT 



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341-3392 



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428-7089 



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Virginia Beach Sun-News # Thursday, August 16, 19#t 
Peg* 44 



n 1 a >\ 



mmm 



COUNTY AGENT 

By E. R. "DICK" COCKRELL, JR. 




ss 



The woman autoist 
for a snap shot in front of the 
fa Han pillars of an and ant 
temple in Greece. 

"Don't gat the car m this 
picture," she warned, "or My 
husband will think I ran into 

the place." 



Corn Silage Meeting — Tour 

It never fails! Just when you 
are ready to go to work, here 
comes some guy with something 




m 



TIMELY 
LOAN 



Can often mean more than just a sum . 
of money. A vacation for the family . . . 
funds to meet unexpected emergencies . . . the peace of mind that lets you sleep 
at night knowing all your scattered obligations are being met by one budget- 
sized monthly payment . . . the satisfaction of doing business with the BANK 
OF PRINCESS ANNE where you will be known, recognized and always welcome 
. . . these are just a few of the ways that a BANK OF PRINCE "" 
mean security to you. 

BANK OF PRINCESS A 

7960 VWG0HA BEACH KVU Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Opes Meedty ftreugh Friday 9 A.M. to 1 P.M. and Friday afternoon 



1 




at PRICE'S HILLTOP STORE 



r. 



1 



KELVINATOR 
TRADE-O-RAMA 

featuring 

13.6 Cubic Foot "NO FROST" 

REFRIGERATOR - FREEZER 




with 105 POUND FREEZER 



Twin Porcelain Crispers 
full with Dairy Chest 
Adjustable Shelf 
Shelves on Both Doors 
5 Yeer Warranty on 
sealed Cold Making Unit 



K65I-N-62 



$298 00 I 



with your old 
R ef r ig enrtor 
with c tos stop 
fatter in run- 
ceaaUfion. 



NO MONEY DOWN 






For up to 12 months 

then regular 

payments 



*5°° A MONTH 

PRICE'S 
HILLTOP, VA. BEACH 



TILL 9 RM 



else for you to do. That guy is 
me, and I want you to do some- 
thing for yourself. Here's why! 

Dairymen found out last win- 
ter that all corn silage isn't the 
same. There's good, bad, and 
indifferent. We also found that 
that difference depends upon 
the management of the farmer. 
What I want every "silage mak- 
er" to do this fall is to put into 
his silo excellent quality silage. 
All you have to have is just 
plain "know-how." 

"Know how" comes in a lot 
of ways, I reckon, but one way 
to get it is to receive all the 
high level education you can, 
get. And here's two ways to get 
that. 

Silaga Meeting— August 16 

Starting at 8:00 p.m., on 
Thursday evening, August 16, in 
the County Court Building, at 
Princess Anne, Va., we're going 
to talk com silage until we are 
blue in the face. Keister Evans, 
Asst. Agent, will preside. I'll 
come through with introductory 
facts and objectives and then 
into the rea lmeat. 
.Helping us will be two 
specialists from VPI; Mr. Ken^ 
netb l^oope will discuss value of 
silage, economics, and the real 
backbone of feeding more high 
quality corn silage to our beef 
and dairy cattle. • 

Mr. Dan Kite will show, 
through slides, various means of 
harvesting, storing and feeding 
silage. 

Silaga Tour — August 17 

Following the meeting we 
planned a real event for 
are going to visit four 
to show various 
operation. 
^Starting at 9:30 a.m., at V. E. 
Milter's at Princess Anne Court- 
house, we will show our most 
modern- dairy operation. This is 
a unit where cows can be main- 
tained 3%5 days a year on con* 
crete. Here is also one of the 
best feeding arrangements we 
have. 

10:30 a.m. will be the time of 
arrival at A. C. Brown's at 
Wood's Corner near Kemps- 
ville. There we will study a new 
upright silo and its cost, the 
cost of moving an older silo. We 
will also study corn of various 
stages of maturity for good 
silage. 

Joe Hershberger and Son, on 
Holland Swamp Road, will be 
next at 11:30 a.m. There we'll 
look at the pile or stack system 
of storage. Of major importance 
will be how to get quality. 

From there we'll go together 
to Frankie's at Chesapeake 
Beach for lunch. After lunch we 
will go on to Bayville Farms, 
where Al MacKay, Cattle Supt. 
wil lshow us their bunker silos. 
He'll also discuss cost, storage 
procedure for quality, etc. 

Then, watermelon on the 
lawn! Come join us!! 



JOE HERSHBERGER A SON 
HIGH DAIRY HERD 

Each month all dairymen on 
DHIA and O. S. record keeping 
systems in Princess Anne Coun- 
ty are summarized in my office. 

The figures are interesting in 
this herd. The average cow pro- 
duces daily; 30.5 lbs. of milk, 
1.4 lbs. of butterfat, is fed 14 
lbs. of grain, and has an overall 
feeding index of 105%. 



Linoleum Fbors 

Individually Dcsi< 




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these Individually Designed Lino- 
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Colors, motifs — "CharacterT In a 
word — that give long-lived service, 
at moderate first-cost! May we 
give you an estimate? 

J.C Law & Son 

NORFOLK, VIBGLNU 
3515 CoUey PI*. MA 5-t4J» 



Weather Is hot, humid, and 
lagy. Wish it would cool off a 
little. Not too meek, though 
Remember the nearest 1 aver 
came to freesinf Was when I 
was holding the lantern for my 
wife while she cut the kindling! 

ZINC * COPMR NOT BRNEFI- 

V.IMS. wfi aspw*»» " 
PRINCISS ANNE TEST 

Don't guess you all mind if I 
talk about fertilising small grain 
in August Just got an interest- 
ing analysis of a demonstration 
we conducted this spring and 
thought rd pass it on to you. 

You probably remember me 
talking to you about all the fast 
talk created down in that state 
below Virginia when farmers 
got increased wheat yields by 
adding sine and copper to the 
small grain fertiliser. 

We wanted fo prove North 
Carolina right or. wrong- We de- 
cided to conduct tests of our 
own in Princess Anne. 

Three tests were tried on 
Robert White's farm and three 
on Howard Salmons' farm. 

The results: No beneficial re- 
sults from either sine or copper. 
Therefore, I will not recommend 
either erf these treatments for 
small grain. 



mm 

1963 $| 



varieties, and many others . 
Tbty will be at peak bloom this 



A little phiTMnfog how cajv 
help you provide plenty of color 
in flower/borders nest year. 

Both perennials and annuals 
can provide much summer color. 
New annual varieties are avail- 
able each year, and it is becom- 
ing increasingly difficult for the 
home gardener to know what 
varieties to collect. 

If you have trouble deciding 
it is a good idea to visit local 
gardens where a large* variety of 
annuals may be growing. An- 
nuals can also be observed at 
many city parks; and at VPI a 
trial garden has been estab- 
lished to evaluate many types 
and varieties of annuals. 
, The trial gardens, established 
in cooperation with several seed 
companies, give Virginia home- 
owners a chance to see what^ 
varieties are available, and also 
give florists and nurserymen 
the opportunity to observe how 
the plants are growing during 
the summer period. Many varie- 
ties of perennials and ornament- 
al or nursery plants suitable for 
home landscaping are also 
grown in the VPI gardens 

The collection of annuals is 
one of the largest in the state. 
There are 238 different annual 
varieties, including 113 petunia 
varieties, 20 snapdragon varie- 
ties, 10 salvia (scarlet sage) 



The collection of ornamentals 
includes several summer flower- 
ing shrubs. 

Who is your Rescue Squad, 
and what U its service? Your 
next door neighbor may be a 
member of the Rescue Squad or 
the man from whom you order 
your fuel oil) The 42 men who 
compose the group are ordinary 
citisens who have generously 
dedicated themselves to helping 
you. Each has to measure up to 
the rigid qualifications neces- 
sary lor service, pledges his 
personal time and energies, re- 
frains from aleohohc beverages 
white he is on eatt and stays fit 
and training wise. 



# r* * * * * ********** * * * *irsr» rvvr w 




iaetaM.sf.Mrt 



SECURITY 



1W V 




You'll find the climb is 
much easier when you 
use the help of on insured 
savings account that pays 
a good return, plus ready 
availability for your hard- 
earned dollars. v 

In any amount your ac- 
count is welcome. 



ACCOUNTS INSURED* UP TO $10,000.00 

VIRGINIA BEACH FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

210 -25th Street Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Phone GA 8-9331 



Something pi should think about 
if pure about to bug a truck: 



If all trucks were built the same way, . 
cost the same to keep up, were worth the 
same at trade-in . . . then probably the 
price tag would be your only concern. 
It can't be, of course, because some trucks , 
have more quality than others. And marks 
ef quality are the real keys to low cost. 
Chevrolet trucks, for example/ have 
double- well construction, which gives 
bodies and cabs more strength. Cabs are 
insulated against heat, cold and noise. A 
big part of road shock, which shortens 
truck life, is damped out by Chevrolet's 
suspension system; it *Jso makes riding, 
in the truck a pleasure. Pickup bodies 
and cabs are separated' to eliminate stress 
between them. 



Value suck us this has induced more 
people to invest in Chevrolet trucks every 
year since 1937, 

This can be a good time to buy 
a modern new Chevrolet truck 

Late summer traditionally is the season 
for all-around savings on a new Chev- 
rolet truck . . . selection is still good . . . 
deliveries are prompt . . . and Chevrolet 
dealers are doubly anxious to put you 
into a new vehicle in order to make way 
for next year's models. Counted with the 
efficient performance a new Chevrolet 
truck will give you, it seems evident that 
you couldn't buy at a better time. 
Come in and take full advantage of it! 



CHEVROLET 



CHEVROLET TRUCKS 



Quality trucks always costless! 




Chevrolet 2-Ton Ptattorm 



l 
1 



See yvwr heat authorized Chevrolet dealer 



105 



CLARK CHEVROLET CORP. 

607 Seventeenth St. Virginia Beach, Va. 



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Batwaan Lantdale Traffic 
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VIRGINIA BEACH -3201 PACIFIC, AVENUE 



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By LUCILE 

SUN-NEWS FOOD 

For the vary latest In food fads 
practical, down-to-earth racHiae! 
it* and pocketbook, .read Ha 
Je Clark each Thursday In Um 




■ I ' L l " > ' I ii ii i u p I MJM 
According to Greek mythol- ated fats so that the shrimp 
ogy tt was the Titan, Promethe- salad sandwiches described be- 



mi 



us, who store lire from the 
and pave it to the lowly m 
lings called man, Legend has* it 
that Zeus, the chief el the gods, 
was so enraged that he 



Prometheus to a rock and left 
him to the vultures aa punish- 
ment. But old Zeus surely would 
have mellowed if he'd seen 
what good use man has made of 
fire-outdoor cooking, for in- 
stance. And skewers made out- 
door grilling one of the easiest 
methods of cooking. Shrimp are 
especially well suited to skewer- 
ing, aid anyone who has tasted 
charcoaled shrimp kabobs will 
thank his lucky stars for both 
Prometheus who stole the |ire, 
and the man who invented the 
skewers, hi case outdoor cookery 
is Greek to you, the Satrhn 
Association of the Americas o 
fan this recipe for Shrimp Ka- 
bobs, doused with garlic butter 
for added flavor. 



t 



low may be enjoyed by the 
cholesterol-conscious. 



serv- 



SHRIMP KABOBS 

% fibs, fresh or frozen shrimp, 
or 2 (8 or 10-eunce) pack- 
ages peeled and deveined 
shrimp 
Va pound butter or margarine 

1 clove garlic, finely minced 
Salt and pepper 

If necessary shell and devein 
shrimp. Malt butter or marga- 
rine In a frying pan, either over 
the kitchen range or outdoors 
over low glowing coals. Add 
minced garlic and simmer three 
minutes. Skewer shrimp. Brush 
with garlic butter and season 
with salt and pepper. Grill two 
or three inches frpm tkie coals 
5 to 7 minutes* basting and 
turning frequency. p#np 
done when they are opffie a 
bright pink. Makes 6 to 8 se; 
ings. 

Did you know that 
live to the ripe old age at one 
When they reach |haj piafr 
white stage* in which they're 
eaten, /he shrimp have had their 
day-ny their year to, be e*act— 
for one yeW is the avesaje 
length of the shrimp's life 
cycle. And did you know that 
human beings who want to live 
to a ripe old age should eat lots 
of shrimp? It's true, because 
these little shellfish are sot only 
low in calories, hut are also low 
in the saturated-type fats which 
scientists have found to be im- 
plicated in the formation of 
cholesterol deposits in the body 
which cause hardening of the 
arteries. The Shrimp Association 
of the Americas reminds you 
that mayonnaise and corn-oil 
margarine is also low in satur- 



StttlMP SALAD ROLLS 
1 (8 or tt ounce) package 

peeled and deveined shrimp 
1 cup shredded lettuce or 
other salad greens 
Few ffttfcf parsley or water- 
cress, chopped 
Va cup chopped celery 
Va cup chopped cucumber 
1 teaspoon chopped onion 
Mayonnaise 
Salt and pepper 
Frankfurter rolls 
Corn oil margarine 

Cook shrimp by boiling in 
salted water 3 to 5 minutes Re- 
serve a few whole shrimp for 
and chop remaining 
p. Toss shrimp with let- 
parsley, celery, cucumber, 
and onion. Mote*au w*th mayon- 
and season to taste with 
and pepper. Split Irank- 
r rolls, but do not cut all 
lave, isy through. Spread reus 
with softened corn oil marga- 
rine and fill with shrimp salad. 
Salad mixture makes enough to 
fill 4 to 8 rolls. 

Prom the test kitchens of fish 
and Wildlife Service, U. S. De- 
partment of the Interior comes 
suggestions as to how to boil 
shrimp. 
Te Boil Shrimp before Peeling 





mwm—mmwmmwm* 

m m. 

1 cjt o| w 

Va cue salt 
Wash shrimp. Place in hoiling 
salted water. Cover and return 
to, mUni point. Simmer 5 rain- 
utea Drain, peel remove sand 
a ad veins, wash, chill 

Te s\oil A« 
1H Ibashruen 




1 qt. water 



% ti.hlo8T MM*fl .!f salt 

Peel shrimp. Make shallow 
cut lengthwise down back oi 
each shrimp. Wash, Place in 
boiling salted water. Cover and 
bring to boiling point. Simmer 
5 minutes. Drain, remove any 
veins remaining, chill. 



Here is a recip efor Shrimp in 
Tomato Aspic: 
Va lb. cooked and deveined 

shrimp 
2 tablespoons gelatin 
1% cups tomato juice 
1 tablespoons lemon juice 

1 teaspoon grated onion 

2 tablespoons chopped pickle 
2 teaspoons horseradish 

Salt and pepper to taste 

Cut shrimp in half. Soften 
gelatin in Vt cup tomato juice 
for 5 minutes. Scald remaining 
tomato juice, add gelatin and 
stir until dissolved. Add remain- 
ing ingredients and shrimp. 
Pour into mold. Chill until firm 
Unmold on lettuce leaves Gar- 
nish with mayonnaise. 



An Analytical Look At 



Retailing & Distribution 



Va. 



By GEORGE L. COFFER 
iU* q iH frujfrt Education Coordinator 



MHBMMBB^ 



*mm*mrmm^mm*m*mim m minKmrwmmmM A 



YAZOO -MASTER MOWERS 

Pageco Authorized Yazoo Denier 
has a lawn mower for everyone 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

CLINTON. WISCONSIN 

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Kg Yard — Small Grounds 
Rotary Modal A-3-H,' 4.0 
H.P. 22" cutting width. 



PRINCE 





Garden Equipment Co* 

• PHONE GA8-W51 



OCEANA. VA. 



'IS Years of Dittrlbviiv. 
vtrytfiia cconvmy 

Having recently attended the 
24th, Anniversajjk DE Confer- 
ence at the Chamberlain on Old 
Paint Comfort, I will attempt to 
analyze and relate some of the 
more pertinent information 
from the numerous informa- 
tive speeches delivered by prom- 
inent business leaders and edu- 
cators. 

The more enlightening 
speeches were almost totally 
centered around the many facets 
of "distribution." The topics 
were developed with a micro as 
well as macro point of view. 
This column will be davotad 
to relating the highlights of 
each of the topics discussed 
at the conference in subse- 
quent editions of the Sun- 

Dr. Wilford White, director of 
the Office of Management and 
Research, Small Business Ad- 
ministration in Washington, dis- 
cussed "Distribution in the Na- 
tional E c o n o m y." Having 
taught at the University of 
Colorado, at the "University of 
Te$as and at Harvard Univer- 
sity, *Dr. White is considered to 
be a prominent authority in the 
role that distribution plays in 
our national economy. 
Virginia Leads 

"Virginia has consistently led 
all other states in the number 
of administrative management 
courses co-sponsored with the 
Small Business Administration," 
Dr. White said. He also stated 
that since the average consumer 
has more money and credit than 
he needs to spend at one time, 
retailers and distributors must 
be constantly aware of the 
changes in this dynamic era. 

**rhe future pf the owners of 
smaller retail stores is largely 
up to these owners themselves," 
he said. "The typical retailer 
needs ta be trained both in ad- 
ministration k operation. Many, 
ef them are pretty good day-to- 
day operators but very few are 
sound administrators." He also 
emphasized the critical need of 
employee training in the areas 
oi selling, getting along with 
customers' and in explaining the 
qualities and services rendered 
by specific products,. 

?At *■** h— InnUi 




year. 



the beflinrUog of this 
Tiers wore Sts) million 
in the Unitad 
States. Yet, during last year, 
437,000 new businesses 



discontinued operations/' Dr. 
Whita pointed out. "Accord- 
ing to Dun and Bradstreet, 
Inc., over 17,000 businesses 
faffed, incurring losses to their 
creditors." 

Virginia distributors are not 
getting their share of the na- 
tion's retail sales as a whole 
even though she is getting more 
than her share of the buying 
income. What can be done to 
improve the position of distri- 
butors in Virginia? Dr. White 
says, "Improve their manage- 
ment through educational pro- 
grams," 

During the past school year 
14,360 businessmen attended 471 
courses. Another 10,062 partici- 
pated in 80 management con 
ferences. This is but a drop in 
the bucket. 

"Management itself is in a 
state of evolution," pointed out 
Dr. White, "and new principles 
and techniques must be passed 
on to business. Virginia is lead 
ing the nation in the develop- 
ment of a practical program for 
the management development 
of small business. You have an 
outstanding distributive educa- 
tion program here in Virginia.." 

Next week's topic will be 
"Facing the Challenge of Today 
and Tomorrow" by Dr. John W. 
Wingate, professor of business 
administration, The City Univer- 
sity of New York. 



PEST CONTROL ASSN. 
MEETING AT CAVAUER 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Vir- 

ginia State Pest Control Asm 

will hold it's annual summer 
meeting at the Cavalier in Vir- 
ginia Beach August 17, 18, 6 19. 
General chairman, Lee Cham 
hers says "this is the sixth an- 
meeting held at the Cava- 
' members from all over 
te will attend with their 
ves, most oi whom belong to 
"The Lady Bug Association." 
Virginia State Pest Control As- 
sociation members and Lady 
Bugs from Washington, DC, 
will he on hand again this year 
to enjoy the many facilities of- 
fered by the Cavalier to, their 
conventioners. 

Several non-members from 
Virginia will also attend along 
with Pest Control Operators 
from neighboring states, and as 
far away as Memphis, Tenn., 
Mi. Vernon, New York and Co- 
lumbus, s,c. 

Dr. i. G. Rowell from the 
Agricultural Department of Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute, 

V*W^*^p '»™p*ajaj VSSW'*"' s)tt HaPs? Sue vAXS*)* 

ology field will be on hand. 
Suppliers of Insecticides, Rod- 
enticides and Pesticides will 
take part in the activities of this 
meeting. 

President Charles C Barnes 
will officiate at the business 
sessions which will be held Fri- 
day afternoon and Saturday 
morning. The remaining time 
will be devoted to recreation 
and pleasure for the entire 
family. Many of the local mem- 
bers will act as hosts with a 
single thought in mind, to have 
The Biggest and Bestest Yet." 



Virginia Beach Syn-News, Thursday, August 16, )f#£ 

Pag# 5-8 




ADMIRAL STORAGE ft TRANSFER OUT 

1 8th & Baltic Ave., Virginia fteech 

AGENT FOk mm HOTHOS, !*£. 



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WHY? 



Buy 



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a Rambler anywhere else when you can 
$200.00 on a factory fresh 1062 Rambler. All 
color. 

For Instance— 1962 Rambler Classic 4-door station wagon 

e Standard transmission e Under coating 

e Weather eye neater e Light 

e Foam cushion seels 

JIS8S tt 




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With its unique design, no 
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Virginia Bead) Sun-News, Thursday, August 16, 1962 



Kids, Animals, Mayhem at Pet Show 




Yapping dogs and frantic cats didn't dampen their small owner's enthusiasm at the Virginia Beach Recreation Depart- 
ment's annual pet show Friday on the Municipal Tennis Courts. Larry Voight (left) and Brian Hall show Larry's family of 
guinea pigs and Debbie Clark tells "First One" not to run off with Santa Claus' sleigh. (Phillips Photo) 



CHEAPER TO BUY R TO RENT HOME? 



(Editor's Not*— This is tho 
first in a series of articles On 
whether it is cheeper to buy • 
home or rent.) 



By JULIAN RASHKIND, 
Tidewater Association of 
Homo Builders 
Is it cheaper to buy your own 



home or to rent? 

Virtually every family has 

asked this question at one time 
or another. Actually, there is no 



55 



I 



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A FRIENDLY INVISIBLE GUARDIAN PROVIDING 
STERILE LAUNDRY SERVICE ACTIVELY HELPS 
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM 

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' and 
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Modern laundry methods insure sterility of apparel and 
linens at completion of finishing. If there is no sub- 
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Through our advanced scientific laundering technique 
we now incorporate into the fabric, at time of washing, 
"CONTROL", The Germicidal Fabric Conditioner, which 
not only assures sterile apparel and linens, but deposits 
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in use. 

Apparel and linens laundered this new way not only 
stay sterile but they took nicer. Bath towels are soft 
and fresh. You'H like the lustrous finish. There is no 
odor except the fresh sweetness of really clean laundry. 

We are pleased to give your family the benefit of its 
protection. We guarantee your satisfaction. 

Another progressive service supplied at no extra cost 



SNOW WHITE 



Bsautitone Cleaning 



Ivory Soap 



Virginia Beach 
I GA 8-5851 



Bayside 



Norfolk 
JU 8-6796 






single answer that will fit every 
family. But for most families, 
the answer strongly favors the 
home buyer. 

The last Government report 
on the cost of owning in con- 
trast to renting was issued in 
1954. It was based on figures 
compiled by the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, the Government 
agency that keeps track of the 
cost of living. Its report said: 

"Even with operating and 
other recurring expenses added 
to mortgage payments, monthly 
cash outlays for housing were 
smaller for the average metro- 
politan family who bought a new 
house in 1949-1950 than ' for 
those who rented new dwell- 
ings." 

But let us look at the ques- 
tion In terms of 1962. A medium- 
priced new home today costs 
about $15,000, according to 
both the National Association of 
Home Builders and the Federal 
Housing Administration. 

This median-priced house is 
a single family home with an 
average Of five and one-half 
rooms including two or three 
bedrooms and at least one and 
one-half baths. 

In this first article, let us 
consider the initial outlay re- 
quired to buy the median-priced 
home. 

We assume the house is pur 
chased with an FHA-insured 
mortgage at 5 1 /* per cent inter- 
est. There will be a charge of 
one-half of one per cent i which 
FHA makes for insuring the 
mortgage, which is to run for 30 
years. These are typical current 
terms. 

The down payment under 
these terms likely will be $450, 
leaving a mortgage of $14,550. 
However, when you "sign on the 
dotted line" there are closing 
costs. In this case, they ordin- 
arily would run from $250 to 
$300 considering the nation as 
a whole. 

Closing costs cover such ex 
penses as legal fees, a search of 
the title so that you protect 
yourself with a clear title, a sur 
vey of the land so that you 
know exactly where your prop 
erty lines are, charges for re 
cording the mortgage a'n d 
charges for recording the trans- 
fer of title to your name. 

The down payment and the 
closing costs thus require a total 
initial outlay of $700 to $750 
This is cash which a renter 
naturally does not have to hand 
over in a similar lump sum. 
However, a landlord also has 
these costs and they are re- 
flected in the rent he charges. 

Moreover, the $450 down pay- 
ment is the start of an invest- 
ment by the home owner — rath- 
er than an expense for which he 
will have nothing to show. It is 
the beginning of regular sav- 
ings, through equity gained in 
his home from month to month 
and the enhancement of its 
value from year to year. 

In fact, the day that down 
payment is made usually stands 
out in the life of a family as a 
joyful red-letter day, for it 
marks the beginning of better 
living and many intangible bene- 
fits that we will discuss in a 
later article. 

(Next: A look at Payments 
which erase the mortgage.) 




IS YOUR RESPONSIBI LITY 
THE FIRST RULE OF SAFETY IS . . . 

Slow Down 

And Live! 



OBEY THE 
SCHOOL PATROL 




2000 MILES of 



AMBULANCES (4 abreast] 

TO TRANSPORT* ZOQOAQQ AUTO VICTIMS 



jI^^w - m 1 11 ' '*■ i * n 



-XTtf, _ nt-~ 



X ^-im parade, tiumper fo Bumper— and a grim reminder of the* 
colossal toll in injuries charged to recklessness on our highways and citjr 
streets. A gruesome addition would be the 45 miles of hearses, four lanes 
wide, bearing the dead in the wake of the injured. i 

^ Look at your watch — every time it ticks off fifteen seconds someone, 
somewhere is injured. Every fifteen minutes one more life is sacrificed to 
speed and recklessness. , - - - ti 

1 Late in 1951 the millionth victim was killed in 52 years of recordea 
highway fatalities. Authorities predict that if the present rapidly growing 
casualty lists are not curbed a second million will die in half that time* i 

| Is the driving public so calloused to life blood spilled on tfce highways 
that it has developed an immunity to sane thinking and acting in this 

! American tragedy? Are you one of those "good drivers" who shrugs off 
facts and figures and surreptitiously gives the Kiss of Death to those about 
to die?. i < 

\ Consider carefully—slow down— you may join the big parade soone g 
than you think. 




SLOW DOWN-l IVES ARE IN YOUR HANDS! 



John Aragona Enterprises, Inc. 

1 23 N. Plaza Trail Princess Anne Plaza 

Be-Lo Super Market 

400 - 30th St., Virginia Beach 
Va. Beach Blvd., London Bridge 

Ames & Webb, Inc. 

3145 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Excellent Restaurant 

OPEN ALL DAY EVERY DAY 
1614 Atlantic Ave. ■ GA 8-9743 

Kellam-Eaton Insurance Co. 

3113 Pacific Avenue 

W. A. Wood, Commission Agent 

ESSO "WATCHDOG OIL HEAT SERVICE" 
Va. Beach-Princess Anne County GA 84385 



Coates Motor Co., Inc. 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH - VALIANT 
21st & Pacific Ave. ,610 -17th St. 

National Bank of Commerce 

3000 Atalntic Ave. and Fort Story 

Hofheimer's 

LINKHORN SHOPPING CENTER - LASKIN RD. 
8 Other Stores in Norfolk and Portsmouth 

Snow White Laundry 

17th & Mediterranean Ave. 

Willis Wayside 

Virginia Beach Blvd., at Thalia 

Mrs. Moore's Bakery 

- NEXT TO BE-LO SUPER MARKET 
400- 30th ST. VIRGINIA BEACH G A 8-5081 



m^mmmm 



• LIGAL NOTICE 




•Ith of Virginia, In 

Clerk's Office of the Ctr- 

cult Court of the County of 

Princess Anno, on tho fiWi day 

of July, 1962. 

Ttomas Glenn Overby, Plaintiff 

against 
Elizabeth Franks Overby, 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suH la to 
obtain from the defendant a 
divorce A Mensa Et Thoro, to 
be later merged into a divorce 
A Vinculo MatrimonU, upon the 



LEGAL NOTICES 



YOU CM GET 
RELIEF FROM 

HEADACHE PAIN 

STANBACK gives you tester relief 
from pains of headache, neuralgia, 
rwtrritis, and minor pains of arthritis, 
rheumatism. Because STANBACK 
contains several medkalty-appreved 
and prescribed ingredients for fast 
relief, you can ton STANBACK with 
confidence. Sat isfactfen guaranteed! 

T.st JeateVrf «tf 

STANBACK 
»g«ln«t any 
preparation 
you va tvar 
UMd 



grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered that 
she do appear here within ten 
(10) days after due publication 
hereof, antf *HIe what may be 
necessary'to protect her interest 
in this suit 

A Copy— T est*: 
JOHN V. F1NTRISS, Oerk 
' By Margaret M. Hood, D.C, 
Kellam & Keuam, p.q; 
Board of Trade Bulking 
Norfolk, Va. 7-284t 




• LEGAL NOTTCIS 



made and filed that the* defend- 
ant is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 2501 Q 
Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 

It Is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy— Tot to: 
JOHNV, f*fTBESS, Clerk 
By: Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
1115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. * 7-26-4t 



10* 25# m 98* 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Or- 
euit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on tho 23rd day 
of July, 1942. 
Guy Wilburt DeFrehn, Plaintiff 

against 
Frances Isabelle DeFrehn, 

■ Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
give evidecne for the purpose 
of obtaining a final' divorce de- 
cree on the 10th day of August, 
1962, at 10:00 A.M., from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion and aband- 
onment 
And an affidavit having been 



<f» 



2. 



PHONE III YOUR APPLICATION 

CONSOLIDATE YOUR PERSONAL BILLS 

!nd Mortgage Loans 

Up to 5 years to repay. 

Sensible Rates 

$1,000 TO $20,000 ; 

NO BROKERAGE 

FEE < • 

NO APPRAISAL FEB 

FAST, CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE 
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily; Saturday * a.m. to II p.m. 

Fidelity Commercial Co. 

31 1 - 3 1 5 LAW BUILDING - Granby and* Plume St. 
NORFOLK MA 7-2571 




OFFICE OF THE COMMISSION. 

ER OP ACCOUNTS, CIRCUIT 
s COURT. COUNTY OF PRIN- 

CISS ANNE, VIRGINIA. 

August 7, 1962. 
Toihe Creditors of 
Devillo 0. Todd, Deceased: 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64-161, Code of 
Virginia, that the undersigned 
Commissioner of Accounts, hav- 
ing for settlement the account 
of the National Bank of Com- 
the Estate of DeViUo 0. Todd, 
Deceased, and having been re- 
quested by the said Executor so 
to do, has appointed the 4th 
day Qf September, 1962, at 
three o'clock p.m., at 210-25th 
Street, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
as the time and place of receiv- 
ing proof of debts or demands 
against the said decedent or his 
estate. 

A^R. WALTON, 
Asst. Commissioner of Acounts 

8-9-2t 



t LEGAL NOTICES 

T War^pansaaf «*VtBejfjs/ 



released based en the security 
posted by the garnishees herein, 
an affidavit having been made 
that the principal defendant is 
not living in the State of Vir- 
ginia, and bis address is un- 
known, and whose last known 
address was Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, hut who is now a non- 
resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, he is hereby ORDERED 
to appear within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect bis interest. 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be published once a 
week for four (4) consecutive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun-Newt, a newspaper pub- 
lished In the City of Virginia 
Beach and Princess Anne Coun- 
ty, Virginia. 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: R H. West, D.C. 
BURLAGE AND DECKER 
L. Charles Burlage, p.q. 
309 Board of Trade Building 
Norfolk, Virginia « 8-16-4t 




Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 19th day 
of Ju|y, 19ol 
Hafrvin Roger McMilJfn, 
* against Plaintiff 

Constance Delaney Coveney 
McMillan Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce from the bonds 
of matrimony from the said de- 
fendant, upon the grounds of 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is not a resident of the* 
State of Virginia, the last know* 
post office address being 821 
Rainey Street, Burlington, N.C. 



pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication- hereof, 
and do what may, be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit 

A Copy— Teate: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Margaret M. Hood, D.C. 
Henry L. Lam, p.q. 
Princess Anne, Virginia 7-26-4t 



NOTICE 

An Application for a moving 
permit will be heard by City 
Council, Monday, August 20, 
1962. 

Description of building: 1 
story frame. 

Location from: 124 feet xl50 
feet in sqhare No. 13. 

Subdivision map' 2, City of 
Virginia Beach, Va.. 

Location to: lots No. 12, 13 14, 
and 13, Block No. 117. 
W. Clyde Simpson Jr.* 
Box 247, 
Virginia Beafli, Va. 8-9-2t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk'. Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 10th day 
of August, 1961 
EDVICE VOLP1N WATTS, 

against * Plaintiff 

THOMAS J. WATTS, SR., 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a . divorce A Menda et 
thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a vinculo matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And ah affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend 



ant is a non-resident of the State 

,4 of Virginja, the lastjenown post 

It is ordered, that she do^ offlce ^address befog: ILS.S. 

Wrangell (AE 12) % Fleet Post 
Office, New York, New York. 
It is ordered, that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to "protect his interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teate: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 



Virginia Beech Sun-News, Thursday, August 1 6, 1 962 



Page 7-B 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



• FEMALE HELP WANTED 



Drug and fountain help, per- 
manent work, apply in person. 
Barr's Pharmacy, ^Tth and 
Atlantic Avenue. 8-9-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 



NO AGE 
I bear you are still looking — still 
looking for the right proposi- 
tion? Why not cafl Mr. Horn- 
stone at 428-8289' and hear 
our proposition. 8-16-lt 



Make extra money fast! Show 
friends big value Christmas 
and all occasion cards,' gifts, 
candy, imprinted cards. Easy 
money, 880 to 8100 or more 
selling 21 for fl. Profits up 
to 60c per box. Dial EX 7-7251, 
write or apply for samples on 
approval. Shirley Greeting 
Cards, 206 County Street, 
Dept. VB, Portsmouth, Va. 

8-16-lt 

NURSES — Graduate, practical 
and nurses .aids. Apply Super- 
intendent, Va. Beach Hospital, 
25th and Arctic Ave. 8-17-tfn 



• STORE FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — Office or store 
space on ocean side of Atlan- 
tic Avenue. Rent very reason- 
able. P.O. Box 827, Virginia 
Beach. 6-7-tfn 

• FOR SALE OR RENT 

Yearly or winter, all locations. 
Additional listings desired. 
Call Margaret P. Thompkins, 
428-7721. 8-16-lt 



TV rentals at Hirtx TV, London 
Bridge, open 9-9. Phone 340- 
8888. Also reconditioned TVs 
for sale. Rentals to purchase 
terms. 7-20-tfn 



• WANTED TO RENT 



Lady wishes efficiency room or 
small apt. Yearly, reasonable. 
References. Phone G A 8-2021 
or Printing shop, $16 & Atlan- 
tic Ave. 8-16-U 

RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

A phone call could start you on 
a new profitable career. Call 
428-7750. 8-16-lt 



• HOUSE FOR RENT 



FOR RENT — Bungalow, Vir- 
ginia Beach Blvd. at Lynn- 
haven; 2 bedrooms, furnished, 
automatic laundry. Call 341- 
3974 or 340-8300. 8-2-tfn 



BUSINESS SERVICES 



Crane, bulldozer and truck rent- 
al service. Top soil, sand and 
clay fill. Douglas S. Mason 
Crane Service Company, Box 
03, London Bridge, Virginia. 
Phone 340-8558. 7-5-tfn 



PRESCRIPTIONS WANTED: to 
fill. Free delivery. Call Barr's 
Rexall Pharmacy. GA 8-1211. 

6-15-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

If you are still looking call 428- 
5257. 8-16-l t 

• HOUSEHOLD GOODS 



• LOST AND- FOUND 



LOST — 5-pound Chihauhau, 
light brown, black streak 
down back, white ring around 
collar. Reward. No questions 
asked. Dial DeHart, 340-8591. 

8-16-lt 



I hear you are still looking for 
the right proposition. Call 
428-5256. 8-16-lt 



• FOR RENT 



SCHOOL TEACHERS 

Houses and apartments for the 
winter season. Available La- 
bor Day. Call The Brown 
Agency, office, 428-3244; 
home, GA 8-5693. 8-2-5t 



Real bargains in newly uphol- 
stered furniture. Chairs, sofas, 
loveseats and antiques. Hill- 
top Upholstering Company, 
17th Street Extended, Vir- 
ginia Beach, phone 428-1797. 

8-9-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

Would you like to earn $90 to 
$125 per week? For further 
information, call 428-7750. 

8-16-lt 



Reed bottom chairs, dining 
room chairs, chests, desk, 
washstand and other house- 
bold items. Call GA 8-5193. 

8-9-tfn 



f MISC. FOR SALE 



Boys and girls bicycle, good 
condition, new tires, $15 each. 
Phone GA 8*6713. 8-9-tfn 



Antiqued white lane cedar chest, 
$35. 8x10 braided rug, $5. 
Call 428-8909. 8-16-lt 



Gibson guitar, like new, cost 
$165 will sell for $80. Phone 
340-8870. 8-16-lt 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

We may have the answer for 
you. Call 428-5255. 8-16-lt 



rBrydges & Broyles, p.q\ ( »• 

3115 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Va. 8-16-4t 



LOOK WHAT'S NEW 
FOR YOU IN r hp 

at SUBURBAN 



NEW 



I 



SUBURBAN 
WICK 



tla^R frtaaje Mlsj 

#LI mrlm 



1 



HA 



^w 




Commonwealth of Virginia, In 

the Cterk'i Office of the Cir- 

cult Coert of tho County of 

. Princess Anne, on the 26th 

day of July, 1962. 
foseph E. BlackwelL Plaintiff 

against * > 

Dorothy Join Blackwell, 

Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The obtect of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo Ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 
ant, upon the grounds of three 
year separation under Section 
20-91 (9) of the Code of Virginia- 
1950.. . .-? 

Asd an affidavit having been 
made' and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 81jB0 
Crow Canyon Road, Haywoon, 
California. 

It js ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after 'due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in wt$ 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-2-4t 



HELP, 
Male - 




ID 
le 



Assistant cook, kitchen maid 
■and orderlies. Apply Virginia 
Beach Hospital. 5-Jl-tfn 



High school sitter, 4 days per 
week, after school to 5 p.m. 
Laurel Manor area. Phone 
4284954. 8-lMt 



BUSINESS SERVICE— Business 
services. Hoover- Vacuum 
Cleaner. Sales and Service. 
Prompt efficient repairs. Pick 
up and delivery. Phone GA 8- 
4222. Fuel, Feed & Building 
Supplies, Inc., GA 8-1968. 

4-17-tfn 



Pedigree Bird Dog Pointer and 
German Shepherd puppies, 
$10 and $15. 1108 Laskln 
Road. Mrs. H. G. Brooks. 

8-9-2t 



Furnished and unfurnished 
homes and apartments. One 
to four bedrooms. Winter or 
yearly. Anchor Realty. Call 
GA 8-7421. 9-8-tfn 



HOUSE FOR SALE 



By owner, 3-bedroom house, at- 
tached garage, 5704 Meer Rd., 
North Virginia Beach. Shown 
by appointment. Phone 428- 
3671 or 428-1211. 5-24-tfn 



• WANTED TO IUY 



Good clean used electric stove, 
must be reasonable. Dial GA 
8-5822. 8-16-lt 




SPECIAL BUY 

1954 CHEVROLET 
Bel -Air 

Extra clean. Radio, heater, 
etc. Must be seen and driv- 
en to be appreciated. Price 

, $295. 
GA 8-2401 between 8 a.m. 
and 5 p.m. 8-16-tfn 



Repairs 

Commerciaf 



FURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 



Harley's Apts. 2406 Pacific Ave. 
One and two bedroom apts., 
year-round rental. Adults. A 
lease if desired. Call GA8- 
9691. 8-16-3t 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 

NO AGE LIMIT 
,Lefs get together and discuss 
tiie possibilities of making 
more money. Phone 428*255. 

'8-16-lt 




SEE IT TODAY— 

vtsn- oun SHOWROOM 

..range that LQOKSKka a butt-in 
... but iar^ It aim ply aMdea into place.,. 

••%• SfeseWl UViWni ^fiwfVVfl wee&^RVefVe) a e e 

can also be used as frea-standlng range. 

m ibout ns ui service nsT*ujmoN 



RELIABLE MAN OR WOMAN. 
To take over Watkins Route 
in city of Virginia Beach. 
Good for $75 and up weekly. 
No investment. Set your own 
hours. Permanent opportu- 
nity. Full or part time. Write 
Watkins Products, Inc., D-64, 
Winona, Minn. 8-9-2t 



Northend, Oceanside, winter 
rates, September-June, 3 bed- 

v tooms, living room.'den, din- 
ing room, open fireplace, 
well heated, attractive. Phone 
GA 8-2712, GA 8-1853. 8-16-tfn 



Like new, Mahogany buffet, 
will sacrifice. Call or write 
Va. Beach Sun-News, P. 0. 
Box 657, GA 8-2401. 11-30-tfn 



Sale on new appliances, TV and 
Stereo at Hirtz Bazaar, Oce- 
ana. Open 9-9. Also used fur- 
niture, appliances and parts. 
We buy-sell-swap anything at 
Hirtz Bazaar. GA 8-7088. 

7-20-tfn 



• ROOM FOR RENT 



Four rooms and bath, nicely 
furnished duplexes, apart- 
ment, on large wooded lots, 
20 Caribbean Avenue. Phone 
GA 8-2680. ' 8-16-tfn 



• Automobile For Solo 



Serving,- 

Port.awut*. Norfolk. Saffelk, 
VlrtU* Be**, South Norfolk, 
rnmeM Aim. I»U ef Watt 



SUBURBAN 

RULANE 

GAS SERVICE 

»•■*• WeT0» TV fl aVRtW^I fO*t 

Hiehwoy • Porhmoura 
Dial 393-4071 



m 



VIRGINIA: In the Clark's Office 
of the Circuit Court of Rrjp- 
cess Anne County on the 10th 
day ef August, 1962. 
LESLIE B. KREGER, Plaintiff 

vs. 
J. DAVID SCOTT, 
Address Unknown, 
Principal Defendant 

and 
PASQUALE V. ARCESE 
c/o Isle of Capri 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

and 
co Police Department 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

Garnishees 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
subject to garnishment proceed- 
ings for the Benefit of Leslie B. 
Kreger, Plaintiff, a certain 1962 
Model Cadillac Convertible 
Coupe, wtuch Cadillac has been 



Transportation for High School 
student. 40 Plymouth coupe. 
New tires, radio and heater. 
8125. Phone 428-7673. 8-16-lt 



• APARTMENT FOR RENT 



Modern 3-bedroom unfurnished 
apt. Suitable for Officer, near 
school, IMt blocks from Ocean. 
Yearly rental, available Aug. 
10. Phone GA 8-2576. 7-16-lt 

2-bedroom unfurnished apart- 
ment, year round rental, can 
be seen Wednesday, Saturday, 
and Sunday after 1, other 
days after 5 p.m. 1416 Cypress 
Avenue, Virginia Beach, Va. 



3-room, 2nd floor apt., private 
entrance, all utilities, yearly 
rental, $90 month. 3400 Arctic 
Ave. „ 8-16-lt 

RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

The smallest ad— the biggest op- 
portunity. Call 428-7750. 

8-16-lt 

One and two bedroom apts. 
Reasonable rent all year 
round. Call GA 8-9663 or MA 
2-1286. 8-16-tfn 



RESERVE HOSPITALIZATION 
NO AGE LIMIT 

This might be the opportunity 
for a better position. Apply 
303-30th St., Va. Beach. 

8-16-lt 

Make your reservations and stay 
at the Beach Plaza for the 
complete winter season after 
Labor Day. Rooms available 
for weekly or monthly win- 
ter rates. Live in congenial 

• friendly family atmosphere, 
School teachers, salesman, 
service personnel, civilian 
workers, etc. are welcome. 
Ocean front at 22nd St., Vir- 
ginia Beach. Dial 428-2312. 

8-16-tfn 



•»j 



Household 
Refrigeration 

Laundromat* 

DeaJera for Westinghonae 

Applianoea 

Commercial PRIGEDAIRK 
Prodmcta 

W. C JOHNSON 
tax . in* street 

Virginia Beach 
Phone GA 8-ttTl 



AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 



• COTTAGES FOR RENT 



Small furnished cottage by 
month or week, 850 month, 
close to Oceana Base. Avail- 

, able immediately, service 



■tfn 



l-bedroom, kitchen privileges, 
$10 per week. 8-16-lt 

TEACHERS 

1 end 2-bedroom apartments, 
September through June, $75- 
$85 month. Call Four Gables, 
428-5127. 8-9-tfn 



POSTED SIGNS 
FOB SALE 

20c Each « 

or * 
$2.00 doz. 

THE SUN-NEWS 
3108 Pacific Ave. 



INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 



HARDIN SCHOOL 
Of Music 

Brtatow Hardin, Director 

313 -35th Street 
Virginia Beach 

I — — 



®EmRh»o Motors, Inc. 
Ford, Thunderbirds, 
Itatian Fiats 

e*-17tn St— GA S-4232— V«. Baaca 
BayaMa. Va. HO 4-1541 






OPTICIANS 



Ask Your Eye Physician About 

TRAYLOR'S 

Virginia Roach's only 
GUILD OPTICIAN 

1803 Atlantic Afa^ Virginia Beach 
H. McNama™, Mar. 



RESTAURANTS 



WILLIAM KILLGROVE 
Instruction In 

Piano, Organ, Accordian 
JU 74)466 - GA 8-3202 



- 



REAL ESTATE 
EXAM SCH0OL 

STATE LICENSE 

PREPARATORY COURSE 

ENROLL NOW TAUGHT 

By GRADUATE ATTORNEY 

C haw 2 Weeks 7-4© to Ml 

MON. — WED. — no. 

COMPLETE COURSE S35 

Norfolk • Portsmouth 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

SUITE 31* 

LAW BLDG. PHONE 
W GRANBY ST. M4 



m 



Charlie's Seafood Restaurant 

STEAKS — CHICKEN 

ALASKA KING CRAB 

PriYate Dnafaaa Room for Partie* 

810 Atlantic Ave., West 
Near Lynnhaven Inlet 



PEST CONTROi 



ALDRIDGE & CHAMBERS, Inc. 
Exterminators 
Phono 3404262 .. 



PLUMBING & HEATING 



ADAMS BROS. 
PLUMBING CORP. 

Wrjntia Beach atece lt34» 

Plumbing and Heating 
Repair service and supplies 

warm air duct heating 
Chrysler Air Conditioning 

BUDGET TERMS AS DESIRES 
WE SERVICE WHAT WE aw^ 

41 6-1 7th It. - 948-6731 
Virginia Booth 



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AND WE'RE AT YOUR SERVICE 24 HOURS A DAY - AROUND THE CLOCK! 



RESCUE SQUAD MEN ARE 



.*> 



-^ 




LUNTEERS 



This Is How Your 

RESCUE SQUAD 

has served you! 



Our perennial dividend is declared in SERVICE 
TO THE PUBLIC, payable on demand. Divi- 
dends paid to date as follows: 



1,276 CALLS 

—answered for the year, a total of 8,951 since organizing in 1952. 

33,518 MILES 

--dmen in service for a year, making a total of 214,897 since 
organizing. 

13,145 MAN HOURS 

-7-votaajiwed during the past year, making a total of 109,846 
~»<>rganizing. 



What the 

RESCUE SQUAD 

Means to YOU 

and VIRGINIA BEACH 

It means that any hour of the day and night, day-m and day-out, 

•£? *, ^, ned ht ) p rtandm 8 by in case you have an accident, are 
sudderdy ill, need emergency transportation, or any number of 
completely unexpected situations' arise in which you may need help 
The Rescue Squad is dispatched by the Virginia Beach Police 
Department . . . J u * call GA 8-922? and thefre onThrir waTS 

JT-i^^c ^ wlot or crced khows no ^er "hen the 
c^yc^inT *■"■ ° Wr ** ipeakCr And * ck «*" 

Send Your Contribution in TODAY! 

P. O. BOX 47, VIRGINIA BEACH 

OR CALL 

GA 8-9223 



Proposed 1962-1963 

BUDGET 

WtobUe^Eqiripment-Oas - Oil - Repairs $ 2,500.00 

operating Expanse*; g^aZzzzzzzzz s'soooo 

Budding Maintenance and Improvements ....; '".,'. I.'toOOO 

First Aid Suites Z^ZZZZ". " Hmm 

C^TALOUTLaVs 50000 

SmaH Efcupment Replacements 1 300 00 

, Replacement of -Vehicles 4 006 00 

Principal and Interest on Building Fund Note "I 3!o0000 

TOTAL $22,000.00 

WE NEED 

YOUR HELP 

YOU MAT NEED OURS 

Squad is on duty 24 hours a day — to offer assistance t 
hi dbtrea * NO CHARGE for fli«ir%nSSri^ 










am 




This Is Rescue Squad Month-GIVE NOW! 



i 



^27)962 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-JNEWS 



ma. v- 



"HOME pF AMERICA'S FIRST MAN IN SPACE" 



2 SECTIONS 
16 PAGES 



ANTIQUE SHOW BEST 
EVER ACCORDING TO 
OFFICIALS, DEALERS 



TELEPHONE GA 8-2401 VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADS PAY 



It may be several weeks before the 

th An 



Beach Police 
Chief Elected 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

kl n own la 'A" the Fo , urth Annual ^W™ Show and Sale "it 
known, but the event has already been acclaimed as a great 
success. • ' 

By the time the show closed Sunday at 6 p.m. dealers were 
clamoring for space in the Alan 
B. Shepard Convention Center 
for the 1963 event. 

Most of the dealers found 
they could not keep their dis- 
play! stocked because of the 
quick turn-over. Many had to 
re-supple the displays three 
and four times during the 4- 
day show. 

Most of the antiques shown 
were smaller items, such as 
glassware, linens, guns and oth- 
ers. There was not as much 
furniture as in past years, prob- 
ably because the dealers felt 
that tourists would not be in- 
terested in the larger items. 
Furniture Shipped 

This proved to be an error on 
the dealer's part, a show spokes- 
man said, because furniture 
that was displayed was quickly 
sold and shipped* out of town. 
Some pieces were shipped as 
far away as Texas. , 

This is the first year the 
show, which is sponsored by the 
the Princess Anne Woman's 
Club, has been held during the 
summer season. It has previous- 
ly been held in October. 

"We will evaluate the show 
later to see if it has been bene- 
ficial to hold it in August r ather 
than later In the fan," Mrs. Earl 




Use Permit 
For Hotel 
Is Granted 

VIRGINIA BEACH — A use 
permit to erect a $4-million, 12- 
story motel on 40th Street be- 
tween Atlantic and Pacific Ave- 
rhies was approved by City 
Council Monday. 

The elaborate resort facility 
has been proposed by the South- 
western Development Co. of Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Council agreed to sell South- 
western a strip of property 20 
feet wide and 376 feet long 
just west of Pacific Avenue for 
$4,000. The property is the old 
Norfolk Southern Railroad 
right-of-way. 

Southwestern will deed to the 
city a 20-foot wide strip abng 
Holly Road, about 350 feet long, 
which may be used for widen- 
ing the street. 

Council approved a $1,500 ap- 
propriation for the beautifica- 
tion of the Norwegian Lady 
statue site at 25th Street and 
Ocean Front. The statue will be 
presented to the city by the 
citizens of Moss, Norway. 



SINGLE COPY: 5c BY MAIL $3.50 «R YIA*. 



Councilman Tarrall Retires 




Sept. 7-9 



Post 



S 



Of 



DuVal, publicity chairman, said. 
"However, it was definitely a 
success. We had a steady flow 
of people and the dealers were 
Very pleased with the results. 
**We had one of the most amiable 
and enthusiastic group of deal- 
ers we have ever had and it 
made the show a pleasure for 
everyone." 



