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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

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"Th0 Sun had the bait beiaball covar- 
aga tha Baach avar had." -R.B., Kampi- 
vina 

for home delivery phone 486-3430 



Russians vs. 
Virginians 
previewed 

Exchanging 

jobs causes 
some shodcs 

-Pag9 B-10 



BLOOD DONORS are needed to 
tte^ of aoo pints at t|ii$ Red 
9lmb<4xle when 'it visits the 
G«ieral Hospital of Virginia Beach 
tltosdsy (11 a.m.'Sp.m.). AD dcmors 
will rede^ a ^ re^atorant certificate. 

PLANNING a trip? There's valuaWe 
information and advice in the four- 
page vacation, travel and car care 
guide, incliKling tips (m how to save 

money while having fun in the sun 

. Page B^ to B-6. 

TO BENEFIT the General Hosintal 
of Virginia Bead), the auxiliary to the 
ho^tal plain a June Fest Saturday (10 
a.m^^ p.m.) on Xa& hcwpital gnnm^, 
1060^ First Ckdonial Road. Gam^, 
rides, prizes and demonstrations will 
be included. 



Inside 



Two Mctiont 20 1 

Qwifiad 8-8 

Commmt ~ A-2 

Natural A4 

Qaidaning A-6 

Ufa Stylai ...^ B-1 to B4 

Real Ettata ......; B-0 

Religion A-6 

Sports A-7 to A-9 



COMMUTERS Frank Barnes and Dorothy 
Wri^t were amwig the few passengers trying 



out the Beach's new bus transit service 
Monday. (Sun photo by Linda Miller) 



Transit service debut 
draws smaii turnout 



By LINDA MILLER 
San Staff Writer 

Monday was a dreary day — as far as the weather 
and the beginnings of a bus system in Virginia 
Beach were coneemed. 

.The few paiij^erB jtt|o stepped ' ^f the 
.^dewater Meb^lNin^ (IPT) bus» at Prinoess 
Aiuie Plaza aii^ipag Cex^xs to diange from slwttle 
runs to express buses were ti'eated royally. 
Ushered from flie buses t^ ycmng hostrases clad in 
blue and yellow outfits wfth Tidewatet* Tran- 
!i|»rtation EHstrict (TTD) si»hes, the passengers 
were greeted by city, TTD and TMT officials who 
offered them hot cirffee, donuts and a morning 
newspaper. 

But, onfy 437 persons who tirned out to ride ttie 
U*ansit system on its first day of full-service ex- 
perioiced the royal ti«atment. At times, the press, 
the officials am) the bus drivers were the only 



Arson suspect 
sought by police 



A search continues for a second suspect in con- 
nection with the May 28 fire which resulted in an 
estimated $70,000 damage to the Emanuel 
Efxspocal Church on Princess Anne Road. 

Detective Dennis Watsm (rf the HIT (High 
Intensity Target) bureau says O'Brian Tullis, 18, 
wIm> has no Icnown address, is bdng sought on arson 
and bursary charges. Mr. Tidlis was indicted on 
the charges by a Circuit Court patid jury Monday. 

A 17-year-oId juvenile has already beoi arrested 
on the same charges in amnectioa with the fire. 

The rectory and several Sunday School 
classrooms recei^^ wewn heat and smoke 
damage from the fire. Invatigatwa said the fire 
was set after a break-in of the building and theft of a 
small amount (rf petty cash. The fire had beoi 
buridng for some time b^ore discovery abmit 3:30 
a.m. on May 28. llie sanctoary of Um church, 
lodated in a separate building, was not dama^ by 
Uie fire. *"i 



persons around to see that the buses were on 
schedule. 

THE BUS system is a joint effort by the cities ci 

Norfolk and Virginia Beach, the TTd Commission 

and TMT bus company. The buses on the road this 

k week were a residt of moiUhs (A negotiations for 

mass transit service in the Beach. 

Moit officials said th^ weren't r^ly disw- 
pointed with Monday's turnout of bus ride's, but the 
ridership would have to {rfck up in the weeits to 
come if the system is to conttnue to exist. 

Herbert Pence, with TMT public relations, said 
te didn't know exactly how to evaulate the rider- 
ship since "no one really kmw what to expect for 
the Inis system." 

Cmdr . Lee Carlson of the 5th Naval District, who 
has been coordinating efforts for the bus route to 
the Norfolk Naval Base and Air Stotion, said he was 
disappmnted with the turn-out (A Navy persmnel 
who rode the bus. Only about six persona caught the 
exiH'esses to NOB Monday morning. 

CMDR. CARLSON was, however, optimistic 
that once the word got to all of the Navy personnel, 
the ridership on the NOB routes would increase. A 
survey conducted by the 5th Naval District showed 
tint there were more than 3,000 potential Navy 
riders in the Plaza area. 

Though the shuttle runs remained riderless for 
several tripis, many passengers who had oreviously 
rickien the Eh-incess Anne Plaza (PET) transit 
experiment before its discontinuation durng the 
Cardina Trailways Bus drivers strike, parked their 
cars at the shopping center and caught the expteu 
biees. 

Ami while there was little action on the buses 
themselves, the actim on the city Hotline in- 
ftHination telephones line kept two city employes 
busy most of the day. The information assistants 
r^orded more than 100 calls Monday concerning 
bus rout^ and schedules. 

Whoi the gasoUng shortage hit the Beach, many 
persom vwre lokii^ why the city didn't Imve a bus 
systan. Now that the city has a bus system, many 
peraoie are asking why it has so few riders. Others 
are jist hoping that the transit system's ridership 
will grow in ^ next few we^s. "" 



j^ 



A community center, complete with swimming 
pool, full-size gymnasium, two bowling alleys, a 
roller rink, a theatre and rooms for arts and crafts 
classes, is scheduled to be in operation by 1976 in 
the Princess Anne Plaza area of the city. 

Plans for the center, to be located on Holland 
Road near the intersection of Holland and 
Rosemont Roads, were given an informal nod of 
approval from members <A the Virginia Beach City 
Council at their Monday meeting. The building will 
cost between $2 million and $2.5 million upon 
comidetion. 

The 68,000-square-foot center will offer complete 
family recreation facilities designed for expanding 
"intellectual, as well as physical activities in tlw 
city," according to Asst. City Manager George 
Hanbury. The center will accomodate between 
50,000 and 70,000 persons. 

TO BK SET on a 28-acre land parcel, the three- 
story community center will house many of the 
current Parks and Recreation Department ac- 
tivities. The building will be barrier-free ami 
' equipped with the handicapped in mind. Special 
extra-wide doorways, restroom facilities and 
lifts to help handicapped persons in and out of 
the swimming pool will be instolled in the facility. 

Mr. Hanbury estimates that some 16,000 persons 
in the city are involved in Parks and Recreation 
Department programs, including adult and teen 
activity classes, senior citizen programs and 
athletics teams, "nie center, which will be under the 
Paries Department supervision, will also be 
available to civic groups to rent for a meeting . 
place. Baby sitters will be made available at the 
center to encourage adulte to participate in the 
programs. 

En0neering for the building, desiped by 
McCiurg and Wall architects has already begun. ,^^^ 
The engaaeiiing <KMt8, about $100,000, will be tar ^^^ 
clu<tedin the city's bcmdii^ pafMier, exye(^ad to 
be prmeit^d to the Council at ite May^ 17 (hewing. 
The rest (tf the project will be financed over the next 
two years by use of the city's ejqtanded bonding 
capacity. 

Federal funds 
eyed by city 

It's time once again for the city to considn* how to 
spend ite federal revenue sharing funb for the 
year. The city staff is {»«sently working on a 
$3,528,730 revenue sharii^ package whk;h Is ex- 
pected to be presented to ttie Vir^nia Beach City 
Council at its June 17 meeting, along with {n^oaals 
to issue bonds under the city's expanded bondng 
capacity. 

Ilie more than $3 million in federal revalue 
sharing funds is about $250,000 less than what was 
anticipated in Uie 1974-75 capital improvenwits 
program (CIP), The largest portion of fed«al 
fun^ (more than $1.0 million, accordii^ to the 
CIP) is expected to go to highway construction. 
BuikJUng construction, parks and recreation and 
water and sewer facilities also are to receive their 
share of the revenue sharing funds. ; 

Hie city received about $3.7 million in revemie '. 

sharh^ funds last year. When the five-year revenue ! 

sharing program «nd8 in 1977, the city will have 
used more than $16 million in federal funds to 
finance local capiUl improvement projects. 

Tlw main component in the city's bomtng 
package is expected to be the issuance of bonds to 
install water and sew^* lines. Under the city's ,, 

cluirter change ^nted by the last Gennal '; 

AssonUy, Virginia Beach may now borrow tm to • 

$10 million a year in bonds as long as the total debt • 

does not exceed 10 per cent of the city's total 
anessed value of real estate. 



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rr SOUNDED G( 



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BUT. 



Recreation authority idea hits snarls 



By UNDA MILLER 
San Ittaff Writer 

"The i(toa (A craatli^ a recmtion authority, 
whkh could wU btMids to build recreatim 
facfliti^ to ttie city, sowided ^aoL But, 
nMmb^s of the city's ^ff and the dty's 
bondng adviser queattoo whether wch an 
authority, if establtehed, coyM then sell 
revalue brads to finnce toe projei^ 

City Councilman Robert CaUs asked the 
etty staff and ttM c^ attorn^ to dwc^ toe 
^te law fw po^riUtea for e^ybM^ a 
reof^itim utfierity to Im^ the |Mivate 
buUding aector to financing recreational 
projects, wUte Mting tlw ta^pay«« otf toe 
bo(* from oonrtru^ian ante tf toe city were 
to bulk) the tocOlttos. ^ toeery wu that toe 
reereathM i^korlty wwk) opar^e mrii ^ 
aslodnalrlalaaHiority wito tliepatwertoiBaae 
revottebOMia. 

ttoil^ toe Mte ReereMon Act woiid 
aOow tlie craatiaB of a recrMtfoii antharity, 
toe law iovervtag such an author^ te ap- 



pareiUty not as rtrong as the law govemix^ an 

inttostoial autholty. No other municipaUty to 
the state has established mich an authority 
even thou^ it has beoi a part <A enabiing 
leg^bitkm since 1962, accordii^ to city ol- 
fictals. 

A£BT. an Urn^esf George Hanbury 
explained the advartages and dtaad\«ntag«i 
of creattag an authority and toM the aty 
Council Monday that MKh an autbxity ribouM 
not be oaated at tUs time. 

Ifr.ltaiitoiffy told the C^meil monbers that 
while me advantage of the authority is that it 
"m«s weepi pw^ fnm pffiyute a^icia or 
pe^le for reerNrttonal activities, so may the 
toealtty. R (the nitoority) can seU or leMC 
pe^eny wttoA §o^ ttvough tlw Ud 
ptoeem. However, so may the to^ty, unttsr 
eerMn oondltoiaa." And whfle the authority 
CT^ laaMefweiaic bonds tw the owrtraetow 
(rf reoeottoMd faeitttias without the etty in- 
aavtol ai7 d^ toe dty may mm adi 
laMgnm lMiitA wltltuul uli a ie i iilu u i . as Imic m 
the beads are supported ftdly 1^ revenasa d 



the facility constevcted. 

The nwin d^d^ntage to toe creation s( 
toe authority seems to be pOuiUe demise to 
the city's ability to borrow to finance othw 
projeds tmder consitotition. 

"THE ACT ^uiUes the authaity to sdl 
bmds. However it is extoemely doubtful if any 
bonds coidd be s<M at a dec«it rate without 
the city's ftdl taito and credit," Mr. Hanbury 
said in a letter to the coukA. "If a reoreaUon 
facility is t^istnKted by thvauthoity and the 
land acquired, and Qme is an wxmnnk: 
rec«iiOB, the first activitiM to feel toe 
m<HMtary pind) would be reofeatimid. If toe 
mithority d^aulted in paymeota, I am stffe it 
woidd require the kxadity to asrirt with the 
payme^s." 

An^to- cHsMlvantige to tlM ereatton <rf an 
autoor^. citad to Ur. Hanbuy's ^tor, to 
toat it wouM reqiire the Mrtog of quaUfled 
MiminiMti^e feemuoA, irtilch uraidd tai 
tMM cases (tapltoate the jrmesA ad- 
mtoMratMn in toe aty's Departaoent of 



Parks and Recreation and toe Departmoit oi 
EccHMMnic Devetopment. 

MR. HANBURY said he had atoo bem to 
cmAact wito Harry FYazim- III, the city's 
bonding counsel, who originally drafted the 
RecreAion Act in 19^. Mr. Frazior had in- 
(Heated to the aMMairt city mana^ ttoit 
th«« was a qvMstiMi whether "toe Reoreatlm 
Act contemplates the typical industrial 
devek^ott type financmg...{uui wh^ior 
recreatkMBl withcnity may be vmei as a 
financii^ ^^kle." 

"Mr. Tl^z^hasiMttctedtometoiAitwaa 
not tlw iirtent (rf toe Act to altow te 
reowtional authnity to functom as a 
ftaaiKing institutiMi, but as an autlMNrity to 
tolerate and maintato public facilities," Mr. 
Hanbuy's Mi&t stated. 

The C^ncil inUcated that it wanM nnire 
time tolodt into toe matt^ bd«e cantkMy 
ruling out the poasibility of a r e CTo a toiP 
author^. Furtoer (ttscusskm of the authority 
Is opaded to be haard Mratfaiy. 



■^MWi 



T 




Ht$ A^2-THt Sun-Wtdnndiy, Aim 6, 1974 



AnmBtoM: 



Gagging society 




: Tte fN^ce puU up to a neightxr's 

- house. He is led away in handcuffo. 

Why has he been arrested? Who is 

•his accuser? Questions are 

• unanswered by a blanlc wall of 
! silence. The newspapers report 
: nothing. That is a fomiliar story 
: under dictatorships, but we 
t comfortably assume it can't happen 

• here. 

Yet that sort of action has it's 
: forerunner in the kind of secrecy 
: orders imposed recently by 
-Albemarle County Chrcuit Court 
Judge David F. Berry. During a 
' special granid jury investigation of 

• Albemarle County officials, Judge 
: Berry ordered wiUiheld from the 
: press information concerning a 
: motion to quash the jury and held a 
: closed preliminary hearing on the 
'motion. His gag order included a 
' threat to hold in contempt those at 
ttfae hearing if information was 
: leaked to the pmn. 

I In AlKil, Berry ordered court 
'Officers to close access to all suits 

• and motions fUed wiUi his cmirt until 
'matured 21 days after filing. Only 
' thai are they made available to the 
:ire88. His actions have prompted 
; Chariottesville Newspapers, Inc. to 
:a8k the Vii^inia Siqreme Court of 
•Appeals to prohibit Judge Berry 
•firom withhoklii^ court documents 
^firom the press and public. 

MOST AMERICANS, and with 
.good reason, have faith that their 
'law enforcement agencies and 



CUyslde 



BvUniammer 



Tryhg to keep 
tnshinthebag 

Everyone may soon be looking into Om trash at 
city hall. 

To cat down <m gasoline consumption the city 
stopped i^ddng vp garbage twice-a-wedt and put 
residenis on a oiK»«-weck trash cidlection 
sdwMeafew mm^w ago. Few povons complained 
in the wintor months. But, now that summer is 
here, residents are wondering how they'll keep 
th^ trash tai the bag from decaying and causing 
heaMi and envlrofynental pnMems. 

anee tb arrival of the tourist season, the city 
b^an piddog lip putage in the mort area six 
times a week. Ait the dty noanagnr has said ttie 
dty etuaoi. resume residential garbarge collection 
two times a week untU the city's gasoline aUocatlon 
is i ncr e as ed. 

But, some citiiens are not satisfied with that 
answer. Petttk»s to get back flie twicea-week 
garbage coUectien service were bdng prepared for 
ctarculatkm by a KempsviUe groq> Uat wedi. 

So, as the summer gets hotter, Vhrginia Beach 
city cotaicilmen may find thonselws up to didr 
eyebalto ta garbage. 

THE VIRGINIA Beach city employes were left in 
tlM dwk twice iMt wedE. 

The power at thecity administratton building was 
cut off om% as sdwduled by the power conqMuy ^ 
ai^ (Mice as a surprise. A car wredt which dami^ted 
noriv utility poOs shut down the power in the 
bon^ tot several hours one day, and VEPOO 
sdiedimd a shut-down one day to make power 
cwm e cti eBB in tte area. 

One dty eaxfltoye boMled ttiat even die powor 
dMrt^kiwa^coddBt ^t down work at the 
imayeJ^Mlcanter. (tae wonders, however, how thqr 
ran aB those electrte typewriters and computers 
without dectrldty. 

< > aa <> aaaaa 

BEACH ADMINISTIUTORS have been elected 
as officers in varkms state or g anisa t i on s. 

Ctty Managsr Roger Soott was elected vice- 
pKsidHit of the Vhrgtaita Chapter of the loter- 
natJoMlCHy Management Assodrtkw at its annual 
meettiv ki May. fite was also appointed to the 
gn^»'s F^Mnd (Ximndttee on Manigii^ Growth. 

muices Ekod, ^edor of die Dqiutmcnt of 
Sodal Sendees, has beoi deded president of the 
Vlii^riaCeuadlflf SodalServk* Bsaeutives. GUes 
DoddT^faeder of ftamoe, is now president of the 
Vta^tateOipter of the Maiddpal finance Offiosrs 



courts woidd never be used for 
repression and intimidatioii the way 
such institutions are perverted in 
totalitarian countries. That faith is 
justified because a free press, 
guaranteed under the First 
Amendm^, is always examinii^ 
the way prosecutors and the courts 
fulfill their obligation to give 
defendants the qieedy and puldto 
trial they ar« guaranteed fay the 
Sixth Amendment. The link between 
a firee press and equitable justice 
cannot be sevwred. 

Whim judges worry that publidty 
may serve todeny a ddendant a fair 
hairing they are looking at the 
question inside out. Tlie searching 
eye of publidty is the best guarantee 
of impartial justice. The few judges 
who assume Oiat news oovonge in 
advance of a trial nuikes it 
impossible to assemble a jury 
intdligent enou^ to base a dedston 
on evidence oroduced hi court and 
nothing else are sefflng the public 

short. 

In the iMToad soise, a ^dge vtho 
imposes a "news blackout" on any 
case is engaging in prior censorship 
of the news. For any officer of 
govemmoit to exercise such power 
is wholly inconsistent with the 
' principle of a tree press. In turn, it is 
a threat to the impartial 
administration of justice. The "star 
chamber" court proceeding, cut off 
from public view and inunune to 
pid)lic critkism or comment, is the 
beginning of the end of a free 
sodety. 



^n/lfeieh fom lengmge. Tfikeln'^l/m WMe Nome. 



r 




Renters 



New law spells out rights 
for tenants and kmdlords 



#.VWi 



II.MMI 



vnnHMimi 




•Me* niHMHwe eowoMnoN 



vaa.ge' 



By UN&A MILLER 
SiuiStetr Writer 

As Irnig as apartmente and other hone rentals 
continue to be a trend in the American living style, 
tliere will be disagreemente betwem some land- 
Irnds and tenants. If you are a renter with an 
unreasonable landlord or a landod with an unruly 
tenant, you may som find a legal medwd to deal 
with your problem throu^ a landlord and tenant 
act passed 1^ the last Viiginia General Assembly. 

Tlw "Vii^faiia Reddratial Landlmd and Tenant 
Act," as the sectkm of the stete code is to be called, 
will go into effed Jidy 1. Hie law, the first (rf its 
kind in the Virginia code, outlines what a landlord 
must provide to a renter, as weU as what the land- 
lord's rigltfs are over Ms property. 

Del. Glemi McClanui, Virgtaila Beach democrat, 
a member of the House General Laws Qnnmittee, 
out of which the bill amie bdore reaching the 
House and Sente (kwrs, says the UU is "good 
l^^tion and particular^ important f «* Virginia 
Beach citizens with all the multi-family dwelUngs 
that are being constructed in the dty. The bill 
however, ori^^ted primarily from northom 
ViiiJinia where 60 to 85 per cent of the people live in 
apartmoite." 

THE ACT APPUE8 to all rental agreementa — 
written (»■ OTsl. Exempted uiMler the law are terms 
or conditions that are not profa&ited t^ the law rad) 
u raiting to an exctaaive graiq> of persons, lUw 
seniOT d^ns. 

Listed among the land- 
lord's new obligations in 
the law b a provision that a 
landkxd may not demand hi 
excess of two mooflis roit as 
a seourity dqiodt Aftor ji 
tenant has dwelled to a umt 
for 13 months, the landkrd 
mt»t bcgbi to pay him three 
pex cent interert annually on 
the original deposit. 
Oflrrei^y, most buKlards charge a tMumt'from 
ISO aadtq> for a security depodt, and the raato* 
recdves no iiMorest on mrt deposit 

Dd. Mcdanan says the 13^|prth period of 
teai^y iwttsd toriiminata those madws ef the 
very brandoA pqsilattoa. 

NOT COVEatED by the biU is the non-refundable 
"pd deposit" charged by many laadhrds. The "pd 
dqjMdt" ta requfa«dQf pd oiraos n^en toey begto 
occiml^ a rentd ta^ re^srdteai of iHietber todr 
pd doss a^ damage to toe hooiAig odt 

Unaware ttuit there were such "non-reftedafale 
depodta," Del MeOaBaa said he woidd kMk tote 
fee matter to die aext Geaerd AsMmbty sess ion , 

"Any depostt shodd be refunded iidess there has 
Ibeen donage to toe jremises," says Dd. 
McCknsn. "And, if a lanfliard te^ilag to charge a 
depostt, be should have to pay tatered on it." 

raOTECTKMV FOR the landord to the law in- 



damage and present a rqMdr bill when the next rent 
is due or ask for immediate payment, if the con- 
tract is terminated 

THE LANDLORD, among other things, must: 
maintoln the premises in compliance with the 
requirem«ite d appUcaUe iMdlding and housing 
codes materially affecting healto and welfare and 
malce aU repdrs and do whatever is necessary to 
put and keep the premises in a fit and habitoble 
cmdiUon; 

roaintoto an itemised recm^ for public in- 
spection d dl de^dtms from security deposits for 
the iNT^xding two years and submit that record^to 
the tehant witoin five days after he ocoqries the 
dwelling umt, itemizing damages to the umt at the 
tioMB occt^ancy; 

disdose the parson or 
persons authwized to 
mani^e the |»remises, the 
owner or any person 
autlxnized to act for toe 
owner for purposes of 
recdving services or 
demands and in the case d 
sale d the premises, toe 
name, address and 
tdq|)bone number d toe 
purchaser. 



Suhsmaf 
sdtffo 

tocourt 



Deposits 
must earn 



redd paymcd - tf ttie tenant fails to pay Ms 
not en tone, dter five dsys adice, the lan dtocd 
termtoato the lesM aad obtato peaseadon d 
prndaes by takiag toe matter to court; 

daai^ to property - tf thoe is a vidatlen tor 

tanut d tois law or toe redd apeemert tod 

be resedted ^ ropdr, r^fa^aat d a 

ttan or daaatog, nd the taisd Wis to 

dtof M days neltoe d thatoaach sim^ 






BOni LANDLORD and toiant can pursue his 
case against the dher by filing a civil sdt f<Mr 
damages. The tow is gppUKBiie in a sdt ody if tl» 
advance notice hu been given m an ^iHrt to 
cored the probtems between the toiant and 
kui^tord. 

The law, however, teaves housing and bdlding 
cede edoroem^ up to the local authiHrttiM. Iliat 
-Jldiortty iraw rests wito toe city bdlding code 
inspectors (for new housing udte) and wito the 
minimim housii^ dvkdm of toe dty Hedto 
Dqiartment (for dher hoiuii^ udts). The 
mtoimum Imeiing code entot»!^it may soon be 
pitt under city adminidratifm, as fntyosed to 
Virgbua Beach Oty Manila' Roger Scott's 1974-75 
bodgd. 

AndtoeproUem for sonw rentos to toe city may 
red tomieclnise to the new date law vdiic^ may be 
idoprded to say toat a landhm) is ex^^ ti^n 
the law imloM he owns tea or more rmtal udto. 
Thd wodd leave tenwto who reside to sonw d the 
city's hMMS wMeh are ta the poored o>nditoms 
witbod ny legd recourse since the ki^ord may 
hdd <»ty ime (NT two redal dwelUi^. 

"I SEE NO merit to that clause," says Dd. 
McOraan. "A landkaid has tlw sune <My to a 
dngle fam% as he dkies if he owns severd apart- 
mei^ ne dause mud tei^ been Mided at the lad 
minute (after it left the General Uws Com- 
mittee)." 

The mato proUen, however, for mod tonnto 
may be fta^ od «cae% tfadr ri^ts m reders 
iffidw the LanAard and Tnont Act. 

"Uudbrds wOlflndodabod it (thelaw) jud the 
way cMsens do,. I gaeas," says Dd. MoClanan. 
"Mod laife ^^artment owners ore represoited by 
lawyers ate wiD tdl than." 

As fd* the poorer "mtte men" ta ^^rgida Beach, 
Dd. MoC&nan says he beUevas th^ win Bod out 
abod the law throat the medto nd ttoeu^ dty 
fgeadea fte the SeeW Servtoea Departmed. 

noigh the tow prttaMy favon the Indted, 
teaaaradghtowedtaMtbettBr defiaedta the new 
Gensrri Assembly legislaHnB for these persons who 
mi take tone to use thalaw. 




By 

Sims 

Sun Editor 




#-A^/#. 



Sucli 

a senator has 



% 



s 



In toe hi^ly politicized atmo6|^i«re <^ the 
nation's capital, the hottest question in town until 
recaitly has been will the House d Represaitatives 
vde to impeach Pr^doit Nixon. But, thanks to 
New Times magazine, Slen. William Uoyd Scott (H- 
Va.) has become the subject d another question 
toat bef<s for an answer: Is Sen. Scott redly "the 
dumbest C!oi^essman of toem dl?" 

Wh«i the article, reportedly based on a surv^ of 
Ck>i^essional assistonts and legislative aides, 
listed Sen. Scott at toe top of a list of the 10 
"(bimbest" members of Congress, the senator was 
understandably upset. Wito 535 membefs' in 
Congress, surel;^ Sen. Scott faced some rough 
competition before gaining this notorious atl^ard. 
But apparently his cleaning of used paper clipci was 
enou^ to give him a majority victory. ' 

At last report, Sen. Scott was considering filing a 
suit agdnst toe magazine (or toe article wtoch 
bestowed upon him the UUe of "King d Dumb." But 
the senator was having second tocnights. He was 
concerned Uiat if he lost the suit, pecqde would 
believe the magazine was correct. 4 



aaaaaaaaa 



CRAGGY OLD John Sparkman is in toe driver's 
seat in the contest for one of the most prestigious 
jobs in the U.S. Senate. Wito toe recent mnmary 
defeat Of Sen. J. William Fdlnright (D-Arlc.), Sen. 
Sparkman (D-Ala.) is next in line for chairman d 
the Senate Foreign Relations Cfunmittee, a post 
which Soi. Fdbright will hold until his SKCfsafor, 
Dale Bumpers, take office next January. 

Presently, Sea. Sparkman dready holds a 
position d lii^ esteem in the Senate. He is ci^h*- 
man of toe Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs 
Committee. But because d a Senate rule making it 
impossible for a member to be chdrman d two 
importont committees, Sen. Sparkman must decide 
which job he {refers. 

Wito Sen. Fulbri^t's defeat. Sen. Sparkman wfil 
rank fifto in Senate seniority when Congre$i con- 



venes Jin i9^u^iAghi9^ years totheSeml^f^P- 
Sparkman has bult vsp a wealto of power and in- 
fluence. His chairmanship over the banking 
committee makes it easy for him to drum up 
financial su^wrt when he needs it to win re- 
election. But indications are now toat he win qpt for 
the Foreign Relations Committee. 



WHILE MANY Congressional observers are bUsy 
analyzing toe impact of Sen. Sparkman on u.S. 
foreign policy, few have taken notice d what would 
occur in toe hierarchy of toe banking coihmittft. 
Next in line for Sen. Sparkman's vacated chair 
would be Sen. William Proxmire (D-Wis,). 

Undernrath all that tiransplanted hAir, Sen. 
Proxmire remains the little man's politician. Afto* 
his mormng jog to his Capitol dflce, Sen. Proxmire 
busies himsdf pointing out Pentogon cost ov«Tuns 
and af^ling for consumer legislation. His impact on 
the domestic fnmt is likely to be as dramatic as 
Sen. Sparkman's on forei^ relations. 

In toe past, closed sessions d toe tMinking 
committee have dten turned to quarrels between 
Sens. Sparkman fflfid I^oxmire — wito a littie 
senatorial name-callii% thrown in. If ai^lMng 
mi^t influence Sen. Sparkman to stay on toe job as 
bedcing committee chairman it is the thou^t d 
Sen. Proxmire presiding over a ccHnmittee con- 
sidraring legislation potentially hazardoiB to the 
hedto of big city banlcs. 



How to saliscrllie 




r 



Many of our mdan prater to gst 
todr periond copiei of The Sim by 
mdl. *:^*»- ^ 

If you with The Sun to fil maHad 3 
MfSiMy to your home or toninet^'ii^R i 
us dw coupon and isii^oe Mrili to#i 
immediatdy. 

Mail to: 

Virginia Baach Sun 

Cir^lation Dapt. 

lURos^ontRd. 

Virfinia Beach. Va. 23452 



MdlTheSunTo: 



Addren 



J ISty" 



w 



I 
I 
I 

i i 

I i 



1Yr.|0fi 6Mot.t«JOO 3M«.^6tO! 



I 







By 

Donna 

Hendrick 

38 peeves can 
drive you wild 



"Ho# wmdd you like to be not rich but at least 
fsimimV asked Bjll Bridges, director of crnitimiuig 
education at Tidewater Commtuiity Cottle's 
(tCCT Virgiiua Beach camiws. 

Mr. Bridges was slyly conning me into ad- 
diri^ng a TCC class on career interest. Varioiffi 
profe^ional types visit the class to chat about what 
they do to earn a living, he said, and I'd be perfect 
to talk ^bout the working press. 

Mf. Bridges twisted my arm a little more by 
telling me the lecture would be videotaped on 
cassettjes so future stu^nts could "{dug me in" so 
to speak., 

i dot)'t know if they learned anything, but I sure 
learned a lot. For one thing, I learned from the 
canoeraman handling the videotape equipmoit that 
the videotape subject should never move around a 
lot (it's difficult to keep the subject in camera 
range) and should never, ever wave papers or 
hands around in front of the face. I'm sure I did 
both. 
. ■ i 

VMJSO LEARNED that I have never be«), am 
not now and never will be a speaker. I stammer and 
stutter and make strange noises when I'm really 
trying to be another Demosthenes. 

I also learned that a sHght tickle in the throat 
caused by a lingering virus becomes a huge, 
rasping, gasping, red-faced, eyes streaming coi^h 
whetf oAe is trying to ignore the tidile and sp^ 
clearly and cleverly. 

ANtmiEK THING I learned is that eve^body's 
got a htesle. In fact, the students in Joan George's 
career 'interest class had so many hassles they 
ty]^ i)l^ ail 38 of them and sutenitted them to me 
for possible use in this column. 

Instead of stealing their ideas, however, I decided 
to pass them along intact. Herie are 38 hassles that 
driv^ those students wild: 

The, way some peq)le park cars. 

Going out in the rain with glasses on that rain- 
drops.fall on. 

flow to get a sunburn without really trying. 

Reviving the 50s. 
.Cloudy glasses. 

t)oi^ 6e;rin papers at the last minute. 

FIndiMeDOiiidi ^urflng ai'ea in A^rghiia Beach. 

1^^^^ WtHfe Vi^Birf Ifeidf VNoflbf 
Eii^^ssway.' 

TiyiQg to ixress the accelerator in a compact car 
while .wearing platform and wedge shoes. 

HesuriBg "He won't bite" while the little mutt 
licte nis lips! 

How to get a migraine thinking about school. 

Washing the storm windows, after which it 
rair^. 

OOve pits. 

When you're getting dressed in the morning and 
you're in a rush and the tips on your shoelaces 
break. "> 

Lighting the wrong end of a filter cigarette. 

Dropping the last sleeping pill down the John. 

Biting into a still-frozen apple turnover. 

Damp weather and salt shak«%. 
. Rain tlie day after you finally watered the whole 
garden., 

The lirst pancake is always burnt. 

Driving 55 mUes per hour without the air con- 
ditioner; cars passing you with windows rdled iq>. 

Bugs that bite. 

Qeuing ttie barbecue grill. 

Getting in a car when it's like an oven. 

Stop li^ts put iq) after their quota of accidents. 

At the beach — sand in your peanut butter sand- 
wich. 

Parking at the drive-in and your speaka* doesn't 
wertc and you ttrn on your parking lights to leave 
and somdtxxly honks the horn because your lights 
are on — iM) otho* parking place. 

^ng and work. 

Finding summer jobs. 

Traffic surveys — are they useful? 

Why doa the city resurface a r<nd thai tear it up 
immediately? 

Trials Mid brit»ilati(His of a cat shower cat club 
meeting. (This from a cat fancin* in the class.) 

lliinking of thinp to write about 



GefttK q> at 6 a;m. to come to an 8 a.m. class 
(Mily £find the teacher isn't tha«. 

Lo&Hi 1^; change to tip the waitress and 
discm^^ ywi only ha^ painies. 

Di^ that knodc over garbage cam. 

Discovering yoiv p^ chameleon can disgiise 
himwlf as a fireplace — after you Ut it. 

Algae on Mi tanks. 



ADVERTISING RATES 
CLASSIFIEDS $2.52 

RETAIL DISPLAY ^r column Inch 
MO CONrHACr NiCnSAItY 



"It pays to ad¥#rtlso 
In Tho Sun" 

CALL 4M^430 TODAYI 
ASK ¥Cm ADVEmSING 



foee/ 



bvMHMii 




Road crews work hard, as hard- 
hatted worker Edward Lawri- 
more knows. He paused recently 
during a busy day of helping 



pave Lynnhaven Road to take a 
^cigarette break and savor a mo- 
ment of quiet Before resuming 
his back-breaking job. 



Whitehurst raps Nixon 
for not releasing tapes 



Sun Washington Bureau 

WASHINGTON --■ Rep. G. 
WUliam Whitehurst (R-Va.) has 
expressed displeasure with 
PresidentNixon'swithholdii^of 
Watergate tapes. 

"I am sorry the President is 
adamant about not turning over 
the tapes," Rep. Whit^urst 
said. "The President does not 
help himself if he withholds 
information from the (House 
Judiciary) Committee." 

Rqp. Whitdnirst had praise 
however, fw the performance 
rf Rep. Peter W. Rodino (D- 
N.J.), chairman- of the 
Judiciary Committee that is 
investigating possible 
impeachment of the President. 

"I have no quarrel with how 
he (R^. Rodino) is hamUing the 
investigation," Rep. Whitehurst 
said. The Virginia congressman 



sail Jjece i^rela numbfr of 
"fawTtics" on the cbrftffllttee 
who are pushing for "radical 
action." He declined to name 
the fanaticsi but said Rep. 
Rodinb has not allowed them to 
interfere with his attitude of 
fairness toward the President. 

"I AM BOTHERED l>y the 

present attitude of the 
President in looking afto- his 
subordinates," Rep. Whitehurst 
said. He said the transcripts of 
Watergate conv,ersati(»is show 
that the president relied on a 
public relations approach to 
misdeeds committed by 
members of his administration 
Transcripts are not sufficient 
basis for committee 
discussions about 
impeachment, Rep. Whitehurst 
said. He said listening to the 
tapes' is the best means for 
judgment and that voice 
inflections should be taken into 
account. 



' &#^ WWt«h|B"8t.»«id he has 
'^pt^Dtnely hot polled his 
constituents about their 
attitudes toward the President's 
difficulties. He said that he, as a 
prospective juror, must not let 
public opinion sway him in his 
decision about th«e merits of the 
President's case. 




-mm, 



StodipHe 



A kmg-iaiigo ansMrer 
to saving the teach 

Hie city recently received a^iroval from the 
Federal Fn^pnrty Council to go idwMl with plans for 
a sand stodcirile {n^oject of Ft Story Army Base. 
Ilie sand wiu be usied to r^^ish the resort strip 
b^ich. » 

The r^enishment program calls f(»r a gov^ti- 
ment-owned Ya^igiet dredge to remove sand from 
the lliimble SiMMdi Ownn^ of the Chesapeake Bay 
and stodtp^le it on a TtHicre land parcel m Ft. 
Story. Ttw sand will th«i be truck-hauled to the 
various portions of the eroded brach along the 
resort strip. 

But, the city stiU faces the batOe of trying to find 
aff interim tource of sand until ttie project can be 
begun s(HneUme in the fall Asst. aty Manager 
George Hanbury says the city is currently 
ne^tiating' with private pn^ierty vamn for sand 
that can b^ truck^auled to the beach. 



VWE EXPECTED to get the abproval (from the 
federal council)," says Mr. Hanoury. "The stock- 
pile ivoject will be the long-range answer to saving 
the beach." 

Orginally' the city and this Virginia Beach 
E^ion Cofnmissiim anticipated that the stockpUe 
IM'ogram c<Nild begin in June or July, but the 
federally-(»vned hopjier dredge is scteduled for 
dredging operations far in advance. 

The city had hoped to be able to use sand now on 
the 70-acre Ft. Story land as a temporary source of 
sand. The sand then would have been replaced 
when the stockpile program began. But, the Army 
Corps of Eijigineers nixed that idea, saying "they 
didn't want to complicate things." 

MR. HANBURY says negotiations for sand 
should be completed in the next few weeks. He adds 
that the city is also trying to aquire a spoil site for 
sand that has to be 6re^edi from the Lynnhav«i 
Channel. 

Once the hopper dredge is in operation, the city 
will have a source of "pure sand of good quality that 
wi)l make 9 beautiful beach," says Mr. Hanbury. 
"Right now, we would be happy to get a 100 feet 
wide beach, but in the future the beach could be 
200 feet wi^g." 

fhe repleSiishment program will have at least a 
$3.2 million price tag, according to figures 
calculated ("iising cost factors from two years ago) 
by the Virginia Eieach Erosion Commission. The 
Thimble Shoals dredging will |»*ovide about one 
million cubic yards of sand for the beach annually. 



■nie Sun-Wajneriay. Juiw 5. 1974- Pteg A 



" .--m 









1 



^WBLJ^f ' 






OUR 20th SUMMER PROGRAM 

JUNE lOth-AUGUST 30th 

Featuring A 

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2Vk Throu^ 13 

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VACANCIES 



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your home address this sunimei: 



Lots of people are buying beach 
condominium homra. 

But only a very few, very smai^ 
peopde will actually be living in 
their new homes this summer. 
You could be one of them. 

And you could be spending 
lefls. Becatsse Pacific S<rath 
offers unlimited luxury at t;he 
^^Bwest cost per square foot of 
living space. Check prices. Yo« 
won't bie able to duplicate the 
$23,(m to $53,000 price range 
availaMe at Padfic South. 

Hunk about it. Better still, 
come see the condominiam hom« 
con^krte and ready for your 



inspection at Pacific South. 
Check rooovaizes. Compfure floor 
B plans. Marvel at the view from 
oceanf ront picture windows. 

But don't wait too Img. Three 
out of four of all our home units 
already belong to somecHie. 

MQFC SOUTH. 

. 5th and Pacific AvenuM 
Virginia Beach 

SalM ^c«s and model uniU 
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Features 



Page A4-Th8 Sun-Wtdmtday. June S, 1974 



Do-it-yourselfers 
no longer men 




Several years ago, a friaid of mine moved 
into a new apartment just befwe she lost her 
job. Outside of a bed and table she had no 
furniture and didn't dare delete her savings 
buying any. Most women at that time would 
have wrung their hands and reconciled 
thonselves to a baO'ren, dreary apartment. 

Not Lila. She used all that free time to read 
everything she could get her, hands on on 
"doing-it-yourself" and built "built-in" 
closets throughout her apartment, painted 
and papered the walls, tiled the floor and in 
h«- spare time created "antique" furniture. 

WHICH LED me to wonder back then before 
the mass consciousness raising of the woman's 
movement how the idea ever got started that 
making things was a male monthly. Today, 
of course, the concefH of "handiness" as a sex- 
linked characteristic is obsolete and women 
refuse to be reduced to helplessness when 
there's no man around the house. Or even if 
there is a man around the house. 

A slew of books have arisen on how to do 
yourself what your husband, boyfriend or 
repairman was supposed to do for you and one 
of the best is Florence Adams' "I To<* a 
Hammer in My Hand — The Women's Build-It 
and Fix-It Handbook" (Morrow $9.95). Ms. 
Adams could easily have titled her book 
"Everything You Always Wanted to Know 



About Doing It Yourself But Were Afraid to 
Ask," for she has written a snuU en- 
cyclopedia that should liberate (1) women 
who want to build and fix but never learned 
how, (2) anyone with more time than money 
to invest in Mie's home, (3) men who have 
been intimidated by the super competence of 
Popular Mechanics type heroes, (4) home 
owners. 

MS. ADAMS' expertise on building and 
fixing originally began as a home owner when 
she purchased and renovated a brownstone 
hersdf. Today, she teaches carpentry and 
plumbing and has her own "Workalong" local 
radio show. 

Copiously illusb-ated with her own line 
drawings, Ms. Adams' bode begins with 
detailed descriptions (rf every conceivable 
type of tool, hardware fastening, and building 
material on the market. She tells how to cope 
at the hardware store and lumber yard and 
what walls are (some are sandwiches). There 
are chapters on plpmbing, heating and 
electricity (the last tells how not to get 
electrocuted). 

She covers "repairs and renovations" and 
provides detailed instructions on "wonderful 
things to build" such as bodtcases, storage 



units, closet shd^«g, taUes and desks, bed, 
couches, chairs, kitchen counters, cuptMiards, 
and (day structures. And there's a whtrie 
cl»pter on womoi and cars. 

UNUnJAL FOR do-it-yourself autiMffs, Ms. 
Adams writes clearly, with a sense of humor 
and with an envious dedication to the subject 
Just bear in mind that this book is fw her <»- 
him wlw would be a serioia handb^pors^m 
(perh^s even a nuister builder) — not fw the 
do-it-yourself dabbler seeking to rejuvenate 
an over-age sofa or C(rffee table. 

Another innovative do-it-yourselfer is 'The 
Box Bode" t^ Diane Cleaver, subtiUed "The 
World's Cheapest Way to Build All Your Own 
Fio-niture" (David McKay $4.K). Iliis, ac- 
cording to Ms. Cleaver, is to use boxes, which 
have two advantages: (1) they're already in 
usable fotn, and (2) they're free. In this 
alternative to "contemporary Salvation Army 
decw," Ms. Cleaver gives clear instructions 
and drawing for projects such as cupboard, 
wall units, cabinets, ch-awers, douches, chairs, 
bodffihelves, tables, etc. Everything in the 
book, according to the publisher, has been 
made by Ms. Cleaver who furnished her 
apartment completely from boxes. "My tmly 
concession to mass manufacturing is a bed," 
she says'. 



^tmmmmmm 



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IIORs> 




From 

JutwS 

to Juno 11 

AltIEB:(llarthat«Aprfl 
II- Als« ikriw AaceadMl) - 
You Kt buikttiig tomrda !•• 
vMiMe clfanK this wMk. If 
you v« involved to ^wrts, 
you ooidd come oat tte wioMr 
now. Curb irapidie — randi 
dedaion, Miljr after cnrrfnl 
cautkui, \ mature comklar- 
atk». 

TAURUS: (ApriTlliellqr 
» - AIM Tiurai AMcadMt) 

-Pay particidar attaittai to 
your i^paarwoe -r- oOien are 
noticing. Uae your direct ap- 
proadi and organiiMional 
ridUi, finid) tq> pro^eeli be- 
gun earner, paying particular 
aOntion to detafl mat and 
researdi. 

GEMINI: (May 11 le JUe 
» - Alao Gcmlai Aeccadaat) 
~Cooperati<« is Iny now. Be 
wUlirs to exert extra effort 
Good time also to stsrt a va- 
cation. Situations wlridi were 
coftfiiaed or foggy become 
dear to you now. Intidtion is 
higli — use it in practical 

Wl^8. 

CANCER: (JvM 2| le July 
a — Also Canco' Ascendant) 
— All aiffuls iqvear to be 
"Go" in reference to finances 
and business affairs. Use your 



imi^inatlfln to borne de^rat- 
tag or reJuvmMon — uae «id 
materials and give tbem a 
look. An old romanM 



mar reappear. 

IiDO:(M^atiAag«ttt 
^ Alas U« Miv m m - 
Vmcy tte rautiae rf yow Job 
with unnusl and difbrent 
types of idsure activities. 
Good tfane to fo ever inpor- 
tart docomMta, tegal papers 
and iqidate if necessary. Get 
professional advice ,tf needed, 
curb iniNdse. 

V|IGO:(AagartlSteScpt. 
tt-AlseVlrts Aseeadsit) - 
Be patient and d^kmatic 
with doae assodatas or sari- 
ous difttculttes can occur. 
Don't dw^ im people and 
events in yoor past — live ta 
the here and now. Deteeb 
from your emottons Md ttiink 
out problems. 

UBRA: (Sept a to Oct. B 

- Also Utea Asoeadait) t- 
Be alert for new oppertuiMeB 
that come up tids wedi. Take 
die long-range and broader 
view. Financial questions 
come to a head for lohition. 
Get in touch widi your inner 
sdf and open up to different 
vahie system. 

SCORPIO: (Oct a to Nov. 
n - Ate Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Somradng you have been 
woriting on couU "ov out" 
favoridily now. A kmg-hdd 
wish couki come true. Assume 
new reapmisibUities happily 
in your domestic life. Accept 



criticism from coworkers 

SAGIXrARnS: (Nev» a te 
Dec a - Also SagitlartaB As- 
eeadMt) ^ Your peas for 
priMluctive cliang|s will 
ploMe a boss d- hner-up. 
necusskm of metbods are 
faivored and may lead to a 
r^e latsr. Romance ami fl> 
nances ve ab» kwking up 
now. Be happy! 

CAPRICORN: (Decttto 
Jaa. a - Alee Caprieon Aa* 
eeadsat) — Probtems and 
oonfusiflns bi the past b«^ to 
lads away now. TvmtHAt 
surpriaes are poniDie in ca- 
reer matters. Home bnprove- 
mooita seanUf^ on ^oor list 
of aetivitlaa too. Social life 
gets more active. , 

AQUARIUS: (Jaa. a te 
Prb. U - Also AqaaHas As- 
eMdwt) — Zero ta ontdelaUs 
and using predssmeoods ta 
tanrineas. tadst «n Moal 
dita for propeaed pi^jects. 
Don't b^eve evory^tt you 
hear — dieck up on it! Not a 
good time for gamUae or 
s^ecnlatkns. 

nSCES: (Feb. U to March 
a - Also Pisces Aseeadaat) 
— Things are looking up now. 
Energy is high, so direct it to- 
ward worii bringing cash re- 
turn. Good ttaM to wr^c (hat 
book or artide you've been 
ttiinking about. Real estate 
matters could take a favor- 
able turn. ' 




Strh 



Personai 



Old temper hard to curb 



By PAT and 

MARILYN DAVB 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My husband and I have 
been married for 37 years. 
Bill had alvrayit beeria de- 
manding, dictatorial person. 
He demands too mudi from 
everyone -> sales people, 
family, and friends. 

The problem now is Qiat he 
can't hear well. I'll teU him 
something and he'U say, 
"Yes, yes." PerhaiM a wedc 
later bell swear that no one 
keeps him informed and te 
beomies uni^ually bdliger- 
ent and angry. What can I (to 



about his nasty dispodtkn 
which is getting worse by dw 
day? 



Dear Martha: 

Tdl BBI ti^iana'ta'VdUi a 
hearing aid. Howe^, litoubt 
you can do much for a 37•yea^ 
dd surly dispodtion. He's 
gotten by with diis far too tang 
to change. 

Dear Fat nd Marilyn: 

I know that you have seen 
this protdem mai^ times be- 
fore but perhaps this lettv 
may help someone else. I am 
ttte father of dvee tent^gers 



ACIOSS 



-of 



I. Princni- 
Maiwco 

6. (iruxs; inm>n*i- 
tive 

11. I.urpd; entireil: 
2 wds. 

12. Roof aupport 
H. Forthiieair 

only: 2 wdn. 

(Utin) 
15. Mhbehavml: 

2 wdi. 
.17. Zujrdcr — 
IK. Cut cnirirly 
ZO. Grow dim 
21. Idcntifyinic 

fMturr 
2». Soft mrtal 
24. Spamt 
20. Banned frnder 

feature 
27. Majentir 
29. Deflriency 
.12. Hallnwrd 

place* 
:». Month*: l«tin 
.16. Pprfumr 
18. Rivulet 

40. Com 

41. Bortoi or 
liaiienji 

12. KamaonN 
iH-trayer 

II. (iivtnK 
nttpritval U* 

W lluntinK trip. 

no in Kenya 
I", rhop fine 
IK. Rxnr<>iUnt 
4!). Mnvrd 

irradually 



DOWN 

I. Pottery flniih 

•i. DistribuU th« 

cards avain 
;i. CliiHr 

4. MurmiM- 
sweetly 

5. Bawitcli 

6. Acta the mar- 
tinet: 3 wdt. 

7. — and pinion, 
maelianical 
device 

8. Toward the 
ttcm 

8. Fret or fume 
10. SUid 
13. AlUreation: 
hyirti. wd. 



16. Confined 
19. ReKions 
22. Diiicuiae 

25. Succinct 

26. Unit of forrr 

28. Lithe 

29. Britiih peer 
:HI. Zodiac aiim 
.11. Maria— .diva 
1.1. Finale 

14. Wall candle- 
holder 
.17. Urcad (on) 
19. Elevate 
40. Swiss river 

45. Port in New 
Guinea 

46. Tease 



'■■ ■' 




m 


;: r - 


-\-,„ 


: -r- 


It-— 


1' 



Solution on paga B-6 



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1 



z .. •,_... J 






and I have tost thdr respect 
and the tove of ttidr jnother. I 
began drinking for Ipdal rea- 
sons and then dradcioore and 
man to relax. 

When irairerefirft married j 
I had on^ tieer befcre dbiner. 
I was soon dinortng the I 
executive ladder and a Scotdi 
and water hdped m^ uiwind i 
after dght hours at the office. 
As the old story g9ea, one 
thii^ led to another and I was 
consuming three or four dou- 
bles before each evening 
meal. The obvious began to 
happen. My job suffered and 
my family iias kst in a 
(hiuiken ha». More than once' 
I embarrassed my family — 
Uke the Ume I fell (knm the 
steps at my ddeSt son's party. 

This letter is bdng written 
from the hospital. I finally 
wrecked the oar.^ Thank God 
no (me else was iM^. Wlqr the 
acddent brou0it,me to my 
senses 111 never tapw, but aU 
d a sudden the po^bility of 
never seeing my wife again > 
seemedunendurabla. I am not, 
an akoholic, but I dn a heavy 1 
drinker. I never faitend to: 
(kidc again. The risk is Just^ 
too great PertiqM this will, 
help someone dse to see ti)e 
prddems invdved in dridc-. 
ing. > 

Sony: 

Dear Sorry: ^ 

Don't count your wife and' 
family out Let your wife read 
your tetter and make an 
earnest attend to rdwiki 
your life. You may not be an . 
alcohdk but you ^te a good' 
imitation d one. 



Dsar Pat aad Marttyn: 

I am 16 years old and therK 
is nothing really wrong witi^, 
nK ezc^ that I cvaxit i 
to fUid anyone who wiB dati 
me. Last year I Mamed tt 
the bracea. I 
vnien tbftf wwe i 
situation wwuld ia^ 
Wdl, I am sun dtting huoM 
with my H^ teeth. Too ba<| 
no one 1^ ever see ttem! " 
try to be Meatfly and 
seem tottkeme asa 
Maybe tlMt's thb probli 
rm the one Uwy all come 
alien they have gfrl troulrie.C 
Good old Debbie wiB 
WdL I woidd Uk to ^ out tobi 
nae — 1 

MaadaSpiBste^ 
*. 

Deartt: f 

DoBtprepve to become sft 
dd mdd ^ You we tackS 
diat ^ boys wtsA you as # 
friend. Give youtsetf a litt^ 
ttae and oonttaoelo be wani 
and rec^tive toflii^ aamd 
Mthmk Yov taeft miy 
wortii |l,Sn bM a 
pnaondltytowei^ai 

eomider you ^HnUon. Write: Ite 
«Mf Mtrtjm Dna, Vkpnia Ailct 
&«, 1)8 Rotemott Rami, ^ 




^MB 



** t*-*^ 




e nin g 



The Sim-W«iinMd«y. June 5, 1974~Pm8 A-S 



f 



Marigolds 
won't keep 

bugs away 



Q. Is it true that marigolds will keep 
insects out of my garden? 

, A, Tfaere is no scientific research to 
back up su<^ a claim but every year an 
increasing number of gardeners, plant 
n^arigoUbs around ttie gajr^n, Sven if 
m^ dbn't repel insects, they add a good 
,deal of cdor to the vegetable ganten. 




(luestfcxis & answers about lawns & gardMs 

Q. How can I rid my lawn of moles? 

A. Moles feed m underground iqsects 
and can do severe damage to your lawn 
firom their tunnelUng. There are three 
alternatives available to you. The use (Mf a 
spring-type tr^ is oft^ an effective 
method. Usii% poisonous baits will get rid 
(tf motes, but use with caution wound 
children and pets. An application of 
Chlcnrdane will kUI the insects mol«s feed 
on. Chlordane is an extremely toxic 
material and sh<Mild be ixrad wi^h tb^v 
utmost cauticm. 

Q. My tomato f^nts were growing fine 
but the lower leav^ Sttirted «iM|n»i|Wd 
turning yellow>nd within a fe# oays the 
oitire plant was affected. What went 
wrong? 

A. It sounds as if your tcnnatoes are 
infeqted with wiK, Miiich is a soil-bonie 
fui^. Plantii^ wilt-resistant varieti^ 
is the best method of overcoming this 
problem. Big Boy is not wilt-resistant. 

Q. Is it too late to plant a vege- 
table garden? 



hi.ty A^No. Ywi can still ex|)ectfilnk.luirvest 
T'vegetablte planted noWv Plant tender 
crops such as corn, beans; tomatoes and 
pei^rs now. In late summer you can 
plant cool season crops such as lettuce, 
radishes and greens for a fall garden. 



HotUne wU be ^d to aiawer yourquestUmt about kwm and 
frdeia. Send your questions to ff^bu, VltgMa Beach Sun, 
138 Rbsemoitt Road, Vb-gbUa BalHii, Va. 23452. 



Garden dub 
news andhoies 



NEW OFFICERS of tiie 
CkeBOpdan Colony Garden Chib 
were bntaled at the anoal 
meeting and hincheon in Nags 
Head, N.C. New officers are: 
ptvsident, Mrs. Elwood 
McAllister; first vice-presidei^ 
Mrs. Murray Malbon; second 
vice-president, Mrs. Walter 
Royal; recording secretary, 
Mrs. William Love; 
cmresponding secretary, Mrs. 
James Ayers; treasuro', Mrs. 
William R. H«>ega-. 



IDEAS FOR items to be sold 
at bazaars were docussed 1^ 
Mrs. James Hayes at tiie final 
business meetisi of Uie year of 
the PrfBcess Anne^ Plasa 
Gardm Chib. The UrtDowos 



Beautify tite landscape; 
put plants In containers 



ByJUOnUMUElXER 
VPI Exteailon AgenI 

Plants in cotrtalnos are used in 
numerous ways to improve ttie land- 
scq>ing of modem hom«i. Window boxes 
may be used rni Uie house, and planters 
and containers of many types may be 
located on and around porches, (tecks, 
terraces, swimming pools and other 
outdoOT living areas. 

Planters along Uw edge of a porch or 
terrace tfiould be of strong mastmry 
construction. Good drainage is essential. If 
the soil underneaUi k an imperious clay or 
if the planter has a sealed bottom, tile 
should be installed with an ouUet at a 
lower level to ranove surplus water. The 
tile should be covered with aevoral inches 
of crushed stone or coarse gravel before 
the planter is filled with a rich, high- 
humus soil mixture. 

THE BEST window boxes, Containers or 
tubs are made of wood or crockery with 
adequate drainage. Metal boxes may 
become too hot hi the summer, aftd the 
draint^e holes may be too small. 




Containers should be at least ei^t 
inches deep. Cyprvu or redwood are best 
for loqg life. Other kinds of wood may be 
used but should be treated with a copper 
naphthenate preservative to retard decay. 
Do not use creosote compounds which will 
seriously damage plants. 

Plants growing in containers must be 
located in a place where they can be cared 
for easQy. Most species will need to be 
watered daily. Weeds must be removed to 
avoid undesirable competition and an 
unattractive, unkept appearance. 



MANY TYPES of annual flowers, 
foliage plante and dwarf shrubs and trees 
may be used in {danters, window boxes 
and containers. Hie most important 
requirement is to select plants which will 
attain the desired sixe and form. Seed and 
nursCTy catakigs list many plants which 
wlU fillyour particular needs. 

As annual flowering plants start to grow, 
the main stem and side branch^ may be. 
pinched back to produce a compact, Iwshy 
shape. Flowers should be removed when 
they start to fade to promote continuous 
Uoomlng. Evergreen shrubs and dwarf 
trees must be pruned regularly to retain 
the desired form and size. 



Planters or window boxes which are 
viewed fh)m one side should have taller 
plants at the back, with lower plants in 
front and at the ends. Trailhig plants such 
as ivy and verbens may be planted along 
the edge to hang over the sides. Devekip a. 
pleasing combination and avoid using too 
many different kinds of plants causing a 
crowded, cluttered appearance. 



First Lady helps 
open society home 



The former Wellington Estate 
at Mount Vernon is the new 
home of the American 
Horticulture Society which 
opened its headquarters 
recently with a grand 
celelH-atiDn attended by Mrs. 
Richard Nbcon. 

The new home of the society is 
offkially named the National 
Center for Horticulture. 

A gro|ip (rf 500 horticulturists, 
garden writers, educators and 
newspeopie were hivited to the 
grand opening. Dedication 
ceremonies were held in a 
garden at the rear of the 
headquarters building. 

Keister Evans; former 
Princess Anne County extension 
agent, is director of the 
American Horticulture Society. 



Attmiding from this area wo-e 
Fred Heutte of Norfolk, farmer 
director of the Norfolk 
Botanical Gardens, and J. 
Robert Stiffler of Virginia 
BMch, local garden writer. 

Mrs. Nixon arrived at the 
opening in a boat which docked 
at Uie Potomac River landii^ A 
orionial coach pulled by four 
hOTses took her to ttie dedication 
gard«i. 

The ceremmies also included 
8' concert t^ the U.S. Marine 
Corps, appettZMifduring pre- 
luncheon ceremonies, a 
Williamsburg buffet and a tour 
of the headquarters office and 
prdens. 

A four-day symposium on how 
horticulture enhances 
environmental education 
followed the cerononies. 



Men planning 
flower show 

The Men's Garden Club of Tidewater recentiy an- 
nounced plans for its First Annual Tidewater Flower and / ' 
Garden Show to be held Aug. 30-Sept. 1 at the Virgini«<^ 
Beach Civic Center (Dome). 

Fred Heutte, former director of the Norfolk Botanical 
Gardens, will direct the show, assisted by Dr. Charles 
Elstrodt, VPI extension specialist. 

Nationally recognized Judges will conduct the Judghig 
as well as offer educational lectures and sesskiqs 
Uiroughout the show. 

Gardeners under 18 years of age will compete in giant 
sunflower and giant pumpkin contests. 

The show will be held in August to allow exhibition of 
summer annuals and to attract tourists visiting the 
Tidewater area. ' 

Tickets are $1 each, available from most women's 
garden clidM from now until August. Hours dally are 10 
a.m. to 10 p.m. 

The show is expected to be an annual event rotating 
between the Hampon Roads cities. 




ROSES 



■udd«d orC 
In Bloom ▼ 

frofrt 



• ELEPHANT BARS • ULY OF THE VALLEY 
-PERMANENT ARRANGEMENTS ■ CEMETERY WREATHS 



LOWERING TREES • SHADE TREES 



Hanging 

Baskfts 
BeddingPlants 

Sedums & 
House Plants 



Gardenias 
I. 

Oleanders 



Eucalyptus 
Amaryllis 
Japanese 
Lanterns 

& Geraniums 




Garden Club judged flwal 
arrangements. 

mSTitiXATION of off kers of 
die K^t Forest Garden Club 
was h^ recently. New officers 
are: kmskient, Mre. William 
Darwm; first vice-president, 
Mrs. -David Ascher; second 
vice-president, Mrs. Harold 
Hurls; recording secretary, 
Mrs. J. S<»mabend; bwsurer, 
Mn. Robert Metcalfe; 
correspondii^ secretary, Mrs. 
Robert Beam. 

IHE ANNUAL banquet of tiie 
May Farm Garden Chib will be 
June IS at tiie F^ Story Officers 
C^ Cocktail bour begim at 
6:90 p.m. Spouses and friends 
are invited to attend the dinner 
and imlaOaUon of oCficers. 



ii 



,v, Completo Garden Center 

1%'^ 6M0 ^id«Me Rd. PlMNic 410-2828 




The WOemel^igon 
lte«m 

amtltiofiitfom^ 
AmforytHU 




**\ 



407-O66O 

oftndei 
next iMfty b. 




Geraniums 




ffi* 



FOR PACIC OP SIX 



OR 

^0POR*S.95 



OUARANm OUR PLANTS FOR ONf YiAR 



COLEMAN NURSERY 

GARDENTOWN 

"THE HOME OF CHRISTMAS WONDERIAND" 

4934 HIGH ST.(RT.17) PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

SIMCE 1942 484-3426 



A lovely weed 

Beauty is in tlie eye of tlie belidder. especially 
wliere weeds are concerned. The leaves of a 
sassafras tree are lovely to look at but Uie tree 
whicli grows wild in many parts of Virginia 
Beach is the bane of gardeners who tcy 
linsuccessfully to uproot it. Some trees send 
out roots 30 to 40 feet long. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mann) 

ARE YOU A . . . 
ROCK HOUND? or PEBBLE PUP? 

Hiv0 You Seen 

The New Shipment 

Of Tumbling Materiils 

At 

RINGS-N-THII¥GS 

HAYGOOD SHOfflNG CENTER Phom 460-1016 

1063 Indqpmdsnce Blvd. Vlqlnli BMnh, Vt^InU 23455 




A CUT A AlOVI THI RliTI 



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ftlOING MOWER- 
^ THE PRIDE AND 
PLEASURE MACHINE 



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what has been up to mw^ just another necessary 
chore? Get behind the wheel of an Arlens Fair- 
way Riding Mower. Grass cutting will tal<e on a 
whole new outlook. 

The Ariens Fairway is available in four models, 
a 7 HP and a 5 HP, each with and without elwtric 
start. There's a 26" "Flex-N-Float-Plus" rotary 
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a pre-lubricated sealed tffferential; Disc-O'Maflc 
drh^e; and a full automotive type positive action 
stMring wheel. 

Choose an Arlens Fairway — it's "Built To 
Last A Lawn Time!" 



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Rigo A-e-Tha^im-Mtadnaiday, June 5, 1974 



Soid'Searching 



Religion, morals and IMixon 



Americans have c<Mnpl^ed observance of ttie 
first Day (rf National HumiliaUon, Fastii^ and 
Prayer, {x-ociaimed by Congress for soul-searchii^ 
about socml, nK»-al and ettiiaU ills. 

While the observance in April t»>ought a con- 
centration oi emphasis on the problems confrontii^ 
Americans, many peq>le have long since been 
^vil^ considerable ttiou^t to matters ci grave 
concon. 

There are ttiose who feel the only way out of the 
(Nresent "crisis of ccmfidence" is impeachment <rf 
the President. 

THERE ARE THOSE who call for a spiritual, 
mwal, ethical renewal (rf the entire populace and 
for deeper social commitments by those of 
pr(rfound religious persuasion. 

Tha« are these who are seeking to unify the 
nation behind the President, w at least the 
presidency. One of those is Rabbi Baruch Korff of 
Rehoboth, Mass., who has sparked a national 
campa^n among supporters of the President in an 
effort to counteract criticism of him. Ms non- 
sectarian organization seeking "fair play tor the 
President" distributes a lapel ba^e in the shape oi 
the American and presidontial flags with the slogan 
"Sui^rt the President." 

Rep. Henry S. Reuss, (D-Wis.) writing in the 
independent Roman Catholic weekly Com- 
monwealth, urges passage of a constitutional 
amendment providing for the election of a new 
president whenever each house <rf Congress votes 
"no confidence" in the incumbent by a three-fifths 
majority. 

ALTHOUGH PASSAGE of the amoidment would 
have no bearing on the present administration, 
Reuss wrote, "I wish we had it now." 

Rraolutions f<n- the Unpeachmrat of the President 
have been passed by several religious bodies, most 
recently by the United Methodist Board of Church 
add Society and Uie Women's Divirion of the United 
Me&odtet Board of (Hobal MinistHes. 

The Nashvilte Bxman Cathdic Uocesan Priests' 
Senate, Jdned by Biabap Jos^ A. Durick, voted 10 



to 1 fcnr initiation of impeachmeitf proceedings 
againsf President Nixon. 

NINETEEN NATIONAL religious leaders of 
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish groups and other 
(NTganizations announced the formation of a m»- 
partisan iaterfaith Religious Committee for 
Integrity in Government to OHKkict a five^Kibit 
in-ogram toi 

L Clarify critical moral ismies in the present 
crisis, whidi "is clearly a moral as well as a ctm- 
stitutional one. The religious conmiunity has a 
iniique obligation to clarify the critical m&ni issues 
involved." 

2. Seek Justice for the President and the 
American people, iiKluding supfwrt of orderly, 
ejqpeditious in<piiry by the House Judiciary Cmn- 
mittee on whether grounds exist fear impeachment. 

3. Seek campaign reform, including public 
financing of etection campaigns, 

4. Restore comtitutional ctecks and k»danc«i in 
federal gofenonoit, including a challenge of 
"abuse and improp^* assumption oi auttunnity on 
the part of some law enforcement agencies." 

5. Clarify:critical morid issues facing citizois in 
elections this y«ir and in 1976. 



Need help? Phone-in TV 

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CHURCH 
NOTES 



SUMMER SERVICES at 

Galilee Episcopal Onirch, 4QQi 
Street and P«cffi« Avenue, liave 
beftun. New hmurs for Sunday 
services in Junet July and 
Aufpist areS and 10 a.m. Sun^y 
school has been dteconUnued for 
ihe sunuiwr. 



TOE CHANCEL CHOIR <tf 

Londm Bridge Baptist duirdi 
will praetA tlie Galther-Huff 
cantata "Afleluia" Friday at 8 
p.m. at Baylake United 
Methodist Church, 4300 Siare 
Drive, 

POTENTIAL ACOLYTES are 

invited tfi a meeting Saturday at 

10 a.m. in Ox library of Galilee 

Episcopal Church, 40th Street 

, and Pacific Avenue. 

"THE CARPENTER," a 

dramatic musical, will be 
presented by a touring youtt 
auit from Prattville, Ala., 
June 18 in (be sanctuary of 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Churdi, 207 Ittb St. 
Hie 50-member dioir is from 
Firrt Church in Prattville. The 
musical will be presented at 
7:30 p.m., with a covered dish 
siqiper preceding the naisfeal at 
6:15 p.m. in the churdi sodal 
haO. 

SUMMER DAY CAMP at 
Eastern Shore Chapd, 3030 
Laskin Road, is now taking 
ap|riicatk»8. Tbe camp, for 
children 3 to 6, wUl run in two 
faur-wed[ sessions, June 17- 
July 12 and July 15-Aug. 9. 
Registratica will be conducted 
tai Uie parish hall next to the 
diurch. Ennrilment is one a 
4|^-coinc tMids. 

THE VIRGINIA Annual 
Ppof^'ence of tbe United 
Methodist Qiurch will bt0n 
Mooday in Hampton, ttatM^ 
^ne 13. R^reMiting Vta^i^ 
Beach Uiated IMiodkt CSmrdi 
at the cotf eroice will be Haraid 
^. Keilam. Norfolk Ditfrict lay 
l^der, Lin^^ Gardner and 
William McClurg. Sally 
McClurg will attmd as a 
I^BSore ddegate. 

*'1f:AaiER8 are netted for 
the Sunday SclMxri 3-y«tr-okl 
class at Foundry United 
ttg&xiist Cinirdt, 3101 Virgitda 
pmch Blvd. Vohmteer teKhm 
ai% asked to call Ann 
Casdeiario at 0t4m. 



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Reading room 
has new hon^e 

In a new pubUc oub'eadi frogram, the Christian 
Science Riding Room lias moved to Pacific Avmue to 
readi more persoia durii^ tlie nimmer montliB. 

"We want to encourage more people to drop in," said 
Matgo Matthew, wlw is in charge of priitf puldicity for ttie 
program. "We Invite people to come as th^ are. We'd like 
business people on thek iuncfa hours to drop in to read the 
CStfistiai^ience Monitor. 

"We have a nice big pordi so people In their bathii^ 
suits can drop by ami use our porcl) for reading, " she said. 

THE READING room was located in the First Onirch ci 
Christ Scientist on Laikin Road. Its new locatton is TSO! 
Pacific Avenue., in a former private residence. 

Tlie reading nxsn's motto is "read, borrow or buy," Ms. 
Matthew said. All authorized Christian Science literature, 
the Chrtetian Science Monitor and the King James version 
of the Bible may be purclased, read in the room or 
borrowed from the lending library. 

&immer hours at tbe reading room are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
and 7 to 1(^ p.m. Mooday Qirough Saturday. There is a 
short period on Wednesday evenings when the room is 
closed for 8 p.m. services at the church. Wednesday 
evening hours are 7-7 :4S p.m. and 9: 15-10 p.m. It is closed 
on Sundays. 

Winter hours will be shorter than summer hours. 



r 



"THE OVERCOMERS" 




(Formtriy with Hu BOy GnOum tern) 

The OvercomaBrs wfH be at th« Virginia Beach Dome 
on June Sth & 6th at 10:30 A.M. & 7:30 P.M. 

Admission Free 

"Come and hear the Word that God it $peakif^ to his 
people at this hour!" 



I STRONq 
ckuRcliES 




aIcE STRONq 



• • 



COMMUNITIES 




A THOUGHT 

FOR >^<x 
TODAY 
JUNE 5, 1974 



By W.F. GRANDStAFF 

PASTOR 
KMMAMUEL BAPTIST 
CHURCrf 
4750 BAXTER RD. 
VA. BEACH 



No great consecration to. 

service can excuse failure 

in what may appear to be 

smaller matters of 

conduct Exodus 5: 24 IS. 

And it came to pass by the 

way in the inn, 

that the Lord met hitn, and 

sou^t to kill him. 

Then Zipporah took a sharp 

stone, and 

cut off the foreskin of her 

son, and cast 

it at his feet, and said. 

Surely as bloody husband 

art thou to me. 



Emmanuel Tabernacle 
Church-UPC 

157 Mofiiion Ave. 

(1 block off S. Lynnhtven Rd.) 
Rev. Harold Hulion-Pastoi 
Phone: 340-7333 



BAYUKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 ^oie Drive 
Va. Beach - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead • 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Ohmch School 9:30 AJf. 
Morains Wonh^i 11:00 A.!!. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. ' 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David Holstehi, Fastor 

S514 Pariiamcnt Fh. 497.«703 
Sunday School Hi. - 9:45 A.M. 
Houi of Triumph 10:50 AM. 
JiinkM, Youth, ft Adult 
FeBowMp - 6:00 P.M. 
Houi of Inipinlion • 7:00 P.M. 
Wednead^r Mid.wwk 
Up^lft 7:30 PJH. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640KanpivUleRd. Ph. 499-3727 

Vii^niaBeach 

Switfay 

Sunday Scliool,t:4SA.M. 

Mpnillia Worth!* (1:00 A.M. 

EvMint Ww-lhip 7:M P.M. 

TMttfay 

Mornint Worihtp 10:30 A.M. 

Evnint Worthip 7:N P.M. 

Thuriday 

Mornlna Worship I0:M A.M. 

Evtning Worship riM P.M. 

Nurtory AvoiloW* 
PASTORS 

Rov. John Otmonoi »o». Ann Oimonn 



1 



ST 



Assembly, of God 



(Comer Va. Beach Bhrd.> 
Oceana Blvd.) 

S.Baili(,Pl«tar 
42»297 



Hav«YouClMciml 
Your 01 Today? 

Prayer, like oil on troubled wa- 
ters, calms thought and prepares 
the way for healing. 



thelRUlH 



Broadcast this week over many 
stations including: 

WVHR,1490kc WRAP, ISO kc 
S:4S ajn. 3Kie p.m. 

Sunday, )unc 9 

ACHRISTIAh^SCItNCI RADIO SERieS 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beech 
FMor: W. F. Gtandataff 
Phone: 497-4208 

Sunday School: 9:45 AM. 

(AUAgaa) 
PMacMi^Seryfce: 11:00 AJM. 
Evening PieacMnr 7:00 PJf. 

Wedneadw7:30PJi. 
PkayerftWbkStmfy 
Varied Youlh AclMilea 



WELOMETOWORSIBP 
' ANDW11T(E88Wrai 

ST. MARKilM.L 
CHUftCH 

J. Alton Butts, Mtaiister 
1740PottetsRd.ViigiBla 
Beadi, Va. 

Study Phone 428-1880 
Oiurcfa School • 9:80 A.li 
I»Tinc WonUp ■ 11:00 AJit^ 
Wednesday - 7:00 P.M. 
TheTSadiiivIIOnistry 
Wednesday •8:80 P.M. 
Iht Church at Pnyet 




J 



ipi null Mil 11 III mi^wBMiinii ■ n» 



S ports 



The Sun-WtdnMdiy, Jum 5, 1974--Pagt A-7 



RUSSIANS ARE COMING 



and Virginia is ready and waiting. 



"I've, been screaming for years about how 
wrestl^ in Virginia is the best in the nation," says 
Wayneltoyd. "I can't thiiyicrf a better time to prove 
it." 

Boyd is the coach of the Virginia All-Star 
wrestling squad that will take on ttie Russian Junior 
National team this Saturday at 8:00 p.m. at the Old 
Dominion University Fieldhouse. Admission is $3 
for adults and $2 for students. 

Boyd, who runs the East Coast Wrestling and 
Health Club, has no time for the cautiousness, 
which is the stock and trade of most coaches on any 
level of sport. "We are going to beat the Russians," 
Boyd flatly states. 



THE 
MATCHUPS 



(HIRIS CONKWRIGHT will 
face Gahir Makhmudov in the 
125,S-pound division. 
Conkwright is a two-time 
defending state high school 
champion. This past seasim, 
Conkwright was undefeated, 
taking district, regional and 
state titles for Cox High School. 

Makhmudov is an 18-year (dd 
physical education student. He 
ivas the Russian junior national 
champion in 1973. In 
Atakhmudov's first two bouts on 
tite American tour, he has 
earned a split. Against Maine, 
he was pinned in the second 
period but rebounded to take i^ 
2(h2'decisidn in the New Yoric 
match. 



BOB WKRNICK will face 
Sergey Beioglazov in the 114.5- 
poupd division. Wernick is the 
car^nt Eastern District title- 
holder at 119 pminds. He 
finlihed in the runner-up slot in 
bo4). the Regionals and state 
tdyname^, 4o8ina to ^Oscar 
Sign's Steve PsTTOW In the 
finlB of both towneys. 

0eloglazov is an 18-year old 
stu&nt. He js the current junior 
national champion at 114.S 
poi^s. Beioglazov has been 
impressive in his early bouts on 
the American tour. Posting an 
undefeated record, he scored a 
first period pin against Maine 
and 9-6 decision in his iMut in 
the New York match. 



MARK RIMARSKI wiU face 
Asland^r Bisultanov in the 220- 
pound' division. Rimarski 
post«4 a,n undefeated regular 
seasoA record for Kempsville in 
the heiavyweight bracket .He 
also nude it to the semifinals cf 
both 1^ d^tTKt and regicnal 
tounuytni^. 

BiswbkWW Is an 18-year cdd 
studeliii 'Vho b the current 
ju»«^>i08tidtal champion at 220 
poUMii. JA» has been the 
Russ^s most impressive 
wres£ir^4hus far. Onionents 
have]^%inaake it to the four- 
miami^MMrk of the bout as he 
scoci^ pins in the openfaig 
minsiwid the second period la 
both te Maine and New York 
matdves.^ 






A LOOK AT THE all-star squad Boyd has 
assembled to face the Russian ctrallenge lends 
credibility to his belief. Boyd has skimmed the 
cream from an impressive group of Virginia high 
school wrestlers. "This is a better group of boys 
than 1 took to the National AAU's last year," claims 
Boyd. "And we wrni the national title with that 
team." 

Three Virginia Beach wrestlers are on the 
Virginia team that will tangle with the Russians. 
Two-time state champion Chris Conkwright will 
carry Uie Virginia banner in the 125.5-pound 
division. Conkwright, who was an undefeated 
member on Cox's third consecutive state title team 
this past high school season, is also the defending 
national junior AAU champion. 

The other two Beach grapplers on the ten- 
member Virginia squad are the Kempsville duo of 
Bob Wernick and Mark Rimarski. The pair were 
important members in the Chief's surge toward 
wrestling prominence in the Eastern District. 

Wernick captured the 119-pound Eastern District 
Tournament championship, over a previously 
unctefeated Glen Felthousen of Cox. Wernick went 
on to finish in the runner-up slot in both the rej^onal 
and state tournaments. Oscar Smitti's Steve Per- 
dew defeated Wernick in the regional and state title 
bouts, but was unable to try out for the all-star team 
due to an injury. 

RIMARSKI DELIVERED important victories to 
the Chiefs from the heavyweight division during the 
past high school season. Before Rimarski filled the 
gap at the heavyweight class; Kempsville had 
struggled with one loss and a tie in early season 
dual matehes. The Chiefs lost only one more dual 
match the rest of the season as Rimarski spent 
much of the campaign undefeated. 

If the Virginians prove equal to Boyd's ex- 
piectations, they could very well be the only state to 
defeat the talented Russians on their tour through 
the U.S. "Realistically there are only two states — 
Virginia and Ohio — that have a shot at beating the 
Russians," contends Boyd. 

The Russian national team was impressive in 
their opening two matches on their tour, defeating 
teams from Maine and New York in easy fashion. 
The Russians defeated the Maine team by a count 
of 9-1. In the process of overwhelming Maine, the 
Russians scored six of their nine triumphs via pins. 
Against the New York team, the Russians managed 
only one pin, but still pulled away to an impressive 
9-0-1 win. Despite the lack of pins, the mateh was 
heavily one-sided as the Russians won most of their 
bouts by imposing margins. 

"There are a couple of key things about the 
Russian team," maintains Boyd. "They are in 
super condition, every one of them. They don't 
tire out in the final period. We've been working 
hard. The kids practice everyday but Sunday so by 
the time the match gets here we should be in as 
good a shape as they are." 

THE MATCH will be held under international free- 
style rules, which would figure to put the Russians 
at an advantage. "That's all they wrestle over 
there is free-style, so they are much man ex- 
perienced at it than any of the Americans," claims 
Boyd. "We only start wrestlinjg free style after the 
high school season Is ovw, but most <rf these boys 
have had some experience with free style so it 
shouldn't hurt us that much." 

The biggest difference between high school 
wrestling and free style is the relative ease points 
can be scored in free style. "All you have to do Is 
expose the guy's back and you get points," states 
Boyd. "The kids aren't use to this, but with practice 
they shouldn't have much trouble adjusting to it." 

Another major difference between high schod 
and free style rules is the length of the bout. Free- 
style bouts last nine minutes with three-ttffee- 
minute periods. The high school matches the 
Virginians are accMtomed to wrestling last only six 
minute. "Tlie time period won't be a prolrfem for 




BOB WERNICK (left) and Mark lUmarski 
begin their daily running outside of iie East 
Coast Wrestling and Health Oub. the two 
Beach grapplers are preparing tor the 
upcoming meet with the Russians. (Sun 
photo by Rod Mann) 

us. In free style, you can use the extra-time," 
maintains Boyd. 

Boyd is optimistic about the three Brach 
wrestlers chances against the Russians. "Conk- 
wright is so impOTtant to this team. He believes, he 
is the best wrestler in the world and^at nobody can 
beat him," said Boyd. "His confidence just carries 
over to the rest of the team." 

BOYD RA'^8 Wemick's match as a toss-iq). 
"The guy, Wernick has to wrestler, is real strong, 
and he just keeps coming at you. Bobby has been 
working hard. He's in tremendous shape. Wernick 
is a well-disciplined wrestler. He knows free-style, 
and he is always going to give you 100 per-cent." 

Rimarski faces the toughest assignment of any 
wrestler on the Virginia squad. "The ^y the 
Russians have at 220 is just super-strong. He Is by 
far the best wrestler they have on the team," 
claims Boyd. "Rimarski is tough. He is young and 
strong. I think he has a good shot at winning the 
thing." 

According to Boyd, the biggest disadvantage the 
Virginia team faces is that the Russian team is a 
national squad, while their opponents only 
represent an individual state. All ten-members of 
the Russian squad have been junior national 
champions, with eight of the grapplers still holding 
that distinction. 

"This Is the finest group ot wr^tlers I have ever 
seen assembled," maintains Boyd. "The mateh will 
probably be very close with a one or two bout dif- 
ference separating the teams. I see no reasons wl^ 
we can't win." 



The Russians are coming In three days, and 
Vlrgmla will be ready and waiting. 





Cboire fills out 
grid schedule 



The search has finally ended for KeUam football 
Coach J(^mny Cooke. 

For the longest time, it looked like Kellam's 
chances of taking the Eastern District football Utle 
was going to be hampered by a lack (rf games. The 
Southeastern District went to a master schedule, 
and two teams promptly dropped KeUam from 
their schedule, leaving the Knights with an eight* 
game schedule. KeUam set a single-game school- 
sewing record against Great Bridge which could 
have played an important role in the Wildcats' 
thinking of how desirable a game with Kellam was. 

Co(d(e's dilemma was finally solved. The 
Knights pidied up a game with Jefferson High 
School of Richmond for Uieir ninth game. Cooke 
turned to the Southeastern District to complete his 
schedule with a road test against Manor. 

Despite the full schedule, it does have its bad 
points. Kellam will open the season against First 
Colonial on the first playii^ date. Thanks to an 
unwanted open date in the middle of the season, the 
Knights will iwt finish their season until the last 
playing date. More importantly, '^e Knights will 
have only four home gamM to offset the six ttmra 
they travel to the unfriendly confine of an op- 
ponents stadium. 



THE SEARCH Is only beglhnli^ for the newly 
appointed Bayside head football Coach Terry 
Morton. 

Morton, the former assistent under Bob Hicks, 
inherited a football team that has been depleted due 
to graduation. Morton's immediate problem is to 
find a coaching staff. Next year, Morton will be the 
only holdover on the Bayside coaching staff. Ray 
Gowan, the other varsity assistant this past season, 
Ms leaving to work as a graduate assistant at 
Appalaclan State. 

Nothing like haying to find a backfield and 
somebody to coach them. 



<>» » *» **» * 



THE RUSSIAN Junior national team that will 
face a group of all-stars at Old Dominion University 
Saturday m^t is coached by Alexander Diaklne. 
The 46-year old resident of Moscow writes songs in 
his spare time. Wayne Boyd ami Ms crew of 
Virginia grapplers are hoping to give the Ruuisn 
coach enough material for a sorrowful ballad. So 
far the Russian coach has been singing only happy 
tuHM as his wrestlers have blasted two American 
cluliB. 

The Russian team also features a twin brother 
act, Sergey Belo^azov, who will wrestle Kemp- 
svllle's Bob Wernick in a U4.Si>ound clash, is 
joined on the junior national team by his twin 
brother Anatoly. The Beioglazov brothers are both 
undefeated on the current t<Hir and have the 
identical hobbies of collecUng spori pins. Wernick, 
runner-up In the state high school tournament at 119 
pounds, win be trying to prevent his oiqxment from 
adding to his collection. 



m i UMMt t* 



Some things never change department — the 
Oakland A's are still bickering amoi^t them- 
selves, and Charley Finley has already threatmed 
to axe manager Alvin Dark for the second time. 
Com[4alnte have ranged from Joe Rudi being upset 
about being pulled from a game because of Fintey's 
new toy — a designated pinch runner — to Ken 
Holtznum's and Vida Bhie's annual bickering about 
being yanked from a game. 

Some things never change (part two)— the A's 
are still in first |dace in the Western Division <d the 
American League. 

Basketball camp 
opens this summer 



CHRIS CONKWRIGHT battlM BMkor T. 
Washington's Anthony Odie head t« 



tart lOSMl'S 

wrestling tMiraey. 



Thte 



I^^simI 

SataHlay. 



Caakwright wU nu h^d «n lute a Rwtea 
OTcrtlw. (SMpbeteby R««M«M) 



Some lucky baake^ail 
(rfayers will b^ pUyii« in air- 
conditioiwd comfort this 
summer. The sixth annual 
Virginia Jeach baakedMli 
camp will be in tbe newly air- 
condiUwied Sli^jt the Sea 
gymnaslu'M. "Wje camp is 
vpomortd by the Star of the 
Sea PTA and will run frtnn 
August 5 to Aug. 9. 

The purpow of Uw camp it le 
0ve bislrucUon in baik^haD 
fundamentals to boys who have 
a desire to improve ttwir 
abilities and gain a greater 
IciMwIedge of the game. The 
camp is headed by Vir^nia 
Beach Mgh school baskettMO 
coaches Le# Anthoiqr, Cmt^ 
I^rker and Alton Hill. <Xber 
coaches from urm Mgh schodi 
will abo atrre on the CMcUng 
staff. 

There will be three s^>ar«le 
groups (rf imtruction. Boys h) 
pradM three tbrough seven wfll 
work out fn«i9:3e to 11:30 a.M. 
A Junta' ^1 i^rioB wffl reo 
ffOTi 3:30 to 4:30 in the 
•flmMMi, wMk a ^»ior hkfit 
tetsiflB Witt ran from 7:0S to 
t:00 p.m. 



THK COST for a b# 



attending the camp for one 
senkxi to 135.00. A 915.00 deport 
is required at the time of 
application and the balance 
must be paid t>y the first day of 
camp. Anyone ngisttired in the 
camp wiU be covered by group 
accidental and medical 
insurance provided for by 
the camp. 

The Virginia Beach 
baskeihan camp accq>to only a 
Hmiled number of anriteairtf. 
AD appUcanta will be accepted 
to the camp if Q» ai^ication Is 
receWed with full payment or a 
115.00 dqMiit toward tuition 
bdore Ai» 4. The camp wlU 
hoU late re^tration on Aug. 4 
between 3:00 and 5:00 p.m. 

As i*a been tlM pdicy in the 
past, the majority of instruction 
at Uie camp wiU be given by 
vislUng a^t f»aytn md 
»)acha. Some (rf the fi*yn 
contacted by the camp staff 
nchide North Carina State's 
Um^ Towe, Duke Ufldvertfty> 
(Arts Rid^i^, John Lucas and 
Mo Hward f ran Mwyland and 
Old DmMm Uirimrity's Joel 

For an ^pUcatieB or tmOt^ 
lafMroiatlM (wntaet Csaefe 
A^fl^ at m^m er Ceaefe 
Plitar at «44aS7. 



mmt 



n^e A-8-The Sun-Wednesday, June 5, 1974 



Hard work pays off f or Stacey 



Tennis star 

at the tender 

age of 12 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

The stories are endless -^ Pete Maravich 
use to shoot one thousand baskets a day in his 
backyard under his father's watchful eye — 
Ernie Direggorio rounded up kids in the 
neighborhood, paying them a quarter an hoia* 
to rebound for him as he shot for hours at a 
time — Jimmy Walker had his own key to the 
Providence College gym, where he would 
polish his game in the solitude of the early 
morning hours. 

One thing stands out in all three of these 
examples — dedication. There are many 
success stories in the world pf sport, where 
hard work bordering on a fetish toward 
perfection has been the driving force. 

THE BEGINNING of a story along parrell 
lines could be brewing in Virginia Beach. 
Stacey Ives is a 12-year old girl with a goal in 
mind. Tennis is her game, and she plays it 
much better than your average weekend 
hacker. 

Stacey won her first tournament at the 
tender age of eight. Last year, she was the 
runner-up in the girls 16 and under city junior 
tournament and ranked fourth in the state in 
the 12 and under bradiet — Uien Stacey got 
better. 

. Two weeks ago, Stacey moved up to the 18 
and tinder division in the junior city tour- 
nament. She reversed her championship loss 
the prior year to Shelley Hammill, 
vanquishing her older o[^nent in straight 
sets 6-3, 6-0. 

The city title was not a fluke. The story 
behind the youngster's success is simple — 
hard work. Stacey's schedule is busier than 
White House lawyers answering subpeonas. 

"I GET UP every morning at 6:30 just as its 
getting light and jog two miles," explains 
Stacey. She also plays tennis everyday but 
Monday for about two hours. The schedule 
will get busier when the Ives' complete the 
planned tennis court in their backyard. 
"Wh«i we get the court, I plan to play abcmt 
six hours a day," states Stacey. 

"That's one of our biggest protdems right 
now," claims Stacey's mother. "There just 
are not enough courts in Virginia Beach. The 
public courts are always crowded with 
people." 

Stacey's career in tennis started five years 
ago in California. "My father was the first one 
to get started playing, and then we all got 
interested in it," relates Stacey. 

"1 started working with Stacey's older 
sister Collette," recalls Stacey's fathw. "I use 
to dread having to play with Stacey. It took 
her a long time, before she was even able to 
hit the ball." 




/ 




YOUNG STACEY IVES takes a rest 
during a Inreak In the action at the 
recent Virginia Beach Junimr Tennte 
Tournament. Stacey captured the girls 
18 and under singles title with a 
remarkable performance tor a 12-year 
(rid. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



THE SAME FATHER, who used to (b-ead 
playing with Stacey, now plays with her as a 
doubles partner in mixed doubles com- 
petition. At a recent tournament, Stacey apd 
her father finished in the runner-up slot in the 
mixed doubles competition. 

Stacey's father is a self-confessed pushw of 
his daughter toward her tennis goals and 
severest critic, which is okay from Stacey's 
comer. "The more he pushes the more I lUce 
it," comments Stacey, "The only time I get 
mad is when he doesn't tell me what I'm doing 
wrong." 

In the past few years, the most important 
part of Stacey's game has been consistency. 
She has yet to develop the powerful shots of a 
premier player, but her uncanny ability to 
keep the ball in play has become the 
.trademark of her game. As testimony to her 
consistency as a player, Stacey placed in all 
but one of the tournaments she entered last 
year while moving to that high state ranking. 

Stacey has become a master of the base 



line, during her development as a ^mis 
player. "Sim doesn't l^e the powj^rftd shote 
some tennis playo^ have," maintains her 
father, "but she keeps her o^wnents {nnned 
deep in their end of the court. Those type of 
shots are awfully hard to hande." 

GROWm HAS ALSO {dayed a major role in 
her maturatton as a toinis iriayer. "When slie 
first started iriaying, she was so short, pei^ 
would ^t hit the ball over her head." recalls 
her father. Another prcMem Stacey en- 
countm^ in her early tennis years was her 
hand was too small to grip the racket, so she 
hit her backhand in the two-handed style 
made popular by Chris Evert. The two4ianded 
beckhai^ went by the wayside, however, 
whoi an instructor came vp with the idea of 
cutting a grip into the handle of Stacey's 
tennis racket. 

Stacey needs no such-innovations now as her 
tennis ^me has progressed to the point, whc^re 
she feels confident of winning no matter who 
she is playing. "You have to approach every 
mateh with a positive attitude," maintains 
Stacey. "I'U go to a tournament and 
everybody will be whispering about watching 
out for this player because she's good. You 
can't wonry about the other players. You just 
have to go (Hit there and play your game." 

Stacey pulls no punches when it comes to 
her intentions on the tennis court. One day, 
she wants to make it to the pro circuit and 
play with the best. In search of this end, tennis 
has become her whole life according to her 
moUier. 

Tennis will play an even bigger role 
with Stacey playing in a tournament nearly 
every week this summer. "If you are going to 
imiM'ove, you have to play in tournamaits," 
says Stacey's mother. Stacey plans to enter 
every tournament she can, with possible trips 
to Florida and California circuits. "At first, I 
wasn't looking forward from being away from 
home so much, but if it has to do with tennis 
I'll go," states Stacey. 

HER FATHER maintains there have beat 
other 12 year olds that have played tennis as 
well as his daughter. "They get to be U or 15 
and they start to get interested in other things, 
mostly boys, and they forget about tennis. 
Stacey has a chance to be really good if she 
keeps at it." 

Stacey says that nothing is going to in- 
terfere with her ongoing love affair with a 
ra(*et and ball. "I'm going to stay with it." 
She rarely tires of her grueling practice 
routine. "Every once in awhile, you feel like 
just sitting around and not practicine. but if 
you're going to be good you have to workat it." 
comments Stacey. "I don't get tired of playing 
very often. I just love to play." 

"We've all worked very hard at Stacey's 
tennis game," comments her mother a 
veteran of many hours on the court with h&r 
daughter. 

Work is where we came into the story of this 
young tennis friayer. If Stacey's infatuation 
with a tennis racket is not detoured by a ,bpy 
somewhere along the line, someday the draft 
list of the Philadelphia Freecbms may have 
the name Ives on it. 

Hard work will do it every time. 



ilFUNTSTONES 

•fc^ WEEKDAYS 8 AM 




American Physicd Fitness 

SPORTS CAMP 

Personal Counsallng Jyne 24 thfU AugUSt 2 

Featuring: Hockey, Judo, Archery, Sailing, 

All organized sports. Call: 499-1243 (days) 

425-6087 (nites) 

AGES 7 thru 15 

Fully Accredited Summer School Program 
3 thru 12 grades 

Tidewater Christian High Campus 



Dun f **'. 



h 



ctooW* 



tXt 



of>' 









Soap box 
trials, horse 
show on tap 



The Virginia Beach Dq>art- 
ment of Parks and Recreation is 
sponsoring an all-youth horse 
and pony show at Princess Anne 
Park. 

There will l>e 24 classes in the 
show, including hunter, English 
and western riding. To be 
eligible for the competition, 
contestants must be 18 years old 
or under. The top flnishers in 
each category will be presented 
with a trophy or a ribbon for 
their efforts. 

Iliere is an entry fee of $1 for 
regular classes and $2 for the 
championship classes. 

Also on this week's parks and 
recreation schedule is the 
preliminary soap box terby 
trials on Saturday. This is the 
flrst of a series of three 
elimination trials, which will be 
, this month. 

Tlie soap box derby finals will 
be at Mt. TradmuH^ on July 13. 




— ' S 



-f 



i 




JOHN MOORE cheeks his line 
while passing the time flshfaig on 
the Wooden Pier last weelt. Moore 
had an off day as far as catching 



fish went, but he didn't let it spod 
the Joy of fishing. (Sun photo by 
John Bannon) 



RELAXATION 

. . . is fisliing on a pier 



ths sun has just begun its daily ascent into 
the skies, and already the fisherman armed 
with rod, reel and bait has begun ttie hunt for 
his prey. 

What is it that draws a man to the water in 
search of fish? What is so fascinating about 
the nerve-jarring aspect of chasing an unseen 
foe? Fish are about as uni»tK]ictable as the 
weather. There is no written guarantee that 
fish will be swirling around your hook. Still, 
they come day after day. 

"I've been fishing a lot of years now," says 
Jotm Moore. "There is nothing I enjoy 
better." Moore was still full of ix-aise for the 
sport of fishing even though he had spent the 
better part of a day with very little to show for 
his effwts. 

STANDING ALONGSIDE Moore on the 
Wooden Pier, T(»n Coughlin concurred with 
his fellow fisherman's opinion of the past 
time. "There is no greater relaxation in the 
world than fishing," stated Coughlin. "No 
such thing as smog on a fishing pier, there is 
just fresh air and sunshine." 

Fishing is m(n*e than just throwing your line 
in the water and reeling in a fish. It is Uie 
whole atmos{rfiere that surrounds the ritual, 
which draws the person back to the pier. 

The thrill of battUng a big fish, or catching 
two at once or the disappointment of finding 
your hooks cleaned of bi^t all mesb together- 



to make a fisherman's day. "FisMi^on apier 
is always atot of fun," contends CoughUn. "On 
a pier, there te always somebodty to talk to. • 
Very seMom will yoo meet a grumpy person 
fishing." 

On this particular day, the fish wer«i't 
biting. "There will be days like this. Then 
there will be other di^r's when you can't pull 
them in fast enough," states Moore. "You 
don't have to be fishing long to know, that to 
catch fish you have to be there when they 
are." So with no guarantee on whoi the fish 
are going to be there, Moore shows up at the 
pier and waits. 

"ALL IT TAKKS to be a good fisherman is a 
little common sense and a whole lot of 
patience," says Coughlin. 

There are some things that are constant 
about fishing, whether it be from the surf, on 
a pier or in a boat "You always here the 
stories about the one that got away," laughs 
Moore. "If somebody catches a big fish, you 
had better see him do it because if you doi't 
and the fish is 12 inches long you can bet when 
he tells you how big it is, it'll be 24 inches. 
Coughlin adds, "By tomorrow it would be at 
least three feet." 

"If I had to eat every ftsh I caught, I'd be 
eating fish four times a day," comments 
Moore. So one day of bad luck won't affect 
Moore's infatuation with the fmstrating 
busin^^qf catchii^firii. v -r ' 




kSu. 



TOM COUGHLIN, biting down on 
the ever - present cigarette, 
contbiues telling tme of his many 
fish stories. Cou^Un comes to the 



pier for conversatimi as much as 
Ashing. (Sun photo by John 
Bannon) 



■91B!" 



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The Sim-Wedneiday, June S, 1974 -F^ A4 



What da hey? Lefs run the ^ow right 




A fan's view 

of Wheeler and 

his sidetddc dealer 




ERNIE LAUGHS to keep from crying as he 
remembers the time the Squires almost had to 
play a game in Seope with the temperature 
dropping below 60 degrees. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mann) 




ByJOHNBANNON 
SportiEdltor 

Eririe Gray is a pnrfessiomd sports fan. He lives 
in Vir^nia Beach and has put up with Uie un- 
certainty all lidewater spc^ fans have lived 
through in recoit numths. 

De^te the numerous setbacks, Ernie hasn't 
soured on the major league po^biUtes of the area. 
"If the SqiUTM am draw 10,000 me time, then they 
could draw Uiat many people ftn* ev^ game," 
ctmanenti Ernie. "1%e peofde are out th^. The 
guys, that are runid^ ttw show, Just have to malce 
an effort to reach U»e little man." 

The little man is a Icey factor in Ernie's opinion of 
ttie life or death of a pro franchise. "You may need 
the big money to finance a club, but it's the little 
guy spendng his five bucics fcnr a ticket that makes 
a francldse," maintains Ernie. "The peq>le that 
have been runnbig the pro teams aroimd liere just 
tiaven't made an ^ort to get the common wwking 
guy involved in ttieir teams." 

ERNIE LOOKS to the 74-75 pro seasoiu as being 
vital in Ti<tewater's search to become known as a 
major sports area. "Next year will be the year, we 
either prove we're major league or Blidcey 
Mouse,'' contends Ernie. As to what it will take to 
convince the pro wpcrt magnates ttiat Tidewater is 
a worUiy area to invest in, Ernie feels, "We are 
going to have to support the teams we have." I don't 
tiiink the Ambassadors hurt our image with people, 
but if we don't support ttie teams we have, people 
are going to write us off." 

Joe Wheeler does not head the list of Ernie's hit 
parade. "It is just like Lamar Hunt said, Wheeler 
was just a huckster who saw a chance to make a 
quick buck. He bit olf more than he could chew, and 
then left us holding the bag." 

Ernie does not have any hate crusade brewing for 
Wheeler. "I'm a little disaiqpointed in him, Iwt I'm 
more mad at the league for letting a guy like that 
buy a team in the first place," states Bmie. "The 
only thing that scared me was when Wheder 
started talking about getting involved with the 
Squires and the Wings. I thcHight we were going to 
lose the whole package in one swoop." 

"I looittd at his financial statement when he first 
came to town. Wheeler's company only gross^ two 
million. Anybody, whose business only grosses that 
much, can't iiave enough capital to finance a 
team," contends Ernie. "I was a bit leery even 



missisii^&>i»ssm»imi 



trom the beginnii^. At least, the money for the 
senon tickets was refimded." 

ERNIE DCMESN'T PEEL you Oan {riac^Wheeler 
in the same ball park witti Earl Pwmnan. twheeler 
just took us for a ride, without everl|»ttit^ a team 
on ttie fleld,*' states &nie. "Fweman put his 
product out there for the pubUc to see. You can say 
alot of Uiings about Earl F^iraiuin, but ^e thing 
you can't take away ftrom him is he did piK a team 
(m the court." 

BadcetlMll is Enrie's firet love. He has attended 
ev«ry Squtavs game In Scope and Hiimpton since 
the team's inc^imi in Virginia, except during a 
stint in the hospital. "I even drove up to Richmond 
to see the games they played th»«." 

Ernie's biggest gripe is with management of both 
the teams and the ci^. "What this town needs is to 
brii^ hi somebody from the outsicte, who knows 
how to run a pro team. In order to have a successful 
franchise, you need major league people from tlie 
janitor right up to the front office." 

ERNIE IS JUST as critical of the city of NcHiolk's 
dealings with its pro teams as he is of the way the 
teams are run. "I remember the time, it was 58 
degrees in Scope, and they had to go get the city 
manager at his home because they didn't want to 
turn the heat on." 

"Wheeler com^ to town and G. Robert House is 
runnuig around trying to do everything he can for 
him," comments Ernie. "When did you ever see 
him try to help Earl Foreman. The city is helping 
ttie guys that are trying to buy the Squires now. But 
if (hey had given Foreman just a little cooperation 
two years ago when he needed it, we wouldn't be 
gobig through what we are now." 

Despite his criticism of the way things are run, 
Ernie is not ready to abandon ship. "No matter who 
they bring in to run the clubs, I'll go out and watch. 
What else is ttiere to do down here during the fall 
and winter?" 

Ernie feels Uie light at the end of ttie tunnel is 
beginning to shine through. "The Wings are here to 
stay . at least for another year. I really feel 
hodcey can make it in this area. Everywhere I go 
people are always talking about it." 

The actions of local investors trying to buy the 
Squires have bouyed Ernie's hopes about pro 
basketball's future in the area. "They've come too 
far not to make it now." 




AN ARGUMENTATIVE Ernie makes a point 
while holding court at the local restaurant he 
owns. The decorations on the wall shows the 
track Ernie's mind is usually running on. 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



»¥J¥S»IS«»SSS«»^^ 



E:%SA»$A^%%»«»«A%¥!»!%;:&%:;»w 




SPORTS RECORD, 



VIRGINIA BEACH CSC 

RSCREATION DEPT. Ar«gona "A" 

I. 

: RECREATION SOFTBALL 
C RESULTS 

|< UNLIMITED DIVISION No.1 

Ct«I'$ Pizza 18; Orioles 13% 
!44ortt) Landing Elec. 29; P.O.P. 
340. « 1« 
Mail Bcndtrs 9; Mills Elac. 7 
litres 11; H a M Contractlno 7 



INTERMEDIATE 
NATIONAL 



MIDOET 
CONTINENTAL 



UNLIMITED DIVISION No. 3 



I. 



• i: 



UNLIMITED DIVISION No. 2 



I'E. Caligarl 8; Pungo Radio 
■.Crabbors 13; Aragona "A" 
l-Oucks 18; C.S.C. 



I'My Brother's .Mothers 
•ISurgor King 4 



5 
5 

6 

i; 



W L 

Larasan 5 2 

Mulkey's 5 2 

ISSI 4 2 
Howerm ' 

Residential 4 3 

C & P Telephone 3 3 

Cool Blues 3 4 

Lynnhaven Loung 1 3 

Paradise Inn 1 3 

Tiki 1 5 



Bulldogs 

Blue Jays 

Merchants 

Cardinals 

Giants 

Larks 

Tigers 

Indians 

Metr 



W 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 




b 



L 





2 
2 
2 
2 



Yankees 

Dodgers 

Wildcats 

Wheels 

Pirates 

Chiefs 

Cubs 

Tigers 

Rebels 



W 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 





L 





1 
1 
1 

2 
1 



MIOOIT AMERICAN 



CLASS "A' 



riarasan 7; Mulkey's 5 UNLIMITED DIVISION Na.4 



iCool Blues 1$; 
• Truckers 13 
jHowerin Sales 10; 
iTelephone 7 



Va. Bch. 
C a P 



; UNLIMITED DIVISION No. 4 

>Talco Plumbers 17; Jaycees 8 

•True Value 20; Coasfline 16 

iSmlth a Keene 24; Bunn's 

tO a M e r s 3 

k. 

I UNLIMITED DIVISION No. S 

i^Hot Wheels 37; Corvette Club 4 
'Rookies 34; Pembroke Mali 6 
r-Rommles 11; Newcomers 10 
^jStreakers 11; Travelers 4 
fMinute Mans Men 16; B a H 
^Construction 5 



W 

My Brothers 6 

Smith a Keene 6 

True Value 4 

Taico Plumbers 4 

Green Run 4 

Coastline Corp. 3 

Chops 3 

Bunn's Bailers 2 

Sir Buddy's 2 

Va.BeachJaycees 



INTERMEDIATES 
•AMERICAN 



L 

1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
5 
5 
6 



Porkers 
Stewart 

Sandwiches 
Reld Associates 
Merchants 



W 

s 

4 

4 
3 



G.N. Grim 
Reaiwrs . 
Kemps Tigers 
Kemps Cubs 
Kemps Cardinals 
G.N. Khights 
Rockets 
G.N. Cardinals 
G.N. Tigers 
Ortoles 
G. N.Yankees 
Kemps Indians 
Kemps Yankees 



w 

2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 







CHURCH 
DIVISION NO a 

W 
London 

Bridge Baptist 3 

Providence Friends 3 

Thalia Lynn 3 

Memorial Methodist i 

St. Gregory's i 

t^.e. I^esbyterian i 

<>,,H- B«itl»t 

VIROINIA BIACN 
RKCR«ATION ORPAeTMINT 

MCRIATION SOFTBALL- 
BASHALL BISULTS 



MIDaiTt.AMBRICAN 







1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 
2 
2 



Ktmpt. CardlMli It; OM. Rocktti t 
Kempt. IndlWM S: GNl Cardlnalt 14 
kvmpt. Tlgtrt \\i OrloKi t 
Kempt Cubt If; G.N. Tlg«r» r 
G.N. Knightt U, O.N. Y«)k«« 3 
Grim RMpm 10; Kcmpl. VwkM* 3 



UNLIMITED DIVISION NO.S 



UNLIMITED DIVISION No. 1 



I'Pork Chop 

Ted's Pizza 

^orth Landing 

t'H & M extracting 

li^stros 

^ill Elec. 

^Jaguars 

•Nail Benders 

'Ortoles 

;f.O.P.No.8 



W 
5 

5 
S 

4 

4 
4 
3 
3 
1 




L 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
6 
7 



T 
1 



Eagles 

Renegades 

A'S 

Spurs 

Chiefs 

Mets 

Yanks 

Cubs 

Cardinals 



W 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 






<'. UNLIMITED DIVISION No. 2 



f. Caligarl 
urger King 
CraWMrs 

My Brolfier's Mothers 
Micks 

ClHist Guard 
Olcho's 
mngo Radio 



W 
6 
6 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 



CLASS A 



Porkers 

Stewart Sandwiches 

Reld Associates 

Murden's 

Merchants 

Tony's 

Greenwich Supply 

Expo's 

Cavaliers 

Ott Realty 

ProfoKtonal Realty 

Evergreen Realty 



L 






w 

5 

4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 





W 

Ho't Wheels 6 

Rummies 4 

Newcomers 4 

Streakers 4 

Rookies 4 

Travelers 3 
Minute 

Man's Men 3 

Pembroke Mail 2 

B a H Construction 2 

Corvette Club 



L 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 

3 
4 
5 
7 



WOMEN 



AJ'S 
Streakers 
ISSI 
Snark 

Sun Flowers 
Tidewater Auto 
WestwoodHill 



W 
4 
3 
2 

1- 

1 

1 



L 

1 
2 

3 

3 



MIDOITI, NATIONAL 

Spurt 10: Cardintit 

T-M cardlnilt U; TIdat 

Cr««d* Orleitt 17 1 A'l 

Brtvft 14; Mttt 

Wlldcatt 7; Dodetrt 

Larkt 10; Ltom 



MIOOBTS, CONTINBNTAL 
yankMt 12; Bravat 

INTIRMBOIATBS, AMBRICAN 



7 

11 
1 
7 
S 
3 



ChMl 
Spurt 
Eaglat 
A't 



t; 
I; 



Card malt 
Vankt 
CluM 

Mata 



fSSWSftW: 



INTBRMIDIATIf , NATIONAL 

Slut Jayi «^ ' Tlgari 3 

UNLIMITBD, DIVISION I 

Jaguari 13; Nail Bandtri 10 

Milll Elac. 13; H ft M Contracting » 

Tcd't Pllia I; Aitroi 7 

North Landing Elac. 7; F.O.P. No. I « 



UNLIMITBO, DIVISION II 

Burgar King Whopptn 10; Aragona "A" 4 
Pungo Radio 9; U.S. Coatt Guard I 



UNLIMITBO, DIVISION HI 

ISSI 9; Lynnhavtn Loungt f 

Mulkav't 14; TIkl 1} 

Cool Bluas 9; Howarin Salti 4 



UNLIMrrBD, DIVISION IV 

Smitti li Kttna 14; Graan Run * 
Trut Value 11: Bunn't BBIIart f 
Coattllna II; Jayctat 12 



UNLIMITED, DIVISION V 

Travalart 25; Corvatta Club 5 

Hot Whatli 19; Rooklai I 

Nawcomart 30; Pambroka Mall t 



CLASS A 

Stawarl Sandwichtt t: Oraanwicli Supply 

5 

Murdan't 9; Pfolatilonal I 

Marchanti • 9; Expo't i 

Porkart Evargraan Realty 

ReldAitoc Cavalier* 



Women's tourney 
starts Saturday 



The Princess Anne High 
School tennis courts will again 
be the site of a tennis tour- 
nament. 

The Maureen Connelly Tennis 
Tournament will be Saturday 
and Sunday afternoon. The 

Softball 
tournament 
set for June 14 

The first annual "Stars and 
Stripes" softl»Il tournament is 
scheduled for June 14-16. It will 
be a double elimination tour- 
nament with play beginning the 
night of June 14 at 6:30 p.m. 

First round games will be 
played in Norfolk at the 
Lake wood, Sherwood, 
Rosemont and Norview fields. 
The finals are schedided for 
June 16 on the Lakewood field. 
Final roimd action will Iwgin at 
3:00 p.m. 

Any teams wishing to enter 
the tournament should contact 
Norfolk Softball commissioner 
Jim Brown at 340-6845. 



tournament Is open to women of 
all ages, who will compete in 
both singles and doubles 
competition. 

The tourney, named after one 
of the best women tennis 
players of all time, is sponsored 
by the Tennis Patrons of 
Virginia Beach in cooperation 
with the city's Department of 
Parks and Recreation. The 
tourney traditionally draws 
some of the best women tennis 
players from Virginia and 
surrounding staleir •» 



MIDGET NATIONAL 



L 








< 



Wildcats 2 

Spurs ,2 

Larks 2 

Braves 1 
T-M Cardhials 1 

Dodgers 1 1 

A'S 1 1 

Ortoles 1 1 

Lions • 2 

Cardinals 2 

Tides 2 

MelB 2 

iQOLFCOORS 
ui 

> 



CHURCH 
DIVISION NO. A 



] Weshwood Hill 
f Baptist Church 
Rock Church 
F\n» Baptist Deacons 
Aragona Baptist 
Free Will Baptist 
VaBchCMrlstlanCh 
ComdWhity Chapel 



III 



'if poys to advertise 

in Tlie Sun" 

CALL 4t6-343Q TODAY! 
ASK FOii ADVERTISING 



Y.M.C.A. 

DAY CAMP 

Boys & Girli 
Ag«6-13 

FOR INFORMATION 

CALl 

622-6328 



"Cf»a«v« money Weas 

and a unique 11^ end 

haaith Insurance 

service." 



BOB ANDREIWS 

FIIUO UNOCRWIN'mi 

RMi 1 1I Capital Avb. 

CHnAPtAKC. VA. 233(4 
SAB-RSn 



NEW YORK UPE INSURANCE C<»IPANY 

1 1 30 UMTIO VHWIWA BAMC BLBa, 

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u ConfMt 9Aay IS-Juna 16 § 

Fora$1.00c(mMbiiaoii,]ronwMMerii«ttel974 ^ 
BOOK or GOLF » » diMMi to lial ttB ftw ft »•• 
eelv* I $1 JB "I Bm« tlw ntoT OHr ML 

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CALL ^74^1 

STOHL REALTY 

m2Q Vtrfinia BMeh Blvd. at Aragma Mvd. 



Important 

AUCTION 



a> 



PERSIAN RUGS 

and ofhar Oriental ^gs 

TO BE HELD AT 

VfffOfMfA SfACH CIVIC CfN7fff 

(Mattfi^ Room) 
Virginto BaMii, Va. 

Situntoy, Aim 8 2 P.M. 
VUtmg & ImsptcUon from 12 noon uiUU auction 



A PRIVAf* COLLECTIOM OF RARE PERSIAN A ORtOtTAL RUOS from th« w^Htnown 
eolMcbtn. Joim ezmadMaii and All Nteni Nttiidton. Miny of IMm rue* imM Mm wrtrtbHad 
Ml diffarwM txiiNritionf throuflfioul Europe ond t(w UnMd States. 

we Mve hmv reeiivM iMtruMPiM to tiwr tM ontlra extortion by SM^leii. TM eoiMetlon 
IHIIMIHI «f Ma fiMM gradBS •( HERMAN, BOKIMRA, ISFEHAN, SAROUKS, TABRIZ, 

acLoucHErrAN, naturau silj( qume, huntino scene carpets, roval 

KESHAN, ARDERIL. PRAYER RUOS, NAIN, Mc 



MfCnONICR: Pr»f. I 



TERMB:CMii«r«Mak. 



BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




WE HAVE A NEW POLICY OE- 
nCNED FOR THE OWNERS 
OF 0UTBOARD8, INBOARDS. 
SAILBOATS AND INBOARD/ 
OUTBOARJM, 2S FEET OR 
IJNDER.COVERAGE INCLUDES: 

YOUR BOAT, MOTOR, EQUIP- 
ira^TAIXAlLER 

YOUR LUBIUTV TO OTHERS 
ARISING FROM THE USE OP 
BOAT. 

IffiDICAL PAYMErlTS 

12 MONTHS OreRATION 

UNRESTRICTED TERRITORIAL 
UMI1S. 

PREMIUMS INCLUDE COVER- 
AiGE FOR niYSICAL DAM- 
kGE $ldO,(MirWATERCRAFT 
UABIUrrllNt) $ 1,000 IffiDI- 
CAL PAYMENTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 




It 



'^^^^ I 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■SHiisaHsaHa 



■■■MHiMMiMaiaMa 



mmmgmmmmmm 



-# 




Commuting can be fun 



Hits high-speed hovercraft is only a gleam in 
the eyes of Tidewater Transportation District 
Commtesioners now, but who knows what the 
future may bring? it was used Friday in 
demonstratifms at the Pilots Association 



doci(s in NorfollK to show how commuters 
might be whisked to work <hi Tidewater's 
many waterways w tourists could speed to 
Williamsburg from Hampton Roads. (Son 
photo by Rod Mann) 



ROLL CALL 



WASHINGTON - Here's how 

area Members of Congress 

were recorded on major roU call 

votes May 23 throu^ May 29. 

HOUSE 

FEDERAL DEBT CEILINO: 

Passed, 191 for and 190 against, 
a bill to raise the federal debt 
celling from UlS to $495 billion. 
The Administration had 
requested a SS05 billion ceiling. 

ThebilKH.R. 14832) now goes 
to the Senate. 

Supporters argued that the 
increase is needed to pay for 
programs already funded. They 
said failure to raise the ceiling 
would result in fiscal chaos. 
Rep. At unman (D-Ore) said, 
"We have no alternative but to 
vote this bill out." 

Opponents argued that a 
lower ceiling would force 
Congress to cut back on 
programs' that stimulate 
Inflation. Rep. LaMar Baker 
(R-Tenn) said, "This country 

lias to wake up We can no 

longer price ourselves out of 
existence." 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D- 
1), William Whltehurst (R-2), 
Caldwell Butler (R-6) and Joel 
aroyhill (R-10) voted "yea." 

Reps. David Satterfield (O- 
3), Robert Daniel (R 4), W.C. 
Daniel (D-5), Kenneth Robinson 
(R-7>, Stanford Parris (R-8) 
and William Wampler (R-9) 
voted "nay." 

ABORTIONS: Passed, 290 for 
and 91 against, an amendment 
to bar the use of federal anti- 
poverty funds "for medical 
assistance and supplies" for 
abortions. 

The amendment was offered 
to a bill to dismantle the Office 
of Economic Opportunity by 
turning over most of its 
functions to the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare 
(H.R. 14449). 

Supporters of the amendment 
argued that taxpayer's dollars 
should not be used for 
abortions. 

Opponents argued that the 
amendment would discriminate 
against poor women. One 
opponent. Rep. Donald Fraser 
(D-MInn) said that In barring 
the funds "we would not outlaw 
abortion, we would only outlaw 
it for poor people." 

Oowing, Whltehurst, 
Satterfield, Robert Daniel, W.C. 
Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parris, Wampler and Broyhill 
voted "yea." 

ANTI - POVERTY PRO- 
ORAM: Rejected, ?4 for 
Mtd ^4 against, an amendment 
to give the Secretary of tIEW 
total control of community 
action agencies, the core units 
of the Great Society's War on 
Poverty. 

In refecting the amendmt 
the House voted to kee] 
language to create an 
independent Community Action 
Administration within HEW. 
The new administration would 
fund local ant i poverty efforts, 
such as day-care centers and 
lob programs, that now are 
funded by the Office of 
Economic Opportunity. DEC 
will go out of existence on June 
30, 1974. 

Supporters argued that anti- 
poverty efforts should be under 
AdmUnistratlon control. They 
said creating an Independent 
Community Action 
Administration merely 
perpetuates OEO, but with a 
new name. Rep. Albert Quie (R- 
Mlnn) argued against "letting 
the whole thing go on 
before." 

Opponents argued that 
community action programs 
need to be insulated from the 
Admtnistration because it 
wants to gut anti-poverty 
efforts. Rep. William Steiger 
(R-Wis) said Congress must tell 
HEW "that we believe in ttte 



independence of community 
action." 

Satterfield, Robert Daniel, 
W.C. Daniel, Robinson, Parris, 
Wampler and Broyhill voted 
"yea." 

Downing, Whltehurst and 
Butler voted "nay." 

NEW POVERTY AOE»fCY: 
Passed, 331 for and 53 against, a 
bill to dismantle OEO. The bill 
(H.R. 14449), however, would 
keep most OEO programs alive 
by transferring them to HEW. 
It now goes to the Senate. 

The bill authorizes S3.7 billion 
in ant i -poverty funds for fiscal 
years 1975 through 1977, with $1 
billion earmarked for the 
nation's 900 community action 
agencies (above vote). 

Supporters argued that the 
government I* obliged to help 
the poor improve their lot. Most 
of those voting against agreed 
with President Nixon that the 
War on Poverty has been 
largely a failure. 

Downing, Whltehurst, Butter 
and Wampler voted "yea." 

Satterfield, Robert Daniel, 
W.C. Daniel, Robinson, Parris 
and Broyhill voted "nay." 

SENATE 

INTERNATIONAL AID: 

Passed, 55 for and 27 against, a 
bill to loan $1.5 billion to poor 
nations by way of the 
international Development 
Association, the so-called "soft 
loan window" of the World 
Bank. 

Borrowing nations have fifty 
years to pay back loans, at one 
per cent interest. The loans pay 
for electrical plants and other 
basic economic improvements. 

The bill (S.2M5)) now goes to 
the House, which rejected a 
similar bill last January. 



Supporters argued that the 
loans are needed desperately by 
the world's poorest nations, 
such as Bangladesh, to keep one 
step ahead of starvation. Other 
members said a healthy world 
economy helps the U.S. Sen. 
John Tower (R -Texas) said the 
IDA is "a channel for bridging 
the gap" between the rich world 
and the poor world. 

Opponents argued that the 
money could be better used 
domestically for such things as 
home mortgages. Sen. Harry 
Byrd (IVa) said, "This 
throwing away of tax funds . . . 
must come to a halt." 

Sens. Harry Byrd (I) and 
William Scott (R) voted "nay." 

SOVIET AID: Tabled, 59 for 
and 25 against, an amendment 
to bar Export-Import Bank 
loans to non-market economy 
nations, such as Russia. 

The amendment was offered 
to the International 

Development Association bill 
(above vote), although the IDA 
is not related to the Export- 
import Bank. 

In tabling the amendment, 
the Senate voted to permit loans 
to Communist countries. 

Those voting to table argued 
that the amendment could 
restrict Secretary of State 
Kissinger's ability to extract 
trade concessions from the 
Soviets. Other memt>ers argued 
that the question was too 
important to be considered as a 
non-germane amendment to the 
IDA bill. 

In arguing against the move 
to table. Sen. Peter Domlnick 
(R Colo) said, "There must be 
some kind of insanity" in a 
policy that gives loans to the 
Soviets while America is hard- 
pressed economically. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 



NOTI€El 

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H OellMied to Store 

«1i.0O lor Plak-Up and Delivery 

3 DAY SERVICE 

All ather Carpets t# par iq. ft 

For Estimates, Call 

428-8571 REEDS ^^^'^iii 



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CARI>ET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 



BEST PICTURE 
OF THE YEAR 



AWARDED MEDAL 

U. CBMta>. Joaqrii D. MUUs 
%m ken mmwritA tte Nav; 
Ai^WfSMM ll«il*l at the Fleet 
^^^Mitet Oircctloa Syitemi 
tMri^E Oi^. Attetk, Dara 



Ik-. MM laerived Ike avani 





Surfer 
killed by 

MarfcE. Cioccia. 16, Narfdk, 
was killed by lightning Sundtay 
wMle surfing with bis brother 
about 1 pm. at Vir^nia Beach. 

Investigators quoted Stqrtten 
Cioccia, 18, with saying he saw 
a lightning bolt strike his 
brother while they were about 
20 yards of fshwe in the Atlantic 
Ocean in an area between Sth 
and 6th Streets. Stephen ad^d 
he pteced Mark on a surfboard 
and brought him to the beach. 

Deqiite ^forts of members of 
the Virginia Beach Rescue 
Squad to revive Uie boy, he was 
pronounced dead oa arrival at 
Virginia Beach General 
Hospital. 

Burgbry 
prevention 
talks set 

Members of the HIT (High 
Intensity Target) bureau, 
Virginia Beach Police Division, 
are conducting a public 
relations program to curtail the 
rate of burglaries in the dty. 

Personnel of the bureku are 
offering their services through 
lectures and demotstrations to 
groups and organizations to 
acquaint residents and business 
persons with burglary 
prevention. 

Those desiring to obtain this 
service are invited to telephone 
427-4495 to obtain further 
infwmation. 