FamousTexas 
Girls to Visit 
Beach Aug. 31 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 

famous all-girl Rangerettes of 

the Kilgore, Texas, College will 

be guests of Virginia Beach on 

Friday, August 31, when they 

will be entertained with a beach 

party and a "day at the beach" ?™ U P; J !P\ n . a ^ " oge "'. uo 
L /h« vi.^™ n M ,i, r^w sultant, Field Service Division 



Police Chief Reeves E. Johnson 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Police 
Chief Reeves E. Johnson of Vir% 
ginia Beach was elected second 
vice president of the FBI Na- 
Associates of 



le Commonwealth ofVlrginia 
at the annual retraining session 
held here last week. 

Other officers elected during 
the two-day retraining and busi- 
ness meeting were Captain Wil- 
liam B. Weaver, Newport News 
Police, Alexandria, first vice- 
president; Capt. Walter E. Bell, 
Jr., Arlington County Police, re- 
elected secretary-treasurer, and 
Chief Wilmer J. Hedrick, Henri- 
co County Police, historian. 
Capt. R. E. Claytor of Richmond 
Police was retiring president. 

The Hon. Robert S. Wahab, 
Judge of the Circuit Court of; 
Princess Anne County and Vir- 
ginia Beach, was guest speaker 
at the annual banquet last 
Thursday, evening and spoke to 
the graduates of the FBI and 
their guests on the source and 
nature of the law. 

Welcomed bv Mayor 

Other speakers included Hon. 
Frank A. Dusch, Mayor of Vir- 
ginia Beach, who welcomed this 
group; Jeptha S. Rogers, Con 



"Hot Dog" Tank 
Car Arrives 



Mayor Dusch (right) presents Tarrall with a Resolution of Appreciation. Vice-Mayor 
John McCombs looks on. (Phillips Photo) 



by the Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce. 

The celebrated marching unit 
will be in this area for the pro- 
fessional football game between 
the Chicago Bears and the 
Washington"* Redskins at Nori 
folk's Foreman Field on Satur- 
day night, September 1. The 
game is being sponsored by the 
Kiwanis Clubs in the Tidewater 
area. 

The Rangerettes are world 
famous. TJiey have appeared at 
the Cotton" Bowl in Dallas for 
12 consecutive years. They per- 
form annually at the Pro-All 
Star .football game in Soldier's 
JSeld m Chicago. They have ap- 
peared on television and in the 
movies. i 

Featuring spectacular routines 
the Rangerettes are a colorful 
group of beautiful Texas girls 
under the directorship of Miss 
Gussie Nell Davis. The Ranger- 
ettes were formed first in 1940. 
The side ' trip to Virginia 
Beach is a request by the girls 
themselves. They will visit here 
during the day and may perform 
in late afternoon. 

Arrangements for the visit of 
this celebrated group is being 
planned by the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce. They 
will visit the Alan B. Shepard 
Convention Center and that will 
be headquarters for the day. A 
box lunch on the beach is also 
planned. 



of The International Association 
of Chiefs of Police, Washington, 
D.C., Alfred Whitehurst, Com- 
monwealth Attorney of Norfolk, 

(Continued on Page 4) 

Dredge Cuts 
Way to Sand 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Ells- 
worth Morse, superintendent of 
the beach replenishment pro- 
gram, suggested to the Virginia 
Beach Erosion Commission Mon- 
day that the dredge, which has 
been slowly working its way up 
Lake Rudee to the commission's 
main sand supply on high 
ground, cut a direct channel to 
the new supply. 

The suggestion was approved 
by the commission after Joseph 
McDonald, consulting engineer, 
said this would be a wise move. 
The sand on high ground is not 
mixed with silt like that in the 
lake, McDonald said. It will take 
about three weeks to cut a chan- 
nel for the dredge to get to the 
sand bank. 

McDonald also estimated the 
commission will receive about 
$8,000 from insurance on pipe- 
lines and pumping equipment 
damaged or destroyed by the 
March storm. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
%$t fwmfefrfiaio fajjjL gar fmrfr 
tag LP gai arrived in the Tide- 
water area last week and it 
went to the Virginia Beach Gas 
Corporation plant on Cypress 
avenue in Virginia Beach . 

Nicknamed the "hot dog" the 
extra large tank car was con- 
structed by the Union Tank Car 
Company in Whiting, Indiana. 
Its design is patented. The car 
is 85 feet long and is 8 feet 
three inches in diameter. 

Wallace T. Clark, president of 
the Virginia Beach Gas Corp., 
was on hand to receive the new 
tank car. Also present was P. H. 
"Dick" Allen, manager of the 
LP Gas department of Humble 
Oil and Refining Company for 
the Virginia-West Virginia area. 

According to Allen, this was 
the first of the new type tank 
cars shipped into the Tidewater 
area. The hage car weighs 
141,000 pounds when loaded and 
110,500 pounds when empty. 

The "Hot Dog" car will carry 
30,000 gallons and is designed 
for more economical transporta- 
tion for LP gas dealers. 



TARRALL HONORED BY FELLOW 
COUNCILMEN AT FINAL MEETING 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Members 
of the Virginia Beach City Cow- 
cil bid farewell to fellow couj- 
cjjnmo^ Frank D. JTaxrall J*. 
HiMsyas Ms last term same tsj 
a close and he retired from pub- 
he life to devote more time to 
private business. 
, He was presented a framed 
Resolution of Appreciation by 
Mayor Frank A. Dusch for his 
many years of service as a city 
official and a bronze plaque by 
Fire Chief E. B.Bayne for, his 
work as honorary chief of the 
Virginia Beach Volunteer Fire 
Department and chief of the 
Virginia Beach Civil Defense 
Fire Department. 

When the meeting ended, 
nearly every person in the 
Council Chambers— city offi- 
cials, city employees and pri- 
vate citizens— came forward 
to shake Terrell's hand and 
wish him well. 

The much-respected and well- 
liked councilman has seen Vir- 
ginia Beach through some of its 
most outstanding growth since 
he took office in 1954 and has 
promoted his city with active 
participation in such groups as 
Rudee Inlet Development Com- 
mittee, the Southeastern Vir- 
ginia Regional Planning Com- 



mission and the Virginia Travel 
Council, 

A native of Norfolk, Tarrall 
worked for the Norfolk City De- 
partment of Pe^fc^Worise -fee 
17 years before opening his own 
land surveying business. 

The "business pressures" of 
his firm, Frank D. Tarrall and 
Associates, prompeted his re- 
tirement as councilman. He di- 
vides his time between the sur- 
veying and engineering firm's 
offices at Virginia Beach, Nor- 



Rescue Squad 
Needs $10,000 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach-Princess Anne 
Rescue Squad is $12,000 near- 
er its $22,000 goal at the end 
of the first three weeks of the 
annual fund-raising campaign. 

Radio Station WBOF will 
present a special 10-minute 
program entitled "Emer- 
gency" Saturday at &15 p.m. 
outlining the squed's 10 years 
of service. The program will 
also include interviews with 
past and present members. 



Another First for Virginia Beach 




the new "hot dog' tank car arrived in Virginia Beach last week bringing a tankload 
of LP gas to the Virginia Beach Gas Corporation. The "hot dog" name is official and is pat- 
ented. Viewing the unusual car is Wallace T. Clark, left, president of the gee firm, and P H 
"Dick" Allen of Humble Oil and Refining Company. (Boice Photo) 



folk and Princess Anne Court 
House. 

Tarrall's influence has been 
felt throughout the community, 
for any job he undertakes, he 
does well, whether it is teaching 
a Sunday School class at the 
Virginia . Beach Baptist Church 
or enlarging the Virginia Beach 
High School Band fund. His 
work with the school has been 
so extensive he once received 
a special award as "chief boost- 
er of Virginia Beach High 
School." 

Tarrall resides with his wife, 
the former Elizabeth Clark of 
Norfolk, at their home on 46th 
Street. 



New Term Topic 
Of School Board 

• PRINCESS ANNE — New 
schools, new schedules and new 
teachers were discussed Tues- 
day at a meeting of the Prin- 
cess Anne County School Board. 
Supt. of Schools Frank W. 
Cox told the board that Malibu 
and Pembroke Manor Elemen- 
tary Schools are "proceeding ac- 
cording to plan and,) barring 
any adverse weather, will be 
ready by Nov. 1." 

Cox also seid that negotia- 
tions for a school site near the 
Arrowhead and Carolanne 
Farms developments ' is * pro- 
gressing. 
M. P. Strickler, assistant 
superintendent, outlined stud- 
ent distribution for the newly 
constructed Kellam High School 
on Holland Swamp Road, 

Strickler said new students 
from the following areas will 
attend the school: all eighth 
graders south of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard from Seatack to Rose- 
mont and on the north side of 
the Boulevard beginning at Sea- 
tack and including Oceana, Lit- 
tle Neck, Chesopeian Colony, 
Eastern Park, King's Grant and 
Belle Haven. 

Also all' eighth, ninth and 
tenth graders beginning at Coun- 
ty View Trailer Court and Po- 
cahontas Village south to the 
lower end of the county. 

Also eighth, ninth and tenth 
graders from Malibu and Prin- 
cess Anne Plaza and from Bell's 
Corner to the courthouse, in- 
cluding Oceana Apartments. 

During the business session 
the board approved the appoint- 
ment of 34 new teachers. The 
county schools will open on a 
half-day basis Sept. 6-7 and on 
a full schedule Sept 10. 



VIRGINIA BEACH— More than 2,000 American Legionnairsi 
and Auxiliary members are expected to attend the annual 
American Legion State Convention here Sept. 7-9. 

Po st No. 113 of Virgins Beach will host the three-day meeting 

with William P. Kellam and 
Pete Scoppa as co-chairmen el 
the steering committee. 

The Alan B. Shepard Conven- 
tion will be the scene of all con- 
vention sessions. 

Official convention activities 
will get under way Sept 8 with 
meetings of the executive, fi- 
nance, resolutions, assignment 
credentials and rules and perm- 
anent organization committees, 
The actual convention will 
open Sept. 7 at 9 a.m. with a 
joint Legion-Auxiliary session. 
Committee reports will be heard 
in separate meetings that day 
and the following morning. 

A mammoth parade wtW 
move down Atlantic Avenue 
the mommy of Sept* I ana) a 
social hour, banquet A demo 
will be held that night 
The convention win dose 
Sept. 9 with joint religious 
services for the Legion ami 
Auxiliary, followed by separate 
annual business meetings of the 
two organisation*. These will be 
by guest 



Boardwalk 
Work Started 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Work 
has begun here on the restora- 
tion of the concrete boardwalk, 
seawall, and hand railing dam 
aged by the March 7 storm. 

This phase of the final drive 
to complete repairs here since 
the storm is being accomplished 
by the Asphalt Roads and Ma- 
terials Company, which is op- 
erating under a contact recent- 
ly awarded by the U.S. Corps of 
Engineers. 

Fred A. Haycox Jr., owner & 
operator of Asphalt Roads and 
Materials Company, is personal- 
ly in charge of the seawall and 
boardwalk restoration. 

Much of the work centers on 
repairs to the boeJffiraW which 
was severely damaged by the 
Ash Wednesday storm. In addi- 
tion, it is estimated that about 
600 feet of railing must be re- 
placed. 

The City has requested that 
the Army Corps of Engineers 
and the Federal Office of Emer- 
gency Planning allow the con- 
tractor to put rack railings as 
they were before the storm. 

As contractor on the board 
walk job, young Haycox is fol 
lowing in his father's footsteps 
on the Virginia Beach board- 
walk. Fred A. Haycox, Sr., now 
retired, was the contractor for 
the original boardwalk and sea- 
wall here some 35 years ago. 

Work actually started this 
week when workmen of Asphalt 
Roads and Materials began mov- 
ing in equipment Work was 
well underway Wednesday. 



fi 



Knotts Island 
Ferry Starting 
Sept. 4 



KNOTTS ISLAND— The chil- 
dren of Knotts Island need no 
longer have to travel the one 
hundred mile round trip to 
school. They will now be able 
to make the trip via a 45-minute 
ferry ride. 

The citizens of Knotts Island 
have worked toward getting a 
ferry for some time in hopes 
that it will build tourist trade. 
The ferry ride cuts the distance 
from Virginia Beach to Manteo, 
N.C. in half. 

The ferry will make its first 
run September 4 after a ribbon 
cutting ceremony at 11:30 a.m. 
Governor Terry Sanford of 
North Carolina, Congressman 
Banner, and Merrill Evans, wiU 
be among those making the first 
triD. 

In celebration, there will be 
a fish fry sponsored by the 
Home Demonstration Clubs of 
Currituck Seven hundred ami 
fifty are expected to attend. 

The ferry will make five trips 
a day. The fall and winter 
schedule from Knotts Island is 
7:30 a.m., 9:30 am., UiW SunL, 
1:30 p.m., and 4:30 p.m. Leave 
Currituck, 6:30 am., 8:30 arn^ 
10:30 a.m., 12:30 pm., and 
3:30 pm. 



and election of officers. • 

Keynote speakers and attrac- 
tions at the conclave will be 
beaded by Charles I. Bacon, 
Kansas dry, Mo.,' National Com- 
mander of the Legion; Cartha 
D. DeLoach, Washington, D.C., 
Assistant Director, FBI, U.S. De- 
partment of Justice; and Nick 
Adams, popular television star 
of "The Rebel" and a forthcom- 
ing series this fast who ap- 
peared previously at the Tobac- 
co Festival in Richmond. 

Other committee chairmen in- 
clude Fred W. Rudiger, regis- 
tration; Scoppa, housing; Wil- 
liam McFarland, parade; A. 
Franklin Nicholson, banquet; Al 
Solito, entertainment; Charles 
Mickey Williams, Negro Legtoo- 
n a i r e activities; Wyndham 
Brown HI, convention treasurer; 
Jack Thompson, decorations; 
Albih R. Mailhes, Bin Allen am} 
Rutiger, golf tournament; John 
R. Strickland, transportation; 
James PUley, arrangements; and 
Doris Fern and Hamm Griffin, 
programs. 

County High 
Bidder for 
GSA Pipeline 

PRINCESS ANNE — Princess 
Anne County submitted the win- 
ning bid of $5,000 Friday for a 
12-inch cast iron pipeline which 
extends 23.985 lineal feet from 
Norfolk's Moores Bridges Pump- 
ing Station to U.S. 80 at Little 
Creek Naval Amphibious Base. 

The only other- bidder for the 
pipeline being disposed by the> 
General Service Administration 
in Washington was M. M. ' 
of Salinas, Kansas who . 
$3,010. The decision on the 
is expected in the next week or 
so. 

Norfolk engineers 
would cost more thai 
to clear out the 
and reline it with < 
it would be usable. 

Norfolk offered $1 ia July for 
the pipeline because of the 
and expense it would 
GSA rejected the 
fared the Use for 
ted beam negotiating 
government tor over i 
an attempt to get the 










«W§inia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 

Pay 2-A * 

Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



llifflja Sw#l 



Another great classic joins Villager: 

• wool cardigan in the original 

spirit of the true sweater. Full 

fashioned, with saddle-shoulder 

Contraction ... the front ribboned 

on the outride with grosgrain 

and buttoned with ocean pcaris. 





I *QQ*t JroilaMd 



(Photo br Simmons) 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Lee Hurd observed their 50th wedding 
anniversary recently at a dinner at the Cape Colony Club with 
their two daughters, Mrs. Lawrence T. Forbes of Roanoke and 
Adelaide Hurt of Virginia Beach, serving as hostesses. 



rejWiBH KNOWN 
f*dfk Are. at Thirty-First St 



BIRTHS 

Lt. (jg) and Mrs. Jerry Duane 
Rutz announce the birth of their 
first child, a daughter, Margaret 
Renee, on Aug. 8 at Virginia 
Beach General Hospital. Mrs. 
Rutz is the former Miss Carla 
Raye Washburn, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Carl R. Washburn of 
Bayside. Mr. Rutz is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Rutz of 
Healdsburg, Calif. 



% « 




i Six »0*e imx Ly ™ h ?™' 

J72© ** , H"*,av ^4*a* Virginia 
SHOPS FOR THE LADIES AND THEIR DAUGHTERS 

I SALE 

Vt Off 

Summer Mcrcliandise 
Starting our bargain basement 



OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS TIL 9 P.M. 



School Belles 



studying for Phi Beta Kappa in good grooming, 
jgraduahe wtth honors when attired in clothes 
from our library of fashion . . . 

In addition to the skirt illustrated below, 
there are hundreds of other style skirts and 
kilts, many new colors in Sweaters woven 
for us in Scotland. Shirtwaist Dresses that 
defy description, and our famous Buffer- 
coats from England. May we serve you 
Tomorrow? 




corduroy wraparound 

3lexa«i.er*Bet 9 l 



Personal Mention 

Miss Jane Howard Showalter 
of Richmond will arrive today 
to spend a week with her uncle 
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Rueger HI in Cavalier. Park. 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L. 
Smith HI and their children 
Herbert and Garrett, recently 
returned to their home in 
Linkhorn Shores after spending 
some time l at Falmouth, Maine. 



Mrs. Louis Guy Jr., and her 
two daughters will leave Friday 
to spend a week visiting in Win- 
chester. 



Miss Chessy Scott of Wil- 
mington, Del., spent several 
days last week as the guest of 
Tanner Rose and his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles T.'Rose, 
who have been spending the 
month of August at the home of 
Mrs. Rose's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Rose and their three chil- 
dren will return to their home 
in Richmond next week. 



Mr. and Mrs. John C. Aspin- 
wall Jr., and their two children 
of Dallas, Texas, are visiting 
Mr. Aspinwall's parents, Mr. & 
Mrs. J. C. Aspinwall at their 
home in London Bridge. 

BERMUDA HOP 

The Bayside Junior Woman's 
Club will hold a Bermuda Hop 
at the Ocean Park Fire Depart- 
ment on Saturday, August 25, 
at 9:00 p.m. The proceeds will 
go into the Scholarship Fund. 

For information concerning 
tickets, call GY 7-5710. 



Society Editor 

Phone GA 8-7993 

. , _ ,. 

Patterson-Gordon 
Vows Are Said 



OCEAN PARK— Mr. and Mrs. 
D. C. Patterson Jr. of Lynnhaven 
announce the marriage of their 
daughter, Patricia Ann to Waits 
Walton Gordon, son of Mrs. 
Claudia Holderfield and the late 
W. W. Gordon of Norfolk. 

The ceremony was held Thurs- 
day evening at the Ocean Park 
Community Chapel. The Rev. 
Parker Young, pastor, officiated. 

Miss Gay Herring was maid 
of honor and David Hayes was 
best man. 

Following the ceremony, the 
couple left on a trip to Green- 
ville, S. C. They will reside at 
947-A Scott St., in Norfolk. 

PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Wood Cole 
recently had as 'their guests for 
ten days, Mr. Cole's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Cole, also 
Mr. Cole's brother and sister-in 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Randall Cole 
with their two children and Mr. 
Cole's aunt, Miss Marjorie Lit- 
tle, all of Manchester, Conn. 



Hughes-Lambert Wedding 




Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Row- 
land II and their three children 
of Little Rock, Ark., spent last 
weekend as the guest of F. S. 
Royster at his'home in Cavalier 
Park. 



Mr. and Mrs. Francis Darrell 
and their two sons, have re- 
turned to their home in Rux- 
ton, Md., after spending a 
month with Mrs. Darrell's moth- 
er, Mrs. Charles H. Hix on 47th 
Street. 



Capt. and Mrs. Jerry Page of 
Camp Lee, Va., spent last week- 
end visiting Capt. Page's broth- 
er-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. E. A. Langhorne at their 
home on Gunston Road. 



Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Wright 
Jr. of 'Petersburg spent last 
weekend with Mrs. Wright's 
mother, Mrs. B. K. Linderaan 
at her home on Holly .Road. 



Mrs. Julian Osborne Jr. and 
her children David and Anne, 
who have been living in Mc- 
Lean, spent last weekend visit- 
ing Mrs. Julian Osborne, Sr., 
on 53rd St., before leaving for 
Finland where they will join 
Major Osborne. 



Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Daniel T. 
Russler who have been spend- 
ing several months in the Philip- 
pine Islands, have arrived at the 
beach and are residing tempor- 
arily with Mr. and Mrs. M. Ward 
Cole on Linkhorn Drive. Mrs. 
Russler is the former Miss Sue 
Jett of Virginia Beach. 



State Senator & Mrs. Charles 
Fenwick of Arlington are spend- 
ing two weeks at The Breakers 
Hotel. 



Mrs. Hugh Brennaman and 
her daughter, Miss Judy Bren- 
naman of Richmond, spent last 
weekend with Mrs. Brennaman's 
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. & 
Mrs. Richard G. Brydges at 
their home in Linlier. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Walter Lambert are pictured leaving 
the Lynnhaven Presbyterian Church recently after they were 
married by the Rev. C. W. Howard. The bride is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Littleton Hughes of Lynnhaven and the 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Joyner Lambert 
of London Bridge. The couple will reside at Wright-Patterson 
Air Force Base in Dayton,' Ohio. (Carroll Walker Photo) 



Harrison-Wilson 
Rites Performed 



NORFOLK — The Christian 
Temple was the scene of the 
marriage .of Miss Linda Hope 
Harrison to Eugene Kelsey Wu\ 
son IH, at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 
12. The Rev. H. S. Hardcastle 
officiated. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Harrison. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. E. K. Wilson Jr., of 
London Bridge. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her brother, Wesley Paul 
Harrison, had Mrs. W. Lee Nor- 
man Jr., her sister, as matron 
of honor. Bridesmaids were the 
Misses Patricia Ann Herring and 
Betty Anne Moore. 

The bridegroom had J.-W. 
Price of Lynchburg as best 
man. Groomsmen were Timothy 
B. Wilson of London Bridge, and 
William Grubb. 

A reception was held at the 
Camellia Room of the Golden 
Triangle. After a southern wed- 
ding trip, the couple will live 
in Elizabeth Park. 



Miss Virginia, 1927 



Comdr. and Mrsj. Wynn V. 
Whidden and their daughters, 
Page Melissa, Vickie and Besty, 
who have been living on Abing- 
don Road, will leave Wednesday 
to make their home in Cohasset, 
Mass. Comdr. Whidder will be 
stationed at Boston. 



Mrs. William C. Overman and 
her two daughters, have re- 
turned to their Bay Colony home 
after visiting Mrs. Overman's 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Henry 
Townsend in Marshall, Va. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S. Mere- 
dith and their children, Leighton 
and Rob, are spending a week 
at High Hampton Inn at 
Cashiers, N.C. They were ac- 
companied by Miss Anne Gen- 
try. 



VMnMA SUCH, VIRGINIA 





YOUR 
RECEPTION... 

At the BANK OF PRINCESS ANNE will always 
be a friendly, personal welcome. With every 
conceivable modern banking service at your 
fingertips . . . you will soon discover what 
a pleasure it can be to do business with 
efficient, neighborly, local people who will 
be glad to see you and make you feel at home. 



I! 



BANK OF PRINCESS ANNE 



7960 VWGINU BEACH BLVD. Member Federal Deposit tannic* Corporafiot 
Opes Monday through Frktoy 9 A.M. to 1 PX end Wdey afternoon 4 to 7 Pit 



^PSp 



■*- T 8 



(Photo ibr^Bolce) 

MRS. HENRY JAFFE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Attired 
in a flowered, ruffled Colonial 
costume, Mrs. Henry I. Jaffe 
greeted guests at the Princess 
Anne Woman's Club's Fourth 
Annual Antiques Show and 
Sale last week-end at the Alan 
B. Shepard Convention Center. 
Her winning smile is just at 
eye-catching at it was that day 
in 1927 when a panel of 
judges, captured by her beau- 
ty, named, her the first "Miss 
Virginia." 

Mrs. Jaffe now resides at 
Cavalier Drive and Ocean Front 
and modestly keeps her title cup 
tucked away in a secluded place, 
hidden from view. 

As the former Miss Leah Co- 
hen of Norfolk, she was one of 
33 girls from all over the state 
sponsored in a beauty contest 
by the Retail Merchants' Associ- 
ation of Virginia. 

The event was one of the high- 
lights of the 1927 statelbnven- 
Uon of the group at the newly 
opened Cavalier Hotel. Attired 
is the latest bathing suit of the 
day, the contestants paraded be- 
fore judges around the hotel's 
indoor swimming pool. Hun- 
dreds of spectators lined the 
spacious galleries around the 
pool to witness the judging of 
the state-wide contest. 

A newspaper account of the 
event states: "To Miss Leah Co- 
hen of Norfolk was awarded the 
title of Miss Virginia and the 
Herman L. Barr sliver cup as 
the outstanding beauty of the 
contest." 

She also won the Norfolk 
costume prize, r dress. 




Miss SaUy Scherer 
Becomes Bride of 
G. Baskerville, III 

RICHMOND — The marriage 
of Miss Sally Hamilton Scherer 
and George Thompson Basker- 
ville HI of Virginia Beach took 
place Saturday at 8:30 p.m. at 
the First English Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. The Rev. Dr. 
Paul Scherer of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary officiated. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. John Hamilton 
Scherer. "The bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hard 
away Baskerville. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her father. Miss Frances 
Elizabeth Oliver of Summit, N.J., 
was maid of honor and Mrs. 
William Halsey Spruanco of 
Greenville, Del., was matron of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Miss 
.Alive Elliott of Lumberton, N.C, 
Mrs. John Nash Mcintosh of Sa- 
vannah, Ga., Miss Eloise Sullins 
Stuart of Birmingham, Ala., Miss 
Susan Bodeker Baskerville, sis- 
ter of the bridegroom, Mrs. John 
Ros Bowers and Miss Ann Pen- 
dleton Powell. 

Mr. Baskerville was his son's 
best man. Groomsmen were 
James Edward Crocker of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Clyde Harvey Rat- 
cliffe HI of Charlottesville, Wil- 
liam Halsey Spruance of Green- 
ville, Frederick Christian Wright 
III of Hagerstown, Md., Charles 
Martin Caravati Jr., William 
Archibald Robertson, John 
Hamilton Scherer Jr., brother of 
the bride, Emil Otto Nolting 
Williams' Jr., and John Dana 
Wise Jr. 

A reception was held at the 
Commonwealth Club. The couple 
will live at Virginia Beach. 

Mr. and Mr^ John F. Winn 
Jr., spent last weekend visiting 
Mrs. J. W. Ennochs in Hopewell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Winn have as 
their guests this week Mrs. 
Winn's brother and sister-in- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Conway 
Channing of Pittsburg, Pa. 




This is the shirt that became so 
famous it acquired a nickname. 

Or, rather; a nicknumber. 

We understand that intelligent 

villager collectors, to save 

time and avoid confusion, simply 

walk in and ask for #583, 

in whichever of its many colors 

they don't already have. Very 

wise. Oxford'cloth, with roll 

sleeves, pan collar. 





i I, i - - - ' «if^{L M j£-..<MAaBaJi 



H. WEBSTER BROWN 

Senior - Junior 

Pacific Ave. at Thirty-First St. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 



"It's clothes cleaning time for, 

BACK TO SCHOO L~ 

"its later than you think" 
f-^lc J 3Ut ^L L^leanerd 

Most Reasonable Cleaners at the Beach 
Opposite Colonial Store, 31st St. Phone GA 8-2801 



* , 



ZJaulor vSur^eid *J4dirdtyUnfy (Senier 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

THE SHAPE-UP. Why do we say shaping instead of haircut? 
Even though we may be featuring a certain hair fashion, no two 
adaptations ever walk out of our salon looking hist alike. We shape 
your new hairstyle to your features. We create a new illusion for 
you, with a new hairdo. We can taper away too much hair, and 
add a look of bulk to thinning tresses. 

STYLISTS 

MRS. ANDERSON MR. HOWARD MRS. WHITE 

MR. WILLIAMS MRS. TERRY 

ZJaylor (J5urc}e5$ ^htairdtulina batons 

LASKIN ROAD, VIRGINIA BEACH Phone GA 8-3191 

TWO NORFOLK LOCATIONS 
100 Louisiana Dr., Wards Corner 2299 Hampton Blvd. 

Ph. 5I3-IM9 Ph. €25-9552 



Barr's Rexall Pharmacy 

VIRGINIA BEA( 

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• POST OFFICE CON 

17th & ATLANTIC AVE. 




Mrs. Moore's Bakery 

NEXT TO BE-LO SUPER MARKET 
400 - 30th ST. VIRGINIA BEACH GA 8-5081 



PHONE IN YOUR APPLICATION 

CONSOLIDATE YOUR PERSONAL BILLS 

nil Mortgage Loans 

Up to 5 years to repay. 

Sengible Rata 

$1,000 TO $20,000 

NO BROKERAGE 

FEE 

NO APPRAISAL FEE 

FAST, CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE 
Hour*: 9 a.m. to 5 pjn. Daily; Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 pan. 

Fidelity Commercial Co. 

311-315 LAW BUILDING - Granby and Plume St. 
NORFOLK MA 7-2571 




Call Your Local Service Center for 

ALL YOUR SERVICE PROBLEMS 




t? 



AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING 



b 7 



COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL 

Prompt 24-HOUR Service 

ALL WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 
Phone: GA 8-1929 204 - 22nd Street 

Phone: Kl 5-6843 Virginia Beach, Va. 



SALES 



RENTALS 



REPAIRS 



TYPEWRITER SPECIALISTS 
Now at 

Virginia Beach 

• 206 - 22nd STREET 

TYPEWRITER 

ScKYICC 




CELEBRATING OUR 1 1th ANNIVERSARY 

428-4231 

• New and Used Machines for Sale 

• Pick up and Delivery Service 
#, Adding Machines - Cash Registers 

Two other locations in 
NORFOLK and PORTSMOUTH 



Bayside News 



Bayside Lions 
Hear Governor 



BAYSIDE— The Bayside Lions 
Club met at the Shore Drive Inn 
with vice president, C. E. McCoy, 
presiding. 

The club was honored by an 
official visit of the District 
Governor, Joseph W. Butter- 
worth; Deputy District Gover- 
nor, Ed Lassiter; Cabinet Secre- 
tary, Spurgeon Toney; District 
Projects Chairman, Harold 
Parks; International Counsellor 
Lew Dillon and Past Deputy 
Governor, John Wood. 

Carroll Clough, Bayside 
Supervisor of Princess Anne 
County was also a guest of the 
club. 

New Lions 
District Gov. Butterworth pre- 
sided over an induction cere- 
mony in which the following 
new lions were officially re- 
ceived; Paul Whitehurst, Mar- 
shall Tollen, Robert Spruill and 
George Freeman. 

He recalled some of the his- 
tory of Lionism, how it was 
Started early in the Twentieth 
Century and since has grown to 
be the largest service club in 
the world with thousands of 
clubs throughout the free world 
with a total membership of over 
600,000 members. In welcoming 
these men into Lions Interna- 
tional he stressed the import- 
ance of each member becoming 
active in some phase of the 
club's many civic and charitable 
activities. 

Deputy District Gov. Lassi- 
ter mad* the following 
awards: Kay membership pins 
for sponsoring three now 
Lions to the following: Lewis 
Thurston, Ernest Posey and 
Gordon Hughson. Eleven year 
perfect attendance pins to 
Eugene Caldwell, D.C. (Mac) 
Wilkins and George 
The three are charter mem 
bers and have maintained a 
perfect attendance record 
since the club was organized. 
Six-year pin was awarded to 
Gordon Hughson. Five-year pins 
to Lewis Thurston and Harold 
Russell. Twenty four members 
received attendance pins for 
the year just completed, June 
30. 

YOUTH FELLOWSHIP INVITED 
BAYSIDE— The Youth Fellow- 
ship of the Bayside Baptist 
Church, has been invited to Ft. 
Story Sunday as guests of Chap- 
lain and Mrs. Ed Flippen. 

The young people will go af- 
ter the evening services. 

SENIOR YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 

BAYSIDE — The Senior High 
Methodist Youth Fellowship of 
the Bay lake Pines Methodist 
Church will leave Friday after- 
noon for a weekend camping 
trip and retreat at Kerr Lake. 

The D. M. Whitakers and the 
Lon Humphreys will accompany 
the group as counselors. 

INFANT BABY BAPTIZED 

BAYSIDE— According to the 
pastor, Rev. J. W. Reynolds, Jr. 
of Baylake Methodist Church, 
the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Gaskill was baptized Sun- 
day, August 19. 



Bayside Personals 

The Frank Colendas who 
moved from this area to Vienna, 
Va., sometime ago, have been 
recent guests of his brother and 
sister-in-law, Lt. Comdr. Her- 
bert Colenda in Thoroughgood. 



Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Reynolds 
Sr* • from Fairfax County are 
house guests of their son and 
daughter-in-law, Rev. and Mrs. 
J. W. Reynolds, Jr., on Indian 
Hill Road. 



Mrs. H. B. Robertson of Lake 
Shores is convalescing in Ports- 
mouth Naval Hospital after un- 
dergoing surgery last week. 



Mrs. J. B. Johnson of Gunter 
St. is convalescing in Norfolk 
General Hospital after undergo- 
ing sdrgery last week. 



Mr. and Mrs. Earl V. Slattum 
of Thoroughgood Drive are re- 
ceiving congratulations on the 
birth of their fourth son, Friday, 
in Norfolk General Hospital. 



Mr. and Mrs, F. R. Elks of 
Claudia Drive, Lake View Park, 
are receiving congratulations on 
the birth of a son, Friday in 
Portsmouth Naval Hospital. 
; 

Births at Beach Hospital 

Aug. 10 — Mr., and Mrs. Mar- 
vin White, Munden, Va.; girl. 

Aug. II— Mr. and Mrs. Gar- 
land Ray Beasley, 730-13th St., 
Virginia Beach, Va.; boy. 

Aug. 14 — Mr. & Mrs. Charles 
Patrick Harris, 7869 De Laura 
Lane, Norfolk, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 15 — Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Dahl, 7428 Erskine Street, Nor- 
folk 24, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 15 — Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard T. Nixon, 605-16th St., 
Virginia Beach, Va.; girl. 

Aug. 16 — Mr. and Mrs. Larry 
Lyon. jKeech, Route 10, Oriole Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va.; boy. 

Aug. 16— Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
C. Campion, Route 2, Box 50, 
London Bridge, Va.; boy. 



5 Years Given 
Kearney By Jury 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Scatter- 
wood Kearney, the troublesome 
and much • arrested Virginia 
Beach Negro, was sentenced to 
five years in the state peniten- 
tiary recently for malicious 
wounding by a Circuit Court 
jury he had requested. 

Kearney has been arrested by 
Virginia Beach Police 12 times 
since 1955, usually for misde- 
meanors such as disorderly con- 
duct and domestic complaints. 
He always resisted arrest and 
once tried to choke Patrolman 
C. H. Payne as he and Patrol- 
man Eddie Whitehurst and Sgt. 
J. J. Waterfield were making an 
arrest. 

The herculean crimnal gained 
much notoriety in 1960 when he 
escaped from the local jail by 
kicking out a steel wall with his 
bare feet after being arrested 
for disorderly conduct, resisting 
arrest, assaulting a police offi- 
cer and destroying city prop- 
erty. He was caught the follow- 
ing day and re-arrested for jail- 
breaking. 

Kearney was arrested April 4 
on the malicious wounding 
charge and bound over from 
lower court to Grand Jury. At 
his own request he was tried by 
a jury in Princess Anne County 
Circuit Court and on August 9 
was given five years in the state 
penitentiary. 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 

Page 3-A 

- ™"- ■ . ...■■..■■■■ — , 

City Gets Safety Award 




(Sun-Hew* Staff Fhojo) 

Virginia Beach Police Chief Reeves Johnson (left) was 
presented a plaque in City Council Monday for carrying Vir- 
ginia Beach through three consecutive years without a pedes- 
trian traffic fatality. It is the sixth time the city has won the 
award in seven years. Making the presentation was J. T. Tim- 
mons (right), manager of the Tidewater Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Automobile Association. Mayor Frank A. Dusch looks on. 



mm 



Hello, Gramma, 
it's me! 

(I mean I) 




Complete investment services 

Direct line with all major markets 

First and only Investment office in Virginia Beach 



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Thomas N. P. Johnson, Jr. 
Manager 

Allan Rotbenberg 
Registered Representative 



VlfldfalA BEACH 
3110 PACIFIC AVENUE 

P O. BOX 5M 

TELEPHONE .428 86*0 



_. J 

Willard R. Ashburn, Jr. 
Asst. Manager 

Frank L. Lawlor 



OFFICE HOURS: 
Weekdays — 9 - 5 
Saturdays — 9-12 

Richmond - Charlottesville - Fredericksburg - Virginia Beach 



PRINCESS ANNE 
HIGH SCHOOL REGISTRATION 

Princess Anne High School 
registration for hew students 
who were not in the county sys- 
tem the last school year will 
be held Friday, August 24th 
from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 
Monday, August 27th through 
Friday, August 81st, from 9:00 
a.m. to 12 noon. 

All students must be accom- 
panied by a parent and students 
who have never attended a Vir- 
ginia Public School must fur* 
nish a photostatic copy of their 
birth certificate. The Student's 
Store will be opened for the 
sale of new and used textbooks 
on September 4, 5, 6, and 7 
from 9:00 A.M. to 12 noon. 

ELKS MEETING 

The next meeting of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Elks Lodge 2268 
will be held next Tuesday night, 
August 28, in the Alan B. Shep- 
ard Convention Center. 

It is expected that those mem- 
bers who applied as charter 
members but who could not be 
present on August 9 will be in- 
ducted into the lodge. 

In ten years of service to Vir- 
ginia Beach and Princess Anne 
County, the RESCUE SQUAD, 
with all VOLUNTEER workers, 
answered 8,951 calls, drove 214,- 
897 miles and put in 109,846 
man hours. / 



FRIEND MEETING 
SET FOR SATURDAY 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Vir- 
ginia Beach Friends Meeting 
will hold a Young Friends 
Meeting Saturday at 10:30 a.m. 
at the Meeting House on Laskin 
Road. 

Guest speaker will be Wyman 
Harrison, a former teacher now 
working for the Virginia Insti- 
tute of Marine, Science. 

Out-of-town youngsters will 
represent Friends Meetings 
from Bethel, Corinth, Somerton 
and Richmond, Va., and Cedar 
Grove Meeting from Woodland, 
N.C. 

There will be a full day of 
activities and discussions, end- 
ing with a folk dance Saturday 
evening under the leadership of 
Bob and Ann Clapp. 



BRIDGE WINNERS 
ARE ANNOUNCED 




A vinyl floor to 

meet every taste 

and budget 

FERRELL 

LINOLEUM A TILE CO. 

326 W. 21rt St. — MA 1-4305 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Weekly 
winners in the Virginia Beach 
Duplicate Bridge Club, which 
met Tuesday at the Jefferson 
Hotel, have been announced. 

They were: first, north-south, 
Mrs. E. V. Caulfield and Mrs. W. 
H. Kitchin Jr.; second, Mrs. 
Marge Bastian and Mrs. Ruby 
Boyd; and third, Mrs. Mary Ann 
Clayton and Mrs. Lily Johnson. 

First, east-west, Mrs. Betty 
Atkinson and Mrs. Dorsey 
Patrick; second, Mrs. M. D. Ker- 
vin and Mrs. Virginia Goodall; 
and third, Mrs. George Alcorn 
and Mrs. Leo Bliley. 

Interested persons are invited 
to play. The club meets each 
Tuesday at 7:45 p.m. in the 
Jefferson Hotel. 



Woman's Missionary Society 
To Hold Outing 

BAYSIDE — The Woman's 
Missionary Society of the Bay- 
side Baptist Church will meet at 
the church Tuesday at 10 a.m. 
and go together to the Azalea 
Gardens for an outdoor meeting 
and a picnic lunch. 



METHODIST YOUTH 
MEET SET AUG. 27-30 

PRINCESS ANNE — The 
Methodist churches in the Prin- 
cess Anne and Virginia Beach 
area will hold a youth activities 
program at the Charity Method- 
ist Church August 27-30. 

Discussion groups and fellow- 
ship hours will be the highlight 
of the three-day program. Min- 
isters from the area will speak 
on informative and interesting 
subjects. 

There will be a covered dish 
dinner for the youth next 
Thursday at 6 p!m. 

All young people are invited. 

FREDERICK OFFICIAL 
ROTARY SPEAKER 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Members 
of the Virginia Beach Rotary 
Club will hear Dr. Paul Arline 
at the regular meeting of the 
club at the Black Angus Res- 
taurant here Thursday night. 

Dr. Arline is assistant to the 
president of Frederick College 
and is reknowned as a lecturer 
and after dinner speaker. 

Dr. Arline wMl be introduced 
by Welton L. Hampton, program 
chairman for the meeting. Dr. 
Otis Wakefield, club president, 
will preside. The meeting begins 
at 7 p.m. 



COLONY CLUB WILL 
SPONSORED COURSE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Cape Colony Club will sponsor 
a seniorj life saving course for 
mothers to teach them water 
safety and make them more 
aware of the dangerous, situa- 
tion of unsupervised children on 
the beaches. 

The 16-hour course, to be 
taught by American Red Cross 
Instructor Mrs. George Abbott, 
will start September 17 and be 
held every Tuesdays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays from 9:30 to 
11:30 a.m. in the club pool. 

The course will be free of 
charge to all mothers belonging 
to the club. Registration must 
be made at the pool de%k. None 
will be accepted over the tele- 
phone, Pool Director Bill Nic- 
hols said. 

The mother's course may be 
a kick-off series of future 
courses for the entire* ftfmlly. 

SUNBEAMS TO MEET 

BAYSIDE— The Sunbeams of 
the Bayside Baptist Church will 
hold their "Christmas in Au- 
gust" celebration next Thurs- 
day. 

The young people will bring 
Christmas gifts for Indian young 
people on the Mission Field. 



..anyway, Daddy 
says I can call 
all over Virginia 
for 50c or less. 





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for Action \ . Results 



GA 8-9161 



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London Bridge ■ 




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GA 8-5273 



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After 9 at night, 
that is. 




So I get to 

stay up 

later! 




Virginia's saving 
a million! 

Yes, new station -to- station 
rates within Virginia savt 
telephone users almost 
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4 5 r. Vlpgfnii Beach S un-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-NEWS 

JIM Padffc aCHIU^ ***** Thwr * day by Th * Bweh ^Wishing Corporation 

- Virginia Beach, Virginia 

ALfilN ft AaA lite President and Publisher 

RUW JEaJoS^IM - " 7 Vice President Genera! Manager 

Vfbn. T. PRESSOR . „.; Production, Superintendent 



Coming to Beach on August 31st 



••tier in tke post office in Virginia fcach, Va., under the act of March 3, 1879 



rate* by nail 



PITOWAtlY SPEAKING 



Outside of County— $4.00 per annum 



Rescue Squad Asks Help Now 



The Virginia Beach-Princess Anne Rescue 
Squad has sent out an urgent call for finan- 
daM help. It stands ready to serve every 
and all Indlviduafe^TrV the beach-county 
area 24 hours of every day and only one 
month in the year is set aside to raise 
enough funds to operate the year-around. 

That time is now. August is traditionally 
"Rescue Squad Month" and it is at this time 
that the volunteer organization seeks dona- 
tion* to its operating budget. Not a single 
npember of this fine emergency team is 
paid one cent. All funds are used for oper- 
ating the ambulances and other equipment. 



Unlike some drives the Rescue Squad 
never seeks funds at any "other time. When 
August 31 rolls around that will bs the 
final day of the Rescue Squad fund driv*. 

There are only a few days left in which 
to contribute. Actually rnonay given to 
the Rescue Squad is neither a donation nor 
a contribution. Rather it is an investment 
in the future of your welfare. One never 
knows when we might need the services 
of the Rescue Squad. It is a wonderful j 
group of men and they deserve your 
W/pport. Contribute now to the Rescue 
Squad. 



A City Councilman 



Last Monday a member of the Virginia 
Eftjecri City Council attended his last meet- 
ing as a member of that body and thereby 
closed an illustrious eight years of service 
to this city. The retiring city councilman is 
Rank D. Tarrall, Jr., whose term of office 
will officially end at midnight on August 
31. 

Mr. Tarrall's fellow councilmen, all of 
whom have served with him for most of 
those eight years, paid high tribute to 
their colleague as he attended his final 
regular city council meeting. 

Mayor Frank A. Dusch, who has leaned 
heavily on Mr. Tarrall's vast experience in 
municipal matters, presented the retiring 
councilman a framed resolution of appreci- 
ation for nls many years of public service to 
tfie City qf Virginia Beach. ~ 

More nonors were bestowed on Mr. 
Terrell at the council meeting. Virginia 
Beach Fire Chief E. B. "Bubba" Bayne pre- 
sented Mr. Tarrall a bronze ' plaque in 
recognition for his work as honorary chief 
of the Virginia Beach Volunteer Fire De- 



partment and chief of the Virginia Beach 
Civil Defense Fire Department. 

Mr. Tarrall was first elected to the City 
Council in 1954. He has devoted his vast 
energies to its exceptional growthTand 
advancement during those years. Mr. Tar- 
rall has not confined his activities to the 
city during these years entirely but has 
been active in such organizations as the 
Southeastern Virginia Regional Planning 
Commission and the Virginia Travel Coun- 
cil. 

Probably no man who has served on the 
Virginia Beach City Council has been more 
devoted to his community than Mr. Tarrall. 
He has served with distinction and has 
always gone "beyond the call of duty" in 
his role as city councilman. But, that is 
the nature of the man. He will never do 
just enough, he always does a little bit 
more. 

The city will miss Mr. Tarrall as a mem- 
ber of the council, but it is good to know 
that he will be available to serve in other 
capacities just as he has done so well in 
the past. 




FUNERALS* 

MRS. GRACE H. MUNFORD 

VIRGI?aA BEACH — Mrs. 
Grace Hoffman (Betty) Mun- 
ford, 59, of 212-67th St. died in 
a local hosoital Thursday at 
12:45 a m. after a long illness. 

A native of Charleston, SC, 
she was a daughter of John J. 
and Mrs. Mabel Richards Hoff- 
man and had lived at Virginia 
Beach since 1934. She was a 
member of Star of the Sea 
Catholic Church and active in 
the Virginia Beach Little Thea- 
ter. Until her illness she was 
supervisor of allotments at 
0>eana Naval Air Station. 

She is survived by a son, 
Richard T. Munford, and two 
sisters, Mrs. Arthur Masury and 
Mrs. John C. McNamara, all of 
Virginia Beach; and a brother, 
John J. Hoffman of Washington. 

The body was taJcen to 
Maestas Funeral Home. A fu- 
neral service was conducted in 
Star of the Sea Catholflc Church 
Saturday at 10 am. by the Rev. 
Nicholas J. Habets cemetery. 



The Kilgore. Texas College Rangerettes 



Daily Log of Calls 
By Rescue Squad 



fa 



TUiSQAY, JULY 31 thru 

MONDAY, AUG. 6 
•Tuesday — July 31st 

1:55 a.m. — Emergency service 
sever burns on thigh, and 
_ Dilation to Va. Beach 
Jtal for victim at Seatack. 
Phillips. 

11:45 a.fii. — Ambulance serv- 
ice for patient from Norfolk 
General Hospital to home. — 
Phillips. 

1:55 p.m. -r- Victim sustained 
back injury in accident, taken 
to Va. Beach Hospital and then 
into De Paul Hospital.— Connell, 
Beauty. 

Wadtta i day August 1st 

1:90 a.m.---Fh-st aid to Navy 
man for cuts on face around 
mouth, and taken to NAS Oce- 
ana dispensary.— Stalling* and 
Caton. 

10:10 a.m — Patient in Vir- 
ginia Beach Hospital taken home 
in. ambulance. — Beasley. 

10:20 am. — Tourist injured 
hip, taken to De Paul Hospital. 
-Buasell 

11:30 a.m. — Emergency serv- 
ice administered by Wallace & 
Phillips to a tourist who Jiad a 
slight attack. Hospitalization not 
needed. 

12:10 pjn. — Elderly person 
given ambulance service from 
Virginia Beach Hospital to con- 
valescent home.— Beasley. 

4:00 p.ra.— Answered caU to 
an acrto accident — no injuries. — 
Beasley. 



10:20 p.m. — Tourist injured 
ankle, given emergency service 
and transportation to Norfolk 
General Hospital.— Russell-Stor- 
mont. 



Sunday— August 5th 

4:04 p.m. — Call to ocean, 
woman all right: no assistance 
needed— Horton, Vasile. 

11:40 p.m.— OB case from At- 
lantic Park to De Paul Hospital 
—Vasile, Horton. 



Judges Named 
For Landscape 
Contest Sept. 1 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
I Mr. E. W. Mouhot, president of 
I Lafayette Building 1 Corporation 
) has announced the judges for 
I the landscape contest which has 
been conducted in the Hidden 



i Valley section of Princess Anne 1 United states 



Chief Johnson 

(Continued From Page 1) 

lectured on the Court and the 
Officer; Donald W. Shriver and 
Sid Oman of the Norfolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce who presented 
Public Relations as related to 
the Police; Glen Shifflett of the 
National Auto Theft Bureau, 
Atlanta and Richmond, prob- 
lems in auto thefts and manners 
of tracing them throughout the 



Friday— August 3rd 

12:10 a.m.— Tourist had emer- 
gency sickness, taken to Vir- 
ginia Beach Hospital. - Stormont, 
Russell. 

9:00 a.m. — Heart patient giv- 
en transportatipn from De Paul 
Hospital to N. Virginia Beach- 
Phillips, J. B. McChesney. 

9:30 a.m.— Transportation Va. 
Beach Hospital to De Paul — 
Russell, Edwards. 

11:10 a.m.— Call for tourists; 
did not need doctor.— Russell. 

11:20 a.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness for pains in stomach, taken 
to Va. Beach Hospital. — Ed- 
wards-Russell. 

.12 noon — Emergency sick- 
ness, tourist, to Virginia Beach 
Hospital.— Ed wards-Hall. 



Thursday— August 2nd 
12;|# §,m, — Vacationer had 
hemmarage of nose. First aid 
given by Hines and Russell. 

9M p.m.— Victim in auto ac- 
cident sustained lacerations on 
the face, ami taken to Virginia 
Beajh Hospital - Ruaaell-Phd- 

aps. 

$M pjft. — Cafl to Princess 
Anne Puua lor a child having 
itans was cflttiUid before ar- 




Saturday— August 4th 

1:20 a.m.— Auto accident' at 
Hilltop, puncture shoulder, head 
injury, minor cuts, mild shock. 
— Va. Beach Hospital—Carpen- 
ter, J. Midgett. 

10:50 a.m. — Emergency serv- 
ice for heart attack. Taken from, 
doctors office to De Paul— Mc- 
Chesney, White. 

11:20 a.m. — Assistance not 
needed on call— Edwards-Gas- 
kin. 

11:30 a.m. — Transportation, 
new mother taken to home in ! 
Norfolk from Va. Beach Hospital 
Maternity— Carpenter, Edwards. 1 

1.15 p.m. — Victim with brok- 
en leg from Virginia Beach i 
Hospital to Norfolk General — j 
Carpenter. 

8:00 p.m. — Tourist given j 
emergency service from fall in 
hotel room, laceration on eye. — j 
Taken to Va. Beach Hospital — j 
J. B. McChesney, White. 



Monday — August 6th 

11:45 a.m.— Transportation — 
Langhorne, Beasley. 

1:00 'p.m. — Transportation, 
Oceana to Marine Hospital — 
Langhorne, Randolph. 

1:00 p.m.— Visitor from Ohio, 
emergency sickness— Va. Beach 
Hospital— Hall, Gray. 

3:55 p.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness, from Oceana to doctors 
office.— Langhorne. 

4:45 p.m. — Three victims 
stung by jelly fish taken to Vir- 
ginia Beach Hospital— Beasley. 

5:20 p.m. — Reported large 
radio exploded near victim, lac- 
erations and cuts— Taken from 
Va. Beach Hospital to De Paul— 
Beasley. 

7:50 p.m. — Tourist with pos- 
sible broken arm to Va. Beach 
Hospital— H. Kitchin, McCaw. 

11:15 p.m.— Cut finger taken 
to Beach Hospital. 



Plaza this summer. Judging will 
be Sept.'l at 9:30 a.m. 

The judges will be Mrs. C. M. 



Both, Special Agents in Charge 
of the two FBI offices in Vir- 
ginia spoke before this group 



Harrison, president of Princess I of 8 rad uates of the FBI Acad 
Anne Plaza Civic League; MrJ emy * Earl Brown of Richmond 



Keister Evans, Jr., assistant 
coutny agent for Princess Anne; 
Mr. A. Vernon Wattv associate 
extension horticulturist of Vir- 
g i n i a Agriculture Extension 
Service. 

Judging of front and back 
yards will be based on the gen- 
eral appearance and condition 



and Joseph D. Purvis of Norfolk. 

This was the largest meet- 
ing that the Virginia Associ- 
ates have held having one 
hundred and forty four mem- 
bers and guests attending 
their banquet, sixty - seven 
registered members & agents. 

Other than Chief Johnson, 



Ty Silbert in 
"BrigadW 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Ty Sil- 
bert stepped into the female 
comedy lead of "Brigadoon" at 
the Sandpiper Playhouse this 
week, replacing Marilyn Ende 
who has left for Hollywood, 
Calif., to look over movie scripts. 

Mrs. Silbert, a Norfolk resi- 
dent for the past four months, 
was a nightclub singer in Bos- 
ton and appeared on the stage 
in Toledo, Ohio. 



tSUTS, °,=" £SH lhere ™ <*» *S locSlgrad 



shrubbery and lawn; grouping 
of flowers and shrubs as to de- 
sign; overall plan of the yard 
for good family indoor-outdoor 
living; general plan as relates 
to house and shrubs; originality. 
Owner of the most attractive 
yard in each of the three sec- 
tions will be awarded $50 in 
cash or shrubs. Second and third 
place winners will be awarded 



uates, Ivan D. Mapp, Commis- 
sioner of Revenue; Capt. Rob- 
ert K. Halsteaa, of the Beach 
Police, and Sgt. George Bryan, 
of Princess Anne Police, all of 
whom attended. 

The FBI Academy is a 12 
weeks school conducted by the 
Training Division of the Federal 
,£ureau of Investigation at the 



CAMPF1RE GIRLS 
ON CAMPING TRIP 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Seven 
groups of Campfire Girls from 
the Tidewater area will go on 
an overnight camping trip at 
Herb Hadsell's Rod and Gun 
Club today from 9 a.m. to Fri- 
day morning., 

. The girls' activities will in- 
clude cooking their meals, sing- 
ing, handcrafts, and Indian lore. 
Parents and leaders who will 
be supervising the camping trip 
are Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Lar- 
sen. Mr. and Mrs. Vance Apple, 
Mrs. Koeraer, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bruce Crickett,- Mr. and Mrs. R. 
F. Wingo, Mr Fred Volker, Mrs. 
Gordon Emmett and Mr. Paul 
Keller. 



$20 and $10 gift certificates at De P artnicnt of Justice Building 
Winn Nursery. : in Washington and at the FBI; 

. L__ Academy Building and Grounds 

in Quantico, Virginia, teaching; 
all factors in law enforcement, 
police organization, and admin- 
istration. 



HILLTOP AREA GIRLS 



HOFHEIMlR'S OPENS 
NOW PLAZA STORE 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
Hofheimer's opened its tenth 
Shoe store in the Tidewater area;. 

Monday in the Princess Amie HEIP RESCUE SQUAD 

Plaza Shopping Center. 

The widely recognized slToel 
firm opened its first store in I 
Norfolk on March 15, 1885. 

The Princess Anne Plaza 
store, in keeping with the other 
Hofheimer stores, offers a full 
line of famous brand shoes and 
a complete selection of hosiery, 
handbags and other fashion ac- 
cessories. 



She has just ended an appear- 


ACROSS 


48 Sulk 




49 Musical note 


1 Confesses 


50 Chart 


7 Brain part 


52 Pound 


10 Brazilian 


(abbr.) 


parrot 


53 Prevaricates 


13 Transferred 


54 Summer: Fr. 


by deed 


55 Plan 


14 Wound" 


57 Ceases 


dressings 


59 College 


16 Weighing 


cheer 


device 


60 Greek poem 


17 The sun 


62 Regret 


18 Lets faT 


63 Bet 


19 Some 


65 Said again 


20 Female 


67 Have great 


horses 


respect 


22 Great Lake 


68 Before 


23 Printing 


69 Negative 


measures 


wold 


24 Rod 


70 Part of boat 


25 Concerning 


(Pi.) 


27 Girl's name 




28 By 


DOWN 


29 Rapid 




30 Brought 


lPaid 


legal action 


notices 


32 And (Pr.) „ 


2 Liquor 


23 Vacation 


container 


spot 


3 Intends 


35 Sterile 


4 Lazily 


37 PJant part 


5 Golf mound 


33 Lubricate 


6 South 


39 Shower 


Dakota 


41 Makes 


(ahbr.) 


sightless 


1 Wan 


43 Ensue 


8 Within 


45 First note 


9 Sum up 


of Guido's 


10 Greek 


Scale 


market 


47 Spoke 


11 To complain 



ance in "You Can't Take It With 
You" in. the Sandpiper's first 
series of plays and has also 
worked with the Norfolk Little 
Theatre Experimental Wing. 

Miss Ende, who also directed 
the hit musical, is expected to 
return to this area shortly after 
Labor Day. She teaches special 
education classes for the Prin- 
cess Anne County Public Schdol 
system. 

Mrs. Silbert will be seen in 
the remaining performances of 
"Brigadoon" Aug. 25-26 and 
Sept. 2. 



CHARLES EBERT BARR 
VIRGINIA BEACH — Grave- 
side services for Charles Ebert 
Barr, 89, brother of the late 
Robert G. Barr of yirginia 
Beach and son of Mr. and Mrs. 
James C. Barr will be held this 
Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Forest; 
Lawn Cemetery with the Rev| 
M»"nn Walton of Galilee Church 
officiating. 

Mr. Barr was a resident of 
Brooklyn, N.Y., and a native of 
Ohio. 



MRS. IRMA J. SMITH 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral 
services for Mrs. Irma J. Smith, 
53, of 110 Linkhom Drive, Vir- 
ginia Beach, wife of John B. 
Smith and daughter of Mrs. 
Valborg Wretman and the late 
Torkil Johannessen, were held 
Monday at 3:30 at the H. D. 
Oliver, Funeral Home. 

Mrs. Smith, a native of Goth- 
enburg, Sweden, lived in Vir- 
ginia Beach area two years. 

Surviving besides her hus- 
band and mother are her two 
sisters, Mrs. Hans Strangebye of 
Oslo, Norway, and Miss Britt 
Wretman of Bloomfield, NJ.<1 
and a brother, Commodore 
Folke Johannessen of the No 
wegian Navy, Bergen. No; 



e Nor- 



The RESCUE SQUAD operate* 
independently from all official 
connections with city or county, 
and is supported entirely by 
contributions from business and 
individuals. > 



Answer To Puzzle 719 



It 



uaunn .innnri 

■lut'iii ;jtfrj(iriM _ 
asanna annnnnmra 
ana finnan nnn 

ana aaaaaaa nan 
aaa oanaa nan 
gna nnnnn laauaaa 
! annnn ana 



nanon 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



»h 



it 



IP |o It 






wl 

EJ 



12 Agree 

14 Tiresome 
person 

15 Part of . 
"to be" 

17 A seasoning 

20 Greatest 
amount 

21 Tart 

23 Auricle 

24 Not total 
26 Derived 

from iron 

29 Idiots 

30 Salt 

31 Distributed 

34 Weep 

35 Twice 

36 Nothing 
38 Uneven 

40 Toward the 

north 
42 Pen points 



43 Enemies 

44 Tiny 

45 Baseball 
referee 

46 Higher 
48 Metal 

tube 
51 Grace 

53 Noisy 

54 Avid 

56 Make lace 

58 Waste 
allowance 

59 Rant 
61 Man's 

nickname 

63 Moist 

64 Legal 
matters 

66 Toward 

67 Revised 
statutes 
(abbr.) 



PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a public 
hearing on Thursday, Septem- 
ber 6, 1962, at frOO p.m. in the 
Council Chamber, 19th St. and 
Arctic Ave. 

The following business wuT be 
heard:. 

Application from J. A. Clif- 
ton for Use Permit to rent cot- 
tage built on lot 9, 10, 11, block 
17, 416 Norfolk Avenue. 

The recommendations by the 
Planning Commission on the 
above request will be heard by 
the city council of Virginia 
Beach on September 17, 1962 at 
2.30 p.m. in the council cham- 
ber. 

CHARLES S. KILEY, Sec'y. 

8-23-lt 



New groups are being formed 
Any girl interested may contact 
Mr. Larsen at S40-&S43. 



SOMEBODY SEALS THE 
SOMEBODY STEALS THE 

BIRCHWOOD — When Rev. I 
(Elmer Medley of 764 Harton! 
'Circle, Birchwood Gar< 
! checked the mail Tuesday n 
( ing, he not only had no letters, j 
j'he had no mailbox 

Ihe to* UdS apparently »toi- 



HLLLTOP— Two little girls in 
the Hilltop area went on their 
own crusade recently to help! 
the Virginia Beach - Princess, 
Anne Rescue Squad % . 

After emptying-' their own < 
piggy banks, Virginia Kirkland, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs. par- 
ret A. Kirkland of 117 Thomas, 
Lane, and Patricia Harris, 
daughter of Mrs. Dotti Harris of 
J10 Karen Lane, began collect- 
ing in. the Hilltop neighborhood.: 

When they had finished, thev ; 
were able to donate $25.89 tot 
the Rescue Squad. 

, : 

en Monday night. 

"My car was in the di 
but wasn't touched," Rev. Med-! 
ley commented. "Maybe the cul- 
prit liiDusht tlie mailbox was ' 
•wit ,4iuablfc," 





George Gilliam Says: 



Now is a good time to think 
about Heating Oil. If you haven't 
been satlsfield with, your previous 
arrangements, why not give us a 
call and let us keep you warm this 
winter? 




Atlantic Fuel 
Oil Co. 

Call: 
GA 8-5OO0 

Day or Night 




Local Golfers in Annual Tournament 



40 REGISTER FOR 
ANNUAL SWIM MEET 

VIRGINIA BEACH — About 
4£ youngsters have registered 
for the Cape Colony Club's an- 
nual swim meet to be held at the 
club pool Sept. 1 at 2 p.m." 

"F»«Wrations h8ve j^gjj sJow 
to far," pool director BUI 
mQhota saio, "but we expect a 
surge of entries at the last min- 
ute." 

Deadlint for r»g!$tration is 
6 p.m. Aug, 31. The meet is 
opan to children of members 
over 6 years of age. Each 
youngster will compete with 
others in his own age group. 
Registrations as of Sunday in- 
clude: (boys) Donald Grant, 
Bradley Brown and Eric Sof- 
field, 6-year-olds; t:iay Phillips 
and David Stauffer, 8; Nick 
Beeching, Hal George and Frank 
Burton, 9; Ken Bartnett, Tom- 
my Soffield and Tommy Burton, 
10; Dave Goodman, Bob Brooks 
and Bill Phillips, 11; Steven 
Clark and Dean Entsminger, 12; 
Mike Bartnett and Bill Miles, 13; 
and Lee Entsminger, 14. 

Girls Entered 
Girls registered include: Janet 
Cooke and Philomena Hughes, 
7; Susan Sofield, 8; Roxanne 
Harris, 9; Susan Hall, Beverly 
Goodman, Leslie Wood and Pen- 



OYS TENNIS MEET 
AT BAY HARBOUR 

PRINCESS ANNE— The First 
Annual Boys' Tennis Tourna- 
meat will be held at the Bay 
Harbour Athletic Club courts 
Saturday at 10 a.m. under the 
sponsorship of the Princess 
Anne Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Participants for the tourna- 
ment will be made up of the 
following age groups: 15-17, 12- 
14, and 11 and under. 

Trophies will be presented to 
first and second place winners 
in each age group. 

Boys wishing to participate 
are asked to register at the Bay 
Harbor ClUb with Mrs. Nina 
Johnson. 

General chairman for the 
tournament is, Lt. Larry DelPla- 

to. i 



ny Braithwaite, 10; Gail Thom- 
son, Patty Marshall and Bridget 
Hughes, 11; Nancy Rydell, Paula 
Rogers and Ann Marshall, 18; 
Molly Miskiman, Sharon Speer 
and Jean Rogers, 14; and Deane 
Ferguson, 15. 

Trophies and medals, to be 
awarded Sept. 4 at a special din- 
ner, are displayed in the lobby 
window adjoining the pool. 




Virginia Beach STJN-NEWS, Thursday, August 23, IMS Fafe 

^mmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmtiiimmi^Z£mmmmt^mmmm^^^mammim^mm*mmtltl^ 

BILL MACDONALD'S 

BIRDNECK ROAD 

Va. Beach Lumber & Supply Co. 

"Lumber arid Plywood cut to site" 

Reputable Contractor* and Carpenters 

GA 8-2981 

©PEN SATURDAYS - ALL DAY 

HARDWARE—BUILDING MATERIALS 

Better Homes and Gardens Idea Center 

i i.' ' 




GA 8-1797 GA 8-9227 

Free Estimates— Pickup & Delivery 

Complete 
Automotive Upholstering 

fL ^^fl^E W Upholstering L^o. 

Ulsi. 1 7* St. at City Limit*— Vi 

Hk AUTO TOPS 

• Custom Made Seat Covers • Carpets & Floor Mats 



Rebuilt 
ENGINES 

1954-60 Ford V-a & 6 Cyl. 

1955-60 Chev. V-8 & 6 Cyl. 

Short Block Assemblies 

FACTOR GUARANTEED 
FINANCING AVAILABLE 

SAVE 

At Va. Beach's Largest 
Used Parts Yard 

Tidewater Salvage Inc 

GA 8-1131 



Contenders in the Virginia vs. West Virginia Annu I Senior's Golf Tournament at the Greenbrier, White Sulphur 
Springs, included Col. F. T. Addington, Virginia Beach; J. B. Hawkins, Norfolk and J..E. Delk, Norfolk, and Roy Charles of 
Virginia Beach. The Virginia team won 109Vi» points to West Virginia's 10Hi» points 



Frederick-Newberry 
Grid Game Here To 
Pit Strong Elevens 



NUMBER ONE" 



FAMILY 



HOUSE OF 



rv 



BOWLING 

THUNDERBIRD LANES 



OPENED NOV. 1959 

1st Modern 10 pin establishment in Tidewater 



Family Bowling ANY HOUR Fri.-Sal.-Sun. 

Mon. thru ThurS. — 9 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. 

Fourth Year with Original 

• Ownership— Stockholders— Key Personnel 

League Registration Now 

428-5897 
Thunderbird Bowling Lanes 

Virginia Beach 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sports Club, co- 
sporisor with the Jaycees of Vir- 
ginia Beach's first College foot- 
ball games, Sept. 15th, heard 
Coach Bill McDonald of Frede- 
rick College tell what to expect 
when th6y meet Newberry Col- 
lege in the Memorial Stadium. _ 

At the Sports Club's weekly 
meeting Tuesday at the Black 
Angus, Coach McDonald told of 
his own teams prospects this 
year and also told of his prob- 
lem in getting older colleges to 
play his young upstarts. 

Frederick's Lions will not be 
as heavy as last year but will 
more than make up for the loss 
of some of the weight by addi- 
tional speed. His starting line 
this year will average a "little 
over 205 and his backfield will 
be about 167 pounds. Seven of 
his starters from last year will 
be back and they will be sup- 
plemented by two high school 
AU-Americans, one in the back- 
field and the other in the line. 

Coach McDonald says that the 
Newberry College teams are an- 
nually one of the better among 
the small colleges and this year 
should be stronger than last 
year when they defeated the 
small college power, Lenoir 
Rhyne and went on to third 
place in the Carolinas Confer- 
ence. 

Frederick will play only 7 



FREEDOM 



//-t// 



DRACWAY 

CREEDS AIRFIELD 
VA. BEACH, VA. 



( 



DRAG RACING 



j 



games again this year with three 
open dates still unfilled. The 
coach finds it hard to get col- 
leges to risk losing against a 
team as new in four-year col- 
lege ball as his team. Especially 
after having a highly successful 
season last year. In 1963 and 
1964 a full ten-game schedule 
has been arranged with . out- 
standing colleges in the eastern i 
part of the country. 

Sports Club members were 
glad to hear Coach McDonald 
say the College as well as his 
staff hopes that the game at 
Virginia Beach can become an 
annual affair. 

Tickets for the game are on 
sale now and gives the citizens 
of this area an opportunity to 
help a game that will be played 
for the benefit of a Youth Foot- 
ball Program long needed at 
Virginia Beach. 

Fletcher Bryant, General 
Chairman for the game an- 
nounced that all of the Six and 
Eight Alan football teams now 
have at least one coach and 
some of the teams have started 
practice for the coming season. 
Assistant Coaches are still need- 
ed, along with any other persons 
who would like to lend a hand 
in the operation of the league. 

Virginia Beach-Princess Anne 
RESCUE SQUAD is not sup- 
ported by any tax levies, but 
relies strictly on the contribu- 
tions of the interested public. 



Dragway Results 

Cecil Pearson of Newport 
News with a blazing 103.36 
mph took top honors at the 
NHRA sanctioned, Mid-season 
Championships at Freedom 7 
Dragway Sunday. With Nancy 
Korger, of Virginia Beach, 
Trophy queen of Freedom 7 
planting a big kiss on his cheek 
and photographers swarming 
around. Pearson was presented 
with a $400.00 U. S. Bond for 
his 11:12 seconds work. He was 
driving a '62 Plymouth from the 
Pearson Baker Club in New- 
port News. R. F. Ward of Hamp- 
ton, also driving a '62 Plymouth 
took second place money of 
I $300.00 bond, and Pee Wee Wal- 
lace of Richmond made it a 
clean sweep for '62 Plymouth by 
taking the third place $100.00 
bond. 

Don Weis of Richmond 
stunned the record crowd of 
over 2,000 with his weird look- 
ing B class Dragster. He turned 
in the fastest speed of the day 
118.57 mph and drove the 1/5 
of a mile dragstrip in one of the 
fastest times ever recorded at 
Freedom 7.9:39 seconds. Weis 
also won top money in the "Top 
Eliminator" race. Melvin Cary of 
Richmond in an A class Gasser 
won the "Street Eliminator." 

One of the hottest competi- 
tions at Freedom 7, the C Class 
Stock Automatic had another 
exciting chapter yesterday. Ray 
Hauser of Portsmouth inched 
out Ann Butler of Portsmouth 
after one dead heat. Ann had 
beaten Hauser the week before 
in the run for the trophy at the 
regional meet at Emporia. 

Nearly 200 racing cars saw 
action at Creeds airstrip in the 



FIRE CALLS 

Aug. 13—10:54 a.m., inhala- 
tor; 32nd & Ocean. 

Aug. 13—6:49 p.m., house; 
Va. Ave., extd. 

Aug. 15 — 4:45 p.m., trash; 
25th and Arctic. 

Aug. 17—7:51 p.m., tractor; 
Cavalier Golf Course. 

Aug. 17 — 1:17 p.m., locked 
out of house; 409 Lakewood 
Circle. 

Aug. 19 — 7:53 p.m., electric 
short circuit ;17th St., bet. 
Arctic & Pacific. 



■w 




Complete Dinner 

SEAFOOD MARINA 

5 Different Seafoods 

French FiSes, 2 Vegetables, 
Hot Rolls, Coffee or Tea 



$165 



HURDS 

SEAFOOD 
RESTAURANTS 0PW DA,lY 

SAME FOOD -SAME PRICE 1 p.10. till 10:30 p.m. 




southern tip of Princess Anne 
County Sunday. Most of these 
top contenders will be on hand' 
again this coming Sunday and 
word has been received that a 
number of new cars will be on 
hand when the gates open at 
12:30 for racing at 3:00 p.m. 



i 



LYNNHAVEN 
341-3592 



& OCEANA 

428-7089 

Reservations For 8 or More 




BOAT 
RENTALS 

by the 

HOUR - DAY - WEEK 

GA 84880 

BEACH-BAY 

MARINA 

Virginia Beach 
31st ST. EXTENDED 



C ME 

For Fist Personalized Service 

when 

BUYING - SELLING - RENTING 



r\ 



EVERY SUNDAY 

OPEN 12:30 

RACE TIME 3 P.M. 

BIG CASH PRIZES TO 
Contestants and Spectators 

ADMISSION-Sl.OO 

Food end Drink Available 

SANCTIONED BY — NATIONAL 
HOT ROD ASSOCIATION 

—DIRECTIONS— 
Bout* 58 to Oceana, turn south on Et. 
615 to Creed*, then east on , Rt. 621. 
North Carolina resident* rouia through 
Blackvatcr. Puago ferry to Creed*. 



.Call BROTHERS 

GA 8-1306 Auto Service 
Va. Beach 

for the new 

Lincon 

HEAVY DUTY MOWERS 
Home & Commercial Use 




ENGINES 
• 3V4 H.P. & 4 H.P. 
4 Cycle— Cast Iron 



Let Us Help You With A 

SECOND MORTGAGE 

AT BANK RATES 

Commercial and Residential 

K. L. JARD, REALTOR 
200 - 25th Street Phone GA 8-2724 



SALES 



WILLYS 



SERVICE 



MALBON Jeep MOTOR CO. 



Va. Beach Blvd. 



GA 8-4961 



Seatack Rd. 



While you wait AUTO GLASS for all make cars 
Curved • Flat • All Sizes 

• USED JEEPS 
4-Wheel Drive - Trucks - Station Wagons 

RADIATORS 
Cleaned — Repaired — Recored 




REALTORS ' 

hmn urn. iimmm^ 



PHONE 341-1915 

Virginia Beach Blvd. at Lynnhavin 
MULTIPLE LISTING REALTOR 




IF IT'S 
FISHING 
TACKLE 

WE HAVE IT 

FUEL-FEED 




mmm 



T 



w 



mmm 



«■ 






VJjtN* *•** Sun-News, Thursday, Augast 23, 1962 
"hge 6-A 



NIXON ELECTRIC 

604 - 17H» St., V«, Beach, Va. Phon* GA8-371 1 

COMMER CIAL and RESIDENTIAL WIRING 

Wiring for Clothes Dryers and Water Heaters 

AUTHORIZED HOUSEPOWER CONTRAaOR 

LARGE and SMALL APPLIANCE REPAIRS 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES AND FIXTURES * 




GA 8-1797 GA 8-9227 

Fm Etfontea-Fktap ft Delivery 
RE-UPHOLSTERING 



op 

lApkolsterinq (So. 



i ft Slip Coven 

INISHING REPAIRING*- 1 "REBUILDING 



Oceana Shoe Repairing 

Complete Shoe Service 

All material and work guaranteed 
None Better 

We fill Orthopedic Prescriptions 

SALMON Prop. 

512 Courthouse Blvd. - Oceana 

NEXT TO EXQUISITE BARBER SHOP 



Chanmldrain 

ROOMG 




THE 
WORLD'S 
BEST 



HEAVY •GALVANIZED • LONG-LIVING 

METAL ROOFING AT A 

MOST ATTRACTIVE LOW PRICE! 

EXCLUSIVE LAP DESIGN 

RESISTS LEAKS! 



DIAL (1) 426-2661 

. . . FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY! 



BUILDERS • SUPERMART 

KELLAM -* EATON 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

tern Hag . . . We Bring — Anywhere ia Tidewater 



J 



New Route Aids Boaters 




ALPHIN 

PRINCESS ANNE COUNTY'S ONLY AUTHORIZED 

MERCURY-COMET Dealer 

Complete Service On All Makes Of Cars 

PICKUP Md DELIVERY 

Factory - Trained Mechanics 

914 I7fh Street Phone 6A 8-7121 

SMITH'S 

Appliance Service 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

ONALL 

Household Appliances 
DIAL 341-1392 

9527 MAVERICK STREET PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 




The recently dredged channel in Chesapeake Bay at 
Lynnhaven Inlet has been a great boost to boaters who once 
had to weave about the water seeking a channel and too often 
ran aground. The new channel clears 6 feet at low tide and is a 
tune-saver for boaters because of its direct path. The improve- 
ment was created through the efforts of County Supervisors 
James Darden and Carroll Clough who urged that needed 
sand be dredged from the inlet by*the Army Corps of Engi- 
neers. 



Gerrlnger Wins 
Payton, Beach 
Players Shine 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Ronnie 
Gerringer, the 19-year-old sharp- 
shooter from Newport News, 
won the annual Payton Memor- 
ial golf tournament Tuesday at 
the Cavalier Club with a record 
54-hole score of 208, but Vir- 
ginia Beach youngsters were 
prominent among the leaders. 

While Gerringer was winning 
the overall title, young Archie 
B. McDowell, who plays out of 
the Princess Anne Country Club 
here, captured the junior 
championship with a 36-hole 
score of 153. In this division 
young Zack Clement, a fellow 
club member of McDowell's, 
finished second at 155. 

Billy Kellam and Randy Zeh- 
mer, both of Virginia Beach and 
the Princess Anne Club, tied 
for seventh spot in the senior 
division. Both had 54-hole totals 
of 222. Kellam fired 72-76-74 
while Zehmer had rounds of 
76-75-71. 

Close behind Kellam and 
Zehmer was young Bill McClan- 
an with a grand total of 223. 
Next came Bobby Bennett with 
225. Both McClanan and Ben- 
nett play at the Princess Anne 
Country Club. 

Local Chapter 
Cited for Work 
In Dimes Drive 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Princess Anne - Virginia Beach 
Chapter of the National Founda- 
tion is one of four winners in 
the 1962 March of Dimes Scrap- 
book Contest. 

Mrs. E. A. Hudson, scrapbook 
chairman, and Richard R. Absa- 
lom, director of the local March 
of Dimes, were notified of the 
award in a letter from Bun- 
Gibson, director of fund raising 
for the National Foundation. 

"Your Chapter is to be highly 
commended for the presentation 
itself," Gibson stated, "the ex- 
cellent coverage received in all 
media, and the solid campaign 
organization which the book re- 
flects. Your Chapter is one of 
four selected as winners from 
the counties of 25,000 to 100,000 
ppoulation. 



Mowen Moves 
Up in Shift 
Of Personnel 




WALDO R. MOWEN 

BIRDNECK POINT — Waldo 
R. Mowen of Birdneck Point 
was recently elected secretary 
and credit and collections super- 
visor for Smith-Douglass Co. of 
Norfolk. 

He succeeds W. Farley Powers 
who retired after 33 years serv- 
ice. 

Mowen is a native of Roselle, 
NJ., and attended Rutgers Uni- 
versity in New Jersey and 
Florida Southern College at 
Lakeland, Fla. 

He joined the Coronet 
Phosphate Co. in 1945 in the 
New York City home office 
end transferred to Florida in 
1945 as secretary and chief 
accountant of the Coronet Di- 
vision which had been merged 
with Smith-Douglass in 1952. 

Mowen was transferred to 
Norfolk in 1959 as assistant sec- 
retary and credit manager. 

He resides with his wife, 
Eadie, and two children, Waldo 
Jr. and Jill. 

Pay- 2 Named 
William H. Payne of North 
Alanton was recently promoted 
to branch manager of the Smith- 
Douglass Co. plant at Wilming- 
ton, N.C. 

He was formerly sales man- 
ager of the Norfolk branch. 
Prior to that he was supervisor 
of sales at Raleigh, N.C. 

Payne is married and has 
three children. 

Mack A. Glass, a former resi- 
dent of Birdneck Point, has 
been named manager of farm 
fertilizer sales for the mid- 
west. He was previously branch 
manager at Albert Lee, Minn. 



Thunderbird 
Bowling News 

On Tuesday, Sept. 4, the 1962- 
63 bowling season will get under 
way. This will be the earliest 
start in the leagues history and 
with more teams than ever be- 
fore. 

The using of the name Major 
with this league is admittedly 
not right at present, but, if the 
hopes of the originators come to 
pass, one of these years it will 
be. 



As originally conceived by a 
few "average bowlers" just two 
years ago this league was to in- 
troduce the idea of bowling 
"scratch" rather than handicap 
to the beginning bowlers of the 
area. To keep the talent distri- 
buted among the teams a maxi- 
mum classification of 850 was 
established. Ten teams partici- 
pated that first season and at 
the end of the year the classifi- 
cation was raised to 865 to allow 
the original teams to get back 
in. In the second season the 
membership dropped to 8 teams 
when several new establish- 
ments opened up and some of 
the bowlers that showed excep- 
tional talent moved to more 
powerful leagues. At seasons 
end the classification again had 
to be raised, this time to 880. 
While the increase is not great 
it does prove that the bowlers 
are getting better as most of the 
original players are still in the 
league. 

Plans for this season were 
started last spring with th»* 
adoption of revised rules and a 
mailing campaign to attract ad- 
ditional teams. While the mail- 
ing idea was not a success some 
attraction must have existed as 
the membership jumped to 14 
teams. One of the biggest sur- 
prises is that the entering 
strength of the teams varies by 
only 20 pins from lowest to 
highest. Also the Sect, has quite 
a lengthy list of bowlers that 
would like to participaje with 
no team to place the mon. 

Officers for the coming sea- 
son are Neil Boucher, Pres. Dick 
Dickens, Vice Pres. and Lee 
AmundsOn, secretary-treasurer. 
While a certain number of 
grumbles and complaints are 
expected a successful season is 
being looked forward to. With 
one exception that is, secretary- 
treasurer Lee Amundson. Dread 
of listening to gripes and 
smoothing over disputes it not 
the reason, however. He's mak- 
ing plans for the 63-64 season 
with a 900 classification. "One 
of these years we are going to 
rate being called a "Major" 
League, says he.. 



MiesiaafeSK 



-* 




1 



aw 



Go and sin no more . . , go and tench . . , go up 
Uglier I Again and again Christ gave the simple 
command: "GO." 

And this positive emphasis on dedicated action 
bait expresses the spirit of His teaching. , 

Christianity continues to inspire earnest, believ- 
ing, determined souls eager to translate their faith 
Into constructive and unselfish effort. 

In every congregation energetic Christians find 
opportunities without number for service to Christ 
and their fellow man. 

So GO to Church. 

And keep on GOING. 

Explore those exciting 
realms of spiritual adventure to which Christ wants 
you to GO. 



THE CHURCH FOR ALL . . . 

ALL rOR THI CHURCH 

Tic Church » ft* iiulett fetter 
on earth for dw buildiaj of char- 
acter cad good ciliieaship. 1 1 u i 
storehouse of spiritual nice.. With- 
out • (troBf Church, neither <Je- 
awcracf cor chrilinlioa cm «>r- 
y'm. There an four sound reasoas 
whjr ncrjr perm ahwld anted 
services regnlarljr end support the 
Church. They ere: (I) For kit 
owe .eke. (2) For hit children's 
tele. (J) For the lake of his can- 
muniijr and nation. (4) For. the 
sake of die Church itself, which 
needs hie moral and material tap- 
port. Plan to jo to church i«gu- 
larfjr and read your Bible daily. 



*:4M* 



I*kt 

10:JWT 



Tuesday 
Mark 
5:14-20 




W*dn«aday 

Acta 
10:17-34 



Copyright 19«», Kditcr Advertising Service, be., Stn.burg, V* 



THIS SERIES OF MESSAGES IN THE INTEREST OF THE CHURCH IS SPONSORED 
BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS 



HOLT BUICK, INC. 

THREE GREAT BUICKS 
LaSabra — Invicta — Ekctfa 



SntNGTHlMAMlKKA'SmafOWtP 

-U.S. 

SAVINGS 
ONDS 




HKnow Your BiMeP 

CHRIST'S SECOND 

ADVENT IS NEARI 

-ACTS 1:11 

For free Bible 
study helps, send 
name and address to: 

THE CHRISTADELPHIANS 

P. O. BOX 842 
RICHMOND 24, VIRGINIA 



21st ft PACIFIC AVE. 



GA 8-2132 



MURDEN DRUG CO. 

Prompt, Efficient Prescription Service 
Phone 3404111 London Bridge, Va. 



23rd Street 



SEASIDE MARKET 

Telephone GA 8-9319 

Virginia Beach 



"Your delegation will be 
awarded a handsome plaque at 
the regional pre-campaign tour 
this fall. We anticipate taking 
your prize winning entry on 



tour with us along with the oth- 
er winners so that everyone may 
have a chance to view the "best 
of show." The scrapbooks wilL 
be prominently displayed near 
the registration desk in each 
city." 



WORLD'S LARGEST 
PEST CONTROL CO. 




STOP 

5WARMINO TIRMITES 

cair 



"Serving Va. Beach and Norfolk" 

Boulevard Employment 



Clerical 

Administrative 



497-4142 



# Domestic 

• Sales 



'No Matter What You Do 

You'll Find it war 



The Boulevard" 

6235 Virginia Beach Boulevard 




• Surety Bonded 
Termite Control . 

• Free Inspection 
GA 8-3382-MA 7-9840 

ORKIN 

Exterminating Co., Inc. 



ROSE'S 5-10-25c STORES. INC. 

309 31st St. ft 1901 Atlantic Avenue 
Your Shopping Center 



RUSSELL ft HOLMES 

Your Newly Enlarged Shoe Store 

"Where Shopping Is a Pleasure" 

1908 Atlantic Avenue Virginia Beach 

GA 8-4301 



PRICE'S INC. 

HILLTOP 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



NIXON ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractors — General Repairs 

Honse.( Commercial Wiring— Light Fixtures 

«•• - 17th Street. Va. Beach— Phone GA 8-3711 



COMET TRAILERS 

Hani your own furniture with Comet Trailers 
Call 543-3534 
1217 South Military Highway 



EMRHAE FORD 

FORD and ITALUN FIAT 
• 17th St. also Bayside on Rt I3Y 
Telephone GA M232 



BE-LO SUPERMARKET 

30th Street ft Arctic Avenue 
Virginia Beach 



*.*.-«ARRIffcER 

Wholesale Meats and Provisions 

Distributors Kraft Food Products 

2446 Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Telephone MA 7-5398 Norfolk, Va. 



CAVALIER GARAGE 

JOHNNY DUDLEY 

Directly Behind Hotel 

Independently Operated 

Holly Rd. & Cavalier Dr. 

Dial GA 8-2131 Virginia Beach 



BRINKLEY'S SHELL SERVICE 

"Friendly Service plus Quality Products*' 
31st Street and Baltic Avenue 
Telephone GA 8-4232 Virginia Beach * 



KELLAM & EATON, INC. 

Building Supplies 

"Headquarters For Your Needs'* 

Princess Anne Phone 2661—2672 



CERTIFIED TV & APPLIANCE CO. 

151 EAST LITTLE CREEK RD. 588-5471 

6000 VA. BEACH BLVD. 497-1021 



KELLAM & EATON INSURANCE CO. 

„„ Real Estate — Rentals — Insurance 
3113 Pacific Avenue — Telephone GA 8-91(1 



PRINCESS ANNE PLUMBING 
ft ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, INC. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 

Westlnghouse Appliances 

Phone: Day 2660 ft 2678 — Night 2663 

Princess Anna 



OCEANA CURB MARKET 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Groceries and Meats 

Phone GA 8-1691 0cea|1Jl< Vr 



VA. BEACH AUTO SUPPLY, INC. 

Evinrude Mot»>~ — Automotive Parts 
Phone GA 8-6556 
820 - 17th Street 



W. A. WOOD OIL CO. 

Commission Agent 

ESSO STANDARD OIL CO. 

Fuel Oil and Kerosene 

Dial GA 8-3385 



Sun-News Classified Ads Bring Results 



CUT fROto TENDER YOUNS 





CENTER 
COT 




FIRST 
CUT 

LOW 




«*MP 



m** 



^»»i 



TEND£R,LEAM, MEATf FRESH/SMITH FIELD 



1» >W 




LOIN 

END 




•lAd^-tai 



■v" 






IN CLOTH IAGS — TODOS VIRGINIA CURED 

SMOKED PICNICS 

MR. FROSTY FRESH FROZEN 

CRAB CAKES 



• • 



«,. 69 



# iC 4,7« 



FRESH TENDER SUCED 

PORK LIVER 29" 

PACKED BY KUDEN PACKING CO.— PEANUT CITY BRAND 

COUNTRY HAMS : - 65' 

BARNHARDT U.S.D A. GRADE A YOUNO 

DUCKLINGS ..... 39- 

SLICED AND PACKED DAILY BY GWALTNEY INC.— SCOTCH TREAT 

SLICED BACON ... 53' 

BONELESS SMOKED— GWALTNEY PAGAN BRAND 

CANNED HAM . . 3 "2" 

MADE FRESH DAILY BY ARMOUR A CO. 

BOLOGNA ..~49<V~43' 

MADE IN SMITHFIELD, VA.— COLONIAL'S 

WINNER FRANKS .» 39" 



MADE FRESH DALLY IN 
COLONIAL'S SALAD KITCHEN 



25 Extra FREE STAMPS 

With th« PvrchoM of Any Pkg. 

" CHEF'S PRIDE 
SALADS 

NO COUPON DEOUWED 



• SEAFOOD • 

ASSORTED SIZES IN THE SHEU 

Fresh Clams • *«. 39< 

FKSM MEDIUM SIZE 

Shrimp . . . . Lb. M w 

FRESH VIRGINIA 

Crahmeat . . ciow Lb. 99* 



Ffk«i Effective 
Augi.it 23, 24, 25, 

'nw ■•IGP^PeJ 

Quantity Rifhti, 



RED MILL STUFFED 

OLIVES 

45* 



7Vt oi. 
Jar 



OLD VIRGINIA GRADE A 
STRAWBERRY 

PRESERVES 

18 ox. COc 

Jar J4J 

MADOLENE 
SWEET CHIPS 

PICKLES 

'* 39' 

■ 1 1 -i 1 

BOWLING ALLEY 
NA-NOR 

WAX 

Can OV 



This Week 
Colonial Salutes 



■ ■ ',.-. 




Products. 



made 



SuipfK>*t 

Tof> CWltty VtoAutite 
Grbwa,Ma<Ie f3 






GOLD BONDsta/nps 

With thii coupon end PurdMM of ONE Am. Can 

REDGATE BLACK PEPPER 

GOOD IN COLONIAL STORE 
GIVING GtXD RONO STAMtt 

#z SO w 




1111 a 



linial 



%rr^ 



Mad* and 
Produced in 
Crow*, Va. 



FROZEN 

CHOCOLATE, LEMON or BANANA 

CREAM 
PIES 



16 ox. 
Pit* 





ORANGE-GRAPE 
OR PUNCH 





JUS-TREAT DRINK 
SKYLINE DRIVE APPLE JUICE . 
REYNOLDS FOIL WRAP . . . 
COCKTAIL PEANUTS «-«... 



II CM. 

itttfe 



13% 



ifirwnlProiuced' 
in Virgin.' 



r*OM EASTERN SHORE * PRIM CESS \ANNE C0W1Y VA. US.Mf 



WHITE POTATOES 10 



K 

BAfr 



FKOM EASTERN SHORE VIKG-WI A. ramr ^_ a* ^ ■ 

SWEET POTATOES 1 ^ 

*7«M# 77/£" FOUNTAINS OF V/Rt/WA - RAM 00 NEMO GOLD 

COOKING APPLES 



1 Grown I Produced!. 
in Virginia 



snaMiowi 



OUR PRIDE BAKERY TREATS . . r . -, «. 3* 

MADE FRESH IN OUR OWN MODERN BAKERY «2L«-«« * * * ' MA 

10 EXTHA WEE STAMPS WITH EACH 10AF OUt PIIDE IAKG* _ UP«HI S I N BOCjS . . • "»0™ 

SANDWICH BREAD v27« SKr^ ~ 39. 

10 EXTRA FREE STAMPS WITH EACH LOAF luwr pocket SCI 

THRIFTY BREAD ■"•■■ "jrl* ChapStfck ...... 35' 

5«oifONiA0<lOAPOURPRiDi •£*" *m*am* mmmamm \ — «*. 

WHEAT BREAD ts 1$ l Bowiee StAacB . .2 - » 




I 




VfrglMM Beach SufeNcws, thursday, August 23, 1962 
h#»8-A 



t^mr Social ^ecurify 



By DARYL E. RATLIFF 

"*Md Rbptbbba tit i vb 

That old saying "Nothing is so 
certain aa change" can have a 
great deal of meaning for you as 
ft did for John Carter. John had 
Just celebrated his 38th birth- 
day and he felt he had a lot to 
be thankful for: a lovely wife, 
two healthy, teen-aged young- 
sters and a good job. life for 
him was progressing on an even 
keel until eight months ago 
when he was severely injured in 
a hit and run accident. From 
then on it was one unpleasant 
change after another. He was 
hospitalised for a long period 
and when he finally returned 
home the doctor told him he 
would not be able to work again. 
Although he received a disability 
pension from his employer, he 
found that all of his needs were 
not being met. 

Then John learned over the 
radio of another kind of change. 
The commentator said that social 
security now pays disability in- 

Ece benefits to qualified 
ns who become severely 
ed before age 65, and he 
urged disabled people to seek 
information from their local 
'social security office. Until a 
recent change in the social se- 
curity law, these payments could 
be made only to disabled work- 
ers aged 50 to 65. 
I John's wife called the social 



security office and mentioned 
that he was unable to visit at 
the office. His application was 
taken by a representative of the 
social security office who came 
to their home. John and his fami- 
ly are now receiving $254 a 
month in social security dis- 
ability benefits. 

The story of John Carter illus- 
trates the daily protection which 
socia lsecurity provides when 
the breadwinner becomes dis- 
abled for any substantial gainful, 
activity. 

To qualify for these payments, 
a person must have a disability 
so severe that it will last indefi- 
nitely and one which will prob- 
ably not improve with time or 
medical treatment. The disability 
must have lasted for 6 months 
or more before payments can 
start. 

If you or anyone in your fami- 
ly become disabled be sure to 
contact your social security of- 
fice to see if you are eligible 
for disability benefits. Booklets 
on the recent changes in the 
social security law, including the 
change permitting payments to 
disabled workers under 50 years 
of age, are available, free of 
charge, at all social security dis- 
trict offices. The local social 
security district office is located 
at 220 West Brambleton Avenue, 
Norfolk 10, Virginia. 



Volunteer Workers 




(Photo by Boice) 

Students (left to right) Kennon Binford, Walter and David 
Brown and Johnny Waller mow their school's grounds. 

All Help In Clean-up 
Day at Friends School 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Saturday 
was clean-up day at Friends 
School when members of the 
Virginia Beach / Friends Meeting 
gathered to brush away the ef- 



f 



SB 



X 



New! 



A FRIENDLY INVISIBLE GUARDIAN PROVIDING 
STERILE LAUNDRY SERVICE ACTIVELY HELPS 
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM 

AIR-BORNE GERMS, 

BACTERIA 

and 

VIRUS 



Modern laundry methods insure sterility of apparel and 
linens at completion of finishing. If there is no sub- 
sequent contamination, this would be sufficient. 

Through our advanced scientific laundering technique 
we now incorporate into the fabric, at time of washing, 
"CONTROL", The Germicidal Fabric Conditioner, which 
not only assures sterile apparel and linens, but deposits 
an invisible germicidal coating that continues to kill infec- 
tious bacteria on contact until laundered again - even 
in 



Apparel and linens laundered this new way not only 
stay sterile but they look nicer. Bath towels are soft 
and fresh. You'll like the lustrous finish. There is no 
odor except the fresh sweetness of really clean laundry. 

We are pleased to give your family the benefit of its 
protection. We guarantee your satisfaction. 

Another progressive service supplied at no extra cost 



SNOW WHITE 



Beautitone Cleaning 



Virginia leach 
fAMMl 



Ivory Soap Laundering 

Bayside 



/ i 



Norfolk 
JU 8-6796 



fects of idle summer months and 
prepare the buildings for a Sept. 
10 opening. 

Under the supervision of 
David H. Brown Jr., the group 
spent a 'full day — from 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. — painting and repair- 
ing, dusting and mopping, mow- 
ing and clipping. 

By late afternoon, the school 
buildings and grounds were 
clean and gleaming, waiting for 
the onslaught of eager young 
students. 

Even the youngsters got in- 
to the act. Four lawn mowers 
at* away at the tall grass 
under the able ' guidance of 
Johnny Waller, David and 
Walter Brown and Kennon 
and Christian. Binford. 
When the young workers got 
tired they solved the problem 
by hitching a wagon to a self- 
propelled mower so that they 
could ride the rest of the way. 
John Waller repaired the 
playhouse and filled in as a 
general handyman; Lynn Brad- 
shaw and her two daughters, 
Martha and Katie, cleaned 
Venetian blinds; and Kit Fiutko 
swished a busy paint brush. 

Equally as important were 
other odd jobs done by Louise 
and Bob Wilson, May Brown, 
Jane Waller, Elfrida Piersall, 
Mary Warren, Violet Brownley, 
Wyman and Doris Harrison, 
Bob Clapp, Lee Gall and Jimmy 
Bradshaw. 

Saturday, was a busy day at 
Friends School but one of fel- 
lowship and accomplishment for 
those who took part. 

Park Dredging 
Is Concluded 

, VIRGINIA ♦BEACH — The 
dredge Norwood ended the 
dredging of more than 250,000 
cubic yards of sand from Sea- 
shore State Park Monday about 
3 p.m. after four months of 
pumping sand out of the isolated 
section. 

The sand was used to replace 
the lost sand from the ocean- 
front in the March 7 storm. The 
dredged sand was pumped onto 
the beach hydraulically in the 
area between 60th and 24th St. 

The dredging left behind is 
a new lake, the acre expanse of 
water up to 35 feet in parts. 

A bulldozer will seal off the 
end of the lake with dirt fill in 
a few days to protect the lake 
b^nks from tidal action. 

The dredge will remain in the 
Narrows for about a week, pre- 
paring for its job on the Eastern 
Shore. It wilj widen a 200-foot 
long section of the Narrows 
channel to about 80 feet and will 
widen a 320-foot Bay-Long CreeV 
canals if present plans are com 
pleted. 

MISS WHITSON GETS 
MASTERS DEGREE 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Miss 
Marilyn Elvira Whitson of Vir- 
ginia Beach received a master 
of education degree recently at 
the University of Virginia. 

Miss Whitson is the daughter 
of Mrs. 'Macon Whitson of 210 
55th St., Virginia Beach. 

She will join the faculty of 
Lane High School in Charlottes- 
ville in Sept. 





MORTON'S FROZEN 

MEAT 

PIES 

. BEEF, CHICKEN 
OR TURKEY 

e-oz. pies -^J-a^F" 
WHITE HOUSE 

APPLE SAUCE 



17-ox. 
Cans 



29 



CRL'TCHFIELD 

CORN MEAL 



PLAIN 

Lb. 



5 H 37' 



UPTON'S 



TEA' BAGS 

69 € 



Pk«. 

Of 48's 



IVORY SNOW 

DETERGENT 



Lge. 
PI*. 



35 



CAMAY 

REGULAR SIZE 

4 «« 41 c 



DASH 

DETERGENT 

41 



25-oz. 
PI*. 



ZEST 

BATH SOAP - 
3 Bar. 41 

BREEZE 

DETERGENT .. 



Lge. 
Pkg. 



35 



TREND 

DETERGENT 

2 Reg. fftaTkC 
Pkgs. 



39 



MR. CLEAN 

4NSER 

39 



CLEANSER 



15-oz. 
Bot. 



DOWNEY 

FABRIC SOFTENER 

79 c 



Gt. 
Bot. 



AJAX 

CLEANSER 



14-oz. 
Cans 



31 



LIFEBUOY 

REGULAR SIZE 

SWAN 

LIQUID DETERGENT 

35 



12-oz. 
Bot. 



CALO 

CAT OR DOG FOOD 

6 - 85 c 



MUSSELMANS 

CHERRY 

PIE FILLING 

'C 



21-oz. 
Cm 



37 



AftPS "SUPER-RIGHT" DELICIOUS 

RIB ROAST 



7-1 NCH 
CUT 



lb. 



69° 



CUTS INCLUDING 
FIRST 2 RIBS 



TENDER JUICY 



RIB STEAKS 

A&P's FRESHLY GROUND WHOLESOME 

GROUND BEEF 



LB. 



79c 
79c 



LB. 



39 



A&P't "SUPER-RIGHT" QUALITY 

LAMB SALE! 



LEG OF LAMB ROAST 
LAMB SHOULDER ROAST 
LAMB RIB CHOPS 
LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS 

LAMB LOIN CHOPS 
BREAST OF LAMB 



LB. 



l. 63c 
43c 
99c 
53c 

$1.09 

L. 10c 



LB 



LB 



LB 



Garden Fresh Fruits & Vegetables 

LARGE RIPE 



HONEYDEWS 



FIRM RIPE 



EA. 



CRISP ICEBERG 



LETTUCE 



FRESH TENDER-GREEN 



FIRM 



2 



BEANS 



YOUNG SNAPPY! 



49 
25 



2 • 29' 



LARGE HEADS 



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■ ■ 16-OZ CANS "f^JU 
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ANGEL RING «« ""» »• 29c WHITE BREAD m» mm «-«. 1-2 7c 

WHEAT BREAD »» ««m ...m«<19c BLACKBERRY PIE jmipuhi 1.55c 

THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 25th " 








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) 



Legal Notice* 



t jPaW 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEWS 



I 






SECTION B 



SERVING VIRCINIA BEACH AND PRINCESS ANNE 



Classified Ads 





VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 1962 



BASKIN' IN . THE SUN 



By GORDON BASKIN 



as 



I see where Mr. George Meany and the Executive 
Council of the AFL-CIO have come on strong for the 25- 
hour week. They figure that this will solve the unemploy- 
ment situation. The ( worker will get the same pay for 35 
as he did for 40, and any overtime will be double time 
instead of time anci a half. This will make it so expensive 
tor the employer, that rather than pay the double time, he 
will hire a whole new batch to work another shift. Well 
now. ' 

Ask the Little Woman 

I am certain that Mr, Meany did not ask the employers 
about this, since he knows what their answer will be 
That's not what bothers me. What bothers- me \% that Mr., 
Meany and his cohorts have not 1 nought about the situa- 
tion carefully enough. They have not questioned the 
proper people. I'm talking about the wives of the members 

°u- j unions - lf ' am an V* M9e, tn e wives would vote 

this down by a margin -of at leasf a thousand to one. Why? 

Can you imagine how the wife will feel having that 

husband at home even more hours per day than he is now? 

Every time I think cf^usbands at home, I think of 

the remark made by Mr*. Casey Stenqle when Casey 

was between jobs. She said that she'd married Casey 

tor better or worse, but not for lunch. Said that she 

almost lost her mind, and was overjoyed when he went 

to work for the New York Mets. 

By the time the wife drags out of bed in the morning, 
fixes breakfast, and shouts the children off to school, she 
is in no shape to be charming to that husband who is 
taking that time off in the middle of the week. He'll get 
in the way, won't lift his feet promptly when she uses the 
vacuum, will leave the refrigerator door open, or at least 
will spend a, large amount of time staring into the refriger- 
ator deciding on what snack he'll have, will leave bottles 
on her best table with resultant rings,' and cause her to 
scream at him earlier in the day. 