— I ' 

Hanuness 
iswmnhg 
apageant 



The bright smile on the; 
face of 18-year-old; 
StepluMiie Dowdy Is purc' 
happlmss. She's the new 
Miss Virginia Beach, 
chosen Monday night in Uie; 
anmial pageant at Plasa| 
Junior High School. Ms.; 
Dowdy is an old hand at: 
winning pageants. She's-r 
also Miss Princess Anne.t 
the beauty pageant winner; 
from Princess Anne High* 
School, where she is air 
graduating senior. Now it's < 
on to Roanoke lor the Miss 
Virginia Pageant in July.. 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) : 




Abeautifiil wER^to talk. 



The Trimline* phone. Sculptured 
and uncluttered. 

Beautiful. What it does is beautiful, too. 
It puts everything in the pahn of your hand. 

The dial is there, and it's lighted. 
The recall button's there, too. 

So you don't have to hang up 



to make another call. That's about 
as modern as you can get. 

The Trimline phone. In colors to suit 
your taste, in desk or waU models 
to suit your needs. 

A beautiful way to talk. 
Just call your local C&P business office. 



©C&PI&lephone 



a^iM^^t^aABi 



l-ifcStyles 



Bitioeg 




9i^by Baiderson with fior best in show painting. 

The one-woman 
show must go on 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writ^ 

Even a turoten foot can't keep artist 
.aielhar Balderam down. ^ 

ftld^son was to hang her oiie#^an 
show of art works at the Virginia Beach 
WUts Center, she and the Baiderson cat 
hiid a ^un-in in the kitch^ of her 54th 
Street hwne' which left her with a 
decorative cast on her left foot. 

The decorations are courtesy Ms. 
Balderson's four children, Ridgely, 13; 
Hatton, 11 ; Scott, 7, and Johnny, 6. All of 
th^nn are showing artistic talents, their 
mother believes, especially Ridgely, 
v^ho draws better than her mottier, Ms. 
Baiderson said. 

Despite her broken foot, she had her 
one-woman show hung in time to 
IMreview it for friends and invited guests 



May 24 at the Arts Center gallery. The 
show opened then and continues through 
June 14. 

MS. BALDERSON'S show includes 
Hne^rtihbleum) block prints, collages,^" 
water colors, oils and acrylics. She won 
the right to have a one-woman show by 
being chosen "best in show" at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center's members' 
exhibit last winter at the Civic Center. 

"Reflection of Color," an oil painting 
of colorful trees, gained her the "best in 
show" designation. "Reflection of 
Color" is on exhibit in her one-woman 
show but is not for sale. Most of her 
works now on view, however, are for 
sale at moderate prices. 

Ms. Baiderson presided over the 
exhibit opening at the Arts Center 
gallery on Arctic Avenue by sitting with 
•fSw ART^T, page B-2) 



BadfBay 

Rural festival 
to showcase 
folk artists 

If you know how to quilt, weave, can, tie fli^, 
make musical instruments, carve decoys, make 
pottery, shoe horses, create handcrafts — in short. 
If you're a folk artist — young Ken Meyer wants to 
hear from you. 

Mr. Meyer, 26, lives in Back Bay and is in- 
terested in preserving and promoting local folk arts. 
He is now trying, with help from friends in Virginia 
Beach and Norfolk, to organize the first annual 
Back Bay Folk Arts Festival. 

The festival is scheduled for July 27 near the 
Lotus Gardens at Tabernacle Creek on Sandbridge 
Road. It will be held in conjunction with the annual 
l.«tus Festival, sponsored by the Cape Henry 
Woman's Club. The women's organization is lend- 
ing support to the folk arts festival, Mr. Meyer 
said. 

"SO FAR the response to the festival has been 
very positive," Mr. Meyer said. "We're sort of 
testing response by this first festival, hoping to 
focus attention on the really valuable things that 
exist out here before they're gone." 

Mr. Meyer is not an artist himself, he said, 
although he does occasionally try his hand at crafts 
and making furniture. He has discovered some real 
artistic wonders in his own backyard, so to speak, 
and is trying to focus attention on some fading local 
arts. 

For instance, he discovered an old blacksmith, 
somewhere in his 80s, who still plies his trade in 
rural Virginia Beach. He knows of women who 
make beautiful quilts, and he's heard about people 
who carve decoys and tie flies. 

Although these are not art in the traditional 
sense, the skills and crafts are worth saving, Mr. 
Meyer iielieves. 

HE ENVISIONS setting up some kind of non- 
profit foundation to promote local folk artists. He 
would like to see a cooperative gallery established 
where artists may exhlut their works without 
paying exhorbitant pric^to do so, he said. 

He hopes the gallery can be established 
somewhere in rural Virginia Beach, hopefully in 
Sandbridge or Back Bay. 

Artists who exhibit at the folk arts festival will be 
asked to pay a $5 entraace fee to reserve a space. 
Each artist will build his or her exhibit booth, Mr. 
Meyer said. •,V^>' \* 

EACH ARTIST will k««p any money he makes 
from the sale of his wareih If there is any money left 
over from the entry fees, Mr. Meyer hopes to use 
the funds as "seed money" to help with the second 
festival. 

He is hopeful of getting some kind of grant, 
through the Virginia Beach Arts Center or the 
Virginia Museum (with which the Arts Center is 
affiliated) to start the foundation to preserve the 
folk arts. 

An informal committee of young people In 
Virginia Beach and Norfolk is working on the 
festival with Mr. Meyer. Anyone who would like to 
help, who knows a folk M-tist or would like to exhibit 
at the festival, is asked to call Mr. Meyer at 426-7m 
anytime, or Kathi Althouse at 622-0370 after 6 p.m. 




I 



'Holding up' the trial 



The lawyers pause In the "heat" of 
the trial to remove their jackets, and 
!\lac IVIcManus (as Henry Drum- 
mond) shows off his purple suspen- 



ders in a scene from "Inherit the 
Wind." on stage at K::t(l p.m. Friday 
and Saturday at the Virginia Beach 
Kittle Theatre. 



», 



m 




The years pedal on 



, I 



mimm:mm 



mssmimsmfS!iss»t-ms«4ir;$i^^^ 



If you are wondering 
about somebody's age, just 
watch (he way they ride a 
bike. 

Those under 6 and over 65 
usually ride the three- 
wheeled kind, but for those 






Student's essay cited 
in nationwide contest 



■V 



The folhwing essay, by i 3-year-old Angi Kos- 
ter, received honorable mention in a nationwide 
prose and poetry contest for secondary school 
students sponsored by Prime Time School TV, 
a non-profit organization which promotes the 
use of evening video as an educational tool 

Angi's essay was submitted in the contest by 
Jan Stark, her seventh grade language arts teack^ 
er at Kemps Landing School, Angi will attend 
Kempsvitte Junior High School in the fall She is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Koster 
of Virginia Beach. 



O^ 



•tiJ" 



■^ 



^ - 



q^ IBM ^ 

Life as a pengutn 




It was rather a nice day, omsiftering the umial 
wither in the Antarctic. The sim was shining 
li^tly wpon the new fall«i snow. Hie ckMMJIs moved 
gentty «i^ward as if they vmn t^ui« their time. 

Frances and her baby paigun, Tmy, jwst awoke 
to the jretty day. Frances thn^t she mi^t take 
Tmy to the ocem today and t^h him to swim, so 
Uiey watkUed down to the cl^r, &M water. TUs 
was the first time Tony had ever m« the ocean 
bdore, aiKl he thought it was beautiful. 

He loved the way Uie wav« gently famed and 
slowly ndted towaitl riiore, thm matte a crasUi^ 
noise as they hU tlw tey bmch. 

WHEN HE sn^PPED into the water, he WseA tte 
f^l^ and knew riglit away he was going to Ifte his 
flrst swlmmii^ l^sm. 

The koMi wnt alwig beautiftdly, and in M) time 
m aU, Tony cquM nHm ^t Uke his mtrtho*. 



The next day Frances took Tony to see her friend, 
Torie, and her son, Jeff, Tliat afternoon Tony and 
Jeff went explorir^ around the huge mountains o( 
ice. They came to the water and Tony proixOy 
showed Jtf f how he had learned to swim. After they 
had finished swimming, Jeff taught Tony how to 
slide down icy hills on his belly and into the water. 
He tlKxight this was gr^t fun, and ttwy did it fat 
hours. 

tony and Jeff became U»e best of friends and 
would do aiQrthii^ to he^ ach otho*. 

AS TIME {wssed on, Tony got okter and stronger. 
He could swim with speed and agility. He learned 
how to dive in arel out of the water, giving m«« 
sp^d. He also leari^ tow to catch fidi and (Hh«r 
small animab for food. Tony Heed cutttefirii bnt. 

It was time fw Ttmy to swim abwt 12 miles e^t 
to an^hM- island to find a wife. 

Tmy made the trip in abmit 19 hours, dUving 



ANGI KOSTER 



gracefully in and out of the water, st(»ping 
freqiKntly for a rest and catching some food. 

When Tony got to the island he chose a nice qwt 
by a lake to rest. 

HIE NEXT moftmg whoi Tony was goii^ to tlw 
ocean he met a nke girl, Heidi. Th^r talked a lot, 
m<»tly about e«:h othw. The following day T«iy 
ami Heidi d«:ided to become husband and wife. 
They swam back to tl» island whwe T«iy Bhemed 
•everyone his new bri^. 

Lata- «i Ttmy bwmne ttie fatlwr <rf two bright 
young boys. He enjoyed t^chii^ them to swim and 
to slide off rocks on Uieir stomach and into the 
water, remcmberii^ when te first learned. 

Tony kjwd his life m a pengirin. He llv«l eMh 
(taiy fw what it was. iwt wwrylng about the fiittffe. 
He tnped his chikfero) wodd g^ as much out of life 
as he hid. 



in-between ages, here are a 
lew tips more reliable than 
crows' feet in strong 
sunlight. 

You can be sure the bike 
rider is between very young 
and young if he rides no- 
handed and leans back on 
(he seat while looking 
iiround at passing scenery. 
Tha( kind of cool and 
balance comes from terrific 
coordination and a lack of 
experience. 

Once such a rider hits a 
rwk or has a tricky wheel 
(urn sideways with him, 
sending him heaped into a 
pile of pain, he has usually 
moved into the next age 
l)racliet — young adult. 

THESE PEOPLE ride 
holding on, but fast, to 
compensate. They come up 
Iwhind you if you're walking 
and pass you like the north 
wind. The men are all 
lanned and havily muscled 
from riding after the girls 
who are just tanned and 
(hats enough. 



And when the youn^ 
iidults catch up with each 
other and become young 
niarrieds, the peddling goed 
on but with time out to buy 4 
kiddie-seat for the ban- 
dV^bars or rear fender. 
Then, they ride a little 
slower, but not as slowly^ ii 
the middle-aged 

THE MIDDLE-AGED 

couple, out for a little 
exercise. ride v«rj» 
carefully. I mean, If i 
woman's husband has pai4 
$4(H) (o have her front teetit 
capped, he is going to ie\\ 
her to be careful. 



And she would be anyway^ 
because she remembm thd 
time shetri|^)ed and fell id 
Ironl of the post offke an^ 
nobody came up to her but a 
Labrador retriever who- 
found her perfum^: 
irresistible. !! 

So. if you are not afrajd of 
giving away your age, ride a 
bike to keep fit — and well- 
balanced. 



litsUo 

Lifestyles 



s? » 



rf- 



Bridal B-2 

Food B-2 

Sun Diat B-2 

Vocatlofi trips 
need tra^sel tlpn 

-Ptigmi B-3 to ff-t 



. # n ■%'*■ ■ pytf'^'^^ w^HW^itf 



FOOD 

Trim those 
meat prices 

by yourself 






A iBifie part of your idmI bill 
foes to pay far two ttiag^ 
labor and aervice. These are 
•cOvities which are easy to take 
fto granted With a Uttle extra 
eneriy, a shrewd showier can 
perform some money-saving 
labor that can add up to laife 
cuts in meat biOs. 

Those deUdous pork diops 
couid be one way of saving. 
Purchase a poifc Idn on sale and 
cut your own chops. You can 
even cut them nice and tUck. Or 



FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

B| MUL ROMAN 

Add a tabk^won of minced 
onion to dough when 
making crust for meat 
pies. Really adds the 

Sweet Potatoes? Praparc 
and fry die raw swaat 
potato ttw aama as white 



Leftover toast can be used 
for French toast, and is far 
tastier and not as so^y >" 
the midde. 



FOR AN BMMYABLB 
MBAL • 8PICIALIZING 
IN CHARBROILED 

grsAxs, mxicAN food 

AND LOW, LOW FRICES 
TRY THB 




400 LASKIH ROAD 



perhaps a less cotpensive pork 
cut, such as a shoulder, Goidd be 
used to make pork steaks. 
They're great for outdoor 
cooking. 

THKRE ARE lots <rf meat' 
cut^ tricks (XMKeming beef, 
too. The next time a seven-inch 
beef rib rout is on sale, pick 
one up. Cut your owmriiort ribs 
or make cube steaks firom 
^lotatip. 

Chopoff pennies per pound by 
cutting up your own chicken.. 
Compare prices between whole 
and cut-up poultry, and you'll 
see the aavi^ instantly. For a 
switch, tcy cutttng up a whole 
turkey. Turkifys are now in 
heavy supply at tow (Nrioes. 

Cotain meat-cutting tools are 
essential to accomptoh Oiese 
money-saving tricks. A buic 
set sfaouki ioehide a cutting 
board, meat saw and cleaver. 
Other tools to consider are a 
meat tenderixiar, poultry 
risars, meat grinder or electric 
knife. TlK invesUnent in proper 
tools win pay off in tower meat 
cost*. 

ANOTHER path to pursue to 
lower meat ^ces is to buy the 
larger cuts of meat, such as 
whoto hams, stob bacon, rib 
roasts, racks of tomb or whoto 
ptoce botogna. Many storea 
offer spectok on these items, 
and some stares will cut and 
wrap at no extra charge. 

****** 

The Mgh coat of sweetness: A 
recent arttoto in the WaU Street 
Journal focused on the higher 
cost of sugar. Consumers may 
soon be paying a much higher 
price for a five-pound bag of 
sugar. 

The impact of the totest 
whotosate pice Increase in 
sugar may show up soon on the 
retail tovd. Si^r deators dotf t 
expect any relief in the world 
sugar nipply until sometime in 
theCaU. 



Artist— 

{CSontinusd hom fift J-J j 

her brdcen foot profiped in the 
rooQi where her-ekhUHt to hung. 



GUESTS INVITED to the art 
preview sampled various 
chesses on homemade Frendi 
bread and drank galtoM of wine 
coolers wMto any admtoed the 
.cotorlkil rasas makhig 19 the 
serving talde coitarptoce. 

The cheeses nwre purctesed 
by Ms. Baldnwn from a 
gourmet spectolly riiop. The 
bread was baked by her 
laloited hudwnd, G. Stafford 
Balderson, the founder and 
guiding force behind the 
Virgittto Beach Friends of 
Muric. The oookffs are a spedal 
Baldenon family omeoctlon 
imbibed annually on her 
husband's Urtiiday. The roses 
were grown tiy her husband, 

Needtoas to say, the guesto 
had a great time. 

Before the preview qwning, 
Ms. Baktoraon pauaed in her 
tony day at tte Arts Cseter 
gallery to ^t about her first 
one-woman show. 

■it'sa fbke," she laughed. "I 
don't think I'm suppoaed to be 
here. I'm really oirt of Une. I'm 
the oidy me who has sluwn here 
who's a real raid^ amateur." 

SHE SAID SHE to convinced 
that die shoukln't have won tiie 
bnt in show at the members' 
exiyblt and tins the r^ to 
have tiie one-woman diow. 

She has bem peintfaig only 
four years, she said. She took 
private art ctosaes from 
Virgtoto Bell for 18 months. Ms. 
Bell teaches at Norfolk 
Academy. She aho took classes 
one quarter at Tidewater 
Community Collie. 

She fiaddy admitted Uiat she 
was "Kared to death" over the 
opening of her show, convinced 
that everyone wouM think her 
work terribto. 

"I'm really frantic," she said. 
"This to my first show - the 
first time I've ever done 
aivthim like Oris. I have stark 
terror Jumping around in my 
stomach." 

DEM*ITK HER fears, the 
preview went smoothly and she 





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For Fritiids Or Nmily 

Mtfo and Femtlf 
HAIR SHAPING . _ 

siii«i«*i*« \r 

fftMip of 2 ...»......$1.25 Moh ^ fi 

group of 3 ..........$1.00 Mch 

SHAMPOO AND SIT- . Slnglj 'a" 

group of 2 J1.78 Mch 

pwip of 3 ...... J1.B0 Mch 

K you art ■ nnv cwtoimnM will giva you any 
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wrilh M. AU Work Guaranteed 

Open Mon.-Fri. until 1 p.m.. Sat. until 5. 

OCEANA BEAUTY ACADEMY 428-3246 



even soU a few worin on 

vD0i^mB i^Wttii 

Ma. Bijdenon, 38. to an 
attnetive, happy-go-hicky 
woman with a ftiU 1^ and a 
qutekwiL 

She talka n«>idly and laughs a 
tot, about bet wei^t ("I'm « 
membw of Weight Watchers 
and rm trying hard to §ti 
sklimy."}, her broken foot ("It 
toirta and U'a swoOen. I tMnk 
the tact that I'm eanying 100 
extra pounds may have 
something to do with the 
swi^ng."), h«r art ctasses 
("We wouU tough and giggte 
and eat a lot of fruitcake"), her 
arttotto tatont ("My husband 
says I don't look tortured 
enough to be an artlsL") and 
her exMbitton two yeus ago at 
the Boardwalk Art Show ("We 
laughed and giggled and drank 
iced tea and taked to the other 
arttoto."). 

She becaoM talerested in art 
when die was doing work fw the 
Galilee EpUccq^l Chureh 
annual bazaar, paintlflg 
Christmas ornaments, 
decorating knickknacks and the 
like. 

"I JUST DEaDED one year 
to pick uipa paint brush and put 
it on canvas," she sakL Even 
with hnr Arts Ctonter hooora, she 
feeto she to still an anaateur. 
"rve had a good time wUh it 
and I tove it. but I think I've got 
anawf^ tot to learn," shesahL 

She painto, not ina garret nor 
a studio, but in the den of her 
home on the north end of the 
beach, with the neighbors, the 
nei^iborhood chiktrai and her 
own chiklren running in and out. 
"I Just paint in all the 
conftiston," she said. 

Her output varies, she said. 
"If I real^ crank them out, I 
can do one patoting a week. 
Some paintinip take one day, 
some three weeks. I did 13 since 
Christmas," die said. 

Beshtos being an artist in her 
own right, HIm. Balderson also to 
a viriunleer worker at Uie Arts 
Center, which includes 
everything from making 
tetophone calto to mannhig the 
Arts Center tent at last year's 
Boardwalk Art Show (whteh to 



q^onsorsd annuaUy hy tiie Mto 
Center). !■ 

THE ARTS CENTER. d» 

said, to her big love. "It's one 
Mag ttMt's n^ taiterest - not 
my drildreifs and not my 
husband's. ThQr've got tiiefar 
ttitop and he's got Ms tUngs, 
miriniy the Frieods of Music, so 
tiito to ii^ tiling." 

When Ae msn't pafailing, 
running her household, 
vidanteering at Qw Arte Center 
or running the Galilee 
Eptacopal bazaar (she's bazaar 
chairpmon thto year), she was 
busy editing the church 
cookbook, which is now 
coniptetedi 

Vkitors to the Arts Center 
who see Ms. Baldersoii's worica 
nuty notice tiiey are siipwd 
"Shelby" rather than 
"Baklerson." She said tiiat 
many arttoto dioese a spectol 
signitore, not necessarily tiieir 
name, to sign their works. 

"When I started in art dass. 
everybody kidded me because I 
qient half the time learning how 
to sign my name." she toi«hed. 

The arUst to now looUng 
forward to next school year, 
when her yout^est child will 
enter first grade "Assoooas he 
starta sduxdfuO time. I hope to 
devote more time to my 
patoting," she sakl. 



Duff'Cashmun 

Barbara Lou Cadiman and 
Hoyt Lytte Duff n were wed 
Friday at London Bridge 
ftiptist Ourd). 

The Mde to ttie dmighter of 
Mr. and Mrs. (%tftes Willtom 
Catfiman Jr. of Vtaiinto Beach. 
Tim bridegroom to tiie son of 
Capt. and Mrs. Hoyt L. Duff of 
Viiigtoto Beadi. 

C^ti^ Watsra was maid of 
honor, and Mn. Lewto Philips 
was matron ot honor. 
Bridesmaids were Barbara 
Castonan, Qirolyn Podructoiy, 
Lisa Cofer and Evelyn 
Hancock. 

Hoyt JMtt was hto son's beat 
man. Ushers were Lewis 
Philips, Charles Cadunan HI, 
Robert Cofer, Kevin Duff and 
Brian Humphries. 

The cou|^ will reside to 
Virginto Beadi. 




MRS. DUFF 

Standing 
Engagement 




TO HAVE AND TO HOLD 

Your wfddinf is a day to rnmembn-, and Portraits by Torres to 
in the mamoty lHi«neai. For those ^lecial moments yoij want 
to lart fwew, the dio^^ memories of your wedding will 
ne^r fMie «4mi yon have fMofenional photo^afrfis of thosif 
qiedd iM^nits by Totres. To have the bert . . . aseiA not be 
npenrive. 



mi Vi#ila ^Mr^^.irt Thalia - f bone 486-5416 



Mr. and Mrs. James Joim 
Standiiv of Virginto Beach 
umodace ttie engagement of 
their daughter Marie Ttfesa 
Standi^ to Scott Arthur Beck, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Lance 
Moitiour Bedi of La Oroaae, 
Wto. 

The Inride-to-be is a graduate 
of Norfolk CatiMUc High School 
and OM Domtaton Uitfveraily. 
She to a teacher wtth the 
Vir^to Beadi paUto sdiooto. 

Her fiance toa graduate of tiie 
U.S. Naval Academy and to a 
pO^ Mtii inxm International. 

A June » weddiv to irianned. 



NAMED CXA8S REP 

Barbara Radford <rf Virgtoto 
Beach has been chosen by 
members of her graduating 
class at Longwood Collie as an 
alumnae class secretary. She 
will serve on the exectttive 
board \ of the Alumnae 
Asaociajton* for the next four 
years and report acUvites of her 
class members to the 
association. 

Sie is a 1970 graduate of 
Bayskte High School and haa 
been listed in Who's Who in 
American Colleges and 
Universities for 1S74. 




2nd-^ade smooch 



The scarecrow (Kevin Bryant) 
didn't object too much when 
little Polly (Kimberly 
lUchards) let him have a big 
ktos in a scene from "Pdly and 
the Scarelrow." The play was 
one of three {Nresented last 



week by second graders in 
Elizabeth Martin's class at 
Trantwood Elementary School 
for their parents and members 
of kindergartm throng tj|drd 
grade classes at the school. 
(Sun photo by Linda Miller) 



# 



J 





I 



4 



i#l- 



FOR THE FUTURE 

DERMAT(M.OGIST Dr. R.J. 
Wytos will be guest speaker at 
today's meeting of the 
Tidewater chapter nt the 
Nattonal Psoriasto Foundation 
at 8 p.m. at ttie General 
Hospital of Virgtoto Beach, 1060 
First Cotontol Road. 

A REUNION to ptonned by 
i tiie 1904 class of Oscu-F.Smitti 
High SdMol. Class members 
are adced to caU 54S4M8 or 430- 
•812 for toformatiM on the 10- 
yetf reunion. 

MISS AMERICA. Rebecca 
Ann Kii«, wiU greet tiie puldic 
today ftom 3-4:30 p.m. on the 
sales floor of GEX, 5125 
Virgtoto Beach Bhrd. 

FILMS for cUMren Satarday 
at 11 a.m. at Virgbda Beach 
brandi Ubrartoa are "The Little 
Engine That Could," "Red 
Shoes" and "The Smile" 
(Virginto Beach branch) and 
"Firebouse Dog" and 
"Geroninra Jones" (Windsor 
Woods to-anch). 



A JUNE FE8T to benefit the 
General Hospital of Virginto 
Beach, sponsored by the 
MtxiUary to ttte hospital, will be 
Satarday (10 a.m.-5 p.m. ) on the 
hospital ground^, 1080 First 
Cotorial Road. Rain date to 
Sunday, with same hours. 
Included will be portrait 
sketches, games, rides, 
entertainment, {vites and 

PICA£ao. Renoir, Kline and 



Warhol are a few of the artiste 
represented in the C3))cyBler 
Collecttons, opra to tiie pufaDc 
for tiie first time at tiie Chiysler 
Museum at Norfolk, Otoey Road 
and Mowbray Arch. The US- 
work odlectton will hang to the 
Changing Gallery Sunday 
tiirou^ July 14. Additional 
iirformatiCHi in the exhitot may 
be obtained from curator 
Dennto Anderson at 622-1211, 
ext. 44. 



THE DIAMOND Anidversary 
Convention kA Zeta Tau Alpha 
wUl be Monday tiirough June 15 
at the Cavalier Oceanfront 
Hotel. Delegates from 
tiiroughout the United State and 
Canada will attend. Five 
collegiate and alumnae 
chapters in Virginia will send 
delq^tes. * 

NAVY WIVES are tovited to 
the montly businee meeting of 
Navy Wives Club of America 
No. 241 Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. to 
Buildii« 3342 of ttie Naval 
Am|rtiibious Base, Littto Creek. 
Additional infonnation may be 
(Stained by callii^ 3404r782. 

SUMMER CAMPS for boys 
and girto ages 6-13 will be 
spomored by Uie Nerfdtc VMCA 
on the Virginia Wesley an 
CoUe^ campus to four two- 
week sessions from June 24- 
Aug. 16. Bus service from 15 
pickup points in Virginia Beadi 
will be provided. Fee for each 
session is $38. More infonnation 
may be obtained from the 
VMCA at 6224328. 



HOURS: 10 a.n. TO B:00 pun. 
CLOSED SUN. ft MON. 

7I6HR.STCOI.UNIAI. 
mi.t.l'OP WK.S'I 

(Helimd MclliHiaMson I a»kin Kd.l 




CURIOS 



FOB THE RECORD 

A BOAT RACE with 
homemade boats was a 
highlight of ttie recent meeting 
of Cub Scout Pack 486. 
Wdc«Mned into the peck w«-e 
David Williams, David Mot^n, 
Rickey Bruce and F'red 
Goodrich. Webelos awards weitf 
to Henry Newborn (athtote), 
Bobby Jay Webb (sdiotor), 
Barry West (athlete, 
craftaman, citizenship) and i«il 
BnxAs (outdoorsman). 



THE CHAUTAUQUA 

scholarship of the King's 
Daughter has been preseirted 
to Kattiryn L. "Kit" Gr^ory, a 
graduate of First Colontol High 
School and now a student at 
Marytond Institute d Art. The 
scholarship is presented to 
young people 18-21 who show an 
excq;>tionaI ability to art. 



THE WINNER of an essay 
contest on "Why I'm Gtod I'm 
an Ammcan," sponswed at 
Arrowhead Elementary Sdiool 
by Hampton Roads Chapter No. 
6 of tte National Sojourners, is 
fifth-grade student Tara Kott. 
Tara's school received an 
oigraved plague and an 
American ftog which has flown 
oyer the Capit<d building. 



THE ANNUAL banquet and 
in^Batimi of officm of the 
Distributive Education Chib 
(DECA) of tiie Virgina Beach 
campus of Tidewater 



(Community (College was Sunday 
at Ibffd's ResUttrant. Eric 
Steerioft^i'^aipian of ttie 
college's burihesi divtoion, v»s 
guest speaker. Offtoers are: 
presktent, Larry Baker; vice-^ 
president,? Dave Shuler; 
secretary, Martha Ptodgerr 
treasurer, YLi. Merit; . ' 
James Hutchinsoi 
parliamentarian, Warn 
Riter; Ustorton, Rahdy Kc 



A DONATION of $50 to 
American Red Cross to 
tornado victims was mad 
recently by the Littto 
branch of ttie Navy Wives Oi 
of Amo^ca. didb memben 
took part in Memwtol 
services ^t Wpodla 
Cemetery. 



NEW OFFICERS w< 

presented by the nominatii 
committee at the May mi 
of tiie Borough of N 
Chapter, Daughters of 
American Revolution. Ne 
offico? nominated are: regei 
Mrs. Alexander Morrison; vie*' 
regent, Mrs. 0. Shumate| 
chaplain, Mrs. J.M. Kuteii 
rec<miing secretary, Mrs. Cil 
Jordan Jr.; treastoer, Mf 
L.C. Davis; registrar, Mr 
M.N. Broughton; historiili 
Mrs. J.L. Tignei 

parliamentarian, Mrs. L.I 
MardiaU Jr.; librarian, Mr 
M.O. McMillan; correspiHMfin 
secretary, Mrs. W.C. Waike 

Items may be mbmltted to^ 
DitU by mml. Pleaie mofl your no 
ice to Sun Ud. Vin^HltfieKkSu 
138 Rotemont Road, ViiltfM Amc 
Vtt. 23451 Deadly is noon f> 
day prior to the week of pubit 
atioH. „ , 




ltl\GS>- 1 lilacs 



Ct I UsC\ 1*1 



BF \l IN 



»)ampoo I Sei ....From $3.45 

Compleie Pmrmm^nt Wovm $6.95 to $19.95 

RouK FonciTone Touch-up From $500 

Roini FfO«»m9 (Shompoo t S«i iKiro) $1250 

Haircut $2.75 (tons "«••• *3.50) 

No ApiHHHtmeat iVecessary - Jml Conrn In 



HILLTOP 
DAILY - 8 'TIL 6:30 



WItos PUft St»op|*tS C«i»f 
Latldn Rd. fMxt to S*to««y 
PhoiMt *t%*901 
Va. 



DAILY - 9 'TIL 6 
THURS. ■ 9 'TIL 9 



Sns Va. SMClt •»«. 
frmn SEX 

II 4»7-e7se 
Va. 



1714 E. 

umaCxmttt Kd. 
Nttf to ZayrM 



IE YOU WILLING? 
To share your iAse, yom ttow axA your faiiUy 
with a chtid whol^& t«ip<Mary eve outride hit 

tf so, aU 437-44S1 - Vnginia Bradi D^ of 
Sodal Servien - 8 a.Bi. ■ 4 p.m. Mon - Fri. 



FOSTER PARENT PROGRAM 



^tMIElF FUNFRAI wriMF 



Summer 1974 V||CaltOfft & 

Car Care Guide 





INSiDE 



AIR TRAVEL may be cheaper tban 
you tUok, especially with the ri^ 
contffi^ioQS .PagefiU. 



JLppK IN your own backyard for 
^(kma gp(M close to home . Page B<S. 



/• 



THEV WAR Between the States is 
beii% (relived this summer in nearby 
Petersburg where visitors may watd^ 
recndts train Page B-6. 




RED TAG SPECIAL 
^ OFF & MORE! 

We have more than 200 Sport Coats speciaUy prked. 
All l$t quality Double Knitn in current stylet & cotorti 
Sizes 36 to 50, Regulars & Longs. AUo a few shorts 
Md extra longs in most sizes -, Values to $80.00 

SaB RED TAG PRICES ^9" to «9« 

FATHER'S DAY 
SPECIAL I! 

Walking Shorts — sues 30 to 50 Doubleknit and wov- 
pi fabrics in patterns and solid colors for summer 

Wort. le-and*?" 



V 




'#*\ 



120p|.JLM«l«CrMkRoacl 
O^pOsftt Mflitary Hwy. , 



Phont 
587-0609 




RECREATIONAL vehicles are still a good 
buy, even with the specter of Uie fuel shortage 
lingering in some areas of the country, The 
careful shopper may find exceptional 



bargains in campers aMl other types of 
vehicles by choosing wisely from a rentable 
dealer. (Sun photo by Rod Man) 



tlM Sun-Wadmidiy, Jum 5, 1974-P^e B-3 

Quo0^ns 
tm service 

Q. My car (kaler iosiitt I sign a blank itatemeirt at ^ 
botttun (rf the repair bill whoi my car is broi^ht in to hit 
sovice department for rqiair. This form authorites him 
to do as he pleases with the car and to enter a security 
ii««r«Bt on Uie car titte If I don't pay the biU proi^plb'. 
Isn't Utia an unfair baslMss practice? 

A. It is not an unfair business practice since you aren't 
oblipted to sign tMs fwm or can sign it with the 
undentandng that you want to be contac ted b^ore repair 
work costing more ^n ISO, or any amount you feel 
reasonable, is undertakea Vou may adc that no wot be 
undertaken until you are informed and anrovt it but you 
wouM probably have to pay for an eatlmate if you refused 
to let the garage do Uie work. Ten dollars is standard for 
an estimate, but it is applied to the repair bill if Um person 
making Uie esUmate does the woric. 

Q. What's to do about noOiing? I suppose Uiat's Uie 
question. I have lost noUiing personally but I am aware of 
a racket pulled on many unsuspecUng motorists and want 
it stopped. ,.._. 

When I took my car to tiie autimiotive sectira of a large 
department stwe, to have snow tires put on, they said Uie 
wheels needed realignment. I told them to go ahead. The 
car wasn't rea^ at the Ume I was tdd to ptok it up. Tlwy 
said they didn'tknow what I wanted done. It appeared the 
car needed new ball joints, sway bar, Ue rod ends, 
adjustmeift sleeves and bushing struts— over tioo in 
rqiairs. I took the car right then. 

Later I had my car dealer check these items and found 
the ball Jointe to be serviceable. He said the other parts 
were not normal replacement items and nothing should go 
wrong wiUi them under normal usage. 

I reported all this to Uie store manager but tw sakl 
noUiing could be done about the mechanic since the parts 
weren't instelled and I wasn't out anything. I Uiink the 
man shouki be fired. 

A. Certainly you need assurance this mechanic's 
unethical activities will be stopped but you can't force Uie 
store to fire him. It is doubtful they will believe he is guilty 
of misleading many customers. It is convenient for them 
to Uiink Uiis way because ft-oirt-end rwair people are hard 
to find. 



Use caution when buying 
aiiy recreational vehicle 



Owners of prospective 
owners of recreational 
vehicles (trailers, campers 
and motor homes) will have 
to face hard economic facts 
this summer. 

The price (rf gasoline has 
dtxutd^ and, in some arei», 

spot sh(Mrtages will contimie. 
All Uiis malces plans for 
campii^ trips much 

t>**^.,. ■■.-':, ■':-:''"r.v;"v 

\tf yqu'ire in the marki^ f<)r 
a recreational vehicle, in 
spite of the gasoline 
situation, you might find 
some bargain prices. 
Buyers have been staying 
away and dealers in some 
areas have had to cut prices 
to move overloaded in- 
ventories. 

But be careful. Don't buy 
an RV (recreational 
vdiicle), ei^ecially a motor 
home, that's an ori^n or 
close to becoming an or- 
phan. In the trade, an or- 
phan is an RV whose 
manfacturer has gone out of 
business, leaving no reliable 
suiqily oi vital replacement 
parts. 

WHENEVER you see a 
terrific distress sale 
discount, ciieck to see if the 
manfacturier is still in 
iNisiness and wiU stay in 
business for the fcneseeable 
ftttate. A year ago there 
were 200 motor home 
manufacturers and now 
there are only a dozen or so. 
Ihey're dwindling fast. 

/ ^ 

ARE YOU GEHING 

LESS THAN 55 

MILES PER 

GALLON? 

Honda of Va. Baaoh 
2970 Va. Beach Blvd. 

Wuft eydafoa/ound outfrontl! 

, 340-6161 J 




AT HAMPTON 
FAMILY CAMPGROUIID 



Also, make sure the in- 
terior appliance 
manufacturers are still in 
business. Many of ttiem 
were hit hard by the energy 
crunch. A canvas ot several 
RV dealers will reveal that: 
such well-known 
manufacturers of RV 
equipment as Frigiking, 
EH)n)(|8tic (refrigerates), 
(^i^enian (furnaces and 
fM^) and^hitfordtoiM 
are still, providing good 
national service. 

If you want to buy an RV 
that las good future tradenui 
value, get one that's made 
by a financially strong, 
national manufacturer and 
think smaU. Deators say 
that the RVs of the im- 
mediate future are going to 
be small and light— to give 
better psoline mileage. 

"A lot of people are going 
back to tents and very light 
trailers," says one East 
coast RV dealer. Other 
dealers say you're going to 
see a new breed of super- 
li^t trailers Uiat can run off 
12-voU car batteries or use 
no-volt plug-in campsite 
electric circuits. 

DEALERS say RV rentals 
will be in demaiui this 
summer because families 
want to do s<nne camping 
but don't want to commit 
themselves to the purchase 
of a gas-gulping RV. In one 
area, a small camping 
trailer can be attache) to a 
locally rented car. Pictaq) 
truck campers rent for 
around $100 pa- wedc and 10 
cents a mile and have 
around a 175-mile range on 
one tank ci gas. 

Have you heard of the 
"telephone" campii^ deal? 
R's new this weeing. You 
^ck a sjpoi you'd like to 
vpt-^iKh as Williamsburg 
or some national or st^ 
park. You call hrformatian 
in the city nearest the sp^ 
wti«e you «wit to do scmts 
camping and ask for tl«e 
"yedow pages informatkai 
<^ratw." ^^'' i * 

Then, call the dealers aiil 
ask for firi^s, availabili^ 
and mileage range ^ 
various ounpers. You nu^ 
resole a camper for a 
specttlc date and, wImo 
vacatitm time arrives, you 
tirin a bus w train to dfe 
«ittp«r d^dor^ city, pick 



up your camper and start off 
on your short range touring. 
This saves plenty of gasolhie 
nu>ney. 

If you already own a gas- 
gulping motor home or 
trailer, think local. Check 
wiihldl^l aud state park 



services to see what's 
available Within eaSy 
driving range. Sdme motor 
home owners;|ire even 
spending mini-vacations 
parked at nearbyfarms and 
ranches enjoying the rustic 
life for a n^odest rental fee. 



Rirsonalized Service and Complete Travel Arrangements 
Fast • Efficient ■ Professional 

WITH NO SERVICE CHARGES ADDED 

HOLIDAY INN-SCOPE 
P.O. Box 328 (804) 627-2907 

Norfolk. VIrginii 23501 



MARGARET E. QULOTTA 
Owner 



JOANNE T. BARNES 
Manager-TravelXonsultant 




June Special 
Air conditioner service. 

$Q95 

_^ ^V pkit itTrtflcranl tnd 
I^^^^V pMtoMnMdad. 
\ ^^f^F (Mauiiriy ll.N) 




• Check and adjust power belt. 

• Check refrigerant level. 

• Test system for teaks. 

• Set idle speed. 

Offer ends Jim 29l 



Tire BoMis Coupon RemMeri 

4im tt le «i M tfiy to uee your Ttoe •mm eei«en esod for: 



QIata-lelM 

Atlas' 

PacaseMern' 

(liaMaMlariM*) 



•9P»0FF 



fltailleltad 

RadMTt 

^••eiitiarft*) 



• SfiHMe Qsnelte IdMt Um^ Night Eidi Month 

• Qn^k^ nAtag ft O^bfaq Eq^lpttent 

• flMBomid PteChMieB 

• MwWsloiieadita 
eReoc^miiyr 



. tf^ottSiotili 
a OMfltiy stOTc 

• BeeattN 8c«m7 

• WMtaoMB Pe^^e 
Si^t Of Wi^rftoBtOT«to<AtigCunttw* Sound 



DIDBIfNpW4CE AUIt) Sl^Y 



DtRECTIONS: 

INQUIRE AT STONETS FILING CAW ON 
1HE INTER-COASTAL WATERWAY, 
IflGHWAY 1 58 AT HIE COINJOCK MUDGE 



WBm eowmc* J.& tim fj^l 

, '" m: iP |>HCmB4f 3-2732 FtHtRESRVAnONS "^"^SEw 



PHCmB 4f 3-2732 FOR RESRVAHONS 
BOB WILT 4 HARVEY JMOHMM-MANACERS 



AMI 



%a&tM Attention 
«W*niHtary 
¥Dhole*e»^ftotrtl 
Newr Naval Base. 



^ffiW 



Thorouiheootf Shop^nf C«nttr 

COMPUETE LINE OF AMER- 
ICAN & FOREIGN CAR 

PARTS a m:c£Ssori^ 

WL MAKE AU. AIR CONDITION. 
INQ ft POWCR STECRINO HOM9 
(^•n MoAMytlmi SMurday 

a AM-ami 

FAST l^LIVERV 
■wtkAmarlcanH-MMtcr Otartt 

460-1174 

t504 INDEPENDENCE W,VPj 



• kiMil SO.0Q(Mnii gumnieed bi^ 
IMngt end dbc paoa. 

.«ftaiifteoadtac«lei»«ndbtat«dn»ne. 

• Dmn, Mil and Check hydrauleayeleni. 

• ijuv<epw«Qni nnep PHHinpc. 



U yeu K«v* ng»#ppwl t Cw^on from prwiww Mn^t** ttfvwtMng. 
you cw pMt WW # « Cw Cm CwMt tocMoM UMad Mow. 





m 




pono wgnmeni epow^ 



Hij^ (iF^taA Center 

ItadtptRilMCf BN. at NaygeMl 

N. 4ie-m5 



1015 

^ (R*«utarly 11.99) 

-1^ le^ w dofwiiofvna aiwioiwoii Mfs. « 

• Helpa correct a common ewne e( 
front-end parte «vMr and read wander. 

• He^ prevent rapid ttraw*V(kM to 
miaallgnment. 



Plaza Car Care Center 

Va. Btach BN. at RtwRMflt 
Rd. 4aMl$l 



\xim Car Care Center 

Laskia Rtf. at Birtfatck Rd. 
4I8-32M 



IndiaR Rwer CarCire 

MUita^ Hi^ at Jnihii Rmr Ri 424-2400 



"5^!" 



ie M-The Smi-WMnciday. June 5, 1974 



Use your connections 
to find air fare deals 



If you're planning a trip abrrad this summer,, you'll 
find the fuel crunch has propelled most air fares into the 
stratosphere. 

By poking carefully through the clouds, however, you 
can still find a few deals. Some samples: 

Camdiin Connectloa Our government has wiped out 
special fares fa- young people. But in Canada theylre still 
.pn. Anyone under 24 can fly from Montreal to Londcm, 
round trip, f«- $313. This is |100 less than the round-trip 
from New YchIc to London. Equally important, the 
Canadians have no time restrictions. The $413 round-trip 
price from New Yoric to London (cheapest regular fare) 
requires a minimum stay of 22 days abroad and a 
maximum limit of 45 days. Many young travelers want to 
stay in Europe for two months or more to explwe (n- study. 

Traveling from central or western states, youth fare 
prospects should try to get up to a Canadian city by car or 
bus in order to get the special fare extended to the cross- 
country leg of the European trip. Air Canada's round-trip 
youth fare from Vancouver to London, for example, is 
$4S6. If a young person tried to make the same trip from, 
say, San Francisco or Seattle to London, it would cost 
around |710 and there would be a 4S-day limit. 

Inclusive Tour Coiinection. If you have belonged to a 
club, association (»■ other organization for at least six 
months, you can qualify fw a group charter flight — by 
far the cheapest way to fly abroad. But many Americans 
do not belong to legally acceptable charter organizations 
and are denied this price break of hundreds of dcdiars off 
the regular fares. There is a way around the charter 
impasse, however, and Oie Canadians have it 

Canadian airlines — scheduled and charter — are 
allowed to offer ITCs (Inclusive Tour Charters) which 
don't require membership to anything. If you live fairly 



. near the Canadian bordo- so the bus or car trip wouldn't 
be too expensive, you can save hundreds of ddlars on 
Canadian package tours to Caribbean islands and Mexico 
(not to Eurc^). Your travel agent might know about 
Canadian ITCs. If not, call long distance infcntttion 
(free) in \he nearest Canadian city and ask fer names and 
numbers of local travel agents. 

Greek Connection. Oly^mpic Airways (Greek line) has 
wangled a deal whereby it is permitted to offer a fare well 
below other airline fares. Passengers flying Olympic from 
New York to Athens can make the round trip for $485, 
compared with $573 for the regular 22 to 4S-day excursion 
fare and $741 for the 14 to 21-day excursitm. Whenflfurii^ 
your fli^t costs from other cities in the U.S., $ei the 
cheapest round-trip fare to New York and deduct IS 
percent from it (because it connects with the ovnweas 
flight) and add the result to the $495 New YcMt-Athehs 
farew 

In Greece, the government-sponsored "Xenla" hotels ' 
are a bargain, starting at $10 a day. Adventuresome types 
can look for ro<»ns and pension lodgings on the Gredt 
islands. Prices start at $3 a day with breakfast Ask Greek 
"tourist police" or local tourist offices for innkeeper 
names. 

Packaged Connections. Dcm't overlook airline package 
deals to Europe. The air fares are the same but airlines 
can get huge discounts on hotels, meals and the like. 
British Airways, for exaniple, has a "Super Show" 
package for $433 from New York to London which includes 
a good hotel for 14 days, air fare, tickets to five top theater 
shows, car for a day, meal discounts ( two peo|de for price 
of me) and other goodies. Figure plane, train or bus fare 
as an add-on to the package if you're traveling fnxn 
another city to New York. 



Where shouM newer tires go? 
On Ihe rear wheels, experts say 



Vnien a parson bi^ a new 
dishwasher, he puts it where he 
needs it rami — in the kitchen. 

Safety experts say the same 
rule applies when buying i»w 
tires. Unle» ttie (^r has front- 
wheel drive, tires should go where 
they're needed most— m the rear 
wheds. 

When selecting a pair of 
replacement tires in the same size 
and construction as already <m the 
car, tlKy diould be pirt (m the rear 
wheels for better traction and 
handling. 



Many experts feei motorists 
viw develop tire proUems on the 
fixmt axte, because <tf skkkliivi or 
disablement, still have a certain 
d^ree of control over the vehicle 
with ttie i^eoing wheel. However, 
whcm the problem occurs on the 
rear wheels, most drivers have no 
way to compeiuate Ux skids or 
swei:ves before the vehicle can be 
stqp^. 

Tire safety experts fed there is 
stoong evidraice that a significant 
numto* of car owners place least 
worn tires on the front wheds, 
whereas available accident 



experience indicates the least 
worn tkes should be.placed (hi the 
rear. 

Bald tins on the rear an)ear to 
be more of a safety hazard t^an on 
the front, a finding at vaHance 
with automotive folklore. And 
bald tires on wet pavement make 
k particularly hazardous 
combinaiion.. 

Vehicles in accidents have a 
lai|;er number (A severely worn 
tires on Uie rear than on the front, 
suggesting it is safer to put iKwer 
or less worn tires in the rear. 



B & L AUTO PARTS 



your 'First 
vacation 

STOP 



AND REPAIRS 

146 S. ROSEMONT RD. 

Next to Sun BIdg. at Toll Rd. Exit 

340-0707, 486-1418 

AUTO PARTS - WHOLESALE TO EVERYONE 
TUNE-UPS - OIL CHANGES - LUBES 
REPAIRS - MINOR TO MAJOR 
HI PERFORMANCE PARTS AND INSTALLATION! 



ONE STOP FOR PARTS AND SERVICE, 
AND AT WHOLESALE PRICES 

Before you start your vacation or week-end trip let us check 
your Ignition System - Brakes - Lights - Shocks - Tires. 
Should they need attention these prices will leave you 

money for your trip. 

TIRES 



TUNE-UP 

•25" 

includes Points - 
Plugs - Rotor & I 

Labor 



SHOCKS 

Pair Installed 

Jfttime Guarantee! 



BOAT 
ITRAILIR tires; 

From •3'* 
PLUS FET 



4 PLY POLY 

FiDiff »22*' 

T. »3P 

PLUS FET 


■ 


4 PLY POLY & 
2 PLY GLASS 

F«.m^31" 

T. '38" 

PLUS FET 


^ 


STEEL BELTED 
RADIAL 

From ^9»-* 

To »58« 

PLUS FET 


4 PLY NYLON 

10 Series 

From »25*' 
T. 'S?" 

PLUS FET 


4 PLY POLY 

70 Series 

From 'Ze" 

To »35" 

PLUS FET 



OIL CHANGE] 

and 
Lube & Filter 

fgM 



BRAKES 

Replace Bnkes 
QnAUFourVflMeb 
Indiidei 9!0t» A 
Labor 

•29»» 

DtuiBtalM 



GABRIEL 

AIR shocks: 

Installed 



KENDALL 

OIL 

QT. 



radiator 
STOP-LEAK 

29< 



'GAS SAVER< 

TANK 
SPRINGS 

49* 



SIMONIZi 

WAX 
$|7« 



A checklist for vacationers 



No one would think of mailing a valuable package 
without making sure it was wrapped carefully and 
completely protected. Yet if statistics are correct, 
most peapXe aren't as careful when sending tiieir 
most precious possession on a long jourmy. 

If that invaluable cargo is a family and the 
carelessly prepared container is a car, then odds 
are almost even that thore is at least one serious 
defect in that vehicle. The odds are based on 
reports from official vehicle inspection agoicies 
showing ap{»'oximately one out of every two cars 
cannot pass simple safety checks. 

To help make certain you and your loved ones 
have a safe and breakdown-free trip, here's a list of 
items to check with your favorite sendee outlet 
before you depart. 

BRAKES. HRES AND WHEELS: Have brake 
lining inspected, check fluid levels and seals and 
adjust brakes. Check tires for excessive wear or 
visible signs of damage. If needed, rotate the tires. 
Also, check wheel alignment and balance and make 
sure your shock absorbers are not worn out or, 
damaged. 

VISION: Check windshield Wipers, headlights. 



Covernment Tests just prove d 
That our Luxury Car 
Is an Economy Car 





S4AB— ff's what a tar nhould bt! , 

SALES ft SERVICE 

499-7614 

Va. Lie. 709 



MOTORS'' 



'c. 



63S2 Vtrginl* Beach Blvd. 
1 Mil* E. of Military Circle 



turn signals, bedc-up and brake lights to make sure 
they are in good condition. Make sure waiher 
reserviors are filled and that all glass and mirrors 
are clean. 

COOLING SYSTEM: 0ean out and flush the 
cooling system and refill with new coolant, and rust 
inhibitor if needed. Check the thermostat, fart belt 
and water pump. Inspect all belts and hoses and 
condition of the radiator cap. < 

LUBRICAHON: If needed, chaise the oil and oil 
filter. As part of an overall chassis lubrication, 
check transmission aqd differential flidds, front 
wheel bearings, locks and hinges. 

TUNE-UP: If it has been mote than 10,000 miles 
since your last tuhe-iq>, have one performed.' As 
part of the tune-up chedc cmnpression, coil output, 
charging rate of generator or alternator, uistall 
new spark plugs, inspect (dug wires and boots, 
service and repace distributor components, ser- 
vice carburetw, check emission system aiMl 
re|dace air cleaner. Also check battery and cables, 
cranking, starting and. operating voltages and 
electric^ wirii^. \ 



Travel guMe here 



:^ 



The 1974 motmists and travel 
guide, published by the Ocean 
Hiway AsBOdation, is printed 
and ready fa- distribution to 
vacationers. 

The guide is {Minted amnially 
by ttie assodatian to offer 
information on gasoline 
purchases, restaurants, 
acconunodations and points of 
interest along U.S. 13 and 17 and 
other Atlantic coastal highways 
from New York to Fk>rUa. 

The association offoring the 
guide is a non-profit 
promotional agency which 



promotes travel along the main 
New York to Florida routes. 

The guide is f^. It is 
available from the Ocean 
Hhvay Association, Dept. 74, 
1047 Laskin Road; Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23451. Additional 
information may be obtained by 
calling ttie associati<jli at 428- 
068B. 



. CLAY 

NMHiaiT CO, ML 

Servka Stotion, Gorog* 
EquipniMf and Tooli 

MUHMisanrKt 

Ull AUhw a^d > »rtMH«nll. Va. 

U0» . 4SS-H00 



JttliU 



SSS:««SS®SSi»S¥:¥AWSft!ft:i»ft%%!: 



^ 



PONY ISLAND MOTEL 

ON BEAUTI FUL OCR ACOKE ISLAND 

25 MOTEL ROOMS 

5 EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS 



• HMtad • Air eendlllMMd 

• TeiMMon • Ctr»«ta4 



OraM A iMtaurant futuiw frMlt-eaM^t 
'^1 iMfeo«, itMk* aiMI tiM Maii4'( bMl heiM 
$: wokint. 



Maphone 9J 9-928-441 1 in OaicoSm 



fsmm 



lAiTIMf AUTO MnflNTS THf 








fht cor thoff got 

37.3 milts ptr gallon 

on a coast-to*coattt: 

oconomy run.* 



H has no igrNtion tyttcm. No corbiiroter. It 
ord tiwM-i^. And fer iheto of you wlw tmrm afc* 
tomorrow, H htm on onfino that rtqu i r w m 
■mtuiem control dovkn. 

COM! m ma mnc and sr tm s»an that 

COSTS AMUT S2.50e USS TNAN TW OTNIt OHUU 





FOLUW 
THE SUN 
TO FUN! 



Find your place In the sun 
on a dream Island. Stay In 
a hjxurlous hotel ... or a 
private beach house. The 
cost? Less than you imag- 
ine. 

FREE BROCHURES 




RAVEL HOUSE 



Of Virginia, Inc. 
3600 Va. Bofch BhRl. 732 Hilltop Noi 

340-3403 425-3030 



rth 



I 



Ml L imu OHS it. 



iMS-IlM 




terriiid? 
auto " ^ 



HNMAT AM »«l#0t StMaT 






( •—Cf'Omet 



RAMADA 
CAMPINN 

OoMD Front, Kitty Hilwk, N.a 
VRagsofPuck 

FAMILY VACATION 

ona waak only $105.00 for four parsons (ex- 
tra parsoni up to six, $15 aach) in our naw 
Hantal Campais. Indudas 3 bumar ranp, sink, 
lea box, eommoda, dinatta, and thraa doubia 
btmk bads-pots, pwis, cooking uianslls, tilvar- 
wara, platas, cups, cfiarcoai brollar and ptenk: 
table and disposabla stiaats and pNlow cases. 

RAMADA CAMP INN 

has swimming pool, indoor "rac." room, play- 
ground, tilad comfort statlons,.groc^, laund- 
ry, and rantal fishing and baach gaar. For ras- 
anwtions call toll fiaa 800-228-^28 or 
919-281-2200 or write Ramada Camp Inn, 
P.O. Box D 136, Kitty Hawk, N.C. 27949. 



fi> 



The Sun-Wedimdty, June 5, 1974-Page B-3 



igWWHIliVTIICErMaRE MU5 
OUTOFACALUIIC. 



!••••• 




ytiw <Joes ttie wpKMioa 'Mind Yout P** tnd Q"f" mcu? Accordiag to idbe' Aeorict 
it wu an Engliihiieneader's admonition lo mind the Pints and Qiiaru be was dis- 
pensing. Today, the watchword is more appropriately, "Miad your GV or salloos:, ' 

This quic is intended to help motorists prove how much they knoiw about operating 
and maintjuning a car to get the best posaibic gasoline mikace. 

Knowiiig the rijht answers will do more tiian gntify your ego. It can also save you 
money jib this tipie of rising prices and dwindling gasoline sundy : 



1. A freshly tuned engine caajavc yov this 
much pit compami td doe ia need of 
tune-up. ' 

A. Tbtre's no mtasmraUe differtmct, 

B. About a gdlom ptr UuAful. 

C. Stsflf fwo §»llem per Uuikful, 

2. Replacing ««rn spark plugs alone can 
save this much gasoline. 

A. About 4 halfgtdlon per tanAful. 

B. BtlItT thaw a galleu per ttmkful. 

C. Almost three gaUons p*r iMkful. 

3. Switching to a higher ocune gasoline 
than your car requires has the fpUow- 
ing effect on fuel economy. 

A, Sone. 

B, U MtiuUy increases fssel tomump- 
tioH, 

C, It cuistve about 2i per cent fn^, 

4. By running on underinflated tires you 

A. Bum less gasoline. 

B. Bum more gasoline. 

C. Do nothing more than provide a 
more comjottahl* rid*. , 

5. ^en defective, the following adverse- 
ly afftcU gasoline mileage. 

A. Wheel alignment, 

B. Windshield wipers. 

C. Alternator. 



'61. Brdte profalenM effect gu fflileege f B- 
cept 

A. When brakes me improperly ad- 
imsted. 

B. When yom hahitsi^lj ride the brahe 
pedal. 

C. When brake lights arenft working. 

7. A dirty air filter mewu wu^d gas be- 
cause: 

A. It produces m improper air-fuel 
mixture in the carburetor. 

B. Should dirt get into spark plugs, 
they CM^t function properly, 

C. The added weight treses "hyper- 
static flux." 1 

8. According to some sources running 
your car's air conditioning can cost you 
as much as 

A. A mile per pUton. 

B. Two miles per gallon. 

C. Three miles por gallon. 

9. Only the following has no effect on 
gasoline mileage. 

A. lack rabbit starts. 

B. Unnecessary use of turn signals, 

C. Prolonged periods of idlmg. 

10. Reducing speeds from 70 to 90 miles 
per hour OB 

A. Save over 20 per com gat mHaage. 

B. Cost you 5 pier cent more gasoline. 

C. Hat M effect. 



ton xp 01 taipnxra -g {'limiimr) Him ifUs^ WfAmD ^ pMMip«» •>»> « tuipwin '3 | :SHHi9(kSNV 



Cooling 
systom 
and fuel 



No one p6ur8 gasoline in the 
car radiator but a car's cooling 
system can be responsible for 
(fducii« ^Mtoe, mile^^e. So^ 
(jftn oth^ cax^parls Ihati 
wemingV bave no connection 
4 vfith fuel consumptioa 

I Since the condition of the 
dbolii^ jSystem affectf|. engine 
^ormance, abnormalitieB in 
doling temperatures curtaU 
gasoline mileage. A faulty 
i^rmwtat causing an engine to 
run too cod creates li condition 
Hlfhere mor^ gas in needed to 

Saintain power. An over- 
iBting engine also hampers 
l^icient combustion of fuel. 

* Inside the ei^ne, astudi heat 
i^er valve abo wasties fuel. 
When this valve is not operating 
a| it i^b), fuid is not 
vaporize^ 4fifidently, and 
: ^cess ra# fuel excapes into the 
exhaust 

• 

«An obstruction in the exhaust 
^em irill make the engine 
work harder, thus using more 
ftiel. 



SAilDpiPfR's TrTICF, LTD. 



1HE HNEST FAMILY ORIENTED CAMPING RESORT 
OF ITS TYPE ON THE ENTIRE EAST COAST. 

OVER 500 WOODED CAMPSITES 
WOODALL'S RATED WWWW 



• Fuli-Service 
h^pk-ups 

•.fi^rty equipped 
pkiygrounds ^ 

• Picnic tables 

• Firewood 
avoilable 

• Groceries, 
gifts, ice 

• Bottled gas 



• Hot showers 
& laundry 

• Fisning & 
crdabing piers 

• Launching romp 

• Patrolled 
campgrounds 

• 1 mile safe 
private beach 

• Gasoline 
for Sale 



FREE BROCHURE- 



BOX 442 VP, MANTEO; N.C. 27954 
PHONE (9f9) 473-3471 



Stay Close to home to en^Y 
different, low-cost vacations 



i 



To cuA vacatitMi ON^ ttiis 
^miminer, try oq^oring your 
own state or the state next 
(hwr. 

A number of farnis are 
taking in paying guests and 
one might wdl be within 
easy driving di^nce of 
your home. Farnis and 
worlting ranches often 
provide guests with h(Nrse- 
back ridingt swimming, 
boating, fishing and, in 
some cases, excellent home- 
cooked meals. 

The price for this type (tf 
wholesome vacation can be 
uidbelMvaUy low. Here are 
ji«st a cdiqrie (rf samfdes 
,from my own state, 
"Maryland: 

For $IU a week: Ymi get a 
small house tudced away on 
a large dairy farm in a 
mountain valley. The house 
has three bedrooms, bath, 
kitchen and living nxHn. 
You cook yoiff own meals 
but you're allowed to pick 
fresh farm vegetables at no 
extra charge. 

ChUdren can hdp with the 
dairy farming and can swim 
in a pool or fish and canoe in 
a nearby river. There are 
occasional hayrides and 
trips into the village for 



country-store shopi^ or 
an evening square dance., 

For |M a week: An adult 
gets to live on a working 
cattle ranch which also 
doubles as a vegetable 
farm. Children uixler 10 pay 
$55 and 10 throu^ 12 year- 
olds pay 165. The rknch- 
farm is located on a large 
parcel of land in hill country 
and has a pond for 
swimmii^ and Ashing am) 
plenty of animals fot the 
children to obwrve and play 
with. Meals are sorved 
family-style around a large 
tahle and regular guests 
claim the food is out of this 
world. 

You can call ypur 
agriculture extension 
service (usually under 
county govemm«it phone 
listings) or get in touch witti 
your state's department of 
agriculture for leads to 
addresses of farmo^ or 
ranchers who accept guests. 
Or, you can hvy "J^arm, 
Ranch and Countryside 
Guide," which lists some 600 
addresses of farmers and 
ranchere in the U.S. and 
Canada who take in guests. 
The guide sdls for $3.50 in 
bo<ri(stores or $3.75 postpaid 



from: Farm Gidde, 36 East 
57th St., New York, N.Y. 
10022. Pat Dickerman, the 
publisher, has carefully 
screoied most of the farms 
and ranches and gives 
considerable detail as to 
price, facilities, charm 
ratings and what the owners 
are like. 

IF YOU WANT to travel 
farther away frmn home, 
don't overlook possible, fiiel- 
saving train and bus deals. 
For example, a train ride 
from Washington, D.C., to 



Montreal on Amtrak's 
"Montrealer" is a mini- 
vacation in itself. You 
depart early evening and 
arrive before noon the next 
day. The center of action on 
the train is "Le Pub," an old 
fashioned bar-car whi(U) 
includes a sing-along piano 
l^ayer. Round-trip coach 
fare is only $64.50. 

On the west coast, you can 
ride Amtrak's "SUrlight" 
train from Los Angdes all 
ttw way up to Seattle. The 
10-hour Los Angeles- 
Oakland (San Francisco) 



portion of the trip paases the 
San Clemente White House, 
a nudist camp and 150 miles 
of magnificent, rocky 
coastline. Round-trip coach 
is $47.50. 

The "starli^t" portion of 
the coastal ride, if you want 
to continue past Oakland, 
go» on up to Seattle through 
the Cascade Mountains 
wilderness area, arriving 
the following afternoon. 
Round-trip coach is $100. 
You can prws on past 
Seattle, via a special train, 
to Expo '74 in Spokane. 




SS ROTTERDAM ^ 

Sailing from Norfolk Jon. 4, 1975 

1 1 DAYS — 6 GREAT 
CARRIBEAN PORTS 

For Information and ro9orvaflon», 

«.» 428-0911 

TRAVEL SERVICE, LTD. 




' Netheriandi Antillet Regiitiy 




^m»^ 



i i 




r 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

J 
I 

I 

i 
1 



1 
I 
I 

I 
I 
« 
I 

I 
I 

\ 



I 
I 
I 
I 
% 
I 
I 
I 

I 



THE 




LIVES. 



i 

You're in Ats country 

His subjects crowd 
arwmd your car. The - 
mighty elet^umt 
watches your 
every move. A 
grao^ giraffe 
js-esses its long 
nose ai^nst the 
window. EJarais, 
wildebeests and 
kudus pass within 
inches. Wppos 

slnkb^ggL.v 
water, fmfmav 

ciUe rhino fries to 

^areyondown. 

And then you 
see him. In the middle 
rf his pri<te. He's free. Uitaaged. And 
wildly magnfficent 

You're m safari in Uon (Country, the 
new Virginia wikilife presCTve that 
opened ttlis year. And you're paying 
tribute to fte long. 

More than 300 wild animals repre- 
senting almost 100 different spedes 
inhabit thi wilds of Virginia's lion 
Camtry, aid voir first OTOwmter 
with eaJi of them is an unfOTgettaWe 

experioice. . . , 

Biirt if s an just the begttming of your 

ITS A JUNOfOOTIHBf. Liort Country Safari isjust20milesnorthofRkhrnond and 70 miles 
write LkmCountry Safari. P.O. Box 166, Ashtad, Va. 23fm. 



adventure here. 

Youllalsoseea 
jui^e bird show, 
barring cockatoos, 
ma:aws and gray 
parrots. Yotff 
diildren will have a 
chance to hug and 
feed young jungle 
animals in the pet- 
tinglarm.Andy(Mir 
wfade family will 
enjoy the live Miter- 
taiimentandti^ 
xaalweviewof 
igslxxninioii,^ 
giant ^O-millidi 
f £uly entertainment 
cen^tii2tfq}ensi»xtyear. 
If s all tere— by his attfhority. Umg 
live ticking! 



^i^pg^DcmiBion 






fi:p 



A lot of it In nationwide fuel 
economy tests, motorists' cars were 
tested before and after a ^ne-up. 
Results showed that a tune-up with 
new Champion spark pli^s saved, 
on the av»age, a gflWlMf gasoline in 
every tankful. Considering that 3 of 
every 5 cars on the r(»d need a 
tune-up right now, tune-ups alone 



could save us millions of gallons of 
gasoline each week . 

Tune-ups benefit us in other ways, 
too. Quicker acceleration for safer 
passing. Dependable starts. Plus a 
substantial reductton in emisstons. 

See your mechanic regularly for a 
Champion tune-up. Once a year or 
every 10,000 miles. 




TaladOh ON 49MI 




i 



TuMd MifliiM mMn dMMr air. 



Wi^ve got your plug. 



-< 



%m,".m'g^s.mmmm-mmm> 



^ 



fwmmmmmmmmmmmBPmt 



U^WUMU^HW* 



fm M-Hw 9iHi-.lMnNd|KlM*Sv 1994 




?-W*K»i»*?«"*IU 



UNITS OF THE National Park Service 
practice Civil War batUe tactics at tlie 
PeterslNirg. Va.. National Battlefield, the site 
of the last major campaign of the Civil War. 



Firing demonstrations are part <tf the living 
history programs conducted daily throughout 
the summer. 



I 



Civil War reUved 
at Petersburg 



The Civil War is being relived 
this summer at the Petersburg 
National Battlefield in 
Petersburg, Va., about 90 miles 
from Virginia Beach on U.S. 460 
and about 20 miles south of 
Richmond. 

Young recruits, mostly 
vacationing college students, 
live and train as Confedotite 
and Union soldiers did over a 
century ago as part of the 
National Park Service 
historical battle units. The 
units interpret the War Between 
the States for summer 



nnnnn nnnnn 
aotUQO OnDGDD 
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0nn nnnn nnnn 
nnnnnnn nnn 

nnnnnnn nnnn 

nnnnnnn 
nnnn nnnnnnn 
nnn nnnnnnn 
nnnn nnnn nnn 
nnnnnnn nnnnn 

nnnnnn nnnnn 
nnnnn nnnnn 



visitors at historical battle sites 
and national parks in dght 
states. 

Hie recruits at Petersburg 
can be seen training at the 
national battlefield through 
June 23. 



A folder describing the 
batttefield and other points of 
intovst may be obtained by 
writing Historical Petersburg 
Information Center, 
Dqwrtment 74-D, Petersburg, 
Va. 23803. 



Solution to puzzle 
on page A4 



HOURS OPEN 
8 AM to 8 PM WEEKDAYS 

8 AM to 6 PM SATURDAYS 

9 AM to 2 PM SUNDAYS 

TIDEWATER AUTO PARTS, INC. 

"Complete Line of Auto Parti" 

5192 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia BtKh. Virglrila 23462 



497-4861 



GASOUNE 
Siphon a mouthful 

risks quick death 



Ed Allen's 

Campgrounds & Cottages 

CHICKAHOMINY ItocrMitional Park 
me FINEST 
FISHING • SCENIC BOATING 
NATURAL CXNlPSITES • CABINS 

SWIMMING & RECREATION 

I Ed Allen's Campground SSC^ Wt wSmISTcSS:.. : 

LUMU, Va. aSMt «WM Rl. •• {Paltow MM aMd WhH* 

(SM) tS»4SSS ^M} 



Vm gasoline shortage has increased 
the exposure of the general public to 
gasoline. Oeiq^te warnings many people 
are storing gasoUne in the home or in the 
car. The dangers of e}q)losions and fires 
from gasoline are well known. But there 
are ottier hazards from gasoline. 

WARNING: DRINKING GASOLINE 
IS HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH. 

Now who in his right mind would drink 
gasoline? On purpose, no one. But by 
accident, quite a few people. Here's one 
way ttiat drinking gasoline happais: 

Tom G., a h^ school U^Uity teacher, 
has a family car and a small car to g^ to 
work with. When he needed gas in the 
family car to take the kicte to grandma's 
house for her birthday, he went to his 
friendly, neighborhood gas-station and 
bought the most they would give him. 
Then he went home, and tried to sijdion 
enough fuel out of his second car to "Uxp 
off" the other tank. To get the flow 
started between the two tanks, he put 
one end of a hose into the small car, and 
put the other end into his mouth. He 
sucked on the pipe to get the flow star- 
ted, — sucked once, twice, three — and 
before he knew it, he had a mouth full of 
gasoline. 

SOME OF THE gasoline he swallowed 
by reflex, and it disappeared into his 
stomach. Within a few minutes he felt 
restless, excited, and gradually became 
confused, then unconscious as he lapsed 
into a deep coma which was to last 2 
days. By the time Tom reached the 
hospital he had vomited a good (kal, and 
s<»ne of the gasoline had tridded down 
into, his lun^. So Tom was suffering 
from coma due to the nervous system 
effects of the gasoline and also 
pnaimonia from the irritation of Uie gas 

in his lungs. 

There is no specific treatment for 
gasdine poismiing of this type. But Tom, 



in generally good health at age 30, 
recovered completely after a few weeks. 
Gasoline fumes can be poisonous when 
inhaled. Human volunteers e:q)osed to 
as little as 1000 part per million (i^m) of 
gasoline in air develop red, itchy, 
tearii^ eyes. Exposure to 2600 ppm of 
gasoline for even an hour causes diz- 
ziness. Inhaling 10,000 ppm (1 per cent) 
for even a short time is fatal. Also, 
people who work around gasoline at 
lesser concentrations but for longer 
periods of time may become chronically 
ill. Their.ii symptoms can include 
muscular- «weakness,- listlessness, 
fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal 
pain and weight loss. Confusion, tremor, 
changes in gait, even paralysis may 
develop after prolonged exposure to 
moderate amounts of gasoline vapors in 
the air. 

IT IS POSSIBLE to inhale gasoline 
direcUy into the lungs while sipAioning, 
too. In this case a pneumonia can 
develop which is slow to clear and for 
which there is at iM-esent no specific 
treatment. About Uie most sudden and 
serious effect of inhaling or drinking 
gasoline is sudden change in the heart- 
beat with ventrioilar fibrillation and 
siKiden cteath. 

Indeed gasoline is dangerous from a 
health stan^wint. Besides exploding 
and burning it is a serious ami fast- 
acting poison. It is also a serious and 
slow acting poison if taken by mouth or 
by breathing over longer periods of time. 

If you must keep gas around, be sure it 
is carefully stored in a tightly closed 
container. Do not leave open containers 
of gasoline around, especially in closed 
or poorly ventilated rooms. Keep it away 
from heat and flames. 

Do not attempt to siphon gas usii« 
your mouth as a pump. Do not drink or 
inhale gasoline. Keep it away from kids. 




NOTICE 

Virginl«: 

The regular mteting of 
the CouiKit of th« City of 
Virginia Beach will bt h«M 
In the Council Chamber* of 
the Adntlnlstratlon 
Building, City Halt, 
Princau Anna Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, June 17, 1974, at 
3:00 P.M. at which tima the 
following application* will 




S6^ 



nm or LIVING 




I • •> K 



Vacotlonlngf G«t that nmw bfcycf* or acemtMorlmt 
for your old on* at on* of Tldowofor't lmrgm$f bikm 
and sorvico confors. 

SAI£$ oSfJIVICE m PARTS 

mJklKLJk • FAUON • 6ITM1E • BOHECOIIA • COVENTRY EA6U 

BEACH PEDALER 

«S20 VA. MACH BLVD. 486-7334 



be heard: 

Change of Zoning DIatrlct 
Claulficatlons: 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Julia, 
Harriet and Katrine da Witt 
for a Chanjga of Zoning 
District Cla»«1flcation from 
B-4 Resort Commercial 
Diatrlct to H-2 Resort Hotel 
District on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Pacific Avenue extending 
between 13th Street and 
13th Street, running a 
distance of 330 feet along 
the East side of Pacific 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 300 feat almg the South 
side of 13th street, running 
a distance of 330 feet along 
the Eastern property Una, 
running a distance of 200 
feet along the Southern 



property line of which 100 
feet is the North side of 13th 
Street. Said parcel contains 
1.14 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Virginia 
Gateway, Inc., for a Change 
v^^. of Zoning District < 
''*^^- Classification from A-1 
Ap<prtment District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Southeast corner of 18th 
Street and Paries .Avenue, 
running a distance of 300 
feet along the South side of 
nth SH^et, running a 
distancrof ISO feet along 
the East side of Parks 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 300 feet along»{^e 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of ISO ^ 
feet along the Eastern ' 
property line. Said parcel 



2* 



ANOTHER 

,ir^r 11 DAYS 

ETAWAY 

'The • Start - The - Nmv 
Yssr • Right CniiM 

SSROnERDAM' 

N«a tmm NarteNi m iM. 4ttt to St. Jalin, it. * ' 
ria, ■ araaa e s. Martlal^m, St. MMrtea, un St. 

•aiat. 

from $551. -,..,.,„„ ^ . 

^IKS WORLD TRAVEL i 

" VA. BSACH 499-2333 

rifiiin ttmMmm 



contabi* 1 acre mora or 
less. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNNAVEN BOROUGH 

3. Petition of Trent 
Barfcahira Development 
Corp., for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-1 
RasMantial District to R-3 
Residential District on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of 
PIve Point* Road and 
Inlynnview Roa<l, running a 
distance of 1335 feet more 
or less along the North side 
of inlynnv4ew Road, 
running a distance of 1330 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line of 
which 610 feet is the West 
side of Five Points Road, 
running a distance of 12M 
feat more or less along fhe 
Northern property lino and 
running a distance of 104S 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 22 acres more or 
lass. (Southern Points 
Trantwood Shores Areas). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of L-O-J 
Associates, A General 
Partnership, for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to B-3 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point MO feet 
more or less West of Hutton 
Lane, and 170 feet more or 
lass North of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running 
a distance of 245.B feet 
along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 
212.5 feet along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 314 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 200 feet along 
tlie Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.3 
acres more or less. ( Eureica 
Park-London Bridge 
Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. Planning 
Commission recommends 
0-1 Office District. 

BAYSiDE BOROUGH 

5. Petition of Century 
Developers for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Southwest corner of Old 
Harris Lane and Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet along 
the South side of Old Harris 
Lane, running a distance of 
175.98 feet along the 
Eastern property line of 
which B2.30 feet Is the West 
side of Pleasure House 
Rood, running a distance of 
417 feet more«r less along 
the Southern property line, 
and running a distance of 
158 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.457 acres. 
(Bradford Terrace Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

6. Petition Of A.T. Taylor 
Estate for a' Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from i-2 
Heavy Industrial District to 
AG-1 Agricultural District 
on certain property 
beginning at a point 2085 
feet more or less Northeast 
of London Bridge Road, 
running a distance of 818 
feet more or less along the 
West side of Harpers Road, 
running a distance of 951 
feet along the Northern 
property line (U.S. Naval 
Air Station), running ifr«^ 
distance of 1445 feet mdreN 
or less along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 11 acres more or 
less. (Oceana Naval Air 
Station Area). PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

Conditional Use Permits: 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

7. Application of Paul N. 
Howard Co., for a 
Conditional Use Permit to 
operate a contractors' 
storage yard for a period of 
two years on certain 
property located on the 
South side of Bow Creek 
Boulevard between 
Carriage Hill .Road and 
South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 200 
feet along the South side of 
Bow Creek Boulevard, 
running a distance of 200 
feet along the West side of 
South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 200 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 200 feet along 
the East side of Carriage 
Hill Road. Said parcel 
contains 0.92 acre. 
(Princess Anne Plaza- 
Magic Hollow Areas). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

8. Application of W.W. 
McClanan, Jr., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for 
a lodge for fraternal 
organization on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 1000 feet more or less 
along Prosperity Road East 
of General Booth 
Boulevard, and running In a 
Northerly direction a 
distance of 1075 feet more 
or less, beginning on the 
East side of Prosperity 
Road, running a distance of 
280 feet along the Western 
property line of which 200 
feet is the East side of 
Prosperity Road, running a 
distance of 743 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 280 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 745 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.1 

MLi> acres. (KOA Campgrounds 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

9. Application of HOT 
Associates for a Conditional 
Use Permit to construct h«ro 
two-family detached 
dwellings (duplexes) on 
certain property located on 
the South side of 2ith Street 
beginning at a point 98.57 
feet Northeast of Cyprns 
Avenue, ruming a distance 
of 120 feet along the South 
side of 2«th Street, running 
a distance of 140 feet along 

•^ tha Eastern property line 
wid running a distance of 
1M faet alofHi the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the Western property line. 
One duplex Is requested on 
Lots 26 and 28 and one 
duplex on Lots 23 and 24, 
Block 138, Map NO. 6. Plat 
of Virginia Beach 
Oavelepment Co. and 
contaM* a total of 0.38 
acres. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 



10. Application of HerckHi 
Corporation for a 
Conditional Use Permit to 
erect a 4-foet by 8-foot 
signboard on certain 
property beginning at a 
poim 325 f*et more or less 
North gf the intersection of 
Sandbrldge Road and 
Princess Anne Road and 
located on the West side of 
Princess Anne Road. Said 
parcel is currently toned B- 
3 Community Buslneu 
District. (Hills Corner 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 
Jane 5,13 yt 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clark's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the Mth 
day of AAay, 1974. 

Jackie Nell Sharp Kerr, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

David William Kerr, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUii-ieATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Atatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion and aban- 
donment or In the alternative 
upon cruelty. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress being: 471 South Allen 
Street, San Bernardino, 
California 93408. 

if Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary fo protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress; Clerk 
Sandra Margrove, D.C. 

Jon P.^ichler 
701 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Va. 

6-5,13.19,3«,4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
3RD DAY OF JUNE, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY NO. 
C-74-214 

in re: 

Adoption of Jonathan Coye 

Litton and Christopher 

Mason Litton 

By: 

John Louis Krai 

TO: 

Ernest Coye Litton, Jr. 

ORDER 

THISDAYcameJohnLouis 
Krai and Patricia Dean Krai, 
Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
infants, Jonathan Coye 
Litton and Christopher 
AAason Litton, by John Louis 
Krai, and affidavit having 
t>een made and filed tttat 
Ernest Coye Litton, Jr., the 
natural father of said 
children, is a non-resident of 
the State ot Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being unknown, 

it is therefore ORDERED 
that the said Ernest Coye 
Litton, Jr. appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Donald H. Rhodes, p.q. 
Owen, Guy, Thodes 8< Betz 
281 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462 

6 5,12.19,26-41 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
The following abandoned 
vehicles were removed from 
the streets of the City of 
Virginia Beach: 

1963, Yellow Plymo\jth 
Station Wagon, Identification 
Number 2531174345. 
1970, Blue Ford, iden- 
tification Number OH35- 
J160403, 1975 Virginia Li- 
cense ESY-951. 
1969, Red Dodge, Super Bee, 
Identification Number 
WM31H8A330873, 1973 Rhode 
Island License 00 3S4. 
1965, Red Rambler Con- 
vertible, Indentificatlon 
Number E019118, 1974 
Florida License 23D-3534. 

These vehicles have been 
removed to Wilson's Auto 
Service, 635 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451. The owner or 
any person having security 
interest may claim this 
vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying all lowing, 
preservation, and storage 
charges. Failure by the 
owner or persons having 
security Interest to exercise 
their right to reclaim the 
vehicle within the time 
provided shall be deemed a 
#aiver and shall be con- 
strued as consent to the sale 
of the abandoned miiftor 
vehicle at a piAHc auctkm. 

W.W. Dawis, Cokmel ,i_ 

Chief of Police 

H.C. Terry, Captian 
Commanding Officer 
Traffic Bureau 



6 5, IT 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
29TH DAY OF AW^Y, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C74-»1 

In re: \ 

Atk^tlmi of Tamela Michelle 

Adair 

By: 

Leslie R. Allison t, Dorothy 

W. Alttaon, 

f>efitloners 

To: 

jon Michael A<ttlr 

Address UNKNOWN 

ORDCR 

Th* day came Leslie R. 
Alllaen Mid Derethy W. 
Alllten, mtn^ntn. awd 



represented that the objecl of 
this procaading is to eNect 
ma adoptton of tha abo«.« 
named infant, Tamtia 
Michelle Adair, by LMlie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, husband Md wHt, 
and aHhfavIt having bean 
made and filed that Jon 
Michael Adair, a natural 
paraiit of said child, is a non- 
reswant of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
UNKNOWN, 

It is thwefore Ordered that 
the sakl Jon Michael Adair 
appear before this Cowt 
within ten (10) days aftar 
publication of this Order and 
indinte her aHltude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this matter. 

A c«H>y tesfe: * 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnslde, p.q. 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Vf 

6-5, 12, 19. a, 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

C74-662 

IN RE: 

Adoptton of DIXIE AAARIE 

VASEY, ROBERT HOWARD 

VASEY and SANDY JO 

VASEY 

BY: 

WALTER LEE GINN, JR., 

and AAARY DIXIE GINN, 

Petitioners. 

TO: 

William H. Vasey 

CO Mr. & AArs. Howard 

Vasey 

Route 8, Box 264 

Brookville, Florida 

ORDER 

This day came Walter Lea 
Ginn, Jr., and AAary Dixie 
Ginn, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named infants, Dixie Marie 
Vasey, Robert Howard 
Vasey and Sandy Jo Vasey, 
by Walter Lee Ginn, Jr., and 
Mary Dixie Ginn, husband - 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made 8nd filed 
that William H. Vasey, a 
natural parent of said 
children, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known' post office address 
being: c-o Mr. ft -Mrs. 
Howard Vasey, Route 8, Box 
364, Brookville, Ftorlda. 

It is therefore ORDERED 
that the said William R. 
Vasey appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

W.Shephered Drewry, Jr., 
p.q. 

6-5, 13, 19, 36, 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIR 
CUIT COURT OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
STATE HIGHWAY COM- 
MISSIONER OF VIRGINIA, 
Petitk>ner, 

vs. 
ELLA M. DAWSON and 
GEORGE W. DAWSON, and 
If ttiey or either of them be 
deceased, her (f his sw- 
vivlng spouse, if any, heirs at 
law or devisees, and tha Han 
creditors of all of said par- 
ties, and ail other persons 
wtK> have any interest in ttie 
property to be condemned in 
this proceeding, the names of 
said parties being unknown 
to the petitioner and are 
hereby proceeded against as 
"Parties Unknown"; and 
Lots 9 and 10 and 35 and 36 
Block "K" on the Plat of 
Rosemont, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 
Defendants. 

LAW NO. L-398 

In this proceeding ttta 
petitioner seeks to acquire by 
condemnation the fee simple 
title of Lots 9, 10, 35 and 36, 
Block "K" on the Plat of 
Rosemont, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, which property is to 
be used for the improvement 
of a section of the Rosemont 
Road Interchange on the 
Norfolk-Virginia Beach 
Expressway (State Highway 
Route No. 44), the nature of 
such improvement being 
more particularly described 
in the pctitton and exhibits 
attached thereto on file in the 
office of the clerk of this 
court, to which reference is 
hereby made for a full and 
accurate description thereof; 
and for the appointment of 
commiuioners to ascertain 
just compensatton to the 
o^ers of any estate «■ in- 
terest in the property to be 
taken or affected as a result 
of the taking and use thereof 
by fhe petitioner. 

For such purposes, the 
petitions* will apply to the 
court, sitting at Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 37th 
day of June, 1974, at 9:30 
o'clock a.m., or as soon 
thereafter as counsel may be 
heard, for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation as 
aforesaid^ and to (^taln a 
date for the trial of the taiui 
of just compensation. 

Affii. it appearing by af- 
fidavit filed according to law 
that Ella M. Dawson and 
George W. Dawson are 
believed to be deceased, and 
that due diligence has been 
used to ascertain the nan«as ^ 
and aMrwsses of their sur- 
viving spouses, if any, tieirs 
at law w devisees, and the 
lien creditors of all of saM 
parties, ail without effect; It 
is ORDERED that the 
aforesaid owners or other 
persons who may have an 
interest in the property to be 
condemned appear within 
ten (10) days after due 
puMlcatton of this 6rder In 
the Cl«1('s (Wfice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do what I* wacaMary fo 
protect ttiair Intamt*; and It 
I* FURTHER ORDERED 
that If any of the above 
named parsons to anart any 
(Election or dafeitta to tha 
tAtng or damage of his 
prop«^ or to tt»e jurtadic- 
tien of tfi* couH to hwr the 
caaaand topi«ce«i with ma 
ai^elntnMNt of eom- 
miwlonara he ihMI file hto 
aiMwer and grminds of 



-» f-m r-..^i:ai^m,i.^m^m 



■^^ 



mimrm^mmm 



mm 



mmm 



mm 



i^ 



LKULS 



ferwH in the property, t»ie 
grounds ot any objection or 
defenM, to the taking or 
danrtaging of his property or 
to the iurisdiction ot the court 
to hear the case and to 
proceed with the ap- 
polntnwnt rt commissioners 
for tlic<Wirmination of lust 
compensation.' 

Should any such owner fail 
to file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinahove provided, such 
failure shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the- 
date set for the appolntnuent 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuation and damages nor 
from sharing in the award ot 
just compensation according 
to his ioferesl therein or 
otherwise protecting his 
rights, but such failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
other defense by way of pleas 
in bar, abatement or 
otherwise. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By. fitadys J. Conboy, D.C. 

KELLAiW, PICKRELL AND 

LAWLER, p.q. 

(James AA. Pickrell) 

1020 First & AAerchants Bank 

Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 23S10 

May29, Junes — 2t 

■■■■■■■^■■■■■ii^H 

' ORDER OF 
1>UBLICATI0N 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIR- 
CUIT COURT OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
STATE HIGHWAY COM 
MISSIONER OF VIRGINIA, 
Petitioner, 

vs. 
N.A. COOPER, and if he be 
deceased, his surviving 
spouse, if any, heirs at law or 
devisees, and the Hen 
creditors of any of said 
parties, and all other persons 
who have any interest In the 
property to be condemned in 
this proceeding, the names of 
said parties being unknown 
to the petitioner and are 
hereby proceeded against as 
"Parties Unknown"; and 
Lots 11 and 12, Block "J", on 
the Plat of Rosemont, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
Defendants. 

LAWNO.L3f7 

In this proceeding the 
petitioner seeks to acquire by 
condemnation the fee simple 
title of Lots 11 and 12, Block 
"J" on the Plat of Rosemont, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
which property is to be used 
for the improvement of a 
section of the Rosemont 
Roarf' Interchange on the 
Norfolk Virginia Beach 
Expressway (State Highway 
Route No. 44), the nature of 
such improvement being 
more particularly described 
in ttte petition and exhibits 
attached thereto on file in the 
office of the Clerk of this 
Court, to which reference is 
hereby made for a full and 
accurate description thereof; 
and for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation to tlie 
owners of any estate or in- 
terest in the property to be 
taken or affected as a result 
ot tl^ fakin^i and use thereof 
by the petitioner. 

For such purposes, the 
pettfioner will apply to the 
CoOrf,'-sWMrtg • at' f*rtncess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia) on the 27th 
day of June, 1974, at 9:30 
o'clock a.m., or as. soon 
thereafter as counsel may be 
heird, for the appointment of 
commissioners lo ascertain 
just compensation as 
aforesaid, and to obtain a 
date for the trial of the issue 
of just'compensation. 

And rf appearing by af- 
fidavit filed according to law 
that* N.A. COOPER is 
believed to be deceased, that 
his last knovwi post office 
address was: Winchester, 
Vir0hia, 22601, and that due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain the names and 
addresses of his surviving 
spouses, if any, heirs at law 
or devisees, and the lien 
creditors of all of said par- 
lies, all without effect; it is 
ORDERED that the 
aforesaid owners or other 
persons who may have an 
interest in the property to be 
condemned appear within 
ten (W) days after due 
publication of this order in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do what is necessary to 
protect their interests; and it 
.is FURTHER ORDERED 
that If any of the above 
named persons wish to assert 
any objection or defense to 
the taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurisdic- 
tion of the court to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
misstoners he shall file his 
answer and grounds of 
defense designating his in 
teresi in the property, the 
grounds o« any objection or 
defense to the taking or 
damaging of his property or 
to the jurisdiction of the court 
to hear the case and to 
proceed with the ap- 
pointment of- commissioners 
for the determination of just 
comp*nsation. 

Should any such ovimer fall 
to 'fite his answer and 
grounds of defense a**, 
hereln^ove provided, such 
failure shall not preclude the 
owner' from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidencie as to 
valuation and damages nor 



BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

1. Petition of W.W.O. 
Associates by Marsh and 
Basgler, Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R 3 Residential District 
to B 2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of 
Shore Drive, beginning at a 
point 755 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 1472 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 7li feet is the South 
side of Shore Drive, running 
a distance of 404 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 1700 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 750 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 13.31 acres. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of W.W.D. 
Associates by Marsh and 
Basgler, Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
Irom B 2 Community 
Business District to H-1 Hotel 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 585 feet 
more or less West of 
Independence Boulevard and 
267.34 feet South of Shore 
Drive running a distance of 
141 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 341 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 137 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
336 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.78 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of W.W.D. 
Associates by AAarsh and 
Basgler, Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R 3 Residential District 
to H-1 Hotel District on 
certain property beginni(ig at 
a point 585 feet more or less 
West of Independence 
Boulevard, and 320 feet more 
or less South of Shore Drive, 
running a distance of 40 feel 
along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 341 
leet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 40 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 341 feet 
along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel contains 0.31 
acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lake Shores-Little Creek 
Amphibious Base Areas). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of R.L. Upton & 
Margaret I. Upton for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located on the 
Southeast corner of South 
Palm Avenue and Bonney 
Road and 200 feet West of 
South Fir Avenue, running a 
distance of 227.55 feet along 
the Northern property line of 
which 177.55 feet is the South 
side of Bonney Road, running 
a distance of 394.1 feet along 
the East sldM>f South Palm 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 187.9 feet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 513.35 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.9 acres. (Thalia 
Village Southern Firs 
Areas). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. Petition by resolution of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from II Light 
Industrial District to AG-1 
Agricultural District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1333 feet more or less 
South of Adventure Trail and 
915 leet more or less West of 
LorKlon Bridge Road, run 
ning a distance of 390 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 257.88 
leet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 371.80 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 310 
feel more or less along the 
Southern property line. Said 
parcel is known as Parcel Y, 
Resubdivision of Lot 12 and 
Subdivision of Lot 13, London 
Bridge Gardens and contains 
2.5 acres more or less. 
(Nottingham Estates Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

6. Petition Of Kings Row, A 
Partnership, by Stanley A. 
Phillips, Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification Irom A-1 
Apartment District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
146.60 feet North ot Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running a 
distance of 276.60 feet along 
the East side of Little Neck 
Road, running a distance of 
430 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 382 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 44%|eet 
along the Southern property 
line. Said parcel contains 
3.247 acres. (Southern 
Terrace- Bellehaven Area). 
byNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

kiRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

- 7^ Petition of Ruby Barco 
lor' a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-7 Residential District to H 



from sharing in the awarg^ t^ Resort Hotel District on 
just compensation accoratt^.jg^lgl^ property located on 
to inn interest therem d^' ,^ southeast corner of High 
protecting his p^,^, Avenue and Arctic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 109.7 feet along the South 
side of High Point Avenue, 
running a distance of 100.07 
feet along the East side of 
Arctic Avenue, running a 
distance of 196.71 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 100 
teet more or less along the 
Eastern property line (Lake 
Holly). Said parcel is known 
as Lots 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8, Block 
10, Map of Shore Acres and 
contains 0.29 acre more or 
less. (Shadowlawn Heights 
Shore Acres Areas). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

8. Petition of Ruby C. 
Barco for a Change ol Zoning 
District Classification from 
R 7 Residential District to H- 
2 Resort Hotel District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 1050.07 feel East of 
Arctic Averwe, running a 
distance of 1(H.18 leet along 
the North side of Wirwtw 
Salem Avenue, runnii^ a 
distance ol 193.29 feet almg 



otherwise protecting his 
rights, but such failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
other defense by way of pleas 
in bar, abatement or 
otherwise. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Gladys J. Conboy, D.C. 

KEULAM, PICKRELL 8. 
LAWUpR, p.q. 
(James M. Pickrell) 
1026 First 8i Merchants Bank 

BolWng "^ 

Norfolk, Virginia 2M10 

yMay29, Junes — 2i 

NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of me 
Council of the Oty of Virginia 
Beach wiM be held in the 
Council Chambers o« the 
Administration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Monday, June 
10, 1974, at 2;0M» M. at which 
time tT»« following ap 
plications will be t»«w<>- , , 

Change of toning Dfeh'ict 
Ciassllicattons: 



the Eastern prc^ierty line, 
running a distance M 10.15 
leet along the Northern 
properly line and running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is known as Lots 1, 3 
and 5, Block 11, Map of Shore 
Acres and contalits 0.163 
acre. (Shadowlawn Heights 
Shore Acres Areas). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Rodney Louis 
Mills for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-7 Residential District to A- 
4 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 270 feet East of battle 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 90 feet along the South sWe 
of» 9th Street, running a 
distance of 100 feet atong the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 90 feet 
along the Southern property 
I ine and running a distance of 
100 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 12, 14 and 16, 
Block 16, Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains 9,000 
square feet. (Shadowlawn 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

10. Petition of J. Walter 
Brothers for a Ctiange of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-7 Residential District 
to A-4 Apartment District oh 
certain properly beginning at 
a point 90 feet East of Baltic 
Avenue and running a 
distance of 240 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 180 feet is the South 
side of 9th Street, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 240 feet 
along the North side of 
Maryland Avenue and 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 
23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29, 
Block 16, Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights and contains 42,000 
square feet. (Shadowlawn 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 

City Clerk 

May2»-June5,2t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of th* City of 
Virginia Beach on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Donald Robert Adams, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Nancy Ann Taylor Adams, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissult isto 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being co Allegheny 
Airlines, 1611 "K" Street, 
N.W. Wash., D.C. it Is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
CLERK 

Linda Noel Hill D. Clerk 
James E. Brydges, Jr. 
2413 Pacific Ave., Va. 
Beach, Va. 

May 22,29— June 5,12 4 1 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 20th 
day of May, 1974. 
Donald Jay Pichinson, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Dorqthy Dale Bratton 
Pichinson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
ihoro from, the said defen 
dant upon the grounds of 
desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being; 1212 
Guadalupe Street, Apt. 803, 
Austin, Texas, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within then (10) days after 
due publication hereof, and 
do what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Adler S. Kanlor 
706 Plaza One < 

Norfolk, Virginia 

May 22,29— June 5,12.4 T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIR 
CUIT COURT OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 24th DAY OF MAY, 1974 
WALTER P. BARCROFT, 
Complainant, 

vs. 
JOHN WILLIAMS, and all 
unknown parties who may be 
the heirs or devisees of the 
said defendant or have an 
Interest in these proceedings, 
whose last known post office 
address is unknown and who 
are made parties defendant 
by the general description of 
"Parties Unknown", 
Defendants. 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C-74.4S7 

The object of this suit is to 
quiet title lo certain real 
estate located in the City of 
Virginia Beach, a more 
jWrWcular description being 
contained in the Bill of 
Complaint in the above 
styled suit. And an Affidavit 
having been made and filed 
by the complainant that the 
defendant, John Williams' 
last residence was unknown; 
and the bill slating that there 
are or may be persons in 
terested In the subject 
matter of this suit whose 
names are unknown, and 
making fhem parties 
defendant by lf»e g^naral 
description of "pe«rfies 
unknown" and an afftdavif 
having been made and filed 
tt«t they are unknown, such 
unkno¥vn parties being the 
widow and heirs, devisees 
and successors in title Of 
John Williams, 

It is Ordered that the said 
defendants namely, John 
Williams, if he be living, and 
the persons m«Je defendants 
by the genwal description of 
"parties unknown" do ap 
peer within ten days after 
doe publicaikm ol this order 
and do w^wt is necessary to 
protect tl«eir interests. 



II is fiNTther Ordered that 
the foregoing pm'tlon of this 
order be published once a 
week for four succasslve 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: SANDRA HARGROVE, 
D.C. 

I ask for this: 
James t> Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 
Wallace B. Smith, p.q. 
May29,Jona5,12.t»— 4t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Robert L. Thompson, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Joyce B. Thompson, 
Defendant. 

Theobject of this suit Is lo 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being* 
Headquarters Company S- 
3, WM Battalion, Paris 
Island, South Carolina It Is 
ordered that she do a|»pear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy — Testa: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
Lowell K. Clarke 
5209 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
May 22,29— June 5,12, 4 1 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's OHIce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Jule Curtis Harvey, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Linda Campbell Harvey, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of continuous and 
uninterrupted separation 
for more than two years. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; 
1630 Ogden Avenue, Bronx, 
New York it is ordered that 
she do appear here within 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her Interest In this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Alan B. Comess 
5284 Princess Anne Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May22,29— JuneS,U,4t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Robert L. Dowdy, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Audrey Gehrmann Dowdy, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that due diligence 
has been used by or on 
behalf of the Complainant 
to ascertain in which county 
or corporation the 
defendant resides, without 
effect, the last known post 
office address being: 2967 
Talon Court, Va. Beach, VA 
23456, It is ordered that she 
do appear here within ten 
(10) days after doe 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest In this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Barrow Si Lowe 
3104 Arctic Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 22,29— June 5,12, 4.1 

""""TfflffEffSF^^^ 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 14th 
day of May, 1974. 
Mamie E. Evans, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
William Leroy Event, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof this suit isto 
obtain a divorce from the 
bonds of matrimony from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of adultery. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
AOAN, USN, 451945975, VF- 
11 AO Shop, FPO, NY., 
N.Y ., 09501 it isordered that 
he do appear hera within 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what' may be necessary to 
protect hit interest In this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk, 
Grover C. Wright 
3330 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 22,29— J we 1,12 4t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office Of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Barbara J. McClure, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Marvin L. McClore, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissult isto 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Ttioro to be later merged 
into a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii at the proper 
lime from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertlcm on 
January 11, 1974. And an 



affidavit having baan made 

and filed that tha dafondant 

l» not a ratldant of the State 

of Virginia, ttw laat known 

post office address being: 

U.S.S. Coral Saa CVS 21. 

F.P.O. San Francisco, 

California It is ordered that 

l«e do appear hero within 

ten (10) days after due 

publication heroof, and do 

what may be nacaasary to 

protect tilt Intaratt In this 

suit. 

A copy— Testa: JOHN V. 

FENTRESS: CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clark 

Decker, Zoby, Colllat 8i 

Christie 

900 Plaza One 

Norfolk. VA p.q. 

May M,»»— Jane S,H. «-t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 20th 
day of May, 1974. 
Edward Earl Pool, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Ruth Roberts Pool, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce, decree A 
Vinculo AAatrlmonll from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of hwo (2) year 
separation. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1112 
ScrantQji Place, Durham, 
North Carolina it is ordered 
thai she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary ^o 
protect her Interest In this 
suit. 

A Copy — Teste: 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

John K. AAoore 
2413 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 22,29-Juno 5,12-4 1 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 15th 
day of May, 1974. 
Ernie Alan Yanatovic, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Patricia W. Yanatovic, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Isto 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; 
9929 East Lower Azusa 
Road, Temple City, 
California 91780 Jt Is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Harry J. Hicks 
524 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May22.a9r— jiMiai,l2 4t 

ORDEROP 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office ot the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach on the 22nd 

day ol May, 1974 

Mary Edity Hall Thompson, 

Plaintiff, 

against 
Mark Allen Thompson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonli from, the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
ol cruelty and desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
know post office address 
being; Route No. 1, Box 244, 
Hubert, North Carolina if is 
ordered that he do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protfct his 
interest In this suit. 
A Copy — Teste; 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

By; Sandra Hargrove 0. 
Clerk 

Harrell >, Landrum 
519 Board of Trade BIdg. 
Norfolk, VA 

May 29— June 5,12,19, 4 1 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office Of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 22nd 
day of May, 1974. 
Albert Emerson Breath 
waite. Plaintiff, 
against 

Verna Mae Lystelly Breath 
waite, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAalrlmonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion of the Com- 
plainant by the Respondent 
on July 1, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, "■- 'est 
known post office address 
being: 11532 Wyandotte 
Street, North Hollywood, 
California 91605 it is ordered 
that she do appear h»e 
wittHn ten (1%^days after due 
publication Ttereof, and do 
what ntay be necessary to 
protect her Interest in this 
suit. 
. A copy-Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS; 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove 0. 
Clerk. 

Stephen R. AAarguHes 
29 Selden Arcade 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

5-29,6 5,12, 19,4T 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, June 11, 1974, at 
1:00 P.M. in the Council 
Chambers ol the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Coortho«»e, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 

SUBDIVISION VARI- 
ANCE: 

A.J. Stuart ^ valance to 
sacthtns of the ^bdlvlsion 
Relations, property of A.J. 



Stuart located on Indian 
&«tk Road. ia«S feet South 
ot Blackwater Road. 
BLACKWATER BOROUGH. 
REAOVERTISED BY 
DIRECTION OF CITY 
COUNCIL ON MAY 13, J974: 

1. Petition of Com- 
monwaaltt« Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain pn^ierty beginning at 
a point 440 feet more or less 
South of South Blrdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
1664 feet more or less along 
the West side of General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of 325 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance ot 13ti.34 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance ol 
159.31 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 8.5 acres more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Com 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, lor a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to A- 
1 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 470 feet more or less 
South of South Birdneck 
Road, running a distance of 
S100 feet along the Western 
property line of which 1642 
leet Is the East side ol 
Oneral Booth Boulevard, 
running a distance of 840.78 
feel along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 2492.11 feet along 
the eastern property line and 
running a distance of 1234.23 
leet along the Northern 
property line of which 200 
leet is the South side of South 
Blrdneck Road. Said parcel 
contains 41.2 acres and ex 
eludes a parcel containing 2.3 
acres proposed for B 1 
Commercial Residential 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Com 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification Irom 
R-8 Residential District to B 
1 Commercial Residential 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1460 feet 
more or less South of South 
Birdneck Road and 115 feet 
more or less East of General 
Booth Boulevard, running 9 
distance ol 175 feel more or 
less along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 444 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 344 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 342 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.3 acres more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

REFERRED BACK TO 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
BY CITY COUNCIL ON 
MAY 20, 1974; 

4. Petition of A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth S. 
Sills by Grover C. Wright, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-6 Residential District 
to A 4 Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (LInkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (LInkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
leet along the Western 
property line and running a 
dlstance'ol 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square feet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Elizabeth 
Williams Everett by George 
Darden, Attorney, lor a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-4 
Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 632.61 feet West of 
Birdneck Road and 187 feet 
East of Mockingbird Drive 
and 50 feet North ol 
Waterfront Drive, running a 
distance of 110 teet along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance ol 372.16 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance ot 110 feet along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 365 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 1 
acre more or less. (Birdneck 
Acres-Watergate Apart 
mentsArea). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
Change ot Zoning District 
Classification 

6. Petition of Smith and 
Williams Funeral Home, 
inc., by H. Calvin Spain, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning DislricI Classification 
from R-5 Residential District 
lo 0-1 Office District on 
certain properly located on 
the West side of Princess 
Anne Roa^j beginning at a 
point 1344 Teet more or less 
North of Brandywine Road 
and running a distance of 
210.05 feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 183.28 
leet is the West side of 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 407.43 feet along 
the Souttiern prooertv line, 
ronnirig a distance of 179.43 
feet along the Western 
prqaerty line and running a 
distance of 487.3 feet along 
the Nwthern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.969 
acres. (Kempsville Manor 
Lark Downs Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. Petitton of the Estate of 
WW. Oliver, Sr., lor a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
ReskJential District to A-l 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the West side of Haygood 
Road beginning at a point 125 
leet South ot Twain Lane, 
runnirig a distance of 649.24 
feel along the West side of 
Haygood Road, running a 
distance of 1218.7 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 693.16 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 997.81 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains ~)5.S 
acres (Lake Smith Terrace 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGtH. 

8. Petition of Carl H. 
Kunzman for a Change ol 
Zoning DislricI ClassMlcailon 
irwn R-4 Resideniial Districf 



11m SMt-Widawliy, Jma S, I974-Il«i 1-7 



to B2 Community Businees 
District on certain propwrty 
beginning at a point 1147.9 
feel East 01 Newtown Road 
at ttw Southern extremity of 
Lawrence Drive and oivthe 
South thte ol Connie Cine, 
runniog a distance ol 691.54 
feel along the Northern 
propeHy line of which 30 feel 
is the Sooth side ol Connie 
Lane, running a distance of 
664.1 taet atong the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 636.8 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of tSf 
teet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.7 acres. 
(Newseme Farm Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

9. Petition of Nelson P. and 
AAabel C. Brock for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-I 
Agricultural District to B-1 
Business Residential District 
on certain property located 
on the East side of Princess 
Anne Road beginning at a 
point 910 teet more or less 
South of Indian River Road, 
running a distance of 300 feet 
along the East side of 
Princess Anne Road, running 
a distance of 190.89 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 2M.26 
feet along the Eastern 
property tine and running a 
distance ot 190.89 feel along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.282 
aom. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

Conditional Use Permit 

10. Application of William 
E. Wood, Jr., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to erect a 
12 foot by 50-foot billboard on 
certain property located en 
the South tWe of Indian River 
Road beginning at a point 100 
feet more or less West ol 
Kempsville Road, running a 
distance of 397.5 feet along 
the Northern property line ol 
which 307.5 feet Is the South 
side of Indian River Road, 
running a distance of 300 leet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 486.67 
leet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.27 acres and is 
currently zoned B-2 Com- 
munity Business Olstricl. 
( Bonney 's Corner Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

11. Application of Alice S. 
Goode lor a Conditional Use 
Permit to construct a duplex 
on certain property located 
at the Southeast Intersection 
of Cypress Avenue, Holly 
Road and 26lh Street, run- 
ning a distance of 70.46 feet 
along the East side ol 
Cypress Avenue, running a 
distance of 98.57 feet along 
the Southeast side of Holly 
Road, and running a distance 
of 140 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 70 feel along the 
Southern property line. Said 
parcel Is known as Lots 30 
and 32, Block 126, Map No. 6, 
Virginia Beach Development 
Co., and contains 7500 square 
feel more or less, VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

12. Application of Herdon 
Corporation for a Conditional 
Use Permit to erect a 4foot 
by 8-fool signboard or; cer 
tain property beginning at a 
point 325 feet more or less 
North of the Intersection ot . 
Sandbridge Road and 
Princess Anne Road and 
located on the West side of 
Princess Anne Road. Said 
parcel Is currently zoned B-2 
Community Business 
Oistriel. (Hills Corner Area). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

13. Application ol James L. 
Jernigan, Jr., for a Con 
ditional Use Permit to 
operate a marina, including 
lacllitles for storage, repair 
and rental of boats and sale 
of boating supplies and fuel 
on certain property located 
on the North side ol Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, beginning 
at a point 200 leet more or 
less West of Hutton Lane, 
running a distance of 652 feel 
more or less along the North 
side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 445 feet along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 750 feel 
more or less along the « 
Northern properly line 
(Lynnhaven River) and 
running a distance of 170 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 3.8 acres. 
(London Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

14. Application ol William 
Albert Crosby for a Con 
ditional Use Permit to 
construct a duplex on certain 
properly located on the 
Southwest corner ol 13fh 
Street and Parks Avenue, 
running a distance ol SO feel 
along the West side ot Parks 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 125 feet along the South 
side of 13fh Street, running a 
distance of 50 feel along the 
Western properly line and 
running a distance of 125 feel 
along the Southern property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 1 and 2, Block 117, Plat 
of Lakewood and contains 
6250 square feet, VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

15. Application of Princess 
Anne Country Club by 
Thomas C. Broyles, Attor 
ney, for a Conditional Use 
Permit for recreation 
lacllitles (tennis) on certain 
property known as fhat 
portion o) the existing 
Princess Anne Country Club 
beginning at a point 400 leet 
nwre or less Southwest of the 
intersection of Pacific 
Avenue and See Pines Drive 
running a distance of 17S feel 
along the Eastern property 
line of »vhich 125 feet is the 
Wesi side ol Sea Pines Drive, 
running a distance of 400 feet 
along the Southern prof»rfy 
line, running a distance of 150 
feel along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 420 teet along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 1.6 acres 
more or less. (Sea Pines 
Area). VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

Street Closures __ 

16. Application of Mrs. 
William C. HayOTx for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of that portion 
ot Wythe Lane extending in a 
Westwardly direction from 
Abingdon Road a distance of 
190 feet more or less. Said 
street is 30 leet in width. 
(Bay Colony Area). LYN- 
(Bay Colony Area. LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. A|«jlicalion of Coley K. 
Dunbar. 

Dunbar tor the discon 
tinuance., closure and 
abandonment ol tttat portion 
of Cleveland Street being 
adjacent to the Sogthem 
bowidary 01 LoH 33 throu^ 
44 inclusive. Plat ^ Euclid 



Place. Said portion extends 
in a weatwardly direction 
Irom Horacr Avaiwe and is 
variable in widtti from 34.03 
feet (0 >.«%feei and contains 
a tdt^ of Aiu acre more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed Information arc 
avalMlo in the Office of tlw 
Planning Oepartment. 
(Euclid Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed 
infornMtion on the above 
applieattora are available In 
the Oeparhnent of Planning, 

All Interested persons are 
invited to attend. 
Charles C. Carrlnglon 
Director of Planning 

M>y»-JMHeS,tt 

vmoimsr'^'^^^^^ 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
24TH DAY OF MAY, W4. 

C.P. NO. 1917 

Re: John B. Coonen, 
deceased 

SHOW CAUSE 
ORDER 

It appearing ttwt a retort 
ol ,the accounts of United 
Virginia Bank-Seaboard 
National, Executor ol the 
Estate ot John B. Coonen, 
deceased, and ol the debts 
and demands against his 
estate has been filed In the 
Clerk's Office and that one 
year hM elapsed since the 
qualification; that on 
February 20, 1974, the 
Commisstoner of Accounts 
held a creditors hearing and 
at that time no claim or 
demands were filed against 
the estate; on motion ol 
United Virginia Bank- 
Seaboard National, the 
Executor; IT IS ORDERED 
that the creditors of, and all 
others interested in the 
estate, do show cause, II any 
ihey can, on the 14th day ol 
Juno, 1974, at 9:30 A.M., 
belore the Judge of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
against the payment and 
delivery ol the estate ol John 
B. Coonen, deceased, lo the 
legatees, without requiring 
refunding bonds. 

it is ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
order be published in the 
"Virginia Beach Sun" once a 
week for two successive 
weeks. 

John V. Fenh'ess, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

CROMWELL AND 

CULVERHOUSE 

Attorney at Law 

P.O. Box SS33 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

23455 

I ask for this; 

Robert B. Cromwell Jr. 

6 5,ia,2T 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given 
that the City Council of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, meeting In the 
City Council Chambers, 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, at 2:00 
p.m ., on Monday, June 17th, 
1974, will hold a pul^llc 
Hearing on a proposed 
amendment to Section 34- 
50, Code of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
Increasing taxicab fares. 

Appended hereto is the 
proposed taxicab fare: 

(a) For the first one- 
seventh mile or fraction 
thereof . . . .tO.M 

(b) For each succeeding 
one seventh mile or 
fraction thereof . . . .80.10 

The proposed taxicab 
rate increase will be 
reviewed by the City 
Council on Monday, June 
17th, 1974, at 2:00 p.m., at 
which time persons wishing 
to appear In support of and 
those opposed to the 
adoption of the rate 
Increase may publicly 
express their opinions. 

Persons wishing to 
address City Council should 
register with the City Clerk, 
Room 310, City 

Administration Building, 
before 5:00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, June 12th, 1974, 
by letter or telephone (427- 
4304), or they may register 
at the Clerk's desk before 
the meeting opens. 

The proposed 
amendment may be 
examined In the Office of 
the City Clerk during 
normal business hours. 
Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

JunaS,i2,2t 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereon given 
that the City Council of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia will at 2:00 p.m., 
on Monday, June 17, 1974, 
hold a public hearing In the 
City Council Chambers, 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess 
Ai'ine Station, Virginia 
Beach Virginia for the 
purpose of hearing persons 
^rtn favor of or opposed to the 
following proposed 
OrHJaance : 

AN ORDINANCE TO 
AMEND SECTION 13 1 OF 
THE CODE OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH TO 
CHANGE THE VOTING 
PLACE OF ELECTION 
DISTRICT 8, LONDON 
BRIDGE, LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH FROM 
LONDON BRIDGE 

VOLUNTEER FIRE 
DEPARTME f*T' T 
LONDON BRIDGE 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

BE IT ORDAINED BY 
THE COUNCIL OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VIRGINIA: 

That Section 13-1 ol the 
Code ol the City of Virginia 
Beach is amended and 
reordained to read as 
lollows; 

Delete "London Bridge 
Volunteer Fire 
Department'' and 
substitute therefore 
"London Bridqe Baptist 
Church." 

This ordinance shall be 
effective from date of 
adoption. 

Persons requesting to 
appear before City Council 
regarding this matter 
sitould register with the 
City Clerk, Room 310, City 
Administration Building, on 
or belore 5:00 p.m., 
Wednesday, June 13. 1*74, 
or at Hie CM^k's dttk prior 
la the meeting. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk -..--.^ 

Jenal.^^U- 



OROIR OP 
PUBLICATION 



Commonwealtoi of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office m the 
Circuit Court ol me City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 13th 
day ol May, 1974. 
Dianna Hancock Tompkim, 
Plaintiff, 

against 

Sarhuel Bailey Tompkins, 
Defendant. 

The object ol this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
malrlmonll from ihe said 
defendant upon the grounds 
ol rhore than tyyo years 
continuous separatton. And 
an affidavit having bean 
made and filed that the 
delendani is a non-resident ol 
Ihe State ol Virginia, the last 
known post olllce address 
being: 1505 Old Kings Road, 
Molly Hill, Florida, it Is or- 
dered that he do appear twre 
within ten (10) d*ys alter due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary lo 
protect his interest In this 
suit. 



A copy— Teste; 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By; J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Clerk. 

Stuart R. Hays 

4310 E Indian River Road 

Chesapeake, Virginia 

MaylS,21,29~JuneS.4t. 



VIRGINIA? 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
8th DAY OF MAY, 1974. 



INCHANCIRY 
NO. C-74-Sn 



In re: Adoption of Kelly Anne 

Higgins and KimlMrly Anne 

Higgins 

By; Joseph Charles Collelfi 

& Rose Arlene Collelll, 

Pel II loners 

To; Martin J. Higgins, Jr. 

3000 Nottingham Road 

Norrisiown, Pennsylvania 



ORDiR 



-1 



llatll and) Rose 
ilti, Pell>(oners, 
wted^at the 
I protfeedlng is to 



This day came /oseph 
Charin Collelll and) Rose 
Arlene Collelll, 
and represented 
object of this 1 " 
effect the adoptin ol the 
above named infants, Kelly 
Anne Higgins and Kimberly 
Anne Higgins, by Joseph 
Charles Collatn and Rose 
Arlene Collelll, husband and 
wile, and alUdavIl having 
been made and Hied thai 
Martin J. Higgins, Jr., a 
natural parent ot said 
children, is a nonresident of 
the Slate ol Virginia, the last 
known post olllce address 
being; 3000 Nolllngham 
Road, Norrisiown, Penn- 
sylvania, 

11 Is therefore Ordered ihal 
the said Martin J, Higgins, 
Jr„appear bflora this Court 
within ten (10) Uay^ alter 
publication ot this Order and 
incticaiB his atfltuda toward 
Ihe proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do wha' Is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this mailer. 



John V. Fentress, Ciork 1 

J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

R, Larry Lamberi, p.q. 

992 First Colonial Road -*, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia ^ 



5- IS, 23, 29, 65, 4T 



■1* 

I 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In Ihe Clerk's oiflce of Ihe 
Circuit Court ol the City of 
Virginia Beach, on Ihe lOlh 
(lay (il May, 1974. 
Suzanne M. Schroedcr, 
PiBlntilf, 

against 
Harry William Schroeder, 
Jr., 
Defendant. 

The object ol this suit is to 
iibiain a divorce a mensa et 
Ihoro, or should one year 
have elapsed, prior to Ihe 
Court receiving a decree 
herein lor entry thai she be 
granted a dlvorcv-« vinculo 
matrinomii (rom the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
III desertion. Andanelfidavif 
having been made and filed 
that the delendani is a non 
resident of Ihe Stale of 
Virginia, the last known post 
olllce address being: 15 
Schroeder Lane, Peichoque, 
New York, M is ordered that 
he tto appear here within ten 
(10) days alter due 
publication hereol, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest m this 
suit 

A copy-Teste: John V. 

Fentress 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 

Clerk 



Gay E. Milius, Jr. ^ 

524 Independence Boulevard *, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia «• 

May 1$,22,2»— June S-41. 



» 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
7th DAY OF AAAY, 1974. 



4(* 



IN CNANCIRY f 

NO, C-74-S66 i 

in re: Adoption ol Kenneth ^ 

Lee Caton t 

BY: Fred Jolm Passamonte » 

and Sue S'lM^e Passamonte, • 

Petitioners '' 
TO: Cteniel David Caton 

427 Maycox Avenue ■ ': 
Norfolk, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Fred J,ohn 

Passamonte and Sue Stone . 

Passamonte, Petitioners, i 

and represented that thtf ^ 
(Aject of this proceeding is to 

ellect the adopt Kw ol the " 

MKivenained infant, Kenneth ' 
Lee ^^<w^^y Fred John 

Passamorde and Sm Stone - 
Passamonte, husband and 

wife, and affidavit having , 
been made Md Hted thai r<m 

•%, 



i^ 



Olcissilied 



P»gt B-8-TlM Sun-Wednnday, June 5, 1974 



486-S4SO 



LiCALS 



Daniel David Caton, a 
natural parent of said child, 
is a non resident of the State 
of Virginia, and that due 
diligence has been by or in 
behalf of the petitioners to 
ascertain in which county or 
corporation the natural 
parent is without effect, the 
last known post office, ad- 
dress being: 427 Maycox 
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia, 
1 1 is therefore Ordered thai 
the said Daniel David Caton 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this. Order 
and indicate his attitude to- 
ward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matfer. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

W. Leigh Ansell, p.q. 

4336 Virginia Beach, 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

5 15, 22, 29, 6 5, 4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk.s Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 10th 
day of May, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

William C. Drier, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Geneva Maxine Drier, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of Title 20-91 (9) of the Code 
ot Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and tiled that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Route 11, Sanford, 
North Carolina. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Decker, Zoby, Collias & 

Christie 

900 Pfaza One 

Norfolk, Virginia 

5 15, 22, 29, 6-5, 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE JUVENILE AND 
DOMESTIC RELATIONS 
DISTRICT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

MARY SUSAN OOZIER, 

Complainant 

vs. 

DAVID EDWARD DOZIER, 

Defendant 

ORDER 



The object of the proposed 
hearing in the above-styled 
matter is to have the court 
enter a judgment for the 
arrearage of child support 
and alimony heretofore 
ordered to be paid by him by 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
by decree entered on July 12, 
1972. 

And, it appearing by af- 
fidavit filed according to law 
that the last known post 
office address of David 
Edward Oozier, defendant, is 
CO Rosemary D. Wright, 4211 
Apt. D, Flowerfield Road, 
Norfolk, Virginia 23518, and 
that due diligence has been 
used by and on behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain 
what county or corporation 
the defendant is, without 
effect, it is therefore OR- 
DERED that the said David 
Edward Dozier do appear 
before this court at 9:00 a.m. 
on Thursday, June 20, 1974, 
and do what is necessary to 
protect his interest. 

It is further ORDERED 
that this order be published 
once a week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in a 
newspaper published in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

ENTER: May 9, 1974 

Frederick P. Aucamp 
Judge, Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations District 
Court of the City of Virginia, 
Beach, Virginia 

Elizabeth E. Henley, Clerk 

5-15, 22, 29, 6 5, 4T 



I SUNSHINE ADS _^ 

Tom — This will be the best 
birthday of my life, because 
of you. Diane. 

JOE — I believed yoo when 
you said you had a hard head, 
you didn't have to prove it! 
Love being your nurse. Yea, I 
Do!! Fuzzy: 

GIRLS — What's happening? 
Jesse. 



<1 AntomobBwfwSale 

JESSUP 
MOTOR CO. 

AT LONDON BRIDGE 

1974 Pinfo, fully 

equipped $2588. 

1973 Monte Carlo, 

fully equipped . . .SSaVI.M 
1971 ElcamlnOy 

iiilfy equipped . . . $1988.80 



16 



Motowydait Saw^w 



j.M. — Everyday should 
start out like today! I Love 
you. S. 

Jeanne: Now that yoo are 
back I can concentrate on my 
48-40-43.^ Pat 

Joe: Wont be long before It's 
smooching time, again. Hang 
in there. Pat. 

SONDR A — Are you sure Joe 
had a accident? Ann. 

r T h 

PEARL — My goodness your 

yard looks neat! Diane t> 

Sondra. 

DIANE — Happy Birthday to 
the Bestest, Sweetest, 
Nuttiest Sister in the World. 
Love you much. Fuzzy <• 
Cripple. 

Fuzzy — Next time you can 
join me! Joe 

Pam 8. Mindy — I'm still 
waiting, did you break an 
arm? Mommie 

3 Special Scrvteei 

AUTO JUNK ^ Top pay and 
tow away. 587-8841 anyNme. 

AUTO JUNK 

TOWED AWAY FREE 

8554372 

AUTO JUNK— Towed Free. 
Phone 625-7918 or 625-5115 
Nights 853-2292 

CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

CARPET CLEANING 

Home or Office 

Free Estimates 

Call 464-4971 

JEWEL TEA PRODUCTS 

Available in 
Va. Beach 



340-1213 



4262146 



7-9:30 P.M. 



Learn to cut and set your 
family's hair, S20 complete 
to first 5 to enroll. Also 
scholarships available for 
complete beauty course. 
Call for details. Oceana 
Beauty Academy, 428-3246. 

REDUCE SAFE 8i FAST 
with GoBese Tablets 8< E- 
Vap "water pills", 
Murden's Drug. 

WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

623-9194. 



NOVA — 1972, Chevy, 
automatic transmission, 
power steering and disc, 
brakes. 14,000 miles. 497-3682. 

NOVA — 1970, straljjht 
transmission, 350- V8. $1500 or 
best offer. 420 2887. 

MERCURY MONTEGO 
MX 1972 — Like new, fully 
equipped. 4900664. 

OPEL — GT, 1970, excellent 
condition, red. $2,000. 855- 
2531. 

OLDSMOBILE — 1969 
Cutlass S. Air conditioned, 
good condition. $100 and take 
over payments. 425-5023 after 

5 p.m. 

MG 1971 Midgetfe Second 
owner. Good condition. $1775. 
587-1676. 