Don't Knock Housework! 
Probably worst of all, he will be around long enough 
to begin criticisms about her housework. He will begin 
to make clever remarks about getting organized and 
making lists and getting the job on a more efficient basis. 
He'll do this if he's stupid, and if he does do it, he vvfti 
wind up at the local dentist's office minus a few front teeth. 
Some of the union members have given this some 
thought, I gues> They probably feel like most men; that 
the family gets enough shots at you as things are now, 

"#riJ?«V.«R't H* slightest desire to be home any more hours' 
during the day. 

About the only thing a wife could clo to preserve her 
sanity under the proposed new set-up would be to tefl 
her husband to stop bothering her and go out and play; 
and husbands haVe been sitting around for several thous- 
and years waiting for that suggestion. 

So I suggest that Mr. Meany poll the wives of the 
members. He might find out that they are in favor of a 
60-hour week for the members. After all, it has taken 
her a generation to get Used to having the man around 
the house on Saturdays without losing her mind, so 
rm certain her nerves are not yet steady enough to cope 
with having husband under foot an extra five hours 
a week. 

I'm no book-maker, but I'll give you eight to five that 
the little woman will let out a scream you will be able to 
hear in New Zealand if Mr. Meany gets this shorter hours 
thing worked out. 



Pet Show Tops 
City Program 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
City * Recreation Department's 
annual pet Show last Week ex- 
cited the youngsters, tried the 
parent's ' patl&nce and caused 
general havoc among the ani- 
mal entries but the eagerly an- 
UcipiUad event was a big hit and 
a highlight of the summer-long 
pwjgtim. i 

The Municipal Tennis Courts 
were filled with youngsters .and 
animals. The parade before the 
judges brought out dogs in bal- 
lerina skirts, kittens in baby 
outfits, birds in gaily decorated 
cages and multi-type hamster 
containers. 

There wart dogs of all 
•izei, shapes and forms put 
among the most outstanding 
was • hurdla-iumping pointer; 
a dainty outfitted chiuahua; 
and a bulldog docked out as 
Santa's reindeer with branches 
for his antlers, pulling old 
St. Nick himself in a mini*- 
, hire sleigh. 

Judges had a tough job se- 
lecting the winners, but when 
all the points were tallied, the 
following youngsters took home 
ribbons: 

Cutest dressed pet: Sheila 
Faulk, first; Susan Wise, sec- 
ond; Kay Booth, third; and 
Tommy Nathias, honorable men- 
tion. 

Most unusual: Evans Reames, 
first; Pam ' Summers, second; 
Craig Dudley, third; and Kathy 
Helmer, honorable mention. 
i Cutest: June Adams, first; 
Peggy Jean Ballance, second; 
Tony Smith, third; and Larry 
Voight, honorable mention.' 

Prettiest dog: Earl Vowell, 
first; Bobby McCoy, Second; and. 
Billy King, third. 

Prettiest cat; Debra Heafner, 
first; Linda i Burmock, second; 
and Debbie Tillet, third. 

Best trained: Ronnie/ Arms- 
worthy, first; Debbie Clark and 
Sandy Ferguson, tie for second. 

CHECiOJPS MUST 
BEFORE SCHOOL 



Recently Promoted 




Francis E. Pittman, chief radioman, USN, son of Mrs 
Thelma Fidler of 1121 West Page ave., Virginia Beach, Va., is 
congratulated by the Executive Officer Captain Strong Boozer, 
Supply Corps, USN, upon being promoted to his present rate 
July 16, at the Naval Supply Center, Naval Station, Norfolk, Va! 
His wife, the former Miss Barbara G. Whitmer of Newport 
News, and his son, Michael, aged 7, look on during the cere- 
mony. (Navy Photo) " 



CADET JAMES E. MORRIS 

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — Cadet 
James E. Morris, 21, whose 
wife, Carole, lives at 4913 N- 
Crestwood Ave., Richmond, Va., 
completed six weeks of training 
($ at tjhe Reserve Officer Training 
Corps (ROTO summer camp at 
Fort Bragg, N.C., Aug. 3. 

Cadet Morris, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert L. Morris, Bayside, 
is active in the ROTC program 
at the University of Richmond. 
He was graduated from Oak 



Ridge. IN.C.) Military Institute in 
1959. 



Cadet Henry L. Thompson 

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — Cadet 
Henry L. Thompson, 20, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Tazewell F. 
Thompson, Route 3, Lynnhaven, 
Va., completed six weeks of 
training at the Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (ROTC) summer 
camp at Fort Bragg, N.C, Aug. 
3. 

Cadet Thompson, a 1959 grad- 



RJCHMOND — Dr. Mack L 
Shadholti, State Health Commis- 
sioner today urged parents to 
see that their children* have a 
medical checkup before starting 
school. "Illness .and poor per- 
formance in school can be pre- 
vented* in many youngsters by 
a preschool checkup," said Dri 
Shanholts, "and this applies 
from kindergarten through high 
school. 

"The ' answer to "Why can't 
Johnny read?' may be that he 
can't see. the Words so well, or 
perhaps he doesn't hear the 
teacher as -well as he should. 
Unsuspected small defects can 
make a big difference in his 
progress at school and later in 
life. 

"P r ot e c t i v e immunication 
against polio, diptheria, tetanus 
and whooping cough, and vac- 
cination against smallpox are 
the best defense against these 
crippling and killing diseases. 
Follow up booster shots should 
be obtained at proper intervals, 
and these can be taken care of 
at the regular checkups. 

"There is need for greater na- 
tional physical fitness, especially 
in our youths. A regular checkup 
can be an important step toward 
maintaining fitness and health. 
"In most cases the child will 
receive a clean bill of health, 
which is always good news. In 
others an unsuspected condition 
may be discovered and taken 
care of before it becomes seri- 
ous, thereby avoiding possible 
suffering, lost time, and ex- 
pense." 

Dr. Shanholtz urges parents 
nqt to wait until the last minute 
when doctors and clinics are 
swamped. "Now is the time to 
arrange for that important pre- 
school checkup," he said. 



Sea Scouts 



Up 




Miiii 



Sea Scouts Aboard the USS Intrepid 




, Dennis V. DeFir (left) and John B. Griggs IV go through 
the chow line. (Navy Photo) 




(Navy Photo) 

By JOY HAKIM 

SOMEWHERE AT SEA— The 
lure of the sea has caught forty 
area boys who are embarked on 
a voyage that most youngsters 
only dream about. 

They are spending eight days 
as guests of the United States 
Navy aboard the aircraft carrier 
USS Intrepid. 

The boys are Sea Scouts from 
Sea Explorer Ships 63 and 202 
based at Virginia Beach and 
Little Creek. 

Learning Firsthand 

The Intrepid is engaged in 
aircraft qualifications and the 
boys are observing the aircraft 
operations and learning about 
navigation and seamanship. 

The scouts boarded ship Au- 
gust 18. They were welcomed 
by Commander F. S. Gallup on 
behalf of Capt. R. J. Morgan 
(commanding officer of the In- 
trepid) and by Capt. Paul L. 
Ruehrmund on behalf of ' Rear 
Adm. E. R. Eastwold, Command- 
er Task Group Alfa. 

Of the forty Sea Scouts on the 
Intrepid, 17 are from Norfolk, 
8 from Virginia Beach, 6 from 
Bayside, 4 from London Bridge, 
3 from Lynnhaven and one each 
from Oceana and Princess Anne. 
Most of the boys belong to 
Sea Scout Ship No. 63, skip- 
pered by William N. Peterson 
of Virginia Beach. Ship No. 
63 was formed last December. 
In April it took first place 
honors in the district Scout-O- 
Rama. The sea scouts have 
throe 28' whale boats (a gift 
of the U.S. Navy) which they 
are rigging with sail. 
The boys returned from a 
trip to Boy Scout Camp Pipsico 
just a few days before going 
aboard the Intrepid. While at 
camp they earned more aquatic 
merit badges than had ever 
been given to one troop. 

Ship 202 from Little Creek is 
skippered by W. Everett, 

Next summer the scouts are 
planning another dream cruise 
— a trip to Europe. 



Summer Play 
Program Closes 

VIRQINIA BEACH— The sum- 
mer playground program at Vir- 
ginia Beach High School and 
W. T. Cooke Elementary School 
came to a close last Friday after 
a full schedule of activities for 
school-age youngsters. 

The annual field day and pre- 
sentation of trophies was held 
Thursday and a watermelon 
party Friday marked the end of 
a busy summer for the young- 
sters who have taken advantage 
of the program and the adult 
leaders who have given their 
time to making it a success. 
The summer program is 
sponsored at both schools each 
year by the City of Virginia 
Beach and is available free of 
charge. 
Special trophies for the "most 
helpful-cooperative" in the arts 
and crafts classes went to Jimmy 
Mathias at the high school and 
Jo Ballard at Cooke. A similar 
trophy for playground assist- 
ance was awarded to George 
Baier, high school, and Ricky 
Hall, Cooke. 

Trophy Winners 

Other trophies were present- 
ed to youngsters accummulating 
the most points during the sum- 
mer. These winners were: girls 
—Lynn Dudley, ages 6-9, and 
Jean Pinkham, ages 10-15; boys 
—Mike King, 6-7; Ricky Hall, 8- 
9; Moe Wolcott, 10-12; and Willy 
Shipp. 

First place winners in the 
field day included: 

Foot race: (girls) Nancy Flan- 
agan, 6-9; Jean Pinkham, 10-13; 
(boys) Mike King, 6-7; Ricky 
Hall, 8-9;* Moe Wolcott, 10-12; 
and 13-16 (boys & girls) Jean 
Pinkham. 

Softball throw: (girls) Lynn 

^Dudley, 6-9; Jean Pinkham, 10- 

15; (boys) Danny Muse, 6-7; 

Ricky Hall, 8-9; Moe Wolcott, 

10-12; Willy Shipp, 13-16. 

Sack race: (girls) Lynn Dud- 
ley, 6-9; Jean Pinkham, 10-15; 
(boys) Mike King, 6-7; Ricky 
Hall, 8.9; 'Buddy Htoes, 1032; 
and Bob Nixon, 13-15. 

Hop race: (girls) Lynn Dud- 
ley, 6-9; Maxine Harary, 10-15; 
(boys) Danny Muse, 6-7; Ricky 
Hall, 8-9; Moe Wolcott, 10-12; 
and Willy Shipp, 13-16. 

Crab race: Danny Muse, 6-7; 
Ricky Hall, 8-9; Moe Wolcott, 
10-12; and Jack Tucker, 13-15. ' 




Barnes Named 
By Sir Walter 




Wood Elected 
League Prexy 



wi, Sea I^H Wayne Rogers (left) an< * J Edwin Day, Skipper 
William N Peterson and Adult Leaders W. Everett and H L 
Pocnepko listen to welcoming speech. (Navy Photo) 



BENEFIT SUPPER 
VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Order of the Eastern Star will 
hold a benefit supper at the 
Masonic Temple oh 20th and 
Arctic Ave. August 30th frtJm 
5 to 9 p.m. Chicken and country 
style steak will be served. 

Tickets will be $1.50 /or 
adults and 75c for children. 



uate of Princess Anne High 
School, is active in the ROTC 
program at North Carolina State 
College, Raleigh, N.C. 



SHORE CHAPEL TO 
HAVE KINDERGARTEN 

LONDON BRIDGE^-The East- 
ern Shore Chapel will open a 
kindergarten and nursery day 
school this fall for youngsters 
of all denominations between 
the ages of three through five 
years, the Rev. B. Sidney San- 
ders, church rector, announced 
this week. 

Registration for the school 
will be held Aug. 27-31 at Jhe 
church from 9 a.m. to noon. 

Classes will begin Sept. 10. 
The 5-year-olds will attend Mon- 
day through Friday from 9:00 
a.m. to noon; the 4-year-olds on 
Mondays, Wednesday and Fri- 
days; and the 3-year-olds on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. 



POWELl IS ELECTED 
CIVIC LEAGUE HEAD 

PRINCESS ANNE* PLAZA — 
Allen Powell was elected presi- 
dent of the Princess Anne Plaza 
Civic League at a recent meet- 
ing at Plaza School. 

Other officers include Nor- 
j man Rieger, first vice-president; 
Ken Stage, second vice presi- 
dent; Don Ludlow, trustee; Otis 
Jackson, trustee; Jarvis Bell, 
trustee; Jim Morgan, treasurer; 
Mrs. Banks, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Powell, corresponding sec- 
retary. 

The civic league was accepted 
by the Civic Council Organiza- 
tion during their quarterly 
meeting in July. 

Charles Boiling and Norman 
Rieger are the representatives 
appointed to attend these meet- 
ings. 



TEXAS MINISTER 
IS GUEST SPEAKER 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Rev. 
Roger J. West, pastor of a 
Spanish-speaking church in 
Sweetwater, Texas, will be the 
guest speaker August 26 at the 
First Colonial Baptist Church of 
Virginia Beach at the 11:00 wor- 
ship service^ ( 
Besides his duties as pastor, 
Rev. West establishes new 
churches in the area near Sweet- 
water, and has evening worship 
services with groups of migrant 
workers who come from Mexico 
to work in the U. S. harvest 
fields. 

He and his family are visit- 
ing with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Roger C. West of Virginia 
Beach. 

First Colonial Baptist Church 
is presently meeting in the 
Linkhorn Park School on Laskin 
Road. The Rev. George T.' Stall- 
ing is the pastor. 

Mrs. J. Thomas Ellington Jr., 
and her young daughter of New 
York are' spending two weeks 
with Mrs. . Ellington's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. R, Meredith on 
Pinewood Road. Mr. Ellington 
will join bis family later. 



LBVKHORN PARK — Joseph 
B. Wood* was elected president 
of the Linkhorn Park Civic 
League at a meeting of the 
group Tuesday at Price's Hill- 
top Store. 

Also elected were J. W. Hal- 
stead, vice president; Mrs. Vir- 
ginia .Tamil, secretary; W. H. 
Phillips, treasurer; and Miss 
Mary E. Crump, corresponding 
secretary. , 

Herbert Holt, G. R. Blosser 
and Col. F. G. Epling were elect- 
ed directors. 

The new president has issued 
an invitation to all residents of 
Linkhorn Park, who are not 



Richard Warrvn Barnes, Jr. 

VIRGINIA 3EACH-4ttchara 
Warren Barnes, Jr. has been 
promoted from front office man- 
ager to assistant manager of 'the 
Sir Walter Hotel, according to 
James Powell, vice president and 
general manager of the hotel. 

A native of Roanoke, Barnes 
is the 32-year-old grandson of 
the late H. C. Barnes, pioneer 
druggist, and the late Dr. B. W. 
Arnold, Jr., professor Emeritus 
of history at Randolph-M*«ejl 
Women's College at LyncHbttA 
He is the nn ofMr. and Mrs. 
R. W. BarneYTSfMayflower Aptl. 

He is a member of Galilee 
Episcopal Church and the father 
of two sons, Richard Wa.rrih 
Barnes III and Mark Currje 
Barnes who presently reside m 
Riverside, Calif. 

Barnes graduated from Trinity 
Preparatory School, New York 
City and attended the University 
of Virginia for two years whejf 
he was a member of Kappa 
Alpha social fraternity. 

A veteran of the Korean Wi 
Barnes served in the U.S. 
Force for ten years and was dfr 
charged as a staff sargeant. ■ 

'While in prep school Barnes 
worked for t#6 summers at tie 
Lake P*eH*€ltrb in New Y< 
and has since been with 
Roanoke in Roanoke and 
Greenbrier in White Sul 
Springs, W. Va. 

Since his service 
he has worked for Stager Sew- 
ing Machine Co. in Portland, 
Ofegon, the Builders' Emporium 
in Riverside Calif. He* is also a 
professional musician. 

SCHOOL REGISTRATION 

PRINCESS ANNE— Registra- 
tion for new students of Floyd 
E. Kellam High School begin 
Wednesday and will continue to 
the opening of school <§aJy 
from 9*a.m. to noon. 

Books and physical education 
equipment will be on sale Aug. 
29-31 from 9 a'.m. to noon, v 
i 

Mrs. George Arnold has re- 
turned to her home in New 
York after visiting her sister, 
Mrs. Edith W. Burden at. her 
home at 7710 Atlantic Avenue. 




presently members, to join the 
league. 

Dues are $5 per family end 
checks may be sent to W. H. 
Phillips, 3600 Holly Road, Vir- 
ginia Beach. 



Fireman s Plaque for Tarrall 





Retiring City Councilman FranV Tamil 8e#t) 
wood and bronae plaque from Virginia Beach Fire Ch 
(Bubba) Bayne at Council meeting Monday la 
the work he has done with the Fire D 
safety groups. Monday wis Tamil's last 
man. (Phillips Photo) 




u**j* •,•**#•• 



3* M 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 



Complete TV Schedule for Week - Thurs. thru Wed. 



. m»- WTAtTV < S| 
} MftC—WAVY-TV (10) 
TV (13) 

thru FRIDAY 
M0OMM0 
or w 




1:80 
fttU 



IW) Mate 

(ISI — A tri e— 



( b>Ui a< KWtkl 

us>— - b**V* bnrwMd 

<flp — a «!—«■■ and Pom** 




StSS 

5:lt 

lis* 
6 15 

II: I* 

•■*• 

• MM 

• :15 
StSS 
8:95 
•:SS 









M~WMlkw 
»> — Or. Whitehurst 
From lurop* 



Report* 



(IS) — Th* Barty 9ho* 

(!•>— -HUawar Patrol 

(131 — Local New* 

<1S>— ABC New* 

( S> — EboiaoI* Club 

( *) — Sport* aouod-Dp 

( «) — TV B*port«r 

(!•>— -Six Thirty Report 

(1S> — Peter Gunn 

( 3> — Weathsnnar 

( ft) — Dootlas Edward* 

<14) — Huntlay-Brinklnr R*pon 



«*0 

t 
St* 

t 



US>— Totm* Or. 

(t«3 Q n **a ForiDv 
< 8)— To TeU Th* Truth 
(!•>— Our » Daughter. 

(IS) — Who Do Ton Tru*t 
( «r— Challmre of Chant 



THURSDAY EVENING 

>•«• ( S) — Shannon 

(10) — Miami Undercover 

( 13) — Beaefcoomoer 
7:30 < Sr-— Th* rlylae Doctor 

(10) — The Outlaws 

(IS> — Oxiie A Harriet 
9:*0 ( 3) — Frontier Circua 

(13) — Donna Re d Show 
3:30 (10) — Dr. Kildaire 

(13) — The Real McCoy* 
9:00 ( 3) — Brenner 

(13)— My Three Son* 
OtSO < 3) — Zane Grev Theatre 

(10) — Pure* Special 

113) — The Lrti» v Mr. .ones 
\ 10:00 ( 3) — Money Talks 

(10>~- Suig Al&u, With Mitch 

<13>— The t'tt .itfhible* 

( 3)— Public Service 

( 3; — Sew* 

■ 10) — Eleven o>hx* Report 

IS) — ARC NrVt 
( S) — Weather 
(13) — News. Weatbar. Sport* 

( 3) — -Sport* Final 
• 
30 ( 3) — Dr. Wiiiu hurst Report* 
From Europe , 
(10) — Sports 
IS) — The iter 18 
11:25 ( 3) — Movie 
11:30 (10)— Tontrtt 

FRIDAY EVENING 



740 ( 3) — The B**t of Tho 
(10)— Men Into Space 
(18) — Divorce Court 

740 ( 3)— Rawhide 

(10) — International 



:s 



9iSS 
OriW 



I 
10:30 



11:10 
11:16 

Hit* 



11:05 

HUM 

1:00 



(lSK-Th* a*****?* 
( J)— Route O* 
(10)— The Detect! re* 
H3>— The rUotitaceo 
(IS)— 77 Sun**t Strip 
( 3)— Path** Of the Brtrt* 
(10) — Pure* Sparta] 
( 3)— Mon*y Talk* 
(IS) — Target: tke Corrupter* 
(10)— Chet Htuttlay Resort* 

(IS) — N*w». Waathar 
( 3) — Waathar 

( S)— Dr. Wh4$*aur.t Report* 
Prow Surop* 

ISR 

( S>- , 

(10) — Tooi«V 

(10)— Motn 



SATURDAY 

MORNING 



7:00 
7.30 



»•> 



( S>— TS* Moraln* Shew 
(10) — BoiVfcmaj 

POoo 0*ck* Pirate Dan 

( ~ 

(10 

(!•>— May** 

(lf>— «p fM 

tOoMrt 



10:30 
11:00 



11:10 

litlS 

l 




L*o* Of lllitnn 



m 

AFTERNOON 




*5es 



18 OUR SPECIALTY 



irvice 

-STEREO - RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 






1:00 
ltS* 



1:45 
2:00 

S:30 
3:30 
4-.S0 
«s»S 

5:00 

5:80 
•«S» 



8:00 

8:30 

8:45 
0:50 

•tr- 
im 

8:00 
8:30 



0:00 

mm 

10:00 

10:45 
1145 




. IMrtwT 

(10>— TV Hour of Star* 

( 3) 

(1 

( - 

U*MM»«N Detective 

(13)— Science Fiction Theatre 

( 3) — NY. at Baltimore 

(10) — Public Service 

(IS)— Marie 

(10) — Piltaburc at St. Louis 

{ IS) — Championship Bowlinr 

( 3) — Baseball Scoreboard 

( 3) — Western Marahall 

(IS)— Tale* of Texas Ranjer* 

(10) — Movie 

(13) — Tele»port* 

( 3)— Lone Ranger 

( 8) — Grand Oi* Opry 

(13) — Peter Gunn 

EVENING 

( 3)— Icabod A Me 

(13) — Playhouse 13 ' ' 

( 3)— Art Linkletter A The Kid* 

(10) — All-Star WrestUnr 

( 3) — News- Weather 

( 3) — New* 

( 3) — Exclusive 

( 3) — Perry Ma — 

(10) — Tale* of Well* Farro 

(18) — Room For One More 

( 3)— The Defenders 

(10) — Tall Man 

(13) — Leave It To Beaver 

(10)— Movie* 

(IS) — Lawrence WeUt 

( S> — Have Gun. W1U Travel 

( S)— Gunsmoke 

(13) — Invitation to Porta 

(13) — Saturday Sport* Final 

( 3) — 11th Hour Final 

(IS) — News- Weather 






SALES and SERVffcP * 
LONDON BRIDGE, VA. 
9 A.M. ■ 9 P.M. Phone 340-8888 



11:05 
11:10 
11:15 



( 3) — Weather 
( S) — Sport* 
(IS) — The Bir Movie 
(IS) — Theatre 13 
11:20 ( 3) — Movie Time 
1240 (IS) — Late. Late Show 
t;3S. (10)— Mew* 
1:4* (10)— Bvanlnc Devotion 



SUNDAY 
MORNING 

7:SS ( 8)— Hcpalonr Caaaidy 

( 13) — ChrUt opher* 
StSS (18)— Fieher Family 
SiSS (10) — Moraine Worship 



X 



Qa 






[ 



I 

I 

t. 

I 
I 



i ' 




Hie Nail 
You Hit 
May 
Be On 
Your Thumb 



Some people can make their own home re» 
pairs. Others are wiser to hire professional 
help. But whether you do it yourself or have 
it done - financing the cost economically 
With a home repair loan at our bank is the 
wisest trick of ail. Come in. 




8 JO ( 3)*-Bob Poole'* Go*pel Favorite 
(IS) — Sacred Heart 

8140 (10) — The ChrUtopher* 
1:00 (10) — Dawn Brble Study 



< Sr— Thl* }• 
(10>— Herald 




»:30 < 3)— Thl* to The Uf* 
ot Truth 
Time 
9 Unto My Feat 
_, I* The AaawW 
•Look Up a»4 t**» 
Safety In The '«0'« 
(13) — 3unday Theatre 
11:00 ( 8) — Camera 8 

AFTERNOON 

12:00 ( S)— Window on Main St. 
( IS)— Criat* 
(lit— Wild Bill Htekok 
12:30 ( S) — Washincton Conversation 
(IS)— iMieTht 
(13) — Traikdown 
18:56 ( S)— CBS New* 
1:00 ( 8) — Sew*. Weather, Sport* 
(IS) — Houer Detective 
(18) — Hollywood Showoa** 
1:30 ( 3) — Builder* Showcase 

(10) — Sport* Wrest 
1:45 ( 3) — H.T. at Baltimore 

(IS)— Sport* Reel 
2:00 (IS) — Pirate* at Cardinal* 
StSS (IS)— Thrill* A Skill* 
StSS (IS) — San Franciaco Beat 
StSS (13>— Editor'* Choice 
4*0 (IS)— Issue* ft Answer* 
4:50 ( 3) — Baseball Scoreboard 
(IS) — Sunday Showo*** 
(IS)— Bowline 
StSS ( 3) — A Way of Thlnkin* 

(IS)— Wide World ol Sport* 
5:30 ( 3) — Amateur Hour 

(10)— Patterns In Muaio 

EVENING 

( S) — 80th Century 

(IS)— Meet The Pre** 

( 3)— MUtor Id 

<10>— This I* NBC Maw* 

(18V— Movie Time 

( 3)— Laaaie 

(10)— Bull winkle 

(IS)— Walt Disner 

(13) — FoUow The Son 

( SK— Bd SuUivan 

(IS) — Adventure* of Sir Frond* 

Drake 
(18)— Hollywood Special 
( 3) — G.E. Theatre 
( 10)— Bonanza 
( 3) — who In This World 
( 3) — Candid Camera 
(10) — DuPont Show 
(18) — Lawmen 
( S>— What'* My Lin* 
( S>— Eric Sevareid 
(10) — Weekend M«w* 




litis | 8) — Sport* 

(IS)— Lat* Weath*. 
llttS ( S>— Dr. Whitehurst Report* 
From Europe 

(IS)— Sport* 
11:25 ( 3)— Movie 
11:27 (l.t) — Theavre IS 
11 ISO (1*) — TonUht 

TUESDAY EVENINO 

( S) — Death Valley Dan 
(IS) — Grand Jury 
(IS) — Everf lades 

i^s^wSr 

(IS)— talehetor Father 
( •)— DoW* S1HU 
(IS)— Alfred HlW*codi 
(IS)— The New Breed 
( 8)— Comedy Spot 
(IS) — Dick Powell Show 
( S) — The Third Man 
(IS) — four* For A 
( S) — Talent Soout* 
(IS)— Cain* Hundred 
(IS)— Akra* Premier 
( S>— 11th Hour lf*w* 
I IS)— Eleven OClook Report 
(IS)— ABC Mew* 

! IS)— Lat* Maw* 
8) Weather 
IS)— Local Newt, Weathw, 
Sport* 

IJOSSL 

( S)— Dr. WhlUhorat Report* 

From Europe 
( 3)— Movie 
(IS)— Theatre IS 

US)— Tonurht 



liSS 

im 

SiSS 
8S0 

0:SS 

StSS 
10:00 

lliOO 



Haysidi Youth 
Ends Course 




S4S 

7:00 
7*0 



StSS 

S:3S 



9:00 

9:30 
1000 



*:s 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 

7 tSS ( S>— The California** 
(10)— Shot«un Blade 



(1S>— Ripcoro_ 



s.so I 

MO ( ' 




(IS)— Lata N.w. 
11:10 (10)— Movie 

(IS)— Weather 
11:15 ( 8) — Sport* Beport 

(IS) — Theatre IS 
11:20 ( 8) — Exclusive 
1:00 (10)— New* 



MONDAY EVENING 

7:00 ( S>— Th* Pioneer* 

(IS) — King- of Diamond* 
(IS) — Sea Hunt 
7:30 ( 3) — To Tell The Truth 

(IS)— Man A The Challenge 
( 13)— Cheyenne 
8:00 ( 8)— Pete A Gladys ■ 
(10)— National Velvet 
8:30 ( 3) — Father Snow* Best 
(10) — Price I* Right 
(13) — Law A The Plainsman 
9:00 ( 3) — Desi-Lucy Comedy, Hour 
(10) — 87th Precinct 
(IS) — Surf side Six 
10:00 ( S) — Heonesey 

(IS)— NBC Actuality 
(IS) — Ben Casey 
10:30 ( 3) — I Got A Secret 
11*90 « S) — 11th Hour New* 

(10) — Eleven O'clock Report 
(IS) — ABC-News. Final 
11:10 ( 3)— Weather 
11:15 (IS) — Local Mew*. Weather. Sport* 



a OF C SPONSOR 
ANNUAL PICNIC 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Knights 
of Columbus Council No. 4632 
of Virginia Beach held its an- 
nual family picnic on Sunday 
afternoon, August 19th. Court 
Stella Maris, Catholic Daughters 
of America, also joined the 
Knights at Picnic Area No. 1 at 
NAS Oceana. 

Cool breezes and clear skies 
contributed to make the event 
a memorable one for the more 
than 150 persons attending. 

Beach balls were given to the 
children, while their athletic- 
minded parents played softball 
or volleyball. 

Council No. 4632 will hold its 
next regular meeting on Wed- 
nesday eveniitg, September 5th 
at 8 p.m. at Star of the Sea 
Recreation Center. 



VACATIONERS 

Consult Our Dentists 
if in need oi • new set of 

TEETH 

Repairs 

While You Wait 

9 TO 6 P.M. DAILY 

QLOSED SATURDAY 

DENTISTS 

Qnutby at WainSl 

No Appointment 
Necessary 

Phone 
MA 2-4575 

FREE FARKJNg 

Motor Ramp Garage 
114 W. Main St. 



8)— Money Talk* 
(IS) — Wagon Tram 
(IS>— Howard K. Smith ABO Mow* 
Mm 
ocu* on America 
•ckmat* 
(IS*— Th* Rebel 
(IS)— Top Cat 
9:00 (IS)— Kralt Mystery Theatr* 

US)— Hawaiian *y* 
9:30 ( 3)— Dick Tan Dyke Show 
10:90 ( 3)— Steel H*nr 

(10) — Play YoOr Hunch 
(IS)— Naked City ^ 
10)— David Brtnkley's Journal 
S)— 11th Hoar New* 
1S>— Rlev*n O'Clock Report 
(18)— ABC-TV Mew* Final 
11:0* (IS)— Late New. 
UUS ( S)— Weather 
11:16 (10>— Late Weather 

(iV) — Looal New*- Weather-Sports 
11:90 ( S>— Or. Whitahurat Report* 
From Europ* 
(IS)— toort* 
HISS ( 8)— Movie 

uts. m$s& w 



BAYSIDE — Pvt. John W. 
Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
I.' Miller of Bayside, recently 
completed the eight week course 
of Field Communication at Fort 
Jackson, S>C. 

Miller entered the Army in 
Feb. 1962 and is stationed in 
Germany for two years. 

"He attended Frank W. Cox 
School before entering the 
Army. 



\M.a 

:taj 3 



ACHING MUSCLES 

Quickly relieve nagging pains of 
tired, tors, aching muscles with 
STANBACK Powders or Tablets. 
STANBACK'S combination of medi- 
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of pain works fast and gives re- 
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SEMJJ 

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FfNArlCJNG 



HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS 



OUR NEWEST OrTICE: 6014 VA. BEACH BLVD. 

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Home Office: 112 West- York Stress 

OTHER OFFICES 
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S511 High St— Portsmouth Newport Nows 

105 N. Main Streetr-Suff oik IS 8. King 



Use SUN-NEWS Classified Ad* 



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Steak Dinner for 4 



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•from actual metered tat in vwco'* Electric Uviof Center. 



Cooked for 4* electrically 



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Now, cook cool, cook clean, cook for just pennies electrically 
. . . and start by saving $20 on the installation of any make 
or model Electric Range or Electric Built-Ins yeu choose. 
Simply replace your non-electric range, or make a new, non- 
replacement installation in your home, rented house or 
separately metered apartment. Act now, before September 
1st, in accordance with terms of vepco oSer, and vwco will 
pay $20 on actual installation of any Electric Range you 
buy from an Authorized Live Better Electrically AjipJiance 
Dealer. Ask vepco for the name of one near you, fid see 
him for details of this $20 saving offer, a 

VIRGINIA RLECTIUw AND POWtJt MtfPANT <^f^ 



■*» 



TWIST ! ! 
TOP 



NEW 

TROPICANA 

Ivory Night 

7:30 to Midnight 

JAM SESSION 

Sunday 2:00 
Sandwiches— Pizzas 

16th & ATLANTIC 



THE ' 

Lighthouse 

Steamed 
CRABS 

SOUTH ATLANTIC AVE. 

Next to Steel Pier 



O MINIATURE 

GOLF 

IShole 
, COURSES 

15th & PACIFIC AYE. 
28th & ATLANTIC AVE. 

OCEAN 

CARPET OOLf COURSES 



Movie Reviews 



Captain of "Mr. Roberts" 



(These reviews appear wkh, 
special permission by The Green 
Sheet, a monthly survey of cur- 
rent films.) 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Beach Theatre will feature "Mer- 
rill's Marauders" Sunday through 
Tuesday and "The Spiral Road" 
Wednesday through Saturday. 
MERRILL'S MARAUDERS 
Estimates Agree: 

Exploits of the famous Mer- 
rill's Marauders during the 
Burma campaign iq World War 
II are shown here with an under- 
played realism that accentuates 
the heroism of their actions. The 




RIGHT ON 
THE OCEAN 

Virginia Beach ' 

AT 31 st STREET - 



DAMC1W 



IlfKKACTS 

WMjwtesy^T 

^ESCALZOS 

Magicians 

and TRIBE 

AU GUST 16* 



Outdo* 



SM9* 






op* 7 t jm\ — *" 



V*UM 



JP® i. 

•AltrsMliew-SPi* . 



TOP HAT 

DANCING 

featuring 

Al Cannon and His "Tuff Sax" 






29th and OCEAN FRONT 



Virginia Beach Theatres 

BEACH-BAYNE 



25th & Atlantic 

^ ^— — ■— ■ 

TODAY, FRIDAY 

and SATURDAY 

August 23, 24 & 25 

THE MIRACLE 
WORKER 

Anne Bancroft 
Patty Duke 
Victor Jory 

• Features: 
2:00— 4:00— 6:00— 8:00-MO:00 

m m Jm m mm j^ m Im mmmm ^ m ■ ■■■■■■■■■ 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and. TUESDAY 
August 26, 27 & 28 

MERRILL'S 
MARAUDERS 

Jeff Chandler 
Ty Hardin 

Fe&lbures: 
2:0O_4:0O— 6:00— 8:00— 1 0:00 

WED., THURS., FRL 

and SATURDAY 

Aug. 30, 31 & Sept. 1 

The 
SPIRAL ROAD 

Rock Hudson 

Gena Rowlands 

Burl Ives 

Features: 
2:00—4:30—7:00—9:30 



17th & Atlantic 

Last Three Days 

TODAY, FRIDAY 
and SATURDAY 

August 23, 24 & 25 

The 
MUSIC MAN 

Robert Preston 
Shirley Jones 

Features: 
2:00— *:30— 7:00— 9:30 

' . Children 50c all day 

Adults 99c Matinee 

$1.25 Evening 

ONE WEEK 
Return Engagement 

SUNDAY thru 
SATURDAY 

Aug. 26 - Sept. 1 

WEST SIDE 
STORY 

Natalie Wood 
Richard Beymer 

Feature*: 2:002-5:30—9:00 

Children 50c aU day 

Adults 90c Matinee 

$1.25 Evening 



men, tired out after ceaseless 
fighting, are eagerly awaking re- 
placements that will let them go 
home. Instead, orders come Gen- 
eral Stillwell that send them an 
additional five hundred miles to 
a Burmese airstrip, in an attempt 
to keep die Japanese from joining 
the German forces. 

Disregarding the company 
doctor's warming that neither the 
General nor the men are physical- 
ly fit for the mission, Merrill and 
his young lieutenant lead the 
Marauders through jungles and 
swamp, and into battles where 
they are hopelessly outnumbered, 
as well, as ill and exhausted. By 
the time they, reach the airstrip 
that is their objective it is mira- 
culous that a hundred men sur- 
vive out of the three thousand 
who made up the company ori- 
ginally. l3ut their feat of endur- 
ance is considered one of the 
turning points of the war. 

Production values throughout 
the film are excellent, with cam- 
era work and direction that 
achieve memorable effects. Indi- 
vidual soldiers are well portray- 
ed. Jeff Chandler, in this, his last 
film, looks and acts as the com- 
manding officer in such a heroic 
tale should look, so that there is 
no difficulty in believing General 
Merrill's amazing fortitude, as, 
in spite of a serious heart ailment, 
he, forces his men and himself 
across enemy-infested Burma. 

THE SPIRAL ROAD 

Estimate Agree, with 
One Exception: 

A colorful, earnest drama fol- 
lows a young man's gradual 
awakening to the error in his 
belief that he needs neither God 
nor man m his self-sufficient life. 
Ht is a brilliant Dutch doctor who 
goes to the Netherlands East 
Indies in the mid-Thirties for a 
five-year term with the Govern- 
ment Hearth Service. ( 

Initially his, motive has noth- 
ing to do with serving humanity. 
He wants to study tropical dis- 
eases at first hand under the fore- 
most authority in the field, - a 
crotchety old humanitarian who 
has given his life to medical help 
in die strange, primitive land. 
Through the young doctor's work 
with the sick under this teacher, 
the unhappiness of his faltering 
marriage and a terrifying exper- 
ience when he is tost in the jungle 
at the mercy of a vindictive witch 
doctor, he finds that scientific 
knowledge alone may conquer 
'disease, but it is not enough to 
live by. 

Rock Hudson evidences a 
strong sympathy with his role as 
the physician who almost des- 
troys himself through his driving 
ambition, his denial of God and 
his reckless rejection of all human 
relationships. Burl Ives domin- 
ates the picture as a testy, auto- 
cratic yet compassionate old doc- 
tor, remarfkable in his handling 
of the superstitious natives. 

Life in the tiny villages, in die 
grip of witchcraft and voodoo, 
is in striking contrast to the care- 
free, sophisticated country club 
existence of colonial officials in 
Batavia. The supporting cast is 
able and effective. 




Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 

Thursday, August 23, 1,962 
Page 3-B 



Cadet Eugene K. Wilson III 
FORT BRAGG, N.C. — Cadet 

Eugene K. Wilson III, whose 
parents live on Route 2, Lon- 
don Bridge, Va., completed six 
weeks of training at the Reserve 
Officer Training Corps (ROTO 
summer camp at Fort Bragg, 
N.C, Aug. 3. i , 

Cadet Wilson, a 1958 graduate 
of Princess Anne High School, 
Lynnhaven, is active in the 
ROTC program at the Virginia 
Military Institute, Lexington. 

In 1801, the Marine Band 
played for the first New Year's 
reception ever held at the Pres- 
ident's House in Washington, 
and at the city's first inaugural 
parade on August 4. 



M. 



AiSSi 



dhaneli 




19th & Arctic-G A 8-7844 

"MR. ROBERTS" 
Geo. Hefgen and Joshua Loaan 

August 27 - 28 

Admission S3.W 

"CRITIC'S CHOICE" 

by IRA LEVIN 

August 23-24-29 

Admission 2.50 

"BRIGADOON" 

by LERNER and IjOEWE 

August 25 - 26 

Admission $3.50 




Wainwright Waters Beloved Palm Tree. (Boice Photo) 

WAINWRIGHT LEADS 
DOUBLE LIFE OF 
REALTOR AND ACTOR 




BEST PICTURE! " m 

Winner of 10 Academy Awards! 



BEST* 
BEST* 



BESTS£$£~ BBSTflSr* 1E3TZZZL. • w 



'«*# 



•WEST SIDE STORY" 

* « ROBE RT WI9 

—NATALIE WOOD 

RICHARD BEYMER RUSS TAMBLYN 
RITA MORENO GEORGE CHAKIRIS 

rROeSRT WISE -JEROME I 



RO68INS1 



... ERNEST LEHMAN 



naewK Nonoa SAUL CHMJN / we 
mmem LEONARD BERNSTQN 



i w •» STEPHEN S0N0HBM 



mm m ARTHUR LAURE 





Return Engagement 
— ONE WEEK — 

Sunday Aug. 26 thru Saturday, Sept. 1st 

BAYNE THEATRE 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Bob 
Wainwright is a man who leads 
two lives, a fact that surpises 
few followers of Sandpiper 
Playhouse and other local thea- 
trics. 

By day he is a highly success- 
ful Virginia Beach realtor, dash- 
ing about town showing homes, 
renting property and closing 
sales. 

Comes nighttime, however, he 
dons the greasepaint, steps be- 
fore the footlights and becomes 
an actor in the truest profession- 
al sense of the word. '*j 
Sinca Aug. 1 ha has as- 
sumed the rota of "the Cap- 
tain" in the hilarious Sand- 
piper production of "Mr. Rob- 
arts/' a part that requires a 
slight Jekyll-and-Hyde trans- 
formation. 

The Captain, a vinegar-and- 
fire character whose thoughts of 
well-being are toward his palm 
tree rather than the ship's crew, 
was a challenge to the mild man- 
nered and even-tempered Wain- 
wright but one he met head on 
and walked away with great 
praise and acclaim from critics 
and audience alike. 

26- Year Veteran 

But praise has come his way 
ever since he walked onstage 
for the first time in 1936 in the 
Norfolk Little Theatre produc- 
tion of "Three Cornered Moon," 
a start that launched h i m 
through many successful pai 
during his 14-year stint with that 
group. 



m 

Specializing in 

Superb Seafoods 

Hot and Cold Luncheon Selections 
Dinner Menu Features Gourmet Sea- 
food, Crab Imperial, Flounder Stuff- 
ed with Crabmeat, Blue Fish Aman- 
dine, Seafood Platters, etc. 1 .95 up 

Breakfast. Lunch and Dinner served in Beautiful 
Nautical Atmosphere with Panoramic Bay View 




LASKIN ROAD — VIRGINIA BEACH 



Since 1950 he has appeared 
with the Virginia Beach Little 
Theatre in such plays as "Heav- 
en Can Wait" and "See How 
They Run" and was in the 
memorable "Edward, My Son" 
with Lesley Savages' Theatre- 
Go-Round. 

Last year ha chalked up an- 
other credit to his vast exper- 
ience with a role in "Teahouse 
of the August Moon," the 
comedy production that open- 
ed the Sandpiper Playhouse 
and contributed greatly to its 
outstanding first season. 

A native of Norfolk, Wain- 
wright is married to the former 
Dorothy Leslie Parker and re- 
sides at 106-73rd St. They have 
two sons, Robert McCormick 
Wainwright Jr., 22 and Taylor 
McCormick Wainwright, 18. 



NORMANDIE 
CAFETERIA 



Fast Service 

Wide Variety 

Attractive 

Prices 



Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 



2118 ATLANTIC AVE. 



LETS TWIST 

J 

Dancing Nightly and Saturday and Sunday Afternoon 

PEPPERMINT 

BEACH CLUB 






NOW FEATURlf 



"THE DYNAMIC 



'• N 



Plus 



GENE and His TBlOf BEATS' 

15th and ATLANTIC AVE. 



»^«4^N'•^^4^"(•^'"'••^'-V»^'.V«^i/»\r/«^'7*\'^f«^'r^»^';,»^';,•«^',V»^''/#\'; 




Cadet William J. Hearring 
FORT BRAGG, N.C — Cadet 
William J. Hearring, 21, whose 
wife, Rebecca, lives on Route 3, 
Hickory, Va., completed six 
weeks of training at the Reserve 
Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 
summer camp at Fort Bragg, 
N.C. Aug. 3. 

Cadet Hearring is a 1958 grad- 
uate of Princess Anne High 
School, Lynnhaven, and a 1962 
graduate of Virginia Polytech- 
nic Institute. His mother, Mrs. 
Elva M. Beddingfield, lives in 
Pleasant Ridge. 



Children 50c all day 



1 7th & ATLANTIC AVE. 

Features: 2:00 -'5:30-9:00 

Adults 90c Matinee - $1.25 Evening 



SURREY 
CAFETERIA 

Home Cooked Meals 
Air Conditioned ' 
Ample Parking 

15th & ATLANTIC AVE. 



Donut Kitchen 



Fresh Donuts 
Made Daily 

ALL MEALS SERVED 
18th and ATLANTIC 



OCEAN REEF FISHING 

On The Party Boat "MISSY" 

LEAVES DAILY AT 8:00 A.M. 

(Regardless of number of people aboard) 

LONG CREEK MARINA 

Route 615—</ 2 Mile South of Shore Drive 

#£ HO 4-99S2 C J5*T 

Includes Bait, etc. 






CLIP COUPON WORTH 

$ 1 00 Mon, Tiles. & Wed 

Toward Fare 



^SfiHTTBfla? 



■Snack .Bar Aboard ■ 




SEAS SEAFOOD 

RESTAURANT 

Snak Bar 



Serving Breakfast 3Uf 

HO 4-9804 

Shore Drive at Lynnhaven Bridge 



# 



Ml 



■VfJMMi 



wmmm 



aaaeaai 



T 



imnmi 



it 








ie Ribbon 



. ' ■ ■ 



* 
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* 
* 

4 
* 

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ktatalM *' 



SAopp/'/if for t new washer? 

now MAYTAG 

DEPENDABILITY 

at low, Loir Prices 

QN L Y»17S°«» 




, a Maytag Highlander was picked at 
from the aaaembly line, and put into 
operation in the Maytag Product Testing Labora- 
made under typical "home 
b Maytag Highlander Auto- 
matic Waaher worked day in and day out for 
1044a houra (16,218 loads) $quoi to SO fan' 
normal horns «a*/ Service cost averaged only $2.00 
a yawl Proving again that you buy the most 
dependable washer made . . . when it's a Maytag. 



T— t^j- \i, M iu^ >fu»lml fuwuflakf 

jcaeuin vyvvo vmnn/i nanwve 

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on Topics 
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clothes, top loading 

■ Water level control for 
irwTII mm fw Mmll Wl Mil 

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Important Feature of All . . . DEPENDABILITY! 



No Money Down with Trade 
$5.00 a Month up to 1 2 Months 



Murden's Appliances 



31st AND HOLLY RD. 



GA 8-4044 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Ttiufedtv, Auogit 23 1962 



* 



county m?m 

By I. t, "WCH" 90CKBBLU JB. 



"Why 4W the foreman fira 
your* 

wa^fc. rne foreman is the 
man wt» stands around and 
wateho* others work." 

"Yea- But why did ha fira 
yeuT" 

"Ha got jealous of me. A 
•ot of the fellows thought I 
was the, foreman." 




1963 WHEAT REFERENDUM 

I dropped over to see Norman 
Beal, the County ASCS Office 
Manager the other day, and he 
had a couple of things that he 

was very anxious that I should 
tell you about. 

First of all, he wanted me to 
mention that August SO is the 
date, for the referendum on 
wheat marketing quotas for the 
1963 crop. If farmers approve 
marketing quotas by a % vote 
in the August 30th referendum, 
minimum price support would 
be at a national average of $1.82 
per bushel, with a 55 million 
acre national wheat allotment. 
If farmers disapprove marketing 
quotas support would be a na- 
tional average of $1.21 ' per 
bushel for those who stay in the 
acreage allotments with no sup- 
port for non-cooperators. 

1963 ACP Signup 

Beal also said that quite a few 
fanners has signed up for cov- 
er crops, lime and pasture, dur- 
ing the recent sign up period. 
However, he feels that there are 
a lot more farms that need 
cover crops for the winter, and 
that the owners have neglected 
to sign for some reason or an- 
other. 

So, they will still take appli- 
cations for a few more days on 
those farms that have not signed 
up now. 

Anybody wondering about 
ditching and farm ponds, would 
just like to point out that this 
sign up period will be latter in 
the fall, probably in October. 

Grain ' Storage & Bins 

Beal is all excited about the 
4% loan that he can get through 
his office on storage bins. He 
says that loans may be made up 
to 95% of the bin cost in some 
cases; 80% in others. Looks to 
me like this is a pretty good 
possibility for you folks to get 
started with some real good 
storage facilities on your own 
farm. 



■ 




Take A 

Closer Look 

At Your Investments 

Uncertain world conditions and inflation make 
It the better part of wisdom to review your in- 
vestments periodically. Unless you can afford 
to take a chance, speculative securities can be- 
come unusually hazardous. 

Today, more people than ever before ere turn- 
ing to an insured savings account. Attractive 
earnings and ready availability make U a life- 
line to security. 



1 



VIRGINIA BEACH FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

210 • 25th Street Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Pnene GA8-?331 



KILL MORNING GLORIES 
IN CORN NOW 

Mr. Irvin McClanan called last 
week wanting some recommen- 
dations on killing Morning 
Glories in corn fields by spray- 
ing with an airplane. I fixed him 
up with the recommendations 
and he is now in the Morning 
Glory killing business. Already, 
Norris Shirley, on Holland 
Swamp Road, has had 100 acres 
of corns sprayed 

lite material is 1 pint of 2, 
4-D per acre, and it takes about 
3 days to get the killing job 
completed. 



large margin by C. A- Kutchina, 
in, at Praakhn, Va. The Hamp- 
shire bower, exhibited by Mr, 
Kutchina, displayed a loin area 
of 6,6 square inches and a 16.4 
pound ham. These 2 cuts axe 
counted for 39.61% of the car- 
cass. Certainly this is the type 
of meat-type hogs we are all 
very proud, as well as being the 
type that we need many more 
of. 

The Grand Champion Single 
was a tremendous 180 lb. Poland 
China gilt, shown by Ben Ivey, 
and purchased by Gwaltney, mc 
for $2,50 per pound. 

The Grand Champion pen of 
three was shown by Charles 
Drewrey, was purchased by 
Smithfield Packing Co., for 95c 
per pound. 

The Grand Champion pen of 
ten, was shown by John Barlow, 
purchased by Smithfield Pack- 
ing Co., for 38c per lb. 

A really tremendous and out- 
standing market hog show and 
sale. 



MARKET HOB SHOW A SALE 
The third Annual Virginia 
Market Hog Show and Sale, held 
at Courtland on August 8 and 
8th, was certainly considered by 
everyone in attendance to be a 
tremendous success. The great- 
est downfall, as I saw it when I 
was there, was that the crowd 
observing the event was too 
small. It was estimated that the 
total attendance numbered ap- 
proximately 550. 

Franklin Chamber of Com- 
merce was the sponsoring or- 
ganisation with H. P. Beale Ie 
Son, Meat Packers at Courtland, 
the cooperating packer on 
slaughtering the hoof carcass 
contest animals. 
This contest was won by a 



GUERNSEY COW MAKES 
HIGH R6CVORD 

A Registered Guernsey Cow, 
Bayville Royal Susan, owned by 
Bayville Farms, Inc., has com- 
pleted an official DHIR produc- 
tion record according to the 
American Guernsey Cattle Club. 

This record was 13,740 lbs. of 
milk and 641 lbs.' of fat. Susan 
is a ^year-old, and was milked 
2 times daily for 305 days while 
on the teat. 

This official production rec- 
ord was supervised by Mr. Elvin 
Flint, DHIA Supervisor ot the 
Southampton - Princess Anne 
DHIA Association. 
HEPTACHLOR AGAIN 
RECOMMENDED TO 
CONTROL ALFALFA WEEVIL 

Heptachlor is being recom- 
mended again this fall by VPI 
to control the. Alfalfa weevil. 

In a joint announcement with 



*tfie State Department ef Agri- 
( culture» VPI pointed out some 
changes ie recommendations 
from last year. , H \ 

Tests have shown that tem- 
peratures as governed by eleva- 
tion play an important rote in 
'.ne weevil's behavior, so# that 
Mming of the application is in- 
fluenced by elevation. 

According to continued ex- 
hausted testing, it has been de- 
termined that from November 
I to Nov. 15 is the best Ume to 
apply heptachlor or heptachlor 
f *»rtili7er irnv+ures to alfalfa 
here in our area. 

Scientists also say not to 
make more than one fall treat- 
ment per season. Of course, you 
should know that you should not 
pasture your animals on the 
fertilized heptachlor fields, un- 
til after the first cutting the 
following spring. 

In addition to a , 214% granu- 
lated heptachlor the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, acting 
on VPI's recommendations, re- 
leased six heptachlor fertilizer 
mixtures for use in weevil con- 
trol. The four medium analysis 
fertilizers with two pounds of 
heptachlor per ton and a recom- 
mendprl application rate of 800 
to 1,000 poundsTper acre are 0- 
0-27, 0-10-20, (M4-14, and 2-12- 
12. Also releaseTl were 0-18-36 
and 0-25-25, two high analysis 
graded with four pounds of 
heptachlor per ton and a rec- 
ommended application rate of 
400 to 500 pounds per acre. 

Farmers who do not use hep- 
tachlor this fall will have to re- 
sort to spring sprays of rnala- 
thion or methoxychlor, which 
may have to be applied more 
than once. 

Weevil control has been a 
"must" for farmers who grow 
alfalfa in Princess Anne Coun- 
ty, and we must continue to be 
on the extreme watch out for 
this weevil 'and to control him as 
recommended. • 



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FRIDAY * 
SATURDAY 



AUG. 24 & 




For The Ladies: 

DRESSES - Ree. $10.98-$39.98 - $5 -THE FAMOUS T imrSS. ?? St^Portemouth 
SWEATERS - Reg. $3.98 - $1.99 - W. T. GRANT CO,, W, Indian River, Downtown, Norfolk; 

MINK STOLE -Reg. $375 - $299 - GREAN'S FURRIERS, 1 B StePhS! NrftfT '* 

85H&J!S ,MPS ~ Re «' $8 " ~ $6 » 7 ~ HOFHEIMER'S, 10 SlwX??o, 

PENDANT, CHAIN - Reg. $3.95 _ $2.25 - LENOX JEWELERsT 523 Gr^nbv S,r«t N«rf„n, 

. lElSfWk* 8 ~ Reg - $65 ° - $499 ~ LOWENTHAL FURRIEM, 120 W £2 sflffif 
COATS -Reg. $29.95 - $19.95 - RALEIGH SHOP, 1911 ColleyAww. NoST 
LEATHER JACKET - Reg. $35 - $22 - SIDNEY'S, 1 19 W. Freem™ ' NorWk 
CASHMERE COATS - Mink Trimmed _ $99 - SMITH & WELTOWS, viSSL, Dowme** 

Norfolk; Portsmouth; Virginia Peach 
SUMMER JEWELRY - Reg. 47c _ 37c - F. W. WOOLWORTH CO., Norfolk and Porttmouth 

For The Men: 

SHOES — Reg. $10.95 — $7.77 — FLEMING'S SHOE STORE, 139 Church Street Norfolfc 
BAIT BUCKET, COVER-Reg. $3.99-$1.49-GOLDEN FURNITURE, 157ft O^ewAve Norf. 
TOPCOATS - Reg. $49.95 - $37.99 - HOWARD CLOTHES, 265 Granby^, Sfofc 
SHIRTS - Reg. $3.98 - $2.99 - NATIONAL SHIRT SHOP, 335 GranbVsW NorfX 
RAINCOATS - Reg. $ 1 4.98 - $8 - RICE'S, Norfolk * ' * 

SUITS — Reg. $89.50 — $73.10 — SHULMAN & CO., Granby at Taiwell, Norfolk 

For The Children; 

^ N E R ^ CK F "I Reg $6 ' 98 - $333 - IRW,NS PHARMACIES,' Norfolk and Portsmouth 
I5?„ U . SERS ~ Re ?' $l595 - $, °- 90 - LO" 18 * LEITNER, 509 High Street, P^nZST^ 
CRIB MATTRESS - Reg. $10.95 - $5.95 - LINCOLN FURNITURE, 16MB . B ambC, N«£ 
SPORT SHIRTS - Reg. $ 1 .98 - $1.33 - 1*. PENNEY CO., 245 MonfeHo AvewHwS 

Southern, Norfolk; Midcity, Portsmouth 
SPORT SHIRTS - Reg. $ 1 .99-$2.99 - $«67 - L. SNYDER'S, City Hall Avenue, Norfolk 

For The Family: 

MARGARINE— Reg. 2 lbs. 39c — 15e lb. — BE-LO SUPER MARKETS, Norfolk and Portsmouth 
CANVAS SHOES- Values to $2.99 - $1 - BUTLER'S, 310 Granby Street, Norfolk 
!FA^ E * A ~ Reg " $1195 ~ $4 * 95 ~ CAMERAS & HOBBIES - Mikity Shopping Center, Porta, 
MOVIE CAMERA - Reg. 124.50 - $97.50 Z CAMPBELLS CAMERA CBfffifc H7Ci52j? 

TRANSISTOR RADIO BATTERY Reg. 49c 24c~CQASTAkTV, 3409 Chesapeake Blvd^Norf. 
WATCH BANDS — Reg. $5.95 — $3.95 — COOPERS, 327 High Street, Portsmouth 
CAMERA KIT — Reg. $18 — $12 — HECHTS JEWELERS, 543 High Street, Portsmouth 
BATH TOWELS - Reg. 59c - 44c - LEGGETTS DEPT. STORE, 221 High Street, Portsmouth 
BLANKET — Reg. $6.95 — $3.88 — D. LEVITIN & SON, 755 Church Street, Norfolk 
MOVIE CAMERA - Reg. $29.95 - $17.95 - MACON'S CAMERA W>P, 214 Granby Si, Nori 
PIANO — Reg. $420 — $280 — MOZART MUSIC CORP, 123 Grant* Street, Norfolk 
STATIONERY — Reg. $2.78 — $2.19 — TERRIES, 125 W. Freemason St., Norfolk 

For The Home: 

CAN OPENER — Reg. $24.95 — $12.50 — ALADDIN TV & APPLIANCE, 153 W, Oqean V5e% , 

Avenue, Norfolk 
LINOLEUM RUG — Reg. $6.98 — $3.98 — ALLAN FURNITURE CO., 726 High %, Portsmouth 
PLASTIC DRAPES — Reg. 98c — 67c — GIANT FOOD STORES, INC., Janaf, Norfolk 
TRASH BURNER — Reg. $1.5$L— 49c — GOODYEAR SERVICE STORE, 1629 High St., Ports. 
CHAISE LOUNGES - Reg. $12.95 - $6.77 - HIGH PQ1NT FACTORY OUTLET. 828 E. pttfe 

Creek Rd., Norfolk 
HOUSE PAINT — Reg. $5.95 — $3.98 — HOBBS HARDWARE C0. 4 Southern Shopping Cen„ Norf. 
VACUUM — Reg. $79.95 — $28.88 — JACKSON'S SEW & VAC STORES, Granby at 31st, Norf, 
PORTABLE TV — Reg. $139.95 — $119 — MONTGOMERY WARD, Town & Country, Forts. 
PILLOW— Reg. $3.95 — $1.28 — MORRIS COMPANY, Portsmouth 

REFRIGERATORS — Reg $89.50 — $69.50 — A. ROBBINS FURNITURE, 600 Church a, Norf. 
TOILET SEAT — Reg $3.95 - $2.66 - ROBERTSON HARDWARE CQ., 700 Crawford St, Ports. 
CAN OPENER — Reg. $14.95 - $8.88 - ROGER'S JEWELRY CO., 219 Granby Street, Norfolk 
HOUSE PAINT — Reg $6 35 gal. - 3.96 gal. — STAR HARDWARE, Jatnf, Norfolk 
ICE CUBE TRAY - Holds 12 Cubes - 49c - WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY Siutfcern Shop. Ces^ 

Norfolk 
GARBAGE CAN - Reg. $3 — $1.19 - H. B. WILKINS, 1213 WashJA$ta« $t, FoftsmffA 

Automotive: * 

RENAULT DAUPH1NE — Reg. $1435 — 2000 Miles Oas Free, $95 down — EASTERN AUTO* 

11th & Granby Street 
TIRE —(Plus Tax and Recappable Tire) — $12,67 — GENERAL T1RI QF NORFOLK — 10th $L 

Granby, Norfolk 
1959 FORD — Reg. $ 1 395 — $1245 - MID CITY MOTOR CQ^ I6tb & Gr«*y Street!, NorfA 
NEW VALIANT - Reg. $2 1 22 .45 - $1776 - MID TOWN MOTOR* lift- A Metrtieette, Norfolk 
MOTORCYCLE - Reg $1195 -^ $1000 - ryORFQI* MOTORCYCLE, 739 G^by Street, Norf. 
1961 DODGE DART - Reg. $24 10 - $1962 — TIDEWATER DODGE, 2 1st St. Iteateo, Norfolk 



f* 



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\ 

Vfcginlt Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 
Ptge 6-B 



. a ?,.. Ja* -a W Ta .At 



1W CMWESt CANTONESE or AMERICAN at 

Mwntur. Dlnti'i ftifft 

mm • Dinners • Parties • lonqwets 
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 



UL 5-6761 



Military Highway-**. 13 

Between lansdale Traffic 

Circle and Va. Beach Blvd. 

Open 10:30 A.M. 

10:30 P.M. 



now. 



• • 



TWO 



I 




Mutual Federal offices 



L 




serving the 
Virginia Beach 
Princess Anne 




PRINCESS ANNE -94 15 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH -3201 PACIFIC AVENUE 




The MIXING BOWL . . . 

IT'S 3U TO COOK 



By LUCILE CLARK 

8UN-NBTWS FOOD EDITOR 

Par the very latest In food fads end fables , . . for 
practical, down-to-earth recipes that pleat* both 
palate and pocketbook, read the "Mixing fiowl" by 
Lucille Clark each Thursday in the Sun-News. 




Question: Whether or not to 
turn on the oven for dinner 
preparation on hot summer 

days. Yet, there must be a nu- 
tritional meal with necessary 
meat power when the hungry 
family gets home for dinner. 
Solution: A fully cooked picnic 
roast that may be sliced and 
served cold without further 
cooking. With your kitchen kept 
cool during meal preparation 
you will be kept cool, also. 

Fully cooked meats are a 
blessing to summer meal Pi- 
ning. They are ready to slice 
and serve as soon as the wrap- 
per is removed. One of the more 
economical roasts that may be 
purchased fully cooked, a picnic, 
is a blessing to the budget, too. 
The picnic is a pork shoulder 
roast that has been cured and 
smoked to give the same flavor 
goodness as that of ham. And, 
as with a fully cooked style ham, 
the picnic may be heated 
through, should the weather 
turn cool, either as a whole 
picnic or in slices. Or, you can 
purchase a cook-before-eating 
style to be baked to an internal 
temperature of 170°F. Either 
style will be a pleasure to serve 
when you select the brand bear- 
ing the two most trusted words 
in meat. 

Martha Logan of meat head- 
quarters suggests a guide to fol- 
low when purchasing the size 
picnic for your needs. One-half 
pound per serving allows fine 
slices for dinner and extra for 
second-day casseroles tor sand- 
wich fillings. 

Plums 'n' peaches are a re- 
freshing and colorful garnish 
for your summer picnic platter. 
The plums are stuffed with 
toasted pecans and cream cheese 
and then placed on peach 
halves to surround the picnic 



that locks in the picnic's smoked 
delectable flavor, while enroute 
to your store. You'll find picnics 
under several leading meat 
brands because many top meat 
companies are taking advantage 
of the plastic packaging to hold 
picnic flavor at its peak. You 
can't beat the picnic for a ten- 
der yet inexpensive meal, and 
you can't beat these north-south 
glazes for extra flavor. 

First, let's go north for a New 
England • style roasted smoked 
picnic- that's guaranteed one of 
the best roast pork meals you've 
ever served. 



Mrs. Bush Gets 
Science Degree 



Clear Consomme 
Picnic Plums 'n Peaches 
Tossed Vegetable Salad 

Italian Bread Sticks 
Banana Split Ice Cream Pie 
Iced Coffee or Tea 
PICNIC, PLUMS 'N PEACHES 

Yield: 8 peach halves. 
Fully Cooked Picnic 
. 8 fresh or canned plums 
3 ounce package cream 

cheese 
1 tablespoon milk 
16 pecan halves, toasted 
8 fresh or canned peach 
- halves 

Remove pit from plums. Soft- 
en cream cheese and blend in 
milk. Stuff each plum with 2 
pecan halves ands ome of the 
cream cheese mixture. Place a 
stuffed plum in hollow of each 
peach half. Arrange around hot 
or cold picnic shoulder roast. 





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PICNIC-LIMA SUPPER 

Yield: 4 to 6 servings 
2 cups cubed fully cooked 
picnic 

1 onion, peeled and sliced 

2 cans (1 lb. each) tomatoes 
10 ounce package frozen lima 

beans 
1 cup uncooked macaroni 

1 teaspoon pepper 
1/8 teaspoon pepper 

2 bay leaves 

1 teaspoon Worcestershire 
sauce 

Combine all ingredients in a 
skillet. Cover and cook over 
medium heat for about 30 min- 
utes, stirring occasionally. Serve 
hot. 

From the tip of Maine to the 
toe of Florida, housewives who 
want really top-tasting and in- 
expensive meals are singing the 
praises of the smoked picnic. 
Reason: it has an almost-ham 
flavor but a lower-than-ham 
price. Add to this a culinary 
twist in the form of Old New 
England and Deep South glazes 
and the picnic takes on all the 
glamour of a husky-voiced con- 
tralto. 

Up New England way, the 
picnic glaze includes the tradi- 
tionally northern flavor of apple 
butter and cider, a glaze that 
brings out the picnic's hearty, 
heafty flavor with gusto. Down 
south, the twist is a peanut 
glaze . . . smoky, delectable and 
easy to prepare.- The net result 
is that young housewives' up and 
down the coast are claiming that 
these glazes, and picnics, are the 
most delicious easy-on-the- 
budget meals yet. Picnics are 
actually smoked pork shoulder, 
tender and flavorful. Many are 
now available in a see-through, 
plastic, flavor-holding package 



HARVEST PICNIC ROAST 

1 4-5 lb. Smoked Picnic 
Glaze: 

Vz cup apple butter 
Vs cup cider 
1 tsp. mace 
Almond slivers 

* Place roast fat side up on 
rack in roasting pan— insert 
meat thermometer into center of 
thickest muscle. Roast uncov- 
ered at 325,°F. to internal tem- 
perature of 170°F. or about 45 
minutes per pound. Pour off 
drippings. Remove all skin. 
Score picnic and cover with 
glaze and almonds. Then bake at 
400° F. 15-20 minutes to form* a 
brown coating. Picnics will 
carve more easily if allowed to 
rest 15 minutes before serving. 



Mutual Federal 
Promotes Two 

NORFOLK — Mutual Federal 
Savings and Loan Association of 
Norfolk has announced the pro- 
motion of William H. Meissel 
and J. A. Gi Parrish to posts as 
Assistant Vice Presidents. Both 
were former Assistant Secre- 
taries of the firm. Robert P. 
Johnson has been promoted to 
an assistant secretary. He is 
manager of Mutual Federal's 
new Princess Anne office. 

Meissel joined the Mutual Fed- 
eral staff in 1949. *He has served 
as the association's public rela- 
tions officer and held responsi- 
bilities in the area of internal 
operations. Meissel is a native 
of Washington, D.C. and Treas- 
urer of St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Church. He is a past president 
of The Tidewater Chapter of 
American Savings and Loan 
Institute and secretary of Tide- 
water Group, Virginia Savings 
and Loan League. 

Mr. Parrish is in charge of 
mortgage loan processing for 
Mutual. He has been active in 
the affairs of the Norfolk Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, having 
most recently served that organi- 
zation as first vice president. 
Currently he is serving oh the 
Board of Givernors of the Tide- 
water Chapter, American Sav- 
ings and Loan Institute. Parrish 
joined the Mutual Federal staff 
in 1954. 

Robert P. Johnson, a native 
of Norfolk attended Maury High 
School and the Norfolk College 
of William and Mary. Johnson, 
joined Mutual Federal in Febru- 
ary 1961 after serving in the 
U.S. Coast Guard.* 

All three promotions became 
effective July 25th. 



MRS. AMY HELMER BUSH 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Mrs. 
Amy Helmer Bush received her 
bachelor of science degree in 
psychology Saturday from the 
College of William and Mary in 
Williamsburg at th| Phi Beta 
Kappa Hall. 

She is the daughter of Vir- 
ginia Beach High School Prin- 
cipal and Mrs. James M. Helmer 
of 611-21st Street and a graduate 
of Suffolk High School. 

Mrs. Bush, who completed the 
course in three years, was a 
Dean's List student and member 
of the Psi Chi honorary fratern- 
ity in psychology. 

She has. accepted a position 
with the Princess Anne County 
School system, and will teach the 
6th grade at King's Grant Ele- 
mentary School this fall. 




WHY? 

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color. 

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i 'I 



An Analytical Leek At 

Retailing & Distribution 

By GEORGE L. COPPER 
V: iea* Distributive Education Coordinator 



FACING THE CHALLENGE 
OF TODAY AND TOMORROW 

This week's column will be 
devoted to a speech made by 
Dr. John W. Wingate, professor 
of business administration, The 
City University of New York. A 
distinguished author and lectur- 
er on distribution, Dr. Wingate 
recently addressed the annual 
DE Coordinator's Conference. 
Developments Listed 

Since the end of World War 
II, only 17 years ago, retailing 
haa advanced beyond the realm 
of I comprehension. Some ' of 
thdkev developments are: 

t. Great planned shopping 
centers, dominated by depart- 
ment store branches who ac- 
count for 20% of the country's 
retail trade. 

2. .» Discount houses every- 
where, selling at markups of 
20% to 25%, and doing as much 
business as all the limited price 
variety stores combined. 

3, scrambled merchandising, 
the* pattern of today, each store 
offering ene-stop shopping to 




the customer. 

V 4. A scarcity of salespeople, 
in many oaset none at all. They 
have been replaced by stock 
clerks and the beginnings of au- 
tomation. 

5. Stores open almost around 
the clock: five to six nights a 
week and often on Sunday. 

6. A proliferation of brand 
names, many of them private, 
all trying for consumer patron- 
age. 

7. Leasing of major merchan- 
dise lines accepted as a legiti- 
mate method of expansion. 

8. Mergers and combination 
rampant, with larger chains 
busily acquiring smaller chains 
and independents. 

9. New flexfcle credit plans, 
providing for the prompt payer 
on open account and no carry- 
ing charge, and for the con- 
sumer who wishes to pay over 
a period of time, a revolving 
credit plan with a carrying 
charge. 

10. Automation is on every- 
one's lips. While it has nbt yet 



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GVa your kitchen NEW beauty with this 
modem range mat LOOKS like a buiWn 
...but Isn't It simply slides into piece... 
ftta flush between kitchen cabinets . , . 
can also be used as free-standing ranee. 

ASK ABOUT REE IAS SERVICE WmUATIOfl 
LMTED THE ONLY 



SUBURBAN 

RULANE 

GAS SERVICE 

3208 Gee. Washington 

Highway • Portsmouth 

Dial 393-4071 



made a major impact on retail- 
ing, models to provide automa- 
tic merchandise assembly and 
cashiering have already been 
developed, and the time for ©p- 
eration may soon, be ripe. 

Whet does alf this have te 
do with Virginia Beech mer. 
chants? It has a greet deal te 
do with the Beach merchant*. 
It if an accepted fact that 
people from Virginia Beech gg 
other places te shop. Why? 
The independent stores have 
advantages that the chains and 
other store groups often over- 
look. The modern consumer is 
rapidly changing; retailing is 
rapidly changing; every mer- 
chant must appraise his own 
situation; HE TOO MUST 
CHANGE. 

Some of the topics to be dis- 
cussed in subsequent editions 
are "The New Consumer," "Op- 
portunities for the Smaller In- 
dependent Merchant," "Solu- 
tions for the Independent," and 
others. 



• LEGAL NOTICES 




Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the County of Prin- 
cess Anne, on the 21st day of 
August, 1962. 
Alice Anne Austin Loomis, 

against Plaintiff 

Richard H. Loomis, Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit if te 
obtaiwa final divorce decree A 
Vinculo Matrimonii. 

And tn affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: VA 42, 
Naval Air Station, Oceana, Vir- 
ginia. 

It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk- 
By: Mary M. White, D.CX 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
1900 Laskin Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. , 8-23-4* 

— j- 1 ft *-" 



• LfOAL NOTICES 



obtain a divorce A Vinculo Ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 
ant, upon the grounds of three 
gar separation Under * Section 
1 (0) of 'the Code of Virginia* 



year 

ss 



And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
itate of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 8190 
Crow Canyon Road, Haywood, 
California. 

It is ordered that she do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect her interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
1415 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-24t 

JL 



NOTICE OF AUCTION 

NOTICE is hereby given that 
at 10:00 a.m. cm September 10, 
1962, at Everett-Jordan Motor 
Co., 516 17th Street, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, we shall offer 
for sale at public auction one 
1957 Ford automobile, D7EW- 
297302,* with accessories, regis- 
tered in the name of Norma Lee 
Lawrence. Terms: cash at time 
of sale. The undersigned com- 
pany reserves the right to bid. 
EVERETT JORDAN MOTOR CO. 
Drewry & Evans, Attorneys 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-23-lt 



ommon wealth of. Virginia, In 
tho Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the' County of 
Princess Anne, on the 14th day 
of August, 1962. 
Barbara Buchanan Fritz, 

against Plaintiff 

Robert E. Fritz, Defendant \ 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo ma- 
trimonii from the said defend- 
ant, upon the grounds of con- 
duct tantamount to desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: Box 
15, Oldtown, Kentucky. 

It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
,after due publication hereof, 
And do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
Drewry and^rans, p.q. 
3007 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-16-4t 



• LEGAL NOTICES 



not living in the State of Vir- 
ginia, and hia address is un- 
known, and whose last known 
address was Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, but who is now a non- 
resident of the State of Vir- 
ginia, he is hereby ORDERED 
to appear within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect bis interest 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be published once a 
week for four (4) consecutive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun-News, a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Virginia 
Beach and Princess Anne Coun- 
ty, Virginia. 
A Copy — Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 

By: R. H. West, D 
BURLAGE AND DEC 
L. Charles Burlage, p. 
309 Board of'Trade Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 8-164t 



HELP WANTS) 
Male - Female 



$3.00 or more per hour can be 
yours. Local Watkins Products 
route available. Set your own 
hours. We train. Rush name 
and address for PERSONAL 
INTERVIEW to RURAL MAN- 
AGER, P.O. Box 5071, Rich 
mond 20, Virginia. 8-23-3t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 17th day 
of August, 1962. 
ELIA M. GILL, Plaintiff 

against " 
JOHN F. GILL, Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
thoro from the. said defendant, 
upon the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
mads and filed that the .defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 457 Cen- 
tral Avejuie, Cedarhurtt, I.I., 
New Yog! 

* It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after di^e publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect hjs interest in this 
suit, 

A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, DC. 
Alan S. Mirman, p.q. 
Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 8-23-4t 



Summer job about over? Look- 
ing for a year round position? 
High earnings— many extras. 
For interview, write Mr. C, 
P.O. Box No. 5071, Richmond, 
Virginia. 8-23-3t 



Assistant cook, kitchen maid 

and orderlies. Apply Virginia 

- Beach Hospital. 5-11-tfn 



High school sitter, 4 days per 
week, after school to 5 p.m. 
LaYrrel Manor area. Phone 
4284954. 8-16-2t 



• Automobile For Silo 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 16th day 
of August, 1962. 
MARIE ROTTACH, Plaintiff 

against 
GEORGE ROTTACH, Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo Ma- 
trimonii from the said Defend- 
ant, upon the grounds of three 
years separation. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 536 Knick- 
er Back Avenue, Brooklyn, New 
Work. ~ 

It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest ' in this 
suit. 
A Copy— Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. Whjte.Jfr.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
1900 Professional Bldg 
Laskin Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-23-4t 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, en the 86th 
dey of July, 1962. 
Joseph E. BlackwelL Plaintiff 

against 
Dorothy Joan Blackwell, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 



Commonwealth of Virginia, In 
the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the County of 
Princess Anne, on the 10th day 
of August, 1962. • 
EDVICE VOLPIN WATTS, 

against Plaintiff 

THOMAS J. WATTS, SR., 

Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Menda et 
thoro to be later merged into a 
divorce a vinculo matrimonii 
from the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defend- 
ant is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: U.S.S. 
Wrangell (AE 12) % Fleet Post 
Office, New York, New York. 
It is ordered that he do ap- 
pear here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be necessary 
to protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy— Teste: 
J0HN 4 V FENTRESS, Clerk 
By: Mary M. White, D.C. 
Brydges & Broyles, p.q. 
3115 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Va. 8-16-4t 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 23, 1962 



Pago 7-B 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



• FEMALE HELP WANTED 



A- 



Teiephone contact ladies. We 
now have openings for 2 
ladies ages 21-65 to do tele* 
phone contact work from our 
local office at 303-30th St. 
Must have pleasing voice, 
willingness to work 4 hours a 
day and a guaranteed hourly 
wage. Hours can be arranged 
to suit your free time. 5-day 
week. Call 428-5255, 9 a.m. 
to 12 for appointment for 
personal interview. 8-23-lt 



Drug and fountain help, per- 
manent work, apply in person. 
Barr's Pharmacy, 17th and 
Atlantic Avenue. 8-9-tfn 



Clubs, organizations and individ- 
uals sell America's finest as- 
sortment of Christmas and All 
Occasion cards, gifts, candy, 
novelties, personalized cards. 
Easy money, $50 to $100 or 
more selling 21 for $1. Profits 
up to 60c per box. Dial EX 7- 
7251, write or apply for 
samples on approval. Shirley 
Greeting Cards, 206 County 
street, Dept. VB, Portsmouth, 
Virginia. 8-23-lt 



i 

M i i m i i r i w H h et h i ill ..a j w e i it.." m i ' ■ Mi "*-* " 1 

• FOR SALI OR RENT 



TV rentals at Hirtz TV, London 
Bridge, open 9-9. Phone 340- 
8888. Also reconditioned TV's 
for sale. Rentals to purchase 
terms. 7-20-tfn 



• HOUSEHOLD GOODS 



Real bargains in newly uphol- 
stered furniture. Chairs, sofas, 
loveseats and antiques. Hill- 
top Upholstering Company, 
17th Street Extended, Vir- 
ginia Beach, phone 428-1797. 

8-9-tfn 



Limed Oak bedroom set. 
Bleached Mahogany dining 
room set. Call 340-8899. 

8-23-lt 



Reed bottom chairs, dining 
room chairs, chests, desk, 
washstand and other house- 
hold items. CaU GA 8-5193. 

8-9-tfn 



• MISC. FOR SALE 



1958 Buick Special, light green, 
with full power, radio and 
heater, financing if desired. 
Phone GA 8-3278. 8-23-lt 



Transportation for High School 
student 40 Plymouth coupe. 
New tires, radio and heater. 
$125. Phone 428-7873. 8-16-3t 



• COTTAGES FOR RENT 



Small furnished cottage by 
month or week, $45 month, 
dose to Oceana Base. Avail- 
able immediately, service 
couple only. Call 340-8329. 

8-lgrtfn 



• APARTMENT FOR RENT 



Lovely unfurnished apartment, 
, consisting of 3 bedrooms, liv- 
ing room, huge kitchen, duct 
heat, ranch type house, yearly 
rental. Centrally located, suit- 
able for officer. Available im- 
mediately. 316-24th St. Dial 
GA 8-2578. 8-23-2t 



NURSES — Graduate, practical 
and nurses aids. Apply Super- 
intendent, Va. Beach Hospital, 
25th and Arctic Ave. 8-17-tfn 

Some people like to "just get 
by." This doesn't apply to you 
if you are one of the few that 
would like to accept the chal- 
lenge of success. I will teach 
you how to make money and 
advance. CaU 428-5259. 8-23-lt 

• FURNISHED APTS. 
FOR RENT 



Boys and girls bicycle, good 
condition, new tires, $15 each. 
Phone GA 8-6713. 8-9-tfn 

Like new, Mahogany buffet, 
will sacrifice. Call or write 
Va. Beach Sun-News. P. O. 
Box 657, GA 8-2401. H-30<tfn 



AIR CONDITIONER 

Emerson Quiet-Cool, 1 h.p., 115 
volt, 12 amp. capacity; top 
condition, reasonable. See at 
Shealy's Refrigeration Serv- 
ice, 204-22nd Street. 8-234$ 



Harley's Apts. 2#Q6 Pacific Ave. 
One and two bedroom apts., 
year-round rental. Adults. A 
lease if desired. Call GA8- 
9691. 8-16-3t 



One-bedroom, living room 
kitchen and bath, large fenced 
yard, one block from ocean 
Available September 1. Yearly 
rental. GA8-1B72. 8-23-lt 



3-rooro furnished apartment, Vk 
blocks from, beach, near Cava- 
lier Hotel. Year lease. $75 
per month including utilities 

No young children. GA 8-5168. 

8-23-2t 



One-bedroom apartment, 416- 
22nd Street, yeady. Call G\ 
8-2724. 8-23-tfn 



HOTEL HELP WANTED 



Front office, kitchen, dining 
room maids to work through 
September at least. Dolphin 
Hotel, Virginia Beach. 8-23-3t 



HOUSE FOR RENT 



3-bedroom house, furnished or 
unfurnished, by week or 
month. Corner Baltic and 
Delaware on lake. 8-23-lt 



Virginia Beach, 218-65th, 4-room 
furnished house, screened 
porch, winter or year round 
rental. GA 8-6120. 8-23-lt 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of Prin- 
cess Anne County on the 10th 
day of August, 1962. 
LESLIE B. KREGER, Plaintiff 

vs. 
J. DAVE) SCOTT, 
Address Unknown, 
Principal Defendant, 

and 
PASQUALE V. ARCESfi 
c/o Isle of Capri 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

and 
c/o,folice Department 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

Garnishees 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
subject to garnishment proceed- 
ings for the benefit of Leslie p. 
Kreger, Plaintiff, a eertain 1992 
Model Cadillac Convertible 
Coupe, wbich Cadillac haj been 
released based en the security 
posted *y the garnishees herein, 
an affidavit having been made 
that the principal defendant is 



FOR RENT — Bungalow, Vir- 
ginia Beach Blvd. at Lynp- 
haven; 2 bedrooms, furnished, 
automatic laundry. Call 341- 
3974 or 340-8300. 8-2-tfn 

♦ BUSINESS SERVICES 

Crane, bulldozer and truck rent- 
al service. Top soil, sand and 
clay fill. Douglas £. Mason 
Crane Service Company, Box 
63, London Bridge, Virginia. 
Phone 340*558. 7-5-tfn 




Established millionaires need 
not apply. But if $90-$125 per 
week interests you, call 428- 
5258. 8-23-lt 

ON5 WANTED;~to 
ee delivery. CaU larr's 
Pharmacy. 'qA 0-1211. 
• 8-15-tfn 

lUewEsS SERVIClr-Iusiness 
services. Hoover Vacuum 
Cleaner. Sales and Service. 
Prompt efficient repairs. Pick 
up and delivery. Phone GA 8- 
4222. Fuel, Feed & Building 
Supplies, Jiu;., GA M9$g. 

' 4-mfn 



«u II ■. _ , r . ' .t fj 

• FOR SAH-CLOTHING 

Mink stole, Royal pastel, with 
sleeves, perfect condition. 
$400. GA 8-2848. 8-23-lt 



FOLLY RANCH, 140017th St., 
clean, modern rooms, effici- 
encies. 1 and 2-bedroom apart- 
ments. Reasonable weekly, 
monthly, or annual rates. 

8-23-tfn 

Four rooms and bath, nicely 
furnished duplex apartment, 
on large wooded lot, 20 Carib- 
bean Avenue. Phone GA8- 
2680. 8-16-tfn 

2 bedrooms, knotty pine living 
room, modern kitchen and 
bathroom, reasonable rent, 
available immediately. Call 
JU 7-4776, mornings. If no 
answer, call after 6 p.m. 

8-23-2t 



4-room furnished apartment, 
year-round rent. 414-22nd St, 
Phone GA 8-1435. 8-28-3tj 



114 -62nd Street, winter rates, 
September - June, 3 bed- 
rooms, living room, den, din- 
ing room, open fireplace, 
well heated, attractive. Phone 
GA 8-2712, GA 8-1853. 8-16-tfn 



Four rooms and bath, nicely 
furnished duplexes, apart- 
ment, on large wooded lots, 
20 Caribbean Avenue. Phone 
GA 8-2680. 8-16-tfn 



One and two bedroom apts. 
Reasonable rent all year 
round. Call GA 8-9663 or MA 
2-1286. 8-16-tfn 



1-bedroom, kitchen privileges, 
$10 per week. 516-20th Street, 
phone GA 8-2458. 8-16-lt 



TEACHERS 

1 and 2-bedroom apartments, 
September through June, $75- 
$85 month. Call Four Gables, 
428-5127. 8-9-tfn 



POSTED SIGNS 

FOR SALE 

20c Each 

or 

$2.00 (Joz. 

THE SUN-NEWS 
3108 Pacific Ave. 



New RCA New Vista TV, $150, 
table model. New inner spring 
mattress and box springs, cost 
$70, sacrifice at $45. Oster 
electric massage pillow, $7. 
Owner leaving town. Phone 
428-5382, between 4-7 p.m. 

8-23-lt 



• LOST AND POUND 



LOST — Sunday evening, orts 
gold and pearl drop earring. 
Reward. Call Gay Vacationer 
Hotel. 8-2S-U 



LOST — 5-lb. Chihauhau male 
dog. Light brown, black streak 
down back, white ring around 
tail. Reward. No questions 
asked. Dial DeHart, 3400591. 

8-16-lt 



LOST — Eyeglasses, male site, 
prescription lense, smoked 
frames with clear bottom. 
Somewhere in vicinity V^- 
ginia Beach, London Bridge or 
Oceana. Reward. Return to 
Traylor Optical Co. 8-23-21,,. 



• FARMS FOR SALE 



Princess Anne, Back Bay. Phone 
GA 8-7109. 8-23-3t 



• FOR RENT 



SCHOOL TEACHERS 

Houses and apartments for the 
winter season. Available La- 
bor Day. Call. The Brown 
Agency, office, 428-3244; 
home, GA 8-5693 



Furnished and unfurnished 
hemes and apartments. One 
to four bedrooms. Winter or 
yearly. Anchor Realty. Call 
GA 0-7421. 9-fctfn 




Sale on new appliances, TV and 
Stereo at Hirtz Bazaar, Oce- 
ana. Open 9-9. Also used fur- 
niture, appliances and parts. 
We buy-sell-swap anything at 
Hirtz Bazaar. GA 8-7088. 

7-20-tfn 



SPECIAL BUY 

1954 CHEVROLET 
Bel -Air 

Extra clean. Radio, heater, 
etc. Must be seen and driv- 
en to be appreciated. Price 
$295. 

GA 8-2401/ between 8 a.m. 
and 5 p.m. 8-16-tfn 



ROOM FOR RENT 



Room with twin bed, excellent 
location, gentleman only. 
Kitchen privileges available. 
Call GA 8-5180, after 1 p.m. 

8-23-St 



Make your reservations and stay 
at the Beach Plaza for the 
complete winter season after 
Labor Day. Rooms available 
for weekly or monthly win- 
ter rates. Live in congenial 
friendly family atmosphere, 
School teachers, salesman, 
service personnel, civilian 
workers, etc. are welcome. 
Ocean front at 22nd St., Vir- 
ginia Beach. Dial 428-2312. 

8-16-tfn 



MALE HELP WANTED 



We have openings for two 
salesmen to, service pre-ap- 
pointed prospects. Call 428- 
5255. 8-23*lt 



Do you want a good position? 
We have one to offer a man 
who has transportation, is 
neat in appearance and is 
bondable. This position is 
above average as to position 
and income. Call 428-5257. 

8-23-lt 



• HOUSE FOR SALE 



By owner, 3-bedroom house, at- 
tached garage, 5704 Meer Rd., 
North Virginia Beach. Shown 
by appointment. Phone 428- 
3671 or 428-1211. 5-24-tfn 



• INSTRUCTION-SCHOOLS 



HARDIN SCHOOL 

Of Music 

Bristow Hardin, Director 

313 -35th Street 
Virginia Beach 



WILLIAM KILLGROVE 
Instruction in 

Piano, Organ, Accordian 

JU 7-0466 - GA 8-3202 



Repairs 

C om mercial 



Household 



Laundromat* 
Dealers for 

Appliance* 

Commercial FRIGIDAIBB 



W. C. JOHNSON 

32t - 17tn Street 
Virginia Beach 

Phone GA 8-4*71 



AUTOMOBILE DIALERS 



® 



EmRhee Motors, Inc. 

Ford, Thunderbirds, 
Itatian Fiats 

•i-l7fh St.— GA a-e231— V*. 
Bayatde. Va. HO 4-J541 



.«*#* 



OPTICIANS 



Ask Your Eye Physician About 

TRAYLOR'S 

Virginia Beach's onry 
GUILD OPTICIAN 

1803 Atlantic Atc^ Vhrtn in 

i H. McNawara, 1 

GAita laeae 



RESTAURANTS 



Charlie's 



Restaurant 



STEAK8 — CHICKEN 

ALASKA KING CRAB 

Private Dining Boom for Parties 

810 Atlantic Ave., West 
Near Lynnhaven Inlet 



RIAL ESTATE 
EXAM SCHOOL 

STATE LICENSE 

PREPARATORY COURSE 

ENROLL NOW TAUGHT 

By GRADUATE ATTORNEY 

Classes— 2 Weeks 7*9 to *45 

MON. — WED. — FRL 

COMPLETE COURSE $35 

Norfolk • Portsmouth 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

SUITE 314 

LAW BLDG. PHONE 
147 GRANBY ST. M * 2 ^ny* 
NORFOLK * *-SW7* 



ALDRIDGE & CHAMBERS, Inc. 
• Exterminators 
Phono 340*4261 



» l 



• PLUMBING . HEATING 



ADAMS BROS. 
PLUMBING CORP. 



Plumbing and Heating 

Repair service and supplied 

warm aif duct heating 
Chrysler Air Conditioning 

BUDGET TERMS AS DE93BJEB 
WE SERVICE WHAT WS SELL 

41 6-1 7th St. - GA 1-6731 
Virginia leech 






I 




* 










I 







H ♦ 

} 



V 



» '1 






4- 



I 



Virginia Beach-Princess Anne 

RESCUE SQUAD 



Listen 




WBOF 6:05 p.m. 

* 

Saturday. Aug. 25th 



n 



^\ 



T 



■S5^ ^~— 



— T^ 



^^ 




Drive With Care Over Labor Day 



r* 



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\ 




VIRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEW 




VA. 



"HOME OF AMERICA'S FIRST MAN IN SPACE" 



14PAGE5 



VOL. XXXVII. No. 35 



85 



TELEPHONE GA 8-2401 



Sept. 22 Unveiling 

Norwegian Lady 
ArrivingTuesday 
At Naval Base 

i 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Norwegian Cadet Ship Haakon VH 
will fulfill a unique service when she berths Tuesday at the Naval 
Station in Norfolk. Aboard the Haakon VII is a nine-foot bronze 
statue, "The Norwegian Lady," a gift from the City of Moss, 
Norway, to The City of Virginia Beach. 

The work of Norway's foremost sculptor, Ornulf Bast, "The 
Lady" is a replacement for a — — 

Elks Lodge Has 
New Members 




VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1962 



CLASSIFIED ADS PAY 



SINGLE COPY: 5c BY MAIL $3.50 PER YEA*. 



■> — ■ 



ISeason Will 
Slacken After 



All Aboard, Legionnaires 



! 



v 



a replacement for a 
Norwegian Pine figurehead that 
washed ashore at Virginia Beach 
after the 1891 sinking of the 
Norwegian barque "The Dicta- 
tor" out of Moss, Norway. 

The seafaring Norwegian 
Lady stood as a landmark for 
many years on the Virginia 
Beach oceanfront, a memorial 
to the tragic wreck which took 
the lives of the Captain's wife, 
infant son and all but a few of 
her crewmen. In 1953 the figure- 
head was so deteriorated by the 
elements that it was taken down 
and eventually disentegrated in 
storage. 

With its removal, the Nor- 
wegian Lady might have 
passed into the limbo of most 
legends had not a Norwegian 
Shipping Magazine carried an 
article which activiated her 
replacement by the people of 
Moss. 

The legend will be perpetu- 
ated in late September with the 
unveiling of the new bronze 

ELKS INVITED 
Members of the Virginia 
Beach Elks Lodge No. 2268 
are urged to join a motorcade 
from Virginia Beach Tuesday 
morning that will travel to 
the Norfolk Naval Base for 
the arrival ceremony of the 
"Norwegian Lady" statue. 

Exalted Ruler Robert L. 
Simpson has asked all Elks 
who can attend to gather at 
the Virginia Beach City Hall 
at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. The 
motorcade will leave from 
City Hall so that the party 
may arrive at Pier 7 in Nor- 
folk no later than 9:30 a.m., 

statue which will overlook the 
sea at 25th Street. A memorial 
park 150 feet by 110 feet is 
being prepared as a site for the 
statue. 

Welcoming Ceremony 

The arrival tff the Haakon 
VII and the statue will be 
saluted with a brief welcoming 
ceremony when the ship docks 
at Pier 7 of the Naval Station 
Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. The 
statue and a 6,600-lb grey gran- 
ite pedestal will be hoisted 
ashore during the ceremony to 
be carried to storage until the 
memorial park is readied. 

The public is invited to watch 
the Haakon VII arrive and to 
attend the welcoming, cere- 
monies after which visitors will 
be permitted aboard the Haakon 
until noon. 

Aboard the Haakon, under 
the command of Captain Knut 
Larsen, are 94 midshipmen, 14 
trainees, 10 officers, 15 chief 
petty officers and 66 enlisted 
men. The Haakon VII is named 
after Norway's King Haakon 
VII, who preceded the present 
King Clav. 

The training cruise originated 
July 31st at Horten with port 
calls at the Shetland Islands and 
Bermuda. While she is berthed 
at the Naval Station in Norfolk, 
members of the crew will be ex- 
tended a program of entertain- 
ment by the City of Virginia 
Beach which will include tours 
in the area and a day at Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

ORCHESTRA AT CLUB- 
VIRGINIA BEACH — Claude 
Thornhill and his orchestra will 
open at the Cavalier and Cabana 
Club, Labor Day and will ap- 
pear nightly through Sept. 23. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Four- 
teen new members were in- 
ducted into the Virginia Beech 
Elks Lodge No. 2268 at the 
first regular meeting of the 
lodge held Tuesday night in 
the Alan B. Shepard Conven- 
tion Center. 

• 

The initiation was conduct- 
ed by the officers of Ports- 
mouth Lodge 82 of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Inducted Tuesday night 
were Fred A. Haycox, Wil- 
liam H. Brown, R. Lee Bonney, 
James P. Coates, Paul M. 
Gaskill, H. E. Hogge, Floyd E. 
Kellam, Jr., William P. Kel- 
lem, John W. McCombs, 
Charles S. Mason, A. F. 
Nicholson, Jr. and Herbert L. 
Smith III. 

It was announced, that the 
next meeting of the lodge 
would be held on Tuesdey, 
September 11, at the Sir Wal- 
ter Hotel. The lodge meeting 
is scheduled for 8 p.m., but it 
was pointed out that the fa- 
cilities of the Sir Walter 
would, be open starting at 
3 p.m. for the Elks. 

Gulverhouse 
To West Coast 
For Demo Meet 

VIRGINIA BEACH — E. A. 
"Sonny" Culverhouse, national 
committeeman for the Young 
Democrats of Virginia, will rep- 
resent the state group at a 
meeting of the National Com- 
mittee in Seattle, Wash., Aug. 
31-Sept. 2 ; 

He will leave today from the 
Norfolk Municipal Airport. 
While there he will attend 
"Young Democrats Day" at the 
Seattle World's Fair and take 
part in discussions on the 1962 
Congressional campaign. 

Culverhouse is president of 
the Virginia Beach - Princess 
Anne Young Democrats and was 
elected to the state post in 
March for a 2-year term. 

BRIDGE WINNERS 
ARE ANNOUNCED 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Winners" 
for the weekly. Virginia Beach 
Duplicate Bridge Club have 
been announced. 

, They were: a tie for first 
place, north-south, between Mrs. 
Marge Bastian and Harry Pin- 
cus and Mrs. H. M. Marshall and 
Mrs. G. G. Simpson; and third. 
Mrs. W. H. Kitchin Jr. and Mrs. 
E. V. Caulfield. 

""East-west, first Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Furness; second, Mrs. 
Ida Mae Esmond and' E. M. 
Moore; and third, Mrs. W. W. 
Gray and Mrs. J. G. Cavanaugh. 

Duplicate bridge enthusiasts 
are invited to join the group 
each Tuesday at 7:45 p.m. at the 
Jefferson Hotel. 



ThisWeekend 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
bustling resort days of Virginia 
Beach are now short-lived as the 
approaching Labor Day weekend 
brings the vacationing season to 
a close. 

For three months the city 
has been turned over to the 
summer . visitors. Shops and 
stores have been filled with 
vacationers and parking spaces 
along the main thoroughfare be- 
came a rarity. 

It has been a busy season de- 
spite dark predictions that Vir- 
ginia Beach tourism would suf- 
fer from the extensive March 7 
damage and resulting publicity. 

The Virginia Beach Cham- 
ber of Commerce has received 
more than 23,000 inquiries, a 
reasonably accurate gauge 
that the number of summer 
visitors has equaled past sea- 
sons. 

Most hotels have maintained 
a steady no-vacancy business, 
especially on weekends, and 
store and shop owners have re- 
ported a normal summer in- 
crease. 

Entertainment places have 
taken in enough revenue to en- 
courage owners to provide some 
of the best known show business 
names to appear here in many 
season. 

New businesses and new en- 
deavors have proved beneficial 
and successful to their promot- 
ers. A newly launched buffet 
dinner at a North Virginia hotel 
has enjoyed a capacity business 
most of the summer. 

Converts To Residents 

Now, with the coming of Sep- 
tember, permanent 'residents 
will take advantage of the re- 
sort facilities. With the opening 
of school next Thursday, moth- 
ers will have more time to en- 
joy the less crowded beach, free 
from the responsibility of swim- 
ming youngsters. 

Businessmen and merchants 
will have more time to spend 
with their families because' store 
hours will be shortened to the 
regular schedule. 

September brings delightful 
warm, sunny weather, ideally 
suited for swimming, golfing, 
boating and other pre-winter 
sports. 

It has been a busy and fi- 
nancially successful summer but 
most residents seems to voice 
the same opinion . . . "we are 
glad fall is almost here." 

SCHOOL BOOKS ON SALE 

KEMPSVILLE — New books 
went on sale at Union Kemps- 
ville High School Wednesday 
and will remain on sale through 
Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. .. 
— It— 




Next Thursday 



26,500 Expected 
For Opening Of 
PA-VB Schools 

VIRGINIA BEACH — More than 26,500 youngsters are 4 
pected to enter Virginia Beach-Princess Anne County pttM 
schools when the 1962-63 term starts next Thursday, an increase 
of about 3,000 over last year's enrollment. 

Superintendent of Schools Frank W. Cox said Wednesday 

that the 3,000 figure is based 



More than 3,000 members of the American Legion, Department of Virginia, are ex- 
pected to enjoy the city's miniature train during the State Conventi6n here next weekend. 
The train will travel up Atlantic Avenue to the Sir Walter Hotel and back down Pacific Ave. 
periodically and a Legion badge will provide free transportation anywhere along the route. 
Pictured with the crew are Carl Atkinson, Mrs. Atkinson and Fred Rudiger. (Boice Photo) 



Bid Opening 
Set Sept. 1 8 

PRINCESS ANNE — The 
Princess Anne County School 
Board will open bids on the pro- 
posed Trantwood Elementary 
QcIrooI Sept. 18, Superintendent 
of Schools Frank W. Cox said 
Wednesday. 

The school was originally 
scheduled to open this fall but 
construction was delayed until a 
sfjgaie^hsposal system could be 
approved* ' 

If construction should get 
underway in the near future 
there is a possibility some of the 
classrooms will open during the 
present school term. 

However, an early opening is 
not anticipated, Cox said, and 
the school will probably not ac- 
commodate students until the 
1963-64 term. 

Located in the Trantwood 
area, just off Great Neck Road, 
the new facility will relieve the 
congestion now being felt in 
Linkhorn Park and John B. Dey 
Elementary Schools. 

$1,000 TAKEN FROM 
LOCAL AUTO FIRM 

VIRGINIA BEACH — About 
$1,000 was taken from a safe at 
Emrhae Ford, Inc., 406-1 7th St., 
early Tuesday morning. 

Virginia Beach Police said the 
office was forcibly entered, and 
the safe opened with an acety- 
lene torch. A police spokesman 
said the burglary was appar- 
ently the work of amateurs. , . 



City Shapes Up 



Building 

PRINCESS ANNE— The draw- 
ing 'of plans for additions to the 
offices of county treasurer and 
revenue commissioner in the 
main one - story government 
building has been authorized by 
the Princess Anne Board of 
Supervisors. 

In a meeting Monday, the 
board also voted to proceed with 
work on another addition held 
up until offlce-spfice -arrange- 
ments could be finalized for the 
Virginia Beach - Princess Anne 
merger. 

, The seat of government of the 
new City of Virginia Beach will 
be Princess Anne Court House 



Post Office 

PRINCESS ANNE— The mer- 
ger committee will send a re- 
quest to Washington post office 
authorities to incorporate the 
presently independent post of- 
fices of the Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne area under one 
main post office so that all mail 
will carry a Virginia Beach post- 
mark. 

The merger committee, com- 
posed of the Virginia Beach 
City Council and Princess Anne 
Board of Supervisors, can not 
take any formal action until the 
Jan. 1 merger date, but is able 
to approve proposals. 

The independent post offices 
of the area are Virginia Beach, 
Bayside, Pungo, Back Bay, 
Pleasant Ridge, Princess Anne 
and Munden. 

in other business in the Tues- 



Mahy Chiefs But Few Indians 



day meeting, City Manager Rus- 
sell Hatchett said business and 
professional taxes in the present 
City of Virginia Beach will prob- 
ably be extended to the county 
but may be reduced. 

Hatchett was also authorized 
to set up radio communications 
system for the police, fire and 
public work departments of the 
new city. 



Taxes 

PRINCESS ANNE— The main 
topic of discussion at the Mon- 
day meeting of the merger com- 
mittee, composed of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Councilmen and 
Princess Anne's Boar dof Super- 
visors, was the adjustment of 
cigarette taxes and the progress 
of a water plan for the new City 
of Virginia Beach. 

City Manager Russell M. 
Hatchett said the executive ses- 
sion discussed whether the 2- 
cent-per-pack tax in the present 
city of Virginia Beach will be 
enforced after Jan. 1, when the 
two governments merge. It was 
not decided, but continuation 
seems likely, he said. 

It was also announced that 
progress is being made toward 
water plans for the new city. 
"We are very pleased with the 
progress," Hatchett said. "Nor- 
folk and Portsmouth have been 
very cooperative in supplying 
information,' 'he said. 



Roads 




Tnese past presidents of the Princess Anne Ruritan Club got together prior to a recent 
meeting. From left, William P. Kellam, Tommy Thompson, V. A. "Jack" Etheridge, Murray Mal- 
bon, James G. Darden, Joe Murden, Richard Absalom and Roy DeHart. (Photo by Townes) 



PRINCESS ANNE — Over 
$6,000 was appropriated for im- 
provement on county roads to 
bring them up to the require- 
ments of state secondary roads 
and enter them in the second- 
ary system in the Monday meet- 
ing of the Princess Anne Board 
of Supervisors. 

In other business, they dis- 
cussed using convict labor on 
the roads of the new City of 
Virginia Beach. Frank Robinson, 
resident engineer ior the State 
Highway Department, said the 
use of this labor in Princess 
Anne "has been a great help in 
saving us money." 