PII>ITO-1971, Runabout. 
Standard, air conditioned. 
Excellent condition $1695. 
587-0451. Apply at 323 E. 
Leicester st. Norfolk 

PLYMOUTH— 1971, SlWrti- 
man Station Wagl>n 
423-0593. 

PLYMOUTH — 1969, Fury 
III, 4 door hardtop, all 
power, small V-8, good 
condition. $595. 481-3088. 

1 

PLYMOUTH Roadrunner, 
1970. 4-speed, tape, 
tachometer, posi -traction, 
new tires. $1000 or best 
offer. 855-1716. 

PLYMOUTH 1969 Fury 11, 
air conditioned, automatic, 
good condition. $600 or best 
offer. 464-3667. 

PLYMOUTH — 1971 Scamp, 

6 cylinder, standard, new 
paint, new tires. In top 
condition. $1300 firm. Call 
857 4273. 

PONTIAC — 1973 Fh-eblrd, 
fully equJpped, V-8, 
automatic, must sacrifice, 
427-1451 after 6 p.m. 



HONDA 1968 Scrambler, 
Good condition. $500. 497-8861 

a . I . _^ 

HONDA— 1972 CB 350; 
high rise bars, crash bar, 
luggage rack. $750. 4S8-2S48,- 
after 5; 484-7942. 

HONDA - 1973, 175. 

Excellent condition. Low 

mUeage. Muct sell. Job 

relocation. 340-S23S, 464- 
170S. 

HONDA — 1972, CB-175 
2,600 miles. Excellent 
condition. $475. 587-5684. 

SEARS — Minl-bike, 4 h,p. 
front and back shock 
absorbers, $400. 545-7697. 

r^ 

■RECREATIONALJ 



18Camp«H,TltaMeii ' 

AVENGER TRAIl£R — 
24', used 2 weeks, sleeps 6, 
completely selfcontalneit 4 
burner gas or electrNy 
refrigerator, converts from 
battery to 120 volts, 
rechargeable by battery. 
Full bath. 424-3412. 



. 2i Botii, Mnine Sy^Mes 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 
IH: 8SS-2510 

CABIN CRUISER — 23' 
Spor ts Fisherman, 
Chrysler inboard, mint 
condition. $3200. 420-4863. 

HARKERS ISLAND 21' 
with small cabin. Like new. 
65 HP Mercury motor in 
well. 397-4590. 

LUGAR — 21'; 110 hp in- 
board-outboard with trailer. 
$1,400. 543-2454. 



MOTOR — 1972 Johnson, 25 
hp, electric start; with 
remote shift and throttle and 
cables. 482-1564. 

STAR CRAFT-14' 

windshield lights, rod 
holder, equipped to fish day 
or night. Master Craft 
trailer electric winch. 
Ready to go. 545-6616. 



PONTIAC 1968 Firebird 400.4 SAILBOAT — Ketch Choey 
speed, power steerinq, $950. Uee, 32' new diesel engine; 
588-2540. 24.0)0 425-5313 4251197. 



5 Lost A Found 



BICYCLE LOST — New red 
Eddy-Merckx. Boys 10 
speed bike. Vicinity of 
Tidewater Dr. and Bayview 
Ave; Sat., May 11 between 2 
and 8 pm. Reward. Please 
call 587-0076 after 3 pm. 

LOST SIAMESE — 
Sealpoint, female, wearing 
rust color flea collar, last 
seen May 13 In Windsor 
Woods area. 486-5270. 

LOST - IRISH SETTER -5 
months old, Male, L9 tat- 
tooed inside left ear. Rudee 
Inlet area; 425-5932, 855-0620. 
REWARD. 



RENAULT 

The nation'! largtst »»l«ctloo of 
used Renaults from the notion's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

W3 E LITTLE CREEK RO. SW 



SHENANDOAH — 1968, 23' 
fiberglass, new rebuilt 160 
1-0, fully equipped. $3500 
firm. 488-0263. 

WANTED TO RENT: Boat 
slip for 23' boat Virginia 
Beach. 486-7080 



21A Boats FofHiie 



8 Burial Lots 



RATES: All classified 

- advertising (businesses 

^ and individuals) only 25 

cents per line of type, with 

a minimum charge of $2. 

Classified display $2.52 

per column inch, with a 

minimum charge of $5.04 

«xcept on contract basis. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
3^*.^ublication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mall to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486-3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment Is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



CEMETERY LOTS - 2 tots 
with markers in Rosewood 
Memorial Cemetery. $450 
for both. 340-5011. 



^^ 



llAmomobflesPwSrie 

BUICK-1963 Electra 225 
Coupe, 1 owner, low mileage, 
fully loaded. $1295. 853-2006. 
Va. License 3514. 

BUICK— 1970 RIVIERA, all 
extras. Like new $2350. 853- 
8219; aft. 5 f20--4140. 

CAMARO — 1973, 

automatic, power steering 
and brakes, excellent 
condition. $2595. 420-4490. 

D*TSUN — 1971, 510 4 dOOr 
station wagon, $1850, 
excellent throughout, many 
extras. 486-2664. 

DbDGE — 1972, maxl-van, 
paneled, carpeted, tape 
deck. Excellent condition. 
428 1622. 



s 



tAY IT ISN'T SO, ETHEL I 



mm» — How Mm your 
twMn V«w? WItti Irnwl 

JM. — I'm wre my 9M>- 
•tlM* ean Itamae all Itte 



DATSUN — 1973 240Z; 
Brown w-tan interior, auto, 
transmission, air cond., AM- 
FAA Stereo 8 track tape 
player. WOO miles. 484-3164. 

FALCON — 1964, new red 
paint job, 4 magt; new 260 
V8; automatic 
transmission, many new 
parts. $525 or best oHer. 857- 
6629. 

FORD GALAXIE — 1963, 4 
door automatic. $125. 481- 
7682. 

FORD — 1969 Bronco, no 
rust, like new, 6 cylinder, 
new tires, battery, radio, 
etc. $1795. 488 6561. 

FORD — 1968 Galaxie 500, 2 
<iot», white sidewall tires, 
factory air amiintomd. tm. 
481-3736. 

FORO-1972 Galaxia SOO 4 

door sedan, V4, at^mattc, 
potmr steering, air OMid. 
aem. $1795. 8&3MS 

HONDA— MO Sedan, 1972. 
Still under warranty. $1700 
420 0I95. 

JAGUAfi — mt V-12, 2 pM 
2, loadad. UJBm. Exmiant 
condition, mms. 



TOYOTA — 1973 Mark II 
Sedan, automatic, factory 
air conditioning, power 
steering, AM-FM, Steel 
radials. $3375 or offer. 464- 
6929. 

TOYOTA-1969 Corona, 4 
door, very good condition. 
$975. 464 2181. 

THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent 
condition. Driven dally. 
$400. 587-2075. 

VOLKSWAGON CAMP- 
ER— Van, .1964, new 
rebuilt engine, good cond. 
$650. 481-7470. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1960, 
good tires, dependable; 
new paint lob, newer 40 h.p. 
engine; 587-7513. 

VOLKSWAGEN BUG — 
1963. Needs some repair. 
$250. 340-9004. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1962 
Custom, $450, or best offer. 
480-1007. 

12 Tncki, IWien, Jeepi 

CHEVROLET— 1971 pickup, 
% ton, 8' bed, camper 
special, new paint; $1745; 
855-6458. 

DODGE — 1973 Pickup 
Adventurer, air 
conditioned, power 
steering, disc brakes, 
automatic, Img wide bed. 
$28(M>. 487-2714. 

FORD — 1964, F-lOO, 'A ton 
pickup. 6 cylinder, 6 ft. bed, 
Kadis shell camper with 
boat rack, cabinet vent, 
drop screen, carpet and 
plywood seats. Good 
condition. $850. 420-5983. 

FORD 1972, Super Van, V8; 
sliding side door, excellent 
mechanical cond. New tires. 
$2500. 583-3920. 

FOftD — 1973 F-lOO Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with campv.... 
shell, 302 engine, straltffir" 



BOAT — 16' X 5', wood, 
Lapstrake; fiberglass 
in good condition; with 
trailer; upholstered seat 
cushions, 40 h.p. Johnson 
outboard. Necessary 
equipment. Ready to go. 
$750. 853-5478. 

■ KMrLOYMENTl 



stick. $2,850. 588-2540. 



16iio«o«y« 



See^Sco^w 



it 



HetpWa 



BEAUTICIAN — Immediate 
opening, with or without 
following. Nicolas Coiffures, 
340-2647. 

BILLING CLERK Full or 
Part-time Motor Carrier 
experience required. 853-5311 

ELECTRICIANS 8. 
HELPERS — Experienced 
in house and apartment 
wiring. Must have 
journeyman's card. 
Excellent pay, 
hospitalization, paid 
holiday*, paid vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, l^r. Pete Parker. 

H0iiiKiE?ER~ 

AAaturc, live ih, full charge. 
References, salary open. 428- 
54^. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 
ADVERTISING 
PERSONNEL 
Unusual opportunity for 
right person, attractive, 
neat, good personality. 
Meet exciting people. High 
Income. Call days 2 to 3 
p.m. 623-7858, nights 490 
1749, Mr. Green. 

RATECLERK- 
Full or Parttihie Motor 
Carrier experience required. 
853 5311 

REFRIGERATION 
MECHANIC 
Commercial repair work. 1st 
class only. Permanent 
position. Top pay. Equal 
opportunity employer. 420- 
6140. 

SALES -r- can earn $4 an 
hour selling Fuller Brush 
Products. Full or part-time. 
Call 543-5224. 

SHEET METAL 

MECHANIC — and helpers. 
Experienced in house and 
apartment installation, 
duct work and equipment. 
Excellent pay and 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays and vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Dezern. 

STATE INSPECTOR- 
Arrowhead Union 76 ^- 
497-6473 



OA Sonaral iMinictiom 



VOICE LESSONS — 
Boflinnert, advanced. Jamos 
Morrlsson, 4n4>SB7. 



£ 



Ooodi 



44liiiiie 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

PriDrieHviicLeMoiuiii 

Piembioke Ana 

5 String Banjp-Tenor Banjo- 
Q;jitir-EI«ctrfc B«s»-Hawa- 
Han Gultar-Mandolln. 

C^Aft«4PJi. 499-1428 



$4S8.00 delivers 3 room, 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Nwfolk, Phone 622-4165. 



S2A Gangs- 



W vets- ^ 

I UVESTOCK I 



YARD SALE — Saturday, 
June 8, 10 AM to 5 PM. Pool, 
Bike, Furniture, Toys, 
Baby Items, Pictures, 
Brass Andirons, etc. 400 E. 
Bethune dr. Virginia 
Beach, 486-8697. 



53 Wuited to Buy 



ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR — Retired 
railroad man. Any kind, any 
condition, pay good price. 
S456242. 



LADIES- MEN 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company-will train 3 ladles 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Plus bonuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



' J i I I I 
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS- 
6 full-time, 6 part-time 
agents needed for new 
Virginia. .Beacli^ office, 
instant comntssion 
arrangement. life 
insurance, hospitalization, 
free license preparation, 
and on the |ob train- 
ing. Call Wayne Jar- 
rett for confidential 
Interview. 



4209940 623-3401 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

BROKER 



CZ — 1972, 125 Motocross 
bike, like new. $700. Cycle 
Engineering of 
Chesapeake, 543-5585. 

HONDA — 1974, 125, like 
new, less than 500 miles. $600. 
340-0045 or 340-1262. 

HONDA-1974, 360, Sissy bar, 
crash bar, high rise handle 
bars, cover. $1250 or best 
offer. 488-92M. 



34 He» Wanted 

^^laOROVE^^^^ 
Turn your spare time Into 
$$$$$. First $10 in your 
home with Sarah Coventry. 
424-1198. 

ARE YOU SATISFIED with 
your present family income? 
Let your ability supplement 
your income. Husband and 
wife work together. For 
interview 588-5174 

AIR CONDITIONING 
MECHANIC — 
Experienced. 

623-7265 

APPLICATORS — To learn 
to Install new type of 
building material. Drivers 
license necessary. Hourly 
wages plus company 
benefits. 853-8800. 

AUTO BODY Fender man 
and Painter. Must have 
tools. Apply In person. 
Martin's Body Works, 3536 
E. Little Creek Rd., Norfolk 
583 4551. 

AUTO MECHANICS 
Must have own tools. 
543-1661 

AUTOMOBILE BODY 
REPAIR-PAINT WORKER- 
Experienced with own tools. 
625 2791. 

BABYSITTERS 
Register and earn ejdra 
money sitting with wur 
agency. For Info call 489- 
1622. Babysitters Tidewater 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
In good paying lob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

No experience necessary. 
We will train you. 

Call 499-2763 



36 Jobs Wanted 



BABYSITTING In my 
home. Infant to 3 years. 428- 
4058. 



38 



OpportairitiH 



47Mi-Lhwlock 



3^^VMjd 



DREAMS LARGER 

Than 
YOUR PAYCHECK? 
Let us help you achieve the 
things you wanti 
Nationally known 
products. Amazing 
security possible. 
Investment of leu than 
SM.OO, too per cent 
refundable and $4.04 
membership fee (not 
refundable) . No oMIgation 
to sit down and talk over 
potentiala. Phone 4»-H6i 
or $4S-«M4, Room B M«. 



124 COWS & HEIFERS 

Lttw Gwdtaey. Wiadior. Vt. 

A-U-C-M-041 

June 7ili-FRI.-10:30 ajn. • MILKING HERO - 
100 COWS - Dm Av|. 13,906b 476f - 24 BRED 
HEIFERS - CTo le^ Ficdici^ la Aii|iiit) - S4.639 
Im. Va. m Bw (SnauBer) • ALSO SELUNG • 
lOLnNG BqOTMENT - 2400 GdL MoKwirier Balk 
T^ ad CMMMiy Pack^ - DeLmri Plpdiae, 6 
lOkfa^ IMtt nd DeLral VaoMB Fiiiiv 




47Nti-Lbertock 

BASSETS - Quality puppies. J'^,!*f^° ^^^^7 ..« 
shots and wormed AKC Cash paid for cameras, taixj 
registered. $50. 4979500 or recorders. »'fr«>»' TV s, 
497-3595 Band Instruments, 
1 Typewriters, guns. 

COLLI E-Female, 9 weeks _. ,,. 'r'TJ^'^'^'^ «o <«ia 

old. Tri-colo?, AKC 201 City Halt av. 622-6989 

resiistered. 857-0490. ^^T?^^^^?""'"'" 

54 Muikai MeiclundiM 

DACHSHUND PUPPIES— "i^^BBi^^BMBBBBBBi 

Miniature males, 7 weeks. ORGAN — Wurlizer 

AKC Registered; $75; 420- Funmaker custom, orbit 

4139 III, mini Moog synthesizer, 

Bell and Howell cassette 

FREE KITTENS-to a good player recorder, automatic 

home. 9 weeks old. 460-0680. percussion built-in. like 

new, $2,000. 855-8016. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUP 2 months old. 8559407. PIANO— Story and Clark, 

Remod eled; $ 275; 499-1474 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS— HBHBBBBBBBHBaHHaM 

AKC reg.. 9 weeks, shots, 5S TV-Radio-Stereo 

black 8< silver. 853-1085. ^i^mi^i^^mi^mmmm 

ROSS TAP€ PLAYER — 2 

GREAT DANE— Female, speakers; good condition, 

black, 7 weeks old. 490-1493 $50 857-1938. 

or 855-8931. MMBMBB^BiHaMBBi^ 

57 Wearing Appaiel 

GREAT DANE -^ AKC reg. ^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■1 

Female, Fawn. 10 months NEW SUIT for young man. 

old. $175. 497-4701. Navy blue, size 44 short. 

Cost $150 will sell for $80 or 

best offer. 481-6085. 



LABRADOR PUPS — reg.. 7 
weeks, black. Super Chief 
strain. Dr. Green, days, 627- 
4131, nights Suffolk 539-6515. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUP 
PIES — 10 weeks old, 
champion sired, shots, 
wormed, 853-9213. 



ST. BERNARD PUPPIES— 
Registered, wormed, shots, 
females $75, males $100. 
340-5240. 

ST. BERNARD— male. 1 
year. AKC registered. Best 
Otfer. 340-0888. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
AKC registered, shots, 
wormed, terms. 340-5/73. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
Males, AKC registered, 
wormed. dew claws 
removed, available, 
reasonable. 499-5247. 

A, ^ fiti-, i ji s a. 

WEIMARANERS— Choice 
pups available. Ready to go 
now. Also selected 
personable older 
indivldxials for the 
discriminating home. Fully 
guaranteed. Terms 
available. 421-3966. 

YORKSHIRE TER 
RiERS — AKC reg. 12 
weeks. Reasonable. Shots. 
490-0487. 



47APrt-StiidSeifice 

POODLES — Black 
miniatures, AKC 
Registered; Terms. 588-4066. 

■MERdiANUSEl 



BABYSITTING — In my 
home. Amphibious Base 
area. 460-0874. 

BABYSITTING «- In my 
home, anytime. Monday- 
Friday. Call 428-7934. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home. Ages 3 and up. 
Carriage Hill area. 340-3507. 

CHILD CARE — In my 
home, Westview area. 424- 
9754. 

CHILD CARE— My home. 
Ocean%area. Anytime. Hot 
meals.<^ Very reasonable. 
428-5987. 



PARTNER WANTED — 
Step In on a going and 
expanding business. 
Business presently doing 
$25,000 per month. 
Minimum Investment for 
right man willing to devote 
full time. For more 
information call 545-9163. 



SIArttetetPoiSaie 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
10,800 BTU. Excellent cond. 
220 volts. $110. 486-2819. 

BABY CARRIAGE — From 
Italy, brown corduroy, 
must see to appreciate. $55. 
583-9139. 

GOLF CLUBS — Hague 
Ultra. Complete set, bag and 
head covers. 588-2540. 

INSULATION — 3W full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1^. 

MOVIlilG-MUST SELL- 
Encyctopedias, Dinette set, 
small appliances, drapes, 
rods, misc. 464-1664. 

SIAAntJquee 

ANTIQUES, We buy 
anything old; furniture, 
glassware, jewelry; 1 piece 
or^ entire estate. ZEDD 
aVCTION CO. 622-4182. 

Duncan Phyfe sofa and 
chair; solid m^^ia table. 
Very old. 420-9M4. 

OLD ROLL TOP desks for 
sale, 8 to choose from. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 3994J979 

52 Howiriiold Goods 

Ban Franklin stove; never 
waed. $175. Encyclopedia 
Americana, 35 volwmas. 
$75. 420 9164. 

CHA I R S — set of 4 Maiwgany 
(Mniim chairs. Empire style. 
Excellent eonankm. 
8135 48993M. 

DISHWASHER — Sears 
Kenmore. Automatic. 1 
yaar OW. $150. 499-7591 

FURNITURE from Model 
twmes. Bedroom or Living 
Room $119.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recllner, 
Sunk Bods, $78 eacA. Maple 
■o««Mi Rtekar $45. Eaey 
farms. Call Mr. Kay at 623 
4100, d^ler. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
TURE for sole. 
Moving. 464-0746 



SSGoo dThiagiToEat 

WE SHELL ANY KIND OF 
FEASOR BUTTER BEAriS. 
4972151. 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Hurds rd.. 340 5171. 

MLawnftGafden 

Grading, seeding, beds 
reworked. 545 1155. 

62 Machineiy i. Tools 

JOHNSON TRACTORS 
Nine in Ford 200 Case, 600 
Ford and equipment, two 
^laded Disc Plow. 545-8370. 



63 Biiildii^ Material* 

HOME BufldTeVs Si Con- 
tractors • Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM 8. EATON 427 3200. 

64 Birsiness Equipment 

1969 PRICES 
On Office Furniture 

ARE BACK II 
Entire inventory of new 
desks, chairs i, files. 

REDUCEDUPTO 
50 PER CENT OFF OF 1969 

PRICE LIST. 
Celebrating our 5 year 
Anniversary Sale. Example 
new executive desk. $75.00 
delivered. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 

■ HOMES ■ 



6SII^^Hoii^FgrS^^^ 

ALTAIR— 1970, 12'x56' 
Small quiet court in Back 
Bay, fishing 8i boating In 
your front yard. $3950. 426- 
6032. 

AMERICAN — 10 x 55. air 
conditioned, washer, 
freezer, furnished shed; 
$2600. evenings 499-6227. 

AMER ICAN — 1970, 12 x 40, 1 
bedroom, furnished. $300 
equity and assume balance. 
5430364. 



65 MobUe Howes for Sale 



AUBUM4-1970, 12x60' 3 
bedrooms, skirt Uig, 150 gal. 
fuel tank. $3,200. Call 499- 
3916. 

CASTLE — 8' X 30' and 10' X 
50'. Sacrifice. Best offer. 
Call 497-8104 or 460-1283. 

OETROITER 1969, 12 X 60; 
3 bedrooms, partially 
furnished, washer, dryer, 
dishwasher, carpeted. 497- 
5169 



TTAJL 



Pof^t 



HOMETTE — 1964 50 X 10. 
with 4 X lOexpando in living 
room, 2 bedrooms, fully 
furnished. Must see to ap- 
preciate. $1675. 499-4812. 

MARLETTE-1966, 12' X 60'. 
3 bedrooms, unfurnished 
except for master bedroom, 
appliances, storm windows, 
2 sheds, and custom skirt. 
Call 545-4770 

AAAGNOLIA TRAILER-1962, 
10x55'. 3 bedrooms, par- 
ticularly furnished. Very 
good condition. 497-0075. 

MARLETTE - 1964, 10' x 
55', air conditioned, 
carpeted, • excellent 
condition, partially 
furnished. 460-1003, 497- 
8783. 

MOBILE HOME 1965 
Marlette. 2 bedrooms, 
carpet, air conditionong. 
Furnished. Excellent con- 
dition. $3,200. Day s-460- 1003, 
nights 497-8783. 

WINDSOR — 65 » 12, 6 
rooms, dining room, living 
room, kitchen, tip-out. 
Available July 1. Equity 
and assume. Can be seen 
anytime. 490-1307.. 

68 Rooms For Boaid 

OCEANFRONT — Rooms 
for 2. $25 per person weekly. 
Avalon Hotel, Oceanfront 8i 
20th St. 



VIRGINIA BEACH-6 blocks 
from water, 3 bedrooms, 
garage. Prefer family. $245 
year around. Avail. June 15. 
425^9767. 

78 Kaaart PrawMUf-lwrt 

3 bedroom 2 bath cottage at 

211-77th St., Va. Beach. $160 

. week. Avail. June 1st, June 

15th and 1st 2 weeks of July. 

can Mrs. Futch at $55-0195 

days, wknds. 855-1263 

HOUSES a. 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323Lasklnrd. 

428-4882 




81C Industrial for Sale 



WE CAN GET CASH FOR 
YOUR DUPLEX! 

REALTY GROUP, INC. 

499-9989 

24hrs. 




7$ Apartments-FvrnlsDed 

DELUXE 2 Bedroom 
Townhouse, completely 
furnished; dishwasher, air 
conditioning, At Green 
Run $265. monthly. 340- 
3747. 

76 A Moyei>5tonie 

FURNlfURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators. Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
853-9308. 



77 Apt For R^t 



£ffi 



OCEANA GARDENS — 3 
bedrooms, available 
immediately, $195. 340-7777 
or 340-4121. 

PEMBROKE PARK — 3 
bedroom, 2'/i bath 
townhouse. Owner, 420-8525. 

POPLAR HALLS 4 
bedrooms with den, on lake 
lot. Available July 1st. Call 
424-3309 



86FoiSaleVfaglriaBeich, ,/ 

HILLTOP MANOR — 3 
bedroom ranch, corner lot. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041 or 
464-4839. We trade. Higgins 
Realiy,Jnc^ R EALTOR . 

LAUREL COVE — Colonial 4 
bedroom, 2</^ bath heme with 
fireplace. Pay equity aiid 
assume 7 per cent VA loan. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041. 
or 464-4839. We trade. 
Higgins, Realty, Inc., 
REALTOR. 

WASHINGTON SQUARE 
— 3 bedroom townhouse in 
the best setting! Charming, 
cozy, immaculate, and best 
of ail, fantastic price! Call 
Jackson Realty, 490>059S. or 
420-1156. 

WINDSOR OAKS ~~4 
bedroom, 2"2 bath ranch; 
eat-in kitchen with pantry, 
large family room with 
fireplace and sliding door to 
oversize patio. Extra work 
'pace in large 2car garage; 
20 V 30 ft. basketball (:ourt; 
large treed lot on cul cfe sac. 
Call Jim Sawyer, 466-4041 or 
340-3181. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. REALTOR. 

87ForSaleCliBMpealM 

ALBEMARLE ACRES — 4 
bedrooms, 2 l>afhs, large 
country kitchen; $39,000. No 
agents. 482-3W4. 

92^to(Tmrato»Sg^^^ 

LOT FOR SALE. Port 
Malabar. FlorMa, $4,000 or 
trade Equity in Virginia 
Beach. 4517:7818 aftf r j5 P.M. 

93Lo{iForSale 

CREEDS, Beautiful building 
lot, 1 acre, 2 oM oak trees, 
septic tank 8, well. $7,2^. 425- 
5313, 425-1197. 



96WmtedR^Eig^^^^ 

CASH TALKS 
We buy 8. sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



200 ACRES 

^ V V Approximately 

Chesapeake "T^ . 

AUCriON - JUNE 15 

Excavating Equipmmt Sells Separately 

EXCELLENT INVESTMENT 
POTENTIAL 

DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL AS LAKE-SIDE 
FARM&'ITE Cunently stiU operating Bar-Pit w/ 
approx. 30% of 86 Acre Use Permit yet undis- 
turbed. 

Frontage on Martin Johnscm Road and present access 
by Dowdy Lane off of Galberry Road. (2 nA. bom 
Rt. 17 Exit of 1-64) For Brochures & Info. 


1 ^^^^^VT^^^^, AiirrinNLji 


■CHKSAPKAKe Dl- ■■■■^■ni »"^-"a8"fi^ | 

■OWNER 1101 HOWITAOI KOAD ^^toI^MM^^^^ 1 

■ mcHHOiJD.X vmaiHK laito ■ 



A^FAMILY AFFAIR! 
FEATURES 



-.ft*. 



^Stai 




KANDIE LAW 



Although new to the Real Estate business, Kandie has ctemon- 
mated bar profesionalism by her m^ice to th9 oomrrMinlty. 
Let tf»e newest addition to the Byler Family help your family 
wHth its real estate needs. 



BYLER REALTY 

SHOAUSTS m MMtt RKN^MTIAL WHy HTttS 
IN AU VWGIMA HACH "^ 

3707 




340-8081 



REALTOR* 



^mt^m 



W«^HP 



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wm^^ 



wimm^tmt^mmmmmmm 



mmmmimi 



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state 



•» 



;ONSUMER| 

Retreads: 
use care for 
a good buy 

Bfg Peter Weaver 

Q. Are retread tires a good deal? If so, how do you 
explain those hunks of rubber on the highway? - L.W., 
Detroit, Mich. 

A. Retreads getumlly cost less than half the price of 
new tires and can provide quite a saving if you pick 
yo^ retreader with care. Here are sonw sample 
retrMd prices: sub«>mpacts — $ll; intermediate — 
$12.Se; lar|^ cars and station wagons — $1S; radiab — 
m. 

Uke everything else, there are good and bad 
retreaders. To find a good me, try calling taxi 
cmnpanies or delivery fleets (United Parcel, beverage 
companies, utilities) in "your area. Ask the fleet 
maintenance manager where the best retreader can be 
found. 

You have to be absolutely sure of your retreader 
when you have radial tires done over. The job has to be 
perfect if the radial has a steel-belted carcass— less so 
for other radials and regular, belted tires. 

All retread tires must now meet minimum Federal 
safety standards and some retreaders will give 
guarantees that equal those of new tires. Some tires, 
however, should not be retreaded and a good retteader 
will tell you so. For example, tires that are won) down 
too much, have nail hdes or damage around the bead 
area should not be reused. 

About those hunks of rubber on the highway. 
Experts say that some of the rubber comes from new 
tires that might have had a slight defect and were 
driven too hard or too fast durii% the first 100 miles of 
use. Otho- hunks of rubber come from tnidt tires 
(many of which have been retreaded two or three 
times) which were overloaded ac imprqwrly inflated. 

For more infwmation, you can get a pamphlet, 
"Save Fuel and Money Throu^ Recycling Tires," i^ 
sending a self-ad^-essed, stamped envelope to: Tire 
Retreading Institute, 1343 L. SL, N.W., Washingtm, 
D. C. 20005. 

Mind ^our Money 

Q. In a previous column you advised reader to use 
"dry gas" to eliminate moisture in the gas line and 
carburetw. It's a good idea. But, I spilled some on my 
hands once and the ends of my fingers were sore for 
weeks. Thought you'd like to know. — C.S.L., Bangor, 
Me. 

A. Thanks for the words d caution but mechanics 
tell me they get the stuff on their hands all the time and 
it doesn't bother them. Perhaps you have an allergy to 
the chemical. At any rate, you should always wash 
yoitf hands after s|illing ai^ possible caustic fhiid, 
inchiding gasoline. 



Tli»8un--Wtednaid^, Jww 5, 1874--N|tM 



Financ^Business/Economy 



^P^a 



•If 



• •• 



Q. I have several documents that deal with slavery 
wttch are well over 100 years dd. Do they have any 
/^ riu8)etary value? — L.W.B., Dublin, Ote 

A. According to an expert on old doaiments at the 
Library of Cwigress, "there is collecter and 
intitutional interest in documents relating to 
slavery." The expert suggested that you get in touch 
with an autograi^ or manuscript dealer selected trom 
the membership of the Antiquarian Booksellers' 
Association of America, Shop 2 Concourse, 630 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, NY. lOOlO. The association will 
send you a membership Ust and s(»ne wise words on 
"books and values" which shoukl be of interest to 
rummago^ who have hopes of making money from old 
books and papov. 

A kit d^iends on Uie condition of the bocks or 
documents and the possible fame of the person who 
signed or autop«phed them. 

Q. I was most Interested in your cdumn on "free 
legal hdp." The Wave Project, which I direct, has 21 
off k;es thiwgheut the state of California where we help 
pe<^ie to their own divorces for $65 (far less than most 
lawyers usually charge). - P.W.E., Van Nuys, Calif. 

A. lliis slnuM be oi great interest to Calif ornians 
with marital {roblems. Unfortunately, this kind (tf 
servtee fen't available ev»ywhere. 



I." 

M 

I; 



KlagFealiirM$yn<lcalc. Inc., 1114. 
Ptttr Wmvw iraicoaMS quwtions frma raad^n 
for pooiU* u» in his colunui. Please aand letters 
to hbn in care of Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Rose- 
nxMit Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 




m 

HMNM 



"^ 



r 

i 



JOK PA«UNOU 
RKAI.TOR 



f 



For pviOMi atnrioe, odl me uiy- 
ttow rt 4K4800 or borne, 
3404136. Thov b ate a con^iete 
itatt at Cnrtom Rwtty ready to 
swfe you with (^tomiiMl BmI 
Bst^aSmiee. 



CAU42S^80O 

m» Vi. Be »!tBlKl.V». Bt« it,Vi. 



Member 
Realtors 
MLS 

USTOM 

REALTY CORP. 
MAKING THE 
MOVE? 

CALL 

US 

FIRST 

OR 

LAST 

NO 

OBLIGATION 



April business slow 



Business in Virginia during A{Hil was slow, llie 
recession continues, and maiv ecommUc indicators 
are down, according to the monthly ecommiic 
report of the Bureau of Business ResMrch at ttie 
Cdlege of William and Mary. 

Ahnost all econonic Indicatcnrs are sufferii^ from 
inflation. Bank d^its (checks charged against 
demand depcwits) were down in April to 19.2 par 
cent over the same moirth last year. Bank debits are 
consklared good indicators of curroit ectnwmic 
events. 

If the inflation rate is deleted, the April figure for 
this year for bank deUts r^flecte a 13.3 pet cent 
increase over last year. 

BUILDING PERMITS also were down in April. 
Permits were down 48 per cent statewide, with 
some cities reflectirig an even greater decline ttiaa 
the state average. Charlottesville, Franklin, 
Lynchburg, Williamsburg and Winchester held 
their own over a year ago in the pereoitage ci 
buildhig permits issued 

Building permits are down 6.7 per cent for the 
quarter ending in April. The comparable quarter hi 
1973 showed buikling permits up 252.8 per cent 



The Fedoal Enei^ (MQce and Fedovl Power 
Commtosloh are tinady wanting about poraible 
brownouto and Mackouts caused by too much 
demand for electrkdty. Virginians are conserving 
electricity, the report indicates. Electricity 
consumer in April was up 1.4 per cent, and it was 
down l.S pw cent for ttie first quarter of this year. 

New car registrations continued to decline in 
April. Car registrations were down 38.9 per cent in 
April and 35 per cent for the quarter. 

THK STATE unemploymeirt rate contimies to be 
lower than the naUonal rate. Nmagricultural 
empkiynoent is up 2.2 per cent fm- April and 2.4 per 
oaA for Uie quarter. Unemidoyment stood at 2.5 par 
cent in April on the basis of "place of employment" 
and at 3.5 per cent using "place of residence." 

ReteU sales were up 5.6 per cent in April and 13.4 
per oeat for the first quarter of the y«ir. The report 
emphasizes that neither pereoitage is considered 
good whoi inflation is considered. 

Food prices were vp 14.4 per cent in April and 15. 1 
per cent in May. Postal recdpts were down 5.9 per 
cent in April and 3.3 per cent for the first four 
mcmths of the year. 



Industrial officer's 
replacement sought 



Local food prices still rising 



diK;f 



While producers and 
manufacturers al-ound the 
nation have been saying 
food prices are dropping, 
slalislics show that prices 
in Virginia Beach were still 
on lh«' rise in April. 

Food prices in the 
Virginia Beach. 
Portsmouth and Norfolk 
area oonlinued to rise 



slighliy in April, according 
to the Virginia Department 
ol \abm and Industry. 
Wliilo lite market basket 
price tor March was $36.26. 
April's marlcet basket 
price reached $36.34. The 
marki'i tiasket price is an 
index used by the 
Department of Labor and 
liiditsirv to measure the 



New Oceans Club 
has grand opening 



The new Oceans Chib at 
4004 Oceanfront is 
celebrating its grand 
opening with a ribbon- 
cutting and three special 
dinner parties. 

The finishing touches are 
now being put on the chib, 
which opened today to 
members and their guests. 
The club will be connected 
to the new Oceans 
Condominium by an 
enclosed pedestrian Ividge 
over Atlantic Avenue. 

The condominium is still 
under construction at the 
fork of Atlantic and Padf k 



Avenues. It is expected to 
open next spring. 

The ribbon-cutting is 
scheduled for today at 10 
a.m. A dinner for members 
of the club's board of 
directors and their guests 
was held Tuesday. 

Dinners for members, 
their guests, the press, 
builders and other invited 
guests are planned for 
tonight and Thursday. Two 
bands will entertain at the 
d i n^e r parties. 
ApprdTimately 400 to 500 
guests are expected for the 
two parties. 



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price changes in the retail 
c(isl of a fixed quantity of 
specified foods. 

The imirket basket price 
in the Ihrcc-city area is up 
by more (han ^5 compared 
lo ilK' price in April 1973. 
PriiM's in ihe area (his 
yeai°. however, continue to 
remain lower than those in 
Kichmond and northern 
Virginia. 

Hiiilding permits issued 
in X'irginia Beach for the 
month of A|ril toUled 533, 
worth about $10,124,880 in 
ciHislruclion value. 

New building permits 
issiKHl since the first of the 
year reached 1,638. down 
b\' 'HM compared to the 
\M1 permit figure for the 



siime period last year. 
Conslrurtion value for 
■lanunry Ihrbugh April 
liilaled $46,299,337 
conipaied lo $52,928,562 
worth (il building in those 
nxmlhs in 1973. Statistics 
are ciimpiled by (he city's 
Cfimmiinity Services 
Depuinionl. 

riuMiiployment in the 
NiHfollt. Virginia Beach, 
P <» r I s ni o u I h and 
Chesa|ieake area dKlined 
during March, according to 
lhi> Virginia Kmploymenl 
Commisiiion While 
unemployment in the four- 
city aresi was 7,025 in 
lebruaiy, March figures 
sh<med 6.875 persons out of 
work. The civilian work 
force in the four cities is 
about 245,600 persons. 



Virginia Beach 
Department of Economic 
Development Director 
Jam^ D^ellis is now 
sifting through 
applications of eight to 10 
candidates to replace 
Walter Alford, the city's 
industrial development 
coordinator, who has 
resign^ ^ective June 15. 

Mr. Alford, 34, is leavii^ 
his city post to join Eastern 
Electric Wire and 
Cable Ca as head of the 
New J«iey-based firm's 
new subsidiary, Eastern 
International Developers. 

Mr. Alford's resignation 
is the second major turn- 
over in the Economic 
Development Department 
this year. Robert Whitley, 
the city's tourism 
coordinator, resigned 
earlier this year to take a 
position with the travel 
department for the state of 
Pennsylvania. 

ACCORDING id Mr. 

DeBellis, the company just 
made Mr. Alfn-d an offer 



"too good to turn down. In 
thmkindof business, that's 
the hazards. A fellow who 
knows the area will be 
wwkiiv closely with a 
company and he will be 
their contact in the area 
and they'll make him an 
offer." 

Mr. DeBellis says he 
knew about numerous 
other offers which Mr. 
Alford had received, but 
which were not substantial 
enough to entice him to 
leave his job with the city. 

Mr. Alford has been 
employed by the city since 
November 1963. He first 
served with the Virginia 
Beach Planning 
Department and the Real 
Estate Department. He 
became the city's first 
industrial development 
coordinator in April 1971, 
shortly after the creation of 
the Economic 
Development departments 
In September 1970," 



The new subsidiary will 
have its headquarters in 
Virginia Beach. "The firm 
will develop industrial 
land, erect office buildings 
and provide industrial 
relocation services in 
Tidewater, and eventually 
in other East Coast areas. 

Mr. DeBellis hopes to 
have a replacement to step 
into Mr. Alford's position 
within the next two weeks. 



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Puec B-10-The Sun-Wedneiday, June S, 1974 




) MILLER 





BROWDER 




FEREBEE 



MCLAUGHUN 



Exchange teachers: ^Grass is greener up there^ 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

Five Virginia Beach social studies teachei:8 
experienced true "culture shock" recently when 
they taught for three days at high schools in 
Delaware. 

The teachers were impressed by the northern 
schools' lack of discipline problems, pr(rfessipnal 
attitudes among teachers and students alike, small 
class sizes, community involvement in the schools 
and money. 

The money makes the big difference, the 
teachers believe. Three teachers went to Alexis I. 
DuPont High School, a public school in Greenville, 
an upper-class suburb of Wilmington, Del. Two 
went to Wilmington Friends School, a wealthy 
.{N'ivate (Quaker) school. Five teachers from those 
two schools visited schools here. 

"IT WAS REAL culture shock," said John 
McLaughlin, 25, who has been teaching three years 
at Plaza Junior High School. 

"The kids there are definitely super rich. They've 
traveled all around. They've had money for a long 
time. They're definitely upper class," he said. 
"They have a lot of tradition in their school. It's 
very Ivy League, very prep school." 

Ed Browder, 29, in his first year of teaching at 
Bayside High School, echoed Mr. McLaughlin's 
comments. Mr. Browder also taught at Friends 
School. 

"We found out the grass is a lot greener up 
there," he said. "Those kids are very highly 
motivated, and they should be. Momma and daddy 
spend $2,200 a year for tuition. The school has good 
facilities, good materials, and they can be in- 
novative. "Diey have a lot of money." 

PATSY FEREBEE, 24, and Gary Miller, 22, both 
in their first year ci teaching at Kempsville High 
School, taught at DuPont High School in Greenville. 
Although it is a public school, they experienced 
much the same feelings as their fellpw teachers at 
the Quaker school. 

(The fifth Virginia BesK:h teacher in the ex- 
change, Betty Lou Whitford of Kempsville High 
School, was not available to be interviewed.) 

"There's not a whole lot oi difference between the 



two schools," Mr. Miller said, "They're in the same 
district, and they're both rich. I heard the median 
income there is around $50,000." 

Both Ms. Ferebee and Mr. Miller said they were 
impressed by the high motivation of the DuPont 
school students, by the lushness of the school 
facilities (the hsdls are carpeted, the restrooms are 
free of Student graffiti) and by the students' sense 
of responsibility. 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH teachers liked the in- 
formal scheduling at both Friends and DuPont 
schools, they said, where there are no bells, and 
both students and teachers are free to innovate. 

For instance, Ms. Ferebee said teachers at 
DuPont school are free to move their classes out- 
side on nice days. At the Quaker school, Mr. 
McLaughlin was impressed with the flexible 
scheduling allowing classes to take off on camping 
trips with their teachers or hop on a bus to take a 
field trip, with classes canceled for the day. 

"There are no discipline problems there, either," 
Ms. Ferebee said. "The students know what is 
expected of them. For instance, if they abuse their 
lounge (the students have lounges for relaxation at 
DuPont school), they know it will be shut down, so 
ihey don't do it," she said. 

"It's the big thing of responsibility," Mr. Miller 
said. "The students know what's expected of them, 
and they come across." 

THE FIVE Virginia Beach teachers are not the 
only ones who experienced culture shock from the 
exchange teaching program. Their Delaware 
counterparts who tai^ht their classes here for 
three days also were impressed by the differences 
between the school systems. 

Harry Hammond, a Friends School teacher who 
took over Mr. McLaughlin's classes at Plaza Junior 
High School, wrote the Virginia Beach teacher 
when the exchange ended, expressing shock over 
the time local teachers spend on other duties, such 
as the hall duty, "meatball" (lunchroom) duty and 
boys' room duty. 

"There, Harry has no duties except teaching," 
Mr. McLaughlin said. "The teachers there don't 
have to watch the lunchroom or the halls, because 
the students dcm't n^ed supervising. It's the 
discipline thing again. 



"Harry also was shocked at my teaching load," 
Mr. McLaughlin continued. "I have five classes a 
day at Plaza Junior with a total of 142 students. He 
has 42 students total." 

MR. BROWDER exchanged teaching assign- 
ments with Jim Smith, a Quaker, who has b^n 
teaching for 27 years. 

"He's a very low-key guy, very quiet, and I'm 
just the opposite," Mr. Browder said. "We seemed 
to complement each other." 

He said Mr. Smith was amazed by the "burden of 
paperwork" the Bayside High School teacher must 
contend with. He also felt the administrators did not 
support the teachers at Bayside High, Mr. Browder 
said. 

"Jim said, i don't see how you can do it,'" Mr. 
Browder said. 

Ms. Ferebee and Mr. Miller also were impressed 
with the small classroom size at DuPont school, 
they said. "I have about 110 students total," Ms. 
Ferebee said, "with about 35 at the most in one 
class." 

Her exchange teacher, Bob Siere, has seven 
students in one class at DuPont School, with his 
largest class composed of 15 students, she said. She 
said Mr. Siere had no more than 50 students total in 
all his classes at DuPont school. 

MR. MILLER said his exchange teacher, Ed 
Zippe, has 70 to 80 students total at DuPont. "I have 
about 130 here at Kempsville High," he said. 

Mr. Siere told Ms. Ferebee he could nev&c teach 
in a school like Kempsville High, she said. "He told 
me there were just so many things he couldn't 
handle." 

"I got a very negative attitude from Ed Zippe," 
Mr. Miller said. "He enjoyed the exchange but he 
was appalled by our school. I got the impression it 
was all so negative to him," he said. 

The local teachers expressed apprehensions at 
first about going on the exchange, because they 



said they diAi't know what to expect. 

"I was scared to death when I found out I was 
going to a Quaker school," Mr. Browder said. "I'm 
not a structured teacher, and I discovered I had to 
wear a tie for three days." 

BUT HE SAID his fears were unfounded and he 
enjoyed the exchange. "I went up there and saw 
what school could be if people really get behind it. I 
saw a system that really seems to work. It 
motivated me to come back here ami try harder." 

Mr. McLaughlin said he aslo felt apprehensive 
about the trip at first and didn't want to go. "But 
after I got there, I just wanted to do it again eva7 
year. We feel we got a lot out of it." 

Ms. Ferebee said she enjoyed the teaching ex- 
perience and would like, to repeat it next year in a 
different location. "It made me realize," she said, 
"that not all teoiagers don't care about learning. 
Those kids were so highly motivated.'! 

"THE EXCHANGE made me realize we are right 
in the middle here at Kempsville High," Mr. Miller 
said. "I did some student teaching in eastern North 
Carolina, and it was awful. Half of my students 
were basically illiterate and they were in high 
school. Then I went to A. I, DuPont, and it's on the 
other end of the educational scale. It was a hell of 
an education in itself just seeing that school," he 
said. 

The three-day teacher exchange program was 
arranged by Thomas Garrou, supervisor of social 
studies for the Virginia Beach schools. Hie teacher 
exchange idea grew out of a summer workshop on 
new curriculum ideas held at the University of 
Minnesota. A Minnesota professor, director of the 
workshop, is on sabbatical leave teaching at 
DuPont school, and helped arrange the teacher 
exchange with Mr. Garrou. The five local teachers 
volunteered for the exchange. 



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PHONE 428-0055 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 17 to August 30 — Morning & Evening Classes 

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One-yeor transfer courses In any of the following 
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LET'S 

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RmI Opportunity for 
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49th Year No. 24 



Circulation 23,000 



$3.27 A VOTE 

Griffin tops 
in spending 



Councilman-elect John Griffin oi Lynn- 
haven Borough was the top spader in the 
recent campaign for the Virginia Beach City 
Council election. As expected, Mr. Griffin led 
all candidates reporting in spending for the 
May 7 election with a total d $39,669.09. 

Incumbent Lynnhaven Councilman Reid 
Ervin, whom Griffin defeated in the election, 
was the second highest spender with 
$17,472.23. 

As of Monday, all winners in Uie election 
bad filed a report of campaign expenditures 
with the State Board of Elections. 

Candidates are required to file their reports 
within 30 days after the date of the election, 
which was last Friday, but a ruling from the 
Virginia attorney general says that the time 
limit is "directory only." Nevertheless, 
winners who do not file are not allowed to take 
cifiee, and losers not filing are subject to a 
misdemeanor penalty. 

CANDIDATES who had not filed as of 
Monday were at-large candidates Sandy Bolin 
and Peter Joy. 

A ccMnparison of cost per vote (determined 
by dividing the amount of expenditures by the 
^^. total number of votes received) revealed that 
•efech of Mr. Griffin's 12,138 votes represerited 
an expenditure of $3.27 each. Mr. Ervin's cost 
per vote for 10,728 votes was $1.63. 

Other candidates' expenditures, vote total 
and cost per vote fibres are: 

Dr. Henry McCoy, councilman-elect from 
Kempsville Bwough, $14,845.02 for 10,879 
votes at a cost per vote of $1.36. 

Patrick Standing, at-large councilman- 
elect, $14,287.59 for 7,590 votes at a cost per 
vote of $1.88. 

^. ,Ci$aepass Holland, re-elected to l)is 
,S^^fi0ll^^^mi^B(»k $7,054^ m .12,278 
votes «t a dost pa* vote of 57 (^ts. 

Meyera Oberndorf, defeated for an at-large 
seat, $3,670.43 for SfilSO votes at a cost per vote 
of $1.19. 

Cecily Macttonald, defeated for an at-large 
seat, $3,533.06 for 2,792 votes at a cost per vote 
of $1.27. 

Gaynette Winter, defeated for the Bayside 
Borough seat, $2,731 .20 for 9,067 votes at a cost 
per vote of 30 cents. 

Albert Sparrow, defeated for an at-large 
seat, $1,629.41 for 1,711 votes at a cost per vote 
of 95 cents. 

Joel Smith, defeated for an at-large seat, 
$1,344.08 for 2,322 votes at a cost per vote of 58 
cents. 

Reba McClanan, defeated for an at-large 
seat, $1,125 for 4,368 votes at a cost per vote oi 
26 cents. 

Edward Lynk, defeated for an at-large seat, 
$438.19 for 1,503 votes at a cost per vote of 29 
cents. 

Drewry Little, defeated for an at-large seat, 
$396.68 for 662 votes at a cost per vote of 60 
cents. 

Philip Muldez, defeated for an at-large seat, 
$114.90 for 356 votes at a c(»t per vote of 32 
cents. 

Garland Isdell, defeated for his Kempsville 
Borough seat, was granted a two-we^ ex- 
tension to file his report. 

Floyd Waterfield, uno[^)Osed for his Pungo 
Borough seat, reported receiving $150 for his 
campaign. ] 

Mayor Robert Cromwell, \ who was re- 
elected to his at-large seat, and his running- 
mate Murray Malbon, who was defeated in 
the at-large race, filed a ^int campaign ex- 
penditures report. Together they spent 
$14,497.91. 





VlHGINl^ 



gUH 18 5974 



AIE UBRmR^ 



SESIALS SECTION 
VA STATE LIBRARY 
RICHMOND VA 23219 





Ca 4973524 



Wadiwiday, June 12, 1974 



City of Virginia Beadi, Va. 



Copyright 1974 
Batch PublliMng Corp. 



IBCanti 




Trash pick-up 
back to normal 



If you've been worried about coping 
with decreasing trash pick-ups, in- 
creasing litter and multiplying garbage 
odors from the hot summer sun, your 
worries have been eased som^hat, 

The Federal Energy Office, perhaps 
smelling something pungent in Virginia 
Beach, has increased the city's gasoline 
allocation, allowing the city to resume 
twice-a-week garbage pick-ups in 
residential sections. 

The doubled pick-ups start July 1, City 
Manager Roger M. Scott told City 
Council during an informal session 
Monday. The city plans to resume the 
same schedule it had at the time pick- 
ups were cut to once a week some 
months ago. 



IF YOUR TRASH was picked up on 
Monday and Thursday then, it will be 
picked up on Monday and Thurfday 
beginning July 1, Mr. Scott said. 

Meyera Oberndorf, an unsuccessful 
candidate for City Council in the recent 
election, approached the council in 
regular session Monday armed with 
petitions signed by 275 residents askii% 
for the old pick-up schedule to be 
resumed. Ms. Oberndorf was told the 
matter was academic since the energy 
office had heeded the city's cries for 
more fuel. 

The commercial resort strip establish- 
ments will continue to have six pick-ups 
per week throughout the summer 
season, Mr. Scott said. 



Double reverse 
on zoning plea 



Bernard Midlins isn't really sitting 
in the street reading the paper, 
although that car on the right looks 
uncomfortably close. Actually, Mr. 
Mullins is in the parking 1<^ of 
Princess Anne Plaza Shopping 



Center where the buses took off 
Monday on their first wedtday run 
of the new Beach bus service. He's 
taking a break, after helping serve 
refreshments to bus riders. (Sun 
photo by Linda Miller) / 



'The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission Tuesday reversed 
its own rerommendaUon for 
approval on a zoning change 
application, reconvened after it 
had adjourned and agreed to 
rehear Uie application again in 
next month's meeting. 

Attcrney Grove Wright, who 
charged the commission earlier 
in the meeting with violating the 
state Freednn ol Information 
Act by meetii4 privatu^ «ii bis 
client's appUcaticm, approached 
the commissioners after 
adjournment and asked them to 
reconsider their vote. 

Seven commissioners still 
present at the end (rf the 
meeting voted to reconsider the 
application next month. Earlier 



Med school asks funds 



Norfolk's Eastern Virginia Medical School may 
start receiving a regular gift from Virginia Beach 
— a quarter of a million doQars a year. 

The school and its guiding wganization, the 
Norfolk Area Medical Center Authority (NAMCA), 
have started sending out financial feelers to 
surrounding cities asking for contributions to the 
school 

Representatives of NAMCA and the medical 
school met informally with the Beach City Council 
in March to solicit an annual contribution of 
$250,000. 

Cities that contribute money to the school will 
feel the benefits of medical educational programs 
taught there, NAMCA feels. I^ese benefits may 
come in the form <rf more doctm^ for the resort city, 
said Councilman Dr. Clarence Holland, a member 
of a special committee studying the NAMCA fund 
request. 

DR. HOLLAND TOli) the City CouncU during 
an informal meeting Monday that medical students 
tend to stay in the area where they receive their 
education and complete their internship and 
residency requirements. 

The report of the special committee recom- 
mended that certain points be met by NAMCA 
before City Cmmcil ai^qriates any funds for the 



Drugs: City studies proposed program 



medical school. 

The committee wants the City of Norfolk and the 
medical authority to work toward chatting 
existing state legislation in the 1975 General 
Assembly regarding appointments to the NAMVA 
board. 

MEMBERS OF the board are now nominated by 
localities, with approval and appointment by 
Norfolk City Council. Dr. Holland said Virginia 
Beach should first assure the city's full par- 
ticipation on the board. 

The state legislation would be changed allowii^ 
Virginia Beach to appoint its own board member. 
Each city participating should be all(»ved e<]pial 
representation on the board, r^ardless of the 
population size or the amount conb'ibuted by the 
city, the committee's report recommends. 

Also, Dr. Holland said tte committee wants the 
name of the authority changed to reflect its 
proposed regional emphasis, he said. 

The committee's report recommends that 
Council aM>ropriate the $250,000 requested by the 
medical school after the stipidations regarding 
board representation and clni^e oi name are met 
by the medical authority. 

The council will be asked to take action on the 
"^natter Monday during its r^ular me^ng. 



in the meeting the commission 
recommended denial of his 
client's zoning change, 

IN APRIL the commission 
recommended approval of the 
zoning change. It was referred 
back to the commission for 
further review by City Council 
on May 20. 

Commissioner J. Harry Mote 
toM Mr. Wright the City Council 
had^reiyMtiad a sfvond look at 
Uw ap^ication in light of the 
city's new managed growth 
policy. 

Commisiion Chairman Bailey 
Parker told Mr. Wright the 
commissioners had met In a 
private briefing after their 
April decision. Mr. Parker said 
the commission had made a 
"mistake" in apprwing the 
application of A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth Sills 
to rezone two acres of laml frtmi 
residential to apartment use at 
Unkhorn Drive and Pacific 
Avenue. 

Mr. Wright chared that the 
commissioner's private 
briefing had violated the 
Freedcnn of Information Act 



Press 
honors 
to Sun 



The Virginia Beach Sun 
has won two top awards for 
outstandinK achievement 
in the annual Better 
Newspaper Contest of the 
Virginia Press Association. 

In competition with other 
large weekly newspapers 
in Virginia, The Sun won 
8 first place for excellence 
ef editoilal page and a 
third place for excell- 
ence of sports page. 

The first -place award for 
the editorial page was 
based on content, overall 
appearance, typography, 
layout, choice of art woric 
and general coverage. 

The third-place award 
for the sports page was 
given for excellence in 
niakeup and general ap- 
pearance, selection of 
stories. comprehensive- 
ness of sports coverage, 
local appeal of material, 
and use of photographs and 
illustrations. 

The Sun will receive a 
plaque and a certificate for 
the two awards. 



Inside 



Two isctlom 16 

dassiflod B-8 

Comm^it A-2 

FaatufM A4 

Gardening A-6 

Lift Styles B-1 to B-3 

Reel Estate B«7 

Religion B-3 

Sports A-6 to A-8 



By BONNA HENDRICK 
San »aff Writer 

• The Virginia Beac^ City 
'Coiaicil saw the results Monday 
of a ^,000 appropriation made 
in Fdruary 1973, to establiA a 
comprehensive drug abuse 
fH-ogram in the city. 

John Aycock, a rehabilitative 
psychologist, briefed coun- 
cilmen on the results to date erf 
the development of a drug 
p n ^am started by him last 
iHBiimM' wh«] he was hired to 
imi^mmt the ^,010 Initiation 
and Dev^vneit (I md D) 
grant. 

Now Uwt the pngftm has 
been set up M paper, ttw city 
will apiriy to state and federal 
BgeiK^ for hmii to impton@t 
it. The aty Coundl wUl be 
a^ed to eaione the gfmt 
applications and provide 
matching sums In varies 
amoints. 



IVE C(^T of the Mw am- 



|N%hensive program will be 
$133,239, Mr. Aycock's report to 
the councibnen indicates. Of 
that amount, $^,188 will be 
allocated to the Drug Outreach 
Center and $48,051 to new 
pn^am services. 

Finds will be asked to hire a 
director of the new drug 
program, to continue the 
<q>eration ot the Drug Outreach 
Center and to hire a drug 
treatment and training 
supervisor. 

TIk pn^Msed drug pro-am 
wiU b«»me a divisim) of the 
Chapter 10 Board (Mental 
Healtii and M«ital Retardation 
Services Board), George 
Tinnes, an as^Mant to the city 
mana^r, told the co^ilmen. 

Mr. nnaes said tte Chapte- 
tt AMrd has no pn^ams in its 
^vg dvt^, and placing ttw 
iMw c<miprebensive during 
{MTOfram unter Chapter 10 
Boaird ^natf^oB «wM avM 



expensiye^div''c*'tion of ser- 
vices ari8*]^sonnel. 

WHEN MR. AYCOCK was 

hired last summer as director of 
the grant, he said he wwld use 
the grant monies to collect and 
evaluate data on the incidence 
of local drug abuse before 
designing a comprehensive 
drug treatment propam. 

Surveys have be^ made <hi 
local drug ise, he told coun- 
cibnen, with 0Mra«fom swvey 
of households and another of 
professionals who are close to 
the drug scene, such as 
physictans and dn^g^sts. 

He said the sirvey data 
provide a "good overview, a 
trfrd's eye |NCture" ot *i« use 
io the City, buk mm^ iteU is 
needed. He said the re^ts 
wMild be correlated and "run* 
thresh a comfNtt^," M the 
ren^ to date "p^t^ v«y 
strMitfy to the direiXmi we 
^o^i (»nsMR-" in i^t^ iqi 
the cwni M -di airi v e pngittm. 



THE PROPOSED program 
has two broad goals, Mr. 
Aycock said. The first is to help 
people going through any type 
of crisis. This would be ac- 
complished using the existing 
series of the Outreach coiter 
and by training so-called 
"gatekeepers" in the com- 
munity to l»lp with personal 
protrfems. 

The "gatekeepers" are 
persons who, thrtHgh their jobs, 
come Into contact with many 
people in crisis, such as 
teachers, police personnel, 
pules and recreation em|rioyes, 
social worko-s and ^^^ibntiim 
(dicers. 

"Oug abuse doea't ^ 
h^ipa)," Mr. A^»ek said. 
"Other situatioM occur first — 
a d«:ismi to rm away ftt»n 
Iwme, to dn^ out of s^ool, to 
leave a j^. 

"This program will help 
contend with emotional 
problems, family problems. 



schod^ 
turn to 



jMbiems, 
mgs." h. 



before they 
he said. 



THE SECOND broad gMl of 
the program will be to reduce 
"jail recidivism," for persons 
with drug and drug^elated 
problems, he said. The goal 
would be to prevent persons 
with drug problems from 
rrturning to jail or repeating 
the same actions leading them 
io be placed in jail. 

'IWs is an (qqwsite kind (rf 
ap|M-oach from the flrst goal," 
Mr. Aycock told the coun- 
cilmen. "We need a nM^:essftd 
jail-drug rehabilitation- 
prt^am." ^ 

He said that about half of the 
curre^ inmate of the Virginia 
Beach City Jail have itoD^ or 
At^-related proUffiis. 

The new program would 
Mablish a jail rdiabiUtation 
cwimeling pian, Mr. Aycock 
said. Counseling would be 
provkied to inmates in ^ and 
f<rilow-i9 couBKih« miiM be 



provided after the inmate is 
released. 

CtHincilman George Ferrell 
asltod about the effectiveness of 
such a |Ht>gram and how the 
city can tell if it is getting 
r^ults for its money. 

"Y«i (Aycock) have been 
here a year and I've never seen 
how many peofrie have gotten 
well. How many you have 
cured? " Mr. FerreU said. 

"It looks good on paper," Mr. 
Fnrell continued. "I'm going to 
spend mmey b»-e, and I want to 
know how many }^u have 
cured." 

MR. AYCOCK refriM that the 
exact data Mr. Ferrell 
re<pieirt<^ is not available. He 
sdd that many residts of the 
ir^«m so tar have be«i 
cttfflcult to mMMa«. 

For esMtt^, he explained 
that couBseling techniques 
m^t help a f&mm And a }o^ 



who {M^viously could not bold a 
job. "Tliese mults are hard to 
measure," he said. 

Mr. Aycock explained that 
the new comprehensive 
program includes extensive 
follow-up procedures and 
evaluation techniques that 
wmild provide the exact data 
Mr. Ferrell requited. 

Although Mr. Aycock said in 
July that the original grant 
^oeram would not include the 
stuify of aUsoM abuse, Mr. 
Tinn« told councUmen that the 
comjM-ehensive pn^am wUI 
incli^ alrariwl treatmait. 

The fHt^iosed ramprehenslve 
drug abuse program has 
m^eived the emtorsements <A 
the Virginia Beach Drug Focus 
Committee, the Chapter 10 
B<wd. the United Dn« Abuse 
CouBcU, Vir^te B«ch Sieriff 
S.J. Smith, the Tidewater 
Regional Health Planning 
Cmmnl ttid I^mtav ^trtet 
». 




Closed 
cowhmI 



The Vtotiala Bcack Ctty 
CaancM owt M«day tar a 
mliMec la elosetf seas k w , 
•pea to neiyiM^tie piMfe 
■or tke press. Tke a^afa 
listed a '^pertoaael" 
matter, "a^fttatncats" 
and a "legal" matt^ far 
^iomIm. to II 
••tartkhyear.UMi 
has nrt far II hMn aai 21 
mlMites behlatf cImc4 



\ 



.1": J*' -*. i" 



Comment 



Page A-2-Tha Sun-Wednesday, June 12, 1974 



An editorial: 



Watergate Day 



Monday is Watergate Day. June 17 
will mark two years since the 
arrests were made inside 
Democratic National Committee 
headquarters, but the investigations 
that resulted directly and indirectly 
from the arrests are continuing. 
Presidential campaign activities 
and the Watergate scandal are being 
investigated in Congressional 
committees, courtrooms and the 
Department of Justice. 

Meanwhile, President Nixon — 
saying "let others wallow in 
Watergate" — parries the thrusts of 
the several investigations and 
declares that Congress and the 
judiciary have all the information 
that they need. To give more, he 
says, would only undermine the 
office of the presidency. It's 
President Nixon's delaying tactics 
which are frustrating the efforts of 
the investigators and dragging out 
the Watergate case. 

It has b€<ien recognized throughout 
American history that once the 
constitutional process of 
impreachment is underway, the 
ri^t of the president to withhold 
relevant material is erased. The 
opinions of Presidents Washington, 
Jackson, Polk, Buchanan, Grant, 



Cleveland and Theodore Roosevelt 
stand as precedent. \ 

EVEN MR. NIXON himself said in 
1970, when the executive branch was 
called on to provide information 
about Supreme Court Justice 
William 0. Douglas, that it was 
"clearly obligated, both by 
precedent and by the necessity of the 
House of Representatives having all 
the facts before reaching its 
decision, to supply relevant 
information to the legislative 
branch." 

The time is long past when fine 
points of law could divert the 
legislative or judicial branches of 
government from their pursuit of the 
truth. Two years is long enough. As 
Mr. Nbccm has noted time and time 
again, Watergate is interfering with 
the efficient operation of the 
government. 

As the principal constitutional 
officer of the United States, 
President Nixon should supply the 
information that can resolve the 
issue of whether he should be 
impeached. This is an obligatirai to 
the office of the presidency, to the 
Constituticxi and to the public. 




^ 







CHysMe 

ByUndaimiei' 

Place your bets 
on mayor's race 



As the time approaches for the city to send out the 
old cwincilmen and bring in those newly-elected 
members, speculation seems to grow about who 
will be the next mayor of the city. 

Mayor Robert Cromwell has said he will not 
accept the mayoral responsibilities again because 
the duties are too time-consuming. Some persons 
have speculated that Councilman Robert Callis 
may be the man to fill the mayor's shoes. 

But the latest gossip is that Councilman J. Curtis 
Payite will be the governing body's choice for 
mayor. Some persons have said Mr. Payne's health 
will prevent Wm from accepting the position. But 
others say while Mr. Payne has had gall bladder 
troubles, his health is as good as the next person's 

Though probably not quite as prestigioiK as the 
mayor's title, the Council also will be selecting a 
new vice-mayor. Word is that there is a move 
behind the scenes to name Councilman George 
Ferrell to that post. However, several on the 
Council may not go for that idea. One Council 
member says that should such a move succeed, 
there would probably be a strong pubUc push for a 
charter change to allow for an elected mayor. 

So far, that's f«ir names in the pot for the mayor 
and vice-mayor positions. But, speculation 
continues and probably the only thing for certain at 
this point is that the Council's choices will come 
from CMie of the U members mi the city government. 

The new council members take office July 1, at 
which time the new mayor and vice-mayor will be 
selected by the Camcil. 



THERE WERE few early bird city officials to 
watch the Beach's new bus sj^tem begin operation 
last week. But, among the group who drove tte 
PrincKs Anne Plaza Shopping Center to see tl» 
buses roll were Councilman John Griffin, 
Councilman-electPatrick Standing andCouncilman 
John Baum. 

Mr. Standing was (Hie <rf the first on the scene 
(even when there were no bus ritters), and wWle 
almost everyone else was wanderii^ around the 
paricing lot sleepy-eyed at 7 a.m. , Mr. Standing was 
f3«. wide awake. He attributed his early morning 
Uvine^ to a carry over from his days as a 
; "^^^Ti^spaper boy. 

Mr. Baum was the brunt (rf most j(*es fwr the 

day, as he arrived around 8 a.m. from his home in 

the Blac^water Borough. 

"Did you ride the bus in from Balckwater, 

I John?" several members of the press and city 

goaded turn 

"WeU, he did have to get up at the same time we 
did, ymi know," joked anotl^r city staffer. 




THE NEW Green Run campus of Tidewater 
Community College is shown here in an 
architect's sketch as it will lo<* when the 



campus opens this September. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 



'HEIGHT OF LUXURY' 



TCC campus opens in fall 




OMM>ll.«M 



' An Jnt^Kndent Ntteipmper ^ 

nmmnnm mALWmmmt 



■OHMAOLOAMR 



m HownorH Read 
Viffinit ■•tfi, Vi^ma 234i2 



k,*t 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Snn staff Writer 

The new Green Run campus 
of Tidewater Community 
College is the height of luxury 
when compared to conditions at 
the C^mp Pendleton campus 
where students and faculty 
have worked since the college 
opened in 1971. 

About the only good thing 
anyone could say atwut the old 
campus is that the price is right. 
The college uses the old state- 
owned barracks at Camp 
Pendleton free of charge. 

Students and faculty alike 
have coped with crater-filled 
parking lots, non-air con- 
ditioned buildings, drab 
barracks surroundings, drafty 
classrooms, inadequate 
lighting, uninviting student 
lounge facilities, creaky, 
crotchety stairs and furnishings 
and cramped, crowded quar- 
ters. 

BUT THE intolerable con- 
ditions couldn't stop the college 
from growing. The Virginia 
Beach campus is the fastest- 
growing of the three Tidewater 
Community CoUejM campuses. 

The latest enrofiment figures 
far the last qujJU'ter at the 
college show a bout 2,900 students 
attending. Thfsre were only 
about 7^ when it opened for 
business in 1971. 

About 3,700 students are 
expected to -attend the Beach 
campus in the fall. The new 
Greoi Run campus, to be 
completed by the time classy 
start in September, can hancDe 
abmit 950 students at one time, 
according to D. William 
Bridges, director of continuing 
education. 

The college's ambitious 
in-ogram of off -campus classes 
and the addition of portable 
classrooms at the Green Run 
site will enable to handle all the 
students who wish to attend the 
Beach campus, Mr. Bridges 
said. 

THE FIRST PHASE of Uie 

new cam{NU, now under con- 
struction with W.B. MereiBth 11. 
as general contractor, inclucte 
four buildings, a large ^mi- 
circular parking tot aiKl a man- 
made lake for drainage. 

The new campus is on 115 
iK:res of land at Green Rtoi 



the city. Although the college 
now seems to be out in rural 
Virginia Beach (it's off Prin- 
cess Anne Road and what will 
be Rosemont Road extended,) it 
will probably be in the middle of 
Beach growth by 1980 or 1985, 
predicts Mr. Bridges. 

Once Rosemont Road con- 
struction is extended past 
Holland Road, the main en- 
trance of the campus (where 
the administration building is 
going up) will be at Rosemont 
Road. 

The entrance is now a new 
street dubbed Diana Lee Drive 
by the city. The drive is directly 
off Princess Anne Road, 
roughly half-way between the 
heart of Kempsville and the city 
municii»l complex. 

THE BUILDING nearest 
completion is the first one 
reached from Princess Anne 
Road, the science and 
technology building. It looks 
something like two buildings in 
one, which it is. 

Each of the buildings at the 
new campus is planned so 
additions may be constructed 
easily as future phases are 
funded. Some of the buildings 
planned for additions in Phase 
II instead are combined in 
Phase I cqnstruction. 
■'^' Here ^miil be taught the 
science and 'technological 
COTirses, with a laboratory for 
the college's vending machine 
repair and servicing program. 

The only two-story building on 
the site is the learning 
resources iHiilding (library), 
which houses two-story'" book 
stacks, a small auditorium to 
seat about 200 persons, and the 
various audio-visual resource 
of the college. 

The outside walls of the 
center are up, but the bialding 
still lacks a rocrf and the 
auditorium walls. 

THE BUILDING housing 
stud^it services, humanitira 
and social sciences is almost 
completed. It wiU include a 
stui^t loioige, a hot food 
service, patios with views ct the 
lake, a boiAstore, financial aid 
and couraeling offices, plus 
classroom space. 

TTie central administrati«i 
and busines science bulding 
include aU facilities for student 
aiknteiraaand records plm the 
m«^ ^minirt-ative Meet. 



The business science portion of 
the building houses classrooms 
for teaching secretarial and 
related courses. 

A feature of the business 
science portion of the building is 
the data processing center. It 
will be used both to serve as a 
teaching center for students 
learning data processing and to 
store all the school's com- 
puterized records. 

ALTHOUGH THE site of the 
campus is now a construction 
nightmare, with broken glass, 
trash, unfinished sidewalks, 
still-in-progress buildings, 
exposed wiring, missing doors 



and other construction debris, it 
is to be finished by September. 

"We're confident now that 
we'll make it," Mr. Bridges 
said. 

Probably the only work not 
completed by the time fall 
classes start will he the land- 
scape work, he said. 

The city is responsible for all 
site preparatitm and main- 
tenance, he said. 

Sometime in the college's 
construction future will be 
additions to present buildings, 
allowing more space for 
classrooms, and construction of 
five additional permanent 
buildings, including a gym- 
nasium. 






SLEEK NEW buildinp of the future offer a 
sharp contrast to the "coistruction 
nightmare" that is the present coi^tlon of the 
site <rf TMewater Cemmnntty Cdtoge't mm 
Green Run campus. (Sun ph^o by Rod Mann) 




Tidings 

By 

7>feal 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

The marketing 
of Miss Anwrica 



So you thought being Miss America was all Bert 
Parks, bathing suits, evening gowns and talait. 
Well, it's not. It's more like a tight schedule of 
grinding public relations work. Once the pageantry 
and spectacle are over, her job resembles that of 
Ronald McDonald or an off-season Joe Namath, 
where brand name products trot out the celebrities 
to promote their wares. 

Miss America of 1974, Rebecca Anne King of 
Sterling, Colo., has taken on that task. She was in 
Virginia Beach last week as part of a tour for the 
Personal Care Division of Gillette. During her day 
in Tidewater, Miss America endured television 
appearances, press conferences and a couple of 
hours of smiling and signing autographs at the GrE- 
X department store. 

But Becky King is honest about her position. She 
readily admits being on a "public relations job" for 
Gillette. "I'm handsomely rewarded for it, too," 
she adds. 

WITH EIGHT YEARS of training in voice, piano 
and dramatics, 10 years in art and six years in 
dance, the 23-year-old pretty blonde was prepared 
to win the Miss America pageant and the $15,000 
scholarship that comes with it. 

Being Miss America 
is a practical thing for 
her. "It's a job," she 
says, "but I'm still my 
own woman. For one 
thing, I refuse to appear 
in a swimsuit." For the 
scholarship, other 
compensation and the 
experience, she is 
willing to spend one 
year promoting Gillette 
products. Campion's 
soup and Kellogg's 
cereal, all three 
sponsors of the Miss 
America pageant. 



/. 




MISS AMERICA 



AT G-E-X, she was all iMisiness. FOr a press 
luncheon, someone brought in a four-foot ice 
sculpture of an American eagle as a table cen- 
terpiece, and the show was on. 

"No pictures while she's eating. Let her eat," 
barked the Gillette man. 

A flurry of officials wearing amazingly similar 
sport coats looking as if they came right off the 
store racks scurried in and out of the room to get a 
quick glance at the girl they had once seen on 
television. 

AS THE ICE eagle melted. Miss America 
prevailed. Once she was ready to take questions, 
she shouted above the clamour, "Would you all be 
quiet in the background here?" 
"Are you a liberated woman. Miss America?" 
"Oh, dear Lord," she sighed. 
"What about activist women libl)ers?" 
"Infiltration is better than picketing." 
"What are your views on Watergate?" 
"I feel that, in the long run, we can all learn 
something from it." 
"And President Nixon?" 
"Impeachement seems imnecessary to me." 

SOON THE "for appearances only" production 
was completed. Reporters and cameramen filed 
past the dripping eagle to prepare their stories. For 
Miss America, it was only a little whUe before 
autograph-signing time. 

A couple of questions remained, however. 
"Excuse me, Becky. Do you have any idea where 
you are?" 

She nodded her head. "Vaguely." 

"And do you really use Gillette products?". 

"Yes, I do," she laughed. 

The Gillette man smiled and walked away with 
Bert Parks' ideal. 



How tosnbseribe 




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i,*"' 



HASSLES 



The Sun-Wednesday. June 12. 1974-ftige A-3 







■V\ 



By 

Donna 

Hendrick 



.>•*. 



Pen conspiracy: 
ink's tite stinic 

There's another conspiracy going on to 
undermine the morale of the masses. It's one of 
those insidious plots formulated by some sjck 
pierson somewhere to drive us all bananas. 

This is another in a long line of underhanded 
schemes all concocted by the same madman, the 
one who thinks up thingjs like the return portion of 
the bill that won't fit into the envelope provided. Qr\^ 
the lunchmeat package that cannot be clo^d 
properly no matter how carefully you open it.nOr ^ 
the check register that's filled before the checks 
ruh oit. Or the aerosol can that won't spray even 
though it's still half full. 

The newest scheme involves an innocent little 19- 
cent pen, the ball point kind (other types of pens 
also are involved in this conspiracy, but we'll get to 
them later). 



THE DIABOLICAL genius responsible for this 
plot has developed a way to make the pen run out erf 
ink while it's still full of ink. Clever, don't you 
think? 

Somewhere in a dark corner of the ballpoint pen 
factory, this evil person sits concocting his ink 
schemes, developing a formula that never fails. 

The unsuspecting buyer plops down his or her 19 
cents (plus tax), writes a few hundred words, and 
it's all over. No more ink. 

"These cheap pens are clear plastic so the buyer 
can see that the pen is still full of ink. So why won't 
it ;write? 



THE UNSUSPECTING pen-pusher shakes it a 
few times, hoping the ink is somehow stuck inside. 
Still no ink. Then the pen-pusher lights a match to 
the pen's point, figuring to heat the contents and 
cause the ink to flow freely. But still no ink. 

The pen-user gives up in disgust, throwing the 
still full but dry pen into the trashcan. 

Worse than the see-through pens that don't work 
even though they're apparently full of ink are those 
relatively new inventions, the felt tip pens. 

WITH A felt tip pen, the writer has no way of 
knowing if the pen is full of ink, half full or at the 
danger mark. The same guy who planned the 19 
cent pen rip-off must be responsible for the felt tip 
pen plot. The main difference is that felt tip pens 
cost mace, from about 49 cents on up. 

The only good thing about a felt tip pen is that it 
can be used confidently to forge signatures without 
those tell-tale pressure marks caused by ball point 
pens. Handwriting experts are always using 
pressure marks to nab check forgers and other 
criminal types. 

No pressure is the felt tip pen's big selling point 
You don't have to press down to use it, and you can 
write upside down with it. (An obvious advantage 
for people who stand on their headsa lot. ) 

BUT BACK to the conspiracy. The fellow in the 
ball point pen factory probaUy moonlights at the 
felt tip pen factory thinking up new and clever ways 
to make the pens quit writing in the middle of a 
word. 

Since you don't have to apply pressure to make 
the felt tip pen work, applying pressure is no help at 
all when the pen starts to run dry. You can push and 
squeeze and bear down all you want but ttiat little 
man in the factory knows it's all over for your pen. 

Every pen must come to the end of its ink, but 
must it be after it's written only a few hundred 
words? Maybe we should take a g'ant step 
backward and return to the pencil. It doesn't 
^lotch or blotch or run out of ink at unlikely 
moments, and it doesn't cost anywhere near 19 
cents or 39 cents or more. 



race/ 





Waiting in the wings to learn 
who is the winner in the Mtss 
Virginia Beach pageant can be 
hard on a beauty's nerves, Joan 
Brady (left) was snapped back- 



stage before she was named first 
runner-up in last week's pageant 
Stephanie Dowdy (top) flashes a 
big smile when she learns she's 
the winner. 



i 



I 



'I'VE FOUND GOD' 



His plea futile in trial 



Richard L. Saxton, 19, failed in his 
attempt Thursday to avoid going to 
prison by professing he had "found 
God" and was leading a changed life. 
He was on trial in Virginia Beach 
Circuit Court for attempted armed 
robbery. 

Noting that an investigation of his 
past showed Mr. Saxton, New York, 
had a behavior problem all his life 
including several violations of the law, 
Judge Robert S. Wahab Jr. said he felt 
Mr. Saxton "wmild be able to function 
better in a controlled environment 
away from the temptations of day to 
day life." He sentenced Mr. Saxton to 
eight years in the state penitentiary and 



suspended three years of the sentence. 
Judge Wahab pointed out Mr. Saxton 
has been in the city jail five months 
since his arrest and conviction and 
could be eligible for parole in 10 
months. Mr. Saxton possibly could be 
sent to the state farm at Southampton. 

Mr. Saxton was charged with the Jan. 
28 attempted armed robbery of the 
Oceana Salvage Co. on Oceana 
Boulevard by threatening office 
manager Rodney Malbon Jr., 44, with a 
22-calibre rifle. He was overpowered 
by Malbon when be momentarily 
became distracted by an auto parking 
outside the business. 

John F. Cailan, a member of the Rock 



Church in Kempsville, said he had 
talked with Mr. Saxton during 
numerous visits to the jail as a lay- 
minister. He said he felt "Rick had 
given his life over to Jesus Christ." Mr. 
Saxton told the court he had " found 
God" through his association with Mr. 
Cailan. 

Asst. Commonwealth's Atty. Paul 
Sciortino noted a pre-sentence report 
recommended probation not be con- 
sidered for Mr. Saxton. He also pointed 
to the report citing Mr. Saxton's 
previous conviction for unauthorized 
auto use, going AWOL from the U. S. 
Army and recommended a ten-year 
sentence with five years suspended. 




Milstein trial 
set Monday for 
motel burglary 



Gerald B. Milstein, 22, of 
Pikesville, Md., is scheduled to 
appear in General District 
Court Monday on four counts of 
burglary. Mr. Milstein was 
released on $4,000 bond June 3 
'following a preliminary 
hearing. 

Officials of the police HIT 
investigative bureau say -Mr. 
Milstein was arrested June 2 in 
the Cherry Motel, 29th Street 
and Artie Avenue, where he was 
registered. Authorities said Mr. 
Milstein was-^charged with 
burglarizing four rooms of the 
motel. 



$?; I 



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THE 



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weekdays 11 PM 



WEXLER 

WexhKfiamed 
Oceana N AS 
sailor of month 

Petty Officer Wayne R. 
Wexler has been named June 
sailor (rf the month at Naval Air 
Station (NAS) Oceana. He is a 
jet engine mechanic in the base 
Air Operations Maintenance 
Department. 



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k Mr. Wetter Hves with his 

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• Mfte ««1 Ivan, in eidisted 
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Features 



Page A4-Tha Sun-WMliwidiy, Juiw 12, 1«74 



Writing of Mom 
for Father^s Day 




So why did I write a cohiffiJi on inotb|r))ood fa- 
Father's Day? 

Well, for one thing, I forgot to write one for Mother's 
Day. For another, whatever affects mothers is likely to 
affect fathers. And, finally, there has been an 
incredible amount of nonsense bandied about both for 
and against motherhood. 

A mere five yipars ago, most women were convinced 
that a life without motherhood was no meaningful life 
at all. Today, accerding to U.S. government statistics, 
the fertility rate (<».3 births per 1,000 wotnen of child- 
bearing agef is the lowest in the nation's history. 

rm: availability of contraceptives and abortion . 
is only a minimal explanation; no one's forcing wwnen 
to avail themselves. Obvioi»ly, given alternatives, 
many women are finding • other activities more 
fulfilling than taking care of children. 

Which has led many men to iiidulge in hand-wringing 
and loud lamentation of, "Who will have the babies?" 
(as if this were really a problem anyway in this age of 
'over-population). These are usually the very same 
men who proclaim the sanctity (rf private property 
whenever there's talk of nationalizing public utilities; 
yet they are quite ready to nationalize women's bodies. 

There are ateo the men who insist that they pursue 
professional lives only because they can't fulfill 
themselves aS women do — by rearing children. We 
have an inkling of just how many tnen feel their place 
is in the home from New Ywk City's school system, 
which recently made paternity leave available to male 



tracbera with children under Uiree years old ( the same 
basis upon which maternity leave is granted). To date 
three men out of the system's 50,000 phis teachers have 
availed themselves (tf this ben^it — and all three do 
free-lance work at home. 

HOWEVER ttie traditionalists have no monopoly on 
moUio'hood myths. To read some of Uie feminist 
literature, one might assume that any wcrnian who is a 
mother is automatically oppressed, while in fact mai^ 
women are quite content to make their children the 
center of their lives. Perhaps tj|iis overreacUon is 
understandable since for so long^e --women who 
wanted to be doctors, lawyers, and Inaiairchiefs were 
denied our place in the sun. 

Still, one wonders why the Radical Feminists chose 
to hold a cMiference on Motherhood, sintx this group 
considers all men the enemy and many of their 
members have adopted a life style 99 per cent free (d 
male contamination. The results of their conference 
are just as predictable as a construction woriier's 
conference on wcmien's liberation. 

AND THEN there are the perennial paeans to single 
mcrithers and lesbian mothers. What if you're a 
married, heterosexual mother? Are you con^mned t^ 
nothing more liberating than the Good Housekeeping 
Seal of Ai^oval? 

There is also a Idbhy to make nonmotherhood as 
sacred as ai^le pie. This is "Non-Parent" which wants 



equal time whenever motherhood it ^oriOed. 
Personally, I rather doudbt whether greeting card 
poetry and poUtieians' tributes are gi^ng to affect any 
woman's dedsion on motherhood, one way or another. 

What the partisans have failed to peroeive is that one 
of the central imblems concerning motherhood is ^ 
diqiarity between the optimum Uolcgiwl i^te and the 
optimum social age. Teenage mothos breeze through 
pregnancy but by 35 a first pregHaoey is so 
cMiplication-prone that doctors label it "eider^ 
primapara" (note the typical mate M.D. taetK The 
chaiKes of bearing an abnormal child are one in 900 at 
age 25; at 40 it's one in 40. 

ALAS FQR the woman who would do what so many 
men do: paeq;K)ne parenthood until she's seen Qm 
wwld, established a sudcessful oireer, and feels readlsf 
to settle down. (Most self-made successful mtta 
become faUwrs in th(^r 40s, 50s and even 60i^ Ihey 
marry young women, of course. ) s ' 

If nature is cruel, society is enieler. NoJipiversal 
child care; no research hi "fertility aftsr 40.^' 9ut 
perhaps one answer for ttie future lies in ^ pist,^liw 
great, great aunt whote namesiie I am wasepi^lf Q)« 
first women doctors in Europe, widely rii{w6)ea as a 
person of letters and science. Though auirrtM}, she 
didn't have natural children, but at some .fi9» in 
middle life adopted two. Cmtrary to family olitom, I 
was named for Uds distant r^ttve beca^#vefy«ie 
agreed she ted ted an unumally rich aid rewarding 
life. ' '■ '<•':- 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
ANDGIRLS 

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If you would likt to earn extra 
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that axtn monay right nowl 

Circulation 



471 S. Lynnhaven Rd. (mlQi*M[a)l) 

JOESURACI V^riXXi 





HOROSCOPC 



Junan 
to Juno IB 

AUBB:(llay^nM April 
If-^iUse Aries Jtiwadaat)- 
Qat tttravMWt iVgB and go 
over tiiMget wftt a (toe 
toothed teoU>. Unexpected 
ezpehaea eould' arise this 
•Moniar. Gsrcfrily go over ail 
the ItsiM tM tUmWamly and 
Uigi^hti^todiVeiapanew 
project 

TAURUS: (April M to iMay 
9 —Abe fmras Aaecodant) 
^ FUA up pnilects atreacly 
In the worin and wfdt till next 
mcQtti to ^art aiQi^taig new. 
Take special p^ins irith your 
appearance nisw. A short 
waeltend trip is favored. 
Briiig Joy and cheer to r^- 
tives. 

GHONI: (Msf n to Jnne 
II — Also G«nyai AseeBdaat) 
-^ Take your weU^onmilated 
plauto siverteranow for q>- 
proval. You're in the spot- 
Ufllit, so look your hert. Ac- 
cept criticism paciously. 
Keep^your cool in the face (A 
deli^ and muddled oondi- 
ttons with oommunicatiorts. 

CANCfiR: (Jt^ 21 to July 
t} - Alia Gaaeer AseeuiaBt) 
— Yo«>dgmaitii excelloit 
and optimism runs high. 
Listen to your bundles. Wind 
up 4|l pr9jf0s hanging fire 



and begin only diort term 
projects for now. "Hia^ ^ <■ 
duince to use creative 
imagination for gain. 



L£0: (July n to Aufsst 22 

— Also Leo Ascoidant) — 
Curb impulse. Be sure you 
have the necessuy founda- 
tion for new ventta^. Study 
in private to be prepared for 
later opportunity. Keep your 
ear to ttie grwnd for new 
proqiects. Catchup on details 

— keep conmiuttications 
open. 

VIRGO: (Anpst 23 to Sqit. 
22 — Also \irgo Ascendant) — 
Use care and caution in 
transit now. Be alert and 
drive defensively. Avoid 
family quarrels over money. 
C^arry yow «d of the fi- 
nancial load. Think twice \»- 
fore trying to relight an ud 
romantic fire. 

UHU: (S(vt 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 
Get any new projects started 
early this wedc. A business 
trip is possible. Some dianges 
in professional scene appear 
upcoming. Be cooperative re- 
garding new plans even 
though they aren't quite what 
you want. 

SC(«PIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Take care of all routine 
matters — dean out drawers, 
files, etc. Clear the decks'for 
action c(Hning up next wedc. 
Cooperatively discuss again a 



matter with mate or partner 
you thought was resdved. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Abo ;SaKittarins As- 
eeadant) ^ Be especidly 
careful in transit and guard 
valuables and cash. Curb 
temper. Make an tSSxai to re- 
lax and release tensions built 
up from work. Undertdte a 
course of study in ordo^ to ful- 
fill a fond dream. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn Aa- 
coidant) — DiTed your en- 
o-gy to projects already in 
progress. Allow time for pos- 
dUe communications foul- 
iqM. Be careful about ddails. 
Past services or ideas may 
pay off now with increased 
business or honors. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan20toFeb. 
11 — Also Aquartas Ascend- 
ant) — Some Aquarians find 
romance now. Some dreams 
come true and creativity is 
accented. Follow your own in- 
tuition. A new responsibility 
i^ipears to be finandally un- 
rewarding but leads to gdns 
in the long run. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— Social life blossoms and 
creativity is highlighted. 
WM-k started in the pest could 
pay off now. Put your career 
(freams into action. Home re- 
pairs, dianges or loans are 
highlighted too. Good time to 
buy a pet. 



StrlcUy 
Personal 



Acaoss 

1. Judft't 

cmwcrn 

13. Wharf 

14. PartieipaU 
It. Podiwtbonlr . 
17. W)ii4<nir 

Mction 
It. Lauihing 
It. Burn vith 

hot vMtr 
21. ChHiM 
n. Bucket 
tS. iUfitw^ua 

MhcduM TV 
rfiow- 
«T. ActttM.-- 
Marptt 
ImpUmrntA 
KxM 

Withdnwi 
SiMdMidIc 
Api«« 

SMfMpirth* 

hidtaf 

Trahitr 
17. VUi lurt 
tt. Chifttr, •! nf 

grapM 
tl. Sehenw undcr- 

handcdly 
41. Currc 

45. Bovine aound 
44. Put on ««l||tit 
4i.' roamjr brow 

46. Writint fluid 

47. CnnducMti , 



21. 
tt 
SO. 
tt. 
St. 
M. 

St. 



aowN 

I. Drink like > 
*« 

t. 'T- mode, itjrl- 
M:2«de. 

,3. Makeup: 
2 «d»> lilaiic) 
Tahuc or Erie 
Lyric poem 
Yo« and f 
Ktvoive 
The Orient 
FoUto'a bud 
Pot off; delay 

It. Miigivint 

It. Plua 

K. Heupa 

It. Stanert alwut 

It. Box lifhtty 

to. Walkincitiek 



21. Clear aoup 

23. Hunt fame 
illetilly 

24. Macnifleent, 
aa a manaion 

25. Three-apot , 
ite. Underetandt 

2t. Instruct 
SI. Go as far as 
32. Hurl 

34. Strike out 

35. Rinilct 

38. Formerly 
37. Ubrary item 
St. Lamb'a cry 

39. Proand — 

40. Compote 

41. Concluaion 
43. Note in music 



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Solution on page B-4 



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• PEMftROKfc 

MAtl 
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• JANAF • CHURCHIAND 

CINTER CENTER 

853-4536 484-1385 



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Uso 

Totiwlt «i Music's 

ScN^#Bnd Instrument 

RMitd Plan 

wJM Opihn fe Buy 

l» yOMf child tokts band this lerm, you con rem o 
new or M*ed tfMB^Mt, cornel, dorinet, trombone, Huie, ioxo 
phon«, vioiinei pwcusiion hit for jwjt pennies o doy for 3 
monthi, and <M p^<^enta wiH ppply i< you decide fo hwy' 

Owoltty imffumenh ore in $horf supply this yeor <o 
phone your nearest Templt of Music ond reserve yours 
fdOWl out GIFT TO YOU . . . Your FIRST SAND INSTRUC 
T»ON KK>K is FREE when you rent from TtMPlE OF MUSiC 



Tellson 
to find 
home 



J^ PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Our son is 28 divorced, and 
the father of a lovely son. Af- 
ter his divorce, he moved in 
with us "temporarily." That 
was three years ago. 

His i4Y>etite is great and he 
n^vcrgpes out Even fliough 
be is our son, we would like 
privai:jr once in a While. Ks 
former wife tells us ttiat he is 
a lacy bum and lived off her 
for years. Up until now both 
my wife and I felt that our son 
was the injured party. Re- 
cently, however, we are be- 
^nning to undo^tand vHiy hii 
wife threw him out. What can 
be done about a person like 
Oiis? 

Dear Pt^: 

If you have been putting q> 
with his nonsense for three 
years, your son sees no reason 
to change. After letting his 
wife support him, he trotted 
home. Give him two wedcs to 
find an apartment and pack 
his bags. You will be doing 
yourself and him a big favor. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Three years ago my son and 
daughter-in-law moved to our 
town. Ever since then I have 
been a free babysitting serv- 
ice. At least twice a week they 
<lropin mxl leave twc healthy, 
active childrai. My son id- 
ways calls and asks if I will 
watch the children, but I am 
beginnii^ to feel that he is 
taking me for granted. I want 
to see my ^ndchildren, but 
these late hours and constant 
visits are g^ing me down. 
How can I get the idea across 
to my son and tus vdfe? 

Gnuiay 

Dear Granay: 

Don't be so available. Tlie 
next tinw yow son calls, teD 
lum that you are tired and 
caraiot keep the childrea Per- 
hajM he doesn't realixe that 
two active children ctfi ex- 
haust evoi the most ftnring 
grandma. 






:g 









f^^s^kt'X .^j^-t^' 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Does anyom have a happy 
home? I don't. My m(^er is 
gone all day wiHking and 80 it 
my dad. When they are home 
dl yi^ do is mrk aroiaid the 
house. I realize that they both 
must work but I need to talk 
with them. My moth«- is on 
her feet ei^t hours a day and 
frtien she comes home she 
cleans house. Dad idso works 
hard. We realize that this is 
for the three of us, but we 
need their companiwiship too. 
Give us Uie miswer. 

Three Mosketeen 

Dear Three Musketefft: 

When you get home from 
school do your mother's 
(Waning and your tattler's 
yvd work. If the three of you 
pitch In, it dxNiMn't t^e too 
kmg. Tlten you oin all qxnd 
the evaiii^ togetl^-. Try it, 
jnMir parei^ will love it and 
so will you. Good luck. 

Strictly per^oMl m'H he gkil lo 
consider ycmr nuetUon. Write Pat 
and Marilyn Daiii. i'ir^iiia Death 
San, UH hownoni Road, Mr- 
0nk Beech, la. - 2J4.%2. 



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Gardening 

J- 



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TiM Sun-WtdriMdty, Jum 12, 1974-Pib» A-5 



IVs worse 



Brown ring 

causedby 

a fungus 

,Q. Lai^e areas of my lawn are dying 
and I have noticed that some of the grass 
has a purplish cast to it. What is wrong? 

A. Brown patch is a fui^us disease 
that attacks practically all kinds of turf 
grasses. The fungus produces irregularly 
shaped brown spots one inch to several 
feet in diameter. The spots may have a 
dark "smoke-ring" effect aromd the 
outer edges where the disease is active. 
Recommended sprays are: Acti-dione- 
Thirma, Daconil 2787, Dyrene or Fore. 




questkNis & answers about lawns & gardecw 



Q. Should I fertilize my fescue lawn 
throu^out the summer? 

A. Fescue makes its maximum growth 
in the spring and fall and is semi-dormant 
.during hot weather. Fertilizing fescue 
now will only encourage weed growth, 
and excessive amounts of nitrogen will 
make your lawn more susceptible to^ 
fungus (Useases. 

Q. My cucumber plants have started 
blooming, but no fruit set on. What can I 
do? 

A. Cucumber plants produce separate 
male and female flowers on\the same 
plant. The first flowers areVionnaUy 
always male and will not produce any 
fruit. 

Q. Aphids are becoming a problem on 
my tomatoes. Are there any insecticides 
which can be used? 

A. Malathion 5 per cent dyst or the 57 
per cent Uquid can be used for tomatoes. 
After ai^lyii^ malathion you must wait 
me full day before using any <rf, ttie fruit. 

Q. Many of my shrubs are infested 
with spider mites. What will control 
them? 

A. Spraying your shrubs with kelthane 
will help. CdHcentrate spraying on the 
leaf underside where the insect is found. 



HoUtne will be glad to aiawer your quatUmt about lawru and 
girdeta. Send your questions to HoObu, Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Nasturtiums are edible 



ByD.INGRlDVANliOON «^ 
lyPlHtateMidli Agent ,^ 

' ' ' I # 

NasturtiuinB ffon.to jM fi^teted by ||any gardeners, 
they originated in the high Ancles Mounpins of Peru in 
South America many centuries ago, and^fere tberdore an 
important native flower of the western hetnisptoore. They 
were very popidar, in the gardeos of previouSj|enerations 
and draerve inn^ attent^n today. '^. 

The nastm-fciuin, also cidl^ Indian Cress, Is adapted to 
cool growir^eqnditions as miglt be expected becautc of 
its mountain ori^n^ Plant them in a location which will 
not be subjected to the, .hot i^temoon sun. They need 
plenty of light to produce good flowCn, but shdUd not be 
exposed to ejccesslve. heat. 

THE FtoWER colors of t^ ^sturtiutti inclwte shades 
of yellow, Orai«e, red and itiahogany. but not blue. 
Although double flowers are available, they lack some of 
the Bf^al which is foun(l in the wide trumpet' form of the 
sfngle varieties. 

Nasturtiums grow rapidly find will ci^e into bloom in 
about six or eight wedcs fro^ seed. T^ k falcker than 
most other annual flowers. Plant them after the danger of 
.frost is past iMcause they ai^e tender. > 

Sow nasturtium seeds in soil of below average fertility 
to iencourage riow growth and abundant flowering. Rich 






« •#!*•* r 



Roadside txHinty 

Many local gardeners And a market for their 
efforts at the roadside stands whiclt tping up 
all over Virginia Beach as aopn as wtfm 
weatiier appears. The stand« ,|ij|ye ^nttful 
supplies erf fruits, vegetables* iiitiry produce 
and bedding plants. (Sun pliot0liy |lod Mann) 




BCnNSIOli DM8IQN 



soils will produce lush green plants with few Mocmts. 

A UNIQUE feature of nastirtiums is that some parts of 
this ornamental plant are edible. The young flower buds 
and unripe seeds have a pleasant pungent flavor. The 
round leaves lave a peppery flavor and may be used in 
sandwiches with cheese or bologna, as a substitute for 
lettuce. 

The low buBh type nasturtiums grow to a height of one or 
two feet. They are flne as edging plants or in masses in the 
flower border. The flowers are produced freely and are 
useful for f n'^ll and medium sized arrangements. 

T^i; cUmUng t^ nasturtium Is especially useful. It 
ri^)idly grows to a height of six or eight feet and will 
,qui<i|(ly covaf a fence or lattice. This vine climbs by 
twining around its sun>ort. Therefore, you will need to 
provide atting, wire, or a trellis for climbing nasturtiums. 
They may also be used to hang down from a window box 
or trail down a banic or stone retaining wall. 

TliE CANARY Bird Flower is closely r^ted to the 
nasturtium. When planted in a semi-shaded location with 
a rich moist soil, this vine will grow to a height of 10 or 12 
feet. I 

The leaves are somewhat similar to a maple but more 
deeply notched. The pale yellow flowers are about one 
inch jicross With two large and three small petals, and a 
green spur. Fr(Hn a distance they look like small canary 
birds. 



On top ot the v&m shortages 
we've heard about — whether 
short-term w long — now 
there's a fertilizer shortage, 
which is bad news to gardeners. 

The already acute fertilizer 
situation is getting worse, says 
the Virginia Departmmt (tf 
Agriculture and Commerce, A 
survey made earlier this year 
revealed that the nitrogen 
supply needed for fertilizer is 
either tight or critical in 19 of 60 
Virginia counties surveyed. 

Nationally, 42.5 million tons of 
fertilizer were used in 1973. 
About 85 per cent was for 
agricultural purposes. 
Agriculture will n^edeven more 
fertilizer this year. Estimates 



are that farmers will need eight ^ 
to 10 pn* cent more than in 1973; *» 

CONTRIBUTING TO the 

shortage is the fact that all of 
the 60 million acres of farmland 
in the country formerly set 
aside has now beva released for 
production to increase farm 
oiHput. "^ 

The fertilizer shortage will hit 
large farmers harder than the 
week-end gardener, of course. \^ 

Less farm production means T 
higher food prices. And those 
higher food prices are exactly 
the reason many people are 
turning to gardening to grow 
their own food and, hopefully, 
save some money. 



A CUT % AiOVE TNI RItTI 



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''FAiRwrnr" 

RIOINOMOWER- 

THE PRIDE AND 

PLEASURE MACHINE 



Want to take a great deal of pride and pleasure In 
what has been up to now just another necessary 
chore? Get behind the wheel of an Arlens Fair- 
way Riding Mower. Grass cutting will take on a 
whole new outlook, 

The Arlens Fairway Is available In four models, 
a 7 HP and a 5 HP, each with and without electric 
start. There's a 26" "Flex-N-Float-Plua" rotary 
mower, f^ur speeds fon^rd, noutrai and reverse; 
a pre-lubrlcated sealed differential; Plsc-C^-Matlc 
drive; and a full autorpotlve type pojiitlve action 
steering wheel, ^ *' ' ' 

Choose an Arlens Fairway — it's "Built To 
Last A Lawn TImel" 



STEBBINS LAWN IQUIPMENTJiic. 

306 Dorset Ave. Vs. leach, Va. 

497-4029 497-OfOI 

Wt StrWce MTfuif IVe Mi 



\ '» 



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-v-vr^ 



wmmmmmm 



S ports 



Page A-6-The Sun-Wadnetday, June 12, 1974 



1 




CHRIS CONKWRIGHT (top) exerts pressure on his Russian 
opponent during the Virginia-Russia wrestling meet last 
Saturday at Old Dominion University. Conkwright came 



closer to victory than any other Beach wrestler, but he still 
lost 3-2. 



19-1 

Russians count Virginia out 



ByJOIINBANNON 
Sports Editor 



The Russian wrestlers came — to the Old 
Dominion fieldhouse Saturday night — they saw a 
groUp of Virginia all-stars — and they conquored 19- 
1, before a crowd of 3,500. 

Moe Haslip of Jefferson High School in Fairfax 
prevented a Virginia whitewash. Wrestling at 180.5, 
Haslip rallied in the final minute of his bout with 
Nugzar Buthuzy to gain a 5-5 draw. Haslip's closing 
rush was the only joyous moment on an otherwise 
somber evening. 

The Virginians entered the match with high 
hopes. Wayne Boyd, their coach, had predicted 
victory. It was false hope, however, as the Russians 
proved too much the master at the international 
freestyle format to be troubled by the Virginians. 

IT WAS A particularly long evening for the four 
Virginia Beach members of the all-star team. All 
four local grapplers were sent uncermoniousiy to 



*3 




CHRIS CONKWRIGHT (bottom) finds 
himself in an uncomfortable position with 
Russian Gahir Makmudov on t<^ of him. 
This series of actlwi cost Conkwright one ot 
ttie three points, the Russian scored against 
him. 



Sim photos 
by Rod Mann 



defeat with two Beach wrestlers falling via pins. 

Kempsville's Bob Wernick was the first Beach 
wrestler to take to the mat, and the first to suffer a 
defeat at the hands of a Russian. Entering the bout 
with Virpnia trailing 2-0, Wernick contained 
Sergey Beloglazov in the 114.5 division, throughout 
much of the first period. The Russian finally scored 
the first point of the bout with a take down with 1 :25 
left in the first period. A minute later, Beloglazov 
added his second take down of the bout to take a 2-0 
at the end of one period. ^ 

It was the closest Wernick would come to the 
Russian the rest of the bout. Using superior 
strength, Beloglazov muscled his way to a M lead 
after two periods, turning nearly every one of 
Wernick's offensive thrusts to his own advantage. 

Beloglazov put the finishing touches on his 
victory, pinning the tiring Wernick at the 7 :56 mark 
of the bout. The Russian had rolled to an in- 
surmountable 15-0 before ending the bout with the 
fall. Beloglazov finished the eight match American 
tour with an undefeated record. 

COX'S CHRIS Conkwright followed Wernick to 
the mat in a 125.5-pound battle with Gahir 
Makhmudov. Conkwri^t, a two-time high school 
state champion and a current junior national 
champion, met with defeat 3-2 as Virginia lost 
perhaps their best chance at victory. 

Conkwright started slowly in his bout. "I couldn't 
go out there and blow myself out in the first period. 
I knew, I had to go nine minutes," said Conkwright. 
"I had never wreslted the guy before so I just 
wanted to find out what he could do." 

Against the cautious Conkwright, Makhmudov 
moved to a 2-0 advantage midway through the 
second period. Conkwri^t went to work, storming 
back into the match. He pulled within one point with 
a takedown late in the second period, and pulled 
even with his Russian opponent early in the final 
period with his second scoring manouever in less 
than a mimite. 

Waiting for the opening that would have brought 
him victory, Conkwright lost his chance being 
penalized for stalling with only 58 seconds 
remaining in tte bout. Neither Conkwright nor 
Coach Boyd were aware that he had received an 
official warning for stalling back in the first period. 
"I just didn't want to do anything rash," com- 
mented Conkwright. "It would have been stupid to 
just go charging in there. I was waiting for a good 
openii^." 

CONKWRIGHT CAME close to tying the bout 
with a strong move with only 13 seconds remaining 
in the match. Time ran out on the Cox grappler 
before he could complete the tying move. 

After his defeat, the only national cham{Hon on; 
the Virginia team did mt make any excises. "He" 
was in peak wrestling shape. I wasn't. I just got 
beat." 

Conkwright accefrted his first defeat of the year 
graciously. "I'm not going to let it worry me. I'm 
only a junior in high school. I'm sure, I'll get 
artother crack at the Riesians before I'm tlu-oi^h 
with wrestling." 

Conkwright's Cac teammate Mike Newbern 
made a valiant effori to compete in the RiBsian 
match. Newbern i^iored a dislocated elbow and 
(ta-op|^24 potoids to give the Vir^ians a wrestla* 
at 149.5 poumte, refisLcivg a sick teammate. 

VALOR WAS all Newbera had to rffer the 
Virginia sqpud. With only five days of woikouts, 
Newbern wrestled under free style rute for the 
first Ume in corap^UcKL CrtwicHffily out (rf sh^>e. 



Newbern's strainings were to no avail as the 
Russian moved to an imposing lead early in the 
second period. 

"The guy just never got tired," commented 
Newbern. "When I got down 11-1,1 went crazy and 
that didn't help any either." The fjnal count found 
Newbern on the short end of a 16-2 count. 

Mark Rimarski was the final Beach wrestler of 
the evening. His unsettling task was to face 
Aslanbek Bisultanov in the 220-pound match-up. . 
Bisultanov was the most impressive Russian^ 
wrestler on the American tour. Entering' the 
Virginia match, Bisultanov had sc^^dTseven 
successive victories via pins. Rimarski proved no 
more equal to the challenge than his predeccessors. 

The bout ended suddenly with Bisultanov 
displaying awesome strength. The Russian hoisted 
his o[^nent on his shoulders before slamming 
Rimarski to the mat for the bout ending pin at the 
with 1:46 left in the opening period. 

Despite the wide margin of defeat, the 
Virginians had little to be embarrassed about. The 
Russians were at the peak of their wrestling form, 
following an intensive training camp and seven 
matches in two weeks. The Virginians had not 
wrestled competitively since the state meet in 
February and had only a two-week training period 
to familiarize themselves with the different 
techniques involved in freestyle wrestling. 

Coach Boyd summed up Virginia's feelings. "I'm 
disappointed, but we'll get another crack at them." 

Or as Wernick put it following his defeat, "I'm 
certaintly not going to go home and cry about it. I'm 
just starting in wrestling." Perhaps, that is the best 
way to lock at the match from a Virginia point of 
view — a start. 




SIDEUNES 

By 

John 

Bmnon 

Sports Editer 



Newbern shifts 
winning h^c 

This week Mike Newbern's arm is in a cast and a 
doctor is shooting him full of cortisone, liit 
Saturday night at the Old Dominion University 
fieldhouse, Newbern was busy wrestling a Russian. 

He really had no business being there, but nobody 
could tell Newbern that. The arm is in a cast this 
week not because of any hold his Russian opponoit 
put on him. Newbern suffered a dislocated elbow 
pole-vaulting for the Cox High School track team. 

To backtrack the story somewhat, Newbern's 

pole vaulting for Cox will help explain why he was 

out on a wrestling mat, representing Virginia with a 

dislocated elbow. Cox track Coach (jfewge 

McGovern was without a pole vaulter so he turned 

to Newbern. 

WITHOUT ANY prior 

vaulting experience, 

Newbern accepted the 

challenge. In his first 

dual meet appearance, 

he finished third. 

Newbern's vaulting 

career came to a close a 

few weeks later with the 

elbow injury. 

Accepting the end of 

his high school aUiletic 

career, Newbern 

relaxed in out of shape 

comf&rt, balloning close 

to 180 pounds. He had 

won the state 145-pound 

wrestling crown just a 

few months earlier. 




NEWBERN 




Another coach came knocking at Newborn's door. 
Eric Heinonen, who was to have represented 
Virginia in the 149.5-pound bracket against the 

Russians, wassufferingfrommononucleosis.Turn to 
Mr. Newbern again. 

Cox Coach Billy Gutermuth, who served as 
trainer for the Virginia team, came to Newborn the 
Monday before the match asking if he could fill-in. 
"It really meant alot to me to have Coach Guter- 
muth come to me and ask if I could help him," said 
Newbern. 

TO iJ VK UP to his promise to compete, Newbern 
had pounds of problems. Before the weigh-in on 
Friday, Newbern had to drop 24 pounds. A task, he 
tackled with uncommon vigor. Newbern's diet for 
the week of training consisted of one pork chop 
consumed on Tuesday night and some sugar ice 
cubes. 

While striving for the required weight loss, 
Newbern had to pound himself into wrestling shape, 
condensing an entire b'aining camp into five 
practice sessions. 

By Friday, Newbern had dropped the excess 
baggage and was pronounced ready to wrestle. 
Managing to keep his wounded wing intact 
throughout the week of practice, talk even started 
of a Newbern victory. 

"I thought I could win," stated Newborn. "If I 
went into a match thinking I was going to lose, my 
father would kill me. I have a sign in my bedroom 
that says, 'Winning isn't everything. It's the only 
thing!" 

"The only thing" avoided Newbern Saturday 
night. He stayed close in the first period of his 
match down 3-1 after the first three minutes. The 
combination of the unfamiliarity with freestyle 
rules and the constant aggression of his Russian 
of^nent soon wearied the Beach grappler. Timury 
Koniashivilli reeled off five consecutive points at 
the start of the second period to move to a com- 
fortable 8-1 lead. Newbern never quit, but the 
never-tiring Russian kept the pressure on for an 
easy 16-2 win. 

Newbern was left with the sour taste of defeat and 
a right hand which had swollen to three times its 
normal size. The elbow, which had survived the 
grueling week of practice, had been banged around 
during the nine-minute tussle. 

Newbern had dedicated himself to victory and 
came up a loser. Yet, the well-wishers formed a line 
to pump his hand and congratulate him after his 
match. Wayne Boyd, coach of the Virginians, had 
stated early in the week about people not realizing 
what Newbern had given to wrestle for Virginia. 
Those hearty congratulations Newbern received 
Saturday night were from people who understood 
just that. 

Winning isn't the only thing Mike — you proved 
that Saturday night. 



H 



BOB WERNICK (left) to involved in some 
inflating with Russian opponent Serg^ 
BelogUzov ^rly in his bout &itarday n^t. 
Wemlck suffered from unfamiliarity witt 



freestyle rul^, falling way beU^ hte 
RwsiaB oi^onrat befire being pinned hi the 
final period. 



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Baff side pair sign grants' 



The Sun-Wednetdiy. June 12, 1974-Pkge A-? 



OSBORNE: 



GOFFIGAN: 



toGuBford 



toChowmt 



Joe Osborne hais become the third member of 
Bayside high school's backf ield to receive a football 
grant-in-aid, FoUdiwing runningmates Roscoe Coles 
and Leandis Hodges, quarterback Osborne signed a 
grant-in-aid last week. 

Guilford College awarded Osborne a scholarship 
in exchange for his talents on the gridiron. It is the 
second time this year the North Carolina school 
plucked some athletic talent from Bayside. 
Bayside's Elton Gross, who was the third leading 
scorer in the state last season, will attend Guilford 
on a basketball grant. 

OsbcHne had an excellent year in leading the 
Marlins to their 8-2 finish last season. Osborne 
controlled the league's most explosive offense. 
Twice during the past season, Bayside rolled for 
over 40 points. The senior quarterback had his best 
game of the year in the Marlins 27-2 rout over 
Maury, passing for more than 100 yards and two 
tmicMowns. Osborne's aerial antics were a key 
factm* in the Marlins ^napping Maury's 35-game 
win streak. 

Osborne was honored for his efforts on the 
gridiron by being named as the second team 
quarterback on llie Sun's All-City team. The 
Virginia Beach Sports Club tabbed Osborne as the 
high school scholar-athlete in Virginia Beach. 

Guilford plans to use Osborne at either defensive 
back or split end while gradually working him into 
their quarterback system. "I know, I can play down 
there," maintains Osborne. 

Osborne did a great amount (rf playing during the 
past two years at Bayside. Osbonie is one of a 
dwindling breed of three sport athletes. He started 
in football, basketball and baseball for Bayside the 
past two years. This past ba^ball season, Osborne 
was an honorable mention selection to The Sun All- 
City baseball team. 




OSBORNE 




GOFFIGAN 



Bayside's Jim Goffigan has received a 
scholarship from Chowan Jr; College of 
Murphyesboi-o, N.C. The highest scorii^ forward in 
Bayside basketball history was a first team Sun All- 
City selection for the past two years. 

Goffigan, who combined with teammate Elton 
Gross to give Bayside the most productive frontline 
in the Beach last season, finished his senior season 
with a 19.5 points per game average. The 6'4" 
Goffigan's choice of Chowan was based on the 
clance to play forward. The other schools, who had 
eJ^-Ksed an interest in Goffigan, wished to 
convert Mm into a guard. 

GOFFIGAN FEELS his biggest challenge in 
making the adjustment from high school basketball 
to college ball will be in the physical nature of the 
game the way the colleges play it. "They play much 
harder in college than we have here," states 
Goffigan, "but I know I can play with them." 

Goffigan leaves Bayside, holding nearly every 
three-year career marie in the school's record 
books. Goffigan, who hit on 42 per cent of field goals 
at Bayside, holds the Bayside record for most field 
goals attempted (750), most field goals made (290), 
most free throws attempted (204), most free throws 
made (158), most total points (978), most rebounds 
(602) and most assists (71). Goffigan also holds two 
single game Bayside records. In 1972, Goffigan set 
a record, connecting on 15 field goal attempts 
against First Colonial. He set a single game scoring 
mark this past season with a 39-point effort against 
Lake Taylor. 

Bayside basketball Coach Conrad Parker is very 
high on Goffigan's talents. "Jim is the best 
defensive player I have ever coached." Goffigan 
will now take his defense and scoring ability to 
Chowan. 




:%¥ft%W:%%*f 



9fsmsismsi 



Sports Record 



TEEN BOVS 



Streakers 

Padres 

Satilles 

Bullets 

Cossacks 

Orioles 

Alley Trashcans 

Brewers 



W 
1 
1 
1 
1 







Rtsulti 



SatMltes 5, Bullets 4; Padres S, Orioles 1; 
Streakers 9, Alley Trashcans 4. 

Streakers U, Brewers 3, Padres 14, Alley 
TrashcHtsA; Satilites)S,Orioles9,' Bullets 
11, Cossacks 7. 



CLASS "A" 

W L 

Sewart Sandwiches 6 1 

Porkers 6 1 

Merchants 5 2 

Reid Associates si 

Murden's 4 3 

Tony's 4 3 

Greenwich Supply 3 4 

Expo's 3 4 

Cavaliers 2 5 

Professional Realty 2 S 

Ott Realty 2 5 

Eversreen Realty 7 

Results 

Porkers 7, Tony's 3; Reld Assoc. 12, 
Greenwich Supply 7; Stewart Sandwiches 
)7, Expo's 0; Professional 2, Evergreen 0; 
Ott Realty 10, Cavaliers 6; Merchants 14, 
Murden's V. 

Tony's 12, Evergreen Realty 6; Cavaliers 
13, Murden's 12: Professional 12, Ott 
Realty 7; Stewart Sandwiches 5, Porkers 
1; Merchants 17, Reid Assoc. 5; Expo's t, 
Greenwich S. 



UNLIMITED OIVSION NO. 1 
W 

Larasan 7 

Mulkev's 7 

ISSI 5 

C & P Telephone S 

Howerin Residental 4 

Truckers 3 

Cool Blues 3 

Lynnhaven Lounge 2 

Paradise Inn 2 

Tiki 1 

Results 



Larasan 14, Paradise Inn 10; CAP 
Telephone 14, Va. Bch Truckers 10; IssI 13, 
Tiki », 

Va.Bch Truckers 9, Howerin Sales, 0; C & 
P Telephone 21, IssI 7; Pardlse Innfe 13; 
Tiki 6; Mulkey's 13, Cool Blues 12; 
Larasan U, Lynnhaven Lounge 5. 

UNLIMITED DIVISION NO. 4 



fiSSftWiWSSftSSSSSSS^SaS 



MIDGETS AMERICAN 

W L 

Kemps Cardinals 3 

K.Cubs 2 

G.N. Grim Reapers 2 1 

G.N. Rockets 2 1 

G.N. Tigers 2 1 

Kemps Tigers 2 1 

G.N. Cardinals l 1 

G.N. Knights 1 2 

G.N. Orioles 1 2 

Kemps Yankees 1 2 

G.N.Yankees 3 

Kemps Indians 3 

Results 

Kemps Cardinals 21, Grim Reapers 2; 
G.N. Orioles 22, G.N. Yankees 2; G.N. 
Rockets 17, Kemps Indians 9. 



Morton fills out 
Bayside staff 



MIDGETS NATIONAL 



My Brothers 


8 




Smith & Keene 


7 




Taico 


6 




True Value 


5 




Green Run 


5 




Chops 


4 




Bunn's Bailers 


2 




Sir Buddy's 


2 




Jaycees 


1 





w 

5 
4 
2 
2 
1 
,1 



WOMEN 
AJ'S 

Streakers 
Tidewater Auto 
ISSI, Dam'Neck 
Westwood Hill Baptist 
Snark, Sun Flowers 

Results 

streakers IS, ISSI, Dam Neck i. 

Streakers), Sun Flowers, Snark 1; A J's 
37, Westwood Baptist 1; Tidewater Auto 
15, ISSI 7. 

UNLIMITED DIVISION NO. I 

W L 

Pork Chop Farms 7 1 

Ted's Pizza Lounge 7 2 

H & AA Contracting 5 3 

Mills Electric 5 3 

Astros 5 4 

North Landing 5 4 

Nail Benders 4 5 

Jaguars 3 5 

Orioles 1 8 

FOP. No. 8 1 8 

Results 

F.O.P. NO. « II, H i M Contracting 10; 
Nail Benders 12, Orioles 11; Pork Chop 
Farm IS, Jaguars 6. 

Jaguars I, Mills Elec. ■; Astros 5, Nail 
Benders 3; N fc M Contracting 9, Orioles 7; 
Ted's Pliia 15, FOP. No. 8 4. 



UNtlMITED DIVISION NO. J 



ResiMIs 

Coastline6, Bunn's Bailers 5; My Brothers 
20, Chops »: Jaycees 4, Sir Buddy's 1; 
Taico Plumbers 13, True Value 8. 
Smith & Keene, *, Coastline 5; My 
Brothers t. Chops 3; Taico 14, Bum's 
Bailers 8. 



UNLIMITED DIVISION NO. S 

W L 

Hot Wheels 7 2 
Streakers ,62 

Rummies 5 2 

Newcomers S 2 

Rookies 4 4 

Travelers 3 4 

Minute Mans' Men 3 4 

Pembroke Mall 3 5 

B 8, H Construction 3 5 

Corvette Club 9 
ResalH 

Pembroke Mall 14, Corvette Club 5; 
Streakers 11, Hot Wheels 10. 
Newcomers 17, Corvette Club 3; B & H 
Construction 1«, Travelers 9. 



CHURCH DIVISION NO. A 

W L 

Westwood Hill Bapt. 4 

Rock Church 4 

First Baptist 2 2 

Aragona Baptist 2 2 

Freewill Baptist l 3 

Christian Church 1 4 

Community Chapel 1 4 

Resvlts 

Aragona Baptist 19, Comtnunity Chapel »; 
Rock Church 17, First Baptist 16; 
Westwood Hill Bapt 14, Christian 0>. 2. 



Arrow Wildcats 
T-M Cardinals 
Arrow Doggers 
Creeds Orioles 
Larkspur Spurs 
Larkspur Larks 
Arrow Braves 
Arrow Lions 
Arrow Tides 
Arrow A's 
Arrow Cardinals 
Creeds Mets 



W 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



1 1 
1 2 



Results 

Orioles 12, Braves S. 

MIDGETS CONTINENTAL 

Yankees 

Wildcats 

Dodgers 

Rebels 

Wheels 

Pirates 

Chiefs 

Cubs 

Tigers 

Braves 



3 

2 

1 

1 1 

1 1 

1 1 

1 1 



Results 

Wildcats 15, Braves, 3; Rebels 15, Cubs 7; 
Yankees 6, Wheels 5. 



INTERMEDIATES AMERICAN 



Bayside head football Coach 
Terry Morton has dipped into 
.the William and Mary allumni 
association to fill out his 
coaching staff. Bruce Biehl and 
Kevin Rogers, both graduates 
of William and Mary, will join 
Morton as members of the 
Marlin varsity football staff for 
next season. 

Biehl, who graduated from 
William and Mary in 1971, was 
an offensive guard at the school. 
A New Jersey native, Biehl has 
l)een an assistant football coach 
at Camden Catholic in New 
Jersey since his gradulitioli 
from William and Mary. Biehl 
will be in charge of the varsity 
offensive line next season. 

Rogers was a starting 
linebacker on the William and 

Tennis 

tourney 
postponed 

The weather left its mark on 
the Marueen Conelly Memorial 
tennis tournament scheduled 
for this past weekend at 
Princess Anne High School. 
Saturday's rain forced post- 
ponement of the planned 
tourney. 

The tournament, which is co- 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach tennis patrons and the 
city's Department of Parks and 
Recreation, has been 
rescheduled for June 22-2S. 



Mary team last season. The 
Bayside job will be Rogers' first 
venture' into the coaching ranks. 
His duties will be working with 
the defensive line and 
linebackers. 

Morton the only holdover 
from last season's 8-2 Bayside 
edition, will continue to work 
with both the offensive and 
defensive backfields in his first 
year as head coach. 

Bayside was forced to search 
for new assistant coaches due to 
the retirement of former head 
Coach Bob Hicks, and assistant 
Coach Ray Gowan leaving to 
become a graduate assistant 




BIEHL 



KWASNY 

Yankees 
draft 

Kwasny 

Joe Kwasny got some 
welcome news last week. The 
New York Yankees Ft. 
L.auderdale farm club selected 
the hard throwing pitcher 
during the tenth round of major 
league baseball's annual free 
agent draft. 

Kwasny was the only Virginia 
Beach high school player 
selected in the draft. Kwasny, 
who transferred from Rhode 
Island to Kellam this past year, 
made the Knights a contender 
in the Eastern District. Starting 
nearly every Kellam district 
contest, Kwasny keyed his 
mates into a first place tie with 
eventual champion Bayside at 
the midway point of the season. 

Kwasny and his teammates 
faltered somewhat in the 
stretch as Kwasny suffered two 
of his three defeats in the last 
weeks of the season. Still, the 
Kellam righthander finished 
tied for most victories in the 
district with seven. He also led 
(he district in innings pitched 
and was the only hurler in the 
area to strike out more than 100 
batters. Kwasny finished the 
season with a total of 104 
strikeouts. 

Speaking after the season, 
Kellam Coach Don Peccia 
stated, "Kwasny didn't make 
the season, he was the season. 

Coles 
takes two 

AAU titles 

Success continues to follow 
Roscoe Coles around. "The 
splendid Bayside senior Cap- 
tured two events in the junior 
division of the Virginia AAU 
tratk and field championships 
Saturday in Richmond. 

Coles returned to form after a 
cold and a slightly pulled 
hamstring had bothered him at 
the Eastern Regional and the 
state high school track meets. 
He captured the 100-yard dash 
and 220 AAU state titles. 