It was also recommended that 
an application for a use permit 
by John Aragona to operate a 
sewage lagoon be changed and 
sent back to the County Plan- 
ning Commission. The* requeest 
came after Aragona asked that 
a lake in which he had planned 
a holding pond be used for the 
lagoon. 

Richard 8 J. Webbon, board 
'executive secretary announced 
that the Army Corps of Engi- 
neers is considering requests to 
restore the dunes north of 60th 
St. at Virginia Beach, and a mile 
south of present restoration at 
Sand Bridge. 



Get 
Reminder From 
Safety Expert 

RICHMOND— Asking for care- 
ful observance of traffic rules 
during Labor Day weekend, Col. 
C. W. Woodson, Jr., Chairman 
of the Governor's Highway Safe- 
ty Committee and Superintend- 
ent of State Police, today cited 
the 1961 ' Labor Day weekend 
experience as a warning. 

The weekend, costing 16 lives, 
was the worst since that of 1955 
which saw 17 deaths. Nine peo- 
ple were killed on Saturday. 
There were 12 fatal crashes, of 
which three killed one pedes- 
trian each. The nation saw 515 
deaths. 

Of the nine fatal crashes 
which did not invelve pedes- 
trians, drivers In three were 
known to have been drinking, 
there wre five speed violations, 
three drivers were inexplain- 
ably on the wrong side of the 
road, one driver ignored a stop 
sign and one was amazingly in- 
attentive. In the three pedes- 
trian deaths, no driver fault was 
assigned. 

In three cases in which driv- 
ers were on the wrong side of 
the road, Colonel Woodson 
stated that sleep or exhaustion 
could not be overruled and men- 
tioned that three crashes earlier 
this summer, in which drivers 
fell asleep at the wheel, killed 
a total of 20 people. 

"The dangers of holiday traf- 
fic should be obvious to any- 
one," he said. "However, some 
people are prone to overlook 
the fact that they can be killed 
through no fault of their own 
and others seem to feel they 
can compensate for exhaustion, 
alcoholic effect and chance tak- 
ing -toy superior driving ability, 
We must realize that survival in 
modern traffic requires «ood 
physical condition, sharp mental 
alertness at all times, scrupulous 
obedience of traffic laws and 
rules of common sense, defen- 
sive driving an da willingness to 
give up the right of way rather 
than die for it." 

Colonel Woodson stated in 
closing that the holiday week- 
end marks the end of the na- 
tional summer-long "Slow Down 
and Live" campaign in which 
Virginia has participated. 



on an estimated third day en 
rollment but that the number 
will probably increase to nearly 
4,000 by the middle of the school 
term. 

Building Boom 
This increase, which is about 
1,000 over last year, is due to 
the extensive building boon the- 
county is now experiencing. 

"This has been one of the 
biggest years the county has 
ever had in construction accord- 
ing to the number of building 
permits issued," Cox said. 

Most of this increase is in the 
Princess Anne Plaza and Ara- 
gona Village areas. Two schools 
are now under construction to 
relieve the over-crowded condi- 
tions and are expected to open 
by November 1. 

The new Pembroke School 
will relieve Aragona and Malibu 
will relieve Plaza. Until the two 
schools open, their staffs and 
student body will be housed In 
Aragona and Plaza, operating on 
ft split shift basis. 

Tho only schools in the 
batch-county system to ©par- 
ate on permanent split shifts 
this year will be Shalton Park 
and Bayside whare the ffttf 
and second grades will 90 
from 8:20 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. 
and from 12:20 to 3j20 p.m. 
Bus transportation will be ex- 
tended to the Virginia Beach 
schools this year for the first 
time due to the Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne County merger. 
Although the consolidation does 
not become effective until Jan. 
1, the bus service will commence 
with the opening of school, Cox 
said. 

The only change this win* 
make for city schools is that 
W. T. Cooke will now accom- 
modate youngsters living in the 
area from the stop light at Sea- 
tack- east to the city limits. 

About 145 buses will be in op- 
eration this year and will carry 
25,000 students over 400 routes 
twice a day. 

School Hours 
All schools will open Thurs- 
day and Friday on a half-day 
basis but will resume a lull 
schedule Sept. 10. Elementary 
schools will maintain hours from 
8:20 a.m. to 2:20 pm. and sec- 
ondary schools will operate on 
a 9:10 a^m. to 3:23 p.m. basis. 

The sale of new and 
textbooks will ibe held at 
schools the remainder of this 
week and the ffrst part of next 
week. 




PROCLAMATION 



WHEREAS, the development of this City's skilled craftsmen 
is of vital importance to the continued national security and 
economic growth, and 

WHEREAS, the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, 
United States Department of Labor and the Virginia Apprentice- 
ship Council of the State Department of Labor and Industry, 
Commonwealth of Virginia, seeks to achieve, throughout coopera- 
tive effort, a skilled work force adequate to the Nation's Needs, 
and 

WHEREAS, the President of the United Statu has proclaimed 
the month of August, 1962, as National Apprenticeship Month 

NOW, THEREFORE, 1, Frank A. Dusch, Mayer of the Citjr 
of Virginia Beach, do hereby proclaim the month of August, 
1962 as ^ 

CITY APPRENTICESHIP MONTH 

and call upon employers, union organizations and all of 
citizens to unit their efforts in the furtherance of this program. 
Given under my hand this 23rd day of August, 1962. 

FRANK A. DUSCH, Mayor 



i 



Tfiuridty, August 30, 1962 

Ann Stall 1$ 
Recent Brkk 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Wedding 
vows were «aehaaged by Miss 
Ann Blu ford Stall of this city 
and Wayne, Pa., «,d Edward 
Marvin Mann Jr. Saturday at 
2 p.m. in 3Hr of Jhe Sea Catho- 
Uc Churcb/fhe Rev. Nicholas J. 
Habets officiated. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mra. Thomas Loyless 
Mell of Wayne. The bridegroom 
is the am of Dr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Marvin Mann of Hickory. 

Given On marriage by her 
step-fctlnsy Mr. Hell, the bride 
bad Miss Sarah Page Houghton 
of Norfolk as maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were tyiaen ¥f - 
garet Gay Finley, Bettte Kate 
Pace Cadieox, Mary Ben Wool- 
ling and" "Sarah Logan Killen. 
Junior bridesmaid was Ann 
Laurence Nixon. 

Beat man was Harold Thomp- 
son Mann of Hickory. Grooms- 
men were John A. Thomas of 
Lawrenceville; George Edmund 
Vaughan of Hickory; Thomas 
Martin Oliver and John Dahl 
Cooke, both of South Norfolk; 
and Melvin Mayo Hooker. 

A reception waa held in the 
Colonial Room at The Cavalier. 
After a wedding trip to Tides 
Inn, Irvingjton, the couple will 
live at 4« TreadwBU St., Fay- 
ettevlBs, Art, where both will 
attend the University of Arkan- 
sas. 




MRS. EDWARD MARVIN MANN, JR. 



CapC mad Mrs. Robert Wil- 
liams of Arlington spent last 
weekend as the guests of Comdr. 
H. L. Walsh (r*t> and Mrs. 
Walsh at their Bay Colony home. 




Joan Loftin 
Becomes Bride of 
R. L Drescher 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Loftin 
Jr. of Virginia Beach announce 
the marriage of their daughter, 
Miss Joan Ellen Loftin, to Rich- 
ard Laurence Drescher, son of 
Mr. & Mrs. Otto Charles Dres- 
cher of London Bridge. 

The marriage was performed 
August 11 at City Road Method- 
ist Church, Elizabeth City, N.C., 
by the Rev. C. G. Nickens. 

The bride was attended by 
Miss Martha Jean Weatherford 
of Peterstown, W. Va. The bride- 
groom had his brother, Charles 
Alison Drescher, as best man. 

The couple will make their 
home in Charlottesville, where 
Mr. Drescher is a student in the 
school of commerce at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. He is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Kappa Psi profes- 
sional business fraternity. 

The bride attended Longwood 
College, Farmville, where she 
was a member of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma social sorority. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Cline Brooks 
Ostrander of Virginia Beach an- 
nounce the birth of their first 
child, a son, Gregory Brooks, 
on Aug. 15 at Norfolk General 
Hospital. Mrs. Ostrander is the 
former Miss Shirley Beale, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. 
Beale of South Norfolk. Mr. Os- 
trander is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. F. Ostrander Sr. of 
South Norfolk. 



Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. J. Walter 
Carpenter of Bayside announce 
the birth of their second child, 
second daughter, Lisa Renee, on 
Aug. 8 Portsmouth Naval Hos- 
pital. Mrs. Carpenter is the for- 
mer Miss Joyce Anne Cannon, 
daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. 
Robert C. Cannon of Memphis, 
Tenn. Mr. Carpenter is the son 
of Dr. and Mrs. J. Walter Car- 
penter of Washington, D.C. . 



Society Editor 

Phone OA 8>7ff3 

— : m „ . m » .m t n .m, ■ — *— — i i i mt k , — . 

Boggs-Watts 
Vows Exchanged 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Ft. Story 
Chapel was the setting Saturday 
it 4 p m. for the marriage of 
Miss Rita Rae Boggs and Lt 
fig.) David Henderson Watts of 
Virginia Beach and NuUey, N.J. 
, tit. Col. Albert J. Chapdelaine, 
(ChC), USA, performed the 
ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Caldwell 
Boggy of Greensboro, N.C. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ivor Bach Watts of Nutley. 

Given in marriage by her 
brother, Clarence Caldwell 
Boggs Jr. of Virginia Beach, the 
bride had her sister, Mrs. Doug- 
las Winfred Walters of Greens- 
boro, as her matron of honor. 
Bridesmaid was Miss Eleanor 
Vandoren Watts, sister of the 
bridegroom, of Nutley. 

Lt.Ttobert Bach Watts of Wor- 
cester, Mass., and Nutley was 
best man for his brother. 
Groomsmen were John J. Meak- 
em Jr. of White Plains, N.Y.; 
Charles A. Brown of Newark, 
Del.; and Lt. (j.g.) Ronald- 
George Luketz. 

A reception was held at Little 
Creek Officers' Club. After a 
wedding trip to Lake Placid, 
N.Y., and Quebec, Canada, the 
couple will live at 119-50th St 

JOHN SYER WED 
TO MISS McCALLUM 

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The 
marriage of Miss Virginia Jett 
McCallum and Lt. John Ballard 
Syer, USA, took place Saturday 
at 4:30 p.m. in Second Presby- 
terian Church. The Rev. Dr. 
Henry Russell performed the 
ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davis Mc- 
Callum. The bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Syer Jr. of Virginia Beach, Va. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride had her sister, 
Miss Mary Wyatt McCallum as 
maid) of honor. Bridesmaids 
were Miss Irwin Leatherman of 
Commerce, Miss.; Miss Kate 
Harwood, Miss Mary Montedoni- 
co, Mrs. Herbert Jordan Jr., and 
Mrs. Thomas C. Lee Jr. 

Charles Syer IV of Norfolk 
served his brother as best man. 
Groomsmen were Landon Hil- 
liard HI and Edwin A. Darden 
III, both of Virginia Beach; Lt. 
William A. Percy of Greenville, 
Miss.; Hunter Faulconer Jr., 
Mark deWolf Gibson and Hardy 
Dillard, all of Charlottesville, 
Va.; and Robert Davis McCallum 
Jr., brother of the bride. 

A reception was held at the 
Memphis Hunt and Polo Club. 
After a wedding trip to Mexico 
City and Acapulco the couple 
will live at Ft. Sill, Okla. 




MRS. CHARLES CRAVEN BENNETT, JR. 

Frances Anne Tharp Is 
Bride of Charles Bennett Jr. 



BAYSIDE — Miss Frances 
Anne Tharp and Charles Craven 
Bennett, Jr., were married Sat- 
urday, August 25, at 3:00 p.m. 
at Ferebee-Halstead Methodist 
Church by the Rev. Oscar S. 
Good, pastor. 

Frances is the daughter of 



Four Local Girls 
Among German 
Club Debutantes 




SYERS FETE COUPLE 
WITH PARTY 

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Syer Jr. of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va., entertained 
Friday at a dinner and dance in 
honor «f their son, Lt. John 
Ballard Syer, USA and Miss Vir- 
ginia Jett McCallum. 

Miss McCallum and Lt. Syer 
were married Saturday at 4:30 
p.m. in Second Presbyterian 
Church. 

The party followed the re- 
hearsal of the wedding which 
was held at the Memphis Coun- 
try Club. 

Guests included members of 
the wedding party and out-of- 
town guests. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Four 
girls from the Virginia Beach- 
Princess Anne area have been 
listed in the 1902 list of debu- 
tantes by the Norfolk German 
Club. 

Miss Florence Pretlow Hodgman 

Miss Florence Pretlow Hodg- 
man, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Milton Hodgman Jr., of 
Lawson Hall, Princess Anne, 
will return to Madison College 
for her sophomore year this 
fail. 

MISS MARY PARKE JOHNSON 

Miss Mary Parke Johnson, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thom- 
as elson Page Johnson, Jr. of 
221-03rd St., Virginia Beach, 
will be a senior at Mount Ver- 
non Junior College, Washington. 
D.C, this fall. 
MISS JULIA LAWSON MILES 

Miss Julia Lawson Miles, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Lawson Miles, Jr., of Cavalier 
Park, Virginia Beach will re- 
turn to Converse College, Spart- 
anburg, S.C., this fall. 
MISS MARTHA ANNE REDD 

Miss Martha Anne Redd, 
daughter of Judge and Mrs. 
Jefferson Davis Reed Jr. of 
"Lynncove," London Bridge will 
return to Randolph - Macon 
Woman's College in September! 

The girls will make their bow 
to society at a formal ball given 
in their honor, November 23, in 
the Starlight Room of the Monti- 
cello Hotel. 

The Rev. and Mrs. Edmund 
Berkeley have returned after 
spending two weeks visiting 
Mrs. Berkeley's mother, Mrs. 
John Fuller in Lumberton, N.C, 
and also visiting in Myrtle 
Beach, S.C. 



Jay lor dSuraes& J4airitutina iSenier 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

THE 8HAPE-UP. Why do we say shaping instead of hafceut? 
Even though we may he featuring a certain hair fashion, no Wo 
adaptation* ever walk out of our salon looking just alike. We shape 
your new hattstyk to your feature*. We create a new illusion for 
you, with a new hairdo. We can taper away too much hair, and 
add a look of bulk to thinning r- 



STYLISTS 

MRS. ANDERSON MR. HOWARD MRS. WHITE 

MR. WILLIAMS MR8. TERRY ' 



3, 



ilor (Out 



*3a«w 



'auior VJ>uraeAi J4airdtulina 

LASKIN ROAD, VIRGINIA BEACH 

TWO NORFOLK LOCATIONS ' 

100 Louisiana Dr., Wards Comer 2209 Hampton Blvd. 

Ph. 583-1119 Ph. tt£*SS2 



GA 8-3191 






Mr. and Mrs. John H. Tharp, Jr., 
of Baylake Pines. She graduated 
from Emory and Henry College 
and has been teaching in the 
Norfolk public schools. 

Charles Bennett, Jr., is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles C 
Bennett Cr. pf Apex, N.C, and 
is presently serving in the U.S. 
Air Force and is stationed, at 
Langley Field, Va. 

Miss Tharp was given in mar- 
riage by her father. She wore a 
white peau de soie bridal gown 
trimmed in seed pearls with 
sleeves ending in points and a 
three tiered bridal veil arranged 
from a pearl headpiece. She 
carried an arms bouquet of 
white orchids and white bridal 
roses. . 

Her maid of honor was Miss 
Jane McAmis of Kingspoint, 
Tenn., and the bridesmaids 
were Misses Gail Altizer and 
Barbara Jean Stanford both of 
Norfolk. The Junior bridesmaids 
were Charyl Bennett, sister of 
groom and Brenda Stanford of 
Norfolk. 

The attendants all wore blue 
organza over taffeta dresses, 
in ballerina length and carried 
arms bouquets of purple asters. 

Mr. Bennett, Sr. was best man 
for his son and the groomsmen 
were: John Tharp, James Ben- 
nett, Thomas Roberts of Raleigh, 
N.C and Donald Schubbe of 
Chicago, HI. 

Prior to the wedding cere- 
mony Richard Zimmerman sang 
"Whither Thou Goest" and "The 
Wedding Prayer." During the 
ceremony he sang "Have Thine 
Own Way, Oh Lord." 

Following the ceremony there 
was a reception in the Social 
Hall of the Church. 

After their wedding trip the 
young couple will reside at 
3801-A Roads View Avenue, 
Hampton, Va. 



WORLD'S LARGEST 
PEST CONTROL CO. 




• Surety Bonded 
Termite Control 

• Free Inspection 
GA 8-3382-MA 7-9840 

OR KIN 

Exterminating Co., Inc. 



Dixie Jenkins 
Becomes Bride of 
Edward L Riepl 

VIRGINIA EEACH—The Re 
organised Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter Day Saints was the 
setting today a$ 2 o'clock for the 
wedding of Miss Dixie Dee Jen- 
kins and Edward Louis Riepl 
Elder Paul F. Dillon performed 
the double ring ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Jen- 
kins. The bridegroom is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs- Edward C 
Riepl of Fremont, Neb. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride had as her ma- 
tron of honor, ' Miss Marvene 
Warrington of Portsmouth. 
Bridesmaids' were Miss Peggy 
Hawkins and Miss Carolyn Jenk- 
ins, sister of the bride 

Meredith H Mitchell of Bryan, 
Tex., was best man. Groomsmen 
were Bill Vickery of Flint, Mich, 
and Dick Pennington of Kens- 
ington, Md. 

A reception was held at Rol- 
lingwood Community H a 11. 
After a Vedding trip, the couple 
will make their home in Lamoni, 
Iowa. 

Lash-Steenburg 
Are Married 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Rev. 
H. Wadell Waters performed 
the double ring ceremony that 
united in marriage Miss Ruth 
Ann Lash and Charles Joseph 
Steenburg Saturday at 4:30 p.m. 
in the First Baptist Church. 

The » bride is the daughter of 
Mrs. Robert Franklin Lash and 
the late Mr. Lash. The bride- 
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Joseph Steenburg* of 
Amsterdam, N.Y. 

Given in marriage by her 
uncle, Elbert L. Lash of Wash- 
ington, D.C, the bride had her 
sister, Mrs. E. Randolph Pugh 
Jr. of New York, as her only 
attendant. 

Best man was John L. Latza 
of Amsterdam. Gromsmen were 
John H. Steenburg of Amster- 
dam, brother of the bridegroom, 
R. 'Thomas Griggs and Charles 
M. Hooper. 

A reception was held in the 
social halj of the church. After 
a northern wedding trip, the 
couple will live in Raleigh, .C 



(Photo fcy Bolce) 

MRS. RIEPL 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Several Virginia Beach vaca- 
tioners have been enjoying the 
mountain facilities of The Home- 
stead, located in the Virginia 
AUeghanies. Among the resort's 
recent visitors were Mrs. J. E. 
Graham, Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
McNeal and family and I. W. 
McNeal, all of Virginia Beach. 



Mr. and Mrs. Gerald P. Smith 
of White Bear, Minn., spent two 
weeks recently with Mrs. Smith's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Ramsey of 6 Airport Road, Lon- 
don Bridge. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Myer 
of Linlier have recently return- 
ed from a tour of the New Eng- 
land states. 



Miss Frances Price, daughter 
of Comdr. and Mrs. H. L., Walsh, 
recently spent^ several days 
*fcfting Capt. and Mrs.' Douglas 
Pugh, Sr., at their home in 
Georgetown. 



a 




SHOPS FOR THE LADIES AND THEIR DAUGHTERS 

BACK TO SCHOOL 
FASHIONS 

for all ages covering their complete 
wardrobe as well as fashions for the 
ladies: 

Open Labor Day 
OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS TIL 9 VM. 



Purest Lambswool 



. . . expertly blended into 
featherweight marl 
mixtures for Cox Moore's 
handsome Saddle Shoulder 
Cardigans. Note the 
fine full fashioning, 
and easy action 
sleeve . . . 
niceties you'll 
also find in 
Cox Moore'i 
Pullover. 



The 
"Nairn" 
Cardigan 




$lexan&er*])eerjl 

fcnp«r*tr$ t rttoilm finest genliemtru opporel - todies' sport twt or 

3Ut STRfIT VIRGINIA cEACH. VIRGINIA 

1 * ■ ■ •' ' * ' '• i ii i i i 




I 



1 



mm 



606 



tflAOX ELECTRIC 

*l - 1 7A St., V«. Beach, Vi. Phone 6A 8-37 . 1 

COMMERCIAL and RESIDENTIAL WIRING . 

Wiring for Clothes Dryers and Water Heater* ' 
AUTHORIZED HOUSEPOWER CONTRACTOR 
LARGE and SMALL APPLIANCE REPAIRS 
' ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES AND FIXTURES 




BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Coleman 
Kitchin of Virginia Beach an- 
nounce the birth of their first 
child, a son, Lee Coleman Jr., 
on Aug. 19 at Norfolk General 
Hospital. Mrs. Kitchen la the 
former Miss Virginia Lord Mac- 
Kethan, daughter of Mr. & Mrs, 
Edwin R. MacKethan of Norfolk. 



Mrs* Moore's Bakery 

NEXT TO BE-LO SUPER MARKET 
400 - 30th ST. VIRGINIA BEACH GA 8-5081 



Use SUN-NEWS Classified Ads 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard W. Barnes Sr. of 
Virginia Beach announce the 
birth of a granddaughter, Cas- 
sandra Lee Beam, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Bradley 
Beam, born Aug. 16 at Flower 

and 5th Ave. Hospital in New 
York City. Mrs. Beam is the 
former Stratford Arnold Barnes 
of Roanoke and Virginia Beach. 



VIRGINIA BEACH— Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Nixon of 605-16th 
Street, Virginia Beach, announce 
the birth of a daughter, Sandra 
Tate Nixon, August' 15. 



Keener-Rrumley 
Vows Exchanged 

PRINCESS ANNE — Miss 
Patricia Lee Keener and Thomas 
Jay Brumbley were married 
Sunday, Aug. 19 at 4 p.m. In 
Kempsville Baptist Church by 
the Rev. Arnold B. Blount. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Way Gleason 
Keener. The bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John Thom- 
as Brumbley of Dagsboro, Del. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride had Miss Diane 
Hargrove of Norfolk as maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Misses 
Leslie Purifoy and Judy Burrier, 
both of Charlotte, N.C., Lettie 
Boomer, and Wanda Keener, the 
bride's sister. 

Best man was Earl W. Quillen 
of Omar, Del. Groomsmen were 
Norman C. Fisher of Dagsboro, 
F. Peter Sturm of Midland Park, 
N.J., John W. Urian Jr. of Col- 
lege Park, Md., and John B. 
Carr Jr. of Rockingham, N.C. 

A reception was held at the 



Personal Mention 



Mrs, J. W. Enochs of Hope- 
well and Henry Boynton of Roa- 
noke, will arrive Friday to 
spend the Labor Day weekend 
as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
John F. Winn Jr., on Raleigh 
Drive. 



Mr, and Mrs. William Bruce 
and their three children have 
returned to their home on Lee 
Road after spending several 
weeks visiting Mr. Brace's moth- 
er, Mrs. Edwin Bruce, at her 
summer home at Lake George, 
N.Y. 



Alexandria after visiting Mrs. 
Clarke's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Julian S. Lawrence in Cavalier 
Park. 



T 



Miss Mary Motley is spending 
a week in New York visiting 
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hugh Camp. 



Comdr. and Mrs. H. Donald 
Clarke and their two children 
have returned to their home in 

church social hall. After a wed- 
ding trip to the Bahamas, the 
couple will live at 302 Weiner 
Ave., Harrington, Del. 



Exciting! Exclusive! 



i j 



* EUROPEAN VACATION 
OF YOUR DREAMS! 

An Unforgettable 5-C6vntry Tour for 2 via the ALL NEW 
trans world airlines %r Stream Jet! 

Visit PARIS, ROME, MADRID, LISBON & ZURICH 



LI. 



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COLONIAL STORES 



TkWM 

CONTEST 

401 PRIZES 



'. J is?-. 



(**J 



Everyone love* Europe in the (»». Here's your chance to win ■ fabulous expense-paid 
17-day, 5-country European tour. Colonial Stores' winning couple will fly via connect- 
ing airline to New York, then on to Europe via TWA'a superb new Star Stream jet. 
Itinerary will include Lisbon and Sintra in Portugal; Madrid, and a side trip to 
ancient Toledo in Spain . . . then ancient and modern Rome. Next Zurich and Lucerne 
in Switzerland, including a Volkswagen for personal sightseeing use, and finally Paris, 
"City •! Light." So hurry to your nearest Colonial Store and get your free entry blank. 



Qujs*>rrXu-i oi fir 



j ^^a 



50 2nd PRIZES 100 3rd PRIZES 



8 Exclusive 
TWA "Around 
Hi* World" 
Travel ■ 
Glasses 



These handsome 9 01 glasses are 
finished in black and gold, contain at- 
tractively illustrated European motifs. 



TWA 

••Over the Shoulder" 

night Bag* 

Muted red and white 
nylon bag* have 
hundreds of uses. 
Ideal for trips, pic- 
nics, the beach. 



250 4th PRIZES 



Exclusive fAir du Ttmps Perfume flown direct 
from Pans Distinctive . . Alluring . . Tantalizing. 



Complete travel arrangements will be handled by John Miles, Ltd, Charlotte, N,C 

NOTHING TO BUY! NO JINQLES TO WRITE I ENTER NOW! ENTER OFTEN I 

Contest ends September 8. Winners will be notified by mail. 



(mploym —4 f o-.h.i of t.pl.,..i «f UmM Stam wt as* cUtlM* k> eanid*«* 



For your shopping convenience, 
the following stores will be open 
all day Labor Day, Monday, 
September 3: 

17th St & Arctiee Avenue 
(Va. Beach) 

319 - 31st Street (Lasfcin 
Road) Va. Beach 

Princess Anne Plaza Shop- 
png Center 

2109 Shore Drive Road 
(Bayshfe) 

All others will be closed all day 
Labor Day. 



Pries, in rhu Ad laVKv* 
tWi , ft*., S«t.. Awff. 30, 31. ft Sep! I 

Quontii* Rightf ftaterved 




COlOrtlAL STORES 





\ 




NATUR -TENDER US DA INSPECTED 




I 



on" 






, 6M> 



**<> 



» 




READY FOR THE PAN 

NATUK-TENDEK 

CUT-UP FRYERS 



31* 



WHOLE 
ONLY 




YOUR 

CHOICE 



PILLSBURY 



FLOUR 



PLAIN OR 
SELF RISING 




FRESH LEAN GROUND CHUCK 
LEAN BONELESS STEW BEEF 
TENDER LEAN PORK STEAK 

ARMOUR STAR LUNCHEON MEATS 

STREAK OF LEAN SALT MEAT «? y. . . > 35 

ARMOUR'S CAMPFIRE FRANKS 2 % 89 



69* 



4 'CM* 



25 EXTRA FREE STAMPS 

Wrrh the Purchase of Any Fka. 

CHEF'S PRIDE SALADS 

NO COUPON REQUIRED 



FLOUNDER FILLET . . 


lb. 


59* 


WINTER TROUT ... 


lb 


2* 


BUTTERFISH ..... 


lb 


2 9< 



WISCONSIN MILD CHEDDAR CHEESE 
CAROLINA MAID CANNED BISCUITS 
COLONIAL'S NUTREAT MARGARINE 



• • * 



• • . • 



4* 



. c ,To 4* 



10 EXTRA FREE STAMPS WITH 
THE PURCHASE OF EACH LOAF 

NEW IMPROVED — KING SIZE 

Thrifty Bread is 24' 

OUR PRIDE — LARGE SIZE 

Sandwich Bread . . ~ 27' 



EXTRA GOOO VAU* — PRIMLY 



CAKE MIX 

COMPARE THIS VALUE — COLONIALS SO 

FACIAL TISSUE 

JUST CHILL AND SERVE — NON 

Hl-C DRINK 



wnitf. choco., ruoes 

TWO* OS DOUtU DUTCH a) 



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3 
2 



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400 C» 
Reset 



JUST CHILL AND SERVE — NON CARRONATED 



II OI 

Can 



35« 
10' 



SWEET WHIT^SEEOLiSSOR REDAAALA&A 

P lbs 



VINE YARD Wtrr WHITE StEC l*» 

^CRAPES 

ZrJSS. LARGE CRISP PASCAL 



IausBmw t-A Kfrfc iwi^r » »v«u 

CELERY 2* 

. -., ..ai...»i41 annuls) 



FANCY MOUNTAIN GROWN 



CABBAGE 4 



green pepper ^ R :. A . R r.y. M . e . & . R r. N . ) . «*« 3c EGG PLANT ^y. E . ;y. c . Y . H ?? e . ny.". ■"* 10c 




200 FREE 

GOLD BOND stamps 
KODAK KODACOIOR FILM 

its CIMtltS OIVSK1 BfllS SOS* «»MM 




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GOLD BOND -tumps 

Witfc *t» €#v»K* mm* NM ».*■!»»*»• »t •*• ..tl I * Pi 

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GOLD BOND stomps 

win H» CHfW *«s »• > »■»■■« •• 

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REEF DINNER STEAKS 

COOO IN CCHONUU stow 
SWING OOIO BONO STAMPS 




Mrs. William T. Fuller and 
her two children have returned 
to their home in Linkhorn Drive 
after spending the summer in 
Europe where they joined 
Comdr. Fuller. 



Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 30, 1962 
Page 3-A 



Mrs. T. N. P. Johnson and her 
children, Mary Parke, Betsy, 
Helen and Jimmie are visiting 
Mrs. Johnson's mother, Mrs. 
James A. Smith Jr., at her home 
in Richmond. 



Miss Carol Anne Emory and 
Miss Nancy Ferwilleger of 
Ridgewood, N.J., will arrive Fri- 
day to spend a week with Miss 
Emory's uncle and aunt, Mr. & 
Mrs. P. H. Allen on Pinewood 
Rd. 



Mr. and Mrs. G. Watts Hill 
Jr., and their two children of 
Durham, N.C, are spending two 
weeks at their home on Bay 
Colony Drive. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. Lee White- 
hurst and their daughter, Miss 
Julie Whitehurst, returned 
Wdnesday to their home on 
53rd St., after spending several 
days in Memphis, Term., and at- 
tending the marriage of Mrs. 
Whitehurst's nephew, Lt. John 
Ballard Syer, USA to Miss Vir- 
ginia Jett McCallum, which took 
place Saturday afternoon in 
Memphis. 



Engagements 

SPANGLER — MAYLE 

LYNNHAVEN— Mr. and Mrs. 
H. L. Spangler announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Miss Betty Lou Spangler to 
George Edward Mayle. 

Mr. Mayle is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Mayle of Bay- 
side. 

Miss Spangler is a graduate 
of Princess Anne High School. 
She is a clerk at Norfolk Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

Mr. Mayle is a graduate of 
Princess Anne High School. He 
is serving with the U.S. Air 
Force at Keesler Air Force Base, 
Biloxi, Miss. 



How much is a 
Long Distance call 
now? 




50C or less 



Miss Vera Md&rill of Washing- 
ton is spending, this week as 
the guest of Mrs? Julian Osborne 
at her home jm 53rd Street. 



Capt. and Mrs. Lee W. Mather 
and their daughter, Miss Mar- 
garet Mather, who have been 
living on 46th St., have left to 
make their home in Cohasset, 
Mass., while Capt. Mather has 
duty in Boston. They were ac- 
companied by Miss Frances 
Gilliam, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Gilliam, who will 
spend the winter with Capt. and 
Mrs. Mather. . 



AlViBS— DAY 

LONDON BRIDGE — Mrs. 
Chauncey E. Ambs announce 
the engagement of her daughter, 
Miss Brenda Joyce Ambs to Wal- 
ter Bryant Day. Miss Ambs is 
the daughter of the late Mr. 
Ambs (CWO). 

Mf . Day is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Day, Sr., of Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

Miss Ambs is a graduate of 
Princess Anne High School and 
attended Hick's Academy of 
Beauty Culture. 

Mr. Day is a graduate of 
Oceana High School and attend- 
ed Norfolk Business College. He 
is associated with Clarence Day 
and Son, Certified Public Ac- 
countants, at Virginia Beach. 

The wedding will take place 
September 29th, at Star of The 
Sea Catholic Church. 

siding in Georgia, will arrive 
Saturday to visit Mrs. Dyer's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George 
L. Aldridge at their home on 
22nd Street. 



nights after 9 



Mr. and Mrs. William B. 
TrevUlan of Farmington are 
spending a week at the Princess 
Anne Country Club. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Beckham 
and their three daughters of 
Hasting-on-Hudson, N.Y., are 
spending several weeks at their 
summer home on Lakeside Df\ 



Mrs. K. C. Robinson is spend- 
ing this week in Richmond visit- 
ing her son-in-law and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Cameron Lacy 
Jr. 



Mrs. B. K. Lindeman has re- 
turned to her home on Holly 
Road, after visiting her son-in- 
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher Wright Jr., in Peters- 
burg. 



Mr. and Mrs. John B. Preston 
have, returned to their home on 
69th St., after spending a week 
at Hyannis Port and Cape Cod. 



Mrs. Dorothy Gray Hodgson 
and her sons, Vivie and Gray, 
who have been residing on 
North Bay Shore Drive have 
moved to 154 Bruton Lane, 
Bay Colony. 



Mr. and Mrs. Claude Shell- 
horse have returned to their 
home in Charlottesville, after 
visiting Mrs. Shellhorse's broth- 
er-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. L. L. Clark on Cedar Point 
Drive. 



Capt. and Mrs. P. M. Dyer 
III and their daughters, Kelly 
and Natalie, who have been re- 



Mrs. Emily Faber of Norfolk, 
is spending this week at the 
Princess Anne Country Club. 



Mrs. A. L. Grimes and her 
granddaughter, Miss Jean Tay- 
lor are visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Verner in Ashville, N.C. 



Adm. and Mrs. P. P. Powell 
of Washington are spending ten 
days at the Princess Anne Coun- 
try Club. 



SmNGmiN AMtMCA-S PtACi POWER* 




us 

SAVINGS 
ONDS 




A vinyl floor to 

jnaet every tastt 

and budget 

FERRELL 

LINOLEUM & TILE CO. 

326 W. 21st St. — MA 5-5305 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 




where? 

fust anywheres 

IPiiPil 




\s 




anywhere 
in Virginia 
that is! 






Call Your Local Service Center Jor 

ALL YOUR SERVICE PROBLEMS 




\ AIR CONPITIONINQ AND HEATTNQ / 

COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL 

Prompt 24-HOUR Service 

ALL WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 
Phone: GA 8-1929 204 - 22nd Street 

Phono: Kl 5-6843 Virginia Beach, Vo. 



Virginia's saving 
a million! 



CAP'S reduced Long Dttanc* 
station-to-station rates within 
Virginia are saving phone- 
users almost $1,000,000 • 
year. Most daytime rates are 
down. And after 9 p.m., 50c 
or less is the most you pay for 
a 3-minute call anywhaft 
within Virginia. Your phona** 
a bigger value than aver. Use 
it for all rf s .worth I 



C&P 



TELEPHONE COMPANY OF VMMfe 




Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 30, 19A2 



»'. ' - ••* 



THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN-NEWS 

e*ery Thursday by The Beach Publishing CorporaHon 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 



1101 Pacific Avenue 



HlfD A. HAYCOX 
ALAIN R. MAILHES 
WHY JEAN PHIULIH _ 
WILLIAM R. MeKNIGHT 

CECIL T. PRESSON " 

* 



President and Publisher 

Vice-President - General Manager 

News Editor 

- Advertising Manager 

-— - Production Superintendent 



! Off-Season Goblins? 



EaUrea 



■■—— 



deal natter in tl* port office is Virginia Beach, Va., under the act of March 3. 1879 



Sa a a ty sj tl ua rates by mail 



EDITOWAILY SPtAKING 



Outside of County— $4.00 per 



Labor Day Weekend Is Time 
To Evaluate the Summer 



To most of us here in Virginia Beach it 
seems only a few days ago that youngsters 
were released from school for the summer 
and that meant the summer resort season 
was upon us. Well, it wasn't just yesterday 
but three months ago and now the sum- 
mpr season is about to slip into "history v 

Last spring and with the fast approach- 
ing season folks here looked ahead to the 
summer season with some misgivings. The 
March 7 storm had taken its toll and the 
resulting publicity was such that 
veteran observers thought visitors wiu 
stay away in droves. 

The apprehension oh the part of 
business man was readily understandable, 
but as the traditional Labor Day weekend 
drawl near it would seem that, despite 
many obstacles, the season as a whole has 
been exffemely good. 

No surveys are needed to know that 



visitors did not stay away in droves, In 
fact, at peak times we would venture to j 
say that some of the weekends were the 
busiest ever experienced. 

Sure, business was spotty to some ex- 
tent, but by apd large Virginia Beach has 
enjoyed a good summer trade. Its popular- 
ity continues to grow and her accomoda- 
tions are constantly being upgraded. 

While the big rush of business drops 
off after the Labor Day Weekend there are 
still many tourists visiting throughout 
September and October. If most visitors 
know what residents know there would 
in more vacationers during the next 
two months. They are just about the nicest 
months of the year here. 

Despite the horrible storm of last Ash 
Wednesday the Beach has survived and is 
now more attractive than ever. 




Thesg youngst£i£|riigKt4 appear to be dolled-up for a premature trick - or - treat escapde 
but actually they are costumed for a wee-folks neighborhood show in the Bay Colony area, 
an interesting diversion for the restless preschool day*. Pictured are (left to right) Ballerina 
Wendy Eastoiv Clowns Bud Easton, Kathi White and Curtis White and Superman Clay PhU- 
lips. The young director sh<T orginator was Karen White. (Staff Photo) 



-ai U- 



While Rome Burned 



A railroad spokesman, in giving testi- 
mony before the House Committee on Inter- 
state and Foreign Commerce, proposed that 
competition in the transportation industry 
be allowed to take its course, subject to 
restraints of the anti-trust laws. This would 
seem to be in line with President Kennedy's 
transportation message, which urges great- 
er reliance on competition and less on reg- 
ulation. 

The spokesman's reason is a striking one. 
In his words: "Since World War II there has 
been a practical demonstration of the in- 
ability of incapacity of a' public agency to 
preside over the competition of different 
forms of transportation in a manner which 
at once (1) promotes competition, (2) en- 
courages the\jse of competing forms where 



they are most efficient, and (3) protects the 
public against competitive practices which 
are truly unfair or destructive. . . . It is 
simply too tough a job for any regulatory 
body to do." 

The notion that all we need to do to solve 
national problems is to set up commissions 
and regulatory agencies is dangerous, as 
the condition of the railroads, probably the 
most regulated of all industries, proves. 

The old story goes that Nero fiddled 
while Rome burned. Congress and the 
regulatory agencies are doing just about 
that with the railroads. Competition, im- 
personal and irresistible as it is, remains 
the soundest and safest "regulator" of af- 
fairs yet devised. - 



Daily Log of Calls 
By Rescue Squad 



Tuesday— August 7th 
10:00 a.m.— Navy dependant 
— to NAS Oceana dispensary — > 
unconscious, breathing shallow; 
no oxygen needed— Russell and 
S.P. 

, 11:30 a.m. — Victim ai Sea- 
tack given first aid for cut on 
foot, taken to Beach Hospital- 
Russell, L. Kitchin. 

4:15 p.m. — Army dependent 
fainted on street, emergency 
sickness— Va. Beach Hospital— 
Phillips, Beasley, Russell. 

9:30 p.m. — Victim injured eye 
playing football — to Norfolk 
General, eye treated, then back 
to home— Gilliland, Hogan. 



Economy, the Price of Tax Reduction 



The American people are wiser than 
many of their elected and appointed lead- 
ers. 

That is the deduction one can make from 
a recent Gallup poll concerning the tax 
question. 

Almost all of us, to say the obvious, 
would enjoy lower taxes. But when Dr. 
Gallup asked: "Would you favor or oppose 
a cut in federal income taxes at this time, 
if a cut meant that the government would 
go further in debt?" almost three-quarters 
of the representative citizens polled— 72 per 
cent-voted their opposition. Only 19 per 
cent were on the other side, <with 9 per 
cent offering no opinion. 

. The American people have learned, from 
hard experience, that deficit financing is a 
primary breeder of inflation, and that the 



cheapened dollar that results does far more 
harm than any attainable degree of tax 
reduction can do good: The statistics tell 
that story. Average' family income in this 
country is about $5,000 a year. A 1 per 
cent tax cut-^which is a higher cut than is 
generally regarded as possible— would give 
this family only 80 cents a week more in 
spendable income. That would hardly lead 
to a thrilling upsurge in the economy. 

The real need is to reduce the corpora- 
tion taxes, and thus release big sums of 
money for plant expansion, modernization, 
and the creation of new jobs. But no tax cut 
can be economically or socially justified if 
spending-as-usual is to be continued. And 
that, seemingly, is what the welfare-staters 
want— which is a way of saying that they 
want to risk more inflation, and, sooner or 
later, a two-bit or a 10-cent dollar. 



LOCAL RESIDENT HAS 
SPECIAL INTEREST IN 
ONE-MAN ART SHOW 



The 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Mrs 
Grier Bovard of Bay Colony is 
quite proud of her Mother and 
she has a perfect right to be 
when you consider her mother's 
accomplishments. 

Mrs. Bovard 's mother is Har- 
riet French Turner, a native 
Virgiaian of oRanoke, whose oil 
paintings will be featured next 
month in a one-man show at 
the Abby Aidrich Rockefeller 
Folk Art Collection in Williams- 

Mrs. Turner is an unusual ar- 
tist along the lines of Grandma 
Moses. R was in lt54 at the age 
of 66 that Mrs. Turner painted 
her first oil landscape. This 
painting was of an apple orchard 
seen from bar front porch and 
was later purchased for toe Hol- 
Uss College "-nmnnent collec- 



tion by John Ballator. 

According to Folk Art Collec- 
tion Director Mary Black, Mrs. 
Turner has an "intuitive sense 
for color value" that is a delight 
to behold. The Roanoke grand- 
mother has never been tutored 
and paints principally from na- 
ture and her most frequent sub- 
jects are the Blue Ridge moun- 
tains and farmlands. 

Mrs. Turner is the widow of 
J. R. Turner, a Roanoke drug- 
gist, and she has two other 
daughters besides Mrs. Bovard. 
She is proudest of her "five 
wonderful grandchildren." 

The Abby Aidrich Rockefeller 
Folk Art Collection is one of 
the nation's finest collections of 
I9*h century art. It is located 
near the restored area of Wil- 
Hamsbur^. 



Fund Raising 
Drive Begins 
Here Tuesday 

VIRGINIA BEACH — 
fund raising campaign in Vir- 
ginia Beach and Princess Anne 
County for the Children's Home 
Society of Virginia will be held 
September 4-18, Mrs. R. Lawson 
Miles and Mrs. M. Ward Cole, 
co-chairmen, announced today. 

Sponsors of the drive are Mrs. 
G. Bentley Byrd, Millard C. 
Butt. Mrs. Richard M. Cooke, 
Mrs. Floyd H. Dormire, Mrs. Al- 
fred L. Nicholson, Mrs. James 
P. Sadler. A. Gordon Stephenson 
and Mrs. L. Crawford Syer. 

Mrs. Miles and Mrs. Cole 
have asked the people of Vir- 
ginia Beach and Princess Anne 
County to give generously in 
this year's campaign. 

The need is greater than ever 
this year. Unless everyone gives 
his share the Children's Home 
Society will not be able to help 



Wednesday — August 8th ~ 
11:15 a.m. — Seatack; emer- 
gency sickness— to Beach Hospi- 
tal. — Beasley. 

1:15 p.m. — Transported prev- 
ious call to Norfolk General 
Hospital.— McCaw, Beasley. 

8:15 p.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness at Oceana— Wallace and 
Casey. 

Thursday — August 9th 
11:00 a.m. — Transportation 
for elderly person liom Lynn- 
haven to Bph(1i Hiwtpfta).- \»\ 
loi. 

12:10 p.m.— Navy dependent, 
complained of paii •*> in cheat ; . 
hotel swimming pool, lak n U\ 
NAS Oceana rflf«p« m«h\ . i 
loi 

7:30 pan. - Atlantic 1 a I 
near OB to D<- Paul flrKfii';. 
Woolford, White. 

9:30 p.m. — Tianspoitatiou 
from Birdneck Point to Leigh 
Memorial Hospital. — WopIUmH, 
McClannai . 

11:00 p.m. — Victim sustained 
cuts on thin and i« j g a* P»ive-'i 
—to De Paul Hospital.— wool- 
ford, McClannan. 

11:30 p.m.— Parents and two 
daughters M auto accident — 
called to Beach Hospital — taken 
to Norfolk General Hospital.— 
Wallace. 

Friday — August 10th 
10:05 a.m.— Tourist taken to 
Beach Hospital; emergency sick- 
ness — Langhorne, Jim Cook. 

10:50 a.m. — Transportation 
Norfolk, emergency sickness; 
child fell— Beasley. 

1:00 p.m. — Emergency service 
transportation to Norfolk — 
Beasley. 

1:20 p.m,— OB— Beach Hospi- 
tal—Randolph. 

6:05 p.m. — Wolfsnare trans- 
portation — to Doctor's office — 
A. B. Midgett and Jessup. 

8:05 p.m.— Child injured — 
transportation to Norfolk— A. B. 
Midgett; Randolph. 

9:00 p.m. — Transportation; 
emergency service to Beach 
Hospital; Morse and Gray. 

11:05 p.m.— Auto accident — 
Beach Hospital — Randolph. 
Saturday — August 11th 
2:30 p.m.— Transportation to 
Norfolk — Randolph. 
5:30 p.m. — Transportation Ho 



Beach Hospital. — Gaskin and 
Beasley. 

8.15 p.m. — Transportation 
from Portsmouth to Beach Hos- 
pital.— Gaskin, Wade. 

9:00 p.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness and transportation Beach 
Hospital— Wade and Gray. 

10:00 p.m.— Auto accident — 
.Oceana to Beach Hospital — 
Wade and Gaskin. 

10:35 p.m.— Transportation to 
Norfolk— Wade and Gaskin. 



Monday— August 13th 

12:45 a.m.— Heart attack — 
Seatack to Beach Hospital— Ed- 
wards, Beasley. 

3:28 a.m.— Auto accident -— 
Beach Hospital — Beasley, Ed- 
wards. 

5:40 a jn— Wolfsnare — heart 
attack— to Norfolk — Edwards 
and Beasley. 

10:45 a.m.— Emergency sick — 
Beach Hospital— Langhorne and 
L. Kitchin. 

6:45 p.m. — Bay Colony — 
emeregncy sickness — Beach 
Hospital— L. Kitchin and Hines. 

7:00 p.m.— Stand by fire call 
— Hines and White. 

7:30 p.m. — First aid to fire 
victim— Hines and White. 

7:50 p.m.— Transportation to 
Beach Hospital— L. Kitchin and 
Hines, 



Wadnasday— August 15th 
1:30 a.m.— Transportation — 
Beasley and Phillips. 

1:05 p.m. — Emergency service 
transportation to Norfolk — 
Beasley and Phillips. 

12:30 p.m.— Accident, trans- 
portation Beach Hospital — 
Beasley. 



Thursday — August 16th 

2:18 a.m. — Accident — Sand- 
bridge to Beach Hospital — 
Stallings and Langhorne. 

3:47 a.m. — Emergency serv- 
ice — Seatack to Beach Hospital 
— Caton -and, <tonnell. 



Friday — August 17th 

9:15 a.m.— Heart attack, DOA 
— Hortoh and Beasley. 

11:10 a.m.— Navy dependent 
transportation, NAS Oceana — 
Carpenter and White. 

2:00 p.m.— Call unknown — 
no assistance — Beasley. 



all the babies who need assist- 
ance. 

The society last year received 
154 babies into its care and 
placed 148 babies in adoptive 
homes. 



Tuasday — August 14th 

11:00 a.m.— Transportation to 
Beach Hospital— Edwards and 
A. B. Midgett. 

2:00 p.m. — Transportation 
Norfolk— Edwards and Russell. 

2:30 p.m.— Auto accident — 
Navy dependent— NAS Oceana 
— - Phillips and Russell. 

9:10 p.m. — Transportation 
Beach Hospital — Caton and 
Connell. 

10:00 p.m. — Non-auto acci- 
dent — to Beach Hospital — Con- 
nell and Caton. 



Saturday '— August 18th 

9:20 a.m. — Transportation — 
Beach Hospital — Gastrins and 
Edwards. 

10:30 a.m. — Transportation — 
Norfolk— Gaskin. 

1:50 p.m. — Auto accident PA 
Plaza— J. Midgett and Stormont. 

5:50 p.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness—transportation Norfolk — 
Connell and McCaw. * 



Sunday — August 19th 

12:12 a.m.— Heart attack — 
transportation to Norfolk — 



Local B&PWC 
Head Attends 
D. G. Meeting 

Mary G. Atkins of 16 Poplar 
Point Court, London Bridge, 
President of Princess Anne 
Business and Professional Wom- 
en's Club, is attending a Leader- 
ship Conference sponsored by 
the National Federation of Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's 
Clubs, Inc., at the StaUer" Hilton 
Hotel in Washington, D.C., next 
weekend. The National organi- 
zation is a federation of 3,532 
dubs throughout the United 
States, District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico and the -Virgin 
Islands. This is one of a series 
of conferences being held simul- 
taneously in strategic areas. 
State officers, district directors, 
and club presidents from the 
states of FloridaV ^Maryland, 
North Carolina, SouthXJarolina, 
Virginia, West Virginia, and the 
District of Columbia will attend. 

"Achieve Through Leader- 
ship" is the theme of the con- 
ference which* will feature the 
appearance of Miss Virginia Al- 
lan of Wyandotte, Mich., First 
Vice President of the National 
Federatipn. A former well- 
known educator in Detroit, Miss 
Allan is now Executive Vice 
President of the Cahalan Drug 
Stores, Inc. in Wyandotte. 

Other members of the Con- 
ference team will be Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Glenn Eastburn of Wash- 
ington, D.C., National Federa- 
tion Program Director ,and Mrs. 
Dorothy Woodall, Decatur, Ala., 
National Membership Chairman. 

The Conference workshops 
will enable officers oi the 170,- 
000 member Federating ^to in- 
crease their effectiveness as 
leaders through orientation and 
program planning sessions. Em- 
phasis will be placed on person- 
al development, on community 
participation and on study and 
understanding of world affairs, 
the three areas of the Federa- 
tion's National program, "Lead- 
ership — A Dimension in 
Democracy for You, the Career 
Woman." 



1RALS 



A. FRED ORIINWOOD 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral » 
services for A. Fred Green- 
wood,- vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of Governmei 
Employees Exchange (GEX) ai 
president of the National 
iation of Consumer Orgar 
tion, were held Saturday in 
Detroit 

Mr. Greenwood had been ill 
many months • and was semi- 
retired. He had served 28 year* 
with Montgomery Ward and 
rose to the past of general man- 
ager for all catalogue saiea 
units m the United States. Ha 
served with GEX from its or- 
ganization until the time he was 
taken ill. ^ 

Mr. Greenwood, a native of 
Detroit, was a son of the Rev. 
Thomas A. and Mrs. Maude 
Ricker Greenwood and the hus- 
band of Mrs. Erma Heap Green- 
wood. 

He resided in Virginia Beach 
for the past two years. He was 
a member of the Methodist 
Church and a veteran of World 
War I service with the Marine 
Corps. 

Besides his wife, surviving are 
a daughter, Mrs. Don Bullard 
of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; three 
sons, George A. Greenwood of 
Lynnhaven, Dwight F. Green- 
wood of Dallas and Donald A. 
Greenwood of Peoira; a sister, 
Mrs. R. J. Coronweth of Grosse 
Point Shores, Mich.; two broth- 
ers, George E. Greenwood of 
Detroit and Russell W. Green- 
wood of Huntington, L.I.; and 
eight grandchildren. 



V 



Mrs. Mary Pearl Rhodes Gay 



Maternity transr 
rfolk — Conneil 



Connell and McCaw. 

3:30 a.m . — Emergency sick- 
ness—Beach Hospital— Wallace. 

9:10 a.m. 
portation to Norfolk 
and McCaw. 

4:05 p.m.— Auto accident at 
38th St. Army dependent — 
Beach Hospital— Wallace. 

5:15 p.m. — Emergency sick- 
ness — Beach Hospital — Hogan. 

7:00 p.m.— Call to Beach Hos- 
pital—Russell and Hogan. 

10:15 p.m. — Accident trans- 
portation Marine — NAS Oceana 
—Hogan and Russell. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Funeral 
services for Mrs. Mary Pearl 
Rhodes Gay, 67, of Rt 1, Lon- 
don Bridge, were held Friday in 
the Maestas Funeral Home at 
2 p.m. by the Rev. Henry Mor- 
gan of First Presbyterian 
Church. 

Surviving are a son, Osie H. 
Gay, Jr., and a daughter, Mrs. 
•George Hines, both of London 
Bridge; two brothers, John 
Frank Rhodes and Clem Oliver 
Rhodes of Norfolk; and three 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Princess Anne 
Memorial Park, London Bridge. 



Petit Larceny 
Shows Increase 



VIRGINIA BEACH — Police 
Chief Reeves Johnson said 
Wednesday that there has been 
a noticeable increase in pettit 
thievery in the resort the past 
week, probably because the sea- 
son is coming to an end. 

"Thieves seem to think they 
have to get busy before the sea- 
son is over," Johnson said, "and 
our cases always increase this 
time of year." 

Much of the stolen property 
is not recovered because sum- 
mer visitors either do hot miss 
the articles until they get home 
or are too pressed for time to 
go to the police, he said. 

Especially hard hit by these 
"last minute" thieves are sum- 
mer hotel and restaurant em- 
ployee* -wh^V^i^tfeg. 
money from local banks' before 
leaving for their winter homes. 

Johnson cautioned Labor Day 
weekend vacationers to be care- 
ful about leaving . money or 
valuable items laying around in 
easy reach of theives. 



ACROSS 

1 Extra tire 

6 Detest 
10 Exclamation 
of despair 

14 Clock 

15 Singles * 

16 Bargain 

17 Trial 

20 Small brook 

21 Wager 

22 Belief 

23 Bora 

24 Footlike 
pert ' 

25 004 of 
thunder 

27 Levy 

28 Rural 
diety 

29 Self 
32 Scatter 
35 Net 
36Geai 
37Drj 

38 Enamel 

39 Indian 
tribe 

40 Affirmative 
word 

41 Holy person 

42 Awaken 

43 Notice 

44 Lively song 

45 Roman 
bronze 



46 Weight of 
India (pL) 
17 Entire 
48 Swiss rivet 
51 Decrease 
84 High card 
55 Mediterran- 
ean island 
58 Misunder- 
standing 

60 Polish river 

61 Ireland 

62 Lifeless 

63 Chair 

64 Crucifix 

65 Canvas 
shelters 

DOWN 

1 Strict 

2 Fairy 

3 Plenty 

4 Spin 

8 Make a 
. mistake 

6 Residences 

7 Dill 

8 A number 

9 Superlative 
ending 

10 Vail flower 

11 Rested 

12 Succulent 
plant 

13 Dispatched 

18 Wild goat 

19 Repent 



Answer To Puxxle No. 72C 

IPlllAl I aTr] A 



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ULUJUUI'JlUULl'JrJUUI 

nrannra Finn ronmrjt 

■unn f r.ujun urjnr 
aau ui-juu nG nci 

Qil ULH3U iU'MIO HI 

I.IHMOil.iK Mfll.MJHI ■ 

"LIUHli WIIH LKJIjU 

■nranrnn ranrsnm 

l!JU EJLHMO UFIPjIi Lit 

uuu mi [Minn nor 

nnnnn nrnn nnnnr. 
cnniinnraninrannnn 

ItlUULlDt 



24 Animal foot 

25 Spoil 

28 Look for 

?7 Spread to dry 
8 Trick 
89 Unbleached 
30 Departs 
SI Curved 
.. molding 

32 Speaks 

33 Woody plant 
84 Oat up 

35 does boating 

38 Couple 

39 Kind of 
lettuce 

41 Slumber 

42 Electric 
unit 



45 Toward 
sheltered 
side 

46Begin 

47 Pained 

48 Foreign 

49 Stop 
development 

50 Raves 

51 Hebrew 
prophet 

52 Wei* * * 

53 Bewildered 

54 Air: comb, 
form 

55 Slave 

57 Through 

58 River (8p.) 

59 Insect egg 



Jamas Kenneth Newland 

LONDON BRIDGE — Funeral 
services for James Kenneth 
Newland, 18, son of Lt. James 
E. and Dorothy Louise Knight 
Newland, of 95 Great Neck 
Rbad, London Bridge, were held 
Monday at the Hollomon-Brown 
Funeral Home at 2 p.m. 

Besides his parents, he is sur- 
vived by a sister, Miss Dianne 
L. Newland; a brother, David 
Newland; his paternal grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy D. 
Newland, all of London Bridge, 
and his maternal grandmother, 
Mrs. Alice C. Knight of Tujunga, 
Calif. . 'J, 

A member of the Norview 
Presbyterian Church, he was a 
senior at Princess Anne High 
School. 

Burial was Monday at 3 p.m. 
at the Hampton National Ceme- 
tery. 



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George Gilliam Says: 



Some People celebrated the 
Fourth with a Fifth; with die 
Laser Day weekend coming up, 
Let's aU try to be Safer Drivers. 



11 

HEATING OILS 





ic Fuel 
il Co. 



Call: 

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Day or Night 




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hoe Repqirln 



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All material and work guaranteed 
None Better 

We fill Orthopedic Prescriptions 

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NEXT TO EXQUISITE BARBER SHOP 




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,^h .SL, £ 5l aCh , 'jf^F™ 11 ™ a e every strike count recently when they landed the 
and V™ ^ * ST le n' ^-S* Mrs - W T ' " Slim " Parker « Mrs *** Chancer and Mr 
%£JELf&T *"?% ^ ° f Virginia Beacb - ^y a*** 1 <* Oregon Inlet aboard the 



: 



SAVE 

At Vo. Beach's 

LARGEST 

USED AUTO PARTS YARD 

Tidewater Salvage Inc. 

10 ACRES OF USED PARTS 
Just Off Va. Beach Blvd. in Oceana 

GA 8-1131 



Summer Racing 
Season Closes 



? NUMBERONE= 




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OPENED NOV. 1959 

1st Modern 10 pin establishment in Tidewater 

Family Bowling ANY HOUR Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 

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Thynderbird Bowling Lanes 

Virginia Beach 



CREEDS — The summer racing 
meet at Freedom 7 came to a 
roaring end Sunday with nearly 
100 racing cars thrilling a crowd 
of over a thousand people. 

By dividing the late model 
stock cars into two classes, 
Super Super Stock and Super 
Stock Automatic the NHRA 
sanctioned track provided extra 
thrills for the crowd and extra 
purse money for the drivers. 

Roy parden of Portsmouth 
took top money of $50 in SS/S 
and Pop Whitt took second 
money of $25 for second. The 
SS/SA class was dominated by 
Pearson-Baker of Newport News 
first and R. F. Ward of Hampton 
second. .The best Elapsed Time 
of the day was turned in by 
Nollie Simpson in his A class 
Gasser. The Portsmouth speed- 
ster turned the 1/5 mile in 
11:05 seconds. Not a track rec- 
ord but good enough to be the 
best of the day. The Pearson 
Baker Plymouth showed the 
fastest speed of the day with a 
moving 104 mph, Baker hit this 
speed while ^winning $25 top 
money in theTJo. 1 Stock 
Eliminator race. L. *W. Clark 
took'the No. 2 Stock Eliminator 
race money. Charlie Gary of 
Newport News took the Street 
Eliminator in his B class Gasser. 
Freedom 7 will not operate 
Sunday Sept. 2nd. The National 
Drag races in Indianapolis beck- 
on so many local drivers that 
Freedom 7 does not wish to 
stand in the way. The track, lo- 
cated at Creeds Airstrip in the 
Southern tip of Princess Anne 
County will resume racing witlr 
a big event on Sunday, Sept. 9. 
This will begin the Fall Meet at 
Freedom 7. Racing, is expected 
to continue year round, weather 
permitting, every Sunday. Drag 
racers enjoy testing their equip- 
ment in all kinds of weather and 
the Drag Af fecionados never let 
weather bother them. 



WHO PAYS MORE? 
BUYER OR RENTER 






( 



FREEDOM 

H-jtt 

DRACWAY 

CREEDS AIRFIELD 
VA. BEACH, VA. 

DRAG RACING 



By JULIAN RASHKIND, 
Preside/it of Tidewater Assn. 
Of Hon^a Builders 
(Editor's Note: This is the 
second in a series of articles 
on whether it is cheaper to 
buy a home or rent.) 
It is said that whether you 
buy or rent, you pay for the 
house you occupy. 

Our question is: Who pays 
more — the buyer or the renter? 

A landlord has all the ex- 
penses of a home buyer. Natur- 
ally, he sets his rents to cover 
these expenses. In addition, he 
is in business to make a profit. 
This is basic to the free enter- 
prise system. Obviously, the 
prices the landlord and the 
home buyer paid for their 
houses reflected a profit mar- 
gin for the builder. 

But a home buyer escapes 
paying that second profit — 
which a renter pays a landlord. 

Families which have never 
bought a home are sometimes 
somewhat frightened by the 
idea of a mortgage. But once 
understood, a mortgage is far 
from the ogre it may seem from 
a distance. In this article, we 
will see how a mortgage is paid 
off. 

We are considering a $14,550 
mortgage on a $15,000 home on 
which there was a $450 down 
payment. It is an FHA-insured 
mortgage that is to run for 30 
years at 5 ft per cent interest 
This, according to the National 
Association of Home Builders 
and the Federal Housing Admin- 
istration, is a median-priced 
home and a typical mortgage. 

Monthly payments the first 
year will be $86.48. Each pay- 
ment embraces interest, retire- 
ment of some principal and a 
charge of half of dne per cent 
for having the mortgage FHA- 
insured. 

Throughout the first year and 
for roughly half the life of the 



mortgage, the bulk of each 
monthly payment will go for in- 
terest on the loan. But this pat- 
tern reverses itself and during 
the last half of the mortgage 
life, the bulk of monthly pay- 
ments will go to -wiping out the 
principal. Each year, the home 
buyer builds up an equity in 
his home. 

The charge for the FHA in- 
surance is $6.02 a month the 
first year. This charge gets 
smaller each year, until in the 
final year of the mortgage, it 
\ but 17 cents a month. 

Because the FHA charge goes 
down at yearly intervals, the 
yearly installments follow a 
slightly downhill track. But the 
interest and principal together 
amount to the same each month 
—$80.46. The single exception is 
the last month of the mortgage, 
when they drop to $61.37. 

Thus, payments by a home 
owner are stable. The cost of 
living may soar and rents may 
skyrocket. But a home owner's 
payments are fixed. This is a 
protection against inflation 
which a renter does not have. 



Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 3$/ 1962 
Page 5-A 

Virginia Beach 
Golf Tourney 
This Weekend 

LYNNHAVEN— The first an- 
nual City of Virginia Beach 
amateur golf champonship is 
scheduled to be played this 
weekend over the Highland 
Links Country Club course. 

Approximately 150 of the 
area's top amateur golfers are 
expected to participate in the 
72-hole medal play event, ac- 
cording to Barnes. Play will be 
18 holes on Saturday, 18 on 
Sunday and the final 36 holes 
are set for Monday. 

The city champonship is open 
to all golfers with a 10 handi- 
cap or less residing in the Tide- 
water area of Norfolk. Entry fee 
for the tournament is $8. 

After the first 36 holes the 
field will be cut to the low 60 
scorers. Unlike most events of 
this type, the five low men after 
the cutoff point will receive 
prizes. 

A championship dinner is 
scheduled for Monday night at 
the Pine Tree Inn. The champion 
will be awarded a three-foot 
high trophy, a sports coat and 
merchandise and the runner-up 
will receive similar prizes. 

Many low handicap players 
have already entered. These in- 
clude such stars as Billy Mc- 
Clanan, Bobby Bennett, Ocie 
Barnes, Clyde Barnette, Horty 
Powell and Bobby Bourdon. 

The course is open today and 
Friday for practice rounds. 



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Food and Drink Available 

SANCTIONED BY — NATIONAL 
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— DIKEtTIOVS— 

Route 58 to QAana. turn iouth on Kt. 
816 to Creeds, then out on Ht Ml 
North Cwolina resident* route throotfa 
*J«W«r, J^jjt^ Itejjr to OPT 2 

I I 



Call 
GA 8-1306 



BROTHERS 

Auto Service 
Va. Beach 



for the new 



Lincon 



HEAVY DUTY MOWERS 
Home & Commercial Use 




ENGINES 

• 3% H.P. & 4 H.P. 

4 Cycle— Cast Iron 



In the last year of the mort- 
gage, the home buyer makes on- 
ly 11 monthly payments instead 
of 12.' This is because the pay- 
ments are in advance and the 
slate is wiped clean by the time 
that last month rolls around. 

When this happy days arrives, 
the home owner has an invest- 
ment which will give him prac- 
tically free housing for years, as- 
suming that he has maintained 
his home in good order while 
paying/ off the mortgage. 

Actually, many families do 
not expect to live in that first 
home all their lives. And many 
do not. Frequently they "trade 
up" to larger homes as their 
children grow and their mode 
of living changes'. They may 
even buy a third and smaller 
home after the children strike 
out for themselves, or as retire- 
ment age nears. 

In any event, the monthly 
payments they made on that 
first home give them financial 
means for further improvement 
in their housing. 

The family which rented over 
a 10-year or similar period, made 
monthly payments, too, but their 
payments for housing did not 
give them any savings or equity 
in their home. 

(Next: Rental Coats) 



Dr. and Mrs. Fred M. Wil- 
liams of 11354th Street were 
caught by the roving camera 
while enjoying an informal 
perty recently in Birdneck 
Point. (Staff Photo) 







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when 
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31st ST. EXTENDED 




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MULTIPLE LISTING REALTOR 



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VWeWa «•**» SUN-NEW5 
T1iur»d*y, August 30, 1962 
Ptg» 6-A 

Biylake Pines 
Church News 

\ 

BAYSIDE— The Senior High 

.YJ\ of the Baylake Methodist 

■ch enjoyed a camping trip 

Retreat this past weekend 

t Kerr Lake, Clarkville. 

At 7:00 P.M. Sunday the 
AduR Fellowship Council will 
meet at the church with John 
Bolger, chairman, presiding. 

The Chancel choir of Baylake 
Methodist Church will rehearse 
Tuesday night, instead of 
Wednesday. 

The Commission on Worship 
will meet Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. with 
Richard Dorton, chairman pre- 
siding and the Commission on 
Education will meet at the 
church Sept 6 at 7:30 p.m. with 
Eugene Wilbern chairman, pre- 
siding. 

BAYSIDE MYF IS 
BACK FROM TRIP 

BAYSIDE— The Senior M.YJ. 
of the Baylake Methodist Church 
enjoyed a camping trip and Re- 
treat this past weekend at Ken- 
Lake, Clarkville. 

They were accompanied by 
their senior counselors, Mr. and 
Mrs. D. M. Whitaker and Mr. 
and Mrs. Lon Humphries. 



Bayside Personals 

Capt. and Mrs. W. W. Mead- 
ow and three daughters, Pam, 
Diane and Wendy, of the Little 
Creek Amphibious Base, joined 
with the congregation of Bay- 
lake Methodist Church, Sunday. 

Mrs. H. B. Robertson Jr., of 
Lake Shores is convalescing at 
Portsmouth Naval Hospital after 
undergoing surgery. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Davis of 
Indian Hill Road, Baylake Pines, 
are receiving congratulations on 
the birth of a daughter last 
week at Norfolk General Hos- 
pital. 



Mr. and Mrs. H. D.»Harvey of 
Lake Shores are receiving con- 
gratulations on the birth of a 
son last week at De Paul Hos- 
pital. 



Mr. Richard Dorton of Lake 
Shores returned to his home 
Saturday after vacationing in 
West Virginia. 

CHURCH PURCHASES 
ADDITIONAL LAND 

BAYSIDE— The Bayside Bap- 
tist Church has recently pur- 
chased 3.06 acres of land ad- 
joining their present property. 
This will allow for ample room 
for additional Education Build- 
ings and a Sanctuary. Rev. 
James V. DeFoe is pastor of the 
rapidly growing Bayside Baptist 
Church. 



It happened 100 YEARS ago 

The oldest incorporated trade association in the country, 
the United States Brewers Association, was organized in 
1862 ... the same year that 




IN VIRGINIA, on March 8, in a furious naval battle at Hampton 
Roads, the Confederate ironclad Virginia sank the Union steam 
frigate Cumberland, disabled the Minnesota, and captured the 
frigate Congress. Virginians cheered their victory with foaming 
steins of beer. 

For even then, beer was Virginia's traditional bever- 
age of moderation. Beer still provides enjoyment for 
Virginians, and a good living for the employees and 
suppliers of the Brewing Industry. 

TODAY, in its centennial year, the United States 
Brewers Association still works constantly to assure 
maintenance of high standards of quality and pro- 
priety wherever beer and ale are served. 




Bayside Ladies 
Program Starts 
September 13th 

BAYSrDE — The Bayside 
"Ladies Day Out Program" will 
get underway with registration, 
scheduled Sept. 13 at the Bay- 
lake Methodist Church,- from 
10 a.m. to noon. 

Classes will begin Sept. 20 
and will continue for eight 
weeks, which is something new 
this year. Usually, the classes 
are for six weeks only. 

The following courses will be 
offered: 

Trimnastics — Fashion and 
Charm will be taught by Mrs. 
Victor Rink. 

Sewing, Mrs. Joseph Allen; 
Interior Decorating, Mr. Neai 
Thomas. 

Bridge — beginners and inter- 
mediates — Mrs. Norman Arring- 
i ton. 

Holiday Creations — Mrs. 
W. O. Stakes; Art— Mrs. Eliza- 
beth D'Auria. 

Flower Clinic — Mrs. Malcolm 
Todd, Jr., and a new class has 
been added this year "You Too 
| Can Win" — how to write win- 
ning contest entries, will be 
| taught by Mrs. W. O. Thomas. 

The Committee in charge of 
arrangements, who are working 
through Central Y.W.C.A. Di- 
rector Mrs. Jean Newnam, is 
composed of the following: Mrs. 
O. L. Gilbert Jr., chairman; 
Mrs. E. C. Hurd, Vice chair- 
man; Mrs. R. L. Hite, secretary; 
Mrs. T. R. Burnette, registra- 
tion chairman; Mrs. R. H. Tay- 
lor, publicity. Others serving 
are: Mrs. J. D. DeJarnette, Mrs. 
J. E. Weirich, Mrs. H. E. Lar- 
sen, Mrs. J. W. Reynolds, Jr., 
and Mrs. H. J. Harm, Jr. 

Sunday School 
Has New Class 

BAYSIDE — A new Sunday 
School Class is being formed at 
Baylake Pines Methodist Church 
for the "Older Youth." This 
class is for single high school 
graduates and will be taught by 
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Robertson, 
Jr. 

H. B. Wright will teach the 
class until Mrs. Robertson can 
take over. 

MISS LINDEMANN 
SHOWER HONOREE 

BAYSIDE— Miss Martha Gene 
Lindemann of Parrish Road, 
Thoroughgood, entertained Aug. 
20, at 8:00 P.M. at a Miscellan- 
eous Shower in honor of Miss 
Dorothy Fay Nummy with about 
25 guests attending. 

Miss Nummy and Robert 
Parrish were married Saturday 
at Park Place Baptist Church, 
Norfolk. 



Ermine Suits Featured 



WINTERIZE 

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TEMS INSPECTIONS! No obligations 
—15 Radio dispatched trucks staffed with 
heating experts are waiting for your call. 
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with guaranteed satisfaction. Don t wait 
—Winter is just around the corner! 




BUILDERS • SUPERMART 




PLUMBING & 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIERS^ 

lUtflumt, vttmeess anne m 424-26*1 | 




(Photo .toy Phillip*) 

Fashion Consultant Inga Borg (left) and Mrs. Maxine 
Barber model two of the outstanding fashions to be featured 
in a special showing of Miss Borg's own original creations at 
the Cape Colony Club Sept. 26. The two swim suits, though not 
exactly designed for swim use, are of real ermine. A preview 
of the show will be held around the club pool Sunday afternoon. 



LEAGUE, CLUB TO 
HOLD "OPEN HOUSE" 

BAYSBDE — The Thorough- 
good Civic League and Thor- 
oughgood Garden Club will 
hold a joint "open house" at 
the. old Thoroughgood House, 
September 9, at 5:00 P.M. 

This "open house" is for the 
residents of Thoroughgood. Re- 
freshments will be served un- 
der the Magnolia trees in the 
Pleasure Garden. 




JUDGING CORRECTLY f-tr-ir-^ri 
FROM EXPERIENCE ULJLJl J 

UNITED OR 

LEAGUED 

TOGETHER. 



LEAGUED □□[]□□[] 



□□ □□ODD 

Fill in the word iquarei. The letters in Ike heavy 
iquarn form an Anagram, (he lolurion of which is 
the, TV TEEZH Personality of the Week. 



(9/M31 IV J 
d3inV7 39IAAI SVMAtSW 



Fire Calls 

Aug. 20—12:28 a.m., miscel- 
laneous; 28th, & Ocean. 

Aug. 20—1:40 p.m., inhalator; 
16th and Ocean. 

Aug. 20—8:21' p.m., trash; 
210-75th St. 

Aug. 21—9:48 p.m., grease on 
stove; 210-43rd Street. 

Aug. 21—9:52 p.m., wood; 835 
Goldsboro. 

Aug. 22—9:53 a.m., honest 
mistake; 25th and Arctic. 

Aug. 24 — 4:17 p.m., house; 
113-63rd Street. 

Aug. 24 — 8:57 p.m., trash can; 
2108 Atlantic Avenue. 

Aug. 25 — 8:28 a.m., inhalator; 
71st Street and Ocean. 

Aug. 26 — 1:40 a.m., house; 
Colony Trailer Ct. 

Aug. 26—4:51 p.m., grass; 300 
blk. 25^ Street. 

Aug. 26-7-8:37 p.m., locked 
out of house; 305-38th Street. 

TEEN CLUB WILL 
SPONSOR "HOP" 

BAYSIDE — The Ocean Park 
Teen Club will hold a "Ship 
Wreck Hop" Saturday from 
7:30 to 11 p.m. at the club room 
of the Ocean Park Fire Station. 
Tommy Lewis will be the disc 
jockey. 

Admission will be 35c and the 
dress will be either casual or 
"ship wreck." Refreshments 
will be served at the canteen. 




GA 8-1797 6A 8-9227 

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tH 



AftP's 

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HAMS 



12 to 16 

POUNDS 

AVERAGE 



SHANK PORTION 



lb. 






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BUTT PORTION 



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FULL SHANK HALF «. 43c 

WHOLE HAMS 



FULL BUTT HALF » 530 



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"SUPER-RIGHT" 10 to 12 Lb. Avg. 

SEMI-BONELESS 



HAMS 



63c 



WHOLE ONLY LB. 

MORRELL'S CANNED 

HAMS 3- » $ 2 W 



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STEAKS 

SLICED— AMERICAN or PIM. 

CHEESE 



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A&P FOOD MARKETS 

OPEN LABOR DAY 

Monday, Sept. 3 



"SUPER-RIGHT" SLICED 

LUNCHEON 

MEATS 

SPICED SALAMI OR OA 

PICKLE-PIMENTO e-oz pkg. /£§C 



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16 POUNDS AND OVER * 

ib. 33 c 



SIZES UP TO 15 POUNDS 

ib. 37 c 



WHITE SEEDLESS 



GRAPES 

NECTARINES 

POTATOES 



LARGE RIPE 



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IDEAL FOR BAKING 



JL «•• L I c 

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in RQc 

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ONIONS "'Low 



2 u. ..... 25c PEPPERS >■<«• 3 '" IOC 

J lis. m« 19C POTATOES "low twin 3 lis. 29c 






FRESH EGGS 
LUNCH MEAT 



SUNNTBROOK GRADE "A" SMALL 



SUPER-RIGHT 



|J DOZ I &1C 

1 1 nn 

mM 12-OZ CANS Nil 



17-02. Cms 



A&P FRUIT 

COCKTAIL 2 

ORANGE OR GRAPE 

H I -C DR I N K 3 "" c> " 

GREEN GIANT 



TRIANGLE SLICED 

43c PINEAPPLE2 39c 

MAHCAL-TOILET 

89c TISSUE 10 -• - 89c 

A&P— TOMATO 



GREEN PEAS 2 43c JUICE 



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VITA— PROCESSED DILL 

10c PICKLES 

CHARCOAL 



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9 




Legal Notices 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN- NEWS 

SERVING VIRGINIA BEACH AND PRINCESS ANNE 



Classified Ada 



SECTION B 






VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1962 



-*-*■ 



BASKXN' IN THE SUN 



By GORDON BASKIN 




__________ ■ , ' 

I see where Beverly Hills, California has applied for. a 
Federal grant of one hundred thousand dollars. They will use 
the money to make a survey to see if they need to combat urban 
blight. They don't want this money to combat the blight, they 
^ just want to see if they need to start worrying 
about it. Well, now. 

Beverly Hills, according to the i960 
Census, has the highest oer-capita income in 
the nation, being a collection of little old 
thirty-room shacks called home by more than 
900 doctors, 800 lawyers, and a very high 
percentage of various and sundry desirable 
and undesirable movie actors and actresses. 

I don't know what blight the city father had 
in mind, since the newspapers did not report 
the fact. Perhaps thev want to relocate some 
G-oroon Baskin ^1^. folks like E i izabeth Taylor and Mar i 0Il 

Brando. Maybe these two, and others, have been flinging them- 
selves around with such wild abandon that they are giving the 
old home town a bad name. Maybe tbis constitutes a blight. I 
really don't think this is the real reason, since the request came 
from the wrong place. Now if Rome and Tahiti had asked for 
money to combat blight, then I woyld be sure that Taylor and 
Brando were about to be asked to move on. The way they've 
been behaving lately, it's enough to upset a continent — let 
alone a town, j , 

Maybe the city needs the money to help the doctors. Even 
for California, where psychiatrists ha«e found„a home, 900 doctors 
seems like ajot of doctors for a small town. 

Perhaps the lawyers, all 800 of them, are sick of suing the 
same people over and over. Maybe the lawyers need soVne 
"leaving-town" money. 

Depressed Area, Maybe! 

Maybe they want to conduct the survey to see if they can 
qualify as a depressed area. By definition they certainlv seem 
to be. It makes me feel depressed iust thinking about it. If they 
could qualify for some crop support monev they couid then get 
paid lor NOT making movies. I believe I'd vote for that, since 
I have seen a few movies lately. I'd even pay them a little extra 
if they'd plow under some of the ones I've seen on TV this 
summer. i 

I suppose they'll get the money. The whole thinqs is iust 
screwy enough to appeal to those knuckle-heads in Washington 
who are throwing away our money like it is going out of style. 
Maybe Harrv Byrd will hear about it. If he does I think we 
can look forward to a few days of entertainment that will make 
the movies look sicker. * 



French-Canadian Spreads Word About Beach 




MISS SAUCIER 



GREAT NECK STABLES 
JUNIOR HORSE SHOW 
SET FOR SATURDAY 



S 



GREAT NECK— Great Neck 
Stables will hold a Junior Horse 
Show Saturday at 1 . p.m., ac- 
cording to Mrs. Gerry M. Ash- 
burn, director. 

A highlight of the show will 
be a Mad Hatter Class, when 
horses or ponies will be shown 
in line wearinq outstanding 
hats. Prizes will be given for 
the funniest and prettiest hats 
as selected by the judge, 
Fashion Consultant inga Borg. 

A special Sportsmanship 
Award will be presented by 
Mrs. Ashburn. All contestants 
must be 18 years of age. or un- 
der. 

Judges 

L. T. Parker of Hampton will 
' serve as senior judge and Kath- 
leen Watson of London Bridge 
and Martha Bullock of Hampton 
will be junior judges. 
Jr. Committee 

The junior committee consists 
of Elizabeth Landis, Wing Todd, 
Carol Anderson, Irene Hillard, 
Marie Walkley, Elizabeth Ash- 
burn, Elisabeth Campbell, Sus- 
an Denny, Janie Byrd, Sally 
Pridmore, Carol Spindle, Wendy 
Farmer, Fontaine Syer, Carol 
Anne Evans, Nancy and Sally 
Rydell, Townsend Brown and 
Bill Ashburn. 

The adult committee will be 
made up of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Watson, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
McNeil, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. T. 
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. 
Spindle in, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. 
Keeley, Mrs. Ashburn, Judge & 
Mrs. J. Davis Reed, Mrs. Albert 

BIBLE CLASS GIVES 
TO RESCUE SQUAD 

VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach-Princess Anne 
Rescue Squad, a children's 
orphanage and the boy scouts 
have benefited by recent action 
of the Men's Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church here. 

The class voted appropriations 
of fifty dollars to the Rescue 
Squad and the other organiza- 
tions at a recent meeting of the 
officers, according to E. L. 
Applegate, president. 



Holt, Mrs. David Echols and 
Ens. Paul Cronin. . 

CLASSES 

Classes to. be judged include 
(1) small pony working hunters, 
8 fences in the ring, approxi- 
mately 2% feet; (2) large pony 
working hunters, 8 fences, about 
3 feet; (3) junior working hunt- 
ers, 8 fences, about ZVz feet; 

(4) pleasure ponies and horses; 

(5) small pony working hunters 
under saddle; (6) large pony 
working hunters under saddle, 
(7) junior working hunters un- 
der saddle; (8) hunter seat equi- 
tation for 12 and under; (9) 
hunter seat equitation 13 thru 
18; (10) small handy pony work- 
ing hunters; (11) large handy 
pony working hunters; (12) 
junior handy working hunters; 
and , (13) pleasure horses and 
pony championship. 

Junior exhibitors will hold 
a party in the tent following 
the show and parents will 
meet in the clubhouse. , 
Further information about 
the show may be obtained from 
Mrs. Ashburn at 464-3028. 



Cancer Society 
New Grants in 
Research Field 

The American Cancer Society 
has awarded two grants totaling 
$38,203 for the continuation of 
research projects underway at 
Virginia medical institutions, ac- 
cording to Dr. Robert J. Faul- 
coner, research spokesman for 
the Society's Virginia Division.' 

A g«ant for 122,000 was 
awarded to the University of 
Virginia in Charlottesville to re- 
new the Society's Institutional 
Research grant presently in ef- 
fect. The Medical College of 
Virginia in Richmond received 
a total of $16,203 to continue 
conducting experiments with 
whole body radiation. Both 
grants become effective Septem- 
ber 1, 1962. 

The University of Virginia is 
one of many institutions 
throughout thj country receiv- 
ing an institutional research 
grant from the Society. The 
grant is used to provide aid to 
investigators in all scientific 
fields and enables the Univer- 
sity to continue its program of 
developing new research leads. 

At the Medical College, re- 
search is continuing in the field 
of whole body radiation. This 
work is a cooperative venture 
of surgeons and radiologists 
who are attempting to find a 
solution to a problem which 
plagues the whole field of can- 
cer. The problem is that when- 
ever an agent can be found 
which destroys cancer tissue, it 
also destroys normal growing 
tissue. The American Cancer 
Society's grant enables scien- 
tists at the Medical College to 
explore the effect of radiation 
combined with various drugs on 
the body's immune defense to 
see if a greater resistance to 
cancer can be produced by cell 
transplantation. 

These and other research 
projects at the Medical College 
and the University of Virginia 
are supported by the American 
Cancer Society through funds 
from its combined educational 
and fund-raising Crusade each 
April. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
young French-Canadian lass who 
visited here about a month ago 
so she "could practice her Eng- 
lish," has become somewhat of 
a good-will ambassador between 
Virginia Beach and her native 
Anjou, Montreal. 

Miss Colette Saucier, secre- 
tary to Anjou's mayor for more 
than seven years, presented her 
employer, Ernest Crepeault, 
with the city -emblem cuff links 
sent him by Virginia Beach 
Mayor Frank A. Dusch. 
Preparing Article 

But Miss Saucier has done 
more than that. She is working 
on a detailed article about Vir- 
ginia Beach for the Canadian 
newspapers, a move that may 
benefit the resort's tourist trade 
in that area. 

To make sure that her ar- 
ticle is correct, Miss Saucier 
has written several letters to 
her City Hall friend, Mrs. 
Eileen Oliver, Mayor Dutch's 
secretary, asking for informa- 
tion on the city's history, data 
on the Cape Henry Light- 
house and other points of in- 
terest. ^ 
This good-will gesture all 
started with a telephone call. 
Miss Saucier, who was spending 
15 days at The Cavalier in 
hopes that time spent among 
Americans . would improve her 
newly learned English, gave 
Mr*. Oliver a ring because the 
two had so much in common — 
both being a mayor's secretary. 

City Hall Guest 

Mrs. Oliver invited her to tour 
City Hall, meet some of the city 
employees and put her English 
to good use, all of which Miss 
Saucier did and soon made 
many friends during her last 
busy week here. 

Since returning to Anjou, the 
lovely self - appointed "ambas- 
sador" has done much to pro- 
mote Virginia Beach and the 
hospitality she found here. 



Youth Returns 




Tales Of Italian 
City Almost Beyond 
Belief, But It's True 

By LESLIE RUSSELL 

BAYSIDE— Eight-cent pizza . . . wine cheaper than cgto . . • 
no speed limits ... no stop signs . . . seem impossible? It's not, 
for these are things Bob Teller, 17-year-old son of Comdr. and 
Mrs. Leslie Teller, found when he lived in Naples, Italy for two 

very unusual years. 
Bob, who recently returned to 



System 



■^ 



Horse Show Entry 




Miss Wing Todd on "Liliath". (Creech Photo) 



Friday Change 
In C&P System 



At 9:30 p.m. on August 31, 
the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company of Vir- 
ginia and the entire Bell Sys- 
tem exchange teletypewriter 
network will be converted to 
dial operation. 

L. F. Patrick, local C&P man- 
ager, said the change of TWX 
service to dial will be the first 
nationwide cutover in telephone 
history and is costing the Bell 
System some $110 million. 

In the Virginia Company 
there are over 700 teletypewrit- 
er machines that are used on 
the general exchange with some 
60,000 throughout the country. 

Under the new automatic 
system any one teletypewriter 
station will be able to dial di- 
rectly to the distant TWX in the 
same manner that customers 
dial their own telephone calls. 

Basically TWX service is to 
the teletypewriter subscriber 
what regular local and long dis- 
tance service is to the telephone 
customer. All TWX customers 
are served by a common net- 
work, each station having its 
own number. Each customer, in 
turn, can place a call to any 
other customer just as with 
telephone calls. Today the al- 
most 60,000 such stations serve 
customers coast to coast trans- 
mitting and receiving more than 
two and half million written 
messages each month. 

This modernization will en- 
able the telephone companies to 
furnish a faster and more effi- 
cient . service for TWX custom- 
ers. It is estimated that the 
average call will be established 
in half a minute, about three 
times faster than before. 

With dial TWX sixteen reg- 
ional operating centers will 
handle collect, conference and 
other special calls as well' as 
provide operator assistance 
when needed. It is expected, 
however, that 85 to 90 per cent 
of all TWX messages will be 
dialed directly. 

The national operating center 
in St. Louis will provide TWX 
information for the entire nation 
and will enable the Bell System 
to provide fast, up-to-date serv- 
ice for this growing form of 
modern communication. 



Anjou Mayor Ernest Crepeault with "Freedom 7? cuff links. 



Murphy Named 
Manager For 
Insurance Firm 




Junior Women 
In Fall Meet 

VIRGINIA BEACH— The Vir- 
ginia Beach-Princess Anne Jr. 
Woman's Club will hold its first 
fall meeting Tuesday in the Par- 
rish Hall at Galilee Episcopal 
Church. 

The Community Affairs and 
Welfare Department'? of the 
club will provide a panel dis- 
cussion on "Ways to Help Im- 
prove the Welfare of Our Com- 
munity." - 

Panel members will consist of 
Dr. James . Williams, director of 
the Atlantic Mental Hygiene 
Clinic, The Rey, H. Waddell 
Waters, pastor of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Virginia. Beach, 
and Mrs. Emily Parks, principal 
of W. T. Cooke Elementary 
School. 



TOMMY MURPHY 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Tommy 
Murphy has been appointed 
Manager of the Life Insurance 
Department of Southeastern 
Agents, Inc., it was announced 
today by William H. Brown, 
officer of the corporation. 

Murphy is a native of Princess 
Anne County and attended local 
school. He has completed the 
Life Underwriters training 
course and the career agents 
Advance course. 

He is qualified in Estate Plan- 
ning and business insurance 
administration as well as person- 
al insurance planning. 

In his new position Murphy 
will supervise the life insurance 
production for Southeastern 
Agents, Inc., . which is a man- 
agerial corporation for the fol- 
lowing agencies: Dale Fairless 
Insurance Corporation, W. W. 
Johnson k Son, W. W. Johnson 
& Company and Southeastern 
Insurance Agency, Inc. . 

Murphy is married to the 
former Dorothy P. Tompkins 
and is the father of three chil- 
dren. They make their home at 
821 Homestead Dr., Princess 
Anne, Va. 

DAVIS, LOEB TO 
REPRESENT CAVALIER 

VIRGINIA BEACH— Elizabeth 
Davis and Eileen Loeb will rep- 
resent the Cavalier and Yacht 
Club at the Cascades in the big 
State Golf Tournament. 

Representing the club in the 
senior division will be Florence 
Lyons and Alpine Martin. This 
division will play at The Home- 
stead. 

In a recent ringer tournament 
the following placed:" A-Di vision 



\ 



Traylor Moves 
To Laskin Rd. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Virginia Beach branch office of 
Traylor Optical has moved from 
its former Atlantic Avenue lo- 
cation to the recently construct- 
ed Professional Building on 
Laskin Road. 

The branch manager, Ber- 
nard H. McNamara is a Marine 
Corps veteran of World War II 
and a native of Boston, Mass., 
where he received his formal 
education and graduated from 
the Fenway School of Mechanic- 
al Optics. 

He recently completed a 
course in Fashion Eyewear of- 
fered by the Tura Foundation of 
Great Neck, N.Y. 

After working in Richmond 
for several years, McNamara 
joined the Traylor organization 
in 1953 at the main office in 
Norfolk and has been manager 
of the Virginia Beach office 
since its opening. He is a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Beach Rotary 
Club, Contact Club and Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

The Traylor firm is 61 years 
old, originating in Norfolk in 
1901 when three associates 
formed a business for eye ex- 
aminations, fittings and optical 
sales. In 1925 Traylor Optical 
Co. was established and the 
precedent was changed so that 
the firm devoted its efforts to 
filling prescriptions. 



School 

Makes Changes 
In Personnel 

PRINCESS ANNE— With the 
addition of three new schools in 
the Princess Anne County Pub- 
lic School system, there will be 
several changes among the 
principals. 

Jefferson Davis, former 
principal of Woodstock Ele- 
mentary School, will head up 
the new Kellam High School 
on Holland Swamp Road. His 
position at Woodstock will be 
filled by Grey Cassell. 
The new elementary school at 
Malibu will have Mrs. Ruth 
Bridges as principal and Pem- 
broke School will come under 
the supervision of E. L. Land, 
who will serve jointly as princi- 
pal of Pembroke and Aragona 
Elementary Schools. 

Principals Visited 
Other principals are Mrs. 
Hortense Parke rson, Bay side; 
Mrs. Ruth E. Cole, Court House; 
Mrs. Bessie Bell, Creeds; Bruce 
McGuire, John B. Dey; Robert 
Stenzhorn, Kempsville; N. W. 
Morris, Kempsville Junior High; 
Mrs. Josephine Charles, Kemps- 
ville Meadows; Mrs. Anne Lind- 
sey, King's Grant; Gordon Bas- 
kin, Linkhorn Park; J. Warren 
Littleton, Princess Anne High 
School; W. V. Pendleton, Lux- 
ford; and Mrs. Mable Church, 
Princess Anne Plaza. 

Also, Miss Patricia King, Shel- 
ton Park; H. O. Copley, Thalia; 
Grant J. Smith, Thoroughgood; 
G. V. Boykins, Union-Kemps- 
ville High School; Mrs. Lelia 
Holloman, Seaboard; Mrs. Mary 
Lucille Johnson, Sea tack; Mrs. 
Laurena Sears Archer, Betty F. 
Williams; James M. Helmer, 
Virginia Beach High School; Mrs. 
Emily Parks, W. T .Cooke; and 
Walter Carroll, Cox Junior High 
School. 

MALIBU CDS SCOUTS 
PLANNING RODEO 

MALIBU— Shouts of "Yippee" 
and "Wahoo" will echo through 
Malibu August 31 when Cub 
Scout Pack No. 4191 holds a 
Lazy M Rodeo Show on the 
parking lot adjacent to the sales 
office on Malibu Drive. 

Youngsters will dress as cow- 
boys and Indians and Den 
Mothers will turn out as Indian 
squaws and pioneer women. 

The parking lot will look 
even more like rodeo grounds 
as the scouts scurry about in 
costume trying their hand at 
antics familiar to the "Old 
West." Some of the parents will 
dress as rodeo clowns. 

Scheduled to get underway at 
6 p.m., the event will feature a 
chuckwagon cook-out. 



the Bayside area where he was 
a former resident for a brief 
week-end visit on his way to 
Oberlin College, delighted old 
friends with his experience* in 
Italy. 

Recreation for an American 
high school student is endless, 
Bob explained. Going to operas, 
swimming at the Italian Riveria, 
skiing in the Alps, skin-diving 
for Roman relics, and of course, 
the movies, plus playing the 
piano gave him more -than 
enough to do. 

"You could visit Naples a 
hundred times and still be 
amaxed at new end u n usu al 
sites," he commented. 

He spoke calmly about com- 
munists demonstrations and ral- 
lies explaining that it is a reco^ 
nized political party in that 
country. However, all America*!* 
are warned to steer clear of the 
districts being used for the 
rallies, he said. 

Dark Side, Too 

When someone jokingly asked 
about the Mafia, Bob surprised 
everyone by saying that it cer- 
tainly does exist, right along 
with the "black market." Some- 
things would be practically ihv 
possible for the Italians to get 
without the "market" although 
most things are sold double in 
value, he said. 

No stop signs and no speed 
limits seemed absolutely unbe- 
lievable to Bob's Americas 
friends. 

"It's true,' 'he said. "Italian 
policemen ride horses, so it's 
impossible for them to catch a 
speeder. With no stop lights or 
signs, the cautious driver has to 
blow his horn before entering 
an intersection." 

"The American beauty rose" 
doesn't seem to compare, in 
Bob's opinion, with those of 
Italy. "The Italian women are 
among, if not the most, beautiful 
in the world," he said. 

Fashion trends in Italy are 
more extreme than the fads is 
America. Bob explained that 
most, of the Italians who can 
afford it prefer to go to a de* 
signer and have clothes designed 
specifically for themselves. Ttrip 
explains the uniqueness of 
Italian fashion. 

P. A. VOLUNTEERS 
TO RAISE FUNDS 

COURTHOUSE — The Court* 
house Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment will sponsor a drive to 
raise $11,000 to pay for a new 
fire engine. 

The house to house campaign 
will officially begin Sept. 15 
and will continue through Sept 
27. 

About 25 volunteer members 
will cover the areas of Sand- 
bridge, Pungb, Pleasant Ridge, 
and all of the Court House area. 



Funds Needed for Truck 



Loeb, gross 65; B, King, 67; C, 
Burton, 81 and low net of the 
field, K. Oliver. 

In the putting ringer, Kim- 
nach, Woolf. and Pool placed in 
the A, B, and C division. 




Court House Fire Dept. has a ™T e|gp 
money for this badly needed fire truck. 



Pggt 2-E 



Virginia Beach Surr-Nows, Thursday, August 30, 1962 



Complete TV Schedule for Week - Thurs. thru 



CIS— WTAt-TV ( $ 
k»C-WAVYTV m 

MONDAY rrirv FRIDAY 




S3 BESS 



Chamee* 



<*W— U Boat Vlhn 

. Wf tjMlui Wortu 



i&* «.«— 




»!«• ( i-CMlnn of Charm 
(W— American Bandstand 



I s !! u^mvkmu 



oat <it>— s 




1 !•> 1„ 

JW ( 3>— Weather 

»!•• ( 8r— Dr. Whll*hur»t Report. 




ft*| (Jl 
«l* < I 
t;tt (IS) — The Rsny Show 
6. -St (It) — Hub war Patrol 
6:08 (lSK— Al Hodtt 
-Rca Coch 



S:15 (13) — Rca Cochran* 
«t »' 8) — Xuoihote Club 

(it) — Six Thirty aepur 
< 13) — Peter Guns 

•« 3»— Weatherma* 
-its i 3>~-Douria* aWwanfc. 
• lw) — Huuttow Brinhlej 



itm \ v m m \ U Ji 



. Ught 
New* Report 
Together 
Jo* For Dollar* 

of TV 

For Dollar* 




Saw ( _ 

**•»— Toto* ST. State** 
,^ <*»-*SFor ADi7 




'l.-tt 

7tat 
Ml 

8:30 
8:00 
8:80 

10:00 



10:30 
11:00 



11:10 

11:15 
11:30 



11:36 
11:30 



THURSDAY EVENING 

< 3> — Shannon 

<10> — Miami Undercover 
(IS) — Beachcomber 

< t)— The Plying Doctor 
(It) — Th* Outlaws 

1 13) — Otzie & Harriet 

( 3) — Frontier Circa* 

(IS) — Donna Reed Show 

(10) — Dr. KiMaire 

(III — Tlie Real McCoy* 

( 3>— Brenner 

(13)— My Three Son* 

( S) — Zane Grev Theatre 

(!•) — Purest Special 

UJ> — t'tic Law St Mr. Jone* 

( 3)— Ana* and Arabesque* 

(10) — Siuif AlodK With Miteh 

<13) — The UnMu.-hable. 

( 3) — Public Service 

( 3>— -New* 

<10>— Klevsn O'clock Report 

(13) — ABC New* 

< 3) — Weather 

1 l»; — Weather 

(13) — Bill 3ne<lell & BUI Brady 

( 3) — bporis Final 

1 13> — bj. ort. 

( 3) — Dr. Whitehurat Report* 

From Europe 
(10) — Sports 
<13) — Theater "It" 
( 3)--rMovie 
<lt>— Tontrht 

FRIDAY EVENING 



TtW 
t.tt 

tit* 



:s 

l«:0O 
It.St 



Hit* 
lltl* 

11,00 



Hits 

HUM 



( 3) — atawhJds 

JJlU«r^sJrU^ owtta - 

( 3)— Route 00 
(Mr— Tho Detectives 

(i3>— Th* nuimw 

(10)— Eleven O'clock «eon*i 

( , 
di 

( Sr-4**, Whitehunl Report* 
ffoa Cares* 

(It* shoe* 

\ m) M QYf** 

(It)— ToeMrht 
(10>— Kew* 




•too (lt>— Pisher Fu_ 



Favorite 



SATURDAY 
MORNING 





IliM 

11 



(l»_J|*J|ae 
( Sr— Made 



•how (Color) 

aad 

(Color) 



(ltr— Mel* iSow For Daddy 
<18>—Wlh1 BUI HJoke* ^^ 



AFTERNOON 



(18)— -Drroroe Court 



I 



Service 



IS OUR SPECIALTY 



TV - STEREO - RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 



T-V 




ltitt 

18:3t 

lift 
lUt 
S*t 



( 3)— Sky KhW 
(10)— Mr. WiMrd 



(13>— Ban 
( 8>— New* 

(18>— Wfei 



Marshal 




Detective 
Ftettea Theatre 



»— (Metro at Detroit— Baseball 




i»*t 

lSsSt 



1*«S 
IKS) 



Sit*) 

stat 

4:tt 

«x 

B:tt 



5:3t 

8.00 
«:3t 



(It)— Sacred Heart 
(Mr— Biff Mae 
18>— The Chi _ 



Unto My Fwel 
J Th* Aaawor 

TMme 

a 

Loam 



5 81— Window oa Main St. 

(IS) — Wild BUI HJckok 

( 8) — Washinrton Conversation 

(It) — Dwipht 

(IS) — Traokdown 

( S> — CBS New* 

( 8) — New*, Weather. Sport* 

(It) — House Detective 

(IS) — Holryirood Showcase 

( 8) — Builder* Showcaae 

(It) — Baltimore at Cleveland 

( 8) — Kama* City at M.Y. 

(18)— Thrilto A Skill* 

(M) — San Franciaeo Baal 

(18>— Editor'. Choice 

(It)— Jim Bowie 

(18) — Isiue* it Antwer* 

(It) — Land of Promise 

( 8) — Baseball Scoreboard 

(13) — Bowline 

( 8)— A Way of Thlnhlna- 

(ltl — Sunday Showcase 

(IS) — Wide World ol Sports 

( 3)— Amateur Hour 



"iSt (lt>— Tonl»bt 




Us AJS How* 



ckmate 



Amjrtea 






EVENING 



7:00 
f«t 



8 .-00 
8:30 



t:O0 

t:80 
10:00 



( 8)— 80th Century 

(it)— Meet The Press 

( 8)— Mister Sd 

(It) — National Chairman 

(1S>— Moris Time 

( 8)— Laaaie 

( 8)— Dsnai* Th* f — in 

(it)— Walt Dtaaay 

(13)— FoUow The San 

( 8)— Ed Sulliran 

(it) — Adyentures of Sir Francis 

Drake 
(18)— Bollywood . 
' 8)— 6.E. Theatre 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 

Titt) ( S>— Th* CalilomUn. 