In the 100, Coles finished 
ahead of his challengers in the 
excellent time of 9.9 seconds. It 
was the fifth time that Coles had 
been under 10 seconds during 
the outdoor season. Coles set a 
new state junior division record 
with a 21.8 second performance 
in the 220. 

Coles will attend Virginia 
Tech next year on a football 
grant-in-aid. 



Boating 

accidents 
are rising 



Boating accidents have risen dramatically over 
the past five summers. If the trend continues, 
hundreds of Americans will experience watery 
deaths this summer, the Insurance Information 
Institute ccmtends. 

The Coast Guard reported 5,322 boating accidents 
in 1973, a 38 per cent increase over 1972 figures. 

Boating deaths have also risen sharply in the past 
few years. Boating deaths jumped to 1,754 in 1973, a 
22 per cent increase. Last year, 1,599 injuries were 
reported compared to 829 in 1972 — a 93 per cent 
increase. Property damage in 1973 accidents were 
up 57 per cent over the previous year to $11 million. 

VIRGINIA DID not escape the spiralling trend of 
boating accidents. In 1973, 110 boating accidents, 44 
deaths, 37 injuries and $234,600 in property damage 
were recorded in the state. 

The Insurance Information Institute lays a major 
portion of the blame for the idramatic increase in 
boating accidents to the boat owners themselves. 
The Institute maintains that no matter how well 
designed and engineered » boat is, using it in the 
wrong waters, or trying to exceed the limitations of 
a particular boat automatically renders the craft 
unsafe. Boat owners should be aware of their 
craft's limitations and when it is in safe working 
order. 

Fuel, electricity and steering are the three 
priorities in making sure a boat is in safe working 
condition. Hazards during operation can be 
prevented by expert checking of the connection^, 
protective casings and other parts of each system. 



PASSENGER SAFETY is dependent upon built- 
in floatation materials, which keep boats afloat if 
swamped or capsized. In the event, a passenger is 
separated from a capsized boat floatation cushions 
and vests are essential to his safety. 

Numerous boating accidents are caused by boat 
owners overloading their craft with either 
passengers or objects. Every boat has a definite 
load capacity which can be learned from the 
manufacturer, retailer or local coast guard 
authority. A plaque, attached to the craft, tells the 
maximum speed and power output of the craft 
under optimum conditions. If the plaque does not 
indicate this, a check with the manufacturer will 
obtain the information. The operator, who uses his 
craft in Weather and water with which it can cope, 
is one of the most important ingredients to boating 
safety according to tte Insurance Information 
Institute, 

The Coast Guard has required all recreational 
craft to meet specific safety standards, and that 
each boat have a plaque attached certifying that 
the standards in effect at the date of construction 
have been met, since 1972. The auxiliary also offers 
a home study program "The Skipper's Course" 
which is available from the Superintendent of 
Documents for a nominal fee of $1,50 (ask for 
catalogue No, 7DS.2:SK3, Superihtendent of 
Documents, GPO, Washington, D.C. 20402). 



ENTON CYCLE 
CENTER -INC. 

MX-Enduro 
125 Street 

Moped (Motor or Peddle) 
High-Point Accenmies 



.J^ 



' -^'^i.'^ 



Renegades 

A's 

Eagles 

Mets 

Spurs 

Chiefs 

Cardinals 

Yanl<s 

Cubs 



Results 



A's a, Yanks 0; Mets 7, Chiefs, 5; 
Renegades 13, Eagles, t. 

INTERMEDIATES NATIONAL 



CHURCH DIVISION NO. B 



KTM and Fachs 
Spacialittt 

Completa 2-cycle Service 

Wheal ti-ulng 

Spec. Porting 
Pipe Tuning and Buildingi 

DMV 7195 
4666 So. Cape Henry 

Norfolk, Va. 23513 
857-0813 



Crabbers 
E.Caligari & Son 
Burger King Whoppers 
My Brother's MolWw 
Bocks **** 

Coast Guard 
CSC 
Chicho's 
Pungo Radio 
Aragona "A" 

Results 



W 
7 
7 
7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 



tondon Bridge Baptist 
Memorial Methodist 
St. Gregory's 
Providence Friends 
Thalial Lynn 
K.G. Presbyterian 
G.N. Baptist 

iNiiiits 

Memorial Methodist 12, Thalia Lynn 10; 
St. Gregory's », G.N. Baptist IJ. i»*^'*' 



W 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



Merchants 

Cardinals 

Bulldogs 

Giants 

Tigers 

Larks 

Indians 

Mets 



Results 



St. Gregory It, Thalia Lynn 9; G.N. 
Baptist I, Mnnarial MettMdlst Jl. 



Giants 2, Blue Jays I. 



gUlFcgurse" 



"STUMPY LAKE, 



Crabber* 2, U.S. Caatt Guard 1; My 
Brothers Mongers 12, A^agdna "a" 2; 
CSC. II, Burger King IS; E< Callgari and 
Son 1], Chk:ho's 12; Bucks H, C.G. Pwigo 
Radio 12 

Bucks II. Chiclw^ }; U.S. Coast Ciiard 23, 
Aragona "A" I; CraMcrs 7, E. Callgari 0; 
My Brdftor't MoHian a, CS.C. 5. 



AREYOUGEniNG 

LESS THAN 55 

MILES PER 

GALLON? 

Honda of Va. Beach 
2970 Va. Beach Blvd. 

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. 340-6161 ^ 



< 

UJ 




PUT FATHER 
INTO 

GOLF 11 





Remember Ocean View and 
Shimpy Lake Golf Courses with tfwir 
tonie section of sportsweer and golf 
aquifmiMit at discount |M-ic«. 

OCeAN VIEW GOLF COURSE 

9610 Norfolk Ave. 587-0632 or 588-9326 

STUMPY LAKE GOLF COURSE 



Indian River Rd. 



420-9834 



'^GILUGAN'S I B(!m)'S BIG 

^ISLAND I m TOP 



4:30 PM WEEKDAYS 





2:30 PM WEEKDAYS 




BOAT 

OWNER 

READ 

THIS! 




WE HAVE A NEW POLICY DE- 
UmtXi FOR THE OWNERS 
OF OUTBOAROS, iNBOARDS, 
SAILBOATS AND INBOARD/ 
OUTBOARDS, 25 FEET OR 
UNDER.COVERAGEINCLUDES: 

YOUR BOAT, MOTOR, EQUIP- 
MENT ft TJUILER 

YOUR LIABILITY TO OTHERS 
ARISING PROM THE IffiE OF ^ ^ 
BOAT. 

MEDICAL PAYMENTS 

12 MONIHS OPERATION 

UNRESTRICTED TERRITORIAL 
UMITS. 



PROtflUMS INCLUDE COVER- 
AGE FOR PHYSICAL DAM- 
AGE $100,000. WATERCRAPTi 
UABILITY AND $1,000 MEDI- 
CAL PAYMENTS. 



CHECK 
WITH US 
FOR COST 

COMPARISON 



TfiXtASBR 

^rrti 

_BS3 UathlnRd.^ 



ftge A-8-The Sun-Wednesday, June 12. 1974 



Beach 
wrestlers 



up. 



$ t 



y **^ 



wn 



andout 




'■^■^'^^Ai ^^ .+ ^ ->'ii.i,s *s''^^-i'd&*-'*"?"^'%i*' u* s 




American junior 
national champion 
Chris ^onkw right (top) 
is given a ride from 
Russian Gahir Malih- 
mudov during their 
match Saturday night. 
Conliwright escaped 
from the Russian's 
clutches, but still lost 3- 
2. In the middle photo, 
Conkwright finds the 
positions reversed, but 
once again he is on the 
short end of the action. 
Conkwright rallied in 
the late going to over- 
come a Z-O deficit only to 
see his chance at victory 
slip away when he was 
cited for stalling with 
less than a minute 
remaining in the match. 
In the photo at the right, 
Mike Newbern wearily 
eyes the scoreboard in 
bietween periods. The 
scoreboard told a sad 
story to Newbern as he 
dropped the match 16-2. 



Sun photos 

by Rod Mann 

hntlNoalSims 




HOGAN'S 
HEROES 



ROCXM 
222 



*9i 



k 



V 



7 PM 

weekdays | weekdays 



6:301 



THE 700 
CLUB J 



/:h 



f^ GOMER 

PVLE 



WEEKDAYS 



8PM 



5:30 PM 



WEEKDAYS 





• • 



f e gives Ali chance 



ByBOBORTMAN 
Special (b The Sun 



In the Archie Moore alphabet, ABC stands for 
Any B<^ Can or, now Anybody Can or, in pugilistic 
parlance. Any Boxer Can. A roundabout way of 
saying that Mo(re feels Muhammad Ali has a 
better chance in his upcoming fight with 
heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman 
than most folks give him, which is none. 

"A man must always look at an o^Mnent as if he 
is a serious threat," said Archie, when he drq[)ped 
off the lecture circuit to pick up a change (rf sodts at 
his home. "You can never take anybody lightly, 
take anything for granted, because this is the way 
mistakes are made." 



Moore served as "ad- 
viser" to Foreman when 
George savagely wrenched 
the heavyweight crown 
from Joe Frazier and when 
he defended it by casually 
crushing Ken Norton. Totad 
elapsed time of the two 
bouts: nine minutes, 35 
seconds. Foreman's right 
hand may be the most 
devastatirg weapon since 
the atom bomb. 



. AS FOR ARCHIE'S relationship with Ali, that 
dates back to a time when Ali was still Cassius Clay 
— to 1960 when the mwly titled Olympic king made 
a pilgrimage to Moore's training camp at Ramona, 
Calif., to sit at the feet of the wily Old Mongoose. 

"He only learned what he wanted to learn," said 
Archie. "The thii^ (rf deep technical nature, he 
refused them: He told me, " 'I'm only going to fight 
five years and I'm going to quit. So I only want to 
fight like my idol, Sugar Ray Robiiison.' 

"And I said, 'You're fighting in the wrong stable.' 
I asked him, 'Why don't you go home for Christ- 
mas?' And he said, 'Okay I'll go.' He never came 
back. 

"But he did write me a letter about four montte 
later, and he said he hadn't learned a thing since he 
left the Salt Mine, which was a credit to me." 



MOORK WATCHED bemusedly as Ali danced to 




ttie top of the heavyweight heap, dazzling all 
comers with his speed of hand and foot, until his age 
and the pressing attacks of Frazier and Norton 
brought Um down from his toes and back to earth. 

"He was a garrulous young man — mouthy, 
windy — but he could fight," said Archie. "He had 
speed in excess of any fighter I've ever seen at any 
weight. And that includes flyweight. But he was 
very sensitive of danger. He often chatted with his 
opponents. He (rften reflected his own image, 
saying he was too pretty to get hurt. 

"He really began to believe this, you see. What a 
man practices to a great extent, it becomes habit. ' 
Ali really believed he was the greatest. He fought as 
the greatest. And he was, in many people's opinion 
and in his own (pinion especially, the greatest. 



"I used to become 
amused," continued the 
grizzled former light- 
heavyweight champ, who is 
57 going on 61," because I 
knew he was like a beautiful 
watch with a couple of the 
jewels missing. It was the 
most glamourous watch 
you'd ever seen, and it 
would run accurately, on 
time. The oft-times you 
would miss those jewete, 
like in the Frazier fight and 
the Norton fight. 



"NOW IF HE had learned these things I was 
trying to teach him years before, these technical 
things — fighting on the inside, how to properly tie 
a man up, utilize more defense — when he got in 
trouble with Frazier the first time, he could have 
handled him, and certainly I believe he could have 
handled Kenny. 

"I really believe that if Foreman pays as sbrict 
attention to me as he has in the past," Archie 
concluded, I can help him an awful lot." 

Mowe's role with Foreman is "that of 
strategist," he explained. "I'd advise him on 
tactics and techniques in his warfare. I don't relish 
being called a trainer, although I could train a 
fighter, you know. 

"I do a lot in regards to getting a fighter ready 
physically. But I like to work with his mind and try 
to enlarge his ideas. I try to instill a lot of con- 
fidence in the relationship between me and the 
fighter. Once a fighter believes what a trainer tells 
him is correct, he is not hesitant in trying to carry 
out his instructions." 




WANTED 

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For quick results arwl more cash in your pocket . . . 
tet us sell your property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

i 

CALL 497 4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 




why rent 

a shampooer? 

use ours free 

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With Hagerty, you eon shampoo 
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residue. No phosphates. 



The Hagerty 
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and money, look 
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manager for details 

If you really care for your home . 
core (or it with Hagerty. 

REJEDS 

CARPET and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANING 

621-19th St Va. Beach 

428-8571 





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I future 
I doctor 



Jeffrey Scott Bunch, a 
graduating senior at 
Kempsville High 
School, was pleased, 
shocked and surprised 
Friday when he learned 
he was the winner of the 
second annual medical 
scholarship given by the 
Women's Auxiliary to 
the Virginia Beach 
Medical Society. 

Mr. Bunch, 18, was so 
surprised to hear his 
name called out during 
Friday's annual school 
awards ceremonies that 
it took him several 
seconds to realize what 
had happened and start 
his journey from his 
seat in the audience up 
to the stage (top photo). 
Presenting the envelope 
containing the $500 
scholarship award is 
Terry Decker (center 
photo), health chairman 
of the women's 
auxiliary. A happy 
scholarship recipient 
returns to his seat 
(bottnn photo), where 
he is doubly rewarded 
by a huge hug fr<»n a 
fellow honor student, 
Paula Pruden. The $500 
award is presented 
annually to a Virginia 
Beach high school 
senior who plans a 
medical career of any 
type and who has been 
accepted by a college. 

Mr. Bunch wants to 
become a physician and 
starts classes this fall at 
the University of 
Vii^inia. He is active in 
school activities, 
including the German 
Qub, Latin Club and 
National Honor Society. 
He also is a member of 
the medical Explorer 
Scouting program. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William C. Bunch of 
Coventry Road in 
Virginia Beach. 




Sun photos by Rod Mann 



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Volunteers lauded 



More than 100 persons who have volunteered 
their tifne to feed the elderly, the handicapped and 
the bechridden in Virginia Beach were honored last 
wedc with a tea at the home of Mary Ellen Cox, 
chairperson of the Mayor's Commission on Aging. 

Since the all-volunteer Meals on Wheels program 
was organized in April by Dot Wood and other 
charity-minded residents, volunteers from 28 local 
churches and other organizations have helped 
deliver hot meals to those who are unable to 
prepare their own meals, Mrs. Wood said. 

The charitable program has grown steadily since 
the first meal was delivered the week of April 22, 



Mrs. Wood said. 

THE MKALS on Wheels program is a local, non- 
sectarian charitable organization which receives 
no public funds. Donations from private citizens and 
funds from local churches help provide meals free 
of charge to those who cannot affford to pay the 
nominal meal cost. 

Donations, which are tax-deductible, may be 
made to Bill Neely, treasurer, Meals on Wheels, 
P.O. Box 2006, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 

Anyone who would like to receive hot meals from 
the organization is asked to call 499-5424. 



Fathers are spedalin every yvay 



Father's Day always get 
me thinking, and that alone 
is cause for celebration. 
What, I wonder, could the 
kids and 1 possibly give their 
Dad that he would really 
like? 

Should we go to the store 
and charge an expensive 
gift for him? Should we 
bring him breakfast in bed 
when we know he hates 
to eat in bed? 

A walk through the stores 
show retailers have an- 
ticipated the yearly 
dilemma. There are special 
displays of gifts for fathers 
which are supposed to let 
them know just how much 
their families care: Battery- 
operated mini-vacuums to 
suck the crumbs off dad's 




vest. A bar of soap on a rope 
to hang around his neck in 
case of showers. Worry 
beads to finger and, when all 
else fails, ties that blind. 

This year, we will fall for 
a gimmick or two as always, 
but this year we want to give 
Dad something every real 
father should have: a 



second glance. 

WHO IS UK. anyway? Is 
he that helpless, befuddled 
guy in the comics whose 
wife has him doing dishes in 
a flowered apron? Is he the 
mythical dad who never 
speaks above a platitude on 
that oh-so-perfect TV family 
series? Is he the man in the 



headlines who does 
desperate things under 
desperate circumstances? 

None is he. He is uniquely 
hknself. And he brings all 
the things that make him 
our one, original, father-of- 
the-family into play 
everyday in so many ways, 
that 1 wonder if we could 
ever really know what a 
wonderful job of loving he 
has done. 

But if we give him a 
second glance, not just on 
Fath(?r's Day, but every 
day, then maybe we might 
begin to see. 

He is only a part of a big 
group of real fathers— they 
all deserve more than a one- 
day celebration and a bar of 
soap. 



Graduation 

meansgoing 

tojunlorhigh 



Not all graduation ceremonies at this time of year 
celebrate the end of high school or college studies. 
Elementary school students also attend ceremonies 
marking their entrance into junior high school, a 
new academic level and a new way of life for many 
younger pupils. 

At Seatack Elementary School, 205 sixth and 
seventh-grade students marked their rise to junior 
high school in ceremonies Friday. At right, a happy 
student proudly shares her excitement with her 
parents. At bottom, school principal Bernard 
Morgan shakes the hand d a student receiving his 
diploma. Also presenting diplomas Friday was 
Albert Floyd, a community-school consultant. 




5^ photos by Rod Mann 




fti^ B-2-The Sun -Wednesday, June 12, 1974 



FOOD 



Salads for ^ 

eating \ 





Tired of potato salad for 
summer? Try these delicious 
low-fat and nutritious siimmer 
salads: ''" 

MACARmi SALAD 

3 cups cooked macaroni, 
drained 

4 cup diced carrots 
1 cup diced celery 
4 cup mayonnaise 

*'4 cup diced sweet pickles 

1 teaspoon prepared mus- 
tard 

1 tablespoon chopped chives 
or green onions 

1 taUespoon white vinegar 

1 teaspoon salt 

Toss all the ingredients to- 
gether lightly and chill well 
before using. Serves eight. 

CORN SALAD 

2 cups drained, canned^ 
whcde com 

V« cup diopped lumientos 
Vi cup chopped fresh green 

peppers 
1 taUespoon finely chopped 

green onions 
V4 ciq> diced cucumbers 
y» cup French dressing 

Combine the com, pimien- 
tos, green pen)ers, onions, 
and cucumbers. Add the 
French dressing and toss the 
salad li^tly. Refrigo-ate it 
for one to three hours. Drain 
and toss Uie salad lightly be- 
fore serving. Sores four. 

■^— » (AdveitiaemenO '^^••^ 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

B; PAUL ROMAN 

Lemons will yield twice 
the juice if heated in the 
oven or boiling water be- 
fore squeezing. 



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TWO-BEAN SALAD 

2 cups drained, canned 

green beans 
2 cups drained, canned wax 

beans 

v« cup chopped mions 
yt cup diced celery 
4 cup diced fresh green 

peppers 
4 cup Italian style salad 

dressing 

Combine the beans, onions, 
celery, greesi peppers and 
salad dressing. Mix Qiem 
gently. Refrigerate fte salad 
overnight to blend the flavors. 
Drain and toss the salad light- 
ly before serving. Serves six. 



GARDEN COLE SLAW 

m quarts shredded cab- 
bage 

Vz cwp shredded carrots 

V4 cup finely chopped fresh 
green peppers 

V4 cup finely diopped onions 

Vi c\sp ttiinly slioed radishes 

m teaspoons salt 

V4 teaaqxwh coarsely ground 
black pepper 

3 tablespoons sugar 

4 cup polyunsaturated (ril 
V4 ciq) white vinegar 

Combine the cabbage, car- 
rots, green peppers, cnions 
and radishes, and cMll well 
Just before serving combine 
salt, pepper, sugar, oil and 
vinegar. Mix weU. Pour over 
chilled vegetables and mix 
li^tly. Serves eight. 



FOR THE FUTURE 

A NEW CLUB for Modern 
Woodmen of America, Junior 
Service division, will be started 
today at an organization party 
in Virginia Beach. The club 
offers planned recreation for 
l)oys and girls 16 and under. 
Modern Woodmen of America is 
a fraternal life insurance 
society. 

A FILM for children today at 
10 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the 
Virginia Beach branch library 
is "Rabbit Hill." 

A FOLK Forum featuring 
four concerts and afternoon 
workshops will be held Friday 
through Sunday at Old 
Dominion University. Concerts 
in the ODU Arts and Letters 
auditorium are Friday at 8 p.m. 
($2), Saturday at 11 a.m. (free) 
and 8 p.m. ($2) and Sunday at 1 
p.m. ($1 for adults, children 
free). Additional information 
may be obtained from ODU 
(489-800) or Ramblin' 
Conrad's, one of the sponsors 
(423-7387). 

FILMS for children Saturday 
at 11 a.m. at the Windsor Woods 
br^ch library are "I Know an 
Old Lady Who Swallowed a 
Fly," "How Hot is a Dragon?," 
"Just Say Hie!" and "Girl in 
the White Hat." 

A WORKSHOP for secondary 
school social studies teachers 
will begin Monday at Old 



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June 28-30 

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Wlieatland, Landis Valley Farm Museum, an Amisli Homestead as well as an Amish 
Style Feast. You'll also enjoy ttie beautiful Hershey Gardens as well as a guided tour 
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Dominion University's center at arms. Dr. Duncan S. 
for economic education. The Wallace, 
three-week workshop will in- 
clude discussion of current A HELMET was donated to 
economic topics. the Plaza Volunteer Fire 

Company and Rescue Squad 

BIKE SAFETY will be the recently by Millers Department 

topic of an all-day conference- Store as part of a project to help 

June 19 at the Commodore raise money during the Plaza 

Country Club, 5600 Southern queen contest and carnival, 
Blvd. Registration begins at 9 

a.m. The conference will cover A CHECK for $525 was 

all aspects of .bicycle safety and presented recently to the 

is open to the public. Virginia Beach Emergency 

Coronary Care Program from 

"BYE BYE Birdie" opens the Beta Alpha Chapter of Beta 
June 21 at the Little Theatre of Sigma Phi. The money was 
Virginia Beach, 24th Street and raised during the chapter's 
Barberton Drive, with per- Spring Fling dance in April, 
formances Wednesday- 
Saturday through July 6 (no BIKE SAFETY tips were 
performance July 4). Call 428- given to members of Cub Scout 
9523 for ticket information and Pack 486 by Officer Harold D. 
reservations. Suggs and summer patrolman 

Leon Demsky of the First Police 

"SUMMER SOLSTICE Precinct during the recent Cub 

Concert," a performance of the pack meeting at Brookwood 

Virginia Beach Civic Sym- Elementary School, 
phony, will be June 22 at 8:15 

p.m. and June 23 at 3: 15 p.m. at WINDSOR Neighborhood Girl 

Plaza Junior High School. Scouts ended the year with a 

Tickets are $1 M children, $3 neighborhood encampment for 

for adults and $7 for families, Junior and Cadette Girl Scouts, 

available at the door or from a Brownie Revel for Brownies 

orchestra members. and a luncheon for adult 

leaders. Nancy Cranford and 

SUMMER CAMP for boys Evelyn Sell, adult leaders, were 

and girls 6-13 begins June 24 on honored at the luncheon, 
the campus of Virginia 

Wesleyan College, sponsored by A DONATION of $500 was 

the Norfolk YMCA. Four two- made to the Virginia Beach 

week sessions run until Aug. 16. Emergency Coronary Care 

Bus pick-ups will be provided in Program from the USS 

15 Virginia Beach locations. Independence Officers Wives 

Call 622-6328 for more in- Club. The check was presented 

formation. to Bruce Edwards, volunteer 

coordinator of the care 

CAMP DAKDEN in Sedley, program, Monday at the 

Va., has openings for girls in the General Hospital of Virginia 

fourth grade or older. The 12- Beach. The club has also given 

day session begins June 24. Call $125 to the American Cancer 

the Girl Scout Council of Society for leukemia research 

Greater Tidewater, 622-1871, for and $50 to the Armed Forces 

more information. Hospitality House. 

*"^~^~"*"~~~"~^"~~~"~"" Items may be submitted to Sun 
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NEW OFFICERS of the Va. 23452. Deadline is noon Fri- 

Thoroughgood Civic League day prior to the week of public- 

were installed recently at a ati<m. 
dinner and dance at the 

Admiralty Hotel. The officers 

are: president, Henry 0. 

Pezzella; president-elect, Capt. BEHNKE HONORED 
Charles D. Webb; vice- 
president. Harold T. Mahler; Patrick J. Behnke of Virginia 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. Beach has been named to the 
Gene T. Allender; recording fail semester honor roll at the 
secretary, Mrs. Marshall R. University of Texas at Austin. 
Willenbucher; treasurer, Capt. He is majoring in social and 
Alexander L. Redon; sergeant behavioral sciences. 

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Complete Permoneni Woves ..,..$6.95 to $19.95 

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MRS. SAUNDERS 



Gupton-W&tson 

Patricia Ann Watson and 
Ricky Allen Gupton were wed 
Saturday at Rock Church. 

The bridge is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fulton Watson of 
Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin Thomas 
Gupton of Virginia Beach. 

Ronnie Watson was her 
sister's maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Gladys 
Morgan, Edie Watson, Teresa 
Gupton and Bonita Rogers. 
Connie Bullock and Sharon 
Gupton were junior 
bridesmaids. 

Missie Rogers was flower 
girl, and Ray Gupton was ring 
bearer. 

Edwin Gupton was his son's 
best man. Ushers were Earl 
Watson, Lester Gray Ma this Jr. 
and Dave Gregory. Junior 
ushers were Eddie Lewis and 
Mike Wood. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 



Scott-Gallop 

Laura Alethea Gallop and 
Glenn Allison Scott were wed 
Saturday at Old Donation 
Episcipal Church. 



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The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herrel Gallop d 
Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Mays Scott of 
Chesapeake. 

Gloria Garrett was her 
sister's matron of honor. 
Bridesmaids were D(»ina Dale, 
Mary Kay Reed and Mary 
Keith. Louise Mays Scott was 
flower girl. 

Robert David Goodwin Jr. 
was best man. Ushers were 
Thomas, Joseph and Robert 
Scott. Marc Allen and Michael 
German were ring bearers. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

Rhodes-Venner 

Sarah Elizabeth Venner 
became the bride of Hughes 
Jennings Rhodes HI Saturday 
at First Presbyterian Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Browning 
Venoer of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hughes Jennings 
Rhodes Jr. of Burlington, N.C. 

Martha Kellam was maid of 
honor, and Ann Attmore was 
matron <rf honor. Bridesmaids 
were Elleii and Jane Rhodes, 
Ramona Venner, Sarah Haynes 
and Linda Dodson. - 

Hughes Jennings Rhodes Jr. 
was his son's best man. Ushers 
were Robert, William, John and 
James Venner, Richard 
Rhodes, Frank Lyon, Keith 
Langford and Phillip Cook. 

The couple will reside in High 
Point, N.C. 

Saunders-Pitkin 

Joan Elizabeth Pitkin was 
wed to Martin Alan Saunders 
June 1 at Eastern Shore Chapel. 

The Iride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Tate 
Pitkin of Virginia Beach. The 
iH-idegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James V. Saunders of 
Virginia Beach. 

Mary Pat Nuckols was maid 
of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Debbie Edmunds. Joyce 
Zydron, Lou Askew, Debbie 
Francis and Becky Royal. 

James V. Saunders was best 
man. Ushers were Miltoif 
Edmunds, Tom Pitkins Jr., Don 
Askew, Robert Boyd and Scott 
Royal. 

The couple will r^ide in 
Virginia B^IU:h. 



MRS. COE 

Coe-Mason 

Frankie Jean Mason and 
Stephen Edward Coe were wed 
Sunday in Ararat, N.C. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Coe (rf 
Dobson, N.C. The bridegroom is 
the son of Mrs. Donald N. Stout 
of Virginia Beach and Howard 
F. Coe of Pittsburgh. 

Mary Jane Shelton was her 
sister's matron of honor. Susan 
Sewell and Elizabeth A. Coe 
were bridesmaids. 

Donald N. Stout was his 
stepson's best man. Ushers 
were Eddie Mason and J. 
Kennard, Johnson. 

The couple will reside in 
Fayetteville, N.C. 



Bjorkman 
engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. itaymond W. 
Bj(M*kman of Virginia Beach 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Karen, Ann 
Bjorkman, to Joseph Aloysius 
Roenker, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond A. Roenkv>r of 
Virginia Beach. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Princess Anne High School 
and attends DePauI School of 
Nursing, Norfolk. Her fiance is 
a graduate oS Princess Annei 
High School and attends the 
College of the Albemarle, 
EUzabeth City, N.C. 

No wedding date has been set 



ON DEAN'S LIST 

Six students from Virginia 
Beach iiave been named to the 
Dean's List at Virginia State 
College for outstanding 
academic and scholastic 
achievement for the s{»ing 
semester of 1974. 

They are Gale A. AIlisoD, 
Raymond Bloomer Jr., Wanella 
D. Jones, Walter M. Kindred 
Jr., Pltyllis A. Moore and 
Patricia A. Parker. 



Candy Beaman of Virginia 
Beach has been named to the 
Dean's List for the spring 
semester at the University of 
Virginia. 



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The Sun-W»dnetday. June 12. 1974-Pag> B^ 



i 

Saving the 
churches 
from fire 



Fire is a specter that haunts every church and 
synagogue. 

Regardless of how much stone or brick and mortar go 
into a religious edifice, it not only will not be fireproof but 
it is far more likely to be consumed by flames than many 
another building. 

Certain fire hazards seem to be "built In" to religious 
structures and others are added with use, age and, 
sometimes, neglect. 

AS A SERVICE to religious bodies, the Insurance 
Information Institute has issued "A Guide To Property 
and Liability Insurance on Churches" as an aid to 
clergymen and laymen who are responsible for the 
management of a church and its properties. 

"In spite of all pi-ecautions," the institute said, "there 
is always the danger of fire or other catastrophe. The 
position of trustees faced with the necessity of rebuilding 
a church from the proceeds of wholly inadequate fire 
insurance is an unenviable one." 

The institute urged religious organizations to conduct 
an insurance survey of their properties to make sure that 
converage is adequate in case of fire. But anotiier form of 
insurance was proposed — prevehtion, plus precautions to 
minimize damage should a fire break out. 

A STUDY OF church fires by the National Fire 
Protection Association found that 28.5 per cent of them are 
caused by defective or poorly installed heating equip- 
ment. More than 20 per cent result from electrical faults 
while a surprising 16.8 per cent are listed as "incendiary, 
suspicious." 

Contrary to what many may think, lightning is 
responsible for a mere 6.2 per cent of church fires, while 
smoking, matches and candles account for a total of 
nearly 8 per cent. 

In discussing the chief "culprit," heating systems, the 
institute said that furnaces often are taxed to capacity for 
weekly services because a moderate average tem- 
perature has not been maintained when the building has 
been idle during the week. 

"This may result in overheated flues and chimney 
fires," the institute cautioned. "The custodian should be 
warned to avoid this hazard and to remain on the 
premises and exercise great care when heating devices 
are being fired." 

MOREOVER, the experts advised that fire-resistant 
materials should be used to enclose furnace and boiler 
room areas, including the installation of self-closing fire 
doors. 

Fire-resistant metal containers should be used for 
papers and trash, and the ashes from coal furnaces should 
always be placed in metal containers. 

Lightning protection was recommended for all church 
buildings, particularly steeples. 




SMOKE-BLACKENED walls of Emmanuel 
Episcopal Church receive a scrubbing from 
Doug Schuler, who works for a firm 



specializing in cleaning up fire damage. (Sun 
photo by Rod Mann) 



Arson fire rekindles parish spirit 
at Bnmanuei Episcopai Citurcit 



The fire precautions urged in 
the accompanying article 
wouldn't have helped much in 
the case of the recent church 
fire at Emmanuel Episcopal 
Church. That fire was set 
deliberately. 

The church has insurance, 
and it is expected to cover the 
damages estimated between 
$50,000 and $75,000, said the 
church pastor, the Rev. Michael 
M. Vermillion. 

No one was hurt in the fire set 
by burglars early in the morn- 
ing of May 28. The old church 
sanctuary, which is a separate 
building from the building 
damaged by fire, was "ab- 
solutely untouched," Rev. 
Vermillion said. 

The church building damaged 
in the fire included Rev. Ver- 
million's office, the parish hall, 
church school classrooms, 
offices and the kitchen. 



THE BUILDING sustained 
little or no structural damage 
except for a hole smashed into 
the roof of the pastor's office by 
fire fighters, Rev. Vermillion 
said. "Most of what was 
destroyed was the contents, 
such ■ as lessons, books and 
papers," he said. 

The classrooms damaged in 
the fire should be cleaned up 
and ready for use by Aug. 1, he 
said. During the winter months, 
the church conducts a day 
school for children 3-5 in the 
classrooms. The rooms are used 
for church school on Sundays. 
Sunday school classes are now 
being held in makeshift quar- 
ters in building breezeways 
until the classes are cleaned up, 
Rev. Vermillion said. 

The parish and the com- 
munity have been very 
generous in offering help to 
restore the church building, the 



pastor said. People in the 
community have offered the use 
of clean-up crews and heavy 
equipment, he said. 

"THIS FIRE has rekindled 
the spirit of community in- 
volvement," Rev. Vermillion 
said. 

The burglars who set the fire 
entered the building looking for 
money, police believe. They 
found "several dollars" in a soft 
drink machine and some petty 
cash in the church secretary's 
office, the pastor said. "All 
total, they couldn't have found 
more than $8," he said. 

The fire set by the burglars in 
the pastor's office was not seen 
by a passerby Until around 3:30 
a.m. Police estimate the 



burglars entered the church 
about midnight. 

The fiVemen who fought the 
blaze recommended that the 
church consider installing a 
smoke or heat activated siren 
on the church roof. 

"THE SIREN would be aimed 
at the Kempsville Volunteer 
Fire Department, which is 
practically across the street," 
Rev. Vermillion said. The 
church is located at 5181 
Princess Anne Road. 

"If a fire started, we wouldn't 
have an alarm system but that 
siren would be loud enough to be 
heard all over this part of 
town," he said. 



CHURCH 
NOTES 



A REVIVAL Will be con- 
ducted at a large tent on the 
grounds of Emmanuel Baptist 
Church, 4750 Baxter Road, 
Sunday through June 21 with 
services beginning at 7:30 p.m. 
daily. Guest speaker at all 
services will be Dr. Herbert 
Fitzpatrick, pastor of First 
Baptist Church of Riverdale, 
Md. Free nursery services will 
be provided each evening. 

A COOKOUT at the Armed 
Forces. Hospitality House, 18th 
Street and Arctic Avenue, will 
be hosted June 23 by members 
of Galilee Episcopal Church. 
Codcouts for service men and 
women are held each Sunday at 
the hospitality center. Church 
members will furnish cakes and 
co<* and serve hamburgers. 

CHILDREN of Virginia 
Beach United Methodist Church 
have been invited to serve as 
the audience during a training 
exercise for personnel of the 
Norfolk District, United 
Methodist Church, for a new 
pr(^am of ministry at Sand- 
bridge. The Norfolk District is 
sponsoring a beach ministry 
entitled "Sun, Sea, Sand and 
Search." Children of Virginia 
, Beach United Methodist will 
. participate in the exercise 

■ Satiffday from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at 
' the ««h Street boat ramp of 
• Seashore State Park. 

t 

THE HYMN of the Month is a 
; new musical program at 

Foundry United Methodist 
' Church. Jack Barnett, church 

music director, will choose a 
, "new" hymn each month for all 
^ church members to learn. While 
; most of the hymns are not 

■ familiar, they are all traditional 
,' pieces. "The Hymn of the Month 

■ for June is "Sometimes a Light 

■ Surprises," a traditional Welsh 
' melody. 



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HISTORICAL CLASS 

John Watts of Virginia Beach 
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Mar's HiU CoUege, N.C., the 
largest graduating cla» in the 
college's 118-year history. 

A crowd of seniors, par«ite 
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Local church 
commissioned 

The Reformed Presbyterian Church of 
Tidewater, with 50 to 60 members, has received a 
commission from the National Presbyterian 
Church formally accepting the new church as an 
affiliate. 

The new church now meets in the chapel of the 
Eastminster Presbyterian Church on MacDonald 
Road, astride the Virginia Beach-Chesapeake 
municipal line. The church is looking for a 
temporary home to rent and a permanent site. It 
expects to name a new pastor within a few weeks. 

The Rev. E. Crowell Cooley, pastor of Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, was moderator of the 
meeting in May when the new church was 
accepted by the national church organization. 

THE NEW CHURCH W3s started by a group of 
local Presbyterians who were disturbed by the 
departure (rf the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States from its adherence to the Westminster 
Confession of Faith, its Presbyterian heritage and 
the priority given to social rather than scriptural 
doctrine, a church spokesman said. 

The Presbyterian Church in the United States has 
about one million members, explained a 
spdcesman for the Norfolk Presbytery. The 
National Presbyterian Church has about 60,000 
members, the spokesman said. The National 
Presbyterian Church was organized in January of 
this year. 

Session officers of the new church are Fred H. 
Sumption, moderator; Clifford Smith, clerk, and 
James H. Campbell and George H. Bohlander. 

Deacons are W. C. Hayes, chairman; C. Anthony 
Smith, treasurer, and James A, Nelms and James 
E. HoUoway. 

The church has Sunday services in the mornings 
and evenings. The Rev. Kenneth Pollock of 
Charleston, W. Va., conducted services last 
Sunday. The Rev. Robert Schoof 0f Martinsburg, 
W. Va., will conduct services this Sunday. 



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• • 



COMMUNITIES 




A THOUGHT 

FOR 

TODAY 

JUNE 12, 1974 

BY REV. 

HAROLD HULION 

PASTOR: 

EMMANUEIi" 

TABERNACLE 

CHURCH 

UNITED 

PENTECOSTAL 

CHURCH 

157 MORRISON 

AVE. VA. BEACH. 

Our Nation and society 
stands or falls on the 
spiritual strength of our 
homes. However, no 
structure ae system is 
sounder than that upon 
which it is built. There is 
no foumlation which will 
suppirt a home like a 
relationship with Christ 
and his church. 



Emmanuel Tabernacle 
Church-UPC 

157 Moniwn Ave. 

(1 block off S. Lynnh«ven Rd.) 
Rev. Harold Hulion-Putor 
PhoM: 340-7333 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shoie Drive 
Vt. Beach - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead • 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Oiuicii ScIkmI 9:30 AM. 
Momii« Wonhip 11:00 A.M. 
VISTORS)ARE WELCOME. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640KeinpfvilleRd. Ph. 499-3727 
VitjpnU Beach 

Swdsy 

Sundcy fclwol * *S AM. 

M*riiln« Worttiip ll:«e A.M. 

ev*nin« Wortliip 7:M P M. 

Tutid(y 

Marflliif Worihip l»:M A.M. 

tvtnliig MTartMp 7:N P M. 

Thurtday 

Morning Werthip It M AM 

evtnint WortMp 1:M P.M. 

Nurwry AvpiUbt* 
PASTOMS 

«»» jenneimtiwi «t». A»n©im»n«i 



1 



ST 



Assembly of God 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. DavMl Holitein, P»^or 

$514 PuUament Ph. 497-8703 
feinday School Hi. • 9:45 A.M. 
HoMt of Triumph 10:50 A.M. 
JuMOf, Yovlh, k Adult 
Piflowriiip ■ 6:00 P.M. 
HoMT of Iiiq>lnri<m - 7:00 P.ftL 
WwtaMdiy Wd-WMk 
Vp-mt 7:30 fM. 



FIRST CHURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Virginia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:90 AM 
Sunday School 11:09 AM 
Wednesday 

Taitlmeny Meetlni 1:00 
PM 

Christian Sciantlst 
Raadinv Room 
(same address as above) 
Monday thru Saturday 
11:00 am to 3:00 PM 
Also Open Tuesday Evening 
7:09 PM to «:99 PM 

EvcryetM It welcome to 
Study, Borrow, or Buy 
Authorised Christian 
Sclentitt Litarature and tlw 
King James Version of tlra' 
Bible. 

Christian Scientist Monitor 
Is also available. 



(Comet Va. Beach Blvd. 

Oceana Blvd.) 

S.Beilei, Pastor 

428-5297 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Vs. Beach 
Pastor: W. F. Grandttaff 
Ph<me: 497-4208 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(Alt Ages) 
Preaching Service: 11:00 A.M. 
Evmiiig Pmching: 7:00 P.M. 

Wednesday 7:30 P.M. 
PtayerA Bible Study 
VHied Youth Activitiei 



Welcome To Worship 
And Witness With 



J. Alton Butts. Minis- 
ter 

1740 Potters Rd. Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. / ,_ 
Study Phone 42i-1 330 ' 
Church School ■ 9:30 
A.M. 

Divine Worship - 1 1 :00| 
Divine Worship - 
1 1 :00 A.M. 




h«e B-4-T1«e Siui-Wedneidiy, June 12, 1974 




She has 
mastered 

aLARC 



Bff U4 Ukl^ 



Pvt. Marcia Mitchell became the first WAC to be 
certified as a LARC (Lighter Amphibian Resupply 
Cargo) operator, June 3, when she earned second 
place standi!^ in her class which just completed 
four weeks of training at Ft. Story. 

In addition to classroom study and learning to 
drive a LARC on land, Pvt. Mitchell, 20, also had to 
complete 34 hours training in operating the craft in 
waters of the Atlantic Ocean. 

She said, "I've always loved the water," but 
confesses the ocean is more water than she was 
used to in her hometown of Lawrence, Kan. She 
quietly added, "I had to eat a lot of soda crackers. I 
got seasick a lot out there." 

PVT. MITCHELL, who is attached to the 458th 
Transportation Go. at Ft. Story, said that going 
through training with 44 men posed little difficulty 
for her. "We all got along together pretty good. Tlie 
tests were the toughest part (of the school). We had 
a lot of tests, and if you wanted to stay with the 
group you had to study." She also smilingly con- 
fided that when she entered the school, "I started 
from scratch. I knew the bow from the stem and 
that was. about it." 

As she stands alongside the LARC she had just 
taken into the ocean and back ashore, she is 
dwarfed by the size of the craft. The wheel's appear 
twice as tall as her slender 5 foot 2 frame. 

HER HEIGHT posed another small [n-oblem for 
her. She said, "I have to use the hand throttle all the 
time. My legs aren't long enough to reach the foot 
pedals." Sitting in the cab of the LARC, following 
instructions of S. Sgt. J.L. Josey, she looks as 
though the enclosure has swallowed her. When it 
becomes necessary to stand up to get directions 
from the "signalmen" at the front of LARC, wily 
the top of her head, her eyes and nose are all that is 
visible outside the cabin roof's porthole. 

While the controls of the hugh LARCs use a 
hydraulic system, it still requires a great deal of 
strength to manuever the craft. When asked how 
this affected her, Pvt. Mitohell jokingly replied, "I 
think I'm developing muscles in my arms." As the 
crew began cleaning up the LARC after its trip 
through the sandy beaches and ocean water, Pvt. 
Mitchell commented, "Now comes the fun part — 
ready maintenance. You get grease all over you." 



MARCIA MITCHELL peers over the roof 
of a LARC cab fw a clear view off the 
surroundings as she guides the craft 
through the Atlantic Ocean off Ft. Story. 
(Sun phcAo by I^es Lehigh) 



Changes 
due for 

police 

cars 



Changas wiU be made in the 
anmrance iA poliM patrol can 
in the futia^, acoMrdiiig to Lt. D. 
G. McOoud, exMculhre aide to 
PoUce Oiief W. W. Mvis. 

U, Meaoud ••)« additiona] 
can purdiaaMl i^ (b« pi^ 
divisioa wm be all white in 
ctAttt. Uttering on tto veUeki 
identifying them as p(di« antta 
will also be redeil^e^ witti the 
aim <rf dgnlfyiog than ai 
Virginia Beach. piliee. Speeld 
marUi^ win idlo>e)rt«»ed on 
top of the can to i^d in tl^. 
b^og k>c«ted fntm the air 1^ 
men assigned to police 
heltovten. 

Lt. McCloud said the changes 



will take ^ace as new police 
caH ««> rectived by the city, 
«iti}«r M additional equipmeat 
or, n^M^ents for can In iiae. 
ExMbg patrol can wUI not be 
chaaf^ from their fp-ay and 
white cdoration but rattier 
phnad ipirt of service. 

tlw marin reason bdiind flie 
change, according to ' Lt. 
Mc(%)iid, is to make thepoU^ 
can Mrier to recognise MBidst 
otho* tntfic in the fAf^: 

It' iA expected two or ttow 
years will be required to 
reidace existing police pfitK^ 
can With the new fleet. 



OK given for 'development 



The Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday approved 
cbwH* of zoning, near the 
Little Credc Naval Ami^ibious 
Base paviMg the way for om- 
irtmcttoli of a Aqffing center, 
eiqjMn^ of a motel and an 
apartment project. 

GatO^Shoires Plua will be a 
I47.^;g^qjare-fo0t sboppidg 
«mer Mar the iii|d««ction of 



■I ndqi e od e Bcc Boulevard and 
amre Drite^, acron the sbreet 
from Uie navy base. 
. An eiiating Econo-Travel 
Motor Hotel will be expanded 



m 





WASHINGTON^Here'B how 
area Memb«i of Congress 
were recorded on major roll call 
votes May 30 Outmgh June 5. 

HOUSE 

FBOERAL RESERVE 
AUDIT: Passed, 224 for and 139 
against, an amendment to limit 
congressional audits of the 
Federal Reserve Board to tlie 
agency's operating expenses. 

In approving the amendment, 
the House weakenediasectionof 
a bill to audit all Federal 
Reserve Board operations, 
including credit and securities 
transactions. 

The t)oard Is an independent 
agency that regulates national^ 
monetary policy— the supply of 
money — by buying and selling 
doUars to banks. 

The audit wouJd be conducted 
by the General Accounting 
Office, an arm of Congress. The 
House later approved the 
overall bill (H.R. 10265) and 
sent It to the Senate. 

Supporters argued that broad 
audit powers would undermine 
the board's Independence. They 
said technical banking 
decisions should be left to the 
experts. Rep. Margaret 
Heckler (R-Mass) said 
monetary policy should not "be 
publicly judged on short-term 
political criteria." 

Opponents argued that the 
board is too indeoendent and 
should be subjected to the control 
of Congress. Rep. Henry Reuss 
(D-Wis) said the issue was 
"whether Congress would be a 
toothless tiger, or whether It 
will be keeping tabs" on 
monetary policy. 

Reps. William Whitehurst (R- 
2), David Satterfleld (D-3), 
Robert Daniel (R-4), Caldwell 
Butler (R-6), Kenneth Robinson 
(R-7), William Wafnpler (R-9) 
and Joel Broyhlll (R-10) voted 
"yea." 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D-1) 
and W. C. Daniel (D 5) voted 
"nay." 

Rep. Stanford Parris (R-l) 
did not vote. 

HOSPITAL LABOR 
UNIONS: Rejected, 152 for and 
161 against, an amendment 
giving pre-eminence to state 
laws that are "substantially 
equivalent" to a proposed 
tederal law permitting 
employees of non-profit 
hospitals to form labor unions. 

The amendment was offered 



to a bill (H.R. 13*7«) that wevM 
grant svcti cmiiloyees tlit righl 
to unionize, MAiich was iaier 
paued and sent to conference. 

The bill would prohibit 
wildcat strikes and other 
lnterr<iptlon» to patient care. 

One supporter of- fh» 
amendment. Rep. Albert Qui* 
(R-MInn), argued against pre- 
empting state taws that are 
demonstrably superior to 
federal regulations. 

Opponefits arsued that there 
must be uniformity in national 
laws wl)t) rMpect to labor 
unions. 

Downing, WhItehUrst, - 
Satterfleld, Robert Daniel, w. 
C. Daniel, Butler, Robinson and 
Broyhlll voted *'yea." 

Parris and Wampler did not 
vote. 

SUOAR: Rejacted, 175 for m 
209 against, a bill to extend for 
five years the federal program 
of price supports and Import 
quotas for the benefit of 
domestic sugar producers. 

In rejecting the bill (H. R. 
14747), the House voted to kill 
the 40-year-old program. The 
Senate could attemiit to revive 
it. 

The subsidies have 
encouraged domestic 
production and have been paid 
for by taxes on Imported sugar. 
About 50 per cent of the nation's 
sugar needs come from foreign 
sources. 

Supporters argued that 
without price supports domestic 
producers would turn from 
sugar to more prof Itable crops, 
thus forcing more dependence 
on imported sugar. Rep. W.R. 
Poage (D-Texas) said 
unlimited Imports could 
"completely destroy both the 
cane and beet Industries m this 
country." 

Opponents argued that tlie 
program creates artificially 
high prices for sugar. Rep. 
William Broomfield (R-Mlch) 
said American conlumers pay 
"over $600 million ennuatly... to 
support a noncompetitive 
Industry." 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfleld, Robert Daniel, W. 
C. Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parris, Wampler, and Broyhlll 
voted "yea." 



SENATE 

FBI FILES: Passed, 51 fer 
and 33 against, an amendment 
to open the files of the FBI and 
other investigatory agencies. 



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Solution to puzzle on pago A4 



SKcept when a person'i trial 
rl«ht». would be |eop«FSIaec|ir«. 

The amendment was offered' 
to %.U4A. e bill to perfect the 
Freedom of intarmatloA A^t of 
1*66i The everell bill was 1a1*r 
passed end sent to otnfereiice. 

Under tlie amendtnaHt, the 
FBI could protect its Informers 
by deleting nemes from 
released material. 

Supporters argued that the 
puMIc deserves to Itnow how the 
FBI operates and that public 
aeecM to such files Would 
protect against abuses Of p«wer 
such as those assocfsted with 
' Wetepgete. Sen: Lowell 
Weteker (RConn) said It Is 
Congress' responsltllify tb 
'-'exercise supervision over' aii 
agencies of govemrneht." 

Opponents argued that public 
access to FBI files wduid scare 
off Informants. TheV said tl^e 
Freedom of information' Act 
orlftlnaliy was Intended to focus 
on rsgulatory agencies, not 
Investigatory agefrcles. Sen. 
Roman Hruska (R-M4b) said,. 
"The first duty of a nation is to 
survive.... this nation cannot 
SMrvlve if we are not able to 
deal : with the lawless 
elements." 

Sens. Harry Byrd (I) and 
William Scott (R) voted "nay." 

ciA BUDOBT: Rejected, 33 
for and 55 agalrist, an 
amendment to reciuiira yearly 
publication of the tetll — but 
not Itemized — Central 
Intelligence Agency budget. 

In refecting the amendment, 
the Senate voted to kee0 the 
CIA'S budget secret. At present, 
a congressional oversight 
committee can learn how much 
the CIA spends, but It cannot 
make the information public. 

T4te amendment was offered 
to S. 3000, a bill to authorize 
money for procuring military 
weapons. 

Supporters argued that tlie 
public Should know how many 
bllllOi^ are spent each year for 
intelligence gathering. Sen. 
William Proxmire (D-Wls) 
said, "We have to run our 
Intelligence agencies In a 
democratic environment." 

Opponents argued that 
jsubllining the CIA's budget 
would p«-mlt the Soviets to 
trace where the money goes. 
Th^y said confldentJat 
, aif 4.l4Sur« H permits a 

congressional check on waste, 
without leopardlzing national 
security. Sen. Hubert 
Humphrey (0-Mtnn) said 
disclosure would be "like loose 
strltig on « ball of twine... that 
starts to unravel." 
■ EVrd and Scott voted "nay." 

•■1 BOMBBRi Rejected, 31 
for and 59 agajnst, an 
amendment to slice fufids for 
4#vini>lng ffte controversial B- 
I.Bpmber. 

The amendment was offered 
to the ntiiitary wMiNmli^li: tt 
ca^Jed f^F reducing the 



bomber's fiscal ' 1975 
'.MMfiorteaMen from $455 million 
jt^.^^ mitllon, and for furttier 
stMity pf the bomber's 
effictiveneM- 

, ' the 1^-1 Js designed to be 
AHierlca't manned strategic 
bOtnler 6f the future, and 
Operational by 1900. 

Those voting to slice funds 
argued that cost overruns have 
ittade the bomber a white 
elephant. They said existing 
strategit bombers are good 
enough ;n> allow more time to 
stydy the B-1. Sen George 
McfGovern (D-S.D.) said the 
cut6ac(( "will save us a quarter 
of a billion dollars of urgently 
needed funds." 

Opponents argued that 
studies have shown the bomber 
Wilt work and that delaying its 
production endangers the 
nation's security. They said 
much of the cost overrun results 
from inflation, not 

mismanagement. Sen. Barry : 
GOidwater (RArIz) said, 
"There are so many 
advantages of the B-1, that I 
think we have to go on with It." 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 

VIET POLITICAL 
PRISONERS: Rejected, 32 for 
and 57 against, an amendment 
ot cut off military aid to the 
government of South Vietnam 
until It "has released all 
persons" who have been 
imprisoned without trials. 

The State Department has 
said that South Vietnam does 
not have such prisoners. Other 
sources report that up to 200,000 
persons have been locked up in 
South Vietnamese jails without 
being tried In court. 

The amendment was offered 
to the military weapons bill. 

In supporting the 

amendment. Sen. James 
Abourezk (D-S.D.) said, "If the 
Government of South Vietnam 
Isgulltyof such.acts... I believe 
we have no choice but to stop 
our military support of that 
government." 

in opposing the amendment, 
Sen. John Tower (R-Texas) 
said the measure would set a 
precedent "which Is totally 
Impractical In terms of the 
formulation and conduct of 
American foreign policy." 
Other opponents argued against 
cutting aid to a nation tbat ties 
fought so long for its 
Indepeiidence. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 



D4DEPBNDENCE AUTO SUFTLY 

Special Attention 

to Military 
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Near Nav^ Base 



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I haM mtclosad money wttor, chadt or cMl) amount •.".'■ ; • 

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next to the center. In ackiition, 
the developer, W. W. D. 
Associates, plans to construct 
an apartment complex on the 
western side of the dwpping site 
sometime in the futia-e, said H. 
Calvin Spain attorney 
representing, the applicant. 
Rezoning for the apartment 
project was not reqyested at 
Monday's Council meeting. 

THREE LAND parcels 
totaling 14.4 acres were rezoned 
by the Council, following 
recommendations of the city 
Planning Commission^, which 
ai^roved the changes m May. 

The largest parcel of land, 
13.31 acres, was changed from 
R-3 residential district to B-2 
community busine» district for 
the shopping center. The other 
parcds were changed from B-2, 
community business district to 
HI hotel district and R-3 
residential district to H-1 hotel 
district. 

In action on other planning 
items, the CouncU 



a Deferred indefinitely action' 
on a change of zoning for 1.9. 
acres near Bonney Road and 
South Palm Avenue near Thalia 
Village. Attorney Grover 
Wright: representing ai^licants 

R. L. and Margaret Upton, said 

a dispute ovei; pwn«-ship of 
some of the land had cropped up 
since the Planning Commission ' ^ 
recommended last month that 
the zoning change be ai^roved. 

•Approved its own resolution - 
changing 2.5 acres from M light 
industrial district to AG-1 
agricultural district near , 
Adventure Trail and London < 
Bridge Road in Nottingham 
Estates. The Planning Com- 
mission recommended ap- , 
proval of the change. 

• Deferred for 60 days at the 
applicant's request a change of 
zoning from A-l apartment 
district to 0-1 office ^strict for 
the King's Row Apartments at 
Little Neck Road and Vii^inia ; 
Beach Boulevard. The owners . 
wanted to convert the apart- . 
ments to offices. 



[ 



^ Ufii4U 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The reoular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, June 17, 1974, at 
2:00 P.M. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Julia, 
Harriet and Katrine de Witt 
for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
B-4 Resort Commercial 
District to H-2 Resort Hotel 
District on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Pacific Avenue extending 
between 12th Street and 
13th Street, running a 
distance of 330 feet along 
the East side of Pacific 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 200 feet along the South 
side of 13th Street, running 
a. distance of 330 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 200 
feet along the Southern 
property line of which 100 
feet is the North side of 12th 
Street. Said parcel contains 
1.14 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

2. Petition of Virginia 
Gateway, Inc., for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from A-l 
Apartment District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Southeast corner of 18th 



Street and Partis Avenue, 
running a distance of 300 
feet along the South side Of 
18th Street, running a 
distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Parks 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 300 feet along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 150 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1 acre more or 
less. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

3. Petition of Trant 
Berkshire Development 
Corp., for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-l 
Residential District to R-3 
Residential District o" 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of 
Five Points Road and 
iniynnview Road, running a 
distance of 1235 feet more 
or less along the North side 
of Iniynnview Road, 
running a distance of 1220 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line of 
which 610 feet is the West 
side of Five Points Road, 
running a distance of 1260 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 1045 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 22 acres more or 
less. (Southern Polnts- 
Trantwood Shores Areas). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of L-O-J 
Associates, A General 
Partnership, for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from A-l 
Apartment District to B-2 



mnhus 

FROM VIRGINIA BEACH TERMINAL TO 

RICHMOND 

6 THRU TRIPS DAILY 

STAUNTON 

2 THRU, 4 TRIPS VIA CONNECTION 

WASHINGTON 

3 THRU TRIPS, PLUS 3 ADD'L 

BALTIMORE 

DAILY THRU SERVipE 

PITTSBURGH 

DAILY THRU SERVICE. AT 4:45 PM 

CHARLOHESVILLE 

2 THRU TRIPS, 4 BY CONNECTION 

18th and 
Pacific — ^^^28.2002 

Virginia Btaeli, Va. 



TrMwavs 



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iiilPIWIi|liiliUijll|lill»iUli 



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The Sun-Wediwiday, June 12, 1974-Pkge B-3 



LKUIS 



Ji 



community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 800 feet 
more or less West of Hutton 
Lane, and 170 feet more or 
less Nortli of Virginia 

• Beach Boulevard, running 
a distance of 245.8 feet 

1 along the Eastern property 
' line, running a distance of 
^212.5 feet along the 
i Northern property line and 

• running a distance of 314 
•feet along the Western 
I property line and running a 

■ distance of 200 feet along 
I the South^n property line. 
, Said parcel contains 1.2 

> acres moreor less. (Eureka 
'Park-London Bridge 

Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. Planning 

' Commission recommends 

, 01 Office District. 

s BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

• 5. Petition of Century 
^ Developers for a Change of 

■ Zoning District 

• Classification from R-5 
; Residential District to A-2 
, Apartment District on 
« certain property located on 
I the Southwest corrier of Old 
1 Harris Lane and Pleasure 
' House Road, running a 
' distance of 400 feet along 
I the South side of Old Harris 

• Lane, running a distance of 
; 175.98 feet along the 
. Eastern property line of 

• which 82.30 feet is the West 
' side of Pleasure House 
, Rood, running a distance of 
< 417 feet more or less along 
I the Southern property line, 
, and running a distance of 

• 158 feet along the Western 
' property line. Said parcel 
, contains 1.457 acres. 

• (Bradford Terrace Area). 
' BAYSIDE BOROUGH 
, PRINCESS ANNE 

• BOROUGH 

1 , 6. Petition of A.T. Taylor 
i Estate for a Change of 

• Zoning District 
^Classification from 1-2 

2 Heavy Industrial District to 
' AG-1 Agricultural District 
Jon certain property 
' beginning at a point 2085 

> feet more or less Northeast 

■ of London Bridge Road, 
^running a distance of 818 
I feet more or less along the 
' West side of Harpers Road, 
ijcunning a distance of 951 

feet along the Non*tern 

Jroperty Jioe: ^UiS, Naval 
ir Statloh), frnmm a 
-<llstaim>t 1445 feet more 
"*r less^tong the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
■contains 11 acres more or 
^ess. (Oceana Naval Air 

3tation Area). PRINCESS 
iNNE BOROUGH. 
"■ Conditional Use Permits: 
™ PRINCESS ANNE 
aAOROUGH 

" 7. Application of Paul N. 
mjloward Co., for a 
aConditlonal Use Permit to 
"^peratfe a contractors' 
^forage yard for a period of 
•4W0 years on certain 
*[Broperty located on the 
South side of Bow Creek 
aBouievard between 

3arrlageHill .Road and 
outh Lynnhaven Road, 
•running a distance of 200 
%et along the South side of 
iH^ow Creek Boulevard, 
Niunning a distance of 200 

5»et along the West side of 
outh Lynnhaven Road, 
orunning a distance of 200 

3eet along ttie SQuth/trn 
iroperty HnSfl^tunrftng a 
^ adistanfe of 200 feet along 
.JJhe E«st side of Carriage 
^ill Road. Said parcel 
■contains 0.92 acre. 

3Prin!;ess Anne Plaza- 
(agic Hollow Areas). 
»*> R. t N C E S S 
5OROUGH. 
„ 8. Application 
iNMcClanan, Jr 
Conditional Use Permit for 
h9 lodge for fraternal 
■organization on certain 
property beginning at a 
.point 1000 feet more or less 
a«long Prosperity Road East 
'%f General Booth 

boulevard, and running In a 
aMortherly direction a 
'distance of 1075 feet more 
^ less, beginning on the 
^ast side of Prosperity 
"Road, running a distance of 
^80 feet along the Western 
■•(iroperty line of which 200 
••feet is the East side of 
3»rosperity Road, running a 
ndistance of 742 feet along 
«the Northern property line, 
l^unning a distance of 280 
••ifeet along the Eastern 
i^woperty line and running a 
Slistance of 745 feet along 
ri^he Southern property line, 
•^aid parcel contains 4-1 
!5icres. (KOA Campgrounds 
^rea(). PRINCESS ANNE 
"BOROUGH. 

■ virginia beach 
Zborough 

m 9. Application of hot 

■^Associates for a Conditional 

2use Permit to construct two 

Mwo-family detached 

dwellings (duplexes) on 

pertain property located on 

M*he South side of 26th Street 

"teginnlng at a point 98.57 

3eet Northeast of Cypress 

■Avenue, running a distance 

•n>f 120 feet along the South 

^de of 26th Street, running 

■• distance of 140 feet along 

"the Eastern property line 

3id running a distance of 

-'V20 feet along the Southern 

property tine and running a 

distance of T40 feet along 

the Western prop^ty line. 

One duplex Is requested on 

Lots 26 and 28 and one 

duplex on Lots 22 and 24, 

Block 128, Map No. 6, Plat 

of Virginia Beach 

Development Co. and 

contains a total of 0.38 

acres. VIRGINIA BEACH 

borough. 

princess anw* 

fOROUGH 

10. Application of Herdon 
Corporation for a 
Conditional Use Permit to 
erect a 4-foot by 8-foot 
signboard on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 325 feet more or less 
North of the intersection of 
Sandbrldge Road and 
Princess Anne Road and 
located on the West side of 
Princess Anne Road. Said 
^rcel Is currently zoned "B- 
I Community Business 
District. (Hills Corner 
ArM). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. . 
Richard Webbon 
. City Clerk 
iV J wwel,ia2t 



ORDBROP 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

4fi the Clerk's OHIce of the 
• fclrcuit Court of the City of 
' Virginia B«»* on the 6th 

day of June, 1974. 

General Hospital of 

Virginia Baad<. 

PlalntiH, 

against 

Tom Mill, et ai, 

Ocftndant. 



ANNE 

Of W.W. 
for a 



The obitct of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a Mie of land of Itie 
said Tom Hill, defmdant, 
and of land of others, to 
satisfy the lien of a 
judgment out of the 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by the said 
defendant, and out of the 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by others, said 
judgment being against a 
prtor owner of said land 
which lien attached before 
the said defendants 
obtained title to said lands. 
Andanaffldavit having been 
made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by 
or Jn behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain In 
which county _ or 

corporation the defendant 
Is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1544 Fuller Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia it 
is ordered that they do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
interest In this suit. 
A copy — Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12,19,26, July 3, 4t 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 20th 
day ol May, 1974. 
Donald Jay Plchinson, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Dorothy Dale Bratton 
Plchinson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro from the said defen- 
dant upon the grounds of 
desertion. And an affidavit 
having t>een made and filed 
that the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being : 1212 
Guadalupe Street, Apt. 803, 
Austin, Texas»it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within then (10) days after 
due publication hereof, and 
do what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Adier i, Kantor 
706 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Virginia 

May 22,29— June 5.12-4 T 

ORDERTO - 
SHOW CAUSE 

AGAINST 
DISTRIBUTION 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE CITY OF 

VIRGINIA BEACH ON 

THE 3RD DAY OF JUNE, 

1974 

Re: MAY WESTCOTT 

HAYES, DECEASED 

CP No. 1991 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of A. 
Michael Hayes, Jr., 
Executor of May Westcott 
Hayes, deceaM|^M4ttf^f 
debts and denriahovatiatnU 
the estate has been filed In 
the Clerk's Office, and that 
more than six (6) months 
have elapsed ^Ince the 
qualification, on motion of 
the Executor it is ordered 
that the creditors of, and all 
others interested In, the 
estate show cause, if any 
they can, on the 2lst day of 
June, 1974, before this Court 
at its courtroom against the 
payment and delivery of the 
estate to the legatees 
without requiring refunding 
bonds. 

It Is further ordered that 
the foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for two successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

June 12,19,21 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 28th 
day of AAay, 1974. 

Jackie Nell Sharp Kerr, 

PlalntiH, 

against 

David William Kerr, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendanf, upon the grounds 
of desertion and aban- 
donment or in the alternative 
upon cruelty. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last t<nown post office ad- 
dress beinq: 471 South Allen 
Streett'^^i^ Bernardino, 
California 92408. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Santtt'a Hargrove, D.C. 

Jon P. Eichlsr " 

701 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Va. 






PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Jule Curtis Harvey, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Linda Campbell Harvey, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A VIncuto 
Matrimonii from the satd 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of continuous and 
uninterrupted separation 
for more than two years. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State M 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1630 Ogden Avenue, Bronx, 
New York it is ordered that 
•He do ap pear Here witttin 
Mn (10) days •fter dve 



publication hereof, and do 

what may be necessary to 

protect her intorest le thii ^ 

suit. '■ 

A copy — Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk. 

Alan B. Comess 

5284 Princess Ann* Rd. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

May 2a,2^-Jwii* 5,12, 4 f 

■MHtaHMMHltaHl 
VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
3RD DAY OF JUNE, 1974. 

INCHANCeRYNO. 
C-74-314 

In re: 

Adoption of Jonathan COye 

Litton and Christopher 

AAason Litton 

By: 

John Louis Krai 

TO: 

Ernest Coye Litton, Jr. 

ORDER 

THISbAY came John Louis 
Krai and Patricia Dean Krai, 
Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
infants, Jonathan Coye 
Litton and Christopher 
AAason Litton, by John Louis 
Krai, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ernest Coye Litton, Jr., the 
natural father of said 
children, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being unknown. 

It is therefore ORDERED 
that the said Ernest Coye 
Litton, Jr. appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of thfs 
Order and indicate his at 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Donald H. Rhodes, p.q. 
Owen, Guy, Rhodes 8> Betz 
281 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462 

6-5,12,19,2641 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

C74-462 

IN RE: 

Adoption of DIXIE MARIE 

VASEY, ROBERT HOWARD 

VASEY and SANDY 40 

VASEY 

BY: 

WALTER LEE GINN, JR., 

and AAARY DIXIE GINN, 

Petitioners. 

TO: 

William H. Vasey 

c-o Mr. & Mrs. Howard 

Vasey 

Route 8, Box 264 

Brookville, Florida 

ORDER 

This day came Walter Lee 
Ginn, Jr., and Mary Dixie 
Ginn, Petitioners, and 
represented that the pbject of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named infants, Dixie AAarie 
Vasey, Robert Howard 
Vasey and Sandy Jo Vasey, 
by Walter Lee GIno, Jr., and 
AAary Dixie Ginn, husband ■ 
ahd Wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that William H. Vasey, a 
natural parent of said 
children. Is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Mr. & AArs. 
Howard Vasey, Route 8, Box 
264, Bruokville, FK>rlda. 

It is therefore ORDERED 
that the said William R. 
Vasey appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his Interest In this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

W.Shephered Drewry, Jr., 
p.q. 

6-5, 12, 19, 26, 4T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of th« City of 
Virginia Beach on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Donald Robert Adams, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Nancy Ann Taylor Adams, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissult Isto 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last knol0^ post office 
address being c-o Allegheny 
Airlines, 1611 "K" Street, 
N.W. Wash., D.C. It, Is, 
ordered that she do appsar 
here within ten (10) days 
after, due publication 
h^rraf , and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 
A copy — TMto: 
JOHN V.^FtNTRESS, 
CLERK 

Linda Noel Hill D. Clerk 
James E. Brydges, Jr. 
2413 Pacific Ave., Va, 
Beach, Va. 

May 22.29— June S,H 41 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
29TH DAY OF MAY, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C74-S21 

In re: 

AtoplUm of Tamela Michelle 

Adair 

By: 

Leslie R. Allison 81 Dorothy 

W. Allison, 

PetltNmers 

To: 

Jon MichaM Adair 

AddrCK UNKNOWN 

ORDER 

This day came Leslie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, Petitioners, and 



raprasanted thaKiM object of 
HtM.irqMMllng^ls to' affaet 
the MRWtl^ o#; tbt ahowp 
namett^ inVanf, Tamata 
Michelle Adair, by LmM N. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, husbani and wlft, 
and affidavit iiaving baan 
made and filed that Jon 
Michael Adair.! a natural 
parent of said cMId, Is a non- 
retidant of the State of 
Vlrgir^A. tii* lot i«nqwn post 
offic* address balno: 
UNKNOWN, 

It Is thai'efare OrdeiM th«t 
the said Jon Michail Adair 
appear bofore this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publicatloh of this Order and 
Indicate tier httVude iow«rd 
th* prop«|*d Kloptlon. or 
otherwise do'' what is, 
necessfel'V to 0rot*ct his 
inter%st in this matter. 



A copy teste: 

John V. Fentr'M, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnside, p.q. 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 



6-5, T 



i^n^n^ 



ORDeK 
PUlLICAtlOH 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of th« 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 17th 
day of May, 1974. 
Robert L, Thonripson, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Joyce B. Thompson, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectofthlssultlsto 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
Matrimonii from the sHld 
def eijidBbt,. ViP^M ; the , 
grounds df constfuctiye 
desertion. And ah affldaLylt 
hayino been made afid.ftl^iei 
that the defendant Is not a 
resident of the StatiO ,pf 
Virginia, the la^t known 
post office address being: 
Headquarters Compahy S- 
3, WM Battalion, Parii 
island. South Carollni it Is 
orderM that she do appefi; 
here w.Cthln ten (10) ddV* 
after due publication 
hereof, aqd do what miiy be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit. 
A copy ^ Teste : 
jQhq., V, Fentress, Clerk 
LIrtda Noel Hill, D.C- 
Lowell K. Clarke 
5209 Virginia Bfach Blvd< 
Virginia Beaclt, Vtrgihia 
^Ma^2ja^jiBM/lMt 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION. 

Commonwealth ,of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 10th 
day ol June, 1974. 
Connie Sue Williams, 
Plaintiff, 

against,, 
James Vernon Williamjs^ 
Defendant. 

The objeei ol this suit Isto 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
ihoro to be later mergad Into 
a divorce a 1 Vinculo 
mairimonii from 'the said 
defendant upon the groUhds 
01 desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed thai the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office addi'ess 
being; TD2 Williams, 452-746- 
633, S 42t Co. 3 B BATTC, 
Millington, MemphlSf 
Tenne?see^" ',,. . , '.',' , 

II Is ordered thai he do, 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 



Clarke 8. Shider 
5209. Virpinia , iBeach 
Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12, 19, 26, July 3, — 41 



NOTICI 

Virginia: 

Tli* ragwtar meeting of 
th* CautKil 9f the City of 
Virginia r**ch will be held 
In the Council Chambers of 
th* Admlntttration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Ann* Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on AAonday, June 24, 1974, at 
2:00 P.M. at which time th* 
following applications will 
b* h*ard: 

Chang* of Zoning District 
Classifications 

PRINCSSS ANNS 
BOROUGH 

1. Patitlon of 
Commonw*aith Financial 
Corp., by Owan B. Plek*tt, 
Attorney, for a Chang* of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-l 
Rasidantiai Olstrlct to Af 
Apartmant District on 
cortain pfdparfy' beginning 

'^ at a point 440 fait more or 

Riess South of $puth 
. Birdnael^^Road, runnlfig a 
1 distance 4W 1444 feet tmor* 
^' or test aldhg the Wesf side 
«» of 0*n*ii«i Booth 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of ns feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property liha, running a 
distance of 1365.34 feet 
along the Western property 
line and running a distance 
of 159.31 feet along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.5 
ceres mora or less. 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. P«fltlon of 
Commonwealth Financial 
Corp., by Owen B. Pickatt, 
Attorney, for a Chang* of 
Zoning -Olstrlct 
Classification from R^o 
Residential Olstrlct to A-l 
Apartment DIstHct on 
certain property b*glnnlng 
at a point 470 feet more or 
less South of South 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 2100 feet along 
the W*st*rn property line of 
which 1643 f**t is the East 
side of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 8M.78 feet along 
the Southern proporty line, 
running a distance of' 
2492.11 feat along th* 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 
1234.23 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 200 feet is the South 
side of S'oufh Birdneck 
Road. Said parcel contains 
41.2 acres and excludes a 
parcel containing 2.3 acres, 
proposed for B-l 
Commercial Residential 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of , 
Commonwoalth Financial 
Corp., by Owan B. Pickett, 
Attorrtey, ,for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Ciaaslficatton from' R-s 
Residential District to B-1 
Commerciaji Residential 
District on c*rtain property 
beginning at a point 1460 
feet more or less South of 
Sou^ Birdneck Road and, 
115 fact mora or less East of 
General Booth Boulevard, 
running a distance of 175 
feet more or less akng the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 444 
feet more or less albng the 
, Northern property line and 

running a distance of 344 
feet more or less along the 
Eastefn property line and 
running a distance of 342 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.3 
acres more or less. 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 

s, . June 12.19, 2t 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA; IN Tt4E' 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF TME 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH. 

VILTER MANUFACTUR- 
ING CORPORATION, 
a Wisconsin Corporation, 
Plaintiff 

vs. 
AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL 
REFRIGERATION, INC. 
a Georgia Corporation, 
Principal Defendant 

and ,«,., and filed thit due .diligence 

EMPIRE STORAGE &y4||l has been v»ed by 9t, on 



MMHmpBHHHHaaii^ 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth Of Virginia, 
In tflif CierK^ Office of the 
Circuit CaoH of the City of 
Virginia Beach,«n the 23rd 
day of April, 1974. 
Robert L. Dowdy, 
Plaintiff, 

_j againtt 
Audrey Gehrmann Dowdy, 
Defendant. 

TheobleCtofthlssultlsto 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii hrom the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit haying been made 



CORPORATIC^, ;, . J, 
a Virginia CorfwratJon,^ ">' 
Co-Defendant 

L-434 
The object of this suit is to 
attach certain personal 
property of the defendant, 
American Industrjal.. 
Refrjgeratioif, Inc^ wht<|h is£ 
in the possesion of 6mplP#' 
Storage a. Van Corp., which 
property is more particularly 
described as being five (5) 
refrigeration compressor 
unites, > tostthef wjQi . parjs 
having* falRiinarktft vaRj*of 
$24,348\f0. si 'Thi* - sild 
refrigefatfBh *c<awpr#ssof 
units have the following 
serial numbers: 

176*1 A«448RCB. 

l76k3AS4«RClf 
. 0OHAt«fa&fipft7 

176*3 AS 446 RCB 
. 17ae4AS444RCB' 
The parts have Viitpr Sales 
Order No. D-33918! 

This attachment suit 
petitions the Court tq.have 
the above d*i<frlbed ^operfy 
told and the proceeds applied 
to a debt owed to the plaintiff, 
Vilter AAanufacturing Cor 



behalf of the Complainant 
ito ascertaln^n whic^ cbunfy 
or corporation the 
defendant resides, withqut 
effect, the last t^p post 
office addreta being: 2967 
Talon Court, Va. Beach, VA 
23456, It Is ortfered'that she 
do appear hare within ten 
(10) data after au* 
publication hereof, and do 
what may b* n*c*ssary to 
protect her Interest in this 
suit. 

A copy — Teafei . « s*. 
JOHN V. FEHTREil: 
^^LERK "' 

*By: Sanitt^a 44aiPgriil«r'^. 
i^Clerk. 
Barrow ft Lowe 
}(; 3104 Arctic. Ave. 
,^ Virginia Bea^h, VA 
f ^ May M.»*-ilane 1,11, 4-1 



ORORROF 
PUBI.ICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 33rd 
day of Aprlj, 1^4. 



. J. /^ttjre. 



poration, by the .principal 
defendant, >a»ari«»jn a|f^,''"f" 
Industrial Relxrft#|ttiah,t*P'«'"t'W 

Inc., in the amount .of . . r. *. -^ 

And an* affidavif having 
been filed that- American 
Industrial Refrigeration, 
Inc., a Georgia corporation, 
is a foreign corporation and 
its last known post office 
address is 1810 Auger Drive, 
Tucker, Georgia, it is OR- 
DERED- that American 
Industrial Refrigeration, Inc. 
appew within ten days after 
due publication of this Order 
and do what is nece»ary to 
protect its Interest. It is 
further ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a 
we*k for four swccatsive 
weeks m the Virginia Beach 
Sun which newspaper is 
published and has a general 
circulatton ttroughoul the 
City of Virginia Btoch, Va. 
Witlcox, Savage, LawrwKe, 
Dickson ft SplmMe 
1800 Virginia Nat^mal Bank 
Butidlim 1'. . 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 



•^* 



John V. Fentrws, Clwk f; . 
By, Gladys J. C»iboy, O.C, 
June 12, 19, 36, July 3, 4-t 



The oblect of thfs suit Is h) 
obtain a divM-ce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
Into a divom A Vinculo 
Matrimonii at the proper 
lime from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion on 
January 11, Wft. And an 
affidavit havlfif |>*M,n[iad,e> 
and filed that the ITefendant 
is not a resident of the Stat* 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office aMress being: 
U.S.S. Coral Sea CVS 21, 
F.P.O, San Francisco, 
California It is ordered that 
he do appaw hw* within 
tan (K)) days aftar due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may b* necessary to 
protect his interest m this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Cl«rk *n 

0*ck*r, ^y, CoUlas ft 
Christie 
f«IPI«i8Qn* ^ 
NerttHt, vA p.k. 

Mayn,t9~jHtt*S,i3,4t 



ORORROF 
PU9LICATI0N 

Commonwoaith of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 14th 
day of May, 1974. 
Mamie E. Evans, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
William Lerey Evans, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectofthlssultlsto 
obtain a divorce from the 
tMnds of matrimony from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of adultery. And an 
affidavit having b**n mad* 
and f iled.that the defendant 
Is not a resident of the State 
Of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
AOAN, USN, 451945975. VF- 
n AO Shop, FPO, NY., 
N.Y., 09501 It Is ordered that 
he do appear here within 
ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary h> 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

A copy— Teste; JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk. 
Grover C. Wright 
3330 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 32,29— June S,12 4-t 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 30th 
day of May, 1974. 
Edward Earl Pool, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Ruth Roberts Pool, 
Defendant, 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce, decree A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of two (2) year 
separation. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1112 
Scranton Place, Durham, 
North Carolina it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten ( 10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A Copy — Teste: 
BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

John K. Moore 
2413 Pacific Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

AAay 22,2f-June 5,12-4 1 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Offjce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 15th 
day of May, 1974. 
Ernie Alan Yanatovic, 
Plairttlff, 

against 
Patricia W. Yanatovic, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissult isto 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is^i^dt a resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
9929 East Lower Azusa 
Road, Temple City, 
California 91780 it is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Harry J. Hicks 
524 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

May 32.29— June 5,12 4-t 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach on the 22nd 

day Of AAay, 1974 

Mary Edity Hall Thompson, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

, AAark Allen Thompson, 

JvDefendant. 

' Theebiectof thissult is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro tg be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of cruelty and desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 

•. the State of Virginia, the last 
know post office address 
being: Route No. t. Box 244, 
Hubert, North Carolina It is 
ordered that he do appear 
hve Within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
^d do what may be 
necessary to ' protect his 

' interest in this suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLgRK 

By; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

HarreU ft Landrum 
519 Board of Trade BIdg. 
Norfolk, VA 

May 29-June 5,12,19.41 

Commonwealth of Vinilnia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 22nd 
day of AAay, 1974. 
'Albert Ennerson Breath- 
waite. Plaintiff, 
against 

verna AAaeLystelly Breath- 
wait*, Defendant. 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Th* object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A vinculo 
Matrlnwnli from the saW 
d*f*ndant, upon the grounds 
of d*s*rtlan of me Com- 
plainant by the Respondent 
Srt July 1, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
been mKie and filed that the 
'delilidaht Is net a resident of 
the State of Virginia, *•- 'aet 
known post office address 
being: 11532 Wyandotte 
Street, North Hollywood, 
California 916M it is ordered 
ttiat she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after du* 
publication h*r*Qf, and do 
what may b* necessary to 
protect her Interest in this 
suit. 

A copy- Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Stephen R. AAargulies 
9 S*»don Arode 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

5-29,6-5,12, 19,4T 



^ ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIR 
CUIT COURT OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 24fh DAY OF MAY, 1974 
WALTER P. BARCROFT, 
Complainant, 

vs. 
JOHN WILLIAMS, and all 
unknown parties who may be 
the heirs or devisees of the 
said defendant or have an 
int*r*st in these proceedings, 
whose last known post office 
address is unknown and who 
are made parties defendant 
by the general description of 
"Parties Unknown" 
Defendants. ^ 

IN CHANCERY / 
NO. C-74.657 ' 

The obJKt of this suit Is to 
quiet title to certain real 
estate located in the City of 
Virginia Beach, a more 
particular descriptton t)eing 
contained in the Bill of 
Complaint in the above 
styled suit. And an Affidavit 
having tieen made and filed 
by the complainant that the 
defendant, John Williams' 
last residence was unknown; 
and the bill stating that there 
are or may be persons in- 
ter*st*d In the subject 
matter of this suit whose 
names are unknown, and 
making them parties 
defendant by the general 
description of "parties 
unknown" and an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that they are unknown, such 
unknown parties being the 
widow and heirs, devisees 
and successors In title of 
John Williams, 

It Is Ordered that the said 
defendants namely, John 
Williams, if he be living, and 
the persons made defendants 
by the general description of 
"parties unknown" do ap 
pear within ten days after 
due publication ol this order 
and do what is necessary to 
protect their interests. 

it is further Ordered that 
the foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: SANDRA HARGROVE, 
D.C. 

I ask tor this: 
James ft Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 
Wallace B. Smith, p.q. 
May29,June5,12, 19— 41 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON THE 
24TH DAY OF MAY, 1974. 

CP. NO. 1987 

Re: John B. Coonen, 
deceased 

iHOW CAUSE 
ORDER 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of United 
Virginia Bank-Seaboard 
National, Executor of the 
Estate of John B. Coonen, 
deceased, and of the debts 
and demands against his 
estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office and that one 
year has elapsed since the 
qualification; that on 
February 20, 1974, the 
Commissioner of Accounts 
held a creditors hearing and 
at that time no claim or 
demands were filed against 
the estate; on motion of 
United Virginia Bank- 
Seaboard National, the 
Executor; IT IS ORDERED 
that the creditors of, and all 
others interested In the 
estate, do show cause, if any 
they can, on the 14th day of 
June, 1974, at 9:30 A.M., 
before the Judge of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
against the payment and 
delivery of the estate of John 
B. Coonen, deceased, to the 
legatees, without requiring 
refunding bonds. 

It is ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
order be published in the 
"Virginia Beach Suri'* once a 
week for two successive 
weeks. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

CROMWELL AND 

CULVERHOUSE 

Attorney at Law 

P.O. Box 5533 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

23455 

I ask for this: 

Robert B. Crorhwell Jr. 

6-5,12,2T 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereon given 
that the City Council of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia will at 2:00 p.m., 
on Monday, June 17, 1974, 
hold a public hearing in the 
City Council Chambers, 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess 
Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach Virginia for the 
purpose of hearing persons 
in favor of or opposed to the 
following proposed-! 
Ordinance: 

AN ORDINANCE TO 
AMEND SECTION 13-1 OF 
THE CODE OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH TO 
CHANGE THE VOTING 
PLACE OF ELECTION 
DISTRICT 8, LONDON 
BRIDGE, LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH FR OM 
LONDON BRIDGE 
VOLUNTEER FIRE 
DEPARTMENT TO 
LONDON BRIDGE 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

BE IT ORDAINED BY 
THE COUNCIL OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VIRGINIA; 

That Section 131 of the 
Code of the City of Virginia 
Beach is amended and 
reordained to read as 
follows: 

Delete "London Bridge 
Volunteer Fire 
Department" and 
substitute therefore 
"London Bridge Baptist 
Church." 

This ordinance ti«ail be 
effective from date of 
adoption. 

Persons requesting to ' 
appear before City Council 
regarding this matter 
should register with the 
City Clerk, Room 310, City 
Administration Building, on 
or before 5:00 p.m., 
Wednesday, June 12, 1974, 
or at the Clerk's desk prior 
to the meeting. 

Richard J. Webbon 
Cl»y Clerk 

Jen* 5,12, 21 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given 
that the City Council of th* 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, meeting In the 
City Council Chambers, 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess 
Ann* Station, Virginia 
Bcich, Virginia, at 2:00 
p.m., on Monday, June 17th, 
1974, will hold a public 
hearing on a proposed 
amendment to Section 34- 
50, Code of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
increasing taxicab fares. 

Appended hereto Is the 
proposed taxicab fare: 

(a) For the first one- 
seventh mil* or fraction 
thereof . . . .$0.60 

(b) For each succeeding 
one-seventh mile or 
fraction thereof . . . .10.10 

The proposed taxicab 
rate Increase will be 
reviewed by the City 
Council on Monday, June 
17th, 1974, at 2:00 p.m., at 
which time persons wishing 
to appoar In support of and 
thos* oppos*d to the 
adoption pf the rate 
increase may publicly 
express their opinions. 

Persons wishing to 
address City Council should 
register with the City Clerk, 
Room 310, City 

Administration Building, 
before 5:00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, June 12th, 1974, 
by letter or telephone (427- 
4304), or they may register 
at the Clerk's desk before 
the meeting opens. 

The proposed 
amendment may be 
examined In the Office of 
the City Clerk during 
normal business hours. 
Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

June 1,13, 11 



1 SUNSHINE ADS 



PAT — Now that I'm back 
you'll have time for your 
own problems, like 
crediting your assets. Jean.. 

C.A.B. - See, I Used The 
Word!!. J. D.C. 



DIANE — What we have, so 
few have! Get them blues. 
Honey! Love, Poppa Bear. 

ANN,PATTI AND IRMA — 
Nothing is Impossible. You 
said it couldn't be done. 
Congratulations. Stan. 




"CLASSY GIRLS" — 
You're the greatest! Now, 
make me pay out ttS. 
Sondra. 

JOE — You're getting well, 
but I've lost your discharge 
papers, so I 'm going to have 
to keep you. How about that 
?????????? Yea, I do. 
Fuzzy. 

MELINDA — Hold on 
honey; I'll see you soon. 
Mom 

PAMMY JO — How does it 
feel to be back on your feet? 
Love you. Mom. 

BILL ft KAREN — Thanks 
for the fertilizer, you get the 
first tomatoes! Tom ft 
Diane. 

OR EG — We only have one, 
so It will be a great week- 
end. Pattl. 

FUZZY — The stitches are 
gone, I'm getting ready to 
say Uncle. And that goes for 
your Monkey, tool Cripple 

EDDIE "HEATH POOP" • 
Happy Father's Day to the 
sweetest Daddy In the 
world. We love you. Diane, 
Sondra and Archie. 



IT WAS TOO LATE!, 
SHE'D ALREADY BEEN 
MOONEDIII! 



JOHN 
Sport ! 



Happy Birthday, 



ANNABELLE - Happy 
Birthday tomorrow. Keep 
smiling. Your "Sun" 
Friends. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
SUNDAY TO THE BEST 
HUSBAND AND 
SWEETEST PERSON IN 
THE WHOLE WORLD, 
YOUR WIFE LOVES YOU. 

TOM — Another great 
catch! I'm proud of you, 
Diane. 

JOHNNY -I Still love you, 
don't let 'em tali you 
otherwise. Your old friend, 

FANG — Hurry and get 
well, all your friends miss 
you. Pat and Dec. 

J.M. — Keep a stiff upper 
lip. YUK, YUK. D.M, 



Daddy Fraser and Daddy 
Lemon — Happy Father's 
Dayi Pattl and Greg. 

OREO — Go Navy! I Jesse 
and Joe. 

GIRLS - What'* 
happening? Joe and Jesse, 

To the most perfect Dad In 
the world, you arc always 
there when I need you. I 
love you very much. 
Annabelle. 



RATES: AI! classified 
advertising (businesses 
and individuals) only 35 
cents per line of type, with 
a minimum charge of 13. 
Classified display 12.53 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge ol 85.04 
except on contract basis. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. Mn column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. BeaCh, Va. 23452, or 
mall to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486-3430, Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SunWilntMi..*. 1 

Ptninit Netlcn I 

Special Notlcn i 

Trin«pert»fi«o 4 

LMt a ^ovnd 1 

Cwdef Thinki t 

inM«m«rl(m 7 

Manummnaurlal uti | 



AUTOMOTIVE 



AutaiTM6lln«or Sal* II 

Trueki, Trillm, Jtft 1] 

WmtMAutometlv* |]A 

Aiifo», True W far hirt 1J 

Aute^»fli,e*palr» >4 

Aula AcciM..palniln( 14A 

Utility Traliart is 

Bum* ISA 

WanfadTralian ISB 

MaMrcycM, Icaatart u 

Alrcran far mi*, pirM 17 



I RECREATIONAL | 

Campan, Tral lar* «• 

RfC. V*filcl*<ler tilr* ISA 

Camp, Spam Iqulp if 

iaachluppll** M 

Bea»t,MarlMSuppllM 11 

taaHfarHIr* J1A 



EMPLOYMENT 



HatpWanM 
RfUirn**, (.Ittlnet 
JaM Wthttd 



.U 
15 



au*ln*iiOppertuniil*t M 

WantatflaauvautiMM MA 

Macks indSanM n 

La*ft*'Man«aa** « 

mmttftamm 4i 



o(sntucn(»i 



,f»nipaimnca,C«iri* . 41 

Lacal iNMnicMan Claim -41 

eaiiai l iMfrvcMara 4SA 

Muiie-OancfOramallct 44 

Prlva** intlructignt <S 

l(»fruc»leo»w*ntad « 



iPEtS-UVKTOCXl 



0*af.CaK,OtMrP»li if 

Ptt $t gp $«¥ K* 4?A 

1«n*», Cam*, eic 41 

faulty 6 tappiiat .. 4* 

Mftia^kivtMack 4*A 



I MRKy»lEI I 



MOM* taavica-aaPAia ouiea 



MERCHANDISE 



Artlclaslarlal* SI 

An»l4un SIA 

HauaaKaMOaadt - ,.11 

Oaraea-Mummap* flA 

WanladlaSuy Si 

Swap.Trpda BA 

AMIeal AMrcliandlu S4 

TV-RadlP-Sfarae M 

ilactrenic Rpulpmanf ISA 

Calfiaand itampt ss 

JawalryawatcfMi 17 

Waarlne Apparal 17A 

OatdTitMgitaRai M 

Parm and Oalry Pradwcia SIA 

Pirawaad ' 

kawnandOardan M 

S*ad*.PIanM.pia«Mn 40A 

P**dandP*rtllliar II 

Parm impMmaftit SIA 

Machlnary and Toon 4) 

SulMlnp Malarial! U 

Butlna** BawlpinanI M 



I MOBILE HOMES 

Maplia Homn tar Sala ss 

MoWla Hbmat lor Pant slA 

Mabll*Ham*Mov*n SSB 

MaWla Mama SUM u 

AMMIa Hama* Wanlad ISA 



I ROCmg-HOTELS | 

Poofflswllh Baard *7 

RooffltwlltiautBoar* it 

Poow* ler Hau i akaaplnp t* 

•narti.MM*M to 

RMIauranli j\ 

WanladKeamaar Baard 71 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



^^gffln«nl*.p«rn|jnad >j 

-■^•rtmama. Unfurnunad ;/ 

OarapaatorPani 7) 

'jr™* and Land «orp*iit 7s 

A****r*-tfafae* 7sa 

Mou«*t(»rPant . jj 

FurniuiadHPiiiat ,77* 

tttert Praparty lor PaM 7S 

SubvrpanWrPant 71A 

Onto* Town for Ram 7tB 

wan«*d«eR*m 7* 

PorRaniarMia st 

GraMiei.aaiN SDA 

Bu*in*««PiPCMforPtflt SI 

OMc«*andO«MiSpac* SIA 

indualrMMrRant siB 

I REAL ESTATE FOT SALEJ 

indwMriaiSH'Spi* SIC 

BwsliMH Pr^prtySPl* SI 

lewattmaM ^roparty MA 

ApartmanMHsrSpl* «B 

Parmt^jneTlmbar SI 

R*ai|t»a«*Notlc*> 44 

MIMpflBrfBlk IS 

PsrSaliM*tala8«aeli .M 

l^SMpChatvaeM tt 

for SPla f Bf tw n ev wi H 

Caneamkiiiiitw ISA 

Sucwbpn wr sal* W 

RasartPrapartytorSala fl 

0««afTo«vn tor Sail *] 

LMtlofSala « 

CMliang* Raal litata H 

FarSpMsrtiichane* «S 

W*RIM.Ra*l aatal* M 

rSPla *7 



> PLACE A "PeWSCNH TO PtRSON" AO 
ill ANY OF THE ABOVE CLASSIFJCATION5 
CALL4B6-J4JO 












"%• 



w. 






mm 



■■■MM 



■H 



«■■■■■■ 



■■ 



mn 



M«i 



Clcissifiecl 



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Page B-6-Th« Sun-Wednesday, June 12. 1974 



486-S4SO 



3 SpecM Sctvices 

AUTO JUNK 

TOWED AWAY FREE 

8554372 

AUTO JUNK— Towed Free. 
Phone 625 7918 or 625-5115 
Nights 853-2292 

CANDY THE CLOWN- 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings, 587-3697. 



DOUBLE KNIT REPAIR 
Reweaving. French 
Reweaving Co., 213 
Midtown BIdg. Wards 
Corner, Norfolk. 588-6162. 



FURNITURE — 

Appliances, Recllners, 
Rugs, at Auction Prices. 
Gladstone Auction Co., 5359 
Virginia Beach blvd. 
Norfolk, 855 2821, 



JEWEL TEA PRODUCTS 

Available in 

Va. Beach 

426-2146 7 9:30 P.M. 

Learn to cut and set your 
family's hair, $20 complete 
to first 5 to enroll. Also 
scholarships available for 
complete beauty course. 
Call for details. Oceana 
Beauty Academy, 428-3246. 

MOVING — SAVE! Rent 
our trucks. Drivers 
available. Call American 
Rental Co, 855 1067. 



REDUCE SAFE 8. FAST 
with GoBese Tablets 8. E- 
Vap "water pills", 
Murden's Drug. 



WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

623-9194. 



5 Lost & Found 



BICYCLE LOST — New red 
Eddy Merckx. Boys 10 
speed bike. Vicinity of 
Tidewater Dr. and Bayview 
Ave; Sat., May 11 between 2 
and 8 pm. Reward. Please 
call 587-0076 after 3 pnr). 

LOST SIAMESE — 
Sealpoint, female, wearing 
rust color flea collar, last 
seen May 13 in Windsor 
Woods area. 486 5270. 



8 Burial Lots 



CEMETERY LOTS — 2 lots 
with markers in Rosewood 
Memorial Cemetery. $450 
for both. 340-5011. 



£3 



11 Automobileg Fof Sale 

BUICK 1963 Electra 225 
Coupe, 1 owner, low mileage, 
fully loaded. $1295. 853 2Sd6. 
Va. License 3514. 

DATSUN — 1971, 24 OZ, 
new Michelin tires, mag 
wheels. 428 2070. 

DODGE — 1972, maxi van, 
paneled, carpeted, tape 
deck. Excellent condition, 
428-1622. 



FALCON — 1964, new red 
paint job, 4 mags; new 260 
V-S; automatic 
transmission, many new 
parts. $525 or best offer. 857 
6629. 

FORD GALAXIE — 1963, 4 
door automatic. $125. 481- 
7682. 

FORD — 1969 Bronco, no 
rust, like new, 6 cylinder, 
new tires, battery, radio, 
etc. $1795. 488-6561. 

FORD 1972 Galaxie 500 4 
door sedan, V 8, automatic, 
power steering, air cond. 
Clean. $1795. 855 3965 

JAGUAR — 1972 V-12, 2 plus 
2, loaded. $6,000. Excellent 
condition. 857-5792. 



JESSUP 
MOTOR CO. 

AT LONDON BRIDGE 

1974 Pinto, fully 

equipped $2588. 

1973 Monte Carlo, ,, 

fully equipped ..$3898.86 
1971 Elcamino, 

fully equipped . . $1988.80 



1 1 Automobiles for Sale 



MERCURY MONTEGO 
MX 1972 — Like new, fully 
equipped. 490-0664. 

MG 1971 Midgette Second 
owner. Good condition. $1775. 
587 1676. 



MG — 1969 Midgett, 
excellent running condition, 
needs painting, $1350. 625- 
9633 after 2 p,m. 

MUSTANG. — 1974 

Hatchback. $3400. Call 
Clarkat420 0562or 625 3691. 

OLDSMOBILE — 1973, 
Cutlass, blue, 2 door 
hardtop, blue interior, 
automatic, power steering 
and brakes, AM FM Radio, 
350y8 engine, air 

conditioning, white side 
wall tires. Good cond. $3600. 
490 2294. 

OLDSMOBILE — 1969 
Cutlass S. Air conditioned, 
good condition. $100 and take 
over payments. 425 5023 after 
5 p.m. 



OPEL — GT, 1970, excellent 
condition, red. $2,000. 855- 
2531. 

PINTO 1971, Runabout. 
Standard, air conditioned. 
Excellent condition $1695. 
5870451. Apply at 323 E. 
Leicester st. Norfolk 

PLYMOUTH — 1969, Fury 
III, 4 door hardtop, all 
power, small V-8, good 
condition. $595. 481-3088. 

PLYMOUTH Roadrunner, 
1970. 4-speed, tape, 
tachometer, posi -traction, 
new tires. $1000 or best 
offer. 855 1716. 



12 Tniclu, Tnilefi, Jeept I: 

FORD 1972. Super Van, V8; 
sliding side door, excellent 
mechanical cond. New tires. 
$2500. 583 3920. 

16 Motorcyclei, Scootm 

CZ — 1972, 125 Motocross 
bike, like new. $700. Cycle 
Engineering of 
Chesapeake, 543-5585. 



HONDA 1974, 360, Sissy bar, 
crash bar, high rise handle 
bars, cover. $1250 or best 
offer. 488 9269. 

HONDA 1968 Scrambler, 
Good condition. $500. 497-8861 

HONDA — 1974, 125, like 
new. Less than SbO miles. 
$600. 340 0045 or 340-1260. 

HONDA — 1972-Vj CB100, 
very good condition. 3,000 
miles, new inspection, 
extra tire, 2 helments. $375. 
486-4089. 

HONDA— 1972 CB 350; 
high rise bars, crash bar, 
luggagerack. $750. 488-2548; 
after 5; 484-7942. 

HONDA — 1973, 175. 
Excellent condition. Low 
mileage. Must sell. Job 
relocation. 340 5235, 464- 
1705. 

HONDA — 1972, CB-175 
2,600 miles. Excellent 
condition. $475. 587-5684. 

SEARS — Mini-bike, 4 h,p. 
front and back shock 
absorbers, $100. 545-7697. 

SUZUKI — 1966, 250 CC, X6 
Hustler, 6 speed 

transmission, recent work, 
$250. 499-7424. 



34 Hdp W«iit«d 



PLYMOUTH 1969 Fury II, 
air conditioned, automatic, 
good condition. $600 or best 
offer. 464 3667. 



PONT I AC — 1973 Firebird, 
fully equipped, V-8, 
automatic, must sacrifice, 
427-1451 after 6 p.m. 

PONTIAC 1968 Firebird 400.4 
sp $950. 

588 2540. 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection of 
used Renaults from the nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty- 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK RD 5M 
1334 



TOYOTA — 1973 Mark II 
Sedan, automatic, factory 
air conditioning, power 
steering, AM-FM, Steel 
radials. $3375 or offer. 464- 
6929. 

TOYOTA 1969 Corona, 4 
door, very good condition. 
$975. 464-2181. 

THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent 
condition. Driven daily. 
$400. 587 2075. 

VEGA — 1973 Wagon, 
automatic, radio, less than 
14,500 miles. $2500. 399-4672. 

VEGA — 1971 Station 
Wagon, 4 speed, new 
engine, new alternator, 
carburetor overhauled, 4 
ply white wall tires. AM 
FM radio with antenn^ in 
windshield. Rear glass 
defroster. Excellent 
mechanical. Body slightly 
damaged. $1385. 464-3352. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1972 
Super Beetle with air 
conditioning, rear 
defroster, FM green, one 
owner. $2,550. 489-7295. 

VOLKSWAGON CAMP- 
ER— Van, 1964, new 
rebuilt engine, good cond. 
$650. 481 7470. 

VOLKSWAGEN — 1962 
Custom, $450, or best offer. 
480-1007. 

12 Tracks, Tnilen, Jeeps 

CHEVROLET — 1968 
Pannel Truck. Has new 
carberator, tires and brake 
shoes. Excellent condition. 
$800. 481 3261. 

DATSUN — 1974 Pickup, 
step bumper, 5,000 miles, 
$3,000. 340-7530. 

DODGE — 1973 Pickup 
Adventurer, air 
conditioned, power 
steering, disc brakes, 
automatic, long wide bed. 
$2800. 487-2714. 



340-1213 



fORD — 1956 ft^neled 
truck, $250. 855 496V 

FORD — 1973 F-lOO Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, M2 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588-25M. 



I Wanted 

A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE 
CAN BE YOURS 

No Experience Necessary 
Ask yourself these three questioiu: 

i. Do I want to be of tefvice to the public? 

2. Do I want to learn all I can about Real Estate? 

3. Am I willii^ to devote long hours, evenii^ and 
««ek-ends to the real estate profession? 

ff yoy can answer yes to these questions and want to 
le^ more about the Real EsUte ptfAemon, call Bill 
EUott for an interview today. 

BYLER REALTY 

SPtQAian M PMMi ■BRMNTIAL PIOMRTB 
M ALL ^m&mA WUkW 




340-8081 



MAITOB 



YAMAHA — 1973 TC3, 
175CC. Excellent condition. 
$650. 486-1805. 

rRECREATlONAl^ 
18 Campers, Trailers 



APOLLO MOTOR HOME 
— 22' or 25', all power, AM- 
FM stereo, bath, air 
conditioning, generator, 
sleeps 6. 424-2678. 

AV E n"gE R~TR AIL ¥r^~- 
24', used 2 weeks, sleeps 6, 
completely self con tain eel, 4 
burner gas or electrrc, 
refrigerator, converts from 
battery to 120 volts, 
rechargeable' by battery. 
Full bath. 424-3412. 



MAINE — 10 ft. Pickup 
Camper, self contained, 
1973, priced for quick sale. 
$1195. 486-1805. 

21 Boats, Mtiine Supplies 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 

FH: 8SS-2S10 

CABIN CRUISER — 23' 
Sports Fisherman, 
Chrysler inboard, mint 
condition. S3200. 420-4863. 

CHRYSLER — 1971, 23', all 
fiberglass cruiser, fully 
equipped on trailer. 
Excellent cond. $5500. 340- 
7469. 



HARKERS ISLAND 


21' 


with small cabin. 


Like new. 


65 HP Mercury 


motor 


in 


well. 397-4590. 







OWENS — 28' Sport 
Fisherman with flying 
bridge, flagship engine. 
$3,000 or best offer. 587-4376, 
588-2880. 

STAR CRAFT — 14' 

vjiodshield lights, rod 
holdSr^equipped to fish day 
or night. Master Craft 
trailer electric winch. 
Ready to go. 545-6616. 

- 

SHENANDOAH — 1968, 23' 
fiberglass, new rebuilt 160 
1-0, fully equipped. $3500 
firm. 488-0263. 

SPORTCRAFT — 21', 1972, 
Outriggers, depth finder, 
Evinrude motor. $3,500. 855 
6601 or 855-5756. 

WANTED TO RENT:Boat 
Slip for 23' boat Virginia 
Beach. 486-7080 



21ABoatoPorHte 



BOAT — 16' X 5', wood, 
Lapstrake; fiberglass 
in good condition; with 
trailer; upholstered seat 
cushions, 40 h.p. Johnson 
outboard. Necessary 
equipment. Ready to go. 
$750. 853 5478. • V» 



■ EMPLOYMENT ■ 



18OR0VER 
Turn your spare time into 
S%$%S. First $10 in your 
hojne with Sarah Coventry. 
424-1198. 



DREAMS LARGER 

Than 
YOUR PAYCHECK? 
Let us help you achieve the 
things you want! 

Nat lona lly known 
products. Amazing 
security possible. 
Investment of less than 
$40.00, 100 per cent 
refundable and $4.00 
membership fee (not 
refundable). No obligation 
to sit down and talk over 
potentials. Phode 423-9560 
or 545 0004, Room B 606 



ARE YOU SATISFIED with 
your present family income? 
Let your ability supplement 
your income. Hustuind and 
wife work together. For 
interview SMS174 

AIR CONDITIONING 
Mechanic. Experienced. 
623-7265. 

AIR CONDITIONING 
MECHANIC — 

Experienced. 

623-7265 

APPLICATORS — To learn 
to install new type of 
building material. Drivers 
licen* necessary. Hourly 
wages plus company 
benefits. 853-8800. 

AUTO BODY Fender man 
and Painter. Must have 
tools. Apply In person. 
Martin's Body Works, 3536 
E. Little Creek Rd., Norfolk 
583-4551. 

A^UTOMOBILE BODY 
REPAIR PAINT WORKER- 
Experienced with own tools. 
625 2791. 



36Job«WMitcd 



47 Pets- Ufestsck 



AUTOMECHANICJ 
Must have own tools. 
543-1661 



AUTO WORKERS — AutO 
mechanics. State Inspector, 
Wreck driver. Call 583-3814, 
ask for Mr. Barker. 

BABYSITTERS 
Register and earn extra 
money sitting with our 
agency. For info call 489 
1622. Babysitters Tidewater 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
Earn $3,000 to $5,000 this 
summer, while getting a 
good basic background in 
business and marketing. 
Qualifications: must be 
over 21, personable, honest 
and have own trans- 
portation. Call 499-7053. 

ELECTRICIANS & 
HELPERS — Experienced 
in house and apartment 
wiring. Must have 
journeyman's card. 
Excellent pay, 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays, paid vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Pete Parker. 



HOUSEKEEPER 

Mature, live ih, full charge. 
References, salary open. 428 
5453. 

MATfrfENA' NCE WORK - 
ERS — Knowledge of 
all types of maintenance 
on houses. 460-0171. 

MECHANIC — Forklift 
experience desirable. Must 
have own tools. Call 627 
0474. 



REFRIGERATION 
MECHANIC 
Commercial repair work. Isl 
class only. Permanent 
position. Top pay. Equal 
opportunity employer. 420- 
6140. 

SALES — can earn $4 an 
hour selling Fuller Brush 
Products. Full or part-time. 
Call 543 5224. 

SHEET METAL 

MECHANIC — and helpers. 
Experienced in house and 
apartment installation, 
duct work and equipment. 
Excellent pay and 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays and vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Oezern. 

STATE INSPECTOR- 

Arrowhead Union 76 

497-6473 



TRAINEE — An unusual 
opportunity for an alert, 
responsible woman to train 
as a Laboratory Technician 
with consulting and 
analytical laboratory. No 
technical skill or 

experience needed. Desire 
to learn a must. Promising 
future for the right 
permanent resident. Call 
Jennings Laboratory for 
appointment, 425 1498. 



BABYSITTING - for 
working mothers, my 
home. Windsor Woods area. 
340-3655. 

BABYSITTING - My 
home, day or night, near 
Military Mall. 499-4557. 

BABYSITTING — My 
home, fenced yard; 
Kempsvllle area. 497 7394. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home, no age limit, 
Aragona Village, days, 
weekly. 4994023. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home, Thalia Village. 486- 
8166. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home, anytime. Monday- 
Friday. Call 428 7934. 

CHILD CARE — In my 
home, Westview area. 424- 
9754. 

B ABy¥| T fl N G^ "^~ m~rn y 
home. Ages 3 and up. 
Carriage Hill area. 340-3507. 

CHILD CARE— My home. 
Oceana area. Anytime. Hot 
meals. Very reasonable. 
428-5987. 

TYPING — My home, 
experienced. Secretary; 
reasonable. 420 9584. 



^ 



38 Business Opportunities 

BEAUTY SALON — Near 
shopping center on Little 
Creek Rd. Call 587-7477 or 
340-1914. 

MOTORCYCLE BUSINESS 
— For sale. Inventory of 
motorcycles, parts, tools, 
and equipment. Mr. Beiler, 
547 7984, 485-5800. 

$300. will get you a shop at 
Old Towne on an 
assumption basis. Some 
merchandise included, a 
tremendous family 
business. For information 
call 486-6905. 



GREAT DANE— Female, 
black, 7 weeks old. 490-1493 
or 855-8931. 



GREAT DANE — AKC reg. 
Female, Fawn. 10 months 
old. $175. 497-4701. 



KITTENS — Lively, exc. 
dispositions, must sell, good 
homes only. 2 males, 2 
females. Black-wht. $3 ea. 
423-1094. 

LABRADOR PUPS — reg., 7 
weeks, black. Super Chief 
strain. Dr. Green, days, 627- 
4131, nights Suffolk 539-6515. 

LABRADOR RETRIEVER 

— AKC registered. 7 
months old. $85. 464-6080. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPS 

— 10 weeks old. Champion 
sired. Shots, wormed. S53- 
9218. 

ST. BERNARD PUPPIES— 
Registered, wormed, shots, 
females $75, males $100. 
340-5240. 

ST. BERNARD— male. 1 
year. AKC registered. Best 
offer. 340-0888. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
AKC registered, shots, 
wormed, terms. 340-5773. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
Males, AKC registered, 
wormed, dew claws 
removed, available, 
reasonable. 499 5247. 

WEIMARANERS — Choice 
pups available. Ready to go 
now. Also selected 
personable older 
individuals for the 
discriminating home. Fully 
guaranteed. Terms 
available. 421-3966. 

YORKSHIRE TER- 
RIERS — AKC reg. 12 
weeks. Reasonable. Shots. 
4900487. 

47 A Pet-Stud Service 

Virginia Stud Registry 
Looking for a good AKC ' 
registered stud or puppy. 
Call 424-2174, 9-7. Closed 
Wed. 



52 Homeliold Goods 

HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
TURE for sale. 
Moving. 464-0746 



65 MoMle Homes tm 



S^ 



:rfEN~ 




REAL ESTATE EXAM 

COURSE Virginia Real 

Estate School. Beacon 

BIdg. 499-3461 

(Across from Pembroke 

Mall) 

nurses'aides~~ 

Summer's here, school's 
out. Starting classes now. 
Holmes School of Nurses 
Aides, 340-0620. 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrisson, 428-0587. 



44Muik 



GRIMES 

MUSIC SCHOOL 

Mvate Music Lessons in 

Pembroke Area 

5 String Banjp-Tenor B&njo- 
Gultar-Electrfc Bass-Hawa- 
iian Guitar-Mandolin. 

CiU After 4 P.M. 499-1428 



45 Private lastiuctions 

PIANO LESSONS — 
Princess Anne Plaza area, 
experienced, accredited 
teacher, references can be 
furnished. 486-4920. 

TtJTORING — In my 
home; all elementary 
subiects; by certified 
teacher. 853 6596. 



S2.75 PER HOUR 
Part or full time. Ideal for 
civilian or military. Weneed 
10 people to work in sales 
and service dept. No 
experience necessary. Call 
Mrs. Black 4991269 



il for ^T' ^m 

need ■ PETS- ■ 

*"{r ■ UVESTOCK I 



LADIES- MEN 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to start 
Plus l>onuses and benefits 

Call 499-2763 



REAL ESTATE AGENM- 
6 fuir"tlme. 6 part-Tltne 
agents needed for new 
Virginia Beach office. 
Instant commission 
arrangement, life 
insurance, hospitalization, 
free license preparation, 
and on the |ob train- 
ing. Call Wayne Jar- 
rett for confidential 
interview. 



420 9940 623 3401 I 

EOUAL OPPORTUNITY I 

BROKER I 



WANTED 
IMMEOIATELYI 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying |ob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

NO experience necessary. 
We will train you. 

Call tn-tH% 



47 Pets -livestock 

BASSETS — (Soality puppies, 
shots and wormed. AKC 
registered. $50. 497-9500 or 
497-3595. 

BASSET HOUND PUPPY 

— 1 male, Tricolor, 10 
weeks old. AKC registered. 
Wormed. $100. 499-4349. 

CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES — 
Purebred, AKC registered, 
paperbroke, wormed, 90 
percent love and affection, 
10 percent bone and hair. 
623-1256. 

CHINESE PUG Puppies, 8 
weeks, Shots, wormed. AKC 
reg. $135. 420-0791. 

COLLIE— Female, 9 weeks 
Old. Tricolor, AKC 
registered. 857-0490. 

DACHSHUND PUPPIES— 
Miniature males, 7 weeks, 
AKC Registered; $75; 420- 
4139. 

DOBERMAN PINSCHER 

— Free to good home, good 
house pet. 583 8813. 

FREE KITTENS — To a 
good home. Call 486-3430 
days before 5 p.m., ask for 
Miss Painter. 

FREE KITTENS-to a good 
home. 9 weeks old. 460-0680. 

" — J 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
PUP 2 months old, 855 9407. 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS— 
AKC reg., 9 weeks, shots, 
black & silver. 853-1085. 



AIR CONDITIONER — 
10,800 BTU. Excellent cond. 
220 volts. $110. 486-2819. 

AIR CONDITIONERS — 
(2) 30,000 BTU,; excellent 
condition. $350 each. Call 
853-7661. 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
J973, Sears Coldspot. Used 3 
months. 21,000 BTU, 220 
volt. $250. 420-8107. 

BABY CARRIAGE — From 
Italy, brown corduroy, 
must see to appreciate. $55. 
583-9139. 

BICYCLE — 26 "Girls, air 
condition. $15. Call 486-3430 
days before 5 p.m. Ask for 
Mrs. Ann Parker. 

BUILT '- IN RANGE - 
OVEN — Westingbouse 
electric with clock timer. 
Coppertone. Good 
condition. $35. 497-2578. 

INSULATION — 3Vj" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard^ 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 

MOVING-MUST SELL- 
Encyclopedias, Dinette set, 
small appliances, drapes, 
rods, misc. 464-1664. 

51 A Antiques 

ANTIQUES, We buy 
anything old; furniture, 
glassware, jewelry; 1 piece 
or entire estate. ZEDO 
AUCTION CO. 622-4182. 

Duncan Phyfe sofa and 
chair; solid maple table. 
Very old. 420-9164. 

OLD ROLL TOP desks for 
sale, 8 to choose from. 

DESKS, INC- 
3411 High St. 399 0979 

52 Ikwisehohl Goods 

Ben Franklin stove; never 
used, $175. Encyclopedia 
Americana, 35 volumes, 
$75. 420-9164. 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
Gibson, 10,500 BTU, 
excellent work ing 
condition. $75. 497-3702. 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
20,000 BTU. Signature. Like 
new. Wood grain frQn^$250. 
481-1334. 1^ 

CHAI RS — set of 4 Mahogany 
dining chairs, Empire style. 
Excellent condition. 
$135 4899328. 

CHINA — Quality furniture 
and miscellaneous Items. 
587-2317. 

DISHWASHER — Sears 
Kenmore. Automatic, 1 
year old. $150. 499-7591 

DISHWASHER — 
Kelvinator, like new, $125. 
489-1303. 

FURNITURE — 3 rooms, 
living room, dinette, 
bedroom, almost new. Very 
reasonable. 427-2127. 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room $119.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $7S each. Maple 
Boston Rocker $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623 
4100, dealer. 



KITCHEN SET — 5 piece, 
black and white. $45. Call 
5437253. 

TABLES — Solid maple 
round and end tables; 
coffee table. 481-3261. 

TWO RUSH BOTTOM 
Chairs, Love Seat, danish 
modern, antique table with 
chairs. 423-4487. 

42" Round Marblized 
Formica top table with 12" 
leaf and 4 chairs, all 
wrought iron legs, good 
condition. $75. Call 622-8902. 



$458.00 delivers 3 room, 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 

S2A Garage • Ruminiy 

GARAGE SALE — June 
15th, 1300 DePaul Way, 
College Park. Also living 
room furniture, rugs, 
kitchen or patio furniture. 
Call 424-2042. 



53 Wanted to Buy 

ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR — Retired 
railroad man. Any kind, any 
condition, jjay good price. 
545 6242. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 

54 Musical Meichindise 

PIANO— Story and Clark, 
Remodeled; $275; 499-1474 



PIANO -PLAYER, Old, 
needs some work. $525. 855- 
9189. 

WANTED TO BUY used 
Pianos. We also tune, 
rebuild, refinish and sell all 
types of pianos. 583-0486. 

55 TV-IUdio-Steieo 

ROSS TAPE PLAYER — 2 
speakers; good condition, 
$50 857- 1938. 

58 Good Things To Eat 

WE SHELL ANY KIND OF 
PEAS OR BUTTER BEANS. 
497-2151. 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Eari Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Hurds rd., 340 5171. 

60 Lawn & Garden 

FILL SAND — Wash Mason 
Sand, top soil. Between 8-9. 
424-9883. 

LANDSCAPING — 
Grading, seeding, beds 
reworked. 545-1155. 

TOP SOIL — Sand 8. gravel. 
Call now, serve you next. 
489-3997. 

61a Faim implements 

9N, Ferguson 30, Fordson 
Major Diesel; 4 row Ford 
disc S, brushog, 7 ft cut. 
Best offer. 460-0722, 497- 
8104, dealer. 

63 Building Materiali 

HOME Builders 8i Con- 
tractors - Let us help yoo 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM «i EATON 427-3200. 

64 B»>lil«M Eqwipmilt 



MARLETTE - 1964, 10' x 
55', air conditioned, 
carpeted, excellent 
condition, partially 
furnished. 460-1003, 497- 
8783. 

OLYMPIC — 3 bedrooms, 
furnished, only 7 months 
old. Can remain on lot. Just 
take over payments. 425- 
1991. 

SUNRISE — 1968, 60x12, 
Shed. $600 equity and 
assume. 421-9386, 4604 
Chickadee st. Chesapeake. 

VIRGINIAN — 1973, 12x60',' 
2 bedrooms, central air 
cond., fully furnished, 
carpeted, shed. $200 and 
assume payments of 
$116.95. 426-7497. 

MOBILE HOME 1965 
Marlette. 2 bedrooms, 
carpet, air conditionong. 
Furnished. Excellent con- 
dition. $3,200. Days-460-1003, 
nights 497-8783. 

WINDSOR -r- 65 X 12, 6 
rooms, dining room, living 
room, kitchen, tip-out. 
Available July l. Equity 
and assume. Can be seen 
anytime. 490-1307. 



68 Rooms For Board 

ATLANTIC HOTEL 
Rooms— Single $16 week; 
Double $20 week. HI 
Granby 622-4311. 

OCEANFRONT — Rooms 
for 2, $25 per person weekly. 
Avalon Hotel, Oceanfront 8i 
20th St. 

■ real ESTATES 
ft FOR RENT I 

76 A Movers-Storage 

FURNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators, Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a week and 
holidays no extra charge. 
8539308. 

77 Apt F<w Rent 



OCEANA GARDENS — 3 
bedrooms, available 
immediately, $195. 340-7777 
or 340-4121. 

POPLAR HALLS-4 
bedrooms with den, on lake 
lot. Available July 1st. Call 
4243309 

VIRGINIA BEACH-6 blocks 
from water, 3 bedrooms, 
garage, Prefer family. $245 
year around. Avail. June 15. . 
425-9767. 

78 Resort Property-Rent 

COTTAGE FOR RENT, 
Delray Beach, Nags Head, 
N.C. Sleeps 8. 484-3804. . 

HOUSES 8. 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323 Laskin rd. 

428-4882 




81C Industrial for Sale 



WE CAN GET CASH FOR 
YOUR DUPLEX! 

REALTY GROUP, INC. 

499.»»8» 

»4lirs. 



KNTIMI STOCK 

ANTIQUC 
ROLLTOP DESKS 
$100 OH 
Umttad Offer 

DISKS, INC. 

Mil Hlfll St. 387-7US 



■ MOBILE ■ 

■ HOMES ■ 



65 Mobile Homes For Srie 

ALTAIR— 1970, 12'x56' 
Small quiet court In Back 
Bay, fishing 8< boating in 
your front yard. $3950. 426- 
6032. 



83 Fan— -Laad-Tlmbei 

ACREAGE-VA. BEACH 
5 acres nr. Sandbrldge 
4 bedrm. waterfront home 
with boathouse on large 
bulkheaded lot, at 
Sandbrldge. 

15 acre farm with 1500 ft 
frontage. 

Restored home on 6 acres, 
Pungo. 

36 acres wooded, Pungo 
25 acre farm with 
restorable home. 
29 acre farm, partly 
wooded. 

8 acres at Back Bay. 
Nelson P. Brock 426-6111 
PUNGO REALTY CO. 

85 Fm Sale Norfolk 



CAMELLIA GARDENS 
Waterfront. Quick access to 
buy. Brick 4 bedrooms, 3</l2 
baths, den, 4 fireplaces, 
bulkhead, boat dock, ramp. 
By owner. 481 2661 or 622 
5333. 



86 Pm Srie Vlsjiria Beach __ 

HILLTOP MANOR — 3 
bedroom ranch, corner lot. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041 or 
464 4839. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc., REALTOR. 



LAUREL COVE — Colonial 4 
bedroom, 2t/i bath home with 
fireplace. Pay equity and 
assume 7 per cent VA loan. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041, 
or 464-4839. We trade. 
Higgins, Realty, Inc., 
REALTOR, 



LYNWOOD SHORES — 3 
bedroom Ranch, Priced to 
sell. 

JACKSON 
4900555 427-6545 



CAPE HENRY SHORES- 
By owner. Spacious Ranch 
with 3,000 sq. ft. of living 
area. 4bedrms., oversized 3 
car garage. Walk to beach. 
481-5063. 



GREEN RUN — 3 bedroom 
Villa, 1% baths, fully 
carpeted, central air, 
fireplace, large covered 
patio, utility room, storage 
shed, landscaped. $38,500. 
427-2457. No aflents. 



PEMBROKE MANOR - 
Equity, assume 5'/4 per cent 
or refinance. Lovely 3 
bedroom, Vh bath, central 
air conditioned ranch. 497- 
7033. 



POCAHONTAS VILLAGE 

COZY 
3 bedroom, eonvenient 
location in most desirable 
area. Call Ellle Talanian, 
486-4041 or 34P-1690. We 
trade. Higgins Realty, INc. 
Realtor. 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA- 
Lovely 3 bedroom Ranch. 
$8,100 and assume or buy 
conventional $25,900. Call 
Robert Fowler, 486-4041 or 
486-1369. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. Realtor. 

THALIA GARDENS — 4 
bedrooms, 2 baths, air 
conditioning large wooded 
lot; screened porch, self 
cleaning oven. $59,500. 340- 
8411. 