(It) 

11 
7lSt |fL 

Sit* ( 

(1-, 

US* ( t ) ■ O ho * 

•m (ij^rafMMnt 
(18)— HAwailaa a*** 

,!!2 ! fJ-^ 1 ** t. M J*** »>ow 

I0:t© ( 8) — Steel How 

(lt)-^"lay Toar Hunch 
(1«)--Siaked CRy 

It tat (lt>— Darid Brlnhtey'. 

lijtt ( 8)_uth Hour Mows 
(lt>— Elareo O'clock Be 
(IS)— ABC TV New* Fna) 

Hilt ( 8»— Weather ^ 

11:18 (1»>— Late Weather 

..... J 1 iM£ *L^ »e*»-Wsather-Sport* 
llitt ( 8) — Or. Whiten urtt Report* 
From Europe 

(ltr— flporta 
llttS ( 8)— Movie 

(13)— Theatre 18 
U:St (It) — Tonifht 



yallDGE 




BY MA RV MONE 



/VortA A South vulnerable. West 



■fWT 

if 




F§1M7#II 



JOUTB 



BAST 

♦ A* 

||f« 
tA< 

♦ 1QI85 







BOHpt 






EVENING 



IRTZ TV 



' SALES and SERVICE 
LONDON BRIDGE, VA. 
OPEN 9 AM. . 9 P.M. Phone 340-8888 




Stat 

8:43 
6:50 
7:00 

7iat 

8:00 



•itt 



'•••to 

lt:45 
11 Itt 



llatS 

11:10 
litis 

lltSt 

IMS 



( 8)— fcabod aV Ms 

(13)— Playhouse 18 

( 3)— Art Linkletter ft The 

(It)— AU-Star Wrestlinc 

( 8) — New».Weather 

( 3)— News 

( 8) — Exclusive 

< •)— Psrry Mason 

(It)— Tale* of Well* Farro 

(IS) — Room For On* More 

( 8) — The Defender* 

(It)— TaU Man 

(13)— Leave It To Beaver 

(101— Movie* 

(13) — Lawrence Welk 

( 3> — Hare Can, Will Tr.vel 

( 3)— -Gunsmoit 

(18) — Invitation to Paris 

(18) — Saturday Sport* Final 

( 8) — 11th Hour Final 

( lt»— New.- Weather 

(18)— Bill Brady 

(IS)— Movie 

( S) — Weather 

( 8) — Sport* 

(lt>— The Bir Movie 

(13) — Theatre 13 

( 3)— Movie Time 

tfcfcw; ^ *~ 

(lt*-rh>sbiBr Dwvotloo 



11 itt 



( 8)— Who la Thi* World 
( m— Candid Camera 
<lt>— DnPoot Bho W 
(18)— Uwmeo 
( 8)— What'* My Uno 



8) — Eric SersreM 
It) — Wert end Newi 



11 tit 

H:1S 



(i-. 

(18)— Lata New. 
(ltV- Movi* 
(IS)— Weather 
( 3)— Bport* Report 
(18)— Theatre 18 
( 3)— Exclusive 
(it)— New. 



SUNDAY 
MORNING 



7:3t ( S) — Hcpalon*- Cassidy 



I 



% 



v SOME PEOPLE 
SAVE MONEY; 
SOME PEOPLE DON'T 

And you know who'll get ahead; 
You know who won't I 



11 may not be universally true, but your own 
observation will tell you that it's pretty con* 
sistently so: The steady saver is the best bet 
to move out in front 

And the bank saver enjoys the multiple ad* 
vantages of safety, availability, earnings, 
sendee, and helpfulness, Save . . • save more . 
. . . save more regularly— at ptir bank! 



MONDAY EVENING 

Tttt) ( 3)— The Pioneer* 

(10)— King of Diamond* 

(18) — Sea Hunt 
7:30 ( 3)— To Tell The Truth 

(It) — Man A The Challenge 

(18) — Cheyenne 
8:00 ( 8)— Pete A Gladys 

(it)— National Velvet 
8:30 ( 3)— Father Know. Best 

(It) — Price I* Right 

- — *. IS) — l * w _* T* 18 Plainaman 
0:00 ( 8) — Desl-Lucy Comedy Hour 

(it)— 87th Precinct 

(18) — Surfgide Six 
It itt ( 3) — Hennesey 

(lO^NBC Actuality 

(18>— Ben Casey 
10:30 ( a>— I Got a Secret 
llttt ( a>— nth Hour New* 

tit)— Eleven OClock Reoort 

(18) — Bill Shedell A Bill Brady 

( 3) — Weather 

<*f ^--|gf»j Eow*. Weather, Sport* 

(ItCiahiWsather 

( S)— Dr. Whitefehret Report* 

From Europe 
(It)— Sport. 
( 8)— Movie 

aaW&& ia . 

TUESDAY EVENING 

( 3)— Death Valley Day* 
(lSV-erand JarF 
(IS)— Everglade. 
( 8) — Rescue 8 
(1*»— Laramie 
(13) — Rat* Bunny 
( 8)-fa*sw«rd 

( 1 sfcBot1S etor r,Uler 
(lf>— Alfred Hitchcock 




Eta. South 

If past 
I a) double 




MO t A REFUSAL OR 

anckhestra rnriririi-i 

LEADERS WANO UUUUU 

nn6a 

ODDDDD 

™ ■■ MO WtwO l*^*MFM> t*M ItavoWf la BIS MOSI"jf 

r^suorM forn oo AivOOjroM, Nw SSSMM of Midi h 
*» TV TH2W rwMMRy ef *m W«k. 



(nolmj Any) 3TOTva*e 
NQLvaj: AVWI-T* 



Opening lead: 6 of spade*. 

South evertakes East's king of 
spades and returns her seven of 
diamonds. North wins the two 
diamond tricks and returns the 
five of hearts. West takes this 
trick with the ace in the dummy, 
then leads the queen of spades, 
sluffs bir small heart and norm 
trumps. North returns a heart and 
west shows nothing but trumps for 
a two trick set 

COMMENT: West could not 
make her bid, but an error in play 
caused her to go down two tricks 
instead of one. She should have 
cleared her trumps before leading 
the queen of spades. 



FiNAnCfNG 



HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS 



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OTHER OFFICES 
TOO Booth Street— Norfolk Huntington at aS*t> '■ 

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11 tit 
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Titt) 
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H:or. 

11:10 
11:18 

HUB 

I 11:20 

11:85 
ll:*7 
UlSt) 



( tr— Comedy Spot - 
(It) — Dtck Powell Show 
( 8)— The Third Man 
(IS) — Tour, for A Song 
( Sf— Talent Scout* 
<lt>~Cain'* Hundred 
(ISr— Alcoa Premier 

(IS) — ABC New. 

(18) — Bill Snedell A Bill Brady 

( t)— Weather 

(13)— Local New*. Weather. 

Sport* 
( 8)— Movie 
(it)— Weather 
( 3) — Dr. Whttehuret Reports 

From Europe 
( 3) — Movie 
(13)— Theatre 18 
(It)— Sport. 






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|«50— Attractions- 50 ■ i 



"Lolita" Review 



(This raview of Hi* contro- 
versial Holita," which will 
run for one week at the 
Beach Theatre, starting Sun- 
day, appears with special per- 
mission from "The Green 
Sheet, a monthly survey of 
current films.) 



LOLITA 

Released by Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer. Producer James B. Har- 
ris. Director: Stanley Kubrick. 
Source: Screenplay by Vladimir 
Nabokov, from his novel. 
Photography: Oswald Morris. 
Music: Nelson Riddle. Cinema- 
Scope. Leading Players: James 
Mason, Shelley Winters, Sue 
Lyon, Peter Sellers. 152 min. 

ESTIMATES AGREE: 

The erotic aspects of Vladimir 
Nabokov's novel have been mod- 
ified in his screenplay, and 
LOLITA, in its film version, 
is considerably expurgated. It is 
now the infatuation of a middle- 
aged man for a middle-aged 
teenager, not a child, a situation 
still uncomfortable but not ap- 
palling. 

Told in flashback, the ending 
is bared by the semi-surrealistic 



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opening sceen in a dilapidated 
mansion where James Mason 
kills his rival, Peter Sellers. The 
story then goes back four years, 
when Mr. Mason, a college pro- 
fessor takes a room for the sum 
mer in the New England home 
of a youngish widow with a 
striking daughter, Lolita. His 
marriage to the mother, simply 
to be near the seductive, pre- 
cocious girl, follows, and when 
he is widowed shortly after, he 
becomes her eager guardian. 

The affair develops to a point 
where he feels a constant heed 
to protect their illicit relation- 
ship from the prying eyes that 
seem to drive them on to a ter- 
rible and bizarre road, from 
place to place. Then suddenly 
the girl disappears for a while, 
and when he finds her the 
shock of their meeting leads to 
an inevitable ending. 

Stanley Kubrick's direction 
and treatment have imagination 
and virtuosity, sardonic humor 
with touches of macabre horror. 
James Mason gives one of his 
strongest performances, making 
his desperate obsession for the 
amoral Lolita crystal clear. 
Peter Sellers, competing with 
the older man for Lolita, is a 
mysteriously prankish, evilly 
mischievous character, played so 
broadly that at times it seems 
as if he were in a different film. 
Newcomer Sue Lyon, more 
woman than child, is amazingly 
unaffected and quite natural in 
her self -centered, gum-chewing 
callousness. Shelley Winters as 
the love-starved widow and 
small town intellectual, compet- 
ing with her daughter for at- 
tention, makes her role memor- 
able. The mood-evoking photo- 
graphy gives the proper back- 
ground for the drama's turbu- 
lent emotion. 



Sandpiper Performers at Work 




What Is It? 



"THE GREEN SHEET?" 

By RUBY JEAN PHILLIPS 

VIRGINIA BEACH— A few weeks ago this newspaper started 
carrying reviews of current movies on the entertainment page 
as published in The Green Sheet. 

Since that time many people have asked me, "what is The 
Green Sheet?" 



Virginia Beach SUf 
Thursday, August 30, 1 
Paga 3-6 



In this scene from "Critic's Choice," LaVerne Watson (left) 
as a kookie director, congratulates Clayton Edwards on the 
me" play his stage wife, Chi Chi Lively, has written 



Busy Person 



Virginia Beach Theatres 

BEACH-BAYNE 



25th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 
and SATURDAY 

Aug. 30, 31 & Sept. 1 

The 
SPIRAL ROAD 

Rock Hudson 

Gena Rowlands 

Burl Ives 

features: 
2:00--i:30— 7:00— 9:30 



, ONE WEEK 
SUNDAY thru SATURDAY 
September 2 - 8 

LOLITA 

James Mason 
Shelley Winters 

Features - 
2:0O--4:3O— 7:00— 9:30 



17th & Atlantic 

TODAY, FRIDAY 

and SATURDAY 

Aug. 30, 31 & Sept. 1 

WEST SIDE 
STORY 

r 

Natalie Wood 
Richard Beymer 

Features: 2:00—5:30—9:00 

Children 50c all day 

Adults 90c Matinee 

$1.25 Evening 

SUNDAY, MONDAY 

and TUESDAY 
September 2, 3 & 4 

The 
SPIRAL ROAD 

* 

Rock Hudson 

Gena Rowlands 

Burl Ives 

Features: 
2:00—4:30—7:00—9:30 

ADVANCED PRICES 

WED. & THURS. 
September 5 & 6 

VICTIM 

Dirk Bogarde 
Sylvia Syms 

Features: 
2.00—4:00—6:00—8:00—10:00 



LIVELY IS THE HAME, 
LIVELY IS THE LADY 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
roles Chi Chi Lively plays on- 
stage, such as her starring per- 
formance in the Sandpiper Play- 
house production of "Critic's 
Choice," almost takes a back 
seat to the roles she plays in 
real life. 

Her most important roles are 
that of wife to Sandpiper Play- 
house Producer A. Lee Lively; 
mother to their two young sons, 
David, 7, and Peter 4; and 
keeper and manager of their 
Lynnhayen home. 

Somewhere in here mention 
must also be made that with 
two sons comes the responsibil- 
ity of the inevitable menagerie 
which, in the Lively's case, in- 
cludes a dog, a cat, three kit- 
tens, a parakeet, and two gold- 
fish. 

Falling second to these 
major rotas, the important 
roles, are Mrs. Lively's ac- 
complishments as actress, 
writer, director, radio star and 
television weather reporter. 
If any of you have ever seen 
"The Opened Door," the motion 
picture filmed by the Protestant 
Radio and Television *Center, 
perhaps you noticed Mrs. Live- 
ly's name on the credits. She 
wrote it. What's more, she has 
just completed writing a sequel 
to it. 

As charming and lovely as 
she, is talented, this dynamic 
young woman has made her 
mark on stage, radio and tele- 
vision in every city she has 
called home. 

A native of Westchester 
County, New York, Mrs. Lively 
was a drama major at Mary 
Washington College where she 
wrote and directed all the class 
shows and acted in such pro- 
ductions as "The Women," 
"Young and Fair" and "The 
Heiress." 

College Award 
For these efforts she received 
the Alpha Psi Omega Drama 
Award for "outstanding achieve- 
ment in the field of drama." 

She furthered her education 
along these same lines by study- 
ing radio and television writ- 
ing, acting and directing at New 
York University. 



This background eventually 
led her to a position in the con- 
tinuity department at WRVA in 
Richmond and it was here she 
met her future husband. 

Widely acknowledge as an 
artist and creator of radio 
shows, Lively's work took him 
to WARN at Ft. Pierce, Fla., 
where the couple teamed up for 
a gruelling husband and wife 
Breakfast Show that ran from 
"6 to 9 a.m. Mondays through 
Fridays. 

Mrs. Lively continued her 
radio work when they moved to 
the ' Tidewater area with posi- 
tions, again in the continuity de- 
partment, at WLOW and WTAR 
and also appeared as the 
"Weather Girl" on television. 
She has appeared with Lit- 
tle Theatre groups in Rich-, 
mond, Ft. Pierce, Norfolk and 
Virginia Beach but her favor- 
ite role was that of Patty 
O'Neal in 'The Moon Is Blue" 
when she appeared opposite 
Broadway Actor Shepperd 
Strudwick in the famous play's 
Virginia Beach showing. 
Mrs. Lively is presently re-! 
cording secretary for the Nor- 
folk Little Theatre, serves on 
the Board of Directors and is 
chairman of the Experimental 
Wing One-Act Play Contest. 



Special Show 
Of 'Mr. Roberts" 
For U.S. Navy 



Sensation of The Virginia Beach Jazz Festival 
Direct frorn Birdland in New York ' 

KAI WINDING SEPTET 

AUG. 30th thru SEPT. 2nd 

8 P.M. TILL 12 MIDNIGHT 

RATHSKELLER LOUNGE 



THE LONG HORN STEAK HOUSE 



VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — The 
Sandpiper Playhouse will pre- 
sent a special showing of "Mr. 
Roberts" at the Norfolk Naval 
Air Station Sept 6 at 8:15 p.m. 
in the base theatre. 

The Special Services Depart- 
ment requested the presentation 
for Navy personnel. 

Virginia Beach actor Foy 
Shaw, who was recently seen 
in "You Can't Take It With 
You'" and is currently appear- 
ing in "Mr. Roberts," has been 
named business manager of the 
Sandpiper Playhouse. 

Shaw, an instructor at Prin- 
cess Anne High School, replaces 
W. P. Covington III of Ports- 
mouth who was taken ill, and 
hospitalized several weeks ago. 



Before I explain what this in- 
valuable publication is, let me 
first telr you how I became fa- 
miliar with it and why we chose 
to publish its information. 

Movies, as you know, have 
become a rather controversial 
issue. For a few months a 
general hue and cry went out 
over the nation about the poor 
quality of movies, the most 
common opinion being that 
Hollywood was killing itself 
with filmed trash. 
It cannot be denied that many 
undesirable movies have reached 
the screens but the entire in- 
dustry must not be judged by 
a few. Hollywood is still pro- 
ducing some fine motion pic- 
tures, ones that the entire family 
will enjoy. The main thing is to 
know which movies are best to 
see. That's where the reviews 
come in. 

Stay Away 
An article in a national pub- 
lication caught my attention 
about a year ago. It pointed out 
that the best way to keep Holly- 
wood from producing so many 
undesirable films was to stay 
away from the movie theatres 
when these pictures were shown 
and support the ones that were 
of a higher quality. 

Hollywood, artistic as it may 
claim to be, cannot continue 
■filming pictures that don't make 
money. If the public doesn't 
turn out for trash, there is sure 
to be an improvement in the 
quality of movies. 

Knowledge of what a movie is 
about is the only way the pub- 
lic can veto the undesirable 
films and support the entertain- 
ing ones. A review is the only 
way the public can obtain this 
knowledge. 

Now to The Green Sheet. 
This particular publication was 
mentioned in the article, that is 
how I first learned of it. 

It is published each month 
and carries a review on each 
film released that month. 

The Sheet states: 'The re- 
views in this publication pro- 
vide movie-goers wjth a guide 
to the selection of entertain- 
ment films in current release. 
They present the composite 
opinion of the organizations 
listed below, end give con- 
sideration to a wide range of 
tastes. ^—f 

The Film Estimate Board of 
National Organizations includes 
representativesof: 

American Jewish Committee; 
American Library Association; 
Federation of Motion Picture 
Councils, Inc.; General Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs, National 
Congress of Parents and Teach- 
ers; National Council of Women 



of the U.S.A.; National Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs; National 
Society Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution; Protestant Mo- 
tion Picture Council; & Schools 
Motion Picture Committee." 



S8A Accepting 
Registrations 

Small business concerns seek- 
ing Government prime and sub- 
contracts can now register their j 
facilities in the Small Business 
Administration's newly expand- 
ed Facilities Inventory. The 
Agency's inventory will not on- 
ly include small manufacturers 
but will also include small firms 
engaged in research and de- 
velopment, construction con- 
tractors, service businesses and 
forestry and forest products 
concerns. 

Clarence P. Moore, Regional 
Director, Small Business Ad- 
ministration, Richmond, Vir- 
giriia, pointed out that the ex- 
panded small business facilities 
inventory will provide greater 
opportunities for small concerns 
to participate in contracting 
work of al types. It will provide 
a clearing house through which 
the government procurement 
agencies and large government 
contractors can obtain informa- 
tion about small firms capable 
of providing needed goods or 
services. He also stated that it 
will be the most complete list- 
ing of small business facilities 
that can be utilized in the event 




WHAT'S FOR BREAKFASTf 
. . . Gail Jones stretches while 
selecting a coconut for her • 
breakfast from cluster at St 
Thon\as in the Virgin Islands. 

■ i — i . — * ■* 

of a national emergency. 

Mr. Moore said that small 
firms in this area who are not 
already included in the Facili- 
ties Inventory can obtain reg*- 
tration forms by contacting the 
SBA Office located in the Exe- 
cutive Office Building, 100*; 
Byrd Ave., Richmond 26, Vg. ' 



THE 

Lighthouse 

Steamed 
CRABS. 

SOUTH ATLANTIC AVE. 

Next to Steel Pier 




PUYHOOSI 



19th & Arctic-GA 8-7844 

"MR. ROBERTS" 
by 

Geo. Hcggm and Joshua Logan 

September 1st 

Admission $3.00 

"CRITICS CHOICE" 

hy IRA LEVIN 

August 30-31 

be 



"BRIGADOON" 

by LERNER and LOEWE 

September 2nd 

03.50 



NORMANDIE 
CAFETERIA 



Fast Service 
Wide Variety 
Attractive 
Prices 



Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 



2118 ATLANTIC AVE. 



TOP HAT 

DANCING 

featuring 



f 



Al Cannon and His "Tuff Sax' 

29th and OCEAN FRONT 




SURREY 
CAFETERIA 

Home Cooked Meals 
Air Conditioned 
Ample Parking 

15th & ATLANTIC AVE. 



Donut Kitchen 

Fresh Donuts 
Made Daily 

ALL Mr-AiS SERVED 
18th and ATLANTIC 



OCEAN REEF FISHING 

On The Party Boat "MISSY" 

LEAVES DAILY AT 8:00 A. M 

(Regardless of number of people aboard) 

LONG CREEK MARINA 

Route 615—'/; Mile South of Shore Drive 

HO 4-9952 %"&" 

Includes Bait, etc. 




SEAS SEAFOOD 

RESTAURANT 

Snak Bar 

Serving Break! ait * 4 HOURS 

HO 4-9804 

Shore Drive at Lynnhaven Bridge 




J 



p+w* trwynr** # ±KS_* * «** * #> * * * * 



* e. 




Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 3u\ 1 962 
Page 4-B 



%#! !■ fc* it fc* ** -^^., , , ^. _ 



County Agent 

Doctor: "You're coughing 
moro easily this morning." 

Patient: "I should be. I 
practiced all night." 



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now MAYTAG 

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at Low, Low Prices 
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COUNTY A 



our 



By E. R. "DICK" COCKRELL, JR. 





Ha ft Proof of Maytag Dependability 

Recently a Maytag Highlander was picked at 
random from the assembly line, and put into 
operation in the Maytag Product Testing Labora- 
tory. The test was made under typical "home 
use" conditions. This Maytag Highlander Auto- 
matic Washer worked day in and day out for 
10,145 hours (15,218 loads) equal to SO yean* 
normal home use! Service cost averaged only $2.00 
a year! Proving again that you buy the most 
d epe n d able washer made . . . when it's a Maytag. 



■ Selective cycle control handles 
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oyraioom aciion a mof oogn, 
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Murden's Appliances 

31st AND HOLLY RD. GA 8-4044 



CORN PRICES 

Several factors point to strong 
corn prices at harvest time this 
year. 

While the national production 
is estimated to be two percent 
below last year, Virginia's crop 
is expected to be eight percent 
above last year. 

Although the state acreage 
will be down one percent, the 
estimated yield will be a record 
58 bushels per acre — five more 
than a year ago. 

In the seaboard area only 
Virginia and North -Carolina will 
have increased production. The 
other states in this area will 
have a decrease in production 
prospects of 21 percent. 

This should allow Virginia 
growers to shop around at har- 
vest time in what may be sharp 
bidding. Considering these fac- 
tors there should not be the 
usual sharp seasonal price dip 
at harvest time. Another plus. 
factor in the demand picture is 
that the poultry and animal 
units requiring feed will be, 
equal to or above last year. 

This year Virginia support 
price will be $1.31, the national 
price is $1.20. 

Prices last week in Richmond 
were $1.32, Norfolk $1.25 to 
$1.30, the Valley $1.35 to $1.38, 
and Chicago $1.13 to $1.13%. 
SOYBEANS 
The estimated Virginia soy- 
bean crop will be 11 percent 
above last year, which is well 
above the national production 
increase 0/ one percent. 

Acreage in the state will be 
down ope percent, but the ex- 
pected 23 bushels per acre will 
run up production. 

Demand will remain strong. 
Continuing record highs are 
forecast for domestic and export 
uses, especially meal and whole 
soybeans. 

Record crushings resulting 
from, strong demand for meal 
are expected to continue. Lack 
of comparable demand for soy- 
bean oil has resulted in a big 
build-up of oil stocks. In fall 
and winter an expected sharp 
increase in oil exports should 
"work off some of these stocks. 
However, the large supply of 
soybean oil will weigh heavily 



on developments in the total 
soybean market. 

A price indication for this 
year's crop can be found in a 
limited booking of crops in the 
Northern Neck. Some farmers in 
this area have booked their 
crops for $2.12. 

Price support nationally is 
$2.25 and in Virginia it will be 
$2,21. 



mmsaamm 



am 



i- 



MP 

An Analytical Look At 

Retailing & Distribution 

By GEORGE L. COFFER 
Va. Beach Distributive Education Coordinator 



CERTIFIED SEED 
DIRECTORY AVAILABLE 

A handy aid to higher crop 
yields in Virginia is now avail- 
able in the Virginia Certified 
Seed Directory. 

The directory lists growers of 
certified seed in Virginia, rec- 
ommended varieties, & controls 
for insects and diseases, and 
gives many valuable tips on oth- 
er phases of crop production. It 
is available from my office. 
Write or call for your copy. 

Association officials point out 
that certification is the farmers's 
assurance of top-quality seed. 
The varieties recommended by 
the Agriculture Extension Sta- 
tion at VPI are certified in Vir- 
ginia. Certification assures the 
grower that the seed he buys 
was grown from planting stocks 
of known pedigrees, that the 
fields were closely inspected and 
met the high standards of 
varietal purity, that the seed 
was properly handled during 
harvesting and cleaning, and 
that the seed meets high stand- 
ards set for purity and germin- 
ation. 







i 



• • . and now, 
off f o college I 



Simply because you had the foresight to 
save something regularly. Your youngster 
will be better equipped to fight the battle of 
the twentieth century with additional edu- 
cation. 



A savings account still remains one of the 
safest and most convenient ways to build 
up a reserve. Attractive earnings, lighten 
the bad. 



ACCOUNTS INSURED UP TO $10,000.00 

VIRGINIA BEACH FEDERAL 

, Savihgs and Loan Association 



USE CLIMATE CONTROL FOR 
SUMMERTIME HEAT RELIEF 

Don't believe that old saying 
about the weather. You can do 
something about it 

A few well-placed trees and 
other plants can lower sizzling 
summertime temperatures as 
much as 15 percent. Windows 
on either the east or west side 
of the house often present a 
heat problem. Trees placed to 
throw shade here will block the 
sun's heat rays. They also may 
provide shade for the family 
car or the backyard patio. Often 
patios absorb heat — and make 
tthe area warmer — if they're 
not shaded. 

Trees planted on areas of the 
lawn provide a certain amount 
of "air conditioning" when sum- 
mer breezes blow through the 
area. In addition, shade from 
trees provides some psychologic- 
al cooling. Pools of water give 
the same sensation- 
Vines on the house often 
absorb some of the heat that 
would otherwise come directly 
through the window. And if 
"stiff" breezes blow when the 
family is enjoying outdoor liv- 
ing, a windbreak will soften and 
channel breezes past the outdoor 
dining area. By placing trees 
and shrubs strategically home- 
owners can put summertime 
wind currents to work to cool- 
ing advantage. 



210 -25th Street 



Virginia Beach, Virginia 



Phone GA 8-9331 



CORN SILAGE 

Corn silage will take an even 
more important role in beef 
cattle feeding in the future. 
Agronomists have been success- 
ful in developing newer, better 
grades of corn for silage. This 
improved silage will enable the 
cattleman to better his income 
considerably. 

The main advantage of silage 
is the amount of total digestible 
nutrients which can be produced 
per acre. Nothing else in Prin- 
cess Anne County can produce 
as much nutrients, and only 
grain is of higher quality. 

Long used for wintering beef 
cows, now silage will find a 
larger role in feeding out 
yearling steers for good grade 
slaughter purposes, and for 
wintering beef calves to be put 
on pasture the following year, 
and for those to be put in the 
feedlot for finishing. 

We now know that the earlier 
varieties of corn, which have a 
higher proportion of ear to 
stalk, are making the highest 
quality feed. The agronomists 
tell us that we can make as 
large yields with these varieties 
as we can the later varieties 
simply by planting close togeth- 
er. This means the cattleman 
can now have his quality and his 
quantity at the same time. 



aamwamsssammmwmam 
"THE NEW CONSUMER" 

This week's column again will 
be devoted to statements ex- 
tracted from a speech made re- 
cently by Dr. John W. Wingate, 
professor of business adminis- 
tration, The City University of 
New York. The distinguished 
author and lecturer on retailing 
and distribution had this to say: 

"Since it is essentially con- 
sumer acceptance or rejection 
that is delineating the shape of 
the new retailing world, it is im- 
perative that the merchant be 
fully aware of the radical 
changes in the consumer market 
that have recently taken place," 
stated Dr. Wingate. 

Dr. Wingate suggested that 
Hie most important changes 
•re due to first of all me 
population explosion. There 
•re 45 million mere people in 
this country than in 1#45. 
Forecasts indicate that there 
will be SO million moro by 
1975. This is not far away. 

Second, the consumer's mo- 
bility has been greatly increased. 
This is expressed in three dif- 
ferent forms. 

Mobility of Time 
Consumers are enjoying a 
shorter working week and labor 
saving equipment This' leads to 
new demands for. merchandise 
and service. About a third of 
consumer income is currently 
spent for services as opposed to 
merchandise and this ratio is in- 
creasing. 

Mobility of Travel 
Because of recent advances in 
the various modes of transpor- 
tation and because of the fre- 
quent relocation due to his or- 
ganization's expansion or be- 
cause of a promotion, the con- 
sumer finds that he must move 
with his job. The results sug- 
gest less consumer loyalty for 
the. local store. 

Mobility of Funds 
There has been an increase, in 
the real income per person of 
about 93 percent since 1935. 
Easy credit facilities are readilyj 
available for the consumer. The 
results are shown in the 
phenominal increase in discre- 
tionary spending, uncommitted 
to the basic necessities or to 
long-term buying. 

Third, let us not overlook the 
new teen-age market. Here we 
see 20 million teen-agers with 9 
billion dollars to spend. The fast- 
est growing of all age markets is 
the teen group between the ages 
15 to 17 years. This dynamic 
market is one that should be 
cultivated by the retailer. 

Fourth, there is an increasing 
number of senior citizens with 
pensions, savings and social se- 
curity payments to spend. This 
group is approaching 10 percent 
of our population. 

Last, but by no means least, 
let us consider the emergence 
of a mighty blue collar group 
of consumers. This group has 
even more discretionary spend- 
ing power than the white collar 
middle class, according to Dr. 
Wingate. It is not uncommon 
for a blue collar worker to earn 
in excess of five thousand dol- 
lars a year. As a matter of fact 
there are about as many blue 
collar workers as the white col- 




and the intermediate ones are 
the types # of corn to use for 
finishing yearling steers and 
for wintering calves. The late 
varieties haye too much stalk in 
relation to ear to make the best 
silage for this purpose. 

Time of harvest is of top im- 
portance for feeding cattle. 
From the time corn is in the 
milk or roasting ear stage un- 
til the grain turns hard, the 
total digestible nutrients per 
pound of I material increases 
rapidly. ThW most TDN per 
acre is found when grain is in 
the dent or the hard dough 
stage. Cutting at this stage is as 
important as any other phase of 
the silage making business in 
my opinion. 

Other farm jobs should take 
a back seat to silage— making 
once the proper stage is 
reached. The most common er- 
ror is cutting the corn too early 
—before it has reached a full 
dent stage. 

Cattle will eat silage better if 
knives are kept sharp so silage 
is cut clean and not frayed or 
shredded. It is fairly well estb- 
Ushed that silage which is cut 



clean and has a soft velvet feel 

is consumed much more readily 

' The early matufln| varielifca J By ciftle thaa Iure3a , ed ailafe,* 



lar workers in that income 
bracket. If we observe closely, 
however, we will find that the 
spending patterns of the blue 
collar worker will differ con- 
siderably from those of the 
white collar workers because of 
reading habits ami because of a 
difference in their social and 
community outlook. 

The store approaches that 
have proven so successful in 
the pest with the white collar 
workers ere not attracting the 
new blue collar group. This 
could be the reason for the 
phenominal success of the dis- 
count houses since their ap- 
peals are directed toward the 
workingman't family needs. 
Next week I will discuss some J 
of the opportunities for the I 
smaller independent merchants I. 
of Virginia Beach. 



TYPEWRITER SPECI 
No* at 

Virginia Beach 

206 - 22Hd 





CELEBRATING £UR 1 1th ANNIVERSARY 

428-4231 

• New and Used Machines for Sale 
• Pick up and Delivery Service 

• Adding Machines - Cash Registers 

Two other locations in 
NORFOLK and PORTSMOUTH 



Complete investment services 

Direct line with all major markets 

First and only Investment office in Virginia Beach 



Anderson S Strudwicic, 

UNDERWRITERS - DI5TRI1UTORJ 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
MIMHW NfW YORK STOCK 1XCHAKCE 



ASSOCIATE MIMSIM 

? ft id A M STOC at IXf MA Mf.l 



Thomas N. P. Johnson, Jr. 

Manager 

Allan Rothenberg 

Registered Representative: 



VIRGINIA BEACH 
31 10 PACIFIC AVENUE 

p. o. box see 

TELEPHONE 428-8600 



Willard R. Ashburn, Jr. 

Asst. Manager 

Frank L. Lawlor 



OFFICE HOURS: 
Weekdays — 9-5 
Saturdays — 9 - 1 2 

Richmond - Charlottesville -Fredericksburg - Virginia Beach 



OLD Mr. BOSTON" 

IMPORTED 
SCOTCH 
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FIFTH 




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IT'S Mm TO COOK 

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8UN-NEWS FOOD EDITOR 

Pot the very latest in food t»a» and tablet . . . fa 
practical, down-to-earth recipes that please both 

Elate an4 oosketboofc, read the "Mixing Bowl" by 
icllle Clark each Thursday in the Sun-News. 



—m 



SUMMER DIETING 
IN HIGH STYLE 

Summer's a wonderful time to 
diet! Appetites are on the wane, 
and it's moch easier to subsist 
on low-calorie foods. Certainly 
should be, but, more often than, 
not, it isn't. 

The main reason being, of 
course, that changing one's eat- 
ing pattern isn't easy, even in 
warm weather. And a drastic 
regime often results in high- 
calorie snacks and beverages 
that keep the scales from 
budging. 

Some suggestions, then. Make 
low • calorie meals attractive, 
with a variety of tastes and tex- 
tures. Take advantage of sum- 
mer's garden bounty and some 
calorie-low convenience foods. 
Try to eat more leisurely to ap- 
preciate each and every flavor. 

Here's an example of a cool 
and satisfying weight-watcher's 
summer luncheon, done in high 
style for company service, but 
the same menu could easily be 
enjoyed on a tray for one on the 
porch or beside a cooling fan. 

First course is appetizing 
chilled soup . . . sparkling 
jellied consomme, each icy 
spoonful melting deliciously, 
and, for contrast, a bite or two 
of thinly-sliced crisp cucumber. 
(No""~trick to make, either; a 
four-hour stay in the refrigera- 
tor and canned condensed con- 
somme obligingly jellies itself!) 
The always-favored sandwiches 
are here, too, but diminutives, 
with contrasting zippy fillings. 
Small pickles, and if you like, 
some whole cooked shrimp, add 
extra tang and color. For guests, 
string all these on skewer 
"daggers," and, for fun, insert 
in pineapple half. 

No need to skip dessert. Pre- 
sent a fruit meringue with sea- 
sonal berries or fruits, or water- 
packed canned fruits, capped 
with a dab of low-calorie top- 
ping, made from a mix or non- 
fat dry milk. Iced tea or coffee 
or Iced Cafe Chocolate (half 
coffee, half cocoa, sweetened 
with sugar substitute) served in 
demitasse cups, for the bever- 
age. 

P.S. If dinner should seem a 
little far off, don't forget soup 
on the rocks . . . condensed beef 
broth (not consomme), poured 
right from the can over ice 
cubes. Good pick-up (it's high in 
protein), and its job of refresh- 
ment adds up to only about 
30 calories per glass. 



■^s^aBSsas^paa l i i, n 

densed consomme In refrigera- 
tor for at bast 4 hour.. Open 
can arid spoon jellied consomme 
into chilled bowls. Garnish with 
cucumber slices. 



Dagger Sandwiches 
Vegetable-Cottage Cheoso Filling 

8 ounces cream style cottage 

cheese 
Vz cup finely chopped celery 
2 tablespoons finely chopped 

green pepper 

2 tablespoons finely chopped 
cucumber 

1 tablespoon finely chopped 

mild onion 
8 slices whole wheat bread, 

crusts removed 

Combine ingredients. Spread 

on 4 slices bread. Cut each 

sandwich into 4 triangles. Makes 

4 whole or 16 small sandwiches. 



Tunafish Salad Filling 

1 cup (7 ozs.) water-packed 
tuna, drained and flaked 

Vi cup finely chopped apple 
1 teaspoon grated onion 
Dash salt and pepper 
Low-calorie mayonnaise 
8 slices white bread, crusts 

removed 
Combine ingredients with 
just enough mayonnaise to 
moisten. Spread on 4 slices 
bread; cover. Cut each sand- 
wich into 4 squares. Makes 4 
whole or 16 small sandwiches. 
TO ASSEMBLE: 

Alternate whole wheat and 
white bread sandwiches on 
skewers, with a small pickle 
and cooked shrimp between 
each sandwich. 



For Goodness' Sake- 
Sip Cool Soup 

For a flavorful treat that's 
easy to make, and hard to beat, 
pass a tray of sandwiches and 
icd-cold soup cups on a hot day. 
Add a dash of curry to tuna or 
salmon salad sandwich fillings. 
Serve the sandwiches with cups 
of chilled celery-consomme. Mix 
l refrigerated can each con- 
densed cream of celery and 
consomme with 2 cans or a lit- 
tle less of ice water or cold milk 
for 4 to 8 servings. 
Right-Off-the-Vine Soup 

Ever had a beverage that 
tasted "just picked" right off 
the vine? Chilled cucumber 
soup has that fresh-tasting, 
flavorful quality. Refrigerate 1 
can^condensed cream of mush- 
room soup for three to four 
hours. Just before serving, open 
and pour into blender or elec- 
tric mixer bowl with 1 soup can 
cold milk, % cup diced, chilled 
cucumber, 4 sprigs watercress, 
and a dash of tabasco. Blend for 
a few seconds. Pour into chilled 
glasses or bowls. Garnish with a 
thin slice of cucumber. Makes 2 
to 3 servings. 
Consomme-Stuffed Avocados 

Call it soup, call it salad or a 
main dish — by whatever name, 




Simply Enchanting 



9105 



SOUPER COOLERS 
Summer Soups, They're 
Cool, Man 

The newest, method of chill- 
ing soups involves a minimum 
of effort. You' just keep cans of 
your favorite cream or tomato 
soup in the refrigerator for 
three or four hours. Just before 
serving, open soup and mix with 
about 1 can of ice water or cold 
milk to desired consistency. 
Serve in chilled bowls with a 
garnish of chopped parsley or 
chives. 



Jellied Consomme 

For each two servings, chill 
1 (10% ounces) unopened con- 



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_ 

Garden Equipment Co. 



OCEANA. VA. 



PHONE GA 84051 



Open Season For 
Soup-On-tho-Rocks 

Soup-onthe-rocks, a beef broth 
and ice cube beverage, born on 
the golf course a few years ago, 
has become a classic refresher 
with all sportsmen. After a 
game of tennis or a rigorous 
swim, try this tangy, tinkling 
restorative. Fill a roomy glass 
with ice cubes. Pour beef broth 
right from the can over the 
cubes. Serve with slices of lem- 
qn or lime. One can makes 2 to 
3 servings. Caution: Be sure to 
use beef broth, not consomme. 
Consomme contains gelatin 
which thickens on ice. 




Floral 




Boat the Heat With Shivery- 
Cool Jellied Consomme 

Want to forget the hot weath- 
er? Cook cool. Open a can of 
consomme which has been 
chilled at least 4 hours in the 
refrigerator .Spoon into a "bowl 
or two and top with sour cream 
and a sprinkling of chopped 
chives or parsley — or garnish 
with diced cucumber and toma- 
toes. It's great for lunch, dinner 
or for the "fourth" meal. 



Linoleum Floors 

Individually 




We create Floors that distinguish 
room! In homes, offices, shops, 
these Individually Designed Lino- 
leum Floors confer smart, color- 
contrast distinction wbich no 
other floor treatment can match. 
Colon, motifs— "Characterl" in, a 
word — that give long-lived service, 
at moderate first-cost! May we 
give you an estimate? 

J.G Law & Son 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
3515 Cefley Pta. MA 5443* 



Drtts Patttn No, 3103. Simply En> 
chanting. Thlt prttty t/»t*»ltu drttt hat 

twirl of tkirt attache to a llguro- 
Manning top. No. 3105 com.i in lint 
12, 14. 16. IS, 30. 5/» M taktt 3 yordi 

01 39-i'ncfc fabric. Trimming it- optional. 
N««dl«work Pattern No. 593. floral 

Ottlgnt. Lottlf batktt of ffpwort, roj.i 
and tprpfi or* worktd on p/Howew.j or 
towtlt, Tito ttitchti era timplt and Hi* 
totuht art btootllul llntnt. Son** for 
No.. 592. 

Our Nttdltwork Catalog containing 
coupon let tofocMnf one poWn htt i» 
30 ctnfi. 

Sond Uf lor oach dttu patttrn, 25f 
'or toch nttdltwork potttrn (add if for 
•ecfc potttrn lot third claii mailing and 
>Ot for oeco pottorn lor firtt elan mall- 
ingl to AUDRer IANI tUHBAU, *M 1490, 
Niw York i; NT 



Loan Firm Opens 

•J %. 

Oceana Branch 

OCEANA— A new branch of 
Associates Loan Corporation has 
opened an office at 92-A Vir- 
ginia Beach Blvd. in Oceana 
with L. W. McClellen as man- 
ager and Mrs. Barbara Wilson, 
cashier-receptionist. 

McClellen, a jjative of Nor- 
folk and a 19&7 graduate of 
Norview High School and the 
Tecnicai Institote of the Col- 
lege of William and Mary (Old 
Dominion), lives with his wife, 
Beverly, and daughter, Karen, 
at 103 Caribbean Avenue, Vir- 
ginia Beach. He is a master 
Mason of Norview Lodge No. 
113, part-time musician with the 
"Statesman" as a hobby, and 
also enjoys golf and bowling. 

Mrs. Wilson is a native of 
Lynnhaven and a 1961 graduate 
of Princess Anne High School. 
She and her husband, Robert 
G. Wilson, who reside at 506 
West Lane, Oceana, raise and 
breed Shetland ponies as a hob- 
by and enjoy fishing and antique 
displays. 

The parent company of As- 
sociates Investments Corpora- 
tion was founded in South Bend, 
Indiana, in 1918 by E. M. Mor- 
ris. The firm is now represented 
in 45 states and Canada with 
approximately 525 offices. 



it's superb summer eating. Gent- 
ly combine 2 cans thoroughly 
chilled consomme with 1 chilled 
can crab (drained and flaked), 
1 tablespoon lemon juice. Halve 
and peel 2 avacodos; brush with 
lemon juice, fill with consomme 
mixture for 4 servings. 



Virginia Beach Sun-News, Thursday, August 30, 1962 




ADMIRAL STORAGE & TRANSFER CORP. 

18th & Baltic Ave., Virginia Beach 428-2833 

AGENT FOR ENGEL BROTHER. INC. 




!»-M»l'M,WJ:H 



FOR CAR BUYS 

WHY? 

Buy a Rambler anywhere else when you can save up to 
$200.00 on a factory fresh 1962 Rambler. All models and 
color. 

For Instance— 1962 Rambler Classic 4-door station wagon 



• Standard transmission 
a Weather aye heater 

• Foam cushion seats 



a Under coating 
a Light package 
a Dow-guard Antifreeze 



•A«*iJv GA 8-5*91 

Marshall Rambler <~ 



l\\0b n& H 



907 . 17th St. (Bus. Rt. 58) Va. Beach 



***** 



■MpMStei 




ATTENTION FLOOR 

USERS! 

TEM CO Now offers for as little as $399.95 
easiest and least expensive warm air central duet 
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This compact shallow 
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With its unique design, no . 
return air discharge ple- 
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they are incorporated within'."' 1 
the unit itself. This unit will r 
accommodate six 6" and. , 
two 4" take-offs. No special 1 ' 
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and in many oases complete 
installation can be made in 
only one day, which greatly 
reduces labor costs, and in- 



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Average Installation Can Be Made in One Day 

Virginia Beach Gas Corp. 

1118 Cypress Avenue Phone GA 8-7171 




Specializing in all types of 



"Fresh Daily" 




SEAFOOD 

428- 3151 

"We have the Fish that got away" 

ATLANTIC SEAFOOD Co. 



661 



OPEN FREE DELIVERIES" 

year-round 3006 Arctic Ave. Virginia Beach 



\ 



— - 




let's 90 to Church Sunday 



Virginia Beach SUN-NEWS 
Thursday, August 30, 1962 
6-fe 



Calendar of 
Meetings and 

Special Events 



AMERICAN LEGION— 1st & 
3rd Thursdays, 8:00 p.m., Club- 
house, Laskin Road. Phone 6A 
8-9548. 



Burrows Church 
Plans Revival 



40 6 8 — 1st Monday each 
month, 8 p.m., clubhouse, Las- 
kin Road. 



LEGION AUXILIARY — tod 
Monday each month 8 p.m., club- 
house, Laskin Road. 



CIVITAN— 1st and 3rd Tues- 
days 7:00 p.m., Bay Harbour 
Club. 



DAUGHTERS 
—2nd and 4th 
17th Street 



OP AMERICA 
Tuesday, 308- 



Daughters of American Revo- 
lution — 2nd Saturday. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. 



DAR, Princess Anne Chapter — 
2nd Saturday, Sept-May. Phone 
GA 8-3453 for details. 



EXCHANGE CLUE— 2nd and 
3rd Mondays, 7:00 p.m. Dinner, 
American Legion CTub House, 
Laskin Road. 



VIRGINIA BEACH JUNIOR 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — 
2nd Tuesday, 8 p.m., 4th Tues- 
day, 7:00 pjn. Dinner meeting, 
Black Angus Restaurant. 



SHRINE CLUB — 2nd Friday 
each month 7 P.M. at Cavalier 
Yacht Club. 



KIWANK— Every Wednesday, 
7 pjn. Dinner, Cavalier Yacht 
Club. 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS — 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 8 pjn. 
Star of the Sea Parish Hall, 14th 
and Arctic. 



iLIONS CLUB— 2nd and 4th 
Monday at Isle of Capri at 
7.-80 PJf. 




BAFT! T CHURCH 

London Bridge, Vi rginia 
G. Edwaii! Hughes, Pastor 
9:43 turn.— Sunday School. 
1 1:00 a.m.— Moron* Worship. 
7:00 p.m. — Training Union. 
8:00 p.m.Evtoing Worship. 

ST. JOHN'S BAPTIST CHURCH 
Princess Anne Court House 
Rev. Brace B. Perkins, Paster 

10:00 A.M.— Sunday School 
1 1:00 A.M.— Morning Worship. 

6:00 P.M.— B.T.U. 

7:00 P.M.— Evening Worship. 



HILLTOP BAPTIST CHAPEL 

meeting in 
Linkhorn Park School, Laskin Rd. 
Paster— Ge o tn T. 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
1 1:00 a.m.— Worship Service. 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Rev. Frank Hughes, Jr. 

245 Rosemont Road 
9:30 A.M. ft 5 P.M. — Worship 

Services 
10:30 A.M.— Sunday School 



;OCEANA LIONS CLUB — 
Meets at Cavalier Y.C.C. 2nd & 
4th Tuesday at 7 pjn. 



MASONS — 2nd Wednesday, 
7:30 p.m., Masonic Hall, 20th 
Street and Arctic Avenue. 



MOOSE LODGE 1998— Every 
Tuesday, 8 pjn., at Lodge 904 
Atlantic Avenue. Phone GA8- 
9788. 

ROTARY — Every Thursday, 
7 pjn., Black Angus Restaurant. 



SPORTS — Every Tuesday, 
1:00 p.m., Cape Colony Club. 



VFW POST NO. 7186— Meets 
2nd and 4th Thursday of each 
month, 8 p.m., 13th and Cart- 
wright. 



VFW AUXILIARY— 2nd and 
4th Monday, 8 pjn., 13th St. and 
Cartwright. 



PRINCESS ANNE RURTTAN 
CLUB — 1st Tuesday each month 
7 P.M- H. H. Bendler, Secretary. 
GA 8-2881. 



I 



C frSwYourBiS^ 

CHRIST'S SECOND 

ADVENT IS NEAR! 

-ACTS 1:11 

Per free Bible 
study helps, send 
name and address to: 

THE CHRISTADELPHIANS 

P. O. BOX B42 
RICHMOND 24, VIRGINIA 



Rev. .Herman Mauche 

LONDON BRIDGE — Rev. 
Herman Mauche, pastor of Bur- 
rows Memorial Baptist Church 
in Norfolk, will be the guest 
speaker for Revival Services St 
London Bridge Baptist Church, 
September 3-9, beginning at 
7:45 each evening. 

Rev. Mauche, as pastor- 
Evangelist, has conducted many 
revivals in fourteen states. He 
has preached in Alaska and con- 
ducted revival meetings in Cana- 
da. 

The church is promoting the 
revival through its organiza- 
tions. During the revival these 
organizations will be seated to- 
gether and recognized during 
the services. 

The schedule includes the fol 
lowing: 

Monday — the Junior Dept. of 
the Sunday School, Board of 
Deacons and Trustees. 

Tuesday — The Intermediate 
Department of the Sunday 
School. 

Wednesday — The Woman's 
Missionary Union and its organ- 
izations; the Brotherhood and 
the Royal Ambassadors. 

Thursday — Sunday School Of- 
ficers and Teachers, John F. 
Stone Bible Class. 

Friday — Young Peoples and 
Young Adult Department of the 
Sunday School, Baptist Training 
Union. 

Rev. Mauche will deliver a 
special sermon to the Sunday 
School Sept. 9 10:00 A.M. 

Lutrell Sawyer, Choir Direc- 
tor of the church, will be in 
charge of the music for the 
revival. 

A nursery will be provided 
during the revival services. 

The church will hold a Home- 
coming dinner on September 9 
at 12:15 p.m. in the church pic- 
nic area. Each family is invited 
to bring a picnic lunch. 

■ - — — ... — 4 i — i 

PRINCESS ANNE BUSINESS 

6 PROFESSIONAL WOMAN'S 
CLUB OF VA. BEACH — Meets 
2nd Monday of each month 

7 p.m. Make reservations with 
Mrs. Atkins, at 428-9274. 



B A YSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 

1480 Pleasure House Road 
Pas t o r lam e s V. De Foe 

8:30 ft 11:00 A.M.— Worship 

Service 
8:00 P.M.— Evening Service 



Oak Grove 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

Back Bay, Virginia 
Rev* H. Eugene Arlington, 

9:45 a.m.— Church School. 
11:00 a.m. — Morning Worship. 

8:00 pjn.— Evening Worship. 

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Bayside. Virginia 
GreenweM Road & La keview Dr. 

Rev. David Moore, Pastor 
9:45 a.m.— Sunday School » 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
7:45 p.m. — Evening Worship 



FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 

419 Gfcnrock Road, Norfolk 2, Va. 
Rev. Charles T. Hendricks, 

9:45 a.m — Church School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Worship 
7:30 pin.— Evening Worship. 



FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 

6818 Va. Beach Blvd., Norfolk, Va. 
Fred M. Farias, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m,— Morning Worship. 

6:30 p.m.— Fellowship Hour. 

7:30 pjn.— Evening Services. 



FREEWILL BAPTIST 

In Princess Anne County on Highway 
615 Vi mae Past Oceana Air Station 
on right. 
T. I. Tingle, Serving as Minister 

Sunday School t* 9:45 A.M 

Worship Service 11:45 A.M 

Evening Service — 7:30 P.M 



GRACE BRETHREN CHURCH 

Great Neck at Hffitop 
A. Harold Arlington, Patter 

10:00, A.M.— Sunday School 
1 1:00 A.M.— Worship Service 
7:30 P.M.— Evening Service. 



Star of the Sea 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

14th Street and Arctic Circle 

Nicholas I. Habets, Pastor 

Sunday Masses: Winter, 8:00, 9:30 

and 11:00 a.m. 
Summer, June 15th thru Labor Day, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m. and 

12:15 p.m. 
Hory Days, 7:00, 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 

p.m. 
Confessions, 4:00 to 6:00 and 7:00 

to 8:00 pjn. Saturday 
Weekday Mass, 8 sun. 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 

15th Street and Baltic Avenue 
Erwood Kan, Pastor 
9:45 a.m.— Sunday School. 
11:00 a.m.— Morning Wonbap. 
7:30 p.m.— Evaagefistfc Service. 

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, 
SCIENTIST 

209 - 20th Street 
9:30 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Cbufach Service 
8:00 P.M.— Wednesday Service 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Virginia Beach Boulevard 
East Lane — Ocean* * 
Rev. Samuel D. BeUer, Jr. 

9:46 a.m.— Church School. 
11.-00 a.m.— Morning Worship. 
7:30 p.m.Evangelistk Service. 

CHURCH OF GOD 

620 14th Stre et 
Bobby Ha Sams, Pastor 
9:45 A.M.— Sunday School 
11:00 A.M.— Morning Worship 
7:30 A.M.— Evening Worship 



FRANCIS ASBURY 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Grant Neck Road 
E. 1. Taylor, Pastor 

9:45 a.m.— Church School 
11. -00 a.m.— Morning Worship 

Foundry 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Virginia Beach Boulevard, Lynnhaven 



8:45 a.m. and 11 a.m.— services 
9:45 a.m.— Church School 
6:30 p-.m— Youth Fellowship 



GALILEE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

40th and Pacific— GA 8-3573 

The Rev. Edmund Berkeley, Rector 

Rev. Macon B. Walton 

Assistant Rector 
8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion 
10:00 a.m. — Morning Sermon a