VIRGINIA BEACH — By 
owner, 4 bedrooms, 
fireplace, 4 blocks to beach, 
$49,000. 430-26th St., 428- 
6521. 



WELLINGTON WOODS — 
4 bedroom, 2 baths, double 
car garage, brick Ranch, 
large family room with 
fireplace off kitchen with 
breakfast bar, good yard 
space, schools, and 
convenient to expressway 
and beaches. Immediate *, 
possession. Only $48,500. -; 
Pay equity and assume 7 
per cent loan. Call owner, 
481-2770. 



WINDSOR OAKS — , 4 
bedroom, 2'? bath ranch; 
eat in kitchen with pantry, 
large family room with 
lireplace and sliding door to 
oversize patio. Extra work 
■pace in large 2 car garage; 
20 X 30 ft. basketball court; 
large treed lot on cul de sac. 
Call Jim Sawyer, 486-4041 or 
340-3181. We trade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc. REALTOR. 



WINDSOR OAKS WEST 
DOLLS HOUSE 
3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 
family room. Spotless! 
Large fenced yard on culde 
sac. Call Elle Talwiian, 
486-4041, 340-1690. We trade. 
Higgins Realty, Inc. 
Realtor. 



87 Foe 



ALBEMARLE ACRES — 
VA Loan. 3 year old brick 
Ranch, large wooded lot. 4 
bedrooms, 2 baths, carpet, 
central air, fenced. $39,000. 
No agents. 482-3904. 

9yg|»FOTS^^^^^^^ 

CANDLEWOODCOVE 
Acre plus wooded water- 
front site. Reduced. Dave 
Miller, Jr., 428-3822, 481 
6772. 
DAVE MILLER REALTY 

LINLIER 
Beautiful wooded 
waterfront acre corner site. 
Dave Miller, Jr., 428-3822, 
481-6772. 
DAVE MILLER REALTY 

96 Wanted Real Estate 

CASH TALKS 

We buy 8, sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



AMERICAN — 10 X 55, aff 
conditioned, washer, 
freezer, furnished shed; 
$2600. evenings 499-6227. 

AMERICAN — 1970, 12 x 40, 1 
bedroom, furnished. $300 
equity and assume balance. 
5430364. 



CASTLE — 8' x 30' and 10' x 
50*. Sacrifice. Best offer. 
Call 497-8104 or 460-1283. 

OETROITER-1969, 12 X 60; 
3 bedrooms, partially 
furnished, washer, dryer, 
dishwasher, carpeted. 497- 
5169 

MARLETTE-196*, 12' x 60'. 
3 bedrooms, unfurnished 
except for master bedroom, 
appliances, storm windows, 
2 sheds, and custom skirt. 
Call 545-4770 
a 

MAGNOLIA TRAILER W62, 
10x55'. 3 bedrooms, par- 
ticularly furnished. Very 
good condition. 497-0075. 



200 J^CRES 

^ \0 V Approximately 

Chesapeake ""Sr 

AUCTION - JUNE 15 

Excavating Equipment Sells Separately 

EXCELLENT INVESTMENT 
POTENTIAL 

DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL AS LAK&SIDE 
FARMETTE Cuireatly still operating Bar-Kt w/ 
■pprox. 30% of 86 Aae Use Peroit yet undis- 



Frontage on Mutin J<rtinson Rmd and preaent 
by Dowdy Lane off of Galb«iy Road. (2 mi. from 
Rt. 17 Exit of 1-64) F<» Brochurea & Info. 



CHOAPCAKK iX- 
VILtmiraNT COUP. 
(MMICR 







VI»4M<IA latio 



-I-* 



!■«■ 



^^^^ 



mmmt 



mmmmtrntmi 



mmmmm 



. jtsmman i"~ '- ^ iiiiH^.^->»i 



»*^f-„-- 



Real Estate 



Tht Sun-Wedmsday, Jum 12. 1974-Pag> B-7 



Financ^Business/Econoniy 



IIHCONSUMERI 

Cheapest 
aspirin is 
best buy 

By Peter Weaver 

Q. I keep hearing that the best aspirin is the cheapest 
aspirin. Is this true? -M.L., Falo Alto, Calif. 

A. Since all aspirins basically work Uie same way, 
the American Pharmaceutical Association 
(pharmacists) says it's true that the cheapest aspirin 
is usually best buy. 

The APA notes some differences among various 
tn-and of aspirins, such as color, size, weight and 
dissolution rate but these differences don't really 
affect the time it takes to relieve a headache. There are 
some studies underway concerning absorption times 
for various aspirins. According to the APA, however, 
it's believed that even if absorbed more quickly, the 
end result (cessation of pain) will be about the same 
for various aspirin brands. 

All aspirin will deteriorate. Differences In 
manufacturing techniques can make some aspirins 
deteriorate faster than others. If an opened aspirin 
bottle smells like vinegar inside or the tablets have 
begun to crystallize, deterioration has set in. You 
should only buy aspirins in the quantity your family 
can use in one year. Keep the bottle tightly closed in a 
cool place not exposed to excessive heat (such as a hot 
water shower) or light 



Mind 



Y 



our 



Money 



Q. When I ask for the package insert (detailed 
information on side-effects and contraindications) for 
prescription medicine I encounter reluctance on the 
part of the druggist. If I can't get the insert, how else 
can I get information on potentially harmful side 
effects?— H.G.H., Los Angeles, Calif. 

A. No law prohibits a pharmacist from supplying this 
extra inf orma tio'n. But some doctors feel providing this 
kind of information is an infringement (rf the doctw- 
patient relationship. Not wanting to get into trouble 
with physicians, pharmacists are often reluctant to 
include informational inserts with prescriptions. These 
inserts are written for pharmacists and physicians in 
technical language and may be confusing to the 
patient. 

The Food and Drug Administration has been 
experimenting with providing package information 
irKerts for such drugs as oral contraceptives. If the 
experiment proves successful, the FDA may require 
all [»-escribed drugs to be sold with information irserts 
ex|jaining side effects and other potential dangers in 
plain English. 



Q. I'm told that certain vitamins and minerals can 
slow down or erase the graying of hair. Is ih|s so?— 
Mrs. J.A., Millbury, Mass. »" " 

A. According to a National Institutes of Health 
nutritipn^t, no magic vitamin pill or "secret" diet can 
change those sUver hairs to gold. Some unscrupulous 
vitamin voidors have cited research studies where 
rats have undergone hair changes becaiee of certain 
vitamin dosages. But, through other tests, it has been 
determined that there is no corresponding reaction 
with human hair. 

Save your mcmey. Some stylists claim silver hair is 
becoming chic. It won't cost you a cent to be right in 
styte. 

Q. CEm^ou save money by using disposable 
<Mapers?-J.S., New Ywk NY. 

A. Old-fashioned cloth diapers are the least 
expensive ($3 to $5 a dozen) and they last for years. 
Even when you throw in the cost of detergent and 
bleach, cloth diapers are still much less expensive than 
disposables (at about $1.59 a dozen). Disposables are 
convenient, especially for travel, and are no more 
expensive than most diaper services during the 100- 
diaper-week stage and less expensive than diaper 
services thereafter. 

YOUR ENERGY MONEY : When trying to cut down 
your energy bills this summer, don't forget the 
importance of your windows. For some reason (h* 
other, the advent of air conditioning has made some 
people forget that windows can be opened. When it's 
cool enough outside, (^n the windows and get some 
free air cwiditioning. When it's really hot, ma«:e sure 
your windows are shaded against direct sunlight. Heat 
penetration through windows can be reduced by as 
much as 40 per cent if an awning, sun-screen ( looks like 
a bug screen) or reflective blinds are used. 

Q KlngFe*liirM9yndicaie.lBC..If74. 
P9t9r Weaver wetccanes questions from readers 
for possible use in his column. Please send letters 
to bim in care of Virginia Beach Sun, 158 Rose- 
tttont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 





HMoa' 



JOK PAOUNOKS 
USALTOR 



F(tf yersonal wrrice, call me any- 
time rt 425-3900 or home, 
3404136. There is also ■ comi^ete 
itatf rt Custom Realty ready to 
serve you wttb Customized RmI 
Estate Scrrice. 



Rea/tar board sets 
condominium tailc 



The Virginia Beach Board of Realtors will 
sponsor its first condominium conference June 26 at 
the Sheraton Hotel in Military Circle. 

The conference, designed for realtors, will teach 
new sales and marketing techniques for all types of 
condominium sales, including townhouses, 
quadroplex developments, duplexes and high rises. 

Conference leader will be Frank R. Spadea, 
executive vice-president, Larasan Realty Corp. 
Local speakers will be Joseph Boyd (Larasan), 
Lionel Hahne (Oceans Condominium Corp.), Burt 
Reavis (Pembroke Realty) and attorney Calvin 
Spain. Speakers from Arlington and Charlottesville 
also will participate. 



"TOPICS TO BE covered include how to talk 
condominium language, a brief history of the 
condominium, comparsion of condominium 
ownership with other types of ownership, how touse 
"condo" jargon, what a realtor can and cannot say 
in selling condominiums, what professional con- 
dominium management does and how IRS rulings 
affect the condominium association. 

All panel members participating in the day's 
discussions will be available to answer audience 
questions. 

In addition, development representatives will 
participate in special conference table discussions 
at the end of the conference designed to teach 
realtors how to earn more money from con- 
dominium sales. 



Gallup named to 
city industrial post 



Kelbm is board moderator 




SIDNEY KELLAM 



Sidney S. Kellam has 
been appointed moderator 
of the board of Bay side 
Hospital, (formerly 
Tidewater Memorial 
Hospital), a new medical 
facility now under 
construction on 
Independence Boulevard. 

The new 70,000 square 
foot medical office building 
will house 50 physicians' 
offic&suites, as well as the 
250-bed hospital. The 
buildii^ is scheduled for 
completion in November 
and will be q}ened in 
January 1975. 

Bayside Hospital will be 
a general-acute facility 
offering patients various 
services including 
radiology, a laboratory, 



Group installs 
new officers 



The Insurance Women of 
Virginia Beach recently 
held their installation of 
new officers at a dinner at 
the Thunderbird Motor 
Lodge. 

The newly-installed 
officers are: president, 
Maria Johns (Burroughs & 
Watson Inc.); vice- 
president, Virginia 



Morrison, (Henderson k 
Phillips Inc.); recording 
secretary, Elizabeth Ellis 
(Kellam-Eaton Insurance 
Co.); corresponding 
secretary, Martha Lee 
Dinsmore (Withers & 
Taylor Co), and treasurer, 
Margaret K. Gimbert 
(Kellam-Eaton Insurance 
Co.). 




lEtlUUM 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME 



FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens •Family Rooms 

•Bedrooms •Convert 

Garages 



ALL WORK 
INSURED 



545-4613 



Added space to your home means added value to 
your home. Make your home more comfortable and 
convenient by adding a room...Don't Wait...CALL NOW 



FREE 
lESHMAIlS 



, LUMBER AND HOME REMODELING 
835 WILSON ROAD, CHESAPEAKE 545-4613 

35 Years of Community Service 




CAU4»3800 

1788 y*. Beach Bhfd.Va. Beach, Va. 



Member 
Realtors 
MLS 

USTOM 

REALTY CORP.? 
MAKING THE 

MOVE? 

CALL 

FIRST "^***»^ 

OR 

LAST 

NO 

OBLIGATION 



pmiiriki CMirtt ApartiiMts 

WlviiiiaicMiiMirieis 

PEMBROKE COURTS MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
(All utHitiM indudwl) 



$190 
$21S 
S218 
S220 
S23e 

3-b«iroo<n S2S0 

S^Mdroom TownhoiMa $315 



2-bMlnxHn Typ* I 
2-lMdroein Typ» M 
2-b«droomTyp*MI 
1 Typ* IV 



(kinf MM badroom, full bsthl 
(IRMHMJ floor, \% batM 
( upittin. 1H iMthil 
llarffr ttoragi araa. IK tothi), 
ibrfw IMn( room, Wtoony ' 
•ndklMlwn. IKbafM 
I1H battel 

(1732 H). ft. bift 2H batki, 
Malk-in doaat*. 3 palica) 



■MNmbR^RaMy LeeaMtl off Indapan^ 
>-'f^B~^ danea BoulayartI, ona mfla nortli of Pam- 
^ -" - Mril, VifjiiMa Saach. Trtaphena 

BBS. Modalt opan f to S:30, Sa«ir- 
1M, Sunday !-•. mt antra bonus: 
^^b beitfa, ulyifipvc tira pool. 



davlfr*. 






SUMMER SPECIALS 



CERIAIN-TEED 

SOUO VINYL SIDING 



Mad* from B.F. Qoodrieh 
QEON VINYLS, A Hdlnf 
matarlal for your heuta 
that maaturat up to vir- 
tually ayary baauty and 
malntananea-ffoa raqulra- 
manti for Mm PERFECT 
(idlnt. 



MIG6I0-VIIIVL 

R»LACiMBiT wmeows 



Wf RiPlACi THOSE 
TROUPi fSOMf 



'oSouNq* 



• MHnus 

• MUMfNn.MT. 

n.mm. 

• mmmKmn 

• nuiHHMnn 

• NNUMRMI 

mttmtmm 



imssL 



• ■UNromn 
KiracM 



497-6970 



CVF 

kvmmm/nm 



M4t.«nMMii*M. 
A»»M Ingf aa » W iili i a 




ESTMim 



ilBTAU SIAMIESS AUMMMMI 6lfrTIMN6 

Oiw pieca tcamlau (Nof jotirti to laok) with ow uniqiM, p<m 
yinyl enomel and bokcd ot htflh fempartura lo a gtaoming 
iMin Kha fini$h 

tMSe CHU TOB W WJ. NOT: tkm. Uoh. Chip, 

Crvdi, Pool, Mntor 

Navar wads pointma ■ Safora you buy any Sdtnfl of Win 

dowj CoH M» or we both may lo»a. 



pharmacy, electro- 
cardiograph, nuclear 
medicine, physical therapy, 
respiratory therapy and 
amtHilatory surgery. 

The medical facility is 
being constructed by 
Humana Inc., an 
organization which already 
operates three hospitajs in 
Virginia. Humana has 51 
hospitals in 12 states with 
21 additional medical 
facilities now under 
construction. 

In addition to his new 
post in the hospital board of 
directors, Mr. Kellam is a 
partner in Kellam-Eaton 
Insurance and Real Estate 
Co. and a member of the 
boards of directors of First 
and Merchants National 
Bank and Virginia Beach 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association. He is 
president of the Sea 
Broadcasting Co. and 



secretary-treasurer of the 
Beach Motel Corporation. 

His civic affiliations 
include membership in the 
Virginia Beach Rotary 
Club and Princess Ann 
Ruritan Club. He is a past 
"First Citizen of Virginia 
Beach." 

Hardy 

appointed 

to 



Harold Gallup, 27, has 
been named the new 
industrial coordinator 
for the city's Depart- 
ment of Economic 
Development. He 
replaces Walter Alford 
who resigned effective 
June 15. 



Mr. Gallup has been 
employed by tlie city for 
three years. He is 
presently an ad- 
ministrative assistant to 
W.W. Fleming, director 
of Community Services. 
He worked with the 
city's real estate 
department prior to 
joining the Community 
Services Department. 



munity Services 
Department, Mr. Gallup 
worked with area land 
developers and the city 
utilities and highways 
divisions. 

With his change in 
city departments, Mr. 
Gallup will receive a 



During 
ployment in 



his em- 
the Com- 




pay hike. His salary in 
the Community Ser- 
vices Department would 
have been $12,000, while 
at his new post he will 
receive $15,840 for fiscal 
year 1974-75. 



A graduate of Old 
Dominion University, 
Mr Gallup will receive 
his master's degree in 
urban planning from the 
university in the fall. 



HAROLD GALLUP 



••••••••••••••••••• 



i 



Don't 



Preston B. Hardy Jr. of 
Virginia Beach has been 
appointed a member of 
Thorn McAn ShoeCo.'s 1974 
Manager's ^-Advisory 
Council, one of 17 out of 
more than 1,000 McAn 
managers selected. 

He is manager of the 
Thorn McAn Shoe Store in 
Pembroke Mall. 



TRANSFERRED? 

5 Give Up E'tu'^y 

In your homel 

j^ CALL R.E. (BOB) MANN 

(Your roal •sfof« man) 
Rental Manager For 

499-7611 ^ 

j^ Serving Virginia B«ach Homeowneri 
•••••••••••••••••••• 








HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTItlTIES 
COST 

PAY" 

ONE 

BILL 

AT 

REGENCY 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 

•IHIUTOP 

1,2.43 bedroom 

Apartments, 

Townhouses, 

Garden and Bachelor. 

LASKINROADAT 
HILLTOP 
PHONE: 428-6813 



Rent beautiful 
new furniture 




with purchase option 

Oui laige ihow-foom features 200 combinations of 
quality fumtiure that you can lease with the option 
to purchase. Rent individual items or complete 
grtoups at low monthly rates. We also offer office 
futnitufe, TV's, ban and a complete accessory 
boutique — a one-step furniture center. Free local 
deliveiy oh 12 month leases. 

FURNITURE RENTAL 

AAETROLEASE 

4995Xiewiand St., Virginia Beach, Va. 
Phone (804f 499-9888 

0« witchduck Rd. b«t¥Man Vlr«lnla aaaeh Blvd. 4 tha axpfawaay. 






LUXURY 
GARDEN APARTMENTS AND TOWNHOUSES 



Larfa roomi with many clesats 
Ona to thraa badroomi 
Fully earpatad— sound anflnaarad 
Individual Iteatlnt A air eendltlenlna 
individual private antraneas 



Larfa storaia room off kitehan 
Olsliwashar, rania l> rafrlgaralor In all unite 
fittings for your own waihar !■ dryar 
Swimming pool abd elubhousa 
Total alaatrlo larvloa 



PLANNED FOR ADULT LIVING 

Shopping within walking dlitanca 
Monthly rental Includes all utllltiai 



] 



IDEAL LOCATION-IN EXCLUSIVE RESIDENTIAL AREA 

On Haygood Road off Independerice Blvd. Around tha corner from 
the Haygood Shopping Center. 

CALL 499-3788 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 




Air Conditioning 



USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHABETICAUY USTED 
GUIDE FOR AU YOUR SERVICE NBEDSI 

Concrete General Contractor Plastering 




Vinyl-Aluminum 



DALEY AND SONS 
Heating & Cooling 

with 
Installation 
and Service 

York Climatrol 
Coleman 

4855341 



CONCRETE WORK 

PATIOS 

DRIVEWAYS 

{(SLABS 

CALL 

855-7111 



L.E. PIFER 

G«n«ral 

Contractor 

Additions, repairs, 

carpentry work. 

References furniahed. 

Call 420-8486. 



Electrical Contnctot 




COAAMERCIAL. 8. 
DOMESTIC REFRIGER- 
ATION 

8.AIRCI^DITI0NING 
Repair 8i 
Service 



a.E<niucAL 

CONrRACrOR 



i»d«ttU 
D.E. MITCHELL 
426-7262 



Home Improvement 



PLASTERING 
& DRY WALL 

Repairs 8. Remodeling 
gi patchwork 

NEW&0L^j«8,R|C 

Spray '^ 
Acouitical Caillngi. 
CALL 4204687 



Painting 



Vinyl-Aluminum 
Siding 
Storm Doors 
Siorm Windows 
Roofing Guttering 
Fencing 
Call tor free estimates 
Levco Aluminum Co. 
423 6358 



General Contractor 



/Muminum Sding 



ALUMINUMSIDING, 
VINYL SHUTTERS, . 
ALUMINUM GUTTERS, 

AWNINGS. PRIME 
REPLACEMENT WINDOW 

STORM WINDOWS. 
All with the proven depen 
dability of experts v^o have 
served Tidewater ov»r 25 
^Mrs. BURGESS SNYDER 
INDUSTRIES 

lOMBallentlneblvd 

Call 623 7700 

For FREE ESTIMATES 



! 



BLACK 
BROTHERS 

^dldtrs 



Home InproMiBOOt 

GanfC Bdkton 
Room Ad^lMi 

fUxa» - Carports 
Kitchea RcBOdeUflc 



CAU ANYTIME 

545-7318 
tak E. ^uA, Ir. 
Ch^pwte. Va. 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

Lumber and building materiili, 
room additions, sform doors and 
windows, wall to wall carpel; 
vinyl siding frt* estimates, 

terms. 

KELLAM t EATW4, INC 
427-3200 



R.e. CONNER 
PAINTING 

WALLPAPERING 
Custom Work 

Old & new 
(Airless Sprayer)' 

Mr. Conner Jr. 
4902473 




Lawn Mower S^vice 



Ten 40,000 
PMple About 
YoorSennce. 

To placa your ad in 
this diractory cali 

Mrs. Ann Hariier 
486-3430 



Tile 



Uwn Mower Service 
BkfdeRe|i»n,Wddli« 
aad Onamemtil InM R^ 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER A WELDING 
428.9029 



Kitclien or Batt^ 
Needs Remodeling? 
Complete tile work 
Call 853 7S92 
or 855 3787 
forlree estimates. 




mmm 



mtm 



hse B-8-The Sun -Wednesday, June 12, 1974 

Zoning 




• • 



suit out 



The suit of the Dalby-White 
Investment Co. against the city 
has been laid to rest with the 
city deciding against appealing 
it to the Virginia Supreme 
Court. 

City Council voted Monday 
against filing an appeal, with 
only Councilmen F. Reid Ervin 
and Charles W. Gardner voting 
to take the case to the high 
court. 

Mr. Ervin mad? the motion 
directing City attorney J. Dale 
Bimson to appeal the matter. "I 
think it's important we appeal 
this matter," Mr. Ervin said, 
'it can affect other situations 
where we have taken similar 
action." 

THK CASE was decided 
against the city recently in 
Circuit Court by Judge Wescott 
Jacob, who rules the City 
Council acted unreasonably in 
down-zoning approximately 30 
acres d land in Kings Grant 
from apartment zoning to 
single-family zoning. 

Residents of the area wanted 
the land zoned for single-family 
homes. The developer wanted it 
zoned for more potentially 
lucrative apartments. 

The developer claimed that 
a building permit application 
for apartments was improperly 
"frozen" by the Council until 
the land could be re-zoned for 
single-family homes. The 
developer also claimed the land 
had been zoned for apartments 
for 10 "years preceding the re- 
zoning. 

Representatives of the Kings 
Grant Civic League and the 
Lynnhaven-Little Neck Civic 
League asked the Council in its 
informal session Monday if 
private citizens could pursue 
the case in lieu of the city. 

ATTORNEY Grover Wright, 
who represented the city in the 
suit, told interested citizens 
th^ could not appeal the case if 
the city did not pursue it. 

"The issue is whether you 
( the Council ) want to see this all 
the way through or not," Mr. 
Wri^t said. "It is a very im- 
portant issue regarding 
piecemeal down-zoning." 

During the Council's regular 
session, Mr. Wright told 
councilmen the matter should 
, be appealed "if you still feel 
that you acted properly when 
you rezoned the property." 

Councilman John Baum noted 
the lack of new evidence in the 
case in his decision to vote 
against the appeal. Most of the 
other councilmen apparently 
agreed with Mr. Baum. 




Beach prosecutor 
reinstated to I 



Andlhmi 
it went 
crash/ 

Nothing could be more 
embarrastlng than 
crashing (he driven' 
education car. These 
dejected students are 
unhappily awaiting aid 

after the telephone pole 
got in the way of evasive 
maneuvering tests on wet 
pavement. The car, going 
about 15 miles per hour, 
was damaged Friday. The 
student driver failed the 
maneuvering test. No 
estimate was available on 
the amount of damage to 
the car or injuries to the 
drivers' ego. (Sun photo by 
Robert Hall) . 



^T-g'.-.'^' . ^ m- 



Asst. Commonwealth's Atty. Rog^ S. 
Praley, 28, has been reinstated after being 
acquitted Jime 5 of a charge of using 
abusive language towards a police officer. 
He was suspenixd after being arrested the 
night of Jime 2 chirii^ a disturbance at the 
Budlfeathers Restaurant on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. 

Judge White, during the same hearing, 
convicted Sandra C. Brunt, 25, Piney 
Branch Drive, of disturbing the peace in 
connection with the same incident. She was 
fined $50 and court costs. Her attorn^, 
Mike Cavish, says he is undecided 
whether the conviction wiH be appealed. 

During the trial several police officers 
said they had be«i dispatched to the 
location on report ai a woman with a gun 
inside the restaurant. Investigation showed 
Ms. Brunt had produced a weapon to 
frighten a woman who had accompanied a 
friend of hers to the restai^ant. 

THE WEAPON, accordii^ to testimony, 
was a plastic cap-pistol which had been 
taken from Ms. Brunt and turned over to 
police as they arrived on the scene. Police 
were met at the scene by a group of patrons 
running from the building. 

Officers C.L. Lowell, D.R. Helmer, G.W. 
Lawrence and W.D. Black said it was 
necessary to bodUy carry Ms. Brunt to a 
police car and that Mr. Fraley assisted in 



• • 



this while attempting to calm her. As they' 
pljaced haHidcuffs of Ms. Bnint, Mr. Fraley, "^ 
accwding to testimony, asked shrnot be 
handcuffed and that she be taken to a 
hospital. When officer Lowell informed him 
it appeared necessary to handcuff Ms. 
Bnuit to control her, Mr. FValey, according 
to witnesses said to offico* Lowell, "You 
dumbb " 



During his trial Mr. Fraley admitted he 
made the statement. Howewr, he said he 
felt he had calmed Ms. Brunt down until 
handcuffs were produced, and that he; 
meant no abuse towards the police but used^ 
the language spontaneously as a result of> 
his being upset from the chain of events.^ 

HIS ATTORNEY. Michael H. Dills, told 
the court Mr. Fraley had "tried for 20 
minutes to solve the proUem and he 
calmed her down." Mr. Dills referred to the : 
state code classifying such language as a 
law violation when used in breachins the^ 
peace. Mr. Dills contended the peace had ; 
already been breached earlier when the- 
disturbance erupted inside the restaurant,, 
and therefore, Mr. Fraley was not guilty. 



Judge P.B. White referring to Mr.» 
Fraley's actions said, "He conducted^ 
himself very well. I don't think Mr. Fraley^ 
meant to curse and abuse this officer. But,; 
Mr. Fraley knows they take a lot of abuse. " 
Under the situation I'm going to dismiss the^ 
charge." « 



The Welcome Wagon 

Hostess 
has lovely gifts and 
a wealth of informa- 
tion for you. 



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NORFOLK STATE 
COLLEGE 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

VETERANS - NORFOLK STATE COLLEGE 

WANTS TO SHOW ITS APPRECIATION BY 

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2401 Corprew Awnue 
Nwfdk, Virginia 23504 
Rtone 623-8054 



«*i 



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3224 Atlantic Avenue 

Phone S43.3S61 

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SERIALS SECTION 
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RICHMOND VA 25219 



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WMnndiy, JuM 19, 1974 



CityofVlfflntoBiwli,Vi. 



- Cepyrlgiht 197« 
BMcn Pubiunlng Corp. 



ISCMiti 




Homeward bound at day's end 



oftoi catch a glimpse of a spectacular sunset In their rear- 
view mirrm-s as they head east to the beach. (Sim photo by 
Rod Mann). 



Tlie sun throws its last flery rays into the clouds before 
slipping slowly out of sight in the west as busy commuters, 
rush to get home from work on the Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Expressway. Workers heading home afto* a long day can 

FT. STORY 

Council asks Anny to return unused land 



llie Virginia Beach City Council adqjted a 
resolution Monday by a vote of 10-1 askii« that all 
land at Ft. Story Army base no longer in use by the 
mUitary be returned to the citizens of Virginia fa* 
recr«iti(H»l use. 

llie resolution, passed last wedc at the Virginia 
Beach Parks and Recreation meeting, was 
presrated by Parks Ccmimissioner Jack Jennings. 
Though the CouncU was basicaUy in favor of the 
intent of the resolution,' several councilmen took 
exception to Mr. Jennings personal remarks. 

Since the Council had passed a similar resolution 
more than a month ago, the resolution's idea was 
not controversial. But a statement by Mr. Jenning's 
that Uie city "remind the admirals and generals 
that they are working for us and not the ottier way 
around" stirred the dander (rf several councilmen 
and brought a scolding from Mayor Robert 
Cromwell. 

MAYOR CROMWELL, who said the city's 



rdaticms with the miUtai^ had been exeeptionaUy 
good, remindMl Mr. Jennings that the Army and the 
Navy provided large payrolls in the city. 

Hie mayor called Mr. Jennings approach to 
asking the military for the return <rf the Ft. Story 
land "immature." He said Mr. Jennings should not 
use the same approach when seating support from 
other groups for the resolution. 

Parks Commission Chahtnan Maury Riganto 
was quick to tell the Coumnl that Mr. Jennings 
remarics were his own and did not represent the 
commissicm. He said the commission was merely 
asking for ttie Council's approval of the resolution 
to "get the ball rolling" in rallying commraiity 
support to acquire public land. 

THE COUNCIL approwd the resolutitm with 

Councilman John Baum dissentii^. Mr. Baum said 

he thought the Camcil had spent "an awful lot (rf 

* time discussing what is probably a nickel resoiutimi 



anyway." He voted no m the resolution saying he 
didn't like "the way the matter was bro^ht up and 
handled." 

The Council deleted a paragraph of the 
resolution, however, which read "the U.S. Army 
Post at Ft. Fwt Story, located wholly within the 
boundaries of Virginia Beach is i^uiring less and 
less of this land to accomplish their mission." 

Councilman Charles Gardner, who has actively 
suworted acquiring more public land, expressed 
disapjM'Oval of the statement since the Army has 
publicly stated their need for the land. 

The Parks Commission now plans to seek the 
support of residents of the Beach, as well as the 
Commomwealth of Virginia, cHy cwncils in 
surrouncttng communities in Virginia and Nwth 
Carolina, the Congress of ttie U.S. and the 
Department all Defense. 




Closed 
coimcU 



The Virginia Beach City 
Coancil met Monday for W 
minutes in closed session, 
(^n to neither the pabllc 
nor the pren. The agenda 
listed a "legal" matter and 
"appointments" for 
discusai^^n ZZ meetings 
sofartR^ear. theCouncii 
has met for 12 *->urs and 
one mimite behind closed 
doors. 



SAVE A TREE 

is a protection .oidmance needed? 



"Save a tree" has long bwn the cry of the 
ecol(^ts. While no one in the city 
govemmrait disputes the need to protect the 
area's tree's, there is a dispute over whether 
the city needs an additional ordinance to 
provide that protection. 

Even before the Beach's Comprehensive 
Zfmag Ordinance was adopted, city «ffk:ials 
batted back and fwth the need fw an 
ordinance specificaDy designed to limit the 
removal of the city's trees by developers and 
others. At the requtet of Councilman Charles 
Gardner, toe city staff once again placed 
before the Council a tree ordinance at ttie 
governing body's informal ^ssicm Monday. 
(The qlilinance was completed in November 
1973, ttit went without staff recommendations 
and litOe Council discussion until this wedc.) 

■Rie city staff is divided over whether the 
city needs a tree ordinance. They believe the 
treeK are protected by ttM Erositm and 



Sedimentation Ordinance. Geoit^e Tinnes of 
the City Manager's Office, and members of 
the Community Services Department believe 
the Erosion and Sedimentation Ordinance 
gives the city the authority to limit removal (rf 
trees and ttere is no need for another 
ordinance. Planning Director Charles 
9#nringt<m and a representative ot the Farm, 
and Home Oiftonstration Bureau, a state 
agency, say that in the long run the city wUl 
r»ed to adopt a tree ordinance, but for now the 
Erosion Ordinance is miffkient. 

"THERE IS NO corwrete evidence to this 
point that we're losing any major specimens," 
said Mr. Tinnes "The Erosion Ordinance 
(wMch got state enablii* legislatlpn in 1973) 
appears to be doiiyj the jc*, and therefore, we 
are reluctant to recommend another level <rf 
regdat^atthis time." 

Councilman Gardner said he was not sure 
the Erosion Ordinance would protect trees in 



all areas of the city. He said the ordiaj^e 
does not spell out specifics for protectioifiiW 
may only apply in areas where erosion aM 
sedimentation would take place if the tree 
were removed and not in the flat lands of the 
city. 

MfT Tinnes asked that before taking any 
actioi on the wdinance that the city maiitor 
the area's needs for six months. 

The CCKincil was agreeable with the mtmltor 
period, but Mr. Gardner ask^ that there be a 
public hearing on the tree ordirance. The 
council instructed the city manager to set a 
date for the public hearing. No date has been 
announced yet. 

Many (rf the city's garden clubs and the 
Beautificatlon Commission have advocated 
the'adofrtioi of a tree ordinance. Mr. Timies. 
however, feels that perhaps they are unaware 
of the protection provided in the Erosim and 
Sedimentotimi Ordinance. 



Inside 



Women imhe in piMtkxJ tMve 



TwOMCti(N» 



1&|Mves 



a«iifiwi B-6 

CumniMit ,.„.••...•.......«••......•.«....... ..A-Z 

r^MmftT^w «••••••«•••••«••##••«■••••«»•••••■■•• ••■•••^^^ 

Rmim ., A-2 

(jBRMIIH^ " ••• ......A*0 

Ufa Stylw B-1 to B-3 

fltal Estati "•• -B-/ 

ritli^on ,...,D-3 

^01% A^ to A^ 

FM Eitita — .....B-7 



««•••#•>•••■ 



There's a new pditlcal movement growing in 
Vin;inia B«»ch aimed at getting mo^ women 
imcdved in politics and elected to crffice. 

Wwnen United fw Poiitical Actiwi (rf Virginia 
Beach will htrid a ktek-off mating M(»iday at 7:30 
p.m. at Hurd's Seafood Restaiffant, 964 Kurd's 
Road (M Utile Neck Road). 

The intrOdiKtory meetii^ is open to all women 
and m«i whowre inter^ted in seeing m<« women 
eltee e d to offiM. said Elaine Kuhn. r«:«-ding 
secretary of Uw nmv trf^nizatitNL 

MONDAY'S MEETING wiU include an op« 
txmR discusiM m the "PntfUe of the Elect^t^ 



Woman Candidate" with the four ui»uccessful 
female candidates in the recent City CaiiK:il race 
invited to atterei to share their campaign 
experiences. 

The new organizatiwi is still uncharted but does 
have by-laws, acting officers and established goals. 
Its primary purpose will be to «lucate women 
abwit the political proems, Ms. Kulm said. 

AccortttiW to the new group's by-laws. It is a nai- 
prwTit n«i-partisan wganizaUon being established 
to eAicate women pditlcally. prepare wwaen 
intwwted in fKiiacal candidacy and e^^ ai^ 
supp«1 qualified women candidate f« pdiUcal 
offi<« by iHJiting wtmen as a force behind endorsed 
can^dates. . 



$83/100 

Potter 
payment 

delayed 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Virginia Beach inventor John Potter will have 
to wait still another week to find out if the city 
intends to pay him $83,000 for his sand erosion 
control fence. 

The Virginia Beach City Council reached no 
decision on the payment Monday when the vote 
ended in a 5-5 tie with Councilman Floyd 
Waterfield abstaining. Mr. Waterfield, placed 
"on the spot" since he is the last councilman to 
vote, simply said he wasn't "ready to vote" on 
the issue Monday. (Mr. Waterfield votes last 
since the roll is called alphabetically.) 

The Council voted 6-5 last month to pay Mr. 
Potter 125,000 of his requested $106,000 for the 
erosion fence, According to a contract signed by 
the city and Mr. Potter in March 1973, Mr. 
Potter's company. Shoreline Erosion Contrtd 
Corp., was to receive $25,000 for a build-up of one 
foot of sand in front of the steel sand fences in the 
ocean between between 17th and 20th Streets. 
The city was to pay the company the full $106,000 
if the sand build-up reached two feet. 

CONTROVERSY continues over 
iiHerpretation of the contract. Figures submitted 
by Chewning-Hoggard-Adkins Inc., the 
ei4{ineering firm agreed upon In the eontract, 
show ttiat the elevatimi of sand between the 
device and the low water line in front (A the fence 
has been raised two feet. Mr, A. J. Chewning told 
the Council at their meeting, as he has before, 
that he believed the device had performed in 
compliance with the contract, and the city owed 
Mr. Potter the $106,000. 



Engineers 
say fence 
hes worked 



However, the city 
staff says the contract's 
test area was to include 
not only the area in front 
of the 1,000 feet device, 
but also two 500-foot 
sections of the ocean 
floor along the sides of 
the device. 



Cwincilman Murray Malbon, who pushed the 
Council to vote on the payment and make "a 
decision one way or the otter" Monday, said it 
wasn't fair to judge tte device's performance in 
any area outside tte 1,000 feet In front of tte 
fen<| 



■^i' 



MR. MALBON made^Bie motion to pay Mr. 
Potter tte $83,000. Voting with him were 
Councilman Curtis Payne, Councilman Dr. 
Clarence Holland, Councilman George Ferrell 
and Councilman Garland Isdell. Voting against 
die payment were Mayor Robert Cromwell, 
Vice-mayor Held Ervin, Cwincilman John 
Baum, Councilman Robert Callis and 
Councilman Cterles Gardner. 

Wten the Council voted to allow Mr. Potter to 
histall his fence, those favoring the contract 
were Mayor Cromwell, Mr. Malbon, Mr. Payne, 
Mr. Waterfield, Dr. Hollaml and Mr. Ferrell. 
Former Kempsvllle Councilman Donald Rhodes 
voted against entering into the contract, but his 
replM^ment, Garland Isdell, vot^Jn favor <rf 
paying Mr. Potter. Mr. Isdell said tfiat while te 
didn't feel iiyrax a good contract in tte first 
place, te interiweted the terms of the contract 
leing tte figures submitted to indicate ttet tte 
city owed Mr. Potter the money. ^ 

"I ALMOST regret ever voting to let Mr. 
Potter put ttiesefencra in," said Mayor CrwBwell. 

"It's reached a point where it's no longer a 
questiwi^^^hether tte device is servii* tte 
citizens ^Virginia Beach, but just whether it's 
living up to the contract." 

Mayor Cromwell said 
he believed, "perteps 
naively," when te votkl 
for Ite contract that if 
tte sand built up. ttere 
woild te IK) question 
whether the device 
woiked. He added that 
te ted teped tte fence 
would answer "the 
dreams of many in 
Vir^nia Beach." 

Tte Council is scheduled to discuss tte 
payment again at Monday's meeting. Should tte 
city decide not to f»y Mr. Potter the addttiowl 
$83,000, Mr. Potter could, according to terms of 
ttie coitracU a^ that the matter go to 
arWtraUon. Should tte CouncU delay tte 
decisis oi the payment, the city's recently 
etetMl councilmen will be thrown into ttie sand 
coitroversy wten ttiey take crffice July I. 



^ 



Cromwet 
regrets 

fence ¥Ote 



«s*- 






Comment 



Pags A-2-Tlw Sun-WedfiMday, June 19, 1974 



An edfto^al: 



Who jumps first? 



In their ever-widraing but so far 
futile search for a solutirai to the 
nation's inflation problem, some 
expert economic voices in the land 
have turned to the American 
consumer for a solutirai. 

Since traditional anti-inflation 
tools have not worked for one reason 
or another, Federal Reserve Board 
Chairman Arthur Burns flatly warns 
that cmisumers must either exercise 
discipline in their spending habits or 
find their country's future "in 
jeopardy." Mr. Bums says that 
inflation's cure can come only 
through a return to traditional 
American virtues of thrift, self- 
reliance and judicious {Mirchasii^ 
which avoids the effect of impulse 
buying. 

What is being asked, then, of 
consumers is more sacrifice in 
discretionary use of the dollars that 
they spend. If we all pay more 
attention to the prices of goods and 
services, this in turn will force 
businesses to keep prices down. In 
such a process, the inflatimary 
spiral wiU be stopped or at least 
sharply curtailed. 



THAT'S ALL to the good as far as 
^economic theory is concerned. But 
as a practical matter, however, it 
makes the consumer the major 
sacrificial victim in .the war with 
iitflation. 

For example: If an average wage- 
earner received a 10 per cent raise 
last year to cope with a 10 per cent 
inflati(m, he actually falls bdiiml, 
since oie-fourth of that is si|riioned 
off in taxes to support the 
government. Now if he follows the 
advice of the authoritarian 
economists, he will put whatever 
money he can into a savings account 
at little better than 5 per coit 
interest. In the next year, unhappily, 
inflation will reduce the value of 
those savings by at least 10 per cent 
if the ix-esent rate continues, so he 
.just slips farther and farther behind. 
Businessmen and economists 
alike should have a lot ot respect for 
the cmsumer. But he would more 
likely be willing to take the first step 
off the inflationary merry-go-round 
if he had the faintest c«iviction that 
all of the others riding on it with him 
were willing to take the same leap. 





CUyside 

Kerns confuse 
even the council 



Sometimes Virginia Beach City Coucil meetings 
can be confusing — even to city fathers. 

At last week's meeting it was hard, even for the 
council members to keep track of what was 
happening to a zoning change application in the 
Shadowlawn Heights area. The council first voted 
to deny the application to change a portion of land 
from residential to hotel district. Then, changing 
their minds, they voted to reconsider the 
application and followed by voting to allow the 
apidicant to withdraw the application. 

When it was all over, Councilman John Baum 
said, "In case the newspapers write about this, I'll 
be glad to go home and read what we just did." 



THE CITY IS once again taking on Municipal 
Fellows^— or interns — for the summer. Each i 
student will have a research project to complete as ^ 
a part of their job. 

Charlotte, Kingery, 22, of Rocky Mwint, Va., is 
coordinating the intern program. She will be 
working in the Personnel Department revising the 
city's employe handbook. She is a graduate in 
political science from Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Makir^ a study of city water and sewer contracts 
for the Division of Public Utilities will be Jeanne 
Proctor, 21, of Virginia Beach. She attends Virginia 
Commonwealth University. 

Rudolph Martinez, 21, (rf Virginia Beach will 
make a pumping station study during the summer. 
He is a graduate in Civil Engineering from Old 
Dominion University (ODU). 

Working on a project fw the Parks Department 
will be Mary Jane Guion, 21 , of Virj^nia Beach. She 
is a senior art major at the College rf Notre Dame, 
Md. 

The City Manager's Office will have Ragan 
Pulley, 26, working as an intern making 
recommendatidhs lac the possible development oi 
an administrative manual for i)x city. He is from 
Virginia Beach and is an economics graduate of the 
Collie rf William and Mary and plans to attend 
graduate school. * * 



Public network offers 
alternative to viewer 



By DON FREEMAN 
Special to The Sun 

lie ,has the look and bearing to go with his 
distinguished name, Hartford N. Gunn Jr., and he is 
president of the Public Broadcasting Service, that 
often beleaguered arm of non-commercial 
television and the nation's alternative to the big 
networks. 

Mr. Gunn is a product of Harvard College, the 
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and i\\e Harvard 
(Graduate School of Business Administration. For 
most of his career, he has been involved with 
education, communications, science and television. 

Now. he is involved with the production and 
distribution of national programs not for com- 
mercial gain but, in the words of the orginal PBS 
charter, "in the piAlic interest." 

BUT WHAT, precisely, is the public interest? 

This is the crux of public television, but Mr. Gunn 
admits it is a strangely vague concept, loose and 
elastic. "We really can't put an exact definition on 
the phrase, public interest." said Mr. Gunn. "One 
way is to say that it is whatever the public defines it 
lo be from lime to time. We talk, in public 
television, in terms of public needs in information, 
education and those areas that have to do with the 
public interest." 

In a sense, then, there is a crossing of lines 
wherein the commercial networks, NBC, CBS and 
ABC. are in direct competition with public 
television. But only, Mr. Gunn insists, in a limited 
sense. 

"WK IM>N*T compete for the advertising dollar 
and we don't compete for the largest possible 
audience, for the numbers." says Mr. Gunn. "We 
do compete for some portion of the individual 
viewer's lime. We're out to provide a range of in- 
terests thai the networks don't cover, such as 
French cooking, science, regional theater. 

"To put it another way, our ideal on PBS is not to 
attract every possible viewer at one time. But we 
would like a lot rf viewers to watch one or two 
programs that they find of particular inter^t. We 
don't expect our viewers to stay with us for an 
entire evening, the way they do on the other net- 
works. They schedule their shows with that in mind. 



Forum 



Mike Andres, 21, from Norfolk, wHTaawestigate 
ti% ownership rf private roads lac the Real Estate 
Department. He will graduate from ODU with an 
ei^if»ering degree in December. 

Cathrine Flanagan will review water controls fw 
the Department rf Data Processing. She is a native 
rf Virginia Beach are! a senior at Madison College 
in Harrisonburg. 

One rfher intern, Joe Norton, was scheduled to 
rqxrt for work Tu^day. He will work in the 
Ftnams l^partment. ■ 



^^ 





yvn 



OWWILMMI 



An Jnd^tndmtt Netmpapm' 

NCALtMrTONSMIt 



CTMIIIMITM 



^iiimitir^ fc^M^ II m 



WH li i i t lM^VinwiMOWi 



Letters from 
our readers 



SM¥0 



Po 

Sir: 



In regards to an article in The Sun rf June S, 1974. 
cMicermng the teacher exchai^e, w« would like to 
pre^t theposttive vAm nt the intervKw which was 
nrf ^1nl«l. » 



After reading tl» article we felt that we left the 
impression that the Virginia Beach school system 
was less than second-rate. At this tfme we would 
like to make it clear to the public that this is not our 
"evaluation." We emphasized this to the reporter 
at the end rf tte interview. 

Although logical contrasts pertaining to the 
situation were made, statements were given 
stressing the fact that tte Virginia Beach system 
does have quality education, a high caliber of 
students and quite an enjoyable working' 
atmosphere. 

As wc cannot speak for Mr. Browder and Mr. 
McLaughlin, so did we not speak f(N- Mr. Zippe and 
Mr. Sierer. It definitely would be unfair to any 
party to attempt to state thoughts and ideas in their 
stead. ', 

Hopefully this unfortunate ifflsconception will not 
darken any reader's view rf the quality of students 
in Virginia Beach or rf the Virginia Beach school 
system. 

Patev Ferebee 
Gar:r Miller 



The SuH wtksmKi Ml Utten from in rtmJ- 
en. Nmnet w0l be witkheU <m re<^t«, but 
pleme incbtde your mmt ami telephone mtm 
fter Wfrt your letter. Letters are tul^' tu 
eMum lo meet new^iaper ttyle and ^me ft- 
4H#«MM*tt MWm Forum. Vrf^Ua M^ek &m. 
IJ,s Rmawmi Md, V^^mBemk, Va. 2S4S1 



with shows they hope will lead the viewer to other 
shows. Our programming isn't tailored at all in that 
fashion. We jump from subject to subject, from a 
cooking show maybe to a news panel to a guitar 
lesson. 

IS THERE a typical public television viewer? 
Mr. Gunn suggests there may have been at one time 
but no longer. "From our surveys, we know that 40 
per cent rf all homes in the United States watch 
public TV at some time in a month. The range 
varies from people with a lot of education to those 
with very little. 

"However," says Mr. Gunn. "if we were to put 
together a profile of the public television viewers, 
we'd find that they do tend to be .nore active in , 
community affairs." 

Mr. Gunn suggests that the growing number of 
public TV viewers is a boon to all of television. 
'iPublic television brings a certain type of viewer 
into television." he reasons, "lie may be attracted 
by Washington Week in Review' or Bill Buckley or 
Forsyte Saga.' He buys a set. He watches public 
TV and the charges are he'll start flipping the dial 
and then he'll discover programs he likes and didn't 
even know existed on the commercial networks." 

THERE IS. in fact, a cross-pollination between 
public TV and the other networks. Mr. Gunn points 
(() the huge success of "Sesame Street" as a spur to y 
improved children's programming in all of 
television. And he cites the appeal of Julia Child, 
public TV's "French Chef," as the predecessor of 
the syndicated "Galloping Gourmet." 

A year ago, NBC brought over the BBC series, 
"America," narrated by Alistair Corfie. a 
prestigious hit from the outset. It seemed to Hart- 
ford Gunn the kind of program that should be 
gracing PBS. Recently, he went to the Xerox Corp. 
and suggested that the series be repeated this 
coming fall, but on PBS. 

"I told Xerox that it was a shame that the show 
w as on too late for kids the first time around." said 
Mr. Gunn. "and they agreed. 

"Tlien I persuaded Alistair Cooke lo do some new 
openings and closings. We bccke down the hour-long 
shows to a half-hour and we arranged to have it 
shown al schools during the day and evenings on 
PBS. It's an idea that clicked and it should be a 
tremendous asset to our fall schedule." 



Tidings 



By 

JVenl 
Sims 

Sun Editor 




This soi^ open 
is a teaijerker 

My, but it was a tearful gang the Nhcon 
administration assembled in Washington befwe the 
jail sentences and resignations split them all up. 
The trials, the pleas, the expressions rf regret — 
the nation's capital is beginning to sound Ifte 
wediday afternoon television. 

Up Monday was Herbert W. KalmbacH, formerly 
President Nixon's personal attorney. As a collector 
rf campaign contributions for Mr. Nixon, all Mr. 
Katanbach had done was offer to sell an 
ambassadorship for $100,000. And for this dastardly 
deed, Judge John Sirica sentenced him to six to 18 
montte and fmed him $10,000. What a.hard-no6ed 
judtee! And the contributor never did get the 
appointment. 

Oh, but Mr. Kalmbach was so sorry. "Your 
honor," he said, "I'd like you to know how deeply 
embarrassed I am and how much I regret standing 
brfore you this afternoon." 

LAST WEEK it was Secretary of 
State Henry Kissinger's turn. This cowboy rf 
diplomacy, a charming, witty hero, would 
never be given to tears.But, alas, press dispatehes 
said he was close to tears as he threatened to rraign 
unless cleared rf wiretap charges. 

Since the mess is so troubling to Mr. Kissinger, 
the nation should be willing to forget that he might 
have committed perjury before the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee. Mr. Kissinger suggests that 
his value to the nation's foreign policy is so great 
that his integrity is above questioning. 



Mr. Kalmbach and Mr. Kissinger are only the 
latest in the parade rf weepers to lay open theU* 
emotion-filled hearts to the public, "rhe touching 
drama has many earlier chapters. Cue the organ 
music. 



BEFORE THE Senate Watergate Committee, a 
moving mcnnent was supplied by fcn'mer White 
House aide Gordon Shrachan. He advised young 
persons aspiring to poUtical careers to stay away 
from Washington. 

Jeb Stuart Magruder regretted that he 
lost his "ethical compass," and John Dean 
squealed to get himself a lighter sentence. 

Charles Colson, though, to|» them all as a 
repenter. The man who once advocated fire- 
bombuig* Brookings Institute and offered to hire 
thugslto beat up a protestor outside the White House 
is now a "baby in Christ." 

LErs NOT forget former Attorney General 
Richard Klemdienst. He lied under oatti to the 
Senate Judiciary Committee but pled guilty to a 
lesser charge. With moist eyes, the judge called 
him a man rf "highest integrity" who was led 
astray by a "heart that was too loyal." After he 
gave him a one-month sentence, suspended, and a 
fine of $100, Mr. Kleindienst broke down in tears. 

Strangely enough, these saddened victims of 
misplaced loyalty were devoted to a couple of real 
t(Migh guys. Formerly second in command was 
Spiro Agnew, a Maryland politician who rose up 
through the ranks the hard way. He managed a no 
contest plea to an income tax charge, but the 
Justice Department brief filed at his trial descril)ed 
a public servant on the take since his early days in 
rffice. 

The head man has received a notoriety all his 
own. He's returned every penny of that half million 
dollars income tax which he avoided paying for so 
long. And he is the first unindicted co-conspirator to 
be greeted by cheering crowds in Egyptian streets. 
President Nixon has lent a tmich of gi^ce to the 
capital soap opera. 



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mail. 

^»s^You with The Sun to be mailed 
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HASSLES 




i \' 



By 

Donna 

Hendrick 



A hidden snake 
is hard to take 

I am not by nature a timid person. I do not fear 
the unknown (h- things that go bump in the nigh^or 
darkened rooms or vacant houses. 

But I was scared out of my wits on a recent 
weekend when my best friend came running into 
the kitchen of her apartment (where I was helping 
cook dinner), her stricken face as pale as her white 
shorts. 

-'Omigod!" she^oUered. "There's a snake in the 
bedroom!" , 

And I, who do not usually fear snakes (although 
they're not my favorite creatures), immediately 
thought of climbing on a chair with my friend and 
huddling there together until someone rescued us. 

HOWEVER, reason prevailed, so I asked what I 
thought was a perfectly logical question: "Are you 
sure you saw a snake?" 

"I'm sure, I'm sure," she gasped. "It's black and 
long and it's half under the bed and I saw it move. 
What are we going to do?" she wailed. 

The snake had us covered, so to speak. It was in 
the bedroom, which is off the hallway leading from 
the kitchen to escape by the front door. No safe way 
out, I thought to myself. 

"We'll call the police," I said, knowing they 
would call the animal control bureau, those brave 
and wonderful people who know how to deal with 
loose snakes and other crawly creatures. 

"YOU'RE NOT going to believe this," I said to 
the male voice who answered the police department 
telephone, "but I want to report a loose snake in the 
apartment." 

"Are you sure you saw a snake?" he asked 
wittily. 

"I personally did not see the snake," I told him. 
"However, my friend saw the snake. It's black and 
it moves, and it's Under the bed." 

He cheerily informed me that the.animal control 
people would come rescue us, but it might take a 
while. 

MY FRIEND and I, hungry but still trembling, 
literally ran outside with plates prepared for 
dinner. We decided to eat outside where the snake 
couldn't get us. 

"I just hope it isn't Jane O'Leary," I mused to my 
friend, remembering that Ms. O'Leary is a very 
competent animal control warden. I just couldn't 
face the fact that she could handle that snake, and 
we two females were too afraid. 

When the comforting sight of the animal control 
bureau truck came into view, my worst fears were 
correct: It was Jane O'Leary, complete with pistol 
and two snake snares. 



WHEN WE told Ms. O'Leary ttiat we were 
ashamed to be afraid, since she obviously was not, 
she assured us we had done the right thing. She was 
certain it was a black snake, not poisonous but 
knovH) to bite when cornered. 

"Snakes can strike half their length," she 
explained. "The snake you saw might be four feet to 
six feet long," she calculated from my friend's 
description of the creature. With a long pole 
containing a .looped snare on the end, she could grab 
the snake before it grabbed her. 

"Did you see where it went?" she wanted to 
know. 

No, we didn't. We were too scared and only 
wanted to get out of that apartment. 

SHE LOOKED and looked, under beds, behind 
couches, inside closets, over windows ("My gosh," 
I thought to myself, "can those things climb?")- 
Indeed they can, Ms. O'Leary said. 

After a thorough search of the apartment, she 
concluded the snake was either thoroughly hidden 
or had gone back the way it came in. 

She left, and my friend and I looked at each other, 
still trembling. Then we went into action. She 
gathered up a toothbrush and some clothes while I 
guanted h&f with a broom (Ms. O'Leary 's 
su^estieojp if we see the snake, hit it with the 
broom itiil%Mt^r\in like hell. 

The yie tan like bteU out of the apartment to spend 
the \i5^kend at my place. There was no way, no 
way, she would stay in that apartment not knowing 
where that snake was, my friend said. 

We never did find that snake. We a^ume it went 
wherever snakes go to be with other snakes. And we 
learned something from Ms. O'Leary — let the 
professionals handle the situations we civilians 
can't handle ourselv^. That's what we pay them 
for, and they're mighty good at their j(*s. 



foee/ 



b| Il04 ttrntn 




Bike route 



The Sun -Wednesday, June 19, 1974-Pige A-3 



Paths, lanes and trails 
welcome the bicyclist 



This baby is Sun photographer 
Rod Mann's favorite camera sub- 
ject. He feels the youngster is the 
smartest, cutest and most photo- 



genic baby in the world— and no 
wonder. This is Aram Mann, our 
photographer's son, snapped at 
seven months. 



By IM)NNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

/If you live on the Chesapeake 
Bay near Seashore State Park 
and you want to commute to 
London Bridge, just hop on your 
bike. It's now possible to ride 
that far by bicycle on special 
bike paths, lanes, trails and 
routes. 

In a report to the Parks and 
Recreation Commission last 
week, James K. Cole, 
recreation supervisor, traced 
the completed bike route for 
commissioners. 

The route from Seashore 
State Park to London Bridge (or 
vice versa > is part of a proposed 
citywide bicycle system that is 
being completed as funds are 
appropriated. 

PARKS AND recreation 
officials envision a bicycle 
system throughout the city 
someday, with possible con- 
nections to Norfolk. Mr. Cole 
told commissioners that Nor- 
folk city officials are working on 
connecting some of that city's 
bike trials and lanes to the 
Virginia Beach system. 

Most residents have no doubt 
seen the new painted yellow 
lines for bicycles on Pacific 
Avenue. The parking areas 
were removed and that part of 
the street reserved for bicycles. 

Undeveloped feeder road 
rights of way on Atlantic 
Avenue have been taken over 
and paved for bicycle use only. 
Also, previously unconnected 
sections of feeder roads on 
Laskin Road have now been 
connected with asphalt bike 
lanes. 

THE BIKE ROUTE is 

marked with $2,000 worth of 
signs. It is clearly marked 
throughout; commissioners 
were told. 

- Starting at Seashore' State 
Park, a bicyclist may ride all 
the way to London Bridge by 
entering the park's bicycle trail 
at the information center (near 
the Shore Drive entrance). 

The trail goes through the 
park to 64th Street. At 64th 
Street, the bike route takes to 
(he Atlantic Avenue feeder 
roads. Any part of the feeders 
that were not connected are now 
connected by asphalt paving 



and clearly marked for bicycles 
only. 

AT *40th STREET, the path 
turns onto Pacific Avenue to 
33rd Street. This part of Pacific 
Avenue includes the painted 
bike lane on the right-hand side 
where parking for cars was 
previously allowed. 

At 33rd Street, the path goes 
right to Artie Avenue, down 
Arctic to Laskin Road (3Ist St- 
reet), then up Laskin Road to 
London Bridge. Laskin Road 
has new eight-foot -wide asphalt 
bike lanes connecting the feeder 
roads. 

Paving of the bike lanes has 
been qujte expensive, reported 
Harold Whitehurst, director of 
the city's Parks and Recreation 
Department. Asphalt now cost 
about $3 a running foot, he said. 

HE ALSO TOLD com- 



missidners that the recreation 
department has received 
numerous letters from 
residents about the new bike 
system. "They think it's great," 
he said, "and they want us t0 
expand it." 

The major concern now is to 
create a bike system for the 
heavily populated areas near 
Mt. Trashmore Park and Green 
Run, with connection to the city 
parks, Mr. Cole said. 

There also are plans to in- 
clude a bike lane on the 
shoulder of Shore Drive. This 
system would be connected with 
Great Neck Road, which wilt 
include bike lanes once the 
planned highway improve'^ 
ments are completed. 

The bike lanes on Great Neck 
Roa<d will complete a large 
circle of bike routes in the north- 
east section of Virginia Beach.,' 



why rent 

a shampooer? 

use ours free 

Thol'i right, we let you use our 
qualify carpel ihampooar FREE, when 
you buy Hagerly ihompoo. 
If I that eoty. 

With Hagerly, you con ihampoo 
your rugt and corpeli in Ihe morning, 
entertain Ihol evening. Sole, foil 
drying. No hard Krubbing, no greoiy 
residue. No phoiphalei. 

The Hagerly 
thompooer plan 
10 vet you lime . 
ond money, look 
lor Ihe colorful 
Hagerly display, 
or otk Ihe ilore 
manager lor deloili 

If you realty core for your home . 
care lor it with Hagerly. 

REEDS 

CARPET and UPHOLSTERY 
CLEANING 

62M9th St Vi. Betch 

428-8571 





Opening 
of park 
delayed 

The grand opening of Mt. 
Trashmore Park has been 
delayed. 

Rather than have the opening 
at the end of June, as originally 
announced last month, mem- 
bers of the Parks and Recreat- 
ion Commission voted at last 
week's meeting to celebrate the 
opening in October during the 
citywide Neptune Festival 

The parks staff has had 
problems controlling erosions 
on the mountain's steep sides, 
reported Harold Whitehurst, 
city Parks and Recreation 
Department director. 

COMMISSIONERS now plan 
to hold grand opening cere- 
monies the night of Oct. 4 when 
the youth milk carton derby, 
time trials in the nine-state 
Regional Soap Box Derby Rally 
and other events are scheduled 
at Mt. Trashmore as part of the 
festival. Oct 4. will be a local 
school holiday. 

Dedication of the park's 
visitors' center will also be 
held during grand opening 
ceremonies in October. Com- 
missioners originally planned to 
open the park at the end of this 
month, then dedicate the 
visitors' center during the 
Neptune Festival. 

Delay of the grand opening 
ceremonies will not delay 
events already planned for the 
last weekend in June and July. 

A water ski tournament on 
Mt. Trashmore 's large lake still 
will be at the end of this month. 



13 juveniles 
arrested for 
school 
iireak-ins 

Members of the police High 
Intensity Target (HIT) bur- 
glary squad have arrested 13 
juveniles on charges of 
l»-eaking into the Kings Grant 
ElemeiHary Sclwol on Little 
Neck Road. 

Officials said the group broke 
into the school once on June 7, 
twice on 3\me 8 and once on 
June 9. A small quantity of 
stereo equipment and cash 
; taken from the school wai 
recovered with the arrest ot 
the su^ects 

Investigators said only one of 
the juvenllM, a^ 10 to ><• *"« 
a ttutknt at the sdwd. 



the sedan 
that costs about 
$2,500 less than 
the other diesel. 



The Peugeot Diesel 



sn<n34 





Last year we brought you over 

a billion dollars wortfvof furniture. 

You've goto lot riding on us. 



A lot of furniture rode our rails in 1973. We estimate that the 
manufacturers' value of furniture we shipped amounted to 
SI, 120,000,000. 

And when you put Southern's shipments together with all 
other railroads; you ve got almost half of all the furniture 
Americans buy 

Why do the furniture industry and so many other industries 
ship by rail? They know it's usually the most economical way to go. 

Consider the^e figures for the thousands of things shipped 
by rail. The average cost j^r-ton-mile by truck is fi\« times as 
much as rail. Air shipping is almost fifteen times more expensive. 



And the fuel crunch has made railroad efficiency more than 
just a matter of dollars and cents. It's a matter of delivering the 
goods with the smallest possible use of fuel. 

Then there's the reliability of rail shipping. Add this on to 
everything else and you have a good idea why there's so much 
riding on us. And why you need Southern. •■j' 




©UTHEI^M 



THE WMLVmr SYSTEM THAI GIVfS AGRKN UGHT TO NNOMWIONS 



An equal opportunity employer. 






Features 

Lontkm: like seeing 



Page A-4-The Sun-Wwhwiday, June 19, 1974 



two cities at once 




LONDON — Guardian of ancient traditions, in- 
stiptor of avant prde trends, London is really two 
cities in one. 

One dances off dinner at a restaurant that liasn't 
changed a timber in 300 years at a discotheque blaring 
ihe hardest of rock. The National Health Service 
provide free medical care for all but traffic stops on a 
dime for an aristocratic equesb-ienne on her way to her 
blue-blooded bridle path. 

But London (or any other foreign city) has never 
been seen firsthand by any but an infinitesimal frac- 
tion of American women. According to travel industry 
figures, fewer than 5 per cent of the women in the 
United Slates have ever crossed their country's bor- 
.ders. 

MANY WOMEN, I am sure, have no desire to 
travel, but I am equally sure that there are thousands 
of women who stifle their wanderlust out of insecurity 
(from culturally instilled dependency) and-or lack of 
iunds (from low-paying women's jobs). For the would- 
he liberated traveler. London is the place to start for 
(1 ) it offers its own unique experience without cultural 
shock, (2) it's relatively inexpensive, and (3) it's the 
gateway to the rest of Europe. 

If you can cope in New York or Chicago, you can cope 
in London (possibly better). There is the common 
language, of course (well, give or take a few dozen 
words) but most important, women are as safe on 
Undon streets (despite the city's international 
character) as they would be in a small town in the 
USA. This is not to say that incidents don't occur, but 
when they do, it's news. (I have still to chedc <Mt the 
report that a mugger got an 18-year jail sentence.) 



IT TOOK some prodding to overcome my New York 
paranoia, but I have walked through most of London 
day and night without once being subjected to Iwrs, 
smirks, smacks, or grunts, much less overt in- 
timidation. The only area women alone are advised to 
stay away from at night is the Soho district (a colorful 
but somewhat X-rated neighborhood) but I took in the 
Soho sights in Vm wee hours with a friend (male) 
without being hassled. 

I also rode the subway (tube or underground to 
Londoners) at all hours without one uneasy moment. 
My London friends thought I was a bit dotty for getting 
a kick from riding their underground, but after all in 
New York the police ride shotgun on the subways after 
8 p.m. The underground is also clean, confortaUe, fast 
and easy to understand. 

While London has superplush hotels where you can 
be treated like visiting royalty (for royal prices), it 
also has scores of inexpensive hotels and guest houses 
where you can stay for as little as $5 per night (in- 
cluding breakfast). The difference between inex- 
pensive hotels ($5-$10 per single room per night) 
American and European style is that middle-class 
European hotels generally don't have private 
bathrooms. But they are safe, clean, comfortable and 
respectable. Let's face it: Don't most of us have 
private bathrooms at home? Isn't it worth a bit of in- 
convenience to see what's beyond the horizon. 

The British Tourist Authority (680 Fifth Ave., New 
York, N.Y. 10019) offers a booklet "London: Inex- 
peisive Hotel Accommodations and Youth Hostels" 
listing over 300 accommodations that have been in- 
spected and approved by the government. (The 



prettiest and most canvenient area for budget hotels is 
Kensington Gardens.) While you're writing ask for a 
tourist map and a list (rf free literatiffe. 

IF YOU should arrive in London without a reaer- 
vatioir, the London Tourist Board has a service at 
Heathrow Airport's British Airways Terminal which 
will match you up with hotel rooms ui all priee ranges. 

You can be well fed here on a slim budget. Not only 
does an ample En^h iMvakfast come with a hotel 
room ("bed breakfast," it's called) but American-style 
fast food shops are now a London institution. The 
Jolyon Shops (Engltoh versim of the Automat) are tfae 
best and most prevalent. 

In additton, the town is literally saturated with smaU 
atmospheric restaurants (of every nationality) of- 
fering dinners for the equivalent of $2 or $3 (Unless 
money is no object, don't go into a restaurant that 
doesn't have a menu poatad In the window.) 

Any guidebook gives the most well-known tourist 
attracttons, but London's great bargain is en- 
tertainment. As many as SO shows run simultaneously ; 
tickets are available just before curtaintime; and 
prices start at ib cents. A dozen concerts an evening is 
not unusual and many (tf them are free. For the last 
word on everything going on, get Time Out magazine. 

If you want to see more of Europe, Paris and 
Brussels are only six hours and approximately ^ 
away by train and Hovercraft (a fantastic "boat" that 
rides a cushion of air a foot above the waters of the 
English Channel). 

To be a liberated traveler, don't fly Cheryl.fly the 
Atlantic. 



NEWSPAPER 

CARRIER BOYS 
AND GIRLS 

: MUST BE 12 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER 
If |ou would liks to oarnixtra 
money and livo in any of the 
\ areas listed below, call 

' 486-3430, Monday thru Friday 

THESE ARE THE AREAS 
WHERE CARRIERS 
ARE NEEDED 



GATiWOOD PARK 
REGENCY APTS. 




lACIOSS 

I. BfiirAt 
7. AbyM 
12. Makrrtrrr 

vcMcnl 
1.1. Blunder: 
hyph wd 
Itlanni 

14. Krmain at 
hum* : i wdit. 

15. Shucks diamay 
lA. Cuntainrr 

17 Dnrriptivr ni 

many Italian 

foodR 
18. Bad on« 
20. HiMidluni :, 

•lane 
22. SufaaUnc* i>n ' 

thia page 
2S. Brawniah 

purpk 
24. CondcMMidt 
2«. Onaof tlw 

"outa" 
27. Yaaraingx 
29 Difginc tool 
M. Opera aUr. 

Robcita 
%i DilatUntiah 
W Cut <if on»'» 

ona't mannrr 

iir appcaranrr 
rt Word with ' 



5(1 I'mm iht 
purx' Mrini(« 

DOWN 

I. Pallid 

2 Kv«n*d again, 
aa Uir wwrr 

3 Lunrh-hux 
itam, p«rhap> 

4. Artrtiw Wray 
i Suffix nwaning 
"inflammation" 
' <t. Bowling gam* 
7 Replica 
i. Quirk trip 
9. OricnUI "add- 
ing machine" 

10. Comfort in 
miafortune 

11. Turn toduat 
hy natural da- 
cay 

IS. Stand up for 
IS. Dull: flat 



21. Privoloiiii: 

flighty 
ZS. PrtatMad, an 

a pniMam 
•a. Mild aapirtivr 
M. Give th« grwn 

light til 
28. Snuht 
IS. Woodtn ahon 
M. Shrub uaad 

for hadgca 
31. Sot right 
33. Fame 
M. riy into a 

ngt: 2 wdii 
M. Witticiam 
38. Duk« and carl 
40 Mardiaa 
41. Softmaaa 
44. "Allcitiwni 

art aqual ht- 

fori the — " 
4K. Piah dtlicacy 



TT 



BAYLAKE PINES 
WEBUN PLACE 



BELLAAdY AAANOR 
iWOODHURST 
CARDINAL ESTATES 
WASHINGTON SQUARE 
•CHANTICLEAR APTS. 
GREAT NECK AAANOR 

486-3430 



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LYNNHAVEN COLONY 
GREAT NECK ESTATES 
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tha% axtn mon9Y right now! 

Ckculatton 



"fry" 

m Smidg«n 
40. World-weary 

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42 "Maidenly 

namod" 
43. Small «gg!< 
4!^ < 'ommntion . 

uproar: var 

«»• 
17. Ua aa e 



1» M 




4S. Boutonniere 
4i» FreU and 
funae* 



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1 



Solution to puzzle of page B-4 



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ORIENTAL ARTS 



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HOURS: 10 a.m. TO 5:00 pjn. 
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HOROSCOPC 



From 

JunmfS 

toJunoZS 

ARIES: (Marck 21 to April 
B - Aho Ariw AirwMlMl) - 
OOwrs in you- enviranimnt 
appear changeable — be 
adaptaMc. Family matters 
are beat bandied in a "confer- 
ence" Witt all mendMrs ex- 
pr^ring opinions. Be cauttous 
in real estate matters — 
check the facts. 

TAURUS: (Apr! M to May 
» - Aisa IkTO iyecudant) 

—Curb impiMaice irith deal- 
ings which get bo^ed doim in 
paper worit and delays. Give 
attention to more routine 
matters. Pleasures with 
young people in out4oor ac- 
tivities is h^Mi^ted. Calmly 
discuss iaii% problems. 

QEMVn: (May tl to Joae 
»- Also Gantad Ascendant) 

— Getktsofrestnowtore- 
charge your energy batteries. 
Get away from it all to restore 
lalance and peace of mind. 
Enjoy nature, art and aflec- 
tionate friends. Romance is in 
the air too somdiow mixed 
with bittiness. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
21 — iUso Cancer Ascendant) 
— Situations from ttie past re- 
quire your attntion. If you 
have slipped up in financial 
a^as, you may have to deal 



with it now. Be sure you aren't 
cairying the w^ght for some- 
mie else. Diapose of uselos 
itons. 

LEO: (Jnfy 22 to Angnst 22 
— Also Leo AKOdant) - En- 
ergy is high and you can ac- 
complish the seemingly im- 
prasiUe. Take the time to be 
pleasant and charming to oth- 
ers. Slop carefully and com- 
pare prices for needed itons. 
Home ertertairanent favored 
now. 

VIRG0:(AngDst2StoSqit. 
22 — Abo Virgo Ascendant) 
— Devote time to study wid 
practice en a new skill. Some- 
one you meet now could be- 
come a serious romantic partr 
ner. Reevaluate your budget 
so you know exactly where 
you stand. Money worries 
hurt friendship. 



UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

- Also Ukra Ascendant) - 
Take care of all routine mat- 
ters such as paying bills, fin- 
ishing (M-oJects relating to 
business or profession. Cut- 
backs at work may affect 
you so be sure past perform- 
ance speaks in your favor. 
Use logic and patioice. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— You have lots of coopo'a- 
tion now in career areas. New 
ideas for expansion occur to 
you — possibly developing 
something that has been a 



hobby only up to now. Inherit- 
ance or tegacy is possible. 
Talents shine. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also SagittarioB As- 
cendant) — Have a health 
checkup if any symptoms oc- 
cur. Follow medical advice 
carefully. Be willing to carry 
responsibility at work no mat- 
to- what others do. A business 
venture requires patience and 
effort. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capicera As- 
cendant) — Other people, 
mate or partno' appear short- 
tonpered and hard to deal 
with. Delay discussions witt 
them to a better tinw. Have 
health checkup and get lota of 
rest. Keep business and per- 
sonal life separate. 

AQUARRJS: (Jan. 21 to 
Feb. U — Also Aqnarins As* 
coidant),— Career proq)ers 
and prestige and achievement 
are highlighted. Goals appear 
to be in sij^t now. Advertis- 
ing, publicity and communi- 
cations are favored. Itavel is 
a distinct possibility for busi- 
ness and pleasure. 

PISCES: (Feb. U to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascoidant) 
— Personal affairs may seem 
confused — be patient. If pos- 
siUe delay important career 
decisions until the "fog of con- 
fusion" clears up. Concoi- 
trate on the home environ- 
ment — redecorate econcwni- 
cally. 



Strictiy 
Personal. 



Wife is uncomfortabie 



wnh iter 'Icissy' husliand 



By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 
Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

What can I do about my 
"kissy" husband? We have 
been married 30 years and 
he is still at it. I really 
wouldn't mind if he would 
confine his kissing to our 
home, but he'll kiss me in 
public or in the home <rf our 
friends. I find this em- 
barrassii^. 

I've toM him how I feel 
and he said, "You're my 
wife and I see no reason not 
to kiss you when I please." 
These .are not passionate 
embraces but I still fee! 
uncomfortable. What should 
I do? 

Married 30 Years 

Dear Married: 

You should be glad your 
husband is still at it! And 
with you. I'll bet there are 
(denty of women who would 
love to change places with 
you. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I am 16 and running into a 
few problems with my 
friends. Many of them will 
take a drink and smoke pot. 
1 don't want to be different. 
I've been called chicken 
because I won't join in. How 
can I answer my friends? 
Steve 



Dear Steve: 

You do not owe your 
friends an explanation. Ask 
them why they care whether 
or not you drink or sm(*e? 
Tell them that you have 
decided yw don't need it, 
and that whatever decision 
they make isTipTo thernr 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My husband was in the 
army and is now home, and 
nothing is right between us. 
It may be partly my fault 
because I know I'm a dif- 
ieceni person than when he 
left. I now have a jd) I like 
very much. I've had two 
advancements dnd am soon 
to have another. My 
husband doesn't know my 
friends and isn't interested 
in them. I am accustomed to 
my freedom and find that 
my job absorbs the major 
part of my interest and 
energy. 

Last week seemed to 
bring the final blow. Ed was 
complaining about the 
amount of time I spent at the 
office. When I didn't 
respond as he felt I should, 
he said, "Well, European 
girls certainly treated me 
better." That was all I 
needed to hear. I feel our 
marriage is hanging by a 
thread and I'm not even 
sure I care. How can people 



grow so far apart? 



OUR dOthSUMMiR PROGRAM^ 

JUNE 10th-AUGUST30th 

Featuring A .,cf 

COMPLETE PROGRAM FOR 
BOJH GIRLS AND BOYS 
^\l Through 13 



DAY CAMP 
SUMMiR SCHOOL 
DAY CARE 

Lit Us Qiva Your Child A 
Memoratrfe Summer 

• Comptoto FacHlttes 

• Transportation 

• Lunch 



APPLICATIONS NOW BEING 

ACCEPTED FOR FALL 

VACANCIES 



SmMTvlMd SwHiMiini If Our Ntw 
DOMtod Oi»a^*F c^SwAj^dv Anb bjr IM170II5, H^ 

:f me 9aa|ttei ftciool 

2100 Harbor Laii«t Va. ■•ach 
401-a2f AAi^ Iwgrgw 




^ For The Collector 

(Baginnart fi Up) 



this prejucide? 



Tom 



Dear Tom: 

Local junior colleges are 
fine institutions of learning, 
as is your father's alma 
mater. You should be 



Amethjrst, Spanish P|rite, Quart:. ^ 



and others - Mani show pieces 



«M^W«MMtf«^W«M 



^AMMMMMMMA^WMW^AA^M^M^^ 



SEE THE AMAZING 

STONE THAT BENDSI 

(Flexible Sandstone) 



ALSO MANY UNIQUE AND 

LOVELY GIFTS FOR 

ALL OCCASIONS 

GEM SPECIALTIES 

3320 Va. Beach BN. S^'' 

OUi 486-7886 

_ Nov MMd (N Moidqis 



■i^) 




your 
education. Perhaps your 
father would be happier if he 
thou^t you would consider 
his school after two years at 
the junior college. At that 
time, many stt^nts are 
better prepared to cope witti 
a large university. And, 
Dad, it's your son's college 
days so 1^ him choose. 



Dnr Pat and Marilyn: 

Wtore does the saying 
"Borrowing from Peter to 
pay Paul" came frwn? 

Andy 



Dear Andy: 
(Tica'o. 






Irene S 



Dear Iren: 

There's a great deal of 
adjustment to be done when 
two people have been 
separated for a long time. 
However, the twotrf you had 
something or you wouldn't 
have gotten married. Why 
not give counseling a try 
before becoming a statistic? 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Is it strange to want to go 
to my local college and not 
3,000 miles away to my 
father's alma mater? He 
went to a well-known 
university, and I have 
nothing against this school. 
However, I would like' to be ■ 
a little closer to home for the 
first year or two. My grades 
are good and I could get into 
the university, but right now 
that much competition does 
not interest me. 

My father says that for 18 
years he has looked forward ; 
to the day when his son 
would enter this great in- '■ 
stitution of learning. He 
thinks that the local junior 
college is a copout. Just how ' 
can I convince him other- 
wise? My mother says that 
it is my decision, but she lets 
my dad rave on. What can I ^ 
say to him to talk him out of* 



MMi 



mmm^mp^mam 



*\ 



Gardening 



TiM Sun-W0dnesday, June 18, 1974-Page A-5 



i 



«j* 



i.* 



^ 



Vine borer 
controlled 
with Sevin 

Q. A small w(»iil_gets into the stalk of 
my squash vines every year. What can be 
used to control this insect? 



A. Spray or dust tlw stems of your 
squash with Sevin (Carbaryl) every week 
through July. The squash vine borer is 
impossible to control once it has entered 
the stem. 




questions & answers at>out lawns,& gardens 



<*' 



Q. Bean beetles are a problem on my 
snap and lima beans. What chemical wiU 
control this pest? 

A. Sevin (carbaryl) spray or dust is the 
best chemical control. Apply the 
chemical to the leaf underside where 
most of the damage is done. There is no 
waiting period between last application 
and harvest. Just wash the beans 
thoroughly before using. 

Q. I applied Sevin to my beans and some 
of the new growth was burned. What did I 
do wrong? 

A. To avoid possible injury to tender 
foliage, do not apply when foliage is wet 
or when rain or high humidity is expected 
during the next two days. 

Q. When can I divide my daffodils? 

A. Division of spring-flowering bulbs 
can be accomplished with success after 
the foliage has turned brown. 

Q. My tomato plants are doing well 
except that most of the flowers fall off 
and no fruit set. What's wrong? 

A. Under high humidity, fruit set can be 
increased by shaking the plant to release 
poUoi. ^ 




HoHtne wiU be ^ad to answer your questions about lawns and 
gsrdens. Send your questions to I*taine, Virginia Beach Sun. 
138 Rosemont Road, Vir^nia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Garden club 
news and notes 



Five awarcb went to the Prin- 
cess Anne Plaza Garden Club 
in the Council of Garden Clubs 
of Virginia Beach annual 
competition. Announcement of 
the awards was made at the 
garden club's recent in- 
stallation luncheon. 

The club received the 
Charlotte Tilbrood Beautifica- 
tion award, the attendance 
award, the Reba McClanan 
bicentennial beautification 
award, a third-place award for 
its continuing HANDS project 
and a third-place award for a 
new HANDS project. 

Mrs. Richard C Dunaja, 
nationally accredited flower 
show judge and member of the 
Lake Shore Garden Club, in- 
stalled the new officers. TTiey 



Beautiful asters 
come in all sizes 



Flowering fragrance 



Honeysuckles are nature's own 
perfume factory. Their heady 
fragrance < can sweeten the air for 
blocks when a large wild clump of 
honeysuckle releases its sweet 



smell. Remember plucking the 
bi<»soms and sucking out the sweet 
juice when you were just a child? 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



By DEM ETR A MAR AS 
VPI Extension Agent 

It's easy to sing praises about 
plant breeders. During recent 
years, these dedicated men and 
womep have produced many 
new and unusual varieties of 
flowers and vegetables. 

Asters are a fine exampfe of 
this effort. Ths sizes now 
available range from dwarfs 
only 10 inches tall to giants that 
grow to a height of three feet. 
The most common colors are 
white, pink, red and blue, but 
yellow is also found in a few 
varieties. 

ASTERS are especially 
desirable as cut flowers 
because of their beauty in 
arrangements and fine keeping 
quality. Some of the newer 
varieties have strong stiff stems 
which are a real improvement 
over the weak types which were 
common a few years ago. 

Be sure to select wilt- 
resistant varieties. They will 
continue to bloom over a long 
period of time without 
becoming diseased. 

Asters are half-hardy and 
may be planted about a week 
before the average last frost 
date in your locality. Make 




BXTENSION DIVIStON 



successive plantings of early 
and late varieties to provide 
blooms from early August until 
the cold weather in the fall kills 
your plants. 

American Beauty and Per- 
fection asters have the typical 
double flowers with regular 
incurved petals, The plants are 
24 to 30 inches tall with flowers 
three to four inches acrms. 

CRESTED and Princess 
asters have compact, high 
crested flowers that resemble 
an anemone-type chrysan- 
themum. The plants are about 
two feet tall. 

Crego and Fluffy asters have 
large double flowers with 
plumed, feathery, curled petals. 



These are loose and informal aa«^ 
ronipared to the more uniformly 
appearance of most others' 
asbM's. The petals are thin and 
may fade or turn brown quite 
soon in hot, humid weather. 

Other asters now available '' 
include the cactus varieties 
with straight needle-like tubular 
pointed petals and the dwarf 
types which have double and 
pompon blooms. You may also ^ 
wish to try some of the single' 
varieties to complete your" 
collection. 

WITH so many types to"; 
cho<»e from, you can use asters , 
as a low border or edging, or for' 
bedding, cutting or background ' 
plants. An entire section of your 
flower bed may be planted with 
asters to include selections of ' 
many types and colors. 

Asters are easy to grow. Give 
them a moderate application of , 
S-lO-S fertilizer at planUng time 
and a light side-dressing of the 
same material about four weeks 
later. Use sawdust or wood 
chips as mulch to conserve soil ■■ 
moisture. Apply extra water, 
during dry weather to promote 
continute vigorous growth. Cut ' . 
the flowers as they fade to keep 
the plants blooming over a long ■ „ 
period. 



Seedling plants needed 
to start later gai]dens 



OEOROIA 

Long Needle 
PINE $^50 

from 




Having second thoughts about a 
vegetable garden? If yoix failed to plant 
seeds you can still try your green thumb 
with seedling plants. 

Select sturdy seedling vegetable plants 
with dark green color. Avoid tall, spindly, 
light green or yellow plants. 

Set seedling plants alraut one inch lower 
than they grew in the flat or peat^t. If the 
peat pot has been kept continually moist, 
and is soft, with roots protruding, it should 
not be remov.ed. 



When peat pots have been allowed to 
become dry and hard, root growth through 
them will be retarded, and the pot should 
be removed be(ore the plant is set out. In 
all cases, it is advisable to remove before 
the plant is set out. In all cases, it is ad- 
visable to rernove any portion of the pot 
which extends above the soil ball of the 
seedling plant. 



lay the lower portion of the stem in a 
trench and cover with about three inches 
of soil, leaving five or six inches of the top 
exposed. Roots will develop along the 
buried part of the stem. 

The use of starter solution instead of 
water when setting young vegetable plants 
will add nutrients and promote rapid 
• recovery from the transplanting 
operation. Apply one cupful around each 
plant when it is set, and repeat every day 
for ^riiwut four applipatfcns. 

To make a starter solution, use ^ soluble 
, fertilizer which you may get from a garden 
center. Follow the instructions which are 
printed on the package. If you are unable 
to secure a soluble fertilizer, use one-half 
cup of 10-10-10 or one cup of 5-10-5 in three 
gallons of water. Stir thoroughly several 
times. There will always be some un- 
dissolved residue because regular com- 
mercial fertilizers are not completely 
soluble. 



IF LEGGY tomato plants must be used, WEEDS MUST be controlled to 



eliminate their use of the soil nutrients and 
moisture needed by your vegetables. 
Cultivate or hoe your garden as frequently 
as needed to destroy all weeds when they 
are only a few inches tall. Do not dig too 
deep because this would damage the 
shallow roots of your vegetable cro|». 
Keep the hoe sharp to facilitate the cutting 
of weeds. 

The use of herbicides is not a practical 
method for controlling weeds in the home 
garden. With several types of plants 
located close together in a small area, 
tome may be seriously damaged by any 
herbicide which may be selected. The best 
methods of weed control are cultivation, 
hoeing and the use of mulch. 

Vegetables need about one inch of water 
each week to promote maximum yields 
and high quality. Moisture will be con- 
served by controlling weeds and using 
mulch, but irrigation may be necessary 
during periods of drouth. Give the garden 
agoodsoaking about once a week when the 
soil becomes dry. This is more effective 
than frequent light sprinklings. Rotary 
sprinklers or porous irrigation hoses may 
be used. 



• ELEPHANT EARS • ULY OF THE VALLEY 
-PERMANENT ARRANGEMENTS • CEMETERY WREATHS 



HANGING BASKETS • HOUSE PUNTS 


Geraniums 

Bedding 
Plants 

Sedums 


JIOSES 

Gardenias 
Oleanders 

Shade Trees 


Eucalyptus 
Amaryllis 

Japanese 
lanterns 




^,,, Complete Garden Center 

^li'ttj S9S0 Frovyenee Bd. Phone 420-2825 
4 V Open Mondty-Satuiday 9-S 



are: president, Mrs. Bill For- 
inash; first vice-president, Mrs, 
Eddie Snead; second vice- 
president, Mrs. William Co- 
lona; recording secretary, Mrs. 
Melvin Seay; treasurer, Mrs. 
Charles Price; parliamen- 
tarian, Mrs. Garnet Barnes^ 

The club's yearbook won first 
place in the annual competition 
(rf Uie statewide garden club 
organization, it was announced 
at the lundieon. 

Club awards went to Mrs. 
Everett Mitchell for first place 
in flower arranging, Mrs. 
Forinash for second place in 
arranging and Mrs. Seneker for 
.first place in horticjilture. Mrs. 
John Froehler ar^ Mrs. Barnes 
received the Reba McClanan 
award ttr outstanding service 
to the club. 



It^s over 
until fall 



Since April, The Sun lias been pleased to 
provide our gardening readers with 
informative articles on everything from 
how to start a garden to information on 
growing, picking and enjoying 
strawberries. 

Staff members of the VPI extensirai 
service have been most helpful in 
answering readers' questions about 
gardening and providing timely articles on 
every aspect of horticulture. 

This is the last garden page of the s^s<m. 
Spring is over, and summer's hot and humid 
weather is about to begin. The Sun's^arden 
page will resume in the fall with articles on 
seasonal maintenance of lawns and 
gardens. 



COLEMAN NURSERY 



GARDENTOWN 

THE HOME OF CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND 

PORTSMOUTH, 



4934 HIGH ST.(RT. 17) 



SINCE 1942 



VA 

484-3426 



•c^trm 



^ 



TIMMY& 
LASSIE 






^T^LINTSTONES 

b? WEEKDAYS 8 AM I 9 AM WEEKDAYS 



BOZO'S aC I '^NglLLjCANJ 

TOP 



^y<' 



4:30 PM WFEKDAYS 



NOW 

Is an Excellent Time 

for 
LANDSCAPING YOUR HOME 




2:30 PM WEEKDAYS 





PLANTING SHADE TREES 

(We Have a Nice Selection 

of Both 
Plants and Trees) 






WE GUARANTSB OUH PLANTS FORgNfYtAR^ 



S ports 



Rigs A-6-The Sun-Wedne>day, June 19, 1974 



STARTS TODA Y 



Red Wing hosts State Open 



The Virginia PGA Open has 
come to Virginia Beach and the 
Hed Wing Municipal Golf. A 
pro-aniateur contest kicks off 
the festivities >oday. 

The 47th annual tournament 
is making its second ap- 
pearance in Vifginri Beach. 
The 72-hole tourney starts on 
Thursday with the concluding 18 
holes of competition played on 
Sunday. 

The 7,007 yard par-72 course 
will be challenged by a field of 
150 golfers. Included in the field 
of Open hopefuls, will be ap- 



proximately 45 pro golfers. The 
players will be competing for 
prize money in the vicinity of 
$7,000. 

HKI) WIN(; club pro Jennings 
House must rate near the top of 
the list of pre-tourney favorites, 
ifouse will have the advantage 
of playing in the familiar 
surroundings of his home 
course. Last month House 
shattered the Red Wing course 
record with a blistering six- 
under par 86. The recoM-setting 
round bettered the old course 



mark by one stroke which 
House had shared with Lee 
Trevino. 

Another of the pre-tourney 
favorites is Banks Guyton of 
Willianuburg Country Qub. In 
seven pro-am events this 
spring, the hot-shooting Guyton 
has captured thr^ firsts, two 
seconds and two thirds. Guyton 
has three third place State Open 
finishes to his credit. 

Among the other favorites are 
former champion Claude King, 
Larry Wheeler, Mike Felker 
and 10-time champion Chandler 



Harper, who is making his first 
appearance in the open in three 
years. 

Red Wing's first iftiot at 
hosting the State Open has been 
plagued with difficulties. The 
Princess Anne Country Gub 
and the Cavalier Yacht and 
Country Club are holding their 
annual member-guest tour- 
naments this week. The two 
club affairs have severely cut 
into the expected amateur 
entrants in the tournament. The 
original expectation was for a 
field of 200 competitors. 



The State Open should also be 
hurt at the gate due to the 
competition of the two club 
tournaments. 

Red Wing, which originally 
lost its bid for the open, was 
named the host tourney last 
March. A military course, 
originally scheduled to host the 
tourney, failed to get civilian 
clearance. The hurried 
preparations at Red Wing have 
dropped original expectations 
of a $10,000 tournament to the 
hope of breaking even. 



YOUTH CLASSIC 



Savage leads Beach qualifiers 



x 
*. 




BILLY WOOLARD eyes one of his iron 
siiots on tlie bacic nine of the Red Wing golf 
course. A triple l>ogey on the 15th hde cost 
Woolard a chance at the Youth Classic title, 
but his sub-par round was good enough to 
qualify for the State Finals in August. (Sun 
photo by Rod Mann) 

ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

Nine Virginia Beach golfers are headed for the 
Insurance Agents State Finals at the Reston Golf 
Course in Fairfax, Aug. 5-7. The locals earned their 
shot at the state tourney by finishing in the Uxg three 
(rf their age brackets at the second annual 
Insurance Youth Classic tourney held at Red Wing 
Thursday. 

The nine local golfers, who qualified for the state 
tournament are: George MacDonald, Tommy 
Masters, Kevin Sweeny, Jim Braithwaite, Jdm 
Anderson, Richard Lucas, Roger Savage, Mike 
Fleinick and BiUy Woolard. Qualifying for the state 
finals earns Uie nine local golfers a shot at making 
it to the insurance agents national tmirney in 
Cranston R.I. on Aug. 16-M. 

MacDonald dominated the 13 ^d imder division 
capturing the first place prize for the second con- 
s«:utive year by the comifortable margin of seven 
strokes. He covered the par-^2 Red Wing Course in 
nine over-par 81 to fashion his victory. 

M/^TERS WAS in the runner-i^ slot in the 13 
year-oW and under bracket. After challenging 
MacDonald, Masters feU back, finishing with a 16- 
^r par 88. He had challenged for the t(^ slot early 
in the round. 

Three strokes back in the final qualifying slot in 
the bracket was Sweeny. He grabbed the final spot 
wth a 19-over par performance of 91. 

Michael Hays was sue strokes back in fourth 
place, tourii^ the par-72 course with a 18-hole total 
cH 97. Philip Davis narrowly edged Jordan Ball and 
Chris Martira for the fifth slot, finishing one-stroke 
ah«Ki(rfhi8 piffsuera with a 28-ova- par total of 100. 

Braithwaite and Anda-son led the 14-15 group in 
th^ tour around the Red Wing course. The pair 
gralted the top qualifying slots in their age 
t»-acket, flnishing in a dead heat with identical 
scor» of four-over-par 76. 

Braitfafraite edged Andersmi for the title in the 
Youtti Oasic i^ edging his o|^mnt in a playoff. 
&tiithwBtte sai^ a tni-foot par-putt on the first 
hole ^ nM«<death to capture first place hmnrs. 

* 

LUCAS GRABBED the final cpialifying slot in ttie 
^e brKlKt filching five tMkm b«:k m thu^ 
^m Witt a matmrn-fBT pofomance irf 81. 

n« ^0d^t of te ton-ney ««s in the 17 and 
w^Kt eomp^^MR. The field featured Uk b^t <tf the 
tm &Wf «f h^ stibosA ^ers in tl^ B^mA. 
SMtfiilNdutland n^odc ^mc emt»t>ited in a 
t^p^Me M ^Htack Biae <rf Um Red Wii^ course. 



Savage grasped victory on the final hole, avoiding a 
three-way playoff. 

Savage came to the par-five 18th hole needing a 
birdie to claim the title. Fleinick and Woolard had 
already finished with one-under par 7rs to put the 
pressure on Savage. 

A playoff for the title seemed a distinct possibility 
when Savage pushed his second shot to the right of 
the green into a clump of trees. Fleinick and 
Woolard saw their chance at victory slip away as 
Savage made a brilliant recovery pitching to within 
six feet of the cup. 

SAVACJE TOOK the junior Youth Classic title, 
calmly sinking the birdie putt into the center of the 
cup. Savage, a junior and number-one player on 
Kempsville High School's state runner-up golf 
team, posted a two-under a par total of 70. Savage, 
Fleinick and Woolard were the only three players to 
better the par-72 figure in the field of 76 contestants. 

The trio faced some stiff challenges for the 
qualifying spots in their bracket before Red Wing's 
back nine claimed as victims some of the hopefuls. 
Richard Tucker, Rich Ramsey, and John Saunders 
were all in challenging positions at the turn but 
couldn't keep up the pace. Ramsey finished in the 
fourth slot with an 18-hole total of 74. A succession of 
bogeys late in the round cost Tucker a shot at a 
qualifying spot, finishing with a 76. Saunders joined 
Tucker and a late charging Ricardo Britt at the 76 
mark. 

Woolard seemed to have the tournament well in 
hand, coming to the 15th hole. Playing ahead of 
Fleinick and Savage, he had moved to a two-stroke 
advantage on his pursuers— then tradgedy struck 
on the par-four 14th. Woolard mistakenly hit a 
playing partner's ball. The oversight cost the 
leading Woolard a two-str<*e penalty and led to a 
triple bogey seven. The mix-up cost Woolard the 
lead, dropping him back in a pack at even par. 
. Woolard came roaring back into contention, 
carding a birdie <m the 16th hole to regain a portion of 
the lead. The determined Woolard finished with 
pars on the 17th and 18th holes to finish his sub-par 
round. 

PLAYIN(i IN THE threesome behind Woolard, 
Fleinick displayed some of the most consistent golf 
of the tburney. Fleinick, a member of the Princess 
Anne golf team this past scholastic season, was in 
. or near the lead for the majority of the tourney. 
Fleinick moved to two-under on the par three I5th 
when his tee shot dropped him in easy birdie ranger 
Fleinick's dream of a title disappeared on the 
closing hole of the tourney. After a fine drive and 
second shot, Fleinick's approach shot on the par- 
five 18th hole left him 20-feet from the cup. Fleinick 
three-putted from the unassuming distance to fall 
before the charging Savage. 




A LARGE STRETCH of water teparatei 
RIfAard Taeker (right) from the green m 
Red Wlnr« ^8h Itth bole. A poor liadi 
nlm cwt Tttck«- a ch«w:e to qualify for tte 
state tMimey. He (faiitlied tied for Wth with a 
f^-orar |»r 7t. (Sua fhoto by Rod Mau) 




ROGER SAVAGE, the eventual tourney 
winner. Is disturbed after a poor shot from 
the fairway. Savage captured the Ymith 
Classic 17 and under title with a six-foot 
birdie putt on the final hole to win by one 
stroke. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 

Flemick did regain his touch to ed^e Woolard in a 
playoff with a birdie on the first playoff hole to grab 
the second slot in the bracket. Woolard got in 
trouble when his drive found the trees down the left 
side of the fairway. 

It is now on to the state finals for the nine Beach 
golfers and a chance to play with touring PGA pros 
at the national tournament, if they grab a 
qualifying spot at the state tournament. 



THE 
SCORES 



1974 insurance Youth C/assIc 




16 and 17 

Roger Savage 
Michael Fleinck 
Billy Joe Woolard 
Rich Ramsey 
Ricardo Britt 
John Saunders 
Richard Tucker 
^hn Sweeney 
Thomas Cullen 
Gary Edwards 
Robert Pet«^ 



Roy Santonil 
TcHiy Smith 
Jam^Ballew 
Reynolds Dawsm 
Eddie HiUegaK 
David ThomiMon 
Art King 
Jack Henry 
Bracfly Williams 
Oiarto Norrington 
Kevin Kmt 
SeanForiNitt 



UandlS 



'® Jim Braithwaite 

'^ John Anderson 

^^ Ruhard Lucas 

^* Donald Newhart 

^^ Alan King 

" Rot)ert Kraemer 

'^ Tom Bacalis 

^ Walter Bankmttki 

^ WiUiamGiblw 

^ Fred Fryman 

^ Mm Bradshaw 



m 

83 
■3 

84 

H 
87 
88 

90" 
96 
102 



13 and Under 

George MacDonald 
Tommy Masters 
Kevin Sweeney 
Michael Hays 
PhUlip Davis 
JwdanBaU 
Chris Martini 
racterdUles 
WiUi«»(3ark 
Sa}tt Alexander 
Kevin Slattinn 



76 
76 
61 
82 
84 

m 

93 
•3 
93 

96 
136 



81 
88 

91 

m 

109 
101 
101 
103 
104 
116 
123 
» 



SIDEUNES 

By 

John 
Baimen 

Sports Mter 



Giris liberate 
liasebaii fields 



You had to know, it was only a matter of time. 
Women have been battlu^ for equal standing with 
men on nearly every front. The head honchos of the 
Little League organization put up the good 
chauvinst fight but to no avail. 

Last week, one of the oldest bastions Of male 
supremacy c<»ne tumbling down. After struggling 
for m<M-e than a year off the field and in the courts, 
the masters of the little league world capitulated. 
They had fought the good fight and lost — conceding 
that yes pigtails do have a plaee on a baseball 
diamond. 

To underscore the girls move upward from ttie 
neighborhood sandlots to the limelight of organized 
baseball, a girl in West Vu-ginia stopped an all-boy 
team mi a no-hitter the day after die momentous 
decision to have little league baseball go co-ed. _, 

IT WAS JUST sheer audacity to throw a no-hitter 
the first day you are allowed in the game. It's 
tantamount to a special prosecutor taking 
President Nixon to court on his first day on the job. 

How many dreams were shattered wi that fateful 
night in West Virginia? It is the standard operating 
procedure for all little league players to dream (rf 
someday makii^ it to the big leagues. 

How can any normal red-blooded American boy 
go home and dream about hitting a pennant- 
clinching home-run off of Tom Seaver? When he 
couldn't even manlage a scrateh single off of some 
unheralded girl hurler. One seemingly harmless 
pitched game could have turned a crew of future 
major league baseball players into ballet stodents. 

The whole complexion of the game could undergo 
a drastic change. The famed pat on the fanny to 
symbolize a job well done will become a thing (rf the 
past. Can't have the upstanding little league 
coaches accused of being sexual deviants. . 



IT WOULD SEEM the coach has the most to lose 
in this move to a new frontier. Thmk of the long 
hours he has spent drilling his team in fundamentals 
only to have his double play combination wrecked 
because the shortstop and the second baseman are 
not talking to each other. 

The long revered terminology of baseball will be 
rendered obsolete. Clan you imagine a boy believing 
a walk is as good as a hit when the girl next door 
just blasted a two-run double off the left-field 
fence? What happens to the bench jockeys who yell, 
'Aw ya throw like a girl' when the piteher really is a 
girl, and she has proceeded to strike out the side for 
the fourth consecutive time? Accusing her of 
throwing like a boy, just does not seem to make it. 

Adding insult to injury, gu"ls will probably more 
than hold their own on the little league diamond. 
They develop more rapidly at that age. Plus in this 
first year of female participation, it won't be a 
religious crusade with parents to have their little 
girl play baseball. The majority of girls, who do 
play, will be truly involved in the game. 

The advent of co-ed litde league will probably 
leave a few crushed male egos in its wake. 
However, in the long run it is the girls who will 
(MTobably end up losing the most. 



THEY WILL, mistakenly enter the realm of 
organized sport with the silly notion that playing 
baseball is fun. The idea was bred on the sandlots 
where the idea is to pass Vae time playing baseball. 

In organized baseball, disruptive things happen 
^ch as being cut or worse yet making the team and 
languishing on the bench. Little league baseball has 
all the trappings — unif(H'ms, new baseballs, 
unbroken bats, real bases and umpires, but girls 
will so(m find out the game does not belong entirely 
to die players as it does in the solitude of the 
sandlots. 

For the first time, they will be exposed to pushy 
parents, screaming coaches and win-crazed 
teammates. They will all too soon learn the maxim 
(rf organized sport — its not how y(Ni play the game 
its whether you win or lose. 

Many little league coaches have defended their 
attitude toward winning, contending it is no fun 
getting your brains beat in all the time. It is an 
arguiTwaot not without its sbrong points, but critics 
of (H-ganized sport have long maintained that the 
sports have grown too far away from its original 
(xirpose — providing supervised recreation. 

If the girls can interject more (rf a spuit of 
friendly competition ratter than a life and death 
struggle, they will be a welcome addition to the htfle 
-■-"' leagues. All too likely, however, is that they too will 
be swept up in the oiosession with being first and 
then who will be Wt to amply «ijoy baseball for the 
fun of it. 

KwasitY signs 



with Yanlcees 



0' 



Joe Kwasny has had his 
dream come true. Drafted by 
the New York Yankee two 
weeks ago in major league 
baseball's annual free agart 
draft, he became a member tf 
the Yankee organization, 
sipiing a contract for an un- 
^K^u^ amount last week. 

K^irasBy reported to the 
YankMs team in the rooUe 
league late last wed(. Kwasi^'s 
Immediate goal In the Y«tee 
orpnization will be to make the 
Yank^, Fort Laudo-dde tern 
chib in the i^bii^ioHl taagiw. 



Kwasny was an honorable 
mention selectim on The Sua 
All-City basebdl team this p«^ 
season. 



Kwasny sold the Yankee om 
Us major league pirtential afterl 
a brilliant senkMr seasM A 
Kellam Hi^ School. He led the! 
district in innings pltch^ and* 
Mrtteouts. The hard-dinnriiig. 
right-hander tirn^ the Kni^t^ 
club around, making them- 
a contender in the Easter^ 
District this iMist season.- 



^■a^i*^ 



•■■■■■■■I 



Dynasties are nearing extinction 



By RANDY GRAY 
Special to The ^n 

The days of the great sports dynasties are over. 
We will never again see the glories ci the past — the 
New York Yankees, the Bosttm Celtics, the Green 
Bay Packers or ttie USC track teanis of the olden 
days. 

Tte current ones, such as UCLA basketball and 
USC baseball are in their waning years, as more 
and mwe opposition mounts forces. 

FINANCES HAVE evened oUt among the 
prof^siomils, and recruiting is leveling off in 
major college sports. 

The cycles will still be there, all right, and the 
magic won^ "dynasty" will arise with assorted 
championships. But in the 19608, people w<m't be 
saying "Remember the great (name deleted) 
teams of flie 1970s?" 

The latesLarising is, of all people, the Nets, and 
Ameincan Basketball Association team housed in 
New York City and employing the heralded Dr. J. 
Julius Erving. 

The Nets recently won the ABA title for the first 
straight year. That is, of course, a necessary step 
toward building a dynasty. 




BUT ERVING himself 
unrealistic in our times. 



says the idea is 



;%¥5¥^!?Sft%S:%% 



Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks & Recreation softball. 
and baseball scores and stan- 
dings as of Monday: 



"Basketball is the sport (rf the '70s and there are 
just too many good ballplayers comity out of 
college tiiese days for one team to dominate. 
Players are l)etter now and the talent is spread 
armmd. 

^'The teams that had dynasties were able to 
maintain them because they got the talent together 
and blended it. But now, with so much talent 
around, the poorer teams get better," Erving was 
quoted as saying. 

His remarks about basketball apply to a large 
extent to the other major sports. 

"THERE IS A tendency toward a high turnover 
today," he continued. "Even in the NBA. 
"Milwaukee won a championship a couple of 



Sports Record. 



years ago and then made some changes, changes 
they pnriMbly rc^pret now." 

One change Milwatdcee probably regrets is 
something Erving wasn't talking about. That was 
the loss of Lucius Allen due to injury, as the Bucks 
were coasting into playoff time. 

Even with a dominating factor such as Kareem 
Abdul-Jabbar, Milwaukee could not create 
anything that even threatened to b»:ome a dynasty. 

IN THE NFL. Miami's chances to build 
s(Hnething resembling Vince Lombardi's Green 
Bay Packers died wiUi the annmiiKed defection d 
Larry Csonka, Paul Warfield and Jim Kiick to the 
WFL. 

Baseball has less chance than any of them 
becaise of the division system. The winner of a 
division now has to win two short series to win the 
crown, a chancy situation indeed. 

In the college ranks, athletes are gone in four 
years, v«Hhich leav^ the matter in the grasp of a 
continuation of recruiting. 

UCLA basketball still warrants the "d^^nasty" 
tag, despite its def^t in the last NCAA playoffs. 
But things are getting toucher and John Wooden 
won't be around much longer. 

Meanwhile, Trojan baseball keeps defying the 
law oi averages. USC is no longer the national 
talent center, but Rod Dedeaux just keeps 
producing championships. 



Tht Sun-Wcdnwday. Juiw 19. 1974-pHe M. 



Tennis tourney 
makes 2nd try 



The Maureen Connelly Memorial Tennis Tour- 
nament will make its second attempt to get un- 
derway this weekend at the Princess Anne High 
School tennis courts. It was originally scheduled for 
the weekend of June 8th but was postponed due to 
inclement weather. 

The tournament will start Saturday with the 
opening rounds. The tournament finals are 
scheduled for Sunday afternoon. Women of all ages 
are eligible to participate in the tourney. 

At its originally scheduled time, the tourney 
featured some of the best women's players in the 
area. Some players, who originally intended to 
participate in the competition, may be unable to do 
so due to scheduling conflicts. 



Class A 



w 

8 

7 
7 
7 
6 
4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 




Stewart Sandwich 

Reid Associates 

Porkers 

Merct«ant$ 

Murden's 

Tony's 

Greenwicti Supply 

Expo's 

Professional 

Ott Realty 

Cavaliers 

Evergreen 

RESULTS 



Stfwart Sandwiches 7; Ott RMlty t. 
Professional 10; Greenwicti 8. 
Mercttanls 15; Cavaliers 4. 
Reld Assoc,'?; Porkers 3. 
Stewart Sandwiches 16; Cavaliers 5. 
Greenwich Supply \7: Tony's 3. 
Mercltants ti Professional 3. 
Porkers 15; Expo's 5. 
Murden's 11; Ott Realty 10. 

UnlimitBdNo. 1 

W L T 

Pork Chop 9 1 1 

Ted's ' B 3 

Mills Elec. "731 

Astros 7 4 

H&M Contract 6 4 1 

North Landing -5 6 

Nail Benders 5 6 

Jaguar 3 7 1 

F.O.P.No. 8 2 9 

Orioles 1 10 

RESULTS 

Pork Chop Farnr U, Ted's 10. 

Astros 11; Jaguars 10. 

Astro* 'MiOriolas 5. 

Nail Bandera IS; t«orth Landing Elec. 12. 

pork Chop 16; H. & M Contracting 10. 

Ted's 11; Jaguars 5. 

Mills Elec; 36: F.O.P. No. ( 4. 

UnlunhBdNo.2 

W L 

E.Caligari 9 2 

Mottiers 9 2 

Burger King 8 3 

Crabbers 8 3 

Bucks 7 4 

C.S.C. 4 7 

Coast Guard 4 7 

Pungo Radio 3 8 

Chlcho's 2 9 

Aragona "A" 1 10 
RESULTS 

Pungo Radio 17: CSC. 2. 
Bucks 16; Coast Guard 9. 
Mothers 14; Chkho's 13. 
E. Callgari 7: Coast Guard 5. 
Mottier's 14; Pungo Radio 6. 
Burger King 17; ChlchO'* 3. 
C.S.C. 7: Aragona "A" 0. 
Buck 22; CraUbers f. 

UnUmited No. 3 



W L 

Larasan 8 3 

Mulkey's 8 3 

C 8i P Telephone 7 3 

ISSI « 4 

Lynnhaven 4 4 

Paradise 4 4 

Howerin 4 7 

Truckers 3 5 

Cool Blues 3 8 

Tiki 2 8 
RESULTS 



RESULTS 

Hot Wheels 20; Travelers 16. 
Newcomers 23; Minute Mans 11. 
Streakers 12; Rookies 5. 
B It H Construction 14: Pembroke Mall 4. 
Minute Mans AAen 2f ; Pembroke Mall 5 



Chufvh A 



L 
0. 
1 
3 

4 
4 
4 

4 



Westwood 5 

Rock Church 4 

First Baptist 3 

Community 3 

Christian 2 

Aragona 2 

Freewill 1 
RESULTS 

Westvwod Hill 13; Aragona Church 6. 
Christian Church 16; Rock Church 12. 
Community Chapel 17; Free Will Baptist 7. 
First Baptist 6: Aragona Church 4. 

Church B 

W L 

London Bridge 5 1 

Thalia Lynn S 3 

St. Gregory's 4 3 

Memorial 3 3 

K.G.Presbyterian 3 3 

Providence Fr. 3 4 

G.N. Baptist 1 7 
RESULTS 

Thalia tynn 22; St. Gregory's ». 
K.G. Presbyterian 7; Great Neck 
Baptist 0. 

St. Gregory's 10; London Bridge. 
Thalia Lynn IS; Provkjence Friends 14. 



Women 



AJ'i 

Streakers 

Snark Sun Flowers 

Tidewater 

ISSI 

Westwood 

RESULTS 



W 
7 
6 
3 
2 
2 
1 



RESULTS 

Cavalettes 12; Mustangs 4. 
Patriots 22: Jolley Rogers 4. 
Chiefs 10; Swingers 4. 
DingA Lings 10; Roundabouts I. 
Roadrunners 7; Eagles 2. 
Swingers 13: Roundabouts I. 
Roadrunners IB; Mustangs 17. 
Eagles 31; Jolly Roger 4. 
Patriots 16; Chiefs I. 
Cavalett II: DingA Ling 1 

PrS'Toen 
GMs No. 2 



w 

Larks 2 

Hustler's 2 

Pilots 2 

Tigers 2 

Larkettes 1 

Chargers 1 

Diamondettes 1 

7 Ups 1 

Rebels 

Queens 

Chicks 

Sluggers 
RESULTS 

Hustler's 13; Chicks 0. 
Tigers 16; Rebels 6. 
Larks 10: LarRettes 3. 
7 Ups 17; Queens 12. 
Pilots 11; Diamondettes 2. 
Tigers 9: Chargers 5. 
Hustlers 10; Queens 6. 
Diamondettes 14; Chicks 4. 



Pn-Teen 
Girls No. 3 



RESULTS 

Cougars l»; Waysidars 3. 
Wipeouts 15; Cutlet i. 
Cuties 23; Waysiden «. 
Wipeouts 6; Cavaliers 3. 
Belles 9: Powder Puffs I. 
strangers 14; Cougars 10. 



W 



Streakers 11: Tidewater Auto 5. 
AJ-s 22; ISSI. Dam Neck 4 
Sun Flowers 16; Westwood Hill 0. 
AJ's 19; Tidewater Auto 5. 
Streakers 12; Westwood Hill Bapt. 0. 
Sun Flowers, 11: ISSI, Dam Neck 4 



Wipeouts 

Belles 

Streakers 

Falcons 

Powder Puffs 

Cuties 

Cougars 

Stranglers 

Cavaliers 

Waysiders 



Pre-Teen 



Girls No. 1 



Patriots 

Roadrunners 

Cavalett 

Ding-A-Llngs 

Swingfrs 

Eagles 

Chiefs 

Mustangs 

Jolly. Roger 

Roundabouts 



W 

2 



ARE YOU GEHING 

LESS THAN 55 " 

MILES PER 

GALLON? 

Honda of Va. Beach 
2970 Va. Beach Blvd. 

When cycles go around ou t front! I 

^ 340-6161 J 



Tiki IS: Larasanli. 
Paradise inn 22: Howerin Sales 13. 
Lynnfiaven Lounge 6; Truckers 5. 
C&P Telapnane 16; Muttey^s I. 
AAutkay's 12: Truckers 11. 
Urasan 24: ISSI, Dam Neck 3. 
Paradise Inn 30; Cool Bluet 12. 
CtiP Telephone 11, Tiki t. 

UnHmNml No. 4 

W L 

My Brothers 10 

Taico 8 3 

Green Run 7 4 

Smith 8i Keene 7 5 

True Value 6 5 

Coastline 5 6 

Chops 4 6 

Sir Buddy's 3 8 

Jaycee's 2 8 

Bunn's Bailers 2 9 
RESULTS 

TaIco 31: Ceatfllnc 12. 
Jayc«« 24; Chops 20. 
,t3rt«i Run 11; True Value I. 
Sir auddyt 20: Bunn«t Bailers 13. 
My Breltitrt 10: SmlNi k Keene 5. 
My arelhefs 11; Jayceet 6. 
Green Run trmtint Bailers 5. 
Coatfllne M; Sir Buddy^ 11. 
Taloo f ; Smith fc Keene t. 
True Value it: Chops 13. 

UnlbnHsd No. S 

W L 

Hot Wheels 9 2 

Streakers • J 

Rummies * ' 

Newcomers * 3 

Rookies S f 

Travelers * f 

Minute Mans. * ' 

B li H Construction 4 < 

Pembroke Mall 3 7 

Corvette Club l" 



■ •WleCeMe 

DAY CAMP 

Boys li Oiris 
Agt6-13 

FORINFORMAIKM^ 

CALL 

629-6328 



HOURS OPEN 

8 AM to 8 PM WEEKDAYS 

8 AM to 6 PM SATURDAYS 

9 AM to 2 PM SUNDAYS 

TIDEWATER AUTO PARTS, INC. 

"Compkte Line of Auto Part$" 

5192 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 



497-4861 



yr 



jl LOOKING FC^ 
A CAREER? ^ 



We need six professional full-tlnrte Real Estate 
Agents, - Desirous of earning minimum $10,000 
to $15,000... 

For Intarriew eall Cklle QuinUnm 
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STOHL REALTY 

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XTirpnia Beech Commuirity M|et Com- 
pany is sponsoring a Skating Party 
June 2Ath 7:00 - 10:00 

PLAZA ROLURraNK 
PdtMcIaflM DoorFriwi 

Tl^ito8eUADoor $lMfmHaom 



^IMIELE FUNERAL HOME 



PrS'Tesn 
GMs No. 4 



Leo's 

Swingers 

Sting Rays 

Demons 

Ladybugs 

Queen Bees 

Top Ten 

Tigers 

Lions 

Squirettes 

Fillies 

Crickets 

RESULTS 

Queen Bees 10; Squirettits t. 
Ladybugs 13: Crickets 12. 
Swingers 19; Lions 4. 
Sting Rays 17: Fillies 1. 
Top Ten 19; Golddiggers 13. 
Lions 23: Ladybugs 2. 
Swingers 10; Fillies 1. 
Tigers 17; Queen Bees 4. 
sting Rays 14; Squirettes 10. 
Demons U; Top Teen 2 
Leo's 2S: Crickets 3. 



W 

2 
2 
2 



RESULTS 

coot a The Gang I; Apaches 3. 
Robins B: Seventy Sixers t. 
Rookies 9; Lions 5. t 
Larks 17; Scorphlans 1. 
Wipeouts 13: Squaws 4. 

Teen Girls 
National 

W L 

Spoilers 1 

Angels 10 

Newligtit 1 

Pungo Pals 1 

Streakers 1 

TNT 1 

Scorplos 1 

Farmers Daugtiters 1 

Quicksteps I 

Waysiders 1 

RESULTS 
Spoilers I: TNT 6. 
Newiight II; Quicksteps S. 
streakers 15; ScorpkM 13. 
Angels 10; Waysiders 9. 
Pungo Pals 19; Farmers Daughters 1. 

Teen Girls 
Continental 



Streakers 

Bullets 

Orioles 

Alley Trasticans 

Cossacks 

Brewers 

RESULTS 
Orioles 9: Cossacks I. 
Alley Trashcans 12: Satilltes I. 
Padres 13; Brewers 2. 
Red's S Streakers 5. 
Orioles 9: Cossacks I. 
Alley Trathckns 12: Satillfet I. 
Padres 13: Brewers 2. 
Red's I; Streakers 5. 

Intermediate 
American 



w 
s 

5 

4 
2 
3 

i 

1 
1 

1 



Teen Girls 
American 



Cool & The Gang 

Rookies 

Wipeouts 

Robirts 

Larks 

Apacties 

Scorpttians 

Seventy-Sixers 

Squaws 

Lions 



w 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






w 

Surfers 1 

Scampers i 

Sluggers t 

Eagles 1 

Pacers l 

All Stars 

Cardinals o 

Robins 

Debutantes 

Royals o 
RESULTS 

Surfers 7; Debutantes 0. 
$luggers 13; Cardinals 3. 
Eagles 20: Royals 0. 
Pacers 12: Robins 4. 
Scampers 6; All Stars 5. 



Teen Boys 



„ , D.S. Padres 
" ' Hed's 



Satilltes 



W 

3 
2 
2 



A'S 

Eagles 

Renegades 

Yanks 

Cardinals 

Mets 

Spurs 

Cubs 

Chiefs 

RESULTS 

Eagles 12; Chiefs 3. 

Yanks 5; Mets 4. 

A'S 17; Cubs 0. 

Cubs 10: Chiefs I. 

A'S 19; Renegades 3. 

Cardinals 4; Mets 5. 

Intermediate 
National 

w 

Merchants 4 

Bulldogs 3 

Giants 3 

Blue Jays 3 

Cardinals 2 

Indians 2 

Mets 2 

Tigers i 

Larks 1 

RESULTS 
Larks 13; Indians 4. 
AAets 19; Cardinals 7. 
Merchants «: Bulldogs 1. 
Giants 14; Cvdinalt 3. 
Indians 12; Merchants I. 
Blue Jays 6: Atets 5. 




I 

i 



BOAT 

OWNER 

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THIS! 




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Off ounoAidje, inboards, 

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An Eeuoi Opportunity Empleyif 



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call US 



Your telephone company is 
spending hundreds of thousands 
of dollars putting cables 
underground to improve the quality 
of the environment around you. 
So, before you dig in, check to be 



certain you won't wind up digging 
into a cable we'll have to repair, 
and you may haye to pay for. If 
you're not sure, call before you 
dig in. 




First Colony 
Telephone Company 

A Menfcer of Contineftol Tebphone Sy^em 




vAige A-8-The Sun-Wednesday, Juw 19, 1974 



TENNIS' Novices gain stature 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Imports Editor 

They were not the greatest tennis players in the 
world, "but quality of play is all relative. The Sears- 
Koebuck junior novice tournamrait made a three- 
day stand at the Princess Anne High School tennis 
courts. The tournament was for players who had 
not reached the quarterfinals in previous tour- 
nament play. 

For the 76 entries the novice tournament drew, it 
was their chance to capture the glory of winning, 
competing against players of equally advanced 
skill. 

Susan Engles was the most impressive tennis 
player in the girls 12 years old and under bracket. 
After being awarded her opening match by default, 
Engles stormed to the tourney title with two con- 
secutive straight set victories. She moved into the 
finals of the bradtet with a strong 6-3, 6-1 semifinal 
(riumph over Cheryl Collicot. Engles captured the 
12 and under title with a 6-1, 6-1 rout of Leslie 
Sonnabend. 

: SONNABEND HAD moved into the finals of the 

" bracket with two consecutive straight set victories. 

' In an opening round match, she defeated Lindsay 

Lawless 6-1, 6-1. Sharon Brown was the next to fall 

to Sonnabend, dropping a semifinal test 6-2, 6-3. 

Tracy Eubank wrapped up the girls 14 years and 
under title with a straight set 6-2, 6-2 final round 
victory over Margaret Joy. Eubank lost only two 
games in route to her title confrontation. She 
dropped Carrie Foote in an opening round contest 6- 
0, 6-1 . Martha Broecker fell by the identical score to 
Eubank in a semifinal match. Broecker had moved 
into the semifinals with an opening round 6-1, 6-0 
triumph over Pattie Gleason. 

Joy was equally impressive before falling in the 
championship match, winning two consecutive 
matcnes in straight sets. Joy dropped only two 
games before her demise in the final round. In the 
opening round, she defeated Teresa Medlin 6-0, 6-1 . 
Joy moved into the finals, defeating Bett) Lake by 
the same count. 

Mary Coughlin took the girls 16 years old and 
under girls novice title, edging Mary Hyatt in a 
hard fought 6-3, 6-3 contest. Coughlin moved into the 
.: title confrontation after two consecutive straight 
set triumphs. In the openir^ round, she defeated 
l^san Sully 6-0, 6-1. Coughlin came out on top in a 
tough semifinal match with Debbie Pavik with a 6- 
1, 7-5 win. 

HYATT WAS strong m her matches leading to 
the finals, posting a 24-7 margin in games won. She 
defeated Debbie Stepp in her opening match 6-2, 6-0. 
Reginal Handel put up a better fight in the 
semifinals against Hyatt before falling 6-3, 6-2. 

Neal Shulwolf erased three opponents in straight 
sets to take the boys 12 and under junior novice 
title. He earned a semifinal berth in the tournament 
with an easy 6-1, 6-3 quarterfinal win over Earl 
Hacklev. Sclnilwolf proceeded to the title. match 





im-m 



FROM VIRGINIk BEACH TERMINAL TO 

RICHMOND 

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SmmOrrwmwt 



with a 6-2, 7-5 triumph over Greg Goodall. He took 
the .title wiUi a 6-2, 6-4 win over Mark Wagner. 

Wagner had moved into the finals with Uiree 
impressive straight set wiitt. He dropped Chris 
VanMetre in the opening rotmd of the tx-acket 6-0, 6- 
2. In the quarterfinals, Wagner turned in the most 
impressive performance in the bracket, shutting 
out Scott Mahnes 6-0, 6^. He earned the right to 
meet Schulwolf in ttie finals with a 6-4, 6-1 semifinal 
triumph over Mike Koppelman. 



TENNIS 
SUMMARY 



David Wheeler captured the boys 14 and under 
title with three consecutive straight set triumphs. 
In the opening round, he dropped Steve Davis in 
easy fashion 6-3, 6^. Wheeler also made ouick wwk 
of his quarterfinal opponent Chris Brocl^er, win- 
ning 6-3, 6-2. He moved into the finals^ with a 6-2, 
6-1 semifinal triumph over Tommy Smy. Wheeler 
took the title by defeating Steve Nodna 6-2, 6-1. 

NOONA HAD a tough route to the finals after a 
bye and a default had moved him into the quar- 
terfinals. He moved into the semifinals (rf the 
bracket with a 7-5, 6-1 victory over Pat Koppleman. 
Noona made it to the finals with a hard-earned 
semifinal win over Milton Beaton. In one of the 
tourneys rare three-set matches, Noona prevailed 
6-2, 4-6, 6-2. 

Will Sherman stm-med to the boys 16 and under 
title with four successive straight set triumphs. 
Sherman advanced to the quarterfinals with a 6-3, 
6-0 second round win over John Kaiser. In his next 
match, Sherman got stronger defeating Yves 
Pollart6-l, 6-1. He moved into the title round with a 
6^). 6-2 win over Ronald Maratea. Sherman cap- 
tured the tourney title with a 6-2, 6-1 final round 
victory over Jimmy DiNardo. 

DiNardo had moved into the final round by 
virtue of two straight set victories and a default. He 
defeated Danny Law 6-0, 6-1 in a second round 
match. DiNardo advanced into the title match with 
a 7-5. 6-1 win over Aaron Carey after a default had 
moved him into the semifinals. 

In ^ sparse gathering of 18 and under boys, 
Norvell Scott prevailed. The bracket drew only four 
competitors. Scott moved into the finals with a 7-5, 
6-4 win over David Hatch. He took the title with a 
straight set 6-2, 6-0 win over Neal Ward. 



Girb 12 and under 

QUARTERFINALS 

Susan Engles d. Jennifer Sne«i by defaidt. 

Cheryl Colliottt d. Laura Muoben-y, 6-1, e- 

i). 

Leslie Sonnabend d. Uncbay Lawless. 6-1, 

6-1. * 

SEMIFINALS 

Susan Engles d. Cheryl CoUicott, 6-1, 64. 
Leslie Sonnabend d. ^ron Brown. 6-2, 6- 
3. 

FINALS 

Susan Engles d. Leslie Sonnabend, 6-1, 6-1. 

Giris 14 and under 

QUARTERFINALS 

Margaret Joy d. Teresa Melin, 64i, 6-1. 
Beth Lake d. Amber Clark, 74, 7-5. 
Martha Broecker d. Pattie Gleason, 6-1, 6-0. 
Tracy Eubank d. Carrie Foote, M, 6-1. 

SEMIFINALS 

Margaret Joy d.,Beth Lake, 6-0, 6-1. 
Tracy Eubank d. Martha Broecker, 6-0, 6- 
1. 

FINALS 

Tracy Eubank d. Margaret Joy, 6-2, 6-2. 

Giris IS and under 

QUARTERFINALS 

Mary Coughlin d. Susan Sully, 6-1, 6-0. 

Debbie Pavik d. Nancy Cooper by d^ault. 

Regina Handel d. Rena Coughlin, 6-3, 5-7, 

7-5. 

Mary Hyatt d. Debbie Stqpp, 6-2, M. 

SEMIFINALS 

Mary Coughlin d. Debbie Pavik, 6-1, 7-6. 
Mary Hyatt d. Regina Handel, 6-3, 6-2. 



FINALS 

Mary Cou|^ilin d. Mary Hyatt, 6-3, 6-3. 

Boys 12 end under 

FIRST ROUND 

Mark Wagner d. Oiris VanMetre, 8-0, 6-2. 
Earl Hackley d. Martin Olson, 7-5, 1-6, 7-5. 

QUARTERFINALS 

Mike Koi^lman d. David Forman, 6-1, 6- 

3. 

Mark Wagner d. Scott Mahnes, 6-0, 6-0. 

Neal Schulwolf d. Earl Hackley, 6-1, 6-3. 

Greg Goodall d. Bobby Schwartz, 2-6, 6-1, 

6-0. 

SEMIFINALS 

Mark Wagner d. Mike Koppelman, 6-1, 6-3. 
Neal Schulwolf d. Greg Goodall, 6-2, 7-5. 

FINALS 

Neal Schulwolf d. Mark Wagner, 6-2, 64. 

Boys 14 end under 

FIRST ROUND 

Austin Owen d. Casey Gillett, 6-0^ 6-2. 

Pat Koppelman d. Mark Haffenden, 6-0, 6- 

0. 

David Waddell d. Mark Seim, 6-1, 6-1. 

Chip Broecker d. Adam Warner, 7-5, 2-6, 6- 

2. 

SECOND ROUND 

D. J. Walters d. Mike Mitchell, 6-3, 6-4. 
Milton Beaton d. Richard Becker, 6-1, 6-3. 
Steve Noona d. Steve Ryan by default. 
Pat Koppelman d. Austin Owen, 6-2, 6-1. 
Chip Broecker d. David Waddell, 6-2, 6-4. 
David Wheeler d. Steve Davis, 6-3, M. 
Tommy Sully d. Jeff Mencini, 64, 74. 
Greg Wetz d. Bob Mahin by default. 

QUARTERFINALS 



Steve Noona d. Pat Koppelman, 7-5, 6-1. 
David Wheeler d. Chip Broecker, 6-3, 6-2. 
Tommy Sully d. Gred WerU by default. 

SEMIFINALS 

Steve Noona d. Milton Beaton, 6-2, 44, 6-2. 
David Wheeler d. Tommy Sully, 6-2, 6-1. 

FINALS 

David Wheeler d. Steve Noona, 6-2, 6-1, 

Boys iB end under 

FIRST ROUND 

Jim DiNardo d. Danny Law, 6-0, 6-1. 

Corcoran Tyson d. John Padgett, 6-2, 64. 

Scott Sagester d. Dwight Newton by 

default. 

Aaron Carey d. Issac Bateman, 6-2, 64. 

Corey Clark d. Allan Mahanes, 6-3|, 6-2. 

Ronald Maratea d. James Stein^e, 6-2, 6- 

4. 

Will Sherman d. Jcrfm Kaiser, 6-3, 6-0. 

Yves Follart d. Gary Sonnabend, 64, 64. 

QUARTERFINALS 

Jim DiNardo d. Corcoran Tyson by 

default. 

Aaron Carey d. Scott Sagester by default. 

Ronald Maratea d. Cory Clark, 5-7, 64, 6-3. 

Will Sherman d. Yves Pollart, 6-1, 6-1. 

SEMIFINALS 

Jim DiNardo d. Aaron Carey, 7-5, 6-1. 
Will Sherman d. Ronald Maratea, 64, 6-2. 

FINALS 

Will Shennan d. Jim DiNardo, 6-2, 6-1. 

Boys 18 ahd under 

SEMIFINALS 

Neal Ward d. Paul Powers by default. 
Norvell Scott d. David Hatch, 7-5, 64. 

FINALS 



Milton Beaton d. D. J. Walters, 6-2, 6-1. Norvell Scott d. Neal Ward, 6-2, 64. 




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Band students in Beach for festival 



They're here. Some 3,280 high school band 
students ai% in Vii^inia Beach this week for 
the 1974 Vii^inia Beach Music Fratival. 

The festival, which began Mmiday, will run 
through Thursday. The Princess Anne High 
Schod Marching Cavaliers are hosting the 
festival which features 19 high schod bands 
from nine states. The Fort Hunt High School 
Band from Alexandria, winner of the 1973 
festival competition, is Uie honor band f (x* this 
year's f^tival. (Virginia Beach bands are not 



eligible for the competition.) 

Concerts by each of the competing bands 
continue this morning at the Virginia Beach 
avic CNitor. Tlie concert series is open to the 
pidblic free of charge. Tlie festival, which 
began with a Grand Fietttval parade dowti 
Atlantic avenue Monday, will end with 
marching exhibitions and competitions 
Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Cox High School 
football stadium. 



FOLLOWING the precision drills, including 
drum major and majorette perfOTmaces, the 
bands wUl form a l,61Si>iece band to present a 
concert-in-mass for the audience. 

The prc^ram will include "Anchors 
Aweigh," "King Cotton," "His Honor," 
Sousa's "National Anthem" and Voder's 
"Virginia Beach." The show is also open to the 
public free of charge. 

Thursday's closing ceremonies will feature 
the presentation of the festival awards. 



Troidiies will be presented after the marchii^ 
competition. The winner of the 1974 cmtest 
automatically becomes the honor band for 
next year's festival. 

Judges fw thte year's contest are Al 6. 
Wright, W. J. Julian, Roy V. Wood and 
William F. Swor. Awards will be presented for 
best drum major and majorette, best in show 
and oUier band competition categories. 

Charles H. Forbes is the chairman of the 
1974 festival. 



sun DIM 



Summer 
sounds 



*^ 



'New' Civic Symphony 
led by Walter Noona 
readies first concert 
showing style change 



Members of the Virginia Beach Civic Symphony 
are tuning up for their first performance under 
new conductor Walter Noona Saturday and Sunday 
at Plaza Junior Wgh School. 

Entitled the "Summer Solstice Concert" (since 
the concert dates fall just after June 21, which is 
one of the^ year's two solstice holidays), the sym- 
phony is looking for a new public image with this 
performance. The orchestra has undergone a 
"weeding out" and style change since Mr. Noona 
took over conducting duties a couple of months ago. 
The group is working to pick up new area talent, 
particidarly musicians for the string section, to 
round out their symphonic sound. Some 12 
musicians have been added to ttie orchestra since 
Mr., Noona joined the group making orchestra 
membership total about 50 persons. 

With a variety of new and challenging music for 
the swnmer concert, the orchestra hopes to (and 




HffcStylcs 



§1$ B 




Veteran pair highlight 
'Bye Bye Birdie' cast 



nee^ to financially) attract a packed house for 
both music performances this week. Where the 
p-oup traditionally has been known for a "brassy" 
sound, they are wwking to improve their quality of 
music, as well as their playing abilities. ^ 

"WE'VK GOT a lot of the same people (in the 
orchestra ) , but it's an entirely different ballgame," 
says Dr. Milton Saunders, president of the sym- 
phonic organization. "The group is playing a better 
quality of music, and their sound is really shaping 
up. 

Probably Uie most challenging piece of muac 
the concert will offer is "Pilgrims and Pioneers" by 
Virgil Thompson. The selection has a variety of 
musical sounds, from bluegrass to classical and 
was the background music for a special America 
series television program. 

Two works by composer Aaron Copeland will 
also be on the pr<^am. The orchesh-a will perform 
"Fanfare for Common Man," and "Hoe-down" 
from "Rodeo." 

lilROY ANDERSON'S "The Typewriter," a 
light musical piece, will feature Frank Ferrigno, 
symr*ony founder and former president, on stage 
as "the typist."' 

The symphony will also present "The Enter- 
tainer," Scott Joplin's rec«it hit theme from the 
movie "The Sting." Other music for the concert 
includes Franz Shubert's "Unfinished Sym|rtiony," 
'Holiday for Strings" by David Rose and 
"Gitanerias" by Hugo Montenegro. 

The "Summer Solstice Concert" may be hrard 
at 8:15 p.m Saturday and 3:15 p.m. Sunday at 
Plaza Junior High on South Lynnhaven Road. 
Tickets are $3 for adults and $1 for chiklren. A 
family ticket; priced at $7, will admit an entire 
family, regardless of the mimber of chiklren. 
Tickets may be pin-chased from sym|rfMM»y 
members or at the door. 



During one of the rehearsals for the "Summed 
Solstice Concert" vioUnist WlUiam AUes 
(Mi) coBcmtratcs on the music. Mike Smith 
(above), wi the bass, is a new addUion to tlw 
avic Symphony mnsiclans. (ftm photos by 
Linda Milter) 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

When the lights go up on the Virginia Beach Little 
Theatre pro<kiction of "Bye Bye Birdie" Friday, 
two former theatre professionals will be among the 
cast for the musical comedy. 

Hank and Enid Clarke, who retired from theatre 
life some 16 years ago to raise their family, will 
appear on the Beach stage for the first time. They 
are cast as Mr. and Mrs. MacAfee, the parents of a 
teenage girl who worships singer Conrad Birdie. 
(The show is a spoof on the teenage idol-worship of 
singer 'Elvis Presley.) 

Though they've appeared on stages throughout 
the U.S. and Europe, acting at the Virginia Beach 
Little Theatre will be a new experience for the 
Clarkes. For one thing, the Little Theatre will be 
one of the smallest theatre stages on which the two 
have performed. Hank, however, says some of the 
theatres-in-the-round where he acted were about 
the same size. 

"IT WILL be a novel experience almost playing 
in the audience's lap," says Enid. "It's (the Little 
Theatre stage) more challenging though than a 
large theatre stage because you ^on't have the 
surroundings and curtains to help you out. There's 
more of a challenge to create the allusion." 

The Clarkes sang and acted their way across the 
country in various touring shows, as well as per- 
forming in summer stock during the 50s. The 
theatre is where the two met and decided to marry. 

Hank originated the role of Jud in the musical 
"Oklahoma" in London. Enid was a member (rf the 
chorus for the show. She stepped into the lead role 
of Laurey when actress Shirley Jones left the acting 
company and her understudy became ill. The two 
appeared In nearly 2,000 performances of 
•Oklahoma" In theU.S. and Europe. 

BOTH HANK and Enid got the acting "bug" at an 
early age. Each appeared in plays during junior 
high, high school and college. 

Whether it was "Carousel," "One Touch of 
Venice," "Oklahoma," "Time Limit" ot another 
play, the Clarks loved the theatre, but both were 
determined that their children weren't going to be 
"brought up out of a suitcase." 

The Clarkes left the Theatre scene in the late 508. 
Hank had been working with a New York-based 
securities and life insurance company while he was 
still acting and remained with the firm when he left 
the theatre world. The Qarkes moved to the Beach 
about 10 years ago. Hank is now a trust officer with 
the United Bank of Virginia. Enid teaches music to 
children ages 3 to 5 at the Parish Day School at 
Eastern Shore Chapel, as well as bdng a tennis 
instructor. Both sing with the Virginia Beach Civic 
ChoriB. 

BoUj have been too busy with family and woris to 
think about returning to the theatre until now. 

"THE CHILDREN are older now," says Enid. 
"And now that summer is here, we thought we'd 
have the time to grt involved again." 

Their daughter Tauni, who recently was grad- 
uated from KeUam High School, plays the flute 
in the wchestra for the Little TheaU-e show. S<m 
Brett is a junior at the University of Miami. Though 
both cWWren are musically inclined, their parents 
don't expect th«n to foUow in their footsteps. 

Tl» Clarkes are both lodcing forward to the Little 
Theatre e)q>erience. Neither Hank nor Enid have 
ambitions to reUirn to the theatre professionally — 
at least not at the present time. Hank says he has 
thought about taking to the stage when he retires. 

Tho*^ the two are veterans «rf the stage, the 
roles in "Bye Bye Birdie" are not familiar. Hank 
says he has jeen neithw- the movie version nw the 



Spring in the park is the real tiiiflg 



f 



We wait to the park last Sunday in search of 
six-ing and we found it— «la4 with a few othor 
things. 

tt's a big-city park, with rai«er-like guid^ to 
save you If you take a wrmg turn and cant And 
your way from kw area to jHcnlc grouncte. We to* 
a wrtM^ turn. 

"How can we get to the q>ot with ^-ass and a 
Irook?" adced my husband of a tall, Monde ywmg 
man win loflk^ faintty like Netocm Eckly. It must 
have been the bat. 

HE TOLD m to bear ri^t at all tirora. We (ttd as 
he said and found brook, grass, h-ees and bold blue 
jays waitii^ to see what our pkaiu: teii4)er hM. 

"iMi't tMs grMt? " I i^G^, teowlag ow iM 
bedqpread down tor vm Wmt on. "Look in ttw 
Wook. I ttBBk tlttfs watw-cress ^owii* there!" 

My s(Mi irapectiog the buiin of the brook, but not 

tor watercr^s, * 

**U tite tUi« man-nwde?" he ari^. 




Ctearly, the wwkIcts <rf Diwieyland had made 
him suipicNus of the wowters of nature. I took a 
cloeer kick myaeV. It was man-made. But I awffed 
the boy thtf the Unto wm% real and that it was 
indeed watocreM. Ife wamto«d <M. 

MINlfTES later, he ran br^thtenly up on- 
p-aisy k^ and pntod. "Ci^ on! You'w 0it to 



see this..." A patch <rf wild flowers? A bird's nrat 
full of ^gs? No. 

"ThH-e's a ^y getting busted over tl«*," said 
my SOI. "Hifl-ry, or you'll miss the handcu^ii^." 

BACK ON the bed^H^ad, we ate our picnic lunch 
and th«i lay on war backs to look up thro^ the 
trera and listen to the sounds of ^ng in tt« big- 
city park. Binte, traffic in the distance, movement 
erf real water In a man-made brook, and a little 
girls voice asking l»r mother, "M(Wimy, what's 
•gay? " She had wen the "Gay Help-Une" postw 
pasted to the ta^rii barrel. 

Wetfayed untUthe evening iN^^ze blew an wnpty 
poUto chip bi« and a few leav^ ov& oar te^ TliaJ 
we headed tot the car with one look toA. 

In the dusk, the brook look^ natural. A lone 
bladcbird strutted acreas the grara and fbted us 
with a wtee. yeUow ^e. I wWi him and the watw- 
a«H a hqW s^m 



play. (Paul Lynde portrayed Mr. MacAfee In the 
movie version.) Both of. the Clarkes will, however, 
feel at home on stage. 

"IT'S LIKE swimming," says Hank. "You never 
really forget It. You may forget some of the fine 
points, but It all comes back naturally." 

But, just because they're veterans doesn't mean 
that they won't feel a little stage fright right along 
with the rest of the Beach cast. 

"1 never envy anyone who doesn't get a little 
stage fright. You need It to get keyed up," says 
Enid. '^ 

"If you didn't get a little stage fright, you'd lose 
your edge," says Hank. "You always get that little 
knot In your stomach." 

Few of the members of the Beach cast know the 
background of their co-actors. 

"WHEN WE came to the auditions, one fellow 
asked me if this was our first show at the Little 
Theatre," says Hank. "I sald,'ye8, 1 thought we'd 
take a crack at It.' He said I think you'll like being 
In the Little Theatre." 

"Bye Bye Birdie" has a large cast. The show is 
under the direction of Faye Whitlock with Jean 
Washburn as assistant director. 

Earl Vowell is cast as the singer Conrad Birdie. 
Anna Marie Smith plays the MacAfee's daughter 
Kim. Other princlpalain the cast are fidUe SnUtli 
(Albert), Zoe Wages (Rose), Ann Penlngton (Mae 
Peterson) and Tripp March (Hugo). 



The musical will run Friday and Saturday June 
26-29 and July 3-6. There will be no performance 
July 4. Curtain time is 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 for 
adults and $1.50 for students and the military. 
Reservations may be made by calling the theatre at 
428-«523. 




ENID AND HANK Clarke return to the ttexe 
— and the hourt (rf rehearaab — in the 
production of "ByCiBye Birdie" which opens 
Friday at the Uttte theatre of Vta-gtaiia Beach. 
(Son photo by Linda Miller) 




B-2-The Sim-Wednetday. June 19, 1974 



FOOD 



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WINE SAUCE 

m to 2 pounds fish fillets 

1 tablespoot\ polyunsatu- 
rated oU 

% cup iHdte wine 

^ teaspoon salt 

V4 tea^Mxai pepper 

% teaqwon garlic powder 
(optional) 

IVt tableepoons polyunsat^ 
uratedofl 

IVt tablespoons Sow 

Paprika 

Oil a shallow baking pan. 
Place the flltets in a large 
bowl ami add a mixture con- 
sisting of white wine, salt, 



r 



(AdyettimnenO 



FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

B) PAUL ROMAN 

To prevent breaking, 
slice hard-boiled eggs 
with a wet knife. 



pepper and garlic powder. 
Marinate for 15 minutes to a 
half hour, place ttie fiOete 
with ttie marinade in baking 
pan an4 bake about 25 min- 
utes at 350 degrees. In the 
meantime dake Sour in ^ 
cup of the marinade and oil, 
heat in a ddDet, stir until 
smooth paste forms. Mix and 
heat slowly uitU it diickens. 
Spoon the sauce over the fi^ 
and serve with dusting 
paprika. Serves fow to six. 



EASY SCALLOPED 
POTATtMBS 

2% pounds potatoes 
2 onions 

Vt cup non-fat dry milk 
solids 

V4 cup polyunsaturated oil 
Salt 
Pepper 

Slice potatoes and onions in 
V4-iDch thidmess. Place in 
large saucepan and cook 
about lOminutes. Drain water 
from potatoes and place liquid 
in blendo- (bring amount up 



to at least tluree cq»); Add 
nonfat milk solids, oil, aatt, 
pepper, and Mend IS secmds. 
Place potatoes and onions in 
ml baking pan and pour on liq- 
uid. Bake idMwt 40 miputes at 
3^ d^Srees. Servea ib. 



MACEDOINE 
OFFMJIT 



1 envelope (1 tablespoon) 
unflavored gdatin 

lV4CUp8Wlto' 

m cupa onmge jidce 
V^cupsugu* 

2 cups cut fresh fruit 
(grapes, oranges, ba- 
nanas, pears, peaches, 
melon balls) 

Soften the gdatin in V4 cup 
of die water. Heat the remain- 
ii« one civ water; add the 
gelatin and stir until thor- 
ou^y diasfdved. 

Stir in ttie orange Juice and 
nigar. CSiill until syrupy. Fdd 
in the fruit and turn into a one- 
quart moU or lix individual 
molds. ChiU until firm and un- 
mdd. Serves six. 



YOU CAN WIN 

A $25. Savings Bond 
(lit Prixi) 

Dinner For Two At 
The Circle C 

(2nd PrU«) 

SEND YOUR COOKING 
HINTS TO QRCLE C, 
400 LASKIN RD., VA. 
BEACH, VA. 23451 



FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
UkAL - SPECIAUZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
TRY THE 




YES - 

I JUST GOT 
ENGAGED !! 

then plan your 
wedding at our 
party. 

Loads of free gifts, helpful 
advice from the professionals 
& just plain fun. 

Call now 464-4784 
or mail in the following: 



FOR THE FUTURE 

BLOOD DONORS are nee(ted 
to give Mood when the Red 
Cross BIoodm(AUe visits the 
United Virginia Bank building 
today from 10 a.m. -3 p.m. The 
bloodmoiHle will be on the first 
floor of the bank in the gallery, 
No. 5 Main Plaza East, Norfolk. 

CHiLDREN'8 films at the 
Virginia Beacli branch public 
library today at 10 a m . and 7 : 30 
p.m. are "Madeline," "Casey at 
the Bat" and "Perils of 
Priscilla." 

BIKK SAFETY will be the 
topic of an all-day conference 
today at the Commodore 
Country Club, 5600 Southern 
Blvd. Registration begins at 9 
a.m. The conference will cover 
all aspects of bicycle safety and 
is open to the public. 

CHILDREN'S films offered 
Thursday at 4 p.m. and Friday 
at 10 and 11 a.m. at the Kemp^ 
viile branch public library are 
"Cat and the Fiddler" and "Ali 
Baba." 

"BYK BYE Birdie" opens 
Friday at the Little Theatre of 
Virginia Beach, 24th Street and 
Barberton Drive. Per- 
formances are this Friday and 
Saturday, plus Wednesday 
through Saturday in late June 
and early July (no performance 
July 4). Call 428-9523 for ticket 
information and reservations. 

STATISTICS and how to use 
them will be explwed in a 
conference Friday from 9 a.m.- 
4 p.m. at Old Dominion 




DOITYOURSOfl 

"SliAMT'CLEAN VeXJR 

CAWE1S«k 

mi PROffESSIONAL WAY 

Rent the fantaatic new UP & 
OUT* Hydro-Mist macUTne 
for all your carpet ~ 
cleaning. Effectively 
looMns and removes 
dirt, previous sham- 
poo residue and up 
to 90% <A the mois- 
ture in just one step! 




University. The conference will 
explain how to use new in- 
formation available from the 
1972 economic census. 
Registration information may 
be obtained from the 
Southeastern Virginia Planning 
District Commission, 622-5301. 

"SUMMER Sdlstice Con- 
cert," a performance of the 
Virginia Beach Civic Sym- 
phony, will be Saturday (8:15 
p.m.) and Sunday (3:15 p.m. )at 
Plaza Junior High School. 
Tickets are $1 for children, $3 
for adults and $7 for families, 
availaUe at the door or from 
symphony members. 

AMATEUR RADIO buffs wiU 
participate in a field day test oi 
emergency radio com- 
munications Saturday and 
Sunday at Mt. Trashmore. The 
public is invited to observe the 
annual tests, sponsored by the 
American Radio Relay League. 
Members of the Virghiia Beach 
Amateur Radio Club will 
participate. More information 
may be obtained from Bill 
Ballew (481-6478) or Paul 
Pawlowski (486-1327). 

ASTROLOGER Isabel Hickey 
will conduct a workshop 
Saturday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at 
the Atlantic Permanent Savings 
and Loan Association twilding, 
944 Independence Blvd. Her 
workshop is sponsored by the 
Virginia Astrological 
Association. Call 464-5825, 428- 
0155 or 340-5708 for more in- 
formation. 

FILMS for children Saturday 
at 11 a.m. at the Windsor Woods 
branch library are "Circus 
Memories" and "Wind in the 

Willows." 

SENIOR CITIZENS are in- 
vited to learn more about the 
new federal Supplemental 
Security Income program 
Sunday from 1-4 p.m. at four 
Virginia Beach churches: 
Westwood Hill Baptist Church 
(Providence and Woodstock 
Roads), Princess Anne Plaz^ 
United Methodist Church (20BS. 
Plaza Trail), Nimmo United 
Methodist Church (Princess 
Anne Road and Oceana 
Boulevard) and Bayside Baptist 
Church (1920 Pleasure House 
Road). 



AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL 
4 HOUR— 8 HOUR— 
OR OVERNIGHT BASIS 



382S Bonney Rd. 

(Locstfd Near Moore's 

BU^ Supply) 

340-0908 



BOYS are invited to join the 
Tidewater Girl Scout Day Camp 
beginning Monday. This is the 
first time boys (in grattes seven, 
eight and nine) haVt been in- 
vited to participate. Infor- 
mation on cost and registration 
may be obtained by calling the 
Girl Scout Council office, 622- 
1871. 

SUMMER CAMP for boys 
and girls ages 6-13 begins 
Monday on the campus of 
Virginia Wesleyan College, 
sponspred by the Norfolk 
YMCA. Four two-wedt sessions 
run until Aug. 16. Bus irick-ups 
will be provided from 15 
Virginia Beach kxations. Call 
the YMCA at 622-6328 for ad- 
ditional informatton. 

CAMP DARDEN In Sedley, 
Va., has openings for girls in 
fourth grade or older. The 12- 
day srasion begins June 24. Call 
the Girl Scout Council of 
Greater Tidewater, 622-1871, for 
additional information. 

CRAFTS will again be offered 
for sale at the Sugar Plum Tree 
sponsored by the Cape Henry 
Woman's Club. This year's 
"tree" shop will be at 34th 
Street and Atlantic Avenue (the 
old Smith and Wellon store) 
from Monday through July 5. 
. Senior citizens offer crafts for 
sale at the shop and receive 100 
per cent of all selling |H-ices. 

"WHAT THE BUTLER 

SAW" is- presented by the 
Chrysler Museum Actors' 
Theatre June 28-July 20 at the 
Chrysler Museum, Olney Road 
and Mowbray Arch, Norfolk. 
Reservations and ticket in- 
formation may be obtained 
from the museum, 622-1211. 

BLOOD DONORS are needed 
*o give blood July 1 , 3 and 5 from 
10 a.m.-4 p.m. in a drive 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce 
to assist the Tidewater Red 
Cross. IDonors may go to Wickes 
Furniture activities room, 4815 
Virginia Beach Blvd., on any of 
the three days. 

DANCE instruction will be 
offered for five v/etks this 
summertieginning July 1 by Old 
Dominion University's Com- 
munity Ballet program. 



Programs are planned for 
children and adults, both male 
and female, on the elementary, 
intermediate and advanced 
levels. Call Lew Drarickson, 
director, ODU Bounty 
Program, 488-6291, for more 
information. 

UFO mysteries will be ex- 
plored at the Virginia Beach 
City Schools Planetarium at 
Plaza Junior High School 
during July. Programs are 
offered at 7 p.m. each Sunday 
and Tuesday. Admission is free. 
Call 486-1971 for reservations. 

HANDICAPPED children are 
invited to the fourth annual 
Helping Hands Day Camp July 
8-19 at Kingston Elementary 
School. No fee is charged. More 
information may be obtained by 
calling 428-8975. 

FOR THE RECORD 

A BIRTHDAY PARTY for the 

"grandmother" of the Ladies 
Auxiliary to the Davis Corner 
Volunteer Fire Department was 
held recently at the Medic-home 
Health Center. The ladies 



auxiliary "adopted" one <rf th^ 
patients as their grantknother. 
All patienU at the home werl 
invited to attend the party. ^ 

CAMPFIRE building wai 
demonstrated atCubScoutPa* 
434*8 recent meeting. Bemarp 
Bersano graduated into B<» 
Scout Troop,^, and Micha« 
Fritz was inducted as a new 
Bobcat. David Sape advanced 
to Wolf. Badges went to Ke^' 
neth Moyer, Douglas O'NeiK 
Donny Tackett and Donalf 
CoUison. 

AN ACCOUNTING awarfl 
given in memory of the late Dr. 
Lawrence A. Allen, Kee| 
Business College professor, was 
presented to Betty Kaye 
Haverty, 1972 honor graduate of 
Bayside High School, during ti^ 
college's commencemeirt 
ceremonies recently at Holida^ 
Inn Scope. j; 

Item may be mbmitted toSm 
bid by nudl Meae nua your not 
ke to Sun Did, Vii^nia Beach Sui 
138 Rosemont Road, yirgfnia BeaA 
Va. 23451 Deadliiw is noon /W 
day prior to the week of pubm 
ation. ' 



Artshowset 
forboanlwalk 

Prizes totaling $3,500 will be handed out during the 19th 
annual Boardwalk Art Show, June 27 through July 1. 

Approximately 500 artists from more than 25 states and 
Canada will display their works from 10a.m. - 6 p.m. daily 
«n the boardwalk between 10th and 20th Streets. 

Reservations for space at the show have been filled for 
some lime. It is sponsored annually by the Virginia Beach 
Arts Center. 

All paintings and other art works at the show will be 
offered for sale to the public. Last year's show netted 
more than $116,000. 

Churches present 
income program 




Senior citizens who would Kke 
to know more about the federal 
Supplemental Security Income 
(SSI) program are invited to 
participate in "SSI Alert 
Sunday" at four churches in 
Virginia Beach Sunday from 1-4 
p.m. 

The new SSI program, begun 
in January of this year, 
replaces federal and state 
programs of public assistance 
payments to persons who are 
blind, disabled or age 65 and 
older. 

The programs will be 



presented at four churches 
Sunday: ; 

Westwood Hill Baptist 
Church, Providence ai^ 
Woodstock Roads in the 
Kempsville area; Princ 
Anne Plaza United Methodii 
Church, 208 S. Plaza Trail in the 
Plaza-Holland-Little Neck 
area; Nimmo United Methodic 
Church, Princess Anne Road 
and Oceana Boulevard in ^ 
Courthouse-Sandbridge area, 
and Bayside Baptist Church, 
1920 Pleasure House Road in the 
Bayside area. 



Cii^xOH 



■ COUPON SAVING ■ 

[ Htra if your chance to get that ring you have been j 

I wantingll 10% OFF on ail finish rings with this I 

I coupon! Coupon good only June 19 tfiru 26 | 



Pacific South could be 
your home address this suitimei: 



Lots of people are buying beach 
condonunium homes. 

But only a very few^, very smart 
people will actually be living in 
their new homes this summer. 
You a>uld be one of them.^- 

And you could be spending 
less. Because Pacific South 
offers unlimited luxury at the 
lowest cost per square foot of 
living space. Check prices. You 
won't be able to duplicate the 
S31 ,900 to $54,780 pri(% range 
•vsflable at Pacific South. 

tbmk about it. Better still, 
OHne 8^ the condominium homes 
omiidete and iMdy for yaat 



inspection at Pacific South. 
Check room wzes. Compare floor 
plans. Marvel at the view from 
oceanfront picture windows. 

But don't wait too long. Three 
out of four of all our home unifi^ 
already belong to someone. 

eClFC SOUTH 

5th and Pacific Avenues 
Virginia Bmch 

Sales c^ces and model units 
open on psemisM. 

BvcfyDqr 
10aM.to6pA. 



aiy- 



Zip. 



O R^ BW jsw In* bndM* <M ftciflc Ssulh 

a n«M hHV a raoSc 4aA ^Hrt ed ■■ at IW« Maohar: 



NC. 



Cumnm Umdm k AMoctrtet 



SltLaridBtad 



!« ■ ■■»■«»»■»»■■« ■ ■ 



H 23451 



n** 




Ht \l IN S\l ONS 



Shampoo S S«i - ■ F'om $3.45 

Complat* Permonem Wovw .u.. ..$6.95 to $19.95 

Roux Fonci-Ton* Touch-up Ffom $5,00 

Roux Frosting (Shompoo A Set Extro) $12.50 

Haircut .$2.75;{Long Hoir $3.50) 

No Appointment Necessary - Just Come In 



HILLTOP 
DAILY -8 'TIL 6:30 



Hilltop Pl*z« Shopping Canter 
uskln Rd. Next to Safawiy 
Phorte: 42S-9t97 
Va. Beach 



DAILY -9 'TIL 6 
THURS.-9'TIL9 



Silt Va. Baach Blvd. 
Acroi* from GEX 
l>l«ona: 497-9769 
Va. Beach 



1734 E. 
Uttle creek Rd.^ 
Next to Zayras ' 
Phonei SS8-9093 
Norfolk '* 



mp 



Temple Of Music 



dhaU 0f S£me . . . 



J«at a fleeting monMit in the hu^t and iNistle of the rec^tion, but 
captured forever in the champ^M j^aii. C(4or tlM mood pink, tx Uue, 
or forever wt^om. For dioae wpv^ mcMiMiiti you want to last fore^wr, 
Ae dMrUied memcxi^ of yow wedding wOl Mtrer f«le when you have 
pr<tfeanonal photographs of thoae qMdid imMMnts by Torres. To have 
dM belt ... need not be expei^e. 

4221 Virgiflii Bsidi BM. itjhilii ■ PhoM 486-5416 



ePCMMOKI: 
499-0551 



• JANAF 
CENTER 
853-4536 



• CHURCHIAND 

CENTER 

.484-1385 



Attention, Parents 








TmvI* of Muric't 
School land Irotnamtiil 

KOmai rNHI 

vWi vfnM^ ie wy 

H yowr cMd tokn hand tfm tafm, you con rent o rj 
new »r med truni^, cornet, doraitl, troiiAone, fMe. mxo- ' 
plwM, sieKn or ptrews»on Utier (iitf pwiniti e day for 3 
men**. e«d ol peymwiN w« oprtr H yow ^idt to buy! 

^ Ow^y inrtfwwenii v In ^pf4 «^^ rtwyto' « J 
plienc y«ir nmwi T«M* •< I*'** «»«* r«tf*t jwrj 
NOW? OWI G»T TO ttW . . . Tour FIRST RAW) rf«TRtJC. 
TION ROOK n WEI when you rwt from TEMHE Of AftUSiC 



I 



^^■^■^^■■■MHfli 



■■^■■■■■■■■1 



w^m 



H^i"^ 



1 




The Sun-Wednesday, June 19, 1974-Page B-3 










I 



i 



I 






The world's 
foremost 



authority 



He's billed as "the world's 
foremost Bible authority" — 
Bishops. McDowell Shelton, 
apostle and general 
overseer of the Church of 
the Lord Jesus Christ of the 
Apostolic Faith. When he 
carried his message to 
Norfolk's Chrysler Hall 
June 9, his local followers, 
some 500 strong, gathered to 
hear their spritual leader. 

Most of the women 
dressed in all white, 
according to church custom 
vWien celebrating a special 
occasion. That Sunday was 
''^"Bishop's Day." Members 
of the flock carried Brownie 
Instamatics and portable 
recorders to, preserve the 
memwies of the Bishop's 
visit. 

After the choir delivered 
soulful, foot-tapping music. 
Bishop Shelton entered, 
waved to his airiience and 
knelt in prayer. His sefMon 
urged believe- 3 TO turn from 
their "carnal minds to 
inward spiritualness." 

When the message was 
comj^eted, the congregation 
filed one-by-orte past the 
Bishop's Basket, dropping 
in letters, cards and dollar 
bills. His eyes hidden behind 
sunglasses, the Bishop 
smiled at his flo<*, whise 
faces reflected their rapture 
at having seen him. 



Sun photos 

and text 

by Nmal Skns 



Revival brings 
guestspeakers 



THE TOO 
CUIB 



/rJ^i 



First Colonial Baptist 
Church is putting up a tent 
and spreading the word that 
a two-week inter- 
denominational revival will 
begin Monday. 

The tent is going up in the 
Hilltq) area south of the 
Virginia Steak House on 
First Colonial Road to house 
guest speakers, singers and 
musicians who will visit 
through July 5. 

The husband and wife 
singing duo of Eric and 
Rosalinde Aucoin will sing 
Tuesday night. Mr. Aucoin 
is director of radio ministry 
of the Christian 
Broadcasting Network. 

"Brother Pat" Robertson, 
president of the Christian 
Broadcasting Network and 
host of television's 700 Club, 
will preach on July 1. 

OTHER SERVICES will 
have the Rev. John 
Caraway, radio announcer 
for the Christian 
Broadcasting Network and 
pastor of the Trinity 
Tabernacle; the Rev. Sam 
Beiler, pastor of the First 
Assembly of God of Virginia 
Beach; the Rev. Tim 
Myzelle, pastor of Pleasant 
Grove Baptist Church in 
North Carolina; Uie Rev. 
Phil Clark, evangelist from 
Albemarle, N.C.; the Rev. 
Don Beddingf ield, former 
Virginia Beach 
businessman and a recent 
graduate of Southeastern 
Theological Seminary; and 
the Rev. Dick Benninghove, 
pastor of St. Matthews 
United Methodist Church, 
Richmond. 



CHURCH 
NOTES 



A SCRIPTURES Courtesy 
Center has been established 
at Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church. The 
center includes Bibles, New 
Testaments and scripture 
portions. All items are sold 
at cost through the 
American Bible Society. 
The center has been 
established in the foyer of 
the educational building. 



A BAKE SALE to raise 
money for a trip to Lake 
Junaluska will be held by 
the Junior Methodist Youth 
Fellowship of Foundry 
United Methodist Church 
Saturday. 



Revival services will 
begin at 7:30 p.m. nightly. 
The public is invited to all 
services. Additional 
information may be 
(Stained by calling First 
Colonial Baptist Church at 
428-3700 or 428-3903. 



WEEKDAYS 



8PM 



Religion Page Sponsors 



PRICE'S 

INCORPORATED 

BRAND NAME 

AppHanft 

TV Stereo 



REAL ESTATE 

1% OUR 

BUSINESS 

Florida General Realty Co., Inc. 

of VIriLinia Beach 
and Virginia Real Estate Co. 

3115 Pacific Ave., Virginia Beach 

428-9211 




PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504 S. Military Hwy. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 
Phono 420- 1840 

John Deoro Equlpmonf 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Phone • 3404161 



PEOPLE 
BANK 

OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



ACH ^i^ 



Offices Throughout Virginia Beach 

. 425-5077 
First In Free Checking 
Ffrsf In Saturday Banking 



7HCRE IS A 
DIFFERENCE 

TRY 

Beach Forii 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

5266 PRINCESS ANNE RD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 

497-3516 



CREDIT BUREAU 

of, 

TIDEWATER 

INC. 

4946 Pocahontas Center 
Virginia Beach 490-0575 

Cicdit, repotting, ctrtkction, and rqioiieuioni. 



HollttluU 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 
'1.40 



up 



Including salad & baverag* 
3600 Bonney Rd. 340-9463 



9 STRONq 

chuRchEs 




MAkE STRONq 



• • 



COMIVIUNITIES 



A THOUGHT 




THE WEEK 
JUNE 19, 1974 

When you are 

troubled by 

anyone or 

anything, become 

Inwardly quiet. In 

that quietness you 

can absorb any 

trouble, with 

God's help. 

"When he giveth 

quietness, ' who 

then can make 

trouble?" Job 
34:29. 



Emmanuel Tab«rnlcle 
Church-UPC 

157 Morrison Ave. 

(1 block orrs. Lynnhaven Rd.) 
Rev. Harold Huiion-Paslot 
Phone: 340-7333 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shore Drive 
Va-teKh - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead • 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Church School 9:30 AM. 
Mornii^ ¥lmthip 1 1:00 A.M. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. 



VACATION BIBLE 
SCHOOL 

JuM 24th thru June 28lli. 
1:00 A.M. to 11:00 Noon. 
Ah>4 thru It. 
PrM Trini|H>rtatloii 
Call 401'-42«8 or 42e^MI1 • 
lEMMANUEL iAPnST CHURCH 
UtM »*n%m n«. Vlftlnia ■••«*, Va 



TIDE*/ATER CENTRAL 

CHURCH OF THE 

IIAZARENE 

Rev. David Holstein, Part^ir 

5514 Pariiameni Ph. 497-8703 
Sunday fehool Hr. - 9:45 A.M. 
Houi of Triumph 10:50 A.M. 
Junior. Youth, k Adult 
FeUowship ■ 6:00 P.M. 
Hour of iB^iration ■ 7:00 P.M. 
Wcdneiday Mid-weeic 
Up-lifl 7:30 P.M. 



ROCKCHimCIl 

640 Kempiville Rd. Ph. 499-3727 
Virginia Beach 

Sunday 

Sundty Scheol i*i * M, 

Mwiiiai Wonmp 11:00 AM 

fvinina Wortliip ':M P M 

Tu*i«*v 

Mornim wor»l<i» IO:IO AM 

Evmina Weriliip 7:30 P M 

Thurtday 

Mprnin* Worthip 10 JO AM 

Ev«nin9 Wwihip t M P.M. 

H«r»«ry AviiliW* 
PftlTORt 



1 



ST 



Assembly or Gqd 



(Comer Va. Beach Blvd. 
Oceana Bhrd.) 

S. Beiler, Paator 
4285297 



Rev JohnGimenci 



Rtv AnnOinwMi 



FIRSTCHURCH 
OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST 
Virginia Beach 
1341 Laskin Rd. 
Sunday 
Church Service 11:00 AM 
Sunday School 11:00 AM 
Wednesday 

Testimony Meeting 1:00 
PM 

Christian Scientist 
Reading Room 
(same address as above) 
Daily 
10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 
7 00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Wed. 
t:0ep.m.-7:4S p.m. 
»:1$ p.m. -10:00 p.m. 
Everyone is welcome to 
Study, Borrow, or Buy 
Authorited Christian 
Scientist Literature and the 
ICing James Version ol the 
Bible 

Christian Scientist Monitor 
IS also available. 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
Putor: W. F. Grandstaff 
Phone: 497-4208 

Sunday School: 9:45 A.M. 

(All A^s) 
leaching Service: 1 1 :00 A.M. 
Evening Preaching: 7:00 P.M. 

Wednesday 7:30 P.M. 
Prayer A BiMeStud^ 
Varied Youth Activities 



Welcome To Worship 
And Witness With 

ST. MARK'S A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butts, Minis- 
ter 

1740 Potters Rd. Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. 
Study Phone 428-1330 
Church School - 9:30 
A.M. 

Divine Worship - 11:00| 
Divine Worship • 
11:00 A.M. 



m 



t^ M-Th« &tt-We^Mid»y, June 19. 1974 




ROLL CALL 



She rides 
for the 
fun of it 



BffiMUkigk 




lAWNICZAK 



It's really strange. If I stop at a traffic light some 
motorist will turn around and say. 'Wow! A chick 
riding a wheel.' Most people think it's more for a 
man. but really more girls are starting to ride," 
said Linda Uwniczak, a WAVE stationed at Dam 
Neck. 

Ms. Lawniczak, 20, is 
a member of the Golden 
Eagl^ Motorcycle Club 
at Naval Air Station, 
Oceana. She is the only 
woman member of the 
club's precision riding 
team, the Golden 
Eagles Motor Patrol. 
She also was recently 
chosen as the club's 
"Ms. Motorcycle 
Safety" by a vote of the 
club membership. She 
will appear before 
groups to promote 
safety in the use of 
motorcycles and mini- 
bttces. 

Ms. Lawniczak, an attractive blond, is a veteran 
of four years experience with motorcycles. She 
says she obtained her first motorcycle at 16 in her 
Jjometown of Gibsonia, Pa. She does her own 
maintenance on three cycles she owns, now having 
gained the experience through working in motor- 
cyle repair shops. 

TALKIN(i ABOUT how she overcame family 
opposition to buying her first motorcycle, she 
smilingly confesses. "I found out three wedis after 
I started riding that my grandmother used to be a 
member of a motorcycle club." She says she found 
out from her father and has never told her grand- 
mother she knows. 

What attracts her to motorcycles? "I like being 
out in the open," she says, "being able to explore 
fields I couldn't get to in a car." 

She is, however, apprehensive over one aspect of 
the sport. She contends. "Drivers of cars are 
carel^s as far as bikes are concerned. On the in- 
terstates it scares me because of being close to this 
many cars in heavy traffic. The only protection you 
have is what you're wearing." 

SHK SAYS "You should have confidence in 
yourself but shouldn't become overconfident. You 
should get to know your bike just like you would a 
car and learn what to do in dangerous situations." 

There is anothra- opinion of motorcycle riders 
which gives Ms. Lawniczak some conceni. She 
says, "Some people appear to think bikes are for 
hoodlums," but they're really becoming a part of 
our soci^y." 

Although she has traveled a great number of 
mUes in pursuing her favwite pasttime, she says 
her longest cycle trip came June 4. She traveled 
wiUi other members (rf the Golden Eagles Motor- 
cycle Club to Rkhmond, where tl» group made a 
presentation to cfriver education teachers in a 
seminar sponsored by the Virginia Highway Safety 
Division. 



WASHINGTON - Here'i how 
area Members of Congress 
were recorded on major roU call 
voles June 6 through June 12. 

HOUSE 

DEEPWATER PORTS: 

Passed, 174 for and 15S against, 
an amendment to speed 
construction of off-shore 
recelvlnfl stations to handle 
large oil tankers, so-called 
"super tanKers". 

The amendment was offered 
as a substitute for a bill (H.R. 
10701) to establish federal 
regulations over construction of 
such deepwater ports. 

The amendment speeds the 
process bv giving the 
Department of Interior control 
over construction permits, 
instead of establishing a new 
commission, and by eliminating 
certain provisions that would 
have allowed states to block 
construction or to assess taxes 
on constructed ports. 

The bill, as amended, was 
later passed and sent to the 
Senate. 

The ports would be built at 
least 20 miles off-shore and 
could only be used by oil 
tankers. States could block 
construction in order to protect 
shoreline environments. 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D- 
1), William Whitehourst (R-2), 
David Satterfleld (D-3), Robert 
Daniel (R-4), W. C. Daniel (D- 
5), Kenneth Robinson (R-7), 
Stanford Parris (R-8), Viniliam 
Wampler <R-9) and Nloel 
Broyhill (R-10> voted' "ye«>/; 

Rep. Caldwell Butler (R-6) 
did not vote. 

LAND USE PLANNING: 

Rejected, 204 for and 211 
against, a motion to grant a rule 
to permit consideration of a bill 
calling for federal support of 
state and local land use 
planning efforts. 

Under House procedures, a 
bill must be granted a rule — 
which governs such things as 
length of debate — before the 
House can consider it. 

By refusing to grant a rule, 
the House in effect killed the bill 
(H.R. 1029|»>. 

The bill called for the Interior 
Department to establish federal 
guidelines on the best ways to 
use land without endangering 
the environment. The bill 
earmarked $800 million in 
federal grants to fund state land 
use planning efforts. 

Wampler voted "yea." 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfleld, Robert Daniel, W. 
C. Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parris and Broyhill voted 
"nay." 

VICE PRESIDENT'S 
HOME: Passed, 380 for and 23 

against, a bill to create a 
temporary official residence for 
the Vice President. 

The bill (S.J. Res. 202) now 
goes to conference. It 
authorizes remodeling a home 
at the Naval Observatory — 
presently occupied by the Chief 
of Naval Operations — as a 
temporary resident until a 
permanent Vice President's 
home can be built. 

The remodeling costs are 
. estimated at $48,000. 



At prcsipt, the government 
pays for security protection of 
Vice Presidents' homes. The 
cost for securing Vice President 
Ford's home was ttl,00O; for 
Vice President Agnew, $24S,000 
and for Vice President 
Humphrey's Minnesota, home 
and WBUhlngton apartment, 
$123,000. 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Robert Daniel, W. C. Daniel, 
Butler, Robinson, Parris, 
Wampler and Broyhill voted 
"yea." 

Satterfleld voted "nay." 

SENATE 

DEFENSE SPENDIN0 
CEILING: Rejected, 38 for and 
52 against, an amendment to set 
an overall ceiling of $21.6 billion 
for military weapons 
procurement In fiscal 1975. 

The amendment was offered 
to the military weapons 
procurement bill (S. 3000), 
which later passed and was sent 
to conference. 

The amendment would not 
have cut any funds from the 
bill, but would have served as 
instructions to the conference 
that the Senate would net 
accept a bill that went above the 
ceiling. . 

The amendment w« 
designed to force the House to 
accept the Senate's version of 
the bill. The House military 
weapons bill calls for spending 
$22.6billion.The 
Administration had requested 
$23.3 billion. 

Most of the funding difference 

between the Senate and House 

ji/ersions was due to lower 

Senate appropriations for naval 

shipbuilding. 

Sens. Harry Byrd (I) and 
William Scott (R) voted "nay." 

ROTO AND UNIVERSITIES: 

passed, 48 for and 43 against, an 
amendment to instruct the 
Defense Department to offer 
scholarship aid to officers who 
take courses at universities that 
have dropped the Reserve 
Officers Training Corps. 

The amendment was 
attached to the military 
procurements bill. 

At present, the Defense 
Department will underwrite 
educational costs for active 
officers, except at schools that 
have dropped ROTC. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 

TROOP CUTS: Rejected, 44 
for and 46 against, an 
amendment to cut overseas 
troop strength by 76,000 as of 
Dec. 31, 1975. 

The amendment was offered 
to the military procurements 
bill. 

Scott voted "yea." 

Byrd voted "nay." 

EPA RESEARCH: Rejected, 
40 for and 50 against, an 
amendment to let private 
contractors do energy research 
with funds that are transferred 
from the Environmental 
Protection Agency to other 
federal agencies. 

The amendment was offered 
to an energy research and 
development bill (H.R. 14434) 
that was later passed and sent 
to conference. 

Byrd and Scott voted "yea." 



June, 1974, before this Court 
at Its courtroom against the 
payment and delivery of the 
estate to the legatees 
without requiring refunding 
bonds. 

It is further ordered that 
the foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for two successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Jane 13, 19, It 



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iPublic hearing scheduled 

1 ■ ■ 

Ion 45-15 school program 






LiGALS 



Parents and shidents affected 
I9 the 45-15 pilot propfam in 
year-round eAicatian will have 
a ctence to share their opinions 
on the program with the 
Vii^inia Beadi Schod Board in 
three public hearings this 
masassx. 

Two of tiie hearing dates were 
announced earlier this wedt in 
the moattify newsletter sent to 
90.000 residents from Dr. E.E. 
Mckell, school superintendeirt. 
Qm hearing will t>e July 8 at 
7:S0 p.m. at Holland 
Ekmentary SdMoi. The oUier 
wfllbeJufy 11 at 7:30 p.m. at 
Wtaidsor Oaks Elementary 



Schod. 

A third hearing will be in late 
August at one of the four 45-15 
schods, Dr. Brkdcell announced 
at Tuesday's School Board 
meeting. The third hearii^ (bte 
was set after it was teamed 
many families would be out of 
town during the July hearing 
dates, Dr. Bridiell said. The 
dates fall during the two-wedc 
perk)d when the 45-15 schotds 
are ckeed for maintoianoe and 
rqmir. 

The two-year 45-15 pilot 
program at Holland, Windsor 
Woocfa, Windsor Oaks and Plaza 
Elemmtary Schools te ottering 



its last year. Afto- compiling 
data frmn residents and outside 
research agencies contracted to 
evaluate the program, the 
School Board will decide by, 
November whether to continue, 
expand or end the program. 

In otha* business, it was 
announced that the School 
Board will have a qiecial 
meeting Tuesday at 2 p.m. to 
receive information from the 
schools' Research, Planning 
and Deveb^ment Department 
on housing students in the 
schocris durii% the next two 
schod years. The meeting will 
be open to the public. 



ORDER TO 
SHOW CAUSE 

AGAINST 
DISTRIBUTION 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE CITY OF 

VIRGINIA BEACH ON 

THE 3RD DAY OF JUNE, 

1974 

Re: MAY WESTCOTT 

HAYES, DECEASED 

CP No. 1991 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of A. 
Michael Hayes, Jr., 
Executor of May Westcott 
Hayes, deceased, and of the 
debts and demands against 
the estate has been filed In 
the Clerk's Office, and that 
more than six (6) months 
have elapsed since the 
qualification, on motion of 
the Executor It is ordered 
that the creditors of, and ail 
others interested In, the 
estate show cause.if any 
they can, on the 2lst day of 




VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
3RD DAY OF JUNE, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY NO. 
C-74.2141 

In re: 

Adoption of Jonathan Coyit 

Litton and Christopher 

Mason Litton 

By: 

John Louis Krai 

TO: 

Ernest Coye Litton. Jr. 

, ORDER 

THiSDAYcame John Louis 
Krai and Patricia Dean Krai, 
Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
infanta!^ Jonathan Coye 
Litton and Christopher 
AAason Litton, by John Louis 
Krai, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Ernest Coye Litton, Jr., the 
natural father of said 
children, is a nonresident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
knovm post oHIce address 
t>eing unknown. 

It is therefore ORDERED 
that the said Ernest Coye 
Litton, Jr. appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Donald H. Rhodes, p.q. 
Owen, Guy, Rhodes 81 Betz 
281 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462 

6-5,12,19,26-41 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 6th 
day of June, 1974. 
General Hospital of 
Virginia Beach, 
Plaintiff, ' 

against 
Tom Hill, et al. 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a sale of land of the 
said Tom Hill, defendant, 
and of land of others, to 
satisfy the lien of a 
judgment out of the 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by the said 
defendant, and «ut of the 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by others, said 
judgment being against a 
prior owner of said land 
which lien attached before 
the said defendants 
obtained title to said lands. 
Andanaffidavlthavingbeen 
made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by 
or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain In 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1544 Fuller Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia it 
is ordered that they do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
"hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
interest in this suit. 
A copy — Teste: John V. 
FentreM, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12,19,26, July 3, 4 1 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

a4-Mi 

IN RE: 

Adoptkm of DIXIE MARIE 

VASEY, ROBERT HOWARD 

VASEY and SANDY JO 

VASEY 

BY: 

WALTER LEE GINN, JR., 

and MARY DIXIE GINN, 

Petltkmers. 

TO: 

William H. Vasey 

c-o Mr. a. Mrs. Howard 

Vas0v 

Route 8, Box M4 

Brookville, Florida 

ORDER 



Jiow III Stock 

VESPA! 




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tor oi^v^ Or Mtey «M moior 
tor ^loppifiB* tIw Om Vim auio* 
H^to U'MwmiMiMi Miv It wnW' 
per-quiet Weighe iaei 74 pounds. 



ONLY 



'388 



This day came Walter Lee 
Ginn, Jr., and Mary Dixie 
GInn, Petitioners, and 
represented that the (^joct of 
this proceeding is to effact 
itie adoption of the above 
named infants, Dixie Marie 
Vasey, Robert Howard -. 
Vasey and Sandy Jo Vasey, 
by Walter Lee Ginn, Jr., and 
Mary Dixie Ginn, husbartd - 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that William H. Vasey, a 
natural parent of said 
children, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Mr. 81 Mrs. 
Howard Vasey, Route 8, Box 
264, Brookville, FkM-ida. 

it Is therefore ORDERED 
that the said William R. 
Vasey appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

W.Shephered Drewry, Jr., 
p.q. 

6-5, 12, 19, 26, 4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 28th 
day of May, 1974. 

Jackie Nell Sharp Kerr, 

Plaintitt, 

against 

David WIttiam Kerr, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion and aban- 
donment or in the alternative 
upon cruelty. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress beinq: 471 South Allen 
Street, San Bernardino, 
California 92408. 

it is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress; Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Jon P. Eichler 
701 Plaia One 
Norfolk, Va. 



CUMD IMNDAYS 
NOiOt T«mmM. f le • 
f ie» 



6-5, 12, 19, 26, 4T 



CYCUcnn 



iiat lii 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
29TH DAY OF MAY, 1974. 

II^CHANCERY 
NO. C74-521 

In re: 

Actoptkm of Tameia Michelle 

Adair 

By: 

Leslie R. Allison 8. Dorothy 

W. Allison, 

Petitioners 

To: 

Jon Michael Adair 

Address UNKNOWN 

ORDER 

This day came Leslie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding Is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named infant, Tameia 
Michelle Adair, by Leslie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Jon 
Michael Adair, a natural 
parent of said chiM, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
UNKNOWN, 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Jon Michael Adair 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and 
indicate her attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what Is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnside, p.q. 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

6-5, 12, 19, 24, 4T 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 10th 
day of Jurte, 1974. 
Connie Sue Williams, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
James Vernon Williams, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce a" vinculo 
mah-imooii ffWn the said 
defendant i^»n the grounds 
of desertion. 

/^d an affidavit having 
been made and filed ttial the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office addrMS 
being: TD2 Williams, 452746- 
633, S-421 Co. 3 B BATTC, 
Millington, Memphis, 
Tenneuee. 

it Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
^ys after due publicatton 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Clarke a Snitter 

5209 Virginia Beach 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12, 19, 26. July 3,-* 




ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH. 

VILTER AWkNUFACTUR 
ING CORPORATION, 
a Wisconsin Corporation, 
Plaintiff 

vs. 
AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL 
REFRIGERATION, INC. 
a Georgia Corporation, 
Principal Defendant 
and 

EMPIRE STORAGE 8. VAN 
CORPORATION, 
a Virginia Corporation, 
Co- Defendant 

L-434 
The object of this suit is to 
attach certain personal 
property of .the defendant, 
American Industrial 
Refrigeration, Inc., which ll 
in the possession of Empire 
Storage %• Van Cor'p., which 
property is more particularly 
described as being five (5) 
refrigeration compressor 
unites, together with parts 
having a lair market vafOe of 
$24,348.70. Ths said 
refrigeration compressor 
units have the following 
serial numbers: 

17681 AS 448 RCB 

17682 AS 448 RCB 
45083 AH 456 RCB 

17683 AS 446 RCB 
17684AS444RCB 

The parts have Vilter Sales 
Order No. D-33910. 

This attachment suit 
petitions the Court to have 
the above described property 
told and the proceeds applied 
to a debt owed to the plaintiff, 
Vilter AAanufacturing Cor- 
poration, by the principal 
defendant, American 
Industrial Refrigeration, 
Inc., in the amount of 
S39,469.71 due on open ac- 
count. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed that American 
industrial Refrigeration, 
Inc., a Georgia corporation, 
is a foreign corporation and 
Its last known post office 
address is 1810 Auger Drive, 
Tucker, Georgia, It is OR- 
DERED that American 
industrial Refrigeration, inc. 
appear within ten days after 
due publication of this Order 
and do what is necessary to 
protect its interest. It is 
further ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a 
week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun which newspaper Is 
published and has a general 
circulation throughout ttie 
City of Virginia Beach, Va. 
Wlilcox, Savage, Lawrence, 
Dickson 8i Spindle 
1800 Virginia National Bank 
Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By, Gladys J. Conboy, D.C. 
June 12, 19, 26, July 3,4— t 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach on the 22nd 

day of AAay, 1974 

AAary Edity Hall Thompson, 

Plaintiff, 

against 
Mark Allen Thompson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa Et 
Thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of cruelty and desertion. And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
know post office address 
being: Route No. 1, Box 244, 
Hubert, North Carolina it is 
ordered that he do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A Copy — Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLBRK 

By; Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Harrell 8. Landrum 
519 Board of Trade BIdg. 
Norfolk, VA 

May 29— June 5,12,19, 4 1 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 22nd 
day of AAay, 1974. 
Albert Emerson Breath- 
waite. Plaintiff, 
against 

Verna AAae Lystelly Breath- 
.walte. Defendant. 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion of the Com- 
plainant by the Respondent 
on July 1, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
been n>ade and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, ^- 'ast 
known fost office address 
being: -U532 Wyandotte 
Street, North Hollywood, 
California 91605 it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A coi^-Teste: 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
Ck€RK 

BY: Santira Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

Stephen R. AAargulies 
29 Selden Aroade 
Norfolk, VA p.q. 

5-29,6-5,12, 19,4T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIR 
CUIT COURT OF THE CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE Vm DAY OF AAAY, 1974 
WALTER P. BARCROFT, 
Conr^ainant, 

vs. 
JOHN WILLIAMS, aiM all 
ufAnown parties who may be 
the hairs or devisees of the 
said detandant or have an 
Intarest in ttiesa proceedings, 
whose last known post office 
address to wMuiown and who 
are made pMtlas defMNtant 
by ttw9«fw«l Mscrlptton M 
"nrttos Untewwn", 
Defandants. 

IN CNANCERY 
NO.C-74.6S7 
The Object of this suit Is to 
quiet title to certain real 
»tate tocated hi the City ^ 
Virsinia Beac*. a more 
ptg%womm siicnpTian uvwiu 

cHM^m ma im af 



styled suit. And an Affidavit 
having been made and filed 
by the complainant that the 
ctofendant, John Williams' 
last residence was unknown; 
and the bill stating that there 
are or may be persons in- 
terested in the subject 
matter of this suit whose 
names are unknown, and 
making them parties 
defendant by the general 
description of "parties 
unknown" and an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that they are unknown, such 
unknown parties being the 
widow and heirs, devisees 
and successors In title of 
John Williams, 

It is Ordered that ttie said 
defendants namely, John 
Williams, it he be living, and 
the persons made defendants 
by the general description of 
"parties unknown" do ap 
pear within ten days after 
due publication of this order 
and do what is necessary to 
protect their interests. 

It is further Ordered that 
the foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: SANDRA HARGROVE, 
D.C. 

I ask for this: 
James & Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 
Wallace B. Smith, p.q. 
AAay29,June5,12, 19— 4f 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

The following abandoned 
vehicles were removed 
from the streets of the City 
of Virginia Beach: 

Light blue, Plymouth 
Valiant, 4 Or Sedan, 
identification Number 
132611792 

1964, Blue Dodge Dart, 4 
door sedan. Identification 
Number 52533378 

1961, green Ford, Pick up 
truck, Identification 
Number F10JN325697, 1973 
Virginia License PBZ-274 

These vehicles have been 
removed to Pungo Exxon, 
Route 3, BOX 2522, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 23456. The 
owner or any person having 
security interest may claim 
this vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying all towing, 
preservation, and storage 
charges. Failure by the 
owner or persons having 
security Interest to exercise 
their right to reclaim the 
vehicle within the time 
provided shall be deemed a 
waiver and shall be 
construed as consent to the 
sale of the abandoned 
motor vehicle at public 
auction. 

W.W. Davis, Colonel 
Chief of Police 
H.C. Terry, Captain 
Commanding Officer 
Traffic Bureau 

June 19, It 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of , 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
In the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, June 24, 1974, at 
2:00 P.M. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

Change of Zonino District 
Classifications 

PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition of 
Commonwealth Financial 
Corp., by Owen B. Pickett, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 440 feet more or 
less South of South 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 1664 feet more 
or less along the West side 
of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 325 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1365.34 feet 
along the Western property 
line and running a distance 
of 159.31 feet along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 8.5 
acres more or less. 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. ■ Petition of 
Commonwealth Financial 
Corp., by Owen B. Pickett, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District to A-l 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 470 feet more or 
less South of South 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 2100 feet along 
the Western property line of 
which 1642 feet Is the East 
side of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 860.78 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 
2492.11 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 
1234.23 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 200 feet is the South 
side of South Birdneck 
Road. Said parcel contains 
41.2 acres and excludes a 
parcel containing 2.3 acres 
proposed for B-V 
Commercial Residential 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of 
Commonwealth Financial 
Corp., by Owen B. Pickett, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District to B-1 
Commercial Residential 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1460 
feet more or less South of 
South Birdneck Road and 
115 feet more or less East of 
General Booth Boulevard, 
running a distance of 175 
feet more or less along the 
Western propert^t line, 
running a distance of 444 
faet more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 344 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 342 
feet more or less along the 
Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.S 
acres more or less. 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

RMiard Webbon 
aty Clwk a 

ILIf.lf 



rt^l 



Hm Sun-WediMMhy, June 19, 1974-Pag« 5 



L 



LK>4L$ 



'_J 



NOTICE 

This is to notify ttie public 
itiat itte undersigned, trading 
as Cap & Quill Restaurant 
will within ten days after 
publication of this notice 
apply to the Vioiinia State 
Alcotralic Beverage Control 
Board for a license to sell 
mixed beverages for on- 
premis consumption. 
William R. Clark 
T A Cap & Quill Rest. 
172 b S. Plaza Trail 
Virginia Beach, Va. 234S2 
Ann Parker 
Witness 

June 19 H 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEAftINO 

The Virginia Beach Board 
of Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, July 10, 1974, at 
7:30 P.M. in the court room 
(Traffic Court) adjacent to 
the Building Inspector's 
Office, City Hall, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The 
following applications will 
appear on the agenda. 

PLEASE MAKE NOTE OF 



property line. Said parcel 
contains 1 acre more pr 
less. (BIrdneck t Acres 
Watergate Apartments 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 
2. Petition of Smith and 
Williams Funeral Home, 
Inc., by H. Calvin Spain, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from RS 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located on the 
West side of Princess Anne 
Road, beginning at a point 
1344 feet more or less North 
of Brandywine Road and 
running a distance of 210.05 
feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 
1S3.28 feet is the West side 
of Princess Anne Road, 
running a distance of 407.43 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 179.43 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 
487.3 feet along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.9Af 
acres. (Kempsville Manor- 
Lark Downs Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 



Brunswick, Buchanan, 
Buckingham, Campbell, 
Caroline, Carroll, Cttarles 
City, Charlotte, Chesterfield, 
Clarke, Culpeper, Cum- 
berland, Dickenson, Din 
widdie, Essex, Fairfax, 
Fauquier, Floyd, Fluvanna, 
Franklin, Frederick, 
Gloucester, Goochland, 
GreensvillJe, Halifax, 
Hanover, Henrico, Henry, 
James City, King and Queen, 
King George, King William, 
Lancaster, Lee, Loudoun, 
Louisa, Luenburg, Mathews, 
Mecklenburg, Middlesex, 
New Kent, Northampton, 
Northumberland, Nottoway, 
Orange, Patrick, Pitt- 
sylvania, Powhatan, Prince 
Edward, Prince George, 
Prince William, Richmond, 
Roanoke, Scott, Souttiamp- 
lon, Spotsylvania, Stafford, 
Surry, Sussex, West- 
moreland, Wise and York; 
and in the cities of Hampton 
and Newport News; and on 
the Clinch Mountain Wildlife 
Management Area in 
Russell, Smyth, Taiewell 
and Washington counties and 
on the Hidden Valley Wildlife 
Management Area in 
Washington County. 



THE CHANGE OF BAYSIDE BOROUGH 



-»1 



LOCATION. 

1. (Deferred Junes, 1974). 
Richard L. and Patty J. 
Davis request a variance of 3 
'eet to a 7 foot side yard 
setback (eastern property 
line) instead of 10 feet as 
required of Lot 22, Block P, 
Carolanne Farms, Challedon 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

2. Irvin G. and Pearl A. 
Abeloff request a variance of 
10 feel to a 10 foot setback 
from 76th Street instead of 20 
feet as required of Lot 6, 
Block 23, Section D, Cape 
Henry Syrxlicate, 7600 Ocean 
Front. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. B.M. Stanton requests a 
variance to provide a 2.5 foot 
landscaped area around the 
perimeter of the lot and tc 
allow parking where 
prohibited in the remaining 
7.5 feet of the required 10 foot 
setback on Lot 1, Block 107, 
Linkhorn Park, northwest 
corner of 33rd Street and 
Pacific Avenue. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

4. Manuel F. Garcia 
requests a variance of 25 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from the 
Norfolk-Virginia Beach 
Expressway instead of 35 
feet as required of Parcel A, 
Princess Anne Plaza, 3600 
Rosemont Road. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. David E. Bezanson 
requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required 
of Lot 9, Block 45, Section 5, 
Princess Anne Plaza, 3400 
Club House Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. - 

6. Robert S. Stroud 
requests a variance of 10 feet 
lo a 20 foot setback from 
Atlantic Avenue instead of 30 
leet as required of Lot 18, 
Section A, Cavalier Shores, 
northeast corner of 43rd 
Street and Atlantic Avejiue. 
Virginia Beach BoroOgh. 

7. James H. Howell 
requests a variance of 8 feet 
lo a 22 foot setback from 
Narragansett Drive and a 
variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from ^he north 
property line (unimproved 
Southern Boulevard) instead 
of a 30 foot setback as 
required of Lot 1, Block 7, 
Pocahontas Village, 4852 
Mandan Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

8. B.F. Traylor requests a 
variance of 8 feet to a 12 foot 
setback from Atlantic 
Avenue instead of 20 feet as 
required of Lot 1, Resub- 
division of Lot A, Subdivision 
of western 20 feet of Lot 14, 30 
feet of Lot 20, and all of Lots 
16 & 18, Block 1, Section E, 
Cape Henry Syndicate, 
northeast corner of 73rd 
Street and Atlantic Avenue. 

Z haven Borough. 
Hightower Enterprises 
»sts a variance of S feet 
to a "0" setback from 13th 
Street and from the Ocean 
Front instead of a 5 foot 
setback as required and a 
variance of four (4) parking 
spaces to fifty (50) parking 
spaces instead of fifty-four 
(54) parking spaces as 
previously allowed by the 
Board of Zoning Appeals and 
to allow parking in the 
required setbacks where 
prohibited on a Parcel, 
(northeast corner of 13th 
Street and Atlantic Avenue), 
13th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

10. Albert L. Bonney, Jr. 
requests a variance to allow 
an access driveway to the 
rear of the proposed 
buildings and to waive 
landscaping requirements in 
the required 10 foot setback 
on the northern property line 
starting at a point 145 feet 
east of Edwin Drive and to 
allow an access driveway to 
the rear of the proposed 
buildings and a 3 foot land- 
scaped area instead of a 5 
foot landscaped area on the 
eastern property line star- 
ting at a point 35 tigetjiorth of 
Princess Aniie --Road. 
Kempsville Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 

PLEASE MAKE NOTE OF 
THE CHANGE OF ' 

LOCATION. 
W.L. Towers 
Secretary 

Virginia: 

The r^ular meeting of the 
Council oJ the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the .Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, July 8, 1974, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard; 

Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 
1. Petition of Elizabeth 
Williams Everett by 
George Darden, Attorney, 
tor a change of Zoning 
I* District Clasjification from 
' R-4 Residential District to 
A-2 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 632.61 feet West of 
Birdnack Road and 187 feet 
East of Mockingbird Drive 
and 50 feet North of 
Waterfront Drive, running 
a distance of 110 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 372.16 
feet along the Eastern 
^^perty line, running a 
distance of 110 feet along 
Mia Nwihem property line 
and rwnnkifl a distance ^ 
Ml Mat ahMig the wattam 



RIO 3. It shall be lawful to 
trap mink from December 15 
through AAarch 10, both dates 
inclusive, in the counties of 
Accomack, Charles City, 
Essex, Gloucester, Isle of 
Wight, James City, King arid 
Queen, King George, King 
William, Lancaster, 
AAathews, Middlesex, New 
Kent, Northampton, Noi*- 
ihumberland, Prince 
George, Richmond, 
Southampton, Surry, 
Westmoreland and York; 
and in the cities of 
Chesapeake, Hampton, 
Newport News, Suffolk (area 
formerly constituting 
Nansemond County), 
Virginia Beach and east of 
U.S. Route 95 in the counties 
of Caroline, Chesterfield, 
Dinwiddie, Fairfax, 
Greensville, Hanover, 
Henrico, Prince William, 
Spotsylvania, Stafford and 
Susse)(. 

CHAPTER ll.Muskrat. 

RIM. Except as otherwise 
specilicaily provided in the 
regulations appearing in this 
chapter, ii shall be lawful lo 
trap muskrat from 
December 1 through the last 
day of Fetsruary, txjth dates 
inclusive. 



3. Petition of Carl H. 
Kunzman for a Change Of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1847.9 
feet East of Newtown Road 
at the Southern extremity 
of Lawrence Drive and on 
the South side of Connie 
Lane, running a distance of 
691.54 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 30 feet is the South 
side of Connie Lane, 
running a distance of 664.1 
feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 636.8 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
659 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.7 acres. 
(Newsome Farm Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 

City Clerk 

June 19,26-21 



NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC 

The Commission of Game 
and inland Fisheries at a 
meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on AAay 3, 1974, 
ordered the following 
proposed changes in its 
regulations pursuant to 
Sections 29125, 29-126 and 29- 
127 of the Code of Virginia. A 
public hearing for this 
purpose of adopting such 
changes will be held at 4010 
West Broad Street, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, at 9:30 a.m., 
July 10, 1974. 

CHAPTER 16. Raccoon. 
Adopt a new regulation to be 
numbered R16-13 as follow: 

II shall be unlawful in the 
counties of Bedford, Bland, 
Botetourt, Buchanan, 
Carroll, Craig, Dickenson, 
Floyd, Franklin, Giles, 
Grayson, Henry, Lee, 
Montgomery, Patrick, 
Pittsylvania, Pulaski, 
Roanoke, Russell, Smyth, 
Tazewell, Washington, Wise 
and Wythe to buy, sell, 
barter, exchange, traffic or 
trade in, bargain for, solicit 
tor, purchase or transport 
oui of the county where 
trapped any raccoon pelts 
until the pelts have been 
sealed by an agetvt of the 
Commission. 

COMMISSION OF GAME 
AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Dr. Allan A. Hoffman, 
Chairman 

6.19,1-t 



NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC 

The Commission of Game 
and inland Fisheries at a 
meeting held in Richnond, 
Virginia, on May 3, 1974, 
adopted the following 
amended or new regulations 
pursuant to Sections 29-125, 
29 126 and 29-127 of the Code 
of Virginia, to become ef- 
fective July 1, 1974. 

CHAPTER 16. Raccoon. 

R16-1. Except as otherwise 
specifically provided in the 
regulations appearing in this 
article and except as 
provided by local legislation, 
it shall be lawful to hunt 
raccoon in all counties east of 
the Blue Ridge Mountains 
from September l through 
AAarch 31, both dates in 
elusive. 



R3-5. (a) II shall be lawful 
to hunt bear with bow and 
arrow from the second 
Saturday in October through 
the Saturday prior to the 
second AAonday in Novem- 
ber, both dates inclusive. 

(d) It shall be unlawful to 
use dogs when hunting with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior tp 
the second Monday in 
November, both dates in- 
clusive. • 

CHAPTER 5. Bobcat. 

R5 01. It Shall be lawful to 
hunt bobcat by day or night 
during the open season for 
hunting raccoon as provided 
for in R16-1 through R16-6, 
inclusive. 



RS-02. It shall be lawful to 
trap bobcat from December l 
through the last day of 
February, both dates in 
elusive 

CHAPTER 6. Deer. 

R6-3. (a) It shall be lawful 
to hunt deer with bow and 
arrow from the second 
Saturday in October through 
the Saturday prior to the 
second AAonday in Novem- 
ber, both dates inclusive, 
except where there is a 
closed general hunting 
season on deer. 

(b) It shall be unlawful to 
use dogs when hunting with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior to 
the second Monday in 
November, both dates in- 
clusive. 



- R11-1. It shall be lawful to 
trap muskrat from 
December 15 through March 
10, both dates inclusive, in 
the counties of Accomack, 
Charles City, Essex, 
Gloucester, Isle of Wight, 
James City, King and Queen, 
King George, King William, 
Lancaster, Mathews, Mid- 
dlesex, New Kent, Nor- 
thampton, Northumberland, 
Prince George, Richmond, 
Southampton. Surry, 
Westmoreland and York, and 
in the cities of Chesapeake, 
Hampton, Newport News, 
Suffolk (area formerly 
constituting Nansemond 
County), Virginia Beach and 
east of U.S. Route 95 in the 
counties of Caroline, 
Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, 
Fairfax, Greensville, 
Hanover, Henrico, Prince 
William, Spotsylvania, 
Stafford and Sussex. 



CHAPTER 11.1. Nutria. 

R11.1-1.lt shall be unlawful 
lo hunt nutria with the aid of 
watercraft on Back Bay and 
its iribuiaries between 
October 1 and March 31, both 
dates inclusive. 



CHAPTER 12. Opossum. 

Rt2 1. It shall be lawful to 
hunt opossum only during the 
open season for hunting 
raccoon as provided in R 16-1 
ihrough R16-6, inclusive. 



R6-3.1. (c) A muzzle- 
loading gun for the purpose 
of this regulation means a 
single shot weapon, forty five 
caliber or larger, firing a 
single projectile loaded from 
the muzzle of the weapon and 
propelled by at least fifty 
grains of black powder, if 
telescopic sights are used, 
such weapon shall not be 
deemed to be a muzzle- 
loading gun. 



CHAPTER 16. Raccoon. 

R16-10, prescribing bag 
limit for hunting raccoon in 
national forests, is hereby 
rescinded. 



CHAPTER 17. Squirrel. 

Article I.Gray and 

Red Squirrel. 

R17-01. The provision of 
this article shall apply only to 
gray and red squirrel and 
shall not be applicable to fox 
squirrel. 



R6 7. The bag limit for deer 
shall be one a day and two a 
license year, one of which 
may be a doe during the last 
twelve hunting days only, in 
the counties of Caroline 
(except thai portion of Camp 
A. P. Hill north of Route 301), 
Essex, Gloucester, Green 
sville, isle, of Wight, King 
and Queen, King George, 
King William, Lancaster, 
Middlesex, Northumberland, 
Richmond, Surry (except on 
Hog island Wildlife 
Management Area) and 
Westmoreland; and in the 
city of Suffolk (that portion 
of the city, formerly Nan- 
semond County west of a line 
established by Acts 1950, c. 
83, as amended by Acts 1958, 
c. 40); and on the U.S. 
AAarine Corps Base, Quan- 
tico. 



R17 10. (a) It shall be 
lawful to hunt squirrel with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday prior to 
ihe second Monday in 
November, both dates in 
elusive. 

(c) It shall be unlawful fo 
use dogs when hunting with 
bow and arrow from the 
second Saturday in October 
through the Saturday pri6r to 
the second Monday in 
November, both dates in 
elusive. 



R16 2. It shall be lawful to 
hunt raccoon in the Rapidan 
Wildlife AAanagement Area 
from the first AAonday in 
November ihrough January 
5, both dates inclusive 

COMMISSION OF GAME 
AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Dr. Allan A. Hoffman, 
ChairmanPublish; 
Counties East of the Blue 
Ridge 
6-19,1 t 



-^ 



NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC 



The Commission of Game 
and Inland Fisheries at a 
n»eeting held in Rlchmortd, 
Virginia, on AAay 3, 1974, 
adoptl^ the following 
amended or new regulattons 
pursuant to Sections 29-125, 
29 126 and 29 127 of the Code 
of Vtrghita, to become ef- 
fective July 1, 1974. 

CHAPTER 3. Bear. 

R3-1. Except as otherwise 
provided by local legislation 
and with the specific ex- 
cepti(Nis provided in the 
re9ilatk>«» appMring m this 
chapter. It shall be lawful to 
twnt bear from the fourth 
Monday m November 
throut^ December 31, both 
dates inclusive. 



R6-7.3. The bag limit for 
deer shall be one a day, Wvo a 
license year, one of which 
may be a doe on the last six 
hunting days only in the 
counties of Accomack (ex- 
cept Parramore Island), 
Amelia (except on Amelia 
Wildlife Management Area), 
Brunswick (except on Camp 
Pickett), Buckingham 
(except on Buckingham- 
Appomattox State Forest and 
Lee Experimental Forest), 
Charles City, Chesterfield 
(except on Pocahontas State 
Forest and Park and 
Presquile Federal Refuge), 
Cumberland (except 
Cumberland State Forest), 
Dinwiddie (except on Camp 
Pickett), Fluvanna (except 
on Hardware Wildlife 
Management Area), 
Goochland, Hanover, 
Henrico, James City, Louisa, 
New Kent, Nottoway (except 
on Camp Pickett), Powhatan 
(except on Powhatan 
Wildlife Management Area), 
Prince George, Spotsylvania. 
Stafford (except on U.S. 
AAarine Cwps Base, Quan- 
tico), York (except on Camp 
Peary, Cheatt»am Annex and 
Naval Weapons Station) ; and 
the cities ol Hampton (except 
on Langley Air Force Base), 
Newport Nevw (except on Ft. 
Eustis) and Suffolk (that 
portion of the city formerly 
Nansemond County east of a 
line established by Acts 19S0, 
c. 83, as amended by Acts 
19%, c. 40). 



Article 2. Fox Squirrel. 

R17-13. Except as other- 
wise specifieail/provided in 
the regulations appearing in 
this article, there shall be a 
continuous closed season for 
hunting fox squirrel. 



R17-14. It shall be laMrful to 
hunt fox squirrel from 
September 15 through 
September 30, both dates 
inclusive, and from the 
second AAonday in November 
through January 31, both 
dates inclusive, in the 
counties of Bland, Giles, 
Montgomery, Pulaski, 
Russell, Scott, Smyth, 
Tazewell, Washington and 
Wythe. 



calendar year. Such permit 
will be issued on a form 
provided by the Commission, 
and will authorize shooting 
from a vehicle only on 
private property with the 
landowner's permission, and 
not less tlwn ttiree hundred 
feel from nor acrws any 
public road or highway, and 
only w^en Ihe bearer is 
properly licensed to hunt. 

CHAPTER 23. 
Fishing Generally. 

R23 3. Except as prdvided 
in this regulation and in R24- 
10.1, there shall be no size 
limit on any species of fish. 
There shall, however, be a 
fen-inch minimum size limit 
on grayling, a twenty-six 
inch minimum size limit on 
muskel lunge and northern 
pike and a twenty inch 
minimum size limit on 
landlocked striped bass 
(rockflsh), except that in 
Gaston Reservoir to the 
mouth of Difficult Creek on 
the Roanoke (Staunton) 
River Arm and to the mouth 
of the Bannister River on the 
Dan River Arm Ihe 
minimum size limit on 
landlocked striped bass 
(rockflsh) shall be twelve 
inches. The minimum size 
limit on yellow pike perch 
Mwalleye) in Smith AAountain 
and Leesville reservoirs 
shall be twenty inches. Also, 
there shall be a twelve-inch 
minimum size limit on 
largemouth, smallmouth and 
spotted bass in Ihe North 
Fork of Pound Reservoir and 
in the Roanoke (Staunton) 
and Dan rivers and their 
tributaries downstream from 
Niagara Dam on the 
Roanoke River and the 
Brantly Steam Plant Dam on 
the Dan River and the 
Shenandoah River including 
the North and South forks 
downstream from Route 42 
bridge in Timberville on the 
North Fork and from the 
confluence of North and 
South rivers on the South^ 
Fork below Port Republic' 
and the New River from 
Clayton Dam to the West 
Virginia boundary line, and 
in the North Anna, 
Chickahominy, Chesdin, 
Claytor, Philpott ' and 
Flanaghan reservoirs. It 
shall be unlawful to have any 
largemouth, smallmouth or 
spotted bass less than twelve 
inches in length in one's 
possession while on any of 
the waters mentioned in the 
preceding sentence. 

COMMISSION OF GAME 
AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Dr. Allan A. Hoffman, 
Chairman 

6-19,lt 



NOTICE OF 
' PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, July 9, 1974, at 1 :00 
P.M., in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 

DEFERRED FOR 90 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON APRIL 9, 
1974: 

1. Application of T.G. 
Christopolous for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of the portions 
of Potomac Street, Cleveland 
Street, Lafayette Street, 
Fifth Street, Sixth Street as 
shown on a plat entitled 
"Sunnybrook, Princess Anne 
County, Virginia owned by 
Sunny Brook, Inc." dated 
December 1916 referred lo as 
Plat A and a plat entitled 
"Property Dedication for 
Columbus Street" dated 
November 26, 1971 referred 
to as Plat B. 

Parcel 1: Potomac Street 

— That section of Potomac 
Street beginning at the east 
side ol Fourth Street, as 
shown on Plat A, and ex- 
tending eastwardly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plat B, now called 
Columbus Street. 

Parcel 2: Cleveland Street 

— That section of Cleveland 
Street beginning at the west 
side of Lot 8, Block 40, as 
shown on Plat A, and ex- 
tending eastwardly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plat B. 

Parcel 3: Lafayette Street 

— That section of Lafayette 
Street beginning at the east 
side of 4th Street as shown on 
Plat A, and extending 
westwardly to the west side 
of relocated Columbus 
Street, as shown on Plat B. 

Parcel 4: Fifth Street — 
That section of Fifth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
shown on Plat A and B and 
extending southwardly to the 
north side of Relocated 
Columbus Street as shown on 
Plats A and B. 

Parcel 5: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 



R17-15. Itshallbelawrful to 
l»unf fox squirrel from 
Oct(^>er 1 through October 
14, both dates inclusive, and 
from the second AAonday in 
Novemtjer through January 
31, both dates inclusive. In 
the counties of Alleghany, 
Augusta? Clarke, Federick, 
Rockingham, Shenandoah 
and Warren. 



feel along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 599.48 feet along 
Ihe Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 2.726 
acres. ( Bonney 's Corner 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON MAY 14, 
1974: 

3. Petition of Ocean island 
inn. Inc., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from B-4 Resort Commercial 
District to H-2 Resort Hotel 
District on certain property 
located at the Northeast 
corner of Jade Street and 
Page Avenue, running a 
distance of 422.43 feet along 
the North side of Page 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 600 feet more or less along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 568 feel 
more or less along the 
Northern properly line 
(Chesapeake Bay) and 
running a distance of 533 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 6.378 acres. 
(Lynnhaven Shores Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Oscar Lewis, 
Claudis Holley and James E. 
Jefferson, Trustees of 
Washington Lodge, 139, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
ResWential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property b#ginning at a point 
584.4 feet North of Weldon 
Street (formerly Grace 
Street) between Frost Road 
and Eagleton Lane, running 
a distance of 82.2 feet along 
the East side ol Eagleton 
Lane, running a distance of 
280 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 82.2 feel along the 
West side of Frost Road, and 
running a distance of 280 feet 
along lh6 Southern property 
line. Said parcel contains 0.54 
acres more or less. 
(Gracetown-Fentresstown 
Areas), BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 30 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON JUNE 11, 
1974: 

5. Petition of A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth S. 
Sills by Grover C. Wright, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District classification 
from R-6 Residential District 
to A-4 Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
feet along the Western 
properly line and running a 
distance of 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line.*' 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square feet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. Application of William 
E. Wood, Jr., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to erect a 
12-foot by SO-foot billboard on 
certain property located on 
the South side of Indian River 
Road beginning at a point lOO 
feet more or less West of 
Kempsville Road, running a 
distance of 397.5 feet along 
the Northern property line of 
which 307.5 feet is the South 
side of Indian River Road, 
running a distance of 300 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 486.67 
teet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.27 acres and is 
currently zoned B-2 Com- 
munity Business District. 
(Bonney's Corner Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. Application ot Princess 
Anne Country Club by 
Thomas C. Broyles, Attor 
ney, for a Conditional Use 
Permit for recreation 
facilities (tennis) on certain 
property known as that 
portion of the existing 
Princess Anne Country Club 
beginning at a point 90 feel 
more or less North of Holly 
Drive and 140 feet more or 
less East of Holly Road 
running a distance of 180 feet 
more or' less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance of 145 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 180 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of ^50 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. 
(Princess Anne Country Club 
Area). VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification 

8. Petition by morion of the 
Planning Commission of the 
City of Virginia Beach for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A 1 
Apartment District to P-l 
Preservation District to 
correct drafting errors which 
had been carried over from 
previous years that became 



beginning at the south side of 

Virginia Beech Boulevard ^.£,^1^1 v^^hen an attempt was 
shovwi on Plat A and B e)r „^jg j^ p|ot g recent zoning 
tending souttiwardly to the change in the area, beginfiing 



R17-16. It ^atl be lawful to 
hunt fox squirrel from the 
second AAonday in November 
through January 31, both 
dates inclusive, in the 
counties of Batjn and 
Highland. 



R17-17. The bag limit for 
fox squirrel shall be six a d«y 
and seventy.flve a license 
year. 



R3-2.1. It shall be unlawful 

to hunt bmr at any time in 

the a)unt»« of Accomack, 

'Amelia, Appomattox, 



R6-8. The bag limit for deer 
shad be one a day,two a 
license year, bucks only, in 
the counties of Mathews and 
Pittsylvania (east of 
Soufhwn Railroad) and in 
the cities of Chesapeake and 
Virginia Beach. 



CHAPTER 10. Mink. 

R10-2 Except as otherwise 
specifically j^-ovldrt irj tf» 
regulations appearing in this 
chapter, it stiall be tmt^%A to 
trap mink from December 1 
through the last day of 
FebruwT^, both dat« w»- 



cluslve. 



R 17-18. It shall be unlawful 
to sell, buy or offer for sale 
any fox squirrel. 

CHAPTER 22. Permits. 

R22 13. Any person, upon 
application to a game 
warden and the preswitatton 
of a medical doctor's written 
statement that such person is 
permanently ufMWt ts walk 
w is ottMTwIse permanently 
physically dis«>tad to the 
exwit he or she cannot safely 
hunt except from a v*icle, 
may in the discretkw ol such 
game ««rden b« isKied a 
permit to shoot iiiaundhovt 
from a whtale ftrom May M 
lo SaptwnbM- M ot •« em 



north side of Potomac Street, 
as shown on Plat A and B. 

Parcel 6: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at ftie south side of 
Potomac Street, as shown on 
Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly fo the north side 
of Cleveland Street as shown 
on Plats A and B. 

Parcel 7: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Cleveland Street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Columbus Street as shown 
on Plats A afKi B. 

Parcel 8: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south skta of 
Columbus street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north sWe 
of Lafayette Street, as shown 
on Plat A. 

Plats with more detalMd 
Information are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
( Pembroke Area ) . 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. Petition Of Fanner V. 
Woolard, Jr., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from H-6 Residential District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
beglmilnB at a peinf ^.18 
feet East of Kempsville 
Road, rwming a distance of 
467 n feet along the Northern 
prt^erty line of which 292.11 
leet is tf)e South side of 
Indian River Road, running a 
ditlance of SS2.74 feet aloi^ 
nm EMiem propefty line, 
rttnt a distance of WM 



at a point 720 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and 435 feet more or 
less Northeast of Holland 
Road containing 0.23 acre. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Deparfment ofcftannlng. 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition by motion of the 
Planning Commission of ttte 
City of Virginia Beach for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business 
District to Al Apartment 
District to (wrect drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years that became evldwit 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 825 feet more or 
less Soutt^ast rt Washington 
Avenue and 435 feet more or 
less Northeast of Holland 
Road containing 0.56 acre. 
Plats with nKM-e detailed 
information are available In 
the Department of Plawlng. 
(Pecan GardensCity Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

10. Petition by motion of 
the Planning Commission of 
ttie City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change of Zwiing District 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business 
District to A 1 Apartment 
Districf to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previow 



mn« 



years tt«ai became evident 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 1825 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and fronting 75 feel 
along the East side of 
Holland Road containing 0.61 
acre. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 
ot Planning. (Pecan Gar 
dens City Park Areas). 
PRi'nCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

11. Petition by motion of 
the Planning Commission ol 
Ihe City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change ot Zoning District 
Classification from A 1 
Apartment District to B2 
Community Business 
District to correct drafting 

errorswhich had been carried 
over Irom previous years 
thai became evident when an 
attempt was >nade lo plot a 
recent zoning change In the 
area, beginning al a point 160 ' 
feel more or less Southeast ol 
Washington Avenue and 210 
feel more or less North ol 
Holland Road containing 
0.034 acre. Plats with more 
detailed information are 

avaiiablein the Department ol 
P'lanning. (Pecan Gardens 
City Park Area). PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

12. Petition by motion of 
the Planning Commission of 
the City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification trom A 1 
Apartment District lo B-2 
Community Business 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had befsn car 
rledoverfromprevlous years 
thai become evident when an 
attempt was made to plot a 
recent zoning change in the 
area, beginning at a point 750 
feel more or less Southeast ot 
Washington Avenue and 360 
feel more or less Northeast ot 
Holland Road containing 0.08 
acre. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (Pecan Gar 
dens-City Park Areas). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

u. mention oy monon ot 
the Planning Commission of 
the City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change ot Zoning District 
Classification trom A 1 
Apartment District to B-2 
Community Business 
Disirfct to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years that became evident 
when an attempt was made 
lo plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 900 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue on the Northeast side 
ot Holland Road to a distance 
of 420 feet more or less 
containing 1.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in 
tormation are available in 
Ihe Department of Planning. 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

14. Petition by motion of 
the Planning Commission of 
Ihe City of Virginia Beach lor 
a Change ot Zoning District 
Classification from B 2 
Community Bus|ness 
District to P-1 Preservation 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years t.'iat became evident 
when an attempt was made 
lo plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 150 feet more or 
less Southeast ot Washington 
Avenue and 925 leet more or 
less North of Holland Road 
containing 1.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed infor- 
mation are available In the 
Department ot Planning 
(Pecan GardensCity Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Dr. Waller L. 
Taylor, Jr. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
trom A 1 Apartment District 
to 1 Office District on 
certain property beginning al 
a point 130 feel East ot Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
ol 120 feel along the South 
side of 25ih Street, running a 
distance ol 190 feel along the 
Eastern properly line, 
running a distance of 120 f*Bt 
along Ihe Southern properly 
line, running a distance of 190 
leet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as Lots 22, 24, 26, and 
28, Block 93, Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 0.525 acre. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

16. Petition of Kimberly 
Shores, Inc. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from B-1 Business 
Residential District to A3 
Apartment District on 

. certain property beginning at 
a point 2,640 feet more or less 
East of Diamond Springs 
Road, runnlfH) a distance ot 
487.02 feet along the South 
side of Shore Drive, running 
a distance of 776.83 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
(Lake Smith) and running a 
distance ot 661.96 feet along 
the Western properly line. 
Said parcel contains 4.17 
acres and Is triangular in 
shape. (Lake Smith Little 
Creek Amphibious Base 
Areas). BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

17. Petition of n.O. AAoore, 
F. Donald Reid, and Jim 
Rose for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R 6 Residential District to B 

1 Business-Residential 
Districf on certain property 
beginning at a point 500 feet 
more or less Southwest al 
Stewarf Drive located at the 
Southeast corner of Kemps- 
ville Road and Albright 
Drive, running a distance of 
170.71 feet along the East 
side of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 581.74 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 350 
feet is the South side of 
Albright Drive, running a 
distance of 151.21 feet along 
the Eastern property line a 
running a distance of 581.06 
feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2,175 acres. 
(Country Haven 
Brigadoon Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH 

18. Petition ol Windermore 
Propoerties Co. by Pickett, 
Spain and Lyie, Attorneys, 
for a Change (rf ZonWm 
Disirict ClassHlcatlon trrni 
R-6 Residential District to ■- 

2 Community Business 
District on cw-faln property 
located on tl» Southw^f 
comer of Providence Road 
and Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of l,4W 
leet mwe or less atong the 
South side of Providence 
Road, running a distance of 
1 J« feel more or leM along 

9 « 



the West side of Kem|Rville 
Road, running a distance of 
750 feel more more of le« 
along the Southern property 
line, and running a dislaltee 
of 1,450 leet more or less 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 33.7 
acres. (Haven Estates 
Bellamy Manor Stratford 
Chase Acredale Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

19. Petition ol Windermere 
Properties Co. by Pickett, 
Spain and LyIe, Attorneys, 
lor a Change of Zoning 
DIslrici Classification from 
R 6 Residential districf to A 2 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the South side ofProvidence 
Road, beginning at a point 
1,470 feet more or less West 
of Kempsville Road, running 
a distance ot 600 feet more or 
less along the South side of 
Providence Road, running a 
distance of 1,150 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 650 feet more or 
less along ihe Southern 
property line, and running a 
distance of 1,790 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 20.5 acres. (Hawwi 
Estates Bellamy Manor 
Stratford Chase Acredale 
Arras). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

20. Petition of Windermere 
Properties Co. by Pickett, 
Spain, and LyIe, Attorneys, 
tor a Change of Zoning 
Disirict Classification from 
R 6 Residential District to R 
9 Townhouse District on 
certain property located on 
the West side of Kempsville 
Road beginning at a point 
1,140 teet more or less South 
ot Providence Road, runnlnq 
a distance of 2,050 feet more 
or less along the Eastern 
property line of which 960 
feet more or less Is the West 
side of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 630 feel 
more or less along Ihe 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 1,730 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line, and 
running a distance of 1,050 
leet more or less along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 34J acres. 
(Haven Estates Bellamy 
Manor Stratford Chase 
Acredale Areas). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

21. Petition of Expressway 
Construction Company for a 
Change of Zoning Dlstrld 
Classification from 0-1 
Office District to 1-1 
Industrial District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
200 feel North of Holland 
Road, running a distance ol 
495 leet along the West side of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 257.33 leet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 394.90 
feel along the Western 
property line, and running a 
distance ol 257.33 feel along 
Ihe Southern properly line. 
Said parcel contains 2,92 
acres. (Mount Trashmore 
Area). KEMPSVILLE BOR 
OUGH. 

22. Petition ol Arthur B. 
Carter, Jr. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
trom A 1 Apartment District 
to B-4 Resort Commercial 
Districi on certain property 
beginning al a point 190 feel 
East of Cypress Avenue, 
running a distance of 60 feet 
along the South side of 21st 
Street, running a distance of 
130 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 60 feet along Ihe 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 130 feet 
along Ihe Western property 
line. Said parcel Is known as 
Lots 18 and 20, Block 46, Map 
No. 6 Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 7,800 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

23. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from H-1 Hotel 
Districi lo B-4 Resort 
Commercial District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 529.18 feel West of 
Woodland Aveiiue and 
running a distance of 260 feet 
along ihe Sooth side of 
Laskln Road, running a 
distance of 346.87 feet along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of 260 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, and running a distance 
ol 347.10 feel along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 2.07 acres. 
(Laskln Road Shopping 
Center Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

Conditional Use Permlls: 

24. Application of Ralph A. 
and Anna Bess Godley 
Souder lor a Conditional Use 
Permit for a private 
recreational area for a 
building for the storage of 
boats on certain property 
beginning at a point 3,325 feet 
more or less East of Princess 
Anne Road and running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
South side ot Public Landing 
Road, rdnning a distance of 
155.40 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 157.» 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.36 acre. (Back 
Bay Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

25. petiflon of Sidney R. 
Denny and William E. Barco 
for a Conditional Use Permit 
to operate an outdoor 
recreation ar«a^joil driving 
range on certain property 
located on t^ East side of 
Holland Road across from' 
L^ndstown Road, running a 
distance of 670 feet more or 
less along the East side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 8M feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
dlstwce of 535 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 1075 feet nwe or 
less along the Northern 
^^wrty Une. Said parcel 
contains 8.8 acres more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

26. Application Of 
Tidewater Hunt Club fw a 
Conditional Use Permit to 
operate »n outdoor 
recreafkw area to Include a 
sportsmen's lodge, hunting, 
fishing, skeet range, indoor 
small bore range, year i^ond 
family activities, firwirms 
instructions for youngsters 
on cM^ln property currently 
zoned AG 1 Agricultural 
Dislrici beginnlrni at a point 
2,4M'feet more or less North 
of Gum Bridge Road, run 
ning a distance of 4t0.61 feet 
akjng the East side ol A^jddy 
Creek Road, ruiming a 
distance of ^in (mi atong 



the Northern propeKfy llt»e, 
running a distance of 448.10 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, anb running a 
distance of 1,628.74 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 16.26 
acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 
Street Closures: 

27. Application ol the City 
ol Virginia Beach 
Development Authority by 
Bruce B, Mills, Attorney, for 
the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonment of Old 
Baker Road which begins al 
a point 970,89 teet North of 
the Norfolk and Southern 
Railway Right ol Way from 
the West side of Diamond 
Springs Road and running In 
a westwardly direction a 
distance of 1,036.52 feet to the 
East side ol Baker Road. 
Said street is 30 leet in width. 
(Airport Industrial Park 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

28. Application of 
Beachlawn Baptist Church 
lor the discontinuance, 
closure and abandonment of 
that portion of 10th Street 
beginning at a point 25 feet 
more or less South of Norfolk 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 183 leet more or less almig 
Ihe Northern boundary line, 
running a distance of 32 feel 
more or less along the 
Eastern boundary line and 
running a distance of 180 feet 
along Ihe Southern boundary 
line (Northern property line 
of Lois 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, - 
Block 27, Plat of Shadowlawn 
Heights) and running a 
distance of SO feet along the 
Western boundary line. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

29. Appllcellon Of Indian 
Lakes, Inc., by Talbot and 
Associates, Ltd. for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
atjandonmeni ot a portion of 
Garnett Road beginning on 
the South side ol Andover 
Road and running in a South- 
westwardly direction a 
distance of 830 leet more or 
less. Said request includes 
only the eastern 20 feet of the 
existing 70 foot rlghf-ofway 
to the Southern rlghlol way 
line of Bonnydale Road; the 
remaining portion to the 
Northern boundary line of 
Indian Lakes Planned 
Development Is 70 feet In 
width. Plats with more 
detailed Information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (Indian Lakes 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH, 

30. Application ot the City 
of Virginia Beach for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment ol Avenue A 
located North and South of 
Shore Drive and portions of 
Ocean Avenue as shown on 
AAap Book 5, PI. 1, Page 71. 
Plats with more detailed 
Information are available in 
Ihe Department of Planning. 
Parcel 1: Avenue A; 
Beginning at a point 129,49 
feet East of Kleen Street and 
running a distance of 187.11 
feet along the South side ol 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance ol 428.72 feel along 
Ihe Eastern boundary line, 
running a distance ot 160.74 
teet along the Southern 
boundary line and running a 
distance ol 457.47 teet along 
the Western boundary line. 
Parcel 2: Avenue A: 
Beginning at a point- 134.72 
feel East of Kleen Street and 
running a distance ol 200.27 
leet along the North side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 500 feet along the 
Eastern boundary line, 
running a distance of 235 
feet more or less along the 
Northern boundary line and 
running a distance of 500.02 
feet along the Western 
boundary property line. 

Parcel 3: Ocean Avenue: 
Beginning at a point 334.99 
^ feel Easi ol Kleen Street and 
500 teet North of Shore Drive, 
running in a westwardly 
direction a distance of 185 
feel, running a distance of 100 
feet along the Western 
boundary line and running a 
distance of 185 leet along Ihe 
Northern boundary line and 
running a distance of 100 feet «, 
along Ihe Eastern boundary fii 
line. 5 

Parcel 4: Ocean Avenue" 
(Northern 40 (eel): Begin- 
ning al a point 118.97 feet 
East ol Great Neck Road and 
565.60 feel North of Shore ^ 
Drlv* and running in a > 
westwardly direction a .' 
distance of 2126.5 feel along 
the Southern boundary line, 
running a distance of 40 feet 
along the Western boundary „i 
line, running a distance of 
2125 feel more or less along " 
the Northern boundary line, '• 
and running a distance of 40 • 
feet along the Eastern 
boundary line. (Lynnhaven , 
Shores Lynnhaven Colony ' 
Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
Amendments: 

31. Resolution of the,, 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend ani;! reordain ' 
Article 1, Section 102, 'I 
Paragraph (b) (1) entitled , » 
Recording Amendments to ,. 
the Official Zoning AAap to ,; 
read as follows: 

( 1 ) On the effective date of ••. 
any map amendment or upon ;; 
the satisfactory compliance 
with Ihe conditions imposed,^ 
the change shall be posted onX 
the zoning rtap by the^ 
Planning Director and.,^ 
records accompanying the^ 
map shall identify the official ;{| 
action by which such S 
amendment was made, 'he^ 
date of such action, the area 2 
involved, and the date of w 
p««tlng. #■' 

32. A/totion by the Planning 5 
Commission of the City rt 4g 
Virginia Beach to amend andsp 
reordain Article 2, Section^ 
216, entitled OutdoorX 
Advertising Structures,^ 
Billboards, Signboards, and ^ 
Poster Panels, Paragraph ,» 
(0 Is amended and reor--**, 
<toined to read as follows: !* 

(f) The following streets,^ 
highways, interstafes, and ^ 
exprewways shall, beginning rf 
with the effective date of this * 
Ordinance, be designated IOm 
nave special Sign Resfrlc-rt 
tlons: Northampton);? 
Boulevard, Independence*^ 
Boulevard, Shore Drive (U.S. «» 
60), First Colonial Road, ^ 
Great Neck Road, Little ^ 
Neck Road, Virginia B«ch-i«* 
r^trfolk Expressway (VA.jJ 
Rt. 44), General ■oofhJj 
Boulevard, U.S. Intefstate.;- 
64, Sandbrl^je Road, False ^ 
Cape Parkway atMi Lynn^ 
havwi Parkway. h 

Plats with mora detailed-^ 
information on the ab««f 
applications are avallatrte 
the Oe^rtment ot Plaiwiint.J 

All taterested ptnmm 
invited to attend. 
ChwiK C C«rrlnffw> 
Director of Plannfig 



mm 



9mm 



OlcissifiecP 



Page B-e-The Sun-WedneMay, June 19, 1974 



RATES: All classified 
advertising (businesses 
and individuals) only 25 
cents per line of type, with 
a nrilnimum ctiarge of $2. 

Classified display $2.52 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk; or 
phone 486 3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basls; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



3 Special Servlcet 



REDUCE 


SAFE 


& FAST 


with GoBese Tablets & E- 


Vap 


water 


pills", 


Murden's 


Drug. 





WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

623-9194. 



SIXMt&Found 



Announcements 



1_SUNSJ 



msk 



ADS 



SORRY GIRLS — But we 
couldn't make it. Jesse 8< 
Joe. 

DIANE — I will always think 
you are the sweetest person I 
have ever known, always, 
your old friend, Johnny. 



MARGARET 
Birthday ever, 
you Saturday. 
Bill & Jeanne. 



-r Happiest 
Hope to see 
Much love. 



JOE — I'm ready! Monkey's 
ready! You're the one that's 
chicken. Just remember I've 
got the whipped cream. Yea, 
I do. Fuiiy. 

DEAR DIANE — Thank you 
for my day. June 16 vyas al! I 
could hope for. You, and my 
gift and my Blues. Love you 
with all my heart. Popa 
Bear. 

JOE & JESSE - Yoor co- 
workers think you're rat 
finks, now prove us different! 

TOM Friday is only 2 days 
away ... I can hardly wait. I 
love you Diane. 



BICYCLE LOST — New red 
Eddy-Merckx. Boys 10 
spe^d bike. Vicinity of 
Tidewater Dr. and Bayview 
Ave; Sat., May U between 2 
and 8 pm. Reward. Please 
call 587-0076 after 3 pm. 

LOST SIAMESE — 
Sealpoint, female, wearing 
rust color flea collar, last 
seen May 13 in Windsor 
Woods area. 486-5270. 



8 Buria l Lots 

CEMETERYlLOT^^^tS 
with markers In Rosewood 
Memorial Cemetery. $450 
for both. 340-5011. 



e 



11 Auttmiobilei Pot Sile 

CADILLAC — 1965, all 
power, air conditioned. 
Good condition. 487-4166. 



1 1 Automobto for Sri« 

VEGA — 19*73 Wagon, 
automatic, radio, lest than 
14,500 miles. $2500. 399-4672. 

VEGA — 1971 Station 
Wagon, 4 speed, new 
engine, new alternator, 
carburetor overhauled, 4 
ply white wall tires. AM- 
FM radio with antenna in 
windshield. Rear glass 
defroster. Excellent 
mechanical. Body slightly 
damaged. $1385. 464-3352. 



irBoaSriiMiiie 



toppSeT 



CHRYSLER — 1971, 23', alt 
fiberglass cruiser, fully 
equipped on trailer. 
Excellent cond. $5500. 340- 
7469. 



MM^ 



Wtntod 



VOLKSWAGEN-1970 
^Squareback. New tires. 464- 
0424. 



VOLKSWAGEN 
Camper. Good 
$1695. 499-7 J3'9. 



1968 Van 
condition. 



VOLKSWAGEN — 1972 
Super Beetle with air 
conditioning, rear 
defroster, FM green, one 
owner. $2,550. 489-7295. 



CHRYSLER — 1967, Station 
Wagon, Town & Country. 9 
passenger. Excellent for 
trip. 426-6559. 

DATSUN - 1971, 24 OZ, 
new Michelln tires, mag 
wheels. 428-2070. 



VOLKSWAGON CAMP- 
ER— Van, .1964, new 
rebuilt engine, good cond. 
$650. 481-7470. 



12 Trucks, TnUeit, Jeeps 

CHEVROLET — ,19A« 
Panel Truck. Has new 
carburetor, tires and brake 
shoes. Excellent condition. 
$800. 481-3261. 

ECONOLINE VAN 
Automatic transmission; 
engine excellent. New 8 ply 
tires. Great for work. $550. 
425 3831. 

DATSUN — 1974 Pickup, 
Step bumper, 5,000 miles, 
$3,000. 340 7530. 

FORD — 1974 RANGER 
XLT. Fully loaded. Small 
equity and take oyer 
payments. 490-0602. 

FORD - 1970, Vjton. New 
paint. V-8 A-1 condition. 
$1495. 583 4003. 



HARKERS^'lSLAND 21' 
with small cabin. Like new. 
65 HP Mercury motor In 
well. 397-4590. 

OWENS — 28' Sport 
Fisherman with flying 
bridge, flagship engine. 
$3,000 or bestoHer. 587-4376, 
588-2880. 

SAlTFoAT ^^ 10' 

Fiberglass Cape Dory. 
Solid mahogany seats, with 
sail. $700. 547-8949. 

SCORPION — Sailboat, 
Fiberglass, simlllar to 
Sunfish; trailer. $395. 340- 
9774^_ 

STAR CRAFT— 14' 

windshield lights, rod 
holder, equipped to fish day 
or night. Master Craft 
trailer electric winch. 
Ready to go. 545-6616. 

SHENANDOAH - 1968, 23' 
fiberglass, new rebuilt 160 
1-0, fully equipped. $3500 
firm. 488-0263. 

SPORTCRAFT — 21', 1972, 
Outriggers, depth finder, 
Evinrude motor. $3,500. 855- 
6601 or 855-5756. 

WANTED TO RENT:Boat 
Slip for 23' boat Virginia 
Beach. 486 7080 

WINNER — 1972, 

Fiberglass, 120 H.P. Chevy 
II Motor; 1-0. 497-7538. 



■ EMPLOYMENTB 



MAINTENANCE WORK 
ERS — Knowledge of 
all types of maintenance 
on houses. 460-0171. 

MECHANIC — Forkllft 
experience desirable. Must 
have own tools. Call 627- 
0474. 



MEN - WOMEN — Start 
now. Earn extra Income in 
your spare time. Call 464- 
4971. 

REFRIGERATION 
MECHANIC 
Commercial repair work. 1st 
class only. Permanent 
position. Top pay. Equal 
opportunity employer. 420- 
6140. 

SALES — can earn $4 an 
hour selling Fuller Brush 
Products. Full or part-time. 
Call 543-5224. 

SHEET METAL 

MECHANIC — and helpers. 
Experienced in house and 
apartment installation, 
duct work and equipment. 
Excellent pay and 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays and vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622 
3605, Mr. Oezern. 

STATE INSPECTOR 

Arrowhead Union 76 

497-6473 

SUMMER JOBS — Full and 
part-time. Ideal for students. 
340-1434. . 

TENNIS COURT CON 
STRUCTION — Some ex 
perience necessary. Call 
after 8 p.m. 489-7891. 

$2.75 PER HOUR 
Part or full time. Ideal for 
civilian or military. We need 
10 people to work In sales 
and service dept. No 
experience necessary. Call 
Mrs. Black 499-1269. 

36Jd»Wi]ited 



DATSUN - 1973, 610, 2 
door, hardtop, automatic, 
radio, lowner. Mags. 
Excellent condition. $2750. 
588-7057. 



J.M. — Can I be there when 
the time comes? D.M. 



FORD — 1956 paneled 
truck", $250. 855-4961. 

FORD — 1973 F-100 Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, 302 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588-2540. 



FORD — 1973 Grand Torino 

Sport. Fully equipped, air 

■— 7 conditioned, 4 barrel car- 

TIMMY-Nowyou'llhaveto buretor. 8,000 miles. 486-1319. s,=d,no 5:^. door excellent 

keep your room clean. Tom & sliding sioe °^'^"\"" 

*^' ,_,, mechanical cond. New tires. 

HONDA-CiviC, 1973. 

Hatchback, air 

conditioning, radio, 8,000 

miles. $2,600. 545-5370. 



Diane. 

SUGAR LUMP — How's your 
piscatology? Pat. 



FORD-1972, Super Van, V8; 



$2500. 583 3920. 



SCOTT — Take good care 
of Gramma 8, Grampa. Luv 



JAGUAR — 1972 V-12, 2 plus 
2, loaded. %6J0m. Excellent 
Vf_^ condition. 857-5792. 

THADEUS — It's good to 

have you back, even for a 
visit. Your "Sun" Friends 



FUZZY — Thanks for the 
whipped cream, even 'though 
it was all smushed up. But — 
Look Out! Cripple 

JESSE AND JOE — I don't 
think you're anything but 
nice. Besides, I'll bet they 
really didn't have a good 
time. Diane. 



¥ 



3 special Services 



AUTO JUNK 

TOWED AWAY FREE 

855-4372 

BOARDING HOME — For 
children, 7 days a week. For 
information call 547-3069. 



AUTO JUNK— Towed Free. 
Phone 625-7918 or 625-5115 
Nights 853-2292 

CANDY THE CLOWN • 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

DOUBLE KNIT REPAIR 
Reweaving. French 
Reweaving Co., 213 
Midtown BIdg. Wards 
Corner, Norfolk. 588-6162. 

FURNITURE — 
Appliances, Recliners, 
Rugs, at Auction Prices. 
Gladstone Auction Co., 5359 
Virginia Beach blvd. 
Norfolk, 855-2821. 



HOUSEJACKING 





Replacing floor 


ioists 


and 


sills. 4649636, 


4645229. 


Rogers. 







MAZDA - 1973, RX2 
Coupe. Automatic, air 
conditioned, AM-FM Stereo 
tape. Blue. Like new 
condition. 545-1291. 

MORRIS MINOR — 1967 
Convertible. $450. 428 0183. 

MUSTANG — 1970, Black 
vinyl top, new tires, 
standard transmission, 302 
V8 engine. Excellent cond. 
$1300. 857-7280, 444-5107. 

MG- 1971 Midgette Second 
owner. Good condition. $1775. 
587-1676. 

MG — 1969 Midgett, 
excellent running condition, 
needs painting. $1350. 625- 
9633 after 2 p.m. 

MUSTANG — 1974 

Hatchback. $3400. Call 
Clark at 420-0562 or 625-3691. 



OLDSMOBILE — 1969 
Cutlass S. Air conditioned, 
good condition. $100 and take 
over payments. 425-5033 after 
5 p.m. 

PLYMOUTH — 1969, Fury 
III, 4 door hardtop, all 
power, small V-8, good 
condition. $595. 481-3088. 

PONTIAC — 1968 Firebird, 
400. 4 speed, power 
steering. $950. 588-1540. 

PONTIAC — 1973 Firebird, 
fully equipped, V-8, 
eutomatic, must sacrifice, 
427-1451 after 6 p.m. 



l^Jotofcycl^^ot^^^^ 

CZ — 1972, 125 Motocross 
bike, like new. $700. Cycle 
Engineering of 
Chesapeake, 543-5585. 



HONDA — 1974, 125, like 
new. Less than SbO miles. 
$600. 340-0045 or 340-1260. 

HONDA — 1972-'/i CBIOO, 
very good condition. 3,000 
miles, new inspection, 
extra tire, 2 helmets. $375. 

486-4UVy. 

HONDA— 1^72 CB 350; 
high rise bars, crash bar, 
luggage rack. $750. 488-2548; 
after 5; 484-7942. 

HONDA 1974, CL360. Just 
take over payments. 425- 
1991. 



JEWEL TEA PRODUCTS 



Available in 
Va. Beach 



4262146 



7-9:30 P.M. 



Learn to cut and set your 
family's hair, $20 compete 
to first 5 to enroll. Also 
scholarships, available for 
complete beauty course. 
Call for details. Oceana 
Beauty Academy, 428-3246. 

MOVING - SAVE! Rent 
our trucks. Drivers 
available. Call American 
Rental Co. 855 1067. 



RENAULT 

The nation's Iar9«t seledion of 
used Renaulfs from the nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars wH»i our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E. LITTLE CREEK RO. 58i 
1334 .1.^— 



TOYOTA- 1969 Corona, 4 
door, very good condition. 
$975. 464 2181. 

THUNDERBIRD — 1959 
Classic. Excellent 
condition. Driven daily. 
$400. 587-2075. 



ACAREER IN REAL ESTATE 
CAN BE YOURS 

No fixperiwicc Necfinwy 

Ask ymumU tbtm three questtoi^ 

1. Do 1 waat to be <rf mviee to the pwblic? 

3. Do 1 imrt to lemitf I can dKWt Rod Ertale? 

>HNi 



3. Aa I wWm to derate loaf Immhs, 
weeltwdi to the ical erttte profeaioe? 



tf ytm em laiw yes to (hcM qMtttoM and waat to 
iHn man akeat te Red Eatile prafeirioe, ctf BU 
men tot m hMrviaw to^. 

fiyiER RlAlTf 

IIMIWBMflAi PtOPIM^i 

4M(^} US 



MOAUmMtaMI 
MAIL ~ 




IKAlfOR 



HONDA — 1974, CB360, 
Sissy bar, high rise handle 
bars. $1150. 488-9269. 

HONDA-1973, XR-75 plus 2 
helmets. Like new. 481-6072. 

HONOA-175. like new. Only 
400 miles. 485-3703. 

KAWASAKI — 1972, Mack 
IV 750. First $1100 takes it. 
497-8823. 

« 

YAMAHA — 1973 TC3, 
175CC. Excellent condition. 
$650. 486-1805. 

iSCMiipeis.TMa«w 

AIRSTREAM — 25', 1971. 
Like new. Air conditioned, 
awning, AM-FM Stereo, TV 
Hookup, extras. Electric 
brakes, hitch. 583-1410. 

APOLLO MOTOR HOME 
— 22' or 25', all power, AM- 
FM stereo, bath, air 
conditioning, generator, 
sleeps 6. 424-2678. 

AVENGER TRAIlfR - 
24', used 2 weeks, sleeps 6, 
completely selfcontalne<l, 4 
burner gas or electrrc, 
refrigerator, converts from 
battery to 120 volts, 
rechargeable by battery. 
Full ba th. 424-3418. 

21Bo^itotoe8Jff^w. 

AUTHORIZED 

T-CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 

H: 8S5-2510 



34 Help Wanted 

mmmmmtmmmimmmmmam 

I8QROVER 
Turn your spare time into 
$$$$$. First $10 in your 
home with' Sarah Coventry. 
424-1198. 

AIR CONDITIONING 
Mechanic. Experienced. 
6237265. 

AIR CONDITIONING 
MECHANIC - 

Experienced. 

623-7265 

AUTO BODY Fender man 
and Painter. Must have 
tools. Apply in person. 
Martin's Body Works, 3536 
E. Little Creek Rd., Norfolk 
583-4551. 

AUTOMOBILE BODY 
REPAIR-PAINT WORKER- 
Experienced with own tools. 
6252791. 



AUTO MECHANICS 

Must have own tools. 
543-1661 



AUTO WORKERS — AutO 
mechanics. State Inspector, 
Wreck driver. Call 583-3814, 
ask for Mr. Barker. 

BABYSITTERS 
Register and earn extra 
money sitting with our 
agency. For info call 489- 
1622. Babysitters Tidewater 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
Earn $3,000 to $5,000 this 
summer, while getting a 
good basic background In 
business and marketing. 
Qualifications: Must be 
over 21, personable, honest 
and have own trans- 
portation. Call 499-7053. 

ELECTRICIANS 8. 
HELPERS — Experienced 
in house and apartment 
wiring. Must have 
lourneyman's card. 
Excellent pay, 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays, paid vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Pete Parker. 

HEATING - AIR CON 
DITIONING MECHANIC - 
Full time. 499-9677. 

FENCE ERECTORS — 
Experienced. Top pay. 857- 
0071 days; 545-4558 nights. 



LADIES- MEN 

BRANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladles 
for Branch Manager 
positions. Must have neat 
appearance. 

$610 month to Start 
Plus bon^s and benefits 

Call 499-276] 



BOAT — 14" 
frailer. 40 
Motor. $«M. 



Aluminum with 
hp Evinrude 
54$-««0. 



CABIN CRUISER — 23 
Sports Fisherman, 
Chrysler inboard, mint 
conditton, $3200. 420-4863. 



DREAMS LARGER 
Than 

YOUR PAYCHECK? 
Let us help you achle^ the 
things you wanti 
Nationally known 
products. Amazlne 
security possible. 
Investment of IMS tl^an 
S40.00, 100 per cent 
refundAble and S4.M 
membership fee (net 
refundable). No oMigatton 
to sit down and talk over 
potantlals. Phone 4n-«S«e 
or S4S-0004, Room • 606. 



REAL ESTATE AOENTS- 
6 fulf-timt, « part-time 
agents needed for new 
Virginia Beach office. 
Instant commission 
arrangement, lif,s 
Insurance, hospltalizatien, 
free license preparation, 
and on the fob traln- 
fng. Call Wayne Jar- 
rett for confidonttal 
Interview. 



m 



430-0940 623-S4ei 

■aUAL OPPORTUNITY 

•ROttRR 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATBLVI 

6 men and women to start 
In good paying lob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
provided. 

NO experience necessary. 
We will train yoe. 



45 Mrale iminictioBt 

TUTORING — in "ly 
home; all elementary 
sublects; by certified 
teacher. 853-6596. 



W PETS- W 
I UVESTOOC ■ 



47Peti-U»eptock ^ 

BASSETS — Quality puppies, 
shots and wormed. AKC 
registered. $50. 497-9500 or 
497-3595. 

BASSET HOUND PUPPY 
— 1 male. Tricolor, 10 
weeks old. AKC registered. 
Wormed. $100. 499-4349. 

BEAGLE PUPS 
Registered. $75. 625-7131, 
Please leave message. ' 

BUNNIES 
for sale, $4 and $5 each. 
855-4956. 



CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES — 
Purebred, AKC registered, 
paperbroke, wormed, 90 
percent love and affection, 
10 percent bone and hair. 
623-1256. 

CHINESE PUG Puppies, 8 
weeks, shots, wormed. AKC 
reg. $135. 4200791. 



COLLIE— Female, 9 weeks 
old. Tricolor, AKC 
registered. 857-0490. 



47 PM» Ufeitodc 



ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
AKC registered, shots, 
wormed, terms. 340-5773. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
Males, AKC registered, 
wormed, dew claws 
removed,' available, 
reasonable. 499-5247. 

WELSH CORGI PUPPY 
3 month old male, AKC reg. 
Permanent shots. 
Champion sired. 490-2246. 

47A Fet-Stiid Serrkc 

Virginia Stud Registry 
Looking for a good AKC 
registered stud or puppy. 
Call 424-2174, 9-7. Closed 
Wed. 



■ merchandiseI 




AIR CONDITIONER - 
10,800 BTU. Excellent cond. 
220 volts. $110. 486-2819. 



AIR CONDITIONERS - 
(2) 30,000 BTU, excellent 
condition. $350 each. 
853-7661. 



Call 



BABYSITTING — In my 
home, nights only. For in 
formation call 855-2561. 

BABYSITTING — my home, 
np age limit, 5 days a week. 
Daily, nightly, weekly. 
Oceana area. 428-4927. 

BABYSITTING 
My home. Fenced yard. 497- 
0666. 

BABYsirTlNG - for 
working mothers, my 
home. Windsor Woods area. 
340-5655. 

BABYSITTING — My 
home, day or night, near 
Military Mall. 499-4557. 



COLLIES - AKC registered. 
Wormed and shots. 
Guaranteed. Call Pet Luv, 
497 8468 or 490-0874. 



DACHSHUND PUPPIES— 
Miniature males, 7 weeks, 
AKC Registered; $75; 420- 
4139. 



DOBERMAN PINSCHER 
— Free to good home, good 
house pet. 583-8813. 

FREE KITTENS — To a 
good home. Call 486-3430 
days before 5 p.m., ask for 
Miss Painter. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPY- REGISTERED. 

855-4078 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPS AKC registered. 
Black and silver. 420-5197. 



BABYSITTING 
home, fenced 
Kempsville area. 



— My 

yard; 

497-7394. 



AIR CONDITIONER - 
1973, Sears Coldspot. Used 3 
months. 21,000 BTU, 220 
volt. $250. 420-8107. 

BUILT - IN RANGE - 
OVEN — Westlnghouse 
electric with clock timer. 
Coppertone. Good 
condition. $35. 497-2578. 

INSULATION — 3W full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 



51A Antiques 

ANTIQUES, We buy 
anything old; furniture, 
glassware, jewelry; 1 piece 
or entire estate. ZEDD 
AUCTION CO. 622-4182. 

Duncan Phyfe sofa and 
chair; solid maple table. 
Very old. 420-9164. 

52 Household Goods 

Ben Franklin stove; never 
used, $175. Encyclopedia 
Americana, 35 volumes, 
$75. 420-9164. 



BABYSITTING — In my 
home, no age limit, 
Aragona Village, days, 
weekly. 499-8023. 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home, Thalia Village. 486- 
8166. 



GERMAN SHEPHERD — 10 
months, AKC registered. 
Spayed. Obedience trained. 
All shots. 340-7016. 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS- 
AKC reg., 9 weeks, shots, 
black 8i silver. 853-1085. 



GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
PUP 2 months old. 855-9407. 



BABYSITTING — in my ^ ^, . ..._ 

home, anytime. Monday- dinmg 



Friday. Call 428-7934. 

CHILD CARE — In my 
home, Westview area. 424- 
9754. _ 

BABYSITTING — in my 
home. Ages 3 and up. 
Carriage Hill area. 340-3507. 

CHILD CARE-My hOlTie. 
Oceana area. Anytime. Hot 
meals. Very reasonable. 
428-5987. 

TYPING — My home, 
experienced. Secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 

■ FINANCIAL I 

38 Buifawis Opportunities 

BEAUTY SALON — Near 
Shopping center on Little 
creek Rd. Call 587 7477 or 
340-1914. 

MOTORCYCLE BUSINESS 
— For sale. Inventory of 
motorcycles, parts, tools, 
and equipment. Mr. Beller, 
547-7984, 485-5800. 

$300. will get you a shop ^ 
Old Towne on an 
assumption basis. Some 
merchandise Included, a 
tremendous family 
business. For Information 
call 486-6905. 



4M Oenarai mstrycttens 

Real estate exam 
COURSE Virginia Real 
Estate School. Beacon 
BIdg. 499-3461 
(Across from Pembroke 

Mall) 

NURSES AIDES 

Summer's here, Khool's 
out. Starting classes now. 
Holmes School of Nurses 
Aides, 340-0620. 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrlsson, taMSfl. 



44 



GREAT DANE— Female, 
black, 7 weeks old. 490-1493 
or 855-8931. 

GREAT DANE — AKC reg. 
Female, Fawn. 10 months 
old. $175. 497-4701. 

KITTENS — Lively, exc. 
dispositions, must sell, good 
homes only. 2 males, 2 
females. Black-wht. $3 ea. 
423 1094. 

KITTENS -mixed. 
Free. 5 weeks. 
Call 486-5206. 

KITTENS — Free to good 
home, 8 M«eks old. Call 426- 
6648. 

KITTENSFREE 
4 Kittens, all female. 583- 
4124. 



LABRADOR PUPS — reg., 7 
weeks, black. Super Chief 
strain. Dr. Green, days, 627- 
4131, nights Suffolk 539-6515. 

LABRADOR RE^^RIEVER 
— AKC registered. 7 
months old. $85. 464-6080. 



486-S4SO 



54 Mmkri Merchwdiie TT^t^rR^*^^^^ 

CLARINET — Bundy, OCEANA GARDENS — 3 
Seimer, wood, very good bedrooms, available 
condition, $105. 464-1297. immediately, $195. 340-7777 

— or 340-4121. 

GUITARS — Gigson, Les 

Paul, $500. Gibson SG, $350. ' ^^^m^^^^gmmmm^tm 

both 1 month old. 543-5113 j, Resort Pr agerty-Rent 

anytime. ■■^■■■i^SiHaBi*'^'' 

COTTAGE FOR RgNT, 

ORGAN — Lowery, 2 oelray Beach, Mags Head, 
manual, $350 or will trade for ^ ^ Sleeps 8. 484-3804. 

piano in good condition. 427 __' ■ 

2555 

1 HOUSES a. 

_,..,_ ,. ^ r-i u APARTMENTS 

PIANG-Story and Clark, Available on a yearly or 
Remodeled; $275; 499-1474 ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

fJT^O - PLAYER, Old, ^^^IJI.^^tVT*"^^ 

needs some work. $525. 8.S5- Zmo^ 

9189. __„ 

3906 PACIFIC AVE. 

New2bedf0omapts. 
Central *(r, carpeted, 
drapes, dishwasher, washer 
and dryer. 1 block to beach; 
$275 month yearly. Available 
Aug. 1st. Call, 

DICKSON REALTY 
428 6501 



WANTED TO BUY used 
Pianos. We also tune, 
rebuild, reflnish and sell all 
types of pianos. 583-0486. 

55 TV-Radto-Stereo 

ROSS TAPE PLAYER — 2 
speakers; good condition, 
$50 857 1938. 

58 Goo d Things TojEat 

CRABS — Hard shell by 
dozen or bushel; also 
Croakers and gray trout. 30 
cents lb. with minimum of 25 
lbs. 340-1988. 

WE SHELL ANY KIND OF 
PEAS OR BUTTER 
BEANS. SO LBS. Of 
Potatoes, $5.25. 497-2157. 

WE SELL Live Crabs, by 
the dozen or by the bushel. 
Earl Smith Oyster Co., 947 
Hurds rd.. 340-5171. 



AIR CONDITIONER — 
Gibson, 10,500 BTU, 
excellent working 
condition. $75. 497-3702. 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
20,000 BTU. Signature. Like 
new. Wood grain front. $250. 
481-1334. 



CHAIRS — set of 4 AAahogany 
chairs. Empire style. 
Excellent condition. 
$135 489-9328. 

CHINA — Quality furniture 
and miscellaneous items. 
587-2317. 

DISHWASHER — 
Kelvinator, like new, $125. 
489-1303. 

FURNITURE — 3 rooms, 
living room, dinette, 
bedroom, almost new. Very 
reasonable. 427-2127. 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room $119.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recliner, 
Bunk Beds, $78 each. Maple 
Boston Rocker $45. Easy . 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623- 
4100, dealer. 



KITCHEN SET — 5 piece, 
black and white. $45. Call 
5437253. 



LHASA APSOPUPPY- 
AKC registered. Female. 
545-6768. 

Pekingese pups - 
AKC I'eglstered. 6 weeks. 
Pick yours now. Honey 
beige, brown. 587-6175. 

POODLE PUPPIES — 
Miniature. AKC registered. 
2 males, 2 females. 
Wormed, clipped, shots. $50 
480-3062. 



POODLES 
registered. 
Should see 
4266559. 



- Apricot, AKC 
5 weeks old. 
to appreciate. 



SHETLAND SHEEPDOGS^^o. ff. refrigerator-freezer. 



GRIMiS 

Ml^lC SCHOOL 

tin 



•Tenor Banlo- 

aawHaws- 

■m QMltaHMandollA. 



Males, Champion sired 
AKC litter registered, 
sable, pet, show. 340-8765. 

SHIH TZU PUPPIES — 
Champion Sellers! $275. 
Sm»ll, rare Tibetan Lion 
dogs. Black and black and 
white. 6 weeks old. AKC 
reg. 464-3441. 

SILKY TERRIERS - 
Breed Information, quality 
puppies, sired by top US 
Silky 1969, member Silky 
Terrier Club of America. 
423-4157. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPS 
— 10 weeks old. Champion 
sired. Shots, wormed. 853- 

9218. ^^______ 

ST. BERNARD— Male, AKC 
registered, 6 monttts old, $90. 
340-7109. 

ST. BERNARD PUPPIES— 
Registered, wormed, shots, 
fwnales $75, mal« $100. 
340S2M. 



d3WntodtoBmr 



ST. BERNARD— male. 1 
year.AKC registered. Best 




81C Industrial for Sale 



& 



60 Lawn k Garden 

FILL SAND — Wash Mason 
Sand, top soil. Between 8-9. 
424-9883. 

LANDSCAPING - 
Grading, seeding, beds 
reworked. 545-1155. 

TOP SOIL — Sand &■ gravel. 
Call now, serve you next. 
489-3997. 

61a Farm Implements 

9N, Ferguson 30, Fordson 
Major oresel; 4 row Ford 
disc 8. brushog, 7 ft cut. 
Best offer. 4600722, 497- 
8104, dealer. 

63 Building Materials 

HOME Builders 8i Con- 
tractors - Let us help you 
ivith that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM 8. EATON 427 3200. 



64 Bi'slness 



Equipi 



ment 



BEAUTY SHOP 

EQUIPMENT — Hallwell 
Dryer and styling chair. 
Reasonable. 420-4366. 



ENTIRE STOCK 

ANTIQUE 
ROLLTOP DESKS 
$100 Off 
Umitad Offer 

DESKS, INC. 

341 1 Hl«h St. 3t7*7883 



I HOMES I 



65 MobUe Homes For Srie 

ALTAIR-1970, 12'x56' 
Small quiet court in Back 
Bay, fishing & boating In 
your front yard. $3950. 426- 
. 6032. 

AMERICAN — 1970, 12 x 40, 1 
bedroom, furnished. $300 
equity and assume balance. 
543-0364. 



TABLES — Solid maple 
round and end tables; 
coffee table. 481-3261. 

TWO RUSH BOTTOM 
Chairs, Love Seat, danish 
modern, antique table with 
chairs. 423-4487. 

42" Round Marblized 
Formica top table with 12" 
leaf and 4 chairs, all 
wrought iron legs, good 
condition. $75. Call 622-8902. 

SOLD HOUSE — Must sell! 
Beds, Chests, Dressers, 
Sofas, Breakfront, Dining 
Room, Kitchen, appliances. 
Rugs and old Piano. Some 
almost new. 20 year 
accumulation of 
everything, including 
,, antiques. Call 486-4464. 

MOVING — Must sell! 21 



SUNRISE 





1968, 


60x12, 


Shed. $600 


equity 


and 


assume. 


421-9386, 


4604 


Chickadee 


St. 


Chesapeake. 



dryer, hide-abed,.5j^l)ite 
bedroom dressers, outdoor 
grill, shelving with 
tM-ackets, golf clubs, coats, 
paintings, books, lamps, 
brIc-a-brac. 588-0898. 



$458.00 delivers 3 room, 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr.. In 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 



ELECTRIC TRAIN 
COLLECTOR — Retired 
railroad man. Any kind, any 
conditkKi, pay good price. 
S45-^«. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for camwas. tape 
.recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band instruments, 
Type«M-ltwi. 0ura. 

LITTMAN'S 
301 City ttallav. &nm 




WE CAN GET CASH FOR 
YOUR DUPLEX! 



REALTY GROUP 
499-9989 
24 hrs. 



INC. 



83 Fttms-Land-'Umber 

- ACREAGEVA. BEACH 
5 acres nr. Sandbrldge 
4 bedrm. waterfront home 
with boathouse on large 
bulkheaded lot, at 
Sandbrldge. 

15 acre farm with 1500 ft 
frontage. 

Restored home on 6 acres, 
Pungo. 

36 acres wooded, Pungo 
25 acre farm with 
restorable home. 
29 acre farm, partly 
wooded. 

8 acres at Back Bay. 
Nelson P. Brock 426-6111 
PUNGO REALTY CO. 

85 For Sale Notfdk 

CAMELLIA GARDENS — 
Waterfront. Quick access to 
the bay. Brick, 4 bedrooms, 
Vh baths, den, 4 fireplaces, 
bulkhead, boat dock, ramp. 
By owner. 481-2661 or 622- 
5333. 

POCAHONTAS VILLAGE 

COZY 
3 bedrooms, convenient- 
location in most desirable 
area. Call Elite Taianlan, 
486-4041 or 340-1690. We 
trade. Higglns Realty Inc., 
REALTOR 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
Lovely 3 bedroom Ranch. 
$8,100 and assume or buy 
conventional $25,900. Call 
Robert Fowler, 486-4041 or 
486-1369. We trade. Higglns 
Realty, inc. REALTOR. 

WINDSOR OAKS 
Price reduced on this 4 
bedrooms, Vf-i bath home, 
now vacant. For info, call 
Jim Sawyer, 486-4041 or 340- 
3181. We trade. Higglns 
Realty, Inc. REALTOR. 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST 
DOLL HOUSE 
3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 
family room. Spotless! 
Large fenced yard on cul- 
de-sac. Call Ellie Taianlan, 
486-4041, 340-1690. We trade. 
Higglns Realty, Inc. 
REALTOR. 



86 For Sale 



V^fa^ 



Beach 



CASTLE — 8' x 30' and 10' x 
50'. Sacrifice. Best offer. 
Call 497-8104 or 460-1283. 



MARLETTE - 1964, 10' X 
55', air conditioned, 
carpeted, excellent 
condition, partially 
furnished. 460-1003, 497- 
8783. 

OLYMPIC — 'S bedrooms, 
furnished, only 7 months 
old. Can remain on lot. Just 
take over payments. 425- 
1991. 



WINDSOR — 65 x 12, 6 
rooms, dining room, living 
room, kitchen, tip-out. 
Available July 1. Equity 
and assume. Can be seen 
anytime. 490-1307. 

68 Rooms Fof Board 

ATLANTIC HOTEL 
Rooms— Single $16 week; 
Double $20 week. Ill 
Granby 622-4311. 

OCEANFRONT — Rooms 
for 2, $25 per person weekly. 
Avalon Hotel, Oceanfront 8i 
20th St. 



76Alfci»«P-Sto^i 

FURNITURE MOVING — 
Washers, dryers, 
refrigerators. Pianos, Etc. 24 
hours, 7 days a w«k and 
holidays n^ ectre ai«r9e. 



CAPE HENRY SHORES — 
By owner. Spacious Ranch 
with 3,000 sq. ft. of living 
area. 4 bedrms., oversized 3 
car garage. Walk to beach. 
481-5063. ^ 

HILLTOP MANOR — 3 
bedroom ranch, corner lot. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041 or 
464-4839. We trade. Higglns 
Really, Inc., REALTOR. 

LAUREL COVE —Colonial 4 
bedroom, 2Vj bath home with 
fireplace. Pay equity and 
assume 7 per cent VA loan. 
Call Joe Robinson, 486-4041, 
or 464-4839. We trade. 
Higglns Realty, Inc., 
REALTOR. 

VIRGINIA RWkCH — By 
owner, 4 bedrooms, 
fireplace, 4 blocks to beach, 
$49,000. 430-26th St., 428- 
6521. 

WELLINGTON WOODS — 
4 bedroom, 2 twths, double 
car garage, brick Ranch, 
large family room with 
fireplace oft kitchen with 
breakfast bar, good yard 
space, schools, and 
convenient to expressway 
and beaches. Immediate 
possession. Only $48,500. 
Pay equity and assume 7 
per cent loan. Call owneib 
481-2770. 

87P«tSdeC he i^ e tl re 

ALBEMARLE ACR€S — 
VA Loan. 3 year old brick 
Ranch, large wooded lot. 4 
bedrooms, 2 baths, carpet, 
central air, fenced. $39,000. 
No agents. 482-39,04. 



CANDLEWOODCOVE 
Acre plus wooded water- 
front site. Reduced. Dave 
Miller, Jr., 428-3822, 481- 
6772. 
DAVE MILLER REALTY 

LINLIER 
Beautiful wood ed 
waterfront acre comer site. 
Dave Miller, Jr., 43t-3832, 
481-6772. 
DAVE MILLER REALTY 

CASHTALiCS 

WebvySisell. Need Hornet. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



■^^■^^■■■■B 



Real Estate 



.JumW, 1*74-1^ B-7 



IIHK^ONSUMERI 

Buying home 
still cheaper 
than renting 

Bff Peter Weaver 

Q. With interest rates and property taxes going up 
out of sight, which is the most economical — raiting a 
home or buying one? — Mrs. L.C., Laguna Beach, 
CaUf. 

A. If you can come up with the down payment and 
m<mey to cover the closing costs and you plan to live in 
the home for more than three years, you'll pntebly do 
better buying. True, you have to pay high mortgage 
rates these days and, true, you have to pay highar 
pn^rty taxes but most, if not all. of these costs woidd 
pnrttably be lumped into your roital payments 
anyway. 

You get a tax deduction for the interest you pay on 
your mortgage and, if you select a home in a Rowing 
area that's convenient to shopping, wwk and 
recreation, you stand a good chance to make mon^ 
when you eventually sell it. 

If you only plan to live in the home for a coufde of 
years, it prdaably isn't worth buying. Closing costs and 
sales commissions will be too heavy. 




Financ^Business/Economy 



Chamber opens 



headquarters 



Assistance for tourists 



The new round building in frwit of the 
Virginia Beach Civic Center at 20th Street 
and Pacific Avenue is the Chamber of 
Commerce Tourist Information Center. The 
recently-completed building will be open 



year-round, providing information to 
visitors on everything from campground 
vacancies to auto repair facilities, lliis is 
the Chamber's second new building to opoi 
this year. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



The new Chamber ot 
Commerce building at 
Pembroke Mall will celebrate 
its grand opening with official 
ribbon-cutting ceremonies 
Tuesday at 11 a.m. 

Att^Kling will be officers and 
dignitaries of national, state 
and local Chambers of 
Commerce and 100 other 
di^itaries of Uie Tidewater 
area. 

Hughes heads 
branch division 



The Chamber has already 
moved its executive offices into 
the new headquarters at 4510 
Virginia Beach Blvd. in the 
mall parking lot. 

The $130,000 structure sits m 
land donated by the Terry 
Corp. of Virginia on a long-term 
lease. The structure contains 
approximately 3,200 square 
feet. Official ground-breaking 
ceremonies were held in 
September. 



Minj Your Money QomtO On 

Eastern Va. 



Q. I've r«id that some people are gettog a tax break 
on Uieir housing rental paymente. How soon will 
tenants be able to get tax advantages ^equal to honie 
owners? — T.P., New Rochelle, N.Yv f 

A. In most cases, home owners and landlords get all 
the tax breaks. Congress is studying the possibility of 
tax breaks for renters but the outlook for legislation 
isn't good. In some areas, elders (those over 65) are 
getting a discount off their property ^xes. Fairfax 
County , gives elder renters a break and, I believe, 
Wisconsin and California also offer tax breaks to 
certain classes of home roiters. 



medical board 



*<' 



( 



Q. Are there any specific [wecautidbs a person should 
take before signing a lease for an apartment? — Ms. A. 
McH., Baltimore, Md > 

A. According to Roy L. Farmer, Director of 
Consumer Affairs, Virginia bepartment of 
Agriculture, you should ctieck with others in the 
buildii^ to see how they like the living conditims. 
Check toseewhattheexta-a utility payments run on the 

average. 

Mr. Fanner says you should have, the landl<xtl 
hspect the apartment thwougMy with you and all 
damages should be listed. Make duplicate of the list 
and have the landlord sign both cq;>ies. You keep one, 
the landlord keeps one. In most caseaarou have to make 
a deposit on the apartment to cov«- any e^«ntual 
damages. This list will protect you. Never sign the 
lease ^ntil you have determined \what rc^Mirs the 
landk)rd is responsible fa- and what repairs you are 
responsible for. Get this in writing if possible. Find out 
how much notice you have to give before leaving and 
be sure to get, and keep, a copy of your lease. 

Q. I'm going to retire next year and, just for kicks, 
rd like to know where is the cheapest place to live? — 
P.M., Chicago, 111. 

A. According to Dynamic Maturity (a pre-returement 
magaane published by the American Association of 
Retired PersMis), Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys 
show that the cheapest urban area is Austin, Tex., and 
the cheapest rural area is in the South. Most expensive 
places are Anchorage, Alaska, Honolulu and Bosttm. 
The figures are based mt middle-income neecb. 

YOUR ENERGY MONEY: When buying a new car 
see if you can get one with a lower axle ratio. Some 
manufacturers give you a choice (in some cases at no 
extra charge). Generally speaking, the lower the axle 
ratio, the better gasoline mileage you'll get. You give 
Oup power on acceleration but you can save on gasdine. 
allure's one excq)tioa If you have to drive a lot in 
mountains or hUl country, a lower axle ratto won't save 
money. You'U be driving in tower gears too of tai. 

KiligFMtiirMfyMdtcatci IM.. 1174. 
PtUr Wmvw waJcomM quosUaa tran rMden 
for ponfUe uw in his co/u/nn. Mease send letters 
to him in cue ot Virginia Boach Sun, 138 Rose- 
mont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Lancaster is 
first graduate 



Albert B. Gomto Jr. of 
Virginia Beach has been 
fleeted vice-chairman of 
the Norfolk Area Medical 
Center Authority (NAM- 
CA), parent organization of 
Norfolk's Eastern Virginia 
Medical School. 

Mr. Gomto is corporate 
executive officer of 
Virginia National Bank. He 
was elected by NAMCA 
commissioners. 

Mr. Gomto is a member 
of the seven -person 
commission which also 
includes representatives 
from ttorfolk, Portsmouth 
and Suffolk. 

REPRESENTATIVES of 

NAMCA and the medical 

school recently met with 

^ Virginia B?ach City 



Council to solicit $250,000 
per year from the city to 
promote the regional 
character of the school, 

NAMCA also is seeking a 
change in the authority's 
charter (o , allow the 
authority to be guided on a 
regional basis, in 
proportion to funds 
provided by the com- 
munities. 

However, a City Council 
committee studying the 
request for funds has 
recommended that each 
city contributing funds be 
allowed equal represen- 
tation on the commission 
regardless of the amount of 
funds, contributed or 
population size of cities 
participating. 




1 

Chapter 
leader 



Kmily Steele, assistant 
secretary and corporate 
administrative officer 
of Ufe Federal Savings 
and Ixtan Association, 
was recently named 
Secretary of the Year by 
the Virginia Beach 
chapter of the National 
Secretaries Association. 

I 



Wesley E. Hughes Jr., 
manager of the Kempsville 
branch of People's Bank of 
Virginia Beach, has been 
named branch ad- 
ministration diviston head 
for the bank. 

He will t>e responsible for 




JOI PAOUNOKS 
REALTOR 



I 



For personal lorvice, call me any- 
time at 425-3806 or home, 
3404136. There is also a complete 
staff at Custom Realty ready to 
serve you with Customized Real 
1 Estate Service. 

CALL42&3800 

1788 Va. BeKh Blvd. V*. Beach, Va 



coordinating and super- 
vising all functions of the 
branch division, including 
branch operations, per- 
sonnel budgets and reports. 
He will continue as 
manager of the Kempsville 
branch. 



Member 
Realtors 
MLS 

USTOMI 

REALTY CORP.! 
IVIAKING THE 

l¥IOVE? 

CALL 




US 

FIRST 

OR 

LAST 

NO 

OBLIGATION 



I 



HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 




REGENCY 

ALL UliLITIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 

%ency 

•t HIUTOP 

1,2,&3 bedroom 
Apartments, 
Townhouses, 

Garden and Bachelor. 

LASKINROADAT 
HILLTOP 
PHONE! 428-6813 



Pmhroke courts uartments 
BNmwmiatGMiipaetpricM 

PEMBROKE COURTS MONTHLY PAYMEItlTS 
(All utilitiM incluiMI 
Ombadroom $1S0 (king (ixa badroom, fullbathl 

2-badreoni Typ* I $215 (ground floor, 1H bathtl 

2-b«droom Typo II S218 ( upMairs, IHlMtht) 
2-badroomTypalll $220 (largarstoragaarea. IVibathil 
2-tMdroom Typa IV $236 (largar living room, balcony 

andkitchan, IMbaiht) 
3-badroom $260 (IMbathil 

3-badrooni Townhoina $315 (1732aq. ft.bia 7Mbatht, 
walk-in dowtt, 3 patioal 



HHPembroke Realty toeatad oh indapwi- 

/'^Kr~\ danea Boulavard, ona mila north of Pam- 
A fej^ J braka Mall, Virginia Baach. Talaphona 

V.™^ 499-3666. Modal* opan 9 to 5:30, Satur- 
day 10-6, Sunday 1-6. An axtra bonus: 
diib hotna, olympic-siza pool. 



^amMiY 



Rent beautiful 
new furniture 




with purchase option 

Out laige ihow-foom featuiet 200 comUnatioM of 
quality furntiuie that you can leaie with the option 
to piuchase. Rent individual items ot complete 
yottps at low montiily rates. We also offer omce 
ftmitaie, TV's, ban and a complete accesaoty 
boutique — a one-step furniture center. Free local 
deUveiy oh 12 month leases. 

FURNITURE RENTAL 




_ METROLEASE 

4995 Clevelar-d St., Vir^nla Beach, Va. 
Phone (804) 499-9888 

on MmchMek Hd. Mttaaan vir««M aaaelt Slvd. a tna tmpnmmh 




LUXURY 
GARDEN APARTMENTS AND TOWNHOUSES 



Urn rooms wlili many alosats 
One to tkrea badiooms 
PuHy earpete d sound anglnaaiod 
IndlvMual Mating « air aondltlonlng 
IndivMual pflvale antranoes 



Large storage room off Mtahon 
DIsliwasliaf, range A rofrlgerator In all units 
Fittings for your own wasltar * dryer 
Swimming pool abd clubhouse 
ToUl aleetrie sorvleo 






PLANN»> FOR ADULT LIVING 

Shopping within walking distance 
Monthly rental Includes all utilities 



IDEAL LOCATION-IN EXCLUSIVE RESIDENTIAL AREA 

On Haygood Road off Independence Blvd. Around the corner from 
the Haygopd Shopping Center. 

CALL 499-3788 



Gladys Lancaster of 
Virginia Beach is the 
first student to receive 
an associate in applied 
science d^ree in real 
estate from the Virginia 
Beach campus of 
Tidewater Community 
College <TCC). 

Ms. Lancaster, a 



veteran, attended the 
college for Uiree years 
as a part-time studait 
under the benefits of the 

GI BiU. 

She is a license reel 
estate salesperson and 
is em|doyed by Judy 
Andrassy Realty of 
Virginia Be«:h. 



BEAUTIFY YOUR HOME 



WOk 



CanMN-TEH) 

SOUD Vlim. SIDING 



Made from B.P. QoodrtM 
OKON VINYLS, A sUHng 
material for your House 
that moasuMS up to «lt^ 
luaHy o«enr MMity and 
malnta«anao4ree require- 
ments for tM PCRnCT 
sMInf. 




WIIIMHB 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR HOME 



FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens •Fomily Rooms 

•Bedrooms •Convert 

Garages 

Y^Sf?» 545-4613 

Added qpee to your botw eaeaa added filti* to 
WW bcHUfc Mito ytw iMmt BMte eoo^Ht^e nd 
^oMMimt Iqr aidlag • looa. J)oii't Wait..CALL NOW 



tumuoM iu)M^aBMrEAni4Miu^ 

^Temi 



Add • new ■ddWoo to jfom home oe oomwt ywB pfoaeat 
■nae or cvport to a bentital den wMh a flMMx or CK- 
CibMtRxmkWe fanifah d mstetUa inride md out 



Wf RlPlACi THO^E 
TROUBLESOME 



• MUM* 









*»mam 
oMMnia 

onUMIMtl.HT, 
W.W HB 

oNiNTaNonnr 

oHUfWHRID 
oNMIHaill 



• MlMriMNtf 

■imau 



497-6970 



€W 



no mfc 




Mtmbar of BMtar Btttinen BuTMu 





FIRST TIME IN TIDEWATER 

"ALL mw^Rixxmo ^UD vmYL 

PORCH ENCLOSURES 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 





WS!>^^ 




USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHABETICAUY USTED 
GUIDE FOR ALL YOUR SERVKZ NEEDSI 

Air Conditioning Concrete General Contractor Lawn Mower Service 



DALEY AND SONS 
Healing & Cooling 

wllh 
Insiallation 
and Service 

York CMmatrol 
Coleman 

4t5SM1 



CONCRETE WORK 

PATK» 

DRIVEWAYS 

& SLABS 

CAIX 

855-7111 



L.E. Plf^ER 

General 

Contractor 

Additions, repairs, 

carpentry work. 

References furnished. 

Call 420 84M. 



Uwn Mower Service 
Bicycle Repairs, Welding 
and (hnamenfal Iron Rail- 
ii^s. 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER A WELDING 
428-9029 



Electrical Contractor Home Improvement 



COMAAERCfAWSi 
DOMESTIC REFRIGER 
ATION 

8. AIR CONDITIONING 
Repair & 
Service 
«MS«9 




Genenrf Contractor 



Woods Plasloring Co. 
Serving Tidewaier M vear?.. 



Plaster and lile repairs. 
Paini Call 857 1009 



Pleiterlng 



PLASTERING 

4 DRY WALL 

ftepairs & Remodeling 

& Patchwork 

NEW & OLD WORK 

Spr»C 
AceuMtca* C«llln9> 

CALL 420-4687 



"3* 



Aluminum Sding 



ALUMINUM SIDING, 

VINYL SHUTTERS, 

ALUMINUM GUTTERS, 

AWNINGS. PRIME 
REPLACEMENT WINDOW, 

STORM WINDOWS 
All with the proven depen 
dabiliiy ol experts whtt have 
'erved Tidewater over 2S 
years. BURGESS SNYDER 
INDUSTRIES 

lOO«Ballentineblvd. 

Call 623 7700 

For FREE ESTIMATES 



Bridc-BockWork 



BRICKWORK • 

SmalfWorkAIA 

Small Price! 

Flower boxes, Paiios, 

Columns, Steps, Lattice 

fences. 

Call Ooog 
•S3M42 or 153 1472 



BLACK 
BROTHERS 

B^ktert 

Home Improvemeirt 

Contractors 

Carafe BuiMers 

Rorai MdttiON 

AluniiBum Sidii^ 

Roofs - Cui»rts 

Kltckefl RtMfcttw 

CAUANYTIAAE 
545-7318 

Iwk E. Btodi, 8r. 
Chti fnkt, Ya. 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

1 umrter ind buiMinq m.itef i«l». 
room .iddilions, norm floors nn<t 
.■ indowrt, vwill to *,iH f«rp#f, 
vinyl ^itfirtg free «»im.il«, 
Iwms 

KELLAMAEAT(»<I,INC 
427-3200 



Painting 



R.O.CONNER 
PAINTING 

WALLPAPERING 
Custom Work 

Old St new 
(Airless Sprayer) 

Mr, Conner Jr. 
4902473' 



M. 



Lawn Mower Service 



OCEANA LAWNMOWER 
305 First Colonial Rd 
-— Phone 425-et34 

S '. REPAIRSON MOST 
WIAKES AND MODELS 

Authorized 
Snapper Dealer 




Roofing 



ROOFING 

GUTTERING 

8. 

SIDING 

FINANCING ARRANGED 

CALL B5S 715S 



Tile Work 



oof .-_ _ >=» r 



Cuttcm B«.t-hs 



A 



^^fc^ ^^^^WWW^ ^w« 



-«ps- 



A«6 M-The Sim-WediiMday. June 19, 1974 



Cable TV committee has to delay public hearing 



B.vIM»NNAIlKNDRlCK 
SnnSUrr Writer 

The Virginia Beach Cable Television 
Evaluation Committee was forced to scrap plaia 
to set a public hearing date on a proposed cable 
TV ordinance Friday diffing its scheduled 
meeting when only three members of the seven- 
person committee showed up. 

Committee Chairman Lawrence B. Wales Jr. 
instead turned Friday's meetii^ into a wort 
session to refine the language of the proposed 
city cable television ordinance and bid package. 
Consultants from the Urban Institute's Cable 
Television Inf(rmati<m Center In WashingUm, 
D.C., assisted the committee with the wording of 
the ordinance and bid package. 

Mr. Wales was obviously displeased with the 
turnout at Friday's meeting and said he would 
schedule another meeting within the next two 
weeks. 



Besides the chairman, the only committee 
members present at Friday's meeting were city 
employes George Tinnes, assistant to the city 
manager; 3. Dale BinuMn, city att(»t)ey, and 
Edwin S. "Sam" Clay, director of libraries and 
public information and ex-officio committee 
member. 

THE fOMMlTTEK was unatde to com|rfete 
the propoKd agenda for Friday's meeting with 
so few committee members in attendance. The 
committee wm scheduled to comply the cable 
TV bid package, including the applications for 
franchises and the franchise ordinance, vote to 
tentatively approve the bid package and set a 
dale for public hearings on the proposed bid 
package. 

The first public hearii« was planned for this 
month. However, Mr. Wales said the hearing 
would be delayed until after the fUll committee 



could meet to approve the bid package. He saM 
the first public hearings would be hdd b^(H« 
Sept. 1. 

Sheila Mahony and Vee Figures, attorneys 
with the Cable Television Information Center, 
reviewed the city's proposed bid ordinance and 
helped clarify the lai^uage to conform with 
Federal C<mimunication Commissian (FCC) 
requirements and guid^nes. 

TIIK CONSULTANTS told the committee that 
the FCC reqidres peraons who will not be in- 
cluded in the cable system to be notified they will 
be excluded when caUe service is installed. 

Mr. Tinnes said the southern area <rf the city, 
basically south of Indian River Road, would not 
be inducted in the cable system. The low 
population density of the south«m part of the city 
prompted the committee to exclude it from the 
proposed calde system, Mr. Tinnes said. 



Also attending Friday's meeting was George 
L. Hall, cHrectbr of the FuUic Telecon- 
munications Council for the State of Virginia. 
Mr. Hall is not an officiid considtant to the 
committee tnit instead lent his auistance to the 
committee. 

MS. MAHcmv "roLD committee members 
thai the proposed ordinance is "a very good 
ordinance and not too complicated." Mi*. Hall 
said the committee is "being very realBtte" in 
its |m)posed ordinance. 

Aftn: the bid package (which includes the 
cable TV ordinance and bid apfdication for 
prospective franchise holders) is approved by 
the committee, a public hearii^ will be held 

The committee will take public comments 
under advisement, changing the bid package as 
required. Then the entire bid padcage, with 
modifications, will go to the city manager who 



will turn it over tp the aty Council for approval. 

TIIK COUNCIL will approve or deny the bid 
package thr««h fmmal reaohttion ind if ap- 
proved, establish a drte for receipt of bids from 
companies intmvsted in obtaining the caWe TV 
franchise. 

Re|»«8entitfives of two wr&ag* interated in 
bidding on the franchise also attended Friday's 
nieeting. Richard Browner, a former city 
plani^ and now a land planner for Roaemimt 
Development Corp.. attended represMting a 
group of Virginia Beach business people. 

BIr.Brownersaid his poup includes four or five 
different construction companies. 

Joy Hakim represented attorney George 
Darden, vi^o has attended previous o)mmittee 
meetings. Mr. Darden represaits anottier group 
of Beach residents who plan to bid on the fran- 
chise. 



Gilreath 
gets life 
plus 50 
years 



John S. Gilreath was sen- 
loiced to life imprisonment and 
5(t years Thursday for the 
(Jctobo- 1973 abduction and 
murder of 14-year-old Natalia 
Semier. 

Mr. Gilreath stood quietly, 
showing no emotion, as Virginia 
Beach Circuit Court Judge 
Robert S. Wahab Jr. 
pronounced the sentence fixed 
by the six-man, six-woman jury 
which had convicted him three 
weeks earlier. Under Virginia 
law, Mr. Gilreath will be 
eligible for parole in 15 years. 

The nearly nude, badly 
bruised body of the girl was 
found by her father on the 
grounds of the exclusive girls 
Madeira School near McLean 
the morning after she failed to 
return from classes. She was 
gagged and tied to a tree. An 
autopsy showed she died from 
shock, exhaustion and ex- 
posure. 

TIIK TRIAL was moved to 
Virginia Beach from Fairfax 
County due to extensive pre- 
trial publicity. 

When Judge Wahab asked 
Mr. Gilreath if he had anything 
to say before sentence was 
pronounced he softly replied, 
"No sir, nothing. " Earlier in the 
day during a pre-hearing 
discussion, Mr. Gilreath in- 
dicated he hoped he would be 
sent to the state mental hospital 
rather than to prison. 

Following sentencing, 
d^ense attorney Thomas R. 
Dyson reaffirmed earlier in- 
dications to appeal the con- 
viction and said he anticipates 
(his will be done within six 
months. Fairfax County 
Commonwealth's Atty. Robert 
F. Horan Jr. requested that Mr. 
Gilreath be held in the state 
penitentiary pending outcome 
of the appeal but it was denied. 

Mr. Gilreath was returned to 
the Fairfax (bounty jail Monday, 
to await a hearing, expected to 
be held within two weeks, on 
Tevocation of his probation on 
an earlier conviction. He was 
given a 20-year suspended 
sentence, placed on probation 
and ordered to undergo 
psychiatric treatment after a 
1971 conviction of abduction and 
attempted rape of another 
young girl at the Madeira 
School. 



VPI 

service 

honored 



The Virginia Beach Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute (VPI 
extension service has won the 
Extension Unit Award of the 
Alpha Gamma Chapter of 
E{»ilon Sigma Phi, national 
honorary extension 
organization. 

The Virginia Beach VPI 
extension office was selected 
from among 108 other state 
fMces to receive the annual 
award. Dr. WE. Skeltm, dean 
of the institute's extension 
division, awarded a plaque at 
the extoision c«ivention last 
moith. The kx:al office also 
r«c«ved a citati<m. 

The Virginia Beach service 
wu cited for its ptogrtss in < 
devdm^ a stnmg exten^m 
fngnxn, fw a dramatic in- 
cresM in cooperatmn with other 
city dqjartments, for givti^ 
each sUff m«nba- an area of 
spedalization snd for grater 
iavdvement irf ttie staff in 
community resource 
devek>|»ient. 

Mayor Rtrtieri B. Cromwdl 
M, f«eognia«l re^pt of the 
#1 Mwd i« lart week's aty 



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'When you're a poKHcd unknown, 
you do everything you feel is nece$$a- 
ry to get known.' 



GRIFFIN 



Griffin in spotiiglit 

after iieavily-f inanced 
campaign tops Ervin 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

A few scattered posters and an oc- 
casional billboard around the city are all 
that's left of John Griffin's heavily- 
financed campaign for the Lynnhaven 
Borough City Council seat which he will 
take Monday, replacing Vice-mayor 
Reid Ervin. 

Criticized by those who opposed him 
for his nearly $40,000 in campaign ex- 
penditures and praised by his supporters 
for his successful campaign, Mr. 
Griffin's actions on Council wUl most 
likely continue to be in the spollight in 
the months to come. Though Jhe cam- 
paign is over, Mr. Griffin continues to 
deny charges th4 ,^u^.jtSjheavily- 
financed ^Mnpeifn dm ifMtfy lw»e Wm 
"owing" politicid favors to campaign 
su{^rters. '^ 

The Griffin political attack was well 
planned with what seemed like a Con- 
tinuous string of billboards and posters 
down Virginia Beach Boulevard, as well 
as numerous radio and television spots. 
In fact, during the last few days of the 
campaign, television viewers were 
virtually bombarded by "vote John 
Griffin" commercials. 

" THE AVERAGE voter does not keep up 
with the issues in a campaign in the 
newspaper, so you have to advertise on 
radio and television, and that's ex- 
pensive," says Mr. Griffin. "If a 
Virginia Beach candidate didn't have to 
buy six cities (of television and radio 
time), the cost would be a lot less." 



TV work helpful 

Television proved to be Mr. Griffin's 
biggest asset since with his years in the 
broadcast business he was at home in 
front of the camera. Mr. Griffin worked 
in television in the Beach area off and on 
from 1958 before becoming a stock- 
broker for Legg Mason Inc. in Norfolk 
where he is now employed. He is also a 
former employe of the Virginia Beach 
Sun. 

"I was not imaware of the potential of 
winning a public office by being on 
television," Mr. Griffin says. 

IN FACT. Mr. Griffin contemplated 
running for political office in the race for 
the Congressional seat in 1%8. 41% 
Changed his mind when G. William 
Whitehurst announced his candidacy. 
Mr. Griffin has planned since 1970 to run 
for the Beach City Council and says he 
has no aspirations to seek a higher 
public office at this time. 

^"You see something that is needed in 
the community and you see someone 
who is serving who. in ycf^R^inion. is 
doing a poor job, and so you d«:ide to 
run." says Mr. Griffin. "Once "Vou get 
involved <in the campaign), you don't 
want to lose." 

Co9t8 fop $3B,000 

A campaipi for which $25,000 was 
originally bud^ted emted up costing 
$39,668.09. Mr. Griffin is quick to point out 
that sonw $19,000 of that money came 
from perswial Icwns or gifts and loans 
from his family and in-laws. 

"When you're a political unknown, you 
d«i everything you feel is necessary to 
gel known," he says. "In my case. I had 
to overcome a well-known and well- 
publicized incumbent cowicilman (Mr, 
Ervini." 

MR. tiKIEKIN DOES not favor 
limiting campaign expenditures b«:ause 
he says "the incianbent would always 



•Series 



ThU is the flnt trtkle of a three-part teries 
in which Sun Staff Writer Linda Miller taket an 
in-depth look at each of the city's three newly- 
eiecUd councUmen. 



have an inherent advantage." 

When his campaign funds ran short 
during the final days before the election, 
he says he turned to his family for 
financial support. Besides financial 
support, his wife Mary (his campaign 
treasurer) also provided moral support. 
Mrs. Griffin is a school teacher at 
Kingston Elementary School, and Mr. 
Griffin attributes many of his stands on 
education to information and ideas 
supplied by his wife. * ^ 

Mr. Griffin, 40, and his wlfe~are 
mitives of North Car<riina. He was 
graduated from the University of North 
Carolina. The Griffins reside at 3428 
Misty Plance with their two children. 
Mever, 15, and Roger, 13. 

S/aps at Mr. Ervin 

PERSONALLY WILLING to spend as 
much money and time as it took to get 
elected, Mr. Griffin took a two-month 
leave of absence from his brokerage job 
to campaign for the Council seat. He 
admits that some of his reasons for 
wanting to defeat Mr. Ervin were per- 
sonal business matters concerning his 
friends, but he declines to discuss them, 
continuously reminding himself during 
an hour and half interview that "the 
campaign is over and I don't need to run 
the man down." 

But just because the campaign is over 
doesn't mean Mr. Griffin doesn't take a 
few jate at Mr. Ervin when given the 
opportunity. 

"While I'm aware (rf the part the 
tourist industry plays in the city, there's 
a lot to do to serve the rest of the 
peo[rie," Mr. Griffin says. "1 live back in 
the borough, away from the oceanfront. 
I feel 1 can represent the o{Nnions and 
attitudes of those (persons) off the 
beachfront better than someone who 
lives on the beachfront," 

And asked what he can do better than 
his predecessor, Mr. Griffin replies. 'I 
can work with the councilmen who are 
there." 

No spocM interests 

MR. GRIFFIN SEES his election as a 
victory for the "little man." and not for 
any special interest group. He says he is 
"confused" by people trying to link him 
with the old organization. And. though 
many persons say the Griffin campaign 
had the backing of builders who were 
disenchanted .with Mr. Ervin's stands on 
city growth, Mr. Griffin says the key is 
that a decision for "no growth" in the city 
hurts not the cteveloper. but the peq)le 
he employs. It was those person, Mr. 
Griffin says, who turned out to support 
him. 

He says l» does not align with any 
member or faction on Council, and he 
would "like to think that those lines im 
longer, exist." 

"I'm^sure sometime I'll vote with 
Charlie (iardner. who was associated 
with the fwmer Reid (Ervin) faction, 
l)ut that doesn't mean I have committed 
myself to an alignment." 

With no specific legislation in mind for 
when he takes office next week, Mr 
(Jrlffin says he plans to work for the 
ii^allation (if water and sewer lines and 
strert improvements. He adds he would 
like to siH' a shift in lh«' Council's con 
rimtralion spending less time «»n 

rezHnin^ af^licatioas awJ niirc time on 
"improving the quality of living m Ihe 
dtv." 




Wadwawiiy, Jum 26, 1974 



*-;"10 Copvrifl*»t 1974 

Oty of Vk^a B ai ch , Va. bmch PubiuMng corp. 



IBCantt 




r 



FROM SCOTT 

Spending 



Golden grain 



Mature wheat ready for harvesting 
glints golden in the sunlight as 
farmers throughout rural Virginia 
Beach prepare to ready their crop 
for market. Virginia Beach has 



enjoyed a good wheat crop this year, 
and harvesting coirtlnues on sunny 
days. This grain is growing in 
southern Princess Anne Borough. 
(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



V 



i $:§ 



to Council 



Th^ Virginia Beach City Council will get its first 
formal look Monday at proposed expenditures of 
Federal Revenue Sharing funds, as well as the 
amount of bonds the city staff proposes to issue 
under the new increased bonding capacity, 
according to City Manager Roger Scott. 

The Beach is to receive $3,528,730 in Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds for the fiscal year 1974-75. 
According to a report that had to be filed with the 
Federal Revenue Sharing Office in Washington this 
week, the city intends to allocate $1 ,373,730 to public 
transportation, which includes highway con- 
\struction. Some $1,050,000 is to go to environmental 
j^ith $610,000 for multipurpose and 
general government, $220,000 for recreation, 
$150,000 for public safety and $125,000 for libraries. 
The Council, however, has the final say in how the 
money is spent. 

The city also is due $515,000 in interest on revenue 
sharing funds left unspent from last year, bringing 
the total to $4,043,730, according to Giles Dodd, 
director of finance. 

Mr. Dodd also said the city will ask Council 
Monday to approve a $14 million non-referendum 
bond issue as part of an $18 million ca{Htal 
improvements package. 

Both Mr. Scott and Mr. Dodd declined to name 
which specific projects in the city those funds would 
go to until the Council is presented with both the 
revenue sharing and bonding packages next week. 

It is expected that ttie main component in the 
packa^ will be the Issuance of iMnds to Install 
-'mkmwd aewar lines. Uncte- the dty's charter 
change granted by the last Virginia General 
Assembly, Virginia Beach may borrow up to $10 
million a year in bonds as long as the total debt does 
not exceed 10 per cent of the city's total assessed 
value of real estate. 

The proposals for the two spending packages was 
tentatively to go to the Council at their June 17 
meeting, but according to Mr. Scott. "We (the 
staff) just weren't ready." 



For impmvements 



$1 million schools' plan 



The school system plans to embark 
on a $1 million capital improvements 
program and a $604,500 project to 
renovate and upgrade all the city's 
schools. 

At a special meeting Tuesday, the 
Virginia Beach School Board 
approved the $1 million plan for fiscal 
year 1974-75 for construction and 
planning of projects at Princess Anne 
Elementary School. Cox High School, 
the Center for Effective Learning. 
John B. Dey Elementary School and 
the central school administration 
building. 

The board also heard plans to spend 
$604,500 to conduct routine 
maintenance, uj*eep projects and 
renovation at all the city's schools. 

THE $1 MILLION capiUl 
improvements project has already 
been included in the city's operating 
iMidget for the fiscal year. The scho(d 
sy^m wUl request that aty Council 



apin-opriate the funds for the project. 
The majority of the $604,500 needed 
for maintenance, upkeep and 
renovation has been included in the 
schools' operating budget for the 
fiscal year. Funds left over from the 
1972 b<md referendum also will be 
used. 

The $1 million capital 
improvements program includes: 

• Complete reworking of the 
electrical systems at Cox High School 
and expansion of the school's shop 
areas, $335,000; 

4 Construction (rf a heating vent 
and air conditicming system at the 
Center for Effective Learning, 
$320,000; 

• Preliminary study and basic 
design for a new school 
administration building, $1^,000; 

• Construction of sewage pumping 
stations at Cox High School and John 
B. Dey ElemenUry School, $110,000; 



• Improvement of the Princess 
Anne Elementary School parking and 
bus drive areas, $37,500; 

•Engineering, planning and 
supervision of the jwojects, $27,500; 
and 

• Reserve for contingencies, $20,000 

IN OTHER BUSINESS Tuesday, 
the School Board heard a report from 
Martha Burgess, assistant for 
population projections, on new 
construction underway and planned 
in the city which could generate 
children into the school system. 

This is the second report the School 
Board has heard in recent months on 
projected population. 

Dr. James C. Mounie. assistant 
superintendent for research, planning 
and development, told the board that 
his staff will be ready in 90 to 120 days 
to make recommendations to the 
board on housing the city's students. 



Closed 
council 



The Virginia Beacli City 
Counril mrl \londay for 30 
minulr!! iii closed iieii«ion. 
open io npHlier tht public 
nor thr preiii. The agrads 
IIkIhI a "legal" maUer and 
"appointmenls" for 
dificuKHion. In 23 meelings 
so far ihlK year, the Council 
han me< for 12 hours and 31 
minutes behind closed 
d*H>rs. 



Folly or riot^ city owns fence 



Whether or not his sand fences work, in- 
ventor John Potter won the last round in the 
controversy oxjfer his erosion control device 
Monday when Ae Virginia Beach City Council 
voted 6-5 to pay him $83,000. 

The vote came after several weeks of 
discission over the terms of the contract for 
the installation of the device signed by Vne city 
and Mr Potter in March 1973. TTie Cmmcil 
voted 6-5 last month to pay Mr. Potter's 
company, the Shoreline Erwion Control 
Corp.,* $25,000 (in accirfdance with the con- 
tract » for a .sand build-up of one fool in front of 
the device. The $83,000 payment will fulfill 
terms of the contract for $108,000 for a two- 
foot build-up of sand, and the city now owns 
1,000 feet of steel fence in the ocean waters 
between 17th arxJ 2M) Streets. 

The city staff, while bieically agreeing with 
elevation measurements submitted by 
Chewning-Hoggard-Adkins Inc.. engineers 
a^'eed upon in the contract, remained un- 
convinced that the device actually woriced 



They conterated that the test area was to in- 
clude not only the area in front of the 1 .000 feet 
device, but also two 500 feet strips along its 
sides. 

The Council left the payment matter in a 
stalemate last week with five councilmen for 
the payment, five against and Cojncilman 
Floyd "Waterfield abstaining. Councilman 
Murray Malbon called for the matter to be 
reconsidered Monday, and Mr. Waterfield's 
"aye" swung the Council vole for the 
payment. Voting against the payment were 
Councilmen John Baum. Robert Callis. 
Charles Gardner, Mayor Robert Cromwell 
and Vice-mayor Reid Ervin. Those in favor of 
paying Mr. Poller were Councilmen Floyd 
Waterfield. Murray Malbon. Curtis Payne. 
Garland Isdell. George Ferrell and Dr. 
Clarence Holland. 

VICK-MAYOK KRVIN expressed concern 
that figures showing the initial elevation of the 
ocean floor before the experiment began were 



never submitted to the city. "Without those 
figures 1 don't see how anyone can evaluate 
(he effectiveness of the device." . 

Community Services Director W.W. 
Fleming told the Council that initial 
measurements of the sand elevation were not 
submitted to the city until January, some nine 
months after the erosion fence was installed. 

Councilman Charles Gardner said he didn't 
want the Council's vote to be a "poUtical 
decision " and asked why, according to terms 
of the contract, the matter couldn't go to 
arbitration. 

.SEVKHAL COUNCILMEN lo(* exception 
to him callir^ it a "pohtical ctecision." \mt no 
one answered his qtwstion. 

The discussions contimied for several 
minutes before Mayor Robert Cromwell 
called for a vote saying, "We're not goii^ to 
change anyone's mind. TTiis is oW grMind, and 
we've rehased it many times." 



t 




mm 



IPHIVi 



Comment 



P^ A-2-Tlw Sun-WadnMday, June 26, 1974 



An Bditoriak 



H99II 



Budget 



Congress has finally moved to 
implement a law to re^in its control 
over the nation's pursestrings. Ov^ 
the years, Congress has allowed the 
executive branch to take away much 
of its power over the federal budget. 

Tlie powers of the president have 
increased so much in this century 
that Congress presently doesn't 
have a chance to do much more than 
exercise general supervision over 
each appropriations bill and hope 
Uiat everything balances at the end 
of the year. Since the New Deal days 
of tt^ 1930s opened the door to social 
experimentation at great expense, 
the president has accumulated 
immense powers over national 
spending. 

On the other hand, however, 
Congress has hardly done much to 
assert its Constitutional authority 
over spending or to streamline its 
antiquated fiscal procedures. 

THE MEASURE passed by the 
Senate last week seeks to remedy 
this longstandit^ oversight. One 
aspect of the law would prevent the 
president from impcmnding any 
funds appropriated by Congress 
udess the legislative body gives its 
approval. 




trol 



HI 



Sen. Hubert Humphrey (D-Minn.) 
told, the Senate Judiciary 
Subcommittee on Separation of 
Powers last year that President 
Nixon, "through impoundment of 
funds, has succeeded in getting 
himself an item veto, expressly 
forbid(ten by the C(Histitution." By 
impoundir^ funds specified for a 
particular program, the President 
can halt a project without having to 
veto an entire bill. 

Another aspect of the law would 
establish in Congress for the first 
time a professicmal budget staff 
comparable to the Office of 
Management and Budget in the 
^ecutive branch. The office should 
give Congress a total picture of the 
budget at any time during its 
progress J^wough the House and 
Senate. 

If Congress overhauls its 
backward procedures, it will be 
better able to strike a balance with 
the executive branch duriiigTahnual 
budgetary drills, particujarb' if the 
president and the majority of 
Congress hold differi^ views on 
how the taxpayers' money is best 
spent. 



^ 





Ciiyside 



ByUadaHmhw 



Tapes now only 
part of the past 



When a question came up concerning John 
Potter's sand fence last week, Councilman John 
Baum suggested jAingly , "Maybe our clerk should 
get out our secret Watergate tapes." 

Mr. Baum was referring to tapes of the Council's 
closed session at the time the city considered the 
Potter erosion device in 1972. Those discussions 
were back in the days when the Council taped all 
their closed door sessions. They've since discon- 
tinued those taping, however, to make sure the 
tapes can't be subpoenaed. (One lawyer tried to 
subpoaia some of the Council's secret tapes in a 
recent zoning case that was taken into the local 
courts. 

THE COUNCIL made several reappointments to 
various boards and commissions recently. Algy W. 
Cohen was reappointed for a three-year term to the 
Soutjteastern Virginia Planning District Com- 
missfon. James L. Craig and George R. ScheU were 
reai^inted to two-year terms on the Building 
Board of Adjustment and Appeals. And, Joseph M. 
Dodd and H.D. Smith were reappointed for two- 
year terms on the Board of Electrical Examiners. 

Joyce Strelitz has submitted her resignation from 
the Arts and Humanities Commission, but the 
Council is asking for a recommendation from the 
Arts Commission before appointing a replacement. 
Helen Dungee was also recently appointed to the 
Southeastern Virginia Areawide Model Program 
(SEVAMP) Advisory Council for a t>pvy«ir term. 



MONDAY WAS the last day the faces of Vice- 
mayor Reid Ervin, Councilman Garland Isdell and 
Councilman Murray Malbon will be seen seated 
with the Virginia Beach City Council — at least for 
another two years. 

Next Mondjqf? newly-elected Councilmen John 

*"' Griffin, I^. Henry McCoy and Patrick Standir^ will, 
take thdr respective offices. A special orientation 
session is being held for the new Council members 
Friday. They will meet city department heads and 
be te-iefed on various city procedures. The new 

; Council members have been receiving the regular 
"councilman's package" with agendas and 

' corresponctence) weekly since their election. 



FIRST YEAR 



49^75 school affects 



programs for children 




Hm 



MVWH.HM 



yun 

An In^pmn^nt New^Mper 



STMIIMnTW 



■OHMAOllNtfan 



OlMffMMiM 



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By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

It was one year ago that students in four Virginia 
Beach elementary schools started the new school 
year just as other students were looking forward to 
summer vacations. 

Students interviewed then on the first day of 
school in the new year-round attendance program 
both liked and disliked the new program. 

Some thought it was fun being able to take 
vacations in the winter when other students had to 
attend school. Others thought attending schod in 
the summer was a rotten idea. One student said, "I 
don't like going to school in the summer. You can't 
go to the pool . Who wants to go on trips in the winter 
time? You can't go swimming in the winter time." 



Second year begins 



A YEAR HAS passed since then, and the two 
year pilot program of year-round education now 
enters its second year. Whether there will be a third 
year, an expansion of the program or an end to it 
will be the Virginia Beach School Board's decision. 

The School Board will hear reports throughout 
the summer on operational costs, student 
achievement and parental attitudes toward the 
program from three major outside research 
agencies. 

The agencies are Schlecty Associates of Chapel 
Hill, N.C. (parental attitudes); Institute for Social 
Analysis of New York (cost analysis), and 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J. (piqjil 
achievement and attitude). 

The 45-15 program (so called because students 
attend school for 45 days, then have 15 days off) also 
will be evaluated from the viewpoint of the 
residents affected by the pilot program. 

THE BOARD has scheduled three hearings in 
July and Augt£5t to hear public comments on 45-15. 
The hearings will be July 8 at 7:30 p.m. at Holland 
Elementary School, July 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Wincbor 
Oaks Etenentary School and Aug. 13 at 7 :30 p.i^^t 
Windsor Woods Elementary School. 

The schools involved in the program, all in the 
heavily-populated Princess Anne Plaza-Gre«i Run 
area, are Plaza, Holland, Wimteor Woods and 
Windsor Oaks schools. 

Last week the School Board heard a final t&port 
on how the pilot program has affected various 
youth-oriented activities, such as playground, 
sports, religious, library, scouting, YMCA- 
YWCA prc^ams and youth-related busine^es, 
including dance, baton, music and riding schools. 

The report was prepared by Dr. Bruce Anderson 
and Dr. Robert MacDonald <rf Old Dominion 
University's Sclwol (rf Education. Dr. MacDonald 
presented the report to the board. 

DR. MACDONALD found, in gawral. that the 
45-15 pn^am has affected youth-orient«l ac- 
tivities in variwis ways, but mwt community 
agencies offering the activities have adjusted their 
schedules to include 45-15 school children. 

He also found that participants who answered 
swvey qiKstions for the report were nwst M^ul in 
suf^lying information «i their pn^ams fw 
chiMrwi, he told tte beard. 



"People were very willing to offer information 
and comments," Dr. MacDonald said. He said that 
survey participants tried to be objective in their 
answers, but also often offered subjective com- 
ments. 

"They would answer my questions," he said, 
"but then they'd often tell me how the 4&-15 
program louses up their vacations." 



Playgrounds altered 



THE SUMMER playground program operated 
by the Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Riecreation has been altered to include 45-15 
students. Dr. MacDonald said. 

Playground programs conducted at the public 
schools have been from 45-15 schools to schools on 
the regular school calendar, and special programs 
have been established after school for 45-15 
students. , 

Sports programs offered by the Parks an^ 
Recreation Department have not been affected by 
45-15 since the games and practice sessions are held 
on Saturdays and after school hours. 

Vacation Bible school progriams have been 
seriously affected by 45-15. The programs are 
traditionally held in the summer during the day. 
Children in the 45-15 program are unable to par- 
ticipate in these church programs unless the 
churches alter their schedules to accommodate the 
children. 

THE WINDSOIt WOODS branch library (the 
only public Ubrary in the 45-15 attendance zone) 
has added new pn^rams and adjusted old 
programs to accommodate the cycled 45-15 at- 
tendance. 

The traditional summer reading program may 
be expmided year-round to include 45-15 stiKlents. 
Use <rf the Ubrary has increased, with part of 
the increase due to children using the library 
throu^out the day and evening raUier than in late 
afternoons and evoiings as in the past. 



Scouting at^sted 



Scouting programs which were previously 
seasonal with few activities scheduled in the 
summer also have tried to adjust to include 45-15 
students. 

ALTHOUGH FIELD trij» and campoute are 
difficult to coordinate for children on diner«Jt 
school attendance cycte, the scouting (Ht^rams 
have made efforts to sche<hile these activities ai 
weeken<fe. Summer camps for Scwts are held 
throughout the summer, ami 45-15 children can 
attend the camfs during their 15 days rff . 

The YMCA and YWCA have adjusted their 
swimming programs to include children during 
their 15 days M. Studaits al» can attend Y sum- 
mer camps on their days off. 

Most youth-CMi«ited busin^ses, such as dance 
and riding schools, reported no effects from the 45- 
15 (Nt^am. The busin^ses surveyed said they 
wnM sAfOBi their froffana U the need arose. 




Hidings 

By 

74eal 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

On Watergate: 
Buckley and Guy 



Syndicated columnist William F. Buckley was in 
Virginia Beach Friday to acblress the annual 
meting of the Virginia State Bar, and his visit 
occasioned the (q)pOTtunity to sound him out (mi 
Watergate. His idea is that it is becoming boring. 

Referring to the 
public's interest in 
Watergate, Mr. Buckley 
said in a press con- 
ference, "There is a 
great yawn coming on 
all of a sudden." 

That's all well and 
good for a noted con- 
servative writer and 
editor like Bill Buckley 
to say. So what about 
the businessman or 
professional person who 
doesn't write about it 
three times a week but 
only discusses it over 
dinner with his family? 
^iXXiS^ What does he think? 

LOCAL ATTORNEY Richard Guy doesn't have 
the answCT for everybody, of course. Though he's 
p-esident (rf the Virginia Beach Bar Association, he 
will only speak for himself. But Mr. Guy says, "I 
don't think the interest is dwindling. New matters 
come up every day which renew the interest. I have 
to look at impeachment now as a real possibility." 

In an interview, Mr. Guy was asked to give his 
personal views on some of the same issues to which 
Mr. Buckley had spoken. 

Mr. Buckley characterized President Nixon as 
"easy to pick on." "He's incapable of making any 
statement without vulcanizing it in morality," Mr. 
Buckley said, pausing to think over every word in 
that distinguished manner of his. Pecause cS. that, 
people want to get back at Mr. Nixon, he says. 

Mr. Guy thinks the press has a tendency to 
overstate the case, but he believes it is not out to get 
the President. "I'm not one of his severe critics," 
he says, "but I think Watergate gives us a clear 
indication of the extent to which improper activities 
are becoming widesjHread." 




MANY VOTERS, Mr. 

Guy says, may feel that 
the only way to correct 
that is by a clean sweep 
in the polls. But the 
bureaucrats and 
politicians who have 
learned over the years 
to live with misdeeds 
have been forced to 
recognize through 
Watergate that the 
public does not like it. In 
that sense, Watergate 
has slowed the carry- 
over effect of continued 
misconduct, Mr. Guy 
says. 




GUY 



For Mr. Buckley, the ideal solution to Watergate 
is for Congress to formally censure the President 
and thei allow everyone to go on about their 
business. Mr. Guy feels the issue must be brought to 
some kind of condition as soon as possible. If the 
evidence warrants it, we should bring him to a 
Senate trial as soon as possible and decide once and 
for all if he's guilty. 

On the {H-actical side, Mr. Guy observes, you have 
to look at the alternatives. "Right now my only 
choices are Nixon or Ford. I'd prefer he stay on," 
he concludes. 



How tosnbserllie 




Many of our raaden prefer to get 
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if you with The Sun to be mailed 
weekly to your home or buthie^inail 
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Circulation Oapt. 

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By 

Donna 

Hendrick 

h's not worth 
the brainpower 



When one is hassled about something, it is the 
hassle-ee's fault rather than the hassle«r, says an 
intelligent friend of mine who is wont to offer 
philosophical gems of wisdom every now and then. 

What he means is, it's all in your mind. If you 
refuse to let something bother you, Uien it won't 
bother you. No matter that the car won't start or the 
dogs just knocked over the garbage cans for the 
10th time this week or you got another overdue 
notice when you paid the bill two months ago— it's 
all unimportant, trivial and not worth the brain- 
power required to stew about it, my friend con- 
tends. 

Our minds should be occupied with more im- 
portant things, such as the state of the world in 
general, the future of humankind and the quality of 
our souls, my friend says. 

THIS TYPE of thinking follows very closely the 
tenets set forth in a recent magazine article I read. 
(I'm not above stealing the article's major points.) 
The article was about life's everyday hassles and 
how they can rob us of our vital energies by wasting 
our time, preoccupying our minds and wearing us 
down. 

For example, I spent a good 30 minutes recently 
ranting and raving about the unknown fiend who 
snapped off my car's antenna, presumably for no 
other reason than it was there to be brrfien in half. 

I wasted another half hour shrieking about the 
dumbbell who parked in my parking space at home, 
forcing me to park out on the street where my car 
was most vulnerable to the malicious antenna 
breaker. 

THEN I SPENT another 20 minutes drawing 
corollaries between the two acts and rationalizing 
how to blame the hapless parker for the brcricen 
antenna. 

All this wasted almost an hour and a half of 
brairq)ower when I could have been dreaming up 
some brilliant plan to feed the world's starving 
millions or bring peace to all the warring nations. 

It sounds good on paper, but it's mighty difficulty 
to accomplish. It's not easy to refuse to be hassled 
by something that's definitely a hassle. 



LIFE IS SO full of little everyday aggravations 
Uiat seem designed specifically to drive us up the 
wall. If we stopped to think about it, we c(Hild 
prdaably list at least 10 minor irritations each of us 
experienced today, all of which wasted our time, 
occupied our minds and probably caused our 
stomachs to start churning. 

It's also difficult to escape the feeling that all 
these hassles are aimed at us on purpose— that, we 
are somehow deserving of those irritable hap- 
penings. Some psychiatrist somewhere would 
probably pin this kind of thinking on some deep 
down guilt complex and have a field day exploring 
why some people seem to be hassled more than 
others. 

t You know you're not to blame when the postal 
service loses your package— so why does it happen? 
Ami you know it's not your fault that the ham vou 
bought at the grocery store yesterday is spoUed 
today— so whose fault is it ? 

LAYING BLAME on the hassle^r is a good way 
to avoid doling with the problem positively. It's 
just so much easier to blame everyone and 
everything else for the things that happen to us. 

From now on I'm going to remember that life's 
little hassles are too unimportant for me to worry 
about. I'm going to ignore people and things that 
try to interrupt my inner tranquility. 

Now if I can just remember all this when that 
stupid man in the car ahead of me slams on his 
Ix-akes and starts to make a turn without 
signalling... and ttiose dogs out thwe start sniffing 
around the garbage cans again ... and the 
I !"" y^^ toaster won't pop up.... 



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TheSufl-WediMtday, lum 26. i974-P^ A-3 



. ^ 



by Rod ■oAA 




Dorothy Heitn is almost lost in a sea of empty 
chairs as she casts a critical eye toward the stage of 
Plaza Junior High School. Ms. Heim, a New York 
actress, was talent coordinator for the recent Miss 



Virginia Beach Pageant. She was observing the ta- 
lent of the pageant contestants during pageant re- 
heeffsals. 



Beach . 
gets2 ■ 
grants 

The City of Virginia Beach 
has been awarded two 
grants totaling $13,748 to aid* 
the city's law enforcement' 
program. t 

Tlie grants were awarded 
by the Virginia Council on 
Criminal Justice last week. 
The funds originate from the 
federal Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration. 
(LEAA). 

A grant of $10,447 was 
approved to send Virginia 
Beach police officers to 
various training programs 
during the year. A $3,301 
grant was approved 
enabling the com- 
monwealth's attorney to 
attend various training 
schools and seminars, 

A $166,301 grant affecting; 
Virginia Beach was ap~ 
proved to continue the ex-^ 
perimental public defender 
project. The money was- 
given to the Public Defender 
Commission to continue 
paying public defenders and 
funding their programs in 
Virginia Beach, Staunton,' 
Waynesboro and Augusta; 
County. '-, 



Students cited 
for leadership 

Six Virginia Beach high school students have 
been recognized for their outstanding leadership 
abilities by the Virginia Beach Republican 
Women's Club. 

The six seniors, who have just been graduated 
from high school, are Paula Pruden (Kempsville 
High School), Anthony Maygarden (Bayside High 
School), Jack Leslie Wright (Cox High School), 
Michael L. Rogers (Kellam High School), Allen 
Bruce Gilpin (First Colonial High School) and Brett 
Lewis (Princess Anne High School). 

Government teachers at each school were asked 
to choose the students in the annual leadership 
awards program sponsored by the women's club. 

Each student was given a $25 U.S. Savings Bond 
during recent annual awards ceremonies at each 
high school. In addition, the students and their 
parents were recognized recently at a luncheon at 
the Oceana Naval Air Station Officers Club. 

The students also will spend a day ki Washington, 
D.C., with Rep. G. William Whitehurst (R-Va), 
with all e3q)enses for the day's visit assumed by the 
women's club. 



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TUITION GRANT 
NOTICE 

VIRGINIA BEACH CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
1 974-1 975 Application Deadline 
July 15, 1974 
Secure Application at the 
Special Education Ofiice 
Center for Effective Learning 
233 N. Witchduck Road 
Mobile Unit No. 1 

Telephone: 499-2328 

Rules and regulations for Tuition Assistance'^for the 
Education of Handicapped Ctiildren In Virginia attending 
Approved Private Nonsectarlan Schools for the 
Handicapped, 1974-75. (In Compliance with Sections 22- 
9.1:4 and 22-9.1:5, Code of Virginia, 1972 Acts of the 
General Assembly as amended by 1974 General 
Assembly.) ■^. 

A. DEFINITION: Handicapped children Include those 
who are mentally retarded, physically handicapped, 
emotionally disturbed, learning disabled, hearing 
impaired, multiple handicapped and visually impaired 
as defined In the publications Administrative 
Requirements and Guidelines for Special Education' 
Programs, 1972, and Services for Exceptional 
Children, A Guide for Program Improvement, 1970, 
Virginia State Department of Education. 

B. ELIGIBILITY OF PUPIL. In order to determine the 
eligibllltyof a handicapped child for tuition assistance, 
the following requirements must be fulfilled: 

1. For the School year 1974-75, the handicapi9«d child must 
have reached hlsher fifth birthday by November 30, 
1974, and shall not have reached hlsher twentieth 
birthday by September 1, 1974. If hearing impaired, the 
handicapped child may to* between the ages of two and 
twenty. 

2. The child must be Identified as handicapped In 
accordance with State Board of Educatlmi definitions 
and procedures. This determination shall be made by 
the local school division placement committee after 
careful review of appropriate professional 
evaluations. Additionally, it must be determined that 
the school division is unable to provide appropriate 
special education for this handicapped child and such 
education is not available in the State schools or 
institutions. Such evaluations shall be on file and 
available for review by designated State Department 
of Education personnel. 

3. The parent or guardian of the child fw whom tuition 
assistance is requested must approve the reiMM of 
necessary evaluative information, medical, social, 
psychological (psychiatric, if appropriate) and 
educational to the local school division for 
determination of eligibility. 

4. Application on the official form accompanied by the 
above evaluations shall be submitted by the parent or 
guardian to the local school division by July IS, 1974 to 
be eligible for Initial consideration for school year 1974- 
75. 

5. Tuition assistance will not be allowed whwi the 
handicapped child no longer requires special education 
services, graduates from high school or a State Board 
of Education approved training ^ogram. 



THURSDAY, 
JUNE 27th 



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wm 



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Features 



w 



Pagt A-4-The Sun-Wednaiday, June 26, 1974 



Ms, now accepted 
part of language 




"Is that Miss or Mrs.?" Remember that? It 
was barely two years ago that a woman began 
every transaction— social, business or civil— 
with a disclosure of her private life. 

At first, only feminist activitists used Ms. 
Today "radical types" like housewives and 
schoolteachers are calling themselves Ms. 

The logic is elementary. If all men are Mr., 
why should women be divided into Miss and 
Mrs. If a man reveals his marital status only 
if and wh«i he chooses to, why should a woman 
be defined in terms of it? 

THERE IS more than an invasion oS privacy 
involved in this distinction because what 
"Miss or Mrs. " really means is that what's 
most important about a woman is whether or 
tM)t she's married. 

Actually, it is only within the past few 
hundred years that different forms of address 
have been used for single and married 
women. When Shakespeare referred to his 
"mistress," he wasn't writing about his girl 
friend. Mistress originally meant a woman 
having power, authority or ownership (today, 
of course, it means just the opposite — a rich 
man's plaything). Eventually, Mistress was 
contracted to Missus, abbreviated to Mrs., 
and used as a title of respect for married 
women of all economic classes. Miss, a 



shortened form spun off for young girls, the case. It is custom and nothing more that 
became institutionalized in the United States dictates such toage. A woman is free to refer 
and England to mark the inferior status of to herself by aiqr title she chooses. Or none, if 
single women. she prefers that. 

^g-^-^^ttte women (and men) do |H*efer no title 
AT ONE time feminists considered (simply Jane or John Doe) ttius eliminating 



reverting to Mistress with its original 
meaning, but the prospect of the smirks and 
smears this would produce from chauvinists 
unversed in etymology ruled this out. 

What was decided on was Ms., which 
originated in secretarial hancflsooks <d the 
1920s as a form ci address when writing to a 
woman oi undertermined marital status. It 
was an idea whose time had not yet come and 
didn't catch on. Today, of course, Miz it is. 

Enshrined on "MS Magazine" covers 
throughout the country and used by an in- 
creasing nural)er of women (married and 
sit^e) , Ms. has now come i^to its own as part 
of the language. Most businesses, univer- 
sities, government agencies and serious 
publications recognize Ms. The only exception 
in this last category is the New York Times, 
which archaicly insists that Ms. is not proper 
usage and refuses to call a woman Ms. even 
whoi she requests it. , 

MANY women believe they are required by 
law to use Mrs. if they are married. This is not 



all sexual or marital distinctions b^oce 
names. I think this is fine but don't see the 
practice being adopted in the near future. It is 
easier to get society to use a preferred title 
than to drop^all titles. So I say, whenever Mr. 
is used, let's use Ms. 

I think too, that we feminists should be more 
understanding of women who still prefer to 
call themsdves Mrs: Women like my mother, 
who's proud of her daughter, the writer; 
who's gung-ho on women's liberation; and 
who uses Ms. religiously on correspondence. 
But she says, "After 35 years of being Mrs. 
Gellis, I just can't chaise." 

As for those men u^o claim the lack of 
distinction between Miss and Mrs. un- 
dermines the institution of marriage, my 
answer is : start thinking up a title for married 
men. 

Men have identity and self-image apart 
from their marital roles; wonien are entitled 
to no less. So if anybody stiU asks, "Is that 
Miss or Mrs.? ", just tell them: 

"CALL ME MS." 



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From 
June 28 
ioJufy2 

ARIES: (MMch U to Aprff 
»- AiN Artot AMcniiHt) - 
Dtwnify your acttvitiM this 
w«d(. Divide your time be- 
tween {mily and work areas 
witiKwt beli« "scattered." A 
diort trip over tlw holiday is 
favored. You have nq>port 
from otters in groi9 acttvi- 
iiea. 

TAURUS: (April » to ll«y 
» - Also TauM Asccadant) 
— Concentrate your attcntton 
on reality, not vague plans or 
promises. Be catai and com- 
promi^ to bring peace and 
harmony to partnersh^ af- 
fairs. Show apfvedation of 
ethers. Adopt a cooperative 
spirit. 

GENIMI: (May 21 to June 
»- Also Gemini AsccndaBt) 
— Getsufficientrestandsee a 
doctor if health problems crop 
up. ^lonring tr^ for the 
practical and unusual diould 
be rewarding. Spend some 
time alone to be coitempla- 
tive and brii% emotions into 
balance. 

CANCER: (June 21 to Joly 
21 — Also Cancer Asccndut) 

— Ttavd at this time could be 
frustrating and disappointing. 
If possible plan to spend die 
holiday closer to home with 




family and friends. ProUeros 
from the part InvtdvinR fi- 
nances may come 19 for ful- 
flllment. 

(JriyStoAi«iirt22 
Leo Asceadaat) — 
is a good time to find 
and pieanre in 
puUfa^friaces — parks, play- 
grounds. comDuaiity affairs. 
Plan to be with the one nraet 
important in ^our life, apart 
from family and cUlcfren. 
Watd) your diet. 

VIRGO: (Angast 2S to Sept 
22~AlsoVfrge Aseendaat) - 
A strong pcssiUlity of money 
coming to you now from in- 
heritance, extra work or a 
prise of sune kind. Get he^ to 
conqdete promote on time. 
Use care tiiatyou do not altoi- 
ate a Nperior by offending 
them. 

UBRA: (Sept 21 to Oct. 22 

— Also Uhra Ascendant) — 

Complete projecto already 
underway. Take care of aU 
routine matters in business. 
Resist pessiroistic attitudes 
vdiich reflect on your health. 
A "duty trip" may be neces- 
sary. Give q[iecial care to diet 
and rest 

SCOBFIO: (Oct 22 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Woridng associates are 
particularly helpful now. Be 
especially modest and digni- 
fied while accepting acclaim 
and recognition viliich could 
come to you now. Give 



thought to savii^, security 
proff'ams. 

SAGITTARnn: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 - Abe tegMwins Ai- 
cendant) — Your naves may 
be overwrou^t due to an ez- 
fra work load. Dcm't "take it 
out" on family and mate. An 
emotional rttocfament pur- 
sued now will demand a real- 
ly attitude. Curb t«nper — 
betdnwt 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. U — Also C^tkan As- 
cendant) — Reworidng a pre- 
vioiB business project nrny 
entoil a trip. Be practical, pa- 
tient and pay dose attention 
to details. Don't believe ev- 
oything you hear — it could 
be idle gossip. Stay dose to 
home on the wedtend. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 21 to 
Peb. U — Also Aqnarlns As- 
cendant) — You murt readi a 
decision about a frustrating 
situation — rely on your own 
wisdom. Creative projecto be- 
gun in die past pay off tbun- 
dally now. Honors -and ac- 
claim couki come to you alao. 
Be unemotional in criato. 

PISCES: (Feb. IS to March 
21 — Also nsces Ascendant) 
— Cooperation from partners 
is lacking — they we "cau^t 
up" in Uiefr own affairs. Be 
patient. Stick closely to your 
budget and take care of rou- 
tine matters, lid the best 
time to travel. Better times 
are condng. 



12. 
1.1. 



M. 



■k^ 



SEE THE AMAZING 

STONE THAT BENDS! 

(Flexible Sandstone) 



ACROSS 

I. Chop with an 

■X 

4. Bf boaiitful 
8. Rnutique 

Malt drinli 

OIRwr'ii 

■Miitant 

Vacnnt 
15. Fuhionahlf 

rolk:2wri>. 
17. 80 b* it! 
It. Appraiar 
19. Rock Iwaa 
21. Short anrt 

plump 

Resiliency 

Madirinal 

plant 
26. B* an omrn nf 

Diitent 

UnHwd 

30. Sing like Bine 

31. Feel ramone 
for 



23. 
24. 



». 
29. 



:ti. 2,0M) iHiiinilH 
:i;i. Kit .if n-M'nt- 

ment 
.14. Departed 
:IR Take it 

relax 
1R. Hindu Mirial 

clan 
yi. Knife ease 

40. Festive Cath- 
erine: slanK 

41. Filly's brother 

42. Hifiiway 
bridfC 

4A. Part of a 

church 
47. Clenched 



48. 



49. 



60. 



Mr. President, 
1963-1961 
Sufflx meaning 
"ten and" 
Kismet or 
karma 
Cereal irraM 



10. 
U. 
16. 
20. 



ALSO MANY UNIQUE AND 

LOVELY GIFTS FOR 

ALL OCCASIONS 

GEM SPECIALTIES 

3320 Va. Beach Blvd. gSS^BWg.) 

CALL 486-7886 

_ Now Closed On Mondays 





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DOWN 

1. Possesses 

2. Shade tree 

,T Knxlr; 2 wds 

4. Oasy; de- 
ranged : slanit 

.■>. Have an up- 
ward !tlant 

«. Citrus riioler 

7. "Shake": 
3 wds. 

8. Ghost; specter 

9. Charity Iw- 
gins here 
Fullow orders 
Corn bread 
Furious anger 
Balanced 

21. Gasp for 
breath 

22. Bread spread 

23. Disney cartoon 
dog 

26. Rude dis- 
missal : slang 

2S. Breath of — , 
a refreshing 
change: 2 wds. 

27. Family memhei 

28. Anatomical 
neturork 

■10. Informal con- 
versation 

.14. .Stinging in- 
sect 

36. Moth- — , old 
and outmoded 

36. Bill of fare 

37. "Be»t it!" 
Comic who en- 
tertains the 
troops 
Otherwise 
Most suitable 
By means of 
Heavens 
"Understand?" 



38. 



Solution on page B-4 



NOW 

Is on Excellent time for 
LANDSCAPING YOUR HOME 

or PLANTING SHADE TREES 
(We Haye a Nice Selection 

of Both Planfs and Trees) 

WE OUARANTn OUR PLANTS fOR OWE YBAR 

COLEMAN NURSERY 

GARDENTOWN 

"THE HOME OF CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND" 
4934 HIGH ST. (RT. 17) PORTSMOUTH, VA. 
SINCE 1942 484-3426 



JIjS ii\ 



425-9335 



'ORIENTALARTS& CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 a.in. TO 5:00 p.m. 
CLOSED SUN. IcMON. 

716FIR.STCOLUNIAI. 
HILLTOP WKST 

(Hehind McDonalds on Laskin Kd.) 



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VISIT OUR STORES ...TALK TO OWNERS CHOICE AREAS AVAILABLE 

CALL COLLECT MR. TODD...904/396-1707 
OR WRITE HY-SmESHOPPE 

P.O. Box 2 6009... Jacksonville, Fla. 3221 8 



HOGAN'S 
HEROES 



mmm^y/mmmsm>mif»>x-M>^^^^^ 



&mim&m»«^: 



7PM 



Strict 
Personal. 

was should ask 
for allowance 

By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

What do you think of a husband who refuses to 
allow his wife to purchase makeup, go to the beauty 
shop, or bity new clothes? If my friend didn't give 
me home permanents, I don't know what I would 
do. 

Befwe I was married I worked as a secretary, 
wore nice clothes, and kept my hair well groomed. 
We've been married two years and I don't think I 
can stand another two. 

Fed Up 

Dear Fed Up: 

Every wife should have an allowance. She should 
feel free to spend a few dollars as she pleases. Tell 
your husband exactly how you feel. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

This is my second marriage and I'm determined 
to make it a success. However, Karl is making 
things all but impossible. When he gets home from 
worit he goes to the bedroom to watch TV. He (toes 
come out long enough for dinner and then it's back 
to the bedroom. I watch television in the living 
room because Karl says he would rather be alone. 
He shows me no affection but is polite and makes a 
good livir^. 

Karl is 32 and I am 28. 1 simply refuse to accept 
another failure. 

J.C. 

Dear J. C. 

It takes two to make marriage a success. You 
can't do it alone. What you have now can hardly be 
called success. Unless Karl is willing to see a 
counselor, the outcome of your marriage is 
doubtful. 

Strictly Penonal wltt be glad to condder your questlmu 
write: Pat and MaHyn Darts, Vtgink Beach Sun, 138 Roie- 
moHLRoad, MmiMa Beach, Va., 2345Z 



Need help? Phone-in TV 

TOO CLUB 

featuring i 

Pat Robertson 1^^ 

8PM wceknights 



WHO'S WHO CONTEST—^ 

Among Virginia Beach Area Merchants 
nfW^ In Cosh Awards For Those Who Know 



s 



Check Next Wednesday's Sun 

for Details 



mmmmm 



immmmmtkmmmm 





THE 



BOJ-D ONES 



Ts:0] 



weekdays 11PM 



■^liM 



MflMMHIttaMtfaH 



^mmmmtmmmmmm 




•flu Sim-Wtdimdty. Jum 26, 1974~P^ A j_ 



0,^,0^0m^^,^mpni* » ,Mvw* m P u * wh ki h ■ , w,w.wi»,<m. ,,^ . ^ -_-u-^-j-_njn,njnj-^.-Lnj-^,-------. r ' 



««MM 




Growing church expamls 



Methodists recommend 



full funds forWesleyan 



Vi^inia Wesleyan Odlege could 
r«ilize ao additional $27,(K)0 in 
opn-aUng fiinite in 1975 as a result of a 
recommendation adopted at the 
Virgiida Annual Confo^nce d the 
Unital Methodist Church, which met 
in Hampton earlier tUs month. 

The conference's Council on 
Finance and Administration 
rectxnmeiMled that the educational 
fttnd at the confa*ence be revitalized 
to provide mmre <^rating money to 
the six coU^es and schools in 
Virginia affiliated with the United 
Methodist Church. 

Besides Virginia Wesleyan College, 
other schools supported by the 
{NTOgram are Shosandoah Ccdlege, 
Randtdpli-Macm College, Randolph- 
Macon Wranan's College. Ferrum 



College and Randolph-Macon 
Academy. 

MONEY RECEIVED each year in 
the educational fuml from the 350,000 
United Methodists in the state is 
appwtioned amtmg the six schools 
and the campus ministry {vograms at 
state college and universities. 

The annual goal for the fund, set in 
1970, is $647,796. The fund for the 
calendar year 1973 contained only 
$440,671, or 70 per cent d the 
goal. 

Each church district in the con- 
ference is apportioned a certain 
amount of the fund each year. In turn, 
churches in the districts are asked to 
place a specific amount in their 
budgets f(H- the fund, depending on 
church size and other factws. 



EACH YEAR, the amount 
approtioned to each district and the 
amount actually paid on the 
apportionments has shrunk. The 
church's Council on Finance and 
Administration and the Commission 
ui Higher Education and Campus 
Ministary urged the 2,000 delegates 
attending the conference to accept 
their full apportionments when 
budgets are adopted for 1975 and 
make a special effort to pay the 
apportionments in full. 

If the full funding is provided In 
1975, Virginia Wesleyan College 
w(Hild receive $93,926, instead of the 
$66,732 it received for 1973. The local 
collie receives 14.5 per cent of the 
total amount of the educational fund. 

The cdlege hopes to receive $75,000 
tram the fund for 1974. 



4^' 



Mount Zion AME Church on Princess Anne 
Road is getting a new educational annex, now 
undo* construction at the left rear of the 
church sanctuary. The annex will be 
connected to the sanctuary and will house 
Sunday school classrooms, a kitchen, dfadng 



room and large meettaig room. Hie new 
structure, estimated to coat |45,0M, should be 
ready fw use by August. Church members 
have been actively raising money for the 
annex on a pay-as-you-build basis. (I^u photo 
by Rod Mann) 



MWWM^^VMMMinMMMMAA^ 



i jljUtAlVW li ' i ~ i ~ i " ****«***^^^ 



9 STRONq 

ckuRchES 




MAkE STRONq 
COMIVIUNiTiES 



j-^j-|j-^f-^|T_nj-y-X/-UXrXr i XIJlJU"LrXJ^^ »■*»»»■ ^ m^^m^^^.m^m^^m^^m.m^^m.^ » ^ m^^^^^^i 



Foundry church 
plans sanctuary 



THE 700 
CLJB 



/^i 



Foundry United Methodist 
Church will finally have a 
sanctuary by the fall of 1975 
if everything goes as 
planned. 

The church at 2801 
Virginia Beach Blvd. has 
Siever had a real sanctuary, 
said the pastor, the Rev. 
HaroM Kirby. Services are 
now held in the fellowship 
hall, with 275 to 300 
congregation members 
"kind .of jammed up" in the 
buildii^ seated on folding 
chairs. 

The church also has an 
education builcting which 
houses facilities for the 
nursery, a crib room, a 
library, plus kindergarten 
and babysitting services 
during the reffdar school 
year. 

THE NEW sanctuary, to 
be constructed on almost 
three acres of church-owned 
land, win be attached to the 
presait structures by a new 
wing. 

The church is now so 
crowcted that some Sunday 
school classes meet in 
facilities provided by Beach 
Ford, Rev. Kirby said. 

The executive building 
committee was scheduled to 
meet Monday to finalize 
{dans for the new sanctuary 
and turn the plans over to 
the architectural Ann d 
Mcaurg and Wall, which 
wUl design the sanctuary. 

REV. KIRBY envisions a 
building oi modem design 
with large glass win<tows. 
The windows wiU "open up" 
the chiffdi to make it more 
visible from Virginia B«ich 
Boulevard, the pastor said. 

"We want to create as 
much exposure to the 
church as possible," he said. 
"We've beo) hidden in ttie 
pine trees for years." 

The first sanctuary for the 
ctwrch, referred to as the 
chq)el, was coMtructed 13 
y^rs ago of cement blocks. 
It cmild acoimmodate only 
125-150 pawns, he said. 

The new ore-story sane- 
xuary miy cwr ▼*'''(»»• »•• 
construct, although thfr 
construction cost may be 
^vra hi^m-, Rev. Kirby 
•^id. 

HE EMPHASI^D that 
members of the 
coi^^egBtioti must an>rove 
all plans for the con- 
struction iroject. 

"All (rf i^iat we have d«»e 
Is suMect to amgregatfam 
^iiroMA," heaakL "Befora 
we m^mS^ ^rt bi^dtag 
the - 



will have a church con- 
ference and take a 
congregation vote." 

Church members are 
serving on the general 
building committee's 
various subcommittees, 
handling plans for financing 
and construction. 



kV 



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MOISTURE CONTROL 

OF 

TIDEWATER INC. 

1600 E.Uttie Creek Rd. 
Norfolc,Va. 

(In fnwl ^>aee only) 



138 Rosemont Road 

Va. Beach 
Phone — 486-3430 



CONTRACTORS 
PAVING CO. INC. 

3779 Bonney Road 
Phone • 340-1161 



A THOUGHT 

THE WEEK 
JUNE 26, 1974 

By Rer. Hanld HuUon 
EMMANUEL TABERNA- 
CLE CHURCH 
United Penteooita] Church 

Christ It the 
resurrection 
and the life. 

' I am the ressurection, 
and the life: he that 
believeth in me, though 
he were dead, yet shall 
he live: And whosoever 
liveth and believeth in 
me shall never die. Be- 
lievest thou this? 
John 11:25,26. 



Emmanuel Tabernacle 
Church-UPC 

1S7 Moniwn Ave. 

(1 block off S. LynnhBven Rd.) 
Rev. HiroM HulkNi-Pulor 
Phone: 340-7333 



BAYLAKE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4300 Shoie Drive 
Vt.Beadh - 464-2423 

Byron S. Hallstead - 
Minister 

SUNDAY SERVICES 
Qiuich School 9:30 AJU. 
Monili« Wonhip 11:00 A.M. 
VISTORS ARE WELCOME. 



TIDEWATER CENTRAL 
CHURCH OF THE 
NAZARENE 

Rev. David Holitein, Putor 

SS14 RuUanient Ph. 497-8703 
Sunday School Hi. - 9:4S A.M. 
Houj of 'Mumph 10:S0 A.M. 
Junior, Youth, k Adult 
PeUowriilp • 6:00 P.M. 
Houi of InapiiaiiMi - 7:00 P.M. 
Wednesday Mid-week 
Up4ift 7:30 F.M. 



ROCK CHURCH 

640KenipiviUeRd. Fh. 499-3727 

Viixlnia Beach 

Suneay 

Sunday SctMDl t:4> A.M. 

Morntne Warihl* \\M A.M. 

■ vMlni WorMilp 7:N P.M. 

TiMMay 

Mwnlne Worihtp )t:M A.M. 

BvMlne Worilitp ;:3e'i>.M. 

Thurtday 

Mornlnt Worth)* l»:M A.M. 

■vtnlni Worthlp *:M P.M. 

Niirttry AvdItMt 
PAITORi 

Rtv . John Olmtnoi «•» Ann Olminoi 



Fact RtUramtnt wKh 
Praytrful Action 

Man never really retires 
from his most important 
responsibilities — to Cod 
and to^iis neighbor. 



thelRUTH 

ifiorHCAlS 



Broadcast this week over many 
stations including: 

WVHR,1490kc WRAP.SSOkc 

8:45 ajn. 3:00 pjn. 

Sunday, |uly 7 

A Christian Sclenre radio series 



1 



ST 



AiMinblyorGod 






(Comer Va. Beach BKd. 

Oceana Blvd.) 

S. Bdlar,Paitar 

428-S297 



EMMANUEL BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

4750 Baxter Rd.-Va. Beach 
Pailor: W. F. Granditaff 
Fhona: 4974208 

Sund^ School! 9:45 A.M. 

(AIIAgit) 
PnachiniSaivica: 11:00 A.M. 
Evening haacMiv: 7:00 P.M. 

Wednaiday 7:30 P.M. 
ftayar A Bible Study 
Variwt Youth Actlvitlaa 



ft ' 



Welcome To Worship 
And Witntss With 

ST. MARK'S A.M.E. 
CHURCH 

J. Alton Butts, Minls- 
ttr 

1740 Potttrs Rd. Vir- 
ginia Boach, Va. 
Study Phona 428-1330 
Church School - 9:30 
A.M. 

Divina Worship - 11:00| 
Divina Worship - 
11:00 A.M. 



THERE IS A 
DIFFERENCE 

TRY 

Beach Fori/ 



CREDIT BUREAU 

of 

TIDEWATER 

INC. 

4946 Pocihsntas CMtsr 
VirfiRia Batch 4104575 




McCOY 

OIL COMPANY 

213 FIRST COLONIAL ROAD 
VA. BEACH VA. 



KEMPSVILLE 
PHARMACY 

526( PRINCESS ANNfRD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 

497-3S16 



Jol^nlluU 
PubMBxiuBP 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS 
ij 40 up 

Indwiinf salad 4 lw«araflt 

M. 340446S 




v^n* 




^ 



■y 

John 
Baimon 

Sports Editor 




Perry discards 
greasy kid stuff 



A look at the current major league baseball 
standings gives you the feeling you are standing on 
your head. Here it is almost the end of June and 
right up near the top of their respective divisions 
are the Texas Rangers, the Atlanta Braves and the 
Philadelphia Phillies. 

II has not been your run of the mill baseball 
season underscored by the brew-brawl in 
Cleveland. Here are some observations: 

Gaylord Perry has won 13 consecutive games 
which in itself is not that unusual, considering the 
lalents of the Cleveland hurler. Perry maintains 
though that he has fashioned this win streak without 
l)enefit of his greatest talent — doctoring a 
baseball. 

PEKKY EMERGED as a big major league 
winner upon his discovery of a hard slider. Perry's 
addition to his pitching reptoire also coincided with , 
complaints around the league that Perry's new 
pitch performed unnatural acts on its travels 
toward the plate. 

Now, Perry claims to have gone clean, swearing 
off the greasy kid's stuff. Ah, history is repeating 
itself once again. There has been another new 
addition to the Perry arsenal to help subtract 
numbers from opposing hitters batting averages. 

Perry calls his new pitch a forkball. Sure 
(liiylord. 

Pete Rose hustles all the time. 

Even without his crew-cut. Rose is not likeable. 

After a trade with Cleveland stripped the New 
York Yankee pitching staff to the bone, fan reaction 
has not been too pleasant. There is a rumor that 
some Yankee fans are planning t6 record a spin-off 
of the Tony Bennett classic entitled "I left my 
pitching in Cleveland." 

IN SOME CASES, the fan's all-star votmg seems 
strange. 

The Braves getting solid pitching is even 
stranger. 

The Phillies in first place is downright ridiculous. 

One thing has remained constant about this 
baseball season. The gifted Richie Allen is battling 
his ever-present advesary — the press. If Allen's 
love affair with Chicago ends, he will have gone 
through his fourth major league city in his career. 

Isn't there some city in this country where a 
somewhat surly, horse-loving, .300 hitter who hits 
30 homers and drives home 100 runs a season can 
find true peace and happiness — or at least a couple 
of race tracks where he can blow a portion of his 
overwhelming salary. 

AS A PLAY-BY-PLAV man, Joe Garagiola 
makes a good car salesman. 

In comparison to Tony Kubek, Garagiola sounds 
like^the broadcaster of the year. 

The Detroit Tigers have not set the American 
League's Eastern Division on fire. Considering the 
age of their line-up, the Tigers would be the terror 
of the senior citizen circuit. 

Alvin Dark is doing an acceptable job as manager 
of the world champion Oakland A's — at least two of 
his players are still talking to each other. 

Oakland owner Charley Finley is still going to fire 
him. 

TOM SEAVER'S acting in commercials has been 
better than his performance on the mound for the 
New York Mets. 

In relation to the other Mets, 'Tom TerriffiC can 
build a case that he has been efficient at something. 

Texas Ranger manager Billy Martin had an 
interesting experience during the recent up-ising at 
the ten-cent beer night in Cleveland. The fiesty 
Martin was actually involved in a fight that he did 
not start. 

Leo Durocher actually pi(^ed the Phillies to win 
their division on national television no less. If his 
prediction does not come true, it certainly won't be 
the first — or the last time he has been wrcmg. 

Despite all the strange happening in the baseball 
world as the season grinds toward the all-star 
break, it still can not hold a candle to the idiocy that 
to<4[ place in Lubbock, Texas last Saturday night. 

In the middle of June, 40,000 plus pei^le paraded 
out to a football stadium in 80 tegree heat to watch 
of all things — an all-star football game. There 
down'on the field players performed the rites of 
fall 

With little to gain, Barty Smith endangwed what 
was the beginning (rf a {xt)mising pco career, 
tearing up his knee. 

Bring on Uie WFL. 



OPEN 
SCORES 



S ports 



Page A-6-The Sun-WedfWMlay, Juim 26, 1974 





CHANDLER HARPER (rU^t) and his gallery watch as his 
chip shot from just off the 8th green stops sh<Ht of the cup 
Saturday. Harper sank the short par-putt and went onto take 
the lead on the third day of the State Open. The amazing 60- i 

STATE OPEN 

Bruce wins in playoff 



year old golfer, who has won the event 10 times, could not 
keep up the pace and faded to a 75 and a secrnid place flnish 
on the final day. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



Danville amateur John Bruce captured 
the 1974 Virginia PGA Open, defeating 
Farmville professional Mac Main in a 18- 
hole playoff Tuesday at the Red Wing Golf 
Course. Bruce l)ested his older opponent, 
firing a two-under par 70 to edge Main by 
two strokes and take the open crown. 

Bruce, a junior at Virginia Tech, slipped 
by a field of faltering frontrunners to tie 
for the top spot after 72 holes. Playing 
consistent golf, Bruce was the tourney's 
co-leader with a two under par total of 286 
after rounds of 70-74-70-72. 

It was the seventh time in 47 opens that 
the title had been decided by an 18-hole 
playoff. The last time the open ended in a 
tie was in 1967. 

MAIN, WHO LED the tournament after 
36 holes, missed a chance to win the 
tournament Sunday, leaving a birdie putt 
on the 72-hole of the tourney itiches short. 
He fired rounds of 68-71-74-73 to match 
Bruce's four round total of 286. 

In a tournament that featured a different 
leader every day, it was fitting that after 
72 holes it would end in a tie. At the turn on 
the final day, Bruce's and Main's hopes of 
being in a playoff for the top position 
seemed bleak. 60-year old Chandler 



Harper and a hard-charging Banks Guyton 
seemed to have the tournament under 
control, heading for the final nine holes of 
the tourney. 

Harper made the turn two str(dces up on 
Bruce and three shots ahead of Main, but 
with Guyton snipping at his heels. The 
long-hitting Guyton, who started the 
tournament as the favorite, finally made 
his move after languishing in the pack for 
the first three rounds. Playing the hottest 
golf of the afternoon, Guyton was four- 
under for the round after 13 holes of play. 

HARPER AND Guyton dueled them- 
selves out of title contention opening the 
way for Main and Bruce. The leaders could 
riot keep up the pace down the stretch as 
Harper bogeyed three of the last six holes 
while Guyton capitulated his share of the 
lead with three bogeys over the final five 
holes. 

With the frontrunners sagging, Main and 
Bruce moved into the thick of the battle. 
Main moved into a share of the lead with a 
birdie-two on the par three 13th hole. 
Bruce gained his share of the top spot 
when he birdied the par-four 16th. Both 
players finished their rounds in par 
fashion after their birdies had moved them 
to two-under par for the tournament. 

Despte his closing round of 75, ten-time 



open champion and PGA hall of fame 
member Harper finished in second place 
at 287. The Bide-A-Wee professional 
earned $650 for his efforts. 

Guyton finished with a 71, one of only 
four sub-par rounds on the final round of 
the tournament. A bogey on the final hole 
cost the Williamsburg pro a share of 
second place. Guyton had to settle for a 
third place total of even par 288 and $500 
in prize money. 

Kempsville High School's Roger Savage 
turned in the best Virginia Beach per- 
formance in the State Open. After a brief 
challenge for the lead with an opening 
round 69, Savage finished with scores of 76- 
74-73 to finish at four over par 292. 
Savage's total tied him for the fifth slot 
among amateurs in the competition. 

Host pro Jennings House never got his 
game untracked during the four-day 
tournament, finishing well back tn the 
pack with rounds of 70-74-75-75-294. HiS 
total left House tied for the ninth place in 
the tournament and earned him $175. 

Main and Bruce each had a chance to 
end the tournament on Sunday. Bruce 
missed a 15-foot birdie putt on the final 
green while Main left an eight-foot birdie 
putt on the same hole inches short. 



RED WING golf pro 
Jennings House 
angntohes over a putt 
that falls short on 
Saturday. Home never 
did get untracked 
during the open and 
finished well back in the 
pack. (Sun photo by Red 
Mann) 



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• •wMaJMv 



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Larry Wheelar 

a-Grint Parlor 
«-O.D. Gardnar 
a Dsvk) Hydute 
MIkt Felkcr 
Wayn* Hollay 
a-JtfM >M«MB 



a •HI aatlwrvin 
Dec Daavar 
a-Gr*g Overton 
a Wemit ConMy 
a Gary Andansn 

J. P. Leigh 
a Tern Oougharty 
a-GordonHuty 
aMfradCMdi 
a Rkliard Tuckar 
a Lou FugMa 
a danotai amdMur 



<•-?• 73-77— W 
7t-73-7J-75— JW 

7jn-7»-»-a« 
74-7S-71 7t— in 
7*^71 74-74— JW 
7»7^74-73-»» 
73 7» 74-7^-301 
75 74-7S-n— 191 
73 rt-7$-7»-^Jei 
73 7«-»«-7»-303 
73-7S41 74-103 
74-73-n4»-^e4 
7»^7»-«-n— 304 

75^7577 77-304 
7i 7$-n-7*-a84 
7»-7» 74-74— 30S 
7S-74-70-7»-30» 
77 7»-74-7»-*» 
74.7*-7i-l»-IM 



SoflbaH toumey Starts 



Tht ^MlA-IMro Chwdi 
SeAteO tm^mmmt will 
tm Ml wtckMd irith (day 
rtwttag rrhtay « •:» p.m. 

Afl BmA CbwA le^ ve 



4^M« to MMpM* to tk« 



toumey. 

^ Anyone int««ted to eiA&i^ 

the oMnpMttai » f(V ftvtim- 

infornattei ^ould cvirtict 

Norf«lk CwamiMtaiwr Jim 

Brmmtk 




Strange takes 
NCAA crown 



Curtis Strange accomplished something Arnold 
Palmer never could — win an NCAA team golf title 
for Wake Forest. Strange, a freshmen attending 
Wake Forest on an Arnold Palmer scholarship, led 
the Deacons to their first NCAA golf title last 
weekend, and now is the favorite to be named 
college golfer of the year. 

Winning titles seems to come naturally to 
Strange. During his stay at Princess Anne High 
School, he led the Cavaliers to two consecutive state 
golf championships, winning numerous tour- 
naments with last hole heroics. 

Strange continued the pattern of last hole heroics 
at the NCAA tourney taking the tournaments in- 
dividual title by one stroke, sinkuig an eagle putt on 
the futtil hole. The Virginia Beach native's effort 
enabled Wake Forest to edge defending champion 
the UnWrsity of Florida by two str(*es 1,158 to 
1,160 forlh^ team title. 

STRANtiE EDGED Florida's Gary Koch and 
Phil Hancock with a 72-hole total of six-under-par 
282. Strange cardeid rounds of 72-73-65-72 to take the 
individual title. Strange joins touring PGA pro Ben 
Crenshaw as the only freshmen to win the NCAA 
title. 

Wake Forest had come from five strokes back 
on the final day of the four-day affair to dethrone 
the defending champions. It was on the third day of 
the tourney that the Deacons and Strange made 
.their challenge for their respective titles. 

Strange brought the Deacons' dreams of a 
national title into focus with a record-tying per- 
formance on the third-day of the tourney. Strange 
tied the NCAA single round record with a seven- 
under-par 65 perfornt&nce. 

Strange joins an elite group as an NCAA in- 
dividual titlist from Wake Forest. The legen<i?rx. 
Palmer who captured the crown in 1949 and 1950 is 
the only other Deacon to win an individual NCAA 
golf title. 

Summerellhas 
tougit outing 
in aif-star test 



KeUam High School graduate 
Carl Summerell, a recent 
draftee of the New York Giants, 
spent a not too pleasant evening 
as a member of the East squad 
at the Coaches All-America 
football game Saturday night in 
Lubbock Texas. 

Quarterback Summerell's 
team was on the wrong end of a 
36-6 score at the annual all-star 
contest. Summerell, who 
quarterbacked the East 
Carolina University team to two 
consecutive Southern Con- 
ference football champion^ips, 
spent less than half the game at 
the controls of the East attack. 

Summerell's statistics were 
less than impressive as he 
comi^eted only 6 of 15 passes for 



47 yards. The Virginia Beach 
native rushed six tim^ for 27 
yards, an average of 4.5 yards a 
carry. 

Summerell did not have to 
shoulder the blame for his less 
than sparkling performance 
alone. Numerous Summerell 
passes hit their intended target 
only to have the receiver drop 
the pass. One IS-yard gain via 
the passing lan^ was nullified 
by an off-sides penalty. In a one- 
sided contest,.. Summerell fell 
victim to an ove-all letdown 
team. 

Summerell was selected as 
Tidewater's most outstanding 
college athlete this past year by 
the Virginia Beach ^rts Clid). 



Legion showdown 
comes Saturday 



The long-awaited . con- 
frontation of the American 
Legion baseball season is 
almost here. Prince Anne 113 
and Virginia B^ch 113, the two 
undefeated frcmtrunnCTs of the 
legion circuit, will meet head on 
Satifl-day at 7:W at Cox Hi^ 
Sctool. 

Princess Anne currwitly 
hoick the top mn$ in the ^fiaa 
stan<ii^. 1%ey have tett««d 
five im»«^iv« offoemiat ki 
iMvtBf to tMr leading 



position. Princess Anne's lat«t 
succei» came Sunday at Cox* 
with a 2-1 win over Nta-folk 67. 
Bayside High School pitche- 
Marty Mowe went the distance, 
holding the Norfolk club to ^t 
six. hits. 

Virginia Beach has b«en 
equally impressive in the . 
openii^ wedu of the legkmr 
season. They have also pMted 
an undef»ted renrd, siraqilng 
tbdr first thrtt games. Vbr^nia 
Beach was rained oM Sua^y. 



jMBMl 



laftaaA^iM^ 



■M 



warn 



^ 




Harris wins tennis title 



Hmk Harris emer^ from 
the POitonoitfh Bankers tenais 
IcHirnaneiA as the bo^ M- 
under divi^n as diampkm. 
Entering the tounuuneirt as Uw 
^ second seed, the Virginia Beach 
native earned the tmimameirt 
title with a surpririi^y easy 
stnO^t sete-3, e-1 vi^wy over 
Rkdunontf s Tony Veto. 

Harris was one of the tour- 
ney's most impressive players, 
turning in two straight set 
victmies on tlie way to Qie 
finals. Harris handed Steve 
Lazar ot Lynchbwg 6-0, M in 
an opening matcli. He moved 
into his title confrontatioa with 
Velo, following a tough 
semifinal triumph over Bill 
Cook of McLean, 7-S, 64. 

THE PORTSMOUTH tourney 
officials overlooked 12-year old 
Stacey Ives at Virginia Beach 
when they paned wit seeds in 
the girls 14-under bracket. Miss 
Ives, who captured the Virgmia 
Beach jimior singles title in the 
18-under girls division earlier 
this month, showed the tourney 
organizers the oror of their 




IVES 

ways. 

In a quartofinal romd Mte 
Ives rearranged the rankings in 
her division. Dis|daying the- 
form that won her the Beach 
junior title, she Kored the 
biggest upset of the' tour- 
nament, handing top seeded 
Cathleen Cummings a 6-1, 6-2 
straight set (hiibbing.- 



Miss Ives catOfaMied her t^mb 
toward the title in her tttvisien 
with a strait set semiUnsI 
victory. She moved faito the 
Aud round in the 14-aDder 
dNWon with a M, 6-4 triunqih 
over Susan Lawless of Norfidk. 

In Uw title match Mtet Ives' 
upeet magk finaDy deputfld 
her. Facing second^eeded 
Qiristo|rf)er Mast for the 
tourney tttk, she stormed to an 
early l«id taking the first set hi 
6-1 fashwn. Her okkr opponent 
wore Miss Ives down extending 
the match to three sets, 
defeating Miss Ives in the 
second set by the identical 6^1 
score. 

Mtes Ives dr«ims of a title 
ev^wrated in the final set, 
dropping the third and deciding 
set 6-1. 

Miss Ives continied to idague 
the highly-touted Miss Cum- 
minp. She ctonbined with Hiss 
Lawless to drop Misa Cmn- 
mings and Jennifo- Vdo for the 
l4-tnd«* douUes title. The pair 
gabbed the tiUe with a 64, 44, 
6=4 triunph. 



Virginia Beach Deptkrtment 
of Parks & Recreation Softball 
aiid baseball scores and stan- 
dings as of Monday: 

Un»nHedNo. 1 

w L r 

Pork Chop 10 2 1 

Mill Etcc. 9 3 1 

Ted's 9 4 

Astros 8 5 

HSiM Contracting 7 5 1 

North Landing 6 7 

Nail Benders 5 8 

Jaguars 4 8 1 

Orioles 3 10 

F.O.PNo. 8 3 10 

Ted's II. (MM Bandar* 1 
OriolM 15, F.O.P. No. 1 11 
Monti LMuMng 11, Alrat V 

Mills El«c. 7, North Landing 5 
F.O.P. No. I 12, Astros IS 
Orlolas *, Jaguars I 
H & M Contracting 14, Tad's 11 
Pork Chop W, Nail Bandars 4 

Untimlted No. 2 



Sports Recordi 



Class A 



w 

9 

• 
7 
6 
5 
4 
4 
' 4 
2 
2 
1 



Stewart 

Reid Assoc. 

Merchants 

PorMrs 

Murden's 

Greenwich 

Tony's 

Professional 

Expo's . 

Cavaliers 

Ott Realty 

Evergreen 

Stawart Sahdwictias It, Tonyk S 
EvargFtan 11, Cavallars t 
Marchanta 11, Ott Raalty 3 
Profasslonal 10, Porkars t 
GraanwiOi 14, Murdan'k 13 
RtM Assoc. », Expo'k 11 



IntermBdiaU 
American 



Pra-Taen 
GMs No. 1 



Cavalett 

Roadrunners 

Patriots 

Ding-A-Llngs 

Eagles 

Chleft 

Swingers 

Mustangs 

Jolly Rogers 

Roundabouts 

EaglM II, Chiats 11 
Roadnmnars 19, Jotly Rogar* • 
Ding-A-Llngs t\. Mustangs 14 
Cavalalt t. Swingar* 
Patriots U. Roundabouts 4 



L T 






3 

2 1 

1 1 1 

1 1 1 

1 2 

3 

3 

3 



Pra-Taan 
GIris No. 2 



w 

E.Cailgari 11 
My Brothers Mother 10 

BOrger King 9 

Crabbers 9 

Bucks 8 

C.S.C. 5 

Pungo Radio 5 

Coast Guard 4 

Chicho's 2 

Aragona "A" 1 

E. Cailgiri U, Burgar King 11 
Punga Radio IS, Oiiclio^ I 
Wtoltiar^s 13, Coast Guard 7 

C.S.C. II, Chidio's I 

Pungo Radio M Aragana "A" 7 

E. CailsCI 14, Sucks 10 

UnHmNad No. 3 



L 
2 
4 
4 
4 
5 
8 
8 
9 
10 
12 



A'S 

Renegades 

pagles 

Mets 

Yanks 

Cardinals 

Cubs 

Spurs 

Chiefs 



Cubs 21, Cardinals 4 
A'S 16, Spurs 1 

Mats 7, Eagles 4 

Mais 2, Spurs! 
Ranagadas I, Cubs 6 



W L 
6 
6 
S 

3 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



Hustler's 

Pilots 

Tigers 

Larks 

Larkettes 

Chargers 

Rebels 

Diamondettes 

7Ups 

Queens 

Sluggers 

Chicks 

Qyaans 20, DIamondalta* S 

Tigers 4, Larks 3 

Sluggers 1*, Larkettes I 

Hustler's 27, 7- Ups 2 

Pilots II, Chargers 9 

Rebels If, Chicks S 



Mulkey's 

CSiP Telephone 

Larasan 

ISSI, OanvNeoK 

Paradise Inn 

Lynnhaven 

Tiki f 

Howerin 

Truckers 

Cool Blues 



W 

10 
9 
9 
8 
5 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 



Intarmadtota 
National 



Mulkeys IS, Paradise Inn 12 

cap Telephone U, LynnhavanLounge 5 

Larasan 15, Cool Blues 3 

Tiki 17, Hoiwarln 15 

ISSI, Dam Neck 10, Truckers t 

ISSI, Dam Neck 5, Ho«»arfn 1 
, TJki 17, CMI Blues IV 

r & P Telephone II, Larasan 3 
Mulkey's 9, Lynnheven Lounge I 
Paradisa Inn 17, Truckers 13 / 

UnllmhadNo.4 



w I 

My Brothers 12 

Taico 10 3 

Smith & Keene 9 4 

True Value 7 6 

Green Run 7 6 

Chops « 1 

Coastline 6 7 

Sir Buddy's 3 10 

Jsycees 2 10 

Bunn's Batltrs 2 11 

TaIco 10, Green Run i 

Smllh a Keene 9, Sir Buddy's 4 

My Brothers 15, Sinn's Ballars 4 

My Brothers 11, True Value 10 
coastline 9, Green Rut « 



W 

Merchants S 

Giants 4 

Bulldogs 4 

Blue Jays 4 

Cardinals 3 

Mets 3 

f Tigers 2 

Indians 2 

Larks 1 



Blue Jays 9, Cardinal* 1 
Giants 14, Tiger* 2 
AAets 13, Indians 3 

Tigers 1, Met* 1 
Cardinal* 1, Bulldog* 



MUgats 
Amarlcan 



Pra-Taan 
GMs No. 3 

w 

Wipeouts 3 

Belles 3 

Falcons 2 

Powder Puffs 2 

Strangters 2 

Streakers 1 

Cuties 1 

Cougars 1 

Cavaliers 

Waysiders 

WIpaout* 17, Cougars 5 

Strangiars 12, WaysMars t 
Powder Puffs 13, Streekers 5 
Falcons 11, Cavaliers 5 
Belles 20, Culles I 

Pra-Taan 

GMs No. 4 



Church A 



Westwood Hill 
Rock Church 
Community Chapel 
First Baptist • 
Christian Church 
Aragona Bapt. 
Free Will 



W L 
i 
5 

4 
3 
2 
2 
1 



W L T 

Kemps. Cardinals 6 1 

Grim Reapers 5 1 1 

G.N. Tigers 5 1 

Cubs 4 2 

Kemps. Yankees 4 3 

Orioles 4 3 

Rockets 3 3 1 

Kemps. Tigers 3 4 

G.N. Cardinals 1 4 

Indians 1 5 

Knights 1 5 

G.N.Yankees 1 6 

Grim Reapers 9, G. N. Cardktals 4 
G. N. Tiger* 10, Kemp*' Yankaea 4 

Indians 20, G. N. Yankees 19 

Ken<ps. Cardinals 23, Orioles 3 

Kemps. Tiger* 22, 6. N. Knights 10 

Cobs 15, G. N. Yankaea 10 

Orloln 11, Indians 10 

Grim Reapars 10, Rockets 10 

Kemps. Yankees 17, G. N. Cardinals 4 

G. N. Tigers 14, Kemps Cardinals 12 



Demons 

Leo's 

Ladybugs 

Swingers 

Sting Rays 

Top Tea 

Tigers 

Lions 

Queen Bees 

Squlrettes 

Fillies 

Tigers It, Sting Rays 14 
Liom 9, Lao's « 
Demons 54, Crickets 3 
Top Ten I, Quean Bees 2 ' 
Ladybws 27, Fillies 2 
ScMreltes 13, Swingers 5 



W 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 




Taan Girls 
Continental 



1 



Community Chapel 9, Christian Churai i 
Washaood Hill 11, Free Will 9 
Rock Ch. II, Aragana Bapt. 3 



MUgats 
National 



Church B 



"London Bridge 
iThalia Lynn 
, St. Gregory's 

Memorial 
' Providence Fr. 

K.G.Presbyterian 

G.R. Baptist 

Thalia Lynn 17, 6. N. Baptist 13 

^^Ttum. », PfovManca Friend. 



W 
6 
« 

4 
4 
3 
3 
1 



Woman 



AJ'S 

Streakers 

Tidewater Auto 

Snark 

ISSI, Dam Neck 

Westwood 



W 
8 
8 

4 
3 
3 
1 



SireaMT* 7, A J<s « 
iSSi, oam Neck 15, Wesh«iood Hill 4 
Tlde»^ar Auto 14, &»< FWwers 



Taan Boy 

W L 

Padres 4 

Red's 3 

Bullets 3 1 

Streakers 3 2 

Satiiltes 3 2 

Alley Trashcwis 2 3 

, CMsacks 1 3 

^OrtoMn 1 3 

; Brewers S 

BuIMM It AlWy T r a ^Kaws 5 



W L 

Wildcats 7 

Dodgers i 1 

Spurs i 1 

Laria i 1 

Ortoles 4 3 

A'S 3 3 

Lions 3 4 

T-M Cardinals 2 3 

Braves 2 4 

Tides 1 « 

Arrow. Cardinals 7 

Mets 7 

Wtldtats th T M Cardinals 3 
Spurs It, A-s I 
OrlOlet a, MOH S 
Dodger* S, Arrow. Cardkwls I 

Dodgers II. Orioles 1 

Wildcats 29, Mett 

T M Cardinals 11, A's 11 

Llom 19, Arrow. Cardinals 4 

Larks 32, Tides 4 

Spurs t. Brave* 5 

MUgats 
Continental 



Surpers 

Scampers 

Pacers 

All Stars 

Eagles 

Robins 

Sluggers 

Debutantes 

Royals 

Cardinals 

Scampers 5, Debutantes 4 
All Start 4, Shiggars 3 

Eagles I, Cardinal* 7 
Surfer* 4, Robin* 3 



W 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 






Teen GMs 
National 



W L 



Angels 

Pungo Pals 

Spoilers 

Newllght 

Waysiders 

TNT 

Farmers Daughters 

Streakers 

ScOrplOs 

Quicksteps 

Pungo Pals 14, Streaker* 
AngeM 14, Spoiler* 7 

WayUdar* 7. Scorpio* 
Pungo Pal* 13, Quickitep* 3 



Wt.L 
3 
3 
2 1 
2 1 



2 1 
1 2 



American 



Wildcats 
Yankees 
Dodgers 
Rebels 
Wheels 
Cula 
Braves 
.Pirates 
Qiiefs 
TIgws 



W 
« 
S 

4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 




7, BrawofVt 

H. AWay Traw i ca i w n 



Og« 7. T igaty I 

WHASn 11* 



' Larks. 

, Cool ft The Gang 

I Rookies 

I wipeouts 

^ SqwBws 

RMilM 

Scorphians 

Lions 

Seventy-Sixer* 

Apachn ^ 

MMM 9, w^aaaM S 
¥m*mf* V, %tnm»f»itr* 1 

Wip^uti i$, iia ii laaY S 
Uli^iliai M. Agach ai W 
aillilli It. &e( SThaOansS 



W 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 




■fte am-'IMamatf, Has 26. 1974-fiin M 

\ 



'» 



Will Rose die in ieft field? 



By JACK MURPHY 
SpcdaltoTkeSoB 

Suddenly an ugly spirit \aa manifested 
itself at baUparfu this qring. Crowd behavior 
has bec<Hne a coiM:em to botti the athirtes and 
the people req)oiK(tt>le for maintainii^ order. 

Jeers have given way to obficenittes and 
vulgarities. The athl^s, especially out- 
fielders, have the uneasy feeling they've 
become targets in a shooting ^Itery. Fighting 
among spectators is the latest fashion. 

I should say fighting and abusing Cin- 
cinnati's supot leftfidder, Pete Rose. 

WHEN ROSE tdcM up his position in Uie 
outfield, the least of his worries is catching 
line drives and pidcing up ground baUs. He 
must be alert to the menace in the stands. It's 
idiotic, but some of the creeps have begun 
hurling bottles, ice and ottier objects at the 
athletes. 

Hank Aaron just avoided being beaned by 
an apide in San FYancisco. Bob Watson, the 
Houston outfielder, was mistreated in Cin- 
cinnati after collidii^ with a wall. Rose was 
harassed in San FYancisco, Los Angeles and 
San Di^o. 

The public's crude behavior puzzles Rose. 
For years he has beoi one (rf the National 
League's most p<^)ular figures, and deserv- 
edly. He is not only skillful with a bat but 
plays with a wonderful abandon which 
suggests his love for the game. 



The natural response to Rose is to cheo- 
him. He's the guy with the dirty uniform, the 
guy sliding into a base on his stomach, the guy 
who makes the maximum effort. 



YET IHE LUNATIC fringe has rdbbed 
him (rf some of the pleasure d playing 
baseball. Especially in Los Angeles. He was 
dq^ressed by the gutter mentality of the 
crowds at Dodger stadium in a recoit series. 

"I'll confess," he says, "I was shocked by 
the vidgarity. "They sc^ up a vidgar chant in 
the leftfield bleach»-s so loud it carried all the 
way to our dugout. It was embarrassing; 
women and chiUren could hear it. The 
vidgarity amazes me. 

"It affected me. For the first time in my 
life I didn't enjoy playing baseball." 

Suddenly the ballpark seemed a hostile 
place. "There were fights breaking out all 
over Dodger Stadium. I've never seen so 
many fights going on at the same time." 

This discourages good-natured banter with 
the fans. 



"I'VE ALWAYS enjoyed the fans," says 
Rose. "I toss baseballs into the stands, we Idd 
back and forth. Even at Dodger Stadium 1 had 
some friends. Some were booing me but 
others stood up and applauded." 

Rose assumes his new identity as a 
villain "I used to be Charley Hustle, now I'm a 
brute"— as a carryover from the free-for-all he 



{HPecipitated in the National League playoffs 
last October at Shea Stadium. 

Itose collided with Mets' shortstop Bud 
Harrdson at second base and a fight enq>ted 
among the two teams. 

"That wasn't dirty {day, it was good hard 
baseball. Bud is a good friend of mine. He 
ccme toward me and I grabbed him. but it 
didn't amount to ai^thing. We dkin't land any 
ptmches." 

BUT THE CROWD was angry and 
resentful. Whoi Rrae went to left field, 
somebody Inirled a wMskey bottle and it was a 
near miss. Cincinnati manager Sparky 
Anderson ordered his tram ott the field. 

"Pete has contributed too much to baseball 
to die in left field at Shea Stadium," said 
Sparky. 

But the aiumosity (rf October has followed 
him into the new season and he's concerned. 

"They used to throw hot dog wrappers and 
toilet paper, but now it's bottles. The objects 
are becoming a little more solid. Some throw 
apples, others firecrackers. What if a 
firecracker explodes in your face? A player 
can lose an eye. 

"I don't know what we can do. I can't 
blame the police and the security people; it's 
a few of them against a mob. I know the club 
owners must be concerned." 

Rose concedes that the ballplayers' best 
hope is to appeal to the decency of the masses. 
Perhaps the decent majority will police the 
cretins. 



GOLF 



nw 



Fleinek takes medalist honors 



Mike Fleinek continues to be one of the 
hottest young goifo^ around. Two weeks 
ago, Fleinek flnished secimd in the 
Virginia Bead) Youth Classic, losing by a 
mere one stroke when he three-putted on 
the final hole of the toumammt. 

Fleinek im{>roved on his performance 
last week taking medalist honors in a 
qualifying round for the State Junior 
Amateur Golf championship at the Sleepy 
Hde Golf aub in Driver. Fleinek fired a 73 
to lead the field in the 16-17 age bracket by 



the comfortaWe margin of five strokes. 

George MacDonald kept his personal 
win streak alive at the qualiflcations. 
MacDonald topped the U-13 age bracket 
with an 84 to qualify for the state tourney. 
A week earlier, MacDonald had suc- 
cessfully defended his Youth Classic title 
with an eight stroke victory. 

John Andersen, who played on the 
Bayside HiKh School varsity as a freshman 
this past sdiolastic season, carded a 
qualifying round of 82, good for the final 



spot in the 14-15 age bracket. Andenen 
finished second in the recent Youth 
Classic. 

Ricardo Britt, Reynolds Dawson, John 
Saunders, Richard Tucker and Tim Foly 
were the other local players to qualify for 
the tournament. 

The State Junior Amateur Golf 
championship enters its second round 
today at Front Royal. The (including 
round of the 544ioie tournament to 
scheduled for Thursday. 



The second time around 
better for golf er Britt 



Ricardo Britt believes in the 
saying 'if at first you don't 
succeed try again.' Two weeks 
ago, Britt failed to qualify for a 
state tournament bierth in the 
Virginia Beach Insurance 
Agents' Youth Classic, finishing 
tied for fifth place. 

■niursday, Britt found the 
competition in the Norfolk 
Insurance Agents Youth Classic 
more to his liking. Britt toured 
the Lake Wright golf course in 
three-over par 73 fadiion to 
flnish in a dead heat with Rex 
Jarvis for the top spiH in the 17- 



Y.M.CA. 

DAY CAMP 

Boys fc Girls 
Age 6 -13 

FORINFORMA'nON 

CALL 

622-6328 



years old and under com- 
petition. 

Britt captured first place 
honors when he holed a par-putt 
on the first hole of a sudden 
death playoff. Britt will now go 
on to the . state tournamoit 
which win be on the Boston Golf 
Course in Fairfax Aug. 5-7. 

First Colpnial teammates 
Reynolds Dawson and John 
Saisiders failed in Uieir second 
attempt to qualify for the state 
lownament. The pair flnished 
tied for fourth place in their 

/ \ 

ARE YOU GEHING 

LESS THAN 55 

MILES PER 

GALLON? 

Honda of Va. BMdi 
2970 Va. BMch Blvd. 

mere cyck$ go tround out pontit 

L 340-6161 



diviskin with six-over par 76 s. 
Only the top three finishers 
qualified for the state toiv- 
nament. 

Britt played on the First 
Colonial High School golf team 
this past scholastic season and 
was a key factor in the Patriots 
winning the Eastern District 
Tournament title. At the district 
tournament, Britt carded a 36- 
hole total of 74-75-149 to take 
medalist honon. 





FLEINEK 



BRITT 



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h^ A-8-The Sun-Wedneiday, June 26, 1974 



Jordan upset in Connolly tennis 







I 



TALBOT JORDAN sets to make a forehand 
r^urn in her quarterfhial match against 
Shelley Laibstein hi the Maureen Connolly 
tournament Saturday. Jordan won the matdi 
in straight sets but was ups^ in tiie finals by 
Nancy Osborne. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 




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The Maureen Connolly Memorial 
tennis tournament managed to decision 
the weather this time aroimd, and Nancy 
OsbOTne upset the number one seed in 
the tournament. 

The annual women's tennis tour- 
nament was scheduled for earlier this 
month but was postponed because fA 
rain. Last weekend at the Princess Anne 
High School tennis courts, only t}» finals 
of the junior veterans doubles feU victim 
to the rain. 

Talbot Jordan, seeded number one in 
the women's singles division, fell victim 
to a different sort of force. Second 
seeded Nancy Osborne scored the major 
upset of the two-day tmirney dropping 
the highly touted Jordan in straight sets 
for Uie tournament crown. Osborne 
disposed of her top-ranked exponent in 
surprisingly easy fashion, winning the 
first set by a 6-3 count and putting the 
finishing touches on her victory with a 6- 
4 triumph in the second and deciding set. 

JORDAN HAD ROUTINELY ad- 
vanced into the finals of the tournamoit 
with three successive strai^t set vic- 
tories. She rolled over her three early 
round opponents, ammassing a 36-4 
differential in games won. 

In the opening round, Jordan handled 
Cartie Kerae by a 6-1, 6-0 margin. 
Shelley Laibstein fell in the quar- 
terfinals to the powerful Jordan ground 
strdces by the count (rf 6^, 6-1. 

Jordan moved into the title con- 
frontation with Osborne by virtue of a 
semifinal win over Brenda Draper. 
Jordan captured her third consecutive 
strai^t set win, handling Draper 6-2, 6- 
0. 

Draper had moved into the semifinals 
with an upset over the tourney's third 
seed Sugie Harrison. In one of the 



competition's best matches, Draper 
extended the match witti Harrison to 
three sets befwe sewing her upset. 

DRAPER BROKE ON top with a 64 
first set triumi^i. A rayjIiH HarrisMi 
knotted matto^ after two sets with a 7^ 
win, but coidd wA com{dete the 
comeback losing in the deciding set by a 
6-3 score. 

Osborne breezed through ttie flrst two 
rounds of tiie tournament with no dif- 
ficulty. She handle the opening round 
chaltenge of Carol Oamy in 6-1, 64) 
fasmon. In the quarterfinals, Osborne 
met with similar success, blitzing Helen 
James by a 64), 6-0 margin. 

Osborne met with her stiffest 
challoige of the tourney in the semifinal- 
round against Suzie Hatcher. Osborne 
beat back the challenge with a hard- 
earned 6-3, 7-5 win over Hatcher. 

In the junior division, Adel Williams 
lived up to ho* number one ranking. 
Williams stormed \ii^ three successive 
opponents in straight sets to take the 
tourney crown in her division. 

WILUAMS DEFEATED Marylynn 
Kohn 64, 6-3 in an opening round test. 
Monie Hect was the next to faU to the hot 
playing Williams, losing a semifinal 
match t^ a 6-4, 6-1 margin. 

Williams captured top honors with a 
final round victory over Edie White. Her 
third straight set victim fell by a count of 
6-3, 6-3. White had moved into the finals 
with the biggest upset in her division. 
White edged second seeded Terry Griffin 
in three sets in the semifinals. 

In the women's doubles competition, 
Osborne and Jordan teammed up to 
sweep the field. The pair earned the 
tourney doubles title with an easy 6-1, 6-0 
strai^t set triumph over the team of 
Suzie Hatcher and Terri Boyle. 




SUGIE HARRISON stretches to 
make a return in the quarterfinals of 
the Maureen Connolly tennis 
tournament at Princess Anne 



Saturday. The third seeded Harrison 
was upset hi the quarto'ffaials by 
Brenda Draper. (Sun photo by Rod 
Mann) 



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Blames 




ONE ARTIST from the 1973 Boardwalk Art 
Show patiently displays his wares (at the 



thousands of bargain hunters and art 
collectors who annually attend the show. 



THROUGH MONDAY 



Art Stars onboarilwalk 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Starr Writer 

The city will once again be besieged by 
thousands of art connoisseurs, bargain 
hunters and tourists this week during the 
19th annual Boardwalk Art Show. 

Some 500 artists from 25 states and 

Canada are arriving in the Beach to 

ftsplay their wares Thursday "tKreugh 

Monday. Some 76 Virginia Beach artists 

I'kis will be among the exhibitors. 

Ten blocks of art (and one of the largest 
art shows on the East Coast) will be on 
display daUy frwn 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. be- 
tween 10th and 20th Streete. The show is 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach Arts 
Center. All art works on display will be on 
sale to the public priced from about $5 and 
up. 



AMONG THE more unusual exhibits in 
this year's show will be a display of mirror 
sculpture. The show also will include other 
wood and metal sculpture ranging from 
thimble size to more than seven feet tall. 
Art show executive director Marilyn Davis 
says that this year's show also wiU mclude 
some of the East Coast's most unusual 
hand-turned pottery, as well as a wide 
selection of oil, watercolor and acrylic 
paintings. 

. Sales from last year's show netted 
exhibiting artists more than $116,000. No 
monetary goal has been set this year, 
thou^ Ms. Davis expects the show to 
net well ovor $100,000. 



"For so many years that $100,000 figure 
just seemed to be the magic number," 
says Ms. Davis. "We're not setting any 
goal this year, but we're just hoping for 
five good days. If the weather is with us, 
I'm sure we'll sell at least that much." 



MORE THAN $3,f00 in prize money is at 
stake for artists in the show. T^e Vir^nia 
Beach lanke^pers Association is 
donating $1,000 for the Best-In-Show cash 
award. Other award money is donated by 
local merchants. Awards are made in 
seven categories including oils and 
' acrylics, watercolors, drawings, mixed 
niedia, hand-turned pottery, sculpture and 
prints. 

Preliminary judging will be made 
Friday. All semi-final selections will be 
moved to the Virginia Beach Civic Center 
Us final judging Saturday m(»iui«. 

The Concert Band from the Little Creek 
Naval Amphibious Base will present lawn 
concert at 13th and Oceanfront at 2 p.m. 
Saturday preceeding the formal presen- 
tation of the art show awards. Mayor 
Robert Cromwell is scheduled to present 
the awards at 3 p.m. 

DURING THE show each artist rents a 
space along the boardwalk to display his or 
her work. Rental fees are $20 for a (4-feet 
high and 7-feet long) space along the rail 
side of the boardwalk. The slices on the 
lawn side (7-feet high and 7-feet long) rent 
for $30. All fees go into the operation 
budget of the Virginia Beach Arts Center. 
The Arts Center sponsors various classes 
and shows throughout the year, as well as 
maintaining its small gallery at 19th Street 
and Artie Avenue. 



Last year, the Boardwalk Art Show was 
(dagued not only by occassional rainy 
weather, but also by the threat of a forced 
Sunday shut-down to comply with the 
state's Blue Law. The art show, however, 
received a waiver from Commonwealth's 
Attorney Andre Evans, and the Sunday 
sales soared as usual. Sunday has 
traditionally been the day when all the 
artists recorded the highest number of 
.saV^s. , " * 

So far this year, there has been no 
mention of enforcement of the Sunday 
closing law. The Commonwealth's 
Attorney says he has'not been contacted 
concerning the Art Show, but he assumes 
"everyone will obey the law." 

M8. DAVIS SAVS the arts show 
organizers view the show as a tourist at- 
traction and that is should be allowed to 
remain open on Sunday just as any other 
tourist attraction in the Tidewater area. 

The Blue Law has, in the past, been 
enforced in tbe dty OBiy wben the police 
received complaints. The law may be 
discontinued if the voters so decide in a 
local referendum after July 1, according to 
recently passed General Assembly 
legislation. The Commonwealth's 
Attorney would not say what his decision 
would be if there were complaints about 
enforcement of the Blue Law at this year's 
show. 

Various city departments are working 
with art show organizers and some 200 
volunteer hostesses to present the show 
this year. Committee chairmen who have 
been putting the show. together since this 
time last year are Mrs. Wayne Sawyer, 
entries; Mrs. William Gill, placement; 
and Mrs. Ronald B. Wiles, publicity. 



Bands march on despite weather 
at Beach's annual music festival 



Neither wind, rain nor hail could stop the 
marching high school students in the 13th 
Annual Virginia Beach Music Festival last 
week. When the weather turned sour 
Thursday, the bands timed up and moved 
their musical competition and exhibition 
from the Cox High School stadium to the 
Virginia Beach Civic Center. 

The Falls Church Virginia High School 
Band took top honors in the festival, 
competing with 16 other high school bands 
fivAi eight 8ta^ during the four-day 
event. The band automatically becomes 
the h»nor band for the 1975 Music Festival 



Second in the competition was the 
James W. Robinson Secondary School 
Band of Fairfax, followed by the Wheeling 
High School Band, Wheeling, III. 

THE MARPLE Newton High School 
Band from Newton Square, Pa., won the 
parade performance competition. Hall 
Bryant df Towers High School, Dekalb 
County, Ga., was selected as the festival's 
top drum major, and Kathy Redd of Prince 
Edward Academy, Farmville, wwi^ie best 
majorette trophy, 

The Music Festival, sponsored annually 



by the Virginia Beach Chamber of Com- 
merce, began June 17 with the Grand 
Parade down Atlantic Avenue. Some 3,280 
band students took part in the concerts, 
marching exhibitions and sightreading 
contests during the festival. 

Judges for this year's competition were 
Al G. Wright, W. J. Julian. Roy V. Wood 
and William F. Swor. ^je Princess Anne 
Marching (Cavaliers were hosts for the 
festival. (Virginia Beach bands are not 
eligible for the competition.) The Fort 
Hunt Hi^ School Band from Alexandria, 
winner of the 1973 Music Festival, was this 
year's honor band. 



Personality 



Mt Trashmnore born 
years ago in his mindT 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

The man behind Virginia Beach's 
only mountain is a white-haired, pipe- 
smoking gentleman whose specialty is 
the disposal of garbage and trash. 

Rowland Dorer, a Kempsville 
resident for 21 years, is the man who 
thought up Mt. Tr^s^more, that huge 
pile of dirt and garbage near the 
Virginia Beach-Norfolk Expressway. 

Mr. Dorer is modest about his idea 
which has grown into a unique 
recreational complex and park. Now 
that the mountain's recreational 
facilities are almost completed, he 
views it not so much as a monument to 
his own accomplishment but rather as 
just another finished job. 

"I DON'T FEEL anything special 
about it," Mr. Dorer said in a recent 
interview. "I do think it will be a unique 
park. I see it as a job done that worked 
out well." 

Mr. Dorer's involvement with Mt. 
Trashmore began in 1965 and con- 
tinues today. He is a member of the 
Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation 
Commission which is actively in- 
terested in Trashipore's development. 

As a past president and current 
member of the Kempsville Ruritaff 
Club, he and the club decided to im- 
prove the fishing at Mt. Trashmore's 
large fresh-water lake by building 
artificial reefs with old tires. 

ALTHOUGH MR. DORER works for 
the state of Virginia and his job covers 
the entire state, his special interest in 
Virginia Beach stems from the fact that 
he has lived in the area for 41 years. 

He is married and has two married 
daughters living in Alabama and 
CalUornia. Those two daughters have 
produced five grandchildren. 

He is stationed here and not in Rich- 
mond where most state offices .are 
based because Virginia Beach and 
Tidewater are mosquito country— and 
mosquito control is part of his job as 
director of the Bureau of Solid Waste 
and Vector (disease-carrying 
organisms) Control. 

He spends about half his time on solid 
waste control, such as dreaming up 
ways to convert disease-laden dumps to 
sanitary landfills, and other half of his 
(ime on controlling rats, flies, 
cockroaches, mosquitoes and other 
disease-carrying creatures. 

ALTHOU(iH MOST persons would 
blanch at the though of working with 
garbage and rats, Mr. Dorer finds the 
whole thing fascinating. 

"I get a kick out of my job," he said, 
"but I want to see the solid waste 
program in the state on better footing 
before I leave." 

At 66, he is past the usual retirement 



age. However, retirement Is not 
required by age 65, he said, and he 
would like to help more cities and 
counties in Virginia establish sanitary 
disposal methods for their trash and 
garbage b^ore he gives up his job. 

The idea for Mt. Trashmore had been 
growing in Mr. Dorer's mind for some 
time until 1965, when the U.S. Congr^s 
passed legislation making money 
available for demonstration grants to 
explore new ideas in disposing of solid 
waste. 

With the opportunity available to get 
some federal money for his idea, Mr. 
Dorer asked Russell Hatchett, then 
Virginia Beach city manager, if he 
would favor going to Washington, DC, 
to apply for the federal funds. Mr. 
Hatchett was all for it. 

MR. DORER, then AssisUnt City 
Manager Roger and City Engineer 
Charles Kiley went to Washington with 
a model of what would become Ml. 
Trashmore. 

After they saw the chief U.S. engineer 
and presented a written proposal, the 
federal government gave a $300,000 
grant to the city of Virginia Beach to 
start the Mt. Trashmore project. 

When the three-year federal grant 
ran out, the city undertook complete 
financing of the Trashmore project. 

The mountain sits on the site of an old 
city dump, a "horrible" dump, Mr. 
Dorer said. The dump was dug up to 
make way for the expressway. The pits 
created for the expressway were fur- 
ther Avg to provide fill for Trashmore 
and to create the manmade lakes at the 
site. 

Trashmore was created to fill three 
major needs, Mr. Dorer said. Some 
project was needed to keep refuse away 
from the city's ground water, which ist 
within four or five feet of the ground 
surface, he said. "We were dead set 
against putting muncipal refuse in the 
ground water," Mr. Dorer explained. 

"IK VOU DIG a hole to dump gar- 
bage in, then you're in the ground 
water," he said. So Trashmore has a 
sealed bottom keeping the U-ash away 
from the water. Old Dominion 
University dug five test wells to 
monitor the project and mak» sur^i no 
water pollution occurred. None has. 

A second goal was to create a garbage 
disposal site without using up a lot of 
valuable land. A sanitary landfill might 
have taken up 50 or 60 acres of land, he 
explained. By piling the garbage up in 
the air, Trashmore takes up eight or 
nine acres, he said, thus conserving 
space. 

A third goal was to create a useful 
facility out of unwanted material. After 
Ihe mountain and soap box derby track 
were designed as part of the hill. 

The ampitheatre isn't there yet, but it 
will be. The do-by track was used last 



summer and will continue to be used 
this summer and during the Neptune 
Festival. 

THE COMPLETED Trashmore 
project will Include picnic facilities, 
boating and fishing on the two lalws, 
outdoor plays and concerts at the 
ampitheatre, sailing, bicycle paths and 
an information center complete with a 
plaque dedicated to Mr. Dorer. 

Virginia Beach and Norfolk residents 
alike contributed their refuse to the 
mountain. Virginia Beach and Norfolk 
city officials struck a bargain which 
essentially enabled Norfolk to dump 
garbage at the site in return for 
providing water to Virginia Beach. 

"Never have so many contributed so 
much," Mr. Dorer chuckled about the 
resident -supplied garbage. 

AS THE MOUNTAIN grew, so did the 
problems and anecdotes. Seagulls by 
Ihe thousands congregated there. After 
trying poison and firecrackers to chase 
Ihem away, officials decided to leave 
them alone. The seagulls left of their 
own volition once the garbage was 
covered. 

Then there were the mini-bikes. The 
bike riders decided it was great fun 
racing up and i^own t)ie mountain's 
steep sides. Cit^ Officials, however, 
frowned on the pnictice since they were 
desperately trying to grow grass on the 
mountain. 

The smell was often a complaint, 
especially for nearby residents of 
Windsor Woods. A faint odor was 
noticeable at last July's soap box derby 
race, but it's almost completely gone by 
now. 

Gases still escape from the mountain, 
but they're harmless as long as they're 
not confined. They are natural gases 
caused by Ihe decomposition of the 
organic material in the mountain. 
They're th« same gases seen in 
swamps. Th^ gases escape In about half 
a dozen places and will burn if ignited, 
Mr. Dorer said. 

ALTHOUGH THE mountain's naine 
is descriptive of its origin, Mr. Dorer is 
not happy with the Trashmore 
designation. It was once called Dorer's 
Mountain, but the Trashmore name 
seems to have stuck. 

"I think it's a poor name now," he 
said. "Trashmore was OK when It was 
being constructed, but something else 
would be more appropriate now." 

The official opening of the park was 
planned for the end of this month, but 
the recreational facilities will not be 
finished in time. 

II will open instead during the 
Neptune Festival in early October. At 
that time the information center and 
plaque will finally be dedicated to 
Rowland Dorer, the man who thought 
up Ihe mountain so long ago. 




MT. TRASHMORE rises in the background as 
the mountain's creator, Rowland Dorer, 
surveys the site of the planned recreational 



complex at the mountain's base. (Sun ph<Ao by 
Linda Miller) 



Guilty calories in new confessions 



The diet confession story is taking the place (rf 
'Jie love coirfession story. 

Pick up any women's magazine and you'll finda 
lei^thy article about how Jane, just an ordinary 
woman, managed to overcome her magnificent 
obsession with chocolate cake or anyttiing else she 
cmdd lav her hai^ on. 

"inj«» my husband left for wm* in U» mom- 
im" ■ typical passage will read, "I tried not to 
thhik about the bowl of left over s|Mgl»tti in the 
refrigerator, but it was no use. I waited until tte 
kids were outsitte playing and then I ate the wlwie 
thing. No one knew, baause I broke the bowl and 
carefully wiped my mouto. But that aftenwon I 
went back to the refrigeraUw and killed a leg of 
lamb I'd been saving for company. That's when I 
knew I needed help. It was raw." 

THF1M THF. RFAnER BOfs with Jane throufih 




the agony and an^ish of clanctestine gluttony. 
Stolen pizzas, ftartiveFritoand tremewk^ Itmcl^, 
in small, out-of-tlw-wav cafes 



In the end, of cwirse, Jane realizes that her real 
happiness lies not In a bed of lettuce smothered in 
Koquefort dressing, but in the arms of Fred, her 
adoring Inisteral. Fred foi^ives her for the two 
huncta-ed pounds she put on and she bravely shovra 
aside the exfra ei^t meals a day she's been 
eating — a sadcter tmt wiser girl. • 

Together, they resolve to live happily ever after 
and iiever mention the woodai spcwn she bit in half 
Airing those mad and capricious two years of 
gourmet gallivanting. 

That's what comes of giving up our Vidorian 
mores. Sex has c«ne out of the shactows and Is now 
as wfwlesome as mom's aj^e pie. Mom's; a^jle 
pie. however, has become a no-no. Which only go» 
to prove. I supfxse. that guiUls h«e to stay*- aiQf 
way you slice it. , 

it- 



^. 



Inside 
Lif€$tyl€S 



Bridos B-2 

Food.... B-2 

Sun DW B-2 

Ftowows B-3 



wmm 



I •^2-T%e Swi-Wednesday, June 26, 1974 



FOOD 



Colorful summer meals 
accented by fresh fruit f 





Warm weatiier is increas- 
Mg ttw bounty of fresh fruit, 
ad^ Intn^ to meals of the 
present and d the future. 

Fruit can be featured in al- 
most ai^ course on the meini. 
It can be ttw q>petizer, salad 
or dessert. And taoet fruits 
knd (te|ghtful accent to meat 
wdpoiitry. 

Ftesh fruit salad, whidi of- 
ten a wealth of nutritional 
benefits, is one of the most 
poiMlar sunmer salads. Tlie 
fruit can be varied to suit 
availidde supplies. Right now. 
Western Valencia oranges are 
to mariwts in abundance and 
wiU be Ovough October. Ckxn- 
Une them with avocados - 
■nothn- plentiful fruit - for a 
dsUdous flavor melange. 

A Sununer Fruit Cnxt can 
provide delightful toppings 
for ice cream, cake or custard 
igr both proent md future 
meals. For a different taste 
treat add fruit to a dieese 
cake. 

tbe fruit crodt begins with 
frt^ cond]ined with an equal 
wei^ of sugar and enou^ 
bnuNly, rum or other q^t to 
cover. As the season wears 
on, oUier fresh fruits can be 
added as needed. 



SUNBURST FREffl 
FRUIT SALAD 

(Iservlags) 



1 small avocado 
BiB^i-i (AdverHiemenO " 

FOOD 

FOR 

THOUGHT 

By PAUL ROMAN 

The next time you have 
■teak, try marinating it in 
Flench Dnaing for about 
an hour, then InoO as usu- 
al Great Balls of Fire! 



2tips. fresh squeezed lemon 
Juice 

2 thsps. dairy sour cream 

Dadi hot pepp« sauce 

3 oranges, peded, sectioned 

3 fredi peaches, peded, 

sliced 
^ cup fresh bhMberms 

(optional) 
Orisp salad greens 



About OM hour before i 
ing, peel avocado; remove pit 
and mash with fork. Add lam* 
on juice, sour cream and hot 
pepper sauce. ChiU until serv- 
ing time. Arrange orange see* 
tions and peach slices on crisp 
greens. Pile avocado dressing 
in ceoler and top witti blue- 
berries. If you don't plan to 
serve the salad quiddy be 
sire to dip peadi slices in 
lemon tx orange Juice to pre- 
vent discokring. 




Dinner For Two At 
llie Cfarcle C 
(2nd PriM) 

SEND YOUR COOKING 
HINTS TO CIRCLE C, 
400 LASKIN RD, VA. 
BEACH, VA. 234S1 



SUMMER 
FRUIT CROCK 

1 pint strawberries 

1 cup sugar 

Brandy or mm to cover 

Wash and hull berries, put 
into a wide mouttied Jar. Add 
sugar and enough Uquor to 
cover. Cover Jar and let stand 
at least one week before ua- 
ii«. Add more fruite as th«y 
come into season, aka^ with 
an equal weif^t of sugar and 
more Uquor, as needed, to 
cover the thiit Possible addi- 
tions to the crock include 
chenies, raq)berries, seed- 
less grapes, peaches, pears, 
oranges, dried fruits. For ez- 
fra security in storage, and 
cool readiness to serve, keep 
crock in the refrigerator be- 
tween uses. 




SUNBURST fresh fruit salad combines 
wanges, avocados and peaclies witli a 
decorative blueberry topping. 



NO-BAKE 
CHEESE PIE 

1 padcage (8 oe.) cream 
cheese, softened 

3 tbsps. fruit^lavored li- 
queur 

1 lap. grated lemon rind 

\k ciq> sifted confectioners 
sugar 

IV4 cvqM drained fruit from 
Sununer Fruit Qrock 



(I I IIN(, \ 



IM . |\S I K 



HIM*S.\.|iil\CiS 



FOR AN ENJOYABLE 
MEAL - SPECIAUZING 
IN CHARBROILED 
STEAKS, MEXICAN FOOD 
AND LOW, LOW PRICES 
TRY "niE 




CuUaCii4 



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BFAllN SVIONS 



Shampoo ft Set.... - From $3.45 

Complete Permonent Woves -....$6.95 to $19.95 

Roox FonciTone Touch-up From $5.00 

Roox Frosting (Shompoo ft Set Extra) $12.50 

Haircut.... $2.75 (Long Hair $3.50) 

No Appointment Necessary — Just Come In 



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•TIL 6 


DAILY -8 'TIL 6:30 


THURS. - 9 'TIL 9 


HIMtop Pliza Shopping Canter 


Sill Va. Beach Blvd. 


1734 E. 


Caskin Rd. Naxt to Safeway 


Across from QEX 


Uttle Creek Rd. 


Phoife: 42t-9t97 


Phone: 497-9769 


ftaxt to Zayres 


Va. Beach 


Va. Baach 


Phone: 5«a-9093 
Norfolk 



V« cup syn|> fhm Summer 
^ Fruit Crock 
Vicup water 
ltbq>. comstardi 

Madi cream dieese with 
fruit liqueur until well 
blended; add kmon rind and 
sugar, beat well Hie mixture 
shouki be very light and 
smooth, but thick enough to 
hokl its shape. SpmA in a 
grahan craiier crunU)shdl 
(below). ChilL Pour wyrvf 
from Summer Fndt Chick in- 
to a small saucepan. Stfr wa- 
ter and comstardi to a paste, 
acM to the pan. Cook, stfrring, 
until sauce is thtdened and 
dear. Adda little sugar, or a 
pinch of spice, to taste, if de- 
sired. iPaat over fruit in a 
mudUwwl, chin quickly. Use 
Aiilt mixture to top cheese 
ptt. Serve cold. 

GRAHAM CRACOR 
PIBBELL 

1% cups tindy crushed 
grdiam crater crundis 
Ml cup oonfectloaers 
6 tbvs. soft butler 

Blend ingredients with flie 
finger tips; press ffrmly 
i«ainst bottom and ddes of an 
UKh pie plate. ChiU untO 
Ann. 



FOR THE FUTURE 

CHIIDREN'S films at the 
Vir^nia Beadi branch library 
today at 10 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
are "The Cetebrated Jumpii« 
Frog of CalavCTss County," 
"Gulliver's Traveh," "Tony's 
Good Luck" and "OM MUL" 

"BYE BYE BIRDIE" 

contiraica at the Little Theatre 
of Virginia Beach, 24th Sfreet 
and Barberton Drive. 
Performances are at 8:45 p.m. 
today throu^ Saturday ai^ 
J\ily 3S (no perfo-mance July 
4). The show may be extoided 
Qirough July 20. Call 4284623 for 
ticket information and 
reservations. 

BOYS AND GraLS ages 6-13 
are invited to the YMCA 
summer day camp at Virginia 
Wesleyan College. The camp is 
held for two-week periods 
throu^ Aug. 16. Bus pick-ups 
will be provided from IS 
Virginia Beach locations. Call 
the YMCA at 622-6328 for 
additional information. 

CRAFTS handmade by senior 
dtizens are dterei for sale at 
the Sugar Plum Tree now 
ttirou^ July 6. The shop is 
qtonsored annually by the Cape 
Henry Woman's Club. Mrs. 
Mills Godwin is this year's 
honorary chairpersoa The shop 
at 34th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue (okl Smith & Welton 
building) is open from 10 a.m.-8 
p.m. 

BOYS AND GIRLS ages 7-13 
are invited to the summer 
program of the Boys' Club of 
Virginia Beech at Kempsville 
Meadows Elementary School. 
Programs in arts and crafts, 
trips, hikes, swimming, 
athletics and games are offered 
on weekdays from 10 a.m.-4 
p.m. The program began 
Monday but signups continue 
throughout the summer. 
Applications may be obtained at 
the Virginia Beach Service 
Colter in the Princess Theab-e 
Building on Virginia Brach 
Bhrd. Call 855^908 «■ 3404385 
tor additional information. 

' RETIRED federal employes 
are invited to Thursday's 
meeting of the Virginia Beach 
Chapter of the National 
Association of Retired Federal 
Employes, 1:30 p.m. in Uw 
conference room of ttie Atlantic 
Permanent Savings and Loan 
Association building, 944 
Indqiendence Blvd. 



King Artlnir's Court" and 
"Tammy the Towl," 

"KALEIDOSCOPE of 
Dance" will be presented by Uk 
Virginia Beach Civic Ballet in a 
'free performance Friday at 8 
p.m. at the Center Theafre, 9th 
and Granby Streds, Norfolk. 
Ilie performance is pert of the 
Norfolk Festival of the Arts. 

'•^HAT THE BUTLER 

SAW" is presented by the 
Chrysler Museum Actors' 
llieatre Friday, July 20, at the 
Chrysler Museum theatre, 
Ohi^ Road and Mowbray Ardi, 
Norfolk. Tteket bifarmation and 
res«rvations may be obtained 
fay calUi« the theatre at 622- 
1211. 

AUDITIONS for the Chrysler 
Museum Actors' Theatre will be 
Sunday ats p.m. at the museum 
theatre, Olney Road and 
Mowbray Arch, Norfolk. 
Informatioi may be obtained 
from Fradc Klages, general 
manager, at ^2-1211, ej^nsion 
68. 

FREE FILMS in tbe Norfdk 
Festival of the Arts film series 
begin Sunday with f ibns offered 
throu^ July 3 at the Chrysler 
Museum at Norfolk, Ohiey Road 
and Mowlx-ay Arch. Films are 
at 8 p.m. each night. Call 622- 
1211 tac more infcrmation. 

BLOOD DONORS are needed 
to give blood to the Tidewater 
Red Cross Monday through July 
5 at the Wickes Furniture 
activity nxHn, 4815 Virginia 
Beach Blvd. Donors may give 
blood from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 

CREATIVE dramatics and 
theatre wiU be taught in a 30- 
hour non-credit course 
beginning Monday at Old 
Dominion University for 
students ages 6-17. Additional 
information may be obtained 
from Lew Derrickson, director 
of the ODU Bounty Program, at 
489^291. 

DANCE instruction for 
children and adults will be 
oHerei in five weeks of training 
by Old Dominion University's 
Community Ballet program in 
ODU's Bounty Program. 



Classes begin Monday. 
Ri^tratioa informatimt may 
be obtained from Lew 
Derridcson, directs of the ODU 
Bounty Program, at 4894291. 

UFO mysteries will be 
explored begfaining Tuesday at 
the Virginia BeadtCity Schools' 
Planetartama at Plaza Junior 
Hii^ Sdiod. The program is 
offered at 7 p.m. every Tuesttay 
and Sunday in July. Call 486- 
1971 for reservaticms. 
Admission is free. 

SHIVARAM, Indian 
Kathakali Temple dancer, will 
perform Tuesday at7:30 p.m. at 
the Aquarian Age Yoga Center, 
620 14th St Call the center at 
425-9414 for more information. 

TWO DIRECTORS of the 
Garden Chib of Virginia from 
Vfrginia Beach will attend the 
sumnwr board of directors 
meding July 13 in Stauntm. 
The local directors are Mrs. W. 
Wright Harrison and Mrs. 
William R. MiUer Jr. 

HANDICAPPED children are 
invited to the fourth annual 
Hdphig Hands Day Camp July 
8-19 at Kington Elementary 
School No fee is charged. Call 
4284975 for more hiformation. 

NAVY and Marine Ccarps 
wives are invited to a three-day 
service informatioi school July 
15-17 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the 
Naval Aur Station, Norfolk. 
Registration information may 
be obtained from Ens. D.K. 
Gibson at 444-8352 or 4444674. 



NATIONAL Teacher 
Examinations will be giyen at 
OM D<»ninion University July 
20. Sample l»st questions, 
informatimi and registraticm 
ixvcedures may be obtained 
from the goieral educatim 
office at the university. 



CAMP OPENINGS for girls in 
the fifth grade or older are 
available at Girl Scout Camp 
Matoaka July 23-Aug. 4. Call the 
Girl Scout Council of Greater 
Tidewatw, 622-1871, for more 
informatimi. 



FOR THE RECORD 

NEW OFFICERS of the 
Aragona Civic League weN 
iiBtdkd recedly by State Sen, 

A. Joaej^ Canada Jr. They are: 
president, Charles Kemble; 
vice-president. Gene 
Henderson; second vice- 
president, Charles 
Scharenberg; recording 
secretary, Kay Svagdys; 
correqwnding secretary, D^ 
Webster; treasurer, Ellen 
Kelly. ■ Richard Dickeqs, 
Edward Lynch and ClauiUa 
Cotey are on the beard d 
trustees. 

A SCHOLARSHIP from the 
Kempsvilte Etementary Sdibol 
PTA was awarded recoatty to 
Jand Cook, a graduate d 
Kempsville High Schod «dio 
will attend Vir|^ Pdytechdc 
Institute this faU. Ms. Code is 
the dau^ter d Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Cook d Vfri(inia Beadi. 

THE NEPTUNE FES'HVAL 

insigida on pins, tie tacks ai^ 
charms is being sold by 
manb«rs d the Business and 
Professional Women's Club, 
American Business Women's 
Club and Navy Wives aub xl 
America No. 241. Mayor Robert 

B. Cromwell Jr. bou^t the first 
Neptune Festival pin Monday in 
ceremonies in his i^ce. The 
festival jeweb7 is available for 
$1 from any member d tbe 
clubs. 

A LUNCHEON for members 
d the Navy Wives Club d 
America, No. 241, was hdd 
recently at the home d Capt. 
and Mrs. R.A. Bihr. Mrs. Bilv is 
one d the dub's sponsors. 

ARTISTS from Virginia 
Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake 
and Portsmouth exhibited their 
woks in the recent Great 
Bridge Art Show sponsored 
annually by the Chesapeake Art 
Guild. Richmmd artist William 
Youngbhwd was the Judge. 

Itemt may be mbikitted toSiii 
DU by matt. Pltae mad your not- 
ice to Sun DU, Vlrglnk Be^A Sun 
138 Roiemont Road, VIrgbik Beadi 
Va. 2S45Z Deadline Is noon Fk- 
day fHior to the week of public- 
ation. 



Bob Harrington 

The Chaplain Of Bourbon Street" ^^ 

Returns To Radio 

Monday, July 1 

Daily From 12:15pm To 12:30pm 

Listen also to the 700 Club. 
Kathryn Kulman, Jimmy 
Swaggart and many other 
Gospel Programs. 




Temple Of Music 



• PEMMOKt 
MAll 
499-0551 



• JANAP 
CENTfR 

853-4536 



• CHURCHIAND 

CENTER 

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■r 
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If' 



WXRI 



105 




Patricia Ann Gebert and 
William Elvin Dismore Illiwere 
wed June 15 at the Chapd d the 
Good aiepherd, Oceana Naval 
Air SUtion. 

The briite is the dau^ter d 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred P. Gebert 
of Virginia Beach. The 
brid^room is the son d Cm6t. 
and Mrs. John D. Cockier Jr d 
Vii^inia Beadi. 



Beverly Plemmons was 
matron d honor. Brictesmaids 
were SanDee Garrett, Chee- 
Chee Williams and Cathy 
Smith. 

Cmdr. Cooper was his son's 
best man. Mthen were Jimmy 
Martin, Don Ftmlet and Mark 
IMsmore. John D. Cooper III 
was ring t>earer. 

The I iiii|ilf>iWiH, riJlidr in 



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Va.icfc.,V8.234S5 



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IIRS.MILLS 

Vb-ginia Beach. 

Reinertsen-Hilder 

Anne Elizabeth Hilder 
became the bride d Ralirti Roy 
Reinertsen Saturday at the 
chapel d the Naval AmjMbious 
Base, Little Credc. 

The bride is the dau^ter d 
Cmdr. and Mrs. Frederick A. 
Hikier d Virginia Beach. The 
Mde^mmi is die son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arne R. Reinertsoid 
New Canaan, Com. 

Janet lOklH' was maid d 
h<»ior, and Ellen lUitan was 
bridesmaid. Cadet John L. 
D^Tn^e III was best man. 
Andrew J. Rein»rts«) was an 
attendant. Ushers were 
FYederick and David Ififaler. 

Hie cou|rie will redde in 
l^mford, Coim. 

MUls-MUler^ 

Shirleen Rae Milter and 
Kenneth Wayne Mills wttn wed 
Saturday at Eastminster 
Presbytolan Oiurdi. 

Hie Mde is Qie dau^ter d 
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Millo- 
Jr. d Vfrginia Beaeh. The 
isi6eff9om^^bfnm d Mr. — 
and Mrs. Udon R. MIBs Jt. of 
Virgtaiia Beach. 

Ann Cresswhite was her 
n^»'s matnffi d htmef. Ca^y 
Hutchinson was maid d hoofr. 
Bridesmaids irarc (%idy Jooea, 
Marie Cos and Rolte Jadwm. 

Unton R. MiDs DI was hto 
brother's best maa Ushers 
w^ Wittim E. Milkr m, 
Mkdiael E. Young. Steve Kta« 
moA (^fcu Wtimnoa. 

Amy and Ixm (^-oairiiih. 
w«e Oamm i^rb, Md Joqt 
Mills- was 1^ bearer. 

Tbo- eoi^ «n reside in 
Vlr^^ Rti^. i 

t 



^IM^ 



The SuB-Wednes^y, Jwm 26, 1974-h^ B*3 




0' 



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SCREAMS AND SQUEALS of delight go out 
from teenage Conrad Birdie Fan Club 
members as their idol, Conrad Birdie (played 



by Earl Vowell) sings and swings a song after 
his arrival in Sweet Apple. (Sun photo by 
Linda Miller) 



Comic ^Bye Bye Birdie' 
stars roclfin 'good cast 



With a lively and predominantly young cast, the 
musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie" hit the Virginia 
Beach Little Theatre stage Friday. 

Set in the late 50s or early 60s, the show is a spoof 
on the days of screaming rock'n rollers. And thie 
cast at the Beach Little Theatre has, put together g 
rockin show — one they enjoy as much as the 
audience. 

The cast has a wealth of high school and college 
age members — many whose voices are unable to 
withstand the screaming scene in the show. Con- 
sequently, some of the solo parts are sung with 
rather raspy voices. 

KDDIE SMITH, a well-known face on the Little 
Theatre stage, "makes" the role of Albert Peter- 
son, business manager for singer Conrad Birdie. 
Mr. Smith seems at home in the role and comes 
across well throughout the play. He is exceptional 
in the song and dance routine of ."Put On a Happy 

Face." 

Albert's.sweetheart-secretary Rose is played by 
Zoe Wages. Ms. Wages has a warm voice and is cast 
well in her role. Dancing, however, does not appear 
to be one of her strong points, and scenes where she 
trifes h^f hand' at dramatic interpretive dancing 
tend to become exceedingly lengthy. 

Albert's meddlesome mother, Mae, is portrayed 
by Ann Penington. Ms. Penington, as usual, ^ves a 




CLAD IN JEANS and bobby socks, rock 'n 
rirfler cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" 
sing out "Going Steady" as the phwies in 
Sweet Apple, (Miio are busy with the news that 
Kim MacAfee and Hugo Peabody are going 
steady. (Sun photo by Linda Miller) 



Rev i e w 

The musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie" is on stage at 
the Little Theatre of Virginia Beach, 24th Street and 
Barberton Drive. The Aow wHl run Wednesdays through 
Saturdays (except July 4) until July 6 and may be 
extended through July 20. Tickets are $3. 75 for adults and 
$2 for students and the military. Resavations may be made 
by caning the theatre at 428-9523. 

"scene-stealing" performance. 

EARL VOWELL is the teen-idol, Conrad Birdie. 
Mr. Vowell has captured the hip-swinging of the 
rock singer, but not the screaming voice. He has a 
fair voice, for what one can hear — but definitely 
needs more volume. 

Lack of volume is also a problem for Anne Mane 
Smith, who plays Kim, the girl selected to give 
Conrad Birdie a last kiss before he enters the Army. 
Otherwise, Ms. Smith's performance, like that of 
her "steady" played by Tripp March, is good. 

Lending their mature voices to the show are 
Enid and HenryClarke, former professional actors 
who are making their first appearance on the 
Beach stage. As the MacAfees, Kim's parents, both 
of the Clarkes turn in humorous performances^ As 
the stag^-struck father who is going to be on the Ed 
Sullivan Show, Mr. Clarke keeps the audience 
doubled over in laughter. 

THE CLARKES combine with other cast 
members for "Kids," one of the show's best 
musical numbers. Mark Chevalier, as young 
Randolph MacAfee, is a delightful addition to the 
cast and comes across well in this number. 

One must applaud Ross Gottstein for making the 
most of even the small parts in the play. Though 
Mr. Gottstein is on stage in several roles, his acting 
and facial expressions are priceless in the scene as 
tavern owner Charles F. AJaude. 

Though the cast is good, many times over lodced 
in a production of this sort is the musical ac- 
companiment. Backstage orchestra members Ray 
Asercion, Jeff Barrow, Tauni Clarke, Susan 
Lawlor, Dave Lech, John Meulenberg, Gene Swartz 
and Pame Weller also deserve a hand for their 
performance. 

AT TIMES, the play seems that it will never end 

scene changes tend to be slow and a few of the 
dancing routines might easily be omitted. Most 
probably, however, many of the breaks in the flow 
of the play will be ironed out as the musical con- 
tinues its run. 

Despite the fact that the Little Theatre stage is 
fairly small, choreographer Susie Pedigo has done 
a good job manipulating the large cast in scenes 
where almost everyone is on stage. (One wonders, 
however, where all the actors find a place to stand 
when they're off stage. ) 

The production, on the whole, is one that director 
Faye Whitlock and her cast members should 
certainly take pride in, and one that young and old 
will enjoy. 



Linda Miller 



'Solstice' sound sltows 
improved sympitony 



The Virginia Beach Qvic Sym- 
phony heralded in the summer last 
weekend with an ambitious "Summer 
SoMice Concert." 

Symphony President Dr. Milton 
Saunders, in a brief speech during the 
concert, described the summer 
pr(^am as the symphony's "coming 
out party." And, well it was. With a 
variety of highly recognized music 
and new conductor Walter Noona, the 
symphony todc a big step toward 
providing the Beach with top sym- 
[Clonic sound. 

The program offered music to suit 
most any taste. The first portion of the 
concert was what one might term the 
"heavy" music. The concert began 
with a stnHig, forceful piece of music, 
Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for 
Common Man." An excellent opening 
choice, the music set the audience for 
the good things to come. Franz 
Schubert's "UnTinished" symphony 
was the highlight of the concert's first 
half. Though there were a few 
hesitations where the musicians 
perhaps weren't sure of their music, 
the two-movement sym{^ony was 
received well by the audience. 

GUITARISTS Scott Reeves and 
Chet Blackstone were the featured 
performers in Ernesto Lecuone's 
"Gitanerias". With Spanish flair, the 
symphony performed the number 
well despite the complicated music. 

Perhaps the most exhausting and 
most demanding piece of the concert 
was Virgil Thomson's "Pilgrims and 
Pioneers." So complicated is this 
composition that Mr. Noona took a 



Review 

The nrgbda Btack CMe Syn^thony 
performed a "Summer St^tice Conctrt" 
FHdkiy and Satimlay at Pkaa Jutd» H^h 
School The symphony's next performmce 
wis be (biHug Me N^tune Festival, 
stitedukdfor September. 



little time out to explain portions of 
the music before performing the 
number. His remarks, though brief, 
seemed to enhance the audience's 
enjoyment of the piece. The music 
was originally composed for the John 
Houseman film, "Journey to 
America." Various themes are in- 
terwoven in the piece, climaxing in 
what Mr. Noona termed "a real wild 
chase." The symphony members 
displayed their talents in this taxing 
selection, and they well deserved the 
applause they received. 

"Holiday for Strings," by David 
Rose and "The Typewriter," by 
Leroy Anderson were two of the light 
pieces interjected into the concert 
program. Both brief selections 
brought smiles to the audience. 

THOUGH AUDIENCE members 
may not have recognized the name on 
the program, they delighted to hear 
the theme from "The Sting" when the 
orchestra began playing Scott 
Joplin's "The Entertainer." 

The program concluded with a little 
"Hoe-down" from "Rodeo" by Aaron 
Copland. It is a lighthearted, but not 
exceptionally simple work, which, 
like most of the concert, provided real 
entertainment. 

ARTS FESTIVAL 



The symphony has been working 
cUligently the past few months since 
Mr. Noona joined the group. Mr. 
Noona's no-nonsense attitude in 
conducting the orchestra seems to be 
paying off, and the quality of music 
played is on the upswing. Mr. Noona 
brings with hitn a long line of credits 
in the music world, and the symphony 
is fortunate to be working under such 
able direction. 

THE AUDIENCE turn-out for the 
concert, like attendance at many such 
cultural events in the city, was 
disappointing. The orchestra 
deserved a much larger audience 
than showed up Friday night to 
receive the program. The small, but 
appreciative audience that was tbere, 
however, got more than their money's 
worth. 

Because the group still lacks a 
sufficient number of musicians in the 
string section, the orchestra imported 
a few string players (all Beach 
residents) from the Norfolk Sym- 
phony to help round out its sound. The 
symphony is still searching the city 
for talent to help do away with any 
"brassy" sound it may have been 
known for in the past, 

As one orchestra member matter- 
of-factly put it, "We've (the sym- 
phony) got an image to change," but 
the "Summer Solstice Concert" was a 
big step in the right direction. One can 
expect bigger and better things from 
this small Beach symphony under its 
new direction. 

- Linda Miller 



Ballet repeats 'Kaleidoscope' 



If you missed the Virginia Beach 
Civic Ballet's "Kaleidoscope of 
Dance" last mohth, you'll have 
another chance to see it when the 
ballet company gives a repeat per- 
formance of the spring show Friday 
at 8 p.m. at ' the Norfolk Center 
Theatre as a part of the Norfolk 
Festival of the Arts. 

"Kaleidoscope of Dance" features 
classical ballet, modern jazz and 
character dance. Music is varied 
from Beethoven and Chopin to Jazz 
and blues, Choreograhpy has been 
created or adapted to the company 
by the Civic Ballet's artistic 



director Mieczyslaw Morawski and 
other dancers. 

The performers will present the 
"Chopin Suite" featuring dancers 
Shirley Oakes and John Medlin in 
"Andante Spinnato", Linda Sear Is 
and James Ambrose will dance a pas 
de deax from "Sleeping Beauty," 

Also included in the program is 
"Awakening," a special modern 
dance selection which has been 
staged by dancer Linda Searls. Ms. 
Searls and Petra Wirth will perform 
the nilDiber. 

Debby Benvin, ballet teacher and 
dancer, has choreographed and will 



perform a jazz Impression number 
entitled "Give It Up." The ballet 
company will also perform "Waltz In 
E-Minor," "Trepak" from the 
"Nutcracker Suite," a polka called 
"Bumming Around," a dance to 
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and a 
number called "Greeting Polonaise" 
featuring the junior members of the 
company, 

The performance, like most ac- 
tivities during the Festival of the 
Arft, is open to the public free df 
charge. The Center Theatre is located 
at Ninth and Granby Streets. 



Sopranos and 
tenors naaded 
for auditions 

Have you been looking for an 
outlet for your singing talents? 
The Virginia Beach Civic 
Chorus is searching for two 
persons with strong hign 
soprano voices and for several 
additional persons with tenor 
voices. 

Auditions for the chorus will 
be held Sunday by appointment. 
Persons interested in joining 
the group should contact Enid 
Clarke at ,340-4528 any day 
between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. 

The Civic Chorus, under the 
direction of Walter Noona, will 
be rehearsing during July. 
After a brief vacation period, 
the group will resume 
rehearsals in September in 
preparation for the Virginia 
Beach Neptune Festival and the 
regular winter concert. 



CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 




NORMAL REFUSE COLLECTION SERVICE WILL 
BE RESTORED MONDAY, JULY 1. 1974 

(n«ICE A WEEK, AS BEFORE, IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS; SEVEN DAYS A 
WEEK FROM MEMORIAL DAY TO LABOR DAY IN RESORT AREA; FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION CALL REFUSE COLLECTION DIVISION, 4274201) 

YOUR COOPERATION) DURING THE GASOLINE SHORTAGE 

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n«e M-Tke Sun-Wedneiday, June 26, 1974 




Fomah cmKBdates 



Sex barrier to election 



^College 

goes to 
students 



There is a definite barrier in 
Virginia Beach to electing a fonale to 
(rffice, say the unsuccessful female 
candidates in the recent City Council 
race. 



ByUiUkigk 



Men or women stationed at the Naval 
Amphibious Base, Little Creek, or Naval Air 
Station, Oceana, who desire to enter college but 
lack (he sufficient educational backgrcHind now 
have the opportunity to correct that (teficiency — 
and at no cost to them. 

The Virginia Beach 
campus of Tidewater 
Community College is 
providing this op- 
portunity through its 
Preparatory Education 
Program (PREP). The 
program includes 
preparatory courses 
specifically designed to 
assist the prospective 
college student who 
may be deficient in 
reading ability, English 
grammar and com- 
position or 
mathematics. 




"There is prejudice against 
women," said former candidate 
Meyera Obemdorf. "I think the all- 
male City Council speidcs fw itself. 
Possibly the greatest prejudice comes 
from women themselves. We can 
overcome this with education." 

Ms. Oberndorf , Eeba McClanan and 
Gaynette Winter pointed to (^er 
Tidewater cities which do have 
female elected officials during an 
infOTmal panel discussion Monday 
night sponsored by the newly-formed 
Women United for Political Action of 
Virginia Beach. 

THE PANELISTS filled out 
questionnaires about their campaigns 
in advance of Monday's meeting. The 
questionnaires were used as the basis 



for the panel discussloni 
The fourth female candidate in Uie 

recent election, Cecily Macdonald, is 

in the hospital and was unable to 
Jtteml the meeting. Her rqireser.- 

tative, Pat Jaudon, read her 
. questionnaire answers as part <rf the 

discussion. 

The former candidates discussed 
various aspects of their campii^is 
before an audience of ab(Mit 50 
women, including wh* motivated 
them to run, how much political ex- 
perience was needed, campaign 
funding, whether moi or womoi were 
mwe responsive to them in their 
campaigns, successful campaign 
techniiqpies and the effects (k the 
campaiffts on Uieir family lives. 

SOME OF THE panelists agreed 
that men and women supported them 
equally in their quest for votes but 
that women are at a definite disad- 
vantage in getting campaign con- 



tributens. 

"I was surfMTised at the amcHint (rf 
nqipml I got from ttie male 
popidation," Ms. Winter said. "I was 
suri»ised at the general acceptance 
(tf (he female coiddate. Our time is 
coming." 

Howev«-, Ms. McClanan said tiiat 
mar^ men, especially older men, are 
not prepared to accqit women as 
candidates. "Ami an awfiil lot of 
women still vote tiie way ttieir 
husbands do," she saM. 

Women United for Political Action 
is a new non-partisan organizatitm 
aimed at getting more women in- 
volved in politics and elected to office. 
Its iH'imary purp(»e is to educate 
women about the political process and 
choose and endorse female can- 
didates for local and state elections. 

By-laws of the Wganization will be 
discussed at an opoi membership 
meeting July 8 at 7:30 p.m. at Hurd's 
Seafood Restaurant. 



ROLL CALL 



PANG 



PREP classes are conducted on the two naval 
installations by instructors from the college. 
During a ten-week period, students receive 50 hours 
of instruction in each of the respective fields cited 
above. Military personnel are permitted to use a 
portion of their active duty hours to attend class. 
Cost of the course is paid by the Veteran's 
Administration without affecting entitlement to 
regular GI Bill education benefits. 

A KKCENT GRADUATE of the program is Sgt. 
Milton K.H. Pang, (USMC), 22, atteched to Uie 
Landing Force Training Command at Littie Creek. 
He is planning on entering the University of Hawaii 
and majoring in physical education or recreational 
leadership following his discharge from service in 
August. 

He says he attended coUege in Hawaii for a brief 
period before dropping out to enlist in the U.S. 
Marines four years ago. He added, "I didn't get 
much out of college then. It just seemed like a good 
time for parties." FoUowing completion of the 
PREP program, Sgt. Pang says his view of college 
has changed. He said, "It was a very good course 
with tips on how to^tudy in college. I think I'll take 
college more seriously this time. 



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WASHINGTON — Here's how 

area Members of Congress 

were recorded on ma jw roU call 

votes June 13 through June 19. 

House 

ANTI-TRUST: Passed, 21« 
for and 185 against, an 
amendment to Increase by $1.85 
million ttie fiscal 1975 
appropriation for the Justice 
Department's Antitrust 
Division. 

The added money restored 
funds that the Appropriations 
Committee had cut from the 
Administration's budget 
request. The money will finance 
the hiring of 83 persons, and the 
key Issue was whether the Anti- 
Trust Division should be beefed 
up. 

Reps. Thomas Downing (D- 
1), William Whitehorst (R-2), 
David Satterfleld (D-3), Robert 
Daniel (R-4), W. C. Daniel (D- 
5), Caldwell Butler (R-6), 
Kenneth Robinson (R-7), 
Stanford Parris (R-8), William 
Wampler (R-9) and Joel 
Broyhlll (R-10) voted "nay." 

POSTAL SUBSIDIES: 

Passed, 277 for and 129 against, 
a bill (S. 411) to delay the 
effective date of higher postal 
rates for newspapers, 
magazines, books and mall 
from non-profit organizations. 

W. C. Daniel and Wampler 
voted "yea." 

Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfleld, Robert Daniel, 
Butler, Robinson, Parris and 
Broyhlll voted "nay." 

AIRPORT SAFETY: Passed, 
281 for and 120 against, an 
amendment to continue the 
existing ban against the 
Federal Aviation 
Administration automating Its 
manned flight service stations. 



Downing, Whitehurst, 
Satterfleld, Robert Daniel, W. 
C. Daniel, Butler, Robinson, 
Parris, Wampler and Broyhlll 
voted "yea." 

SENATE 

AM-FM RADIOS: Passed, 44 
for and 42 against, a bill to 
require that all radios selling 
for more than $15 be equipped to 
receive both AM and PM 
signals. 

Sens. Harry Byrd (I) and 
William Scott (R) voted "nay/' 

VET'S BENEFITS: 

Rejected, 35 for and 54 against, 
an amendment to tie veteran's 
subsistence and educational 
benefits to cost-of-living rises. 

The amendment was offered 
to a new GI Bill (S. 2784), later 
passed and sent to conference. 

G I benefits now must be voted 
by Congress. In rejecting the 
amendment, the Senate voted to 
continue the present system of 
requiring Congress to pass on 
increases. 

Byrd and Scott voted "nay." 



TAX CUTS AND HIKES: 
Rejected, 45 for and 48 against, 
a motion to close debate and 
force a vote on the debt ceiling 
bill, which some senators want 
to use as a vehicle for tax- 
reform proposals. 

If the motion had passed, the 
tax proposals would have been 
blocked because Senate rules do 
not permit amendments to bills 
on which debate has been 
limited. 

A "yea" vote was a vote to 
block the tax proposals. 

Scott voted "yea" and Byrd 
voted "nay." 



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ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF 

THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 

BEACH, ON THE 17TH 

DAY OF JUNE, 1974. 

In re: Adoption of 

THERESA IRENE 

BLALACK 

By: Nancy J. Egbert and 

Gary L. Egberf, 

Petitioners 

To: Mr. Roy Blalack 

501 North 10th Street 

Garden City, Kansas 67846 

In Chancery No. C-74-735 

This day came Nancy J. 
Egbert and Gary L. Egbert, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, 
Theresa Irene Blalack by 
Nancy J. Egbert and Gary 
L. Egbert, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
t>een made and filed that 
Roy Blalack, a natural 
parent of said child, is a 
non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
501 North 10th Street, 
Garden City, Kansas 67846. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Roy Blalack 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what Is necessary to protect 
his Interest In this matter. 
A copy teste; 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit D.C. 
William H. Colona, Jr. 
281 Independence 
Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June I*— July 3,10,17—4 1 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, July 15, 1974, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 
PUNGO BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Nelson P. 
and Mabel C. Brock for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG-1 
Agricultural District to B-1 
Business - Residential 
District on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Princess Anne Road 
beginning at a point 910 feet 
more or less South of Indian 
River Road, running a 
distance of 300 feet along 
the East side of Princess 
Anne Road, running a 
distance of 190.89 feet along 
the Northern property line. 



M.CLAY 

NwmnT CO, MC 

Swvica StofKHt. Gorag* 
EquipiMnl and Tooh 



running a distance of 286.26 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 190.89 feet along 
the Southern property llhe. 
Said parcel contains 1.282 
acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 
BAYSID^ BOROUGH 

2. Petition of Century 
Developers for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-5 
Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Southwest corner of Old 
Harris Lane and Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet along 
the South side of Old Harris 
Lane, running a distance of 
175.98 feet along the 
Eastern property line of 
which 82.30 feet Is the West 
side of Pleasure House 
Road, running a distance of 
417 feet more or less along 
the Southern property line, 
and running a distance of 
158 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.457 acres. 
(Bradford Terrace Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

3. Petition of A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth 
S. Sills by Grover C. 
Wright, Attorney, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
squarefeet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
Conditional Use Permits: 

4. Application of Alice S. 
Goode for a Conditional Use 
Permit to construct a 
duplex on certain property 
located at the Southeast 
intersection of Cypress 
Avenue, Holly Road and 
26th Street, running a 
distance of 70.46 feet along 
the East side of Cypress 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 98.57 feet along the 
Southeast side of Holly 
Road, and running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 70 
feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as Lots 30 and 32, 
Block 126, Map No. 6, 
Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 7500 square feet 
more or less. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

5. Application of William 
Albert Crosby for a 
Conditional Use Permit to 



THE ORIGINAL 



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APPEARING NIGHTLY AT 



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mPMMEUMOrBEEF 
CRAB IMf^RIAL 

Tte hm* in fHxi 'nd driak, 
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Sir Rkhard'i Ub House. 
»i4 An.Airrrc Avi.yniQwiA bkacb. va. 



construct a duplex on 
certain property located on 
tfie Souttiwest comer of 13th 
Stro«t and Parks Avenue, 
rwinlng a distance of SO feet 
along the West side of 
Parks Avenue, running a 
distance of 12S feet along 
the South side M 13th Street 
running a distance of SO feet 
along the Western property 
line and running a distance 
of 125 feet along the 
Southern property tine. 
Said parcel is known as 
Lotslandt Block 117, Plat 
of Lakewood and contains 
6250 sqvare feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 

June 26, July 3 — 2t 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: IN THE, 
CLERK'S OFFICEOF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 18th DAY 
OF JUNE, 1974. 
in Re: Adoption of Baby 
Boy Stamps 

By: Alan Donald Lane and 
Glenda Jean Lane, 
Petitioners 

To: Guy William Stamps, 

6021 Wedgewood Drive, 

Charleston, South Carolina 

In Chancery 

No.C-74'370 

This day came Alan 
Donald Lane and Glenda 
Jean Lane, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant, Baby 
Boy Stamps, by Alan 
Donald Lane and Glenda 
Jean Lane, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Guy William Stsmps, a 
natural parent of said child, 
is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 6061 Wedgewood 
Drive, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Guy William 
Stamps appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate HIs-Her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what Is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Richard E. Payne, p.q. 

Sullivan t> Cubine 

3830 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

23452 

June 26, July 3, 10, 17 — 4t 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE 18 DAY 
OF JUNE, 1974 
ROSE K. SIMON a-k:a 
ROSE K. BUX, /^] 

Complainanti 



7- /y 

5/JOSEPK^UX 



NICHOLAS/JOSEPITBUX 

831 Holly i^edge^Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

and 

HELEN BUX 

96-37 Corona Avehue 

Long Island, New York 

New York 

IN CHANCERY 
NO.C-73-151S 

Theobject Of this suit is to 
effect partition. of the real 
property In the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known as: 

ALL THAT certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land, with 
the buildings and 
improvements thereon, 
situate in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and known, numbered and 
designated as Lot 24, in 
Block 21, as shown on that 
certain plat entitled 
"Subdivision of Princess 
Anne Plaza, Section 12", 
which said plat Is duly 
recorded in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map 
Book 52, at page 47. 

An affidavit having been 
made and filed by the 
complainant that the said 
Helen Bux is not a resident 
of Virlginla, the last known 
postoffice address being 96- 
37 Corona Avenue, Long 
Island, New York, New 
York, It Is Ordered that the 
above named person 
appear within ten (10) days 
after due publication of this 
order and do what Is 
necessary to protect her 
Interest therein; and It Is 
further ORDER ED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
order be published once a 
week for four (4) successive 
weeks In the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper printed in 
the City of Virginia Beach 
and having circulation In 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Moor*ier#is|lidges Si Cohen 
Attorneys At Law 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
June 16, July 3, 19,17-41 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office Of the 
Circuit Court of the City- of 
Virginia, on the 18th day of 
June, 1974. 

Thomas Ann demons 
Fonvllle, Plaintiff, 

against 
Oliver Lee Fonvllle, 
Defendant. 

The obi act of th Is su It is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of a Two Year Separation< 
and, an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or on behalf of 
Complainant to ascertain in 
which county or 

corporation the defendant 
Is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being 109 Sea Cove Court, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

it is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 
June26,July3, 19, 17 — 4t 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

-Notice is hereby given 
that Everett A. Martin, 1328 
Starling Court, Virginia 
Beach, Va., 23451, has 
applied for a Certificate of 
Compliance from the State 
Water Control Board 
pursuant to Section 401 of 
the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 
1972, Public Law 92-500 to 
Dredge and Fill In Great 
Neck Creek, Va. Beach, Va. 

The decision whether to 
issue the Certificate of 
Complalnce will be based 
on an evaluation of the 
effect of the proposed 
activity on State waters. 

Written comments or 
inquiries relative to this 
notice should be addressed 
to the State Water Control 
Board, P.O. Box 11143, 
Richmond, Virginia 23230 
and should reach the Board 
not later than 15 days after 
this publication. 

June 26 — It 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 21st 
day of June, 1974. 
Deimus M. Bramble, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Hoa ThI Bramble, 
Defendant. 

- Theobjectof thissult is to 
obtain an annulment or. In 
the alternative, a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion. . 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
Hop Thu Luu Tru, Le Loi, 
Saigon, Viet Nam. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
John. V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Kelberg 8i Childress, p.q. 
533 Newtown Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June26,July3, 10, 17— 4t 



ORDEROF 
, PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 21st 
day of June, 1974. 
Donna Shup Gllbreath, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Paul V. Gllbreath, 
Defendant. 

The obi ect of th is su it is to 
A Vinculo Matrimonii from 
thesaid defendant, upon the 
grounds of two (2) year 
separation of the parties. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
209 Trimper Avenue, Ocean 
City, Maryland. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear within Teh (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Moore, Brydges <■ Cohen 
2413 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 

June 26, July 3, 10,17 — 41 




5:30 PM 




VOTi 



Tlie Sim-WedBMdty. Svm 26. 1974-N|e B-S 



L 



UGALS 



ORoenop 

PUILICATION 

Commonwtalth of Virginia, 
In the Clark's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 24th 
day of June, 1974. 
George R. Broolts, 

^ PiaintiH, 

^ against 

Goidta P. Brooks, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
of desertion. And an 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant 
is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 43-744 Marigold 
Drive, Palm Desert, 
California 92260 It Is 
ordered that she do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

^ iHaroid J. Goodman 
1120 Sparrow Road 
Chesapeake, Virginia 
June 2*— July 3,10,17— 4 1 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, July 9, 1974, at 1 :00 
P.M., in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 

DEFERRED FOR 90 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON APRIL 9, 
1974: 

1. Application of T.G. 
Christopolous for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of the portions 
ol Potomac Street, Cleveland 
Street, Lafayette Street, 
Fifth Street, Sixth Street as 
shown on a plat entitled 
"Sunnybrook, Princess Anne 
County, Virginia owned by 
Sunny Brook, Inc." dated 
December 1916 referred to as 
Piai A and a plat entitled 
"Property Dedication for 
Columbus Street" dated 
November 26, 1971 referred 
to as Plal B. 

Parcel 1: Potomac Street 

— That section of Potomac 
Street beginning at the east 
side of Fourth Street, as 
shown on Plat A, and ex- 
tending eashwardly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plat B, now called 
Columbus Street. 

Parcel 2: Cleveland Street 

— That section of Cleveland 
Street beginning at the west 
side of Lot 8, Block 40, as 
shown on Plat A, and ex- 
tending eastwardly to the 
west side of relocated 
Columbus Strett, as shown 
on Plat B. 

' Parcel 3: Lafayette Street 

— That section of Lafayette 
Street beginning at the east 
side of 4th Street as shown on 
Plat A, and extending 
weshwardly to the west side 
of relocated Columbus 
Street, as shown on Plat B. 

Parcel 4: Fifth Street — 
That section of Fifth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
shown on Plat A and B and 
extending southwardly to the 
north side of Relocated 
Columbus Street as shown on 
Plats A and B. 

Parcel 5: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the south side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
shown on Plat A and B ex- 
tending southwardly to the 
north side of Potomac Street, 
as shown on Plat A and B. 

Parcel 6: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth street 
beginning at the south side of 
Potomac Street, as shown on 
Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
. of Cleveland Street as shown 
on Plats A and B. 

Parcel 7: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the sooth side of 
Cleveland Street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Columbus Street as st>own 
on Plats A and B. 

Parcel 8: Sixth Street — 
That section of Sixth Street 
beginning at the sooth side of 
Columbus Street, as shown 
on Plats A and B, extending 
southwardly to the north side 
of Lafayette Street, as shown 
on Plat A. 

Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Pembroke Area). 

BAYsiDE Borough. 



■» 



2. Petition of Fenner V. 
Woolard, Jr., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-6 Residential District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain prt^Jerty 
beginning at a point 350.18 
feet East of Kempsville 
Road, running a distance of 
467.11 feet along the Nwtttern 
property line of which 292.11 
feet is the South side of 
Indian River Road, running a 
distance of 552.76 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 227.06 
feet along the Southern 
w-operty line and running a 
distance of 599.41 feet along 
the western proptriy Wnt. 
Said parcel contains 2.7M 
acres. (Bonney's Corner 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR M 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON AAAY 14, 

3 Petition of Ocean island 
Inn, Inc., for a Cwwige of 
Zoning District classification 
, from B-4 Resort Commwciai 
'^blstrlct to H-2 R««1H^' 
Dish'ict on certain property 
located at the Northeast 
conw of jade Sh-eet and 
Page Avenue, running a 
distance of ea.« f^ ^"^ 
the North side of Page 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 600 feet more «■ less along 
IM &mmn iJhjperty line, 
ruw^ng a distance rt 568 teet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line 
(ChwapMk* ••V> ?f^ 
nmnkig a dli^Ke of 533 ^t 
mora or lets along the 
W^m WT>perty nn« Said 



parcel contains 6.378 acres. 
(Lynnhavan »wres Area). 
LVNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. P^ition of Oscar Lewis. 
Claudls Holley «id James E. 
Jefferson, Trustees of 
Washington Lodge, 139, for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a pcrint 
584.4 feet North of WeMon 
Street (formerly Grace 
Street) behween Frost Road 
and Eaglaton Lane, running 
a distance of 82.2 feet along 
the East side of Eagfeton 
Lane, runn^ a distance of 
280 feet along the Nortttem 
property line, running a 
distance of 82.2 feet along the 
West side of Frost Road, and 
running a distance of 280 feet 
along the Souttiem property 
line. Said parcel contains 0.54 
acres more or less. 
(Gracetown- Fentress town 
Areas). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 30 
DAYS BY PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON JUNE 11, 
1974: 

5. Petition of A. Gordon 
Stephenson and Elizabeth S. 
Sills by Grover C. Wright, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from R-6 Residential Oistglct 
to A-4 Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the Northwest corner of 
Hilltop Road (Linkhorn 
Drive) and Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 412.41 
feet along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 411.93 feet along 
the North side of Hilltop 
Road (Linkhorn Drive) 
running a distance of 185.66 
feet along the Western 
properly line and running a 
distance of 173.11 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 70,316 
square feet. (Princess Anne 
Country Club Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. Application of William 
E. Wood, Jr., for a Con- 
ditional Use Permit to erect a 
12-foot by 50-foot billboard on 
certain property located on 
the South side of Indian River 
Road beginning at a point 100 
teet more or less West of 
Kempsville Road, running a 
distance of 397.5 feet along 
the Northern property line of 
which 307.5 feet is the South 
side of Indian River Road, 
running a distance of 300 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distarice of 486.67 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.27 acres and is 
currently zoned B-2 Com- 
munity Business District. 
(Bonney's Corner Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

7. Application of Princess 
Anne Country Club by 
Thomas C. Broyles, Attor- 
ney, for a Conditional Use 
Permit for recreation 
facilities (tennis) on certain 
property known as that 
portion of the existing 
Princess Anne Country Club 
beginning at a point 90 feet 
more or less North of Holly 
Drive and 140 feet more or 
less East of Holly Road 
running a distance of 180 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance of 145 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 180 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 150 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. 
(Princess Anne Country Club 
Area). VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
Change of Zoning DIshrlct 
Classification 

8. Petition by motion of the 
Planning Commission of the 
City of Virginia Beach for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to P-1 
Preservation District to 
correct drafting errors which 
had been carried over from 
previous years that became 
evident when an attempt was 
made to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 720 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and 435 feet more or 
less Northeast of Holland 
Road containing 0.23 acre. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition by motion of the 
Planning Commission of the 
City of Virginia Beach for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business 
District to A-1 Apartment 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years that became evident 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 825 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and 435 feet more or 
less Northeast of Holland 
Road containing 0.56 acre. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

10. Petitton by motton of 
the Planning Commission of 
the City Of Virginia Beach for 
a Chaise of Zoning Dish-ict 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business 
District to A-1 Apartment 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
yoaw that became evident 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 1825 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and fronting 75 feet 
along the East side of 
Holland Road containing 0.61 
acre. Plats with more 
detailed Information are 
availtfrio in the Department 
of Plawiing. (Pecan Gar- 
dens-City Park Areas). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

n. Petition by motion of 
the Plarmmg Commlulon of 
tfte City of Virginia Beach for 
a Chai«e of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to B2 
Community Business 
District to correct drafting 
errors (»hlch had been carried 
ovfr from previous years 
ff»at became evidwit wh«i an 
attend wmt ma* to plot a 
reonl wrtng ctiwige m the 
area. bagMMiMg at a poM MO 
faai mereor IMS SounwMt of 
W^ilngtan Avanue and 2W 
Met more or l^ NorWi tt 



Holland Road containing 
0JI34 acre. Plafe wilti nxire 
detailed information are 
avallabtain tite Department of 
F^aiming. (Pecan GKnltns- 
City f^rk ArN). PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

12. Petitkxi by motion of 
the Planning Commliaion of 
the City of Virginia Baach for 
a Changa of Zoning Dislrlct 
Classlflcalloh from A-1 
Apartment District to B-2 
Community Business 
Oish'ict to correct drafting 
errors which fiad bt^ car- 
riedoverfrompravlousyeart 
tliai become evidant witen an 
attempt was made to plot a 
recmt zoning change in tlie 
area, beginning at a point 750 
feel more or less Souttwast of 
Washington Avenue and 360 
feet more or less Northaast of 
Holland Road containing 0.08 
acre. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (Pecan Gar- . 
dens-City Park Areas). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

ij. Kennon oy motion ot 
the Planning Commlsskm of 
the City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A-1 
Apartment District to B-2 
Community Business 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years that became evident 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 900 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue on the Northeast side 
of Holland Road to a distance 
of 420 feet more or less 
containing 1.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in, 
the Department of Planning. 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 
Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

14. Petition by motion of 
the Planning Commission of 
the City of Virginia Beach for 
a Change ol Zoning Di.sh-ict 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business 
District to P-1 Preservation 
District to correct drafting 
errors which had been 
carried over from previous 
years that became evident 
when an attempt was made 
to plot a recent zoning 
change in the area, beginning 
at a point 150 feet more or 
less Southeast of Washington 
Avenue and 925 feet more or 
less North of Holland Road 
containing 1.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning 
(Pecan Gardens-City Park 

; Areas). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Dr. Waller L. 
Taylor, Jr. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from A-1 Apartment District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 130 feel East of Baltic 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 120 feet along the South 
side of 25th Street, running a 
distance of 190 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 120 feet 
along the Southern property 
liTO, running a distance of 190 
leet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as Lots 22, 24, 26, and 
28, Block 93, Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 0.525 acre. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

16. Petition of Kimberly 
Shores, Inc. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from B-1 Business 
Residential District to A-3 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 2,640 feet more or less 
East of Diamond Springs 
Road, running a distance of 
487.02 feet along the South 
side of Shore Drive, running 
a distance of 776.83 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
(Lake Smith) and running a 
distance of 661.96 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.17 
acres and is triangular in 
shape. (Lake Smith - Little 
Creek Amphibious Base 
Areas). BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

17. Petition Of R.G. Moore, 
F. Donald Reid, and Jim 
Rose for a Change of Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-6 Residential District to B- 

1 Business-Residential 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 500 feet 
more or less Southwest of 
Stewart Drive located at the 
Southeast corner of Kemps- 
ville Road and Albright 
Drive, running a distance of 
170.71 feet along the East 
side of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 581.74 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 350 
feet is the South side of 
Albright Drive, running a 
distance of 151.21 feet along 
the Eastern property line a 
running a distance of 581.06 
feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.175 acres. 
(Country Haven 
Brigadoon Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

18. Petitton of Windermore 
Propoerties Co. by Pickett, 
Spain and Lyie, Attorneys, 
for a Change of Zoriing 
District Classification from 
R-6 Residential District to B- 

2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
k>ated on the Southwest 
comer of ProvideiKe Ro»d 
and Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 1,470 
feet more or less along the 

' south side of Providence 
Road, running a distance of 
1,140 feet more or less along 
the West side of Kempsville 
Road, running a distance of 
750 feet more more or less 
akMig the Southern property 
line, and rurming a distance 
of 1,450 leet mort or less 
atong the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 33.7 
«cres. (Haven Estates - 
Bellamy Manor ■ Stratford 
Chase - Acredale Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
19. Petition of Windermere 
Pri^jertles Co. by Pickett, 
Spain and LyIe, Attorneys, 
for a Change of Zoning 
District ClassHlcation from 
R-6 ResMential district to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain pr(verty hxated on 
the South side of ProvMance 
Road, beginning at a point 
MTO feet more or less West 
of Kcnvsvlllc Road, running 
a distance of MO feet more or 
le» »tono the %Mth sM of 
P r o vM en ce Ro^, ruwiing a 
distance d 1,150 fMt more or 
less along the Eastern 
IN-oparty line, running a 
distance d UO feet more or 
less along the Southern 
veperty line, anif runnlna • 



distance of 1,790 fact mora or 
less along the Wasttrn 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 20.5 acm. (Haven 
Estates • Ballamy Mafwr - 
Stratford Chase - Acrectola 
&rM«). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

20. Petition of wmdemwre 
Properties Co. by Pickett. 
Spain, and Lyie, Attorneys, 
for a Chaiige of ^Zoning 
District Classification from 
R-6 Rcsidantlal DIsh'icI to R 
9 Townhouse District on 
certain property tocatad on 
the West side of Kempsville 
Road beginning at a point 
1,140 feet more or less South 
of Providence Read, running 
a distance of 3,050 feet more 
or less along the Eastarn 
property line ot which 960 
feet more or less is the Wast 
side of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 630 feet 
more, or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 1.730' 
feet more or less ahjng ttte 
Western property line, and 
running a distance of 1.IS0 
feet more or less along ttte 
Northern propeHy line. Said 
parcel contains 34.7 acres. 
(Haven Estates Bellamy 
Manor - StraHord Chase - 
Acredale Areas). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

21. Petition of Expresiway 
Construction Company for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from 0-1 
Office District to 11 
Industrial District on certain 
property t>eginnlng at a point 
200 feet North of Holland 
Road, running a distance of 
495 feet along the West side of 
Edwin Drive, running a 
distance of 257.33 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 394.90 
feet along the Western 
property line, and running a 
distance of 257.33 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel coyitains 2.92 
acres. (AAount Trashnnore 
Area). KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

22. Petition of Arthur B. 
Carter, Jr. for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification 
from A-1 Apartment District 
to B-4 Resort Commercial 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 190 feet 
East of Cypress Avenue, 
runnirn a distance of 60 feet 
along me South side of 21st 
Street, running a distance of 
130 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 60 feet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 130 feet 
along the Western property 
line. Said parcel is known as 
Lots 18 and 20, Block 46, Map 
No. 6 Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 7,M0 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

23. Petition by Resolution 
of the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach for a Change 
of Zoning District 
Classification from H-1 Hotel 
District to B-4 Resort 
Commercial District on 
certain property beginning at 
a point 529.18 feet West of 
Woodland Avenue and 
running a distance of 260 feet 
along the South side of 
Laskin Road, running a 
distance of 346.87 feet along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of 260 feet 
along the Southern property 
line, and running a distance 
ot 347.10 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 2.07 acres. 
(Laskin Road Shopping 
Center Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

Conditional Use Permits: 

24. Application of Ralph A. 
and Anna Bess Godley 
Souder for a Conditional Use 
Permit for a private 
recreational area for a 
building for the storage of 
boats on certain property 
beginning at a point 3,325 feet 
more or less East of Princess 
Anne Road and running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
South side of Public Landing 
Road, running a distance of 
155.40 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the 
Southern property line, and 
running a distance of 157.20 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.36 acre. (Back 
Bay Area). PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

25. Petition of Sidney R. 
Denny and William E. Barco 
for a Conditional Use Permit 
to operate - an outdoor 
recreation area-golf driving 
range on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Holland Road across from 
Landsfown Road, running a 
distance of 670 feet more or 
less atong the East side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 820 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 535 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 1075 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 8.8 acres more or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

26. Application Of 
Tidewater Hunt Club for a 
Conditional Use Permit to 
operate an outdoor 
recreation area to Include a 
sportsmen's lodge, hunting, 
fishing, skeet range, indoor 
snrwil bore range, year-round 
family activities, firearms 
inshTJCtions for youngsters 
on certain property currently 
zoned AG-1 Agricultural 
District beginning at a point 
2,425 feet more or less North 
of Gum BrWge Road, run- 
ning a distance of 480.61 feat 
atong the East sMe of Muddy 
Creek Road, running a 
distance of 1,413.87 feet aking 
the Northern property Una, 
running a distance of 4a. 10 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, and running a 
distance of 1,6^.74 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel omtalns 16.26 
acres PUNGO BOROUGH. 

Street CKmM-es: 

27. Applicatton ot the City 
of Virginia Beach 
Devetopment Authority by 
Bruce B. Mills, Attorney, for 
the dlsomtinuance, closure 
and abandonment of OM 
Baker Road which begins at 
a pomi 970.89 feet Nortti ot 
ttw Nortolk and Southern 
Railway RigM-oi Way from 
the West sMe of Diamond 
Springs Road and rwming in 
a weshivardly directton a 
distance of 1,036 J2 feet to the 
East side of Bak«- Road. 
Stid street is 30 feet In width. 
(Airport Industrial Park 
Area ) . BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

28. Application of 
Beachia«vn B«>tlst Chur^i 
for the discontinuance, 
cloMwa and atwndownant of 



that portion of 10th Street 
beginning at a point 25 fe^ 
more or Ian South of Nor«oH( 
Avenue, running a distance 
ol 18) teal more or lass atong 
Hie Nortlwm boundary line, 
runntna a distance of U Him 
more or less along tha 
Eastern bburaftry line and 
running a distann of no (aet 
along Hw SoutiMm botmdary 
line (Nortbam proparty line 
of LOIS 34. 36, M. 30, 32, 34. 
Block 37, Plal of Shadowlawn 
Heights) and running a 
distance of 50 feet along the 
Western boundary line. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

29. Applicatton of Indian 
Lakes, Inc., by Talbot and 
Associates, Ltd. for the 
disomtimiwice, closure and 
abandonment of a portton of 
Garnatt Road beginning on 
the South sMe of Andover 
Road and running in a South, 
westwardly direction a 
distance iar NO feat more or 
less. Said request includes i 
only the eastern 20 feet of the 
misting 70 fool right-of-way 
to the Southern right-of way 
line of Bonnydale Road; the 
remaining portkw to the 
Northern boundary line of 
Indian Lakes Planned 
DevetopnrMnt Is 70 feet in 
width. Plats with more 
detailed Information are 
available in the Department 
of Planning. (Indian Lakes 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

30. Applicatton of the City 
rt Virginia Beach for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of Avenue A 
located North and South of 
Shore Drive and portions of 
Ocean Avenue as shown on 
Map Book 5, Pt. 1, Page 71. 
Plats with more detailed 
informatton are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
Parcel 1: Avenue A: 
Beginning at a point 129.49 
feet East of Kteen Sitreet and 
running a distance of 187.18 
feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance ot 428.72 feet along 
ihe Eastern boundary line, 
running a distance of 160.74 
teet along the Southern 
boundary line and running a 
distance of 457.47 feet along 
the Western boundary line. 
Parcel 2: Avenue A: 
Beginning at a point 134.72 
feet East of Kleen Street and 
running a distance of 200.27 
leet along the North side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 500 feet along the 
Eastern boundary line, 
running a distance of 235 
feet more or less along the 
Northern boundary line and 
running a distance of 500.02 
feet along the Western 
boundary property line. 

Parcel 3: Ocean Avenue: 
Beginning at a point 334.99 
feet East of Kleen Street and 
500 feet North of Shore Drive, 
running in a westwardly 
direction a distance of 185 
feet, running a distance of 100 
leet along the Western 
boundary line and running a 
distance of 185 feet along the 
Northern boundary line and 
running a distance of 100 feet 
along the Eastern boundary 
line. 

Parcel 4: Ocean Avenue 
(Northern 40 feet): Begin- 
ning at a point 118.97 feet 
East of Great Neck Road and 
565.60 feet North Of Shore 
Drive and running in a 
Westwardly direction a 
distance of 2126.5 feet along 
the Southern boundary line, 
running a distance of 40 feet 
atong the Western boundary 
line, running a distance of 
2125 feet more or less along 
the Northern boundary line, 
and running a distance of 40 
feet along the Eastern 
boundary line. (Lynnhaven 
ShoresLynnhaven Colony 
Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
Amendments: 

31. Resolution of the 
Counicii of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend and reordain 
Article 1, Section 102, 
Paragraph (b) (1) entitled 
Recording Amendments to 
the Official Zoning Map to 
read as follows: 

(1) On the effective date of 
any map amendment or upon 
the satisfactory compliance 
with the conditions imposed, 
the change shall be posted on 
the zoning map by the 
Planning Director and 
records accompanying the 
map shall identify the official 
action by which such 
ameridment was made, the 
date of such action, the area 
involved, and the date of 
posting. 

32. Motion by the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach to amend and 
reordain Article 2, Section 
216, entitled Outdoqr 
Advertising Structures, 
Billboards, Signboards, and 
Poster Panels, Paragraph 
(f) is amended and reor- 
dained to read as follows: 

(f) The following streets, 
highways, interstates, and 
expressways shall, beginning 
with the effective date of this 
Ordinance, be designated to 
have Special Sign Restric 
tlons: Northampton 
Boulevard, Independence 
Boulevard, Shore Drive (U.S. 
40), First Cotonlal Road, 
Great Neck Road, Little 
Neck Road, Virginia Beach- 
Norfolk Expressway (VA. 
Rt. 44), General Booth 
Boulevard, U.S. interstate 
64, Sandbrldge Road, False 
Cape Parkway and Lynn 
haven Parkway. 

Plats with more detailed 
informatton on the above 
applications are available in 
the Department of Planning. 

Ail mterestad persons are 
Invited to attend. 
Charles C. Carrlngton 
Director of Planning 

Jime19,26— 2t 



made and filed that 
Ernest Coye LIHon, Jr.. «ie 
natural father of said 
4 children, is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being unknown, 

it is tharafore ORDERED 
that the said Ernest Coye 
Litton. Jr. appear before this 
court witttin ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Ord«- and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoptton, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
3RD DAY OF JUNE, 1974. 

' INCHANCIRYNO. 
C-74-314 

In re: 

Adaption of Jonathan Coye 

Litton and Christopher 

Mason Litton 

By: 

John Louis Krai 

TO: 

Ernest Coye LItlon, Jr. 

ORDER 

THISDAY came J^n Louis 
Krai and Patrtela Oaan Krti, 
F>etitkMwrs, and r^resentad 
that the oblect of this 
proceeding is to effed the 
adoption of the Move nwned 
infants, Jonathan Coye 
Litton and Christo^er 
MMon Litton, by John Louis 
Kr«. and affidavit havkig 



A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Donald H. Rhodes, p.q. 
Owen, Guy, Rhodes & Betz 
281 independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462 

6-5.12,19,26 41 

NOTICE OP 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board 
of Zoning Appeals will 
conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, July 10, 1974, at 
7:30 P.M. In the court room 
(Traffic Court) adjacent to 
the Building Inspector's 
Office, City Hall, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The 
following aiviications will 
appear on the agenda. 

PLEASE MAKE NOTE OF 
THE CHANGE OF 

LOCATION. 

1. (Deferred June 5, 1974). 
Richard L. and Patty J. 
Davis request a variance of 3 
feet to a 7 foot side yard 
setback (eastern property 
line) instead of 10 feet as 
required of Lot 22, Block P, 
Carolanne Farms, Challedon 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

2. Irvin G. and Pearl A. 
AbeloH request a variance of 
10 feet to a 10 foot settwck 
from 76th Street instead of 20 
feet as required of Lot 6, 
Block 23, Section D, Cape 
Henry Syndicate, 7600 Ocean 
Front. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. B.M. Stanton requests a 
variance to provide a 2.5 foot 
landscaped area around the 
perimeter of the lot and to 
allow parking where 
prohibited in the remaining 
7.5feei of the required 10 foot 
setback on Lot 1, Block 107, 
Linkhorn Park, northwest 
comer of 33rd Street and 
Pacific Avenue. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

4. Manuel F. Garcia 
requests a variance of 25 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from the 
Norfolk-Virginia Beach 
Expressway instead of 35 
feet as required of Parcel A, 
Princess Anne Plaza, 3600 
Rosemont Road. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. David E. Bezanson 
requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feel as required 
of Lot 9, Block 45, Section 5, 
Princess Anne Plaza, 3400 
Club House Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

6. Robert S. Stroud 
requests a variance of 10 feet 
lo a 20 foot setback from 
Atlantic Avenue instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 18, 
Section A, Cavalier Shores, 
northeast corner of 43rd 
Street and Atlantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

7. James H. Howell 
requests a variance of 8 feet 
to a 22 fool setback from 
Narragansett Drive and a 
variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from the north 
property line (unimproved 
Southern Boulevard) Instead 
of a 30 foot setback as 
required of Lot 1, Block 7, 
Pocahontas Village, 4852 
AAandan Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

8. B.F. Traylor requests a 
variance of 8 feet to a 12 foot 
setback from Atlantic 
Avenue instead of 20 feet as 
required of Lot l, Resub 
division of Lot A, Subdivision 
of western 20 feet of Lot 14, 30 
feet of Lot 20, and ail of Lots 
16 8i 18, Block 1, Section E, 
Cape Henry Syndicate, 
northeast corner of 73rd 
Street and Atlantic Avenue. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

9. Hightower Enterprises 
requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a "0" setback from 13th 
Street and from the Ocean 
Front Instead of a S foot 
setback as required and a 
variance of four (4) parking 
spaces to fifty (50) parking 
spaces instead of fifty-four 
(54) parking spaces as 
previously allowed by the 
Board of Zoning Appeals and 
to allow parking in the 
required setbacks where 
prohibited on a Parcel, 
(northeast corner of I3th 
Street and Atlantic Avenue), 
13th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

10. Albert L. Bonney, Jr. 
requests a variance to allow 
an access driveway to the 
rear of the proposed 
buildings and to waive 
landscaping requirements In 
the required 10 foot setback 
on the northern property line 
starting at a point 145 feet 
east of Edwin Drive and to 
allow an access driveway to 
the rear of the proposed 
buildings and a 3 foot land- 
scaped area instead of a 5 
foot landscaped area on the«- 
eastern property line star- 
ting at a point 35 feel north of 
Princess Anne Road. 

. Kempsville Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 

PLEASE AWkKE NOTE OF 
THE CHANGE OF 

LOCATION. 
W.L. Towers 
Secretary 
^^^^^Jffl»19j2^2t 

NOTICE 

I Virginia: 

Tha regular meeting of the 
Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, July 8, 1974, at 
3:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

Oiange of Zoning District 
Claulfications: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 
1. Petition of Elizabeth 
Williams Everett by 
George Oarden, Attorney, 
fw a change of Zoning 
District Clasaiflcation from 
R-4 Residential District to 
A-2 Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 432.61 feet West of 
BIrdneck Road and 187 feet 
East of Mockingbird Drive 
and 50 feet North of 
Waterfront Drive, running 
a «stann of 110 feet along 
tha Seuihem property Ikia. 



running a distance of 372.16 
feet along tha Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 110 feet atong 
the Northern prtwerty line 
and rufwing a distance of 
365 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1 acre more or 
less. (BIrdneck Acres- 
Watergate Apartments 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

KEIWPSVILLE BOROUGH 
2. Petition of Smith and 
Williams Funeral Home, 
Inc., by H. Calvin Spain, 
Attorney, for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from RS 
Residential Oistrict to 0-1 
Office District on. certain 
property located on the 
West side of Princess Anne 
Road, beginning at a point 
1344 feet more or less North 
of Brandywine Road and 
running a distance of 210.05 
feet along the Eastern 
property line of which 
183.28 feet is the West side 
of Princess Anne Road, 
running a distance of 407,43 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 179.43 feet atong 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 
487.3 feet along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.969 
acres. (Kempsville Manor- 
Lark Downs Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

3. Petition of Carl H. 
Kunzman for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1847.9 
feet East of Newtown Road 
at the Southern extremity 
of Lawrence Drive and on 
the South side of Connie 
Lane, running a distance of 
691.54 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 30 feet Is the South 
side of Connie Lane, 
running a distance of 664.1 
feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 636.8 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
659 feel along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.7 acres. 
(Newsome Farm Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
Richard Webbon 
City Clerk 

June 19,26 — 21 



This day came Walter Lee 
Ginn, Jr., and Mary Dixie 
Ginn. Petitioners, and 
represented that the ob|ect of 
this proceeding Is to effect 
the adopfkm of the above 
named Infants, Dixie Marie 
Vasey, Robert Howard 
Vasey and Sandy Jo Vasey, 
by Walter Lea GInn, Jr., and 
AAary Dixie Ginn, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that William H. vasey, a 
natural parent of said 
children, is a nonresident of 
the State ot Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: co Mr. & Mrs. 
Howard Vasey, Route 8, Box 
264, Brookvllle, Florida. 

It is therefore ORDERED 
that the said William R. 
Vasey appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his at 
litude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his Interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 



a divorce a ' vinculo 
mairimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grotmds 
ol desertton 

And an allidavit having 
been made and filed that Ihe 
rietendani Is a non resident of 
Ihe State ol Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: TD2 Williams, 452-746 
633, S 421 Co. 3 B BATTC, 
Miliington, Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

II is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
dayi alter due publlcatton 
tiereot, and do what may bf 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Clarke 8i Snider 
S209 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12, 19, 26, July 3,- 4t 



^m 



W.Shephered 



Drewry, Jr., 



6-5.12, 19,26, 4T 



ORDEROP 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 6th 
day of June, 1974. 
General Hospital of 
Virginia Beach, 
Plaintiff, 

against 
Tom Hill, et ai. 
Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a sale of land of the 
said Tom Hill, defendant, 
and of land of others, to 
satisfy the lien of a 
judgment out of the 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by the said 
defendant, and out of the ' 
proceeds of the sale of land 
owned by others, said 
judgment being against a 
prior owner of said land 
which lien attached before 
the said defendants 
obtained title to said lands. 
And anaffidavit having been 
made and filed that due 
diligence has been used by 
or in behalf of the 
complainant to ascertain in 
which county or 

corporation the (lefendant 
is, without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 1544 Fuller Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia It 
Is ordered that they do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy — Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk. 

Grover C. Wright, Jr. p.q. 
3330 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
June 12,19.26, July 1, 4 1 

Commonwealth of VIrglrHa, 
In the Clerk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 28th 
day of May, 1974. 

Jackie Nell Sharp Kerr, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

David William Kerr, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa et 
Thoro to be merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion and aban- 
donment or in the alternative 
upon cruelty. 
And an affidavit having 
^.. been made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress beino: 471 South Alien 
Street, San Bernardino, 
California 92408. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
h»terest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Jon P. Eichier 
701 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Va. 

6-5, 12. 19, 36, 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

C74463 

IN RE: 

Adoptkm of DIXIE A^RIE 

VASEY, ROBERT HOWARD 

VASEY and SANDY JO 

VASEY 

BY: 

WALTER LEE GINN, JR., 

and MARY DIXIE GINN, 

f>etitioners. 

TO: 

William H. vasey 

c-o Mr. 8. Mrs. ftowwd 

VMey 

Route 8, B(m 264 

Brookvllle. Florlcta 

ORDIR 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
29TH DAY OF MAY, 1974. 

IN CHANCERY 
NO. C74-S2I 

In re: 

Adoption of Tamela Michelle 

Adair <!, 

By: 

Leslie R. Allison 8i Dorothy 

W. Allison, 

Petitioners. 

To: 

Jon Michael Adair 

Address UNKNOWN 

ORDER 

This day came Leslie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named infant, Tamela 
Michelle Adair, by Leslie R. 
Allison and Dorothy W. 
Allison, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Jon 
Michael Adair, a natural 
parent of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
UNKNOWN, 

It Is therefore Ordered that 
the said Jon Michael Adair 
appear before this Court 
within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and 
indicate her attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what Is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William F. Burnside, p.q. 
958 Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 



RATES: Ail classified 
adverflsing ^businesses 
and individuals) only 25 
cents per line of type, with 
a minimum charge of 83. 
Classified display 83.53 
per column Inih, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 

DEADLINE for classified 
display is Noon Monday 
prior to Wednesday 
publication. In column 
classifieds accepted until 5 
p.m. Monday prior to 
Wednesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont Rd., 
Va. Beach, Va. 23452, or 
mail to Classified Desk, or 
phone 486-3430. Classifieds 
are priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



Announcements 



I SUNSHINE AM 

LEPRECHAUN — Never 
underestimate the power of 
a friend, 



JOHNNY — Welcome back, 
hope you enjoyed the trip. 
We all missed you, 
especially Mr. G, 

FUZZY — If you're going to 
keep me, what are you 
going to do with me? I — 
You. Miserable Cripple. 



TOM — Happiness Is 
watching a Squirrel with 
you. Thank you for loving 
me. Momma Bear. 



JEANNE — Welcome back. 
I was hoping you'd stay one 
day longer just to scare the 
wits out of Pat I R.S.M. 



JOHN 
the oil 



- I'll gladly loan you 
D. 



6-5, 12, 19, 26, 4T 



ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH. 

VILTER MANUFACTUR- 
ING CORPORATION, 
a Wisconsin Corporation, 
Plaintiff 

vs. 
AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL 
REFRIGERATION, INC. 
a Georgia Corporation, 
Principal Defendant 
and 

EMPIRE STORAGE 8. VAN 
CORPORATION, 
a Virginia Corporation, 
Co Detendani 

L-434 
The object of this suit is to 
attach certain personal 
property ol the defendant, 
American Industrial 
Refrigeration, Inc., which is 
in Ihe possession of Empire 
Storage 8. Van Corp., which 
property is more particularly 
described as being five (5) 
refrigeration compressor 
unites, together with parts 
having a lair market vahie of 
$24,348,70. Ths said 
refrigeration compressor 
units have the following 
serial numbers: 

17681 AS 448 RCB 

17682 AS 448 RCB 
45083 AH 456 RCB 

17683 AS 446 RCB 
17684AS444RCB 

The parts have Vilter Sales 
Order No. D-33910. 

This attachment suit 
petitions the Court to have 
Ihe above described property 
told and the proceeds applied 
10 a debt owed to the plaintiff, 
Vilter A/\anufacturing Cor 
poration, by the principal 
defendant, American 
Industrial Refrigeration, 
Inc., in the amount of 
$39,469.71 due on open ac 
count. 

And an affWavit having 
been filed that American 
Industrial Refrigeration, 
Inc., a Georgia corporation, 
is a foreign corporation and 
its last known post office 
address is 1810 Auger Drive, 
Tucker, Georgia, it is OR- 
DERED that American 
Industrial Refrigeration, Inc. 
appear within ten days after 
due publication of this Order 
and do what is neceuary to 
protect its interest. It Is 
further ORDERED that the 
foregoing portion ol this 
Order be piAlished once a 
week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun which newspaper Is 
published and has a general 
circulatton throughout the 
City of Virginia Beach, Va. 
Willcox, Savage, Lawrence, 
Dickson Si Spindle 
1800 Virginia National Bank 
Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

j«*»n V. Fentress, Clerk 
By, Gladys J. Conboy, D.C. 
June12.l9,^,July3T4-t 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth ol Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 10th 
day of June, 1974. 
Connie Sue Williams, 
PiaintiH, 

against 
James Vernon Williams, 
Def«tdant. 

The oblect of this wit Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later n^rged mto 

ft 



DUG IE — Are you sure 
there's enough room In tha 
truck for both of us7 Pat 



BABY OLIVIA — Welcome 
Into the worldl And 
congratulations to your 
Mom and Pop. 



DIANE — Me for you. You 
for me, That's the way It'll 
always be. Love You. 
Poppa Bear 

GINO — Thanks for taking 
care of "The Shadow" — 
Aunt Patsy. 



DAD AND IRENE - Roses 
are red, violets are blue; It 
Is all the little things, that 
make me love you. (So very 
much) Your Daughter. 



Sweet Daddy "Heath- 
Poop" — Sorry I forgot to 
mail your Father's Day 
Card, Hope you had a happy 
day. I love you. My Daddy. 
Diane. 



JESSE, JOE AND STAN - 
July is our month. Yes, we 
cam YES, YES, YESI You 
know who's- who. 



J,M, GUESS WHO 
SHOWED SOMEBODY 
THE AD? YEA, I DID. 
«.M. V 



JOE — Marry you, 
dummy I And we will raise 2 
families, a boy lor you, a 
girl for me (even If It's our 
grandchildren), can't you 
see how happy we would 
be 1 1 Better say yea I do, or 
else you'll have another 
broken arm, and broken 
foe, I Love You. Fuzzy. 



3 Speoial Notices 

AUTO JUNK 

TOWED AWAY FREE 

855 4372 

BOARDING HOME — For 
chiWren, 7 days a week. For 
information call 5«-3069. 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. »7-3697. 

DOUBLE KNIT REPAIR 
Reweaving. French 
Reweaving Co., 213 
MIdtown BIdg. Wards 
Corner, Norfolk. 588-6162. 

FURNITURE — 
Appliances, Recllners, 
Rugs, at AuctlOT Prices. 
Gladstone Auction Co., 5359 
Virginia Beach blvd. 
Norfolk, 855-2821. 



HOUSEJACKING 


— 


Replacing ftoor 


joists 


and 


sills. 4649636, 


4645229. 


Rogers, 







JEWEL TEA PRODUCTS 



Available in 
Va. Beach 



4M^2146 



7-9:30 P.M. 



Learn » cut and »l four 
family's hair, $20 complete 
to first 5 to enroll. Also 
scholarships available for 
complete beauty course. 
Call for details. Oceana 
Beauty Academy, 4»-334«. 

6 . • 



CIcissified 



P^ B-6~The Sun-WadMKliy, Juim 26, 1974 



486-S4SO 



3 SpaeM Notteet 



MOVING — SAVE! Rent 
our trucks. Drivers 
available. Call American 
Rental Co. 855 1067. 



: 



REDUCE SAFE 8. FAST 
with GoBese Tablets & E- 
Vap "wi^ater pills", 
AAurden's Drug. 



WE HAUL 

OLD CARS AWAY 

423-9194. 



3 Lort md Pound 



LOST SIAMESE — 
Sealpoint, female, wearing 
rust color flea collar, last 
seen May 13 in Windsor 
Woods area. 486-5270. 



8 Burial Lots 



I 



•CEMETERY LOTS— 2 lots 
'witli markers in Rosewood 
Memorial Cemetery. $450 
for botti. 340-5011. 



llAutomobilMPoiSale 



AUSTIN HEALY - 3,000 
1967 with hardtop, $1900. 
' 488-5666. 



CORTINA — Gt 170, 22 to 
26 mpg, excellent running 
, condition. 420-8324. 

CADILLAC — 1965, all 

power, air conditioned. 

' Good condition. 487-4166. 

CHRYSLER — 1967, Station 
Wagon, Town 8. Country. 9 
passenger. Excellent for 
' trip. 426-6559. 



HONDA-CiviC, 1973. 
Hatchback, a i r 
conditioning, radio, 8,000 
miles. $2,600. 545-5370. 



: JAGUAR - 1972, V-12, 2 
plus 2. Loaded. $5,200. 

'Excellent condition. 847- 
5792. 



: MORRIS MINOR - 1967 
; Convertible. $450. 428018 3. 

* MlTsTANG - 1970, Black 
I vinyl top, new tires, 

* standard transmission, 302 
V8 engine. Excellent cond. 

'..$1300. 857-7280, 444-5107. 

MG 1971 MIdgette Second 
,' owner. Good condition. $1775. 
! 587 1676. 

' OLDSMOBILE - 1969 
' Cutlass S. Air conditioned, 
' good condition. $100 and take 

over payments. 425-5023 after 

5 p.m. 

PLYMOUTH — 1969, Fury 
i- III, 4 door hardtop, all 
power, small V-8, good 
condition. $595. 481-3088. 



PONTIAC — 1973 Firebird, 
fully equipped, V-8, 
automatic, must sacrifice, 
427-1451 after 6 p.m. 

PONTIAC — 1968 Firebird, 
400. 4 speed, power 
steering. $950. 588-2540. 



RENAULT 

The mtion's largest selection of 
used fienaulfs from tlie nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous on* year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK HD. 5M 
1334 - 



VOLKSWAGEN-1970 
Squareback. New tires. 464- 
0424. 



VOLKSWAGEN 1968 Van 
Camper. Good condition. 
$1695. 49<^ 7239. 

12 Tracks, Trailers, Jeeps 

CHEVROLET — 19A8 
Panel Truck. Has new 
carburetor, tires and brake 
shoes. Excellent condition. 
$800. 481 3261. 

ECONOLINE VAN 
Automatic transmission; 
engine excellent. New 8 ply 
tires. Gre^ for work. $550. 
425 3831. 

FORD TRUCK — 69, 8' bed, 
built in tool chest, $1,300. 
497-0300. *^ 

FORD 1970, V2 ton. New 
paint. V-8 A-1 condition. 
$1495. 583-4003. 

FORD — 1973 FlOO Pickup 
truck, 8 ft. bed with camper 
shell, 302 engine, straight 
stick. $2,850. 588 2540. 



16 MoKHcyidei, Scootefs 



34 He^ Wanted 



38 



OppottmMu 4lHtt-linttodt. 



CZ — 1972, 125 Motocross 
bike, like new. $700. Cycle 
Engineering of 
Chesapeake, 543-5585; 



HARLEY DAVIDSON — 
1972, 125 cc, 2 stroke. $400. 
588-3801. 



HONDA - 1974, 125, like 
new. Less than SbO miles. 
$600. 340-0045 or 340-1260. 



DREAMS LARGER 
Than 

YOUR PAYCHECK? 
Let us help you achieve the 
things you want! 
Nationally known 
products. Amazing 
security possible . 
Investment of less than 
$40.00, 100 per cent 
refundable and $4.00 
membership fee (not 
refundable). No obligation 
to sit down and talk over 
potentials. Phone 423 9560 
or 545-0004, Room B 606. 



■ employment! ■ FiNANOAL I 



HONDA — 1973 CB 350, 
good condition, 7,000 miles, 
2 new helmets, $795. or best 
offer or trade for car. 853- 
8489 



HONDA — 1973V3, 175CL, 
Excellent condition, kept in 
garage, dark blue, call 464- 
6594. 

HONDA — 1971, 350, 
excellent condition, garage 
kept, 2 helmets, must see 
to appreciate, $700. 487- 
2456. 



HONDA - 1974, CL360. Just 

take SLoetAFound"* ^" 

1991. 



HONDA — 1974, CB360, 
Sissy bar, high rise handle 
bars. $1150. 488-9269. 

HONDA 1973, XR-75 plus 2 
helmets. Like new. 481-6072. 

HONDA-175. like new. Only 
400 miles. 485-3703. 

KAWASAKI — 1972, Mack 
IV 750. First $iiootaKes it. 
497 8823. 



180R0VER 
Turn your spare time Into 
$$$$$. First $10 In your 
home with Sarah Coventry. 
424-1198. 



AIR CONDITIONING 
Mechanic. Experienced. 
623-7265. 

AUTO BODY Fender man 
and Painter. Must have 
tools. Apply in person. 
Martin's Body Works, 3536 
E. Little Creek Rd., Norfolk 
583 4551. 

AUTOMOBILE BODY 
REPAIR-PAINT WORKER- 
Experienced with own tools. 
625 2791. 

AUTO MECHANICS 

Must have own tools. 
543-1661 

BABYSITTERS 
Register and earn extra 
money sitting, with our 
agency. For info call 489- 
1622. Babysitters Tidewater 

ELECTRICIANS & 
HELPERS — Experienced 
in house and apartment 
wiring. Must have 
journeyman's card. 
Excellent pay, 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays, paid vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Pete Parker. 



BEAUTY SALON — Near 
shopping center on Little 
Creek Rd. Call 587-7477 or 
340-1914. 

MOTORCYCLE BUSINESS 
— For sale, inventory of 
motorcycles, parts, tools, 
and equipment. Mr. Beller, 
547-7984, 485-5800. 

$300. will get you a shop at 
Old Towne on an 
assumption basis. Some 
merchandise included, a 
tremendous family 
business. For information 
call 486-6905. 

I INSTRUCTION I 



OA OwiT«t Instriicttoin 

REAL ESTATE EXAM 

COURSE Virginia Real 

Estate School. Beacon 

BIdg. 499-3461 

(Across from Pembroke 

Mall) 

NURSES AIDES 

Summer's here, school's 
out. Starting classes now. 
Holmes School of Nurses 
Aides, 340-0620. 

VOICE k^ONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
Morrlsson, 428-0SB7. 



LABRADOR RETRIEVER 
— AKC registerid. 7 
months old. $85. 46i^-6080. 



LHASA ASPO PUPPIES - 
AKC registered males. 583- 
8902. 



LHASA APSOPUPPY- 
AKC registered. Female. 
545-6768. 

PEKINGESE PUPS — 
AKC registered. 6 weeks. 
Pick yours now. Honey 
beige, brown. 587-6175. 



PETGROOMING 
Does your pet need 
grooming? Is he bothered 
with nasty fleas? Are you to 
busy with work and home? 
Call us, 
SNIP'N'DIPOn Wheels. 

Free pickup and delivery, 
at your convenience. 
CALL 399-9552 
for appointment 



POODLE PUPPIES — 
Miniature. AKC registered. 
2 males, 2 females. 
Wormed, clipped, shots. $50 
480-3062. 

POODLES — Apricot, AKC 
registered. 5 weeks old. 
Should see to appreciate. 
426-6559. 



RUSSIAN BLUE KITTENS 
— registered. $150. Deposit 
accepted now. 460-0303. 



4S Plirato ImtiucttoM 



YAMAHA - 1973 TC3, 

i^o*'.^! iBoi""* """"°''' DESK CLERK - Retired 

$650. 486-iBQi. or semi-retired. Night Shift. jUTORING - In my 

Apply Flagship Motel, 6th. home; all elementary 

8i Atlantic. subjects; by certified 

e_^_ teacher. 853-6596. 

HEATING AIR CON ^mt^^^'mmtm 

FENCE ERECTORS - ■ ..JS^ ■ 

Experienced. Top pay. 857- ■ UVESTOCK ■ 

0071 days; 545-4558 nights. ^^^ M 

^g/^^^^i^ma^^mmmB MEN - WOMEN — Start ^^a^H^HH^H^^iHi 

18 Campers, TWIew now. Earn extra Income in 47 p^,. Livestock 

lli^j^iiiiiBai^Hi^^^^BB your spare time. Call 464- ^mmmi^a^^a^ma^mm^ 

W- BASSET HOUND PUPPY 

— 1 male. Tricolor, lO 
weeks old. AKC registered. 
Wormed. $100. 499-4349. 



AIRSTREAM — 25', 1971. 
Like new. Air conditioned, 
awning, AM-FM Stereo, TV 
Hookup, extras. Electric 
brakes, hitch. 583-1410. 

AVENGER TRAILER — 
24', used 2 weeks, sleeps 6, 
completely selfcontalne<L 4 
burner gas or electrtty 
refrigerator, converts from 
battery to 120 volts, 
rechargeable by battery. 
Full bath. 424-3412. 



21 Boats Marine Sun;»Uei 



AUTHORIZED 

T.CRAFT DEALER 
JACK THORNTON 

MOBILE HOMES 

FH: 855-2510 



BOAT — 14" Aluminum with 
trailer. 40 hp Evinrude 
/Motor. $695. 545-6450. 

CABIN CRUISER — 23' 
Sports Fisherman, 
Chrysler inboard, mint 
condition. $3200. 420-4863. 

HARKERS ISLAND - 21' 
with small cabin. Like new. 
65 hp Mercury motor in 
well. $1400 or best offer. 
397-4590. 

SAILBOAT — 10' 

Fiberglass Cape Dory. 
Solid mahogany seats, with 
sail. $700. 547-8949. 

SCORPION — Sailboat, 
Fiberglass, simillar to 
Sunfish; trailer. $395. 340- 
9774. 

-STAR CRAFT— 14' 
windshield lights, rod 
holder, equipped to fish day 
or night. Master Craft 
trailer electric winch. 
Ready to go. 545-6616. 

— 

SHENANDOAH — 1968, 23' 
fiberglass, new rebuilt 160 
1-0, fully equipped. $3500 
firm. 488-0263/\>. 

SPORTCRAFT — 1972, 18 ft 
Tri-hull. 80 h.p. Mercury 
motor, power wench, depth- 
finder, CB radio, bilge 
pump, safety equipment, 
full canvas. Cox trailer. 
$3500. 497-5279, after 5 p.m. 

WINNER — 1972, 

Fiberglass, 120 H.P. Chevy 
II Motor; 10. 497 7538. 



REFRIGERATION 
MECHANIC 
Commercial repair work. Isl 
class only. Permanent 
position. Top pay. Equal 
opportunity employer. 420- 
6140. _ 

SALES — can earn $4 an 
hour selling Fuller Brush 
Products. Full or part-time. 
Call 543-5224. 

SHEET METAL 

MECHANIC — and helpers. 
Experienced in house and 
apartment installation, 
duct work and equipment. 
Excellent pay and 
hospitalization, paid 
holidays and vacation. At 
least 40 hours per week. 622- 
3605, Mr. Dezern. 

STATE INSPECTOR- 

Arrowhead Union 76 

497-6473 



SUMMER JOBS — Full and 
part time. Ideal for students. 
340-1434. 

$2.75 PER HOUR 
Part or full time. Ideal for 
civilian or military. We need 
10 people to work in sales 
and service dept. No 
experience necessary. Call 
MCS. Black 499-1269. 

36JobtWMited 

BABYSITTING — In my 
home, nights only. For in- 
formation call 855-2561. 

BABYSITTING — my home, 
no age limit, 5 days a week. 
Daily, nightly, weekly. 
Oceana area. 428-4927. 

BABYSITTING 
My home. Fenced yard. 497- 
0666. 

BABYSItTiNG — tor 
working mothers, my 
home. Windsor Woods area. 
3405655. 

BABYSITTING - My 
home, day or night, near 
Military Mall. 499-4 557. 

BABYSITTING - My 
home, fenced yard; 
Kempsville area. 497-7394. 



BASSET HOUND — AKC 
registered, 3 puppies, 8 
weeks old and 1 older male. 
481-5405. 

BEAGLE PUPS * - 
Registered. $75. 625-7131, 
Please leave message. 

-~ BUNNIES ' 

for sale, $4 and $5 each. 
855-4956.^ 

CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES — 
Purebred, AKC registered, 
paperbroke, wormed, 90 
percent love and affection, 
10 percent bone and hair. 
623-1256. 

CHINESE PUG Puppies, 8 
weeks. Shots, wormed. AKC 
reg. $135. 420-0791. 

COLLIES - AKC registered. 
Wormed and shots. 
Guaranteed. Call Pet Luv, 
497-8468 or 4900874. 

DACHSHUND — Male, 
AKC registered. $50. 340- 
0055 or 486-4481. 



REAL ESTATE AGENTS— 
« tulftime, 6 part-time 
agents needed for new 
Virginia Beach office. 
Instant commission 
arrangement, life 
insurance, twspitalizatlon, 
free license preparation, 
and on the job train- 
ing. Call Wayne Jar 
reft for confidential 
interview. 



420 ■>9i!0 623 3401 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

BROKER 



BABYSITTING - In my 
home, Thalia Village. 486 
8166. 



BABYSITTING 

Military Circle 

area. 

420-0132 



DALMATION — Male, 5 
months, pedigree, $50. 855- 
9251. 

DOBERMAN PINSCHER 
— Free to good home, good 
house pet. 583-8813. 



ENGLISH SPRINGER 
SPANIEL PUPS — AKC 
registered, 7 weeks, $100. 
427-6493. 

FREE KITTENS — To a 
good home. Call 486-3430 
days before 5 p.m., ask for 
Miss Painter. 

GERMAN SHEPHARD 
PUPPIES — 6 weeks, 
registered, extra large, 
huge feet, beautiful black 
and silver, also 8 month old 
brother and sister. Also 
mother. May be seen at 420- 
1814. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPY— REGISTERED. 

855-4078 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPS AKC registered. 
Black and silver. 420-5197. 



SIAMESE KITTENS - 
Litter trained. Seal points. 
497-5874. 

SHETLAND SHEEPDOGS 
— Males, Champion sired. 
AKC litter registered, 
sable, pet, show. 340-8765. 

SHIH TZU PUPPIES — 
Champion Sellers! $275. 
Small, rare Tibetan Lion 
dogs. Black and black and 
white. 6 weeks old. AKC 
reg. 464-3441. 

SILKY TER-RIERS — 
Breed information, quality 
puppies, sired by top US 
Silky 1969, member Silky 
Terrier Club of America. 
423-4157. 



SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPS 
— 10 weeks old. Champion 
sired. Shots, wormed. 853- 
9218. 

SPRINGER SPANIEL 2 
years old, good disposition, 
housebroken, excellent for 
children. $50. 428-8571. 



ST. BERNARD— male. 1 
year.AKC registered. Best 
offer! 340-0*88. 



ST. BERNARD PUPS — 
AKC registered, shots, 
wormed, terms. 340-5773. 



TIDEWATER CAT 8. DOG 
Stud Registry. Puppy and 
Kitten referals. 399-9552. 

WELSH CORGI PUPPY 
3 month old male, AKC reg. 
Permanent shots. 
Champion sired. 490 2246. 



Virginia Stud Registry 
Looking fpr a good AKC 
registered stud or puppy. 
Calf 424-2174, 9-7. Closed 
Wed. 



52 Howdwid Goods 



Ben Franklin stove; never 
used, $175. Encyclopedia 
Americana, 35 volumes, 
$75. 420-9164. 



AIR CONDITIONER — 
Gibson, 10,500 BTU, 
excell«nt working 
condition. 175. 497-3702. 

^IR CONDITIONER — 
20,000 BTU. Signature. Like 
new. Wood grain front. $250. 
481-1334. 



Apartment-Size gas range, 
cooks like new; wringer- 
type washer, excellent 
condition. Call 499-3885. 



Electric stove, $60. 
Refrigerator, $15. Air 
cooler, $10. Gas dryer, $30. 
Call 490-0263. 

CHAIRS —set of 4 Mahogany 
dining chairs. Empire style. 
Excellent condition. 
$135 4899328. 

CHINA — Quality furniture 
and miscellaneous items. 
587-2317. 

DISH WASH E R — 
Kelvinator, like new, $125. 
489-1303. 

FURNITURE — 3 rooms, 
living room, dinette, 
bedroom, almost new. Very 
reasonable. 427-2127. 

FURNITURE from Model 
homes. Bedroom or Living 
Room $119.95; Dinette, 
Mattress set, Recllner, 
Bunk Beds, $78 each. Maple 
Boston Rocker $45. Easy 
terms. Call Mr. Kay at 623- 
4100, dealer. 



60 Lawn A (^vden 



73 ^^utmrnto-FwnUitd 85 PecgdaNorfoit 



FILL SAND — Wash Mason 
Sand, top soil. Between 8-9. 
424-9883. 



TOP SOIL — Sand & gravel. 
Call now, serve you next. 
489-3997. 



61 Feed atad Fertilizer 



NEW 6 FT DISC 

HARROWS — $350 each. 

STEVENSON 

FORDTRACTOR 

1792 S. Military hwy. 

420-4220 



6U Pum ImplMneiits 

9N, Ferguson 30, Fordson 
Major Diesel; 4 row Ford 
disc 8< brushog, 7 ft cut. 
Best offer. 460-0722, 497- 
8104, dealer. 



KITCHEN SET -5 
piece. Black 8< white. $35. 
Call 543-7253 



LIVING ROOM SET — Sofa 
and 2 chairs, -Bassett; very 
good condition. 423-1227. 



MOVING — MUST SELL! 
Best offers on dryer, hide-a- 
bed, end tables, shelving 
pegboard, clothing, dishes, 
iamps/ bric-a-brac, 
paintings 8. golf clubs. 7221 
Midfleld St., upstairs, 1 
block of E. of Granby St., at 
Granby High., Norfolk, 
Tues., Wed., Thurs. 8> Fri., 
ail day.' 

Sewing machine, Kenmore 
in cabinet, never used, $175. 
Kenmore washer and 
dryer, gold, all cycles, $350. 
for both. 486-5052. 



SOLD HOUSE — Must sell! 
Beds, Chests, Dressers, 
Sofas, Breakfront, Dining 
Room, Kitchen, appliances. 
Rugs and old Piano. Some 
almost new. 20 year 
accumulation of 
everything, including 
antiques. Call 486-4464. 



TABLES — Solid maple 
round and end tables; 
coffee table. 481-3261. 



$458.00 delivers 3 roomi 
outfit. Early American, 
Spanish or Modern. 1st 
small monthly payment 
starts 45 days after 
delivery. Household 
Furniture Corp., 1917 
Lafayette Blvd., near 
corner of Tidewater dr., in 
Norfolk, Phone 622-4165. 



53 Wanted to Bu; 



L 




SlAitictosPorSale 

AIR CONDITIONER — 
10,800 BTU. Excellent cond. 
220 volts. $110. 486-2819. 



LADIES- MEN 

•RANCH MANAGER 
TRAINEES 

Local progressive 
company will train 3 ladies 
rer Branch Manager 
■It^is. Must have neat 
■^•arance. 

S«Mmeirth to start 
IHm Mnu^ end bandits 

CaH«tM7M 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY! 

6 men and women to start 
in good paying (ob. 

Excellent working 
conditions. Bonuses and 
other company benefits 
irovided. 

No experience necessary. 
We will tram you. 

cell 499-17M 



BABYSITTING 
In my home. Fenced y